WorldWideScience

Sample records for antibodies targeting epitopes

  1. Novel approaches to cancer targeting using epitope-binding properties that mimic monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The investigators have extensive experience in all of the techniques required for this project including: animal models of tumors, quantitative autoradiography, radiochemistry, peptide synthesis, organic synthesis, molecular biology, kinetic modeling and radionuclide imaging both with single photon and PET agents. Preliminary results and progress in the following areas are presented: (1) Establishment of an in vivo tumor model and successful targeting of this tumor using monoclonal antibodies raised to p185 erbB2 , (2a) Screening of a synthetic peptide combinatorial library, (2b) Screening of a phage display peptide library, (3) Determination of the epitope recognized by ICR12, (4) Radiolabeling with 99m Tc, 18 F and * I (radioiodines), (5) High resolution positron emission tomography (PET) studies of tumors, and (6) Development of a high resolution (∼mm) PET camera

  2. Adjuvant-Mediated Epitope Specificity and Enhanced Neutralizing Activity of Antibodies Targeting Dengue Virus Envelope Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denicar Lina Nascimento Fabris Maeda

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The heat-labile toxins (LT produced by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli display adjuvant effects to coadministered antigens, leading to enhanced production of serum antibodies. Despite extensive knowledge of the adjuvant properties of LT derivatives, including in vitro-generated non-toxic mutant forms, little is known about the capacity of these adjuvants to modulate the epitope specificity of antibodies directed against antigens. This study characterizes the role of LT and its non-toxic B subunit (LTB in the modulation of antibody responses to a coadministered antigen, the dengue virus (DENV envelope glycoprotein domain III (EDIII, which binds to surface receptors and mediates virus entry into host cells. In contrast to non-adjuvanted or alum-adjuvanted formulations, antibodies induced in mice immunized with LT or LTB showed enhanced virus-neutralization effects that were not ascribed to a subclass shift or antigen affinity. Nonetheless, immunosignature analyses revealed that purified LT-adjuvanted EDIII-specific antibodies display distinct epitope-binding patterns with regard to antibodies raised in mice immunized with EDIII or the alum-adjuvanted vaccine. Notably, the analyses led to the identification of a specific EDIII epitope located in the EF to FG loop, which is involved in the entry of DENV into eukaryotic cells. The present results demonstrate that LT and LTB modulate the epitope specificity of antibodies generated after immunization with coadministered antigens that, in the case of EDIII, was associated with the induction of neutralizing antibody responses. These results open perspectives for the more rational development of vaccines with enhanced protective effects against DENV infections.

  3. Linking Single Domain Antibodies that Recognize Different Epitopes on the Same Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen R. Goldman

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Single domain antibodies (sdAb are the recombinantly expressed variable regions from the heavy-chain-only antibodies found in camelids and sharks. SdAb are able to bind antigens with high affinity, and most are capable of refolding after heat or chemical denaturation to bind antigen again. Starting with our previously isolated ricin binding sdAb determined to bind to four non-overlapping epitopes, we constructed a series of sdAb pairs, which were genetically linked through peptides of different length. We designed the series so that the sdAb are linked in both orientations with respect to the joining peptide. We confirmed that each of the sdAb in the constructs was able to bind to the ricin target, and have evidence that they are both binding ricin simultaneously. Through this work we determined that the order of genetically linked sdAb seems more important than the linker length. The genetically linked sdAb allowed for improved ricin detection with better limits of detection than the best anti-ricin monoclonal we evaluated, however they were not able to refold as well as unlinked component sdAb.

  4. Structural biology of antibody recognition of carbohydrate epitopes and potential uses for targeted cancer immunotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingjan, Tamir; Spendlove, Ian; Durrant, Lindy G; Scott, Andrew M; Yuriev, Elizabeth; Ramsland, Paul A

    2015-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies represent the most successful class of biopharmaceuticals for the treatment of cancer. Mechanisms of action of therapeutic antibodies are very diverse and reflect their ability to engage in antibody-dependent effector mechanisms, internalize to deliver cytotoxic payloads, and display direct effects on cells by lysis or by modulating the biological pathways of their target antigens. Importantly, one of the universal changes in cancer is glycosylation and carbohydrate-binding antibodies can be produced to selectively recognize tumor cells over normal tissues. A promising group of cell surface antibody targets consists of carbohydrates presented as glycolipids or glycoproteins. In this review, we outline the basic principles of antibody-based targeting of carbohydrate antigens in cancer. We also present a detailed structural view of antibody recognition and the conformational properties of a series of related tissue-blood group (Lewis) carbohydrates that are being pursued as potential targets of cancer immunotherapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies Block Chikungunya Virus Entry and Release by Targeting an Epitope Critical to Viral Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Jin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the mechanism by which neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies inhibit chikungunya virus (CHIKV infection. Potently neutralizing antibodies (NAbs blocked infection at multiple steps of the virus life cycle, including entry and release. Cryo-electron microscopy structures of Fab fragments of two human NAbs and chikungunya virus-like particles showed a binding footprint that spanned independent domains on neighboring E2 subunits within one viral spike, suggesting a mechanism for inhibiting low-pH-dependent membrane fusion. Detailed epitope mapping identified amino acid E2-W64 as a critical interaction residue. An escape mutation (E2-W64G at this residue rendered CHIKV attenuated in mice. Consistent with these data, CHIKV-E2-W64G failed to emerge in vivo under the selection pressure of one of the NAbs, IM-CKV063. As our study suggests that antibodies engaging the residue E2-W64 can potently inhibit CHIKV at multiple stages of infection, antibody-based therapies or immunogens that target this region might have protective value.

  6. Analysis of Individuals from a Dengue-Endemic Region Helps Define the Footprint and Repertoire of Antibodies Targeting Dengue Virus 3 Type-Specific Epitopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela V. Andrade

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The four dengue virus serotypes (DENV1 to 4 cause dengue, a major public health problem worldwide. Individuals exposed to primary DENV infections develop serotype-specific neutralizing antibodies, including strongly neutralizing antibodies targeting quaternary epitopes. To date, no studies have measured the levels and kinetics of serum antibodies directed to such epitopes among populations in regions where dengue is endemic. Here, we use a recombinant DENV4 (rDENV4/3-M14 displaying a major DENV3 type-specific quaternary epitope recognized by human monoclonal antibody 5J7 to measure the proportion, magnitude, and kinetics of DENV3 type-specific neutralizing antibody responses targeting this epitope. Primary DENV3 sera from 30 individuals in a dengue hospital-based study in Nicaragua were studied 3, 6, 12, and 18 months post-infection, alongside samples collected annually 1 to 4 years post-primary DENV3 infection from 10 individuals in a cohort study in Nicaragua. We found substantial individual variation in the proportion of DENV3 type-specific neutralizing antibody titers attributed to the 5J7 epitope (range, 0 to 100%, with the mean significantly increasing from 22.6% to 41.4% from 3 to 18 months. We extended the transplanted DENV3 5J7 epitope on the virion (rDENV4/3-M16, resulting in increased recognition in several individuals, helping define the footprint of the epitope. However, 37% and 13% of the subjects still showed little to no recognition of the 5J7 epitope at 3 and 18 months, respectively, indicating that one or more additional DENV3 type-specific epitopes exist. Overall, this study demonstrates how DENV-immune plasma from populations from areas of endemicity, when coupled with structurally guided recombinant viruses, can help characterize the epitope-specific neutralizing antibody response in natural DENV infections, with direct implications for design and evaluation of dengue vaccines.

  7. Epitope mapping of inhibitory antibodies targeting the C2 domain of coagulation factor VIII by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevy, Alexander M.; Healey, John F.; Deng, Wei; Spiegel, P. Clint; Meeks, Shannon L.; Li, Renhao

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background The development of anti-factor VIII (fVIII) antibodies (inhibitors) is a significant complication in the management of patients with hemophilia A, leading to significant increases in morbidity and treatment cost. Using a panel of anti-fVIII monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to different epitopes on fVIII, we recently have shown that epitope specificity, inhibitor kinetics, and time to maximum inhibition are more important than inhibitor titer in predicting response to fVIII and the combination of fVIII and recombinant factor VIIa. In particular, a subset of high-titer inhibitors responded to high dose fVIII, which would not be predicted based on their inhibitor titer alone. Thus the ability to quickly map the epitope spectrum of patient plasma using a clinically feasible assay may fundamentally change how clinicians approach the treatment of high-titer inhibitor patients. Objectives To map the epitopes of anti-fVIII MAbs, of which 3 are classical inhibitors and one non-classical, using hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). Methods Binding epitopes of 4 MAbs targeting fVIII C2 domain were mapped using HDX-MS. Results The epitopes determined by HDX-MS are consistent with those obtained earlier through structural characterization and antibody competition assays. In addition classical and non-classical inhibitor epitopes could be distinguished using a limited subset of C2-derived peptic fragments. Conclusion Our results demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the HDX-MS method for epitope mapping and suggest a potential role of rapid mapping of fVIII inhibitor epitopes in facilitating individualized treatment of inhibitor patients. PMID:24152306

  8. Epitope mapping of inhibitory antibodies targeting the C2 domain of coagulation factor VIII by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevy, A M; Healey, J F; Deng, W; Spiegel, P C; Meeks, S L; Li, R

    2013-12-01

    The development of anti-factor VIII antibodies (inhibitors) is a significant complication in the management of patients with hemophilia A, leading to significant increases in morbidity and treatment cost. Using a panel of mAbs against different epitopes on FVIII, we have recently shown that epitope specificity, inhibitor kinetics and time to maximum inhibition are more important than inhibitor titer in predicting responses to FVIII and the combination of FVIII and recombinant FVIIa. In particular, a subset of high-titer inhibitors responded to high-dose FVIII, which would not be predicted on the basis of their inhibitor titer alone. Thus, the ability to quickly map the epitope spectrum of patient plasma with a clinically feasible assay may fundamentally change how clinicians approach the treatment of high-titer inhibitor patients. To map the epitopes of anti-FVIII mAbs, three of which are classic inhibitors and one of which is a non-classic inhibitor, by the use of hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled with mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). The binding epitopes of four mAbs targeting the FVIII C2 domain were mapped with HDX-MS. The epitopes determined with HDX-MS are consistent with those obtained earlier through structural characterization and antibody competition assays. In addition, classic and non-classic inhibitor epitopes could be distinguished by the use of a limited subset of C2 domain-derived peptic fragments. Our results demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the HDX-MS method for epitope mapping, and suggest a potential role of rapid mapping of FVIII inhibitor epitopes in facilitating individualized treatment of inhibitor patients. © 2013 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  9. HLA Epitopes: The Targets of Monoclonal and Alloantibodies Defined

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadim El-Awar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensitization to human leukocyte antigens (HLA in organ transplant patients causes graft rejection, according to the humoral theory of transplantation. Sensitization is almost ubiquitous as anti-HLA antibodies are found in almost all sera of transplant recipients. Advances in testing assays and amino acid sequencing of HLA along with computer software contributed further to the understanding of antibody-antigen reactivity. It is commonly understood that antibodies bind to HLA antigens. With current knowledge of epitopes, it is more accurate to describe that antibodies bind to their target epitopes on the surface of HLA molecular chains. Epitopes are present on a single HLA (private epitope or shared by multiple antigens (public epitope. The phenomenon of cross-reactivity in HLA testing, often explained as cross-reactive groups (CREGs of antigens with antibody, can be clearly explained now by public epitopes. Since 2006, we defined and reported 194 HLA class I unique epitopes, including 56 cryptic epitopes on dissociated HLA class I heavy chains, 83 HLA class II epitopes, 60 epitopes on HLA-DRB1, 15 epitopes on HLA-DQB1, 3 epitopes on HLA-DQA1, 5 epitopes on HLA-DPB1, and 7 MICA epitopes. In this paper, we provide a summary of our findings.

  10. Construction of dystrophin fusion proteins to raise targeted antibodies to different epitopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginjaar, H. B.; van Paassen, H. B.; den Dunnen, J. T.; Man, N. T.; Morris, G. E.; Moorman, A. F.; van Ommen, G. J.

    1992-01-01

    For the study of the structure and function relationship of dystrophin, defective in DMD, and for diagnostic purposes it is important to dispose of antibodies against different parts of the protein. We have made five different constructs for the expression of fusion proteins containing parts of the

  11. Broadly neutralizing antibodies targeted to mucin-type carbohydrate epitopes of human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Nielsen, C; Arendrup, M

    1991-01-01

    The cancer-related mucin-type carbohydrate neoantigen Tn was found on gp160 and gp120 of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against Tn neutralized infection with cell-free virus and blocked fusion between HIV-infected and uninfected cells....... This inhibition was found in infection of both lymphocytic cells and monocytoid cells. Viruses tested included six HIV-1 and five HIV-2 isolates propagated in different cells, as well as infectious plasma from AIDS patients. The antiviral effect of anti-Tn MAbs occurred by specific binding of the MAb to the virus...

  12. Identification of a new epitope in uPAR as a target for the cancer therapeutic monoclonal antibody ATN-658, a structural homolog of the uPAR binding integrin CD11b (αM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Xu

    Full Text Available The urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR plays a role in tumor progression and has been proposed as a target for the treatment of cancer. We recently described the development of a novel humanized monoclonal antibody that targets uPAR and has anti-tumor activity in multiple xenograft animal tumor models. This antibody, ATN-658, does not inhibit ligand binding (i.e. uPA and vitronectin to uPAR and its mechanism of action remains unclear. As a first step in understanding the anti-tumor activity of ATN-658, we set out to identify the epitope on uPAR to which ATN-658 binds. Guided by comparisons between primate and human uPAR, epitope mapping studies were performed using several orthogonal techniques. Systematic site directed and alanine scanning mutagenesis identified the region of aa 268-275 of uPAR as the epitope for ATN-658. No known function has previously been attributed to this epitope Structural insights into epitope recognition were obtained from structural studies of the Fab fragment of ATN-658 bound to uPAR. The structure shows that the ATN-658 binds to the DIII domain of uPAR, close to the C-terminus of the receptor, corroborating the epitope mapping results. Intriguingly, when bound to uPAR, the complementarity determining region (CDR regions of ATN-658 closely mimic the binding regions of the integrin CD11b (αM, a previously identified uPAR ligand thought to be involved in leukocyte rolling, migration and complement fixation with no known role in tumor progression of solid tumors. These studies reveal a new functional epitope on uPAR involved in tumor progression and demonstrate a previously unrecognized strategy for the therapeutic targeting of uPAR.

  13. Measles Virus Hemagglutinin epitopes immunogenic in natural infection and vaccination are targeted by broad or genotype-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Alía, Miguel Angel; Casasnovas, José M; Celma, María Luisa; Carabaña, Juan; Liton, Paloma B; Fernandez-Muñoz, Rafael

    2017-05-15

    Measles virus (MV) remains a leading cause of vaccine-preventable deaths in children. Protection against MV is associated with neutralizing antibodies that preferentially recognize the viral hemagglutinin (MV-H), and to a lesser extent, the fusion protein (MV-F). Although MV is serologically monotypic, 24 genotypes have been identified. Here we report three neutralization epitopes conserved in the more prevalent circulating MV genotypes, two located in the MV-H receptor binding site (RBS) (antigenic site III) and a third in MV-H/MV-F interphase (antigenic site Ia) which are essential for MV multiplication. In contrast, two MV-H neutralization epitopes, showed a genotype-specific neutralization escape due to a single amino acid change, that we mapped in the "noose" antigenic site, or an enhanced neutralization epitope (antigenic site IIa). The monoclonal antibody (mAb) neutralization potency correlated with its binding affinity and was mainly driven by kinetic dissociation rate (k off ). We developed an immunoassay for mAb binding to MV-H in its native hetero-oligomeric structure with MV-F on the surface of a MV productive steady-state persistently infected (p.i.) human cell lines, and a competitive-binding assay with serum from individuals with past infection by different MV genotypes. Binding assays revealed that a broad neutralization epitope, in RBS antigenic site, a genotype specific neutralization epitopes, in noose and IIa sites, were immunogenic in natural infection and vaccination and may elicit long-lasting humoral immunity that might contribute to explain MV immunogenic stability. These results support the design of improved measles vaccines, broad-spectrum prophylactic or therapeutic antibodies and MV-used in oncolytic therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Low-Cost Peptide Microarrays for Mapping Continuous Antibody Epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Ryan; Head, Steven R; Ordoukhanian, Phillip; Law, Mansun

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing need for understanding antibody specificity in antibody and vaccine research, pepscan assays provide a rapid method for mapping and profiling antibody responses to continuous epitopes. We have developed a relatively low-cost method to generate peptide microarray slides for studying antibody binding. Using a setup of an IntavisAG MultiPep RS peptide synthesizer, a Digilab MicroGrid II 600 microarray printer robot, and an InnoScan 1100 AL scanner, the method allows the interrogation of up to 1536 overlapping, alanine-scanning, and mutant peptides derived from the target antigens. Each peptide is tagged with a polyethylene glycol aminooxy terminus to improve peptide solubility, orientation, and conjugation efficiency to the slide surface.

  15. High-Throughput Tools for Characterization of Antibody Epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Anders

    binders. In this study, phage display screenings were used to identify peptides that could inhibit a major toxin in cobra snake venom, α-cobratoxin. Peptide inhibitors were successfully identified. Importantly, HTS enabled the identification of toxin inhibitors that were not discovered by traditional...... phage display. Phage display coupled with HTS was again used in Chapter 3 in an attempt to map the epitopes of a therapeutic target injected into animals. The animals were immunized with a therapeutic target and the expectation was that they develop antibodies, which can be used in therapy. While...

  16. Peptide-Based Vaccinology: Experimental and Computational Approaches to Target Hypervariable Viruses through the Fine Characterization of Protective Epitopes Recognized by Monoclonal Antibodies and the Identification of T-Cell-Activating Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Castelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Defining immunogenic domains of viral proteins capable of eliciting a protective immune response is crucial in the development of novel epitope-based prophylactic strategies. This is particularly important for the selective targeting of conserved regions shared among hypervariable viruses. Studying postinfection and postimmunization sera, as well as cloning and characterization of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs, still represents the best approach to identify protective epitopes. In particular, a protective mAb directed against conserved regions can play a key role in immunogen design and in human therapy as well. Experimental approaches aiming to characterize protective mAb epitopes or to identify T-cell-activating peptides are often burdened by technical limitations and can require long time to be correctly addressed. Thus, in the last decade many epitope predictive algorithms have been developed. These algorithms are continually evolving, and their use to address the empirical research is widely increasing. Here, we review several strategies based on experimental techniques alone or addressed by in silico analysis that are frequently used to predict immunogens to be included in novel epitope-based vaccine approaches. We will list the main strategies aiming to design a new vaccine preparation conferring the protection of a neutralizing mAb combined with an effective cell-mediated response.

  17. High-resolution mapping of linear antibody epitopes using ultrahigh-density peptide microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Søren; Rockberg, Johan; Forsström, Björn

    2012-01-01

    against unwanted (e.g. autoimmune) reactivities. Antibodies target proteins as either conformational or linear epitopes. The latter are typically probed with peptides, but the cost of peptide screening programs tends to prohibit comprehensive specificity analysis. To perform high-throughput, high......-resolution mapping of linear antibody epitopes, we have used ultrahigh-density peptide microarrays generating several hundred thousand different peptides per array. Using exhaustive length and substitution analysis, we have successfully examined the specificity of a panel of polyclonal antibodies raised against...... linear epitopes of the human proteome and obtained very detailed descriptions of the involved specificities. The epitopes identified ranged from 4 to 12 amino acids in size. In general, the antibodies were of exquisite specificity, frequently disallowing even single conservative substitutions. In several...

  18. Confirmation of antibodies against L-tryptophan-like epitope in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Confirmation of antibodies against L-tryptophan-like epitope in human African trypanosomosis serological diagnostic. ... number of patients in Congo. A diagnostic test based on this synthetic epitope, especially in combination with other tests, might improve the HAT diagnostic test in field conditions. Key words: Tryptophan ...

  19. Enhancing antibody patent protection using epitope mapping information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaoxiang; Storz, Ulrich; Doranz, Benjamin J.

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT As the $100B therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb) market continues to grow, developers of therapeutic mAbs increasingly face the need to strengthen patent protection of their products and enforce their patents in courts. In view of changes in the patent law landscape, patent applications are strategically using information on the precise binding sites of their mAbs, i.e., the epitopes, to support patent novelty, non-obviousness, subject matter, and a tightened written description requirement for broad genus antibody claims. Epitope data can also allow freedom-to-operate for second-generation mAbs by differentiation from patented first-generation mAbs. Numerous high profile court cases, including Amgen v. Sanofi over rival mAbs that block PCSK9 activity, have been centered on epitope mapping claims, highlighting the importance of epitopes in determining broad mAb patent rights. Based on these cases, epitope mapping claims must describe a sufficiently large number of mAbs that share an epitope, and each epitope must be described at amino acid resolution. Here, we review current best practices for the use of epitope information to overcome the increasing challenges of patenting mAbs, and how the quality, conformation, and resolution of epitope residue data can influence the breadth and strength of mAb patents. PMID:29120697

  20. Enhancing antibody patent protection using epitope mapping information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaoxiang; Storz, Ulrich; Doranz, Benjamin J

    As the $100B therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb) market continues to grow, developers of therapeutic mAbs increasingly face the need to strengthen patent protection of their products and enforce their patents in courts. In view of changes in the patent law landscape, patent applications are strategically using information on the precise binding sites of their mAbs, i.e., the epitopes, to support patent novelty, non-obviousness, subject matter, and a tightened written description requirement for broad genus antibody claims. Epitope data can also allow freedom-to-operate for second-generation mAbs by differentiation from patented first-generation mAbs. Numerous high profile court cases, including Amgen v. Sanofi over rival mAbs that block PCSK9 activity, have been centered on epitope mapping claims, highlighting the importance of epitopes in determining broad mAb patent rights. Based on these cases, epitope mapping claims must describe a sufficiently large number of mAbs that share an epitope, and each epitope must be described at amino acid resolution. Here, we review current best practices for the use of epitope information to overcome the increasing challenges of patenting mAbs, and how the quality, conformation, and resolution of epitope residue data can influence the breadth and strength of mAb patents.

  1. Human Antibodies that Recognize Novel Immunodominant Quaternary Epitopes on the HIV-1 Env Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicar, Mark D; Chen, Xuemin; Sulli, Chidananda; Barnes, Trevor; Goodman, Jason; Sojar, Hakimuddin; Briney, Bryan; Willis, Jordan; Chukwuma, Valentine U; Kalams, Spyros A; Doranz, Benjamin J; Spearman, Paul; Crowe, James E

    2016-01-01

    Numerous broadly neutralizing antibodies (Abs) target epitopes that are formed or enhanced during mature HIV envelope formation (i.e. quaternary epitopes). Generally, it is thought that Env epitopes that induce broadly neutralizing Abs are difficult to access and poorly immunogenic because of the characteristic oligomerization, conformational flexibility, sequence diversity and extensive glycosylation of Env protein. To enhance for isolation of quaternary epitope-targeting Abs (QtAbs), we previously used HIV virus-like particles (VLPs) to bind B cells from long-term non-progressor subjects to identify a panel of monoclonal Abs. When expressed as recombinant full-length Abs, a subset of these novel Abs exhibited the binding profiles of QtAbs, as they either failed to bind to monomeric Env protein or showed much higher affinity for Env trimers and VLPs. These QtAbs represented a significant proportion of the B-cell response identified with VLPs. The Ab genes of these clones were highly mutated, but they did not neutralize common HIV strains. We sought to further define the epitopes targeted by these QtAbs. Competition-binding and mapping studies revealed these Abs targeted four separate epitopes; they also failed to compete for binding by Abs to known major neutralizing epitopes. Detailed epitope mapping studies revealed that two of the four epitopes were located in the gp41 subunit of Env. These QtAbs bound pre-fusion forms of antigen and showed differential binding kinetics depending on whether oligomers were produced as recombinant gp140 trimers or as full-length Env incorporated into VLPs. Antigenic regions within gp41 present unexpectedly diverse structural epitopes, including these QtAb epitopes, which may be targeted by the naturally occurring Ab response to HIV infection.

  2. Comprehensive Mapping Antigenic Epitopes of NS1 Protein of Japanese Encephalitis Virus with Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-Hong Hua

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV non-structural protein 1 (NS1 contributes to virus replication and elicits protective immune responses during infection. JEV NS1-specific antibody responses could be a target in the differential diagnosis of different flavivirus infections. However, the epitopes on JEV NS1 are poorly characterized. The present study describes the full mapping of linear B-cell epitopes in JEV NS1. We generated eleven NS1-specific monoclonal antibodies from mice immunized with recombinant NS1. For epitope mapping of monoclonal antibodies, a set of 51 partially-overlapping peptides covering the entire NS1 protein were expressed with a GST-tag and then screened using monoclonal antibodies. Through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, five linear epitope-containing peptides were identified. By sequentially removing amino acid residues from the carboxy and amino terminal of peptides, the minimal units of the five linear epitopes were identified and confirmed using monoclonal antibodies. Five linear epitopes are located in amino acids residues (5AIDITRK(11, (72RDELNVL(78, (251KSKHNRREGY(260, (269DENGIVLD(276, and (341DETTLVRS(348. Furthermore, it was found that the epitopes are highly conserved among JEV strains through sequence alignment. Notably, none of the homologous regions on NS1 proteins from other flaviviruses reacted with the MAbs when they were tested for cross-reactivity, and all five epitope peptides were not recognized by sera against West Nile virus or Dengue virus. These novel virus-specific linear B-cell epitopes of JEV NS1 would benefit the development of new vaccines and diagnostic assays.

  3. Antibodies against HLA-DP recognize broadly expressed epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Daimon P; Kafetzi, Maria L; Wood, Isabelle; Macaskill, Peter C; Milford, Edgar L; Guleria, Indira

    2016-12-01

    HLA matching and avoidance of pre-transplant donor-specific antibodies are important in selection of donors for solid organ transplant. Solid phase testing with single antigen beads allows resolution of antibody reactivity to the level of the allele. Single antigen bead testing results at a large transplant center were reviewed to identify selective reactivity patterns of anti-HLA antibodies. Many HLA-DP antibodies were identified in the context of other HLA antibodies, but some sera had antibodies against only HLA-DP. B cell flow crossmatch testing was positive for 2 out of 9 sera with HLA-DP antibodies. Many patterns of reactivity corresponded to epitopes in hypervariable regions C and F of DPB1, but some matched epitopes in other regions or DPA1. Through analysis of single antigen bead testing from a large number of patients, we report that anti-HLA-DP antibodies predominantly recognize broadly cross-reactive epitopes. The United Network for Organ Sharing has mandated HLA-DP typing on all deceased kidney donors, and HLA-DP epitopes should be considered as the major antigens for avoidance of pre-transplant donor-specific antibodies. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Epitope Mapping of Monoclonal Antibody PMab-48 Against Dog Podoplanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shinji; Kaneko, Mika K; Itai, Shunsuke; Chang, Yao-Wen; Nakamura, Takuro; Yanaka, Miyuki; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Murata, Takeshi; Uchida, Hiroaki; Tahara, Hideaki; Harada, Hiroyuki; Kato, Yukinari

    2018-04-02

    Podoplanin (PDPN), a type I transmembrane sialoglycoprotein, is expressed on normal renal podocytes, pulmonary type I alveolar cells, and lymphatic endothelial cells. Increased expression of PDPN in cancers is associated with poor prognosis and hematogenous metastasis through interactions with C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2) on platelets. We previously reported a novel PMab-48 antibody, which is an anti-dog PDPN (dPDPN) monoclonal antibody (mAb) recognizing PDPN expressed in lymphatic endothelial cells. However, the binding epitope of PMab-48 is yet to be clarified. In this study, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and flow cytometry were used to investigate epitopes of PMab-48. The results revealed that the critical epitope of PMab-48 comprises Asp29, Asp30, Ile31, Ile32, and Pro33 of dPDPN.

  5. Epitope Mapping of Monoclonal Antibody PMab-38 Against Dog Podoplanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yao-Wen; Yamada, Shinji; Kaneko, Mika K; Kato, Yukinari

    2017-12-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN), a type I transmembrane sialoglycoprotein, is extensively expressed by normal lymphatic endothelial cells, renal podocytes, and pulmonary type I alveolar cells. Nevertheless, increased expression of PDPN in malignant tumors not only associates with poor prognosis but also facilitates hematogenous metastasis through interaction with C-type lectin-like receptor-2 presented on platelets, followed by PDPN-mediated platelet activation. We previously reported a novel PMab-38 antibody, an anti-dog PDPN (dPDPN) monoclonal antibody, which specifically recognizes PDPN in squamous cell carcinomas melanomas and cancer-associated fibroblasts in canine cancer tissues. However, the specific binding with the epitope of PMab-38 remains undefined. In this study, flow cytometry was utilized to investigate the epitope of PMab-38, which was determined using a series of deletion or point mutants of dPDPN. The results revealed that the critical epitope of PMab-38 is Tyr67 and Glu68 of dPDPN.

  6. Epitope focused immunogens and recombinant antibody ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Combining cutting-edge immunology and protein engineering methods, this collaborative research project aims to develop affordable antibody-based therapies for dengue patients and improved vaccines for the control of dengue fever and East Coast fever in both humans and animals. The core technologies that will be ...

  7. Structure-Based Design of Hepatitis C Virus Vaccines That Elicit Neutralizing Antibody Responses to a Conserved Epitope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Brian G.; Boucher, Elisabeth N.; Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Ejemel, Monir; Rapp, Chelsea A.; Thomas, William D.; Sundberg, Eric J.; Weng, Zhiping; Wang, Yang; Diamond, Michael S.

    2017-08-09

    Despite recent advances in therapeutic options, hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains a severe global disease burden, and a vaccine can substantially reduce its incidence. Due to its extremely high sequence variability, HCV can readily escape the immune response; thus, an effective vaccine must target conserved, functionally important epitopes. Using the structure of a broadly neutralizing antibody in complex with a conserved linear epitope from the HCV E2 envelope glycoprotein (residues 412 to 423; epitope I), we performed structure-based design of immunogens to induce antibody responses to this epitope. This resulted in epitope-based immunogens based on a cyclic defensin protein, as well as a bivalent immunogen with two copies of the epitope on the E2 surface. We solved the X-ray structure of a cyclic immunogen in complex with the HCV1 antibody and confirmed preservation of the epitope conformation and the HCV1 interface. Mice vaccinated with our designed immunogens produced robust antibody responses to epitope I, and their serum could neutralize HCV. Notably, the cyclic designs induced greater epitope-specific responses and neutralization than the native peptide epitope. Beyond successfully designing several novel HCV immunogens, this study demonstrates the principle that neutralizing anti-HCV antibodies can be induced by epitope-based, engineered vaccines and provides the basis for further efforts in structure-based design of HCV vaccines.

    IMPORTANCEHepatitis C virus is a leading cause of liver disease and liver cancer, with approximately 3% of the world's population infected. To combat this virus, an effective vaccine would have distinct advantages over current therapeutic options, yet experimental vaccines have not been successful to date, due in part to the virus's high sequence variability leading to immune escape. In this study, we rationally designed several vaccine immunogens based on the structure of a conserved epitope that

  8. Conformational Occlusion of Blockade Antibody Epitopes, a Novel Mechanism of GII.4 Human Norovirus Immune Evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindesmith, Lisa C; Mallory, Michael L; Debbink, Kari; Donaldson, Eric F; Brewer-Jensen, Paul D; Swann, Excel W; Sheahan, Timothy P; Graham, Rachel L; Beltramello, Martina; Corti, Davide; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Baric, Ralph S

    2018-01-01

    Extensive antigenic diversity within the GII.4 genotype of human norovirus is a major driver of pandemic emergence and a significant obstacle to development of cross-protective immunity after natural infection and vaccination. However, human and mouse monoclonal antibody studies indicate that, although rare, antibodies to conserved GII.4 blockade epitopes are generated. The mechanisms by which these epitopes evade immune surveillance are uncertain. Here, we developed a new approach for identifying conserved GII.4 norovirus epitopes. Utilizing a unique set of virus-like particles (VLPs) representing the in vivo -evolved sequence diversity within an immunocompromised person, we identify key residues within epitope F, a conserved GII.4 blockade antibody epitope. The residues critical for antibody binding are proximal to evolving blockade epitope E. Like epitope F, antibody blockade of epitope E was temperature sensitive, indicating that particle conformation regulates antibody access not only to the conserved GII.4 blockade epitope F but also to the evolving epitope E. These data highlight novel GII.4 mechanisms to protect blockade antibody epitopes, map essential residues of a GII.4 conserved epitope, and expand our understanding of how viral particle dynamics may drive antigenicity and antibody-mediated protection by effectively shielding blockade epitopes. Our data support the notion that GII.4 particle breathing may well represent a major mechanism of humoral immune evasion supporting cyclic pandemic virus persistence and spread in human populations. IMPORTANCE In this study, we use norovirus virus-like particles to identify key residues of a conserved GII.4 blockade antibody epitope. Further, we identify an additional GII.4 blockade antibody epitope to be occluded, with antibody access governed by temperature and particle dynamics. These findings provide additional support for particle conformation-based presentation of binding residues mediated by a particle

  9. Significance of monoclonal antibodies against the conserved epitopes within non-structural protein 3 helicase of hepatitis C virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixin Bian

    Full Text Available Nonstructural protein 3 (NS3 of hepatitis C virus (HCV, codes for protease and helicase carrying NTPase enzymatic activities, plays a crucial role in viral replication and an ideal target for diagnosis, antiviral therapy and vaccine development. In this study, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs to NS3 helicase were characterized by epitope mapping and biological function test. A total of 29 monoclonal antibodies were produced to the truncated NS3 helicase of HCV-1b (T1b-rNS3, aa1192-1459. Six mAbs recognized 8/29 16mer peptides, which contributed to identify 5 linear and 1 discontinuous putative epitope sequences. Seven mAbs reacted with HCV-2a JFH-1 infected Huh-7.5.1 cells by immunofluorescent staining, of which 2E12 and 3E5 strongly bound to the exposed linear epitope (1231PTGSGKSTK(1239 (EP05 or core motif (1373IPFYGKAI(1380 (EP21, respectively. Five other mAbs recognized semi-conformational or conformational epitopes of HCV helicase. MAb 2E12 binds to epitope EP05 at the ATP binding site of motif I in domain 1, while mAb 3E5 reacts with epitope EP21 close to helicase nucleotide binding region of domain 2. Epitope EP05 is totally conserved and EP21 highly conserved across HCV genotypes. These two epitope peptides reacted strongly with 59-79% chronic and weakly with 30-58% resolved HCV infected blood donors, suggesting that these epitopes were dominant in HCV infection. MAb 2E12 inhibited 50% of unwinding activity of NS3 helicase in vitro. Novel monoclonal antibodies recognize highly conserved epitopes at crucial functional sites within NS3 helicase, which may become important antibodies for diagnosis and antiviral therapy in chronic HCV infection.

  10. Antibodies to a conformational epitope on gp41 neutralize HIV-1 by destabilizing the Env spike

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong Hyun; Leaman, Daniel P.; Kim, Arthur S.; Torrents de La Peña, Alba; Sliepen, Kwinten; Yasmeen, Anila; Derking, Ronald; Ramos, Alejandra; de Taeye, Steven W.; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Klein, Florian; Burton, Dennis R.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Poignard, Pascal; Moore, John P.; Klasse, Per Johan; Sanders, Rogier W.; Zwick, Michael B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Ward, Andrew B.

    2015-09-01

    The recent identification of three broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against gp120-gp41 interface epitopes has expanded the targetable surface on the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer. By using biochemical, biophysical and computational methods, we map the previously unknown trimer epitopes of two related antibodies, 3BC315 and 3BC176. A cryo-EM reconstruction of a soluble Env trimer bound to 3BC315 Fab at 9.3 Å resolution reveals that the antibody binds between two gp41 protomers, and neutralizes the virus by accelerating trimer decay. In contrast, bnAb 35O22 binding to a partially overlapping quaternary epitope at the gp120-gp41 interface does not induce decay. A conserved gp41-proximal glycan at N88 was also shown to play a role in the binding kinetics of 3BC176 and 3BC315. Finally, our data suggest that the dynamic structure of the Env trimer influences exposure of bnAb epitopes.

  11. Multi-epitope Models Explain How Pre-existing Antibodies Affect the Generation of Broadly Protective Responses to Influenza.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika I Zarnitsyna

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of next-generation influenza vaccines that elicit strain-transcendent immunity against both seasonal and pandemic viruses is a key public health goal. Targeting the evolutionarily conserved epitopes on the stem of influenza's major surface molecule, hemagglutinin, is an appealing prospect, and novel vaccine formulations show promising results in animal model systems. However, studies in humans indicate that natural infection and vaccination result in limited boosting of antibodies to the stem of HA, and the level of stem-specific antibody elicited is insufficient to provide broad strain-transcendent immunity. Here, we use mathematical models of the humoral immune response to explore how pre-existing immunity affects the ability of vaccines to boost antibodies to the head and stem of HA in humans, and, in particular, how it leads to the apparent lack of boosting of broadly cross-reactive antibodies to the stem epitopes. We consider hypotheses where binding of antibody to an epitope: (i results in more rapid clearance of the antigen; (ii leads to the formation of antigen-antibody complexes which inhibit B cell activation through Fcγ receptor-mediated mechanism; and (iii masks the epitope and prevents the stimulation and proliferation of specific B cells. We find that only epitope masking but not the former two mechanisms to be key in recapitulating patterns in data. We discuss the ramifications of our findings for the development of vaccines against both seasonal and pandemic influenza.

  12. Epitope Mapping of Monoclonal Antibody PMab-52 Against Cat Podoplanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yao-Wen; Kaneko, Mika K; Yamada, Shinji; Kato, Yukinari

    2018-02-02

    The mucin-type membrane glycoprotein podoplanin (PDPN) is frequently overexpressed in numerous malignant cancers, including squamous cell carcinoma, germinal neoplasia, mesothelioma, lung cancer, oral cancer, and brain tumor. PDPN expression is strongly associated with cancer progression and poor prognosis. Furthermore, PDPN binds to C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2) on platelets, followed by PDPN-mediated platelet aggregation to facilitate tumor metastasis. We have previously reported a novel anti-cat PDPN (cPDPN) monoclonal antibody (mAb), PMab-52, which specifically detects cPDPN using flow cytometry analysis and successfully identifies cPDPN in feline squamous cell carcinomas. However, the specific binding epitope of cPDPN for PMab-52 remains unelucidated. In this study, a series of deletion or point mutants of cPDPN were utilized for investigating the binding epitopes of PMab-52 using flow cytometry and Western blotting. The findings of this study revealed that the critical epitopes of platelet aggregation-stimulating domain 4 (PLAG4) of cPDPN are responsible for the binding of PMab-52 to cPDPN.

  13. Antibodies Targeting EMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    determine their targets on the cell. The newly discovered antibodies will then be engineered for utility as new highly specific drugs and diagnostics in...are from the aldo-keto reductase family (AKRs). Remarkably, 3 of the top 10 genes with induction in the mesenchymal TES2b cells Figure 1. Amino

  14. Variable epitope library-based vaccines: shooting moving targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroza-Roldan, Cesar; Charles-Niño, Claudia; Saavedra, Rafael; Govezensky, Tzipe; Vaca, Luis; Avaniss-Aghajani, Eric; Gevorkian, Goar; Manoutcharian, Karen

    2009-12-01

    While the antigenic variability is the major obstacle for developing vaccines against antigenically variable pathogens (AVPs) and cancer, this issue is not addressed adequately in current vaccine efforts. We developed a novel variable epitope library (VEL)-based vaccine strategy using immunogens carrying a mixture of thousands of variants of a single epitope. In this proof-of-concept study, we used an immunodominant HIV-1-derived CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitope as a model antigen to construct immunogens in the form of plasmid DNA and recombinant M13 bacteriophages. We generated combinatorial libraries expressing epitope variants with random amino acid substitutions at 2-5 amino acid positions within the epitope. Mice immunized with these immunogens developed epitope-specific CD8+ IFN-gamma+ T-cell responses that recognized more than 50% of heavily mutated variants of wild-type epitope, as demonstrated in T-cell proliferation assays and FACS analysis. Strikingly, these potent and broad epitope-specific immune responses were long lasting: after 12 months of priming, epitope variants were recognized by CD8+ cells and effector memory T cells were induced. In addition, we showed, for the first time, the inhibition of T-cell responses at the molecular level by immune interference: the mice primed with wild-type epitope and 8 or 12 months later immunized with VELs, were not able to recognize variant epitopes efficiently. These data may give a mechanistic explanation for the failure of recent HIV vaccine trials as well as highlight specific hurdles in current molecular vaccine efforts targeting other important antigenically variable pathogens and diseases. These findings suggest that the VEL-based strategy for immunogen construction can be used as a reliable technological platform for the generation of vaccines against AVPs and cancer, and contribute to better understanding complex host-pathogen interactions.

  15. Synthetic B-Cell Epitopes Eliciting Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies: Strategies for Future Dengue Vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu Ramanathan

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is a major public health threat worldwide. A key element in protection from dengue fever is the neutralising antibody response. Anti-dengue IgG purified from DENV-2 infected human sera showed reactivity against several peptides when evaluated by ELISA and epitope extraction techniques. A multi-step computational approach predicted six antigenic regions within the E protein of DENV-2 that concur with the 6 epitopes identified by the combined ELISA and epitope extraction approach. The selected peptides representing B-cell epitopes were attached to a known dengue T-helper epitope and evaluated for their vaccine potency. Immunization of mice revealed two novel synthetic vaccine constructs that elicited good humoral immune responses and produced cross-reactive neutralising antibodies against DENV-1, 2 and 3. The findings indicate new directions for epitope mapping and contribute towards the future development of multi-epitope based synthetic peptide vaccine.

  16. Synthetic B-Cell Epitopes Eliciting Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies: Strategies for Future Dengue Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Babu; Poh, Chit Laa; Kirk, Kristin; McBride, William John Hannan; Aaskov, John; Grollo, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a major public health threat worldwide. A key element in protection from dengue fever is the neutralising antibody response. Anti-dengue IgG purified from DENV-2 infected human sera showed reactivity against several peptides when evaluated by ELISA and epitope extraction techniques. A multi-step computational approach predicted six antigenic regions within the E protein of DENV-2 that concur with the 6 epitopes identified by the combined ELISA and epitope extraction approach. The selected peptides representing B-cell epitopes were attached to a known dengue T-helper epitope and evaluated for their vaccine potency. Immunization of mice revealed two novel synthetic vaccine constructs that elicited good humoral immune responses and produced cross-reactive neutralising antibodies against DENV-1, 2 and 3. The findings indicate new directions for epitope mapping and contribute towards the future development of multi-epitope based synthetic peptide vaccine.

  17. Viral escape from HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies drives increased plasma neutralization breadth through sequential recognition of multiple epitopes and immunotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantinos Kurt Wibmer

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the targets of broadly neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1 and understanding how these antibodies develop remain important goals in the quest to rationally develop an HIV-1 vaccine. We previously identified a participant in the CAPRISA Acute Infection Cohort (CAP257 whose plasma neutralized 84% of heterologous viruses. In this study we showed that breadth in CAP257 was largely due to the sequential, transient appearance of three distinct broadly neutralizing antibody specificities spanning the first 4.5 years of infection. The first specificity targeted an epitope in the V2 region of gp120 that was also recognized by strain-specific antibodies 7 weeks earlier. Specificity for the autologous virus was determined largely by a rare N167 antigenic variant of V2, with viral escape to the more common D167 immunotype coinciding with the development of the first wave of broadly neutralizing antibodies. Escape from these broadly neutralizing V2 antibodies through deletion of the glycan at N160 was associated with exposure of an epitope in the CD4 binding site that became the target for a second wave of broadly neutralizing antibodies. Neutralization by these CD4 binding site antibodies was almost entirely dependent on the glycan at position N276. Early viral escape mutations in the CD4 binding site drove an increase in wave two neutralization breadth, as this second wave of heterologous neutralization matured to recognize multiple immunotypes within this site. The third wave targeted a quaternary epitope that did not overlap any of the four known sites of vulnerability on the HIV-1 envelope and remains undefined. Altogether this study showed that the human immune system is capable of generating multiple broadly neutralizing antibodies in response to a constantly evolving viral population that exposes new targets as a consequence of escape from earlier neutralizing antibodies.

  18. A novel monoclonal antibody to a defined peptide epitope in MUC16

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcos-Silva, Lara; Ricardo, Sara; Chen, Kowa

    2015-01-01

    The MUC16 mucin is overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated in ovarian carcinomas. Immunodetection of circulating MUC16 is one of the most used cancer biomarker assays, but existing antibodies to MUC16 fail to distinguish normal and aberrant cancer glycoforms. Although all antibodies react...... of ovarian benign and cancer lesions, 5E11 showed similar reactivity as traditional MUC16 antibodies, suggesting that the epitope is not efficiently glycosylated. The study provides a vaccine design and immunodominant MUC16 TR epitopes....

  19. Label free checkerboard assay to determine overlapping epitopes of Ebola virus VP-40 antibodies using surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, George P; Liu, Jinny L; Zabetakis, Dan; Legler, Patricia M; Goldman, Ellen R

    2017-03-01

    Immunoassay formats, in which antibodies provide sensitivity and specificity, are often utilized to provide rapid and simple diagnostic tests. Surface plasmon resonance is frequently used to evaluate the suitability of antibodies by determining binding kinetics to agents or surrogate antigens. We used SPR to evaluate a number of commercial monoclonal antibodies as well as single domain antibodies produced in-house. All the antibodies targeted the Ebola virus viral protein 40 (VP40). We determined the ability of each antibody to bind to immobilized VP40, and ensured they did not bind Ebola glycoprotein or the nucleoprotein. A subset of the monoclonal antibodies was immobilized to characterize antigen capture in solution. It can be advantageous to utilize antibodies that recognize distinct epitopes when choosing reagents for detection and diagnostic assays. We determined the uniqueness of the epitope recognized by the anti-VP40 antibodies using a checkerboard format that exploits the 6×6 array of interactions monitored by the Bio-Rad ProteOn XPR36 SPR instrument. The results demonstrate the utility of surface plasmon resonance to characterize monoclonal and recombinant antibodies. Additionally, the analysis presented here enabled the identification of pairs of anti-VP40 antibodies which could potentially be utilized in sandwich type immunoassays for the detection of Ebola virus. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Comprehensive mapping of common immunodominant epitopes in the West Nile virus nonstructural protein 1 recognized by avian antibody responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Encheng Sun

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that primarily infects birds but occasionally infects humans and horses. Certain species of birds, including crows, house sparrows, geese, blue jays and ravens, are considered highly susceptible hosts to WNV. The nonstructural protein 1 (NS1 of WNV can elicit protective immune responses, including NS1-reactive antibodies, during infection of animals. The antigenicity of NS1 suggests that NS1-reactive antibodies could provide a basis for serological diagnostic reagents. To further define serological reagents for diagnostic use, the antigenic sites in NS1 that are targeted by host immune responses need to be identified and the potential diagnostic value of individual antigenic sites also needs to be defined. The present study describes comprehensive mapping of common immunodominant linear B-cell epitopes in the WNV NS1 using avian WNV NS1 antisera. We screened antisera from chickens, ducks and geese immunized with purified NS1 for reactivity against 35 partially overlapping peptides covering the entire WNV NS1. This study identified twelve, nine and six peptide epitopes recognized by chicken, duck and goose antibody responses, respectively. Three epitopes (NS1-3, 14 and 24 were recognized by antibodies elicited by immunization in all three avian species tested. We also found that NS1-3 and 24 were WNV-specific epitopes, whereas the NS1-14 epitope was conserved among the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV serocomplex viruses based on the reactivity of avian WNV NS1 antisera against polypeptides derived from the NS1 sequences of viruses of the JEV serocomplex. Further analysis showed that the three common polypeptide epitopes were not recognized by antibodies in Avian Influenza Virus (AIV, Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV, Duck Plague Virus (DPV and Goose Parvovirus (GPV antisera. The knowledge and reagents generated in this study have potential applications in differential diagnostic approaches and

  1. Synthetic B-Cell Epitopes Eliciting Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies: Strategies for Future Dengue Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Ramanathan, Babu; Poh, Chit Laa; Kirk, Kristin; McBride, William John Hannan; Aaskov, John; Grollo, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a major public health threat worldwide. A key element in protection from dengue fever is the neutralising antibody response. Anti-dengue IgG purified from DENV-2 infected human sera showed reactivity against several peptides when evaluated by ELISA and epitope extraction techniques. A multi-step computational approach predicted six antigenic regions within the E protein of DENV-2 that concur with the 6 epitopes identified by the combined ELISA and epitope extraction app...

  2. Docking of B-cell epitope antigen to specific hepatitis B antibody

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The interaction of pres1 region of hepatitis B virus B-cell epitope antigen with specific hepatitis B neutralizing monoclonal antibody was examined by docking study. We modelled the 3D complex structure of B-cell epitope antigen residues CTTPAQGNSMFPSCCCTKPTDGNCY by homology modelling and docked it with the ...

  3. Docking of B-cell epitope antigen to specific hepatitis B antibody

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Abstract. The interaction of pres1 region of hepatitis B virus B-cell epitope antigen with specific hepa- titis B neutralizing monoclonal antibody was examined by docking study. We modelled the 3D complex structure of B-cell epitope antigen residues CTTPAQGNSMFPSCCCTKPTDGNCY by homology model- ling and ...

  4. Isolation of populations of antipeptide antibodies directed against different epitopes of the same fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chersi, A; Greger, C; Houghten, R A

    1985-01-01

    Rabbit antibodies against small peptides may be composed by subpopulations recognizing different epitopes made likely by few amino acids. This explains the frequent crossreactivity of antipeptide antibodies with unrelated peptides. A suitable use of immunoadsorbents is suggested to obtain truly specific antibodies able to react with restricted amino acid sequences.

  5. Monoclonal antibodies reacting with multiple epitopes on the human insulin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soos, M A; Siddle, K; Baron, M D; Heward, J M; Luzio, J P; Bellatin, J; Lennox, E S

    1986-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies for the human insulin receptor were produced following immunization of mice with IM-9 lymphocytes and/or purified placental receptor. Four separate fusions yielded 28 antibodies, all of which reacted with receptor from human placenta, liver and IM-9 cells. Some antibodies cross-reacted to varying degrees with receptor from rabbit, cow, pig and sheep, but none reacted with rat receptor. At least 10 distinct epitopes were recognized as indicated by species specificity and binding competition experiments. All of these epitopes appeared to be on extracellular domains of the receptor as shown by binding of antibodies to intact cells. In some cases the epitopes were further localized to alpha or beta subunits by immunoblotting. Several antibodies inhibited binding of 125I-insulin to the receptor, some had no effect on binding, and others enhanced the binding of 125I-insulin. It is concluded that these antibodies will be valuable probes of receptor structure and function.

  6. Functional Transplant of a Dengue Virus Serotype 3 (DENV3)-Specific Human Monoclonal Antibody Epitope into DENV1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messer, William B; Yount, Boyd L; Royal, Scott R; de Alwis, Ruklanthi; Widman, Douglas G; Smith, Scott A; Crowe, James E; Pfaff, Jennifer M; Kahle, Kristen M; Doranz, Benjamin J; Ibarra, Kristie D; Harris, Eva; de Silva, Aravinda M; Baric, Ralph S

    2016-05-15

    The four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes, DENV1 through 4, are endemic throughout tropical and subtropical regions of the world. While first infection confers long-term protective immunity against viruses of the infecting serotype, a second infection with virus of a different serotype carries a greater risk of severe dengue disease, including dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Recent studies demonstrate that humans exposed to DENV infections develop neutralizing antibodies that bind to quaternary epitopes formed by the viral envelope (E) protein dimers or higher-order assemblies required for the formation of the icosahedral viral envelope. Here we show that the quaternary epitope target of the human DENV3-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibody (MAb) 5J7 can be partially transplanted into a DENV1 strain by changing the core residues of the epitope contained within a single monomeric E molecule. MAb 5J7 neutralized the recombinant DENV1/3 strain in cell culture and was protective in a mouse model of infection with the DENV1/3 strain. However, the 5J7 epitope was only partially recreated by transplantation of the core residues because MAb 5J7 bound and neutralized wild-type (WT) DENV3 better than the DENV1/3 recombinant. Our studies demonstrate that it is possible to transplant a large number of discontinuous residues between DENV serotypes and partially recreate a complex antibody epitope, while retaining virus viability. Further refinement of this approach may lead to new tools for measuring epitope-specific antibody responses and new vaccine platforms. Dengue virus is the most important mosquito-borne pathogen of humans worldwide, with approximately one-half the world's population living in regions where dengue is endemic. Dengue immunity following infection is robust and thought to be conferred by antibodies raised against the infecting virus. However, the specific viral components that these antibodies recognize and how they neutralize the virus

  7. Analysis of epitopes on dengue virus envelope protein recognized by monoclonal antibodies and polyclonal human sera by a high throughput assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-En Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The envelope (E protein of dengue virus (DENV is the major target of neutralizing antibodies and vaccine development. While previous studies on domain III or domain I/II alone have reported several epitopes of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against DENV E protein, the possibility of interdomain epitopes and the relationship between epitopes and neutralizing potency remain largely unexplored. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a dot blot assay by using 67 alanine mutants of predicted surface-exposed E residues as a systematic approach to identify epitopes recognized by mAbs and polyclonal sera, and confirmed our findings using a capture-ELISA assay. Of the 12 mouse mAbs tested, three recognized a novel epitope involving residues (Q211, D215, P217 at the central interface of domain II, and three recognized residues at both domain III and the lateral ridge of domain II, suggesting a more frequent presence of interdomain epitopes than previously appreciated. Compared with mAbs generated by traditional protocols, the potent neutralizing mAbs generated by a new protocol recognized multiple residues in A strand or residues in C strand/CC' loop of DENV2 and DENV1, and multiple residues in BC loop and residues in DE loop, EF loop/F strand or G strand of DENV1. The predominant epitopes of anti-E antibodies in polyclonal sera were found to include both fusion loop and non-fusion residues in the same or adjacent monomer. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our analyses have implications for epitope-specific diagnostics and epitope-based dengue vaccines. This high throughput method has tremendous application for mapping both intra and interdomain epitopes recognized by human mAbs and polyclonal sera, which would further our understanding of humoral immune responses to DENV at the epitope level.

  8. Molecular dissection of the human antibody response to the structural repeat epitope of Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite from a protected donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogers William O

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The circumsporozoite surface protein is the primary target of human antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites, these antibodies are predominantly directed to the major repetitive epitope (Asn-Pro-Asn-Alan, (NPNAn. In individuals immunized by the bites of irradiated Anopheles mosquitoes carrying P. falciparum sporozoites in their salivary glands, the anti-repeat response dominates and is thought by many to play a role in protective immunity. Methods The antibody repertoire from a protected individual immunized by the bites of irradiated P. falciparum infected Anopheles stephensi was recapitulated in a phage display library. Following affinity based selection against (NPNA3 antibody fragments that recognized the PfCSP repeat epitope were rescued. Results Analysis of selected antibody fragments implied the response was restricted to a single antibody fragment consisting of VH3 and VκI families for heavy and light chain respectively with moderate affinity for the ligand. Conclusion The dissection of the protective antibody response against the repeat epitope revealed that the response was apparently restricted to a single VH/VL pairing (PfNPNA-1. The affinity for the ligand was in the μM range. If anti-repeat antibodies are involved in the protective immunity elicited by exposure to radiation attenuated P. falciparum sporozoites, then high circulating levels of antibodies against the repeat region may be more important than intrinsic high affinity for protection. The ability to attain and sustain high levels of anti-(NPNAn will be one of the key determinants of efficacy for a vaccine that relies upon anti-PfCSP repeat antibodies as the primary mechanism of protective immunity against P. falciparum.

  9. Critical epitopes in the nucleocapsid protein of SFTS virus recognized by a panel of SFTS patients derived human monoclonal antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: SFTS virus (SFTSV is a newly discovered pathogen to cause severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS in human. Successful control of SFTSV epidemic requires better understanding of the antigen target in humoral immune responses to the new bunyavirus infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have generated a combinatorial Fab antibody phage library from two SFTS patients recovered from SFTSV infection. To date, 94 unique human antibodies have been generated and characterized from over 1200 Fab antibody clones obtained by screening the library with SFTS purified virions. All those monoclonal antibodies (MAbs recognized the nucleocapsid (N protein of SFTSV while none of them were reactive to the viral glycoproteins Gn or Gc. Furthermore, over screening 1000 mouse monoclonal antibody clones derived from SFTSV virions immunization, 462 clones reacted with N protein, while only 16 clones were reactive to glycoprotein. Furthermore, epitope mapping of SFTSV N protein was performed through molecular simulation, site mutation and competitive ELISA, and we found that at least 4 distinct antigenic epitopes within N protein were recognized by those human and mouse MAbs, in particular mutation of Glu10 to Ala10 abolished or significantly reduced the binding activity of nearly most SFTS patients derived MAbs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The large number of human recombinant MAbs derived from SFTS patients recognized the viral N protein indicated the important role of the N protein in humoral responses to SFTSV infection, and the critical epitopes we defined in this study provided molecular basis for detection and diagnosis of SFTSV infection.

  10. Production of Epitope-Specific Antibodies by Immunization with Synthetic Epitope Peptide Formulated with CpG-DNA-Liposome Complex Without Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongbum; Lee, Younghee; Kwon, Hyung-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Antibody production using synthetic peptides has been investigated extensively to develop therapeutic antibodies and prophylactic vaccines. Previously, we reported that a complex of CpG-DNA and synthetic peptides corresponding to B cell epitopes, encapsulated in a phosphatidyl-β-oleoyl-γ-palmitoyl ethanolamine (DOPE):cholesterol hemisuccinate (CHEMS) complex, significantly enhanced the synthetic peptide-specific IgG production. Here, we describe synthetic peptide-based epitope screening and antibody production without conventional carriers.

  11. A Linear Epitope in the N-Terminal Domain of CCR5 and Its Interaction with Antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benny Chain

    Full Text Available The CCR5 receptor plays a role in several key physiological and pathological processes and is an important therapeutic target. Inhibition of the CCR5 axis by passive or active immunisation offers one very selective strategy for intervention. In this study we define a new linear epitope within the extracellular domain of CCR5 recognised by two independently produced monoclonal antibodies. A short peptide encoding the linear epitope can induce antibodies which recognise the intact receptor when administered colinear with a tetanus toxoid helper T cell epitope. The monoclonal antibody RoAb 13 is shown to bind to both cells and peptide with moderate to high affinity (6x10^8 and 1.2x107 M-1 respectively, and binding to the peptide is enhanced by sulfation of tyrosines at positions 10 and 14. RoAb13, which has previously been shown to block HIV infection, also blocks migration of monocytes in response to CCR5 binding chemokines and to inflammatory macrophage conditioned medium. A Fab fragment of RoAb13 has been crystallised and a structure of the antibody is reported to 2.1 angstrom resolution.

  12. Large-scale analysis of B-cell epitopes on influenza virus hemagglutinin - implications for cross-reactivity of neutralizing antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Jing; Kudahl, Ulrich J.; Simon, Christian

    2014-01-01

    of tens of thousands of HA sequences. The detailed description of B-cell epitopes, measurement of epitope area similarity among different strains, and estimation of antibody neutralizing coverage provide insights into cross-reactivity status of existing nAbs against influenza virus. We have developed...... that share 100% identity with experimentally verified neutralized strains. By cataloging influenza strains and their B-cell epitopes for known bnAbs, our method provides guidance for selection of representative strains for further experimental design. The knowledge of sequences, their B-cell epitopes......Influenza viruses continue to cause substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Fast gene mutation on surface proteins of influenza virus result in increasing resistance to current vaccines and available antiviral drugs. Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) represent targets for prophylactic...

  13. A human monoclonal antibody derived from a vaccinated volunteer recognizes heterosubtypically a novel epitope on the hemagglutinin globular head of H1 and H9 influenza A viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boonsathorn, Naphatsawan; Panthong, Sumolrat [Medical Life Sciences Institute, Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Public Health, Muang, Nonthaburi (Thailand); Japan Science and Technology Agency/Japan International Cooperation Agency, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (JST/JICA, SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Koksunan, Sarawut [Medical Life Sciences Institute, Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Public Health, Muang, Nonthaburi (Thailand); Chittaganpitch, Malinee; Phuygun, Siripaporn; Waicharoen, Sunthareeya [National Institute of Health, Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Public Health, Muang, Nonthaburi (Thailand); Prachasupap, Apichai [Medical Life Sciences Institute, Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Public Health, Muang, Nonthaburi (Thailand); Japan Science and Technology Agency/Japan International Cooperation Agency, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (JST/JICA, SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Sasaki, Tadahiro [Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency/Japan International Cooperation Agency, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (JST/JICA, SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko [Kanonji Institute, The Research Foundation for Microbial Diseases of Osaka University, Kanonji, Kagawa (Japan); Yasugi, Mayo [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, Izumisano, Osaka (Japan); Ono, Ken-ichiro [Ina Laboratory, Medical and Biological Laboratories Corporation, Ltd., Ina, Nagano (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency/Japan International Cooperation Agency, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (JST/JICA, SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Arai, Yasuha [Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); and others

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • A human monoclonal antibody against influenza virus was produced from a volunteer. • The antibody was generated from the PBMCs of the volunteer using the fusion method. • The antibody neutralized heterosubtypically group 1 influenza A viruses (H1 and H9). • The antibody targeted a novel epitope in globular head region of the hemagglutinin. • Sequences of the identified epitope are highly conserved among H1 and H9 subtypes. - Abstract: Most neutralizing antibodies elicited during influenza virus infection or by vaccination have a narrow spectrum because they usually target variable epitopes in the globular head region of hemagglutinin (HA). In this study, we describe a human monoclonal antibody (HuMAb), 5D7, that was prepared from the peripheral blood lymphocytes of a vaccinated volunteer using the fusion method. The HuMAb heterosubtypically neutralizes group 1 influenza A viruses, including seasonal H1N1, 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) and avian H9N2, with a strong hemagglutinin inhibition activity. Selection of an escape mutant showed that the HuMAb targets a novel conformational epitope that is located in the HA head region but is distinct from the receptor binding site. Furthermore, Phe114Ile substitution in the epitope made the HA unrecognizable by the HuMAb. Amino acid residues in the predicted epitope region are also highly conserved in the HAs of H1N1 and H9N2. The HuMAb reported here may be a potential candidate for the development of therapeutic/prophylactic antibodies against H1 and H9 influenza viruses.

  14. A human monoclonal antibody derived from a vaccinated volunteer recognizes heterosubtypically a novel epitope on the hemagglutinin globular head of H1 and H9 influenza A viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonsathorn, Naphatsawan; Panthong, Sumolrat; Koksunan, Sarawut; Chittaganpitch, Malinee; Phuygun, Siripaporn; Waicharoen, Sunthareeya; Prachasupap, Apichai; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Yasugi, Mayo; Ono, Ken-ichiro; Arai, Yasuha

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A human monoclonal antibody against influenza virus was produced from a volunteer. • The antibody was generated from the PBMCs of the volunteer using the fusion method. • The antibody neutralized heterosubtypically group 1 influenza A viruses (H1 and H9). • The antibody targeted a novel epitope in globular head region of the hemagglutinin. • Sequences of the identified epitope are highly conserved among H1 and H9 subtypes. - Abstract: Most neutralizing antibodies elicited during influenza virus infection or by vaccination have a narrow spectrum because they usually target variable epitopes in the globular head region of hemagglutinin (HA). In this study, we describe a human monoclonal antibody (HuMAb), 5D7, that was prepared from the peripheral blood lymphocytes of a vaccinated volunteer using the fusion method. The HuMAb heterosubtypically neutralizes group 1 influenza A viruses, including seasonal H1N1, 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) and avian H9N2, with a strong hemagglutinin inhibition activity. Selection of an escape mutant showed that the HuMAb targets a novel conformational epitope that is located in the HA head region but is distinct from the receptor binding site. Furthermore, Phe114Ile substitution in the epitope made the HA unrecognizable by the HuMAb. Amino acid residues in the predicted epitope region are also highly conserved in the HAs of H1N1 and H9N2. The HuMAb reported here may be a potential candidate for the development of therapeutic/prophylactic antibodies against H1 and H9 influenza viruses

  15. Structural and functional analysis of orthopoxvirus epitopes with neutralizing monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerny, C P; Mahnel, H

    1990-10-01

    Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were produced in BALB/c mice immunized with live modified vaccinia virus Ankara or infected with sublethal doses of the neurovirulent vaccinia virus strain Munich 1. The immunization scheme proved to be important for obtaining MAbs of different specificity. The MAbs could be classified into three epitope groups (1 A, 1 B and 2). Immunogold electron microscopy demonstrated that the epitopes were localized on the virus surface. In immunoblotting, MAbs were reactive with polypeptides of 14K, 16K and 30K. Purified MAbs binding to the epitopes 1 A and 2 showed a 50% reduction of 100 p.f.u./0.05 ml vaccinia virus M1 with respectively 3.9 and 5.9 ng of immunoglobulin/0.05 ml. MAbs binding to the epitope 1 B neutralized the virus at a concentration of 250 ng/0.05 ml. In intraperitoneal challenge experiments, MAbs binding to the epitopes 1 A and 2 protected mice against 4 LD50 of vaccinia virus M1, but not against local lesions by subcutaneous application. MAbs against epitope 1 B had no protective effect in vivo. The three epitopes were present in 14 of 16 orthopoxviruses tested but with quantitative differences. Maximal binding (Vmax) and the antibody concentration at half-maximal binding (Km) which were calculated as for Michaelis-Menten kinetics from regression analysis of the ELISA data and the MAb concentration giving 50% plaque reduction were the basis for the evaluation. In monkey-pox virus Kopenhagen the epitopes 1 A and 1 B were absent. MAbs binding to epitope 2 reacted just as well as with vaccinia viruses. Ectromelia virus lacked all the epitopes.

  16. Identifying Candidate Targets of Immune Responses in Zika Virus Based on Homology to Epitopes in Other Flavivirus Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaojun; Vaughan, Kerrie; Weiskopf, Daniela; Grifoni, Alba; Diamond, Michael S; Sette, Alessandro; Peters, Bjoern

    2016-11-15

    The current outbreak of Zika virus has resulted in a massive effort to accelerate the development of ZIKV-specific diagnostics and vaccines. These efforts would benefit greatly from the definition of the specific epitope targets of immune responses in ZIKV, but given the relatively recent emergence of ZIKV as a pandemic threat, few such data are available. We used a large body of epitope data for other Flaviviruses that was available from the IEDB for a comparative analysis against the ZIKV proteome in order to project targets of immune responses in ZIKV. We found a significant level of overlap between known antigenic sites from other Flavivirus proteins with residues on the ZIKV polyprotein. The E and NS1 proteins shared functional antibody epitope sites, whereas regions of T cell reactivity were conserved within NS3 and NS5 for ZIKV.  Discussion: Our epitope based analysis provides guidance for which regions of the ZIKV polyprotein are most likely unique targets of ZIKV-specific antibodies, and which targets in ZIKV are most likely to be cross-reactive with other Flavivirus species. These data may therefore provide insights for the development of antibody- and T cell-based ZIKV-specific diagnostics, therapeutics and prophylaxis.

  17. Epitope Mapping of Dengue-Virus-Enhancing Monoclonal-Antibody Using Phage Display Peptide Library

    OpenAIRE

    Chung-I Rai; Huan-Yao Lei; Yee-Shin Lin; Hsiao-Sheng Liu; Shun-Hua Chen; Lien-Cheng Chen; Trai-Ming Yeh

    2008-01-01

    The Antibody-Dependent Enhancement (ADE) hypothesis has been proposed to explain why more severe manifestations of Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever and Dengue Shock Syndrome (DHF/DSS) occur predominantly during secondary infections of Dengue Virus (DV) with different serotypes. However, the epitopes recognized by these enhancing antibodies are unclear. Recently, anti-pre-M monoclonal antibody (mAb 70-21), which recognized all DV serotypes without neutralizing activity, were generated and demonstrated...

  18. Monoclonal antibodies reacting with multiple epitopes on the human insulin receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    Soos, M A; Siddle, K; Baron, M D; Heward, J M; Luzio, J P; Bellatin, J; Lennox, E S

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies for the human insulin receptor were produced following immunization of mice with IM-9 lymphocytes and/or purified placental receptor. Four separate fusions yielded 28 antibodies, all of which reacted with receptor from human placenta, liver and IM-9 cells. Some antibodies cross-reacted to varying degrees with receptor from rabbit, cow, pig and sheep, but none reacted with rat receptor. At least 10 distinct epitopes were recognized as indicated by species specificity and ...

  19. Epitope Predictions Indicate the Presence of Two Distinct Types of Epitope-Antibody-Reactivities Determined by Epitope Profiling of Intravenous Immunoglobulins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luštrek, Mitja; Lorenz, Peter; Kreutzer, Michael; Qian, Zilliang; Steinbeck, Felix; Wu, Di; Born, Nadine; Ziems, Bjoern; Hecker, Michael; Blank, Miri; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Cao, Zhiwei; Glocker, Michael O.; Li, Yixue; Fuellen, Georg; Thiesen, Hans-Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Epitope-antibody-reactivities (EAR) of intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIGs) determined for 75,534 peptides by microarray analysis demonstrate that roughly 9% of peptides derived from 870 different human protein sequences react with antibodies present in IVIG. Computational prediction of linear B cell epitopes was conducted using machine learning with an ensemble of classifiers in combination with position weight matrix (PWM) analysis. Machine learning slightly outperformed PWM with area under the curve (AUC) of 0.884 vs. 0.849. Two different types of epitope-antibody recognition-modes (Type I EAR and Type II EAR) were found. Peptides of Type I EAR are high in tyrosine, tryptophan and phenylalanine, and low in asparagine, glutamine and glutamic acid residues, whereas for peptides of Type II EAR it is the other way around. Representative crystal structures present in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) of Type I EAR are PDB 1TZI and PDB 2DD8, while PDB 2FD6 and 2J4W are typical for Type II EAR. Type I EAR peptides share predicted propensities for being presented by MHC class I and class II complexes. The latter interaction possibly favors T cell-dependent antibody responses including IgG class switching. Peptides of Type II EAR are predicted not to be preferentially presented by MHC complexes, thus implying the involvement of T cell-independent IgG class switch mechanisms. The high extent of IgG immunoglobulin reactivity with human peptides implies that circulating IgG molecules are prone to bind to human protein/peptide structures under non-pathological, non-inflammatory conditions. A webserver for predicting EAR of peptide sequences is available at www.sysmed-immun.eu/EAR. PMID:24244326

  20. Epitope predictions indicate the presence of two distinct types of epitope-antibody-reactivities determined by epitope profiling of intravenous immunoglobulins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitja Luštrek

    Full Text Available Epitope-antibody-reactivities (EAR of intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIGs determined for 75,534 peptides by microarray analysis demonstrate that roughly 9% of peptides derived from 870 different human protein sequences react with antibodies present in IVIG. Computational prediction of linear B cell epitopes was conducted using machine learning with an ensemble of classifiers in combination with position weight matrix (PWM analysis. Machine learning slightly outperformed PWM with area under the curve (AUC of 0.884 vs. 0.849. Two different types of epitope-antibody recognition-modes (Type I EAR and Type II EAR were found. Peptides of Type I EAR are high in tyrosine, tryptophan and phenylalanine, and low in asparagine, glutamine and glutamic acid residues, whereas for peptides of Type II EAR it is the other way around. Representative crystal structures present in the Protein Data Bank (PDB of Type I EAR are PDB 1TZI and PDB 2DD8, while PDB 2FD6 and 2J4W are typical for Type II EAR. Type I EAR peptides share predicted propensities for being presented by MHC class I and class II complexes. The latter interaction possibly favors T cell-dependent antibody responses including IgG class switching. Peptides of Type II EAR are predicted not to be preferentially presented by MHC complexes, thus implying the involvement of T cell-independent IgG class switch mechanisms. The high extent of IgG immunoglobulin reactivity with human peptides implies that circulating IgG molecules are prone to bind to human protein/peptide structures under non-pathological, non-inflammatory conditions. A webserver for predicting EAR of peptide sequences is available at www.sysmed-immun.eu/EAR.

  1. Monoclonal antibodies to molluskan hemocyanin from Concholepas concholepas demonstrate common and specific epitopes among subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Harold; Moltedo, Bruno; De Ioannes, Pablo; Faunes, Fernando; De Ioannes, Alfredo E; Becker, María Inés

    2002-10-01

    We studied the reactivity of mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the hemocyanin from the Chilean marine gastropod Concholepas concholepas (CCH). This protein has been successfully used as a carrier to produce antibodies to haptens and peptides. All MAbs (13) belonging to IgG subclass exhibit dissociation constants (K(d)) from 1 x 10(-7) M to 1 x 10(-9) M. MAbs were characterized by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) using CCH treated with different procedures, including dissociation into CCH-A and CCH-B subunits, Western blot, enzymatic digestion, chemical deglycosylation, and thermal denaturation. MAbs were classified into three categories, according to subunit specificity by ELISA. The epitope distribution shows that CCH subunits display common epitopes (group I, 5 MAbs, 1H5, 2A8, 3A5, 3B3, and 3E3), as well as specific epitopes for CCH-A subunits (group II, 3 MAbs, 1B8, 4D8, and 8E5) and for CCH-B subunits (group III, 5 MAbs, 1A4, 1E4, 2H10, 3B7, and 7B4). The results can be summarized as follows: (1). six antibodies react with thermal denatured CCH, suggesting that they recognize linear epitopes, whereas seven recognize conformational epitopes; (2). oxidation of carbohydrate moieties does not affect the binding of the MAbs; (3). enzymatic digestion of CCH decreases the reactivity of all antibodies irrespective of the protease used (elastase or trypsin); (4). bringing together the above data, in addition to epitopic complementarity analysis, we identified 12 different epitopes on the CCH molecule recognized by these MAbs. The anti-CCH MAbs presented here can be useful tools to understand the subunit organization of the CCH and its complex structure, which can explain its immunogenic and immunostimulating properties in mammals.

  2. Confirmation of antibodies against L-tryptophan-like epitope in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rachel Oneya

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... test based on this synthetic epitope, especially in combination with other tests, might improve the HAT diagnostic test in field conditions. Key words: Tryptophan, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), human African trypanosomosis, serological diagnostic. INTRODUCTION. Trypanosoma brucei ...

  3. Epitope mapping of Ebola virus dominant and subdominant glycoprotein epitopes facilitates construction of an epitope-based DNA vaccine able to focus the antibody response in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-06

    Epitope mapping of Ebola virus dominant and subdominant glycoprotein epitopes facilitates construction of an epitope-based DNA vaccine able to focus... vaccinated against or infected with EBOV. Using the information obtained along with structural modeling to predict epitope accessibility, we then...constructed two DNA vaccines encoding immunodominant and subdominant epitopes predicted to be accessible on EBOV GP. Although a construct designed to

  4. Antibody Production and Th1-biased Response Induced by an Epitope Vaccine Composed of Cholera Toxin B Unit and Helicobacter pylori Lpp20 Epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Chen, Zhongbiao; Ye, Jianbin; Ning, Lijun; Luo, Jun; Zhang, Lili; Jiang, Yin; Xi, Yue; Ning, Yunshan

    2016-06-01

    The epitope vaccine is an attractive potential for prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination against Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Lpp20 is one of major protective antigens which trigger immune response after H. pylori invades host and has been considered as an excellent vaccine candidate for the control of H. pylori infection. In our previous study, one B-cell epitope and two CD4(+) T-cell epitopes of Lpp20 were identified. In this study, an epitope vaccine composed of mucosal adjuvant cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) and these three identified Lpp20 epitopes were constructed to investigate the efficacy of this epitope vaccine in mice. The epitope vaccine including CTB, one B-cell, and two CD4(+) T-cell epitopes of Lpp20 was constructed and named CTB-Lpp20, which was then expressed in Escherichia coli and used for intraperitoneal immunization in BALB/c mice. The immunogenicity, specificity, and ability to induce antibodies against Lpp20 and cytokine secretion were evaluated. After that, CTB-Lpp20 was intragastrically immunized to investigate the prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy in infected mice. The results indicated that the epitope vaccine CTB-Lpp20 possessed good immunogenicity and immunoreactivity and could elicit specific high level of antibodies against Lpp20 and the cytokine of IFN-γ and IL-17. Additionally, CTB-Lpp20 significantly decreased H. pylori colonization in H. pylori challenging mice, and the protection was correlated with IgG, IgA, and sIgA antibody and Th1-type cytokines. This study will be better for understanding the protective immunity of epitope vaccine, and CTB-Lpp20 may be an alternative strategy for combating H. pylori invasion. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Mechanisms of equine infectious anemia virus escape from neutralizing antibody responses define epitope specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponseller, Brett A; Clark, Sandra K; Friedrich, Rachel A

    2012-08-01

    Determining mechanisms of viral escape to particular epitopes recognized by virus-neutralizing antibody can facilitate characterization of host-neutralizing antibody responses as type- versus group-specific, and provides necessary information for vaccine development. Our study reveals that a single N-glycan located in the 5' region of the Wyoming wild-type equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) principal neutralizing domain (PND) accounts for the differences in neutralization phenotype observed between PND variants, while variations in charged amino acids within the PND do not appear to play a key role in viral escape. Site-directed mutagenesis and peptide mapping of a conserved epitope to neutralizing antibody in the 3' region of the PND showed rapid selective pressure for acquisition of a 5' PND N-glycan responsible for defining the specificity of the neutralizing-antibody response.

  6. Localization of immunodominant epitopes within the "a" determinant of hepatitis B surface antigen using monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golsaz-Shirazi, Forough; Mohammadi, Hamed; Amiri, Mohammad Mehdi; Khoshnoodi, Jalal; Kardar, Gholam Ali; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Shokri, Fazel

    2016-10-01

    The common "a" determinant is the major immunodominant region of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) shared by all serotypes and genotypes of hepatitis B virus (HBV). Antibodies against this region are thought to confer protection against HBV and are essential for viral clearance. Mutations within the "a" determinant may lead to conformational changes in this region, which can affect the binding of neutralizing antibodies. There is an increasing concern about identification and control of mutant viruses which is possible by comprehensive structural investigation of the epitopes located within this region. Anti-HBs monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against different epitopes of HBsAg are a promising tool to meet this goal. In the present study, 19 anti-HBs mAbs were employed to map epitopes localized within the "a" determinant, using a panel of recombinant mutant HBsAgs. The topology of the epitopes was analyzed by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Our results indicate that all of the mAbs seem to recognize epitopes within or in the vicinity of the "a" determinant of HBsAg. Different patterns of binding with mutant forms were observed with different mAbs. Amino acid substitutions at positions 123, 126, 129, 144, and 145 dramatically reduced the reactivity of antibodies with HBsAg. The T123N mutation had the largest impact on antibody binding to HBsAg. The reactivity pattern of our panel of mAbs with mutant forms of HBsAg could have important clinical implications for immunoscreening, diagnosis of HBV infection, design of a new generation of recombinant HB vaccines, and immunoprophylaxis of HBV infection as an alternative to therapy with hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG).

  7. Antibodies against linear epitopes on Goodpasture autoantigen in patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiao-Yu; Yu, Jun-Tao; Hu, Shui-Yi; Li, Jian-Nan; Wang, Miao; Wang, Chen; Chen, Min; Cui, Zhao; Zhao, Ming-Hui

    2017-09-01

    In a substantial number of patients with crescentic glomerulonephritis, both anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibodies and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are detected simultaneously. ANCA is presumed to be the initial event but the mechanism is unknown. In the present study, we investigated the antibodies against linear epitopes on Goodpasture autoantigen in sera from patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis, aiming to reveal the mechanisms of the coexistence of the two kinds of autoantibodies. Thirty-one patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis were enrolled in this study. Twenty-four overlapping linear peptides were synthesized across the whole sequence of Goodpasture autoantigen. Serum antibodies against linear peptides were detected by ELISA and their associations with clinical features were further analyzed. Twenty-five out of the thirty-one (80.6%) sera from patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis possessed antibodies against linear peptides on Goodpasture autoantigen. These antibodies could be detected in 50% of patients with normal renal function (Scr ≤ 133 μmol/L), 70% of patients with moderate renal dysfunction (133 μmol/L  600 μmol/L) (P = 0.032). The highest recognition frequencies were found for peptides P4 (51.6%), P14 (54.8%), and P24 (54.8%), which contained the sequences that constitute the conformational epitopes of E A (P4) and E B (P14) recognized by anti-GBM antibodies. The level of anti-P4 antibodies was positively correlated with the percentage of crescents in glomeruli (r = 0.764, P = 0.027). Patients with anti-P24 antibodies had a significantly higher prevalence of renal dysfunction on diagnosis (88.2 vs. 42.9%, P = 0.018). Antibodies against linear epitopes on Goodpasture autoantigen could be detected in sera of patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis, which might mediate the production of antibodies towards the conformational epitopes on Goodpasture autoantigen, namely, the anti-GBM antibodies.

  8. Isolation and Epitope Mapping of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B Single-Domain Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendrick B. Turner

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Single-domain antibodies (sdAbs, derived from the heavy chain only antibodies found in camelids such as llamas have the potential to provide rugged detection reagents with high affinities, and the ability to refold after denaturation. We have isolated and characterized sdAbs specific to staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB which bind to two distinct epitopes and are able to function in a sandwich immunoassay for toxin detection. Characterization of these sdAbs revealed that each exhibited nanomolar binding affinities or better.  Melting temperatures for the sdAbs ranged from approximately 60 °C to over 70 °C, with each demonstrating at least partial refolding after denaturation and several were able to completely refold. A first set of sdAbs was isolated by panning the library using adsorbed antigen, all of which recognized the same epitope on SEB. Epitope mapping suggested that these sdAbs bind to a particular fragment of SEB (VKSIDQFLYFDLIYSI containing position L45 (underlined, which is involved in binding to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC. Differences in the binding affinities of the sdAbs to SEB and a less-toxic vaccine immunogen, SEBv (L45R/Y89A/Y94A were also consistent with binding to this epitope. A sandwich panning strategy was utilized to isolate sdAbs which bind a second epitope. This epitope differed from the initial one obtained or from that recognized by previously isolated anti-SEB sdAb A3. Using SEB-toxin spiked milk we demonstrated that these newly isolated sdAbs could be utilized in sandwich-assays with each other, A3, and with various monoclonal antibodies.

  9. Elicitation of HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies by presentation of 4E10 and 10E8 epitopes on Norovirus P particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yongjiao; Fu, Lu; Shi, Yuhua; Guan, Shanshan; Yang, Lan; Gong, Xin; Yin, He; He, Xiaoqiu; Liu, Dongni; Kuai, Ziyu; Shan, Yaming; Wang, Song; Kong, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Eliciting efficient broadly neutralizing antibodies (BnAbs) is a major goal in vaccine development against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Conserved epitopes in the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of HIV-1 are a significant target. In this study, Norovirus P particles (NoV PPs) were used as carriers to display conformational 4E10 and 10E8 epitopes in different patterns with an appropriate linker. Immune responses to the recombinant NoV PPs were characterized in guinea pigs and Balb/c mice and could induce high levels of MPER-binding antibodies. Modest neutralizing activities could be detected in sera of guinea pigs but not of Balb/c mice. The 4E10 or 10E8 epitopes dispersed on three loops on the outermost surface of NoV PPs (4E10-loop123 PP or 10E8-loop123 PP) elicited higher neutralizing activities than the equivalent number of epitopes presented on loop 2 only (4E10-3loop2 PP or 10E8-3loop2 PP). The epitopes on different loops of the PP were well-exposed and likely formed an appropriate conformation to induce neutralizing antibodies. Although sera of immunized guinea pigs could neutralize several HIV envelope-pseudoviruses, a vaccine candidate for efficiently inducing HIV-1 BnAbs remains to be developed. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Elicitation of neutralizing antibodies directed against CD4-induced epitope(s using a CD4 mimetic cross-linked to a HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antu K Dey

    Full Text Available The identification of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env structures that can generate broadly neutralizing antibodies (BNAbs is pivotal to the development of a successful vaccine against HIV-1 aimed at eliciting effective humoral immune responses. To that end, the production of novel Env structure(s that might induce BNAbs by presentation of conserved epitopes, which are otherwise occluded, is critical. Here, we focus on a structure that stabilizes Env in a conformation representative of its primary (CD4 receptor-bound state, thereby exposing highly conserved "CD4 induced" (CD4i epitope(s known to be important for co-receptor binding and subsequent virus infection. A CD4-mimetic miniprotein, miniCD4 (M64U1-SH, was produced and covalently complexed to recombinant, trimeric gp140 envelope glycoprotein (gp140 using site-specific disulfide linkages. The resulting gp140-miniCD4 (gp140-S-S-M64U1 complex was recognized by CD4i antibodies and the HIV-1 co-receptor, CCR5. The gp140-miniCD4 complex elicited the highest titers of CD4i binding antibodies as well as enhanced neutralizing antibodies against Tier 1 viruses as compared to gp140 protein alone following immunization of rabbits. Neutralization against HIV-2(7312/V434M and additional serum mapping confirm the specific elicitation of antibodies directed to the CD4i epitope(s. These results demonstrate the utility of structure-based approach in improving immunogenic response against specific region, such as the CD4i epitope(s here, and its potential role in vaccine application.

  11. Substantial gaps in knowledge of Bordetella pertussis antibody and T cell epitopes relevant for natural immunity and vaccine efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Kerrie; Seymour, Emily; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The recent increase in whooping cough in vaccinated populations has been attributed to waning immunity associated with the acellular vaccine. The Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) is a repository of immune epitope data from the published literature and includes T cell and antibody epitopes for human pathogens. The IEDB conducted a review of the epitope literature, which revealed 300 Bordetella pertussis-related epitopes from 39 references. Epitope data are currently available for six virulence factors of B. pertussis: pertussis toxin, pertactin, fimbrial 2, fimbrial 3, adenylate cyclase and filamentous hemagglutinin. The majority of epitopes were defined for antibody reactivity; fewer T cell determinants were reported. Analysis of available protective correlates data revealed a number of candidate epitopes; however few are defined in humans and few have been shown to be protective. Moreover, there are a limited number of studies defining epitopes from natural infection versus whole cell or acellular/subunit vaccines. The relationship between epitope location and structural features, as well as antigenic drift (SNP analysis) was also investigated. We conclude that the cumulative data is yet insufficient to address many fundamental questions related to vaccine failure and this underscores the need for further investigation of B. pertussis immunity at the molecular level. PMID:24530743

  12. Circulating microparticles carry oxidation-specific epitopes and are recognized by natural IgM antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiantoulas, Dimitrios; Perkmann, Thomas; Afonyushkin, Taras; Mangold, Andreas; Prohaska, Thomas A; Papac-Milicevic, Nikolina; Millischer, Vincent; Bartel, Caroline; Hörkkö, Sohvi; Boulanger, Chantal M; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Fischer, Michael B; Witztum, Joseph L; Lang, Irene M; Binder, Christoph J

    2015-02-01

    Oxidation-specific epitopes (OSEs) present on apoptotic cells and oxidized low density lipoprotein (OxLDL) represent danger-associated molecular patterns that are recognized by different arcs of innate immunity, including natural IgM antibodies. Here, we investigated whether circulating microparticles (MPs), which are small membrane vesicles released by apoptotic or activated cells, are physiological carriers of OSEs. OSEs on circulating MPs isolated from healthy donors and patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STE-MI) were characterized by flow cytometry using a panel of OSE-specific monoclonal antibodies. We found that a subset of MPs carry OSEs on their surface, predominantly malondialdehyde (MDA) epitopes. Consistent with this, a majority of IgM antibodies bound on the surface of circulating MPs were found to have specificity for MDA-modified LDL. Moreover, we show that MPs can stimulate THP-1 (human acute monocytic leukemia cell line) and human primary monocytes to produce interleukin 8, which can be inhibited by a monoclonal IgM with specificity for MDA epitopes. Finally, we show that MDA(+) MPs are elevated at the culprit lesion site of patients with STE-MI. Our results identify a subset of OSE(+) MPs that are bound by OxLDL-specific IgM. These findings demonstrate a novel mechanism by which anti-OxLDL IgM antibodies could mediate protective functions in CVD. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. An unstable Th epitope of P. falciparum fosters central memory T cells and anti-CS antibody responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A Parra-López

    Full Text Available Malaria is transmitted by Plasmodium-infected anopheles mosquitoes. Widespread resistance of mosquitoes to insecticides and resistance of parasites to drugs highlight the urgent need for malaria vaccines. The most advanced malaria vaccines target sporozoites, the infective form of the parasite. A major target of the antibody response to sporozoites are the repeat epitopes of the circumsporozoite (CS protein, which span almost one half of the protein. Antibodies to these repeats can neutralize sporozoite infectivity. Generation of protective antibody responses to the CS protein (anti-CS Ab requires help by CD4 T cells. A CD4 T cell epitope from the CS protein designated T* was previously identified by screening T cells from volunteers immunized with irradiated P. falciparum sporozoites. The T* sequence spans twenty amino acids that contains multiple T cell epitopes restricted by various HLA alleles. Subunit malaria vaccines including T* are highly immunogenic in rodents, non-human primates and humans. In this study we characterized a highly conserved HLA-DRβ1*04:01 (DR4 restricted T cell epitope (QNT-5 located at the C-terminus of T*. We found that a peptide containing QNT-5 was able to elicit long-term anti-CS Ab responses and prime CD4 T cells in HLA-DR4 transgenic mice despite forming relatively unstable MHC-peptide complexes highly susceptible to HLA-DM editing. We attempted to improve the immunogenicity of QNT-5 by replacing the P1 anchor position with an optimal tyrosine residue. The modified peptide QNT-Y formed stable MHC-peptide complexes highly resistant to HLA-DM editing. Contrary to expectations, a linear peptide containing QNT-Y elicited almost 10-fold lower long-term antibody and IFN-γ responses compared to the linear peptide containing the wild type QNT-5 sequence. Some possibilities regarding why QNT-5 is more effective than QNT-Y in inducing long-term T cell and anti-CS Ab when used as vaccine are discussed.

  14. Characterization of Binding Epitopes of CA125 Monoclonal Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcos-Silva, Lara; Narimatsu, Yoshiki; Halim, Adnan

    2014-01-01

    The most used cancer serum biomarker is the CA125 immunoassay for ovarian cancer that detects the mucin glycoprotein MUC16. Several monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) including OC125 and M11 are used in CA125 assays. However, despite considerable efforts, our knowledge of the molecular characteristics ...

  15. Mapping of linear antibody epitopes of the glycoprotein of VHSV, a salmonid rhabdovirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez-Alonso, M.; Lorenzo, G.; Perez, L.

    1998-01-01

    antibodies (MAbs), only 2 non-neutralizing MAbs, I10 (aa 139-153) and IP1H3 (aa 399-413), could be mapped to specific peptides in the pepscan of the gpG. Mapping of these MAbs was confirmed by immunoblotting with recombinant proteins and/or other synthetic peptides covering those sequences. None...... of the neutralizing MAbs tested reacted with any of the gpG peptides. Previously mapped MAb resistant mutants in the gpG did not coincide with any of the Linear epitopes defined by the pepscan strategy, suggesting the complementarity of the 2 methods for the identification of antibody recognition sites....

  16. Use of Moraxella catarrhalis lipooligosaccharide mutants to identify specific oligosaccharide epitopes recognized by human serum antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwingel, Johanna M; Edwards, Katie J; Cox, Andrew D; Masoud, Hussein; Richards, James C; St Michael, Frank; Tekwe, Carmen D; Sethi, Sanjay; Murphy, Timothy F; Campagnari, Anthony A

    2009-10-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a causative agent of otitis media in children and lower respiratory tract infections in adults suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This strict human pathogen continues to be a significant cause of disease in this broad spectrum of patients because there is no available vaccine. Although numerous putative vaccine antigens have been described, little is known about the human immune response to M. catarrhalis infection in vivo. Human serum antibodies are directed at a number of surface proteins, and lipooligosaccharides (LOS) and detoxified LOS may be an effective immunogen in mice. In this study, we used a specific LOS-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), containing the three major M. catarrhalis serotypes together with a complete series of truncated LOS mutants, to detect the development of new antibodies to specific regions of the oligosaccharide molecule. We compared serum samples from COPD patients who had recently cleared an M. catarrhalis infection to serum samples collected prior to their infection. Variability in the antibody response to LOS was observed, as some patients developed serotype-specific antibodies, others developed antibodies to the LOS of each serotype, others developed broadly cross-reactive antibodies, and some did not develop new antibodies. These newly developed human antibodies are directed at both side chains and core structures in the LOS molecule. This LOS-based ELISA can be used to dissect the human antibody response to both internal and external carbohydrate epitopes, thus providing a better understanding of the humoral immune response to M. catarrhalis LOS epitopes developed during natural infection.

  17. Mature Epitope Density - A strategy for target selection based on immunoinformatics and exported prokaryotic proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Anderson R; Pereira, Vanessa Bastos; Barbosa, Eudes

    2013-01-01

    . However, currently available tools do not account for the concentration of epitope products in the mature protein product and its relation to the reliability of target selection. RESULTS: We developed a computational strategy based on measuring the epitope's concentration in the mature protein, called...

  18. A human PrM antibody that recognizes a novel cryptic epitope on dengue E glycoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Hoi Yi Chan

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is a major mosquito-borne pathogen infecting up to 100 million people each year; so far no effective treatment or vaccines are available. Recently, highly cross-reactive and infection-enhancing pre-membrane (prM-specific antibodies were found to dominate the anti-DENV immune response in humans, raising concern over vaccine candidates that contain native dengue prM sequences. In this study, we have isolated a broadly cross-reactive prM-specific antibody, D29, during a screen with a non-immunized human Fab-phage library against the four serotypes of DENV. The antibody is capable of restoring the infectivity of virtually non-infectious immature DENV (imDENV in FcγR-bearing K562 cells. Remarkably, D29 also cross-reacted with a cryptic epitope on the envelope (E protein located to the DI/DII junction as evidenced by site-directed mutagenesis. This cryptic epitope, while inaccessible to antibody binding in a native virus particle, may become exposed if E is not properly folded. These findings suggest that generation of anti-prM antibodies that enhance DENV infection may not be completely avoided even with immunization strategies employing E protein alone or subunits of E proteins.

  19. A novel computer algorithm improves antibody epitope prediction using affinity-selected mimotopes: a case study using monoclonal antibodies against the West Nile virus E protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisova, Galina F; Denisov, Dimitri A; Yeung, Jeffrey; Loeb, Mark B; Diamond, Michael S; Bramson, Jonathan L

    2008-11-01

    Understanding antibody function is often enhanced by knowledge of the specific binding epitope. Here, we describe a computer algorithm that permits epitope prediction based on a collection of random peptide epitopes (mimotopes) isolated by antibody affinity purification. We applied this methodology to the prediction of epitopes for five monoclonal antibodies against the West Nile virus (WNV) E protein, two of which exhibit therapeutic activity in vivo. This strategy was validated by comparison of our results with existing F(ab)-E protein crystal structures and mutational analysis by yeast surface display. We demonstrate that by combining the results of the mimotope method with our data from mutational analysis, epitopes could be predicted with greater certainty. The two methods displayed great complementarity as the mutational analysis facilitated epitope prediction when the results with the mimotope method were equivocal and the mimotope method revealed a broader number of residues within the epitope than the mutational analysis. Our results demonstrate that the combination of these two prediction strategies provides a robust platform for epitope characterization.

  20. Depletion of albumin and immunoglobulin G from human serum using epitope-imprinted polymers as artificial antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hsueh-Hui; Lu, Kuo-Hao; Lin, Yee-Fung; Tsai, Sheng-Hung; Chakraborty, Subrata; Zhai, Wei-Jun; Tai, Dar-Fu

    2013-07-01

    Serum is a readily available source for noninvasive studies in clinical research, but it contains abundant proteins such as albumin and immunoglobulin G that can hinder the presence of low-abundant proteins as well as decrease sample loading capacity of analytical methods. Therefore, depletion of these two proteins is required to observe low-abundance serum proteins. Molecularly imprinted polymers are template-induced artificial antibodies with the ability to recognize and selectively bind the target molecule. In this study, artificial albumin and immunoglobulin G antibodies were developed by using two epitopes of human serum albumin and immunoglobulin G as templates. Acrylic acid, acrylamide, and N-acryl tyramine were the corresponding monomers; N,N'-ethylene bisacrylamide served as a cross-linker, and cellulosic fibers were used as a supporting matrix. The adsorption capacity of these artificial antibodies was 15.2 mg, 10 mg, and 15 μL per gram for human serum albumin, immunoglobulin G, and human serum, respectively. The dissociation constant (Kd ) of these artificial antibodies toward the human serum albumin and immunoglobulin G was 1 μM and 0.6 μM, respectively. The biomimetic properties of these artificial antibodies, coupled with their economical and rapid production, high specificity and their reusability, make them attractive for protein separation and analysis. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Epitope analysis of anti-myeloperoxidase antibodies in patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis.

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    Shen-Ju Gou

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Increasing evidences have suggested the pathogenic role of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA directing myeloperoxidase (MPO in ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV. The current study aimed to analyze the association between the linear epitopes of MPO-ANCA and clinicopathological features of patients with AAV. METHODS: Six recombinant linear fragments, covering the whole length amino acid sequence of a single chain of MPO, were produced from E.coli. Sera from 77 patients with AAV were collected at presentation. 13 out of the 77 patients had co-existence of serum anti-GBM antibodies. Ten patients also had sequential sera during follow up. The epitope specificities were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using the recombinant fragments as solid phase ligands. RESULTS: Sera from 45 of the 77 (58.4% patients with AAV showed a positive reaction to one or more linear fragments of the MPO chain. The Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Scores and the sera creatinine were significantly higher in patients with positive binding to the light chain fragment than that in patients without the binding. The epitopes recognized by MPO-ANCA from patients with co-existence of serum anti-GBM antibodies were mainly located in the N-terminus of the heavy chain. In 5 out of the 6 patients, whose sera in relapse recognize linear fragments, the reactivity to linear fragments in relapse was similar to that of initial onset. CONCLUSION: The epitope specificities of MPO-ANCA were associated with disease activity and some clinicopathological features in patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis.

  2. Synergistic capture of Clostridium botulinum Type A neurotoxin by scFv antibodies to novel epitopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Sean A.; Barr, John R.; Kalb, Suzanne R.; Marks, James D.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Cangelosi, Gerard A.; Miller, Keith D.; Feldhaus, Michael J.

    2011-10-01

    A non-immune library of human single chain fragment variable (scFv) antibodies displayed on Saccharomyces cerevisiae was screened for binding to the Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin serotype A binding domain [BoNT/A (Hc)] with the goal of identifying scFv to novel epitopes. To do this, an antibody-mediated labeling strategy was used in which antigen-binding yeast clones were selected after labeling with previously characterized monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to the Hc. Twenty unique scFv clones were isolated that bound Hc. Of these, three also bound to full-length BoNT/A toxin complex with affinities ranging from 5 nM to 170 nM. Epitope binning showed that the three unique clones recognized at least two epitopes that were distinct from one another and from the detection MAbs. After production in E. coli, the scFv were coupled to magnetic particles and tested for their ability to capture BoNT/A holotoxin using an Endopep-MS assay. In this assay, toxin captured by scFv coated magnetic particles was detected by incubation of the complex with a peptide containing a BoNT/A-specific cleavage sequence. Mass spectrometry was used to detect the ratio of intact peptide to cleavage products as evidence for toxin capture. When tested individually, each of the scFv showed a weak positive Endopep-MS result. However, when the particles were coated with all three scFv simultaneously, they exhibited significantly higher Endopep-MS activity, consistent with synergistic binding. These results demonstrate novel approaches toward the isolation and characterization of scFv antibodies specific to unlabeled antigen. They also provide evidence that distinct scFv antibodies can work synergistically to increase the efficiency of antigen capture onto a solid support.

  3. Epitope and functional specificity of monoclonal antibodies to mouse gamma interferon: the synthetic peptide approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, J.K.; Hayes, M.P.; Carter, J.M.; Torres, B.A.; Dunn, B.M.; Johnson, H.M.

    1986-01-01

    Four anti-recombinant mouse gamma interferon (α-IFNγ) monoclonal antibodies were generated using hamster spleen cells. Binding of 125 I-IFNγ by these protein A-bound antibodies was specifically blocked by cold IFNγ. Binding by three of these antibodies was also blocked by a synthetic peptide corresponding to the N-terminal 1-39 amino acids of IFNγ, while a corresponding C-terminal (95-133) peptide had no effect on binding. One of the N-terminal specific monoclonal antibodies inhibited both the antiviral and macrophage priming (for tumor cell killing) activities of IFNγ, while the other two had no effect on either biological function. Blocking experiments with cold IFNγ and N-terminal peptide suggest that the epitope specificities of the monoclonal antibodies could be determined by the conformational or topographic structure of IFNγ. Polyclonal antibodies to either the N-terminal or C-terminal peptides also inhibited both the antiviral and macrophage priming activities of IFNγ. All of the antibodies that inhibited IFNγ function also blocked binding of IFNγ to membrane receptor on cells, while antibodies that did not inhibit function also did not block binding. The data suggest that both the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of IFNγ play an important role in its antiviral and macrophage priming functions, possibly in a cooperative manner

  4. Epitope Sequences in Dengue Virus NS1 Protein Identified by Monoclonal Antibodies

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    Leticia Barboza Rocha

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dengue nonstructural protein 1 (NS1 is a multi-functional glycoprotein with essential functions both in viral replication and modulation of host innate immune responses. NS1 has been established as a good surrogate marker for infection. In the present study, we generated four anti-NS1 monoclonal antibodies against recombinant NS1 protein from dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV2, which were used to map three NS1 epitopes. The sequence 193AVHADMGYWIESALNDT209 was recognized by monoclonal antibodies 2H5 and 4H1BC, which also cross-reacted with Zika virus (ZIKV protein. On the other hand, the sequence 25VHTWTEQYKFQPES38 was recognized by mAb 4F6 that did not cross react with ZIKV. Lastly, a previously unidentified DENV2 NS1-specific epitope, represented by the sequence 127ELHNQTFLIDGPETAEC143, is described in the present study after reaction with mAb 4H2, which also did not cross react with ZIKV. The selection and characterization of the epitope, specificity of anti-NS1 mAbs, may contribute to the development of diagnostic tools able to differentiate DENV and ZIKV infections.

  5. Manipulation of immunodominant dengue virus E protein epitopes reduces potential antibody-dependent enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hughes Holly R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue viruses (DENV are the most important arboviruses of humans and cause significant disease. Infection with DENV elicits antibody responses to the envelope glycoprotein, predominantly against immunodominant, cross-reactive, weakly-neutralizing epitopes. These weakly-neutralizing antibodies are implicated in enhancing infection via Fcγ receptor bearing cells and can lead to increased viral loads that are associated with severe disease. Here we describe results from the development and testing of cross-reactivity reduced DENV-2 DNA vaccine candidates that contain substitutions in immunodominant B cell epitopes of the fusion peptide and domain III of the envelope protein. Results Cross-reactivity reduced and wild-type vaccine candidates were similarly immunogenic in outbred mice and elicited high levels of neutralizing antibody, however mice immunized with cross-reactivity reduced vaccines produced significantly reduced levels of immunodominant cross-reactive antibodies. Sera from mice immunized with wild-type, fusion peptide-, or domain III- substitution containing vaccines enhanced heterologous DENV infection in vitro, unlike sera from mice immunized with a vaccine containing a combination of both fusion peptide and domain III substitutions. Passive transfer of immune sera from mice immunized with fusion peptide and domain III substitutions also reduced the development of severe DENV disease in AG129 mice when compared to mice receiving wild type immune sera. Conclusions Reducing cross-reactivity in the envelope glycoprotein of DENV may be an approach to improve the quality of the anti-DENV immune response.

  6. Minute Time Scale Prolyl Isomerization Governs Antibody Recognition of an Intrinsically Disordered Immunodominant Epitope*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassolari, Marisol; Chemes, Lucia B.; Gallo, Mariana; Smal, Clara; Sánchez, Ignacio E.; de Prat-Gay, Gonzalo

    2013-01-01

    Conformational rearrangements in antibody·antigen recognition are essential events where kinetic discrimination of isomers expands the universe of combinations. We investigated the interaction mechanism of a monoclonal antibody, M1, raised against E7 from human papillomavirus, a prototypic viral oncoprotein and a model intrinsically disordered protein. The mapped 12-amino acid immunodominant epitope lies within a “hinge” region between the N-terminal intrinsically disordered and the C-terminal globular domains. Kinetic experiments show that despite being within an intrinsically disordered region, the hinge E7 epitope has at least two populations separated by a high energy barrier. Nuclear magnetic resonance traced the origin of this barrier to a very slow (t½ ∼4 min) trans-cis prolyl isomerization event involving changes in secondary structure. The less populated (10%) cis isomer is the binding-competent species, thus requiring the 90% of molecules in the trans configuration to isomerize before binding. The association rate for the cis isomer approaches 6 × 107 m−1 s−1, a ceiling for antigen-antibody interactions. Mutagenesis experiments showed that Pro-41 in E7Ep was required for both binding and isomerization. After a slow postbinding unimolecular rearrangement, a consolidated complex with KD = 1.2 × 10−7 m is reached. Our results suggest that presentation of this viral epitope by the antigen-presenting cells would have to be “locked” in the cis conformation, in opposition to the most populated trans isomer, in order to select the specific antibody clone that goes through affinity and kinetic maturation. PMID:23504368

  7. High Resolution Mapping of Bactericidal Monoclonal Antibody Binding Epitopes on Staphylococcus aureus Antigen MntC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey V Gribenko

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Staphylococcus aureus manganese transporter protein MntC is under investigation as a component of a prophylactic S.aureus vaccine. Passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies mAB 305-78-7 and mAB 305-101-8 produced using MntC was shown to significantly reduce S. aureus burden in an infant rat model of infection. Earlier interference mapping suggested that a total of 23 monoclonal antibodies generated against MntC could be subdivided into three interference groups, representing three independent immunogenic regions. In the current work binding epitopes for selected representatives of each of these interference groups (mAB 305-72-5 - group 1, mAB 305-78-7 - group 2, and mAB 305-101-8 - group 3 were mapped using Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (DXMS. All of the identified epitopes are discontinuous, with binding surface formed by structural elements that are separated within the primary sequence of the protein but adjacent in the context of the three-dimensional structure. The approach was validated by co-crystallizing the Fab fragment of one of the antibodies (mAB 305-78-7 with MntC and solving the three-dimensional structure of the complex. X-ray results themselves and localization of the mAB 305-78-7 epitope were further validated using antibody binding experiments with MntC variants containing substitutions of key amino acid residues. These results provided insight into the antigenic properties of MntC and how these properties may play a role in protecting the hostagainst S. aureus infection by preventing the capture and transport of Mn2+, a key element that the pathogen uses to evade host immunity.

  8. Predicted Indirectly Recognizable HLA Epitopes Presented by HLA-DRB1 Are Related to HLA Antibody Formation During Pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geneugelijk, K; Hönger, G; van Deutekom, H W M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341356816; Thus, K A; Kesmir, C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304843393; Hösli, I; Schaub, S; Spierings, E

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy can prime maternal immune responses against inherited paternal HLA of the fetus, leading to the production of child-specific HLA antibodies. We previously demonstrated that donor-specific HLA antibody formation after kidney transplantation is associated with donor-derived HLA epitopes

  9. Predicted indirectly recognizable HLA epitopes presented by HLA-DRB1 are related to HLA antibody formation during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geneugelijk, K.; Hönger, G.; Van Deutekom, H. W M; Thus, K. A.; Keşmir, C.; Hösli, I.; Schaub, S.; Spierings, E.

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy can prime maternal immune responses against inherited paternal HLA of the fetus, leading to the production of child-specific HLA antibodies. We previously demonstrated that donor-specific HLA antibody formation after kidney transplantation is associated with donor-derived HLA epitopes

  10. BepiPred-2.0: improving sequence-based B-cell epitope prediction using conformational epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Martin Closter; Peters, Bjoern; Nielsen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    for predicting B-cell epitopes from antigen sequences. BepiPred-2.0 is based on a random forest algorithm trained on epitopes annotated from antibody-antigen protein structures. This new method was found to outperform other available tools for sequence-based epitope prediction both on epitope data derived from......Antibodies have become an indispensable tool for many biotechnological and clinical applications. They bind their molecular target (antigen) by recognizing a portion of its structure (epitope) in a highly specific manner. The ability to predict epitopes from antigen sequences alone is a complex...... and immunology community....

  11. Systematic Synthesis and Binding Study of HIV V3 Glycopeptides Reveal the Fine Epitopes of Several Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orwenyo, Jared; Cai, Hui; Giddens, John; Amin, Mohammed N; Toonstra, Christian; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2017-06-16

    A class of new glycan-reactive broadly neutralizing antibodies represented by PGT121, 10-1074, and PGT128 has recently been discovered that targets specific N-glycans and the peptide region around the V3 domain. However, the glycan specificity and fine epitopes of these bNAbs remain to be further defined. We report here a systematic chemoenzymatic synthesis of homogeneous V3 glycopeptides derived from the HIV-1 JR-FL strain carrying defined N-glycans at N332, N301, and N295 sites. Antibody binding studies revealed that both the nature and site of glycosylation in the context of the V3 domain were critical for high-affinity binding. It was found that antibody PGT128 exhibited specificity for high-mannose N-glycan with glycosylation site promiscuity, PGT121 showed binding specificity for glycopeptide carrying a sialylated N-glycan at N301 site, and 10-1074 was specific for glycopeptide carrying a high-mannose N-glycan at N332 site. The synthesis and binding studies permit a detailed assessment of the glycan specificity and the requirement of peptide in the context of antibody-antigen recognition. The identified glycopeptides can be used as potential templates for HIV vaccine design.

  12. EPITOPE MAPPING OF SCLC-CLUSTER-2 MABS AND GENERATION OF ANTIBODIES DIRECTED AGAINST NEW EGP-2 EPITOPES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HELFRICH, W; KONING, PW; THE, TH; DELEIJ, L

    1994-01-01

    Western blot analysis proved that all cluster-2 MAbs recognize identical or overlapping disulfide-bond-dependent epitopes, indicating the presence of a disulfide-bond-stabilized EGP-2 domain carrying highly immunodominant non-linear epitopes. The apparent immunodominance of this domain makes it

  13. 'Multi-epitope-targeted' immune-specific therapy for a multiple sclerosis-like disease via engineered multi-epitope protein is superior to peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathali Kaushansky

    Full Text Available Antigen-induced peripheral tolerance is potentially one of the most efficient and specific therapeutic approaches for autoimmune diseases. Although highly effective in animal models, antigen-based strategies have not yet been translated into practicable human therapy, and several clinical trials using a single antigen or peptidic-epitope in multiple sclerosis (MS yielded disappointing results. In these clinical trials, however, the apparent complexity and dynamics of the pathogenic autoimmunity associated with MS, which result from the multiplicity of potential target antigens and "epitope spread", have not been sufficiently considered. Thus, targeting pathogenic T-cells reactive against a single antigen/epitope is unlikely to be sufficient; to be effective, immunospecific therapy to MS should logically neutralize concomitantly T-cells reactive against as many major target antigens/epitopes as possible. We investigated such "multi-epitope-targeting" approach in murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE associated with a single ("classical" or multiple ("complex" anti-myelin autoreactivities, using cocktail of different encephalitogenic peptides vis-a-vis artificial multi-epitope-protein (designated Y-MSPc encompassing rationally selected MS-relevant epitopes of five major myelin antigens, as "multi-epitope-targeting" agents. Y-MSPc was superior to peptide(s in concomitantly downregulating pathogenic T-cells reactive against multiple myelin antigens/epitopes, via inducing more effective, longer lasting peripheral regulatory mechanisms (cytokine shift, anergy, and Foxp3+ CTLA4+ regulatory T-cells. Y-MSPc was also consistently more effective than the disease-inducing single peptide or peptide cocktail, not only in suppressing the development of "classical" or "complex EAE" or ameliorating ongoing disease, but most importantly, in reversing chronic EAE. Overall, our data emphasize that a "multi-epitope-targeting" strategy is required for

  14. Mapping the epitopes of a neutralizing antibody fragment directed against the lethal factor of Bacillus anthracis and cross-reacting with the homologous edema factor.

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    Philippe Thullier

    Full Text Available The lethal toxin (LT of Bacillus anthracis, composed of the protective antigen (PA and the lethal factor (LF, plays an essential role in anthrax pathogenesis. PA also interacts with the edema factor (EF, 20% identity with LF to form the edema toxin (ET, which has a lesser role in anthrax pathogenesis. The first recombinant antibody fragment directed against LF was scFv 2LF; it neutralizes LT by blocking the interaction between PA and LF. Here, we report that scFv 2LF cross-reacts with EF and cross-neutralizes ET, and we present an in silico method taking advantage of this cross-reactivity to map the epitope of scFv 2LF on both LF and EF. This method identified five epitope candidates on LF, constituted of a total of 32 residues, which were tested experimentally by mutating the residues to alanine. This combined approach precisely identified the epitope of scFv 2LF on LF as five residues (H229, R230, Q234, L235 and Y236, of which three were missed by the consensus epitope candidate identified by pre-existing in silico methods. The homolog of this epitope on EF (H253, R254, E258, L259 and Y260 was experimentally confirmed to constitute the epitope of scFv 2LF on EF. Other inhibitors, including synthetic molecules, could be used to target these epitopes for therapeutic purposes. The in silico method presented here may be of more general interest.

  15. A new panel of epitope mapped monoclonal antibodies recognising the prototypical tetraspanin CD81 [version 1; referees: 1 approved, 2 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Grove

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tetraspanins are small transmembrane proteins, found in all higher eukaryotes, that compartmentalize cellular membranes through interactions with partner proteins. CD81 is a prototypical tetraspanin and contributes to numerous physiological and pathological processes, including acting as a critical entry receptor for hepatitis C virus (HCV. Antibody engagement of tetraspanins can induce a variety of effects, including actin cytoskeletal rearrangements, activation of MAPK-ERK signaling and cell migration. However, the epitope specificity of most anti-tetraspanin antibodies is not known, limiting mechanistic interpretation of these studies. Methods: We generated a panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs specific for CD81 second extracellular domain (EC2 and performed detailed epitope mapping with a panel of CD81 mutants. All mAbs were screened for their ability to inhibit HCV infection and E2-CD81 association. Nanoscale distribution of cell surface CD81 was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. Results: The antibodies were classified in two epitope groups targeting opposing sides of EC2. We observed a wide range of anti-HCV potencies that were independent of their epitope grouping, but associated with their relative affinity for cell-surface expressed CD81. Scanning electron microscopy identified at least two populations of CD81; monodisperse and higher-order assemblies, consistent with tetraspanin-enriched microdomains. Conclusions: These novel antibodies provide well-characterised tools to investigate CD81 function, including HCV entry, and have the potential to provide insights into tetraspanin biology in general.

  16. A 12-residue epitope displayed on phage T7 reacts strongly with antibodies against foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chuan Loo; Yong, Chean Yeah; Muhamad, Azira; Syahir, Amir; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Sieo, Chin Chin; Tan, Wen Siang

    2018-05-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a major threat to the livestock industry worldwide. Despite constant surveillance and effective vaccination, the perpetual mutations of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) pose a huge challenge to FMD diagnosis. The immunodominant region of the FMDV VP1 protein (residues 131-170) displayed on phage T7 has been used to detect anti-FMDV in bovine sera. In the present study, the functional epitope was further delineated using amino acid sequence alignment, homology modelling and phage display. Two highly conserved regions (VP1 145-152 and VP1 159-170 ) were identified among different FMDV serotypes. The coding regions of these two epitopes were fused separately to the T7 genome and displayed on the phage particles. Interestingly, chimeric phage displaying the VP1 159-170 epitope demonstrated a higher antigenicity than that displaying the VP1 131-170 epitope. By contrast, phage T7 displaying the VP1 145-152 epitope did not react significantly with the anti-FMDV antibodies in vaccinated bovine sera. This study has successfully identified a smaller functional epitope, VP1 159-170 , located at the C-terminal end of the structural VP1 protein. The phage T7 displaying this shorter epitope is a promising diagnostic reagent to detect anti-FMDV antibodies in vaccinated animals.

  17. Generation of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against a conformational epitope of human adenovirus type 7 (HAdv-7 incorporated in capsid encoded in a HAdv-3-based vector.

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    Minglong Liu

    Full Text Available The generation of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs by epitope-based immunization is difficult because the immunogenicity of simple peptides is poor and T cells must be potently stimulated and immunological memory elicited. A strategy in which antigen is incorporated into the adenoviral capsid protein has been used previously to develop antibody responses against several vaccine targets and may offer a solution to this problem. In this study, we used a similar strategy to develop HAdv-7-neutralizing MAbs using rAdMHE3 virions into which hexon hypervariable region 5 (HVR5 of adenovirus type 7 (HAdv-7 was incorporated. The epitope mutant rAdMHE3 was generated by replacing HVR5 of Ad3EGFP, a recombinant HAdv-3-based vector expressing enhanced green fluorescence protein, with HVR5 of HAdv-7. We immunized BALB/c mice with rAdMHE3 virions and produced 22 different MAbs against them, four of which showed neutralizing activity against HAdv-7 in vitro. Using an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA analysis and an antibody-binding-competition ELISA with Ad3EGFP, HAdv-7, and a series of chimeric adenoviral particles containing epitope mutants, we demonstrated that the four MAbs recognize the neutralization site within HVR5 of the HAdv-7 virion. Using an immunoblotting analysis and ELISA with HAdv-7, recombinant peptides, and a synthetic peptide, we also showed that the neutralizing epitope within HVR5 of the HAdv-7 virion is a conformational epitope. These findings suggest that it is feasible to use a strategy in which antigen is incorporated into the adenoviral capsid protein to generate neutralizing MAbs. This strategy may also be useful for developing therapeutic neutralizing MAbs and designing recombinant vector vaccines against HAdv-7, and in structural analysis of adenoviruses.

  18. Mapping of Lol p I allergenic epitopes by using murine monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourad, W; Bernier, D; Jobin, M; Hébert, J

    1989-11-01

    Murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against three non-overlapping epitopes of Lol p I allergen were previously produced and subsequently used for purification of the allergen. In the present study, these MAbs were further characterized, and the biological activity of the purified allergen assessed. The three MAbs were of the IgG isotype and carried a kappa light chain. Their affinity constants were in the range of 7.4-15.1 x 10(-9) mol/l. Purified Lol p I kept its biological activity, as shown by its ability to induce histamine release by basophils of Lol p I-sensitive patients. The profiles of histamine release induced by either Lol p I or crude Lolium perenne extracts were comparable. This observation suggests that human IgE bound to basophils are polyspecific which has been confirmed by immunoblot and inhibition assay. Our data indicated also that Lol p I possesses a major allergenic epitope recognized by all human serum IgE tested. This epitope seems to be partially shared by those recognized by the three MAbs. Finally, preincubation of Lol p I with either one of the Mabs did not affect significantly the basophil-histamine release induced by the purified allergen. This suggests that Lol p I possesses allergenic sites other than the one shared by MAbs and IgE Abs.

  19. Characterization of an isotype-dependent monoclonal antibody against linear neutralizing epitope effective for prophylaxis of enterovirus 71 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Fang Lim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is the main causative agent of Hand, Foot and Mouth disease (HFMD and is associated with severe neurologic complications and mortalities. At present, there is no vaccine or therapeutic available for treatment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: In this study, we generated two mAbs, denoted as mAb 51 and 53, both targeting the same linear epitope on VP1 capsid protein, spanning amino acids 215-219. In comparison, mAb 51 belonging to isotype IgM possesses neutralizing activity in vitro, whereas, mAb 53 belonging to isotype IgG1 does not have any neutralizing ability, even towards its homologous strain. When mAb 51 at 10 µg/g of body weight was administered to the 2-week-old AG129 mice one day prior to lethal challenge, 100% in vivo passive protection was observed. In contrast, the isotype control group mice, injected with an irrelevant IgM antibody before the challenge, developed limb paralysis as early as day 6 post-infection. Histological examination demonstrated that mAb 51 was able to protect against pathologic changes such as neuropil vacuolation and neuronal loss in the spinal cord, which were typical in unprotected EV-71 infected mice. BLAST analyses of that epitope revealed that it was highly conserved among all EV71 strains, but not coxsachievirus 16 (CA16. CONCLUSION: We have defined a linear epitope within the VP1 protein and demonstrated its neutralizing ability to be isotype dependent. The neutralizing property and highly conserved sequence potentiated the application of mAb 51 and 53 for protection against EV71 infection and diagnosis respectively.

  20. Pneumocystis carinii and specific fungi have a common epitope, identified by a monoclonal antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, B; Kovacs, J A; Nelson, N N

    1992-01-01

    Because Pneumocystis carinii may be related to fungi, we evaluated the reactivities of monoclonal antibodies raised against P. carinii with a variety of fungi. Fifty-two fungi and six protozoa were evaluated by immunofluorescence. One of three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) tested (MAb 7D7) reacted...... with 15 fungi but no protozoa. Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed the strongest reactivity by immunofluorescence. The reactive antigen was characterized for four fungi by the immunoblot technique. In all cases the antigen that was reactive with MAb 7D7 was larger than the P. carinii antigens that reacted...... with 7D7. In further studies with P. carinii, Aspergillus species, and S. cerevisiae, we found that MAb 7D7 reacted with a carbohydrate component in all organisms. The presence of an epitope that is common to P. carinii and a number of fungi further supports the fungal nature of P. carinii....

  1. Development of a sensitive and specific epitope-blocking ELISA for universal detection of antibodies to human enterovirus 71 strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is a common cause of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD in young children. It is often associated with severe neurological diseases and mortalities in recent outbreaks across the Asia Pacific region. Currently, there is no efficient universal antibody test available to detect EV71 infections. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: In the present study, an epitope-blocking ELISA was developed to detect specific antibodies to human EV71 viruses in human or animal sera. The assay relies on a novel monoclonal antibody (Mab 1C6 that specifically binds to capsid proteins in whole EV71 viruses without any cross reaction to any EV71 capsid protein expressed alone. The sensitivity and specificity of the epitope-blocking ELISA for EV71 was evaluated and compared to microneutralization using immunized animal sera to multiple virus genotypes of EV71 and coxsackieviruses. Further, 200 serum sample from human individuals who were potentially infected with EV71 viruses were tested in both the blocking ELISA and microneutralization. Results indicated that antibodies to EV71 were readily detected in immunized animals or human sera by the epitope blocking ELISA whereas specimens with antibodies to other enteroviruses yielded negative results. This assay is not only simpler to perform but also shows higher sensitivity and specificity as compared to microneutralization. CONCLUSION: The epitope-blocking ELISA based on a unique Mab 1C6 provided highly sensitive and 100% specific detection of antibodies to human EV71 viruses in human sera.

  2. Toward Effective HIV Vaccination INDUCTION OF BINARY EPITOPE REACTIVE ANTIBODIES WITH BROAD HIV NEUTRALIZING ACTIVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Planque, Stephanie; Mitsuda, Yukie; Nitti, Giovanni; Taguchi, Hiroaki; Jin, Lei; Symersky, Jindrich; Boivin, Stephane; Sienczyk, Marcin; Salas, Maria; Hanson, Carl V.; Paul, Sudhir; (Texas-MED); (Viral Rickettsial)

    2009-11-23

    We describe murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) raised by immunization with an electrophilic gp120 analog (E-gp120) expressing the rare ability to neutralize genetically heterologous human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) strains. Unlike gp120, E-gp120 formed covalent oligomers. The reactivity of gp120 and E-gp120 with mAbs to reference neutralizing epitopes was markedly different, indicating their divergent structures. Epitope mapping with synthetic peptides and electrophilic peptide analogs indicated binary recognition of two distinct gp120 regions by anti-E-gp120 mAbs, the 421-433 and 288-306 peptide regions. Univalent Fab and single chain Fv fragments expressed the ability to recognize both peptides. X-ray crystallography of an anti-E-gp120 Fab fragment revealed two neighboring cavities, the typical antigen-binding cavity formed by the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) and another cavity dominated by antibody heavy chain variable (VH) domain framework (FR) residues. Substitution of the FR cavity VH Lys-19 residue by an Ala residue resulted in attenuated binding of the 421-433 region peptide probe. The CDRs and VH FR replacement/silent mutation ratios exceeded the ratio for a random mutation process, suggesting adaptive development of both putative binding sites. All mAbs studied were derived from VH1 family genes, suggesting biased recruitment of the V gene germ line repertoire by E-gp120. The conserved 421-433 region of gp120 is essential for HIV binding to host CD4 receptors. This region is recognized weakly by the FR of antibodies produced without exposure to HIV, but it usually fails to induce adaptive synthesis of neutralizing antibodies. We present models accounting for improved CD4-binding site recognition and broad HIV neutralizing activity of the mAbs, long sought goals in HIV vaccine development.

  3. Epitope grafting, re-creating a conformational Bet v 1 antibody epitope on the surface of the homologous apple allergen Mal d 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jens; Ferreras, Mercedes; Ipsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Birch-allergic patients often experience oral allergy syndrome upon ingestion of vegetables and fruits, most prominently apple, that is caused by antibody cross-reactivity of the IgE antibodies in patients to proteins sharing molecular surface structures with the major birch pollen group 1 allergen...... scaffold molecule without loss of epitope functionality. Furthermore, we show that increasing surface similarity to Bet v 1 of Mal d 1 variants by substitution of 6-8 residues increased the ability to trigger basophil histamine release with blood from birch-allergic patients not responding to natural Mal d...

  4. A synthetic peptide derived from the animo acid sequence of canine parvovirus structural proteins which defines a B cell epitope and elicits antiviral antibody in BALB c mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); J. Carlson; F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractSynthetic peptides, recombinant fusion proteins and mouse monoclonal antibodies were used to delineate a B cell epitope of the VP'2 structural protein of canine parvovirus (CPV). Although this epitope is not preferentially recognized in the normal antibody response to CPV, virus-specific

  5. Fusion of C3d molecule with neutralization epitope(s) of hepatitis E virus enhances antibody avidity maturation and neutralizing activity following DNA immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shucai; Wang, Chunling; Fang, Xuefeng; Zhai, Lijie; Dong, Chen; Ding, Lei; Meng, Jihong; Wang, Lixin

    2010-08-01

    Previous studies have identified that a hepatits E virus peptide (HEV-p179), spanning amino acids (aa) 439-617 in the 660-aa protein encoded by open reading frame 2(ORF2) of the Chinese epidemic strain (genotype 4), is the minimal size fragment of conformation-dependent neutralization epitope(s). We report here the successful immunization of mice with DNA vaccines expressing the secreted form of HEV-p179 (fused with a human tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) signal sequence) and the tPA-p179-C3d fusion protein (fused with three tandem copies of the murine complement C3d). Analysis of antibody responses in vaccinated mice revealed that immunizations with tPA-p179-C3d3 DNA vaccine dramatically increased both the level and avidity maturation of antibodies against HEV-p179 compared to p179 and tPA-p179 DNA vaccines. In addition, this increased antibody response correlated with neutralizing titers in a PCR-based cell culture neutralization assay. These results indicate that vaccination with C3d conjugated p179 DNA vaccine enhances antibody responses to HEV, and this approach may be applied to overcome the poor immunogenicity of DNA vaccines to generate HEV neutralizing antibodies. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Induction of antibodies against epitopes inaccessible on the HIV type 1 envelope oligomer by immunization with recombinant monomeric glycoprotein 120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Bolmstedt, A; Novotny, J

    1998-01-01

    An N-glycan (N306) at the base of the V3 loop of HIV-BRU gp120 is shielding a linear neutralization epitope at the tip of the V3 loop on oligomeric Env. In contrast, this epitope is readily antigenic on monomeric gp120. Immunization with recombinant monomeric HIV-BRU gp120 may thus be expected to...... immunogenic structures inaccessible on the envelope oligomer. The limited ability of recombinant gp120 vaccines to induce neutralizing antibodies against primary isolates may thus not exclusively reflect genetic variation.......An N-glycan (N306) at the base of the V3 loop of HIV-BRU gp120 is shielding a linear neutralization epitope at the tip of the V3 loop on oligomeric Env. In contrast, this epitope is readily antigenic on monomeric gp120. Immunization with recombinant monomeric HIV-BRU gp120 may thus be expected...

  7. HLA-A2 reactive antibodies in a patient who types as HLA-A2: The importance of high resolution typing and epitope-based antibody analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, A B; Bravo-Egana, V; Jackstadt, J L; Conti, D J; Duquesnoy, R J

    2015-06-01

    This report describes a case of a highly sensitized patient who had serum antibodies reacting with HLA-A2 but whose phenotype included HLA-A2. The determination of HLA mismatch acceptability at the antigen level was problematic, but high-resolution HLA typing information and epitope-based antibody specificity analysis based on the nonself-self paradigm of HLA epitope immunogenicity have provided a solution. This case supports the concept that HLA typing at the allele level offers a better approach to identifying suitable donors for sensitized patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. AL amyloid imaging and therapy with a monoclonal antibody to a cryptic epitope on amyloid fibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S Wall

    Full Text Available The monoclonal antibody 2A4 binds an epitope derived from a cleavage site of serum amyloid protein A (sAA containing a -Glu-Asp- amino acid pairing. In addition to its reactivity with sAA amyloid deposits, the antibody was also found to bind amyloid fibrils composed of immunoglobulin light chains. The antibody binds to synthetic fibrils and human light chain (AL amyloid extracts with high affinity even in the presence of soluble light chain proteins. Immunohistochemistry with biotinylated 2A4 demonstrated positive reaction with ALκ and ALλ human amyloid deposits in various organs. Surface plasmon resonance analyses using synthetic AL fibrils as a substrate revealed that 2A4 bound with a K(D of ∼10 nM. Binding was inhibited in the presence of the -Glu-Asp- containing immunogen peptide. Radiolabeled 2A4 specifically localized with human AL amyloid extracts implanted in mice (amyloidomas as evidenced by single photon emission (SPECT imaging. Furthermore, co-localization of the radiolabeled mAb with amyloid was shown in biodistribution and micro-autoradiography studies. Treatment with 2A4 expedited regression of ALκ amyloidomas in mice, likely mediated by the action of macrophages and neutrophils, relative to animals that received a control antibody. These data indicate that the 2A4 mAb might be of interest for potential imaging and immunotherapy in patients with AL amyloidosis.

  9. CD4+ T cells targeting dominant and cryptic epitopes from Bacillus anthracis Lethal Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie eAscough

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Anthrax is an endemic infection in many countries, particularly in the developing world. The causative agent, Bacillus anthracis, mediates disease through the secretion of binary exotoxins. Until recently, research into adaptive immunity targeting this bacterial pathogen has largely focused on the humoral response to these toxins. There is, however, growing recognition that cellular immune responses involving IFNγ producing CD4+ T cells also contribute significantly to a protective memory response. An established concept in adaptive immunity to infection is that during infection of host cells, new microbial epitopes may be revealed, leading to immune recognition of so called ‘cryptic’ or ‘subdominant’ epitopes. We analysed the response to both cryptic and immunodominant T cell epitopes derived from the toxin component lethal factor and presented by a range of HLA-DR alleles. Using IFNγ-ELISPOT assays we characterised epitopes that elicited a response following immunisation with synthetic peptide and the whole protein and tested their capacities to bind purified HLA-DR molecules in vitro. We found that DR1 transgenics demonstrated T cell responses to a greater number of domain III cryptic epitopes than other HLA-DR transgenics, and that this pattern was repeated with the immunodominant epitopes, a greater proportion of these epitopes induced a T cell response when presented within the context of the whole protein. Immunodominant epitopes LF457-476 and LF467-487 were found to induce a T cell response to the peptide, as well as to the whole native LF protein in DR1 and DR15, but not in DR4 trangenics. The analysis of Domain I revealed the presence of several unique cryptic epitopes all of which showed a strong to moderate relative binding affinity to HLA-DR4 molecules. However, none of the cryptic epitopes from either domain III or I displayed notably high binding affinities across all HLA-DR alleles assayed. These responses were

  10. Epitope mapping for monoclonal antibody reveals the activation mechanism for αVβ3 integrin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuji Kamata

    Full Text Available Epitopes for a panel of anti-αVβ3 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs were investigated to explore the activation mechanism of αVβ3 integrin. Experiments utilizing αV/αIIb domain-swapping chimeras revealed that among the nine mAbs tested, five recognized the ligand-binding β-propeller domain and four recognized the thigh domain, which is the upper leg of the αV chain. Interestingly, the four mAbs included function-blocking as well as non-functional mAbs, although they bound at a distance from the ligand-binding site. The epitopes for these four mAbs were further determined using human-to-mouse αV chimeras. Among the four, P3G8 recognized an amino acid residue, Ser-528, located on the side of the thigh domain, while AMF-7, M9, and P2W7 all recognized a common epitope, Ser-462, that was located close to the α-genu, where integrin makes a sharp bend in the crystal structure. Fibrinogen binding studies for cells expressing wild-type αVβ3 confirmed that AMF-7, M9, and P2W7 were inhibitory, while P3G8 was non-functional. However, these mAbs were all unable to block binding when αVβ3 was constrained in its extended conformation. These results suggest that AMF-7, M9, and P2W7 block ligand binding allosterically by stabilizing the angle of the bend in the bent conformation. Thus, a switchblade-like movement of the integrin leg is indispensable for the affinity regulation of αVβ3 integrin.

  11. Screening for epitope specificity directly on culture supernatants in the early phase of monoclonal antibody production by an ELISA with biotin-labeled antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte C; Jensen, Charlotte H; Gregersen, Annemette

    2004-01-01

    This report describes an assay for comparison of epitope specificity in groups of monoclonal antibodies against a given antigen. The only prerequisite is the biotin-labeled antigen. One of the monoclonal antibodies is captured onto a plastic surface via a rabbit anti-mouse Ig, and the other...... preincubated with biotinylated antigen. When the two antibodies react with the same epitope subsequent binding of the biotin-labeled antigen is abolished (inhibition). In the cases where no inhibition was observed, the two antibodies were considered to react with distinct, independent epitopes. The obvious...

  12. Antibody response to a synthetic peptide covering a LAV-1/HTLV-IIIB neutralization epitope and disease progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boucher, C. A.; de Wolf, F.; Houweling, J. T.; Bakker, M.; Dekker, J.; Roos, M. T.; Coutinho, R. A.; van der Noordaa, J.; Goudsmit, J.

    1989-01-01

    Sequential sera of homosexual men participating in a prospective study on the incidence of HIV-1 infection and risk factors for AIDS were tested for the presence of antibodies to a synthetic 17-mer (Neu21; KSIRIQRGPGRAFVTIG) representing a neutralization epitope as present on the LAV-1/HTLV-IIIB

  13. Proof of principle for epitope-focused vaccine design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Bruno E.; Bates, John T.; Loomis, Rebecca J.; Baneyx, Gretchen; Carrico, Chris; Jardine, Joseph G.; Rupert, Peter; Correnti, Colin; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Vittal, Vinayak; Connell, Mary J.; Stevens, Eric; Schroeter, Alexandria; Chen, Man; MacPherson, Skye; Serra, Andreia M.; Adachi, Yumiko; Holmes, Margaret A.; Li, Yuxing; Klevit, Rachel E.; Graham, Barney S.; Wyatt, Richard T.; Baker, David; Strong, Roland K.; Crowe, James E.; Johnson, Philip R.; Schief, William R.

    2014-03-01

    Vaccines prevent infectious disease largely by inducing protective neutralizing antibodies against vulnerable epitopes. Several major pathogens have resisted traditional vaccine development, although vulnerable epitopes targeted by neutralizing antibodies have been identified for several such cases. Hence, new vaccine design methods to induce epitope-specific neutralizing antibodies are needed. Here we show, with a neutralization epitope from respiratory syncytial virus, that computational protein design can generate small, thermally and conformationally stable protein scaffolds that accurately mimic the viral epitope structure and induce potent neutralizing antibodies. These scaffolds represent promising leads for the research and development of a human respiratory syncytial virus vaccine needed to protect infants, young children and the elderly. More generally, the results provide proof of principle for epitope-focused and scaffold-based vaccine design, and encourage the evaluation and further development of these strategies for a variety of other vaccine targets, including antigenically highly variable pathogens such as human immunodeficiency virus and influenza.

  14. Identification of one B-cell epitope from NS1 protein of duck Tembusu virus with monoclonal antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinfeng Ti

    Full Text Available This study describes the identification of one linear B-cell epitope on TMUV NS1 protein with monoclonal antibody (mAb 3G2 by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. In this study, NS1 protein was expressed in prokaryotic expression system and purified. One mAb against NS1 protein was generated from Balb/c mice immunized with recombinant protein NS1. A set of 35 partially-overlapping polypeptides covering the entire NS1 protein was expressed with PGEX-6P-1 vector and screened with mAb 3G2. One polypeptide against the mAb was acquired and identified by indirect ELISA and western-blot. To map the epitope accurately, one or two amino acid residues were removed from the carboxy and amino terminal of polypeptide sequentially. A series of truncated oligopeptides were expressed and purified. The minimal determinant of the linear B cell epitope was recognized and identified with mAb 3G2. The accurate linear B-cell epitope was 269DEKEIV274 located in NS1 protein. Furthermore, sequence alignment showed that the epitope was highly conserved and specific among TMUV strains and other flavivirus respectively. The linear B-cell epitope of TMUV NS1 protein could benefit the development of new vaccines and diagnostic assays.

  15. Mature Epitope Density - A strategy for target selection based on immunoinformatics and exported prokaryotic proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Anderson R; Pereira, Vanessa Bastos; Barbosa, Eudes

    2013-01-01

    . However, currently available tools do not account for the concentration of epitope products in the mature protein product and its relation to the reliability of target selection. RESULTS: We developed a computational strategy based on measuring the epitope's concentration in the mature protein, called...... Mature Epitope Density (MED). Our method, though simple, is capable of identifying promising vaccine targets. Our online software implementation provides a computationally light and reliable analysis of bacterial exoproteins and their potential for vaccines or diagnosis projects against pathogenic....... Half of the 60 proteins were classified as highest scored by the MED statistic, while the other half were classified as lowest scored. Among the lowest scored proteins, ~13% were confirmed as not related to antigenicity or not contributing to the bacterial pathogenicity, and 70% of the highest scored...

  16. Production, Characterization and Use of Monoclonal Antibodies Recognizing IgY Epitopes Shared by Chicken, Turkey, Pheasant, Peafowl and Sparrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajda Biček

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Chicken antibodies are not only a part of immune defense but are more and more popular commercial products in form of chicken polyclonal, monoclonal or recombinant antibodies. We produced and characterized mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs that recognize epitopes located on heavy or light chain of chicken immunoglobulin Y (chIgY shared also by some other Phasianidae birds. The use of mAbs 1F5 and 2F10 that recognize heavy chain on chIgY common epitopes was demonstrated on immunoglobulins of turkey, pheasant and peafowl. Chicken IgY light chain specific mAb 3E10 revealed the presence of common epitopes on immunoglobulins of turkey, pheasant and sparrow. Monoclonal antibody clone 1F5/3G2 was used to prepare horseradish peroxidase (HRP conjugate and immunoadsorbent column. Conjugated mAbs were demonstrated to be excellent secondary antibodies for diagnostics of certain infections in different avian species. Since they do not react with mammalian immunoglobulins using our mAbs as secondary antibodies in human serodiagnostics would minimize background staining that appears when using mouse detection system. In dot immunobinding assay (DIBA and immunoblot assay they recognized specific IgY antibodies against Mycoplasma synoviae, Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Newcastle disease virus in sera of infected or vaccinated birds. Immunoadsorption as a method for removal of IgY from samples in which Mycoplasma synoviae specific IgY was predominant immunoglobulin class enabled more exact demonstration of specific IgA and IgM antibodies. Herein we are presenting effective mAbs useful in diagnostics of avian and mammalian infections as well as in final steps of detection and purification of chicken antibodies and their subunits produced in vivo or in vitro as polyclonal, monoclonal or recombinant antibodies.

  17. Immunodominant IgM and IgG Epitopes Recognized by Antibodies Induced in Enterovirus A71-Associated Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kam Leng Aw-Yong

    Full Text Available Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71 is one of the main causative agents of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD. Unlike other enteroviruses that cause HFMD, EV-A71 is more frequently associated with severe neurological complications and fatality. To date, no effective licensed antivirals are available to combat EV-A71 infection. Little is known about the immunogenicity of viral non-structural proteins in humans. Previous studies have mainly focused on characterization of epitopes of EV-A71 structural proteins by using immunized animal antisera. In this study, we have characterized human antibody responses against the structural and non-structural proteins of EV-A71. Each viral protein was cloned and expressed in either bacterial or mammalian systems, and tested with antisera by western blot. Results revealed that all structural proteins (VP1-4, and non-structural proteins 2A, 3C and 3D were targets of EV-A71 IgM, whereas EV-A71 IgG recognized all the structural and non-structural proteins. Sixty three synthetic peptides predicted to be immunogenic in silico were synthesized and used for the characterization of EV-A71 linear B-cell epitopes. In total, we identified 22 IgM and four IgG dominant epitopes. Synthetic peptide PEP27, corresponding to residues 142-156 of VP1, was identified as the EV-A71 IgM-specific immunodominant epitope. PEP23, mapped to VP1 41-55, was recognized as the EV-A71 IgG cross-reactive immunodominant epitope. The structural protein VP1 is the major immunodominant site targeted by anti-EV-A71 IgM and IgG antibodies, but epitopes against non-structural proteins were also detected. These data provide new understanding of the immune response to EV-A71 infection, which benefits the development of diagnostic tools, potential therapeutics and subunit vaccine candidates.

  18. Viral O-GalNAc peptide epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olofsson, Sigvard; Blixt, Klas Ola; Bergström, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    meningitis patients, CSF antibodies are focussed to only one single glycoform peptide of a major viral glycoprotein. Thus, dependent on the viral disease, the serological response may be variable or constant with respect to the number of targeted peptide glycoforms. Mapping of these epitopes relies......Viral envelope glycoproteins are major targets for antibodies that bind to and inactivate viral particles. The capacity of a viral vaccine to induce virus-neutralizing antibodies is often used as a marker for vaccine efficacy. Yet the number of known neutralization target epitopes is restricted...... owing to various viral escape mechanisms. We expand the range of possible viral glycoprotein targets, by presenting a previously unknown type of viral glycoprotein epitope based on a short peptide stretch modified with small O-linked glycans. Besides being immunologically active, these epitopes have...

  19. Conserved B-cell epitopes among human bocavirus species indicate potential diagnostic targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human bocavirus species 1-4 (HBoV1-4 have been associated with respiratory and enteric infections in children. However, the immunological mechanisms in response to HBoV infections are not fully understood. Though previous studies have shown cross-reactivities between HBoV species, the epitopes responsible for this phenomenon remain unknown. In this study, we used genomic and immunologic approaches to identify the reactive epitopes conserved across multiple HBoV species and explored their potential as the basis of a novel diagnostic test for HBoVs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We generated HBoV1-3 VP2 gene fragment phage display libraries (GFPDLs and used these libraries to analyze mouse antisera against VP2 protein of HBoV1, 2, and 3, and human sera positive for HBoVs. Using this approach, we mapped four epitope clusters of HBoVs and identified two immunodominant peptides--P1 (¹MSDTDIQDQQPDTVDAPQNT²⁰, and P2 (¹⁶²EHAYPNASHPWDEDVMPDL¹⁸⁰--that are conserved among HBoV1-4. To confirm epitope immunogenicity, we immunized mice with the immunodominant P1 and P2 peptides identified in our screen and found that they elicited high titer antibodies in mice. These two antibodies could only recognize the VP2 of HBoV 1-4 in Western blot assays, rather than those of the two other parvoviruses human parvovirus B19 and human parvovirus 4 (PARV4. Based on our findings, we evaluated epitope-based peptide-IgM ELISAs as potential diagnostic tools for HBoVs IgM antibodies. We found that the P1+P2-IgM ELISA showed a higher sensitivity and specificity in HBoVs IgM detection than the assays using a single peptide. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The identification of the conserved B-cell epitopes among human bocavirus species contributes to our understanding of immunological cross-reactivities of HBoVs, and provides important insights for the development of HBoV diagnostic tools.

  20. Analysis of pectic epitopes recognised by hybridoma and phage display monoclonal antibodies using defined oligosaccharides, polysaccharides, and enzymatic degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willats, William George Tycho; Limberg, G.; Buchholt, H.C.

    2000-01-01

    The structure of epitopes recognised by anti-pectin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has been investigated using a series of model lime-pectin samples with defined degrees and patterns of methyl esterification, a range of defined oligogalacturonides and enzymatic degradation of pectic polysaccharides....... In immuno-dot-assays, the anti-homogalacturonan (HG) mAbs JIM5 and JIM7 both bound to samples with a wide range of degrees of methyl esterification in preference to fully de-esterified samples. In contrast, the anti-HG phage display mAb PAM1 bound most effectively to fully de-esterified pectin...... occurs where specific but undefined methyl-esterification patterns are present on HG domains, although fully de-esterified HG samples contain sub-optimal JIM5 epitopes. The persistence of mAb binding to epitopes in pectic antigens, with 41% blockwise esterification (P41) and 43% random esterification (F...

  1. Mapping of epitopes on Poa p I and Lol p I allergens with monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Z W; Ekramoddoullah, A K; Jaggi, K S; Dzuba-Fischer, J; Rector, E; Kisil, F T

    1990-01-01

    Allergen Poa p I isolated from the dialysed aqueous extract of Kentucky blue grass pollen by affinity chromatography with an anti-Lol p I murine monoclonal antibody (MAb) 290A-167 was previously shown to consist of a 35.8-kilodalton (kD) component with a pI of 6.4, designated as Poa p Ia, and a 33-kD component with a pI of 9.1, designated as Poa p Ib. The present study reports on the comparative antigenic analyses of these two components, using MAbs produced separately against Poa p I and Lol p I. Thus, anti-Poa p I MAbs 60 and 61 and anti-Lol p I MAb 290A-167 recognized Poa p Ia and Poa p Ib whereas anti-Poa p I MAbs 62, 63 and 64 and anti-Lol p I MAb 348A-6 recognized only Poa p Ia. The specificities of the MAbs were further resolved by comparing their respective abilities to inhibit the binding of 125I-Poa p I or 125I-Lol p I to the different MAbs prepared in the form of solid phase. These studies revealed that at least 4 distinct epitopes (designated as E1, E2, E3 and E4) were shared by both Poa p I and Lol p I. All 4 epitopes were present on Poa p Ia whereas only E1 and E3 were detected on Poa p Ib. E1 was recognized by MAbs 60 and 61, E2 by MAbs 62, 63 and 64, E3 by MAb 290A-167 and E4 by MAb 348A-6.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Unraveling the role of maternal anti-HLA class I antibodies in fetal and neonatal thrombocytopenia-Antibody specificity analysis using epitope data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Jesper; Refsum, Erle; Ahlen, Maria Therese; Egeland, Torstein; Jensen, Tore; Viken, Marte K; Stuge, Tor Brynjar; Acharya, Ganesh; Husebekk, Anne; Skogen, Bjørn; Tiller, Heidi

    2017-08-01

    Anti-HLA class I antibodies have been suggested as a possible cause of fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT). The aim of this study was to characterize maternal anti-HLA class I alloantibodies in suspected cases of FNAIT. The study population consisted of all nationwide referrals of neonates with suspected FNAIT to the National Unit for Platelet Immunology in Tromsø, Norway, during 1998-2009 (cases), and 250 unselected pregnancies originally included in a prospective study (controls). Inclusion criterion was a positive screening for maternal anti-HLA class I antibodies. Neonates with other identifiable causes of thrombocytopenia, including maternal anti-human platelet antigens (HPA) antibodies, were excluded. Ultimately, 50 cases with suspected FNAIT were compared with 60 controls. The median neonatal platelet count nadir among cases was 24×10 9 /L (range 4-98×10 9 /L). Five children (10%) were reported to have intracranial hemorrhage. Maternal and neonatal HLA class I genotype was available for 33 mother/child pairs (66%). Immunization was not tied to any particular HLA class I antigen. Using epitope mapping, we could demonstrate that the maternal anti-HLA class I antibodies were specific towards mismatched paternally-inherited fetal epitopes, with little reactivity towards any third-party epitopes. Antibody reactivity patterns were similar to those found among controls, although the mean fluorescence intensities (MFI) among cases were significantly higher. This study demonstrates the value of using data on HLA epitope expression, instead of HLA antigens, to examine alloimmune responses in connection with neonatal thrombocytopenia. Our findings support the idea that maternal anti-HLA class I antibodies are involved in FNAIT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Targeting Malignant Brain Tumors with Antibodies

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    Rok Razpotnik

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies have been shown to be a potent therapeutic tool. However, their use for targeting brain diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases and brain cancers, has been limited, particularly because the blood–brain barrier (BBB makes brain tissue hard to access by conventional antibody-targeting strategies. In this review, we summarize new antibody therapeutic approaches to target brain tumors, especially malignant gliomas, as well as their potential drawbacks. Many different brain delivery platforms for antibodies have been studied such as liposomes, nanoparticle-based systems, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs, and cell-based approaches. We have already shown the successful delivery of single-chain fragment variable (scFv with CPP as a linker between two variable domains in the brain. Antibodies normally face poor penetration through the BBB, with some variants sufficiently passing the barrier on their own. A “Trojan horse” method allows passage of biomolecules, such as antibodies, through the BBB by receptor-mediated transcytosis (RMT. Such examples of therapeutic antibodies are the bispecific antibodies where one binding specificity recognizes and binds a BBB receptor, enabling RMT and where a second binding specificity recognizes an antigen as a therapeutic target. On the other hand, cell-based systems such as stem cells (SCs are a promising delivery system because of their tumor tropism and ability to cross the BBB. Genetically engineered SCs can be used in gene therapy, where they express anti-tumor drugs, including antibodies. Different types and sources of SCs have been studied for the delivery of therapeutics to the brain; both mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and neural stem cells (NSCs show great potential. Following the success in treatment of leukemias and lymphomas, the adoptive T-cell therapies, especially the chimeric antigen receptor-T cells (CAR-Ts, are making their way into glioma treatment as another type of cell

  4. Identification of a novel canine distemper virus B-cell epitope using a monoclonal antibody against nucleocapsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Li; Cheng, Yuening; Zhang, Miao; Cao, Zhigang; Tong, Mingwei; Wang, Jianke; Zhao, Hang; Lin, Peng; Cheng, Shipeng

    2016-02-02

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a member of the genus Morbillivirus within the family Paramyxoviridae and has caused severe economic losses in China. Nucleocapsid protein (N) is the major structural viral protein and can be used to diagnose CDV and other morbilliviruses. In this study, a specific monoclonal antibody, 1N8, was produced against the CDV N protein (amino acids 277-471). A linear N protein epitope was identified by subjecting a series of partially overlapping synthesized peptides to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis. The results indicated that (350)LNFGRSYFDPA(360) was the minimal linear epitope that could be recognized by mAb 1N8. ELISA assays revealed that mouse anti-CDV sera could also recognize the minimal linear epitope. Alignment analysis of the amino acid sequences indicated that the epitope was highly conserved among CDV strains. Furthermore, the epitope was conserved among other morbilliviruses, which was confirmed with PRRV using western blotting. Taken together, the results of this study may have potential applications in the development of suitable diagnostic techniques for CDV or other morbilliviruses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Production of mouse monoclonal antibody against Streptococcus dysgalactiae GapC protein and mapping its conserved B-cell epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Limeng; Zhang, Hua; Fan, Ziyao; Zhou, Xue; Yu, Liquan; Sun, Hunan; Wu, Zhijun; Yu, Yongzhong; Song, Baifen; Ma, Jinzhu; Tong, Chunyu; Zhu, Zhanbo; Cui, Yudong

    2015-02-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae (S. dysgalactiae) GapC protein is a protective antigen that induces partial immunity against S. dysgalactiae infection in animals. To identify the conserved B-cell epitope of S. dysgalactiae GapC, a mouse monoclonal antibody 1E11 (mAb1E11) against GapC was generated and used to screen a phage-displayed 12-mer random peptide library (Ph.D.-12). Eleven positive clones recognized by mAb1E11 were identified, most of which matched the consensus motif TGFFAKK. Sequence of the motif exactly matched amino acids 97-103 of the S. dysgalactiae GapC. In addition, the epitope (97)TGFFAKK(103) showed high homology among different streptococcus species. Site-directed mutagenic analysis further confirmed that residues G98, F99, F100 and K103 formed the core of (97)TGFFAKK(103), and this core motif was the minimal determinant of the B-cell epitope recognized by the mAb1E11. Collectively, the identification of conserved B-cell epitope within S. dysgalactiae GapC highlights the possibility of developing the epitope-based vaccine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Recombinant Protein Containing B-Cell Epitopes of Different Loxosceles Spider Toxins Generates Neutralizing Antibodies in Immunized Rabbits

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    Sabrina de Almeida Lima

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Loxoscelism is the most important form of araneism in South America. The treatment of these accidents uses heterologous antivenoms obtained from immunization of production animals with crude loxoscelic venom. Due to the scarcity of this immunogen, new alternatives for its substitution in antivenom production are of medical interest. In the present work, three linear epitopes for Loxosceles astacin-like protease 1 (LALP-1 (SLGRGCTDFGTILHE, ENNTRTIGPFDYDSIMLYGAY, and KLYKCPPVNPYPGGIRPYVNV and two for hyaluronidase (LiHYAL (NGGIPQLGDLKAHLEKSAVDI and ILDKSATGLRIIDWEAWR from Loxosceles intermedia spider venom were identified by SPOT-synthesis technique. One formerly characterized linear epitope (DFSGPYLPSLPTLDA of sphingomyelinase D (SMase D SMase-I from Loxosceles laeta was also chosen to constitute a new recombinant multiepitopic protein. These epitopes were combined with a previously produced chimeric multiepitopic protein (rCpLi composed by linear and conformational B-cell epitopes from SMase D from L. intermedia venom, generating a new recombinant multiepitopic protein derived from loxoscelic toxins (rMEPLox. We demonstrated that rMEPLox is non-toxic and antibodies elicited in rabbits against this antigen present reactivity in ELISA and immunoblot assays with Brazilian L. intermedia, L. laeta, L. gaucho, and L. similis spider venoms. In vivo and in vitro neutralization assays showed that anti-rMEPLox antibodies can efficiently neutralize the sphingomyelinase, hyaluronidase, and metalloproteinase activity of L. intermedia venom. This study suggests that this multiepitopic protein can be a suitable candidate for experimental vaccination approaches or for antivenom production against Loxosceles spp. venoms.

  7. Allergen and Epitope Targets of Mouse-Specific T Cell Responses in Allergy and Asthma

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    Véronique Schulten

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Mouse allergy has become increasingly common, mainly affecting laboratory workers and inner-city households. To date, only one major allergen, namely Mus m 1, has been described. We sought to identify T cell targets in mouse allergic patients. PBMC from allergic donors were expanded with either murine urine or epithelial extract and subsequently screened for cytokine production (IL-5 and IFNγ in response to overlapping peptides spanning the entire Mus m 1 sequence, peptides from various Mus m 1 isoforms [major urinary proteins (MUPs], peptides from mouse orthologs of known allergens from other mammalian species and peptides from proteins identified by immunoproteomic analysis of IgE/IgG immunoblots of mouse urine and epithelial extracts. This approach let to the identification of 106 non-redundant T cell epitopes derived from 35 antigens. Three major T cell-activating regions were defined in Mus m 1 alone. Moreover, our data show that immunodominant epitopes were largely shared between Mus m 1 and other MUPs even from different species, suggesting that sequence conservation in different allergens is a determinant for immunodominance. We further identified several novel mouse T cell antigens based on their homology to known mammalian allergens. Analysis of cohort-specific T cell responses revealed that rhinitis and asthmatic patients recognized different epitope repertoires. Epitopes defined herein can be formulated into an epitope “megapool” used to diagnose mouse allergy and study mouse-specific T cell responses directly ex vivo. This analysis of T cell epitopes provides a good basis for future studies to increase our understanding of the immunopathology associated with MO-allergy and asthma.

  8. Generation and characterization of recombinant human antibodies specific for native laminin epitopes. Potential application in cancer therapy. Cancer Immunol. Immunother

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanz, Laura; Kristensen, Peter; Russell, Stephen J.

    2001-01-01

    indicated that these antibodies recognize the native protein through conformational epitopes. All of them reduced tumor cell attachment to laminin, suggesting that domains of the laminin molecule that are recognized by these antibodies likely bind to cell-surface receptors. The antibody fragments bind...... to mouse, rat and human laminin. and show strong immunohistochemical reactivity with basement membranes in human and murine tissue sections. Their properties make them ideal candidates for in vivo applications....... of single chain antibodies was selected using intact mouse laminin, and five different clones were identified. All the antibodies were specific for their cognate antigen, as revealed by lack of cross-reactivity with other components of the basement membranes. A more extensive characterization of the panel...

  9. Association analysis of anti-Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 antibodies, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, the shared epitope and smoking status in Brazilian patients with rheumatoid arthritis

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    Michel Alexandre Yazbek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Epstein-Barr virus exposure appears to be an environmental trigger for rheumatoid arthritis that interacts with other risk factors. Relationships among anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, the shared epitope, and smoking status have been observed in patients with rheumatoid arthritis from different populations. OBJECTIVE: To perform an association analysis of anti-Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 antibodies, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, the shared epitope, and smoking status in Brazilian patients with rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS: In a case-control study, 140 rheumatoid arthritis patients and 143 healthy volunteers who were matched for age, sex, and ethnicity were recruited. Anti-Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 antibodies and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies were examined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and shared epitope alleles were identified by genotyping. Smoking information was collected from all subjects. A comparative analysis of anti-Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 antibodies, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, the shared epitope, and smoking status was performed in the patient group. Logistic regression analysis models were used to analyze the risk of rheumatoid arthritis. RESULTS: Anti-Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 antibodies were not associated with anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, shared epitope alleles, or smoking status. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody positivity was significantly higher in smoking patients with shared epitope alleles (OR = 3.82. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis using stepwise selection, only anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies were found to be independently associated with rheumatoid arthritis (OR = 247.9. CONCLUSION: Anti-Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 antibodies did not increase the risk of rheumatoid arthritis and were not associated with the rheumatoid arthritis risk factors studied. Smoking

  10. Structural basis of differential neutralization of DENV-1 genotypes by an antibody that recognizes a cryptic epitope.

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    S Kyle Austin

    Full Text Available We previously developed a panel of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against Dengue virus (DENV-1, of which few exhibited inhibitory activity against all DENV-1 genotypes. This finding is consistent with reports observing variable neutralization of different DENV strains and genotypes using serum from individuals that experienced natural infection or immunization. Herein, we describe the crystal structures of DENV1-E111 bound to a novel CC' loop epitope on domain III (DIII of the E protein from two different DENV-1 genotypes. Docking of our structure onto the available cryo-electron microscopy models of DENV virions revealed that the DENV1-E111 epitope was inaccessible, suggesting that this antibody recognizes an uncharacterized virus conformation. While the affinity of binding between DENV1-E111 and DIII varied by genotype, we observed limited correlation with inhibitory activity. Instead, our results support the conclusion that potent neutralization depends on genotype-dependent exposure of the CC' loop epitope. These findings establish new structural complexity of the DENV virion, which may be relevant for the choice of DENV strain for induction or analysis of neutralizing antibodies in the context of vaccine development.

  11. Schistosoma mansoni Infection of Mice, Rats and Humans Elicits a Strong Antibody Response to a Limited Number of Reduction-Sensitive Epitopes on Five Major Tegumental Membrane Proteins.

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    Greice Krautz-Peterson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a major disease of the developing world for which no vaccine has been successfully commercialized. While numerous Schistosoma mansoni worm antigens have been identified that elicit antibody responses during natural infections, little is known as to the identities of the schistosome antigens that are most prominently recognized by antibodies generated through natural infection. Non-reducing western blots probed with serum from schistosome-infected mice, rats and humans on total extracts of larval or adult schistosomes revealed that a small number of antigen bands predominate in all cases. Recognition of each of these major bands was lost when the blots were run under reducing condition. We expressed a rationally selected group of schistosome tegumental membrane antigens in insect host cells, and used the membrane extracts of these cells to unambiguously identify the major antigens recognized by S. mansoni infected mouse, rat and human serum. These results revealed that a limited number of dominant, reduction-sensitive conformational epitopes on five major tegumental surface membrane proteins: SmTsp2, Sm23, Sm29, SmLy6B and SmLy6F, are primary targets of mouse, rat and human S. mansoni infection sera antibodies. We conclude that, Schistosoma mansoni infection of both permissive (mouse and non-permissive (rat rodent models, as well as humans, elicit a dominant antibody response recognizing a limited number of conformational epitopes on the same five tegumental membrane proteins. Thus it appears that neither infecting schistosomula nor mature adult schistosomes are substantively impacted by the robust circulating anti-tegumental antibody response they elicit to these antigens. Importantly, our data suggest a need to re-evaluate host immune responses to many schistosome antigens and has important implications regarding schistosome immune evasion mechanisms and schistosomiasis vaccine development.

  12. The gp41659 - 671 HIV-1 antibody epitope: a structurally challenging small peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan; Sagui, Celeste

    2014-03-01

    We present the results of extensive Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of the tridecapeptide corresponding to residues 659-671 of the envelope glycoprotein gp41 of HIV-1, which spans the 2F5 monoclonal antibody epitope ELDKWA. The most recent AMBER force fields ff99SB and ff12SB in both implicit and explicit solvents have been used for a cumulative time longer than 7.2 μs . We have analyzed the conformational ensembles of the peptide both with and without applied tensile restraints, and found that: (1) The amount of helical populations is important in aqueous solution, but this structure forms part of a flexible conformational ensemble with a rugged free energy landscape with shallow minima, which agrees well with the bulk of the experimental observations; (2) our results are more consistent with the experimental results than those from previous simulations; (3) under uniaxial tension, the disordered peptide first becomes fully helical before melting into turns, loops and 310-helices.

  13. Rat monoclonal antibody distribution in mice: an epitope inside the lung vascular space mediates very efficient localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennel, S.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Lee, Ray (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (USA)); Bultman, Scott (Tennessee Univ., Oak Ridge, TN (USA). Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences); Kabalka, George (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA). Biomedical Imaging Center)

    1990-01-01

    MoAb to an epitope on lung endothelial cells accumulates rapidly in the lung resulting in localization ratios of over 100. MoAb to a macrophage antigen found in spleen and lung has maximum localization ratios of 24 and 5, respectively, while MoAb specific for a human tumor grown in nude mice has a maximum ratio of about 4. Epitope concentrations in target organs (300-600 ng/mg protein) are comparable in all three systems, indicating that the MoAb to endothelium is efficient in localization to the lung. (author).

  14. Production, Characterization, and Epitope Mapping of Monoclonal Antibodies Against Different Subtypes of Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus (RHDV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Desheng; Liu, Jiasen; Jiang, Qian; Yu, Zuo; Hu, Xiaoliang; Guo, Dongchun; Huang, Qianqian; Jiao, Meihui; Qu, Liandong

    2016-02-16

    In 2010, a new rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) variant, designated RHDV2, was identified for the first time in Italy. Studies have shown that RHDV2 differs from RHDV1 (traditional RHDV) in terms of its antigenic profile and genetic characteristics. The VP60 protein of RHDV is a structural protein that plays important roles in viral replication, assembly, and immunogenicity. In this study, we immunized BALB/c mice with recombinant VP60 proteins from different RHDV subtypes. After three rounds of subcloning, type-specific positive hybridoma clones of RHDV1 and RHDV2 were further identified by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blotting, and an indirect immunofluorescence assay. Finally, three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) (1D6, 1H2, and 3F2) that only recognize RHDV1, and four MAbs (1G2, 2C1, 3B7, and 5D6) that only recognize RHDV2 were identified. The epitopes recognized by these MAbs were mapped by Western blotting. Sequence analysis showed that the epitope sequences recognized by 1D6, 1H2, and 3F2 are highly conserved (98%) among RHDV1 strains, whereas the epitope sequences recognized by 1G2, 2C1, 3B7, and 5D6 are 100% conserved among RHDV2 strains. The high conservation of the epitope sequence showed that the screened MAbs were type-specific, and that they could distinguish different RHDV subtypes.

  15. Use of epitope libraries to identify exon-specific monoclonal antibodies for characterization of altered dystrophins in muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen thi Man; Morris, G.E. (North East Wales Inst., Clwyd (United Kingdom))

    1993-06-01

    The majority of mutations in Xp21-linked muscular dystrophy (MD) can be identified by PCR or Southern blotting, as deletions or duplications of groups of exons in the dystrophin gene, but it is not always possible to predict how much altered dystrophin, if any, will be produced. Use of exon-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) on muscle biopsies from MD patients can, in principle, provide information on both the amount of altered dystrophin produced and, when dystrophin is present, the nature of the genetic deletion or point mutation. For this purpose, mAbs which recognize regions of dystrophin encoded by known exons and whose binding is unaffected by the absence of adjacent exons are required. To map mAbs to specific exons, random [open quotes]libraries[close quotes] of expressed dystrophin fragments were created by cloning DNAseI digestion fragments of a 4.3-kb dystrophin cDNA into a pTEX expression vector. The libraries were then used to locate the epitopes recognized by 48 mAbs to fragments of 25--60 amino acids within the 1,434-amino-acid dystrophin fragment used to produce the antibodies. This is sufficiently detailed to allow further refinement by using synthetic peptides and, in many cases, to identify the exon in the DMD (Duchenne MD) gene which encodes the epitope. To illustrate their use in dystrophin analysis, a Duchenne patient with a frameshift deletion of exons 42 and 43 makes a truncated dystrophin encoded by exons 1--41, and the authors now show that this can be detected in the sarcolemma by mAbs up to and including those specific for exon 41 epitopes but not by mAbs specific for exon 43 or later epitopes. 38 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Characterization of epitope-specific anti-RSV antibody responses after natural infection and after vaccination with formalin-inactivated RSV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widjaja, Ivy; Wicht, Oliver; Luytjes, Willem; Leenhouts, Kees; Rottier, Peter J M; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Haijema, Bert Jan; de Haan, Cornelis A M

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies against the fusion (F) protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) play an important role in the protective immune response against this important respiratory virus. Little is known, however, about antibody levels against multiple F-specific epitopes induced by infection or after

  17. Generation of human antibody fragments recognizing distinct epitopes of the nucleocapsid (N SARS-CoV protein using a phage display approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grasso Felicia

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV is a newly emerging virus that causes SARS with high mortality rate in infected people. Successful control of the global SARS epidemic will require rapid and sensitive diagnostic tests to monitor its spread, as well as, the development of vaccines and new antiviral compounds including neutralizing antibodies that effectively prevent or treat this disease. Methods The human synthetic single-chain fragment variable (scFv ETH-2 phage antibody library was used for the isolation of scFvs against the nucleocapsid (N protein of SARS-CoV using a bio panning-based strategy. The selected scFvs were characterized under genetics-molecular aspects and for SARS-CoV N protein detection in ELISA, western blotting and immunocytochemistry. Results Human scFv antibodies to N protein of SARS-CoV can be easily isolated by selecting the ETH-2 phage library on immunotubes coated with antigen. These in vitro selected human scFvs specifically recognize in ELISA and western blotting studies distinct epitopes in N protein domains and detect in immunohistochemistry investigations SARS-CoV particles in infected Vero cells. Conclusion The human scFv antibodies isolated and described in this study represent useful reagents for rapid detection of N SARS-CoV protein and SARS virus particles in infected target cells.

  18. Generation of human antibody fragments recognizing distinct epitopes of the nucleocapsid (N) SARS-CoV protein using a phage display approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flego, Michela; Di Bonito, Paola; Ascione, Alessandro; Zamboni, Silvia; Carattoli, Alessandra; Grasso, Felicia; Cassone, Antonio; Cianfriglia, Maurizio

    2005-01-01

    Background Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-CoV is a newly emerging virus that causes SARS with high mortality rate in infected people. Successful control of the global SARS epidemic will require rapid and sensitive diagnostic tests to monitor its spread, as well as, the development of vaccines and new antiviral compounds including neutralizing antibodies that effectively prevent or treat this disease. Methods The human synthetic single-chain fragment variable (scFv) ETH-2 phage antibody library was used for the isolation of scFvs against the nucleocapsid (N) protein of SARS-CoV using a bio panning-based strategy. The selected scFvs were characterized under genetics-molecular aspects and for SARS-CoV N protein detection in ELISA, western blotting and immunocytochemistry. Results Human scFv antibodies to N protein of SARS-CoV can be easily isolated by selecting the ETH-2 phage library on immunotubes coated with antigen. These in vitro selected human scFvs specifically recognize in ELISA and western blotting studies distinct epitopes in N protein domains and detect in immunohistochemistry investigations SARS-CoV particles in infected Vero cells. Conclusion The human scFv antibodies isolated and described in this study represent useful reagents for rapid detection of N SARS-CoV protein and SARS virus particles in infected target cells. PMID:16171519

  19. Generation of human scFvs antibodies recognizing a prion protein epitope expressed on the surface of human lymphoblastoid cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imperiale Valentina

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A hallmark of prion disease is the transformation of normal cellular prion protein (PrPc into an infectious disease-associated isoform, (PrPsc. Anti-prion protein monoclonal antibodies are invaluable for structure-function studies of PrP molecules. Furthermore recent in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that anti-PrP monoclonal antibodies can prevent the incorporation of PrPc into propagating prions. In the present article, we show two new human phage antibodies, isolated on recombinant hamster prion protein (rHaPrP. Results We adopted an antibody phage display strategy to isolate specific human antibodies directed towards rHaPrP which has been used as a bait for panning the synthetic ETH-2 antibody phage library. Two phage antibodies clones named MA3.B4 and MA3.G3 were isolated and characterized under genetic biochemical and immunocytochemical aspects. The clones were found to recognize the prion protein in ELISA studies. In flow-cytometry studies, these human single chain Fragment variable (scFv phage-antibodies show a well defined pattern of reactivity on human lymphoblastoid and myeloid cells. Conclusion Sequence analysis of the gene encoding for the antibody fragments and antigen recognition patterns determined by flow-cytometry analysis indicate that the isolated scFvs recognize novel epitopes in the PrPc molecule. These new anti PrPc human antibodies are unique reagents for prion protein detection and may represent a biologic platform to develop new reagents to treat PrPsc associated disease.

  20. Generation of human scFvs antibodies recognizing a prion protein epitope expressed on the surface of human lymphoblastoid cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flego, Michela; Ascione, Alessandro; Zamboni, Silvia; Dupuis, Maria L; Imperiale, Valentina; Cianfriglia, Maurizio

    2007-01-01

    Background A hallmark of prion disease is the transformation of normal cellular prion protein (PrPc) into an infectious disease-associated isoform, (PrPsc). Anti-prion protein monoclonal antibodies are invaluable for structure-function studies of PrP molecules. Furthermore recent in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that anti-PrP monoclonal antibodies can prevent the incorporation of PrPc into propagating prions. In the present article, we show two new human phage antibodies, isolated on recombinant hamster prion protein (rHaPrP). Results We adopted an antibody phage display strategy to isolate specific human antibodies directed towards rHaPrP which has been used as a bait for panning the synthetic ETH-2 antibody phage library. Two phage antibodies clones named MA3.B4 and MA3.G3 were isolated and characterized under genetic biochemical and immunocytochemical aspects. The clones were found to recognize the prion protein in ELISA studies. In flow-cytometry studies, these human single chain Fragment variable (scFv) phage-antibodies show a well defined pattern of reactivity on human lymphoblastoid and myeloid cells. Conclusion Sequence analysis of the gene encoding for the antibody fragments and antigen recognition patterns determined by flow-cytometry analysis indicate that the isolated scFvs recognize novel epitopes in the PrPc molecule. These new anti PrPc human antibodies are unique reagents for prion protein detection and may represent a biologic platform to develop new reagents to treat PrPsc associated disease. PMID:17605808

  1. Nanobodies targeting norovirus capsid reveal functional epitopes and potential mechanisms of neutralization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna D Koromyslova

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Norovirus is the leading cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. Despite recent developments in norovirus propagation in cell culture, these viruses are still challenging to grow routinely. Moreover, little is known on how norovirus infects the host cells, except that histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs are important binding factors for infection and cell entry. Antibodies that bind at the HBGA pocket and block attachment to HBGAs are believed to neutralize the virus. However, additional neutralization epitopes elsewhere on the capsid likely exist and impeding the intrinsic structural dynamics of the capsid could be equally important. In the current study, we investigated a panel of Nanobodies in order to probe functional epitopes that could trigger capsid rearrangement and/ or interfere with HBGA binding interactions. The precise binding sites of six Nanobodies (Nano-4, Nano-14, Nano-26, Nano-27, Nano-32, and Nano-42 were identified using X-ray crystallography. We showed that these Nanobodies bound on the top, side, and bottom of the norovirus protruding domain. The impact of Nanobody binding on norovirus capsid morphology was analyzed using electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. We discovered that distinct Nanobody epitopes were associated with varied changes in particle structural integrity and assembly. Interestingly, certain Nanobody-induced capsid morphological changes lead to the capsid protein degradation and viral RNA exposure. Moreover, Nanobodies employed multiple inhibition mechanisms to prevent norovirus attachment to HBGAs, which included steric obstruction (Nano-14, allosteric interference (Nano-32, and violation of normal capsid morphology (Nano-26 and Nano-85. Finally, we showed that two Nanobodies (Nano-26 and Nano-85 not only compromised capsid integrity and inhibited VLPs attachment to HBGAs, but also recognized a broad panel of norovirus genotypes with high affinities. Consequently, Nano-26 and Nano-85 have a great

  2. Nanobodies targeting norovirus capsid reveal functional epitopes and potential mechanisms of neutralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Norovirus is the leading cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. Despite recent developments in norovirus propagation in cell culture, these viruses are still challenging to grow routinely. Moreover, little is known on how norovirus infects the host cells, except that histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) are important binding factors for infection and cell entry. Antibodies that bind at the HBGA pocket and block attachment to HBGAs are believed to neutralize the virus. However, additional neutralization epitopes elsewhere on the capsid likely exist and impeding the intrinsic structural dynamics of the capsid could be equally important. In the current study, we investigated a panel of Nanobodies in order to probe functional epitopes that could trigger capsid rearrangement and/ or interfere with HBGA binding interactions. The precise binding sites of six Nanobodies (Nano-4, Nano-14, Nano-26, Nano-27, Nano-32, and Nano-42) were identified using X-ray crystallography. We showed that these Nanobodies bound on the top, side, and bottom of the norovirus protruding domain. The impact of Nanobody binding on norovirus capsid morphology was analyzed using electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. We discovered that distinct Nanobody epitopes were associated with varied changes in particle structural integrity and assembly. Interestingly, certain Nanobody-induced capsid morphological changes lead to the capsid protein degradation and viral RNA exposure. Moreover, Nanobodies employed multiple inhibition mechanisms to prevent norovirus attachment to HBGAs, which included steric obstruction (Nano-14), allosteric interference (Nano-32), and violation of normal capsid morphology (Nano-26 and Nano-85). Finally, we showed that two Nanobodies (Nano-26 and Nano-85) not only compromised capsid integrity and inhibited VLPs attachment to HBGAs, but also recognized a broad panel of norovirus genotypes with high affinities. Consequently, Nano-26 and Nano-85 have a great potential to

  3. C595 antibody: A potential vector for targeted alpha therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, A.C.; Allen, B.J.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Mucins are high molecular-weight heavily glycosylated glycoproteins with many oligosaccharide side-chains, linked to a protein backbone called apomucin. A total of 19 different mucin genes (MUC1-MUC4, MUC5B, MUC5AC, MUC6-MUC18) have been identified to date. Mucins are present on the surface of most epithelial cells and play a role in their protection and lubrication. In cancer cells the mucin molecule becomes altered, thus representing an important target for diagnosis and therapy. Urinary epithelial mucin1 (MUC1) is found to be frequently up-regulated and abnormally glycosylated in a number of common malignancies, including breast, bladder, colon, ovarian and gastric cancer. The monoclonal antibody C595 is an IgG3 murine MAb raised against the protein core of human MUC1. Epitope mapping has shown that C595 recognizes a tetrapeptide motif (RPAP) within the protein core of MUC1 mucin that contains a large domain of multiples of a highly conserved 20-amino-acid-repeat sequence (PDTRPAPGSTAPPAHGVTSA). This antibody has previously been radiolabelled with 99m Tc and 111 In and used for imaging a range of tumour types including ovary, breast and bladder. The antibody has also been radiolabelled with 67 Cu and 188 Re for the therapy of superficial bladder cancer. More recently we have investigated the pre-clinical use of the C595 antibody for targeted alpha therapy using 213 Bi which emits alpha particles with high linear energy transfer (LET), short range (80 m) radiation and has a short physical half-life of 45.6 minutes. Alpha particles are some 7300 times heavier than beta particles and in theory, following binding of an alpha immunocongugates to the target, a large fraction of the alpha particle energy is delivered to cancer cells, with minimal concomitant radiation of normal tissues. 213 Bi was produced from the 225 Ac/ 213 Bi generator. For antibody conjugation the chelator, cyclic diethylenetriaminepentacetic acid anhydride (DTPA) was used. Initial

  4. Structures of phlebovirus glycoprotein Gn and identification of a neutralizing antibody epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Zhu, Yaohua; Gao, Feng; Jiao, Yongjun; Oladejo, Babayemi O; Chai, Yan; Bi, Yuhai; Lu, Shan; Dong, Mengqiu; Zhang, Chang; Huang, Guangmei; Wong, Gary; Li, Na; Zhang, Yanfang; Li, Yan; Feng, Wen-Hai; Shi, Yi; Liang, Mifang; Zhang, Rongguang; Qi, Jianxun; Gao, George F

    2017-09-05

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) and Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) are two arthropod-borne phleboviruses in the Bunyaviridae family, which cause severe illness in humans and animals. Glycoprotein N (Gn) is one of the envelope proteins on the virus surface and is a major antigenic component. Despite its importance for virus entry and fusion, the molecular features of the phleboviruse Gn were unknown. Here, we present the crystal structures of the Gn head domain from both SFTSV and RVFV, which display a similar compact triangular shape overall, while the three subdomains (domains I, II, and III) making up the Gn head display different arrangements. Ten cysteines in the Gn stem region are conserved among phleboviruses, four of which are responsible for Gn dimerization, as revealed in this study, and they are highly conserved for all members in Bunyaviridae Therefore, we propose an anchoring mode on the viral surface. The complex structure of the SFTSV Gn head and human neutralizing antibody MAb 4-5 reveals that helices α6 in subdomain III is the key component for neutralization. Importantly, the structure indicates that domain III is an ideal region recognized by specific neutralizing antibodies, while domain II is probably recognized by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Collectively, Gn is a desirable vaccine target, and our data provide a molecular basis for the rational design of vaccines against the diseases caused by phleboviruses and a model for bunyavirus Gn embedding on the viral surface.

  5. Targeting the autolysis loop of urokinase-type plasminogen activator with conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botkjaer, Kenneth A; Fogh, Sarah; Bekes, Erin C; Chen, Zhuo; Blouse, Grant E; Jensen, Janni M; Mortensen, Kim K; Huang, Mingdong; Deryugina, Elena; Quigley, James P; Declerck, Paul J; Andreasen, Peter A

    2011-08-15

    Tight regulation of serine proteases is essential for their physiological function, and unbalanced states of protease activity have been implicated in a variety of human diseases. One key example is the presence of uPA (urokinase-type plasminogen activator) in different human cancer types, with high levels correlating with a poor prognosis. This observation has stimulated efforts into finding new principles for intervening with uPA's activity. In the present study we characterize the so-called autolysis loop in the catalytic domain of uPA as a potential inhibitory target. This loop was found to harbour the epitopes for three conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies, two with a preference for the zymogen form pro-uPA, and one with a preference for active uPA. All three antibodies were shown to have overlapping epitopes, with three common residues being crucial for all three antibodies, demonstrating a direct link between conformational changes of the autolysis loop and the creation of a catalytically mature active site. All three antibodies are potent inhibitors of uPA activity, the two pro-uPA-specific ones by inhibiting conversion of pro-uPA to active uPA and the active uPA-specific antibody by shielding the access of plasminogen to the active site. Furthermore, using immunofluorescence, the conformation-specific antibodies mAb-112 and mAb-12E6B10 enabled us to selectively stain pro-uPA or active uPA on the surface of cultured cells. Moreover, in various independent model systems, the antibodies inhibited tumour cell invasion and dissemination, providing evidence for the feasibility of pharmaceutical intervention with serine protease activity by targeting surface loops that undergo conformational changes during zymogen activation. © The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 Biochemical Society

  6. Identification of a defined linear epitope in the OspA protein of the Lyme disease spirochetes that elicits bactericidal antibody responses: Implications for vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izac, Jerilyn R; Oliver, Lee D; Earnhart, Christopher G; Marconi, Richard T

    2017-05-31

    The lipoprotein OspA is produced by the Lyme disease spirochetes primarily in unfed ticks. OspA production is down-regulated by the blood meal and it is not produced in mammals except for possible transient production during late stage infection in patients with Lyme arthritis. Vaccination with OspA elicits antibody (Ab) that can target spirochetes in the tick midgut during feeding and inhibit transmission to mammals. OspA was the primary component of the human LYMErix™ vaccine. LYMErix™ was available from 1998 to 2002 but then pulled from the market due to declining sales as a result of unsubstantiated concerns about vaccination induced adverse events and poor efficacy. It was postulated that a segment of OspA that shares sequence similarity with a region in human LFA-1 and may trigger putative autoimmune events. While evidence supporting such a link has not been demonstrated, most efforts to move forward with OspA as a vaccine component have sought to eliminate this region of concern. Here we identify an OspA linear epitope localized within OspA amino acid residues 221-240 (OspA 221-240 ) that lacks the OspA region suggested to elicit autoimmunity. A peptide consisting of residues 221-240 was immunogenic in mice. Ab raised against OspA 221-240 peptide surface labeled B. burgdorferi in IFAs and displayed potent Ab mediated-complement dependent bactericidal activity. BLAST analyses identified several variants of OspA 221-240 and a closely related sequence in OspB. It is our hypothesis that integration of the OspA 221-240 epitope into a multivalent-OspC based chimeric epitope based vaccine antigen (chimeritope) could result in a subunit vaccine that protects against Lyme disease through synergistic mechanisms. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Antibody recognition of cathepsin L1-derived peptides in Fasciola hepatica-infected and/or vaccinated cattle and identification of protective linear B-cell epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza-Cuartero, Laura; Geurden, Thomas; Mahan, Suman M; Hardham, John M; Dalton, John P; Mulcahy, Grace

    2018-02-08

    Fasciola hepatica infection causes important economic losses in livestock and food industries around the world. In the Republic of Ireland F. hepatica infection has an 76% prevalence in cattle. Due to the increase of anti-helminthic resistance, a vaccine-based approach to control of Fasciolosis is urgently needed. A recombinant version of the cysteine protease cathepsin L1 (rmFhCL1) from F. hepatica has been a vaccine candidate for many years. We have found that vaccination of cattle with this immunodominant antigen has provided protection against infection in some experimental trials, but not in others. Differential epitope recognition between animals could be a source of variable levels of vaccine protection. Therefore, we have characterised for first time linear B-cell epitopes recognised within the FhCL1 protein using sera from F. hepatica-infected and/or vaccinated cattle from two independent trials. Results showed that all F. hepatica infected animals recognised the region 19-31 of FhCL1, which is situated in the N-terminal part of the pro-peptide. Vaccinated animals that showed fluke burden reduction elicited antibodies that bound to the regions 120-137, 145-155, 161-171 of FhCL1, which were not recognised by non-protected animals. This data, together with the high production of specific IgG2 in animals showing vaccine efficacy, suggest important targets for vaccine development. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Identification of a novel linear B-cell epitope using a monoclonal antibody against the carboxy terminus of the canine distemper virus nucleoprotein and sequence analysis of the identified epitope in different CDV isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Li; Cao, Zhigang; Tong, Mingwei; Cheng, Yuening; Yang, Yong; Li, Shuang; Wang, Jianke; Lin, Peng; Sun, Yaru; Zhang, Miao; Cheng, Shipeng

    2017-09-29

    The Nucleoprotein (NP) is the most abundant and highly immunogenic protein in canine distemper virus (CDV), playing an important role in CDV viral replication and assembly. In this study, a specific monoclonal antibody, named C8, was produced against the NP protein C terminal (amino acids 401-523). A linear N protein epitope was identified by subjecting a series of partially overlapping synthesized peptides to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis.The results indicated that 444 GDKYPIHFNDER 455 was the minimal linear epitope that could be recognized by mAb C8. Sequence alignments demonstrated that this linear epitope is less conserved among three CDV genotypes. We next analyzed the level of conservation of the defined epitope in19 Chinese CDV clinical isolates, and it has one site variation in amino acid among these CDV isolations. 2 isolates have the amino acid mutations F451L, while one has P448Ssubstitution.Phylogenetic analysis showed the two isolates with F451Lsubstitution had a closer relationship in a virulent strain ZJ-7, so the epitope may be a significant tag associated with virus virulence. This collection of mAb along with defined linear epitope may provide useful reagents for investigations of NP protein function and the development of CDV specific diagnostics.

  9. Aberrantly glycosylated MUC1 is expressed on the surface of breast cancer cells and a target for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrsen, Kirstine; Madsen, Caroline B; Rasch, Morten G

    2013-01-01

    not covered by immunological tolerance in MUC1 humanized mice and man. The objective of this study was to determine if mouse antibodies to this Tn-MUC1 epitope induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) pivotal for their potential use in cancer immunotherapy. Binding affinity of mAb 5E5 directed...... to Tn-MUC1 was investigated using BiaCore. The availability of Tn-MUC1 on the surface of breast cancer cells was evaluated by immunohistochemistry, confocal microscopy, and flow cytometry, followed by in vitro assessment of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity by mAb 5E5. Biacore analysis...... is expressed on the surface of breast cancer cells and a target for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity suggesting that antibodies targeting glycopeptide epitopes on mucins are strong candidates for cancer-specific immunotherapies....

  10. Evaluation of a novel multi-immunogen vaccine strategy for targeting 4E10/10E8 neutralizing epitopes on HIV-1 gp41 membrane proximal external region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Saikat; Shi, Heliang; Banasik, Marisa; Moon, Hojin; Lees, William; Qin, Yali; Harley, Andrew; Shepherd, Adrian; Cho, Michael W

    2017-05-01

    The membrane proximal external region (MPER) of HIV-1 gp41 is targeted by broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) 4E10 and 10E8. In this proof-of-concept study, we evaluated a novel multi-immunogen vaccine strategy referred to as Incremental, Phased Antigenic Stimulation for Rapid Antibody Maturation (IPAS-RAM) to induce 4E10/10E8-like bnAbs. Rabbits were immunized sequentially, but in a phased manner, with three immunogens that are progressively more native (gp41-28×3, gp41-54CT, and rVV-gp160 DH12 ). Although nAbs were not induced, epitope-mapping analyses indicated that IPAS-RAM vaccination was better able to target antibodies towards the 4E10/10E8 epitopes than homologous prime-boost immunization using gp41-28×3 alone. MPER-specific rabbit monoclonal antibodies were generated, including 9F6. Although it lacked neutralizing activity, the target epitope profile of 9F6 closely resembled those of 4E10 and 10E8 ( 671 NWFDITNWLWYIK 683 ). B-cell repertoire analyses suggested the importance of co-immunizations for maturation of 9F6, which warrants further evaluation of our IPAS-RAM vaccine strategy using an improved priming immunogen. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A Conserved Epitope Mapped with a Monoclonal Antibody against the VP3 Protein of Goose Parvovirus by Using Peptide Screening and Phage Display Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenxi; Liu, Hongyu; Li, Jinzhe; Liu, Dafei; Meng, Runze; Zhang, Qingshan; Shaozhou, Wulin; Bai, Xiaofei; Zhang, Tingting; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Waterfowl parvovirus (WPV) infection causes high mortality and morbidity in both geese (Anser anser) and Muscovy ducks (Cairina moschata), resulting in significant losses to the waterfowl industries. The VP3 protein of WPV is a major structural protein that induces neutralizing antibodies in the waterfowl. However, B-cell epitopes on the VP3 protein of WPV have not been characterized. To understand the antigenic determinants of the VP3 protein, we used the monoclonal antibody (mAb) 4A6 to screen a set of eight partially expressed overlapping peptides spanning VP3. Using western blotting and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), we localized the VP3 epitope between amino acids (aa) 57 and 112. To identify the essential epitope residues, a phage library displaying 12-mer random peptides was screened with mAb 4A6. Phage clone peptides displayed a consensus sequence of YxRFHxH that mimicked the sequence 82Y/FNRFHCH88, which corresponded to amino acid residues 82 to 88 of VP3 protein of WPVs. mAb 4A6 binding to biotinylated fragments corresponding to amino acid residues 82 to 88 of the VP3 protein verified that the 82FxRFHxH88 was the VP3 epitope and that amino acids 82F is necessary to retain maximal binding to mAb 4A6. Parvovirus-positive goose and duck sera reacted with the epitope peptide by dot blotting assay, revealing the importance of these amino acids of the epitope in antibody-epitope binding reactivity. We identified the motif FxRFHxH as a VP3-specific B-cell epitope that is recognized by the neutralizing mAb 4A6. This finding might be valuable in understanding of the antigenic topology of VP3 of WPV.

  12. A Conserved Epitope Mapped with a Monoclonal Antibody against the VP3 Protein of Goose Parvovirus by Using Peptide Screening and Phage Display Approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenxi Li

    Full Text Available Waterfowl parvovirus (WPV infection causes high mortality and morbidity in both geese (Anser anser and Muscovy ducks (Cairina moschata, resulting in significant losses to the waterfowl industries. The VP3 protein of WPV is a major structural protein that induces neutralizing antibodies in the waterfowl. However, B-cell epitopes on the VP3 protein of WPV have not been characterized.To understand the antigenic determinants of the VP3 protein, we used the monoclonal antibody (mAb 4A6 to screen a set of eight partially expressed overlapping peptides spanning VP3. Using western blotting and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, we localized the VP3 epitope between amino acids (aa 57 and 112. To identify the essential epitope residues, a phage library displaying 12-mer random peptides was screened with mAb 4A6. Phage clone peptides displayed a consensus sequence of YxRFHxH that mimicked the sequence 82Y/FNRFHCH88, which corresponded to amino acid residues 82 to 88 of VP3 protein of WPVs. mAb 4A6 binding to biotinylated fragments corresponding to amino acid residues 82 to 88 of the VP3 protein verified that the 82FxRFHxH88 was the VP3 epitope and that amino acids 82F is necessary to retain maximal binding to mAb 4A6. Parvovirus-positive goose and duck sera reacted with the epitope peptide by dot blotting assay, revealing the importance of these amino acids of the epitope in antibody-epitope binding reactivity.We identified the motif FxRFHxH as a VP3-specific B-cell epitope that is recognized by the neutralizing mAb 4A6. This finding might be valuable in understanding of the antigenic topology of VP3 of WPV.

  13. Complete epitopes for vaccine design derived from a crystal structure of the broadly neutralizing antibodies PGT128 and 8ANC195 in complex with an HIV-1 Env trimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Leopold; Torrents de la Peña, Alba; Deller, Marc C; Garces, Fernando; Sliepen, Kwinten; Hua, Yuanzi; Stanfield, Robyn L; Sanders, Rogier W; Wilson, Ian A

    2015-10-01

    The HIV-1 envelope gp160 glycoprotein (Env) is a trimer of gp120 and gp41 heterodimers that mediates cell entry and is the primary target of the humoral immune response. Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) to HIV-1 have revealed multiple epitopes or sites of vulnerability, but mapping of most of these sites is incomplete owing to a paucity of structural information on the full epitope in the context of the Env trimer. Here, a crystal structure of the soluble BG505 SOSIP gp140 trimer at 4.6 Å resolution with the bNAbs 8ANC195 and PGT128 reveals additional interactions in comparison to previous antibody-gp120 structures. For 8ANC195, in addition to previously documented interactions with gp120, a substantial interface with gp41 is now elucidated that includes extensive interactions with the N637 glycan. Surprisingly, removal of the N637 glycan did not impact 8ANC195 affinity, suggesting that the antibody has evolved to accommodate this glycan without loss of binding energy. PGT128 indirectly affects the N262 glycan by a domino effect, in which PGT128 binds to the N301 glycan, which in turn interacts with and repositions the N262 glycan, thereby illustrating the important role of neighboring glycans on epitope conformation and stability. Comparisons with other Env trimer and gp120 structures support an induced conformation for glycan N262, suggesting that the glycan shield is allosterically modified upon PGT128 binding. These complete epitopes of two broadly neutralizing antibodies on the Env trimer can now be exploited for HIV-1 vaccine design.

  14. Immunogenicity of epitope vaccines targeting different B cell antigenic determinants of human α-synuclein: feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghochikyan, Anahit; Petrushina, Irina; Davtyan, Hayk; Hovakimyan, Armine; Saing, Tommy; Davtyan, Arpine; Cribbs, David H; Agadjanyan, Michael G

    2014-02-07

    Immunotherapeutic approaches reducing α-synuclein deposits may provide therapeutic benefit for Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB). Immunization with full-length human α-synuclein (hα-Syn) protein in a Parkinson's disease mouse model decreased the accumulation of the aggregated forms of this protein in neurons and reduced neurodegeneration. To enhance the immunogenicity of candidate vaccines and to avoid the risk of autoreactive anti-hα-Syn T-helper (Th) cell responses, we generated three peptide-based epitope vaccines composed of different B-cell epitopes of hα-Syn fused with a "non-self" Th epitope from tetanus toxin (P30). Immunization of mice with these epitope vaccines produced high titers of anti-hα-Syn antibodies that bound to Lewy bodies (LBs) and Lewy neurites (LNs) in brain tissue from DLB cases and induced robust Th cell responses to P30, but not to hα-Syn. Further development of these first generation epitope vaccines may facilitate induction of anti-hα-Syn immunotherapy without producing potentially harmful autoreactive Th cell responses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Human antibodies to the dengue virus E-dimer epitope have therapeutic activity against Zika virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Estefania; Dejnirattisai, Wanwisa; Cao, Bin; Scheaffer, Suzanne M; Supasa, Piyada; Wongwiwat, Wiyada; Esakky, Prabagaran; Drury, Andrea; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip; Moley, Kelle H; Mysorekar, Indira U; Screaton, Gavin R; Diamond, Michael S

    2017-11-01

    The Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic has resulted in congenital abnormalities in fetuses and neonates. Although some cross-reactive dengue virus (DENV)-specific antibodies can enhance ZIKV infection in mice, those recognizing the DENV E-dimer epitope (EDE) can neutralize ZIKV infection in cell culture. We evaluated the therapeutic activity of human monoclonal antibodies to DENV EDE for their ability to control ZIKV infection in the brains, testes, placentas, and fetuses of mice. A single dose of the EDE1-B10 antibody given 3 d after ZIKV infection protected against lethality, reduced ZIKV levels in brains and testes, and preserved sperm counts. In pregnant mice, wild-type or engineered LALA variants of EDE1-B10, which cannot engage Fcg receptors, diminished ZIKV burden in maternal and fetal tissues, and protected against fetal demise. Because neutralizing antibodies to EDE have therapeutic potential against ZIKV, in addition to their established inhibitory effects against DENV, it may be possible to develop therapies that control disease caused by both viruses.

  16. Lytic antibodies elicited by Trypanosoma cruzi infection recognize epitopes present on both bloodstream trypomastigote and epimastigote forms of parasite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harumi A. Takehara

    1988-10-01

    Full Text Available Sera of Chaga's disease patients containing anti-T. cruzi lytic antibodies were submitted to affinity chromatography using Sepharose 4B conjugated with antigen extracted from epimasiigote or trypomasiigote forms of the parasite. Epimastigotes were obtained from culture at the exponential growth phase and the trypomastigotes from blood of infected and immunosuppressed mice. Antigen of both parasite forms was obtained by sonication of the parasites followed by centrifugation. Both antigens were then conjugated to activated Sepharose 4B. Affinity chromatography was performed by passing sera from chagasic patients through an immunoadsorbent column containing either epimasiigote or trypomasiigote antigens. Antibodies bound to the column were eluted with cold 0,2 M glycine buffer pH 2,8. The eluted antibodies were analysed regarding their isotype and lytic activity. The results showed that anti-T. cruzi lytic antibodies present in sera from chagasic patients are mainly located in the IgG isotype and recognize epitopes present in both trypomasiigote and epimastigote forms. A brief report of this work has already been published12.

  17. The CEA/CD3-bispecific antibody MEDI-565 (MT111) binds a nonlinear epitope in the full-length but not a short splice variant of CEA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Li; Oberst, Michael D; Huang, Jiaqi; Brohawn, Philip; Morehouse, Chris; Lekstrom, Kristen; Baeuerle, Patrick A; Wu, Herren; Yao, Yihong; Coats, Steven R; Dall'Acqua, William; Damschroder, Melissa; Hammond, Scott A

    2012-01-01

    MEDI-565 (also known as MT111) is a bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE®) antibody in development for the treatment of patients with cancers expressing carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). MEDI-565 binds CEA on cancer cells and CD3 on T cells to induce T-cell mediated killing of cancer cells. To understand the molecular basis of human CEA recognition by MEDI-565 and how polymorphisms and spliced forms of CEA may affect MEDI-565 activity, we mapped the epitope of MEDI-565 on CEA using mutagenesis and homology modeling approaches. We found that MEDI-565 recognized a conformational epitope in the A2 domain comprised of amino acids 326-349 and 388-410, with critical residues F(326), T(328), N(333), V(388), G(389), P(390), E(392), I(408), and N(410). Two non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs10407503, rs7249230) were identified in the epitope region, but they are found at low homozygosity rates. Searching the National Center for Biotechnology Information GenBank® database, we further identified a single, previously uncharacterized mRNA splice variant of CEA that lacks a portion of the N-terminal domain, the A1 and B1 domains, and a large portion of the A2 domain. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of multiple cancers showed widespread expression of full-length CEA in these tumors, with less frequent but concordant expression of the CEA splice variant. Because the epitope was largely absent from the CEA splice variant, MEDI-565 did not bind or mediate T-cell killing of cells solely expressing this form of CEA. In addition, the splice variant did not interfere with MEDI-565 binding or activity when co-expressed with full-length CEA. Thus MEDI-565 may broadly target CEA-positive tumors without regard for expression of the short splice variant of CEA. Together our data suggest that MEDI-565 activity will neither be impacted by SNPs nor by a splice variant of CEA.

  18. Endoplasmic reticulum targeting sequence enhances HBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes induced by a CTL epitope-based DNA vaccine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Wei; Chu Yiwei; Zhang Ruihua; Xu Huanbin; Wang Ying; Xiong Sidong

    2005-01-01

    CD8 + T cells play a critical role in protective immunity against Hepatitis B Virus (HBV). Epitope-based DNA vaccines expressing HBV-dominant CTL epitopes can be used as candidate vaccines capable of inducing cytotoxic T Lymphocytes (CTL) responses. A plasmid DNA encoding a CTL epitope of HBV core antigen, HBc 18-27 , was constructed. Intramuscular immunization of C57BL/6 mice with this DNA vaccine resulted in successful induction of HBV-specific CTL responses. In order to promote transportation of the peptide into endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to bind to MHC class I molecules for optimal class I antigen presentation, an ER targeting sequence (ERTS) was fused with the C 18-27 encoding gene. ERTS fusion significantly enhanced specific CD8 + T cell responses in terms of CTL cytolysis as well as IFN-γ secretion. This enhancement was correlated with promoted epitope presentation on target cell surface. We report here an enhanced immunogenicity of an epitope-based DNA vaccine using an ER targeting signal sequence, which has significant implications for future design of therapeutic HBV vaccine

  19. Epitope targeting and viral inoculum are determinants of Nef-mediated immune evasion of HIV-1 from cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Diana Y; Balamurugan, Arumugam; Ng, Hwee L; Cumberland, William G; Yang, Otto O

    2012-07-05

    The impact of HIV-1 Nef-mediated HLA-I down-regulation on CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) varies by epitope, but the determining factors have not been elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the impact of Nef on the antiviral efficiency of HIV-1-specific CTLs targeting 17 different epitopes to define properties that determine susceptibility to Nef. The impact of Nef was not correlated with the presenting HLA-I type or functional avidity of CTLs, but instead was related directly to the kinetics of infected cell clearance. Whereas Gag-specific CTLs generally were less susceptible to Nef than those targeting other proteins, this was determined by the ability to eliminate infected cells before de novo synthesis of viral proteins, which was also observed for CTLs targeting a Nef epitope. This very early clearance of infected cells depended on virus inoculum, and the required inoculum varied by epitope. These results suggest that whereas Gag-specific CTLs are more likely to recognize infected cells before Nef-mediated HLA-I down-regulation, this varies depending on the specific epitope and virus inoculum. Reduced susceptibility to Nef therefore may contribute to the overall association of Gag-specific CTL responses to better immune control if a sufficient multiplicity of infection is attained in vivo, but this property is not unique to Gag.

  20. Antibody responses against epitopes on the F protein of bovine respiratory syncytial virus differ in infected or vaccinated cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrijver, R.S.; Hensen, E.J.; Langedijk, J.P.M.; Daus, F.; Middel, W.G.J.; Kramps, J.A.; Oirschot, van J.T.

    1997-01-01

    The fusion protein F of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is an important target for humoral and cellular immune responses, and antibodies against the F protein have been associated with protection. However, the F protein can induce antibodies with different biological activity, possibly

  1. Epitope mapping of the carcinoembryonic antigen by monoclonal antibodies and establishment of a new improved radioimmunoassay system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroki, Masahide; Arakawa, Fumiko; Matsunaga, Akira; Okamoto, Naomi; Takakura, Kyoko; Matsuoka, Yuji; Higuchi, Hiroshi.

    1987-01-01

    A comprehensive mapping of epitopes on the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) molecule has been achieved by analyses of the specificities of 146 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) from more than 300 hybridomas established recently. The reactivities of MAbs were analyzed by radio-immunoassays (RIA) with highly purified preparations of CEA and related antigens including normal fecal antigen-1 (NFA-1), NFA-2 in normal adult feces, nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (NCA) in lung and NCA-2 in meconium. The MAbs could be divided into five groups: group I, 23 clones directed to the NCA-common part of the CEA molecule; group II, 31 clones directed to the normal fecal cross-reacting antigen (NFCA)-common part; group III, 46 clones directed to the NFA-1-common part; group IV, 33 clones reactive with the heterogeneous carbohydrate part; and group V, 13 clones directed to the CEA-distinctive part which seemed to be highly specific for CEA. Mutual inhibitions of CEA binding between MAbs of the individual groups revealed that at least 25 different subgroups can be defined i.e., 4, 7, 8, 4, and 2 subgroups in groups I to V, respectively. The epitopes recognized by the group IV MAbs were found to be sensitive to oxidation with periodate, while the epitopes defined by MAbs of the other groups were resistant to this treatment. A solid-phase sandwich-type RIA system for CEA was established by using 2 MAbs from groups II and III as the CEA catcher and an MAb of group V as the tracer. This assay was shown to exhibit improved cancer-specificity and accuracy in the estimation of serum CEA levels. (author)

  2. Human monoclonal antibodies to a novel cluster of conformational epitopes on HCV E2 with resistance to neutralization escape in a genotype 2a isolate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keck, Zhen-yong; Xia, Jinming; Wang, Yong

    2012-01-01

    regions that will be relevant for vaccine design, we employed yeast surface display of antibodies that bound to genotype 1a H77C E2 mutant proteins containing a substitution either at Y632A (to avoid selecting non-neutralizing antibodies) or D535A. A panel of nine human monoclonal antibodies (HMAbs......, when HCVcc were passaged in the presence of each of these antibodies, virus escape was not observed. Thus, the cluster of HC-84 epitopes, designated as antigenic domain D, is relevant for vaccine design for this highly diverse virus....

  3. Epitope identification and in silico prediction of the specificity of antibodies binding to the coat proteins of Potato Virus Y strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keller, H.J.H.G.; Pomp, H.; Bakker, J.; Schots, A.

    2005-01-01

    A phage library containing 2.7 × 10(9) randomly expressed peptides was used to determine the epitopes of three monoclonal antibodies that bind to the coat protein of Potato Virus Y. Construction of the consensus sequences for the peptides obtained after three selection rounds indicated that each

  4. A Plasmodium falciparum 48/45 single epitope R0.6C subunit protein elicits high levels of transmission blocking antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Susheel K; Roeffen, Will; Andersen, Gorm

    2015-01-01

    The sexual stage Pfs48/45 antigen is a well-established lead candidate for a transmission blocking (TB) vaccine because of its critical role in parasite fertilization. We have recently produced the carboxy-terminal 10C-fragment of Pfs48/45 containing three known epitopes for TB antibodies...

  5. Generation and molecular characterization of a monoclonal antibody reactive with conserved epitope in sphingomyelinases D from Loxosceles spider venoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias-Lopes, C; Felicori, L; Rubrecht, L; Cobo, S; Molina, L; Nguyen, C; Galéa, P; Granier, C; Molina, F; Chávez-Olortegui, C

    2014-04-11

    We report the production of a neutralizing monoclonal antibody able to recognize the venoms of three major medically important species of Loxosceles spiders in Brazil. The mAb was produced by immunization of mice with a toxic recombinant L. intermedia sphingomyelinase D {SMases D isoform (rLiD1)} [1] and screened by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using L. intermedia, L. laeta and L. gaucho venoms as antigens. One clone (LiD1mAb16) out of seventeen anti-rLiD1 hybridomas was cross-reactive with the three whole Loxosceles venoms. 2D Western blot analysis indicated that LiD1mAb16 was capable of interacting with 34 proteins of 29-36kDa in L. intermedia, 33 in L. gaucho and 27 in L. laeta venoms. The results of immunoassays with cellulose-bound peptides revealed that the LiD1mAb16 recognizes a highly conserved linear epitope localized in the catalytic region of SMases D toxins. The selected mAb displayed in vivo protective activity in rabbits after challenge with rLiD1. These results show the potential usefulness of monoclonal antibodies for future therapeutic approaches and also opens up the perspective of utilization of these antibodies for immunodiagnostic assays in loxoscelism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. An HLA-B27 Homodimer Specific Antibody Recognizes a Discontinuous Mixed-Disulfide Epitope as Identified by Affinity-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iuraşcu, Marius-Ionuţ; Marroquin Belaunzanar, Osiris; Cozma, Claudia; Petrausch, Ulf; Renner, Christoph; Przybylski, Michael

    2016-06-01

    HLA-B27 homodimer formation is believed to be a hallmark of HLA-B27 associated spondyloarthritides. Recently, we have generated a homodimer-specific monoclonal antibody (HD6) and have demonstrated that HLA-B27 homodimer complexes are present on monocytes of healthy HLA-B27 gene carriers at low levels, with significantly increased levels at active disease. The capability of the HD6 antibody to discriminate between correctly formed HLA-B27 heterotrimers and pathology-associated homodimers is striking and cannot be explained by the primary structure of HLA-B27. We hypothesized that HD6 accesses a unique epitope and used affinity-mass spectrometry for its identification. The HD6 antibody was immobilized on an activated sepharose affinity column, and HLA-B27 homodimer characterized for affinity. The epitope was identified by proteolytic epitope excision and MALDI mass spectrometry, and shown to comprise a discontinuous Cys-203- 257-Cys mixed-disulfide peptide structure that is not accessible in HLA-B27 heterotrimers due to protection by noncovalently linked β2-microglobulin. The epitope peptides were synthesized by solid phase peptide synthesis, and the two monomeric peptide components, HLA-B27(203-219) and HLA-B27(257-273), as well as the homo- and hetero-dimeric disulfide linked combinations prepared. The affinity binding constants KD towards the antibodies were determined using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor, and showed the highest affinity with a KD of approximately 40 nM to the HD6 antibody for the (203-219)-SS-(257-273) mixed disulfide epitope.

  7. Large Scale Genome Analysis Shows that the Epitopes for Broadly Cross-Reactive Antibodies Are Predominant in the Pandemic 2009 Influenza Virus A H1N1 Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar E. Lara-Ramírez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The past pandemic strain H1N1 (A (H1N1pdm09 has now become a common component of current seasonal influenza viruses. It has changed the pre-existing immunity of the human population to succeeding infections. In the present study, a total of 14,210 distinct sequences downloaded from National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI database were used for the analysis. The epitope compositions in A (H1N1pdm09, classic seasonal strains, swine strains as well as highly virulent avian strain H5N1, identified with the aid of the Immune Epitope DataBase (IEDB, were compared at genomic level. The result showed that A (H1N1 pdm09 contains the 90% of B-cell epitopes for broadly cross-reactive antibodies (EBCA, which is in consonance with the recent reports on the experimental identification of new epitopes or antibodies for this virus and the binding tests with influenza virus protein HA of different subtypes. Our analysis supports that high proportional EBCA depends on the epitope pattern of A (H1N1pdm09 virus. This study may be helpful for better understanding of A (H1N1pdm09 and the production of new influenza vaccines.

  8. Chemical Characterization of N-Linked Oligosaccharide As the Antigen Epitope Recognized by an Anti-Sperm Auto-Monoclonal Antibody, Ts4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Yoshitake

    Full Text Available Ts4, an anti-sperm auto-monoclonal antibody, possesses immunoreactivity to the acrosomal region of mouse epididymal spermatozoa. In addition, the mAb shows specific immunoreactivity to reproduction-related regions such as testicular germ cells and early embryo. Our qualitative study previously showed that the antigen epitope for Ts4 contained a N-linked common oligosaccharide (OS chain on testicular glycoproteins as determined by Western blotting for testicular glycoproteins after treatment with several glycohydrolases. Since the distribution of the Ts4-epitope is unique, the OS chain in Ts4-epitope may have role(s in the reproductive process. The aim of this study was to clarify the molecular structure of the Ts4-epitope, particularly its OS moiety. Using Ts4 immunoprecipitation combined with liquid chromatography and multiple-stage mass spectrometry, the candidate carbohydrate structure in the Ts4-epitope is proposed to be N-linked fucosylated agalacto-biantennary with bisecting N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc or with N-acetylgalactosamine-GlcNAc motif. Further binding analyses using various lectins against the mouse testicular Ts4-immunoprecipitants revealed that Phaseolus vulgaris erythroagglutinin and Pisum sativum agglutinin showed positive staining of the bands corresponding to Ts4 reactive proteins. Moreover, the immunoreactivity of Ts4 against the testicular extract was completely abrogated after digestion with β-N-acetylglucosaminidase. These results show that the Ts4-epitope contains agalacto-biantennary N-glycan with bisecting GlcNAc carrying fucose residues.

  9. Epitope mapping of Brugia malayi ALT-2 and the development of a multi-epitope vaccine for lymphatic filariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhumathi, J; Prince, P R; Rao, D N; Karande, A A; Reddy, M V R; Kaliraj, P

    2017-01-01

    Human lymphatic filariasis is a neglected tropical disease, causing permanent and long-term disability with severe immunopathology. Abundant larval transcript (ALT) plays a crucial role in parasite establishment in the host, due to its multi-faceted ability in host immune regulation. Although ALT protein is a key filarial target, its exact function is yet to be explored. Here, we report epitope mapping and a structural model of Brugia malayi ALT-2, leading to development of a multi-epitope vaccine. Structural analysis revealed that ALT represents unique parasitic defence proteins belonging to a toxin family that carries a 'knottin' fold. ALT-2 has been a favourite vaccine antigen and was protective in filarial models. Due to the immunological significance of ALT-2, we mapped B-cell epitopes systematically and identified two epitope clusters, 1-30 and 89-128. To explore the prophylactic potential of epitope clusters, a recombinant multi-epitopic gene comprising the epitopic domains was engineered and the protective efficacy of recombinant ALT epitope protein (AEP) was tested in the permissive model, Mastomys coucha. AEP elicited potent antibody responses with predominant IgG1 isotype and conferred significantly high protection (74.59%) compared to ALT-2 (61.95%). This proved that these epitopic domains are responsible for the protective efficacy of ALT-2 and engineering protective epitopes as a multi-epitope protein may be a novel vaccine strategy for complex parasitic infections.

  10. New High Affinity Monoclonal Antibodies Recognize Non-Overlapping Epitopes On Mesothelin For Monitoring And Treating Mesothelioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Fan; Phung, Yen; Gao, Wei; Kawa, Seiji; Hassan, Raffit; Pastan, Ira; Ho, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    Mesothelin is an emerging cell surface target in mesothelioma and other solid tumors. Most antibody drug candidates recognize highly immunogenic Region I (296–390) on mesothelin. Here, we report a group of high-affinity non-Region I rabbit monoclonal antibodies. These antibodies do not compete for mesothelin binding with the immunotoxin SS1P that binds Region I of mesothelin. One pair of antibodies (YP218 and YP223) is suitable to detect soluble mesothelin in a sandwich ELISA with high sensitivity. The new assay can also be used to measure serum mesothelin concentration in mesothelioma patients, indicating its potential use for monitoring patients treated with current antibody therapies targeting Region I. The antibodies are highly specific and sensitive in immunostaining of mesothelioma. To explore their use in tumor therapy, we have generated the immunotoxins based on the Fv of these antibodies. One immunotoxin (YP218 Fv-PE38) exhibits potent anti-tumor cytotoxicity towards primary mesothelioma cell lines in vitro and an NCI-H226 xenograft tumor in mice. Furthermore, we have engineered a humanized YP218 Fv that retains full binding affinity for mesothelin-expressing cancer cells. In conclusion, with their unique binding properties, these antibodies may be promising candidates for monitoring and treating mesothelioma and other mesothelin-expressing cancers. PMID:25996440

  11. A synthetic glycan microarray enables epitope mapping of plant cell wall glycan-directed antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruprecht, Colin; Bartetzko, Max P; Senf, Deborah

    2017-01-01

    In the last three decades, more than 200 monoclonal antibodies have been raised against most classes of plant cell wall polysaccharides by different laboratories world-wide. These antibodies are widely used to identify differences in plant cell wall components in mutants, organ and tissue types, ...

  12. Single-Domain Antibodies and the Promise of Modular Targeting in Cancer Imaging and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena Iezzi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies and their fragments have significantly changed the outcome of cancer in the clinic, effectively inhibiting tumor cell proliferation, triggering antibody-dependent immune effector cell activation and complement mediated cell death. Along with a continued expansion in number, diversity, and complexity of validated tumor targets there is an increasing focus on engineering recombinant antibody fragments for lead development. Single-domain antibodies (sdAbs, in particular those engineered from the variable heavy-chain fragment (VHH gene found in Camelidae heavy-chain antibodies (or IgG2 and IgG3, are the smallest fragments that retain the full antigen-binding capacity of the antibody with advantageous properties as drugs. For similar reasons, growing attention is being paid to the yet smaller variable heavy chain new antigen receptor (VNAR fragments found in Squalidae. sdAbs have been selected, mostly from immune VHH libraries, to inhibit or modulate enzyme activity, bind soluble factors, internalize cell membrane receptors, or block cytoplasmic targets. This succinct review is a compilation of recent data documenting the application of engineered, recombinant sdAb in the clinic as epitope recognition “modules” to build monomeric, dimeric and multimeric ligands that target, tag and stall solid tumor growth in vivo. Size, affinity, specificity, and the development profile of sdAbs drugs are seemingly consistent with desirable clinical efficacy and safety requirements. But the hepatotoxicity of the tetrameric anti-DR5-VHH drug in patients with pre-existing anti-drug antibodies halted the phase I clinical trial and called for a thorough pre-screening of the immune and poly-specific reactivities of the sdAb leads.

  13. Glypican-3 antibodies: a new therapeutic target for liver cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Mingqian Feng, Mitchell

    2013-01-01

    Glypican-3 (GPC3) is an emerging therapeutic target in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), even though the biological function of GPC3 remains elusive. Currently human (MDX-1414 and HN3) and humanized mouse (GC33 and YP7) antibodies that target GPC3 for HCC treatment are under different stages of preclinical or clinical development. Humanized mouse antibody GC33 is being evaluated in a phase II clinical trial. Human antibodies MDX-1414 and HN3 are under different stages of preclinical evaluation....

  14. Mapping of epitopes for autoantibodies to the Type 1 diabetes autoantigen IA-2 by peptide phage display and molecular modelling: Overlap of antibody and T-cell determinants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A. Dromey, James; Weenink, Sarah M.; Peters, Günther H.J.

    2004-01-01

    IA-2 is a major target of autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes. IA-2 responsive T cells recognize determinants within regions represented by amino acids 787–817 and 841–869 of the molecule. Epitopes for IA-2 autoantibodies are largely conformational and not well defined. In this study, we used peptide......, and aromatic residues and amino acids contributing to the epitope investigated using site-directed mutagenesis. Mutation of each of amino acids Asn858, Glu836, and Trp799 reduced 96/3 Ab binding by >45%. Mutations of these residues also inhibited binding of serum autoantibodies from IA-2 Ab-positive type 1...... phage display and homology modeling to characterize the epitope of a monoclonal IA-2 Ab (96/3) from a human type 1 diabetic patient. This Ab competes for IA-2 binding with Abs from the majority of patients with type 1 diabetes and therefore binds a region close to common autoantibody epitopes. Alignment...

  15. Superior control of HIV-1 replication by CD8+ T cells targeting conserved epitopes: implications for HIV vaccine design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratima Kunwar

    Full Text Available A successful HIV vaccine will likely induce both humoral and cell-mediated immunity, however, the enormous diversity of HIV has hampered the development of a vaccine that effectively elicits both arms of the adaptive immune response. To tackle the problem of viral diversity, T cell-based vaccine approaches have focused on two main strategies (i increasing the breadth of vaccine-induced responses or (ii increasing vaccine-induced responses targeting only conserved regions of the virus. The relative extent to which set-point viremia is impacted by epitope-conservation of CD8(+ T cell responses elicited during early HIV-infection is unknown but has important implications for vaccine design. To address this question, we comprehensively mapped HIV-1 CD8(+ T cell epitope-specificities in 23 ART-naïve individuals during early infection and computed their conservation score (CS by three different methods (prevalence, entropy and conseq on clade-B and group-M sequence alignments. The majority of CD8(+ T cell responses were directed against variable epitopes (p<0.01. Interestingly, increasing breadth of CD8(+ T cell responses specifically recognizing conserved epitopes was associated with lower set-point viremia (r = - 0.65, p = 0.009. Moreover, subjects possessing CD8(+ T cells recognizing at least one conserved epitope had 1.4 log10 lower set-point viremia compared to those recognizing only variable epitopes (p = 0.021. The association between viral control and the breadth of conserved CD8(+ T cell responses may be influenced by the method of CS definition and sequences used to determine conservation levels. Strikingly, targeting variable versus conserved epitopes was independent of HLA type (p = 0.215. The associations with viral control were independent of functional avidity of CD8(+ T cell responses elicited during early infection. Taken together, these data suggest that the next-generation of T-cell based HIV-1 vaccines should focus

  16. A Mouse Monoclonal Antibody against Dengue Virus Type 1 Mochizuki Strain Targeting Envelope Protein Domain II and Displaying Strongly Neutralizing but Not Enhancing Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotaki, Tomohiro; Konishi, Eiji

    2013-01-01

    Dengue fever and its more severe form, dengue hemorrhagic fever, are major global concerns. Infection-enhancing antibodies are major factors hypothetically contributing to increased disease severity. In this study, we generated 26 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the dengue virus type 1 Mochizuki strain. We selected this strain because a relatively large number of unique and rare amino acids were found on its envelope protein. Although most MAbs showing neutralizing activities exhibited enhancing activities at subneutralizing doses, one MAb (D1-IV-7F4 [7F4]) displayed neutralizing activities without showing enhancing activities at lower concentrations. In contrast, another MAb (D1-V-3H12 [3H12]) exhibited only enhancing activities, which were suppressed by pretreatment of cells with anti-FcγRIIa. Although antibody engineering revealed that antibody subclass significantly affected 7F4 (IgG3) and 3H12 (IgG1) activities, neutralizing/enhancing activities were also dependent on the epitope targeted by the antibody. 7F4 recognized an epitope on the envelope protein containing E118 (domain II) and had a neutralizing activity 10- to 1,000-fold stronger than the neutralizing activity of previously reported human or humanized neutralizing MAbs targeting domain I and/or domain II. An epitope-blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) indicated that a dengue virus-immune population possessed antibodies sharing an epitope with 7F4. Our results demonstrating induction of these antibody species (7F4 and 3H12) in Mochizuki-immunized mice may have implications for dengue vaccine strategies designed to minimize induction of enhancing antibodies in vaccinated humans. PMID:24049185

  17. Antibodies directed against monomorphic and evolutionary conserved self epitopes may be generated in 'knock-out' mice. Development of monoclonal antibodies directed against monomorphic MHC class I determinants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claesson, M H; Endel, B; Ulrik, J

    1994-01-01

    binding antibodies. Three stable anti-MHC class I (MHC-I) antibody secreting hybridoma clones were established and subcloned. All three MoAbs precipitated radiolabelled H-2 molecules as analysed by SDS PAGE, and all three MoAbs stained H-2b, H-2d, as well as H-2k cells by FACS analysis. The MoAbs stained...... to two beta 2m loss mutant cell lines, C4.4-25- and R1E, suggesting that some MHC-I heavy chain is exported to the cell surface even in the absence of endogenous beta 2m. Staining of murine cell lines kept under serum-free culture conditions was strongly influenced by the addition of bovine or human......-S cells were cultured at 37 degrees C. In total, these observations suggest that the MoAbs recognize conformational, presumably beta 2m and peptide dependent, self epitopes on MHC-class I. One of the three MoAbs stained rat blood mononuclear blood cells (BMC), all three MoAbs stained hamster BMC, whereas...

  18. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  19. Design and evaluation of bi- and trispecific antibodies targeting multiple filovirus glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyakatura, Elisabeth K; Zak, Samantha E; Wec, Anna Z; Hofmann, Daniel; Shulenin, Sergey; Bakken, Russell R; Aman, M Javad; Chandran, Kartik; Dye, John M; Lai, Jonathan R

    2018-03-02

    Filoviruses (family Filoviridae ) include five ebolaviruses and Marburg virus. These pathogens cause a rapidly progressing and severe viral disease with high mortality rates (generally 30%-90%). Outbreaks of filovirus disease are sporadic and, until recently, were limited to less than 500 cases. However, the 2013-2016 epidemic in western Africa, caused by Ebola virus (EBOV), illustrated the potential of filovirus outbreaks to escalate to a much larger scale (over 28,000 suspected cases). Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the envelope glycoprotein represent a promising therapeutic platform for managing filovirus infections. However, mAbs that exhibit neutralization or protective properties against multiple filoviruses are rare. Here, we examined a panel of engineered bi- and trispecific antibodies, whereby variable fragments of mAbs that target epitopes from multiple filoviruses were combined, for their capacity to neutralize viral infection across filovirus species. We found that bispecific combinations targeting EBOV and Sudan virus (SUDV, another ebolavirus), provide potent cross-neutralization and protection in mice. Furthermore, trispecific combinations, targeting EBOV, SUDV, and MARV, exhibited strong neutralization potential against all three viruses. These results provide important insight into multispecific antibody engineering against filoviruses and will inform future immunotherapeutic discovery. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Measuring Single-Domain Antibody Interactions with Epitopes in Jet Fuel Using Microscale Thermophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    marker troponin I (Zhang et al. 2014) and the explosive trinitrotoluene (Charles et al. 2014), as well as use in lateral-flow and cellulose paper...M. Orson . 2012. Probing cocaine-antibody interactions in buffer and human serum. PLoS One. 7(7): e40518. Song, K.-M., S. Lee, and C. Ban. 2012

  1. Antibody or Antibody Fragments: Implications for Molecular Imaging and Targeted Therapy of Solid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina T. Xenaki

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of antibody-based therapeutics has proven very promising for clinical applications in cancer patients, with multiple examples of antibodies and antibody–drug conjugates successfully applied for the treatment of solid tumors and lymphomas. Given reported recurrence rates, improvements are clearly still necessary. A major factor limiting the efficacy of antibody-targeted cancer therapies may be the incomplete penetration of the antibody or antibody–drug conjugate into the tumor. Incomplete tumor penetration also affects the outcome of molecular imaging, when using such targeting agents. From the injection site until they arrive inside the tumor, targeting molecules are faced with several barriers that impact intratumoral distribution. The primary means of antibody transport inside tumors is based on diffusion. The diffusive penetration inside the tumor is influenced by both antibody properties, such as size and binding affinity, as well as tumor properties, such as microenvironment, vascularization, and targeted antigen availability. Engineering smaller antibody fragments has shown to improve the rate of tumor uptake and intratumoral distribution. However, it is often accompanied by more rapid clearance from the body and in several cases also by inherent destabilization and reduction of the binding affinity of the antibody. In this perspective, we discuss different cancer targeting approaches based on antibodies or their fragments. We carefully consider how their size and binding properties influence their intratumoral uptake and distribution, and how this may affect cancer imaging and therapy of solid tumors.

  2. [Analysis of epitopes and function of anti-M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antibodies in patients with Sjögren's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Hiroto; Matsuo, Naomi; Iizuka, Mana; Nakamura, Yumi; Matsumoto, Isao; Sumida, Takayuki

    2010-01-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is an autoimmune disease that affects exocrine glands including salivary and lacrimal glands. It is characterized by lymphocytic infiltration into exocrine glands, leading to dry mouth and eyes. A number of auto-antibodies, such as anti-SS-A and SS-B antibodies, are detected in patients with SS. However, no SS-specific pathologic auto-antibodies have yet been found in this condition. M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M3R) plays a crucial role in the secretion of saliva from salivary glands. It is reported that some patients with SS carried inhibitory auto-antibodies against M3R. To clarify the epitopes and function of anti-M3R antibodies in SS, we examined antibodies to the extracellular domains (N terminal region, the first, second, and third extracellular loop) of M3R by ELISA using synthesized peptide antigens encoding these domains in 42 SS and 42 healthy controls (HC). Titers and positivity of anti-M3R antibodies to every extracellular domain of M3R were significantly higher in SS than in HC. For functional analysis, human salivary gland (HSG) cells were pre-cultured with IgG from anti-M3R antibodies positive SS, negative SS, and HC. HSG cells were stimulated with cevimeline hydrochloride and intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) was measured. IgG from anti-M3R antibodies to the second loop positive SS inhibited the increase of [Ca(2+)](i), but IgG from antibodies to the N terminal or the first loop positive SS enhanced it, while IgG from antibodies to the third loop positive SS showed no effect on [Ca(2+)](i) as well as IgG from anti-M3R antibodies negative SS and HC. These findings indicated the presence of several B cell epitopes on M3R in SS and effect of anti-M3R antibodies on the salivary secretion might differ with these epitopes.

  3. Epitope mapping of the monoclonal antibody MM12.10 to external MDR1 P-glycoprotein domain by synthetic peptide scanning and phage display technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romagnoli, G; Poloni, F; Flego, M; Moretti, F; Di Modugno, F; Chersi, A; Falasca, G; Signoretti, C; Castagna, M; Cianfriglia, M

    1999-05-01

    Epitope mapping of MDR1-P-glycoprotein using specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) may help in delineating P-glycoprotein topology and hence in elucidating the relationship between its structural organization and drug-efflux pump function. In this work, by using synthetic peptide scanning and phage display technologies, the binding sites of the mAb MM12.10, a novel antibody to intact human multidrug resistant (MDR) cells, were studied. The results we obtained confirm that two regions localized on the predicted fourth and sixth loops are indeed external and that MDR1 peptides covering the inner domain of the current 12 transmembrane segment (TMs) model of P-glycoprotein could form part of the MM12.10 epitope.

  4. Linear epitope recognition antibodies strongly respond to the C-terminal domain of HP-PRRSV GP5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinglong; Qui, Li; Dang, Yu; Xiao, Sha; Zhang, Shuxia; Yang, Zengqi

    2014-12-05

    A total of 155 peptides derived from the highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV) glycoprotein 5 (GP5) were printed on a chip to reveal the antigen reaction characteristics of the protein. The reactions of these peptides to HP-PRRSV-specific pig serum were scanned and quantified using fluorescence intensity via the PepSlide(®) Analyzer software. The intensity plots showed different reactions in the different sectors of GP5. The highest reaction intensity value reached 3894.5, with a peptide sequence of IVEKGGKVEVEGHLI. Seventeen peptides that showed relatively high reaction levels with HP-PRRSV-specific pig serum were selected as epitope candidates. Furthermore, the antigenic character was predicted using a software and was compared with the peptide scan results. In contrast to the software prediction, the HP-PRRSV-specific antibodies strongly responded to the C-terminal domain of GP5. The acquired data may be useful for understanding the antigenic characteristics of HP-PRRSV GP5. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Oral delivery of Acid Alpha Glucosidase epitopes expressed in plant chloroplasts suppresses antibody formation in treatment of Pompe mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jin; Sherman, Alexandra; Doerfler, Phillip A; Byrne, Barry J; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2015-10-01

    Deficiency of acid alpha glucosidase (GAA) causes Pompe disease in which the patients systemically accumulate lysosomal glycogen in muscles and nervous systems, often resulting in infant mortality. Although enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is effective in treating patients with Pompe disease, formation of antibodies against rhGAA complicates treatment. In this report, we investigated induction of tolerance by oral administration of GAA expressed in chloroplasts. Because full-length GAA could not be expressed, N-terminal 410-amino acids of GAA (as determined by T-cell epitope mapping) were fused with the transmucosal carrier CTB. Tobacco transplastomic lines expressing CTB-GAA were generated through site-specific integration of transgenes into the chloroplast genome. Homoplasmic lines were confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Despite low-level expression of CTB-GAA in chloroplasts, yellow or albino phenotype of transplastomic lines was observed due to binding of GAA to a chloroplast protein that has homology to mannose-6 phosphate receptor. Oral administration of the plant-made CTB-GAA fusion protein even at 330-fold lower dose (1.5 μg) significantly suppressed immunoglobulin formation against GAA in Pompe mice injected with 500 μg rhGAA per dose, with several-fold lower titre of GAA-specific IgG1 and IgG2a. Lyophilization increased CTB-GAA concentration by 30-fold (up to 190 μg per g of freeze-dried leaf material), facilitating long-term storage at room temperature and higher dosage in future investigations. This study provides the first evidence that oral delivery of plant cells is effective in reducing antibody responses in ERT for lysosomal storage disorders facilitating further advances in clinical investigations using plant cell culture system or in vitro propagation. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Boosting antibody responses by targeting antigens to dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminschi, Irina; Shortman, Ken

    2012-02-01

    Delivering antigens directly to dendritic cells (DCs) in situ, by injecting antigens coupled to antibodies specific for DC surface molecules, is a promising strategy for enhancing vaccine efficacy. Enhanced cytotoxic T cell responses are obtained if an adjuvant is co-administered to activate the DC. Such DC targeting is also effective at enhancing humoral immunity, via the generation of T follicular helper cells. Depending on the DC surface molecule targeted, antibody production can be enhanced even in the absence of adjuvants. In the case of Clec9A as the DC surface target, enhanced antibody production is a consequence of the DC-restricted expression of the target molecule. Few other cells absorb the antigen-antibody construct, therefore, it persists in the bloodstream, allowing sustained antigen presentation, even by non-activated DCs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A Rationally Designed TNF-α Epitope-Scaffold Immunogen Induces Sustained Antibody Response and Alleviates Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhang

    Full Text Available The TNF-α biological inhibitors have significantly improved the clinical outcomes of many autoimmune diseases, in particular rheumatoid arthritis. However, the practical uses are limited due to high costs and the risk of anti-drug antibody responses. Attempts to develop anti-TNF-α vaccines have generated encouraging data in animal models, however, data from clinical trials have not met expectations. In present study, we designed a TNF-α epitope-scaffold immunogen DTNF7 using the transmembrane domain of diphtheria toxin, named DTT as a scaffold. Molecular dynamics simulation shows that the grafted TNF-α epitope is entirely surface-exposed and presented in a native-like conformation while the rigid helical structure of DTT is minimally perturbed, thereby rendering the immunogen highly stable. Immunization of mice with alum formulated DTNF7 induced humoral responses against native TNF-α, and the antibody titer was sustained for more than 6 months, which supports a role of the universal CD4 T cell epitopes of DTT in breaking self-immune tolerance. In a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis, DTNF7-alum vaccination markedly delayed the onset of collagen-induced arthritis, and reduced incidence as well as clinical score. DTT is presumed safe as an epitope carrier because a catalytic inactive mutant of diphtheria toxin, CRM197 has good clinical safety records as an active vaccine component. Taken all together, we show that DTT-based epitope vaccine is a promising strategy for prevention and treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  8. Conserved epitope on influenza-virus hemagglutinin head defined by a vaccine-induced antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, Donald D.; Bajic, Goran; Ferdman, Jack; Suphaphiphat, Pirada; Settembre, Ethan C.; Moody, M. Anthony; Schmidt, Aaron G.; Harrison, Stephen C. (Duke-MED); (CH-Boston); (Seqirus)

    2017-12-18

    Antigenic variation requires frequent revision of annual influenza vaccines. Next-generation vaccine design strategies aim to elicit a broader immunity by directing the human immune response toward conserved sites on the principal viral surface protein, the hemagglutinin (HA). We describe a group of antibodies that recognize a hitherto unappreciated, conserved site on the HA of H1 subtype influenza viruses. Mutations in that site, which required a change in the H1 component of the 2017 vaccine, had not previously “taken over” among circulating H1 viruses. Our results encourage vaccine design strategies that resurface a protein to focus the immune response on a specific region.

  9. Hepatitis C virus epitope exposure and neutralization by antibodies is affected by time and temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabo, Michelle C; Luca, Vincent C; Ray, Stuart C

    2012-01-01

    at 37°C or after longer pre-incubation periods, and a corresponding loss-of-neutralization was observed when pre-binding was performed at 4°C. A similar profile of changes was observed with acute and chronic phase sera from HCV-infected patients. Our data suggest that time and temperature of incubation...... by a glycan shield, apolipoprotein interactions, and the hypervariable region on the E2 envelope protein, we assessed how time and temperature of pre-incubation altered monoclonal antibody (MAb) neutralization of HCV. Notably, several MAbs showed increased inhibitory activity when pre-binding was performed...

  10. Study of the epitope structure of purified Dac G I and Lol p I, the major allergens of Dactylis glomerata and Lolium perenne pollens, using monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourad, W; Mécheri, S; Peltre, G; David, B; Hébert, J

    1988-11-15

    The use of mAb allowed us to further analyze the cross-reactivity between purified Dac g I and Lol p I, the major allergens of Dactylis glomerata (cocksfoot) and Lolium perenne (Rye grass), respectively. It was first shown, using IEF, followed by immunoprinting, that serum IgE antibodies from most grass-sensitive patients recognize both Dac g I and Lol p I. Second, three different anti-Lol p I mAb, 290A-167, 348A-6, and 539A-6, and one anti-Dac g I mAb, P3B2 were all shown to react with Dac g I and Lol p I, indicating that the two molecules share common epitopes. Epitope specificity of the mAb was determined by competitive binding inhibition of a given labeled mAb to solid phase fixed Dac g I or Lol p I by the mAb. The results indicated that the four mAb are directed against four different and non-overlapping epitopes present on both allergens. Using double-binding RIA, our data strongly suggest that the common epitopes are not repetitive on both molecules. In addition to their similar physicochemical characteristics, such as isolectric points and m.w., Dac g I and Lol p I share four identical epitopes. Binding inhibition of human IgE to Lol p I and Dac g I by the mAb was also assessed. The results indicated that each mAb was able to inhibit such reactions to variable degree but no additive inhibition was observed when two mAb of different specificities were used in combination, suggesting that the human IgE binding site is partially shared by each epitope recognized by the four mAb.

  11. P-glycoprotein epitope mapping. I. Identification of a linear human-specific epitope in the fourth loop of the P-glycoprotein extracellular domain by MM4.17 murine monoclonal antibody to human multi-drug-resistant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianfriglia, M; Willingham, M C; Tombesi, M; Scagliotti, G V; Frasca, G; Chersi, A

    1994-01-02

    A new murine monoclonal antibody (MAb), MM4.17, to human multi-drug-resistant (MDR) cells was found to be reactive in an ELISA with a synthetic 16-amino acid peptide selected from the fourth loop of the P-glycoprotein extracellular domain. Immunohistochemistry indicated that this MAb reacted in human tissues in the same pattern as that previously found with other human-specific MAbs to P-glycoprotein. For a precise definition of the MM4.17 epitope, a peptide library consisting of overlapping 4- to 10-mer residues covering the entire P-glycoprotein-fragment was synthesized on polyethylene pins and tested for MAb binding. The results of this ELISA demonstrated that the MM4.17 epitope is constituted by the continuous-linear TRIDDPET amino-acid sequence (residues 750-757 of the human MDRI-P-glycoprotein). The MAb MM4.17 recognizes only the human MDRI-P-glycoprotein isoform, and excess TRIDDPET peptide blocks the binding of the MAb to MDR variants of CEM cells. These results demonstrate that the amino-acid sequence TRIDDPET from the human MDRI gene represents the first continuous-linear epitope identified in the P-glycoprotein extracellular domain.

  12. Highly Specific and Effective Targeting of EGFRvIII-Positive Tumors with TandAb Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellwanger, Kristina; Reusch, Uwe; Fucek, Ivica; Knackmuss, Stefan; Weichel, Michael; Gantke, Thorsten; Molkenthin, Vera; Zhukovsky, Eugene A; Tesar, Michael; Treder, Martin

    2017-01-01

    To harness the cytotoxic capacity of immune cells for the treatment of solid tumors, we developed tetravalent, bispecific tandem diabody (TandAb) antibodies that recognize EGFRvIII, the deletion variant III of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and CD3 on T-cells, thereby directing immune cells to eliminate EGFRvIII-positive tumor cells. Using phage display, we identified scFv antibodies selectively binding to EGFRvIII. These highly EGFRvIII-specific, fully human scFv were substantially improved by affinity maturation, achieving K D s in the picomolar range, and were used to construct a set of bispecific EGFRvIII-targeting TandAbs with a broad range of binding and cytotoxic properties. These antibodies exhibited an exquisite specificity for a distinguished epitope in the N-terminal portion of EGFRvIII, as shown on recombinant antigen in Western Blot, SPR, and ELISA, as well as on antigen-expressing cells in FACS assays, and did not bind to the wild-type EGFR. High-affinity EGFRvIII/CD3 TandAbs were most potent in killing assays, displaying cytotoxicity toward EGFRvIII-expressing CHO, F98 glioma, or human DK-MG cells with EC 50 values in the range of 1-10 pM in vitro . They also demonstrated dose-dependent growth control in vivo in an EGFRvIII-positive subcutaneous xenograft tumor model. Together with the tumor-exclusive expression of EGFRvIII, the EGFRvIII/CD3 TandAbs' high specificity and strictly target-dependent activation with no off-target activity provide an opportunity to target tumor cells and spare normal tissues, thereby reducing the side effects associated with other anti-EGFR therapies. In summary, EGFRvIII/CD3 TandAbs are highly attractive therapeutic antibody candidates for selective immunotherapy of EGFRvIII-positive tumors.

  13. Highly Specific and Effective Targeting of EGFRvIII-Positive Tumors with TandAb Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Ellwanger

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available To harness the cytotoxic capacity of immune cells for the treatment of solid tumors, we developed tetravalent, bispecific tandem diabody (TandAb antibodies that recognize EGFRvIII, the deletion variant III of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, and CD3 on T-cells, thereby directing immune cells to eliminate EGFRvIII-positive tumor cells. Using phage display, we identified scFv antibodies selectively binding to EGFRvIII. These highly EGFRvIII-specific, fully human scFv were substantially improved by affinity maturation, achieving KDs in the picomolar range, and were used to construct a set of bispecific EGFRvIII-targeting TandAbs with a broad range of binding and cytotoxic properties. These antibodies exhibited an exquisite specificity for a distinguished epitope in the N-terminal portion of EGFRvIII, as shown on recombinant antigen in Western Blot, SPR, and ELISA, as well as on antigen-expressing cells in FACS assays, and did not bind to the wild-type EGFR. High-affinity EGFRvIII/CD3 TandAbs were most potent in killing assays, displaying cytotoxicity toward EGFRvIII-expressing CHO, F98 glioma, or human DK-MG cells with EC50 values in the range of 1–10 pM in vitro. They also demonstrated dose-dependent growth control in vivo in an EGFRvIII-positive subcutaneous xenograft tumor model. Together with the tumor-exclusive expression of EGFRvIII, the EGFRvIII/CD3 TandAbs’ high specificity and strictly target-dependent activation with no off-target activity provide an opportunity to target tumor cells and spare normal tissues, thereby reducing the side effects associated with other anti-EGFR therapies. In summary, EGFRvIII/CD3 TandAbs are highly attractive therapeutic antibody candidates for selective immunotherapy of EGFRvIII-positive tumors.

  14. A novel mouse monoclonal antibody targeting ErbB2 suppresses breast cancer growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawa, Seiji [Division of Oncology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Shirokanedai 4-6-1, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Matsushita, Hirohisa; Ohbayashi, Hirokazu [Department of Research and Development, Nichirei Biosciences Inc., Tokyo 104-8402 (Japan); Semba, Kentaro [Department of Life Science and Medical Bio-Science, School of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Yamamoto, Tadashi, E-mail: tyamamot@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Division of Oncology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Shirokanedai 4-6-1, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan)

    2009-07-03

    Overexpression of ErbB2 in breast cancer is associated with increased recurrence and worse prognosis. Accumulating evidences suggest that molecular targeted therapy is a promising anticancer strategy. In this study, we produced a novel anti-ErbB2 monoclonal antibody, 6G10, that recognized an epitope distinct from the trastuzumab binding site. 6G10 induced aggregation of BT474 breast cancer cells and inhibited proliferation of various breast cancer cell lines including BT474. A growth inhibition assay showed that 6G10 had EC{sub 50} values comparable to trastuzumab, indicating that the drugs have a similar level of potency. Furthermore, intraperitoneal administration of 6G10 completely inhibited the growth of xenografted tumors derived from BT474 and SK-BR-3 cells. These data suggested that 6G10 has great therapeutic potential and could be administered to patients alternatively, or synergistically, with trastuzumab.

  15. New epitopes and function of anti-M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antibodies in patients with Sjögren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, H; Matsumoto, I; Wakamatsu, E; Nakamura, Y; Iizuka, M; Hayashi, T; Goto, D; Ito, S; Sumida, T

    2010-10-01

    M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M3R) plays a crucial role in the secretion of saliva from salivary glands. It is reported that some patients with Sjögren's syndrome (SS) carried inhibitory autoantibodies against M3R. The purpose of this study is to clarify the epitopes and function of anti-M3R antibodies in SS. We synthesized peptides encoding the extracellular domains of human-M3R including the N-terminal region and the first, second and third extracellular loops. Antibodies against these regions were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in sera from 42 SS and 42 healthy controls. For functional analysis, human salivary gland (HSG) cells were preincubated with immunoglobulin G (IgG) separated from sera of anti-M3R antibody-positive SS, -negative SS and controls for 12 h. After loading with Fluo-3, HSG cells were stimulated with cevimeline hydrochloride, and intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations [(Ca(2+) )i] were measured. Antibodies to the N-terminal, first, second and third loops were detected in 42·9% (18 of 42), 47·6% (20 of 42), 54·8% (23 of 42) and 45·2% (19 of 42) of SS, while in 4·8% (two of 42), 7·1% (three of 42), 2·4% (one of 42) and 2·4% (one of 42) of controls, respectively. Antibodies to the second loop positive SS-IgG inhibited the increase of (Ca(2+) )i induced by cevimeline hydrochloride. Antibodies to the N-terminal positive SS-IgG and antibodies to the first loop positive SS-IgG enhanced it, while antibodies to the third loop positive SS-IgG showed no effect on (Ca(2+) )i as well as anti-M3R antibody-negative SS-IgG. Our results indicated the presence of several B cell epitopes on M3R in SS. The influence of anti-M3R antibodies on salivary secretion might differ based on these epitopes. © 2010 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Immunology © 2010 British Society for Immunology.

  16. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against hepatitis C virus E2 protein bind discontinuous epitopes and inhibit infection at a postattachment step

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabo, Michelle C; Luca, Vincent C; Prentoe, Jannick

    2011-01-01

    localized epitopes for the neutralizing MAbs on the E2 protein. Two of the strongly inhibitory MAbs, H77.16 and J6.36, showed markedly reduced binding when amino acids within hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) and at sites ~100 to 200 residues away were changed, suggesting binding to a discontinuous epitope...

  17. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and computational modeling reveal a discontinuous epitope of an antibody/TL1A Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Richard Y-C; Krystek, Stanley R; Felix, Nathan; Graziano, Robert F; Srinivasan, Mohan; Pashine, Achal; Chen, Guodong

    2018-01-01

    TL1A, a tumor necrosis factor-like cytokine, is a ligand for the death domain receptor DR3. TL1A, upon binding to DR3, can stimulate lymphocytes and trigger secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Therefore, blockade of TL1A/DR3 interaction may be a potential therapeutic strategy for autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Recently, the anti-TL1A monoclonal antibody 1 (mAb1) with a strong potency in blocking the TL1A/DR3 interaction was identified. Here, we report on the use of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to obtain molecular-level details of mAb1's binding epitope on TL1A. HDX coupled with electron-transfer dissociation MS provided residue-level epitope information. The HDX dataset, in combination with solvent accessible surface area (SASA) analysis and computational modeling, revealed a discontinuous epitope within the predicted interaction interface of TL1A and DR3. The epitope regions span a distance within the approximate size of the variable domains of mAb1's heavy and light chains, indicating it uses a unique mechanism of action to block the TL1A/DR3 interaction.

  18. A novel monoclonal antibody targeting carboxymethyllysine, an advanced glycation end product in atherosclerosis and pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrika Wendel

    Full Text Available Advanced glycation end products are formed by non-enzymatic reactions between proteins and carbohydrates, causing irreversible lysine and arginine alterations that severely affect protein structure and function. The resulting modifications induce inflammation by binding to scavenger receptors. An increase in advanced glycation end products is observed in a number of diseases e.g. atherosclerosis and cancer. Since advanced glycation end products also are present in healthy individuals, their detection and quantification are of great importance for usage as potential biomarkers. Current methods for advanced glycation end product detection are though limited and solely measure total glycation. This study describes a new epitope-mapped single chain variable fragment, D1-B2, against carboxymethyllysine, produced from a phage library that was constructed from mouse immunizations. The phage library was selected against advanced glycation end product targets using a phage display platform. Characterization of its binding pattern was performed using large synthetic glycated peptide and protein libraries displayed on microarray slides. D1-B2 showed a preference for an aspartic acid, three positions N-terminally from a carboxymethyllysine residue and also bound to a broad collection of glycated proteins. Positive immunohistochemical staining of mouse atherosclerotic plaques and of a tissue microarray of human pancreatic tumors confirmed the usability of the new scFv for advanced glycation end product detection in tissues. This study demonstrates a promising methodology for high-throughput generation of epitope-mapped monoclonal antibodies against AGE.

  19. A human inferred germline antibody binds to an immunodominant epitope and neutralizes Zika virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo M Magnani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The isolation of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (nmAbs against the Zika virus (ZIKV might lead to novel preventative strategies for infections in at-risk individuals, primarily pregnant women. Here we describe the characterization of human mAbs from the plasmablasts of an acutely infected patient. One of the 18 mAbs had the unusual feature of binding to and neutralizing ZIKV despite not appearing to have been diversified by affinity maturation. This mAb neutralized ZIKV (Neut50 ~ 2 μg/ml but did not react with any of the four dengue virus serotypes. Except for the expected junctional diversity created by the joining of the V-(D-J genes, there was no deviation from immunoglobulin germline genes. This is a rare example of a human mAb with neutralizing activity in the absence of detectable somatic hypermutation. Importantly, binding of this mAb to ZIKV was specifically inhibited by human plasma from ZIKV-exposed individuals, suggesting that it may be of value in a diagnostic setting.

  20. Label free targeted detection and quantification of celiac disease immunogenic epitopes by mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeck, van den H.C.; Cordewener, J.H.G.; Nessen, M.A.; America, A.H.P.; Meer, van der I.M.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a food-related disease caused by certain gluten peptides containing T-cell stimulating epitopes from wheat, rye, and barley. CD-patients have to maintain a gluten-free diet and are therefore dependent on reliable testing and labeling of gluten-free products. So far, the

  1. Epitope reactions can be gauged by relative antibody discriminating specificity (RADS values supported by deletion, substitution and cysteine bridge formation analyses: potential uses in pathogenesis studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falconar Andrew K I

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epitope-mapping of infectious agents is essential for pathogenesis studies. Since polyclonal antibodies (PAbs and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs are always polyspecific and can react with multiple epitopes, it is important to distinguish between specific and non-specific reactions. Relative antibody discriminating specificity (RADS values, obtained from their relative ELISA reactions with L-amino acid peptides prepared in the natural versus reverse orientations (x-fold absorbance natural/absorbance reverse = RADS value may be valuable for this purpose. PAbs generated against the dengue type-2 virus (DENV-2 nonstructural-1 (NS1 glycoprotein candidate vaccine also reacted with both DENV envelope (E glycoproteins and blood-clotting proteins. New xKGSx/xSGKx amino acid motifs were identified on DENV-2 glycoproteins, HIV-1 gp41 and factor IXa. Their potential roles in DENV and HIV-1 antibody-enhanced replication (AER and auto-immunity were assessed. In this study, a RADS values were determined for MAbs and PAbs, generated in congeneic (H2: class II mice against DENV NS1 glycoprotein epitopes, to account for their cross-reaction patterns, and b MAb 1G5.3 reactions with xKGSx/xSGKx motifs present in the DENV-4 NS1, E and HIV-1 glycoproteins and factor IXa were assessed after the introduction of amino acid substitutions, deletions, or intra-/inter-cysteine (C-C bridges. Results MAbs 1H7.4, 5H4.3, 3D1.4 and 1G5.3 had high (4.23- to 16.83-fold RADS values against single epitopes on the DENV-2 NS1 glycoprotein, and MAb 3D1.4 defined the DENV complex-conserved LX1 epitope. In contrast, MAbs 1G5.4-A1-C3 and 1C6.3 had low (0.47- to 1.67-fold RADS values against multiple epitopes. PAb DENV complex-reactions occurred through moderately-high (2.77- and 3.11-fold RADS values against the LX1 epitope. MAb 1G5.3 reacted with xSGKx motifs present in DENV-4 NS1 and E glycoproteins, HIV-1 gp41 and factor IXa, while natural C-C bridge formations or

  2. Targeting FcRn for the modulation of antibody dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, E Sally; Devanaboyina, Siva Charan; Ober, Raimund J

    2015-10-01

    The MHC class I-related receptor, FcRn, is a multitasking protein that transports its IgG ligand within and across cells of diverse origins. The role of this receptor as a global regulator of IgG homeostasis and transport, combined with knowledge of the molecular details of FcRn-IgG interactions, has led to opportunities to modulate the in vivo dynamics of antibodies and their antigens through protein engineering. Consequently, the generation of half-life extended antibodies has shown a rapid expansion over the past decade. Further, FcRn itself can be targeted by inhibitors to induce decreased levels of circulating IgGs, which could have applications in multiple clinical settings. The engineering of antibody-antigen interactions to reduce antibody-mediated buffering of soluble ligand has also developed into an active area of investigation, leading to novel antibody platforms designed to result in more effective antigen clearance. Similarly, the target-mediated elimination of antibodies by internalizing, membrane bound antigens (receptors) can be decreased using novel engineering approaches. These strategies, combined with subcellular trafficking analyses of antibody/antigen/FcRn behavior in cells to predict in vivo behavior, have considerable promise for the production of next generation therapeutics and diagnostics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Epitope Mapping of a Monoclonal Antibody Directed against Neisserial Heparin Binding Antigen Using Next Generation Sequencing of Antigen-Specific Libraries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Domina

    Full Text Available We explore here the potential of a newly described technology, which is named PROFILER and is based on next generation sequencing of gene-specific lambda phage-displayed libraries, to rapidly and accurately map monoclonal antibody (mAb epitopes. For this purpose, we used a novel mAb (designated 31E10/E7 directed against Neisserial Heparin-Binding Antigen (NHBA, a component of the anti-group B meningococcus Bexsero® vaccine. An NHBA phage-displayed library was affinity-selected with mAb 31E10/E7, followed by massive sequencing of the inserts present in antibody-selected phage pools. Insert analysis identified an amino acid stretch (D91-A128 in the N-terminal domain, which was shared by all of the mAb-enriched fragments. Moreover, a recombinant fragment encompassing this sequence could recapitulate the immunoreactivity of the entire NHBA molecule against mAb 31E10/E7. These results were confirmed using a panel of overlapping recombinant fragments derived from the NHBA vaccine variant and a set of chemically synthetized peptides covering the 10 most frequent antigenic variants. Furthermore, hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass-spectrometry analysis of the NHBA-mAb 31E10/E7 complex was also compatible with mapping of the epitope to the D91-A128 region. Collectively, these results indicate that the PROFILER technology can reliably identify epitope-containing antigenic fragments and requires considerably less work, time and reagents than other epitope mapping methods.

  4. Vaccine Targeting of Subdominant CD8+ T Cell Epitopes Increases the Breadth of the T Cell Response upon Viral Challenge, but May Impair Immediate Virus Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Maria A; Pedersen, Louise Holm; Jahn, Marie Louise

    2016-01-01

    to a vaccine expressing the same Ag without its immunodominant epitope. We found that removal of the dominant epitope allowed the induction of CD8(+) T cell responses targeting at least two otherwise subdominant epitopes. Importantly, the overall magnitude of the induced T cell responses was similar, allowing......As a result of the difficulties in making efficient vaccines against genetically unstable viruses such as HIV, it has been suggested that future vaccines should preferentially target subdominant epitopes, the idea being that this should allow a greater breadth of the induced T cell response and......, hence, a greater efficiency in controlling escape variants. However, to our knowledge the evidence supporting this concept is limited at best. To improve upon this, we used the murine lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus model and adenoviral vectors to compare a vaccine expressing unmodified Ag...

  5. Structure-based, targeted deglycosylation of HIV-1 gp120 and effects on neutralization sensitivity and antibody recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, Markus; Pancera, Marie; Kwong, Peter D.; Kolchinsky, Peter; Grundner, Christoph; Wang Liping; Hendrickson, Wayne A.; Sodroski, Joseph; Wyatt, Richard

    2003-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) exterior envelope glycoprotein, gp120, mediates receptor binding and is the major target for neutralizing antibodies. Primary HIV-1 isolates are characteristically more resistant to broadly neutralizing antibodies, although the structural basis for this resistance remains obscure. Most broadly neutralizing antibodies are directed against functionally conserved gp120 regions involved in binding to either the primary virus receptor, CD4, or the viral coreceptor molecules that normally function as chemokine receptors. These antibodies are known as CD4 binding site (CD4BS) and CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies, respectively. Inspection of the gp120 crystal structure reveals that although the receptor-binding regions lack glycosylation, sugar moieties lie proximal to both receptor-binding sites on gp120 and thus in proximity to both the CD4BS and the CD4i epitopes. In this study, guided by the X-ray crystal structure of gp120, we deleted four N-linked glycosylation sites that flank the receptor-binding regions. We examined the effects of selected changes on the sensitivity of two prototypic HIV-1 primary isolates to neutralization by antibodies. Surprisingly, removal of a single N-linked glycosylation site at the base of the gp120 third variable region (V3 loop) increased the sensitivity of the primary viruses to neutralization by CD4BS antibodies. Envelope glycoprotein oligomers on the cell surface derived from the V3 glycan-deficient virus were better recognized by a CD4BS antibody and a V3 loop antibody than were the wild-type glycoproteins. Absence of all four glycosylation sites rendered a primary isolate sensitive to CD4i antibody-mediated neutralization. Thus, carbohydrates that flank receptor-binding regions on gp120 protect primary HIV-1 isolates from antibody-mediated neutralization

  6. The road to toxin-targeted therapeutic antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozel, Thomas R

    2014-07-08

    Once an infection by a toxin-producing bacterium is well established, therapies such as antibiotics that target bacterial growth may have little impact on the ultimate patient outcome. In such cases, toxin-neutralizing antibodies offer an opportunity to block key virulence factors. New work by A. K. Varshney, X. Wang, J. L. Aguilar, M. D. Scharff, and B. C. Fries [mBio 5(3):e01007-14, 2014, doi:10.1128/mBio.01007-14] highlights the role of the antibody isotype in determining the efficacy of toxin-neutralizing antibodies in vivo. Varshney et al. examined the role of antibody isotype for protection in murine models of staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB)-induced lethal shock and sepsis produced by SEB-producing Staphylococcus aureus. Murine antibodies of the IgG2a isotype were more protective than antibodies of the IgG1 and IgG2b isotypes that have identical variable regions and binding activity. These results add to the complexity inherent in the selection and optimization of antibodies for anti-infective passive immunization and emphasize the need to use relevant in vivo models to evaluate potential therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. Copyright © 2014 Kozel.

  7. Circulating Memory CD4+ T Cells Target Conserved Epitopes of Rhinovirus Capsid Proteins and Respond Rapidly to Experimental Infection in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehling, Lyndsey M; Mai, Duy T; Kwok, William W; Heymann, Peter W; Pomés, Anna; Woodfolk, Judith A

    2016-10-15

    Rhinovirus (RV) is a major cause of common cold and an important trigger of acute episodes of chronic lung diseases. Antigenic variation across the numerous RV strains results in frequent infections and a lack of durable cross-protection. Because the nature of human CD4 + T cells that target RV is largely unknown, T cell epitopes of RV capsid proteins were analyzed, and cognate T cells were characterized in healthy subjects and those infected by intranasal challenge. Peptide epitopes of the RV-A16 capsid proteins VP1 and VP2 were identified by peptide/MHC class II tetramer-guided epitope mapping, validated by direct ex vivo enumeration, and interrogated using a variety of in silico methods. Among noninfected subjects, those circulating RV-A16-specific CD4 + T cells detected at the highest frequencies targeted 10 unique epitopes that bound to diverse HLA-DR molecules. T cell epitopes localized to conserved molecular regions of biological significance to the virus were enriched for HLA class I and II binding motifs, and constituted both species-specific (RV-A) and pan-species (RV-A, -B, and -C) varieties. Circulating epitope-specific T cells comprised both memory Th1 and T follicular helper cells, and were rapidly expanded and activated after intranasal challenge with RV-A16. Cross-reactivity was evidenced by identification of a common *0401-restricted epitope for RV-A16 and RV-A39 by tetramer-guided epitope mapping and the ability for RV-A16-specific Th1 cells to proliferate in response to their RV-A39 peptide counterpart. The preferential persistence of high-frequency RV-specific memory Th1 cells that recognize a limited set of conserved epitopes likely arises from iterative priming by previous exposures to different RV strains. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  8. Fibril specific, conformation dependent antibodies recognize a generic epitope common to amyloid fibrils and fibrillar oligomers that is absent in prefibrillar oligomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasool Suhail

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyloid-related degenerative diseases are associated with the accumulation of misfolded proteins as amyloid fibrils in tissue. In Alzheimer disease (AD, amyloid accumulates in several distinct types of insoluble plaque deposits, intracellular Aβ and as soluble oligomers and the relationships between these deposits and their pathological significance remains unclear. Conformation dependent antibodies have been reported that specifically recognize distinct assembly states of amyloids, including prefibrillar oligomers and fibrils. Results We immunized rabbits with a morphologically homogeneous population of Aβ42 fibrils. The resulting immune serum (OC specifically recognizes fibrils, but not random coil monomer or prefibrillar oligomers, indicating fibrils display a distinct conformation dependent epitope that is absent in prefibrillar oligomers. The fibril epitope is also displayed by fibrils of other types of amyloids, indicating that the epitope is a generic feature of the polypeptide backbone. The fibril specific antibody also recognizes 100,000 × G soluble fibrillar oligomers ranging in size from dimer to greater than 250 kDa on western blots. The fibrillar oligomers recognized by OC are immunologically distinct from prefibrillar oligomers recognized by A11, even though their sizes overlap broadly, indicating that size is not a reliable indicator of oligomer conformation. The immune response to prefibrillar oligomers and fibrils is not sequence specific and antisera of the same specificity are produced in response to immunization with islet amyloid polypeptide prefibrillar oligomer mimics and fibrils. The fibril specific antibodies stain all types of amyloid deposits in human AD brain. Diffuse amyloid deposits stain intensely with anti-fibril antibody although they are thioflavin S negative, suggesting that they are indeed fibrillar in conformation. OC also stains islet amyloid deposits in transgenic mouse models of type

  9. Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource (IEDB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This repository contains antibody/B cell and T cell epitope information and epitope prediction and analysis tools for use by the research community worldwide. Immune...

  10. Neutralization of tier-2 viruses and epitope profiling of plasma antibodies from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infected donors from India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raiees Andrabi

    Full Text Available Broadly cross neutralizing antibodies (NAbs are generated in a group of HIV-1 infected individuals during the natural infection, but little is known about their prevalence in patients infected with viral subtypes from different geographical regions. We tested here the neutralizing efficiency of plasma antibodies from 80 HIV-1 infected antiretroviral drug naive patients against a panel of subtype-B and C tier 2 viruses. We detected cross-neutralizing antibodies in approximately 19-27% of the plasma, however the subtype-C specific neutralization efficiency predominated (p = 0.004. The neutralizing activity was shown to be exclusively mediated by the immunoglobulin G (IgG fraction in the representative plasma samples. Epitope mapping of three, the most cross-neutralizing plasma (CNP AIIMS206, AIIMS239 and AIIMS249 with consensus-C overlapping envelope peptides revealed ten different binding specificities with only V3 and IDR being common. The V3 and IDR were highly antigenic regions but no correlation between their reciprocal Max50 binding titers and neutralization was observed. In addition, the neutralizing activity of CNP was not substantially reduced by V3 and gp41 peptides except a modest contribution of MPER peptide. The MPER was rarely recognized by plasma antibodies though antibody depletion and competition experiments demonstrated MPER dependent neutralization in two out of three CNP. Interestingly, the binding specificity of one of the CNP (AIIMS206 overlapped with broadly neutralizing mAb 2F5 epitope. Overall, the data suggest that, despite the low immunogenicity of HIV-1 MPER, the antibodies directed to this region may serve as crucial reagents for HIV-1 vaccine design.

  11. Targeted cancer therapy through antibody fragments-decorated nanomedicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibakhshi, Abbas; Abarghooi Kahaki, Fatemeh; Ahangarzadeh, Shahrzad; Yaghoobi, Hajar; Yarian, Fatemeh; Arezumand, Roghaye; Ranjbari, Javad; Mokhtarzadeh, Ahad; de la Guardia, Miguel

    2017-12-28

    Active targeting in cancer nanomedicine, for improved delivery of agents and diagnose, has been reviewed as a successful way for facilitating active uptake of theranostic agents by the tumor cells. The application of a targeting moiety in the targeted carrier complexes can play an important role in differentiating between tumor and healthy tissues. The pharmaceutical carriers, as main part of complexes, can be polymeric nanoparticles, micelles, liposomes, nanogels and carbon nanotubes. The antibodies are among the natural ligands with highest affinity and specificity to target pharmaceutical nanoparticle conjugates. However, the limitations, such as size and long circulating half-lives, hinder reproducible manufacture in clinical studies. Therefore, novel approaches have moved towards minimizing and engineering conventional antibodies as fragments like scFv, Fab, nanobody, bispecific antibody, bifunctional antibody, diabody and minibody preserving their functional potential. Different formats of antibody fragments have been reviewed in this literature update, in terms of structure and function, as smart ligands in cancer diagnosis and therapy of tumor cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterization of 65 Epitope-Specific Dystrophin Monoclonal Antibodies in Canine and Murine Models of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy by Immunostaining and Western Blot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jin-Hong; Yue, Yongping; Morris, Glenn E.; McIntosh, Mark A.; Duan, Dongsheng

    2014-01-01

    Epitope-specific monoclonal antibodies can provide unique insights for studying cellular proteins. Dystrophin is one of the largest cytoskeleton proteins encoded by 79 exons. The absence of dystrophin results in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Over the last two decades, dozens of exon-specific human dystrophin monoclonal antibodies have been developed and successfully used for DMD diagnosis. Unfortunately, the majority of these antibodies have not been thoroughly characterized in dystrophin-deficient dogs, an outstanding large animal model for translational research. To fill the gap, we performed a comprehensive study on 65 dystrophin monoclonal antibodies in normal and dystrophic dogs (heart and skeletal muscle) by immunofluorescence staining and western blot. For comparison, we also included striated muscles from normal BL10 and dystrophin-null mdx mice. Our analysis revealed distinctive species, tissue and assay-dependent recognition patterns of different antibodies. Importantly, we identified 15 antibodies that can consistently detect full-length canine dystrophin in both immunostaining and western blot. Our results will serve as an important reference for studying DMD in the canine model. PMID:24516626

  13. Disease-specific monoclonal antibodies targeting glutamate decarboxylase impair GABAergic neurotransmission and affect motor learning and behavioral functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario U Manto

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Autoantibodies to the smaller isoform of glutamate decarboxylase can be found in patients with type 1 diabetes and a number of neurological disorders, including stiff-person syndrome, cerebellar ataxia and limbic encephalitis. The detection of disease-specific autoantibody epitopes led to the hypothesis that distinct glutamate decarboxylase autoantibodies may elicit specific neurological phenotypes. We explored the in vitro/in vivo effects of well-characterized monoclonal glutamate decarboxylase antibodies. We found that glutamate decarboxylase autoantibodies present in patients with stiff person syndrome (n = 7 and cerebellar ataxia (n = 15 recognized an epitope distinct from that recognized by glutamate decarboxylase autoantibodies present in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (n = 10 or limbic encephalitis (n = 4. We demonstrated that the administration of a monoclonal glutamate decarboxylase antibody representing this epitope specificity (1 disrupted in vitro the association of glutamate decarboxylase with γ-Aminobutyric acid containing synaptic vesicles, (2 depressed the inhibitory synaptic transmission in cerebellar slices with a gradual time course and a lasting suppressive effect, (3 significantly decreased conditioned eyelid responses evoked in mice, with no modification of learning curves in the classical eyeblink-conditioning task, (4 markedly impaired the facilitatory effect exerted by the premotor cortex over the motor cortex in a paired-pulse stimulation paradigm, and (5 induced decreased exploratory behavior and impaired locomotor function in rats. These findings support the specific targeting of glutamate decarboxylase by its autoantibodies in the pathogenesis of stiff-person syndrome and cerebellar ataxia. Therapies of these disorders based on selective removal of such glutamate decarboxylase antibodies could be envisioned.

  14. Epitope characterization and variable region sequence of f1-40, a high-affinity monoclonal antibody to botulinum neurotoxin type a (Hall strain.

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    Miles C Scotcher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Botulism, an often fatal neuroparalytic disease, is caused by botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT which consist of a family of seven serotypes (A-H produced by the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium botulinum. BoNT, considered the most potent biological toxin known, is a 150 kDa protein consisting of a 100 kDa heavy-chain (Hc and a 50 kDa light-chain (Lc. F1-40 is a mouse-derived, IgG1 monoclonal antibody that binds the light chain of BoNT serotype A (BoNT/A and is used in a sensitive immunoassay for toxin detection. We report the fine epitope mapping of F1-40 and the deduced amino acid sequence of the variable regions of the heavy and light chains of the antibody. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To characterize the binding epitope of F1-40, three complementary experimental approaches were selected. Firstly, recombinant peptide fragments of BoNT/A light-chain were used in Western blots to identify the epitope domains. Secondly, a peptide phage-display library was used to identify the specific amino acid sequences. Thirdly, the three-dimensional structure of BoNT/A was examined in silico, and the amino acid sequences determined from the phage-display studies were mapped onto the three-dimensional structure in order to visualize the epitope. F1-40 was found to bind a peptide fragment of BoNT/A, designated L1-3, which spans from T125 to L200. The motif QPDRS was identified by phage-display, and was mapped to a region within L1-3. When the three amino acids Q138, P139 and D140 were all mutated to glycine, binding of F1-40 to the recombinant BoNT/A light chain peptide was abolished. Q-138, P-139 and D-140 form a loop on the external surface of BoNT/A, exposed to solvent and accessible to F1-40 binding. CONCLUSIONS: The epitope of F1-40 was localized to a single exposed loop (ss4, ss5 on the Lc of BoNT. Furthermore amino acids Q138, P139 and D140 forming the tip of the loop appear critical for binding.

  15. Pro region engineering of nerve growth factor by deep mutational scanning enables a yeast platform for conformational epitope mapping of anti-NGF monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Cucurella, Angélica V; Zhu, Yaqi; Bowen, Scott J; Bergeron, Lisa M; Whitehead, Timothy A

    2018-04-12

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) plays a central role in multiple chronic pain conditions. As such, anti-NGF monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that function by antagonizing NGF downstream signaling are leading drug candidates for non-opioid pain relief. To evaluate anti-canine NGF (cNGF) mAbs we sought a yeast surface display platform of cNGF. Both mature cNGF and pro-cNGF displayed on the yeast surface but bound conformationally sensitive mAbs at most 2.5-fold in mean fluorescence intensity above background, suggesting that cNGF was mostly misfolded. To improve the amount of folded, displayed cNGF, we used comprehensive mutagenesis, FACS, and deep sequencing to identify point mutants in the pro-region of canine NGF that properly enhance the folded protein displayed on the yeast surface. Out of 1,737 tested single point mutants in the pro region, 49 increased the amount of NGF recognized by conformationally sensitive mAbs. These gain-of-function mutations cluster around residues A-61-P-26. Gain-of-function mutants were additive, and a construct containing three mutations increased amount of folded cNGF to 23- fold above background. Using this new cNGF construct, fine conformational epitopes for tanezumab and three anti-cNGF mAbs were evaluated. The epitope revealed by the yeast experiments largely overlapped with the tanezumab epitope previously determined by X-ray crystallography. The other mAbs showed site-specific differences with tanezumab. As the number of binding epitopes of functionally neutralizing anti-NGF mAbs on NGF are limited, subtle differences in the individual interacting residues on NGF that bind each mAb contribute to the understanding of each antibody and variations in its neutralizing activity. These results demonstrate the potential of deep sequencing-guided protein engineering to improve the production of folded surface-displayed protein, and the resulting cNGF construct provides a platform to map conformational epitopes for other anti-neurotrophin m

  16. Specific targeting of tumor cells by lyophilisomes functionalized with antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bracht, Etienne; Stolle, Sarah; Hafmans, Theo G.; Boerman, Otto C.; Oosterwijk, Egbert; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Daamen, Willeke F.

    Lyophilisomes are a novel class of proteinaceous biodegradable nano/micro drug delivery capsules prepared by freezing, annealing and Iyophilization. In the present study, lyophilisomes were functionalized for active targeting by antibody conjugation in order to obtain a selective drug-carrier

  17. GABARAPL1 antibodies: target one protein, get one free!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Grand, Jaclyn Nicole; Chakrama, Fatima Zahra; Seguin-Py, Stéphanie; Fraichard, Annick; Delage-Mourroux, Régis; Jouvenot, Michèle; Risold, Pierre-Yves; Boyer-Guittaut, Michaël

    2011-11-01

    Atg8 is a yeast protein involved in the autophagic process and in particular in the elongation of autophagosomes. In mammals, several orthologs have been identified and are classed into two subfamilies: the LC3 subfamily and the GABARAP subfamily, referred to simply as the LC3 or GABARAP families. GABARAPL1 (GABARAP-like protein 1), one of the proteins belonging to the GABARAP (GABA(A) receptor-associated protein) family, is highly expressed in the central nervous system and implicated in processes such as receptor and vesicle transport as well as autophagy. The proteins that make up the GABARAP family demonstrate conservation of their amino acid sequences and protein structures. In humans, GABARAPL1 shares 86% identity with GABARAP and 61% with GABARAPL2 (GATE-16). The identification of the individual proteins is thus very limited when working in vivo due to a lack of unique peptide sequences from which specific antibodies can be developed. Actually, and to our knowledge, there are no available antibodies on the market that are entirely specific to GABARAPL1 and the same may be true of the anti-GABARAP antibodies. In this study, we sought to examine the specificity of three antibodies targeted against different peptide sequences within GABARAPL1: CHEM-CENT (an antibody raised against a short peptide sequence within the center of the protein), PTG-NTER (an antibody raised against the N-terminus of the protein) and PTG-FL (an antibody raised against the full-length protein). The results described in this article demonstrate the importance of testing antibody specificity under the conditions for which it will be used experimentally, a caution that should be taken when studying the expression of the GABARAP family proteins.

  18. Combined Roles of Human IgG Subclass, Alternative Complement Pathway Activation, and Epitope Density in the Bactericidal Activity of Antibodies to Meningococcal Factor H Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuntini, Serena; Reason, Donald C.

    2012-01-01

    Meningococcal vaccines containing factor H binding protein (fHbp) are in clinical development. fHbp binds human fH, which enables the meningococcus to resist complement-mediated bacteriolysis. Previously, we found that chimeric human IgG1 mouse anti-fHbp monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) had human complement-mediated bactericidal activity only if the MAb inhibited fH binding. Since IgG subclasses differ in their ability to activate complement, we investigated the role of human IgG subclasses on antibody functional activity. We constructed chimeric MAbs in which three different murine fHbp-specific binding domains were each paired with human IgG1, IgG2, or IgG3. Against a wild-type group B isolate, all three IgG3 MAbs, irrespective of their ability to inhibit fH binding, had bactericidal activity that was >5-fold higher than the respective IgG1 MAbs, while the IgG2 MAbs had the least activity. Against a mutant with increased fHbp expression, the anti-fHbp MAbs elicited greater C4b deposition (classical pathway) and greater bactericidal activity than against the wild-type strain, and the IgG1 MAbs had similar or greater activity than the respective IgG3 MAbs. The bactericidal activity against both wild-type and mutant strains also was dependent, in part, on activation of the alternative complement pathway. Thus, at lower epitope density in the wild-type strain, the IgG3 anti-fHbp MAbs had the greatest bactericidal activity. At a higher epitope density in the mutant, the IgG1 MAbs had similar or greater bactericidal activity than the IgG3 MAbs, and the activity was less dependent on the inhibition of fH binding than at a lower epitope density. PMID:22064712

  19. IDEPI: rapid prediction of HIV-1 antibody epitopes and other phenotypic features from sequence data using a flexible machine learning platform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Lance Hepler

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Since its identification in 1983, HIV-1 has been the focus of a research effort unprecedented in scope and difficulty, whose ultimate goals--a cure and a vaccine--remain elusive. One of the fundamental challenges in accomplishing these goals is the tremendous genetic variability of the virus, with some genes differing at as many as 40% of nucleotide positions among circulating strains. Because of this, the genetic bases of many viral phenotypes, most notably the susceptibility to neutralization by a particular antibody, are difficult to identify computationally. Drawing upon open-source general-purpose machine learning algorithms and libraries, we have developed a software package IDEPI (IDentify EPItopes for learning genotype-to-phenotype predictive models from sequences with known phenotypes. IDEPI can apply learned models to classify sequences of unknown phenotypes, and also identify specific sequence features which contribute to a particular phenotype. We demonstrate that IDEPI achieves performance similar to or better than that of previously published approaches on four well-studied problems: finding the epitopes of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNab, determining coreceptor tropism of the virus, identifying compartment-specific genetic signatures of the virus, and deducing drug-resistance associated mutations. The cross-platform Python source code (released under the GPL 3.0 license, documentation, issue tracking, and a pre-configured virtual machine for IDEPI can be found at https://github.com/veg/idepi.

  20. Identification of a linear epitope on the haemagglutinin protein of pandemic A/H1N1 2009 influenza virus using monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Zhang, Jian; Qiao, Chuanling; Wang, Jingfei; Yang, Huanliang; Chen, Hualan

    2014-06-01

    A novel influenza A/H1N1 virus, emerging from Mexico and the United States in the spring of 2009, caused the pandemic human infection of 2009-2010. The haemagglutinin (HA) glycoprotein is the major surface antigen of influenza A virus and plays an important role in viral infection. In this study, three hybridoma cell lines secreting specific monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) against the HA protein of pandemic influenza A/H1N1 2009 virus were generated with the recombinant plasmid pCAGGS-HA as an immunogen. Using Pepscan analysis, the binding sites of these Mabs were identified in a linear region of the HA protein. Further, refined mapping was conducted using truncated peptides expressed as GST-fusion proteins in E. coli. We found that the (250)VPRYA(254) motif was the minimal determinant of the linear epitope that could be recognized by the Mabs. Alignment with sequences from the databases showed that the amino acid residues of this epitope were highly conserved among all pandemic A/H1N1 2009 viruses as well as the classical swine H1N1 viruses isolated to date. These results provide additional insights into the antigenic structure of the HA protein and virus-antibody interactions at the amino acid level, which may assist in the development of specific diagnostic methods for influenza viruses.

  1. IDEPI: rapid prediction of HIV-1 antibody epitopes and other phenotypic features from sequence data using a flexible machine learning platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepler, N Lance; Scheffler, Konrad; Weaver, Steven; Murrell, Ben; Richman, Douglas D; Burton, Dennis R; Poignard, Pascal; Smith, Davey M; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L

    2014-09-01

    Since its identification in 1983, HIV-1 has been the focus of a research effort unprecedented in scope and difficulty, whose ultimate goals--a cure and a vaccine--remain elusive. One of the fundamental challenges in accomplishing these goals is the tremendous genetic variability of the virus, with some genes differing at as many as 40% of nucleotide positions among circulating strains. Because of this, the genetic bases of many viral phenotypes, most notably the susceptibility to neutralization by a particular antibody, are difficult to identify computationally. Drawing upon open-source general-purpose machine learning algorithms and libraries, we have developed a software package IDEPI (IDentify EPItopes) for learning genotype-to-phenotype predictive models from sequences with known phenotypes. IDEPI can apply learned models to classify sequences of unknown phenotypes, and also identify specific sequence features which contribute to a particular phenotype. We demonstrate that IDEPI achieves performance similar to or better than that of previously published approaches on four well-studied problems: finding the epitopes of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNab), determining coreceptor tropism of the virus, identifying compartment-specific genetic signatures of the virus, and deducing drug-resistance associated mutations. The cross-platform Python source code (released under the GPL 3.0 license), documentation, issue tracking, and a pre-configured virtual machine for IDEPI can be found at https://github.com/veg/idepi.

  2. Broad-spectrum inhibition of HIV-1 by a monoclonal antibody directed against a gp120-induced epitope of CD4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuele E Burastero

    Full Text Available To penetrate susceptible cells, HIV-1 sequentially interacts with two highly conserved cellular receptors, CD4 and a chemokine receptor like CCR5 or CXCR4. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs directed against such receptors are currently under clinical investigation as potential preventive or therapeutic agents. We immunized Balb/c mice with molecular complexes of the native, trimeric HIV-1 envelope (Env bound to a soluble form of the human CD4 receptor. Sera from immunized mice were found to contain gp120-CD4 complex-enhanced antibodies and showed broad-spectrum HIV-1-inhibitory activity. A proportion of MAbs derived from these mice preferentially recognized complex-enhanced epitopes. In particular, a CD4-specific MAb designated DB81 (IgG1Κ was found to preferentially bind to a complex-enhanced epitope on the D2 domain of human CD4. MAb DB81 also recognized chimpanzee CD4, but not baboon or macaque CD4, which exhibit sequence divergence in the D2 domain. Functionally, MAb DB81 displayed broad HIV-1-inhibitory activity, but it did not exert suppressive effects on T-cell activation in vitro. The variable regions of the heavy and light chains of MAb DB81 were sequenced. Due to its broad-spectrum anti-HIV-1 activity and lack of immunosuppressive effects, a humanized derivative of MAb DB81 could provide a useful complement to current preventive or therapeutic strategies against HIV-1.

  3. Structural study of liposomes loaded with a GM3 lactone analogue for the targeting of tumor epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristori, Sandra; Di Cola, Emanuela; Lunghi, Carlotta; Richichi, Barbara; Nativi, Cristina

    2009-12-01

    Therapeutic vaccination with tumor antigens is a new approach in cancer treatment, which aims at inducing immune response while avoiding the side effects generally associated to many conventional therapies. To improve the efficacy of vaccines, suitable carriers may be used. Herein the insertion of a thioether analogue of GM3 lactone (SNeuAC-C14) into liposomes is reported. SNeuAC-C14 is a potential vaccine for the targeting of saccharide-based tumor epitopes. Different liposome formulations were designed to act as carriers and to generate recognition by tumor epitopes. The structural study of pure and loaded liposomes was carried out by synchrotron Small Angle X-ray Scattering and was complemented by Dynamic Light Scattering and Zeta potential measurements. This provided detailed information on relevant properties of the investigated host-guest structures and showed that the active unit of SNeuAC-C14, i.e. its spiro tricyclic moiety, was located in the polar head region of the liposome bilayer, which is an important requirement for recognition phenomena. Moreover, it was found that most of the SNeuAC-C14/liposome complexes were positively charged. The obtained results allow these systems to be considered as candidates to promote immunoresponse in tumor cells.

  4. Structure of an HIV-1-neutralizing antibody target, the lipid-bound gp41 envelope membrane proximal region trimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Patrick N; Sage, Harvey; Dennison, S Moses; Martin, Jeffrey W; Donald, Bruce R; Alam, S Munir; Haynes, Barton F; Spicer, Leonard D

    2014-01-28

    The membrane proximal external region (MPER) of HIV-1 glycoprotein (gp) 41 is involved in viral-host cell membrane fusion. It contains short amino acid sequences that are binding sites for the HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies 2F5, 4E10, and 10E8, making these binding sites important targets for HIV-1 vaccine development. We report a high-resolution structure of a designed MPER trimer assembled on a detergent micelle. The NMR solution structure of this trimeric domain, designated gp41-M-MAT, shows that the three MPER peptides each adopt symmetric α-helical conformations exposing the amino acid side chains of the antibody binding sites. The helices are closely associated at their N termini, bend between the 2F5 and 4E10 epitopes, and gradually separate toward the C termini, where they associate with the membrane. The mAbs 2F5 and 4E10 bind gp41-M-MAT with nanomolar affinities, consistent with the substantial exposure of their respective epitopes in the trimer structure. The traditional structure determination of gp41-M-MAT using the Xplor-NIH protocol was validated by independently determining the structure using the DISCO sparse-data protocol, which exploits geometric arrangement algorithms that guarantee to compute all structures and assignments that satisfy the data.

  5. Antibody targeting of Cathepsin S induces antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok Hang Fai

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteolytic enzymes have been implicated in driving tumor progression by means of their cancer cell microenvironment activity where they promote proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion. Therapeutic strategies have focused on attenuating their activity using small molecule inhibitors, but the association of proteases with the cell surface during cancer progression opens up the possibility of targeting these using antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC. Cathepsin S is a lysosomal cysteine protease that promotes the growth and invasion of tumour and endothelial cells during cancer progression. Our analysis of colorectal cancer patient biopsies shows that cathepsin S associates with the cell membrane indicating a potential for ADCC targeting. Results Here we report the cell surface characterization of cathepsin S and the development of a humanized antibody (Fsn0503h with immune effector function and a stable in vivo half-life of 274 hours. Cathepsin S is expressed on the surface of tumor cells representative of colorectal and pancreatic cancer (23%-79% positive expression. Furthermore the binding of Fsn0503h to surface associated cathepsin S results in natural killer (NK cell targeted tumor killing. In a colorectal cancer model Fsn0503h elicits a 22% cytotoxic effect. Conclusions This data highlights the potential to target cell surface associated enzymes, such as cathepsin S, as therapeutic targets using antibodies capable of elicitingADCC in tumor cells.

  6. Anti-citrullinated glucose-6-phosphate isomerase peptide antibodies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis are associated with HLA-DRB1 shared epitope alleles and disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, N; Matsumoto, I; Ito, I; Kawasaki, A; Tanaka, Y; Inoue, A; Tsuboi, H; Suzuki, T; Hayashi, T; Ito, S; Tsuchiya, N; Sumida, T

    2013-04-01

    To identify and characterize anti-citrullinated glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI) peptide antibodies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Nine GPI arginine-bearing peptides in human GPI protein were selected and cyclic citrullinated GPI peptides (CCG-1-9) were constructed. Samples were obtained from RA (n = 208), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (n = 101), Sjögren's syndrome (SS; n = 101) and healthy controls (n = 174). Antibodies against CCG-1-9 were measured, and anti-citrullinated α-enolase-1 (CEP-1), -cyclic citrullinated peptides (CCP) and -GPI proteins antibodies were also examined. Patients with RA were genotyped for HLA-DRB1. The numbers of shared epitope (SE) alleles were counted and compared with those of the autoantibodies. Rabbit GPI was citrullinated with rabbit peptidylarginine deiminase and immunoblot analysis of RA sera performed. The levels of autoantibodies were compared before and after treatment with TNF antagonists in 58 RA patients. Anti-CCG-2, -4 and -7 antibodies were detected in 25·5, 33·2 and 37·0% patients with RA, respectively, and these antibodies were very specific for RA (specificity, 98·1-99·7%). Altogether, 44·2, 86·1 and 13·9% of RA sera were positive for anti-CEP-1, -CCP and -GPI protein antibodies, respectively. Anti-CCG-2, -4 and -7 antibodies were correlated with anti-CCP and anti-CEP-1 antibodies and with the presence of HLA-DRB1 SE alleles. Citrullinated GPI protein was detected using RA sera. Treatment with tumour necrosis factor antagonists reduced significantly the levels of anti-CCG-2 and -7 but not of anti-CEP-1 antibodies. This is the first report documenting the presence of anti-CCG antibodies in RA. Anti-CCG-2 and -7 antibodies could be considered as markers for the diagnosis of RA and its disease activity. © 2012 British Society for Immunology.

  7. A single point in protein trafficking by Plasmodium falciparum determines the expression of major antigens on the surface of infected erythrocytes targeted by human antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jo-Anne; Howell, Katherine B; Langer, Christine; Maier, Alexander G; Hasang, Wina; Rogerson, Stephen J; Petter, Michaela; Chesson, Joanne; Stanisic, Danielle I; Duffy, Michael F; Cooke, Brian M; Siba, Peter M; Mueller, Ivo; Bull, Peter C; Marsh, Kevin; Fowkes, Freya J I; Beeson, James G

    2016-11-01

    Antibodies to blood-stage antigens of Plasmodium falciparum play a pivotal role in human immunity to malaria. During parasite development, multiple proteins are trafficked from the intracellular parasite to the surface of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes (IEs). However, the relative importance of different proteins as targets of acquired antibodies, and key pathways involved in trafficking major antigens remain to be clearly defined. We quantified antibodies to surface antigens among children, adults, and pregnant women from different malaria-exposed regions. We quantified the importance of antigens as antibody targets using genetically engineered P. falciparum with modified surface antigen expression. Genetic deletion of the trafficking protein skeleton-binding protein-1 (SBP1), which is involved in trafficking the surface antigen PfEMP1, led to a dramatic reduction in antibody recognition of IEs and the ability of human antibodies to promote opsonic phagocytosis of IEs, a key mechanism of parasite clearance. The great majority of antibody epitopes on the IE surface were SBP1-dependent. This was demonstrated using parasite isolates with different genetic or phenotypic backgrounds, and among antibodies from children, adults, and pregnant women in different populations. Comparisons of antibody reactivity to parasite isolates with SBP1 deletion or inhibited PfEMP1 expression suggest that PfEMP1 is the dominant target of acquired human antibodies, and that other P. falciparum IE surface proteins are minor targets. These results establish SBP1 as part of a critical pathway for the trafficking of major surface antigens targeted by human immunity, and have key implications for vaccine development, and quantifying immunity in populations.

  8. Dopamine-2 receptor extracellular N-terminus regulates receptor surface availability and is the target of human pathogenic antibodies from children with movement and psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinmaz, Nese; Tea, Fiona; Pilli, Deepti; Zou, Alicia; Amatoury, Mazen; Nguyen, Tina; Merheb, Vera; Ramanathan, Sudarshini; Cooper, Sandra T; Dale, Russell C; Brilot, Fabienne

    2016-12-01

    Anti-Dopamine-2 receptor (D2R) antibodies have been recently identified in a subgroup of children with autoimmune movement and psychiatric disorders, however the epitope(s) and mechanism of pathogenicity remain unknown. Here we report a major biological role for D2R extracellular N-terminus as a regulator of receptor surface availability, and as a major epitope targeted and impaired in brain autoimmunity. In transfected human cells, purified anti-D2R antibody from patients specifically and significantly reduced human D2R surface levels. Next, human D2R mutants modified in their extracellular domains were subcloned, and we analyzed the region bound by 35 anti-D2R antibody-positive patient sera using quantitative flow cytometry on live transfected cells. We found that N-glycosylation at amino acids N5 and/or N17 was critical for high surface expression in interaction with the last 15 residues of extracellular D2R N-terminus. No anti-D2R antibody-positive patient sera bound to the three extracellular loops, but all patient sera (35/35) targeted the extracellular N-terminus. Overall, patient antibody binding was dependent on two main regions encompassing amino acids 20 to 29, and 23 to 37. Residues 20 to 29 contributed to the majority of binding (77%, 27/35), among which 26% (7/27) sera bound to amino acids R20, P21, and F22, 37% (10/27) patients were dependent on residues at positions 26 and 29, that are different between humans and mice, and 30% (8/27) sera required R20, P21, F22, N23, D26, and A29. Seven patient sera bound to the region 23 to 37 independently of D26 and A29, but most sera exhibited N-glycosylation-independent epitope recognition at N23. Interestingly, no evident segregation of binding pattern according to patient clinical phenotype was observed. D2R N-terminus is a central epitope in autoimmune movement and psychiatric disorders and this knowledge could help the design of novel specific immune therapies tailored to improve patient outcome.

  9. ArrayPitope: Automated Analysis of Amino Acid Substitutions for Peptide Microarray-Based Antibody Epitope Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Skjødt; Østerbye, Thomas; Marcatili, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    of the data provided in such large-scale screenings is far from trivial and in most cases it requires advanced computational and statistical skills. Here, we present an online application for automated identification of linear B cell epitopes, allowing the non-expert user to analyse peptide microarray data......-HSA (and mouse anti-rabbit-Cy3). The application is made available at: www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/ArrayPitope....

  10. Monoclonal antibodies that bind to common epitopes on the dengue virus type 2 nonstructural-1 and envelope glycoproteins display weak neutralizing activity and differentiated responses to virulent strains: implications for pathogenesis and vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconar, Andrew K I

    2008-03-01

    The abilities of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that bind to defined sequential epitopes on the dengue virus (DENV) nonstructural-1 (NS1) glycoproteins to cross-react with epitopes on the DENV envelope (E) glycoproteins were investigated. In this study, some of these MAbs cross-reacted with the DENV type 2 (DENV-2) E glycoprotein and with synthetic peptides representing X-ray crystallographically confirmed surface-exposed regions on this glycoprotein. MAb 1G5.3 cross-reacted with the flavivirus-conserved 101-WGNGCGLFG-109 fusion sequence, the 273-SSGNL-277 DENV-2 hinge region sequence, and the 156-GKHGKEIKIT-165 sequence of virulent DENV-2 strains. MAb 1G5.4-A1-C3 cross-reacted with the 67-NTTTESRCPT-76 and 156-GKHGKEIKIT-165 sequences of virulent DENV-2 strains, the 338-EIMDLDNRHV-347 sequence from a highly virulent DENV-2 (M2) strain, and two epitopes on a virulent DENV-3 strain (288-KMDKLELKG-296 and 323-RVEYRGEDAP-332), which all contained target ELK/KLE-type motifs (underlined). These MAbs showed reduced cross-reactions with the corresponding sequences from weakly pathogenic strains of all four DENV serotypes and had either no (MAb 1G5.4-A1-C3) or weak (MAb 1G5.3) neutralizing activity against them. MAb 1G5.3 more strongly neutralized DENV-2 strains with higher pathogenic capacities, while MAb 1G5.4-A1-C3 showed increasing neutralizing titers against the virulent DENV-3 strain and the moderately virulent and highly virulent (M2) DENV-2 strains. These cross-reactions with the E glycoprotein accord with the observation that MAb 1G5.3 caused dramatic and lethal antibody-enhanced replication (AER) of a DENV-2 strain in vivo. Together with in vivo AER studies of these DENV strains using MAb 1G5.4-A1-C3, these results may account for the increased pathogenic capacities of such strains, which is likely to have important implications for pathogenesis and vaccines.

  11. Fluorometric titration approach for calibration of quantity of binding site of purified monoclonal antibody recognizing epitope/hapten nonfluorescent at 340 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaolan; Hu, Xiaolei; Xu, Bangtian; Wang, Xin; Qin, Jialin; He, Chenxiong; Xie, Yanling; Li, Yuanli; Liu, Lin; Liao, Fei

    2014-06-17

    A fluorometric titration approach was proposed for the calibration of the quantity of monoclonal antibody (mcAb) via the quench of fluorescence of tryptophan residues. It applied to purified mcAbs recognizing tryptophan-deficient epitopes, haptens nonfluorescent at 340 nm under the excitation at 280 nm, or fluorescent haptens bearing excitation valleys nearby 280 nm and excitation peaks nearby 340 nm to serve as Förster-resonance-energy-transfer (FRET) acceptors of tryptophan. Titration probes were epitopes/haptens themselves or conjugates of nonfluorescent haptens or tryptophan-deficient epitopes with FRET acceptors of tryptophan. Under the excitation at 280 nm, titration curves were recorded as fluorescence specific for the FRET acceptors or for mcAbs at 340 nm. To quantify the binding site of a mcAb, a universal model considering both static and dynamic quench by either type of probes was proposed for fitting to the titration curve. This was easy for fitting to fluorescence specific for the FRET acceptors but encountered nonconvergence for fitting to fluorescence of mcAbs at 340 nm. As a solution, (a) the maximum of the absolute values of first-order derivatives of a titration curve as fluorescence at 340 nm was estimated from the best-fit model for a probe level of zero, and (b) molar quantity of the binding site of the mcAb was estimated via consecutive fitting to the same titration curve by utilizing such a maximum as an approximate of the slope for linear response of fluorescence at 340 nm to quantities of the mcAb. This fluorometric titration approach was proved effective with one mcAb for six-histidine and another for penicillin G.

  12. Computational analysis of anti-HIV-1 antibody neutralization panel data to identify potential functional epitope residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Anthony P; Scharf, Louise; Horwitz, Joshua; Klein, Florian; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Bjorkman, Pamela J

    2013-06-25

    Advances in single-cell antibody cloning methods have led to the identification of a variety of broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 antibodies. We developed a computational tool (Antibody Database) to help identify critical residues on the HIV-1 envelope protein whose natural variation affects antibody activity. Our simplifying assumption was that, for a given antibody, a significant portion of the dispersion of neutralization activity across a panel of HIV-1 strains is due to the amino acid identity or glycosylation state at a small number of specific sites, each acting independently. A model of an antibody's neutralization IC50 was developed in which each site contributes a term to the logarithm of the modeled IC50. The analysis program attempts to determine the set of rules that minimizes the sum of the residuals between observed and modeled IC50 values. The predictive quality of the identified rules may be assessed in part by whether there is support for rules within individual viral clades. As a test case, we analyzed antibody 8ANC195, an anti-glycoprotein gp120 antibody of unknown specificity. The model for this antibody indicated that several glycosylation sites were critical for neutralization. We evaluated this prediction by measuring neutralization potencies of 8ANC195 against HIV-1 in vitro and in an antibody therapy experiment in humanized mice. These experiments confirmed that 8ANC195 represents a distinct class of glycan-dependent anti-HIV-1 antibody and validated the utility of computational analysis of neutralization panel data.

  13. Analysis of Conformational B-Cell Epitopes in the Antibody-Antigen Complex Using the Depth Function and the Convex Hull.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zheng

    Full Text Available The prediction of conformational b-cell epitopes plays an important role in immunoinformatics. Several computational methods are proposed on the basis of discrimination determined by the solvent-accessible surface between epitopes and non-epitopes, but the performance of existing methods is far from satisfying. In this paper, depth functions and the k-th surface convex hull are used to analyze epitopes and exposed non-epitopes. On each layer of the protein, we compute relative solvent accessibility and four different types of depth functions, i.e., Chakravarty depth, DPX, half-sphere exposure and half space depth, to analyze the location of epitopes on different layers of the proteins. We found that conformational b-cell epitopes are rich in charged residues Asp, Glu, Lys, Arg, His; aliphatic residues Gly, Pro; non-charged residues Asn, Gln; and aromatic residue Tyr. Conformational b-cell epitopes are rich in coils. Conservation of epitopes is not significantly lower than that of exposed non-epitopes. The average depths (obtained by four methods for epitopes are significantly lower than that of non-epitopes on the surface using the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Epitopes are more likely to be located in the outer layer of the convex hull of a protein. On the benchmark dataset, the cumulate 10th convex hull covers 84.6% of exposed residues on the protein surface area, and nearly 95% of epitope sites. These findings may be helpful in building a predictor for epitopes.

  14. Immunoinformatics Approach in Designing Epitope-based Vaccine against Meningitis-inducing Bacteria (, and Type b

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilyatuz Zahroh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Meningitis infection is one of the major threats during Hajj season in Mecca. Meningitis vaccines are available, but their uses are limited in some countries due to religious reasons. Furthermore, they only give protection to certain serogroups, not to all types of meningitis-inducing bacteria. Recently, research on epitope-based vaccines has been developed intensively. Such vaccines have potential advantages over conventional vaccines in that they are safer to use and well responded to the antibody. In this study, we developed epitope-based vaccine candidates against various meningitis-inducing bacteria, including Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis , and Haemophilus influenzae type b. The epitopes were selected from their protein of polysaccharide capsule. B-cell epitopes were predicted by using BCPred, while T-cell epitope for major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I was predicted using PAProC, TAPPred, and Immune Epitope Database. Immune Epitope Database was also used to predict T-cell epitope for MHC class II. Population coverage and molecular docking simulation were predicted against previously generated epitope vaccine candidates. The best candidates for MHC class I- and class II-restricted T-cell epitopes were MQYGDKTTF, MKEQNTLEI, ECTEGEPDY, DLSIVVPIY, YPMAMMWRNASNRAI, TLQMTLLGIVPNLNK, ETSLHHIPGISNYFI, and SLLYILEKNAEMEFD, which showed 80% population coverage. The complexes of class I T-cell epitopes-HLA-C * 03:03 and class II T-cell epitopes-HLA-DRB1 * 11:01 showed better affinity than standards as evaluated from their δ G binding value and the binding interaction between epitopes and HLA molecules. These peptide constructs may further be undergone in vitro and in vivo testings for the development of targeted vaccine against meningitis infection.

  15. Fine-mapping naturally occurring NY-ESO-1 antibody epitopes in melanoma patients' sera using short overlapping peptides and full-length recombinant protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Nobukazu; Jackson, Heather M; Chan, Kok-fei; Oveissi, Sara; Cebon, Jonathan; Itoh, Kyogo; Chen, Weisan

    2013-07-01

    The tumor antigen NY-ESO-1 is one of the most antigenic cancer-testis antigens, first identified by serologic analysis of a recombinant cDNA expression library (SEREX). NY-ESO-1 is expressed in different types of cancers including melanoma. NY-ESO-1-specific spontaneous humoral and cellular immune responses are detected in a large proportion of patients with advanced NY-ESO-1-expressing cancers. Therefore NY-ESO-1 is a good candidate antigen for immunotherapy. Although cellular immune responses to NY-ESO-1 are well characterized, much less is known about the humoral immune responses. In this study, we finely mapped linear antibody epitopes using sera from melanoma patients and shorter overlapping peptide sets. We have shown that melanoma patients' humoral immune systems responded to NY-ESO-1 differently in each individual with widely differing antibody specificity, intensity and antibody subtypes. This knowledge will help us further understand anti-tumor immunity and may also help us to monitor cancer progress and cancer vaccine efficacy in the future. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Sensitivity of HIV-1 to neutralization by antibodies against O-linked carbohydrate epitopes despite deletion of O-glycosylation signals in the V3 loop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Jansson, B; Gram, G J

    1996-01-01

    of such threonine or serine residues could decrease the sensitivity to infectivity inhibition by Tn or sialosyl-Tn specific antibodies. All potentially O-glycosylated threonine and serine residues in the V3 loop of cloned HIV-1 BRU were mutagenized to alanine thus abrogating any O-glycosylation at these sites......It has been suggested that threonine or serine residues in the V3 loop of HIV-1 gp120 are glycosylated with the short-chain O-linked oligosaccharides Tn or sialosyl-Tn that function as epitopes for broadly neutralizing carbohydrate specific antibodies. In this study we examined whether mutation....... Additionally, one of these T-A mutants (T308A) also abrogated the signal for N-glycosylation at N306 inside the V3-loop. The mutant clones were compared with the wild type virus as to sensitivity to neutralization with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies specific for the tip of the V3 loop of BRU or for the O...

  17. Reverse engineering the antigenic architecture of the haemagglutinin from influenza H5N1 clade 1 and 2.2 viruses with fine epitope mapping using monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockman, Steve; Camuglia, Sarina; Vandenberg, Kirsten; Ong, Chi; Baker, Mark A; Nation, Roger L; Li, Jian; Velkov, Tony

    2013-04-01

    The induction of neutralising antibodies to the viral surface glycoprotein, haemagglutinin (HA) is considered the cornerstone of current seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccines. Mapping of neutralising epitopes using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) helps define mechanisms of antigenic drift, neutralising escape and facilitates pre-pandemic vaccine design. In the present study we reverse engineered the antigenic structure of the HAs of two highly pathogenic H5N1 vaccine strains representative of currently circulating clade 1 and 2.2 H5N1 viruses. The HA sequence of the A/Vietnam/1194/04 clade 1 virus was progressively mutated into the HA sequence of the clade 2.2 virus, A/Bar-headed Goose/Qinghai/1A/05. Fine mapping of clade-specific neutralising epitopes was performed by examining the cross-reactivity of mAbs raised against the native HA of each parent virus. The reactivity across all clade specific mAbs centred around a constellation of mutations at positions 140, 145, 171 and 172, all of which are proximal to the receptor binding site on the membrane distal globular head of the HA. Overlapping cross-reactivity of these antigenic sites suggests that these amino acid positions relate to the antigenic evolution of the H5 clade 1 and 2.2 viruses. This finding may prove useful for the design of vaccines with broader neutralising cross-reactivity against the different H5 HA sublineages currently in circulation. These findings provide important information about the amino acid changes involved in the cross-clade evolution of H5N1 viruses and their potential for human to human transmission; and facilitates a greater understanding of the pandemic potential of H5N1 isolates. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A double-sandwich ELISA for identification of monoclonal antibodies suitable for sandwich immunoassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    The sandwich immunoassay (sIA) is an invaluable technique for concentrating, detecting, and quantifying target antigens. The two critical components required are a capture antibody and a detection antibody, each binding a different epitope on the target antigen. The specific antibodies incorporated...

  19. Chondroitin sulfate A-adhering Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes express functionally important antibody epitopes shared by multiple variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Lea; Dobrilovic, Tina; Magistrado, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    Acquired protection from Plasmodium falciparum placental malaria, a major cause of maternal, fetal, and infant morbidity, is mediated by IgG specific for the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 variant VAR2CSA. This protein enables adhesion of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes...... monoclonal IgG Abs from affinity-matured memory B cells of P. falciparum-exposed women to study interclonal variation and functional importance of Ab epitopes among placental and peripheral parasites from East and West Africa. Most placental P. falciparum isolates were labeled by several mAbs, whereas...

  20. A Cross-Reactive Human Single-Chain Antibody for Detection of Major Fish Allergens, Parvalbumins, and Identification of a Major IgE-Binding Epitope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merima Bublin

    Full Text Available Fish allergy is associated with moderate to severe IgE-mediated reactions to the calcium binding parvalbumins present in fish muscle. Allergy to multiple fish species is caused by parvalbumin-specific cross-reactive IgE recognizing conserved epitopes. In this study, we aimed to produce cross-reactive single chain variable fragment (scFv antibodies for the detection of parvalbumins in fish extracts and the identification of IgE epitopes. Parvalbumin-specific phage clones were isolated from the human ETH-2 phage display library by three rounds of biopanning either against cod parvalbumin or by sequential biopanning against cod (Gad m 1, carp (Cyp c 1 and rainbow trout (Onc m 1 parvalbumins. While biopanning against Gad m 1 resulted in the selection of clones specific exclusively for Gad m 1, the second approach resulted in the selection of clones cross-reacting with all three parvalbumins. Two clones, scFv-gco9 recognizing all three parvalbumins, and scFv-goo8 recognizing only Gad m 1 were expressed in the E. coli non-suppressor strain HB2151 and purified from the periplasm. scFv-gco9 showed highly selective binding to parvalbumins in processed fish products such as breaded cod sticks, fried carp and smoked trout in Western blots. In addition, the scFv-gco9-AP produced as alkaline phosphatase fusion protein, allowed a single-step detection of the parvalbumins. In competitive ELISA, scFv-gco9 was able to inhibit binding of IgE from fish allergic patients' sera to all three β-parvalbumins by up to 80%, whereas inhibition by scFv-goo8 was up to 20%. 1H/15N HSQC NMR analysis of the rGad m 1:scFv-gco9 complex showed participation of amino acid residues conserved among these three parvalbumins explaining their cross-reactivity on a molecular level. In this study, we have demonstrated an approach for the selection of cross-reactive parvalbumin-specific antibodies that can be used for allergen detection and for mapping of conserved epitopes.

  1. A Cross-Reactive Human Single-Chain Antibody for Detection of Major Fish Allergens, Parvalbumins, and Identification of a Major IgE-Binding Epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bublin, Merima; Kostadinova, Maria; Fuchs, Julian E; Ackerbauer, Daniela; Moraes, Adolfo H; Almeida, Fabio C L; Lengger, Nina; Hafner, Christine; Ebner, Christof; Radauer, Christian; Liedl, Klaus R; Valente, Ana Paula; Breiteneder, Heimo

    2015-01-01

    Fish allergy is associated with moderate to severe IgE-mediated reactions to the calcium binding parvalbumins present in fish muscle. Allergy to multiple fish species is caused by parvalbumin-specific cross-reactive IgE recognizing conserved epitopes. In this study, we aimed to produce cross-reactive single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies for the detection of parvalbumins in fish extracts and the identification of IgE epitopes. Parvalbumin-specific phage clones were isolated from the human ETH-2 phage display library by three rounds of biopanning either against cod parvalbumin or by sequential biopanning against cod (Gad m 1), carp (Cyp c 1) and rainbow trout (Onc m 1) parvalbumins. While biopanning against Gad m 1 resulted in the selection of clones specific exclusively for Gad m 1, the second approach resulted in the selection of clones cross-reacting with all three parvalbumins. Two clones, scFv-gco9 recognizing all three parvalbumins, and scFv-goo8 recognizing only Gad m 1 were expressed in the E. coli non-suppressor strain HB2151 and purified from the periplasm. scFv-gco9 showed highly selective binding to parvalbumins in processed fish products such as breaded cod sticks, fried carp and smoked trout in Western blots. In addition, the scFv-gco9-AP produced as alkaline phosphatase fusion protein, allowed a single-step detection of the parvalbumins. In competitive ELISA, scFv-gco9 was able to inhibit binding of IgE from fish allergic patients' sera to all three β-parvalbumins by up to 80%, whereas inhibition by scFv-goo8 was up to 20%. 1H/15N HSQC NMR analysis of the rGad m 1:scFv-gco9 complex showed participation of amino acid residues conserved among these three parvalbumins explaining their cross-reactivity on a molecular level. In this study, we have demonstrated an approach for the selection of cross-reactive parvalbumin-specific antibodies that can be used for allergen detection and for mapping of conserved epitopes.

  2. Identification of a linear epitope recognized by a monoclonal antibody directed to the heterogeneous nucleoriboprotein A2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tronstrøm, Julie; Dragborg, Anette H.; Hansen, Paul Robert

    2014-01-01

    ), where the amino acids Ser, Ile and Asp were found to be essential for antibody reactivity. These amino acids were found to contribute to the antibody-antigen interface through side-chain interactions, possibly in combination with a positively charged amino acid in position 77. Moreover, the amino acids...

  3. A targeted LC-MS strategy for low-abundant HLA class I-presented peptide detection identifies novel human papillomavirus T-cell epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatnik, Renata; Mohan, Nitya; Bonsack, Maria; Falkenby, Lasse G; Hoppe, Stephanie; Josef, Kathrin; Steinbach, Alina; Becker, Sara; Nadler, Wiebke M; Rucevic, Marijana; Larsen, Martin R; Salek, Mogjiborahman; Riemer, Angelika B

    2018-03-30

    For rational design of therapeutic vaccines, detailed knowledge about target epitopes that are endogenously processed and truly presented on infected or transformed cells is essential. Many potential target epitopes, either of viral origin or mutation-derived, are presented at low abundance. Therefore, direct detection of these peptides remains a challenge. This study presents a method for the isolation and LC-MS 3 -based targeted detection of low-abundant HLA class-I presented peptides from transformed cells. We used human papillomavirus (HPV) as a model system, as the HPV oncoproteins E6 and E7 are attractive therapeutic vaccination targets and expressed in all transformed cells, but present at low abundance due to viral immune evasion mechanisms. Our approach included preselection of target antigen-derived peptides by in silico predictions and in vitro binding assays. We tailored the peptide purification process to minimize contaminants after immunoprecipitation of HLA-peptide complexes, while keeping high isolation yields of low-abundant target peptides. The subsequent targeted LC-MS 3 detection allowed for increased sensitivity, which resulted in successful detection of the previously described HLA-A2-restricted epitope E7 11-19 and 10 additional E7-derived peptides on the surface of HPV16-transformed cells. T-cell reactivity was shown for all of the 11 detected peptides in ELISpot assays, which shows that detection by our approach has high predictive value for immunogenicity. Thus, it is suitable for validating even low-abundant candidate epitopes to be true immunotherapy targets. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D'Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products.

  5. Cell Penetrating Bispecific Antibodies for Targeting Oncogenic Transcription Factors in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Bispecific Antibodies for Targeting Oncogenic Transcription Factors in Advanced Prostate Cancer Michael Lilly, MD Richard Weisbart, MD Medical...0534, entitled Cell- penetrating bispecific antibodies for targeting oncogenic transcription factors in advanced prostate cancer . The research is a... Prostate cancer , antibody, bispecific, androgen receptor, castration-resistant 3

  6. Development of Monoclonal Antibodies Recognizing Linear Epitope: Illustration by Three Bacillus thuringiensis Crystal Proteins of Genetically Modified Cotton, Maize, and Tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhen; Zhang, Wei; Ning, Xiangxue; Wang, Baomin; Liu, Yunjun; Li, Qing X

    2017-11-22

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac, Cry1Ia1, and Cry1Ie are δ-endotoxin insecticidal proteins widely implemented in genetically modified organisms (GMO), such as cotton, maize, and potato. Western blot assay integrates electrophoresis separation power and antibody high specificity for monitoring specific exogenous proteins expressed in GMO. Procedures for evoking monoclonal antibody (mAb) for Western blot were poorly documented. In the present study, Cry1Ac partially denatured at 100 °C for 5 min was used as an immunogen to develop mAbs selectively recognizing a linear epitope of Cry1Ac for Western blot. mAb 5E9C6 and 3E6E2 selected with sandwich ELISA strongly recognized the heat semidenatured Cry1Ac. Particularly, 3E6E2 recognized both E. coli and cotton seed expressed Cry1Ac in Western blot. Such strategy of using partially denatured proteins as immunogens and using sandwich ELISA for mAb screening was also successfully demonstrated with production of mAbs against Cry1Ie for Western blot assay in maize.

  7. Laminin binding protein, 34/67 laminin receptor, carries stage-specific embryonic antigen-4 epitope defined by monoclonal antibody Raft.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katagiri, Yohko U.; Kiyokawa, Nobutaka; Nakamura, Kyoko; Takenouchi, Hisami; Taguchi, Tomoko; Okita, Hajime; Umezawa, Akihiro; Fujimoto, Junichiro

    2005-01-01

    We previously produced monoclonal antibodies against the detergent-insoluble microdomain, i.e., the raft microdomain, of the human renal cancer cell line ACHN. Raft.2, one of these monoclonal antibodies, recognizes sialosyl globopentaosylceramide, which has the stage-specific embryonic antigen (SSEA)-4 epitope. Although the mouse embryonal carcinoma (EC) cell line F9 does not express SSEA-4, some F9 cells stained with Raft.2. Western analysis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry identified the Raft.2 binding molecule as laminin binding protein (LBP), i.e., 34/67 laminin receptor. Weak acid treatment or digestion with Clostridium perfringens sialidase reduced Raft.2 binding to LBP on nitrocellulose sheets and [ 14 C]galactose was incorporated into LBP, indicating LBP to have a sialylated carbohydrate moiety. Subcellular localization analysis by sucrose density-gradient centrifugation and examination by confocal microscopy revealed LBP to be localized on the outer surface of the plasma membrane. An SSEA-4-positive human EC cell line, NCR-G3 cells, also expressed Raft.2-binding LBP

  8. Synthetic peptides reproducing tissue transglutaminase-gliadin complex neo-epitopes as probes for antibody detection in celiac disease patients' sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pisa, Margherita; Pascarella, Simona; Scrima, Mario; Sabatino, Giuseppina; Real-Fernández, Feliciana; Chelli, Mario; Renzi, Daniela; Calabrò, Antonio; D'Ursi, Anna Maria; Papini, Anna Maria; Rovero, Paolo

    2015-02-12

    Celiac disease (CD) patients usually present high levels of circulating IgA antibodies directed to different antigens, in particular tissue transglutaminase (tTG), gliadin (Glia), and endomysium. A series of synthetic peptide constructs containing cross-linked tTG and Glia deamidated peptides have been synthesized. Peptides were tested in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays against celiac disease patients' sera versus normal blood donors, and their conformational features were evaluated by molecular modeling techniques. Four peptides were recognized as epitopes by autoantibodies (IgG class) circulating in CD patients' sera before gluten-free diet. The peptide II, containing Ac-tTG(553-564)-NH2 sequence cross-linked with deamidated Ac-α2-Glia(63-71)-NH2, was able to identify specific disease antibodies with a sensitivity of 50% and a specificity of 94.4%. Structural conformations of the linear fragments Ac-tTG(553-564)-NH2 and Ac-α2-Glia(63-71)-NH2 and the corresponding cross-linked peptide II were calculated by molecular modeling. Results showed that cross-linking is determinant to assume conformations, which are not accessible to the linear fragments.

  9. Clinical efficacy and management of monoclonal antibodies targeting CD38 and SLAMF7 in multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van de Donk, Niels W C J; Moreau, Philippe; Plesner, Torben

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapeutic strategies are emerging as promising therapeutic approaches in multiple myeloma (MM), with several monoclonal antibodies in advanced stages of clinical development. Of these agents, CD38-targeting antibodies have marked single agent activity in extensively pretreated MM, and pre...

  10. SCIB2, an antibody DNA vaccine encoding NY-ESO-1 epitopes, induces potent antitumor immunity which is further enhanced by checkpoint blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wei; Metheringham, Rachael L; Brentville, Victoria A; Gunn, Barbara; Symonds, Peter; Yagita, Hideo; Ramage, Judith M; Durrant, Lindy G

    2016-06-01

    Checkpoint blockade has demonstrated promising antitumor responses in approximately 10-40% of patients. However, the majority of patients do not make a productive immune response to their tumors and do not respond to checkpoint blockade. These patients may benefit from an effective vaccine that stimulates high-avidity T cell responses in combination with checkpoint blockade. We have previously shown that incorporating TRP-2 and gp100 epitopes into the CDR regions of a human IgG1 DNA (ImmunoBody®: IB) results in significant tumor regression both in animal models and patients. This vaccination strategy is superior to others as it targets antigen to antigen-presenting cells and stimulates high-avidity T cell responses. To broaden the application of this vaccination strategy, 16 NY-ESO-1 epitopes, covering over 80% of HLA phenotypes, were incorporated into the IB (SCIB2). They produced higher frequency and avidity T cell responses than peptide vaccination. These T cells were of sufficient avidity to kill NY-ESO-1-expressing tumor cells, and in vivo controlled the growth of established B16-NY-ESO-1 tumors, resulting in long-term survival (35%). When SCIB2 was given in combination with Treg depletion, CTLA-4 blockade or PD-1 blockade, long-term survival from established tumors was significantly enhanced to 56, 67 and 100%, respectively. Translating these responses into the clinic by using a combination of SCIB2 vaccination and checkpoint blockade can only further improve clinical responses.

  11. Molecular and functional analysis of a conserved CTL epitope in HIV-1 p24 recognized from a long-term nonprogressor: constraints on immune escape associated with targeting a sequence essential for viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, R; Leschonsky, B; Harrer, E; Paulus, C; Weber, C; Walker, B D; Buchbinder, S; Wolf, H; Kalden, J R; Harrer, T

    1999-03-15

    It has been hypothesized that sequence variation within CTL epitopes leading to immune escape plays a role in the progression of HIV-1 infection. Only very limited data exist that address the influence of biologic characteristics of CTL epitopes on the emergence of immune escape variants and the efficiency of suppression HIV-1 by CTL. In this report, we studied the effects of HIV-1 CTL epitope sequence variation on HIV-1 replication. The highly conserved HLA-B14-restricted CTL epitope DRFYKTLRAE in HIV-1 p24 was examined, which had been defined as the immunodominant CTL epitope in a long-term nonprogressing individual. We generated a set of viral mutants on an HX10 background differing by a single conservative or nonconservative amino acid substitution at each of the P1 to P9 amino acid residues of the epitope. All of the nonconservative amino acid substitutions abolished viral infectivity and only 5 of 10 conservative changes yielded replication-competent virus. Recognition of these epitope sequence variants by CTL was tested using synthetic peptides. All mutations that abrogated CTL recognition strongly impaired viral replication, and all replication-competent viral variants were recognized by CTL, although some variants with a lower efficiency. Our data indicate that this CTL epitope is located within a viral sequence essential for viral replication. Targeting CTL epitopes within functionally important regions of the HIV-1 genome could limit the chance of immune evasion.

  12. Development of vaccine for dyslipidemia targeted to a proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9 epitope in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Kawakami

    Full Text Available Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9 regulates expression of low-density lipoprotein (LDL receptors via receptor internalization and subsequent lysosomal degradation. Thus, an anti-PCSK9 antibody is well known as an anti-hyperlipidemia drug. Here, we aimed to develop vaccine for a long-term treatment of dyslipidemia targeted to PCSK9. In This study, we designed a peptide vaccine for mouse PCSK-9, which consisted of short peptides conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH as a carrier protein. Vaccines were administered to male apolipoprotein E (ApoE deficient mice with adjuvants and significantly elicited an antibody response against PCSK9. The PCSK9 vaccines were administered to mice three times in 2-week intervals, and antibody titers and lipoprotein levels were evaluated up to 24 weeks after the first immunization to determine the therapeutic effect. Anti-PCSK9 antibody titers reached peak levels 6 weeks after the first immunization, and theses titers were maintained for up to 24 weeks. Decreased plasma levels of total cholesterol, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL, and chylomicron (CM were maintained for up to 24 weeks. Immunized mice exhibited a significant increase in cell-surface LDL receptor expression. Stimulation with KLH, but not PCSK9, induced the production of INF-gamma and interleukin-4 (IL-4, as determined with ELISPOT assays, thus indicating that PCSK9 vaccine did not elicit T-cell activation in our vaccine system. The present anti-PCSK9 vaccine induced long-lasting anti-PCSK9 antibody production and improved lipoprotein profiles. Thus, anti-PCSK9 vaccine could become a new option for the treatment of dyslipidemia as a long-acting therapy in future.

  13. Indirect detection of an epitope-specific response to HIV-1 gp120 immunization in human subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny Shmelkov

    Full Text Available A specific response of human serum neutralizing antibodies (nAb to a conformational epitope as a result of vaccination of human subjects with the surface envelope glycoprotein (gp120 of HIV-1 has not previously been documented. Here, we used computational analysis to assess the epitope-specific responses of human subjects, which were immunized with recombinant gp120 immunogens in the VAX003 and VAX004 clinical trials. Our computational methodology--a variation of sieve analysis--compares the occurrence of specific nAb targeted conformational 3D epitopes on viruses from infected individuals who received vaccination to the occurrence of matched epitopes in the viruses infecting placebo subjects. We specifically studied seven crystallographically defined nAb targeted conformational epitopes in the V3 loop, an immunogenic region of gp120. Of the six epitopes present in the immunogens and targeted by known monoclonal neutralizing antibodies, only the one targeted by the anti-V3 nAb 2219 exhibited a significant reduction in occurrence in vaccinated subjects compared to the placebo group. This difference occurred only in the VAX003 Thailand cohort. No difference was seen between vaccinated and placebo groups for the occurrence of an epitope that was not present in the immunogen. Thus, it can be theorized that a specific 2219-like human neutralizing antibody immune response to AIDSVAX immunization occurred in the VAX003 cohort, and that this response protected subjects from a narrow subset of HIV-1 viruses circulating in Thailand in the 1990s and bearing the conformational epitope targeted by the neutralizing antibody 2219.

  14. HLA-A2-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes from human hepsin as novel targets for prostate cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, J; Li, G; Tang, J; Cao, X-B; Zhou, Q-Y; Fan, Z-J; Zhu, B; Pan, X-H

    2013-09-01

    Hepsin is a type II transmembrane serine protease that is overexpressed in prostate cancer, and it is associated with prostate cancer cellular migration and invasion. Therefore, HPN is a biomarker for prostate cancer. CD8(+) T cells play an important role in tumour immunity. This study predicted and identified HLA-A2-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes in human hepsin protein. HLA-A2-restricted CTL epitopes were identified using the following four-step procedure: (1) a computer program generated predicted epitopes from the amino acid sequence of human hepsin; (2) an HLA-A2-binding assay detected the affinity of the predicted epitopes to the HLA-A2 molecule; (3) the primary T cell response against the predicted epitopes was stimulated in vitro; and (4) the induced CTLs towards different types of hepsin- or HLA-A2-expressing prostate cancer cells were detected. Five candidate peptides were identified. The effectors that were induced by human hepsin epitopes containing residues 229 to 237 (Hpn229; GLQLGVQAV), 268 to 276 (Hpn268; PLTEYIQPV) and 191 to 199 (Hpn199; SLLSGDWVL) effectively lysed LNCaP prostate cancer cells that were hepsin-positive and HLA-A2 matched. These peptide-specific CTLs did not lyse normal liver cells with low hepsin levels. Hpn229, Hpn268 and Hpn199 increased the frequency of IFN-γ-producing T cells compared with the negative peptide. These results suggest that the Hpn229, Hpn268 and Hpn199 epitopes are novel HLA-A2-restricted CTL epitopes that are capable of inducing hepsin-specific CTLs in vitro. Hpn229, Hpn268 and Hpn199 peptide-based vaccines may be useful for immunotherapy in patients with prostate cancer. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Physical characteristics of a citrullinated pro-filaggrin epitope recognized by anti-citrullinated protein antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis sera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Holm, Bettina Eide; Slot, Ole

    2016-01-01

    whether biotin labelling influence antibody recognition. The full-length cyclic pro-filaggrin peptide and a linear form with a N-terminal biotin, was recognized to the same level, whereas, a notable difference in ACPA reactivity to the linear peptides with a C-terminal biotin was found, probably due...... amino acid in position 4 C-terminal to citrulline. Collectively, peptide structure, length, the presence of charged amino acids and biotin labelling markedly influence antibody reactivity. In relation to the clinical diagnostics of ACPA, these findings may reflect the differences in diagnostic assays...

  16. IL-8 as antibody therapeutic target in inflammatory diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Lone; Beurskens, Frank J; Zachariae, Claus O C

    2008-01-01

    IL-8 is a chemokine that has been implicated in a number of inflammatory diseases involving neutrophil activation. HuMab 10F8 is a novel fully human mAb against IL-8, which binds a discontinuous epitope on IL-8 overlapping the receptor binding site, and which effectively neutralizes IL-8-dependen...

  17. Two widely used anti-DR alpha monoclonal antibodies bind to an intracellular C-terminal epitope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grüneberg, U.; Rich, T.; Roucard, C.; van Ham, S. Marieke; Charron, D.; Trowsdale, J.

    1997-01-01

    In this report we show that two widely-used monoclonal antibodies, TAL-1B5 and DA6.147, which react with the HLA-DR alpha chain on immunoblots, recognize the C-terminal intracellular tail of this HLA-DR subunit. We demonstrate that both MoAbs react with a synthetic peptide representing the

  18. Detection of eight different tospovirus species by a monoclonal antibody against the common epitope of NSs protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, T.C.; Lu, Y.Y.; Kang, Y.C.; Li, J.T.; Yeh, Y.C.; Kormelink, R.J.M.; Yeh, S.D.

    2008-01-01

    Rabbit antisera against the nucleocapsid protein (NP) have been commonly used for detection of tospoviruses and classification into serogroups or serotypes. Mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) with high specificity to the NPs have also been widely used to identify tospovirus species. Recently, a

  19. Novel rabies virus-neutralizing epitope recognized by human monoclonal antibody: Fine mapping and escape mutant analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marissen, W.E.; Kramer, R.A.; Rice, A.; Weldon, W.C.; Niezgoda, M.; Faber, M.; Slootstra, J.W.; Meloen, R.H.; Clijsters-van der Horst, M.; Visser, T.J.; Jongeneelen, M.; Thijsse, S.; Throsby, M.; Kruif, de J.; Rupprecht, C.E.; Dietzschold, B.; Goudsmit, J.; Bakker, A.B.H.

    2005-01-01

    Anti-rabies virus immunoglobulin combined with rabies vaccine protects humans from lethal rabies infections. For cost and safety reasons, replacement of the human or equine polyclonal immunoglobulin is advocated, and the use of rabies virus-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) is recommended. We

  20. Novel rabies virus-neutralizing epitope recognized by human monoclonal antibody: fine mapping and escape mutant analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marissen, Wilfred E.; Kramer, R. Arjen; Rice, Amy; Weldon, William C.; Niezgoda, Michael; Faber, Milosz; Slootstra, Jerry W.; Meloen, Rob H.; Clijsters-van der Horst, Marieke; Visser, Therese J.; Jongeneelen, Mandy; Thijsse, Sandra; Throsby, Mark; de Kruif, John; Rupprecht, Charles E.; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Goudsmit, Jaap; Bakker, Alexander B. H.

    2005-01-01

    Anti-rabies virus immunoglobulin combined with rabies vaccine protects humans from lethal rabies infections. For cost and safety reasons, replacement of the human or equine polyclonal immunoglobulin is advocated, and the use of rabies virus-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) is recommended. We

  1. Structure of an N276-Dependent HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibody Targeting a Rare V5 Glycan Hole Adjacent to the CD4 Binding Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt; Gorman, Jason; Anthony, Colin S.; Mkhize, Nonhlanhla N.; Druz, Aliaksandr; York, Talita; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Labuschagne, Phillip; Louder, Mark K.; Bailer, Robert T.; Karim, Salim S. Abdool; Mascola, John R.; Williamson, Carolyn; Moore, Penny L.; Kwong, Peter D.; Morris, Lynn (NHLS-South Africa); (NIH); (Witwatersrand); (KwaZulu-Natal)

    2016-08-31

    ABSTRACT

    All HIV-1-infected individuals develop strain-specific neutralizing antibodies to their infecting virus, which in some cases mature into broadly neutralizing antibodies. Defining the epitopes of strain-specific antibodies that overlap conserved sites of vulnerability might provide mechanistic insights into how broadly neutralizing antibodies arise. We previously described an HIV-1 clade C-infected donor, CAP257, who developed broadly neutralizing plasma antibodies targeting an N276 glycan-dependent epitope in the CD4 binding site. The initial CD4 binding site response potently neutralized the heterologous tier 2 clade B viral strain RHPA, which was used to design resurfaced gp120 antigens for single-B-cell sorting. Here we report the isolation and structural characterization of CAP257-RH1, an N276 glycan-dependent CD4 binding site antibody representative of the early CD4 binding site plasma response in donor CAP257. The cocrystal structure of CAP257-RH1 bound to RHPA gp120 revealed critical interactions with the N276 glycan, loop D, and V5, but not with aspartic acid 368, similarly to HJ16 and 179NC75. The CAP257-RH1 monoclonal antibody was derived from the immunoglobulin-variable IGHV3-33 and IGLV3-10 genes and neutralized RHPA but not the transmitted/founder virus from donor CAP257. Its narrow neutralization breadth was attributed to a binding angle that was incompatible with glycosylated V5 loops present in almost all HIV-1 strains, including the CAP257 transmitted/founder virus. Deep sequencing of autologous CAP257 viruses, however, revealed minority variants early in infection that lacked V5 glycans. These glycan-free V5 loops are unusual holes in the glycan shield that may have been necessary for initiating this N276 glycan-dependent CD4 binding site B-cell lineage.

    IMPORTANCEThe conserved CD4 binding site on gp120 is a major target for HIV-1 vaccine design, but key events in the elicitation and maturation of

  2. Structure of an N276-Dependent HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibody Targeting a Rare V5 Glycan Hole Adjacent to the CD4 Binding Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt; Gorman, Jason; Anthony, Colin S; Mkhize, Nonhlanhla N; Druz, Aliaksandr; York, Talita; Schmidt, Stephen D; Labuschagne, Phillip; Louder, Mark K; Bailer, Robert T; Abdool Karim, Salim S; Mascola, John R; Williamson, Carolyn; Moore, Penny L; Kwong, Peter D; Morris, Lynn

    2016-11-15

    All HIV-1-infected individuals develop strain-specific neutralizing antibodies to their infecting virus, which in some cases mature into broadly neutralizing antibodies. Defining the epitopes of strain-specific antibodies that overlap conserved sites of vulnerability might provide mechanistic insights into how broadly neutralizing antibodies arise. We previously described an HIV-1 clade C-infected donor, CAP257, who developed broadly neutralizing plasma antibodies targeting an N276 glycan-dependent epitope in the CD4 binding site. The initial CD4 binding site response potently neutralized the heterologous tier 2 clade B viral strain RHPA, which was used to design resurfaced gp120 antigens for single-B-cell sorting. Here we report the isolation and structural characterization of CAP257-RH1, an N276 glycan-dependent CD4 binding site antibody representative of the early CD4 binding site plasma response in donor CAP257. The cocrystal structure of CAP257-RH1 bound to RHPA gp120 revealed critical interactions with the N276 glycan, loop D, and V5, but not with aspartic acid 368, similarly to HJ16 and 179NC75. The CAP257-RH1 monoclonal antibody was derived from the immunoglobulin-variable IGHV3-33 and IGLV3-10 genes and neutralized RHPA but not the transmitted/founder virus from donor CAP257. Its narrow neutralization breadth was attributed to a binding angle that was incompatible with glycosylated V5 loops present in almost all HIV-1 strains, including the CAP257 transmitted/founder virus. Deep sequencing of autologous CAP257 viruses, however, revealed minority variants early in infection that lacked V5 glycans. These glycan-free V5 loops are unusual holes in the glycan shield that may have been necessary for initiating this N276 glycan-dependent CD4 binding site B-cell lineage. The conserved CD4 binding site on gp120 is a major target for HIV-1 vaccine design, but key events in the elicitation and maturation of different antibody lineages to this site remain elusive

  3. Males without apparent alloimmunization could have HLA antibodies that recognize target HLA specificities expressed on cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, J; Nakajima, F; Kamada, H; Tadokoro, K; Nagai, T; Satake, M

    2017-05-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies, which are involved in the development of transfusion-related side effects such as transfusion-related lung injury, are sometimes found in males without a history of alloimmunization (eg, transplantation and transfusion). Whether HLA antibodies in male donors can interact with their target HLA specificities expressed on cells have not been completely investigated. The HLA antibodies detected in 7 male donors were characterized. Flow cytometry and immunocomplex capture fluorescence analysis were performed to evaluate the ability of these antibodies to bind with target HLA specificities expressed on cells. The association of these antibodies with complement was examined using anti-C1q antibody. Sustainability of HLA antibodies over time was compared in 26 male vs 57 female donors. The antibodies from all 7 donors recognized intact HLA molecules coated onto microbeads. The antibodies in 2 of 7 donors also recognized their target HLA specificities expressed on cells. Furthermore, the antibodies in one of these 2 donors showed HLA specificities that involved complement binding. Twenty-one of 26 initially positive male donors had turned negative for HLA antibody at least 1 year after their initial positive screening, whereas HLA antibody positivity was maintained for a long time in most female donors. Males without apparent alloimmunization could have HLA antibodies that recognize their target HLA specificities on cells and that could potentially modify molecular events in affected cells. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Immune epitope database analysis resource

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Yohan; Ponomarenko, Julia; Zhu, Zhanyang

    2012-01-01

    The immune epitope database analysis resource (IEDB-AR: http://tools.iedb.org) is a collection of tools for prediction and analysis of molecular targets of T- and B-cell immune responses (i.e. epitopes). Since its last publication in the NAR webserver issue in 2008, a new generation of peptide...

  5. Identification of an immunodominant epitope in glycoproteins B and G of herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) using synthetic peptides as antigens in assay of antibodies to HSV in herpes simplex encephalitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhullar, S S; Chandak, N H; Baheti, N N; Purohit, H J; Taori, G M; Daginawala, H F; Kashyap, R S

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is a severe viral infection of the central nervous system (CNS). Assay of antibody response is widely used in diagnostics of HSE. The aim of this study was to identify an immunodominant epitope determining the antibody response to herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of HSE patients. The synthetic peptides that resembled type-common as well as type-specific domains of glycoproteins B (gB) and G (gG) of these viruses were evaluated for binding with IgM and IgG antibodies in CSF samples from HSE and non-HSE patients in ELISA. The QLHDLRF peptide, derived from gB of HSV was found to be an immunodominant epitope in the IgM and IgG antibody response. The patients with confirmed and suspected HSE showed in ELISA against this peptide 26% and 23% positivities for IgM, 43% and 37% positivities for IgG and 17% and 15% for both IgM and IgG antibodies, respectively. The total positivities of 86% and 75% for both IgM and IgG antibodies were obtained in the patients with confirmed and suspected HSE, respectively. These results demonstrate that a synthetic peptide-based diagnostics of HSE can be an efficient and easily accessible alternative. This is the first report describing the use of synthetic peptides derived from HSVs in diagnostics of HSE using patientsʹ CSF samples.

  6. Broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies define a glycan-dependent epitope on the prefusion conformation of gp41 on cleaved envelope trimers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falkowska, Emilia; Le, Khoa M.; Ramos, Alejandra; Doores, Katie J.; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Blattner, Claudia; Ramirez, Alejandro; Derking, Ronald; van Gils, Marit J.; Liang, Chi-Hui; McBride, Ryan; von Bredow, Benjamin; Shivatare, Sachin S.; Wu, Chung-Yi; Chan-Hui, Po-Ying; Liu, Yan; Feizi, Ten; Zwick, Michael B.; Koff, Wayne C.; Seaman, Michael S.; Swiderek, Kristine; Moore, John P.; Evans, David; Paulson, James C.; Wong, Chi-Huey; Ward, Andrew B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Poignard, Pascal; Burton, Dennis R.

    2014-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies are much sought after (a) to guide vaccine design, both as templates and as indicators of the authenticity of vaccine candidates, (b) to assist in structural studies, and (c) to serve as potential therapeutics. However, the number of targets on the viral envelope

  7. Immunoprecipitation of amyloid fibrils by the use of an antibody that recognizes a generic epitope common to amyloid fibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin R Greiner

    Full Text Available Amyloid fibrils are associated with many maladies, including Alzheimer's disease (AD. The isolation of amyloids from natural materials is very challenging because the extreme structural stability of amyloid fibrils makes it difficult to apply conventional protein science protocols to their purification. A protocol to isolate and detect amyloids is desired for the diagnosis of amyloid diseases and for the identification of new functional amyloids. Our aim was to develop a protocol to purify amyloid from organisms, based on the particular characteristics of the amyloid fold, such as its resistance to proteolysis and its capacity to be recognized by specific conformational antibodies. We used a two-step strategy with proteolytic digestion as the first step followed by immunoprecipitation using the amyloid conformational antibody LOC. We tested the efficacy of this method using as models amyloid fibrils produced in vitro, tissue extracts from C. elegans that overexpress Aβ peptide, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF from patients diagnosed with AD. We were able to immunoprecipitate Aβ(1-40 amyloid fibrils, produced in vitro and then added to complex biological extracts, but not α-synuclein and gelsolin fibrils. This method was useful for isolating amyloid fibrils from tissue homogenates from a C. elegans AD model, especially from aged worms. Although we were able to capture picogram quantities of Aβ(1-40 amyloid fibrils produced in vitro when added to complex biological solutions, we could not detect any Aβ amyloid aggregates in CSF from AD patients. Our results show that although immunoprecipitation using the LOC antibody is useful for isolating Aβ(1-40 amyloid fibrils, it fails to capture fibrils of other amyloidogenic proteins, such as α-synuclein and gelsolin. Additional research might be needed to improve the affinity of these amyloid conformational antibodies for an array of amyloid fibrils without compromising their selectivity before

  8. Potential for novel MUC1 glycopeptide-specific antibody in passive cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Caroline B; Wandall, Hans H; Pedersen, Anders Elm

    2013-01-01

    MUC1 is an important target for antibodies in passive cancer immunotherapy. Antibodies against mucin glycans or mucin peptide backbone alone may give rise to cross reactivity with normal tissues. Therefore, attempts to identify antibodies against cancer-specific MUC1 glycopeptide epitopes havebeen...

  9. Shared epitope alleles remain a risk factor for anti-citrullinated proteins antibody (ACPA--positive rheumatoid arthritis in three Asian ethnic groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Too Chun-Lai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To investigate the associations between HLA-DRB1 shared epitope (SE alleles and rheumatoid arthritis in subsets of rheumatoid arthritis defined by autoantibodies in three Asian populations from Malaysia. METHODS: 1,079 rheumatoid arthritis patients and 1,470 healthy controls were included in the study. Levels of antibodies to citrullinated proteins (ACPA and rheumatoid factors were assessed and the PCR-SSO method was used for HLA-DRB1 genotyping. RESULTS: The proportion of ACPA positivity among Malay, Chinese and Indian rheumatoid arthritis patients were 62.9%, 65.2% and 68.6%, respectively. An increased frequency of SE alleles was observed in ACPA-positive rheumatoid arthritis among the three Asian ethnic groups. HLA-DRB1*10 was highly associated with rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility in these Asian populations. HLA-DRB1*0405 was significantly associated with susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis in Malays and Chinese, but not in Indians. HLA-DRB1*01 did not show any independent effect as a risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis in this study and HLA-DRB1*1202 was protective in Malays and Chinese. There was no association between SE alleles and ACPA- negative rheumatoid arthritis in any of the three Asian ethnic groups. CONCLUSION: The HLA-DRB1 SE alleles increase the risk of ACPA-positive rheumatoid arthritis in all three Asian populations from Malaysia.

  10. Monoclonal antibodies against muscle actin isoforms: epitope identification and analysis of isoform expression by immunoblot and immunostaining in normal and regenerating skeletal muscle [version 2; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Chaponnier

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Higher vertebrates (mammals and birds express six different highly conserved actin isoforms that can be classified in three subgroups: 1 sarcomeric actins, α-skeletal (α-SKA and α-cardiac (α-CAA, 2 smooth muscle actins (SMAs, α-SMA and γ-SMA, and 3 cytoplasmic actins (CYAs, β-CYA and γ-CYA. The variations among isoactins, in each subgroup, are due to 3-4 amino acid differences located in their acetylated N-decapeptide sequence. The first monoclonal antibody (mAb against an actin isoform (α-SMA was produced and characterized in our laboratory in 1986 (Skalli  et al., 1986 . We have further obtained mAbs against the 5 other isoforms. In this report, we focus on the mAbs anti-α-SKA and anti-α-CAA obtained after immunization of mice with the respective acetylated N-terminal decapeptides using the Repetitive Immunizations at Multiple Sites Strategy (RIMMS. In addition to the identification of their epitope by immunoblotting, we describe the expression of the 2 sarcomeric actins in mature skeletal muscle and during muscle repair after micro-lesions. In particular, we analyze the expression of α-CAA, α-SKA and α-SMA by co-immunostaining in a time course frame during the muscle repair process. Our results indicate that a restricted myocyte population expresses α-CAA and suggest a high capacity of self-regeneration in muscle cells. These antibodies may represent a helpful tool for the follow-up of muscle regeneration and pathological changes.

  11. Dual antibody therapy to harness the innate anti-tumor immune response to enhance antibody targeting of tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Cariad; Marabelle, Aurelien; Houot, Roch; Kohrt, Holbrook E

    2015-04-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is a rapidly evolving field that offers a novel paradigm for cancer treatment: therapies focus on enhancing the immune system's innate and adaptive anti-tumor response. Early immunotherapeutics have achieved impressive clinical outcomes and monoclonal antibodies are now integral to therapeutic strategies in a variety of cancers. However, only recently have antibodies targeting innate immune cells entered clinical development. Innate immune effector cells play important roles in generating and maintaining antitumor immunity. Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) are important innate immune mechanisms for tumor eradication. These cytolytic processes are initiated by the detection of a tumor-targeting antibody and can be augmented by activating co-stimulatory pathways or blocking inhibitory signals on innate immune cells. The combination of FDA-approved monoclonal antibodies with innate effector-targeting antibodies has demonstrated potent preclinical therapeutic synergy and early-phase combinatorial clinical trials are ongoing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Selection of SARS-Coronavirus-specific B cell epitopes by phage peptide library screening and evaluation of the immunological effect of epitope-based peptides on mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Hua; Jiang Lifang; Fang Danyun; Yan Huijun; Zhou Jingjiao; Zhou Junmei; Liang Yu; Gao Yang; Zhao, Wei; Long Beiguo

    2007-01-01

    Antibodies to SARS-Coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-specific B cell epitopes might recognize the pathogen and interrupt its adherence to and penetration of host cells. Hence, these epitopes could be useful for diagnosis and as vaccine constituents. Using the phage-displayed peptide library screening method and purified Fab fragments of immunoglobulin G (IgG Fab) from normal human sera and convalescent sera from SARS-CoV-infected patients as targets, 11 B cell epitopes of SARS-CoV spike glycoprotein (S protein) and membrane protein (M protein) were screened. After a bioinformatics tool was used to analyze these epitopes, four epitope-based S protein dodecapeptides corresponding to the predominant epitopes were chosen for synthesis. Their antigenic specificities and immunogenicities were studied in vitro and in vivo. Flow cytometry and ELISPOT analysis of lymphocytes as well as a serologic analysis of antibody showed that these peptides could trigger a rapid, highly effective, and relatively safe immune response in BALB/c mice. These findings might aid development of SARS diagnostics and vaccines. Moreover, the role of S and M proteins as important surface antigens is confirmed

  13. Identification and characterization of a virus-specific continuous B-cell epitope on the PrM/M protein of Japanese Encephalitis Virus: potential application in the detection of antibodies to distinguish Japanese Encephalitis Virus infection from West Nile Virus and Dengue Virus infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Wen-Xin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Differential diagnose of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV infection from other flavivirus especially West Nile virus (WNV and Dengue virus (DV infection was greatly hindered for the serological cross-reactive. Virus specific epitopes could benefit for developing JEV specific antibodies detection methods. To identify the JEV specific epitopes, we fully mapped and characterized the continuous B-cell epitope of the PrM/M protein of JEV. Results To map the epitopes on the PrM/M protein, we designed a set of 20 partially overlapping fragments spanning the whole PrM, fused them with GST, and expressed them in an expression vector. Linear epitope M14 (105VNKKEAWLDSTKATRY120 was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. By removing amino acid residues individually from the carboxy and amino terminal of peptide M14, we confirmed that the minimal unit of the linear epitope of PrM/M was M14-13 (108KEAWLDSTKAT118. This epitope was highly conserved across different JEV strains. Moreover, this epitope did not cross-react with WNV-positive and DENV-positive sera. Conclusion Epitope M14-13 was a JEV specific lineal B-cell epitpe. The results may provide a useful basis for the development of epitope-based virus specific diagnostic clinical techniques.

  14. Fully human IgG and IgM antibodies directed against the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA Gold 4 epitope and designed for radioimmunotherapy (RIT of colorectal cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pugnière Martine

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs are needed for colon cancer radioimmunotherapy (RIT to allow for repeated injections. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA being the reference antigen for immunotargeting of these tumors, we developed human anti-CEA MAbs. Methods XenoMouse®-G2 animals were immunized with CEA. Among all the antibodies produced, two of them, VG-IgG2κ and VG-IgM, were selected for characterization in vitro in comparison with the human-mouse chimeric anti-CEA MAb X4 using flow cytometry, surface plasmon resonance, and binding to radiolabeled soluble CEA and in vivo in human colon carcinoma LS174T bearing nude mice. Results Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated binding of MAbs on CEA-expressing cells without any binding on NCA-expressing human granulocytes. In a competitive binding assay using five reference MAbs, directed against the five Gold CEA epitopes, VG-IgG2κ and VG-IgM were shown to be directed against the Gold 4 epitope. The affinities of purified VG-IgG2κ and VG-IgM were determined to be 0.19 ± 0.06 × 108 M-1 and 1.30 ± 0.06 × 108 M-1, respectively, as compared with 0.61 ± 0.05 × 108 M-1 for the reference MAb X4. In a soluble phase assay, the binding capacities of VG-IgG2κ and VG-IgM to soluble CEA were clearly lower than that of the control chimeric MAb X4. A human MAb concentration of about 10-7 M was needed to precipitate approximatively 1 ng 125I-rhCEA as compared with 10-9 M for MAb X4, suggesting a preferential binding of the human MAbs to solid phase CEA. In vivo, 24 h post-injection, 125I-VG-IgG2κ demonstrated a high tumor uptake (25.4 ± 7.3%ID/g, close to that of 131I-X4 (21.7 ± 7.2%ID/g. At 72 h post-injection, 125I-VG-IgG2κ was still concentrated in the tumor (28.4 ± 11.0%ID/g whereas the tumor concentration of 131I-X4 was significantly reduced (12.5 ± 4.8%ID/g. At no time after injection was there any accumulation of the radiolabeled MAbs in normal tissues. A pertinent analysis of

  15. Functional, structural and epitopic prediction of hypothetical proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv: An in silico approach for prioritizing the targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazi, Md Amran; Kibria, Mohammad Golam; Mahfuz, Mustafa; Islam, Md Rezaul; Ghosh, Prakash; Afsar, Md Nure Alam; Khan, Md Arif; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2016-10-15

    The global control of tuberculosis (TB) remains a great challenge from the standpoint of diagnosis, detection of drug resistance, and treatment. Major serodiagnostic limitations include low sensitivity and high cost in detecting TB. On the other hand, treatment measures are often hindered by low efficacies of commonly used drugs and resistance developed by the bacteria. Hence, there is a need to look into newer diagnostic and therapeutic targets. The proteome information available suggests that among the 3906 proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, about quarter remain classified as hypothetical uncharacterized set. This study involves a combination of a number of bioinformatics tools to analyze those hypothetical proteins (HPs). An entire set of 999 proteins was primarily screened for protein sequences having conserved domains with high confidence using a combination of the latest versions of protein family databases. Subsequently, 98 of such potential target proteins were extensively analyzed by means of physicochemical characteristics, protein-protein interaction, sub-cellular localization, structural similarity and functional classification. Next, we predicted antigenic proteins from the entire set and identified B and T cell epitopes of these proteins in M. tuberculosis H37Rv. We predicted the function of these HPs belong to various classes of proteins such as enzymes, transporters, receptors, structural proteins, transcription regulators and other proteins. However, the structural similarity prediction of the annotated proteins substantiated the functional classification of those proteins. Consequently, based on higher antigenicity score and sub-cellular localization, we choose two (NP_216420.1, NP_216903.1) of the antigenic proteins to exemplify B and T cell epitope prediction approach. Finally we found 15 epitopes those located partially or fully in the linear epitope region. We found 21 conformational epitopes by using Ellipro server as well. In

  16. Bispecific engineered antibody domains (nanoantibodies that interact noncompetitively with an HIV-1 neutralizing epitope and FcRn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Gong

    Full Text Available Libraries based on an isolated human immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1 constant domain 2 (CH2 have been previously diversified by random mutagenesis. However, native isolated CH2 is not very stable and the generation of many mutations could lead to an increase in immunogenicity. Recently, we demonstrated that engineering an additional disulfide bond and removing seven N-terminal residues results in an engineered antibody domain (eAd (m01s with highly increased stability and enhanced binding to human neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn (Gong et al, JBC, 2009 and 2011. We and others have also previously shown that grafting of the heavy chain complementarity region 3 (CDR-H3 (H3 onto cognate positions of the variable domain leads to highly diversified libraries from which a number of binders to various antigens have been selected. However, grafting of H3s to non-cognate positions in constant domains results in additional residues at the junctions of H3s and the CH2 framework. Here we describe a new method based on multi-step PCR that allows the precise replacement of loop FG (no changes in its flanking sequences by human H3s from another library. Using this method and limited mutagenesis of loops BC and DE we generated an eAd phage-displayed library. Panning of this library against an HIV-1 gp41 MPER peptide resulted in selection of a binder, m2a1, which neutralized HIV-1 isolates from different clades with modest activity and retained the m01s capability of binding to FcRn. This result provides a proof of concept that CH2-based antigen binders that also mimic to certain extent other functions of full-size antibodies (binding to FcRn can be generated; we have previously hypothesized that such binders can be made and coined the term nanoantibodies (nAbs. Further studies in animal models and in humans will show how useful nAbs could be as therapeutics and diagnostics.

  17. Neurofilament light as an immune target for pathogenic antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puentes, Fabiola; van der Star, Baukje J; Boomkamp, Stephanie D; Kipp, Markus; Boon, Louis; Bosca, Isabel; Raffel, Joel; Gnanapavan, Sharmilee; van der Valk, Paul; Stephenson, Jodie; Barnett, Susan C; Baker, David; Amor, Sandra

    2017-12-01

    Antibodies to neuronal antigens are associated with many neurological diseases including paraneoplastic neurological disorders, epilepsy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and multiple sclerosis. Immunization with neuronal antigens such as neurofilament light (NF-L), a neuronal intermediate filament in axons, has been shown to induce neurological disease and spasticity in mice. Also, although antibodies to NF-L are widely used as surrogate biomarkers of axonal injury in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and multiple sclerosis, it remains to be elucidated if antibodies to NF-L contribute to neurodegeneration and neurological disease. To address this, we examined the pathogenic role of antibodies directed to NF-L in vitro using spinal cord co-cultures and in vivo in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and optic neuritis animal models of multiple sclerosis. Here we show that peripheral injections of antibodies to NF-L augmented clinical signs of neurological disease in acute EAE, increased retinal ganglion cell loss in experimental optic neuritis and induced neurological signs following intracerebral injection into control mice. The pathogenicity of antibodies to NF-L was also observed in spinal cord co-cultures where axonal loss was induced. Taken together, our results reveal that as well as acting as reliable biomarkers of neuronal damage, antibodies to NF-L exacerbate neurological disease, suggesting that antibodies to NF-L generated during disease may also be pathogenic and play a role in the progression of neurodegeneration. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Monoclonal antibodies targeting CD38 in hematological malignancies and beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van de Donk, Niels W C J; Janmaat, Maarten L.; Mutis, Tuna

    2016-01-01

    CD38 is a multifunctional cell surface protein that has receptor as well as enzyme functions. The protein is generally expressed at low levels on various hematological and solid tissues, while plasma cells express particularly high levels of CD38. The protein is also expressed in a subset of hema...... strong anti-tumor activity in preclinical models. The antibody engages diverse mechanisms of action, including complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis, programmed cell death, modulation of enzymatic activity...... combination therapies with existing as well as emerging therapies, which are currently evaluated in the clinic. Finally, CD38 antibodies may have a role in the treatment of diseases beyond hematological malignancies, including solid tumors and antibody-mediated autoimmune diseases. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A....../S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd....

  19. Site-specifically radioiodinated antibody for targeting tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rea, D.W.; Ultee, M.E.; Belinka, B.A. Jr.; Coughlin, D.J.; Alvarez, V.L.

    1990-01-01

    Labeling of an antibody site specifically through its carbohydrate regions preserves its antigen-binding activity. Previously site-specific labeling studies have conjugated antibodies with metallic radioisotopes or drugs. We now report site-specific labeling with a new radioiodinated compound, 2-hydroxy-5-iodo-3-methylbenzoyl hydrazide, whose synthesis we described earlier. The compound is reacted with aldehyde groups produced by specific oxidation of the carbohydrate portion of the antibody with sodium m-periodate. Optimized conjugation conditions give good recovery of active antibody containing 10 groups per molecule. The conjugate is stable in solution for at least several weeks at both 4 and -70 degrees C. When injected into nude mice bearing LS174T human cancer xenografts, the conjugate of B72.3 antibody localizes well to tumor tissue, with low uptake by other organs. This biodistribution is similar to that of conjugate prepared by using solid-phase chloramine-T (Iodohead). There are only two significant differences. First, the carbohydrate conjugate is much less susceptible to dehalogenation, and thus shows much less thyroid uptake. Secondly, the biological half-life of the carbohydrate conjugate was about half that of the chloramine-T one. This could be due primarily to lysis of the hydrazine bond through which the antibody is attached to the compound, which would then be excreted rapidly by itself. The new reagent will be especially useful for antibodies which either cannot be labeled by chloramine-T methods, or whose activity is impaired by them

  20. Automated Detection of Conformational Epitopes Using Phage Display Peptide Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra S Negi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Precise determination of conformational epitopes of neutralizing antibodies represents a key step in the rational design of novel vaccines. A powerful experimental method to gain insights on the physical chemical nature of conformational epitopes is the selection of linear peptides that bind with high affinities to a monoclonal antibody of interest by phage display technology. However, the structural characterization of conformational epitopes from these mimotopes is not straightforward, and in the past the interpretation of peptide sequences from phage display experiments focused on linear sequence analysis to find a consensus sequence or common sequence motifs.Results: We present a fully automated search method, EpiSearch that predicts the possible location of conformational epitopes on the surface of an antigen. The algorithm uses peptide sequences from phage display experiments as input, and ranks all surface exposed patches according to the frequency distribution of similar residues in the peptides and in the patch. We have tested the performance of the EpiSearch algorithm for six experimental data sets of phage display experiments, the human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2/neu, the antibody mAb Bo2C11 targeting the C2 domain of FVIII, antibodies mAb 17b and mAb b12 of the HIV envelope protein gp120, mAb 13b5 targeting HIV-1 capsid protein and 80R of the SARS coronavirus spike protein. In all these examples the conformational epitopes as determined by the X-ray crystal structures of the antibody-antigen complexes, were found within the highest scoring patches of EpiSearch, covering in most cases more than 50% residues of experimental observed conformational epitopes. Input options of the program include mapping of a single peptide or a set of peptides on the antigen structure, and the results of the calculation can be visualized on our interactive web server.Availability: Users can access the EpiSearch from our web

  1. Immunogenicity and in vitro and in vivo protective effects of antibodies targeting a recombinant form of the Streptococcus mutans P1 surface protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Milene Tavares; Souza, Renata D; Ferreira, Ewerton L; Robinette, Rebekah; Crowley, Paula J; Rodrigues, Juliana F; Brady, L Jeannine; Ferreira, Luís C S; Ferreira, Rita C C

    2014-12-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a major etiologic agent of dental caries, a prevalent worldwide infectious disease and a serious public health concern. The surface-localized S. mutans P1 adhesin contributes to tooth colonization and caries formation. P1 is a large (185-kDa) and complex multidomain protein considered a promising target antigen for anticaries vaccines. Previous observations showed that a recombinant P1 fragment (P1(39-512)), produced in Bacillus subtilis and encompassing a functional domain, induces antibodies that recognize the native protein and interfere with S. mutans adhesion in vitro. In the present study, we further investigated the immunological features of P1(39-512) in combination with the following different adjuvants after parenteral administration to mice: alum, a derivative of the heat-labile toxin (LT), and the phase 1 flagellin of S. Typhimurium LT2 (FliCi). Our results demonstrated that recombinant P1(39-512) preserves relevant conformational epitopes as well as salivary agglutinin (SAG)-binding activity. Coadministration of adjuvants enhanced anti-P1 serum antibody responses and affected both epitope specificity and immunoglobulin subclass switching. Importantly, P1(39-512)-specific antibodies raised in mice immunized with adjuvants showed significantly increased inhibition of S. mutans adhesion to SAG, with less of an effect on SAG-mediated bacterial aggregation, an innate defense mechanism. Oral colonization of mice by S. mutans was impaired in the presence of anti-P1(39-512) antibodies, particularly those raised in combination with adjuvants. In conclusion, our results confirm the utility of P1(39-512) as a potential candidate for the development of anticaries vaccines and as a tool for functional studies of S. mutans P1. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in vitro by anticarbohydrate monoclonal antibodies: peripheral glycosylation of HIV envelope glycoprotein gp120 may be a target for virus neutralization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Clausen, H; Nielsen, C

    1990-01-01

    Carbohydrate structures are often involved in the initial adhesion of pathogens to target cells. In the present study, a panel of anticarbohydrate monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) was tested for their ability to inhibit in vitro human immunodeficiency virus infectivity. MAbs against three different N......- and O-linked carbohydrate epitopes (LeY, A1, and sialyl-Tn) were able to block infection by cell-free virus as well as inhibit syncytium formation. Inhibition of virus infectivity was independent of virus strain (HTLVIIIB or patient isolate SSI-002), the cell line used for virus propagation (H9 or MT4......), and the cell type used as the infection target (MT4, PMC, or selected T4 lymphocytes). Inhibition was observed when viruses were preincubated with MAbs but not when cells were preincubated with MAbs before inoculation, and the MAbs were shown to precipitate 125I-labeled gp120. The MAbs therefore define...

  3. Identification and characterization of two linear epitope motifs in hepatitis E virus ORF2 protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Wang

    Full Text Available Hepatitis E virus (HEV is responsible for hepatitis E, which represents a global public health problem. HEV genotypes 3 and 4 are reported to be zoonotic, and animals are monitored for HEV infection in the interests of public hygiene and food safety. The development of novel diagnostic methods and vaccines for HEV in humans is thus important topics of research. Opening reading frame (ORF 2 of HEV includes both linear and conformational epitopes and is regarded as the primary candidate for vaccines and diagnostic tests. We investigated the precise location of the HEV epitopes in the ORF2 protein. We prepared four monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against genotype 4 ORF2 protein and identified two linear epitopes, G438IVIPHD444 and Y457DNQH461, corresponding to two of these mAbs using phage display biopanning technology. Both these epitopes were speculated to be universal to genotypes 1, 2, 3, 4, and avian HEVs. We also used two 12-mer fragments of ORF2 protein including these two epitopes to develop a peptide-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA to detect HEV in serum. This assay demonstrated good specificity but low sensitivity compared with the commercial method, indicating that these two epitopes could serve as potential candidate targets for diagnosis. Overall, these results further our understanding of the epitope distribution of HEV ORF2, and provide important information for the development of peptide-based immunodiagnostic tests to detect HEV in serum.

  4. Synergy between vascular targeting agents and antibody-directed therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedley, R. Barbara; El-Emir, Ethaar; Flynn, Aiden A.; Boxer, Geoffrey M.; Dearling, Jason; Raleigh, James A.; Hill, Sally A.; Stuart, Sam; Motha, Reeya; Begent, Richard H.J.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Tumor heterogeneity necessitates the use of combined therapies. We have shown that combining antibody-directed therapy with antivascular agents converts a subcurative to a curative treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate, by radioluminographic and microscopic techniques, the regional effects of the two complementary therapies. Methods and Materials: Nude mice bearing colorectal tumors were injected with 125 I-labeled anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody, and images were obtained for antibody distribution and modeling studies using radioluminography. For therapy studies, the mice were given radioimmunotherapy alone ( 131 I-A5B7 anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody), the antivascular agent combretastatin A-4 3-0-phosphate (200 mg/kg), or both. Extra mice were used to study the regional tumor effects of these therapies over time: relevant histochemical procedures were performed on tissue sections to obtain composite digital microscopic images of apoptosis, blood vessels, perfusion, hypoxia, and morphology. Results: Antibody distribution, modeling, and immunohistochemistry showed how radioimmunotherapy (7.4 MBq/40 μg antibody) effectively treated the outer, well-oxygenated tumor region only. Combretastatin A-4 3-0-phosphate treated the more hypoxic center, and in doing so altered the relationship between tumor parameters. Conclusion: The combined complementary therapies produced cures by destroying tumor regions with different pathophysiologies. Relating these regional therapeutic effects to the relevant tumor parameters microscopically allows optimization of therapy and improved translation to clinical trials

  5. Epitope-dependent mechanisms of CD27 neutralization revealed by X-ray crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obmolova, Galina; Teplyakov, Alexey; Malia, Thomas J.; Wunderler, Nicole; Kwok, Deborah; Barone, Linda; Sweet, Raymond; Ort, Tatiana; Scully, Michael; Gilliland, Gary L. (Janssen)

    2017-03-01

    CD27 is a T and B cell co-stimulatory protein of the TNF receptor superfamily dependent on the availability of the TNF-like ligand CD70. Two anti-CD27 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies were obtained from mouse hybridoma and subsequently humanized and optimized for binding the target. The two antibodies are similar in terms of their CD27-binding affinity and ability to block NF-κB signaling, however their clearance rates in monkeys are very different. The pharmacokinetics profiles could be epitope dependent. To identify the epitopes, we determined the crystal structure of the ternary complex between CD27 and the Fab fragments of these non-competing antibodies. The structure reveals the binding modes of the antibodies suggesting that their mechanisms of action are distinctly different and provides a possible explanation of the in vivo data.

  6. A human monoclonal antibody prevents malaria infection by targeting a new site of vulnerability on the parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisalu, Neville K; Idris, Azza H; Weidle, Connor; Flores-Garcia, Yevel; Flynn, Barbara J; Sack, Brandon K; Murphy, Sean; Scho N, Arne; Freire, Ernesto; Francica, Joseph R; Miller, Alex B; Gregory, Jason; March, Sandra; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F; Wiehe, Kevin; Trama, Ashley M; Saunders, Kevin O; Gladden, Morgan A; Monroe, Anthony; Bonsignori, Mattia; Kanekiyo, Masaru; Wheatley, Adam K; McDermott, Adrian B; Farney, S Katie; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Zhang, Baoshan; Kc, Natasha; Chakravarty, Sumana; Kwong, Peter D; Sinnis, Photini; Bhatia, Sangeeta N; Kappe, Stefan H I; Sim, B Kim Lee; Hoffman, Stephen L; Zavala, Fidel; Pancera, Marie; Seder, Robert A

    2018-03-19

    Development of a highly effective vaccine or antibodies for the prevention and ultimately elimination of malaria is urgently needed. Here we report the isolation of a number of human monoclonal antibodies directed against the Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP) from several subjects immunized with an attenuated Pf whole-sporozoite (SPZ) vaccine (Sanaria PfSPZ Vaccine). Passive transfer of one of these antibodies, monoclonal antibody CIS43, conferred high-level, sterile protection in two different mouse models of malaria infection. The affinity and stoichiometry of CIS43 binding to PfCSP indicate that there are two sequential multivalent binding events encompassing the repeat domain. The first binding event is to a unique 'junctional' epitope positioned between the N terminus and the central repeat domain of PfCSP. Moreover, CIS43 prevented proteolytic cleavage of PfCSP on PfSPZ. Analysis of crystal structures of the CIS43 antigen-binding fragment in complex with the junctional epitope determined the molecular interactions of binding, revealed the epitope's conformational flexibility and defined Asn-Pro-Asn (NPN) as the structural repeat motif. The demonstration that CIS43 is highly effective for passive prevention of malaria has potential application for use in travelers, military personnel and elimination campaigns and identifies a new and conserved site of vulnerability on PfCSP for next-generation rational vaccine design.

  7. Antibody Epitopes Identified in Critical Regions of Dengue Virus Nonstructural 1 Protein in Mouse Vaccination and Natural Human Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz, Tomer; Beatty, P Robert; MacMillen, Zachary; Killingbeck, Sarah S; Wang, Chunling; Harris, Eva

    2017-05-15

    Dengue is a global public health problem and is caused by four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes (DENV1-4). A major challenge in dengue vaccine development is that cross-reactive anti-DENV Abs can be protective or potentially increase disease via Ab-dependent enhancement. DENV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) has long been considered a vaccine candidate as it avoids Ab-dependent enhancement. In this study, we evaluated survival to challenge in a lethal DENV vascular leak model in mice immunized with NS1 combined with aluminum and magnesium hydroxide, monophosphoryl lipid A + AddaVax, or Sigma adjuvant system+CpG DNA, compared with mice infected with a sublethal dose of DENV2 and mice immunized with OVA (negative control). We characterized Ab responses to DENV1, 2, and 3 NS1 using an Ag microarray tiled with 20-mer peptides overlapping by 15 aa and identified five regions of DENV NS1 with significant levels of Ab reactivity in the NS1 + monophosphoryl lipid A + AddaVax group. Additionally, we profiled the Ab responses to NS1 of humans naturally infected with DENV2 or DENV3 in serum samples from Nicaragua collected at acute, convalescent, and 12-mo timepoints. One region in the wing domain of NS1 was immunodominant in both mouse vaccination and human infection studies, and two regions were identified only in NS1-immunized mice; thus, vaccination can generate Abs to regions that are not targeted in natural infection and could provide additional protection against lethal DENV infection. Overall, we identified a small number of immunodominant regions, which were in functionally important locations on the DENV NS1 protein and are potential correlates of protection. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  8. In vivo neutralization of naturally existing antibodies against linear alpha(1,3)-galactosidic carbohydrate epitopes by multivalent antigen presentation: a solution for the first hurdle of pig-to-human xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duthaler, Rudolf O; Ernst, Beat; Fischer, Reto; Katopodis, Andreas G; Kinzy, Willy; Marterer, Wolfgang; Oehrlein, Reinhold; Streiff, Markus B; Thoma, Gebhard

    2010-01-01

    Pig-to-human xenotransplantation of islet cells or of vascularized organs would offer a welcome treatment alternative for the ever-increasing number of patients with end-stage organ failure who are waiting for a suitable allograph. The main hurdle are preexisting antibodies, most of which are specific for 'Linear-B', carbohydrate epitopes terminated by the unbranched Gal-alpha(1,3)Gal disaccharide. These antibodies are responsible for the 'hyper-acute rejection' of the xenograft by complement mediated hemorrhage. For depletion of such antibodies we have developed an artificial injectable antigen, a glycopolymer (GAS914) with a charge neutral poly-lysine backbone (degree of polymerization n = 1000) and 25% of its side chains coupled to Linear-B-trisaccharide. With an average molecular weight of 400 to 500 kD, presenting 250 trisaccharide epitopes per molecule, this multivalent array binds anti-alphaGal antibodies with at least three orders of magnitude higher avidity on a per-saccharide basis than the monomeric epitope. In vivo experiments with non-human primates documented that rather low doses--1 to 5 mg/kg of GAS914 injected i.v.--efficiently reduce the load of anti-Linear-B antibodies quickly by at least 80%. This treatment can be repeated without any sensitization to GAS914. Interestingly, although the antibody levels start raising 12 h after injection, they do not reach pretreatment levels. The polymer is degraded and excreted within hours, with a minute fraction remaining in lymphoid tissue of anti-alphaGal producing animals only, probably binding to and inhibiting antibody-producing B-cells. The results of pig-to-non-human primate xenotransplantations established GAS914 as a relevant therapeutic option for pig-to-human transplantations as well. The synthesis of GAS914 was successfully scaled up to kg amounts needed for first clinical studies. Key was the use of galactosyl transferases and UDP-galactose for the synthesis of the trisaccharide.

  9. Fab antibody fragment-functionalized liposomes for specific targeting of antigen-positive cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ohradanova-Repic, A.; Nogueira, E.; Hartl, I.; Gomes, A.C.; Preto, A.; Steinhuber, E.; Muehlgrabner, V.; Repic, M.; Kuttke, M.; Zwirzitz, A.; Prouza, M.; Suchánek, M.; Wozniak-Knopp, G.; Hořejší, Václav; Schabbauer, G.; Cavaco-Paulo, A.; Stockinger, H.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 1 (2018), s. 123-130 ISSN 1549-9634 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Active targeting * Liposome functionalization * Immunoliposome * Antibody engineering * Recombinant Fab antibody fragment Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Cell biology Impact factor: 5.720, year: 2016

  10. A Fast and Inexpensive Protocol for Empirical Verification of Neutralizing Epitopes in Microbial Toxins and Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine N. Vuong

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In vivo targeting of peptides to antigen-presenting cells by use of agonistic anti-CD40 monoclonal antibodies has been used successfully as an immune response enhancing strategy. When tested in chickens, the antibody-guided platform was capable of inducing specific IgG production within 1 week postimmunization. However, use of this method beyond its initial conception as a vaccine delivery tool has not been fully exploited. In this study, Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin was used as a model microbial toxin for epitope mapping by using the antibody-guided immunization method to generate a panel of antibodies against specific, regions of the toxin in an attempt to identify crucial determinants on the toxin which, once bound, would hinder downstream toxicity. Alpha-toxin, which possesses both hemolytic and phospholipase C (PLC enzymatic activities, has long been known to be one of the key destructive etiological agents of necrotic enteritis disease in poultry. Previous attempts to identify crucial antigenic determinants on the toxin mediating its enzymatic activities have been performed using expensive and labor-intensive site-directed mutagenesis techniques. To create a panel of antibodies, 23 short candidate alpha-toxin peptide regions were selected in silico using B-cell epitope prediction algorithms in the public domain and were custom synthesized to load onto the antibody-guided complex for immunization in birds for antisera production. Peptide-specific antibody responses were generated against all candidate neutralizing epitopes and used for in vitro toxin neutralization tests. Antisera against all 23 peptides were able to neutralize the toxin’s hemolytic activity, with neutralization titers ranging from 80 to 320, but none were effective in blocking PLC. The novel approach of antibody-guided immunization introduces a new, inexpensive method for polyclonal IgG production and de facto identification of neutralizing epitopes in microbial

  11. IGHV1-69-Encoded Antibodies Expressed in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia React with Malondialdehyde-Acetaldehyde Adduct, an Immunodominant Oxidation-Specific Epitope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Que, Xuchu; Widhopf Ii, George F; Amir, Shahzada

    2013-01-01

    The immunoglobulins expressed by chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) B cells are highly restricted, suggesting they are selected for binding either self or foreign antigen. Of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable (IGHV) genes expressed in CLL, IGHV1-69 is the most common, and often is expressed...... are products of enhanced lipid peroxidation and a major target of innate natural antibodies. Specifically, CLL69C bound immunodominant OSE adducts termed MAA (malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde-adducts), which are found on apoptotic cells, inflammatory tissues, and atherosclerotic lesions. It also reacted...

  12. Epitope of titin A-band-specific monoclonal antibody Tit1 5 H1.1 is highly conserved in several Fn3 domains of the titin molecule. Centriole staining in human, mouse and zebrafish cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikelsaar Aavo-Valdur

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously we have reported on the development of a new mouse anti-titin monoclonal antibody, named MAb Titl 5 H1.1, using the synthetic peptide N-AVNKYGIGEPLESDSVVAK-C which corresponds to an amino acid sequence in the A-region of the titin molecule as immunogen. In the human skeletal muscles, MAb Titl 5 H1.1 reacts specifically with titin in the A-band of the sarcomere and in different non-muscle cell types with nucleus and cytoplasm, including centrioles. In this report we have studied the evolutionary aspects of the binding of MAb Tit1 5 H1.1 with its target antigen (titin. Results We have specified the epitope area of MAb Tit1 5 H1.1 by subpeptide mapping to the hexapeptide N-AVNKYG-C. According to protein databases this amino acid sequence is located in the COOH-terminus of several different Fn3 domains of the A-region of titin molecule in many organisms, such as human being, mouse, rabbit, zebrafish (Danio rerio, and even in sea squirt (Ciona intestinalis. Our immunohisto- and cytochemical studies with MAb Tit1 5 H1.1 in human, mouse and zebrafish tissues and cell cultures showed a striated staining pattern in muscle cells and also staining of centrioles, cytoplasm and nuclei in non-muscle cells. Conclusions The data confirm that titin can play, in addition to the known roles in striated muscle cells also an important role in non-muscle cells as a centriole associated protein. This phenomenon is highly conserved in the evolution and is related to Fn3 domains of the titin molecule. Using titin A-band-specific monoclonal antibody MAb Tit1 5 H1.1 it was possible to locate titin in the sarcomeres of skeletal muscle cells and in the centrioles, cytoplasm and nuclei of non-muscle cells in phylogenetically so distant organisms as Homo sapiens, Mus musculus and zebrafish (Danio rerio.

  13. Peptide Targeted by Human Antibodies Associated with HIV Vaccine-Associated Protection Assumes a Dynamic α-Helical Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiyegbo, Mohammed S; Shmelkov, Evgeny; Dominguez, Lorenzo; Goger, Michael; Battacharya, Shibani; deCamp, Allan C; Gilbert, Peter B; Berman, Phillip W; Cardozo, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    The only evidence of vaccine-induced protection from HIV acquisition in humans was obtained in the RV144 HIV vaccine clinical trial. One immune correlate of risk in RV144 was observed to be higher titers of vaccine-induced antibodies (Abs) reacting with a 23-mer non-glycosylated peptide with the same amino acid sequence as a segment in the second variable (V2) loop of the MN strain of HIV. We used NMR to analyze the dynamic 3D structure of this peptide. Distance restraints between spatially proximate inter-residue protons were calculated from NOE cross peak intensities and used to constrain a thorough search of all possible conformations of the peptide. α-helical folding was strongly preferred by part of the peptide. A high-throughput structure prediction of this segment in all circulating HIV strains demonstrated that α-helical conformations are preferred by this segment almost universally across all subtypes. Notably, α-helical conformations of this segment of the V2 loop cluster cross-subtype-conserved amino acids on one face of the helix and the variable amino acid positions on the other in a semblance of an amphipathic α-helix. Accordingly, some Abs that protected against HIV in RV144 may have targeted a specific, conserved α-helical peptide epitope in the V2 loop of HIV's surface envelope glycoprotein.

  14. Antibody-mediated Targeting of the Urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator Proteolytic Function Neutralizes Fibrinolysis in Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ida K.; Jögi, Annika; Rono, Birgitte

    2008-01-01

    models, we have now developed murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against murine uPA by immunization of uPA-deficient mice with the recombinant protein. Guided by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blotting, surface plasmon resonance, and enzyme kinetic analyses, we have selected two...... highly potent and inhibitory anti-uPA mAbs (mU1 and mU3). Both mAbs recognize epitopes located on the B-chain of uPA that encompasses the catalytic site. In enzyme activity assays in vitro, mU1 blocked uPA-catalyzed plasminogen activation as well as plasmin-mediated pro-uPA activation, whereas mU3 only...... fibrinolysis in tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA)-deficient mice, resulting in a phenotype mimicking that of uPA;tPA double deficient mice. Importantly, this is the first report demonstrating specific antagonist-directed targeting of mouse uPA at the enzyme activity level in a normal physiological...

  15. Antibodies from malaria-exposed pregnant women recognize trypsin resistant epitopes on the surface of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes selected for adhesion to chondroitin sulphate A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharling, Lisa; Enevold, Anders; Sowa, Kordai M P

    2004-01-01

    erythrocyte surface. However, several studies have found that parasite adhesion to placental receptors can be markedly less sensitive to trypsin. This study investigates whether chondroitin sulphate A (CSA) binding parasites express trypsin-resistant variant surface antigens (VSA) that bind female....... falciparum infected erythrocytes selected for adhesion to CSA were found to express trypsin-resistant VSA that are the target of naturally acquired antibodies from pregnant women living in a malaria endemic region of Ghana. However in vitro adhesion to CSA and HA was relatively trypsin sensitive. An improved...... labelling technique for the detection of VSA expressed by CSA binding isolates has also been described. CONCLUSION: The VSA expressed by CSA binding P. falciparum isolates are currently considered potential targets for a vaccine against PAM. This study identifies discordance between the trypsin sensitivity...

  16. T cell immunity to Zika virus targets immunodominant epitopes that show cross-reactivity with other Flaviviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, C J; Suleyman, O M; Ortega-Prieto, A M; Skelton, J K; Bonnesoeur, P; Blohm, A; Carregaro, V; Silva, J S; James, E A; Maillère, B; Dorner, M; Boyton, R J; Altmann, D M

    2018-01-12

    Zika virus (ZIKV) Infection has several outcomes from asymptomatic exposure to rash, conjunctivitis, Guillain-Barré syndrome or congenital Zika syndrome. Analysis of ZIKV immunity is confounded by the fact that several related Flaviviruses infect humans, including Dengue virus 1-4, West Nile virus and Yellow Fever virus. HLA class II restricted T cell cross-reactivity between ZIKV and other Flaviviruses infection(s) or vaccination may contribute to protection or to enhanced immunopathology. We mapped immunodominant, HLA class II restricted, CD4 epitopes from ZIKV Envelope (Env), and Non-structural (NS) NS1, NS3 and NS5 antigens in HLA class II transgenic mice. In several cases, ZIKV primed CD4 cells responded to homologous sequences from other viruses, including DENV1-4, WNV or YFV. However, cross-reactive responses could confer immune deviation - the response to the Env DENV4 p1 epitope in HLA-DR1 resulted in IL-17A immunity, often associated with exacerbated immunopathogenesis. This conservation of recognition across Flaviviruses, may encompass protective and/or pathogenic components and poses challenges to characterization of ZIKV protective immunity.

  17. Optimal selection of epitopes for TXP-immunoaffinity mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joos Thomas

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mass spectrometry (MS based protein profiling has become one of the key technologies in biomedical research and biomarker discovery. One bottleneck in MS-based protein analysis is sample preparation and an efficient fractionation step to reduce the complexity of the biological samples, which are too complex to be analyzed directly with MS. Sample preparation strategies that reduce the complexity of tryptic digests by using immunoaffinity based methods have shown to lead to a substantial increase in throughput and sensitivity in the proteomic mass spectrometry approach. The limitation of using such immunoaffinity-based approaches is the availability of the appropriate peptide specific capture antibodies. Recent developments in these approaches, where subsets of peptides with short identical terminal sequences can be enriched using antibodies directed against short terminal epitopes, promise a significant gain in efficiency. Results We show that the minimal set of terminal epitopes for the coverage of a target protein list can be found by the formulation as a set cover problem, preceded by a filtering pipeline for the exclusion of peptides and target epitopes with undesirable properties. Conclusions For small datasets (a few hundred proteins it is possible to solve the problem to optimality with moderate computational effort using commercial or free solvers. Larger datasets, like full proteomes require the use of heuristics.

  18. Targeting of prolamins by RNAi in bread wheat: effectiveness of seven silencing-fragment combinations for obtaining lines devoid of coeliac disease epitopes from highly immunogenic gliadins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barro, Francisco; Iehisa, Julio C M; Giménez, María J; García-Molina, María D; Ozuna, Carmen V; Comino, Isabel; Sousa, Carolina; Gil-Humanes, Javier

    2016-03-01

    Gluten proteins are responsible for the viscoelastic properties of wheat flour but also for triggering pathologies in susceptible individuals, of which coeliac disease (CD) and noncoeliac gluten sensitivity may affect up to 8% of the population. The only effective treatment for affected persons is a strict gluten-free diet. Here, we report the effectiveness of seven plasmid combinations, encompassing RNAi fragments from α-, γ-, ω-gliadins, and LMW glutenin subunits, for silencing the expression of different prolamin fractions. Silencing patterns of transgenic lines were analysed by gel electrophoresis, RP-HPLC and mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), whereas gluten immunogenicity was assayed by an anti-gliadin 33-mer monoclonal antibody (moAb). Plasmid combinations 1 and 2 downregulated only γ- and α-gliadins, respectively. Four plasmid combinations were highly effective in the silencing of ω-gliadins and γ-gliadins, and three of these also silenced α-gliadins. HMW glutenins were upregulated in all but one plasmid combination, while LMW glutenins were downregulated in three plasmid combinations. Total protein and starch contents were unaffected regardless of the plasmid combination used. Six plasmid combinations provided strong reduction in the gluten content as measured by moAb and for two combinations, this reduction was higher than 90% in comparison with the wild type. CD epitope analysis in peptides identified in LC-MS/MS showed that lines from three plasmid combinations were totally devoid of CD epitopes from the highly immunogenic α- and ω-gliadins. Our findings raise the prospect of breeding wheat species with low levels of harmful gluten, and of achieving the important goal of developing nontoxic wheat cultivars. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. TCR Gene Transfer: MAGE-C2/HLA-A2 and MAGE-A3/HLA-DP4 Epitopes as Melanoma-Specific Immune Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trudy Straetemans

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive therapy with TCR gene-engineered T cells provides an attractive and feasible treatment option for cancer patients. Further development of TCR gene therapy requires the implementation of T-cell target epitopes that prevent “on-target” reactivity towards healthy tissues and at the same time direct a clinically effective response towards tumor tissues. Candidate epitopes that meet these criteria are MAGE-C2336-344/HLA-A2 (MC2/A2 and MAGE-A3243-258/HLA-DP4 (MA3/DP4. We molecularly characterized TCRαβ genes of an MC2/A2-specific CD8 and MA3/DP4-specific CD4 T-cell clone derived from melanoma patients who responded clinically to MAGE vaccination. We identified MC2/A2 and MA3/DP4-specific TCR-Vα3/Vβ28 and TCR-Vα38/Vβ2 chains and validated these TCRs in vitro upon gene transfer into primary human T cells. The MC2 and MA3 TCR were surface-expressed and mediated CD8 T-cell functions towards melanoma cell lines and CD4 T-cell functions towards dendritic cells, respectively. We intend to start testing these MAGE-specific TCRs in phase I clinical trial.

  20. Using llama derived single domain antibodies to target botulinum neurotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Marla D.; Anderson, George P.; Bernstein, Rachael D.; Liu, Jinny L.; Goldman, Ellen R.

    2010-04-01

    Llama serum contains both conventional IgG as well as unique forms of antibody that contain only heavy chains where antigen binding is mediated through a single variable domain. These variable domains can be expressed recombinantly and are referred to as single domain antibodies (sdAb). SdAb are among the smallest known naturally derived antigen binding fragments, possess good solubility, thermal stability, and can refold after heat and chemical denaturation. Llamas were immunized with either BoNT A or B toxoid and phage display libraries prepared. Single domain antibodies (sdAb) that were able to detect botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) serotypes A and B were selected from their respective libraries. Here, the binders obtained by panning the BoNT B library on either BoNT B toxoid or BoNT B complex toxoid coated plates or BoNT B toxin coupled microspheres are described. Using these panning methods, we selected for binders that showed specificity for BoNT B. Phage displayed binders were screened, moved to a protein expression vector and soluble sdAb was produced. Using a Luminex flow cytometer binders were evaluated in direct binding assays. We have exploited the unique properties of sdAb and used them as biological recognition elements in immuno-based sensors that can detect BoNT B.

  1. Plasticity and Epitope Exposure of the HIV-1 Envelope Trimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Rebecca L R; Totrov, Maxim; Itri, Vincenza; Liu, Xiaomei; Fox, Alisa; Zolla-Pazner, Susan

    2017-09-01

    We recently showed that mutations in the HIV-1 envelope (Env) destabilize the V3 loop, rendering neutralization-resistant viruses sensitive to V3-directed monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Here, we investigated the propagation of this effect on other Env epitopes, with special emphasis on V2 loop exposure. Wild-type JR-FL and 19 mutant JR-FL pseudoviruses were tested for neutralization sensitivity to 21 MAbs specific for epitopes in V2, the CD4 binding site (CD4bs), and the CD4-induced (CD4i) region. Certain glycan mutants, mutations in the gp120 hydrophobic core, and mutations in residues involved in intraprotomer interactions exposed epitopes in the V2i region (which overlies the α4β7 integrin binding site) and the V3 crown, suggesting general destabilization of the distal region of the trimer apex. In contrast, other glycan mutants, mutations affecting interprotomer interactions, and mutations affecting the CD4bs exposed V3 but not V2i epitopes. These data indicate for the first time that V3 can move independently of V2, with V3 pivoting out from its "tucked" position in the trimer while apparently leaving the V2 apex intact. Notably, none of the mutations exposed V2 epitopes without also exposing V3, suggesting that movement of V2 releases V3. Most mutations increased sensitivity to CD4bs-directed MAbs without exposure of the CD4i epitope, implying these mutations facilitate the trimers' maintenance of an intermediate energy state between open and closed conformations. Taken together, these data indicate that several transient Env epitopes can be rendered more accessible to antibodies (Abs) via specific mutations, and this may facilitate the design of V1V2-targeting immunogens. IMPORTANCE Many epitopes of the HIV envelope (Env) spike are relatively inaccessible to antibodies (Abs) compared to their exposure in the open Env conformation induced by receptor binding. However, the reduced infection rate that resulted from the vaccine used in the RV144 HIV-1 vaccine

  2. Efficacy of HER2-targeted therapy in metastatic breast cancer. Monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dorte L; Kümler, Iben; Palshof, Jesper Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Therapies targeting the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) 2 are effective in metastatic breast cancer (MBC). We review the efficacy of HER2-directed therapies, focussing on monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting HER2 that have been tested in phase II-III studies...

  3. Intracellular Targeting of CEA Results in Th1-Type Antibody Responses Following Intradermal Genetic Vaccination by a Needle-Free Jet Injection Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Johansson

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The route and method of immunization, as well as the cellular localization of the antigen, can influence the generation of an immune response. In general, intramuscular immunization results in Th1 responses, whereas intradermal delivery of DNA by gene gun immunization often results in more Th2 responses. Here we investigate how altering the cellular localization of the tumor antigen CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen affects the quality and amplitude of DNA vaccine-induced antibody responses in mice following intradermal delivery of DNA by a needle-free jet injection device (Biojector. CEA was expressed either in a membrane-bound form (wild-type CEA or in two truncated forms (CEA6 and CEA66 with cytoplasmic localization, where CEA66 was fused to a promiscuous T-helper epitope from tetanus toxin. Repeated intradermal immunization of BALB/c mice with DNA encoding wild-type CEA produced high antibody titers of a mixed IgG1/IgG2a ratio. In contrast, utilizing the DNA construct that resulted in intracellular targeting of CEA led to a reduced capacity to induce CEA-specific antibodies, but instead induced a Th1-biased immune response.

  4. Defining the immunogenicity and antigenicity of HLA epitopes is crucial for optimal epitope matching in clinical renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, C S M; Roelen, D L; Heidt, S; Claas, F H J

    2017-07-01

    Transplantation of an human leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatched graft can lead to the development of donor-specific antibodies (DSA), which can result in antibody mediated rejection and graft loss as well as complicate repeat transplantation. These DSA are induced by foreign epitopes present on the mismatched HLA antigens of the donor. However, not all epitopes appear to be equally effective in their ability to induce DSA. Understanding the characteristics of HLA epitopes is crucial for optimal epitope matching in clinical transplantation. In this review, the latest insights on HLA epitopes are described with a special focus on the definition of immunogenicity and antigenicity of HLA epitopes. Furthermore, the use of this knowledge to prevent HLA antibody formation and to select the optimal donor for sensitised transplant candidates will be discussed. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Improved method for predicting linear B-cell epitopes

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Jens Erik Pontoppidan; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten

    2006-01-01

    Background B-cell epitopes are the sites of molecules that are recognized by antibodies of the immune system. Knowledge of B-cell epitopes may be used in the design of vaccines and diagnostics tests. It is therefore of interest to develop improved methods for predicting B-cell epitopes. In this paper, we describe an improved method for predicting linear B-cell epitopes. Results In order to do this, three data sets of linear B-cell epitope annotated proteins were constructed. A data set was co...

  6. A vaccine of L2 epitope repeats fused with a modified IgG1 Fc induced cross-neutralizing antibodies and protective immunity against divergent human papillomavirus types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Chen

    Full Text Available Current human papillomavirus (HPV major capsid protein L1 virus-like particles (VLPs-based vaccines in clinic induce strong HPV type-specific neutralizing antibody responses. To develop pan-HPV vaccines, here, we show that the fusion protein E3R4 consisting of three repeats of HPV16 L2 aa 17-36 epitope (E3 and a modified human IgG1 Fc scaffold (R4 induces cross-neutralizing antibodies and protective immunity against divergent HPV types. E3R4 was expressed as a secreted protein in baculovirus expression system and could be simply purified by one step Protein A affinity chromatography with the purity above 90%. Vaccination of E3R4 formulated with Freunds adjuvant not only induced cross-neutralizing antibodies against HPV pseudovirus types 16, 18, 45, 52, 58, 6, 11 and 5 in mice, but also protected mice against vaginal challenges with HPV pseudovirus types 16, 45, 52, 58, 11 and 5 for at least eleven months after the first immunization. Moreover, vaccination of E3R4 formulated with FDA approved adjuvant alum plus monophosphoryl lipid A also induced cross-neutralizing antibodies against HPV types 16, 18 and 6 in rabbits. Thus, our results demonstrate that delivery of L2 antigen as a modified Fc-fusion protein may facilitate pan-HPV vaccine development.

  7. T-cell memory responses elicited by yellow fever vaccine are targeted to overlapping epitopes containing multiple HLA-I and -II binding motifs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Barbosa de Melo

    Full Text Available The yellow fever vaccines (YF-17D-204 and 17DD are considered to be among the safest vaccines and the presence of neutralizing antibodies is correlated with protection, although other immune effector mechanisms are known to be involved. T-cell responses are known to play an important role modulating antibody production and the killing of infected cells. However, little is known about the repertoire of T-cell responses elicited by the YF-17DD vaccine in humans. In this report, a library of 653 partially overlapping 15-mer peptides covering the envelope (Env and nonstructural (NS proteins 1 to 5 of the vaccine was utilized to perform a comprehensive analysis of the virus-specific CD4(+ and CD8(+ T-cell responses. The T-cell responses were screened ex-vivo by IFN-γ ELISPOT assays using blood samples from 220 YF-17DD vaccinees collected two months to four years after immunization. Each peptide was tested in 75 to 208 separate individuals of the cohort. The screening identified sixteen immunodominant antigens that elicited activation of circulating memory T-cells in 10% to 33% of the individuals. Biochemical in-vitro binding assays and immunogenetic and immunogenicity studies indicated that each of the sixteen immunogenic 15-mer peptides contained two or more partially overlapping epitopes that could bind with high affinity to molecules of different HLAs. The prevalence of the immunogenicity of a peptide in the cohort was correlated with the diversity of HLA-II alleles that they could bind. These findings suggest that overlapping of HLA binding motifs within a peptide enhances its T-cell immunogenicity and the prevalence of the response in the population. In summary, the results suggests that in addition to factors of the innate immunity, "promiscuous" T-cell antigens might contribute to the high efficacy of the yellow fever vaccines.

  8. A Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Surface N-Glycoproteome Resource Reveals Markers, Extracellular Epitopes, and Drug Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth R. Boheler

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Detailed knowledge of cell-surface proteins for isolating well-defined populations of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs would significantly enhance their characterization and translational potential. Through a chemoproteomic approach, we developed a cell-surface proteome inventory containing 496 N-linked glycoproteins on human embryonic (hESCs and induced PSCs (hiPSCs. Against a backdrop of human fibroblasts and 50 other cell types, >100 surface proteins of interest for hPSCs were revealed. The >30 positive and negative markers verified here by orthogonal approaches provide experimental justification for the rational selection of pluripotency and lineage markers, epitopes for cell isolation, and reagents for the characterization of putative hiPSC lines. Comparative differences between the chemoproteomic-defined surfaceome and the transcriptome-predicted surfaceome directly led to the discovery that STF-31, a reported GLUT-1 inhibitor, is toxic to hPSCs and efficient for selective elimination of hPSCs from mixed cultures.

  9. A Broadly Neutralizing Antibody Targets the Dynamic HIV Envelope Trimer Apex via a Long, Rigidified, and Anionic β-Hairpin Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong Hyun; Andrabi, Raiees; Su, Ching-Yao; Yasmeen, Anila; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Kong, Leopold; Wu, Nicholas C; McBride, Ryan; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Cottrell, Christopher A; Nieusma, Travis; Blattner, Claudia; Paulson, James C; Klasse, Per Johan; Wilson, Ian A; Burton, Dennis R; Ward, Andrew B

    2017-04-18

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) to HIV delineate vaccine targets and are prophylactic and therapeutic agents. Some of the most potent bnAbs target a quaternary epitope at the apex of the surface HIV envelope (Env) trimer. Using cryo-electron microscopy, we solved the atomic structure of an apex bnAb, PGT145, in complex with Env. We showed that the long anionic HCDR3 of PGT145 penetrated between glycans at the trimer 3-fold axis, to contact peptide residues from all three Env protomers, and thus explains its highly trimer-specific nature. Somatic hypermutation in the other CDRs of PGT145 were crucially involved in stabilizing the structure of the HCDR3, similar to bovine antibodies, to aid in recognition of a cluster of conserved basic residues hypothesized to facilitate trimer disassembly during viral entry. Overall, the findings exemplify the creative solutions that the human immune system can evolve to recognize a conserved motif buried under a canopy of glycans. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Antibodies to autoantigen targets in myasthenia and their value in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. I. Dedaev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis is a classic autoimmune disease, which clinical manifestations in the form of weakness and abnormal muscle fatigue, due to the damaging effect of polyclonal antibodies to different structures of the neuromuscular synapse and muscles. The study of autoimmune substrate with myasthenia is routine in many clinics dealing with the problems of neuromuscular pathology, and the identification of high concentration of serum antibodies to a number of antigenic structures is the gold standard in diagnosis.Determination of serum antibodies to various autoimmune targets is an important tool in clinical practice. The majority of patients shows the high concentration of antibodies to AchR that gives the opportunity to use it as an important diagnostic criterion. The specificity of changes in the concentration of AchR-antibodies due to pathogenetic treatment allows to objectify the suppression of autoimmune aggression and evaluate the reliability of remission. However, the absence of AchR-antibodies when there are clear clinical and electromyography signs of myasthenia gravis suggests an autoimmune attack against a number of other targets, the most studied of which is the MuSK. On the contrary, patients with myasthenia gravis associated with thymoma, almost always have a higher level of AchR-antibodies. The presence of thymoma is accompanied by the generation of antibodies to titin and RyR, which is also observed in persons with late-onset myasthenia without thymoma. High concentration of antibodies to these structures can be interpreted as a reliable sign of thymoma in patients younger than 60 years.

  11. Antibody formation towards porcine tissue in patients implanted with crosslinked heart valves is directed to antigenic tissue proteins and αGal epitopes and is reduced in healthy vegetarian subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böer, Ulrike; Buettner, Falk F R; Schridde, Ariane; Klingenberg, Melanie; Sarikouch, Samir; Haverich, Axel; Wilhelmi, Mathias

    2017-03-01

    Glutaraldehyde-fixed porcine heart valves (ga-pV) are one of the most frequently used substitutes for insufficient aortic and pulmonary heart valves which, however, degenerate after 10-15 years. Yet, xeno-immunogenicity of ga-pV in humans including identification of immunogens still needs to be investigated. We here determined the immunogenicity of ga-pV in patients with respect to antibody formation, identity of immunogens and potential options to reduce antibody levels. Levels of tissue-specific and anti-αGal antibodies were determined retrospectively in patients who received ga-pV for 51 months (n=4), 25 months (n=6) or 5 months (n=4) and compared to age-matched untreated subjects (n=10) or younger subjects with or without vegetarian diet (n=12/15). Immunogenic proteins were investigated by Western blot approaches. Tissue-specific antibodies in patients were elevated after 5 (1.73-fold) and 25 (1.46-fold, both PVegetarian diet reduced significantly (0.63-fold, P<.01) the level of pre-formed αGal but not of tissue-specific antibodies. Immune response in patients towards ga-pV is induced by the porcine proteins albumin and collagen 6A1 as well as αGal epitopes, which seemed to be more sustained. In contrast, in healthy young subjects pre-formed anti-Gal antibodies were reduced by a meat-free nutrition. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Fine epitope specificity of anti-erythropoietin antibodies reveals molecular mimicry with HIV-1 p17 protein: a pathogenetic mechanism for HIV-1-related anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiakalos, Aristotelis; Routsias, John G; Kordossis, Theodore; Moutsopoulos, Haralampos M; Tzioufas, Athanasios G; Sipsas, Nikolaos V

    2011-09-15

    Circulating autoantibodies to endogenous erythropoietin (anti-Epo) are detected in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected patients and represent a risk factor for anemia. The aim of this study was to map the B-cell epitopes on the Epo molecule. Serum samples from HIV-1-positive patients and healthy individuals were tested against overlapping peptides covering the entire sequence of Epo. Serum samples from anti-Epo-positive patients exhibited significant binding to Epo epitopes spanning the following sequences: amino acids 1-20 (Ep1), amino acids 54-72 (Ep5), and amino acids 147-166 (Ep12). Structural analysis of erythropoietin revealed that the immunodominant epitopes, Ep1 and Ep12, comprise the interaction interface with Epo receptor (EpoR). Autoantibodies binding to this specific region are anticipated to inhibit the Epo-EpoR interaction, resulting in blunted erythropoiesis; this phenomenon is indicated by the significantly higher Epo levels and lower hemoglobin levels of anti-Ep1-positive patients compared with anti-Ep1-negative individuals. The region corresponding to the Ep1 epitope exhibited a 63% sequence homology with the ³⁴LVCASRELERFAVNPGLLE⁵² fragment of the HIV-1 p17 matrix protein. These results suggest that the main body of anti-Epo is directed against a functional domain of Epo, and that the presence of anti-Epo can be considered to be a result of a molecular mimicry mechanism, which is caused by the similarity between the Ep1 region and the p17 protein.

  13. Surface targeting of the dopamine transporter involves discrete epitopes in the distal C terminus but does not require canonical PDZ domain interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerggaard, Christian; Fog, Jacob U; Hastrup, Hanne; Madsen, Kenneth; Loland, Claus J; Javitch, Jonathan A; Gether, Ulrik

    2004-08-04

    The human dopamine transporter (hDAT) contains a C-terminal type 2 PDZ (postsynaptic density 95/Discs large/zona occludens 1) domain-binding motif (LKV) known to interact with PDZ domain proteins such as PICK1 (protein interacting with C-kinase 1). As reported previously, we found that, after deletion of this motif, hDAT was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 and Neuro2A cells, suggesting that PDZ domain interactions might be critical for hDAT targeting. Nonetheless, substitution of LKV with SLL, the type 1 PDZ-binding sequence from the beta2-adrenergic receptor, did not disrupt plasma membrane targeting. Moreover, the addition of an alanine to the hDAT C terminus (+Ala), resulting in an LKVA termination sequence, or substitution of LKV with alanines (3xAla_618-620) prevented neither plasma membrane targeting nor targeting into sprouting neurites of differentiated N2A cells. The inability of +Ala and 3xAla_618-620 to bind PDZ domains was confirmed by lack of colocalization with PICK1 in cotransfected HEK293 cells and by the inability of corresponding C-terminal fusion proteins to pull down purified PICK1. Thus, although residues in the hDAT C terminus are indispensable for proper targeting, PDZ domain interactions are not required. By progressive substitutions with beta2-adrenergic receptor sequence, and by triple-alanine substitutions in the hDAT C terminus, we examined the importance of epitopes preceding the LKV motif. Substitution of RHW(615-617) with alanines caused retention of the transporter in the ER despite preserved ability of this mutant to bind PICK1. We propose dual roles of the hDAT C terminus: a role independent of PDZ interactions for ER export and surface targeting, and a not fully clarified role involving PDZ interactions with proteins such as PICK1.

  14. Activated platelets in carotid artery thrombosis in mice can be selectively targeted with a radiolabeled single-chain antibody.

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    Timo Heidt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Activated platelets can be found on the surface of inflamed, rupture-prone and ruptured plaques as well as in intravascular thrombosis. They are key players in thrombosis and atherosclerosis. In this study we describe the construction of a radiolabeled single-chain antibody targeting the LIBS-epitope of activated platelets to selectively depict platelet activation and wall-adherent non-occlusive thrombosis in a mouse model with nuclear imaging using in vitro and ex vivo autoradiography as well as small animal SPECT-CT for in vivo analysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: LIBS as well as an unspecific control single-chain antibody were labeled with (111Indium ((111In via bifunctional DTPA ( = (111In-LIBS/(111In-control. Autoradiography after incubation with (111In-LIBS on activated platelets in vitro (mean 3866 ± 28 DLU/mm(2, 4010 ± 630 DLU/mm(2 and 4520 ± 293 DLU/mm(2 produced a significantly higher ligand uptake compared to (111In-control (2101 ± 76 DLU/mm(2, 1181 ± 96 DLU/mm(2 and 1866 ± 246 DLU/mm(2 indicating a specific binding to activated platelets; P<0.05. Applying these findings to an ex vivo mouse model of carotid artery thrombosis revealed a significant increase in ligand uptake after injection of (111In-LIBS in the presence of small thrombi compared to the non-injured side, as confirmed by histology (49630 ± 10650 DLU/mm(2 vs. 17390 ± 7470 DLU/mm(2; P<0.05. These findings could also be reproduced in vivo. SPECT-CT analysis of the injured carotid artery with (111In-LIBS resulted in a significant increase of the target-to-background ratio compared to (111In-control (1.99 ± 0.36 vs. 1.1 ± 0.24; P < 0.01. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Nuclear imaging with (111In-LIBS allows the detection of platelet activation in vitro and ex vivo with high sensitivity. Using SPECT-CT, wall-adherent activated platelets in carotid arteries could be depicted in vivo. These results encourage further studies elucidating the role of

  15. How immunoglobulin G antibodies kill target cells: revisiting an old paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biburger, Markus; Lux, Anja; Nimmerjahn, Falk

    2014-01-01

    The capacity of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to eliminate virtually any target cell has resulted in the widespread introduction of cytotoxic antibodies into the clinic in settings of cancer therapy, autoimmunity, and transplantation, for example. More recently, it has become apparent that also the protection from viral infection via IgG antibodies may require cytotoxic effector functions, suggesting that antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) directed against malignant or virally infected cells is one of the most essential effector mechanisms triggered by IgG antibodies to protect the host. A detailed understanding of the underlying molecular and cellular pathways is critical, therefore, to make full use of this antibody effector function. Several studies over the last years have provided novel insights into the effector pathways and innate immune effector cells responsible for ADCC reactions. One of the most notable outcomes of many of these reports is that cells of the mononuclear phagocytic system rather than natural killer cells are critical for removal of IgG opsonized target cells in vivo. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Use of synthetic peptides to represent surface-exposed epitopes defined by neutralizing dengue complex- and flavivirus group-reactive monoclonal antibodies on the native dengue type-2 virus envelope glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconar, Andrew K I

    2008-07-01

    The reactions of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that defined dengue virus (DENV) complex, flavivirus subgroup or group neutralizing epitopes were tested against synthetic peptide sequences from domains I, II and III of the envelope (E) glycoproteins of different DENV-2 genotypes/strains. The DENV complex-reactive mAb identified the surface-exposed 304-GKFKV/IVKEIA-313 peptides and the DENV complex-conserved 393-KKGSSIGQ/KM-401 peptides in domain III, which were located adjacently in the native glycoprotein. Both flavivirus group-reactive mAbs reacted most strongly with fusion sequence peptides from domain II when they contained a cysteine (C) by glycine (G) substitution (underlined) (101-WGNGGGLFG-109) to represent the native rotated C side chain. The 393-401 sequence represents a newly identified epitope, present as a highly flexible coil located between the 385 and 393 cell-binding sequence and the 401 and 413 sequence involved in the E glycoprotein homo-trimer formation. The 101-109 sequence containing 105-C by G substitution and the 393-401 sequence are good candidates for diagnostic assays and cross-protection experiments.

  17. Direct binding of radioiodinated monoclonal antibody to tumor cells: significance of antibody purity and affinity for drug targeting or tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennel, S.J.; Foote, L.J.; Lankford, P.K.; Johnson, M.; Mitchell, T.; Braslawsky, G.R.

    1983-01-01

    For MoAb to be used efficiently for drug targeting and tumor imaging, the fraction of antibody binding to tumor cells must be maximized. The authors have studied the binding of 125 I MoAb in three different tumor systems. The fraction of antibody that could be bound to the cell surface was directly proportional to the antibody purity. The affinity constant also limits the fraction of antibody that can bind to cells at a given antigen concentration. Rearrangement of the standard expression for univalent equilibrium binding between two reactants shows that in antigen excess, the maximum fraction of antibody that can bind =Ka[Ag total]/1 + Ka[Ag total]. Binding data using four different MoAb with three cell systems confirm this relationship. Estimates for reasonable concentrations of tumor antigens in vivo indicate that antibodies with binding constants less than 10 8 M -1 are not likely to be useful for drug targeting or tumor imaging

  18. Direct binding of radioiodinated monoclonal antibody to tumor cells: significance of antibody purity and affinity for drug targeting or tumor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennel, S.J.; Foote, L.J.; Lankford, P.K.; Johnson, M.; Mitchell, T.; Braslawsky, G.R.

    1983-01-01

    For MoAb to be used efficiently for drug targeting and tumor imaging, the fraction of antibody binding to tumor cells must be maximized. We have studied the binding of 125I MoAb in three different tumor systems. The fraction of antibody that could be bound to the cell surface was directly proportional to the antibody purity. The affinity constant also limits the fraction of antibody that can bind to cells at a given antigen concentration. Rearrangement of the standard expression for univalent equilibrium binding between two reactants shows that in antigen excess, the maximum fraction of antibody that can bind (formula; see text). Binding data using four different MoAb with three cell systems confirm this relationship. Estimates for reasonable concentrations of tumor antigens in vivo indicate that antibodies with binding constants less than 10(8) M-1 are not likely to be useful for drug targeting or tumor imaging.

  19. DNA-templated antibody conjugation for targeted drug delivery to cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Tianqiang

    2016-01-01

    conjugation strategy. Recently, a site-selective antibody conjugation method called “DNA-templated protein conjugation (DTPC)” was developed by our group. The site-selective covalently attachment of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) to proteins was achieved by using a metal-affinity DNA probe and DNA-templated...... state to get a good pharmacological performance. Recombinant antibody engineering with non-natural amino acids, or enzyme-mediated conjugation approaches (transglutaminase, Sortase A or endoglycosidase) have been reported for producing homogeneous antibody conjugates. However, these methods require...... organic synthesis due to the wide existence of the 3-histidine cluster in most wild-type proteins. In this thesis, three projects that relate to targeted drug delivery to cancer cells based on the DTPC method is described. The first project was a delivery system which uses transferrin as the targeting...

  20. Superiority in Rhesus Macaques of Targeting HIV-1 Env gp140 to CD40 versus LOX-1 in Combination with Replication-Competent NYVAC-KC for Induction of Env-Specific Antibody and T Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurawski, Gerard; Shen, Xiaoying; Zurawski, Sandra; Tomaras, Georgia D; Montefiori, David C; Roederer, Mario; Ferrari, Guido; Lacabaratz, Christine; Klucar, Peter; Wang, Zhiqing; Foulds, Kathryn E; Kao, Shing-Fen; Yu, Xuesong; Sato, Alicia; Yates, Nicole L; LaBranche, Celia; Stanfield-Oakley, Sherry; Kibler, Karen; Jacobs, Bertram; Salazar, Andres; Self, Steve; Fulp, William; Gottardo, Raphael; Galmin, Lindsey; Weiss, Deborah; Cristillo, Anthony; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Levy, Yves

    2017-05-01

    We compared the HIV-1-specific immune responses generated by targeting HIV-1 envelope protein (Env gp140) to either CD40 or LOX-1, two endocytic receptors on dendritic cells (DCs), in rhesus macaques primed with a poxvirus vector (NYVAC-KC) expressing Env gp140. The DC-targeting vaccines, humanized recombinant monoclonal antibodies fused to Env gp140, were administered as a boost with poly-ICLC adjuvant either alone or coadministered with the NYVAC-KC vector. All the DC-targeting vaccine administrations with poly-ICLC increased the low-level serum anti-Env IgG responses elicited by NYVAC-KC priming significantly more (up to a P value of 0.01) than in a group without poly-ICLC. The responses were robust and cross-reactive and contained antibodies specific to multiple epitopes within gp140, including the C1, C2, V1, V2, and V3, C4, C5, and gp41 immunodominant regions. The DC-targeting vaccines also elicited modest serum Env-specific IgA responses. All groups gave serum neutralization activity limited to tier 1 viruses and antibody-dependent cytotoxicity responses (ADCC) after DC-targeting boosts. Furthermore, CD4 + and CD8 + T cell responses specific to multiple Env epitopes were strongly boosted by the DC-targeting vaccines plus poly-ICLC. Together, these results indicate that prime-boost immunization via NYVAC-KC and either anti-CD40.Env gp140/poly-ICLC or anti-LOX-1.Env gp140/poly-ICLC induced balanced antibody and T cell responses against HIV-1 Env. Coadministration of NYVAC-KC with the DC-targeting vaccines increased T cell responses but had minimal effects on antibody responses except for suppressing serum IgA responses. Overall, targeting Env to CD40 gave more robust T cell and serum antibody responses with broader epitope representation and greater durability than with LOX-1. IMPORTANCE An effective vaccine to prevent HIV-1 infection does not yet exist. An approach to elicit strong protective antibody development is to direct virus protein antigens

  1. Human IgG1 antibodies suppress angiogenesis in a target-independent manner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogdanovich, Sasha; Kim, Younghee; Mizutani, Takeshi; Yasuma, Reo; Tudisco, Laura; Cicatiello, Valeria; Bastos-Carvalho, Ana; Kerur, Nagaraj; Hirano, Yoshio; Baffi, Judit Z; Tarallo, Valeria; Li, Shengjian; Yasuma, Tetsuhiro; Arpitha, Parthasarathy; Fowler, Benjamin J; Wright, Charles B; Apicella, Ivana; Greco, Adelaide; Brunetti, Arturo; Ruvo, Menotti; Sandomenico, Annamaria; Nozaki, Miho; Ijima, Ryo; Kaneko, Hiroki; Ogura, Yuichiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Ambati, Balamurali K; Leusen, Jeanette HW; Langdon, Wallace Y; Clark, Michael R; Armour, Kathryn L; Bruhns, Pierre; Verbeek, J Sjef; Gelfand, Bradley D; De Falco, Sandro; Ambati, Jayakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant angiogenesis is implicated in diseases affecting nearly 10% of the world's population. The most widely used anti-angiogenic drug is bevacizumab, a humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody that targets human VEGFA. Although bevacizumab does not recognize mouse Vegfa, it inhibits angiogenesis in

  2. Targeting HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Trimers to B Cells by Using APRIL Improves Antibody Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melchers, Mark; Bontjer, Ilja; Tong, Tommy; Chung, Nancy P. Y.; Klasse, Per Johan; Eggink, Dirk; Montefiori, David C.; Gentile, Maurizio; Cerutti, Andrea; Olson, William C.; Berkhout, Ben; Binley, James M.; Moore, John P.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2012-01-01

    An HIV-1 vaccine remains elusive, in part because various factors limit the quantity and quality of the antibodies raised against the viral envelope glycoprotein complex (Env). We hypothesized that targeting Env vaccines directly to B cells, by fusing them to molecules that bind and activate these

  3. Tumor infarction in mice by antibody-directed targeting of tissue factor to tumor vasculature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, XM; Molema, G; King, S; Watkins, L; Edgington, TS; Thorpe, PE

    1997-01-01

    Selective occlusion of tumor vasculature was tested as a therapy for solid tumors in a mouse model. The formation of blood clots (thrombosis) within the tumor Vessels was initiated by targeting the cell surface domain of human tissue factor, by means of a bispecific antibody, to an experimentally

  4. Anti-claudin 18.2 antibody as new targeted therapy for advanced gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Prabhsimranjot Singh; Sudhamshi Toom; Yiwu Huang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Targeted therapy and immunotherapy have revolutionized treatment of various cancers in the past decade. Despite targeted therapy with trastuzumab in Her2-positive gastric cancer patients, survival has been dismal, mostly due to disease progression and toxicity related to the treatments. One area of active development is looking for ideal monoclonal antibodies (IMAB) specific to the proteins only on the tumor and hence avoiding unnecessary side effects. Claudin proteins with isoform 2...

  5. Generation and epitope analysis of human monoclonal antibody isotypes with specificity for the timothy grass major allergen Phl p 5a

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hecker, J.; Diethers, A.; Seismann, H.

    2011-01-01

    and cross-reactivity, standardisation of allergens as well as improvement of allergy diagnostics and therapeutics. Here we report the generation and application of the first set of authentic human IgG, IgE and IgA antibodies. On the basis of a Phl p 5a specific antibody fragment, a lambda light chain...

  6. Indocyanine green as effective antibody conjugate for intracellular molecular targeted photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sijia; Hüttmann, Gereon; Rudnitzki, Florian; Diddens-Tschoeke, Heyke; Zhang, Zhenxi; Rahmanzadeh, Ramtin

    2016-07-01

    The fluorescent dye indocyanine green (ICG) is clinically approved and has been applied for ophthalmic and intraoperative angiography, measurement of cardiac output and liver function, or as contrast agent in cancer surgery. Though ICG is known for its photochemical effects, it has played a minor role so far in photodynamic therapy or techniques for targeted protein-inactivation. Here, we investigated ICG as an antibody-conjugate for the selective inactivation of the protein Ki-67 in the nucleus of cells. Conjugates of the Ki-67 antibody TuBB-9 with different amounts of ICG were synthesized and delivered into HeLa and OVCAR-5 cells through conjugation to the nuclear localization sequence. Endosomal escape of the macromolecular antibodies into the cytoplasm was optically triggered by photochemical internalization with the photosensitizer BPD. The second light irradiation at 690 nm inactivated Ki-67 and subsequently caused cell death. Here, we show that ICG as an antibody-conjugate can be an effective photosensitizing agent. Best effects were achieved with 1.8 ICG molecules per antibody. Conjugated to antibodies, the ICG absorption peaks vary proportionally with concentration. The absorption of ICG above 650 nm within the optical window of tissue opens the possibility of selective Ki-67 inactivation deep inside of tissues.

  7. Conserved epitope on several human vitamin K-dependent proteins: location of the antigenic site and influence of metal ions on antibody binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Church, W.R.; Messier, T.; Howard, P.R.; Amiral, J.; Meyer, D.; Mann, K.G.

    1988-01-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody (designated H-11) produced by injecting mice with purified human protein C was found to bind several human vitamin K-dependent proteins. Using a solid-phase competitive radioimmunoassay with antibody immobilized onto microtiter plates, binding of 125 I-labeled protein C to the antibody was inhibited by increasing amounts of protein C, prothrombin, and Factors X and VII over a concentration range of 1 x 10 -8 to 1 x 10 -6 M. Chemical treatment of prothrombin with a variety of agents did not destroy the antigenic site recognized by the antibody as measured by immunoblotting of prothrombin or prothrombin derivative immobilized onto nitrocellulose. Immunoblotting of purified vitamin K-dependent polypeptides with the monoclonal antibody following sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and electrophoretic transfer to nitrocellulose indicated that the antigenic site was found on the light chains of protein C and Factor X. The exact location of the antigenic determinant for antibody H-11 was established using synthetic peptides. Comparison of protein sequences of bovine and human vitamin K-dependent proteins suggests that the sequence Phe-Leu-Glu-Glu-Xaa-Arg/Lys is required for antibody binding. Increasing concentrations of Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ , or Mn 2+ partially inhibited binding of 125 I-protein C to the antibody in a solid-phase assay system with half-maximal binding observed at divalent metal ion concentrations of 2, 4, and 0.6 mM, respectively. The antigenic site thus recognized by monoclonal antibody H-11 is located at the amino-terminal region in the highly conserved γ-carboxyglutamic acid-containing domains of several, but not all, vitamin K-dependent proteins

  8. Computationally driven deletion of broadly distributed T cell epitopes in a biotherapeutic candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvat, Regina S; Parker, Andrew S; Guilliams, Andrew; Choi, Yoonjoo; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Griswold, Karl E

    2014-12-01

    Biotherapeutics are subject to immune surveillance within the body, and anti-biotherapeutic immune responses can compromise drug efficacy and patient safety. Initial development of targeted antidrug immune memory is coordinated by T cell recognition of immunogenic subsequences, termed "T cell epitopes." Biotherapeutics may therefore be deimmunized by mutating key residues within cognate epitopes, but there exist complex trade-offs between immunogenicity, mutational load, and protein structure-function. Here, a protein deimmunization algorithm has been applied to P99 beta-lactamase, a component of antibody-directed enzyme prodrug therapies. The algorithm, integer programming for immunogenic proteins, seamlessly integrates computational prediction of T cell epitopes with both 1- and 2-body sequence potentials that assess protein tolerance to epitope-deleting mutations. Compared to previously deimmunized P99 variants, which bore only one or two mutations, the enzymes designed here contain 4-5 widely distributed substitutions. As a result, they exhibit broad reductions in major histocompatibility complex recognition. Despite their high mutational loads and markedly reduced immunoreactivity, all eight engineered variants possessed wild-type or better catalytic activity. Thus, the protein design algorithm is able to disrupt broadly distributed epitopes while maintaining protein function. As a result, this computational tool may prove useful in expanding the repertoire of next-generation biotherapeutics.

  9. Rapid identification of novel immunodominant proteins and characterization of a specific linear epitope of Campylobacter jejuni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Hoppe

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni remains one of the major gut pathogens of our time. Its zoonotic nature and wide-spread distribution in industrialized countries calls for a quick and reliable diagnostic tool. Antibody-based detection presents a suitable means to identify pathogenic bacteria. However, the knowledge about immunodominant targets is limited. Thus, an approach is presented, which allows for the rapid screening of numerous cDNA derived expression clones to identify novel antigens. The deeper understanding of immunodominant proteins assists in the design of diagnostic tools and furthers the insight into the bacterium's pathogenicity as well as revealing potential candidates for vaccination. We have successfully screened 1536 clones of an expression library to identify 22 proteins that have not been described as immunodominant before. After subcloning the corresponding 22 genes and expression of full-length proteins, we investigated the immunodominant character by microarrays and ELISA. Subsequently, seven proteins were selected for epitope mapping. For cj0669 and cj0920c linear epitopes were identified. For cj0669, specificity assays revealed a specific linear epitope site. Consequently, an eleven amino acid residue sequence TLIKELKRLGI was analyzed via alanine scan, which revealed the glycine residue to be significant for binding of the antibody. The innovative approach presented herein of generating cDNAs of prokaryotes in combination with a microarray platform rendering time-consuming purification steps obsolete has helped to illuminate novel immunodominant proteins of C.jejuni. The findings of a specific linear epitope pave the way for a plethora of future research and the potential use in diagnostic applications such as serological screenings. Moreover, the current approach is easily adaptable to other highly relevant bacteria making it a formidable tool for the future discovery of antigens and potential biomarkers. Consequently, it is

  10. DNA-mediated strand displacement facilitates sensitive electronic detection of antibodies in human serums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Baoting; Yang, Jianmei; Shi, Kai; Yuan, Ruo; Xiang, Yun

    2016-09-15

    We describe here the development of a sensitive and convenient electronic sensor for the detection of antibodies in human serums. The sensor is constructed by self-assembly formation of a mixed monolayer containing the small molecule epitope conjugated double stranded DNA probes on gold electrode. The target antibody binds the epitope on the dsDNA probe and lowers the melting temperature of the duplex, which facilitates the displacement of the antibody-linked strand of the duplex probe by an invading methylene blue-tagged single stranded DNA (MB-ssDNA) through the strand displacement reaction and leads to the capture of many MB-ssDNA on the sensor surface. Subsequent electrochemical oxidation of the methylene blue labels results in amplified current response for sensitive monitoring of the antibodies. The antibody assay conditions are optimized and the sensor exhibits a linear range between 1.0 and 25.0nM with a detection limit of 0.67nM for the target antibody. The sensor is also selective and can be employed to detect the target antibodies in human serum samples. With the advantages of using small molecule epitope as the antibody recognition element over traditional antigen, the versatile manipulability of the DNA probes and the unique properties of the electrochemical transduction technique, the developed sensor thus hold great potential for simple and sensitive detection of different antibodies and other proteins in real samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of Tetravalent, Bispecific CCR5 Antibodies with Antiviral Activity against CCR5 Monoclonal Antibody-Resistant HIV-1 Strains▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanzer, Jürgen; Jekle, Andreas; Nezu, Junichi; Lochner, Adriane; Croasdale, Rebecca; Dioszegi, Marianna; Zhang, Jun; Hoffmann, Eike; Dormeyer, Wilma; Stracke, Jan; Schäfer, Wolfgang; Ji, Changhua; Heilek, Gabrielle; Cammack, Nick; Brandt, Michael; Umana, Pablo; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we describe novel tetravalent, bispecific antibody derivatives that bind two different epitopes on the HIV coreceptor CCR5. The basic protein formats that we applied were derived from Morrison-type bispecific antibodies: whole IgGs to which we connected single-chain antibodies (scFvs) via (Gly4Ser)n sequences at either the C or N terminus of the light chain or heavy chain. By design optimization, including disulfide stabilization of scFvs or introduction of 30-amino-acid linkers, stable molecules could be obtained in amounts that were within the same range as or no less than 4-fold lower than those observed with monoclonal antibodies in transient expression assays. In contrast to monospecific CCR5 antibodies, bispecific antibody derivatives block two alternative docking sites of CCR5-tropic HIV strains on the CCR5 coreceptor. Consequently, these molecules showed 18- to 57-fold increased antiviral activities compared to the parent antibodies. Most importantly, one prototypic tetravalent CCR5 antibody had antiviral activity against virus strains resistant to the single parental antibodies. In summary, physical linkage of two CCR5 antibodies targeting different epitopes on the HIV coreceptor CCR5 resulted in tetravalent, bispecific antibodies with enhanced antiviral potency against wild-type and CCR5 antibody-resistant HIV-1 strains. PMID:21300827

  12. Design and Characterization of Epitope-Scaffold Immunogens That Present the Motavizumab Epitope from Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLellan, Jason S.; Correia, Bruno E.; Chen, Man; Yang, Yongping; Graham, Barney S.; Schief, William R.; Kwong, Peter D. (UWASH); (NIH)

    2012-06-28

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of respiratory tract infections in infants, but an effective vaccine has not yet been developed. An ideal vaccine would elicit protective antibodies while avoiding virus-specific T-cell responses, which have been implicated in vaccine-enhanced disease with previous RSV vaccines. We propose that heterologous proteins designed to present RSV-neutralizing antibody epitopes and to elicit cognate antibodies have the potential to fulfill these vaccine requirements, as they can be fashioned to be free of viral T-cell epitopes. Here we present the design and characterization of three epitope-scaffolds that present the epitope of motavizumab, a potent neutralizing antibody that binds to a helix-loop-helix motif in the RSV fusion glycoprotein. Two of the epitope-scaffolds could be purified, and one epitope-scaffold based on a Staphylococcus aureus protein A domain bound motavizumab with kinetic and thermodynamic properties consistent with the free epitope-scaffold being stabilized in a conformation that closely resembled the motavizumab-bound state. This epitope-scaffold was well folded as assessed by circular dichroism and isothermal titration calorimetry, and its crystal structure (determined in complex with motavizumab to 1.9 {angstrom} resolution) was similar to the computationally designed model, with all hydrogen-bond interactions critical for binding to motavizumab preserved. Immunization of mice with this epitope-scaffold failed to elicit neutralizing antibodies but did elicit sera with F binding activity. The elicitation of F binding antibodies suggests that some of the design criteria for eliciting protective antibodies without virus-specific T-cell responses are being met, but additional optimization of these novel immunogens is required.

  13. Anti-HIV-1 activity and structure-activity-relationship study of a fucosylated glycosaminoglycan from an echinoderm by targeting the conserved CD4 induced epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Wu; Wu, Mingyi; Huang, Ning; Gao, Na; Xiao, Chuang; Li, Zi; Zhang, Zhigang; Zheng, Yongtang; Peng, Wenlie; Zhao, Jinhua

    2013-10-01

    Fucosylated glycosaminoglycan (FG) is a novel glycosaminoglycan with a chondroitin sulfate-like backbone and fucose sulfate branches. The aim of this study is to investigate the mechanism and structure-activity relationships (SAR) of FG for combating HIV-1 infection. Anti-HIV activities of FGs were assessed by a cytopathic effect assay and an HIV-1 p24 detection assay. The biomolecule interactions were explored via biolayer interferometry technology. The SAR was established by comparing its anti-HIV-1 activities, conserved CD4 induced (CD4i) epitope-dependent interactions and anticoagulant activities. FG efficiently and selectively inhibited the X4- and R5X4-tropic HIV-1 infections in C8166 cells with little cytotoxicity against C8166 cells and PBMCs. Our data indicated that FG bound to gp120 with nanomolar affinity and may interact with CD4i of gp120. Additionally, the CD4i binding affinity of FG was higher than that of dextran sulfate. SAR studies suggested that the unique sulfated fucose branches account for the anti-HIV-1 activity. The molecular size and present carboxyl groups of FG may also play important roles in various activities. Notably, several FG derivatives showed higher anti-HIV-1 activities and much lower anticoagulant activities than those of heparin. FG exhibits strong activity against X4- and R5X4-tropic HIV-1 infections. The mechanism may be related to targeting CD4i of gp120, which results in inhibition of HIV-1 entry. The carboxyl group substituted derivatives of FG (8.5-12.8kDa), might display high anti-HIV-1 activity and low anticoagulant activity. Our data supports further the investigation of FG derivatives as novel HIV-1 entry inhibitors targeting CD4i. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A novel anti-CD146 antibody specifically targets cancer cells by internalizing the molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nollet, Marie; Stalin, Jimmy; Moyon, Anaïs; Traboulsi, Waël; Essaadi, Amel; Robert, Stéphane; Malissen, Nausicaa; Bachelier, Richard; Daniel, Laurent; Foucault-Bertaud, Alexandrine; Gaudy-Marqueste, Caroline; Lacroix, Romaric; Leroyer, Aurélie S; Guillet, Benjamin; Bardin, Nathalie; Dignat-George, Françoise; Blot-Chabaud, Marcel

    2017-12-22

    CD146 is an adhesion molecule present on many tumors (melanoma, kidney, pancreas, breast, ...). In addition, it has been shown to be expressed on vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Generating an antibody able to specifically recognize CD146 in cancer cells (designated as tumor CD146), but not in normal cells, would thus be of major interest for targeting tumor CD146 without affecting the vascular system. We thus generated antibodies against the extracellular domain of the molecule produced in cancer cells and selected an antibody that specifically recognizes tumor CD146. This antibody (TsCD146 mAb) was able to detect CD146-positive tumors in human biopsies and in vivo , by PET imaging, in a murine xenograft model. In addition, TsCD146 mAb antibody was able to specifically detect CD146-positive cancer microparticles in the plasma of patients. TsCD146 mAb displayed also therapeutic effects since it was able to reduce the growth of human CD146-positive cancer cells xenografted in nude mice. This effect was due to a decrease in the proliferation and an increase in the apoptosis of CD146-positive cancer cells after TsCD146-mediated internalization of the cell surface CD146. Thus, TsCD146 mAb could be of major interest for diagnostic and therapeutic strategies against CD146-positive tumors in a context of personalized medicine.

  15. A novel monoclonal antibody targeting coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor inhibits tumor growth in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Manabu; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Kajikawa, Masunori; Sugiura, Masahito; Sakamoto, Shuichi; Urano, Sakiko; Karasawa, Chigusa; Usami, Ihomi; Futakuchi, Mitsuru; Masuda, Tohru

    2017-01-11

    To create a new anti-tumor antibody, we conducted signal sequence trap by retrovirus-meditated expression method and identified coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CXADR) as an appropriate target. We developed monoclonal antibodies against human CXADR and found that one antibody (6G10A) significantly inhibited the growth of subcutaneous as well as orthotopic xenografts of human prostate cancer cells in vivo. Furthermore, 6G10A also inhibited other cancer xenografts expressing CXADR, such as pancreatic and colorectal cancer cells. Knockdown and overexpression of CXADR confirmed the dependence of its anti-tumor activity on CXADR expression. Our studies of its action demonstrated that 6G10A exerted its anti-tumor activity primarily through both antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Moreover, 6G10A reacted with human tumor tissues, such as prostate, lung, and brain, each of which express CXADR. Although we need further evaluation of its reactivity and safety in human tissues, our results show that a novel anti-CXADR antibody may be a feasible candidate for cancer immunotherapy.

  16. Self-assembly of carbon nanotubes and antibodies on tumours for targeted, amplified delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, J. Justin; Villa, Carlos H.; McDevitt, Michael R.; Escorcia, Freddy E.; Casey, Emily; Scheinberg, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can deliver imaging agents or drugs to tumours and offer significant advantages over approaches based on antibodies or other nanomaterials. In particular, the nanotubes can carry a substantial amount of cargo (100 times more than a monoclonal antibody), but can still be rapidly eliminated from circulation by renal filtration, like a small molecule, due to their high aspect ratio. Here we show that SWNTs can target tumours in a two-step approach in which nanotubes modified with morpholino oligonucleotide sequences bind to cancer cells that have been pre-targeted with antibodies modified with oligonucleotide strands complementary to those on the nanotubes. The nanotubes can carry fluorophores or radioisotopes, and were shown to selectively bind to cancer cells in vitro and in tumour-bearing xenografted mice. The binding process is also found to lead to antigen capping and internalization of the antibody/nanotube complexes. The nanotube conjugates were labelled with both alpha-particle and gamma-ray emitting isotopes, at high specific activities. Conjugates labelled with alpha-particle generating 225Ac were found to clear rapidly, thus mitigating radioisotope toxicity, and were shown to be therapeutically effective in vivo. PMID:24077028

  17. Analysis of an immunodominant epitope of topoisomerase I in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesters, T M; Hoet, M; van den Hoogen, F H; Verheijen, R; Habets, W J; van Venrooij, W J

    1992-05-01

    In this paper an immunodominant epitope of Topoisomerase I is described. An epitope expression sublibrary was constructed from Topoisomerase I cDNA. The subclones were screened with an antiserum from a patient with systemic sclerosis (SSc). The positive clones defined one immunodominant B cell epitope (epitope III), which was located at the carboxyterminal part of the protein. The epitope, 52 amino acids in length, neither contains the p30gag sequence nor the suggested active site Tyr-723, both presumed antibody recognition sites. More than 70% of our anti-TopoI sera recognize this epitope III, indicating that it is a major recognition site of the anti-TopoI autoantibodies in SSc sera. DNA relaxation experiments show that all sera that recognize epitope III and most sera with antibodies to other epitopes inhibit Topoisomerase I activity.

  18. Anti-claudin 18.2 antibody as new targeted therapy for advanced gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhsimranjot Singh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Targeted therapy and immunotherapy have revolutionized treatment of various cancers in the past decade. Despite targeted therapy with trastuzumab in Her2-positive gastric cancer patients, survival has been dismal, mostly due to disease progression and toxicity related to the treatments. One area of active development is looking for ideal monoclonal antibodies (IMAB specific to the proteins only on the tumor and hence avoiding unnecessary side effects. Claudin proteins with isoform 2 are one such protein, specific for several cancers, particularly gastric cancer and its metastases, leading to the development of anti-claudin 18.2 specific antibody, claudiximab. This review will highlight the latest development of claudiximab as first in class IMAB for the treatment of gastric cancer.

  19. Mapping the Human Memory B Cell and Serum Neutralizing Antibody Responses to Dengue Virus Serotype 4 Infection and Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivarthi, Usha K; Kose, Nurgun; Sapparapu, Gopal; Widman, Douglas; Gallichotte, Emily; Pfaff, Jennifer M; Doranz, Benjamin J; Weiskopf, Daniela; Sette, Alessandro; Durbin, Anna P; Whitehead, Steve S; Baric, Ralph; Crowe, James E; de Silva, Aravinda M

    2017-03-01

    The four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes are mosquito-borne flaviviruses responsible for dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever. People exposed to DENV develop antibodies (Abs) that strongly neutralize the serotype responsible for infection. Historically, infection with DENV serotype 4 (DENV4) has been less common and less studied than infections with the other three serotypes. However, DENV4 has been responsible for recent large and sustained epidemics in Asia and Latin America. The neutralizing antibody responses and the epitopes targeted against DENV4 have not been characterized in human infection. In this study, we mapped and characterized epitopes on DENV4 recognized by neutralizing antibodies in people previously exposed to DENV4 infections or to a live attenuated DENV4 vaccine. To study the fine specificity of DENV4 neutralizing human antibodies, B cells from two people exposed to DENV4 were immortalized and screened to identify DENV-specific clones. Two human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that neutralized DENV4 were isolated, and their epitopes were finely mapped using recombinant viruses and alanine scan mutation array techniques. Both antibodies bound to quaternary structure epitopes near the hinge region between envelope protein domain I (EDI) and EDII. In parallel, to characterize the serum neutralizing antibody responses, convalescence-phase serum samples from people previously exposed to primary DENV4 natural infections or a monovalent DENV4 vaccine were analyzed. Natural infection and vaccination also induced serum-neutralizing antibodies that targeted similar epitope domains at the EDI/II hinge region. These studies defined a target of neutralizing antigenic site on DENV4 targeted by human antibodies following natural infection or vaccination. IMPORTANCE The four serotypes of dengue virus are the causative agents of dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever. People exposed to primary DENV infections develop long-term neutralizing antibody responses

  20. Development of antibody-based c-Met inhibitors for targeted cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee D

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Dongheon Lee, Eun-Sil Sung, Jin-Hyung Ahn, Sungwon An, Jiwon Huh, Weon-Kyoo You Hanwha Chemical R&D Center, Biologics Business Unit, Daejeon, Republic of Korea Abstract: Signaling pathways mediated by receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs and their ligands play important roles in the development and progression of human cancers, which makes RTK-mediated signaling pathways promising therapeutic targets in the treatment of cancer. Compared with small-molecule compounds, antibody-based therapeutics can more specifically recognize and bind to ligands and RTKs. Several antibody inhibitors of RTK-mediated signaling pathways, such as human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, vascular endothelial growth factor, epidermal growth factor receptor or vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, have been developed and are widely used to treat cancer patients. However, since the therapeutic options are still limited in terms of therapeutic efficacy and types of cancers that can be treated, efforts are being made to identify and evaluate novel RTK-mediated signaling pathways as targets for more efficacious cancer treatment. The hepatocyte growth factor/c-Met signaling pathway has come into the spotlight as a promising target for development of potent cancer therapeutic agents. Multiple antibody-based therapeutics targeting hepatocyte growth factor or c-Met are currently in preclinical or clinical development. This review focuses on the development of inhibitors of the hepatocyte growth factor/c-Met signaling pathway for cancer treatment, including critical issues in clinical development and future perspectives for antibody-based therapeutics. Keywords: hepatocyte growth factor, ligands, receptor tyrosine kinase, signaling pathway, therapeutic agent

  1. Therapeutic Antibodies against Intracellular Tumor Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Trenevska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies are among the most clinically effective drugs used to treat cancer. However, their target repertoire is limited as there are relatively few tumor-specific or tumor-associated cell surface or soluble antigens. Intracellular molecules represent nearly half of the human proteome and provide an untapped reservoir of potential therapeutic targets. Antibodies have been developed to target externalized antigens, have also been engineered to enter into cells or may be expressed intracellularly with the aim of binding intracellular antigens. Furthermore, intracellular proteins can be degraded by the proteasome into short, commonly 8–10 amino acid long, peptides that are presented on the cell surface in the context of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I molecules. These tumor-associated peptide–MHC-I complexes can then be targeted by antibodies known as T-cell receptor mimic (TCRm or T-cell receptor (TCR-like antibodies, which recognize epitopes comprising both the peptide and the MHC-I molecule, similar to the recognition of such complexes by the TCR on T cells. Advances in the production of TCRm antibodies have enabled the generation of multiple TCRm antibodies, which have been tested in vitro and in vivo, expanding our understanding of their mechanisms of action and the importance of target epitope selection and expression. This review will summarize multiple approaches to targeting intracellular antigens with therapeutic antibodies, in particular describing the production and characterization of TCRm antibodies, the factors influencing their target identification, their advantages and disadvantages in the context of TCR therapies, and the potential to advance TCRm-based therapies into the clinic.

  2. Impact of Antibodies and Strain Polymorphisms on Cytomegalovirus Entry and Spread in Fibroblasts and Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaohong; Freed, Daniel C; Wang, Dai; Qiu, Ping; Li, Fengsheng; Fu, Tong-Ming; Kauvar, Lawrence M; McVoy, Michael A

    2017-07-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) entry into fibroblasts differs from entry into epithelial cells. CMV also spreads cell to cell and can induce syncytia. To gain insights into these processes, 27 antibodies targeting epitopes in CMV virion glycoprotein complexes, including glycoprotein B (gB), gH/gL, and the pentamer, were evaluated for their effects on viral entry and spread. No antibodies inhibited CMV spread in fibroblasts, including those with potent neutralizing activity against fibroblast entry, while all antibodies that neutralized epithelial cell entry also inhibited spread in epithelial cells and a correlation existed between the potencies of these two activities. This suggests that exposure of virions to the cell culture medium is obligatory during spread in epithelial cells but not in fibroblasts. In fibroblasts, the formation of syncytiumlike structures was impaired not only by antibodies to gB or gH/gL but also by antibodies to the pentamer, suggesting a potential role for the pentamer in promoting fibroblast fusion. Four antibodies reacted with linear epitopes near the N terminus of gH, exhibited strain specificity, and neutralized both epithelial cell and fibroblast entry. Five other antibodies recognized conformational epitopes in gH/gL and neutralized both fibroblast and epithelial cell entry. That these antibodies were strain specific for neutralizing fibroblast but not epithelial cell entry suggests that polymorphisms external to certain gH/gL epitopes may influence antibody neutralization during fibroblast but not epithelial cell entry. These findings may have implications for elucidating the mechanisms of CMV entry, spread, and antibody evasion and may assist in determining which antibodies may be most efficacious following active immunization or passive administration. IMPORTANCE Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a significant cause of birth defects among newborns infected in utero and morbidity and mortality in transplant and AIDS patients. Monoclonal antibodies

  3. Enhanced neutralization potency of botulinum neurotoxin antibodies using a red blood cell-targeting fusion protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad P Adekar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT potently inhibits cholinergic signaling at the neuromuscular junction. The ideal countermeasures for BoNT exposure are monoclonal antibodies or BoNT antisera, which form BoNT-containing immune complexes that are rapidly cleared from the general circulation. Clearance of opsonized toxins may involve complement receptor-mediated immunoadherence to red blood cells (RBC in primates or to platelets in rodents. Methods of enhancing immunoadherence of BoNT-specific antibodies may increase their potency in vivo. We designed a novel fusion protein (FP to link biotinylated molecules to glycophorin A (GPA on the RBC surface. The FP consists of an scFv specific for murine GPA fused to streptavidin. FP:mAb:BoNT complexes bound specifically to the RBC surface in vitro. In a mouse model of BoNT neutralization, the FP increased the potency of single and double antibody combinations in BoNT neutralization. A combination of two antibodies with the FP gave complete neutralization of 5,000 LD50 BoNT in mice. Neutralization in vivo was dependent on biotinylation of both antibodies and correlated with a reduction of plasma BoNT levels. In a post-exposure model of intoxication, FP:mAb complexes gave complete protection from a lethal BoNT/A1 dose when administered within 2 hours of toxin exposure. In a pre-exposure prophylaxis model, mice were fully protected for 72 hours following administration of the FP:mAb complex. These results demonstrate that RBC-targeted immunoadherence through the FP is a potent enhancer of BoNT neutralization by antibodies in vivo.

  4. Extracorporeal adsorption therapy: A Method to improve targeted radiation delivered by radiometal-labeled monoclonal antibodies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemecek, Eneida R.; Green, Damian J.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Pagal, John M.; Lin, Yukang; Gopal, A. K.; Durack, Lawrence D.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Wilbur, D. S.; Nilsson, Rune; Sandberg, Bengt; Press, Oliver W.

    2008-04-01

    Many investigators have demonstrated the ability to treat hematologic malignancies with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies targeting hematopoietic antigens such as anti-CD20 and anti-CD45. [1-5] Although the remission rates achieved with radioimmunotherapy (RIT) are relatively high, many patients subsequently relapse presumably due to suboptimal delivery of enough radiation to eradicate the malignancy. The dose-response of leukemia and lymphoma to radiation has been proven. Substantial amounts of radiation can be delivered by RIT if followed by hematopoietic cell transplantation to rescue the bone marrow from myeloablation.[ref] However, the maximum dose of RIT that can be used is still limited by toxicity to normal tissues affected by nonspecific delivery of radiation. Efforts to improve RIT focus on improving the therapeutic ratios of radiation in target versus non-target tissues by removing the fraction of radioisotope that fails to bind to target tissues and circulates freely in the bloodstream perfusing non-target tissues. Our group and others have explored several alternatives for removal of unbound circulating antibody. [refs] One such method, extracorporeal adsorption therapy (ECAT) consists of removing unbound antibody by a method similar to plasmapheresis after critical circulation time and distribution of antibody into target tissues have been achieved. Preclinical studies of ECAT in murine xenograft models demonstrated significant improvement in therapeutic ratios of radioactivity. Chen and colleagues demonstrated that a 2-hour ECAT procedure could remove 40 to 70% of the radioactivity from liver, lung and spleen. [ref] Although isotope concentration in the tumor was initially unaffected, a 50% decrease was noted approximately 36 hours after the procedure. This approach was also evaluated in a limited phase I pilot study of patients with refractory B-cell lymphoma. [ref] After radiographic confirmation of tumor localization of a test dose of anti-CD20

  5. Use of flow cytometry to identify monoclonal antibodies that recognize conserved epitopes on orthologous leukocyte differentiation antigens in goats, llamas, and rabbits

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Davis, W. C.; Drbal, Karel; El-Aziz, A.; Mosaad, A.E.; Elbagory, A.R.M.; TIbary, A.; Barrington, G.M.; Park, Y.H.; Hamilton, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 119, 1-2 (2007), s. 123-130 ISSN 0165-2427 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : flow cytometry * monoclonal antibodies * leukocyte s Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.957, year: 2007

  6. The role of the shared epitope in arthralgia with anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP), and its effect on anti-CCP levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, W. H.; Ursum, J.; de Vries, N. [=Niek; Bartelds, G. M.; Wolbink, G. J.; Nurmohamed, M. T.; van der Horst-Bruinsma, I. E.; van de Stadt, R. J.; Crusius, J. B. A.; Tak, P. P.; Dijkmans, B. A. C.; van Schaardenburg, D.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Patients presenting with both arthralgia and antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) have an increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To further characterise this patient group and shed more light on its relationship with clinically manifest early arthritis

  7. Development of Broadly Neutralizing Antibody Mimitopes for Characterization of CRF01_AE HIV-1 Antibody Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse V. Schoen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Mapping humoral immune responses to HIV-1 over the course of natural infection is important in understanding epitope exposure in relation to elicitation of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs, which is considered imperative for effective vaccine design. When analyzing HIV-specific immune responses, the antibody binding profiles may be a correlate for functional antibody activity. In this study, we utilized phage display technology to identify novel mimitopes that may represent Env epitope structures bound by bNAbs directed at V1V2 and V3 domains, CD4 binding site (CD4bs and the membrane proximal external region (MPER of Env. Mimitope sequence motifs were determined for each bNAb epitope. Given the ongoing vaccine development efforts in Thailand, these mimitopes that represent CD4bs and MPER epitopes were used to map immune responses of HIV-1 CRF01_AE-infected individuals with known neutralizing responses from two distinct time periods, 1996-98 and 2012-15. The more contemporary cohort showed an increase in binding breadth with binding observed for all MPER and CD4bs mimitopes, while the older cohort showed only 75% recognition of the CD4bs mimitopes and no MPER mimotope binding. Furthermore, mimitope binding profiles correlated significantly with magnitude (p=0.0036 and breadth (p=0.0358 of neutralization of a multi-subtype Tier 1 panel of pseudoviruses. These results highlight the utility of this mimitope mapping approach for detecting human plasma IgG-specificities that target known neutralizing antibody epitopes, and may also provide an indication of the plasticity of antibody binding within HIV-1 Env neutralization determinants.

  8. Development of monoclonal antibodies bearing the internal image of the gizzerosine epitope and application in a competitive ELISA for fish meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manosalva, Headdy; De Ioannes, Alfredo E; Becker, María Inés

    2004-02-01

    Gizzerosine (GZ), a derivative of histamine, is a biogenic amine found in fish meal, and one of the causative agents of black vomit, a poultry disease. We describe here the preparation of anti-idiotype antibodies to the anti-GZ monoclonal antibody (anti-GZ 3H4) and their possible application to an immunoassay. BALB-c mice were immunized with anti-GZ 3H4 antibody coupled to hemocyanin from Concholepas concholepas. Using somatic cell fusion between NSO/2 cells and splenic lymphocytes from the immunized mice, we obtained 34 potential anti-idiotype antibodies. They were characterized by passive agglutination with supernatants from hybridoma cultures and latex particles conjugated to the idiotype. Anti-idiotype antibodies were analyzed by a competitive RIA, to determine their ability to dissociate the interaction between (125)I-GZ and the anti-GZ 3H4-idiotype antibody. They were also characterized by GZ inhibition of latex passive agglutination assay. Three anti-idiotypes named 2D11, 2H6, and 3A12, all of the IgG isotype, were obtained. They were evaluated by a competitive ELISA, in which GZ competes with the tracer (HRP-idiotype). All presented sensitivity in the range of 0.1-10 microg/mL of GZ; and the 3A12 anti-idiotype antibody showed the best performance. An ELISA was developed using the idiotype bound to the solid phase and the anti-idiotype 3A12-HRP as the tracer. The assay showed a similar sensitivity and cross-reactivity with histamine was only observed at concentrations over 10 microg/mL. Lysine and histidine did not interfere with the assay up to 500 microg/mL. An experiment was conducted with fish meal contaminated with synthetic GZ. The results are promising, and showed that no other compounds of the fish meal interfere with the ELISA system; however the extraction procedure of the sample needs to be improved. From the results presented here, we conclude that the idiotype anti-idiotype ELISA would be an appropriate method to determine GZ in fish meal.

  9. Construction of Rabbit Immune Antibody Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi Thu Ha; Lee, Jong Seo; Shim, Hyunbo

    2018-01-01

    Rabbits have distinct advantages over mice as a source of target-specific antibodies. They produce higher affinity antibodies than mice, and may elicit strong immune response against antigens or epitopes that are poorly immunogenic or tolerated in mice. However, a great majority of currently available monoclonal antibodies are of murine origin because of the wider availability of murine fusion partner cell lines and well-established tools and protocols for fusion and cloning of mouse hybridoma. Phage-display selection of antibody libraries is an alternative method to hybridoma technology for the generation of target-specific monoclonal antibodies. High-affinity monoclonal antibodies from nonmurine species can readily be obtained by constructing immune antibody libraries from B cells of the immunized animal and screening the library by phage display. In this article, we describe the construction of a rabbit immune Fab library for the facile isolation of rabbit monoclonal antibodies. After immunization, B-cell cDNA is obtained from the spleen of the animal, from which antibody variable domain repertoires are amplified and assembled into a Fab repertoire by PCR. The Fab genes are then cloned into a phagemid vector and transformed to E. coli, from which a phage-displayed immune Fab library is rescued. Such a library can be biopanned against the immunization antigen for rapid identification of high-affinity, target-specific rabbit monoclonal antibodies.

  10. Antibodies directed to drug epitopes to investigate the structure of drug-protein photoadducts. Recognition of a common photobound substructure in tiaprofenic acid/ketoprofen cross-photoreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoz, A; Hernández, D; Miranda, M A; Pérez-Prieto, J; Morera, I M; Castell, J V

    2001-11-01

    Drug-induced photoallergy is an immune adverse reaction to the combined effect of drugs and light. From the mechanistic point of view, it first involves covalent binding of drug to protein resulting in the formation of a photoantigen. Hence, determination of the structures of drug-protein photoadducts is of great relevance to understand the molecular basis of photoallergy and cross-immunoreactivity among drugs. Looking for new strategies to investigate the covalent photobinding of drugs to proteins, we generated highly specific antibodies to drug chemical substructures. The availability of such antibodies has allowed us to discriminate between the different modes by which tiaprofenic acid (TPA), suprofen (SUP), and ketoprofen (KTP) photobind to proteins. The finding that the vast majority of the TPA photoadduct can be accounted for by means of antibody anti-benzoyl strongly supports the view that the drug binds preferentially via the thiophene ring, leaving the benzene ring more accessible. By contrast, selective recognition of SUP-protein photoadducts by antibody anti-thenoyl evidences a preferential coupling via the benzene ring leaving the thiophene moiety more distant from the protein matrix. In the case of KTP, photoadducts are exclusively recognized by antibody anti-benzoyl, indicating that the benzene ring is again more accessible. As a result of this research, we have been able to identify a common substructure that is present in TPA-albumin and KTP-albumin photoadducts. This is remarkable since, at a first sight, the greatest structural similarities can be found between TPA and SUP as they share the same benzoylthiophene chromophore. These findings can explain the previously reported observations of cross-reactivity to KTP (or TPA) in patients photosensitized to TPA (or KTP).

  11. Structural basis of hepatitis C virus neutralization by broadly neutralizing antibody HCV1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Leopold; Giang, Erick; Robbins, Justin B.; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.; Law, Mansun (Scripps)

    2012-10-29

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects more than 2% of the global population and is a leading cause of liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and end-stage liver diseases. Circulating HCV is genetically diverse, and therefore a broadly effective vaccine must target conserved T- and B-cell epitopes of the virus. Human mAb HCV1 has broad neutralizing activity against HCV isolates from at least four major genotypes and protects in the chimpanzee model from primary HCV challenge. The antibody targets a conserved antigenic site (residues 412-423) on the virus E2 envelope glycoprotein. Two crystal structures of HCV1 Fab in complex with an epitope peptide at 1.8-{angstrom} resolution reveal that the epitope is a {beta}-hairpin displaying a hydrophilic face and a hydrophobic face on opposing sides of the hairpin. The antibody predominantly interacts with E2 residues Leu{sup 413} and Trp{sup 420} on the hydrophobic face of the epitope, thus providing an explanation for how HCV isolates bearing mutations at Asn{sup 415} on the same binding face escape neutralization by this antibody. The results provide structural information for a neutralizing epitope on the HCV E2 glycoprotein and should help guide rational design of HCV immunogens to elicit similar broadly neutralizing antibodies through vaccination.

  12. Targeted Killing of Virally Infected Cells by Radiolabeled Antibodies to Viral Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadachova, Ekaterina; Patel, Mahesh C; Toussi, Sima; Apostolidis, Christos; Morgenstern, Alfred; Brechbiel, Martin W; Gorny, Miroslaw K; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Casadevall, Arturo; Goldstein, Harris

    2006-01-01

    Background The HIV epidemic is a major threat to health in the developing and western worlds. A modality that targets and kills HIV-1-infected cells could have a major impact on the treatment of acute exposure and the elimination of persistent reservoirs of infected cells. The aim of this proof-of-principle study was to demonstrate the efficacy of a therapeutic strategy of targeting and eliminating HIV-1-infected cells with radiolabeled antibodies specific to viral proteins in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Findings Antibodies to HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins gp120 and gp41 labeled with radioisotopes bismuth 213 (213Bi) and rhenium 188 (188Re) selectively killed chronically HIV-1-infected human T cells and acutely HIV-1-infected human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs) in vitro. Treatment of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice harboring HIV-1-infected hPBMCs in their spleens with a 213Bi- or 188Re-labeled monoclonal antibody (mAb) to gp41 resulted in a 57% injected dose per gram uptake of radiolabeled mAb in the infected spleens and in a greater than 99% elimination of HIV-1-infected cells in a dose-dependent manner. The number of HIV-1-infected thymocytes decreased 2.5-fold in the human thymic implant grafts of SCID mice treated with the 188Re-labeled antibody to gp41 compared with those treated with the 188Re-control mAb. The treatment did not cause acute hematologic toxicity in the treated mice. Conclusions The current study demonstrates the effectiveness of HIV-targeted radioimmunotherapy and may provide a novel treatment option in combination with highly active antiretroviral therapy for the eradication of HIV. PMID:17090209

  13. Characterization and specificity of the linear epitope of the enterovirus 71 VP2 protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiener Tanja K

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71 has emerged as a major causative agent of hand, foot and mouth disease in the Asia-Pacific region over the last decade. Hand, foot and mouth disease can be caused by different etiological agents from the enterovirus family, mainly EV71 and coxsackieviruses, which are genetically closely related. Nevertheless, infection with EV71 may occasionally lead to high fever, neurologic complications and the emergence of a rapidly fatal syndrome of pulmonary edema associated with brainstem encephalitis. The rapid progression and high mortality of severe EV71 infection has highlighted the need for EV71-specific diagnostic and therapeutic tools. Monoclonal antibodies are urgently needed to specifically detect EV71 antigens from patient specimens early in the infection process. Furthermore, the elucidation of viral epitopes will contribute to the development of targeted therapeutics and vaccines. Results We have identified the monoclonal antibody 7C7 from a screen of hybridoma cells derived from mice immunized with the EV71-B5 strain. The linear epitope of 7C7 was mapped to amino acids 142-146 (EDSHP of the VP2 capsid protein and was characterized in detail. Mutational analysis of the epitope showed that the aspartic acid to asparagine mutation of the EV71 subgenogroup A (BrCr strain did not interfere with antibody recognition. In contrast, the serine to threonine mutation at position 144 of VP2, present in recently emerged EV71-C4 China strains, abolished antigenicity. Mice injected with this virus strain did not produce any antibodies against the VP2 protein. Immunofluorescence and Western blotting confirmed that 7C7 specifically recognized EV71 subgenogroups and did not cross-react to Coxsackieviruses 4, 6, 10, and 16. 7C7 was successfully used as a detection antibody in an antigen-capture ELISA assay. Conclusions Detailed mapping showed that the VP2 protein of Enterovirus 71 contains a single, linear, non

  14. Humanised IgG1 antibody variants targeting membrane-bound carcinoembryonic antigen by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, S Q; Umana, P; Mössner, E; Ntouroupi, T; Brünker, P; Schmidt, C; Wilding, J L; Mortensen, N J; Bodmer, W F

    2009-11-17

    The effect of glycoengineering a membrane specific anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) (this paper uses the original term CEA for the formally designated CEACAM5) antibody (PR1A3) on its ability to enhance killing of colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines by human immune effector cells was assessed. In vivo efficacy of the antibody was also tested. The antibody was modified using EBNA cells cotransfected with beta-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase III and the humanised hPR1A3 antibody genes. The resulting alteration of the Fc segment glycosylation pattern enhances the antibody's binding affinity to the FcgammaRIIIa receptor on human immune effector cells but does not alter the antibody's binding capacity. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is inhibited in the presence of anti-FcgammaRIII blocking antibodies. This glycovariant of hPR1A3 enhances ADCC 10-fold relative to the parent unmodified antibody using either unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear or natural killer (NK) cells and CEA-positive CRC cells as targets. NK cells are far more potent in eliciting ADCC than either freshly isolated monocytes or granulocytes. Flow cytometry and automated fluorescent microscopy have been used to show that both versions of hPR1A3 can induce antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) by monocyte-derived macrophages. However, the glycovariant antibody did not mediate enhanced ADCP. This may be explained by the relatively low expression of FcgammaRIIIa on cultured macrophages. In vivo studies show the efficacy of glycoengineered humanised IgG1 PR1A3 in significantly improving survival in a CRC metastatic murine model. The greatly enhanced in vitro ADCC activity of the glycoengineered version of hPR1A3 is likely to be clinically beneficial.

  15. Purification of antibodies to bacterial antigens by an immunoadsorbent and a method to quantify their reaction with insoluble bacterial targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathews, H.L.; Minden, P.

    1979-01-01

    A combination of procedures was employed to develop a radioimmunoassay which quantified the binding of antibodies to antigens of either intact Propionibacterium acnes or to antigens of insoluble extracts derived from the bacteria. Reactive antibody populations were purified by use of bacterial immunoadsorbents which were prepared by coupling P. acnes to diethylaminoethyl cellulose. Binding of antibodies was detected with [ 125 I]staphylococcal protein A ([ 125 I]SpA) and optimal conditions for the assay defined by varying the amounts of antibodies, bacterial antigenic targets and [ 125 I]SpA. In antibody excess, 100% of available [ 125 I]SpA was bound by the target-antibody complexes. However, when antibody concentration was limiting, a linear relationship was demonstrated between per cent specific binding of[ 125 I]SpA and antibodies bound to bacterial targets. These results were achieved only with immunoadsorbent-purified antibody populations and not with hyperimmune sera or IgG. The radioimmunoassay detected subtle antigenic differences and similarities between P. acnes, P. acnes extracts and a variety of unrelated microorganisms. (Auth.)

  16. Fitness landscape of the human immunodeficiency virus envelope protein that is targeted by antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Raymond H. Y.; Kaczorowski, Kevin J.; Chakraborty, Arup K.; McKay, Matthew R.

    2018-01-01

    HIV is a highly mutable virus, and over 30 years after its discovery, a vaccine or cure is still not available. The isolation of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) from HIV-infected patients has led to renewed hope for a prophylactic vaccine capable of combating the scourge of HIV. A major challenge is the design of immunogens and vaccination protocols that can elicit bnAbs that target regions of the virus’s spike proteins where the likelihood of mutational escape is low due to the high fitness cost of mutations. Related challenges include the choice of combinations of bnAbs for therapy. An accurate representation of viral fitness as a function of its protein sequences (a fitness landscape), with explicit accounting of the effects of coupling between mutations, could help address these challenges. We describe a computational approach that has allowed us to infer a fitness landscape for gp160, the HIV polyprotein that comprises the viral spike that is targeted by antibodies. We validate the inferred landscape through comparisons with experimental fitness measurements, and various other metrics. We show that an effective antibody that prevents immune escape must selectively bind to high escape cost residues that are surrounded by those where mutations incur a low fitness cost, motivating future applications of our landscape for immunogen design. PMID:29311326

  17. Biodistribution and endocytosis of ICAM-1-targeting antibodies versus nanocarriers in the gastrointestinal tract in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mane V

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Viraj Mane,1 Silvia Muro1, 21Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research, 2Fischell Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USAAbstract: Drug delivery to the gastrointestinal (GI tract is key for improving treatment of GI maladies, developing oral vaccines, and facilitating drug transport into circulation. However, delivery of formulations to the GI tract is hindered by pH changes, degradative enzymes, mucus, and peristalsis, leading to poor GI retention. Targeting may prolong residence of therapeutics in the GI tract and enhance their interaction with this tissue, improving such aspects. We evaluated nanocarrier (NC and ligand-mediated targeting in the GI tract following gastric gavage in mice. We compared GI biodistribution, degradation, and endocytosis between control antibodies and antibodies targeting the cell surface determinant intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1, expressed on GI epithelium and other cell types. These antibodies were administered either as free entities or coated onto polymer NCs. Fluorescence and radioisotope tracing showed proximal accumulation, with preferential retention in the stomach, jejunum, and ileum; and minimal presence in the duodenum, cecum, and colon by 1 hour after administration. Upstream (gastric retention was enhanced in NC formulations, with decreased downstream (jejunal accumulation. Of the total dose delivered to the GI tract, ~60% was susceptible to enzymatic (but not pH-mediated degradation, verified both in vitro and in vivo. Attenuation of peristalsis by sedation increased upstream retention (stomach, duodenum, and jejunum. Conversely, alkaline NaHCO3, which enhances GI transit by decreasing mucosal viscosity, favored downstream (ileal passage. This suggests passive transit through the GI tract, governed by mucoadhesion and peristalsis. In contrast, both free anti-ICAM and anti-ICAM NCs demonstrated significantly enhanced upstream (stomach and duodenum

  18. The new face of bispecific antibodies: targeting cancer and much more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Lawrence G; Davol, Pamela A; Lee, Randall J

    2006-01-01

    The term magic bullet was first coined by bacteriologist Paul Ehrlich in the late 1800s to describe a chemical with the ability to specifically target microorganisms while sparing normal host cells. His concept was later expanded to include treatments for cancer, but it is only in recent decades, with development and improvements in monoclonal antibody (mAb) technology, that the full therapeutic implications of "magic bullet" strategies have been realized. Expanding on the success of mAb-targeting, linking the specificity of two mAbs into a single agent, called a bispecific antibody (BiAb), allows for targeting of a therapeutic biological agent or cell to specific tissue antigens. Classically, BiAbs have been used for several decades to redirect cytotoxic T cells or other effector cells to kill tumor cells. Here, we review preclinical models and ongoing phase I clinical trials in which arming polyclonally activated T cells with BiAbs may provide anti-tumor activity without dose-limiting toxicities. Additionally, we review findings from this novel strategy that merges magic bullet technology with hematopoietic stem cells to repair injured myocardium. Arming stem cells with BiAbs directed at injury-associated antigens enhances specific homing and engraftment to myocardial infarctions and may significantly improve cardiac function, strongly suggesting new paradigms for BiAb-targeting applications in tissue repair.

  19. Should we ignore western blots when selecting antibodies for other applications?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhlén, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    and then heated to very high temperatures (normally >100 °C) in a procedure that is sometimes termed 'epitope retrieval'. Obviously, this procedure might influence the target protein differently than the procedure used to prepare proteins for a western blot, in which the sample is instead treated with a detergent...... (SDS) before the electrophoresis step. Thus, as concluded by the members of the IWGAV1, the results obtained for a given antibody in western blot applications cannot be used to predict the specificity of the antibody in another assay based on an entirely different epitope-retrieval method, such as IHC...

  20. Structural basis of potent Zika-dengue virus antibody cross-neutralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba-Spaeth, Giovanna; Dejnirattisai, Wanwisa; Rouvinski, Alexander; Vaney, Marie-Christine; Medits, Iris; Sharma, Arvind; Simon-Lorière, Etienne; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Cao-Lormeau, Van-Mai; Haouz, Ahmed; England, Patrick; Stiasny, Karin; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip; Heinz, Franz X; Screaton, Gavin R; Rey, Félix A

    2016-08-04

    Zika virus is a member of the Flavivirus genus that had not been associated with severe disease in humans until the recent outbreaks, when it was linked to microcephaly in newborns in Brazil and to Guillain-Barré syndrome in adults in French Polynesia. Zika virus is related to dengue virus, and here we report that a subset of antibodies targeting a conformational epitope isolated from patients with dengue virus also potently neutralize Zika virus. The crystal structure of two of these antibodies in complex with the envelope protein of Zika virus reveals the details of a conserved epitope, which is also the site of interaction of the envelope protein dimer with the precursor membrane (prM) protein during virus maturation. Comparison of the Zika and dengue virus immunocomplexes provides a lead for rational, epitope-focused design of a universal vaccine capable of eliciting potent cross-neutralizing antibodies to protect simultaneously against both Zika and dengue virus infections.

  1. Radiolabeling of antibody for epitope of human carbonic anhydrase IX (IgG M75) by 61Cu and 64Cu and its biological testing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čepa, Adam; Ráliš, Jan; Pavelka, A.; Marešová, L.; Kleinová, M.; Seifert, Daniel; Sieglová, Irena; Král, Vlastimil; Polášek, Miroslav; Lebeda, Ondřej; Paúrová, M.; Lázníček, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 42, S (2015), s. 465-466 ISSN 1619-7070. [28th Annual congress of the European-Association-of-Nuclear-Medicine (EANM). 10.10.2015-14.10.2015, Hamburg] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA02010797; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : antibodies * Cu-61 * Cu-64 Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders; EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology (UMG-J)

  2. Interactions between Human Antibodies and Synthetic Conformational Peptide Epitopes: Innovative Approach for Electrochemical Detection of Biomarkers of Multiple Sclerosis at Platinum Electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellagha-Chenchah, W.; Sella, C.; Fernandez, F. Real; Peroni, E.; Lolli, F.; Amatore, C.

    2015-01-01

    The detection of human antibodies of Multiple Sclerosis patients was investigated based on the electrochemical oxidation of a synthetic antigenic probe, a glycopeptide Fc-CSF114(Glc) bearing a ferrocenyl moiety. Electrochemical measurements were carried out at platinum microband electrodes without any electrode surface modification. A microfluidic device was designed in order to both minimize peptide consumption and increase the number of experiments with low volumes of samples. The specific interactions between Fc-CSF114(Glc) and antibodies were evidenced through comparison with electrochemical responses obtained from the ferrocenyl unglycosylated peptide Fc-CSF114 used as negative control. The interactions between Fc-CSF114(Glc) and autoantibodies were characterized by a shift of the oxidation potential towards positive values. A mechanism for peptide oxidation was proposed based on a diffusion control of mass transport and the formation of adsorbed layers able to mediate electron transfer. Results showed efficient antigen-antibody recognition without any electrode grafting or further addition of labels in solution. Preliminary tests using human sera from Multiple Sclerosis patients and healthy donors validated this new approach aimed at developing innovative and fast diagnostic tools, based on electrochemical synthetic antigenic probes

  3. Diagnosis of Herpes Simplex Encephalitis by ELISA Using Antipeptide Antibodies Against Type-Common Epitopes of Glycoprotein B of Herpes Simplex Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhullar, Shradha S; Chandak, Nitin H; Baheti, Neeraj N; Purohit, Hemant J; Taori, Girdhar M; Daginawala, Hatim F; Kashyap, Rajpal S

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) represents one of the most severe infectious diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). As effective antiviral drugs are available, an early, rapid, and reliable diagnosis has become important. The objective of this article was to develop a sensitive ELISA protocol for herpes simplex viruses (HSV) antigen detection and quantitation by assessing the usefulness of antipeptide antibodies against potential peptides of HSV glycoprotein B (gB). A total of 180 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples of HSE and non-HSE patients were analyzed using a panel of antipeptide antibodies against synthetic peptides of HSV glycoprotein gB. The cases of confirmed and suspected HSE showed 80% and 51% positivity for antipeptide against synthetic peptide QLHDLRF and 77% and 53% positivity for antipeptide against synthetic peptide MKALYPLTT, respectively for the detection of HSV antigen in CSF. The concentration of HSV antigen was found to be higher in confirmed HSE as compared to suspected HSE group and the viral load correlated well with antigen concentration obtained using the two antipeptides in CSF of confirmed HSE group. This is the first article describing the use of antibodies obtained against synthetic peptides derived from HSV in diagnostics of HSE using patients' CSF samples.

  4. Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycan 4 and Its Potential As an Antibody Immunotherapy Target across Different Tumor Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina M. Ilieva

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4 has been associated with the pathology of multiple types of such as melanoma, breast cancer, squamous cell carcinoma, mesothelioma, neuroblastoma, adult and pediatric sarcomas, and some hematological cancers. CSPG4 has been reported to exhibit a role in the growth and survival as well as in the spreading and metastasis of tumor cells. CSPG4 is overexpressed in several malignant diseases, while it is thought to have restricted and low expression in normal tissues. Thus, CSPG4 has become the target of numerous anticancer treatment approaches, including monoclonal antibody-based therapies. This study reviews key potential anti-CSPG4 antibody and immune-based therapies and examines their direct antiproliferative/metastatic and immune activating mechanisms of action.

  5. Malondialdehyde epitopes as mediators of sterile inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Clara J; Binder, Christoph J

    2017-04-01

    Enhanced lipid peroxidation occurs during oxidative stress and results in the generation of lipid peroxidation end products such as malondialdehyde (MDA), which can attach to autologous biomolecules, thereby generating neo-self epitopes capable of inducing potentially undesired biological responses. Therefore, the immune system has developed mechanisms to protect from MDA epitopes by binding and neutralizing them through both cellular and soluble effectors. Here, we briefly discuss innate immune responses targeting MDA epitopes and their pro-inflammatory properties, followed by a review of physiological carriers of MDA epitopes that are relevant in homeostasis and disease. Then we discuss in detail the evidence for cellular responses towards MDA epitopes mainly in lung, liver and the circulation as well as signal transduction mechanisms and receptors implicated in the response to MDA epitopes. Last, we hypothesize on the role of MDA epitopes as mediators of inflammation in diseases and speculate on their contribution to disease pathogenesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid modification and lipid peroxidation products in innate immunity and inflammation edited by Christoph J. Binder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Immunotherapy of melanoma with the immune costimulatory monoclonal antibodies targeting CD137

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li SY

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Shi-Yan Li, Yizhen Liu Cancer Research Institute, Scott and White Healthcare, Temple, TX, USA Abstract: Knowledge of how the immune system recognizes and attempts to control cancer growth and development has improved dramatically. The advent of immunotherapies for cancer has resulted in robust clinical responses and confirmed that the immune system can significantly inhibit tumor progression. Until recently, metastatic melanoma was a disease with limited treatment options and a poor prognosis. CD137 (also known as 4-1BB a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF receptor superfamily, is an activation-induced T cell costimulator molecule. Growing evidence indicates that anti-CD137 monoclonal antibodies possess strong antitumor properties, the result of their powerful capability to activate CD8+ T cells, to produce interferon (IFN-γ, and to induce cytolytic markers. Combination therapy of anti-CD137 with other anticancer agents, such as radiation, has robust tumor-regressing abilities against nonimmunogenic or poorly immunogenic tumors. Of importance, targeting CD137 eliminates established tumors, and the fact that anti-CD137 therapy acts in concert with other anticancer agents and/or radiation therapy to eradicate nonimmunogenic and weakly immunogenic tumors is an additional benefit. Currently, BMS-663513, a humanized anti-CD137 antibody, is in clinical trials in patients with solid tumors, including melanoma, renal carcinoma, ovarian cancer, and B-cell malignancies. In this review, we discuss the basis of the therapeutic potential of targeting CD137 in cancer treatment, focusing in particular, on BMS-663513 as an immune costimulatory monoclonal antibody for melanoma immunotherapy. Keywords: anti-CD137 monoclonal antibodies, immune costimulator molecule, BMS-663513

  7. Survivors Remorse: antibody-mediated protection against HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, George K; Pazgier, Marzena; DeVico, Anthony L

    2017-01-01

    It is clear that antibodies can play a pivotal role in preventing the transmission of HIV-1 and large efforts to identify an effective antibody-based vaccine to quell the epidemic. Shortly after HIV-1 was discovered as the cause of AIDS, the search for epitopes recognized by neutralizing antibodies became the driving strategy for an antibody-based vaccine. Neutralization escape variants were discovered shortly thereafter, and, after almost three decades of investigation, it is now known that autologous neutralizing antibody responses and their selection of neutralization resistant HIV-1 variants can lead to broadly neutralizing antibodies in some infected individuals. This observation drives an intensive effort to identify a vaccine to elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies. In contrast, there has been less systematic study of antibody specificities that must rely mainly or exclusively on other protective mechanisms, although non-human primate (NHP) studies as well as the RV144 vaccine trial indicate that non-neutralizing antibodies can contribute to protection. Here we propose a novel strategy to identify new epitope targets recognized by these antibodies for which viral escape is unlikely or impossible. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. The Chikungunya Virus Capsid Protein Contains Linear B Cell Epitopes in the N- and C-Terminal Regions that are Dependent on an Intact C-Terminus for Antibody Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Y. H. Goh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is an arthropod-borne agent that causes severe arthritic disease in humans and is considered a serious health threat in areas where competent mosquito vectors are prevalent. CHIKV has recently been responsible for several millions of cases of disease, involving over 40 countries. The recent re-emergence of CHIKV and its potential threat to human health has stimulated interest in better understanding of the biology and pathogenesis of the virus, and requirement for improved treatment, prevention and control measures. In this study, we mapped the binding sites of a panel of eleven monoclonal antibodies (mAbs previously generated towards the capsid protein (CP of CHIKV. Using N- and C-terminally truncated recombinant forms of the CHIKV CP, two putative binding regions, between residues 1–35 and 140–210, were identified. Competitive binding also revealed that five of the CP-specific mAbs recognized a series of overlapping epitopes in the latter domain. We also identified a smaller, N-terminally truncated product of native CP that may represent an alternative translation product of the CHIKV 26S RNA and have potential functional significance during CHIKV replication. Our data also provides evidence that the C-terminus of CP is required for authentic antigenic structure of CP. This study shows that these anti-CP mAbs will be valuable research tools for further investigating the structure and function of the CHIKV CP.

  9. Development of a Chlamydia suis-specific antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on the use of a B-cell epitope of the polymorphic membrane protein C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Puysseleyr, K; Kieckens, E; De Puysseleyr, L; Van den Wyngaert, H; Ahmed, B; Van Lent, S; Creasy, H H; Myers, G S A; Vanrompay, D

    2018-04-01

    Chlamydia suis infections lead to economic loss in the pork industry. Chlamydia suis infections could be successfully treated with tetracyclines until the appearance of a tetracycline resistant phenotype, which was acquired via horizontal gene transfer of the tet(C) gene. Given the importance of C. suis as a swine pathogen and as a recently emerged tetracycline resistant pathogen with zoonotic potential, our aim was to develop a sensitive C. suis-specific antibody ELISA based on the polymorphic membrane proteins (Pmps). Chlamydia Pmps are important virulence factors and candidate antigens for serodiagnosis. We identified nine Pmps (PmpA to I) in C. suis strain MD56 using a recently developed Hidden-Markov model. PmpC was the most promising candidate for the development of a C. suis-specific antibody ELISA as the protein was absent in C. abortus, C. pecorum and C. psittaci which also infect pigs and as the protein contained C. suis-specific amino acid regions, absent in C. trachomatis PmpC. We identified an immunodominant B-cell epitope in C. suis PmpC using experimental porcine sera. The sensitivity and specificity of the PmpC ELISA was compared to the complement fixation test (CFT) and to a recombinant MOMP ELISA using experimental sera. The PmpC ELISA detected all positive control sera and was in contrast to CFT and the rMOMP ELISA 100% C. suis specific as positive control sera against other Chlamydia species did not react in the PmpC ELISA. The test was successfully validated using slaughterhouse sera and sera from clinically affected pigs. The PmpC ELISA could assist in diminishing the spread of C. suis infections in the pork industry. © 2018 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Impact of Shed/Soluble targets on the PK/PD of approved therapeutic monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samineni, Divya; Girish, Sandhya; Li, Chunze

    2016-12-01

    Suboptimal treatment for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against endogenous circulating soluble targets and the shed extracellular domains (ECD) of the membrane-bound targets is an important clinical concern due to the potential impact of mAbs on the in vivo efficacy and safety. Consequently, there are considerable challenges in the determination of an optimal dose and/or dosing regimen. Areas covered: This review outlines the impact of shed antigen targets from membrane-bound proteins and soluble targets on the PK and/or PD of therapeutic mAbs that have been approved in the last decade. We discuss various bioanalytical techniques that have facilitated the interpretation of the PK/PD properties of therapeutic mAbs and also considered the factors that may impact such measurements. Quantitative approaches include target-mediated PK models and bi- or tri-molecular interaction PK/PD models that describe the relationships between the antibody PK and the ensuing effects on PD biomarkers, to facilitate the mAb PK/PD characterization. Expert commentary: The proper interpretation of PK/PD relationships through the integrated PK/PD modeling and bioanalytical strategy facilitates a mechanistic understanding of the disease processes and dosing regimen optimization, thereby offering insights into developing effective therapeutic regimens. This review provides an overview of the impact of soluble targets or shed ECD on mAb PK/PD properties. We provide examples of quantitative approaches that facilitate the characterization of mAb PK/PD characteristics and their corresponding bioanalytical strategies.

  11. The antibody response against human and chimeric anti-TNF therapeutic antibodies primarily targets the TNF binding region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schie, K. A.; Hart, M. H.; de Groot, E. R.; Kruithof, S.; Aarden, L. A.; Wolbink, G. J.; Rispens, T.

    2015-01-01

    In a subset of patients, anti tumour necrosis factor (TNF) therapeutic antibodies are immunogenic, resulting in the formation of antidrug antibodies (ADAs). Neutralising ADAs compete with TNF for its binding site and reduces the effective serum concentration, causing clinical non-response. It is

  12. Selective apoptotic killing of malignant hemopoietic cells by antibody-targeted delivery of an amphipathic peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Alexandra J; Cooper, Margaret S; Anderson, Robert J; Orchard, Kim H; Hale, Geoffrey; North, Janet M; Ganeshaguru, Kanagasabai; Steele, Andrew J; Mehta, Atul B; Lowdell, Mark W; Wickremasinghe, R Gitendra

    2005-03-15

    The alpha-helical amphipathic peptide D-(KLAKLAK)2 is toxic to eukaryotic cells if internalized by a suitable targeting mechanism. We have targeted this peptide to malignant hemopoietic cells via conjugation to monoclonal antibodies, which recognize lineage-specific cell surface molecules. An anti-CD19/peptide conjugate efficiently killed 3/3 B lymphoid lines. However, an anti-CD33/peptide conjugate was cytotoxic to only one of three CD33-positive myeloid leukemia lines. The IC50 towards susceptible lines were in the low nanomolar range. Conjugates were highly selective and did not kill cells that did not express the appropriate cell surface cognate of the antibody moiety. Anti-CD19/peptide conjugates efficiently killed cells from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia but anti-CD33/peptide reagents were less effective against fresh acute myeloid leukemia cells. We therefore suggest that amphipathic peptides may be of value as targeted therapeutic agents for the treatment of a subset of hematologic malignancies.

  13. HLA-A2–Restricted Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Epitopes from Human Heparanase as Novel Targets for Broad-Spectrum Tumor Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Chen

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Peptide vaccination for cancer immunotherapy requires identification of peptide epitopes derived from antigenic proteins associated with tumors. Heparanase (Hpa is broadly expressed in various advanced tumors and seems to be an attractive new tumor-associated antigen. The present study was designed to predict and identify HLA-A2– restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL epitopes in the protein of human Hpa. For this purpose, HLA-A2–restricted CTL epitopes were identified using the following four-step procedure: 1 a computer-based epitope prediction from the amino acid sequence of human Hpa, 2 a peptide-binding assay to determine the affinity of the predicted protein with the HLA-A2 molecule, 3 stimulation of the primary T-cell response against the predicted peptides in vitro, and 4 testing of the induced CTLs toward different kinds of carcinoma cells expressing Hpa antigens and/or HLA-A2. The results demonstrated that, of the tested peptides, effectors induced by peptides of human Hpa containing residues 525-533 (PAFSYSFFV, Hpa525, 277-285 (KMLKSFLKA, Hpa277, and 405-413 (WLSLLFKKL, Hpa405 could effectively lyse various tumor cell lines that were Hpa-positive and HLA-A2-matched. We also found that these peptide-specific CTLs could not lyse autologous lymphocytes with low Hpa activity. Further study revealed that Hpa525, Hpa277, and Hpa405 peptides increased the frequency of IFN-γ–producing T cells compared to a negative peptide. Our results suggest that Hpa525, Hpa277, and Hpa405 peptides are new HLA-A2–restricted CTL epitopes capable of inducing Hpa-specific CTLs in vitro. Because Hpa is expressed in most advanced malignant tumors, Hpa525, Hpa277, and Hpa405 peptide–based vaccines may be useful for the immunotherapy for patients with advanced tumors.

  14. Stabilization of antibody structure upon association to a human carbonic anhydrase IX epitope studied by X-ray crystallography, microcalorimetry, and molecular dynamics simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Král, Vlastimil; Mader, Pavel; Collard, Renata; Fábry, Milan; Hořejší, Magdalena; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Kožíšek, Milan; Závada, Jan; Sedláček, Juraj; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Brynda, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 3 (2008), s. 1275-1287 ISSN 0887-3585 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OE 210; GA MPO 2A-2TP1/076; GA MŠk 1M0508; GA MŠk 1M0505; GA MŠk LC512; GA ČR GA203/02/0405 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : antigen-antibody recognition * CDR loop rearrangement * Fab crystal structure Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.419, year: 2008

  15. Novel strategy for a bispecific antibody: induction of dual target internalization and degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J M; Lee, S H; Hwang, J-W; Oh, S J; Kim, B; Jung, S; Shim, S-H; Lin, P W; Lee, S B; Cho, M-Y; Koh, Y J; Kim, S Y; Ahn, S; Lee, J; Kim, K-M; Cheong, K H; Choi, J; Kim, K-A

    2016-08-25

    Activation of the extensive cross-talk among the receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), particularly ErbB family-Met cross-talk, has emerged as a likely source of drug resistance. Notwithstanding brilliant successes were attained while using small-molecule inhibitors or antibody therapeutics against specific RTKs in multiple cancers over recent decades, a high recurrence rate remains unsolved in patients treated with these targeted inhibitors. It is well aligned with multifaceted properties of cancer and cross-talk and convergence of signaling pathways of RTKs. Thereby many therapeutic interventions have been actively developed to overcome inherent or acquired resistance. To date, no bispecific antibody (BsAb) showed complete depletion of dual RTKs from the plasma membrane and efficient dual degradation. In this manuscript, we report the first findings of a target-specific dual internalization and degradation of membrane RTKs induced by designed BsAbs based on the internalizing monoclonal antibodies and the therapeutic values of these BsAbs. Leveraging the anti-Met mAb able to internalize and degrade by a unique mechanism, we generated the BsAbs for Met/epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Met/HER2 to induce an efficient EGFR or HER2 internalization and degradation in the presence of Met that is frequently overexpressed in the invasive tumors and involved in the resistance against EGFR- or HER2-targeted therapies. We found that Met/EGFR BsAb ME22S induces dissociation of the Met-EGFR complex from Hsp90, followed by significant degradation of Met and EGFR. By employing patient-derived tumor models we demonstrate therapeutic potential of the BsAb-mediated dual degradation in various cancers.

  16. Naturally acquired antibodies target the glutamate-rich protein on intact merozoites and predict protection against febrile malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kana, Ikhlaq Hussain; Adu, Bright; Tiendrebeogo, Régis Wendpayangde

    2017-01-01

    Background.: Plasmodium species antigens accessible at the time of merozoite release are likely targets of biologically functional antibodies. Methods.: Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against intact merozoites were quantified in the plasma of Ghanaian children from a longitudinal cohort using...... support previous studies that found OP of merozoites to be associated with protection against malaria and further shows IgG3 and GLURP antibodies are key in the OP mechanism, thus giving further impetus for the development of malaria vaccines targeting GLURP....

  17. Targeting the autolysis loop of urokinase-type plasminogen activator with conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtkjær, Kenneth Alrø; Fogh, Sarah; Bekes, Erin C

    2011-01-01

    , with high levels correlating with a poor prognosis. This observation has stimulated efforts into finding new principles for intervening with uPA's activity. In the present study we characterize the so-called autolysis loop in the catalytic domain of uPA as a potential inhibitory target. This loop was found......, demonstrating a direct link between conformational changes of the autolysis loop and the creation of a catalytically mature active site. All three antibodies are potent inhibitors of uPA activity, the two pro-uPA-specific ones by inhibiting conversion of pro-uPA to active uPA and the active u...

  18. Target-mediated drug disposition model and its approximations for antibody-drug conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibiansky, Leonid; Gibiansky, Ekaterina

    2014-02-01

    Antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) is a complex structure composed of an antibody linked to several molecules of a biologically active cytotoxic drug. The number of ADC compounds in clinical development now exceeds 30, with two of them already on the market. However, there is no rigorous mechanistic model that describes pharmacokinetic (PK) properties of these compounds. PK modeling of ADCs is even more complicated than that of other biologics as the model should describe distribution, binding, and elimination of antibodies with different toxin load, and also the deconjugation process and PK of the released toxin. This work extends the target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) model to describe ADCs, derives the rapid binding (quasi-equilibrium), quasi-steady-state, and Michaelis-Menten approximations of the TMDD model as applied to ADCs, derives the TMDD model and its approximations for ADCs with load-independent properties, and discusses further simplifications of the system under various assumptions. The developed models are shown to describe data simulated from the available clinical population PK models of trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1), one of the two currently approved ADCs. Identifiability of model parameters is also discussed and illustrated on the simulated T-DM1 examples.

  19. Use of Tc-rCRP as a target for lytic antibody titration after experimental Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Tatiane; Silva, Gustavo Caetano; Henrique Paiva, Priscila Moraes; Nascentes, Gabriel Antônio Nogueira; Ramirez, Luis Eduardo; Norris, Karen; Meira, Wendell Sérgio Ferreira

    2018-01-01

    Experimental Chagas disease has been used as a model to identify several host/parasite interaction factors involved in immune responses to Trypanosoma cruzi infection. One of the factors inherent to this parasite is the complement regulatory protein (Tc-CRP), a major epitope that induces production of lytic antibodies during T. cruzi infections. Previous studies have evaluated the function of Tc-CRP as an antigenic marker via ELISAs, which demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity when compared to other methods. Therefore, this study aimed to assess and compare the levels of lytic antibodies induced by this protein following experimental infection using different T. cruzi strains. Our results demonstrated that infections induced by strains isolated from vectors resulted in subpatent parasitaemia and low reactivity, as assessed by Tc-rCRP ELISAs. On the other hand, mice inoculated with T. cruzi strains isolated from patients developed patent parasitaemia, and presented elevated lytic antibodies titres, as measured by Tc-rCRP ELISA. In addition, comparison between different mouse lineages demonstrated that Balb/c mice were more reactive than C57BL/6 mice in almost all types of infections, except those infected by the AQ-4 strain. Parasites from the Hel strain generated the greatest lytic antibody response in all evaluated models. Therefore, application of sensitive techniques for monitoring immune responses would enable us to establish growth curves for lytic antibodies during the course of the infection, and allow us to discriminate between T. cruzi strains that originate from different hosts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Smoking interacts with HLA-DRB1 shared epitope in the development of anti-citrullinated protein antibody-positive rheumatoid arthritis: results from the Malaysian Epidemiological Investigation of Rheumatoid Arthritis (MyEIRA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Too, Chun Lai; Yahya, Abqariyah; Murad, Shahnaz; Dhaliwal, Jasbir Singh; Larsson, Per Tobias; Muhamad, Nor Asiah; Abdullah, Nor Aini; Mustafa, Amal Nasir; Klareskog, Lars; Alfredsson, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Bengtsson, Camilla

    2012-04-26

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease in which genetic and environmental factors interact in the etiology. In this study, we investigated whether smoking and HLA-DRB1 shared-epitope (SE) alleles interact differently in the development of the two major subgroups of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), anti-citrullinated proteins antibody (ACPA)-positive and ACPA-negative disease, in a multiethnic population of Asian descent. A case-control study comprising early diagnosed RA cases was carried out in Malaysia between 2005 and 2009. In total, 1,076 cases and 1,612 matched controls participated in the study. High-resolution HLA-DRB1 genotyping was performed for shared-epitope (SE) alleles. All participants answered a questionnaire on a broad range of issues, including smoking habits. The odds ratio (OR) of developing ACPA-positive and ACPA-negative disease was calculated for smoking and the presence of any SE alleles separately. Potential interaction between smoking history (defined as "ever" and "never" smoking) and HLA-DRB1 SE alleles also was calculated. In our multiethnic study, both the SE alleles and smoking were associated with an increased risk of developing ACPA-positive RA (OR SE alleles, 4.7; 95% confidence interval (CI), 3.6 to 6.2; OR smoking, 4.1; 95% CI, 1.9 to 9.2). SE-positive smokers had an odds ratio of ACPA-positive RA of 25.6 (95% CI, 10.4 to 63.4), compared with SE-negative never-smokers. The interaction between smoking and SE alleles was significant (attributable proportion due to interaction (AP) was 0.7 (95% CI, 0.5 to 1.0)). The HLA-DRB1*04:05 SE allele, which is common in Asian populations, but not among Caucasians, was associated with an increased risk of ACPA-positive RA, and this allele also showed signs of interaction with smoking (AP, 0.4; 95% CI, -0.1 to 0.9). Neither smoking nor SE alleles nor their combination was associated with an increased risk of ACPA-negative RA. The risk of developing ACPA-positive RA is

  1. Antibody-mediated enzyme replacement therapy targeting both lysosomal and cytoplasmic glycogen in Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Haiqing; Sun, Tao; Armstrong, Dustin; Borneman, Scott; Yang, Chunyu; Austin, Stephanie; Kishnani, Priya S; Sun, Baodong

    2017-05-01

    Pompe disease is characterized by accumulation of both lysosomal and cytoplasmic glycogen primarily in skeletal and cardiac muscles. Mannose-6-phosphate receptor-mediated enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human acid α-glucosidase (rhGAA) targets the enzyme to lysosomes and thus is unable to digest cytoplasmic glycogen. Studies have shown that anti-DNA antibody 3E10 penetrates living cells and delivers "cargo" proteins to the cytosol or nucleus via equilibrative nucleoside transporter ENT2. We speculate that 3E10-mediated ERT with GAA will target both lysosomal and cytoplasmic glycogen in Pompe disease. A fusion protein (FabGAA) containing a humanized Fab fragment derived from the murine 3E10 antibody and the 110 kDa human GAA precursor was constructed and produced in CHO cells. Immunostaining with an anti-Fab antibody revealed that the Fab signals did not co-localize with the lysosomal marker LAMP2 in cultured L6 myoblasts or Pompe patient fibroblasts after incubation with FabGAA. Western blot with an anti-GAA antibody showed presence of the 150 kDa full-length FabGAA in the cell lysates, in addition to the 95- and 76 kDa processed forms of GAA that were also seen in the rhGAA-treated cells. Blocking of mannose-6-phosphate receptor with mannose-6-phosphate markedly reduced the 95- and the 76 kDa forms but not the 150 kDa form. In GAA-KO mice, FabGAA achieved similar treatment efficacy as rhGAA at an equal molar dose in reducing tissue glycogen contents. Our data suggest that FabGAA retains the ability of rhGAA to treat lysosomal glycogen accumulation and has the beneficial potential over rhGAA to reduce cytoplasmic glycogen storage in Pompe disease. FabGAA can be delivered to both the cytoplasm and lysosomes in cultured cells. FabGAA equally reduced lysosomal glycogen accumulation as rhGAA in GAA-KO mice. FabGAA has the beneficial potential over rhGAA to clear cytoplasmic glycogen. This study suggests a novel antibody-enzyme fusion protein therapy

  2. What Do Chaotrope-Based Avidity Assays for Antibodies to HIV-1 Envelope Glycoproteins Measure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Marina R; Ringe, Rajesh; Sanders, Rogier W; Voss, James E; Moore, John P; Klasse, Per Johan

    2015-06-01

    When HIV-1 vaccine candidates that include soluble envelope glycoproteins (Env) are tested in humans and other species, the resulting antibody responses to Env are sifted for correlates of protection or risk. One frequently used assay measures the reduction in antibody binding to Env antigens by an added chaotrope (such as thiocyanate). Based on that assay, an avidity index was devised for assessing the affinity maturation of antibodies of unknown concentration in polyclonal sera. Since a high avidity index was linked to protection in animal models of HIV-1 infection, it has become a criterion for evaluating antibody responses to vaccine candidates. But what does the assay measure and what does an avidity index mean? Here, we have used a panel of monoclonal antibodies to well-defined epitopes on Env (gp120, gp41, and SOSIP.664 trimers) to explore how the chaotrope acts. We conclude that the chaotrope sensitivity of antibody binding to Env depends on several properties of the epitopes (continuity versus tertiary- and quaternary-structural dependence) and that the avidity index has no simple relationship to antibody affinity for functional Env spikes on virions. We show that the binding of broadly neutralizing antibodies against quaternary-structural epitopes is particularly sensitive to chaotrope treatment, whereas antibody binding to epitopes in variable loops and to nonneutralization epitopes in gp41 is generally resistant. As a result of such biases, the avidity index may at best be a mere surrogate for undefined antibody or other immune responses that correlate weakly with protection. An effective HIV-1 vaccine is an important goal. Such a vaccine will probably need to induce antibodies that neutralize typically transmitted variants of HIV-1, preventing them from infecting target cells. Vaccine candidates have so far failed to induce such antibody responses, although some do protect weakly against infection in animals and, possibly, humans. In the search for

  3. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies to Viral Emerging Pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Bradley

    2011-03-31

    During the current period the following key objectives were achieved: demonstration of high titer antibody production by geese following immunization with inactived H1N1 virus; completion of the epitope mapping of West Nile Virus-specific goose antibodies and initiation of epitope mapping of H1N1 flu-specific goose antibodies; advancement in scalable purification of goose antibodies.

  4. Oligoclonal antibody targeting ghrelin increases energy expenditure and reduces food intake in fasted mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhari, Joseph S; Zorrilla, Eric P; Zhou, Bin; Mayorov, Alexander V; Janda, Kim D

    2012-02-06

    Ghrelin, an enteric peptide hormone linked to the pathophysiology of obesity has been a therapeutic target of great interest over the past decade. Many research efforts have focused on the antagonism of ghrelin's endogenous receptor GHSR1a, which is found along ascending vagal afferent fibers, as well as in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. Additionally, peptidic inhibitors of ghrelin O-acyltransferase, the enzyme responsible for the paracrine activation of ghrelin, have recently been studied. Our research has taken an alternative immunological approach, studying both active and passive vaccination as a means to sequester ghrelin in the periphery, with the original discovery in rat of decreased feed efficiency and adiposity, as well as increased metabolic activity. Using our previous hapten designs as a stepping-stone, three monoclonal antibodies (JG2, JG3, and JG4) were procured against ghrelin and tested in vivo. While mAb JG4 had the highest affinity for ghrelin, it failed to attenuate the orexigenic effects of food deprivation on energy metabolism or food intake in mice. However, animals that were administered a combination of JG3:JG4 (termed a doublet) or JG2:JG3:JG4 (termed a triplet) demonstrated higher heat dispersion and rate of respiration (higher CO(2) emission and O(2) consumption) during a 24 h fast refeed. Mice administered the triplet cocktail of JG2:JG3:JG4 also demonstrated decreased food intake upon refeeding as compared to control animals. Recently, Lu and colleagues reported that a passive approach using a single, high affinity N-terminally directed monoclonal antibody did not abrogate the effects of endogenous ghrelin. Our current report corroborates this finding, yet, refutes that a monoclonal antibody approach cannot be efficacious. Rather, we find that a multiple monoclonal antibody (oligoclonal) approach can reproduce the underlying logic to previously reported efficacies using active vaccinations.

  5. Opsonic and protective properties of antibodies raised to conjugate vaccines targeting six Staphylococcus aureus antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa Pozzi

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections for which a vaccine is greatly desired. Antigens found on the S. aureus outer surface include the capsular polysaccharides (CP of serotype 5 (CP5 or 8 (CP8 and/or a second antigen, a β-(1→6-polymer of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (PNAG. Antibodies specific for either CP or PNAG antigens have excellent in vitro opsonic killing activity (OPKA, but when mixed together have potent interference in OPKA and murine protection. To ascertain if this interference could be abrogated by using a synthetic non-acetylated oligosaccharide fragment of PNAG, 9GlcNH(2, in place of chemically partially deacetylated PNAG, three conjugate vaccines consisting of 9GlcNH(2 conjugated to a non-toxic mutant of alpha-hemolysin (Hla H35L, CP5 conjugated to clumping factor B (ClfB, or CP8 conjugated to iron-surface determinant B (IsdB were used separately to immunize rabbits. Opsonic antibodies mediating killing of multiple S. aureus strains were elicited for all three vaccines and showed carbohydrate antigen-specific reductions in the tissue bacterial burdens in animal models of S. aureus skin abscesses, pneumonia, and nasal colonization. Carrier-protein specific immunity was also shown to be effective in reducing bacterial levels in infected lungs and in nasal colonization. However, use of synthetic 9GlcNH(2 to induce antibody to PNAG did not overcome the interference in OPKA engendered when these were combined with antibody to either CP5 or CP8. Whereas each individual vaccine showed efficacy, combining antisera to CP antigens and PNAG still abrogated individual OPKA activities, indicating difficulty in achieving a multi-valent vaccine targeting both the CP and PNAG antigens.

  6. Exploiting the proteomics revolution in biotechnology: from disease and antibody targets to optimizing bioprocess development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffner, Kelley M; Hizal, Deniz Baycin; Kumar, Amit; Shiloach, Joseph; Zhu, Jie; Bowen, Michael A; Betenbaugh, Michael J

    2014-12-01

    Recent advancements in proteomics have enabled the generation of high-quality data sets useful for applications ranging from target and monoclonal antibody (mAB) discovery to bioprocess optimization. Comparative proteomics approaches have recently been used to identify novel disease targets in oncology and other disease conditions. Proteomics has also been applied as a new avenue for mAb discovery. Finally, CHO and Escherichia coli cells represent the dominant production hosts for biopharmaceutical development, yet the physiology of these cells types has yet to be fully established. Proteomics approaches can provide new insights into these cell types, aiding in recombinant protein production, cell growth regulation, and medium formulation. Optimization of sample preparations and protein database developments are enhancing the quantity and accuracy of proteomic results. In these ways, innovations in proteomics are enriching biotechnology and bioprocessing research across a wide spectrum of applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Fast Targeting and Cancer Cell Uptake of Luminescent Antibody-Nanozeolite Bioconjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marega, Riccardo; Prasetyanto, Eko Adi; Michiels, Carine; De Cola, Luisa; Bonifazi, Davide

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the targeted cellular uptake of nanomaterials is an essential step to engineer and program functional and effective biomedical devices. In this respect, the targeting and ultrafast uptake of zeolite nanocrystals functionalized with Cetuximab antibodies (Ctxb) by cells overexpressing the epidermal growth factor receptor are described here. Biochemical assays show that the cellular uptake of the bioconjugate in the targeted cancer cells already begins 15 min after incubation, at a rate around tenfold faster than that observed in the negative control cells. These findings further show the role of Ctxb exposed at the surfaces of the zeolite nanocrystals in mediating the targeted and rapid cellular uptake. By using temperature and pharmacological inhibitors as modulators of the internalization pathways, the results univocally suggest a dissipative uptake mechanism of these nanomaterials, which seems to occur using different internalization pathways, according to the targeting properties of these nanocrystals. Owing to the ultrafast uptake process, harmless for the cell viability, these results further pave the way for the design of novel theranostic tools based on nanozeolites. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Antibody targeting of phosphatidylserine for the detection and immunotherapy of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belzile O

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Olivier Belzile,1 Xianming Huang,2,3 Jian Gong,2,3 Jay Carlson,2,3 Alan J Schroit,1 Rolf A Brekken,1 Bruce D Freimark2,3 1Hamon Center for Therapeutic Oncology Research, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, 2Department of Preclinical Research, 3Department of Antibody Discovery, Peregrine Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Tustin, CA, USA Abstract: Phosphatidylserine (PS is a negatively charged phospholipid in all eukaryotic cells that is actively sequestered to the inner leaflet of the cell membrane. Exposure of PS on apoptotic cells is a normal physiological process that triggers their rapid removal by phagocytic engulfment under noninflammatory conditions via receptors primarily expressed on immune cells. PS is aberrantly exposed in the tumor microenvironment and contributes to the overall immunosuppressive signals that antagonize the development of local and systemic antitumor immune responses. PS-mediated immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment is further exacerbated by chemotherapy and radiation treatments that result in increased levels of PS on dying cells and necrotic tissue. Antibodies targeting PS localize to tumors and block PS-mediated immunosuppression. Targeting exposed PS in the tumor microenvironment may be a novel approach to enhance immune responses to cancer. Keywords: immunosuppression, tumor microenvironment, immunotherapy, imaging, phosphatidylserine, bavituximab

  9. Monoclonal Antibody Therapies for Hematological Malignancies: Not Just Lineage-Specific Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Cuesta-Mateos

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs are a widespread and necessary tool for biomedical science. In the hematological cancer field, since rituximab became the first mAb approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of B-cell malignancies, a number of effective mAbs targeting lineage-specific antigens (LSAs have been successfully developed. Non-LSAs (NLSAs are molecules that are not restricted to specific leukocyte subsets or tissues but play relevant pathogenic roles in blood cancers including the development, proliferation, survival, and refractoriness to therapy of tumor cells. In consequence, efforts to target NLSAs have resulted in a plethora of mAbs—marketed or in development—to achieve different goals like neutralizing oncogenic pathways, blocking tumor-related chemotactic pathways, mobilizing malignant cells from tumor microenvironment to peripheral blood, modulating immune-checkpoints, or delivering cytotoxic drugs into tumor cells. Here, we extensively review several novel mAbs directed against NLSAs undergoing clinical evaluation for treating hematological malignancies. The review focuses on the structure of these antibodies, proposed mechanisms of action, efficacy and safety profile in clinical studies, and their potential applications in the treatment of hematological malignancies.

  10. Globular Head-Displayed Conserved Influenza H1 Hemagglutinin Stalk Epitopes Confer Protection against Heterologous H1N1 Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Klausberger

    Full Text Available Significant genetic variability in the head region of the influenza A hemagglutinin, the main target of current vaccines, makes it challenging to develop a long-lived seasonal influenza prophylaxis. Vaccines based on the conserved hemagglutinin stalk domain might provide broader cross-reactive immunity. However, this region of the hemagglutinin is immunosubdominant to the head region. Peptide-based vaccines have gained much interest as they allow the immune system to focus on relevant but less immunogenic epitopes. We developed a novel influenza A hemagglutinin-based display platform for H1 hemagglutinin stalk peptides that we identified in an epitope mapping assay using human immune sera and synthetic HA peptides. Flow cytometry and competition assays suggest that the identified stalk sequences do not recapitulate the epitopes of already described broadly neutralizing stalk antibodies. Vaccine constructs displaying 25-mer stalk sequences provided up to 75% protection from lethal heterologous virus challenge in BALB/c mice and induced antibody responses against the H1 hemagglutinin. The developed platform based on a vaccine antigen has the potential to be either used as stand-alone or as prime-vaccine in combination with conventional seasonal or pandemic vaccines for the amplification of stalk-based cross-reactive immunity in humans or as platform to evaluate the relevance of viral peptides/epitopes for protection against influenza virus infection.

  11. Globular Head-Displayed Conserved Influenza H1 Hemagglutinin Stalk Epitopes Confer Protection against Heterologous H1N1 Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausberger, Miriam; Tscheliessnig, Rupert; Neff, Silke; Nachbagauer, Raffael; Wohlbold, Teddy John; Wilde, Monika; Palmberger, Dieter; Krammer, Florian; Jungbauer, Alois; Grabherr, Reingard

    2016-01-01

    Significant genetic variability in the head region of the influenza A hemagglutinin, the main target of current vaccines, makes it challenging to develop a long-lived seasonal influenza prophylaxis. Vaccines based on the conserved hemagglutinin stalk domain might provide broader cross-reactive immunity. However, this region of the hemagglutinin is immunosubdominant to the head region. Peptide-based vaccines have gained much interest as they allow the immune system to focus on relevant but less immunogenic epitopes. We developed a novel influenza A hemagglutinin-based display platform for H1 hemagglutinin stalk peptides that we identified in an epitope mapping assay using human immune sera and synthetic HA peptides. Flow cytometry and competition assays suggest that the identified stalk sequences do not recapitulate the epitopes of already described broadly neutralizing stalk antibodies. Vaccine constructs displaying 25-mer stalk sequences provided up to 75% protection from lethal heterologous virus challenge in BALB/c mice and induced antibody responses against the H1 hemagglutinin. The developed platform based on a vaccine antigen has the potential to be either used as stand-alone or as prime-vaccine in combination with conventional seasonal or pandemic vaccines for the amplification of stalk-based cross-reactive immunity in humans or as platform to evaluate the relevance of viral peptides/epitopes for protection against influenza virus infection.

  12. Designing and overproducing a tandem epitope of gp350/220 that shows a potential to become an EBV vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widodo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epstein-Barr virus (EBV can cause cancer in people from around the world. There is no EBV vaccine available for use on a global scale. However, emerging evidence suggests that the epitope on the gp350/220 capsid protein may be developed into an EBV vaccine. Nevertheless, the production of small, single epitope is challenging of stability issues and possible alteration of peptide structure. In this study, a tandem epitope was developed consisting of three single epitopes, aimed to improve stability, antigenicity and preserve epitope structure. Materials and methods: A tandem epitope was designed using bioinformatics based on the epitope structure of the gp350/220 protein. The tandem epitope structure was analyzed using a protein folding method with Abalone software, which was further refined via YASARA force field and molecular repairing using a FoldX method. Immunogenicity was examined with Epitopia software, whereas allergen properties were tested using AlgPred. The pattern of the tandem epitope binding with anti-gp350/220 antibodies was performed using Z-dock and snugDock. The tandem epitope was then overproduced in E. coli strain BL21 as a host cell. Result: Our model demonstrated a successfully designed and overproduced tandem epitope. The tandem epitope demonstrated a similar structure compared with the epitope of whole protein gp350/220. Our epitope also demonstrated non-allergen and antigenicity properties, and possessed antibody binding patterns consistent with whole protein gp350/220. Conclusion and recommendation: These data suggest a novel tandem epitope composed of three similar epitopes demonstrates antigenicity, structure, and binding properties consistent with whole protein gp350/220. We also demonstrate successful production of the tandem epitope using E. coli strain BL21 as a host. Future in vivo experimental animal research is necessary to test the ability of this tandem epitope to stimulate antibody production

  13. Mapping Protein Binding Sites and Conformational Epitopes Using Cysteine Labeling and Yeast Surface Display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najar, Tariq Ahmad; Khare, Shruti; Pandey, Rajesh; Gupta, Satish K; Varadarajan, Raghavan

    2017-03-07

    We describe a facile method for mapping protein:ligand binding sites and conformational epitopes. The method uses a combination of Cys scanning mutagenesis, chemical labeling, and yeast surface display. While Ala scanning is widely used for similar purposes, often mutation to Ala (or other amino acids) has little effect on binding, except at hotspot residues. Many residues in physical contact with a binding partner are insensitive to substitution with Ala. In contrast, we show that labeling of Cys residues in a binding site consistently abrogates binding. We couple this methodology to yeast surface display and deep sequencing to map conformational epitopes targeted by both monoclonal antibodies and polyclonal sera as well as a protein:ligand binding site. The method does not require purified protein, can distinguish buried and exposed residues, and can be extended to other display formats, including mammalian cells and viruses, emphasizing its wide applicability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Quaternary epitopes of α345(IV) collagen initiate Alport post-transplant anti-GBM nephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olaru, Florina; Luo, Wentian; Wang, Xu-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Alport post-transplant nephritis (APTN) is an aggressive form of anti-glomerular basement membrane disease that targets the allograft in transplanted patients with X-linked Alport syndrome. Alloantibodies develop against the NC1 domain of α5(IV) collagen, which occurs in normal kidneys, including...... of alloantibodies against allogeneic collagen IV. Some alloantibodies targeted alloepitopes within α5NC1 monomers, shared by α345NC1 and α1256NC1 hexamers. Other alloantibodies specifically targeted alloepitopes that depended on the quaternary structure of α345NC1 hexamers. In Col4a5-null mice, immunization...... with native forms of allogeneic collagen IV exclusively elicited antibodies to quaternary α345NC1 alloepitopes, whereas alloimmunogens lacking native quaternary structure elicited antibodies to shared α5NC1 alloepitopes. These results imply that quaternary epitopes within α345NC1 hexamers may initiate...

  15. Antibody-mediated targeting of the transferrin receptor in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luria-Pérez, Rosendo; Helguera, Gustavo; Rodríguez, José A

    Iron is essential for cell growth and is imported into cells in part through the action of transferrin (Tf), a protein that binds its receptor (TfR1 or CD71) on the surface of a cell, and then releases iron into endosomes. TfR1 is a single pass type-II transmembrane protein expressed at basal levels in most tissues. High expression of TfR1 is typically associated with rapidly proliferating cells, including various types of cancer. TfR1 is targeted by experimental therapeutics for several reasons: its cell surface accessibility, constitutive endocytosis into cells, essential role in cell growth and proliferation, and its overexpression by cancer cells. Among the therapeutic agents used to target TfR1, antibodies stand out due to their remarkable specificity and affinity. Clinical trials are being conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of agents targeting TfR1 in cancer patients with promising results. These observations suggest that therapies targeting TfR1 as direct therapeutics or delivery conduits remain an attractive alternative for the treatment of cancers that overexpress the receptor. Copyright © 2016 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  16. Trispecific antibodies for CD16A-directed NK cell engagement and dual-targeting of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantke, Thorsten; Weichel, Michael; Herbrecht, Carmen; Reusch, Uwe; Ellwanger, Kristina; Fucek, Ivica; Eser, Markus; Müller, Thomas; Griep, Remko; Molkenthin, Vera; Zhukovsky, Eugene A; Treder, Martin

    2017-09-01

    Bispecific antibodies that redirect the lytic activity of cytotoxic immune effector cells, such as T- and NK cells, onto tumor cells have emerged as a highly attractive and clinically validated treatment modality for hematological malignancies. Advancement of this therapeutic concept into solid tumor indications, however, is hampered by the scarcity of targetable antigens that are surface-expressed on tumor cells but demonstrate only limited expression on healthy tissues. To overcome this limitation, the concept of dual-targeting, i.e. the simultaneous targeting of two tumor-expressed surface antigens with limited co-expression on non-malignant cells, with multispecific antibodies has been proposed to increase tumor selectivity of antibody-induced effector cell cytotoxicity. Here, a novel CD16A (FcγRIIIa)-directed trispecific, tetravalent antibody format, termed aTriFlex, is described, that is capable of redirecting NK cell cytotoxicity to two surface-expressed antigens. Using a BCMA/CD200-based in vitro model system, the potential use of aTriFlex antibodies for dual-targeting and selective induction of NK cell-mediated target cell lysis was investigated. Bivalent bispecific target cell binding was found to result in significant avidity gains and up to 17-fold increased in vitro potency. These data suggest trispecific aTriFlex antibodies may support dual-targeting strategies to redirect NK cell cytotoxicity with increased selectivity to enable targeting of solid tumor antigens. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Targeting angiogenesis for radioimmunotherapy with a {sup 177}Lu-labeled antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehlerding, Emily B.; Hernandez, Reinier [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Lacognata, Saige; Jiang, Dawei [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Ferreira, Carolina A. [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Madison, WI (United States); Goel, Shreya [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Madison, WI (United States); Jeffery, Justin J. [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Small Animal Imaging Facility, Madison, WI (United States); Theuer, Charles P. [TRACON Pharmaceuticals, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Cai, Weibo [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Madison, WI (United States)

    2018-01-15

    Increased angiogenesis is a marker of aggressiveness in many cancers. Targeted radionuclide therapy of these cancers with angiogenesis-targeting agents may curtail this increased blood vessel formation and slow the growth of tumors, both primary and metastatic. CD105, or endoglin, has a primary role in angiogenesis in a number of cancers, making this a widely applicable target for targeted radioimmunotherapy. The anti-CD105 antibody, TRC105 (TRACON Pharmaceuticals), was conjugated with DTPA for radiolabeling with {sup 177}Lu (t{sub 1/2} 6.65 days). Balb/c mice were implanted with 4T1 mammary carcinoma cells, and five study groups were used: {sup 177}Lu only, TRC105 only, {sup 177}Lu-DTPA-IgG (a nonspecific antibody), {sup 177}Lu-DTPA-TRC105 low-dose, and {sup 177}Lu-DTPA-TRC105 high-dose. Toxicity of the agent was monitored by body weight measurements and analysis of blood markers. Biodistribution studies of {sup 177}Lu-DTPA-TRC105 were also performed at 1 and 7 days after injection. Ex vivo histology studies of various tissues were conducted at 1, 7, and 30 days after injection of high-dose {sup 177}Lu-DTPA-TRC105. Biodistribution studies indicated steady uptake of {sup 177}Lu-DTPA-TRC105 in 4T1 tumors between 1 and 7 days after injection (14.3 ± 2.3%ID/g and 11.6 ± 6.1%ID/g, respectively; n = 3) and gradual clearance from other organs. Significant inhibition of tumor growth was observed in the high-dose group, with a corresponding significant increase in survival (p < 0.001, all groups). In most study groups (all except the nonspecific IgG group), the body weights of the mice did not decrease by more than 10%, indicating the safety of the injected agents. Serum alanine transaminase levels remained nearly constant indicating no damage to the liver (a primary clearance organ of the agent), and this was confirmed by ex vivo histological analyses. {sup 177}Lu-DTPA-TRC105, when administered at a sufficient dose, is able to curtail tumor growth and provide a

  18. Studies on ADCC (antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity) using sheep red blood cells as target cells, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Yukinobu; Takaya, Masatoshi; Arimori, Shigeru

    1979-01-01

    A non-specific cytotoxic mediator from effector cells (human peripheral blood leukocytes) was investigated in the ADCC (antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity) system using antibody-coated sheep red blood cells (SRBC) as target cells. 51 Cr-labelled homologous (sheep) or heterologous (human) red blood cells were used as adjacent cells. Either crude lymphocyte fraction, phagocyte depleted fraction or granulocyte rich fraction separated from human peripheral leukocytes showed moderate cytotoxic effect on homologous adjacent cells, however no cytotoxic activity on heterologous adjacent cells was demonstrated in any leukocyte fraction. This suggests that the cytotoxic effects on homologous adjacent cells were resulted from the translocation of antibody molecules to adjacent cells from antibody-coated target cells. We concluded that the cytotoxic mechanism in this ADCC system was not mediated by non-specific soluble factors released from either human peripheral lymphocytes, monocytes or granulocytes. (author)

  19. Preparation of an epitope-imprinted polymer with antibody-like selectivity for beta2-microglobulin and application in serum sample analysis with a facile method of on-line solid-phase extraction coupling with high performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fangfang; Deng, Dandan; Dong, Xiangchao; Lin, Shen

    2017-04-21

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for protein recognition have great application potential in the biological analysis. However, preparation of protein imprinted polymer is still facing challenge. Beta2-microglobulin (β 2 m) is a protein biomarker that can be used in diagnosis of different diseases. In this research, a novel MIP with ability of β 2 m recognition has been developed by epitope and surface-confined imprinting approaches. A peptide with sequence of MIQRTPKIQ was selected as template. A strategy of combination of hierarchical imprinting and template immobilization was employed in the β 2 m-MIP synthesis. Imprinted binding sites with open-entrance have been created that have good accessibility for β 2 m and facilitated fast reversible binding kinetics. The experimental results demonstrated that the MIP has good selectivity. It can differentiate the template from peptide with different sequence and distinguish the β 2 m from other proteins with similar size and pI values. After binding property study of the β 2 m-MIP, a method of β 2 m determination in serum was established in which β 2 m was on-line extracted by MIP and analyzed by HPLC process. The recoveries for spiked serum was ≥83% with RSD <1.1%, indicating that the method has good accuracy and precisions. The LOD and LOQ were 0.058 and 0.195mgL -1 respectively, which meet the requirements of the β 2 m analysis. The successful application of the β 2 m-MIP demonstrated that β 2 m has reversible binding on the MIP with a kinetics that can meet the requirements of the HPLC analysis. It also indicated that the β 2 m-MIP has good mechanical strength and reusability that can be applied reliably in the practical analysis. As a synthetic antibody, β 2 m-MIP is advantageous compared to the biological molecules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Chimeric Monoclonal Antibody Cetuximab Targeting Epidermal Growth Factor-Receptor in Advanced Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Uwe Wollina; Georgi Tchernev; Torello Lotti

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common malignancy in humans. Targeted therapy with monoclonal antibody cetuximab is an option in case of advanced tumor or metastasis. AIM: We present and update of the use of cetuximab in NMSC searching PUBMED 2011-2017. METHODS: The monoclonal antibody cetuximab against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been investigated for its use in NMSC during the years 2011 to 2017 by a PUBMED research using the following items: ...

  1. The monoclonal antibody Zt/f2 targeting RON receptor tyrosine kinase as potential therapeutics against tumor growth-mediated by colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Rui-Wen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overexpression of the RON receptor tyrosine kinase contributes to epithelial cell transformation, malignant progression, and acquired drug resistance. RON also has been considered as a potential target for therapeutic intervention. This study determines biochemical features and inhibitory activity of a mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb Zt/f2 in experimental cancer therapy. Results Zt/f2 is a mouse IgG2a mAb that is highly specific and sensitive to human RON and its oncogenic variants such as RON160 (ED50 = 2.3 nmol/L. Receptor binding studies revealed that Zt/f2 interacts with an epitope(s located in a 49 amino acid sequence coded by exon 11 in the RON β-chain extracellular sequences. This sequence is critical in regulating RON maturation and phosphorylation. Zt/f2 did not compete with ligand macrophage-stimulating protein for binding to RON; however, its engagement effectively induced RON internalization, which diminishes RON expression and impairs downstream signaling activation. These biochemical features provide the cellular basis for the use of Zt/f2 to inhibit tumor growth in animal model. Repeated administration of Zt/f2 as a single agent into Balb/c mice results in partial inhibition of tumor growth caused by transformed NIH-3T3 cells expressing oncogenic RON160. Colon cancer HT-29 cell-mediated tumor growth in athymic nude mice also was attenuated following Zt/f2 treatment. In both cases, ~50% inhibition of tumor growth as measured by tumor volume was achieved. Moreover, Zt/f2 in combination with 5-fluorouracil showed an enhanced inhibition effect of ~80% on HT-29 cell-mediated tumor growth in vivo. Conclusions Zt/f2 is a potential therapeutic mAb capable of inhibiting RON-mediated oncogenesis by colon cancer cells in animal models. The inhibitory effect of Zt/f2 in vivo in combination with chemoagent 5-fluorouracil could represent a novel strategy for future colon cancer therapy.

  2. A functional dermatan sulfate epitope containing iduronate(2-O-sulfate)alpha1-3GalNAc(6-O-sulfate) disaccharide in the mouse brain: demonstration using a novel monoclonal antibody raised against dermatan sulfate of ascidian Ascidia nigra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xingfeng; Pavão, Mauro S G; Dos Santos, Joana Cabral; Sugahara, Kazuyuki

    2005-06-17

    Oversulfated chondroitin sulfate (CS), dermatan sulfate (DS), and CS/DS hybrid structures bind growth factors, promote the neurite outgrowth of hippocampal neurons in vitro, and have been implicated in the development of the brain. To investigate the expression of functional oversulfated DS structures in the brain, a novel monoclonal antibody (mAb), 2A12, was generated against DS (An-DS) from ascidian Ascidia nigra, which contains a unique iD disaccharide unit, iduronic acid (2-O-sulfate)alpha1-->3GalNAc(6-O-sulfate), as a predominant disaccharide. mAb 2A12 specifically reacted with the immunogen, and recognized iD-enriched decasaccharides as minimal structures. The 2A12 epitope was specifically observed in the hippocampus and cerebellum of the mouse brain on postnatal day 7, and the expression in the cerebellum disappeared in the adult brain, suggesting a spatiotemporally regulated expression of this epitope. Embryonic hippocampal neurons were immunopositive for 2A12, and the addition of the antibody to the culture medium significantly reduced the neurite growth of hippocampal neurons. In addition, two minimum 2A12-reactive decasaccharide sequences with multiple consecutive iD units were isolated from the An-DS chains, which exhibited stronger inhibitory activity against the binding of various growth factors and neurotrophic factors to immobilized embryonic pig brain CS/DS chains (E-CS/DS) than the intact E-CS/DS, suggesting that the 2A12 epitope at the neuronal surface acts as a receptor or co-receptor for these molecules. Thus, we have selected a unique antibody that recognizes iD-enriched oversulfated DS structures, which are implicated in the development of the hippocampus and cerebellum in the central nervous system. The antibody will also be applicable for investigating structural alterations in CS/DS in aging and pathological conditions.

  3. Antibody to a conserved antigenic target is protective against diverse prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cywes-Bentley, Colette; Skurnik, David; Zaidi, Tanweer; Roux, Damien; Deoliveira, Rosane B; Garrett, Wendy S; Lu, Xi; O'Malley, Jennifer; Kinzel, Kathryn; Zaidi, Tauqeer; Rey, Astrid; Perrin, Christophe; Fichorova, Raina N; Kayatani, Alexander K K; Maira-Litràn, Tomas; Gening, Marina L; Tsvetkov, Yury E; Nifantiev, Nikolay E; Bakaletz, Lauren O; Pelton, Stephen I; Golenbock, Douglas T; Pier, Gerald B

    2013-06-11

    Microbial capsular antigens are effective vaccines but are chemically and immunologically diverse, resulting in a major barrier to their use against multiple pathogens. A β-(1→6)-linked poly-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (PNAG) surface capsule is synthesized by four proteins encoded in genetic loci designated intercellular adhesion in Staphylococcus aureus or polyglucosamine in selected Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. We report that many microbial pathogens lacking an identifiable intercellular adhesion or polyglucosamine locus produce PNAG, including Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and fungal pathogens, as well as protozoa, e.g., Trichomonas vaginalis, Plasmodium berghei, and sporozoites and blood-stage forms of Plasmodium falciparum. Natural antibody to PNAG is common in humans and animals and binds primarily to the highly acetylated glycoform of PNAG but is not protective against infection due to lack of deposition of complement opsonins. Polyclonal animal antibody raised to deacetylated glycoforms of PNAG and a fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody that both bind to native and deacetylated glycoforms of PNAG mediated complement-dependent opsonic or bactericidal killing and protected mice against local and/or systemic infections by Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Listeria monocytogenes, Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B, Candida albicans, and P. berghei ANKA, and against colonic pathology in a model of infectious colitis. PNAG is also a capsular polysaccharide for Neisseria gonorrhoeae and nontypable Hemophilus influenzae, and protects cells from environmental stress. Vaccination targeting PNAG could contribute to immunity against serious and diverse prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathogens, and the conserved production of PNAG suggests that it is a critical factor in microbial biology.

  4. Antibody-directed targeting of lysostaphin adsorbed onto polylactide nanoparticles increases its antimicrobial activity against S. aureus in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satishkumar, R; Vertegel, A A

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to study the effect of antibody-directed targeting of S. aureus by comparing the activities of lysostaphin conjugated to biodegradable polylactide nanoparticles (NPs) in the presence and in the absence of co-immobilized anti-S. aureus antibody. Lysostaphin–antibody–NP conjugates were synthesized through physical adsorption at different enzyme:antibody:NP ratios. The synthesized enzyme–NP conjugates were characterized by means of dynamic light scattering and zeta potential analysis, and the total protein binding yield on the NPs was characterized using Alexa Fluor 350 and 594 dyes for the S. aureus antibody and lysostaphin respectively. We observed enhanced antimicrobial activity for both enzyme-coated and enzyme–antibody-coated NPs for lysostaphin coatings corresponding to ∼ 40% of the initial monolayer and higher compared to the free enzyme case (p < 0.05). At the highest antibody coating concentration, bacterial lysis rates for antibody-coated samples were significantly higher than for lysostaphin-coated samples lacking the antibody (p < 0.05). Such enzyme–NP conjugates thus have the potential for becoming novel therapeutic agents for treating antibiotic-resistant S. aureus infections.

  5. Characterization and Imaging of Antibody-Coated Gold Nanoparticles for Targeted Treatment of Microbial Keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, Matthew

    Microbial keratitis (MK) is an infection of the cornea by pathogenic organisms that causes inflammation and irritation. It can lead to full or partial blindness if left untreated. Current clinical treatment methods rely on high frequency application of topical drugs which are subject to the issues of patient compliance and microbial resistance. In this work, gold nanoparticles (AuNP) were proposed as an alternative treatment method in light-based therapies. Particle formulation methods were investigated and assessed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis). AuNP of 20 nm diameter were used as platforms to attach monoclonal antibodies anti-FLAG or anti-F1 to enhance their cell-targeting ability as well as polyethylene glycol to reduce non-specific binding and protein adsorption. These functionalized particles were qualitatively assessed using UV-Vis. The antibody-functionalized AuNP were then assessed for their ability to attach directly to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, expressing FLAG peptide, or Aspergillus fumigatus, expressing the F1 receptor. Attachment was imaged using dark field microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and fluorescence microscopy.

  6. Cell Surface Glycoprotein of Reactive Stromal Fibroblasts as a Potential Antibody Target in Human Epithelial Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garin-Chesa, Pilar; Old, Lloyd J.; Rettig, Wolfgang J.

    1990-09-01

    The F19 antigen is a cell surface glycoprotein (M_r, 95,000) of human sarcomas and proliferating, cultured fibroblasts that is absent from resting fibroblasts in normal adult tissues. Normal and malignant epithelial cells are also F19^-. The present immunohistochemical study describes induction of F19 in the reactive mesenchyme of epithelial tumors. F19^+ fibroblasts were found in primary and metastatic carcinomas, including colorectal (18 of 18 cases studied), breast (14/14), ovarian (21/21), bladder (9/10), and lung carcinomas (13/13). In contrast, the stroma of benign colorectal adenomas, fibrocystic disease and fibroadenomas of breast, benign prostate hyperplasia, in situ bladder carcinomas, and benign ovarian tumors showed no or only moderate numbers of F19^+ fibroblasts. Analysis of dermal incision wounds revealed that F19 is strongly induced during scar formation. Comparison of F19 with the extracellular matrix protein tenascin, a putative marker of tumor mesenchyme, showed a cellular staining pattern for F19 vs. the extracellular matrix pattern for tenascin and widespread expression of tenascin in F19^- normal tissues and benign tumors. Our results suggest that the F19^+ phenotype correlates with specialized fibroblast functions in wound healing and malignant tumor growth. Because of its abundance in tumor mesenchyme, F19 may serve as a target for antibodies labeled with radioisotopes or toxic agents, or inflammatogenic antibodies, in carcinoma patients.

  7. Evaluation of tumor targeting with radiolabeled F(ab2 fragment of a humanized monoclonal antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Babaei MH

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Humanized monoclonal antibody U36 and its F(ab'2 fragment, radio labeled with 125I, were tested for tumor localization in nude mice bearing a squamous cell carcinoma xenograft line derived from a head and neck carcinoma. Monoclonal antibody IgG or F(ab'2 fragment were injected in parallel and at days 1, 2 and 3, mice were dissected for determination of isotope biodistribution. IgG as well as F(ab'2 showed highly specific localization in tumor tissue. The mean tumor uptake (n=3 is expressed as the percentage of the injected dose per gram of tumor tissue (%ID/g. %ID/g of IgG was 11.7% at day 1 and decreased to 10.9% at day 3 whereas %ID/g of F(ab'2 was 2.9% at day 1 and decreased on following days. Tumor to blood ratios (T/B at day 1 were 0.86 for IgG and 1.32 for F(ab'2 and reached a maximum at day 3 with values of 4.41 and 1.84 respectively. These findings suggest that the superior tumor to non-tumor ratios in the day of 1 render the F(ab'2 fragment more qualified for specific targeting radioisotopes to tumor xenografts in this exprimental setting.

  8. Neutralization of antibody-enhanced dengue infection by VIS513, a pan serotype reactive monoclonal antibody targeting domain III of the dengue E protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Luke N.; Ong, Li Ching; Rowley, Kirk J.; Winnett, Alexander; Tan, Hwee Cheng; Hobbie, Sven; Shriver, Zachary; Babcock, Gregory J.; Alonso, Sylvie; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2018-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection imposes enormous health and economic burden worldwide with no approved treatment. Several small molecules, including lovastatin, celgosivir, balapiravir and chloroquine have been tested for potential anti-dengue activity in clinical trials; none of these have demonstrated a protective effect. Recently, based on identification and characterization of cross-serotype neutralizing antibodies, there is increasing attention on the potential for dengue immunotherapy. Here, we tested the ability of VIS513, an engineered cross-neutralizing humanized antibody targeting the DENV E protein domain III, to overcome antibody-enhanced infection and high but brief viremia, which are commonly encountered in dengue patients, in various in vitro and in vivo models. We observed that VIS513 efficiently neutralizes DENV at clinically relevant viral loads or in the presence of enhancing levels of DENV immune sera. Single therapeutic administration of VIS513 in mouse models of primary infection or lethal secondary antibody-enhanced infection, reduces DENV titers and protects from lethal infection. Finally, VIS513 administration does not readily lead to resistance, either in cell culture systems or in animal models of dengue infection. The findings suggest that rapid viral reduction during acute DENV infection with a monoclonal antibody is feasible. PMID:29425203

  9. Evaluation of anti-podoplanin rat monoclonal antibody NZ-1 for targeting malignant gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Yukinari; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Kaneko, Mika Kato; Mishima, Kazuhiko; Srivastava, Nidhi; Chandramohan, Vidyalakshmi; Pegram, Charles; Keir, Stephen T.; Kuan, C.-T.; Bigner, Darell D.; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Podoplanin/aggrus is a mucin-like sialoglycoprotein that is highly expressed in malignant gliomas. Podoplanin has been reported to be a novel marker to enrich tumor-initiating cells, which are thought to resist conventional therapies and to be responsible for cancer relapse. The purpose of this study was to determine whether an anti-podoplanin antibody is suitable to target radionuclides to malignant gliomas. Methods: The binding affinity of an anti-podoplanin antibody, NZ-1 (rat IgG 2a ), was determined by surface plasmon resonance and Scatchard analysis. NZ-1 was radioiodinated with 125 I using Iodogen [ 125 I-NZ-1(Iodogen)] or N-succinimidyl 4-guanidinomethyl 3-[ 131 I]iodobenzoate ([ 131 I]SGMIB-NZ-1), and paired-label internalization assays of NZ-1 were performed. The tissue distribution of 125 I-NZ-1(Iodogen) and that of [ 131 I]SGMIB-NZ-1 were then compared in athymic mice bearing glioblastoma xenografts. Results: The dissociation constant (K D ) of NZ-1 was determined to be 1.2x10 -10 M by surface plasmon resonance and 9.8x10 -10 M for D397MG glioblastoma cells by Scatchard analysis. Paired-label internalization assays in LN319 glioblastoma cells indicated that [ 131 I]SGMIB-NZ-1 resulted in higher intracellular retention of radioactivity (26.3±0.8% of initially bound radioactivity at 8 h) compared to that from the 125 I-NZ-1(Iodogen) (10.0±0.1% of initially bound radioactivity at 8 h). Likewise, tumor uptake of [ 131 I]SGMIB-NZ-1 (39.9±8.8 %ID/g at 24 h) in athymic mice bearing D2159MG xenografts in vivo was significantly higher than that of 125 I-NZ-1(Iodogen) (29.7±6.1 %ID/g at 24 h). Conclusions: The overall results suggest that an anti-podoplanin antibody NZ-1 warrants further evaluation for antibody-based therapy against glioblastoma.

  10. Evaluation of anti-podoplanin rat monoclonal antibody NZ-1 for targeting malignant gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Yukinari, E-mail: yukinari-k@bea.hi-ho.ne.j [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Oncology Research Center, Advanced Molecular Epidemiology Research Institute, Yamagata University Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Vaidyanathan, Ganesan [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Kaneko, Mika Kato [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Oncology Research Center, Advanced Molecular Epidemiology Research Institute, Yamagata University Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Mishima, Kazuhiko [Saitama Medical University International Medical Center 1397-1 Yamane Hidaka-shi, Saitama 350-1298 (Japan); Srivastava, Nidhi; Chandramohan, Vidyalakshmi; Pegram, Charles [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Keir, Stephen T. [Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Kuan, C.-T.; Bigner, Darell D. [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Zalutsky, Michael R. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Introduction: Podoplanin/aggrus is a mucin-like sialoglycoprotein that is highly expressed in malignant gliomas. Podoplanin has been reported to be a novel marker to enrich tumor-initiating cells, which are thought to resist conventional therapies and to be responsible for cancer relapse. The purpose of this study was to determine whether an anti-podoplanin antibody is suitable to target radionuclides to malignant gliomas. Methods: The binding affinity of an anti-podoplanin antibody, NZ-1 (rat IgG{sub 2a}), was determined by surface plasmon resonance and Scatchard analysis. NZ-1 was radioiodinated with {sup 125}I using Iodogen [{sup 125}I-NZ-1(Iodogen)] or N-succinimidyl 4-guanidinomethyl 3-[{sup 131}I]iodobenzoate ([{sup 131}I]SGMIB-NZ-1), and paired-label internalization assays of NZ-1 were performed. The tissue distribution of {sup 125}I-NZ-1(Iodogen) and that of [{sup 131}I]SGMIB-NZ-1 were then compared in athymic mice bearing glioblastoma xenografts. Results: The dissociation constant (K{sub D}) of NZ-1 was determined to be 1.2x10{sup -10} M by surface plasmon resonance and 9.8x10{sup -10} M for D397MG glioblastoma cells by Scatchard analysis. Paired-label internalization assays in LN319 glioblastoma cells indicated that [{sup 131}I]SGMIB-NZ-1 resulted in higher intracellular retention of radioactivity (26.3{+-}0.8% of initially bound radioactivity at 8 h) compared to that from the {sup 125}I-NZ-1(Iodogen) (10.0{+-}0.1% of initially bound radioactivity at 8 h). Likewise, tumor uptake of [{sup 131}I]SGMIB-NZ-1 (39.9{+-}8.8 %ID/g at 24 h) in athymic mice bearing D2159MG xenografts in vivo was significantly higher than that of {sup 125}I-NZ-1(Iodogen) (29.7{+-}6.1 %ID/g at 24 h). Conclusions: The overall results suggest that an anti-podoplanin antibody NZ-1 warrants further evaluation for antibody-based therapy against glioblastoma.

  11. Comparative analysis of bispecific antibody and streptavidin-targeted radioimmunotherapy for B cell cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Damian J.; Frayo, Shani L.; Lin, Yukang; Hamlin, Donald K.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Frost, Sofia H.L.; Kenoyer, Aimee L.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Gooley, Theodore A.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Till, Brian G.; O’Steen, Shyril; Orcutt, Kelly D.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Wittrup, K. Dane; Press, Oliver W.

    2016-01-01

    Streptavidin (SA)-biotin pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) that targets CD20 in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) exhibits remarkable efficacy in model systems, but SA immunogenicity and interference by endogenous biotin may complicate clinical translation of this approach. In this study, we engineered a bispecific fusion protein (FP) that evades the limitations imposed by this system. Briefly, one arm of the FP was an anti-human CD20 antibody (2H7) with the other arm of the FP an anti-chelated radiometal trap for a radiolabeled ligand (yttrium[Y]-DOTA) captured by a very high-affinity anti-Y-DOTA scFv antibody (C825). Head-to-head biodistribution experiments comparing SA-biotin and bispecific FP (2H7-Fc-C825) PRIT in murine subjects bearing human lymphoma xenografts demonstrated nearly identical tumor targeting by each modality at 24 hrs. However, residual radioactivity in the blood and normal organs was consistently higher following administration of 1F5-SA compared to 2H7-Fc-C825. Consequently, tumor-to-normal tissue ratios of distribution were superior for 2H7-Fc-C825 (p<0.0001). Therapy studies in subjects bearing either Ramos or Granta subcutaneous lymphomas demonstrated that 2H7-Fc-C825 PRIT is highly effective and significantly less myelosuppressive than 1F5-SA (p<0.0001). All animals receiving optimal doses of 2H7-Fc-C825 followed by 90Y-DOTA were cured by 150 days, whereas the growth of tumors in control animals progressed rapidly with complete morbidity by 25 days. In addition to demonstrating reduced risk of immunogenicity and an absence of endogenous biotin interference, our findings offer a preclinical proof of concept for the preferred use of bispecific PRIT in future clinical trials, due to a slightly superior biodistribution profile, less myelosuppression and superior efficacy. PMID:27590740

  12. Photothermal killing of Staphylococcus aureus using antibody-targeted gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millenbaugh, Nancy J; Baskin, Jonathan B; DeSilva, Mauris N; Elliott, W Rowe; Glickman, Randolph D

    2015-01-01

    The continued emergence of multidrug resistant bacterial infections and the decline in discovery of new antibiotics are major challenges for health care throughout the world. This situation has heightened the need for novel antimicrobial therapies as alternatives to traditional antibiotics. The combination of metallic nanoparticles and laser exposure has been proposed as a strategy to induce physical damage to bacteria, regardless of antibiotic sensitivity. The purpose of this study was to test the antibacterial effect of antibody-targeted gold nanoparticles combined with pulsed laser irradiation. Gold nanoparticles conjugated to antibodies specific to Staphylococcus aureus peptidoglycan were incubated with suspensions of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MRSA and MSSA). Bacterial suspensions were then exposed to 8 ns pulsed laser irradiation at a wavelength of 532 nm and fluences ranging from 1 to 5 J/cm(2). Viability of the bacteria following laser exposure was determined using colony forming unit assays. Scanning electron microscopy was used to confirm the binding of nanoparticles to bacteria and the presence of cellular damage. The laser-activated nanoparticle treatment reduced the surviving population to 31% of control in the MSSA population, while the survival in the MRSA population was reduced to 58% of control. Significant decreases in bacterial viability occurred when the laser fluence exceeded 1 J/cm(2), and this effect was linear from 0 to 5 J/cm(2) (r (2)=0.97). Significantly less bactericidal effect was observed for nonfunctionalized nanoparticles or functionalized nanoparticles without laser activation. Laser-activated nanoparticles targeted to S. aureus surface antigens significantly reduced the percentage of viable organisms and represents a promising new treatment modality that could be used either alone or as an adjunct to existing, conventional antibiotic therapy.

  13. Sterile immunity to malaria after DNA prime/adenovirus boost immunization is associated with effector memory CD8+T cells targeting AMA1 class I epitopes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Sedegah

    Full Text Available Fifteen volunteers were immunized with three doses of plasmid DNA encoding P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP and apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA1 and boosted with human adenovirus-5 (Ad expressing the same antigens (DNA/Ad. Four volunteers (27% demonstrated sterile immunity to controlled human malaria infection and, overall, protection was statistically significantly associated with ELISpot and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ activities to AMA1 but not CSP. DNA priming was required for protection, as 18 additional subjects immunized with Ad alone (AdCA did not develop sterile protection.We sought to identify correlates of protection, recognizing that DNA-priming may induce different responses than AdCA alone. Among protected volunteers, two and three had higher ELISpot and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses to CSP and AMA1, respectively, than non-protected volunteers. Unexpectedly, non-protected volunteers in the AdCA trial showed ELISpot and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses to AMA1 equal to or higher than the protected volunteers. T cell functionality assessed by intracellular cytokine staining for IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 likewise did not distinguish protected from non-protected volunteers across both trials. However, three of the four protected volunteers showed higher effector to central memory CD8+ T cell ratios to AMA1, and one of these to CSP, than non-protected volunteers for both antigens. These responses were focused on discrete regions of CSP and AMA1. Class I epitopes restricted by A*03 or B*58 supertypes within these regions of AMA1 strongly recalled responses in three of four protected volunteers. We hypothesize that vaccine-induced effector memory CD8+ T cells recognizing a single class I epitope can confer sterile immunity to P. falciparum in humans.We suggest that better understanding of which epitopes within malaria antigens can confer sterile immunity and design of vaccine approaches that elicit responses to these epitopes will increase the

  14. Epitope-dependent synergism and antagonism between CD40 antibodies and soluble CD40 ligand for the regulation of CD23 expression and IgE synthesis in human B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challa, A; Pound, J D; Armitage, R J; Gordon, J

    1999-06-01

    The induction of IgE synthesis in naive B cells requires two T-cell-derived signals: one delivered through CD40 and the other via interleukin-4 (IL-4). The natural counterstructure to CD40 is the CD40 ligand (CD40L). We have asked about the interplay between CD40L and CD40 mAb that recognize distinct epitopes in delivering signals for regulating IL-4-dependent IgE synthesis and the expression of CD23, the low-affinity IgE receptor, in resting B cells. After culture of purified human tonsillar B cells with CD40 agonists and IL-4, surface CD23 was determined by flow cytometric analysis. CD23 levels in cell lysates and supernatants were quantified by ELISA, as were those of secreted IgE. With regard to both induction of CD23 and IgE production, soluble CD40L trimer (sCD40LT) showed synergistic interaction with two mAb to CD40 which bind to epitopes located outside the ligand binding site (EA5 and 5C3), but not with a mAb (G28-5) which effectively competes for CD40L binding to CD40. Each of the two noncompeting mAb to CD40 was able to cooperate strongly with sCD40LT in promoting high-level induction of CD23 even in the absence of IL-4, an effect mirrored in the promotion of strong homotypic clustering and high-rate DNA synthesis. G28-5, uniquely, induced a down-regulation in IL-4-induced CD23 expression with time, a change that was accompanied by an increase in the amount of soluble CD23 detected. While the two noncompeting mAb consistently synergized with sCD40LT for the promotion of IL-4-dependent IgE synthesis, sCD40LT and G28-5 (which, by itself, was the most potent of the CD40 mAb at inducing IL-4-dependent IgE production) exhibited mutual antagonism in this regard, the level of which could be quite profound. This study demonstrates that appropriate targeting of CD40 can modulate IgE synthesis either positively or negatively.

  15. Dual display: phage selection driven by co-engagement of two targets by two different antibody fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagète, Séverine; Botas-Perez, Ledicia; Rossito-Borlat, Irène; Adea, Kenneth; Gueneau, Franck; Ravn, Ulla; Rousseau, François; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie; Fischer, Nicolas; Hartley, Oliver

    2017-09-01

    Antibody phage display technology has supported the emergence of numerous therapeutic antibodies. The development of bispecific antibodies, a promising new frontier in antibody therapy, could be facilitated by new phage display approaches that enable pairs of antibodies to be co-selected based on co-engagement of their respective targets. We describe such an approach, making use of two complementary leucine zipper domains that heterodimerize with high affinity. Phagemids encoding a first antibody fragment (scFv) fused to phage coat protein via the first leucine zipper are rescued in bacteria expressing a second scFv fused to the second leucine zipper as a soluble periplasmic protein, so that it is acquired by phage during assembly. Using a soluble scFv specific for a human CD3-derived peptide, we show that its acquisition by phage displaying an irrelevant antibody is sufficiently robust to drive selection of rare phage (1 in 105) over three rounds of panning. We then set up a model selection experiment using a cell line expressing the chemokine receptor CCR5 fused to the CD3 peptide together with a panel of phage clones capable displaying either an anti-CCR5 scFv or an irrelevant antibody, with or without the capacity to acquire the soluble anti-CD3 scFv. In this experiment we showed that rare phage (1 in 105) capable of displaying the two different scFvs can be specifically enriched over four rounds of panning. This approach has the potential to be applied to the identification of pairs of ligands capable of co-engaging two different user-defined targets, which would facilitate the discovery of novel bispecific antibodies. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. B Epitope Multiplicity and B/T Epitope Orientation Influence Immunogenicity of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Peptide Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Blanco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic peptides incorporating protective B- and T-cell epitopes are candidates for new safer foot-and-mouth disease (FMD vaccines. We have reported that dendrimeric peptides including four copies of a B-cell epitope (VP1 136 to 154 linked to a T-cell epitope (3A 21 to 35 of FMD virus (FMDV elicit potent B- and T-cell specific responses and confer protection to viral challenge, while juxtaposition of these epitopes in a linear peptide induces less efficient responses. To assess the relevance of B-cell epitope multivalency, dendrimers bearing two (B2T or four (B4T copies of the B-cell epitope from type O FMDV (a widespread circulating serotype were tested in CD1 mice and showed that multivalency is advantageous over simple B-T-epitope juxtaposition, resulting in efficient induction of neutralizing antibodies and optimal release of IFNγ. Interestingly, the bivalent B2T construction elicited similar or even better B- and T-cell specific responses than tetravalent B4T. In addition, the presence of the T-cell epitope and its orientation were shown to be critical for the immunogenicity of the linear juxtaposed monovalent peptides analyzed in parallel. Taken together, our results provide useful insights for a more accurate design of FMD subunit vaccines.

  17. Deletion of fusion peptide or destabilization of fusion core of HIV gp41 enhances antigenicity and immunogenicity of 4E10 epitope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jing; Chen Xi; Jiang Shibo; Chen Yinghua

    2008-01-01

    The human monoclonal antibody 4E10 against the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of HIV-1 gp41 demonstrates broad neutralizing activity across various strains, and makes its epitope an attractive target for HIV-1 vaccine development. Although the contiguous epitope of 4E10 has been identified, attempts to re-elicit 4E10-like antibodies have failed, possibly due to the lack of proper conformation of the 4E10 epitope. Here we used pIg-tail expression system to construct a panel of eukaryotic cell-surface expression plasmids encoding the extracellular domain of gp41 with deletion of fusion peptide and/or introduction of L568P mutation that may disrupt the gp41 six-helix bundle core conformation as DNA vaccines for immunization of mice. We found that these changes resulted in significant increase of the antigenicity and immunogenicity of 4E10 epitope. This information is thus useful for rational design of vaccines targeting the HIV-1 gp41 MPER

  18. Identification of HLA-A2 or HLA-A24-restricted CTL epitopes for potential HSP105-targeted immunotherapy in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Yu; Komori, Hiroyuki; Tsunoda, Yoshiyuki; Shimomura, Manami; Takahashi, Mari; Baba, Hideo; Ito, Masaaki; Saito, Norio; Kuwano, Hiroyuki; Endo, Itaru; Nishimura, Yasuharu; Nakatsura, Tetsuya

    2014-03-01

    We previously reported that heat shock protein 105 (HSP105) is overexpressed in a variety of human cancers, including colorectal, pancreatic and esophageal cancer and has proven to be a novel biomarker for the immunohistochemical detection of these cancers. In the present study, we used HLA-transgenic mice (Tgm) and the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of colorectal cancer patients to identify HLA-A2 and HLA-A24-restricted HSP105 epitopes, as a means of expanding the application of HSP105-based immunotherapy to HLA-A2- or HLA-A24-positive cancer patients. In addition, we investigated by ex vivo IFN-γ ELISPOT assay whether the HSP105-derived peptide of cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) exists in PBMCs of pre-surgical colorectal cancer patients. We found that four peptides, HSP105 A2-7 (RLMNDMTAV), HSP105 A2-12 (KLMSSNSTDL), HSP105 A24-1 (NYGIYKQDL) and HSP105 A24-7 (EYVYEFRDKL), are potential HLA-A2 or HLA-A24-restricted CTL HSP105-derived epitopes. HSP105-specific IFN-γ-secreting T cells were detected in 14 of 21 pre-surgical patients with colorectal cancer in response to stimulation with these four peptides. Our study raises the possibility that these HSP105 peptides are applicable to cancer immunotherapy in patients with HSP105-expressing cancer, particularly colorectal cancer.

  19. Conservation and diversity of influenza A H1N1 HLA-restricted T cell epitope candidates for epitope-based vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Thiamjoo Tan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The immune-related evolution of influenza viruses is exceedingly complex and current vaccines against influenza must be reformulated for each influenza season because of the high degree of antigenic drift among circulating influenza strains. Delay in vaccine production is a serious problem in responding to a pandemic situation, such as that of the current H1N1 strain. Immune escape is generally attributed to reduced antibody recognition of the viral hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins whose rate of mutation is much greater than that of the internal non-structural proteins. As a possible alternative, vaccines directed at T cell epitope domains of internal influenza proteins, that are less susceptible to antigenic variation, have been investigated.HLA transgenic mouse strains expressing HLA class I A*0201, A*2402, and B*0702, and class II DRB1*1501, DRB1*0301 and DRB1*0401 were immunized with 196 influenza H1N1 peptides that contained residues of highly conserved proteome sequences of the human H1N1, H3N2, H1N2, H5N1, and avian influenza A strains. Fifty-four (54 peptides that elicited 63 HLA-restricted peptide-specific T cell epitope responses were identified by IFN-gamma ELISpot assay. The 54 peptides were compared to the 2007-2009 human H1N1 sequences for selection of sequences in the design of a new candidate H1N1 vaccine, specifically targeted to highly-conserved HLA-restricted T cell epitopes.Seventeen (17 T cell epitopes in PB1, PB2, and M1 were selected as vaccine targets based on sequence conservation over the past 30 years, high functional avidity, non-identity to human peptides, clustered localization, and promiscuity to multiple HLA alleles. These candidate vaccine antigen sequences may be applicable to any avian or human influenza A virus.

  20. In vivo imaging and specific targeting of P-glycoprotein expression in multidrug resistant nude mice xenografts with [{sup 125}I]MRK-16 monoclonal antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Andrew M.; Rosa, Eddie; Mehta, Bippin M.; Divgi, Chaitanya R.; Finn, Ronald D.; Biedler, June L.; Tsuruo, Takashi; Kalaigian, Hovannes; Larson, Steven M

    1995-05-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumors is associated with P-glycoprotein (Pgp) expression. In vivo quantitation of Pgp may allow MDR to be evaluated noninvasively prior to treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to radiolabel MRK-16, a monoclonal antibody that targets an external epitope of P-glycoprotein, and perform in vivo quantitation of P-glycoprotein in a MDR xenograft nude mouse model. MRK-16 was labeled with {sup 125}I by the iodogen method, with subsequent purification by size exclusion chromatography. Groups of 10 Balb/c mice were each xenografted with colchicine-resistant or -sensitive neuroblastoma cell lines, respectively. Whole body clearance and tumor uptake over time was quantitated by gamma camera imaging, and biodistribution studies were performed with [{sup 125}]MRK-16 and an isotype matched control antibody, A33. Quantitative autoradiography and immunohistochemistry analysis of tumors was also evaluated to confirm specific targeting of [{sup 125}I]MRK-16. Peak tumor uptake was at 2-3 days post-injection, and was significantly greater in resistance compared to sensitive tumors (mean % injected dose/g {+-} SD) (18.76 {+-} 2.94 vs 10.93 {+-} 0.96; p < 0.05). Quantitative autoradiography verified these findings (19.13 {+-} 0.622 vs 12.08 {+-} 0.38, p < 0.05). Specific binding of [{sup 125}I]MRK-16 was confirmed by comparison to [{sup 131}I]A33 in biodistribution studies, and localized to cellular components of tissue stroma by comparison of histologic and autoradiographic sections of sensitive and resistant tumors. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated a 4.5-fold difference in P-glycoprotein expression between sensitive and resistant cell lines without colchicine selective pressure. We conclude that in vivo quantitation of P-glycoprotein in MDR tumors can be performed with [{sup 125}I]MRK-16. These findings suggest a potential clinical application for radiolabeled MRK-16 in the in vivo evaluation of multidrug resistance in tumors.

  1. Evolution of the HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Genes and Neutralizing Antibody Response in an Individual with Broadly Cross Neutralizing Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-31

    FBS, L-glutamine, penicillin, streptomycin (Gibeo), tylosin (Sigma), and puromycin. All cell cultures were maintained in a humidified atmosphere...white walled, flat- bottomed tissue culture plates (Costar, Coming NY). The virus-antibody mixtures were then combined with 1-2 x 104 HOS-CD4+-CCR5...all lineages combined obtained from 1986-1993 to sCD4 and eight cross-reactive mAbs targeting distinct neutralization epitope regions. We chose

  2. Cell-Penetrating Bispecific Antibodies for Targeting Oncogenic Transcription Factors in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    either antibody occurred rapidly, and was maximum between 1 and 3hrs after antibody addition. When antibody was removed from the culture medium a...substantial quantity of the cell associated antibody was lost, appearing into the fresh medium rapidly. However between 25-50% of the initial cell...plasmid pTCON2 encodes the Saccharomyces aga2 gene, with Myc tag. When transfected into yeast, the aga2 protein is secreted and then binds to aga1

  3. Rebmab200, a Humanized Monoclonal Antibody Targeting the Sodium Phosphate Transporter NaPi2b Displays Strong Immune Mediated Cytotoxicity against Cancer: A Novel Reagent for Targeted Antibody Therapy of Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Mariana Lopes; Yeda, Fernanda Perez; Tsuruta, Lilian Rumi; Horta, Bruno Brasil; Pimenta, Alécio A.; Degaki, Theri Leica; Soares, Ibere C.; Tuma, Maria Carolina; Okamoto, Oswaldo Keith; Alves, Venancio A. F.; Ritter, Gerd; Moro, Ana Maria

    2013-01-01

    NaPi2b, a sodium-dependent phosphate transporter, is highly expressed in ovarian carcinomas and is recognized by the murine monoclonal antibody MX35. The antibody had shown excellent targeting to ovarian cancer in several early phase clinical trials but being murine the antibody's full therapeutic potential could not be explored. To overcome this impediment we developed a humanized antibody version named Rebmab200, expressed in human PER.C6® cells and cloned by limiting dilution. In order to select a clone with high therapeutic potential clones were characterized using a series of physicochemical assays, flow cytometry, real-time surface plasmon resonance, glycosylation analyses, immunohistochemistry, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, complement-dependent-cytotoxicity assays and quantitative PCR. Comparative analyses of Rebmab200 and MX35 monoclonal antibodies demonstrated that the two antibodies had similar specificity for NaPi2b by flow cytometry with a panel of 30 cell lines and maintained similar kinetic parameters. Robust and high producer cell clones potentially suitable for use in manufacturing were obtained. Rebmab200 antibodies were assessed by immunohistochemistry using a large panel of tissues including human carcinomas of ovarian, lung, kidney and breast origin. An assessment of its binding towards 33 normal human organs was performed as well. Rebmab200 showed selected strong reactivity with the tested tumor types but little or no reactivity with the normal tissues tested confirming its potential for targeted therapeutics strategies. The remarkable cytotoxicity shown by Rebmab200 in OVCAR-3 cells is a significant addition to the traits of stability and productivity displayed by the top clones of Rebmab200. Antibody-dependent cell-mediated toxicity functionality was confirmed in repeated assays using cancer cell lines derived from ovary, kidney and lung as targets. To explore use of this antibody in clinical trials, GMP production of Rebmab

  4. Rapid profiling of the antigen regions recognized by serum antibodies using massively parallel sequencing of antigen-specific libraries.

    KAUST Repository

    Domina, Maria

    2014-12-04

    There is a need for techniques capable of identifying the antigenic epitopes targeted by polyclonal antibody responses during deliberate or natural immunization. Although successful, traditional phage library screening is laborious and can map only some of the epitopes. To accelerate and improve epitope identification, we have employed massive sequencing of phage-displayed antigen-specific libraries using the Illumina MiSeq platform. This enabled us to precisely identify the regions of a model antigen, the meningococcal NadA virulence factor, targeted by serum antibodies in vaccinated individuals and to rank hundreds of antigenic fragments according to their immunoreactivity. We found that next generation sequencing can significantly empower the analysis of antigen-specific libraries by allowing simultaneous processing of dozens of library/serum combinations in less than two days, including the time required for antibody-mediated library selection. Moreover, compared with traditional plaque picking, the new technology (named Phage-based Representation OF Immuno-Ligand Epitope Repertoire or PROFILER) provides superior resolution in epitope identification. PROFILER seems ideally suited to streamline and guide rational antigen design, adjuvant selection, and quality control of newly produced vaccines. Furthermore, this method is also susceptible to find important applications in other fields covered by traditional quantitative serology.

  5. Designed Amino Acid Feed in Improvement of Production and Quality Targets of a Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkashvand, Fatemeh; Vaziri, Behrouz; Maleknia, Shayan; Heydari, Amir; Vossoughi, Manouchehr; Davami, Fatemeh; Mahboudi, Fereidoun

    2015-01-01

    Cell culture feeds optimization is a critical step in process development of pharmaceutical recombinant protein production. Amino acids are the basic supplements of mammalian cell culture feeds with known effect on their growth promotion and productivity. In this study, we reported the implementation of the Plackett-Burman (PB) multifactorial design to screen the effects of amino acids on the growth promotion and productivity of a Chinese hamster ovary DG-44 (CHO-DG44) cell line producing bevacizumab. After this screening, the amino acid combinations were optimized by the response surface methodology (RSM) to determine the most effective concentration in feeds. Through this strategy, the final monoclonal antibody (mAb) titre was enhanced by 70%, compared to the control group. For this particular cell line, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, arginine and glycine had the highest positive effects on the final mAb titre. Simultaneously, the impact of the designed amino acid feed on some critical quality attributes of bevacizumab was examined in the group with highest productivity. The product was analysed for N-glycan profiles, charge variant distribution, and low molecular weight forms. The results showed that the target product quality has been improved using this feeding strategy. It was shown how this strategy could significantly diminish the time and number of experiments in identifying the most effective amino acids and related concentrations in target product enhancement. This model could be successfully applied to other components of culture media and feeds. PMID:26480023

  6. Designed Amino Acid Feed in Improvement of Production and Quality Targets of a Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Torkashvand

    Full Text Available Cell culture feeds optimization is a critical step in process development of pharmaceutical recombinant protein production. Amino acids are the basic supplements of mammalian cell culture feeds with known effect on their growth promotion and productivity. In this study, we reported the implementation of the Plackett-Burman (PB multifactorial design to screen the effects of amino acids on the growth promotion and productivity of a Chinese hamster ovary DG-44 (CHO-DG44 cell line producing bevacizumab. After this screening, the amino acid combinations were optimized by the response surface methodology (RSM to determine the most effective concentration in feeds. Through this strategy, the final monoclonal antibody (mAb titre was enhanced by 70%, compared to the control group. For this particular cell line, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, arginine and glycine had the highest positive effects on the final mAb titre. Simultaneously, the impact of the designed amino acid feed on some critical quality attributes of bevacizumab was examined in the group with highest productivity. The product was analysed for N-glycan profiles, charge variant distribution, and low molecular weight forms. The results showed that the target product quality has been improved using this feeding strategy. It was shown how this strategy could significantly diminish the time and number of experiments in identifying the most effective amino acids and related concentrations in target product enhancement. This model could be successfully applied to other components of culture media and feeds.

  7. Predicting linear B-cell epitopes using string kernels

    Science.gov (United States)

    EL-Manzalawy, Yasser; Dobbs, Drena; Honavar, Vasant

    2008-01-01

    The identification and characterization of B-cell epitopes play an important role in vaccine design, immunodiagnostic tests, and antibody production. Therefore, computational tools for reliably predicting linear B-cell epitopes are highly desirable. We evaluated Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers trained utilizing five different kernel methods using fivefold cross-validation on a homology-reduced data set of 701 linear B-cell epitopes, extracted from Bcipep database, and 701 non-epitopes, randomly extracted from SwissProt sequences. Based on the results of our computational experiments, we propose BCPred, a novel method for predicting linear B-cell epitopes using the subsequence kernel. We show that the predictive performance of BCPred (AUC = 0.758) outperforms 11 SVM-based classifiers developed and evaluated in our experiments as well as our implementation of AAP (AUC = 0.7), a recently proposed method for predicting linear B-cell epitopes using amino acid pair antigenicity. Furthermore, we compared BCPred with AAP and ABCPred, a method that uses recurrent neural networks, using two data sets of unique B-cell epitopes that had been previously used to evaluate ABCPred. Analysis of the data sets used and the results of this comparison show that conclusions about the relative performance of different B-cell epitope prediction methods drawn on the basis of experiments using data sets of unique B-cell epitopes are likely to yield overly optimistic estimates of performance of evaluated methods. This argues for the use of carefully homology-reduced data sets in comparing B-cell epitope prediction methods to avoid misleading conclusions about how different methods compare to each other. Our homology-reduced data set and implementations of BCPred as well as the APP method are publicly available through our web-based server, BCPREDS, at: http://ailab.cs.iastate.edu/bcpreds/. PMID:18496882

  8. Liver-targeting of interferon-alpha with tissue-specific domain antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Coulstock

    Full Text Available Interferon alpha (IFNα is used for the treatment of hepatitis C infection and whilst efficacious it is associated with multiple adverse events including reduced leukocyte, erythrocyte, and platelet counts, fatigue, and depression. These events are most likely caused by systemic exposure to interferon. We therefore hypothesise that targeting the therapeutic directly to the intended site of action in the liver would reduce exposure in blood and peripheral tissue and hence improve the safety and tolerability of IFNα therapy. We genetically fused IFN to a domain antibody (dAb specific to a hepatocyte restricted antigen, asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR. Our results show that the murine IFNα2 homolog (mIFNα2 fused to an ASGPR specific dAb, termed DOM26h-196-61, could be expressed in mammalian tissue culture systems and retains the desirable biophysical properties and activity of both fusion partners when measured in vitro. Furthermore a clear increase in in vivo targeting of the liver by mIFNα2-ASGPR dAb fusion protein, compared to that observed with either unfused mIFNα2 or mIFNα2 fused to an isotype control dAb VHD2 (which does not bind ASGPR was demonstrated using microSPECT imaging. We suggest that these findings may be applicable in the development of a liver-targeted human IFN molecule with improved safety and patient compliance in comparison to the current standard of care, which could ultimately be used as a treatment for human hepatitis virus infections.

  9. Magnesium wasting associated with epidermal-growth-factor receptor-targeting antibodies in colorectal cancer: a prospective study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tejpar, S.; Piessevaux, H.; Claes, K.; Piront, P.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Verslype, C.; Cutsem, E. van

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preliminary evidence suggests that magnesium wasting occurs in patients who are treated with epidermal-growth-factor receptor (EGFR)-targeting antibodies for colorectal cancer. The mechanism of this side-effect is unknown, and if all or a subset of patients are affected is also unclear.

  10. Photothermal killing of Staphylococcus aureus using antibody-targeted gold nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millenbaugh NJ

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nancy J Millenbaugh,1 Jonathan B Baskin,1 Mauris N DeSilva,1 W Rowe Elliott,1 Randolph D Glickman2 1Maxillofacial Injury and Disease Department, Naval Medical Research Unit San Antonio, Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, TX, USA; 2Department of Ophthalmology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USAPurpose: The continued emergence of multidrug resistant bacterial infections and the decline in discovery of new antibiotics are major challenges for health care throughout the world. This situation has heightened the need for novel antimicrobial therapies as alternatives to traditional antibiotics. The combination of metallic nanoparticles and laser exposure has been proposed as a strategy to induce physical damage to bacteria, regardless of antibiotic sensitivity. The purpose of this study was to test the antibacterial effect of antibody-targeted gold nanoparticles combined with pulsed laser irradiation.Methods: Gold nanoparticles conjugated to antibodies specific to Staphylococcus aureus peptidoglycan were incubated with suspensions of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MRSA and MSSA. Bacterial suspensions were then exposed to 8 ns pulsed laser irradiation at a wavelength of 532 nm and fluences ranging from 1 to 5 J/cm2. Viability of the bacteria following laser exposure was determined using colony forming unit assays. Scanning electron microscopy was used to confirm the binding of nanoparticles to bacteria and the presence of cellular damage.Results: The laser-activated nanoparticle treatment reduced the surviving population to 31% of control in the MSSA population, while the survival in the MRSA population was reduced to 58% of control. Significant decreases in bacterial viability occurred when the laser fluence exceeded 1 J/cm2, and this effect was linear from 0 to 5 J/cm2 (r2=0.97. Significantly less bactericidal effect was observed for nonfunctionalized nanoparticles or

  11. Antibodies targeting dengue virus envelope domain III are not required for serotype-specific protection or prevention of enhancement in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Katherine L.; Wahala, Wahala M.P.B.; Orozco, Susana; de Silva, Aravinda M.; Harris, Eva

    2012-01-01

    The envelope (E) protein of dengue virus (DENV) is composed of three domains (EDI, EDII, EDIII) and is the main target of neutralizing antibodies. Many monoclonal antibodies that bind EDIII strongly neutralize DENV. However in vitro studies indicate that anti-EDIII antibodies contribute little to the neutralizing potency of human DENV-immune serum. In this study, we assess the role of anti-EDIII antibodies in mouse and human DENV-immune serum in neutralizing or enhancing DENV infection in mic...

  12. Direct targeting of cancer cells with antibodies: What can we learn from the successes and failure of unconjugated antibodies for lymphoid neoplasias?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golay, Josée

    2017-12-01

    Following approval in 1997 of the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab for the treatment of B-NHL and CLL, many other unconjugated IgG1 MAbs have been tested in pre-clinical and clinical trials for the treatment of lymphoid neoplasms. Relatively few have been approved however and these are directed against a limited number of target antigens (CD20, CD52, CCR4, CD38, CD319). We review here the known biological properties of these antibodies and discuss which factors may have led to their success or may, on the contrary, limit their clinical application. Common factors of the approved MAbs are that the target antigen is expressed at relatively high levels on the neoplastic targets and their mechanism of action is mostly immune-mediated. Indeed most of these MAbs induce ADCC and phagocytosis by macrophages, and many also activate complement, leading to target cell lysis. In contrast direct cell death induction is not a common feature but may enhance efficacy in some cases. Interestingly, a key factor for the success of several MAbs appears to be their capacity to skew immunity towards an anti-tumour mode, by inhibiting/depleting suppressor cells and/or activating immune cells within the microenvironment, independently of FcγRs. We also expose here some of the strategies employed by industry to expand the clinical use of these molecules beyond their original indication. Interestingly, due to the central role of lymphocytes in the control of the immune response, several of the antibodies are now successfully used to treat many different autoimmune diseases and have also been formally approved for some of these new indications. There is little doubt that this trend will continue and that the precise mechanisms of therapeutic MAbs will be further dissected and better understood in the context of both tumour immunology and autoimmunity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Immunogenicity of novel Dengue virus epitopes identified by bioinformatic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Burgos, Gilma; Ramos-Castañeda, José; Cedillo-Rivera, Roberto; Dumonteil, Eric

    2010-10-01

    We used T cell epitope prediction tools to identify epitopes from Dengue virus polyprotein sequences, and evaluated in vivo and in vitro the immunogenicity and antigenicity of the corresponding synthetic vaccine candidates. Twenty-two epitopes were predicted to have a high affinity for MHC class I (H-2Kd, H-2Dd, H-2Ld alleles) or class II (IAd alleles). These epitopes were conserved between the four virus serotypes, but with no similarity to human and mouse sequences. Thirteen synthetic peptides induced specific antibodies production with or without T cells activation in mice. Three synthetic peptides induced mostly IgG antibodies, and one of these from the E gene induced a neutralizing response. Ten peptides induced a combination of humoral and cellular responses by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Twelve peptides were novel B and T cell epitopes. These results indicate that our bioinformatics strategy is a powerful tool for the identification of novel antigens and its application to human HLA may lead to a potent epitope-based vaccine against Dengue virus and many other pathogens. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Productive common light chain libraries yield diverse panels of high affinity bispecific antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Blarcom, Thomas; Melton, Zea; Cheung, Wai Ling; Wagstrom, Chris; McDonough, Dan; Valle Oseguera, Cendy; Ding, Sheng; Rossi, Andrea; Potluri, Shobha; Sundar, Purnima; Sirota, Marina; Yan, Yu; Jones, Jeffrey; Roe-Zurz, Zygy; Srivatsa Srinivasan, Surabhi; Zhai, Wenwu; Pons, Jaume; Rajpal, Arvind; Chaparro-Riggers, Javier

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT The commercial success of bispecific antibodies generally has been hindered by the complexities associated with generating appropriate molecules for both research scale and large scale manufacturing purposes. Bispecific IgG (BsIgG) based on two antibodies that use an identical common light chain can be combined with a minimal set of Fc mutations to drive heavy chain heterodimerization in order to address these challenges. However, the facile generation of common light chain antibodies with properties similar to traditional monoclonal antibodies has not been demonstrated and they have only been used sparingly. Here, we describe the design of a synthetic human antibody library based on common light chains to generate antibodies with biochemical and biophysical properties that are indistinguishable to traditional therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. We used this library to generate diverse panels of well-behaved, high affinity antibodies toward a variety of epitopes across multiple antigens, including mouse 4-1BB, a therapeutically important T cell costimulatory receptor. Over 200 BsIgG toward 4-1BB were generated using an automated purification method we developed that enables milligram-scale production of BsIgG. This approach allowed us to identify antibodies with a wide range of agonistic activity that are being used to further investigate the therapeutic potential of antibodies targeting one or more epitopes of 4-1BB. PMID:29227213

  15. Epitope mapping from real time kinetic studies–Role of cross-linked ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Real time kinetic studies were used to map conformational epitopes in human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) for two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). The epitopes were identified in the regions (5–14 and 55–62). The association rate constant (+1) was found to be altered by chemical modification of hCG, and the ionic ...

  16. Time-Evolution Contrast of Target MRI Using High-Stability Antibody Functionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles: An Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. W. Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, high-quality antibody functionalized Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles are synthesized. Such physical characterizations as particle morphology, particle size, stability, and relaxivity of magnetic particles are investigated. The immunoreactivity of biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles is examined by utilizing immunomagnetic reduction. The results show that the mean diameter of antibody functionalized magnetic nanoparticles is around 50 nm, and the relaxivity of the magnetic particles is 145 (mM·s−1. In addition to characterizing the magnetic nanoparticles, the feasibility of using the antibody functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for the contrast medium of target magnetic resonance imaging is investigated. These antibody functionalized magnetic nanoparticles are injected into mice bearing with tumor. The tumor magnetic-resonance image becomes darker after the injection and then recovers 50 hours after the injection. The tumor magnetic-resonance image becomes the darkest at around 20 hours after the injection. Thus, the observing time window for the specific labeling of tumors with antibody functionalized magnetic nanoparticles was found to be 20 hours after injecting biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles into mice. The biopsy of tumor is stained after the injection to prove that the long-term darkness of tumor magnetic-resonance image is due to the specific anchoring of antibody functionalized magnetic nanoparticles at tumor.

  17. Antibodies to enterocyte epitopes in celiac disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tučková, Ludmila; Karská, Kamila; Farré, Maria; Rossmann, Pavel; Steiner, L.; Tlaskalová, Helena

    1995-01-01

    Roč. 76, č. 1 (1995), s. 75 ISSN 0090-1229. [International congress of mucosal immunology /8./. San Diego, 17.07.1995-20.07.1995] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/93/1093; GA AV ČR IAA720401 Impact factor: 2.088, year: 1995

  18. Epitope focused immunogens and recombinant antibody ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    In Canada, the project is led by the University of Toronto, in collaboration with Tel Aviv University (Israel), the International Livestock Research Institute (Kenya), the SciGenom Labs (India), and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine (USA). It was selected and approved for funding through the second research competition ...

  19. A xylogalacturonan epitope is specifically associated with plant cell detachment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willats, William George Tycho; McCartney, L.; Steele-King, C.G.

    2004-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (LM8) was generated with specificity for xyloglacturonan (XGA) isolated from pea (Pisum sativum L.) testae. Characterization of the LM8 epitope indicates that it is a region of XGA that is highly substituted with xylose. Immunocytochemical analysis indicates that this epitop...... that is specifically associated with a plant cell separation process that results in complete cell detachment....... is restricted to loosely attached inner parenchyma cells at the inner face of the pea testa and does not occur in other cells of the testa. Elsewhere in the pea seedling, the LM8 epitope was found only in association with root cap cell development at the root apex. Furthermore, the LM8 epitope is specifically...... associated with root cap cells in a range of angiosperm species. In embryogenic carrot suspension cell cultures the epitope is abundant at the surface of cell walls of loosely attached cells in both induced and non-induced cultures. The LM8 epitope is the first cell wall epitope to be identified...

  20. Public epitopes and the antigenic structure of the HLA molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodey, G E; Fuller, T C

    1987-01-01

    private epitopes will be important if epitope-specific immunological probes are use to map specific regions of an MHC molecule. Many investigators are interested in the possibility that some components of HLA alloimmunization are regulated through idiotypic networks. Suciu-Foca and colleagues have provided preliminary evidence that epitope-specific HLA alloantibodies bear dominant idiotypic determinants. Antibodies to these determinants appear during pregnancy, following blood tranfusion, and following renal allograft transplantation, also, the antibodies have been correlated with renal allograft survival.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  1. A Mucin1 C-terminal Subunit-directed Monoclonal Antibody Targets Overexpressed Mucin1 in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guang; Kim, Dongbum; Kim, Jung Nam; Park, Sangkyu; Maharjan, Sony; Koh, Heeju; Moon, Kyungduk; Lee, Younghee; Kwon, Hyung-Joo

    2018-01-01

    Background: Mucin1 (MUC1) is a highly glycosylated transmembrane protein that has gained attention because of its overexpression in various cancers. However, MUC1-targeted therapeutic antibodies have not yet been approved for cancer therapy. MUC1 is cleaved to two subunits, MUC1-N and MCU1-C. MUC1-N is released from the cell surface, making MUC1-C a more reasonable target for cancer therapy. Therefore, we produced a monoclonal antibody (anti-hMUC1) specific to the extracellular region of MUC1-C and evaluated its effects in vitro and in vivo . Methods : We produced a monoclonal antibody (anti-hMUC1) using a purified recombinant human MUC1 polypeptide and our novel immunization protocol. The reactivity of anti-hMUC1 was characterized by ELISA, western blotting and immunoprecipitation analyses. The localization of the antibody in the breast cancer cells after binding was determined by confocal image analysis. The effects of the antibody on the growth of cells were also investigated. We injected anti-hMUC1 and performed in vivo tracing analysis in xenograft mouse models. In addition, expression of MUC1 in tissue sections from patients with breast cancer was assessed by immunohistochemistry with anti-hMUC1. Results : The anti-hMUC1 antibody recognized recombinant MUC1 as well as native MUC1-C protein in breast cancer cells. Anti-hMUC1 binds to the membrane surface of cells that express MUC1 and is internalized in some cancer cell lines. Treatment with anti-hMUC1 significantly reduced proliferation of cells in which anti-hMUC1 antibody is internalized. Furthermore, the anti-hMUC1 antibody was specifically localized in the MUC1-expressing breast cancer cell-derived tumors in xenograft mouse models. Based on immunohistochemistry analysis, we detected significantly higher expression of MUC1 in cancer tissues than in normal control tissues. Conclusion : Our results reveal that the anti-hMUC1 antibody targets the extracellular region of MUC1-C subunit and may have utility in

  2. In vivo mapping of a protective linear neutralizing epitope at the N-terminus of alpha hemolysin from Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oscherwitz, Jon; Muñoz-Planillo, Raul; Yu, Fen; Núñez, Gabriel; Cease, Kemp B

    2014-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is responsible for a large and diverse burden of human disease associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The dynamic challenge of this pathogen is exemplified by the emergence of highly virulent community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus strain USA300, which threatens both healthy and vulnerable individuals and constitutes a public health imperative in the United States. Though S. aureus employs many virulence factors that enable infectivity and evasion of host defenses, evidence suggests that the increased production of alpha hemolysin may be a critical contributor to the increased virulence of USA300. To enable and inform immunological targeting of alpha hemolysin, we sought to precisely map a neutralizing epitope that we hypothesized existed in the N-terminal domain. Using an in vivo mapping strategy employing peptide immunogens and an optimized in vitro toxin neutralization assay, we identified a linear neutralizing determinant in the N-terminal 19 amino acids of alpha hemolysin. Affinity purified rabbit antibody against this neutralizing epitope was shown to be highly effective at mitigating dermonecrosis in inbred and outbred mice challenged with USA300. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a linear neutralizing epitope in alpha hemolysin, and the delineation of this determinant should inform and facilitate the rational design and development of an efficacious, epitope-focused or multivalent vaccine against S. aureus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effective Depletion of Pre-existing Anti-AAV Antibodies Requires Broad Immune Targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria M. Velazquez

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Pre-existing antibodies (Abs to AAV pose a critical challenge for the translation of gene therapies. No effective approach is available to overcome pre-existing Abs. Given the complexity of Ab production, overcoming pre-existing Abs will require broad immune targeting. We generated a mouse model of pre-existing AAV9 Abs to test multiple immunosuppressants, including bortezomib, rapamycin, and prednisolone, individually or in combination. We identified an effective approach combining rapamycin and prednisolone, reducing serum AAV9 Abs by 70%–80% at 4 weeks and 85%–93% at 8 weeks of treatment. The rapamycin plus prednisolone treatment resulted in significant decreases in the frequency of B cells, plasma cells, and IgG-secreting and AAV9-specific Ab-producing plasma cells in bone marrow. The rapamycin plus prednisolone treatment also significantly reduced frequencies of IgD−IgG+ class-switched/FAS+CL7+ germinal center B cells, and of activated CD4+ T cells expressing PD1 and GL7, in spleen. These data suggest that rapamycin plus prednisolone has selective inhibitory effects on both T helper type 2 support of B cell activation in spleen and on bone marrow plasma cell survival, leading to effective AAV9 Abs depletion. This promising immunomodulation approach is highly translatable, and it poses minimal risk in the context of therapeutic benefits promised by gene therapy for severe monogenetic diseases, with a single or possibly a few treatments over a lifetime.

  4. An intracellular targeted antibody detects EGFR as an independent prognostic factor in ovarian carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noske, Aurelia; Denkert, Carsten; Schwabe, Michael; Weichert, Wilko; Darb-Esfahani, Silvia; Buckendahl, Ann-Christin; Sehouli, Jalid; Braicu, Elena I; Budczies, Jan; Dietel, Manfred

    2011-01-01

    In ovarian cancer, the reported rate of EGFR expression varies between 4-70% depending on assessment method and data on patient outcome are conflicting. Methods: In this study we investigated EGFR expression and its prognostic value in a cohort of 121 invasive ovarian carcinomas, using a novel antibody against the intracellular domain of the receptor. We further evaluated an association between EGFR, the nuclear transporter CRM1 as well as COX-2. Furthermore, we evaluated EGFR expression in ten ovarian cancer cell lines and incubated cancer cells with Leptomycin B, a CRM1 specific inhibitor. We observed a membranous and cytoplasmic EGFR expression in 36.4% and 64% of ovarian carcinomas, respectively. Membranous EGFR was an independent prognostic factor for poor overall survival in ovarian cancer patients (HR 2.7, CI 1.1-6.4, p = 0.02) which was also found in the serous subtype (HR 4.6, CI 1.6-13.4, p = 0.004). We further observed a significant association of EGFR with COX-2 and nuclear CRM1 expression (chi-square test for trends, p = 0.006 and p = 0.013, respectively). In addition, combined membranous EGFR/COX-2 expression was significantly related to unfavorable overall survival (HR 7.2, CI 2.3-22.1, p = 0.001). In cell culture, we observed a suppression of EGFR protein levels after exposure to Leptomycin B in OVCAR-3 and SKOV-3 cells. Our results suggest that the EGFR/COX-2/CRM1 interaction might be involved in progression of ovarian cancer and patient prognosis. Hence, it is an interesting anti-cancer target for a combination therapy. Further studies will also be needed to investigate whether EGFR is also predictive for benefit from EGFR targeted therapies

  5. Murine CR1/2 targeted antigenized single-chain antibody fragments induce transient low affinity antibodies and negatively influence an ongoing immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prechl, József; Molnár, Eszter; Szekeres, Zsuzsanna; Isaák, Andrea; Papp, Krisztián; Balogh, Péter; Erdei, Anna

    2007-01-01

    We have generated a single-chain antibody which recognizes murine CR1/2 and carries a genetically fused influenza hemagglutinin derived peptide. Theoretically such a construct is able to crosslink the B cell antigen receptor and CR1/2 on peptide specific B cells. The construct was able to reach its CR1/2 positive target cells, yet intraperitoneal delivery of the construct elicited an IgM response only slightly exceeding that induced by the free peptide. Providing T cell help by the injection of peptide specific lymphocytes did not alter the response in essence, that is anti-peptide IgG was not detectable even after booster immunizations. When used as a booster vaccine following injection of the peptide in adjuvant, the construct even inhibited the development of IgG1 and IgG3 anti-peptide antibodies. These data indicate that although targeting of antigen to CR1/2 on B cells can enhance transient proliferation or differentiation of antigen specific B cells it cannot induce strong, longlasting humoral immune responses. Furthermore, CR1/2 targeting constructs may negatively influence an ongoing immune reaction.

  6. A Supercluster of Neutralizing Epitopes at the Interface of Ricin’s Enzymatic (RTA and Binding (RTB Subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Y. Poon

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available As part of an effort to engineer ricin antitoxins and immunotherapies, we previously produced and characterized a collection of phage-displayed, heavy chain-only antibodies (VHHs from alpacas that had been immunized with ricin antigens. In our initial screens, we identified nine VHHs directed against ricin toxin’s binding subunit (RTB, but only one, JIZ-B7, had toxin-neutralizing activity. Linking JIZ-B7 to different VHHs against ricin’s enzymatic subunit (RTA resulted in several bispecific antibodies with potent toxin-neutralizing activity in vitro and in vivo. JIZ-B7 may therefore be an integral component of a future VHH-based neutralizing agent (VNA for ricin toxin. In this study, we now localize, using competitive ELISA, JIZ-B7’s epitope to a region of RTB’s domain 2 sandwiched between the high-affinity galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine (Gal/GalNAc-binding site and the boundary of a neutralizing hotspot on RTA known as cluster II. Analysis of additional RTB (n = 8- and holotoxin (n = 4-specific VHHs from a recent series of screens identified a “supercluster” of neutralizing epitopes at the RTA-RTB interface. Among the VHHs tested, toxin-neutralizing activity was most closely associated with epitope proximity to RTA, and not interference with RTB’s ability to engage Gal/GalNAc receptors. We conclude that JIZ-B7 is representative of a larger group of potent toxin-neutralizing antibodies, possibly including many described in the literature dating back several decades, that recognize tertiary and possibly quaternary epitopes located at the RTA-RTB interface and that target a region of vulnerability on ricin toxin.

  7. Biomeasures and mechanistic modeling highlight PK/PD risks for a monoclonal antibody targeting Fn14 in kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoying; Farrokhi, Vahid; Singh, Pratap; Ocana, Mireia Fernandez; Patel, Jenil; Lin, Lih-Ling; Neubert, Hendrik; Brodfuehrer, Joanne

    2018-01-01

    Discovery of the upregulation of fibroblast growth factor-inducible-14 (Fn14) receptor following tissue injury has prompted investigation into biotherapeutic targeting of the Fn14 receptor for the treatment of conditions such as chronic kidney diseases. In the development of monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics, there is an incr