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Sample records for antibodies promising experimental

  1. Single domain antibodies: promising experimental and therapeutic tools in infection and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesolowski, Janusz; Alzogaray, Vanina; Reyelt, Jan; Unger, Mandy; Juarez, Karla; Urrutia, Mariela; Cauerhff, Ana; Danquah, Welbeck; Rissiek, Björn; Scheuplein, Felix; Schwarz, Nicole; Adriouch, Sahil; Boyer, Olivier; Seman, Michel; Licea, Alexei; Serreze, David V; Goldbaum, Fernando A; Haag, Friedrich; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich

    2009-08-01

    Antibodies are important tools for experimental research and medical applications. Most antibodies are composed of two heavy and two light chains. Both chains contribute to the antigen-binding site which is usually flat or concave. In addition to these conventional antibodies, llamas, other camelids, and sharks also produce antibodies composed only of heavy chains. The antigen-binding site of these unusual heavy chain antibodies (hcAbs) is formed only by a single domain, designated VHH in camelid hcAbs and VNAR in shark hcAbs. VHH and VNAR are easily produced as recombinant proteins, designated single domain antibodies (sdAbs) or nanobodies. The CDR3 region of these sdAbs possesses the extraordinary capacity to form long fingerlike extensions that can extend into cavities on antigens, e.g., the active site crevice of enzymes. Other advantageous features of nanobodies include their small size, high solubility, thermal stability, refolding capacity, and good tissue penetration in vivo. Here we review the results of several recent proof-of-principle studies that open the exciting perspective of using sdAbs for modulating immune functions and for targeting toxins and microbes.

  2. Monomeric CH3: A Small, Stable Antibody Domain with Therapeutic Promise | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer Antibody domains are emerging as promising biopharmaceuticals because of their relatively small size compared to full-sized antibodies, which are too large to effectively penetrate tumors and bind to sterically restricted therapeutic targets. In an article published in The Journal of Biological Chemistry, Tianlei Ying, Ph.D., Dimiter Dimitrov, Ph.D., and their colleagues in the Protein Interactions Group, Cancer and Inflammation Program, Center for Cancer Research, reported their design of a novel antibody domain, monomeric CH3 (mCH3).

  3. Promises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    AT dusk, I switched on my radio. What I heard was a special call-in program entitled "New Air of the City," on a local music channel; the two silver-tongued hosts were discussing the topic of promises. A young woman with a soft voice managed to get through first. She said that she had been in love for many years. She and her fiance often went to the banks of the Yangtze River in their spare time, lifting stones to look for small crabs, as tiny as fingernails. They liked to raise the crabs in a glass bowl. But one day, there were few stones by the river; they searched for a long time, but found nothing. An old man who was catching fish told them that it was difficult to find those crabs on the bank. Then he took several crabs out of his

  4. Antibody response to Hepatozoon canis in experimentally infected dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baneth, G; Shkap, V; Samish, M; Pipano, E; Savitsky, I

    1998-01-31

    Canine hepatozoonosis is a disease caused by the tick-borne protozoan Hepatozoon canis. Five puppies were inoculated by ingestion of Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks experimentally infected with H. canis, and all became infected with H. canis: gametocytes were detected in blood smears from four dogs and schizonts were observed in the spleen and bone marrow of the fifth. Antibodies reactive with H. canis gametocytes were detected by the indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFA), with IgM detected initially in all dogs 16 to 39 days post infection (PI) and IgG 22 to 43 days PI. The presence of gametocytes was first observed within peripheral blood neutrophils in Giemsa-stained blood smears between days 28 and 43 PI. Gametocyte-reactive antibodies were detected before the appearance of blood gametocytes in three of the four parasitemic dogs and also in a dog with no observed parasitemia. The detection of serum antibodies prior to the detection of blood gametocytes, or without apparent parasitemia, suggests that antibodies reactive with gametocytes may be formed against earlier forms of the parasite developing in the parenchymal tissues. Sera of dogs experimentally infected with Babesia canis, Babesia gibsoni and Ehrlichia canis exhibited no reactivity when tested with H. canis antigen. Additionally, sera positive for H. canis were not reactive with antigens of Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum, Leishmania donovani and E. canis. In conclusion, incoculation of dogs with ticks infected with H. canis results in production of antibodies reactive with peripheral blood gametocytes. Detection of IgG titres would be beneficial for the diagnosis of progressive infections with undetectable parasitemia, for seroprevalence studies, and as an adjunct to IgM titres in early infections.

  5. Prostate-specific RNA aptamer: promising nucleic acid antibody-like cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangoni, Karina; Neves, Adriana F; Rocha, Rafael M; Faria, Paulo R; Alves, Patrícia T; Souza, Aline G; Fujimura, Patrícia T; Santos, Fabiana A A; Araújo, Thaise G; Ward, Laura S; Goulart, Luiz R

    2015-07-15

    We described the selection of a novel nucleic acid antibody-like prostate cancer (PCa) that specifically binds to the single-stranded DNA molecule from a 277-nt fragment that may have been partially paired and bound to the PCA3 RNA conformational structure. PCA3-277 aptamer ligands were obtained, and the best binding molecule, named CG3, was synthesized for validation. Aiming to prove its diagnostic utility, we used an apta-qPCR assay with CG3-aptamer conjugated to magnetic beads to capture PCA3 transcripts, which were amplified 97-fold and 7-fold higher than conventional qPCR in blood and tissue, respectively. Histopathologic analysis of 161 prostate biopsies arranged in a TMA and marked with biotin-labeled CG3-aptamer showed moderate staining in both cytoplasm and nucleus of PCa samples; in contrast, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) samples presented strong nuclear staining (78% of the cases). No staining was observed in stromal cells. In addition, using an apta-qPCR, we demonstrated that CG3-aptamer specifically recognizes the conformational PCA3-277 molecule and at least three other transcript variants, indicating that long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) is processed after transcription. We suggest that CG3-aptamer may be a useful PCa diagnostic tool. In addition, this molecule may be used in drug design and drug delivery for PCa therapy.

  6. Sclerostin antibody stimulates bone regeneration after experimental periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taut, Andrei D; Jin, Qiming; Chung, Jong-Hyuk; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Yi, Erica S; Sugai, James V; Ke, Hua Z; Liu, Min; Giannobile, William V

    2013-11-01

    The reconstruction of large osseous defects due to periodontitis is a challenge in regenerative therapy. Sclerostin, secreted by osteocytes, is a key physiological inhibitor of osteogenesis. Pharmacologic inhibition of sclerostin using sclerostin-neutralizing monoclonal antibody (Scl-Ab) thus increases bone formation, bone mass and bone strength in models of osteopenia and fracture repair. This study assessed the therapeutic potential of Scl-Ab to stimulate alveolar bone regeneration following experimental periodontitis (EP). Ligature-induced EP was induced in rats to generate localized alveolar bone defects. Following 4 weeks of disease induction, Scl-Ab (+EP) or vehicle (+/- EP) were systemically delivered, twice weekly for up to 6 wks to determine the ability of Scl-Ab to regenerate bone around tooth-supporting osseous defects. 3 and 6 wks after the initiation of Scl-Ab or vehicle treatment, femur and maxillary jawbones were harvested for histology, histomorphometry, and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) of linear alveolar bone loss (ABL) and volumetric measures of bone support, including bone volume fraction (BVF) and tissue mineral density (TMD). Serum was analyzed to examine bone turnover markers during disease and regenerative therapy. Vehicle + EP animals exhibited maxillary bone loss (BVF, TMD and ABL) at ligature removal and thereafter. 6 weeks of Scl-Ab significantly improved maxillary bone healing, as measured by BVF, TMD and ABL, when compared to vehicle + EP. After 6 weeks of treatment, BVF and TMD values in the Scl-Ab + EP group were similar to those of healthy controls. Serum analysis demonstrated higher levels of bone formation markers osteocalcin and PINP in Scl-Ab treatment groups. Scl-Ab restored alveolar bone mass following experimental periodontitis. These findings warrant further exploration of Scl-Ab therapy in this and other oral bone defect disease scenarios.

  7. Design of high-pressure direct contact heater for promising power supply units: Experimental substantiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somova, E. V.; Shvarts, A. L.; Turkin, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    The results of experimental studies of superheated steam condensation on feed water jets in a highpressure, direct-contact heat exchanger are presented. Direct contact feed water heater (DCFWH) can be used in a dual-flow diagram of a steam-power unit with ultrasupercritical steam parameters (35 MPa, 700/720°C). The direct contact feed water heater is included in the flow diagram of the II circuit in a promising power unit; it provides feed water heating to 340°C in all maintenance and emergency operation modes of the unit. The reliability of the high-pressure direct contact heater operation in this flow diagram is of major importance in relation to the danger of lead solidification in the tube space of the steam generator. Technical requirements to the design of the high-pressure direct contact heater for increasing the heat exchange efficiency are formulated based on the results of earlier studies with steam-water mixture as the heating medium. The results of studies of superheated steam condensation on jets presented in this study testify that feed water is additionally heated to the required temperature at the output of the installation. The influence of initial feed water parameters (outflow velocity and temperature) on the jet heating length is elucidated. The numerical approximation of the experimental data for determination of the jet heating length in the nominal and partial power unit loads is obtained. The results of the calculations are used to simplify the design of the water-supplying element for the direct contact feed water heater. The proposed design of direct contact feed water heater is characterized by simplicity and low metal intensity, which provides the installation reliability at the considered pressure level due to the minimum number of structural elements.

  8. The antibody response to methyl isocyanate: experimental and clinical findings.

    OpenAIRE

    Karol, M H; Taskar, S; Gangal, S.; Rubanoff, B F; Kamat, S. R.

    1987-01-01

    As a result of the industrial accident in Bhopal, India (December 1984) in which thousands of people were exposed to methyl isocyanate (MIC), concern was raised for possible long-term health effects. The well-recognized immunologic consequences of exposure to other industrial isocyanates prompted investigation of an antibody response to MIC. Using procedures which had been developed in this laboratory to evaluate isocyanate immunotoxicity, animal studies were undertaken to develop and test re...

  9. Amphiregulin Antibody and Reduction of Axial Elongation in Experimental Myopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Jun Jiang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available To examine the mechanism of ocular axial elongation in myopia, guinea pigs (age: 2–3 weeks which either underwent unilateral or bilateral lens-induced myopization (group 1 or which were primarily myopic at baseline (group 2 received unilateral intraocular injections of amphiregulin antibody (doses: 5, 10, or 15 μg three times in intervals of 9 days. A third group of emmetropic guinea pigs got intraocular unilateral injections of amphiregulin (doses: 0.25, 0.50 or 1.00 ng, respectively. In each group, the contralateral eyes received intraocular injections of Ringer's solution. In intra-animal inter-eye comparison and intra-eye follow-up comparison in groups 1 and 2, the study eyes as compared to the contralateral eyes showed a dose-dependent reduction in axial elongation. In group 3, study eyes and control eyes did not differ significantly in axial elongation. Immunohistochemistry revealed amphiregulin labelling at the retinal pigment epithelium in eyes with lens-induced myopization and Ringer's solution injection, but not in eyes with amphiregulin antibody injection. Intraocular injections of amphiregulin-antibody led to a reduction of lens-induced axial myopic elongation and of the physiological eye enlargement in young guinea pigs. In contrast, intraocularly injected amphiregulin in a dose of ≤1 ng did not show a significant effect. Amphiregulin may be one of several essential molecular factors for axial elongation.

  10. Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  11. Detection of experimental pulmonary emboli using radiolabeled monoclonal antiplatelet antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Tomiyoshi (Fukushima Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1988-12-01

    This study compared the ability of radiolabeled anti-platelet antibody (7E3) and Tc-99m macroaggregated albumin (MAA) to detect pulmonary emboli induced by thrombin and barium or by thrombogenic copper coils in mongrel dogs. In-111 diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid-7E3-F (ab'){sub 2} was incubated with platelet-rich plasma before i.v. administration to minimize unbound antibody. Serial planar images were obtained over a 4-5 hour, followed by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. Similarly, planar and SPECT images were obtained after i.v. injection of Tc-99m MAA. The animals were autopsied for the confirmation of embolus localization. A total of 34 emboli were recovered. When the In-111 or Tc-99m activity for the lung distal to an embolus was {le}10% of the normal lung one, an occlusive embolus was regarded as present. Eighteen emboli were considered occlusive and the 16 others non-occlusive. In-111 antibody imaging revealed: 14 emboli (41%)--6 occlusive and 8 non-occlusive emboli--by planar study and 22 emboli (65%)--13 occlusive and 9 non-occlusive-- by SPECT study. In detecting occlusive emboli, SPECT was significantly superior to planar imaging with In-111. Conventional lung perfusion imaging with Tc-99m MAA, whether by planar or SPECT study, revealed 18 emboli (53%), consisting of 11 occlusive and 7 non-occlusive emboli. It is concluded that SPECT with In-111 platelets is equivalent or sometimes superior to lung perfusion imaging with Tc-99m MAA, especially in detecting non-occlusive emboli.

  12. The Effect of CD3-Specific Monoclonal Antibody on Treating Experimental Autoimmune Myasthenia Gravis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruonan Xu; Jianan Wang; Guojiang Chen; Gencheng Han; Renxi Wang; Beffen Shen; Yan Li

    2005-01-01

    CD3-specific monoclonal antibody was the first one used for clinical practice in field of transplantation. Recently,renewed interests have elicited in its capacity to prevent autoimmune diabetes by inducing immune tolerance. In this study, we tested whether this antibody can also be used to treat another kind of autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis (MG) and explored the possible mechanisms. MG is caused by an autoimmune damage mediated by antibody- and complement-mediated destruction of AChR at the neuromuscular junction. We found that administration of CD3-specific antibody (Fab)2 to an animal model with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) (B6 mice received 3 times of AChR/CFA immunization) could not significantly improve the clinical signs and clinical score. When the possible mechanisms were tested, we found that CD3 antibody treatment slightly down-regulated the T-cell response to AChR, modestly up-regulation the muscle strength. And no significant difference in the titers of IgG2b was found between CD3 antibody treated and control groups. These data indicated that CD3-specific antibody was not suitable for treating MG, an antibody- and complementmediated autoimmune disease, after this disease has been established. The role of CD3-specific antibody in treating this kind of disease remains to be determined.

  13. ROLE OF IL-6 IN EXPERIMENTAL ARTHRITIS CAUSED BY TRANSFER OF ARTHRITOGENIC ANTIBODIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Drutskaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-6 (IL-6 exerts important functions on immune regulation. In case of high expression, IL-6 may promote autoimmune disorders, e.g., arthritis. Systemic IL-6 blockers based on monoclonal antibodies against IL-6, or its specific receptor subunit, are already used in clinical settings, adding to a range of known biological drugs, such as, TNF blockers. Rheumatic disorders and their experimental therapy are reproducible in mice. This study revealed systemically increased levels of IL-6 in developing arthritis caused by transfer of pathogenic antibodies, as well as the effects of IL-6 neutralization by monoclonal antibodies against murine IL-6. Our results suggest a pathogenic role of the two cytokines, TNF and IL-6, in experimental arthritis induced by passive transfer of anti-collagen antibodies.

  14. Experimental prestorage filtration removes antibodies and decreases lipids in RBC supernatants mitigating TRALI in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silliman, Christopher C; Kelher, Marguerite R; Khan, Samina Y; LaSarre, Monica; West, F Bernadette; Land, Kevin J; Mish, Barbara; Ceriano, Linda; Sowemimo-Coker, Samuel

    2014-05-29

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) remains a significant cause of transfusion-related mortality with red cell transfusion. We hypothesize that prestorage filtration may reduce proinflammatory activity in the red blood cell (RBC) supernatant and prevent TRALI. Filters were manufactured for both small volumes and RBC units. Plasma containing antibodies to human lymphocyte antigen (HLA)-A2 or human neutrophil antigen (HNA)-3a was filtered, and immunoglobulins and specific HNA-3a and HLA-2a neutrophil (PMN) priming activity were measured. Antibodies to OX27 were added to plasma, and filtration was evaluated in a 2-event animal model of TRALI. RBC units from 31 donors known to have antibodies against HLA antigens and from 16 antibody-negative controls were filtered. Furthermore, 4 RBC units were drawn and underwent standard leukoreduction. Immunoglobulins, HLA antibodies, PMN priming activity, and the ability to induce TRALI in an animal model were measured. Small-volume filtration of plasma removed >96% of IgG, antibodies to HLA-A2 and HNA-3a, and their respective priming activity, as well as mitigating antibody-mediated in vivo TRALI. In RBC units, experimental filtration removed antibodies to HLA antigens and inhibited the accumulation of lipid priming activity and lipid-mediated TRALI. We conclude that filtration removes proinflammatory activity and the ability to induce TRALI from RBCs and may represent a TRALI mitigation step.

  15. Experimental studies of low salinity water flooding in carbonate reservoirs: A new promising approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahid, Adeel; Shapiro, Alexander; Skauge, Arne

    2012-01-01

    additional oil recovery can be achieved when successively flooding composite carbonate core plugs with various diluted versions of seawater. The experimental data on carbonates is very limited, so more data and better understanding of the mechanisms involved is needed to utilize this method for carbonate...... reservoirs. In this paper, we have experimentally investigated the oil recovery potential of low salinity water flooding for carbonate rocks. We used both reservoir carbonate and outcrop chalk core plugs. The flooding experiments were carried out initially with the seawater, and afterwards additional oil...... of experimental results, discussions are made about possible mechanisms for improving oil recovery in carbonate reservoir as a function of change in brine salinity. Copyright 2012, Society of Petroleum Engineers....

  16. Antibody administration in experimental influenza increases survival and enhances the effect of oseltamivir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pourroy, Brit Naldahl Jessen; Kolmos, Hans Jørn; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2012-01-01

    and treatment of a number of infectious diseases. In this experimental study anti-influenza antibodies were passively administrated to mice, subsequently they were infected with influenza virus and treated with oseltamivir. The aim was to investigate, if anti-influenza antibodies influenced the out come...... of oseltamivir treatment and development of resistance towards oseltamivir. We show, that oseltamivir alone was not able to effectively prevent a fatal outcome, but that oseltamivir administered together with a limited amount of antibodies, resulted in improvement of the clinical condition of the mice....... The results also showed that a higher dosage of antibodies alone were able to protect the mice from a lethal dose of virus. These findings suggest that the effectiveness of oseltamivir depends on the host’s immune response to the influenza virus, and that that passive immunization is an option that should...

  17. Sensory perception in cetaceans: Part II – Promising experimental approaches to study chemoreception in dolphins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothee eKremers

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemosensory perception in cetaceans remains an intriguing issue as morphological, neuroanatomical and genetic studies draw unclear conclusions, while behavioral data suggest that dolphins may use it for food selection or socio-sexual interactions. Experimental approaches have been scarce due to the practical difficulties of testing chemoreception in wild dolphins. Go/no-go tasks are one elegant way to investigate discrimination abilities; however, they require to train the animals, thus preventing spontaneous responses and hence the expression of preferences. Here, we aimed at testing potential spontaneous responses to chemical stimuli and developed novel procedures. First, we conducted a study to test whether captive dolphins respond to a biologically relevant smell. Therefore, we placed dead fish within an opaque barrel at the border of the pool and counted the number of respirations at proximity as an indicator of investigation. The same dead fishes were presented several times during experiments lasting three consecutive days. From the second day on (i.e. when the odor composition changed, dolphins breathed more often close to the fish-smelling barrel than close to the visually identical but empty control barrel. Second, we conducted a study to test whether dolphins are able to discriminate food flavors. Captive dolphins are commonly provided with ice cubes as a source of enrichment. We took this opportunity to provide ice cubes with different flavors and to compare the reaction to these different flavors as a measure of discrimination. Hence, we used the latency of return to the ice cube begging spot as a measure of discrimination from the previous ice cube flavor. Thus, our method used a non-invasive and easily replicable technique based on the spontaneous begging responses of dolphins toward more or less attractive items bearing biological relevance. The procedures used enabled us to show that dolphins may discriminate odors and flavors

  18. Prevalence of Neospora caninum and Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in coyotes (Canis latrans) and experimental infections of coyotes with Neospora caninum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, D S; Kelly, E J; McKown, R D; Stein, F J; Plozer, J; Herman, J; Blagburn, B L; Dubey, J P

    1996-08-01

    Antibodies to Neospora caninum were detected in 5 (10%) of 52 coyotes from Texas. Antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii were detected in 32 (62%) of 52 samples from these same coyotes. Four (80%) of the 5 coyotes that were seropositive for N. caninum also had antibodies to T. gondii. Nineteen (37%) of the coyotes did not have antibodies to either parasite. Three coyote pups were inoculated with the brains from mice infected with 3 strains of N. caninum originally isolated from dogs. None of the pups developed neosporosis or excreted N. caninum oocysts in their feces. The pups developed anti-N. caninum antibody titers of > or = 1:800 but did not develop antibodies to T. gondii. Results of this study indicate that antibodies to T. gondii are more common than antibodies to N. caninum in coyotes. Additionally, young coyotes appear to be resistant to experimental N. caninum infection.

  19. Antibody Profiling in Naive and Semi-immune Individuals Experimentally Challenged with Plasmodium vivax Sporozoites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Arévalo-Herrera

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Acquisition of malaria immunity in low transmission areas usually occurs after relatively few exposures to the parasite. A recent Plasmodium vivax experimental challenge trial in malaria naïve and semi-immune volunteers from Colombia showed that all naïve individuals developed malaria symptoms, whereas semi-immune subjects were asymptomatic or displayed attenuated symptoms. Sera from these individuals were analyzed by protein microarray to identify antibodies associated with clinical protection.Serum samples from naïve (n = 7 and semi-immune (n = 9 volunteers exposed to P. vivax sporozoite-infected mosquito bites were probed against a custom protein microarray displaying 515 P. vivax antigens. The array revealed higher serological responses in semi-immune individuals before the challenge, although malaria naïve individuals also had pre-existing antibodies, which were higher in Colombians than US adults (control group. In both experimental groups the response to the P. vivax challenge peaked at day 45 and returned to near baseline at day 145. Additional analysis indicated that semi-immune volunteers without fever displayed a lower response to the challenge, but recognized new antigens afterwards.Clinical protection against experimental challenge in volunteers with previous P. vivax exposure was associated with elevated pre-existing antibodies, an attenuated serological response to the challenge and reactivity to new antigens.

  20. LINGO-1 antibody ameliorates myelin impairment and spatial memory deficits in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jun-Jun; Ren, Qing-Guo; Xu, Lin; Zhang, Zhi-Jun

    2015-09-18

    More than 50% of multiple sclerosis patients develop cognitive impairment. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear, and there is no effective treatment. LINGO-1 (LRR and Ig domain containing NOGO receptor interacting protein 1) has been identified as an inhibitor of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. Using the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model, we assessed cognitive function at early and late stages of EAE, determined brain expression of myelin basic protein (MBP) and investigated whether the LINGO-1 antibody could restore deficits in learning and memory and ameliorate any loss of MBP. We found that deficits in learning and memory occurred in late EAE and identified decreased expression of MBP in the parahippocampal cortex (PHC) and fimbria-fornix. Moreover, the LINGO-1 antibody significantly improved learning and memory in EAE and partially restored MBP in PHC. Furthermore, the LINGO-1 antibody activated the AKT/mTOR signaling pathway regulating myelin growth. Our results suggest that demyelination in the PHC and fimbria-fornix might contribute to cognitive deficits and the LINGO-1 antibody could ameliorate these deficits by promoting myelin growth in the PHC. Our research demonstrates that LINGO-1 antagonism may be an effective approach to the treatment of the cognitive impairment of multiple sclerosis patients.

  1. Anti-fibrin antibody binding in valvular vegetations and kidney lesions during experimental endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, M; Basi, D L; Herzberg, M C; Meyer, M W

    2001-01-01

    In Streptococcus sanguinis (sanguis) induced experimental endocarditis, we sought evidence that the development of aortic valvular vegetation depends on the availability of fibrin. Endocarditis was induced in New Zealand white rabbits by catheter placement into the left ventricle and inoculation of the bacteria. Fibrin was localized in the developing vegetation with 99mTechnetium (Tc)-labeled anti-fibrin antibody one or three days later. When rabbit anti-fibrin antibody was given intravenously on day 1, the mass of aortic valvular vegetation was significantly reduced at day 3; infusion of non-specific rabbit IgG showed no effect. The 99mTc-labeled anti-fibrin antibody also labeled kidneys that showed macroscopic subcapsular hemorrhage. To learn if the deposition of fibrin in the kidneys was a consequence of endocarditis required a comparison of farm-bred and specific pathogen-free rabbits before and after the induction of endocarditis. Before induction, the kidneys of farm-bred rabbits were labeled, but specific pathogen-free rabbits were free of labeling and signs of macroscopic hemorrhage. After 3 days of endocarditis, kidneys of 10 of 14 specific pathogen-free rabbits labeled with 99mTc-labeled anti-fibrin antibody and showed hemorrhage. Kidney lesions were suggested to be a frequent sequellae of S. sanguinis infective endocarditis. For the first time, fibrin was shown to be required for the continued development of aortic valvular vegetations.

  2. Pharmacokinetics of indium-111-labeled antimyosin monoclonal antibody in murine experimental viral myocarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, T.; Matsumori, A.; Watanabe, Y.; Tamaki, N.; Yonekura, Y.; Endo, K.; Konishi, J.; Kawai, C. (Kyoto Univ. (Japan))

    1990-11-01

    The pharmacokinetics of indium-111-labeled antimyosin monoclonal antibody Fab were investigated with use of murine experimental viral myocarditis as a model. The biodistribution of indium-111-labeled antimyosin antibody Fab on days 3, 5, 7, 14, 21 and 28 after encephalomyocarditis virus inoculation demonstrated that myocardial uptake increased significantly on days 5, 7 and 14 (maximum on day 7) in infected versus uninfected mice (p less than 0.001). In vivo kinetics in infected mice on day 7 demonstrated that the heart to blood ratio reached a maximum 48 h after the intravenous administration of indium-111-labeled antimyosin Fab, which was considered to be the optimal time for scintigraphy. The scintigraphic images obtained with indium-111-labeled antimyosin Fab demonstrated positive uptake in the cardiac lesion in infected mice. The pathologic study demonstrated that myocardial uptake correlated well with pathologic grades of myocardial necrosis. High performance liquid chromatography revealed the presence of an antigen-antibody complex in the circulation of infected mice after the injection of indium-111-labeled antimyosin Fab. This antigen bound to indium-111-labeled antimyosin Fab in the circulation might be whole myosin and this complex may decrease myocardial uptake and increase liver uptake. It is concluded that indium-111-labeled antimyosin monoclonal antibody Fab accumulates selectively in damaged heart tissue in mice with acute myocarditis and that indium-111-labeled antimyosin Fab scintigraphy may be a useful method for the visualization of acute myocarditis.

  3. Modification of silicon nitride surfaces with GOPES and APTES for antibody immobilization: computational and experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dien To, Thien; Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Nhat Thanh Phan, Khoa; Thu Thi Truong, An; Doan, Tin Chanh Duc; Mau Dang, Chien

    2015-12-01

    Chemical modification of silicon nitride (SiN) surfaces by silanization has been widely studied especially with 3-(aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) and 3-(glycidyloxypropyl) dimethylethoxysilane (GOPES). However few reports performed the experimental and computational studies together. In this study, surface modification of SiN surfaces with GOPES and APTES covalently bound with glutaraldehyde (GTA) was investigated for antibody immobilization. The monoclonal anti-cytokeratin-FITC (MACF) antibody was immobilized on the modified SiN surfaces. The modified surfaces were characterized by water contact angle measurements, atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy. The FITC-fluorescent label indicated the existence of MACF antibody on the SiN surfaces and the efficiency of the silanization reaction. Absorption of APTES and GOPES on the oxidized SiN surfaces was computationally modeled and calculated by Materials Studio software. The computational and experimental results showed that modification of the SiN surfaces with APTES and GTA was more effective than the modification with GOPES.

  4. Diversity of antibody responses to Borrelia burgdorferi in experimentally infected beagle dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Elisabeth; Grosenbaugh, Deborah A; Barbour, Alan G

    2014-06-01

    Lyme borreliosis (LB) is a common infection of domestic dogs in areas where there is enzootic transmission of the agent Borrelia burgdorferi. While immunoassays based on individual subunits have mostly supplanted the use of whole-cell preparations for canine serology, only a limited number of informative antigens have been identified. To more broadly characterize the antibody responses to B. burgdorferi infection and to assess the diversity of those responses in individual dogs, we examined sera from 32 adult colony-bred beagle dogs that had been experimentally infected with B. burgdorferi through tick bites and compared those sera in a protein microarray with sera from uninfected dogs in their antibody reactivities to various recombinant chromosome- and plasmid-encoded B. burgdorferi proteins, including 24 serotype-defining OspC proteins of North America. The profiles of immunogenic proteins for the dogs were largely similar to those for humans and natural-reservoir rodents; these proteins included the decorin-binding protein DbpB, BBA36, BBA57, BBA64, the fibronectin-binding protein BBK32, VlsE, FlaB and other flagellar structural proteins, Erp proteins, Bdr proteins, and all of the OspC proteins. In addition, the canine sera bound to the presumptive lipoproteins BBB14 and BB0844, which infrequently elicited antibodies in humans or rodents. Although the beagle, like most other domestic dog breeds, has a small effective population size and features extensive linkage disequilibrium, the group of animals studied here demonstrated diversity in antibody responses in measures of antibody levels and specificities for conserved proteins, such as DbpB, and polymorphic proteins, such as OspC.

  5. Antibody response against Trichinella spiralis in experimentally infected rats is dose dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franssen Frits FJ

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Domestic pigs are the main representatives of the domestic cycle of Trichinella spiralis that play a role in transmission to humans. In Europe, backyard pigs of small household farms are the most important risks for humans to obtain trichinellosis. Rats might play a role in the transmission of Trichinella spiralis from domestic to sylvatic animals and vice versa. In order to be able to investigate the role of wild rats in the epidemiology of T. spiralis in The Netherlands, we studied the dynamics of antibody response after T. spiralis infections in experimental rats, using infection doses ranging from very low (10 muscle larvae, ML, per rat to very high (16 000 ML per rat. To evaluate the feasibility of rats surviving high infection doses with T. spiralis, clinical and pathological parameters were quantified. Serological tools for detecting T. spiralis in rats were developed to quantitatively study the correlation between parasite load and immunological response. The results show that an infection dose-dependent antibody response was developed in rats after infection with as low as 10 ML up to a level of 10 000 ML. A positive correlation was found between the number of recovered ML and serum antibody levels, although specific measured antibody levels correspond to a wide range of LPG values. Serum antibodies of rats that were infected even with 10 or 25 ML could readily be detected by use of the T. spiralis western blot 2 weeks post infection. We conclude that based on these low infection doses, serologic tests are a useful tool to survey T. spiralis in wild rats.

  6. Antibody response against Trichinella spiralis in experimentally infected rats is dose dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franssen, Frits F J; Fonville, Manoj; Takumi, Katsuhisa; Vallée, Isabelle; Grasset, Aurélie; Koedam, Marie A; Wester, Piet W; Boireau, Pascal; van der Giessen, Joke W B

    2011-11-30

    Domestic pigs are the main representatives of the domestic cycle of Trichinella spiralis that play a role in transmission to humans. In Europe, backyard pigs of small household farms are the most important risks for humans to obtain trichinellosis. Rats might play a role in the transmission of Trichinella spiralis from domestic to sylvatic animals and vice versa. In order to be able to investigate the role of wild rats in the epidemiology of T. spiralis in The Netherlands, we studied the dynamics of antibody response after T. spiralis infections in experimental rats, using infection doses ranging from very low (10 muscle larvae, ML, per rat) to very high (16,000 ML per rat). To evaluate the feasibility of rats surviving high infection doses with T. spiralis, clinical and pathological parameters were quantified. Serological tools for detecting T. spiralis in rats were developed to quantitatively study the correlation between parasite load and immunological response. The results show that an infection dose-dependent antibody response was developed in rats after infection with as low as 10 ML up to a level of 10,000 ML. A positive correlation was found between the number of recovered ML and serum antibody levels, although specific measured antibody levels correspond to a wide range of LPG values. Serum antibodies of rats that were infected even with 10 or 25 ML could readily be detected by use of the T. spiralis western blot 2 weeks post infection. We conclude that based on these low infection doses, serologic tests are a useful tool to survey T. spiralis in wild rats.

  7. Euterpe oleracea Extract (Açaí) Is a Promising Novel Pharmacological Therapeutic Treatment for Experimental Endometriosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Daniel Escorsim; Rodrigues-Baptista, Karina Cristina; Alessandra-Perini, Jessica; Soares de Moura, Roberto; dos Santos, Thiago Alves; Pereira, Kariny Gomes; Marinho da Silva, Yasmin; Souza, Pergentino José Cunha; Nasciutti, Luiz Eurico; Perini, Jamila Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the therapeutic potential of Euterpe oleracea extract (açaí) on the growth and survival of endometriotic lesions using an experimental model. Twenty female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into two groups after the implantation and establishment of autologous endometrium onto the peritoneum abdominal wall and treated with 200 mg/kg hydroalcoholic solution extract from açaí stone or vehicle via gastric tube for 30 consecutive days. Body weight, lesion surface areas, histological and immunohistochemistry analyses of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2), metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and F4-80 were performed. Levels of VEGF, VEGFR-2, MMP-9 and COX-2 mRNA were measured. Flow cytometry of F4-80 was performed, and ELISA immunoassays measured prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), VEGF and nitric oxide (NO) and concentrations. Macrophage cell line J774.G8 was treated with 10, 20, and 40 μg/mL of açaí for 24, 48 and 72 h, and cell viability was measured using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays. Açaí treatment significantly decreased the implant size, and histological examination indicated atrophy and regression. A reduction in immunostaining and mRNA expression of VEGF, MMP-9 and COX-2 was observed, and F4-80 was lower in the treated group than the control group. The treated group also exhibited lower concentrations of PGE2, VEGF and NO compared to the control group. Macrophages cells treated with 20 and 40 μg/ml of açaí reduced cell viability in about 50% after 24, 48 and 72 h. Our results suggest that açaí effectively suppressed the establishment and growth of endometriotic lesions, and this agent is a promising novel pharmacological therapeutic treatment for endometriosis. PMID:27851787

  8. Adjuvant treatment with dexamethasone plus anti-C5 antibodies improves outcome of experimental pneumococcal meningitis: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background We compared adjunctive treatment with placebo, dexamethasone, anti-C5 antibodies, and the combination of dexamethasone plus anti-C5 antibodies in experimental pneumococcal meningitis. Methods In this prospective, investigator-blinded, randomized trial, 96 mice were infected intracisternally with 107 CFU/ml Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 3, treated with intraperitoneal ceftriaxone at 20 h, and randomly assigned to intraperitoneal adjunctive treatment with placebo (saline), dexame...

  9. Cytokine, antibody and proliferative cellular responses elicited by Taenia solium calreticulin upon experimental infection in hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendlovic, Fela; Cruz-Rivera, Mayra; Ávila, Guillermina; Vaughan, Gilberto; Flisser, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Taenia solium causes two diseases in humans, cysticercosis and taeniosis. Tapeworm carriers are the main risk factor for neurocysticercosis. Limited information is available about the immune response elicited by the adult parasite, particularly the induction of Th2 responses, frequently associated to helminth infections. Calreticulin is a ubiquitous, multifunctional protein involved in cellular calcium homeostasis, which has been suggested to play a role in the regulation of immune responses. In this work, we assessed the effect of recombinant T. solium calreticulin (rTsCRT) on the cytokine, humoral and cellular responses upon experimental infection in Syrian Golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus). Animals were infected with T. solium cysticerci and euthanized at different times after infection. Specific serum antibodies, proliferative responses in mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen cells, as well as cytokines messenger RNA (mRNA) were analyzed. The results showed that one third of the infected animals elicited anti-rTsCRT IgG antibodies. Interestingly, mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cells from either infected or non-infected animals did not proliferate upon in vitro stimulation with rTsCRT. Additionally, stimulation with a tapeworm crude extract resulted in increased expression of IL-4 and IL-5 mRNA. Upon stimulation, rTsCRT increased the expression levels of IL-10 in spleen and MLN cells from uninfected and infected hamsters. The results showed that rTsCRT favors a Th2-biased immune response characterized by the induction of IL-10 in mucosal and systemic lymphoid organs. Here we provide the first data on the cytokine, antibody and cellular responses to rTsCRT upon in vitro stimulation during taeniasis.

  10. Cytokine, antibody and proliferative cellular responses elicited by Taenia solium calreticulin upon experimental infection in hamsters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fela Mendlovic

    Full Text Available Taenia solium causes two diseases in humans, cysticercosis and taeniosis. Tapeworm carriers are the main risk factor for neurocysticercosis. Limited information is available about the immune response elicited by the adult parasite, particularly the induction of Th2 responses, frequently associated to helminth infections. Calreticulin is a ubiquitous, multifunctional protein involved in cellular calcium homeostasis, which has been suggested to play a role in the regulation of immune responses. In this work, we assessed the effect of recombinant T. solium calreticulin (rTsCRT on the cytokine, humoral and cellular responses upon experimental infection in Syrian Golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus. Animals were infected with T. solium cysticerci and euthanized at different times after infection. Specific serum antibodies, proliferative responses in mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen cells, as well as cytokines messenger RNA (mRNA were analyzed. The results showed that one third of the infected animals elicited anti-rTsCRT IgG antibodies. Interestingly, mesenteric lymph node (MLN cells from either infected or non-infected animals did not proliferate upon in vitro stimulation with rTsCRT. Additionally, stimulation with a tapeworm crude extract resulted in increased expression of IL-4 and IL-5 mRNA. Upon stimulation, rTsCRT increased the expression levels of IL-10 in spleen and MLN cells from uninfected and infected hamsters. The results showed that rTsCRT favors a Th2-biased immune response characterized by the induction of IL-10 in mucosal and systemic lymphoid organs. Here we provide the first data on the cytokine, antibody and cellular responses to rTsCRT upon in vitro stimulation during taeniasis.

  11. Detection of antibodies against Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus GDVII strain in experimental guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häger, C; Glage, S; Held, N; Bleich, E M; Burghard, A; Mähler, M; Bleich, André

    2016-10-01

    A disease affecting guinea pigs called 'guinea pig lameness' characterized by clinical signs of depression, lameness of limbs, flaccid paralysis, weight loss and death within a few weeks was first described by Römer in 1911. After a research group in our facility kept laboratory guinea pigs from two different origins together in one room, lameness was observed in two animals. Further investigations revealed a serological immune response against Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV; GDVII strain) in these animals. Histopathology of the lumbar spinal cord of these animals showed mononuclear cell infiltration and necrotic neurons in the anterior horn. Therefore, all guinea pigs from this contaminated animal unit, from other units in our facility, as well as from different European institutions and breeding centres were screened for antibodies directed against GDVII. Our investigations showed that approximately 80% of all guinea pigs from the contaminated animal unit were seropositive for GDVII, whereas animals from other separate units were completely negative. In addition, 43% of tested sera from the different European institutions and breeding centres contained antibodies against GDVII. The present data confirm that an unknown viral infection causes an immune response in experimental guinea pigs leading to seroconversion against GDVII and that guinea pigs from a commercial breeder are the source of the infection.

  12. Prevention of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by antibodies against α4βl integrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yednock, Ted A.; Cannon, Catherine; Fritz, Lawrence C.; Sanchez-Madrid, Francisco; Steinman, Lawrence; Karin, Nathan

    1992-03-01

    EXPERIMENTAL autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an inflammatory condition of the central nervous system with similarities to multiple sclerosis1,2. In both diseases, circulating leukocytes penetrate the blood-brain barrier and damage myelin, resulting in impaired nerve conduction and paralysis3-5. We sought to identify the adhesion receptors that mediate the attachment of circulating leukocytes to inflamed brain endothelium in EAE, because this interaction is the first step in leukocyte entry into the central nervous system. Using an in vitro adhesion assay on tissue sections, we found that lymphocytes and monocytes bound selectively to inflamed EAE brain vessels. Binding was inhibited by antibodies against the integrin molecule α4βl, but not by antibodies against numerous other adhesion receptors. When tested in vivo, anti-α4 integrin effectively prevented the accumulation of leukocytes in the central nervous system and the development of EAE. Thus, therapies designed to interfere with α4βl integrin may be useful in treating inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis.

  13. Immobilization strategy for enhancing sensitivity of immunosensors: L-Asparagine-AuNPs as a promising alternative of EDC-NHS activated citrate-AuNPs for antibody immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghav, Ragini; Srivastava, Sudha

    2016-04-15

    This paper addresses the question - Is EDC-NHS activated gold nanoparticles modified electrode surface the best available option for antibody immobilization for immunosensor fabrication? Is there any other alternative covalent immobilization strategy for orthogonal orientation of antibody, ensuring enhanced sensitivity of immunosensors? Does EDC-NHS activation of carboxyl functionalized nanoparticles surface really leads to orthogonal or directed immobilization of antibody? Gold nanoparticles synthesized using L-Asparagine as reducing and stabilization agent were employed for orthogonal immobilization of antibody for immunosensor fabrication. Anti-CA125 antibody was used as a model system for immunosensor fabrication. A comparative evaluation of immunosensors fabricated using L-Asparagine stabilized gold nanoparticles and citrate stabilized gold nanoparticles via different immobilization strategies/chemistries was done. The three strategies involved immobilization of Anti-CA125 antibody - (1) after EDC-NHS activation of citrate stabilized gold nanoparticles, (2) directly onto citrate stabilized gold nanoparticles and (3) directly onto L-Asparagine stabilized gold nanoparticles modified electrode surfaces. Comparative evaluation of Impedimetric response characteristics showed 2.5 times increase in sensitivity (349.36 Ω/(IU/mL)/cm(2)) in case of third strategy as compared to first (147.53 Ω/(IU/mL)/cm(2)) and twice that of second strategy (166.24 Ω/(IU/mL)/cm(2)). Additionally, an extended dynamic range of 0-750 IU/mL was observed while for others it was up to 500 IU/mL. Amino acid coated gold nanoparticles ensured orthogonal immobilization, lesser randomization, with 88% of active antibody available for antigen binding as opposed to other two strategies with less than 30% active antibody.

  14. Experimental infection of Newcastle disease virus in pigeons (Columba livia): humoral antibody response, contact transmission and viral genome shedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Torres Carrasco, Adriano; Seki, Meire Christina; de Freitas Raso, Tânia; Paulillo, Antônio Carlos; Pinto, Aramis Augusto

    2008-05-25

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the humoral antibody response, the genome viral excretion and the contact transmission of pathogenic chicken origin Newcastle disease virus (NDV) from experimentally infected pigeons (Columba livia) to in-contact pigeon. The antibody response to infection was assessed by the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test and the genome viral excretion was detected by RT-PCR. Viral strain induced high antibody levels, both in inoculated and in sentinel birds. The pathogenic viral strain for chickens was unable to produce clinical signs of the disease in experimentally infected pigeons, although it induced the humoral antibody response and produced NDV genome shedding. NDV genome was detected intermittently throughout the experimental period, from 5 days post-infection (dpi) to 24 dpi. Therefore, viral genome shedding occurred for 20 days. The viral genome was detected in all birds, between 11 and 13 dpi. Furthermore, the high infectivity of the virus was confirmed, as all non-inoculated sentinel pigeons showed antibody levels as high as those of inoculated birds.

  15. Fuzzy promises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anker, Thomas Boysen; Kappel, Klemens; Eadie, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    This article clarifies the commonplace assumption that brands make promises by developing definitions of brand promise delivery. Distinguishing between clear and fuzzy brand promises, we develop definitions of what it is for a brand to deliver on fuzzy functional, symbolic, and experiential...

  16. Sequence Tolerance of a Highly Stable Single Domain Antibody: Comparison of Computational and Experimental Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-09

    2012 Single-domain antibody fragments derived from heavy-chain antibodies: A review. Veterinarni Medicina 57: 439–513. 8. George J, Compton JR, Leary...21: 171–185. 25. RosettaCommons. 2010 Available at: http://www.rosettacommons.org. Accessed 2015 December 22. 26. Zhou H, Zhou Y. 2002 Distance

  17. Structure and pathogenicity of antibodies specific for citrullinated collagen type II in experimental arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uysal, Hüseyin; Bockermann, Robert; Nandakumar, Kutty S

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies to citrulline-modified proteins have a high diagnostic value in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, their biological role in disease development is still unclear. To obtain insight into this question, a panel of mouse monoclonal antibodies was generated against a major triple helical...... collagen type II (CII) epitope (position 359-369; ARGLTGRPGDA) with or without arginines modified by citrullination. These antibodies bind cartilage and synovial tissue, and mediate arthritis in mice. Detection of citrullinated CII from RA patients' synovial fluid demonstrates that cartilage-derived CII...

  18. Antithyroglobulin antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Hypothyroidism - thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Graves disease - thyroglobulin antibody; Underactive thyroid - thyroglobulin antibody

  19. An experimental design approach to optimize an amperometric immunoassay on a screen printed electrode for Clostridium tetani antibody determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patris, Stéphanie; Vandeput, Marie; Kenfack, Gersonie Momo; Mertens, Dominique; Dejaegher, Bieke; Kauffmann, Jean-Michel

    2016-03-15

    An immunoassay for the determination of anti-tetani antibodies has been developed using a screen printed electrode (SPE) as solid support for toxoid (antigen) immobilization. The assay was performed in guinea pig serum. The immunoreaction and the subsequent amperometric detection occurred directly onto the SPE surface. The assay consisted of spiking the anti-tetani sample directly onto the toxoid modified SPE, and then a second antibody, i.e. a HRP-labeled anti-immunoglobulin G, was deposited onto the biosensor. Subsequent amperometric detection was realized by spiking 10 µL of a hydroquinone (HQ) solution into 40 µL of buffer solution containing hydrogen peroxide. An experimental design approach was implemented for the optimization of the immunoassay. The variables of interest, such as bovine serum albumin (BSA) concentration, incubation times and labeled antibody dilution, were optimized with the aid of the response surface methodology using a circumscribed central composite design (CCCD). It was observed that two factors exhibited the greatest impact on the response, i.e. the anti-tetani incubation time and the dilution factor of the labeled antibody. It was discovered that in order to maximize the response, the dilution factor should be small, while the anti-tetani antibody incubation time should be long. The BSA concentration and the HRP-anti-IgG incubation had very limited influence. Under the optimized conditions, the immunoassay had a limit of detection of 0.011 IU/mL and a limit of quantification of 0.012 IU/mL. These values were below the protective human antibody limit of 0.06 IU/mL.

  20. Experimental studies of heat exchange for sodium boiling in the fuel assembly model: Safety substantiation of a promising fast reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khafizov, R. R.; Poplavskii, V. M.; Rachkov, V. I.; Sorokin, A. P.; Trufanov, A. A.; Ashurko, Yu. M.; Volkov, A. V.; Ivanov, E. F.; Privezentsev, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    Numerical simulation of the ULOF-type accident development in a fast reactor with sodium coolant performed using the COREMELT code indicates that sodium boiling in the active core takes place. The boiling is accompanied by oscillations of the technological parameters of the reactor installation; these oscillations can go on during several tens of seconds. In this case, it is possible that a stable regime of removal of heat from residual energy release is implemented. The model of the two-phase coolant flow applied in the code has an important effect on the numerical results; that is why this model needs experimental verification. For eliminating the development of an accident resulting in destruction of the active core elements, a structural solution is proposed; the essence of it is the application of the sodium void above the reactor active core. The experimental installation was developed and the heat exchange at sodium boiling in the model fuel assembly of the fast reactor in the regimes of natural and forced circulation in the presence of the sodium void and the top end shield was studied. It was demonstrated that, in the presence of the sodium void, it is possible to provide long-term cooling of the fuel assembly for a thermal flux density on the fuel element simulator surface of up to 140 and 170 kW/m2 in the natural and forced circulation modes, respectively. The obtained data are used for more precise determination of the numerical model of sodium boiling in the fuel assembly and verification of the COREMELT code.

  1. Treatment with anti-interferon-δ monoclonal antibodies modifies experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in interferon-δ receptor knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espejo, C.; Penkowa, Milena; Saez-Torres, I.

    2001-01-01

    Neuroinflammation, neuronal degeneration, regeneration, monoclonal antibodies, multiple schlerosis......Neuroinflammation, neuronal degeneration, regeneration, monoclonal antibodies, multiple schlerosis...

  2. Bispecific antibodies for treatment of cancer in experimental animal models and man

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroesen, Bart-Jan; Helfrich, Wijnand; Molema, Ingrid; de Leij, Lou

    1998-01-01

    Immunotherapy is a powerful anti-cancer treatment modality. However, despite numerous encouraging results obtained in pre-clinical studies, a definite breakthrough towards an established clinical treatment modality has as yet not occurred. Antibodies against tumor antigens have been shown to localis

  3. Characterization of epitopes recognized by monoclonal antibodies: experimental approaches supported by freely accessible bioinformatic tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, Nicola; Mancini, Nicasio; Castelli, Matteo; Clementi, Massimo; Burioni, Roberto

    2013-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been used successfully both in research and for clinical purposes. The possible use of protective mAbs directed against different microbial pathogens is currently being considered. The fine definition of the epitope recognized by a protective mAb is an important aspect to be considered for possible development in epitope-based vaccinology. The most accurate approach to this is the X-ray resolution of mAb/antigen crystal complex. Unfortunately, this approach is not always feasible. Under this perspective, several surrogate epitope mapping strategies based on the use of bioinformatics have been developed. In this article, we review the most common, freely accessible, bioinformatic tools used for epitope characterization and provide some basic examples of molecular visualization, editing and computational analysis.

  4. Experimental Design and Methods for Development of Diagnostic Assays for Schistosomiasis Using Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-08-25

    Sera from patients or experimental animals infected with Schistosoma, Fasciola hepatica, Trichinella spiralis, Taenia solium, Echinococcus...were used as antigens for immuno- precipitation with sera of patients infected with one of three species of Schistosoma or Trichinella spiralis, Taenia

  5. INHIBITION OF HUMAN EXPERIMENTAL GASTRIC CARCINOMA METASTASIS IN VIVO BY P-SELECTIN MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈金联; 陈维雄; 朱金水; 陈尼维; 姚明; 周同

    2001-01-01

    Objeetive To study the role of cell adhesion molecule P-selectin monoclonal antibody ( MAb ) in tumor metastasis of an orthotopic metastatic model. Methods SCID mice were implanted orthotopically SGC-7901 human gastric cancer tissue. 3d later, animals received i. v. injections of PBS or P-selectin MAb ( 100μg /injection ) twice weekly for 3 weeks. 42d after operation, all animals were sacrificed. Tissues from all organs were obtained for histopathological evaluation. Results 10 of the animals ( n = 11 ) treated with PBS were found to develop metastatic tumors in the regional lymph nodes, liver, and lung. In contrast, 2 of the animals ( n = 9 ) treated with P-selectin MAb developed metastatic tumors in the organs examined. The expression of P-selectin mRNA in gastric cancer tissue of SCID mice with tumor metastasis was higher than that without such metastasis. Conclusion P-selectin expression is associated with tumor metastasis, and the metastasis may be inhibited by the MAb.

  6. In vitro experimental {sup 211}At-anti-CD33 antibody therapy of leukaemia cells overcomes cellular resistance seen in vivo against gemtuzumab ozogamicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrich, Thorsten; Korkmaz, Zekiye; Krull, Doris; Meyer, Geerd J.; Knapp, Wolfram H. [Hanover University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hanover (Germany); Froemke, Cornelia [Hanover University School of Medicine, Department of Biometry, Hanover (Germany)

    2010-05-15

    Monoclonal anti-CD33 antibodies conjugated with toxic calicheamicin derivative (gemtuzumab ozogamicin, GO) are a novel therapy option for acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Key prognostic factors for patients with AML are high CD33 expression on the leukaemic cells and the ability to overcome mechanisms of resistance to cytotoxic chemotherapies, including drug efflux or other mechanisms decreasing apoptosis. Alpha particle-emitting radionuclides overwhelm such anti-apoptotic mechanisms by producing numerous DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) accompanied by decreased DNA repair. We labelled anti-CD33 antibodies with the alpha-emitter {sup 211}At and compared survival of leukaemic HL-60 and K-562 cells treated with the {sup 211}At-labelled antibodies, GO or unlabelled antibodies as controls. We also measured caspase-3/7 activity, DNA fragmentation and necrosis in HL-60 cells after treatment with the different antibodies or with free {sup 211}At. The mean labelling ratio of {sup 211}At-labelled antibodies was 1:1,090 {+-} 364 (range: 1:738-1:1,722) in comparison to 2-3:1 for GO. Tumour cell binding of {sup 211}At-anti-CD33 was high in the presence of abundant CD33 expression and could be specifically blocked by unlabelled anti-CD33. {sup 211}At-anti-CD33 decreased survival significantly more than did GO at comparable dilution (1:1,000). No significant differences in induction of apoptosis or necrosis or DNA DSB or in decreased survival were observed after {sup 211}At-anti-CD33 (1:1,090) versus GO (1:1) treatment. Our results suggest that {sup 211}At is a promising, highly cytotoxic radioimmunotherapy in CD33-positive leukaemia and kills tumour cells more efficiently than does calicheamicin-conjugated antibody. Labelling techniques leading to higher chemical yield and specific activities must be developed to increase {sup 211}At-anti-CD33 therapeutic effects. (orig.)

  7. The IgM Response to Modified LDL in Experimental Atherosclerosis Hypochlorite-modified LDL IgM Antibodies versus Classical Natural T15 IgM Antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Marcella; Damoiseaux, Jan; Duijvestijn, Adriaan; Heeringa, Peter; Gijbels, Marion; de Winther, Menno; Tervaert, Jan Willem Cohen; Shoenfeld, Y; Gershwin, ME

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: It is hypothesized that IgM antibodies to oxidized LDL are anti-atherogenic. Myeloperoxidase from plaque-infiltrating neutrophils catalyzes the production of hypochlorite (HOCl), which oxidizes LDL. Here we study the IgM response to HOCl-modified LDL in comparison to titers of T15 clon

  8. The influence of antibodies on Staphylococcus epidermidis adherence to polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated silicone elastomer in experimental biomaterial-associated infection in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekhuizen, C.A.N.; Boer, L.; Schipper, K.; Jones, C.E.; Quadir, S.; Feldman, R.G.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C.M.J.E.; Zaat, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    Biomaterial-associated infection (BAI) is a major problem in modern medicine, and is often caused by Staphylococcus epidermidis. We aimed to raise monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against major surface protein antigens of S. epidermidis, and to assess their possible protective activity in experimental B

  9. An experimental test of stroke recovery by implanting a hyaluronic acid hydrogel carrying a Nogo receptor antibody in a rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Jun [Biomaterials Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Tian Weiming [Biomaterials Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Hou Shaoping [Beijing Institute of Neuroscience, Capital University of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100054 (China); Xu Qunyuan [Beijing Institute of Neuroscience, Capital University of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100054 (China); Spector, Myron [Tissue Engineering, VA Boston Healthcare System, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Cui Fuzhai [Biomaterials Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2007-12-15

    The objective of the study was to determine the effects of a hyaluronic-acid-based (HA-based) hydrogel implant, carrying a polyclonal antibody to the Nogo-66 receptor (NgR), on adult rats that underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Behavioral tests of a forelimb-reaching task suggested that the disabled function of the impaired forelimb in this stroke model was ameliorated by the implant to a certain extent. These behavioral findings were correlated with immunohistochemical results of investigating the distribution of NgR antibody, neurofilaments (NF) and neuron-specific class III {beta}-tubulin (TuJ1) in the brain sections. The porous hydrogel functioned as a scaffold to deliver the NgR antibody, support cell migration and development. In addition, it was found NF-positive and TuJ1-positive expressions were distributed in the implanted hydrogel. Collectively, the results demonstrate the promise of the HA hydrogel as a scaffold material and the delivery vehicle of the NgR antibody for the repair of defects and the support of neural regeneration in the brain.

  10. The time course of the specific antibody response by various ELISAs in pigs experimentally infected with Toxoplasma gondii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Peter; Haugegaard, J.; Wingstrand, Anne

    1997-01-01

    With the aim of developing routine serological tests for monitoring the Toxoplasma infection status of Danish swine herds, four ELISAs based on tachyzoite antigen were set up: (1) an indirect ELISA for IgG-antibody; (2) a blocking ELISA for antibody to the membrane antigen, P-30; (3) an indirect ...

  11. Promises, promises for neuroscience and law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckholtz, Joshua W; Faigman, David L

    2014-09-22

    Stunning technical advances in the ability to image the human brain have provoked excited speculation about the application of neuroscience to other fields. The 'promise' of neuroscience for law has been touted with particular enthusiasm. Here, we contend that this promise elides fundamental conceptual issues that limit the usefulness of neuroscience for law. Recommendations for overcoming these challenges are offered.

  12. Doxycycline levels and anti-Wolbachia antibodies in sera from dogs experimentally infected with Dirofilaria immitis and treated with a combination of ivermectin/doxycycline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menozzi, A; Bertini, S; Turin, L; Serventi, P; Kramer, L; Bazzocchi, C

    2015-04-30

    Sera from Dirofilaria immitis-experimentally infected dogs treated with a combination of ivermectin/doxycycline were analysed for doxycycline levels by HPLC and anti-Wolbachia Surface Protein (rWSP) antibodies by ELISA and compared with sera from dogs treated with doxycycline alone. Results show that doxycycline levels were not statistically different between the two groups. Circulating anti-WSP antibody titres were markedly lower in both treatment groups when compared to control D. immitis infected dogs, indicating that doxycycline is able to reduce Wolbachia and prevent the immune response against the bacteria. The combination treatment protocol has been shown to be highly adulticidal and further studies are needed to better understand the interaction between doxycycline and ivermectin in D. immitis infected dogs.

  13. DETECTION OF ANTIBODIES TO CANDIDA ALBICANS GERM TUBE BY IMMUNOFLUORESCENCE IN IMMUNOSUPPRESSED MICE WITH EXPERIMENTAL SYSTEMIC CANDIDIASIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Zaini

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available "nThe increasing incidence of systemic candidiasis, which parallels the use of invasive and immunosuppressive medical procedures, necessitates development of rapid and cost effective tests for diagnosis of systemic candidiasis. Therefore in this study 85 mice were first immunosuppressed by cyclophosphamide and then infected by Candida albicans NCPF 3153. Other 85 mice were employed as control. The case and control mice were bled and then autopsied. Hearts and kidneys were checked by direct, histopathological and cultural examination for systemic candidiasis. The 85 sera from histological proven cases and 85 control mice were adsorbed with heat killed blastospores of same strain of C. albicans. Anti-Candida albicans germ tube antibodies were detected by indirect immunofluorescence assay for diagnosis of invasive candidiasis in case and control mice. In addition, sera from 35 mice with proven cryptococcosis were also tested. While 84 mice with proven systemic candidiasis (100% had anti-germ tube antibodies, these antibodies were absent in all controls and mice with cryptococcosis. The specificity was 100%, indicating a high degree of discrimination was possible between systemic candidiasis and cryptococcosis in the mice studied. It must be concluded that anti-germ tube responses did not appear to be significantly reduced in immunocompromised mice.

  14. Early detection and longitudinal monitoring of experimental primary and disseminated melanoma using [{sup 18}F]ICF01006, a highly promising melanoma PET tracer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rbah-Vidal, Latifa; Vidal, Aurelien; Besse, Sophie; Audin, Laurent; Degoul, Francoise; Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth; Moins, Nicole; Auzeloux, Philippe; Chezal, Jean-Michel [Clermont Universite, Universite d' Auvergne, Imagerie Moleculaire et Therapie Vectorisee, BP 10448, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Inserm, U 990, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Cachin, Florent [Clermont Universite, Universite d' Auvergne, Imagerie Moleculaire et Therapie Vectorisee, BP 10448, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Inserm, U 990, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Centre Jean Perrin, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Bonnet, Mathilde [U1071 INSERM-Universite d' Auvergne, M2USH, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Askienazy, Serge [CYCLOPHARMA Laboratories, Biopole Clermont-Limagne, Saint-Beauzire (France); Dolle, Frederic [CEA, I2BM, Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Orsay (France)

    2012-09-15

    Here, we report a new and rapid radiosynthesis of {sup 18}F-N-[2-(diethylamino)ethyl]-6-fluoro-pyridine-3-carboxamide ([{sup 18}F]ICF01006), a molecule with a high specificity for melanotic tissue, and its evaluation in a murine model for early specific detection of pigmented primary and disseminated melanoma. [{sup 18}F]ICF01006 was synthesized using a new one-step bromine-for-fluorine nucleophilic heteroaromatic substitution. Melanoma models were induced by subcutaneous (primary tumour) or intravenous (lung colonies) injection of B16BL6 melanoma cells in C57BL/6J mice. The relevance and sensitivity of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using [{sup 18}F]ICF01006 were evaluated at different stages of tumoural growth and compared to {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ([{sup 18}F]FDG). The fully automated radiosynthesis of [{sup 18}F]ICF01006 led to a radiochemical yield of 61 % and a radiochemical purity >99 % (specific activity 70-80 GBq/{mu}mol; total synthesis time 42 min). Tumours were visualized before they were palpable as early as 1 h post-injection with [{sup 18}F]ICF01006 tumoural uptake of 1.64 {+-} 0.57, 3.40 {+-} 1.47 and 11.44 {+-} 2.67 percentage of injected dose per gram of tissue (%ID/g) at days 3, 5 and 14, respectively. [{sup 18}F]ICF01006 PET imaging also allowed detection of melanoma pulmonary colonies from day 9 after tumour cell inoculation, with a lung radiotracer accumulation correlated with melanoma invasion. At day 21, radioactivity uptake in lungs reached a value of 5.23 {+-} 2.08 %ID/g (versus 0.41 {+-} 0.90 %ID/g in control mice). In the two models, comparison with [{sup 18}F]FDG showed that both radiotracers were able to detect melanoma lesions, but [{sup 18}F]ICF01006 was superior in terms of contrast and specificity. Our promising results provide further preclinical data, reinforcing the excellent potential of [{sup 18}F]ICF01006 PET imaging for early specific diagnosis and follow-up of melanin-positive disseminated melanoma. (orig.)

  15. Experimental Validation of Multi-Epitope Peptides Including Promising MHC Class I- and II-Restricted Epitopes of Four Known Leishmania infantum Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agallou, Maria; Athanasiou, Evita; Koutsoni, Olga; Dotsika, Eleni; Karagouni, Evdokia

    2014-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a significant worldwide health problem for which no vaccine exists. Activation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells is crucial for the generation of protective immunity against parasite. Recent trend in vaccine design has been shifted to epitope-based vaccines that are more specific, safe, and easy to produce. In the present study, four known antigenic Leishmania infantum proteins, cysteine peptidase A (CPA), histone H1, KMP-11, and Leishmania eukaryotic initiation factor (LeIF) were analyzed for the prediction of binding epitopes to H2(d) MHC class I and II molecules, using online available algorithms. Based on in silico analysis, eight peptides including highly scored MHC class I- and II-restricted epitopes were synthesized. Peptide immunogenicity was validated in MHC compatible BALB/c mice immunized with each synthetic peptide emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvant/incomplete Freund's adjuvant. CPA_p2, CPA_p3, H1_p1, and LeIF_p6 induced strong spleen cell proliferation upon in vitro peptide re-stimulation. In addition, the majority of the peptides, except of LeIF_p1 and KMP-11_p1, induced IFN-γ secretion, while KMP-11_p1 indicated a suppressive effect on IL-10 production. CPA_p2, CPA_p3, LeIF_p3, and LeIF_p6 induced IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) T cells indicating a TH1-type response. In addition, CPA_p2, CPA_p3, and H1_p1 induced also the induction of CD8(+) T cells. The induction of peptide-specific IgG in immunized mice designated also the existence of B cell epitopes in peptide sequences. Combining immunoinformatic tools and experimental validation, we demonstrated that CPA_p2, CPA_p3, H1_p1, H1_p3, CPA_p2, LeIF_p3, and LeIF_p6 are likely to include potential epitopes for the induction of protective cytotoxic and/or TH1-type immune responses supporting the feasibility of peptide-based vaccine development for leishmaniasis.

  16. Relative disease susceptibility and clostridial toxin antibody responses in three commercial broiler lines coinfected with Clostridium perfringens and Eimeria maxima using an experimental model of necrotic enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Seung I; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Lee, Sung-Hyen; Lee, Kyung Woo; Lillehoj, Erik P; Hong, Yeong Ho; An, Dong-Jun; Jeoung, D Hye-Young; Chun, Ji-Eun

    2013-09-01

    Necrotic enteritis is an enteric disease of poultry resulting from infection by Clostridium perfringens with coinfection by Eimeria spp. constituting a major risk factor for disease pathogenesis. This study compared three commercial broiler chicken lines using an experimental model of necrotic enteritis. Day-old male Cobb, Ross, and Hubbard broilers were orally infected with viable C. perfringens and E. maxima and fed a high-protein diet to promote the development of experimental disease. Body weight loss, intestinal lesions, and serum antibody levels against alpha-toxin and necrotic enteritis B-like (NetB) toxin were measured as parameters of disease susceptibility and host immune response. Cobb chickens exhibited increased body weight loss compared with Ross and Hubbard breeds and greater gut lesion severity compared with Ross chickens. NetB antibody levels were greater in Cobb chickens compared with the Ross or Hubbard groups. These results suggest that Cobb chickens may be more susceptible to necrotic enteritis in the field compared with the Ross and Hubbard lines.

  17. A novel bead-based assay to detect specific antibody responses against Toxoplasma gondii and Trichinella spiralis simultaneously in sera of experimentally infected swine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bokken Gertie CAM

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A novel, bead-based flow cytometric assay was developed for simultaneous determination of antibody responses against Toxoplasma gondii and Trichinella spiralis in pig serum. This high throughput screening assay could be an alternative for well known indirect tests like ELISA. One of the advantages of a bead-based assay over ELISA is the possibility to determine multiple specific antibody responses per single sample run facilitated by a series of antigens coupled to identifiable bead-levels. Furthermore, inclusion of a non-coupled bead-level in the same run facilitates the determination of, and correction for non-specific binding. The performance of this bead-based assay was compared to one T. spiralis and three T. gondii ELISAs. For this purpose, sera from T. gondii and T. spiralis experimentally infected pigs were used. With the experimental infection status as gold standard, the area under the curve, Youden Index, sensitivity and specificity were determined through receiver operator curve analysis. Marginal homogeneity and inter-rater agreement between bead-based assay and ELISAs were evaluated using McNemar's Test and Cohen's kappa, respectively. Results Results indicated that the areas under the curve of the bead-based assay were 0.911 and 0.885 for T. gondii and T. spiralis, respectively, while that of the T. gondii ELISAs ranged between 0.837 and 0.930 and the T. spiralis ELISA was 0.879. Bead-based T. gondii assay had a sensitivity of 86% and specificity of 96%, while the ELISAs ranged between 64-84% and 93-99%, respectively. The bead-based T. spiralis assay had a sensitivity of 68% and specificity of 100% while the ELISA scored 72% and 95%, respectively. Marginal homogeneity was found between the T. gondii bead-based test and one of the T. gondii ELISAs. Moreover, in this test combination and between T. spiralis bead-based assay and respective ELISA, an excellent inter-rater agreement was found. When results of

  18. Treatment with anti-interferon-gamma monoclonal antibodies modifies experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in interferon-gamma receptor knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espejo, C; Penkowa, M; Sáez-Torres, I;

    2001-01-01

    antibodies (mAb) on day 8 postimmunization. Clinical scoring and both histological and immunohistochemical studies were undertaken for all groups. We hereby show that treatment with anti-IFN-gamma mAb worsened the disease course of 129Sv wild-type mice. However, it decreased the mean daily score in IFN......-gamma R(-/-) 129Sv and the incidence of the disease down to 50% in C57Bl/6x129Sv IFN-gamma R(-/-) mice. Moreover, after anti-IFN-gamma mAb treatment, oxidative stress levels, metallothionein I and II antioxidant protein expression, and apoptoticneuronal death were increased in wild-type mice while...... decreased in IFN-gamma R(-/-) mice. These results suggest a putative alternative mechanism of action of this cytokine that works independent of its receptor....

  19. Promises in Different Cultures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Holly Shi

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports a pilot study, which examines culture differences in a social function of language, i.e.,the function of promise making using Searle′s constitutive rules. It is to argue that different cultures may have the same type of speech-act such as promise, which, however, represents different cultural concepts. Evidence supporting the argument was drawn from a comparison of performance of Americans and Orientals concerning their respective concepts of promise making.

  20. Antimitochondrial antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003529.htm Antimitochondrial antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are substances ( antibodies ) that form against mitochondria. ...

  1. Evaluation of Humoral Immune Response of Cats to the Experimental Infection with the different Clonal Types of Toxoplasma gondii by Measurement of IgG Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosseininejad, M.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii is one of the most prevalent parasitic infections in world. Rh, NED and Me49 are of the most prevalent clonal types of the parasite isolated till now. Differences in pathogenicity and virulence of different types have been investigated in different studies. No controlled study was performed to compare the ability of different types to initiate humoral immune response. We investigated IgG antibody responses of kittens infected with each of these three clonal types. For this, experimental infection was performed using ME49 clonal type of T. gondii and humoral immune response (by measurement of IgG was detected and compared with the other two clonal types of the parasite. No antibodies were detectable at least until 7 days post infection for types Rh and NED while this period of no response was 19 days for ME49. Serum ELISA indices were significantly higher in kittens infected with Rh and NED tpes in comparison with ME49. The results of this study showed that humoral immune response of cats to ME49 starts with delay and are weaker than two other clonal types.

  2. Coproantigen detection in dogs experimentally and naturally infected with Echinococcus granulosus by a monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malgor, R; Nonaka, N; Basmadjian, I; Sakai, H; Carámbula, B; Oku, Y; Carmona, C; Kamiya, M

    1997-12-01

    A sandwich ELISA for the detection of Echinococcus granulosus coproantigen in formalin and heat-treated faecal supernatants of dogs was developed. The assay used affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies obtained from rabbits hyperimmunised with E. granulosus excretory/secretory antigens and biotinylated monoclonal antibody EmA9 produced against adult E. multilocularis somatic extract. The test was sensitive to 7 ng and 2.3 ng of E. granulosus protein and carbohydrate/ml of faecal supernatant, respectively. Thirteen helminth-free dogs were infected with different amounts of E. granulosus protoscoleces and the presence of coproantigen was monitored during the prepatent period until day 35 post-infection, when they were necropsied. Faecal antigen levels started to rise above the normal range between days 10 and 20 post-infection, and typically peaked at the end of the experiment. All the dogs, bearing from 3 to 67,700 worms, showed positive values in the ELISA during the prepatent period. One dog experimentally infected with Taenia hydatigena metacestode and harbouring three worms, tested positive only after the prepatent period at day 52. The test was applied to 98 stray dogs. The ELISA detected all of four dogs naturally infected with E. granulosus, two dogs with patent infections of T. hydatigena and two dogs with no cestode infections, showing a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 96%.

  3. Expression of recombinant antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with "human-like" post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications.

  4. Promise Zones for Applicants

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — This tool assists applicants to HUD's Promise Zone initiative prepare data to submit with their application by allowing applicants to draw the exact location of the...

  5. Beneficial effect of an antibody against interleukin-2 receptor(daclizumab) in an experimental model of hepatocyte xenotransplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dimitrios Papagoras; Apostolos Papalois; Alexandra Tsaroucha; Dimitrios Lytras; John Kyriazanos; Nikoletta Giannakou; Prodromos Laftsidis; Constantine Simopoulos

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the use of Daclizumab (Dmab) as an immunosuppressive agent in an experimental model of hepatocyte xenotransplantation (XenoTx) in rats with fulminant hepatic failure (FHF).METHODS: Two white male New Zealand rabbits were used as donors and 68 Wistar rats as recipients.FHF was induced by intravenous application of dimethylnitrosamine (DMNA). The isolated hepatocytes of the rabbits were xenotransplanted into the spleen of the rats 24 h after FHF induction. Group A (n = 13): no treatment; Group B (n = 14): FHF and XenoTx; Group C (n = 14): FHF and XenoTx and cyclosporin (CsA); Group D (n = 14): FHF and XenoTx and Dmab; Group E (n =13): FHF and XenoTx and CsA and Dmab. The rats were followed for 15 d.RESULTS: Statistical analysis showed better survival among groups D (92.86%) and E (76.92%) compared to group A (all rats died after 72 h), group B (28.57%)or group C (71.43%), although the differences were not statistically significant. Biochemical evaluation of the liver enzymes and histology confirmed satisfactory function and engraftment, respectively.CONCLUSION: This experimental model has shown the safe, effective and beneficial use of Dmab in a xenotransplantation model of rabbit hepatocytes in rats.

  6. Antibody informatics for drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirai, Hiroki; Prades, Catherine; Vita, Randi;

    2014-01-01

    to the antibody science in every project in antibody drug discovery. Recent experimental technologies allow for the rapid generation of large-scale data on antibody sequences, affinity, potency, structures, and biological functions; this should accelerate drug discovery research. Therefore, a robust bioinformatic...... infrastructure for these large data sets has become necessary. In this article, we first identify and discuss the typical obstacles faced during the antibody drug discovery process. We then summarize the current status of three sub-fields of antibody informatics as follows: (i) recent progress in technologies...... for antibody rational design using computational approaches to affinity and stability improvement, as well as ab-initio and homology-based antibody modeling; (ii) resources for antibody sequences, structures, and immune epitopes and open drug discovery resources for development of antibody drugs; and (iii...

  7. Systemic and local antibodies induced by an experimental inactivated vaccine against bovine herpesvirus type 1 Anticorpos locais e sistêmicos induzidos por uma vacina experimental inativada contra o herpesvírus bovino tipo 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Carmo Cilento

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available An experimental inactivated vaccine against bovine herpesvirus-1 (BoHV-1 was produced aiming to evaluate the systemic and local antibody responses in 12 seronegative heifers, after vaccination and revaccination. Serum samples were submitted to virus neutralization assay and to ELISA test for detection of IgG1 and IgG2 isotypes. Nasal secretion samples were submitted to the same ELISA test for detection of IgG1 and IgG2 isotypes. The results showed that moderate to high neutralizing titres and IgG1 and IgG2 antibody responses were induced after the second vaccination in the serum and in nasal secretions up to 114 days post vaccination. IgG2 antibodies were the prevalent isotype for most of the post-vaccination period. The results indicate that BoHV-1 experimental inactivated vaccine elicited potentially protective IgG1 and IgG2 antibody levels, both in the systemic and mucosal compartments.Uma vacina experimental inativada contra o herpesvírus bovino tipo 1 (BoHV-1 foi produzida com o objetivo de se avaliar a resposta imune humoral local e sistêmica contra o BoHV-1, em 12 novilhas soronegativas, após a vacinação e a revacinação. Os soros foram submetidos à prova de vírus-neutralização para quantificação do título de anticorpos neutralizantes e a um ELISA para detecção de IgG1 e IgG2. Os swabs nasais também foram submetidos ao ELISA para detecção de IgG1 e IgG2 na secreção nasal. Os resultados demonstraram que títulos de anticorpos neutralizantes foram induzidos após a revacinação, em níveis moderados a altos, permanecendo em níveis significativos no soro sanguíneo e na secreção nasal até o dia 114 pós-vacinação. O IgG2 foi o isótipo predominante na maior parte do período pós-vacinação, tanto na secreção nasal, como no compartimento sistêmico. A vacina experimental inativada contra o BoHV-1 estimulou níveis de anticorpos potencialmente protetores dos isótipos IgG1 e IgG2, tanto no compartimento sist

  8. scFv from Antibody That Mimics gp43 Modulates the Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses during Experimental Paracoccidioidomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannuzzi, Grasielle Pereira; Tavares, Aldo Henrique F P; Kaihami, Gilberto Hideo; de Almeida, José Roberto Fogaça; de Almeida, Sandro Rogério; Ferreira, Karen Spadari

    2015-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), caused by Paracoccidioides species is a prevalent systemic and progressive mycosis that occurs in Latin America. It is caused by Paracoccidioides species. Immunization with dendritic cells transfected with a plasmid encoding the scFv (pMAC/PS-scFv) that mimics the main antigen of P. brasiliensis (gp43) confers protection in experimental PCM. DCs link innate and adaptive immunity by recognizing invading pathogens and selecting the type of effector T cell to mediate the immune response. Here, we showed that DC-pMAC/PS-scFv induces the activation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Moreover, our results demonstrated that BALB/c mice infected with P. brasiliensis and treated with DC-pMAC/PS-scFv showed the induction of specific IgG production against gp43 and IFN-γ, IL-12 and IL-4 cytokines. Analysis of regional lymph nodes revealed increases in the expression of clec7a, myd88, tlr2, gata3 and tbx21, which are involved in the immune response. Taken together, our results indicate that the scFv modulates the humoral and cellular immune responses and presents epitopes to CD4+ and CD8+ T cells.

  9. scFv from Antibody That Mimics gp43 Modulates the Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses during Experimental Paracoccidioidomycosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grasielle Pereira Jannuzzi

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM, caused by Paracoccidioides species is a prevalent systemic and progressive mycosis that occurs in Latin America. It is caused by Paracoccidioides species. Immunization with dendritic cells transfected with a plasmid encoding the scFv (pMAC/PS-scFv that mimics the main antigen of P. brasiliensis (gp43 confers protection in experimental PCM. DCs link innate and adaptive immunity by recognizing invading pathogens and selecting the type of effector T cell to mediate the immune response. Here, we showed that DC-pMAC/PS-scFv induces the activation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Moreover, our results demonstrated that BALB/c mice infected with P. brasiliensis and treated with DC-pMAC/PS-scFv showed the induction of specific IgG production against gp43 and IFN-γ, IL-12 and IL-4 cytokines. Analysis of regional lymph nodes revealed increases in the expression of clec7a, myd88, tlr2, gata3 and tbx21, which are involved in the immune response. Taken together, our results indicate that the scFv modulates the humoral and cellular immune responses and presents epitopes to CD4+ and CD8+ T cells.

  10. Nanoparticles for the delivery of therapeutic antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sousa, Flávia; Castro, Pedro; Fonte, Pedro;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Over the past two decades, therapeutic antibodies have demonstrated promising results in the treatment of a wide array of diseases. However, the application of antibody-based therapy implies multiple administrations and a high cost of antibody production, resulting in costly therapy...

  11. Promising More Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    When NASA needed a real-time, online database system capable of tracking documentation changes in its propulsion test facilities, engineers at Stennis Space Center joined with ECT International, of Brookfield, Wisconsin, to create a solution. Through NASA's Dual-Use Program, ECT developed Exdata, a software program that works within the company's existing Promise software. Exdata not only satisfied NASA s requirements, but also expanded ECT s commercial product line. Promise, ECT s primary product, is an intelligent software program with specialized functions for designing and documenting electrical control systems. An addon to AutoCAD software, Promis e generates control system schematics, panel layouts, bills of material, wire lists, and terminal plans. The drawing functions include symbol libraries, macros, and automatic line breaking. Primary Promise customers include manufacturing companies, utilities, and other organizations with complex processes to control.

  12. Characterization and evaluation of a novel anti-MUC-1 monoclonal antibody:induction of the idiotypic network in experimental mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马洁; 曹利人

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the anti-idiotypic effect induced by a monoclonal antibody.Methods A conventional fusion method was used to obtain hybridoma cells produing monoclonal antibody, which were detected by flow cytometry. ELISA were used to detect the humoral response induced by the antibody in mice. Cytotoxic and proliferation experiments were used to detect the cellular response induced by the antibody in mice.Results CS20 is a MUC-1 specific monoclonal antibody that strongly reacts with MUC-1 antigen expressed on the cell surface of breast cancer cells. The antibody could not kill tumor cells directly through complement-dependant cytotoxicity or antibody-dependant cell-mediated cytotoxicity. However, after 6 administrations of mAb CS20-KLH (keyhole limpet hemocyanin) conjugated to BALB/c mice (n=5) at a dose of 50 μg/mouse, anti-idiotypic antibodies and anti-anti-idiotypic antibodies were induced. T cells derived from CS20-KLH-immunized mice responded to mAb CS20, indicating the existence of idiotype-specific T cells.Conclusion These data indicated the possibility of using MUC-1 specific antibody for active immunotherapy of breast cancer.

  13. The promise of dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, Louise Jane

    It has become commonplace to employ dialogue-based approaches in producing and communicating knowledge in diverse fields. Here, “dialogue” has become a buzzword that promises democratic, participatory processes of mutual learning and knowledge co-production. But what does “dialogue” actually entail...... in the fields in which it is practised and how can we analyse those practices in ways that take account of their complexities? The Promise of Dialogue presents a novel theoretical framework for analysing the dialogic turn in the production and communication of knowledge that builds bridges across three research...

  14. Promising change, delivering continuity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Jens Friis; Sungusia, Eliezeri; Mabele, Mathew Bukhi;

    2017-01-01

    have conceptualized REDD+ as an example of ‘‘green grabbing” and have voiced fears of a potential global rush for land and trees. In this paper we argue that, in practice and up until now, REDD+ resembles longstanding dynamics of the development and conservation industry, where the promise of change...

  15. Is Bitcoin Promising?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张程程

    2014-01-01

    On 26th Feb. 2014, the biggest Bitcoin trading platform al over the world was of line. It was bankrupt due to data theft. Global Bitcoin players got into a panic. Is Bitcoin promising? Below I wil analyze this question on several aspects, which are Bitcoins’ traits, demerits, and contrasts.

  16. MM3-ELISA evaluation of coproantigen release and serum antibody production in sheep experimentally infected with Fasciola hepatica and F. gigantica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, M Adela; Ubeira, Florencio M; Khoubbane, Messaoud; Artigas, Patricio; Muiño, Laura; Mezo, Mercedes; Pérez-Crespo, Ignacio; Periago, M Victoria; Mas-Coma, Santiago

    2009-01-22

    During an experimental infection of sheep with Fasciola hepatica or F. gigantica, MM3-SERO and MM3-COPRO ELISA tests were applied to compare the kinetics of antibody production and coproantigen release between the 2nd and 32nd week post-infection (wpi). The Kato-Katz technique was used to measure the kinetics of egg shedding by both Fasciola species (eggs per gram of feces, epg). The kinetics of IgG antibodies for all sheep infected with F. hepatica and F. gigantica followed a similar pattern. Optical density (OD) increased rapidly between the 4th until the 12th wpi, when the highest values were reached and then decreased slowly until the 32nd wpi. Coproantigen levels increased above the cut-off value between 6 and 9 wpi in the F. hepatica group, and between 9 and 11wpi in the F. gigantica group. The comparison between coproantigen levels and epg indicated that F. hepatica-infected sheep had detectable amounts of coproantigens 4-7 weeks before patency (egg shedding), while F. gigantica-infected sheep had detectable amounts of coproantigens 3-6 weeks before patency. When comparing the kinetics of coproantigen release vs the kinetics of epg, a similar pattern emerged, but with a two-week time-lag in epg, for both F. hepatica and F. gigantica infections. The amount of coproantigen release by each adult was not burden dependent for F. hepatica infection (burden of 33-66 adults), while it was for F. gigantica infection (burden of 17-69 adults). The results demonstrate the usefulness of the MM3-SERO and MM3-COPRO ELISAs as tools for the diagnosis of early as well as long-term fascioliasis infections, and suggest that they can potentially be applied to human fascioliasis even in countries where F. hepatica and F. gigantica co-exist. These tests can be employed not only in the diagnosis, but also in studies on epidemiology as well as pathogenesis and treatment in animals and humans since they allow post-treatment infection monitoring.

  17. Antibody to a 145-kilodalton outer membrane protein has bactericidal activity and protective activity against experimental bacteremia caused by a Brazilian purpuric fever isolate of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius. The Brazilian Purpuric Fever Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, L G; Rizvi, A

    1991-12-01

    The immunologic basis for protection against Brazilian purpuric fever, a septicemic infection associated with Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius bacteremia, is unknown. Passive immunization of infant rats with antiserum to whole bacterial cells of the homologous strain protects them from experimental bacteremia following bacterial challenge. In immunoblotting, antibody to a 145-kDa protein (P145) was present in protective antisera but not in nonprotective antisera. As judged by analysis of the antibodies eluted from whole bacterial cells and the agglutination of bacteria by antisera to P145, this protein is surface exposed. We prepared monospecific rat antisera to this protein by three methods: (i) immunization with whole bacterial cells and absorption with a Brazilian purpuric fever strain not expressing P145, (ii) immunization with gel-purified P145, and (iii) immunization with a P145-expressing transformant of a laboratory H. influenzae strain expressing this protein and absorption of the antiserum with the laboratory H. influenzae strain. These antisera had low antilipooligosaccharide antibody titers, were reactive only with P145, and had bactericidal activity in vitro. Following passive immunization, these antisera partially protected infant rats from bacteremia resulting from intraperitoneal challenge with bacteria. As assessed by immunoblotting, pooled adult human sera contained antibodies reactive with P145. Antibody to P145 may contribute to protection against Brazilian purpuric fever.

  18. {sup 99m}Tc-annexin V and {sup 111}In-antimyosin antibody uptake in experimental myocardial infarction in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarda-Mantel, Laure; Rouzet, Francois; Martet, Genevieve; Raguin, Olivier; Vrigneaud, Jean-Marc; Guludec, Dominique Le [Bichat Hospital AP-HP, EA 3512, Nuclear Medicine Department, Paris (France); Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Louedec, Liliane [INSERM U460, UFR Bichat, Paris (France); Vanderheyden, Jean-Luc [Theseus Imaging Corporation, Boston, MA (United States); Hervatin, Florence [Bichat Hospital AP-HP, EA 3512, Nuclear Medicine Department, Paris (France); CGA/SHFS, Orsay (France); Khaw, Ban An [Bouve College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Center for Drug Targeting and Analysis, Boston, MA (United States)

    2006-03-15

    {sup 99m}Tc-annexin V (ANX) allows scintigraphic detection of apoptotic cells via specific binding to exposed phosphatidylserine. In myocardial infarction, apoptosis of myocytes is variable and depends especially on the presence or absence of coronary reperfusion. In this study, ANX uptake in non-reperfused experimental myocardial infarcts was compared with uptake of a marker of myocyte necrosis ({sup 111}In-antimyosin antibodies, AM) and an immunohistochemical marker of apoptosis (Apostain). The left anterior coronary artery was ligated in 47 Wistar rats, which were then injected with ANX (n=20), AM (n=21) or both (n=6). Myocardial uptake of ANX and AM was determined at 2 h (n=14), 4 h (n=14) and 24 h (n=19) after coronary ligation (CL), by quantitative autoradiography with (n=23) or without (n=24) gamma imaging. Heart-to-lung ratios (HLRs) and infarct-to-remote myocardium activity ratios (INRs) were calculated on the scintigrams and autoradiograms respectively. Cardiac sections were stained with haematoxylin-eosin and Apostain. The above studies were repeated in 12 normal rats. All rats with CL showed increased ANX and AM uptake in cardiac areas on scintigrams 24 h after CL, with HLRs higher than in controls: 3.1{+-}0.6 versus 1.5{+-}0.3 (p=0.001) for ANX and 1.99{+-}0.44 versus 1.01{+-}0.05 (p<0.0005) for AM. Autoradiography showed intense ANX and AM uptake in infarcts, with comparable topography and INRs at 2 h, 4 h and 24 h after CL (4.6{+-}0.9 versus 5.0{+-}1.8 at 24 h), while Apostain staining was very low (0.06{+-}0.06% of cells). In this model of persistent CL, we observed increased ANX uptake in injured myocardium, comparable in intensity, topography and kinetics to that of AM. There was only minimal Apostain staining in the same areas. (orig.)

  19. Autologous antibodies that bind neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yujing; Sholler, Giselle S; Shukla, Girja S; Pero, Stephanie C; Carman, Chelsea L; Zhao, Ping; Krag, David N

    2015-11-01

    Antibody therapy of neuroblastoma is promising and our goal is to derive antibodies from patients with neuroblastoma for developing new therapeutic antibodies. The feasibility of using residual bone marrow obtained for clinical indications as a source of tumor cells and a source of antibodies was assessed. From marrow samples, neuroblastoma cells were recovered, grown in cell culture and also implanted into mice to create xenografts. Mononuclear cells from the marrow were used as a source to generate phage display antibody libraries and also hybridomas. Growth of neuroblastoma patient cells was possible both in vitro and as xenografts. Antibodies from the phage libraries and from the monoclonal hybridomas bound autologous neuroblastoma cells with some selectivity. It appears feasible to recover neuroblastoma cells from residual marrow specimens and to generate human antibodies that bind autologous neuroblastoma cells. Expansion of this approach is underway to collect more specimens, optimize methods to generate antibodies, and to evaluate the bioactivity of neuroblastoma-binding antibodies.

  20. Influence of Maternal Antibodies on Efficacy of Porcine Circovirus Type 2 (PCV2) Vaccination To Protect Pigs from Experimental Infection with PCV2▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opriessnig, T.; Patterson, A. R.; Elsener, J.; Meng, X. J.; Halbur, P. G.

    2008-01-01

    Due to the ubiquitous nature of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) in the pig population and the increasing use of PCV2 vaccines in breeding herds, the majority of dams have been exposed to field PCV2 or PCV2 vaccines, resulting in piglets with varied levels of passively acquired PCV2 maternal antibodies. The objective of the current research was to investigate the influence of passively acquired anti-PCV2 antibodies on PCV2 vaccine efficacy. Sixty 26-day-old pigs were divided into four groups: vaccinated pigs with no maternal PCV2 antibodies at the time of vaccination (VAC-NEG; n = 9), vaccinated pigs with maternal PCV2 antibodies at the time of vaccination (VAC-POS; n = 21), nonvaccinated pigs with no maternal antibodies at the time of challenge (NVAC-CNEG; n = 15), and nonvaccinated pigs with maternal antibodies at the time of challenge (NVAC-CPOS; n = 15). Vaccinations and challenges were performed on trial days 0 and 28, respectively, according to group designation. The pigs were monitored for clinical signs of disease daily and weighed weekly, and blood was collected weekly. All pigs were necropsied on trial day 49, and tissues were evaluated for macroscopic and microscopic lesions. Serum was evaluated using PCV2 immunoglobulin G (IgG) and PCV2 IgM enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, quantitative PCV2 PCR, and a serum PCV2 neutralizing antibody test. In comparison to NVAC-CPOS pigs, VAC-POS animals had significantly (P < 0.01) less severe microscopic PCV2-associated lymphoid lesions and significantly (P < 0.04) reduced PCV2 genomic copies in serum following PCV2 challenge. These results indicate that vaccination with Suvaxyn PCV2 One Dose reduces viremia and prevents microscopic lesions associated with PCV2 in the presence of maternal antibodies. PMID:18094109

  1. Influence of maternal antibodies on efficacy of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) vaccination to protect pigs from experimental infection with PCV2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opriessnig, T; Patterson, A R; Elsener, J; Meng, X J; Halbur, P G

    2008-03-01

    Due to the ubiquitous nature of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) in the pig population and the increasing use of PCV2 vaccines in breeding herds, the majority of dams have been exposed to field PCV2 or PCV2 vaccines, resulting in piglets with varied levels of passively acquired PCV2 maternal antibodies. The objective of the current research was to investigate the influence of passively acquired anti-PCV2 antibodies on PCV2 vaccine efficacy. Sixty 26-day-old pigs were divided into four groups: vaccinated pigs with no maternal PCV2 antibodies at the time of vaccination (VAC-NEG; n = 9), vaccinated pigs with maternal PCV2 antibodies at the time of vaccination (VAC-POS; n = 21), nonvaccinated pigs with no maternal antibodies at the time of challenge (NVAC-CNEG; n = 15), and nonvaccinated pigs with maternal antibodies at the time of challenge (NVAC-CPOS; n = 15). Vaccinations and challenges were performed on trial days 0 and 28, respectively, according to group designation. The pigs were monitored for clinical signs of disease daily and weighed weekly, and blood was collected weekly. All pigs were necropsied on trial day 49, and tissues were evaluated for macroscopic and microscopic lesions. Serum was evaluated using PCV2 immunoglobulin G (IgG) and PCV2 IgM enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, quantitative PCV2 PCR, and a serum PCV2 neutralizing antibody test. In comparison to NVAC-CPOS pigs, VAC-POS animals had significantly (P < 0.01) less severe microscopic PCV2-associated lymphoid lesions and significantly (P < 0.04) reduced PCV2 genomic copies in serum following PCV2 challenge. These results indicate that vaccination with Suvaxyn PCV2 One Dose reduces viremia and prevents microscopic lesions associated with PCV2 in the presence of maternal antibodies.

  2. Persistence of the protective immunity and kinetics of the isotype specific antibody response against the viral nucleocapsid protein after experimental Schmallenberg virus infection of sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poskin, Antoine; Verite, Stephanie; Comtet, Loic; Van der Stede, Yves; Cay, Brigitte; De Regge, Nick

    2015-10-15

    Schmallenberg virus (SBV) is an Orthobunyavirus that induces abortion, stillbirths and congenital malformations in ruminants. SBV infection induces a long lasting seroconversion under natural conditions. The persistence of the protective immunity and the isotype specific antibody response upon SBV infection of sheep has however not been studied in detail. Five sheep were kept in BSL3 facilities for more than 16 months and subjected to repeated SBV infections. Blood was regularly sampled and organs were collected at euthanasia. The presence of SBV RNA in serum and organs was measured with quantitative real-time PCR. The appearance and persistence of neutralizing and SBV nucleoprotein (N) isotype specific antibodies was determined with virus neutralization tests (VNT) and ELISAs. The primo SBV infection protected ewes against clinical signs, viraemia and virus replication in organs upon challenge infections more than 15 months later. Production of neutralizing SBV specific antibodies was first detected around 6 days post primo-inoculation with VNT and correlated with the appearance of SBV-N specific IgM antibodies. These IgM antibodies remained present for 2 weeks. SBV-N specific IgG antibodies were first detected between 10 and 21 dpi and reached a plateau at 28 dpi. This plateau remained consistently high and no significant decrease in titre was found over a period of more than 1 year. Similar results were found for the neutralising antibody response. In conclusion, the SBV specific IgM response probably eliminates SBV from the blood and the protective immunity induced by SBV infection protects sheep against reinfection for at least 16 months.

  3. Antibody responses to a novel Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein vaccine correlate with protection against experimental malaria infection in Aotus monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Cavanagh

    Full Text Available The Block 2 region of the merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-1 of Plasmodium falciparum has been identified as a target of protective immunity by a combination of seroepidemiology and parasite population genetics. Immunogenicity studies in small animals and Aotus monkeys were used to determine the efficacy of recombinant antigens derived from this region of MSP-1 as a potential vaccine antigen. Aotus lemurinus griseimembra monkeys were immunized three times with a recombinant antigen derived from the Block 2 region of MSP-1 of the monkey-adapted challenge strain, FVO of Plasmodium falciparum, using an adjuvant suitable for use in humans. Immunofluorescent antibody assays (IFA against erythrocytes infected with P. falciparum using sera from the immunized monkeys showed that the MSP-1 Block 2 antigen induced significant antibody responses to whole malaria parasites. MSP-1 Block 2 antigen-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA showed no significant differences in antibody titers between immunized animals. Immunized animals were challenged with the virulent P. falciparum FVO isolate and monitored for 21 days. Two out of four immunized animals were able to control their parasitaemia during the follow-up period, whereas two out of two controls developed fulminating parasitemia. Parasite-specific serum antibody titers measured by IFA were four-fold higher in protected animals than in unprotected animals. In addition, peptide-based epitope mapping of serum antibodies from immunized Aotus showed distinct differences in epitope specificities between protected and unprotected animals.

  4. Antibody responses to a novel Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein vaccine correlate with protection against experimental malaria infection in Aotus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, David R; Kocken, Clemens H M; White, John H; Cowan, Graeme J M; Samuel, Kay; Dubbeld, Martin A; Voorberg-van der Wel, Annemarie; Thomas, Alan W; McBride, Jana S; Arnot, David E

    2014-01-01

    The Block 2 region of the merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-1) of Plasmodium falciparum has been identified as a target of protective immunity by a combination of seroepidemiology and parasite population genetics. Immunogenicity studies in small animals and Aotus monkeys were used to determine the efficacy of recombinant antigens derived from this region of MSP-1 as a potential vaccine antigen. Aotus lemurinus griseimembra monkeys were immunized three times with a recombinant antigen derived from the Block 2 region of MSP-1 of the monkey-adapted challenge strain, FVO of Plasmodium falciparum, using an adjuvant suitable for use in humans. Immunofluorescent antibody assays (IFA) against erythrocytes infected with P. falciparum using sera from the immunized monkeys showed that the MSP-1 Block 2 antigen induced significant antibody responses to whole malaria parasites. MSP-1 Block 2 antigen-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) showed no significant differences in antibody titers between immunized animals. Immunized animals were challenged with the virulent P. falciparum FVO isolate and monitored for 21 days. Two out of four immunized animals were able to control their parasitaemia during the follow-up period, whereas two out of two controls developed fulminating parasitemia. Parasite-specific serum antibody titers measured by IFA were four-fold higher in protected animals than in unprotected animals. In addition, peptide-based epitope mapping of serum antibodies from immunized Aotus showed distinct differences in epitope specificities between protected and unprotected animals.

  5. Gene Therapy Shows Promise for Aggressive Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163824.html Gene Therapy Shows Promise for Aggressive Lymphoma Over one-third ... TUESDAY, Feb. 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental gene therapy for aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma beat back more ...

  6. Thyroid Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... e.g., at regular intervals after thyroid cancer treatment) Thyroid stimulating hormone receptor antibody, Thyroid Stimulating Immunoglobulin TRAb, TSHR Ab, TSI Graves disease When a person has symptoms of hyperthyroidism If a pregnant woman has a known autoimmune ...

  7. Antibody-drug conjugates: Intellectual property considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storz, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates are highly complex entities that combine an antibody, a linker and a toxin. This complexity makes them demanding both technically and from a regulatory point of view, and difficult to deal with in their patent aspects. This article discusses different issues of patent protection and freedom to operate with regard to this promising new class of drugs.

  8. The Promises of Biology and the Biology of Promises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Jieun

    2015-01-01

    commitments with differently imagined futures. I argue that promises are constitutive of the stem cell biology, rather than being derivative of it. Since the biological concept of stem cells is predicated on the future that they promise, the biological life of stem cells is inextricably intertwined...... patients’ bodies in anticipation of materializing the promises of stem cell biology, they are produced as a new form of biovaluable. The promises of biology move beyond the closed circuit of scientific knowledge production, and proliferate in the speculative marketplaces of promises. Part II looks at how...... of technologized biology and biological time can appear promising with the backdrop of the imagined intransigence of social, political, and economic order in the Korean society....

  9. How antibodies use complement to regulate antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sörman, Anna; Zhang, Lu; Ding, Zhoujie; Heyman, Birgitta

    2014-10-01

    Antibodies, forming immune complexes with their specific antigen, can cause complete suppression or several 100-fold enhancement of the antibody response. Immune complexes containing IgG and IgM may activate complement and in such situations also complement components will be part of the immune complex. Here, we review experimental data on how antibodies via the complement system upregulate specific antibody responses. Current data suggest that murine IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b upregulate antibody responses primarily via Fc-receptors and not via complement. In contrast, IgM and IgG3 act via complement and require the presence of complement receptors 1 and 2 (CR1/2) expressed on both B cells and follicular dendritic cells. Complement plays a crucial role for antibody responses not only to antigen complexed to antibodies, but also to antigen administered alone. Lack of C1q, but not of Factor B or MBL, severely impairs antibody responses suggesting involvement of the classical pathway. In spite of this, normal antibody responses are found in mice lacking several activators of the classical pathway (complement activating natural IgM, serum amyloid P component (SAP), specific intracellular adhesion molecule-grabbing non-integrin R1 (SIGN-R1) or C-reactive protein. Possible explanations to these observations will be discussed.

  10. Persistence of the protective immunity and kinetics of the isotype specific antibody response against the viral nucleocapsid protein after experimental Schmallenberg virus infection of sheep

    OpenAIRE

    Poskin, Antoine; Verite, Stephanie; Comtet, Loic; Van der Stede, Yves; Cay, Brigitte; De Regge, Nick

    2015-01-01

    International audience; AbstractSchmallenberg virus (SBV) is an Orthobunyavirus that induces abortion, stillbirths and congenital malformations in ruminants. SBV infection induces a long lasting seroconversion under natural conditions. The persistence of the protective immunity and the isotype specific antibody response upon SBV infection of sheep has however not been studied in detail. Five sheep were kept in BSL3 facilities for more than 16 months and subjected to repeated SBV infections. B...

  11. Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society December 7-10, 2015, San Diego, CA, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauthner, Matthias; Yeung, Jenny; Ullman, Chris; Bakker, Joost; Wurch, Thierry; Reichert, Janice M; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Carter, Paul J; Melis, Joost P M

    2016-01-01

    The 26th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society united over 800 participants from all over the world in San Diego from 6-10 December 2015. The latest innovations and advances in antibody research and development were discussed, covering a myriad of antibody-related topics by more than 100 speakers, who were carefully selected by The Antibody Society. As a prelude, attendees could join the pre-conference training course focusing, among others, on the engineering and enhancement of antibodies and antibody-like scaffolds, bispecific antibody engineering and adaptation to generate chimeric antigen receptor constructs. The main event covered 4 d of scientific sessions that included antibody effector functions, reproducibility of research and diagnostic antibodies, new developments in antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), preclinical and clinical ADC data, new technologies and applications for bispecific antibodies, antibody therapeutics for non-cancer and orphan indications, antibodies to harness the cellular immune system, building comprehensive IgVH-gene repertoires through discovering, confirming and cataloging new germline IgVH genes, and overcoming resistance to clinical immunotherapy. The Antibody Society's special session focused on "Antibodies to watch" in 2016. Another special session put the spotlight on the limitations of the new definitions for the assignment of antibody international nonproprietary names introduced by the World Health Organization. The convention concluded with workshops on computational antibody design and on the promise and challenges of using next-generation sequencing for antibody discovery and engineering from synthetic and in vivo libraries.

  12. The promise of the anti-idiotype concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieber-Emmons, Thomas; Monzavi-Karbassi, Bejatohlah; Pashov, Anastas; Saha, Somdutta; Murali, Ramachandran; Kohler, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    A basic tenet of antibody-based immunity is their specificity to antigenic determinates from foreign pathogen products to abnormal cellular components such as in cancer. However, an antibody has the potential to bind to more than one determinate, be it an antigen or another antibody. These observations led to the idiotype network theory (INT) to explain immune regulation, which has wax and waned in enthusiasm over the years. A truer measure of the impact of the INT is in terms of the ideas that now form the mainstay of immunological research and whose roots are spawned from the promise of the anti-idiotype concept. Among the applications of the INT is understanding the structural implications of the antibody-mediated network that has the potential for innovation in terms of rational design of reagents with biological, chemical, and pharmaceutical applications that underlies concepts of reverse immunology which is highlighted herein. PMID:23267437

  13. The Promise of the Anti-Idiotype Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eKieber-Emmons

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A basic tenet of antibody-based immunity is their specificity to antigenic determinates from foreign pathogen products to abnormal cellular components such as in cancer. However, an antibody has the potential to bind to more than one determinate, be it an antigen or another antibody. These observations led to the Idiotype Network Theory (INT to explain immune regulation, which has wax and waned in enthusiasm over the years. A truer measure of the impact of the INT is in terms of the ideas that are spawned that now form the mainstay of immunological research and whose roots is the promise of the Anti-Id concept. Among the applications of the INT is understanding the structural implications of the antibody mediated network that has the potential for innovation in terms of rational design of reagents with biological, chemical and pharmaceutical applications that underlies concepts of reverse immunology which is highlighted herein.

  14. Experimental on Antibody Targeting Liver Cancer Stem Cell Treatment%肝癌干细胞抗体靶向治疗的实验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙力超; 赵璇; 孙立新; 遇珑; 杨治华; 冉宇靓

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the biological characteristics and function of the anti- hepatocellular carcinoma cancer stem cells (HCC-CSC) monoclonal antibody 15B7 in vivo and in vitro, and to investigate whether the targeting liver stem cells can inhibit recurrence, spontaneous lung metastasis and prolong the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Methods Monoclonal antibody 15B7 which could recognize HCC-CSC was identified by two-color immunofluorescence, two-color flow cytometry and subcutaneous tumor formation assay. CD133+ phenotype cells were sorted from BEL7402 cell lines by the flow cytometry and cultured in serum free medium. The function of 15B7 was identified by CCK8 cell proliferation, invasion assay, migration assay and flow cytometry. The inhibition of implanted tumor growth and spontaneous lung metastasis of monoclonal antibody 15B7 were studied by tumor treatment experiments and the survival of mice was also observed. The antigen of 15B7 was identified by western blotting. Results The results of two-color immunofluorescence and two-color flow cytometry showed that monoclonal antibody 15B7 could recognized cells which also were partly co-stained with ESA or CD133. 15B7+ or ESA+ cells or CD133+ cells sorted by flow cytometry could form mammospheres after serum-free suspension culture. 1 × 104 15B7+ cells were inoculated into the nude mice and developed visible tumors in 2 months. In vitro functional experiments showed that monoclonal antibody 15B7 could inhibit the proliferation, migration and invasion of CD133+ cells, and the inhibition rates was 13. 8%, 15. 7% and 30. 9%, respectively. Furthermore, CD133+ cells incubated with monoclonal antibody 15B7 were induced G1 phase arrest.Animal experiment revealed that monoclonal antibody 15B7 significantly inhibited tumor growth by 60. 5%. Conclusion 15B7 not only inhibited tumor growth. The results indicated that targeting cancer stem cell antibody therapy had significant advantages and monoclonal antibody 15B7

  15. Single-domain antibodies for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krah, Simon; Schröter, Christian; Zielonka, Stefan; Empting, Martin; Valldorf, Bernhard; Kolmar, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Single-domain antibodies are the smallest antigen-binding units of antibodies, consisting either only of one variable domain or one engineered constant domain that solely facilitates target binding. This class of antibody derivatives comprises naturally occurring variable domains derived from camelids and sharks as well as engineered human variable or constant antibody domains of the heavy or light chain. Because of their high affinity and specificity as well as stability, small size and benefit of multiple re-formatting opportunities, those molecules emerged as promising candidates for biomedical applications and some of these entities have already proven to be successful in clinical development.

  16. JavaScript promises essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Sarieddine, Rami

    2014-01-01

    If you are a JavaScript developer working with asynchronous operations and want to know more about promises, then this book is ideal for you. Having a detailed explanation of JavaScript promises will be perfect as your next step towards adopting this new standard and using the API in your web and JavaScript applications.

  17. Promising treatments of tomorrow for multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic options for multiple sclerosis are rapidly expanding. What was once seen as a disease with little hope for treatment is now a target of rapid drug development. Current therapies have demonstrated efficacy in limiting the impact of the disease, but none is fully effective in all patients. However, promising new treatments are on the horizon. In this review we will discuss potential novel immunomodulating drugs that are in advanced stages of investigation; these drugs include monoclonal antibodies, chimeric molecules, and oral therapies. The use of hematopoietic stem cells will also be discussed and, in addition, we will look farther ahead at possible novel targets for the development of new immunomodulatory or neuroprotective pharmaceuticals.

  18. Antiparietal cell antibody test

    Science.gov (United States)

    APCA; Anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Atrophic gastritis - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Gastric ulcer - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Pernicious anemia - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; ...

  19. Controlled delivery of antibodies from injectable hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Nathan A; Babcock, Lyndsey R; Murray, Ellen A; Krebs, Melissa D

    2016-02-01

    Therapeutic antibodies are currently used for the treatment of various diseases, but large doses delivered systemically are typically required. Localized controlled delivery techniques would afford major benefits such as decreasing side effects and required doses. Injectable biopolymer systems are an attractive solution due to their minimally invasive potential for controlled release in a localized area. Here, alginate-chitosan hydrogels are demonstrated to provide controlled delivery of IgG model antibodies and also of Fab antibody fragments. Also, an alternate delivery system comprised of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres loaded with antibodies and encapsulated in alginate was shown to successfully provide another level of control over release. These biopolymer systems that offer controlled delivery for antibodies and antibody fragments will be promising for many applications in drug delivery and regenerative medicine.

  20. The Promise of Personalized Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Past Issues From The Director The Promise of Personalized Medicine Past Issues / Winter 2007 Table of Contents ... medicine that I call the four Ps: predictive, personalized, preemptive and participatory. This requires patient involvement well ...

  1. Experimental studies for immunoscintigraphy of adenocarcinoma of the prostate with [sup 125]I-labeled monoclonal antibody to [gamma]-seminoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujino, Awato; Suyama, Kazuho; Shidara, Toshiya; Ao, Teruaki; Ishibashi, Akira; Koshiba, Ken (Kitasato Univ., Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1994-02-01

    We established LNCaP tumor in male nude mice after inoculation of LNCaP cells. The tumor produces the organ-specific glycoproteins in the human prostate, [gamma]-seminoprotein ([gamma]-Sm). The LNCaP tumor is composed of fluid and solid portions. The fluid portion contains much more [gamma]-Sm than the solid part. Monoclonal antibody against [gamma]-Sm (murine IgG[sub 1], K) was radiolabeled with iodine-125 by lactoperoxidase method followed by passage over column chromatography. Finally the conjugates with specific activity of 49.8-56.6 KBq/[mu]g were obtained. Biodistribution of [sup 125]I- labeled monoclonal antibody to [gamma]-Sm ([sup 125]I-[gamma]MAb) was evaluated by whole-body autoradiography (ARG) and by determination of label uptake (DLU) by the LNCaP tumor using the well type gamma counter. The ARG were obtained 1-9 days after intravenous administration of 32-38 [mu]g of [sup 125]I-[gamma]MAb to 12 nude mice bearing LNCaP tumor. The DLU were evaluated 3, 4 and 7 days after intravenous administration of 18-25 [mu]g of [sup 125]I- [gamma]MAb to 9 nude mice bearing LNCaP tumor. The DLU by organs (fluid portion, solid portion, liver, kidney, spleen, lung, etc.) were expressed as F-values (%) which were calculated by the following formula: F=radioactivity per gram of tissue (dpm/g) / injected dose per gram of animal (dpm/g)x100 and tissue-to-blood ratios (T/B). The specific uptake by the LNCaP tumors, especially in the fluid portion, was observed on ARG, with optimal images of the tumor evaluated 4-7 days after administration. The F-values and T/B of the LNCaP tumors were always higher than those of other organs. Especially T/B of fluid portion were of 6.7 and 6.3, evaluated 4 and 7 days after administration of [sup 125]I-[gamma]MAb respectively. These results suggest that the radiolabeled [gamma] MAb is applicable for immunoscintigraphy of adenocarcinoma of the prostate. (author).

  2. Milk supplemented with immune colostrum: protection against rotavirus diarrhea and modulatory effect on the systemic and mucosal antibody responses in calves experimentally challenged with bovine rotavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parreño, V; Marcoppido, G; Vega, C; Garaicoechea, L; Rodriguez, D; Saif, L; Fernández, F

    2010-07-01

    Group A bovine rotavirus (BRV) is the major cause of neonatal calf diarrhea worldwide. As a preventive strategy, we evaluated the protection and immunomodulation in two groups of BRV-inoculated calves. All calves received control colostrum (CC; VN=65,536; IgG(1)=16,384) prior to gut closure followed by the milk supplemented with immune colostrum (VN=1,048,576; IgG(1)=262,144), twice a day, for 14 days. Calves received milk supplemented with 0.8% immune colostrum [(Gp 1) VN=16,384; IgG(1)=4096] or milk supplemented with 0.4% immune colostrum [(Gp 2) VN=1024; IgG(1)=1024]. Calves receiving CC or colostrum deprived calves (CD) fed antibody (Ab) free milk served as controls (Gp 3 and 4). Calves were inoculated with virulent BRV IND at 2 days of age. Group 1 calves (milk IgG(1) 4096) showed 80% protection against BRV diarrhea and significantly reduced virus shedding. At 21 post-inoculation days (PID), the antibody secreting cell (ASC) responses of Gp 1 calves were limited mainly to duodenal and jejunal lamina propria (LP) with limited or no responses in systemic sites (spleen and PBL) and mesenteric lymph nodes. The profile of serum and fecal Ab responses as well as the ASC responses was also modulated by the presence of passive IgG(1) Abs and probably other colostrum components, toward higher titers of IgA Ab in serum and feces and a greater number of IgA ASC in the proximal intestine, reflecting positive modulation by colostrum toward this isotype associated with optimal protection of the intestinal mucosa. After challenge, at PID 21, all calves in Gp 1 and 2 were fully protected against diarrhea and only 1 of 5 calves in Gp 1 shed virus asymptomatically, indicating that the passive Ab treatment for 14 days was effective in protecting most of the animals after a first and a second virus exposure. The final outcome was a positive modulation of the mucosal immune responses and a high protection rate against diarrhea and virus shedding during the period of peak

  3. Relevance of anti-myelin antibodies in Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Antibodies directed against myelin antigens have been described in multiple sclerosis (MS). Although anti-myelin antibodies have been implicated in central nervous system (CNS) demyelination, it is unclear to what extent anti-myelin antibodies contribute to MS pathogenesis. In this dissertation, the role of antibodies in MS and in the animal model experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) is addressed in eight chapters: Chapter 1: A review on antibodies, complement and Fc receptors in MS ...

  4. Trichinella spiralis, T-britovi, and T-nativa: infectivity, larval distribution in muscle, and antibody response after experimental infection of pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapel, C.M.O.; Webster, P.; Lind, Peter;

    1998-01-01

    The infectivity of Trichinella spiralis, T. nativa, and T. britovi was experimentally compared in pigs. Blood sampling was performed weekly, and muscle juices were obtained at slaughter 10 weeks after inoculation. Muscle larvae were found in all of four pigs inoculated with T. spiralis [mean 190...

  5. TOMOCOMD-CARDD, a novel approach for computer-aided 'rational' drug design: I. Theoretical and experimental assessment of a promising method for computational screening and in silico design of new anthelmintic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Castillo-Garit, Juan A; Olazabal, Ervelio; Serrano, Hector S; Morales, Alcidez; Castañedo, Nilo; Ibarra-Velarde, Froylán; Huesca-Guillen, Alma; Jorge, Elisa; del Valle, Arletys; Torrens, Francisco; Castro, Eduardo A

    2004-10-01

    In this work, the TOMOCOMD-CARDD approach has been applied to estimate the anthelmintic activity. Total and local (both atom and atom-type) quadratic indices and linear discriminant analysis were used to obtain a quantitative model that discriminates between anthelmintic and non-anthelmintic drug-like compounds. The obtained model correctly classified 90.37% of compounds in the training set. External validation processes to assess the robustness and predictive power of the obtained model were carried out. The QSAR model correctly classified 88.18% of compounds in this external prediction set. A second model was performed to outline some conclusions about the possible modes of action of anthelmintic drugs. This model permits the correct classification of 94.52% of compounds in the training set, and 80.00% of good global classification in the external prediction set. After that, the developed model was used in virtual in silico screening and several compounds from the Merck Index, Negwer's handbook and Goodman and Gilman were identified by models as anthelmintic. Finally, the experimental assay of one organic chemical (G-1) by an in vivo test coincides fairly well (100%) with model predictions. These results suggest that the proposed method will be a good tool for studying the biological properties of drug candidates during the early state of the drug-development process.

  6. Mastering JavaScript promises

    CERN Document Server

    Hussain, Muzzamil

    2015-01-01

    This book is for all the software and web engineers wanting to apply the promises paradigm to their next project and get the best outcome from it. This book also acts as a reference for the engineers who are already using promises in their projects and want to improve their current knowledge to reach the next level. To get the most benefit from this book, you should know basic programming concepts, have a familiarity with JavaScript, and a good understanding of HTML.

  7. Atom, atom-type and total molecular linear indices as a promising approach for bioorganic and medicinal chemistry: theoretical and experimental assessment of a novel method for virtual screening and rational design of new lead anthelmintic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Castillo-Garit, Juan A; Olazabal, Ervelio; Serrano, Hector S; Morales, Alcidez; Castañedo, Nilo; Ibarra-Velarde, Froylán; Huesca-Guillen, Alma; Sánchez, Alicia M; Torrens, Francisco; Castro, Eduardo A

    2005-02-15

    Helminth infections are a medical problem in the world nowadays. In this paper a novel atom-level chemical descriptor has been applied to estimate the anthelmintic activity. Total and local linear indices and linear discriminant analysis were used to obtain a quantitative model that discriminates between anthelmintic and non-anthelmintic drug-like compounds. The discriminant model has an accuracy of 90.11% in the training set, with a high Matthews' correlation coefficient (MCC=0.80). To assess the robustness and predictive power of the obtained model, internal (leave-n-out) and external validation process was performed. The QSAR model correctly classified 88.55% of compounds in this external prediction set, yielding a MCC of 0.77. Another LDA model was carried out to outline some conclusions about the possible modes of action of anthelmintic drugs. It has an accuracy of 93.50% in the training set, and 80.00% in the external prediction set. After that, the developed model was used in the virtual--in silico--screening and several compounds from the Merck Index, Negwer's Handbook and Goodman and Gilman were identified by the model as anthelmintic. Finally, the experimental assay of an organic chemical (a furylethylene derivative) by an in vivo test permits us to carry out an assessment of the model. An accuracy of 100% with the theoretical predictions was observed. These results suggest that the proposed method will be a good tool for studying the biological properties of drug candidates during the early state of the drug-development process.

  8. Treatment with a Monoclonal Anti-IL-12p40 Antibody Induces Substantial Gut Microbiota Changes in an Experimental Colitis Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josué Castro-Mejía

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim. Crohn’s disease is associated with gut microbiota (GM dysbiosis. Treatment with the anti-IL-12p40 monoclonal antibody (12p40-mAb has therapeutic effect in Crohn’s disease patients. This study addresses whether a 12p40-mAb treatment influences gut microbiota (GM composition in mice with adoptive transfer colitis (AdTr-colitis. Methods. AdTr-colitis mice were treated with 12p40-mAb or rat-IgG2a or NaCl from days 21 to 47. Disease was monitored by changes in body weight, stool, endoscopic and histopathology scores, immunohistochemistry, and colonic cytokine/chemokine profiles. GM was characterized through DGGE and 16S rRNA gene-amplicon high-throughput sequencing. Results. Following 12p40-mAb treatment, most clinical and pathological parameters associated with colitis were either reduced or absent. GM was shifted towards a higher Firmicutes-to-Bacteroidetes ratio compared to rat-IgG2a treated mice. Significant correlations between 17 bacterial genera and biological markers were found. The relative abundances of the RF32 order (Alphaproteobacteria and Akkermansia muciniphila were positively correlated with damaged histopathology and colonic inflammation. Conclusions. Shifts in GM distribution were observed with clinical response to 12p40-mAb treatment, whereas specific GM members correlated with colitis symptoms. Our study implicates that specific changes in GM may be connected with positive clinical outcomes and suggests preventing or correcting GM dysbiosis as a treatment goal in inflammatory bowel disease.

  9. The Ambivalence of Promising Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shelley-Egan, Clare

    2010-01-01

    Issues of responsibility in the world of nanotechnology are becoming explicit with the emergence of a discourse on ‘responsible development’ of nanoscience and nanotechnologies. Much of this discourse centres on the ambivalences of nanotechnology and of promising technology in general. Actors must f

  10. The Promises of Biology and the Biology of Promises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Jieun

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation considers the ontology of stem cells as a future-oriented life form characterized by its potentiality in relation to the anticipatory mode of living in contemporary Korea. The biological notion that stem cells have the potential for differentiation and the capacity for self-rene...... of technologized biology and biological time can appear promising with the backdrop of the imagined intransigence of social, political, and economic order in the Korean society....

  11. The antibody Hijikata Tatsumi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éden Peretta

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Considered one of the most influential modern dance representatives in Japan, Tatsumi Hijikata’s work was a milestone in the Japanese post-war experimental artistic scene. Heretic son of his time, he staged a fertile mix of artistic and cultural influences, overlapping subversive elements of European arts and philosophy with radical references from pre-modern Japanese culture. In this way he built the foundations of its unstable antibody, its political-artistic project of dissolution of a organism, both physical and social.

  12. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1992-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated.

  13. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  14. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  15. N-terminal residues of an HIV-1 gp41 membrane-proximal external region antigen influence broadly neutralizing 2F5-like antibodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dezhi Li; Jie Liu; Li Zhang; Tianshu Xu; Junheng Chen; Liping Wang; Qi Zhao

    2015-01-01

    The Human immunodeficiency virus type 1(HIV-1) gp41 membrane proximal external region(MPER) is targeted by broadly neutralizing antibodies(e.g. 2F5, 4E10, Z13 e and m66.6), which makes this region a promising target for vaccine design. One strategy to elicit neutralizing antibodies against the MPER epitope is to design peptide immunogens mimicking neutralization structures. To probe 2F5-like neutralizing antibodies, two yeast-displayed antibody libraries from peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a HIV-1 patient were screened against the 2F5 epitope peptide SP62. Two 2F5-like antibodies were identified that specifically recognized SP62. However,these antibodies only weakly neutralized HIV-1 primary isolates. The epitopes recognized by these two 2F5-like antibodies include not only the 2F5 epitope(amino acids(aa) 662–667 in the MPER)but also several other residues(aa 652–655) locating at the N-terminus in SP62. Experimental results suggest that residues of SP62 adjacent to the 2F5 epitope influence the response of broadly neutralizing 2F5-like antibodies in vaccination. Our findings may aid the design of vaccine immunogens and development of therapeutics against HIV-1 infection.

  16. N-terminal residues of an HIV-1 gp41 membrane-proximal external region antigen influence broadly neutralizing 2F5-like antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dezhi; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Li; Xu, Tianshu; Chen, Junheng; Wang, Liping; Zhao, Qi

    2015-12-01

    The Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp41 membrane proximal external region (MPER) is targeted by broadly neutralizing antibodies (e.g. 2F5, 4E10, Z13e and m66.6), which makes this region a promising target for vaccine design. One strategy to elicit neutralizing antibodies against the MPER epitope is to design peptide immunogens mimicking neutralization structures. To probe 2F5-like neutralizing antibodies, two yeast-displayed antibody libraries from peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a HIV-1 patient were screened against the 2F5 epitope peptide SP62. Two 2F5-like antibodies were identified that specifically recognized SP62. However, these antibodies only weakly neutralized HIV-1 primary isolates. The epitopes recognized by these two 2F5-like antibodies include not only the 2F5 epitope (amino acids (aa) 662-667 in the MPER) but also several other residues (aa 652-655) locating at the N-terminus in SP62. Experimental results suggest that residues of SP62 adjacent to the 2F5 epitope influence the response of broadly neutralizing 2F5-like antibodies in vaccination. Our findings may aid the design of vaccine immunogens and development of therapeutics against HIV-1 infection.

  17. Next generation of antibody therapy for cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenping Zhu; Li Yan

    2011-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become a major class of therapeutic agents providing effective altematives to treating various human diseases. To date, 15 mAbs have been approved by regulatory agencies in the world for clinical use in oncology indications. The selectivity and specificity, the unique pharmacokinetics, and the ability to engage and activate the host immune system differentiate these biologics from traditional small molecule anticancer drugs. mAb-basod regimens have brought clinical benefits, including improvements in overall survival, to patients with a variety of cancers. Many challenges still remain, however, to fully realize the potential of these new medicines. With our further understanding of cancer biology, mechanism of antibody action, and advancement of antibody engineering technologies, many novel antibody formats or antibody-derived molecules are emerging as promising new generation therapeutics. Carefully designed and engineered, they retain the advantage of specificity and selectivity of original antibodies, but in the meantime acquire additional special features such as improved pharmacokinetics, increased selectivity, and enhanced anticancer efficacy. Promising clinical results are being generated with these newly improved antibody-based therapeutics.

  18. Peptide-Based Vaccinology: Experimental and Computational Approaches to Target Hypervariable Viruses through the Fine Characterization of Protective Epitopes Recognized by Monoclonal Antibodies and the Identification of T-Cell-Activating Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Castelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Defining immunogenic domains of viral proteins capable of eliciting a protective immune response is crucial in the development of novel epitope-based prophylactic strategies. This is particularly important for the selective targeting of conserved regions shared among hypervariable viruses. Studying postinfection and postimmunization sera, as well as cloning and characterization of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs, still represents the best approach to identify protective epitopes. In particular, a protective mAb directed against conserved regions can play a key role in immunogen design and in human therapy as well. Experimental approaches aiming to characterize protective mAb epitopes or to identify T-cell-activating peptides are often burdened by technical limitations and can require long time to be correctly addressed. Thus, in the last decade many epitope predictive algorithms have been developed. These algorithms are continually evolving, and their use to address the empirical research is widely increasing. Here, we review several strategies based on experimental techniques alone or addressed by in silico analysis that are frequently used to predict immunogens to be included in novel epitope-based vaccine approaches. We will list the main strategies aiming to design a new vaccine preparation conferring the protection of a neutralizing mAb combined with an effective cell-mediated response.

  19. Breadth of humoral response and antigenic targets of sporozoite-inhibitory antibodies associated with sterile protection induced by controlled human malaria infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Kaitian; Goh, Yun Shan; Siau, Anthony; Franetich, Jean-François; Chia, Wan Ni; Ong, Alice Soh Meoy; Malleret, Benoit; Wu, Ying Ying; Snounou, Georges; Hermsen, Cornelus C.; Adams, John H.; Mazier, Dominique; Preiser, Peter R.; Sauerwein, Robert W.; Grüner, Anne-Charlotte; Rénia, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    The development of an effective malaria vaccine has remained elusive even until today. This is due to our incomplete understanding of the immune mechanisms that confer and/or correlate with protection. Human volunteers have been protected experimentally from a subsequent challenge by immunization with Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites under drug cover. Here, we demonstrate that sera from the protected individuals contain neutralizing antibodies against the pre erythrocytic stage. To identify the antigen(s) recognized by these antibodies, a newly developed library of P. falciparum antigens was screened with the neutralizing sera. Antibodies from protected individuals recognized a broad antigenic repertoire of which three antigens, PfMAEBL, PfTRAP and PfSEA1 were recognized by most protected individuals. As a proof of principle, we demonstrated that anti-PfMAEBL antibodies block liver stage development in human hepatocytes. Thus, these antigens identified are promising targets for vaccine development against malaria. PMID:27130708

  20. The Promise of Quantum Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Muller, Richard P

    2015-01-01

    Quantum simulation promises to be one of the primary application of quantum computers, should one be constructed. This article briefly summarizes the history quantum simulation in light of the recent result of Wang and coworkers demonstrating calculation of the ground and excited states for a HeH+ molecule, and concludes with a discussion of why this and other recent progress in the field suggests that quantum simulation of quantum chemistry has a bright future.

  1. Nanomaterials promise better bone repair

    OpenAIRE

    Qifei Wang; Jianhua Yan; Junlin Yang; Bingyun Li

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials mimicking the nano-features of bones and offering unique smart functions are promising for better bone fracture repair. This review provides an overview of the current state-of-the-art research in developing and using nanomaterials for better bone fracture repair. This review begins with a brief introduction of bone fracture repair processes, then discusses the importance of vascularization, the role of growth factors in bone fracture repair, and the failure of bone fracture rep...

  2. Dextran: A promising macromolecular drug carrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaneshwar Suneela

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past three decades intensive efforts have been made to design novel systems able to deliver the drug more effectively to the target site. The ongoing intense search for novel and innovative drug delivery systems is predominantly a consequence of the well-established fact that the conventional dosage forms are not sufficiently effective in conveying the drug compound to its site of action and once in the target area, in releasing the active agent over a desired period of time. The potential use of macromolecular prodrugs as a means of achieving targeted drug delivery has attracted considerable interest in recent years. Macromolecules such as antibodies, lipoproteins, lectins, proteins, polypeptides, polysaccharides, natural as well as synthetic polymers offer potential applicabilities as high molecular weight carriers for various therapeutically active compounds. Dextrans serve as one of the most promising macromolecular carrier candidates for a wide variety of therapeutic agents due to their excellent physico-chemical properties and physiological acceptance. The present contribution attempts to review various features of the dextran carrier like its source, structural and physico-chemical characteristics, pharmacokinetic fate and its applications as macromolecular carrier with special emphasis on dextran prodrugs.

  3. [Antinuclear antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabiedes, Javier; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos A

    2010-01-01

    Anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) are immunoglobulin directed against autologous cell nuclear and cytoplasmic components. Besides the autoimmune ANA there are other ANA that can be detected in circulation, like natural and infectious ANA. Because of its high sensibility, detection of the ANA must be done by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) as screening test and all of those positive samples are convenient to confirm its specificity by ELISA, western blot or other techniques. Positive ANA detected by IIF must be evaluated taking in to account the pattern and titer. The following recommended step is the specificity characterization (reactivity against extractable nuclear antigens [ENA], dsDNA, etc.) which is useful for the diagnosis and follow up of patients with autoimmune diseases, and by such reasoning, its detection must be performed in an orderly and reasonable way using guides or strategies focused to the good use and interpretation of the autoantibodies. The objective of this review is to present a compilation of the literature and our experience in the detection and study of the ANA.

  4. Burkholderia Hep_Hag autotransporter (BuHA proteins elicit a strong antibody response during experimental glanders but not human melioidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foster Simon J

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterial biothreat agents Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei are the cause of glanders and melioidosis, respectively. Genomic and epidemiological studies have shown that B. mallei is a recently emerged, host restricted clone of B. pseudomallei. Results Using bacteriophage-mediated immunoscreening we identified genes expressed in vivo during experimental equine glanders infection. A family of immunodominant antigens were identified that share protein domain architectures with hemagglutinins and invasins. These have been designated Burkholderia Hep_Hag autotransporter (BuHA proteins. A total of 110/207 positive clones (53% of a B. mallei expression library screened with sera from two infected horses belonged to this family. This contrasted with 6/189 positive clones (3% of a B. pseudomallei expression library screened with serum from 21 patients with culture-proven melioidosis. Conclusion Members of the BuHA proteins are found in other Gram-negative bacteria and have been shown to have important roles related to virulence. Compared with other bacterial species, the genomes of both B. mallei and B. pseudomallei contain a relative abundance of this family of proteins. The domain structures of these proteins suggest that they function as multimeric surface proteins that modulate interactions of the cell with the host and environment. Their effect on the cellular immune response to B. mallei and their potential as diagnostics for glanders requires further study.

  5. Experimental Drug Shows Promise for Disfiguring Tumor Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... her hip and buttock that rendered the girl wheelchair-bound and pain-ridden, Widemann said. "Her tumor ... to perform phase 1 trials specifically in the pediatric population before expanding to studies that evaluate efficacy," ...

  6. Antibody engineering & therapeutics, the annual meeting of the antibody society December 7–10, 2015, San Diego, CA, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauthner, Matthias; Yeung, Jenny; Ullman, Chris; Bakker, Joost; Wurch, Thierry; Reichert, Janice M.; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Bradbury, Andrew R.M.; Carter, Paul J.; Melis, Joost P.M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The 26th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society united over 800 participants from all over the world in San Diego from 6–10 December 2015. The latest innovations and advances in antibody research and development were discussed, covering a myriad of antibody-related topics by more than 100 speakers, who were carefully selected by The Antibody Society. As a prelude, attendees could join the pre-conference training course focusing, among others, on the engineering and enhancement of antibodies and antibody-like scaffolds, bispecific antibody engineering and adaptation to generate chimeric antigen receptor constructs. The main event covered 4 d of scientific sessions that included antibody effector functions, reproducibility of research and diagnostic antibodies, new developments in antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), preclinical and clinical ADC data, new technologies and applications for bispecific antibodies, antibody therapeutics for non-cancer and orphan indications, antibodies to harness the cellular immune system, building comprehensive IgVH-gene repertoires through discovering, confirming and cataloging new germline IgVH genes, and overcoming resistance to clinical immunotherapy. The Antibody Society's special session focused on “Antibodies to watch” in 2016. Another special session put the spotlight on the limitations of the new definitions for the assignment of antibody international nonproprietary names introduced by the World Health Organization. The convention concluded with workshops on computational antibody design and on the promise and challenges of using next-generation sequencing for antibody discovery and engineering from synthetic and in vivo libraries. PMID:26909869

  7. Chitin fulfilling a biomaterials promise

    CERN Document Server

    Khor, Eugene

    2001-01-01

    The second edition of Chitin underscores the important factors for standardizing chitin processing and characterization. It captures the essential interplay between chitin's assets and limitations as a biomaterial, placing the past promises of chitin in perspective, addressing its present realities and offering insight into what is required to realize chitin's destiny (including its derivative, chitosan) as a biomaterial of the twenty-first century. This book is an ideal guide for both industrialists and researchers with a vested interest in commercializing chitin.An upd

  8. Selection of antibodies from synthetic antibody libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel Inbar, Noa; Benhar, Itai

    2012-10-15

    More than 2 dozen years had passed since the field of antibody engineering was established, with the first reports of bacterial [1-3] and mammalian cells [4] expression of recombinant antibody fragments, and in that time a lot of effort was dedicated to the development of efficient technological means, intended to assist in the creation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Research focus was given to two intertwined technological aspects: the selection platform and the recombinant antibody repertoires. In accordance with these areas of interest, it is the goal of this chapter to describe the various selection tools and antibody libraries existing, with emphasis on the later, and their applications. This chapter gives a far from exhaustive, subjective "historic account" of the field, describing the selection platforms, the different formats of antibody repertoires and the applications of both for selecting recombinant antibodies. Several excellent books provide detailed protocols for constructing antibody libraries and selecting antibodies from those libraries [5-13]. Such books may guide a newcomer to the field in the fine details of antibody engineering. We would like to offer advice to the novice: although seemingly simple, effective library construction and antibody isolation provide best benefits in the hands of professionals. It is an art as much as it is science.

  9. Persistence of specific antibody response in different experimental infections of mice with Toxocara canis larvae Persistência da resposta humoral em camundongos experimentalmente infectados com larvas de Toxocara canis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Paulo Chieffi

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available Anti-Toxocara antibody production and persistence were studied in experimental infections of BALB/c mice, according to three different schedules: Group I (GI - 25 mice infected with 200 T. canis eggs in a single dose; Group II (GII 25 mice infected with 150 T. canis eggs given in three occasions, 50 in the 1st, 50 in the 5th and 50 in the 8th days; Group III (GIII - 25 mice also infected with 150 T. canis eggs, in three 50 eggs portions given in the 1st, 14th and 28th days. A 15 mice control group (GIV was maintained without infection. In the 30th, 50th, 60th, 75th, 105th and 180th post-infection days three mice of the GI, GII and GIII groups and two mice of the control group had been sacrificed and exsanguinated for sera obtention. In the 360th day the remainder mice of the four groups were, in the same way, killed and processed. The obtained sera were searched for the presence of anti-Toxocara antibodies by an ELISA technique, using T. canis larvae excretion-secretion antigen. In the GI and GII, but not in the GIII, anti-Toxocara antibodies had been found, at least, up to the 180th post-infection day. The GIII only showed anti-Toxocara antibodies, at significant level, in the 30th post-infection day.Estudou-se a cinética de anticorpos anti-Toxocara em camundongos BALB/c infectados experimentalmente segundo três esquemas: Grupo I (GI: 25 camundongos infectados com dose única de 200 ovos embrionados de T. canis; grupo II (GII: 25 camundongos infectados com 150 ovos embrionados de T. canis, divididos em três doses de 50 ovos, administrados no 1º, 5º e 8º dias; Grupo III (GIII: 25 camundongos infectados com 150 ovos embrionados de T. canis, administrados em três doses de 50 ovos no 1º, 14º e 28º dias. Um grupo de 15 camundongos foi mantido nas mesmas condições, porém sem infecção, constituindo o grupo controle (GIV. No 30º, 50º, 60º, 75º, 105º e 180º dias pós-infecção três camundongos dos grupos GI, GII e GIII e dois do

  10. IgA as therapeutic antibody

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leusen, Jeanette H W

    2015-01-01

    This review is focused on the promises of IgA as a new therapeutic antibody. For more than 30 years IgG molecules have been used in the clinic in the fields of oncology, hematology, auto immune diseases and infections. However, IgA might be a good alternative, since it recruits different effector ce

  11. Programmed death-1 & its ligands: promising targets for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrimali, Rajeev K; Janik, John E; Abu-Eid, Rasha; Mkrtichyan, Mikayel; Khleif, Samir N

    2015-01-01

    Novel strategies for cancer treatment involving blockade of immune inhibitors have shown significant progress toward understanding the molecular mechanism of tumor immune evasion. The preclinical findings and clinical responses associated with programmed death-1 (PD-1) and PD-ligand pathway blockade seem promising, making these targets highly sought for cancer immunotherapy. In fact, the anti-PD-1 antibodies, pembrolizumab and nivolumab, were recently approved by the US FDA for the treatment of unresectable and metastatic melanoma resistant to anticytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 antibody (ipilimumab) and BRAF inhibitor. Here, we discuss strategies of combining PD-1/PD-ligand interaction inhibitors with other immune checkpoint modulators and standard-of-care therapy to break immune tolerance and induce a potent antitumor activity, which is currently a research area of key scientific pursuit.

  12. Antibodies against the majority subunit of type IV Pili disperse nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae biofilms in a LuxS-dependent manner and confer therapeutic resolution of experimental otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotny, Laura A; Jurcisek, Joseph A; Ward, Michael O; Jordan, Zachary B; Goodman, Steven D; Bakaletz, Lauren O

    2015-04-01

    Despite resulting in a similar overall outcome, unlike antibodies directed against the DNABII protein, integration host factor (IHF), which induce catastrophic structural collapse of biofilms formed by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI), those directed against a recombinant soluble form of PilA [the majority subunit of Type IV pili (Tfp) produced by NTHI], mediated gradual 'top-down' dispersal of NTHI from biofilms. This dispersal occurred via a mechanism that was dependent upon expression of both PilA (and by inference, Tfp) and production of AI-2 quorum signaling molecules by LuxS. The addition of rsPilA to a biofilm-targeted therapeutic vaccine formulation comprised of IHF plus the powerful adjuvant dmLT and delivered via a noninvasive transcutaneous immunization route induced an immune response that targeted two important determinants essential for biofilm formation by NTHI. This resulted in significantly earlier eradication of NTHI from both planktonic and adherent populations in the middle ear, disruption of mucosal biofilms already resident within middle ears prior to immunization and rapid resolution of signs of disease in an animal model of experimental otitis media. These data support continued development of this novel combinatorial immunization approach for resolution and/or prevention of multiple diseases of the respiratory tract caused by NTHI.

  13. Purines: from premise to promise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M

    2000-07-01

    Geoff Burnstock's remarkable insight and tenacity has established the area of purinergic research as a bona fide target for drug discovery. While efforts in P1 receptor-based medicinal chemistry and biology efforts over the past 25 years have not reached the level of success that the pharmaceutical industry investment may have anticipated, the P2 area, with knowledge of the selective localization of members of the P2X and P2Y family members and data from transgenic knockouts, has identified several potential therapeutic areas of major promise including cystic fibrosis, chronic bronchitis, male contraception and neurodegeneration. In addition, interest in the potential of purinergic therapeutics has extended outside the major pharmaceutical companies to the 'biotech industry' resulting in an environment where the inherent risks of 'first in field' in a therapeutic area may be more appropriately nurtured.

  14. The promise of psychiatric pharmacogenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Steven P

    2015-01-01

    Clinicians already face "personalized" medicine every day while experiencing the great variation in toxicities and drug efficacy among individual patients. Pharmacogenetics studies are the platform for discovering the DNA determinants of variability in drug response and tolerability. Research now focuses on the genome after its beginning with analyses of single genes. Therapeutic outcomes from several psychotropic drugs have been weakly linked to specific genetic variants without independent replication. Drug side effects show stronger associations to genetic variants, including human leukocyte antigen loci with carbamazepine-induced dermatologic outcome and MC4R with atypical antipsychotic weight gain. Clinical implementation has proven challenging, with barriers including a lack of replicable prospective evidence for clinical utility required for altering medical care. More recent studies show promising approaches for reducing these barriers to routine incorporation of pharmacogenetics data into clinical care.

  15. Mangiferin: a promising anticancer bioactive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Rajneet K; Kaur, Ranjot; Lohan, Shikha; Singh, Kamalinder K; Singh, Bhupinder

    2016-05-01

    Of late, several biologically active antioxidants from natural products have been investigated by the researchers in order to combat the root cause of carcinogenesis, in other words, oxidative stress. Mangiferin, a therapeutically active C-glucosylated xanthone, is extracted from pulp, peel, seed, bark and leaf of Mangifera indica. These polyphenols of mangiferin exhibit antioxidant properties and tend to decrease the oxygen-free radicals, thereby reducing the DNA damage. Indeed, its capability to modulate several key inflammatory pathways undoubtedly helps in stalling the progression of carcinogenesis. The current review article emphasizes an updated account on the patents published on the chemopreventive action of mangiferin, apoptosis induction made on various cancer cells, along with proposed antioxidative activities and patent mapping of other important therapeutic properties. Considering it as promising polyphenol, this paper would also summarize the diverse molecular targets of mangiferin.

  16. Cultural Neuroscience: Progress and Promise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiao, Joan Y; Cheon, Bobby K; Pornpattanangkul, Narun; Mrazek, Alissa J; Blizinsky, Katherine D

    2013-01-01

    The nature and origin of human diversity has been a source of intellectual curiosity since the beginning of human history. Contemporary advances in cultural and biological sciences provide unique opportunities for the emerging field of cultural neuroscience. Research in cultural neuroscience examines how cultural and genetic diversity shape the human mind, brain and behavior across multiple time scales: situation, ontogeny and phylogeny. Recent progress in cultural neuroscience provides novel theoretical frameworks for understanding the complex interaction of environmental, cultural and genetic factors in the production of adaptive human behavior. Here, we provide a brief history of cultural neuroscience, theoretical and methodological advances, as well as empirical evidence of the promise of and progress in the field. Implications of this research for population health disparities and public policy are discussed.

  17. Nanomaterials promise better bone repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qifei Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials mimicking the nano-features of bones and offering unique smart functions are promising for better bone fracture repair. This review provides an overview of the current state-of-the-art research in developing and using nanomaterials for better bone fracture repair. This review begins with a brief introduction of bone fracture repair processes, then discusses the importance of vascularization, the role of growth factors in bone fracture repair, and the failure of bone fracture repair. Next, the review discusses the applications of nanomaterials for bone fracture repair, with a focus on the recent breakthroughs such as nanomaterials leading to precise immobilization of growth factors at the molecular level, promoting vascularization without the use of growth factors, and re-loading therapeutic agents after implantation. The review concludes with perspectives on challenges and future directions for developing nanomaterials for improved bone fracture repair.

  18. Model-based prediction of monoclonal antibody retention in ion-exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guélat, Bertrand; Delegrange, Lydia; Valax, Pascal; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2013-07-12

    In order to support a model-based process design in ion-exchange chromatography, an adsorption equilibrium model was adapted to predict the protein retention behavior from the amino acid sequence and from structural information on the resin. It is based on the computation of protein-resin interactions with a colloidal model and accounts for the contribution of each ionizable amino acid to the protein charge. As a verification of the protein charge model, the experimental titration curve of a monoclonal antibody was compared to its predicted net charge. Using this protein charge model in the computation of the protein-resin interactions, it is possible to predict the adsorption equilibrium constant (i.e. retention factor or Henry constant) with an explicit pH and salt dependence. The application of the model-based predictions for an in silico screening of the protein retention on various stationary phases or, alternatively, for the comparison of various monoclonal antibodies on a given cation-exchanger was demonstrated. Furthermore, considering the structural differences between charge variants of a monoclonal antibody, it was possible to predict their individual retention times. The selectivity between the side variants and the main isoform of the monoclonal antibody were computed. The comparison with the experimental data showed that the model was reliable with respect to the identification of the operating conditions maximizing the selectivity, i.e. the most promising conditions for a monoclonal antibody variant separation. Such predictions can be useful in reducing the experimental effort to identify the parameter space.

  19. Simulation model for overloaded monoclonal antibody variants separations in ion-exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guélat, Bertrand; Ströhlein, Guido; Lattuada, Marco; Delegrange, Lydia; Valax, Pascal; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2012-08-31

    A model was developed for the design of a monoclonal antibody charge variants separation process based on ion-exchange chromatography. In order to account for a broad range of operating conditions in the simulations, an explicit pH and salt concentration dependence has been included in the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The reliability of this model was tested using experimental chromatographic retention times as well as information about the structural characteristics of the different charge variants, e.g. C-terminal lysine groups and deamidated groups. Next, overloaded isocratic elutions at various pH and salt concentrations have been performed to determine the saturation capacity of the ion-exchanger. Furthermore, the column simulation model was applied for the prediction of monoclonal antibody variants separations with both pH and salt gradient elutions. A good prediction of the elution times and peak shapes was observed, even though none of the model parameters was adjusted to fit the experimental data. The trends in the separation performance obtained through the simulations were generally sufficient to identify the most promising operating conditions. The predictive column simulation model thus developed in this work, including a set of parameters determined through specific independent experiments, was experimentally validated and offers a useful basis for a rational optimization of monoclonal antibody variants separation processes on ion-exchange chromatography.

  20. The Ambivalence of Promising Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley-Egan, Clare

    2010-08-01

    Issues of responsibility in the world of nanotechnology are becoming explicit with the emergence of a discourse on 'responsible development' of nanoscience and nanotechnologies. Much of this discourse centres on the ambivalences of nanotechnology and of promising technology in general. Actors must find means of dealing with these ambivalences. Actors' actions and responses to ambivalence are shaped by their position and context, along with strategic games they are involved in, together with other actors. A number of interviews were conducted with industrial actors with the aim of uncovering their ethical stances towards responsible development of nanotechnology. The data shows that standard repertoires of justification of nanotechnological development were used. Thus, the industrial actors fell back on their position and associated responsibilities. Such responses reinforce a division of moral labour in which industrial actors and scientists can focus on the progress of science and technology, while other actors, such as NGOs, are expected to take care of broader considerations, such as ethical and social issues.

  1. Production and characterization of peptide antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Hansen, Paul Robert; Houen, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    Proteins are effective immunogens for generation of antibodies. However, occasionally the native protein is known but not available for antibody production. In such cases synthetic peptides derived from the native protein are good alternatives for antibody production. These peptide antibodies...... are powerful tools in experimental biology and are easily produced to any peptide of choice. A widely used approach for production of peptide antibodies is to immunize animals with a synthetic peptide coupled to a carrier protein. Very important is the selection of the synthetic peptide, where factors...... such as structure, accessibility and amino acid composition are crucial. Since small peptides tend not to be immunogenic, it may be necessary to conjugate them to carrier proteins in order to enhance immune presentation. Several strategies for conjugation of peptide-carriers applied for immunization exist...

  2. Acetylcholine receptor antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003576.htm Acetylcholine receptor antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acetylcholine receptor antibody is a protein found in the blood ...

  3. Antinuclear antibody panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003535.htm Antinuclear antibody panel To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The antinuclear antibody panel is a blood test that looks at ...

  4. Lyme disease antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JavaScript. The Lyme disease blood test looks for antibodies in the blood to the bacteria that causes ... needed. A laboratory specialist looks for Lyme disease antibodies in the blood sample using the ELISA test . ...

  5. The antibody mining toolbox

    OpenAIRE

    D'Angelo, Sara; Glanville, Jacob; Ferrara, Fortunato; Naranjo, Leslie; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Shen, Xiaohong; Bradbury, Andrew RM; Kiss, Csaba

    2013-01-01

    In vitro selection has been an essential tool in the development of recombinant antibodies against various antigen targets. Deep sequencing has recently been gaining ground as an alternative and valuable method to analyze such antibody selections. The analysis provides a novel and extremely detailed view of selected antibody populations, and allows the identification of specific antibodies using only sequencing data, potentially eliminating the need for expensive and laborious low-throughput ...

  6. A Promising Development: "Promise" Scholarships Targeting Individual Communities Reduce Barriers to College Access--and Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses Promise Scholarships in community colleges and sources of funding. The following community colleges and their scholarships are mentioned in this article: (1) Oregon Promise, Oregon; (2) Ventura College Promise, California; (3) Kalamazoo Promise, Michigan; (4) Pittsburgh Promise, Pennsylvania; (5) SEED Scholarship, Delaware;…

  7. Bovine milk antibodies for health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, H; Marnila, P; Gill, H S

    2000-11-01

    The immunoglobulins of bovine colostrum provide the major antimicrobial protection against microbial infections and confer a passive immunity to the newborn calf until its own immune system matures. The concentration in colostrum of specific antibodies against pathogens can be raised by immunising cows with these pathogens or their antigens. Immune milk products are preparations made of such hyperimmune colostrum or antibodies enriched from it. These preparations can be used to give effective specific protection against different enteric diseases in calves and suckling pigs. Colostral immunoglobulin supplements designed for farm animals are commercially available in many countries. Also, some immune milk products containing specific antibodies against certain pathogens have been launched on the market. A number of clinical studies are currently in progress to evaluate the efficacy of immune milks in the prevention and treatment of various human infections, including those caused by antibiotic resistant bacteria. Bovine colostrum-based immune milk products have proven effective in prophylaxis against various infectious diseases in humans. Good results have been obtained with products targeted against rotavirus, Shigella flexneri, Escherichia coli, Clostridium difficile, Streptococcus mutans, Cryptosporidium parvum and Helicobacter pylori. Some successful attempts have been made to use immune milk in balancing gastrointestinal microbial flora. Immune milk products are promising examples of health-promoting functional foods, or nutraceuticals. This review summarises the recent progress in the development of these products and evaluates their potential as dietary supplements and in clinical nutrition.

  8. Identification of antigen-specific human monoclonal antibodies using high-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ju; Li, Ruihua; Liu, Kun; Li, Liangliang; Zai, Xiaodong; Chi, Xiangyang; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2016-04-22

    High-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire provides a large number of antibody variable region sequences that can be used to generate human monoclonal antibodies. However, current screening methods for identifying antigen-specific antibodies are inefficient. In the present study, we developed an antibody clone screening strategy based on clone dynamics and relative frequency, and used it to identify antigen-specific human monoclonal antibodies. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that at least 52% of putative positive immunoglobulin heavy chains composed antigen-specific antibodies. Combining information on dynamics and relative frequency improved identification of positive clones and elimination of negative clones. and increase the credibility of putative positive clones. Therefore the screening strategy could simplify the subsequent experimental screening and may facilitate the generation of antigen-specific antibodies.

  9. Antibody-mediated Prevention of Fusarium Mycotoxins in the Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Cai Liao

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium mycotoxins directly accumulated in grains during the infection of wheat and other cereal crops by Fusarium head blight (FHB pathogens are detrimental to humans and domesticated animals. Prevention of the mycotoxins via the development of FHB-resistant varieties has been a challenge due to the scarcity of natural resistance against FHB pathogens. Various antibodies specific to Fusarium fungi and mycotoxins are widely used in immunoassays and antibody-mediated resistance in planta against Fusarium pathogens has been demonstrated. Antibodies fused to antifungal proteins have been shown to confer a very significantly enhanced Fusarium resistance in transgenic plants. Thus, antibody fusions hold great promise as an effective tool for the prevention of mycotoxin contaminations in cereal grains. This review highlights the utilization of protective antibodies derived from phage display to increase endogenous resistance of wheat to FHB pathogens and consequently to reduce mycotoxins in field. The role played by Fusarium-specific antibody in the resistance is also discussed.

  10. Antibody engineering: facing new challenges in cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laura SANZ; (A)ngel M CUESTA; Marta COMPTE; Luis (A)LVAREZ-VALLINA

    2005-01-01

    Antibody-based therapeutics are beginning to realize the promise enclosed in their early denomination as "magic bullets". Initial disappointment has turned into clinical and commercial success, and engineered antibodies currently represent over 30% of biopharmaceuticals in clinical trials. Recent structural and functional data have allowed the design of a new generation of therapeutic antibodies, with strategies ranging from complement-mediated and antibody-dependant cellular cytotoxicity enhancement to improved cytotoxic payloads using toxins, drugs,radionucleids and viral delivery. This review considers the structure of different types of recombinant antibodies, their mechanism of action and how their efficacy has been increased using a broad array of approaches. We will also focus on the additional benefits offered by the use of gene therapy methods for the in vivo production of therapeutic antibodies.

  11. [VGKC-complex antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2013-04-01

    Various antibodies are associated with voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKCs). Representative antibodies to VGKCs were first identified by radioimmunoassays using radioisotope-labeled alpha-dendrotoxin-VGKCs solubilized from rabbit brain. These antibodies were detected only in a proportion of patients with acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome). VGKC antibodies were also detected in patients with Morvan's syndrome and in those with a form of autoimmune limbic encephalitis. Recent studies indicated that the "VGKC" antibodies are mainly directed toward associated proteins (for example LGI-1 and CASPR-2) that complex with the VGKCs themselves. The "VGKC" antibodies are now commonly known as VGKC-complex antibodies. In general, LGI-1 antibodies are most commonly detected in patients with limbic encephalitis with syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. CASPR-2 antibodies are present in the majority of patients with Morvan's syndrome. These patients develop combinations of CNS symptoms, autonomic dysfunction, and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability. Furthermore, VGKC-complex antibodies are tightly associated with chronic idiopathic pain. Hyperexcitability of nociceptive pathways has also been implicated. These antibodies may be detected in sera of some patients with neurodegenerative diseases (for example, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease).

  12. Anticorpos neutralizantes contra o vírus da Diarréia Viral Bovina (BVDV: comparação entre um imunógeno experimental atenuado e três vacinas comerciais inativadas Vaccination-induced neutralizing antibodies against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV: comparison between an experimental modified-live vaccine and three comercial inactivated vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo de Lima

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Os títulos e duração de anticorpos neutralizantes contra o vírus da Diarréia Viral Bovina (BVDV induzidos por uma vacina experimental atenuada (vacina A: dose única foram comparados com os induzidos por três vacinas comerciais inativadas (B, C e D: duas doses com intervalo de 30 dias. Trinta dias após a vacinação (vacina A ou após a segunda dose (vacinas B, C e D, anticorpos neutralizantes contra o BVDV-1 foram detectados em todos os animais (12/12 do grupo A (título médio geométrico GMT=1612,7; em 32 de 36 animais do grupo B (GMT=14,3; 22 de 28 do grupo C (GMT=25,1; e em 16 de 30 do grupo D (GMT=40,0. Anticorpos frente ao BVDV-2 foram detectados em todos os animais do grupo A (GMT=151,0; em 27 de 36 do grupo B (GMT=10,0; 12 de 28 do grupo C (GMT=11,5 e em 10 de 30 animais do grupo D (GMT=10,0. No dia 180 após a vacinação, o número de animais que ainda apresentava anticorpos contra o BVDV-1 e os GMTs para cada grupo foram: vacina A (12/12, GMT=905,0; vacina B (30/36, GMT=28,3; vacina C (20/28, GMT=28,3; vacina D (14/30, GMT=16,1; e contra o BVDV-2 foram: vacina A (12/12, GMT=56,6; vacina B (18/36, GMT=16,8; vacina C (10/28, GMT=21,6 e vacina D (6/30, GMT=16,1. Os títulos médios (GMTs induzidos pela vacina A foram significativamente superiores aos demais, tanto para o BVDV-1 (PThe titers and duration of neutralizing antibodies against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV induced by an experimental attenuated vaccine (vaccine A: one dose were compared to those induced by three commercial inactivated ones (B, C and D: two doses at a 30 day interval. Thirty days after vaccination (vaccine A or the second dose (vaccines B, C and D, neutralizing antibodies to BVDV-1 were detected in all calves (12/12 from group A (mean geometric titer GMT=1612.7; in 32 out of 36 from group B (GMT=14.3; 22/28 from group C (GMT=25.1; 16/30 from group D (GMT=40.0. Antibodies reacting with BVDV-2 were detected in all animals from group A (GMT=151.0; 27

  13. Functional antibodies produced by oncolytic clostridia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, Arjan J; Mengesha, Asferd; van der Wall, Elsken; van Diest, Paul J; Theys, Jan; Vooijs, Marc

    2007-12-28

    Hypoxia is a hallmark of solid cancer and characterized by regions of low oxygen and necrosis due to insufficient blood perfusion. Intratumoral hypoxia triggers the transcription of genes responsible for cell survival. The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha (HIF-1alpha) is a key regulator of this response. HIF activation is associated with resistance to radio- and chemotherapy and poor clinical outcome, and may therefore provide an attractive therapeutic target. Clostridium-based oncolysis is a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of hypoxic tumors where these microorganisms naturally home. Here, we report for the first time the isolation of transconjugants of two excellent tumor colonizing Clostridium strains, C. novyi-NT and C. sporogenes, expressing single chain antibodies specific for human HIF-1alpha. This is a first step towards Clostridium-directed antibody therapy (CDAT) that holds promise as a carrier of cancer therapeutics targeting the most resistant regions in human solid cancer.

  14. Antibody response against gastrointestinal antigens in demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banati, M; Csecsei, P; Koszegi, E

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antibodies against gastrointestinal antigens may indicate altered microbiota and immune responses in the gut. Recent experimental data suggest a connection between gastrointestinal immune responses and CNS autoimmunity. METHODS: Antibodies against gliadin, tissue transglutaminase (tTG...

  15. Considerations in producing preferentially reduced half-antibody fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makaraviciute, Asta; Jackson, Carolyn D; Millner, Paul A; Ramanaviciene, Almira

    2016-02-01

    Half-antibody fragments are a promising reagent for biosensing, drug-delivery and labeling applications, since exposure of the free thiol group in the Fc hinge region allows oriented reaction. Despite the structural variations among the molecules of different IgG subclasses and those obtained from different hosts, only generalized preferential antibody reduction protocols are currently available. Preferential reduction of polyclonal sheep anti-digoxin, rabbit anti-Escherichia coli and anti-myoglobin class IgG antibodies to half-antibody fragments has been investigated. A mild reductant 2-mercaptoethylamine (2-MEA) and a slightly stronger reductant tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) were used and the fragments obtained were quantitatively determined by SDS-PAGE analysis. It has been shown that the yields of half-antibody fragments could be increased by lowering the pH of the reduction mixtures. However, antibody susceptibility to the reductants varied. At pH4.5 the highest yield of sheep anti-digoxin IgG half-antibody fragments was obtained with 1M 2-MEA. Conversely, rabbit IgG half-antibody fragments could only be obtained with the stronger reductant TCEP. Preferential reduction of rabbit anti-myoglobin IgG antibodies was optimized and the highest half-antibody yield was obtained with 35 mM TCEP. Finally, it has been demonstrated that produced anti-myoglobin half-IgG fragments retained their binding activity.

  16. 牙龈卟啉单胞菌 Kgp DNA 疫苗防治牙周炎的实验研究%Porphyromonas Gingivalis Kgp DNA Vaccine Induces Antibody Response in Experimental Periodontitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王甜甜; 朱丽娜; 王志峰; 蓝菁

    2013-01-01

    Objective To construct Kgp gene vaccine and to evaluate its immune response in animal model with periodontitis,and to provide experimental data for the study of peri-implantits.Methods Kgp gene amplified from Porphyromonas gingivalis strains ATCC33277 were cloned into vector pVAX1.16 rats and randomly divided into group A and group B.Group A was immunized with pVAX1-Kgp,while group B with pVAX1.Cotton ligation infiltrated with Por-phyromonas gingivalis was ligatured around the neck of the first maxillary molar to construct the periodontitis model .The status of periodontal tissue was observed .Before the first immunized and one week after the last immunized ,sIgA and IgG specific antibody were detected by ELISA .Results After immunization,sIgA and IgG of group A were higher than be-fore the immunization(P0.05).Periodontitis in group B was more serious than in group A .Conclusion Kgp DNA vaccine could induce specific immune response in experimental periodontitis ,and these could be effective to protect bone loss.%  目的构建牙龈卟啉单胞菌(P.gingivalis)Kgp DNA疫苗真核表达质粒,并对Wistar大鼠进行免疫接种,分析和评价其对牙周炎的免疫效果.方法将牙龈卟啉单胞菌ATCC33277 Kgp基因通过聚合酶链反应(PCR)扩增后连接至真核表达质粒pVAX1,构建真核表达质粒pVAX1-kgp;16只Wistar大鼠随机分为A,B两组,分别接种pVAX1-Kgp和pVAX1,绑线法构建牙周炎模型,记录各组牙周状况,免疫前后收集大鼠唾液和血清样本,酶联免疫吸附测定(ELISA)检测唾液中sIgA和外周血中IgG抗体水平.结果 A组牙周软组织炎症和牙槽骨吸收明显低于B组,且A组动物sIgA和IgG抗体较未免疫前明显增高(P<0.05),较B组显示出更高的抗体水平(P<0.05).结论牙龈卟啉单胞菌Kgp基因疫苗可诱导牙周炎大鼠产生有效免疫应答,对实验性牙周炎起到明显保护作用.

  17. Immunotherapy and immunochemotherapy in visceral leishmaniasis: promising treatments for this neglected disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Mendes Roatt

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis has several clinical forms: self-healing or chronic cutaneous leishmaniasis or post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis; mucosal leishmaniasis; and visceral leishmaniasis, which is fatal if left untreated. The epidemiology and clinical features of VL vary greatly due to the interaction of multiple factors including parasite strains, vectors, host genetics, and the environment. HIV infection, augments the severity of VL increasing the risk of developing active disease by 100 to 2320 times. An effective vaccine for humans is not yet available. Resistance to chemotherapy is a growing problem in many regions, and the costs associated with drug identification and development, make commercial production for leishmaniasis, unattractive. The toxicity of currently drugs, their long treatment course, and limited efficacy are significant concerns. For cutaneous disease, many studies have shown promising results with immunotherapy/immunochemotherapy, aimed to modulate and activate the immune response to obtain a therapeutic cure. Nowadays, the focus of many groups centers on treating canine VL by using vaccines and immunomodulators with or without chemotherapy. In human disease, the use of cytokines like Interferon-γ associated with pentavalent antimonials demonstrated promising results in patients that did not respond to conventional treatment. In mice, immunomodulation based on monoclonal antibodies to remove endogenous immunosuppressive cytokines (interleukin-10 or block their receptors, antigen-pulsed syngeneic dendritic cells, or biological products like Pam3Cys (TLR ligand has already been shown as a prospective treatment of the disease. This review addresses VL treatment, particularly immunotherapy and/or immunochemotherapy as an alternative to conventional drug treatment in experimental models, canine VL, and human disease.

  18. Immunotherapy and Immunochemotherapy in Visceral Leishmaniasis: Promising Treatments for this Neglected Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roatt, Bruno Mendes; Aguiar-Soares, Rodrigo Dian de Oliveira; Coura-Vital, Wendel; Ker, Henrique Gama; Moreira, Nádia das Dores; Vitoriano-Souza, Juliana; Giunchetti, Rodolfo Cordeiro; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins; Reis, Alexandre Barbosa

    2014-01-01

    Leishmaniasis has several clinical forms: self-healing or chronic cutaneous leishmaniasis or post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis; mucosal leishmaniasis; visceral leishmaniasis (VL), which is fatal if left untreated. The epidemiology and clinical features of VL vary greatly due to the interaction of multiple factors including parasite strains, vectors, host genetics, and the environment. Human immunodeficiency virus infection augments the severity of VL increasing the risk of developing active disease by 100–2320 times. An effective vaccine for humans is not yet available. Resistance to chemotherapy is a growing problem in many regions, and the costs associated with drug identification and development, make commercial production for leishmaniasis, unattractive. The toxicity of currently drugs, their long treatment course, and limited efficacy are significant concerns. For cutaneous disease, many studies have shown promising results with immunotherapy/immunochemotherapy, aimed to modulate and activate the immune response to obtain a therapeutic cure. Nowadays, the focus of many groups centers on treating canine VL by using vaccines and immunomodulators with or without chemotherapy. In human disease, the use of cytokines like interferon-γ associated with pentavalent antimonials demonstrated promising results in patients that did not respond to conventional treatment. In mice, immunomodulation based on monoclonal antibodies to remove endogenous immunosuppressive cytokines (interleukin-10) or block their receptors, antigen-pulsed syngeneic dendritic cells, or biological products like Pam3Cys (TLR ligand) has already been shown as a prospective treatment of the disease. This review addresses VL treatment, particularly immunotherapy and/or immunochemotherapy as an alternative to conventional drug treatment in experimental models, canine VL, and human disease. PMID:24982655

  19. shRNA-armed conditionally replicative adenoviruses: a promising approach for cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Ding, Meng; Xu, Kai; Mao, Lijun; Zheng, Junian

    2016-01-01

    The small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have been employed to knockdown the expression of cancer-associated genes and shown some promise in cancer therapy. However, synthetic siRNA duplexes or plasmid mediated delivery of siRNAs have several problems, such as short half-life, low transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity associated with transfection. Conditionally replicating adenovirus (CRAds) as the delivery vector for short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) could overcome these limitations and have shown augmented anti-tumor effects in experimental studies and preclinical trials. In this review, we summarize recent progress in the development of CRAds-shRNA for cancer treatment. Combination of CRAds-shRNA with chemotherapeutics, radiation, dendritic cells, monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule inhibitors will be necessary to eradicate cancer cells and cancer stem cells and achieve superior outcomes. The use of CRAd platform for efficient delivery of shRNAs and foreign genes will open a new avenue for cancer therapy. PMID:26980708

  20. Identification of anti-CD98 antibody mimotopes for inducing antibodies with antitumor activity by mimotope immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Misa; Kondo, Masahiro; Ohshima, Motohiro; Deguchi, Kazuki; Hayashi, Hideki; Inoue, Kazuyuki; Tsuji, Daiki; Masuko, Takashi; Itoh, Kunihiko

    2014-04-01

    A mimotope is an antibody-epitope-mimicking peptide retrieved from a phage display random peptide library. Immunization with antitumor antibody-derived mimotopes is promising for inducing antitumor immunity in hosts. In this study, we isolated linear and constrained mimotopes from HBJ127, a tumor-suppressing anti-CD98 heavy chain mAb, and determined their abilities for induction of antitumor activity equal to that of the parent antibody. We detected elevated levels of antipeptide responses, but failed to detect reactivity against native CD98-expressing HeLa cells in sera of immunized mice. Phage display panning and selection of mimotope-immunized mouse spleen-derived antibody Fab library showed that HeLa cell-reactive Fabs were successfully retrieved from the library. This finding indicates that native antigen-reactive Fab clones represented an undetectable minor population in mimotope-induced antibody repertoire. Functional and structural analysis of retrieved Fab clones revealed that they were almost identical to the parent antibody. From these results, we confirmed that mimotope immunization was promising for retrieving antitumor antibodies equivalent to the parent antibody, although the co-administration of adjuvant compounds such as T-cell epitope peptides and Toll-like receptor 4 agonist peptides is likely to be necessary for inducing stronger antitumor immunity than mimotope injection alone.

  1. The Promising Syllabus Enacted: One Teacher's Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Christine Courtade

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe a rationale and strategies for use of the Promising Syllabus (in Bain, 2004, What the best college teachers do). This syllabus reflects the learner-centered paradigm where students take charge of their own learning. The syllabus creates a series of promises between teacher and student, focusing on a…

  2. Realizing the promises of marine biotechnology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiten, EEM; Akkerman, [No Value; Koulman, A; Kamermans, P; Reith, H; Barbosa, MJ; Sipkema, D; Wijffels, RH

    2003-01-01

    High-quality research in the field of marine biotechnology is one of the key-factors for successful innovation in exploiting the vast diversity of marine life. However, fascinating scientific research with promising results and claims on promising potential applications (e.g. for pharmaceuticals, nu

  3. Porous Alumina as a Promising Biomaterial for Public Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Gasparini, Roberto; Amicizia, Daniela; Panatto, Donatella; Larosa, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Porous aluminum is a nanostructured material characterized by unique properties, such as chemical stability, regular uniformity, dense hexagonal porous lattice with high aspect ratio nanopores, excellent mechanical strength, and biocompatibility. This overview examines how the structure and properties of porous alumina can be exploited in the field of public health. Porous alumina can be employed for fabricating membranes and filters for bioremediation, water ultrafiltration, and microfiltration/nanofiltration, being a promising technique for having clean and fresh water, which is essential for human health. Porous alumina-based nanobiosensor coated with specific antibodies or peptides seem to be a useful tool to detect and remove pathogens both in food and in water, as well as for environmental monitoring. Further, these applications, being low-energy demanding and cost-effective, are particularly valuable in resource-limited settings and contexts, and can be employed as point of use devices in developing countries, where there is an urgent need of hygiene and safety assurance.

  4. Utility, limitations, and promise of proteomics in animal science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippolis, John D; Reinhardt, Timothy A

    2010-12-15

    Proteomics experiments have the ability to simultaneously identify and quantify thousands of proteins in one experiment. The use of this technology in veterinary/animal science is still in its infancy, yet it holds significant promise as a method for advancing veterinary/animal science research. Examples of current experimental designs and capabilities of proteomic technology and basic principles of mass spectrometry are discussed. In addition, challenges and limitations of proteomics are presented, stressing those that are unique to veterinary/animal sciences.

  5. CD47-signal regulatory protein-alpha (SIRP alpha) interactions form a barrier for antibody-mediated tumor cell destruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Xi Wen; van Beek, Ellen M.; Schornagel, Karin; Van der Maaden, Hans; Van Houdt, Michel; Otten, Marielle A.; Finetti, Pascal; Van Egmond, Marjolein; Matozaki, Takashi; Kraal, Georg; Birnbaum, Daniel; van Elsas, Andrea; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Bertucci, Francois; van den Berg, Timo K.

    2011-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are among the most promising therapeutic agents for treating cancer. Therapeutic cancer antibodies bind to tumor cells, turning them into targets for immune-mediated destruction. We show here that this antibody-mediated killing of tumor cells is limited by a mechanism involving

  6. Antigen-Specific Antibody Glycosylation Is Regulated via Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, Alison E; Jennewein, Madeleine F; Suscovich, Todd; Dionne, Kendall; Tedesco, Jacquelynne; Chung, Amy W; Streeck, Hendrik; Pau, Maria; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Francis, Don; Fast, Patricia; Laufer, Dagna; Walker, Bruce D; Baden, Lindsey; Barouch, Dan H; Alter, Galit

    2016-03-01

    Antibody effector functions, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, complement deposition, and antibody-dependent phagocytosis, play a critical role in immunity against multiple pathogens, particularly in the absence of neutralizing activity. Two modifications to the IgG constant domain (Fc domain) regulate antibody functionality: changes in antibody subclass and changes in a single N-linked glycan located in the CH2 domain of the IgG Fc. Together, these modifications provide a specific set of instructions to the innate immune system to direct the elimination of antibody-bound antigens. While it is clear that subclass selection is actively regulated during the course of natural infection, it is unclear whether antibody glycosylation can be tuned, in a signal-specific or pathogen-specific manner. Here, we show that antibody glycosylation is determined in an antigen- and pathogen-specific manner during HIV infection. Moreover, while dramatic differences exist in bulk IgG glycosylation among individuals in distinct geographical locations, immunization is able to overcome these differences and elicit antigen-specific antibodies with similar antibody glycosylation patterns. Additionally, distinct vaccine regimens induced different antigen-specific IgG glycosylation profiles, suggesting that antibody glycosylation is not only programmable but can be manipulated via the delivery of distinct inflammatory signals during B cell priming. These data strongly suggest that the immune system naturally drives antibody glycosylation in an antigen-specific manner and highlights a promising means by which next-generation therapeutics and vaccines can harness the antiviral activity of the innate immune system via directed alterations in antibody glycosylation in vivo.  .

  7. Antigen-Specific Antibody Glycosylation Is Regulated via Vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison E Mahan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Antibody effector functions, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, complement deposition, and antibody-dependent phagocytosis, play a critical role in immunity against multiple pathogens, particularly in the absence of neutralizing activity. Two modifications to the IgG constant domain (Fc domain regulate antibody functionality: changes in antibody subclass and changes in a single N-linked glycan located in the CH2 domain of the IgG Fc. Together, these modifications provide a specific set of instructions to the innate immune system to direct the elimination of antibody-bound antigens. While it is clear that subclass selection is actively regulated during the course of natural infection, it is unclear whether antibody glycosylation can be tuned, in a signal-specific or pathogen-specific manner. Here, we show that antibody glycosylation is determined in an antigen- and pathogen-specific manner during HIV infection. Moreover, while dramatic differences exist in bulk IgG glycosylation among individuals in distinct geographical locations, immunization is able to overcome these differences and elicit antigen-specific antibodies with similar antibody glycosylation patterns. Additionally, distinct vaccine regimens induced different antigen-specific IgG glycosylation profiles, suggesting that antibody glycosylation is not only programmable but can be manipulated via the delivery of distinct inflammatory signals during B cell priming. These data strongly suggest that the immune system naturally drives antibody glycosylation in an antigen-specific manner and highlights a promising means by which next-generation therapeutics and vaccines can harness the antiviral activity of the innate immune system via directed alterations in antibody glycosylation in vivo.  .

  8. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  9. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D'Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products.

  10. Bispecific antibodies and their use in applied research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshit Verma

    Full Text Available Bispecific antibodies (BsAb can, by virtue of combining two binding specificities, improve the selectivity and efficacy of antibody-based treatment of human disease. Antibodies with two distinct binding specificities have great potential for a wide range of clinical applications as targeting agents for in vitro and in vivo immunodiagnosis, therapy and for improving immunoassays. They have shown great promise for targeting cytotoxic effector cells, delivering radionuclides, toxins or cytotoxic drugs to specific targets, particularly tumour cells. The development of BsAb research goes through three main stages: chemical cross linking of murine-derived monoclonal antibody, hybrid hybridomas and engineered BsAb. This article is providing the potential applications of bispecific antibodies. [Vet World 2012; 5(12.000: 775-780

  11. Hybridization-based antibody cDNA recovery for the production of recombinant antibodies identified by repertoire sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-Alemán, Javier; Téllez-Sosa, Juan; Ovilla-Muñoz, Marbella; Godoy-Lozano, Elizabeth; Velázquez-Ramírez, Daniel; Valdovinos-Torres, Humberto; Gómez-Barreto, Rosa E; Martinez-Barnetche, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire is enabling a thorough analysis of B cell diversity and clonal selection, which may improve the novel antibody discovery process. Theoretically, an adequate bioinformatic analysis could allow identification of candidate antigen-specific antibodies, requiring their recombinant production for experimental validation of their specificity. Gene synthesis is commonly used for the generation of recombinant antibodies identified in silico. Novel strategies that bypass gene synthesis could offer more accessible antibody identification and validation alternatives. We developed a hybridization-based recovery strategy that targets the complementarity-determining region 3 (CDRH3) for the enrichment of cDNA of candidate antigen-specific antibody sequences. Ten clonal groups of interest were identified through bioinformatic analysis of the heavy chain antibody repertoire of mice immunized with hen egg white lysozyme (HEL). cDNA from eight of the targeted clonal groups was recovered efficiently, leading to the generation of recombinant antibodies. One representative heavy chain sequence from each clonal group recovered was paired with previously reported anti-HEL light chains to generate full antibodies, later tested for HEL-binding capacity. The recovery process proposed represents a simple and scalable molecular strategy that could enhance antibody identification and specificity assessment, enabling a more cost-efficient generation of recombinant antibodies.

  12. Anti-insulin antibody test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... You appear to have an allergic response to insulin Insulin no longer seems to control your diabetes

  13. Fecal Transplant Shows Early Promise Against Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 163263.html Fecal Transplant Shows Early Promise Against Autism Small study found giving healthy gut bacteria to ... study suggests a novel treatment for kids with autism: Give these young patients a fresh supply of ...

  14. Panspermia: A Promising Field of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampelotto, P. H.

    2010-04-01

    In recent years, most of the major barriers against the acceptance of Panspermia have been demolished and this hypothesis emerges as a promising field of research. In this work, recent discoveries and the principal advances in Panspermia are discussed.

  15. New Eczema Drug Promising in Early Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163883.html New Eczema Drug Promising in Early Trial Nemolizumab significantly ... the appearance of moderate to severe eczema, a new, preliminary trial finds. Nemolizumab is a man-made, ...

  16. Big data in nephrology: promises and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Girish N; Coca, Steven G; Wyatt, Christina M

    2016-08-01

    Data from the electronic health records hold great promise for nephrology research. However, due to significant limitations, reporting guidelines have been formulated for analyses conducted using electronic health records data.

  17. Monoclonal antibody "gold rush".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggon, Krishan

    2007-01-01

    The market, sales and regulatory approval of new human medicines, during the past few years, indicates increasing number and share of new biologics and emergence of new multibillion dollar molecules. The global sale of monoclonal antibodies in 2006 were $20.6 billion. Remicade had annual sales gain of $1 billion during the past 3 years and five brands had similar increase in 2006. Rituxan with 2006 sales of $4.7 billion was the best selling monoclonal antibody and biological product and the 6th among the top selling medicinal brand. It may be the first biologic and monoclonal antibody to reach $10 billion annual sales in the near future. The strong demand from cancer and arthritis patients has surpassed almost all commercial market research reports and sales forecast. Seven monoclonal antibody brands in 2006 had sales exceeding $1 billion. Humanized or fully human monoclonal antibodies with low immunogenicity, enhanced antigen binding and reduced cellular toxicity provide better clinical efficacy. The higher technical and clinical success rate, overcoming of technical hurdles in large scale manufacturing, low cost of market entry and IND filing, use of fully human and humanized monoclonal antibodies has attracted funds and resources towards R&D. Review of industry research pipeline and sales data during the past 3 years indicate a real paradigm shift in industrial R&D from pharmaceutical to biologics and monoclonal antibodies. The antibody bandwagon has been joined by 200 companies with hundreds of new projects and targets and has attracted billions of dollars in R&D investment, acquisitions and licensing deals leading to the current Monoclonal Antibody Gold Rush.

  18. Study Finds Ebola Treatment ZMapp Holds Promise, Although Results Not Definitive

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Release Thursday, October 13, 2016 Study finds Ebola treatment ZMapp holds promise, although results not definitive ... emergency. A clinical trial to evaluate the experimental Ebola treatment ZMapp found it to be safe and ...

  19. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutteh, William H; Hinote, Candace D

    2014-03-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) are acquired antibodies directed against negatively charged phospholipids. Obstetric antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) is diagnosed in the presence of certain clinical features in conjunction with positive laboratory findings. Obstetric APS is one of the most commonly identified causes of recurrent pregnancy loss. Thus, obstetric APS is distinguished from APS in other organ systems where the most common manifestation is thrombosis. Several pathophysiologic mechanisms of action of aPLs have been described. This article discusses the diagnostic and obstetric challenges of obstetric APS, proposed pathophysiologic mechanisms of APS during pregnancy, and the management of women during and after pregnancy.

  20. Coarse grained modeling of transport properties in monoclonal antibody solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, James; Wang, Gang

    Monoclonal antibodies and their derivatives represent the fastest growing segment of the bio pharmaceutical industry. For many applications such as novel cancer therapies, high concentration, sub-cutaneous injections of these protein solutions are desired. However, depending on the peptide sequence within the antibody, such high concentration formulations can be too viscous to inject via human derived force alone. Understanding how heterogenous charge distribution and hydrophobicity within the antibodies leads to high viscosities is crucial to their future application. In this talk, we explore a coarse grained computational model of therapeutically relevant monoclonal antibodies that accounts for electrostatic, dispersion and hydrodynamic interactions between suspended antibodies to predict assembly and transport properties in concentrated antibody solutions. We explain the high viscosities observed in many experimental studies of the same biologics.

  1. A Simple Model for Assessment of Anti-Toxin Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Skvortsov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The toxins associated with infectious diseases are potential targets for inhibitors which have the potential for prophylactic or therapeutic use. Many antibodies have been generated for this purpose, and the objective of this study was to develop a simple mathematical model that may be used to evaluate the potential protective effect of antibodies. This model was used to evaluate the contributions of antibody affinity and concentration to reducing antibody-receptor complex formation and internalization. The model also enables prediction of the antibody kinetic constants and concentration required to provide a specified degree of protection. We hope that this model, once validated experimentally, will be a useful tool for in vitro selection of potentially protective antibodies for progression to in vivo evaluation.

  2. A Simple Model for Assessment of Anti-Toxin Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skvortsov, Alex; Gray, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The toxins associated with infectious diseases are potential targets for inhibitors which have the potential for prophylactic or therapeutic use. Many antibodies have been generated for this purpose, and the objective of this study was to develop a simple mathematical model that may be used to evaluate the potential protective effect of antibodies. This model was used to evaluate the contributions of antibody affinity and concentration to reducing antibody-receptor complex formation and internalization. The model also enables prediction of the antibody kinetic constants and concentration required to provide a specified degree of protection. We hope that this model, once validated experimentally, will be a useful tool for in vitro selection of potentially protective antibodies for progression to in vivo evaluation. PMID:23862138

  3. Antibody specific epitope prediction-emergence of a new paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sela-Culang, Inbal; Ofran, Yanay; Peters, Bjoern

    2015-04-01

    The development of accurate tools for predicting B-cell epitopes is important but difficult. Traditional methods have examined which regions in an antigen are likely binding sites of an antibody. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that most antigen surface residues will be able to bind one or more of the myriad of possible antibodies. In recent years, new approaches have emerged for predicting an epitope for a specific antibody, utilizing information encoded in antibody sequence or structure. Applying such antibody-specific predictions to groups of antibodies in combination with easily obtainable experimental data improves the performance of epitope predictions. We expect that further advances of such tools will be possible with the integration of immunoglobulin repertoire sequencing data.

  4. Anti-cartilage antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbury, C L; Skingle, J

    1979-08-01

    Antibody to cartilage has been demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence on rat trachea in the serum of about 3% of 1126 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Titres ranged from 1:20 to 1:640. The antibody was not found in 284 patients with primary or secondary osteoarthritis or in 1825 blood donors, nor, with the exception of two weak reactors, in 1314 paraplegic patients. In most cases the antibody appears to be specific for native type II collagen. Using this as an antigen in a haemagglutination test 94% of anti-cartilage sera were positive, whereas among 100 rheumatoid control sera there were only three weak positives. More than 80% of patients with antibody had some erosion of articular cartilage, but there was no correlation with age, sex, duration of disease, nor any recognisable clinical event or change.

  5. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to confirm the cause of thyroid problems, including Hashimoto thyroiditis . The test is also used to find ... positive test may be due to: Granulomatous thyroiditis Hashimoto thyroiditis High levels of these antibodies have also ...

  6. Serum herpes simplex antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2. HSV-1 most often causes cold sores (oral herpes). HSV-2 causes genital herpes. How the Test ... whether a person has ever been infected with oral or genital herpes . It looks for antibodies to herpes simplex virus ...

  7. The Position of His-Tag in Recombinant OspC and Application of Various Adjuvants Affects the Intensity and Quality of Specific Antibody Response after Immunization of Experimental Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Krupka

    Full Text Available Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi-caused infection, if not recognized and appropriately treated by antibiotics, may lead to chronic complications, thus stressing the need for protective vaccine development. The immune protection is mediated by phagocytic cells and by Borrelia-specific complement-activating antibodies, associated with the Th1 immune response. Surface antigen OspC is involved in Borrelia spreading through the host body. Previously we reported that recombinant histidine tagged (His-tag OspC (rOspC could be attached onto liposome surfaces by metallochelation. Here we report that levels of OspC-specific antibodies vary substantially depending upon whether rOspC possesses an N' or C' terminal His-tag. This is the case in mice immunized: (a with rOspC proteoliposomes containing adjuvants MPLA or non-pyrogenic MDP analogue MT06; (b with free rOspC and Montanide PET GEL A; (c with free rOspC and alum; or (d with adjuvant-free rOspC. Stronger responses are noted with all N'-terminal His-tag rOspC formulations. OspC-specific Th1-type antibodies predominate post-immunization with rOspC proteoliposomes formulated with MPLA or MT06 adjuvants. Further analyses confirmed that the structural features of soluble N' and C' terminal His-tag rOspC and respective rOspC proteoliposomes are similar including their thermal stabilities at physiological temperatures. On the other hand, a change in the position of the rOspC His-tag from N' to C' terminal appears to affect substantially the immunogenicity of rOspC arguably due to steric hindrance of OspC epitopes by the C' terminal His-tag itself and not due to differences in overall conformations induced by changes in the His-tag position in rOspC variants.

  8. Cell-Free Synthesis Meets Antibody Production: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlitt Stech

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineered antibodies are key players in therapy, diagnostics and research. In addition to full size immunoglobulin gamma (IgG molecules, smaller formats of recombinant antibodies, such as single-chain variable fragments (scFv and antigen binding fragments (Fab, have emerged as promising alternatives since they possess different advantageous properties. Cell-based production technologies of antibodies and antibody fragments are well-established, allowing researchers to design and manufacture highly specific molecular recognition tools. However, as these technologies are accompanied by the drawbacks of being rather time-consuming and cost-intensive, efficient and powerful cell-free protein synthesis systems have been developed over the last decade as alternatives. So far, prokaryotic cell-free systems have been the focus of interest. Recently, eukaryotic in vitro translation systems have enriched the antibody production pipeline, as these systems are able to mimic the natural pathway of antibody synthesis in eukaryotic cells. This review aims to overview and summarize the advances made in the production of antibodies and antibody fragments in cell-free systems.

  9. Development of Biodegradable Nanocarriers Loaded with a Monoclonal Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Gdowski

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Treatments utilizing monoclonal antibody therapeutics against intracellular protein-protein interactions in cancer cells have been hampered by several factors, including poor intracellular uptake and rapid lysosomal degradation. Our current work examines the feasibility of encapsulating monoclonal antibodies within poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticles using a water/oil/water double emulsion solvent evaporation technique. This method can be used to prepare protective polymeric nanoparticles for transporting functional antibodies to the cytoplasmic compartment of cancer cells. Nanoparticles were formulated and then characterized using a number of physical and biological parameters. The average nanoparticle size ranged from 221 to 252 nm with a low polydispersity index. Encapsulation efficiency of 16%–22% and antibody loading of 0.3%–1.12% were observed. The antibody molecules were released from the nanoparticles in a sustained manner and upon release maintained functionality. Our studies achieved successful formulation of antibody loaded polymeric nanoparticles, thus indicating that a PLGA-based antibody nanoformulation is a promising intracellular delivery vehicle for a large number of new intracellular antibody targets in cancer cells.

  10. Monoclonal antibodies in animal production; their use in diagnostics and passive immunization.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booman, P.

    1989-01-01

    One of the landmarks in immunology was the invention and development of monoclonal antibody-secreting hybridomas by Milstein and his coworkers. The enormous promise of monoclonal antibody technology, which became apparent soon after its discovery, may explain the unusual speed with which monoclonal

  11. Neutralization of botulinum neurotoxin by a human monoclonal antibody specific for the catalytic light chain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad P Adekar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT are a family of category A select bioterror agents and the most potent biological toxins known. Cloned antibody therapeutics hold considerable promise as BoNT therapeutics, but the therapeutic utility of antibodies that bind the BoNT light chain domain (LC, a metalloprotease that functions in the cytosol of cholinergic neurons, has not been thoroughly explored. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used an optimized hybridoma method to clone a fully human antibody specific for the LC of serotype A BoNT (BoNT/A. The 4LCA antibody demonstrated potent in vivo neutralization when administered alone and collaborated with an antibody specific for the HC. In Neuro-2a neuroblastoma cells, the 4LCA antibody prevented the cleavage of the BoNT/A proteolytic target, SNAP-25. Unlike an antibody specific for the HC, the 4LCA antibody did not block entry of BoNT/A into cultured cells. Instead, it was taken up into synaptic vesicles along with BoNT/A. The 4LCA antibody also directly inhibited BoNT/A catalytic activity in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: An antibody specific for the BoNT/A LC can potently inhibit BoNT/A in vivo and in vitro, using mechanisms not previously associated with BoNT-neutralizing antibodies. Antibodies specific for BoNT LC may be valuable components of an antibody antidote for BoNT exposure.

  12. A novel assay for monitoring internalization of nanocarrier coupled antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pickering Edward M

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Discovery of tumor-selective antibodies or antibody fragments is a promising approach for delivering therapeutic agents to antigen over-expressing cancers. Therefore it is important to develop methods for the identification of target- and function specific antibodies for effective drug delivery. Here we describe a highly selective and sensitive method for characterizing the internalizing potential of multivalently displayed antibodies or ligands conjugated to liposomes into tumor cells. The assay requires minute amounts of histidine-tagged ligand and relies on the non-covalent coupling of these antibodies to fluorescent liposomes containing a metal ion-chelating lipid. Following incubation of cells with antibody-conjugated liposomes, surface bound liposomes are gently removed and the remaining internalized liposomes are quantitated based on fluorescence in a high throughput manner. We have termed this methodology "Chelated Ligand Internalization Assay", or CLIA. Results The specificity of the assay was demonstrated with different antibodies to the ErbB-2 and EGF receptors. Antibody-uptake correlated with receptor expression levels in tumor cell lines with a range of receptor expression. Furthermore, Ni-NTA liposomes containing doxorubicin were used to screen for the ability of antibodies to confer target-specific cytotoxicity. Using an anti-ErbB2 single chain Fv (scFv (F5 antibody, cytotoxicity could be conferred to ErbB2-overexpressing cells; however, a poly(ethylene glycol-linked lipid (DSPE-PEG-NTA-Ni was necessary to allow for efficient loading of the drug and to reduce nonspecific drug leakage during the course of the assay. Conclusion The CLIA method we describe here represents a rapid, sensitive and robust assay for the identification and characterization of tumor-specific antibodies capable of high drug-delivery efficiency when conjugated to liposomal nanocarriers.

  13. Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia Antibody Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Global Sites Search Help? Heparin-induced Thrombocytopenia PF4 Antibody Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Heparin-PF4 Antibody; HIT Antibody; HIT PF4 Antibody; Heparin Induced Antibody; ...

  14. Plant expression of chicken secretory antibodies derived from combinatorial libraries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieland, W.H.; Lammers, A.; Schots, A.; Orzaéz, D.V.

    2006-01-01

    Delivery of secretory IgA antibodies (sIgA) to mucosal surfaces is a promising strategy to passively prevent infectious diseases. Plants have been proposed as biofactories for such complex immunoglobulin molecules. Recently, the molecular characterization of all four monomers of chicken sIgA (IgA im

  15. [New antibodies in cancer treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestalozzi, B C; Knuth, A

    2004-09-22

    Since the development of hybridoma technology in 1975 monoclonal antibodies with pre-defined specificity can be produced. Only twenty years later did it become possible to make therapeutic use of monoclonal antibodies in oncology. To this end it was necessary to attach the antigen-binding site of a mouse antibody onto the scaffold of a human antibody molecule. Such chimeric or "humanized" antibodies may be used in passive immunotherapy without eliciting an immune response. Rituximab and trastuzumab are such humanized antibodies. They are used today routinely in the treatment of malignant lymphoma and breast cancer, respectively. These antibodies are usually used in combination with conventional cytostatic anticancer drugs.

  16. Engineering antibodies for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boder, Eric T; Jiang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    The advent of modern antibody engineering has led to numerous successes in the application of these proteins for cancer therapy in the 13 years since the first Food and Drug Administration approval, which has stimulated active interest in developing more and better drugs based on these molecules. A wide range of tools for discovering and engineering antibodies has been brought to bear on this challenge in the past two decades. Here, we summarize mechanisms of monoclonal antibody therapeutic activity, challenges to effective antibody-based treatment, existing technologies for antibody engineering, and current concepts for engineering new antibody formats and antibody alternatives as next generation biopharmaceuticals for cancer treatment.

  17. Little bottles and the promise of probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burges Watson, Duika; Moreira, Tiago; Murtagh, Madeleine

    2009-03-01

    In this article we explore; regimes of hope' in contemporary bioscience as articulated in spaces of health consumption. We use the case study of probiotic little bottles, highlighting their promissory branding as consumer products, to consider how hope and truth play out across different spaces of health care - the supermarket, media and laboratory. Drawing on work within both sociological and geographic literatures to think about hope, truth and probiotics, this article explores their ambiguous promise through an analysis of their biomedical and popular representation. The seemingly incommensurate promise of probiotics between popular and medical spheres provides the point of departure for an examination of the geographies of hope, truth and selfhood.

  18. Origin and pathogenesis of antiphospholipid antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. Celli

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL are a heterogeneous group of antibodies that are detected in the serum of patients with a variety of conditions, including autoimmune (systemic lupus erythematosus, infectious (syphilis, AIDS and lymphoproliferative disorders (paraproteinemia, myeloma, lymphocytic leukemias. Thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, recurrent fetal loss and other clinical complications are currently associated with a subgroup of aPL designating the antiphospholipid syndrome. In contrast, aPL from patients with infectious disorders are not associated with any clinical manifestation. These findings led to increased interest in the origin and pathogenesis of aPL. Here we present the clinical features of the antiphospholipid syndrome and review the origin of aPL, the characteristics of experimentally induced aPL and their historical background. Within this context, we discuss the most probable pathogenic mechanisms induced by these antibodies.

  19. [Absorbable coronary stents. New promising technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbel, Raimund; Böse, Dirk; Haude, Michael; Kordish, Igor; Churzidze, Sofia; Malyar, Nasser; Konorza, Thomas; Sack, Stefan

    2007-06-01

    Coronary stent implantation started in Germany 20 years ago. In the beginning, the progress was very slow and accelerated 10 years later. Meanwhile, coronary stent implantation is a standard procedure in interventional cardiology. From the beginning of permanent stent implantation, research started to provide temporary stenting of coronary arteries, first with catheter-based systems, later with stent-alone technology. Stents were produced from polymers or metal. The first polymer stent implantation failed except the Igaki-Tamai stent in Japan. Newly developed absorbable polymer stents seem to be very promising, as intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and optical coherence tomography have demonstrated. Temporary metal stents were developed based on iron and magnesium. Currently, the iron stent is tested in peripheral arteries. The absorbable magnesium stent (Biotronik, Berlin, Germany) was tested in peripheral arteries below the knee and meanwhile in the multicenter international PROGRESS-AMS (Clinical Performance and Angiographic Results of Coronary Stenting with Absorbable Metal Stents) study. The first magnesium stent implantation was performed on July 30, 2004 after extended experimental testing in Essen. The magnesium stent behaved like a bare-metal stent with low recoil of 5-7%. The stent struts were absorbed when tested with IVUS. Stent struts were not visible by fluoroscopy or computed tomography (CT) as well as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). That means, that the magnesium stent is invisible and therefore CT and MRI can be used for imaging of interventions. Only using micro-CT the stent struts were visible. The absorption process could be demonstrated in a patient 18 days after implantation due to suspected acute coronary syndrome, which was excluded. IVUS showed a nice open lumen. Stent struts were no longer visible, but replaced by tissue indicating the previous stent location. Coronary angiography after 4 months showed an ischemia-driven target lesion

  20. Behavioural activation: history, evidence and promise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Jonathan W; Puspitasari, Ajeng J; Santos, Maria M; Nagy, Gabriela A

    2012-05-01

    Behavioural activation holds promise to reduce the global burden of depression as a treatment approach that is effective, easy to teach, scalable and acceptable to providers and patients across settings and cultures. This editorial reviews the history of behavioural activation, what it is, current evidence for its use and future directions.

  1. Ideological Repositioning: Race, Social Justice, and Promise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Samuel R.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I engage in discourse centrally located in the ideology of race in the United States of America juxtaposed to social justice with promise for tomorrow in higher education and beyond. I assert that social justice in kinesiology requires that once hired, retaining, securing tenured status, and promoting faculty of color means having…

  2. Capture technologies: Improvements and promising developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blomen, E.; Hendriks, C.; Neele, F.

    2009-01-01

    In this status report we want to provide a comprehensive overview of the current status and promising technologies of CO2 capture by means of a literature review, in-house knowledge and interviews. We describe the technology, bottlenecks towards implementation and potential use. The results will be

  3. Collaboration: Perks, Problems, and Promising Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Whatley, Gloria; And Others

    1994-01-01

    General educator-special educator collaboration is discussed. Advantages include professional exchange of ideas and sharing of resources; barriers include a feeling by staff of lack of ownership and lack of power in decision making, and the perception that goals are incompatible; promising practices include clarifying goals and developing…

  4. Natural and Man-made Antibody Repertories for Antibody Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C eAlmagro

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies are the fastest-growing segment of the biologics market. The success of antibody-based drugs resides in their exquisite specificity, high potency, stability, solubility, safety and relatively inexpensive manufacturing process in comparison with other biologics. We outline here the structural studies and fundamental principles that define how antibodies interact with diverse targets. We also describe the antibody repertoires and affinity maturation mechanisms of human, mice and chickens, plus the use of novel single-domain antibodies in camelids and sharks. These species all utilize diverse evolutionary solutions to generate specific and high affinity antibodies and illustrate the plasticity of natural antibody repertoires. In addition, we discuss the multiple variations of man-made antibody repertoires designed and validated in the last two decades, which have served as tools to explore how the size, diversity and composition of a repertoire impact the antibody discovery process.

  5. Fluorescent antibody labeling for experimental choroidal neovascularization in mice%荧光抗体标记法在小鼠脉络膜新生血管中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾丽萍; 陈莉; 陈辉; 庹旌生; 高小伟

    2011-01-01

    impairment in many retinal diseases.To create an ideal CNV animal model is very important for the experimental and clinical study of CNV.The assessment method of repeatable and reliable for CNV model is still seldom.Objective This experiment was to explore the label value of fluorescent antibody for visualizing and quantifying the morphologic changes associated with laser-induced CNV.Methods Laser-induced CNV models were created in 30 eyes of 15 male SPF C57BL/6J mice by Krypton red laser irradiating fundus 2 spots around the optical disc with the wavelength 647.1nm,power 260 mW,spot diameter 50μm and exposure time 0.05 seconds.The CNV was evaluated at 5 minutes,4,7,14 and 28 days after laser injury by using fundus photography and fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA),and the successful models were identified as the rupture of Bruch's membrane.The mice were then immediately sacrificed and the eyeballs were enucleated to prepare the choroidal flatmounts.The posterior eye cups were fluorescently labeled with markers of cell nuclei (DAPI,4',6'-diamino-2-phenylindole),endothelial cells (isolectin-B4),and filamentous actin (phalloidin).The CNV areas from specimens were measured by Image pro plus 6.0.Two eyes from one matched mouse without receiving photocoagulation were used as the controlls.This study followed the Standard of Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology.Results No any CNV was seen in photocoagulated eyes in 5 minutes and 4 days after laser irradiation.The first sign of CNV appeared at 7 days following photocoagulation.The incidence of fluorescein leakage was 76.47% (26/34),81.81% (18/22),50.00% (5/10) at 7,14 and 28 days,respectively.The fluomicroscope examination showed that in unphotocoagulated areas,retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells were visualized with a uniform hexagonal array.Immediately after laser exposure,a circular area devoid of fluorescent labeling was observed,indicating disruption of the choroid-Bruch membrane-RPE complex.On the fourth

  6. Single cycle structure-based humanization of an anti-nerve growth factor therapeutic antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Covaceuszach

    Full Text Available Most forms of chronic pain are inadequately treated by present therapeutic options. Compelling evidence has accumulated, demonstrating that Nerve Growth Factor (NGF is a key modulator of inflammatory and nociceptive responses, and is a promising target for the treatment of human pathologies linked to chronic and inflammatory pain. There is therefore a growing interest in the development of therapeutic molecules antagonising the NGF pathway and its nociceptor sensitization actions, among which function-blocking anti-NGF antibodies are particularly relevant candidates.In this respect, the rat anti-NGF αD11 monoclonal antibody (mAb is a potent antagonist, able to effectively antagonize rodent and human NGF in a variety of in vitro and in vivo systems. Here we show that mAb αD11 displays a significant analgesic effect in two different models of persistent pain in mice, with a remarkable long-lasting activity. In order to advance αD11 mAb towards its clinical application in man, anti-NGF αD11 mAb was humanized by applying a novel single cycle strategy based on the a priori experimental determination of the crystal and molecular structure of the parental Fragment antigen-binding (Fab. The humanized antibody (hum-αD11 was tested in vitro and in vivo, showing that the binding mode and the NGF neutralizing biological activities of the parental antibody are fully preserved, with even a significant affinity improvement. The results firmly establish hum-αD11 as a lead candidate for clinical applications in a therapeutic area with a severe unmet medical need. More generally, the single-cycle structure-based humanization method represents a considerable improvement over the standard humanization methods, which are intrinsically empirical and require several refinement cycles.

  7. Single Cycle Structure-Based Humanization of an Anti-Nerve Growth Factor Therapeutic Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covaceuszach, Sonia; Marinelli, Sara; Krastanova, Ivet; Ugolini, Gabriele; Pavone, Flaminia; Lamba, Doriano; Cattaneo, Antonino

    2012-01-01

    Most forms of chronic pain are inadequately treated by present therapeutic options. Compelling evidence has accumulated, demonstrating that Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) is a key modulator of inflammatory and nociceptive responses, and is a promising target for the treatment of human pathologies linked to chronic and inflammatory pain. There is therefore a growing interest in the development of therapeutic molecules antagonising the NGF pathway and its nociceptor sensitization actions, among which function-blocking anti-NGF antibodies are particularly relevant candidates. In this respect, the rat anti-NGF αD11 monoclonal antibody (mAb) is a potent antagonist, able to effectively antagonize rodent and human NGF in a variety of in vitro and in vivo systems. Here we show that mAb αD11 displays a significant analgesic effect in two different models of persistent pain in mice, with a remarkable long-lasting activity. In order to advance αD11 mAb towards its clinical application in man, anti-NGF αD11 mAb was humanized by applying a novel single cycle strategy based on the a priori experimental determination of the crystal and molecular structure of the parental Fragment antigen-binding (Fab). The humanized antibody (hum-αD11) was tested in vitro and in vivo, showing that the binding mode and the NGF neutralizing biological activities of the parental antibody are fully preserved, with even a significant affinity improvement. The results firmly establish hum-αD11 as a lead candidate for clinical applications in a therapeutic area with a severe unmet medical need. More generally, the single-cycle structure-based humanization method represents a considerable improvement over the standard humanization methods, which are intrinsically empirical and require several refinement cycles. PMID:22403636

  8. Selection strategies for anti-cancer antibody discovery: searching off the beaten path

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Martín, David; Sørensen, Morten Dræby; Lykkemark, Simon; Sanz, Laura; Kristensen, Peter; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Álvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Antibody based drugs represent one of the most successful and promising therapeutic approaches in oncology. Large combinatorial phage antibody libraries are available for identification of therapeutic antibodies, and a variety of technologies exist for their further conversion into multivalent and multispecific formats optimized for the desired pharmacokinetics and the pathological context. However, there is no technology for antigen profiling of intact tumors to identify tumor markers targetable with antibodies. Such constraints have led to a relative paucity of tumor-associated antigens for antibody targeting in oncology. Here we review novel approaches aimed at the identification of antibody-targetable, accessible antigens in intact tumors. We hope that such advanced selection approaches will be useful in the development of next-generation antibody therapeutics for cancer. PMID:25819764

  9. Recent advances in the construction of antibody-drug conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudasama, Vijay; Maruani, Antoine; Caddick, Stephen

    2016-02-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) comprise antibodies covalently attached to highly potent drugs using a variety of conjugation technologies. As therapeutics, they combine the exquisite specificity of antibodies, enabling discrimination between healthy and diseased tissue, with the cell-killing ability of cytotoxic drugs. This powerful and exciting class of targeted therapy has shown considerable promise in the treatment of various cancers with two US Food and Drug Administration approved ADCs currently on the market (Adcetris and Kadcyla) and approximately 40 currently undergoing clinical evaluation. However, most of these ADCs exist as heterogeneous mixtures, which can result in a narrow therapeutic window and have major pharmacokinetic implications. In order for ADCs to deliver their full potential, sophisticated site-specific conjugation technologies to connect the drug to the antibody are vital. This Perspective discusses the strategies currently used for the site-specific construction of ADCs and appraises their merits and disadvantages.

  10. Anaphylaxis to chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castells, Mariana C

    2015-05-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions are increasingly prevalent, although underrecognized and underreported. Platins induce immunoglobulin E-mediated sensitization; taxenes and some monoclonal antibodies can induce reactions at first exposure. Severe hypersensitivity can preclude first-line therapy. Tryptase level at the time of a reaction is a useful diagnostic tool. Skin testing provides a specific diagnosis. Newer tests are promising diagnostic tools to help identify patients at risk before first exposure. Safe management includes rapid drug desensitization. This review provides information regarding the scope of hypersensitivity and anaphylactic reactions induced by chemotherapy and biological drugs, as well as diagnosis, management, and treatment options.

  11. Antibody affinity maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjødt, Mette Louise

    surface expression of various antibody formats in the generated knockout strain. Functional scFv and scFab fragments were efficiently displayed on yeast whereas impaired chain assembly and heavy chain degradation was observed for display of full-length IgG molecules. To identify the optimal polypeptide...... linker for yeast surface display of scFv and scFab fragments, we compared a series of different Gly-Ser-based linkers in display and antigen binding proficiency. We show that these formats of the model antibody can accommodate linkers of different lengths and that introduction of alanine or glutamate...... fragments by in vivo homologous recombination large combinatorial antibody libraries can easily be generated. We have optimized ordered assembly of three CDR fragments into a gapped vector and observed increased transformation efficiency in a yeast strain carrying a deletion of the SGS1 helicase...

  12. Antithyroglobulin Antibodies and Antimicrosomal Antibodies in Various Thyroid Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gwon Jun; Hong, Key Sak; Choi, Kang Won; Lee, Kyu; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho; Park, Sung Hoe; Chi, Je Geun; Lee, Sang Kook [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-03-15

    The authors investigated the incidence of antithyroglobulin antibodies and antibodies and antimicrosomal antibodies measured by tanned red cell hemagglutination method in subjects suffering from various thyroid disorders. 1) In 15 normal patients, neither suffering from any thyroid diseases nor from any other autoimmune disorders, the antithyroglobulin antibodies were all negative, but the antimicrosomal antibody was positive only in one patient (6.7%). 2) The antithyroglobulin antibodies were positive in 31.5% (34 patients) of 108 patients with various thyroid diseases, and the antimicrosomal antibodies were positive in 37.0% (40 patients). 3) of the 25 patients with Graves' diseases, 7 patients (28.0%) showed positive for the antithyroglobulin antibodies, and 9 (36.0%) for the antimicrosomal antibodies. There was no definite differences in clinical and thyroid functions between the groups with positive and negative results. 4) Both antibodies were positive in 16 (88.9%) and 17 (94.4%) patients respectively among 18 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, all of them were diagnosed histologically. 5) Three out of 33 patients with thyroid adenoma showed positive antibodies, and 3 of 16 patients with thyroid carcinoma revealed positive antibodies. 6) TRCH antibodies demonstrated negative results in 2 patients with subacute thyroiditis, but positive in one patient with idiopathic primary myxedema. 7) The number of patients with high titers(>l:802) was 16 for antithyroglobulin antibody, and 62.5% (10 patients) of which was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Thirteen (65.0) of 20 patients with high titers (>l:802) for antimicrosomal antibody was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. TRCH test is a simple, sensitive method, and has high reliability and reproducibility. The incidences and titers of antithyroglobulin antibody and antimicrosomal antibody are especially high in Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

  13. Prediction of Antibody Epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies recognize their cognate antigens in a precise and effective way. In order to do so, they target regions of the antigenic molecules that have specific features such as large exposed areas, presence of charged or polar atoms, specific secondary structure elements, and lack of similarity...... to self-proteins. Given the sequence or the structure of a protein of interest, several methods exploit such features to predict the residues that are more likely to be recognized by an immunoglobulin.Here, we present two methods (BepiPred and DiscoTope) to predict linear and discontinuous antibody...

  14. Antiviral Therapy by HIV-1 Broadly Neutralizing and Inhibitory Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqing Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS, a global epidemic for more than three decades. HIV-1 replication is primarily controlled through antiretroviral therapy (ART but this treatment does not cure HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, there is increasing viral resistance to ART, and side effects associated with long-term therapy. Consequently, there is a need of alternative candidates for HIV-1 prevention and therapy. Recent advances have discovered multiple broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1. In this review, we describe the key epitopes on the HIV-1 Env protein and the reciprocal broadly neutralizing antibodies, and discuss the ongoing clinical trials of broadly neutralizing and inhibitory antibody therapy as well as antibody combinations, bispecific antibodies, and methods that improve therapeutic efficacy by combining broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs with latency reversing agents. Compared with ART, HIV-1 therapeutics that incorporate these broadly neutralizing and inhibitory antibodies offer the advantage of decreasing virus load and clearing infected cells, which is a promising prospect in HIV-1 prevention and treatment.

  15. Antiviral Therapy by HIV-1 Broadly Neutralizing and Inhibitory Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiqing; Li, Shaowei; Gu, Ying; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-11-18

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), a global epidemic for more than three decades. HIV-1 replication is primarily controlled through antiretroviral therapy (ART) but this treatment does not cure HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, there is increasing viral resistance to ART, and side effects associated with long-term therapy. Consequently, there is a need of alternative candidates for HIV-1 prevention and therapy. Recent advances have discovered multiple broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1. In this review, we describe the key epitopes on the HIV-1 Env protein and the reciprocal broadly neutralizing antibodies, and discuss the ongoing clinical trials of broadly neutralizing and inhibitory antibody therapy as well as antibody combinations, bispecific antibodies, and methods that improve therapeutic efficacy by combining broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) with latency reversing agents. Compared with ART, HIV-1 therapeutics that incorporate these broadly neutralizing and inhibitory antibodies offer the advantage of decreasing virus load and clearing infected cells, which is a promising prospect in HIV-1 prevention and treatment.

  16. Promising Products for Printing and Publishing Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Činčikaitė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The article surveys printing and publishing market and its strong and weak aspects. The concept of a new product is described as well as its lifetime and the necessity of its introduction to the market. The enterprise X operating on the market is analyzed, its strong and weak characteristics are presented. The segmentation of the company consumers is performed. On the basis of the performed analysis the potential promising company products are defined.Article in Lithuanian

  17. Compositions, antibodies, asthma diagnosis methods, and methods for preparing antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Hongjun; Zangar, Richard C.

    2017-01-17

    Methods for preparing an antibody are provided with the method including incorporating 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid into a protein to form an antigen, immunizing a mammalian host with the antigen, and recovering an antibody having an affinity for the antigen from the host. Antibodies having a binding affinity for a monohalotyrosine are provided as well as composition comprising an antibody bound with monohalotyrosine. Compositions comprising a protein having a 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid moiety are also provided. Methods for evaluating the severity of asthma are provide with the methods including analyzing sputum of a patient using an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine, and measuring the amount of antibody bound to protein. Methods for determining eosinophil activity in bodily fluid are also provided with the methods including exposing bodily fluid to an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine, and measuring the amount of bound antibody to determine the eosinophil activity.

  18. Thrombus imaging in a primate model with antibodies specific for an external membrane protein of activated platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palabrica, T.M.; Furie, B.C.; Konstam, M.A.; Aronovitz, M.J.; Connolly, R.; Brockway, B.A.; Ramberg, K.L.; Furie, B.

    1989-02-01

    The activated platelet is a potential target for the localization of thrombi in vivo since, after stimulation and secretion of granule contents, activated platelets are concentrated at sites of blood clot formation. In this study, we used antibodies specific for a membrane protein of activated platelets to detect experimental thrombi in an animal model. PADGEM (platelet activation-dependent granule-external membrane protein), a platelet alpha-granule membrane protein, is translocated to the plasma membrane during platelet activation and granule secretion. Since PADGEM is internal in unstimulated platelets, polyclonal anti-PADGEM and monoclonal KC4 antibodies do not bind to circulating resting platelets but do interact with activated platelets. Dacron graft material incubated with radiolabeled KC4 or anti-PADGEM antibodies in the presence of thrombin-activated platelet-rich plasma bound most of the antibody. Imaging experiments with 123I-labeled anti-PADGEM in baboons with an external arterial-venous Dacron shunt revealed rapid uptake in the thrombus induced by the Dacron graft; control experiments with 123I-labeled nonimmune IgG exhibited minimal uptake. Deep venous thrombi, formed by using percutaneous balloon catheters to stop blood flow in the femoral vein of baboons, were visualized with 123I-labeled anti-PADGEM. Thrombi were discernible against blood pool background activity without subtraction techniques within 1 hr. No target enhancement was seen with 123I-labeled nonimmune IgG. 123I-labeled anti-PADGEM cleared the blood pool with an initial half-disappearance time of 6 min and did not interfere with hemostasis. These results indicate that radioimmunoscintigraphy with anti-PADGEM antibodies can visualize thrombi in baboon models and is a promising technique for clinical thrombus detection in humans.

  19. Human germline antibody gene segments encode polyspecific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Jordan R; Briney, Bryan S; DeLuca, Samuel L; Crowe, James E; Meiler, Jens

    2013-04-01

    Structural flexibility in germline gene-encoded antibodies allows promiscuous binding to diverse antigens. The binding affinity and specificity for a particular epitope typically increase as antibody genes acquire somatic mutations in antigen-stimulated B cells. In this work, we investigated whether germline gene-encoded antibodies are optimal for polyspecificity by determining the basis for recognition of diverse antigens by antibodies encoded by three VH gene segments. Panels of somatically mutated antibodies encoded by a common VH gene, but each binding to a different antigen, were computationally redesigned to predict antibodies that could engage multiple antigens at once. The Rosetta multi-state design process predicted antibody sequences for the entire heavy chain variable region, including framework, CDR1, and CDR2 mutations. The predicted sequences matched the germline gene sequences to a remarkable degree, revealing by computational design the residues that are predicted to enable polyspecificity, i.e., binding of many unrelated antigens with a common sequence. The process thereby reverses antibody maturation in silico. In contrast, when designing antibodies to bind a single antigen, a sequence similar to that of the mature antibody sequence was returned, mimicking natural antibody maturation in silico. We demonstrated that the Rosetta computational design algorithm captures important aspects of antibody/antigen recognition. While the hypervariable region CDR3 often mediates much of the specificity of mature antibodies, we identified key positions in the VH gene encoding CDR1, CDR2, and the immunoglobulin framework that are critical contributors for polyspecificity in germline antibodies. Computational design of antibodies capable of binding multiple antigens may allow the rational design of antibodies that retain polyspecificity for diverse epitope binding.

  20. Prediction of antibody persistency from antibody titres to natalizumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Poul Erik H; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Sellebjerg, Finn Thorup;

    2012-01-01

    In a subgroup of patients with multiple sclerosis natalizumab therapy causes generation of anti-natalizumab antibodies that may be transient or persistent. It is recommended to discontinue natalizumab therapy in persistently antibody-positive patients.......In a subgroup of patients with multiple sclerosis natalizumab therapy causes generation of anti-natalizumab antibodies that may be transient or persistent. It is recommended to discontinue natalizumab therapy in persistently antibody-positive patients....

  1. Monoclonal antibodies in myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergeld, P.; van de Donk, N. W. C. J.; Richardson, P. G.;

    2015-01-01

    The development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for the treatment of disease goes back to the vision of Paul Ehrlich in the late 19th century; however, the first successful treatment with a mAb was not until 1982, in a lymphoma patient. In multiple myeloma, mAbs are a very recent and exciting add...

  2. Antibody Blood Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What do I do if I have a negative blood test (or panel) but I’m still having symptoms? While it is rare, it is possible for patients to have a negative antibody test results and still have celiac disease. ...

  3. RBC Antibody Screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... test also may be used to help diagnose autoimmune-related hemolytic anemia in conjunction with a DAT. This condition may be caused when a person produces antibodies against his or her own RBC antigens. This can happen with some autoimmune disorders , such as lupus , with diseases such as ...

  4. Promises, Promises, and Not a Job in Sight; Broke Ass State; The Violinist

    OpenAIRE

    Callahan, Lauren

    2011-01-01

    Promises, Promises, and Not a Job in Sight Abstract: This piece was produced in October 2010 and looked at California’s impending gubernatorial race. Jobs and the economy were a big issue in that campaign between Meg Whitman and Jerry Brown, and I set out to answer whether either candidate could provide the economic relief they were promising. Resources: Mathews, Joe and Mark Paul. California Crackup: How Reform Broke the Golden State and How We Can Fix It. 2010, University of California Pre...

  5. Antibody-Mediated Rejection: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garces, Jorge Carlos; Giusti, Sixto; Staffeld-Coit, Catherine; Bohorquez, Humberto; Cohen, Ari J.; Loss, George E.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Chronic antibody injury is a serious threat to allograft outcomes and is therefore the center of active research. In the continuum of allograft rejection, the development of antibodies plays a critical role. In recent years, an increased recognition of molecular and histologic changes has provided a better understanding of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR), as well as potential therapeutic interventions. However, several pathways are still unknown, which accounts for the lack of efficacy of some of the currently available agents that are used to treat rejection. Methods: We review the current diagnostic criteria for AMR; AMR paradigms; and desensitization, treatment, and prevention strategies. Results: Chronic antibody-mediated endothelial injury results in transplant glomerulopathy, manifested as glomerular basement membrane duplication, double contouring, or splitting. Clinical manifestations of AMR include proteinuria and a rise in serum creatinine. Current strategies for the treatment of AMR include antibody depletion with plasmapheresis (PLEX), immunoadsorption (IA), immunomodulation with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and T cell– or B cell–depleting agents. Some treatment benefits have been found in using PLEX and IA, and some small nonrandomized trials have identified some benefits in using rituximab and the proteasome inhibitor-based therapy bortezomib. More recent histologic follow-ups of patients treated with bortezomib have not shown significant benefits in terms of allograft outcomes. Furthermore, no specific treatment approaches have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Other agents used for more difficult rejections include bortezomib and eculizumab (an anti-C5 monoclonal antibody). Conclusion: AMR is a fascinating field with ample opportunities for research and progress in the future. Despite the use of advanced techniques for the detection of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) or non-HLA donor-specific antibodies

  6. Solid phase radioimmunoassay using labelled antibodies: a conceptual framework for designing assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalmakoff, J.; Parkinson, A.J.; Crawford, A.M.; Williams, B.R.

    1977-01-01

    A simple theoretical model for the antigen-antibody reaction is presented and used to evaluate the optimum conditions for designing solid phase radioimmunoassay (RIA) using labelled antibodies. Both theoretical and experimental data are presented, using a wide variety of antigens and their corresponding antibodies. The types of RIA described include the direct, the indirect, and sandwich assays for detecting either antigen or antibody. The experimental results confirm in a semiquantitative manner that the greatest sensitivity of the RIA is achieved when the smallest amount of labelled antibody is used, that whenever possible the antigen/antibody ratio should be greater than unity (greater than 1), and that the formation of the antigen-antibody complex is dependent on the mass action effect.

  7. What Is Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome? Antiphospholipid (AN-te-fos-fo-LIP-id) antibody ... weeks or months. This condition is called catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS). People who have APS also are at ...

  8. Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ID, RBC; RBC Ab ID Formal name: Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification Related tests: Direct Antiglobulin Test ; RBC ... I should know? How is it used? Red blood cell (RBC) antibody identification is used as a follow- ...

  9. Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000547.htm Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lupus anticoagulants are antibodies against substances in the lining ...

  10. Anti-smooth muscle antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/003531.htm Anti-smooth muscle antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Anti-smooth muscle antibody is a blood test that detects the presence ...

  11. Hypotheses of the origin of natural antibodies: a glycobiologist's opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasbiullina, N R; Bovin, N V

    2015-07-01

    It is generally accepted that the generation of antibodies proceeds due to immunization of an organism by alien antigens, and the level and affinity of antibodies are directly correlated to the presence of immunogen. At the same time, vast experimental material has been obtained providing evidence of antibodies whose level remains unchanged and affinity is constant during a lifetime. In contrast to the first, adaptive immunoglobulins, the latter are named natural antibodies (nAbs). The nAbs are produced by B1 cells, whereas adaptive Abs are produced by B2. This review summarizes general data on nAbs and presents in more detail data on antigens of carbohydrate origin. Hypotheses on the origin of nAbs and their activation mechanisms are discussed. We present our thoughts on this matter supported by our experimental data on nAbs to glycans.

  12. Relative disease susceptibility and clostridial toxin antibody responses in three commercial broiler lines co-infected with Clostridium perfringens and Eimeria maxima using an experimental model of necrotic enteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necrotic enteritis is an enteric disease of poultry resulting from infection by Clostridium perfringens with co-infection by Eimeria spp. constituting a major risk factor for disease pathogenesis. This study compared three commercial broiler chicken lines using an experimental model of necrotic ente...

  13. Targeting PCSK9 as a promising new mechanism for lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Badia, Laura A; Elshourbagy, Nabil A; Mousa, Shaker A

    2016-08-01

    Statins and other lipid-lowering drugs have dominated the market for many years for achievement of recommended levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). However, a substantial number of high-risk patients are unable to achieve the LDL-C goal. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 (PCSK9) has recently emerged as a new, promising key therapeutic target for hypercholesterolemia. PCSK9 is a protease involved in chaperoning the low-density lipoprotein receptor to the process of degradation. PCSK9 inhibitors and statins effectively lower LDL-C. The PCSK9 inhibitors decrease the degradation of the LDL receptors, whereas statins mainly interfere with the synthetic machinery of cholesterol by inhibiting the key rate limiting enzyme, the HMG CoA reductase. PCSK9 inhibitors are currently being developed as monoclonal antibodies for their primary use in lowering LDL-C. They may be especially useful for patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia, who at present receive minimal benefit from traditional statin therapy. The monoclonal antibody PCSK9 inhibitors, recently granted FDA approval, show the most promising safety and efficacy profile compared to other, newer LDL-C lowering therapies. This review will primarily focus on the safety and efficacy of monoclonal antibody PCSK9 inhibitors in comparison to statins. The review will also address new, alternative PCSK9 targeting drug classes such as small molecules, gene silencing agents, apolipoprotein B antisense oligonucleotides, and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein inhibitors.

  14. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics Conference

    OpenAIRE

    Larrick, James W; Parren, Paul WHI; Huston, James S; Plückthun, Andreas; Bradbury, Andrew; Tomlinson, Ian M; Chester, Kerry A.; Burton, Dennis R.; Adams, Gregory P.; Weiner, Louis M.; Scott, Jamie K.; Alfenito, Mark R; Veldman, Trudi; Reichert, Janice M.

    2013-01-01

    The Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics conference, which serves as the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, will be held in Huntington Beach, CA from Sunday December 8 through Thursday December 12, 2013. The scientific program will cover the full spectrum of challenges in antibody research and development, and provide updates on recent progress in areas from basic science through approval of antibody therapeutics. Keynote presentations will be given by Leroy Hood (Institute of System Bi...

  15. Structural Characterization of Peptide Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chailyan, Anna; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The role of proteins as very effective immunogens for the generation of antibodies is indisputable. Nevertheless, cases in which protein usage for antibody production is not feasible or convenient compelled the creation of a powerful alternative consisting of synthetic peptides. Synthetic peptides...... can be modified to obtain desired properties or conformation, tagged for purification, isotopically labeled for protein quantitation or conjugated to immunogens for antibody production. The antibodies that bind to these peptides represent an invaluable tool for biological research and discovery...

  16. Epitope specificity plays a critical role in regulating antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity against influenza A virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wenqian; Tan, Gene S; Mullarkey, Caitlin E; Lee, Amanda J; Lam, Mannie Man Wai; Krammer, Florian; Henry, Carole; Wilson, Patrick C; Ashkar, Ali A; Palese, Peter; Miller, Matthew S

    2016-10-18

    The generation of strain-specific neutralizing antibodies against influenza A virus is known to confer potent protection against homologous infections. The majority of these antibodies bind to the hemagglutinin (HA) head domain and function by blocking the receptor binding site, preventing infection of host cells. Recently, elicitation of broadly neutralizing antibodies which target the conserved HA stalk domain has become a promising "universal" influenza virus vaccine strategy. The ability of these antibodies to elicit Fc-dependent effector functions has emerged as an important mechanism through which protection is achieved in vivo. However, the way in which Fc-dependent effector functions are regulated by polyclonal influenza virus-binding antibody mixtures in vivo has never been defined. Here, we demonstrate that interactions among viral glycoprotein-binding antibodies of varying specificities regulate the magnitude of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity induction. We show that the mechanism responsible for this phenotype relies upon competition for binding to HA on the surface of infected cells and virus particles. Nonneutralizing antibodies were poor inducers and did not inhibit antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Interestingly, anti-neuraminidase antibodies weakly induced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and enhanced induction in the presence of HA stalk-binding antibodies in an additive manner. Our data demonstrate that antibody specificity plays an important role in the regulation of ADCC, and that cross-talk among antibodies of varying specificities determines the magnitude of Fc receptor-mediated effector functions.

  17. MEMORY AND PROMISE IN ARENDT AND NIETZSCHE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VANESSA LEMM

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates and compares the value and significance that Arendt and Nietzsche attribute to the role played by memory and by the promise in constituting the political and in safeguarding the freedom and plurality of human actionEste artículo compara el valor y el significado que Arendt y Nietzsche otorgan a la memoria y a la promesa para la constitución de lo político así como para la salvaguardia de la libertad y de la pluralidad humana

  18. Autophagy : Moving Benchside Promises to Patient Bedsides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaid, Amine; Ndiaye, Papa Diogop; Filippakis, Harilaos; Roux, Jérémie; Röttinger, Éric; Graba, Yacine; Brest, Patrick; Hofman, Paul; Mograbi, Baharia

    2015-01-01

    Survival rates of patients with metastatic or recurrent cancers have remained virtually unchanged during the past 30 years. This fact makes the need for new therapeutic options even more urgent. An attractive option would be to target autophagy, an essential quality control process that degrades toxic aggregates, damaged organelles, and signaling proteins, and acts as a tumor suppressor pathway of tumor initiation. Conversely, other fascinating observations suggest that autophagy supports cancer progression, relapse, metastasis, dormancy and resistance to therapy. This review provides an overview of the contradictory roles that autophagy plays in cancer initiation and progression and discusses the promises and challenges of current strategies that target autophagy for cancer therapy.

  19. Synthetic peptides for antibody production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, N.D.

    1995-01-01

    Synthetic peptides are useful tools for the generation of antibodies. The use of antibodies as specific reagents in inununochemical assays is widely applied. In this chapter, the application of synthetic peptides for the generation of antibodies is described. The different steps that lead to the uni

  20. Monoclonal Antibodies Against Xenopus Greatwall Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Fisher, Laura A.; Wahl, James K.

    2011-01-01

    Mitosis is known to be regulated by protein kinases, including MPF, Plk1, Aurora kinases, and so on, which become active in M-phase and phosphorylate a wide range of substrates to control multiple aspects of mitotic entry, progression, and exit. Mechanistic investigations of these kinases not only provide key insights into cell cycle regulation, but also hold great promise for cancer therapy. Recent studies, largely in Xenopus, characterized a new mitotic kinase named Greatwall (Gwl) that plays essential roles in both mitotic entry and maintenance. In this study, we generated a panel of mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for Xenopus Gwl and characterized these antibodies for their utility in immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunodepletion in Xenopus egg extracts. Importantly, we generated an MAb that is capable of neutralizing endogenous Gwl. The addition of this antibody into M-phase extracts results in loss of mitotic phosphorylation of Gwl, Plk1, and Cdk1 substrates. These results illustrate a new tool to study loss-of-function of Gwl, and support its essential role in mitosis. Finally, we demonstrated the usefulness of the MAb against human Gwl/MASTL. PMID:22008075

  1. Monoclonal antibodies based on hybridoma technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagami, Hisanori; Kato, Hiroshi; Tsumoto, Kanta; Tomita, Masahiro

    2013-03-01

    Based on the size and scope of the present global market for medicine, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have a very promising future, with applications for cancers through autoimmune ailments to infectious disease. Since mAbs recognize only their target antigens and not other unrelated proteins, pinpoint medical treatment is possible. Global demand is dramatically expanding. Hybridoma technology, which allows production of mAbs directed against antigens of interest is therefore privileged. However, there are some pivotal points for further development to generate therapeutic antibodies. One is selective generation of human mAbs. Employment of transgenic mice producing human antibodies would overcome this problem. Another focus is recognition sites and conformational epitopes in antigens may be just as important as linear epitopes, especially when membrane proteins such as receptors are targeted. Recognition of intact structures is of critical importance for medical purposes. In this review, we describe patent related information for therapeutic mAbs based on hybridoma technology and also discuss new advances in hybridoma technology that facilitate selective production of stereospecific mAbs.

  2. Antiphospholipid Antibody and Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴竞生

    2008-01-01

    @@ Antiphospholipid antibodies (APA) APA is a big category for all kinds of negative charge phospholipid or lecithin - a protein complex autoantibodies or the same antibody, through its recognition of antigen (target protein) different, and phospholipids or lecithin - protein complex combination of various rely on the interference Phospholipid clotting and anti-coagulation factor, and promote endothelial cells, platelets, complement activation and play a role. APA including lupus anticoagulant(LA) and anticardiolipin antibody (ACA), In addition, there are anti-β2 glycoprotein-I (β2-GPI) antibody, anti-prothrombin (a- PT) antibody, anti-lysophosphatidic acid antibody and anti-phosphatidylserine antibody, and so on. APA as the main target of phospholipid-binding protein, including β2-GPI, prothrombin, annexin, protein C (PC) and protein S (PS), plasminogen, and so on.

  3. Engineering antibodies by yeast display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boder, Eric T; Raeeszadeh-Sarmazdeh, Maryam; Price, J Vincent

    2012-10-15

    Since its first application to antibody engineering 15 years ago, yeast display technology has been developed into a highly potent tool for both affinity maturing lead molecules and isolating novel antibodies and antibody-like species. Robust approaches to the creation of diversity, construction of yeast libraries, and library screening or selection have been elaborated, improving the quality of engineered molecules and certainty of success in an antibody engineering campaign and positioning yeast display as one of the premier antibody engineering technologies currently in use. Here, we summarize the history of antibody engineering by yeast surface display, approaches used in its application, and a number of examples highlighting the utility of this method for antibody engineering.

  4. Therapeutic application of monoclonal antibodies in multiple sclerosis: focus on alemtuzumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niino M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Masaaki NiinoDepartment of Clinical Research, Hokkaido Medical Center, Sapporo, JapanAbstract: Recent progress in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS is significant, and the potential of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs for the treatment of MS has been highlighted. Natalizumab demonstrated a high level of efficacy for MS and is the first mAb to be approved for treatment of MS. Clinical trials of several types of mAbs for treatment of MS are in progress, and mAbs are expected to become the new choice of treatment for MS. Alemtuzumab is one of the most promising mAbs for treatment for MS, despite some side effects to be considered such as autoimmune hyperthyroidism, Goodpasture’s syndrome, and autoimmune idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Any therapeutic agents for MS may carry risks of short- or long-term side effects; however, information regarding the long-term side effects of these new agents is lacking. Long-term adverse effects can often be recognized after the approval of agents. Here, recent progress on mAbs for the treatment of MS is reviewed, with a focus on alemtuzumab.Keywords: multiple sclerosis, monoclonal antibody, alemtuzumab, therapy, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

  5. Review of Some Promising Fractional Physical Models

    CERN Document Server

    Tarasov, Vasily E

    2015-01-01

    Fractional dynamics is a field of study in physics and mechanics investigating the behavior of objects and systems that are characterized by power-law non-locality, power-law long-term memory or fractal properties by using integrations and differentiation of non-integer orders, i.e., by methods of the fractional calculus. This paper is a review of physical models that look very promising for future development of fractional dynamics. We suggest a short introduction to fractional calculus as a theory of integration and differentiation of non-integer order. Some applications of integro-differentiations of fractional orders in physics are discussed. Models of discrete systems with memory, lattice with long-range inter-particle interaction, dynamics of fractal media are presented. Quantum analogs of fractional derivatives and model of open nano-system systems with memory are also discussed.

  6. GOLD NANOPARTICLES: PROMISING AND POTENTIAL NANOMATERIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri Shringirishi*, S.K. Prajapati , Alok Mahor , Shashi Alok , Poonam Yadav and Amita Verma

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs have appeared as an attractive candidate for delivery of various drug molecules or considered as extraordinary molecular carriers for the targeting, intracellular trafficking and delivery of a huge array of biomolecules including DNA, RNA, proteins, peptides, drugs, genes and other molecules of therapeutic significance. Particularly gold nanoparticles have attracted intensive interest, because they are easily prepared, have low toxicity and can be readily attached to molecules of biological interest. More and more research shows that AuNPs-based technologies are becoming promising approaches in drug and gene delivery, liver targeting, brain targeting, cancer research and AIDS treatment. The present review focuses on synthesis and functionalization methods of GNPs, the past researchs and reviews about GNPs, their emerging applications and uses and their future prospects.

  7. Nanomedicine delivers promising treatments for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Leena Kumari; O'Mary, Hannah; Cui, Zhengrong

    2015-01-01

    An increased understanding in the pathophysiology of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, reveals that the diseased tissue and the increased presence of macrophages and other overexpressed molecules within the tissue can be exploited to enhance the delivery of nanomedicine. Nanomedicine can passively accumulate into chronic inflammatory tissues via the enhanced permeability and retention phenomenon, or be surface conjugated with a ligand to actively bind to receptors overexpressed by cells within chronic inflammatory tissues, leading to increased efficacy and reduced systemic side-effects. This review highlights the research conducted over the past decade on using nanomedicine for potential treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and summarizes some of the major findings and promising opportunities on using nanomedicine to treat this prevalent and chronic disease.

  8. The promise of Lean in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, John S; Berry, Leonard L

    2013-01-01

    An urgent need in American health care is improving quality and efficiency while controlling costs. One promising management approach implemented by some leading health care institutions is Lean, a quality improvement philosophy and set of principles originated by the Toyota Motor Company. Health care cases reveal that Lean is as applicable in complex knowledge work as it is in assembly-line manufacturing. When well executed, Lean transforms how an organization works and creates an insatiable quest for improvement. In this article, we define Lean and present 6 principles that constitute the essential dynamic of Lean management: attitude of continuous improvement, value creation, unity of purpose, respect for front-line workers, visual tracking, and flexible regimentation. Health care case studies illustrate each principle. The goal of this article is to provide a template for health care leaders to use in considering the implementation of the Lean management system or in assessing the current state of implementation in their organizations.

  9. Analysis of promising sustainable renovation concepts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanhoutteghem, Lies; Tommerup, Henrik M.; Svendsen, Svend

    This report focuses on analyses of the most promising existing sustainable renovation concepts, i.e. full-service concepts and technical concepts, for single-family houses. As a basis for the analyses a detailed building stock analysis was carried out. Furthermore, as a basis a general working...... of the building envelope and the electricity required to run the system. Positive impact on the indoor environment can be expected. Thermal comfort will be improved by insulation and air-tightness measures that will increase surface temperatures and reduce draught from e.g. badly insulated windows. A ventilation...... method for proposals on package solutions for sustainable renovation was described. The method consists of four steps, going from investigation of the house to proposal for sustainable renovation, detailed planning and commissioning after renovation. It could be used by teams of consultants...

  10. The promise and peril of healthcare forecasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharam, J Frank; Weiner, Jonathan P

    2012-03-01

    Health plans and physician groups increasingly use sophisticated tools to predict individual patient outcomes. Such analytics will accelerate as US medicine enters the digital age. Promising applications of forecasting include better targeting of disease management as well as innovative patient care approaches such as personalized health insurance and clinical decision support systems. In addition, stakeholders will use predictions to advance their organizational agendas, and unintended consequences could arise. Forecasting-based interventions might have uncertain effectiveness, focus on cost savings rather than long-term health, or specifically exclude disadvantaged populations. Policy makers, health plans, and method developers should adopt strategies that address these concerns in order to maximize the benefit of healthcare forecasting on the long-term health of patients.

  11. Underexploited tropical plants with promising economic value

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-01-01

    The apparent advantages of staple plants over the minor tropical plants often result only from the disproportionate research attention they have been given. A world-wide inquiry resulted in a list of 400 promising but neglected species. The 36 most important species are described in compact monographs and concern cereals (Echinochloa turnerana, grain amaranths, quinua and Zosterea mazina), roots and tubers (Arrachacha, cocoyams and taro), vegetables (chaya, hearts of palms, wax gourd, winged bean), fruits (durian, mangosteen, naranjilla, pejibaye, pummelo, soursop, uvilla), oilseeds (babassu palm, buffalo gourd, Caryocar species, Hessenia polycarpa and jojoba), forage (Acacia albida, Brosimum alicastrum Cassia sturtii, saltbushes and tamarugo) and other crops (buriti palm, Calathea lutea, candelilla, guar, guayule, Paspalum vaginatum, ramie and Spirulina).

  12. Autism: Pathophysiology and Promising Herbal Remedies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahmani, Mahmoud; Sarrafchi, Amir; Shirzad, Hedayatollah; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Autism is a comprehensive growth abnormality in which social skills, language, communication, and behavioral skills are developed with delay and as diversionary. The reasons for autism are unclear, but various theories of genetics, immunity, biological, and psychosocial factors have been proffered. In fact, autism is a complex disorder with distinct causes that usually co-occur. Although no medicine has been recognized to treat this disorder, pharmacological treatments can be effective in reducing its signs, such as self-mutilation, aggression, repetitive and stereotyped behaviors, inattention, hyperactivity, and sleeping disorders. Recently, complementary and alternative approaches have been considered to treat autism. Ginkgo biloba is one of the most effective plants with an old history of applications in neuropsychological disorders which recently is used for autism. The present review discusses the recent findings, pathophysiology, and etiology of autism and thereafter addresses the promising results of herbal remedies.

  13. Halopentacenes: Promising Candidates for Organic Semiconductors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Gong-He; REN Zhao-Yu; GUO Ping; ZHENG Ji-Ming

    2009-01-01

    We introduce polar substituents such as F, Cl, Br into pentacene to enhance the dissolubility in common organic solvents while retaining the high charge-carrier mobilities of pentacene. Geometric structures, dipole moments,frontier molecule orbits, ionization potentials and electron affinities, as well as reorganization energies of those molecules, and of pentacene for comparison, are successively calculated by density functional theory. The results indicate that halopentacenes have rather small reorganization energies (< 0.2 eV), and when the substituents are in position 2 or positions 2 and 9, they are polarity molecules. Thus we conjecture that they can easily be dissolved in common organic solvents, and are promising candidates for organic semiconductors.

  14. Court rules insurer must honor its promise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-10-01

    Monumental Life Insurance Co. has to pay more than $230,000 to a beneficiary whose partner died of AIDS, shortly after paying the monthly premium for a life insurance policy. Unaware of the health status of the policy holder, a representative from the insurance company granted coverage and gave the policy holder a written statement that showed the amount of coverage of the policy. After the death of the partner, the insurance company told the beneficiary that the amount of coverage promised was a mistake. The beneficiary sued, and it was ruled that the company's letter, and the payment of the monthly premium, constituted a contract that the insurance company was obligated to uphold.

  15. The Economic Promise of Delayed Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Dana

    2015-12-18

    Biomedicine has made enormous progress in the last half century in treating common diseases. However, we are becoming victims of our own success. Causes of death strongly associated with biological aging, such as heart disease, cancer, Alzheimer's disease, and stroke-cluster within individuals as they grow older. These conditions increase frailty and limit the benefits of continued, disease-specific improvements. Here, we show that a "delayed-aging" scenario, modeled on the biological benefits observed in the most promising animal models, could solve this problem of competing risks. The economic value of delayed aging is estimated to be $7.1 trillion over 50 years. Total government costs, including Social Security, rise substantially with delayed aging--mainly caused by longevity increases--but we show that these can be offset by modest policy changes. Expanded biomedical research to delay aging appears to be a highly efficient way to forestall disease and extend healthy life.

  16. Antibodies against bovine herpesvirus (BHV) 5 may be differentiated from antibodies against BHV1 in a BHV1 glycoprotein E blocking ELISA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wellenberg, G.J.; Mars, M.H.; Oirschot, van J.T.

    2001-01-01

    We examined whether antibodies against bovine herpesvirus (BHV) 5 cross-react with BHV1 antigens and whether they could interfere with BHV1 eradication programmes. Six calves were experimentally infected with different doses of BHV5 strain N569; homologous antibodies were ?rst detectable on day 11 p

  17. Siltuximab (CNTO 328: a promising option for human malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen R

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Runzhe Chen, Baoan Chen Department of Hematology and Oncology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Siltuximab (CNTO 328 is a promising antibody-drug conjugate targeting cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6. It is highly binding to IL-6 and thus neutralizing IL-6 bioactivity and promoting death of tumor cell. In this review, we mainly focus on the mechanisms, clinical studies, and adverse effect of siltuximab in the treatment of human malignancies. We also provide our recommendations for siltuximab treatment in the future. Keywords: interleukin-6, Castleman’s disease, clinical trials

  18. Antibody-protein A conjugated quantum dots for multiplexed imaging of surface receptors in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Takashi; Tiwari, Dhermendra K; Tanaka, Shin-Ichi; Inouye, Yasushi; Yoshizawa, Keiko; Watanabe, Tomonobu M

    2010-11-01

    To use quantum dots (QDs) as fluorescent probes for receptor imaging, QD surface should be modified with biomolecules such as antibodies, peptides, carbohydrates, and small-molecule ligands for receptors. Among these QDs, antibody conjugated QDs are the most promising fluorescent probes. There are many kinds of coupling reactions that can be used for preparing antibody conjugated QDs. Most of the antibody coupling reactions, however, are non-selective and time-consuming. In this paper, we report a facile method for preparing antibody conjugated QDs for surface receptor imaging. We used ProteinA as an adaptor protein for binding of antibody to QDs. By using ProteinA conjugated QDs, various types of antibodies are easily attached to the surface of the QDs via non-covalent binding between the F(c) (fragment crystallization) region of antibody and ProteinA. To show the utility of ProteinA conjugated QDs, HER2 (anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) in KPL-4 human breast cancer cells were stained by using anti-HER2 antibody conjugated ProteinA-QDs. In addition, multiplexed imaging of HER2 and CXCR4 (chemokine receptor) in the KPL-4 cells was performed. The result showed that CXCR4 receptors coexist with HER2 receptors in the membrane surface of KPL-4 cells. ProteinA mediated antibody conjugation to QDs is very useful to prepare fluorescent probes for multiplexed imaging of surface receptors in living cells.

  19. R-phycoerythrin-conjugated antibodies are inappropriate for intracellular staining of murine plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myun Soo; Kim, Tae Sung

    2013-05-01

    Phycoerythrin (PE) is a type of phycobiliproteins found in cyanobacteria and red algae. PE-conjugated antibodies are broadly used for flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. Because nonspecific binding of antibodies results in decreased analytic accuracy, numerous efforts have been made to unveil cases and mechanisms of nonspecific bindings. However, nonspecific binding of specific cell types by a fluorescent dye-conjugated form of antibody has been rarely reported. In the present study, we discovered that PE-conjugated antibodies, but not FITC- or APC-antibodies, selectively stained lamina propria plasma cells (LP-PCs) from the murine small intestine after membrane permeabilization. We demonstrated that LP-PC-selective staining with PE-antibodies was not due to interactions of antibody-epitope or antibody-Fc receptor. This unexpected staining by PE-antibody was not dependent on the mouse strain of LP-PCs, experimental methods, or origin species of the antibody, but dependent on PE itself. This phenomenon was also observed in plasma cells isolated from bone marrow, spleen, and mesenteric lymph nodes. Furthermore, in vitro activated B cells and in vivo generated LP-PCs were also selectively stained by PE-conjugated antibodies. Taken together, these results show that PE-conjugated antibodies are inappropriate for intracellular staining of murine plasma cells.

  20. Promise Neighborhoods: The Promise and Politics of Community Capacity Building as Urban School Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsford, Sonya Douglass; Sampson, Carrie

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this inquiry is to consider how the U.S. Department of Education's Promise Neighborhoods (PNs) program can improve persistently low-achieving urban schools by making their "neighborhoods whole again" through community capacity building for education reform. As the "first federal initiative to put education at the…

  1. Medical big data: promise and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choong Ho; Yoon, Hyung-Jin

    2017-03-01

    The concept of big data, commonly characterized by volume, variety, velocity, and veracity, goes far beyond the data type and includes the aspects of data analysis, such as hypothesis-generating, rather than hypothesis-testing. Big data focuses on temporal stability of the association, rather than on causal relationship and underlying probability distribution assumptions are frequently not required. Medical big data as material to be analyzed has various features that are not only distinct from big data of other disciplines, but also distinct from traditional clinical epidemiology. Big data technology has many areas of application in healthcare, such as predictive modeling and clinical decision support, disease or safety surveillance, public health, and research. Big data analytics frequently exploits analytic methods developed in data mining, including classification, clustering, and regression. Medical big data analyses are complicated by many technical issues, such as missing values, curse of dimensionality, and bias control, and share the inherent limitations of observation study, namely the inability to test causality resulting from residual confounding and reverse causation. Recently, propensity score analysis and instrumental variable analysis have been introduced to overcome these limitations, and they have accomplished a great deal. Many challenges, such as the absence of evidence of practical benefits of big data, methodological issues including legal and ethical issues, and clinical integration and utility issues, must be overcome to realize the promise of medical big data as the fuel of a continuous learning healthcare system that will improve patient outcome and reduce waste in areas including nephrology.

  2. The Renewed Promise of Medical Informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bemmel, J H; McCray, A T

    2016-05-20

    The promise of the field of Medical Informatics has been great and its impact has been significant. In 1999, the Yearbook editors of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) - also the authors of the present paper - sought to assess this impact by selecting a number of seminal papers in the field, and asking experts to comment on these articles. In particular, it was requested whether and how the expectations, represented by these papers, had been fulfilled since their publication several decades earlier. Each expert was also invited to comment on what might be expected in the future. In the present paper, these areas are briefly reviewed again. Where did these early papers have an impact and where were they not as successful as originally expected? It should be noted that the extraordinary developments in computer technology observed in the last two decades could not have been foreseen by these early researchers. In closing, some of the possibilities and limitations of research in medical informatics are outlined in the context of a framework that considers six levels of computer applications in medicine and health care. For each level, some predictions are made for the future, concluded with thoughts on fruitful areas for ongoing research in the field.

  3. Cancer imaging with radiolabeled antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldenberg, D.M. (Center for Molecular Medicine and Immunology, Newark, NJ (US))

    1990-01-01

    This book presents a perspective of the use of antibodies to target diagnostic isotopes to tumors. Antibodies with reasonable specificity can be developed against almost any substance. If selective targeting to cancer cells can be achieved, the prospects for a selective therapy are equally intriguing. But the development of cancer detection, or imaging, with radiolabeled antibodies has depended upon advances in a number of different areas, including cancer immunology and immunochemistry for identifying suitable antigen targets and antibodies to these targets, tumor biology for model systems, radiochemistry for he attachment of radionuclides to antibodies, molecular biology for reengineering the antibodies for safer and more effective use in humans, and nuclear medicine for providing the best imaging protocols and instrumentation to detect minute amounts of elevated radioactivity against a background of considerable noise. Accordingly, this book has been organized to address the advances that are being made in many of these areas.

  4. VIRAL ANTIBODIES IN PRESCHOOL CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Saidi

    1974-08-01

    Full Text Available One hundred sera from children 1 - 6 years of age, representative of a large serum collection, were tested for the prevalence of antibodies against different viruses. Hemagglutination-inhibition (HI antibodies were found in 68% for measles; 61 % for rubella; 75'% for influenza A2/Hong Kong/68, 16% for influenza B/Md./59, 0% for group A arboviruses, 10% for group B arboviruses, 3% for phlebotomus fever group and 4% for Congo-Crimean hemorrhagic fever (C-CHF group of arboviruses Poliomyelitis-neutralizing antibodies for type 1, 2 and 3 were 90%; 85% and 84%~ respectively. Antibody to EH virus was detected in 84% of the sera by immuno-fluorescence. None of the sera were positive for hepatitis-B antigen or antibody by immuno-precipitation test. The prevalence of some viral antibodies found in this survey are compared with results obtained from surveys in other parts of the country.

  5. Dynamics of circulating antibodies against Trichinella spiralis after application of anthelmintics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corba, J; Cerman, J; Spaldonová, R

    1977-01-01

    Formation and dynamics of circulating antibodies were studied in mice experimentally inefected with T. spiralis and treated with mebendazole. Latex-fixation tube was used in the experiment. In the control group of untreated mice the antibodies were detected on the 21st day after infection. The antibody level reached the maximum on day 76 and low titres were found still on day 207 after infection. In mice treated with mebendazole in the intestinal phase of trichinellosis, the antibodies were detected 10 or 7 days earlier than in the control group. At this time the antibody level reached the maximum and then it decreased gradually until no antibodies were detected on days 66-76. This phenomenon correlated with postmortem examination and suggested that the formation and dynamics of circulating antibodies against T. spiralis are directly dependent on the effectiveness of the treatment.

  6. Detection of anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in experimentally and naturally infected non-human primates by Indirect Fluorescence Assay (IFA and indirect ELISA Detecção de anticorpos anti-Toxoplasma gondii por meio das técnicas de Imunofluorescência Indireta e ELISA Indireto em primatas experimentalmente e naturalmente infectados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Bouer

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The Indirect Fluorescence Assay (IFA and the indirect ELISA were comparatively used to detect IgG and IgM antibodies for Toxoplasma gondii in experimentally and naturally infected primates. In the experimentally infected group, antibodies of diagnostic value were detected at day 9 post-infection (PI with the IFA (IgG and IgM and with IgG-ELISA. IgM-ELISA detected antibodies for T. gondii starting at day 3 PI until the end of the experiment (102 days PI. Of the 209 naturally infected sera tested, from many zoos of State of Sao Paulo, 64.59 and 67.94% were positive in the IgG-IFA test and IgG-ELISA respectively. IgM-ELISA test detected seropositivity in 52.63% of the sera although IgM-IFA test detected it in only in 0.96% of the samples. The differential toxoplasmosis diagnosis was accomplished with Neospora caninum by IFA, observing 61 (29.2% seropositive animals for this parasite and 149 (70.8% negative. Sixty animals were positive for both T. gondii and N. caninum. Pneumonia, splenomegaly, and intestinal ulcers were macroscopically observed. Unremarkable interstitial pneumonia, enteritis, colitis, splenitis, and glomerulitis were microscopically observed. The immunohistochemical stain could not detect the presence of T. gondii in the tissues of the animals infected experimentally.Detectou-se anticorpos das classes IgG e IgM anti-Toxoplasma gondii em primatas experimentalmente e naturalmente infectados, utilizando-se como técnicas comparativas a RIFI e o ELISA-teste. No grupo dos primatas experimentalmente infectados, anticorpos de valor diagnóstico foram detectados a partir do 9º dia de infecção tanto na RIFI (IgG e IgM como no ELISA-IgG. O ELISA IgM detectou anticorpos a partir do 3º dia de infecção até o final do experimento (102 dias pós-infecção. Dos 209 soros dos primatas naturalmente infectados, de diversos zoológicos do Estado de São Paulo, 64,59 e 67,94% mostraram-se positivos na RIFI-IgG e no ELISA-IgG, respectivamente. O

  7. Resveratrol as promising natural radioprotector. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrzyńska, Małgorzata M

    2013-01-01

    Public feelings concerning radiation are still controversy. The main sources of trouble seems to be the failure nuclear power plant and danger of terroristic attack, which may cause temporally enhanced level of radiation leading to harmful health effects. Since radiation induced cellular damage is attributed primarily to harmful effect of free radicals, molecules with direct free radical scavenging properties are particularly promising as radiation modifiers/protectors, i.e. agents which present prior to or shortly after radiation exposure alter to response of tissues to radiation. Unfortunately, some of known radioprotectors are toxic at doses required for radioprotection. Resveratrol (RSV), an natural polyphenol is produced in several plants in response to injury, stress, bacteria or fungi infection, UV-irradiation and exposure to ozone. It is present in human diet i.e. in fruits and in wine. RSV is known for its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antiviral, cardioprotective, neuroprotective and antiageing action and it has been shown to have chemopreventive effects with respect to several human disease such as cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and gastric ulcers. Depending on the dose, RSV may act as antioxidant or as pro-oxidant. RSV improves sperm count and motility in rodents and prevent DNA damage caused by cryptopreservation of human sperm. Moreover, RSV acting with other agents, inhibits the toxic action of them. There are evidences that RSV is able to modulate the behavior of cells in response to radiation induced damage. Minimalization of radiation induced damage to somatic and germ cells by RSV might be useful in cancer therapy to prevent the damage to normal cells as well as in case of radiological accidents.

  8. Enantioselectivity of mass spectrometry: challenges and promises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Hanan; El-Aneed, Anas

    2013-01-01

    With the fast growing market of pure enantiomer drugs and bioactive molecules, new chiral-selective analytical tools have been instigated including the use of mass spectrometry (MS). Even though MS is one of the best analytical tools that has efficiently been used in several pharmaceutical and biological applications, traditionally MS is considered as a "chiral-blind" technique. This limitation is due to the MS inability to differentiate between two enantiomers of a chiral molecule based merely on their masses. Several approaches have been explored to assess the potential role of MS in chiral analysis. The first approach depends on the use of MS-hyphenated techniques utilizing fast and sensitive chiral separation tools such as liquid chromatography (LC), gas chromatography (GC), and capillary electrophoresis (CE) coupled to MS detector. More recently, several alternative separation techniques have been evaluated such as supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) and capillary electrochromatography (CEC); the latter being a hybrid technique that combines the efficiency of CE with the selectivity of LC. The second approach is based on using the MS instrument solely for the chiral recognition. This method depends on the behavioral differences between enantiomers towards a foreign molecule and the ability of MS to monitor such differences. These behavioral differences can be divided into three types: (i) differences in the enantiomeric affinity for association with the chiral selector, (ii) differences of the enantiomeric exchange rate with a foreign reagent, and (iii) differences in the complex MS dissociation behaviors of the enantiomers. Most recently, ion mobility spectrometry was introduced to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate chiral compounds. This article provides an overview of MS role in chiral analysis by discussing MS based methodologies and presenting the challenges and promises associated with each approach.

  9. RDoC: Translating promise into progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Christopher J; Hajcak, Greg

    2016-03-01

    As highlighted by articles in the current special issue, the RDoC initiative holds promise for advancing understanding of mental health problems. However, the initiative is at its early stages and it remains unclear what level of progress can be achieved and how quickly. In this closing article, we identify major challenges facing RDoC and propose concrete approaches to addressing these challenges, including (a) clearer specification of clinical problems for study, with use of symptom dimensions from integrative dimensional models of psychopathology as provisional, modifiable referents; (b) encouragement of research on a distinct set of traits corresponding to process constructs from the RDoC matrix-those represented across animal, child temperament, and adult personality literatures-to serve as interfaces between matrix constructs and clinical problems; (c) an emphasis in the near term on use of proximal units of analysis in RDoC studies-in particular, on physiological, behavioral, and self-report measures of matrix constructs (examined as states or traits, or both); (d) inclusion of a clear ontogenetic-developmental component in RDoC research projects; (e) routine analysis of the psychometric properties of nonreport (e.g., physiological, task-behavioral) variables, including systematic evaluation of their reliability and convergent-discriminant validity; (f) modification of existing grant review criteria to prioritize replication and synergy in RDoC investigative work; and (g) creation of a cumulative data network system (RDoC-DataWeb) to encourage and facilitate coordination of research efforts across RDoC research groups.

  10. Antibodies against antibodies: immunogenicity of adalimumab as a model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schouwenburg, P.A.

    2012-01-01

    Upon repeated adalimumab exposure part of the patients start to produce ADA. The antibody response is polyclonal and consists mainly of antibodies of IgG1 and IgG4 isotype. In the majority of ADA positive patients ADA are already produced within the first 28 weeks of treatment and in part of the pat

  11. Lepromatous leprosy patients produce antibodies that recognise non-bilayer lipid arrangements containing mycolic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Baeza

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements are three-dimensional structures that form when anionic phospholipids with an intermediate structure of the tubular hexagonal phase II are present in a bilayer of lipids. Antibodies that recognise these arrangements have been described in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome and/or systemic lupus erythematosus and in those with preeclampsia; these antibodies have also been documented in an experimental murine model of lupus, in which they are associated with immunopathology. Here, we demonstrate the presence of antibodies against non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements containing mycolic acids in the sera of lepromatous leprosy (LL patients, but not those of healthy volunteers. The presence of antibodies that recognise these non-bilayer lipid arrangements may contribute to the hypergammaglobulinaemia observed in LL patients. We also found IgM and IgG anti-cardiolipin antibodies in 77% of the patients. This positive correlation between the anti-mycolic-non-bilayer arrangements and anti-cardiolipin antibodies suggests that both types of antibodies are produced by a common mechanism, as was demonstrated in the experimental murine model of lupus, in which there was a correlation between the anti-non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements and anti-cardiolipin antibodies. Antibodies to non-bilayer lipid arrangements may represent a previously unrecognised pathogenic mechanism in LL and the detection of these antibodies may be a tool for the early diagnosis of LL patients.

  12. Overcoming Instability of Antibody-Nanomaterial Conjugates: Next Generation Targeted Nanomedicines Using Bispecific Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Christopher B; Fletcher, Nicholas; Houston, Zachary H; Fuchs, Adrian V; Boase, Nathan R B; Simpson, Joshua D; Raftery, Lyndon J; Ruder, Tim; Jones, Martina L; de Bakker, Christopher J; Mahler, Stephen M; Thurecht, Kristofer J

    2016-08-01

    Targeted nanomaterials promise improved therapeutic efficacy, however their application in nanomedicine is limited due to complexities associated with protein conjugations to synthetic nanocarriers. A facile method to generate actively targeted nanomaterials is developed and exemplified using polyethylene glycol (PEG)-functional nanostructures coupled to a bispecific antibody (BsAb) with dual specificity for methoxy PEG (mPEG) epitopes and cancer targets such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The EGFR-mPEG BsAb binds with high affinity to recombinant EGFR (KD : 1 × 10(-9) m) and hyperbranched polymer (HBP) consisting of mPEG (KD : 10 × 10(-9) m) and demonstrates higher avidity for HBP compared to linear mPEG. The binding of BsAb-HBP bioconjugate to EGFR on MDA-MB-468 cancer cells is investigated in vitro using a fluorescently labeled polymer, and in in vivo xenograft models by small animal optical imaging. The antibody-targeted nanostructures show improved accumulation in tumor cells compared to non-targeted nanomaterials. This demonstrates a facile approach for tuning targeting ligand density on nanomaterials, by modulating surface functionality. Antibody fragments are tethered to the nanomaterial through simple mixing prior to administration to animals, overcoming the extensive procedures encountered for developing targeted nanomedicines.

  13. DARPins: a true alternative to antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpp, Michael T; Amstutz, Patrick

    2007-03-01

    Designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins) are a promising class of non-immunoglobulin proteins that can offer advantages over antibodies for target binding in drug discovery and drug development. DARPins have been successfully used, for example, for the inhibition of kinases, proteases and drug-exporting membrane proteins. DARPins specifically targeting the cancer marker HER2 have also been generated and were shown to function in both in vitro diagnostics and in vivo tumor targeting. DARPins are ideally suited for in vivo imaging or delivery of toxins or other therapeutic payloads because of their favorable molecular properties, including small size and high stability. The low-cost production in bacteria and the rapid generation of many target-specific DARPins make the DARPin approach useful for drug discovery. Additionally, DARPins can be easily generated in multispecific formats, offering the potential to target an effector DARPin to a specific organ or to target multiple receptors with one molecule composed of several DARPins.

  14. Monoclonal Antibody-Based Therapeutics for Melioidosis and Glanders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Yong Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Burkholderia Pseudomallei (BP and B. Mallei (BM were two closely related pathogenic gram-negative bacteria. They were the causative agents of melioidosis and glanders, respectively and are recognized by CDC as category B select agents. Significant efforts had been devoted to developing the diagnostic and therapeutic measures against these two pathogens. Monoclonal antibody-based therapeutic was a promising targeted therapy to fight against melioidosis and glanders. Valuable findings have been reported by different groups in their attempt to identify vaccine targets against these two pathogens. Approach: Our group has generated neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies (MAbs against BP and BM and characterized them by both in vitro and in vivo experiments. We present an overview of the MAb-based therapeutic approaches against BP and BM and demonstrate some of our efforts for developing chimeric and fully human MAbs using antibody engineering. Results: Throughout conventional mouse hybridoma technique and antibody engineering (chimerization and in vitro antibody library techniques, we generated 10 chimeric MAbs (3 stable MAbs and 7 transient MAbs and one fully human MAb against BP and BM. In addition, we present the reactive antigen profiles of these MAbs. Our approaches had potentials to accelerate the development of therapeutics for melioidosis and glanders in humans. Conclusion: Our experience and findings presented here will be valuable for choosing the best antigenic targets and ultimately for the production of effective vaccines for these two pathogens.

  15. Monoclonal antibody-based candidate therapeutics against HIV type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weizao; Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2012-05-01

    Treatment of HIV-1 infection has been highly successful with small molecule drugs. However, resistance still develops. In addition, long-term use can lead to toxicity with unpredictable effects on health. Finally, current drugs do not lead to HIV-1 eradication. The presence of the virus leads to chronic inflammation, which can result in increased morbidity and mortality after prolonged periods of infection. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been highly successful during the past two decades for therapy of many diseases, primarily cancers and immune disorders. They are relatively safe, especially human mAbs that have evolved in humans at high concentrations to fight diseases and long-term use may not lead to toxicities. Several broadly neutralizing mAbs (bnmAbs) against HIV-1 can protect animals but are not effective when used for therapy of an established infection. We have hypothesized that HIV-1 has evolved strategies to effectively escape neutralization by full-size antibodies in natural infections but not by smaller antibody fragments. Therefore, a promising direction of research is to discover and exploit antibody fragments as potential candidate therapeutics against HIV-1. Here we review several bnmAbs and engineered antibody domains (eAds), their in vitro and in vivo antiviral efficacy, mechanisms used by HIV-1 to escape them, and strategies that could be effective to develop more powerful mAb-based HIV-1 therapeutics.

  16. A strategy for eliciting antibodies against cryptic, conserved, conformationally dependent epitopes of HIV envelope glycoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna C Kelker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Novel strategies are needed for the elicitation of broadly neutralizing antibodies to the HIV envelope glycoprotein, gp120. Experimental evidence suggests that combinations of antibodies that are broadly neutralizing in vitro may protect against challenge with HIV in nonhuman primates, and a small number of these antibodies have been selected by repertoire sampling of B cells and by the fractionation of antiserum from some patients with prolonged disease. Yet no additional strategies for identifying conserved epitopes, eliciting antibodies to these epitopes, and determining whether these epitopes are accessible to antibodies have been successful to date. The defining of additional conserved, accessible epitopes against which one can elicit antibodies will increase the probability that some may be the targets of broadly neutralizing antibodies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We postulate that additional cryptic epitopes of gp120 are present, against which neutralizing antibodies might be elicited even though these antibodies are not elicited by gp120, and that many of these epitopes may be accessible to antibodies should they be formed. We demonstrate a strategy for eliciting antibodies in mice against selected cryptic, conformationally dependent conserved epitopes of gp120 by immunizing with multiple identical copies of covalently linked peptides (MCPs. This has been achieved with MCPs representing 3 different domains of gp120. We show that some cryptic epitopes on gp120 are accessible to the elicited antibodies, and some epitopes in the CD4 binding region are not accessible. The antibodies bind to gp120 with relatively high affinity, and bind to oligomeric gp120 on the surface of infected cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Immunization with MCPs comprised of selected peptides of HIV gp120 is able to elicit antibodies against conserved, conformationally dependent epitopes of gp120 that are not immunogenic when presented as gp120. Some

  17. Pathogenic role of antiphospholipid antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salmon, J. E.; de Groot, P. G.

    2008-01-01

    The antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) is characterized by recurrent arterial and venous thrombosis and/or pregnancy in association with antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies. The pathogenic mechanisms in APS that lead to in vivo injury are incompletely understood. Recent evidence suggests that AP

  18. Educational paper: Primary antibody deficiencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J.A. Driessen (Gertjan); M. van der Burg (Mirjam)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPrimary antibody deficiencies (PADs) are the most common primary immunodeficiencies and are characterized by a defect in the production of normal amounts of antigen-specific antibodies. PADs represent a heterogeneous spectrum of conditions, ranging from often asymptomatic selective IgA a

  19. Targeting of Antibodies using Aptamers

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    The chapter presents a methodology for the rapid selection of aptamers against antibody targets. It is a detailed account of the various methodological steps that describe the selection of aptamers, including PCR steps, buffers to be used, target immobilisation, partitioning and amplification of aptamers, clonning and sequencing, to results in high affinity and specificity ligands for the chosen target antibody.

  20. New engineered antibodies against prions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škrlj, Nives; Dolinar, Marko

    2014-01-01

    A number of recently developed and approved therapeutic agents based on highly specific and potent antibodies have shown the potential of antibody therapy. As the next step, antibody-based therapeutics will be bioengineered in a way that they not only bind pathogenic targets but also address other issues, including drug targeting and delivery. For antibodies that are expected to act within brain tissue, like those that are directed against the pathogenic prion protein isoform, one of the major obstacles is the blood-brain barrier which prevents efficient transfer of the antibody, even of the engineered single-chain variants. We recently demonstrated that a specific prion-specific antibody construct which was injected into the murine tail vein can be efficiently transported into brain tissue. The novelty of the work was in that the cell penetrating peptide was used as a linker connecting both specificity-determining domains of the antibody peptide, thus eliminating the need for the standard flexible linker, composed of an arrangement of three consecutive (Gly4Ser) repeats. This paves the road toward improved bioengineered antibody variants that target brain antigens. PMID:23941991

  1. Characterisation of new monoclonal antibodies reacting with prions from both human and animal brain tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvass, Henriette Cordes; Bergström, Ann-Louise; Ohm, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    spongiform encephalopathy (bovine brain), scrapie (ovine brain) and experimental scrapie in hamster and in mice. The antibodies were also used for PET-blotting in which PrPSc blotted from brain tissue sections onto a nitrocellulose membrane is visualized with antibodies after protease and denaturant...

  2. Anti-MrkA Monoclonal Antibodies Reveal Distinct Structural and Antigenic Features of MrkA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qun; Chen, Yan; Cvitkovic, Romana; Pennini, Meghan E.; Chang, Chew shun; Pelletier, Mark; Bonnell, Jessica; Wu, Herren; Dall’Acqua, William F.; Stover, C. Kendall; Xiao, Xiaodong

    2017-01-01

    Antibody therapy against antibiotics resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae infections represents a promising strategy, the success of which depends critically on the ability to identify appropriate antibody targets. Using a target-agnostic strategy, we recently discovered MrkA as a potential antibody target and vaccine antigen. Interestingly, the anti-MrkA monoclonal antibodies isolated through phage display and hybridoma platforms all recognize an overlapping epitope, which opens up important questions including whether monoclonal antibodies targeting different MrkA epitopes can be generated and if they possess different protective profiles. In this study we generated four anti-MrkA antibodies targeting different epitopes through phage library panning against recombinant MrkA protein. These anti-MrkA antibodies elicited strong in vitro and in vivo protections against a multi-drug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strain. Furthermore, mutational and epitope analysis suggest that the two cysteine residues may play essential roles in maintaining a MrkA structure that is highly compacted and exposes limited antibody binding/neutralizing epitopes. These results suggest the need for further in-depth understandings of the structure of MrkA, the role of MrkA in the pathogenesis of Klebsiella pneumoniae and the protective mechanism adopted by anti-MrkA antibodies to fully explore the potential of MrkA as an efficient therapeutic target and vaccine antigen. PMID:28107434

  3. Metrics for antibody therapeutics development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Janice M

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of full-size monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats can be produced through genetic and biological engineering techniques. These molecules are now filling the preclinical and clinical pipelines of every major pharmaceutical company and many biotechnology firms. Metrics for the development of antibody therapeutics, including averages for the number of candidates entering clinical study and development phase lengths for mAbs approved in the United States, were derived from analysis of a dataset of over 600 therapeutic mAbs that entered clinical study sponsored, at least in part, by commercial firms. The results presented provide an overview of the field and context for the evaluation of on-going and prospective mAb development programs. The expansion of therapeutic antibody use through supplemental marketing approvals and the increase in the study of therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats are discussed.

  4. Single chain FV constructs of anti-ganglioside GD2 antibodies for radioimaging and radioimmumotheraphy. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, N.K.V.; Larson, S.M.

    1993-11-01

    For the past several years, we have studied the anti-G{sub D2} murine monoclonal antibody, 3F8, in radiolabeled form, for diagnosis and therapy of neuroblastoma. The targeting properties of this antibody/antigen system are exceptional, with uptakes consistently in the highest range of reported results for in vivo human studies. The radioiodinated antibody 3F8 is now used by us as our criteria for diagnosis and staging of advanced neuroblastoma. This antibody is showing considerable promise also in our Phase I trials in Stage 4 neuroblastoma, and major responses are being seen at current dose level, with manageable marrow toxicity, but no limiting organ toxicity.

  5. Man-made antibodies and immunoconjugates with desired properties: function optimization using structural engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyev, S. M.; Lebedenko, E. N.; Petrovskaya, L. E.; Dolgikh, D. A.; Gabibov, A. G.; Kirpichnikov, M. P.

    2015-01-01

    The review outlines progress and problems in the design of non-natural antibodies for clinical applications over the past 10-15 years. The modular structure of natural antibodies and approaches to its targeted modifications and combination with other structural elements and effector molecules are considered. The review covers modern methods for immunoglobulin engineering and promising strategies for the creation and applications of monoclonal antibodies, their derivatives and analogues, including abzymes and scaffolds, oriented to the use in the diagnosis and targeted therapy of cancer and other socially significant diseases. The bibliography includes 225 references.

  6. Synthetic oligonucleotide antigens modified with locked nucleic acids detect disease specific antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsen, Simone V.; Solov’yov, Ilia A.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Mellins, Elizabeth; Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup; Heegaard, Niels H. H.; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-01-01

    New techniques to detect and quantify antibodies to nucleic acids would provide a significant advance over current methods, which often lack specificity. We investigate the potential of novel antigens containing locked nucleic acids (LNAs) as targets for antibodies. Particularly, employing molecular dynamics we predict optimal nucleotide composition for targeting DNA-binding antibodies. As a proof of concept, we address a problem of detecting anti-DNA antibodies that are characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus, a chronic autoimmune disease with multiple manifestations. We test the best oligonucleotide binders in surface plasmon resonance studies to analyze binding and kinetic aspects of interactions between antigens and target DNA. These DNA and LNA/DNA sequences showed improved binding in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using human samples of pediatric lupus patients. Our results suggest that the novel method is a promising tool to create antigens for research and point-of-care monitoring of anti-DNA antibodies. PMID:27775006

  7. Synthetic oligonucleotide antigens modified with locked nucleic acids detect disease specific antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsen, Simone V.; Solov'Yov, Ilia A.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Mellins, Elizabeth; Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup; Heegaard, Niels H. H.; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-10-01

    New techniques to detect and quantify antibodies to nucleic acids would provide a significant advance over current methods, which often lack specificity. We investigate the potential of novel antigens containing locked nucleic acids (LNAs) as targets for antibodies. Particularly, employing molecular dynamics we predict optimal nucleotide composition for targeting DNA-binding antibodies. As a proof of concept, we address a problem of detecting anti-DNA antibodies that are characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus, a chronic autoimmune disease with multiple manifestations. We test the best oligonucleotide binders in surface plasmon resonance studies to analyze binding and kinetic aspects of interactions between antigens and target DNA. These DNA and LNA/DNA sequences showed improved binding in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using human samples of pediatric lupus patients. Our results suggest that the novel method is a promising tool to create antigens for research and point-of-care monitoring of anti-DNA antibodies.

  8. Prosecuting the Leaders: Promises, Politics and Practicalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Cryer

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Given recent developments in relation to the prosecution of international crimes,  it might be thought that one of the last bastions of sovereignty has been breached, and international criminal law has not only entrenched itself in international law. Indeed further to this, it has assumed a supranational position that stands entirely above States, promising justice for all and as a trump card over depredations committed in the name of State sovereignty. After all, Charles Taylor from Liberia is standing trial before the Special Court for Sierra Leone, Slobodan Milošević only escaped judgment by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former

  9. Animal models of antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody-associated vasculitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Salama, Alan D

    2012-01-01

    To provide an update on the experimental models that have been developed recapitulating clinical antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA) associated vasculitis. The application of the models in the study of pathogenesis, and the therapeutic implications of this, are covered in the article by van Timmeren and Heeringa in this issue.

  10. Antibodies to Phospholipids and Liposomes: Binding of Antibodies to Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    LIPOSOMES: BINDING OF ANTIBODIES TO CELLS 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) W.E. FOGLER , G. M. SWARTZ, AND C.R. ALVING 13a TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE...Elsevier BBA 73693 Antibodies to phospholipids and liposomes: binding of antibodies to cells William E. Fogler *, Glenn M. Swartz, Jr. and Carl R. Alving...Immunol. 21. Research Associateship from the U.S. National 12863-86812Hall. T. and Esser, K. (1984) 3. Immunol. 132. 2059-2063 Research Council. 13 Fogler

  11. Simultaneous expression of displayed and secreted antibodies for antibody screen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanping Zhou

    Full Text Available The display of full-length antibody on the cell surface was achieved by fusing a transmembrane domain of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR to the C-terminus of the heavy chain constant region. We also incorporated a furin cleavage site between the constant region and PDGFR transmembrane domain to obtain secreted antibodies. As a result, antibodies can be expressed simultaneously on the cell surface in a membrane-anchored version for screening and selecting through fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS analysis, as well as in conditioned medium in a secreted version for function analysis.

  12. Neural stem cells as a novel platform for tumor-specific delivery of therapeutic antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard T Frank

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recombinant monoclonal antibodies have emerged as important tools for cancer therapy. Despite the promise shown by antibody-based therapies, the large molecular size of antibodies limits their ability to efficiently penetrate solid tumors and precludes efficient crossing of the blood-brain-barrier into the central nervous system (CNS. Consequently, poorly vascularized solid tumors and CNS metastases cannot be effectively treated by intravenously-injected antibodies. The inherent tumor-tropic properties of human neural stem cells (NSCs can potentially be harnessed to overcome these obstacles and significantly improve cancer immunotherapy. Intravenously-delivered NSCs preferentially migrate to primary and metastatic tumor sites within and outside the CNS. Therefore, we hypothesized that NSCs could serve as an ideal cellular delivery platform for targeting antibodies to malignant tumors. METHODS AND FINDINGS: As proof-of-concept, we selected Herceptin (trastuzumab, a monoclonal antibody widely used to treat HER2-overexpressing breast cancer. HER2 overexpression in breast cancer is highly correlated with CNS metastases, which are inaccessible to trastuzumab therapy. Therefore, NSC-mediated delivery of trastuzumab may improve its therapeutic efficacy. Here we report, for the first time, that human NSCs can be genetically modified to secrete anti-HER2 immunoglobulin molecules. These NSC-secreted antibodies assemble properly, possess tumor cell-binding affinity and specificity, and can effectively inhibit the proliferation of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells in vitro. We also demonstrate that immunoglobulin-secreting NSCs exhibit preferential tropism to tumor cells in vivo, and can deliver antibodies to human breast cancer xenografts in mice. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, these results suggest that NSCs modified to secrete HER2-targeting antibodies constitute a promising novel platform for targeted cancer immunotherapy. Specifically

  13. Genetically Modified Crops: Risks and Promise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Conway

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available GM foods have the potential to provide significant benefits for developing countries. Over 800 million people are chronically undernourished, and 180 million children are severely underweight for their age. By 2020, there will be an extra two billion mouths to feed. Ecological approaches that underpin sustainable agriculture (e.g., integrated pest management and participatory approaches that strengthen farmers' own experimentation and decision making are key. Biotechnology will be an essential partner, if yield ceilings are to be raised, if crops are to be grown without excessive reliance on pesticides, and if farmers on less favored lands are to be provided with crops that are resistant to drought and salinity, and that can use nitrogen and other nutrients more efficiently. Over the past 10 years, in addition supporting ecological approaches, the Rockefeller Foundation has funded the training of some 400 developing-country scientists in the techniques of biotechnology. Most of the new crop varieties are the result of tissue culture and marker-aided selection. The Foundation also supports the production of genetically engineered rices, including a new rice engineered for beta carotene (the precursor of Vitamin A in the grain. Some specific steps can be taken by Monsanto that would improve acceptance of plant biotechnology in both the developing and the industrialized worlds: label; disavow gene protection (terminator systems; phase out the use of antibiotic resistance markers; agree (with big seed companies to use the plant variety protection system, rather than patents, in developing countries; establish an independently administered fellowship program to train developing-country scientists in crop biotechnology, biosafety, and intellectual property; donate useful technologies to developing countries; agree to share financial rewards from intellectual property rights on varieties such as basmati or jasmine rice with the countries of origin; and

  14. Arenavirus Glycan Shield Promotes Neutralizing Antibody Evasion and Protracted Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rami Sommerstein

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Arenaviruses such as Lassa virus (LASV can cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans. As a major impediment to vaccine development, delayed and weak neutralizing antibody (nAb responses represent a unifying characteristic of both natural infection and all vaccine candidates tested to date. To investigate the mechanisms underlying arenavirus nAb evasion we engineered several arenavirus envelope-chimeric viruses and glycan-deficient variants thereof. We performed neutralization tests with sera from experimentally infected mice and from LASV-convalescent human patients. NAb response kinetics in mice correlated inversely with the N-linked glycan density in the arenavirus envelope protein's globular head. Additionally and most intriguingly, infection with fully glycosylated viruses elicited antibodies, which neutralized predominantly their glycan-deficient variants, both in mice and humans. Binding studies with monoclonal antibodies indicated that envelope glycans reduced nAb on-rate, occupancy and thereby counteracted virus neutralization. In infected mice, the envelope glycan shield promoted protracted viral infection by preventing its timely elimination by the ensuing antibody response. Thus, arenavirus envelope glycosylation impairs the protective efficacy rather than the induction of nAbs, and thereby prevents efficient antibody-mediated virus control. This immune evasion mechanism imposes limitations on antibody-based vaccination and convalescent serum therapy.

  15. Arenavirus Glycan Shield Promotes Neutralizing Antibody Evasion and Protracted Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerstein, Rami; Flatz, Lukas; Remy, Melissa M; Malinge, Pauline; Magistrelli, Giovanni; Fischer, Nicolas; Sahin, Mehmet; Bergthaler, Andreas; Igonet, Sebastien; Ter Meulen, Jan; Rigo, Dorothée; Meda, Paolo; Rabah, Nadia; Coutard, Bruno; Bowden, Thomas A; Lambert, Paul-Henri; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Pinschewer, Daniel D

    2015-11-01

    Arenaviruses such as Lassa virus (LASV) can cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans. As a major impediment to vaccine development, delayed and weak neutralizing antibody (nAb) responses represent a unifying characteristic of both natural infection and all vaccine candidates tested to date. To investigate the mechanisms underlying arenavirus nAb evasion we engineered several arenavirus envelope-chimeric viruses and glycan-deficient variants thereof. We performed neutralization tests with sera from experimentally infected mice and from LASV-convalescent human patients. NAb response kinetics in mice correlated inversely with the N-linked glycan density in the arenavirus envelope protein's globular head. Additionally and most intriguingly, infection with fully glycosylated viruses elicited antibodies, which neutralized predominantly their glycan-deficient variants, both in mice and humans. Binding studies with monoclonal antibodies indicated that envelope glycans reduced nAb on-rate, occupancy and thereby counteracted virus neutralization. In infected mice, the envelope glycan shield promoted protracted viral infection by preventing its timely elimination by the ensuing antibody response. Thus, arenavirus envelope glycosylation impairs the protective efficacy rather than the induction of nAbs, and thereby prevents efficient antibody-mediated virus control. This immune evasion mechanism imposes limitations on antibody-based vaccination and convalescent serum therapy.

  16. The promise of the anti-idiotype concept

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas eKieber-Emmons; Bejatohlah eMonzavi-Karbassi; Anastas ePashov; Somdutta eSaha; Ramachandran eMurali; Heinz eKohler

    2012-01-01

    A basic tenet of antibody-based immunity is their specificity to antigenic determinates from foreign pathogen products to abnormal cellular components such as in cancer. However, an antibody has the potential to bind to more than one determinate, be it an antigen or another antibody. These observations led to the idiotype network theory (INT) to explain immune regulation, which has wax and waned in enthusiasm over the years. A truer measure of the impact of the INT is in terms of the ideas th...

  17. GABARAPL1 antibodies: target one protein, get one free!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Grand, Jaclyn Nicole; Chakrama, Fatima Zahra; Seguin-Py, Stéphanie; Fraichard, Annick; Delage-Mourroux, Régis; Jouvenot, Michèle; Risold, Pierre-Yves; Boyer-Guittaut, Michaël

    2011-11-01

    Atg8 is a yeast protein involved in the autophagic process and in particular in the elongation of autophagosomes. In mammals, several orthologs have been identified and are classed into two subfamilies: the LC3 subfamily and the GABARAP subfamily, referred to simply as the LC3 or GABARAP families. GABARAPL1 (GABARAP-like protein 1), one of the proteins belonging to the GABARAP (GABA(A) receptor-associated protein) family, is highly expressed in the central nervous system and implicated in processes such as receptor and vesicle transport as well as autophagy. The proteins that make up the GABARAP family demonstrate conservation of their amino acid sequences and protein structures. In humans, GABARAPL1 shares 86% identity with GABARAP and 61% with GABARAPL2 (GATE-16). The identification of the individual proteins is thus very limited when working in vivo due to a lack of unique peptide sequences from which specific antibodies can be developed. Actually, and to our knowledge, there are no available antibodies on the market that are entirely specific to GABARAPL1 and the same may be true of the anti-GABARAP antibodies. In this study, we sought to examine the specificity of three antibodies targeted against different peptide sequences within GABARAPL1: CHEM-CENT (an antibody raised against a short peptide sequence within the center of the protein), PTG-NTER (an antibody raised against the N-terminus of the protein) and PTG-FL (an antibody raised against the full-length protein). The results described in this article demonstrate the importance of testing antibody specificity under the conditions for which it will be used experimentally, a caution that should be taken when studying the expression of the GABARAP family proteins.

  18. Cognitive remediation: a promising tool for the treatment of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demily, Caroline; Franck, Nicolas

    2008-07-01

    Cognitive remediation is a type of treatment added recently to the range of tools available to therapists. It includes a number of miscellaneous methods that aim to correct some of the cognitive impairments observed in schizophrenia. These cover the fields of target attention, memory and executive deficits, as well as impaired social cognition. Cognitive remediation acts as a complement to medication and psychological therapies, which constitute the core methods of treatment for schizophrenia. The present paper reviews the state of the art in cognitive remediation. The principle underlying this innovative therapeutic approach is the enhancement of the cognitive resources of patients with schizophrenia in order to improve their cognitive functions, social skills and in some cases alleviate some of the symptoms of the disease. Several programs developed within the past two decades (e.g., IPT, CRT, NEAR, CET, NET, CRT and CAT) are becoming more widely used. Their efficacy on neurocognition and on functional outcome has been demonstrated, with inconstant continuation of benefit after completion of treatment. The sustainability of the cognitive and functional improvements following completion of these programs has to be further studied. Other programs aimed at acting upon altered social cognition (one of the critical facets of schizophrenia) are still in the experimental stages, but the results obtained so far are encouraging. A preliminary study has also demonstrated the effectiveness of board games in improving cognitive functioning, which seems to be a highly promising therapeutic avenue owing to its ease of use.

  19. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo; Marcatili, Paolo; Tramontano, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are rapidly becoming essential tools in the clinical practice, given their ability to recognize their cognate antigens with high specificity and affinity, and a high yield at reasonable costs in model animals. Unfortunately, when administered to human patients, xenogeneic antibodies can...... elicit unwanted and dangerous immunogenic responses. Antibody humanization methods are designed to produce molecules with a better safety profile still maintaining their ability to bind the antigen. This can be accomplished by grafting the non-human regions determining the antigen specificity...

  20. Antibody Production in Response to Staphylococcal MS-1 Phage Cocktail in Patients Undergoing Phage Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Maciej Żaczek; Marzanna Łusiak-Szelachowska; Ewa Jończyk-Matysiak; Beata Weber-Dąbrowska; Ryszard Międzybrodzki; Barbara Owczarek; Agnieszka Kopciuch; Wojciech Fortuna; Paweł Rogóż; Andrzej Górski

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the humoral immune response (through the release of IgG, IgA, and IgM antiphage antibodies) to a staphylococcal phage cocktail in patients undergoing experimental phage therapy at the Phage Therapy Unit, Medical Center of the Ludwik Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy in Wrocław, Poland. We also evaluated whether occurring antiphage antibodies had neutralizing properties towards applied phages (K rate). Among 20 examined patients receiving...

  1. Scientists find promising predictor of HPV-related oropharynx cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers have found that antibodies against the human papillomavirus (HPV) may help identify individuals who are at greatly increased risk of HPV-related cancer of the oropharynx, which is a portion of the throat that contains the tonsils.

  2. Single-domain antibody-based and linker-free bispecific antibodies targeting FcγRIII induce potent antitumor activity without recruiting regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozan, Caroline; Cornillon, Amélie; Pétiard, Corinne; Chartier, Martine; Behar, Ghislaine; Boix, Charlotte; Kerfelec, Brigitte; Robert, Bruno; Pèlegrin, André; Chames, Patrick; Teillaud, Jean-Luc; Baty, Daniel

    2013-08-01

    Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, one of the most prominent modes of action of antitumor antibodies, suffers from important limitations due to the need for optimal interactions with Fcγ receptors. In this work, we report the design of a new bispecific antibody format, compact and linker-free, based on the use of llama single-domain antibodies that are capable of circumventing most of these limitations. This bispecific antibody format was created by fusing single-domain antibodies directed against the carcinoembryonic antigen and the activating FcγRIIIa receptor to human Cκ and CH1 immunoglobulin G1 domains, acting as a natural dimerization motif. In vitro and in vivo characterization of these Fab-like bispecific molecules revealed favorable features for further development as a therapeutic molecule. They are easy to produce in Escherichia coli, very stable, and elicit potent lysis of tumor cells by human natural killer cells at picomolar concentrations. Unlike conventional antibodies, they do not engage inhibitory FcγRIIb receptor, do not compete with serum immunoglobulins G for receptor binding, and their cytotoxic activity is independent of Fc glycosylation and FcγRIIIa polymorphism. As opposed to anti-CD3 bispecific antitumor antibodies, they do not engage regulatory T cells as these latter cells do not express FcγRIII. Studies in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient gamma mice xenografted with carcinoembryonic antigen-positive tumor cells showed that Fab-like bispecific molecules in the presence of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells significantly slow down tumor growth. This new compact, linker-free bispecific antibody format offers a promising approach for optimizing antibody-based therapies.

  3. DARPA Antibody Technology Program Standardized Test Bed for Antibody Characterization: Characterization of an MS2 ScFv Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    ECBC-TR-1356 DARPA ANTIBODY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM STANDARDIZED TEST BED FOR ANTIBODY CHARACTERIZATION...From - To) Oct 2010 – Sep 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE DARPA Antibody Technology Program Standardized Test Bed for Antibody Characterization...Arlington, VA 22203-2114 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) DARPA 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 12. DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY STATEMENT

  4. Antibodies are not required to a protective immune response against dengue virus elicited in a mouse encephalitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Jaime Henrique; dos Santos Alves, Rúbens Prince; Bizerra, Raíza; Araújo Pereira, Sara; Ramos Pereira, Lennon; Nascimento Fabris, Denicar Lina; Santos, Robert Andreata; Romano, Camila Malta; de Souza Ferreira, Luís Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Generating neutralizing antibodies have been considered a prerequisite to control dengue virus (DENV) infection. However, T lymphocytes have also been shown to be important in a protective immune state. In order to investigate the contribution of both humoral and cellular immune responses in DENV immunity, we used an experimental model in which a non-lethal DENV2 strain (ACS46) is used to intracranially prime Balb/C mice which develop protective immunity against a lethal DENV2 strain (JHA1). Primed mice generated envelope-specific antibodies and CD8(+) T cell responses targeting mainly non-structural proteins. Immune sera from protected mice did not confer passive protection to naïve mice challenged with the JHA1 strain. In contrast, depletion of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes significantly reduced survival of ACS46-primed mice challenged with the JHA1 strain. Collectively, results presented in this study show that a cellular immune response targeting non-structural proteins are a promising way in vaccine development against dengue.

  5. Evolution of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baviskar, Rutuja R; Amonkar, Gayathri P; Chaudhary, Vinod A; Balasubramanian, Meenakshi; Mohite, Shailesh C; Puranik, Gururaj V

    2012-12-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is a very important cause of cerebral infarction, myocardial infarction, and repeated pregnancy losses in women. We present an extremely rare case of a 44-year-old man with antiphospholipid syndrome who collapsed and died suddenly. At autopsy, he was found to have both cerebral and myocardial infarction. In all young patients with cerebral infarction, myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, recurrent miscarriages, and unexplained low platelet count, one must consider the strong possibility of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

  6. Antibodies to watch in 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Reichert, Janice M

    2015-01-01

    The number of novel antibody therapeutics that received first marketing approvals in 2015 met expectations, with 6 (alirocumab (Praluent®), evolocumab (Repatha®), daratumumab (Darzalex®), dinutuximab (Unituxin®), idarucizumab (Praxbind®), mepolizumab (Nucala®)) granted first approvals as of mid-November*. Seven novel antibody therapeutics (begelomab, brodalumab, elotuzumab, ixekizumab, necitumumab, obiltoxaximab, reslizumab) are in regulatory review, and thus a similar number, if not more, ar...

  7. Efficient method to optimize antibodies using avian leukosis virus display and eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Changming; Pike, Gennett M; Rinkoski, Tommy A; Correia, Cristina; Kaufmann, Scott H; Federspiel, Mark J

    2015-08-11

    Antibody-based therapeutics have now had success in the clinic. The affinity and specificity of the antibody for the target ligand determines the specificity of therapeutic delivery and off-target side effects. The discovery and optimization of high-affinity antibodies to important therapeutic targets could be significantly improved by the availability of a robust, eukaryotic display technology comparable to phage display that would overcome the protein translation limitations of microorganisms. The use of eukaryotic cells would improve the diversity of the displayed antibodies that can be screened and optimized as well as more seamlessly transition into a large-scale mammalian expression system for clinical production. In this study, we demonstrate that the replication and polypeptide display characteristics of a eukaryotic retrovirus, avian leukosis virus (ALV), offers a robust, eukaryotic version of bacteriophage display. The binding affinity of a model single-chain Fv antibody was optimized by using ALV display, improving affinity >2,000-fold, from micromolar to picomolar levels. We believe ALV display provides an extension to antibody display on microorganisms and offers virus and cell display platforms in a eukaryotic expression system. ALV display should enable an improvement in the diversity of properly processed and functional antibody variants that can be screened and affinity-optimized to improve promising antibody candidates.

  8. Roles of glycans in interactions between gp120 and HIV broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yifei; Jo, Sunhwan; Im, Wonpil

    2016-03-01

    Many novel broadly neutralizing antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have been identified during the past decade, providing promising templates for the development of an effective HIV-1 vaccine. Structural studies reveal that the epitopes of some of these antibodies involve one or more crucial glycans, without which the binding is completely abolished. In this study, we have investigated the critical roles of glycans in interactions between HIV-1 gp120 and two broadly neutralizing antibodies PG9 (targeting V1/V2) and PGT128 (targeting V3) that are able to neutralize more than 70% of HIV-1 isolates. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of a number of systems including antibody-gp120 complex with and without glycans, antibody, gp120 with and without glycans, and glycan-only systems. The simulation results show that the complex structures are stabilized by the glycans, and the multivalent interactions between the antibody and gp120 promote cooperativities to further enhance the binding. In the free gp120, the glycans increase the flexibility of the V1/V2 and V3 loops, which likely increases the entropy cost of the antibody recognition. However, the antibodies are able to bind the flexible interface by recognizing the preexisting glycan conformation, and penetrating the glycan shield with flexible complementarity determining region loops that sample the bound conformations occasionally.

  9. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization.

    KAUST Repository

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo

    2014-10-09

    SUMMARY: Antibodies are rapidly becoming essential tools in the clinical practice, given their ability to recognize their cognate antigens with high specificity and affinity, and a high yield at reasonable costs in model animals. Unfortunately, when administered to human patients, xenogeneic antibodies can elicit unwanted and dangerous immunogenic responses. Antibody humanization methods are designed to produce molecules with a better safety profile still maintaining their ability to bind the antigen. This can be accomplished by grafting the non-human regions determining the antigen specificity into a suitable human template. Unfortunately, this procedure may results in a partial or complete loss of affinity of the grafted molecule that can be restored by back-mutating some of the residues of human origin to the corresponding murine ones. This trial-and-error procedure is hard and involves expensive and time-consuming experiments. Here we present tools for antibody humanization (Tabhu) a web server for antibody humanization. Tabhu includes tools for human template selection, grafting, back-mutation evaluation, antibody modelling and structural analysis, helping the user in all the critical steps of the humanization experiment protocol. AVAILABILITY: http://www.biocomputing.it/tabhu CONTACT: anna.tramontano@uniroma1.it, pierpaolo.olimpieri@uniroma1.it SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  10. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, David Sherman [UND SMHS

    2012-12-31

    A number of infectious agents have the potential of causing significant clinical symptomology and even death, but dispite this, the number of incidence remain below the level that supports producing a vaccine. Therapeutic antibodies provide a viable treatment option for many of these diseases. We proposed that antibodies derived from West Nile Virus (WNV) immunized geese would be able to treat WNV infection in mammals and potential humans. We demonstrated that WNV specific goose antibodies are indeed successful in treating WNV infection both prophylactically and therapeutically in a golden hamster model. We demonstrated that the goose derived antibodies are non-reactogenic, i.e. do not cause an inflammatory response with multiple exposures in mammals. We also developed both a specific pathogen free facility to house the geese during the antibody production phase and a patent-pending purification process to purify the antibodies to greater than 99% purity. Therefore, the success of these study will allow a cost effective rapidly producible therapeutic toward clinical testing with the necessary infrastructure and processes developed and in place.

  11. Mechanisms of resistance to HER family targeting antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruser, Tim J. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States); Wheeler, Deric L., E-mail: dlwheeler@wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States)

    2010-04-15

    The epidermal growth factor (EGF) family of receptor tyrosine kinases consists of four members: EGFR (HER1/ErbB1), HER2/neu (ErbB2), HER3 (ErbB3) and HER4 (ErbB4). Receptor activation via ligand binding leads to downstream signaling that influence cell proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. Aberrant expression or activity of EGFR and HER2 have been strongly linked to the etiology of several human epithelial cancers including but not limited to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), colorectal cancer (CRC), and breast cancer. With this, intense efforts have been made to inhibit the activity of the EGFR and HER2 by designing antibodies against the ligand binding domains (cetuximab, panitumumab and trastuzumab) or small molecules against the tyrosine kinase domains (erlotinib, gefitinib, and lapatinib). Both approaches have shown considerable clinical promise. However, increasing evidence suggests that the majority of patients do not respond to these therapies, and those who show initial response ultimately become refractory to treatment. While mechanisms of resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been extensively studied, resistance to monoclonal antibodies is less well understood, both in the laboratory and in the clinical setting. In this review, we discuss resistance to antibody-based therapies against the EGFR and HER2, similarities between these resistance profiles, and strategies to overcome resistance to HER family targeting monoclonal antibody therapy.

  12. Sungkai (Peronema canescens) a promising pioneer tree : an experimental provenance study in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hatta, G.M.

    1999-01-01

    Sungkai ( Peronema canescens Jack.), Verbenaceae, is one among the fancy woods of Indonesia. Sungkai belongs to a small number of species recommended by The Ministry of Forestry for use in the development of industrial forest plantations (IFP). The IFPs are carried out in response to an increasing w

  13. The Promises and Challenges of Ecological Momentary Assessment in Schizophrenia: Development of an Initial Experimental Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon A. Gaudiano

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Severe mental illnesses, including schizophrenia and other psychotic-spectrum disorders, are a major cause of disability worldwide. Although efficacious pharmacological and psychosocial interventions have been developed for treating patients with schizophrenia, relapse rates are high and long-term recovery remains elusive for many individuals. Furthermore, little is still known about the underlying mechanisms of these illnesses. Thus, there is an urgent need to better understand the contextual factors that contribute to psychosis so that they can be better targeted in future interventions. Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA is a dynamic procedure that permits the measurement of variables in natural settings in real-time through the use of brief assessments delivered via mobile electronic devices (i.e., smartphones. One advantage of EMA is that it is less subject to retrospective memory biases and highly sensitive to fluctuating environmental factors. In the current article, we describe the research-to-date using EMA to better understand fluctuating symptoms and functioning in patients with schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders and potential applications to treatment. In addition, we describe a novel EMA protocol that we have been employing to study the outcomes of patients with schizophrenia following a hospital discharge. We also report the lessons we have learned thus far using EMA methods in this challenging clinical population.

  14. Improving properties of llama heavy chain antibodies using in silico analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutje Hulsik, D.

    2009-01-01

    Microbicides offer a promising way to prevent HIV infection in developing countries. Llama heavy chain antibody fragments (VHHs) that neutralize HIV are an ideal candidate for usage as active microbicide component. A VHH is the smallest intact antigen binding domain which allows it to reach for anti

  15. Recent Developments in Antibody-Based Assays for the Detection of Bacterial Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kui Zhu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Considering the urgent demand for rapid and accurate determination of bacterial toxins and the recent promising developments in nanotechnology and microfluidics, this review summarizes new achievements of the past five years. Firstly, bacterial toxins will be categorized according to their antibody binding properties into low and high molecular weight compounds. Secondly, the types of antibodies and new techniques for producing antibodies are discussed, including poly- and mono-clonal antibodies, single-chain variable fragments (scFv, as well as heavy-chain and recombinant antibodies. Thirdly, the use of different nanomaterials, such as gold nanoparticles (AuNPs, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs, quantum dots (QDs and carbon nanomaterials (graphene and carbon nanotube, for labeling antibodies and toxins or for readout techniques will be summarized. Fourthly, microscale analysis or minimized devices, for example microfluidics or lab-on-a-chip (LOC, which have attracted increasing attention in combination with immunoassays for the robust detection or point-of-care testing (POCT, will be reviewed. Finally, some new materials and analytical strategies, which might be promising for analyzing toxins in the near future, will be shortly introduced.

  16. Recent developments in antibody-based assays for the detection of bacterial toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Kui; Dietrich, Richard; Didier, Andrea; Doyscher, Dominik; Märtlbauer, Erwin

    2014-04-11

    Considering the urgent demand for rapid and accurate determination of bacterial toxins and the recent promising developments in nanotechnology and microfluidics, this review summarizes new achievements of the past five years. Firstly, bacterial toxins will be categorized according to their antibody binding properties into low and high molecular weight compounds. Secondly, the types of antibodies and new techniques for producing antibodies are discussed, including poly- and mono-clonal antibodies, single-chain variable fragments (scFv), as well as heavy-chain and recombinant antibodies. Thirdly, the use of different nanomaterials, such as gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), quantum dots (QDs) and carbon nanomaterials (graphene and carbon nanotube), for labeling antibodies and toxins or for readout techniques will be summarized. Fourthly, microscale analysis or minimized devices, for example microfluidics or lab-on-a-chip (LOC), which have attracted increasing attention in combination with immunoassays for the robust detection or point-of-care testing (POCT), will be reviewed. Finally, some new materials and analytical strategies, which might be promising for analyzing toxins in the near future, will be shortly introduced.

  17. Validating Antibodies to the Cannabinoid CB2 Receptor: Antibody Sensitivity Is Not Evidence of Antibody Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchalant, Yannick; Brownjohn, Philip W; Bonnet, Amandine; Kleffmann, Torsten; Ashton, John C

    2014-06-01

    Antibody-based methods for the detection and quantification of membrane integral proteins, in particular, the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), have been plagued with issues of primary antibody specificity. In this report, we investigate one of the most commonly utilized commercial antibodies for the cannabinoid CB2 receptor, a GPCR, using immunoblotting in combination with mass spectrometry. In this way, we were able to develop powerful negative and novel positive controls. By doing this, we are able to demonstrate that it is possible for an antibody to be sensitive for a protein of interest-in this case CB2-but still cross-react with other proteins and therefore lack specificity. Specifically, we were able to use western blotting combined with mass spectrometry to unequivocally identify CB2 protein in over-expressing cell lines. This shows that a common practice of validating antibodies with positive controls only is insufficient to ensure antibody reliability. In addition, our work is the first to develop a label-free method of protein detection using mass spectrometry that, with further refinement, could provide unequivocal identification of CB2 receptor protein in native tissues.

  18. Antibody-Mediated Rejection: An Evolving Entity in Heart Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Chih

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR is gaining increasing recognition as a major complication after heart transplantation, posing a significant risk for allograft failure, cardiac allograft vasculopathy, and poor survival. AMR results from activation of the humoral immune arm and the production of donor-specific antibodies (DSA that bind to the cardiac allograft causing myocardial injury predominantly through complement activation. The diagnosis of AMR has evolved from a clinical diagnosis involving allograft dysfunction and the presence of DSA to a primarily pathologic diagnosis based on histopathology and immunopathology. Treatment for AMR is multifaceted, targeting inhibition of the humoral immune system at different levels with emerging agents including proteasome and complement inhibitors showing particular promise. While there have been significant advances in our current understanding of the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of AMR, further research is required to determine optimal diagnostic tools, therapeutic agents, and timing of treatment.

  19. Plasmodium falciparum synthetic LbL microparticle vaccine elicits protective neutralizing antibody and parasite-specific cellular immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Thomas J; Tang, Jie; Derome, Mary E; Mitchell, Robert A; Jacobs, Andrea; Deng, Yanhong; Palath, Naveen; Cardenas, Edwin; Boyd, James G; Nardin, Elizabeth

    2013-04-01

    Epitopes of the circumsporozoite (CS) protein of Plasmodium falciparum, the most pathogenic species of the malaria parasite, have been shown to elicit protective immunity in experimental animals and human volunteers. The mechanisms of immunity include parasite-neutralizing antibodies that can inhibit parasite motility in the skin at the site of infection and in the bloodstream during transit to the hepatocyte host cell and also block interaction with host cell receptors on hepatocytes. In addition, specific CD4+ and CD8+ cellular mechanisms target the intracellular hepatic forms, thus preventing release of erythrocytic stage parasites from the infected hepatocyte and the ensuing blood stage cycle responsible for clinical disease. An innovative method for producing particle vaccines, layer-by-layer (LbL) fabrication of polypeptide films on solid CaCO3 cores, was used to produce synthetic malaria vaccines containing a tri-epitope CS peptide T1BT comprising the antibody epitope of the CS repeat region (B) and two T-cell epitopes, the highly conserved T1 epitope and the universal epitope T. Mice immunized with microparticles loaded with T1BT peptide developed parasite-neutralizing antibodies and malaria-specific T-cell responses including cytotoxic effector T-cells. Protection from liver stage infection following challenge with live sporozoites from infected mosquitoes correlated with neutralizing antibody levels. Although some immunized mice with low or undetectable neutralizing antibodies were also protected, depletion of T-cells prior to challenge resulted in the majority of mice remaining resistant to challenge. In addition, mice immunized with microparticles bearing only T-cell epitopes were not protected, demonstrating that cellular immunity alone was not sufficient for protective immunity. Although the microparticles without adjuvant were immunogenic and protective, a simple modification with the lipopeptide TLR2 agonist Pam3Cys increased the potency and

  20. Production and Purification of Polyclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Masami; Mukumoto, Mari; Miyatake, Kazutaka

    2016-01-01

    Polyclonal antibodies consist of a mixture of antibodies produced by multiple B-cell clones that have differentiated into antibody-producing plasma cells in response to an immunogen. Polyclonal antibodies raised against an antigen recognize multiple epitopes on a target molecule, which results in a signal amplification in indirect immunoassays including immune-electron microscopy. In this chapter, we present a basic procedure to generate polyclonal antibodies in rabbits.

  1. Normative perils and promises of food health branding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anker, Thomas Boysen

    The paper identifies and describes normative perils and promises that may crop up in relation to branding of foods on the value og health......The paper identifies and describes normative perils and promises that may crop up in relation to branding of foods on the value og health...

  2. Nanocellular polymer foams as promising high performance thermal insulation materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, S.; Duvigneau, J.; Vancso, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Low density, nanocellular polymer nanocomposite foams are considered as a promising new class of materials with many promising applications, for example to passively enhance the energy efficiency of buildings. This paper discusses recent developments in this field of polymer materials science. Parti

  3. Small targeted cytotoxics: current state and promises from DNA-encoded chemical libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krall, Nikolaus; Scheuermann, Jörg; Neri, Dario

    2013-01-28

    The targeted delivery of potent cytotoxic agents has emerged as a promising strategy for the treatment of cancer and other serious conditions. Traditionally, antibodies against markers of disease have been used as drug-delivery vehicles. More recently, lower molecular weight ligands have been proposed for the generation of a novel class of targeted cytotoxics with improved properties. Advances in this field crucially rely on efficient methods for the identification and optimization of organic molecules capable of high-affinity binding and selective recognition of target proteins. The advent of DNA-encoded chemical libraries allows the construction and screening of compound collections of unprecedented size. In this Review, we survey developments in the field of small ligand-based targeted cytotoxics and show how innovative library technologies will help develop the drugs of the future.

  4. Systemic therapy in muscle-invasive and metastatic bladder cancer: current trends and future promises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B; Trump, Donald L

    2016-09-01

    Bladder urothelial cancers remain an important urologic cancer with limited treatment options in the locally advanced and metastatic setting. While neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced muscle-invasive cancers has shown overall survival benefit, clinical uptake in practice have lagged behind. Controversies surrounding adjuvant chemotherapy use are also ongoing. Systemic therapies for metastatic bladder cancer have largely used platinum-based therapies without effective standard second-line therapy options for those who fail, although vinflunine is approved in Europe as a second-line therapy based on a Phase III trial, and most recently, atezolizumab, a checkpoint inhibitor, was approved by the US FDA. Given increasing recognition of mutational signatures expressed in urothelial carcinomas, several promising agents with use of VEGF-targeted therapies, HER2-directed agents and immunotherapies with PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies in various settings are discussed herein.

  5. Preparation of Polyclonal Antibodies Against Testis-specific Protease 50 and Characterization of Antibody Specificity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Testis-specific protease 50 (TSP50) is a testis-specific oncogene, which is abnormally activated in most tested patients with breast cancer. This property makes it an attractive molecular marker and a promising target for the diagnosis and therapy of breast cancer. In order to obtain the protective and specific polyclonal antibodies for further research, TSP50 cDNA was amplified by RT-PCR from normal human testicular tissue, and inserted into eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1. Rabbit anti-TSP50 polyclonal antibodies were prepared by means of intramuscular injection of pcDNA3.1-TSP50 into the rabbits. Titers of the anti-sera were measured by ELISA and Western blotting with the E. coli cell lysate containing the induced GST-TSP50 fusion protein as an antigen. In addition, we examined the expression of TSP50 in both breast cancer cell line MCF-7 and breast cancer tissue by immunofluorescent and immunohistochemistry analysis.

  6. Novel Antibody-Based Proteins for Cancer Immunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuenmayor, Jaheli; Montaño, Ramon F., E-mail: jfuenmay@ivic.gob.ve [Laboratorio de Patología Celular y Molecular, Centro de Medicina Experimental, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas. Caracas, 1020-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2011-08-19

    The relative success of monoclonal antibodies in cancer immunotherapy and the vast manipulation potential of recombinant antibody technology have encouraged the development of novel antibody-based antitumor proteins. Many insightful reagents have been produced, mainly guided by studies on the mechanisms of action associated with complete and durable remissions, results from experimental animal models, and our current knowledge of the human immune system. Strikingly, only a small percent of these new reagents has demonstrated clinical value. Tumor burden, immune evasion, physiological resemblance, and cell plasticity are among the challenges that cancer therapy faces, and a number of antibody-based proteins are already available to deal with many of them. Some of these novel reagents have been shown to specifically increase apoptosis/cell death of tumor cells, recruit and activate immune effectors, and reveal synergistic effects not previously envisioned. In this review, we look into different approaches that have been followed during the past few years to produce these biologics and analyze their relative success, mainly in terms of their clinical performance. The use of antibody-based antitumor proteins, in combination with standard or novel therapies, is showing significant improvements in objective responses, suggesting that these reagents will become important components of the antineoplastic protocols of the future.

  7. Rationalization and design of the complementarity determining region sequences in an antibody-antigen recognition interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Ming Yu

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interactions are critical determinants in biological systems. Engineered proteins binding to specific areas on protein surfaces could lead to therapeutics or diagnostics for treating diseases in humans. But designing epitope-specific protein-protein interactions with computational atomistic interaction free energy remains a difficult challenge. Here we show that, with the antibody-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor interaction as a model system, the experimentally observed amino acid preferences in the antibody-antigen interface can be rationalized with 3-dimensional distributions of interacting atoms derived from the database of protein structures. Machine learning models established on the rationalization can be generalized to design amino acid preferences in antibody-antigen interfaces, for which the experimental validations are tractable with current high throughput synthetic antibody display technologies. Leave-one-out cross validation on the benchmark system yielded the accuracy, precision, recall (sensitivity and specificity of the overall binary predictions to be 0.69, 0.45, 0.63, and 0.71 respectively, and the overall Matthews correlation coefficient of the 20 amino acid types in the 24 interface CDR positions was 0.312. The structure-based computational antibody design methodology was further tested with other antibodies binding to VEGF. The results indicate that the methodology could provide alternatives to the current antibody technologies based on animal immune systems in engineering therapeutic and diagnostic antibodies against predetermined antigen epitopes.

  8. Antibodies to watch in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Janice M

    2016-01-01

    The number of novel antibody therapeutics that received first marketing approvals in 2015 met expectations, with 6 (alirocumab (Praluent®), evolocumab (Repatha®), daratumumab (Darzalex®), dinutuximab (Unituxin®), idarucizumab (Praxbind®), mepolizumab (Nucala®)) granted first approvals as of mid-November*. Seven novel antibody therapeutics (begelomab, brodalumab, elotuzumab, ixekizumab, necitumumab, obiltoxaximab, reslizumab) are in regulatory review, and thus a similar number, if not more, are projected to gain first approvals in 2016. Commercial late-stage antibody therapeutics development exceeded expectations by increasing from 39 candidates in Phase 3 studies as of late 2014 to 53 as of late 2015. Of the 53 candidates, transitions to regulatory review by the end of 2016 are projected for 8 (atezolizumab, benralizumab, bimagrumab, durvalumab, inotuzumab ozogamicin, lebrikizumab, ocrelizumab, tremelimumab). Other "antibodies to watch" include 15 candidates (bavituximab, bococizumab, dupilumab, fasinumab, fulranumab, gevokizumab, guselkumab, ibalizumab, LY2951742, onartuzumab, REGN2222, roledumab, romosozumab, sirukumab, Xilonix) undergoing evaluation in Phase 3 studies that have estimated primary completion dates in 2016. As evidenced by the antibody therapeutics discussed in this perspective, the biopharmaceutical industry has a highly active late-stage clinical pipeline that may deliver numerous new products to the global market in the near future. *See Note added in proof for updates through December 31, 2015.

  9. New broadly reactive neutralizing antibodies against hepatitis B virus surface antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucinskaite-Kodze, Indre; Pleckaityte, Milda; Bremer, Corinna M; Seiz, Pia L; Zilnyte, Milda; Bulavaite, Aiste; Mickiene, Gitana; Zvirblis, Gintautas; Sasnauskas, Kestutis; Glebe, Dieter; Zvirbliene, Aurelija

    2016-01-01

    genotypes. Recombinant scFv consisting of immunoglobulin VH and VL regions joined by a 20 aa-long linker was generated by cloning the respective cDNA sequences from hybridoma HB1. The recombinant scFv generated in Escherichia coli recognized the same epitope as the parental MAb HB1. Cloning of HB1 VH and VL regions allowed determination of their primary structure and subsequent computer modeling of antibody-epitope interaction. The generated molecular models of HB1 variable region with its target peptides were in accordance with experimental data showing the importance of certain aa residues in antibody binding. In conclusion, the current study describes new HBsAg-specific antibodies with HBV-neutralizing potency and a broad cross-reactivity against different HBV strains. The generated MAb HB1 will be of great value in diagnostic and research settings, while the recombinant HB1-derived scFv represents a promising "building block" for producing anti-HBV tools with a potential biopharmaceutical application.

  10. Antibodies to watch in 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Janice M

    2013-01-01

    The transitions of antibody therapeutics to late-stage clinical development, regulatory review and the market are proceeding at a rapid pace in 2013. Since late 2012, two monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics (itolizumab, trastuzumab emtansine) received their first approvals, first marketing applications for three mAbs (vedolizumab, ramucirumab, obinutuzumab) were submitted to regulatory agencies, and five mAbs (brodalumab, MABp1, moxetumomab pasudotox, tildrakizumab, rilotumumab) entered their first Phase 3 studies. The current total of commercially-sponsored antibody therapeutics undergoing evaluation in late-stage studies is 30. Recently announced study results for farletuzumab, naptumomab estafenatox, and tabalumab indicate that clinical endpoints were not met in some Phase 3 studies of these product candidates. PMID:23727858

  11. Epigenetics of the antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guideng; Zan, Hong; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2013-09-01

    Epigenetic marks, such as DNA methylation, histone post-translational modifications and miRNAs, are induced in B cells by the same stimuli that drive the antibody response. They play major roles in regulating somatic hypermutation (SHM), class switch DNA recombination (CSR), and differentiation to plasma cells or long-lived memory B cells. Histone modifications target the CSR and, possibly, SHM machinery to the immunoglobulin locus; they together with DNA methylation and miRNAs modulate the expression of critical elements of that machinery, such as activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), as well as factors central to plasma cell differentiation, such as B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp-1). These inducible B cell-intrinsic epigenetic marks instruct the maturation of antibody responses. Their dysregulation plays an important role in aberrant antibody responses to foreign antigens, such as those of microbial pathogens, and self-antigens, such as those targeted in autoimmunity, and B cell neoplasia.

  12. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2013-04-09

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  13. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2013-02-26

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  14. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A; Thompson, Vicki S

    2013-02-26

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  15. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2017-03-28

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  16. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S

    2010-04-13

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  17. Experimental study on the positive inotropic effect of the antibody against sodium calcium exchanger α-2 repeat (815-839) on cardiac function in isolated adult rat hearts%抗钠-钙交换体α-2(815-839)重复序列抗体对成年大鼠离体心脏心功能影响的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    封启龙; 吴博威

    2011-01-01

    . Conclusion The antibody against α-2(815-839)could enhance cardiac contraction and also accelerate its relaxation via stimulating sodium-calcium exchange and L-type calcium channel activity, which provides an experimental evidence for exploring and developing new therapeutic drugs for patients with heart failure.

  18. Significance of Anti-HLA Antibodies on Adult and Pediatric Heart Allograft Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiola, Massimo; Marrari, Marilyn; Feingold, Brian; Zeevi, Adriana

    2017-01-01

    As methods for human leukocyte antigens (HLA) antibody detection have evolved and newer solid phase assays are much more sensitive, the last 15 years has seen a renewed focus on the importance of HLA antibodies in solid organ transplant rejection. However, there is still much controversy regarding the clinical significance of antibody level as depicted by the mean fluorescence intensity of a patient’s neat serum. Emerging techniques, including those that identify antibody level and function, show promise for the detection of individuals at risk of allograft rejection, determination of the effectiveness of desensitization prior to transplant, and for monitoring treatment of rejection. Here, we review current publications regarding the relevance of donor-specific HLA antibodies (DSA) in adult and pediatric heart transplantation (HT) with graft survival, development of antibody-mediated rejection and cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV). The negative impact of DSA on patient and allograft survival is evident in adult and pediatric HT recipients. Many questions remain regarding the most appropriate frequency of assessment of pre- and posttransplant DSA as well as the phenotype of DSA memory vs. true de novo antibody using large multicenter adult and pediatric cohorts and state-of-the-art methodologies for DSA detection and characterization. PMID:28191005

  19. Isolation of Anti-Ricin Protective Antibodies Exhibiting High Affinity from Immunized Non-Human Primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tal Noy-Porat

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ricin, derived from the castor bean plant Ricinus communis, is one of the most potent and lethal toxins known, against which there is no available antidote. To date, the use of neutralizing antibodies is the most promising post-exposure treatment for ricin intoxication. The aim of this study was to isolate high affinity anti-ricin antibodies that possess potent toxin-neutralization capabilities. Two non-human primates were immunized with either a ricin-holotoxin- or subunit-based vaccine, to ensure the elicitation of diverse high affinity antibodies. By using a comprehensive set of primers, immune scFv phage-displayed libraries were constructed and panned. A panel of 10 antibodies (five directed against the A subunit of ricin and five against the B subunit was isolated and reformatted into a full-length chimeric IgG. All of these antibodies were found to neutralize ricin in vitro, and several conferred full protection to ricin-intoxicated mice when given six hours after exposure. Six antibodies were found to possess exceptionally high affinity toward the toxin, with KD values below pM (koff < 1 × 10−7 s−1 that were well correlated with their ability to neutralize ricin. These antibodies, alone or in combination, could be used for the development of a highly-effective therapeutic preparation for post-exposure treatment of ricin intoxication.

  20. Harnessing the protective potential of HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Abigail Smith

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent biological, structural, and technical advances are converging within the HIV-1 vaccine field to harness the power of antibodies for prevention and therapy. Numerous monoclonal antibodies with broad neutralizing activity against diverse HIV-1 isolates have now been identified, revealing at least five sites of vulnerability on the envelope (Env glycoproteins. While there are practical and technological barriers blocking a clear path from broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAb to a protective vaccine, this is not a dead end. Scientists are revisiting old approaches with new technology, cutting new trails through unexplored territory, and paving new roads in the hopes of preventing HIV-1 infection. Other promising avenues to capitalize on the power of bNAbs are also being pursued, such as passive antibody immunotherapy and gene therapy approaches. Moreover, non-neutralizing antibodies have inhibitory activities that could have protective potential, alone or in combination with bNAbs. With a new generation of bNAbs, and a clinical trial that associated antibodies with reduced acquisition, the field is closer than ever to developing strategies to use antibodies against HIV-1.

  1. Efficient Methods To Isolate Human Monoclonal Antibodies from Memory B Cells and Plasma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, Davide; Lanzavecchia, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    In this article, we highlight the advantages of isolating human monoclonal antibodies from the human memory B cells and plasma cell repertoires by using high-throughput cellular screens. Memory B cells are immortalized with high efficiency using Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the presence of a toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist, while plasma cells are maintained in single-cell cultures by using interleukin 6 (IL-6) or stromal cells. In both cases, multiple parallel assays, including functional assays, can be used to identify rare cells that produce antibodies with unique properties. Using these methods, we have isolated potent and broadly neutralizing antibodies against a variety of viruses, in particular, a pan-influenza-A-neutralizing antibody and an antibody that neutralizes four different paramyxoviruses. Given the high throughput and the possibility of directly screening for function (rather than just binding), these methods are instrumental to implement a target-agnostic approach to identify the most effective antibodies and, consequently, the most promising targets for vaccine design. This approach is exemplified by the identification of unusually potent cytomegalovirus-neutralizing antibodies that led to the identification of the target, a pentameric complex that we are developing as a candidate vaccine.

  2. Efficient, chemoselective synthesis of immunomicelles using single-domain antibodies with a C-terminal thioester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raats Jos MH

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classical bioconjugation strategies for generating antibody-functionalized nanoparticles are non-specific and typically result in heterogeneous compounds that can be compromised in activity. Expression systems based on self-cleavable intein domains allow the generation of recombinant proteins with a C-terminal thioester, providing a unique handle for site-specific conjugation using native chemical ligation (NCL. However, current methods to generate antibody fragments with C-terminal thioesters require cumbersome refolding procedures, effectively preventing application of NCL for antibody-mediated targeting and molecular imaging. Results Targeting to the periplasm of E. coli allowed efficient production of correctly-folded single-domain antibody (sdAb-intein fusions proteins. On column purification and 2-mercapthoethanesulfonic acid (MESNA-induced cleavage yielded single-domain antibodies with a reactive C-terminal MESNA thioester in good yields. These thioester-functionalized single-domain antibodies allowed synthesis of immunomicelles via native chemical ligation in a single step. Conclusion A novel procedure was developed to obtain soluble, well-folded single-domain antibodies with reactive C-terminal thioesters in good yields. These proteins are promising building blocks for the chemoselective functionalization via NCL of a broad range of nanoparticle scaffolds, including micelles, liposomes and dendrimers.

  3. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, Rochella A; Robinson, John A

    2008-02-01

    The arbitrary division between antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and secondary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome has not proven useful. Antiphospholipid antibodies in the absence of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome often occur as epiphenomena in many autoimmune diseases. They are very common in systemic lupus erythematosus. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is a significant comorbidity in lupus but is uncommon in Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, and systemic vasculitis. Evidence is growing that antiphospholipid antibodies may have a pathogenic role in pulmonary hypertension and accelerated atherosclerosis of autoimmune diseases.

  4. Cold Atmospheric Plasma: A Promising Complementary Therapy for Squamous Head and Neck Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Welz

    Full Text Available Head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC is the 7th most common cancer worldwide. Despite the development of new therapeutic agents such as monoclonal antibodies, prognosis did not change for the last decades. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP presents the most promising new technology in cancer treatment. In this study the efficacy of a surface micro discharging (SMD plasma device against two head and neck cancer cell lines was proved. Effects on the cell viability, DNA fragmentation and apoptosis induction were evaluated with the MTT assay, alkaline microgel electrophoresis (comet assay and Annexin-V/PI staining. MTT assay revealed that the CAP treatment markedly decreases the cell viability for all tested treatment times (30, 60, 90, 120 and 180 s. IC 50 was reached within maximal 120 seconds of CAP treatment. Comet assay analysis showed a dose dependent high DNA fragmentation being one of the key players in anti-cancer activity of CAP. Annexin-V/PI staining revealed induction of apoptosis in CAP treated HNSCC cell lines but no significant dose dependency was seen. Thus, we confirmed that SMD Plasma technology is definitely a promising new approach on cancer treatment.

  5. Cold Atmospheric Plasma: A Promising Complementary Therapy for Squamous Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welz, Christian; Emmert, Steffen; Canis, Martin; Becker, Sven; Baumeister, Philipp; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Morfill, Gregor E.; Harréus, Uli; Zimmermann, Julia L.

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) is the 7th most common cancer worldwide. Despite the development of new therapeutic agents such as monoclonal antibodies, prognosis did not change for the last decades. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) presents the most promising new technology in cancer treatment. In this study the efficacy of a surface micro discharging (SMD) plasma device against two head and neck cancer cell lines was proved. Effects on the cell viability, DNA fragmentation and apoptosis induction were evaluated with the MTT assay, alkaline microgel electrophoresis (comet assay) and Annexin-V/PI staining. MTT assay revealed that the CAP treatment markedly decreases the cell viability for all tested treatment times (30, 60, 90, 120 and 180 s). IC 50 was reached within maximal 120 seconds of CAP treatment. Comet assay analysis showed a dose dependent high DNA fragmentation being one of the key players in anti-cancer activity of CAP. Annexin-V/PI staining revealed induction of apoptosis in CAP treated HNSCC cell lines but no significant dose dependency was seen. Thus, we confirmed that SMD Plasma technology is definitely a promising new approach on cancer treatment. PMID:26588072

  6. Aptamers as a promising approach for the control of parasitic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan David Ospina-Villa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Aptamers are short single-stranded RNA or DNA oligonucleotides that are capable of binding various biological targets with high affinity and specificity. Their identification initially relies on a molecular process named SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment that has been later modified in order to improve aptamer sensitivity, minimize duration and cost of the assay, as well as increase target types. Several biochemical modifications can help to enhance aptamer stability without affecting significantly target interaction. As a result, aptamers have generated a large interest as promising tools to compete with monoclonal antibodies for detection and inhibition of specific markers of human diseases. One aptamer-based drug is currently authorized and several others are being clinically evaluated. Despite advances in the knowledge of parasite biology and host-parasite interactions from "omics" data, protozoan parasites still affect millions of people around the world and there is an urgent need for drug target discovery and novel therapeutic concepts. In this context, aptamers represent promising tools for pathogen identification and control. Recent studies have reported the identification of "aptasensors" for parasite diagnosis, and "intramers" targeting intracellular proteins. Here we discuss various strategies that have been employed for intracellular expression of aptamers and expansion of their possible application, and propose that they may be suitable for the clinical use of aptamers in parasitic infections.

  7. Cold Atmospheric Plasma: A Promising Complementary Therapy for Squamous Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welz, Christian; Emmert, Steffen; Canis, Martin; Becker, Sven; Baumeister, Philipp; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Morfill, Gregor E; Harréus, Uli; Zimmermann, Julia L

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) is the 7th most common cancer worldwide. Despite the development of new therapeutic agents such as monoclonal antibodies, prognosis did not change for the last decades. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) presents the most promising new technology in cancer treatment. In this study the efficacy of a surface micro discharging (SMD) plasma device against two head and neck cancer cell lines was proved. Effects on the cell viability, DNA fragmentation and apoptosis induction were evaluated with the MTT assay, alkaline microgel electrophoresis (comet assay) and Annexin-V/PI staining. MTT assay revealed that the CAP treatment markedly decreases the cell viability for all tested treatment times (30, 60, 90, 120 and 180 s). IC 50 was reached within maximal 120 seconds of CAP treatment. Comet assay analysis showed a dose dependent high DNA fragmentation being one of the key players in anti-cancer activity of CAP. Annexin-V/PI staining revealed induction of apoptosis in CAP treated HNSCC cell lines but no significant dose dependency was seen. Thus, we confirmed that SMD Plasma technology is definitely a promising new approach on cancer treatment.

  8. 78 FR 63913 - Proposed Priority-Promise Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... number of Department programs and projects that support activities in designated Promise Zones. This... jobs, increasing economic activity, improving educational opportunities, reducing violent crime, and... violent crime. For calendar year 2013, only communities that have previously been granted funds under...

  9. Promise Zone Round 2 Applicant Geography and Goal Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — This dataset includes Promise Zone initiative round II applicant project data from 111 urban, rural, and tribal communities who consented to share their application...

  10. Stem Cells Hold Promise, Peril in Treating Seniors' Eye Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164099.html Stem Cells Hold Promise, Peril in Treating Seniors' Eye Disease ... 15, 2017 WEDNESDAY, March 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Stem cells may offer new hope for people losing their ...

  11. Protein Replacement Therapy Shows Promise in Treating Rare Skin Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1999 Spotlight on Research 2014 February 2014 (historical) Protein Replacement Therapy Shows Promise in Treating Rare Skin Disorder Replacing a protein that is crucial to ensuring that the skin’s ...

  12. Genital Herpes Vaccine Shows Promise in Animal Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 163137.html Genital Herpes Vaccine Shows Promise in Animal Trials Two-pronged approach tested on lab monkeys, guinea ... vaccines have not shown very robust protection in animal and human trials. Friedman and his colleagues decided that an effective ...

  13. Web-Based Help for Insomnia Shows Promise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162290.html Web-Based Help for Insomnia Shows Promise Interactive program ... Now, insomnia might be one of them. A web-based interactive program may help chronically sleepless individuals ...

  14. Recent progress of diagnostic and therapeutic approach to cancers using polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koji, T. (Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1982-09-01

    Among the major topics of interest in cancer immunology, immunodiagnosis and immunotherapy with the antibodies are summarized historically and prospectively. The concept of injecting anti-tumor cell antibodies to localize tumors was first introduced in experimental systems by Pressman (1957). Since then, various trials have been achieved with human tumors using specific or nonspecific tumor-localizing antibodies diagnostically or therapeutically. In 1970's, successes in immunodiagnosis with the antibodies to oncofetal proteins also have been reported. Recently, there are numerous papers dealing with a series of external scanning or serotherapeutic trials by the use of monoclonal antibodies that bind selectively to tumor cells. Various relevant problems with them are discussed.

  15. Targeted in vivo inhibition of specific protein-protein interactions using recombinant antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Zábrady

    Full Text Available With the growing availability of genomic sequence information, there is an increasing need for gene function analysis. Antibody-mediated "silencing" represents an intriguing alternative for the precise inhibition of a particular function of biomolecules. Here, we describe a method for selecting recombinant antibodies with a specific purpose in mind, which is to inhibit intrinsic protein-protein interactions in the cytosol of plant cells. Experimental procedures were designed for conveniently evaluating desired properties of recombinant antibodies in consecutive steps. Our selection method was successfully used to develop a recombinant antibody inhibiting the interaction of ARABIDOPSIS HISTIDINE PHOSPHOTRANSFER PROTEIN 3 with such of its upstream interaction partners as the receiver domain of CYTOKININ INDEPENDENT HISTIDINE KINASE 1. The specific down-regulation of the cytokinin signaling pathway in vivo demonstrates the validity of our approach. This selection method can serve as a prototype for developing unique recombinant antibodies able to interfere with virtually any biomolecule in the living cell.

  16. Anti-inflammatory activity of human IgG4 antibodies by dynamic Fab arm exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Neut Kolfschoten, Marijn; Schuurman, Janine; Losen, Mario; Bleeker, Wim K; Martínez-Martínez, Pilar; Vermeulen, Ellen; den Bleker, Tamara H; Wiegman, Luus; Vink, Tom; Aarden, Lucien A; De Baets, Marc H; van de Winkel, Jan G J; Aalberse, Rob C; Parren, Paul W H I

    2007-09-14

    Antibodies play a central role in immunity by forming an interface with the innate immune system and, typically, mediate proinflammatory activity. We describe a novel posttranslational modification that leads to anti-inflammatory activity of antibodies of immunoglobulin G, isotype 4 (IgG4). IgG4 antibodies are dynamic molecules that exchange Fab arms by swapping a heavy chain and attached light chain (half-molecule) with a heavy-light chain pair from another molecule, which results in bispecific antibodies. Mutagenesis studies revealed that the third constant domain is critical for this activity. The impact of IgG4 Fab arm exchange was confirmed in vivo in a rhesus monkey model with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. IgG4 Fab arm exchange is suggested to be an important biological mechanism that provides the basis for the anti-inflammatory activity attributed to IgG4 antibodies.

  17. DARPA Antibody Technology Program Standardized Test Bed for Antibody Characterization: Characterization of an MS2 Human IgG Antibody Produced by AnaptysBio, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    ECBC-TR-1339 DARPA ANTIBODY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM STANDARDIZED TEST BED FOR ANTIBODY...CHARACTERIZATION: CHARACTERIZATION OF AN MS2 HUMAN IGG ANTIBODY PRODUCED BY ANAPTYSBIO, INC. DARPA ATP Standardized Test Bed for Antibody...Characterization: Characterization of an MS2 human IgG antibody produced by AnaptysBio DARPA ATP Standardized Test Bed for Antibody

  18. Studies of monoclonal antibodies IOR-CEA-1 and IOR-EGF/R3 labelled with {sup 99m}Tc; Estudo de marcacao dos anticorpos monoclonais IOR-CEA-1 e IOR-EGF/R3 com {sup 99m}Tc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Carla Roberta de Barros Rodrigues

    2005-07-01

    Nuclear Medicine is a speciality that uses radioisotopes for the diagnosis or treatment of diseases and it is considered one of the best tools among the diagnostic modalities for detection of cancer. {sup 99m}Tc is one of the main isotopes for labelling antibodies and in Nuclear Medicine in general, due to its adequate physical properties, availability and low cost. Labelled monoclonal antibodies have shown promising results for diagnosis and therapy of cancer and their use has brought great experimental and clinical advances in the field of oncology. The main clinical applications of immunoscintigraphy with monoclonal antibodies are staging and evaluation of tumoral reappearance. The antibodies employed in this work were: OIR-CEA-1, a murine monoclonal antibody that acts directly against CEA expressed in several neoplasia in particular those from the gastrointestinal tract (colorectal cancer) and IOR-EGF/R3, a murine monoclonal antibody that binds to the external domain of EGF-R and it has been used in the diagnosis of tumors of epithelial origin. The objectives of this work were the development and optimization of the reduction and purification processes, the radiolabelling techniques and quality control procedures (radiochemical, immunoreactivity and cystein challenge) and imaging studies of monoclonal antibodies OIR-CEA-1 and IOR-EGF/R3, using the simple, fast and efficient method of direct labelling of the antibody with {sup 99m}Tc. The final results was the definition of the best conditions for the preparation of lyophilized reactive kits of OIR-CEA-1 and IOR- EGF/R3 for an efficient diagnostic application in Nuclear Medicine. The most adequate conditions for the labelling of the antibodies were: 1.0 mg Ab, 29 {mu}L MDP, 3.0 {mu}g Sn{sup 2+}, 1 mL of {sup 99m}Tc and 30 min. reaction time. With these conditions the labelling yield was always higher than 95% and the maximum activity of {sup 99m}Tc was about 2220 MBq (60 mCi). The evidences of the efficiency and

  19. Novel anti-HER2 monoclonal antibodies: synergy and antagonism with tumor necrosis factor-α

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceran Ceyhan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One-third of breast cancers display amplifications of the ERBB2 gene encoding the HER2 kinase receptor. Trastuzumab, a humanized antibody directed against an epitope on subdomain IV of the extracellular domain of HER2 is used for therapy of HER2-overexpressing mammary tumors. However, many tumors are either natively resistant or acquire resistance against Trastuzumab. Antibodies directed to different epitopes on the extracellular domain of HER2 are promising candidates for replacement or combinatorial therapy. For example, Pertuzumab that binds to subdomain II of HER2 extracellular domain and inhibits receptor dimerization is under clinical trial. Alternative antibodies directed to novel HER2 epitopes may serve as additional tools for breast cancer therapy. Our aim was to generate novel anti-HER2 monoclonal antibodies inhibiting the growth of breast cancer cells, either alone or in combination with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α. Methods Mice were immunized against SK-BR-3 cells and recombinant HER2 extracellular domain protein to produce monoclonal antibodies. Anti-HER2 antibodies were characterized with breast cancer cell lines using immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, immunoprecipitation, western blot techniques. Antibody epitopes were localized using plasmids encoding recombinant HER2 protein variants. Antibodies, either alone or in combination with TNF-α, were tested for their effects on breast cancer cell proliferation. Results We produced five new anti-HER2 monoclonal antibodies, all directed against conformational epitope or epitopes restricted to the native form of the extracellular domain. When tested alone, some antibodies inhibited modestly but significantly the growth of SK-BR-3, BT-474 and MDA-MB-361 cells displaying ERBB2 amplification. They had no detectable effect on MCF-7 and T47D cells lacking ERBB2 amplification. When tested in combination with TNF-α, antibodies acted synergistically on SK-BR-3 cells

  20. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootla, Bharath; Denic, Aleksandar; Rodriguez, Moses

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) or antibodies are heavy plasma proteins, with sugar chains added to amino-acid residues by N-linked glycosylation and occasionally by O-linked glycosylation. The versatility of antibodies is demonstrated by the various functions that they mediate such as neutralization, agglutination, fixation with activation of complement and activation of effector cells. Naturally occurring antibodies protect the organism against harmful pathogens, viruses and infections. In addition, almost any organic chemical induces antibody production of antibodies that would bind specifically to the chemical. These antibodies are often produced from multiple B cell clones and referred to as polyclonal antibodies. In recent years, scientists have exploited the highly evolved machinery of the immune system to produce structurally and functionally complex molecules such as antibodies from a single B clone, heralding the era of monoclonal antibodies. Most of the antibodies currently in the clinic, target components of the immune system, are not curative and seek to alleviate symptoms rather than cure disease. Our group used a novel strategy to identify reparative human monoclonal antibodies distinct from conventional antibodies. In this chapter, we discuss the therapeutic relevance of both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

  1. Antibody Engineering for Pursuing a Healthier Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Abdullah F. U. H.; Wang, Rongzhi; Ling, Sumei; Wang, Shihua

    2017-01-01

    Since the development of antibody-production techniques, a number of immunoglobulins have been developed on a large scale using conventional methods. Hybridoma technology opened a new horizon in the production of antibodies against target antigens of infectious pathogens, malignant diseases including autoimmune disorders, and numerous potent toxins. However, these clinical humanized or chimeric murine antibodies have several limitations and complexities. Therefore, to overcome these difficulties, recent advances in genetic engineering techniques and phage display technique have allowed the production of highly specific recombinant antibodies. These engineered antibodies have been constructed in the hunt for novel therapeutic drugs equipped with enhanced immunoprotective abilities, such as engaging immune effector functions, effective development of fusion proteins, efficient tumor and tissue penetration, and high-affinity antibodies directed against conserved targets. Advanced antibody engineering techniques have extensive applications in the fields of immunology, biotechnology, diagnostics, and therapeutic medicines. However, there is limited knowledge regarding dynamic antibody development approaches. Therefore, this review extends beyond our understanding of conventional polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. Furthermore, recent advances in antibody engineering techniques together with antibody fragments, display technologies, immunomodulation, and broad applications of antibodies are discussed to enhance innovative antibody production in pursuit of a healthier future for humans.

  2. [Promises and limits of genomics and its applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gros, François

    2015-01-01

    This text traces the extraordinary advances made in genomics for 40 years: recombinant DNA, transgenesis or genetic sequencing. In recent years, the model "all genetics" was questioned and post-genomics emerged in the molecular landscape. The promises of medical advances are many and the ethical issues that accompany them are challenges. Advances in synthetic biology are a relevant illustration of these promises and challenges.

  3. Pharmacokinetics interactions of monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Nicola; Bellosta, Stefano; Baldessin, Ludovico; Boccia, Donatella; Racagni, Giorgi; Corsini, Alberto

    2016-09-01

    The clearance of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) typically does not involve cytochrome P450 (CYP450)-mediated metabolism or interaction with cell membrane transporters, therefore the pharmacokinetics interactions of mAbs and small molecule drugs are limited. However, a drug may affect the clearance of mAbs through the modulation of immune response (e.g., methotrexate reduces the clearance of infliximab, adalimumab, and golimumab, possibly due to methotrexate's inhibitory effect on the formation of antibodies against the mAbs). In addition, mAbs that are cytokine modulators may modify the metabolism of drugs through their effects on P450 enzymes expression. For example, cytokine modulators such as tocilizumab (anti-IL-6 receptor antibody) may reverse the "inhibitory" effect of IL-6 on CYP substrates, resulting in a "normalization" of CYP activities. Finally, a drug may alter the clearance of mAbs by either increasing or reducing the levels of expression of targets of mAbs on the cell surface. For instance, statins and fibrates induce PCSK9 expression and therefore increase cellular uptake and clearance of alirocumab and evolocumab, anti-PCSK9 antibodies. In the present review, we will provide an overview on the pharmacokinetics properties of mAbs as related to the most relevant examples of mAbs-small molecule drug interaction.

  4. Monoclonal antibodies to Treponema Pallidum.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J.M. van de Donk; J.D.A. van Embden; M.F. van Olderen; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); J.C. de Jong (Jan)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractThree successive fusions of mouse myeloma cells and spleen lymphocytes of a mouse immunized with Treponema Pallidum resulted in one hybridoma producing anti T. pallidum antibodies for each fusion. The mice were immunized with live pallidum cells respectively 1, 3 and 5 months before fusi

  5. Antibody Isotype Switching in Vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senger, Kate; Hackney, Jason; Payandeh, Jian; Zarrin, Ali A

    2015-01-01

    The humoral or antibody-mediated immune response in vertebrates has evolved to respond to diverse antigenic challenges in various anatomical locations. Diversification of the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) constant region via isotype switching allows for remarkable plasticity in the immune response, including versatile tissue distribution, Fc receptor binding, and complement fixation. This enables antibody molecules to exert various biological functions while maintaining antigen-binding specificity. Different immunoglobulin (Ig) classes include IgM, IgD, IgG, IgE, and IgA, which exist as surface-bound and secreted forms. High-affinity autoantibodies are associated with various autoimmune diseases such as lupus and arthritis, while defects in components of isotype switching are associated with infections. A major route of infection used by a large number of pathogens is invasion of mucosal surfaces within the respiratory, digestive, or urinary tract. Most infections of this nature are initially limited by effector mechanisms such as secretory IgA antibodies. Mucosal surfaces have been proposed as a major site for the genesis of adaptive immune responses, not just in fighting infections but also in tolerating commensals and constant dietary antigens. We will discuss the evolution of isotype switching in various species and provide an overview of the function of various isotypes with a focus on IgA, which is universally important in gut homeostasis as well as pathogen clearance. Finally, we will discuss the utility of antibodies as therapeutic modalities.

  6. Development of Antibody Against Sulfamethazine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIZi-ying; XUWen-ge; LIUYi-bing; ZHANGLi-ling; GUOWei-zheng; HANShi-quan

    2003-01-01

    Polyclonal antibodies(PcAbs) against sulfamethazine(SMT) are obtained by immunizing rabbits with SMT-conjugated bovine serum albumin(BSA). The affinity constants (Ka) of the PcAbs are higher than 1×108 and the cross-reactivities with sulfadiazine(SD), sulfaquinoxaline (SQX) are lower than 0.05% (R/A).

  7. SARS Patients-derived Human Recombinant Antibodies to S and M Proteins Efficiently Neutralize SARS-Coronavirus Infectivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MI-FANG LIANG; KONG-XING WU; ZHAO-HUI XIONG; QI JIN; DE-XIN LI; RUN-LEI DU; JING-ZHI LIU; CHUAN LI; QUAN-FU ZHANG; LU-LU HAN; JIAN-SHI YU; SHU-MIN DUAN; XIAO-FANG WANG

    2005-01-01

    to cellular receptors and the fusion activity of the virus.Conclusion The SARS-CoV spike protein and membrane proteins are able to elicite efficient neutralizing antibodies in SARS patients. The neutralizing antibodies we generated in this study may be more promising candidates for prophylaxis and treatment of SARS infection.

  8. HIV aspartyl protease inhibitors as promising compounds against Candida albicans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    André; Luis; Souza; dos; Santos

    2010-01-01

    Cells of Candida albicans(C.albicans) can invade humans and may lead to mucosal and skin infections or to deep-seated my coses of almost all inner organs,especially in immunocompromised patients.In this context,both the host immune status and the ability of C.albicans to modulate the expression of its virulence factors are relevant aspects that drive the candidal susceptibility or resistance;in this last case,culminating in the establishment of successful infection knownas candidiasis.C.albicans possesses a potent arma-mentarium consisting of several virulence moleculesthat help the fungal cells to escape of the host immuneresponses.There is no doubt that the secretion of aspartyl-type proteases,designated as Saps,are one of the major virulence attributes produced by C.albicans cells,since these hydrolytic enzymes participate in a wide range of fungal physiological processes as well as in different facets of the fungal-host interactions.For these reasons,Saps clearly hold promise as new potential drug targets.Corroborating this hypothesis,the introduction of new anti-human immunodeficiency virus drugs of the as party l protease inhibitor-type(HIV PIs) have emerged as new agents for the inhibition of Saps.The introduction of HIV PIs has revolutionized the treatment of HIV disease,reducing opportunistic infections,especially candidiasis.The attenuation of candidal infections in HIV-infected individuals might not solely have resulted from improved immunological status,but also as a result of direct inhibition of C.albicans Saps.In this article,we review updates on the beneficial effects of HIV PIs against the human fungal pathogen C.albicans,focusing on the effects of these compounds on Sap activity,growth behavior,morphological architecture,cellular differentiation,fungal adhesion to animal cells and abiotic materials,modulation of virulence factors,experimental candidiasis infection,and their synergistic actions with classical antifungal agents.

  9. Detection of Campylobacter species using monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Colin R.; Lee, Alice; Stanker, Larry H.

    1999-01-01

    A panel of species specific monoclonal antibodies were raised to Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter lari. The isotypes, and cross-reactivity profiles of each monoclonal antibody against an extensive panel of micro- organisms, were determined.

  10. [Neuroimmunological diseases associated with VGKC complex antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2013-05-01

    Antibodies to voltage-gated potassium channels(VGKC) were first identified by radioimmunoassay of radioisotope labeled alpha-dendrotoxin-VGKCs solubilized from rabbit brain. These antibodies were found only in a proportion of patients with acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome). VGKC antibodies were also detected in Morvan's syndrome and in a form of autoimmune limbic encephalitis. Recent studies indicated that the "VGKC" antibodies are mainly directed toward associated proteins(for example LGI-1, Caspr-2) that complex with the VGKCs themselves. The "VGKC" antibodies are now usually known as VGKC-complex antibodies. In general, LGI-1 antibodies are most common in limbic encephalitis with SIADH. Caspr-2 antibodies are present in the majority of patients with Morvan's syndrome. These patients develop combinations of CNS symptoms, autonomic dysfunction, and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability.

  11. Platelet antigens and antibodies. Literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Mineeva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Platelet antigens structure, role of platelet antibodies in the pathogenesis of various clinical conditions, characteristic of modern antibodies detection methods are presented in this article.

  12. Platelet antigens and antibodies. Literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Mineeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet antigens structure, role of platelet antibodies in the pathogenesis of various clinical conditions, characteristic of modern antibodies detection methods are presented in this article.

  13. Chemical engineering of cell penetrating antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y; Lou, D; Burkett, J; Kohler, H

    2001-08-01

    Antibodies, being exquisitely specific tools in biology, are routinely used to detect and identify intra-cellular structures. However, current intra-cellular application of antibodies requires that the membrane be rendered leaky, resulting in the death of cells. Here, we present a novel method to allow antibodies to penetrate the cellular membrane of living cells without affecting cell viability. A peptide (MTS, membrane transport sequence) that facilitates transport across membranes has been site-specifically attached to antibodies. MTS-antibodies enter the living cells in culture and can be detected by immunofluorescence and ELISA after extraction. Cellular structures are visualized in living cells using a specific MTS-antibody. Antibodies with membrane penetrating properties can become an important tool for the study of intra-cellular processes in living cells. Furthermore, such membrane penetrating antibodies can be used to selectively stimulate or suppress functions of the cellular machinery.

  14. Affinity improvement of a therapeutic antibody by structure-based computational design: generation of electrostatic interactions in the transition state stabilizes the antibody-antigen complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato Kiyoshi

    Full Text Available The optimization of antibodies is a desirable goal towards the development of better therapeutic strategies. The antibody 11K2 was previously developed as a therapeutic tool for inflammatory diseases, and displays very high affinity (4.6 pM for its antigen the chemokine MCP-1 (monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1. We have employed a virtual library of mutations of 11K2 to identify antibody variants of potentially higher affinity, and to establish benchmarks in the engineering of a mature therapeutic antibody. The most promising candidates identified in the virtual screening were examined by surface plasmon resonance to validate the computational predictions, and to characterize their binding affinity and key thermodynamic properties in detail. Only mutations in the light-chain of the antibody are effective at enhancing its affinity for the antigen in vitro, suggesting that the interaction surface of the heavy-chain (dominated by the hot-spot residue Phe101 is not amenable to optimization. The single-mutation with the highest affinity is L-N31R (4.6-fold higher affinity than wild-type antibody. Importantly, all the single-mutations showing increase affinity incorporate a charged residue (Arg, Asp, or Glu. The characterization of the relevant thermodynamic parameters clarifies the energetic mechanism. Essentially, the formation of new electrostatic interactions early in the binding reaction coordinate (transition state or earlier benefits the durability of the antibody-antigen complex. The combination of in silico calculations and thermodynamic analysis is an effective strategy to improve the affinity of a matured therapeutic antibody.

  15. Antibody therapies for melanoma: new and emerging opportunities to activate immunity (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malas, Sadek; Harrasser, Micaela; Lacy, Katie E; Karagiannis, Sophia N

    2014-09-01

    The interface between malignant melanoma and patient immunity has long been recognised and efforts to treat this most lethal form of skin cancer by activating immune responses with cytokine, vaccine and also antibody immunotherapies have demonstrated promise in limited subsets of patients. In the present study, we discuss different antibody immunotherapy approaches evaluated in the context of melanoma, each designed to act on distinct targets and to employ different mechanisms to restrict tumour growth and spread. Monoclonal antibodies recognising melanoma-associated antigens such as CSPG4/MCSP and targeting elements of tumour-associated vasculature (VEGF) have constituted long-standing translational approaches aimed at reducing melanoma growth and metastasis. Recent insights into mechanisms of immune regulation and tumour-immune cell interactions have helped to identify checkpoint molecules on immune (CTLA4, PD-1) and tumour (PD-L1) cells as promising therapeutic targets. Checkpoint blockade with antibodies to activate immune responses and perhaps to counteract melanoma-associated immunomodulatory mechanisms led to the first clinical breakthrough in the form of an anti-CTLA4 monoclonal antibody. Novel modalities to target key mechanisms of immune suppression and to redirect potent effector cell subsets against tumours are expected to improve clinical outcomes and to provide previously unexplored avenues for therapeutic interventions.

  16. Engineered single chain antibody fragments for radioimmunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huhalov, A.; Chester, K. A. [Cancer Research UK Imaging and Targeting Group Royal Free, London (United Kingdom). Department of Oncology; University College Medical School Royal Free Campus, London (United Kingdom)

    2004-12-01

    An ideal molecule to deliver radioimmunotherapy (RIT) would be target specific and have prolonged residence time at high concentrations in the tumour with rapid clearance from normal tissues. It would also be non-immunogenic. These features can be rationally introduced into recombinant antibody-based proteins using antibody engineering techniques. This reviews focuses on the use of antibody engineering in the design and development of RIT molecules which have single chain Fv (scFv) antibody fragments as building blocks.

  17. Recombinant bispecific antibodies for cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roland E KONTERMANN

    2005-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies can serve as mediators to retarget effector mechanisms to disease-associated sites. Studies over the past two decades have revealed the potentials but also the limitations of conventional bispecific antibodies. The development of recombinant antibody formats has opened up the possibility of generating bispecific molecules with improved properties. This review summarizes recent developments in the field of recombinant bispecific antibodies and discusses further requirements for clinical development.

  18. Production and Screening of Monoclonal Peptide Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Mortensen, Anne; Schiolborg, Annette; Friis, Tina

    2015-01-01

    Hybridoma technology is a remarkable and indispensable tool for generating high-quality monoclonal antibodies. Hybridoma-derived monoclonal antibodies not only serve as powerful research and diagnostic reagents, but have also emerged as the most rapidly expanding class of therapeutic biologicals. In this chapter, an overview of hybridoma technology and the laboratory procedures used routinely for hybridoma production and antibody screening are presented, including characterization of peptide antibodies.

  19. Development and standardization of multiplexed antibody microarrays for use in quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlee, Lt; Christiansen, J; Dondero, R; Grimwade, B; Lejnine, S; Mullenix, M; Shao, W; Sorette, M; Tchernev, Vt; Patel, Dd; Kingsmore, Sf

    2004-12-15

    BACKGROUND: Quantitative proteomics is an emerging field that encompasses multiplexed measurement of many known proteins in groups of experimental samples in order to identify differences between groups. Antibody arrays are a novel technology that is increasingly being used for quantitative proteomics studies due to highly multiplexed content, scalability, matrix flexibility and economy of sample consumption. Key applications of antibody arrays in quantitative proteomics studies are identification of novel diagnostic assays, biomarker discovery in trials of new drugs, and validation of qualitative proteomics discoveries. These applications require performance benchmarking, standardization and specification. RESULTS: Six dual-antibody, sandwich immunoassay arrays that measure 170 serum or plasma proteins were developed and experimental procedures refined in more than thirty quantitative proteomics studies. This report provides detailed information and specification for manufacture, qualification, assay automation, performance, assay validation and data processing for antibody arrays in large scale quantitative proteomics studies. CONCLUSION: The present report describes development of first generation standards for antibody arrays in quantitative proteomics. Specifically, it describes the requirements of a comprehensive validation program to identify and minimize antibody cross reaction under highly multiplexed conditions; provides the rationale for the application of standardized statistical approaches to manage the data output of highly replicated assays; defines design requirements for controls to normalize sample replicate measurements; emphasizes the importance of stringent quality control testing of reagents and antibody microarrays; recommends the use of real-time monitors to evaluate sensitivity, dynamic range and platform precision; and presents survey procedures to reveal the significance of biomarker findings.

  20. Development and standardization of multiplexed antibody microarrays for use in quantitative proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorette M

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative proteomics is an emerging field that encompasses multiplexed measurement of many known proteins in groups of experimental samples in order to identify differences between groups. Antibody arrays are a novel technology that is increasingly being used for quantitative proteomics studies due to highly multiplexed content, scalability, matrix flexibility and economy of sample consumption. Key applications of antibody arrays in quantitative proteomics studies are identification of novel diagnostic assays, biomarker discovery in trials of new drugs, and validation of qualitative proteomics discoveries. These applications require performance benchmarking, standardization and specification. Results Six dual-antibody, sandwich immunoassay arrays that measure 170 serum or plasma proteins were developed and experimental procedures refined in more than thirty quantitative proteomics studies. This report provides detailed information and specification for manufacture, qualification, assay automation, performance, assay validation and data processing for antibody arrays in large scale quantitative proteomics studies. Conclusion The present report describes development of first generation standards for antibody arrays in quantitative proteomics. Specifically, it describes the requirements of a comprehensive validation program to identify and minimize antibody cross reaction under highly multiplexed conditions; provides the rationale for the application of standardized statistical approaches to manage the data output of highly replicated assays; defines design requirements for controls to normalize sample replicate measurements; emphasizes the importance of stringent quality control testing of reagents and antibody microarrays; recommends the use of real-time monitors to evaluate sensitivity, dynamic range and platform precision; and presents survey procedures to reveal the significance of biomarker findings.

  1. Preparation and properties of monoclonal antibodies to individual prekeratins of simple rat epithelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troyanovskii, S.M.; Krutovskikh, V.A.; Bannikov, G.A.

    1986-11-01

    The authors study the properties of a series of hybridoma clones producing antibodies to individual prekeratins (PK) from simple types of epithelium. BALB/c mice were immunized with a preparation of intermediate filaments isolated from the mucosa of the rat large intestine. The specificity of the five clones studied was studied by monoautoradiography. For a more detailed study of the specificity of the experimentally obtained antibodies, the authors used the same immunoautoradiographic method to study their reaction with proteins of cells of other types. The authors have obtained monoclonal antibodies to three individual PK of simple types of rat epithelium: PK40, PK49, and PK55.

  2. Monoclonal antibodies neutralizing the haemolytic activity of box jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri) tentacle extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, S P; Comis, A; Marshall, M; Hartwick, R F; Howden, M E

    1993-09-01

    1. Three monoclonal antibodies have been produced which neutralize in vitro the haemolytic activity present in tentacle extracts of the box jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri). 2. Two of these monoclonal antibodies bound specifically to a component of relative molecular mass 50,000 in tentacle extract on Western blots. 3. This binding only occurred when the extracts were electrophoresed under non-reducing conditions. 4. The third monoclonal antibody did not display binding to Western blots of tentacle extract under any of our experimental conditions.

  3. Binding induced conformational changes of proteins correlate with their intrinsic fluctuations: a case study of antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keskin Ozlem

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How antibodies recognize and bind to antigens can not be totally explained by rigid shape and electrostatic complimentarity models. Alternatively, pre-existing equilibrium hypothesis states that the native state of an antibody is not defined by a single rigid conformation but instead with an ensemble of similar conformations that co-exist at equilibrium. Antigens bind to one of the preferred conformations making this conformation more abundant shifting the equilibrium. Results Here, two antibodies, a germline antibody of 36–65 Fab and a monoclonal antibody, SPE7 are studied in detail to elucidate the mechanism of antibody-antigen recognition and to understand how a single antibody recognizes different antigens. An elastic network model, Anisotropic Network Model (ANM is used in the calculations. Pre-existing equilibrium is not restricted to apply to antibodies. Intrinsic fluctuations of eight proteins, from different classes of proteins, such as enzymes, binding and transport proteins are investigated to test the suitability of the method. The intrinsic fluctuations are compared with the experimentally observed ligand induced conformational changes of these proteins. The results show that the intrinsic fluctuations obtained by theoretical methods correlate with structural changes observed when a ligand is bound to the protein. The decomposition of the total fluctuations serves to identify the different individual modes of motion, ranging from the most cooperative ones involving the overall structure, to the most localized ones. Conclusion Results suggest that the pre-equilibrium concept holds for antibodies and the promiscuity of antibodies can also be explained this hypothesis: a limited number of conformational states driven by intrinsic motions of an antibody might be adequate to bind to different antigens.

  4. Anti-DNA antibodies in SLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voss, E.W.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 8 chapters. Some of the titles are: Anti-DNA Antibodies in SLE: Historical Perspective; Specificity of Anti-DNA Antibodies in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Monoclonial Autoimmune Anti-DNA Antibodies; and Structure--Function Analyses of Anti-DNA Autoantibodies.

  5. Antibodies to staphylococcal enterotoxin in laboratory personnel.

    OpenAIRE

    Jozefczyk, Z; Robbins, R N; Spitz, J M; Bergdoll, M S

    1980-01-01

    Eighty-five percent of laboratory personnel working with staphylococcal enterotoxin had antibodies to enterotoxin in their sera, whereas only 23% of the control group had antibodies specific for enterotoxin. Two persons who carried enterotoxin B-producing staphylococci in their noses, throats, or both, had antibodies to enterotoxin B in their sera.

  6. Molecular mechanisms of resistance to the EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Toni M; Iida, Mari; Wheeler, Deric L

    2011-05-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a receptor tyrosine kinase belonging to the HER family of receptor tyrosine kinases. Receptor activation upon ligand binding leads to down stream activation of the PI3K/AKT, RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK and PLCγ/PKC pathways that influence cell proliferation, survival and the metastatic potential of tumor cells. Increased activation by gene amplification, protein overexpression or mutations of the EGFR has been identified as an etiological factor in a number of human epithelial cancers (e.g., NSCLC, CRC, glioblastoma and breast cancer). Therefore, targeting the EGFR has been intensely pursued as a cancer treatment strategy over the last two decades. To date, five EGFR inhibitors, including three small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and two monoclonal antibodies have gained FDA approval for use in oncology. Both approaches to targeting the EGFR have shown clinical promise and the anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab is used to treat HNSCC and CRC. Despite clinical gains arising from use of cetuximab, both intrinsic resistance and the development of acquired resistance are now well recognized. In this review we focus on the biology of the EGFR, the role of EGFR in human cancer, the development of antibody-based anti-EGFR therapies and a summary of their clinical successes. Further, we provide an in depth discussion of described molecular mechanisms of resistance to cetuximab and potential strategies to circumvent this resistance.

  7. Dynamic force spectroscopy of parallel individual mucin1-antibody bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulchek, T A; Friddle, R W; Langry, K; Lau, E; Albrecht, H; Ratto, T; DeNardo, S; Colvin, M E; Noy, A

    2005-05-02

    We used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to measure the binding forces between Mucin1 (MUC1) peptide and a single chain antibody fragment (scFv) selected from a scFv library screened against MUC1. This binding interaction is central to the design of the molecules for targeted delivery of radioimmunotherapeutic agents for prostate and breast cancer treatment. Our experiments separated the specific binding interaction from non-specific interactions by tethering the antibody and MUC1 molecules to the AFM tip and sample surface with flexible polymer spacers. Rupture force magnitude and elastic characteristics of the spacers allowed identification of the bond rupture events corresponding to different number of interacting proteins. We used dynamic force spectroscopy to estimate the intermolecular potential widths and equivalent thermodynamic off rates for mono-, bi-, and tri-valent interactions. Measured interaction potential parameters agree with the results of molecular docking simulation. Our results demonstrate that an increase of the interaction valency leads to a precipitous decline in the dissociation rate. Binding forces measured for mono and multivalent interactions match the predictions of a Markovian model for the strength of multiple uncorrelated bonds in parallel configuration. Our approach is promising for comparison of the specific effects of molecular modifications as well as for determination of the best configuration of antibody-based multivalent targeting agents.

  8. Passive Immunization against HIV/AIDS by Antibody Gene Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite tremendous efforts over the course of many years, the quest for an effective HIV vaccine by the classical method of active immunization remains largely elusive. However, two recent studies in mice and macaques have now demonstrated a new strategy designated as Vectored ImmunoProphylaxis (VIP, which involves passive immunization by viral vector-mediated delivery of genes encoding broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs for in vivo expression. Robust protection against virus infection was observed in preclinical settings when animals were given VIP to express monoclonal neutralizing antibodies. This unorthodox approach raises new promise for combating the ongoing global HIV pandemic. In this article, we survey the status of antibody gene transfer, review the revolutionary progress on isolation of extremely bnAbs, detail VIP experiments against HIV and its related virus conduced in humanized mice and macaque monkeys, and discuss the pros and cons of VIP and its opportunities and challenges towards clinical applications to control HIV/AIDS endemics.

  9. Membrane adsorbers as purification tools for monoclonal antibody purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boi, Cristiana

    2007-03-15

    Downstream purification processes for monoclonal antibody production typically involve multiple steps; some of them are conventionally performed by bead-based column chromatography. Affinity chromatography with Protein A is the most selective method for protein purification and is conventionally used for the initial capturing step to facilitate rapid volume reduction as well as separation of the antibody. However, conventional affinity chromatography has some limitations that are inherent with the method, it exhibits slow intraparticle diffusion and high pressure drop within the column. Membrane-based separation processes can be used in order to overcome these mass transfer limitations. The ligand is immobilized in the membrane pores and the convective flow brings the solute molecules very close to the ligand and hence minimizes the diffusional limitations associated with the beads. Nonetheless, the adoption of this technology has been slow because membrane chromatography has been limited by a lower binding capacity than that of conventional columns, even though the high flux advantages provided by membrane adsorbers would lead to higher productivity. This review considers the use of membrane adsorbers as an alternative technology for capture and polishing steps for the purification of monoclonal antibodies. Promising industrial applications as well as new trends in research will be addressed.

  10. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy and Renal Transplantation: Focus on Adverse Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluigi Zaza

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A series of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs are commonly utilized in renal transplantation as induction therapy (a period of intense immunosuppression immediately before and following the implant of the allograft, to treat steroid-resistant acute rejections, to decrease the incidence and mitigate effects of delayed graft function, and to allow immunosuppressive minimization. Additionally, in the last few years, their use has been proposed for the treatment of chronic antibody-mediated rejection, a major cause of late renal allograft loss. Although the exact mechanism of immunosuppression and allograft tolerance with any of the currently used induction agents is not completely defined, the majority of these medications are targeted against specific CD proteins on the T or B cells surface (e.g., CD3, CD25, CD52. Moreover, some of them have different mechanisms of action. In particular, eculizumab, interrupting the complement pathway, is a new promising treatment tool for acute graft complications and for post-transplant hemolytic uremic syndrome. While it is clear their utility in renal transplantation, it is also unquestionable that by using these highly potent immunosuppressive agents, the body loses much of its innate ability to mount an adequate immune response, thereby increasing the risk of severe adverse effects (e.g., infections, malignancies, haematological complications. Therefore, it is extremely important for clinicians involved in renal transplantation to know the potential side effects of monoclonal antibodies in order to plan a correct therapeutic strategy minimizing/avoiding the onset and development of severe clinical complications.

  11. Citicoline: update on a promising and widely available agent for neuroprotection and neurorepair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saver, Jeffrey L

    2008-01-01

    Choline precursors promote repair and growth of cell membranes and hold promise in a variety of neurologic diseases, including ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Citicoline, the most well-studied choline agent precursor, is widely prescribed throughout the world and recently became available in the United States as a dietary supplement. In experimental stroke models, citicoline conferred acute neuroprotection and enhanced neuroplasticity and neurorepair in the subacute period. Although individual human stroke trials have been inconclusive, meta-analysis of 10 trials enrolling 2279 patients suggests patients receiving citicoline had substantially reduced frequencies of death and disability. Reinvestigation of citicoline with modern neuroimaging and clinical trial methods are underway and will provide more definitive information regarding the mechanistic and clinical effects of this promising neurotherapeutic agent.

  12. Monopoly experimentation

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    This paper considers a firm facing an uncertain demand curve. The firm can experimentally adjust its output in order to gain information that willincrease expected future profits. We examine two basic questions. Under whatconditions is it worthwhile for the firm to experiment? How does the firmadjust its output away from the myopic optimism to exploit its ability to experiment? Two necessary conditions are established for experimentation tooccur, involving requirements that experimentation be...

  13. The Use of Monoclonal Antibodies in Human Prion Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodemer, Walter

    Detection of PrP and its pathological isoform(s) is the key to understanding the etiology and pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. There is ample evidence that PrP isoforms constitute a major component of an unknown and perhaps unconventional infectious agent. An etiological relationship between human and zoonotic transmissible spongiform encephalopathies may be revealed with monoclonal antibodies. Knowledge of the conformational transition rendering a nonpathogenic, almost ubiquitous cellular protein into a pathogenic one is crucial to defining pathomechanisms. The stepwise or even continuous formation of pathogenic molecules can be monitored. Any improvement in the early diagnosis could help to conceive new therapeutic measures which are not currently available. Determination of PrP isoforms in tissue, cells, or body fluids may be of prognostic value. Many experimental approaches in molecular medicine and molecular biology of the prion protein already rely on monoclonal antibodies. Recombinant antibodies such as the single-chain Fv may soon replace traditional hybridoma techniques. Binding affinity can easily be manipulated by a number of techniques, including in vitro mutagenesis - a step which could never be carried out using the traditional hybridoma technology. Monoclonal antibodies are and will remain an essential support for ongoing research on the prion protein in general and on the unconventional infectious prions.

  14. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and skin disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, D.A.; Lee, L.A.

    1985-07-01

    Antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is a recently described mechanism of immunologic lysis in which cellular targets sensitized by specific antibodies are efficiently and selectively lysed by Fc receptor (FcR) bearing nonspecific effectors. Immunoglobulins of various classes (IgG, IgM, IgA, IgE) and various cellular effectors (large granular lymphocytes, monocyte/macrophages, T lymphocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils) can induce ADCC in vitro, and the importance of ADCC in vivo is being tested experimentally in resistance to viral, bacterial, and parasitic infection, in tumor surveillance, in allograft rejection, and in inflammatory diseases. There is much indirect evidence that ADCC may be the mechanism of damage of different cellular targets in skin diseases, but the best direct evidence concerns immunologic keratinocyte damage, especially in cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE). The authors have shown that keratinocytes of several species are highly susceptible to lymphocyte and monocyte-mediated ADCC, but not to neutrophil or eosinophil ADCC in vitro using two different cytotoxicity assays. In contrast, complement was a relatively ineffective mediator of lysis of metabolically intact keratinocyte targets. Patients with certain cutaneous lupus syndromes have serum antibodies capable of inducing monocyte and lymphocyte ADCC of targets coated with extractable nuclear antigens. The authors have shown that these antigens apparently move to the cell membrane of keratinocytes in vitro following ultraviolet irradiation. In an animal model, they have shown that antibodies to SSA/Ro bind to human keratinocytes in vivo, especially after ultraviolet irradiation.

  15. Adsorption orientations and immunological recognition of antibodies on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilhena, J. G.; Dumitru, A. C.; Herruzo, Elena T.; Mendieta-Moreno, Jesús I.; Garcia, Ricardo; Serena, P. A.; Pérez, Rubén

    2016-07-01

    MD results and the AFM images demonstrate that the IgG antibodies are strongly adsorbed, do not unfold, and retain their secondary and tertiary structures upon deposition. Statistical analysis of the AFM images shows that many of the antibodies adopt vertical orientations, even at very small coverages, which expose at least one Fab binding site for recognition events. Single molecule force spectroscopy experiments demonstrate the immunological response of the deposited antibodies by recognizing its specific antigens. The above properties together with the strong anchoring and preservation of the secondary structure, make graphene an excellent candidate for the development of immunosensors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Further details concerning the experimental methods, the MD simulation protocols, and the characterization and stability of the different adsorption configurations. See DOI: 10.1039/C5NR07612A

  16. Phenotypic screening: the future of antibody discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Munoz, Andrea L; Minter, Ralph R; Rust, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Most antibody therapeutics have been isolated from high throughput target-based screening. However, as the number of validated targets diminishes and the target space becomes increasingly competitive, alternative strategies, such as phenotypic screening, are gaining momentum. Here, we review successful phenotypic screens, including those used to isolate antibodies against cancer and infectious agents. We also consider exciting advances in the expression and phenotypic screening of antibody repertoires in single cell autocrine systems. As technologies continue to develop, we believe that antibody phenotypic screening will increase further in popularity and has the potential to provide the next generation of therapeutic antibodies.

  17. Antibody response of rainbow trout with single or double infections involving viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus and infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fregeneda-Grandes, Juan Miguel; Skall, Helle Frank; Olesen, Niels Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Juvenile rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss were experimentally infected by immersion with viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) or with both viruses. The presence of neutralizing antibodies in the sera of infected fish were analysed by 50......% plaque neutralization tests (50%PNT). In Group 1 (infected with VHSV) and Group 2 (infected with IHNV) neutralizing antibodies were found in 41% and 21% of the serum samples, respectively. No cross-reacting antibodies were found in these 2 groups. In Group 3 (infected with both viruses) 30......% of the samples showed neutralizing antibodies against VHSV, 21% against IHNV and 12% against both viruses. Fish in Group 3 developed a double specific antibody reaction whose kinetics and intensity (mean of log10 titres) were similar to the antibody response of the single infected groups....

  18. Local and Global Trust Based on the Concept of Promises

    CERN Document Server

    Bergstra, Jan

    2009-01-01

    We use the notion of a promise to define local trust between agents possessing autonomous decision-making. An agent is trustworthy if it is expected that it will keep a promise. This definition satisfies most commonplace meanings of trust. Reputation is then an estimation of this expectation value that is passed on from agent to agent. Our definition distinguishes types of trust, for different behaviours, and decouples the concept of agent reliability from the behaviour on which the judgement is based. We show, however, that trust is fundamentally heuristic, as it provides insufficient information for agents to make a rational judgement. A global trustworthiness, or community trust can be defined by a proportional, self-consistent voting process, as a weighted eigenvector-centrality function of the promise theoretical graph.

  19. Congestion Service Facilities Location Problem with Promise of Response Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandan Hu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In many services, promise of specific response time is advertised as a commitment by the service providers for the customer satisfaction. Congestion on service facilities could delay the delivery of the services and hurts the overall satisfaction. In this paper, congestion service facilities location problem with promise of response time is studied, and a mixed integer nonlinear programming model is presented with budget constrained. The facilities are modeled as M/M/c queues. The decision variables of the model are the locations of the service facilities and the number of servers at each facility. The objective function is to maximize the demands served within specific response time promised by the service provider. To solve this problem, we propose an algorithm that combines greedy and genetic algorithms. In order to verify the proposed algorithm, a lot of computational experiments are tested. And the results demonstrate that response time has a significant impact on location decision.

  20. Formaldehyde: catalytic oxidation as a promising soft way of elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz Torres, Jhon; Royer, Sébastien; Bellat, Jean-Pierre; Giraudon, Jean-Marc; Lamonier, Jean-François

    2013-04-01

    Compared to other molecules such as benzene, toluene, xylene, and chlorinated compounds, the catalytic oxidation of formaldehyde has been studied rarely. However, standards for the emission level of this pollutant will become more restrictive because of its extreme toxicity even at very low concentrations in air. As a consequence, the development of a highly efficient process for its selective elimination is needed. Complete catalytic oxidation of formaldehyde into CO2 and H2 O using noble-metal-based catalysts is a promising method to convert this pollutant at room temperature, making this process energetically attractive from an industrial point of view. However, the development of a less expensive active phase is required for a large-scale industrial development. Nanomaterials based on oxides of manganese are described as the most promising catalysts. The objective of this Minireview is to present promising recent studies on the removal of formaldehyde through heterogeneous catalysis to stimulate future research in this topic.

  1. Copenhagen's climate finance promise: six key questions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, J. Timmons [Brown University (United States); Stadelmann, Martin [University of Zurich (Switzerland); Huq, Saleemul

    2010-02-15

    One clear promise emerged from the confusion of the 2009 climate talks in Copenhagen. This was to provide short- and long-term 'climate finance' to help developing countries – especially the most vulnerable – adapt to climate impacts. The promise seemed simple enough: wealthier nations would pledge US$10 billion a year from 2010-2012, ramping up to US$100 billion a year starting in 2020. This was also touted as a way to help developing countries avoid high-carbon pathways of development by adopting lower-emitting power sources such as solar or natural gas. But a closer look at the Copenhagen promise unearths at least six big questions – any one of which could seriously challenge the trust these funds were designed to build.

  2. Serum Antibody Biomarkers for ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    their mothers in many studies (e.g., Ashwood & Van deWater, 2004; Jyonouchi et al., 2005; Molloy et al., 2006; Braunschweig et al., 2013). Systemic...against brain and CNS proteins. For example, both abnormalities in serum antibody concentrations and T cells have been reported for ASD compared to...Accomplishments: - Nearly all serum samples have been obtained and processed. - Two unique peptoid libraries have been synthesized and validated. - The peptoid

  3. Promise-based management: the essence of execution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sull, Donald N; Spinosa, Charles

    2007-04-01

    Critical initiatives stall for a variety of reasons--employee disengagement, a lack of coordination between functions, complex organizational structures that obscure accountability, and so on. To overcome such obstacles, managers must fundamentally rethink how work gets done. Most of the challenges stem from broken or poorly crafted commitments. That's because every company is, at its heart, a dynamic network of promises made between employees and colleagues, customers, outsourcing partners, or other stakeholders. Executives can overcome many problems in the short-term and foster productive, reliable workforces for the long-term by practicing what the authors call "promise-based management," which involves cultivating and coordinating commitments in a systematic way. Good promises share five qualities: They are public, active, voluntary, explicit, and mission based. To develop and execute an effective promise, the "provider" and the "customer" in the deal should go through three phases of conversation. The first, achieving a meeting of minds, entails exploring the fundamental questions of coordinated effort: What do you mean? Do you understand what I mean? What should I do? What will you do? Who else should we talk to? In the next phase, making it happen, the provider executes on the promise. In the final phase, closing the loop, the customer publicly declares that the provider has either delivered the goods or failed to do so. Leaders must weave and manage their webs of promises with great care-encouraging iterative conversation and making sure commitments are fulfilled reliably. If they do, they can enhance coordination and cooperation among colleagues, build the organizational agility required to seize new business opportunities, and tap employees' entrepreneurial energies.

  4. Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies for HIV Eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Kathryn E; Barouch, Dan H

    2016-02-01

    Passive transfer of antibodies has long been considered a potential treatment modality for infectious diseases, including HIV. Early efforts to use antibodies to suppress HIV replication, however, were largely unsuccessful, as the antibodies that were studied neutralized only a relatively narrow spectrum of viral strains and were not very potent. Recent advances have led to the discovery of a large portfolio of human monoclonal antibodies that are broadly neutralizing across many HIV-1 subtypes and are also substantially more potent. These antibodies target multiple different epitopes on the HIV envelope, thus allowing for the development of antibody combinations. In this review, we discuss the application of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) for HIV treatment and HIV eradication strategies. We highlight bNAbs that target key epitopes, such as the CD4 binding site and the V2/V3-glycan-dependent sites, and we discuss several bNAbs that are currently in the clinical development pipeline.

  5. 9 CFR 113.452 - Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.452 Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody. Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody is a specific antibody product containing antibodies directed against one or more somatic...

  6. Regulation of levels of serum antibodies to ryegrass pollen allergen Lol pIV by an internal image anti-idiotypic monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, E M; Kisil, F T

    1995-03-01

    A murine monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibody (anti-Id), designated B1/1, was produced against an idiotope of a murine antibody (mAb91), which recognizes the epitope, site A, of allergen Lol pIV, one of the major groups of allergens in ryegrass (Lolium perenne) pollen. The ability of B1/1 to modulate the antibody responses to Lol pIV was investigated in murine model systems. In the first system, B1/1-keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH) conjugate was administered to treat three different strains of mice (C57BL/6, BALB/c and C3H). In the second and third model systems, a solution of B1/1 in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) was used to treat syngeneic BALB/c mice at various doses and time intervals, respectively. The treatment with either form of B1/1, administered at doses ranging from 100 ng to 100 micrograms mouse, resulted in a reduction of the levels of the antibodies to Lol pIV. In particular, the level of IgE antibodies to Lol pIV was greatly reduced. The administration of a single intravenous (i.v.) injection of a solution of B1/1 8 weeks prior to the challenge with Lol pIV was still effective in reducing the level of antibodies to the allergen. Moreover, the level of antibodies to Lol pIV that expressed the idiotope mAb91 was also markedly decreased. By contrast, it was observed that the level of antibodies to Lol pIV in mice pretreated with B1/1 in PBS at a dose of 10 ng/mouse increased (albeit slightly) compared to that in mice treated with control mAb. These experimental models lend themselves for investigating the mechanism(s) by which an anti-Id modulates antibody responses to a grass pollen allergen.

  7. Advances in monoclonal antibody application in myocarditis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-na HAN; Shuang HE; Yu-tang WANG; Li-ming YANG; Si-yu LIU; Ting ZHANG

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have become a part of daily preparation technologies in many laboratories.Attempts have been made to apply monoclonal antibodies to open a new train of thought for clinical treatments of autoimmune diseases,inflammatory diseases,cancer,and other immune-associated diseases.This paper is a prospective review to anticipate that monoclonal antibody application in the treatment of myocarditis,an inflammatory disease of the heart,could be a novel approach in the future.In order to better understand the current state of the art in monoclonal antibody techniques and advance applications in myocarditis,we,through a significant amount of literature research both domestic and abroad,developed a systematic elaboration of monoclonal antibodies,pathogenesis of myocarditis,and application of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis.This paper presents review of the literature of some therapeutic aspects of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy to demonstrate the advance of monoclonal antibody application in myocarditis and a strong anticipation that monoclonal antibody application may supply an effective therapeutic approach to relieve the severity of myocarditis in the future.Under conventional therapy,myocarditis is typically associated with congestive heart failure as a progressive outcome,indicating the need for alternative therapeutic strategies to improve long-term results.Reviewing some therapeutic aspects of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis,we recently found that monoclonal antibodies with high purity and strong specificity can accurately act on target and achieve definite progress in the treatment of viral myocarditis in rat model and may meet the need above.However,several issues remain.The technology on howto make a higher homologous and weak immunogenic humanized or human source antibody and the treatment mechanism of monoclonal antibodies may provide solutions for these open issues.If we are to further stimulate

  8. Monoclonal antibodies to intermediate filament proteins of human cells: unique and cross-reacting antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gown, A M; Vogel, A M

    1982-11-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were generated against the intermediate filament proteins of different human cells. The reactivity of these antibodies with the different classes of intermediate filament proteins was determined by indirect immunofluorescence on cultured cells, immunologic indentification on SDS polyacrylamide gels ("wester blot" experiments), and immunoperoxidase assays on intact tissues. The following four antibodies are described: (a) an antivimentin antibody generated against human fibroblast cytoskeleton; (b), (c) two antibodies that recognize a 54-kdalton protein in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells; and (d) an antikeratin antibody made to stratum corneum that recognizes proteins of molecular weight 66 kdaltons and 57 kdaltons. The antivimentin antibody reacts with vimentin (58 kdaltons), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and keratins from stratum corneum, but does not recognize hepatoma intermediate filaments. In immunofluorescence assays, the antibody reacts with mesenchymal cells and cultured epithelial cells that express vimentin. This antibody decorates the media of blood vessels in tissue sections. One antihepatoma filament antibody reacts only with the 54 kdalton protein of these cells and, in immunofluorescence and immunoperoxidase assays, only recognizes epithelial cells. It reacts with almost all nonsquamous epithelium. The other antihepatoma filament antibody is much less selective, reacting with vimentin, GFAP, and keratin from stratum corneum. This antibody decorates intermediate filaments of both mesenchymal and epithelial cells. The antikeratin antibody recognizes 66-kdalton and 57-kdalton proteins in extracts of stratum corneum and also identifies proteins of similar molecular weights in all cells tested. However, by immunofluorescence, this antibody decorates only the intermediate filaments of epidermoid carcinoma cells. When assayed on tissue sections, the antibody reacts with squamous epithelium and some, but not all

  9. HER2 as a promising target for cytotoxicity T cells in human melanoma therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ma

    Full Text Available Anti-HER2/neu antibody therapy has been reported to mediate tumor regression of HER2/ neu(+ tumors. Here we demonstrated the expression of HER2 in a wide range of human melanoma cells including a primary culture and seven cell lines, and we further investigated whether HER2 could be served as a target for T cell mediated immunotherapy of human melanoma. Specific cytolytic activity of activated T cells (ATC armed with anti-CD3 x anti-HER2 bispecific antibody (HER2Bi-Ab against Malme-3M-luc cells was evaluated by bioluminescent signal generated by luciferase reporter which did not alter HER2 expression or proliferation ability of Malme-3M cells. Contrast with unarmed ATC, increased cytotoxic activity of HER2Bi-armed ATC against Malme-3M-luc cells was observed at effector/target (E/T ratios of 1:1, 5:1, and 20:1. Moreover, HER2Bi-armed ATC expressed higher level of activation marker CD69 and secreted significantly higher level of IFN-γ than unarmed ATC counterpart at the E/T ratio of 20:1. In addition, compared with anti-HER2 mAb (Herceptin® or unarmed ATC, HER2Bi-armed ATC showed remarkable suppression effect on Malme-3M-luc tumor cells. Furthermore, in melanoma tumor cell xenograft mice, infusion of HER2Bi-armed ATC successfully inhibited the growth of melanoma tumors. The anti-tumor effect of HER2Bi-armed ATC may provide a promising immunotherapy for melanoma in the future.

  10. Clinical utility of anti-p53 auto-antibody: systematic review and focus on colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suppiah, Aravind; Greenman, John

    2013-08-07

    Mutation of the p53 gene is a key event in the carcinogenesis of many different types of tumours. These can occur throughout the length of the p53 gene. Anti-p53 auto-antibodies are commonly produced in response to these p53 mutations. This review firstly describes the various mechanisms of p53 dysfunction and their association with subsequent carcinogenesis. Following this, the mechanisms of induction of anti-p53 auto-antibody production are shown, with various hypotheses for the discrepancies between the presence of p53 mutation and the presence/absence of anti-p53 auto-antibodies. A systematic review was performed with a descriptive summary of key findings of each anti-p53 auto-antibody study in all cancers published in the last 30 years. Using this, the cumulative frequency of anti-p53 auto-antibody in each cancer type is calculated and then compared with the incidence of p53 mutation in each cancer to provide the largest sample calculation and correlation between mutation and anti-p53 auto-antibody published to date. Finally, the review focuses on the data of anti-p53 auto-antibody in colorectal cancer studies, and discusses future strategies including the potentially promising role using anti-p53 auto-antibody presence in screening and surveillance.

  11. Immunosympathectomy as the first phenotypic knockout with antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Antonino

    2013-03-26

    In a PNAS Classic Article published in 1960, Rita Levi-Montalcini offered formal and conclusive proof that endogenous NGF was responsible for the survival of sympathetic neurons in vivo. Thus ended an experimental tour de force lasting a decade, starting with the demonstration that a humoral factor, produced from a tumor transplanted in a chicken embryo, was responsible for stimulating outgrowth of nerve fibers from sympathetic and sensory neurons. From a more general methodological point of view, this work provided a breakthrough in the quest to achieve targeted loss of function and experimentally validate the function of biological molecules. Finally, this work provided an example of the ablation of a specific neuronal subpopulation in an otherwise intact nervous system, an immunological knife of unsurpassed effectiveness and precision. The novelty and the importance of the PNAS Classic Article is discussed here, collocating it within the context of the particular moment of the NGF discovery saga, of Rita Levi-Montalcini's scientific and academic career, and of the general scientific context of those years. This seminal work, involving the use of antibodies for phenotypic knockout in vivo, planted seeds that were to bear new fruit many years later with the advent of monoclonal antibodies and recombinant antibody technologies.

  12. Cell Culture Microfluidic Biochips: Experimental Throughput Maximization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minhass, Wajid Hassan; Pop, Paul; Madsen, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidic biochips offer a promising alternative to a conventional biochemical laboratory, integrating all necessary functionalities on-chip in order to perform biochemical applications. Researchers have started to propose computer-aided design tools for the synthesis of such biochips. Our focus...... metaheuristic for experimental design generation for the cell culture microfluidic biochips, and we have evaluated our approach using multiple experimental setups....

  13. Promising applications of graphene and graphene-based nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Bich Ha; Hieu Nguyen, Van

    2016-06-01

    The present article is a review of research works on promising applications of graphene and graphene-based nanostructures. It contains five main scientific subjects. The first one is the research on graphene-based transparent and flexible conductive films for displays and electrodes: efficient method ensuring uniform and controllable deposition of reduced graphene oxide thin films over large areas, large-scale pattern growth of graphene films for stretchble transparent electrodes, utilization of graphene-based transparent conducting films and graphene oxide-based ones in many photonic and optoelectronic devices and equipments such as the window electrodes of inorganic, organic and dye-sensitized solar cells, organic light-emitting diodes, light-emitting electrochemical cells, touch screens, flexible smart windows, graphene-based saturated absorbers in laser cavities for ultrafast generations, graphene-based flexible, transparent heaters in automobile defogging/deicing systems, heatable smart windows, graphene electrodes for high-performance organic field-effect transistors, flexible and transparent acoustic actuators and nanogenerators etc. The second scientific subject is the research on conductive inks for printed electronics to revolutionize the electronic industry by producing cost-effective electronic circuits and sensors in very large quantities: preparing high mobility printable semiconductors, low sintering temperature conducting inks, graphene-based ink by liquid phase exfoliation of graphite in organic solutions, and developing inkjet printing technique for mass production of high-quality graphene patterns with high resolution and for fabricating a variety of good-performance electronic devices, including transparent conductors, embedded resistors, thin-film transistors and micro supercapacitors. The third scientific subject is the research on graphene-based separation membranes: molecular dynamics simulation study on the mechanisms of the transport of

  14. The phase behavior study of human antibody solution using multi-scale modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Gang; Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Benedek, George B.; Stanley, H. Eugene; Xu, Limei; Buldyrev, Sergey V.

    2016-11-01

    Phase transformation in antibody solutions is of growing interest in both academia and the pharmaceutical industry. Recent experimental studies have shown that, as in near-spherical proteins, antibodies can undergo a liquid-liquid phase separation under conditions metastable with respect to crystallization. However, the phase diagram of the Y-shaped antibodies exhibits unique features that differ substantially from those of spherical proteins. Specifically, antibody solutions have an exceptionally low critical volume fraction (CVF) and a broader and more asymmetric liquid-liquid coexistence curve than those of spherical proteins. Using molecular dynamics simulation on a series of trimetric Y-shaped coarse-grained models, we investigate the phase behavior of antibody solutions and compare the results with the experimental phase diagram of human immunoglobulin G (IgG), one of the most common Y-shape typical of antibody molecules. With the fitted size of spheres, our simulation reproduces both the low CVF and the asymmetric shape of the experimental coexistence curve of IgG antibodies. The broadness of the coexistence curve can be attributed to the anisotropic nature of the inter-protein interaction. In addition, the repulsion between the inner parts of the spherical domains of IgG dramatically expands the coexistence region in the scaled phase diagram, while the hinge length has only a minor effect on the CVF and the overall shape of the coexistence curve. We thus propose a seven-site model with empirical parameters characterizing the exclusion volume and the hinge length of the IgG molecules, which provides a base for simulation studies of the phase behavior of IgG antibodies.

  15. {sup 68}Ga-labelled recombinant antibody variants for immuno-PET imaging of solid tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eder, Matthias; Eisenhut, Michael [German Cancer Research Center, Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Heidelberg (Germany); Knackmuss, Stefan; Gall, Fabrice Le; Reusch, Uwe; Little, Melvyn [Affimed Therapeutics AG, Heidelberg (Germany); Rybin, Vladimir [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberkorn, Uwe; Mier, Walter [University of Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-07-15

    Recombinant antibodies isolated from human antibody libraries have excellent affinities and high target specificity. As full-length IgGs are cleared inadequately slowly from the circulation, the aim of this work was to figure out which kind of recombinant antibody fragment proves to be appropriate for imaging epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)-expressing tumours with the short-living radioisotope {sup 68}Ga. In order to combine the promising tumour targeting properties of antibodies with {sup 68}Ga, four antibody variants with the same specificity and origin only differing in molecular weight were constructed for comparison. Therefore, the binding domains of a single-chain fragment variable (scFv) isolated from a human naive antibody library were modified genetically to construct the respective full-length IgG, the tria- and diabody variants. These molecules were conjugated with the bifunctional chelating agent N,N{sup '}-bis[2-hydroxy-5-(carboxyethyl)benzyl]ethylenediamine-N,N{sup '}-diacetic acid (HBED-CC) to enable {sup 68}Ga labelling at ambient temperature and compared in biodistribution and immuno-PET imaging experiments. The antibody variants with identical specificity proved to have the correct molecular weight, high binding affinity and specificity to their antigen, EpCAM. Radiometal complexation was efficiently performed at room temperature leading to {sup 68}Ga-labelled antibodies with unchanged binding properties compared to the original antibody variants. The best targeting properties were obtained with the scFv and especially with the diabody. The triabody showed higher absolute tumour uptake but only moderate clearance from circulation. The antibody variants differed considerably in normal organ uptake, clearance from circulation and tumour accumulation. The data demonstrate the feasibility of imaging solid tumours with the {sup 68}Ga-labelled diabody format. This type of recombinant protein might be a promising carrier even for the

  16. BAP31, a promising target for the immunotherapy of malignant melanomas

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Shaojuan; Wang, Fuli; Fan, Li; Wei, Yuying; Li, Haitao; Sun, Yuanjie; Yang, Angang; Jin, Boquan; Song, Chaojun; Yang, Kun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Malignant melanoma’s (MM) incidence is rising faster than that of any other cancer in the US and the overall survival at 5 years is less than 10%. B cell associated protein 31 (BAP31) is overexpressed in most MMs and might be a promising target for immunotherapy of this disease. Experimental design Firstly, we investigated the expression profiles of human BAP31 (hBAP31) and mouse BAP31 (mBAP31) in human and mouse normal tissues, respectively. The expression level of hBAP31 in human MM...

  17. Severe alcoholic hepatitis: Glucocorticoid saves lives and transplantation is promising

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alain Braillon

    2011-01-01

    Glucocorticosteroids have been used as the only treatment for a long time which significantly reduced the mortality of the patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis. The efficacy of transplantation has been recently addressed in a pilot study. The result seems promising but needs larger multicenter trials.

  18. Promising Programs for Sex-Fair Vocational Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Matilda; And Others

    This collection of program descriptions consists of case studies of 47 programs that contain promising approaches to sex-fair vocational education. The case studies (which represent programs in 39 states and the District of Columbia) describe programs that address the educational and job-skill training needs of such groups as displaced homemakers,…

  19. The Math Promise: Celebrating at Home and School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legnard, Danielle; Austin, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The Math Promise is a contract that family members make with one another. They commit to spending mathematical time together; getting to know each other's mathematical thinking and understanding; and finding time to play math games, solve problems, and notice mathematics in their daily lives. Whether parents and children are cooking in the…

  20. Parent Trigger Laws and the Promise of Parental Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, William C.; Rowland, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Parent trigger laws have gained momentum nationally under the premise that they will increase local authority by amplifying parental voice in the decision to turn around "failing" schools. Using Hirschman's exit, voice, and loyalty framework we create two conceptual models of voice and evaluate the promise of voice in California, home of…

  1. Promising Practices in Drug Treatment: Findings from Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libretto, Salvatore; Nemes, Susanna; Namur, Jenny; Garrett, Gerald; Hess, Lauren; Kaplan, Linda

    2005-01-01

    In a study to evaluate the drug treatment and aftercare efforts sponsored by the State Department's International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs Bureau, residential Therapeutic Community (TC) treatment programs in three countries in Southeast Asia--Malaysia, Singapore, and Thailand--were examined to identify promising practices and to…

  2. Exact quantum algorithms for promise problems in automata theory

    CERN Document Server

    Yakaryilmaz, Abuzer

    2011-01-01

    In this note, we show that quantum finite automata can be polynomially more succinct than their classical counterparts for promise problems in case of exact computation. Additionally, in terms of language recognition, the same result is shown to be valid up to a constant factor depending on how bigger the size of the alphabet is.

  3. Reducing Aggressive Male Behavior in Elementary School: Promising Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Barbara; Gibson, Jamel; Morrison-Danner, Dietrich

    2014-01-01

    Student aggression and violent behavior, especially among males, is pervasive and problematic in the classroom. When incorporated in the lesson design, promising practices (music, movement, and visual stimulation) are evidence-based strategies that may reduce male aggression in the classroom.

  4. Parent Trigger Laws and the Promise of Parental Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, William C.; Rowland, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Parent trigger laws have gained momentum nationally under the premise that they will increase local authority by amplifying parental voice in the decision to turn around "failing" schools. Using Hirschman's exit, voice, and loyalty framework we create two conceptual models of voice and evaluate the promise of voice in California,…

  5. Understanding the promises and premises of online health platforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijck, J.; Poell, T.

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates the claims and complexities involved in the platform-based economics of health and fitness apps. We examine a double-edged logic inscribed in these platforms, promising to offer personal solutions to medical problems while also contributing to the public good. On the one ha

  6. Competency Education Offers Promise and Peril for Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritterband, Vicki; Heller, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Lindsay Unified School District (California) exemplifies the promise of competency education (or performance-based education, as it is called locally). Since beginning its transition to the model in 2009, discipline problems have sharply dropped, the school climate has dramatically improved (as measured by the California Healthy Kids Survey), and…

  7. TSOL18 Vaccine Antigen of Taenia solium: Development of Monoclonal Antibodies and Field Testing of the Vaccine in Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assana, E.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chapter 1 reviews the literature about the immunological aspects of taeniid cestode infections and the existing vaccines against Taenia solium cysticercosis in pigs. One of the most promising vaccines is TSOL18, a protein that has been identified in the oncosphere of Taenia solium and expressed as a recombinant molecule in E. coli. Repeated experimental trials have shown that this vaccine is able to protect up to 100% of the immunised pigs against a challenge infection with T. solium. Antibodies raised by the vaccine are capable of killing the parasite in in vitro cultures and it is believed that antibody and complement mediated killing of invading parasites is the major protective immune mechanism induced by vaccination with TSOL18. The identification of the villages with a high risk of T. solium infection, which could subsequently be used in the vaccine trial, is reported in chapter 2. A survey was conducted in 150 households owning 1756 pigs in the rural areas of Mayo-Danay division in the far north region of Cameroon. A questionnaire survey was carried out to collect information on the pig farming system and to identify potential risk factors for T. solium cysticercosis infection in pigs. Blood samples were collected from 398 pigs with the aim of estimating the sero-prevalence of Taenia solium cysticercosis. The results showed that 90.7% of the pigs were free roaming during the dry season and that 42.7% of households keeping pigs in the rural areas had no latrine facility. Seventy six percent of the interviewed pig owners affirmed that the members of the household used open field defecation. ELISA for antigen and antibody detection showed an apparent prevalence of porcine cysticercosis of 24.6% and 32.2%, respectively. A Bayesian approach using the conditional dependence between the two diagnostic tests indicated that the true sero-prevalence of cysticercosis in Mayo-Danay was 26.6%. Binary logistic regression analysis indicated that the

  8. Generation of monospecific antibodies based on affinity capture of polyclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelm, Barbara; Forsström, Björn; Igel, Ulrika; Johannesson, Henrik; Stadler, Charlotte; Lundberg, Emma; Ponten, Fredrik; Sjöberg, Anna; Rockberg, Johan; Schwenk, Jochen M; Nilsson, Peter; Johansson, Christine; Uhlén, Mathias

    2011-11-01

    A method is described to generate and validate antibodies based on mapping the linear epitopes of a polyclonal antibody followed by sequential epitope-specific capture using synthetic peptides. Polyclonal antibodies directed towards four proteins RBM3, SATB2, ANLN, and CNDP1, potentially involved in human cancers, were selected and antibodies to several non-overlapping epitopes were generated and subsequently validated by Western blot, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence. For all four proteins, a dramatic difference in functionality could be observed for these monospecific antibodies directed to the different epitopes. In each case, at least one antibody was obtained with full functionality across all applications, while other epitope-specific fractions showed no or little functionality. These results present a path forward to use the mapped binding sites of polyclonal antibodies to generate epitope-specific antibodies, providing an attractive approach for large-scale efforts to characterize the human proteome by antibodies.

  9. The Promised Savior in Pre-Islamic Great Religions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahin Arab

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the ancient times the belief in the rise of the Reformer has been a fundamental principle. Many of the holy prophets have announced the advent of new prophet. Moreover in the announcements and indications of predecessors there are always allusions to "the Last Promised" and "the Savior of Last Days" under such titles as "Kalki", "Fifth Buddha", "Soshyans", "Messiah", "The Son of Man" and so on and so forth. Of course there are different types of belief in the last reformer in religions. In one place the Savior is merely a social reformer while in another place he is only after the spiritual salvation of people and even sometimes he undertakes both tasks. On the other hand, the Last Promised is once nationalist and once seeks to save the whole world.    This essay seeks to assay the views of pre-Islamic great religions including Zoroastrianism, Judaism, Christianity, Hinduism and Buddhism as to the Promised Savior. This essay is an analytico-descriptive research which has based itself on the first hand works comprising the sacred scriptures of religions and proceeds through the typological analyses of idea of the Promised in religions.    Zoroastrianism: the idea of the Promised has been tied to the notion of Soshyant. Generally speaking, this notion alludes to a group of people who periodically emerge at the end of every millennium of the last three millennia of world's age so as to uproot evil and renew the world, the last one of these reformers is Soshyans. According to the aforementioned typology, Zoroastrian idea of Last Savior is among the Promised who saves the whole world. Moreover Zoroastrian Promised cannot be declared only a social savior as he is not wholly detached from people's spirituality too. From another point of view, Zoroastrian idea of the Promised represents a universal and not nationalist savior who is relatively a human and not divine entity who emerges in the last millennium of world's age.    Judaism: in the

  10. Naturally acquired antibody responses to recombinant Pfs230 and Pfs48/45 transmission blocking vaccine candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Sophie; Grignard, Lynn; Nebie, Issa;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Pfs48/45 and Pfs230 are Plasmodium falciparum sexual stage proteins and promising malaria transmission-blocking vaccine candidates. Antibody responses against these proteins may be naturally acquired and target antigens may be under selective pressure. This has consequences for the fu...

  11. OptMAVEn--a new framework for the de novo design of antibody variable region models targeting specific antigen epitopes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Li

    Full Text Available Antibody-based therapeutics provides novel and efficacious treatments for a number of diseases. Traditional experimental approaches for designing therapeutic antibodies rely on raising antibodies against a target antigen in an immunized animal or directed evolution of antibodies with low affinity for the desired antigen. However, these methods remain time consuming, cannot target a specific epitope and do not lead to broad design principles informing other studies. Computational design methods can overcome some of these limitations by using biophysics models to rationally select antibody parts that maximize affinity for a target antigen epitope. This has been addressed to some extend by OptCDR for the design of complementary determining regions. Here, we extend this earlier contribution by addressing the de novo design of a model of the entire antibody variable region against a given antigen epitope while safeguarding for immunogenicity (Optimal Method for Antibody Variable region Engineering, OptMAVEn. OptMAVEn simulates in silico the in vivo steps of antibody generation and evolution, and is capable of capturing the critical structural features responsible for affinity maturation of antibodies. In addition, a humanization procedure was developed and incorporated into OptMAVEn to minimize the potential immunogenicity of the designed antibody models. As case studies, OptMAVEn was applied to design models of neutralizing antibodies targeting influenza hemagglutinin and HIV gp120. For both HA and gp120, novel computational antibody models with numerous interactions with their target epitopes were generated. The observed rates of mutations and types of amino acid changes during in silico affinity maturation are consistent with what has been observed during in vivo affinity maturation. The results demonstrate that OptMAVEn can efficiently generate diverse computational antibody models with both optimized binding affinity to antigens and reduced

  12. A novel mechanism of thrombosis in antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachoyiannopoulos, Panayiotis G; Routsias, John G

    2010-11-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune thrombophilia mediated by autoantibodies directed against phospholipid-binding plasma proteins, mainly β2 Glycoprotein I (β2GPI)-a plasma apolipoprotein and prothrombin (PT). A subgroup of these antibodies termed "Lupus Anticoagulant" (LA) elongate in vitro the clotting times, this elongation not corrected by adding normal plasma in the detection system. The exact mechanism by which these autoantibodies induce thrombosis is not well understood. Resistance to natural anticoagulants such as protein C, impaired fibrinolysis, activation of endothelial cells to a pro-coagulant phenotype and activation of platelets, are among the mechanisms partially supported by experimental evidence. Artificially dimerized β2GPI binds tightly to platelet membrane activating them. We search for mechanisms of natural dimerization of β2GPI by proteins of the platelet membranes and found that platelet factor 4 (PF4) assembled in homotetramers binds two molecules of β2GPI and this complex is recognized by anti-β2GPI antibodies, the whole complexes being thrombogenic in terms of activating platelets as confirmed by p38MAP kinase phosphorylation and thromboxane B2 production. Of note PF4/heparin complexes are also immunogenic triggering the production of anti-PF4/heparin antibodies which activate also platelets (the so-called "heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and thrombosis syndrome", HITT). The anti-β2GPI antibodies activate platelets by their F(ab)2, while the anti-PF4/heparin by their Fc fragments. Thus PF4 is a common denominator in the pathogenesis of APS and HITT which share also clinical characteristics such as thrombocytopenia and thrombosis.

  13. Surface activity of a monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Senner, Frank; Maeder, Karsten; Mueller, Robert

    2009-12-01

    The development of high concentration antibody formulations presents a major challenge for the formulation scientist, as physical characteristics and stability behavior change compared to low concentration protein formulations. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential correlation between surface activity and shaking stress stability of a model antibody-polysorbate 20 formulation. The surface activities of pure antibody and polysorbate 20 were compared, followed by a study on the influence of a model antibody on the apparent critical micelle concentration (CMC) of polysorbate 20 over a protein concentration range from 10 to 150 mg/mL. In a shaking stress experiment, the stability of 10, 75, and 150 mg/mL antibody formulations was investigated containing different concentrations of polysorbate 20, both below and above the CMC. The antibody increased significantly the apparent CMC of antibody-polysorbate 20 mixtures in comparison to the protein-free buffer. However, the concentration of polysorbate required for stabilization of the model antibody in a shaking stress experiment did not show dependence on the CMC. A polysorbate 20 level of 0.005% was found sufficient to stabilize both at low and high antibody concentration against antibody aggregation and precipitation.

  14. Robotic QM/MM-driven maturation of antibody combining sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Ivan V; Golovin, Andrey V; Chatziefthimiou, Spyros D; Stepanova, Anastasiya V; Peng, Yingjie; Zolotareva, Olga I; Belogurov, Alexey A; Kurkova, Inna N; Ponomarenko, Natalie A; Wilmanns, Matthias; Blackburn, G Michael; Gabibov, Alexander G; Lerner, Richard A

    2016-10-01

    In vitro selection of antibodies from large repertoires of immunoglobulin (Ig) combining sites using combinatorial libraries is a powerful tool, with great potential for generating in vivo scavengers for toxins. However, addition of a maturation function is necessary to enable these selected antibodies to more closely mimic the full mammalian immune response. We approached this goal using quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations to achieve maturation in silico. We preselected A17, an Ig template, from a naïve library for its ability to disarm a toxic pesticide related to organophosphorus nerve agents. Virtual screening of 167,538 robotically generated mutants identified an optimum single point mutation, which experimentally boosted wild-type Ig scavenger performance by 170-fold. We validated the QM/MM predictions via kinetic analysis and crystal structures of mutant apo-A17 and covalently modified Ig, thereby identifying the displacement of one water molecule by an arginine as delivering this catalysis.

  15. Bioanalytical approaches for characterizing catabolism of antibody-drug conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Ola M; Shen, Ben-Quan; Xu, Keyang; Khojasteh, S Cyrus; Girish, Sandhya; Kaur, Surinder

    2015-01-01

    The in vivo stability and catabolism of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) directly impact their PK, efficacy and safety, and metabolites of the cytotoxic or small molecule drug component of an ADC can further complicate these factors. This perspective highlights the importance of understanding ADC catabolism and the associated bioanalytical challenges. We evaluated different bioanalytical approaches to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize ADC catabolites. Here we review and discuss the rationale and experimental strategies used to design bioanalytical assays for characterization of ADC catabolism and supporting ADME studies during ADC clinical development. This review covers both large and small molecule approaches, and uses examples from Kadcyla® (T-DM1) and a THIOMAB™ antibody-drug conjugate to illustrate the process.

  16. Hybrid aptamer-antibody linked fluorescence resonance energy transfer based detection of trinitrotoluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabherwal, Priyanka; Shorie, Munish; Pathania, Preeti; Chaudhary, Shilpa; Bhasin, K K; Bhalla, Vijayender; Suri, C Raman

    2014-08-05

    Combining synthetic macromolecules and biomolecular recognition units are promising in developing novel diagnostic and analysis techniques for detecting environmental and/or clinically important substances. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) apta-immunosensor for explosive detection is reported using 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) specific aptamer and antibodies tagged with respective FRET pair dyes in a sandwich immunoassay format. FITC-labeled aptamer was used as a binder molecule in the newly developed apta-immunoassay format where the recognition element was specific anti-TNT antibody labeled with rhodamine isothiocyanate. The newly developed sensing platform showed excellent sensitivity with a detection limit of the order of 0.4 nM presenting a promising candidate for routine screening of TNT in samples.

  17. 2-(ω-Carboxyethyl)pyrrole Antibody as a New Inhibitor of Tumor Angiogenesis and Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chunying; Wang, Xizhen; Tomko, Nicholas; Zhu, Junqing; Wang, William R; Zhu, Jinle; Wang, Yanming; Salomon, Robert G

    2016-09-22

    Angiogenesis is a fundamental process in the progression, invasion, and metastasis of tumors. Therapeutic drugs such as bevacizumab and ranibuzumab have thus been developed to inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor (VEFG)-promoted angiogenesis. While these anti-angiogenic drugs have been commonly used in the treatment of cancer, patients often develop significant resistance that limits the efficacy of anti-VEGF therapies to a short period of time. This is in part due to the fact that an independent pathway of angiogenesis exists, which is mediated by 2-(ω-carboxyethyl)pyrrole (CEP) in a TLR2 receptor-dependent manner that can compensate for inhibition of the VEGF-mediated pathway. In this work, we evaluated a CEP antibody as a new tumor growth inhibitor that blocks CEP-induced angiogenesis. We first evaluated the effectiveness of a CEP antibody as a monotherapy to impede tumor growth in two human tumor xenograft models. We then determined the synergistic effects of bevacizumab and CEP antibody in a combination therapy, which demonstrated that blocking of the CEP-mediated pathway significantly enhanced the anti-angiogenic efficacy of bevacizumab in tumor growth inhibition indicating that CEP antibody is a promising chemotherapeutic drug. To facilitate potential translational studies of CEP-antibody, we also conducted longitudinal imaging studies and identified that FMISO-PET is a non-invasive imaging tool that can be used to quantitatively monitor the anti-angiogenic effects of CEP-antibody in the clinical setting. That treatment with CEP antibody induces hypoxia in tumor tissue was indicated by 43% higher uptake of [18F]FMISO in CEP antibody-treated tumor xenografs than in the control PBS-treated littermates.

  18. Oncological nuclear medicine: from antibody to PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuneo, Saga; Takako, Furukawa [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Molecular Imaging Center, Inage-ku, Chiba (Japan)

    2006-07-01

    Department of Diagnostic Imaging has recently established in the Molecular Imaging Center of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. The major aim of the department is to develop novel molecular imaging probes and to establish functional imaging methods of various cancers. The department consists of three sections; 1) biomolecule section (find out optimal biomolecule as the target of cancer imaging), 2) molecular diagnosis section (develop imaging method using specific molecular probe), and 3) clinical diagnosis section (applying molecular imaging modalities to cancer patients). In the present lecture, I would like to review my experiences in various aspects of cancer imaging using nuclear medicine procedures, which might be important in the research in the new department. The talk includes; 1) characteristics and limitations of cancer targeting with radiolabeled anti-cancer monoclonal antibodies and the attempts to overcome the limitations including pre-targeting strategy, 2 ) application of a newly synthesized polyamine (dendrimer) to the delivery and imaging of oligo-DNA and cancer treatment, 3) transfection of Na '/I - sym-porter gene to add iodide uptake mechanism to non-thyroid cancer cells for the wider application of radioiodine therapy, which is now also used as a promising reporter gene in gene therapy, and 4) basic and clinical study of PET metabolic imaging with fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and fluoro-thymidine (FLT) to evaluate the characteristics of various cancers. Although these modalities can not directly visualize molecular processes occurring in cancer cells, we can evaluate the imaging results with the insight of molecular biology, and the experiences of these modalities can be the bases for the future development of molecular imaging of malignant tumors. (author)

  19. Direct detection of antibody concentration and affinity in human serum using microscale thermophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippok, Svenja; Seidel, Susanne A I; Duhr, Stefan; Uhland, Kerstin; Holthoff, Hans-Peter; Jenne, Dieter; Braun, Dieter

    2012-04-17

    The direct quantification of both the binding affinity and absolute concentration of disease-related biomarkers in biological fluids is particularly beneficial for differential diagnosis and therapy monitoring. Here, we extend microscale thermophoresis to target immunological questions. Optically generated thermal gradients were used to deplete fluorescently marked antigens in 2- and 10-fold-diluted human serum. We devised and validated an autocompetitive strategy to independently fit the concentration and dissociation constant of autoimmune antibodies against the cardiac β1-adrenergic receptor related to dilated cardiomyopathy. As an artificial antigen, the peptide COR1 was designed to mimic the second extracellular receptor loop. Thermophoresis resolved antibody concentrations from 2 to 200 nM and measured the dissociation constant as 75 nM. The approach quantifies antibody binding in its native serum environment within microliter volumes and without any surface attachments. The simplicity of the mix and probe protocol minimizes systematic errors, making thermophoresis a promising detection method for personalized medicine.

  20. Detection of specific antibodies in dogs infected with Angiostrongylus vasorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schucan, A; Schnyder, M; Tanner, I; Barutzki, D; Traversa, D; Deplazes, P

    2012-04-30

    Canine angiostrongylosis, caused by the nematode Angiostrongylus vasorum, is an emerging cardiopulmonary disease in Europe which can be fatal if left untreated. We determined the diagnostic value of the specific detection of antibodies against A. vasorum adult somatic antigen, adult excretory/secretory (E/S) antigen and first stage larvae (L1) somatic antigen in ELISAs. Also, A. vasorum adult somatic antigen purified by monoclonal antibodies (mAb) was evaluated in a sandwich-ELISA. Among the crude antigens, the best sensitivities when testing 21 naturally infected dogs were obtained using adult E/S and somatic antigen (85.7% and 76.2%, respectively), which were comparable with the results of the sandwich-ELISA based on mAb-purified antigens (81%). The ELISA performed with L1 antigen had the lowest sensitivity (42.9%). In experimentally inoculated dogs, the sensitivities ranged from 97.7% to 100% with all test settings. The specificity was 98.8% (92.5-99.9%, 95% CI) with all ELISAs using sera of 82 randomly selected dogs. Cross-reactions using adult somatic, adult E/S and L1 somatic antigen were observed in sera of dogs infected with Crenosoma vulpis, Dirofilaria immitis, Dirofilaria repens, and Eucoleus aerophilus. In contrast, using the mAb-purified antigens, the cross-reactions were minimal. Depending on the antigens used, specific antibodies were detected starting between 13 and 21 days post experimental inoculation (dpi), and at latest between 35 and 48 dpi, thus before or around the onset of patency. The serological follow-up of four A. vasorum-infected dogs after anthelmintic treatment at 88 dpi showed a decrease of antibody levels after drug administration, and the animals became seronegative 2-9 weeks later. Two untreated dogs remained seropositive. In four dogs treated 4 dpi, virtually no antibody-reaction was detectable, with the exception of the ELISA performed with L1 antigen. The early detection of specific antibodies against A. vasorum by ELISA

  1. Initiating a watch list for Ebola virus antibody escape mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig R. Miller

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The 2014 Ebola virus (EBOV outbreak in West Africa is the largest in recorded history and resulted in over 11,000 deaths. It is essential that strategies for treatment and containment be developed to avoid future epidemics of this magnitude. With the development of vaccines and antibody-based therapies using the envelope glycoprotein (GP of the 1976 Mayinga strain, one important strategy is to anticipate how the evolution of EBOV might compromise these efforts. In this study we have initiated a watch list of potential antibody escape mutations of EBOV by modeling interactions between GP and the antibody KZ52. The watch list was generated using molecular modeling to estimate stability changes due to mutation. Every possible mutation of GP was considered and the list was generated from those that are predicted to disrupt GP-KZ52 binding but not to disrupt the ability of GP to fold and to form trimers. The resulting watch list contains 34 mutations (one of which has already been seen in humans at six sites in the GP2 subunit. Should mutations from the watch list appear and spread during an epidemic, it warrants attention as these mutations may reflect an evolutionary response from the virus that could reduce the effectiveness of interventions such as vaccination. However, this watch list is incomplete and emphasizes the need for more experimental structures of EBOV interacting with antibodies in order to expand the watch list to other epitopes. We hope that this work provokes experimental research on evolutionary escape in both Ebola and other viral pathogens.

  2. An integrated microfluidic system for measurement of glycated hemoglobin levels by using an aptamer-antibody assay on magnetic beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ko-Wei; Li, Jinglun; Yang, Ching-Hsuan; Shiesh, Shu-Chu; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2015-06-15

    Blood glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), reflecting the average blood glucose level in the proceeding 2-3 months, is recommended for screening/diagnosing and patient management of diabetes. However, accurate measurement of the HbA1c level at the point of care is hampered by costly, large-scale instruments (such as high-performance liquid chromatography) or reagent instability of classical immunologic methods, which involve antibody-based immunoturbidimetry. In this work, an integrated microfluidic system using aptamer-based testing to measure HbA1c in blood samples is therefore presented. This measuring system used nucleic-acid aptamers that exhibited high sensitivity and high specificity for hemoglobin and HbA1c to perform a stable and robust testing. The compact microfluidic system consumed less samples and reagents and significantly shortened the detection time. Combining the advantages of microfluidics and aptamers, this integrated microsystem presents a promising tool for accurate and point-of-case HbA1c detection. To demonstrate its clinical utility, whole blood samples with clinically-relevant concentrations of HbA1c and Hb were automatically measured on the integrated microfluidic system. Experimental data showed that the developed aptamer-based microfluidic system is capable of detecting HbA1c and Hb with a good linear response. The entire process was completed within 25 min. The aptamer-antibody on-chip sandwich immunoassay may be further refined to allow diabetes screening and diagnosis at lower cost and earlier phase to minimize the risk of diabetic complications.

  3. The humoral immune response of lambs experimentally infected with Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirkell, D; Spooner, R K; Jones, G E; Russell, W C

    1990-08-01

    Using sera from lambs experimentally infected with Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and Pasteurella haemolytica, the development of a good humoral immune response to M. ovipneumoniae was detected by ELISA. The antibody titres peaked 41 days post-infection and good antibody titres were maintained over the 16-week experimental period. Immunoblotting revealed that antibodies to specific antigens appeared in the sera in a sequential manner, some being seen shortly after infection and others developing only after a substantial time lag. Antibodies were raised against almost all the major antigens detected in one laboratory strain (956/2) and against all antigens previously shown to be conserved in 22 Scottish field isolates of M. ovipneumoniae.

  4. Host-Pathogen Coevolution and the Emergence of Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies in Chronic Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourmohammad, Armita; Otwinowski, Jakub; Plotkin, Joshua B

    2016-07-01

    The vertebrate adaptive immune system provides a flexible and diverse set of molecules to neutralize pathogens. Yet, viruses such as HIV can cause chronic infections by evolving as quickly as the adaptive immune system, forming an evolutionary arms race. Here we introduce a mathematical framework to study the coevolutionary dynamics between antibodies and antigens within a host. We focus on changes in the binding interactions between the antibody and antigen populations, which result from the underlying stochastic evolution of genotype frequencies driven by mutation, selection, and drift. We identify the critical viral and immune parameters that determine the distribution of antibody-antigen binding affinities. We also identify definitive signatures of coevolution that measure the reciprocal response between antibodies and viruses, and we introduce experimentally measurable quantities that quantify the extent of adaptation during continual coevolution of the two opposing populations. Using this analytical framework, we infer rates of viral and immune adaptation based on time-shifted neutralization assays in two HIV-infected patients. Finally, we analyze competition between clonal lineages of antibodies and characterize the fate of a given lineage in terms of the state of the antibody and viral populations. In particular, we derive the conditions that favor the emergence of broadly neutralizing antibodies, which may have relevance to vaccine design against HIV.

  5. Host-Pathogen Coevolution and the Emergence of Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies in Chronic Infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armita Nourmohammad

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The vertebrate adaptive immune system provides a flexible and diverse set of molecules to neutralize pathogens. Yet, viruses such as HIV can cause chronic infections by evolving as quickly as the adaptive immune system, forming an evolutionary arms race. Here we introduce a mathematical framework to study the coevolutionary dynamics between antibodies and antigens within a host. We focus on changes in the binding interactions between the antibody and antigen populations, which result from the underlying stochastic evolution of genotype frequencies driven by mutation, selection, and drift. We identify the critical viral and immune parameters that determine the distribution of antibody-antigen binding affinities. We also identify definitive signatures of coevolution that measure the reciprocal response between antibodies and viruses, and we introduce experimentally measurable quantities that quantify the extent of adaptation during continual coevolution of the two opposing populations. Using this analytical framework, we infer rates of viral and immune adaptation based on time-shifted neutralization assays in two HIV-infected patients. Finally, we analyze competition between clonal lineages of antibodies and characterize the fate of a given lineage in terms of the state of the antibody and viral populations. In particular, we derive the conditions that favor the emergence of broadly neutralizing antibodies, which may have relevance to vaccine design against HIV.

  6. Nephritogenic lupus antibodies recognize glomerular basement membrane-associated chromatin fragments released from apoptotic intraglomerular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaaji, Manar; Mortensen, Elin; Jørgensen, Leif; Olsen, Randi; Rekvig, Ole Petter

    2006-06-01

    Antibodies to dsDNA represent a classification criterion for systemic lupus erythematosus. Subpopulations of these antibodies are involved in lupus nephritis. No known marker separates nephritogenic from non-nephritogenic anti-dsDNA antibodies. It is not clear whether specificity for glomerular target antigens or intrinsic antibody-affinity for dsDNA or nucleosomes is a critical parameter. Furthermore, it is still controversial whether glomerular target antigen(s) is constituted by nucleosomes or by non-nucleosomal glomerular structures. Previously, we have demonstrated that antibodies eluted from murine nephritic kidneys recognize nucleosomes, but not other glomerular antigens. In this study, we determined the structures that bind nephritogenic autoantibodies in vivo by transmission electron microscopy, immune electron microscopy, and colocalization immune electron microscopy using experimental antibodies to dsDNA, to histones and transcription factors, or to laminin. The data obtained are consistent and point at glomerular basement membrane-associated nucleosomes as target structures for the nephritogenic autoantibodies. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling or caspase-3 assays demonstrate that lupus nephritis is linked to intraglomerular cell apoptosis. The data suggest that nucleosomes are released by apoptosis and associate with glomerulus basement membranes, which may then be targeted by pathogenic anti-nucleosome antibodies. Thus, apoptotic nucleosomes may represent both inducer and target structures for nephritogenic autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus.

  7. [Expression and purification of GST-CML28 fusion protein and preparation of its polyclonal antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xia; Zhang, Bing; Bai, Xue-Ling; Liu, Long-Long; Zhang, Dong-Hua

    2012-12-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the expression of GST-CML28 in Escherichia Coli and to prepare its antibody. The constructed recombinant expression vectors CML28-pGEX-3X were transformed into Escherichia Coli BL21 under IPTG induction. The protein was abstracted from the transformers, and purified by a GSTrap FF column. The rabbits were immunized by the purified fusion protein to produce serum with anti-CML28 antibody. The serum was purified by chromatographic column stuffed with glutathione Sephamse 4B to get the antibody. The specific antibody against CML28 was further identified by ELISA, Western blot, immunohistochemistry and quantum dot luminescence. The results indicated that GST-CML28 fusion protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and its specific polyclonal antibody was obtained. It is concluded that the anti-CML28 polyclonal antibodies with high titer and specificity are successfully prepared. These antibodies provide an useful experimental tool to profoundly research the physiological significance and biological function of the CML28 gene.

  8. Further evaluation of an ELISA kit for detection of antibodies to a nonstructural protein of foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukai, Katsuhiko; Nishi, Tatsuya; Morioka, Kazuki; Yamada, Manabu; Yoshida, Kazuo; Kitano, Rie; Yamazoe, Reiko; Kanno, Toru

    2016-03-01

    An ELISA kit for detection of antibodies to a nonstructural protein of foot-and-mouth disease (FMDV) was further evaluated using sequentially collected serum samples of experimentally infected animals, because the sensitivity of the kit used in a previous study was significantly low in field animals. The kit fully detected antibodies in infected animals without vaccination; however, the first detections of antibodies by the kit were later than those by the liquid-phase blocking ELISA that is used for serological surveillance in the aftermath of outbreaks in Japan, for detection of antibodies to structural proteins of FMDV. Additionally, although the kit effectively detected antibodies in infected cattle with vaccination, there were several infected pigs with vaccination for which the kit did not detect antibodies during the experimental period. Taken together, the kit may not be suitable for serological surveillance after an FMD outbreak either with or without emergency vaccination in FMD-free countries.

  9. Natural Flavonoids as Promising Analgesic Candidates: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiao; Wang, Xiaoyu; Gui, Xuan; Chen, Lu; Huang, Baokang

    2016-11-01

    Due to the chemical structural diversity and various analgesic mechanisms, an increasing number of studies indicated that some flavonoids from medicinal plants could be promising candidates for new natural analgesic drugs, which attract high interests of advanced users and academic researchers. The aim of this systematic review is to report flavonoids and its derivatives as new analgesic candidates based on the pharmacological evidences. Sixty-four papers were found concerning the potential analgesic activity of 46 flavonoids. In this case, the evidence for analgesic activity of flavonoids and total flavonoids was investigated. Meanwhile, the corresponding analgesic mechanism of flavonoids was discussed by generalizing and analyzing the current publications. Based on this review, the conclusion can be drawn that some flavonoids are promising candidates for painful conditions and deserve particular attention in further research and development.

  10. Stem cells: a promising source for vascular regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammal, Hassan; Harmouch, Chaza; Lataillade, Jean-Jacques; Laurent-Maquin, Dominique; Labrude, Pierre; Menu, Patrick; Kerdjoudj, Halima

    2014-12-15

    The rising and diversity of many human vascular diseases pose urgent needs for the development of novel therapeutics. Stem cell therapy represents a challenge in the medicine of the twenty-first century, an area where tissue engineering and regenerative medicine gather to provide promising treatments for a wide variety of diseases. Indeed, with their extensive regeneration potential and functional multilineage differentiation capacity, stem cells are now highlighted as promising cell sources for regenerative medicine. Their multilineage differentiation involves environmental factors such as biochemical, extracellular matrix coating, oxygen tension, and mechanical forces. In this review, we will focus on human stem cell sources and their applications in vascular regeneration. We will also discuss the different strategies used for their differentiation into both mature and functional smooth muscle and endothelial cells.

  11. Latino Immigrants, Acculturation, and Health: Promising New Directions in Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraído-Lanza, Ana F; Echeverría, Sandra E; Flórez, Karen R

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an analysis of novel topics emerging in recent years in research on Latino immigrants, acculturation, and health. In the past ten years, the number of studies assessing new ways to conceptualize and understand how acculturation-related processes may influence health has grown. These new frameworks draw from integrative approaches testing new ground to acknowledge the fundamental role of context and policy. We classify the emerging body of evidence according to themes that we identify as promising directions--intrapersonal, interpersonal, social environmental, community, political, and global contexts, cross-cutting themes in life course and developmental approaches, and segmented assimilation--and discuss the challenges and opportunities each theme presents. This body of work, which considers acculturation in context, points to the emergence of a new wave of research that holds great promise in driving forward the study of Latino immigrants, acculturation, and health. We provide suggestions to further advance the ideologic and methodologic rigor of this new wave.

  12. Antibody response to measles immunization in India*

    OpenAIRE

    Job, J. S.; John, T J; Joseph, A.

    1984-01-01

    Antibody response to measles vaccine was measured in 238 subjects aged 6-15 months. Seroconversion rates ranged from 74% at 6 months of age to 100% at 13-15 months; the differences in age-specific rates were not statistically significant. The postimmunization antibody titres increased with increasing age of the vaccinee. Seroconversion rates and antibody titres in 49 subjects with grades I and II malnutrition were not significantly different from those in the 189 normal subjects.

  13. Complement inhibition enables tumor delivery of LCMV glycoprotein pseudotyped viruses in the presence of antiviral antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evgin, Laura; Ilkow, Carolina S; Bourgeois-Daigneault, Marie-Claude; de Souza, Christiano Tanese; Stubbert, Lawton; Huh, Michael S; Jennings, Victoria A; Marguerie, Monique; Acuna, Sergio A; Keller, Brian A; Lefebvre, Charles; Falls, Theresa; Le Boeuf, Fabrice; Auer, Rebecca A; Lambris, John D; McCart, J Andrea; Stojdl, David F; Bell, John C

    2016-01-01

    The systemic delivery of therapeutic viruses, such as oncolytic viruses or vaccines, is limited by the generation of neutralizing antibodies. While pseudotyping of rhabdoviruses with the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus glycoprotein has previously allowed for multiple rounds of delivery in mice, this strategy has not translated to other animal models. For the first time, we provide experimental evidence that antibodies generated against the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus glycoprotein mediate robust complement-dependent viral neutralization via activation of the classical pathway. We show that this phenotype can be capitalized upon to deliver maraba virus pseudotyped with the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus glycoprotein in a Fischer rat model in the face of neutralizing antibody through the use of complement modulators. This finding changes the understanding of the humoral immune response to arenaviruses, and also describes methodology to deliver viral vectors to their therapeutic sites of action without the interference of neutralizing antibody. PMID:27909702

  14. Anti-S100A4 antibody suppresses metastasis formation by blocking stroma cell invasion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klingelhöfer, Jörg; Grum-Schwensen, Birgitte; Beck, Mette K

    2012-01-01

    The small Ca-binding protein, S100A4, has a well-established metastasis-promoting activity. Moreover, its expression is tightly correlated with poor prognosis in patients with numerous types of cancer. Mechanistically, the extracellular S100A4 drives metastasis by affecting the tumor...... microenvironment, making it an attractive target for anti-cancer therapy. In this study, we produced a function-blocking anti-S100A4 monoclonal antibody with metastasis-suppressing activity. Antibody treatment significantly reduced metastatic burden in the lungs of experimental animals by blocking the recruitment...... its activity by suppressing stroma cell recruitment to the site of the growing tumor. Our epitope mapping studies suggested that the antibody recognition site overlaps with the target binding interface of human S100A4. We conclude here that this antibody could serve as a solid basis for development...

  15. [Promising technologies of packed red blood cells production and storage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimov, A G; Golota, A S; Krassiĭ, A B

    2013-10-01

    The current article is dedicated to promising technologies of packed red blood cells production and storage. The following new technical approaches are presented: (1) erythrocytes storage in strict anaerobic argon-hydrogen environment, (2) lyophilization of erythrocyte suspension by its atomization in nitrogen gas, (3) lyophilization of erythrocytes by directional freezing under the influence of radio frequency radiation, (4) automated pharming of antigen free packed red blood cells from progenitor cell directly at the battlefield.

  16. NOTCH INHIBITION AS A PROMISING NEW APPROACH TO CANCER THERAPY

    OpenAIRE

    Purow, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    The Notch pathway powerfully influences stem cell maintenance, development and cell fate and is increasingly recognized for the key roles it plays in cancer. Notch promotes cell survival, angiogenesis and treatment resistance in numerous cancers, making it a promising target for cancer therapy. It also crosstalks with other critical oncogenes, providing a means to affect numerous signaling pathways with one intervention. While the gamma-secretaase inhibitors are the only form of Notch inhibit...

  17. KirCII- promising tool for polyketide diversification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musiol-Kroll, Ewa Maria; Härtner, Thomas; Kulik, Andreas;

    2014-01-01

    Kirromycin is produced by Streptomyces collinus Tü 365. This compound is synthesized by a large assembly line of type I polyketide synthases and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (PKS I/NRPS), encoded by the genes kirAI-kirAVI and kirB. The PKSs KirAI-KirAV have no acyltransferase domains integra...... introducing the non-native substrates in an in vivo context. Thus, KirCII represents a promising tool for polyketide diversification....

  18. Food biopreservation: Promising strategies using bacteriocins, bacteriophages and endolysins

    OpenAIRE

    García Suárez, María Pilar; Rodríguez,Lorena; Rodríguez González, Ana; Martínez Fernández, Beatriz

    2010-01-01

    The interest in biopreservation of food has prompted the quest for new natural antimicrobial compounds from different origins. Bacteriocins have been widely recognized as natural food biopreservatives but lastest advances on bateriocin biology have opened new fields to explore. On the contrary, the use of bacteriophages and endolysins has only been considered in the last five years and recent developments have produced promising perspectives. This review provides an overview of the current an...

  19. Understanding the promises and premises of online health platforms

    OpenAIRE

    van Dijck, J.; Poell, T.

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates the claims and complexities involved in the platform-based economics of health and fitness apps. We examine a double-edged logic inscribed in these platforms, promising to offer personal solutions to medical problems while also contributing to the public good. On the one hand, online platforms serve as personalized data-driven services to their customers. On the other hand, they allegedly serve public interests, such as medical research or health education. In doing ...

  20. Discovery and therapeutic promise of selective androgen receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiyun; Kim, Juhyun; Dalton, James T

    2005-06-01

    Androgens are essential for male development and the maintenance of male secondary characteristics, such as bone mass, muscle mass, body composition, and spermatogenesis. The main disadvantages of steroidal androgens are their undesirable physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties. The recent discovery of nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) provides a promising alternative for testosterone replacement therapies with advantages including oral bioavailability, flexibility of structural modification, androgen receptor specificity, tissue selectivity, and the lack of steroid-related side effects.

  1. Antiphospholipid Antibodies and Systemic Scleroderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awa Oumar Touré

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Antiphospholipid antibodies (APLs could be associated with an increased risk of vascular pathologies in systemic scleroderma. The aim of our study was to search for APLs in patients affected by systemic scleroderma and to evaluate their involvement in the clinical manifestations of this disease. Materials and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study, from January 2009 until August 2010, with patients received at the Department of Dermatology (Dakar, Senegal. Blood samples were taken at the hematology laboratory and were analyzed for the presence of APLs. Results: Forty patients were recruited. Various types of either isolated or associated APLs were found in 23 patients, i.e. 57.5% of the study population. The most frequently encountered antibody was IgG anti-β2 GPI (37.5% of the patients, followed by anticardiolipins (17.5% and lupus anticoagulants (5%. No statistically significant association of positive antiphospholipid-related tests to any of the scleroderma complications could be demonstrated. Conclusion: A high proportion of patients showing association of systemic scleroderma and APLs suggests the presence of a morbid correlation between these 2 pathologies. It would be useful to follow a cohort of patients affected by systemic scleroderma in order to monitor vascular complications following confirmation of the presence of antiphospholipid syndrome.

  2. Antibody engineering and therapeutics, The Annual Meeting of the Antibody Society: December 8-12, 2013, Huntington Beach, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul W H I; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates.

  3. 6th Annual European Antibody Congress 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The 6th European Antibody Congress (EAC), organized by Terrapinn Ltd., was held in Geneva, Switzerland, which was also the location of the 4th and 5th EAC.1,2 As was the case in 2008 and 2009, the EAC was again the largest antibody congress held in Europe, drawing nearly 250 delegates in 2010. Numerous pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical companies active in the field of therapeutic antibody development were represented, as were start-up and academic organizations and representatives from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The global trends in antibody research and development were discussed, including success stories of recent marketing authorizations of golimumab (Simponi®) and canakinumab (Ilaris®) by Johnson & Johnson and Novartis, respectively, updates on antibodies in late clinical development (obinutuzumab/GA101, farletuzumab/MORAb-003 and itolizumab/T1 h, by Glycart/Roche, Morphotek and Biocon, respectively) and success rates for this fast-expanding class of therapeutics (Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development). Case studies covering clinical progress of girentuximab (Wilex), evaluation of panobacumab (Kenta Biotech), characterization of therapeutic antibody candidates by protein microarrays (Protagen), antibody-drug conjugates (sanofi-aventis, ImmunoGen, Seattle Genetics, Wyeth/Pfizer), radio-immunoconjugates (Bayer Schering Pharma, Université de Nantes) and new scaffolds (Ablynx, AdAlta, Domantis/GlaxoSmithKline, Fresenius, Molecular Partners, Pieris, Scil Proteins, Pfizer, University of Zurich) were presented. Major antibody structural improvements were showcased, including the latest selection engineering of the best isotypes (Abbott, Pfizer, Pierre Fabre), hinge domain (Pierre Fabre), dual antibodies (Abbott), IgG-like bispecific antibodies (Biogen Idec), antibody epitope mapping case studies (Eli Lilly), insights in FcγRII receptor (University of Cambridge), as well as novel tools for antibody fragmentation (Genovis). Improvements

  4. Isoimmunization with anti-U antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, R J; Holder, W T; McCord, D L

    1984-03-01

    Isoimmunization with anti-U antibody is a rare but significant cause of hemolytic disease in black newborns. In this case report, an lgG antibody stimulated by fetomaternal transfusion produced a positive direct Coombs' test on cord blood but not neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. A review of the literature suggests the pathophysiology is similar to Rh isoimmunization. The anti-U antibody may develop as a result of pregnancy or blood transfusion in the 1.2 percent of American blacks who are at risk for developing the antibody. The principles of treatment employed in Rh isoimmunization can be successfully used in isoimmunization due to anti-U.

  5. Exceptional Antibodies Produced by Successive Immunizations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia J Gearhart

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies stand between us and pathogens. Viruses mutate quickly to avoid detection, and antibodies mutate at similar rates to hunt them down. This death spiral is fueled by specialized proteins and error-prone polymerases that change DNA sequences. Here, we explore how B lymphocytes stay in the race by expressing activation-induced deaminase, which unleashes a tsunami of mutations in the immunoglobulin loci. This produces random DNA substitutions, followed by selection for the highest affinity antibodies. We may be able to manipulate the process to produce better antibodies by expanding the repertoire of specific B cells through successive vaccinations.

  6. MCM2 - a promising marker for premalignant lesions of the lung: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beck Amy F

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because cells progressing to cancer must proliferate, marker proteins specific to proliferating cells may permit detection of premalignant lesions. Here we compared the sensitivities of a classic proliferation marker, Ki-67, with a new proliferation marker, MCM2, in 41 bronchial biopsy specimens representing normal mucosa, metaplasia, dysplasia, and carcinoma in situ. Methods Parallel sections were stained with antibodies against MCM2 and Ki-67, and the frequencies of staining were independently measured by two investigators. Differences were evaluated statistically using the two-sided correlated samples t-test and Wilcoxon rank sum test. Results For each of the 41 specimens, the average frequency of staining by anti-MCM2 (39% was significantly (p Conclusions We conclude that MCM2 is detectable in 2-3 times more proliferating premalignant lung cells than is Ki-67. The promise of MCM2 as a sensitive marker for premalignant lung cells is enhanced by the fact that it is present in cells at the surface of metaplastic lung lesions, which are more likely to be exfoliated into sputum. Future studies will determine if use of anti-MCM2 makes possible sufficiently early detection to significantly enhance lung cancer survival rates.

  7. An efficient method for isolating antibody fragments against small peptides by antibody phage display

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duan, Zhi; Siegumfeldt, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    We generated monoclonal scFv (single chain variable fragment) antibodies from an antibody phage display library towards three small synthetic peptides derived from the sequence of s1-casein. Key difficulties for selection of scFv-phages against small peptides were addressed. Small peptides do....... The scFvs were sequenced and characterized, and specificity was characterized by ELISA. The methods developed in this study are universally applicable for antibody phage display to efficiently produce antibody fragments against small peptides....

  8. Convenience experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohs, Ulrich

    2012-03-01

    Systems biology aims at explaining life processes by means of detailed models of molecular networks, mainly on the whole-cell scale. The whole cell perspective distinguishes the new field of systems biology from earlier approaches within molecular cell biology. The shift was made possible by the high throughput methods that were developed for gathering 'omic' (genomic, proteomic, etc.) data. These new techniques are made commercially available as semi-automatic analytic equipment, ready-made analytic kits and probe arrays. There is a whole industry of supplies for what may be called convenience experimentation. My paper inquires some epistemic consequences of strong reliance on convenience experimentation in systems biology. In times when experimentation was automated to a lesser degree, modeling and in part even experimentation could be understood fairly well as either being driven by hypotheses, and thus proceed by the testing of hypothesis, or as being performed in an exploratory mode, intended to sharpen concepts or initially vague phenomena. In systems biology, the situation is dramatically different. Data collection became so easy (though not cheap) that experimentation is, to a high degree, driven by convenience equipment, and model building is driven by the vast amount of data that is produced by convenience experimentation. This results in a shift in the mode of science. The paper shows that convenience driven science is not primarily hypothesis-testing, nor is it in an exploratory mode. It rather proceeds in a gathering mode. This shift demands another shift in the mode of evaluation, which now becomes an exploratory endeavor, in response to the superabundance of gathered data.

  9. Use of AN Eosinophil Specific Monoclonal Antibody in Assessing Eosinophil Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkoff, Marjorie Sue

    A monoclonal antibody to an eosinophil specific determinant is very important in assessing eosinophil function during helminthic infection. Eosinophils induced by Schistosoma mansoni infection in BALB/c mice were used to induce C57B1/6 immunocytes for production of hybridomas secreting eosinophil monoclonal antibodies. These antibodies were shown to react with an eosinophil surface epitope but not with neutrophils or macrophages as determined by ELISA, immunodiffusion, immunofluorescence, and immunoblot assay. Affinity chromatography with eosinophil chemotactic factor-sepharose consistently selected out a { rm M_ R} 67,000 protein from solubilized eosinophil membrane antigens but not from neutrophil and macrophage antigens. In vitro studies showed that the eosinophil-specific monoclonal antibodies abrogated antibody-dependent eosinophil -mediated killing of S. mansoni schistosomula using mouse, rat or human eosinophils. Neutrophil and macrophage killing activities were unaffected. The monoclonal antibodies effected complement-dependent lysis of mouse and rat eosinophils but not of human eosinophils. ECF-treated eosinophils showed enhanced killing of schistosomula which was blocked by the monoclonal antibody. Murine and human eosinophils preincubated with monoclonal antibody exhibited decreased chemotaxis to ECF at optimal chemotactic concentrations. The monoclonal antibody also blocked eosinophil binding to ECF- sepharose beads. In vivo induction of peripheral blood eosinophilia by injection of S. mansoni eggs was suppressed by injections of monoclonal antibodies 2CD13 and 2QD45 in mouse and rat experimental models. Eosinophilia induced by keyhole limpet hemocyanin- cyclophosphamide treatment was also suppressed by monoclonal antibody in both murine and rat systems. Pulmonary granulomas in mice given egg injection and monoclonal antibody were smaller and contained fewer eosinophils than those granulomas from mice given eggs only. In immuno-biochemical studies, the

  10. Determination of Cellular Processing Rates for a Trastuzumab-Maytansinoid Antibody-Drug Conjugate (ADC) Highlights Key Parameters for ADC Design

    OpenAIRE

    Maass, Katie F.; Kulkarni, Chethana; Betts, Alison M.; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are a promising class of cancer therapeutics that combine the specificity of antibodies with the cytotoxic effects of payload drugs. A quantitative understanding of how ADCs are processed intracellularly can illustrate which processing steps most influence payload delivery, thus aiding the design of more effective ADCs. In this work, we develop a kinetic model for ADC cellular processing as well as generalizable methods based on flow cytometry and fluorescence ...

  11. Determination of Cellular Processing Rates for a Trastuzumab-Maytansinoid Antibody-Drug Conjugate (ADC) Highlights Key Parameters for ADC Design

    OpenAIRE

    Kulkarni, Chethana; Maass, Katie F.; Betts, Alison M.; Wittrup, Karl Dane

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are a promising class of cancer therapeutics that combine the specificity of antibodies with the cytotoxic effects of payload drugs. A quantitative understanding of how ADCs are processed intracellularly can illustrate which processing steps most influence payload delivery, thus aiding the design of more effective ADCs. In this work, we develop a kinetic model for ADC cellular processing as well as generalizable methods based on flow cytometry and fluorescence ...

  12. Experimental philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobe, Joshua; Buckwalter, Wesley; Nichols, Shaun; Robbins, Philip; Sarkissian, Hagop; Sommers, Tamler

    2012-01-01

    Experimental philosophy is a new interdisciplinary field that uses methods normally associated with psychology to investigate questions normally associated with philosophy. The present review focuses on research in experimental philosophy on four central questions. First, why is it that people's moral judgments appear to influence their intuitions about seemingly nonmoral questions? Second, do people think that moral questions have objective answers, or do they see morality as fundamentally relative? Third, do people believe in free will, and do they see free will as compatible with determinism? Fourth, how do people determine whether an entity is conscious?

  13. Beneficial impact of CCL2 and CCL12 neutralization on experimental malignant pleural effusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Marazioti

    Full Text Available Using genetic interventions, we previously determined that C-C motif chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2 promotes malignant pleural effusion (MPE formation in mice. Here we conducted preclinical studies aimed at assessing the specific therapeutic potential of antibody-mediated CCL2 blockade against MPE. For this, murine MPEs or skin tumors were generated in C57BL/6 mice by intrapleural or subcutaneous delivery of lung (LLC or colon (MC38 adenocarcinoma cells. Human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549 were used to induce MPEs in severe combined immunodeficient mice. Intraperitoneal antibodies neutralizing mouse CCL2 and/or CCL12, a murine CCL2 ortholog, were administered at 10 or 50 mg/kg every three days. We found that high doses of CCL2/12 neutralizing antibody treatment (50 mg/kg were required to limit MPE formation by LLC cells. CCL2 and CCL12 blockade were equally potent inhibitors of MPE development by LLC cells. Combined CCL2 and CCL12 neutralization was also effective against MC38-induced MPE and prolonged the survival of mice in both syngeneic models. Mouse-specific CCL2-blockade limited A549-caused xenogeneic MPE, indicating that host-derived CCL2 also contributes to MPE precipitation in mice. The impact of CCL2/12 antagonism was associated with inhibition of immune and vascular MPE-related phenomena, such as inflammation, new blood vessel assembly and plasma extravasation into the pleural space. We conclude that CCL2 and CCL12 blockade are effective against experimental MPE induced by murine and human adenocarcinoma in mice. These results suggest that CCL2-targeted therapies may hold promise for future use against human MPE.

  14. The production of antibody fragments and antibody fusion proteins by yeasts and filamentous fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, V.; Lokman, C.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Punt, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    In this review we will focus on the current status and views concerning the production of antibody fragments and antibody fusion proteins by yeasts and filamentous fungi. We will focus on single-chain antibody fragment production (scFv and VHH) by these lower eukaryotes and the possible applications

  15. Antibodies to watch in 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Janice M

    Over 50 investigational monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics are currently undergoing evaluation in late-stage clinical studies, which is expected to drive a trend toward first marketing approvals of at least 6-9 mAbs per year in the near-term. In the United States (US), a total of 6 and 9 mAbs were granted first approvals during 2014 and 2015, respectively; all these products are also approved in the European Union (EU). As of December 1, 2016, 6 mAbs (atezolizumab, olaratumab, reslizumab, ixekizumab, bezlotoxumab, oblitoxaximab) had been granted first approvals during 2016 in either the EU or US. Brodalumab, was granted a first approval in Japan in July 2016. Regulatory actions on marketing applications for brodalumab in the EU and US are not expected until 2017. In 2017, first EU or US approvals may also be granted for at least nine mAbs (ocrelizumab, avelumab, Xilonix, inotuzumab ozogamicin, dupilumab, sirukumab, sarilumab, guselkumab, romosozumab) that are not yet approved in any country. Based on announcements of company plans for regulatory submissions and the estimated completion dates for late-stage clinical studies, and assuming the study results are positive, marketing applications for at least 6 antibody therapeutics (benralizumab, tildrakizumab, emicizumab, galcanezumab, ibalizumab, PRO-140) that are now being evaluated in late-stage clinical studies may be submitted during December 2016* or 2017. Other 'antibodies to watch' in 2017 include 20 mAbs are undergoing evaluation in pivotal studies that have estimated primary completion dates in late 2016 or during 2017. Of these, 5 mAbs are for cancer (durvalumab, JNJ-56022473, ublituximab, anetumab ravtansine, glembatumumab vedotin) and 15 mAbs are for non-cancer indications (caplacizumab, lanadelumab, roledumab, tralokinumab, risankizumab, SA237, emapalumab, suptavumab, erenumab, eptinezumab, fremanezumab, fasinumab, tanezumab, lampalizumab, brolucizumab). Positive results from these studies may

  16. Quantitative systems pharmacology: a promising approach for translational pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadkar, K; Kirouac, D; Parrott, N; Ramanujan, S

    Biopharmaceutical companies have increasingly been exploring Quantitative Systems Pharmacology (QSP) as a potential avenue to address current challenges in drug development. In this paper, we discuss the application of QSP modeling approaches to address challenges in the translational of preclinical findings to the clinic, a high risk area of drug development. Three cases have been highlighted with QSP models utilized to inform different questions in translational pharmacology. In the first, a mechanism based asthma model is used to evaluate efficacy and inform biomarker strategy for a novel bispecific antibody. In the second case study, a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway signaling model is used to make translational predictions on clinical response and evaluate novel combination therapies. In the third case study, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model it used to guide administration of oseltamivir in pediatric patients.

  17. Experimental Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Engelfried, J

    1999-01-01

    In this course we will give examples for experimental techniques used in particle physics experiments. After a short introduction, we will discuss applications in silicon microstrip detectors, wire chambers, and single photon detection in Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) counters. A short discussion of the relevant physics processes, mainly different forms of energy loss in matter, is enclosed.

  18. 21 CFR 866.3290 - Gonococcal antibody test (GAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gonococcal antibody test (GAT). 866.3290 Section... antibody test (GAT). (a) Identification. A gonococcal antibody test (GAT) is an in vitro device that..., indirect fluorescent antibody, or radioimmunoassay, antibodies to Neisseria gonorrhoeae in sera...

  19. Immunotherapy: A promising approach to reverse sepsis-induced immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Naeem K; Bohannon, Julia K; Sherwood, Edward R

    2016-09-01

    Sepsis is defined as life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by dysregulated host responses to infection (Third International Consensus definition for Sepsis and septic shock). Despite decades of research, sepsis remains the leading cause of death in intensive care units. More than 40 clinical trials, most of which have targeted the sepsis-associated pro-inflammatory response, have failed. Thus, antibiotics and fluid resuscitation remain the mainstays of supportive care and there is intense need to discover and develop novel, targeted therapies to treat sepsis. Both pre-clinical and clinical studies over the past decade demonstrate unequivocally that sepsis not only causes hyper-inflammation, but also leads to simultaneous adaptive immune system dysfunction and impaired antimicrobial immunity. Evidences for immunosuppression include immune cell depletion (T cells most affected), compromised T cell effector functions, T cell exhaustion, impaired antigen presentation, increased susceptibility to opportunistic nosocomial infections, dysregulated cytokine secretion, and reactivation of latent viruses. Therefore, targeting immunosuppression provides a logical approach to treat protracted sepsis. Numerous pre-clinical studies using immunomodulatory agents such as interleukin-7, anti-programmed cell death 1 antibody (anti-PD-1), anti-programmed cell death 1 ligand antibody (anti-PD-L1), and others have demonstrated reversal of T cell dysfunction and improved survival. Therefore, identifying immunosuppressed patients with the help of specific biomarkers and administering specific immunomodulators holds significant potential for sepsis therapy in the future. This review focusses on T cell dysfunction during sepsis and discusses the potential immunotherapeutic agents to boost T cell function during sepsis and improve host resistance to infection.

  20. Anti-idiotypic antibody: A new strategy for the development of a growth hormone receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Hainan; Zheng, Xin; Khan, Muhammad Akram; Li, Steven

    2015-11-01

    In general, traditional growth hormone receptor antagonist can be divided into two major classes: growth hormone (GH) analogues and anti-growth hormone receptor (GHR) antibodies. Herein, we tried to explore a new class of growth hormone receptor (GHR) antagonist that may have potential advantages over the traditional antagonists. For this, we developed a monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibody growth hormone, termed CG-86. A series of experiments were conducted to characterize and evaluate this antibody, and the results from a competitive receptor-binding assay, Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISA) and epitope mapping demonstrate that CG-86 behaved as a typical Ab2β. Next, we examined its antagonistic activity using in vitro cell models, and the results showed that CG-86 could effectively inhibit growth hormone receptor-mediated signalling and effectively inhibit growth hormone-induced Ba/F3-GHR638 proliferation. In summary, these studies show that an anti-idiotypic antibody (CG-86) has promise as a novel growth hormone receptor antagonist. Furthermore, the current findings also suggest that anti-idiotypic antibody may represent a novel strategy to produce a new class of growth hormone receptor antagonist, and this strategy may be applied with other cytokines or growth factors.

  1. Potential use of humanized antibodies in the treatment of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Niklaus G; Pestalozzi, Bernhard C; Knuth, Alexander; Renner, Christoph

    2006-07-01

    With the growing knowledge of key cellular pathways in tumor induction and evolution, targeted therapies make up an increasing proportion of new drugs entering clinical testing. In the treatment of breast cancer, humanized antibodies have become a major option. The humanized monoclonal antibody trastuzumab (Herceptin); Genentech, Inc., CA, USA) for HER2-overexpressing, metastatic breast cancer, represents a successful agent associated with impressive survival benefits when combined with chemotherapy. Based on impressive results, trastuzumab will become a standard in the adjuvant treatment of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer. The role of trastuzumab in the neoadjuvant setting is promising, but must be further evaluated in large prospective, randomized trials. However, there is still a large proportion of patients overexpressing HER2 that do not respond to trastuzumab. Regarding this patient cohort, the optimal combination of trastuzumab with other agents needs further evaluation. In breast cancer lacking HER2 amplification, the role of the new antibody pertuzumab remains to be defined. The role of antibodies interfering with angiogenesis, tumor stroma or glycoproteins is of a preliminary nature and warrants further investigation. Here, an overview of humanized antibodies in human breast cancer is provided, with emphasis on the recent advances and future prospects in treating malignant breast cancer.

  2. Surface-activated microtiter-plate microarray for simultaneous CRP quantification and viral antibody detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viitala, Sari M; Jääskeläinen, Anne J; Kelo, Eira; Sirola, Helena; Moilanen, Kirsi; Suni, Jukka; Vaheri, Antti; Vapalahti, Olli; Närvänen, Ale

    2013-02-01

    Microarrays are widely used in high-throughput DNA and RNA hybridization tests and recently adopted to protein and small molecule interaction studies in basic research and diagnostics. Parallel detection of serum antibodies and antigens has several potential applications in epidemiologic research, vaccine development, and in the diagnosis of allergies, autoimmunity, and infectious diseases. This study demonstrates an immobilization method for immunoassay-based microarray in conventional 96-well polystyrene plates for a serologic diagnostic method combined with quantitative C-reactive protein (CRP) assay. A synthetic peptide (HIV-1), a recombinant protein (Puumala hantavirus nucleocapsid), and purified virus preparations (Sindbis and adenoviruses) were used as antigens for virus-specific antibody detection and monoclonal anti-CRP antibody for antigen detection. The microarray was based on conventional enzyme immunoassays and densitometry from photographed results. Peptide and recombinant antigens functioned well, while whole virus antigens gave discrepant results in 1 out of 23 samples from the reference method, tested with human sera with various antibody responses. The CRP results were in concordance in the concentration range 0.5-150 mg/L with 2 commercially available CRP assays: ReaScan rapid test (R(2) = 0.9975) and Cobas 6000 analyzer (R(2) =0.9595). The results indicate that microtiter plates provide a promising platform for further development of microarrays for parallel antibody and antigen detection.

  3. On-chip native gel electrophoresis-based immunoassays for tetanus antibody and toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Amy E; Throckmorton, Daniel J; Davenport, Andrew A; Singh, Anup K

    2005-01-15

    By integrating photopolymerized cross-linked polyacrylamide gels within a microfluidic device, we have developed a microanalytical platform for performing electrophoresis-based immunoassays. The microfluidic immunoassays are performed by gel electrophoretic separation and quantitation of bound and unbound antibody or antigen. To retain biological activity of proteins and maintain intact immune complexes, nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis conditions were investigated. Both direct (noncompetitive) and competitive immunoassay formats are demonstrated in microchips. A direct immunoassay was developed for detection of tetanus antibodies in buffer as well as diluted serum samples. After an off-chip incubation step, the immunoassay was completed in less than 3 min and the sigmoidal dose-response curve spanned an antibody concentration range from 0.17 to 260 nM. The minimum detectable antibody concentration was 0.68 nM. A competitive immunoassay was also developed for tetanus toxin C-fragment by allowing unlabeled and fluorescently labeled tetanus toxin C-fragment compete to bind to a limited fixed concentration of tetanus antibody. The immunoassay technique described in this work shows promise as a component of an integrated microfluidic device amenable to automation and relevant to development of clinical diagnostic devices.

  4. Improved antibody production in Chinese hamster ovary cells by ATF4 overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haredy, Ahmad M; Nishizawa, Akitoshi; Honda, Kohsuke; Ohya, Tomoshi; Ohtake, Hisao; Omasa, Takeshi

    2013-12-01

    To improve antibody production in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, the humanized antibody-producing CHO DP-12-SF cell line was transfected with the gene encoding activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), a central factor in the unfolded protein response. Overexpression of ATF4 significantly enhanced the production of antibody in the CHO DP-12-SF cell line. The specific IgG production rate of in the ATF4-overexpressing CHO-ATF4-16 cells was approximately 2.4 times that of the parental host cell line. Clone CHO-ATF4-16 did not show any change in growth rate compared with the parental cells or mock-transfected CHO-DP12-SF cells. The expression levels of mRNAs encoding both the antibody heavy and light chains in the CHO-ATF4-16 clone were analyzed. This analysis showed that ATF4 overexpression improved the total production and specific production rate of antibody without affecting the mRNA transcription level. These results indicate that ATF4 overexpression is a promising method for improving recombinant IgG production in CHO cells.

  5. Design, challenge, and promise of stimuli-responsive nanoantibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edson, Julius A; Kwon, Young Jik

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few years, there have been calls for novel antimicrobials to combat the rise of drug-resistant bacteria. While some promising new discoveries have met this call, it is not nearly enough. The major problem is that although these new promising antimicrobials serve as a short-term solution, they lack the potential to provide a long-term solution. The conventional method of creating new antibiotics relies heavily on the discovery of an antimicrobial compound from another microbe. This paradigm of development is flawed due to the fact that microbes can easily transfer a resistant mechanism if faced with an environmental pressure. Furthermore, there has been some evidence to indicate that the environment of the microbe can provide a hint as to their virulence. Because of this, the use of materials with antimicrobial properties has been garnering interest. Nanoantibiotics, (nAbts), provide a new way to circumvent the current paradigm of antimicrobial discovery and presents a novel mechanism of attack not found in microbes yet; which may lead to a longer-term solution against drug-resistance formation. This allows for environment-specific activation and efficacy of the nAbts but may also open up and create new design methods for various applications. These nAbts provide promise, but there is still ample work to be done in their development. This review looks at possible ways of improving and optimizing nAbts by making them stimuli-responsive, then consider the challenges ahead, and industrial applications.Graphical abstractA graphic detailing how the current paradigm of antibiotic discovery can be circumvented by the use of nanoantibiotics.

  6. Design, challenge, and promise of stimuli-responsive nanoantibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edson, Julius A.; Kwon, Young Jik

    2016-10-01

    Over the past few years, there have been calls for novel antimicrobials to combat the rise of drug-resistant bacteria. While some promising new discoveries have met this call, it is not nearly enough. The major problem is that although these new promising antimicrobials serve as a short-term solution, they lack the potential to provide a long-term solution. The conventional method of creating new antibiotics relies heavily on the discovery of an antimicrobial compound from another microbe. This paradigm of development is flawed due to the fact that microbes can easily transfer a resistant mechanism if faced with an environmental pressure. Furthermore, there has been some evidence to indicate that the environment of the microbe can provide a hint as to their virulence. Because of this, the use of materials with antimicrobial properties has been garnering interest. Nanoantibiotics, (nAbts), provide a new way to circumvent the current paradigm of antimicrobial discovery and presents a novel mechanism of attack not found in microbes yet; which may lead to a longer-term solution against drug-resistance formation. This allows for environment-specific activation and efficacy of the nAbts but may also open up and create new design methods for various applications. These nAbts provide promise, but there is still ample work to be done in their development. This review looks at possible ways of improving and optimizing nAbts by making them stimuli-responsive, then consider the challenges ahead, and industrial applications.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Photonic crystal fiber based antibody detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duval, A; Lhoutellier, M; Jensen, J B

    2004-01-01

    An original approach for detecting labeled antibodies based on strong penetration photonic crystal fibers is introduced. The target antibody is immobilized inside the air-holes of a photonic crystal fiber and the detection is realized by the means of evanescent-wave fluorescence spectroscopy...

  8. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L; Shaw, A; Slupsky, J; Vos, H; Poppema, S

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia were developed to aid in the diagnosis of this subtype of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and to gain better insight into the origin of hairy cells. Three antibodies were found to be of value in the diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia. Antibod

  9. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2013-04-16

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  10. Methods for Selecting Phage Display Antibody Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara-Acevedo, Ricardo; Diez, Paula; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, Maria; Degano, Rosa Maria; Ibarrola, Nieves; Gongora, Rafael; Orfao, Alberto; Fuentes, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The selection process aims sequential enrichment of phage antibody display library in clones that recognize the target of interest or antigen as the library undergoes successive rounds of selection. In this review, selection methods most commonly used for phage display antibody libraries have been comprehensively described.

  11. Receptor antibodies as novel therapeutics for diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussar, Siegfried; Vienberg, Sara Gry; Kahn, C Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Antibodies to receptors can block or mimic hormone action. Taking advantage of receptor isoforms, co-receptors, and other receptor modulating proteins, antibodies and other designer ligands can enhance tissue specificity and provide new approaches to the therapy of diabetes and other diseases....

  12. Photonic crystal fiber based antibody detection

    OpenAIRE

    Duval, A.; Lhoutellier, M; Jensen, J. B.; Hoiby, P E; Missier, V; Pedersen, L. H.; Hansen, Theis Peter; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Bang, Ole

    2004-01-01

    An original approach for detecting labeled antibodies based on strong penetration photonic crystal fibers is introduced. The target antibody is immobilized inside the air-holes of a photonic crystal fiber and the detection is realized by the means of evanescent-wave fluorescence spectroscopy and the use of a transversal illumination setup.

  13. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy for Advanced Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI is sponsoring two clinical trials of a monoclonal antibody called ch14.18, in combination with other drugs, to see if the antibody may be helpful for children or young adults (up to age 21) with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma.

  14. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2011-12-20

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  15. Bioconjugation of antibodies to horseradish peroxidase (hrp)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The bioconjugation of an antibody to an enzymatic reporter such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) affords an effective mechanism by which immunoassay detection of a target antigen can be achieved. The use of heterobifunctional cross—linkers to covalently link antibodies to HRP provides a simple and c...

  16. "Unconventional" Neutralizing Activity of Antibodies Against HIV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies are recognized to be one of the essential elements of the adaptive immune response that must be induced by an effective vaccine against HIV. However, only a limited number of antibodies have been identified to neutralize a broad range of primary isolates of HIV-1 and attempts to induce such antibodies by immunization were unsuccessful. The difficulties to generate such antibodies are mainly due to intrinsic properties of HIV-1 envelope spikes, such as high sequence diversity, heavy glycosylation, and inducible and transient nature of certain epitopes. In vitro neutralizing antibodies are identified using "conventional" neutralization assay which uses phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human PBMCs as target cells. Thus, in essence the assay evaluates HIV-1 replication in CD4+ T cells. Recently, several laboratories including us demonstrated that some monoclonal antibodies and HIV-1-specific polyclonal IgG purified from patient sera, although they do not have neutralizing activity when tested by the "conventional" neutralization assay, do exhibit potent and broad neutralizing activity in "unconventional" ways. The neutralizing activity of these antibodies and IgG fractions is acquired through post-translational modifications, through opsonization of virus particles into macrophages and immature dendritic cells (iDCs), or through expression of antibodies on the surface of HIV-1-susceptible cells. This review will focus on recent findings of this area and point out their potential applications in the development of preventive strategies against HIV.

  17. Serum anti-BPAG1 auto-antibody is a novel marker for human melanoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Shimbo

    Full Text Available Malignant melanoma is one of the most aggressive types of tumor. Because malignant melanoma is difficult to treat once it has metastasized, early detection and treatment are essential. The search for reliable biomarkers of early-stage melanoma, therefore, has received much attention. By using a novel method of screening tumor antigens and their auto-antibodies, we identified bullous pemphigoid antigen 1 (BPAG1 as a melanoma antigen recognized by its auto-antibody. BPAG1 is an auto-antigen in the skin disease bullous pemphigoid (BP and anti-BPAG1 auto-antibodies are detectable in sera from BP patients and are used for BP diagnosis. However, BPAG1 has been viewed as predominantly a keratinocyte-associated protein and a relationship between BPAG1 expression and melanoma has not been previously reported. In the present study, we show that bpag1 is expressed in the mouse F10 melanoma cell line in vitro and F10 melanoma tumors in vivo and that BPAG1 is expressed in human melanoma cell lines (A375 and G361 and normal human melanocytes. Moreover, the levels of anti-BPAG1 auto-antibodies in the sera of melanoma patients were significantly higher than in the sera of healthy volunteers (p<0.01. Furthermore, anti-BPAG1 auto-antibodies were detected in melanoma patients at both early and advanced stages of disease. Here, we report anti-BPAG1 auto-antibodies as a promising marker for the diagnosis of melanoma, and we discuss the significance of the detection of such auto-antibodies in cancer biology and patients.

  18. Initial study with Tc99m antigranulocyte antibody (MAK-47) in detection sources of infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cwikla, J.B.; Buscombe, J.R.; Hilson, A.J. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Medical Physics, Royal Free Hospital and School of Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Janoki, G.A. [FJC National Research Inst. for Radiology and Radiohygene, Dept. of Applied Radioisotopes, Budapest (Hungary)

    1997-12-31

    Antigranulocytes antibodies (AGAB) are antibodies directed against glycoprotein on the surface of granulocytes and as such provides in vivo cell labelling. They are easily labelled with Tc99m and comes a one step labelling technique. 20 patients have been studied 1 h and 4-6 hours after administration of 200 MBq of Tc99m AGAB (MAK-47). Less then 0.5 mg of antibody was given to each patients. Sites of uptake and outside of the reticular-endothelial system were reported as showing positive accumulation. Clinical results were confirmed by microbiological, pathological examinations, clinical follow-up and autopsy. There were 8 patients who had sites of infection confirmed by additional examination. All patients were visualized by Tc99m AGAB (MAK-47). There were 4 cases of osteomyelitis and septic arthritis and 4 cases of focal intra-abdominal infection. Two patients had uptake in non-infected/inflammatory arthritis, both in the knee. The remaining patients had true negative studies. The diagnostic accuracy of this study was as follows: sensitivity 100%, specificity 83%, positive predictive value (PPV) was 80% and negative predictive value (NPV) was 100%. Antigranulocyte antibody (MAK-47) seems to by promising tool in detecting focal infection in bone and soft tissue, except physiological accumulation in some parts of the body. It should be considered that antibodies can have non-specific uptake in non-infected, inflammation sites. It is easy to use and no had allergic reaction and HAMA antibody (human antimouse antibody). (author) 18 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  19. The promises and facts of emergent strategy in public management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Peter

    Public managers are experiencing a growing demand for innovation. One of the promising approaches to instigating innovation is that of emergent strategic patterns (ESPs). According to the literature, the institutional barriers and drivers of ESPs are shaped by the two dominant public management...... models, NPM (the barriers) and governance (the drivers). However, based on an empirical case study of the institutional barriers and drivers for ESPs in the Danish Crime Prevention Council, this article concludes that ESPs are in fact enabled by a much more mixed management model....

  20. Slit/Robo pathway: a promising therapeutic target for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gara, Rishi K; Kumari, Sonam; Ganju, Aditya; Yallapu, Murali M; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C

    2015-01-01

    Axon guidance molecules, slit glycoprotein (Slit) and Roundabout receptor (Robo), have implications in the regulation of physiological processes. Recent studies indicate that Slit and Robo also have important roles in tumorigenesis, cancer progression and metastasis. The Slit/Robo pathway can be considered a master regulator for multiple oncogenic signaling pathways. Herein, we provide a comprehensive review on the role of these molecules and their associated signaling pathways in cancer progression and metastasis. Overall, the current available data suggest that the Slit/Robo pathway could be a promising target for development of anticancer drugs.