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Sample records for antibodies mediate improved

  1. Treatment of Antibody-Mediated Renal Allograft Rejection: Improving Step by Step

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    Nils Lachmann

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the past years we stepwise modified our immunosuppressive treatment regimen for patients with antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR. Here, we describe three consecutive groups treated with different regimens. From 2005 until 2008, we treated all patients with biopsy-proven ABMR with rituximab (500 mg, low-dose (30 g intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG, and plasmapheresis (PPH, 6x (group RLP, n=12. Between 2009 and June 2010, patients received bortezomib (1.3 mg/m2, 4x together with low-dose IVIG and PPH (group BLP, n=11. In July 2010, we increased the IVIG dose and treated all subsequent patients with bortezomib, high-dose IVIG (1.5 g/kg, and PPH (group BHP, n=11. Graft survival at three years after treatment was 73% in group BHP as compared to 45% in group BLP and 25% in group RLP. At six months after treatment median serum creatinine was 2.1 mg/dL, 2.9 mg/dL, and 4.2 mg/dL in groups BHP, BLP, and RLP, respectively (p=0.02. Following treatment, a significant decrease of donor-specific HLA antibody (DSA mean fluorescence intensity from 8467±6876 to 5221±4711 (p=0.01 was observed in group BHP, but not in the other groups. Our results indicate that graft survival, graft function, and DSA levels could be improved along with stepwise modifications to our treatment regimen, that is, the introduction of bortezomib and high-dose IVIG treatment.

  2. Novel Non-Histocompatibility Antigen Mismatched Variants Improve the Ability to Predict Antibody-Mediated Rejection Risk in Kidney Transplant

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    Silvia Pineda

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Transplant rejection is the critical clinical end-point limiting indefinite survival after histocompatibility antigen (HLA mismatched organ transplantation. The predominant cause of late graft loss is antibody-mediated rejection (AMR, a process whereby injury to the organ is caused by donor-specific antibodies, which bind to HLA and non-HLA (nHLA antigens. AMR is incompletely diagnosed as donor/recipient (D/R matching is only limited to the HLA locus and critical nHLA immunogenic antigens remain to be identified. We have developed an integrative computational approach leveraging D/R exome sequencing and gene expression to predict clinical post-transplant outcome. We performed a rigorous statistical analysis of 28 highly annotated D/R kidney transplant pairs with biopsy-confirmed clinical outcomes of rejection [either AMR or T-cell-mediated rejection (CMR] and no-rejection (NoRej, identifying a significantly higher number of mismatched nHLA variants in AMR (ANOVA—p-value = 0.02. Using Fisher’s exact test, we identified 123 variants associated mainly with risk of AMR (p-value < 0.001. In addition, we applied a machine-learning technique to circumvent the issue of statistical power and we found a subset of 65 variants using random forest, that are predictive of post-tx AMR showing a very low error rate. These variants are functionally relevant to the rejection process in the kidney and AMR as they relate to genes and/or expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs that are enriched in genes expressed in kidney and vascular endothelium and underlie the immunobiology of graft rejection. In addition to current D/R HLA mismatch evaluation, additional mismatch nHLA D/R variants will enhance the stratification of post-tx AMR risk even before engraftment of the organ. This innovative study design is applicable in all solid organ transplants, where the impact of mitigating AMR on graft survival may be greater, with considerable benefits on

  3. Intravital imaging reveals improved Kupffer cell-mediated phagocytosis as a mode of action of glycoengineered anti-CD20 antibodies.

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    Grandjean, Capucine L; Montalvao, Fabricio; Celli, Susanna; Michonneau, David; Breart, Beatrice; Garcia, Zacarias; Perro, Mario; Freytag, Olivier; Gerdes, Christian A; Bousso, Philippe

    2016-10-04

    Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) represent an effective treatment for a number of B cell malignancies and autoimmune disorders. Glycoengineering of anti-CD20mAb may contribute to increased anti-tumor efficacy through enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and phagocytosis (ADP) as reported by in vitro studies. However, where and how glycoengineered Ab may potentiate therapeutic responses in vivo is yet to be elucidated. Here, we have performed mouse liver transplants to demonstrate that the liver is sufficient to mediate systemic B cells depletion after anti-CD20 treatment. Relying on intravital two-photon imaging of human CD20-expressing mice, we provide evidence that ADP by Kupffer cells (KC) is a major mechanism for rituximab-mediated B cell depletion. Notably, a glycoengineered anti-mouse CD20 Ab but not its wild-type counterpart triggered potent KC-mediated B cell depletion at low doses. Finally, distinct thresholds for KC phagocytosis were also observed for GA101 (obinutuzumab), a humanized glycoengineered type II anti-CD20 Ab and rituximab. Thus, we propose that enhanced phagocytosis of circulating B cells by KC represents an important in vivo mechanism underlying the improved activity of glycoengineered anti-CD20 mAbs.

  4. Current perspectives on antibody-mediated rejection after lung transplantation

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    Witt CA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Chad A Witt, Ramsey R Hachem Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, USA Abstract: The role of donor-specific antibodies (DSA to human leukocyte antigens and the burden of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR in lung transplantation remain enigmatic. Over the past several years, evidence has been emerging that humoral immunity plays an important role in the development of both acute and chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD. Multiple case reports and case series have identified lung allograft recipients with clinical findings consistent with acute AMR. However, there is currently no widely accepted definition for AMR in lung transplantation, and this has been a significant barrier to furthering our understanding of this form of rejection. Nonetheless, the development of DSA after transplantation has consistently been identified as an independent risk factor for persistent and high-grade acute cellular rejection and CLAD. This has raised the possibility that chronic AMR may be a distinct phenotype of CLAD although evidence supporting this paradigm is still lacking. Additionally, antibodies to lung-restricted self-antigens (collagen V and K-α 1 tubulin have been associated with primary graft dysfunction early and the development of CLAD late after transplantation, and emerging evidence underscores significant interactions between autoimmunity and alloimmunity after transplantation. There is currently an active International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation working group that is developing an operational definition for AMR in lung transplantation. This will be critical to improve our understanding of this form of rejection and conduct clinical trials to identify optimal treatment strategies. This review will summarize the literature on DSA and AMR in lung transplantation and discuss the impact of antibodies to self-antigens on lung

  5. SNAP-tag technology mediates site specific conjugation of antibody fragments with a photosensitizer and improves target specific phototoxicity in tumor cells.

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    Hussain, Ahmad Fawzi; Kampmeier, Florian; von Felbert, Verena; Merk, Hans-F; Tur, Mehmet Kemal; Barth, Stefan

    2011-12-21

    Cancer cells can be killed by photosensitizing agents that induce toxic effects when exposed to nonhazardous light, but this also causes significant damage to surrounding healthy cells. The specificity of photodynamic therapy can be increased by conjugating photosensitizing agents to antibodies and antibody fragments that bind specifically to tumor cell antigens. However, standard conjugation reactions produce heterogeneous products whose targeting specificity and spectroscopic properties can be compromised. In this study, we used an antibody fragment (scFv-425) that binds to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) as a model to investigate the use of SNAP-tag fusions as an improved conjugation strategy. The scFv-425-SNAP-tag fusion protein allowed the specific conjugation of a chlorin e6 photosensitizer modified with O(6)-benzylguanine, generating a homogeneous product that was delivered specifically to EGFR(+) cancer cells and resulted in significant, tumor cell-specific cytotoxicity. The impact of our results on the development of photodynamic therapy is discussed.

  6. Pathogenesis and mechanisms of antibody-mediated hemolysis.

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    Flegel, Willy A

    2015-07-01

    The clinical consequences of antibodies to red blood cells (RBCs) have been studied for a century. Most clinically relevant antibodies can be detected by sensitive in vitro assays. Several mechanisms of antibody-mediated hemolysis are well understood. Such hemolysis after transfusion is reliably avoided in a donor-recipient pair, if one individual is negative for the cognate antigen to which the other has the antibody. Mechanisms of antibody-mediated hemolysis were reviewed based on a presentation at the Strategies to Address Hemolytic Complications of Immune Globulin Infusions Workshop addressing intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and ABO antibodies. The presented topics included the rates of intravascular and extravascular hemolysis; immunoglobulin (Ig)M and IgG isoagglutinins; auto- and alloantibodies; antibody specificity; A, B, A,B, and A1 antigens; A1 versus A2 phenotypes; monocytes-macrophages, other immune cells, and complement; monocyte monolayer assay; antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity; and transfusion reactions due to ABO and other antibodies. Several clinically relevant questions remained unresolved, and diagnostic tools were lacking to routinely and reliably predict the clinical consequences of RBC antibodies. Most hemolytic transfusion reactions associated with IVIG were due to ABO antibodies. Reducing the titers of such antibodies in IVIG may lower the frequency of this kind of adverse event. The only way to stop these events is to have no anti-A or anti-B in the IVIG products. © 2015 AABB.

  7. Not All Antibodies Are Created Equal: Factors That Influence Antibody Mediated Rejection

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    Carrie L. Butler

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Consistent with Dr. Paul Terasaki’s “humoral theory of rejection” numerous studies have shown that HLA antibodies can cause acute and chronic antibody mediated rejection (AMR and decreased graft survival. New evidence also supports a role for antibodies to non-HLA antigens in AMR and allograft injury. Despite the remarkable efforts by leaders in the field who pioneered single antigen bead technology for detection of donor specific antibodies, a considerable amount of work is still needed to better define the antibody attributes that are associated with AMR pathology. This review highlights what is currently known about the clinical context of pre and posttransplant antibodies, antibody characteristics that influence AMR, and the paths after donor specific antibody production (no rejection, subclinical rejection, and clinical dysfunction with AMR.

  8. Antibody-Mediated Internalization of Infectious HIV-1 Virions Differs among Antibody Isotypes and Subclasses.

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    Tay, Matthew Zirui; Liu, Pinghuang; Williams, LaTonya D; McRaven, Michael D; Sawant, Sheetal; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Xu, Thomas T; Dennison, S Moses; Liao, Hua-Xin; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Alam, S Munir; Moody, M Anthony; Hope, Thomas J; Haynes, Barton F; Tomaras, Georgia D

    2016-08-01

    Emerging data support a role for antibody Fc-mediated antiviral activity in vaccine efficacy and in the control of HIV-1 replication by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Antibody-mediated virus internalization is an Fc-mediated function that may act at the portal of entry whereby effector cells may be triggered by pre-existing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 acquisition. Understanding the capacity of HIV-1 antibodies in mediating internalization of HIV-1 virions by primary monocytes is critical to understanding their full antiviral potency. Antibody isotypes/subclasses differ in functional profile, with consequences for their antiviral activity. For instance, in the RV144 vaccine trial that achieved partial efficacy, Env IgA correlated with increased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. decreased vaccine efficacy), whereas V1-V2 IgG3 correlated with decreased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. increased vaccine efficacy). Thus, understanding the different functional attributes of HIV-1 specific IgG1, IgG3 and IgA antibodies will help define the mechanisms of immune protection. Here, we utilized an in vitro flow cytometric method utilizing primary monocytes as phagocytes and infectious HIV-1 virions as targets to determine the capacity of Env IgA (IgA1, IgA2), IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies to mediate HIV-1 infectious virion internalization. Importantly, both broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. PG9, 2G12, CH31, VRC01 IgG) and non-broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. 7B2 mAb, mucosal HIV-1+ IgG) mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions. Furthermore, we found that Env IgG3 of multiple specificities (i.e. CD4bs, V1-V2 and gp41) mediated increased infectious virion internalization over Env IgG1 of the same specificity, while Env IgA mediated decreased infectious virion internalization compared to IgG1. These data demonstrate that antibody-mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions depends on antibody specificity and isotype. Evaluation of the phagocytic potency of vaccine

  9. Antibody-Mediated Rejection: Pathogenesis, Prevention, Treatment, and Outcomes

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    Olivia R. Blume

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR is a major cause of late kidney transplant failure. It is important to have an understanding of human-leukocyte antigen (HLA typing including well-designed studies to determine anti-MHC-class-I-related chain A (MICA and antibody rejection pathogenesis. This can allow for more specific diagnosis and treatment which may improve long-term graft function. HLA-specific antibody detection prior to transplantation allows one to help determine the risk for AMR while detection of DSA along with a biopsy confirms it. It is now appreciated that biopsy for AMR does not have to include diffuse C4d, but does require a closer look at peritubular capillary microvasculature. Although plasmapheresis (PP is effective in removing alloantibodies (DSAs from the circulation, rebound synthesis of alloantibodies can occur. Splenectomy is used in desensitization protocols for ABO incompatible transplants as well as being found to treat AMR refractory to conventional treatment. Also used are agents targeted for plasma cells, B cells, and the complement cascade which are bortezomib rituximab and eculizumab, respectively.

  10. Antibody-Mediated Catalysis in Infection and Immunity.

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    Bowen, Anthony; Wear, Maggie; Casadevall, Arturo

    2017-09-01

    The existence of catalytic antibodies has been known for decades. Natural antibodies capable of cleaving nucleic acid, protein, and polysaccharide substrates have been described. Although the discovery of catalytic antibodies initially aroused great interest because of their promise for the development of new catalysts, their enzymatic performance has been disappointing due to low reaction rates. However, in the areas of infection and immunity, where processes often occur over much longer times and involve high antibody concentrations, even low catalytic rates have the potential to influence biological outcomes. In this regard, the presence of catalytic antibodies recognizing host antigens has been associated with several autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, naturally occurring catalytic antibodies to microbial determinants have been correlated with resistance to infection. Recently, there has been substantial interest in harnessing the power of antibody-mediated catalysis against microbial antigens for host defense. Additional work is needed, however, to better understand the prevalence, function, and structural basis of catalytic activity in antibodies. Here we review the available information and suggest that antibody-mediated catalysis is a fertile area for study with broad applications in infection and immunity. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. Antibody-Mediated Clearance of Alphavirus Infection from Neurons

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    Levine, Beth; Hardwick, J. Marie; Trapp, Bruce D.; Crawford, Thomas O.; Bollinger, Robert C.; Griffin, Diane E.

    1991-11-01

    Humoral immunity is important for protection against viral infection and neutralization of extracellular virus, but clearance of virus from infected tissues is thought to be mediated solely by cellular immunity. However, in a SCID mouse model of persistent alphavirus encephalomyelitis, adoptive transfer of hyperimmune serum resulted in clearance of infectious virus and viral RNA from the nervous system, whereas adoptive transfer of sensitized T lymphocytes had no effect on viral replication. Three monoclonal antibodies to two different epitopes on the E2 envelope glycoprotein mediated viral clearance. Treatment of alphavirus-infected primary cultured rat neurons with these monoclonal antibodies to E2 resulted in decreased viral protein synthesis, followed by gradual termination of mature infectious virion production. Thus, antibody can mediate clearance of alphavirus infection from neurons by restricting viral gene expression.

  12. Multifactorial aspects of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapur, R.

    2014-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focuses on diseases of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction via FcγRs on phagocytes, in particular regarding platelets in fetal or neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) and red blood cells (RBC) in hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN).

  13. Antibody-mediated immunotherapy against chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

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    Gao, Ying; Zhang, Tian-Ying; Yuan, Quan; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2017-08-03

    The currently available drugs to treat hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection include interferons and nucleos(t)ide analogs, which can only induce disease remission and are inefficient for the functional cure of patients with chronic HBV infection (CHB). Since high titers of circulating hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) may be essential to exhaust the host anti-HBV immune response and they cannot be significantly reduced by current drugs, new antiviral strategies aiming to suppress serum hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) could help restore virus-specific immune responses and promote the eradication of the virus. As an alternative strategy, immunotherapy with HBsAg-specific antibodies has shown some direct HBsAg suppression effects in several preclinical and clinical trial studies. However, most described previously HBsAg-specific antibodies only had very short-term HBsAg suppression effects in CHB patients and animal models mimicking persistent HBV infection. More-potent antibodies with long-lasting HBsAg clearance effects are required for the development of the clinical application of antibody-mediated immunotherapy for CHB treatment. Our recent study described a novel mAb E6F6 that targets a unique epitope on HBsAg. It could durably suppress the levels of HBsAg and HBV DNA via Fcγ receptor-dependent phagocytosis in vivo. In this commentary, we summarize the current research progress, including the therapeutic roles and mechanisms of antibody-mediated HBV clearance as well as the epitope-determined therapeutic potency of the antibody. These insights may provide some clues and guidance to facilitate the development of therapeutic antibodies against persistent viral infection.

  14. Treatment of Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Kidney Transplantation

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    Magdalena Durlik

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR is a relatively rare but severe complication in kidney transplantation associated with increased risk of graft loss. Diagnosis of acute and chronic AMR is based on typical histological hallmarks, deposition of C4d in peritubular capillaries and presence of donor-specific antibodies (DSA. Many novel and attractive treatment options have become available in recent years: antibody removal and production inhibition (plasmapheresis, IVIg, B cell depletion (rituximab, plasma cell depletion and apoptosis (bortezomib, and complement activation inhibition (eculizumab. Standard therapy is based on PP and IVIg. Preliminary results with new agents are encouraging but require randomised clinical trials and long-term follow-up.

  15. HIV-Specific Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity (ADCC) -Mediating Antibodies Decline while NK Cell Function Increases during Antiretroviral Therapy (ART)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov Jensen, Sanne; Fomsgaard, Anders; Borggren, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Understanding alterations in HIV-specific immune responses during antiretroviral therapy (ART), such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), is important in the development of novel strategies to control HIV-1 infection. This study included 53 HIV-1 positive individuals. We evaluated...... during ART. These findings suggest improved cytotoxic function of the NK cells if initiating ART early during infection, while the levels of ADCC mediating antibodies declined during ART....

  16. Aggregation of hapten-bearing liposomes mediated by specific antibodies.

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    Lee, K D; Kantor, A B; Nir, S; Owicki, J C

    1993-01-01

    We studied specific membrane-membrane interactions mediated by ligand-receptor binding in a model system, which consisted of (a) FG3P, the fluorescein hapten attached to a phospholipid by a peptidyl spacer as described previously (Petrossian, A., A.B. Kantor, and J.C. Owicki. 1985. J. Lipid Res. 26:767-773), (b) antifluorescein monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), and (c) phospholipid vesicles (liposomes) into which the FG3P was incorporated. The aggregation of the hapten-bearing liposomes by four MAbs was studied by differential centrifugation. The ability of the MAbs to induce vesicle aggregation varied considerably and correlated inversely with affinity. Aggregation by one of the MAbs was studied in more detail by turbidimetry and freeze-fracture electron microscopy of samples frozen throughout the course of the aggregation. Rapid freezing was achieved with a double propane-jet apparatus. The aggregate morphologies and the time evolution of the aggregate size distribution were obtained from the two-dimensional fracture views with a stereological correction. The aggregation kinetics were simulated by considering dynamical aggregation according to a mass-action model with two parameters, the rate constants for antibody-mediated vesicle aggregation and disaggregation. Both rate constants were orders of magnitude lower than the rate constants for the corresponding interactions of antibodies with haptens either in solution or on vesicles under nonaggregating conditions. Images FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 7 PMID:8471733

  17. Onconeural antibodies: improved detection and clinical correlations.

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    Storstein, Anette; Monstad, Sissel Evy; Haugen, Mette; Mazengia, Kibret; Veltman, Dana; Lohndal, Emilia; Aarseth, Jan; Vedeler, Christian

    2011-03-01

    Onconeural antibodies are found in many patients with paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) and define the disease as paraneoplastic. The study describes the presence of onconeural antibodies and PNS in 555 patients with neurological symptoms and confirmed cancer within five years, and compares the diagnostic accuracy of different antibody assays (immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence and immunoblot). Onconeural antibodies were found in 11.9% of the patients by immunoprecipitation, in 7.0% by immunofluorescence and in 6.3% by immunoblot. PNS were present in 81.8% of the cancer patients that were seropositive by immunoprecipitation. Immunofluorescence and immunoblot failed to detect onconeural antibodies in almost one third of the PNS cases. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Antibody-Mediated Rejection in a Blood Group A-Transgenic Mouse Model of ABO-Incompatible Heart Transplantation.

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    Motyka, Bruce; Fisicaro, Nella; Wang, Szu-I; Kratochvil, Annetta; Labonte, Katrina; Tao, Kesheng; Pearcey, Jean; Marshall, Thuraya; Mengel, Michael; Sis, Banu; Fan, Xiaohu; dʼApice, Anthony J F; Cowan, Peter J; West, Lori J

    2016-06-01

    ABO-incompatible (ABOi) organ transplantation is performed owing to unremitting donor shortages. Defining mechanisms of antibody-mediated rejection, accommodation, and tolerance of ABOi grafts is limited by lack of a suitable animal model. We report generation and characterization of a murine model to enable study of immunobiology in the setting of ABOi transplantation. Transgenesis of a construct containing human A1- and H-transferases under control of the ICAM-2 promoter was performed in C57BL/6 (B6) mice. A-transgenic (A-Tg) mice were assessed for A-antigen expression by histology and flow cytometry. B6 wild-type (WT) mice were sensitized with blood group A-human erythrocytes; others received passive anti-A monoclonal antibody and complement after heart transplant. Serum anti-A antibodies were assessed by hemagglutination. "A-into-O" transplantation (major histocompatibility complex syngeneic) was modeled by transplanting hearts from A-Tg mice into sensitized or nonsensitized WT mice. Antibody-mediated rejection was assessed by morphology/immunohistochemistry. A-Tg mice expressed A-antigen on vascular endothelium and other cells including erythrocytes. Antibody-mediated rejection was evident in 15/17 A-Tg grafts in sensitized WT recipients (median titer, 1:512), with 2 showing hyperacute rejection and rapid cessation of graft pulsation. Hyperacute rejection was observed in 8/8 A-Tg grafts after passive transfer of anti-A antibody and complement into nonsensitized recipients. Antibody-mediated rejection was not observed in A-Tg grafts transplanted into nonsensitized mice. A-Tg heart grafts transplanted into WT mice with abundant anti-A antibody manifests characteristic features of antibody-mediated rejection. These findings demonstrate an effective murine model to facilitate study of immunologic features of ABOi transplantation and to improve potential diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  19. Comparison of Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity and Virus Neutralization by HIV-1 Env-Specific Monoclonal Antibodies.

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    von Bredow, Benjamin; Arias, Juan F; Heyer, Lisa N; Moldt, Brian; Le, Khoa; Robinson, James E; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Burton, Dennis R; Evans, David T

    2016-07-01

    Although antibodies to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein have been studied extensively for their ability to block viral infectivity, little data are currently available on nonneutralizing functions of these antibodies, such as their ability to eliminate virus-infected cells by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). HIV-1 Env-specific antibodies of diverse specificities, including potent broadly neutralizing and nonneutralizing antibodies, were therefore tested for ADCC against cells infected with a lab-adapted HIV-1 isolate (HIV-1NL4-3), a primary HIV-1 isolate (HIV-1JR-FL), and a simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) adapted for pathogenic infection of rhesus macaques (SHIVAD8-EO). In accordance with the sensitivity of these viruses to neutralization, HIV-1NL4-3-infected cells were considerably more sensitive to ADCC, both in terms of the number of antibodies and magnitude of responses, than cells infected with HIV-1JR-FL or SHIVAD8-EO ADCC activity generally correlated with antibody binding to Env on the surfaces of virus-infected cells and with viral neutralization; however, neutralization was not always predictive of ADCC, as instances of ADCC in the absence of detectable neutralization, and vice versa, were observed. These results reveal incomplete overlap in the specificities of antibodies that mediate these antiviral activities and provide insights into the relationship between ADCC and neutralization important for the development of antibody-based vaccines and therapies for combating HIV-1 infection. This study provides fundamental insights into the relationship between antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and virus neutralization that may help to guide the development of antibody-based vaccines and immunotherapies for the prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Ocaratuzumab, an Fc-engineered antibody demonstrates enhanced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

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    Cheney, Carolyn M; Stephens, Deborah M; Mo, Xiaokui; Rafiq, Sarwish; Butchar, Jonathan; Flynn, Joseph M; Jones, Jeffrey A; Maddocks, Kami; O'Reilly, Adrienne; Ramachandran, Abhijit; Tridandapani, Susheela; Muthusamy, Natarajan; Byrd, John C

    2014-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is common in both developed and developing nations where the need for inexpensive and convenient administration of therapy is apparent. Ocaratuzumab is a novel Fc-engineered humanized IgG1 anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb) designed for effective antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) at very low concentrations that may facilitate sub-cutaneous (vs. intravenous) dosing. Here, we report ocaratuzumab's potency against CLL cells. In vitro assessment of ocaratuzumab's direct cytotoxicity (DC), complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC), antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), and ADCC was performed on CLL cells. Ocaratuzumab induced DC, CDC, and ADCP similarly to rituximab or ofatumumab (anti-CD20 mAbs). However, ocaratuzumab showed an advantage in NK cell-mediated ADCC over these antibodies. In allogeneic ADCC, [E:T (effector:target) ratios = 25:1, 12:1, 6:1], ocaratuzumab (10 µg/mL) improved ADCC by ~3-fold compared with rituximab or ofatumumab (P<0.001 all tested E:T ratios). Notably, the superiority of ocaratuzumab-induced ADCC was observed at low concentrations (0.1-10 ug/ml; P<0.03; allogeneic assays). In extended allogeneic ADCC E:T titration, ocaratuzumab (0.1 µg/mL) demonstrated 19.4% more cytotoxicity than rituximab (E:T = 0.38:1; P = 0.0066) and 21.5% more cytotoxicity than ofatumumab (E:T = 1.5:1; P = 0.0015). In autologous ADCC, ocaratuzumab (10 µg/mL) demonstrated ~1.5-fold increase in cytotoxicity compared with rituximab or ofatumumab at all E:T ratios tested (E:Ts = 25:1,12:1,6:1; all P<0.001). Obinutuzumab, a glyco-engineered anti-CD20 mAb, showed no improvement in ADCC activity compared with ocaratuzumab. The enhanced ADCC of ocaratuzumab suggests that it may be effective at low concentrations. If supported by clinical investigation, this feature could potentially allow for subcutaneous dosing at low doses that could expand the potential of administering chemoimmunotherapy in developing

  1. HIV-Specific Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity (ADCC) -Mediating Antibodies Decline while NK Cell Function Increases during Antiretroviral Therapy (ART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Sanne Skov; Fomsgaard, Anders; Borggren, Marie; Tingstedt, Jeanette Linnea; Gerstoft, Jan; Kronborg, Gitte; Rasmussen, Line Dahlerup; Pedersen, Court; Karlsson, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Understanding alterations in HIV-specific immune responses during antiretroviral therapy (ART), such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), is important in the development of novel strategies to control HIV-1 infection. This study included 53 HIV-1 positive individuals. We evaluated the ability of effector cells and antibodies to mediate ADCC separately and in combination using the ADCC-PanToxiLux assay. The ability of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to mediate ADCC was significantly higher in individuals who had been treated with ART before seroconversion, compared to the individuals initiating ART at a low CD4+ T cell count (ART-naïve individuals. The frequency of CD16 expressing natural killer (NK) cells correlated with both the duration of ART and Granzyme B (GzB) activity. In contrast, the plasma titer of antibodies mediating ADCC declined during ART. These findings suggest improved cytotoxic function of the NK cells if initiating ART early during infection, while the levels of ADCC mediating antibodies declined during ART.

  2. Torque Teno Virus Load-Inverse Association With Antibody-Mediated Rejection After Kidney Transplantation.

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    Schiemann, Martin; Puchhammer-Stöckl, Elisabeth; Eskandary, Farsad; Kohlbeck, Philip; Rasoul-Rockenschaub, Susanne; Heilos, Andreas; Kozakowski, Nicolas; Görzer, Irene; Kikić, Željko; Herkner, Harald; Böhmig, Georg A; Bond, Gregor

    2017-02-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) represents one of the cardinal causes of late allograft loss after kidney transplantation, and there is great need for noninvasive tools improving early diagnosis of this rejection type. One promising strategy might be the quantification of peripheral blood DNA levels of the highly prevalent and apathogenic Torque Teno virus (TTV), which might mirror the overall level of immunosuppression and thus help determine the risk of alloimmune response. To assess the association between TTV load in the peripheral blood and AMR, 715 kidney transplant recipients (median, 6.3 years posttransplantation) were subjected to a systematical cross-sectional AMR screening and, in parallel, TTV quantification. Eighty-six of these recipients had donor-specific antibodies and underwent protocol biopsy, AMR-positive patients (n = 46) showed only 25% of the TTV levels measured in patients without AMR (P = 0.003). In a generalized linear model, higher TTV levels were associated with a decreased risk for AMR after adjustment for potential confounders (risk ratio 0.94 per TTV log level; 95% confidence interval 0.90-0.99; P = 0.02). Future studies will have to clarify whether longitudinal assessment of TTV load might predict AMR risk and help guide the type and intensity of immunosuppression to prevent antibody-mediated graft injury.

  3. Postoperative rebound of antiblood type antibodies and antibody-mediated rejection after ABO-incompatible living-related kidney transplantation.

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    Ishida, Hideki; Kondo, Tsunenori; Shimizu, Tomokazu; Nozaki, Taiji; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine whether postoperative antiblood type antibody rebound is attributed to kidney allograft rejection in ABO blood type-incompatible (ABO-I) living-related kidney transplantation (KTx). A total of 191 ABO-I recipients who received ABO-I living-related KTx between 2001 and 2013 were divided into two groups: Group 1 consisted of low rebound [(≦1:32), N = 170] and Group 2 consisted of high rebound [(≧1:64), N = 21], according to the levels of the rebounded antiblood type antibodies within 1 year after transplantation. No prophylactic treatment for rejection was administered for elevated antiblood type antibodies, regardless of the levels of the rebounded antibodies. Within 1 year after transplantation, T-cell-mediated rejection was observed in 13 of 170 recipients (13/170, 8%) in Group 1 and in 2 of 21 recipients (2/21, 10%) in Group 2 (Groups 1 vs. 2, P = 0.432). Antibody-mediated rejection was observed in 15 of 170 recipients (15/170, 9%) and 2 of 21 recipients (2/21, 10%) in Groups 1 and 2, respectively (P = 0.898). In this study, we found no correlation between the postoperative antiblood type antibody rebound and the incidence of acute rejection. We concluded that no treatment is necessary for rebounded antiblood type antibodies. © 2014 Steunstichting ESOT.

  4. Probable C4d-negative accelerated acute antibody-mediated rejection due to non-HLA antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niikura, Takahito; Yamamoto, Izumi; Nakada, Yasuyuki; Kamejima, Sahoko; Katsumata, Haruki; Yamakawa, Takafumi; Furuya, Maiko; Mafune, Aki; Kobayashi, Akimitsu; Tanno, Yudo; Miki, Jun; Yamada, Hiroki; Ohkido, Ichiro; Tsuboi, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Yokoo, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    We report a case of probable C4d-negative accelerated acute antibody-mediated rejection due to non-HLA antibodies. A 44 year-old male was admitted to our hospital for a kidney transplant. The donor, his wife, was an ABO minor mismatch (blood type O to A) and had Gitelman syndrome. Graft function was delayed; his serum creatinine level was 10.1 mg/dL at 3 days after transplantation. Open biopsy was performed immediately; no venous thrombosis was observed during surgery. Histology revealed moderate peritubular capillaritis and mild glomerulitis without C4d immunoreactivity. Flow cytometric crossmatching was positive, but no panel-reactive antibodies against HLA or donor-specific antibodies (DSAbs) to major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A (MICA) were detected. Taken together, we diagnosed him with probable C4d-negative accelerated antibody-mediated rejection due to non-HLA, non-MICA antibodies, the patient was treated with steroid pulse therapy (methylprednisolone 500 mg/day for 3 days), plasma exchange, intravenous immunoglobulin (40 g/body), and rituximab (200 mg/body) were performed. Biopsy at 58 days after transplantation, at which time S-Cr levels were 1.56 mg/dL, found no evidence of rejection. This case, presented with a review of relevant literature, demonstrates that probable C4d-negative accelerated acute AMR can result from non-HLA antibodies. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  5. Survivors Remorse: antibody-mediated protection against HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, George K; Pazgier, Marzena; DeVico, Anthony L

    2017-01-01

    It is clear that antibodies can play a pivotal role in preventing the transmission of HIV-1 and large efforts to identify an effective antibody-based vaccine to quell the epidemic. Shortly after HIV-1 was discovered as the cause of AIDS, the search for epitopes recognized by neutralizing antibodies became the driving strategy for an antibody-based vaccine. Neutralization escape variants were discovered shortly thereafter, and, after almost three decades of investigation, it is now known that autologous neutralizing antibody responses and their selection of neutralization resistant HIV-1 variants can lead to broadly neutralizing antibodies in some infected individuals. This observation drives an intensive effort to identify a vaccine to elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies. In contrast, there has been less systematic study of antibody specificities that must rely mainly or exclusively on other protective mechanisms, although non-human primate (NHP) studies as well as the RV144 vaccine trial indicate that non-neutralizing antibodies can contribute to protection. Here we propose a novel strategy to identify new epitope targets recognized by these antibodies for which viral escape is unlikely or impossible. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Relationship between natural and heme-mediated antibody polyreactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadzhieva, Maya; Vassilev, Tchavdar [Stephan Angelov Institute of Microbiology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Bayry, Jagadeesh; Kaveri, Srinivas; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR-S 1138, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, F-75006 Paris (France); INSERM, UMR-S 1138, F-75006 Paris (France); Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMR-S 1138, F-75006 Paris (France); Dimitrov, Jordan D., E-mail: jordan.dimitrov@crc.jussieu.fr [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR-S 1138, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, F-75006 Paris (France); INSERM, UMR-S 1138, F-75006 Paris (France); Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMR-S 1138, F-75006 Paris (France)

    2016-03-25

    Polyreactive antibodies represent a considerable fraction of the immune repertoires. Some antibodies acquire polyreactivity post-translationally after interaction with various redox-active substances, including heme. Recently we have demonstrated that heme binding to a naturally polyreactive antibody (SPE7) results in a considerable broadening of the repertoire of recognized antigens. A question remains whether the presence of certain level of natural polyreactivity of antibodies is a prerequisite for heme-induced further extension of antigen binding potential. Here we used a second monoclonal antibody (Hg32) with unknown specificity and absence of intrinsic polyreactivity as a model to study the potential of heme to induce polyreactivity of antibodies. We demonstrated that exposure to heme greatly extends the antigen binding potential of Hg32, suggesting that the intrinsic binding promiscuity is not a prerequisite for the induction of polyreactivity by heme. In addition we compared the kinetics and thermodynamics of the interaction of heme-exposed antibodies with a panel of unrelated antigens. These analyses revealed that the two heme-sensitive antibodies adopt different mechanisms of binding to the same set of antigens. This study contributes to understanding the phenomenon of induced antibody polyreactivity. The data may also be of importance for understanding of physiological and pathological roles of polyreactive antibodies. - Highlights: • Exposure of certain monoclonal IgE antibodies to heme results in gain of antigen binding polyreactivity. • Natural polyreactivity of antibodies is dispensable for acquisition of polyreactivity through interaction with heme. • Heme-induced monoclonal IgE antibodies differ in their thermodynamic mechanisms of antigen recognition.

  7. Natural killer (NK cell mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC in tumour immunotherapy with therapeutic antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursula Jördis Eva Seidel

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade several therapeutic antibodies have been FDA and EMEA approved. Although their mechanisms of action in vivo is not fully elucidated, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC mediated by natural killer (NK cells is presumed to be a key effector function. A substantial role of ADCC has been demonstrated in vitro and in mouse tumour models. However, a direct in vivo effect of ADCC in tumour reactivity in humans remains to be shown. Several studies revealed a predictive value of FcγRIIIa-V158F polymorphism in monoclonal antibody treatment, indicating a potential effect of ADCC on outcome for certain indications. Furthermore, the use of therapeutic antibodies after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an interesting option. Studying the role of the FcγRIIIa-V158F polymorphism and the influence of KIR-receptor-ligand incompatibility on ADCC in this approach may contribute to future transplantation strategies. Despite the success of approved second-generation antibodies in the treatment of several malignancies, efforts are made to further augment ADCC in vivo by antibody engineering. Here, we review currently used therapeutic antibodies for which ADCC has been suggested as effector function.

  8. Late antibody-mediated rejection after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation during Gram-negative sepsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. de Weerd (Annelies); A.G. Vonk (Alieke); H. van der Hoek (Hans); M. van Groningen (Marian); W. Weimar (Willem); M.G.H. Betjes (Michiel); M. Agteren (Madelon)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The major challenge in ABO-incompatible transplantation is to minimize antibody-mediated rejection. Effective reduction of the anti-ABO blood group antibodies at the time of transplantation has made ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation a growing practice in our hospital

  9. Recombinant human C1-inhibitor prevents acute antibody-mediated rejection in alloimmunized baboons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tillou, Xavier; Poirier, Nicolas; Le Bas-Bernardet, Stephanie; Hervouet, Jeremy; Minault, David; Renaudin, Karine; Vistoli, Fabio; Karam, Georges; Daha, Mohamed; Soulillou, Jean Paul; Blancho, Gilles

    Acute antibody-mediated rejection is an unsolved issue in transplantation, especially in the context of pretransplant immunization. The deleterious effect of preformed cytotoxic anti-HLA antibodies through complement activation is well proven, but very little is known concerning complement blockade

  10. A Model of Acute Antibody-Mediated Renal Allograft Rejection in the Sensitized Rata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Sharmila Ramessur; Mulley, William R; Kanellis, John; Nikolic-Paterson, David J; Ma, Frank Y

    2017-07-31

    Antibody-mediated rejection in transplant recipients with preexisting donor-specific antibodies is a challenging clinical situation. However, we lack suitable animal models to study this scenario. The aim of this study was to develop an animal model of acute antibody-mediated rejection of renal allografts in sensitized recipients. We used major histocompatibility complex class I and II incompatible rat strains (Dark Agouti RT1av1 and Lewis RT1l), which develop aggressive rejection. Recipient Lewis rats were immunized with donor strain spleen cells 5 days before surgery to induce donor-specific antibodies. Rats underwent bilateral nephrectomy and orthotopic transplant of the donor kidney. To minimize T-cell-mediated rejection while allowing the development of donor-specific antibodies, recipient animals were given tacrolimus starting the day before surgery. Hyperacute rejection was not seen, but acute graft dysfunction was evident on day 1 with a rapid deterioration of graft function by day 3. Histologic damage featured glomerulopathy, capillaritis, capillary thrombosis, and acute tubular injury. Recipients exhibited high serum levels of donor-specific antibodies and deposition of immunoglobulin G and C4d on graft endothelium. Immunostaining showed substantial endothelial damage, fibrin deposition in glomerular and peritubular capillaries, and infiltrates of macrophages, neutrophils, and natural killer cells. T-cell activation was efficiently suppressed by tacrolimus. We have developed a clinically relevant model of acute antibody-mediated rejection in recipients with preexisting donor-specific antibodies, which is suitable for testing novel therapies.

  11. Anti-DNA antibody mediated catalysis is isotype dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yumin; Eryilmaz, Ertan; Zhang, Qiuting; Cowburn, David; Putterman, Chaim

    2016-01-01

    Anti-DNA antibodies are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus, and participate in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis by cross-reacting with multiple renal antigens. Previously, using a panel of murine anti-DNA IgGs that share identical variable regions but that differ in the constant regions, we demonstrated that the cross-reaction and renal pathogenicity of anti-DNA antibodies are isotype dependent. In this study, we investigated the catalytic potential of this anti-DNA antibody panel, and determined its isotype dependency. The three isotype switch variants (IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b) and the parent IgG3 PL9-11 anti-DNA antibodies were compared in their catalysis of 500 base pair linear double stranded DNA and a 12-mer peptide (ALWPPNLHAWVP), by gel analysis, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The binding affinity of anti-DNA antibodies to double stranded DNA and peptide antigens were assessed by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance. We found that the PL9-11 antibody isotypes vary significantly in their potential to catalyze the cleavage of both linear and double stranded DNA and the proteolysis of peptides. The degree of the cleavage and proteolysis increases with the incubation temperature and time. While different PL9-11 isotypes have the same initial attack sites within the ALWPPNLHAWVP peptide, there was no correlation between binding affinity to the peptide and proteolysis rates. In conclusion, the catalytic properties of anti-DNA antibodies are isotype dependent. This finding provides further evidence that antibodies that share the same variable region, but which have different constant regions, are functionally distinct. The catalytic effects modulated by antibody constant regions need to be considered in the design of therapeutic antibodies (abzymes) and peptides designed to block pathogenic autoantibodies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Recombinant human C1-inhibitor prevents acute antibody-mediated rejection in alloimmunized baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillou, Xavier; Poirier, Nicolas; Le Bas-Bernardet, Stéphanie; Hervouet, Jeremy; Minault, David; Renaudin, Karine; Vistoli, Fabio; Karam, Georges; Daha, Mohamed; Soulillou, Jean Paul; Blancho, Gilles

    2010-07-01

    Acute antibody-mediated rejection is an unsolved issue in transplantation, especially in the context of pretransplant immunization. The deleterious effect of preformed cytotoxic anti-HLA antibodies through complement activation is well proven, but very little is known concerning complement blockade to prevent/cure this rejection. Here, we used a baboon model of preimmunization to explore the prevention of acute antibody-mediated rejection by an early inhibition of the classical complement pathway using human recombinant C1-inhibitor. Baboons were immunized against peripheral blood mononuclear cells from allogeneic donors and, once a specific and stable immunization had been established, they received a kidney from the same donor. Rejection occurred at day 2 posttransplant in untreated presensitized recipients, with characteristic histological lesions and complement deposition. As recombinant human C1-inhibitor blocks in vitro cytotoxicity induced by donor-specific antibodies, other alloimmunized baboons received the drug thrice daily intravenously during the first 5 days after transplant. Rejection was prevented during this treatment but occurred after discontinuation of treatment. We show here that early blockade of complement activation by recombinant human C1-inhibitor can prevent acute antibody-mediated rejection in presensitized recipients. This treatment could also be useful in other forms of acute antibody-mediated rejection caused by induced antibodies.

  13. Intracellular antibody-mediated immunity and the role of TRIM21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, William A; Mallery, Donna L; Rhodes, David A; Trowsdale, John; James, Leo C

    2011-11-01

    Protection against bacterial and viral pathogens by antibodies has always been thought to end at the cell surface. Once inside the cell, a pathogen was understood to be safe from humoral immunity. However, it has now been found that antibodies can routinely enter cells attached to viral particles and mediate an intracellular immune response. Antibody-coated virions are detected inside the cell by means of an intracellular antibody receptor, TRIM21, which directs their degradation by recruitment of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. In this article we assess how this discovery alters our view of the way in which antibodies neutralise viral infection. We also consider the antiviral function of TRIM21 in the context of its other reported roles in immune signalling and autoimmunity. Finally, we discuss the conceptual implications of intracellular antibody immunity and how it alters our view of the discrete separation of extracellular and intracellular environments. Copyright © 2011 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Acute antibody-mediated rejection of skin grafts without involvement of granulocytes or complement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogman, M.J.; Cornelissen, I.M.; Koene, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    In immunosuppressed mice that carry rat skin xeno-grafts, acute antibody-mediated graft rejection (AAR) can be induced by intravenous administration of mouse anti-rat globulin. Dependent on the amount of antibody injected and on the complement status of the recipient, an Arthus-like or a Shwartzman-like pattern of vasculitis occurs. The role of polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMNs) in either type of vasculitis was tested by inducing AAR in recipients depleted of PMNs by total body irradiation. Despite the absence of PMNs in the graft vessels, AAR occurred both in the Arthus-like and in the Shwartzman-like type. Moreover, AAR could be elicited in PMN-depleted recipients that were complement-depleted by cobra venom factor treatment or were congenitally C5-deficient. We conclude that neither the PMN nor complement is an essential mediator the PMN nor complement is an essential mediator in this form of antibody-mediated vasculitis

  15. Antigenic specificity of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity directed against human immunodeficiency virus in antibody-positive sera.

    OpenAIRE

    Koup, R A; Sullivan, J L; Levine, P H; Brewster, F; Mahr, A; Mazzara, G; McKenzie, S; Panicali, D

    1989-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) specific for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been described for HIV-infected individuals. To determine the antigenic specificity of this immune response and to define its relationship to the disease state, an ADCC assay was developed using Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell line targets infected with vaccinia virus vectors expressing HIV proteins. The vaccinia virus vectors induced appropriate HIV proteins (envelope g...

  16. Long-term experience of plasmapheresis in antibody-mediated rejection in renal transplantation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brown, C M

    2009-11-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) continues to pose a serious challenge in renal transplantation with potentially devastating consequences. Treatment options for this condition include plasmapheresis, high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), plasmapheresis with low-dose IVIG, and the use of rituximab (anti-CD20 chimeric antibody). We previously reported on the short-term outcome of plasmapheresis as a rescue therapy for AMR in our centre. We now report on the long-term follow up.

  17. Intracellular antibody-caspase-mediated cell killing: An approach for application in cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Eric; Rabbitts, Terence H.

    2000-10-01

    Antibodies have been expressed inside cells in an attempt to ablate the function of oncogene products. To make intracellular antibodies more generally applicable and effective in cancer therapy, we have devised a method in which programmed cell death or apoptosis can be triggered by specific antibody-antigen interaction. When intracellular antibodies are linked to caspase 3, the "executioner" in the apoptosis pathway, and bind to the target antigen, the caspase 3 moieties are self-activated and thereby induce cell killing. We have used this strategy in a model system with two pairs of intracellular antibodies and antigens. In vivo coexpression of an antibody-caspase 3 fusion with its antigenic target induced apoptosis that was specific for antibody, antigen, and active caspase 3. Moreover, the antibody-caspase 3 fusion protein was not toxic to cells in the absence of antigen. Therefore, intracellular antibody-mediated apoptosis should be useful as a specific therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancers, a situation where target cell killing is required.

  18. Biomimetic Nanosponges for Treating Antibody-Mediated Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yao; Fang, Ronnie H; Zhang, Liangfang

    2018-04-18

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by overactive immunity, where the body's defense system launches an attack against itself. If left unchecked, this can result in the destruction of healthy tissue and significantly affect patient well-being. In the case of type II autoimmune hypersensitivities, autoreactive antibodies attack the host's own cells or extracellular matrix. Current clinical treatment modalities for managing this class of disease are generally nonspecific and face considerable limitations. In this Topical Review, we cover emerging therapeutic strategies, with an emphasis on novel nanomedicine platforms. Specifically, the use of biomimetic cell membrane-coated nanosponges that are capable of specifically binding and neutralizing pathological antibodies will be explored. There is significant untapped potential in the application of nanotechnology for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, and continued development along this line may help to eventually change the clinical landscape.

  19. Reviewing the pathogenesis of antibody-mediated rejection and renal graft pathology after kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozumi, Kunio; Takeda, Asami; Otsuka, Yasuhiro; Horike, Keiji; Gotoh, Norihiko; Narumi, Shunji; Watarai, Yoshihiko; Kobayashi, Takaaki

    2016-07-01

    The clinicopathological context of rejection after kidney transplantation was well recognized. Banff conferences greatly contributed to elucidate the pathogenesis and to establish the pathologic criteria of rejection after kidney transplantation. The most important current problem of renal transplantation is de novo donor-specific antibody (DSA) production leading chronic rejection and graft loss. Microvascular inflammation is considered as a reliable pathological marker for antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) in the presence of DSA. Electron microscopic study allowed us to evaluate early changes in peritubular capillaries in T-lymphocyte mediated rejection and transition to antibody-mediated rejection. Severe endothelial injuries with edema and activated lymphocyte invaded into subendothelial space with early multi-layering of peritubular capillary basement membrane suggest T-lymphocyte mediated rejection induce an unbounded chain of antibody-mediated rejection. The risk factors of AMR after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation are important issues. Anti-ABO blood type antibody titre of IgG excess 32-fold before transplant operation is the only predictable factor for acute AMR. Characteristics of chronic active antibody-mediated rejection (CAAMR) are one of the most important problems. Light microscopic findings and C4d stain of peritubular capillary and glomerular capillary are useful diagnostic criteria of CAAMR. Microvascular inflammation, double contour of glomerular capillary and thickening of peritubular capillary basement are good predictive factors of the presence of de novo DSA. C4d stain of linear glomerular capillary is a more sensitive marker for CAAMR than positive C4d of peritubular capillary. Early and sensitive diagnostic attempts of diagnosing CAAMR are pivotal to prevent chronic graft failure. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  20. Bispecific Antibody Pretargeting for Improving Cancer Imaging and Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharkey, Robert M.

    2005-02-04

    The main objective of this project was to evaluate pretargeting systems that use a bispecific antibody (bsMAb) to improve the detection and treatment of cancer. A bsMAb has specificity to a tumor antigen, which is used to bind the tumor, while the other specificity is to a peptide that can be radiolabeled. Pretargeting is the process by which the unlabeled bsMAb is given first, and after a sufficient time (1-2 days) is given for it to localize in the tumor and clear from the blood, a small molecular weight radiolabeled peptide is given. According to a dynamic imaging study using a 99mTc-labeled peptide, the radiolabeled peptide localizes in the tumor in less than 1 hour, with > 80% of it clearing from the blood and body within this same time. Tumor/nontumor targeting ratios that are nearly 50 times better than that with a directly radiolabeled Fab fragment have been observed (Sharkey et al., ''Signal amplification in molecular imaging by a multivalent bispecific nanobody'' submitted). The bsMAbs used in this project have been composed of 3 antibodies that will target antigens found in colorectal and pancreatic cancers (CEA, CSAp, and MUC1). For the ''peptide binding moiety'' of the bsMAb, we initially examined an antibody directed to DOTA, but subsequently focused on another antibody directed against a novel compound, HSG (histamine-succinyl-glycine).

  1. Auto antibody mediated acquired haemophilia: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Abdul Aziz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Autoantibody mediated acquired haomophilia is a rare disease. Hereditary haemophilia usually presents with traumatic or spontaneous bleeding in a young male with positive family history in maternal side.In this case study we described an elderly male patient presenting with short history of recurrent ecchymosis with no similar history in the past and no family history of similar illness. He ultimately turned out to be a case of acquired haemophilia due to SLE.

  2. Eculizumab prevents anti-ganglioside antibody-mediated neuropathy in a murine model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.K. Halstead (Susan); F.M.P. Zitman (Femke); P.D. Humphreys (Peter); K. Greenshields (Kay); J.J. Verschuuren (Jan); B.C. Jacobs (Bart); R.P. Rother (Russell); J.J. Plomp (Jaap); H.J. Willison (Hugh)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAnti-GQ1b ganglioside antibodies are the serological hallmark of the Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS) variant of the paralytic neuropathy, Guillain- Barré syndrome, and are believed to be the principal pathogenic mediators of the disease. In support of this, we previously showed in an in

  3. Polyclonal and Specific Antibodies Mediate Protective Immunity against Enteric Helminth Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCoy, Kathy D.; Stoel, Maaike; Stettler, Rebecca; Merky, Patrick; Fink, Katja; Senn, Beatrice M.; Schaer, Corinne; Massacand, Joanna; Oderrnatt, Bernhard; Oettgen, Hans C.; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.; Bos, Nicolaas A.; Hengartner, Hans; Macpherson, Andrew J.; Harris, Nicola L.

    2008-01-01

    Anti-helminth immunity involves CD4(+) T cells, yet the precise effector mechanisms responsible for parasite killing or expulsion remain elusive. We now report an essential role for antibodies in mediating immunity against the enteric helminth Heligmosomoides polygyrus (Hp), a natural murine

  4. [Improved protein-A chromatography for monoclonal antibody purification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Quan; Toh, Phyllicia; Hoi, Aina; Xian, Mo; Peng, Xinying; Yang, Yuansheng; Zhang, Haibo; Nian, Rui; Zhang, Wei

    2016-06-25

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies become the major product class within the biopharmaceutical market. Protein A as the first capture step is still dominant in current platforms for purification of monoclonal antibodies. In this study, we developed a new antibody harvest process that incorporates acidic treatment of cell harvest, demonstrating high process yield, improved clearance of host cell associated contaminants, like non-histone host cell protein, histone, DNA and heteroaggregates. Host protein contamination was reduced about 10-fold compared to protein A loaded with harvest clarified by centrifugation and microfiltration. Turbidity increase of eluted IgG upon pH neutralization was nearly eliminated. Residual levels of impurities in the protein A eluate were achieved that potentially meet requirements of drug substance and thus alleviate the burden for further impurities removal in subsequent chromatography steps. The mechanism of host cell associated contaminants removal during acidic treatment was also explored. After a polishing step by Capto adhere, host cell protein was reduced to less than 5 ppm, DNA less than 1 ppb, histone to undetectable level, heteroaggregates less than 0.01% with total IgG recovery around 87%. This efficient process can be easily integrated into current IgG purification platforms, and may overcome downstream processing challenges.

  5. Protein microarray-mediated detection of antienterovirus antibodies in serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aiying; Xiu, Bingshui; Zhang, Heqiu; Li, Ning

    2016-04-01

    To utilize prokaryotic gene expression and protein microarray to develop and evaluate a sensitive, accurate protein microarray assay for detecting antienterovirus antibodies in serum samples from patients with hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CA16), two common causative agents for HFMD, were used for assay development. Serum was collected from patients with HFMD and healthy controls. EV71 and CA16 VP1 and VP3 genes were expressed in transfected Escherichia coli; the resultant VP1 and 3 proteins were used in a microarray assay for human serum EV71 and CA16 immunoglobulin (Ig) M and IgG. To validate the microarray assay, serum samples were tested for EV71 IgM using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Out of 50 patients with HFMD, EV71 IgM and CA16 IgM was detected in 80% and 44% of serum samples, respectively, using protein microarray, and EV71 IgM was detected in 78% of samples using ELISA. Protein microarray and ELISA showed 100% specificity for EV71-IgM detection. The protein microarray assay developed in the present study shows potential as a sensitive technique for detecting EV71 IgM in serum samples from patients with HFMD. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Antibody dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) and antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of breast cancer cells mediated by bispecific antibody, MDX-210.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, M; Wallace, P K; Keler, T; Deo, Y M; Akewanlop, C; Hayes, D F

    1999-02-01

    MDX-210 is a bispecific antibody (BsAb) with specificity for both the proto-oncogene product of HER-2/neu (c-erbB-2) and FcgammaRI (CD64). HER-2/neu is overexpressed in malignant tissue of approximately 30% of patients with breast cancer, and FcgammaRI is expressed on human monocytes, macrophages, and IFN-gamma activated granulocytes. We investigated phagocytosis and cytolysis of cultured human breast cancer cells by human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) mediated by BsAb MDX-210, its partially humanized derivative (MDX-H210), and its parent MoAb 520C9 (anti-HER-2/neu) under various conditions. Purified monocytes were cultured with GM-CSF, M-CSF, or no cytokine for five or six days. Antibody dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) and cytolysis (ADCC) assays were performed with the MDM and HER-2/neu positive target cells (SK-BR-3). ADCP was measured by two-color fluorescence flow cytometry using PKH2 (green fluorescent dye) and phycoerythrin-conjugated (red) monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) against human CD14 and CD11b. ADCC was measured with a non-radioactive LDH detection kit. Both BsAb MDX-210 (via FcgammaRI) and MoAb 520C9 (mouse IgG1, via FcgammaRII) mediated similar levels of ADCP and ADCC. ADCP mediated by BsAb MDX-H210 was identical to that mediated by BsAb MDX-210. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that dual-labeled cells represented true phagocytosis. Both ADCP and ADCC were higher when MDM were pre-incubated with GM-CSF than when incubated with M-CSF. BsAb MDX-210 is as active in vitro as the parent MoAb 520C9 in inducing both phagocytosis and cytolysis of MDM. MDX-210 and its partially humanized derivative, MDX-H210, mediated similar levels of ADCP. GM-CSF appears to superior to M-CSF in inducing MDM-mediated ADCC and ADCP. These studies support the ongoing clinical investigations of BsAb MDX-210 and its partially humanized derivative.

  7. Antibody-mediated rejection of single class I MHC-disparate cardiac allografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Y; Bucy, R P; Kubota, Y; Baldwin, W M; Fairchild, R L

    2012-08-01

    Murine CCR5(-/-) recipients produce high titers of antibody to complete MHC-mismatched heart and renal allografts. To study mechanisms of class I MHC antibody-mediated allograft injury, we tested the rejection of heart allografts transgenically expressing a single class I MHC disparity in wild-type C57BL/6 (H-2(b)) and B6.CCR5(-/-) recipients. Donor-specific antibody titers in CCR5(-/-) recipients were 30-fold higher than in wild-type recipients. B6.K(d) allografts survived longer than 60 days in wild-type recipients whereas CCR5(-/-) recipients rejected all allografts within 14 days. Rejection was accompanied by infiltration of CD8 T cells, neutrophils and macrophages, and C4d deposition in the graft capillaries. B6.K(d) allografts were rejected by CD8(-/-)/CCR5(-/-), but not μMT(-/-)/CCR5(-/-), recipients indicating the need for antibody but not CD8 T cells. Grafts recovered at day 10 from CCR5(-/-) and CD8(-/-)/CCR5(-/-) recipients and from RAG-1(-/-) allograft recipients injected with anti-K(d) antibodies expressed high levels of perforin, myeloperoxidase and CCL5 mRNA. These studies indicate that the continual production of antidonor class I MHC antibody can mediate allograft rejection, that donor-reactive CD8 T cells synergize with the antibody to contribute to rejection, and that expression of three biomarkers during rejection can occur in the absence of this CD8 T cell activity. © Copyright 2012 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  8. Antibody-mediated phagocytosis contributes to the anti-tumor activity of the therapeutic antibody daratumumab in lymphoma and multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overdijk, M. B.; Verploegen, S.; Bogels, M.

    2015-01-01

    in MM and other hematological tumors, led us to investigate the contribution of antibody-dependent, macrophage-mediated phagocytosis to DARA's mechanism of action. Live cell imaging revealed that DARA efficiently induced macrophage-mediated phagocytosis, in which individual macrophages rapidly...

  9. Adjuvant-Mediated Epitope Specificity and Enhanced Neutralizing Activity of Antibodies Targeting Dengue Virus Envelope Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denicar Lina Nascimento Fabris Maeda

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The heat-labile toxins (LT produced by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli display adjuvant effects to coadministered antigens, leading to enhanced production of serum antibodies. Despite extensive knowledge of the adjuvant properties of LT derivatives, including in vitro-generated non-toxic mutant forms, little is known about the capacity of these adjuvants to modulate the epitope specificity of antibodies directed against antigens. This study characterizes the role of LT and its non-toxic B subunit (LTB in the modulation of antibody responses to a coadministered antigen, the dengue virus (DENV envelope glycoprotein domain III (EDIII, which binds to surface receptors and mediates virus entry into host cells. In contrast to non-adjuvanted or alum-adjuvanted formulations, antibodies induced in mice immunized with LT or LTB showed enhanced virus-neutralization effects that were not ascribed to a subclass shift or antigen affinity. Nonetheless, immunosignature analyses revealed that purified LT-adjuvanted EDIII-specific antibodies display distinct epitope-binding patterns with regard to antibodies raised in mice immunized with EDIII or the alum-adjuvanted vaccine. Notably, the analyses led to the identification of a specific EDIII epitope located in the EF to FG loop, which is involved in the entry of DENV into eukaryotic cells. The present results demonstrate that LT and LTB modulate the epitope specificity of antibodies generated after immunization with coadministered antigens that, in the case of EDIII, was associated with the induction of neutralizing antibody responses. These results open perspectives for the more rational development of vaccines with enhanced protective effects against DENV infections.

  10. Clinical Cancer Therapy by NK Cells via Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kory L. Alderson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are powerful effector cells that can be directed to eliminate tumor cells through tumor-targeted monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. Some tumor-targeted mAbs have been successfully applied in the clinic and are included in the standard of care for certain malignancies. Strategies to augment the antitumor response by NK cells have led to an increased understanding of how to improve their effector responses. Next-generation reagents, such as molecularly modified mAbs and mAb-cytokine fusion proteins (immunocytokines, ICs designed to augment NK-mediated killing, are showing promise in preclinical and some clinical settings. Continued research into the antitumor effects induced by NK cells and tumor-targeted mAbs suggests that additional intrinsic and extrinsic factors may influence the antitumor response. Therefore more research is needed that focuses on evaluating which NK cell and tumor criteria are best predictive of a clinical response and which combination immunotherapy regimens to pursue for distinct clinical settings.

  11. Endothelial Cells in Antibody-Mediated Rejection of Kidney Transplantation: Pathogenesis Mechanisms and Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR has been identified as a main obstacle for stable immune tolerance and long survival of kidney allografts. In spite of new insights into the underlying mechanisms of AMR, accurate diagnosis and efficient treatment are still challenges in clinical practice. Endothelium is the first barrier between recipients’ immune systems and grafts in vascularized organ transplants. Considering that endothelial cells express a number of antigens that can be attacked by various allo- and autoantibodies, endothelial cells act as main targets for the recipients’ humoral immune responses. Importantly, emerging evidence has shown that endothelial cells in transplants could also initiate protective mechanisms in response to immune injuries. A better understanding of the role of endothelial cells during the pathogenesis of AMR might provide novel therapeutic targets. In the present review, we summarize the antigens expressed by endothelial cells and also discuss the activation and accommodation of endothelial cells as well as their clinical implications. Collectively, the progress discussed in this review indicates endothelial cells as promising targets to improve current diagnosis and therapeutic regimens for AMR.

  12. INTRAVENOUS IMMUNOGLOBULIN ADMINISTRATION FOR DESENSITIZATION BEFORE RENAL TRANSPLANTATION AND MANAGING ANTIBODY-MEDIATED REJECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Sushkov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Much attention has been placed recently in transplantation in highly HLA-sensitized patients. In attempts to remove these antibodies and enable successful renal transplantation, several approaches have been developed. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG was found to be effective in the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders (e. g. Kawasaki disease, Guillain-Barre syndrome. Recently, a beneficial effect of IVIG on the reduc- tion of anti-HLA antibodies was described. The anti-inflammatory effect of IVIG provides hopeful opportunities in antibody-mediated rejection (AMR management. There are several protocols of IVIG administration for pre-transplant desensitization and AMR treatment: high-dose IVIG, low-dose IVIG + plasmapheresis, IVIG + plasmapheresis + rituximab. These advancements have enabled transplantation in patients previously considered untransplantable and in concert with new diagnostic techniques has resulted in new approaches to management of AMR. 

  13. A rapid and quantitative assay for measuring antibody-mediated neutralization of West Nile virus infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierson, Theodore C.; Sanchez, Melissa D.; Puffer, Bridget A.; Ahmed, Asim A.; Geiss, Brian J.; Valentine, Laura E.; Altamura, Louis A.; Diamond, Michael S.; Doms, Robert W.

    2006-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a neurotropic flavivirus within the Japanese encephalitis antigenic complex that is responsible for causing West Nile encephalitis in humans. The surface of WNV virions is covered by a highly ordered icosahedral array of envelope proteins that is responsible for mediating attachment and fusion with target cells. These envelope proteins are also primary targets for the generation of neutralizing antibodies in vivo. In this study, we describe a novel approach for measuring antibody-mediated neutralization of WNV infection using virus-like particles that measure infection as a function of reporter gene expression. These reporter virus particles (RVPs) are produced by complementation of a sub-genomic replicon with WNV structural proteins provided in trans using conventional DNA expression vectors. The precision and accuracy of this approach stem from an ability to measure the outcome of the interaction between antibody and viral antigens under conditions that satisfy the assumptions of the law of mass action as applied to virus neutralization. In addition to its quantitative strengths, this approach allows the production of WNV RVPs bearing the prM-E proteins of different WNV strains and mutants, offering considerable flexibility for the study of the humoral immune response to WNV in vitro. WNV RVPs are capable of only a single round of infection, can be used under BSL-2 conditions, and offer a rapid and quantitative approach for detecting virus entry and its inhibition by neutralizing antibody

  14. Antibody-mediated immunotoxicity in American kestrels (Falco sparverius) exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, J E; Bortolotti, G R

    2001-02-23

    Antibody-mediated immune function in adult and recently fledged (30 to 33 d old) American kestrels (Falco sparverius) was examined in birds exposed directly, or only in ovo, to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). In 1998, 9 mature male and 9 female kestrels were fed PCBs, whereas 9 females and 10 males served as controls. A mixture of Aroclors 1248:1254:1260 suspended in safflower oil was injected into the kestrels' food items, while in control diets only the same volume of oil was added. The dosage of PCBs was approximately 7 mg/kg kestrel/d, beginning in March 1998 and continuing for 120 d. In 1998, the antibody-mediated immune response was stimulated by immunization and booster vaccinations of the kestrels using a nonpathogenic antigen, dinitrophenol-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (DNP-KLH). In 1999, offspring from three treatment groups based upon maternal exposure to PCBs were similarly tested for their antibody response. None of these mothers was vaccinated with DNP-KLH the previous year. The maternal groups were: (1) exposed to PCBs in 1998 for 120 d, (2) exposed in ovo in 1998 (i.e., mothers were produced by PCB-exposed parents), or (3) unexposed to PCBs. Serum antibody levels were determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In 1998, PCB-exposed adult females had a significantly higher antibody response than did controls, whereas adult males exposed to PCBs had significantly suppressed antibody production. For the nestlings produced in 1999, maternal treatment significantly affected antibody response. Generally, the antibody response in the nestlings was much lower than that seen in adult kestrels. Yet both male and female offspring from mothers that had been fed PCBs the previous year had significantly higher postbooster anti-DNP-KLH titers than control and in ovo-exposed maternal groups, thus mimicking the response seen in the adult females the previous year. These sex-specific responses in PCB-exposed birds provide further evidence of the

  15. Antibody-mediated modulation of cytokinins in tobacco: Organ-specific changes in cytokinin homeostasis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gelová, Z.; Hoopen, P.; Novák, Ondřej; Motyka, Václav; Pernisová, M.; Dabravolski, S.; Didi, V.; Tillack, F.; Oklešťková, Jana; Strnad, Miroslav; Hause, B.; Haruštiaková, D.; Conrad, U.; Janda, L.; Hejátko, J.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 3 (2018), s. 441-454 ISSN 0022-0957 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1601; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015062; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-14649S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Antibody-mediated modulation * biosynthesis * ckx * cytokinin * homeostasis * organ specificity * tobacco Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 5.830, year: 2016

  16. Vault nanocapsules as adjuvants favor cell-mediated over antibody-mediated immune responses following immunization of mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upendra K Kar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Modifications of adjuvants that induce cell-mediated over antibody-mediated immunity is desired for development of vaccines. Nanocapsules have been found to be viable adjuvants and are amenable to engineering for desired immune responses. We previously showed that natural nanocapsules called vaults can be genetically engineered to elicit Th1 immunity and protection from a mucosal bacterial infection. The purpose of our study was to characterize immunity produced in response to OVA within vault nanoparticles and compare it to another nanocarrier. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We characterized immunity resulting from immunization with the model antigen, ovalbumin (OVA encased in vault nanocapsules and liposomes. We measured OVA responsive CD8(+ and CD4(+ memory T cell responses, cytokine production and antibody titers in vitro and in vivo. We found that immunization with OVA contain in vaults induced a greater number of anti-OVA CD8(+ memory T cells and production of IFNγ plus CD4(+ memory T cells. Also, modification of the vault body could change the immune response compared to OVA encased in liposomes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These experiments show that vault nanocapsules induced strong anti-OVA CD8(+ and CD4(+ T cell memory responses and modest antibody production, which markedly differed from the immune response induced by liposomes. We also found that the vault nanocapsule could be modified to change antibody isotypes in vivo. Thus it is possible to create a vault nanocapsule vaccine that can result in the unique combination of immunogen-responsive CD8(+ and CD4(+ T cell immunity coupled with an IgG1 response for future development of vault nanocapsule-based vaccines against antigens for human pathogens and cancer.

  17. HER2 monoclonal antibodies that do not interfere with receptor heterodimerization-mediated signaling induce effective internalization and represent valuable components for rational antibody-drug conjugate design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Goeij, Bart E C G; Peipp, Matthias; de Haij, Simone; van den Brink, Edward N; Kellner, Christian; Riedl, Thilo; de Jong, Rob; Vink, Tom; Strumane, Kristin; Bleeker, Wim K; Parren, Paul W H I

    2014-01-01

    The human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)2 provides an excellent target for selective delivery of cytotoxic drugs to tumor cells by antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) as has been clinically validated by ado-trastuzumab emtansine (Kadcyla(TM)). While selecting a suitable antibody for an ADC approach often takes specificity and efficient antibody-target complex internalization into account, the characteristics of the optimal antibody candidate remain poorly understood. We studied a large panel of human HER2 antibodies to identify the characteristics that make them most suitable for an ADC approach. As a model toxin, amenable to in vitro high-throughput screening, we employed Pseudomonas exotoxin A (ETA') fused to an anti-kappa light chain domain antibody. Cytotoxicity induced by HER2 antibodies, which were thus non-covalently linked to ETA', was assessed for high and low HER2 expressing tumor cell lines and correlated with internalization and downmodulation of HER2 antibody-target complexes. Our results demonstrate that HER2 antibodies that do not inhibit heterodimerization of HER2 with related ErbB receptors internalize more efficiently and show greater ETA'-mediated cytotoxicity than antibodies that do inhibit such heterodimerization. Moreover, stimulation with ErbB ligand significantly enhanced ADC-mediated tumor kill by antibodies that do not inhibit HER2 heterodimerization. This suggests that the formation of HER2/ErbB-heterodimers enhances ADC internalization and subsequent killing of tumor cells. Our study indicates that selecting HER2 ADCs that allow piggybacking of HER2 onto other ErbB receptors provides an attractive strategy for increasing ADC delivery and tumor cell killing capacity to both high and low HER2 expressing tumor cells.

  18. Acute antibody-mediated rejection after AB0-incomptible kidney transplantation treated successfully with antigen-specific immunoadsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Just, Søren Andreas; Marcussen, Niels; Sprogøe, Ulrik

    2009-01-01

    ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation is possible after pre-treatment with rituximab, intravenous immunoglobulin and basiliximab combined with tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. We report on the first patient treated with this protocol who developed acute antibody-mediated reje......ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation is possible after pre-treatment with rituximab, intravenous immunoglobulin and basiliximab combined with tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. We report on the first patient treated with this protocol who developed acute antibody......-mediated rejection (Banff grade II with IgG deposits) caused by ABO antibodies (anti-B). Anti-rejection treatment with anti-B-specific immunoadsorption, intravenous immunoglobulin and methylprednisolone efficiently cleared deposited IgG from the kidney allograft and re-established normal kidney function. We suggest...... that ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation complicated by acute antibody-mediated rejection, caused by ABO antibodies, may successfully be treated with this regime....

  19. Acute antibody-mediated rejection after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation treated successfully with antigen-specific immunoadsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Just, Søren Andreas; Marcussen, Niels; Sprogøe, Ulrik

    2010-01-01

    ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation is possible after pre-treatment with rituximab, intravenous immunoglobulin and basiliximab combined with tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. We report on the first patient treated with this protocol who developed acute antibody-mediated reje......ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation is possible after pre-treatment with rituximab, intravenous immunoglobulin and basiliximab combined with tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. We report on the first patient treated with this protocol who developed acute antibody......-mediated rejection (Banff grade II with IgG deposits) caused by ABO antibodies (anti-B). Anti-rejection treatment with anti-B-specific immunoadsorption, intravenous immunoglobulin and methylprednisolone efficiently cleared deposited IgG from the kidney allograft and re-established normal kidney function. We suggest...... that ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation complicated by acute antibody-mediated rejection, caused by ABO antibodies, may successfully be treated with this regime....

  20. Histological long-term outcomes from acute antibody-mediated rejection following ABO-compatible liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bello, Arnaud; Danjoux, Marie; Congy-Jolivet, Nicolas; Lavayssière, Laurence; Esposito, Laure; Muscari, Fabrice; Kamar, Nassim

    2017-04-01

    Acute antibody-mediated rejection (aAMR) is an unusual complication after orthotopic ABO-compatible liver transplantation. To date, the clinical and histological long-term outcomes after aAMR are not well known. Herein, we describe nine cases of aAMR that occurred in our liver-transplant center between 2008 and 2016, with an initial and reevaluation liver biopsy available for reexamination. Two patients presented with aAMR at 10.5 (10, 11) days post-transplantation, caused by preformed donor-specific antibodies. Seven other recipients developed de novo donor-specific antibodies and aAMR at 11.2 (3-24) months post-transplantation. Eight of the nine patients received a B-cell targeting agent (rituximab, with or without plasma exchange), associated with polyclonal antibodies (three patients) or intravenous immunoglobulins (three patients). At the last follow up (i.e. 21 [4-90] months post-aAMR), seven patients were alive, including two patients with normal liver tests. Grafts' survival was 66%. A liver biopsy performed at 11.5 (5-48.5) months after the first biopsy showed no significant improvement in aAMR score (from 2 ± 1.3 to 1.6 ± 1.5, P = 0.6), a significant improvement in chronic AMR score (from 37 ± 9 to 25 ± 8, P = 0.003) and an increase in the Metavir score (1.2 ± 0.6 to 2.1 ± 0.9, P = 0.03). In this study, a B-cell-depleting agent seemed to improve the prognosis of aAMR in selected cases, but several patients kept active lesions antibody-mediated rejection. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. Immunogenicity of anti-tumor necrosis factor antibodies - toward improved methods of anti-antibody measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarden, Lucien; Ruuls, Sigrid R.; Wolbink, Gertjan

    2008-01-01

    To date, millions of people have been treated with therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (TmAbs) for various indications. It is becoming increasingly clear that TmAbs can be immunogenic, which may reduce efficacy or induce adverse effects. Over the years, the importance of antibody formation has been

  2. Novel mutations in Marburg virus glycoprotein associated with viral evasion from antibody mediated immune pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajihara, Masahiro; Nakayama, Eri; Marzi, Andrea; Igarashi, Manabu; Feldmann, Heinz; Takada, Ayato

    2013-04-01

    Marburg virus (MARV) and Ebola virus, members of the family Filoviridae, cause lethal haemorrhagic fever in humans and non-human primates. Although the outbreaks are concentrated mainly in Central Africa, these viruses are potential agents of imported infectious diseases and bioterrorism in non-African countries. Recent studies demonstrated that non-human primates passively immunized with virus-specific antibodies were successfully protected against fatal filovirus infection, highlighting the important role of antibodies in protective immunity for this disease. However, the mechanisms underlying potential evasion from antibody mediated immune pressure are not well understood. To analyse possible mutations involved in immune evasion in the MARV envelope glycoprotein (GP) which is the major target of protective antibodies, we selected escape mutants of recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV) expressing MARV GP (rVSVΔG/MARVGP) by using two GP-specific mAbs, AGP127-8 and MGP72-17, which have been previously shown to inhibit MARV budding. Interestingly, several rVSVΔG/MARVGP variants escaping from the mAb pressure-acquired amino acid substitutions in the furin-cleavage site rather than in the mAb-specific epitopes, suggesting that these epitopes are recessed, not exposed on the uncleaved GP molecule, and therefore inaccessible to the mAbs. More surprisingly, some variants escaping mAb MGP72-17 lacked a large proportion of the mucin-like region of GP, indicating that these mutants efficiently escaped the selective pressure by deleting the mucin-like region including the mAb-specific epitope. Our data demonstrate that MARV GP possesses the potential to evade antibody mediated immune pressure due to extraordinary structural flexibility and variability.

  3. The Rac Activator DOCK2 Mediates Plasma Cell Differentiation and IgG Antibody Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miho Ushijima

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark of humoral immune responses is the production of antibodies. This process involves a complex cascade of molecular and cellular interactions, including recognition of specific antigen by the B cell receptor (BCR, which triggers activation of B cells and differentiation into plasma cells (PCs. Although activation of the small GTPase Rac has been implicated in BCR-mediated antigen recognition, its precise role in humoral immunity and the upstream regulator remain elusive. DOCK2 is a Rac-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor predominantly expressed in hematopoietic cells. We found that BCR-mediated Rac activation was almost completely lost in DOCK2-deficient B cells, resulting in defects in B cell spreading over the target cell-membrane and sustained growth of BCR microclusters at the interface. When wild-type B cells were stimulated in vitro with anti-IgM F(ab′2 antibody in the presence of IL-4 and IL-5, they differentiated efficiently into PCs. However, BCR-mediated PC differentiation was severely impaired in the case of DOCK2-deficient B cells. Similar results were obtained in vivo when DOCK2-deficient B cells expressing a defined BCR specificity were adoptively transferred into mice and challenged with the cognate antigen. In addition, by generating the conditional knockout mice, we found that DOCK2 expression in B-cell lineage is required to mount antigen-specific IgG antibody. These results highlight important role of the DOCK2–Rac axis in PC differentiation and IgG antibody responses.

  4. Dashboard systems: Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic mediated dose optimization for monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mould, Diane R; Dubinsky, Marla C

    2015-03-01

    Many marketed drugs exhibit high variability in exposure and response. While these drugs are efficacious in their approved indications, finding appropriate dose regimens for individual patients is not straightforward. Similar dose adjustment problems are also seen with drugs that have a complex relationship between exposure and response and/or a narrow therapeutic window. This is particularly true for monoclonal antibodies, where prolonged dosing at a sub-therapeutic dose can also elicit anti-drug antibodies which will further compromise safety and efficacy. Thus, finding appropriate doses quickly would represent a substantial improvement in healthcare. Dashboard systems, which are decision-support tools, offer an improved, convenient means of tailoring treatment for individual patients. This article reviews the clinical need for this approach, particularly with monoclonal antibodies, the design, development, and testing of such systems, and the likely benefits of dashboard systems in clinical practice. We focus on infliximab for reference. © 2015, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  5. Daratumumab-mediated lysis of primary multiple myeloma cells is enhanced in combination with the human anti-KIR antibody IPH2102 and lenalidomide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nijhof, I. S.; Lammerts van Bueren, J. J.; van Kessel, B.

    2015-01-01

    killer cell inhibitory receptors with the human monoclonal anti-KIR antibody IPH2102, next to activation of natural killer cells with the immune modulatory drug lenalidomide. In 4-hour antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays, IPH2102 did not induce lysis of multiple myeloma cell lines......RIIa-131R allele, who bind IgG1 with lower affinity than patients carrying the FcgammaRIIIa-158V allele or the FcgammaRIIa-131H allele. Finally, a further synergistically improved myeloma cell lysis with the daratumumab-IPH2102 combination was observed by adding lenalidomide, which suggests that more...

  6. Current and future challenges in therapy for antibody-mediated rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Nandini; Ball, Timothy; Uber, Patricia A; Mehra, Mandeep R

    2011-06-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) continues to present a challenge for the survival of the cardiac allograft. AMR appears to be on the rise, likely secondary to changing trends in clinical practice, including selection of patients for transplantation on mechanical circulatory support and development of more effective combinations of immunosuppressive drugs against acute cellular rejection. Most current strategies are aimed at treating acute AMR, but the treatment of chronic AMR is still not well defined. Clinically, AMR can often be more severe than cellular rejection and more difficult to treat, often not responding to typical protocols of increased immunosuppression. Complex steps involved in the antibody response allows for several potential targets for therapeutic intervention, including suppression of T and B cells, elimination of circulating antibodies, and inhibition of residual antibodies. Existing evidence suggests a multiregimen approach is the best option. Sustenance of accommodation and induction of tolerance could be viewed as viable options if adequate immune surveillance can be achieved in this setting. This review discusses the challenges in treating AMR and provides a critical analysis of current and possible future therapies. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Vibrio cholerae O1 secretes an extracellular matrix in response to antibody-mediated agglutination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle E Baranova

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae O1 is one of two serogroups responsible for epidemic cholera, a severe watery diarrhea that occurs after the bacterium colonizes the human small intestine and secretes a potent ADP-ribosylating toxin. Immunity to cholera is associated with intestinal anti-lipopolysaccharide (LPS antibodies, which are known to inhibit V. cholerae motility and promote bacterial cell-cell crosslinking and aggregation. Here we report that V. cholerae O1 classical and El Tor biotypes produce an extracellular matrix (ECM when forcibly immobilized and agglutinated by ZAC-3 IgG, an intestinally-derived monoclonal antibody (MAb against the core/lipid A region of LPS. ECM secretion, as demonstrated by crystal violet staining and scanning electron microscopy, occurred within 30 minutes of antibody exposure and peaked by 3 hours. Non-motile mutants of V. cholerae did not secrete ECM following ZAC-3 IgG exposure, even though they were susceptible to agglutination. The ECM was enriched in O-specific polysaccharide (OSP but not Vibrio polysaccharide (VPS. Finally, we demonstrate that ECM production by V. cholerae in response to ZAC-3 IgG was associated with bacterial resistant to a secondary complement-mediated attack. In summary, we propose that V. cholerae O1, upon encountering anti-LPS antibodies in the intestinal lumen, secretes an ECM (or O-antigen capsule possibly as a strategy to shield itself from additional host immune factors and to exit an otherwise inhospitable host environment.

  8. N-type calcium channel antibody-mediated paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis: a diagnostic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya-Matsuoka, Carlos; Blas-Boria, David; Williams, Michelle D; Garciarena, Pedro; Tummala, Sudhakar; Tremont-Lukats, Ivo W

    2014-03-15

    The etiology of encephalitis presents a diagnostic challenge and often remains a mystery. However, current technological advances using antibodies can enable a definitive diagnosis in cases that would previously have been suspected to be idiopathic or viral encephalitis. Our objective is to show that tonsil neuroendocrine carcinoma can present initially as limbic encephalitis mediated by N-type calcium channel antibodies and to highlight the diagnostic confusion before cancer detection. We report a rare case of neuroendocrine cancer presenting as limbic encephalopathy, Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome and neuropathy. The patient was diagnosed and treated at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in November 2011. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis was diagnosed based on clinical presentation of seizures, short-term memory loss, retrograde amnesia, disorientation, distractibility, and abulia; on the exclusion of brain metastases, CNS infection, stroke, metabolic or nutritional deficits, or medication-related events; and on CSF results with inflammatory findings and an abnormal electroencephalography study that showed seizure activity in the left temporal lobe. Serum paraneoplastic panel was positive for P/Q-type calcium channel antibody and N-type calcium channel antibody. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain was unremarkable. This case highlights limbic encephalitis as an atypical presentation of neuroendocrine cancer. It also illustrates how treatment of the underlying cancer can reverse limbic encephalitis and Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome in a neuroendocrine carcinoma patient even before the paraneoplastic panel becomes negative. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Comprehensive Cross-Clade Characterization of Antibody-Mediated Recognition, Complement-Mediated Lysis, and Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity of HIV-1 Envelope-Specific Antibodies toward Eradication of the HIV-1 Reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujib, Shariq; Liu, Jun; Rahman, A K M Nur-Ur; Schwartz, Jordan A; Bonner, Phil; Yue, Feng Yun; Ostrowski, Mario A

    2017-08-15

    Immunotherapy with passive administration of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 envelope-specific antibodies (bnAbs) in the setting of established infection in vivo has yielded mixed results. The contribution of different antibodies toward the direct elimination of infected cells is poorly understood. In this study, we determined the ability of 12 well-characterized anti-HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies to recognize and eliminate primary CD4 T cells infected with HIV-1 belonging to clades A, B, C, and D, via antibody-dependent complement-mediated lysis (ADCML) and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), in vitro We further tested unique combinations of these antibodies to determine the optimal antibody cocktails to be tested in future clinical trials. We report that antibody binding to infected CD4 T cells is highly variable and correlates with ADCML and ADCC processes. Particularly, antibodies targeting the envelope glycan shield (2G12) and V1/V2 site (PG9, PG16, and PGT145) are best at recognizing HIV-1-infected CD4 T cells. However, only PG9 and PG16 and their combinations with other bnAbs sufficiently induced the elimination of HIV-1-infected CD4 T cells by ADCML, ADCC, or both. Notably, CD4 binding site antibodies VRC01, 3BNC117, and NIH45-46 G54W did not exhibit recognition of infected cells and were unable to induce their killing. Future trials geared toward the development of a cure for HIV/AIDS should incorporate V1/V2 antibodies for maximal clearance of infected cells. With the use of only primary immune cells, we conducted a comprehensive cross-clade physiological analysis to aid the direction of antibodies as therapeutics toward the development of a cure for HIV/AIDS. IMPORTANCE Several antibodies capable of neutralizing the majority of circulating HIV-1 strains have been identified to date and have been shown to prevent infection in animal models. However, the use of combinations of such broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) for the treatment and

  10. Recent advances using FcRn overexpression in transgenic animals to overcome impediments of standard antibody technologies to improve the generation of specific antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervenak, Judit; Erdei, Anna; Goldsby, Richard A; Butler, John E

    2011-01-01

    This review illustrates the salutary effects of neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) overexpression in significantly improving humoral immune responses in the generation of antibodies for immunotherapy and diagnostics. These include: (1) improved IgG protection; (2) augmented antigen-specific humoral immune response with larger numbers of antigen specific B cells, thus offering a wider spectrum of clones; (3) generation of antibodies against weakly immunogenic antigens; (4) significant improvements in the number and substantial developments in the diversity of hybridomas. FcRn transgenesis thus confers a number of practical benefits, including faster antibody production, higher antibody yields and improved generation of hybridomas for monoclonal antibody production. Notably, these efficiencies in polyclonal antibody production were also demonstrated in FcRn transgenic rabbits. Overall, FcRn transgenic animals yield more antibodies and provide a route to the generation of antibodies against antigens of low immunogenicity that are difficult to obtain using currently available methods. PMID:22048692

  11. Glycine receptor antibody mediated Progressive Encephalomyelitis with Rigidity and Myoclonus (PERM): a rare but treatable neurological syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, W M; Howard, R; Chalmers, R M; Woodhall, M R; Waters, P; Vincent, A; Wickremaratchi, M M

    2014-04-01

    A 40-year-old man presented with respiratory compromise and was intubated. After tracheostomy, he was found to have ophthalmoplegia, severe limb rigidity, stimulus-sensitive myoclonus and autonomic dysfunction. For 1 week before admission, there had been a prodromal illness with low mood, hallucinations and limb myoclonus. Serum glycine receptor antibodies were strongly positive: we diagnosed progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus. Despite a relapse, he has done well following immunotherapies. The clinical syndrome of encephalomyelitis with rigidity, described in 1976, often has a severe progressive course. A minority of patients have glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies. The association with glycine receptor antibody was first reported in 2008, and we briefly review subsequent case reports to illustrate the range of clinical features. The antibody is likely to be disease mediating, although this remains unproven. The spectrum of diagnosable and treatable antibody mediated neurological syndromes is expanding. It is vital to recognise these conditions early to reduce morbidity and mortality.

  12. BAFF mediates splenic B cell response and antibody production in experimental Chagas disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela A Bermejo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: B cells and antibodies are involved not only in controlling the spread of blood circulating Trypanosoma cruzi, but also in the autoreactive manifestations observed in Chagas disease. Acute infection results in polyclonal B cell activation associated with hypergammaglobulinemia, delayed specific humoral immunity and high levels of non-parasite specific antibodies. Since TNF superfamily B lymphocyte Stimulator (BAFF mediates polyclonal B cell response in vitro triggered by T. cruzi antigens, and BAFF-Tg mice show similar signs to T. cruzi infected mice, we hypothesized that BAFF can mediate polyclonal B cell response in experimental Chagas disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: BAFF is produced early and persists throughout the infection. To analyze BAFF role in experimental Chagas disease, Balb/c infected mice were injected with BR3:Fc, a soluble receptor of BAFF, to block BAFF activity. By BAFF blockade we observed that this cytokine mediates the mature B cell response and the production of non-parasite specific IgM and IgG. BAFF also influences the development of antinuclear IgG and parasite-specific IgM response, not affecting T. cruzi-specific IgG and parasitemia. Interestingly, BAFF inhibition favors the parasitism in heart. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate, for the first time, an active role for BAFF in shaping the mature B cell repertoire in a parasite infection.

  13. Studies on ADCC (antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity) using sheep red blood cells as target cells, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Yukinobu; Takaya, Masatoshi; Arimori, Shigeru

    1979-01-01

    A non-specific cytotoxic mediator from effector cells (human peripheral blood leukocytes) was investigated in the ADCC (antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity) system using antibody-coated sheep red blood cells (SRBC) as target cells. 51 Cr-labelled homologous (sheep) or heterologous (human) red blood cells were used as adjacent cells. Either crude lymphocyte fraction, phagocyte depleted fraction or granulocyte rich fraction separated from human peripheral leukocytes showed moderate cytotoxic effect on homologous adjacent cells, however no cytotoxic activity on heterologous adjacent cells was demonstrated in any leukocyte fraction. This suggests that the cytotoxic effects on homologous adjacent cells were resulted from the translocation of antibody molecules to adjacent cells from antibody-coated target cells. We concluded that the cytotoxic mechanism in this ADCC system was not mediated by non-specific soluble factors released from either human peripheral lymphocytes, monocytes or granulocytes. (author)

  14. Improved serological diagnosis of Poplar mosaic virus with monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carra, A; Brocchi, E; Simone, F De; Luisoni, E

    2005-05-01

    Poplar mosaic virus (PopMV) is widespread in all countries where poplar is grown, and causes severe economic losses in terms of quantity and quality of wood production. Control is based on indexing, aimed at the production of healthy propagation material. The currently used diagnostic method is double antibody sandwich (DAS) ELISA with polyclonal antibodies, which is relatively simple and inexpensive and more reliable than visual inspection of symptoms in the nurseries. However, this method also has disadvantages, mainly low sensitivity in relation to low concentration and irregular distribution of the virus in the plant. In this study, a new diagnostic method for PopMV based on production and use of a monoclonal antibody (Mab) in a triple antibody sandwich (TAS) ELISA, is presented. The TAS-ELISA with monoclonal antibodies was optimised by testing a range of reagent combinations and concentrations. PopMV was detected by the optimised TAS-ELISA with sensitivity more than 100 times higher than by DAS-ELISA with polyclonal antibodies. Six PopMV isolates from four European countries were detected with the same efficiency, indicating that no limitations to the practical use of the TAS-ELISA arise due to excessive epitope-specificity of the monoclonal antibody employed.

  15. FcγRII-binding Centyrins mediate agonism and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis when fused to an anti-OX40 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Di; Whitaker, Brian; Derebe, Mehabaw G; Chiu, Mark L

    2018-04-01

    Immunostimulatory antibodies against the tumor necrosis factor receptors (TNFR) are emerging as promising cancer immunotherapies. The agonism activity of such antibodies depends on crosslinking to Fc gamma RIIB receptor (FcγRIIB) to enable the antibody multimerization that drives TNFR activation. Previously, Fc engineering was used to enhance the binding of such antibodies to Fcγ receptors. Here, we report the identification of Centyrins as alternative scaffold proteins with binding affinities to homologous FcγRIIB and FcγRIIA, but not to other types of Fcγ receptors. One Centyrin, S29, was engineered at distinct positions of an anti-OX40 SF2 antibody to generate bispecific and tetravalent molecules named as mAbtyrins. Regardless of the position of S29 on the SF2 antibody, SF2-S29 mAbtyrins could bind FcγRIIB and FcγRIIA specifically while maintaining binding to OX40 receptors. In a NFκB reporter assay, attachment of S29 Centyrin molecules at the C-termini, but not the N-termini, resulted in SF2 antibodies with increased agonism owing to FcγRIIB crosslinking. The mAbtyrins also showed agonism in T-cell activation assays with immobilized FcγRIIB and FcγRIIA, but this activity was confined to mAbtyrins with S29 specifically at the C-termini of antibody heavy chains. Furthermore, regardless of the position of the molecule, S29 Centyrin could equip an otherwise Fc-silent antibody with antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis activity without affecting the antibody's intrinsic antibody-dependent cell-meditated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. In summary, the appropriate adoption FcγRII-binding Centyrins as functional modules represents a novel strategy to engineer therapeutic antibodies with improved functionalities.

  16. HLA-C antibodies in women with recurrent miscarriage suggests that antibody mediated rejection is one of the mechanisms leading to recurrent miscarriage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuleman, T; van Beelen, E; Kaaja, R J; van Lith, J M M; Claas, F H J; Bloemenkamp, K W M

    HLA-C is the only polymorphic classical HLA I antigen expressed on trophoblast cells. It is known that higher incidence of C4d deposition on trophoblast cells is present in women with recurrent miscarriage. C4d is a footprint of antibody-mediated classical complement activation. Therefore, this

  17. Antibody Response to Lyme Disease Spirochetes in the Context of VlsE-Mediated Immune Evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogovskyy, Artem S; Gillis, David C; Ionov, Yurij; Gerasimov, Ekaterina; Zelikovsky, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Lyme disease (LD), the most prevalent tick-borne illness in North America, is caused by Borrelia burgdorferi The long-term survival of B. burgdorferi spirochetes in the mammalian host is achieved though VlsE-mediated antigenic variation. It is mathematically predicted that a highly variable surface antigen prolongs bacterial infection sufficiently to exhaust the immune response directed toward invariant surface antigens. If the prediction is correct, it is expected that the antibody response to B. burgdorferi invariant antigens will become nonprotective as B. burgdorferi infection progresses. To test this assumption, changes in the protective efficacy of the immune response to B. burgdorferi surface antigens were monitored via a superinfection model over the course of 70 days. B. burgdorferi-infected mice were subjected to secondary challenge by heterologous B. burgdorferi at different time points postinfection (p.i.). When the infected mice were superinfected with a VlsE-deficient clone (ΔVlsE) at day 28 p.i., the active anti-B. burgdorferi immune response did not prevent ΔVlsE-induced spirochetemia. In contrast, most mice blocked culture-detectable spirochetemia induced by wild-type B. burgdorferi (WT), indicating that VlsE was likely the primary target of the antibody response. As the B. burgdorferi infection further progressed, however, reversed outcomes were observed. At day 70 p.i. the host immune response to non-VlsE antigens became sufficiently potent to clear spirochetemia induced by ΔVlsE and yet failed to prevent WT-induced spirochetemia. To test if any significant changes in the anti-B. burgdorferi antibody repertoire accounted for the observed outcomes, global profiles of antibody specificities were determined. However, comparison of mimotopes revealed no major difference between day 28 and day 70 antibody repertoires. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. Follicular Helper T (Tfh) Cells Mediate IgE Antibody Response to Airborne Allergens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takao; Iijima, Koji; Dent, Alexander L.; Kita, Hirohito

    2016-01-01

    Background Type 2 helper T (Th2) cells have long been believed to play a pivotal role in allergic immune responses, including IgE antibody production and type 2 cytokine-mediated inflammation and pathology. A new T cell subset, T follicular helper cells (Tfh) cells, is specialized in supporting B cell maturation and antibody production. Objective To investigate the roles of Tfh cells in allergic immune responses. Methods Naïve mice were exposed to cytokines or natural allergens through the airways. Development of allergic immune responses was analyzed by collecting draining lymph nodes (LNs) and sera and by challenging the animals. Cytokine reporter mice and gene-deficient mice were used to dissect the immunologic mechanisms. Results We observed the development of IL-4-producing Tfh cells and Th2 cells in draining LNs following airway exposure to IL-1 family cytokines or natural allergens. Tfh cells and Th2 cells demonstrated unique phenotypes, tissue localization, and cytokine responses. Tfh cells supported the sustained production of IgE antibody in vivo in the absence of other T cell subsets or even when Th2 cell functions were severely compromised. Conversely, conditional deficiency of the master regulator Bcl6 in CD4+ T cells resulted in a marked reduction in Tfh cells and IgE antibody levels, but type 2 cytokine responses and eosinophilic inflammation in the airways remained unaffected. Conclusion Tfh cells play critical roles in the regulation of IgE antibody production. Allergic immune responses to airborne allergens likely involve two distinct subsets of IL-4-producing CD4+ T cells, namely Tfh cells and Th2 cells. PMID:27325434

  19. Follicular helper T cells mediate IgE antibody response to airborne allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takao; Iijima, Koji; Dent, Alexander L; Kita, Hirohito

    2017-01-01

    T H 2 cells have long been believed to play a pivotal role in allergic immune responses, including IgE antibody production and type 2 cytokine-mediated inflammation and pathology. A new T-cell subset, follicular helper T (T FH ) cells, is specialized in supporting B-cell maturation and antibody production. We sought to investigate the roles of T FH cells in allergic immune responses. Naive mice were exposed to cytokines or natural allergens through the airways. Development of allergic immune responses was analyzed by collecting draining lymph nodes and sera and by challenging the animals. Cytokine reporter mice and gene-deficient mice were used to dissect the immunologic mechanisms. We observed the development of IL-4-producing T FH cells and T H 2 cells in draining lymph nodes after airway exposure to IL-1 family cytokines or natural allergens. T FH and T H 2 cells demonstrated unique phenotypes, tissue localization, and cytokine responses. T FH cells supported the sustained production of IgE antibody in vivo in the absence of other T-cell subsets or even when T H 2 cell functions were severely compromised. Conversely, conditional deficiency of the master regulator Bcl6 in CD4 + T cells resulted in a marked reduction in T FH cell numbers and IgE antibody levels, but type 2 cytokine responses and eosinophilic inflammation in the airways remained unaffected. T FH cells play critical roles in the regulation of IgE antibody production. Allergic immune responses to airborne allergens likely involve 2 distinct subsets of IL-4-producing CD4 + T cells, namely T FH and Th2 cells. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. CHALLENGES IN TREATMENT OF RENAL GRAFT ACUTE ANTIBODY-MEDIATED REJECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Sushkov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnostic criteria and treatment protocols for acute antibody-mediated rejection (AMR of kidney allograft remain controversial. We report the case of early severe AMR after primary kidney transplantation. The graft removal was considered in the absence of treatment efficacy and in the presence of systemic infl ammatory response syndrome. However, at surgery the graft looked normal and it was not removed. The repeated treatment course (plasmapheresis, antithymocyte globulin, intravenous immunoglobulin and rituximab was effective. The patient has good and stable graft function in 1 year after transplantation. 

  1. Secondary antibodies as tools to improve tumor to non tumor ratio at radioimmunolocalisation and radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullen, A.; Riklund Aalstroem, K.; Hietala, S.O.; Nilsson, B.; Aerlestig, L.; Stigbrand, T.

    1996-01-01

    One way of selectively improving the efficiency of radioimmunolocalization and radioimmunotherapy is to eliminate redundant, circulating, non-targeting radiolabeled antibodies after saturation of the target sites. Secondary antibodies of different types have been proposed as clearing agents for such purposes. The conceptually different approaches of the 'secondary antibody' strategy including its advantages and limitations are discussed. This mini-review also presents a model describing the kinetics of the components (the antigen, the primary and secondary antibodies) and approaches required to improve the efficacy of both radioimmunolocalization and radioimmunotherapy. (orig.)

  2. Antibody-Mediated Rejection of the Heart in the Setting of Autoimmune Demyelinating Polyneuropathy: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn J. Lindley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR is caused by the production of donor-specific antibodies (DSA which lead to allograft injury in part via complement activation. The inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies (IDP are inflammatory disorders of the nervous system, involving both cellular and humoral immune mechanisms directed against myelin. Case Report. A 58-year-old man five years after heart transplant presented with progressive dyspnea, imbalance, dysphagia, and weakness. Nerve conduction studies and electromyogram were consistent with IDP. Plasmapheresis and high-dose steroids resulted in improvement in neurologic symptoms. Within two weeks, he was readmitted with anasarca and acute renal failure, requiring intravenous furosemide and inotropic support. Echocardiogram and right heart catheterization revealed reduced cardiac function and elevated filling pressures. DSA was positive against HLA DR53, and endomyocardial biopsy revealed grade 1R chronic inflammation, with strong capillary endothelial immunostaining for C4d. Plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG were initiated. His anasarca and renal failure subsequently resolved, echocardiogram showed improved function off inotropes, and anti-DR53 MFI was reduced by 57%. Conclusions. This is an example of a single immune-mediated process causing concurrent IDP and AMR. The improvement in cardiac function and neurologic symptoms with plasmapheresis, IVIG, and high-dose steroids argues for a unifying antibody-mediated mechanism.

  3. Elaborative Retrieval: Do Semantic Mediators Improve Memory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Melissa; Karpicke, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    The elaborative retrieval account of retrieval-based learning proposes that retrieval enhances retention because the retrieval process produces the generation of semantic mediators that link cues to target information. We tested 2 assumptions that form the basis of this account: that semantic mediators are more likely to be generated during…

  4. Trastuzumab mediates antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and phagocytosis to the same extent in both adjuvant and metastatic HER2/neu breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petricevic, Branka; Laengle, Johannes; Singer, Josef; Sachet, Monika; Fazekas, Judit; Steger, Guenther; Bartsch, Rupert; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika; Bergmann, Michael

    2013-12-12

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAb), such as trastuzumab are a valuable addition to breast cancer therapy. Data obtained from neoadjuvant settings revealed that antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) is a major mechanism of action for the mAb trastuzumab. Conflicting results still call into question whether disease progression, prolonged treatment or concomitant chemotherapy influences ADCC and related immunological phenomena. We analyzed the activity of ADCC and antibody-dependent cell-mediated phagocytosis (ADCP) of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu) positive breast cancer patients receiving trastuzumab therapy either in an adjuvant (n = 13) or metastatic (n = 15) setting as well as from trastuzumab treatment-naive (t-naive) HER2/neu negative patients (n = 15). PBMCs from healthy volunteers (n = 24) were used as controls. ADCC and ADCP activity was correlated with the expression of antibody binding Fc-gamma receptor (FcγR)I (CD64), FcγRII (CD32) and FcγRIII (CD16) on CD14+ (monocytes) and CD56+ (NK) cells, as well as the expression of CD107a+ (LAMP-1) on CD56+ cells and the total amount of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ (Treg) cells. In metastatic patients, markers were correlated with progression-free survival (PFS). ADCC activity was significantly down regulated in metastatic, adjuvant and t-naive patient cohorts as compared to healthy controls. Reduced ADCC activity was inversely correlated with the expression of CD107a on CD56+ cells in adjuvant patients. ADCC and ADCP activity of the patient cohorts were similar, regardless of treatment duration or additional chemotherapy. PFS in metastatic patients inversely correlated with the number of peripheral Treg cells. The reduction of ADCC in patients as compared to healthy controls calls for adjuvant strategies, such as immune-enhancing agents, to improve the activity of trastuzumab. However, efficacy of trastuzumab-specific ADCC and ADCP appears not to

  5. Target-mediated drug disposition model and its approximations for antibody-drug conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibiansky, Leonid; Gibiansky, Ekaterina

    2014-02-01

    Antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) is a complex structure composed of an antibody linked to several molecules of a biologically active cytotoxic drug. The number of ADC compounds in clinical development now exceeds 30, with two of them already on the market. However, there is no rigorous mechanistic model that describes pharmacokinetic (PK) properties of these compounds. PK modeling of ADCs is even more complicated than that of other biologics as the model should describe distribution, binding, and elimination of antibodies with different toxin load, and also the deconjugation process and PK of the released toxin. This work extends the target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) model to describe ADCs, derives the rapid binding (quasi-equilibrium), quasi-steady-state, and Michaelis-Menten approximations of the TMDD model as applied to ADCs, derives the TMDD model and its approximations for ADCs with load-independent properties, and discusses further simplifications of the system under various assumptions. The developed models are shown to describe data simulated from the available clinical population PK models of trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1), one of the two currently approved ADCs. Identifiability of model parameters is also discussed and illustrated on the simulated T-DM1 examples.

  6. Antibody-mediated enzyme replacement therapy targeting both lysosomal and cytoplasmic glycogen in Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Haiqing; Sun, Tao; Armstrong, Dustin; Borneman, Scott; Yang, Chunyu; Austin, Stephanie; Kishnani, Priya S; Sun, Baodong

    2017-05-01

    Pompe disease is characterized by accumulation of both lysosomal and cytoplasmic glycogen primarily in skeletal and cardiac muscles. Mannose-6-phosphate receptor-mediated enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human acid α-glucosidase (rhGAA) targets the enzyme to lysosomes and thus is unable to digest cytoplasmic glycogen. Studies have shown that anti-DNA antibody 3E10 penetrates living cells and delivers "cargo" proteins to the cytosol or nucleus via equilibrative nucleoside transporter ENT2. We speculate that 3E10-mediated ERT with GAA will target both lysosomal and cytoplasmic glycogen in Pompe disease. A fusion protein (FabGAA) containing a humanized Fab fragment derived from the murine 3E10 antibody and the 110 kDa human GAA precursor was constructed and produced in CHO cells. Immunostaining with an anti-Fab antibody revealed that the Fab signals did not co-localize with the lysosomal marker LAMP2 in cultured L6 myoblasts or Pompe patient fibroblasts after incubation with FabGAA. Western blot with an anti-GAA antibody showed presence of the 150 kDa full-length FabGAA in the cell lysates, in addition to the 95- and 76 kDa processed forms of GAA that were also seen in the rhGAA-treated cells. Blocking of mannose-6-phosphate receptor with mannose-6-phosphate markedly reduced the 95- and the 76 kDa forms but not the 150 kDa form. In GAA-KO mice, FabGAA achieved similar treatment efficacy as rhGAA at an equal molar dose in reducing tissue glycogen contents. Our data suggest that FabGAA retains the ability of rhGAA to treat lysosomal glycogen accumulation and has the beneficial potential over rhGAA to reduce cytoplasmic glycogen storage in Pompe disease. FabGAA can be delivered to both the cytoplasm and lysosomes in cultured cells. FabGAA equally reduced lysosomal glycogen accumulation as rhGAA in GAA-KO mice. FabGAA has the beneficial potential over rhGAA to clear cytoplasmic glycogen. This study suggests a novel antibody-enzyme fusion protein therapy

  7. Inhibition of EBV-mediated membrane fusion by anti-gHgL antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathiyamoorthy, Karthik; Jiang, Jiansen; Möhl, Britta S.; Chen, Jia; Zhou, Z. Hong; Longnecker, Richard; Jardetzky, Theodore S. (UCLA); (Stanford-MED); (NWU)

    2017-09-22

    Herpesvirus entry into cells requires the coordinated action of multiple virus envelope glycoproteins, including gH, gL, and gB. For EBV, the gp42 protein assembles into complexes with gHgL heterodimers and binds HLA class II to activate gB-mediated membrane fusion with B cells. EBV tropism is dictated by gp42 levels in the virion, as it inhibits entry into epithelial cells while promoting entry into B cells. The gHgL and gB proteins are targets of neutralizing antibodies and potential candidates for subunit vaccine development, but our understanding of their neutralizing epitopes and the mechanisms of inhibition remain relatively unexplored. Here we studied the structures and mechanisms of two anti-gHgL antibodies, CL40 and CL59, that block membrane fusion with both B cells and epithelial cells. We determined the structures of the CL40 and CL59 complexes with gHgL using X-ray crystallography and EM to identify their epitope locations. CL59 binds to the C-terminal domain IV of gH, while CL40 binds to a site occupied by the gp42 receptor binding domain. CL40 binding to gHgL/gp42 complexes is not blocked by gp42 and does not interfere with gp42 binding to HLA class II, indicating that its ability to block membrane fusion with B cells represents a defect in gB activation. These data indicate that anti-gHgL neutralizing antibodies can block gHgL-mediated activation of gB through different surface epitopes and mechanisms.

  8. Alterations of HIV-1 envelope phenotype and antibody-mediated neutralization by signal peptide mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chitra Upadhyay

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env mediates virus attachment and entry into the host cells. Like other membrane-bound and secreted proteins, HIV-1 Env contains at its N terminus a signal peptide (SP that directs the nascent Env to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER where Env synthesis and post-translational modifications take place. SP is cleaved during Env biosynthesis but potentially influences the phenotypic traits of the Env protein. The Env SP sequences of HIV-1 isolates display high sequence variability, and the significance of such variability is unclear. We postulate that changes in the Env SP influence Env transport through the ER-Golgi secretory pathway and Env folding and/or glycosylation that impact on Env incorporation into virions, receptor binding and antibody recognition. We first evaluated the consequences of mutating the charged residues in the Env SP in the context of infectious molecular clone HIV-1 REJO.c/2864. Results show that three different mutations affecting histidine at position 12 affected Env incorporation into virions that correlated with reduction of virus infectivity and DC-SIGN-mediated virus capture and transmission. Mutations at positions 8, 12, and 15 also rendered the virus more resistant to neutralization by monoclonal antibodies against the Env V1V2 region. These mutations affected the oligosaccharide composition of N-glycans as shown by changes in Env reactivity with specific lectins and by mass spectrometry. Increased neutralization resistance and N-glycan composition changes were also observed when analogous mutations were introduced to another HIV-1 strain, JRFL. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing that certain residues in the HIV-1 Env SP can affect virus neutralization sensitivity by modulating oligosaccharide moieties on the Env N-glycans. The HIV-1 Env SP sequences thus may be under selective pressure to balance virus infectiousness with virus resistance to the host antibody

  9. Bortezomib-based treatment of acute antibody-mediated rejection: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q; Li, X L; Xu, X G; Shi, B Y; Zhang, Z M; Li, Z L; Han, Y; Zhou, W Q; Chen, C Q; Cai, M; Zhang, X

    2015-12-22

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) is an important factor affecting survival after renal transplantation. A highly selective proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib, clears activated plasma cells from the body and has important therapeutic effect on AMR. We investigated the effects of bortezomib on AMR in a patient after a second renal transplant. Biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of mixed cellular rejection and AMR. Bortezomib was administered on day 1 (1.3 mg/m(2)), day 4 (1.0 mg/m(2)), and day 8 (1.0 mg/m(2)). On the same days, 250 mg methylprednisolone was administered once, and cyclosporine dose (5 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) was reduced by 50%. Oral mycophenolate mofetil and steroid were withdrawn on day 1 of bortezomib treatment. Intermittent double-filtration plasmapheresis was also performed. We monitored parameters, including T lymphocyte subsets, CD139 and CD19 expression, panel reactive antibody (PRA), and serum creatinine concentration. At follow-up 6 months after bortezomib treatment, we observed: 1) serum creatinine stabilized at 130 μM from a peak level of 337 μM; 2) PRA decreased from a maximum of 66.7 to 0%; 3) blood plasma cell percentage rebounded after significantly decreasing following the first dose of bortezomib; 4) in renal allograft biopsy, immunohistochemical staining for C4d shifted from strongly positive to negative, and cellular rejection shifted from type IIA to borderline; and 5) adverse effects such as platelet suppression, hypotension, and grade 3 peripheral neuropathy emerged. Bortezomib effectively treated antibody-mediated renal transplantation rejection in this case study, but clinical trials with large sample sizes are still needed to explore clinical safety and tolerability.

  10. Immediate and Catastrophic Antibody-Mediated Rejection in a Lung Transplant Recipient With Anti-Angiotensin II Receptor Type 1 and Anti-Endothelin-1 Receptor Type A Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzi, E; Calabrese, F; Schiavon, M; Feltracco, P; Seveso, M; Carollo, C; Loy, M; Cardillo, M; Rea, F

    2017-02-01

    Preexisting donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies (DSAs) have been associated with reduced survival of lung allografts. However, antibodies with specificities other than HLA may have a detrimental role on the lung transplant outcome. A young man with cystic fibrosis underwent lung transplantation with organs from a suitable deceased donor. At the time of transplantation, there were no anti-HLA DSAs. During surgery, the patient developed a severe and intractable pulmonary hypertension associated with right ventriular dysfunction, which required arteriovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. After a brief period of clinical improvement, a rapid deterioration in hemodynamics led to the patient's death on postoperative day 5. Postmortem studies showed that lung specimens taken at the end of surgery were compatible with antibody-mediated rejection (AMR), while terminal samples evidenced diffuse capillaritis, blood extravasation, edema, and microthrombi, with foci of acute cellular rejection (A3). Immunological investigations demonstrated the presence of preexisting antibodies against the endothelin-1 receptor type A (ET A R) and the angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT 1 R), two of the most potent vasoconstrictors reported to date, whose levels slightly rose after transplantation. These data suggest that preexisting anti-ET A R and anti-AT 1 R antibodies may have contributed to the onset of AMR and to the catastrophic clinical course of this patient. © Copyright 2016 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  11. Ranitidine improves postoperative suppression of antibody response to preoperative vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Hammer, J H; Moesgaard, F

    1992-01-01

    The effect of the histamine-2 receptor antagonist ranitidine (100 mg intravenously every 12 hours for 72 hours) on postoperative serum antibody responses to preoperative immunization with six limit of flocculation tetanus toxoid and six limit of flocculation diphtheria toxoid was assessed...... and antidiphtheria toxoid were drawn before skin incision and on postoperative days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, 21, and 28. Ranitidine significantly increased the postoperative antibody response to tetanus toxoid, (p less than 0.01) and insignificantly increased that to diphtheria toxoid vaccination (p less than 0...

  12. Covalent Linkage of HIV-1 Trimers to Synthetic Liposomes Elicits Improved B Cell and Antibody Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, Shridhar; Goebrecht, Geraldine; Stano, Armando; Wilson, Richard; Ota, Takayuki; Tran, Karen; Ingale, Jidnyasa; Zwick, Michael B; Wyatt, Richard T

    2017-08-15

    We have demonstrated that a liposomal array of well-ordered trimers enhances B cell activation, germinal center formation, and the elicitation of tier-2 autologous neutralizing antibodies. Previously, we coupled well-ordered cleavage-independent NFL trimers via their C-terminal polyhistidine tails to nickel lipids integrated into the lipid bilayer. Despite favorable in vivo effects, concern remained over the potentially longer-term in vivo instability of noncovalent linkage of the trimers to the liposomes. Accordingly, we tested both cobalt coupling and covalent linkage of the trimers to the liposomes by reengineering the polyhistidine tail to include a free cysteine on each protomer of model BG505 NFL trimers to allow covalent linkage. Both cobalt and cysteine coupling resulted in a high-density array of NFL trimers that was stable in both 20% mouse serum and 100 mM EDTA, whereas the nickel-conjugated trimers were not stable under these conditions. Binding analysis and calcium flux with anti-Env-specific B cells confirmed that the trimers maintained conformational integrity following coupling. Following immunization of mice, serologic analysis demonstrated that the covalently coupled trimers elicited Env-directed antibodies in a manner statistically significantly improved compared to soluble trimers and nickel-conjugated trimers. Importantly, the covalent coupling not only enhanced gp120-directed responses compared to soluble trimers, it also completely eliminated antibodies directed to the C-terminal His tag located at the "bottom" of the spike. In contrast, soluble and noncovalent formats efficiently elicited anti-His tag antibodies. These data indicate that covalent linkage of well-ordered trimers to liposomes in high-density array displays multiple advantages in vitro and in vivo IMPORTANCE Enveloped viruses typically encode a surface-bound glycoprotein that mediates viral entry into host cells and is a primary target for vaccine design. Liposomes with

  13. Improving Undergraduates' Critique via Computer Mediated Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Maslawati; Musa, Faridah; Amin, Maryam Mohamed; Mufti, Norlaila; Latiff, Rozmel Abdul; Sallihuddin, Nani Rahayu

    2014-01-01

    Our current university students, labeled as "Generation Y" or Millennials, are different from previous generations due to wide exposure to media. Being technologically savvy, they are accustomed to Internet for information and social media for socializing. In line with this current trend, teaching through computer mediated communication…

  14. An improved Agrobacterium mediated transformation in tomato ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-03-29

    Mar 29, 2010 ... Costa MGC, Nogueira FTS, Otoni WC, Brommonschenkel SH (2000). Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of tomato processing cultivars. Revista Brasileira de Fisiologia Vegetal. 12(2):. 107-118. Doyle JJ, Doyle JI (1990) Isolation of plant DNA from fresh tissues. Focus 12: 13-15. Fillatti JJ ...

  15. Soluble BAFF Cytokine Levels and Antibody-Mediated Rejection of the Kidney Allograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavcev, Antonij; Brozova, Jitka; Slatinska, Janka; Sekerkova, Zuzana; Honsova, Eva; Skibova, Jelena; Striz, Ilja; Viklicky, Ondrej

    2016-12-01

    The B-cell activating factor (BAFF) cytokine has important functions for the survival and maturation of B lymphocytes, which implies that this cytokine might play a role in the development of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) after kidney transplantation. In our study, we compared the concentrations of the soluble BAFF cytokine in kidney graft recipients with AMR and patients without rejection with the goal of testing the hypothesis whether BAFF level measurement might be useful as a diagnostic marker of AMR. The study included a cohort of 19 high-risk patients with diagnosed AMR and 17 control patients free of rejection. BAFF was measured in all patients before transplantation, during the rejection episodes, and three months after transplantation in patients free of rejection using the Luminex technique. Before transplantation, the serum concentrations of BAFF in patients with AMR and kidney recipients without rejection did not significantly differ. After transplantation, however, BAFF levels were significantly lower in patients with AMR and also in patients with concurrent humoral and cellular rejection compared with patients without rejection (p BAFF and the production of donor-specific antibodies (DSA) before and after transplantation. Patients experiencing AMR and simultaneous cellular and AMR had significantly lower concentrations of BAFF in comparison with patients free of rejection.

  16. The Role of the Endothelium during Antibody-Mediated Rejection: From Victim to Accomplice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Rachael Cross

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR of solid organ transplants is characterized by the activation and injury of the allograft endothelium. Histological and transcriptomic studies have associated microvascular inflammation and endothelial lesions with the severity of rejection and poor graft outcomes. The allograft endothelium forms the physical barrier between the donor organ and the recipient; this position directly exposes the endothelium to alloimmune responses. However, endothelial cells are not just victims and can actively participate in the pathogenesis of rejection. In healthy tissues, the endothelium plays a major role in vascular and immune homeostasis. Organ transplantation, however, subjects the endothelium to an environment of inflammation, alloreactive lymphocytes, donor-specific antibodies, and potentially complement activation. As a result, endothelial cells become activated and have modified interactions with the cellular effectors of allograft damage: lymphocytes, natural killer, and myeloid cells. Activated endothelial cells participate in leukocyte adhesion and recruitment, lymphocyte activation and differentiation, as well as the secretion of cytokines and chemokines. Ultimately, highly activated endothelial cells promote pro-inflammatory alloresponses and become accomplices to AMR.

  17. Structural insight into antibody-mediated antagonism of the Glucagon-like peptide-1 Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hennen, Stephanie; Kodra, János T; Soroka, Vladyslav

    2016-01-01

    The Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a member of the class B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family and a well-established target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) of GLP-1R is important for GLP-1 binding and the crystal structure...... of the GLP-1/ECD complex was reported previously. The first structure of a class B GPCR transmembrane (TM) domain was solved recently, but the full length receptor structure is still not well understood. Here we describe the molecular details of antibody-mediated antagonism of the GLP-1R using both in vitro...... pharmacology and x-ray crystallography. We showed that the antibody Fab fragment (Fab 3F52) blocked the GLP-1 binding site of the ECD directly and thereby acts as a competitive antagonist of native GLP-1. Interestingly, Fab 3F52 also blocked a short peptide agonist believed to engage primarily...

  18. Circulating angiotensin type II receptor: Possible marker for antibody mediated rejection after renal transplantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Pamela M; Gupta, Gaurav; McDougan, Felecia

    2017-10-01

    Presence of antibody [Ab] against angiotensin receptor [AT1R] indicates heightened risk for antibody mediated rejection [AMR] after transplantation but is insufficient as a marker. We speculated AT1R might be released systemically because of AMR and might be a useful biomarker. AT1R was measured in blood from 73 Normals and 72 renal patients pre- and post-transplantation. Patients were stratified as AMR-free [Gp1], AMR1yr [Gp3]. AT1R was higher [13±26vs.367±537, p<0.01)] and more prevalent [20% vs. 92%, p<0.01] among renal patients than Normals. Pretransplant levels were similar [p=ns] between groups. One-year posttransplant levels approached [p<0.01] normalcy for Gps1+3 but spiked during AMR and remained elevated [155±58, p<0.01] for 50% Gp2 patients. One-year AT1R levels were higher among subsequent graft failures than surviving grafts [171±267vs. 38±50, p<0.01]. Pretransplant AT1R was abnormally elevated: possibly indicating ongoing tissue injury. Pretransplant AT1R didn't predict risk for AMR. However, AT1R spiked during early AMR and sustained elevations were associated with poorer outcomes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Late acute antibody mediated rejection after nine years of renal transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halim Medhat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute Antibody Mediated Rejection (AMR is rarely reported as a long-term com-plication of renal transplantation, and it can present on top of another chronic pathology affecting the graft. A 45-year-old gentleman with chronic kidney disease due to unknown etiology received renal transplantation from his sister with 4 HLA mismatches. He received antithymocte globulin induction therapy and was maintained on steroids, azathioprine (AZA and cyclosporine A (CsA. Up to eight years post-transplantation he was clinically and biochemically stable. He lost follow-up for about one year, and then presented with nephritic nephrotic syndrome and rise of serum creatinine (SCr. to 210 μmol/L. Graft biopsy revealed picture suggestive of acute AMR on top of de novo membranoprolipherative glomerulonephritis (MPGN with focal crescent formation, diffuse immune complex deposition and peri-tubular capillaries C4d positivity. Anti-HLA donor specific antibodies were highly positive for B and T cells class I and class II. The patient was treated with intravenous immunoglobulin, plasma exchange and anti-CD20 (rituximab. AZA was changed to mycophenolate mofetil and CsA to tacrolimus. He had partial response, but SCr. continued at 220 μmol/L.

  20. Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Sensitized Nonhuman Primates: Modeling Human Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghuber, C K; Kwun, J; Page, E J; Manook, M; Gibby, A C; Leopardi, F V; Song, M; Farris, A B; Hong, J J; Villinger, F; Adams, A B; Iwakoshi, N N; Knechtle, S J

    2016-06-01

    We have established a model of sensitization in nonhuman primates and tested two immunosuppressive regimens. Animals underwent fully mismatched skin transplantation, and donor-specific antibody (DSA) response was monitored by flow cross-match. Sensitized animals subsequently underwent kidney transplantation from their skin donor. Immunosuppression included tacrolimus, mycophenolate, and methylprednisolone. Three animals received basiliximab induction; compared with nonsensitized animals, they showed a shorter mean survival time (4.7 ± 3.1 vs. 187 ± 88 days). Six animals were treated with T cell depletion (anti-CD4/CD8 mAbs), which prolonged survival (mean survival time 21.6 ± 19.0 days). All presensitized animals showed antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). In two of three basiliximab-injected animals, cellular rejection (ACR) was prominent. After T cell depletion, three of six monkeys experienced early acute rejection within 8 days with histological evidence of thrombotic microangiopathy and AMR. The remaining three monkeys survived 27-44 days, with mixed AMR and ACR. Most T cell-depleted animals experienced a rebound of DSA that correlated with deteriorating kidney function. We also found an increase in proliferating memory B cells (CD20(+) CD27(+) IgD(-) Ki67(+) ), lymph node follicular helper T cells (ICOS(+) PD-1(hi) CXCR5(+) CD4(+) ), and germinal center (GC) response. Depletion controlled cell-mediated rejection in sensitized nonhuman primates better than basiliximab, yet grafts were rejected with concomitant DSA rise. This model provides an opportunity to test novel desensitization strategies. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  1. SUMMARY OF 2017 FDA PUBLIC WORKSHOP: ANTIBODY MEDIATED REJECTION IN KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velidedeoglu, Ergun; Cavaillé-Coll, Marc W; Bala, Shukal; Belen, Ozlem A; Wang, Yan; Albrecht, Renata

    2018-03-20

    Despite major advances in understanding the pathophysiology of antibody mediated rejection (AMR); prevention, diagnosis and treatment remain unmet medical needs. It appears that early T-cell mediated rejection (TCMR), de novo donor specific antibody (dnDSA) formation and AMR result from patient or physician initiated suboptimal immunosuppression, and represent landmarks in an ongoing process rather than separate events. On April 12-13, 2017, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) sponsored a public workshop on AMR in kidney transplantation to discuss new advances, importance of immunosuppressive medication nonadherence in dnDSA formation, associations between AMR, cellular rejection, changes in GFR, and challenges of clinical trial design for the prevention and treatment of AMR.Results and ConclusionsKey messages from the workshop are summarized in Table 2. Distinction between type 1 (due to preexisting DSA) and type 2 (due to dnDSA) phenotypes of AMR needs to be considered in patient management and clinical trial design. Standardization and more widespread adoption of routine posttransplant DSA monitoring may permit timely diagnosis and understanding of the natural course of type 2 and chronic AMR. Clinical trial design, especially as related to type 2 and chronic AMR, have specific challenges including the high prevalence of nonadherence in the population at risk, indolent nature of the process until the appearance of graft dysfunction and the absence of accepted surrogate endpoints (SEP). Other challenges include sample size and study duration, which could be mitigated by enrichment strategies.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  2. Postattachment neutralization of a primary strain of HIV type 1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells is mediated by CD4-specific antibodies but not by a glycoprotein 120-specific antibody that gives potent standard neutralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, T L; Dimmock, N J

    2001-11-20

    De novo infecting HIV-1 or virus released from an infected cell in vivo attaches relatively quickly to a target cell, but the rate of fusion-entry of such virus is slow, with 50% entry taking > or =2 hr. It is thus desirable that antibodies stimulated by any vaccine or given in immunotherapy are able to neutralize not only free virus, but also virus attached to the target cell. Here we investigated postattachment neutralization (PAN) of a primary HIV-1 strain (JRCSF) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and of a T cell line-adapted strain (IIIB) in C8166 T lymphoblastoid cells, using the highly potent gp120-specific human monoclonal b12 monoclonal IgG, and monoclonal antibodies specific for the CD4 primary cell receptor. In addition, we improved the experimental protocols of related studies by using a pulse of antibody, thus avoiding the complication of neutralizing progeny virus. We found that b12 IgG PAN was inefficient, with PAN of IIIB needing a 1000-fold greater concentration of antibody than was required for standard neutralization, and PAN of JRCSF being detected erratically only at 4 degrees C and unphysiologically high concentrations (300 microg/ml). Nonetheless, under identical conditions a 10-microg/ml pulse of the CD4-specific MAb Q4120 gave up to 99% PAN of JRCSF, and more than 95% even when added 3 hr after infection at 37 degrees C. Possible mechanisms by which PAN by CD4- specific antibodies is mediated are discussed. We suggest that such anti-CD4 antibodies should be considered as a component of HIV-1 immunotherapy.

  3. Antibody-Mediated Extreme Insulin Resistance: A Report of Three Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han Na; Fesseha, Betiel; Anzaldi, Laura; Tsao, Allison; Galiatsatos, Panagis; Sidhaye, Aniket

    2018-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by relative insulin deficiency and insulin resistance. Features suggesting severe insulin resistance include acanthosis nigricans, hyperandrogenism, weight loss, and recurrent hospital admissions for diabetic ketoacidosis. In rare circumstances, hyperglycemia persists despite administration of massive doses of insulin. In these cases, it is important to consider autoimmune etiologies for insulin resistance, such as type B insulin resistance and insulin antibody-mediated extreme insulin resistance, which carry high morbidity and mortality if untreated. Encouragingly, immunomodulatory regimens have recently been published that induce remission at high rates. We describe 3 cases of extreme insulin resistance mediated by anti-insulin receptor autoantibodies or insulin autoantibodies. All cases were effectively treated with an immunomodulatory regimen. Although cases of extreme insulin resistance are rare, it is important to be aware of autoimmune causes, recognize suggestive signs and symptoms, and pursue appropriate diagnostic evaluation. Prompt treatment with immunomodulators is key to restoring euglycemia in patients with autoimmune etiologies of insulin resistance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Capillary Dilation and Rarefaction Are Correlated with Intracapillary Inflammation in Antibody-Mediated Rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR remains one of the major causes of graft loss after renal transplantation. It is dominated by endothelial damage in microcirculation. Clarifying the mechanism of microcirculating damage is obviously a key step to understand the pathogenesis of ABMR. Here we characterized capillary variation in ABMR and its possible mechanisms. Compared with T cell-mediated rejection and stable grafts, there was a significant dilation and rarefaction in peritubular capillaries (PTCs of the ABMR group; Image-Pro Plus revealed a significantly larger intra-PTC area. Interestingly, the dilation of PTCs was strongly correlated with the intra-PTC cell counting. Moreover, peritubular capillary inflammation is correlated with in situ T-bet expression, and there was a good correlation between the intra-PTC expression of T-bet and the PTC diameter. HIF-1α up-regulation could be observed in ABMR but it was not necessary for capillary dilation. In general, ABMR is characterized with early capillary dilation and rarefaction; our data confirmed that the dilation is strongly correlated with intracapillary inflammation, which in turn is correlated with in situ T-bet expression. T-bet plays an important role in the development of microcirculating injury, and thus it is a potential target for the treatment of ABMR.

  5. Possibilities in improvement of the specific biodistribution by means of radiolabelled antibodies after complexation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich, H.

    1990-01-01

    The applicability of labeled by different nuclides poly- or monoclonal antibodies in nuclear medicine diagnostics is restricted by incidental consequences. Overhigh background activities and/or high (additional) binding reactivities in the liver are troublesome. Hence we examined if the lokalizing biodistribution of labeled antibodies regarding the target organ can be improved by complexation with metal ions. The investigations were carried out with the pancreas of four Beagle dogs. Xenogenic polyclonal antibodies were refined by passing down the gammaglobulin fraction of rabbit serum a sephadex G 200 - column three times and hence radiolabeled by Na 131 I. Then the antibodies were injected i.p. either as complete molecules or as partially digested by pepsin fragments F(ab) 2 -fragments in order to avoid nonspecific Fc interactions. In preparing the i.p. injection another part of the antibody preparations both complete and fragments had been complexed with copper ions in an alkaline buffer giving a stable copper-protein-complex (Biuret-complex). Undergoing scanning and after killing the dogs the organ deposition of the radiolabel had been observed and noticed. The complexation with copper of radiolabeled antibodies improves strikingly the specific target organ uptake. Because of inflammatory and other incidental consequences the Fc-fragments should be removed by digestion with enzymes. Higher specific organ uptake should be obtainable if the poyclonal antibody fraction is more refined specifically by immunosorption with respect to its affinity to the specific antigenic structures. (orig.) [de

  6. Developing models of how cognitive improvements change functioning: mediation, moderation and moderated mediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wykes, Til; Reeder, Clare; Huddy, Vyv; Taylor, Rumina; Wood, Helen; Ghirasim, Natalia; Kontis, Dimitrios; Landau, Sabine

    2012-06-01

    Cognitive remediation (CRT) affects functioning but the extent and type of cognitive improvements necessary are unknown. To develop and test models of how cognitive improvement transfers to work behaviour using the data from a current service. Participants (N49) with a support worker and a paid or voluntary job were offered CRT in a Phase 2 single group design with three assessments: baseline, post therapy and follow-up. Working memory, cognitive flexibility, planning and work outcomes were assessed. Three models were tested (mediation - cognitive improvements drive functioning improvement; moderation - post treatment cognitive level affects the impact of CRT on functioning; moderated mediation - cognition drives functioning improvements only after a certain level is achieved). There was evidence of mediation (planning improvement associated with improved work quality). There was no evidence that cognitive flexibility (total Wisconsin Card Sorting Test errors) and working memory (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale III digit span) mediated work functioning despite significant effects. There was some evidence of moderated mediation for planning improvement if participants had poorer memory and/or made fewer WCST errors. The total CRT effect on work quality was d=0.55, but the indirect (planning-mediated CRT effect) was d=0.082 Planning improvements led to better work quality but only accounted for a small proportion of the total effect on work outcome. Other specific and non-specific effects of CRT and the work programme are likely to account for some of the remaining effect. This is the first time complex models have been tested and future Phase 3 studies need to further test mediation and moderated mediation models. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Substitution of the precursor peptide prevents anti-prM antibody-mediated antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Si, Lu-Lu; Guo, Xiao-Lan; Cui, Guo-Hui; Fang, Dan-Yun; Zhou, Jun-Mei; Yan, Hui-Jun; Jiang, Li-Fang

    2017-02-02

    Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) is currently considered as the mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of severe dengue disease. Many studies have shown that precursor (pr) peptide-specific antibodies do not efficiently neutralize infection but potently promote ADE of dengue virus (DENV) infection. To explore the effect of pr peptide substitution on neutralization and ADE of DENV infection, the rabbit anti-prM polyclonal antibodies (pAbs) and anti-JEVpr/DENV-M pAbs were prepared, and the neutralization and ADE of these two pAbs were further compared. Here, we report that both anti-JEVpr/DENV-M and anti-prM pAbs exhibited broad cross-reactivity and only partial neutralization with four DENV serotypes and immature DENV. Rabbit anti-prM pAbs showed a significant enhancement in a broad range of serum dilutions. However, there was no statistically significant difference in the enhancing activity of rabbit anti-JEVpr/DENV-M pAbs at various levels of dilution. These results demonstrate that anti-prM antibody-mediated ADE can be prevented by JEV pr peptide replacement. The present study contribute further to research on the pathogenesis of DENV infection. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Enhancement of antibody-dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity: a new era in cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajasekaran N

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Narendiran Rajasekaran,1,* Cariad Chester,1,* Atsushi Yonezawa,1,2 Xing Zhao,1,3 Holbrook E Kohrt1 1Division of Oncology, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA; 2Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto, Japan; 3Tissue Engineering and Stem Cells Research Center, Department of Immunology, Guiyang Medical University, Guiyang, Guizhou Province, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The therapeutic efficacy of some anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies (mAbs depends on the capacity of the mAb to recognize the tumor-associated antigen and induce cytotoxicity via a network of immune effector cells. This process of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC against tumor cells is triggered by the interaction of the fragment crystallizable (Fc portion of the mAb with the Fc receptors on effector cells like natural killer cells, macrophages, γδ T cells, and dendritic cells. By augmenting ADCC, the antitumor activity of mAbs can be significantly increased. Currently, identifying and developing therapeutic agents that enhance ADCC is a growing area of research. Combining existing tumor-targeting mAbs and ADCC-promoting agents that stimulate effector cells will translate to greater clinical responses. In this review, we discuss strategies for enhancing ADCC and emphasize the potential of combination treatments that include US Food and Drug Administration-approved mAbs and immunostimulatory therapeutics. Keywords: ADCC, NK cell, reovirus, TLR, CD137

  9. Antibody-Mediated Osseous Regeneration for Bone Tissue Engineering in Canine Segmental Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Khojasteh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Among many applications of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs, a unique approach for regenerative medicine has entailed antibody-mediated osseous regeneration (AMOR. In an effort to identify a clinically relevant model of craniofacial defect, the present study investigated the efficacy of mAb specific for bone morphogenetic protein- (BMP- 2 to repair canine segmental mandibular continuity defect model. Accordingly, a 15 mm unilateral segmental defect was created in mandible and fixated with a titanium plate. Anorganic bovine bone mineral with 10% collagen (ABBM-C was functionalized with 25 μg/mL of either chimeric anti-BMP-2 mAb or isotype-matched mAb (negative control. Recombinant human (rh BMP-2 served as positive control. Morphometric analyses were performed on computed tomography (CT and histologic images. Bone densities within healed defect sites at 12 weeks after surgery were 1360.81 ± 10.52 Hounsfield Unit (HU, 1044.27 ± 141.16 HU, and 839.45 ± 179.41 HU, in sites with implanted anti-BMP-2 mAb, rhBMP-2, and isotype mAb groups, respectively. Osteoid bone formation in anti-BMP-2 mAb (42.99% ± 8.67 and rhBMP-2 (48.97% ± 2.96 groups was not significantly different but was higher (p<0.05 than in sites with isotype control mAb (26.8% ± 5.35. In view of the long-term objective of translational application of AMOR in humans, the results of the present study demonstrated the feasibility of AMOR in a large clinically relevant animal model.

  10. Physicochemical improvement of rabbit derived single-domain antibodies by substitutions with amino acids conserved in camelid antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinozaki, Naoya; Hashimoto, Ryuji; Noda, Masanori; Uchiyama, Susumu

    2018-02-01

    Recently, we showed that immunized rabbit heavy chain variable regions (rVHs) can have strong antigen binding activity comparable to that of the camelid variable domain of the heavy chain of heavy chain antibody (VHH). These rVHs lack the light chain variable regions (rVLs), which exist in the authentic Fab format; thus, molecular surfaces at the interface region of rVHs are exposed to solvent. This physical feature may change physicochemical properties, such as causing reduced stability. By overcoming potential physicochemical issues through engineering the interface region, rVHs could become more useful as single-domain antibodies. In this study, we substituted amino acid residues conserved at the interface region of rVHs with those of VHHs. These substitutions included V37F, involving substitution of a residue in the hydrophobic core with a bulkier hydrophobic amino acid, and G44E/L45R, involving double substitutions of highly exposed residues with more hydrophilic ones. As expected, biophysical and structural characterizations showed that the V37F substitution markedly enhanced the thermal stability through increased hydrophobic packing, while G44E/L45R substitutions greatly reduced hydrophobicity of the interface. The quadruple substitutions of V37F/G44E/L45R/F91Y resulted in not only enhancements of thermal stability and reduction in hydrophobicity, both in an additive manner, but also synergistic improvement of purification yield. This quadruple mutant exhibited greatly reduced non-specific binding with improved colloidal stability owing to the reduced hydrophobicity. The approach used in this study should further enhance the utility of rVHs and promote research and development of single-domain antibodies. Copyright © 2018 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Enzyme-mediated site-specific bioconjugation of metal complexes to proteins: sortase-mediated coupling of copper-64 to a single-chain antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Brett M; Alt, Karen; Jeffery, Charmaine M; Price, Roger I; Jagdale, Shweta; Rigby, Sheena; Williams, Charlotte C; Peter, Karlheinz; Hagemeyer, Christoph E; Donnelly, Paul S

    2014-06-10

    The enzyme-mediated site-specific bioconjugation of a radioactive metal complex to a single-chain antibody using the transpeptidase sortase A is reported. Cage amine sarcophagine ligands that were designed to function as substrates for the sortase A mediated bioconjugation to antibodies were synthesized and enzymatically conjugated to a single-chain variable fragment. The antibody fragment scFv(anti-LIBS) targets ligand-induced binding sites (LIBS) on the glycoprotein receptor GPIIb/IIIa, which is present on activated platelets. The immunoconjugates were radiolabeled with the positron-emitting isotope (64)Cu. The new radiolabeled conjugates were shown to bind selectively to activated platelets. The diagnostic potential of the most promising conjugate was demonstrated in an in vivo model of carotid artery thrombosis using positron emission tomography. This approach gives homogeneous products through site-specific enzyme-mediated conjugation and should be broadly applicable to other metal complexes and proteins. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Chlamydia trachomatis and chlamydial heat shock protein 60-specific antibody and cell-mediated responses predict tubal factor infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiitinen, A.; Surcel, H.-M.; Halttunen, M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate the role of Chlamydia trachomatis-induced humoral and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses in predicting tubal factor infertility (TFI). METHODS: Blood samples were taken from 88 women with TFI and 163 control women. C. trachomatis and chlamydial heat shock protein 60 (CHSP......60)-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies were analysed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. Proliferative reactivity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells was studied in vitro against Chlamydia elementary body (EB) and recombinant CHSP60 antigens. RESULTS: C. trachomatis......-specific IgG antibodies were found more frequently (43.2 versus 13.5%), and the antibody levels were higher in the TFI cases than in the controls (P cases and 58.9% of the controls (P

  13. Influence of IgG Subclass on Human Antimannan Antibody-Mediated Resistance to Hematogenously Disseminated Candidiasis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiya, Casey T; Boxx, Gayle M; Robison, Kerry; Itatani, Carol; Kozel, Thomas R; Zhang, Mason X

    2016-02-01

    Candida albicans is a yeast-like pathogen and can cause life-threatening systemic candidiasis. Its cell surface is enriched with mannan that is resistant to complement activation. Previously, we developed the recombinant human IgG1 antimannan antibody M1g1. M1g1 was found to promote complement activation and phagocytosis and protect mice from systemic candidiasis. Here, we evaluate the influence of IgG subclass on antimannan antibody-mediated protection. Three IgG subclass variants of M1g1 were constructed: M1g2, M1g3, and M1g4. The IgG subclass identity for each variant was confirmed with DNA sequence and subclass-specific antibodies. These variants contain identical M1 Fabs and exhibited similar binding affinities for C. albicans yeast and purified mannan. Yeast cells and hyphae recovered from the kidney of antibody-treated mice with systemic candidiasis showed uniform binding of each variant, indicating constitutive expression of the M1 epitope and antibody opsonization in the kidney. All variants promoted deposition of both murine and human C3 onto the yeast cell surface, with M1g4 showing delayed activation, as determined by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. M1g4-mediated complement activation was found to be associated with its M1 Fab that activates the alternative pathway in an Fc-independent manner. Treatment with each subclass variant extended the survival of mice with systemic candidiasis (P < 0.001). However, treatment with M1g1, M1g3, or M1g4, but not with M1g2, also reduced the kidney fungal burden (P < 0.001). Thus, the role of human antimannan antibody in host resistance to systemic candidiasis is influenced by its IgG subclass. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Relationship Between Albuminuria During the First Year and Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Protocol Biopsies in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmar Vega, L; Rodrigo Calabia, E; Gómez Román, J J; Ruiz San Millán, J C; Martín Penagos, L; Arias Rodríguez, M

    2016-11-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection is the main cause of deterioration of kidney transplants and frequently is detected only by means of protocol biopsies. The aim of this study was to relate the presence of albuminuria throughout the 1st year to the histologic findings detected by 1-year protocol biopsies in kidney graft recipients. Retrospective observational study of 86 protocol biopsies 1 year after transplantation. Albuminuria was measured at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months in urine samples and expressed as albumin/creatinine (mg/g). Analysis of biopsies, reflected according to the Banff criteria, the following categories: fibrosis and tubular atrophy, 35 (40.7%); cellular rejection, 13 (15.1%); antibody-mediated rejection, 8 (9.3%); chronic glomerulopathy, 10 (11.6%); normal, 14 (16.3%); recurrence, 1 (1.2%); and other, 5 (5.8%). The proportions of patients with albuminuria for Banff scale scores (0 vs ≥1, respectively) at 6 and 12 months, respectively, after transplantation, were: for marker glomerulitis, 45.5% versus 59.3% (P = .021) and 36.4% versus 70.4% (P albuminuria after renal transplantation is common, especially in patients with proteinuria. Persistent albuminuria after transplantation, even at low levels, can be indicative of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection. Additional broader studies to relate the albuminuria to histologic changes observed in protocol biopsies are required. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. DNA-mediated strand displacement facilitates sensitive electronic detection of antibodies in human serums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Baoting; Yang, Jianmei; Shi, Kai; Yuan, Ruo; Xiang, Yun

    2016-09-15

    We describe here the development of a sensitive and convenient electronic sensor for the detection of antibodies in human serums. The sensor is constructed by self-assembly formation of a mixed monolayer containing the small molecule epitope conjugated double stranded DNA probes on gold electrode. The target antibody binds the epitope on the dsDNA probe and lowers the melting temperature of the duplex, which facilitates the displacement of the antibody-linked strand of the duplex probe by an invading methylene blue-tagged single stranded DNA (MB-ssDNA) through the strand displacement reaction and leads to the capture of many MB-ssDNA on the sensor surface. Subsequent electrochemical oxidation of the methylene blue labels results in amplified current response for sensitive monitoring of the antibodies. The antibody assay conditions are optimized and the sensor exhibits a linear range between 1.0 and 25.0nM with a detection limit of 0.67nM for the target antibody. The sensor is also selective and can be employed to detect the target antibodies in human serum samples. With the advantages of using small molecule epitope as the antibody recognition element over traditional antigen, the versatile manipulability of the DNA probes and the unique properties of the electrochemical transduction technique, the developed sensor thus hold great potential for simple and sensitive detection of different antibodies and other proteins in real samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Modulation of Macropinocytosis-Mediated Internalization Decreases Ocular Toxicity of Antibody-Drug Conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hui; Atkinson, John; Gulesserian, Sara; Zeng, Zhilan; Nater, Jenny; Ou, Jimmy W; Yang, Peng; Morrison, Karen; Coleman, Jeffrey; Malik, Faisal; Challita-Eid, Pia M; Karki, Sher; Aviña, Hector; Hubert, René S; Capo, Linnette; Snyder, Josh; Moon, Sung-Ju; Luethy, Roland; Mendelsohn, Brian A; Stover, David R; Doñate, Fernando

    2018-01-30

    AGS-16C3F is an antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) against ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 3 (ENPP3) containing the mcMMAF linker-payload currently in development for treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. AGS-16C3F and other ADC have been reported to cause ocular toxicity in patients by unknown mechanisms. To investigate this toxicity, we developed an in vitro assay using human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC) and show that HCEC internalized AGS-16C3F and other ADCs by macropinocytosis, causing inhibition of cell proliferation. We observed the same mechanism for target-independent internalization of AGS-16C3F in fibroblasts and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Macropinocytosis-mediated intake of macromolecules is facilitated by the presence of positive charges or hydrophobic residues on the surface of the macromolecule. Modification of AGS-16C3F, either by attachment of poly-glutamate peptides, mutation of residue K16 to D on AGS-16C3F (AGS-16C3F(K16D)), or decreasing the overall hydrophobicity via attachment of polyethylene glycol moieties, significantly reduced cytotoxicity against HCEC and other primary cells. Rabbits treated with AGS-16C3F showed significant ocular toxicity, whereas those treated with AGS-16C3F(K16D) presented with less severe and delayed toxicities. Both molecules displayed similar anti-tumor activity in a mouse xenograft model. These findings establish a mechanism of action for target-independent toxicities of AGS-16C3F and ADCs in general, and provide methods to ameliorate these toxicities. Copyright ©2018, American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Human anti-CAIX antibodies mediate immune cell inhibition of renal cell carcinoma in vitro and in a humanized mouse model in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, De-Kuan; Moniz, Raymond J; Xu, Zhongyao; Sun, Jiusong; Signoretti, Sabina; Zhu, Quan; Marasco, Wayne A

    2015-06-11

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) IX is a surface-expressed protein that is upregulated by the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) and represents a prototypic tumor-associated antigen that is overexpressed on renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Therapeutic approaches targeting CAIX have focused on the development of CAIX inhibitors and specific immunotherapies including monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). However, current in vivo mouse models used to characterize the anti-tumor properties of fully human anti-CAIX mAbs have significant limitations since the role of human effector cells in tumor cell killing in vivo is not directly evaluated. The role of human anti-CAIX mAbs on CAIX(+) RCC tumor cell killing by immunocytes or complement was tested in vitro by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) as well as on CAIX(+) RCC cellular motility, wound healing, migration and proliferation. The in vivo therapeutic activity mediated by anti-CAIX mAbs was determined by using a novel orthotopic RCC xenograft humanized animal model and analyzed by histology and FACS staining. Our studies demonstrate the capacity of human anti-CAIX mAbs that inhibit CA enzymatic activity to result in immune-mediated killing of RCC, including nature killer (NK) cell-mediated ADCC, CDC, and macrophage-mediated ADCP. The killing activity correlated positively with the level of CAIX expression on RCC tumor cell lines. In addition, Fc engineering of anti-CAIX mAbs was shown to enhance the ADCC activity against RCC. We also demonstrate that these anti-CAIX mAbs inhibit migration of RCC cells in vitro. Finally, through the implementation of a novel orthotopic RCC model utilizing allogeneic human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ(-/-) mice, we show that anti-CAIX mAbs are capable of mediating human immune response in vivo including tumor infiltration of NK cells and activation of T cells, resulting in

  18. Immunogenicity of anti-tumor necrosis factor antibodies-toward improved methods of anti-antibody measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarden, Lucien; Ruuls, Sigrid R; Wolbink, Gertjan

    2008-08-01

    To date, millions of people have been treated with therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (TmAbs) for various indications. It is becoming increasingly clear that TmAbs can be immunogenic, which may reduce efficacy or induce adverse effects. Over the years, the importance of antibody formation has been questioned and sometimes minimized, as few antibody responses to TmAbs (HACA or HAHA) were reported. However, the methods to detect and quantify such antibodies used in the past have been problematic. Only recently, methods have been developed that have adequate sensitivity and are not seriously disturbed by false-positive reactions caused by rheumatoid factors, natural antibodies to Fab or F(ab')2 fragments, or Fc interactions of IgG4. The large number of treated patients, in combination with these new assays, presents a unique opportunity to study the anti-antibody immune response in man, possibly allowing us to manipulate immunogenicity in the future.

  19. Antibody Responses with Fc-Mediated Functions after Vaccination of HIV-Infected Subjects with Trivalent Influenza Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anne B; Lay, William N; Ana-Sosa-Batiz, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    This study seeks to assess the ability of seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) to induce nonneutralizing antibodies (Abs) with Fc-mediated functions in HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected subjects. Functional influenza-specific Ab responses were studied in 30 HIV-negative and 27 HIV......-positive subjects immunized against seasonal influenza. All 57 subjects received the 2015 TIV. Fc-mediated antihemagglutinin (anti-HA) Ab activity was measured in plasma before and 4 weeks after vaccination using Fc-receptor-binding assays, NK cell activation assays, and phagocytosis assays. At baseline, the HIV......-positive group had detectable but reduced functional Ab responses to both vaccine and nonvaccine influenza antigens. TIV enhanced Fc-mediated Ab responses in both HIV-positive and HIV-negative groups. A larger rise was generally observed in the HIV-positive group, such that there was no difference in functional...

  20. Chelate chase of radiopharmaceuticals reversibly bound to monoclonal antibodies improves dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwin, D.A.; Smith, S.I.; Meares, C.F.; David, G.S.; McTigue, M.; Finston, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    One hundred micrograms of monoclonal antibody (MoAb) CHA 255 with a binding constant Kb of 4 x 10 9 was complexed with indium-111 labeled BLEDTA II, GLEDTA IV, benzyl EDTA, and an EDTA conjugate of Fab. The 24-hour tumor and organ distribution in BALB/c mice bearing KHJJ tumors was studied for each compound alone, the antibody complex, and 3 hours following a chelate chase of the antibody complex. Whole-body biological half-life was measured for 7 days with and without a chelate chase for each antibody complex. The 24-hour whole-body counts dropped 20-60% within 3 hours of administering the chelate chase. Blood concentration fell over 89% within 3 hours of administering the chase and there was a decrease in concentration in all organs, except the kidneys, of 10 to 85%. Theoretical equivalent human doses were calculated from the 24-hour organ concentrations, effective half-life, and MIRD 11 S values (absorbed dose per cumulated activity). Liver and spleen were the target organs, with the dose ranging from 0.50 to 3.91 rads per millicurie. The reduction in organ radiation dose varied up to 95% following the chelate chase. Rapid selective renal clearance of chelate labeled radiopharmaceuticals by competitive inhibition (chelate chase) of their reversible binding to monoclonal antibodies, greatly improves the radiation dosimetry of tumor imaging agents. 28 references, 5 figures, 5 tables

  1. Intravenous avidin chase improved localization of radiolabeled streptavidin in intraperitoneal xenograft pretargeted with biotinylated antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Meili; Sakahara, Harumi; Yao Zhengsheng; Saga, Tsuneo; Nakamoto, Yuhi; Sato, Noriko; Nakada, Hiroshi; Yamashina, Ikuo; Konishi, Junji

    1997-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the effect of avidin administered intravenously (i.v.) on the biodistribution of radiolabeled streptavidin in mice bearing intraperitoneal (IP) xenografts pretargeted with biotinylated antibody. Tumors were established in nude mice by IP inoculation of LS180 human colon cancer cells. Monoclonal antibody MLS128, which recognizes Tn antigen on mucin, was biotinylated and injected IP into the IP tumor-bearing mice. Radioiodinated streptavidin was administered IP or i.v. 48 h after pretargeting of biotinylated antibody. Avidin was administered i.v. 30 min prior to streptavidin injection. The localization of radioiodinated streptavidin in the tumor pretargeted with biotinylated antibody was significantly higher than that without pretargeting and that of radioiodinated MLS128 by the one-step method. Avidin administration significantly accelerated the clearance of radioiodinated streptavidin in blood and other normal tissues and increased the tumor-to-blood radioactivity ratio regardless of administration route of streptavidin. The i.v. avidin chase improved tumor localization of radiolabeled streptavidin in the IP xenografts pretargeted with biotinylated antibody

  2. C-C chemokine receptor-7 mediated endocytosis of antibody cargoes into intact cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier eCharest-Morin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The C-C chemokine receptor-7 (CCR7 is a G protein coupled receptor that has a role in leukocyte homing, but that is also expressed in aggressive tumor cells. Preclinical research supports that CCR7 is a valid target in oncology. In view of the increasing availability of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies that carry cytotoxic cargoes, we studied the feasibility of forcing intact cells to internalize known monoclonal antibodies by exploiting the cycle of endocytosis and recycling triggered by the CCR7 agonist CCL19. Firstly, an anti-CCR7 antibody (CD197; clone 150503 labeled surface recombinant CCR7 expressed in intact HEK 293a cells and the fluorescent antibody was internalized following CCL19 treatment. Secondly, a recombinant myc-tagged CCL19 construction was exploited along the anti-myc monoclonal antibody 4A6. The myc-tagged ligand was produced as a conditioned medium of transfected HEK 293a cells that contained the equivalent of 430 ng/ml of immunoreactive CCL19 (average value, ELISA determination. CCL19-myc, but not authentic CCL19, carried the fluorophore-labeled antibody 4A6 into other recipient cells that expressed recombinant CCR7 (microscopy, cytofluorometry. The immune complexes were apparent in endosomal structures, colocalized well with the small GTPase Rab5 and progressed toward Rab7-positive endosomes. A dominant negative form of Rab5 (GDP-locked inhibited this endocytosis. Further, endosomes in CCL19-myc- or CCL19-stimulated cells were positive for β-arrestin2, but rarely for β-arrestin1. Following treatment with CCL19-myc and the 4A6 antibody, the melanoma cell line A375 that expresses endogenous CCR7 was specifically stained using a secondary peroxidase-conjugated antibody. Agonist-stimulated CCR7 can transport antibody-based cargoes, with possible therapeutic applications in oncology.

  3. Fusion Peptide Improves Stability and Bioactivity of Single Chain Antibody against Rabies Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Hualong; Zhang, Kaixin; Yin, Yanchun; Gu, Tiejun; Sun, Qing; Shi, Linqing; Zhang, Renxia; Jiang, Chunlai; Kong, Wei; Wu, Yongge

    2017-04-28

    The combination of rabies immunoglobulin (RIG) with a vaccine is currently effective against rabies infections, but improvements are needed. Genetic engineering antibody technology is an attractive approach for developing novel antibodies to replace RIG. In our previous study, a single-chain variable fragment, scFv57R, against rabies virus glycoprotein was constructed. However, its inherent weak stability and short half-life compared with the parent RIG may limit its diagnostic and therapeutic application. Therefore, an acidic tail of synuclein (ATS) derived from the C-terminal acidic tail of human alpha-synuclein protein was fused to the C-terminus of scFv57R in order to help it resist adverse stress and improve the stability and halflife. The tail showed no apparent effect on the preparation procedure and affinity of the protein, nor did it change the neutralizing potency in vitro. In the ELISA test of molecular stability, the ATS fusion form of the protein, scFv57R-ATS, showed an increase in thermal stability and longer half-life in serum than scFv57R. The protection against fatal rabies virus challenge improved after fusing the tail to the scFv, which may be attributed to the improved stability. Thus, the ATS fusion approach presented here is easily implemented and can be used as a new strategy to improve the stability and half-life of engineered antibody proteins for practical applications.

  4. A simple vector system to improve performance and utilisation of recombinant antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Karen J

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Isolation of recombinant antibody fragments from antibody libraries is well established using technologies such as phage display. Phage display vectors are ideal for efficient display of antibody fragments on the surface of bacteriophage particles. However, they are often inefficient for expression of soluble antibody fragments, and sub-cloning of selected antibody populations into dedicated soluble antibody fragment expression vectors can enhance expression. Results We have developed a simple vector system for expression, dimerisation and detection of recombinant antibody fragments in the form of single chain Fvs (scFvs. Expression is driven by the T7 RNA polymerase promoter in conjunction with the inducible lysogen strain BL21 (DE3. The system is compatible with a simple auto-induction culture system for scFv production. As an alternative to periplasmic expression, expression directly in the cytoplasm of a mutant strain with a more oxidising cytoplasmic environment (Origami 2™ (DE3 was investigated and found to be inferior to periplasmic expression in BL21 (DE3 cells. The effect on yield and binding activity of fusing scFvs to the N terminus of maltose binding protein (a solubility enhancing partner, bacterial alkaline phosphatase (a naturally dimeric enzymatic reporter molecule, or the addition of a free C-terminal cysteine was determined. Fusion of scFvs to the N-terminus of maltose binding protein increased scFv yield but binding activity of the scFv was compromised. In contrast, fusion to the N-terminus of bacterial alkaline phosphatase led to an improved performance. Alkaline phosphatase provides a convenient tag allowing direct enzymatic detection of scFv fusions within crude extracts without the need for secondary reagents. Alkaline phosphatase also drives dimerisation of the scFv leading to an improvement in performance compared to monovalent constructs. This is illustrated by ELISA, western blot and

  5. Improved tumor localization with (strept)avidin and labeled biotin as a substitute for antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hnatowich, D.J.; Fritz, B.; Virzi, F.; Mardirossian, G.; Rusckowski, M.

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated tumor localization with labeled biotin administered subsequent to unlabeled and unconjugated streptavidin. Nude mice bearing anti-CEA tumors (LS174T) received 10 μg of 111 In-labeled anti-CEA antibody (C110) or 111 In-labeled streptavidin with sacrifice 5 h later. In an examination of pretargeting, other animals received 50 μg of unlabeled streptavidin followed 3 h later with 1 μg of 111 In-labeled biotin (EB 1 ) and sacrifice 2 h later. The biodistribution of labeled streptavidin was similar to that of labeled specific antibody except for lower blood and higher kidney levels. Tumor levels were also lower with labeled streptavidin but, because of still lower levels in liver and blood, the tumor/normal tissue ratios were improved. When unlabeled streptavidin was administered and followed by labeled biotin (pretargeting), tumor levels were further reduced modestly; however, normal tissue levels were greatly reduced such that the tumor/blood and tumor/liver ratios were 10.6 and 2.2 vs 1.5 and 0.5 for the specific antibody. Improvements were seen in all tissues sampled with the exception of kidney and muscle. A further control of labeled biotin alone (without the preinjection of streptavidin) showed minimal accumulations in all tissues with the exception of kidneys. In conclusion, the accumulation of (strept)avidin by passive diffusion in tumor may be comparable, at early times, to the accumulation of specific antibody. (author)

  6. An improved microtiter assay for evaluating anti-HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies from sera or plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yunyun

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The anti-HIV-1 neutralizing antibody assay is widely used in AIDS vaccine research and other experimental and clinical studies. The vital dye staining method applied in the detection of anti-HIV-1 neutralizing antibody has been used in many laboratories. However, the unknown factor(s in sera or plasma affected cell growth and caused protection when the tested sera or plasma was continuously maintained in cell culture. In addition, the poor solubility of neutral red in medium (such as RPMI-1640 also limited the use of this assay. Methods In this study, human T cell line C8166 was used as host cells, and 3-(4,5-Dimethyl-2-thiazolyl-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT instead of neutral red was used as vital dye. In order to avoid the effect of the unknown factor(s, the tested sera or plasma was removed by a washout procedure after initial 3–6 h culture in the assay. Result This new assay eliminated the effect of the tested sera or plasma on cell growth, improved the reliability of detection of anti-HIV-1 neutralizing antibody, and showed excellent agreement with the p24 antigen method. Conclusion The results suggest that the improved assay is relatively simple, highly duplicable, cost-effective, and well reliable for evaluating anti-HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies from sera or plasma.

  7. The role of CD40 in CD40L- and antibody-mediated platelet activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Florian; Ingersoll, Susan B; Amirkhosravi, Ali; Meyer, Todd; Siddiqui, Farooq A; Ahmad, Sarfraz; Walker, Jamie M; Amaya, Mildred; Desai, Hina; Francis, John L

    2005-06-01

    Our initial finding that CD40- and CD40 ligand (CD40L)-deficient mice displayed prolonged tail bleeding and platelet function analyzer (PFA-100) closure times prompted us to further investigate the role of the CD40-CD40L dyad in primary hemostasis and platelet function. Recombinant human soluble CD40L (rhsCD40L), chemical cross-linking of which suggested a trimeric structure of the protein in solution, activated platelets in a CD40-dependent manner as evidenced by increased CD62P expression. CD40 monoclonal antibody (mAb) M3, which completely blocked rhsCD40L-induced platelet activation, also prolonged PFA-100 closure times of normal human blood. In contrast, CD40 mAb G28-5 showed less potential in blocking rhsCD40L-induced CD62P expression and did not affect PFA-100 closure times. However, when added to the platelets after rhsCD40L, G28-5 significantly enhanced the platelet response by causing clustering of, and signaling through, FcgammaRII. Similarly, higher order multimeric immune complexes formed at a 1/3 molar ratio of M90, a CD40L mAb, to rhsCD40L induced strong Fcgamma RII-mediated platelet activation when translocated to the platelet surface in a CD40-dependent manner, including the induction of morphological shape changes, fibrinogen binding, platelet aggregation, dense granule release, microparticle generation and monocyte-platelet-conjugate formation. The results suggest that CD40 may play a role in primary hemostasis and platelet biology by two independent mechanisms: First, by functioning as a primary signaling receptor for CD40L and, second, by serving as a docking molecule for CD40L immune complexes. The latter would also provide a potential mechanistic explanation for the unexpected high incidence of CD40L mAb-associated thrombotic events in recent human and animal studies.

  8. A type I interferon signature characterizes chronic antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rascio, Federica; Pontrelli, Paola; Accetturo, Matteo; Oranger, Annarita; Gigante, Margherita; Castellano, Giuseppe; Gigante, Maddalena; Zito, Anna; Zaza, Gianluigi; Lupo, Antonio; Ranieri, Elena; Stallone, Giovanni; Gesualdo, Loreto; Grandaliano, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    Chronic antibody-mediated rejection (CAMR) represents the main cause of kidney graft loss. To uncover the molecular mechanisms underlying this condition, we characterized the molecular signature of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and, separately, of CD4(+) T lymphocytes isolated from CAMR patients, compared to kidney transplant recipients with normal graft function and histology. We enrolled 29 patients with biopsy-proven CAMR, 29 stable transplant recipients (controls), and 8 transplant recipients with clinical and histological evidence of interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy. Messenger RNA and microRNA profiling of PBMCs and CD4(+) T lymphocytes was performed using Agilent microarrays in eight randomly selected patients per group from CAMR and control subjects. Results were evaluated statistically and by functional pathway analysis (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) and validated in the remaining subjects. In PBMCs, 45 genes were differentially expressed between the two groups, most of which were up-regulated in CAMR and were involved in type I interferon signalling. In the same patients, 16 microRNAs were down-regulated in CAMR subjects compared to controls: four were predicted modulators of six mRNAs identified in the transcriptional analysis. In silico functional analysis supported the involvement of type I interferon signalling. To further confirm this result, we investigated the transcriptomic profiles of CD4(+) T lymphocytes in an independent group of patients, observing that the activation of type I interferon signalling was a specific hallmark of CAMR. In addition, in CAMR patients, we detected a reduction of circulating BDCA2(+) dendritic cells, the natural type I interferon-producing cells, and their recruitment into the graft along with increased expression of MXA, a type I interferon-induced protein, at the tubulointerstitial and vascular level. Finally, interferon alpha mRNA expression was significantly increased in CAMR compared to control

  9. Antibody-mediated immunotherapy of macaques chronically infected with SHIV suppresses viraemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shingai, Masashi; Nishimura, Yoshiaki; Klein, Florian; Mouquet, Hugo; Donau, Olivia K.; Plishka, Ronald; Buckler-White, Alicia; Seaman, Michael; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Dimitrov, Dimiter; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Martin, Malcolm A.

    2013-11-01

    Neutralizing antibodies can confer immunity to primate lentiviruses by blocking infection in macaque models of AIDS. However, earlier studies of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) neutralizing antibodies administered to infected individuals or humanized mice reported poor control of virus replication and the rapid emergence of resistant variants. A new generation of anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies, possessing extraordinary potency and breadth of neutralizing activity, has recently been isolated from infected individuals. These neutralizing antibodies target different regions of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein including the CD4-binding site, glycans located in the V1/V2, V3 and V4 regions, and the membrane proximal external region of gp41 (refs 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14). Here we have examined two of the new antibodies, directed to the CD4-binding site and the V3 region (3BNC117 and 10-1074, respectively), for their ability to block infection and suppress viraemia in macaques infected with the R5 tropic simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-AD8, which emulates many of the pathogenic and immunogenic properties of HIV-1 during infections of rhesus macaques. Either antibody alone can potently block virus acquisition. When administered individually to recently infected macaques, the 10-1074 antibody caused a rapid decline in virus load to undetectable levels for 4-7days, followed by virus rebound during which neutralization-resistant variants became detectable. When administered together, a single treatment rapidly suppressed plasma viraemia for 3-5weeks in some long-term chronically SHIV-infected animals with low CD4+ T-cell levels. A second cycle of anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibody therapy, administered to two previously treated animals, successfully controlled virus rebound. These results indicate that immunotherapy or a combination of immunotherapy plus conventional antiretroviral drugs might be useful as a treatment for chronically HIV-1-infected

  10. AAVrh.10-Mediated Expression of an Anti-Cocaine Antibody Mediates Persistent Passive Immunization That Suppresses Cocaine-Induced Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenberg, Jonathan B.; Hicks, Martin J.; De, Bishnu P.; Pagovich, Odelya; Frenk, Esther; Janda, Kim D.; Wee, Sunmee; Koob, George F.; Hackett, Neil R.; Kaminsky, Stephen M.; Worgall, Stefan; Tignor, Nicole; Mezey, Jason G.; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2012-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is a major problem affecting all societal and economic classes for which there is no effective therapy. We hypothesized an effective anti-cocaine vaccine could be developed by using an adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene transfer vector as the delivery vehicle to persistently express an anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody in vivo, which would sequester cocaine in the blood, preventing access to cognate receptors in the brain. To accomplish this, we constructed AAVrh.10antiCoc.Mab...

  11. Expression of HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies mediated by recombinant adeno-associated virus 8 in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yongjiao; Fu, Lu; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Guan, Shanshan; Kuai, Ziyu; Kong, Wei; Shi, Yuhua; Shan, Yaming

    2016-12-01

    Despite unremitting efforts since the discovery of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), an effective vaccine has not been generated. Viral vector-mediated transfer for expression of HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (BnAbs) is an attractive strategy. In this study, a recombinant adeno-associated virus 8 (rAAV8) vector was used to encode full-length antibodies against HIV-1 in 293T cells and Balb/c mice after gene transfer. The 10E8 or NIH45-46 BnAb was expressed from a single open reading frame by linking the heavy and light chains with a furin cleavage and a 2A self-processing peptide (F2A). The results showed that the BnAbs could be expressed in the 293T cell culture medium. A single intramuscular injection of rAAV8 led to long-term expression of BnAbs in Balb/c mice. The expressed antibodies in the supernatant of 293T cells and in Balb/c mice showed neutralization effects against HIV-1 pseudoviruses. Combined immunization of rAAV8 expressing 10E8 and rAAV8 expressing NIH45-46 in Balb/c mice could increase these neutralization effects on strains of HIV-1 sensitive to 10E8 or NIH45-46 antibody compared with a single injection of rAAV8 expressing either antibody alone. Therefore, the combined immunization may be a potential vaccine approach against HIV-1. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. An improved haemolytic plaque assay for the detection of cells secreting antibody to bacterial antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barington, T; Heilmann, C

    1992-01-01

    -polysaccharide AbSC of the IgG isotype, the increase was as high as 7.4-11.8 times. Evidence is presented that the pronounced improvement in the detection of the latter is due to the presence of aggregating anti-IgG antibody from the beginning of the assay. It is proposed that in the case of low affinity of anti...

  13. Antibody-Mediated Neutralization of the Exotoxin Mycolactone, the Main Virulence Factor Produced by Mycobacterium ulcerans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Dangy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mycolactone, the macrolide exotoxin produced by Mycobacterium ulcerans, causes extensive tissue destruction by inducing apoptosis of host cells. In this study, we aimed at the production of antibodies that could neutralize the cytotoxic activities of mycolactone.Using the B cell hybridoma technology, we generated a series of monoclonal antibodies with specificity for mycolactone from spleen cells of mice immunized with the protein conjugate of a truncated synthetic mycolactone derivative. L929 fibroblasts were used as a model system to investigate whether these antibodies can inhibit the biological effects of mycolactone. By measuring the metabolic activity of the fibroblasts, we found that anti-mycolactone mAbs can completely neutralize the cytotoxic activity of mycolactone.The toxin neutralizing capacity of anti-mycolactone mAbs supports the concept of evaluating the macrolide toxin as vaccine target.

  14. Different mechanisms are involved in the antibody mediated inhibition of ligand binding to the urokinase receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, K; Høyer-Hansen, G; Rønne, E

    1999-01-01

    or interference with conformational properties of the receptor critical for ligand binding. This distinction is central when employing the antibodies as tools in the elucidation of the structure-function relationship of the protein in question. We have studied the effect of monoclonal antibodies against......PA/uPAR complex. The continuous recording of binding and dissociation, obtained in BIA, is central in characterizing these phenomena. The identification of a non-competitive inhibitory mechanism against this receptor reveals the presence of a determinant which influences the binding properties of a remote site...

  15. Affinity improvement of a therapeutic antibody by structure-based computational design: generation of electrostatic interactions in the transition state stabilizes the antibody-antigen complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato Kiyoshi

    Full Text Available The optimization of antibodies is a desirable goal towards the development of better therapeutic strategies. The antibody 11K2 was previously developed as a therapeutic tool for inflammatory diseases, and displays very high affinity (4.6 pM for its antigen the chemokine MCP-1 (monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1. We have employed a virtual library of mutations of 11K2 to identify antibody variants of potentially higher affinity, and to establish benchmarks in the engineering of a mature therapeutic antibody. The most promising candidates identified in the virtual screening were examined by surface plasmon resonance to validate the computational predictions, and to characterize their binding affinity and key thermodynamic properties in detail. Only mutations in the light-chain of the antibody are effective at enhancing its affinity for the antigen in vitro, suggesting that the interaction surface of the heavy-chain (dominated by the hot-spot residue Phe101 is not amenable to optimization. The single-mutation with the highest affinity is L-N31R (4.6-fold higher affinity than wild-type antibody. Importantly, all the single-mutations showing increase affinity incorporate a charged residue (Arg, Asp, or Glu. The characterization of the relevant thermodynamic parameters clarifies the energetic mechanism. Essentially, the formation of new electrostatic interactions early in the binding reaction coordinate (transition state or earlier benefits the durability of the antibody-antigen complex. The combination of in silico calculations and thermodynamic analysis is an effective strategy to improve the affinity of a matured therapeutic antibody.

  16. Functional improvement of antibody fragments using a novel phage coat protein III fusion system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kim Bak; Larsen, Martin; Pedersen, Jesper Søndergaard

    2002-01-01

    Functional expressions of proteins often depend on the presence of host specific factors. Frequently recombinant expression strategies of proteins in foreign hosts, such as bacteria, have been associated with poor yields or significant loss of functionality. Improvements in the performance...... of heterologous expression systems will benefit present-day quests in structural and functional genomics where high amounts of active protein are required. One example, which has been the subject of considerable interest, is recombinant antibodies or fragments thereof as expressions of these in bacteria......(s) of the filamentous phage coat protein III. Furthermore, it will be shown that the observed effect is neither due to improved stability nor increased avidity....

  17. Opsonization of Treponema pallidum is mediated by immunoglobulin G antibodies induced only by pathogenic treponemes.

    OpenAIRE

    Shaffer, J M; Baker-Zander, S A; Lukehart, S A

    1993-01-01

    Rabbit antisera to Leptospira interrogans, Borrelia hermsii, and Treponema phagedenis biotype Reiter, reactive to shared spirochetal antigens, failed to enhance phagocytosis of Treponema pallidum by macrophages, while immunoglobulin G to Treponema pallidum subsp. pertenue and Treponema paraluiscuniculi promoted phagocytosis. Opsonic antibodies are directed to pathogen-restricted, not shared spirochetal, antigens.

  18. Antibody therapy of cancer : Fc receptor-mediated mechanisms of action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overdijk, M.B.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer, a class of malignant diseases characterized by unregulated cell growth, is still a leading cause of death worldwide. The high specificity of antibodies combined with the ability to engage multiple mechanisms of action (MoA) and minimal side-effects makes them attractive agents for targeted

  19. Different mechanisms are involved in the antibody mediated inhibition of ligand binding to the urokinase receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, K; Høyer-Hansen, G; Rønne, E

    1999-01-01

    Certain monoclonal antibodies are capable of inhibiting the biological binding reactions of their target proteins. At the molecular level, this type of effect may be brought about by completely different mechanisms, such as competition for common binding determinants, steric hindrance or interfer...

  20. Anti-CD8 antibodies can trigger CD8+ T-cell effector function in the absence of TCR engagement and improve pMHCI tetramer staining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Mathew; Ladell, Kristin; Ekeruche-Makinde, Julia; Miles, John J.; Edwards, Emily S. J.; Dolton, Garry; Williams, Tamsin; Schauenburg, Andrea J. A.; Cole, David K.; Lauder, Sarah N.; Gallimore, Awen M.; Godkin, Andrew J.; Burrows, Scott R.; Price, David A.; Sewell, Andrew K.; Wooldridge, Linda

    2011-01-01

    CD8+ T-cells recognize immunogenic peptides presented at the cell surface bound to major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) molecules. Antigen recognition involves the binding of both T-cell receptor (TCR) and CD8 co-receptor to the same peptide-MHCI (pMHCI) ligand. Specificity is determined by the TCR, whereas CD8 mediates effects on antigen sensitivity. Anti-CD8 antibodies have been used extensively to examine the role of CD8 in CD8+ T-cell activation. However, as previous studies have yielded conflicting results, it is unclear from the literature whether anti-CD8 antibodies per se are capable of inducing effector function. Here, we report on the ability of seven monoclonal anti-human CD8 antibodies to activate six human CD8+ T-cell clones with a total of five different specificities. Six out of seven anti-human CD8 antibodies tested did not activate CD8+ T-cells. In contrast, one anti-human CD8 antibody, OKT8, induced effector function in all CD8+ T-cells examined. Moreover, OKT8 was found to enhance TCR/pMHCI on-rates and, as a consequence, could be used to improve pMHCI tetramer staining and the visualization of antigen-specific CD8+ T-cells. The anti-mouse CD8 antibodies, CT-CD8a and CT-CD8b, also activated CD8+ T-cells despite opposing effects on pMHCI tetramer staining. The observed heterogeneity in the ability of anti-CD8 antibodies to trigger T-cell effector function provides an explanation for the apparent incongruity observed in previous studies and should be taken into consideration when interpreting results generated with these reagents. Furthermore, the ability of antibody-mediated CD8-engagement to deliver an activation signal underscores the importance of CD8 in CD8+ T-cell signalling. PMID:21677135

  1. Strategies to Improve Cancer Photothermal Therapy Mediated by Nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo-Diogo, Duarte; Pais-Silva, Cleide; Dias, Diana R; Moreira, André F; Correia, Ilídio J

    2017-05-01

    The deployment of hyperthermia-based treatments for cancer therapy has captured the attention of different researchers worldwide. In particular, the application of light-responsive nanomaterials to mediate hyperthermia has revealed promising results in several pre-clinical assays. Unlike conventional therapies, these nanostructures can display a preferential tumor accumulation and thus mediate, upon irradiation with near-infrared light, a selective hyperthermic effect with temporal resolution. Different types of nanomaterials such as those based on gold, carbon, copper, molybdenum, tungsten, iron, palladium and conjugated polymers have been used for this photothermal modality. This progress report summarizes the different strategies that have been applied so far for increasing the efficacy of the photothermal therapeutic effect mediated by nanomaterials, namely those that improve the accumulation of nanomaterials in tumors (e.g. by changing the corona composition or through the functionalization with targeting ligands), increase nanomaterials' intrinsic capacity to generate photoinduced heat (e.g. by synthesizing new nanomaterials or assembling nanostructures) or by optimizing the parameters related to the laser light used in the irradiation process (e.g. by modulating the radiation wavelength). Overall, the development of new strategies or the optimization and combination of the existing ones will surely give a major contribution for the application of nanomaterials in cancer PTT. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors as modulators of trastuzumab-mediated antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity in breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Denis M; Gately, Kathy; Hughes, Clare; Edwards, Connla; Davies, Anthony; Madden, Stephen F; O'Byrne, Kenneth J; O'Donovan, Norma; Crown, John

    2017-09-01

    Trastuzumab is an anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapy capable of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and used in the treatment of HER2+ breast cancer. Through interactions with FcƴR+ immune cell subsets, trastuzumab functions as a passive immunotherapy. The EGFR/HER2-targeting tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) lapatinib and the next generation TKIs afatinib and neratinib, can alter HER2 levels, potentially modulating the ADCC response to trastuzumab. Using LDH-release assays, we investigated the impact of antigen modulation, assay duration and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) activity on trastuzumab-mediated ADCC in breast cancer models of maximal (SKBR3) and minimal (MCF-7) target antigen expression to determine if modulating the ADCC response to trastuzumab using TKIs may be a viable approach for enhancing tumor immune reactivity. HER2 levels were determined in lapatinib, afatinib and neratinib-treated SKBR3 and MCF-7 using high content analysis (HCA). Trastuzumab-mediated ADCC was assessed following treatment with TKIs utilising a colorimetric LDH release-based protocol at 4 and 12h timepoints. PBMC activity was assessed against non-MHC-restricted K562 cells. A flow cytometry-based method (CFSE/7-AAD) was also used to measure trastuzumab-mediated ADCC in medium-treated SKBR3 and MCF-7. HER2 antigen levels were significantly altered by the three TKIs in both cell line models. The TKIs significantly reduced LDH levels directly in SKBR3 cells but not MCF-7. Lapatinib and neratinib augment trastuzumab-related ADCC in SKBR3 but the effect was not consistent with antigen expression levels and was dependent on volunteer PBMC activity (vs. K562). A 12h assay timepoint produced more consistent results. Trastuzumab-mediated ADCC (PBMC:target cell ratio of 10:1) was measured at 7.6±4.7% (T12) by LDH assay and 19±3.2 % (T12) using the flow cytometry-based method in the antigen-low model MCF-7. In the presence of effector cells with high

  3. Extracorporeal adsorption therapy: A Method to improve targeted radiation delivered by radiometal-labeled monoclonal antibodies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemecek, Eneida R.; Green, Damian J.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Pagal, John M.; Lin, Yukang; Gopal, A. K.; Durack, Lawrence D.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Wilbur, D. S.; Nilsson, Rune; Sandberg, Bengt; Press, Oliver W.

    2008-04-01

    Many investigators have demonstrated the ability to treat hematologic malignancies with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies targeting hematopoietic antigens such as anti-CD20 and anti-CD45. [1-5] Although the remission rates achieved with radioimmunotherapy (RIT) are relatively high, many patients subsequently relapse presumably due to suboptimal delivery of enough radiation to eradicate the malignancy. The dose-response of leukemia and lymphoma to radiation has been proven. Substantial amounts of radiation can be delivered by RIT if followed by hematopoietic cell transplantation to rescue the bone marrow from myeloablation.[ref] However, the maximum dose of RIT that can be used is still limited by toxicity to normal tissues affected by nonspecific delivery of radiation. Efforts to improve RIT focus on improving the therapeutic ratios of radiation in target versus non-target tissues by removing the fraction of radioisotope that fails to bind to target tissues and circulates freely in the bloodstream perfusing non-target tissues. Our group and others have explored several alternatives for removal of unbound circulating antibody. [refs] One such method, extracorporeal adsorption therapy (ECAT) consists of removing unbound antibody by a method similar to plasmapheresis after critical circulation time and distribution of antibody into target tissues have been achieved. Preclinical studies of ECAT in murine xenograft models demonstrated significant improvement in therapeutic ratios of radioactivity. Chen and colleagues demonstrated that a 2-hour ECAT procedure could remove 40 to 70% of the radioactivity from liver, lung and spleen. [ref] Although isotope concentration in the tumor was initially unaffected, a 50% decrease was noted approximately 36 hours after the procedure. This approach was also evaluated in a limited phase I pilot study of patients with refractory B-cell lymphoma. [ref] After radiographic confirmation of tumor localization of a test dose of anti-CD20

  4. Cellular response of ovarian carcinoma cells to antibody-photosensitizer-mediated injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Tayyaba; Sherwood, M. E.; Anderson, T.; Bamberg, Mike; Flotte, Thomas J.; Zurawski, Vince R., Jr.

    1990-07-01

    An anti-ovarian carcinoma antibody OC125 was conjugated to a derivative of the photosensitizer (PS) chiorin e6 yj polyglutamic acid. Target cells from a human ovarian cancer cell line were treated with this conjugate and laser irradiation at 656 rim (absorption maximum of PS) and fixed 24 h later for electron microscopy. Electron niicrographs showed a high degree of vacoulization, generalized cell necrosis, and extrusion of organelles. No specific damage to the plasma membrane was noted. Untreated control cells, or cells treated with conjugate or light alone exhibited no injury. These data suggest that even though the antibody recognizes a cell surface antigen, the conjugate is internalized under the conditions of the experiment.

  5. Influencing Antibody-Mediated Attenuation of Methamphetamine CNS Distribution through Vaccine Linker Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooyit, Major; Miranda, Pedro O; Wenthur, Cody J; Ducime, Alex; Janda, Kim D

    2017-03-15

    Active vaccination examining a single hapten engendered with a series of peptidic linkers has resulted in the production of antimethamphetamine antibodies. Given the limited chemical complexity of methamphetamine, the structure of the linker species embedded within the hapten could have a substantial effect on the ultimate efficacy of the resulting vaccines. Herein, we investigate linker effects by generating a series of methamphetamine haptens that harbor a linker with varying amino acid identity, peptide length, and associated carrier protein. Independent changes in each of these parameters were found to result in alterations in both the quantity and quality of the antibodies induced by vaccination. Although it was found that the consequence of the linker design was also dependent on the identity of the carrier protein, we demonstrate overall that the inclusion of a short, structurally simple, amino acid linker benefits the efficacy of a methamphetamine vaccine in limiting brain penetration of the free drug.

  6. Antiglomerular basement membrane antibody-mediated glomerulonephritis after intranasal cocaine use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, R; Navascués, R A; Baltar, J; Seco, M; Alvarez, J

    1999-01-01

    We report a case of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis due to antiglomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) antibodies that progressed to end-stage renal disease in a 35-year-old man who used intranasal cocaine on an occasional basis. In contrast to many prior reports of acute renal failure occurring with cocaine-associated rhabdomyolysis, this patient did not have any evidence of acute muscle damage and myoglobin release. Circulating anti-GBM antibodies and renal biopsy with linear IgG and C3 deposits confirmed the diagnosis of anti-GBM disease. The possibility of anti-GBM must be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute renal failure in cocaine addicts. This unusual combination raises complex questions regarding the pathogenesis of this type of renal injury.

  7. Adjuvant treatment with dexamethasone plus anti-C5 antibodies improves outcome of experimental pneumococcal meningitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasanmoentalib, E Soemirien; Valls Seron, Mercedes; Morgan, B Paul; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van de Beek, Diederik

    2015-08-15

    We compared adjunctive treatment with placebo, dexamethasone, anti-C5 antibodies, and the combination of dexamethasone plus anti-C5 antibodies in experimental pneumococcal meningitis. In this prospective, investigator-blinded, randomized trial, 96 mice were infected intracisternally with 10(7) CFU/ml Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 3, treated with intraperitoneal ceftriaxone at 20 h, and randomly assigned to intraperitoneal adjunctive treatment with placebo (saline), dexamethasone, anti-C5 antibodies, or dexamethasone plus anti-C5 antibodies. The primary outcome was survival during a 72-h observational period that was analyzed with the log-rank test. Secondary outcome was clinical severity, scored on a validated scale using a linear mixed model. Mortality rates were 16 of 16 mice (100%) in the placebo group, 12 of 15 mice (80%) in the dexamethasone group, 25 of 31 mice (80%) in the anti-C5 antibody group, and 18 of 30 mice (60%) in the dexamethasone plus anti-C5 antibody group (Fisher's exact test for overall difference, P = .012). Mortality of mice treated with dexamethasone plus anti-C5 antibodies was lower compared to the anti-C5 antibody-treated mice (log-rank P = .039) and dexamethasone-treated mice (log-rank P = .040). Clinical severity scores for the dexamethasone plus anti-C5 antibody-treated mice increased more slowly (0.199 points/h) as compared to the anti-C5 antibody-treated mice (0.243 points/h, P = .009) and dexamethasone-treated mice (0.249 points/h, P = .012). Modeling of severity data suggested an additive effect of dexamethasone and anti-C5 antibodies. Adjunctive treatment with dexamethasone plus anti-C5 antibodies improves survival in severe experimental meningitis caused by S. pneumoniae serotype 3, posing an important new treatment strategy for patients with pneumococcal meningitis.

  8. Aberrantly glycosylated MUC1 is expressed on the surface of breast cancer cells and a target for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrsen, Kirstine; Madsen, Caroline B; Rasch, Morten G

    2013-01-01

    not covered by immunological tolerance in MUC1 humanized mice and man. The objective of this study was to determine if mouse antibodies to this Tn-MUC1 epitope induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) pivotal for their potential use in cancer immunotherapy. Binding affinity of mAb 5E5 directed...... to Tn-MUC1 was investigated using BiaCore. The availability of Tn-MUC1 on the surface of breast cancer cells was evaluated by immunohistochemistry, confocal microscopy, and flow cytometry, followed by in vitro assessment of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity by mAb 5E5. Biacore analysis...... is expressed on the surface of breast cancer cells and a target for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity suggesting that antibodies targeting glycopeptide epitopes on mucins are strong candidates for cancer-specific immunotherapies....

  9. The interplay of non-specific binding, target-mediated clearance and FcRn interactions on the pharmacokinetics of humanized antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta-Mannan, Amita; Lu, Jirong; Witcher, Derrick R; Leung, Donmienne; Tang, Ying; Wroblewski, Victor J

    2015-01-01

    The application of protein engineering technologies toward successfully improving antibody pharmacokinetics has been challenging due to the multiplicity of biochemical factors that influence monoclonal antibody (mAb) disposition in vivo. Physiological factors including interactions with the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) and specific antigen binding properties of mAbs, along with biophysical properties of the mAbs themselves play a critical role. It has become evident that applying an integrated approach to understand the relative contribution of these factors is critical to rationally guide and apply engineering strategies to optimize mAb pharmacokinetics. The study presented here evaluated the influence of unintended non-specific interactions on the disposition of mAbs whose clearance rates are governed predominantly by either non-specific (FcRn) or target-mediated processes. The pharmacokinetics of 8 mAbs representing a diverse range of these properties was evaluated in cynomolgus monkeys. Results revealed complementarity-determining region (CDR) charge patch engineering to decrease charge-related non-specific binding can have a significant impact on improving the clearance. In contrast, the influence of enhanced in vitro FcRn binding was mixed, and related to both the strength of charge interaction and the general mechanism predominant in governing the clearance of the particular mAb. Overall, improved pharmacokinetics through enhanced FcRn interactions were apparent for a CDR charge-patch normalized mAb which was affected by non-specific clearance. The findings in this report are an important demonstration that mAb pharmacokinetics requires optimization on a case-by-case basis to improve the design of molecules with increased therapeutic application.

  10. Antibody-mediated neutralization of Ebola virus can occur by two distinct mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shedlock, Devon J.; Bailey, Michael A.; Popernack, Paul M.; Cunningham, James M.; Burton, Dennis R.; Sullivan, Nancy J.

    2010-01-01

    Human Ebola virus causes severe hemorrhagic fever disease with high mortality and there is no vaccine or treatment. Antibodies in survivors occur early, are sustained, and can delay infection when transferred into nonhuman primates. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) from survivors exhibit potent neutralizing activity in vitro and are protective in rodents. To better understand targets and mechanisms of neutralization, we investigated a panel of mAbs shown previously to react with the envelope glycoprotein (GP). While one non-neutralizing mAb recognized a GP epitope in the nonessential mucin-like domain, the rest were specific for GP1, were neutralizing, and could be further distinguished by reactivity with secreted GP. We show that survivor antibodies, human KZ52 and monkey JP3K11, were specific for conformation-dependent epitopes comprising residues in GP1 and GP2 and that neutralization occurred by two distinct mechanisms; KZ52 inhibited cathepsin cleavage of GP whereas JP3K11 recognized the cleaved, fusion-active form of GP.

  11. Anti-alpha-hemolysin monoclonal antibodies mediate protection against Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragle, Brook E; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane

    2009-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia is one of the most common invasive diseases caused by this human pathogen. S. aureus alpha-hemolysin, a pore-forming cytotoxin, is an essential virulence factor in the pathogenesis of pneumonia. Vaccine-based targeting of this toxin provides protection against lethal staphylococcal pneumonia in a murine model system, suggesting that a monoclonal antibody-based therapy may likewise prove to be efficacious for prevention and treatment of this disease. We report the generation of two distinct anti-alpha-hemolysin monoclonal antibodies that antagonize toxin activity, preventing human lung cell injury in vitro and protecting experimental animals against lethal S. aureus pneumonia. Each of these two monoclonal antibodies recognized an epitope within the first 50 amino acid residues of the mature toxin and blocked the formation of a stable alpha-hemolysin oligomer on the target cell surface. Active immunization with the first 50 amino acids of the toxin also conferred protection against S. aureus pneumonia. Together, these data reveal passive and active immunization strategies for prevention or therapy of staphylococcal pneumonia and highlight the potential role that a critical epitope may play in defining human susceptibility to this deadly disease.

  12. Therapeutic Antibody Engineering To Improve Viscosity and Phase Separation Guided by Crystal Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Chi-Kin; Allan, Barrett W; Chai, Qing; Atwell, Shane; Lu, Jirong

    2016-03-07

    Antibodies at high concentrations often reveal unanticipated biophysical properties suboptimal for therapeutic development. The purpose of this work was to explore the use of point mutations based on crystal structure information to improve antibody physical properties such as viscosity and phase separation (LLPS) at high concentrations. An IgG4 monoclonal antibody (Mab4) that exhibited high viscosity and phase separation at high concentration was used as a model system. Guided by the crystal structure, four CDR point mutants were made to evaluate the role of hydrophobic and charge interactions on solution behavior. Surprisingly and unpredictably, two of the charge mutants, R33G and N35E, showed a reduction in viscosity and a lower propensity to form LLPS at high concentration compared to the wild-type (WT), while a third charge mutant S28K showed an increased propensity to form LLPS compared to the WT. A fourth mutant, F102H, had reduced hydrophobicity, but unchanged viscosity and phase separation behavior. We further evaluated the correlation of various biophysical measurements including second virial coefficient (A2), interaction parameter (kD), weight-average molecular weight (WAMW), and hydrodynamic diameters (DH), at relatively low protein concentration (4 to 15 mg/mL) to physical properties, such as viscosity and liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS), at high concentration. Surprisingly, kD measured using dynamic light scattering (DLS) at low antibody concentration correlated better with viscosity and phase separation than did A2 for Mab4. Our results suggest that the high viscosity and phase separation observed at high concentration for Mab4 are mainly driven by charge and not hydrophobicity.

  13. Increasing the clinical efficacy of NK and antibody-mediated cancer immunotherapy: potential predictors of successful clinical outcome observed in high-risk neuroblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony A. Koehn

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Disease recurrence is frequent in high-risk neuroblastoma (NBL patients even after multimodality aggressive treatment [a combination of chemotherapy, surgical resection, local radiation therapy, autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT and cis-retinoic acid (CRA]. Recent clinical studies have explored the use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs that bind to disialoganglioside (GD2, highly expressed in NBL, as a means to enable immune effector cells to destroy NBL cells via antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC. Preclinical data indicate that ADCC can be more effective when appropriate effector cells are activated by cytokines. Clinical studies have pursued this by administering anti-GD2 mAb in combination with ADCC-enhancing cytokines (IL2 and GM-CSF, a regimen that has demonstrated improved cancer-free survival. More recently, early clinical studies have used a fusion protein that consists of the anti-GD2 mAb directly linked to IL2, and antitumor responses were seen in the Phase II setting. Analyses of genes that code for receptors that influence ADCC activity and Natural Killer (NK cell function [Fc Receptor (FcR, Killer Immunoglublin-like Receptor (KIR, and KIR-ligand (KIR-L] suggest patients with antitumor activity are more likely to have certain genotype profiles. Further analyses will need to be conducted to determine whether these genotypes can be used as predictive markers for favorable therapeutic outcome, thus potentially increasing the efficacy of mAb-mediated NK cell-based cancer immunotherapy.

  14. HVR1-mediated antibody evasion of highly infectious in vivo adapted HCV in humanised mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prentoe, Jannick; Verhoye, Lieven; Moctezuma, Rodrigo Velazquez

    2016-01-01

    Objective HCV is a major cause of chronic liver disease worldwide, but the role of neutralising antibodies (nAbs) in its natural history remains poorly defined. We analysed the in vivo role of hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) for HCV virion properties, including nAb susceptibility. Design Analysis...... of HCV from human liver chimeric mice infected with cell-culture-derived prototype genotype 2a recombinant J6/JFH1 or HVR1-deleted variant J6/JFH1ΔHVR1 identified adaptive mutations, which were analysed by reverse genetics in Huh7.5 and CD81-deficient S29 cells. The increased in vivo genomic stability...

  15. Multi-Dimensional Measurement of Antibody-Mediated Heterosubtypic Immunity to Influenza.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiong Wang

    Full Text Available The human immune response to influenza vaccination depends in part on preexisting cross-reactive (heterosubtypic immunity from previous infection by, and/or vaccination with, influenza strains that share antigenic determinants with the vaccine strains. However, current methods for assessing heterosubtypic antibody responses against influenza, including the hemagglutination-inhibition (HAI assay and ELISA, are time and labor intensive, and require moderate amounts of serum and reagents. To address these issues we have developed a fluorescent multiplex assay, mPlex-Flu, that rapidly and simultaneously measures strain specific IgG, IgA, and IgM antibodies against influenza hemagglutinin (HA from multiple viral strains. We cloned, expressed and purified HA proteins from 12 influenza strains, and coupled them to multiplex beads. Assay validation showed that minimal sample volumes (<5 μl of serum were needed, and the assay had a linear response over a four Log10 range. The assay detected nanogram levels of anti-influenza specific antibodies, had high accuracy and reproducibility, with an average percentage coefficient of variation (%CV of 9.06 for intra-assay and 12.94 for inter-assay variability. Pre- and post-intramuscular trivalent influenza vaccination levels of virus specific Ig were consistent with HAI titer and ELISA measurements. A significant advantage of the mPLEX-Flu assay over the HAI assay is the ability to perform antigenic cartography, determining the antigenic distances between influenza HA's, without mathematical correction for HAI data issues. For validation we performed antigenic cartography on 14 different post-influenza infection ferret sera assayed against 12 different influenza HA's. Results were in good agreement with a phylogenetic tree generated from hierarchical clustering of the genomic HA sequences. This is the first report of the use of a multiplex method for antigenic cartography using ferret sera. Overall, the m

  16. Multifunctional Dendrimer-templated Antibody Presentation on Biosensor Surfaces for Improved Biomarker Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hye Jung; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M; Wang, Sunxi; Mao, Guangzhao; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Romero, Roberto

    2010-02-08

    Dendrimers, with their well-defined globular shape and a high density of functional groups, are ideal nanoscale materials for templating sensor surfaces. This work exploits dendrimers as a versatile platform for capturing biomarkers with improved sensitivity and specificity. Synthesis, characterization, fabrication, and functional validation of the dendrimer-based assay platform are described. Bifunctional hydroxyl/thiol functionalized G4-polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer is synthesized and immobilized on to the polyethylene-glycol (PEG)-functionalized assay plate by coupling PEG-maleimide and dendrimer thiol groups. Simultaneously, part of the dendrimer thiol groups are converted to hydrazide functionalities. The resulting dendrimer-modified surface is coupled to the capture antibody in the Fc region of the oxidized antibody. This preserves the orientation flexibility of the antigen binding region (Fv) of the antibody. To validate the approach, the fabricated plates are further used as a solid phase for developing a sandwich type ELISA to detect IL-6 and IL-1β, important biomarkers for early stages of chorioamnionitis. The dendrimer-modified plate provides assays with significantly enhanced sensitivity, lower nonspecific adsorption, and a detection limit of 0.13 pg ml -1 for IL-6 luminol detection and 1.15 pg ml -1 for IL-1β TMB detection, which are significantly better than those for the traditional ELISA. The assays were validated in human serum samples from normal (non-pregnant) woman and pregnant women with pyelonephritis. The specificity and the improved sensitivity of the dendrimer-based capture strategy could have significant implications for the detection of a wide range of cytokines and biomarkers since the capture strategy could be applied to multiplex microbead assays, conductometric immunosensors and field effect biosensors.

  17. Ah receptor mediated suppression of the antibody response in mice is primarily dependent on the Ah phenotype of lymphoid tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silkworth, J.B.; Antrim, L.A.; Sack, G.

    1986-01-01

    Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons act through the aromatic hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor in mice to produce a series of toxic effects of the immune system. The receptor protein is a product of the Ah gene locus. Ah responsive (Ahb/Ahb) mice express a high affinity receptor in both lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues whereas nonresponsive Ahd/Ahd mice express a poor affinity receptor. To determine the role of the Ah receptor of lymphoid tissue relative to that of nonlymphoid tissue in the induction of immune impairment, bone marrow was used to reconstitute lethally irradiated mice of the same or opposite Ah phenotype. All mice were given 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (35 and 350 mumol/kg) ip 2 days before immunization with sheep erythrocytes (SRBC). The immune response to this T dependent antigen and organ weights were determined 5 or 7 days later in normal or chimeric mice, respectively. Monoclonal Lyt 1.1 and Lyt 1.2 antibodies were used to establish the origin of the cells which repopulated the chimeric thymuses. The immune responses of both BALB/cBy (Ahb/Ahb) and the BALB/cBy X DBA/2 hybrid, CByD2F1 (Ahb/Ahd), were significantly suppressed but DBA/2 mice were unaffected. The immune responses of chimeric BALB/cBy----BALB/cBy and BALB/cBy----DBA/2 (donor----recipient) mice were also significantly suppressed and thymic atrophy was observed in both cases. The serum anti-SRBC antibody titers of DBA/2----BALB/cBy chimeras were also significantly decreased although not to the same extent as in BALB/cBy----DBA/2 mice. Chimeric DBA/2----DBA/2 mice were not affected. These results indicate that the sensitivity to Ah receptor mediated suppression of the antibody response is primarily determined by the Ah phenotype of the lymphoid tissue

  18. Enhancement of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity by endowing IgG with FcαRI (CD89) binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrok, M Jack; Luheshi, Nadia M; Beyaz, Nurten; Davies, Gareth C; Legg, James W; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F; Tsui, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Fc effector functions such as antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antibody-dependent cell-mediated phagocytosis (ADCP) are crucial to the efficacy of many antibody therapeutics. In addition to IgG, antibodies of the IgA isotype can also promote cell killing through engagement of myeloid lineage cells via interactions between the IgA-Fc and FcαRI (CD89). Herein, we describe a unique, tandem IgG1/IgA2 antibody format in the context of a trastuzumab variable domain that exhibits enhanced ADCC and ADCP capabilities. The IgG1/IgA2 tandem Fc format retains IgG1 FcγR binding as well as FcRn-mediated serum persistence, yet is augmented with myeloid cell-mediated effector functions via FcαRI/IgA Fc interactions. In this work, we demonstrate anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 antibodies with the unique tandem IgG1/IgA2 Fc can better recruit and engage cytotoxic polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells than either the parental IgG1 or IgA2. Pharmacokinetics of IgG1/IgA2 in BALB/c mice are similar to the parental IgG, and far surpass the poor serum persistence of IgA2. The IgG1/IgA2 format is expressed at similar levels and with similar thermal stability to IgG1, and can be purified via standard protein A chromatography. The tandem IgG1/IgA2 format could potentially augment IgG-based immunotherapeutics with enhanced PMN-mediated cytotoxicity while avoiding many of the problems associated with developing IgAs.

  19. Toll-like receptor activation enhances cell-mediated immunity induced by an antibody vaccine targeting human dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger Marc A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Previously, we have successfully targeted the mannose receptor (MR expressed on monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs using a fully human MR-specific antibody, B11, as a vehicle to deliver whole protein tumor antigens such as the human chorionic gonadotropin hormone (hCGβ. Since MRs play a role in bridging innate immunity with adaptive immunity we have explored several toll-like receptor (TLR-specific ligands that may synergize with MR targeting and be applicable as adjuvants in the clinic. We demonstrate that antigen-specific helper and cytolytic T cells from both healthy donors and cancer patients were effectively primed with B11-hCGβ-treated autologous DCs when a combination of one or several TLR ligands is used. Specifically, concomitant signaling of DCs via TLR3 with dsRNA (poly I:C and DC TLR 7/8 with Resiquimod (R-848, respectively, elicited efficient antigen presentation-mediated by MR-targeting. We demonstrate that MR and TLRs contribute towards maturation and activation of DCs by a mechanism that may be driven by a combination of adjuvant and antibody vaccines that specifically deliver antigenic targets to DCs.

  20. B7h-expressing dendritic cells and plasma B cells mediate distinct outcomes of ICOS costimulation in T cell-dependent antibody responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larimore Kevin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ICOS-B7h costimulatory receptor-ligand pair is required for germinal center formation, the production of isotype-switched antibodies, and antibody affinity maturation in response to T cell-dependent antigens. However, the potentially distinct roles of regulated B7h expression on B cells and dendritic cells in T cell-dependent antibody responses have not been defined. Results We generated transgenic mice with lineage-restricted B7h expression to assess the cell-type specific roles of B7h expression on B cells and dendritic cells in regulating T cell-dependent antibody responses. Our results show that endogenous B7h expression is reduced on B cells after activation in vitro and is also reduced in vivo on antibody-secreting plasma B cells in comparison to both naïve and germinal center B cells from which they are derived. Increasing the level of B7h expression on activated and plasma B cells in B-B7hTg mice led to an increase in the number of antibody-secreting plasma cells generated after immunization and a corresponding increase in the concentration of antigen-specific high affinity serum IgG antibodies of all isotypes, without affecting the number of responding germinal center B cells. In contrast, ICOS costimulation mediated by dendritic cells in DC-B7hTg mice contributed to germinal center formation and selectively increased IgG2a production without affecting the overall magnitude of antibody responses. Conclusions Using transgenic mice with lineage-restricted B7h expression, we have revealed distinct roles of ICOS costimulation mediated by dendritic cells and B cells in the regulation of T cell-dependent antibody responses.

  1. Improving the biophysical properties of anti-ricin single-domain antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendrick B. Turner

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Single-domain antibodies (sdAbs derived from heavy-chain only antibodies produced in camelids are attractive immunoreagents due to their small size, high affinity, and ability to refold and retain binding activity after denaturation. It has been observed that some sdAbs, however, exhibit undesirable properties including reduced solubility when subjected to heating or upon long-term storage at production-relevant concentrations, which can limit their usefulness. Using a multi-step, rational design approach that included consensus-sequence driven sequence repairs, the alteration of net protein charge, and the introduction of non-native disulfide bonds, augmented solubility and increased melting temperatures were achieved. The improved sdAbs tolerated storage in solution at high concentration (10 mg/mL and were able to withstand multiple cycles of heating to high temperature (70 °C. This work demonstrates a pathway for improving the biophysical characteristics of sdAbs which is essential for expanding their utility for both diagnostic as well as therapeutic applications.

  2. Immunization with Clinical HIV-1 Env Proteins Induces Broad Antibody Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity-Mediating Antibodies in a Rabbit Vaccination Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Ingrid; Borggren, Marie; Jensen, Sanne Skov

    2018-01-01

    The induction of both neutralizing antibodies and non-neutralizing antibodies with effector functions, for example, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), is desired in the search for effective vaccines against HIV-1. In the pursuit of novel immunogens capable of inducing an efficient...... of inducing antibodies with ADCC activity did not necessarily induce neutralizing activity and vice versa. Nevertheless, we identified vaccine candidates that were able to concurrently induce both types of responses and that had ADCC activity that was cross-reactive between different subtypes. When searching...

  3. Subclinical antibody-mediated rejection due to anti-human-leukocyte-antigen-DR53 antibody accompanied by plasma cell-rich acute rejection in a patient with cadaveric kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuma, Ai; Yamamoto, Izumi; Komatsuzaki, Yo; Niikura, Takahito; Kawabe, Mayuko; Okabayashi, Yusuke; Yamakawa, Takafumi; Katsumata, Haruki; Nakada, Yasuyuki; Kobayashi, Akimitsu; Tanno, Yudo; Miki, Jun; Yamada, Hiroki; Ohkido, Ichiro; Tsuboi, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Yokoo, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    A 56-year-old man who had undergone cadaveric kidney transplantation 21 months earlier was admitted to our hospital for a protocol biopsy; he had a serum creatinine level of 1.2 mg/dL and no proteinuria. Histological features showed two distinct entities: (i) inflammatory cell infiltration, in the glomerular and peritubular capillaries and (ii) focal, aggressive tubulointerstitial inflammatory cell infiltration, predominantly plasma cells, with mild tubulitis (Banff 13 classification: i2, t1, g2, ptc2, v0, ci1, ct1, cg0, cv0). Immunohistological studies showed mildly positive C4d immunoreactivity in the peritubular capillaries. The patient had donor specific antibody to human-leucocyte-antigen-DR53. We diagnosed him with subclinical antibody-mediated rejection accompanied by plasma cell-rich acute rejection. Both antibody-mediated rejection due to anti- human-leucocyte-antigen -DR53 antibodies and plasma cell-rich acute rejection are known to be refractory and have a poor prognosis. Thus, we started plasma exchange with intravenous immunoglobulin and rituximab for the former and 3 days of consecutive steroid pulse therapy for the latter. Three months after treatment, a follow-up allograft biopsy showed excellent responses to treatment for both histological features. This case report considers the importance of an early diagnosis and appropriate intervention for subclinical antibody-mediated rejection due to donor specific antibody to human-leucocyte-antigen-DR53 and plasma cell-rich acute rejection. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  4. Antibody-Mediated Killing of Carbapenem-Resistant ST258Klebsiella pneumoniaeby Human Neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Scott D; Porter, Adeline R; Freedman, Brett; Pandey, Ruchi; Chen, Liang; Kreiswirth, Barry N; DeLeo, Frank R

    2018-03-13

    Carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae is a problem worldwide. A carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae lineage classified as multilocus sequence type 258 (ST258) is prominent in the health care setting in many regions of the world, including the United States. ST258 strains can be resistant to virtually all clinically useful antibiotics; treatment of infections caused by these organisms is difficult, and mortality is high. As a step toward promoting development of new therapeutics for ST258 infections, we tested the ability of rabbit antibodies specific for ST258 capsule polysaccharide to enhance human serum bactericidal activity and promote phagocytosis and killing of these bacteria by human neutrophils. We first demonstrated that an isogenic wzy deletion strain is significantly more susceptible to killing by human heparinized blood, serum, and neutrophils than a wild-type ST258 strain. Consistent with the importance of capsule as an immune evasion molecule, rabbit immune serum and purified IgG specific for ST258 capsule polysaccharide type 2 (CPS2) enhanced killing by human blood and serum in vitro Moreover, antibodies specific for CPS2 promoted phagocytosis and killing of ST258 by human neutrophils. Collectively, our findings suggest that ST258 CPS2 is a viable target for immunoprophylactics and/or therapeutics. IMPORTANCE Infections caused by carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae are difficult to treat, and mortality is high. New prophylactic approaches and/or therapeutic measures are needed to prevent or treat infections caused by these multidrug-resistant bacteria. A strain of carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae , classified by multilocus sequence typing as ST258, is present in many regions of the world and is the most prominent carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae lineage in the United States. Here we show that rabbit antibodies specific for capsule polysaccharide of ST258 significantly enhance human serum bactericidal activity and promote phagocytosis and

  5. Alterations of HIV-1 envelope phenotype and antibody-mediated neutralization by signal peptide mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Upadhyay, Chitra; Feyznezhad, Roya; Yang, Weiming; Zhang, Hui; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Hioe, Catarina E.

    2018-01-01

    HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) mediates virus attachment and entry into the host cells. Like other membrane-bound and secreted proteins, HIV-1 Env contains at its N terminus a signal peptide (SP) that directs the nascent Env to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where Env synthesis and post-translational modifications take place. SP is cleaved during Env biosynthesis but potentially influences the phenotypic traits of the Env protein. The Env SP sequences of HIV-1 isolates display high sequenc...

  6. Neutralization of Clostridium difficile Toxin B Mediated by Engineered Lactobacilli That Produce Single-Domain Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Kasper Krogh; Strokappe, Nika M.; Hultberg, Anna; Truusalu, Kai; Smidt, Imbi; Mikelsaar, Raik-Hiio; Mikelsaar, Marika; Verrips, Theo; Hammarström, Lennart

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the primary cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated diarrhea in the Western world. The major virulence factors of C. difficile are two exotoxins, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB), which cause extensive colonic inflammation and epithelial damage manifested by episodes of diarrhea. In this study, we explored the basis for an oral antitoxin strategy based on engineered Lactobacillus strains expressing TcdB-neutralizing antibody fragments in the gastrointestinal tract. Variable domain of heavy chain-only (VHH) antibodies were raised in llamas by immunization with the complete TcdB toxin. Four unique VHH fragments neutralizing TcdB in vitro were isolated. When these VHH fragments were expressed in either secreted or cell wall-anchored form in Lactobacillus paracasei BL23, they were able to neutralize the cytotoxic effect of the toxin in an in vitro cell-based assay. Prophylactic treatment with a combination of two strains of engineered L. paracasei BL23 expressing two neutralizing anti-TcdB VHH fragments (VHH-B2 and VHH-G3) delayed killing in a hamster protection model where the animals were challenged with spores of a TcdA− TcdB+ strain of C. difficile (P survived until the termination of the experiment at day 5 and showed either no damage or limited inflammation of the colonic mucosa despite having been colonized with C. difficile for up to 4 days. The protective effect in the hamster model suggests that the strategy could be explored as a supplement to existing therapies for patients. PMID:26573738

  7. Improvement of western blot test specificity for detecting equine serum antibodies to Sarcocystis neurona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossano, M G; Mansfield, L S; Kaneene, J B; Murphy, A J; Brown, C M; Schott, H C; Fox, J C

    2000-01-01

    Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) is a neurological disease of horses and ponies caused by the apicomplexan protozoan parasite Sarcocystis neurona. The purposes of this study were to develop the most stringent criteria possible for a positive test result, to estimate the sensitivity and specificity of the EPM Western blot antibody test, and to assess the ability of bovine antibodies to Sarcocystis cruzi to act as a blocking agent to minimize false-positive results in the western blot test for S. neurona. Sarcocystis neurona merozoites harvested from equine dermal cell culture were heat denatured, and the proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in a 12-20% linear gradient gel. Separated proteins were electrophoretically transferred to polyvinylidene fluoride membranes and blocked in 1% bovine serum albumin and 0.5% Tween-Tris-buffered saline. Serum samples from 6 horses with S. neurona infections (confirmed by culture from neural tissue) and 57 horses without infections (horses from the Eastern Hemisphere, where S. neurona does not exist) were tested by Western blot. Horses from both groups had reactivity to the 62-, 30-, 16-, 13-, 11-, 10.5-, and 10-kD bands. Testing was repeated with another step. Blots were treated with bovine S. cruzi antibodies prior to loading the equine samples. After this modification of the Western blot test, positive infection status was significantly associated with reactivity to the 30- and 16-kD bands (Pblot had a sample sensitivity of 100% and sample specificity of 98%. It is concluded that the specificity of the Western blot test is improved by blocking proteins not specific to S. neurona and using reactivity to the 30- and 16-kD bands as the criterion for a positive test.

  8. Chronic Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Nonhuman Primate Renal Allografts: Validation of Human Histological and Molecular Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, B A; Smith, R N; Rosales, I A; Matsunami, M; Afzali, B; Oura, T; Cosimi, A B; Kawai, T; Colvin, R B; Mengel, M

    2017-11-01

    Molecular testing represents a promising adjunct for the diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). Here, we apply a novel gene expression platform in sequential formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples from nonhuman primate (NHP) renal transplants. We analyzed 34 previously described gene transcripts related to AMR in humans in 197 archival NHP samples, including 102 from recipients that developed chronic AMR, 80 from recipients without AMR, and 15 normal native nephrectomies. Three endothelial genes (VWF, DARC, and CAV1), derived from 10-fold cross-validation receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, demonstrated excellent discrimination between AMR and non-AMR samples (area under the curve = 0.92). This three-gene set correlated with classic features of AMR, including glomerulitis, capillaritis, glomerulopathy, C4d deposition, and DSAs (r = 0.39-0.63, p < 0.001). Principal component analysis confirmed the association between three-gene set expression and AMR and highlighted the ambiguity of v lesions and ptc lesions between AMR and T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR). Elevated three-gene set expression corresponded with the development of immunopathological evidence of rejection and often preceded it. Many recipients demonstrated mixed AMR and TCMR, suggesting that this represents the natural pattern of rejection. These data provide NHP animal model validation of recent updates to the Banff classification including the assessment of molecular markers for diagnosing AMR. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  9. Rebmab200, a Humanized Monoclonal Antibody Targeting the Sodium Phosphate Transporter NaPi2b Displays Strong Immune Mediated Cytotoxicity against Cancer: A Novel Reagent for Targeted Antibody Therapy of Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Mariana Lopes; Yeda, Fernanda Perez; Tsuruta, Lilian Rumi; Horta, Bruno Brasil; Pimenta, Alécio A.; Degaki, Theri Leica; Soares, Ibere C.; Tuma, Maria Carolina; Okamoto, Oswaldo Keith; Alves, Venancio A. F.; Ritter, Gerd; Moro, Ana Maria

    2013-01-01

    NaPi2b, a sodium-dependent phosphate transporter, is highly expressed in ovarian carcinomas and is recognized by the murine monoclonal antibody MX35. The antibody had shown excellent targeting to ovarian cancer in several early phase clinical trials but being murine the antibody's full therapeutic potential could not be explored. To overcome this impediment we developed a humanized antibody version named Rebmab200, expressed in human PER.C6® cells and cloned by limiting dilution. In order to select a clone with high therapeutic potential clones were characterized using a series of physicochemical assays, flow cytometry, real-time surface plasmon resonance, glycosylation analyses, immunohistochemistry, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, complement-dependent-cytotoxicity assays and quantitative PCR. Comparative analyses of Rebmab200 and MX35 monoclonal antibodies demonstrated that the two antibodies had similar specificity for NaPi2b by flow cytometry with a panel of 30 cell lines and maintained similar kinetic parameters. Robust and high producer cell clones potentially suitable for use in manufacturing were obtained. Rebmab200 antibodies were assessed by immunohistochemistry using a large panel of tissues including human carcinomas of ovarian, lung, kidney and breast origin. An assessment of its binding towards 33 normal human organs was performed as well. Rebmab200 showed selected strong reactivity with the tested tumor types but little or no reactivity with the normal tissues tested confirming its potential for targeted therapeutics strategies. The remarkable cytotoxicity shown by Rebmab200 in OVCAR-3 cells is a significant addition to the traits of stability and productivity displayed by the top clones of Rebmab200. Antibody-dependent cell-mediated toxicity functionality was confirmed in repeated assays using cancer cell lines derived from ovary, kidney and lung as targets. To explore use of this antibody in clinical trials, GMP production of Rebmab

  10. Validation of an improved Anaplasma antibody competitive ELISA for detection of Anaplasma ovis antibody in domestic sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Kathleen L; Gonzalez, Michael V; Chung, Chungwon; Mousel, Michelle R; White, Stephen N; Taylor, Joshua B; Scoles, Glen A

    2017-09-01

    An accurate and simple-to-perform new version of a competitive ELISA (cELISA) kit that became commercially available in 2015 for testing of cattle for antibody to Anaplasma marginale was validated for detection of Anaplasma ovis antibody in domestic sheep. True positives and negatives were identified using nested PCR (nPCR) as the gold standard. Negative bovine control sera supplied with the kit were used to calculate % inhibition (%I), designated bovine control ELISA (BcELISA), and this was compared to %I calculated from negative ovine sera derived from hand-raised, pathogen-free sheep, designated ovine control ELISA (OcELISA). The receiver operating characteristics area under the curve was 1.0 with a p value sheep. Furthermore, this work confirmed the historically high infection prevalence (>93%) at the U.S. Sheep Experiment Station (Dubois, Idaho), in spite of efforts to reduce the possibility for iatrogenic transmission there, suggesting high levels of tick-borne transmission.

  11. Anti-CCL21 Antibody Attenuates Infarct Size and Improves Cardiac Remodeling After Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Jiang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Over-activation of cellular inflammatory effectors adversely affects myocardial function after acute myocardial infarction (AMI. The CC-chemokine CCL21 is, via its receptor CCR7, one of the key regulators of inflammation and immune cell recruitment, participates in various inflammatory disorders, including cardiovascular ones. This study explored the therapeutic effect of an anti-CCL21 antibody in cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction. Methods and Results: An animal model of AMI generated by left anterior descending coronary artery ligation in C57BL/6 mice resulted in higher levels of circulating CCL21 and cardiac CCR7. Neutralization of CCL21 by intravenous injection of anti-CCL21 monoclonal antibody reduced infarct size after AMI, decreased serum levels of neutrophil and monocyte chemo attractants post AMI, diminished neutrophil and macrophage recruitment in infarcted myocardium, and suppressed MMP-9 and total collagen content in myocardium. Anti-CCL21 treatment also limited cardiac enlargement and improved left ventricular function. Conclusions: Our study indicated that CCL21 was involved in cardiac remodeling post infarction and anti-CCL21 strategies might be useful in the treatment of AMI.

  12. An improved radioimmunoassay method for the detection of IgG antibodies against cytomegalovirus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, N.J.; Grundy, J.E.; Griffiths, P.D.

    1986-01-01

    The non-specific binding seen with human sera in a radioimmunoassay for the detection of IgG antibodies specific for CMV can be reduced greatly by using a murine monoclonal antibody as a radiolabelled detecting antibody. Such non-specific binding formerly obtained with a polyclonal detecting antibody was due to the binding of the polyclonal reagent to factors on the solid phase other than IgG molecules. (Auth.)

  13. Antibody-mediated immunity to the obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen Coxiella burnetii is Fc receptor- and complement-independent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinzen Robert A

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen Coxiella burnetii causes the zoonosis Q fever. The intracellular niche of C. burnetii has led to the assumption that cell-mediated immunity is the most important immune component for protection against this pathogen. However, passive immunization with immune serum can protect naïve animals from challenge with virulent C. burnetii, indicating a role for antibody (Ab in protection. The mechanism of this Ab-mediated protection is unknown. Therefore, we conducted a study to determine whether Fc receptors (FcR or complement contribute to Ab-mediated immunity (AMI to C. burnetii. Results Virulent C. burnetii infects and replicates within human dendritic cells (DC without inducing their maturation or activation. We investigated the effects of Ab opsonized C. burnetii on human monocyte-derived and murine bone marrow-derived DC. Infection of DC with Ab-opsonized C. burnetii resulted in increased expression of maturation markers and inflammatory cytokine production. Bacteria that had been incubated with naïve serum had minimal effect on DC, similar to virulent C. burnetii alone. The effect of Ab opsonized C. burnetii on DC was FcR dependent as evidenced by a reduced response of DC from FcR knockout (FcR k/o compared to C57Bl/6 (B6 mice. To address the potential role of FcR in Ab-mediated protection in vivo, we compared the response of passively immunized FcR k/o mice to the B6 controls. Interestingly, we found that FcR are not essential for AMI to C. burnetii in vivo. We subsequently examined the role of complement in AMI by passively immunizing and challenging several different strains of complement-deficient mice and found that AMI to C. burnetii is also complement-independent. Conclusion Despite our data showing FcR-dependent stimulation of DC in vitro, Ab-mediated immunity to C. burnetii in vivo is FcR-independent. We also found that passive immunity to this pathogen is independent of

  14. Antibody-mediated targeting of the transferrin receptor in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luria-Pérez, Rosendo; Helguera, Gustavo; Rodríguez, José A

    Iron is essential for cell growth and is imported into cells in part through the action of transferrin (Tf), a protein that binds its receptor (TfR1 or CD71) on the surface of a cell, and then releases iron into endosomes. TfR1 is a single pass type-II transmembrane protein expressed at basal levels in most tissues. High expression of TfR1 is typically associated with rapidly proliferating cells, including various types of cancer. TfR1 is targeted by experimental therapeutics for several reasons: its cell surface accessibility, constitutive endocytosis into cells, essential role in cell growth and proliferation, and its overexpression by cancer cells. Among the therapeutic agents used to target TfR1, antibodies stand out due to their remarkable specificity and affinity. Clinical trials are being conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of agents targeting TfR1 in cancer patients with promising results. These observations suggest that therapies targeting TfR1 as direct therapeutics or delivery conduits remain an attractive alternative for the treatment of cancers that overexpress the receptor. Copyright © 2016 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  15. Improved quantification of a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit for measuring anti-MDA5 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gono, Takahisa; Okazaki, Yuka; Murakami, Akihiro; Kuwana, Masataka

    2018-04-09

    To compare the quantitative performance for measuring anti-MDA5 antibody titer of two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) systems: an in-house ELISA and the commercial MESACUP TM anti-MDA5 test. Anti-MDA5 antibody titer was measured in sera from 70 patients with dermatomyositis using an in-house ELISA and the MESACUP TM anti-MDA5 test side-by-side. For the commercial ELISA kit, serum samples diluted 1:101 were used according to the manufacturer's protocol, but serial dilutions of sera were also examined to identify the optimal serum dilution for quantification. The anti-MDA5 antibody titers measured by the in-house and commercial ELISAs were positively correlated with each other (r = 0.53, p = .0001), but the antibody titer measured by the commercial ELISA was less sensitive to change after medical treatment, and 37 (80%) of 46 anti-MDA5-positive sera had antibody titer exceeding the quantification range specified by the manufacturer (≥150 index). Experiments using diluted serum samples revealed that diluting the sera 1:5050 improved the quantitative performance of the MESACUP TM anti-MDA5 test, including a better correlation with the in-house ELISA results and an increased sensitivity to change. We improved the ability of the commercial ELISA kit to quantify anti-MDA5 antibody titer by altering its protocol.

  16. Improved Diagnosis of Acute Pulmonary Histoplasmosis by Combining Antigen and Antibody Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richer, Sarah M; Smedema, Melinda L; Durkin, Michelle M; Herman, Katie M; Hage, Chadi A; Fuller, Deanna; Wheat, L Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Acute pulmonary histoplasmosis can be severe, especially following heavy inoculum exposure. Rapid diagnosis is critical and often possible by detection of antigen, but this test may be falsely negative in 17% of such cases. Antibody detection by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) may increase sensitivity and permit the measurement of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) classes of antibodies separately. Microplates coated with Histoplasma antigen were used for testing of serum from patients with acute pulmonary histoplasmosis and controls in the MVista Histoplasma antibody EIA. Results for IgG and IgM were reported independently. IgG antibodies were detected in 87.5%, IgM antibodies in 67.5%, and IgG and/or IgM antibodies in 88.8% of patients with acute pulmonary histoplasmosis in this assay, while immunodiffusion, complement fixation, and antigen testing showed sensitivities of 55.0%, 73.1%, and 67.5%, respectively (n = 80). Combining antigen and antibody detection increased the sensitivity to 96.3%. The MVista Histoplasma antibody EIA offers increased sensitivity over current antibody tests while also allowing separate detection of IgG and IgM antibodies and complementing antigen detection. Combining antigen and EIA antibody testing provides an optimal method for diagnosis of acute pulmonary histoplasmosis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  17. Sclerostin antibody treatment improves implant fixation in a model of severe osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virdi, Amarjit S; Irish, John; Sena, Kotaro; Liu, Min; Ke, Hua Zhu; McNulty, Margaret A; Sumner, Dale R

    2015-01-21

    The mechanical fixation of orthopaedic and dental implants is compromised by diminished bone volume, such as with osteoporosis. Systemic administration of sclerostin antibody (Scl-Ab) has been shown to enhance implant fixation in normal animals. In the present study, we tested whether Scl-Ab can improve implant fixation in established osteoporosis in a rat model. We used an ovariectomized (ovx) rat model, in which we found a 78% decrease in trabecular bone volume at the time of implant surgery; sham-ovx, age-matched rats were used as controls. After placement of a titanium implant in the medullary cavity of the distal aspect of the femur, the rats were maintained for four, eight, or twelve weeks and treated biweekly with Scl-Ab or with the delivery vehicle alone. Outcomes were measured with use of microcomputed tomography, mechanical testing, and static and dynamic histomorphometry. Scl-Ab treatment doubled implant fixation strength in both the sham-ovx and ovx groups, although the enhancement was delayed in the ovx group. Scl-Ab treatment also enhanced bone-implant contact; increased peri-implant trabecular thickness and volume; and increased cortical thickness. These structural changes were associated with an approximately five to sevenfold increase in the bone-formation rate and a >50% depression in the eroded surface following Scl-Ab treatment. Trabecular bone thickness and bone-implant contact accounted for two-thirds of the variance in fixation strength. In this model of severe osteoporosis, Scl-Ab treatment enhanced implant fixation by stimulating bone formation and suppressing bone resorption, leading to enhanced bone-implant contact and improved trabecular bone volume and architecture. Systemic administration of anti-sclerostin antibodies might be a useful strategy in total joint replacement when bone mass is deficient. Copyright © 2015 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  18. Macrophage and NK-mediated killing of precursor-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells targeted with a-fucosylated anti-CD19 humanized antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlawska-Wasowska, K; Ward, E; Stevens, S; Wang, Y; Herbst, R; Winter, S S; Wilson, B S

    2013-06-01

    This work reports the tumoricidal effects of a novel investigational humanized anti-CD19 monoclonal antibody (Medi-551). An a-fucosylated antibody with increased affinity for human FcγRIIIA, Medi-551 is shown to mediate both antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP). Medi-551/CD19 complexes internalize slowly (>5 h) and thus remain accessible to effector cells for prolonged periods. We evaluated in vitro ADCC and ADCP activities of primary human natural killer (NK) cells and macrophages against precursor-B (pre-B) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell lines and pediatric patient blasts. Fluorescent imaging studies document immunological synapses formed between anti-CD19-bound target leukemia cells and effector cells and capture the kinetics of both NK-mediated killing and macrophage phagocytosis. Genetic polymorphisms in FcγRIIIA-158F/V modulate in vitro activities of effector cells, with FcγRIIIA-158V homozygotes or heterozygotes showing the strongest activity. Medi-551 treatment of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice engrafted with human pre-B cells led to prolonged animal survival and markedly reduced disease burden in blood, liver and bone marrow. These data show that anti-CD19 antibodies effectively recruit immune cells to pre-B ALL cells and support a move forward to early phase trials in this disease.

  19. Basis and Statistical Design of the Passive HIV-1 Antibody Mediated Prevention (AMP) Test-of-Concept Efficacy Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Peter B; Juraska, Michal; deCamp, Allan C; Karuna, Shelly; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Mgodi, Nyaradzo; Donnell, Deborah J; Bentley, Carter; Sista, Nirupama; Andrew, Philip; Isaacs, Abby; Huang, Yunda; Zhang, Lily; Capparelli, Edmund; Kochar, Nidhi; Wang, Jing; Eshleman, Susan H; Mayer, Kenneth H; Magaret, Craig A; Hural, John; Kublin, James G; Gray, Glenda; Montefiori, David C; Gomez, Margarita M; Burns, David N; McElrath, Julie; Ledgerwood, Julie; Graham, Barney S; Mascola, John R; Cohen, Myron; Corey, Lawrence

    2017-01-01

    Anti-HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) have been developed as potential agents for prevention of HIV-1 infection. The HIV Vaccine Trials Network and the HIV Prevention Trials Network are conducting the Antibody Mediated Prevention (AMP) trials to assess whether, and how, intravenous infusion of the anti-CD4 binding site bnAb, VRC01, prevents HIV-1 infection. These are the first test-of-concept studies to assess HIV-1 bnAb prevention efficacy in humans. The AMP trials are two parallel phase 2b HIV-1 prevention efficacy trials conducted in two cohorts: 2700 HIV-uninfected men and transgender persons who have sex with men in the United States, Peru, Brazil, and Switzerland; and 1500 HIV-uninfected sexually active women in seven countries in sub-Saharan Africa. Participants are randomized 1:1:1 to receive an intravenous infusion of 10 mg/kg VRC01, 30 mg/kg VRC01, or a control preparation every 8 weeks for a total of 10 infusions. Each trial is designed (1) to assess overall prevention efficacy (PE) pooled over the two VRC01 dose groups vs. control and (2) to assess VRC01 dose and laboratory markers as correlates of protection (CoPs) against overall and genotype- and phenotype-specific infection. Each AMP trial is designed to have 90% power to detect PE > 0% if PE is ≥ 60%. The AMP trials are also designed to identify VRC01 properties (i.e., concentration and effector functions) that correlate with protection and to provide insight into mechanistic CoPs. CoPs are assessed using data from breakthrough HIV-1 infections, including genetic sequences and sensitivities to VRC01-mediated neutralization and Fc effector functions. The AMP trials test whether VRC01 can prevent HIV-1 infection in two study populations. If affirmative, they will provide information for estimating the optimal dosage of VRC01 (or subsequent derivatives) and identify threshold levels of neutralization and Fc effector functions associated with high-level protection, setting a benchmark

  20. Sclerostin antibody improves skeletal parameters in a Brtl/+ mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinder, Benjamin P; Eddy, Mary M; Ominsky, Michael S; Caird, Michelle S; Marini, Joan C; Kozloff, Kenneth M

    2013-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic bone dysplasia characterized by osteopenia and easy susceptibility to fracture. Symptoms are most prominent during childhood. Although antiresorptive bisphosphonates have been widely used to treat pediatric OI, controlled trials show improved vertebral parameters but equivocal effects on long-bone fracture rates. New treatments for OI are needed to increase bone mass throughout the skeleton. Sclerostin antibody (Scl-Ab) therapy is potently anabolic in the skeleton by stimulating osteoblasts via the canonical wnt signaling pathway, and may be beneficial for treating OI. In this study, Scl-Ab therapy was investigated in mice heterozygous for a typical OI-causing Gly→Cys substitution in col1a1. Two weeks of Scl-Ab successfully stimulated osteoblast bone formation in a knock-in model for moderately severe OI (Brtl/+) and in WT mice, leading to improved bone mass and reduced long-bone fragility. Image-guided nanoindentation revealed no alteration in local tissue mineralization dynamics with Scl-Ab. These results contrast with previous findings of antiresorptive efficacy in OI both in mechanism and potency of effects on fragility. In conclusion, short-term Scl-Ab was successfully anabolic in osteoblasts harboring a typical OI-causing collagen mutation and represents a potential new therapy to improve bone mass and reduce fractures in pediatric OI. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  1. Complement-mediated virus infectivity neutralisation by HLA antibodies is associated with sterilising immunity to SIV challenge in the macaque model for HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Mark; Quartey-Papafio, Ruby; Robinson, Mark; Hassall, Mark; Cranage, Martin; Stott, James; Almond, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Sterilising immunity is a desired outcome for vaccination against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and has been observed in the macaque model using inactivated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). This protection was attributed to antibodies specific for cell proteins including human leucocyte antigens (HLA) class I and II incorporated into virions during vaccine and challenge virus preparation. We show here, using HLA bead arrays, that vaccinated macaques protected from virus challenge had higher serum antibody reactivity compared with non-protected animals. Moreover, reactivity was shown to be directed against HLA framework determinants. Previous studies failed to correlate serum antibody mediated virus neutralisation with protection and were confounded by cytotoxic effects. Using a virus entry assay based on TZM-bl cells we now report that, in the presence of complement, serum antibody titres that neutralise virus infectivity were higher in protected animals. We propose that complement-augmented virus neutralisation is a key factor in inducing sterilising immunity and may be difficult to achieve with HIV/SIV Env-based vaccines. Understanding how to overcome the apparent block of inactivated SIV vaccines to elicit anti-envelope protein antibodies that effectively engage the complement system could enable novel anti-HIV antibody vaccines that induce potent, virolytic serological response to be developed.

  2. Enhanced CDC of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells mediated by rituximab combined with a novel anti-complement factor H antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark T Winkler

    Full Text Available Rituximab therapy for B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL has met with mixed success. Among several factors to which resistance can be attributed is failure to activate complement dependent cytotoxicity (CDC due to protective complement regulatory proteins, including the soluble regulator complement factor H (CFH. We hypothesized that rituximab killing of non-responsive B-CLL cells could be augmented by a novel human monoclonal antibody against CFH. The B cells from 11 patients with B-CLL were tested ex vivo in CDC assays with combinations of CFH monoclonal antibody, rituximab, and a negative control antibody. CDC of rituximab non-responsive malignant B cells from CLL patients could in some cases be augmented by the CFH monoclonal antibody. Antibody-mediated cytotoxicity of cells was dependent upon functional complement. In one case where B-CLL cells were refractory to CDC by the combination of rituximab plus CFH monoclonal antibody, additionally neutralizing the membrane complement regulatory protein CD59 allowed CDC to occur. Inhibiting CDC regulatory proteins such as CFH holds promise for overcoming resistance to rituximab therapy in B-CLL.

  3. Improved pretargeted delivery of radiolabelled hapten to human tumour xenograft in mice by avidin chase of circulating bispecific antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirallie, Eric; Sai-Maurel, Catherine; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Chatal, Jean-Francois; Barbet, Jacques; Thedrez, Philippe [Universite de Nantes, Cancer Research Department, Nantes (France); Regenet, Nicolas [Service de Chirurgie, CHU Nantes, Nantes (France); Chang, Chien-Hsing; Goldenberg, David M. [IBC Pharmaceuticals Inc., Morris Plains, NJ (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Pretargeted therapy with radiolabelled bivalent haptens and bispecific antibodies has shown promising results, but blood clearance of the activity-carrying haptens under conditions designed for radioimmunotherapy is relatively slow. Thus, the chase of excess circulating bispecific antibody by biotinylation of the bispecific antibody and injection of avidin before hapten administration was tested with a view to increasing tumour-to-blood activity ratios. The anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) x anti-diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid-indium (di-DTPA-indium) bispecific antibody (hMN-14 x 734) was derivatised with NHS-LC-biotin and injected into LS-174T tumour-bearing nude mice at a dose of 3.5 nmol, followed by avidin and finally by the{sup 125}I-labelled di-DTPA-indium hapten (1 nmol). Blood samples were collected, animals sacrificed and tumours and normal tissues counted. Avidin chased up to 72% of the circulating antibody in the liver and the spleen within 30 min. When the labelled hapten was injected 3 h after avidin, tumour to blood ratios measured 3 and 24 h after hapten injection were significantly improved by the chase (3.5-fold), whereas tumour uptake was not significantly reduced. Uptake in normal tissues was unchanged (liver, kidney) or decreased (muscle), with the exception of spleen, in which uptake of both antibody and hapten was increased by the avidin chase. (orig.)

  4. Improving food and agricultural production. Thailand. Application on monoclonal antibodies for progesterone measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butcher, G.W.

    1991-01-01

    The duties of the mission were to provide instructions on the maintenance of hybridoma cell lines and their culture and the harvesting of monoclonal antibodies; to assist the counterparts in Thailand to develop work plans for the use of monoclonal antibodies in radioimmunoassay measurements of progesterone; and to assess the need for and feasibility of establishing a laboratory for producing monoclonal antibodies directed against progesterone. The report contains a summary of the activities performed in fulfillment of these duties

  5. Antibody-mediated Targeting of the Urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator Proteolytic Function Neutralizes Fibrinolysis in Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ida K.; Jögi, Annika; Rono, Birgitte

    2008-01-01

    models, we have now developed murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against murine uPA by immunization of uPA-deficient mice with the recombinant protein. Guided by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blotting, surface plasmon resonance, and enzyme kinetic analyses, we have selected two...... highly potent and inhibitory anti-uPA mAbs (mU1 and mU3). Both mAbs recognize epitopes located on the B-chain of uPA that encompasses the catalytic site. In enzyme activity assays in vitro, mU1 blocked uPA-catalyzed plasminogen activation as well as plasmin-mediated pro-uPA activation, whereas mU3 only...... fibrinolysis in tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA)-deficient mice, resulting in a phenotype mimicking that of uPA;tPA double deficient mice. Importantly, this is the first report demonstrating specific antagonist-directed targeting of mouse uPA at the enzyme activity level in a normal physiological...

  6. The Immunogenicity of a Biological Simulant: Strategies for the Improvement of Antibody-Based Detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grahame, David A; Gencic, Simonida; Bronk, Burt V

    2005-01-01

    .... The bacterium Pantoea agglomerans (formerly Erwinia herbicola, Eh) presently is used to simulate vegetative biological agents, however, anti-Eh antibodies of high affinity and specificity are needed...

  7. [A case of immune-mediated encephalopathy showing refractory epilepsy and extensive brain MRI lesions associated with anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayakawa, Yuko; Tateishi, Takahisa; Kawamura, Nobutoshi; Doi, Hikaru; Ohyagi, Yasumasa; Kira, Jun-ichi

    2010-02-01

    We reported a patient with immune-mediated encephalopathy showing refractory epilepsy and multiple brain lesions on MRI. The patient had high titers of anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibody in sera and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). A 36-year-old previously healthy woman was admitted to our hospital with onset of sudden generalized seizure that then persisted for one month. She had repeated epileptic attacks accompanied with loss of consciousness, and was refractory to valproic acid, zonisamide (200 mg/day) and phenobarbital (200 mg/day). Brain MRI showed multiple hyperintense lesions in predominantly bilateral frontal lobes, parietal lobes, occipital lobes and cingulate cortices. EEG showed epileptic activities (frequent sharp waves) in bilateral frontal regions. After admission, attacks disappeared through the administration of clonazepam (1.5 mg/day), though the patient remained slightly disoriented. As titers of anti-GAD antibody in sera and CSF were extremely high, we implemented plasma exchanges. After treatment, titers of anti-GAD antibody in sera and CSF decreased. The patient completely recovered to an alert state and the abnormal MRI lesions almost disappeared. Since GAD catalyzes production of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), it is proposed that anti-GAD antibodies reduce synthesis of GABA or interferes with exocytosis of GABA in the nervous system. Anti-GAD antibodies are detected in some rare neurological disorders such as stiff-person syndrome. Recently, anti-GAD antibodies have been reported as implicated in cerebellar ataxia, palatal myoclonus, refractory epilepsy and limbic encephalitis. Epilepsy associated with the anti-GAD antibody is mostly pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy; with brain MRI showing no abnormality or only hippocampal sclerosis. It is very rare that brain MRI shows extensive abnormal lesions except in the hippocampus. This case suggests that anti-GAD antibodies could contribute to unexplained encephalopathy with

  8. SUCCESSFUL APPLICATION OF PERIPHERAL VENO-ARTERIAL EXTRACORPOREAL MEMBRANE OXYGENATION FOR CARDIAC ALLOGRAFT ANTIBODY-MEDIATED REJECTION WITH SEVERE HEMODYNAMIC COMPROMISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Poptsov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute antibody-mediated rejection (AMR is one of the severe complications of early and late period after heart transplantation (HT. Only few case reports and studies presented of mechanical circulatory support (MCS application for refractory acute rejection causing hemodynamic compromise. Aim. We report the case of a woman with cardiogenic shock caused by severe AMR that was successfully treatment by peripheral venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA ECMO. Material and methods. In december 2014, a 60-year-old woman with dilated cardiomyopathy was operated for HT. The patient had a good initial cardiac allograft function and no and was discharged from ICU on the 4th day after HT. 1st endomyocardial biopsy (EMB (the 7th day after HT showed absence of acute cellular and antibody-mediated rejection. On the 11th day after HT patient aggravated and presented clinical signs of life-threatening acute cardiac allograft dysfunction: arterial blood pressure 78/49/38 mm Hg, HR 111 in min, CVP 20 mm Hg, PAP 47/34/25 mm Hg, PCWP 25 mm Hg, CI 1.5 l/min/m2, adrenalin 110 ng/kg/min, dopamine 15 mcg/kg/min. ECG showed impairment of systolic left (LVEF 25% and right (RVEF 15% ventricle function, left and right ventricle diffuse hypokinesis, thickness of IVS, LV and RV wall 1.7, 1.4 and 0.8 cm, tricuspid and mitral valve regurgitation 2–3 degrees. EMB presented AMR. In conscience peripheral VA ECMO was installed. We used peripheral transcutaneous cannulation technique via femoral vessels – arterial cannula 15 F, venous cannula – 23 F, vascular catheter 14 G for anterograde leg’s perfusion. ACT 130–150 sec. AMR therapy included: methylprednisolon pulse-therapy (10 mg/kg for 5 day, IgG, plasmapheresis (No 7, rituximab. Results. Under MCS by VA ECMO we noted quick improvement of hemodynamic, metabolic homeostasis and organ functions. On the 6th day of VA ECMO (blood flow 1.8 l/min: arterial blood pressure 133/81/54 mm Hg, CVP 5 mm

  9. Comprehensive characterization of glutamine synthetase-mediated selection for the establishment of recombinant CHO cells producing monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noh, Soo Min; Shin, Seunghyeon; Min Lee, Gyun

    2018-01-01

    and GS-knockout CHO). Regardless of the host cell lines used, the clones selected at 50 μM MSX had the lowest average specific growth rate and the highest average specific production rates of toxic metabolic wastes, lactate and ammonia. Unlike CHO-K1, high producing clones could be generated......To characterize a glutamine synthetase (GS)-based selection system, monoclonal antibody (mAb) producing recombinant CHO cell clones were generated by a single round of selection at various methionine sulfoximine (MSX) concentrations (0, 25, and 50 μM) using two different host cell lines (CHO-K1...... in the absence of MSX using GS-knockout CHO with an improved selection stringency. Regardless of the host cell lines used, the clones selected at various MSX concentrations showed no significant difference in the GS, heavy chain, and light chain gene copies (P > 0.05). Furthermore, there was no correlation...

  10. Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity can be induced by MUC1 peptide vaccination of breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijdewint, F G; von Mensdorff-Pouilly, S; Karuntu-Wanamarta, A H; Verstraeten, A A; Livingston, P O; Hilgers, J; Kenemans, P

    2001-07-01

    Human polymorphic epithelial mucin (PEM, MUC1) is a high molecular weight transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on the apical cell surface of glandular epithelium and is over-expressed and hypo-glycosylated in adenocarcinomas. The extracellular part of the molecule consists mainly of a variable number of 20 amino acid repeats that contain cryptic epitopes exposed in malignancy. The objective of our study was to determine whether humanized MUC1 MAbs and Abs induced by vaccination of breast cancer patients with MUC1 peptides can effect an antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). An in vitro assay has been set up in which the breast tumor cell line ZR-75-1 is used as target and PBMC of healthy donors as effector cells. Different target and effector cells, as well as various MUC1 MAbs were tested to optimize the efficacy of the in vitro assay. The humanized MAb HuHMFG-1, which recognizes the PDTR sequence in the MUC1 tandem repeat, induced a strong cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Nine MUC1-expressing tumor cell lines, including 3 bone marrow-derived cell lines, as well as 2 MUC1-transfected cell lines were susceptible to different extent to MUC1 Ab-dependent killing. Large variations in the killing capacity of PBMC from healthy donors were found. The NK cells were the essential effector cells for the MUC1 Ab-dependent killing. Plasma samples with induced high levels of MUC1 Ab were obtained from breast cancer patients repeatedly immunized with a KLH-conjugated 33-mer or 106-mer MUC1 tandem repeat. Pre- and post-vaccinated plasma samples of these patients were compared in the ADCC assay and it could be clearly demonstrated that the induced MUC1 Abs can effect tumor cell killing. MUC1 Ab-dependent cell-mediated tumor cell killing may occur in vivo and the ADCC assay can be applied to monitor MUC1 vaccination trials. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Anti-Glycoprotein G Antibodies of Herpes Simplex Virus 2 Contribute to Complete Protection after Vaccination in Mice and Induce Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity and Complement-Mediated Cytolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staffan Görander

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the role of antibodies against the mature portion of glycoprotein G (mgG-2 of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2 in protective immunity after vaccination. Mice were immunized intramuscularly with mgG-2 and oligodeoxynucleotides containing two CpG motifs plus alum as adjuvant. All C57BL/6 mice survived and presented no genital or systemic disease. High levels of immunoglobulin G subclass 1 (IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies were detected and re-stimulated splenic CD4+ T cells proliferated and produced IFN-γ. None of the sera from immunized mice exhibited neutralization, while all sera exerted antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC and complement-mediated cytolysis (ACMC activity. Passive transfer of anti-mgG-2 monoclonal antibodies, or immune serum, to naive C57BL/6 mice did not limit disease progression. Immunized B‑cell KO mice presented lower survival rate and higher vaginal viral titers, as compared with vaccinated B-cell KO mice after passive transfer of immune serum and vaccinated C57BL/6 mice. Sera from mice that were vaccinated subcutaneously and intranasally with mgG-2 presented significantly lower titers of IgG antibodies and lower ADCC and ACMC activity. We conclude that anti-mgG-2 antibodies were of importance to limit genital HSV‑2 infection. ADCC and ACMC activity are potentially important mechanisms in protective immunity, and could tentatively be evaluated in future animal vaccine studies and in clinical trials.

  12. Anti-glycoprotein g antibodies of herpes simplex virus 2 contribute to complete protection after vaccination in mice and induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-mediated cytolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görander, Staffan; Ekblad, Maria; Bergström, Tomas; Liljeqvist, Jan-Åke

    2014-11-12

    We investigated the role of antibodies against the mature portion of glycoprotein G (mgG-2) of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) in protective immunity after vaccination. Mice were immunized intramuscularly with mgG-2 and oligodeoxynucleotides containing two CpG motifs plus alum as adjuvant. All C57BL/6 mice survived and presented no genital or systemic disease. High levels of immunoglobulin G subclass 1 (IgG1) and IgG2 antibodies were detected and re-stimulated splenic CD4+ T cells proliferated and produced IFN-γ. None of the sera from immunized mice exhibited neutralization, while all sera exerted antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-mediated cytolysis (ACMC) activity. Passive transfer of anti-mgG-2 monoclonal antibodies, or immune serum, to naive C57BL/6 mice did not limit disease progression. Immunized B‑cell KO mice presented lower survival rate and higher vaginal viral titers, as compared with vaccinated B-cell KO mice after passive transfer of immune serum and vaccinated C57BL/6 mice. Sera from mice that were vaccinated subcutaneously and intranasally with mgG-2 presented significantly lower titers of IgG antibodies and lower ADCC and ACMC activity. We conclude that anti-mgG-2 antibodies were of importance to limit genital HSV‑2 infection. ADCC and ACMC activity are potentially important mechanisms in protective immunity, and could tentatively be evaluated in future animal vaccine studies and in clinical trials.

  13. Microneedle-mediated immunization of an adenovirus-based malaria vaccine enhances antigen-specific antibody immunity and reduces anti-vector responses compared to the intradermal route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, John B.; Vrdoljak, Anto; O'Mahony, Conor; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Draper, Simon J.; Moore, Anne C.

    2014-01-01

    Substantial effort has been placed in developing efficacious recombinant attenuated adenovirus-based vaccines. However induction of immunity to the vector is a significant obstacle to its repeated use. Here we demonstrate that skin-based delivery of an adenovirus-based malaria vaccine, HAdV5-PyMSP142, to mice using silicon microneedles induces equivalent or enhanced antibody responses to the encoded antigen, however it results in decreased anti-vector responses, compared to intradermal delivery. Microneedle-mediated vaccine priming and resultant induction of low anti-vector antibody titres permitted repeated use of the same adenovirus vaccine vector. This resulted in significantly increased antigen-specific antibody responses in these mice compared to ID-treated mice. Boosting with a heterologous vaccine; MVA-PyMSP142 also resulted in significantly greater antibody responses in mice primed with HAdV5-PyMSP142 using MN compared to the ID route. The highest protection against blood-stage malaria challenge was observed when a heterologous route of immunization (MN/ID) was used. Therefore, microneedle-mediated immunization has potential to both overcome some of the logistic obstacles surrounding needle-and-syringe-based immunization as well as to facilitate the repeated use of the same adenovirus vaccine thereby potentially reducing manufacturing costs of multiple vaccines. This could have important benefits in the clinical ease of use of adenovirus-based immunization strategies. PMID:25142082

  14. Fcγ-receptor IIa-mediated Src Signaling Pathway Is Essential for the Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Ebola Virus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wakako Furuyama

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE of Ebola virus (EBOV infection has been demonstrated in vitro, raising concerns about the detrimental potential of some anti-EBOV antibodies. ADE has been described for many viruses and mostly depends on the cross-linking of virus-antibody complexes to cell surface Fc receptors, leading to enhanced infection. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon. Here we show that Fcγ-receptor IIa (FcγRIIa-mediated intracellular signaling through Src family protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs is required for ADE of EBOV infection. We found that deletion of the FcγRIIa cytoplasmic tail abolished EBOV ADE due to decreased virus uptake into cellular endosomes. Furthermore, EBOV ADE, but not non-ADE infection, was significantly reduced by inhibition of the Src family protein PTK pathway, which was also found to be important to promote phagocytosis/macropinocytosis for viral uptake into endosomes. We further confirmed a significant increase of the Src phosphorylation mediated by ADE. These data suggest that antibody-EBOV complexes bound to the cell surface FcγRIIa activate the Src signaling pathway that leads to enhanced viral entry into cells, providing a novel perspective for the general understanding of ADE of virus infection.

  15. Sclerostin Antibody Treatment Improves the Bone Phenotype of Crtap(-/-) Mice, a Model of Recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafe, Ingo; Alexander, Stefanie; Yang, Tao; Lietman, Caressa; Homan, Erica P; Munivez, Elda; Chen, Yuqing; Jiang, Ming Ming; Bertin, Terry; Dawson, Brian; Asuncion, Franklin; Ke, Hua Zhu; Ominsky, Michael S; Lee, Brendan

    2016-05-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is characterized by low bone mass, poor bone quality, and fractures. Standard treatment for OI patients is limited to bisphosphonates, which only incompletely correct the bone phenotype, and seem to be less effective in adults. Sclerostin-neutralizing antibodies (Scl-Ab) have been shown to be beneficial in animal models of osteoporosis, and dominant OI resulting from mutations in the genes encoding type I collagen. However, Scl-Ab treatment has not been studied in models of recessive OI. Cartilage-associated protein (CRTAP) is involved in posttranslational type I collagen modification, and its loss of function results in recessive OI. In this study, we treated 1-week-old and 6-week-old Crtap(-/-) mice with Scl-Ab for 6 weeks (25 mg/kg, s.c., twice per week), to determine the effects on the bone phenotype in models of "pediatric" and "young adult" recessive OI. Vehicle-treated Crtap(-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice served as controls. Compared with control Crtap(-/-) mice, micro-computed tomography (μCT) analyses showed significant increases in bone volume and improved trabecular microarchitecture in Scl-Ab-treated Crtap(-/-) mice in both age cohorts, in both vertebrae and femurs. Additionally, Scl-Ab improved femoral cortical parameters in both age cohorts. Biomechanical testing showed that Scl-Ab improved parameters of whole-bone strength in Crtap(-/-) mice, with more robust effects in the week 6 to 12 cohort, but did not affect the increased bone brittleness. Additionally, Scl-Ab normalized the increased osteoclast numbers, stimulated bone formation rate (week 6 to 12 cohort only), but did not affect osteocyte density. Overall, our findings suggest that Scl-Ab treatment may be beneficial in the treatment of recessive OI caused by defects in collagen posttranslational modification. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  16. Designed Amino Acid Feed in Improvement of Production and Quality Targets of a Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkashvand, Fatemeh; Vaziri, Behrouz; Maleknia, Shayan; Heydari, Amir; Vossoughi, Manouchehr; Davami, Fatemeh; Mahboudi, Fereidoun

    2015-01-01

    Cell culture feeds optimization is a critical step in process development of pharmaceutical recombinant protein production. Amino acids are the basic supplements of mammalian cell culture feeds with known effect on their growth promotion and productivity. In this study, we reported the implementation of the Plackett-Burman (PB) multifactorial design to screen the effects of amino acids on the growth promotion and productivity of a Chinese hamster ovary DG-44 (CHO-DG44) cell line producing bevacizumab. After this screening, the amino acid combinations were optimized by the response surface methodology (RSM) to determine the most effective concentration in feeds. Through this strategy, the final monoclonal antibody (mAb) titre was enhanced by 70%, compared to the control group. For this particular cell line, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, arginine and glycine had the highest positive effects on the final mAb titre. Simultaneously, the impact of the designed amino acid feed on some critical quality attributes of bevacizumab was examined in the group with highest productivity. The product was analysed for N-glycan profiles, charge variant distribution, and low molecular weight forms. The results showed that the target product quality has been improved using this feeding strategy. It was shown how this strategy could significantly diminish the time and number of experiments in identifying the most effective amino acids and related concentrations in target product enhancement. This model could be successfully applied to other components of culture media and feeds. PMID:26480023

  17. Designed Amino Acid Feed in Improvement of Production and Quality Targets of a Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Torkashvand

    Full Text Available Cell culture feeds optimization is a critical step in process development of pharmaceutical recombinant protein production. Amino acids are the basic supplements of mammalian cell culture feeds with known effect on their growth promotion and productivity. In this study, we reported the implementation of the Plackett-Burman (PB multifactorial design to screen the effects of amino acids on the growth promotion and productivity of a Chinese hamster ovary DG-44 (CHO-DG44 cell line producing bevacizumab. After this screening, the amino acid combinations were optimized by the response surface methodology (RSM to determine the most effective concentration in feeds. Through this strategy, the final monoclonal antibody (mAb titre was enhanced by 70%, compared to the control group. For this particular cell line, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, arginine and glycine had the highest positive effects on the final mAb titre. Simultaneously, the impact of the designed amino acid feed on some critical quality attributes of bevacizumab was examined in the group with highest productivity. The product was analysed for N-glycan profiles, charge variant distribution, and low molecular weight forms. The results showed that the target product quality has been improved using this feeding strategy. It was shown how this strategy could significantly diminish the time and number of experiments in identifying the most effective amino acids and related concentrations in target product enhancement. This model could be successfully applied to other components of culture media and feeds.

  18. Cytoreductive Chemotherapy Improves the Biodistribution of Antibodies Directed Against Tumor Necrosis in Murine Solid Tumor Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Julie K.; Khawli, Leslie A.; Park, Ryan; Wu, Brian W.; Li, Zibo; Canter, David; Conti, Peter S.; Epstein, Alan L.

    2013-01-01

    Current strategies in cancer treatment employ combinations of different treatment modalities, which include chemotherapy, radiotherapy, immunotherapy, and surgery. Consistent with that approach, the present study demonstrates how chemotherapeutic agents can potentiate the delivery of radiolabeled, necrosis-targeting antibodies (chTNT-3, NHS76) to tumor. All chemotherapeutics in this study (5-fluorouracil, etoposide, vinblastine, paclitaxel, and doxorubicin) resulted in statistically significant increases in tumor uptake of radiolabeled antibodies and their F(ab')2 fragments compared to no pretreatment with chemotherapy. Labeled antibodies were administered at various time points following a single dose of chemotherapy in multiple tumor models, and the biodistribution of the antibodies were determined by measuring radioactivity in harvested tissues. MicroPET/CT was also done to demonstrate clinical relevancy of using chemotherapy pretreatment to increase antibody uptake. Results of biodistribution and imaging data reveal specific time frames following chemotherapy when necrosis-targeting antibodies are best delivered, either for imaging or radiotherapy. Thus, the present work offers the prospect of using cytoreductive chemotherapy to increase tumor accumulation of select therapeutic antibodies, especially when combined with other forms of immunotherapy, for the successful treatment of solid tumors. PMID:24130055

  19. Improvements in or relating to antibodies active against human hemoglobin Asub(1C)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javid, J.; Cerami, A.; Koenig, R.J.; Pettis, P.K.

    1980-01-01

    A method is described for preparing an antibody against human hemoglobin Asub(1c) which is substantially free of cross-reactivity against the human hemoglobins A 0 , Asub(1a) and Asub(1b). The antibodies are collected from cats, goats or sheep following injections of purified hemoglobin Asub(1c) antigen since these animals do not naturally produce hemoglobin Asub(1c). A radioimmunoassay method is also described whereby these antibodies are used to determine the quantity of hemoglobin Asub(1c) in blood samples. This is a useful technique in the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. (U.K.)

  20. Inhibition of Megakaryocyte Differentiation by Antibody-Drug Conjugates (ADCs) is Mediated by Macropinocytosis: Implications for ADC-induced Thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hui; Gulesserian, Sara; Ganesan, Sathish Kumar; Ou, Jimmy; Morrison, Karen; Zeng, Zhilan; Robles, Veronica; Snyder, Josh; Do, Lisa; Aviña, Hector; Karki, Sher; Stover, David R; Doñate, Fernando

    2017-09-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a common adverse event in cancer patients treated with antibody-drug conjugates (ADC), including AGS-16C3F, an ADC targeting ENPP3 (ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase-3) and trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1). This study aims to elucidate the mechanism of action of ADC-induced thrombocytopenia. ENPP3 expression in platelets and megakaryocytes (MK) was investigated and shown to be negative. The direct effect of AGS-16C3F on platelets was evaluated using platelet rich plasma following the expression of platelet activation markers. Effects of AGS-16C3F, T-DM1, and control ADCs on maturing megakaryocytes were evaluated in an in vitro system in which human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) were differentiated into MKs. AGS-16C3F, like T-DM1, did not affect platelets directly, but inhibited MK differentiation by the activity of Cys-mcMMAF, its active metabolite. FcγRIIA did not appear to play an important role in ADC cytotoxicity to differentiating MKs. AGS-16C3F, cytotoxic to MKs, did not bind to FcγRIIA on MKs. Blocking the interaction of T-DM1 with FcγRIIA did not prevent the inhibition of MK differentiation and IgG1-mcMMAF was not as cytotoxic to MKs despite binding to FcγRIIA. Several lines of evidence suggest that internalization of AGS-16C3F into MKs is mediated by macropinocytosis. Macropinocytosis activity of differentiating HSCs correlated with cell sensitivity to AGS-16C3F. AGS-16C3F was colocalized with a macropinocytosis marker, dextran-Texas Red in differentiating MKs. Ethyl isopropyl amiloride (EIPA), a macropinocytosis inhibitor, blocked internalization of dextran-Texas Red and AGS-16C3F. These data support the notion that inhibition of MK differentiation via macropinocytosis-mediated internalization plays a role in ADC-induced thrombocytopenia. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(9); 1877-86. ©2017 AACR See related article by Zhao et al., p. 1866 . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. The IL-8 release from cultured human keratinocytes, mediated by antibodies to bullous pemphigoid autoantigen 180, is inhibited by dapsone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, E; Reimer, S; Kruse, N; Bröcker, E-B; Zillikens, D

    2001-01-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is a subepidermal blistering disease associated with autoantibodies to the hemidesmosomal 180 kD BP autoantigen (BP180). However, the binding of autoantibodies to BP180 alone is not sufficient for blister formation in this disease and the infiltration of neutrophils into the skin is required. Dapsone and nicotinamide inhibit neutrophil chemotaxis and are used effectively in treating BP. IL-8 is a known chemoattractant for neutrophils and has been implicated in the inflammatory process of both human and experimental murine BP. We have recently shown that antibodies to BP180 mediate a dose and time-dependent release of IL-6 and IL-8 from cultured normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK). In the present study, we addressed the question whether dapsone or nicotinamide influence this cytokine release. We demonstrate that dapsone, but not nicotinamide, in its pharmacological range, inhibits the IL-8, but not the IL-6 release from NHEK, induced by anti-BP180 IgG, in a dose-dependent fashion as detected by ELISA. IL-8 mRNA levels, as determined by RT-PCR, were the same in cells treated with BP IgG alone compared to cells treated with BP IgG plus dapsone. This observation suggests that dapsone inhibits the BP IgG-induced IL-8 release from cultured NHEK by mechanisms at the post-transcriptional level. Our findings contribute to the understanding how dapsone leads to a reduced influx of neutrophils into BP lesions and, finally, to the cessation of blister formation in this disease. PMID:11359455

  2. Fc Receptor-Mediated Activities of Env-Specific Human Monoclonal Antibodies Generated from Volunteers Receiving the DNA Prime-Protein Boost HIV Vaccine DP6-001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Matthew R; Pollara, Justin; Edwards, Regina Whitney; Seaman, Michael S; Gorny, Miroslaw K; Montefiori, David C; Liao, Hua-Xin; Ferrari, Guido; Lu, Shan; Wang, Shixia

    2016-11-15

    HIV-1 is able to elicit broadly potent neutralizing antibodies in a very small subset of individuals only after several years of infection, and therefore, vaccines that elicit these types of antibodies have been difficult to design. The RV144 trial showed that moderate protection is possible and that this protection may correlate with antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity. Our previous studies demonstrated that in an HIV vaccine phase I trial, the DP6-001 trial, a polyvalent Env DNA prime-protein boost formulation could elicit potent and broadly reactive, gp120-specific antibodies with positive neutralization activities. Here we report on the production and analysis of HIV-1 Env-specific human monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) isolated from vaccinees in the DP6-001 trial. For this initial report, 13 hMAbs from four vaccinees in the DP6-001 trial showed broad binding to gp120 proteins of diverse subtypes both autologous and heterologous to vaccine immunogens. Equally cross-reactive Fc receptor-mediated functional activities, including ADCC and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) activities, were present with both immune sera and isolated MAbs, confirming the induction of nonneutralizing functional hMAbs by the DNA prime-protein boost vaccination. Elicitation of broadly reactive hMAbs by vaccination in healthy human volunteers confirms the value of the polyvalent formulation in this HIV vaccine design. The roles of Fc receptor-mediated protective antibody responses are gaining more attention due to their potential contribution to the low-level protection against HIV-1 infection that they provided in the RV144 trial. At the same time, information about hMabs from other human HIV vaccine studies is very limited. In the current study, both immune sera and monoclonal antibodies from vaccinated humans showed not only high-level ADCC and ADCP activities but also cross-subtype ADCC and ADCP activities when a polyvalent DNA prime-protein boost

  3. Expression of miR-142-5p in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from renal transplant patients with chronic antibody-mediated rejection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Danger

    Full Text Available In renal transplantation, the unresponsiveness of patients undergoing chronic antibody mediated rejection (CAMR to classical treatment stress on the need for accurate biomarkers to improve its diagnosis. We aim to determine whether microRNA expression patterns may be associated with a diagnosis of CAMR. We performed expression profiling of miRNAs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC of kidney transplant recipients with CAMR or stable graft function. Among 257 expressed miRNAs, 10 miRNAs associated with CAMR were selected. Among them, miR-142-5p was increased in PBMC and biopsies of patients with CAMR as well as in a rodent model of CAMR. The lack of modulation of miR-142-5p in PBMC of patients with renal failure, suggests that its over-expression in CAMR was associated with immunological disorders rather than renal dysfunction. A ROC curve analysis performed on independent samples showed that miR-142-5p is a potential biomarker of CAMR allowing a very good discrimination of the patients with CAMR (AUC = 0.74; p = 0.0056. Moreover, its expression was decreased in PHA-activated blood cells and was not modulated in PBMC from patients with acute rejection, excluding a non-specific T cell activation expression. The absence of modulation of this miRNA in immunosuppressed patients suggests that its expression was not influenced by treatment. Finally, the analysis of miR-142-5p predicted targets under-expressed in CAMR PBMC in a published microarray dataset revealed an enrichment of immune-related genes. Altogether, these data suggest that miR-142-5p could be used as a biomarker in CAMR and these finding may improve our understanding of chronic rejection mechanisms.

  4. Improved affinity of a chicken single-chain antibody to avian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    linyuan

    2011-12-12

    Dec 12, 2011 ... from hybridomas, or of intact forms of the antibody ..... decreasing concentrations from 400 to 50 ng/ml in carbonate– bicarbonate buffer, pH 7.2 at 4°C overnight. The plate was then emptied and washed three times with PBS-Tween (0.1% v/v .... The affinity constants of wild-type and mutant antibodies for.

  5. Complement-Mediated Bactericidal Activity of Anti-Factor H Binding Protein Monoclonal Antibodies against the Meningococcus Relies upon Blocking Factor H Binding ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuntini, Serena; Reason, Donald C.; Granoff, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    Binding of the complement-downregulating protein factor H (fH) to the surface of the meningococcus is important for survival of the organism in human serum. The meningococcal vaccine candidate factor H binding protein (fHbp) is an important ligand for human fH. While some fHbp-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) block binding of fH to fHbp, the stoichiometry of blocking in the presence of high serum concentrations of fH and its effect on complement-mediated bactericidal activity are unknown. To investigate this question, we constructed chimeric antibodies in which the human IgG1 constant region was paired with three murine fHbp-specific binding domains designated JAR 3, JAR 5, and MAb502. By surface plasmon resonance, the association rates for binding of all three MAbs to immobilized fHbp were >50-fold higher than that for binding of fH to fHbp, and the MAb dissociation rates were >500-fold lower than that for fH. While all three MAbs elicited similar C1q-dependent C4b deposition on live bacteria (classical complement pathway), only those antibodies that inhibited binding of fH to fHbp (JAR 3 and JAR 5) had bactericidal activity with human complement. MAb502, which did not inhibit fH binding, had complement-mediated bactericidal activity only when tested with fH-depleted human complement. When an IgG1 anti-fHbp MAb binds to sparsely exposed fHbp on the bacterial surface, there appears to be insufficient complement activation for bacteriolysis unless fH binding also is inhibited. The ability of fHbp vaccines to elicit protective antibodies, therefore, is likely to be enhanced if the antibody repertoire is of high avidity and includes fH-blocking activity. PMID:21708990

  6. Improved pretargeted delivery of radiolabelled hapten to human tumour xenograft in mice by avidin chase of circulating bispecific antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirallié, Eric; Saï-Maurel, Catherine; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Regenet, Nicolas; Chang, Chien-Hsing; Goldenberg, David M; Chatal, Jean-François; Barbet, Jacques; Thedrez, Philippe

    2005-08-01

    Pretargeted therapy with radiolabelled bivalent haptens and bispecific antibodies has shown promising results, but blood clearance of the activity-carrying haptens under conditions designed for radioimmunotherapy is relatively slow. Thus, the chase of excess circulating bispecific antibody by biotinylation of the bispecific antibody and injection of avidin before hapten administration was tested with a view to increasing tumour-to-blood activity ratios. The anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) x anti-diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid-indium (di-DTPA-indium) bispecific antibody (hMN-14x734) was derivatised with NHS-LC-biotin and injected into LS-174T tumour-bearing nude mice at a dose of 3.5 nmol, followed by avidin and finally by the 125I-labelled di-DTPA-indium hapten (1 nmol). Blood samples were collected, animals sacrificed and tumours and normal tissues counted. Avidin chased up to 72% of the circulating antibody in the liver and the spleen within 30 min. When the labelled hapten was injected 3 h after avidin, tumour to blood ratios measured 3 and 24 h after hapten injection were significantly improved by the chase (3.5-fold), whereas tumour uptake was not significantly reduced. Uptake in normal tissues was unchanged (liver, kidney) or decreased (muscle), with the exception of spleen, in which uptake of both antibody and hapten was increased by the avidin chase. The chase strategy reduces hapten concentration in blood and thus should reduce bone marrow exposure. The use of two different recognition systems limits possible interference between the chase and targeting steps.

  7. How do Housing Subsidies Improve Quality of Life Among Homeless Adults? A Mediation Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Maria; Sint, Kyaw; Rosenheck, Robert

    2018-03-01

    Supported housing, combining rent subsidies with intensive case management, is associated with improvements in quality of life of homeless adults, but factors mediating their impact on quality of life have not been studied. Twelve-month outcome data from a randomized trial of the Housing and Urban Development- Veterans Affairs Supported Housing program (HUD-VASH) showed that access to a housing rent subsidy plus intensive case management (ICM) was associated with greater improvement in subjective quality of life than ICM alone. Multiple mediation analyses were applied to identify variables that significantly mediated the relationship between receipt of housing voucher and improvements in quality of life. Significant mediating covariates were those whose 95% bias-corrected confidence intervals, when added to the model predicting improvement in quality of life, did not overlap zero. Increases in the number of days housed, size of social network, and availability of emotional support appear to mediate improvement in quality of life and account for 71% of the benefit attributable to having a rent subsidy. Improvement in subjective quality of life though housing subsidies is mediated by gains in both material and psychosocial factors. Mediating factors deserve special attention in supported housing services. © Society for Community Research and Action 2018.

  8. Increased infectivity in human cells and resistance to antibody-mediated neutralization by truncation of the SIV gp41 cytoplasmic tail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo eKuwata

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of antibodies in protecting the host from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection is of considerable interest, particularly because the RV144 trial results suggest that antibodies contribute to protection. Although infection of nonhuman primates with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV is commonly used as an animal model of HIV-1 infection, the viral epitopes that elicit potent and broad neutralizing antibodies to SIV have not been identified. We isolated a monoclonal antibody (MAb B404 that potently and broadly neutralizes various SIV strains. B404 targets a conformational epitope comprising the V3 and V4 loops of Env that intensely exposed when Env binds CD4. B404-resistant variants were obtained by passaging viruses in the presence of increasing concentration of B404 in PM1/CCR5 cells. Genetic analysis revealed that the Q733stop mutation, which truncates the cytoplasmic tail of gp41, was the first major substitution in Env during passage. The maximal inhibition by B404 and other MAbs were significantly decreased against a recombinant virus with a gp41 truncation compared with the parental SIVmac316. This indicates that the gp41 truncation was associated with resistance to antibody-mediated neutralization. The infectivities of the recombinant virus with the gp41 truncation were 7900-fold, 1000-fold, and 140-fold higher than those of SIVmac316 in PM1, PM1/CCR5, and TZM-bl cells, respectively. Immunoblotting analysis revealed that the gp41 truncation enhanced the incorporation of Env into virions. The effect of the gp41 truncation on infectivity was not obvious in the HSC-F macaque cell line, although the resistance of viruses harboring the gp41 truncation to neutralization was maintained. These results suggest that viruses with a truncated gp41 cytoplasmic tail were selected by increased infectivity in human cells and by acquiring resistance to neutralizing antibody.

  9. MEDI-563, a humanized anti-IL-5 receptor alpha mAb with enhanced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbeck, Roland; Kozhich, Alexander; Koike, Masamichi; Peng, Li; Andersson, Cecilia K; Damschroder, Melissa M; Reed, Jennifer L; Woods, Robert; Dall'acqua, William W; Stephens, Geoffrey L; Erjefalt, Jonas S; Bjermer, Leif; Humbles, Alison A; Gossage, David; Wu, Herren; Kiener, Peter A; Spitalny, George L; Mackay, Charles R; Molfino, Nestor A; Coyle, Anthony J

    2010-06-01

    Peripheral blood eosinophilia and lung mucosal eosinophil infiltration are hallmarks of bronchial asthma. IL-5 is a critical cytokine for eosinophil maturation, survival, and mobilization. Attempts to target eosinophils for the treatment of asthma by means of IL-5 neutralization have only resulted in partial removal of airway eosinophils, and this warrants the development of more effective interventions to further explore the role of eosinophils in the clinical expression of asthma. We sought to develop a novel humanized anti-IL-5 receptor alpha (IL-5Ralpha) mAb with enhanced effector function (MEDI-563) that potently depletes circulating and tissue-resident eosinophils and basophils for the treatment of asthma. We used surface plasmon resonance to determine the binding affinity of MEDI-563 to FcgammaRIIIa. Primary human eosinophils and basophils were used to demonstrate antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. The binding epitope of MEDI-563 on IL-5Ralpha was determined by using site-directed mutagenesis. The consequences of MEDI-563 administration on peripheral blood and bone marrow eosinophil depletion was investigated in nonhuman primates. MEDI-563 binds to an epitope on IL-5Ralpha that is in close proximity to the IL-5 binding site, and it inhibits IL-5-mediated cell proliferation. MEDI-563 potently induces antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity of both eosinophils (half-maximal effective concentration = 0.9 pmol/L) and basophils (half-maximal effective concentration = 0.5 pmol/L) in vitro. In nonhuman primates MEDI-563 depletes blood eosinophils and eosinophil precursors in the bone marrow. MEDI-563 might provide a novel approach for the treatment of asthma through active antibody-dependent cell-mediated depletion of eosinophils and basophils rather than through passive removal of IL-5. Copyright (c) 2010 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Mediating Role of Insight for Long-Term Improvements in Psychodynamic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Paul; Hoglend, Per; Ulberg, Randi; Amlo, Svein; Marble, Alice; Bogwald, Kjell-Petter; Sorbye, Oystein; Sjaastad, Mary Cosgrove; Heyerdahl, Oscar

    2010-01-01

    Objective: According to psychoanalytic theory, interpretation of transference leads to increased insight that again leads to improved interpersonal functioning over time. In this study, we performed a full mediational analysis to test whether insight gained during treatment mediates the long-term effects of transference interpretation in dynamic…

  11. Species-Specific Chromosome Engineering Greatly Improves Fully Human Polyclonal Antibody Production Profile in Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Hiroaki; Sano, Akiko; Wu, Hua; Wang, Zhongde; Jiao, Jin-An; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Sullivan, Eddie J; Kuroiwa, Yoshimi

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale production of fully human IgG (hIgG) or human polyclonal antibodies (hpAbs) by transgenic animals could be useful for human therapy. However, production level of hpAbs in transgenic animals is generally very low, probably due to the fact that evolutionarily unique interspecies-incompatible genomic sequences between human and non-human host species may impede high production of fully hIgG in the non-human environment. To address this issue, we performed species-specific human artificial chromosome (HAC) engineering and tested these engineered HAC in cattle. Our previous study has demonstrated that site-specific genomic chimerization of pre-B cell receptor/B cell receptor (pre-BCR/BCR) components on HAC vectors significantly improves human IgG expression in cattle where the endogenous bovine immunoglobulin genes were knocked out. In this report, hIgG1 class switch regulatory elements were subjected to site-specific genomic chimerization on HAC vectors to further enhance hIgG expression and improve hIgG subclass distribution in cattle. These species-specific modifications in a chromosome scale resulted in much higher production levels of fully hIgG of up to 15 g/L in sera or plasma, the highest ever reported for a transgenic animal system. Transchromosomic (Tc) cattle containing engineered HAC vectors generated hpAbs with high titers against human-origin antigens following immunization. This study clearly demonstrates that species-specific sequence differences in pre-BCR/BCR components and IgG1 class switch regulatory elements between human and bovine are indeed functionally distinct across the two species, and therefore, are responsible for low production of fully hIgG in our early versions of Tc cattle. The high production levels of fully hIgG with hIgG1 subclass dominancy in a large farm animal species achieved here is an important milestone towards broad therapeutic applications of hpAbs.

  12. Decreased Fc receptor expression on innate immune cells is associated with impaired antibody-mediated cellular phagocytic activity in chronically HIV-1 infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugast, Anne-Sophie; Tonelli, Andrew; Berger, Christoph T; Ackerman, Margaret E; Sciaranghella, Gaia; Liu, Qingquan; Sips, Magdalena; Toth, Ildiko; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Ghebremichael, Musie; Alter, Galit

    2011-07-05

    In addition to neutralization, antibodies mediate other antiviral activities including antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), as well as complement deposition. While it is established that progressive HIV infection is associated with reduced ADCC and ADCP, the underlying mechanism for this loss of function is unknown. Here we report considerable changes in FcR expression over the course of HIV infection on both mDCs and monocytes, including elevated FcγRI expression in acute HIV infection and reduced expression of FcγRII and FcγRIIIa in chronic HIV infection. Furthermore, selective blockade of FcγRII alone was associated with a loss in ADCP activity, suggesting that FcγRII plays a central role in modulating ADCP. Overall, HIV infection is associated with a number of changes in FcR expression on phagocytic cells that are associated with changes in their ability to respond to antibody-opsonized targets, potentially contributing to a failure in viral clearance in progressive HIV-1 infection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Decreased Fc-Receptor expression on innate immune cells is associated with impaired antibody mediated cellular phagocytic activity in chronically HIV-1 infected individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugast, Anne-Sophie; Tonelli, Andrew; Berger, Christoph T.; Ackerman, Margaret E.; Sciaranghella, Gaia; Liu, Qingquan; Sips, Magdalena; Toth, Ildiko; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Ghebremichael, Musie; Alter, Galit

    2011-01-01

    In addition to neutralization, antibodies mediate other antiviral activities including antibody-dependent cellular-phagocytosis (ADCP), antibody dependent cellular-cytotoxicity (ADCC), as well as complement deposition. While it is established that progressive HIV infection is associated with reduced ADCC and ADCP, the underlying mechanism for this loss of function is unknown. Here we report considerable changes in FcR expression over the course of HIV infection on both mDCs and monocytes, including elevated FcγRI expression in acute HIV infection and reduced expression of FcγRII and FcγRIIIa in chronic HIV infection. Furthermore, selective blockade of FcγRII alone was associated with a loss in ADCP activity, suggesting that FcγRII plays a central role in modulating ADCP. Overall, HIV infection is associated with a number of changes in FcR expression on phagocytic cells that are associated with changes in their ability to respond to antibody-opsonized targets, potentially contributing to a failure in viral clearance in progressive HIV-1 infection. PMID:21565376

  14. Improving the solubility of anti-LINGO-1 monoclonal antibody Li33 by isotype switching and targeted mutagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepinsky, R. Blake; Silvian, Laura; Berkowitz, Steven A.; Farrington, Graham; Lugovskoy, Alexey; Walus, Lee; Eldredge, John; Capili, Allan; Mi, Sha; Graff, Christilyn; Garber, Ellen (Biogen)

    2010-11-15

    Monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) are a favorite drug platform of the biopharmaceutical industry. Currently, over 20 Mabs have been approved and several hundred others are in clinical trials. The anti-LINGO-1 Mab Li33 was selected from a large panel of antibodies by Fab phage display technology based on its extraordinary biological activity in promoting oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination in vitro and in animal models of remyelination. However, the Li33 Fab had poor solubility when converted into a full antibody in an immunoglobulin G1 framework. A detailed analysis of the biochemical and structural features of the antibody revealed several possible reasons for its propensity to aggregate. Here, we successfully applied three molecular approaches (isotype switching, targeted mutagenesis of complementarity determining region residues, and glycosylation site insertion mutagenesis) to address the solubility problem. Through these efforts we were able to improve the solubility of the Li33 Mab from 0.3 mg/mL to >50 mg/mL and reduce aggregation to an acceptable level. These strategies can be readily applied to other proteins with solubility issues.

  15. An improved method for estimating antibody titers in microneutralization assay using green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongmei; Baker, Steven F; González, Mario E; Topham, David J; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Zand, Martin; Holden-Wiltse, Jeanne; Wu, Hulin

    2016-01-01

    Viruses that express reporter genes upon infection have been recently used to evaluate neutralizing antibody responses, where a lack of reporter expression indicates specific virus inhibition. The traditional model-based methods using standard outcome of percent neutralization could be applied to the data from the assays to estimate antibody titers. However, the data produced are sometimes irregular, which can yield meaningless outcomes of percent neutralization that do not fit the typical curves for immunoassays, making automated or semi-high throughput antibody titer estimation unreliable. We developed a type of new outcomes model, which is biologically meaningful and fits typical immunoassay curves well. Our simulation study indicates that the new response approach outperforms the traditional response approach regardless of the data variability. The proposed new response approach can be used in similar assays for other disease models.

  16. Biosimilars in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases: initial lessons from the first approved biosimilar anti-tumour necrosis factor monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, J D; Cutolo, M; Keystone, E C; Park, W; Braun, J

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of targeted biological therapies has revolutionised the management of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs) such as rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease. Following treatment with these therapies, many patients experience significant improvements in different aspects of their disease, including symptoms, work productivity and other outcomes relevant for individuals and society. However, due to the complexity of biological drug development and manufacturing processes, the costs of these therapies are relatively high. Indeed, the financial burden on healthcare systems due to biological therapies is considerable and lack of patient access to effective treatment remains a concern in many parts of the world. As many reference biological therapies have now reached or are near to patent expiry, a number of 'biosimilar' drugs have been developed for use in various clinical settings, and some of these drugs are already in use in several countries. While the potential pharmacoeconomic benefits of cost-effective biosimilars seem clear, several issues have been raised regarding, for example, the definition of biosimilarity and the validity of indication extrapolation, as well as the 'switchability' and relative immunogenicity of biosimilars and their reference drugs. In this review, these issues will be discussed with reference to CT-P13, a biosimilar of the anti-tumour necrosis factor monoclonal antibody infliximab, which is approved in Europe and elsewhere for the treatment of various IMIDs. Other important issues, including those related to data collection during nonclinical and clinical development of biosimilars, are also discussed. © 2015 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  17. Sequential development of pulmonary hemorrhage with MPO-ANCA complicating anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody-mediated glomerulonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, R; Rodríguez, M; Pobes, A; Seco, M

    2000-05-01

    We report a case of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis caused by anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) antibodies that progressed to end-stage renal disease in a 67-year-old woman with diabetes. Intensive combined immunosuppressive therapy with methylprednisolone bolus, oral prednisone, and cyclophosphamide led to negativity of anti-GBM antibodies but was not able to restore renal function. After 28 months of hemodialysis, the patient suddenly presented with pulmonary hemorrhage. In this setting, high levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO)-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) and negative anti-GBM antibodies were found. Therapy with oral prednisone and cyclophosphamide led to resolution of pulmonary hemorrhage and negativity of MPO-ANCA.

  18. Collagen Sponge Functionalized with Chimeric Anti-BMP-2 Monoclonal Antibody Mediates Repair of Critical-Size Mandibular Continuity Defects in a Nonhuman Primate Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilin Xie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibody-mediated osseous regeneration (AMOR has been introduced by our research group as a tissue engineering approach to capture of endogenous growth factors through the application of specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs immobilized on a scaffold. Specifically, anti-Bone Morphogenetic Protein- (BMP- 2 mAbs have been demonstrated to be efficacious in mediating bone repair in a number of bone defects. The present study sought to investigate the application of AMOR for repair of mandibular continuity defect in nonhuman primates. Critical-sized mandibular continuity defects were created in Macaca fascicularis locally implanted with absorbable collagen sponges (ACS functionalized with chimeric anti-BMP-2 mAb or isotype control mAb. 2D and 3D analysis of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT imaging demonstrated increased bone density and volume observed within mandibular continuity defects implanted with collagen scaffolds functionalized with anti-BMP-2 mAb, compared with isotype-matched control mAb. Both CBCT imaging and histologic examination demonstrated de novo bone formation that was in direct apposition to the margins of the resected bone. It is hypothesized that bone injury may be necessary for AMOR. This is evidenced by de novo bone formation adjacent to resected bone margins, which may be the source of endogenous BMPs captured by anti-BMP-2 mAb, in turn mediating bone repair.

  19. Improving properties of llama heavy chain antibodies using in silico analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutje Hulsik, D.

    2009-01-01

    Microbicides offer a promising way to prevent HIV infection in developing countries. Llama heavy chain antibody fragments (VHHs) that neutralize HIV are an ideal candidate for usage as active microbicide component. A VHH is the smallest intact antigen binding domain which allows it to reach for

  20. Targeting HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Trimers to B Cells by Using APRIL Improves Antibody Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melchers, Mark; Bontjer, Ilja; Tong, Tommy; Chung, Nancy P. Y.; Klasse, Per Johan; Eggink, Dirk; Montefiori, David C.; Gentile, Maurizio; Cerutti, Andrea; Olson, William C.; Berkhout, Ben; Binley, James M.; Moore, John P.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2012-01-01

    An HIV-1 vaccine remains elusive, in part because various factors limit the quantity and quality of the antibodies raised against the viral envelope glycoprotein complex (Env). We hypothesized that targeting Env vaccines directly to B cells, by fusing them to molecules that bind and activate these

  1. The impact of HLA class I-specific killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors on antibody-dependent natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity and organ allograft rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Rajalingam

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells of the innate immune system are cytotoxic lymphocytes that play important roles following transplantation of solid organs and hematopoietic stem cells. Recognition of self HLA class I molecules by inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR is involved in the calibration of NK cell effector capacities during a developmental stage, allowing the subsequent recognition and elimination of target cells with decreased expression of self HLA class I (due to virus infection or tumor transformation or HLA class I disparities (in the setting of allogeneic transplantation. NK cells expressing an inhibitory KIR binding self HLA can be activated when confronted with allografts lacking a ligand for the inhibitory receptor. Following the response of the adaptive immune system, NK cells can further destroy allograft endothelium by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC, triggered through cross-linking of the CD16 Fc receptor by donor-specific antibodies bound to allograft. Upon recognizing allogeneic target cells, NK cells also secrete cytokines and chemokines that drive maturation of dendritic cells to promote cellular and humoral adaptive immune responses against the allograft. The cumulative activating and inhibitory signals generated by ligation of the receptors regulates mature NK cell killing of target cells and their production of cytokines and chemokines. This review summarizes the role of NK cells in allograft rejection and proposes mechanistic concepts that indicate a prominent role for KIR-HLA interactions in facilitating NK cells for Fc receptor-mediated ADCC effector function involved in antibody-mediated rejection of solid organ transplants.

  2. Microbiota-driven immune cellular maturation is essential for antibody-mediated adaptive immunity to Staphylococcus aureus infection in the eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Tanweer; Zaidi, Tauqeer; Cywes-Bentley, Colette; Lu, Roger; Priebe, Gregory P; Pier, Gerald B

    2014-08-01

    As an immune-privileged site, the eye, and particularly the outer corneal surface, lacks resident mature immune effector cells. Physical barriers and innate mediators are the best-described effectors of immunity in the cornea. When the barriers are breached, infection can result in rapid tissue destruction, leading to loss of visual acuity and frank blindness. To determine the cellular and molecular components needed for effective adaptive immunity on the corneal surface, we investigated which immune system effectors were required for protection against Staphylococcus aureus corneal infections in mice, which are a serious cause of human eye infections. Both systemically injected and topically applied antibodies to the conserved cell surface polysaccharide poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG) were effective at mediating reductions in corneal pathology and bacterial levels. Additional host factors impacting protection included intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1)-dependent polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) recruitment, functional CD4(+) T cells, signaling via the interleukin-17 (IL-17) receptor, and IL-22 production. In germfree mice, there was no protective efficacy of antibody to PNAG due to the lack of LY6G(+) inflammatory cell coeffector recruitment to the cornea. Protection was manifest after 3 weeks of exposure to conventional mice and acquisition of a resident microbiota. We conclude that in the anterior eye, ICAM-1-mediated PMN recruitment to the infected cornea along with endogenous microbiota-matured CD4(+) T cells producing both IL-17 and IL-22 is required for antibody to PNAG to protect against S. aureus infection. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. A novel human-derived antibody against NY-ESO-1 improves the efficacy of chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anurag; Nuber, Natko; Esslinger, Christoph; Wittenbrink, Mareike; Treder, Martin; Landshammer, Alexandro; Noguchi, Takuro; Kelly, Marcus; Gnjatic, Sacha; Ritter, Erika; von Boehmer, Lotta; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Shiku, Hiroshi; Old, Lloyd; Ritter, Gerd; Knuth, Alexander; van den Broek, Maries

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether antibodies against intracellular tumor-associated antigens support tumor-specific immunity when administered together with a treatment that destroys the tumor. We propose that released antigens form immune complexes with the antibodies, which are then efficiently taken up by dendritic cells. We cloned the first human monoclonal antibodies against the Cancer/Testis (CT) antigen, NY-ESO-1. We tested whether the monoclonal anti-NY-ESO-1 antibody (12D7) facilitates cross-presentation of a NY-ESO-1-derived epitope by dendritic cells to human CD8+ T cells, and whether this results in the maturation of dendritic cells in vitro. We investigated the efficacy of 12D7 in combination with chemotherapy using BALB/c mice bearing syngeneic CT26 tumors that express intracellular NY-ESO-1. Human dendritic cells that were incubated with NY-ESO-1:12D7 immune complexes efficiently stimulated NY-ESO-1(157-165)/HLA-A2-specific human CD8+ T cells to produce interferon-γ, whereas NY-ESO-1 alone did not. Furthermore, the incubation of dendritic cells with NY-ESO-1:12D7 immune complexes resulted in the maturation of dendritic cells. Treatment of BALB/c mice that bear CT26/NY-ESO-1 tumors with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) plus 12D7 was significantly more effective than chemotherapy alone. We propose systemic injection of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against tumor-associated antigens plus a treatment that promotes the local release of those antigens resulting in immune complex formation as a novel therapeutic modality for cancer.

  4. Structure and function of broadly reactive antibody PG16 reveal an H3 subdomain that mediates potent neutralization of HIV-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pejchal, Robert; Walker, Laura M.; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Phogat, Sanjay K.; Koff, Wayne C.; Poignard, Pascal; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A. (Scripps); (IAVI)

    2010-11-15

    Development of an effective vaccine against HIV-1 will likely require elicitation of broad and potent neutralizing antibodies against the trimeric surface envelope glycoprotein (Env). Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) PG9 and PG16 neutralize {approx}80% of HIV-1 isolates across all clades with extraordinary potency and target novel epitopes preferentially expressed on Env trimers. As these neutralization properties are ideal for a vaccine-elicited antibody response to HIV-1, their structural basis was investigated. The crystal structure of the antigen-binding fragment (Fab) of PG16 at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution revealed its unusually long, 28-residue, complementarity determining region (CDR) H3 forms a unique, stable subdomain that towers above the antibody surface. A 7-residue 'specificity loop' on the 'hammerhead' subdomain was identified that, when transplanted from PG16 to PG9 and vice versa, accounted for differences in the fine specificity and neutralization of these two mAbs. The PG16 electron density maps also revealed that a CDR H3 tyrosine was sulfated, which was confirmed for both PG9 (doubly) and PG16 (singly) by mass spectral analysis. We further showed that tyrosine sulfation plays a role in binding and neutralization. An N-linked glycan modification is observed in the variable light chain, but not required for antigen recognition. Further, the crystal structure of the PG9 light chain at 3.0 {angstrom} facilitated homology modeling to support the presence of these unusual features in PG9. Thus, PG9 and PG16 use unique structural features to mediate potent neutralization of HIV-1 that may be of utility in antibody engineering and for high-affinity recognition of a variety of therapeutic targets.

  5. Antibody biosimilars: fears or opportunities?: First LabEx MAbImprove industrial workshop, May 28, 2013; Tours, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillon-Munos, Audrey; Daguet, Arnaud; Watier, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    The annual "LabEx MAbImprove industrial workshops" are primarily intended to provide scientists involved in therapeutic antibodies, a comprehensive view about topics of interest for the pharmaceutical industry. They are organized by the "LabEx MAbImprove industrial committee", for this first edition especially in partnership with ARITT, the regional agency for innovation and technology transfer which operates in the French Région Centre, the 1st French region for pharmaceutical production. The 2013 edition, held May 28 at the Vinci Center of Tours, was dedicated to antibody biosimilars. Depending on opinions, the impending expiry of antibody patents and the imminent marketing approval of competitors to blockbusters can be perceived as good or bad things. Fears or opportunities? Risks for patients? Breath of fresh air for the health systems? Opportunity for re-industrializing France? In this context, it is necessary for people to form a fair and informed opinion on the current landscape of antibody biosimilars. In particular, this is especially important for scientists from the academic world, from the industry or from the regulation agencies, for pharmacists, for pharmacovigilance specialists, for health authorities, and staff from health insurance and decision makers. The first session was devoted to market and regulatory issues, and included both an overview of the evolution of the patent landscape and a description of biosimilars regulation in the European Union (EU). This session was closed by a talk on manufacturing processes for biosimilars. In the next session, quality control attributes of biosimilars were discussed and compared with the consistent quality of biotechnology products to raise the question: "How close is close enough?" In vitro assays for evaluating the Fc function of therapeutic antibodies were also discussed. The third session focused on development of biosimilars and primarily on the stepwise process for introducing an antibody biosimilar

  6. Improving oral reading fluency with a peer-mediated intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstadter-Duke, Kristi L; Daly, Edward J

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effects of an experimentally derived, peer-delivered reading intervention on the oral reading fluency of a first-grade student who had been referred for poor reading fluency. Same-grade peers were trained to lead the target student through a structured intervention protocol based on the results of a brief experimental analysis. Results indicated that reading improvements were obtained and are discussed in terms of selecting efficient interventions for use by peers.

  7. An anti-HIV-1 gp120 antibody expressed as an endocytotic transmembrane protein mediates internalization of HIV-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Yee-Joo; Lim, S.-P.; Ting, Anthony E.; Goh, Phuay-Yee; Tan, Y.H.; Lim, Seng Gee; Hong Wanjin

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we used HIV-1 as a model to demonstrate a novel approach for receptor-independent cell entry of virus. The heavy chain of an anti-HIV-1 gp120 antibody was engineered with endocytotic and transmembrane motifs from either the cation-independent mannose 6-phospate receptor or the low-density lipoprotein receptor. Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence studies showed that the chimeric antibodies were expressed on the cell surface and can undergo rapid internalization. Furthermore, one of the chimeric antibodies was able to bind and internalize HIV-1. Using a luciferase reporter HIV-1, we further showed that internalized viruses could undergo replication. Therefore, we have demonstrated a proof-of-principle of a novel method that can be used to internalize virus into cells, without prior knowledge of the cellular receptor for the virus. We propose that this approach would be particularly useful for studying viruses whose cellular receptor(s) is not known

  8. Incorporation of FcRn-mediated disposition model to describe the population pharmacokinetics of therapeutic monoclonal IgG antibody in clinical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chee M

    2016-03-01

    The two-compartment linear model used to describe the population pharmacokinetics (PK) of many therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (TMAbs) offered little biological insight to antibody disposition in humans. The purpose of this study is to develop a semi-mechanistic FcRn-mediated IgG disposition model to describe the population PK of TMAbs in clinical patients. A standard two-compartment linear PK model from a previously published population PK model of pertuzumab was used to simulate intensive PK data of 100 subjects for model development. Two different semi-mechanistic FcRn-mediated IgG disposition models were developed and First Order Conditional Estimation (FOCE) with the interaction method in NONMEM was used to obtain the final model estimates. The performances of these models were then compared with the two-compartment linear PK model used to simulate the data for model development. A semi-mechanistic FcRn-mediated IgG disposition model consisting of a peripheral tissue compartment and FcRn-containing endosomes in the central compartment best describes the simulated pertuzumab population PK data. This developed semi-mechanistic population PK model had the same number of model parameters, produced very similar concentration-time profiles but provided additional biological insight to the FcRn-mediated IgG disposition in human subjects compared with the standard linear two-compartment linear PK model. This first reported semi-mechanistic model may serve as an important model framework for developing future population PK models of TMAbs in clinical patients. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Molecular determinants of dengue virus 2 envelope protein important for virus entry in FcγRIIA-mediated antibody-dependent enhancement of infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chotiwan, Nunya; Roehrig, John T. [Arboviral Diseases Branch, Division of Vector-Borne Disease, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, CO 80521 (United States); Schlesinger, Jacob J. [Department of Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Blair, Carol D. [Arthropod-borne and Infectious Diseases Laboratory, Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States); Huang, Claire Y.-H., E-mail: yxh0@cdc.gov [Arboviral Diseases Branch, Division of Vector-Borne Disease, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, CO 80521 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of infection may cause severe illness in patients suffering a secondary infection by a heterologous dengue virus (DENV) serotype. During ADE of infection, cross-reactive non- or poorly-neutralizing antibodies form infectious virus-Ab complexes with the newly infecting serotype and enhance virus infection by binding to the Fcγ receptors (FcγR) on FcγR-bearing cells. In this study, we determined that molecular determinants of DENV2 envelope protein critical for virus entry during non-ADE infection are also required for ADE infection mediated by FcγRIIA, and binding of virus-Ab complexes with FcγRIIA alone is not sufficient for ADE of infection. The FcγRIIA mainly plays an auxiliary role in concentrating the virus–Ab complex to the cell surface, and other primary cellular receptors are required for virus entry. Understanding the viral entry pathway in ADE of DENV infection will greatly facilitate rational designs of anti-viral therapeutics against severe dengue disease associated with ADE. - Highlights: • KKK305/307/310 in DENV2 E-DIII is critical for virus attachment in ADE and non-ADE infection. • Binding of DENV2–Ab complex with FcγRII alone is not sufficient for virus entry in ADE infection. • Other primary receptors were required for DENV2 internalization during FcγRII–mediated ADE. • G104 and L135 of DENV2 E are critical for virus-mediated membrane fusion. • DENV2 virus-mediated membrane fusion is required for both ADE and non-ADE infection.

  10. Molecular determinants of dengue virus 2 envelope protein important for virus entry in FcγRIIA-mediated antibody-dependent enhancement of infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chotiwan, Nunya; Roehrig, John T.; Schlesinger, Jacob J.; Blair, Carol D.; Huang, Claire Y.-H.

    2014-01-01

    Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of infection may cause severe illness in patients suffering a secondary infection by a heterologous dengue virus (DENV) serotype. During ADE of infection, cross-reactive non- or poorly-neutralizing antibodies form infectious virus-Ab complexes with the newly infecting serotype and enhance virus infection by binding to the Fcγ receptors (FcγR) on FcγR-bearing cells. In this study, we determined that molecular determinants of DENV2 envelope protein critical for virus entry during non-ADE infection are also required for ADE infection mediated by FcγRIIA, and binding of virus-Ab complexes with FcγRIIA alone is not sufficient for ADE of infection. The FcγRIIA mainly plays an auxiliary role in concentrating the virus–Ab complex to the cell surface, and other primary cellular receptors are required for virus entry. Understanding the viral entry pathway in ADE of DENV infection will greatly facilitate rational designs of anti-viral therapeutics against severe dengue disease associated with ADE. - Highlights: • KKK305/307/310 in DENV2 E-DIII is critical for virus attachment in ADE and non-ADE infection. • Binding of DENV2–Ab complex with FcγRII alone is not sufficient for virus entry in ADE infection. • Other primary receptors were required for DENV2 internalization during FcγRII–mediated ADE. • G104 and L135 of DENV2 E are critical for virus-mediated membrane fusion. • DENV2 virus-mediated membrane fusion is required for both ADE and non-ADE infection

  11. Novel Phospholipid-Protein Conjugates Allow Improved Detection of Antibodies in Patients with Autoimmune Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samuelsen, Simone V; Maity, Arindam; Nybo, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Reliable measurement of clinically relevant autoimmune antibodies toward phospholipid-protein conjugates is highly desirable in research and clinical assays. To date, the development in this field has been limited to the use of natural heterogeneous antigens. However, this approach does not take ...... on the correlation of detected autoantibodies with disease activity and manifestations. This confirms the crucial importance of antigens' composition on research and diagnostic assays, and opens up exciting perspectives for synthetic antigens in future studies of autoimmunity.......Reliable measurement of clinically relevant autoimmune antibodies toward phospholipid-protein conjugates is highly desirable in research and clinical assays. To date, the development in this field has been limited to the use of natural heterogeneous antigens. However, this approach does not take...... structural features of biologically active antigens into account and leads to low reliability and poor scientific test value. Here we describe novel phospholipid-protein conjugates for specific detection of human autoimmune antibodies. Our synthetic approach includes mild oxidation of synthetic phospholipid...

  12. Novel Phospholipid-Protein Conjugates Allow Improved Detection of Antibodies in Patients with Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsen, Simone V; Maity, Arindam; Nybo, Mads; Macaubas, Claudia; Lønstrup, Lars; Balboni, Imelda M; Mellins, Elizabeth D; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-01-01

    Reliable measurement of clinically relevant autoimmune antibodies toward phospholipid-protein conjugates is highly desirable in research and clinical assays. To date, the development in this field has been limited to the use of natural heterogeneous antigens. However, this approach does not take structural features of biologically active antigens into account and leads to low reliability and poor scientific test value. Here we describe novel phospholipid-protein conjugates for specific detection of human autoimmune antibodies. Our synthetic approach includes mild oxidation of synthetic phospholipid cardiolipin, and as the last step, coupling of the product with azide-containing linker and copper-catalyzed click chemistry with β2-glycoprotein I and prothrombin. To prove utility of the product antigens, we used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and three cohorts of samples obtained from patients in Denmark (n = 34) and the USA (n = 27 and n = 14). Afterwards we analyzed correlation of the obtained autoantibody titers with clinical parameters for each patient. Our results prove that using novel antigens clinically relevant autoantibodies can be detected with high repeatability, sensitivity and specificity. Unlike previously used antigens the obtained autoantibody titers strongly correlate with high disease activity and in particular, with arthritis, renal involvement, anti-Smith antibodies and high lymphocyte count. Importantly, chemical composition of antigens has a strong influence on the correlation of detected autoantibodies with disease activity and manifestations. This confirms the crucial importance of antigens' composition on research and diagnostic assays, and opens up exciting perspectives for synthetic antigens in future studies of autoimmunity.

  13. Glucagon Receptor Antagonism Improves Glucose Metabolism and Cardiac Function by Promoting AMP-Mediated Protein Kinase in Diabetic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit X. Sharma

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The antidiabetic potential of glucagon receptor antagonism presents an opportunity for use in an insulin-centric clinical environment. To investigate the metabolic effects of glucagon receptor antagonism in type 2 diabetes, we treated Leprdb/db and Lepob/ob mice with REMD 2.59, a human monoclonal antibody and competitive antagonist of the glucagon receptor. As expected, REMD 2.59 suppresses hepatic glucose production and improves glycemia. Surprisingly, it also enhances insulin action in both liver and skeletal muscle, coinciding with an increase in AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK-mediated lipid oxidation. Furthermore, weekly REMD 2.59 treatment over a period of months protects against diabetic cardiomyopathy. These functional improvements are not derived simply from correcting the systemic milieu; nondiabetic mice with cardiac-specific overexpression of lipoprotein lipase also show improvements in contractile function after REMD 2.59 treatment. These observations suggest that hyperglucagonemia enables lipotoxic conditions, allowing the development of insulin resistance and cardiac dysfunction during disease progression.

  14. Selenoprotein P-neutralizing antibodies improve insulin secretion and glucose sensitivity in type 2 diabetes mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Yuichiro; Nakayama, Kaho; Inari, Shogo; Nishito, Yukina; Yoshioka, Yuya; Sakai, Naoko; Sotani, Kanade; Nagamura, Takahiro; Kuzuhara, Yuki; Inagaki, Kumi; Iwasaki, Miki; Misu, Hirofumi; Ikegawa, Masaya; Takamura, Toshinari; Noguchi, Noriko; Saito, Yoshiro

    2017-11-21

    Selenoprotein P (SeP) functions as a selenium (Se)-supply protein. SeP is identified as a hepatokine, promoting insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. Thus, the suppression of Se-supply activity of SeP might improve glucose metabolism. Here, we develop an anti-human SeP monoclonal antibody AE2 as with neutralizing activity against SeP. Administration of AE2 to mice significantly improves glucose intolerance and insulin resistance that are induced by human SeP administration. Furthermore, excess SeP administration significantly decreases pancreas insulin levels and high glucose-induced insulin secretion, which are improved by AE2 administration. Epitope mapping reveals that AE2 recognizes a region of human SeP adjacent to the first histidine-rich region (FHR). A polyclonal antibody against the mouse SeP FHR improves glucose intolerance and insulin secretion in a mouse model of diabetes. This report describes a novel molecular strategy for the development of type 2 diabetes therapeutics targeting SeP.

  15. Oral immunotherapy induces IgG antibodies that act through FcγRIIb to suppress IgE-mediated hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Oliver T; Logsdon, Stephanie L; Zhou, Joseph S; Medina-Tamayo, Jaciel; Abdel-Gadir, Azza; Noval Rivas, Magali; Koleoglou, Kyle J; Chatila, Talal A; Schneider, Lynda C; Rachid, Rima; Umetsu, Dale T; Oettgen, Hans C

    2014-12-01

    Food-induced anaphylaxis is triggered by specific IgE antibodies. Paradoxically, some subjects with significant IgE levels can ingest allergenic foods without incident. Similarly, subjects completing oral immunotherapy (OIT) tolerate food challenges despite persistent high-titer food-specific IgE. We sought to test whether IgG antibodies induced by food immunotherapy prevent food-induced anaphylaxis and whether this occurs through the inhibitory receptor FcγRIIb. Food allergy-susceptible Il4raF709 mice were enterally sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA). Similarly sensitized IgE-deficient (IgE(-/-)) Il4raF709 mice, which can ingest OVA without anaphylaxis, were subjected to a high-dose enteral OVA desensitization protocol (OIT). Sera from both groups were tested for the ability to activate or inhibit bone marrow mast cells (BMMCs) exposed to allergen or to passively transfer allergy to naive hosts. In parallel experiments sera obtained from patients with peanut allergy before and after undergoing OIT were interrogated for their ability to enhance or suppress peanut-induced activation in an indirect assay by using basophils from nonallergic donors. Il4raF709 mice exhibited strong OVA-specific IgE responses. Their sera efficiently sensitized BMMCs for activation by antigen challenge. Sera from Il4raF709/IgE(-/-) mice subjected to OVA OIT suppressed BMMC responses. This inhibition was IgG mediated and FcγRIIb dependent. Similarly, pre-OIT but not post-OIT sera from patients efficiently sensitized basophils for peanut-induced activation. IgG antibodies in post-OIT sera suppressed basophil activation by pre-OIT sera. This inhibition was blocked by antibodies against FcγRII. Food-specific IgG antibodies, such as those induced during OIT, inhibit IgE-mediated reactions. Strategies that favor IgG responses might prove useful in the management of food allergy. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Haemophilus influenzae localized in epithelial cell layers is shielded from antibiotics and antibody-mediated bactericidal activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schilfgaarde, M.; Eijk, P.; Regelink, A.; van Ulsen, P.; Everts, V.; Dankert, J.; van Alphen, L.

    1999-01-01

    Nonencapsulated Haemophilus influenzae frequently persists in the lungs of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cystic fibrosis (CF) patients for prolonged periods of time. The bacteria are not eradicated by antibiotic treatment of the patients or by specific antibodies that are found in

  17. Degradation of radioiodinated B cell monoclonal antibodies: inhibition via a FCgamma-receptor-II-mediated mechanism and by drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervoordeldonk, S. F.; Balkenende, A. Y.; van den Berg, H.; von dem Borne, A. E.; van der Schoot, C. E.; van Leeuwen, E. F.; Slaper-Cortenbach, I. C.

    1996-01-01

    Our aim is to treat patients with B cell malignancies with radioimmunotherapy using monoclonal antibodies (mAb) such as CD19, CD20 and CD22. In this study we investigated the rate of internalization and catabolism of these mAb. After 24 h at 37 degrees C, 20%-25% of initially cell-bound (125)I-CD19

  18. ApoE Receptor 2 mediates trophoblast dysfunction and pregnancy complications induced by antiphospholipid antibodies in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ulrich, Victoria; Gelber, Shari E; Vukelic, Milena; Sacharidou, Anastasia; Herz, Joachim; Urbanus, Rolf T; de Groot, Philip G; Natale, David R; Harihara, Anirudha; Redecha, Patricia; Abrahams, Vikki M; Shaul, Philip W; Salmon, Jane E; Mineo, Chieko

    OBJECTIVE: Pregnancies in women with the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) are frequently complicated by fetal loss and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). How circulating antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) cause pregnancy complications in APS is poorly understood. We sought to determine if the LDL

  19. Effective single chain antibody (scFv) concentrations in vivo via adenoviral vector mediated expression of secretory scFv

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arafat, WO; Gomez-Navarro, J; Buchsbaum, DJ; Xiang, J; Casado, E; Barker, SD; Mahasreshti, PJ; Haisma, HJ; Barnes, MN; Siegal, GP; Alvarez, RD; Hemminki, A; Nettelbeck, DM; Curiel, DT

    Single chain antibodies (scFv) represent powerful interventional agents for the achievement of targeted therapeutics. The practical utility of these agents have been limited, however, by difficulties related to production of recombinant scFv and the achievement of effective and sustained levels of

  20. Immune-mediated steroid-responsive epileptic spasms and epileptic encephalopathy associated with VGKC-complex antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, Jehan; Brenner, Tanja; Gill, Deepak; Troedson, Christopher; Sinclair, Adriane J; Brilot, Fabienne; Vincent, Angela; Lang, Bethan; Dale, Russell C

    2011-11-01

    Autoantibodies that bind to voltage-gated potassium-channel complex proteins (VGKC-complex antibodies) occur frequently in adults with limbic encephalitis presenting with cognitive impairment and seizures. Recently, VGKC-complex antibodies have been described in a few children with limbic encephalitis, and children with unexplained encephalitis presenting with status epilepticus. We report a case of infantile-onset epileptic spasms and developmental delay compatible with epileptic encephalopathy. Our patient was a female infant, aged 4 months at presentation. She had evidence of immune activation in the central nervous system with elevated cerebrospinal fluid neopterin and mirrored oligoclonal bands, which prompted testing for autoantibodies. VGKC-complex antibodies were elevated (201 pmol/L, normaltreatment, which was started late in the disease course. On review at 13 months of age, her development was consistent with an age of 5 to 6 months. These results suggest that VGKC-complex antibodies might represent a marker of immune therapy responsiveness in a subgroup of patients with infantile epileptic encephalopathy. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2011 Mac Keith Press.

  1. Sclerostin Antibody Increases Callus Size and Strength but does not Improve Fracture Union in a Challenged Open Rat Fracture Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Alyson; McDonald, Michelle M; Schindeler, Aaron; Peacock, Lauren; Mikulec, Kathy; Cheng, Tegan L; Liu, Min; Ke, Hua Zhu; Little, David G

    2017-08-01

    Open fractures remain a challenge in orthopedics. Current strategies to intervene are often inadequate, particularly in severe fractures or when treatment is delayed. Sclerostin is a negative regulator of bone growth and sclerostin-neutralizing antibodies (Scl-Ab) can increase bone mass and strength. The application of these antibodies to improve orthopedic repair has shown varied results, and may be dependent on the location and severity of the bony injury. We examined Scl-Ab treatment within an established rat osteotomy model with periosteal stripping analogous to open fracture repair. In one study, Scl-Ab was given 25 mg/kg bi-weekly, either from the time of fracture or from 3 weeks post-fracture up to an end-point of 12 weeks. A second study treated only delayed union open fractures that did not show radiographic union by week 6 post-fracture. Outcome measures included radiographic union, microCT analysis of bone volume and architecture, and histology. In the first study, Scl-Ab given from either 0 or 3 weeks significantly improved callus bone volume (+52%, p union rate was not changed. In the second study treating only established delayed fractures, bony callus volume was similarly increased by Scl-Ab treatment; however, this did not translate to increased biomechanical strength or union improvement. Sclerostin antibody treatment has limited effects on the healing of challenging open fractures with periosteal stripping, but shows the greatest benefits on callus size and strength with earlier intervention.

  2. A novel monoclonal antibody to human laminin α5 chain strongly inhibits integrin-mediated cell adhesion and migration on laminins 511 and 521.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenebech Wondimu

    Full Text Available Laminins, a large family of αβγ heterotrimeric proteins mainly found in basement membranes, are strong promoters of adhesion and migration of multiple cell types, such as tumor and immune cells, via several integrin receptors. Among laminin α (LMα chains, α5 displays the widest tissue distribution in adult life and is synthesized by most cell types. Here, we have generated and characterized five novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs to the human LMα5 chain to further study the biological relevance of α5 laminins, such as laminins 511 (α5β1γ1 and 521 (α5β2γ1. As detected by ELISA, immunohistochemistry, immunoprecipitation and Western blotting, each antibody displayed unique properties when compared to mAb 4C7, the prototype LMα5 antibody. Of greatest interest, mAb 8G9, but not any other antibody, strongly inhibited α3β1/α6β1 integrin-mediated adhesion and migration of glioma, melanoma, and carcinoma cells on laminin-511 and, together with mAb 4C7, on laminin-521. Accordingly, mAb 8G9 abolished the interaction of soluble α3β1 integrin with immobilized laminins 511 and 521. Binding of mAb 8G9 to laminin-511 was unaffected by the other mAbs to the LMα5 chain but largely hindered by mAb 4E10 to a LMβ1 chain epitope near the globular domain of laminin-511. Thus, mAb 8G9 defines a novel epitope localized at or near the integrin-binding globular domain of the LMα5 chain, which is essential for cell adhesion and migration, and identifies a potential therapeutic target in malignant and inflammatory diseases.

  3. Antibody complement-mediated hemolytic studies with kodecytes reveal that human complement utilized in the classical pathway is more stable than generally accepted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Holly; Bovin, Nicolai; Henry, Stephen

    2016-10-01

    Complement has significant status in the field of transfusion medicine. The accepted stability profile of complement is based on historical studies of diluted human serum hemolyzing rabbit heterophile antibody-sensitized sheep red blood cells (RBCs). Contemporary tools are available to reevaluate these historical observations using human heterophile antibodies, undiluted serum, and antigen-modified human RBCs. Human RBCs were made into "animal-like" kodecytes with heterophile Galα3Galβ4GlcNAcβ function-spacer-lipid constructs. These α-Gal-kodecytes were prepared with an antigen dilution capable of consistently producing 50% antibody-mediated hemolysis against human α1-3galactose heterophile antibodies and undiluted standardized serum. Standardized human serum aliquots from a two-donor pool stored at -85, -20, 4, 22, and 37°C for durations of up to 150 days were evaluated for loss of hemolytic activity. Where practical methodologic procedures were aligned with historical studies. Comparison of the historical assay with the α-Gal-kodecyte assay against complement activity standards showed concordance. However, in most scenarios complement was found to be more than twice as stable as generally accepted. At least 60% of complement hemolytic activity was observed in serum stored at 22°C for 1 week or 2 months at 4°C. No loss of hemolytic activity was observed after 5 months' storage at temperatures below -20°C. An alternative method using undiluted serum and modified human RBCs observed that classical-pathway complement hemolytic activity in stored human serum is at least twice as stable as previously accepted. © 2016 AABB.

  4. Novel Phospholipid-Protein Conjugates Allow Improved Detection of Antibodies in Patients with Autoimmune Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone V Samuelsen

    Full Text Available Reliable measurement of clinically relevant autoimmune antibodies toward phospholipid-protein conjugates is highly desirable in research and clinical assays. To date, the development in this field has been limited to the use of natural heterogeneous antigens. However, this approach does not take structural features of biologically active antigens into account and leads to low reliability and poor scientific test value. Here we describe novel phospholipid-protein conjugates for specific detection of human autoimmune antibodies. Our synthetic approach includes mild oxidation of synthetic phospholipid cardiolipin, and as the last step, coupling of the product with azide-containing linker and copper-catalyzed click chemistry with β2-glycoprotein I and prothrombin. To prove utility of the product antigens, we used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and three cohorts of samples obtained from patients in Denmark (n = 34 and the USA (n = 27 and n = 14. Afterwards we analyzed correlation of the obtained autoantibody titers with clinical parameters for each patient. Our results prove that using novel antigens clinically relevant autoantibodies can be detected with high repeatability, sensitivity and specificity. Unlike previously used antigens the obtained autoantibody titers strongly correlate with high disease activity and in particular, with arthritis, renal involvement, anti-Smith antibodies and high lymphocyte count. Importantly, chemical composition of antigens has a strong influence on the correlation of detected autoantibodies with disease activity and manifestations. This confirms the crucial importance of antigens' composition on research and diagnostic assays, and opens up exciting perspectives for synthetic antigens in future studies of autoimmunity.

  5. Improved detection of Pneumocystis carinii by an immunofluorescence technique using monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orholm, M; Holten-Andersen, W; Lundgren, Jens Dilling

    1990-01-01

    was very suitable for the preparation of slides with lavage fluid and processed induced sputum. Finally, the sensitivity of examination of induced sputum to detect Pneumocystis carinii was found to be 50% when compared with bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. However, this sensitivity may increase through......To assess whether a recently developed indirect immunofluorescent stain using monoclonal antibodies was more sensitive in detecting Pneumocystis carinii than the combination of Giemsa and methenamine silver nitrate stains which has routinely been used in the laboratory, 88 lavage fluid specimens...

  6. Toward in vitro-to-in vivo translation of monoclonal antibody pharmacokinetics: Application of a neonatal Fc receptor-mediated transcytosis assay to understand the interplaying clearance mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Claudia A Castro; Belli, Sara; Cascais, Anne-Christine; Dudal, Sherri; Edelmann, Martin R; Haak, Markus; Brun, Marie-Elise; Otteneder, Michael B; Ullah, Mohammed; Funk, Christoph; Schuler, Franz; Simon, Silke

    2017-07-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are a rapidly growing drug class for which great efforts have been made to optimize certain molecular features to achieve the desired pharmacokinetic (PK) properties. One approach is to engineer the interactions of the mAb with the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) by introducing specific amino acid sequence mutations, and to assess their effect on the PK profile with in vivo studies. Indeed, FcRn protects mAbs from intracellular degradation, thereby prolongs antibody circulation time in plasma and modulates its systemic clearance. To allow more efficient and focused mAb optimization, in vitro input that helps to identify and quantitatively predict the contribution of different processes driving non-target mediated mAb clearance in vivo and supporting translational PK modeling activities is essential. With this aim, we evaluated the applicability and in vivo-relevance of an in vitro cellular FcRn-mediated transcytosis assay to explain the PK behavior of 25 mAbs in rat or monkey. The assay was able to capture species-specific differences in IgG-FcRn interactions and overall correctly ranked Fc mutants according to their in vivo clearance. However, it could not explain the PK behavior of all tested IgGs, indicating that mAb disposition in vivo is a complex interplay of additional processes besides the FcRn interaction. Overall, the transcytosis assay was considered suitable to rank mAb candidates for their FcRn-mediated clearance component before extensive in vivo testing, and represents a first step toward a multi-factorial in vivo clearance prediction approach based on in vitro data.

  7. Future strategy and puzzles of heavy ion beam mediated technique in genetic improvement of biological bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Qunce

    2007-01-01

    The 7 research puzzles in the genetic improvement of biological bodies made by ion beam mediated technique, are worth noticed. The technical ideas, including one mediated technique in physics, 2 significant subjects, 3 effective changes, the mediated evidences of 4 aspects and 5 biological characteristics, were particularly put forward according to the existing states in the field. The 2 significant subjects consist of the mechanics of the allogenetic materials entering into the acceptor and they being to be recombined. The 3 effective changes include from studying morphology to genetic laws, from researching M1 generation to the next generations, from determining the single character to the synthetic traits. The mediated evidences of 4 aspects come from morphology, physiology and biochemistry, molecule biology. The 5 biological characteristics are mainly reproduction, development, photosynthesis, bad condition-resistant and quality. (authors)

  8. Development of an improved competitive ELISA based on a monoclonal antibody against lipopolysaccharide for the detection of bovine brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolei; Wang, Yan; Ma, Limei; Zhang, Ran; De, Yanyan; Yang, Xiaowen; Wang, Chuanqing; Wu, Qingmin

    2015-05-21

    Brucellosis is the most common bacterial zoonosis, and serological tests are routinely used in brucellosis control and eradication programs. In order to improve the accuracy of serological diagnostic method used in bovine brucellosis detection, this study developed an improved competitive ELISA with higher specificity and good sensitivity. This study prepared 12 monoclonal antibodies against smooth Brucella lipopolysaccharide. One monoclonal antibody 3 F9, presented C epitope specificity, was used to develop a competitive ELISA for the serological detection of bovine brucellosis. The competitive ELISA, a commercial competitive ELISA kit, the rose-bengal plate agglutination test, and a microplate agglutination test were all used in the detection of 6 hyperimmune antisera against other commonly cross-reacted bacterial pathogens and 110 clinical bovine serum samples. The results of the test comparisons indicated that the competitive ELISA had higher specificity than the commercial competitive ELISA kit and RBT, and comparable sensitivity with the commercial ELISA kit. This study provided a valuable detection tool with high specificity and good sensitivity, which prevent the wrong-culling of bovines in the eradication campaigns of bovine brucellosis.

  9. Milk concentration improves Bluetongue antibody detection by use of an indirect ELISA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaignat, Valérie; Nitzsche, Sabine; Schärrer, Sara; Feyer, Dora; Schwermer, Heinzpeter; Thur, Barbara

    2010-07-14

    A national Bluetongue antibody surveillance in cattle through bulk milk was conducted in Switzerland between July 2007 and June 2008. Using ID Screen Bluetongue Milk ELISA (ID VET, Montpellier, France), samples from 15 out of 210 dairy farms at least once gave a positive result. In only three of these herds bluetongue positive animals were found. Therefore, specificity for bulk milk was not as good as expected and when individual milk samples were tested, it was even lower. As further investigations of positive results were time-consuming and no other ELISA was available at that time, we aimed at discriminating false from true positive samples with a confirmatory test using a protein precipitation method followed by retesting with the same ELISA. Additionally, we examined whether testing of single milk samples can reliably be used to assess status of cows, and whether sampling at the beginning or at the end of milking, as well as freezing and thawing of the milk could influence the performance of the test. Screening with ID VET milk ELISA and confirmatory testing after protein precipitation yielded a clear increase of specificity without any loss of sensitivity in both bulk and single milk samples. This testing scheme allowed minimizing follow-up investigations by blood testing. Antibody levels in plasma and milk showed a good correlation. Tested by logistic regression, none of the possible influencing factors (time point of sample collection, freezing, or milk content of the samples) had a significant influence on the test performance. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Technetium-99m-ECD SPECT in antiphospholipid antibody syndrome: a drastic improvement in brain perfusion by antiplatelet therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokumaru, Sunao; Yoshikai, Tomonori; Uchino, Akira; Kudo, Sho [Dept. of Radiology, Saga Medical School (Japan); Matsui, Makoto; Kuroda, Yasuo [Dept. of Neurology, Saga Medical School (Japan)

    2001-12-01

    We present a case of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) with repeated transient ischemic attacks (TIAs). Magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple cerebral infarcts and ischemic changes in the cerebral white matter. Cerebral angiographies showed no abnormalities. Technetium-99m-ethyl cysteinate dimer (Tc-99m-ECD) brain SPECT showed multiple decreased perfusion areas, which were more extensive than the lesions demonstrated on MRI. After treatment with an antiplatelet agent, the patient subsequently recovered from the TIAs. Although no interval changes were observed by MRI after therapy, follow-up Tc-99m-ECD SPECT revealed a marked improvement in brain perfusion. This is the first imaging report of remarkable post-therapy improvement in brain perfusion in APS cases. (orig.)

  11. Technetium-99m-ECD SPECT in antiphospholipid antibody syndrome: a drastic improvement in brain perfusion by antiplatelet therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokumaru, Sunao; Yoshikai, Tomonori; Uchino, Akira; Kudo, Sho; Matsui, Makoto; Kuroda, Yasuo

    2001-01-01

    We present a case of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) with repeated transient ischemic attacks (TIAs). Magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple cerebral infarcts and ischemic changes in the cerebral white matter. Cerebral angiographies showed no abnormalities. Technetium-99m-ethyl cysteinate dimer (Tc-99m-ECD) brain SPECT showed multiple decreased perfusion areas, which were more extensive than the lesions demonstrated on MRI. After treatment with an antiplatelet agent, the patient subsequently recovered from the TIAs. Although no interval changes were observed by MRI after therapy, follow-up Tc-99m-ECD SPECT revealed a marked improvement in brain perfusion. This is the first imaging report of remarkable post-therapy improvement in brain perfusion in APS cases. (orig.)

  12. Mediatization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjarvard, Stig

    2017-01-01

    Mediatization research shares media effects studies' ambition of answering the difficult questions with regard to whether and how media matter and influence contemporary culture and society. The two approaches nevertheless differ fundamentally in that mediatization research seeks answers...... research is concerned with long-term structural changes involving media, culture, and society, i.e. the influences of the media are understood in relation to how media are implicated in social and cultural changes and how these processes come to create new conditions for human communication and interaction....... From the perspective of mediatization research, the most important effect of the media stems from their embeddedness in culture and society....

  13. Improvement of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and rooting of black cherry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying Wang; Paula M. Pijut

    2014-01-01

    An improved protocol for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of an elite, mature black cherry genotype was developed. To increase transformation efficiency, vacuum infiltration, sonication, and a combination of the two treatments were applied during the cocultivation of leaf explants with Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA105...

  14. Characterization of the mechanism of protection mediated by CS-D7, a monoclonal antibody to Staphylococcus aureus iron regulated surface determinant B (IsdB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory ePancari

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported the development of a human monoclonal antibody (CS-D7, IgG1 with specificity and affinity for the iron regulated surface determinant B (IsdB of Staphylococcus aureus. CS-D7 mediates opsonophagocytic killing in vitro and protection in a murine sepsis model. In light of recent data indicating that IsdB specific T cells (CD4+, Th17, not Ab, mediate protection after vaccination with IsdB, it is important to investigate the mechanism of protection mediated by CS-D7. The mAb was examined to determine if it blocked heme binding to IsdB in vitro. The mAb was not found to have heme blocking activity, nor did it prevent bacterial growth under in vivo conditions, in an implanted growth chamber. To assess the role of the mAb Fc a point mutation was introduced at aa 297 (CS-D7●N297A. This point mutation removes Fc effector functions. In vitro analysis of the mutein confirmed that it lacked measurable binding to FcγR, and that it did not fix complement. The mutein had dramatically reduced in vitro opsonic OP activity compared to CS-D7. Nonetheless, the mutein conferred protection equivalent to the wild type mAb in the murine sepsis model. Both wild type and mutein mAbs were efficacious in FcγR deletion mice (including both FcγRII-/- mice and FcγRIII-/- mice, indicating that these receptors were not essential for mAb mediated protection in vivo. Protection mediated by CS-D7 was lost in Balb/c mice depleted of C3 with cobra venom factor (CFV, was lost in mice depleted of superoxide dismutase (SOD in P47phox deletion mice, and was absent in SCID mice. Enhanced clearance of S. aureus in the liver of CS-D7 treated mice and enhanced production of INF-γ, but not of IL17, may play a role in the mechanism of protection mediated by the mAb. CS-D7 apparently mediates survival in challenged mice through a mechanism involving complement, phagocytes, and lymphocytes, but which does not depend on interaction with FcγR, or on blocking heme

  15. [Head drop syndrome in a patient with immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy with anti-signal recognition particle antibody: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushimura, Yukie; Shiga, Kensuke; Mukai, Mao; Yoshida, Masakatu; Mizuno, Toshiki; Nakagawa, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    We report an 87-year-old female patient who presented a dropped head and progressive weakness in proximal muscles over five months. The value of serum creatine kinase was 2,708 IU/l and the antibody against signal recognition particle (SRP) was detected by means of immunoprecipitation. The computed tomography of skeletal muscles revealed atrophy and fatty degeneration preferentially in the neck extensors and paraspinal muscles. The biopsied specimen of the deltoid muscle showed necrotic fibers scattered in fascicles with marked myophagia. The mononuclear cells in necrotic fibers were positive against CD68, leading to the diagnosis of immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy. We hypothesize that a group of patients with necrotizing myopathy can present a preferential involvement in neck extensors resulting in dropped head syndrome.

  16. Nanoparticle Mediated Drug Delivery of Rolipram to Tyrosine Kinase B Positive Cells in the Inner Ear with Targeting Peptides and Agonistic Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf eGlueckert

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available AimSystemic pharmacotherapies have limitation due to blood-labyrinth barrier, so local delivery via the round window membrane opens a path for effective treatment. Multifunctional nanoparticle (NP mediated cell specific drug delivery may enhance efficacy and reduce side effects. Different NPs with ligands to target TrkB receptor were tested. Distribution, uptake mechanisms, trafficking, and bioefficacy of drug release of rolipram loaded NPs were evaluated.Methods We tested lipid based nanocapsules (LNCs, Quantum Dot, silica NPs with surface modification by peptides mimicking TrkB or TrkB activating antibodies. Bioefficacy of drug release was tested with rolipram loaded LNCs to prevent cisplatin induced apoptosis. We established different cell culture models with SH-SY-5Y and inner ear derived cell lines and used neonatal and adult mouse explants. Uptake and trafficking was evaluated with FACS and confocal as well as transmission electron microscopy. ResultsPlain NPs show some selectivity in uptake related to the in-vitro system properties, carrier material and NP size. Some peptide ligands provide enhanced targeted uptake to neuronal cells but failed to show this in cell cultures. Agonistic antibodies linked to silica NPs showed TrkB activation and enhanced binding to inner ear derived cells. Rolipram loaded LNCs proved as effective carriers to prevent cisplatin induced apoptosis.DiscussionMost NPs with targeting ligands showed limited effects to enhance uptake. NP aggregation and unspecific binding may change uptake mechanisms and impair endocytosis by an overload of NPs. This may affect survival signaling. NPs with antibodies activate survival signaling and show effective binding to TrkB positive cells but needs further optimization for specific internalization. Bioefficiacy of rolipram release confirms LNCs as encouraging vectors for drug delivery of lipophilic agents to the inner ear with ideal release characteristics independent of

  17. RNA Sensors Enable Human Mast Cell Anti-Viral Chemokine Production and IFN-Mediated Protection in Response to Antibody-Enhanced Dengue Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan Y.; Haidl, Ian D.; Al-Afif, Ayham; Marshall, Jean S.; Anderson, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Dengue hemorrhagic fever and/or dengue shock syndrome represent the most serious pathophysiological manifestations of human dengue virus infection. Despite intensive research, the mechanisms and important cellular players that contribute to dengue disease are unclear. Mast cells are tissue-resident innate immune cells that play a sentinel cell role in host protection against infectious agents via pathogen-recognition receptors by producing potent mediators that modulate inflammation, cell recruitment and normal vascular homeostasis. Most importantly, mast cells are susceptible to antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection and respond with selective cytokine and chemokine responses. In order to obtain a global view of dengue virus-induced gene regulation in mast cells, primary human cord blood-derived mast cells (CBMCs) and the KU812 and HMC-1 mast cell lines were infected with dengue virus in the presence of dengue-immune sera and their responses were evaluated at the mRNA and protein levels. Mast cells responded to antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection or polyinosiniċpolycytidylic acid treatment with the production of type I interferons and the rapid and potent production of chemokines including CCL4, CCL5 and CXCL10. Multiple interferon-stimulated genes were also upregulated as well as mRNA and protein for the RNA sensors PKR, RIG-I and MDA5. Dengue virus-induced chemokine production by KU812 cells was significantly modulated by siRNA knockdown of RIG-I and PKR, in a negative and positive manner, respectively. Pretreatment of fresh KU812 cells with supernatants from dengue virus-infected mast cells provided protection from subsequent infection with dengue virus in a type I interferon-dependent manner. These findings support a role for tissue-resident mast cells in the early detection of antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection via RNA sensors, the protection of neighbouring cells through interferon production and the potential recruitment of leukocytes via

  18. RNA sensors enable human mast cell anti-viral chemokine production and IFN-mediated protection in response to antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G Brown

    Full Text Available Dengue hemorrhagic fever and/or dengue shock syndrome represent the most serious pathophysiological manifestations of human dengue virus infection. Despite intensive research, the mechanisms and important cellular players that contribute to dengue disease are unclear. Mast cells are tissue-resident innate immune cells that play a sentinel cell role in host protection against infectious agents via pathogen-recognition receptors by producing potent mediators that modulate inflammation, cell recruitment and normal vascular homeostasis. Most importantly, mast cells are susceptible to antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection and respond with selective cytokine and chemokine responses. In order to obtain a global view of dengue virus-induced gene regulation in mast cells, primary human cord blood-derived mast cells (CBMCs and the KU812 and HMC-1 mast cell lines were infected with dengue virus in the presence of dengue-immune sera and their responses were evaluated at the mRNA and protein levels. Mast cells responded to antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection or polyinosiniċpolycytidylic acid treatment with the production of type I interferons and the rapid and potent production of chemokines including CCL4, CCL5 and CXCL10. Multiple interferon-stimulated genes were also upregulated as well as mRNA and protein for the RNA sensors PKR, RIG-I and MDA5. Dengue virus-induced chemokine production by KU812 cells was significantly modulated by siRNA knockdown of RIG-I and PKR, in a negative and positive manner, respectively. Pretreatment of fresh KU812 cells with supernatants from dengue virus-infected mast cells provided protection from subsequent infection with dengue virus in a type I interferon-dependent manner. These findings support a role for tissue-resident mast cells in the early detection of antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection via RNA sensors, the protection of neighbouring cells through interferon production and the potential recruitment of

  19. Sensitive Detection of the Natural Killer Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity of Anti-CD20 Antibodies and Its Impairment by B-Cell Receptor Pathway Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floyd Hassenrück

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC of the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs rituximab and obinutuzumab against the cell line Raji and isolated CLL cells and its potential impairment by kinase inhibitors (KI was determined via lactate dehydrogenase release or calcein retention, respectively, using genetically modified NK92 cells expressing CD16-176V as effector cells. Compared to peripheral blood mononuclear cells, recombinant effector cell lines showed substantial alloreactivity-related cytotoxicity without addition of mAbs but afforded determination of ADCC with reduced interassay variability. The cytotoxicity owing to alloreactivity was less susceptible to interference by KI than the ADCC of anti-CD20 mAbs, which was markedly diminished by ibrutinib, but not by idelalisib. Compared to rituximab, the ADCC of obinutuzumab against primary CLL cells showed approximately 30% higher efficacy and less interference with KI. Irreversible BTK inhibitors at a clinically relevant concentration of 1 μM only weakly impaired the ADCC of anti-CD20 mAbs, with less influence in combinations with obinutuzumab than with rituximab and by acalabrutinib than by ibrutinib or tirabrutinib. In summary, NK cell line-based assays permitted the sensitive detection of ADCC of therapeutic anti-CD20 mAbs against CLL cells and of the interference of KI with this important killing mechanism.

  20. How Can HIV-Type-1-Env Immunogenicity Be Improved to Facilitate Antibody-Based Vaccine Development?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klasse, Per Johan; Sanders, Rogier W.; Cerutti, Andrea; Moore, John P.

    2012-01-01

    No vaccine candidate has induced antibodies (Abs) that efficiently neutralize multiple primary isolates of HIV-1. Preexisting high titers of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) are essential, because the virus establishes infection before anamnestic responses could take effect. HIV-1 infection elicits

  1. Influence of improved FcRn binding on the subcutaneous bioavailability of monoclonal antibodies in cynomolgus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta-Mannan, Amita; Witcher, Derrick R; Lu, Jirong; Wroblewski, Victor J

    2012-01-01

    Engineering monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with improved binding to the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) is a strategy that can extend their in vivo half-life and slow their systemic clearance. Published reports have predominantly characterized the pharmacokinetics of mAbs after intravenous administration. Recently, studies in mice suggest FcRn may also play a role in affecting the subcutaneous bioavailability of mAbs. Herein, we examined whether five mAbs engineered with the T250Q/M428L Fc mutations that improved their FcRn interactions, and subsequently their in vivo pharmacokinetics after intravenous administration, had improved subcutaneous bioavailability compared with their wild-type counterparts in cynomolgus monkeys. Similar to the intravenous administration findings, the pharmacokinetic profiles of our variant mAbs after subcutaneous injection showed improved half-life or clearance. In contrast, a clear effect was not observed on the subcutaneous bioavailability. We expect that while FcRn may play a role in determining mAb subcutaneous bioavailability, multiple biopharmaceutical and physiological factors are likely to influence the success of engineering strategies aimed at targeting this pathway for improving bioavailability.

  2. B Cell Receptor-Mediated Internalization of Salmonella: A Novel Pathway for Autonomous B Cell Activation and Antibody Production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souwer, Yuri; Griekspoor, Alexander; Jorritsma, Tineke; de Wit, Jelle; Janssen, Hans; Neefjes, Jacques; van Ham, S. Marieke

    2009-01-01

    The present paradigm is that primary B cells are nonphagocytosing cells. In this study, we demonstrate that human primary B cells are able to internalize bacteria when the bacteria are recognized by the BCR. BCR-mediated internalization of Salmonella typhimurium results in B cell differentiation and

  3. Antibody-mediated activation of the classical pathway of complement may compensate for mannose-binding lectin deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, Anja; Garred, Peter; Wildenberg, Manon E.; Lynch, Nicholas J.; Munoz, Jeric R.; Zuiverloon, Tahlita C. M.; Bouwman, Lee H.; Schlagwein, Nicole; Fallaux van den Houten, Francien C.; Faber-Krol, Maria C.; Madsen, Hans O.; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J.; Matsushita, Misao; Fujita, Teizo; Daha, Mohamed R.

    2004-01-01

    Deficiency of mannose-binding lectin (MBL), a recognition molecule of the lectin pathway of complement, is associated with increased susceptibility to infections. The high frequency of MBL deficiency suggests that defective MBL-mediated innate immunity can be compensated by alternative defense

  4. Anti-Sclerostin antibody inhibits internalization of Sclerostin and Sclerostin-mediated antagonism of Wnt/LRP6 signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten van Dinther

    Full Text Available Sclerosteosis is a rare high bone mass disease that is caused by inactivating mutations in the SOST gene. Its gene product, Sclerostin, is a key negative regulator of bone formation and might therefore serve as a target for the anabolic treatment of osteoporosis. The exact molecular mechanism by which Sclerostin exerts its antagonistic effects on Wnt signaling in bone forming osteoblasts remains unclear. Here we show that Wnt3a-induced transcriptional responses and induction of alkaline phosphatase activity, an early marker of osteoblast differentiation, require the Wnt co-receptors LRP5 and LRP6. Unlike Dickkopf1 (DKK1, Sclerostin does not inhibit Wnt-3a-induced phosphorylation of LRP5 at serine 1503 or LRP6 at serine 1490. Affinity labeling of cell surface proteins with [(125I]Sclerostin identified LRP6 as the main specific Sclerostin receptor in multiple mesenchymal cell lines. When cells were challenged with Sclerostin fused to recombinant green fluorescent protein (GFP this was internalized, likely via a Clathrin-dependent process, and subsequently degraded in a temperature and proteasome-dependent manner. Ectopic expression of LRP6 greatly enhanced binding and cellular uptake of Sclerostin-GFP, which was reduced by the addition of an excess of non-GFP-fused Sclerostin. Finally, an anti-Sclerostin antibody inhibited the internalization of Sclerostin-GFP and binding of Sclerostin to LRP6. Moreover, this antibody attenuated the antagonistic activity of Sclerostin on canonical Wnt-induced responses.

  5. Rapid alternative to the clonogenic assay for measuring antibody and complement-mediated killing of tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gee, A.P.; Rolfe, A.E.; Worthington-White, D.; Graham-Pole, J.; Boyle, M.D.

    1985-01-01

    A study of the methods used to quantitate killing of tumor cells by antibody and complement has highlighted a number of problems. Using leukemia as a model, the authors have found that the release of 51 Cr from labeled tumor cells treated with antibody and complement can be an equivocal measure of cell viability. Combined with its restricted sensitivity (less than a 2 log range of cell killing) this makes this widely used assay of questionable value for detecting small numbers of viable cells, or for identifying subpopulations of complement-resistant cells. As an alternative a [ 125 I]iododeoxyuridine uptake assay has been developed, that combines the simplicity and rapidity of the 51 Cr release technique with the sensitivity of a clonogenic assay. This method eliminates the problem of spontaneous isotope release, inherent in prelabeling assays, and variability from experiment to experiment can be avoided by including a viable cell standard curve within each assay. The sensitivity of the 125 IUdR uptake method, which can be completed within a day, is similar to that of a 10 day methylcellulose cloning assay and was capable of detecting the presence of a minor subpopulation of complement-resistant tumor cells

  6. The intervening removable affinity tag (iRAT) production system facilitates Fv antibody fragment‐mediated crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Yayoi; Sato, Yumi; Suno, Ryoji; Horita, Shoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Fv antibody fragments have been used as co‐crystallization partners in structural biology, particularly in membrane protein crystallography. However, there are inherent technical issues associated with the large‐scale production of soluble, functional Fv fragments through conventional methods in various expression systems. To circumvent these problems, we developed a new method, in which a single synthetic polyprotein consisting of a variable light (VL) domain, an intervening removable affinity tag (iRAT), and a variable heavy (VH) domain is expressed by a Gram‐positive bacterial secretion system. This method ensures stoichiometric expression of VL and VH from the monocistronic construct followed by proper folding and assembly of the two variable domains. The iRAT segment can be removed by a site‐specific protease during the purification process to yield tag‐free Fv fragments suitable for crystallization trials. In vitro refolding step is not required to obtain correctly folded Fv fragments. As a proof of concept, we tested the iRAT‐based production of multiple Fv fragments, including a crystallization chaperone for a mammalian membrane protein as well as FDA‐approved therapeutic antibodies. The resulting Fv fragments were functionally active and crystallized in complex with the target proteins. The iRAT system is a reliable, rapid and broadly applicable means of producing milligram quantities of Fv fragments for structural and biochemical studies. PMID:27595817

  7. An aspartate and a water molecule mediate efficient acid-base catalysis in a tailored antibody pocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debler, Erik W.; Müller, Roger; Hilvert, Donald; Wilson, Ian A.

    2009-01-01

    Design of catalysts featuring multiple functional groups is a desirable, yet formidable goal. Antibody 13G5, which accelerates the cleavage of unactivated benzisoxazoles, is one of few artificial enzymes that harness an acid and a base to achieve efficient proton transfer. X-ray structures of the Fab-hapten complexes of wild-type 13G5 and active-site variants now afford detailed insights into its mechanism. The parent antibody preorganizes AspH35 and GluL34 to abstract a proton from substrate and to orient a water molecule for leaving group stabilization, respectively. Remodeling the environment of the hydrogen bond donor with a compensatory network of ordered waters, as seen in the GluL34 to alanine mutant, leads to an impressive 109-fold rate acceleration over the nonenzymatic reaction with acetate, illustrating the utility of buried water molecules in bifunctional catalysis. Generalization of these design principles may aid in creation of catalysts for other important chemical transformations. PMID:19846764

  8. Validation of an improved enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the diagnosis of trypanosomal antibodies in Ghanaian cattle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doku, C.K.; Seidu, I.B.M.

    2000-01-01

    The validation of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Ab-ELISA) for the detection of antibodies to pathogenic trypanosomes in cattle is described. Two hundred known negative sera obtained from the tsetse-free zone of Dori (Burkina Faso) were analyzed using microtitre plates pre-coated with crude antigen lysates of Trypanosoma congolense and T. vivax. A pre-test optimization was carried out and a percent positivity (PP) of 50% was chosen (specificity: >82%) for assaying field sera. A total of 440 serum samples collected from cattle in areas of known and unknown disease prevalence were assayed. For all animals the packed red cell volume (PCV) was determined and the buffy coat technique (BCT) and blood smears were examined to detect trypanosomes at the species level. A comparison of the BCT and Ab-ELISA results showed there was a much higher prevalence of antibodies to both species than the parasite prevalence as shown by the BCT (10 fold). The rate of agreement between BCT-positive and Ab-ELISA-positive samples for both species was low (<10%). No conclusion could be drawn from this finding because of the low number of known BCT positive cases that were identified. There was a better, albeit highly variable, agreement between BCT-negative and Ab-ELISA-negative samples (30-70%). Proposals for further improvement of the Ab-ELISA and prospects for the use of the assay in the monitoring of trypanosomosis control in Ghana are discussed. (author)

  9. Anti-Bv8 Antibody and Metronomic Gemcitabine Improve Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Treatment Outcome Following Weekly Gemcitabine Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erez Hasnis

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Weekly gemcitabine therapy is the major treatment offered for patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma cancer; however, relative resistance of tumor cells to chemotherapy, rapid regrowth, and metastasis are the main causes of death within a year. Recently, the daily continuous administration of chemotherapy in low doses – called metronomic chemotherapy (MC – has been shown to inhibit primary tumor growth and delay metastases in several tumor types; however, its use as a single therapy is still in question due to its moderate therapeutic benefit. Here, we show that the combination of weekly gemcitabine with MC of the same drug delays tumor regrowth and inhibits metastasis in mice implanted orthotopically with pancreatic tumors. We further demonstrate that weekly gemcitabine, but not continuous MC gemcitabine or the combination of the two drug regimens, promotes rebound myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC mobilization and increases angiogenesis in this tumor model. Furthermore, Bv8 is highly expressed in MDSCs colonizing pancreatic tumors in mice treated with weekly gemcitabine compared to MC gemcitabine or the combination of the two regimens. Blocking Bv8 with antibodies in weekly gemcitabine-treated mice results in a significant reduction in tumor regrowth, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Overall, our results suggest that pro-tumorigenic effects induced by weekly gemcitabine are mediated in part by MDSCs expressing Bv8. Therefore, both Bv8 inhibition and MC can be used as legitimate 'add-on' treatments for preventing post-chemotherapy pancreatic cancer recurrence, progression, and metastasis following weekly gemcitabine therapy.

  10. Monoclonal Antibodies Specific for the V2, V3, CD4-Binding Site, and gp41 of HIV-1 Mediate Phagocytosis in a Dose-Dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musich, Thomas; Li, Liuzhe; Liu, Lily; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie; Gorny, Miroslaw K

    2017-04-15

    In light of the weak or absent neutralizing activity mediated by anti-V2 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), we tested whether they can mediate Ab-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), which is an important element of anti-HIV-1 immunity. We tested six anti-V2 MAbs and compared them with 21 MAbs specific for V3, the CD4-binding site (CD4bs), and gp41 derived from chronically HIV-1-infected individuals and produced by hybridoma cells. ADCP activity was measured by flow cytometry using uptake by THP-1 monocytic cells of fluorescent beads coated with gp120, gp41, BG505 SOSIP.664, or BG505 DS-SOSIP.664 complexed with MAbs. The measurement of ADCP activity by the area under the curve showed significantly higher activity of anti-gp41 MAbs than of the members of the three other groups of MAbs tested using beads coated with monomeric gp41 or gp120; anti-V2 MAbs were dominant compared to anti-V3 and anti-CD4bs MAbs against clade C gp120 ZM109 ADCP activity mediated by V2 and V3 MAbs was positive against stabilized DS-SOSIP.664 trimer but negligible against SOSIP.664 targets, suggesting that a closed envelope conformation better exposes the variable loops. Two IgG3 MAbs against the V2 and V3 regions displayed dominant ADCP activity compared to a panel of IgG1 MAbs. This superior ADCP activity was confirmed when two of three recombinant IgG3 anti-V2 MAbs were compared to their IgG1 counterparts. The study demonstrated dominant ADCP activity of anti-gp41 against monomers but not trimers, with some higher activity of anti-V2 MAbs than of anti-V3 and anti-CD4bs MAbs. The ability to mediate ADCP suggests a mechanism by which anti-HIV-1 envelope Abs can contribute to protective efficacy. IMPORTANCE Anti-V2 antibodies (Abs) correlated with reduced risk of HIV-1 infection in recipients of the RV144 vaccine, suggesting that they play a protective role, but a mechanism providing such protection remains to be determined. The rare and weak neutralizing activities of anti-V2 MAbs prompted us

  11. Antibody-mediated delivery of interleukin-2 to the stroma of breast cancer strongly enhances the potency of chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mårlind, Jessica; Kaspar, Manuela; Trachsel, Eveline; Sommavilla, Roberto; Hindle, Stuart; Bacci, Camilla; Giovannoni, Leonardo; Neri, Dario

    2008-10-15

    There is an interest in the discovery of biopharmaceuticals, which are well tolerated and which potentiate the action of anthracyclines and taxanes in breast cancer therapy. We have produced a recombinant fusion protein, composed of the human antibody fragment scFv(F16) fused to human interleukin-2 (F16-IL2), and tested its therapeutic performance in the MDA-MB-231 xenograft model of human breast cancer. The F16 antibody is specific to the alternatively spliced A1 domain of tenascin-C, which is virtually undetectable in normal tissues but is strongly expressed in the neovasculature and stroma of breast cancer. When used as monotherapy, F16-IL2 displayed a strikingly superior therapeutic benefit compared with unconjugated recombinant IL-2. The administration of doxorubicin either before (8 days, 24 h, or 2 h) or simultaneously with the injection of F16-IL2 did not decrease the accumulation of immunocytokine in the tumor as measured by quantitative biodistribution analysis. Therapy experiments, featuring five once per week coadministrations of 20 mug F16-IL2 and doxorubicin, showed a statistically significant reduction of tumor growth rate and prolongation of survival at a 4 mg/kg doxorubicin dose but not at a 1 mg/kg dose. By contrast, combination of F16-IL2 with paclitaxel (5 and 1 mg/kg) exhibited a significant therapeutic benefit compared with paclitaxel alone at both dose levels. F16-IL2, alone or in combination with doxorubicin, was well tolerated in cynomolgus monkeys at doses equivalent to the ones now used in clinical studies. F16-IL2 may represent a new useful biopharmaceutical for the treatment of breast cancer.

  12. IgE antibodies, FcεRIα, and IgE-mediated local anaphylaxis can limit snake venom toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkl, Philipp; Marichal, Thomas; Gaudenzio, Nicolas; Reber, Laurent Lionel; Sibilano, Riccardo; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 cytokine-related immune responses associated with development of antigen-specific IgE antibodies can contribute to pathology in patients with allergic diseases and to fatal anaphylaxis. However, recent findings in mice indicate that IgE also can enhance defense against honeybee venom. We tested whether IgE antibodies, IgE-dependent effector mechanisms, and a local anaphylactic reaction to an unrelated antigen can enhance defense against Russell viper venom (RVV) and determined whether such responses can be influenced by immunization protocol or mouse strain. We compared the resistance of RVV-immunized wild-type, IgE-deficient, and Fcer1a-deficient mice after injection of a potentially lethal dose of RVV. A single prior exposure to RVV enhanced the ability of wild-type mice, but not mice lacking IgE or functional FcεRI, to survive challenge with a potentially lethal amount of RVV. Moreover, IgE-dependent local passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in response to challenge with an antigen not naturally present in RVV significantly enhanced resistance to the venom. Finally, we observed different effects on resistance to RVV or honeybee venom in BALB/c versus C57BL/6 mice that had received a second exposure to that venom before challenge with a high dose of that venom. These observations illustrate the potential benefit of IgE-dependent effector mechanisms in acquired host defense against venoms. The extent to which type 2 immune responses against venoms can decrease pathology associated with envenomation seems to be influenced by the type of venom, the frequency of venom exposure, and the genetic background of the host. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Antibody-mediated enhancement of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infectivity is determined by the structure of gp120 and depends on modulation of the gp120-CCR5 interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Guillon (Christophe); M. Schutten (Martin); P.H.M. Boers (Patrick); R.A. Gruters (Rob); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIn this study, we characterized the viral determinants of coreceptor usage in relation to susceptibility to antibody-mediated neutralization or enhancement of infectivity by using chimeras of three highly related human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates of different

  14. Combination of monoclonal antibodies with DST inhibits accelerated rejection mediated by memory T cells to induce long-lived heart allograft acceptance in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Wei; Chen, Jibing; Dai, Helong; Peng, Yuanzheng; Wang, Feng; Xia, Junjie; Thorlacius, Henrik; Zhu, Qi; Qi, Zhongquan

    2011-08-30

    Donor-reactive memory T cells mediated accelerated rejection is known as a barrier to the survival of transplanted organs. We investigated the combination of different monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and donor-specific transfusion (DST) in memory T cells-based adoptive mice model. In the presence of donor-reactive memory T cells, the mean survival time (MST) of grafts in the anti-CD40L/LFA-1/DST group was 49.8d. Adding anti-CD44/CD70 mAbs to anti-CD40L/LFA-1/DST treatment. The MST was more than 100 d (MST>100 d). Compared with anti-CD40L/LFA-1/DST group, anti-CD40L/LFA-1/CD44/CD70/DST group notably reduced the expansion of memory T cells, enhanced the proportion of CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and suppressed donor-specific responses. Our data suggest that anti-CD40L/LFA-1/CD44/CD70mAbs and DST can synergistically inhibit accelerated rejection mediated by memory T cells to induce long-lived heart allograft acceptance in mice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A novel computer algorithm improves antibody epitope prediction using affinity-selected mimotopes: a case study using monoclonal antibodies against the West Nile virus E protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisova, Galina F; Denisov, Dimitri A; Yeung, Jeffrey; Loeb, Mark B; Diamond, Michael S; Bramson, Jonathan L

    2008-11-01

    Understanding antibody function is often enhanced by knowledge of the specific binding epitope. Here, we describe a computer algorithm that permits epitope prediction based on a collection of random peptide epitopes (mimotopes) isolated by antibody affinity purification. We applied this methodology to the prediction of epitopes for five monoclonal antibodies against the West Nile virus (WNV) E protein, two of which exhibit therapeutic activity in vivo. This strategy was validated by comparison of our results with existing F(ab)-E protein crystal structures and mutational analysis by yeast surface display. We demonstrate that by combining the results of the mimotope method with our data from mutational analysis, epitopes could be predicted with greater certainty. The two methods displayed great complementarity as the mutational analysis facilitated epitope prediction when the results with the mimotope method were equivocal and the mimotope method revealed a broader number of residues within the epitope than the mutational analysis. Our results demonstrate that the combination of these two prediction strategies provides a robust platform for epitope characterization.

  16. Antibody-mediated allotype suppression in adult mice: the role of antigen, effector isotype and regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curling, E M; Dresser, D W

    1984-10-01

    It has been reported (Contemp. Top. Immunobiol. 1974. 3:41) that allotype-specific T suppressor cells can be induced after monoclonal anti-allotype treatment of neonatal (BALB/c X SJL)F1 (Igha/b) mice. Here we show that (BALB/c X CB20)F1 adult-derived spleen cells (SC) are, by contrast, potently suppressed by monoclonal allotype-specific reagents, (when transferred into irradiated BALB/c recipients) in the absence of primary T suppressor cell induction. Such suppression is only induced in activated B cells [exposed to lipopolysaccharide or sheep red blood cells (SRBC)], and is probably dependent on the isotype of the anti-allotype sera administered. For example, two independently produced IgG1 monoclonal reagents raised against the Igh-1b allotype were poorly suppressive or nonsuppressive, whereas an IgG3 and an IgG2a monoclonal antibody induced a 90% suppression of the target allotype in transferred adult SC. It was found that suppression was not due to a depletion of antigen-specific T cell help since: (a) the addition of SRBC-educated T cells did not break suppression and (b) suppressed SC were as good a source of T cell help as normal SC, in the response of virgin or memory B cell (Thy-1-depleted) responses to SRBC in vivo. Suppression was maintained in suppressed cells which had been rechallenged with SRBC after transfer into a second irradiated recipient, but was not induced in normal SC when these were admixed with an equal number from this suppressed SC population. These findings point to a possible mechanism for the regulation of B cell expression, through the formation of an antibody-Ig receptor complex at the surface of the B lymphocyte. After complexing the target cell is either deleted or inactivated. The response to SRBC was reduced or ablated for at least 70 days after treatment with a single dose of anti-allotype serum.

  17. Time to symptom improvement using elimination diets in non-IgE-mediated gastrointestinal food allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozinsky, Adriana Chebar; Meyer, Rosan; De Koker, Claire; Dziubak, Robert; Godwin, Heather; Reeve, Kate; Dominguez Ortega, Gloria; Shah, Neil

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence of food allergy has increased in recent decades, and there is paucity of data on time to symptom improvement using elimination diets in non-Immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated food allergies. We therefore aimed to assess the time required to improvement of symptoms using a symptom questionnaire for children with non-IgE-mediated food allergies on an elimination diet. A prospective observational study was performed on patients with non-IgE-mediated gastrointestinal food allergies on an elimination diet, who completed a questionnaire that includes nine evidence-based food allergic symptoms before and after the exclusion diet. The questionnaire measured symptoms individually from 0 (no symptom) to 5 (most severe) and collectively from 0 to 45. Children were only enrolled in the study if collectively symptoms improved with the dietary elimination within 4 or 8 weeks. Data from 131 patients were analysed including 90 boys with a median age of 21 months [IQR: 7 to 66]. Based on the symptom questionnaire, 129 patients (98.4%) improved after 4-week elimination diet and only two patients improved after 8 weeks. A statistically significant difference before and after commencing the elimination diet was seen in all nine recorded symptoms (all p < 0.001), and in the median of overall score (p < 0.001). This is the first study attempting to establish time to improve after commencing the diet elimination. Almost all children in this study improved within 4 weeks of following the elimination diet, under dietary supervision. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Improvement of Radiation-Mediated Immunosuppression of Human NSCLC Tumour Xenografts in a Nude Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Tokalov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Human tumour xenografts in a nude rat model have consistently been used as an essential part of preclinical studies for anticancer drugs activity in human. Commonly, these animals receive whole body irradiation to assure immunosuppression. But whole body dose delivery might be inhomogeneous and the resulting incomplete bone marrow depletion may modify tumour behaviour. To improve irradiation-mediated immunosuppression of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC xenografts in a nude rat model irradiation (2 + 2 Gy from opposite sides of animals has been performed using a conventional X-ray tube. The described modification of whole body irradiation improves growth properties of human NSCLC xenografts in a nude rat model. The design of the whole body irradiation mediated immunosuppression described here for NSCLC xenografts may be useful for research applications involving other types of human tumours.

  19. Genomic selection for the improvement of antibody response to Newcastle disease and avian influenza virus in chickens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianfei Liu

    Full Text Available Newcastle disease (ND and avian influenza (AI are the most feared diseases in the poultry industry worldwide. They can cause flock mortality up to 100%, resulting in a catastrophic economic loss. This is the first study to investigate the feasibility of genomic selection for antibody response to Newcastle disease virus (Ab-NDV and antibody response to Avian Influenza virus (Ab-AIV in chickens. The data were collected from a crossbred population. Breeding values for Ab-NDV and Ab-AIV were estimated using a pedigree-based best linear unbiased prediction model (BLUP and a genomic best linear unbiased prediction model (GBLUP. Single-trait and multiple-trait analyses were implemented. According to the analysis using the pedigree-based model, the heritability for Ab-NDV estimated from the single-trait and multiple-trait models was 0.478 and 0.487, respectively. The heritability for Ab-AIV estimated from the two models was 0.301 and 0.291, respectively. The estimated genetic correlation between the two traits was 0.438. A four-fold cross-validation was used to assess the accuracy of the estimated breeding values (EBV in the two validation scenarios. In the family sample scenario each half-sib family is randomly allocated to one of four subsets and in the random sample scenario the individuals are randomly divided into four subsets. In the family sample scenario, compared with the pedigree-based model, the accuracy of the genomic prediction increased from 0.086 to 0.237 for Ab-NDV and from 0.080 to 0.347 for Ab-AIV. In the random sample scenario, the accuracy was improved from 0.389 to 0.427 for Ab-NDV and from 0.281 to 0.367 for Ab-AIV. The multiple-trait GBLUP model led to a slightly higher accuracy of genomic prediction for both traits. These results indicate that genomic selection for antibody response to ND and AI in chickens is promising.

  20. A Novel Phenolic Compound, Chloroxynil, Improves Agrobacterium-Mediated Transient Transformation in Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Mitsuhiro; Cutler, Sean; Isobe, Sachiko

    2015-01-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated transformation is a commonly used method for plant genetic engineering. However, the limitations of Agrobacterium host-plant interactions and the complexity of plant tissue culture often make the production of transgenic plants difficult. Transformation efficiency in many legume species, including soybean and the common bean, has been reported to be quite low. To improve the transformation procedure in legumes, we screened for chemicals that increase the transformation efficiency of Lotus japonicus, a model legume species. A Chemical library was screened and chemicals that increase in transient transformation efficiency of L. japonicus accession, Miyakojima MG-20 were identified. The transient transformation efficiency was quantified by reporter activity in which an intron-containing reporter gene produces the GUS protein only when the T-DNA is expressed in the plant nuclei. We identified a phenolic compound, chloroxynil, which increased the genetic transformation of L. japonicus by Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA105. Characterization of the mode of chloroxynil action indicated that it enhanced Agrobacterium-mediated transformation through the activation of the Agrobacterium vir gene expression, similar to acetosyringone, a phenolic compound known to improve Agrobacterium-mediated transformation efficiency. Transient transformation efficiency of L. japonicus with 5 μM chloroxynil was 60- and 6- fold higher than that of the control and acetosyringone treatment, respectively. In addition, transgenic L. japonicus lines were successfully generated by 5 μM chloroxynil treatment.Furthermore, we show that chloroxynil improves L. japonicus transformation by Agrobacterium strain GV3101 and rice transformation. Our results demonstrate that chloroxynil significantly improves Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation efficiency of various agriculturally important crops.

  1. EFFECT OF MAGNESIUM AS SUBSTITUTE MATERIAL IN ENZYME MEDIATED CALCITE PRECIPITATION (EMCP) FOR SOIL IMPROVEMENT TECHNIQUE

    OpenAIRE

    Heriansyah ePutra; Heriansyah ePutra; Hideaki eYasuhara; Naoki eKinoshita; Debendra eNeupane

    2016-01-01

    The optimization of enzyme-mediated calcite precipitation (EMCP) was evaluated as a soil improvement technique. In our previous works, purified urease was utilized to bio-catalyze the hydrolysis of urea, which causes the supplied Ca2+ to precipitate with CO32- as calcium carbonate. In the present work, magnesium chloride was newly added to the injecting solutions to delay the reaction rate and to enhance the amount of carbonate precipitation. Soil specimens were prepared in PVC cylinders and ...

  2. Antibody-mediated rejection after ABO-incompatible pediatric living donor liver transplantation for propionic acidemia: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Masaki; Sakamoto, Seisuke; Sakamoto, Rieko; Matsumoto, Shirou; Irie, Tomoaki; Uchida, Koushi; Shimata, Keita; Kawabata, Seiichi; Isono, Kaori; Hayashida, Shintaro; Yamamoto, Hidekazu; Endo, Fumio; Inomata, Yukihiro

    2016-09-01

    We herein present the case of a four-yr-old boy with PA who developed AMR after ABO-incompatible LDLT despite undergoing B cell desensitization using rituximab. Although the CD19+ lymphocyte count decreased to 0.1% nine days after the administration of rituximab, he developed a high fever which was accompanied by arthralgia due to a streptococcal infection 13 days after rituximab prophylaxis. After the clearance of the infection, he underwent ABO-incompatible LDLT 36 days after the administration of rituximab. The CD19+ lymphocyte count just prior to LDLT was 1.2%. He developed AMR five days after LDLT, and the antidonor-type IgM and IgG antibody titers increased to 1:1024 and 1:1024, respectively. He was treated by plasma exchange, IVIG, steroid pulse therapy, and rituximab re-administration; however, his liver dysfunction continued. Despite intensive treatment, he died due to complicated abdominal hernia, acute renal failure, and ARDS. This case suggests that a streptococcal infection may induce the activation of innate immune responses; thus, additional desensitization therapy should be considered prior to ABO-incompatible LDLT if B cell reactivation is suspected. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Osteopontin (OPN is an important protein to mediate improvements in the biocompatibility of C ion-implanted silicone rubber.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-liang Wang

    Full Text Available Medical device implants are drawing increasing amounts of interest from modern medical practitioners. However, this attention is not evenly spread across all such devices; most of these implantable devices can cause adverse reactions such as inflammation, fibrosis, thrombosis, and infection. In this work, the biocompatibility of silicone rubber (SR was improved through carbon (C ion implantation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, atomic force microscopy (AFM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and X-ray diffraction (XRD results confirmed that these newly generated carbon-implanted silicone rubbers (C-SRs had large, irregular peaks and deep valleys on their surfaces. The water contact angle of the SR surface decreased significantly after C ion implantation. C ion implantation also changed the surface charge distribution, silicone oxygen rate, and chemical-element distribution of SR to favor cell attachment. The dermal fibroblasts cultured on the surface C-SR grew faster and showed more typical fibroblastic shapes. The expression levels of major adhesion proteins, including talin-1, zyxin, and vinculin, were significantly higher in dermal fibroblasts cultured on C-SR coated plates than in dermal fibroblasts cultured on SR. Those same dermal fibroblasts on C-SRs showed more pronounced adhesion and migration abilities. Osteopontin (OPN, a critical extracellular matrix (ECM protein, was up-regulated and secreted from dermal fibroblasts cultured on C-SR. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 activity was also increased. These cells were highly mobile and were able to adhere to surfaces, but these abilities were inhibited by the monoclonal antibody against OPN, or by shRNA-mediated MMP-9 knockdown. Together, these results suggest that C ion implantation significantly improves SR biocompatibility, and that OPN is important to promote cell adhesion to the C-SR surface.

  4. Osteopontin (OPN) is an important protein to mediate improvements in the biocompatibility of C ion-implanted silicone rubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shao-liang; Shi, Xiao-hua; Yang, Zhi; Zhang, Yi-ming; Shen, Li-ru; Lei, Ze-yuan; Zhang, Zhi-Qing; Cao, Cong; Fan, Dong-li

    2014-01-01

    Medical device implants are drawing increasing amounts of interest from modern medical practitioners. However, this attention is not evenly spread across all such devices; most of these implantable devices can cause adverse reactions such as inflammation, fibrosis, thrombosis, and infection. In this work, the biocompatibility of silicone rubber (SR) was improved through carbon (C) ion implantation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results confirmed that these newly generated carbon-implanted silicone rubbers (C-SRs) had large, irregular peaks and deep valleys on their surfaces. The water contact angle of the SR surface decreased significantly after C ion implantation. C ion implantation also changed the surface charge distribution, silicone oxygen rate, and chemical-element distribution of SR to favor cell attachment. The dermal fibroblasts cultured on the surface C-SR grew faster and showed more typical fibroblastic shapes. The expression levels of major adhesion proteins, including talin-1, zyxin, and vinculin, were significantly higher in dermal fibroblasts cultured on C-SR coated plates than in dermal fibroblasts cultured on SR. Those same dermal fibroblasts on C-SRs showed more pronounced adhesion and migration abilities. Osteopontin (OPN), a critical extracellular matrix (ECM) protein, was up-regulated and secreted from dermal fibroblasts cultured on C-SR. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity was also increased. These cells were highly mobile and were able to adhere to surfaces, but these abilities were inhibited by the monoclonal antibody against OPN, or by shRNA-mediated MMP-9 knockdown. Together, these results suggest that C ion implantation significantly improves SR biocompatibility, and that OPN is important to promote cell adhesion to the C-SR surface.

  5. Agonistic monoclonal antibody against CD40 receptor decreases lymphocyte apoptosis and improves survival in sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwulst, Steven J; Grayson, Mitchell H; DiPasco, Peter J; Davis, Christopher G; Brahmbhatt, Tejal S; Ferguson, Thomas A; Hotchkiss, Richard S

    2006-07-01

    Sepsis causes a marked apoptosis-induced depletion of lymphocytes. The degree of lymphocyte apoptosis during sepsis strongly correlates with survival. CD40, a member of the TNFR family, is expressed on APCs and has potent antiapoptotic activity. In this study we determined whether an agonistic Ab against CD40 could protect lymphocytes from sepsis-induced apoptosis. Secondly, we examined potential antiapoptotic mechanisms of the putative protection. Lastly, we aimed to determine whether anti-CD40 treatment could improve survival in sepsis. CD1 mice were made septic by the cecal ligation and puncture method and treated postoperatively with anti-CD40 Ab. Treatment with anti-CD40 completely abrogated sepsis-induced splenic B cell death and, surprisingly, decreased splenic and thymic T cell death as well (p < 0.001). To investigate the mechanism of protection of anti-CD40 therapy on T cells, CD40 receptor expression was examined. As anticipated, the CD40 receptor was constitutively expressed on B cells, but, unexpectedly, splenic and thymic T cells were found to express CD40 receptor during sepsis. Furthermore, CD4+CD8- T cells were the predominant subtype of T cells expressing CD40 receptor during sepsis. Additionally, the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-x(L) was found to be markedly increased in splenic B and T cells as well as in thymic T cells after treatment with anti-CD40 Ab (p < 0.0025). Lastly, mice that were made septic in a double injury model of sepsis had improved survival after treatment with anti-CD40 as compared with controls (p = 0.05). In conclusion, anti-CD40 treatment increases Bcl-x(L), provides nearly complete protection against sepsis-induced lymphocyte apoptosis, and improves survival in sepsis.

  6. A multi-institutional evaluation of antibody-mediated rejection utilizing the Pediatric Heart Transplant Study database: Incidence, therapies and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrush, Philip T; Pahl, Elfriede; Naftel, David C; Pruitt, Elizabeth; Everitt, Melanie D; Missler, Heather; Zangwill, Steven; Burch, Michael; Hoffman, Timothy M; Butts, Ryan; Mahle, William T

    2016-12-01

    Current knowledge of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) after heart transplantation (HT) stems largely from adult data. Using the Pediatric Heart Transplant Study (PHTS) database, we report the incidence of AMR, describe treatment, and evaluate outcomes for treated AMR in children after HT. We queried the PHTS database for patients <18 years of age undergoing primary HT between January 2010 and December 2014. An AMR episode was defined as either a biopsy consistent with pathologic AMR or a rejection event based on immunotherapy augmentation directed against antibody production. Biopsy data, treatment strategies and survival were analyzed. An episode of AMR was identified in 179 of 1,596 (11%) HT recipients and in 246 of 705 (35%) rejection episodes. AMR was diagnosed by biopsy in 182 of 246 episodes and by immunotherapy in 64 of 179 episodes. Mixed rejection was identified in 179. Freedom from AMR was 88% and 82% at 1 and 3 years, respectively. AMR therapies included intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) (58%), plasmapheresis (40%), rituximab (40%), bortezomib (11%) and eculizumab (0.4%). The most commonly used combination therapies included IVIg/plasmapheresis/rituximab (13%). Thirty-three patients (16%) died after developing AMR. Patient and graft survival were lower for the AMR + group. One- and 3-year survival after initial AMR diagnosis was 88% and 77%, respectively. In his study we report the largest experience of AMR in pediatric HT recipients. AMR was common and often occurred concurrently with acute cellular rejection. There is wide variability in the treatment of AMR. Short-term patient and graft outcomes were worse for those with treated AMR. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Improvement in Diagnosis of Histoplasma Meningitis by Combined Testing for Histoplasma Antigen and Immunoglobulin G and Immunoglobulin M Anti-Histoplasma Antibody in Cerebrospinal Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Karen C; Myint, Thein; Raymond-Guillen, Luke; Hage, Chadi A; Davis, Thomas E; Wright, Patty W; Chow, Felicia C; Woc-Colburn, Laila; Khairy, Raed N; Street, Alan C; Yamamoto, Tomotaka; Albers, Amanda; Wheat, L Joseph

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background Central nervous system (CNS) histoplasmosis is a life-threatening condition and represents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Isolation of Histoplasma capsulatum from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or brain tissue is diagnostic; however, culture is insensitive and slow growth may result in significant treatment delay. We performed a retrospective multicenter study to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of a new anti-Histoplasma antibody enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for the detection of IgG and IgM antibody in the CSF for diagnosis of CNS histoplasmosis, the primary objective of the study. The secondary objective was to determine the effect of improvements in the Histoplasma galactomannan antigen detection EIA on the diagnosis of Histoplasma meningitis. Methods Residual CSF specimens from patients with Histoplasma meningitis and controls were tested for Histoplasma antigen and anti-Histoplasma immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibody using assays developed at MiraVista Diagnostics. Results A total of 50 cases and 157 controls were evaluated. Fifty percent of patients with CNS histoplasmosis were immunocompromised, 14% had other medical conditions, and 36% were healthy. Histoplasma antigen was detected in CSF in 78% of cases and the specificity was 97%. Anti-Histoplasma IgG or IgM antibody was detected in 82% of cases and the specificity was 93%. The sensitivity of detection of antibody by currently available serologic testing including immunodiffusion and complement fixation was 51% and the specificity was 96%. Testing for both CSF antigen and antibody by EIA was the most sensitive approach, detecting 98% of cases. Conclusions Testing CSF for anti-Histoplasma IgG and IgM antibody complements antigen detection and improves the sensitivity for diagnosis of Histoplasma meningitis. PMID:29020213

  8. Nanocrystal clusters in combination with spectral imaging to improve sensitivity in antibody labeling applications of fluorescent nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, John S.; Panza, Janice L.; Bootman, Matt

    2007-02-01

    Composition-tunable nanocrystals are fluorescent nanoparticles with a uniform particle size and with adjustable optical characteristics. When used for optical labeling of biomolecular targets these and other nanotechnology solutions have enabled new approaches which are possible because of the high optical output, narrow spectral signal, consistent quantum efficiency across a broad emission range and long lived fluorescent behavior of the nanocrystals. When coupled with spectral imaging the full potential of multiplexing multiple probes in a complex matrix can be realized. Spectral imaging can be used to improve sensitivity of narrowband fluorophores through application of chemometric image processing techniques used to reduce the influence of autofluorescence background. Composition-tunable nanocrystals can be complexed together to form nanoclusters which have the advantage of significantly stronger signal and therefore a higher sensitivity. These nanoclusters can be targeted in biomolecular systems using standard live-cell labeling and immunohistochemistry based techniques. Composition-tunable nanocrystals and nanoclusters have comparable mass and brightness across a wide emission range. This enables the production of nanocrystal-based probes that have comparable reactivity and sensitivity over a large color range. We present spectral imaging results of antibody targeted nanocrystal cluster labeling of target proteins in cultured cells and a Western blot experiment. The combination of spectral imaging with the use of clusters of nanocrystals further improves the sensitivity over either of the approaches independently.

  9. Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin-1-Mediated Toxicity Inhibited by Neutralizing Antibodies Late in the Course of Continual in Vivo and in Vitro Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Stich

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Toxic shock syndrome (TSS results from the host’s overwhelming inflammatory response and cytokine storm mainly due to superantigens (SAgs. There is no effective specific therapy. Application of immunoglobulins has been shown to improve the outcome of the disease and to neutralize SAgs both in vivo and in vitro. However, in most experiments that have been performed, antiserum was either pre-incubated with SAg, or both were applied simultaneously. To mirror more closely the clinical situation, we applied a multiple dose (over five days lethal challenge in a rabbit model. Treatment with toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1 neutralizing antibody was fully protective, even when administered late in the course of the challenge. Kinetic studies on the effect of superantigen toxins are scarce. We performed in vitro kinetic studies by neutralizing the toxin with antibodies at well-defined time points. T-cell activation was determined by assessing T-cell proliferation (3H-thymidine incorporation, determination of IL-2 release in the cell supernatant (ELISA, and IL-2 gene activation (real-time PCR (RT-PCR. Here we show that T-cell activation occurs continuously. The application of TSST-1 neutralizing antiserum reduced IL-2 and TNFα release into the cell supernatant, even if added at later time points. Interference with the prolonged stimulation of proinflammatory cytokines is likely to be in vivo relevant, as postexposure treatment protected rabbits against the multiple dose lethal SAg challenge. Our results shed new light on the treatment of TSS by specific antibodies even at late stages of exposure.

  10. Adjuvant treatment with dexamethasone plus anti-C5 antibodies improves outcome of experimental pneumococcal meningitis: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasanmoentalib, E. Soemirien; Valls Seron, Mercedes; Morgan, B. Paul; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2015-01-01

    We compared adjunctive treatment with placebo, dexamethasone, anti-C5 antibodies, and the combination of dexamethasone plus anti-C5 antibodies in experimental pneumococcal meningitis. In this prospective, investigator-blinded, randomized trial, 96 mice were infected intracisternally with 10(7)

  11. Sclerostin antibody treatment improves the bone phenotype of Crtap−/− mice, a model of recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafe, Ingo; Alexander, Stefanie; Yang, Tao; Lietman, Caressa; Homan, Erica P; Munivez, Elda; Chen, Yuqing; Jiang, Ming Ming; Bertin, Terry; Dawson, Brian; Asuncion, Franklin; Ke, Hua Zhu; Ominsky, Michael S; Lee, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) is characterized by low bone mass, poor bone quality and fractures. Standard treatment for OI patients is limited to bisphosphonates, which only incompletely correct the bone phenotype, and seem to be less effective in adults. Sclerostin neutralizing antibodies (Scl-Ab) have been shown to be beneficial in animal models of osteoporosis, and dominant OI resulting from mutations in the genes encoding type I collagen. However, Scl-Ab treatment has not been studied in models of recessive OI. Cartilage associated protein (CRTAP) is involved in posttranslational type I collagen modification, and its loss of function results in recessive OI. In this study, we treated 1 and 6 week old Crtap−/− mice with Scl-Ab for 6 weeks (25 mg/kg, s.c., twice per week), to determine the effects on the bone phenotype in models of “pediatric” and “young adult” recessive OI. Vehicle treated Crtap−/− and wildtype (WT) mice served as controls. Compared with control Crtap−/− mice, microCT analyses showed significant increases in bone volume and improved trabecular microarchitecture in Scl-Ab treated Crtap−/− mice in both age cohorts, in both vertebrae and femurs. Additionally, Scl-Ab improved femoral cortical parameters in both age cohorts. Biomechanical testing showed that Scl-Ab improved parameters of whole bone strength in Crtap−/− mice, with more robust effects in the week 6–12 cohort, but did not affect the increased bone brittleness. Additionally, Scl-Ab normalized the increased osteoclast numbers, stimulated bone formation rate (week 6–12 cohort only), but did not affect osteocyte density. Overall, our findings suggest that Scl-Ab treatment may be beneficial in the treatment of recessive OI caused by defects in collagen post-translational modification. PMID:26716893

  12. Indigenous opportunistic bacteria inhabit mammalian gut-associated lymphoid tissues and share a mucosal antibody-mediated symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obata, Takashi; Goto, Yoshiyuki; Kunisawa, Jun; Sato, Shintaro; Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Setoyama, Hiromi; Matsuki, Takahiro; Nonaka, Kazuhiko; Shibata, Naoko; Gohda, Masashi; Kagiyama, Yuki; Nochi, Tomonori; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Fukuyama, Yoshiko; Mukai, Akira; Shinzaki, Shinichiro; Fujihashi, Kohtaro; Sasakawa, Chihiro; Iijima, Hideki; Goto, Masatoshi; Umesaki, Yoshinori; Benno, Yoshimi; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2010-04-20

    The indigenous bacteria create natural cohabitation niches together with mucosal Abs in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Here we report that opportunistic bacteria, largely Alcaligenes species, specifically inhabit host Peyer's patches (PPs) and isolated lymphoid follicles, with the associated preferential induction of antigen-specific mucosal IgA Abs in the GI tract. Alcaligenes were identified as the dominant bacteria on the interior of PPs from naïve, specific-pathogen-free but not from germ-free mice. Oral transfer of intratissue uncultured Alcaligenes into germ-free mice resulted in the presence of Alcaligenes inside the PPs of recipients. This result was further supported by the induction of antigen-specific Ab-producing cells in the mucosal (e.g., PPs) but not systemic compartment (e.g., spleen). The preferential presence of Alcaligenes inside PPs and the associated induction of intestinal secretory IgA Abs were also observed in both monkeys and humans. Localized mucosal Ab-mediated symbiotic immune responses were supported by Alcaligenes-stimulated CD11c(+) dendritic cells (DCs) producing the Ab-enhancing cytokines TGF-beta, B-cell-activating factor belonging to the TNF family, and IL-6 in PPs. These CD11c(+) DCs did not migrate beyond the draining mesenteric lymph nodes. In the absence of antigen-specific mucosal Abs, the presence of Alcaligenes in PPs was greatly diminished. Thus, indigenous opportunistic bacteria uniquely inhabit PPs, leading to PP-DCs-initiated, local antigen-specific Ab production; this may involve the creation of an optimal symbiotic environment on the interior of the PPs.

  13. Acute Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Presence of MICA-DSA and Successful Renal Re-Transplant with Negative-MICA Virtual Crossmatch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingzi Ming

    Full Text Available The presence of donor-specific alloantibodies (DSAs against the MICA antigen results in high risk for antibody-mediated rejection (AMR of a transplanted kidney, especially in patients receiving a re-transplant. We describe the incidence of acute C4d+ AMR in a patient who had received a first kidney transplant with a zero HLA antigen mismatch. Retrospective analysis of post-transplant T and B cell crossmatches were negative, but a high level of MICA alloantibody was detected in sera collected both before and after transplant. The DSA against the first allograft mismatched MICA*018 was in the recipient. Flow cytometry and cytotoxicity tests with five samples of freshly isolated human umbilical vein endothelial cells demonstrated the alloantibody nature of patient's MICA-DSA. Prior to the second transplant, a MICA virtual crossmatch and T and B cell crossmatches were used to identify a suitable donor. The patient received a second kidney transplant, and allograft was functioning well at one-year follow-up. Our study indicates that MICA virtual crossmatch is important in selection of a kidney donor if the recipient has been sensitized with MICA antigens.

  14. Functional analysis of bispecific antibody (EpCAMxCD3)-mediated T-lymphocyte and cancer cell interaction by single-cell force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Sabrina C; Wabnitz, Guido H; Samstag, Yvonne; Moldenhauer, Gerhard; Ludwig, Thomas

    2011-05-01

    The atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful tool to analyze forces generated on cellular interactions on the single-cell level. This highly sensitive device can record changes in force in the pico-Newton range, which equals single molecule bonds. Here, we have used single-cell force spectroscopy by AFM to investigate the interaction between T cells and tumor cells that is induced by the bispecific antibody HEA125xOKT3 (specificity anti-EpCAMxCD3). We show that HEA125xOKT3 induces a specific increase in adhesion force between T cells and cancer cells. The adhesive force that is generated on cell-cell contact is dependent on the applied force on initial contact and the duration of this initial contact. In summary, HEA125xOKT3 has been found to mediate contact formation by distinct processes. It induces direct cell-cell interaction, which results in the activation of T-cell signaling, facilitates the formation of supramolecular activation clusters and ultimately of an immune synapse. Copyright © 2010 UICC.

  15. Transglutaminase-catalyzed covalent multimerization of Camelidae anti-human TNF single domain antibodies improves neutralizing activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plagmann, Ingo; Chalaris, Athena; Kruglov, Andrei A; Nedospasov, Sergei; Rosenstiel, Philip; Rose-John, Stefan; Scheller, Jürgen

    2009-06-15

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) plays an important role in chronic inflammatory disorders, such as Rheumatoid Arthritis and Crohn's disease. Recently, monoclonal Camelidae variable heavy-chain domain-only antibodies (V(H)H) were developed to antagonize the action of human TNF (hTNF). Here, we show that hTNF-V(H)H does not interfere with hTNF trimerization, but competes with hTNF for hTNF-receptor binding. Moreover, we describe posttranslational dimerization and multimerization of hTNF-V(H)H molecules in vitro catalyzed by microbial transglutaminases (MTG). The ribonuclease S-tag-peptide was shown to act as a peptidyl substrate in covalent protein cross-linking reactions catalyzed by MTG from Streptomyces mobaraensis. The S-tag sequence was C-terminally fused to the hTNF-V(H)H and the fusion protein was expressed and purified from Escherichia coli culture supernatants. hTNF-V(H)H-S-tag fusion proteins were efficiently dimerized and multimerized by MTG whereas hTNF-V(H)H was not susceptible to protein cross-linking. Cell cytotoxicity assays, using hTNF as apoptosis inducing cytokine, revealed that dimerized and multimerized hTNF-V(H)H proteins were much more active than the monomeric hTNF-V(H)H. We hypothesize that improved inhibition by dimeric and multimeric single chain hTNF-V(H)H proteins is caused by avidity effects.

  16. Immune modulation with a staphylococcal preparation in fibromyalgia/chronic fatigue syndrome: relation between antibody levels and clinical improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachrisson, O; Colque-Navarro, P; Gottfries, C G; Regland, B; Möllby, R

    2004-02-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the serological response to treatment with staphylococcal vaccine in fibromyalgia/chronic fatigue syndrome patients and to explore the relationship between serological response and clinical effect. Twenty-eight patients, half of whom served as controls, were recruited from a 6-month randomised trial in which repeated administration of the staphylococcal toxoid vaccine Staphypan Berna (Berna Biotech, Switzerland) was tested against placebo. Antibody status against extracellular toxins/enzymes, cell-wall components, and enterotoxins was evaluated at baseline and at endpoint. The clinical response to treatment was recorded in rating scales. In the group receiving active treatment, significant serological changes were recorded, whereas no significant changes were found in controls. Treatment led to a significantly increased capacity of serum to neutralise alpha-toxin and a significant increase in serum IgG to alpha-toxin and lipase. Furthermore, the increase in these parameters combined paralleled the improvement in clinical outcome. Thus, the greater the serological response, the greater was the clinical effect. In conclusion, this explorative study has shown that repeated administration of the Staphypan Berna vaccine in patients with fibromyalgia/chronic fatigue syndrome causes a serological response to several staphylococcal antigens, particularly to certain extracellular toxins and enzymes. The results further show that this response is related to the clinical outcome of treatment.

  17. Combination of Weight-Bearing Training and Anti-MSTN Polyclonal Antibody Improve Bone Quality In Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Liang; Gao, Xiaohang; Yang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Didi; Zhang, Xiaojun; Du, Haiping; Han, Yanqi; Sun, Lijun

    2016-12-01

    Weight-bearing exercise is beneficial to bone health. Myostatin (MSTN) deficiency has a positive effect on bone formation. We wondered if a combination of weight-bearing training and polyclonal antibody for MSTN (MsAb) would augment bone formation to a greater degree than single treatment. In this study, rats were randomly assigned to four groups: Control, weight-bearing training (WT), MsAb, and WT+MsAb. The trained rats ran at 15 m/min bearing with 35% of their body weight, 40 min/day (2 min of running followed by 2 min of rest), 6 days/week, for 8 weeks. The rats with MsAb were injected once a week with MsAb for 8 weeks. MicroCT analysis showed that compared with the MsAb group, WT+MsAb significantly enhanced cortical bone mineral density (BMD) (p .05), weight-bearing training significantly increased energy absorption (p weight-bearing training and MsAb have a greater positive effect on bone than treatment with either MsAb or weight-bearing training alone, suggesting that resistance training in combination with MSTN antagonists could be an effective approach for improving bone health and reducing osteoporosis risk.

  18. Alkylation of histidine residues of Bothrops jararacussu venom proteins and isolated phospholipases A2: a biotechnological tool to improve the production of antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, C L S; Andrião-Escarso, S H; Moreira-Dill, L S; Carvalho, B M A; Marchi-Salvador, D P; Santos-Filho, N A; Fernandes, C A H; Fontes, M R M; Giglio, J R; Barraviera, B; Zuliani, J P; Fernandes, C F C; Calderón, L A; Stábeli, R G; Albericio, F; da Silva, S L; Soares, A M

    2014-01-01

    Crude venom of Bothrops jararacussu and isolated phospholipases A2 (PLA2) of this toxin (BthTX-I and BthTX-II) were chemically modified (alkylation) by p-bromophenacyl bromide (BPB) in order to study antibody production capacity in function of the structure-function relationship of these substances (crude venom and PLA2 native and alkylated). BthTX-II showed enzymatic activity, while BthTX-I did not. Alkylation reduced BthTX-II activity by 50% while this process abolished the catalytic and myotoxic activities of BthTX-I, while reducing its edema-inducing activity by about 50%. Antibody production against the native and alkylated forms of BthTX-I and -II and the cross-reactivity of antibodies to native and alkylated toxins did not show any apparent differences and these observations were reinforced by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) data. Histopathological analysis of mouse gastrocnemius muscle sections after injection of PBS, BthTX-I, BthTX-II, or both myotoxins previously incubated with neutralizing antibody showed inhibition of the toxin-induced myotoxicity. These results reveal that the chemical modification of the phospholipases A2 (PLA2) diminished their toxicity but did not alter their antigenicity. This observation indicates that the modified PLA2 may provide a biotechnological tool to attenuate the toxicity of the crude venom, by improving the production of antibodies and decreasing the local toxic effects of this poisonous substance in animals used to produce antivenom.

  19. Alkylation of Histidine Residues of Bothrops jararacussu Venom Proteins and Isolated Phospholipases A2: A Biotechnological Tool to Improve the Production of Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. S. Guimarães

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Crude venom of Bothrops jararacussu and isolated phospholipases A2 (PLA2 of this toxin (BthTX-I and BthTX-II were chemically modified (alkylation by p-bromophenacyl bromide (BPB in order to study antibody production capacity in function of the structure-function relationship of these substances (crude venom and PLA2 native and alkylated. BthTX-II showed enzymatic activity, while BthTX-I did not. Alkylation reduced BthTX-II activity by 50% while this process abolished the catalytic and myotoxic activities of BthTX-I, while reducing its edema-inducing activity by about 50%. Antibody production against the native and alkylated forms of BthTX-I and -II and the cross-reactivity of antibodies to native and alkylated toxins did not show any apparent differences and these observations were reinforced by surface plasmon resonance (SPR data. Histopathological analysis of mouse gastrocnemius muscle sections after injection of PBS, BthTX-I, BthTX-II, or both myotoxins previously incubated with neutralizing antibody showed inhibition of the toxin-induced myotoxicity. These results reveal that the chemical modification of the phospholipases A2 (PLA2 diminished their toxicity but did not alter their antigenicity. This observation indicates that the modified PLA2 may provide a biotechnological tool to attenuate the toxicity of the crude venom, by improving the production of antibodies and decreasing the local toxic effects of this poisonous substance in animals used to produce antivenom.

  20. The monoclonal antibody Zt/f2 targeting RON receptor tyrosine kinase as potential therapeutics against tumor growth-mediated by colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Rui-Wen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overexpression of the RON receptor tyrosine kinase contributes to epithelial cell transformation, malignant progression, and acquired drug resistance. RON also has been considered as a potential target for therapeutic intervention. This study determines biochemical features and inhibitory activity of a mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb Zt/f2 in experimental cancer therapy. Results Zt/f2 is a mouse IgG2a mAb that is highly specific and sensitive to human RON and its oncogenic variants such as RON160 (ED50 = 2.3 nmol/L. Receptor binding studies revealed that Zt/f2 interacts with an epitope(s located in a 49 amino acid sequence coded by exon 11 in the RON β-chain extracellular sequences. This sequence is critical in regulating RON maturation and phosphorylation. Zt/f2 did not compete with ligand macrophage-stimulating protein for binding to RON; however, its engagement effectively induced RON internalization, which diminishes RON expression and impairs downstream signaling activation. These biochemical features provide the cellular basis for the use of Zt/f2 to inhibit tumor growth in animal model. Repeated administration of Zt/f2 as a single agent into Balb/c mice results in partial inhibition of tumor growth caused by transformed NIH-3T3 cells expressing oncogenic RON160. Colon cancer HT-29 cell-mediated tumor growth in athymic nude mice also was attenuated following Zt/f2 treatment. In both cases, ~50% inhibition of tumor growth as measured by tumor volume was achieved. Moreover, Zt/f2 in combination with 5-fluorouracil showed an enhanced inhibition effect of ~80% on HT-29 cell-mediated tumor growth in vivo. Conclusions Zt/f2 is a potential therapeutic mAb capable of inhibiting RON-mediated oncogenesis by colon cancer cells in animal models. The inhibitory effect of Zt/f2 in vivo in combination with chemoagent 5-fluorouracil could represent a novel strategy for future colon cancer therapy.

  1. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisma, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    The usefulness of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for imaging and treatment of human (ovarian) cancer was investigated. A review of tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies is presented. Special attention is given to factors that influence the localization of the antibodies in tumors, isotope choice and methods of radiolabeling of the monoclonal antibodies. Two monoclonal antibodies, OC125 and OV-TL3, with high specificity for human epithelial ovarian cancer are characterized. A simple radio-iodination technique was developed for clinical application of the monoclonal antibodies. The behavior of monoclonal antibodies in human tumor xenograft systems and in man are described. Imaging of tumors is complicated because of high background levels of radioactivity in other sites than the tumor, especially in the bloodpool. A technique was developed to improve imaging of human tumor xenographs in nude mice, using subtraction of a specific and a non-specific antibody, radiolabeled with 111 In, 67 Ga and 131 I. To investigate the capability of the two monoclonal antibodies, to specifically localize in human ovarian carcinomas, distribution studies in mice bearing human ovarian carcinoma xenografts were performed. One of the antibodies, OC125, was used for distribution studies in ovarian cancer patients. OC125 was used because of availability and approval to use this antibody in patients. The same antibody was used to investigate the usefulness of radioimmunoimaging in ovarian cancer patients. The interaction of injected radiolabeled antibody OC125 with circulating antigen and an assay to measure the antibody response in ovarian cancer patients after injection of the antibody is described. 265 refs.; 30 figs.; 19 tabs

  2. An improved Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of recalcitrant indica rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shri, Manju; Rai, Arti; Verma, Pankaj Kumar; Misra, Prashant; Dubey, Sonali; Kumar, Smita; Verma, Sikha; Gautam, Neelam; Tripathi, Rudra Deo; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Chakrabarty, Debasis

    2013-04-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of indica rice varieties has been quite difficult as these are recalcitrant to in vitro responses. In the present study, we established a high-efficiency Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation system of rice (Oryza sativa L. ssp. indica) cv. IR-64, Lalat, and IET-4786. Agrobacterium strain EHA-101 harboring binary vector pIG121-Hm, containing a gene encoding for β-glucuronidase (GUS) and hygromycin resistance, was used in the transformation experiments. Manipulation of different concentrations of acetosyringone, days of co-culture period, bacterial suspension of different optical densities (ODs), and the concentrations of L-cysteine in liquid followed by solid co-culture medium was done for establishing the protocol. Among the different co-culture periods, 5 days of co-culture with bacterial cells (OD600 nm = 0.5-0.8) promoted the highest frequency of transformation (83.04 %) in medium containing L-cysteine (400 mg l(-1)). Putative transformed plants were analyzed for the presence of a transgene through genomic PCR and GUS histochemical analyses. Our results also suggest that different cultural conditions and the addition of L-cysteine in the co-culture medium improve the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation frequencies from an average of 12.82 % to 33.33 % in different indica rice cultivars.

  3. CEA/CD3-bispecific T cell-engaging (BiTE) antibody-mediated T lymphocyte cytotoxicity maximized by inhibition of both PD1 and PD-L1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Takuya; Patel, Sandip P; Hammond, Scott A; Osada, Koya; Morse, Michael A; Lyerly, H Kim

    2015-06-01

    Bispecific T cell-engaging (BiTE) antibodies recruit polyclonal cytotoxic T cells (CTL) to tumors. One such antibody is carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) BiTE that mediates T cell/tumor interaction by simultaneously binding CD3 expressed by T cells and CEA expressed by tumor cells. A widely operative mechanism for mitigating cytotoxic T cell-mediated killing is the interaction of tumor-expressed PD-L1 with T cell-expressed PD-1, which may be partly reversed by PD-1/PD-L1 blockade. We hypothesized that PD-1/PD-L1 blockade during BiTE-mediated T cell killing would enhance CTL function. Here, we determined the effects of PD-1 and PD-L1 blockade during initial T cell-mediated killing of CEA-expressing human tumor cell lines in vitro, as well as subsequent T cell-mediated killing by T lymphocytes that had participated in tumor cell killing. We observed a rapid upregulation of PD-1 expression and diminished cytolytic function of T cells after they had engaged in CEA BiTE-mediated killing of tumors. T cell cytolytic activity in vitro could be maximized by administration of anti-PD-1 or anti-PD-L1 antibodies alone or in combination if applied prior to a round of T cell killing, but T cell inhibition could not be fully reversed by this blockade once the T cells had killed tumor. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that dual blockade of PD-1 and PD-L1 maximizes T cell killing of tumor directed by CEA BiTE in vitro, is more effective if applied early, and provides a rationale for clinical use.

  4. Synthesis and antibody conjugation of magnetic nanoparticles with improved specific power absorption rates for alternating magnetic field cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruettner, Cordula; Mueller, Knut; Teller, Joachim; Westphal, Fritz; Foreman, Allan; Ivkov, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Bionized nanoferrite (BNF) particles with high specific power absorption rates were synthesized in the size range of 20-100 nm by high-pressure homogenization for targeted cancer therapy with alternating magnetic fields. Several strategies were used to conjugate antibodies to the BNF particles. These strategies were compared using an immunoassay to find optimal conditions to reach a high immunoreactivity of the final antibody-particle conjugate

  5. Exogenous DNA internalisation by sperm cells is improved by combining lipofection and restriction enzyme mediated integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchil, R R; Gupta, J; Singh, A; Sharma, D

    2011-06-01

    1. Three types of exogenous DNA inserts, i.e. complete linearised pVIVO2-GFP/LacZ vector (9620 bp), the LacZ gene (5317 bp) and the GFP gene (2152 bp) were used to transfect chicken spermatozoa through simple incubation of sperm cells with insert. 2. PCR assay, Dot Blot hybridisation and Southern hybridisation showed the successful internalisation of exogenous DNA by chicken sperm cells. 3. Lipofection and Restriction Enzyme Mediated Integration (REMI) were used to improve the rate of internalisation of exogenous DNA by sperm cells. 4. Results from dot blot as well as Southern hybridisation were semi-quantified and improved exogenous DNA uptake by sperm cells through lipofection and REMI. Stronger signals were observed from hybridisation of LacZ as well as GFP specific probe with the DNA from lipofected exogenous DNA transfected sperm DNA in comparison with those transfected with nude exogenous DNA.

  6. Physical activity mediates the relationship between program participation and improved mental health in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becofsky, K; Baruth, M; Wilcox, S

    2016-03-01

    There is an implicit assumption that increased physical activity (PA) levels are responsible for the mental health benefits resulting from participation in PA programs. Other factors associated with participation may in fact be responsible. The purpose of this study was to examine whether changes in PA mediated the effects of two PA programs (Active Choices [AC] and Active Living Every Day [ALED]) on mental health outcomes. Secondary data analyses of quasi-experimental study. A sub-sample of older adults who participated in AC (n = 744) and ALED (n = 853) were included in the current analyses. MacKinnon's product of coefficients was used to test change in PA as a mediator of the relationship between program dose and change in mental health outcomes (depressive symptoms, stress, and number of days with poor mental health). Change in PA explained 19% (AC) and 13% (ALED) of the absolute effects of program dose on depressive symptoms, 18% (AC) and 14% (ALED) of the effects on stress, and 37% (ALED) of the effects on days with poor mental health. Mounting evidence from both epidemiological studies and controlled trials suggests that PA can improve mental health. This study adds that increasing PA levels may improve mental health in older adults in 'real-world' settings. Copyright © 2015 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Establishment of calculated panel reactive antibody and its potential benefits in improving the kidney allocation strategy in Taiwan

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    Ssu-Wen Shen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Purpose: Renal transplant candidates who are highly sensitized to human leukocyte antigens (HLAs tend to wait longer to find a matched donor and have poor outcomes. Most organ-sharing programs prioritize highly sensitized patients in the allocation scoring system. The HLA sensitization status is traditionally evaluated by the panel-reactive antibody (PRA assay. However, this assay is method dependent and does not consider the ethnic differences in HLA frequencies. A calculated PRA (cPRA, based on a population's HLA frequency and patients' unacceptable antigens (UAs, correctly estimates the percentage of donors suitable for candidates. The Taiwan Organ Registry and Sharing Center does not prioritize sensitized patients. We propose that the incorporation of the cPRA and UAs into the renal allocation program will improve the local kidney allocation policy. Methods: We established a cPRA calculator using 6146 Taiwanese HLA-A, -B, -C, -DR, and -DQ phenotypes. We performed simulated allocation based on the concept of acceptable mismatch for 76 candidates with cPRA values exceeding 80%. Results: We analyzed 138 waitlisted renal transplant candidates at our hospital, and we determined that the concordance rate of the cPRA and PRA for highly sensitized (%PRA > 80% candidates was 92.5%, which decreased to 20% for those with %PRA < 80%. We matched 76 highly sensitized patients based on acceptable mismatch with the HLA phenotypes of 93 cadaver donors. Forty-six patients (61% found at least one suitable donor. Conclusion: The application of the cPRA and acceptable mismatch can benefit highly sensitized patients and reduce positive lymphocyte cytotoxicity crossmatch. Keywords: Kidney transplantation, Human leukocyte antigen, CPRA

  8. Epitope mapping of the carcinoembryonic antigen by monoclonal antibodies and establishment of a new improved radioimmunoassay system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroki, Masahide; Arakawa, Fumiko; Matsunaga, Akira; Okamoto, Naomi; Takakura, Kyoko; Matsuoka, Yuji; Higuchi, Hiroshi.

    1987-01-01

    A comprehensive mapping of epitopes on the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) molecule has been achieved by analyses of the specificities of 146 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) from more than 300 hybridomas established recently. The reactivities of MAbs were analyzed by radio-immunoassays (RIA) with highly purified preparations of CEA and related antigens including normal fecal antigen-1 (NFA-1), NFA-2 in normal adult feces, nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (NCA) in lung and NCA-2 in meconium. The MAbs could be divided into five groups: group I, 23 clones directed to the NCA-common part of the CEA molecule; group II, 31 clones directed to the normal fecal cross-reacting antigen (NFCA)-common part; group III, 46 clones directed to the NFA-1-common part; group IV, 33 clones reactive with the heterogeneous carbohydrate part; and group V, 13 clones directed to the CEA-distinctive part which seemed to be highly specific for CEA. Mutual inhibitions of CEA binding between MAbs of the individual groups revealed that at least 25 different subgroups can be defined i.e., 4, 7, 8, 4, and 2 subgroups in groups I to V, respectively. The epitopes recognized by the group IV MAbs were found to be sensitive to oxidation with periodate, while the epitopes defined by MAbs of the other groups were resistant to this treatment. A solid-phase sandwich-type RIA system for CEA was established by using 2 MAbs from groups II and III as the CEA catcher and an MAb of group V as the tracer. This assay was shown to exhibit improved cancer-specificity and accuracy in the estimation of serum CEA levels. (author)

  9. Radiolabeled anti-EGFR-antibody improves local tumor control after external beam radiotherapy and offers theragnostic potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koi, Lydia; Bergmann, Ralf; Brüchner, Kerstin; Pietzsch, Jens; Pietzsch, Hans-Jürgen; Krause, Mechthild

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The effect of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using the therapeutic radionuclide Y-90 bound to the anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab combined with external beam irradiation (EBRT) (EBRIT) on permanent local tumor control in vivo was examined. Methods: Growth delay was evaluated in three human squamous cell carcinoma models after RIT with [ 90 Y]Y-(CHX-A′′-DTPA) 4 -cetuximab (Y-90-cetuximab). The EBRT dose required to cure 50% of the tumors (TCD 50 ) for EBRT alone or EBRIT was evaluated in one RIT-responder (FaDu) and one RIT-non-responder (UT-SCC-5). EGFR expression and microenvironmental parameters were evaluated in untreated tumors, bioavailability was visualized by PET using ([ 86 Y]Y-(CHX-A′′-DTPA) 4 -cetuximab (Y-86-cetuximab) and biodistribution using Y-90-cetuximab. Results: In UT-SCC-8 and FaDu but not in UT-SCC-5 radiolabeled cetuximab led to significant tumor growth delay. TCD 50 after EBRT was significantly decreased by EGFR-targeted RIT in FaDu but not in UT-SCC-5. In contrast to EGFR expression, parameters of the tumor micromilieu and in particular the Y-90-cetuximab biodistribution or Y-86-cetuximab visualization in PET correlated with the responsiveness to RIT or EBRIT. Conclusion: EGFR-targeted EBRIT can improve permanent local tumor control compared to EBRT alone. PET imaging of bioavailability of labeled cetuximab appears to be a suitable predictor for response to EBRIT. This theragnostic approach should be further explored for clinical translation

  10. Monoclonal Antibodies, Derived from Humans Vaccinated with the RV144 HIV Vaccine Containing the HVEM Binding Domain of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Glycoprotein D, Neutralize HSV Infection, Mediate Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity, and Protect Mice from Ocular Challenge with HSV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kening; Tomaras, Georgia D; Jegaskanda, Sinthujan; Moody, M Anthony; Liao, Hua-Xin; Goodman, Kyle N; Berman, Phillip W; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Nitayapan, Sorachai; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Haynes, Barton F; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2017-10-01

    The RV144 HIV vaccine trial included a recombinant HIV glycoprotein 120 (gp120) construct fused to a small portion of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein D (gD) so that the first 40 amino acids of gp120 were replaced by the signal sequence and the first 27 amino acids of the mature form of gD. This region of gD contains most of the binding site for HVEM, an HSV receptor important for virus infection of epithelial cells and lymphocytes. RV144 induced antibodies to HIV that were partially protective against infection, as well as antibodies to HSV. We derived monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) from peripheral blood B cells of recipients of the RV144 HIV vaccine and showed that these antibodies neutralized HSV-1 infection in cells expressing HVEM, but not the other major virus receptor, nectin-1. The MAbs mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), and mice that received the MAbs and were then challenged by corneal inoculation with HSV-1 had reduced eye disease, shedding, and latent infection. To our knowledge, this is the first description of MAbs derived from human recipients of a vaccine that specifically target the HVEM binding site of gD. In summary, we found that monoclonal antibodies derived from humans vaccinated with the HVEM binding domain of HSV-1 gD (i) neutralized HSV-1 infection in a cell receptor-specific manner, (ii) mediated ADCC, and (iii) reduced ocular disease in virus-infected mice. IMPORTANCE Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) causes cold sores and neonatal herpes and is a leading cause of blindness. Despite many trials, no HSV vaccine has been approved. Nectin-1 and HVEM are the two major cellular receptors for HSV. These receptors are expressed at different levels in various tissues, and the role of each receptor in HSV pathogenesis is not well understood. We derived human monoclonal antibodies from persons who received the HIV RV144 vaccine that contained the HVEM binding domain of HSV-1 gD fused to HIV gp120. These antibodies were

  11. Precise Genome Modification via Sequence-Specific Nucleases-Mediated Gene Targeting for Crop Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongwei; Li, Jingying; Xia, Lanqin

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing technologies enable precise modifications of DNA sequences in vivo and offer a great promise for harnessing plant genes in crop improvement. The precise manipulation of plant genomes relies on the induction of DNA double-strand breaks by sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) to initiate DNA repair reactions that are based on either non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homology-directed repair (HDR). While complete knock-outs and loss-of-function mutations generated by NHEJ are very valuable in defining gene functions, their applications in crop improvement are somewhat limited because many agriculturally important traits are conferred by random point mutations or indels at specific loci in either the genes' encoding or promoter regions. Therefore, genome modification through SSNs-mediated HDR for gene targeting (GT) that enables either gene replacement or knock-in will provide an unprecedented ability to facilitate plant breeding by allowing introduction of precise point mutations and new gene functions, or integration of foreign genes at specific and desired "safe" harbor in a predefined manner. The emergence of three programmable SSNs, such as zinc finger nucleases, transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases, and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) systems has revolutionized genome modification in plants in a more controlled manner. However, while targeted mutagenesis is becoming routine in plants, the potential of GT technology has not been well realized for traits improvement in crops, mainly due to the fact that NHEJ predominates DNA repair process in somatic cells and competes with the HDR pathway, and thus HDR-mediated GT is a relative rare event in plants. Here, we review recent research findings mainly focusing on development and applications of precise GT in plants using three SSNs systems described above, and the potential mechanisms underlying HDR events in plant

  12. Precise Genome Modification via Sequence-Specific Nucleases-Mediated Gene Targeting for Crop Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongwei; Li, Jingying; Xia, Lanqin

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing technologies enable precise modifications of DNA sequences in vivo and offer a great promise for harnessing plant genes in crop improvement. The precise manipulation of plant genomes relies on the induction of DNA double-strand breaks by sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) to initiate DNA repair reactions that are based on either non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homology-directed repair (HDR). While complete knock-outs and loss-of-function mutations generated by NHEJ are very valuable in defining gene functions, their applications in crop improvement are somewhat limited because many agriculturally important traits are conferred by random point mutations or indels at specific loci in either the genes’ encoding or promoter regions. Therefore, genome modification through SSNs-mediated HDR for gene targeting (GT) that enables either gene replacement or knock-in will provide an unprecedented ability to facilitate plant breeding by allowing introduction of precise point mutations and new gene functions, or integration of foreign genes at specific and desired “safe” harbor in a predefined manner. The emergence of three programmable SSNs, such as zinc finger nucleases, transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases, and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) systems has revolutionized genome modification in plants in a more controlled manner. However, while targeted mutagenesis is becoming routine in plants, the potential of GT technology has not been well realized for traits improvement in crops, mainly due to the fact that NHEJ predominates DNA repair process in somatic cells and competes with the HDR pathway, and thus HDR-mediated GT is a relative rare event in plants. Here, we review recent research findings mainly focusing on development and applications of precise GT in plants using three SSNs systems described above, and the potential mechanisms underlying HDR events in

  13. Precise genome modification via sequence-specific nucleases-mediated gene targeting for crop improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongwei Sun

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Genome editing technologies enable precise modifications of DNA sequences in vivo and offer a great promise for harnessing plant genes in crop improvement. The precise manipulation of plant genomes relies on the induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs by sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs to initiate DNA repair reactions that are based on either non-homologous end joining (NHEJ or homology-directed repair (HDR. While complete knock-outs and loss-of-function mutations generated by NHEJ are very valuable in defining gene functions, their applications in crop improvement are somewhat limited because many agriculturally important traits are conferred by random point mutations or indels at specific loci in either the genes’ encoding or promoter regions. Therefore, genome modification through SSNs-mediated HDR for gene targeting (GT that enables either gene replacement or knock-in will provide an unprecedented ability to facilitate plant breeding by allowing introduction of precise point mutations and new gene functions, or integration of foreign genes at specific and desired ‘safe’ harbor in a predefined manner. The emergence of three programmable SSNs such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs, transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs, and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9 systems has revolutionized genome modification in plants in a more controlled manner. However, while targeted mutagenesis is becoming routine in plants, the potential of GT technology has not been well realized for traits improvement in crops, mainly due to the fact that NHEJ predominates DNA repair process in somatic cells and competes with the HDR pathway, and thus HDR-mediated GT is a relative rare event in plants. Here, we review recent research findings mainly focusing on development and applications of precise GT in plants using three SSNs systems described above, and the potential

  14. Improved micro-distribution of antibody-photon absorber conjugates after initial near infrared photoimmunotherapy (NIR-PIT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaya, Tadanobu; Nakamura, Yuko; Sato, Kazuhide; Harada, Toshiko; Choyke, Peter L; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2016-06-28

    Near infrared photoimmunotherapy (NIR-PIT), a targeted cancer therapy which uses an antibody-photo absorber conjugate (APC) and near infrared light exposure, dramatically improves nano-drug delivery into treated tumor beds due to enhanced vascular permeability. We investigated the micro-distribution of APCs in a variety of NIR-PIT treated tumors. Either cetuximab (cet) or trastuzumab (tra) conjugated with IR700 (cet-tra-IR700) was administered, as appropriate, to each mouse model of tumor. Tumor-bearing mice implanted with A431-GFP, MDAMB468-GFP, 3T3Her2-GFP or N87-GFP were separated into 5 groups: group 1=no treatment; group 2=cet-tra-IR700 i.v., no light exposure; group 3=cet-tra-IR700 i.v., NIR light exposure; group 4=cet-tra-IR700 i.v. and additional cet-tra-IR700 i.v. at 24h but no light exposure; group 5=cet-tra-IR700 i.v., NIR light exposure and additional cet-tra-IR700 i.v. immediately after NIR but no additional NIR light exposure. In vivo, ex vivo and microscopic fluorescence imaging was performed. Fluorescence from the surface of the tumor (s-tumor) was compared to fluorescence from deeper areas of the tumor (d-tumor). In general, there was no significant difference in the fluorescence intensity of GFP in the tumors among all groups, however the highest IR700 fluorescence intensity was consistently shown in group 5 tumors due to added APC after NIR-PIT. Fluorescence microscopy in all tumor types demonstrated that GFP relative fluorescence intensity (RFI) in s-tumor was significantly lower in group 3 and 5 (NIR-PIT groups) than in group 1, 2, and 4 (no NIR-PIT) yet there was no significant difference in d-tumor RFI among all groups. IR700 fluorescent RFI in the d-tumor was highest in group 5 (NIR-PIT+additional APC) compared to the other groups. Cell killing after NIR-PIT was primarily on the surface, however, APCs administered immediately after NIR-PIT penetrated deeper into tissue resulting in improved cell killing after a 2nd NIR-PIT session. This

  15. Immunoproteomics analysis of the murine antibody response to vaccination with an improved Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M Twine

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis subspecies tularensis is the causative agent of a spectrum of diseases collectively known as tularemia. An attenuated live vaccine strain (LVS has been shown to be efficacious in humans, but safety concerns have prevented its licensure by the FDA. Recently, F. tularensis LVS has been produced under Current Good Manufacturing Practice (CGMP guidelines. Little is known about the immunogenicity of this new vaccine preparation in comparison with extensive studies conducted with laboratory passaged strains of LVS. Thus, the aim of the current work was to evaluate the repertoire of antibodies produced in mouse strains vaccinated with the new LVS vaccine preparation.In the current study, we used an immunoproteomics approach to examine the repertoire of antibodies induced following successful immunization of BALB/c versus unsuccessful vaccination of C57BL/6 mice with the new preparation of F. tularensis LVS. Successful vaccination of BALB/c mice elicited antibodies to nine identified proteins that were not recognized by antisera from vaccinated but unprotected C57BL/6 mice. In addition, the CGMP formulation of LVS stimulated a greater repertoire of antibodies following vaccination compared to vaccination with laboratory passaged ATCC LVS strain. A total of 15 immunoreactive proteins were identified in both studies, however, 16 immunoreactive proteins were uniquely reactive with sera from the new formulation of LVS.This is the first report characterising the antibody based immune response of the new formulation of LVS in the widely used murine model of tularemia. Using two mouse strains, we show that successfully vaccinated mice can be distinguished from unsuccessfully vaccinated mice based upon the repertoire of antibodies generated. This opens the door towards downselection of antigens for incorporation into tularemia subunit vaccines. In addition, this work also highlights differences in the humoral immune response to

  16. Improved constraints on monopole–dipole interaction mediated by pseudo-scalar bosons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Crescini

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a more stringent upper limit on long-range axion-mediated forces obtained by the QUAX-gpgs experiment, located at the INFN – Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro. By measuring variations of a paramagnetic GSO crystal magnetization with a dc-SQUID magnetometer we investigate the possible coupling between electron spins and unpolarized nucleons in lead disks. The induced magnetization can be interpreted as the effect of a long-range spin dependent interaction mediated by axions or Axion Like Particles (ALPs. The corresponding coupling strength is proportional to the CP violating term gpegsN, i.e. the product of the pseudoscalar and scalar coupling constants of electron and nucleon, respectively. Our upper limit is more constraining than previous ones in the interaction range 0.01 m<λa<0.2 m, with a best result on gpegsN/(ħc of 4.3×10−30 at 95% confidence level in the interval 0.1 m<λa<0.2 m. We eventually discuss our plans to improve the QUAX-gpgs sensitivity by a few orders of magnitude, which will allow us to investigate the ϑ≃10−10 range of CP-violating parameter and test some QCD axion models.

  17. An Improved Strategy for the Synthesis of Ethylene Glycol by Oxamate-Mediated Catalytic Hydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satapathy, Anilkumar; Gadge, Sandip T; Bhanage, Bhalchandra M

    2017-04-10

    The present study reports an improved approach for the preparation of ethylene glycol (EG) by using carbon monoxide as C1 chemical by a two-step oxidative carbonylation and hydrogenation sequence. In the first step, oxamates are synthesized through oxidative cross double carbonylation of piperidine and ethanol by using Pd/C catalyst under phosphine ligand-free conditions and subsequently hydrogenated by Milstein's catalyst (carbonylhydrido[6-(di-t-butylphosphinomethylene)-2-(N,N-diethylaminomethyl)-1,6-dihydropyridine]ruthenium(II)). The presented stepwise oxamate-mediated coupling provides the basis for a new strategy for the synthesis of EG by selective upgrading of C1 chemicals. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Long-term estradiol treatment improves VIP-mediated vasodilation in atherosclerotic proximal coronary arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, T.; Mortensen, Alicja; Larsen, C. R.

    2003-01-01

    arteries. Female ovariectomized homozygous Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits were randomized to 16 weeks treatment with 17beta-estradiol or placebo. The diet was semisynthetic, thereby avoiding the influence of phytoestrogens. Artery ring segments were mounted for isometric tension recordings...... in myographs. Following precontraction, the dose-response relationships for VIP and PACAP were evaluated. Treatment with 17beta-estradiol significantly improved the maximum VIP-mediated vasodilation (E-max, percentage of precontraction) in proximal coronary arteries (45.8 +/- 9.6% vs. 24.1 +/- 3.7%, p ....05). In the same artery segment, 17β-estradiol induced a significant decrease in the relative ratio between the repeated contractile response to potassium 30 and 120 mM (100 +/- 7% vs. 132 +/- 11%, p

  19. Improvement of a mediator-type biochemical oxygen demand sensor for on-site measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, N; Hoashi, J; Morita, T; McNiven, S J; Nakamura, H; Karube, I

    2001-07-12

    We characterized a mediator-type biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) sensor with a three-electrode system using potassium ferricyanide (FC) and Pseudomonas fluorescens in our previous study. In the present study, we have utilized the advantages of a mediator-type biosensor, which does not require air-supply equipment for on-site measurements, and made a fully disposable sensor tip for a portable device. The tip consists of a two-electrode system with P. fluorescens immobilized on a cellulose acetate membrane and is packaged in polyester film to prevent it from drying out. By aeration with a 0.1 M NaCl solution of P. fluorescens (after growth), the sensor responses as well as their reproducibility and stability have been successfully improved. The responses increased more than seven times, and the calibration curve from 15 to 260 mg l(-1) also remained linear although the response decreased approximately half the original after at least 35 days in storage. The reproducibility of the sensor responses improved to 12.7% (average of relative standard deviations (RSDs)) in the calibration curve obtained by using the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development synthetic sewage. Examination of real samples from three different sources showed that the BOD as determined by the sensor correlates well with the conventional 5-day BOD method (r(2)=0.982, 0.823, and 0.809). Consequently, the aeration process makes it possible to realize rapid, and in situ measurements without the long conditioning process that is generally required to activate the microorganisms immobilized on bio-films before use. Finally, we have designed a portable device that utilizes our disposable sensor tip.

  20. Relate it! Objective and subjective evaluation of mediator-based strategies for improving source memory in younger and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, Beatrice G; Touron, Dayna R

    2017-06-01

    The present study examined younger and older adults' ability to improve their source memory for different types of sources through imaginal and verbal (sentence) mediators. Younger (18-29 years) and older (60-75 years) adults' strategy use and source memory for either text-type (bold vs italic) or person (woman vs man) sources was assessed; strategy use was either spontaneous or the generation of imaginal mediators was instructed before encoding. Younger and older adults did not differ in spontaneous use of mediator-based strategies; however, older adults generated more images but fewer verbal mediators than younger adults. Participants were able to increase mediator generation when instructed to, resulting in substantial increases in both item and source memory for the instructed conditions in both age groups. Use of verbal mediators was more likely for the more concrete person sources for which source memory was generally better. Importantly, these objective benefits of mediator-based strategies translated into subjective benefits for both younger and older adults: Increased use of either mediator type was correlated with lower experienced task difficulty; the instructions to use imaginal mediators resulted in a significant decrease in difficulty ratings on the group level. Participants were generally able to monitor mediator benefits to both item and source memory and accurately judged mediator strategies (especially imagery) as more effective than repetition; older adults, however, rated all strategies as less effective than younger adults. Implications of these findings, especially for neuropsychological studies on source monitoring, are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Improved diagnostic performance of a commercial anaplasma antibody competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using recombinant major surface protein 5–glutathione S-transferase fusion protein as antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study tested the hypothesis that removal of maltose binding protein from recombinant antigen used for plate coating would improve the specificity of Anaplasma antibody competitive ELISA. Three hundred and eight sera with significant MBP antibody binding (=30%I) in Anaplasma negative herds was 1...

  2. Phage display aided improvement of a unique prostate-specific antigen (PSA) antibody unreactive with Lys(145)-Lys(146) internally cleaved forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liton, Md Ferdhos Khan; Peltola, Mari T; Vehniäinen, Markus; Kuusela, Erica; Pettersson, Tiina; Lamminmäki, Urpo; Pettersson, Kim; Brockmann, Eeva-Christine

    2015-07-01

    Prostate specific antigen (PSA) is a commonly used marker of prostate cancer. A panel of four kallikrein immunoassays has been reported to improve the prediction of prostate biopsy outcome (cancer vs benign) in men with elevated PSA in the circulation. Assay of one of the kallikrein forms, intact free PSA (fPSA-I), is based on a unique monoclonal antibody (4D4), which is specific for PSA without the internal cleavage at Lys(145)-Lys(146). Due to high dissociation rate the 4D4 antibody is less than optimal for achieving a highly sensitive robust assay. In this study, we cloned the 4D4 Mab into a recombinant fragment (Fab) format and constructed three mutant libraries with the aim to increase its binding affinity. The libraries contained targeted mutations either in the CDR-H1, CDR-H2 or CDR-L3 region. PSA-I specific antibodies were enriched from the libraries by phage display technology. We identified fourteen unique clones with 1-5 mutated amino acids showing reduced dissociation of the PSA conjugate compared to the wt-4D4 Fab. Five of these mutant antibodies had 2-6 times higher binding affinity compared to the wt-4D4 Fab yet retaining the original specificity for PSA-I. The analytical sensitivity of fPSA-I assay with mutant L3-2 Fab was 0.12 μg/L compared to 4.46 μg/L with the original wt-4D4 Fab. In the method comparison study, the developed assay showed an excellent correlation to the existing fPSA-I assay. The high affinity and specificity of these mutant antibodies have potential to provide sensitive and robust detection of intact and nicked PSA from patient samples in different test formats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Infection of CD4+ T lymphocytes by the human T cell leukemia virus type 1 is mediated by the glucose transporter GLUT-1: Evidence using antibodies specific to the receptor's large extracellular domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Qingwen; Agrawal, Lokesh; VanHorn-Ali, Zainab; Alkhatib, Ghalib

    2006-01-01

    To analyze HTLV-1 cytotropism, we developed a highly sensitive vaccinia virus-based assay measuring activation of a reporter gene upon fusion of two distinct cell populations. We used this system in a functional cDNA screening to isolate and confirm that the glucose transporter protein 1 (GLUT-1) is a receptor for HTLV-1. GLUT-1 is a ubiquitously expressed plasma membrane glycoprotein with 12 transmembrane domains and 6 extracellular loops (ECL). We demonstrate for the first time that peptide antibodies (GLUT-IgY) raised in chicken to the large extracellular loop (ECL1) detect GLUT-1 at the cell surface and inhibit envelope (Env)-mediated fusion and infection. Efficient GLUT-IgY staining was detected with peripheral blood CD4 + lymphocytes purified by positive selection. Further, GLUT-IgY caused efficient inhibition of Env-mediated fusion and infection of CD4 + T and significantly lower inhibition of CD8 + T lymphocytes. The specificity of GLUT-IgY antibodies to GLUT-1 was demonstrated by ECL1 peptide competition studies. Grafting ECL1 of GLUT-1 onto the receptor-negative GLUT-3 conferred significant receptor activity. In contrast, grafting ECL1 of GLUT-3 onto GLUT-1 resulted in a significant loss of the receptor activity. The ECL1-mediated receptor activity was efficiently blocked with four different human monoclonal antibody (HMab) to HTLV-1 Env. The ECL1-derived peptide blocked HTLV-1 Env-mediated fusion with several nonhuman mammalian cell lines. The results demonstrate the utilization of cell surface GLUT-1 in HTLV-1 infection of CD4 + T lymphocytes and implicate a critical role for the ECL1 region in viral tropism

  4. Prevalence of Brucella antibodies in rural and suburban communities in three provinces of Turkey: need for improved diagnosis and prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kose, Sukran; Smits, Henk L.; Abdoel, Theresia H.; Ozbel, Yusuf

    2006-01-01

    To determine the seroprevalence of Brucella-specific antibodies in rural and suburban communities in different provinces of Anatolia. Cross-sectional seroepidemiological study on serum samples collected in communities in two relatively developed provinces in west Anatolia with an official low

  5. Antibody informatics for drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirai, Hiroki; Prades, Catherine; Vita, Randi

    2014-01-01

    to the antibody science in every project in antibody drug discovery. Recent experimental technologies allow for the rapid generation of large-scale data on antibody sequences, affinity, potency, structures, and biological functions; this should accelerate drug discovery research. Therefore, a robust bioinformatic...... infrastructure for these large data sets has become necessary. In this article, we first identify and discuss the typical obstacles faced during the antibody drug discovery process. We then summarize the current status of three sub-fields of antibody informatics as follows: (i) recent progress in technologies...... for antibody rational design using computational approaches to affinity and stability improvement, as well as ab-initio and homology-based antibody modeling; (ii) resources for antibody sequences, structures, and immune epitopes and open drug discovery resources for development of antibody drugs; and (iii...

  6. HIV-1 tat promotes integrin-mediated HIV transmission to dendritic cells by binding Env spikes and competes neutralization by anti-HIV antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Monini

    Full Text Available Use of Env in HIV vaccine development has been disappointing. Here we show that, in the presence of a biologically active Tat subunit vaccine, a trimeric Env protein prevents in monkeys virus spread from the portal of entry to regional lymph nodes. This appears to be due to specific interactions between Tat and Env spikes that form a novel virus entry complex favoring R5 or X4 virus entry and productive infection of dendritic cells (DCs via an integrin-mediated pathway. These Tat effects do not require Tat-transactivation activity and are blocked by anti-integrin antibodies (Abs. Productive DC infection promoted by Tat is associated with a highly efficient virus transmission to T cells. In the Tat/Env complex the cysteine-rich region of Tat engages the Env V3 loop, whereas the Tat RGD sequence remains free and directs the virus to integrins present on DCs. V2 loop deletion, which unshields the CCR5 binding region of Env, increases Tat/Env complex stability. Of note, binding of Tat to Env abolishes neutralization of Env entry or infection of DCs by anti-HIV sera lacking anti-Tat Abs, which are seldom present in natural infection. This is reversed, and neutralization further enhanced, by HIV sera containing anti-Tat Abs such as those from asymptomatic or Tat-vaccinated patients, or by sera from the Tat/Env vaccinated monkeys. Thus, both anti-Tat and anti-Env Abs are required for efficient HIV neutralization. These data suggest that the Tat/Env interaction increases HIV acquisition and spreading, as a mechanism evolved by the virus to escape anti-Env neutralizing Abs. This may explain the low effectiveness of Env-based vaccines, which are also unlikely to elicit Abs against new Env epitopes exposed by the Tat/Env interaction. As Tat also binds Envs from different clades, new vaccine strategies should exploit the Tat/Env interaction for both preventative and therapeutic interventions.

  7. HIV-1 Tat Promotes Integrin-Mediated HIV Transmission to Dendritic Cells by Binding Env Spikes and Competes Neutralization by Anti-HIV Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monini, Paolo; Cafaro, Aurelio; Srivastava, Indresh K.; Moretti, Sonia; Sharma, Victoria A.; Andreini, Claudia; Chiozzini, Chiara; Ferrantelli, Flavia; Cossut, Maria R. Pavone.; Tripiciano, Antonella; Nappi, Filomena; Longo, Olimpia; Bellino, Stefania; Picconi, Orietta; Fanales-Belasio, Emanuele; Borsetti, Alessandra; Toschi, Elena; Schiavoni, Ilaria; Bacigalupo, Ilaria; Kan, Elaine; Sernicola, Leonardo; Maggiorella, Maria T.; Montin, Katy; Porcu, Marco; Leone, Patrizia; Leone, Pasqualina; Collacchi, Barbara; Palladino, Clelia; Ridolfi, Barbara; Falchi, Mario; Macchia, Iole; Ulmer, Jeffrey B.; Buttò, Stefano; Sgadari, Cecilia; Magnani, Mauro; Federico, Maurizio P. M.; Titti, Fausto; Banci, Lucia; Dallocchio, Franco; Rappuoli, Rino; Ensoli, Fabrizio; Barnett, Susan W.; Garaci, Enrico; Ensoli, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Use of Env in HIV vaccine development has been disappointing. Here we show that, in the presence of a biologically active Tat subunit vaccine, a trimeric Env protein prevents in monkeys virus spread from the portal of entry to regional lymph nodes. This appears to be due to specific interactions between Tat and Env spikes that form a novel virus entry complex favoring R5 or X4 virus entry and productive infection of dendritic cells (DCs) via an integrin-mediated pathway. These Tat effects do not require Tat-transactivation activity and are blocked by anti-integrin antibodies (Abs). Productive DC infection promoted by Tat is associated with a highly efficient virus transmission to T cells. In the Tat/Env complex the cysteine-rich region of Tat engages the Env V3 loop, whereas the Tat RGD sequence remains free and directs the virus to integrins present on DCs. V2 loop deletion, which unshields the CCR5 binding region of Env, increases Tat/Env complex stability. Of note, binding of Tat to Env abolishes neutralization of Env entry or infection of DCs by anti-HIV sera lacking anti-Tat Abs, which are seldom present in natural infection. This is reversed, and neutralization further enhanced, by HIV sera containing anti-Tat Abs such as those from asymptomatic or Tat-vaccinated patients, or by sera from the Tat/Env vaccinated monkeys. Thus, both anti-Tat and anti-Env Abs are required for efficient HIV neutralization. These data suggest that the Tat/Env interaction increases HIV acquisition and spreading, as a mechanism evolved by the virus to escape anti-Env neutralizing Abs. This may explain the low effectiveness of Env-based vaccines, which are also unlikely to elicit Abs against new Env epitopes exposed by the Tat/Env interaction. As Tat also binds Envs from different clades, new vaccine strategies should exploit the Tat/Env interaction for both preventative and therapeutic interventions. PMID:23152803

  8. Improving Preschoolers’ Language and Literacy Skills through Web-Mediated Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabell, Sonia Q.; Downer, Jason T.

    2012-01-01

    MyTeachingPartner (MTP) is a web-mediated approach that provides ongoing support for teachers to improve the quality of their interactions with children. This study examined the effects of MTP on the preschool language and literacy development of children who are at risk for later academic difficulties. Results of this randomized controlled trial indicated that for English-only classrooms, teachers receiving a high level of support had students who made greater gains in language and literacy skills than teachers who only received access to a curricular supplement. Three implications are drawn from these findings: (1) on-going, video-based consultation holds promise not only for altering teacher-child interactions, but also improving children's learning, (2) technology allows teachers to receive intensive, effective support from a distance, and (3) there is still much to be learned about how professional development can support effective teaching of language and literacy skills to children whose home language is not English. PMID:23105917

  9. EFFECT OF MAGNESIUM AS SUBSTITUTE MATERIAL IN ENZYME MEDIATED CALCITE PRECIPITATION (EMCP FOR SOIL IMPROVEMENT TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heriansyah ePutra

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The optimization of enzyme-mediated calcite precipitation (EMCP was evaluated as a soil improvement technique. In our previous works, purified urease was utilized to bio-catalyze the hydrolysis of urea, which causes the supplied Ca2+ to precipitate with CO32- as calcium carbonate. In the present work, magnesium chloride was newly added to the injecting solutions to delay the reaction rate and to enhance the amount of carbonate precipitation. Soil specimens were prepared in PVC cylinders and treated with concentration-controlled solutions composed of urea, urease, calcium, and magnesium chloride. The mechanical properties of the treated soil specimens were examined through unconfined compressive strength (UCS tests. A precipitation ratio of the carbonate up to 90% of the maximum theoretical precipitation was achieved by adding a small amount of magnesium chloride. Adding magnesium chloride as a delaying agent was indeed found to reduce the reaction rate of the precipitation, which may increase the volume of the treated soil if used in real fields because of the slower precipitation rate and the resulting higher injectivity. A mineralogical analysis revealed that magnesium chloride decreases the crystal size of the precipitated materials and that another carbonate of aragonite is newly formed. Mechanical test results indicated that carbonate precipitates within the soils and brings about a significant improvement in strength. A maximum UCS of 0.6 MPa was obtained from the treated samples.

  10. An improved and robust DNA immunization method to develop antibodies against extra-cellular loops of multi-transmembrane proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazen, Meredith; Bhakta, Sunil; Vij, Rajesh; Randle, Steven; Kallop, Dara; Chiang, Vicki; Hötzel, Isidro; Jaiswal, Bijay S; Ervin, Karen E; Li, Bing; Weimer, Robby M; Polakis, Paul; Scheller, Richard H; Junutula, Jagath R; Hongo, Jo-Anne S

    2014-01-01

    Multi-transmembrane proteins are especially difficult targets for antibody generation largely due to the challenge of producing a protein that maintains its native conformation in the absence of a stabilizing membrane. Here, we describe an immunization strategy that successfully resulted in the identification of monoclonal antibodies that bind specifically to extracellular epitopes of a 12 transmembrane protein, multi-drug resistant protein 4 (MRP4). These monoclonal antibodies were developed following hydrodynamic tail vein immunization with a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter-based plasmid expressing MRP4 cDNA and were characterized by flow cytometry. As expected, the use of the immune modulators fetal liver tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor positively enhanced the immune response against MRP4. Imaging studies using CMV-based plasmids expressing luciferase showed that the in vivo half-life of the target antigen was less than 48 h using CMV-based plasmids, thus necessitating frequent boosting with DNA to achieve an adequate immune response. We also describe a comparison of plasmids, which contained MRP4 cDNA with either the CMV or CAG promoters, used for immunizations. The observed luciferase activity in this comparison demonstrated that the CAG promoter-containing plasmid pCAGGS induced prolonged constitutive expression of MRP4 and an increased anti-MRP4 specific immune response even when the plasmid was injected less frequently. The method described here is one that can be broadly applicable as a general immunization strategy to develop antibodies against multi-transmembrane proteins, as well as target antigens that are difficult to express or purify in native and functionally active conformation. PMID:24121517

  11. Perceived empathy of service providers mediates the association between perceived discrimination and behavioral intention to take up HIV antibody testing again among men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jing; Lau, Joseph T F; Wang, Zixin; Wu, Anise M S; Tan, Xuhui

    2015-01-01

    HIV antibody testing is a key measure of HIV prevention for men who have sex with men (MSM). The World Health Organization recommends sexually active and at-risk MSM to take up HIV antibody testing regularly. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of behavioral intention to take up HIV antibody testing in the next six months among Hong Kong MSM who were ever-testers. An anonymous cross-sectional survey recruited 326 MSM who had taken up HIV antibody testing from gay-friendly venues and internet in Hong Kong. Of the participants, 40.8% had had unprotected anal intercourse with regular or non-regular male sex partners in the last six months; they were at risk of HIV transmission despite experience in HIV antibody testing. Only 37.2% showed a strong intention to take up HIV antibody testing again in the next six months. Adjusted analysis showed that both perceived discrimination toward Hong Kong MSM (AOR = .60, 95% CI: .36-.98) and the CARE Measure assessing perceived empathy of service providers (AOR = 1.05, 95% CI: 1.02-1.08) were significantly associated with intention for retesting. Perceived discrimination, however, became statistically non-significant (AOR = .68, 95% CI: .41-1.14), when both CARE Measure and perceived discrimination entered into the adjusted model. It is warranted to increase HIV retesting rate by removing perceived discrimination and reducing the negative effect of perceived discrimination through enhancement of empathy of service providers.

  12. Tyramide Signal Amplification for Antibody-overlay Lectin Microarray: A Strategy to Improve the Sensitivity of Targeted Glycan Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meany, Danni L.; Hackler, Laszlo; Zhang, Hui; Chan, Daniel W.

    2011-01-01

    Antibody-overlay lectin microarray (ALM) has been used for targeted glycan profiling to identify disease-related protein glycoforms. In this context, high sensitivity is desired because it allows for the identification of disease-related glycoforms that are often present at low concentration. We describe a new Tyramide Signal Amplification (TSA) for Antibody-overlay Lectin Microarray procedure for sensitive profiling of glycosylation patterns. We demonstrated that TSA increased the sensitivity of the microarray over 100 times for glycan profiling using the model protein Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA). The glycan profile of PSA enriched from LNCAP cells, obtained at a sub-nanogram level with the aid of TSA, was consistent with the previous reports. We also established the glycan profile of Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) using the TSA and ALM. Thus, the Tyramide Signal Amplification for Antibody-overlay Lectin Microarray is a sensitive, rapid, comprehensive, and high-throughput method for targeted glycan profiling and can potentially be used for the identification of disease-related protein glycoforms. PMID:21133419

  13. Monoclonal antibody to the type I insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) receptor blocks IGF-I receptor-mediated DNA synthesis: clarification of the mitogenic mechanisms of IGF-I and insulin in human skin fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flier, J.S.; Usher, P.; Moses, A.C.

    1986-01-01

    Insulin and insulin-like growth factor type I (IGF-I) stimulate an overlapping spectrum of biological responses in human skin fibroblasts. Although insulin and IGF-I are known to stimulate the incorporation of [ 3 H]thymidine into DNA in these cells, the identify of the receptor(s) that mediates this effect has not been fully clarified. The mouse anti-human IGF-I receptor antibody αIR-3 binds with specificity to IGF-I but not to insulin receptors in human placental membranes; it also specifically inhibits the binding of 125 I-labeled IGF-I but not 125 I-labeled insulin to suspensions of human skin fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner. αIR-3 competitively inhibits IGF-I-mediated stimulation of [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation into DNA. This inhibition is dependent on the concentration of αIR-3 and in the presence of a fixed antibody concentration can be partially overcome by high concentrations of IGF-I. In contrast, at concentrations of 3 H]thymidine incorporation is not inhibited by αIR-3. However, the incremental effects of higher concentrations (> 1 μg/ml) of insulin on [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation are inhibited by αIR-3. αIR-3 is a highly specific antagonist of IGF-I receptor-mediated mitogenesis in human skin fibroblasts. By using this antibody, it is shown directly that insulin can act through the IGF-I receptor to stimulate DNA synthesis but can also activate this effect through the insulin receptor itself

  14. Mediators of improved child diet quality following a health promotion intervention: the Melbourne InFANT Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Alison C; Campbell, Karen J; Crawford, David A; McNaughton, Sarah A; Hesketh, Kylie D

    2014-11-04

    Young children's diets are currently suboptimal. Given that mothers have a critical influence on children' diets, they are typically a target of interventions to improve early childhood nutrition. Understanding the maternal factors which mediate an intervention's effect on young children's diets is important, but has not been well investigated. This research aimed to test whether maternal feeding knowledge, maternal feeding practices, maternal self-efficacy, and maternal dietary intakes acted as mediators of the effect of an intervention to improve child diet quality. The Melbourne Infant Feeding Activity and Nutrition Trial (InFANT) Program was a cluster-randomized controlled trial, conducted from 2008-2010. This novel, low-dose, health promotion intervention was delivered quarterly over 15 months and involved educational activities, promotion of peer discussion, a DVD and written materials. Post-intervention, when children were approximately 18 months of age, child diets were assessed using multiple 24-hour recalls and a purpose-developed index of diet quality, the Obesity Protective Dietary Index. Maternal mediators were assessed using a combination of previously validated and purpose-deigned tools. Mediation analysis was conducted using the test of joint significance and difference of coefficients methods. Across 62 parents' groups in Melbourne, Australia, 542 parents were recruited. Post- intervention, higher maternal feeding knowledge and lower use of foods as rewards was found to mediate the direct intervention effect on child diet quality. While other aspects of maternal feeding practices, self-efficacy and dietary intakes did not act as mediators, they were associated with child diet quality. Mediation analysis of this novel health promotion intervention showed the importance of maternal feeding knowledge and use of foods as rewards in impacting child diet quality. The other maternal factors assessed were appropriate targets but further research on how to

  15. Tempol improves xanthine oxidoreductase-mediated vascular responses to nitrite in experimental renovascular hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo H. Oliveira-Paula

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Upregulation of xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR increases vascular reactive oxygen species (ROS levels and contributes to nitroso-redox imbalance. However, XOR can generate nitric oxide (NO from nitrite, and increased superoxide could inactivate NO formed from nitrite. This study tested the hypothesis that XOR contributes to the cardiovascular effects of nitrite in renovascular hypertension, and that treatment with the antioxidant tempol (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl improves XOR-mediated effects of nitrite. Blood pressure was assessed weekly in two-kidney one-clip (2K1C and control rats. After six weeks of hypertension, the relaxing responses to nitrite were assessed in aortic rings in the presence of the XOR inhibitor oxypurinol (or vehicle, either in the absence or in the presence of tempol. Moreover, in vivo hypotensive responses to nitrite were also examined in the presence of oxypurinol (or vehicle and tempol (or vehicle. Aortic XOR activity and expression were evaluated by fluorescence and Western blot, respectively. Vascular ROS production was assessed by the dihydroethidium assay. 2K1C hypertensive rats showed increased aortic XOR activity and vascular ROS production compared with control rats. Oxypurinol shifted the nitrite concentration–response curve to the right in aortic rings from 2K1C rats (but not in controls. Oxypurinol also attenuated the hypotensive responses to nitrite in 2K1C rats (but not in controls. These functional findings agree with increased aortic and plasma XOR activity found in 2K1C rats. Tempol treatment enhanced oxypurinol-induced shift of the nitrite concentration–response curve to the right. However, antioxidant treatment did not affect XOR-mediated hypotensive effects of nitrite. Our results show that XOR is important to the cardiovascular responses to nitrite in 2K1C hypertension, and XOR inhibitors commonly used by patients may cancel this effect. This finding suggests that nitrite

  16. Tempol improves xanthine oxidoreductase-mediated vascular responses to nitrite in experimental renovascular hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Paula, Gustavo H; Pinheiro, Lucas C; Guimaraes, Danielle A; Tella, Sandra O Conde; Blanco, Ana L Furlan; Angelis, Celio D; Schechter, Alan N; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2016-08-01

    Upregulation of xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) increases vascular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and contributes to nitroso-redox imbalance. However, XOR can generate nitric oxide (NO) from nitrite, and increased superoxide could inactivate NO formed from nitrite. This study tested the hypothesis that XOR contributes to the cardiovascular effects of nitrite in renovascular hypertension, and that treatment with the antioxidant tempol (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl) improves XOR-mediated effects of nitrite. Blood pressure was assessed weekly in two-kidney one-clip (2K1C) and control rats. After six weeks of hypertension, the relaxing responses to nitrite were assessed in aortic rings in the presence of the XOR inhibitor oxypurinol (or vehicle), either in the absence or in the presence of tempol. Moreover, in vivo hypotensive responses to nitrite were also examined in the presence of oxypurinol (or vehicle) and tempol (or vehicle). Aortic XOR activity and expression were evaluated by fluorescence and Western blot, respectively. Vascular ROS production was assessed by the dihydroethidium assay. 2K1C hypertensive rats showed increased aortic XOR activity and vascular ROS production compared with control rats. Oxypurinol shifted the nitrite concentration-response curve to the right in aortic rings from 2K1C rats (but not in controls). Oxypurinol also attenuated the hypotensive responses to nitrite in 2K1C rats (but not in controls). These functional findings agree with increased aortic and plasma XOR activity found in 2K1C rats. Tempol treatment enhanced oxypurinol-induced shift of the nitrite concentration-response curve to the right. However, antioxidant treatment did not affect XOR-mediated hypotensive effects of nitrite. Our results show that XOR is important to the cardiovascular responses to nitrite in 2K1C hypertension, and XOR inhibitors commonly used by patients may cancel this effect. This finding suggests that nitrite treatment may not be

  17. Antibodies against chromosomal beta-lactamase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giwercman, B; Rasmussen, J W; Ciofu, Oana

    1994-01-01

    A murine monoclonal anti-chromosomal beta-lactamase antibody was developed and an immunoblotting technique was used to study the presence of serum and sputum antibodies against Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosomal group 1 beta-lactamase in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The serum antibody resp...... against the infection. On the other hand, immune complexes between the beta-lactamase and corresponding antibodies could play a role in the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary injury in CF by mediating hyperimmune reactions....

  18. A probiotic fermented dairy drink improves antibody response to influenza vaccination in the elderly in two randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boge, Thierry; Rémigy, Michel; Vaudaine, Sarah; Tanguy, Jérôme; Bourdet-Sicard, Raphaëlle; van der Werf, Sylvie

    2009-09-18

    Influenza vaccination is recommended for the elderly in many countries, but immune responses are weaker compared to younger adults. To investigate the impact of daily consumption of a probiotic dairy drink on the immune response to influenza vaccination in an elderly population of healthy volunteers over 70 years of age. Two randomised, multicentre, double-blind, controlled studies were conducted during two vaccination seasons in 2005-2006 (pilot) and 2006-2007 (confirmatory). Eighty-six and 222 elderly volunteers consumed either a fermented dairy drink, containing the probiotic strain Lactobacillus casei DN-114 001 and yoghurt ferments (Actimel, or a non-fermented control dairy product twice daily for a period of 7 weeks (pilot) or 13 weeks (confirmatory). Vaccination occurred after 4 weeks of product consumption. Geometric mean antibody titres (GMT) against the 3 viral strains composing the vaccine (H1N1, H3N2, and B) were measured at several time intervals post-vaccination by haemagglutination inhibition test. In the pilot study, the influenza-specific antibody titres increased after vaccination, being consistently higher in the probiotic product group compared to the control group under product consumption. Similarly, in the confirmatory study, titres against the B strain increased significantly more in the probiotic group than in the control group at 3, 6 and 9 weeks post-vaccination under product consumption (p=0.020). Significant differences in seroconversion between the groups by intended to treat analysis were still found 5 months after vaccination. Similar GMT results were observed for the H3N2 strain and H1N1 strain, confirming the results of the pilot study. These studies demonstrate that daily consumption of this particular probiotic product increased relevant specific antibody responses to influenza vaccination in individuals of over 70 years of age and may therefore provide a health benefit in this population.

  19. Improved 123I-Ioflupane Binding After Immunotherapy in Anti-NAE Antibody-Positive Hashimoto Encephalopathy That Clinically Mimicked Multiple System Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Juuri; Hida, Ayumi; Ogyu, Kamiyu; Minamimoto, Ryogo; Takeuchi, Sousuke

    2017-08-01

    We describe an 84-year-old man with anti-NH2-terminal of α-enolase antibody-positive Hashimoto encephalopathy that clinically mimicked multiple system atrophy who underwent investigation by dopamine transporter SPECT before and after immunotherapy. Before treatment, dopamine transporter SPECT showed reduced striatal I-ioflupane binding, with a mean specific binding ratio of 2.42, even though he had no apparent parkinsonism. After immunotherapy, mean specific binding ratio was improved to 3.22. Dopamine transporter SPECT was useful in this case to detect subclinical striatal dysfunction, and evaluation both before and after immunotherapy helped to distinguish between neurodegenerative disease and neuroimmunological disorder.

  20. Cancer type does not affect exercise-mediated improvements in cardiorespiratory function and fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repka, Chris P; Peterson, Brent M; Brown, Jessica M; Lalonde, Trent L; Schneider, Carole M; Hayward, Reid

    2014-11-01

    , and diastolic blood pressure decreased significantly only in the BC group while pulmonary function remained unchanged in all cancer types. Although trends toward improved cardiorespiratory and fatigue parameters only reached significance in some groups, there were no significant differences between cancer types. This suggests that cardiorespiratory and fatigue improvements following rehabilitative exercise are not dependent on cancer type. Further research investigating alternative physiological parameters are needed to confirm the relationship between cancer type and exercise-mediated rehabilitation. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Improvement of resistance to maize dwarf mosaic virus mediated by transgenic RNA interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Yang, Lin; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Wang, Han-Guang; Li, Wan-Chen; Fu, Feng-Ling

    2011-05-20

    To overcome the low efficiency of agronomic protection from maize dwarf mosaic disease, susceptible maize inbred line was transformed by Agrobacterium tumefaciens harboring hpRNA expression vectors containing inverted-repeat sequences of different lengths targeting coat protein gene (CP) of maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV). After PCR screening and Southern blotting, the flanking sequences of the integration sites were amplified by thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR (TAIL-PCR) and used for analysis of T-DNA integration patterns. The T₂ plant lines were evaluated for their MDMV resistance in field inoculation trials under two environments. Of the nineteen T₂ plant lines positive in Southern blotting, six were evaluated as resistant to MDMV, and four of them had resistance non-significantly different from the highly resistant control "H9-21", while the resistance of the other eleven was proved to be significantly improved when compared to their non-transformed parent line. These improvements in MDMV resistance were verified by the relative amount of virus CP gene expression measured by quantitative real time PCR. Comparing the results of Southern blotting and TAIL-PCR analysis, different integration patterns of one or two copies of the inverted-repeat sequences were identified from non-repetitive and repetitive sequences of the maize genome. The MDMV resistance mediated by RNA interference is relative to the length of the inverted-repeat sequence, the copy number of T-DNA integration and the repeatability of integration sites. A longer hpRNA expression construct shows more efficiency than a shorter one. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Improving national surveillance of Lyme neuroborreliosis in Denmark through electronic reporting of specific antibody index testing from 2010 to 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dessau, Ram Benny; Espenhain, L; Mølbak, K

    2015-01-01

    of laboratory results, in contrast to the statutory surveillance based on manually processed notifications. Antibody index (AI) testing is the recommend laboratory test to support the diagnosis of LNB in Denmark. In the period from 2010 to 2012, 217 clinical cases of LNB were notified to the statutory...... surveillance system, while 533 cases were reported AI positive by the MiBa system. Thirty-five unconfirmed cases (29 AI-negative and 6 not tested) were notified, but not captured by MiBa. Using MiBa, the number of reported cases was increased almost 2.5 times. Furthermore, the reporting was timelier (median...

  3. Improved flow cytometric identification of myelopoiesis by the simultaneous labelling with CD13, CD14 and CD66 monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, J; Meyer, K; Broe, M K

    1996-01-01

    in the fast determination of remission state. In MDS, the immature myeloid component could be distinguished in patients defined according to the FAB classification with the possibility of identifying aberrant phenotypes, the assay should also be of interest in other myeloproliferative disorders. Moreover......The aim of the present study was to increase our knowledge of myelopoiesis evaluated by flow cytometry. We therefore designed a triple-marker assay employing monoclonal antibodies against the CD13 (immature), the CD14 (monocytic), and the CD66 (mature myeloid) antigens using three...

  4. Moderators and Mediators of Exercise-Induced Objective Sleep Improvements in Midlife and Older Adults with Sleep Complaints

    OpenAIRE

    Buman, Matthew P.; Hekler, Eric B.; Bliwise, Donald L.; King, Abby C.

    2011-01-01

    Regular exercise can improve sleep quality, but for whom and by what means this occurs remain unclear. We examined moderators and mediators of objective sleep improvements in a 12-month randomized controlled trial among initially underactive midlife and older adults reporting mild/moderate sleep complaints. Participants (N=66, 67% women, 55–79 years) were randomized to moderate-intensity exercise or health education control. Putative moderators were gender, age, and baseline physical function...

  5. Targeting Tumor Cells with Anti-CD44 Antibody Triggers Macrophage-Mediated Immune Modulatory Effects in a Cancer Xenograft Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisel, Daniela; Birzele, Fabian; Voss, Edgar; Nopora, Adam; Bader, Sabine; Friess, Thomas; Goller, Bernhard; Laifenfeld, Daphna; Weigand, Stefan; Runza, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    CD44, a transmembrane receptor reported to be involved in various cellular functions, is overexpressed in several cancer types and supposed to be involved in the initiation, progression and prognosis of these cancers. Since the sequence of events following the blockage of the CD44-HA interaction has not yet been studied in detail, we profiled xenograft tumors by RNA Sequencing to elucidate the mode of action of the anti-CD44 antibody RG7356. Analysis of tumor and host gene-expression profiles led us to the hypothesis that treatment with RG7356 antibody leads to an activation of the immune system. Using cytokine measurements we further show that this activation involves the secretion of chemo-attractants necessary for the recruitment of immune cells (i.e. macrophages) to the tumor site. We finally provide evidence for antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) of the malignant cells by macrophages.

  6. Targeting Tumor Cells with Anti-CD44 Antibody Triggers Macrophage-Mediated Immune Modulatory Effects in a Cancer Xenograft Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Maisel

    Full Text Available CD44, a transmembrane receptor reported to be involved in various cellular functions, is overexpressed in several cancer types and supposed to be involved in the initiation, progression and prognosis of these cancers. Since the sequence of events following the blockage of the CD44-HA interaction has not yet been studied in detail, we profiled xenograft tumors by RNA Sequencing to elucidate the mode of action of the anti-CD44 antibody RG7356. Analysis of tumor and host gene-expression profiles led us to the hypothesis that treatment with RG7356 antibody leads to an activation of the immune system. Using cytokine measurements we further show that this activation involves the secretion of chemo-attractants necessary for the recruitment of immune cells (i.e. macrophages to the tumor site. We finally provide evidence for antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP of the malignant cells by macrophages.

  7. Improving the accuracy of the structure prediction of the third hypervariable loop of the heavy chains of antibodies.

    KAUST Repository

    Messih, Mario Abdel

    2014-06-13

    MOTIVATION: Antibodies are able to recognize a wide range of antigens through their complementary determining regions formed by six hypervariable loops. Predicting the 3D structure of these loops is essential for the analysis and reengineering of novel antibodies with enhanced affinity and specificity. The canonical structure model allows high accuracy prediction for five of the loops. The third loop of the heavy chain, H3, is the hardest to predict because of its diversity in structure, length and sequence composition. RESULTS: We describe a method, based on the Random Forest automatic learning technique, to select structural templates for H3 loops among a dataset of candidates. These can be used to predict the structure of the loop with a higher accuracy than that achieved by any of the presently available methods. The method also has the advantage of being extremely fast and returning a reliable estimate of the model quality. AVAILABILITY AND IMPLEMENTATION: The source code is freely available at http://www.biocomputing.it/H3Loopred/ .

  8. Moderators and mediators of exercise-induced objective sleep improvements in midlife and older adults with sleep complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buman, Matthew P; Hekler, Eric B; Bliwise, Donald L; King, Abby C

    2011-09-01

    Exercise can improve sleep quality, but for whom and by what means remains unclear. We examined moderators and mediators of objective sleep improvements in a 12-month randomized controlled trial among underactive midlife and older adults reporting mild/moderate sleep complaints. Participants (N = 66, 67% women, 55-79 years) were randomized to moderate-intensity exercise or health education control. Putative moderators were gender, age, physical function, self-reported global sleep quality, and physical activity levels. Putative mediators were changes in BMI, depressive symptoms, and physical function at 6 months. Objective sleep outcomes measured by in-home polysomnography were percent time in Stage I sleep, percent time in Stage II sleep, and number of awakenings during the first third of sleep at 12 months. Baseline physical function and sleep quality moderated changes in Stage I sleep; individuals with higher initial physical function (p = .01) and poorer sleep quality (p = .03) had greater improvements. Baseline physical activity level moderated changes in Stage II sleep (p = .04) and number of awakenings (p = .01); more sedentary individuals had greater improvements. Decreased depressive symptoms (CI:-1.57 to -0.02) mediated change in Stage I sleep. Decreased depressive symptoms (CI:-0.75 to -0.01), decreased BMI (CI:-1.08 to -0.06), and increased physical function (CI: 0.01 to 0.72) mediated change in number of awakenings. Initially less active individuals with higher initial physical function and poorer sleep quality improved the most. Affective, functional, and metabolic mediators specific to sleep architecture parameters were suggested. These results indicate strategies to more efficiently treat poor sleep through exercise in older adults.

  9. Comparison of the C-mediating killing activity and C-activating properties of mouse monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. L. Kipnis

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available A Mouse polyclonal antiserum against Trypanosoma cruzi or its IgG and IgM fractions and five monoclonal antibodies (two IgM, two IgG1 and one IgG2a recognize and combine with membrane components of trypomastigote forms of the parasite as revealed by immunofluorescence. Although all these antibodies sensitize trypomastigotes and prepare them to activate the complement (C system, as measured by consumption of total C, C4, B and C3, only the polyclonal antiserum or its IgG, IgM and Fabμ fragments were able to induce trypanosome lysis by the alternative C pathway.

  10. Strategies for improving chemotherapeutic delivery to solid tumors mediated by vascular permeability modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy Chaudhuri, Tista

    An essential mode of distribution of blood-borne chemotherapeutic agents within a solid tumor is via the micro-circulation. Poor tumor perfusion, because of a lack of functional vasculature or a lack of microvessels, as well as low tumor vascular permeability, can prevent adequate deposition of even low molecular-weight agents into the tumor. The modulation of tumor vascular function and density can provides numerous strategies for improving intratumor deposition of chemotherapeutic agents. Here we investigated strategies to improve drug delivery to two tumor types that share in common poor drug delivery, but differ in the underlying cause. First, in an angiogenesis-driven brain tumor model of Glioblastoma, the vascular permeability barrier, along with poorly-functional vasculature, hinders drug delivery. A strategy of nanoparticle-based tumor 'priming' to attack the vascular permeability barrier, employing sterically stabilized liposomal doxorubicin (SSL-DXR), was investigated. Functional and histological evaluation of tumor vasculature revealed that after an initial period of depressed vascular permeability and vascular pruning 3--4 days after SSL-DXR administration, vascular permeability and perfusion were restored and then elevated after 5--7 days. As a result of tumor priming, deposition of subsequently-administered nanoparticles was enhanced, and the efficacy of temozolomide (TMZ), if administered during the window of elevated permeability, was increased. The sequenced regimen resulted in a persistent reduction of the tumor proliferative index and a 40% suppression of tumor volume, compared to animals that received both agents simultaneously. Second, in a hypovascular, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma model, disruption of tumor-stromal communication via sonic hedgehog (sHH) signaling pathway inhibition mediated an indirect vascular proliferation and a more than 2-fold increase in intratumor nanoparticle deposition. Enhanced delivery of SSL-DXR in tumors pre

  11. Antiprothrombin Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polona Žigon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In patients with the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS, the presence of a group of pathogenic autoantibodies called antiphospholipid antibodies causes thrombosis and pregnancy complications. The most frequent antigenic target of antiphospholipid antibodies are phospholipid bound β2-glycoprotein 1 (β2GPI and prothrombin. The international classification criteria for APS connect the occurrence of thrombosis and/or obstetric complications together with the persistence of lupus anticoagulant, anti-cardiolipin antibodies (aCL and antibodies against β2GPI (anti-β2GPI into APS. Current trends for the diagnostic evaluation of APS patients propose determination of multiple antiphospholipid antibodies, among them also anti-prothrombin antibodies, to gain a common score which estimates the risk for thrombosis in APS patients. Antiprothrombin antibodies are common in APS patients and are sometimes the only antiphospholipid antibodies being elevated. Methods for their determination differ and have not yet been standardized. Many novel studies confirmed method using phosphatidylserine/prothrombin (aPS/PT ELISA as an antigen on solid phase encompass higher diagnostic accuracy compared to method using prothrombin alone (aPT ELISA. Our research group developed an in-house aPS/PT ELISA with increased analytical sensitivity which enables the determination of all clinically relevant antiprothrombin antibodies. aPS/PT exhibited the highest percentage of lupus anticoagulant activity compared to aCL and anti-β2GPI. aPS/PT antibodies measured with the in-house method associated with venous thrombosis and presented the strongest independent risk factor for the presence of obstetric complications among all tested antiphospholipid antibodies

  12. Chimeric bispecific OC/TR monoclonal antibody mediates lysis of tumor cells expressing the folate-binding protein (MOv18) and displays decreased immunogenicity in patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiten, R. M.; Warnaar, S. O.; Sanborn, D.; Lamers, C. H.; Bolhuis, R. L.; Litvinov, S. V.; Zurawski, V. R.; Coney, L. R.

    1997-01-01

    The bispecific OC/TR monoclonal antibody (mAb) cross-links the CD3 molecule on T cells with the human folate-binding protein (FBP), which is highly expressed on nonmucinous ovarian carcinomas. Clinical trials of patients with ovarian carcinoma with the OC/TR mAb have shown some complete and partial

  13. Radiosensitization and growth inhibition of cancer cells mediated by an scFv antibody gene against DNA-PKcs in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Li; Zhou, Ping-Kun; Zhou, Li-Jun; Pan, Xiu-Jie; Wang, Yu-Xiao; Xu, Qin-Zhi; Yang, Zhi-Hua; Wang, Yu; Liu, Xiao-Dan; Zhu, Mao-Xiang

    2010-01-01

    Overexpression of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) is commonly occurred in cancers and causes radioresistance and poor prognosis. In present study, the single-chain variable antibody fragments (scFv) targeting DNA-PKcs was developed for the application of radiosensitization in vitro and in vivo. A humanized semisynthetic scFv library and the phage-display antibodies technology were employed to screen DNA-PKcs scFv antibody. DNA-PKcs epitopes were predicted and cloned. A humanized semisynthetic scFv library and the phage-display antibodies technology were employed to screen DNA-PKcs scFv antibody. DNA damage repair was analyzed by comet assay and immunofluorescence detection of γH2AX foci. The radiosensitization in vivo was determined on Balb/c athymic mice transplanted tumours of HeLa cells. Four epitopes of DNA-PKcs have been predicted and expressed as the antigens, and a specific human anti-DNA-PKcs scFv antibody gene, anti-DPK3-scFv, was obtained by screening the phage antibody library using the DNA-PKcs peptide DPK3. The specificity of anti-DPK3-scFv was verified, in vitro. Transfection of HeLa cells with the anti-DPK3-scFv gene resulted in an increased sensitivity to IR, decreased repair capability of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) detected by comet assay and immunofluorescence detection of γH2AX foci. Moreover, the kinase activity of DNA-PKcs was inhibited by anti-DPK3-scFv, which was displayed by the decreased phosphorylation levels of its target Akt/S473 and the autophosphorylation of DNA-PKcs on S2056 induced by radiation. Measurement of the growth and apoptosis rates showed that anti-DPK3-scFv enhanced the sensitivity of tumours transplanted in Balb/c athymic mice to radiation therapy. The antiproliferation and radiosensitizing effects of anti-DPK3-scFv via targeting DNA-PKcs make it very appealing for the development as a novel biological radiosensitizer for cancer therapeutic potential

  14. The role of social media use in improving cancer survivors' emotional well-being: a moderated mediation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shaohai

    2017-06-01

    In the USA, levels of emotional well-being among cancer survivors remain low. Social media is recognized as important to improve their emotional well-being. However, little is known about social mechanisms that underlie the impact of health-related social media in cancer care. This study proposed a moderated mediation model to signify a pathway linking social media use to emotional well-being. Four-hundred and fifty-nine cancer survivors identified through the 2013 US-based Health Information National Trends Survey were included for data analysis. First, structural equation modeling was conducted to examine the path from social media use to emotional well-being, mediated by patient activation. Second, hierarchical regression was performed to test the moderation effect of emotion management. Last, a normal theory-based approach was used to explore the final moderated mediation model. The effect of health-related social media use on emotional well-being was completely mediated by patient activation. Also, emotion management positively moderated the effect of patient activation on emotional well-being. Last, emotion management positively moderated the mediation pathway from health-related social media use to patient activation, and finally, to emotional well-being. Health-related social media, by itself, is not sufficient to bring about improvement in cancer survivors' emotional well-being. Patient activation and emotion management play a significant role. In future interventions designed to improve cancer survivors' emotional health, health practitioners should not only encourage cancer survivors to use social media for health purposes, but also activate them in the course of care, and improve their emotion self-management skills.

  15. Mediation of social cognitive theory variables in the relationship of exercise and improved eating in sedentary adults with severe obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annesi, James J; Tennant, Gisèle A

    2013-01-01

    Results from behavioral treatments for obesity have been disappointing due to an inability to sustain healthy eating. The concurrent use of theory, research, and practical application has the potential of reducing overeating through innovative treatments. When overweight individuals begin an exercise program their eating tends to improve, however, the basis of this relationship is not determined. If the psychosocial mediators of the relationship between exercise and improved eating are better understood, supported exercise may be a key component for improving the efficacy of behavioral weight management treatments. In Phase 1 of this research, psychosocial variables derived from social cognitive theory were tested as possible mediators of the relationship of exercise participation with increased fruit and vegetable intake in severely obese adults initiating a 26-week treatment of supported exercise and standard nutrition education (n = 161). Change in self-regulation for healthy eating and self-regulation at treatment end was a strong mediator; with the addition of mood and self-efficacy for healthy eating being additional mediators that notably increased effect ratios. In Phase 2, participants in a cognitive-behavioral nutrition treatment tailored to improve the identified mediators (n = 163) were contrasted with the original group. The cognitive-behavioral nutrition treatment was associated with significantly greater increases than standard nutrition education in self-regulation, p = 0.023, CIs [4.69, 6.48], and [3.19, 5.02], respectively; self-efficacy, p = 0.013, CIs [19.72, 29.41], and [11.70, 20.71], respectively; and a marginally significant decrease in negative mood, p = 0.062, CIs [-14.26, -9.36], and [-10.90, -6.45], respectively. Findings served to inform treatment designs concerning the use of supported exercise and cognitive-behavioral means to derive better outcomes related to nutrition and weight loss in individuals with severe

  16. An improved Agrobacterium-mediated transformation system for the functional genetic analysis of Penicillium marneffei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummasook, Aksarakorn; Cooper, Chester R; Vanittanakom, Nongnuch

    2010-12-01

    We have developed an improved Agrobacterium-mediated transformation (AMT) system for the functional genetic analysis of Penicillium marneffei, a thermally dimorphic, human pathogenic fungus. Our AMT protocol included the use of conidia or pre-germinated conidia of P. marneffei as the host recipient for T-DNA from Agrobacterium tumefaciens and co-cultivation at 28°C for 36 hours. Bleomycin-resistant transformants were selected as yeast-like colonies following incubation at 37°C. The efficiency of transformation was approximately 123 ± 3.27 and 239 ± 13.12 transformants per plate when using 5 × 10(4) conidia and pre-germinated conidia as starting materials, respectively. Southern blot analysis demonstrated that 95% of transformants contained single copies of T-DNA. Inverse PCR was employed for identifying flanking sequences at the T-DNA insertion sites. Analysis of these sequences indicated that integration occurred as random recombination events. Among the mutants isolated were previously described stuA and gasC defective strains. These AMT-derived mutants possessed single T-DNA integrations within their particular coding sequences. In addition, other morphological and pigmentation mutants possessing a variety of gene-specific defects were isolated, including two mutants having T-DNA integrations within putative promoter regions. One of the latter integration events was accompanied by the deletion of the entire corresponding gene. Collectively, these results indicated that AMT could be used for large-scale, functional genetic analyses in P. marneffei. Such analyses can potentially facilitate the identification of those genetic elements related to morphogenesis, as well as pathogenesis in this medically important fungus.

  17. Possibilities in improvement of the specific biodistribution by means of radiolabelled antibodies after complexation. Untersuchungen ueber Moeglichkeiten der Verbesserung der spezifischen Organbindung mit Hilfe von anti-Organ-Antikoerpern durch Komplexbildung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinrich, H. (Rostock Univ., Klinik fuer Radiologie, Abt. fuer Experimentelle Nuklearmedizin (Germany))

    1990-01-01

    The applicability of labeled by different nuclides poly- or monoclonal antibodies in nuclear medicine diagnostics is restricted by incidental consequences. Overhigh background activities and/or high (additional) binding reactivities in the liver are troublesome. Hence we examined if the lokalizing biodistribution of labeled antibodies regarding the target organ can be improved by complexation with metal ions. The investigations were carried out with the pancreas of four Beagle dogs. Xenogenic polyclonal antibodies were refined by passing down the gammaglobulin fraction of rabbit serum a sephadex G 200 - column three times and hence radiolabeled by Na{sup 131}I. Then the antibodies were injected i.p. either as complete molecules or as partially digested by pepsin fragments F(ab){sub 2}-fragments in order to avoid nonspecific Fc interactions. In preparing the i.p. injection another part of the antibody preparations both complete and fragments had been complexed with copper ions in an alkaline buffer giving a stable copper-protein-complex (Biuret-complex). Undergoing scanning and after killing the dogs the organ deposition of the radiolabel had been observed and noticed. The complexation with copper of radiolabeled antibodies improves strikingly the specific target organ uptake. Because of inflammatory and other incidental consequences the Fc-fragments should be removed by digestion with enzymes. Higher specific organ uptake should be obtainable if the poyclonal antibody fraction is more refined specifically by immunosorption with respect to its affinity to the specific antigenic structures. (orig.).

  18. Postnatal aniracetam treatment improves prenatal ethanol induced attenuation of AMPA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijayawardhane, Nayana; Shonesy, Brian C; Vaglenova, Julia; Vaithianathan, Thirumalini; Carpenter, Mark; Breese, Charles R; Dityatev, Alexander; Suppiramaniam, Vishnu

    2007-06-01

    Aniracetam is a nootropic compound and an allosteric modulator of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) which mediate synaptic mechanisms of learning and memory. Here we analyzed impairments in AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission caused by moderate prenatal ethanol exposure and investigated the effects of postnatal aniracetam treatment on these abnormalities. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were gavaged with ethanol or isocaloric sucrose throughout pregnancy, and subsequently the offspring were treated with aniracetam on postnatal days (PND) 18 to 27. Hippocampal slices prepared from these pups on PND 28 to 34 were used for the whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of AMPAR-mediated spontaneous and miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents in CA1 pyramidal cells. Our results indicate that moderate ethanol exposure during pregnancy results in impaired hippocampal AMPAR-mediated neurotransmission, and critically timed aniracetam treatment can abrogate this deficiency. These results highlight the possibility that aniracetam treatment can restore synaptic transmission and ameliorate cognitive deficits associated with the fetal alcohol syndrome.

  19. Improvement of the Elevated Tryptase Criterion to Discriminate IgE- From Non-IgE-Mediated Allergic Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastaminza, Gabriel; Lafuente, Alberto; Goikoetxea, Maria Jose; D'Amelio, Carmen M; Bernad-Alonso, Amalia; Vega, Olga; Martinez-Molina, Juan Ambrosio; Ferrer, Marta; Nuñez-Cordoba, Jorge M

    2017-11-17

    Differentiating between immunoglobulin E (IgE)-dependent and IgE-independent hypersensitivity reactions may improve the etiologic orientation and clinical management of patients with allergic reactions in the anesthesia setting. Serum tryptase levels may be useful to discriminate the immune mechanism of allergic reactions, but the diagnostic accuracy and optimal cutpoint remain unclear.We aimed to compare the diagnostic accuracy of tryptase during reaction (TDR) alone and the TDR/basal tryptase (TDR/BT) ratio for discriminating IgE- from non-IgE-mediated allergic reactions, and to estimate the best cut point for these indicators. We included 111 patients (45% men; aged 3-99 years) who had experienced an allergic reaction, even though the allergic reaction could be nonanaphylactic. Allergy tests were performed to classify the reaction as an IgE- or non-IgE-mediated one. The area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to estimate the discriminative ability of TDR and TDR/BT ratio. An IgE-mediated reaction was diagnosed in 49.5% of patients, of whom 56% met anaphylaxis criteria. The median (quartiles) TDR for the IgE-mediated reactions was 8.0 (4.9-19.6) and 5.1 (3.5-8.1) for the non-IgE-mediated (P = .022). The median (quartiles) TDR/BT ratio was 2.7 (1.7-4.5) in IgE-mediated and 1.1 (1.0-1.6) in non-IgE-mediated reactions (P IgE- from non-IgE-mediated reactions compared to TDR (AUC TDR/BT = 0.79 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.1-2.2] and AUC TDR = 0.66 [95% CI, 1.1-2.2]; P = .003). The optimal cut point for TDR/BT (maximization of the sum of the sensitivity and specificity) was 1.66 (95% CI, 1.1-2.2). The TDR/BT ratio showed a significantly better discriminative ability than TDR to discriminate IgE- from non-IgE-mediated allergic reactions. An optimal TDR/BT ratio threshold of approximately 1.66 may be useful in clinical practice to classify allergic reactions as IgE- or non-IgE-mediated.

  20. A vegan diet free of gluten improves the signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis: the effects on arthritis correlate with a reduction in antibodies to food antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafström, I; Ringertz, B; Spångberg, A; von Zweigbergk, L; Brannemark, S; Nylander, I; Rönnelid, J; Laasonen, L; Klareskog, L

    2001-10-01

    Whether food intake can modify the course of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an issue of continued scientific and public interest. However, data from controlled clinical trials are sparse. We thus decided to study the clinical effects of a vegan diet free of gluten in RA and to quantify the levels of antibodies to key food antigens not present in the vegan diet. Sixty-six patients with active RA were randomized to either a vegan diet free of gluten (38 patients) or a well-balanced non-vegan diet (28 patients) for 1 yr. All patients were instructed and followed-up in the same manner. They were analysed at baseline and after 3, 6 and 12 months, according to the response criteria of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR). Furthermore, levels of antibodies against gliadin and beta-lactoglobulin were assessed and radiographs of the hands and feet were performed. Twenty-two patients in the vegan group and 25 patients in the non-vegan diet group completed 9 months or more on the diet regimens. Of these diet completers, 40.5% (nine patients) in the vegan group fulfilled the ACR20 improvement criteria compared with 4% (one patient) in the non-vegan group. Corresponding figures for the intention to treat populations were 34.3 and 3.8%, respectively. The immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody levels against gliadin and beta-lactoglobulin decreased in the responder subgroup in the vegan diet-treated patients, but not in the other analysed groups. No retardation of radiological destruction was apparent in any of the groups. The data provide evidence that dietary modification may be of clinical benefit for certain RA patients, and that this benefit may be related to a reduction in immunoreactivity to food antigens eliminated by the change in diet.

  1. Alpha-Linolenic Acid Confers Neuroprotection and Improves Behavioral Deficits After Soman Exposure: Involvement of Neurogenesis Through an mTOR-Mediated Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-15

    ALPHA-LINOLENIC ACID CONFERS NEUROPROTECTION AND IMPROVES BEHAVIORAL DEFICITS AFTER SOMAN EXPOSURE: INVOLVEMENT OF NEUROGENESIS THROUGH...soman exposure: involvement of neurogenesis through an mTOR-mediated pathway" Name of Candidate: Tetsade CB Piermartiri Doctor of Philosophy Degree...IMPROVES BEHAVIORAL DEFICITS AFTER SOMAN EXPOSURE: INVOLVEM OF NEUROGENESIS THROUGH AN mTOR-MEDIATED PATHWAY" is appropriately acknowledged and, beyond

  2. Human Cell Line-Derived Monoclonal IgA Antibodies for Cancer Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Hart

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available IgA antibodies have great potential to improve the functional diversity of current IgG antibody-based cancer immunotherapy options. However, IgA production and purification is not well established, which can at least in part be attributed to the more complex glycosylation as compared to IgG antibodies. IgA antibodies possess up to five N-glycosylation sites within their constant region of the heavy chain as compared to one site for IgG antibodies. The human GlycoExpress expression system was developed to produce biotherapeutics with optimized glycosylation and used here to generate a panel of IgA isotype antibodies directed against targets for solid (TA-mucin 1, Her2, EGFR, Thomsen–Friedenreich and hematological (CD20 cancer indications. The feasibility of good manufacturing practice was shown by the production of 11 g IgA within 35 days in a one liter perfusion bioreactor, and IgA antibodies in high purity were obtained after purification. The monoclonal IgA antibodies possessed a high sialylation degree, and no non-human glycan structures were detected. Kinetic analysis revealed increased avidity antigen binding for IgA dimers as compared to monomeric antibodies. The IgA antibodies exhibited potent Fab- and Fc-mediated functionalities against cancer cell lines, whereby especially granulocytes are recruited. Therefore, for patients who do not sufficiently benefit from therapeutic IgG antibodies, IgA antibodies may complement current regiment options and represent a promising strategy for cancer immunotherapy. In conclusion, a panel of novel biofunctional IgA antibodies with human glycosylation was successfully generated.

  3. Recombinant AAV-mediated in vivo long-term expression and antitumour activity of an anti-ganglioside GM3(Neu5Gc) antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piperno, G M; López-Requena, A; Predonzani, A; Dorvignit, D; Labrada, M; Zentilin, L; Burrone, O R; Cesco-Gaspere, M

    2015-12-01

    The ganglioside GM3(Neu5Gc) has gained increasing attention as therapeutic target because of its selective expression in various human tumours, such as melanoma, breast and lung cancer. 14F7 is a mouse IgG1 with specific reactivity to GM3(Neu5Gc)-positive tumours. The therapeutic activity of 14F7 has also been demonstrated in vivo, through its repetitive passive administration in tumour-bearing animals. In this work we used an alternative strategy to deliver recombinant 14F7 in vivo and analysed the therapeutic efficacy of this approach. We engineered a recombinant adeno-associated vector to direct the expression of secretable recombinant 14F7 in BALB/c animals. A single administration of the rAAV induced efficient production and secretion of the antibody in the bloodstream, with an expression level reaching plateau at ∼3 weeks after injection and persisting for almost a year. Strikingly, upon challenge with GM3(Neu5Gc)-positive X63-AG8.653 myeloma cells, tumour development was significantly delayed in animals treated with rAAV-14F7 with respect to animals treated with a control rAAV codifying for an irrelevant antibody. Finally, no significant differences in survival proportion were detected in animals injected with rAAV-14F7 or treated by standard administration of repetitive doses of purified monoclonal antibody 14F7.

  4. Novel ISCOMs from Quillaja brasiliensis saponins induce mucosal and systemic antibody production, T-cell responses and improved antigen uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Mourglia-Ettlin, Gustavo; Teixeira, Thais Fumaco; Quirici, Lenora; Roehe, Paulo Michel; Ferreira, Fernando; Silveira, Fernando

    2016-02-24

    In the last decades, significant efforts have been dedicated to the search for novel vaccine adjuvants. In this regard, saponins and its formulations as "immunostimulating complexes" (ISCOMs) have shown to be capable of stimulating potent humoral and cellular immune responses, enhanced cytokine production and activation of cytotoxic T cells. The immunological activity of ISCOMs formulated with a saponin fraction extracted from Quillaja brasiliensis (QB-90 fraction) as an alternative to classical ISCOMs based on Quil A(®) (IQA) is presented here. The ISCOMs prepared with QB-90, named IQB-90, typically consist of 40-50 nm, spherical, cage-like particles, built up by QB-90, cholesterol, phospholipids and antigen (ovalbumin, OVA). These nanoparticles were efficiently uptaken in vitro by murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Subcutaneously inoculated IQB-90 induced strong serum antibody responses encompassing specific IgG1 and IgG2a, robust DTH reactions, significant T cell proliferation and increases in Th1 (IFN-γ and IL-2) cytokine responses. Intranasally delivered IQB-90 elicited serum IgG and IgG1, and mucosal IgA responses at distal systemic sites (nasal passages, large intestine and vaginal lumen). These results indicate that IQB-90 is a promising alternative to classic ISCOMs as vaccine adjuvants, capable of enhancing humoral and cellular immunity to levels comparable to those induced by ISCOMs manufactured with Quillaja saponaria saponins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. 9th annual European Antibody Congress, November 11-13, 2013, Geneva, Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Janice M; Beck, Alain; Lugovskoy, Alexey A; Wurch, Thierry; Coats, Steven; Brezski, Randall J

    2014-01-01

    The annual European Antibody Congress (EAC) has traditionally been the key event for updates on critical scientific advances in the antibody field, and 2013 was no exception. Organized by Terrapinn, the well-attended meeting featured presentations on considerations for developing antibodies and antibody-like therapeutics, with separate tracks for antibody-drug conjugates, naked antibodies, and multispecific antibodies or protein scaffolds. The overall focus of the EAC was current approaches to enhance the functionality of therapeutic antibodies or other targeted proteins, with the ultimate goal being improvement of the safety and efficacy of the molecules as treatments for cancer, immune-mediated disorders and other diseases. Roundtable discussion sessions gave participants opportunities to engage in group discussions with industry leaders from companies such as Genmab, Glenmark Pharmaceuticals, MedImmune, Merrimack Pharmaceuticals, and Pierre Fabre. As the 2013 EAC was co-located with the World Biosimilar Congress, participants also received an update on European Medicines Agency guidelines and thoughts on the future direction and development of biosimilar antibodies in the European Union.

  6. Effect of Magnesium as Substitute Material in Enzyme-Mediated Calcite Precipitation for Soil-Improvement Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Putra, Heriansyah; Yasuhara, Hideaki; Kinoshita, Naoki; Neupane, Debendra; Lu, Chih-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The optimization of enzyme-mediated calcite precipitation was evaluated as a soil-improvement technique. In our previous works, purified urease was utilized to bio-catalyze the hydrolysis of urea, which causes the supplied Ca2+ to precipitate with C O 3 2 ? as calcium carbonate. In the present work, magnesium chloride was newly added to the injecting solutions to delay the reaction rate and to enhance the amount of carbonate precipitation. Soil specimens were prepared in PVC cylinders and tre...

  7. In-vitro inhibition of IFNγ+ iTreg mediated by monoclonal antibodies against cell surface determinants essential for iTreg function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Volker

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background IFNγ-producing CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ PBL represent a subtype of iTreg that are associated with good long-term graft outcome in renal transplant recipients and suppress alloresponses in-vitro. To study the mechanism of immunosuppression, we attempted to block cell surface receptors and thereby inhibited the function of this iTreg subset in-vitro using monoclonal antibodies and recombinant proteins. Methods PBL of healthy control individuals were stimulated polyclonally in-vitro in the presence of monoclonal antibodies or recombinant proteins against/of CD178, CD152, CD279, CD28, CD95, and HLA-DR. Induction of IFNγ+ iTreg and proliferation of effector cells was determined using four-color fluorescence flow cytometry. Blockade of iTreg function was analyzed using polyclonally stimulated co-cultures with separated CD4+CD25+CD127-IFNγ+ PBL. Results High monoclonal antibody concentrations inhibited the induction of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+IFNγ+ PBL (anti-CD152, anti-CD279, anti-CD95: p +CD25+CD127-IFNγ+ PBL (anti-CD178, anti-CD152, anti-CD279, anti-CD95: p +CD25+Foxp3+IFNγ+ PBL (rCD152 and rCD95: p +CD25+CD127-IFNγ+ PBL showed lower cell proliferation than co-cultures with CD4+CD25+CD127-IFNγ- PBL (p +CD25+CD127-IFNγ- PBL-containing co-cultures in the presence of monoclonal antibody (anti-CD28, anti-CD152, anti-CD279: p +CD25+CD127-IFNγ+ PBL (with the exception anti-CD28 monoclonal antibody: p +CD25+CD127-IFNγ- PBL but do not efficiently block suppressive iTreg function in co-cultures with CD4+CD25+CD127-IFNγ+ PBL. Conclusions CD178, CD152, CD279, CD28, CD95, and HLA-DR determinants are important for induction and suppressive function of IFNγ+ iTreg.

  8. Differential effects of IL-2 and IL-21 on expansion of the CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ T regulatory cells with redundant roles in natural killer cell mediated antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Aruna; Ramanunni, Asha; Cheney, Carolyn; Rozewski, Darlene; Kindsvogel, Wayne; Lehman, Amy; Jarjoura, David; Caligiuri, Michael; Byrd, John C; Muthusamy, Natarajan

    2010-01-01

    CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells are expanded in solid and hematological malignancies including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Several cytokines and co-stimulatory molecules are required for generation, survival and maintenance of their suppressive effect. We and others have shown direct cytotoxic effect of the novel common gamma chain cytokine interleukin (IL)-21 on primary B cells from CLL patients. Since members of this family of cytokines are known to exhibit their effects on diverse immune cells, we have examined the effects of IL-21 on CLL patient derived regulatory T cell (Treg) induction, expansion and the inhibitory effect on natural killer cells in vitro. We demonstrate here the expression of IL-21 receptor in CD4(+)CD25(High) regulatory cells from CLL patients. In contrast to IL-2, the IL-21 cytokine failed to mediate expansion of regulatory T cells or induced expression of Foxp3 in CD4(+)CD25(Intermediate) or CD4(+)CD25(Dim/-) T cells in whole blood derived from CLL patients. Interestingly, in contrast to their differential effects on expansion of the CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+)T cells, IL-2 and IL-21 exhibited a redundant role in Treg mediated suppression of NK cell mediated antibody dependent cytotoxicity function. Given the infusion related toxicities and pro-survival effect of IL-2 in CLL, these studies provide a rationale to explore IL-21 as an alternate gamma chain cytokine in CLL therapy.

  9. Investigations on the protective role of passively transferred antibodies against avian metapneumovirus infection in turkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubbenstroth, Dennis; Rautenschlein, Silke

    2009-12-01

    The avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) is the causative agent of an acute respiratory disease in turkeys, which causes considerable economic losses to the poultry industry. Currently attenuated live and inactivated vaccines are widely used to control the disease, but vaccine breaks are frequently observed. For improvement of current vaccination strategies it is necessary to gain enhanced knowledge of the immune mechanisms against aMPV infection. Field observations suggest that vaccine-induced aMPV-specific antibodies are not indicative for protection. In the present study we investigated the role of antibodies in protection of turkeys against aMPV. In two experiments, commercial turkey poults received aMPV-specific antibodies by intravenous injection. The antibody transfer resulted in increased antibody levels in the sera. Virus-specific antibodies were also detected on mucosal surfaces such as the trachea, conjunctivae and gall bladder. Turkeys were subsequently challenged with a virulent aMPV subtype A strain. Development of clinical signs, virus detection by polymerase chain reaction and histopathological changes of tracheal mucosa in challenged turkeys with and without passively transferred antibodies were comparable with each other. Our results suggest that humoral immunity does not provide sufficient protection against aMPV infection. Thus, the measurement of vaccine-induced aMPV antibody response may not be considered as an adequate indicator of vaccine efficacy. Further research on the protective role of cell-mediated immune mechanisms is necessary to improve current vaccine strategies.

  10. Mediators of physical exercise for improvement in cancer survivors' quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buffart, L.M.; Ros, W.J.G.; Chin A Paw, M.J.M.; Brug, J.; Knol, D.L.; Korstjens, I.; van Weert, E.; Mesters, I.; van den Borne, B.; Hoekstra-Weebers, J.E.H.M.; May, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Mediating mechanisms of a 12-week group-based exercise intervention on cancer survivors' quality of life (QoL) were examined to inform future exercise intervention development. Methods Two hundred nine cancer survivors ≥3 months posttreatment (57% breast cancer) aged 49.5 (±10.4) years

  11. Improvement of preclinical animal models for autoimmune-mediated disorders via reverse translation of failed therapies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    't Hart, Bert A.; Jagessar, S. Anwar; Kap, Yolanda S.; Haanstra, Krista G.; Philippens, Ingrid H. C. H. M.; Serguera, Che; Langermans, Jan; Vierboom, Michel

    The poor translational validity of autoimmune-mediated inflammatory disease (AIMID) models in inbred and specific pathogen-free (SPF) rodents underlies the high attrition of new treatments for the corresponding human disease. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a frequently used

  12. BDNF mediates improvements in executive function following a 1-year exercise intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Lynn Leckie

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Executive function declines with age, but engaging in aerobic exercise may attenuate decline. One mechanism by which aerobic exercise may preserve executive function is through the up-regulation of brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF, which also declines with age. The present study examined BDNF as a mediator of the effects of a 1-year walking intervention on executive function in 90 older adults (mean age = 66.82. Participants were randomized to a stretching and toning control group or a moderate intensity walking intervention group. BDNF serum levels and performance on a task-switching paradigm were collected at baseline and follow-up. We found that age moderated the effect of intervention group on changes in BDNF levels, with those in the highest age quartile showing the greatest increase in BDNF after 1-year of moderate intensity walking exercise (p = .036. The mediation analyses revealed that BDNF mediated the effect of the intervention on task-switch accuracy, but did so as a function of age, such that exercise-induced changes in BDNF mediated the effect of exercise on task-switch performance only for individuals over the age of 71. These results demonstrate that both age and BDNF serum levels are important factors to consider when investigating the mechanisms by which exercise interventions influence cognitive outcomes, particularly in elderly populations.

  13. Technology as Mediation Tool for Improving Teaching Profession in Higher Education Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinay-Gazi, Zehra; Altinay-Aksal, Fahriye

    2017-01-01

    Technology became a mediation tool for forming information and developing skills is teacher education programs of higher education institutions because technological tools can be used for self-reflection of prospective teachers' teaching performances. Practical implementation of teacher education programmes is a part of quality indicator in higher…

  14. Towards improving treatment for childhood OCD: Analyzing mediating mechanisms & non-response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, L.H.

    2013-01-01

    What are mediating mechanisms in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for childhood obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)? For whom does CBT work and for whom is CBT less effective? What should be recommended for those children who do not sufficiently benefit from CBT? The studies described in the

  15. A 70-year-old male with peripheral neuropathy, ataxia and antigliadin antibodies shows improvement in neuropathy, but not ataxia, after intravenous immunoglobulin and gluten-free diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharshan Anandacoomaraswamy

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Dharshan Anandacoomaraswamy1, Jagdeesh Ullal2, Aaron I Vinik21Department of Internal Medicine, Coney Island Hospital, Brooklyn, NY, USA; 2Strelitz Diabetes Center, Department of Internal Medicine, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA, USAAbstract: This is a case of a 70-year-old man with severe peripheral neuropathy, type 2 diabetes and progressively worsening cerebellar ataxia. He was found to have circulating antigliadin and antireticulin antibodies compatible with celiac disease in the absence of intestinal pathology. The peripheral neuropathy improved with a gluten-free diet, antioxidants and intravenous immunoglobulin, whereas the ataxia did not. This case illustrates the need to test for celiac disease in patients with idiopathic ataxia and peripheral neuropathy and the need for alternative therapies for ataxia. Keywords: celiac disease, peripheral neuropathy, autoimmune disease, cerebellar ataxia, type 2 diabetes

  16. Characterization of antibodies in single-chain format against the E7 oncoprotein of the Human papillomavirus type 16 and their improvement by mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Accardi Luisa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomaviruses (HPV are the etiological agents of cervical cancer. The viral E7 protein plays a crucial role in viral oncogenesis. Many strategies have been explored to block the E7 oncoprotein activity. The single-chain variable antibody fragments (scFvs are valuable tools in cancer immunotherapy and can be used as "intracellular antibodies" to knock out specific protein functions. For both in vivo and in vitro employment, the scFv intrinsic solubility and stability are important to achieve long-lasting effects. Here we report the characterization in terms of reactivity, solubility and thermal stability of three anti-HPV16 E7 scFvs. We have also analysed the scFv43 sequence with the aim of improving stability and then activity of the antibody, previously shown to have antiproliferative activity when expressed in HPV16-positive cells. Methods The three anti-HPV16 E7 scFv 32, 43 51 were selected from the ETH-2 "phage-display" library. Thermal stability was evaluated with ELISA by determining the residual activity of each purified scFv against the recombinant HPV16 E7, after incubation in the presence of human seroalbumine for different time-intervals at different temperatures. Sequence analysis of the scFvs was performed with BLAST and CLUSTALL programs. The scFv43 aminoacid changes were reverted back to the consensus sequence from the immunoglobuline database by site-directed mutagenesis. ScFv solubility was evaluated with Western blotting by determining their relative amounts in the soluble and insoluble fractions of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems. Results ScFv51 was the most thermally stable scFv considered. Sequence analysis of the most reactive scFv43 has evidenced 2 amino acid changes possibly involved in molecule stability, in the VH and VL CDR3 regions respectively. By mutagenesis, two novel scFv43-derived scFvs were obtained, scFv43 M1 and M2. ScFv43 M2 showed to have improved thermal stability and

  17. The Amaranthus leucocarpus lectin enhances the anti-CD3 antibody-mediated activation of human peripheral blood CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrea, Francisco; Ortiz-Quintero, Blanca; Sanchez-Garcia, Francisco Javier; Blanco-Favela, Francisco; Garfias, Yonathan; Lascurain, Ricardo; Zenteno, Edgar

    2010-08-01

    Activation of CD4(+) T cells plays a main role in adaptive immune response by regulating cellular and humoral immunity via processes associated with changes in cell surface oligosaccharide receptors. Lectins are glycoproteins that specifically recognize oligosaccharides and have been used to characterize changes in oligosaccharides present on T cell surface and their effects on activation. A lectin from Amaranthus leucocarpus seeds (ALL) is specific for glycoprotein structures containing galactose-N-acetylgalactosamine and is able to bind to human and murine CD4(+) T cells, however, its effect on activation remains unclear. We examined the effect of ALL on the activation of peripheral blood human CD4(+) T cells and analyzed cell proliferation, expression of the activation-associated molecule CD25, secretion of the activation-dependent cytokine interleukin (IL)-2 and intracellular calcium influx changes using flow cytometry. CD4(+) T cells were stimulated with anti-CD3 antibodies that provided the first activation signal in the presence or absence of ALL. ALL alone did not induce CD4(+) T cell activation but when also stimulated with anti-CD3 antibodies, ALL up-regulated CD25 expression, cell proliferation, IL-2 secretion and an intracellular calcium influx in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, ALL recognized CD4(+) T cells expressing the CD69 and Ki67 molecules expressed only by activated T cells and induced production of the TH1-type cytokine interferon-gamma. Our findings indicate that ALL binds to human activated CD4(+) T cells and enhances the degree of activation of CD4(+) T cells that are stimulated with anti-CD3 antibodies. ALL provides a new tool for analyzing T cell activation mechanisms.

  18. A Nanoparticle Platform To Evaluate Bioconjugation and Receptor-Mediated Cell Uptake Using Cross-Linked Polyion Complex Micelles Bearing Antibody Fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florinas, Stelios; Liu, Marc; Fleming, Ryan; Van Vlerken-Ysla, Lilian; Ayriss, Joanne; Gilbreth, Ryan; Dimasi, Nazzareno; Gao, Changshou; Wu, Herren; Xu, Ze-Qi; Chen, Shaoyi; Dirisala, Anjaneyulu; Kataoka, Kazunori; Cabral, Horacio; Christie, R James

    2016-05-09

    Targeted nanomedicines are a promising technology for treatment of disease; however, preparation and characterization of well-defined protein-nanoparticle systems remain challenging. Here, we describe a platform technology to prepare antibody binding fragment (Fab)-bearing nanoparticles and an accompanying real-time cell-based assay to determine their cellular uptake compared to monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and Fabs. The nanoparticle platform was composed of core-cross-linked polyion complex (PIC) micelles prepared from azide-functionalized PEG-b-poly(amino acids), that is, azido-PEG-b-poly(l-lysine) [N3-PEG-b-PLL] and azido-PEG-b-poly(aspartic acid) [N3-PEG-b-PAsp]. These PIC micelles were 30 nm in size and contained approximately 10 polymers per construct. Fabs were derived from an antibody binding the EphA2 receptor expressed on cancer cells and further engineered to contain a reactive cysteine for site-specific attachment and a cleavable His tag for purification from cell culture expression systems. Azide-functionalized micelles and thiol-containing Fab were linked using a heterobifunctional cross-linker (FPM-PEG4-DBCO) that contained a fluorophenyl-maleimide for stable conjugation to Fabs thiols and a strained alkyne (DBCO) group for coupling to micelle azide groups. Analysis of Fab-PIC micelle conjugates by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, size exclusion chromatography, and UV-vis absorbance determined that each nanoparticle contained 2-3 Fabs. Evaluation of cellular uptake in receptor positive cancer cells by real-time fluorescence microscopy revealed that targeted Fab-PIC micelles achieved higher cell uptake than mAbs and Fabs, demonstrating the utility of this approach to identify targeted nanoparticle constructs with unique cellular internalization properties.

  19. Myosins 1 and 6, myosin light chain kinase, actin and microtubules cooperate during antibody-mediated internalisation and trafficking of membrane-expressed viral antigens in feline infectious peritonitis virus infected monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewerchin, Hannah L; Desmarets, Lowiese M; Noppe, Ytse; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2014-02-12

    Monocytes infected with feline infectious peritonitis virus, a coronavirus, express viral proteins in their plasma membranes. Upon binding of antibodies, these proteins are quickly internalised through a new clathrin- and caveolae-independent internalisation pathway. By doing so, the infected monocytes can escape antibody-dependent cell lysis. In the present study, we investigated which kinases and cytoskeletal proteins are of importance during internalisation and subsequent intracellular transport. The experiments showed that myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and myosin 1 are crucial for the initiation of the internalisation. With co-localisation stainings, it was found that MLCK and myosin 1 co-localise with antigens even before internalisation started. Myosin 6 co-localised with the internalising complexes during passage through the cortical actin, were it might play a role in moving or disintegrating actin filaments, to overcome the actin barrier. One minute after internalisation started, vesicles had passed the cortical actin, co-localised with microtubules and association with myosin 6 was lost. The vesicles were further transported over the microtubules and accumulated at the microtubule organising centre after 10 to 30 min. Intracellular trafficking over microtubules was mediated by MLCK, myosin 1 and a small actin tail. Since inhibiting MLCK with ML-7 was so efficient in blocking the internalisation pathway, this target can be used for the development of a new treatment for FIPV.

  20. Induction of a protein-targeted catalytic response in autoimmune prone mice: antibody-mediated cleavage of HIV-1 glycoprotein GP120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarenko, Natalia A; Vorobiev, Ivan I; Alexandrova, Elena S; Reshetnyak, Andrew V; Telegin, Georgy B; Khaidukov, Sergey V; Avalle, Bérangère; Karavanov, Alexander; Morse, Herbert C; Thomas, Daniel; Friboulet, Alain; Gabibov, Alexander G

    2006-01-10

    We have induced a polyclonal IgG that degrades the HIV-1 surface antigen, glycoprotein gp120, by taking advantage of the susceptibility of SJL mice to a peptide-induced autoimmune disorder, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Specific pathogen-free SJL mice were immunized with structural fragments of gp120, fused in-frame with encephalitogenic peptide MBP(85-101). It has resulted in a pronounced disease-associated immune response against antigens. A dramatic increase of gp120 degradation level by purified polyclonal IgG from immunized versus nonimmunized mice has been demonstrated by a newly developed fluorescence-based assay. This activity was inhibited by anti-mouse immunoglobulin antibodies as well as by Ser- and His-reactive covalent inhibitors. A dominant proteolysis site in recombinant gp120 incubated with purified polyclonal IgG from immunized mice was shown by SDS-PAGE. The SELDI-based mass spectrometry revealed that these antibodies exhibited significant specificity toward the Pro484-Leu485 peptide bond. The sequence surrounding this site is present in nearly half of the HIV-I variants. This novel strategy can be generalized for creating a catalytic vaccine against viral pathogens.

  1. Anti-HER-3 MAbs inhibit HER-3-mediated signaling in breast cancer cell lines resistant to anti-HER-2 antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Horst, Edward Htun; Murgia, Marta; Treder, Martin; Ullrich, Axel

    2005-07-01

    Two members of the EGF receptor family, HER2 and HER3, act as key oncogenes in breast cancer cells. A MAb against HER2, trastuzumab, interferes with HER2 signaling and istherapeutically effective in humans. Here, we explored the biologic effects of an antibody against HER3 (alpha-HER3ECD) in the invasive breast cancer cell lines MCF-7ADR and MDA-MB-468. Pretreating the breast cancer cells with alpha-HER3ECD prior to Heregulin stimulation caused significant reduction of the migratory and proliferative properties. This reduction is due to a substantial decrease in the tyrosine phosphorylation content of HER2 and to a modification of the HER2/HER3 association, which ultimately inhibits the activity of the downstream effectors phosphatidyinositol-3-OH-kinase and c-jun-terminal kinase. Furthermore, HER3 is internalized and not activated by HRG after pretreatment with alpha-HER3ECD. Our data reinforce the notion that HER3 could be a key target in cancer drug design and show the great potential of anti-HER3 antibodies for the therapy of breast cancer and other malignancies characterized by overexpression of HER3. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Humanised IgG1 antibody variants targeting membrane-bound carcinoembryonic antigen by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, S Q; Umana, P; Mössner, E; Ntouroupi, T; Brünker, P; Schmidt, C; Wilding, J L; Mortensen, N J; Bodmer, W F

    2009-11-17

    The effect of glycoengineering a membrane specific anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) (this paper uses the original term CEA for the formally designated CEACAM5) antibody (PR1A3) on its ability to enhance killing of colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines by human immune effector cells was assessed. In vivo efficacy of the antibody was also tested. The antibody was modified using EBNA cells cotransfected with beta-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase III and the humanised hPR1A3 antibody genes. The resulting alteration of the Fc segment glycosylation pattern enhances the antibody's binding affinity to the FcgammaRIIIa receptor on human immune effector cells but does not alter the antibody's binding capacity. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is inhibited in the presence of anti-FcgammaRIII blocking antibodies. This glycovariant of hPR1A3 enhances ADCC 10-fold relative to the parent unmodified antibody using either unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear or natural killer (NK) cells and CEA-positive CRC cells as targets. NK cells are far more potent in eliciting ADCC than either freshly isolated monocytes or granulocytes. Flow cytometry and automated fluorescent microscopy have been used to show that both versions of hPR1A3 can induce antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) by monocyte-derived macrophages. However, the glycovariant antibody did not mediate enhanced ADCP. This may be explained by the relatively low expression of FcgammaRIIIa on cultured macrophages. In vivo studies show the efficacy of glycoengineered humanised IgG1 PR1A3 in significantly improving survival in a CRC metastatic murine model. The greatly enhanced in vitro ADCC activity of the glycoengineered version of hPR1A3 is likely to be clinically beneficial.

  3. A multicentre study to improve clinical interpretation of proteinase-3 and myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bossuyt, Xavier; Rasmussen, Niels; van Paassen, Pieter

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this multicentre study was to improve the clinical interpretation of PR3- and MPO-ANCAs as an adjunct for the diagnosis of ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) by defining thresholds and test result intervals based on predefined specificities and by calculating test result...

  4. Magnesium improves cisplatin-mediated tumor killing while protecting against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Gopal; Solanki, Malvika H; Xue, Xiangying; Mintz, Rachel; Madankumar, Swati; Chatterjee, Prodyot K; Metz, Christine N

    2017-08-01

    Approximately 30% of all cancer patients treated with cisplatin, a widely used broad-spectrum chemotherapeutic agent, experience acute kidney injury (AKI). Almost all patients receiving cisplatin have magnesium (Mg) losses, which are proposed to aggravate AKI. Currently, there are no methods to successfully treat or prevent cisplatin-AKI. Whereas Mg supplementation has been shown to reduce AKI in experimental models and several small clinical trials, the effects of Mg status on tumor outcomes in immunocompetent tumor-bearing mice and humans have not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to further examine the effects of Mg deficiency (±Mg supplementation) on cisplatin-mediated AKI and tumor killing in immunocompetent mice bearing CT26 colon tumors. Using a model where cisplatin alone (20 mg/kg cumulative dose) produced minimal kidney injury, Mg deficiency significantly worsened cisplatin-mediated AKI, as determined by biochemical markers (blood urea nitrogen and plasma creatinine) and histological renal changes, as well as markers of renal oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis. By contrast, Mg supplementation blocked cisplatin-induced kidney injury. Using LLC-PK 1 renal epithelial cells, we observed that Mg deficiency or inhibition of Mg uptake significantly enhanced cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity, whereas Mg supplementation protected against cytotoxicity. However, neither Mg deficiency nor inhibition of Mg uptake impaired cisplatin-mediated killing of CT26 tumor cells in vitro. Mg deficiency was associated with significantly larger CT26 tumors in BALB/c mice when compared with normal-fed control mice, and Mg deficiency significantly reduced cisplatin-mediated tumor killing in vivo. Finally, Mg supplementation did not compromise cisplatin's anti-tumor efficacy in vivo. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Reorganization of functional brain networks mediates the improvement of cognitive performance following real-time neurofeedback training of working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gaoyan; Yao, Li; Shen, Jiahui; Yang, Yihong; Zhao, Xiaojie

    2015-05-01

    Working memory (WM) is essential for individuals' cognitive functions. Neuroimaging studies indicated that WM fundamentally relied on a frontoparietal working memory network (WMN) and a cinguloparietal default mode network (DMN). Behavioral training studies demonstrated that the two networks can be modulated by WM training. Different from the behavioral training, our recent study used a real-time functional MRI (rtfMRI)-based neurofeedback method to conduct WM training, demonstrating that WM performance can be significantly improved after successfully upregulating the activity of the target region of interest (ROI) in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Zhang et al., [2013]: PloS One 8:e73735); however, the neural substrate of rtfMRI-based WM training remains unclear. In this work, we assessed the intranetwork and internetwork connectivity changes of WMN and DMN during the training, and their correlations with the change of brain activity in the target ROI as well as with the improvement of post-training behavior. Our analysis revealed an "ROI-network-behavior" correlation relationship underlying the rtfMRI training. Further mediation analysis indicated that the reorganization of functional brain networks mediated the effect of self-regulation of the target brain activity on the improvement of cognitive performance following the neurofeedback training. The results of this study enhance our understanding of the neural basis of real-time neurofeedback and suggest a new direction to improve WM performance by regulating the functional connectivity in the WM related networks. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Characterization of Antibodies for Grain-Specific Gluten Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Girdhari M; Rallabhandi, Prasad; Williams, Kristina M; Pahlavan, Autusa

    2016-03-01

    Gluten ingestion causes immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated allergy or celiac disease in sensitive individuals, and a strict gluten-free diet greatly limits food choices. Immunoassays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) are used to quantify gluten to ensure labeling compliance of gluten-free foods. Anti-gluten antibodies may not exhibit equal affinity to gluten from wheat, rye, and barley. Moreover, because wheat gluten is commonly used as a calibrator in ELISA, accurate gluten quantitation from rye and barley contaminated foods may be compromised. Immunoassays utilizing grain-specific antibodies and calibrators may help improve gluten quantitation. In this study, polyclonal antibodies raised against gluten-containing grain-specific peptides were characterized for their immunoreactivity to gluten from different grain sources. Strong immunoreactivity to multiple gluten polypeptides from wheat, rye, and barley was observed in the range 34 to 43 kDa with anti-gliadin, 11 to 15 and 72 to 95 kDa with anti-secalin, and 30 to 43 kDa with anti-hordein peptide antibodies, respectively. Minimal or no cross-reactivity with gluten from other grains was observed among these antibodies. The anti-consensus peptide antibody raised against a repetitive amino acid sequence of proline and glutamine exhibited immunoreactivity to gluten from wheat, rye, barley, and oat. The antibodies exhibited similar immunoreactivity with most of the corresponding grain cultivars by ELISA. The high specificity and minimal cross-reactivity of grain-specific antibodies suggest their potential use in immunoassays for accurate gluten quantitation. © Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  7. FcRn affinity-pharmacokinetic relationship of five human IgG4 antibodies engineered for improved in vitro FcRn binding properties in cynomolgus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta-Mannan, Amita; Chow, Chi-Kin; Dickinson, Craig; Driver, David; Lu, Jirong; Witcher, Derrick R; Wroblewski, Victor J

    2012-08-01

    The pH-dependent binding of IgGs to the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) plays a critical role in regulating IgG homeostasis in vivo. Enhancing interactions between Fc and FcRn via protein engineering has been successfully used as an approach for improving the pharmacokinetics of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Although the quantitative translatability of the in vitro FcRn affinity enhancement to an in vivo pharmacokinetic benefit has been supported by several studies, there are also published reports indicating a disconnect in this relation. The body of literature suggests there are likely additional biochemical and biophysical properties of the mAbs along with their FcRn affinity that influence the in vivo pharmacokinetics. Herein, we more broadly evaluate the in vitro Fc-FcRn interactions and biochemical properties of five humanized IgG4 antibodies each with two Fc variant sequences (T250Q/M428L and V308P) and their corresponding pharmacokinetics in cynomolgus monkeys. Our findings indicate that the FcRn affinity-pharmacokinetic relationship does not show a direct correlation either across different IgGs or between the two variant sequences within a platform. Other parameters that have been suggested to contribute to mAb pharmacokinetic properties, such as the pH-dependent dissociation of the FcRn-IgG complexes, mAb biophysical properties, and nonspecific/charge binding characteristics of the mAbs, also did not independently explain the differing pharmacokinetic behaviors. Our results suggest that there is likely not a single in vitro parameter that readily predicts in vivo pharmacokinetics, but that the relative contribution and interplay of several factors along with the FcRn binding affinity are important determinants of mAb pharmacokinetic properties.

  8. Nuclear Factor κB is required for tumor growth inhibition mediated by enavatuzumab (PDL192, a humanized monoclonal antibody to TweakR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W. Purcell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available TweakR is a TNF receptor family member, whose natural ligand is the multifunctional cytokine TWEAK. The growth inhibitory activity observed following TweakR stimulation in certain cancer cell lines and the overexpression of TweakR in many solid tumor types led to the development of enavatuzumab (PDL192, a humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody to TweakR. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanism of action of enavatuzumab’s tumor growth inhibition and to provide insight into the biology behind TweakR as a cancer therapeutic target. A panel of 105 cancer lines was treated with enavatuzumab in vitro; and 29 cell lines of varying solid tumor backgrounds had >25% growth inhibition in response to the antibody. Treatment of sensitive cell lines with enavatuzumab resulted in the in vitro and in vivo (xenograft activation of both classical (p50, p65 and non-classical (p52, RelB NFκB pathways. Using NFκB DNA binding functional ELISAs and microarray analysis, we observed increased activation of NFκB subunits and NFκB regulated genes in sensitive cells over that observed in resistant cell lines. Inhibiting NFκB subunits (p50, p65, RelB, p52 and upstream kinases (IKK1, IKK2 with siRNA and chemical inhibitors consistently blocked enavatuzumab’s activity. Furthermore, enavatuzumab treatment resulted in NFκB-dependent reduction in cell-division as seen by the activation of the cell cycle inhibitor p21 both in vitro and in vivo. The finding that NFκB drives the growth inhibitory activity of enavatuzumab suggests that targeting TweakR with enavatuzumab may represent a novel cancer treatment strategy.

  9. Influenza human monoclonal antibody 1F1 interacts with three major antigenic sites and residues mediating human receptor specificity in H1N1 viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tshidi Tsibane

    Full Text Available Most monoclonal antibodies (mAbs to the influenza A virus hemagglutinin (HA head domain exhibit very limited breadth of inhibitory activity due to antigenic drift in field strains. However, mAb 1F1, isolated from a 1918 influenza pandemic survivor, inhibits select human H1 viruses (1918, 1943, 1947, and 1977 isolates. The crystal structure of 1F1 in complex with the 1918 HA shows that 1F1 contacts residues that are classically defined as belonging to three distinct antigenic sites, Sa, Sb and Ca(2. The 1F1 heavy chain also reaches into the receptor binding site (RBS and interacts with residues that contact sialoglycan receptors and determine HA receptor specificity. The 1F1 epitope is remarkably similar to the previously described murine HC63 H3 epitope, despite significant sequence differences between H1 and H3 HAs. Both antibodies potently inhibit receptor binding, but only HC63 can block the pH-induced conformational changes in HA that drive membrane fusion. Contacts within the RBS suggested that 1F1 may be sensitive to changes that alter HA receptor binding activity. Affinity assays confirmed that sequence changes that switch the HA to avian receptor specificity affect binding of 1F1 and a mAb possessing a closely related heavy chain, 1I20. To characterize 1F1 cross-reactivity, additional escape mutant selection and site-directed mutagenesis were performed. Residues 190 and 227 in the 1F1 epitope were found to be critical for 1F1 reactivity towards 1918, 1943 and 1977 HAs, as well as for 1I20 reactivity towards the 1918 HA. Therefore, 1F1 heavy-chain interactions with conserved RBS residues likely contribute to its ability to inhibit divergent HAs.

  10. Addition of glycosylation to influenza A virus hemagglutinin modulates antibody-mediated recognition of H1N1 2009 pandemic viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Job, Emma R; Deng, Yi-Mo; Barfod, Kenneth K; Tate, Michelle D; Caldwell, Natalie; Reddiex, Scott; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Brooks, Andrew G; Reading, Patrick C

    2013-03-01

    Seasonal influenza A viruses (IAV) originate from pandemic IAV and have undergone changes in antigenic structure, including addition of glycans to the viral hemagglutinin (HA). Glycans on the head of HA promote virus survival by shielding antigenic sites, but highly glycosylated seasonal IAV are inactivated by soluble lectins of the innate immune system. In 2009, human strains of pandemic H1N1 [A(H1N1)pdm] expressed a single glycosylation site (Asn(104)) on the head of HA. Since then, variants with additional glycosylation sites have been detected, and the location of these sites has been distinct to those of recent seasonal H1N1 strains. We have compared wild-type and reverse-engineered A(H1N1)pdm IAV with differing potential glycosylation sites on HA for sensitivity to collectins and to neutralizing Abs. Addition of a glycan (Asn(136)) to A(H1N1)pdm HA was associated with resistance to neutralizing Abs but did not increase sensitivity to collectins. Moreover, variants expressing Asn(136) showed enhanced growth in A(H1N1)pdm-vaccinated mice, consistent with evasion of Ab-mediated immunity in vivo. Thus, a fine balance exists regarding the optimal pattern of HA glycosylation to facilitate evasion of Ab-mediated immunity while maintaining resistance to lectin-mediated defenses of the innate immune system.

  11. Improvement of preclinical animal models for autoimmune-mediated disorders via reverse translation of failed therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    't Hart, Bert A; Jagessar, S Anwar; Kap, Yolanda S; Haanstra, Krista G; Philippens, Ingrid H C H M; Serguera, Che; Langermans, Jan; Vierboom, Michel

    2014-09-01

    The poor translational validity of autoimmune-mediated inflammatory disease (AIMID) models in inbred and specific pathogen-free (SPF) rodents underlies the high attrition of new treatments for the corresponding human disease. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a frequently used preclinical AIMID model. We discuss here how crucial information needed for the innovation of current preclinical models can be obtained from postclinical analysis of the nonhuman primate EAE model, highlighting the mechanistic reasons why some therapies fail and others succeed. These new insights can also help identify new targets for treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Improved accuracy in diagnostic immunohistochemistry, lectin histochemistry and in situ hybridization using a gold-labeled horseradish peroxidase antibody and silver intensification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J; Saremaslani, P; Warhol, M J; Heitz, P U

    1992-08-01

    Improvements in the use of the avidin-biotin peroxidase complex technique and direct as well as indirect labeled avidin-biotin methods for application in diagnostic immunohistochemistry, lectin histochemistry and in situ hybridization are reported. The new technology combines the advantages of immunoenzyme and immunogold silver staining techniques and can be performed on routinely fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues. The basic modification of the labeling procedures was introduced at the final revealing step. The histochemical visualization of catalytic activity of horseradish peroxidase by the diaminobenzidine reaction was replaced by the detection of horseradish peroxidase immunoreactivity using anti-horseradish peroxidase-gold complexes and their intensification with silver acetate which is relatively light insensitive. The use of gold-labeled anti-horseradish peroxidase antibodies eliminates the need for quenching of endogenous peroxidase activity. Furthermore, the immunogold silver staining provides improved lateral resolution, higher contrast, and lower background staining as compared with the diaminobenzidine reaction. The new technology has been applied for the localization of different polypeptides in endocrine cells, cytoskeletal elements, cell surface receptors, basal lamina type IV collagen, endothelial cell marker, lectin binding sites, and DNA of various viruses. We concluded that the anti-horseradish peroxidase-gold complex is of general use in a variety of techniques applying horseradish peroxidase as a marker and should be a valuable alternative to existing enzyme substrate techniques.

  13. Improving computer-mediated synchronous communication of doctors in rural communities through cloud computing: A case study of rural hospitals in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Coleman, A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated how doctors in remote rural hospitals in South Africa use computer-mediated tool to communicate with experienced and specialist doctors for professional advice to improve on their clinical practices. A case study approach...

  14. Antibody biotechnology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-07-06

    Jul 6, 2009 ... and automated, the hybrid cells can be stored for many years in liquid nitrogen and antibodies production is homogeneous. The hybridoma method .... they may be modified to vehicle active molecules such as radio-isotopes, toxins, cytokines, enzyme etc. In these cases, the therapeutic effect is due to ...

  15. Catalytic Antibodies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The ability of the highly evolved machinery of immune system to produce structurally and functionally complex ... to Pauling, if the structure of the antigen binding site of antibodies were to be produced in a random ..... where the immune system of the body is destructive, as in autoimmune disorders or after organ transplant.

  16. Catalytic Antibodies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    While chemistry provides the framework for understanding the structure and function of biomolecules, the immune sys- tem provides a highly evolved natural process to generate one class of complex biomolecules – the antibodies. A combination of the two could be exploited to generate new classes of molecules with novel ...

  17. Clinical usefulness of serum antibodies as biomarkers of gastrointestinal and liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sabatino, Antonio; Biagi, Federico; Lenzi, Marco; Frulloni, Luca; Lenti, Marco Vincenzo; Giuffrida, Paolo; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2017-09-01

    The progressively growing knowledge of the pathophysiology of a number of immune-mediated gastrointestinal and liver disorders, including autoimmune atrophic gastritis, coeliac disease, autoimmune enteropathy, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune hepatitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, primary biliary cholangitis and autoimmune pancreatitis, together with the improvement of their detection methods have increased the diagnostic power of serum antibodies. In some cases - coeliac disease and autoimmune atrophic gastritis - they have radically changed gastroenterologists' diagnostic ability, while in others - autoimmune hepatitis, inflammatory bowel disease and autoimmune pancreatitis - their diagnostic performance is still inadequate. Of note, serum antibody misuse in clinical practice has raised a number of controversies, which may generate confusion in the diagnostic management of the aforementioned disorders. In this review, we critically re-evaluate the usefulness of serum antibodies as biomarkers of immune-mediated gastrointestinal and liver disorders, and discuss their pitfalls and merits. Copyright © 2017 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Modulating Cytotoxic Effector Functions by Fc Engineering to Improve Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellner, Christian; Otte, Anna; Cappuzzello, Elisa; Klausz, Katja; Peipp, Matthias

    2017-09-01

    In the last two decades, monoclonal antibodies have revolutionized the therapy of cancer patients. Although antibody therapy has continuously been improved, still a significant number of patients do not benefit from antibody therapy. Therefore, rational optimization of the antibody molecule by Fc engineering represents a major area of translational research to further improve this potent therapeutic option. Monoclonal antibodies are able to trigger a variety of effector mechanisms. Especially Fc-mediated effector functions such as antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), and complement- dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) are considered important in antibody therapy of cancer. Novel mechanistic insights into the action of monoclonal antibodies allowed the development of various Fc engineering approaches to modulate antibodies' effector functions. Strategies in modifying the Fc glycosylation profile (Fc glyco-engineering) or approaches in engineering the protein backbone (Fc protein engineering) have been intensively evaluated. In the current review, Fc engineering strategies resulting in improved ADCC, ADCP and CDC activity are summarized and discussed.

  19. Improving cognition by adherence to physical or mental exercise: a moderated mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Andrea; Klusmann, Verena; Schwarzer, Ralf; Heuser, Isabella

    2011-05-01

    The role of adherence to an intervention is examined to further understand the relationship between performing new challenging activities (either mental or physical ones) and their putative cognitive benefits. Healthy older women (N = 229, age range: 70-93 years) took part in a six-month randomised controlled trial, covering either a physical or mental activity (three × weekly). They completed five tests, measuring episodic and working memory pre- and post-intervention. A moderated mediation model was specified to test the strength of the indirect effect of the activity mode (i.e. physical vs. mental) through adherence (i.e. time spent on course attendance) on levels of baseline cognitive performance. Both physical and mental activity groups performed better over time than the control group (p mental activity. Results are most promising for cognitively less fit women. Time spent on course attendance can be interpreted as an adherence indicator that makes a difference for various cognitive outcomes of the intervention.

  20. HYdroxychloroquine to Improve Pregnancy Outcome in Women with AnTIphospholipid Antibodies (HYPATIA) Protocol: A Multinational Randomized Controlled Trial of Hydroxychloroquine versus Placebo in Addition to Standard Treatment in Pregnant Women with Antiphospholipid Syndrome or Antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreiber, Karen; Breen, Karen; Cohen, Hannah; Jacobsen, Soren; Middeldorp, Saskia; Pavord, Sue; Regan, Lesley; Roccatello, Dario; Robinson, Susan E.; Sciascia, Savino; Seed, Paul T.; Watkins, Linda; Hunt, Beverley J.

    2017-01-01

    Women with antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) are at risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, including recurrent first-trimester pregnancy loss and late pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia, HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzyme levels, and low platelet levels) syndrome, premature delivery,

  1. Improved production of single domain antibodies with two disulfide bonds by co-expression of chaperone proteins in the Escherichia coli periplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriver-Lake, Lisa C; Goldman, Ellen R; Zabetakis, Daniel; Anderson, George P

    2017-04-01

    Single domain antibodies are recombinantly expressed variable domains derived from camelid heavy chain antibodies. Natural single domain antibodies can have noncanonical disulfide bonds between their complementarity-determining regions that help position the binding site. In addition, engineering a second disulfide bond serves to tie together β-sheets thereby inhibiting unfolding. Unfortunately, the additional disulfide bond often significantly decreases yield, presumably due to formation of incorrect disulfide bonds during the folding process. Here, we demonstrate that inclusion of the helper plasmid pTUM4, which results in the expression of four chaperones, DsbA, DsbC, FkpA, and SurA, increased yield on average 3.5-fold for the nine multi-disulfide bond single domain antibodies evaluated. No increase in production was observed for single domain antibodies containing only the canonical disulfide bond. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. The Display of Single-Domain Antibodies on the Surfaces of Connectosomes Enables Gap Junction-Mediated Drug Delivery to Specific Cell Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadok, Avinash K; Zhao, Chi; Meriwether, Amanda I; Ferrati, Silvia; Rowley, Tanner G; Zoldan, Janet; Smyth, Hugh D C; Stachowiak, Jeanne C

    2018-01-09

    Gap junctions, transmembrane protein channels that directly connect the cytoplasm of neighboring cells and enable the exchange of molecules between cells, are a promising new frontier for therapeutic delivery. Specifically, cell-derived lipid vesicles that contain functional gap junction channels, termed Connectosomes, have recently been demonstrated to substantially increase the effectiveness of small molecule chemotherapeutics. However, because gap junctions are present in nearly all tissues, Connectosomes have no intrinsic ability to target specific cell types, which potentially limits their therapeutic effectiveness. To address this challenge, here we display targeting ligands consisting of single-domain antibodies on the surfaces of Connectosomes. We demonstrate that these targeted Connectosomes selectively interact with cells that express a model receptor, promoting the selective delivery of the chemotherapeutic doxorubicin to this target cell population. More generally, our approach has the potential to boost cytoplasmic delivery of diverse therapeutic molecules to specific cell populations while protecting off-target cells, a critical step toward realizing the therapeutic potential of gap junctions.

  3. Improved production of heterologous lipase in Trichoderma reesei by RNAi mediated gene silencing of an endogenic highly expressed gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Li-Na; Cai, Fu-Rong; Dong, Xin-Rui; Huang, Zhen-Bang; Tao, Yong; Huang, Jian-Zhong; Dong, Zhi-Yang

    2012-04-01

    A lipase gene (Lip) of the Aspergillus niger was de novo synthesized and expressed in the Trichoderma reesei under the promoter of the cellobiohydrolase I gene (cbh1). RNAi-mediated gene silencing was successfully used to further improve the recombinant lipase production via down-regulation of CBHI which comprised more than 60% of the total extracellular proteins in T. reesei. The gene and protein expression of CBHI and recombinant lipase were analyzed by real-time PCR, SDS-PAGE and activity assay. The results demonstrated that RNAi-mediated gene silencing could effectively suppress cbh1 gene expression and the reduction of CBHI could result in obvious improvement of heterologous lipase production. The reconstructed strains with decreased CBHI production exhibited 1.8- to 3.2-fold increase in lipase activity than that of parental strain. The study herein provided a feasible and advantageous method of increasing heterologous target gene expression in T. reesei through preventing the high expression of a specific endogenenous gene by RNA interference. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The critical role of Astragalus polysaccharides for the improvement of PPARα [ correction of PPRAα]-mediated lipotoxicity in diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity-related diabetes mellitus leads to increased myocardial uptake and oxidation of fatty acids, resulting in a form of cardiac dysfunction referred to as lipotoxic cardiomyopathy. We have shown previously that Astragalus polysaccharides (APS administration was sufficient to improve the systemic metabolic disorder and cardiac dysfunction in diabetic models. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate the precise role of APS therapy in the pathogenesis of myocardial lipotoxity in diabetes, db/db diabetic mice and myosin heavy chain (MHC- peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR α mice were characterized and administrated with or without APS with C57 wide- type mice as normal control. APS treatment strikingly improved the myocyte triacylglyceride accumulation and cardiac dysfunction in both db/db mice and MHC-PPARα mice, with the normalization of energy metabolic derangements in both db/db diabetic hearts and MHC-PPARα hearts. Consistently, the activation of PPARα target genes involved in myocardial fatty acid uptake and oxidation in both db/db diabetic hearts and MHC-PPARα hearts was reciprocally repressed by APS administration, while PPARα-mediated suppression of genes involved in glucose utilization of both diabetic hearts and MHC-PPARα hearts was reversed by treatment with APS. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that APS therapy could prevent the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy through a mechanism mainly dependent on the cardiac PPARα-mediated regulatory pathways.

  5. Antibody therapeutics - the evolving patent landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petering, Jenny; McManamny, Patrick; Honeyman, Jane

    2011-09-01

    The antibody patent landscape has evolved dramatically over the past 30 years, particularly in areas of technology relating to antibody modification to reduce immunogenicity in humans or improve antibody function. In some cases antibody techniques that were developed in the 1980s are still the subject of patent protection in the United States or Canada. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. An emerging playbook for antibody-drug conjugates: lessons from the laboratory and clinic suggest a strategy for improving efficacy and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Penelope M; Rabuka, David

    2015-10-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) have become de rigueur for pharmaceutical oncology drug development pipelines. There are more than 40 ADCs undergoing clinical trials and many more in preclinical development. The field has rushed to follow the initial successes of Kadcyla™ and Adcetris™, and moved forward with new targets without much pause for optimization. In some respects, the ADC space has become divided into the clinical realm-where the proven technologies continue to represent the bulk of clinical candidates with a few exceptions-and the research realm-where innovations in conjugation chemistry and linker technologies have suggested that there is much room for improvement in the conventional methods. Now, two and four years after the approvals of Kadcyla™ and Adcetris™, respectively, consensus may at last be building that these two drugs rely on rather unique target antigens that enable their success. It is becoming increasingly clear that future target antigens will require additional innovative approaches. Next-generation ADCs have begun to move out of the lab and into the clinic, where there is a pressing need for continued innovation to overcome the twin challenges of safety and efficacy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Intensive sensorimotor arm training mediated by therapist or robot improves hemiparesis in patients with chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Bruce T; Lynch, Daniel; Rykman-Berland, Avrielle; Ferraro, Mark; Galgano, Michael; Hogan, Neville; Krebs, Hermano I

    2008-01-01

    Investigators have demonstrated that a variety of intensive movement training protocols for persistent upper limb paralysis in patients with chronic stroke (6 months or more after stroke) improve motor outcome. This randomized controlled study determined in patients with upper limb motor impairment after chronic stroke whether movement therapy delivered by a robot or by a therapist using an intensive training protocol was superior. Robotic training (n = 11) and an intensive movement protocol (n = 10) improved the impairment measures of motor outcome significantly and comparably; there were no significant changes in disability measures. Motor gains were maintained at the 3-month evaluation after training. These data contribute to the growing awareness that persistent impairments in those with chronic stroke may not reflect exhausted capacity for improvement. These new protocols, rendered by either therapist or robot, can be standardized, tested, and replicated, and potentially will contribute to rational activity-based programs.

  8. Improved antifouling properties of polymer membranes using a ‘layer-by-layer’ mediated method

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Polymeric reverse osmosis membranes were modified with antifouling polymer brushes through a \\'layer by layer\\' (LBL) mediated method. Based on pure physical electrostatic interaction, the attachment of LBL films did not alter separation performance of the membranes. In addition, the incorporation of an LBL film also helped to amplify the number of potential reaction sites on the membrane surfaces for attachment of antifouling polymer brushes, which were then attached to the surface. Attachment of the brushes included two different approaches, grafting to and grafting from. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and water contact angle measurements showed successful growth of the LBL films and subsequently the polymer brushes. Using this method to modify reverse osmosis membranes, preliminary performance testing showed the antifouling properties of the as-modified membranes were much better than the virgin membrane with no significant loss in water flux and salt rejection. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  9. Testing a path-analytic mediation model of how motivational enhancement physiotherapy improves physical functioning in pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheing, Gladys; Vong, Sinfia; Chan, Fong; Ditchman, Nicole; Brooks, Jessica; Chan, Chetwyn

    2014-12-01

    Pain is a complex phenomenon not easily discerned from psychological, social, and environmental characteristics and is an oft cited barrier to return to work for people experiencing low back pain (LBP). The purpose of this study was to evaluate a path-analytic mediation model to examine how motivational enhancement physiotherapy, which incorporates tenets of motivational interviewing, improves physical functioning of patients with chronic LBP. Seventy-six patients with chronic LBP were recruited from the outpatient physiotherapy department of a government hospital in Hong Kong. The re-specified path-analytic model fit the data very well, χ (2)(3, N = 76) = 3.86, p = .57; comparative fit index = 1.00; and the root mean square error of approximation = 0.00. Specifically, results indicated that (a) using motivational interviewing techniques in physiotherapy was associated with increased working alliance with patients, (b) working alliance increased patients' outcome expectancy and (c) greater outcome expectancy resulted in a reduction of subjective pain intensity and improvement in physical functioning. Change in pain intensity also directly influenced improvement in physical functioning. The effect of motivational enhancement therapy on physical functioning can be explained by social-cognitive factors such as motivation, outcome expectancy, and working alliance. The use of motivational interviewing techniques to increase outcome expectancy of patients and improve working alliance could further strengthen the impact of physiotherapy on rehabilitation outcomes of patients with chronic LBP.

  10. ACE2-mediated reduction of oxidative stress in the central nervous system is associated with improvement of autonomic function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijing Xia

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress in the central nervous system mediates the increase in sympathetic tone that precedes the development of hypertension. We hypothesized that by transforming Angiotensin-II (AngII into Ang-(1-7, ACE2 might reduce AngII-mediated oxidative stress in the brain and prevent autonomic dysfunction. To test this hypothesis, a relationship between ACE2 and oxidative stress was first confirmed in a mouse neuroblastoma cell line (Neuro2A cells treated with AngII and infected with Ad-hACE2. ACE2 overexpression resulted in a reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS formation. In vivo, ACE2 knockout (ACE2(-/y mice and non-transgenic (NT littermates were infused with AngII (10 days and infected with Ad-hACE2 in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN. Baseline blood pressure (BP, AngII and brain ROS levels were not different between young mice (12 weeks. However, cardiac sympathetic tone, brain NADPH oxidase and SOD activities were significantly increased in ACE2(-/y. Post infusion, plasma and brain AngII levels were also significantly higher in ACE2(-/y, although BP was similarly increased in both genotypes. ROS formation in the PVN and RVLM was significantly higher in ACE2(-/y mice following AngII infusion. Similar phenotypes, i.e. increased oxidative stress, exacerbated dysautonomia and hypertension, were also observed on baseline in mature ACE2(-/y mice (48 weeks. ACE2 gene therapy to the PVN reduced AngII-mediated increase in NADPH oxidase activity and normalized cardiac dysautonomia in ACE2(-/y mice. Altogether, these data indicate that ACE2 gene deletion promotes age-dependent oxidative stress, autonomic dysfunction and hypertension, while PVN-targeted ACE2 gene therapy decreases ROS formation via NADPH oxidase inhibition and improves autonomic function. Accordingly, ACE2 could represent a new target for the treatment of hypertension-associated dysautonomia and oxidative stress.

  11. Improving academic performance and mental health through a stress management intervention: outcomes and mediators of change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, Edmund; Bond, Frank W; Flaxman, Paul E

    2006-03-01

    Two hundred and nine pupils were randomly allocated to either a cognitive behaviourally based stress management intervention (SMI) group, or a non-intervention control group. Mood and motivation measures were administered pre and post intervention. Standardized examinations were taken 8-10 weeks later. As hypothesized, results indicated that an increase in the functionality of pupils' cognitions served as the mechanism by which mental health improved in the SMI group. In contrast, the control group demonstrated no such improvements. Also, as predicted, an increase in motivation accounted for the SMI group's significantly better performance on the standardized, academic assessments that comprise the United Kingdom's General Certificate of Secondary Education. Indeed, the magnitude of this enhanced performance was, on average, one-letter grade. Discussion focuses on the theoretical and practical implications of these findings.

  12. ASSESSMENT TECHNIQUES OF ENGLISH READING COMPREHENSION MEDIATED BY TECHNOLOGIES TO IMPROVE COLLEGE STUDENT’S ACHIEVEMENT.

    OpenAIRE

    Ochoa-Vásquez, Miguel A.; Ramírez-Montoya, María S.

    2016-01-01

    Improving reading comprehension skills is fundamental to those students willing to enroll in undergraduate studies. This sequential-explanatory mixed methods research design attempted to measure the impact that English reading comprehension assessment had on 96 college students’ school performance, after receiving a 15-hour instruction on reading evaluating techniques in technological-enriched environments. The data was collected through reading comprehension pre/post-tests and a semi-structu...

  13. CRISPR/Cas9 Mediated Genome Engineering for Improvement of Horticultural Crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkute, Suhas G; Singh, Achuit K; Gupta, Om P; Singh, Prabhakar M; Singh, Bijendra

    2017-01-01

    Horticultural crops are an important part of agriculture for food as well as nutritional security. However, several pests and diseases along with adverse abiotic environmental factors pose a severe threat to these crops by affecting their quality and productivity. This warrants the effective and accelerated breeding programs by utilizing innovative biotechnological tools that can tackle aforementioned issues. The recent technique of genome editing by Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats/CRISPR associated 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) has greatly advanced the breeding for crop improvement due to its simplicity and high efficiency over other nucleases such as Zinc Finger Nucleases and Transcription Activator Like Effector Nucleases. CRISPR/Cas9 tool contains a non-specific Cas9 nuclease and a single guide RNA that directs Cas9 to the specific genomic location creating double-strand breaks and subsequent repair process creates insertion or deletion mutations. This is currently the widely adopted tool for reverse genetics, and crop improvement in large number of agricultural crops. The use of CRISPR/Cas9 in horticultural crops is limited to few crops due to lack of availability of regeneration protocols and sufficient sequence information in many horticultural crops. In this review, the present status of applicability of CRISPR/Cas9 in horticultural crops was discussed along with the challenges and future potential for possible improvement of these crops for their yield, quality, and resistance to biotic and abiotic stress.

  14. CRISPR/Cas9 Mediated Genome Engineering for Improvement of Horticultural Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhas G. Karkute

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Horticultural crops are an important part of agriculture for food as well as nutritional security. However, several pests and diseases along with adverse abiotic environmental factors pose a severe threat to these crops by affecting their quality and productivity. This warrants the effective and accelerated breeding programs by utilizing innovative biotechnological tools that can tackle aforementioned issues. The recent technique of genome editing by Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats/CRISPR associated 9 (CRISPR/Cas9 has greatly advanced the breeding for crop improvement due to its simplicity and high efficiency over other nucleases such as Zinc Finger Nucleases and Transcription Activator Like Effector Nucleases. CRISPR/Cas9 tool contains a non-specific Cas9 nuclease and a single guide RNA that directs Cas9 to the specific genomic location creating double-strand breaks and subsequent repair process creates insertion or deletion mutations. This is currently the widely adopted tool for reverse genetics, and crop improvement in large number of agricultural crops. The use of CRISPR/Cas9 in horticultural crops is limited to few crops due to lack of availability of regeneration protocols and sufficient sequence information in many horticultural crops. In this review, the present status of applicability of CRISPR/Cas9 in horticultural crops was discussed along with the challenges and future potential for possible improvement of these crops for their yield, quality, and resistance to biotic and abiotic stress.

  15. Antibodies to biotinylated red blood cells in adults and infants: improved detection, partial characterization, and dependence on red blood cell-biotin dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Robert L; Mock, Donald M; Franco, Robert S; Cohen, Robert M; North, Anne K; Cancelas, José A; Geisen, Christof; Strauss, Ronald G; Vlaar, Alexander P; Nalbant, Demet; Widness, John A

    2017-06-01

    Biotin-labeled red blood cells (BioRBCs) are used for in vivo kinetic studies. Because BioRBC dosing occasionally induces antibodies, a sensitive and specific anti-BioRBC detection assay is needed. Aims were to 1) develop a gel card assay to evaluate existing, naturally occurring and BioRBC-induced plasma antibodies, 2) compare gel card and tube agglutination detection results, and 3) test for a relationship of antibody induction and BioRBC dose. Reagent BioRBCs were prepared using sulfo-NHS biotin ranging from densities 18 (BioRBC-18) to 1458 (BioRBC-1458) µg/mL RBCs. Among BioRBC-exposed subjects, gel card and tube agglutination results were concordant in 21 of 22 adults and all 19 infant plasma samples. Gel card antibody detection sensitivity was more than 10-fold greater than tube agglutination. Twelve to 16 weeks after BioRBC exposure, induced anti-antibodies were detected by gel card in three of 26 adults (12%) at reagent densities BioRBC-256 or less, but in none of 41 infants. Importantly, induced anti-BioRBC antibodies were associated with higher BioRBC dose (p = 0.008); no antibodies were detected in 18 subjects who received BioRBC doses less than or equal to BioRBC-18. For noninduced BioRBC antibodies, six of 1125 naïve adults (0.3%) and none of 46 naïve infants demonstrated existing anti-BioRBC antibodies using reagent BioRBC-140 or -162. Existing anti-BioRBCs were all neutralized by biotin compounds, while induced antibodies were not. The gel card assay is more sensitive than the tube agglutination assay. We recommend reagent BioRBC-256 for identifying anti-BioRBCs. Use of a low total RBC biotin label dose (≤ BioRBC-18) may minimize antibody induction. © 2017 AABB.

  16. The Relation between Maternal ADHD Symptoms & Improvement in Child Behavior Following Brief Behavioral Parent Training Is Mediated by Change in Negative Parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronis-Tuscano, Andrea; O'Brien, Kelly A.; Johnston, Charlotte; Jones, Heather A.; Clarke, Tana L.; Raggi, Veronica L.; Rooney, Mary E.; Diaz, Yamalis; Pian, Jessica; Seymour, Karen E.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which maternal attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms predict improvement in child behavior following brief behavioral parent training. Change in parenting was examined as a potential mediator of the negative relationship between maternal ADHD symptoms and improvement in child behavior. Seventy…

  17. Effectiveness of Parent-Child Mediation in Improving Family Functioning and Reducing Adolescent Problem Behavior: Results from a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Joan S; Edelen, Maria Orlando; Huang, Wenjing

    2017-03-01

    Parent-child mediation programs are intended to resolve or manage disputes and improve family functioning, but rigorous evaluations of their effectiveness are lacking. Families referred to a community-based mediation program (N = 111) were randomized to an intervention or wait-list control group, and completed three surveys over a 12-week period. With the exception of parent-reported child delinquency (which decreased more in the intervention group), this evaluation provides little support for the short-term effectiveness of parent-child mediation for improving family functioning and reducing child problem behaviors in general. Given that this is the first randomized controlled trial of a parent-child mediation program, additional evaluations involving larger samples and longer follow-ups are needed before firm conclusions can be drawn about the effectiveness of this intervention.

  18. Effectiveness of Parent-Child Mediation in Improving Family Functioning and Reducing Adolescent Problem Behavior: Results from a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Joan S.; Edelen, Maria Orlando; Huang, Wenjing

    2016-01-01

    Parent-child mediation programs are intended to resolve or manage disputes and improve family functioning, but rigorous evaluations of their effectiveness are lacking. Families referred to a community-based mediation program (N=111) were randomized to an intervention or wait-list control group, and completed three surveys over a 12-week period. With the exception of parent-reported child delinquency (which decreased more in the intervention group), this evaluation provides little support for the short-term effectiveness of parent-child mediation for improving family functioning and reducing child problem behaviors in general. Given that this is the first randomized controlled trial of a parent-child mediation program, additional evaluations involving larger samples and longer follow-ups are needed before firm conclusions can be drawn about the effectiveness of this intervention. PMID:26762375

  19. Design of therapeutic vaccines as a novel antibody therapy for cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagami, Hironori

    2017-09-01

    Vaccines are primarily used worldwide as a preventive medicine for infectious diseases and have recently been applied to cancer. We and others have developed therapeutic vaccines designed for cardiovascular diseases that are notably different from previous vaccines. In the case of cancer vaccines, a specific protein in cancer cells is a target antigen, and the activation of cytotoxic T cells (CTL) is required to kill and remove the antigen-presenting cancer cells. Our therapeutic vaccines work against hypertension by targeting angiotensin II (Ang II) as the antigen, which is an endogenous hormone. Therapeutic vaccines must avoid CTL activation and induce the blocking antibodies for Ang II. The goal of our therapeutic vaccine for cardiovascular diseases is to induce the specific antibody response toward the target protein without inducing T-cell or antibody-mediated inflammation through the careful selection of the target antigen, carrier protein and adjuvants. The goal of our therapeutic vaccine is similar to that of antibody therapy. Recently, multiple antibody-based drugs have been developed for cancer, immune-related diseases, and dyslipidemia, which are efficient but expensive. If the effect of a therapeutic vaccine is nearly equivalent to antibody therapy as an alternative approach, the lower medical cost and improvement in drug adherence can be advantages of therapeutic vaccines. In this review, we will describe our concept of therapeutic vaccines for cardiovascular diseases and the future directions of therapeutic vaccines as novel antibody therapies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Exercise-mediated improvements in painful neuropathy associated with prediabetes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groover, Anna L; Ryals, Janelle M; Guilford, Brianne L; Wilson, Natalie M; Christianson, Julie A; Wright, Douglas E

    2013-12-01

    Recent research suggests that exercise can be effective in reducing pain in animals and humans with neuropathic pain. To investigate mechanisms in which exercise may improve hyperalgesia associated with prediabetes, C57Bl/6 mice were fed either standard chow or a high-fat diet for 12 weeks and were provided access to running wheels (exercised) or without access (sedentary). The high-fat diet induced a number of prediabetic symptoms, including increased weight, blood glucose, and insulin levels. Exercise reduced but did not restore these metabolic abnormalities to normal levels. In addition, mice fed a high-fat diet developed significant cutaneous and visceral hyperalgesia, similar to mice that develop neuropathy associated with diabetes. Finally, a high-fat diet significantly modulated neurotrophin protein expression in peripheral tissues and altered the composition of epidermal innervation. Over time, mice that exercised normalized with regards to their behavioral hypersensitivity, neurotrophin levels, and epidermal innervation. These results confirm that elevated hypersensitivity and associated neuropathic changes can be induced by a high-fat diet and exercise may alleviate these neuropathic symptoms. These findings suggest that exercise intervention could significantly improve aspects of neuropathy and pain associated with obesity and diabetes. Additionally, this work could potentially help clinicians determine those patients who will develop painful versus insensate neuropathy using intraepidermal nerve fiber quantification. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Exercise-Mediated Improvements in Painful Neuropathy Associated with Pre-Diabetes in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groover, Anna L.; Ryals, Janelle M.; Guilford, Brianne L.; Wilson, Natalie M.; Christianson, Julie A.; Wright, Doug E.

    2013-01-01

    Recent research suggests that exercise can be effective in reducing pain in animals and humans with neuropathic pain. To investigate mechanisms in which exercise may improve hyperalgesia associated with prediabetes, C57Bl/6 mice were fed either standard chow or a high-fat diet for 12 weeks and were provided access to running wheels (exercised) or without access (sedentary). The high-fat diet induced a number of prediabetic symptoms, including increased weight, blood glucose, and insulin levels. Exercise reduced but did not restore these metabolic abnormalities to normal levels. In addition, mice fed a high-fat diet developed significant cutaneous and visceral hyperalgesia, similar to mice that develop neuropathy associated with diabetes. Finally, a high-fat diet significantly modulated neurotrophin protein expression in peripheral tissues and altered the composition of epidermal innervation. Over time, mice that exercised normalized with regards to their behavioral hypersensitivity, neurotrophin levels, and epidermal innervation. These results confirm that elevated hypersensitivity and associated neuropathic changes can be induced by a high-fat diet and exercise may alleviate these neuropathic symptoms. These findings suggest that exercise intervention could significantly improve aspects of neuropathy and pain associated with obesity and diabetes. Additionally, this work could potentially help clinicians determine those patients which will develop painful versus insensate neuropathy using intraepidermal nerve fiber quantification. PMID:23932909

  2. An improved ternary vector system for Agrobacterium-mediated rapid maize transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Ajith; Bass, Steven H; Wu, Emily; Wang, Ning; McBride, Kevin E; Annaluru, Narayana; Miller, Michael; Hua, Mo; Jones, Todd J

    2018-04-23

    A simple and versatile ternary vector system that utilizes improved accessory plasmids for rapid maize transformation is described. This system facilitates high-throughput vector construction and plant transformation. The super binary plasmid pSB1 is a mainstay of maize transformation. However, the large size of the base vector makes it challenging to clone, the process of co-integration is cumbersome and inefficient, and some Agrobacterium strains are known to give rise to spontaneous mutants resistant to tetracycline. These limitations present substantial barriers to high throughput vector construction. Here we describe a smaller, simpler and versatile ternary vector system for maize transformation that utilizes improved accessory plasmids requiring no co-integration step. In addition, the newly described accessory plasmids have restored virulence genes found to be defective in pSB1, as well as added virulence genes. Testing of different configurations of the accessory plasmids in combination with T-DNA binary vector as ternary vectors nearly doubles both the raw transformation frequency and the number of transformation events of usable quality in difficult-to-transform maize inbreds. The newly described ternary vectors enabled the development of a rapid maize transformation method for elite inbreds. This vector system facilitated screening different origins of replication on the accessory plasmid and T-DNA vector, and four combinations were identified that have high (86-103%) raw transformation frequency in an elite maize inbred.

  3. Photoreceptor Mediated Plant Growth Responses: Implications for Photoreceptor Engineering toward Improved Performance in Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ophilia I. L. Mawphlang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Rising temperatures during growing seasons coupled with altered precipitation rates presents a challenging task of improving crop productivity for overcoming such altered weather patterns and cater to a growing population. Light is a critical environmental factor that exerts a powerful influence on plant growth and development ranging from seed germination to flowering and fruiting. Higher plants utilize a suite of complex photoreceptor proteins to perceive surrounding red/far-red (phytochromes, blue/UV-A (cryptochromes, phototropins, ZTL/FKF1/LKP2, and UV-B light (UVR8. While genomic studies have also shown that light induces extensive reprogramming of gene expression patterns in plants, molecular genetic studies have shown that manipulation of one or more photoreceptors can result in modification of agronomically beneficial traits. Such information can assist researchers to engineer photoreceptors via genome editing technologies to alter expression or even sensitivity thresholds of native photoreceptors for targeting aspects of plant growth that can confer superior agronomic value to the engineered crops. Here we summarize the agronomically important plant growth processes influenced by photoreceptors in crop species, alongwith the functional interactions between different photoreceptors and phytohormones in regulating these responses. We also discuss the potential utility of synthetic biology approaches in photobiology for improving agronomically beneficial traits of crop plants by engineering designer photoreceptors.

  4. Nitric oxide-mediated cutaneous microvascular function is impaired in polycystic ovary sydrome but can be improved by exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprung, V S; Cuthbertson, D J; Pugh, C J A; Daousi, C; Atkinson, G; Aziz, N F; Kemp, G J; Green, D J; Cable, N T; Jones, H

    2013-03-15

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with cardiovascular disease. The contribution of the nitric oxide (NO) dilator system to cutaneous endothelial dysfunction is currently unknown in PCOS. Our aim was to examine whether women with PCOS demonstrate impaired cutaneous microvascular NO function and whether exercise training can ameliorate any impairment. Eleven women with PCOS (age, 29 ± 7 years; body mass index, 34 ± 6 kg m(-2)) were compared with six healthy obese control women (age, 29 ± 7 years; body mass index, 34 ± 5 kg m(-2)). Six women with PCOS (30 ± 7 years; 31 ± 6 kg m(-2)) then completed 16 weeks of exercise training. Laser Doppler flowmetry, combined with intradermal microdialysis of l-N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine, a nitric oxide antagonist, in response to incremental local heating of the forearm was assessed in women with PCOS and control women, and again in women with PCOS following exercise training. Cardiorespiratory fitness, homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance, hormone and lipid profiles were also assessed. Differences between women with PCOS and control women and changes with exercise were analysed using Student's unpaired t tests. Differences in the contribution of NO to cutaneous blood flow [expressed as a percentage of maximal cutaneous vasodilatation (CVCmax)] were analysed using general linear models. At 42°C heating, cutaneous NO-mediated vasodilatation was attenuated by 17.5%CVCmax (95% confidence interval, 33.3, 1.7; P = 0.03) in women with PCOS vs. control women. Exercise training improved cardiorespiratory fitness by 5.0 ml kg(-1) min(-1) (95% confidence interval, 0.9, 9.2; P = 0.03) and NO-mediated cutaneous vasodilatation at 42°C heating by 19.6% CVCmax (95% confidence interval, 4.3, 34.9; P = 0.02). Cutaneous microvascular NO function is impaired in women with PCOS compared with obese matched control women but can be improved with exercise training.

  5. Leptin-induced basal Akt phosphorylation and its implication in exercise-mediated improvement of insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xianjie; Niu, Sen

    2018-01-29

    Physical exercise is an efficient therapeutical tool in the management of insulin resistance (IR) and related metabolic diseases. Leptin, the well-known obesity hormone and the absence of which leads to IR, showed controversial effects on IR as research continues. Thus, in this study, a detailed investigation of the effect of leptin on exercise-mediated improvement of insulin sensitivity and its underlying mechanism was carried out. Using a rat model of chronic or acute swimming exercise training, we found that serum leptin increased 1 h after either acute exercise or the last session of chronic exercise, when impaired insulin action was observed in previous reports. However, chronic exercise reducd basal serum leptin levels and promoted insulin sensitivity compared with sedentary controls or rats subjected to one bout of aerobic exercise. Our animal results indicated the potential linkage between leptin and insulin sensitivity, which is further investigated in the skeletal muscle L6 cells. Leptin treatment in L6 cells promoted the basal levels of insulin signaling as well as glucose uptake, while blocking JAK2 signaling with either pharmacological intervention (JAK2 inhibitor AG490) or genetic manipulation (siRNA knockdown) decreased the basal levels of insulin signaling. Furthermore, leptin treatment inhibited insulin-stimulated insulin signaling and glucose uptake, while blocking JAK2 signaling restored leptin-attenuated insulin sensitivity. Taken together, our results demonstrated that reduced serum leptin, at least in part, contributes to exercise-mediated improvement of insulin sensitivity, indicating JAK2 as a potent therapeutical target of insulin resistance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mediation of smoking-associated postoperative mortality by perioperative complications in veterans undergoing elective surgery: data from Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program (VASQIP)?a cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Jasvinder A; Hawn, Mary; Campagna, Elizabeth J; Henderson, William G; Richman, Joshua; Houston, Thomas K

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the mediation of smoking-associated postoperative mortality by postoperative complications. Design Observational cohort study. Setting Using data from the Veterans Affairs (VA) Surgical Quality Improvement Programme, a quality assurance programme for major surgical procedures in the VA healthcare system, we assessed the association of current smoking at the time of the surgery with 6-month and 1-year mortality. Primary and secondary outcome measures Using mediation analyse...

  7. Improved intracellular delivery of glucocerebrosidase mediated by the HIV-1 TAT protein transduction domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyun Oh; Luu, Nga; Kaneski, Christine R.; Schiffmann, Raphael; Brady, Roscoe O.; Murray, Gary J.

    2005-01-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for Gaucher disease designed to target glucocerebrosidase (GC) to macrophages via mannose-specific endocytosis is very effective in reversing hepatosplenomegaly, and normalizing hematologic parameters but is less effective in improving bone and lung involvement and ineffective in brain. Recombinant GCs containing an in-frame fusion to the HIV-1 trans-activator protein transduction domain (TAT) were expressed in eukaryotic cells in order to obtain active, normally glycosylated GC fusion proteins for enzyme uptake studies. Despite the absence of mannose-specific endocytic receptors on the plasma membranes of various fibroblasts, the recombinant GCs with C-terminal TAT fusions were readily internalized by these cells. Immunofluorescent confocal microscopy demonstrated the recombinant TAT-fusion proteins with a mixed endosomal and lysosomal localization. Thus, TAT-modified GCs represent a novel strategy for a new generation of therapeutic enzymes for ERT for Gaucher disease

  8. TRADITIONAL AND CASCADE PLASMAPHERESIS IN ANTIBODY TITERS’ REDUCTION IN RENAL TRANSPLANT RECIPIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Vatazin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. One of the current tasks of transplantology is to overcome «graft-host» immune confl ict. Partially this confl ict is caused by the presence of circulating pre-existing antibodies. Highly sensitized patients have a greater risk of rejection and subsequent graft loss. There are several methods to remove the antibodies, one of which is a double fi ltration plasmapheresis (DFPF. This report presents our experience of DFPF in recipients of high immunologic risk.Aim: to compare the effectiveness of traditional and double filtration plasmapheresis in desensitization of patients with high risk of immunological complications.Methods. The study included 30 patients after kidney transplantation. All patients were classifi ed as high-immunologic risk group. In 15 patients of study group we performed DFPF, in 15 patients of comparison group – traditional plasmapheresis. We monitored the immune status: markers of humoral immunity activation – IgG, IgM, IgA before and after the procedures. DFPF procedure was performed on OctoNova (MeSys, Germany with a plasmafi lter and plasma components separator. Protocol biopsies were performed on days 30 and 90.Results. The concentration of antibodies may be effectively reduced with DFPF. Total IgM and IgG antibodies were reduced by 30–55% of the original level. There was a less albumin loss in case of DFPF application. There is 1 patient with antibody-mediated rejection with graft dysfunction in study group. There are no signs of rejection in 30- and 90-day biopsy in study group. But there were three patients with subclinical antibody-mediated rejection in the comparison group.Conclusion. DFPF can safely and effectively reduce the high titers of antibodies that are responsible for humoral rejection of renal allograft. Reduction of antibodies in sensitized patients immediately after transplantation may improve graft function.

  9. Plant growth improvement mediated by nitrate capture in co-composted biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammann, Claudia I.; Schmidt, Hans-Peter; Messerschmidt, Nicole; Linsel, Sebastian; Steffens, Diedrich; Müller, Christoph; Koyro, Hans-Werner; Conte, Pellegrino; Stephen, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Soil amendment with pyrogenic carbon (biochar) is discussed as strategy to improve soil fertility to enable economic plus environmental benefits. In temperate soils, however, the use of pure biochar mostly has moderately-negative to -positive yield effects. Here we demonstrate that co-composting considerably promoted biochars’ positive effects, largely by nitrate (nutrient) capture and delivery. In a full-factorial growth study with Chenopodium quinoa, biomass yield increased up to 305% in a sandy-poor soil amended with 2% (w/w) co-composted biochar (BCcomp). Conversely, addition of 2% (w/w) untreated biochar (BCpure) decreased the biomass to 60% of the control. Growth-promoting (BCcomp) as well as growth-reducing (BCpure) effects were more pronounced at lower nutrient-supply levels. Electro-ultra filtration and sequential biochar-particle washing revealed that co-composted biochar was nutrient-enriched, particularly with the anions nitrate and phosphate. The captured nitrate in BCcomp was (1) only partly detectable with standard methods, (2) largely protected against leaching, (3) partly plant-available, and (4) did not stimulate N2O emissions. We hypothesize that surface ageing plus non-conventional ion-water bonding in micro- and nano-pores promoted nitrate capture in biochar particles. Amending (N-rich) bio-waste with biochar may enhance its agronomic value and reduce nutrient losses from bio-wastes and agricultural soils. PMID:26057083

  10. Direct and Pollinator-Mediated Effects of Herbivory on Strawberry and the Potential for Improved Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Muola

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The global decline in pollinators has partly been blamed on pesticides, leading some to propose pesticide-free farming as an option to improve pollination. However, herbivores are likely to be more prevalent in pesticide-free environments, requiring knowledge of their effects on pollinators, and alternative crop protection strategies to mitigate any potential pollination reduction. Strawberry leaf beetles (SLB Galerucella spp. are important strawberry pests in Northern Europe and Russia. Given that SLB attack both leaf and flower tissue, we hypothesized pollinators would discriminate against SLB-damaged strawberry plants (Fragaria vesca, cultivar ‘Rügen’, leading to lower pollination success and yield. In addition we screened the most common commercial cultivar ‘Rügen’ and wild Swedish F. vesca genotypes for SLB resistance to assess the potential for inverse breeding to restore high SLB resistance in cultivated strawberry. Behavioral observations in a controlled experiment revealed that the local pollinator fauna avoided strawberry flowers with SLB-damaged petals. Low pollination, in turn, resulted in smaller more deformed fruits. Furthermore, SLB-damaged flowers produced smaller fruits even when they were hand pollinated, showing herbivore damage also had direct effects on yield, independent of indirect effects on pollination. We found variable resistance in wild woodland strawberry to SLB and more resistant plant genotypes than the cultivar ‘Rügen’ were identified. Efficient integrated pest management strategies should be employed to mitigate both direct and indirect effects of herbivory for cultivated strawberry, including high intrinsic plant resistance.

  11. Solid phase double-antibody radioimmunoassay procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niswender, G.D.

    1977-01-01

    The present invention is concerned with the radioimmunoassay (RIA) procedure for assaying body fluid content of an antigenic substance which may either be an antigen itself or a hapten capable of being converted, such as by means of reaction with a protein, to an antigenic material. The present invention is concerned with a novel and improved modification of a double-antibody RIA technique in which there is a first antibody that is specific to the antigenic substance suspected to be present in a body fluid from which the assay is intended. The second antibody, however, is not specific to the antigenic substance or analyte, but is an antibody against the first antibody

  12. Dietary supplementation of organic selenium could improve performance, antibody response, and yolk oxidative stability in laying hens fed on diets containing oxidized fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laika, M; Jahanian, R

    2015-06-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the effect of dietary supplementation of organic selenium (Se) on performance, egg quality indices, and yolk oxidative stability in laying hens fed diets with different fat sources. A total of 270 Hy-line W-36 Leghorn hens of 47 weeks of age were randomly distributed into the 5 replicate cages of 9 dietary treatments. Experimental diets consisted of a 3 × 3 factorial arrangement of treatments with three different fat sources (soybean oil, SO; yellow grease, YG; and palm fat powder, PFP) and three different levels of supplemental Se (0, 0.2, and 0.4 mg/kg of diet) as supplied by zinc-L-selenomethionine (ZnSeMet) complex, which fed during a 77-day feeding trial including 7 days for adaptation and 70 days as the main recording period. Results showed that the highest (P hens fed on SO-supplemented diets. Hen-day egg production was affected by both dietary fat source (P feed intake was not affected by experimental diets during the first 35-day period, dietary inclusion of PFP reduced feed intake during both second 35-day (P feed conversion ratio during the first 35-day period was assigned to the birds fed on SO-diets, followed by those fed YG-diets. Dietary supplementation of ZnSeMet improved (P feed efficiency during the first 35-day period. Supplementation of ZnSeMet into the diets increased yolk index, with more impact in hens fed on YG-diets. The highest concentration of yolk malondialdehyde was observed in YG-fed groups, and ZnSeMet supplementation of diets decreased (P hens fed on diets supplemented by YG, followed by those on SO-diets. Although different fat sources had no effect on antibody titer against Newcastle disease virus, supplemental ZnSeMet improved (P hens, with the highest impact in diets containing oxidized (high peroxide values) fat sources.

  13. The anti-tumor efficacy of 3C23K, a glyco-engineered humanized anti-MISRII antibody, in an ovarian cancer model is mainly mediated by engagement of immune effector cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estupina, Pauline; Fontayne, Alexandre; Barret, Jean-Marc; Kersual, Nathalie; Dubreuil, Olivier; Le Blay, Marion; Pichard, Alexandre; Jarlier, Marta; Pugnière, Martine; Chauvin, Maëva; Chardès, Thierry; Pouget, Jean-Pierre; Deshayes, Emmanuel; Rossignol, Alexis; Abache, Toufik; de Romeuf, Christophe; Terrier, Aurélie; Verhaeghe, Lucie; Gaucher, Christine; Prost, Jean-François; Pèlegrin, André; Navarro-Teulon, Isabelle

    2017-06-06

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death in women with gynecological cancers and despite recent advances, new and more efficient therapies are crucially needed. Müllerian Inhibiting Substance type II Receptor (MISRII, also named AMHRII) is expressed in most ovarian cancer subtypes and is a novel potential target for ovarian cancer immunotherapy. We previously developed and tested 12G4, the first murine monoclonal antibody (MAb) against human MISRII. Here, we report the humanization, affinity maturation and glyco-engineering steps of 12G4 to generate the Fc-optimized 3C23K MAb, and the evaluation of its in vivo anti-tumor activity. The epitopes of 3C23K and 12G4 were strictly identical and 3C23K affinity for MISRII was enhanced by a factor of about 14 (KD = 5.5 × 10-11 M vs 7.9 × 10-10 M), while the use of the EMABling® platform allowed the production of a low-fucosylated 3C23K antibody with a 30-fold KD improvement of its affinity to FcγRIIIa. In COV434-MISRII tumor-bearing mice, 3C23K reduced tumor growth more efficiently than 12G4 and its combination with carboplatin was more efficient than each monotherapy with a mean tumor size of 500, 1100 and 100 mm3 at the end of treatment with 3C23K (10 mg/kg, Q3-4D12), carboplatin (60 mg/kg, Q7D4) and 3C23K+carboplatin, respectively. Conversely, 3C23K-FcKO, a 3C23K form without affinity for the FcγRIIIa receptor, did not display any anti-tumor effect in vivo. These results strongly suggested that 3C23K mechanisms of action are mainly Fc-related. In vitro, antibody-dependent cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antibody-dependent cell phagocytosis (ADCP) were induced by 3C23K, as demonstrated with human effector cells. Using human NK cells, 50% of the maximal lysis was obtained with a 46-fold lower concentration of low-fucosylated 3C23K (2.9 ng/ml) than of 3C23K expressed in CHO cells (133.35 ng/ml). As 3C23K induced strong ADCC with human PBMC but almost none with murine PBMC, antibody-dependent cell phagocytosis (ADCP) was

  14. Spirulina vesicolor Improves Insulin Sensitivity and Attenuates Hyperglycemia-Mediated Oxidative Stress in Fructose-Fed Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walaa Hozayen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The current study aimed to investigate the anti-hyperglycemic, anti-hyperlipidemic and insulin sensitizing effects of the cyanobacterium Spirulina vesicolor extract in fructose-fed rats. Materials and Methods: Rats were fed 30% fructose solution in drinking water for 4 weeks. Animals exhibited hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia were selected for further investigations. Diabetic and control rats were orally supplemented with 50 mg/kg body weight S. vesicolor extract for 4 weeks. Results: At the end of 8 weeks, fructose-fed rats showed significant increase in serum glucose, insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides, cardiovascular risk indices and insulin resistance. Treatment of the fructose-fed rats with S. vesicolor extract improved this metabolic profile. Fructose feeding produced a significant increase in serum tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α and a decrease in adiponectin levels. In addition, fructose-fed rats exhibited a significant increase in liver, kidney and heart lipid peroxidation levels, and declined antioxidant defenses. Supplementation of the fructose-fed rats with S. vesicolor extract reversed these alterations. Conclusion: S. vesicolor attenuates hyperglycemia-mediated oxidative stress and inflammation, and is thus effective in improving insulin sensitivity in fructose-fed rats. [J Complement Med Res 2016; 5(1.000: 57-64

  15. Efficient Generation of Marker-Free Transgenic Rice Plants Using an Improved Transposon-Mediated Transgene Reintegration Strategy1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaoqing; Zhou, Jie; Li, Jun; Zou, Xiaowei; Zhao, Jianhua; Li, Qingliang; Xia, Ran; Yang, Ruifang; Wang, Dekai; Zuo, Zhaoxue; Tu, Jumin; Tao, Yuezhi; Chen, Xiaoyun; Xie, Qi; Zhu, Zengrong

    2015-01-01

    Marker-free transgenic plants can be developed through transposon-mediated transgene reintegration, which allows intact transgene insertion with defined boundaries and requires only a few primary transformants. In this study, we improved the selection strategy and validated that the maize (Zea mays) Activator/Dissociation (Ds) transposable element can be routinely used to generate marker-free transgenic plants. A Ds-based gene of interest was linked to green fluorescent protein in transfer DNA (T-DNA), and a green fluorescent protein-aided counterselection against T-DNA was used together with polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based positive selection for the gene of interest to screen marker-free progeny. To test the efficacy of this strategy, we cloned the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) δ-endotoxin gene into the Ds elements and transformed transposon vectors into rice (Oryza sativa) cultivars via Agrobacterium tumefaciens. PCR assays of the transposon empty donor site exhibited transposition in somatic cells in 60.5% to 100% of the rice transformants. Marker-free (T-DNA-free) transgenic rice plants derived from unlinked germinal transposition were obtained from the T1 generation of 26.1% of the primary transformants. Individual marker-free transgenic rice lines were subjected to thermal asymmetric interlaced-PCR to determine Ds(Bt) reintegration positions, reverse transcription-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect Bt expression levels, and bioassays to confirm resistance against the striped stem borer Chilo suppressalis. Overall, we efficiently generated marker-free transgenic plants with optimized transgene insertion and expression. The transposon-mediated marker-free platform established in this study can be used in rice and possibly in other important crops. PMID:25371551

  16. A Becn1 mutation mediates hyperactive autophagic sequestration of amyloid oligomers and improved cognition in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altea Rocchi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Impairment of the autophagy pathway has been observed during the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD, a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by abnormal deposition of extracellular and intracellular amyloid β (Aβ peptides. Yet the role of autophagy in Aβ production and AD progression is complex. To study whether increased basal autophagy plays a beneficial role in Aβ clearance and cognitive improvement, we developed a novel genetic model to hyperactivate autophagy in vivo. We found that knock-in of a point mutation F121A in the essential autophagy gene Beclin 1/Becn1 in mice significantly reduces the interaction of BECN1 with its inhibitor BCL2, and thus leads to constitutively active autophagy even under non-autophagy-inducing conditions in multiple tissues, including brain. Becn1F121A-mediated autophagy hyperactivation significantly decreases amyloid accumulation, prevents cognitive decline, and restores survival in AD mouse models. Using an immunoisolation method, we found biochemically that Aβ oligomers are autophagic substrates and sequestered inside autophagosomes in the brain of autophagy-hyperactive AD mice. In addition to genetic activation of autophagy by Becn1 gain-of-function, we also found that ML246, a small-molecule autophagy inducer, as well as voluntary exercise, a physiological autophagy inducer, exert similar Becn1-dependent protective effects on Aβ removal and memory in AD mice. Taken together, these results demonstrate that genetically disrupting BECN1-BCL2 binding hyperactivates autophagy in vivo, which sequestrates amyloid oligomers and prevents AD progression. The study establishes new approaches to activate autophagy in the brain, and reveals the important function of Becn1-mediated autophagy hyperactivation in the prevention of AD.

  17. Intravitreal Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Transiently Improves Cone-Mediated Function in a CNGB3-/- Mouse Model of Achromatopsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangoni, Dario; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Bush, Ronald A; Wei, Lisa L; Wen, Rong; Sieving, Paul A

    2015-10-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) was recently shown to augment cone function in CNGB3 mutant achromat dogs. However, testing CNTF-releasing implant in human CNGB3 achromats failed to show benefit. We evaluated the effects of CNTF protein on the retinal function in an additional achromatopsia model, the CNGB3-/- mouse. Fifty-nine CNGB3-/- mice (postnatal day [PD] ± SD = 30 ± 7) received a unilateral intravitreal injection of 1 or 2 μg CNTF protein, and 15 wild-type (WT) mice (PD = 34 ± 3) received 1 μg CNTF. Retinal function was evaluated by flash ERG and photopic flicker ERG (fERG) at 7 and 14 days after treatment. Seven days post CNTF, the photopic b-wave Vmax was significantly increased in CNGB3-/- mice (P < 0.01), whereas it was reduced in WT mice (P < 0.05). Ciliary neurotrophic factor significantly increased the amplitude of photopic fERG and the photopic oscillatory potentials (OPs) in CNGB3-/- mice. Ciliary neurotrophic factor did not alter the scotopic a-wave in either CNGB3-/- or WT mice, but it increased the scotopic b-wave k (P < 0.01) in CNGB3-/- mice, indicating diminished scotopic sensitivity, and reduced the scotopic b-wave Vmax in WT mice (P < 0.05). No difference was found in ERG parameters between 1 or 2 μg CNTF. Fourteen days after CNTF injection the ERG changes in CNGB3-/- mice were lost. Intravitreal bolus CNTF protein caused a small and transient improvement of cone-mediated function in CNGB3-/- mice, whereas it reduced rod-mediated function. The increase in photopic OPs and the lack of changes in scotopic a-wave suggest a CNTF effect on the inner retina.

  18. Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1505 nasal administration improves recovery of T-cell mediated immunity against pneumococcal infection in malnourished mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, N; Herrera, M; Salva, S; Villena, J; Alvarez, S

    2017-05-30

    Immunobiotic lactic acid bacteria have become an interesting alternative for the prevention of respiratory infections. Previously, we demonstrated that the nasal administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1505, during repletion of malnourished mice, resulted in diminished susceptibility to the challenge with the respiratory pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. Considering the known alterations induced by malnutrition on T lymphocytes and the importance of this cell population on the protection against respiratory pathogens, we aimed to study the effect of L. rhamnosus CRL1505 nasal administration on the recovery of T cell-mediated defences against pneumococcal infection in malnourished mice under nutritional recovery. Malnourished mice received a balanced conventional diet (BCD) for seven days or BCD for seven days with nasal L. rhamnosus CRL1505 supplementation during last two days of the treatment. After the treatments mice were infected with S. pneumoniae. Flow cytometry studies were carried out in bone marrow, thymus, spleen and lung to study T cells, and Th 1 /Th 2 cytokine profiles were determined in broncho-alveolar lavages and serum. The administration of CRL1505 strain to malnourished mice under recovery reduced quantitative and qualitative alterations of CD4 + T cells in the bone marrow, thymus, spleen and lung induced by malnutrition. In addition, CRL1505 treatment augmented Th 2 -cytokines (interleukin 10 and 4) in respiratory and systemic compartments after pneumococcal infection. These results show that modulation of CD4 + T lymphocytes induced by L. rhamnosus CRL1505 has an important role in the beneficial effect induced by this strain on the recovery of malnourished mice. These data also indicate that nasally administered L. rhamnosus CRL1505 may represent a non-invasive alternative to modulate and improve the T cell-mediated immunity against respiratory pathogens in immunocompromised malnourished hosts.

  19. Antibody-Directed Phototherapy (ADP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Adil Butt

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a clinically-approved but rather under-exploited treatment modality for cancer and pre-cancerous superficial lesions. It utilises a cold laser or LED to activate a photochemical reaction between a light activated drug (photosensitiser-drug and oxygen to generate cytotoxic oxygen species. These free radical species damage cellular components leading to cell death. Despite its benefits, the complexity, limited potency and side effects of PDT have led to poor general usage. However, the research area is very active with an increasing understanding of PDT-related cell biology, photophysics and significant progress in molecular targeting of disease. Monoclonal antibody therapy is maturing and the next wave of antibody therapies includes antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs, which promise to be more potent and curable. These developments could lift antibody-directed phototherapy (ADP to success. ADP promises to increase specificity and potency and improve drug pharmacokinetics, thus delivering better PDT drugs whilst retaining its other benefits. Whole antibody conjugates with first generation ADP-drugs displayed problems with aggregation, poor pharmacokinetics and loss of immuno-reactivity. However, these early ADP-drugs still showed improved selectivity and potency. Improved PS-drug chemistry and a variety of conjugation strategies have led to improved ADP-drugs with retained antibody and PS-drug function. More recently, recombinant antibody fragments have been used to deliver ADP-drugs with superior drug loading, more favourable pharmacokinetics, enhanced potency and target cell selectivity. These improvements offer a promise of better quality PDT drugs.

  20. Changes in illness-related cognitions rather than distress mediate improvements in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms and disability following a brief cognitive behavioural therapy intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilcot, Joseph; Moss-Morris, Rona

    2013-10-01

    A previous randomised controlled trial demonstrated that a cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) self-management intervention significantly improved irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms and disability compared to treatment as usual (TAU). The current study analysed additional data to establish whether; 1) cognitive, behavioural and emotional factors hypothesized to perpetuate IBS symptoms and disability changed following CBT and, 2) ascertain if changes in these factors over the intervention period mediated treatment effects 6-months later. IBS patients (CBT = 31, TAU = 33) completed measures pre-and-post intervention including: Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire, Hospital Anxiety & Depression Scale and Cognitive and Behavioural Responses to Symptoms Questionnaire. Path models were evaluated to determine whether changes in cognitive and behavioural factors over the treatment period mediated treatment effects. Compared to TAU, CBT patients showed significant positive changes on several cognitive variables but not anxiety and depression following intervention. Positive change in illness perceptions following intervention mediated the treatment effect on improved IBS symptom severity and social adjustment six months later. Changes in damaging beliefs mediated the effect on social adjustment. Change in cognition rather than mood mediated treatment related improvements. Changing negative perceptions of IBS appears to be a particularly important treatment mechanism. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Advances in alloimmune thrombocytopenia: perspectives on current concepts of human platelet antigens, antibody detection strategies, and genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Tomoya; Hirayama, Fumiya

    2015-07-01

    Alloimmunisation to platelets leads to the production of antibodies against platelet antigens and consequently to thrombocytopenia. Numerous molecules located on the platelet surface are antigenic and induce immune-mediated platelet destruction with symptoms that can be serious. Human platelet antigens (HPA) cause thrombocytopenias, such as neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, post-transfusion purpura, and platelet transfusion refractoriness. Thirty-four HPA are classified into 28 systems. Assays to identify HPA and anti-HPA antibodies are critically important for preventing and treating thrombocytopenia caused by anti-HPA antibodies. Significant progress in furthering our understanding of HPA has been made in the last decade: new HPA have been discovered, antibody-detection methods have improved, and new genotyping methods have been developed. We review these advances and discuss issues that remain to be resolved as well as future prospects for preventing and treating immune thrombocytopenia.

  2. Antibody Drug Conjugates: Preclinical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Gadi G

    2015-05-01

    The development path for antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) is more complex and challenging than for unmodified antibodies. While many of the preclinical considerations for both unmodified and antibody drug conjugates are shared, special considerations must be taken into account when developing an ADC. Unlike unmodified antibodies, an ADC must preferentially bind to tumor cells, internalize, and traffic to the appropriate intracellular compartment to release the payload. Parameters that can impact the pharmacological properties of this class of therapeutics include the selection of the payload, the type of linker, and the methodology for payload drug conjugation. Despite a plethora of in vitro assays and in vivo models to screen and evaluate ADCs, the challenge remains to develop improved preclinical tools that will be more predictive of clinical outcome. This review will focus on preclinical considerations for clinically validated small molecule ADCs. In addition, the lessons learned from Mylotarg®, the first in class FDA-approved ADC, are highlighted.

  3. Jumping the nuclear envelop barrier: Improving polyplex-mediated gene transfection efficiency by a selective CDK1 inhibitor RO-3306.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xuefei; Liu, Xiangrui; Zhao, Bingxiang; Liu, Xin; Zhu, Dingcheng; Qiu, Nasha; Zhou, Quan; Piao, Ying; Zhou, Zhuxian; Tang, Jianbin; Shen, Youqing

    2016-07-28

    Successful transfection of plasmid DNA (pDNA) requires intranuclear internalization of pDNA effectively and the nuclear envelope appears to be one of the critical intracellular barriers for polymer mediated pDNA delivery. Polyethylenimine (PEI), as the classic cationic polymer, compact the negatively charged pDNA tightly and make up stable polyplexes. The polyplexes are too large to enter the nuclear through nuclear pores and it is believed that the nuclear envelope breakdown in mitosis could facilitate the nuclear entry of polyplexes. To jump the nuclear envelope barrier, we used a selective and reversible CDK1 inhibitor RO-3306 to control the G2/M transition of the cell cycle and increased the proportion of mitotic cells which have disappeared nuclear envelope during transfection. Herein, we show that RO-3306 remarkably increases the transfection efficiency of PEI polyplexes through enhanced nuclear localization of PEI and pDNA. However, RO-3306 is less effective to the charge-reversal polymer poly[(2-acryloyl)ethyl(p-boronic acid benzyl)diethylammonium bromide] (B-PDEAEA) which responses to cellular stimuli and releases free pDNA in cytoplasm. Our findings not only offer new opportunities for improving non-viral based gene delivery but also provide theoretical support for the rational design of novel functional polymers for gene delivery. We also report current data showing that RO-3306 synergizes TRAIL gene induced apoptosis in cancer cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. AAV-mediated RLBP1 gene therapy improves the rate of dark adaptation in Rlbp1 knockout mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian W Choi

    Full Text Available Recessive mutations in RLBP1 cause a form of retinitis pigmentosa in which the retina, before its degeneration leads to blindness, abnormally slowly recovers sensitivity after exposure to light. To develop a potential gene therapy for this condition, we tested multiple recombinant adeno-associated vectors (rAAVs composed of different promoters, capsid serotypes, and genome conformations. We generated rAAVs in which sequences from the promoters of the human RLBP1, RPE65, or BEST1 genes drove the expression of a reporter gene (green fluorescent protein. A promoter derived from the RLBP1 gene mediated expression in the retinal pigment epithelium and Müller cells (the intended target cell types at qualitatively higher levels than in other retinal cell types in wild-type mice and monkeys. With this promoter upstream of the coding sequence of the human RLBP1 gene, we compared the potencies of vectors with an AAV2 versus an AAV8 capsid in transducing mouse retinas, and we compared vectors with a self-complementary versus a single-stranded genome. The optimal vector (scAAV8-pRLBP1-hRLBP1 had serotype 8 capsid and a self-complementary genome. Subretinal injection of scAAV8-pRLBP1-hRLBP1 in Rlbp1 nullizygous mice improved the rate of dark adaptation based on scotopic (rod-plus-cone and photopic (cone electroretinograms (ERGs. The effect was still present after 1 year.

  5. Carrier-Mediated Prodrug Uptake to Improve the Oral Bioavailability of Polar Drugs: An Application to an Oseltamivir Analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incecayir, Tuba; Sun, Jing; Tsume, Yasuhiro; Xu, Hao; Gose, Tomoka; Nakanishi, Takeo; Tamai, Ikumi; Hilfinger, John; Lipka, Elke; Amidon, Gordon L

    2016-02-01

    The goal of this study was to improve the intestinal mucosal cell membrane permeability of the poorly absorbed guanidino analogue of a neuraminidase inhibitor, oseltamivir carboxylate (GOC) using a carrier-mediated strategy. Valyl amino acid prodrug of GOC with isopropyl-methylene-dioxy linker (GOC-ISP-Val) was evaluated as the potential substrate for intestinal oligopeptide transporter, hPEPT1 in Xenopus laevis oocytes heterologously expressing hPEPT1, and an intestinal mouse perfusion system. The diastereomers of GOC-ISP-Val were assessed for chemical and metabolic stability. Permeability of GOC-ISP-Val was determined in Caco-2 cells and mice. Diastereomer 2 was about 2 times more stable than diastereomer 1 in simulated intestinal fluid and rapidly hydrolyzed to the parent drug in cell homogenates. The prodrug had a 9 times-enhanced apparent permeability (P(app)) in Caco-2 cells compared with the parent drug. Both diastereomer exhibited high effective permeability (P(eff)) in mice, 6.32 ± 3.12 and 5.20 ± 2.81 × 10(-5) cm/s for diastereomer 1 and 2, respectively. GOC-ISP-Val was found to be a substrate of hPEPT1. Overall, this study indicates that the prodrug, GOC-ISP-Val, seems to be a promising oral anti-influenza agent that has sufficient stability at physiologically relevant pHs before absorption, significantly improved permeability via hPEPT1 and potentially rapid activation in the intestinal cells. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Improved enzyme-mediated synthesis and supramolecular self-assembly of naturally occurring conjugates of β-sitosterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmerová, Martina; Siglerová, Věra; Šaman, David; Šlouf, Miroslav; Kaletová, Eva; Wimmer, Zdeněk

    2017-01-01

    Naturally occurring acylated β-sitosteryl glucosides have been investigated for their novel properties. The synthetic protocol based on the literature data was improved and optimized. The main improvement consists in employing systems of ionic liquids combined with organic solvents in lipase-mediated esterification of (3β)-stigmast-5-en-3-yl β-d-glucopyranoside to get (3β)-stigmast-5-en-3-yl 6-O-acyl-β-d-glucopyranosides. Maximum yields of these products were achieved with Candida antarctica lipase B immobilized on Immobead 150, recombinant from yeast, in absolute THF and in the presence of either ionic liquid [1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM]BF 4 ) or 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIM]PF 6 )] employed. Pharmacological activity of (3β)-stigmast-5-en-3-yl 6-O-acyl-β-d-glucopyranosides was studied in tests on MCF7 tumor cell lines; the compounds displayed moderate activity which was higher than the activity of β-sitosterol. Supramolecular characteristics were discovered at (3β)-stigmast-5-en-3-yl 6-O-dodecanoyl-β-d-glucopyranoside that formed supramolecular polymer through multiple H-bonds in a methanol/water system (60/40). Its formation was confirmed by the independent UV-vis measurements during certain time period, by variable temperature DOSY-NMR measurement in deuteriochloroform, and visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) showing chiral helical structures and complex superassembly systems based on fibrous supramolecular polymer. In contrary, no such properties have been observed for the other two (3β)-stigmast-5-en-3-yl 6-O-acyl-β-d-glucopyranosides under the given experimental conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Inorganic nitrate ingestion improves vascular compliance but does not alter flow-mediated dilatation in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahra, M; Kapil, V; Pearl, V; Ghosh, S; Ahluwalia, A

    2012-05-15

    Ingestion of inorganic nitrate elevates blood and tissue levels of nitrite via bioconversion in the entero-salivary circulation. Nitrite is converted to NO in the circulation, and it is this phenomenon that is thought to underlie the beneficial effects of inorganic nitrate in humans. Our previous studies have demonstrated that oral ingestion of inorganic nitrate decreases blood pressure and inhibits the transient endothelial dysfunction caused by ischaemia-reperfusion injury in healthy volunteers. However, whether inorganic nitrate might improve endothelial function per se in the absence of a pathogenic stimulus and whether this might contribute to the blood pressure lowering effects is yet unknown. We conducted a randomised, double-blind, crossover study in 14 healthy volunteers to determine the effects of oral inorganic nitrate (8 mmol KNO(3)) vs. placebo (8 mmol KCl) on endothelial function, measured by flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) of the brachial artery, prior to and 3h following capsule ingestion. In addition, blood pressure (BP) was measured and aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) determined. Finally, blood, saliva and urine samples were collected for chemiluminescence analysis of [nitrite] and [nitrate] prior to and 3h following interventions. Inorganic nitrate supplementation had no effect on endothelial function in healthy volunteers (6.9±1.1% pre- to 7.1±1.1% post-KNO(3)). Despite this, there was a significant elevation of plasma [nitrite] (0.4±0.1 μM pre- to 0.7±0.2 μM post-KNO(3), pinorganic nitrate ingestion does not alter endothelial function per se, it does appear to improve blood flow, in combination with a reduction in blood pressure. It is likely that these changes are due to the intra-vascular production of NO. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Improving Collaborative Play between Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Their Siblings: The Effectiveness of a Robot-Mediated Intervention Based on Lego® Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huskens, Bibi; Palmen, Annemiek; Van der Werff, Marije; Lourens, Tino; Barakova, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effectiveness of a brief robot-mediated intervention based on Lego® therapy on improving collaborative behaviors (i.e., interaction initiations, responses, and play together) between children with ASD and their siblings during play sessions, in a therapeutic setting. A concurrent multiple baseline design…

  9. The binding affinity of a soluble TCR-Fc fusion protein is significantly improved by crosslinkage with an anti-C{beta} antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozawa, Tatsuhiko; Horii, Masae; Kobayashi, Eiji [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Jin, Aishun [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Department of Immunology, College of Basic Medical Sciences, Harbin Medical University, 157 Baojian Road, Nangang District, Harbin 150081 (China); Kishi, Hiroyuki, E-mail: immkishi@med.u-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Muraguchi, Atsushi [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan)

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel soluble TCR composed of TCR V and C regions with Ig Fc region is generated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TCR-Fc protein immobilized by an anti-C{beta} antibody bound to a p/MHC tetramer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binding affinity of TCR-Fc was markedly increased by binding with anti-C{beta} antibody. -- Abstract: The identification and cloning of tumor antigen-specific T cell receptors (TCRs) and the production of the soluble form of the TCR (sTCR) contributed to the development of diagnostic and therapeutic tools for cancer. Recently, several groups have reported the development of technologies for the production of sTCRs. The native sTCR has a very low binding affinity for the antigenic peptide/MHC (p/MHC) complex. In this study, we established a technology to produce high affinity, functional sTCRs. We generated a novel sTCR-Fc fusion protein composed of the TCR V and C regions of the TCR linked to the immunoglobulin (Ig) Fc region. A Western blot analysis revealed that the molecular weight of the fusion protein was approximately 60 kDa under reducing conditions and approximately 100-200 kDa under non-reducing conditions. ELISAs using various antibodies showed that the structure of each domain of the TCR-Fc protein was intact. The TCR-Fc protein immobilized by an anti-C{beta} antibody effectively bound to a p/MHC tetramer. An SPR analysis showed that the TCR-Fc protein had a low binding affinity (KD; 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} M) to the p/MHC monomer. Interestingly, when the TCR-Fc protein was pre-incubated with an anti-C{beta} antibody, its binding affinity for p/MHC increased by 5-fold (2.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} M). We demonstrated a novel method for constructing a functional soluble TCR using the Ig Fc region and showed that the binding affinity of the functional sTCR-Fc was markedly increased by an anti-C{beta} antibody, which is probably due to the stabilization of the V

  10. Curcumin protects dopaminergic neurons against inflammation-mediated damage and improves motor dysfunction induced by single intranigral lipopolysaccharide injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Neha; Sharma, Sheetal; Nehru, Bimla

    2017-06-01

    Various studies have indicated a lower incidence and prevalence of neurological conditions in people consuming curcumin. The ability of curcumin to target multiple cascades, simultaneously, could be held responsible for its neuroprotective effects. The present study was designed to investigate the potential of curcumin in minimizing microglia-mediated damage in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced model of PD. Altered microglial functions and increased inflammatory profile of the CNS have severe behavioral consequences. In the current investigation, a single injection of LPS (5 ug/5 µl PBS) was injected into the substantia nigra (SN) of rats, and curcumin [40 mg/kg b.wt (i.p.)] was administered daily for a period of 21 days. LPS triggered an inflammatory response characterized by glial activation [Iba-1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)] and pro-inflammatory cytokine production (TNF-α and IL-1β) leading to extensive dopaminergic loss and behavioral abnormality in rats. The behavioral observations, biochemical markers, quantification of dopamine and its metabolites (DOPAC and HVA) using HPLC followed by IHC of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) were evaluated after 21 days of LPS injection. Curcumin supplementation prevented dopaminergic degeneration in LPS-treated animals by normalizing the altered levels of biomarkers. Also, a significant improvement in TH levels as well as behavioral parameters (actophotometer, rotarod, beam walking and grid walking tests) were seen in LPS injected rats. Curcumin shielded the dopaminergic neurons against LPS-induced inflammatory response, which was associated with suppression of glial activation (microglia and astrocytes) and transcription factor NF-κB as depicted from RT-PCR and EMSA assay. Curcumin also suppressed microglial NADPH oxidase activation as observed from NADPH oxidase activity. The results suggested that one of the important mechanisms by which curcumin mediates its protective effects in the LPS-induced PD

  11. Recombinant adenovirus-mediated overexpression of PTEN and KRT10 improves cisplatin resistance of ovarian cancer in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H; Wang, K; Liu, W; Hao, Q

    2015-06-18

    Drug resistance is a major cause of treatment failure in ovarian cancer patients, and novel therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. Overexpression of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) has been shown to preserve the cisplatin-resistance of ovarian cancer cells, while cisplatin-induced keratin 10 (KRT10) overexpression mediates the resistance-reversing effect of PTEN. However, whether overexpression of PTEN or KRT10 can improve the cisplatin resistance of ovarian cancer in vivo has not been investigated. Therefore, we investigated the effects of adenovirus-mediated PTEN or KRT10 overexpression on the cisplatin resistance of ovarian cancer in vivo. Recombinant adenoviruses carrying the gene for PTEN or KRT10 were constructed. The effects of overexpression of PTEN and KRT10 on cisplatin resistance of ovarian cancer cells were examined using the 3(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assays in vitro. Subcutaneously transplanted nude mice, as a model of human ovarian cancer, were used to test the effects of PTEN and KRT10 on cisplatin resistance of ovarian cancer in vivo. The MTT assay showed that recombinant adenovirus-mediated overexpression of KRT10 and PTEN enhanced the proliferation inhibition effect of cisplatin on C13K cells. Recombinant adenovirus-mediated overexpression of KRT10 and PTEN also increased the cisplatin-induced apoptosis rate of C13K cells. Furthermore, recombinant adenovirus-mediated overexpression of KRT10 and PTEN enhanced the inhibitory effect of cisplatin on C13K xenograft tumor growth. Thus, recombinant adenovirus-mediated overexpression of KRT10 and PTEN may improve the cisplatin resistance of ovarian cancer in vitro and in vivo.

  12. Lymphocyte antibody-dependent cytotoxicity test for evaluation of clinical role of monoclonal anti-D-antibodies for prevention of rhesus sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olovnikova, N I; Belkina, E V; Nikolaeva, T L; Miterev, G Yu; Chertkov, I L

    2006-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to D antigen were studied in the reaction of antibody-dependent cytotoxicity for evaluation of the possibility of using these antibodies for preventing rhesus sensitization. High hemolytic activity of four anti-D-monoclonal antibodies in the antibody-dependent cytotoxicity test, mediated by their interaction with FcgammaRI, and the capacity to accelerate elimination of D+ erythrocytes from circulation did not provide the immunosuppressive effect. It was hypothesized that monoclonal antibodies for prevention of rhesus sensitization should interact with FcgammaRIII on lymphocytes. These monoclonal antibodies are extremely rare: only 4 of 125 studied antibodies mediated hemolysis in the antibody-dependent cytotoxicity test with lymphocytes, while all polyclonal anti-D-preparations exhibited this activity.

  13. Identifying the Conditions Under Which Antibodies Protect Against Infection by Equine Infectious Anemia Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, Elissa J.; Smith?, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to predict the conditions under which antibodies protect against viral infection would transform our approach to vaccine development. A more complete understanding is needed of antibody protection against lentivirus infection, as well as the role of mutation in resistance to an antibody vaccine. Recently, an example of antibody-mediated vaccine protection has been shown via passive transfer of neutralizing antibodies before equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infection of horses...

  14. Chronic treatment with paeonol improves endothelial function in mice through inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ker Woon Choy

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress leads to endothelial dysfunction which is commonly associated in the pathogenesis of several cardiovascular diseases. We explored the vascular protective effects of chronic treatment with paeonol (2'-hydroxy-4'-methoxyacetophenone, the major compound from the root bark of Paeonia suffruticosa on ER stress-induced endothelial dysfunction in mice. Male C57BL/6J mice were injected intraperitoneally with ER stress inducer, tunicamycin (1 mg/kg/week for 2 weeks to induce ER stress. The animals were co-administered with or without paeonol (20 mg/kg/oral gavage, reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenger, tempol (20 mg/kg/day or ER stress inhibitor, tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA, 150 mg/kg/day respectively. Blood pressure and body weight were monitored weekly and at the end of treatment, the aorta was isolated for isometric force measurement. Protein associated with ER stress (GRP78, ATF6 and p-eIF2α and oxidative stress (NOX2 and nitrotyrosine were evaluated using Western blotting. Nitric oxide (NO bioavailability were determined using total nitrate/nitrite assay and western blotting (phosphorylation of eNOS protein. ROS production was assessed by en face dihydroethidium staining and lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence assay, respectively. Our results revealed that mice treated with tunicamycin showed an increased blood pressure, reduction in body weight and impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxations (EDRs of aorta, which were ameliorated by co-treatment with either paeonol, TUDCA and tempol. Furthermore, paeonol reduced the ROS level in the mouse aorta and improved NO bioavailability in tunicamycin treated mice. These beneficial effects of paeonol observed were comparable to those produced by TUDCA and tempol, suggesting that the actions of paeonol may involve inhibition of ER stress-mediated oxidative stress pathway. Taken together, the present results suggest that chronic treatment with paeonol preserved

  15. Electroacupunctre improves motor impairment via inhibition of microglia-mediated neuroinflammation in the sensorimotor cortex after ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weilin; Wang, Xian; Yang, Shanli; Huang, Jia; Xue, Xiehua; Zheng, Yi; Shang, Guanhao; Tao, Jing; Chen, Lidian

    2016-04-15

    Electroacupuncture (EA) is one of the safety and effective therapies for improving neurological and sensorimotor impairment via blockade of inappropriate inflammatory responses. However, the mechanisms of anti-inflammation involved is far from been fully elucidated. Focal cerebral ischemic stroke was administered by the middle cerebral artery occlusion and reperfusion (MCAO/R) surgery. The MCAO/R rats were accepted EA treatment at the LI 11 and ST 36 acupoints for consecutive 3days. The neurological outcome, animal behaviors test and molecular biology assays were used to evaluate the MCAO/R model and therapeutic effect of EA. EA treatment for MCAO rats showed a significant reduction in the infarct volumes ac