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Sample records for antibiotic tolerant pseudomonas

  1. Selective labelling and eradication of antibiotic-tolerant bacterial populations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chua, Song Lin; Yam, Joey Kuok Hoong; Hao, Piliang

    2016-01-01

    subpopulations, with colistin-tolerant cells using type IV pili to migrate onto the top of the colistin-killed biofilm. The colistin-tolerant cells employ quorum sensing (QS) to initiate the formation of new colistin-tolerant subpopulations, highlighting multicellular behaviour in antibiotic tolerance......Drug resistance and tolerance greatly diminish the therapeutic potential of antibiotics against pathogens. Antibiotic tolerance by bacterial biofilms often leads to persistent infections, but its mechanisms are unclear. Here we use a proteomics approach, pulsed stable isotope labelling with amino...... acids (pulsed-SILAC), to quantify newly expressed proteins in colistin-tolerant subpopulations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms (colistin is a 'last-resort' antibiotic against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens). Migration is essential for the formation of colistin-tolerant biofilm...

  2. Selective labelling and eradication of antibiotic-tolerant bacterial populations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Song Lin; Yam, Joey Kuok Hoong; Hao, Piliang; Adav, Sunil S.; Salido, May Margarette; Liu, Yang; Givskov, Michael; Sze, Siu Kwan; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Yang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance and tolerance greatly diminish the therapeutic potential of antibiotics against pathogens. Antibiotic tolerance by bacterial biofilms often leads to persistent infections, but its mechanisms are unclear. Here we use a proteomics approach, pulsed stable isotope labelling with amino acids (pulsed-SILAC), to quantify newly expressed proteins in colistin-tolerant subpopulations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms (colistin is a ‘last-resort' antibiotic against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens). Migration is essential for the formation of colistin-tolerant biofilm subpopulations, with colistin-tolerant cells using type IV pili to migrate onto the top of the colistin-killed biofilm. The colistin-tolerant cells employ quorum sensing (QS) to initiate the formation of new colistin-tolerant subpopulations, highlighting multicellular behaviour in antibiotic tolerance development. The macrolide erythromycin, which has been previously shown to inhibit the motility and QS of P. aeruginosa, boosts biofilm eradication by colistin. Our work provides insights on the mechanisms underlying the formation of antibiotic-tolerant populations in bacterial biofilms and indicates research avenues for designing more efficient treatments against biofilm-associated infections. PMID:26892159

  3. An orphan chemotaxis sensor regulates virulence and antibiotic tolerance in the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Pearl McLaughlin

    Full Text Available The synthesis of virulence factors by pathogenic bacteria is highly regulated and occurs in response to diverse environmental cues. An array of two component systems (TCSs serves to link perception of different cues to specific changes in gene expression and/or bacterial behaviour. Those TCSs that regulate functions associated with virulence represent attractive targets for interference in anti-infective strategies for disease control. We have previously identified PA2572 as a putative response regulator required for full virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the opportunistic human pathogen, to Galleria mellonella (Wax moth larvae. Here we have investigated the involvement of candidate sensors for signal transduction involving PA2572. Mutation of PA2573, encoding a probable methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein, gave rise to alterations in motility, virulence, and antibiotic resistance, functions which are also controlled by PA2572. Comparative transcriptome profiling of mutants revealed that PA2572 and PA2573 regulate expression of a common set of 49 genes that are involved in a range of biological functions including virulence and antibiotic resistance. Bacterial two-hybrid analysis indicated a REC-dependent interaction between PA2572 and PA2573 proteins. Finally expression of PA2572 in the PA2573 mutant background restored virulence to G. mellonella towards wild-type levels. The findings indicate a role for the orphan chemotaxis sensor PA2573 in the regulation of virulence and antibiotic tolerance in P. aeruginosa and indicate that these effects are exerted in part through signal transduction involving PA2572.

  4. Selective proteomic analysis of antibiotic-tolerant cellular subpopulations in pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babin, Brett M.; Atangcho, Lydia; van Eldijk, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    to determine the dynamic proteomic response of the tolerant subpopulation to supra-MIC treatment with the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin. The adaptive response included the upregulation of proteins required for sensing and repairing DNA damage and substantial changes in the expression of enzymes...... involved in central carbon metabolism. We differentiated the immediate proteomic response, characterized by an increase in flagellar motility, from the long-term adaptive strategy, which included the upregulation of purine synthesis. This targeted, selective analysis of a bacterial subpopulation......, in which distinct cellular subpopulations can respond differently to stresses, including subpopulations of pathogenic biofilms that are more tolerant to antibiotics. Global proteomic analysis affords insights into cellular physiology but cannot identify proteins expressed in a particular subpopulation...

  5. Nutrient availability as a mechanism for selection of antibiotic tolerant Pseudomonas aeruginosa within the CF airway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas R Hoffman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbes are subjected to selective pressures during chronic infections of host tissues. Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates with inactivating mutations in the transcriptional regulator LasR are frequently selected within the airways of people with cystic fibrosis (CF, and infection with these isolates has been associated with poorer lung function outcomes. The mechanisms underlying selection for lasR mutation are unknown but have been postulated to involve the abundance of specific nutrients within CF airway secretions. We characterized lasR mutant P. aeruginosa strains and isolates to identify conditions found in CF airways that select for growth of lasR mutants. Relative to wild-type P. aeruginosa, lasR mutants exhibited a dramatic metabolic shift, including decreased oxygen consumption and increased nitrate utilization, that is predicted to confer increased fitness within the nutrient conditions known to occur in CF airways. This metabolic shift exhibited by lasR mutants conferred resistance to two antibiotics used frequently in CF care, tobramycin and ciprofloxacin, even under oxygen-dependent growth conditions, yet selection for these mutants in vitro did not require preceding antibiotic exposure. The selection for loss of LasR function in vivo, and the associated adverse clinical impact, could be due to increased bacterial growth in the oxygen-poor and nitrate-rich CF airway, and from the resulting resistance to therapeutic antibiotics. The metabolic similarities among diverse chronic infection-adapted bacteria suggest a common mode of adaptation and antibiotic resistance during chronic infection that is primarily driven by bacterial metabolic shifts in response to nutrient availability within host tissues.

  6. Antibiotic tolerance and microbial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Anders

    Increased tolerance to antimicrobial agents is thought to be an important feature of microbes growing in biofilms. We study the dynamics of antibiotic action within hydrodynamic flow chamber biofilms of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa using isogenic mutants and fluorescent gene...... expression reporters and we address the question of how biofilm organization affects antibiotic susceptibility. The dynamics of microbial killing is monitored by viable count determination, and confocal laser microscopy. Our work shows that the apparent increased antibiotic tolerance is due to the formation...... of antibiotic tolerant subpopulations within the biofilm. The formation of these subpopulations is highly variable and dependent on the antibiotic used, the biofilm structural organization and the induction of specific tolerance mechanisms....

  7. Reverting antibiotic tolerance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 persister cells by (Z-4-bromo-5-(bromomethylene-3-methylfuran-2(5H-one.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiachuan Pan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacteria are well known to form dormant persister cells that are tolerant to most antibiotics. Such intrinsic tolerance also facilitates the development of multidrug resistance through acquired mechanisms. Thus persister cells are a promising target for developing more effective methods to control chronic infections and help prevent the development of multidrug-resistant bacteria. However, control of persister cells is still an unmet challenge. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show in this report that (Z-4-bromo-5-(bromomethylene-3-methylfuran-2(5H-one (BF8 can restore the antibiotic susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 persister cells at growth non-inhibitory concentrations. Persister control by BF8 was found to be effective against both planktonic and biofilm cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1. Interestingly, although BF8 is an inhibitor of quorum sensing (QS in Gram-negative bacteria, the data in this study suggest that the activities of BF8 to revert antibiotic tolerance of P. aeruginosa PAO1 persister cells is not through QS inhibition and may involve other targets. CONCLUSION: BF8 can sensitize P. aeruginosa persister cells to antibiotics.

  8. High-level tolerance to triclosan may play a role in Pseudomonas aeruginosa antibiotic resistance in immunocompromised hosts: evidence from outbreak investigation

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    D'Arezzo Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and methods Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major infectious threat to immunocompromised patients. We recently reported a fatal epidemic of multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa in an onchoematology unit, linked to massive contamination of a triclosan-based disinfectant. The aim of this study is to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of triclosan and chlorhexidine digluconate against the epidemic strain of P. aeruginosa, to confirm the hypothesis that the soap dispenser acted as a continuous source of the infection during the outbreak, and to explore the potential role of triclosan in increasing the level of resistance to selected antibiotics. Susceptibility tests and time-kill assays for disinfectans were performed using two commercial formulations containing triclosan and chlorhexidine digluconate, respectively. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by the broth microdilution method. Findings The P. aeruginosa epidemic strain exhibited an extremely high level of triclosan resistance (apparent MIC = 2,125 mg/L, while it was markedly susceptible to chlorhexidine digluconate (apparent MIC = 12.5 mg/L. Upon gradual adaptation to triclosan, the epidemic strain survived for a long period (> 120 h in the presence of 3,400 mg/L (equivalent to 1.6 × MIC of triclosan, concomitantly increasing the resistance to six antibiotics that are typical substrates of drug efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation division family. This effect was reversed by efflux pump inhibitors. Conclusions The epidemic P. aeruginosa strain was resistant to triclosan and its previous exposure to triclosan increases antibiotic resistance, likely through active efflux mechanisms. Since P. aeruginosa can become tolerant to elevated triclosan concentrations, the use of triclosan-based disinfectants should be avoided in those healthcare settings hosting patients at high risk for P. aeruginosa infection.

  9. Staphylococcus aureus Alters Growth Activity, Autolysis, and Antibiotic Tolerance in a Human Host-Adapted Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lineage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenlund Michelsen, Charlotte; Christensen, Anne-Mette; Bojer, Martin Saxtorph

    2014-01-01

    is mediated by one or more extracellular S. aureus proteins greater than 10 kDa, which also suppressed P. aeruginosa autolysis and prevented killing by clinically relevant antibiotics through promoting small-colony variant (SCV) formation. The commensal interaction was abolished with S. aureus strains mutated...

  10. Heterogeneity in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms Includes Expression of Ribosome Hibernation Factors in the Antibiotic-Tolerant Subpopulation and Hypoxia-Induced Stress Response in the Metabolically Active Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Kerry S.; Richards, Lee A.; Perez-Osorio, Ailyn C.; Pitts, Betsey; McInnerney, Kathleen; Stewart, Philip S.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria growing in biofilms are physiologically heterogeneous, due in part to their adaptation to local environmental conditions. Here, we characterized the local transcriptome responses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa growing in biofilms by using a microarray analysis of isolated biofilm subpopulations. The results demonstrated that cells at the top of the biofilms had high mRNA abundances for genes involved in general metabolic functions, while mRNA levels for these housekeeping genes were low in cells at the bottom of the biofilms. Selective green fluorescent protein (GFP) labeling showed that cells at the top of the biofilm were actively dividing. However, the dividing cells had high mRNA levels for genes regulated by the hypoxia-induced regulator Anr. Slow-growing cells deep in the biofilms had little expression of Anr-regulated genes and may have experienced long-term anoxia. Transcripts for ribosomal proteins were associated primarily with the metabolically active cell fraction, while ribosomal RNAs were abundant throughout the biofilms, indicating that ribosomes are stably maintained even in slowly growing cells. Consistent with these results was the identification of mRNAs for ribosome hibernation factors (the rmf and PA4463 genes) at the bottom of the biofilms. The dormant biofilm cells of a P. aeruginosa Δrmf strain had decreased membrane integrity, as shown by propidium iodide staining. Using selective GFP labeling and cell sorting, we show that the dividing cells are more susceptible to killing by tobramycin and ciprofloxacin. The results demonstrate that in thick P. aeruginosa biofilms, cells are physiologically distinct spatially, with cells deep in the biofilm in a viable but antibiotic-tolerant slow-growth state. PMID:22343293

  11. Antibiotics Susceptibility Pattern of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT: This work investigated the prevalence and antibiotics sensitivity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from wounds of patients attending Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital (ABUTH), Zaria-Nigeria. One hundred Isolates were characterized and identified from the specimens using standard ...

  12. Carbon Sources Tune Antibiotic Susceptibility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa via Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Control

    OpenAIRE

    Meylan, Sylvain; Porter, Caroline B.M.; Yang, Jason H.; Belenky, Peter; Gutierrez, Arnaud; Lobritz, Michael A.; Park, Jihye; Kim, Sun H.; Moskowitz, Samuel M.; Collins, James J.

    2017-01-01

    Metabolically dormant bacteria present a critical challenge to effective antimicrobial therapy because these bacteria are genetically susceptible to antibiotic treatment but phenotypically tolerant. Such tolerance has been attributed to impaired drug uptake, which can be reversed by metabolic stimulation. Here, we evaluate the effects of central carbon metabolite stimulations on aminoglycoside sensitivity in the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We identify fumarate as a tobramycin potentiator...

  13. [Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antibiotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolska, Katarzyna; Kot, Barbara; Piechota, Małgorzata; Frankowska, Aneta

    2013-12-16

    The main problem in the treatment of nosocomial infections is the increasing drug resistance of microorganisms that cause them, limiting the number of effective antibiotics. Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacilli are the cause of many serious hospital-acquired infections occurring primarily in patients within high-risk groups. The most vulnerable are those with weakened immune systems, as well as those with extensive surgical wounds and burn wounds. Infections are usually of the nature of secondary infections, caused by multidrug strains. Due to the high antimicrobial activity, beta-lactams, aminoglycosides and quinolones are drugs commonly used in hospitals, both in prevention and treatment of infections with P. aeruginosa. However, their irrational use is associated with selection and spread of strains resistant to these antibiotics. Resistance of P. aeruginosa to antibiotics is the result of a number of independent co-occurring mechanisms. These are: reducing the membrane permeability, the efflux system, and production of enzymes inactivating and degrading antibiotics. The paper devotes special attention to the determination of resistance mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon.

  14. Collective antibiotic tolerance: mechanisms, dynamics and intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Hannah R; Srimani, Jaydeep K; Lee, Anna J; Lopatkin, Allison J; You, Lingchong

    2015-03-01

    Bacteria have developed resistance against every antibiotic at a rate that is alarming considering the timescale at which new antibiotics are developed. Thus, there is a critical need to use antibiotics more effectively, extend the shelf life of existing antibiotics and minimize their side effects. This requires understanding the mechanisms underlying bacterial drug responses. Past studies have focused on survival in the presence of antibiotics by individual cells, as genetic mutants or persisters. Also important, however, is the fact that a population of bacterial cells can collectively survive antibiotic treatments lethal to individual cells. This tolerance can arise by diverse mechanisms, including resistance-conferring enzyme production, titration-mediated bistable growth inhibition, swarming and interpopulation interactions. These strategies can enable rapid population recovery after antibiotic treatment and provide a time window during which otherwise susceptible bacteria can acquire inheritable genetic resistance. Here, we emphasize the potential for targeting collective antibiotic tolerance behaviors as an antibacterial treatment strategy.

  15. Antibiotic tolerance and resistance in biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important features of microbial biofilms is their tolerance to antimicrobial agents and components of the host immune system. The difficulty of treating biofilm infections with antibiotics is a major clinical problem. Although antibiotics may decrease the number of bacteria...

  16. Antibiotic Conditioned Growth Medium of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benathen, Isaiah A.; Cazeau, Barbara; Joseph, Njeri

    2004-01-01

    A simple method to study the consequences of bacterial antibiosis after interspecific competition between microorganisms is presented. Common microorganisms are used as the test organisms and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are used as the source of the inhibitor agents.

  17. Antibiotic tolerance and resistance in biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important features of microbial biofilms is their tolerance to antimicrobial agents and components of the host immune system. The difficulty of treating biofilm infections with antibiotics is a major clinical problem. Although antibiotics may decrease the number of bacteria...... in biofilms, they will not completely eradicate the bacteria in vivo which may have important clinical consequences in form of relapses of the infection....

  18. Importance of the exopolysaccharide matrix in antimicrobial tolerance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goltermann, Lise; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that can infect the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and persist in the form of antibiotic-tolerant aggregates in the mucus. It has recently been suggested that such aggregates are formed due to restricted bacterial motility independent of......, and Psl, do play a role in the tolerance toward antimicrobials when bacteria grow as aggregates....... of the production of extracellular matrix components, and that they do not rely on an extracellular matrix for antimicrobial tolerance. However, we show here that biofilm matrix overexpression, as displayed by various clinical isolates, significantly protects P. aeruginosa aggregates against antimicrobial treatment...

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa antibiotic resistance in Australian cystic fibrosis centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Daniel J; Ramsay, Kay A; Yerkovich, Stephanie T; Reid, David W; Wainwright, Claire E; Grimwood, Keith; Bell, Scott C; Kidd, Timothy J

    2016-02-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is associated with increased morbidity, antibiotic treatments and mortality. By linking Australian CF registry data with a national microbiological data set, we examined the association between where treatment was delivered, its intensity and P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistance. Sputa were collected from paediatric and adult CF patients attending 18 Australian CF centres. P. aeruginosa antibiotic susceptibilities determined by local laboratories were correlated with clinical characteristics, treatment intensity and infection with strains commonly shared among Australian CF patients. Between-centre differences in treatment and antibiotic resistance were also compared. Large variations in antibiotic usage, maintenance treatment practices and multi-antibiotic resistant P. aeruginosa (MARPA) prevalence exist between Australian CF centres, although the overall proportions of MARPA isolates were similar in paediatric and adult centres (31% vs 35%, P = 0.29). Among paediatric centres, MARPA correlated with intravenous antibiotic usage and the Australian state where treatment was delivered, while azithromycin, reduced lung function and treating state predicted intravenous antibiotic usage. In adult centres, body mass index (BMI) and treating state were associated with MARPA, while intravenous antibiotic use was predicted by gender, BMI, dornase-alpha, azithromycin, lung function and treating state. In adults, P. aeruginosa strains AUST-01 and AUST-02 independently predicted intravenous antibiotic usage. Increased treatment intensity in paediatric centres and the Australian state where treatment was received are both associated with greater risk of MARPA, but not worse clinical outcomes. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  20. Antibiotics profiling of Proteus mirabilis and Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Constant tracking of the antibiotic susceptibilities of these organisms at different region within each country is of great epidemiological value to formulate well informed and scientific based preventive measures to curtail the spread of drug resistant pathogens through the food chain. We screened 19 Proteus mirabilis and 35 ...

  1. Study on Antibiotic compounds from Pseudomonas aeruginosa NO4 Strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Ji Young; Kim, Jin Kyu

    2011-01-01

    As important human and veterinary medicines, antibiotics are being produced and consumed in large quantities around the world. For example, more than 50 million pounds (22,000 tons) of antibiotics are produced in the U.S. each year and annual production in Germany is about 2,000 tons. Antibiotics are low molecular weight microbial metabolites that at low concentrations inhibit the growth of other microorganisms. Resistant bacteria may also spread and become broader infection-control problems, not only within health care institutions, but in communities as well. Clinically important bacteria, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MRSA is a common cause of infection among hospitalized patients. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of opportunistic infections among immunocompromised individuals. The spread of this organism in health care settings is often difficult to control due to the presence of multiple intrinsic and acquired mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance. In this study, we isolated novel bacterium which had strong antagonistic activity and separated antibiotic compounds from Pseudomonas sp., and analyzed characteristics and molecular weight of the antibiotic compound

  2. Study on Antibiotic compounds from Pseudomonas aeruginosa NO4 Strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Ji Young; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    As important human and veterinary medicines, antibiotics are being produced and consumed in large quantities around the world. For example, more than 50 million pounds (22,000 tons) of antibiotics are produced in the U.S. each year and annual production in Germany is about 2,000 tons. Antibiotics are low molecular weight microbial metabolites that at low concentrations inhibit the growth of other microorganisms. Resistant bacteria may also spread and become broader infection-control problems, not only within health care institutions, but in communities as well. Clinically important bacteria, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MRSA is a common cause of infection among hospitalized patients. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of opportunistic infections among immunocompromised individuals. The spread of this organism in health care settings is often difficult to control due to the presence of multiple intrinsic and acquired mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance. In this study, we isolated novel bacterium which had strong antagonistic activity and separated antibiotic compounds from Pseudomonas sp., and analyzed characteristics and molecular weight of the antibiotic compound

  3. A quorum sensing small volatile molecule promotes antibiotic tolerance in bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yok-Ai Que

    Full Text Available Bacteria can be refractory to antibiotics due to a sub-population of dormant cells, called persisters that are highly tolerant to antibiotic exposure. The low frequency and transience of the antibiotic tolerant "persister" trait has complicated elucidation of the mechanism that controls antibiotic tolerance. In this study, we show that 2' Amino-acetophenone (2-AA, a poorly studied but diagnostically important small, volatile molecule produced by the recalcitrant gram-negative human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, promotes antibiotic tolerance in response to quorum-sensing (QS signaling. Our results show that 2-AA mediated persister cell accumulation occurs via alteration of the expression of genes involved in the translational capacity of the cell, including almost all ribosomal protein genes and other translation-related factors. That 2-AA promotes persisters formation also in other emerging multi-drug resistant pathogens, including the non 2-AA producer Acinetobacter baumannii implies that 2-AA may play an important role in the ability of gram-negative bacteria to tolerate antibiotic treatments in polymicrobial infections. Given that the synthesis, excretion and uptake of QS small molecules is a common hallmark of prokaryotes, together with the fact that the translational machinery is highly conserved, we posit that modulation of the translational capacity of the cell via QS molecules, may be a general, widely distributed mechanism that promotes antibiotic tolerance among prokaryotes.

  4. Genotypic diversity and rhizosphere competence of antibiotic-producing Pseudomonas species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergsma-Vlami, M.

    2008-01-01

    The phenolic antibiotic 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG) has been implicated in biological control of multiple plant pathogens by fluorescent Pseudomonas species. DAPG-producing Pseudomonas strains are effective biocontrol agents, however, their ecological performance is often highly variable

  5. Carbon Sources Tune Antibiotic Susceptibility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa via Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meylan, Sylvain; Porter, Caroline B M; Yang, Jason H; Belenky, Peter; Gutierrez, Arnaud; Lobritz, Michael A; Park, Jihye; Kim, Sun H; Moskowitz, Samuel M; Collins, James J

    2017-02-16

    Metabolically dormant bacteria present a critical challenge to effective antimicrobial therapy because these bacteria are genetically susceptible to antibiotic treatment but phenotypically tolerant. Such tolerance has been attributed to impaired drug uptake, which can be reversed by metabolic stimulation. Here, we evaluate the effects of central carbon metabolite stimulations on aminoglycoside sensitivity in the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We identify fumarate as a tobramycin potentiator that activates cellular respiration and generates a proton motive force by stimulating the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. In contrast, we find that glyoxylate induces phenotypic tolerance by inhibiting cellular respiration with acetyl-coenzyme A diversion through the glyoxylate shunt, despite drug import. Collectively, this work demonstrates that TCA cycle activity is important for both aminoglycoside uptake and downstream lethality and identifies a potential strategy for potentiating aminoglycoside treatment of P. aeruginosa infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Antimicrobial properties of Pseudomonas strains producing the antibiotic mupirocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthijs, Sandra; Vander Wauven, Corinne; Cornu, Bertrand; Ye, Lumeng; Cornelis, Pierre; Thomas, Christopher M; Ongena, Marc

    2014-10-01

    Mupirocin is a polyketide antibiotic with broad antibacterial activity. It was isolated and characterized about 40 years ago from Pseudomonas fluorescens NCIMB 10586. To study the phylogenetic distribution of mupirocin producing strains in the genus Pseudomonas a large collection of Pseudomonas strains of worldwide origin, consisting of 117 Pseudomonas type strains and 461 strains isolated from different biological origins, was screened by PCR for the mmpD gene of the mupirocin gene cluster. Five mmpD(+) strains from different geographic and biological origin were identified. They all produced mupirocin and were strongly antagonistic against Staphylococcus aureus. Phylogenetic analysis showed that mupirocin production is limited to a single species. Inactivation of mupirocin production leads to complete loss of in vitro antagonism against S. aureus, except on certain iron-reduced media where the siderophore pyoverdine is responsible for the in vitro antagonism of a mupirocin-negative mutant. In addition to mupirocin some of the strains produced lipopeptides of the massetolide group. These lipopeptides do not play a role in the observed in vitro antagonism of the mupirocin producing strains against S. aureus. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. 40 CFR 180.1145 - Pseudomonas syringae; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pseudomonas syringae; exemption from... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1145 Pseudomonas syringae; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Pseudomonas syringae is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance on all raw agricultural...

  8. Antibiotic strategies for eradicating Pseudomonas aeruginosa in people with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langton Hewer, Simon C; Smyth, Alan R

    2017-04-25

    numbers of participants and most had relatively short follow-up periods; however, there was generally a low risk of bias from missing data. In most trials it was difficult to blind participants and clinicians to treatment given the interventions and comparators used. Two trials were supported by the manufacturers of the antibiotic used.Evidence from two trials (38 participants) at the two-month time-point showed treatment of early Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection with inhaled tobramycin results in microbiological eradication of the organism from respiratory secretions more often than placebo, odds ratio 0.15 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.03 to 0.65) and data from one of these trials, with longer follow up, suggested that this effect may persist for up to 12 months.One randomised controlled trial (26 participants) compared oral ciprofloxacin and nebulised colistin versus usual treatment. Results after two years suggested treatment of early infection results in microbiological eradication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa more often than no anti-pseudomonal treatment, odds ratio 0.12 (95% CI 0.02 to 0.79).One trial comparing 28 days to 56 days treatment with nebulised tobramycin solution for inhalation in 88 participants showed that both treatments were effective and well-tolerated, with no notable additional improvement with longer over shorter duration of therapy. However, this trial was not powered to detect non-inferiority or equivalence .A trial of oral ciprofloxacin with inhaled colistin versus nebulised tobramycin solution for inhalation alone (223 participants) failed to show a difference between the two strategies, although it was underpowered to show this. A further trial of inhaled colistin with oral ciprofloxacin versus nebulised tobramycin solution for inhalation with oral ciprofloxacin also showed no superiority of the former, with increased isolation of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in both groups.A recent, large trial in 306 children aged between one and 12 years

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa tolerance to tobramycin, hydrogen peroxide and polymorphonuclear leukocytes is quorum-sensing dependent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, P.O.; Burmolle, M.

    2005-01-01

    to otherwise lethal doses of antibiotics and are protected from bactericidal activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). P. aeruginosa controls the expression of many of its virulence factors by means of a cell-cell communication system termed quorum sensing (QS). In the present report it is demonstrated......The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant micro-organism of chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. P. aeruginosa colonizes the CF lungs by forming biofilm structures in the alveoli. In the biofilm mode of growth the bacteria are highly tolerant...

  10. Antibiotic Sensitivity in Pseudomonas aeruginosa of Diabetic Patient’s Foot Ulcer

    OpenAIRE

    Pratiwi Apridamayanti; Khairunnisa Azani Meilinasary; Rafika Sari

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) patients are at risk to have the diabetic ulcer. The main reason for DM’s patient with ulcer complication to be treated and healed in hospital is bacterial infection. One of many bacteria that infects diabetic ulcer is Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This conditian can be treated by antibiotic. The using antibiotic is often inaccurate causing the microbe resistance. To choose the right antibiotic, it needs to test the antibiotic’s sensitivity towards Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The...

  11. RpoN Modulates Carbapenem Tolerance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa through Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal and PqsE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Keiji; Amoh, Takashi; Ono, Tsuneko; Miyake, Yoichiro

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to rapidly modulate its response to antibiotic stress and persist in the presence of antibiotics is closely associated with the process of cell-to-cell signaling. The alternative sigma factor RpoN (σ54) is involved in the regulation of quorum sensing (QS) and plays an important role in the survival of stationary-phase cells in the presence of carbapenems. Here, we demonstrate that a ΔrpoN mutant grown in nutrient-rich medium has increased expression of pqsA, pqsH, and pqsR throughout growth, resulting in the increased production of the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS). The link between pqsA and its role in carbapenem tolerance was studied using a ΔrpoN ΔpqsA mutant, in which the carbapenem-tolerant phenotype of the ΔrpoN mutant was abolished. In addition, we demonstrate that another mechanism leading to carbapenem tolerance in the ΔrpoN mutant is mediated through pqsE. Exogenously supplied PQS abolished the biapenem-sensitive phenotype of the ΔrpoN ΔpqsA mutant, and overexpression of pqsE failed to alter the susceptibility of the ΔrpoN ΔpqsA mutant to biapenem. The mutations in the ΔrpoN ΔrhlR mutant and the ΔrpoN ΔpqsH mutant led to susceptibility to biapenem. Comparison of the changes in the expression of the genes involved in QS in wild-type PAO1 with their expression in the ΔrpoN mutant and the ΔrpoN mutant-derived strains demonstrated the regulatory effect of RpoN on the transcript levels of rhlR, vqsR, and rpoS. The findings of this study demonstrate that RpoN negatively regulates the expression of PQS in nutrient-rich medium and provide evidence that RpoN interacts with pqsA, pqsE, pqsH, and rhlR in response to antibiotic stress. PMID:27431228

  12. The solvent efflux system of Pseudomonas putida S12 is not involved in antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isken, S; De Bont, J A

    2000-11-01

    The active efflux system contributing to the solvent tolerance of Pseudomonas putida S12 was characterized physiologically. The mutant P. putida JK1, which lacks the active efflux system, was compared with the wild-type organism. None of 20 known substrates of common multi-drug-resistant pumps had a stronger growth-inhibiting effect on the mutant than on the wild type. The amount of [14C]toluene accumulating in P. putida S12 increased in the presence of the solvent xylene and in the presence of uncouplers. The effect of uncouplers confirms the proton dependency of the efflux system in P. putida S12. Other compounds, potential substrates for the solvent pump, did not affect the accumulation of [14C]toluene. These results show that the efflux system in P. putida S12 is specific for organic solvents and does not export antibiotics or other known substrates of multi-drug-resistant pumps.

  13. Dynamics of mutations during development of resistance by Pseudomonas aeruginosa against five antibiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feng, Y.; Jonker, M.J.; Moustakas, I.; Brul, S.; ter Kuile, B.H.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes considerable morbidity and mortality, specifically in the intensive care. Antibiotic resistant variants of this organism are more difficult to treat and cause substantial extra costs compared to susceptible strains. In the laboratory,

  14. The RNA Chaperone Hfq Regulates Antibiotic Biosynthesis in the Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa M18

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guohao; Li, Sainan; Huang, Jiaofang; Wei, Xue; Li, Yaqian

    2012-01-01

    The rhizosphere microbe Pseudomonas aeruginosa M18 shows strong antifungal activities, mainly due to the biosynthesis of antibiotics like pyoluteorin (Plt) and phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA). The ubiquitous RNA chaperone Hfq regulates bacterial virulence and stress tolerance through global posttranscriptional regulation. Here, we explored the molecular mechanism by which Hfq controls antibiotic biosynthesis in P. aeruginosa M18. The robust downregulation of Plt biosynthesis by Hfq was mediated exclusively by the posttranscriptional downregulation of the plt transcriptional activator PltR. Hfq posttranscriptionally repressed phzM expression and consequently reduced the conversion of PCA to pyocyanin. However, Hfq positively controlled the phz2 operon and PCA biosynthesis through both QscR-mediated transcriptional regulation at the promoter and an unknown regulation at the operator. Also, Hfq was shown to directly bind at the mRNA 5′ untranslated leaders of pltR, qscR, and phzM. These three negatively regulated target genes of Hfq shared a similar secondary structure with a short single-stranded AU-rich spacer (a potential Hfq-binding motif) linking two stem-loops. Taken together, these results indicate that Hfq, potentially in collaboration with unknown small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs), tightly controls antibiotic biosynthesis through both direct posttranscriptional inhibition and indirect transcriptional regulation. PMID:22427627

  15. Antibiotic resistance patterns of Pseudomonas spp. isolated from the River Danube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemens eKittinger

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Spread and persistence of antibiotic resistance pose a severe threat to human health, yet there is still lack of knowledge about reservoirs of antibiotic resistant bacteria in the environment. We took the opportunity of the Joint Danube Survey 3 (JDS3, the world's biggest river research expedition of its kind in 2013, to analyse samples originating from different sampling points along the whole length of the river. Due to its high clinical relevance, we concentrated on the characterization of Pseudomonas spp. and evaluated the resistance profiles of Pseudomonas spp. which were isolated from eight sampling points. In total, 520 Pseudomonas isolates were found, 344 (66.0% isolates were identified as Pseudomonas putida, and 141 (27.1% as Pseudomonas fluorescens, all other Pseudomonas species were represented by less than five isolates, among those two P. aeruginosa isolates. Thirty seven percent (37% of all isolated Pseudomonas species showed resistance to at least one out of eleven tested antibiotics. The most common resistance was against meropenem (30.4% / 158 isolates piperacillin/tazobactam (10.6% / 55 isolates and ceftazidime (4.2% / 22 isolates. 16 isolates (3.1% / 16 isolates were multi-resistant. For each tested antibiotic at least one resistant isolate could be detected. Sampling points from the upper stretch of the River Danube showed more resistant isolates than downriver. Our results suggest that antibiotic resistance can be acquired by and persists even in Pseudomonas species that are normally not in direct contact with humans. A possible scenario is that these bacteria provide a reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes that can spread to related human pathogens by horizontal gene transfer.

  16. Identification of Genes Involved in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm-Specific Resistance to Antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Li; Fritsch, Meredith; Hammond, Lisa; Landreville, Ryan; Slatculescu, Cristina; Colavita, Antonio; Mah, Thien-Fah

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a key opportunistic pathogen characterized by its biofilm formation ability and high-level multiple antibiotic resistance. By screening a library of random transposon insertion mutants with an increased biofilm-specifc antibiotic susceptibility, we previously identified 3 genes or operons of P. aeruginosa UCBPP-PA14 (ndvB, PA1875-1877 and tssC1) that do not affect biofilm formation but are involved in biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance. In this study, we demonstr...

  17. Mannitol enhances antibiotic sensitivity of persister bacteria in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Barraud

    Full Text Available The failure of antibiotic therapies to clear Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection, the key mortality factor for cystic fibrosis (CF patients, is partly attributed to the high tolerance of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Mannitol has previously been found to restore aminoglycoside sensitivity in Escherichia coli by generating a proton-motive force (PMF, suggesting a potential new strategy to improve antibiotic therapy and reduce disease progression in CF. Here, we used the commonly prescribed aminoglycoside tobramycin to select for P. aeruginosa persister cells during biofilm growth. Incubation with mannitol (10-40 mM increased tobramycin sensitivity of persister cells up to 1,000-fold. Addition of mannitol to pre-grown biofilms was able to revert the persister phenotype and improve the efficacy of tobramycin. This effect was blocked by the addition of a PMF inhibitor or in a P. aeruginosa mutant strain unable to metabolise mannitol. Addition of glucose and NaCl at high osmolarity also improved the efficacy of tobramycin although to a lesser extent compared to mannitol. Therefore, the primary effect of mannitol in reverting biofilm associated persister cells appears to be an active, physiological response, associated with a minor contribution of osmotic stress. Mannitol was tested against clinically relevant strains, showing that biofilms containing a subpopulation of persister cells are better killed in the presence of mannitol, but a clinical strain with a high resistance to tobramycin was not affected by mannitol. Overall, these results suggest that in addition to improvements in lung function by facilitating mucus clearance in CF, mannitol also affects antibiotic sensitivity in biofilms and does so through an active, physiological response.

  18. Cell motility and antibiotic tolerance of bacterial swarms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Wenlong

    Many bacteria species can move across moist surfaces in a coordinated manner known as swarming. It is reported that swarm cells show higher tolerance to a wide variety of antibiotics than planktonic cells. We used the model bacterium E. coli to study how motility affects the antibiotic tolerance of swarm cells. Our results provide new insights for the control of pathogenic invasion via regulating cell motility. Mailing address: Room 306 Science Centre North Block, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. Hong Kong SAR. Phone: +852-3943-6354. Fax: +852-2603-5204. E-mail: zwlong@live.com.

  19. Role of Intracellular Proteases in the Antibiotic Resistance, Motility, and Biofilm Formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández, Lucía; Breidenstein, Elena B. M.; Song, Diana; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa possesses complex regulatory networks controlling virulence and survival under adverse conditions, including antibiotic pressure, which are interconnected and share common regulatory proteins. Here, we screen a panel of 13 mutants defective in intracellular proteases and demonstrate that, in addition to the known alterations in Lon and AsrA mutants, mutation of three protease-related proteins PfpI, ClpS, and ClpP differentially affected antibiotic resistance, swarming m...

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa tssC1 Links Type VI Secretion and Biofilm-Specific Antibiotic Resistance▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Hinz, Aaron J.; Nadeau, Jean-Paul; Mah, Thien-Fah

    2011-01-01

    Biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance is influenced by multiple factors. We demonstrated that Pseudomonas aeruginosa tssC1, a gene implicated in type VI secretion (T6S), is important for resistance of biofilms to a subset of antibiotics. We showed that tssC1 expression is induced in biofilms and confirmed that tssC1 is required for T6S. PMID:21784934

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa tssC1 Links Type VI Secretion and Biofilm-Specific Antibiotic Resistance▿

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Li; Hinz, Aaron J.; Nadeau, Jean-Paul; Mah, Thien-Fah

    2011-01-01

    Biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance is influenced by multiple factors. We demonstrated that Pseudomonas aeruginosa tssC1, a gene implicated in type VI secretion (T6S), is important for resistance of biofilms to a subset of antibiotics. We showed that tssC1 expression is induced in biofilms and confirmed that tssC1 is required for T6S.

  2. Outer Membrane Protein D Gene in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa and its Role in Antibiotic Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Neda Motaghi; Sohrab Najafipour

    2016-01-01

    Background & Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common cause of nosocomial infection. OprD protein is a specific protein regulating the uptake of carbapenem antibiotic. Loss of OprD is the main mechanism of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa resistance to carbapenem. In this study, the presence of OprD gene is investigated in isolated Pseudomonas Aeruginosa in burn patients of Ghotboddin hospital in Shiraz. Material & Methods: 66 Pseudomonas Aeruginosa were isolated from wound specimens of 250 b...

  3. A Window of Opportunity to Control the Bacterial Pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa Combining Antibiotics and Phages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Barceló, Clara; Arias-Sánchez, Flor I.; Vasse, Marie; Ramsayer, Johan

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of antibiotic resistance in bacteria is a global concern and the use of bacteriophages alone or in combined therapies is attracting increasing attention as an alternative. Evolutionary theory predicts that the probability of bacterial resistance to both phages and antibiotics will be lower than to either separately, due for example to fitness costs or to trade-offs between phage resistance mechanisms and bacterial growth. In this study, we assess the population impacts of either individual or combined treatments of a bacteriophage and streptomycin on the nosocomial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We show that combining phage and antibiotics substantially increases bacterial control compared to either separately, and that there is a specific time delay in antibiotic introduction independent of antibiotic dose, that minimizes both bacterial density and resistance to either antibiotics or phage. These results have implications for optimal combined therapeutic approaches. PMID:25259735

  4. ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE EVOLUTION OF PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA IN CYSTIC FIBROSIS PATIENTS (2010-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucca, Francesca; Guarnieri, Margherita; Ros, Mirco; Muffato, Giovanna; Rigoli, Roberto; Da Dalt, Liviana

    2018-03-02

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant pathogen responsible of chronic colonization of the airways in Cystic Fibrosis patients. There are few European data about antibiotic susceptibility evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Cystic Fibrosis patients. The aim of this study is to evaluate the evolution of antibiotic resistance in the period 2010-2013 in Cystic Fibrosis patients chronically colonized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and to highlight the characteristics of this evolution in patients younger than 20 years. Clinical and microbiological data were extracted from two electronic databases and analyzed. Antibiotic resistance was defined according to EUCAST for levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, meropenem, amikacin, ceftazidime. The between-group comparison was drawn with the Chi-square test for proportions, with the T-test for unpaired samples for normally distributed data and with Mann-Whitney test for non-normally distributed data. Significancy was defined by pCystic Fibrosis patients, including thirteen subjects aged less than 20 years, were enrolled. Pseudomonas aeruginosa antibiotic sensitivity decreased significantly for fluoroquinolones, mainly in patients agedCystic Fibrosis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Differential transcriptional response to antibiotics by Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molina-Santiago, Carlos; Daddaoua, Abdelali; Gómez Lozano, María

    2015-01-01

    is of critical importance. Pseudomonas putidaDOT-T1E exhibits an impressive array of RND efflux pumps, which confer this microorganism high resistance to organic solvents and antibiotics that would kill most other microorganisms. We have chosen DOT-T1E as a model microbe to study the microbial responses...

  6. Effects of ginseng on Pseudomonas aeruginosa motility and biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hong; Lee, Baoleri; Yang, Liang

    2011-01-01

    Biofilm-associated chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis are virtually impossible to eradicate with antibiotics because biofilm-growing bacteria are highly tolerant to antibiotics and host defense mechanisms. Previously, we found that ginseng treatments...

  7. Hyperbaric oxygen sensitizes anoxic Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm to ciprofloxacin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolpen, Mette; Lerche, Christian J; Kragh, Kasper Nørskov

    2017-01-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection is characterized by the presence of endobronchial antibiotic-tolerant biofilm subject to strong oxygen (O2) depletion due to the activity of surrounding polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The exact mechanisms affecting the antibiotic susceptibility...

  8. Effects of antibiotics on quorum sensing in pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skindersø, Mette Elena; Alhede, Morten; Phipps, Richard Kerry

    2008-01-01

    in animal infection models. Treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients chronically infected with P. aeruginosa with the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM) has been demonstrated to improve the clinical outcome. Several studies indicate that AZM may accomplish its beneficial action in CF patients...... by impeding QS, thereby reducing the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa. This led us to investigate whether QS inhibition is a common feature of antibiotics. We present the results of a screening of 12 antibiotics for their QS-inhibitory activities using a previously described QS inhibitor selector 1 strain....... Three of the antibiotics tested, AZM, ceftazidime (CFT), and ciprofloxacin (CPR), were very active in the assay and were further examined for their effects on QS-regulated virulence factor production in P. aeruginosa. The effects of the three antibiotics administered at subinhibitory concentrations were...

  9. Multiple Antibiotic Resistance (MAR) indices of Pseudomonas and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/Objectives: Pseudomonas and Klebsiella infections are important nosocomial infections because of the attendant significant morbidity, mortality and socio-economic impact. These infections are difficult to treat due to the innate and acquired resistance mediated by the organisms' genome and other transferable ...

  10. Sublethal Concentrations of Antibiotics Cause Shift to Anaerobic Metabolism in Listeria monocytogenes and Induce Phenotypes Linked to Antibiotic Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Gitte Maegaard; Fromberg, Arvid; Ng, Yin

    2016-01-01

    The human pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is exposed to antibiotics both during clinical treatment and in its saprophytic lifestyle. As one of the keys to successful treatment is continued antibiotic sensitivity, the purpose of this study was to determine if exposure to sublethal...... antibiotic concentrations would affect the bacterial physiology and induce antibiotic tolerance. Transcriptomic analyses demonstrated that each of the four antibiotics tested caused an antibiotic-specific gene expression pattern related to mode-of-action of the particular antibiotic. All four antibiotics...... in Imo1179 (eutE) encoding an aldehyde oxidoreductase where rerouting caused increased ethanol production was tolerant to three of four antibiotics tested. This shift in metabolism could be a survival strategy in response to antibiotics to avoid generation of ROS production from respiration by oxidation...

  11. Redundancy in putrescine catabolism in solvent tolerant Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bandounas, L.; Ballerstedt, H.; Winde, J.H. de; Ruijssenaars, H.J.

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida S12 is a promising platform organism for the biological production of substituted aromatic compounds due to its extreme tolerance towards toxic chemicals. Solvent or aromatic stress tolerance may be due to membrane modifications and efflux pumps; however in general, polyamines

  12. Genome-wide identification of tolerance mechanisms towards p-coumaric acid in Pseudomonas putida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calero, Patricia; Jensen, Sheila I.; Bojanovič, Klara

    2017-01-01

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440 has gained increasing biotechnological interest due to its ability to tolerate different types of stress. Here, the tolerance of P. putida KT2440 towards eleven toxic chemical compounds was investigated. P. putida was found to be significantly more...

  13. Testosterone 15β-hydroxylation by solvent tolerant Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijssenaars, H.J.; Sperling, E.M.G.M.; Wiegerinck, P.H.G.; Brands, F.T.L.; Wery, J.; Bont, J.A.M.de

    2007-01-01

    A steroid 15β-hydroxylating whole-cell solvent tolerant biocatalyst was constructed by expressing the Bacillus megaterium steroid hydroxylase CYP106A2 in the solvent tolerant Pseudomonas putida S12. Testosterone hydroxylation was improved by a factor 16 by co-expressing Fer, a putative Fe-S protein

  14. Irrigation Differentially Impacts Populations of Indigenous Antibiotic-Producing Pseudomonas spp. in the Rhizosphere of Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrodi, Olga V.; Mavrodi, Dmitri V.; Parejko, James A.; Thomashow, Linda S.

    2012-01-01

    This work determined the impact of irrigation on the seasonal dynamics of populations of Pseudomonas spp. producing the antibiotics phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (Phz+) and 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (Phl+) in the rhizosphere of wheat grown in the low-precipitation zone (150 to 300 mm annually) of the Columbia Plateau of the Inland Pacific Northwest. Population sizes and plant colonization frequencies of Phz+ and Phl+ Pseudomonas spp. were determined in winter and spring wheat collected during the growing seasons from 2008 to 2009 from selected commercial dryland and irrigated fields in central Washington State. Only Phz+ bacteria were detected on dryland winter wheat, with populations ranging from 4.8 to 6.3 log CFU g−1 of root and rhizosphere colonization frequencies of 67 to 100%. The ranges of population densities of Phl+ and Phz+ Pseudomonas spp. recovered from wheat grown under irrigation were similar, but 58 to 100% of root systems were colonized by Phl+ bacteria whereas only 8 to 50% of plants harbored Phz+ bacteria. In addition, Phz+ Pseudomonas spp. were abundant in the rhizosphere of native plant species growing in nonirrigated areas adjacent to the sampled dryland wheat fields. This is the first report that documents the impact of irrigation on indigenous populations of two closely related groups of antibiotic-producing pseudomonads that coinhabit the rhizosphere of an economically important cereal crop. These results demonstrate how crop management practices can influence indigenous populations of antibiotic-producing pseudomonads with the capacity to suppress soilborne diseases of wheat. PMID:22389379

  15. Irrigation differentially impacts populations of indigenous antibiotic-producing pseudomonas spp. in the rhizosphere of wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrodi, Olga V; Mavrodi, Dmitri V; Parejko, James A; Thomashow, Linda S; Weller, David M

    2012-05-01

    This work determined the impact of irrigation on the seasonal dynamics of populations of Pseudomonas spp. producing the antibiotics phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (Phz(+)) and 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (Phl(+)) in the rhizosphere of wheat grown in the low-precipitation zone (150 to 300 mm annually) of the Columbia Plateau of the Inland Pacific Northwest. Population sizes and plant colonization frequencies of Phz(+) and Phl(+) Pseudomonas spp. were determined in winter and spring wheat collected during the growing seasons from 2008 to 2009 from selected commercial dryland and irrigated fields in central Washington State. Only Phz(+) bacteria were detected on dryland winter wheat, with populations ranging from 4.8 to 6.3 log CFU g(-1) of root and rhizosphere colonization frequencies of 67 to 100%. The ranges of population densities of Phl(+) and Phz(+) Pseudomonas spp. recovered from wheat grown under irrigation were similar, but 58 to 100% of root systems were colonized by Phl(+) bacteria whereas only 8 to 50% of plants harbored Phz(+) bacteria. In addition, Phz(+) Pseudomonas spp. were abundant in the rhizosphere of native plant species growing in nonirrigated areas adjacent to the sampled dryland wheat fields. This is the first report that documents the impact of irrigation on indigenous populations of two closely related groups of antibiotic-producing pseudomonads that coinhabit the rhizosphere of an economically important cereal crop. These results demonstrate how crop management practices can influence indigenous populations of antibiotic-producing pseudomonads with the capacity to suppress soilborne diseases of wheat.

  16. Tolerance of subcutaneously administered antibiotics: a French national prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubaud-Baudron, Claire; Forestier, Emmanuel; Fraisse, Thibaut; Gaillat, Jacques; de Wazières, Benoit; Pagani, Leonardo; Ingrand, Isabelle; Bernard, Louis; Gavazzi, Gaëtan; Paccalin, Marc

    2017-01-08

    Although poorly documented, subcutaneous (SC) administration of antibiotics is common practice in France especially in Geriatrics Departments. The aim of this study was to determine the tolerance of such a practice. Prospective observational multicentre study. Sixty-six physicians accepted to participate from 50 French Infectious Diseases and Geriatrics Departments. From May to September 2014, patients treated at least one day with SC antibiotics could be included. Modalities of subcutaneous administration, occurrence of local and systemic adverse effects (AE) and clinical course were collected until the end of the treatment. Two hundred-nineteen patients (83.0 [19–104] yo) were included. Ceftriaxone (n = 163, 74.4%), and ertapenem (n = 30, 13.7%) were the most often prescribed antibiotics. The SC route was mainly used because of poor venous access (65.3%) and/or palliative care (32.4%). Fifty patients (22.8%) experienced at least one local AE that led to an increased hospital stay for two patients (4.0%) and a discontinuation of the SC infusion in six patients (12.0%). A binary logistic regression for multivariate analysis identified the class of antibiotic (p = 0.002) especially teicoplanin and the use of rigid catheter (p = 0.009) as factors independently associated with AE. In over 80% of cases, SC antibiotics were well tolerated and associated with clinical recovery. SC administration of antibiotics leads to frequent but local and mild AE. Use of non-rigid catheter appears to be protective against AE. As it appears to be a safe alternative to the intravenous route, more studies are needed regarding efficacy and pharmacokinetics.

  17. Heavy metal tolerance genes alter cellular thermodynamics in Pseudomonas putida and river Pseudomonas spp. and influence amebal predation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTee, Michael R; Gibbons, Sean M; Feris, Kevin; Gordon, Nathan S; Gannon, James E; Ramsey, Philip W

    2013-10-01

    Predation rates were measured for two Acanthamoeba castellanii strains feeding on metal-tolerant and metal-sensitive strains of Pseudomonas putida and compared with cellular thermodynamic data. Predation rates by A. castellanii strain ATCC 30010 correlated with cell volume of the prey. To explore whether this observation could be environmentally relevant, pseudomonad species were isolated from a pristine and a metal-contaminated river and were paired based on phylogenetic and physiological relatedness. Then, cellular thermodynamics and predation rates were measured on the most similar pseudomonad pair. Under cadmium stress, the strain from contaminated river sediments, Pseudomonas sp. CF150, exited metabolic dormancy faster than its pair from pristine sediments, Pseudomonas sp. N9, but consumed available resources less efficiently (more energy was lost as heat). Predation rates by both strains of ameba were greater on Pseudomonas sp. CF150 than on Pseudomonas sp. N9 at the highest cadmium concentration. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. 40 CFR 180.1212 - Pseudomonas chlororaphis Strain 63-28; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pseudomonas chlororaphis Strain 63-28... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1212 Pseudomonas chlororaphis Strain 63-28; exemption... for residues of the microbial pesticide Pseudomonas chlororaphis Strain 63-28 in or on all food...

  19. 40 CFR 180.1200 - Pseudomonas fluorescens strain PRA-25; temporary exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pseudomonas fluorescens strain PRA-25... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1200 Pseudomonas fluorescens strain PRA-25; temporary... established for residues of the microbial pesticide, pseudomonas fluorescens strain PRA-25 when used on peas...

  20. Influence of OprM expression on multiple antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, K K; Poole, K; Gotoh, N; Hancock, R E

    1997-01-01

    MexA-MexB-OprM is an efflux system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. OprM overproduced from the cloned gene was able to complement OprM-deficient mutants but did not alter the resistance of a wild-type P. aeruginosa strain to the different antimicrobial agents tested. This suggests that OprM cannot function by itself to efflux antibiotics, including beta-lactams targeted to the periplasm.

  1. Comparison of biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance pattern of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in human and environmental isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Sayyad; Tabatabaei, Mohammad; Sohrabi, Nasrollah

    2017-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen especially in patients with underlying diseases such as cyctic fibrosis and has been established as a model organism to study bacterial biofilm formation. The aim of this study was to compare the biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance in human and environmental P. aeruginosa isolates. Numbers of positive samples for algD and algU genes in human samples were 98% and the positive samples for algD and algU genes in the environmental samples were 80% and 70%, respectively. Ability to create biofilms by the human and environmental samples were 70% and 28%, respectively. The incidences of various antibiotic resistance genes in human samples including bla TEM and bla SHV were 92% and 16%, respectively but antibiotic resistance genes in environmental samples including bla TEM and bla SHV were 20% and 6%, respectively. High resistance to gentamicin (74%) and meropenem (70%), were found in the human samples, were as in the environmental samples high level of resistance were observed to ceftazidime (30%), gentamicin and meropenem (28%). According to findings of this study, differences in genes involve in biofilm synthesis between human and environmental isolates are highly significant and the environmental isolates of P. aeruginosa stile are sensitive to most antibiotics because they lacks the antibiotic resistance genes. But after transfer to human and isolation from diseased people have been taken the antibiotic resistance genes that would be resistant to many antibiotics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Identification of a small molecule that simultaneously suppresses virulence and antibiotic resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qiaoyun; Wei, Yu; Xia, Bin; Jin, Yongxin; Liu, Chang; Pan, Xiaolei; Shi, Jing; Zhu, Feng; Li, Jinlong; Qian, Lei; Liu, Xinqi; Cheng, Zhihui; Jin, Shouguang; Lin, Jianping; Wu, Weihui

    2016-01-11

    The rising antibiotic resistance of bacteria imposes a severe threat on human health. Inhibition of bacterial virulence is an alternative approach to develop new antimicrobials. Molecules targeting antibiotic resistant enzymes have been used in combination with cognate antibiotics. It might be ideal that a molecule can simultaneously suppress virulence factors and antibiotic resistance. Here we combined genetic and computer-aided inhibitor screening to search for such molecules against the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To identify target proteins that control both virulence and antibiotic resistance, we screened for mutants with defective cytotoxicity and biofilm formation from 93 transposon insertion mutants previously reported with increased antibiotic susceptibility. A pyrD mutant displayed defects in cytotoxicity, biofilm formation, quorum sensing and virulence in an acute mouse pneumonia model. Next, we employed a computer-aided screening to identify potential inhibitors of the PyrD protein, a dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODase) involved in pyrimidine biosynthesis. One of the predicted inhibitors was able to suppress the enzymatic activity of PyrD as well as bacterial cytotoxicity, biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance. A single administration of the compound reduced the bacterial colonization in the acute mouse pneumonia model. Therefore, we have developed a strategy to identify novel treatment targets and antimicrobial molecules.

  3. Antibiotic Resistance Determinants in a Pseudomonas putida Strain Isolated from a Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Estrella; Fernández, Matilde; Molina-Santiago, Carlos; Roca, Amalia; Porcel, Mario; de la Torre, Jesús; Segura, Ana; Plesiat, Patrick; Jeannot, Katy; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2014-01-01

    Environmental microbes harbor an enormous pool of antibiotic and biocide resistance genes that can impact the resistance profiles of animal and human pathogens via horizontal gene transfer. Pseudomonas putida strains are ubiquitous in soil and water but have been seldom isolated from humans. We have established a collection of P. putida strains isolated from in-patients in different hospitals in France. One of the isolated strains (HB3267) kills insects and is resistant to the majority of the antibiotics used in laboratories and hospitals, including aminoglycosides, ß-lactams, cationic peptides, chromoprotein enediyne antibiotics, dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors, fluoroquinolones and quinolones, glycopeptide antibiotics, macrolides, polyketides and sulfonamides. Similar to other P. putida clinical isolates the strain was sensitive to amikacin. To shed light on the broad pattern of antibiotic resistance, which is rarely found in clinical isolates of this species, the genome of this strain was sequenced and analysed. The study revealed that the determinants of multiple resistance are both chromosomally-borne as well as located on the pPC9 plasmid. Further analysis indicated that pPC9 has recruited antibiotic and biocide resistance genes from environmental microorganisms as well as from opportunistic and true human pathogens. The pPC9 plasmid is not self-transmissible, but can be mobilized by other bacterial plasmids making it capable of spreading antibiotic resistant determinants to new hosts. PMID:24465371

  4. An update on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation, tolerance, and dispersal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Morten; Yang, Liang; Pamp, Sünje Johanna

    2010-01-01

    We review the recent advances in the understanding of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm lifestyle from studies using in vitro laboratory setups such as flow chambers and microtiter trays. Recent work sheds light on the role of nutrients, motility, and quorum sensing in structure formation in P...

  5. The role of fluoroquinolones in the promotion of alginate synthesis and antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piña, S E; Mattingly, S J

    1997-08-01

    Treatment of nonmucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa with gyrase inhibitors such as ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, and ofloxacin, which target the A subunit of topoisomerase II, resulted in 100% conversion to the mucoid phenotype. However, antibiotics that partially inhibited growth and macromolecular synthesis (DNA, RNA, protein, or peptidoglycan) of nonmucoid isolates in a gluconate-limited chemostat culture system did not promote conversion to mucoid subpopulations. An increase in resistance was observed in populations that expressed the mucoid phenotype. Both mucoid conversion and antibiotic resistance were completely reversible when ciprofloxacin pressure was withdrawn, but only partially reversible by the removal of norfloxacin and ofloxacin. Thus, these experiments indicate that in the presence of some fluoroquinolones, a conditional response resulting in mucoid conversion and antibiotic resistance may occur.

  6. Active efflux systems in the solvent-tolerant bacterium Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieboom, J.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the research presented in this thesis was to study the molecular mechanisms of organic solvent tolerance in Pseudomonas putida S12. This bacterium is capable of growth at saturated solvent concentrations, which are lethal to normal bacteria. Organic

  7. Macrolide antibiotic-mediated downregulation of MexAB-OprM efflux pump expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimura, Makoto; Maseda, Hideaki; Hanaki, Hideaki; Nakae, Taiji

    2008-11-01

    Macrolide antibiotics modulate the quorum-sensing system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We tested the effect of macrolide antibiotics on the cell density-dependent expression of the MexAB-OprM efflux pump and found that 1.0 mug/ml (MIC/6.25) of azithromycin suppressed the expression of MexAB-OprM by about 70%, with the result that the cells became two- to fourfold more susceptible to antibiotics such as aztreonam, tetracycline, carbenicillin, chloramphenicol, and novobiocin.

  8. Membrane-active macromolecules kill antibiotic-tolerant bacteria and potentiate antibiotics towards Gram-negative bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divakara S S M Uppu

    Full Text Available Chronic bacterial biofilms place a massive burden on healthcare due to the presence of antibiotic-tolerant dormant bacteria. Some of the conventional antibiotics such as erythromycin, vancomycin, linezolid, rifampicin etc. are inherently ineffective against Gram-negative bacteria, particularly in their biofilms. Here, we report membrane-active macromolecules that kill slow dividing stationary-phase and antibiotic tolerant cells of Gram-negative bacteria. More importantly, these molecules potentiate antibiotics (erythromycin and rifampicin to biofilms of Gram-negative bacteria. These molecules eliminate planktonic bacteria that are liberated after dispersion of biofilms (dispersed cells. The membrane-active mechanism of these molecules forms the key for potentiating the established antibiotics. Further, we demonstrate that the combination of macromolecules and antibiotics significantly reduces bacterial burden in mouse burn and surgical wound infection models caused by Acinetobacter baumannii and Carbapenemase producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC clinical isolate respectively. Colistin, a well-known antibiotic targeting the lipopolysaccharide (LPS of Gram-negative bacteria fails to kill antibiotic tolerant cells and dispersed cells (from biofilms and bacteria develop resistance to it. On the contrary, these macromolecules prevent or delay the development of bacterial resistance to known antibiotics. Our findings emphasize the potential of targeting the bacterial membrane in antibiotic potentiation for disruption of biofilms and suggest a promising strategy towards developing therapies for topical treatment of Gram-negative infections.

  9. Membrane-active macromolecules kill antibiotic-tolerant bacteria and potentiate antibiotics towards Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppu, Divakara S S M; Konai, Mohini M; Sarkar, Paramita; Samaddar, Sandip; Fensterseifer, Isabel C M; Farias-Junior, Celio; Krishnamoorthy, Paramanandam; Shome, Bibek R; Franco, Octávio L; Haldar, Jayanta

    2017-01-01

    Chronic bacterial biofilms place a massive burden on healthcare due to the presence of antibiotic-tolerant dormant bacteria. Some of the conventional antibiotics such as erythromycin, vancomycin, linezolid, rifampicin etc. are inherently ineffective against Gram-negative bacteria, particularly in their biofilms. Here, we report membrane-active macromolecules that kill slow dividing stationary-phase and antibiotic tolerant cells of Gram-negative bacteria. More importantly, these molecules potentiate antibiotics (erythromycin and rifampicin) to biofilms of Gram-negative bacteria. These molecules eliminate planktonic bacteria that are liberated after dispersion of biofilms (dispersed cells). The membrane-active mechanism of these molecules forms the key for potentiating the established antibiotics. Further, we demonstrate that the combination of macromolecules and antibiotics significantly reduces bacterial burden in mouse burn and surgical wound infection models caused by Acinetobacter baumannii and Carbapenemase producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC) clinical isolate respectively. Colistin, a well-known antibiotic targeting the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Gram-negative bacteria fails to kill antibiotic tolerant cells and dispersed cells (from biofilms) and bacteria develop resistance to it. On the contrary, these macromolecules prevent or delay the development of bacterial resistance to known antibiotics. Our findings emphasize the potential of targeting the bacterial membrane in antibiotic potentiation for disruption of biofilms and suggest a promising strategy towards developing therapies for topical treatment of Gram-negative infections.

  10. Development of Antibiotic Resistance during Simulated Treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Chemostats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yanfang; Hodiamont, Caspar J; van Hest, Reinier M; Brul, Stanley; Schultsz, Constance; Ter Kuile, Benno H

    2016-01-01

    During treatment of infections with antibiotics in critically ill patients in the intensive care resistance often develops. This study aims to establish whether under those conditions this resistance can develop de novo or that genetic exchange between bacteria is by necessity involved. Chemostat cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were exposed to treatment regimes with ceftazidime and meropenem that simulated conditions expected in patient plasma. Development of antibiotic resistance was monitored and mutations in resistance genes were searched for by sequencing PCR products. Even at the highest concentrations that can be expected in patients, sufficient bacteria survived in clumps of filamentous cells to recover and grow out after 3 to 5 days. At the end of a 7 days simulated treatment, the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) had increased by a factor between 10 and 10,000 depending on the antibiotic and the treatment protocol. The fitness costs of resistance were minimal. In the resistant strains, only three mutations were observed in genes associated with beta-lactam resistance. The development of resistance often observed during patient treatment can be explained by de novo acquisition of resistance and genetic exchange of resistance genes is not by necessity involved. As far as conclusions based on an in vitro study using P. aeruginosa and only two antibiotics can be generalized, it seems that development of resistance can be minimized by treating with antibiotics in the highest concentration the patient can endure for the shortest time needed to eliminate the infection.

  11. Identification of genes involved in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm-specific resistance to antibiotics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhang

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a key opportunistic pathogen characterized by its biofilm formation ability and high-level multiple antibiotic resistance. By screening a library of random transposon insertion mutants with an increased biofilm-specifc antibiotic susceptibility, we previously identified 3 genes or operons of P. aeruginosa UCBPP-PA14 (ndvB, PA1875-1877 and tssC1 that do not affect biofilm formation but are involved in biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance. In this study, we demonstrate that PA0756-0757 (encoding a putative two-component regulatory system, PA2070 and PA5033 (encoding hypothetical proteins of unknown function display increased expression in biofilm cells and also have a role in biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance. Furthermore, deletion of each of PA0756, PA2070 and PA5033 resulted in a significant reduction of lethality in Caenorhabditis elegans, indicating a role for these genes in both biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance and persistence in vivo. Together, these data suggest that these genes are potential targets for antimicrobial agents.

  12. Identification of Genes Involved in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm-Specific Resistance to Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Fritsch, Meredith; Hammond, Lisa; Landreville, Ryan; Slatculescu, Cristina; Colavita, Antonio; Mah, Thien-Fah

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a key opportunistic pathogen characterized by its biofilm formation ability and high-level multiple antibiotic resistance. By screening a library of random transposon insertion mutants with an increased biofilm-specifc antibiotic susceptibility, we previously identified 3 genes or operons of P. aeruginosa UCBPP-PA14 (ndvB, PA1875–1877 and tssC1) that do not affect biofilm formation but are involved in biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance. In this study, we demonstrate that PA0756–0757 (encoding a putative two-component regulatory system), PA2070 and PA5033 (encoding hypothetical proteins of unknown function) display increased expression in biofilm cells and also have a role in biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance. Furthermore, deletion of each of PA0756, PA2070 and PA5033 resulted in a significant reduction of lethality in Caenorhabditis elegans, indicating a role for these genes in both biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance and persistence in vivo. Together, these data suggest that these genes are potential targets for antimicrobial agents. PMID:23637868

  13. RESEARCH IN SENSITIVITY TO ANTIBIOTICS, ANTISEPTICS IN PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA STRAINS ISOLATED FROM PATIENTS WITH INFECTIOUS COMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Nazarchuk

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Infections caused by Pseudomonas are one of the topical issues of medicine. Objective. The aim of the research was to study sensityvity to antibiotics, antiseptics of P. aeruginosa clinical strains that cause infectious complications in patients with burns. Methods. Microbiological study of biological material, received from 435 patients with burns of the 3rd-4th stages (2011-2015 years. In early terms of burn disease 127 clinical strains of P. aeruginosa were isolated from patients. Standard methods were used to identify clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa by their morphological, tinctirial, culture and biochemical properties. The research of antimicrobial action of antiseptics, antibiotics against Pseudomonas were carried out by means of standard methods according to the Directive of the Ministry of Health of Ukraine (No. 167 from 05.04.2007 р. and guidelines of National Committee of Clinical and Laboratory Study (NCCLS, 2002. Results. It was established that P. aeruginosa caused infectious complications in 23.9% of patients among other pathogens. Clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were found to be low sensitive to amoxicillin/clavulanate (30.76%, ceftazidime (25.92%, cefoperazonum/sulbactam (46.15%, aztreonam (51.85%, tobramycin (38.46%, amicacin (70.34%, doxiciclini (26.92%, fluoroquinolones (59.26%. The analitical progistic criteria of decrease of sensitivity to ceftazidime, cefepim, meropenem and gatifloxacin were found in P. aeruginosa. This pathogen was determined to be sensitive to decasan ®, antimicrobial composition of decamethoxine ®, iodine pvidone. Conclusions. Clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, being highly resistant to antibiotics, are also very sensitive to antiseptics decasan ®, antimicrobial of decamethoxine®, povidone iodine.

  14. Improvement in solvent tolerance by exogenous glycerol in Pseudomonas sp. BCNU 106.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, H J; Lim, B R; Park, Y J; Joo, W H

    2017-08-01

    Solvent hypertolerant Pseudomonas sp. BCNU 106 still has some underlying growth limitation in solvents. Therefore, efficient mass cultivation methods are needed to pursue its applications in biotechnology. Pseudomonas sp. BCNU 106 was cultured in a medium supplemented with 0·05 mol l -1 glycerol and cell survival was monitored during its cultivation in the presence of 1% (v/v) toluene. Exogenously supplemented glycerol provided more protection against damage caused by toluene stress and conferred higher solvent tolerance of Pseudomonas sp. BCNU 106 to toluene compared to control Pseudomonas sp. BCNU 106 without the supplementation of glycerol. This low-cost mass cultivation method can be used to efficiently apply solvent-tolerant bacteria in biotransformation and biodegradation. Protection against toluene and improvement in bacterial cell growth by supplementation of glycerol in the presence of toluene are demonstrated in this study. This result can be used to solve growth-related hindrances of solvent-tolerant bacteria and establish their low-cost mass cultivation, thereby broadening their industrial and environmental applications. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. PA3225 Is a Transcriptional Repressor of Antibiotic Resistance Mechanisms in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Clayton W.; Zhang, Li; Mah, Thien-Fah

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The tssABC1 locus is part of the Hcp secretion island I (HSI-I) type VI secretion system (T6SS) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Previous work implicated the tssC1 gene in P. aeruginosa biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance, and tssC1 is preferentially expressed in biofilms compared to planktonic cells. Using a DNA-dependent protein pulldown approach, we discovered that PA3225, an uncharacterized LysR-type transcriptional regulator, specifically bound to the tssABC1 upstream regulatory re...

  16. Antibiotic penetration and bacterial killing in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Bao; Christophersen, Lars; Thomsen, Kim

    2015-01-01

    model. METHODS: Seaweed alginate beads containing Pseudomonas aeruginosa were cultured in LB medium, sampled at day 1, 3, 5 or 7 and examined for the effect of treatment with tobramycin for 30 min. Treated beads were homogenized and the number of cfu was determined. The antibiotic concentration...... in the solution of homogenized beads was measured. Finally, beads were examined for live cells by Syto9 staining and for dead cells by propidium iodide staining using a confocal laser scanning microscope. RESULTS: The antibiotic level in each bead was relatively stable (range 30-42 mg/L; MIC = 1.5 mg...... of tobramycin in an in vitro biofilm model. In addition, this model system enables parallel investigation of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, providing a model for testing new treatment strategies....

  17. Antibiotic Susceptibility Patterns and Molecular Epidemiology of Metallo-β-Lactamase Producing Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Strains Isolated From Burn Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Japoni, Aziz; Anvarinejad, Mojtaba; Farshad, Shohreh; Giammanco, Giovanni M; Rafaatpour, Noroddin; Alipour, Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    Background: Failure in the treatment of burn patients infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa could happen as a result of the acquisition of antibiotic resistance, including carbapenems. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, isolated from burn patients. Patients and Methods: During a 12 month period, in this cross-sectional study, two hundred seventy strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were isolated from the burn patients in Ghotbeddin Burn Hospital, Shiraz, Iran. Screening for the carbapenem resistance in the isolates was carried out by the E test method. Sensitivity patterns of metallo-β-lactamase (MβLs) producing strains of pseudomonas to eleven antibiotics were determined by the mentioned method. The epidemiological associations of these strains were determined by Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Results: Of the 270 strains, 60 (22.2%) were resistant to imipenem and meropenem, classified as MβLs producing. MβLs producing strains of pseudomonas were completely resistant to five tested antibiotics while their sensitivities to the three most effective antibiotics including ceftazidime, amikacin and ciprofloxacin were 23.4%, 6.7 % and 1.7%, respectively. In PFGE, 37 patterns from the genome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were observed. Majority of the strains (43; 71.6%) exhibited more than 80% similarity, based on the drawn dendrogram. Conclusions: According to the results, none of the tested antibiotics is safe to prescribe. As PFGE revealed, a limited number of Pseudomonas aeruginosa types are predominant in the hospitals which infect the burn patients. PMID:25031843

  18. Cyclic lipodepsipeptides produced by Pseudomonas spp. naturally present in raw milk induce inhibitory effects on microbiological inhibitor assays for antibiotic residue screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Reybroeck

    Full Text Available Two Pseudomonas strains, identified as closely related to Pseudomonas tolaasii, were isolated from milk of a farm with frequent false-positive Delvotest results for screening putative antibiotic residues in raw milk executed as part of the regulatory quality programme. Growth at 5 to 7°C of these isolates in milk resulted in high lipolysis and the production of bacterial inhibitors. The two main bacterial inhibitors have a molecular weight of 1168.7 and 1140.7 Da respectively, are heat-tolerant and inhibit Geobacillus stearothermophilus var. calidolactis, the test strain of most of the commercially available microbiological inhibitor tests for screening of antibiotic residues in milk. Furthermore, these bacterial inhibitors show antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus and B. subtilis and also interfere negatively with yoghurt production. Following their isolation and purification with RP-HPLC, the inhibitors were identified by NMR analysis as cyclic lipodepsipeptides of the viscosin group. Our findings bring to light a new challenge for quality control in the dairy industry. By prolonging the refrigerated storage of raw milk, the keeping quality of milk is influenced by growth and metabolic activities of psychrotrophic bacteria such as pseudomonads. Besides an increased risk of possible spoilage of long shelf-life milk, the production at low temperature of natural bacterial inhibitors may also result in false-positive results for antibiotic residue screening tests based on microbial inhibitor assays thus leading to undue production loss.

  19. Sublethal Concentrations Of Antibiotics Cause Shift To Anaerobic Metabolism In Listeria Monocytogenes And Induce Phenotypes Linked To Antibiotic Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Gitte Maegaard; Ng, Yin; Gram, Lone

    2015-01-01

    to the coexistence with antibiotic-producing organisms during its saprophytic lifestyle. To determine if tolerance could be induced or potentially alter virulence, we investigated the transcriptome after exposure to sublethal antibiotic concentrations. Results: Four antibiotics caused induction of the alcohol...... dehydrogenase gene lmo1634 and repression of alsA and lmo1992, which are involved in acetoin production leading to more ethanol and less acetoin production. This shift in central metabolism indicates a shift from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism, that could reduce oxidative stress and be a survival strategy...... in response to antibiotics. We investigated the antibiotic tolerance of a Δlmo1634 mutant, however; it was comparable with the wild-type in a killing assay. L. monocytogenes encodes a second alcohol dehydrogenase lmo1179, which potentially could cause a redundant pathway and this is under further...

  20. PA3225 Is a Transcriptional Repressor of Antibiotic Resistance Mechanisms in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Clayton W; Zhang, Li; Mah, Thien-Fah

    2017-08-01

    The tssABC1 locus is part of the Hcp secretion island I (HSI-I) type VI secretion system (T6SS) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Previous work implicated the tssC1 gene in P. aeruginosa biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance, and tssC1 is preferentially expressed in biofilms compared to planktonic cells. Using a DNA-dependent protein pulldown approach, we discovered that PA3225, an uncharacterized LysR-type transcriptional regulator, specifically bound to the tssABC1 upstream regulatory region. The deletion of PA3225 led to a 2-fold decrease in tssA1 expression levels in planktonic cells compared to the wild type, and tssA1 expression was slightly reduced in ΔPA3225 biofilms compared to wild-type biofilms. Intriguingly, further investigations revealed that the ΔPA3225 mutant was less susceptible to multiple, structurally unrelated antibiotics with various mechanisms of action when grown planktonically. The ΔPA3225 mutant was additionally more resistant to ciprofloxacin when grown in a biofilm. The decreased antibiotic susceptibility of the ΔPA3225 strain was linked to the transcriptional upregulation of the MexAB-OprM efflux pump. By using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq), other PA3225-regulated genes were identified, and the products of these genes, such as the putative ABC transporter PA3228, may also contribute to antibiotic resistance. Copyright © 2017 Hall et al.

  1. Novel AroA from Pseudomonas putida Confers Tobacco Plant with High Tolerance to Glyphosate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hai-Qin; Chang, Su-Hua; Tian, Zhe-Xian; Zhang, Le; Sun, Yi-Cheng; Li, Yan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Yi-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Glyphosate is a non-selective broad-spectrum herbicide that inhibits 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS, also designated as AroA), a key enzyme in the aromatic amino acid biosynthesis pathway in microorganisms and plants. Previously, we reported that a novel AroA (PpAroA1) from Pseudomonas putida had high tolerance to glyphosate, with little homology to class I or class II glyphosate-tolerant AroA. In this study, the coding sequence of PpAroA1 was optimized for tobacco. For maturation of the enzyme in chloroplast, a chloroplast transit peptide coding sequence was fused in frame with the optimized aroA gene (PparoA1optimized) at the 5′ end. The PparoA1optimized gene was introduced into the tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. W38) genome via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The transformed explants were first screened in shoot induction medium containing kanamycin. Then glyphosate tolerance was assayed in putative transgenic plants and its T1 progeny. Our results show that the PpAroA1 from Pseudomonas putida can efficiently confer tobacco plants with high glyphosate tolerance. Transgenic tobacco overexpressing the PparoA1optimized gene exhibit high tolerance to glyphosate, which suggest that the novel PpAroA1 is a new and good candidate applied in transgenic crops with glyphosate tolerance in future. PMID:21611121

  2. Effectiveness of halo-tolerant, auxin producing Pseudomonas and Rhizobium strains to improve osmotic stress tolerance in mung bean (Vigna radiata L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Maqshoof; Zahir, Zahir A; Nazli, Farheen; Akram, Fareeha; Arshad, Muhammad; Khalid, Muhammad

    2013-12-01

    Halo-tolerant, auxin producing bacteria could be used to induce salt tolerance in plants. A number of Rhizobium and auxin producing rhizobacterial strains were assessed for their ability to tolerate salt stress by conducting osmoadaptation assay. The selected strains were further screened for their ability to induce osmotic stress tolerance in mung bean seedlings under salt-stressed axenic conditions in growth pouch/jar trials. Three most effective strains of Rhizobium and Pseudomonas containing ACC-deaminase were evaluated in combination, for their ability to induce osmotic stress tolerance in mung bean at original, 4, and 6 dS m(-1) under axenic conditions. Results showed that sole inoculation of Rhizobium and Pseudomonas strains improved the total dry matter up to 1.4, and 1.9 fold, respectively, while the increase in salt tolerance index was improved up to 1.3 and 2.0 fold by the Rhizobium and Pseudomonas strains, respectively. However, up to 2.2 fold increase in total dry matter and salt tolerance index was observed due to combined inoculation of Rhizobium and Pseudomonas strains. So, combined application of Rhizobium and Pseudomonas strains could be explored as an effective strategy to induce osmotic stress tolerance in mung bean.

  3. Effectiveness of halo-tolerant, auxin producing Pseudomonas and Rhizobium strains to improve osmotic stress tolerance in mung bean (Vigna radiata L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maqshoof Ahmad

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Halo-tolerant, auxin producing bacteria could be used to induce salt tolerance in plants. A number of Rhizobium and auxin producing rhizobacterial strains were assessed for their ability to tolerate salt stress by conducting osmoadaptation assay. The selected strains were further screened for their ability to induce osmotic stress tolerance in mung bean seedlings under salt-stressed axenic conditions in growth pouch/jar trials. Three most effective strains of Rhizobium and Pseudomonas containing ACC-deaminase were evaluated in combination, for their ability to induce osmotic stress tolerance in mung bean at original, 4, and 6 dS m-1 under axenic conditions. Results showed that sole inoculation of Rhizobium and Pseudomonas strains improved the total dry matter up to 1.4, and 1.9 fold, respectively, while the increase in salt tolerance index was improved up to 1.3 and 2.0 fold by the Rhizobium and Pseudomonas strains, respectively. However, up to 2.2 fold increase in total dry matter and salt tolerance index was observed due to combined inoculation of Rhizobium and Pseudomonas strains. So, combined application of Rhizobium and Pseudomonas strains could be explored as an effective strategy to induce osmotic stress tolerance in mung bean.

  4. Salicylate-inducible antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas cepacia associated with absence of a pore-forming outer membrane protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Burns, J L; Clark, D K

    1992-01-01

    The most common mechanism of antibiotic resistance in multiply resistant Pseudomonas cepacia is decreased porin-mediated outer membrane permeability. In some gram-negative organisms this form of antibiotic resistance can be induced by growth in the presence of weak acids, such as salicylates, which suppress porin synthesis. To determine the effects of salicylates on outer membrane permeability of P. cepacia, a susceptible laboratory strain, 249-2, was grown in 10 mM sodium salicylate. Antibio...

  5. Antibiotic resistance profile of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from aquaculture and abattoir environments in urban communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isoken Henrietta Igbinosa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To characterize multiple antibiotic resistance profile of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from aquaculture and abattoir environments. Methods: Wastewater samples were obtained from the abattoir and aquaculture environments between May 2016 and July 2016 and analysed using standard phenotypic, biochemical and PCR-based methods. Results: The mean pseudomonads count ranged from (4 × 102 ± 1.01 to (2 × 104 ± 0.10 colony-forming unit/mL in the aquaculture environment and (3 × 103 ± 0.00 to (1 × 105 ± 1.00 colony-forming unit/mL in the abattoir environment. A total of 96 isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa confirmed by PCR were thereafter selected from both aquaculture and abattoir environments and further characterized for their antimicrobial susceptibility profile by adopting the disc diffusion method. High level of resistance was observed against the aminoglycosides [gentamycin 64/96 (66.67% and kanamycin 52/96 (54.17%], monobactams [aztreonam 76/96 (79.17%], carbapenems [meropenem 52/96 (54.17%], tetracyclines [tetracycline 72/96 (75.00%] and cephems [ceftazidime 72/96 (75.00% and cefuroxime 48/96 (50.00%]. Multiple antibiotic resistant index of the respective isolates ranged from 0.4 to 0.8 while multidrug resistant profile of the isolates revealed that 28 of the respective isolates were resistant to ceftazidime, cefuroxime, gentamycin, kanamycin, aztreonam which belongs to cephems, aminoglycosides and monobactam class of antimicrobials. Conclusions: Findings from the present study therefore underscores the need for effective monitoring of the abattoir and aquaculture environments as they could be the significant source for spreading antibiotic resistant bacteria within the environment.

  6. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of antibiotics in biofilm infections of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hengzhuang, Wang; Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana

    2014-01-01

    an efficient dosing regimen and to minimize the development of antimicrobial tolerance and resistance in biofilm infections. Unfortunately, most previous PK/PD studies of antibiotics have been done on planktonic cells, and extrapolation of the results on biofilms is problematic as bacterial biofilms differ......Although progress on biofilm research has been obtained during the past decades, the treatment of biofilm infections with antibiotics remains a riddle. The pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) profiles of an antimicrobial agent provide important information helping to establish...... from planktonic grown cells in the growth rate, gene expression, and metabolism. Here, we set up several protocols for the studies of PK/PD of antibiotics in biofilm infections of P. aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo. It should be underlined that none of the protocols in biofilms have yet been...

  7. Dynamics of Mutations during Development of Resistance by Pseudomonas aeruginosa against Five Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yanfang; Jonker, Martijs J; Moustakas, Ioannis; Brul, Stanley; Ter Kuile, Benno H

    2016-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes considerable morbidity and mortality, specifically during intensive care. Antibiotic-resistant variants of this organism are more difficult to treat and cause substantial extra costs compared to susceptible strains. In the laboratory, P. aeruginosa rapidly developed resistance to five medically relevant antibiotics upon exposure to stepwise increasing concentrations. At several time points during the acquisition of resistance, samples were taken for whole-genome sequencing. The increase in the MIC of ciprofloxacin was linked to specific mutations in gyrA, parC, and gyrB, appearing sequentially. In the case of tobramycin, mutations in fusA, HP02880, rplB, and capD were induced. The MICs of the beta-lactam compounds meropenem and ceftazidime and the combination of piperacillin and tazobactam correlated linearly with beta-lactamase activity but not always with individual mutations. The genes that were mutated during the development of beta-lactam resistance differed for each antibiotic. A quantitative relationship between the frequency of mutations and the increase in resistance could not be established for any of the antibiotics. When the adapted strains are grown in the absence of the antibiotic, some mutations remained and others were reversed, but this reversal did not necessarily lower the MIC. The increased MIC came at the cost of moderately reduced cellular functions or a somewhat lower growth rate. In all cases except ciprofloxacin, the increase in resistance seems to be the result of complex interactions among several cellular systems rather than individual mutations. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Synergistic Interaction Between Phage Therapy and Antibiotics Clears Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Infection in Endocarditis and Reduces Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oechslin, Frank; Piccardi, Philippe; Mancini, Stefano; Gabard, Jérôme; Moreillon, Philippe; Entenza, José M; Resch, Gregory; Que, Yok-Ai

    2017-03-01

    Increasing antibiotic resistance warrants therapeutic alternatives. Here we investigated the efficacy of bacteriophage-therapy (phage) alone or combined with antibiotics against experimental endocarditis (EE) due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an archetype of difficult-to-treat infection. In vitro fibrin clots and rats with aortic EE were treated with an antipseudomonas phage cocktail alone or combined with ciprofloxacin. Phage pharmacology, therapeutic efficacy, and resistance were determined. In vitro, single-dose phage therapy killed 7 log colony-forming units (CFUs)/g of fibrin clots in 6 hours. Phage-resistant mutants regrew after 24 hours but were prevented by combination with ciprofloxacin (2.5 × minimum inhibitory concentration). In vivo, single-dose phage therapy killed 2.5 log CFUs/g of vegetations in 6 hours (P 6 log CFUs/g of vegetations in 6 hours and successfully treating 64% (n = 7/11) of rats. Phage-resistant mutants emerged in vitro but not in vivo, most likely because resistant mutations affected bacterial surface determinants important for infectivity (eg, the pilT and galU genes involved in pilus motility and LPS formation). Single-dose phage therapy was active against P. aeruginosa EE and highly synergistic with ciprofloxacin. Phage-resistant mutants had impaired infectivity. Phage-therapy alone or combined with antibiotics merits further clinical consideration. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  9. Outer Membrane Protein D Gene in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa and its Role in Antibiotic Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Motaghi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common cause of nosocomial infection. OprD protein is a specific protein regulating the uptake of carbapenem antibiotic. Loss of OprD is the main mechanism of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa resistance to carbapenem. In this study, the presence of OprD gene is investigated in isolated Pseudomonas Aeruginosa in burn patients of Ghotboddin hospital in Shiraz. Material & Methods: 66 Pseudomonas Aeruginosa were isolated from wound specimens of 250 burn patients. Strain characteristics were confirmed by biochemical tests. Antibiogram was done via disc diffusion method. Finally, OprD gene was investigated by PCR. Results: Isolated Pseudomonas Aeruginosa showed more sensitivity to chloramphenicol and colicitin and more resistance  to ciprofloxacin, gentamycin, cefotaxim, ceftazidin, imipenem, meropenem, and erythromycin. 61 percent of isolates were positive for OprD gene by PCR. Conclusion: The findings of this study revealed that Colicitin and chloramphenicol are more effective in treatment of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa infections in burn patients, and deletion and mutation in OprD gene cause bacterium resistance to carbapenem antibiotic.

  10. Previous Antibiotic Exposure and Antimicrobial Resistance Patterns of Acinetobacter spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Patients with Nosocomial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorana M. Djordjevic

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The alarming spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria causing healthcare-associated infections has been extensively reported in recent medical literature. Aims: To compare trends in antimicrobial consumption and development of resistance among isolates of Acinetobacter spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa that cause hospital infections. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: A study was conducted in a tertiary healthcare institution in central Serbia, during the 7-year period between January 2009 and December 2015. The incidence rate of infections caused by Acinetobacter or Pseudomonas, as well as their resistance density to commonly used antibiotics, were calculated. Utilization of antibiotics was expressed as the number of defined daily doses per 1000 patient-days. Results: A statistically significant increase in resistance density in 2015 compared to the first year of observation was noted for Acinetobacter, but not for Pseudomonas, to third-generation cephalosporins (p=0.008, aminoglycosides (p=0.005, carbapenems (p=0.003, piperacillin/tazobactam (p=0.025, ampicillin/sulbactam (p=0.009 and tigecycline (p=0.048. Conclusion: Our study showed that there is an association between the resistance density of Acinetobacter spp. and utilization of carbapenems, tigecycline and aminoglycosides. A multifaceted intervention is needed to decrease the incidence rate of Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas hospital infections, as well as their resistance density to available antibiotics

  11. Mucoidy, quorum sensing, mismatch repair and antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa from cystic fibrosis chronic airways infections.

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    Sofía Feliziani

    Full Text Available Survival of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF chronic infections is based on a genetic adaptation process consisting of mutations in specific genes, which can produce advantageous phenotypic switches and ensure its persistence in the lung. Among these, mutations inactivating the regulators MucA (alginate biosynthesis, LasR (quorum sensing and MexZ (multidrug-efflux pump MexXY are the most frequently observed, with those inactivating the DNA mismatch repair system (MRS being also highly prevalent in P. aeruginosa CF isolates, leading to hypermutator phenotypes that could contribute to this adaptive mutagenesis by virtue of an increased mutation rate. Here, we characterized the mutations found in the mucA, lasR, mexZ and MRS genes in P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from Argentinean CF patients, and analyzed the potential association of mucA, lasR and mexZ mutagenesis with MRS-deficiency and antibiotic resistance. Thus, 38 isolates from 26 chronically infected CF patients were characterized for their phenotypic traits, PFGE genotypic patterns, mutations in the mucA, lasR, mexZ, mutS and mutL gene coding sequences and antibiotic resistance profiles. The most frequently mutated gene was mexZ (79%, followed by mucA (63% and lasR (39% as well as a high prevalence (42% of hypermutators being observed due to loss-of-function mutations in mutL (60% followed by mutS (40%. Interestingly, mutational spectra were particular to each gene, suggesting that several mechanisms are responsible for mutations during chronic infection. However, no link could be established between hypermutability and mutagenesis in mucA, lasR and mexZ, indicating that MRS-deficiency was not involved in the acquisition of these mutations. Finally, although inactivation of mucA, lasR and mexZ has been previously shown to confer resistance/tolerance to antibiotics, only mutations in MRS genes could be related to an antibiotic resistance increase. These results help to unravel

  12. Mucoidy, quorum sensing, mismatch repair and antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa from cystic fibrosis chronic airways infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliziani, Sofía; Luján, Adela M; Moyano, Alejandro J; Sola, Claudia; Bocco, José L; Montanaro, Patricia; Canigia, Liliana Fernández; Argaraña, Carlos E; Smania, Andrea M

    2010-09-10

    Survival of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF) chronic infections is based on a genetic adaptation process consisting of mutations in specific genes, which can produce advantageous phenotypic switches and ensure its persistence in the lung. Among these, mutations inactivating the regulators MucA (alginate biosynthesis), LasR (quorum sensing) and MexZ (multidrug-efflux pump MexXY) are the most frequently observed, with those inactivating the DNA mismatch repair system (MRS) being also highly prevalent in P. aeruginosa CF isolates, leading to hypermutator phenotypes that could contribute to this adaptive mutagenesis by virtue of an increased mutation rate. Here, we characterized the mutations found in the mucA, lasR, mexZ and MRS genes in P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from Argentinean CF patients, and analyzed the potential association of mucA, lasR and mexZ mutagenesis with MRS-deficiency and antibiotic resistance. Thus, 38 isolates from 26 chronically infected CF patients were characterized for their phenotypic traits, PFGE genotypic patterns, mutations in the mucA, lasR, mexZ, mutS and mutL gene coding sequences and antibiotic resistance profiles. The most frequently mutated gene was mexZ (79%), followed by mucA (63%) and lasR (39%) as well as a high prevalence (42%) of hypermutators being observed due to loss-of-function mutations in mutL (60%) followed by mutS (40%). Interestingly, mutational spectra were particular to each gene, suggesting that several mechanisms are responsible for mutations during chronic infection. However, no link could be established between hypermutability and mutagenesis in mucA, lasR and mexZ, indicating that MRS-deficiency was not involved in the acquisition of these mutations. Finally, although inactivation of mucA, lasR and mexZ has been previously shown to confer resistance/tolerance to antibiotics, only mutations in MRS genes could be related to an antibiotic resistance increase. These results help to unravel the

  13. Production of the Antibiotic Phenazine-1-Carboxylic Acid by Fluorescent Pseudomonas Species in the Rhizosphere of Wheat

    OpenAIRE

    Thomashow, Linda S.; Weller, David M.; Bonsall, Robert F.; Pierson, Leland S.

    1990-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens 2-79 and P. aureofaciens 30-84 produce the antibiotic phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and suppress take-all, an important root disease of wheat caused by Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici. To determine whether the antibiotic is produced in situ, wheat seeds were treated with strain 2-79 or 30-84 or with phenazine-nonproducing mutants or were left untreated and then were sown in natural or steamed soil in the field or growth chamber. The antibiotic was isolated only from...

  14. Genome‐wide identification of tolerance mechanisms toward p‐coumaric acid in Pseudomonas putida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calero, Patricia; Jensen, Sheila I.; Bojanovič, Klara; Lennen, Rebecca M.; Koza, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440 has gained increasing biotechnological interest due to its ability to tolerate different types of stress. Here, the tolerance of P. putida KT2440 toward eleven toxic chemical compounds was investigated. P. putida was found to be significantly more tolerant toward three of the eleven compounds when compared to Escherichia coli. Increased tolerance was for example found toward p‐coumaric acid, an interesting precursor for polymerization with a significant industrial relevance. The tolerance mechanism was therefore investigated using the genome‐wide approach, Tn‐seq. Libraries containing a large number of miniTn5‐Km transposon insertion mutants were grown in the presence and absence of p‐coumaric acid, and the enrichment or depletion of mutants was quantified by high‐throughput sequencing. Several genes, including the ABC transporter Ttg2ABC and the cytochrome c maturation system (ccm), were identified to play an important role in the tolerance toward p‐coumaric acid of this bacterium. Most of the identified genes were involved in membrane stability, suggesting that tolerance toward p‐coumaric acid is related to transport and membrane integrity. PMID:29131301

  15. Antibiotic-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in patients with bronchiectasis: prevalence, risk factors and prognostic implications

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    Gao YH

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Yong-hua Gao,1,* Wei-jie Guan,2,* Ya-nan Zhu,3 Rong-chang Chen,2 Guo-jun Zhang1 1Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, 2State Key Laboratory of Respiratory Disease, National Clinical Research Center for Respiratory Disease, Guangzhou Institute of Respiratory Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, 3Department of Emergency Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background and aims: Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA is the most common pathogen in bronchiectasis and frequently develops resistance to multiple classes of antibiotics, but little is known about the clinical impacts of PA-resistant (PA-R isolates on bronchiectasis. We, therefore, investigated the prevalence, risk factors and prognostic implications of PA-R isolates in hospitalized bronchiectasis patients.Patients and methods: Between June 2011 and July 2016, data from adult bronchiectasis patients isolated with PA at the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University were retrospectively analyzed. PA was classified as PA-R in case antibiogram demonstrated resistance on at least one occasion.Results: Seven hundred forty-seven bronchiectasis patients were assessed. Of these, 147 (19.7% had PA isolate in the sputum or bronchoscopic culture. PA-R and PA-sensitive accounted for 88 (59.9% and 59 (31.1% patients, respectively. In multivariate model, factors associated with PA-R isolate in bronchiectasis included prior exposure to antibiotics (odds ratio [OR] =6.18, three or more exacerbations in the previous year (OR =2.81, higher modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scores (OR =1.93 and greater radiologic severity (OR =1.15. During follow-up (median: 26 months; interquartile range: 6–59 months, 36 patients died, of whom 24 (66

  16. Mutability in Pseudomonas viridiflava as a programmed balance between antibiotic resistance and pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, Claudia; Lamichhane, Jay Ram; Berge, Odile; Varvaro, Leonardo; Morris, Cindy E

    2015-10-01

    Mutable bacterial cells are defective in their DNA repair system and often have a phenotype different from that of their wild-type counterparts. In human bacterial pathogens, the mutable and hypermutable phenotypes are often associated with general antibiotic resistance. Here, we quantified the occurrence of mutable cells in Pseudomonas viridiflava, a phytopathogenic bacterium in the P. syringae complex with a broad host range and capacity to live as a saprophyte. Two phenotypic variants (transparent and mucoid) were produced by this bacterium. The transparent variant had a mutator phenotype, showed general antibiotic resistance and could not induce disease on the plant species tested (bean). In contrast, the mucoid variant did not display mutability or resistance to antibiotics and was capable of inducing disease on bean. Both the transparent and mucoid variants were less fit when grown in vitro, whereas, in planta, both of the variants and wild-types attained similar population densities. Given the importance of the methyl-directed mismatch repair system (MMR) in the occurrence of mutable and hypermutable cells in human bacterial pathogens, we investigated whether mutations in mut genes were associated with mutator transparent cells in P. viridiflava. Our results showed no mutations in MMR genes in any of the P. viridiflava cells tested. Here, we report that a high mutation rate and antibiotic resistance are inversely correlated with pathogenicity in P. viridiflava, but are not associated with mutations in MMR. In addition, P. viridiflava variants differ from variants produced by other phytopathogenic bacteria in the absence of reversion to the wild-type phenotype. © 2015 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  17. Tracking down antibiotic-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in a wastewater network.

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    Céline Slekovec

    Full Text Available The Pseudomonas aeruginosa-containing wastewater released by hospitals is treated by wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs, generating sludge, which is used as a fertilizer, and effluent, which is discharged into rivers. We evaluated the risk of dissemination of antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa (AR-PA from the hospital to the environment via the wastewater network. Over a 10-week period, we sampled weekly 11 points (hospital and urban wastewater, untreated and treated water, sludge of the wastewater network and the river upstream and downstream of the WWTP of a city in eastern France. We quantified the P. aeruginosa load by colony counting. We determined the susceptibility to 16 antibiotics of 225 isolates, which we sorted into three categories (wild-type, antibiotic-resistant and multidrug-resistant. Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs and metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs were identified by gene sequencing. All non-wild-type isolates (n = 56 and a similar number of wild-type isolates (n = 54 were genotyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing. Almost all the samples (105/110, 95.5% contained P. aeruginosa, with high loads in hospital wastewater and sludge (≥3×10(6 CFU/l or/kg. Most of the multidrug-resistant isolates belonged to ST235, CC111 and ST395. They were found in hospital wastewater and some produced ESBLs such as PER-1 and MBLs such as IMP-29. The WWTP greatly reduced P. aeruginosa counts in effluent, but the P. aeruginosa load in the river was nonetheless higher downstream than upstream from the WWTP. We conclude that the antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa released by hospitals is found in the water downstream from the WWTP and in sludge, constituting a potential risk of environmental contamination.

  18. Tracking Down Antibiotic-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates in a Wastewater Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slekovec, Céline; Plantin, Julie; Cholley, Pascal; Thouverez, Michelle; Talon, Daniel; Bertrand, Xavier; Hocquet, Didier

    2012-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa-containing wastewater released by hospitals is treated by wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), generating sludge, which is used as a fertilizer, and effluent, which is discharged into rivers. We evaluated the risk of dissemination of antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa (AR-PA) from the hospital to the environment via the wastewater network. Over a 10-week period, we sampled weekly 11 points (hospital and urban wastewater, untreated and treated water, sludge) of the wastewater network and the river upstream and downstream of the WWTP of a city in eastern France. We quantified the P. aeruginosa load by colony counting. We determined the susceptibility to 16 antibiotics of 225 isolates, which we sorted into three categories (wild-type, antibiotic-resistant and multidrug-resistant). Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) were identified by gene sequencing. All non-wild-type isolates (n = 56) and a similar number of wild-type isolates (n = 54) were genotyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing. Almost all the samples (105/110, 95.5%) contained P. aeruginosa, with high loads in hospital wastewater and sludge (≥3×106 CFU/l or/kg). Most of the multidrug-resistant isolates belonged to ST235, CC111 and ST395. They were found in hospital wastewater and some produced ESBLs such as PER-1 and MBLs such as IMP-29. The WWTP greatly reduced P. aeruginosa counts in effluent, but the P. aeruginosa load in the river was nonetheless higher downstream than upstream from the WWTP. We conclude that the antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa released by hospitals is found in the water downstream from the WWTP and in sludge, constituting a potential risk of environmental contamination. PMID:23284623

  19. TrgI, toluene repressed gene I, a novel gene involved in toluene-tolerance in Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volkers, R.J.M.; Ballerstedt, H.; Ruijssenaars, H.; Bont, J.A.M. de; Winde, J.H. de; Wery, J.

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida S12 is well known for its remarkable solvent tolerance. Transcriptomics analysis of this bacterium grown in toluene-containing chemostats revealed the differential expression of 253 genes. As expected, the genes encoding one of the major solvent tolerance mechanisms, the solvent

  20. Adaptation and Antibiotic Tolerance of Anaerobic Burkholderia pseudomallei ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Mohamad A.; Austin, Chad R.; Stewart, Amanda L.; Higgins, Mike; Vázquez-Torres, Andrés; Voskuil, Martin I.

    2011-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei is the etiological agent of melioidosis and is remarkably resistant to most classes of antibacterials. Even after months of treatment with antibacterials that are relatively effective in vitro, there is a high rate of treatment failure, indicating that this pathogen alters its patterns of antibacterial susceptibility in response to cues encountered in the host. The pathology of melioidosis indicates that B. pseudomallei encounters host microenvironments that limit aerobic respiration, including the lack of oxygen found in abscesses and in the presence of nitric oxide produced by macrophages. We investigated whether B. pseudomallei could survive in a nonreplicating, oxygen-deprived state and determined if this physiological state was tolerant of conventional antibacterials. B. pseudomallei survived initial anaerobiosis, especially under moderately acidic conditions similar to those found in abscesses. Microarray expression profiling indicated a major shift in the physiological state of hypoxic B. pseudomallei, including induction of a variety of typical anaerobic-environment-responsive genes and genes that appear specific to anaerobic B. pseudomallei. Interestingly, anaerobic B. pseudomallei was unaffected by antibacterials typically used in therapy. However, it was exquisitely sensitive to drugs used against anaerobic pathogens. After several weeks of anaerobic culture, a significant loss of viability was observed. However, a stable subpopulation that maintained complete viability for at least 1 year was established. Thus, during the course of human infection, if a minor subpopulation of bacteria inhabited an oxygen-restricted environment, it might be indifferent to traditional therapy but susceptible to antibiotics frequently used to treat anaerobic infections. PMID:21537012

  1. Auto Poisoning of the Respiratory Chain by a Quorum Sensing Regulated Molecule Favors Biofilm Formation and Antibiotic Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazan, Ronen; Que, Yok Ai; Maura, Damien; Strobel, Benjamin; Majcherczyk, Paul Anthony; Hopper, Laura Rose; Wilbur, David J.; Hreha, Teri N.; Barquera, Blanca; Rahme, Laurence G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bacterial programmed cell death and quorum sensing are direct examples of prokaryote group behaviors, wherein cells coordinate their actions to function cooperatively like one organism for the benefit of the whole culture. We demonstrate here that 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (HQNO), a Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing -regulated low-molecular-weight excreted molecule, and triggers autolysis by self-perturbing the electron transfer reactions of the cytochrome bc1 complex. HQNO induces specific self-poisoning by disrupting the flow of electrons through the respiratory chain at the cytochrome bc1 complex, causing a leak of reducing equivalents to O2 whereby electrons that would normally be passed to cytochrome c are donated directly to O2. The subsequent mass production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) reduces membrane potential and disrupts membrane integrity, causing bacterial cell autolysis and DNA release. DNA subsequently promotes biofilm formation and increases antibiotic tolerance to beta-lactams, suggesting that HQNO-dependent cell autolysis is advantageous to the bacterial populations. These data both identify a new programmed cell death system, and a novel role for HQNO as a critical-inducer of biofilm formation and antibiotic tolerance. This newly identified pathway suggests intriguing mechanistic similarities with the initial mitochondrial-mediated steps of eukaryotic apoptosis. PMID:26776731

  2. Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Activity of Silver Nanoparticles on Antibiotic-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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    Aliakbar Nasiri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antimicrobial resistance is one of the major characteristics of infectious agents. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs have been introduced as novel antibacterial agents in accordance with the traditional treatments. Our purpose of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of AgNPs on the Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa that are resistant to antibiotics. Methods: During a cross-sectional study, we tried to evaluate 20 strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from the urine cultures of patients admitted to the hospital due to urinary tract infections. The AgNPs were commercially purchased. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of AgNPs in different concentrations was determined by the dilution in wells on bacteria. The antibiotic susceptibility pattern of P. aeruginosa was evaluated by the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion standard. Results: Current study indicated that P. aeruginosa were resistant to four types of agents including ampicillin (85%, nitrofurantoin (65%, nalidixic acid (65%, and ciprofloxacin (15% and result of nanosilver indicated that the most MIC was 100 ppm concentration, and six strains of P. aeruginosa were inhibited by it. Conclusion: Our study presented a new type of silver nanoparticle and indicated that they can be embedded in bone cement to prevent infections once synthetic conditions are tailored for such applications.

  3. Effectiveness of Antipseudomonal Antibiotics and Mechanisms of Multidrug Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El ZOWALATYl, Mohamed E; Gyetvaii, Bpla

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading human pathogen that causes serious infections at various tissues and organs leading to life threatening health problems and possible deadly outcomes. Resistance patterns vary widely whether it is from hospitals or community acquired infections. Reporting resistance profiles to a certain antibiotics provide valuable information in a given setting, but may be extrapolated outside the sampling location. In the present study, P. aeruginosa isolates were screened to determine their susceptibilities against anti-pseudomonal antimicrobial agents and possible existing mechanisms of resistance were determined. Eighty-six isolates of P. aeruginosa were recovered. Isolates representing different resistance profiles were screened for the existence of three different resistance mechanisms including drug inactivation due to metallo-β-lactamases, drug impermeability by outer membrane proteins and drug efflux. All tested isolates showed uniform susceptibility (100%, n = 86/86) to piperacillin, meropenem, amikacin, and polymyxin B. A single isolate was found to be imipenem resistant (99%, n = 85/86). The possible mechanisms of resistance of P. aeruginosa to imipenem involve active drug efflux pumps, outer membrane impermeability as well as drug inactivating enzymes. These findings demonstrate the fundamental importance of the in vitro susceptibility testing of antibiotics prior to antipseudomonal therapy and highlight the need for a continuous antimicrobial resistance surveillance programs to monitor the changing resistance patterns so that clinicians and health care officials are updated as to the most effective therapeutic agents to combat the serious outcomes of P. aeruginosa infections.

  4. Antibiotic penetration and bacterial killing in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Bao; Christophersen, Lars; Thomsen, Kim; Sønderholm, Majken; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Høiby, Niels; Moser, Claus

    2015-07-01

    Treating biofilm infections successfully is a challenge. We hypothesized that biofilms may be considered as independent compartments with particular pharmacokinetics. We therefore studied the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of tobramycin in a seaweed alginate-embedded biofilm model. Seaweed alginate beads containing Pseudomonas aeruginosa were cultured in LB medium, sampled at day 1, 3, 5 or 7 and examined for the effect of treatment with tobramycin for 30 min. Treated beads were homogenized and the number of cfu was determined. The antibiotic concentration in the solution of homogenized beads was measured. Finally, beads were examined for live cells by Syto9 staining and for dead cells by propidium iodide staining using a confocal laser scanning microscope. The antibiotic level in each bead was relatively stable (range 30-42 mg/L; MIC = 1.5 mg/L). There were fewer cfu in the tobramycin-treated beads than the non-treated beads (P testing new treatment strategies. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. The transcriptional regulator CzcR modulates antibiotic resistance and quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieppois, Guennaëlle; Ducret, Véréna; Caille, Olivier; Perron, Karl

    2012-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa responds to zinc, cadmium and cobalt by way of the CzcRS two-component system. In presence of these metals the regulatory protein CzcR induces the expression of the CzcCBA efflux pump, expelling and thereby inducing resistance to Zn, Cd and Co. Importantly, CzcR co-regulates carbapenem antibiotic resistance by repressing the expression of the OprD porin, the route of entry for these antibiotics. This unexpected co-regulation led us to address the role of CzcR in other cellular processes unrelated to the metal response. We found that CzcR affected the expression of numerous genes directly involved in the virulence of P. aeruginosa even in the absence of the inducible metals. Notably the full expression of quorum sensing 3-oxo-C12-HSL and C4-HSL autoinducer molecules is impaired in the absence of CzcR. In agreement with this, the virulence of the czcRS deletion mutant is affected in a C. elegans animal killing assay. Additionally, chromosome immunoprecipitation experiments allowed us to localize CzcR on the promoter of several regulated genes, suggesting a direct control of target genes such as oprD, phzA1 and lasI. All together our data identify CzcR as a novel regulator involved in the control of several key genes for P. aeruginosa virulence processes.

  6. The transcriptional regulator CzcR modulates antibiotic resistance and quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guennaëlle Dieppois

    Full Text Available The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa responds to zinc, cadmium and cobalt by way of the CzcRS two-component system. In presence of these metals the regulatory protein CzcR induces the expression of the CzcCBA efflux pump, expelling and thereby inducing resistance to Zn, Cd and Co. Importantly, CzcR co-regulates carbapenem antibiotic resistance by repressing the expression of the OprD porin, the route of entry for these antibiotics. This unexpected co-regulation led us to address the role of CzcR in other cellular processes unrelated to the metal response. We found that CzcR affected the expression of numerous genes directly involved in the virulence of P. aeruginosa even in the absence of the inducible metals. Notably the full expression of quorum sensing 3-oxo-C12-HSL and C4-HSL autoinducer molecules is impaired in the absence of CzcR. In agreement with this, the virulence of the czcRS deletion mutant is affected in a C. elegans animal killing assay. Additionally, chromosome immunoprecipitation experiments allowed us to localize CzcR on the promoter of several regulated genes, suggesting a direct control of target genes such as oprD, phzA1 and lasI. All together our data identify CzcR as a novel regulator involved in the control of several key genes for P. aeruginosa virulence processes.

  7. Efficacy of the Novel Antibiotic POL7001 in Preclinical Models of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigana, Cristina; Bernardini, Francesca; Facchini, Marcella; Alcalá-Franco, Beatriz; Riva, Camilla; De Fino, Ida; Rossi, Alice; Ranucci, Serena; Misson, Pauline; Chevalier, Eric; Brodmann, Maj; Schmitt, Michel; Wach, Achim; Dale, Glenn E; Obrecht, Daniel; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2016-08-01

    The clinical development of antibiotics with a new mode of action combined with efficient pulmonary drug delivery is a priority against untreatable Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections. POL7001 is a macrocycle antibiotic belonging to the novel class of protein epitope mimetic (PEM) molecules with selective and potent activity against P. aeruginosa We investigated ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and cystic fibrosis (CF) as indications of the clinical potential of POL7001 to treat P. aeruginosa pulmonary infections. MICs of POL7001 and comparators were measured for reference and clinical P. aeruginosa strains. The therapeutic efficacy of POL7001 given by pulmonary administration was evaluated in murine models of P. aeruginosa acute and chronic pneumonia. POL7001 showed potent in vitro activity against a large panel of P. aeruginosa isolates from CF patients, including multidrug-resistant (MDR) isolates with adaptive phenotypes such as mucoid or hypermutable phenotypes. The efficacy of POL7001 was demonstrated in both wild-type and CF mice. In addition to a reduced bacterial burden in the lung, POL7001-treated mice showed progressive body weight recovery and reduced levels of inflammatory markers, indicating an improvement in general condition. Pharmacokinetic studies indicated that POL7001 reached significant concentrations in the lung after pulmonary administration, with low systemic exposure. These results support the further evaluation of POL7001 as a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of P. aeruginosa pulmonary infections. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. PFGE and antibiotic susceptibility phenotype analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain chronically infecting Cystic Fibrosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Pulcrano

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the leading cause of chronic lung infection and following pulmonary worsening of cystic fibrosis patients. To verify whether bacterial modifications regarding motility, mucoidy, and serum susceptibility proceeded from an adaptation to chronic infection or a replacement with a new strain, sequential P. aeruginosa isolates of known phenotype collected from 5 cystic fibrosis patients were typed by pulsed-field gel electophoresis (PFGE. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of all isolates was performed by the disc diffusion method. PFGE typing demonstrated that strains dissimilar in colony morphotype and of different antibiotic susceptibility patterns could be of the same genotype. Some patients were colonized with a rather constant P. aeruginosa flora, with strains of different phenotypes but of one genotype. Instead, some patients may be colonized by more than one genotype. Secretion of mucoid exopolysaccharide and acquisition of a new antibiotic susceptibility phenotype in these strain appear to evolve during chronic colonization in cystic fibrosis patients from specific adaptation to infection rather than from acquisition of new bacterial strains.

  9. Cyclic Rhamnosylated Elongation Factor P Establishes Antibiotic Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkovic, Andrei; Erickson, Sarah; Witzky, Anne; Branson, Owen E; Seo, Jin; Gafken, Philip R; Frietas, Michael A; Whitelegge, Julian P; Faull, Kym F; Navarre, William; Darwin, Andrew J; Ibba, Michael

    2015-06-09

    Elongation factor P (EF-P) is a ubiquitous bacterial protein that is required for the synthesis of poly-proline motifs during translation. In Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica, the posttranslational β-lysylation of Lys34 by the PoxA protein is critical for EF-P activity. PoxA is absent from many bacterial species such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, prompting a search for alternative EF-P posttranslation modification pathways. Structural analyses of P. aeruginosa EF-P revealed the attachment of a single cyclic rhamnose moiety to an Arg residue at a position equivalent to that at which β-Lys is attached to E. coli EF-P. Analysis of the genomes of organisms that both lack poxA and encode an Arg32-containing EF-P revealed a highly conserved glycosyltransferase (EarP) encoded at a position adjacent to efp. EF-P proteins isolated from P. aeruginosa ΔearP, or from a ΔrmlC::acc1 strain deficient in dTDP-L-rhamnose biosynthesis, were unmodified. In vitro assays confirmed the ability of EarP to use dTDP-L-rhamnose as a substrate for the posttranslational glycosylation of EF-P. The role of rhamnosylated EF-P in translational control was investigated in P. aeruginosa using a Pro4-green fluorescent protein (Pro4GFP) in vivo reporter assay, and the fluorescence was significantly reduced in Δefp, ΔearP, and ΔrmlC::acc1 strains. ΔrmlC::acc1, ΔearP, and Δefp strains also displayed significant increases in their sensitivities to a range of antibiotics, including ertapenem, polymyxin B, cefotaxim, and piperacillin. Taken together, our findings indicate that posttranslational rhamnosylation of EF-P plays a key role in P. aeruginosa gene expression and survival. Infections with pathogenic Salmonella, E. coli, and Pseudomonas isolates can all lead to infectious disease with potentially fatal sequelae. EF-P proteins contribute to the pathogenicity of the causative agents of these and other diseases by controlling the translation of proteins critical for modulating antibiotic

  10. Antibiotic consumption to detect epidemics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a burn centre: A paradigm shift in the epidemiological surveillance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Anne; Voirol, Pierre; Krähenbühl, Marie; Bonnemain, Claire-Lise; Fournier, Camille; Pantet, Olivier; Pagani, Jean-Luc; Revelly, Jean-Pierre; Dupuis-Lozeron, Elise; Sadeghipour, Farshid; Pannatier, André; Eggimann, Philippe; Que, Yok-Ai

    2016-05-01

    The control of antibiotic resistance and nosocomial infections are major challenges for specialized burn centres. Early detection of those epidemic outbreaks is crucial to limit the human and financial burden. We hypothesize that data collected by antibiotic consumption medico-economic surveys could be used as warning signal to detect early nosocomial outbreaks. A retrospective analysis was conducted that included all burn patients staying >48h on the Lausanne BICU (Burn Intensive Care Unit) between January 2001 and October 2012 who received systemic therapeutic antibiotics. Infection episodes were characterized according to predefined criteria. Antibiotic consumption data, obtained from the quarterly surveillance of drug consumption surveys, were translated into defined daily doses (DDDs). In total, 297 out of 414 burn patients stayed >48h, giving a total of 7458 'burn-days'. We identified 610 infection episodes (burn wound [32.0%], respiratory [31.1%], and catheter [21.8%]), from 774 microorganisms. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (26.2%), Staphylococcus aureus (11.5%), and Candida albicans (7.0%) were the main pathogens. We observed three distinct outbreaks of P. aeruginosa infections in 2002-2003, 2006, and 2009-2011. These outbreaks correlated with an increase in the DDDs of anti-Pseudomonas antibiotics. Our data support a paradigm shift in the epidemiological surveillance of nosocomial P. aeruginosa epidemics in burn centres, using the rise in antibiotic consumption as an early trigger to initiate the molecular typing of P. aeruginosa strains and the reinforcement of standard infection control procedures. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Antibiotic and biosurfactant properties of cyclic lipopeptides produced by fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. from the sugar beet rhizosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, T H; Sørensen, D; Tobiasen, C

    2002-01-01

    Cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) with antibiotic and biosurfactant properties are produced by a number of soil bacteria, including fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. To provide new and efficient strains for the biological control of root-pathogenic fungi in agricultural crops, we isolated approximately 600...... in the peptide moiety. Production of specific CLPs could be affiliated with Pseudomonas fluorescens strain groups belonging to biotype I, V, or VI. In vitro analysis using both purified CLPs and whole-cell P. fluorescens preparations demonstrated that all CLPs exhibited strong biosurfactant properties...

  12. Detection of Tox A Gene in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains Isolated from Dairy Products Using PCR and Determining the Antibiotic Resistance Pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faeze Zadsafar

    2017-08-01

    Conclusion: Due to high presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in raw milk and existence of antibiotic resistance genes in this bacterium, applying appropriate strategies for hygiene control in animal husbandries, is necessary to prevent the spread of bacteria.

  13. Successful antibiotic treatment of Pseudomonas stutzeri-induced peritonitis without peritoneal dialysis catheter removal in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Wook Park

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas stutzeri is a Gram-negative, rod-shaped, motile, single polar-flagellated, soil bacterium that was first isolated from human spinal fluid and is widely distributed in the environment. It was isolated as an uncommon opportunistic pathogen from humans, and a few cases of P. stutzeri-induced peritonitis have been reported in patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD. Catheter removal with antibiotic treatment is generally recommended because peritonitis by Pseudomonas species is commonly associated with catheter-related infection. Here, we describe the first case of P. stutzeri-induced peritonitis in an 82-year-old woman in Korea. She had received two antipseudomonal antibiotics, an aminoglycoside (isepamicin, Yuhan corporation, Seoul, Korea and a fluoroquinolone (ciprofloxacin, and was successfully treated without removal of the CAPD catheter.

  14. Antibiotic and biosurfactant properties of cyclic lipopeptides produced by fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. from the sugar beet rhizosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, T H; Sørensen, D; Tobiasen, C

    2002-01-01

    Cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) with antibiotic and biosurfactant properties are produced by a number of soil bacteria, including fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. To provide new and efficient strains for the biological control of root-pathogenic fungi in agricultural crops, we isolated approximately 600...... fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. from two different agricultural soils by using three different growth media. CLP production was observed in a large proportion of the strains (approximately 60%) inhabiting the sandy soil, compared to a low proportion (approximately 6%) in the loamy soil. Chemical structure...... and that some also had antibiotic properties towards root-pathogenic microfungi. The CLP-producing P. fluorescens strains provide a useful resource for selection of biological control agents, whether a single strain or a consortium of strains was used to maximize the synergistic effect of multiple antagonistic...

  15. Triple antibiotic therapy with ceftolozane/tazobactam, colistin and rifampin for pan-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa ventilator-associated pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammar Alqaid

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Emergence of multi-drug resistant microorganisms such as pan-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa has recently created a therapeutic challenge in ICU patients worldwide. New antipseudomonal antibiotics, like ceftolozane/tazobactam have been developed to meet this challenge. This drug does not demonstrate cross-resistance with other antimicrobial classes, like carbapenems, because of its enhanced binding affinity to the penicillin-binding proteins. A Phase III, multicenter, prospective, randomized, double blind study has been initiated to evaluate the safety and efficacy of ceftolozane/tazobactam in ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP. We present a case of VAP due to pan-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a patient with advanced multiple sclerosis. He was treated with ceftolozane/tazobactam in combination with colistin and rifampin for synergistic effect. Within 2 weeks of treatment, he had significant improvement in his leukocytosis and chest infiltrates, and his ventilator settings were adjusted to their baseline settings. This case illustrates the importance of using this novel antipseudomonal antibiotic to treat bacteria that are resistant to a wide spectrum of antibiotics, including carbapenems. Other antibiotics, like colistin and rifampin, can be used for synergism until more data are collected from trials evaluating the efficacy of monotherapy with this novel antibiotic for VAP.

  16. Modeling Antibiotic Tolerance in Biofilms by Accounting for Nutrient Limitation

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Mark E.; Stewart, Philip S.

    2004-01-01

    A mathematical model of biofilm dynamics was used to investigate the protection from antibiotic killing that can be afforded to microorganisms in biofilms based on a mechanism of localized nutrient limitation and slow growth. The model assumed that the rate of killing by the antibiotic was directly proportional to the local growth rate. Growth rates in the biofilm were calculated by using the local concentration of a single growth-limiting substrate with Monod kinetics. The concentration prof...

  17. SENSITIVITY TO ANTIBIOTICS, ANTISEPTICAL NOSOCOMIAL PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA, ISOLATED IN UROLOGICAL PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rymsha E.V.

    2015-05-01

    g∕ ml For chlorhexidine MBsC 125 ± 8,88 μg∕ ml. Conclusion. Resistance nosocomial strains of P. aeruginosa at the present time is a serious clinical problem. Of all the antibiotics, the lowest level of resistance was determined to Meropenem. Antibacterial drugs, active against P. aeruginosa - Meropenem > amikacin > ceftazidime > imipenem > ciprofloxacin > piperacillin/tazobactam > piperacillin > gentamicin. Found that antibiotic-resistant strains of the Pseudomonas had a low level of sensitivity to antiseptics.

  18. Robustness analysis of culturing perturbations on Escherichia coli colony biofilm beta-lactam and aminoglycoside antibiotic tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimenez-Taracido Lourdes

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biofilms are ubiquitous. For instance, the majority of medical infections are thought to involve biofilms. However even after decades of investigation, the in vivo efficacy of many antimicrobial strategies is still debated suggesting there is a need for better understanding of biofilm antimicrobial tolerances. The current study's goal is to characterize the robustness of biofilm antibiotic tolerance to medically and industrially relevant culturing perturbations. By definition, robust systems will return similar, predictable responses when perturbed while non-robust systems will return very different and potentially unpredictable responses. The predictability of an antibiotic tolerance response is essential to developing, testing, and employing antimicrobial strategies. Results The antibiotic tolerance of Escherichia coli colony biofilms was tested against beta-lactam and aminoglycoside class antibiotics. Control scenario tolerances were compared to tolerances under culturing perturbations including 1 different nutritional environments 2 different temperatures 3 interruption of cellular quorum sensing and 4 different biofilm culture ages. Here, antibiotic tolerance was defined in terms of culturable biofilm cells recovered after a twenty four hour antibiotic treatment. Colony biofilm antibiotic tolerances were not robust to perturbations. Altering basic culturing parameters like nutritional environment or temperature resulted in very different, non-intuitive antibiotic tolerance responses. Some minor perturbations like increasing the glucose concentration from 0.1 to 1 g/L caused a ten million fold difference in culturable cells over a twenty four hour antibiotic treatment. Conclusions The current study presents a basis for robustness analysis of biofilm antibiotic tolerance. Biofilm antibiotic tolerance can vary in unpredictable manners based on modest changes in culturing conditions. Common antimicrobial testing methods

  19. The emergence of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients on inhaled antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atqah AbdulWahab

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDR-PA is an important and growing issue in the care of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF, and a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Objective: The objective of the study was to describe the frequency of MDR-PA recovered from the lower respiratory samples of pediatric and adult CF patients, and its antibiotic resistance pattern to commonly used antimicrobial agents including β-lactams, aminoglycosides, and fluoroquinolones. Materials and Methods: The lower respiratory isolates of P. aeruginosa were obtained from inpatients and outpatients CF clinics from a tertiary care teaching hospital for the period from October 2014 to September 2015. The identification and antimicrobial susceptibility for all the isolates were performed by using the BD Phoenix™ and E-test in compliance with Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI guidelines. Results: A total of 61 P. aeruginosa samples were isolated from thirty CF patients from twenty families. Twelve sputum samples were positive for MDR-PA (seven nonmucoid and five mucoid isolates from five CF patients (five families with moderate-to-very severe lung disease given MDR-PA frequency of 19.7%. The median age of the study group was 20 (range 10–30 years. Three CF patients were on chronic inhaled tobramycin and two on nebulized colistin. The antimicrobial patterns of isolates MDR-PA showed the highest rate of resistance toward each gentamycin, amikacin, and cefepime (100%, followed by 91.7% to ciprofloxacin, 75% to tobramycin, 58.3% to meropenem, and 50% to piperacillin-tazobactam. None of the isolates were resistant to colistin during the study period. Conclusion: The study results emphasize that the emergence of a significant problem in the clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa in CF patients that dictate appropriate attention to the antibiotic management after proper surveillance.

  20. New Insights about Antibiotic Production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa: A Gene Expression Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Gionco

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial resistance for antibiotics is one of the most important problems in public health and only a small number of new products are in development. Antagonistic microorganisms from soil are a promising source of new candidate molecules. Products of secondary metabolism confer adaptive advantages for their producer, in the competition for nutrients in the microbial community. The biosynthesis process of compounds with antibiotic activity is the key to optimize their production and the transcriptomic study of microorganisms is of great benefit for the discovery of these metabolic pathways. Pseudomonas aeruginosa LV strain growing in the presence of copper chloride produces a bioactive organometallic compound, which has a potent antimicrobial activity against various microorganisms. The objective of this study was to verify overexpressed genes and evaluate their relation to the organometallic biosynthesis in this microorganism. P. aeruginosa LV strain was cultured in presence and absence of copper chloride. Two methods were used for transcriptomic analysis, genome reference-guided assembly and de novo assembly. The genome referenced analysis identified nine upregulated genes when bacteria were exposed to copper chloride, while the De Novo Assembly identified 12 upregulated genes. Nineteen genes can be related to an increased microbial metabolism for the extrusion process of exceeding intracellular copper. Two important genes are related to the biosynthesis of phenazine and tetrapyrroles compounds, which can be involved in the bioremediation of intracellular copper and we suggesting that may involve in the biosynthesis of the organometallic compound. Additional studies are being carried out to further prove the function of the described genes and relate them to the biosynthetic pathway of the organometallic compound.

  1. New insights about antibiotic production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a gene expression analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gionco, Bárbara; Tavares, Eliandro R.; de Oliveira, Admilton G.; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli F.; do Carmo, Anderson O.; Pereira, Ulisses de Pádua; Chideroli, Roberta T.; Simionato, Ane S.; Navarro, Miguel O. P.; Chryssafidis, Andreas L.; Andrade, Galdino

    2017-09-01

    The bacterial resistance for antibiotics is one of the most important problems in public health and only a small number of new products are in development. Antagonistic microorganisms from soil are a promising source of new candidate molecules. Products of secondary metabolism confer adaptive advantages for their producer, in the competition for nutrients in the microbial community. The biosynthesis process of compounds with antibiotic activity is the key to optimize their production and the transcriptomic study of microorganisms is of great benefit for the discovery of these metabolic pathways. Pseudomonas aeruginosa LV strain growing in the presence of copper chloride produces a bioactive organometallic compound, which has a potent antimicrobial activity against various microorganisms. The objective of this study was to verify overexpressed genes and evaluate their relation to the organometallic biosynthesis in this microorganism. P. aeruginosa LV strain was cultured in presence and absence of copper chloride. Two methods were used for transcriptomic analysis, genome reference-guided assembly and de novo assembly. The genome referenced analysis identified nine upregulated genes when bacteria were exposed to copper chloride, while the De Novo Assembly identified twelve upregulated genes. Nineteen genes can be related to an increased microbial metabolism for the extrusion process of exceeding intracellular copper. Two important genes are related to the biosynthesis of phenazine and tetrapyrroles compounds, which can be involved in the bioremediation of intracellular copper and biosynthesis of the organometallic compound. Additional studies are being carried out to further prove the function of the described genes and relate them to the biosynthetic pathway of the organometallic compound.

  2. Probing the proteome response to toluene exposure in the solvent tolerant Pseudomonas putida S12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijte, Dorien; van Baar, Ben L M; Heck, Albert J R; Altelaar, A F Maarten

    2011-02-04

    To enhance target production from biocatalysts, it is necessary to thoroughly understand the molecular mechanisms involved in production, degradation, and, importantly, adaptation to the required environment. One such bacterium with high potential for biocatalysis is the solvent-tolerant bacteria Pseudomonas putida S12, which, among others, is able to degrade organic solvents. For bioconversion of organic solvents to become a successful industrial process, the understanding of the molecular response upon solvent tolerance is essential. Here we performed a quantitative analysis of the P. putida S12 proteome at different stages of adaptation to toluene. Using a stable isotope dimethylation labeling approach we monitored the differential expression of 528 proteins, including often hard-to-detect membrane associate proteins, such as multiple RND-family transporters and ABC transporters of nutrients. Our quantitative proteomics approach revealed the remarkable ability of P. putida S12 to severely change its protein expression profile upon toluene exposure. This proteome response entails a significant increase in energy metabolism and expression of the solvent efflux pump SrpABC, confirming its role in solvent tolerance. Other proteins strongly up-regulated in the presence of toluene include the multidrug efflux membrane protein PP1272 and the cation/acetate symporter ActP and may form interesting alternative targets for improving solvent tolerance.

  3. Antimicrobial Tolerance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms Is Activated during an Early Developmental Stage and Requires the Two-Component Hybrid SagS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kajal; Marques, Cláudia N. H.; Petrova, Olga E.

    2013-01-01

    A hallmark characteristic of biofilms is their extraordinary tolerance to antimicrobial agents. While multiple factors are thought to contribute to the high level of antimicrobial tolerance of biofilms, little is known about the timing of induction of biofilm tolerance. Here, we asked when over the course of their development do biofilms gain their tolerance to antimicrobial agents? We demonstrate that in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, biofilm tolerance is linked to biofilm development, with transition to the irreversible attachment stage regulated by the two-component hybrid SagS, marking the timing when biofilms switch to the high-level tolerance phenotype. Inactivation of sagS rendered biofilms but not planktonic cells more susceptible to tobramycin, norfloxacin, and hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, inactivation of sagS also eliminated the recalcitrance of biofilms to killing by bactericidal antimicrobial agents, a phenotype comparable to that observed upon inactivation of brlR, which encodes a MerR-like transcriptional regulator required for biofilm tolerance. Multicopy expression of brlR in a ΔsagS mutant restored biofilm resistance and recalcitrance to killing by bactericidal antibiotics to wild-type levels. In contrast, expression of sagS did not restore the susceptibility phenotype of ΔbrlR mutant biofilms to wild-type levels, indicating that BrlR functions downstream of SagS. Inactivation of sagS correlated with reduced BrlR levels in biofilms, with the produced BrlR being impaired in binding to the previously described BrlR-activated promoters of the two multidrug efflux pump operons mexAB-oprM and mexEF-oprN. Our findings demonstrate that biofilm tolerance is linked to early biofilm development and SagS, with SagS contributing indirectly to BrlR activation. PMID:23995639

  4. Interspecies signalling: Pseudomonas putida efflux pump TtgGHI is activated by indole to increase antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Santiago, Carlos; Daddaoua, Abdelali; Fillet, Sandy; Duque, Estrella; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2014-05-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, multidrug efflux pumps are responsible for the extrusion of chemicals that are deleterious for growth. Some of these efflux pumps are induced by endogenously produced effectors, while abiotic or biotic signals induce the expression of other efflux pumps. In Pseudomonas putida, the TtgABC efflux pump is the main antibiotic extrusion system that respond to exogenous antibiotics through the modulation of the expression of this operon mediated by TtgR. The plasmid-encoded TtgGHI efflux pump in P. putida plays a minor role in antibiotic resistance in the parental strain; however, its role is critical in isogenic backgrounds deficient in TtgABC. Expression of ttgGHI is repressed by the TtgV regulator that recognizes indole as an effector, although P. putida does not produce indole itself. Because indole is not produced by Pseudomonas, the indole-dependent antibiotic resistance seems to be part of an antibiotic resistance programme at the community level. Pseudomonas putida recognizes indole added to the medium or produced by Escherichia coli in mixed microbial communities. Transcriptomic analyses revealed that the indole-specific response involves activation of 43 genes and repression of 23 genes. Indole enhances not only the expression of the TtgGHI pump but also a set of genes involved in iron homeostasis, as well as genes for amino acid catabolism. In a ttgABC-deficient P. putida, background ampicillin and other bactericidal compounds lead to cell death. Co-culture of E. coli and P. putida ΔttgABC allowed growth of the P. putida mutant in the presence of ampicillin because of induction of the indole-dependent efflux pump. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The consequences of being in an infectious biofilm – microenvironmental conditions governing antibiotic tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderholm, Majken; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Alhede, Maria

    2017-01-01

    to antibiotic tolerance. During infection, bacteria in biofilms exhibit slow growth and a low metabolic state due to O2 limitation imposed by intense O2 consumption of polymorphonuclear leukocytes or metabolically active bacteria in the biofilm periphery. Due to variable O2 availability throughout the infection......The main driver behind biofilm research is the desire to understand the mechanisms governing the antibiotic tolerance of biofilm-growing bacteria found in chronic bacterial infections. Rather than genetic traits, several physical and chemical traits of the biofilm have been shown to be attributable......, pathogen growth can involve aerobic, microaerobic and anaerobic metabolism. This has serious implications for the antibiotic treatment of infections (e.g., in chronic wounds or in the chronic lung infection of cystic fibrosis patients), as antibiotics are usually optimized for aerobic, fast...

  6. Reversible antibiotic tolerance induced in Staphylococcus aureus by concurrent drug exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaber, Jakob Krause; Friberg, Cathrine; McCreary, Mark

    2015-01-01

    ] strains). As colistin-induced vancomycin tolerance is reversible, it may not be detected by routine sensitivity testing and may be responsible for treatment failure at vancomycin doses expected to be clinically effective based on such routine testing. IMPORTANCE: Commonly, antibiotic resistance......UNLABELLED: Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus to beta-lactam antibiotics has led to increasing use of the glycopeptide antibiotic vancomycin as a life-saving treatment for major S. aureus infections. Coinfection by an unrelated bacterial species may necessitate concurrent treatment with a second...... is associated with permanent genetic changes, such as point mutations or acquisition of resistance genes. We show that phenotypic resistance can arise where changes in gene expression result in tolerance to an antibiotic without any accompanying genetic changes. Specifically, methicillin-resistant...

  7. Within-host whole genome analysis of an antibiotic resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain sub-type in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrard, Laura J; Tai, Anna S; Wee, Bryan A; Ramsay, Kay A; Kidd, Timothy J; Ben Zakour, Nouri L; Whiley, David M; Beatson, Scott A; Bell, Scott C

    2017-01-01

    A Pseudomonas aeruginosa AUST-02 strain sub-type (M3L7) has been identified in Australia, infects the lungs of some people with cystic fibrosis and is associated with antibiotic resistance. Multiple clonal lineages may emerge during treatment with mutations in chromosomally encoded antibiotic resistance genes commonly observed. Here we describe the within-host diversity and antibiotic resistance of M3L7 during and after antibiotic treatment of an acute pulmonary exacerbation using whole genome sequencing and show both variation and shared mutations in important genes. Eleven isolates from an M3L7 population (n = 134) isolated over 3 months from an individual with cystic fibrosis underwent whole genome sequencing. A phylogeny based on core genome SNPs identified three distinct phylogenetic groups comprising two groups with higher rates of mutation (hypermutators) and one non-hypermutator group. Genomes were screened for acquired antibiotic resistance genes with the result suggesting that M3L7 resistance is principally driven by chromosomal mutations as no acquired mechanisms were detected. Small genetic variations, shared by all 11 isolates, were found in 49 genes associated with antibiotic resistance including frame-shift mutations (mexA, mexT), premature stop codons (oprD, mexB) and mutations in quinolone-resistance determining regions (gyrA, parE). However, whole genome sequencing also revealed mutations in 21 genes that were acquired following divergence of groups, which may also impact the activity of antibiotics and multi-drug efflux pumps. Comparison of mutations with minimum inhibitory concentrations of anti-pseudomonal antibiotics could not easily explain all resistance profiles observed. These data further demonstrate the complexity of chronic and antibiotic resistant P. aeruginosa infection where a multitude of co-existing genotypically diverse sub-lineages might co-exist during and after intravenous antibiotic treatment.

  8. Fungicide, antibiotic, heavy metal resistance and salt tolerance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-03-28

    Mar 28, 2011 ... All of the rhizobial isolates showed resistance to the antibiotic (µg ml-1); streptomycin sulphate ... Using fungicides for crop diseases control in legume fields has contributed to increasing yield ..... on growth of Rhizobium japonicum and symbiotically grown soybean in soil under laboratory conditions. Prot.

  9. Metabolite profiling reveals abiotic stress tolerance in Tn5 mutant of Pseudomonas putida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasvi Chaudhry

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas is an efficient plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR; however, intolerance to drought and high temperature limit its application in agriculture as a bioinoculant. Transposon 5 (Tn5 mutagenesis was used to generate a stress tolerant mutant from a PGPR Pseudomonas putida NBRI1108 isolated from chickpea rhizosphere. A mutant NBRI1108T, selected after screening of nearly 10,000 transconjugants, exhibited significant tolerance towards high temperature and drought. Southern hybridization analysis of EcoRI and XhoI restricted genomic DNA of NBRI1108T confirmed that it had a single Tn5 insertion. The metabolic changes in the polar and non-polar extracts of NBRI1108 and NBRI1108T were examined using 1H, 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Thirty six chemically diverse metabolites consisting of amino acids, fatty acids and phospholipids were identified and quantified. Insertion of Tn5 influenced amino acid and phospholipid metabolism and resulted in significantly higher concentration of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycinebetaine, glycerophosphatidylcholine (GPC and putrescine in NBRI1108T as compared to that in NBRI1108. The concentration of glutamic acid, glycinebetaine and GPC increased by 34%, 95% and 100%, respectively in the NBRI1108T as compared to that in NBRI1108. High concentration of glycerophosphatidylethanolamine (GPE and undetected GPC in NBRI1108 indicates that biosynthesis of GPE may have taken place via the methylation pathway of phospholipid biosynthesis. However, high GPC and low GPE concentration in NBRI1108T suggest that methylation pathway and phosphatidylcholine synthase (PCS pathway of phospholipid biosynthesis are being followed in the NBRI1108T. Application of multivariate principal component analysis (PCA on the quantified metabolites revealed clear variations in NBRI1108 and NBRI1108T in polar and non-polar metabolites. Identification of abiotic

  10. Cecum lymph node dendritic cells harbor slow-growing bacteria phenotypically tolerant to antibiotic treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Kaiser

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In vivo, antibiotics are often much less efficient than ex vivo and relapses can occur. The reasons for poor in vivo activity are still not completely understood. We have studied the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin in an animal model for complicated Salmonellosis. High-dose ciprofloxacin treatment efficiently reduced pathogen loads in feces and most organs. However, the cecum draining lymph node (cLN, the gut tissue, and the spleen retained surviving bacteria. In cLN, approximately 10%-20% of the bacteria remained viable. These phenotypically tolerant bacteria lodged mostly within CD103⁺CX₃CR1⁻CD11c⁺ dendritic cells, remained genetically susceptible to ciprofloxacin, were sufficient to reinitiate infection after the end of the therapy, and displayed an extremely slow growth rate, as shown by mathematical analysis of infections with mixed inocula and segregative plasmid experiments. The slow growth was sufficient to explain recalcitrance to antibiotics treatment. Therefore, slow-growing antibiotic-tolerant bacteria lodged within dendritic cells can explain poor in vivo antibiotic activity and relapse. Administration of LPS or CpG, known elicitors of innate immune defense, reduced the loads of tolerant bacteria. Thus, manipulating innate immunity may augment the in vivo activity of antibiotics.

  11. Cecum Lymph Node Dendritic Cells Harbor Slow-Growing Bacteria Phenotypically Tolerant to Antibiotic Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolowschiak, Tamas; Wotzka, Sandra Y.; Lengefeld, Jette; Slack, Emma; Grant, Andrew J.; Ackermann, Martin; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2014-01-01

    In vivo, antibiotics are often much less efficient than ex vivo and relapses can occur. The reasons for poor in vivo activity are still not completely understood. We have studied the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin in an animal model for complicated Salmonellosis. High-dose ciprofloxacin treatment efficiently reduced pathogen loads in feces and most organs. However, the cecum draining lymph node (cLN), the gut tissue, and the spleen retained surviving bacteria. In cLN, approximately 10%–20% of the bacteria remained viable. These phenotypically tolerant bacteria lodged mostly within CD103+CX3CR1−CD11c+ dendritic cells, remained genetically susceptible to ciprofloxacin, were sufficient to reinitiate infection after the end of the therapy, and displayed an extremely slow growth rate, as shown by mathematical analysis of infections with mixed inocula and segregative plasmid experiments. The slow growth was sufficient to explain recalcitrance to antibiotics treatment. Therefore, slow-growing antibiotic-tolerant bacteria lodged within dendritic cells can explain poor in vivo antibiotic activity and relapse. Administration of LPS or CpG, known elicitors of innate immune defense, reduced the loads of tolerant bacteria. Thus, manipulating innate immunity may augment the in vivo activity of antibiotics. PMID:24558351

  12. High beta-Lactamase Levels Change the Pharmacodynamics of beta-Lactam Antibiotics in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Hengzhuang; Ciofu, Oana; Yang, Liang

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics is a frequent problem in Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. This resistance is mainly due to the hyperproduction of chromosomally encoded beta-lactamase and biofilm formation. The purpose of this study was to investigate......, microtiter plates, and on alginate beads were treated with different concentrations of ceftazidime and imipenem. The kinetics of antibiotics on the biofilms was investigated in vitro by time-kill methods. Time-dependent killing of ceftazidime was observed in PAO1 biofilms, but concentration-dependent killing......-lactamase, which can hydrolyze the beta-lactam antibiotics. The PK/PD indices of the AUC/MBIC and C-max/MBIC (AUC is the area under concentration-time curve, MBIC is the minimal biofilm-inhibitory concentration, and C-max is the maximum concentration of drug in serum) are probably the best parameters to describe...

  13. Redundancy in putrescine catabolism in solvent tolerant Pseudomonas putida S12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandounas, Luaine; Ballerstedt, Hendrik; de Winde, Johannes H; Ruijssenaars, Harald J

    2011-06-10

    Pseudomonas putida S12 is a promising platform organism for the biological production of substituted aromatic compounds due to its extreme tolerance towards toxic chemicals. Solvent or aromatic stress tolerance may be due to membrane modifications and efflux pumps; however in general, polyamines have also been implicated in stressed cells. Previous transcriptomics results of P. putida strains producing an aromatic compound, or being exposed to the solvent toluene, indicated differentially expressed genes involved in polyamine transport and metabolism. Therefore, the metabolism of the polyamine, putrescine was investigated in P. putida S12, as no putrescine degradation pathways have been described for this strain. Via transcriptome analysis various, often redundant, putrescine-induced genes were identified as being potentially involved in putrescine catabolism via oxidative deamination and transamination. A series of knockout mutants were constructed in which up to six of these genes were sequentially deleted, and although putrescine degradation was affected in some of these mutants, complete elimination of putrescine degradation in P. putida S12 was not achieved. Evidence was found for the presence of an alternative pathway for putrescine degradation involving γ-glutamylation. The occurrence of multiple putrescine degradation routes in the solvent-tolerant P. putida S12 is indicative of the importance of controlling polyamine homeostasis, as well as of the high metabolic flexibility exhibited by this microorganism. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Immobilization of Organic Solvent-Tolerant Lipase from Pseudomonas mendocina M-37 with Potential Synthetic Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Dahiya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A thermostable solvent-tolerant lipase was isolated from Pseudomonas mendocina M-37. The lipase production medium was optimized for cost-effective production. Olive oil as a carbon source, and glycine as a nitrogen source were selected as the best for maximum lipase production. Medium optimization led to 3.75-fold increase in the lipase production. The extracellular lipase was purified 42.2-fold to homogeneity by precipitation using polyethyleneglycol, ultrafiltration and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. Its molecular mass, determined with sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was 32 kDa. The enzyme was further immobilized on microcrystalline cellulose. The lipase showed an optimal water activity of 0.53 for both, acidolysis and interesterification reactions. Six- to sevenfold increase in synthetic activity of immobilized lipase was observed when interesterification activity of 0.139 IU/mg and transesterification activity of 0.181 IU/mg, respectively, were obtained. This is the first report on Pseudomonas mendocina lipase with synthetic activity immobilized on microcrystalline cellulose.

  15. The RNA chaperone Hfq enables the environmental stress tolerance super-phenotype of Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce-Rodríguez, Alejandro; Calles, Belén; Nikel, Pablo I; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2016-10-01

    The natural physiological regime of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida involves incessant exposure to endogenous metabolic conflicts and environmental physicochemical insults. Yet, the role of assisted small RNA-mRNA pairing in the stress tolerance super-phenotype that is the trademark of this bacterium has not been accredited. We have thoroughly explored the physiological consequences -in particular those related to exogenous stress - of deleting the hfq gene of P. putida, which encodes the major RNA chaperone that promotes sRNA-target mRNA interactions. While the overall trend was a general weakening of every robustness descriptor of the Δhfq strain, growth parameters and production of central metabolic enzymes were comparatively less affected than other qualities that depend directly on energy status (e.g. motility, DNA repair). The overall catalytic vigour of the mutant decreased to putida. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Resistance to Antibiotics, Biocides, Preservatives and Metals in Bacteria Isolated from Seafoods: Co-Selection of Strains Resistant or Tolerant to Different Classes of Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Romero

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Multi-drug resistant bacteria (particularly those producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases have become a major health concern. The continued exposure to antibiotics, biocides, chemical preservatives, and metals in different settings such as the food chain or in the environment may result in development of multiple resistance or co-resistance. The aim of the present study was to determine multiple resistances (biocides, antibiotics, chemical preservatives, phenolic compounds, and metals in bacterial isolates from seafoods. A 75.86% of the 87 isolates studied were resistant to at least one antibiotic or one biocide, and 6.90% were multiply resistant to at least three biocides and at least three antibiotics. Significant (P < 0.05 moderate or strong positive correlations were detected between tolerances to biocides, between antibiotics, and between antibiotics with biocides and other antimicrobials. A sub-set of 30 isolates selected according to antimicrobial resistance profile and food type were identified by 16S rDNA sequencing and tested for copper and zinc tolerance. Then, the genetic determinants for biocide and metal tolerance and antibiotic resistance were investigated. The selected isolates were identified as Pseudomonas (63.33%, Acinetobacter (13.33%, Aeromonas (13.33%, Shewanella, Proteus and Listeria (one isolate each. Antibiotic resistance determinants detected included sul1 (43.33% of tested isolates, sul2 (6.66%, blaTEM (16.66%, blaCTX−M (16.66%, blaPSE (10.00%, blaIMP (3.33%, blaNDM−1 (3.33%, floR (16.66%, aadA1 (20.0%, and aac(6′-Ib (16.66%. The only biocide resistance determinant detected among the selected isolates was qacEΔ1 (10.00%. A 23.30 of the selected isolates were able to grow on media containing 32 mM copper sulfate, and 46.60% on 8 mM zinc chloride. The metal resistance genes pcoA/copA, pcoR, and chrB were detected in 36.66, 6.66, and 13.33% of selected isolates, respectively. Twelve isolates tested positive for

  17. Antibiotic resistance in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Jamaica Resistencia a antibióticos en cepas clínicas de Pseudomonas aeruginosa en Jamaica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul D. Brown

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess antibiotic resistance in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Jamaica, and to obtain baseline information on the presence of this important pathogen. METHODS: A total of 51 isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, obtained from 162 clinical specimens from major hospitals and laboratories in seven parishes in Jamaica, were analyzed between May and August 2002. Isolates were tested against 18 different antibiotics by a disk diffusion method. RESULTS: Organisms were cultured from wound swabs (56%, high vaginal swabs (10.5% and ear swabs (42.5%. Overall, the highest percentage rates of resistance were found for cefaclor (100% of all isolates, nalidixic acid (82.4%, kanamycin (76.5%, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (56.9%. Resistance rates were 25.5% or lower for tobramycin, gentamicin and polymyxin B, cefotaxime, ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin, piperacillin, carbapenems and amikacin. Forty-one isolates showed intermediate sensitivity to most of the antipseudomonal antibiotics, and the remaining 10 isolates were resistant to eight or more antibiotics. The multiresistant isolates, most of which were hospital isolates, were all resistant to tetracycline, nalidixic acid and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, and highly (80%-90% resistant to kanamycin, ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin. CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms that antibiotic resistance in this clinical pathogen is emerging in Jamaica, and suggests that due care must be taken in hospital settings to adequately diagnose pseudomonal infections and prescribe the antibiotic treatment most effective in preventing the increase in multidrug resistant organisms.OBJETIVO: Evaluar la resistencia a antibióticos de cepas clínicas de Pseudomonas aeruginosa en Jamaica y obtener información de base sobre la presencia de este agente patógeno importante. MÉTODOS: Entre mayo y agosto de 2002 se analizó un total de 51 cepas de Pseudomonas aeruginosa que se obtuvieron de 162 especímenes cl

  18. Differentiation and distribution of colistin- and sodium dodecyl sulfate-tolerant cells in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Klausen, M; Ernst, RK

    2007-01-01

    -targeting antibacterial agents. All biofilm-associated cells were sensitive to the antibacterial agents when tested in standard plate assays. A mutation eliminating the production of type IV pili, and hence surface-associated motility, prevented the formation of regular mushroom-shaped structures in the flow cell......-shaped multicellular structures. The cap-forming subpopulation was found to develop tolerance to membrane-targeting antimicrobial agents, such as the cyclic cationic peptide colistin and the detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate. The stalk-forming subpopulation, on the other hand, was sensitive to the membrane...... that only the cap-forming subpopulation in biofilms treated with colistin expresses the pmr operon. These results suggest that increased antibiotic tolerance in biofilms may be a consequence of differentiation into distinct subpopulations with different phenotypic properties....

  19. The Biofilm-Specific Antibiotic Resistance Gene ndvB Is Important for Expression of Ethanol Oxidation Genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Beaudoin, Trevor; Zhang, Li; Hinz, Aaron J.; Parr, Christopher J.; Mah, Thien-Fah

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria growing in biofilms are responsible for a large number of persistent infections and are often more resistant to antibiotics than are free-floating bacteria. In a previous study, we identified a Pseudomonas aeruginosa gene, ndvB, which is important for the formation of periplasmic glucans. We established that these glucans function in biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance by sequestering antibiotic molecules away from their cellular targets. In this study, we investigate another func...

  20. Multidrug Efflux Pumps: Expression Patterns and Contribution to Antibiotic Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Kievit, Teresa R.; Parkins, Michael D.; Gillis, Richard J.; Srikumar, Ramakrishnan; Ceri, Howard; Poole, Keith; Iglewski, Barbara H.; Storey, Douglas G.

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms are intrinsically resistant to antimicrobial chemotherapies. At present, very little is known about the physiological changes that occur during the transition from the planktonic to biofilm mode of growth. The resistance of P. aeruginosa biofilms to numerous antimicrobial agents that are substrates subject to active efflux from planktonic cells suggests that efflux pumps may substantially contribute to the innate resistance of biofilms. In this study, we investigated the expression of genes associated with two multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps, MexAB-OprM and MexCD-OprJ, throughout the course of biofilm development. Using fusions to gfp, we were able to analyze spatial and temporal expression of mexA and mexC in the developing biofilm. Remarkably, expression of mexAB-oprM and mexCD-oprJ was not upregulated but rather decreased over time in the developing biofilm. Northern blot analysis confirmed that these pumps were not hyperexpressed in the biofilm. Furthermore, spatial differences in mexAB-oprM and mexCD-oprJ expression were observed, with maximal activity occurring at the biofilm substratum. Using a series of MDR mutants, we assessed the contribution of the MexAB-OprM, MexCD-OprJ, MexEF-OprN, and MexXY efflux pumps to P. aeruginosa biofilm resistance. These analyses led to the surprising discovery that the four characterized efflux pumps do not play a role in the antibiotic-resistant phenotype of P. aeruginosa biofilms. PMID:11353623

  1. Antibiotic resistant Pseudomonas spp. in the aquatic environment: A prevalence study under tropical and temperate climate conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarajan, Naresh; Köhler, Thilo; Sivalingam, Periyasamy; van Delden, Christian; Mulaji, Crispin K; Mpiana, Pius T; Ibelings, Bastiaan W; Poté, John

    2017-05-15

    Microbial populations which are resistant to antibiotics are an emerging environmental concern with potentially serious implications for public health. Thus, there is a growing concern in exploring the occurrence of antibiotic resistance in the environment with no limitations to the factors that contribute to their emergence. The aquatic environment is considered to be a hot-spot for the acquisition and spread of antibiotic resistance due to pollution with emerging contaminants derived from anthropogenic activities. In this study, we report on the isolation and characterization of 141 Pseudomonas spp. from aquatic sediments receiving partially (un)treated hospital and communal effluents from three distinct geographical locations: Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), India (IN), and Switzerland (CH). P. putida (42%) and P. aeruginosa (39%) were the dominant Pseudomonas species. The highest frequency of antibiotic resistance against eight anti-pseudomonas agents was found among IN isolates (35-60%), followed by DRC (18-50%) and CH (12-54%). CTX-M was the most frequent β-lactamase found in CH (47% of isolates), while VIM-1 was dominant in isolates from DRC (61%) and IN (29%). NDM-1 was found in 29% of the total IN isolates and surprisingly also in 6% of CH isolates. Chromosomally-encoded efflux mechanisms were overexpressed in P. aeruginosa isolates from all three geographic locations. In vitro conjugative transfers of antibiotic resistance plasmids occurred more frequently under tropical temperatures (30 and 37 °C) than under temperate conditions (10 °C). The presence of Extended Spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and Metallo β-lactamases (MBLs) in the isolates from environmental samples has important implications for humans who depend on public water supply and sanitation facilities. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate a comparison between treated/untreated effluents from urban and hospital settings as a source of microbial resistance

  2. Transcriptome Analysis of Induced Systemic Drought Tolerance Elicited by Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6 in Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Song-Mi Cho

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Root colonization by Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6 induces systemic drought tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana. Microarray analysis was performed using the 22,800-gene Affymetrix GeneChips to identify differentially-expressed genes from plants colonized with or without P. chlororaphis O6 under drought stressed conditions or normal growth conditions. Root colonization in plants grown under regular irrigation condition increased transcript accumulation from genes associated with defense, response to reactive oxygen species, and auxin- and jasmonic acid-responsive genes, but decreased transcription factors associated with ethylene and abscisic acid signaling. The cluster of genes involved in plant disease resistance were up-regulated, but the set of drought signaling response genes were down-regulated in the P. chlororaphis O6-colonized under drought stress plants compared to those of the drought stressed plants without bacterial treatment. Transcripts of the jasmonic acid-marker genes, VSP1 and pdf-1.2, the salicylic acid regulated gene, PR-1, and the ethylene-response gene, HEL, also were up-regulated in plants colonized by P. chlororaphis O6, but differed in their responsiveness to drought stress. These data show how gene expression in plants lacking adequate water can be remarkably influenced by microbial colonization leading to plant protection, and the activation of the plant defense signal pathway induced by root colonization of P. chlororaphis O6 might be a key element for induced systemic tolerance by microbes.

  3. Effect of Organic Solvents on the Yield of Solvent-Tolerant Pseudomonas putida S12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isken, Sonja; Derks, Antoine; Wolffs, Petra F. G.; de Bont, Jan A. M.

    1999-01-01

    Solvent-tolerant microorganisms are useful in biotransformations with whole cells in two-phase solvent-water systems. The results presented here describe the effects that organic solvents have on the growth of these organisms. The maximal growth rate of Pseudomonas putida S12, 0.8 h−1, was not affected by toluene in batch cultures, but in chemostat cultures the solvent decreased the maximal growth rate by nearly 50%. Toluene, ethylbenzene, propylbenzene, xylene, hexane, and cyclohexane reduced the biomass yield, and this effect depended on the concentration of the solvent in the bacterial membrane and not on its chemical structure. The dose response to solvents in terms of yield was linear up to an approximately 200 mM concentration of solvent in the bacterial membrane, both in the wild type and in a mutant lacking an active efflux system for toluene. Above this critical concentration the yield of the wild type remained constant at 0.2 g of protein/g of glucose with increasing concentrations of toluene. The reduction of the yield in the presence of solvents is due to a maintenance higher by a factor of three or four as well as to a decrease of the maximum growth yield by 33%. Therefore, energy-consuming adaptation processes as well as the uncoupling effect of the solvents reduce the yield of the tolerant cells. PMID:10347053

  4. Label-free SRM-based relative quantification of antibiotic resistance mechanisms in Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates

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    Yannick eCharretier

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Both acquired and intrinsic mechanisms play a crucial role in Pseudomonas aeruginosa antibiotic resistance. Many clinically relevant resistance mechanisms result from changes in gene expression, namely multidrug efflux pump overproduction, AmpC beta-lactamase induction or derepression, and inactivation or repression of the carbapenem-specific porin OprD. Changes in gene expression are usually assessed using reverse-transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR assays. Here, we evaluated label-free Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM-based mass spectrometry to directly quantify proteins involved in antibiotic resistance. We evaluated the label-free SRM using a defined set of P. aeruginosa isolates with known resistance mechanisms and compared it against RT-qPCR. Referring to efflux systems, we found a more robust relative quantification of antibiotic resistance mechanisms by SRM than RT-qPCR. The SRM-based approach was applied to a set of clinical P. aeruginosa isolates to detect antibiotic resistance proteins. This multiplexed SRM-based approach is a rapid and reliable method for the simultaneous detection and quantification of resistance mechanisms and we demonstrate its relevance for antibiotic resistance prediction.

  5. Label-free SRM-based relative quantification of antibiotic resistance mechanisms in Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charretier, Yannick; Köhler, Thilo; Cecchini, Tiphaine; Bardet, Chloé; Cherkaoui, Abdessalam; Llanes, Catherine; Bogaerts, Pierre; Chatellier, Sonia; Charrier, Jean-Philippe; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Both acquired and intrinsic mechanisms play a crucial role in Pseudomonas aeruginosa antibiotic resistance. Many clinically relevant resistance mechanisms result from changes in gene expression, namely multidrug efflux pump overproduction, AmpC β-lactamase induction or derepression, and inactivation or repression of the carbapenem-specific porin OprD. Changes in gene expression are usually assessed using reverse-transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) assays. Here, we evaluated label-free Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM)-based mass spectrometry to directly quantify proteins involved in antibiotic resistance. We evaluated the label-free SRM using a defined set of P. aeruginosa isolates with known resistance mechanisms and compared it with RT-qPCR. Referring to efflux systems, we found a more robust relative quantification of antibiotic resistance mechanisms by SRM than RT-qPCR. The SRM-based approach was applied to a set of clinical P. aeruginosa isolates to detect antibiotic resistance proteins. This multiplexed SRM-based approach is a rapid and reliable method for the simultaneous detection and quantification of resistance mechanisms and we demonstrate its relevance for antibiotic resistance prediction.

  6. Beneficial Soil Bacterium Pseudomonas frederiksbergensis OS261 Augments Salt Tolerance and Promotes Red Pepper Plant Growth

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    Poulami Chatterjee

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity, being a part of natural ecosystems, is an increasing problem in agricultural soils throughout the world. Pseudomonas frederiksbergensis OS261 has already been proved to be an effective bio-inoculant for enhancing cold stress tolerance in plants, however, its effect on salt stress tolerance is unknown. The main aim of the present study was to elucidate P. frederiksbergensis OS261 mediated salt stress tolerance in red pepper. The plants were exposed to a salt stress using NaCl at the concentrations of 50, 100, and 150 mM after 12 days of transplantation, while plant growth and enzyme activity were estimated 50 days after sowing. The height in P. frederiksbergensis OS261 inoculated plants was significantly increased by 19.05, 34.35, 57.25, and 61.07% compared to un-inoculated controls at 0, 50, 100, and 150 mM of NaCl concentrations, respectively, under greenhouse conditions. The dry biomass of the plants increased by 31.97, 37.47, 62.67, and 67.84% under 0, 50, 100, and 150 mM of NaCl concentrations, respectively. A high emission of ethylene was observed in un-inoculated red pepper plants under salinity stress. P. frederiksbergensis OS261 inoculation significantly reduced ethylene emission by 20.03, 18.01, and 20.07% at 50, 100, and 150 mM of NaCl concentrations, respectively. Furthermore, the activity of antioxidant enzymes (ascorbate peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase also varied in the inoculated red pepper plants. Salt stress resistance in the bacterized plants was evident from the improved antioxidant activity in leaf tissues and the decreased hydrogen ion concentration. Thus, we conclude that P. frederiksbergensis OS261 possesses stress mitigating property which can enhance plant growth under high soil salinity by reducing the emission of ethylene and regulating antioxidant enzymes.

  7. Proteomic Analysis of Pseudomonas putida Reveals an Organic Solvent Tolerance-Related Gene mmsB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Ye; Song, Liang; Qian, Xiaohong; Sun, Zhihao

    2013-01-01

    Organic solvents are toxic to most microorganisms. However, some organic-solvent-tolerant (OST) bacteria tolerate the destructive effects of organic solvent through various accommodative mechanisms. In this work, we developed an OST adapted strain Pseudomonas putida JUCT1 that could grow in the presence of 60% (v/v) cyclohexane. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to compare and analyze the total cellular protein of P. putida JUCT1 growing with or without 60% (v/v) cyclohexane. Under different solvent conditions, five high-abundance protein spots whose intensity values show over 60% discrepancies were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF spectra. Specifically, they are arginine deiminase, carbon-nitrogen hydrolase family putative hydrolase, 3-hydroxyisobutyrate dehydrogenase, protein chain elongation factor EF-Ts, and isochorismatase superfamily hydrolase. The corresponding genes of the latter three proteins, mmsB, tsf, and PSEEN0851, were separately expressed in Escherichia coli to evaluate their effect on OST properties of the host strain. In the presence of 4% (v/v) cyclohexane, E. coli harboring mmsB could grow to 1.70 OD660, whereas cell growth of E. coli JM109 (the control) was completely inhibited by 2% (v/v) cyclohexane. Transformants carrying tsf or PSEEN0851 also showed an increased resistance to cyclohexane and other organic solvents compared with the control. Of these three genes, mmsB exhibited the most prominent effect on increasing OST of E. coli. Less oxidation product of cyclohexane was detected because mmsB transformants might help keep a lower intracellular cyclohexane level. This study demonstrates a feasible approach for elucidating OST mechanisms of microorganisms, and provides molecular basis to construct organic-solvent-tolerant strains for industrial applications. PMID:23409067

  8. Analysis of Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas sp. QTF5 Reveals Its Benzoic Acid Degradation Ability and Heavy Metal Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas sp. QTF5 was isolated from the continuous permafrost near the bitumen layers in the Qiangtang basin of Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau in China (5,111 m above sea level. It is psychrotolerant and highly and widely tolerant to heavy metals and has the ability to metabolize benzoic acid and salicylic acid. To gain insight into the genetic basis for its adaptation, we performed whole genome sequencing and analyzed the resistant genes and metabolic pathways. Based on 120 published and annotated genomes representing 31 species in the genus Pseudomonas, in silico genomic DNA-DNA hybridization (<54% and average nucleotide identity calculation (<94% revealed that QTF5 is closest to Pseudomonas lini and should be classified into a novel species. This study provides the genetic basis to identify the genes linked to its specific mechanisms for adaptation to extreme environment and application of this microorganism in environmental conservation.

  9. Whole-Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas putida Strain UASWS0946, a Highly Ammonia-Tolerant Nitrifying Bacterium Isolated from Sewage Sludge Aerobic Granules

    OpenAIRE

    Crovadore, Julien; Calmin, Gautier; Cochard, Bastien; Chablais, Romain; Grizard, Damien; Berthon, Jean-Yves; Lefort, François

    2015-01-01

    We report here the genome of Pseudomonas putida strain UASWS0946, a highly ammonia-tolerant nitrifying strain isolated from sewage sludge aerobic granules, which displays adequate genetic equipment for soil depollution, sludge treatment, and biological fertilization in agriculture.

  10. Antibiotic therapy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis : a European consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Döring, G; Conway, S P; Heijerman, H G; Hodson, M E; Høiby, N; Smyth, A; Touw, D J

    2000-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common lethal hereditary disorder with autosomal recessive heredity in caucasians. The majority of CF patients suffer from chronic respiratory infection with the opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. No consensus among clinicians has been reached

  11. Characterization of antibiotic and disinfectant susceptibility profiles among Pseudomonas aeruginosa veterinary isolates recovered during 1994-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, R C; Foley, S L; Davidson, M K; White, D G; McDermott, P F; Bodeis-Jones, S; Zhao, S; Andrews, K; Crippen, T L; Sheffield, C L; Poole, T L; Anderson, R C; Nisbet, D J

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa veterinary isolates to antibiotics and disinfectants. Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates collected from dogs (n = 155) and other animals (n = 20) from sixteen states during 1994-2003 were tested for susceptibility. Most isolates were resistant to twenty-one antimicrobials tested, and the highest prevalence of resistance was to β-lactams (93.8%) and sulphonamides (93.5%). Fluoroquinolone resistance did not increase from 1994 to 2003. Ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin had a 5 and 16% prevalence of resistance, respectively, while sarafloxacin and nalidixic acid had a prevalence of resistance of 97 and 98%, respectively. Strains were pan-resistant to triclosan and chlorhexidine, were highly resistant to benzalkonium chloride and demonstrated high susceptibility to other disinfectants. Didecyldimethylammonium chloride was the most active ammonium chloride. Inducible resistance was observed to cetyl ammonium halides, chlorhexidine and benzyl ammonium chlorides, which formulate disinfectants used in veterinary clinics and dairies. Organic acid inhibition was associated with the dissociated acid species. Dissociated organic acids appear able to inhibit Ps. aeruginosa, and rates of fluoroquinolone resistance merit sustained companion animal isolate surveillance. This is the first report of Ps. aeruginosa susceptibility to 24 disinfectants and illustrates the high resistance of Ps. aeruginosa to both antibiotics and disinfectants. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  12. Effects of environmental conditions on the morphologic change of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and its association with antibiotic resistance in burn patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Moghoofei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an aerobic gram-negative bacteria, which causes hospital infections. Bacteria under stress, such as lack of food, pH and osmotic pressure change and antibiotic stress transforms its morphology to coccoid form. In the bacill form due to changes in the peptidoglycan cell wall, membrane lipids and decreased metabolic activity, bacteria resistant to antibiotics. Due to an increase in mortality in burn patients and important problem of antibiotic resistance in P.aeruginosa the researcher decided to study the factors affecting on morphologic change to coccoid form. Materials and methods: In this study P.aeruginosa strains obtained from clinical samples of burned patients (8 samples were taken from the wound by Infectious Disease Specialist and standard strain ATCC 27853 were used. Samples were confirmed by biochemical tests and PCR by 16srDNA primer. Then bacteria were put under lack of food and antibiotic stress invitro. After that bacterial morphology was examined on different days by digital DP 72-BX 51 microscope to 60 days. After induction coccoid forms, bacterial viability was confirmed by flow cytometry. Results: Bacteria begin to change morphology from 5 days for antibiotic stress and 10 days for other stress. Changing morphology was initially elongate bacilli, U shape and finally the coccoid form was seen. Discussion and conclusion: Changing morphology of bacilli to coccoid bacteria that are the result of stress on the bacteria which enter the body can lead to bacterial resistance to antibiotics and have grave consequences for the patient.

  13. Tolerance to creosote oil of bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas isolated from the wood of coniferous trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewska, Julitta; Miszczyk, Anita; Markiewicz, Zdzisław

    2003-01-01

    A number of Pseudomonas sp. strains isolated from wood shavings not preserved with chemical agents were characterized by tolerance to concentrated creosote oil. Of eleven strains subjected to closer scrutiny, five showed good or very good growth in minimal medium with creosote oil as sole carbon and energy source. These isolates can be of potential use for the biodegradation of waste wood conserved with creosote oil.

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa enolase influences bacterial tolerance to oxidative stresses and virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuding Weng

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram negative opportunistic pathogenic bacterium, which causes acute and chronic infections. Upon entering host, bacteria alter global gene expression to adapt to host environment and avoid clearance by host. Enolase is a glycolytic enzyme involved in carbon metabolism. It is also a component of RNA degradosome, which is involved in RNA processing and gene regulation. Here we report that enolase is required for the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa in a murine acute pneumonia model. Mutation of enolase coding gene (eno increased bacterial susceptibility to neutrophil mediated killing, which is due to reduced tolerance to oxidative stress. Catalases and alkyl hydroperoxide reductases play a major role in protecting the cell from oxidative damages. In the eno mutant, the expression levels of catalases (KatA, KatB were similar as those in the wild type strain in the presence of H2O2, however, the expression levels of alkyl hydroperoxide reductases (AhpB, AhpC were significantly reduced. Overexpression of ahpB but not ahpC in the eno mutant fully restored the bacterial resistance to H2O2 as well as neutrophil mediated killing, and partially restored bacterial virulence in the murine acute pneumonia model. Therefore, we have identified a novel role of enolase in the virulence of P. aeruginosa.

  15. The resistance to antibiotics of strains of Streptococcus viridans, Streptococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus and Klebsiella isolated in Poland*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeljaszewicz, J.; Hawiger, J.

    1966-01-01

    A nation-wide survey has been carried out in Poland into the susceptibility of six genera of bacteria to eight antibiotics. The antibiotic-resistance of streptococci differed from that of the Gram-negative rods studied. Escherichia coli, Klebsiella and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are known to be completely resistant to penicillin. Streptococcus faecalis was much more resistant to antibiotics than Streptococcus viridans (highest resistance to streptomycin — 90.3% and 74.9%, respectively; least resistance to chloramphenicol — 47.3% and 9.1%). More than 90% of all Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated were resistant to all the antibiotics; high resistance was also exhibited by E. coli (94.5% resistant to erythromycin and 59.5% to chloramphenicol), Proteus (92.3% to penicillin and 63.0% to chloramphenicol) and Klebsiella (84.0% to erythromycin and 62.8% to oxytetracycline). PMID:5332528

  16. Multiple antibiotic resistances in metal tolerant E. coli from hospital waste water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Manzar; Imran, Mohd

    2014-01-01

    Study of antibiotic resistance was done among the metal tolerant E. coli isolates from hospital wastewater at Lucknow city. Metal tolerance was determined in terms of visible growth on metal amended plates at their varying concentrations. MICs were also determined among all metal tolerant E. coli isolates. All the isolates showed their MIC in between 100-2000 µg/ml while maximum isolates demonstrated their MICs at 400, 800 and 1600 µg/ml against all the metal tested. 23.07% of the isolates showed their MIC at 2000 µg/ml against Ni(3+). Multiple antibiotic resistances were recorded among all the metal resistant E.coli isolates. A high level of resistance was observed against Methicillin (86.53%) followed by penicillin (73.07%), Cephradin (57.69%), Rifampicin (34.61%), Erythromycin (26.92%), Nalidixic acids (25%), Chloramphenicol (3.84%) and least to Gentamycine (1.92%). Streptomycin was recorded most effective against E.coli isolates among the entire antibiotic tested. Antimicrobial resistance observed among the bacteria from the aquatic system contaminated with hospital wastes may be threatful for the environment and public health both.

  17. Impact of computerized pre-authorization of broad spectrum antibiotics in Pseudomonas aeruginosa at a children's hospital in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikoshi, Yuho; Higuchi, Hiroshi; Suwa, Junichi; Isogai, Mihoko; Shoji, Takayo; Ito, Kenta

    2016-08-01

    The spread of antimicrobial-resistant organisms is a global concern. To stem this tide, an antimicrobial stewardship program at hospitals is essential to optimize the prescription of broad spectrum antibiotics. In this study we examined the impact of computerized pre-authorization for broad spectrum antibiotics for Pseudomonas aeruginosa at a children's hospital. An antimicrobial stewardship program at Tokyo Metropolitan Children's Medical Center was assessed between March 2010 and March 2015. A paper-based post-prescription audit was switched to computerized pre-authorization for broad antipseudomonal agents in October 2011. The prescriber was required to obtain approval from physicians in the pediatric infectious diseases division before prescribing restricted antimicrobial agents. Approved prescriptions were processed and logged electronically. We evaluated days of therapy per 1000 patient-days, the cost of antibiotics, and the susceptibility of P. aeruginosa to piperacillin, ceftazidime, cefepime, piperacillin/tazobactam, carbapenems, and ciprofloxacin. Also, the average length of admission and infection-related mortality at 30 days were compared pre- and post-intervention. Administration of carbapenems, piperacillin/tazobactam, and ceftazidime decreased significantly after the introduction of computerized pre-authorization. Antibiotic costs were reduced by JPY2.86 million (USD 26,000) annually. None of the antipseudomonal agents showed decreased sensitivity. The average length of admission was shorter in post-intervention. Infection-related mortality at 30 days showed no difference between the pre- and post-intervention periods. An antimicrobial stewardship program using computerized pre-authorization decreased the use and cost of broad spectrum antibiotics without significant difference in infection-related mortality at 30 days, although our study did not improve susceptibilities of P. aeruginosa. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosomal beta-lactamase in patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic lung infection. Mechanism of antibiotic resistance and target of the humoral immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana

    2003-01-01

    The intensive antibiotic treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa has improved the survival rate and the clinical condition of Danish patients. Acquirement of resistance to anti-pseudomonal antibiotics is one of the main drawbacks...... of this therapeutic strategy and our results showed the development of resistance of P. aeruginosa to several antibiotics during 25 years of intensive antibiotic treatment. Our studies have been concentrating on the development of resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics. We have shown an association between...... the development of resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics and the occurrence of high beta-lactamase producing strains and between the MIC of the beta-lactams and the levels of beta-lactamase expression. Partially derepressed mutants, characterized by high basal levels of beta-lactamase with the possibility...

  19. Increasing antibiotic resistance in preservative-tolerant bacterial strains isolated from cosmetic products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orús, Pilar; Gomez-Perez, Laura; Leranoz, Sonia; Berlanga, Mercedes

    2015-03-01

    To ensure the microbiological quality, consumer safety and organoleptic properties of cosmetic products, manufacturers need to comply with defined standards using several preservatives and disinfectants. A drawback regarding the use of these preservatives is the possibility of generating cross-insusceptibility to other disinfectants or preservatives, as well as cross resistance to antibiotics. Therefore, the objective of this study was to understand the adaptive mechanisms of Enterobacter gergoviae, Pseudomonas putida and Burkholderia cepacia that are involved in recurrent contamination in cosmetic products containing preservatives. Diminished susceptibility to formaldehyde-donors was detected in isolates but not to other preservatives commonly used in the cosmetics industry, although increasing resistance to different antibiotics (β-lactams, quinolones, rifampicin, and tetracycline) was demonstrated in these strains when compared with the wild-type strain. The outer membrane protein modifications and efflux mechanism activities responsible for the resistance trait were evaluated. The development of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms due to the selective pressure from preservatives included in cosmetic products could be a risk for the emergence and spread of bacterial resistance in the environment. Nevertheless, the large contribution of disinfection and preservation cannot be denied in cosmetic products. Copyright© by the Spanish Society for Microbiology and Institute for Catalan Studies.

  20. Simultaneous and quantitative monitoring of co-cultured Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus with antibiotics on a diffusometric platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chih-Yao; Wang, Jhih-Cheng; Chuang, Han-Sheng

    2017-04-01

    Successful treatments against bacterial infections depend on antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST). However, conventional AST requires more than 24 h to obtain an outcome, thereby contributing to high patient mortality. An antibiotic therapy based on experiences is therefore necessary for saving lives and escalating the emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogens. Accordingly, a fast and effective drug screen is necessary for the appropriate administration of antibiotics. The mixed pathogenic nature of infectious diseases emphasizes the need to develop an assay system for polymicrobial infections. On this basis, we present a novel technique for simultaneous and quantitative monitoring of co-cultured microorganisms by coupling optical diffusometry with bead-based immunoassays. This simple integration simultaneously achieves a rapid AST analysis for two pathogens. Triple color particles were simultaneously recorded and subsequently analyzed by functionalizing different fluorescent color particles with dissimilar pathogen-specific antibodies. Results suggested that the effect of the antibiotic, gentamicin, on co-cultured Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus was effectively distinguished by the proposed technique. This study revealed a multiplexed and time-saving (within 2 h) platform with a small sample volume (~0.5 μL) and a low initial bacterial count (50 CFU per droplet, ~105 CFU/mL) for continuously monitoring the growth of co-cultured microorganisms. This technique provides insights into timely therapies against polymicrobial diseases in the near future.

  1. Genome-based discovery, structure prediction and functional analysis of cyclic lipopeptide antibiotics in Pseudomonas species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, de I.; Kock, de M.J.D.; Meng, Y.; Waard, de P.; Beek, van T.A.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of microbial genome sequences have revealed numerous genes involved in antibiotic biosynthesis. In Pseudomonads, several gene clusters encoding non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) were predicted to be involved in the synthesis of cyclic lipopeptide (CLP) antibiotics. Most of these

  2. [Analysis of drug resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and use of antibiotics in burn wards during 6 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Yi; Zhang, Qin

    2014-02-01

    To study the distribution characteristics of pathogens, the drug resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA), and the use of antibiotics against Gram negative bacilli (GNB) in burn wards, so as to provide a guide for future treatment. A total of 2 758 strains of pathogens were isolated from specimens of wound excretion, venous catheter attachment, blood, stool, urine, and sputum from 7 441 patients hospitalized in our burn wards from January 2007 to December 2012. After being identified by API strips and automatic microorganism identification and drug sensitivity analyzer, drug resistance of all the pathogens to 13 antibiotics commonly used in clinic, including amikacin, cefoperazone/sulbactam, ceftazidime, etc., was tested by K-B paper disk diffusion method. The defined daily doses per 1 000 patient-day of 5 antibiotics including amikacin, cefoperazone/sulbactam, ceftazidime, imipenem, and ciprofloxacin each year was set as use intensity. The WHONET 5.6 software was used to analyze the distribution of pathogens and the drug resistance of PA to 13 antibiotics. The SPSS 19.0 software was used to analyze the relation between changes in drug-resistant rates of PA to 13 antibiotics and year, the relation between the proportion of PA in all the pathogens and the use intensity of 5 antibiotics commonly used against GNB, and the relation between the use intensity of ciprofloxacin and the change in drug-resistant rates of PA to amikacin, cefoperazone/sulbactam, and imipenem with Pearson correlation analysis. (1) In 6 years, Staphylococcus aureus ranked the first with the highest proportion (31%, 865/2 758). The proportion of PA increased to tie in with Acinetobacter baumannii (both accounting for 17%, 458/2 758), both taking the second place. (2) Drug-resistant rates of PA to amikacin, gentamicin, aztreonam, piperacillin, cefoperazone, cefepime, piperacillin/tazobactam, cefoperazone/sulbactam, imipenem, and meropenem were significantly increased and positively correlated

  3. Antibiotic inducibility of the MexXY multidrug efflux system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: involvement of the antibiotic-inducible PA5471 gene product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Yuji; Sobel, Mara L; Poole, Keith

    2006-03-01

    The MexXY components of the MexXY-OprM multidrug efflux system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are encoded by a MexZ repressor-regulated operon that is inducible by antibiotics that target the ribosome. Mutant strains disrupted in a gene, PA5471, were shown to be compromised for drug-inducible mexXY expression and, therefore, MexXY-OprM-mediated antimicrobial resistance. The PA5471 gene was inducible by the same ribosome-targeting agents that induce mexXY expression. Moreover, vector-driven expression of cloned PA5471 was sufficient to promote mexXY expression and MexXY-mediated resistance in the absence of antibiotic exposure, consistent with PA5471 directly or indirectly activating mexXY expression following its own upregulation in response to antibiotics. The requirement for PA5471 for mexXY expression and antimicrobial resistance was, however, obviated in mutants lacking the MexZ repressor of mexXY expression, suggesting that PA5471 directly or indirectly modulates MexZ activity in effecting mexXY expression. While the recruitment of PA5471 and MexXY in response to ribosome disruption by antimicrobials is consistent with their genes playing a role in protecting cells from the adverse consequences of disrupting the translation process, reminiscent of trans-translation, these genes appear to operate independently in their contribution to resistance: mutants defective in trans-translation showed a much more modest (twofold) decrease in resistance to ribosome-targeting agents than those lacking PA5471 or MexXY, and this decrease was observed whether functional PA5471/MexXY was present or not.

  4. Glutathione-Disrupted Biofilms of Clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains Exhibit an Enhanced Antibiotic Effect and a Novel Biofilm Transcriptome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Theerthankar; Ibugo, Amaye; Buckle, Edwina; Manefield, Mike; Manos, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections result in high morbidity and mortality rates for individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF), with premature death often occurring. These infections are complicated by the formation of biofilms in the sputum. Antibiotic therapy is stymied by antibiotic resistance of the biofilm matrix, making novel antibiofilm strategies highly desirable. Within P. aeruginosa biofilms, the redox factor pyocyanin enhances biofilm integrity by intercalating with extracellular DNA. The antioxidant glutathione (GSH) reacts with pyocyanin, disrupting intercalation. This study investigated GSH disruption by assaying the physiological effects of GSH and DNase I on biofilms of clinical CF isolates grown in CF artificial sputum medium (ASMDM+). Confocal scanning laser microscopy showed that 2 mM GSH, alone or combined with DNase I, significantly disrupted immature (24-h) biofilms of Australian epidemic strain (AES) isogens AES-1R and AES-1M. GSH alone greatly disrupted mature (72-h) AES-1R biofilms, resulting in significant differential expression of 587 genes, as indicated by RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis. Upregulated systems included cyclic diguanylate and pyoverdine biosynthesis, the type VI secretion system, nitrate metabolism, and translational machinery. Biofilm disruption with GSH revealed a cellular physiology distinct from those of mature and dispersed biofilms. RNA-seq results were validated by biochemical and quantitative PCR assays. Biofilms of a range of CF isolates disrupted with GSH and DNase I were significantly more susceptible to ciprofloxacin, and increased antibiotic effectiveness was achieved by increasing the GSH concentration. This study demonstrated that GSH, alone or with DNase I, represents an effective antibiofilm treatment when combined with appropriate antibiotics, pending in vivo studies. PMID:27161630

  5. Antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains with increased mutation frequency due to inactivation of the DNA oxidative repair system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandsberg, L F; Ciofu, O; Kirkby, N; Christiansen, L E; Poulsen, H E; Høiby, N

    2009-06-01

    The chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection of the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is characterized by the biofilm mode of growth and chronic inflammation dominated by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). A high percentage of P. aeruginosa strains show high frequencies of mutations (hypermutators [HP]). P. aeruginosa is exposed to oxygen radicals, both those generated by its own metabolism and especially those released by a large number of PMNs in response to the chronic CF lung infection. Our work therefore focused on the role of the DNA oxidative repair system in the development of HP and antibiotic resistance. We have constructed and characterized mutT, mutY, and mutM mutants in P. aeruginosa strain PAO1. The mutT and mutY mutants showed 28- and 7.5-fold increases in mutation frequencies, respectively, over that for PAO1. These mutators had more oxidative DNA damage (higher levels of 7,8-dihydro-8-oxodeoxyguanosine) than PAO1 after exposure to PMNs, and they developed resistance to antibiotics more frequently. The mechanisms of resistance were increased beta-lactamase production and overexpression of the MexCD-OprJ efflux-pump. Mutations in either the mutT or the mutY gene were found in resistant HP clinical isolates from patients with CF, and complementation with wild-type genes reverted the phenotype. In conclusion, oxidative stress might be involved in the development of resistance to antibiotics. We therefore suggest the possible use of antioxidants for CF patients to prevent the development of antibiotic resistance.

  6. Epistasis between antibiotic resistance mutations and genetic background shape the fitness effect of resistance across species of Pseudomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogwill, T; Kojadinovic, M; MacLean, R C

    2016-05-11

    Antibiotic resistance often evolves by mutations at conserved sites in essential genes, resulting in parallel molecular evolution between divergent bacterial strains and species. Whether these resistance mutations are having parallel effects on fitness across bacterial taxa, however, is unclear. This is an important point to address, because the fitness effects of resistance mutations play a key role in the spread and maintenance of resistance in pathogen populations. We address this idea by measuring the fitness effect of a collection of rifampicin resistance mutations in the β subunit of RNA polymerase (rpoB) across eight strains that span the diversity of the genus Pseudomonas We find that almost 50% of rpoB mutations have background-dependent fitness costs, demonstrating that epistatic interactions between rpoB and the rest of the genome are common. Moreover, epistasis is typically strong, and it is the dominant genetic determinant of the cost of resistance mutations. To investigate the functional basis of epistasis, and because rpoB plays a central role in transcription, we measured the effects of common rpoB mutations on transcriptional efficiency across three strains of Pseudomonas Transcriptional efficiency correlates strongly to fitness across strains, and epistasis arises because individual rpoB mutations have differential effects on transcriptional efficiency in different genetic backgrounds. © 2016 The Authors.

  7. Epistasis between antibiotic resistance mutations and genetic background shape the fitness effect of resistance across species of Pseudomonas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojadinovic, M.; MacLean, R. C.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance often evolves by mutations at conserved sites in essential genes, resulting in parallel molecular evolution between divergent bacterial strains and species. Whether these resistance mutations are having parallel effects on fitness across bacterial taxa, however, is unclear. This is an important point to address, because the fitness effects of resistance mutations play a key role in the spread and maintenance of resistance in pathogen populations. We address this idea by measuring the fitness effect of a collection of rifampicin resistance mutations in the β subunit of RNA polymerase (rpoB) across eight strains that span the diversity of the genus Pseudomonas. We find that almost 50% of rpoB mutations have background-dependent fitness costs, demonstrating that epistatic interactions between rpoB and the rest of the genome are common. Moreover, epistasis is typically strong, and it is the dominant genetic determinant of the cost of resistance mutations. To investigate the functional basis of epistasis, and because rpoB plays a central role in transcription, we measured the effects of common rpoB mutations on transcriptional efficiency across three strains of Pseudomonas. Transcriptional efficiency correlates strongly to fitness across strains, and epistasis arises because individual rpoB mutations have differential effects on transcriptional efficiency in different genetic backgrounds. PMID:27170722

  8. In vitro synergy of antibiotic combinations against planktonic and biofilm Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghorbani, Hossein

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The combination of different antimicrobial agents and subsequent synergetic effects may be beneficial in treatment of infections. The aim of the present study was to determine antibiotic susceptibility patterns of clinical isolates of and the effect of different antibiotic combinations against the multidrug-resistant (MDR, biofilm-producing bacterium . Methods: Thirty-six clinical isolates were evaluated. The disk diffusion method was performed to determine antibiotic susceptibility patterns according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI guidelines. The minimum inhibitory concentration of antimicrobial agents for the test organisms was determined by the broth microdilution method. To determine synergetic effects of the combinations of agents, the checkerboard assay and the fractional inhibitory concentration were used. The biofilm inhibitory concentration was determined to detect any inhibitory effect of antibiotics against the biofilm. Results: High levels of resistance were detected against most antibiotics, except colistin and polymyxin. According to the disk diffusion method, 58.3% of isolates were MDR. A synergetic effect between amikacin/ceftazidime, tobramycin/colistin and ceftazidime/colistin was found in 55.6%, 58.3% and 52.8% of isolates, respectively. A significant synergetic effect against biofilm-producing isolates was observed for the combination of tobramycin (0.5–1 µg/ml and clarithromycin (256–512 µg/ml.Conclusion: Combinations of antibiotics have a different activity on the biofilm and planktonic forms of . Consequently, separate detection of antibacterial and antibiofilm effects of the antibiotic combinations may be useful in guiding the antibiotic therapy.

  9. Marine Pseudomonas putida: a potential source of antimicrobial substances against antibiotic-resistant bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palloma Rodrigues Marinho

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria isolated from marine sponges found off the coast of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, were screened for the production of antimicrobial substances. We report a new Pseudomonas putida strain (designated P. putida Mm3 isolated from the sponge Mycale microsigmatosa that produces a powerful antimicrobial substance active against multidrug-resistant bacteria. P. putida Mm3 was identified on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phenotypic tests. Molecular typing for Mm3 was performed by RAPD-PCR and comparison of the results to other Pseudomonas strains. Our results contribute to the search for new antimicrobial agents, an important strategy for developing alternative therapies to treat infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria.

  10. Pesticide tolerant and phosphorus solubilizing Pseudomonas sp. strain SGRAJ09 isolated from pesticides treated Achillea clavennae rhizosphere soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasankar, R; Manju Gayathry, G; Sathiavelu, A; Ramalingam, C; Saravanan, V S

    2013-05-01

    In this study, an attempt was made to identify an effective phosphate solubilizing bacteria from pesticide polluted field soil. Based on the formation of solubilization halo on Pikovskaya's agar, six isolates were selected and screened for pesticide tolerance and phosphate (P) solubilization ability through liquid assay. The results showed that only one strain (SGRAJ09) obtained from Achillea clavennae was found to tolerate maximum level of the pesticides tested and it was phylogenetically identified as Pseudomonas sp. It possessed a wide range of pesticide tolerance, ranging from 117 μg mL(-1) for alphamethrin to 2,600 μg mL(-1) for endosulfan. The available P concentrations increased with the maximum and double the maximum dose of monocrotophos and imidacloprid, respectively. On subjected to FT-IR and HPLC analysis, the presence of organic acids functional group in the culture broth and the production of gluconic acid as dominant acid aiding the P solubilization were identified. On comparison with control broth, monocrotophos and imidacloprid added culture broth showed quantitatively high organic acids production. In addition to gluconic acid production, citric and acetic acids were also observed in the pesticide amended broth. Furthermore, the Pseudomonas sp. strain SGRAJ09 possessed all the plant growth promoting traits tested. In presence of monocrotophos and imidacloprid, its plant growth promoting activities were lower than that of the pesticides unamended treatment.

  11. Characterization of paired mucoid/non-mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from Danish cystic fibrosis patients: antibiotic resistance, beta-lactamase activity and RiboPrinting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, O; Fussing, V; Bagge, N

    2001-01-01

    before 1991 had an antibiotic susceptibility pattern similar to the 1997 isolates. Despite prolonged and intensive antibiotic treatment, susceptible mucoid isolates were isolated from the CF sputum, possibly because these bacteria are protected from the selective pressure of antibiotics by the resistant......The purpose of this study was to characterize 42 paired mucoid and non-mucoid Danish cystic fibrosis (CF) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates collected in 1997, by RiboPrinting, antibiotic susceptibility and beta-lactamase activity. Eight P. aeruginosa isolates collected before 1991 were included...... for comparison. Eighteen of the 42 paired mucoid and non-mucoid isolates showed the same ribotype; the remaining 24 belonged to different ribogroups. Mucoid isolates showed higher susceptibility to antibiotics and lower beta-lactamase activity compared with non-mucoid isolates. Significant differences (P...

  12. Role of the interplay between quorum sensing regulator VqsR and the Pseudomonas quinolone signal in mediating carbapenem tolerance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viducic, Darija; Murakami, Keiji; Amoh, Takashi; Ono, Tsuneko; Miyake, Yoichiro

    2017-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa coordinates its response to environmental conditions through activation of a quorum sensing (QS) system. In this study, we investigated the regulatory interaction between the QS transcriptional regulator VqsR and the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) through integration of sigma factor RpoS, and we addressed whether one of the pathways controlling carbapenem tolerance can be attributed to VqsR. We demonstrate that vqsR expression at the transcriptional level is regulated by pqsA, pqsR, and pqsE. Assessment of the transcriptional expression of vqsR, lasI, rhlI, and qscR in ΔpqsA and ΔpqsAΔrpoS mutants provided insight into pqsA- and rpoS-dependent regulation of vqsR and vqsR-controlled genes. Exogenously supplemented PQS reversed expression of vqsR and vqsR-controlled genes in the ΔpqsA mutant to wild-type levels, but failed to increase expression levels of lasI and qscR in the ΔpqsAΔrpoS mutant to levels observed in wild-type PAO1. The ΔvqsR mutant showed reduced survival when challenged with carbapenems compared to wild-type PAO1. Introduction of a pqsA mutation into the ΔvqsR mutant completely abolished its carbapenem-sensitive phenotype. We conclude that a regulatory link between PQS and vqsR exists, and that RpoS is important in their interaction. We also demonstrate that VqsR affects carbapenem tolerance. Copyright © 2017 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariprasad, Seenu M; Mieler, William F

    2016-01-01

    The Endophthalmitis Vitrectomy Study (EVS) provided ophthalmologists with evidence-based management strategies to deal with endophthalmitis for the first time. However, since the completion of the EVS, numerous unresolved issues remain. The use of oral antibiotics has important implications for the ophthalmologist, particularly in the prophylaxis and/or management of postoperative, posttraumatic, or bleb-associated bacterial endophthalmitis. One can reasonably conclude that significant intraocular penetration of an antibiotic after oral administration may be a property unique to the newer-generation fluoroquinolones. Prophylactic use of mupirocin nasal ointment resulted in significant reduction of conjunctival flora with or without preoperative topical 5% povidone-iodine preparation. Ocular fungal infections have traditionally been very difficult to treat due to limited therapeutic options both systemically and intravitreally. Because of its broad spectrum of coverage, low MIC90 levels for the organisms of concern, good tolerability, and excellent bioavailability, voriconazole through various routes of administration may be useful to the ophthalmologist in the primary treatment of or as an adjunct to the current management of ocular fungal infections. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. 40 CFR 180.1114 - Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance... Tolerances § 180.1114 Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae...

  15. Antibiotic Resistance Pattern and Evaluation of Metallo-Beta Lactamase Genes Including bla- IMP and bla- VIM Types in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Patients in Tehran Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghamiri, Samira; Amirmozafari, Nour; Fallah Mehrabadi, Jalil; Fouladtan, Babak; Samadi Kafil, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Beta-lactamase producing strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are important etiological agents of hospital infections. Carbapenems are among the most effective antibiotics used against Pseudomonas infections, but they can be rendered infective by group B β -lactamase, commonly called metallo-beta lactamase. In this study, the antimicrobial sensitivity patterns of P. aeruginosa strains isolated from 9 different hospitals in Tehran, Iran, as well as the prevalence of MBLs genes (bla- VIM and bla- IMP ) were determined. A total of 212 strains of P. aeruginosa recovered from patients in hospitals in Tehran were confirmed by both biochemical methods and PCR. Their antimicrobial sensitivity patterns were determined by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Following MIC determination, imipenem resistant strains were selected by DDST method which was followed by PCR tests for determination of MBLs genes: bla- IMP and bla- VIM . The results indicated that, in the DDST phenotypic method, among the 100 imipenem resistant isolates, 75 strains were MBLs positive. The PCR test indicated that 70 strains (33%) carried bla- VIM gene and 20 strains (9%) harbored bla- IMP . The results indicated that the extent of antibiotic resistance among Pseudomonas aeruginosa is on the rise. This may be due to production of MBLs enzymes. Therefore, determination of antibiotic sensitivity patterns and MBLs production by these bacteria, can be important in control of clinical Pseudomonas infection.

  16. Pseudomonas pseudomallei, a common pathogen in Thailand that is resistant to the bactericidal effects of many antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sookpranee, T; Sookpranee, M; Mellencamp, M A; Preheim, L C

    1991-03-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to identify newer antimicrobial agents that may be useful in the therapy of melioidosis. The in vitro susceptibilities of 199 clinical isolates of Pseudomonas pseudomallei to 22 antibiotics were determined by standard disk diffusion, and those to 13 antibiotics were determined by agar dilution. Over 90% of the isolates were susceptible to imipenem, piperacillin-tazobactam, piperacillin, ceftazidime, ticarcillin-clavulanate, ampicillin-sulbactam, and carumonam by both methods. Standard disk diffusion yielded unacceptably high false-susceptibility results with aztreonam, ciprofloxacin, and temafloxacin. Piperacillin, ceftazidime, imipenem, and ciprofloxacin were not bactericidal for three selected P. pseudomallei strains as determined by time-kill curve methods. Furthermore, addition of ciprofloxacin to piperacillin, ceftazidime, or imipenem did not enhance bactericidal activity. One hundred ninety-four strains showed weak beta-lactamase production that did not increase upon incubation with cefoxitin. These findings suggest that several newer antimicrobial agents may prove useful in the treatment of melioidosis. However, results of susceptibility studies involving P. pseudomallei and newer agents must be interpreted with caution.

  17. Therapeutic Potential of the Antimicrobial Peptide OH-CATH30 for Antibiotic-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sheng-An; Liu, Jie; Xiang, Yang; Wang, Yan-Jie

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) has been evaluated in many infectious diseases. However, the topical application of AMPs for ocular bacterial infection has not been well investigated. The AMP OH-CATH30, which was identified in the king cobra, exhibits potent antimicrobial activity. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of OH-CATH30 for Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis. Ten isolates of P. aeruginosa from individuals with keratitis were susceptible to OH-CATH30 but not to cefoperazone, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, and levofloxacin. The microdilution checkerboard assay showed that OH-CATH30 exhibited synergistic activity with ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin against antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa. Meanwhile, P. aeruginosa did not develop resistance to OH-CATH30, even after exposure at 0.5× the MIC for up to 25 subcultures. Furthermore, treatment with OH-CATH30, alone or in combination with levofloxacin, significantly improved the clinical outcomes of rabbit keratitis induced by antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa. Taken together, our data indicate that the topical application of OH-CATH30 is efficacious against drug-resistant P. aeruginosa keratitis. In addition, our study highlights the potential application of AMPs in treating ocular bacterial infections. PMID:24637683

  18. Metallo-beta-lactamases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa--a novel mechanism resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacha, Paweł; Wieczorek, Piotr; Hauschild, Tomasz; Zórawski, Marcin; Olszańska, Dorota; Tryniszewska, Elzbieta

    2008-01-01

    Since about twenty years, following the introduction into therapeutic of news beta-lactam antibiotics (broad-spectrum cephalosporins, monobactams and carbapenems), a very significant number of new beta-lactamases appeared. These enzymes confer to the bacteria which put them, the means of resisting new molecules. The genetic events involved in this evolution are of two types: evolution of old enzymes by mutation and especially appearance of new genes coming for some, from bacteria of the environment. Numerous mechanisms of enzymatic resistance to the carbapenems have been described in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The important mechanism of inactivation carbapenems is production variety of b-lactam hydrolysing enzymes associated to carbapenemases. The metallo-beta-enzymes (IMP, VIM, SPM, GIM types) are the most clinically significant carbapenemases. P. aeruginosa posses MBLs and seem to have acquired them through transmissible genetic elements (plasmids or transposons associated with integron) and can be transmission to other bacteria. They have reported worldwide but mostly from South East Asia and Europe. The enzymes, belonging to the molecular class B family, are the most worrisome of all beta-lactamases because they confer resistance to carbapenems and all the beta-lactams (with the exception of aztreonam) and usually to aminoglycosides and quinolones. The dissemination of MBLs genes is thought to be driven by regional consumption of extended--spectrum antibiotics (e.g. cephalosporins and carbapenems), and therefore care must be taken that these drugs are not used unnecessarily.

  19. Metallo-beta-lactamases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa--a novel mechanism resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Olszańska

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Since about twenty years, following the introduction into therapeutic of news beta-lactam antibiotics (broad-spectrum cephalosporins, monobactams and carbapenems, a very significant number of new beta-lactamases appeared. These enzymes confer to the bacteria which put them, the means of resisting new molecules. The genetic events involved in this evolution are of two types: evolution of old enzymes by mutation and especially appearance of new genes coming for some, from bacteria of the environment. Numerous mechanisms of enzymatic resistance to the carbapenems have been described in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The important mechanism of inactivation carbapenems is production variety of b-lactam hydrolysing enzymes associated to carbapenemases. The metallo-beta-enzymes (IMP, VIM, SPM, GIM types are the most clinically significant carbapenemases. P. aeruginosa posses MBLs and seem to have acquired them through transmissible genetic elements (plasmids or transposons associated with integron and can be transmission to other bacteria. They have reported worldwide but mostly from South East Asia and Europe. The enzymes, belonging to the molecular class B family, are the most worrisome of all beta-lactamases because they confer resistance to carbapenems and all the beta-lactams (with the exception of aztreonam and usually to aminoglycosides and quinolones. The dissemination of MBLs genes is thought to be driven by regional consumption of extended--spectrum antibiotics (e.g. cephalosporins and carbapenems, and therefore care must be taken that these drugs are not used unnecessarily.

  20. Identification of MupP as a New Peptidoglycan Recycling Factor and Antibiotic Resistance Determinant in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coralie Fumeaux

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Peptidoglycan (PG is an essential cross-linked polymer that surrounds most bacterial cells to prevent osmotic rupture of the cytoplasmic membrane. Its synthesis relies on penicillin-binding proteins, the targets of beta-lactam antibiotics. Many Gram-negative bacteria, including the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, are resistant to beta-lactams because of a chromosomally encoded beta-lactamase called AmpC. In P. aeruginosa, expression of the ampC gene is tightly regulated and its induction is linked to cell wall stress. We reasoned that a reporter gene fusion to the ampC promoter would allow us to identify mutants defective in maintaining cell wall homeostasis and thereby uncover new factors involved in the process. A library of transposon-mutagenized P. aeruginosa was therefore screened for mutants with elevated ampC promoter activity. As an indication that the screen was working as expected, mutants with transposons disrupting the dacB gene were isolated. Defects in DacB have previously been implicated in ampC induction and clinical resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics. The screen also uncovered murU and PA3172 mutants that, upon further characterization, displayed nearly identical drug resistance and sensitivity profiles. We present genetic evidence that PA3172, renamed mupP, encodes the missing phosphatase predicted to function in the MurU PG recycling pathway that is widely distributed among Gram-negative bacteria.

  1. Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibiotics are powerful medicines that fight bacterial infections. Used properly, antibiotics can save lives. They either kill bacteria or ... natural defenses can usually take it from there. Antibiotics do not fight infections caused by viruses, such ...

  2. Phenotypic and Genome-Wide Analysis of an Antibiotic-Resistant Small Colony Variant (SCV) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qing; Tarighi, Saeed; Dötsch, Andreas; Häussler, Susanne; Müsken, Mathias; Wright, Victoria J.; Cámara, Miguel; Williams, Paul; Haenen, Steven; Boerjan, Bart; Bogaerts, Annelies; Vierstraete, Evy; Verleyen, Peter; Schoofs, Liliane; Willaert, Ronnie; De Groote, Valérie N.; Michiels, Jan; Vercammen, Ken; Crabbé, Aurélie; Cornelis, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Background Small colony variants (SCVs) are slow-growing bacteria, which often show increased resistance to antibiotics and cause latent or recurrent infections. It is therefore important to understand the mechanisms at the basis of this phenotypic switch. Methodology/Principal Findings One SCV (termed PAO-SCV) was isolated, showing high resistance to gentamicin and to the cephalosporine cefotaxime. PAO-SCV was prone to reversion as evidenced by emergence of large colonies with a frequency of 10−5 on media without antibiotics while it was stably maintained in presence of gentamicin. PAO-SCV showed a delayed growth, defective motility, and strongly reduced levels of the quorum sensing Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS). Whole genome expression analysis further suggested a multi-layered antibiotic resistance mechanism, including simultaneous over-expression of two drug efflux pumps (MexAB-OprM, MexXY-OprM), the LPS modification operon arnBCADTEF, and the PhoP-PhoQ two-component system. Conversely, the genes for the synthesis of PQS were strongly down-regulated in PAO-SCV. Finally, genomic analysis revealed the presence of mutations in phoP and phoQ genes as well as in the mexZ gene encoding a repressor of the mexXY and mexAB-oprM genes. Only one mutation occurred only in REV, at nucleotide 1020 of the tufA gene, a paralog of tufB, both encoding the elongation factor Tu, causing a change of the rarely used aspartic acid codon GAU to the more common GAC, possibly causing an increase of tufA mRNA translation. High expression of phoP and phoQ was confirmed for the SCV variant while the revertant showed expression levels reduced to wild-type levels. Conclusions By combining data coming from phenotypic, gene expression and proteome analysis, we could demonstrate that resistance to aminoglycosides in one SCV mutant is multifactorial including overexpression of efflux mechanisms, LPS modification and is accompanied by a drastic down-regulation of the Pseudomonas quinolone

  3. Phenotypic and genome-wide analysis of an antibiotic-resistant small colony variant (SCV of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Wei

    Full Text Available Small colony variants (SCVs are slow-growing bacteria, which often show increased resistance to antibiotics and cause latent or recurrent infections. It is therefore important to understand the mechanisms at the basis of this phenotypic switch.One SCV (termed PAO-SCV was isolated, showing high resistance to gentamicin and to the cephalosporine cefotaxime. PAO-SCV was prone to reversion as evidenced by emergence of large colonies with a frequency of 10(-5 on media without antibiotics while it was stably maintained in presence of gentamicin. PAO-SCV showed a delayed growth, defective motility, and strongly reduced levels of the quorum sensing Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS. Whole genome expression analysis further suggested a multi-layered antibiotic resistance mechanism, including simultaneous over-expression of two drug efflux pumps (MexAB-OprM, MexXY-OprM, the LPS modification operon arnBCADTEF, and the PhoP-PhoQ two-component system. Conversely, the genes for the synthesis of PQS were strongly down-regulated in PAO-SCV. Finally, genomic analysis revealed the presence of mutations in phoP and phoQ genes as well as in the mexZ gene encoding a repressor of the mexXY and mexAB-oprM genes. Only one mutation occurred only in REV, at nucleotide 1020 of the tufA gene, a paralog of tufB, both encoding the elongation factor Tu, causing a change of the rarely used aspartic acid codon GAU to the more common GAC, possibly causing an increase of tufA mRNA translation. High expression of phoP and phoQ was confirmed for the SCV variant while the revertant showed expression levels reduced to wild-type levels.By combining data coming from phenotypic, gene expression and proteome analysis, we could demonstrate that resistance to aminoglycosides in one SCV mutant is multifactorial including overexpression of efflux mechanisms, LPS modification and is accompanied by a drastic down-regulation of the Pseudomonas quinolone signal quorum sensing system.

  4. The resistance of pseudomonas aeruginosa strains to fluoroquinolone group of antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Algun U

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluoroquinolones are antibiotics that are very effective against many gram negative microorganisms, including P. aeruginosa. However, resistance to these antibiotics has been reported in recent years as well. In this study, the sensivity of 136 P. aeruginosa strains, isolated from various clinical materials, to fluoroquinolones has been investigated. The lowest resistance rate was in ciprofloxacin with 12.5%. The resistance rates of the others were as follows: norfloxacin 14.7%, levofloxacin 16.9%, ofloxacin 19.9% and pefloxacin 28.7%. The 88.2% of the resistant strains to all fluoroquinolones were originated from intensive care unit.

  5. Effect of gamma rays on antibiotic resistance of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from human skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shokier, H. A.; EI-Adly, A.A.; Hussein, H.; Shabon, M. H.; EI-Shanshoury, I.H.

    2010-01-01

    Seventy one samples were randomly collected from patients suffering from different bacterial skin infections. Forty isolates could not grow on the artificial media after second subculture while 31 isolates were able to survive. Twenty six of them were identified as Staphylococcus aureus and 5 were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The isolated strains were tested for their susceptibilities to gentamycin, ampicillin, ciprofloxacin and amoxicillin antibiotics .Up to 88.4% of S. aureus and of 80% of P.aeruginosa isolates were found to be resistant to ampicillin. On the other. hand, about 30.7% of S. aureus and 20% of P. aeruginosa were resistant to ciprofloxacin reveals the lowest antibiotic resistance . The antibiotic sensitivity was retested for the most resistant bacterial isolates after irradiated by different doses of gamma radiation (0.5,1, 2 Gy). The previous doses increased S .aureus inhibition zone to gentamycin, from 7.5 mm for unirradiated cells to 25 mm for irradiated one. While ciprofloxacin inhibition zone increased from 1.5 cm to 3 cm in doses of 0.5 to 2.0 Gy. S. aureus sensitivity to amoxicillin increased from 0.0 to 1.0 cm inhibition zone with increase in dose from 0.5 to 2.0 Gy.While the previous doses had no effect on ampicillin resistance. The same doses increased P. aeruginosa isolate resistance. Very low doses of gamma irradiation increased S.aureus and P. aeruginosa capsule production, also increased the release rate of capsule content in both types of bacteria.

  6. Metabolic Compensation of Fitness Costs Is a General Outcome for Antibiotic-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Mutants Overexpressing Efflux Pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares Pacheco, Jorge; Alvarez-Ortega, Carolina; Alcalde Rico, Manuel; Martínez, José Luis

    2017-07-25

    It is generally assumed that the acquisition of antibiotic resistance is associated with a fitness cost. We have shown that overexpression of the MexEF-OprN efflux pump does not decrease the fitness of a resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain compared to its wild-type counterpart. This lack of fitness cost was associated with a metabolic rewiring that includes increased expression of the anaerobic nitrate respiratory chain when cells are growing under fully aerobic conditions. It was not clear whether this metabolic compensation was exclusive to strains overexpressing MexEF-OprN or if it extended to other resistant strains that overexpress similar systems. To answer this question, we studied a set of P. aeruginosa mutants that independently overexpress the MexAB-OprM, MexCD-OprJ, or MexXY efflux pumps. We observed increased expression of the anaerobic nitrate respiratory chain in all cases, with a concomitant increase in NO 3 consumption and NO production. These efflux pumps are proton/substrate antiporters, and their overexpression may lead to intracellular H + accumulation, which may in turn offset the pH homeostasis. Indeed, all studied mutants showed a decrease in intracellular pH under anaerobic conditions. The fastest way to eliminate the excess of protons is by increasing oxygen consumption, a feature also displayed by all analyzed mutants. Taken together, our results support metabolic rewiring as a general mechanism to avoid the fitness costs derived from overexpression of P. aeruginosa multidrug efflux pumps. The development of drugs that block this metabolic "reaccommodation" might help in reducing the persistence and spread of antibiotic resistance elements among bacterial populations. IMPORTANCE It is widely accepted that the acquisition of resistance confers a fitness cost in such a way that in the absence of antibiotics, resistant populations will be outcompeted by susceptible ones. Based on this assumption, antibiotic cycling regimes have been

  7. Interspecies signalling via the Stenotrophomonas maltophilia diffusible signal factor influences biofilm formation and polymyxin tolerance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryan, R.P.; Fouhy, Y.; Garcia, B.F.

    2008-01-01

    Interspecies signalling through the action of diffusible signal molecules can influence the behaviour of organisms growing in polymicrobial communities. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa occur ubiquitously in the environment and can be found together in diverse niches....... maltophilia and could be mimicked by the addition of synthetic DSF. This response of P. aeruginosa to DSF required PA1396, a sensor kinase with an input domain of related amino acid sequence to the sensory input domain of RpfC, which is responsible for DSF perception in xanthomonads. Mutation of PA1396...... or addition of DSF to P. aeruginosa led to increased levels of a number of proteins with roles in bacterial stress tolerance, including those implicated in resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides. This effect was associated with increased tolerance to polymyxins. Homologues of PA1396 occur in a number...

  8. In vitro determination of the antibiotic susceptibility of biofilm-forming Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus: possible role of proteolytic activity and membrane lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masadeh, Majed M; Mhaidat, Nizar M; Alzoubi, Karem H; Hussein, Emad I; Al-Trad, Esra'a I

    2013-01-01

    We carried out a comprehensive overview of inhibitory effects of selected antibiotics on planktonic and biofilm cells of Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 29213) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853) strains. The possible involvement of protease activity and the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) profile of P. aeruginosa were also analyzed. Biofilm cells of both strains were more resistant to antibiotics than their planktonic counterparts. Protease activity was increased in both strains in the biofilm forms. Challenge with sublethal doses of antibiotics also increased proteolytic activity of biofilm cells. Additionally, the LPS profile of P. aeruginosa showed pattern alterations of the biofilm that can contribute to biofilm resistance and survival. These observations provide evidence for the involvement of bacterial proteolytic activity and LPS profile in the resistance of biofilm bacteria to antibiotics compared to their planktonic counterparts.

  9. Recovery of metallo-tolerant and antibiotic resistant psychrophilic bacteria from Siachen glacier, Pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Rafiq

    Full Text Available Cultureable bacterial diversity of previously unexplored Siachen glacier, Pakistan, was studied. Out of 50 isolates 33 (66% were Gram negative and 17 (34% Gram positive. About half of the isolates were pigment producers and were able to grow at 4-37°C. 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed Gram negative bacteria dominated by Proteobacteria (especially γ-proteobacteria and β-proteobacteria and Flavobacteria. The genus Pseudomonas (51.51%, 17 was dominant among γ- proteobacteria. β-proteobacteria constituted 4 (12.12% Alcaligenes and 4 (12.12% Janthinobacterium strains. Among Gram positive bacteria, phylum Actinobacteria, Rhodococcus (23.52%, 4 and Arthrobacter (23.52%, 4 were the dominating genra. Other bacteria belonged to Phylum Firmicutes with representative genus Carnobacterium (11.76%, 2 and 4 isolates represented 4 genera Bacillus, Lysinibacillus, Staphylococcus and Planomicrobium. Most of the Gram negative bacteria were moderate halophiles, while most of the Gram positives were extreme halophiles and were able to grow up to 6.12 M of NaCl. More than 2/3 of the isolates showed antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant S. aureus, E. coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, Enterococcus faecium, Candida albicans, Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus fumigatus and ATCC strains. Gram positive bacteria (94.11% were more resistant to heavy metals as compared to Gram negative (78.79% and showed maximum tolerance against iron and least tolerance against mercury.

  10. Antibiotic combination therapy can select for broad-spectrum multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestergaard, Martin; Paulander, Wilhelm; Marvig, Rasmus L; Clasen, Julie; Jochumsen, Nicholas; Molin, Søren; Jelsbak, Lars; Ingmer, Hanne; Folkesson, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Combination therapy with several antibiotics is one strategy that has been applied in order to limit the spread of antimicrobial resistance. We compared the de novo evolution of resistance during combination therapy with the β-lactam ceftazidime and the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin with the resistance evolved after single-drug exposure. Combination therapy selected for mutants that displayed broad-spectrum resistance, and a major resistance mechanism was mutational inactivation of the repressor gene mexR that regulates the multidrug efflux operon mexAB-oprM. Deregulation of this operon led to a broad-spectrum resistance phenotype that decreased susceptibility to the combination of drugs applied during selection as well as to unrelated antibiotic classes. Mutants isolated after single-drug exposure displayed narrow-spectrum resistance and carried mutations in the MexCD-OprJ efflux pump regulator gene nfxB conferring ciprofloxacin resistance, or in the gene encoding the non-essential penicillin-binding protein DacB conferring ceftazidime resistance. Reconstruction of resistance mutations by allelic replacement and in vitro fitness assays revealed that in contrast to single antibiotic use, combination therapy consistently selected for mutants with enhanced fitness expressing broad-spectrum resistance mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  11. High β-Lactamase Levels Change the Pharmacodynamics of β-Lactam Antibiotics in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciofu, Oana; Yang, Liang; Wu, Hong; Song, Zhijun; Oliver, Antonio; Høiby, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to β-lactam antibiotics is a frequent problem in Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. This resistance is mainly due to the hyperproduction of chromosomally encoded β-lactamase and biofilm formation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of β-lactamase in the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of ceftazidime and imipenem on P. aeruginosa biofilms. P. aeruginosa PAO1 and its corresponding β-lactamase-overproducing mutant, PAΔDDh2Dh3, were used in this study. Biofilms of these two strains in flow chambers, microtiter plates, and on alginate beads were treated with different concentrations of ceftazidime and imipenem. The kinetics of antibiotics on the biofilms was investigated in vitro by time-kill methods. Time-dependent killing of ceftazidime was observed in PAO1 biofilms, but concentration-dependent killing activity of ceftazidime was observed for β-lactamase-overproducing biofilms of P. aeruginosa in all three models. Ceftazidime showed time-dependent killing on planktonic PAO1 and PAΔDDh2Dh3. This difference is probably due to the special distribution and accumulation in the biofilm matrix of β-lactamase, which can hydrolyze the β-lactam antibiotics. The PK/PD indices of the AUC/MBIC and Cmax/MBIC (AUC is the area under concentration-time curve, MBIC is the minimal biofilm-inhibitory concentration, and Cmax is the maximum concentration of drug in serum) are probably the best parameters to describe the effect of ceftazidime in β-lactamase-overproducing P. aeruginosa biofilms. Meanwhile, imipenem showed time-dependent killing on both PAO1 and PAΔDDh2Dh3 biofilms. An inoculum effect of β-lactams was found for both planktonic and biofilm P. aeruginosa cells. The inoculum effect of ceftazidime for the β-lactamase-overproducing mutant PAΔDDh2Dh3 biofilms was more obvious than for PAO1 biofilms, with a requirement of higher antibiotic concentration and a longer period of treatment

  12. Characterization of paired mucoid/non-mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from Danish cystic fibrosis patients: antibiotic resistance, beta-lactamase activity and RiboPrinting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, O; Fussing, V; Bagge, N

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize 42 paired mucoid and non-mucoid Danish cystic fibrosis (CF) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates collected in 1997, by RiboPrinting, antibiotic susceptibility and beta-lactamase activity. Eight P. aeruginosa isolates collected before 1991 were included...... for comparison. Eighteen of the 42 paired mucoid and non-mucoid isolates showed the same ribotype; the remaining 24 belonged to different ribogroups. Mucoid isolates showed higher susceptibility to antibiotics and lower beta-lactamase activity compared with non-mucoid isolates. Significant differences (P...... beta-lactamase for the paired isolates...

  13. Bioproduction of p-hydroxybenzoate from renewable feedstock by solvent-tolerant Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, S.; Ruijssenaars, H.J.; Bont, J.A.M.de; Wery, J.

    2007-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida strain S12palB1 was constructed that produces p-hydroxybenzoate from renewable carbon sources via the central metabolite l-tyrosine. P. putida S12palB1 was based on the platform strain P. putida S12TPL3, which has an optimised carbon flux towards l-tyrosine. Phenylalanine ammonia

  14. Clonal dissemination, emergence of mutator lineages and antibiotic resistance evolution in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cystic fibrosis chronic lung infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Causapé, Carla; Rojo-Molinero, Estrella; Mulet, Xavier; Cabot, Gabriel; Moyà, Bartolomé; Figuerola, Joan; Togores, Bernat; Pérez, José L; Oliver, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Chronic respiratory infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF). We investigated the interplay between three key microbiological aspects of these infections: the occurrence of transmissible and persistent strains, the emergence of variants with enhanced mutation rates (mutators) and the evolution of antibiotic resistance. For this purpose, 10 sequential isolates, covering up to an 8-year period, from each of 10 CF patients were studied. As anticipated, resistance significantly accumulated overtime, and occurred more frequently among mutator variants detected in 6 of the patients. Nevertheless, highest resistance was documented for the nonmutator CF epidemic strain LES-1 (ST-146) detected for the first time in Spain. A correlation between resistance profiles and resistance mechanisms evaluated [efflux pump (mexB, mexD, mexF, and mexY) and ampC overexpression and OprD production] was not always obvious and hypersusceptibility to certain antibiotics (such as aztreonam or meropenem) was frequently observed. The analysis of whole genome macrorestriction fragments through Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) revealed that a single genotype (clone FQSE-A) produced persistent infections in 4 of the patients. Multilocus Sequence typing (MLST) identified clone FQSE-A as the CF epidemic clone ST-274, but striking discrepancies between PFGE and MLST profiles were evidenced. While PFGE macrorestriction patterns remained stable, a new sequence type (ST-1089) was detected in two of the patients, differing from ST-274 by only two point mutations in two of the genes, each leading to a nonpreviously described allele. Moreover, detailed genetic analyses revealed that the new ST-1089 is a mutS deficient mutator lineage that evolved from the epidemic strain ST-274, acquired specific resistance mechanisms, and underwent further interpatient spread. Thus, presented results provide the first evidence of interpatient dissemination of mutator

  15. Persistent Bacteremia from Pseudomonas aeruginosa with In Vitro Resistance to the Novel Antibiotics Ceftolozane-Tazobactam and Ceftazidime-Avibactam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louie Mar Gangcuangco

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ceftazidime-avibactam and ceftolozane-tazobactam are new antimicrobials with activity against multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We present the first case of persistent P. aeruginosa bacteremia with in vitro resistance to these novel antimicrobials. A 68-year-old man with newly diagnosed follicular lymphoma was admitted to the medical intensive care unit for sepsis and right lower extremity cellulitis. The patient was placed empirically on vancomycin and piperacillin-tazobactam. Blood cultures from Day 1 of hospitalization grew P. aeruginosa susceptible to piperacillin-tazobactam and cefepime identified using VITEK 2 (Biomerieux, Lenexa, KS. Repeat blood cultures from Day 5 grew P. aeruginosa resistant to all cephalosporins, as well as to meropenem by Day 10. Susceptibility testing performed by measuring minimum inhibitory concentration by E-test (Biomerieux, Lenexa, KS revealed that blood cultures from Day 10 were resistant to ceftazidime-avibactam and ceftolozane-tazobactam. The Verigene Blood Culture-Gram-Negative (BC-GN microarray-based assay (Nanosphere, Inc., Northbrook, IL was used to investigate underlying resistance mechanism in the P. aeruginosa isolate but CTX-M, KPC, NDM, VIM, IMP, and OXA gene were not detected. This case report highlights the well-documented phenomenon of antimicrobial resistance development in P. aeruginosa even during the course of appropriate antibiotic therapy. In the era of increasing multidrug-resistant organisms, routine susceptibility testing of P. aeruginosa to ceftazidime-avibactam and ceftolozane-tazobactam is warranted. Emerging resistance mechanisms to these novel antibiotics need to be further investigated.

  16. Clonal dissemination, emergence of mutator lineages and antibiotic resistance evolution in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cystic fibrosis chronic lung infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla López-Causapé

    Full Text Available Chronic respiratory infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF. We investigated the interplay between three key microbiological aspects of these infections: the occurrence of transmissible and persistent strains, the emergence of variants with enhanced mutation rates (mutators and the evolution of antibiotic resistance. For this purpose, 10 sequential isolates, covering up to an 8-year period, from each of 10 CF patients were studied. As anticipated, resistance significantly accumulated overtime, and occurred more frequently among mutator variants detected in 6 of the patients. Nevertheless, highest resistance was documented for the nonmutator CF epidemic strain LES-1 (ST-146 detected for the first time in Spain. A correlation between resistance profiles and resistance mechanisms evaluated [efflux pump (mexB, mexD, mexF, and mexY and ampC overexpression and OprD production] was not always obvious and hypersusceptibility to certain antibiotics (such as aztreonam or meropenem was frequently observed. The analysis of whole genome macrorestriction fragments through Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE revealed that a single genotype (clone FQSE-A produced persistent infections in 4 of the patients. Multilocus Sequence typing (MLST identified clone FQSE-A as the CF epidemic clone ST-274, but striking discrepancies between PFGE and MLST profiles were evidenced. While PFGE macrorestriction patterns remained stable, a new sequence type (ST-1089 was detected in two of the patients, differing from ST-274 by only two point mutations in two of the genes, each leading to a nonpreviously described allele. Moreover, detailed genetic analyses revealed that the new ST-1089 is a mutS deficient mutator lineage that evolved from the epidemic strain ST-274, acquired specific resistance mechanisms, and underwent further interpatient spread. Thus, presented results provide the first evidence of interpatient dissemination

  17. Metabolic Compensation of Fitness Costs Is a General Outcome for Antibiotic-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Mutants Overexpressing Efflux Pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares Pacheco, Jorge; Alvarez-Ortega, Carolina; Alcalde Rico, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT It is generally assumed that the acquisition of antibiotic resistance is associated with a fitness cost. We have shown that overexpression of the MexEF-OprN efflux pump does not decrease the fitness of a resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain compared to its wild-type counterpart. This lack of fitness cost was associated with a metabolic rewiring that includes increased expression of the anaerobic nitrate respiratory chain when cells are growing under fully aerobic conditions. It was not clear whether this metabolic compensation was exclusive to strains overexpressing MexEF-OprN or if it extended to other resistant strains that overexpress similar systems. To answer this question, we studied a set of P. aeruginosa mutants that independently overexpress the MexAB-OprM, MexCD-OprJ, or MexXY efflux pumps. We observed increased expression of the anaerobic nitrate respiratory chain in all cases, with a concomitant increase in NO3 consumption and NO production. These efflux pumps are proton/substrate antiporters, and their overexpression may lead to intracellular H+ accumulation, which may in turn offset the pH homeostasis. Indeed, all studied mutants showed a decrease in intracellular pH under anaerobic conditions. The fastest way to eliminate the excess of protons is by increasing oxygen consumption, a feature also displayed by all analyzed mutants. Taken together, our results support metabolic rewiring as a general mechanism to avoid the fitness costs derived from overexpression of P. aeruginosa multidrug efflux pumps. The development of drugs that block this metabolic “reaccommodation” might help in reducing the persistence and spread of antibiotic resistance elements among bacterial populations. PMID:28743808

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas Parafulva PRS09-11288, a Biocontrol Strain Produces the Antibiotic Phenazine-1-carboxylic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Chen, Ping; Ye, Guoyou; Lin, Haiyan; Ren, Deyong; Guo, Longbiao; Zhu, Bo; Wang, Zhongwei

    2018-01-22

    Rhizoctonia solani is a plant pathogenic fungus, which can infect a wide range of economic crops including rice. In this case, biological control of this pathogen is one of the fundmental way to effectively control this pathogen. The Pseudomonas parafulva strain PRS09-11288 was isolated from rice rhizosphere and shows biocontrol ability against R. solani. Here, we analyzed the P. parafulva genome, which is ~ 4.7 Mb, with 4310 coding sequences, 76 tRNAs, and 7 rRNAs. Genome analysis identified a phenazine biosynthetic pathway, which can produce antibiotic phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA). This compound is responsible for biocontrol ability against R. solani Kühn, which is one of the most serious fungus disease on rice. Analysis of the phenazine biosynthesis gene mutant, ΔphzF, which is very important in this pathway, confirmed the relationship between the pathway and PCA production using LC-MS profiles. The annotated full genome sequence of this strain sheds light on the role of P. parafulva PRS09-11288 as a biocontrol bacterium.

  19. DNA Polymerases ImuC and DinB Are Involved in DNA Alkylation Damage Tolerance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatsenko, Tatjana; Sidorenko, Julia; Saumaa, Signe; Kivisaar, Maia

    2017-01-01

    Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), facilitated by low-fidelity polymerases, is an important DNA damage tolerance mechanism. Here, we investigated the role and biological function of TLS polymerase ImuC (former DnaE2), generally present in bacteria lacking DNA polymerase V, and TLS polymerase DinB in response to DNA alkylation damage in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and P. putida. We found that TLS DNA polymerases ImuC and DinB ensured a protective role against N- and O-methylation induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) in both P. aeruginosa and P. putida. DinB also appeared to be important for the survival of P. aeruginosa and rapidly growing P. putida cells in the presence of methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). The role of ImuC in protection against MMS-induced damage was uncovered under DinB-deficient conditions. Apart from this, both ImuC and DinB were critical for the survival of bacteria with impaired base excision repair (BER) functions upon alkylation damage, lacking DNA glycosylases AlkA and/or Tag. Here, the increased sensitivity of imuCdinB double deficient strains in comparison to single mutants suggested that the specificity of alkylated DNA lesion bypass of DinB and ImuC might also be different. Moreover, our results demonstrated that mutagenesis induced by MMS in pseudomonads was largely ImuC-dependent. Unexpectedly, we discovered that the growth temperature of bacteria affected the efficiency of DinB and ImuC in ensuring cell survival upon alkylation damage. Taken together, the results of our study disclosed the involvement of ImuC in DNA alkylation damage tolerance, especially at low temperatures, and its possible contribution to the adaptation of pseudomonads upon DNA alkylation damage via increased mutagenesis.

  20. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa and Cystic Fibrosis: Antibiotic Therapy and the Science behind the Magic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noni E MacDonald

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory failure secondary to chronic bronchiectasis is the cause of death in more than 90% of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF. The predominant microbes involved in CF lung disease are unusual: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Burkolderia cepacia. While antimicrobial therapy has been a component of CF care programs for decades, randomized controlled studies in the 1980s and early 1990s failed to show consistent measurable benefit. Research that stemmed from the discovery of the CF gene has shed new light on the inter-relationship of these microbes and the respiratory epithelial lung changes secondary to the CF gene. Five mechanisms have been proposed to explain the increased P aeruginosa colonization of the lower airway in CF. Recent research has also shown that antimicrobial therapy in CF may be effective not through eradication of the organism but by decreasing bacterial density and exoproduct production in the lung and thus decreasing inflammatory stimulus; by protecting against the consequences of an overexhuberant host response and in patients with stop mutations, potentially by correcting the gene defect. This tale of misunderstanding of the role and value of antimicrobial therapy in CF care illustrates the importance of ensuring close communiation between clinicians and researchers. The randomized controlled studies of the 1980s were not designed to answer the ‘right’ questions. The clinicians’ observations that the CF patients did improve with antimicrobial therapy have been validated by recent studies using different endpoints.

  1. In vitro susceptibility of aural isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to commonly used ototopical antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohar, J E; Kenna, M A; Wadowsky, R M

    1996-03-01

    The choice of antimicrobial agents used to treat Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections of the ear is quite empiric. Yet in spite of this, very little has been published examining susceptibility patterns of aural isolates of P. aeruginosa. Recently, increasing concern has emerged over the development of resistance to many of the commonly used ototopical preparations with activity against P. aeruginosa. This concern stems from the fact that these preparations have been in use for a long time, and P. aeruginosa is known to develop resistance fairly readily. We prospectively studied the susceptibilities of aural isolates of P. aeruginosa in 231 consecutive children who were seen in the outpatient Pediatric Otolaryngology Department at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh during the years 1992 and 1993. The agents tested included neomycin, polymyxin B, colistin, and norfloxacin. We found that only 17.8% of the isolates were sensitive to neomycin, as opposed to > 95% for each of the other agents tested (polymyxin B, 99.6%; colistin, 97.4%; and norfloxacin, 98.3%). This difference proved to be statistically significant (p < 0.05). Given the concern of aminoglycoside-induced ototoxicity and the high rate of neomycin resistance, we believe that further investigation of other alternative ototopic agents with activity against P. aeruginosa is warranted.

  2. The catabolite repression control protein Crc plays a role in the development of antimicrobial-tolerant subpopulations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lianbo; Chiang, Wen-Chi; Gao, Qingguo

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria form complex surface-attached biofilm communities in nature. Biofilm cells differentiate into subpopulations which display tolerance towards antimicrobial agents. However, the signal transduction pathways regulating subpopulation differentiation in biofilms are largely unelucidated....... In the present study, we show that the catabolite repression control protein Crc regulates the metabolic state of Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells in biofilms, and plays an important role in the development of antimicrobial-tolerant subpopulations in P. aeruginosa biofilms....

  3. Study of antibiotic resistance by efflux in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi-Ali, A; Rahmani-Badi, A; Falsafi, T; Nikname, V

    2007-03-15

    Twenty three multidrug resistant (MDR) strains were selected from 104 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa and screened for resistance to ceftazidim, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin and ethidium bromide by determining MICs. The MICs of EtBr and antibiotics were also measured in presence of proton conductor, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP). The presence of proton gradient-dependent efflux mechanism was assessed using ethidium bromide accumulation assays. Drug accumulation studies for these antibiotics were performed to determine the drug specificity of efflux. PCR was used to identify the mexAB-oprM gene as a major factor in MDR intrinsic resistance of clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. In absence of CCCP, the MICs of these antimicrobial agents were > or = 4 microg L(-1). CCCP reduced the MICs of them at least in 1 dilution. Ethidium bromide accumulation assays confirmed the presence of proton gradient-dependent efflux mechanism in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa and results of accumulation assays of drugs demonstrate that, active efflux in this bacterium are due to broadly-specific multidrug efflux system(s). PCR products demonstrate the presence of mexAB-oprM operon in 4 strains from 23 clinical isolates. These results confirmed the presence of proton gradient-dependent efflux mechanism in all of the clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa and demonstrate that, efflux pumps in this bacterium are broadly-specific multidrug efflux systems. In this study we show that MexAB-OprM multidrug efflux system was expressed in only 17% of clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. These results confirmed the presence of other multidrug efflux pumps in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa.

  4. The effects of active efflux pumps on antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzi, Huseyin Agah; Kulah, Canan; Ciftci, Ihsan Hakkı

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the roles of active efflux pumps in antibiotic resistance. The transcription efflux pump genes were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to determine their role in drug resistance. Antibiotic sensitivity testing was carried out using the Vitek 2 automated system (bioMérieux, France). Isolates were divided into four groups according to their resistance status: multiple-drug resistant (MDR), isolated carbapenem resistant (ICR), isolated quinolone resistant (IQR), and carbapenem and quinolone resistant (CQR). Transcript levels of mexB, mexD, mexF, and mexY were analyzed by qPCR using a LightCycler instrument (Roche, Germany). The genetic similarity between isolates was determined using arbitrarily primed PCR (AP-PCR). Among the 50 isolates investigated, the frequency of genes classified as overexpressed were 88 % for mexD, 76 % for mexB, 46 % for mexF, and 40 % for mexY. Within the MDR group, mexB was overexpressed in 15 of 22 isolates, mexD in 20 of 22, mexF in 15 of 22, and mexY in 19 of 22. In the ICR group, isolates mexB and mexD were each overexpressed in five isolates. mexD overexpression was observed in all seven CQR isolates. Within the IQR group, mexB and mexD were overexpressed in all 12 isolates. mexF overexpression was detected in 7 of 12 isolates in this group. 18 distinct banding patterns were determined by AP-PCR. Increased transcription of mexB was directly correlated with meropenem resistance in the majority of isolates tested, while MexCD-OprJ and MexEF-OprN were related to quinolone resistance; the MexCD-OprJ efflux pump was also related to multidrug resistance. Increased transcription of mexY may contribute to the gentamicin resistance.

  5. Whole-Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas putida Strain UASWS0946, a Highly Ammonia-Tolerant Nitrifying Bacterium Isolated from Sewage Sludge Aerobic Granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crovadore, Julien; Calmin, Gautier; Cochard, Bastien; Chablais, Romain; Grizard, Damien; Berthon, Jean-Yves; Lefort, François

    2015-10-08

    We report here the genome of Pseudomonas putida strain UASWS0946, a highly ammonia-tolerant nitrifying strain isolated from sewage sludge aerobic granules, which displays adequate genetic equipment for soil depollution, sludge treatment, and biological fertilization in agriculture. Copyright © 2015 Crovadore et al.

  6. Transposon mutations in the flagella biosynthetic pathway of the solvent-tolerant Pseudomonas putida S12 result in a decreased expression of solvent efflux genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieboom, J; Bruinenberg, R; Keizer-Gunnink, [No Value; de Bont, JAM

    2001-01-01

    Fourteen solvent-sensitive transposon mutants were generated from the solvent-tolerant Pseudomonas putida strain S12 by applying the TnMOD-KmO mutagenesis system. These mutants were unable to grow in the presence of octanol and toluene. By cloning the region flanking the transposon insertion point a

  7. In vitro determination of the antibiotic susceptibility of biofilm-forming Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus: possible role of proteolytic activity and membrane lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masadeh MM

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Majed M Masadeh,1 Nizar M Mhaidat,2 Karem H Alzoubi,2 Emad I Hussein,3 Esra’a I Al-Trad41Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, 2Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan; 3Department of Biological Sciences, Yarmouk University, Irbid, Jordan; 4Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, JordanAbstract: We carried out a comprehensive overview of inhibitory effects of selected antibiotics on planktonic and biofilm cells of Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 29213 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853 strains. The possible involvement of protease activity and the lipopolysaccharide (LPS profile of P. aeruginosa were also analyzed. Biofilm cells of both strains were more resistant to antibiotics than their planktonic counterparts. Protease activity was increased in both strains in the biofilm forms. Challenge with sublethal doses of antibiotics also increased proteolytic activity of biofilm cells. Additionally, the LPS profile of P. aeruginosa showed pattern alterations of the biofilm that can contribute to biofilm resistance and survival. These observations provide evidence for the involvement of bacterial proteolytic activity and LPS profile in the resistance of biofilm bacteria to antibiotics compared to their planktonic counterparts.Keywords: biofilm, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, proteolytic activity, lipopolysaccharide

  8. The Frequency and Antibiotic Resistance of Chromate Tolerating Microorganisms in Qom Industrial wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Zolfaghary

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: Chromium is one of the major sources of environmental pollution and a potent occupational carcinogen. The hexavalent chromium compounds are more toxic than those of trivalent. Recent studies have suggested that reduction of Cr(VI to its lower oxidation states and related free radical reactions play an important role in carcinogenic, genotoxic and immunotoxic effects in human and animals.

     This paper reports occurrence of chromium tolerant and antibiotic resistant organism of four industrial wastewaters including electroplating, textile, galvanization, and dye manufacturing in Qom.

     

    Methods: In this study 241 isolates including 23 gram positive coccus, 3 gram negative bacilli and 215 gram positive bacilli were obtained by using of LB Agar plus determined concentration of potassium chromate.

     

    Results: A gram positive coccus, chromate reducing bacteria strain isolated from effluent of chromo plaiting could tolerate up to 760mM concentration in 34°c and pH=7 within 24h and showed resistance to some antibiotics. Biochemical, physiological, morphological and 16SrRNA tests showed this bacteria belongs to staphylococcus arlettae strain R1-7A.

     

    Conclusion: the result indicates that the indigenous microbial isolates can be useful for hexavalent chromium detoxification of chromium contamination environment and reduction of its pathogenicity and carcinogenicity, on the other hand the control of these bacteria is important from the medical view.

     

  9. Molecular mechanisms of biofilm-based antibiotic resistance and tolerance in pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Clayton W; Mah, Thien-Fah

    2017-05-01

    Biofilms are surface-attached groups of microbial cells encased in an extracellular matrix that are significantly less susceptible to antimicrobial agents than non-adherent, planktonic cells. Biofilm-based infections are, as a result, extremely difficult to cure. A wide range of molecular mechanisms contribute to the high degree of recalcitrance that is characteristic of biofilm communities. These mechanisms include, among others, interaction of antimicrobials with biofilm matrix components, reduced growth rates and the various actions of specific genetic determinants of antibiotic resistance and tolerance. Alone, each of these mechanisms only partially accounts for the increased antimicrobial recalcitrance observed in biofilms. Acting in concert, however, these defences help to ensure the survival of biofilm cells in the face of even the most aggressive antimicrobial treatment regimens. This review summarises both historical and recent scientific data in support of the known biofilm resistance and tolerance mechanisms. Additionally, suggestions for future work in the field are provided. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Correlation of Frequency of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa and Exos & Exou Genes and Their Antibiotic Sensitivity Pattern in Specimen Isolated from ICU Ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Joodzadeh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a cause of nosocomial infections that can be destroyer by antibiotic-resistant strains. This study conducted to determine the antibiotic susceptibility pattern and distribution of exoU and exoS among clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. Fifty three specimens of tracheal tube were collected from patients who were hospitalized in ICU wards and P. aeruginosa were isolated and identified by phenotypic and molecular methods. Antibiotic resistance performs by disk diffusion and analyzed their virulence factors genes by PCR method. Susceptibility pattern of 53 isolates of P. aeruginosa showed that majority and minority of resistance belong to cefepime (55.4%,and Meropenem (50% Respectively. Twenty four (45.2% isolates were not susceptible to three or more different groups of antibiotics. Forty (71.4% of isolated have had exoSand1(1.8% exoU, 8(15%both of exoS and exoU and the rest being negative for exoS or exoU. Distribution of MDR(resistance to three or more group of antibiotics exoenzymes were shown: exoU(7.5%and exoS(90.5%. According to statistically analysis there were not significant relationship between presence of exo SandexoU and antibiotic resistance.

  11. Association of overexpression of efflux pump genes with antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains clinically isolated from urinary tract infection patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemura, Katsumi; Osawa, Kayo; Kato, Ayaka; Tokimatsu, Issei; Arakawa, Soichi; Shirakawa, Toshiro; Fujisawa, Masato

    2015-09-01

    There are several mechanisms for antibiotic-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The purpose of this study is to investigate the association between the expression of efflux pump-coding genes and antibiotic resistance in P. aeruginosa causing urinary tract infections (UTIs). We extracted the RNA from 105 clinical strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from UTI patients with full data on antibiotic MICs and assayed real-time quantitative reverse-transcription PCR. We investigated the gene expressions of four resistance nodulation cell division-type multi-drug efflux pump systems (MexAB-OprM, MexCD-OprJ, MexEF-OprN and MexXY(-OprA)) and the correlation of the MICs of nine antibiotics, risk factors and antibiotic resistance-related genes with expressions of mexB, mexC, mexE and mexY. Multivariate statistical data demonstrated a significant relationship between increased expression of mexB or mexC and complicated UTI (Odds ratio=8.03, Presistance to levofloxacin (LVFX) (Odds ratio=4.48, P=0.035). In conclusion, increased expression of mexC leads to LVFX resistance in P. aeruginosa causing UTI. These results contribute to our knowledge of the efflux pump system and antibiotic resistance.

  12. Fluorescence-Based Reporter for Gauging Cyclic Di-GMP Levels in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten T.; Borlee, Bradley R.; Murakami, Keiji

    2012-01-01

    The increased tolerance toward the host immune system and antibiotics displayed by biofilm-forming Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other bacteria in chronic infections such as cystic fibrosis bronchopneumonia is of major concern. Targeting of biofilm formation is believed to be a key aspect in the dev......The increased tolerance toward the host immune system and antibiotics displayed by biofilm-forming Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other bacteria in chronic infections such as cystic fibrosis bronchopneumonia is of major concern. Targeting of biofilm formation is believed to be a key aspect...

  13. Probing the proteome response to toluene exposure in the solvent tolerant pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijte, D.; Baar, B.L.M. van; Heck, A.J.R.; Altelaar, A.F.M.

    2011-01-01

    To enhance target production from biocatalysts, it is necessary to thoroughly understand the molecular mechanisms involved in production, degradation, and, importantly, adaptation to the required environment. One such bacterium with high potential for biocatalysis is the solvent-tolerant bacteria

  14. The MerR-Like Regulator BrlR Impairs Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Tolerance to Colistin by Repressing PhoPQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Jacob R.

    2013-01-01

    While the MerR-like transcriptional regulator BrlR has been demonstrated to contribute to Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm tolerance to antimicrobial agents known as multidrug efflux pump substrates, the role of BrlR in resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAP), which is based on reduced outer membrane susceptibility, is not known. Here, we demonstrate that inactivation of brlR coincided with increased resistance of P. aeruginosa to colistin, while overexpression of brlR resulted in increased susceptibility. brlR expression correlated with reduced transcript abundances of phoP, phoQ, pmrA, pmrB, and arnC. Inactivation of pmrA and pmrB had no effect on the susceptibility of P. aeruginosa biofilms to colistin, while inactivation of phoP and phoQ rendered biofilms more susceptible than the wild type. The susceptibility phenotype of ΔphoP biofilms to colistin was comparable to that of P. aeruginosa biofilms overexpressing brlR. BrlR was found to directly bind to oprH promoter DNA of the oprH-phoPQ operon. BrlR reciprocally contributed to colistin and tobramycin resistance in P. aeruginosa PAO1 and CF clinical isolates, with overexpression of brlR resulting in increased tobramycin MICs and increased tobramycin resistance but decreased colistin MICs and increased colistin susceptibility. The opposite trend was observed upon brlR inactivation. The difference in susceptibility to colistin and tobramycin was eliminated by combination treatment of biofilms with both antibiotics. Our findings establish BrlR as an unusual member of the MerR family, as it not only functions as a multidrug transport activator, but also acts as a repressor of phoPQ expression, thus suppressing colistin resistance. PMID:23935054

  15. Mutation in elongation factor G confers resistance to the antibiotic argyrin in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielecki, Piotr; Lukat, Peer; Hüsecken, Kristina; Dötsch, Andreas; Steinmetz, Heinrich; Hartmann, Rolf W; Müller, Rolf; Häussler, Susanne

    2012-11-05

    The natural myxobacterial product argyrin is a cyclic peptide exhibiting immunosuppressive activity as well as antibacterial activity directed against the highly intrinsically resistant opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this study, we used whole-genome sequencing technology as a powerful tool to determine the mode of action of argyrin. Sequencing of argyrin-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates selected in vitro uncovered six point mutations that distinguished the resistant mutants from their susceptible parental strain. All six mutations were localized within one gene: fusA1, which encodes for the elongation factor EF-G. After the reintroduction of selected mutations into the susceptible wild type, the strain became resistant to argyrin. Surface plasmon resonance experiments confirmed the interaction of argyrin A with FusA1. Interestingly, EF-G has been previously shown to be the target of the anti-Staphylococcus antibiotic fusidic acid. Mapping of the mutations onto a structural model of EF-G revealed that the mutations conveying resistance against argyrin were clustered within domain III on the side opposite to that involved in fusidic acid binding, thus indicating that argyrin exhibits a new mode of protein synthesis inhibition. Although no mutations causing argyrin resistance have been found in other genes of P. aeruginosa, analysis of the sequence identity in EF-G and its correlation with argyrin resistance in different bacteria imply that additional factors such as uptake of argyrin play a role in the argyrin resistance of other organisms. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Blue light treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Strong bactericidal activity, synergism with antibiotics and inactivation of virulence factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fila, Grzegorz; Kawiak, Anna; Grinholc, Mariusz Stanislaw

    2017-08-18

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is among the most common pathogens responsible for both acute and chronic infections of high incidence and severity. Additionally, P. aeruginosa resistance to conventional antimicrobials has increased rapidly over the past decade. Therefore, it is crucial to explore new therapeutic options, particularly options that specifically target the pathogenic mechanisms of this microbe. The ability of a pathogenic bacterium to cause disease is dependent upon the production of agents termed 'virulence factors', and approaches to mitigate these agents have gained increasing attention as new antibacterial strategies. Although blue light irradiation is a promising alternative approach, only limited and preliminary studies have described its effect on virulence factors. The current study aimed to investigate the effects of lethal and sub-lethal doses of blue light treatment (BLT) on P. aeruginosa virulence factors. We analyzed the inhibitory effects of blue light irradiation on the production/activity of several virulence factors. Lethal BLT inhibited the activity of pyocyanin, staphylolysin, pseudolysin and other proteases, but sub-lethal BLT did not affect the production/expression of proteases, phospholipases, and flagella- or type IV pili-associated motility. Moreover, a eukaryotic cytotoxicity test confirmed the decreased toxicity of blue light-treated extracellular P. aeruginosa fractions. Finally, the increased antimicrobial susceptibility of P. aeruginosa treated with sequential doses of sub-lethal BLT was demonstrated with a checkerboard test. Thus, this work provides evidence-based proof of the susceptibility of drug-resistant P. aeruginosa to BLT-mediated killing, accompanied by virulence factor reduction, and describes the synergy between antibiotics and sub-lethal BLT.

  17. Emergence of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Detection of Isolates harboring blaCTX gene causing infections in hospital and determination of their susceptibility to antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Rabani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Because of its ubiquitous nature, ability to survive in moist environments, and innate resistance to many antibiotics and antiseptics, P. aeruginosa is a common pathogen in hospitals. The goals of this study were detection of Psudomonas aeruginosa harboring blaCTX gene causing infections in hospitals and determination of their susceptibility to antibiotics and ESBL production. Methods: In the present cross-sectional study, clinical samples from hospitalized patients were collected and culture was done on apropriate media. Final identification was performed using biochemical tests and API 20NE system. According to the protocol CLSI 2014 disc diffusion, combination disk, modified hodge test (MHT and E-test were used for antibiotic susceptibility, ESBL production, carbapenemas production, and MIC values of imipenem respectively. The blaCTX gene was detected in the isolates by PCR molecular method. Results: In the current study, 45 isolates of Pseudomonas aeroginosa were obtained from hospitalized patients, consisting of 19 males (42.2% and 26 females (57.8%. As observed, 57.8% (26 strains of isolates were recovered from sputum. The most effective antibiotics against isolates were amikacin and colistin with 97.8% suseptibility whereas the highest resistance was to cefotaxime (97.8%. As revealed 77.8% of isolates showed response to group 2 carbapenems (imipenem, meropenem. All imipenem resistant strains had the MIC more than 32. Seventeen strains (37.7% were  showed resistant to quinolones (ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin. The results of PCR on blaCTX gene indicated that 15.5% of the isolates possess the gene. Conclusion: Carbapenem group of antibiotic in 22% of infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa were ineffective and indiscriminate prescribing of these drugs will increase the ratet of resistance.

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 exopolysaccharides are important for mixed species biofilm community development and stress tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravanan ePeriasamy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 produces three polysaccharides, alginate, Psl and Pel that play distinct roles in attachment and biofilm formation for monospecies biofilms. Considerably less is known about their role in the development of mixed species biofilm communities. This study has investigated the roles of alginate, Psl and Pel during biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa in a defined and experimentally informative mixed species biofilm community, consisting of P. aeruginosa, Pseudomonas protegens and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Loss of the Psl polysaccharide had the biggest impact on the integration of P. aeruginosa in the mixed species biofilms, where the percent composition of the psl mutant was significantly lower (0.06% than its wild-type parent (2.44%. In contrast, loss of the Pel polysaccharide had no impact on mixed species biofilm development. Loss of alginate or its overproduction resulted in P. aeruginosa representing 8.4% and 18.11%, respectively, of the mixed species biofilm. Dual species biofilms of P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae were not affected by loss of alginate, Pel or Psl, while the mucoid P. aeruginosa strain achieved a greater biomass than its parent strain. When P. aeruginosa was grown with P. protegens, loss of the Pel or alginate polysaccharides resulted in biofilms that were not significantly different from biofilms formed by the wild-type PAO1. In contrast, overproduction of alginate resulted in biofilms that were comprised of 35-40% of P. aeruginosa, which was significantly higher than the wild-type (5-20%. Loss of the Psl polysaccharide significantly reduced the percentage composition of P. aeruginosa in dual species biofilms with P. protegens (<1%. Loss of the Psl polysaccharide significantly disrupted the communal stress resistance of the three species biofilms. Thus, the polysaccharide composition of an individual species significantly impacts mixed species biofilm development and the emergent properties of such

  19. Impact of the duration of antibiotics on clinical events in patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa ventilator-associated pneumonia: study protocol for a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouglé, Adrien; Foucrier, Arnaud; Dupont, Hervé; Montravers, Philippe; Ouattara, Alexandre; Kalfon, Pierre; Squara, Pierre; Simon, Tabassome; Amour, Julien

    2017-01-23

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) accounts for 25% of infections in intensive care units. Compared to a long duration (LD) of antibiotic therapy, a short duration (SD) has a comparable clinical efficacy with less antibiotic use and less multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogen emergence, with the exception of documented VAP of non-fermenting Gram-negative bacilli (NF-GNB), including Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA). These results have led the American Thoracic Society to recommend SD therapy for VAP, except for PA-VAP. Thus the beneficial effect of SD therapy in PA-VAP is still a matter of debate. We aimed to assess the non-inferiority of a short duration of antibiotics (8 days) versus prolonged antibiotic therapy (15 days) in PA-VAP. The impact of the duration of antibiotics on clinical events in patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa ventilator-associated pneumonia (iDIAPASON) trial is a randomized, open-labeled non-inferiority controlled trial, conducted in 34 French intensive care units (ICUs), comparing two groups of patients with PA-VAP according to the duration (8 days or 15 days) of effective antibiotic therapy against PA. The primary outcome is a composite endpoint combining day 90 mortality and PA-VAP recurrence rate during hospitalization in the ICU. Furthermore, durations of mechanical ventilation and hospitalization, as well as number and types of extrapulmonary infections or acquisition of MDR pathogens during the hospitalization in the ICU will be recorded. Recurrence with predefined criteria (clinical suspicion of VAP associated with a positive quantitative culture of a respiratory sample) will be evaluated by two independent experts. Demonstrating that an SD (8 days) versus LD (15 days) therapy strategy in PA-VAP treatment is safe and not associated with an increased mortality or recurrence rate could lead to a change in practices and guidelines in the management of antibiotic therapy of this frequent ICU complication. This strategy could lead to

  20. Tetracycline Antibiotics and Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Trudy H

    2016-04-01

    Tetracyclines possess many properties considered ideal for antibiotic drugs, including activity against Gram-positive and -negative pathogens, proven clinical safety, acceptable tolerability, and the availability of intravenous (IV) and oral formulations for most members of the class. As with all antibiotic classes, the antimicrobial activities of tetracyclines are subject to both class-specific and intrinsic antibiotic-resistance mechanisms. Since the discovery of the first tetracyclines more than 60 years ago, ongoing optimization of the core scaffold has produced tetracyclines in clinical use and development that are capable of thwarting many of these resistance mechanisms. New chemistry approaches have enabled the creation of synthetic derivatives with improved in vitro potency and in vivo efficacy, ensuring that the full potential of the class can be explored for use against current and emerging multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens, including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, MDR Acinetobacter species, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Copyright © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  1. Bistable expression of virulence genes in salmonella leads to the formation of an antibiotic-tolerant subpopulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Arnoldini

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic heterogeneity can confer clonal groups of organisms with new functionality. A paradigmatic example is the bistable expression of virulence genes in Salmonella typhimurium, which leads to phenotypically virulent and phenotypically avirulent subpopulations. The two subpopulations have been shown to divide labor during S. typhimurium infections. Here, we show that heterogeneous virulence gene expression in this organism also promotes survival against exposure to antibiotics through a bet-hedging mechanism. Using microfluidic devices in combination with fluorescence time-lapse microscopy and quantitative image analysis, we analyzed the expression of virulence genes at the single cell level and related it to survival when exposed to antibiotics. We found that, across different types of antibiotics and under concentrations that are clinically relevant, the subpopulation of bacterial cells that express virulence genes shows increased survival after exposure to antibiotics. Intriguingly, there is an interplay between the two consequences of phenotypic heterogeneity. The bet-hedging effect that arises through heterogeneity in virulence gene expression can protect clonal populations against avirulent mutants that exploit and subvert the division of labor within these populations. We conclude that bet-hedging and the division of labor can arise through variation in a single trait and interact with each other. This reveals a new degree of functional complexity of phenotypic heterogeneity. In addition, our results suggest a general principle of how pathogens can evade antibiotics: Expression of virulence factors often entails metabolic costs and the resulting growth retardation could generally increase tolerance against antibiotics and thus compromise treatment.

  2. Multiple antibiotic susceptibility of polyphosphate kinase mutants (ppk1 and ppk2 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 as revealed by global phenotypic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javiera Ortiz-Severín

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is known to be a multidrug resistant opportunistic pathogen. Particularly, P. aeruginosa PAO1 polyphosphate kinase mutant (ppk1 is deficient in motility, quorum sensing, biofilm formation and virulence FINDINGS: By using Phenotypic Microarrays (PM we analyzed near 2000 phenotypes of P. aeruginosa PAO1 polyP kinase mutants (ppk1 and ppk2. We found that both ppk mutants shared most of the phenotypic changes and interestingly many of them related to susceptibility toward numerous and different type of antibiotics such as Ciprofloxacin, Chloramphenicol and Rifampicin CONCLUSIONS: Combining the fact that ppk1 mutants have reduced virulence and are more susceptible to antibiotics, polyP synthesis and particularly PPK1, is a good target for the design of molecules with anti-virulence and anti-persistence properties.

  3. A New Twist to the Kirby-Bauer Antibiotic Susceptibility Test Activity?Increasing Antibiotic Sensitivity of Pseudomonas fluorescens through Thermal Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Gerbig, Donald G.; Engohang-Ndong, Jean; Aubihl, Heather

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic sensitivity and the effect of temperature on microbial growth are two standard laboratory activities found in most microbial laboratory manuals. We have found a novel way to combine the two activities to demonstrate how temperature can influence antibiotic sensitivity using a standard incubator in instructional laboratory settings. This activity reinforces the important concepts of microbial growth and temperature along with Kirby-Bauer antibiotic susceptibility testing. We found t...

  4. Interspecific differences in growth response and tolerance to the antibiotic sulfadiazine in ten clonal wetland plants in South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinfeng; Xu, Huilian; Sun, Yingbo; Huang, Lili; Zhang, Peixia; Zou, Chunping; Yu, Bo; Zhu, Genfa; Zhao, Chaoyi

    2016-02-01

    Pollution caused by residual antibiotics is a worldwide environmental issue. Antibiotic residues often occur in aquatic ecosystems, posing threats to the health of aquatic organisms. The effects of antibiotic residues on the growth of crop plants and on human health are reasonably well known. However, less is known about antibiotic effects on wetland plants. Therefore, we studied the response and tolerance of ten clonal wetland plants grown in soil spiked with sulfadiazine at 10 mg kg(-1) (an environmentally relevant concentration) and 100 mg kg(-1). At 10 mg kg(-1), ramet number was the least affected trait, while root number was the most affected among plant species. Plant shoot and total biomass were reduced in all species except in Cyperus malaccensis var. brevifolius and Panicum repens. Chlorophyll content was reduced in Alocasia macrorrhiza, Saururus chinensis, and Commelina diffusa. In general, Panicum paludosum and C. malaccensis var. brevifolius showed the least reduction of growth parameters, whereas growth of both A. macrorrhiza and S. chinensis was severely reduced. At 100 mg kg(-1), negative responses occurred in all species. Comprehensive tolerance analysis revealed that P. paludosum and C. malaccensis var. brevifolius were the species most resistant to sulfadiazine. These species are potential candidates for sulfadiazine polluted wetland restoration. A. macrorrhiza and S. chinensis were the most susceptible species and they should be protected from sulfadiazine pollution. Relative plant shoot biomass and height were the most useful indicators for evaluating plant tolerance to sulfadiazine. Plant tolerance to sulfadiazine was associated with the differences of plants in height and shoot biomass. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Meropenem in cystic fibrosis patients infected with resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Burkholderia cepacia and with hypersensitivity to beta-lactam antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Jensen, Tim; Pressler, Tacjana

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy and safety of meropenem, administered on a compassionate basis to 62 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients (age: 24plus minus6 years) with hypersensitivity reactions to beta-lactam antibiotics and/or infection by bacteria resistant to other antibiotics. METHODS: Fifty......), ciprofloxacin 1.2 (9.7), piperacillin 49 (16.3), ceftazidime 26 (23), aztreonam 26 (35), imipenem 6.4 (not determined) and meropenem 5.1 (4.8). No statistically significant increase in the MICs of meropenem for either pathogen occurred during therapy. Of the 124 courses, 115 were tolerated without any clinical...

  6. Prevalence of Multiple Antibiotics Resistant (MAR) Pseudomonas Species in the Final Effluents of Three Municipal Wastewater Treatment Facilities in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odjadjare, Emmanuel E.; Igbinosa, Etinosa O.; Mordi, Raphael; Igere, Bright; Igeleke, Clara L.; Okoh, Anthony I.

    2012-01-01

    The final effluents of three (Alice, Dimbaza, and East London) wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) were evaluated to determine their physicochemical quality and prevalence of multiple antibiotics resistant (MAR) Pseudomonas species, between August 2007 and July 2008. The annual mean total Pseudomonas count (TPC) was 1.20 × 104 (cfu/100 mL), 1.08 × 104 (cfu/100 mL), and 2.66 × 104 (cfu/100 mL), for the Alice, Dimbaza, and East London WWTPs respectively. The effluents were generally compliant with recommended limits for pH, temperature, TDS, DO, nitrite and nitrate; but fell short of target standards for turbidity, COD, and phosphate. The tested isolates were highly sensitive to gentamicin (100%), ofloxacin (100%), clindamycin (90%), erythromycin (90%) and nitrofurantoin (80%); whereas high resistance was observed against the penicillins (90–100%), rifampin (90%), sulphamethoxazole (90%) and the cephems (70%). MAR index ranged between 0.26 and 0.58. The study demonstrated that MAR Pseudomonas species were quite prevalent in the final effluents of WWTPs in South Africa; and this can lead to serious health risk for communities that depend on the effluent-receiving waters for sundry purposes. PMID:22829792

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosomal beta-lactamase in patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic lung infection. Mechanism of antibiotic resistance and target of the humoral immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciofu, Oana

    2003-01-01

    The intensive antibiotic treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa has improved the survival rate and the clinical condition of Danish patients. Acquirement of resistance to anti-pseudomonal antibiotics is one of the main drawbacks of this therapeutic strategy and our results showed the development of resistance of P. aeruginosa to several antibiotics during 25 years of intensive antibiotic treatment. Our studies have been concentrating on the development of resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics. We have shown an association between the development of resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics and the occurrence of high beta-lactamase producing strains and between the MIC of the beta-lactams and the levels of beta-lactamase expression. Partially derepressed mutants, characterized by high basal levels of beta-lactamase with the possibility of induction to even higher levels during treatment with beta-lactam antibiotics, were the most frequent phenotype found among resistant Danish P. aeruginosa CF isolates. We have also shown that the high alginate producing P. aeruginosa isolates, that characterize the chronic lung infection in CF patients, are more susceptible to antibiotics and produce less beta-lactamase than the non-mucoid paired isolates. We propose that the non-mucoid isolates are exposed to a relatively higher antibiotic pressure than the mucoid isolates and therefore, they become easily antibiotic resistant and in consequence produce high levels of beta-lactamase. The beta-lactamase produced by the non-mucoid isolates might play a protective role in the biofilm, defending the mucoid isolates from the action of beta-lactam antibiotics and helping them to maintain their antibiotic susceptibility. We have also shown that beta-lactamase, which is a periplasmic enzyme, can be secreted extracellulary packed in membrane vesicles liberated by high beta-lactamase-producing P. aeruginosa. The continuos presence in

  8. Metabolic potential of the organic-solvent tolerant Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E deduced from its annotated genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udaondo, Zulema; Molina, Lazaro; Daniels, Craig; Gómez, Manuel J; Molina-Henares, María A; Matilla, Miguel A; Roca, Amalia; Fernández, Matilde; Duque, Estrella; Segura, Ana; Ramos, Juan Luis

    2013-01-01

    Summary Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E is an organic solvent tolerant strain capable of degrading aromatic hydrocarbons. Here we report the DOT-T1E genomic sequence (6 394 153 bp) and its metabolic atlas based on the classification of enzyme activities. The genome encodes for at least 1751 enzymatic reactions that account for the known pattern of C, N, P and S utilization by this strain. Based on the potential of this strain to thrive in the presence of organic solvents and the subclasses of enzymes encoded in the genome, its metabolic map can be drawn and a number of potential biotransformation reactions can be deduced. This information may prove useful for adapting desired reactions to create value-added products. This bioengineering potential may be realized via direct transformation of substrates, or may require genetic engineering to block an existing pathway, or to re-organize operons and genes, as well as possibly requiring the recruitment of enzymes from other sources to achieve the desired transformation. Funding Information Work in our laboratory was supported by Fondo Social Europeo and Fondos FEDER from the European Union, through several projects (BIO2010-17227, Consolider-Ingenio CSD2007-00005, Excelencia 2007 CVI-3010, Excelencia 2011 CVI-7391 and EXPLORA BIO2011-12776-E). PMID:23815283

  9. Metabolic potential of the organic-solvent tolerant Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E deduced from its annotated genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udaondo, Zulema; Molina, Lazaro; Daniels, Craig; Gómez, Manuel J; Molina-Henares, María A; Matilla, Miguel A; Roca, Amalia; Fernández, Matilde; Duque, Estrella; Segura, Ana; Ramos, Juan Luis

    2013-09-01

    Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E is an organic solvent tolerant strain capable of degrading aromatic hydrocarbons. Here we report the DOT-T1E genomic sequence (6,394,153 bp) and its metabolic atlas based on the classification of enzyme activities. The genome encodes for at least 1751 enzymatic reactions that account for the known pattern of C, N, P and S utilization by this strain. Based on the potential of this strain to thrive in the presence of organic solvents and the subclasses of enzymes encoded in the genome, its metabolic map can be drawn and a number of potential biotransformation reactions can be deduced. This information may prove useful for adapting desired reactions to create value-added products. This bioengineering potential may be realized via direct transformation of substrates, or may require genetic engineering to block an existing pathway, or to re-organize operons and genes, as well as possibly requiring the recruitment of enzymes from other sources to achieve the desired transformation. © 2013 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Significantly enhanced substrate tolerance of Pseudomonas putida nitrilase via atmospheric and room temperature plasma and cell immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ting-Ting; Gong, Jin-Song; Gu, Bing-Chen; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Heng; Lu, Zhen-Ming; Lu, Mao-Lin; Shi, Jin-Song; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2017-11-01

    The objective of the study was to enhance the substrate tolerance of Pseudomonas putida nitrilase via atmospheric and room temperature plasma (ARTP) and cell immobilization. The mutant library was constructed by ARTP and rapidly screened by an OPA-TCA microscale reaction. A mutant strain of mut-D3 was obtained and its optimum substrate concentration was improved to 150mM from 100mM. It could accumulate 189g/L nicotinic acid (NA) from 3-cyanopyridine (3-CP), which was increased by 42% compared with that of wild type (WT). Additionally, composite immobilization of mut-D3 was performed and SA-PVA immobilized cells could catalyze 250mM 3-CP each batch with finally accumulating 346g/L NA, while free cells accumulated 175g/L NA. These results indicated that the free or immobilized catalysts of mut-D3 could serve as a good choice for NA production. This is the first report on mutation breeding of nitrilase-producing microorganisms by ARTP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Ongoing evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 sublines complicates studies of DNA damage repair and tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorenko, Julia; Jatsenko, Tatjana; Kivisaar, Maia

    2017-03-01

    Sublines of the major P. aeruginosa reference strain PAO1 are derivatives of the original PAO1 isolate, which are maintained in laboratories worldwide. These sublines display substantial genomic and phenotypic variation due to ongoing microevolution. Here, we examined four sublines, MPAO1, PAO1-L, PAO1-DSM and PAO1-UT, originated from different laboratories, and six DNA polymerase-deficient mutants from the P. aeruginosa MPAO1 transposon library for their employment in elucidation of DNA damage repair and tolerance mechanisms in P. aeruginosa. We found that PAO1 subline PAO1-UT carries a large deletion encompassing the DNA damage inducible imuA-imuB-imuC cassette (PA0669-PA0671), which is implied in mutagenesis in several species. Furthermore, the genetic changes leading to variation in the functionality of the MexEF-OprN efflux system contributed largely to the phenotypic discordance between P. aeruginosa PAO1 sublines. Specifically, we identified multiple mutations in the mexT gene, which encodes a transcriptional regulator of the mexEF-oprN genes, mutations in the mexF, and complete absence of these genes. Of the four tested sublines, MPAO1 was the only subline with the functional MexEF-OprN multidrug efflux system. Active efflux through MexEF-OprN rendered MPAO1 highly resistant to chloramphenicol and ciprofloxacin. Moreover, the functions of specialized DNA polymerase IV and nucleotide excision repair (NER) in 4-NQO-induced DNA damage tolerance appeared to be masked in MPAO1, while were easily detectable in other sublines. Finally, the frequencies of spontaneous and MMS-induced Rif r mutations were also significantly lower in MPAO1 in comparison to the PAO1 sublines with impaired MexEF-OprN efflux system. The MexEF-OprN-attributed differences were also observed between MPAO1 and MPAO1-derived transposon mutants from the two-allele transposon mutant collection. Thus, the accumulating mutations and discordant phenotypes of the PAO1 derivatives challenge the

  12. Media pH and media type can significantly affect the reliability of in vitro copper-tolerance assessments of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Karina; Brown, Philip; Gambley, Cherie

    2018-03-07

    There are inconsistencies with in vitro copper-tolerance screening methodology for Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato in the current literature, particularly in relation to the appropriate medium to use, copper-tolerance thresholds and reporting medium pH and/or pH adjustment steps. This study investigates the effect of medium and pH on copper-tolerance results, including the potential use of 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer to stabilise media pH. Copper-tolerance methodology was investigated through in vitro and in vivo testing of P. syringae pv. tomato. Four different media were tested, Nutrient Agar (NA), Casitone Yeast Extract Glycerol Agar (CYEG), King's B medium (KB) and Potato Dextrose Agar (PDA). Highly variable copper-tolerance profiles were observed for different isolates on the media tested. A pH range of 5.8-7.0 produced consistent copper-tolerance data; outside of this range the data was unreliable. Addition of MES to media, buffered the pH to within the acceptable levels. Copper-tolerance thresholds with different media can vary significantly and the lowering effect of copper sulfate on media pH must be considered in media preparation. Methodology presented in the study can be extrapolated to copper-tolerance testing for other pathogenic plant bacteria, particularly other pseudomonads. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Triazole-containing N-acyl homoserine lactones targeting the quorum sensing system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette Reimert; Jakobsen, Tim H.; Bang, Claus Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    the pathogenesis and antibiotic tolerance of a bacterial biofilm. To identify the structural elements important for antagonistic or agonistic activity against the Pseudomonas aeruginosa LasR protein, we report the synthesis and screening of new triazole-containing mimics of natural N-acyl homoserine lactones...

  14. Identification and molecular characterization of an efflux system involved in Pseudomonas putida 12 multidrug resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieboom, J.; Bont, de J.A.M.

    2001-01-01

    The authors previously described srpABC, an operon involved in proton-dependent solvent efflux in the solvent-tolerant Pseudomonas putida S12. Recently, it was shown that organic solvents and not antibiotics induce this operon. In the present study, the authors characterize a new efflux pump,

  15. No Apparent Costs for Facultative Antibiotic Production by the Soil Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1

    OpenAIRE

    Garbeva, Paolina; Tyc, Olaf; Remus-Emsermann, Mitja N. P.; van der Wal, Annemieke; Vos, Michiel; Silby, Mark; de Boer, Wietse

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many soil-inhabiting bacteria are known to produce secondary metabolites that can suppress microorganisms competing for the same resources. The production of antimicrobial compounds is expected to incur fitness costs for the producing bacteria. Such costs form the basis for models on the co-existence of antibiotic-producing and non-antibiotic producing strains. However, so far studies quantifying the costs of antibiotic production by bacteria are scarce. The current study reports ...

  16. Clinical characteristics and outcomes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia in febrile neutropenic children and adolescents with the impact of antibiotic resistance: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyo Sup; Park, Bo Kyoung; Kim, Seong Koo; Han, Seung Beom; Lee, Jae Wook; Lee, Dong-Gun; Chung, Nack-Gyun; Cho, Bin; Jeong, Dae Chul; Kang, Jin Han

    2017-07-17

    Although the proportion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections has reduced after the introduction of antibiotics with anti-pseudomonal effects, P. aeruginosa bacteremia still causes high mortality in immunocompromised patients. This study determined the clinical characteristics and outcomes of P. aeruginosa bacteremia and the antibiotic susceptibilities of strains isolated from febrile neutropenic patients. Thirty-one febrile neutropenic children and adolescents with underlying hematologic/oncologic disorders diagnosed with P. aeruginosa bacteremia between 2011 and 2016 were enrolled in the study. Their medical records were retrospectively reviewed to evaluate the demographic and clinical characteristics. Antibiotic susceptibility rates of the isolated P. aeruginosa to eight antibiotic categories (anti-pseudomonal penicillin, anti-pseudomonal penicillin and β-lactamase inhibitor combination, anti-pseudomonal cephalosporin, monobactam, carbapenem, aminoglycoside, fluoroquinolone, and colistin) were also determined. Among the investigated factors, risk factors for mortality and infections by a multidrug-resistance (MDR) strain were determined. Thirty-six episodes of P. aeruginosa bacteremia were identified. The mean age of the enrolled patients was 9.5 ± 5.4 years, and 26 (72.2%) episodes occurred in boys. Acute myeloid leukemia (41.7%) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (33.3%) were the most common underlying disorders. The 30-day mortality was 38.9%, and 36.1% of the episodes were caused by MDR strains. The deceased patients were more likely to experience breakthrough infection (P = 0.036) and bacteremia (P = 0.005) due to MDR strains when compared with the patients who survived. The survived patients more likely received appropriate empirical antibiotic therapy (P = 0.024) and anti-pseudomonal β-lactam and aminoglycoside combination therapy (P = 0.039) compared with the deceased patients. The antibiotic susceptibility rates of the isolated P. aeruginosa

  17. Whole genome and transcriptome analyses of environmental antibiotic sensitive and multi-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates exposed to waste water and tap water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Thomas; Armant, Olivier; Bretschneider, Nancy; Hahn, Alexander; Kirchen, Silke; Seifert, Martin; Dötsch, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The fitness of sensitive and resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in different aquatic environments depends on genetic capacities and transcriptional regulation. Therefore, an antibiotic-sensitive isolate PA30 and a multi-resistant isolate PA49 originating from waste waters were compared via whole genome and transcriptome Illumina sequencing after exposure to municipal waste water and tap water. A number of different genomic islands (e.g. PAGIs, PAPIs) were identified in the two environmental isolates beside the highly conserved core genome. Exposure to tap water and waste water exhibited similar transcriptional impacts on several gene clusters (antibiotic and metal resistance, genetic mobile elements, efflux pumps) in both environmental P. aeruginosa isolates. The MexCD-OprJ efflux pump was overexpressed in PA49 in response to waste water. The expression of resistance genes, genetic mobile elements in PA49 was independent from the water matrix. Consistently, the antibiotic sensitive strain PA30 did not show any difference in expression of the intrinsic resistance determinants and genetic mobile elements. Thus, the exposure of both isolates to polluted waste water and oligotrophic tap water resulted in similar expression profiles of mentioned genes. However, changes in environmental milieus resulted in rather unspecific transcriptional responses than selected and stimuli-specific gene regulation. © 2014 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. Evaluation on the Use of β-Lactamase and Aminoglycoside Modifying Enzyme Gene Sequences as Markers for the Early Detection of Antibiotic Resistance Profile of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor A. Doss

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the major causes of infections including the hospital acquired (Nosocomial infections. Detection of them and their antibiotic resistance profile by conventional method takes about three days. Recently, DNA based diagnostic methods are being used for the identification of the pathogens. Hence we have tested a rapid and sensitive method using DNA sequences as markers for detecting the presence of three genes coding for the enzymes that inactivate the two most commonly used Anti-pseudomonadal drugs such as β-lactam antibiotics (Penicillin, and its derivatives and Aminoglycosides such as Gentamicin, Tobramycin, Amikacin, Streptomycin. The internal region of these genes were used for designing and synthesizing primers and these primers were used in Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR to screen for the presence of these genes in the clinical isolates and to label them non-radioactively with Biotin. They in turn were used to detect the presence of the antibiotic resistance genes in the clinical isolates by hybridization. The specificity (ratio of positive results obtained in both methods and the sensitivity (the minimum amount of sample DNA and the labeled probe required for the tests were evaluated.

  19. Tolerance of Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst.) embryogenic tissue to penicillin, carbapenem and aminoglycoside antibiotics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malá, J.; Pavingerová, Daniela; Cvrčková, H.; Bříza, Jindřich; Dostál, J.; Šíma, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 4 (2009), s. 156-161 ISSN 1212-4834 R&D Projects: GA MZe QH71290 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : somatic embryogenesis * Norway spruce * penicillin antibiotics * Agrobacterium tumefaciens * carbapenem antibiotics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  20. The solvent-tolerant Pseudomonas putida S12 as host for the production of cinnamic acid from glucose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijkamp, K.; Luijk, N. van; Bont, J.A.M. de; Wery, J.

    2005-01-01

    A Pseudomonas putida S12 strain was constructed that efficiently produced thefine chemical cinnamic acid from glucose or glycerol via the central metabolite phenylalanine. The gene encoding phenylalanine ammonia lyase from the yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides was introduced. Phenylalanine

  1. The ABC of Biofilm Drug Tolerance: the MerR-Like Regulator BrlR Is an Activator of ABC Transport Systems, with PA1874-77 Contributing to the Tolerance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms to Tobramycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudyal, Bandita; Sauer, Karin

    2018-02-01

    A hallmark of biofilms is their tolerance to killing by antimicrobial agents. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa , biofilm drug tolerance requires the c-di-GMP-responsive MerR transcriptional regulator BrlR. However, the mechanism by which BrlR mediates biofilm drug tolerance has not been elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that BrlR activates the expression of at least 7 ABC transport systems, including the PA1874-PA1875-PA1876-PA1877 (PA1874-77) operon, with chromatin immunoprecipitation and DNA binding assays confirming BrlR binding to the promoter region of PA1874-77. Insertional inactivation of the 7 ABC transport systems rendered P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms susceptible to tobramycin or norfloxacin. Susceptibility was linked to drug accumulation, with BrlR contributing to norfloxacin accumulation in a manner dependent on multidrug efflux pumps and the PA1874-77 ABC transport system. Inactivation of the respective ABC transport system, furthermore, eliminated the recalcitrance of biofilms to killing by tobramycin but not norfloxacin, indicating that drug accumulation is not linked to biofilm drug tolerance. Our findings indicate for the first time that BrlR, a MerR-type transcriptional activator, activates genes encoding several ABC transport systems, in addition to multiple multidrug efflux pump genes. Moreover, our data confirm a BrlR target contributing to drug tolerance, likely countering the prevailing dogma that biofilm tolerance arises from a multiplicity of factors. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. Antibiotic combination therapy can select for broad-spectrum multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Martin; Paulander, Wilhelm; Marvig, Rasmus L.

    2016-01-01

    Combination therapy with several antibiotics is one strategy that has been applied in order to limit the spread of antimicrobial resistance. We compared the de novo evolution of resistance during combination therapy with the β-lactam ceftazidime and the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin with the resi......Combination therapy with several antibiotics is one strategy that has been applied in order to limit the spread of antimicrobial resistance. We compared the de novo evolution of resistance during combination therapy with the β-lactam ceftazidime and the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin...... regulator gene nfxB conferring ciprofloxacin resistance, or in the gene encoding the non-essential penicillin-binding protein DacB conferring ceftazidime resistance. Reconstruction of resistance mutations by allelic replacement and in vitro fitness assays revealed that in contrast to single antibiotic use...

  3. Development of antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa during two decades of antipseudomonal treatment at the Danish CF Center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, O; Giwercman, B; Pedersen, S S

    1994-01-01

    ), and 1991 (100 strains). All the strains were screened and assayed semiquantitatively for beta-lactamase activity by use of nitrocefin. We found a significant (p ... was found between the MIC and the number of antipseudomonal courses of antibiotics. The proportion of resistant in vivo selected P. aeruginosa strains, presumed to be stably derepressed producers of chromosomal beta-lactamase, also increased significantly during the period studied. Our results confirm...... that the beta-lactamase production is an important mechanism of antibiotic resistance in P. aeruginosa....

  4. Development of antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa during two decades of antipseudomonal treatment at the Danish CF Center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, O; Giwercman, B; Pedersen, S S

    1994-01-01

    resistance in P. aeruginosa strains isolated from Danish CF patients over a period of 18 years by testing the in vitro efficacy of carbenicillin, piperacillin, ceftazidime, tobramycin and ciprofloxacin against P. aeruginosa strains collected in 1973 (51 strains), 1980 (80 strains), 1985 (58 strains...... was found between the MIC and the number of antipseudomonal courses of antibiotics. The proportion of resistant in vivo selected P. aeruginosa strains, presumed to be stably derepressed producers of chromosomal beta-lactamase, also increased significantly during the period studied. Our results confirm...... that the beta-lactamase production is an important mechanism of antibiotic resistance in P. aeruginosa....

  5. Translational control of the antibiotic inducibility of the PA5471 gene required for mexXY multidrug efflux gene expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Yuji; Gilmour, Christie; Metcalf, Devon; Poole, Keith

    2009-08-01

    The PA5471 gene required for induction of the MexXY multidrug efflux system in response to ribosome-targeting antimicrobials was itself shown to be inducible by ribosome-targeting antimicrobials (Y. Morita, M. L. Sobel, and K. Poole, J. Bacteriol. 188:1847-1855, 2006). Using a lacZ transcriptional reporter, drug inducibility of PA5471 was shown to require the entirety of the 367-bp PA5472-PA5471 intergenic region. A constitutive promoter activity was, however, localized to the first 75 bp of this region, within which a single PA5471 transcription initiation site was mapped. That 3' sequences of the intergenic region blocked PA5471 expression and made it antibiotic dependent was suggestive of an attenuation mechanism of control. A 13-amino-acid leader peptide (LP)-encoding open reading frame preceded by a Shine-Dalgarno sequence was identified ca. 250 bp upstream of the PA5471 coding sequence, and its expression and translation were confirmed using a lacZ translational reporter. Alteration of the initiation codon (M1T) or introduction of translational stop signals at codons 3 (Q3Am) and 8 (C8Op) of this LP sequence (PA5471.1) yielded high-level constitutive expression of PA5471, suggesting that interference with LP translation was linked to PA5471 gene expression. Consistent with this, a Q3K mutation in the LP sequence maintained the drug inducibility of PA5471 expression. Introduction of the LP Q3Am mutation into the chromosome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa yielded stronger expression of PA5471 than did antibiotic (chloramphenicol) exposure of wild-type P. aeruginosa, in agreement with lacZ transcriptional fusion data. Still, the Q3Am mutation yielded modest expression of mexXY, less than that seen for antibiotic-treated wild-type P. aeruginosa. These data suggest that PA5471 is not sufficient for MexXY recruitment in response to antibiotic exposure and that additional antibiotic-dependent effects are needed.

  6. Bile tolerance and its effect on antibiotic susceptibility of probiotic Lactobacillus candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyacinta, Májeková; Hana, Kiňová Sepová; Andrea, Bilková; Barbora, Čisárová

    2015-05-01

    Before use in practice, it is necessary to precisely identify and characterize a new probiotic candidate. Eight animal lactobacilli and collection strain Lactobacillus reuteri CCM 3625 were studied from the point of saccharide fermentation profiles, bile salt resistance, antibiogram profiles, and influence of bile on sensitivity to antibiotics. Studied lactobacilli differed in their sugar fermentation ability determined by API 50CHL and their identification based on these profiles did not correspond with molecular-biological one in most cases. Survival of strains Lactobacillus murinus C and L. reuteri KO4b was not affected by presence of bile. The resistance of genus Lactobacillus to vancomycin and quinolones (ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin) was confirmed in all strains tested. This study provides the new information about oxgall (0.5 and 1 %) effect on the lactobacilli antibiotic susceptibility. Antibiotic profiles were not noticeably affected, and both bile concentrations tested had comparable impact on the lactobacilli antibiotic sensitivity. Interesting change was noticed in L. murinus C, where the resistance to cephalosporins was reverted to susceptibility. Similarly, susceptibility of L. reuteri E to ceftazidime arose after incubation in both concentration of bile. After influence of 1 % bile, Lactobacillus mucosae D lost its resistance to gentamicin. On the base of gained outcomes, the best probiotic properties manifested L. reuteri KO4b, Lactobacillus plantarum KG4, and L. reuteri E due to their survival in the presence of bile.

  7. Trans-translation mediates tolerance to multiple antibiotics and stresses in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinghua; Ji, Lei; Shi, Wanliang; Xie, Jianping; Zhang, Ying

    2013-11-01

    Trans-translation mediated by SsrA (tmRNA) and its associated protein SmpB plays an important role in rescuing stalled ribosomes and detoxifying toxic protein products under stress conditions. However, the role of SsrA and SmpB in bacterial persister survival has not been studied. The recent finding that pyrazinamide as a unique persister drug inhibits trans-translation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis prompted us to examine the role of trans-translation in persister survival. Using Escherichia coli as a model, we constructed SsrA and SmpB mutants and assessed the susceptibility of the mutants to various antibiotics and stress conditions in MIC/MBC and persister assays. We found that mutations in SsrA and SmpB caused a defect in persister survival as shown by their increased susceptibility to a variety of antibiotics, including gentamicin, streptomycin, amikacin, norfloxacin, trimethoprim and tetracycline, and also stresses, such as acid, weak acid salicylate, heat and peroxide. Additionally, the SsrA and SmpB mutants were 2-8-fold more susceptible than the parent strain to various antibiotics in MIC and MBC tests. The SmpB mutant was more susceptible to antibiotics and stresses than the SsrA mutant. A particularly interesting finding is the hypersusceptibility of the SmpB mutant and the SsrA mutant to trimethoprim. The defect of various SsrA and SmpB mutant phenotypes could be complemented by functional ssrA and smpB, respectively. We conclude that SsrA and SmpB are important for persister survival and may serve as a good target for developing new antibiotics that kill persister bacteria for improved treatment of persistent bacterial infections.

  8. Resistance of Bacteria Isolated from Otamiri River to Heavy Metals and Some Selected Antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    I.C. Mgbemena; J.C. Nnokwe; L.A. Adjeroh; N.N. Onyemekara

    2012-01-01

    This study is aimed at determining the resistance of bacteria to heavy metals and some antibiotics. The ability of aquatic bacteria isolates from Otamiri River at Ihiagwa in Owerri North, Imo State to tolerate or resist the presence of certain selected heavy metals: Pb+, Zn2+ and Fe2+ and some antibiotics was investigated. Identification tests for the bacteria isolates from Otamiri River revealed them to belong to the genera Pseudomonas, Aeromonas, Bacillus, Escherichia, Micrococcus and Prote...

  9. Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønder, Lars

    Tolerance: A Sensorial Orientation to Politics is an experiment in re-orientation. The book is based on the wager that tolerance exceeds the more prevalent images of self-restraint and repressive benevolence because neither precludes the possibility of a more “active tolerance” motivated...... by the desire to experiment and to become otherwise. The objective is to discuss what gets lost, conceptually as well as politically, when we neglect the subsistence of active tolerance within other practices of tolerance, and to develop a theory of active tolerance in which tolerance's mobilizing character...... the current models of restraint and benevolence, other ways of understanding the politics of democratic pluralism might be developed, which will enable us to conceive of tolerance's future in terms different than those currently on offer. Tolerance: A Sensorial Orientation to Politics develops...

  10. Attenuation of quorum-sensing-dependent virulence factors and biofilm formation by medicinal plants against antibiotic resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sankar Ganesh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa use small signaling molecules such as acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs, which play an important role in release virulence factors and toxin for further establishment of host infection. Thus, involving with the QS system would provide alternative ways of preventing the pathogenicity. In the present study, totally six medicinal plants (Terminalia bellerica, Celastrus paniculatus, Kingiodendron pinnatum, Schleichera oleosa, Melastoma malabathricum, Garcinia gummi-gutta were screened for anti-QS activity using biomonitor strain of Chromobacterium violaceum CV12472. The primary screening of antimicrobial activity of all the plant extracts have inhibited the growth of tested bacterial species. Of these at the sub-minimum inhibitory concentration the methanol extract of T. bellerica (0.0625–0.5 mg/ml has significantly inhibited violacein production (20.07–66.22% in C. violaceum (CV12472. Consequently, the extract of T. bellerica has reduced the production of pyocyanin, exopolysaccharide and biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa strains. Fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy analysis confirmed the reduction of biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa strains when treated with T. bellerica. GC–MS analysis showed the active compounds inhibited the production of virulence factors of P. aeruginosa. The results suggest the possible use of this T. bellerica as an anti-QS and anti-biofilm agent to control Pseudomonas infection. Interference of QS provides an important means for the inhibition of bacterial virulence and thus aids in treatment strategies.

  11. On the limits of toxicant-induced tolerance testing: cotolerance and response variation of antibiotic effects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitt, Heike; Martinali, Bennie; Beelen, Patrick van; Seinen, Willem

    2006-01-01

    Pollution-induced community tolerance (PICT) as an ecotoxicological test system has been claimed to detect pollutant effects highly specifically and sensitively. However, the specificity might be limited by the occurrence of cotolerance. Another limitation of the application of any ecotoxicological

  12. The impact of ColRS two-component system and TtgABC efflux pump on phenol tolerance of Pseudomonas putida becomes evident only in growing bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kivisaar Maia

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have recently found that Pseudomonas putida deficient in ColRS two-component system is sensitive to phenol and displays a serious defect on solid glucose medium where subpopulation of bacteria lyses. The latter phenotype is significantly enhanced by the presence of phenol in growth medium. Here, we focused on identification of factors affecting phenol tolerance of the colR-deficient P. putida. Results By using transposon mutagenesis approach we identified a set of phenol-tolerant derivatives of colR-deficient strain. Surprisingly, half of independent phenol tolerant clones possessed miniTn5 insertion in the ttgABC operon. However, though inactivation of TtgABC efflux pump significantly enhanced phenol tolerance, it did not affect phenol-enhanced autolysis of the colR mutant on glucose medium indicating that phenol- and glucose-caused stresses experienced by the colR-deficient P. putida are not coupled. Inactivation of TtgABC pump significantly increased the phenol tolerance of the wild-type P. putida as well. Comparison of phenol tolerance of growing versus starving bacteria revealed that both ColRS and TtgABC systems affect phenol tolerance only under growth conditions and not under starvation. Flow cytometry analysis showed that phenol strongly inhibited cell division and to some extent also caused cell membrane permeabilization to propidium iodide. Single cell analysis of populations of the ttgC- and colRttgC-deficient strains revealed that their membrane permeabilization by phenol resembles that of the wild-type and the colR mutant, respectively. However, cell division of P. putida with inactivated TtgABC pump seemed to be less sensitive to phenol than that of the parental strain. At the same time, cell division appeared to be more inhibited in the colR-mutant strain than in the wild-type P. putida. Conclusions ColRS signal system and TtgABC efflux pump are involved in the phenol tolerance of P. putida. However, as

  13. The impact of ColRS two-component system and TtgABC efflux pump on phenol tolerance of Pseudomonas putida becomes evident only in growing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putrins, Marta; Ilves, Heili; Lilje, Liisa; Kivisaar, Maia; Hõrak, Rita

    2010-04-14

    We have recently found that Pseudomonas putida deficient in ColRS two-component system is sensitive to phenol and displays a serious defect on solid glucose medium where subpopulation of bacteria lyses. The latter phenotype is significantly enhanced by the presence of phenol in growth medium. Here, we focused on identification of factors affecting phenol tolerance of the colR-deficient P. putida. By using transposon mutagenesis approach we identified a set of phenol-tolerant derivatives of colR-deficient strain. Surprisingly, half of independent phenol tolerant clones possessed miniTn5 insertion in the ttgABC operon. However, though inactivation of TtgABC efflux pump significantly enhanced phenol tolerance, it did not affect phenol-enhanced autolysis of the colR mutant on glucose medium indicating that phenol- and glucose-caused stresses experienced by the colR-deficient P. putida are not coupled. Inactivation of TtgABC pump significantly increased the phenol tolerance of the wild-type P. putida as well. Comparison of phenol tolerance of growing versus starving bacteria revealed that both ColRS and TtgABC systems affect phenol tolerance only under growth conditions and not under starvation. Flow cytometry analysis showed that phenol strongly inhibited cell division and to some extent also caused cell membrane permeabilization to propidium iodide. Single cell analysis of populations of the ttgC- and colRttgC-deficient strains revealed that their membrane permeabilization by phenol resembles that of the wild-type and the colR mutant, respectively. However, cell division of P. putida with inactivated TtgABC pump seemed to be less sensitive to phenol than that of the parental strain. At the same time, cell division appeared to be more inhibited in the colR-mutant strain than in the wild-type P. putida. ColRS signal system and TtgABC efflux pump are involved in the phenol tolerance of P. putida. However, as they affect phenol tolerance of growing bacteria only, this

  14. Synergistic effect of artocarpin on antibacterial activity of some antibiotics against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septama, Abdi Wira; Panichayupakaranant, Pharkphoom

    2016-01-01

    Antibacterial resistance has dramatically increased and resulted in serious health problems worldwide. One appealing strategy to overcome this resistance problem is the use of combinations of antibacterial compounds to increase their potency. The objective of this study is to determine the synergistic effects of artocarpin for ampicillin, norfloxacin, and tetracycline against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) as well as the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. A broth microdilution method (1.95-250 µg/mL) was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of artocarpin and the antibiotics. Any synergistic effects were evaluated at their own MIC using the checkerboard method and a time-kill assay at 37 °C for 24 h. Artocarpin showed antibacterial activity against MRSA and E. coli with an MIC value of 62.5 µg/mL, and against P. aeruginosa with an MIC value of 250 µg/mL. The interaction of artocarpin with all tested antibiotics produced synergistic effects against MRSA with a fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) of 0.15-0.37. In addition, a combination of artocarpin and norfloxacin showed a synergistic effect against E. coli with an FICI value of 0.37, while the combinations of artocarpin and tetracycline as well as artocarpin and norfloxacin exhibited synergy interactions against P. aeruginosa with FICI values of 0.24 and 0.37, respectively. Time-kill assays indicated that artocarpin enhanced the antimicrobial activities of tetracycline, ampicillin, and norfloxacin against MRSA as well as Gram-negative bacteria.

  15. Prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in water samples in central Italy and molecular characterization of oprD in imipenem resistant isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuditta Fiorella Schiavano

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyse the prevalence, antibiotic resistance and genetic relatedness of P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from potable and recreational water samples (n. 8,351 collected from different settings (swimming pools, n. 207; healthcare facilities, n 1,684; accommodation facilities, n. 1,518; municipal waterworks, n. 4,500; residential buildings, n. 235. Possible mechanisms underlying resistance to imipenem, with particular focus on those involving oprD-based uptake, were also explored.Isolation and identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was performed according to the standardized procedure UNI EN ISO 16266:2008 followed by PCR confirmation. Antibiotic Susceptibility testing was conducted according to EUCAST standardized disk diffusion method. Genetic relatedness of strains was carried out by RAPD. The sequence of the oprD gene was analyzed by standard method. Fifty-three samples (0.63% were positive for P. aeruginosa, of which 10/207 (4.83% were from swimming pools. Five isolates (9.43% were resistant to imipenem, one to Ticarcillin + Clavulanate, one to both Piperacillin and Ticarcillin + Clavulanate. The highest isolation rate of imipenem resistant P. aeruginosa was observed in swimming pool water. Identical RAPD profiles were found in isolates from the same location in the same year or even in different years.Imipenem resistant strains were identified as carbapenemase-negative and resistance has been associated with inactivating mutations within the oprD gene, with a concomitant loss of porin. RAPD results proved that a water system can remain colonized by one strain for long periods and the contamination may be difficult to eradicate. This study has revealed the presence of P. aeruginosa in different water samples, including resistant strains, especially in swimming pools, and confirmed the role of porins as a contributing factor in carbapenem resistance in Gram-negative bacteria.

  16. The MexJK efflux pump of Pseudomonas aeruginosa requires OprM for antibiotic efflux but not for efflux of triclosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuanchuen, Rungtip; Narasaki, Craig T; Schweizer, Herbert P

    2002-09-01

    Using the biocide triclosan as a selective agent, several triclosan-resistant mutants of a susceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain were isolated. Cloning and characterization of a DNA fragment conferring triclosan resistance from one of these mutants revealed a hitherto uncharacterized efflux system of the resistance nodulation cell division (RND) family, which was named MexJK and which is encoded by the mexJK operon. Expression of this operon is negatively regulated by the product of mexL, a gene located upstream of and transcribed divergently from mexJK. The triclosan-resistant mutant contained a single nucleotide change in mexL, which caused an amino acid change in the putative helix-turn-helix domain of MexL. The MexL protein belongs to the TetR family of repressor proteins. The MexJK system effluxed tetracycline and erythromycin but only in the presence of the outer membrane protein channel OprM; OprJ and OprN did not function with MexJK. Triclosan efflux required neither of the outer membrane protein channels tested but necessitated the MexJ membrane fusion protein and the MexK inner membrane RND transporter. The results presented in this study suggest that MexJK may function as a two-component RND pump for triclosan efflux but must associate with OprM to form a tripartite antibiotic efflux system. Furthermore, the results confirm that triclosan is an excellent tool for the study of RND multidrug efflux systems and that this popular biocide therefore readily selects mutants which are cross-resistant with antibiotics.

  17. Diagnostic multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay for the identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the skin biopsy specimens in burn wound infections and detection of antibiotic susceptibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashouf, Rasoul Y.; Farahani, Hadi S.; Zamani, A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to identify Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) from the skin biopsy specimens in burn wound infections by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (M-PCR) and detection of antimicrobial susceptibility of isolates from culture. We conducted the cross-sectional study in 140 patients with wound infections who admitted to referral burn center of Motahari, Tehran, Iran, during a 12-month period from 2005-2006. Skin biopsy specimens were aseptically taken from each patient, one for PCR and one for bacterial culture. A M-PCR test based on simultaneous amplification of 2 lipoprotein genes: oprI and oprL, was used to directly detect fluorescent pseudomonades and P. aeruginosa in skin biopsy specimens. The susceptibility of P. aeruginosa isolates to 16 antibiotics was determined using the disc diffusion method. Out of 140 biopsy specimens, M-PCR detected 66 (47.2%) isolates, while culture detected 57 (40.7%) isolates as P. aeruginosa. Positive results for both genes which observed only for P. aeruginosa, while only one gene, oprI, was amplified from other fluorescent pseudomonades (n=12) and all other bacterial tested (n=62) were negative by the amplification test. The most effective antibiotics against isolate of P. aeruginosa were cefepime (79%), azetreonam (76%), ticarcillin-clavulanic acid (68%), tobramycin (62%) and amikacin (61%). Multiplex PCR assay appears promising for the rapid and sensitive detection of P. aeruginosa from the burned skin biopsy specimens. Simultaneous amplification of 2 lipoprotein genes: oprI and oprL could detect P. aeruginosa and oprI gene only for other fluorescent pseudomonades. (author)

  18. Interaction networks, ecological stability, and collective antibiotic tolerance in polymicrobial infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vos, Marjon G. J.; Bollenbach, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    Polymicrobial infections constitute small ecosystems that accommodate several bacterial species. Commonly, these bacteria are investigated in isolation. However, it is unknown to what extent the isolates interact and whether their interactions alter bacterial growth and ecosystem resilience in the presence and absence of antibiotics. We quantified the complete ecological interaction network for 72 bacterial isolates collected from 23 individuals diagnosed with polymicrobial urinary tract infections and found that most interactions cluster based on evolutionary relatedness. Statistical network analysis revealed that competitive and cooperative reciprocal interactions are enriched in the global network, while cooperative interactions are depleted in the individual host community networks. A population dynamics model parameterized by our measurements suggests that interactions restrict community stability, explaining the observed species diversity of these communities. We further show that the clinical isolates frequently protect each other from clinically relevant antibiotics. Together, these results highlight that ecological interactions are crucial for the growth and survival of bacteria in polymicrobial infection communities and affect their assembly and resilience. PMID:28923953

  19. Regulation of Nicotine Tolerance by Quorum Sensing and High Efficiency of Quorum Quenching Under Nicotine Stress in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiming Tang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing (QS regulates the behavior of bacterial populations and promotes their adaptation and survival under stress. As QS is responsible for the virulence of vast majority of bacteria, quorum quenching (QQ, the interruption of QS, has become an attractive therapeutic strategy. However, the role of QS in stress tolerance and the efficiency of QQ under stress in bacteria are seldom explored. In this study, we demonstrated that QS-regulated catalase (CAT expression and biofilm formation help Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 resist nicotine stress. CAT activity and biofilm formation in wild type (WT and ΔrhlR strains are significantly higher than those in the ΔlasR strain. Supplementation of ΔlasI strain with 3OC12-HSL showed similar CAT activity and biofilm formation as those of the WT strain. LasIR circuit rather than RhlIR circuit is vital to nicotine tolerance. Acylase I significantly decreased the production of virulence factors, namely elastase, pyocyanin, and pyoverdine under nicotine stress compared to the levels observed in the absence of nicotine stress. Thus, QQ is more efficient under stress. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report that QS contributes to nicotine tolerance in P. aeruginosa. This work facilitates a better application of QQ for the treatment of bacterial infections, especially under stress.

  20. A deep-sea hydrothermal vent isolate, Pseudomonas aeruginosa CW961, requires thiosulfate for Cd2+ tolerance and precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Clifford L.; Ozuna, Samantha C.; Clark, Douglas S.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa CW961, an isolate from the vicinity of a deep-sea hydrothermal vent, grew in the presence of 5 mM Cd2+ and removed Cd2+ from solution. Sulfate was sufficient for growth when Cd2+ was not present in the culture medium; however, thiosulfate was necessary for Cd2+ precipitation and cell survival in the presence of Cd2+. PMID:20725529

  1. A deep-sea hydrothermal vent isolate, Pseudomonas aeruginosa CW961, requires thiosulfate for Cd tolerance and precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Clifford L; Ozuna, Samantha C; Clark, Douglas S; Keasling, Jay D

    2002-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa CW961, an isolate from the vicinity of a deep-sea hydrothermal vent, grew in the presence of 5 mM Cd(2+) and removed Cd(2+) from solution. Sulfate was sufficient for growth when Cd(2+) was not present in the culture medium; however, thiosulfate was necessary for Cd(2+) precipitation and cell survival in the presence of Cd(2+).

  2. Colistin-Tobramycin Combinations Are Superior to Monotherapy Concerning the Killing of Biofilm Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, G.; Yang, Liang; Wu, H.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Antibiotic combination therapy might be more efficient than single antibiotics to combat Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis. We tested the ability of colistin sulphatetobramycin combinations and single antibiotics to kill P. aeruginosa...... biofilms. Methods. P. aeruginosa biofilms were generated in vitro and in rat lungs. In a pilot study, 5 patients with cystic fibrosis inhaled colistin and then tobramycin for 4 weeks. The changes in P. aeruginosa counts and lung function were assessed before and after therapy. Results. Antibiotic...... significantly lower after 7 days in animals receiving antibiotic combination than in animals receiving single antibiotics. In patients with cystic fibrosis, inhaled colistin-tobramycin was well tolerated and resulted in a mean decrease of 2.52 +/- 2.5 cfu of P. aeruginosa per milliliter of sputum (P = .027...

  3. Bead-size directed distribution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa results in distinct inflammatory response in a mouse model of chronic lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, L J; Trøstrup, H; Damlund, Dina Silke Malling

    2012-01-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is characterized by biofilms, tolerant to antibiotics and host responses. Instead, immune responses contribute to the tissue damage. However, this may depend on localization of infection in the upper conductive or in t...

  4. Prophages and growth dynamics confound experimental results with antibiotic-tolerant persister cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Alexander; Fino, Cinzia; Sørensen, Michael Askvad

    2017-01-01

    -tolerant persisters via induction of cryptic prophages. Similarly, the inadvertent infection of mutant strains with bacteriophage φ80, a notorious laboratory contaminant, apparently caused several of the phenotypes that we reported in our previous studies. We therefore reconstructed all infected mutants and probed...... to capture the biology of persisters and instead give widely differing results based on poorly controlled experimental parameters and artifacts caused by cryptic as well as contaminant prophages. We therefore established a new, robust assay that enabled us to follow the dynamics of persister cells through...

  5. Dynamics of Mutator and Antibiotic-Resistant Populations in a Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macià, María D.; Pérez, José L.; Molin, Søren

    2011-01-01

    tagged PAO1 and PAOMS (mutator [mutS] derivative) strains. Two-day-old biofilms were treated with ciprofloxacin (CIP) for 4 days (t4) at 2 µg/ml, which correlated with the mutant prevention concentration (MPC) and provided an AUC/MIC ratio of 384 that should predict therapeutic success. Biofilms were...... monitored by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and the numbers of viable cells and resistant mutants (4- and 16-fold MICs) were determined. Despite optimized pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) parameters, CIP treatment did not suppress resistance development in P. aeruginosa biofilms. One.......01 proportion, took over the whole biofilm after only 2 days of CIP treatment outnumbering PAO1 by 3 log at t4. Our results show that mutational mechanisms play a major role in biofilm antibiotic resistance and that theoretically optimized PK/PD parameters fail to suppress resistance development, suggesting...

  6. The Small Colony Variant of Listeria monocytogenes Is More Tolerant to Antibiotics and Has Altered Survival in RAW 264.7 Murine Macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curtis, Thomas; Gram, Lone; Knudsen, Gitte Maegaard

    2016-01-01

    monocytogenes (strain SCV E18), similar to the high persister mutant phenotype, survived significantly better than the wild type when exposed over a 48-h period to concentrations above Minimal Inhibitory Concentration for most tested antibiotics. SCV E18 survived more poorly than the wildtype in unactivated RAW...... enzyme production, aminoglycoside resistance, and increased intracellular persistence. They are clinically relevant in Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, serving as a reservoir for recurrent or prolonged infections. Here, we found that a SCV mutant in the foodborne pathogen Listeria...... the wild type phenotype. The results reported here suggest that the SCV of L. monocytogenes could be of clinical importance and highlight a need for adequate clinical screening for this phenotype, as it could affect antibiotic treatment outcomes....

  7. Benzoate- and Salicylate-Tolerant Strains of Escherichia coli K-12 Lose Antibiotic Resistance during Laboratory Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creamer, Kaitlin E; Ditmars, Frederick S; Basting, Preston J; Kunka, Karina S; Hamdallah, Issam N; Bush, Sean P; Scott, Zachary; He, Amanda; Penix, Stephanie R; Gonzales, Alexandra S; Eder, Elizabeth K; Camperchioli, Dominic W; Berndt, Adama; Clark, Michelle W; Rouhier, Kerry A; Slonczewski, Joan L

    2017-01-15

    Escherichia coli K-12 W3110 grows in the presence of membrane-permeant organic acids that can depress cytoplasmic pH and accumulate in the cytoplasm. We conducted experimental evolution by daily diluting cultures in increasing concentrations of benzoic acid (up to 20 mM) buffered at external pH 6.5, a pH at which permeant acids concentrate in the cytoplasm. By 2,000 generations, clones isolated from evolving populations showed increasing tolerance to benzoate but were sensitive to chloramphenicol and tetracycline. Sixteen clones grew to stationary phase in 20 mM benzoate, whereas the ancestral strain W3110 peaked and declined. Similar growth occurred in 10 mM salicylate. Benzoate-evolved strains grew like W3110 in the absence of benzoate, in media buffered at pH 4.8, pH 7.0, or pH 9.0, or in 20 mM acetate or sorbate at pH 6.5. Genomes of 16 strains revealed over 100 mutations, including single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), large deletions, and insertion knockouts. Most strains acquired deletions in the benzoate-induced multiple antibiotic resistance (Mar) regulon or in associated regulators such as rob and cpxA, as well as the multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps emrA, emrY, and mdtA Strains also lost or downregulated the Gad acid fitness regulon. In 5 mM benzoate or in 2 mM salicylate (2-hydroxybenzoate), most strains showed increased sensitivity to the antibiotics chloramphenicol and tetracycline; some strains were more sensitive than a marA knockout strain. Thus, our benzoate-evolved strains may reveal additional unknown drug resistance components. Benzoate or salicylate selection pressure may cause general loss of MDR genes and regulators. Benzoate is a common food preservative, and salicylate is the primary active metabolite of aspirin. In the gut microbiome, genetic adaptation to salicylate may involve loss or downregulation of inducible multidrug resistance systems. This discovery implies that aspirin therapy may modulate the human gut microbiome to

  8. A controlled clinical trial of a therapeutic bacteriophage preparation in chronic otitis due to antibiotic-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa; a preliminary report of efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, A; Hawkins, C H; Anggård, E E; Harper, D R

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a therapeutic bacteriophage preparation (Biophage-PA) targeting antibiotic-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in chronic otitis. Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase I/II clinical trial approved by UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) and the Central Office for Research Ethics Committees (COREC) ethical review process. A single specialist university hospital. 24 patients with chronic otitis with a duration of several years (2-58). Each patient had, at the time of entry to the trial, an ear infection because of an antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa strain sensitive to one or more of the six phages present in Biophage-PA. Participants were randomised in two groups of 12 treated with either a single dose of Biophage-PA or placebo and followed up at 7, 21 and 42 days after treatment by the same otologist. Ears were thoroughly cleaned on each occasion and clinical and microbiological indicators measured. Physician assessed erythema/inflammation, ulceration/granulation/polyps, discharge quantity, discharge type and odour using a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Patients reported discomfort, itchiness, wetness and smell also using a VAS. Bacterial levels of P. aeruginosa and phage counts from swabs were measured initially and at follow-up. At each visit patients were asked about side effects using a structured form. Digital otoscopic images were obtained on days 0 and 42 for illustrative purposes only. Relative to day 0, pooled patient- and physician-reported clinical indicators improved for the phage treated group relative to the placebo group. Variation from baseline levels was statistically significant for combined data from all clinic days only for the phage treated group. Variation from baseline levels was statistically significant for the majority of the patient assessed clinical indicators only for the phage treated group. P. aeruginosa counts were significantly lower only in the phage treated

  9. Synthetic biology approaches to shape bacteriophages towards Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm control

    OpenAIRE

    Pires, Diana Priscila Penso

    2016-01-01

    Dissertation for Ph.D. degree in Biomedical Engineering. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a relevant opportunistic pathogen frequently involved in healthcareassociated infections including pneumonia, bloodstream, urinary tract and surgical site infections. Most of the infections caused by this bacterium are particularly difficult to treat, especially due to its great capacity to form biofilms in a wide variety of surfaces, which often display high tolerance to antibiotics. As a result...

  10. Pigments influence the tolerance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 to photodynamically induced oxidative stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlandi, Viviana T; Bolognese, Fabrizio; Chiodaroli, Luca

    2015-01-01

    by exogenous photosensitizers and visible light. To evaluate whether P. aeruginosa pigments can contribute to its relative tolerance to PDT, we analysed the response to this treatment of isogenic transposon mutants of P. aeruginosa PAO1 with altered pigmentation. In general, in the presence of pigments...

  11. Homology modeling and docking studies of a Δ9-fatty acid desaturase from a Cold-tolerant Pseudomonas sp. AMS8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawal Garba

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Membrane-bound fatty acid desaturases perform oxygenated desaturation reactions to insert double bonds within fatty acyl chains in regioselective and stereoselective manners. The Δ9-fatty acid desaturase strictly creates the first double bond between C9 and 10 positions of most saturated substrates. As the three-dimensional structures of the bacterial membrane fatty acid desaturases are not available, relevant information about the enzymes are derived from their amino acid sequences, site-directed mutagenesis and domain swapping in similar membrane-bound desaturases. The cold-tolerant Pseudomonas sp. AMS8 was found to produce high amount of monounsaturated fatty acids at low temperature. Subsequently, an active Δ9-fatty acid desaturase was isolated and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli. In this paper we report homology modeling and docking studies of a Δ9-fatty acid desaturase from a Cold-tolerant Pseudomonas sp. AMS8 for the first time to the best of our knowledge. Three dimensional structure of the enzyme was built using MODELLER version 9.18 using a suitable template. The protein model contained the three conserved-histidine residues typical for all membrane-bound desaturase catalytic activity. The structure was subjected to energy minimization and checked for correctness using Ramachandran plots and ERRAT, which showed a good quality model of 91.6 and 65.0%, respectively. The protein model was used to preform MD simulation and docking of palmitic acid using CHARMM36 force field in GROMACS Version 5 and Autodock tool Version 4.2, respectively. The docking simulation with the lowest binding energy, −6.8 kcal/mol had a number of residues in close contact with the docked palmitic acid namely, Ile26, Tyr95, Val179, Gly180, Pro64, Glu203, His34, His206, His71, Arg182, Thr85, Lys98 and His177. Interestingly, among the binding residues are His34, His71 and His206 from the first, second, and third conserved histidine motif, respectively

  12. Role of the MexAB-OprM efflux pump of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in tolerance to tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) oil and its monoterpene components terpinen-4-ol, 1,8-cineole, and alpha-terpineol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Chelsea J; Carson, Christine F; Chang, Barbara J; Riley, Thomas V

    2008-03-01

    Using a series of efflux mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the MexAB-OprM pump was identified as contributing to this organism's tolerance to the antimicrobial agent tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) oil and its monoterpene components terpinen-4-ol, 1,8-cineole, and alpha-terpineol. These data show that a multidrug efflux system of P. aeruginosa can extrude monoterpenes and related alcohols.

  13. Overexpression of Nictaba-Like Lectin Genes from Glycine max Confers Tolerance towards Pseudomonas syringae Infection, Aphid Infestation and Salt Stress in Transgenic Arabidopsis Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie Van Holle

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Plants have evolved a sophisticated immune system that allows them to recognize invading pathogens by specialized receptors. Carbohydrate-binding proteins or lectins are part of this immune system and especially the lectins that reside in the nucleocytoplasmic compartment are known to be implicated in biotic and abiotic stress responses. The class of Nictaba-like lectins (NLL groups all proteins with homology to the tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum lectin, known as a stress-inducible lectin. Here we focus on two Nictaba homologs from soybean (Glycine max, referred to as GmNLL1 and GmNLL2. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of fusion constructs with the green fluorescent protein either transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves or stably transformed in tobacco BY-2 suspension cells revealed a nucleocytoplasmic localization for the GmNLLs under study. RT-qPCR analysis of the transcript levels for the Nictaba-like lectins in soybean demonstrated that the genes are expressed in several tissues throughout the development of the plant. Furthermore, it was shown that salt treatment, Phytophthora sojae infection and Aphis glycines infestation trigger the expression of particular NLL genes. Stress experiments with Arabidopsis lines overexpressing the NLLs from soybean yielded an enhanced tolerance of the plant towards bacterial infection (Pseudomonas syringae, insect infestation (Myzus persicae and salinity. Our data showed a better performance of the transgenic lines compared to wild type plants, indicating that the NLLs from soybean are implicated in the stress response. These data can help to further elucidate the physiological importance of the Nictaba-like lectins from soybean, which can ultimately lead to the design of crop plants with a better tolerance to changing environmental conditions.

  14. The in vitro tolerant persister population in Burkholderia pseudomallei is altered by environmental factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Charles Nierman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial persistence due to antibiotic tolerance is a critical aspect of antibiotic treatment failure, disease latency, and chronic or reemergent infections. The levels of persisters is especially notable for the opportunistic Gram-negative pathogens from the Burkholderia and Pseudomonas genera. We examined the rate of drug tolerant persisters in Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia thailandensis, Burkholderia cepacia complex organisms, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa at mid-log growth in LB broth culture. We found that a fraction of the antibiotic-sensitive cells from every species were tolerant to a 24 hour high-dose antibiotic challenge. All tested Burkholderia strains demonstrated a drug tolerant persister population at a rate that was at least 100 – 500 times higher than P. aeruginosa. When challenged with a 10X minimum inhibitory concentration 24 hour exposure to five different antibiotics with different modes of action we found that in B. pseudomallei Bp82 the same fraction of persisters in the bacterial population was revealed when using 4 of them. This observation suggests that our assay is detecting a single homogeneous persister population. Persistence in B. pseudomallei Bp82 was highly dependent on growth stage, with a surprisingly high persister fraction of >64% of the late stationary phase cells being antibiotic tolerant. Adaptation of B. pseudomallei to distilled water storage resulted in a population of drug tolerant cells up to 100% of the non-drug-challenged viable cell count. Cultivation of B. pseudomallei with a sub-inhibitory concentration of several antibiotics resulted in altered persister fractions within the population relative to cultures lacking the antibiotic. Our study provides insight into the sensitivity of the persister fraction within the population of B. pseudomallei due to environmental variables and suggests a lack of diversity within the persister population.

  15. 40 CFR 180.1107 - Delta endotoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis variety kurstaki encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... thuringiensis variety kurstaki encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens; exemption from the requirement... killed Pseudomonas fluorescens; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. The delta endotoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis variety kurstaki encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens is exempt from the...

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosomal beta-lactamase in patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic lung infection. Mechanism of antibiotic resistance and target of the humoral immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana

    2003-01-01

    the development of resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics and the occurrence of high beta-lactamase producing strains and between the MIC of the beta-lactams and the levels of beta-lactamase expression. Partially derepressed mutants, characterized by high basal levels of beta-lactamase with the possibility......, are more susceptible to antibiotics and produce less beta-lactamase than the non-mucoid paired isolates. We propose that the non-mucoid isolates are exposed to a relatively higher antibiotic pressure than the mucoid isolates and therefore, they become easily antibiotic resistant and in consequence produce...... high levels of beta-lactamase. The beta-lactamase produced by the non-mucoid isolates might play a protective role in the biofilm, defending the mucoid isolates from the action of beta-lactam antibiotics and helping them to maintain their antibiotic susceptibility. We have also shown that beta-lactamase...

  17. Difference of Type 3 secretion system (T3SS) effector gene genotypes (exoU and exoS) and its implication to antibiotics resistances in isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from chronic otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min-Hyun; Kim, So Young; Roh, Eun Yun; Lee, Ho Sun

    2017-06-01

    Type 3 secretion system (T3SS) is the most important virulence factor in Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Of the various T3SS effector genes, exoS and exoU showed mutually exclusive distributions, and these two genes showed varied virulence. In many pseudomonal infections, the distribution of these genes showed different pattern and it influenced severity of infection. This study was aimed to evaluate differences of virulence factors and antibiotics resistance between chronic otitis media and other body infection caused by P. aeruginosa. To estimate the prevalence of effector genes of T3SS, especially the distributions of exoS and exoU genes and their association with antibiotic resistance in COM, we compared the prevalence of T3SS genes in isolates from COM with those from lower respiratory infection and bacteremia. Other virulence genes, including groEL, pilA, ndvB, lasB, rhlI, and apr, were also studied to evaluate prevalence. These isolates were tested for antibiotic susceptibility, and we examined the association between antibiotic susceptibility and the prevalence of T3SS effector genes. The COM group showed a significantly higher exoU-positive rate than the control group (70.6% vs. 6.7%; P<0.01). Furthermore, COM patients with exoU showed significant antibiotic resistance to ciprofloxacin and tobramycin (P=0.035), whereas there was no significant difference in the control group. The high incidence of exoU-positive P. aeruginosa and ciprofloxacin resistance can explain the chronicity and intractability of infection in COM. Elucidation of this pathogenicity will facilitate the development of new treatment options for COM patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa AmpR on β-lactam and non-β-lactam transient cross-resistance upon pre-exposure to subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Hansi; Balasubramanian, Deepak; Zincke, Diansy

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most dreaded opportunistic pathogens accounting for 10 % of hospital-acquired infections, with a 50 % mortality rate in chronically ill patients. The increased prevalence of drug-resistant isolates is a major cause of concern. Resistance in P. aeruginosa is mediated by various mechanisms, some of which are shared among different classes of antibiotics and which raise the possibility of cross-resistance. The goal of this study was to explore the effect of subinhibitory concentrations (SICs) of clinically relevant antibiotics and the role of a global antibiotic resistance and virulence regulator, AmpR, in developing cross-resistance. We investigated the induction of transient cross-resistance in P. aeruginosa PAO1 upon exposure to SICs of antibiotics. Pre-exposure to carbapenems, specifically imipenem, even at 3 ng ml−1, adversely affected the efficacy of clinically used penicillins and cephalosporins. The high β-lactam resistance was due to elevated expression of both ampC and ampR, encoding a chromosomal β-lactamase and its regulator, respectively. Differences in the susceptibility of ampR and ampC mutants suggested non-AmpC-mediated regulation of β-lactam resistance by AmpR. The increased susceptibility of P. aeruginosa in the absence of ampR to various antibiotics upon SIC exposure suggests that AmpR plays a major role in the cross-resistance. AmpR was shown previously to be involved in resistance to quinolones by regulating MexEF–OprN efflux pump. The data here further indicate the role of AmpR in cross-resistance between quinolones and aminoglycosides. This was confirmed using quantitative PCR, where expression of the mexEF efflux pump was further induced by ciprofloxacin and tobramycin, its substrate and a non-substrate, respectively, in the absence of ampR. The data presented here highlight the intricate cross-regulation of antibiotic resistance pathways at SICs of antibiotics and the need for careful assessment

  19. Co-silencing of tomato S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase genes confers increased immunity against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 and enhanced tolerance to drought stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xiao Hui

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (SAHH, catalyzing the reversible hydrolysis of S-adenosylhomocysteine to adenosine and homocysteine, is a key enzyme that maintain the cellular methylation potential in all organisms. We report here the biological functions of tomato SlSAHHs in stress response. The tomato genome contains three SlSAHH genes that encode SlSAHH proteins with high level of sequence identity. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that SlSAHHs responded with distinct expression induction patterns to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst DC3000 and Botrytis cinerea as well as to defense signaling hormones such as salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and a precursor of ethylene. Virus-induced gene silencing-based knockdown of individual SlSAHH gene did not affect the growth performance and the response to Pst DC3000. However, co-silencing of three SlSAHH genes using a conserved sequence led to significant inhibition of vegetable growth. The SlSAHH-co-silenced plants displayed increased resistance to Pst DC3000 but did not alter the resistance to B. cinerea. Co-silencing of SlSAHHs resulted in constitutively activated defense responses including elevated SA level, upregulated expression of defense-related and PAMP-triggered immunity marker genes and increased callose deposition and H2O2 accumulation. Furthermore, the SlSAHH-co-silenced plants also exhibited enhanced drought stress tolerance although they had relatively small roots. These data demonstrate that, in addition to the functions in growth and development, SAHHs also play important roles in regulating biotic and abiotic stress responses in plants.

  20. The Widespread Multidrug-Resistant Serotype O12 Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clone Emerged through Concomitant Horizontal Transfer of Serotype Antigen and Antibiotic Resistance Gene Clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Sandra Wingaard; Taylor, Véronique L.; Freschi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The O-specific antigen (OSA) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide is highly varied by sugar identity, side chains, and bond between O-repeats. These differences classified P. aeruginosa into 20 distinct serotypes. In the past few decades, O12 has emerged as the predominant serotype in cli...

  1. Identification of a Signal That Mediates the Crosstalk Between Biosynthetic Gene Clusters for the Antibiotics 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol and Pyoluteorin in Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 produces a broad spectrum of secondary metabolites with anti-microbial activity. The production of two of these metabolites, 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG) and pyoluteorin, is coordinately regulated. Our previous study indicated that phloroglucinol, an intermediate in t...

  2. The implication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten T; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Høiby, Niels

    2011-01-01

    -up of the extracellular matrix encasing the biofilm-associated bacteria as well as the elaborate signaling mechanisms employed by the bacterium enables it to withstand the continuous stresses imposed by the immune defense and administered antibiotics resulting in a state of chronic inflammation that damages the host......Biofilm formation by bacteria is recognized as a major problem in chronic infections due to their recalcitrance against the immune defense and available antibiotic treatment schemes. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has drawn special attention in this regard due to its severity...... of infection in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients and in chronic wounds. In this review we address the molecular basis of biofilm development by P. aeruginosa as well as the mechanisms employed by this bacterium in the increased tolerance displayed against antimicrobials. The complex build...

  3. Antibiotic resistance in triclosan tolerant fecal coliforms isolated from surface waters near wastewater treatment plant outflows (Morris County, NJ, USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, June H; Salierno, James D

    2013-02-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is a common antimicrobial agent that has been detected in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent outflows. A link between TCS exposure and increased antibiotic resistance in microbes has been postulated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether fecal coliforms (FC) isolated from surface waters located near (WWTP) outflows display TCS resistance and, if so, whether such organisms exhibit increased resistance to antibiotics. Water samples were collected at two streams in Morris County, NJ that receive WWTP effluent: Loantaka Brook and the Whippany River. Water samples were collected at three sites within each location near the WWTP effluent outflow. Abiotic river parameters were measured and FCs were enumerated for each sample. River parameters were analyzed to determine if TCS or antibiotic resistance was correlated to water quality. Triclosan resistance levels were determined for individual isolates, and isolates were screened against seven classes of antibiotics at clinically relevant levels to assess cross-resistance. At Loantaka Brook, 78.8% of FC isolates were resistant to TCS with an average minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 43.2 μg ml(-1). In addition, 89.6% of isolates were resistant to four classes of antibiotics and all were identified as Citrobacter freundii. There was a significant effect of stream location on mean TCS MIC values in the Loantaka Brook, with effluent isolates maintaining significantly higher MIC values compared to upstream isolates. At Whippany River sites, TCS resistant isolates were detected on 94% of sampling dates with a significant relationship between TCS resistance and multiple antibiotic resistances (≥ three antibiotic classes, p<0.001). TCS resistant isolates were significantly more resistant to chloramphenicol (p=0.007) and to nitrofurantoin (p=0.037) when compared to TCS sensitive isolates. Environmental FC isolates resistant to high level TCS included species of Escherichia, Enterobacter

  4. Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs Resources for You Information for Consumers (Drugs) Buying & Using Medicine Safely Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance Antibiotics ... Antibiotic Resistance and Protect Public Health The White House Blog FDA’s Take on the Executive Order and ...

  5. 40 CFR 180.1108 - Delta endotoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis variety San Diego encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... thuringiensis variety San Diego encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens; exemption from the requirement... into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. The delta endotoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis variety San Diego encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens is...

  6. Subinhibitory Concentrations of Bacteriostatic Antibiotics Induce relA-Dependent and relA-Independent Tolerance to beta-Lactams

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kudrin, P.; Varik, V.; Oliveira, S. R. A.; Beljantseva, J.; Del Peso Santos, T.; Dzhygyr, I.; Rejman, Dominik; Cava, F.; Tenson, T.; Hauryliuk, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 4 (2017), č. článku e02173-16. ISSN 0066-4804 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-11711S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : beta-lactam * RelA * antibiotics * mupirocin * persistence * ppGpp Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 4.302, year: 2016 http://aac.asm.org/content/61/4/e02173-16.full

  7. The Urinary Antibiotic 5-Nitro-8-Hydroxyquinoline (Nitroxoline) Reduces the Formation and Induces the Dispersal of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms by Chelation of Iron and Zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, M.; Hermann, B.; Sachse, S.; Nietzsche, S.; Makarewicz, O.; Keller, P. M.; Pfister, W.; Straube, E.

    2012-01-01

    Since cations have been reported as essential regulators of biofilm, we investigated the potential of the broad-spectrum antimicrobial and cation-chelator nitroxoline as an antibiofilm agent. Biofilm mass synthesis was reduced by up to 80% at sub-MIC nitroxoline concentrations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and structures formed were reticulate rather than compact. In preformed biofilms, viable cell counts were reduced by 4 logs at therapeutic concentrations. Complexation of iron and zinc was demonstrated to underlie nitroxoline's potent antibiofilm activity. PMID:22926564

  8. Extrusion of Penem Antibiotics by Multicomponent Efflux Systems MexAB-OprM, MexCD-OprJ, and MexXY-OprM of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Okamoto, Kiyomi; Gotoh, Naomasa; Nishino, Takeshi

    2002-01-01

    The high intrinsic penem resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is due to the interplay among the outer membrane barrier, the active efflux system MexAB-OprM, and AmpC β-lactamase. We studied the roles of two other efflux systems, MexCD-OprJ and MexXY-OprM, in penem resistance by overexpressing each system in an AmpC- and MexAB-OprM-deficient background and found that MexAB-OprM is the most important among the three efflux systems for extrusion of penems from the cell interior.

  9. Resistance to β-Lactam Antibiotics in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Due to Interplay between the MexAB-OprM Efflux Pump and β-Lactamase

    OpenAIRE

    Nakae, Taiji; Nakajima, Akira; Ono, Toshihisa; Saito, Kohjiro; Yoneyama, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the roles of the MexAB-OprM efflux pump and β-lactamase in β-lactam resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by constructing OprM-deficient, OprM basal level, and OprM fully expressed mutants from β-lactamase-negative, -inducible, and -overexpressed strains. We conclude that, with the notable exception of imipenem, the MexAB-OprM pump contributes significantly to β-lactam resistance in both β-lactamase-negative and β-lactamase-inducible strains, while the contribution of the MexAB-Op...

  10. Optimization of the solvent-tolerant Pseudomonas putida S12 as host for the production of p-coumarate from glucose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijkamp, K.; Westerhof, R.G.M.; Ballerstedt, H.; Bont, J.A.M.de; Wery, J.

    2007-01-01

    A Pseudomonas putida S12 strain was constructed that is able to convert glucose to p-coumarate via the central metabolite l-tyrosine. Efficient production was hampered by product degradation, limited cellular L-tyrosine availability, and formation of the by-product cinnamate via L-phenylalanine. The

  11. Zingerone suppresses liver inflammation induced by antibiotic mediated endotoxemia through down regulating hepatic mRNA expression of inflammatory markers in Pseudomonas aeruginosa peritonitis mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lokender Kumar

    Full Text Available Antibiotic-induced endotoxin release is associated with high mortality rate even when appropriate antibiotics are used for the treatment of severe infections in intensive care units. Since liver is involved in systemic clearance and detoxification of endotoxin hence it becomes a primary target organ for endotoxin mediated inflammation. Currently available anti-inflammatory drugs give rise to serious side effects. Hence, there is an urgent need for safe and effective anti-inflammatory therapy. It is likely that anti-inflammatory phytochemicals and neutraceutical agents may have the potential to reduce the endotoxin mediated inflammation and complications associated with endotoxin release. Keeping this in mind, the present study was planned to evaluate the hepatoprotective potential of zingerone (active compound of zingiber officinale against liver inflammation induced by antibiotic mediated endotoxemia. The selected antibiotics capable of releasing high content of endotoxin were employed for their in vivo efficacy in P.aeruginosa peritonitis model. Released endotoxin induced inflammation and zingerone as co-anti-inflammatory therapy significantly reduced inflammatory response. Improved liver histology and reduced inflammatory markers MDA, RNI, MPO, tissue damage markers (AST, ALT, ALP and inflammatory cytokines (MIP-2, IL-6 and TNF-α were indicative of therapeutic potential of zingerone. The mechanism of action of zingerone may be related to significant inhibition of the mRNA expression of inflammatory markers (TLR4, RelA, NF-kB2, TNF- α, iNOS, COX-2 indicating that zingerone interferes with cell signalling pathway and suppresses hyper expression of cell signaling molecules of inflammatory pathway. Zingerone therapy significantly protected liver from endotoxin induced inflammatory damage by down regulating biochemical as well as molecular markers of inflammation. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that zingerone is a potent anti

  12. Zingerone Suppresses Liver Inflammation Induced by Antibiotic Mediated Endotoxemia through Down Regulating Hepatic mRNA Expression of Inflammatory Markers in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Peritonitis Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Lokender; Chhibber, Sanjay; Harjai, Kusum

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic-induced endotoxin release is associated with high mortality rate even when appropriate antibiotics are used for the treatment of severe infections in intensive care units. Since liver is involved in systemic clearance and detoxification of endotoxin hence it becomes a primary target organ for endotoxin mediated inflammation. Currently available anti-inflammatory drugs give rise to serious side effects. Hence, there is an urgent need for safe and effective anti-inflammatory therapy. It is likely that anti-inflammatory phytochemicals and neutraceutical agents may have the potential to reduce the endotoxin mediated inflammation and complications associated with endotoxin release. Keeping this in mind, the present study was planned to evaluate the hepatoprotective potential of zingerone (active compound of zingiber officinale) against liver inflammation induced by antibiotic mediated endotoxemia. The selected antibiotics capable of releasing high content of endotoxin were employed for their in vivo efficacy in P.aeruginosa peritonitis model. Released endotoxin induced inflammation and zingerone as co-anti-inflammatory therapy significantly reduced inflammatory response. Improved liver histology and reduced inflammatory markers MDA, RNI, MPO, tissue damage markers (AST, ALT, ALP) and inflammatory cytokines (MIP-2, IL-6 and TNF-α) were indicative of therapeutic potential of zingerone. The mechanism of action of zingerone may be related to significant inhibition of the mRNA expression of inflammatory markers (TLR4, RelA, NF-kB2, TNF- α, iNOS, COX-2) indicating that zingerone interferes with cell signalling pathway and suppresses hyper expression of cell signaling molecules of inflammatory pathway. Zingerone therapy significantly protected liver from endotoxin induced inflammatory damage by down regulating biochemical as well as molecular markers of inflammation. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that zingerone is a potent anti

  13. Meropenem in cystic fibrosis patients infected with resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Burkholderia cepacia and with hypersensitivity to beta-lactam antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Jensen, Tim; Pressler, Tacjana

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy and safety of meropenem, administered on a compassionate basis to 62 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients (age: 24plus minus6 years) with hypersensitivity reactions to beta-lactam antibiotics and/or infection by bacteria resistant to other antibiotics. METHODS: Fifty...... in pulmonary function (as a percentage of the predictive values) was 5.6% for FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in the first second) and 8.6% for FVC (forced vital capacity). C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and leukocyte count decreased significantly. In courses administered...... complaint. The following side effects were observed: nausea (0.8%), itching (4%), rash (3.2%), drug fever (1.6%). CONCLUSIONS: Meropenem proved to be a valuable drug in the treatment of CF patients with chronic pulmonary infection with multiresistant P. aeruginosa and B. cepacia and with hypersensitivity...

  14. An exception to the rule "no association between antibiotic resistance and decreased disinfectant microbicidal efficacy": Orthophthalaldehyde (OPA) andPseudomonas aeruginosaisolated from ICU and paraplegic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herruzo, R; Vizcaíno, M J; Herruzo, I

    2017-03-01

    Antibiotic resistance and decreased susceptibility to disinfectants are not usually associated in microorganisms, but we have found an exception to this rule: P. aeruginosa versus orthophthalaldehyde (OPA). Bactericidal effect of OPA was measured at 10 minutes on endodoncy files contaminated with an ATCC strain (control) or 206 strains of P. aeruginosa recently isolated from 206 ICU and paraplegic patients in a tertiary university hospital, in two consecutive years. Differences in bactericidal effect of OPA were found between the strains isolated each year (decreased susceptibility in the first period), but in both years the statistical differences (p OPA susceptibility in parallel to an increase of their antibiotic resistance. In contrast, there were no differences depending on the type of sample (sputum, urine, faeces, pharynx) or of patient (paraplegic or ICU: adult, newborn, burn). Finally we selected 15 strains with an OPA effect below 3.5 log10 at 10 minutes and repeated the study with an OPA exposure of 15 minutes. In these conditions OPA showed a total bactericidal effect on these P. aeruginosa strains. There was an association between antibiotic resistance and decreased OPA susceptibility. This normally does not require an increase in disinfection time, but, for endoscope disinfection or instruments from colonized/infected patients with resistant/multiresistant P. aeruginosa, we consider it better to use 15 min of OPA. Regular tests (e.g., once every 12 months) with germ-carriers, should be performed to assess ecological changes in susceptibility to high level disinfectants and must include not only ATCC strains, but also recently isolated microorganisms with different antibiotic sensitivities (susceptible, resistant and multi-resistant).

  15. Pseudomonas - Fact Sheet

    OpenAIRE

    Public Health Agency

    2012-01-01

    Fact sheet on Pseudomonas, including:What is Pseudomonas?What infections does it cause?Who is susceptible to pseudomonas infection?How will I know if I have pseudomonas infection?How can Pseudomonas be prevented from spreading?How can I protect myself from Pseudomonas?How is Pseudomonas infection treated?

  16. Augmented effect of early antibiotic treatment in mice with experimental lung infections due to sequentially adapted mucoid strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Gennip, M; Moser, Claus; Christensen, Louise D

    2009-01-01

    , histopathology, and measurement of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2). Results: There was a significant reduction of bacteria when comparing treatment initiated 1 h post-infection with treatment initiated after 24 h for isolates 1997 and 2003. Treatment......: A significant reduction in the number of bacteria was observed when initiating treatment 1 h post-infection compared with initiating treatment after 24 h, although the latest isolate avoided complete clearance. Early antibiotic treatment directed at the mucoid phenotype in mice also reduced the inflammation and...

  17. Role of MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM efflux pumps and class 1 integrons in resistance to antibiotics in burn and Intensive Care Unit isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goli, Hamid Reza; Nahaei, Mohammad Reza; Ahangarzadeh Rezaee, Mohammad; Hasani, Alka; Samadi Kafil, Hossein; Aghazadeh, Mohammad; Nikbakht, Mojtaba; Khalili, Younes

    2017-10-06

    The overexpression of efflux pumps and existence of class 1 integrons are the most important mechanisms that contribute to antimicrobial resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa especially in burn and Intensive Care Units (ICUs). The present study evaluated the role of MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM efflux pumps and class 1 integrons in resistance to antibiotics in burn and ICU isolates of P. aeruginosa. Fifteen burn and forty-two ICU isolates were obtained from four hospitals in Northwest Iran. The isolates were identified and evaluated by the disk diffusion and agar dilution methods for determining antibiotic resistances. The presence of class 1 integrons and associated resistance gene cassettes were detected by PCR and sequencing of the products. The expression levels of efflux pumps were evaluated by phenotypic and genotypic (Quantitative Real-time PCR) methods. The isolates were genotyped by Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA Typing (RAPD-PCR). All burn isolates were integron positive and Multi-drug resistant (MDR), while 78.5% and 69% of ICU isolates were found as MDR and integron positive, respectively. The aadB gene was the most prevalent gene cassette (63.6%) followed by aacA4 (47.7%). Thirty-nine (68.4%) and 43 (75.4%) isolates exhibited an overexpression of MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM. Among burn isolates, 80% and 86.6% of them were mexB and mexY overexpressed, while 64.2% and 71.4% of ICU isolates exhibited mexB and mexY overexpression, correspondingly. The isolates were genotyped as 24 different RAPD profiles and were grouped into 15 clusters. The data suggested that class 1 integron had a more significant role than efflux pumps in resistance to beta-lactams and aminoglycosides in burn and ICUs except for gentamicin in burn isolates. Based on our data, it is possible that efflux pumps were not the main cause of high-level resistance to antibiotics. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Tolerance of the antibiotic tylosin on treatment performance of an up-flow anaerobic stage reactor (UASR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelliapan, S; Wilby, T; Sallis, P J; Yuzir, A

    2011-01-01

    Tylosin has been considered inhibiting COD removal in anaerobic digestion. In this study it is proven that this is not always the case. Accordingly, elevated concentrations of Tylosin (100-800mgL-1) could be tolerated by the anaerobic system. The influence of Tylosin concentrations on an up-flow anaerobic stage reactor (UASR) was assessed using additions of Tylosin phosphate concentrate. Results showed high efficiency for COD removal (average 93%) when Tylosin was present at concentrations ranging from 0 to 400 mg L-1. However, at Tylosin concentrations of 600 and 800 mg L-1 treatment efficiency declined to 85% and 75% removal respectively. The impact of Tylosin concentrations on archaeal activity were investigated and the analysis revealed that archaeal cells dominated the reactor, confirming that there was no detectable inhibition of the methanogens at Tylosin levels between 100 and 400mg L-1. Nevertheless, the investigation showed a slight reduction in the number of methanogens at Tylosin levels of 600 and 800 mg L-1. These results demonstrated that the methanogens were well adapted to Tylosin. It would not be expected that the process performance of the UASR would be affected, not even at a level well in excess of those appearing in real wastewater from a Tylosin production site.

  19. Alleviation of fungicide-induced phytotoxicity in greengram [Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek] using fungicide-tolerant and plant growth promoting Pseudomonas strain

    OpenAIRE

    Ahemad, Munees; Khan, Mohammad Saghir

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to explore beneficial plant-associated rhizobacteria exhibiting substantial tolerance against fungicide tebuconazole vis-à-vis synthesizing plant growth regulators under fungicide stressed soils and to evaluate further these multifaceted rhizobacteria for protection and growth promotion of greengram [Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek] plants against phytotoxicity of tebuconazole. Tebuconazole-tolerant and plant growth promoting bacterial strain PS1 was isolated from mustard (...

  20. Resistance patterns of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    negative bacilli in patients with impaired host defences emphasizes the need for information on the antibiotic susceptibility of the organisms that infects such patients. Pseudomonas aeruginosa are becoming increasingly resistant to ...

  1. Biosynthesis and regulation of cyclic lipopeptides in Pseudomonas fluorescens

    OpenAIRE

    Bruijn, de, I.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) are surfactant and antibiotic metabolites produced by a variety of bacterial genera. For the genus Pseudomonas, many structurally different CLPs have been identified. CLPs play an important role in surface motility of Pseudomonas strains, but also in virulence and attachment/detachment to and from surfaces. In this Ph.D. thesis project, two new CLP biosynthesis clusters were identified in Pseudomonas fluorescens and fully sequenced. In P. fluorescens strain SBW2...

  2. Development of antibiotic resistance and up-regulation of the antimutator gene pfpI in mutator Pseudomonas aeruginosa due to inactivation of two DNA oxidative repair genes (mutY, mutM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandsberg, Lotte Frigaard; Maciá, Maria D; Bergmann, Kirsten R; Christiansen, Lasse E; Alhede, Morten; Kirkby, Nikolai; Høiby, Niels; Oliver, Antonio; Ciofu, Oana

    2011-11-01

    Prevention and correction of oxidative DNA lesions in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is ensured by the DNA oxidative repair system (GO). Single inactivation of mutT, mutY and mutM involved in GO led to elevated mutation rates (MRs) that correlated to increased development of resistance to antibiotics. In this study, we constructed a double mutant in mutY and mutM (PAOMY-Mgm) and characterized the phenotype and the gene expression profile using microarray and RT-PCR. PAOMY-Mgm presented 28-fold increases in MR compared with wild-type reference strain PAO1. In comparison, the PAOMYgm (mutY) single mutant showed only a fivefold increase, whereas the single mutant PAOMMgm (mutM) showed a nonsignificant increase in MR compared with PAO1 and the single mutants. Mutations in the regulator nfxB leading to hyperexpression of MexCD-OprJ efflux pump were found as the mechanism of resistance to ciprofloxacin in the double mutant. A better fitness of the mutator compared with PAO1 was found in growth competition experiments in the presence of ciprofloxacin at concentrations just below minimal inhibitory concentration. Up-regulation of the antimutator gene pfpI, that has been shown to provide protection to oxidative stress, was found in PAOMY-Mgm compared with PAO1. In conclusion, we showed that MutY and MutM are cooperating in the GO of P. aeruginosa, and that oxidative DNA lesions might represent an oxidative stress for the bacteria. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Novel Targets for Treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Morten; Alhede, Maria; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes infection in all parts of the human body. The bacterium is naturally resistant to a wide range of antibiotics. In addition to resistance mechanisms such as efflux pumps, the ability to form aggregates, known as biofilm, further reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa...

  4. Biosynthesis and regulation of cyclic lipopeptides in Pseudomonas fluorescens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, de I.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) are surfactant and antibiotic metabolites produced by a variety of bacterial
    genera. For the genus Pseudomonas, many structurally different CLPs have been identified. CLPs play an
    important role in surface motility of Pseudomonas strains, but also in virulence

  5. Alginate overproduction affects Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm structure and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hentzer, Morten; Teitzel, G.M.; Balzer, G.J.

    2001-01-01

    During the course of chronic cystic fibrosis (CF) infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes a conversion to a mucoid phenotype, which is characterized by overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Chronic P. aeruginosa infections involve surface-attached, highly antibiotic-resistant com......During the course of chronic cystic fibrosis (CF) infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes a conversion to a mucoid phenotype, which is characterized by overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Chronic P. aeruginosa infections involve surface-attached, highly antibiotic...

  6. Phenotypes of non-attached Pseudomonas aeruginosa aggregates resemble surface attached biofilm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Alhede

    Full Text Available For a chronic infection to be established, bacteria must be able to cope with hostile conditions such as low iron levels, oxidative stress, and clearance by the host defense, as well as antibiotic treatment. It is generally accepted that biofilm formation facilitates tolerance to these adverse conditions. However, microscopic investigations of samples isolated from sites of chronic infections seem to suggest that some bacteria do not need to be attached to surfaces in order to establish chronic infections. In this study we employed scanning electron microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, RT-PCR as well as traditional culturing techniques to study the properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa aggregates. We found that non-attached aggregates from stationary-phase cultures have comparable growth rates to surface attached biofilms. The growth rate estimations indicated that, independently of age, both aggregates and flow-cell biofilm had the same slow growth rate as a stationary phase shaking cultures. Internal structures of the aggregates matrix components and their capacity to survive otherwise lethal treatments with antibiotics (referred to as tolerance and resistance to phagocytes were also found to be strikingly similar to flow-cell biofilms. Our data indicate that the tolerance of both biofilms and non-attached aggregates towards antibiotics is reversible by physical disruption. We provide evidence that the antibiotic tolerance is likely to be dependent on both the physiological states of the aggregates and particular matrix components. Bacterial surface-attachment and subsequent biofilm formation are considered hallmarks of the capacity of microbes to cause persistent infections. We have observed non-attached aggregates in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients; otitis media; soft tissue fillers and non-healing wounds, and we propose that aggregated cells exhibit enhanced survival in the hostile host environment, compared with non

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Trent and zinc homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Corey B; Harrison, Mark D; Huygens, Flavia

    2017-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative pathogen and the major cause of mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis. The mechanisms that P. aeruginosa strains use to regulate intracellular zinc have an effect on infection, antibiotic resistance and the propensity to form biofilms. However, zinc homeostasis in P. aeruginosa strains of variable infectivity has not been compared. In this study, zinc homeostasis in P. aeruginosa Trent, a highly infectious clinical strain, was compared to that of a laboratory P. aeruginosa strain, ATCC27853. Trent was able to tolerate higher concentrations of additional zinc in rich media than ATCC27853. Further, pre-adaptation to additional zinc enhanced the growth of Trent at non-inhibitory concentrations but the impact of pre-adaption on the growth of ATCC27853 under the same conditions was minimal. The results establish clear differences in zinc-induced responses in Trent and ATCC27853, and how zinc homeostasis can be a promising target for the development of novel antimicrobial strategies for P. aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis patients. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Complement activation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E T; Kharazmi, A; Garred, P

    1993-01-01

    In chronic infections, such as the bronchopulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, bacteria persist despite an intact host immune defense and frequent antibiotic treatment. An important reason for the persistence of the bacteria is their capacity for the biofilm...

  9. Optimization studies on production of a salt-tolerant protease from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain BC1 and its application on tannery saline wastewater treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthilkumar Sivaprakasam

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Treatment and safe disposal of tannery saline wastewater, a primary effluent stream that is generated by soaking salt-laden hides and skin is one of the major problems faced by the leather manufacturing industries. Conventional treatment methods like solar evaporation ponds and land composting are not eco-friendly as they deteriorate the ground water quality. Though, this waste stream is comprised of high concentration of dissolved proteins the presence of high salinity (1-6 % NaCl by wt makes it non-biodegradable. Enzymatic treatment is one of the positive alternatives for management of such kind of waste streams. A novel salt-tolerant alkaline protease obtained from P.aeruginosa (isolated from tannery saline wastewater was used for enzymatic degradation studies. The effect of various physical factors including pH, temperature, incubation time, protein source and salinity on the activity of identified protease were investigated. Kinetic parameters (Km , Vmax were calculated for the identified alkaline protease at varying substrate concentrations. Tannery saline wastewater treated with identified salt tolerant protease showed 75 % protein removal at 6 h duration and 2 % (v/v protease addition was found to be the optimum dosage value.

  10. 33 original article infections a pseudomonas aeruginosa dans un

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a known opportunistic pathogen frequently causing serious infections. It exhibits innate resistance to a wide range of antibiotics thus causing high rates of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Objective: This study was done to determine the distribution and the antibiotic susceptibility ...

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections in a Tertiary Hospital in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a known opportunistic pathogen frequently causing serious infections. It exhibits innate resistance to a wide range of antibiotics thus causing high rates of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Objective: This study was done to determine the distribution and the antibiotic susceptibility ...

  12. Identification and molecular characterization of an efflux system involved in Pseudomonas putida S12 multidrug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieboom, J; de Bont, J

    2001-01-01

    The authors previously described srpABC, an operon involved in proton-dependent solvent efflux in the solvent-tolerant Pseudomonas putida S12. Recently, it was shown that organic solvents and not antibiotics induce this operon. In the present study, the authors characterize a new efflux pump, designated ArpABC, on the basis of two isolated chloramphenicol-sensitive transposon mutants. The arpABC operon is involved in the active efflux of multiple antibiotics, such as tetracycline, chloramphenicol, carbenicillin, streptomycin, erythromycin and novobiocin. The deduced amino acid sequences encoded by the three genes involved show a striking resemblance to proteins of the resistance/nodulation/cell division family, which are involved in both organic solvent and multiple drug efflux. These findings demonstrate that ArpABC is highly homologous to the MepABC and TtgABC efflux systems for organic solvents and multiple antibiotics. However, ArpABC does not contribute to organic solvent tolerance in P. putida S12 but is solely involved in multidrug resistance.

  13. Extracellular DNA Shields against Aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Nilsson, Martin; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2013-01-01

    provide evidence that extracellular DNA shields against aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. We show that exogenously supplemented DNA integrates into P. aeruginosa biofilms and increases their tolerance toward aminoglycosides. We provide evidence that biofilms formed by a DNA release...

  14. Design of a large-scale femtoliter droplet array for single-cell analysis of drug-tolerant and drug-resistant bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryota eIino

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Single-cell analysis is a powerful method to assess the heterogeneity among individual cells, enabling the identification of very rare cells with properties that differ from those of the majority. In this Methods Article, we describe the use of a large-scale femtoliter droplet array to enclose, isolate, and analyze individual bacterial cells. As a first example, we describe the single-cell detection of drug-tolerant persisters of Pseudomonas aeruginosa treated with the antibiotic carbenicillin. As a second example, this method was applied to the single-cell evaluation of drug efflux activity, which causes acquired antibiotic resistance of bacteria. The activity of the MexAB-OprM multidrug efflux pump system from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was expressed in Escherichia coli and the effect of an inhibitor D13-9001 were assessed at the single cell level.

  15. Bacterial mediated amelioration of drought stress in drought tolerant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacterial mediated amelioration of drought stress in drought tolerant and susceptible cultivars of rice (Oryza sativa L.) YS Gusain, US Singh, AK Sharma. Abstract. In the present study, plant growth promoting rhizobacterial (PGPR) strains Pseudomonas fluorescence strain P2, Pseudomonas jessenii R62, Pseudomonas ...

  16. Isolation and characterization of arsenite oxidizing Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A bacterium, Pseudomonas lubricans, isolated from heavy metal laden industrial wastewater, has been shown to tolerate multiple heavy metals suggesting its importance in bioremediation of industrial effluents. P. lubricans tolerated As(III) up to 3 mg ml-1, Cu2+ up to 0.7 mg ml-1, Hg2+ up to 0.4 mg ml-1, Ni2+ up to 0.4 mg ...

  17. Antibiotic policy

    OpenAIRE

    Gyssens, Inge

    2011-01-01

    There is a clear association between antibiotic use and resistance both on individual and population levels. In the European Union, countries with large antibiotic consumption have higher resistance rates. Antibiotic resistance leads to failed treatments, prolonged hospitalisations, increased costs and deaths. With few new antibiotics in the Research & Development pipeline, prudent antibiotic use is the only option to delay the development of resistance. Antibiotic policy consists of prescrib...

  18. Antimicrobial Tolerance in Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    The tolerance of microorganisms in biofilms to antimicrobial agents is examined through a meta-analysis of literature data. A numerical tolerance factor comparing the rates of killing in the planktonic and biofilm states is defined to provide a quantitative basis for the analysis. Tolerance factors for biocides and antibiotics range over three orders of magnitude. This variation is not explained by taking into account the molecular weight of the agent, the chemistry of the agent, the substrat...

  19. Glyceryl trinitrate is a novel inhibitor of quorum sensing inPseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Hisham A; Shaldam, Moutaz A

    2016-12-01

    Targeting quorum sensing is an alternative approach to antibiotics.Targeting quorum sensing-regulated virulence will disarm the pathogen without exerting pressure on its growth. As a result, emergence of resistance is avoided and the immune system can easily eradicate bacteria. Investigation of the possible inhibition of quorum sensing-regulated virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by glyceryltrinitrate. The quorum sensing inhibiting activity of glyceryl trinitrate was assessed by inhibition of violacein production in Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472. Its ability to inhibit pyocyanin, protease, biofilm and tolerance to oxidative stress was evaluated. Docking study was performed to study the interference of glyceryl trinitrate with the binding of autoinducers with LasR and rhlR receptors. Glyceryl trinitrate exerted a significant biofilm inhibiting and eradicating activities. It decreased the production of quorum-sensing dependent violacein production. It significantly inhibited the production of pyocyanin and protease and diminished the tolerance against oxidative stress. Molecular docking study showed that glyceryl trinitrate interferes with the binding of autoinducers to their receptors. It could bind to Las Rand rhlr receptors with binding energy of -93.47 and -77.23, respectively. Glyceryl trinitrate can be an antivirulence agent in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa topical infections such as burn infections.

  20. Bacteriophage-antibiotic synergism to control planktonic and biofilm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacteriophage-antibiotic synergism to control planktonic and biofilm producing clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Amina Amal Mahmoud Nouraldin, Manal Mohammad Baddour, Reem Abdel Hameed Harfoush, Sara AbdelAziz Mohamed Essa ...

  1. Sequential interactions of silver-silica nanocomposite (Ag-SiO2NC) with cell wall, metabolism and genetic stability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a multiple antibiotic-resistant bacterium

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anas, A.; Jiya, J.; Rameez, M.J.; Anand, P.B.; Anantharaman, M.R.; Nair, S.

    The study was carried out to understand the effect of silver-silica nanocomposite (Ag-SiO sub(2)NC) on the cell wall integrity, metabolism and genetic stability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a multiple drug-resistant bacterium Bacterial sensitivity...

  2. Sequential interactions of silver-silica nanocomposite (Ag-SiO2 NC) with cell wall, metabolism and genetic stability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a multiple antibiotic-resistant bacterium

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anas, A.; Jiya, J.; Rameez, M.J.; Anand, P.B.; Anantharaman, M.R.; Nair, S.

    The study was carried out to understand the effect of silver–silica nanocomposite (Ag-SiO sub(2)NC) on the cell wall integrity, metabolism and genetic stability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a multiple drug-resistant bacterium. Bacterial sensitivity...

  3. Selection of antibiotic resistance at very low antibiotic concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandegren, Linus

    2014-05-01

    Human use of antibiotics has driven the selective enrichment of pathogenic bacteria resistant to clinically used drugs. Traditionally, the selection of resistance has been considered to occur mainly at high, therapeutic levels of antibiotics, but we are now beginning to understand better the importance of selection of resistance at low levels of antibiotics. The concentration of an antibiotic varies in different body compartments during treatment, and low concentrations of antibiotics are found in sewage water, soils, and many water environments due to natural production and contamination from human activities. Selection of resistance at non-lethal antibiotic concentrations (below the wild-type minimum inhibitory concentration) occurs due to differences in growth rate at the particular antibiotic concentration between cells with different tolerance levels to the antibiotic. The minimum selective concentration for a particular antibiotic is reached when its reducing effect on growth of the susceptible strain balances the reducing effect (fitness cost) of the resistance determinant in the resistant strain. Recent studies have shown that resistant bacteria can be selected at concentrations several hundred-fold below the lethal concentrations for susceptible cells. Resistant mutants selected at low antibiotic concentrations are generally more fit than those selected at high concentrations but can still be highly resistant. The characteristics of selection at low antibiotic concentrations, the potential clinical problems of this mode of selection, and potential solutions will be discussed.

  4. Role of EfrAB efflux pump in biocide tolerance and antibiotic resistance of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolated from traditional fermented foods and the effect of EDTA as EfrAB inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavilla Lerma, Leyre; Benomar, Nabil; Valenzuela, Antonio Sánchez; Casado Muñoz, María del Carmen; Gálvez, Antonio; Abriouel, Hikmate

    2014-12-01

    Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolated from various traditional fermented foods of both animal and vegetable origins have shown multidrug resistance to several antibiotics and tolerance to biocides. Reduced susceptibility was intra and inter-species dependent and was due to specific and unspecific mechanisms such as efflux pumps. EfrAB, a heterodimeric ABC transporter efflux pump, was detected in 100% of multidrug resistant (MDR) E. faecalis strains and only in 12% of MDR E. faecium strains. EfrAB expression was induced by half of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of gentamicin, streptomycin and chloramphenicol. However, expression of efrA and efrB genes was highly dependent on the strain tested and on the antimicrobial used. Our results indicated that 3 mM EDTA highly reduced the MICs of almost all drugs tested. Nevertheless, the higher reductions (>8 folds) were obtained with gentamicin, streptomycin, chlorhexidine and triclosan. Reductions of MICs were correlated with down-regulation of EfrAB expression (10-140 folds) in all three MDR enterococci strains. This is the first report describing the role of EfrAB in the efflux of antibiotics and biocides which reflect also the importance of EfrAB in multidrug resistance in enterococci. EDTA used at low concentration as food preservative could be one of the best choices to prevent spread of multidrug resistant enterococci throughout food chain by decreasing EfrAB expression. EfrAB could be an attractive target not only in enterococci present in food matrix but also those causing infections as well by using EDTA as therapeutic agent in combination with low doses of antibiotics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Influence of Mucoid Coating on Clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Lungs

    OpenAIRE

    Blackwood, Linda L.; Pennington, James E.

    1981-01-01

    Pulmonary infection with mucoid strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in present in the majority of cystic fibrosis patients with chronic lung disease. It has been postulated that this mucoid coating may act to decrease lung clearance of Pseudomonas by limiting access of phagocytes, antibodies, and antibiotics to the bacteria. To determine whether mucoid coating of Pseudomonas might decrease intrapulmonary killing, groups of guinea pigs were infected with intrabronchial instillations of equivalen...

  6. The Small Colony Variant Of Listeria Monocytogenes Is More Tolerant To Antibiotics And Grows Better Within Caco-2 Epithelial Cells Than The Wild Type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curtis, Thomas; Gram, Lone; Knudsen, Gitte Maegaard

    2015-01-01

    tolerant of 20mM H2O2 as compared to the wild type, with 6.3 log10 CFU/ml and 3.7 log10 CFU/ml, respectively. The SCV E18 had lower survival rate in unactivated macrophages, however, it was able to survive and multiply to almost 100-fold higher CFU/ml than the wild type in CaCo-2 epithelial cells...

  7. Antibiotic Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Superbugs and Drugs" Home | Contact Us General Background: Antibiotic Agents What is an antibacterial and how are ... with the growth and reproduction of bacteria. While antibiotics and antibacterials both attack bacteria, these terms have ...

  8. Combination of Ageratum conyzoides leaf extracts with antibiotics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There has been increasing prevalence of bacterial resistance to commonly used antibiotics. The present study investigates the synergistic action of Ageratum conyzoides leaf extracts and antibiotics against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus isolated from wounds. The disc diffusion method was used.

  9. The Effect of Antioxidants on Antibiotic Sensitivity of Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Azade ATTAR; Akif İ. QURBANOV

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The effect of different concentrations of antioxidants (ascorbic acid, emoxipin, tocopherol acetate and ionol) on antibiotic sensitivity of bacteria was studied. Method: Bacteria belong to different respiration types: Pseudomonas aeruginosa as aerobe and Escherichia coli as facultative anaerobe were used. Antibiotic sensitivity of microorganisms was determined as minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) by dilution test. Results: Different concentrations of antioxidants increased the...

  10. In Vitro Antibiotic Susceptibility Studies Of Bacteria Associated With ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In vitro tests of the susceptibility of isolates of bacterial keratitis pathogens to antibiotics were carried out in this study. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequently isolated organisms followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Antibiotic sensitivity testing showed a high susceptibility to ...

  11. Management and treatment of contact lens-related Pseudomonas keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willcox MD

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mark DP WillcoxSchool of Optometry and Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, AustraliaAbstract: Pubmed and Medline were searched for articles referring to Pseudomonas keratitis between the years 2007 and 2012 to obtain an overview of the current state of this disease. Keyword searches used the terms "Pseudomonas" + "Keratitis" limit to "2007–2012", and ["Ulcerative" or "Microbial"] + "Keratitis" + "Contact lenses" limit to "2007–2012". These articles were then reviewed for information on the percentage of microbial keratitis cases associated with contact lens wear, the frequency of Pseudomonas sp. as a causative agent of microbial keratitis around the world, the most common therapies to treat Pseudomonas keratitis, and the sensitivity of isolates of Pseudomonas to commonly prescribed antibiotics. The percentage of microbial keratitis associated with contact lens wear ranged from 0% in a study from Nepal to 54.5% from Japan. These differences may be due in part to different frequencies of contact lens wear. The frequency of Pseudomonas sp. as a causative agent of keratitis ranged from 1% in Japan to over 50% in studies from India, Malaysia, and Thailand. The most commonly reported agents used to treat Pseudomonas keratitis were either aminoglycoside (usually gentamicin fortified with a cephalosporin, or monotherapy with a fluoroquinolone (usually ciprofloxacin. In most geographical areas, most strains of Pseudomonas sp. (≥95% were sensitive to ciprofloxacin, but reports from India, Nigeria, and Thailand reported sensitivity to this antibiotic and similar fluoroquinolones of between 76% and 90%.Keywords: Pseudomonas, keratitis, contact lens

  12. Antibiotic-Induced Within-Host Resistance Development of Gram-Negative Bacteria in Patients Receiving Selective Decontamination or Standard Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noteboom, Yvonne; Ong, David S. Y.; Oostdijk, Evelien A.; Schultz, Marcus J.; de Jonge, Evert; Purmer, Ilse; Bergmans, Dennis; Fijen, Jan Willem; Kesecioglu, Jozef; Bonten, Marc J. M.

    2015-01-01

    To quantify antibiotic-associated within-host antibiotic resistance acquisition rates in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella species, and Enterobacter species from lower respiratory tract samples of ICU patients receiving selective digestive decontamination, selective oropharyngeal decontamination,

  13. Efficacy, safety, tolerability and population pharmacokinetics of tedizolid, a novel antibiotic, in Latino patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Covarrubias, Alejandro; Fang, Edward; Prokocimer, Philippe G; Flanagan, Shawn D; Zhu, Xu; Cabré-Márquez, Jose Francisco; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Passarell, Julie; Fiedler-Kelly, Jill; Nannini, Esteban C

    2016-01-01

    Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections are caused mainly by Gram-positive bacteria which are often treated with intravenous vancomycin, daptomycin, or linezolid, with potential step down to oral linezolid for outpatients. Tedizolid phosphate 200mg once daily treatment for six days demonstrated non-inferior efficacy, with a favourable safety profile, compared with linezolid 600mg twice daily treatment for 10 days in the Phase 3 ESTABLISH-1 and -2 trials. The objective of the current post-hoc analysis of the integrated dataset of ESTABLISH-1 and -2 was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of tedizolid (N=182) vs linezolid (N=171) in patients of Latino origin enrolled into these trials. The baseline demographic characteristics of Latino patients were similar between the two treatment groups. Tedizolid demonstrated comparable efficacy to linezolid at 48-72h in the intent-to-treat population (tedizolid: 80.2% vs linezolid: 81.9%). Sustained clinical success rates were comparable between tedizolid- and linezolid-treated Latino patients at end-of-therapy (tedizolid: 86.8% vs linezolid: 88.9%). Tedizolid phosphate treatment was well tolerated by Latino patients in the safety population with lower abnormal platelet counts at end-of-therapy (tedizolid: 3.4% vs linezolid: 11.3%, p=0.0120) and lower incidence of gastrointestinal adverse events (tedizolid: 16.5% vs linezolid: 23.5%). Population pharmacokinetic analysis suggested that estimated tedizolid exposure measures in Latino patients vs non-Latino patients were similar. These findings demonstrate that tedizolid phosphate 200mg, once daily treatment for six days was efficacious and well tolerated by patients of Latino origin, without warranting dose adjustment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Efficacy, safety, tolerability and population pharmacokinetics of tedizolid, a novel antibiotic, in Latino patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Ortiz-Covarrubias

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections are caused mainly by Gram-positive bacteria which are often treated with intravenous vancomycin, daptomycin, or linezolid, with potential step down to oral linezolid for outpatients. Tedizolid phosphate 200 mg once daily treatment for six days demonstrated non-inferior efficacy, with a favourable safety profile, compared with linezolid 600 mg twice daily treatment for 10 days in the Phase 3 ESTABLISH-1 and -2 trials. The objective of the current post-hoc analysis of the integrated dataset of ESTABLISH-1 and -2 was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of tedizolid (N = 182 vs linezolid (N = 171 in patients of Latino origin enrolled into these trials. The baseline demographic characteristics of Latino patients were similar between the two treatment groups. Tedizolid demonstrated comparable efficacy to linezolid at 48–72 h in the intent-to-treat population (tedizolid: 80.2% vs linezolid: 81.9%. Sustained clinical success rates were comparable between tedizolid- and linezolid-treated Latino patients at end-of-therapy (tedizolid: 86.8% vs linezolid: 88.9%. Tedizolid phosphate treatment was well tolerated by Latino patients in the safety population with lower abnormal platelet counts at end-of-therapy (tedizolid: 3.4% vs linezolid: 11.3%, p = 0.0120 and lower incidence of gastrointestinal adverse events (tedizolid: 16.5% vs linezolid: 23.5%. Population pharmacokinetic analysis suggested that estimated tedizolid exposure measures in Latino patients vs non-Latino patients were similar. These findings demonstrate that tedizolid phosphate 200 mg, once daily treatment for six days was efficacious and well tolerated by patients of Latino origin, without warranting dose adjustment.

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Healthcare Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sepsis Sharps Safety - CDC Transplant Safety Vaccine Safety Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Healthcare Settings Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... and/or help treat infections? What is a Pseudomonas infection? Pseudomonas infection is caused by strains of ...

  16. Synergistic effect of polyaniline coverage and surface microstructure on the inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallarato, L A; Mulko, L E; Dardanelli, M S; Barbero, C A; Acevedo, D F; Yslas, E I

    2017-02-01

    Biofilm Formation is a survival strategy for microorganisms to adapt to their environment. Microbial cells in biofilm become tolerant and resistant to antibiotics and immune responses, increasing the difficulties for the clinical treatment of microbial infections. The surface chemistry and the micro/nano-topography of solid interfaces play a major role in mediating microorganism activity and adhesion. The effect of the surface chemical composition and topography on the adhesion and viability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was studied. Polymeric (polyethylene terephthalate) surfaces were covered with a conducting polymer (polyaniline, PANI) film by in-situ polymerization and microstructured by Direct Laser Interference Patterning (DLIP). The viability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on the different surfaces was investigated. The physicochemical properties of the surfaces were characterized by water contact angle measurements, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Bacterial biofilms were imaged by atomic force and scanning electron microscopies. The bacterial viability decreased on PANI compared with the substrate (polyethylene terephthalate) and it decreased even more upon micro-structuring the PANI films. In addition, the biofilm reduction could be improved using polymers with different chemical composition and/or the same polymer with different topographies. Both methods presented diminish the bacterial attachment and biofilm formation. These findings present a high impact related to materials for biomedical engineer applications regarding medical devices, as prostheses or catheters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The implication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten T; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Høiby, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Biofilm formation by bacteria is recognized as a major problem in chronic infections due to their recalcitrance against the immune defense and available antibiotic treatment schemes. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has drawn special attention in this regard due to its severity...

  18. Synergistic Photothermal and Antibiotic Killing of Biofilm-Associated Staphylococcus aureus Using Targeted Antibiotic-Loaded Gold Nanoconstructs

    OpenAIRE

    Meeker, Daniel G.; Jenkins, Samir V.; Miller, Emily K.; Beenken, Karen E.; Loughran, Allister J.; Powless, Amy; Muldoon, Timothy J.; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Zharov, Vladimir P.; Smeltzer, Mark S.; Chen, Jingyi

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to conventional antibiotics is a growing public health concern that is quickly outpacing the development of new antibiotics. This has led the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) to designate Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species as ?ESKAPE pathogens? on the basis of the rapidly decreasing availability of useful antibiotics. This emphasizes the urgent need for alternativ...

  19. Survival of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Horizontal Gene Transfer Control Antibiotic Resistance Gene Content in Anaerobic Digesters

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Jennifer H.; Novak, John T.; Knocke, William R.; Pruden, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) versus their antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during wastewater sludge treatment is critical in order to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance through process optimization. Here, we spiked high concentrations of tetracycline-resistant bacteria, isolated from mesophilic (Iso M1-1- a Pseudomonas sp.) and thermophilic (Iso T10- a Bacillus sp.) anaerobic digested sludge, into batch digesters and monitored their fate by plate counts ...

  20. Antibiotic treatment of biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Rojo-Molinero, Estrella; Macià, María D.

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are associated with a wide range of infections, from those related to exogenous devices, such as catheters or prosthetic joints, to chronic tissue infections such as those occurring in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. Biofilms are recalcitrant to antibiotic treatment due...... to multiple tolerance mechanisms (phenotypic resistance). This causes persistence of biofilm infections in spite of antibiotic exposure which predisposes to antibiotic resistance development (genetic resistance). Understanding the interplay between phenotypic and genetic resistance mechanisms acting...... on biofilms, as well as appreciating the diversity of environmental conditions of biofilm infections which influence the effect of antibiotics are required in order to optimize the antibiotic treatment of biofilm infections. Here, we review the current knowledge on phenotypic and genetic resistance...

  1. The relBE2Spn toxin-antitoxin system of Streptococcus pneumoniae: role in antibiotic tolerance and functional conservation in clinical isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concha Nieto

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Type II (proteic chromosomal toxin-antitoxin systems (TAS are widespread in Bacteria and Archaea but their precise function is known only for a limited number of them. Out of the many TAS described, the relBE family is one of the most abundant, being present in the three first sequenced strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae (D39, TIGR4 and R6. To address the function of the pneumococcal relBE2Spn TAS in the bacterial physiology, we have compared the response of the R6-relBE2Spn wild type strain with that of an isogenic derivative, Delta relB2Spn under different stress conditions such as carbon and amino acid starvation and antibiotic exposure. Differences on viability between the wild type and mutant strains were found only when treatment directly impaired protein synthesis. As a criterion for the permanence of this locus in a variety of clinical strains, we checked whether the relBE2Spn locus was conserved in around 100 pneumococcal strains, including clinical isolates and strains with known genomes. All strains, although having various types of polymorphisms at the vicinity of the TA region, contained a functional relBE2Spn locus and the type of its structure correlated with the multilocus sequence type. Functionality of this TAS was maintained even in cases where severe rearrangements around the relBE2Spn region were found. We conclude that even though the relBE2Spn TAS is not essential for pneumococcus, it may provide additional advantages to the bacteria for colonization and/or infection.

  2. Insights into mechanisms and proteomic characterisation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa adaptation to a novel antimicrobial substance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Cierniak

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance has been reported since the introduction of synthetic antibiotics. Bacteria, such as one of the most common nosocomial pathogens P. aeruginosa, adapt quickly to changing environmental conditions, due to their short generation time. Thus microevolutional changes can be monitored in situ. In this study, the microevolutional process of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 resistance against a recently developed novel antibacterial zinc Schiff-base (ZSB was investigated at the proteome level. After extended exposure to ZSB the passaged strain differed in tolerance against ZSB, with the adapted P. aeruginosa PAO1 exhibiting 1.6 times higher minimal inhibitory concentration. Using Two-dimensional Difference Gel Electrophoresis, the changes in the proteome of ZSB adapted P. aeruginosa PAO1 were examined by comparison with the non-adapted P. aeruginosa PAO1. The proteome of the adapted P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain differed significantly from the non-adapted in the abundance of two proteins when both strains were grown under stressing conditions. One protein could be identified as the outer membrane protein D that plays a role in uptake of basic amino acids as well as in carbapeneme resistance. The second protein has been identified as alkyl peroxide reductase subunit F. Our data indicated a slight increase in abundance of alkyl peroxide reductase F (AhpF in the case of ZSB passaged P. aeruginosa PAO1. Higher abundance of Ahp has been discussed in the literature as a promoter of accelerated detoxification of benzene derivatives. The observed up-regulated AhpF thus appears to be connected to an increased tolerance against ZSB. Changes in the abundance of proteins connected to oxidative stress were also found after short-time exposure of P. aeruginosa PAO1 to the ZSB. Furthermore, adapted P. aeruginosa PAO1 showed increased tolerance against hydrogen peroxide and, in addition, showed accelerated degradation of ZSB, as determined by HPLC

  3. Pseudomonas screening assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalit, Ruth (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method for the detection of Pseudomonas bacteria is described where an Azurin-specific antibody is employed for detecting the presence of Azurin in a test sample. The detection of the presence of Azurin in the sample is a conclusive indicator of the presence of the Pseudomonas bacteria since the Azurin protein is a specific marker for this bacterial strain.

  4. PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA IN CHRONIC SUPPURATIVE OTITIS MEDIA- A DRUGSENSITIVITY STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoop M

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Chronic suppurative otitis media is one among the commonest ENT disease seen in day-to-day practice. It is seen mainly among low socioeconomic class. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present study was conducted in the Department of ENT, Shadan Institute of Medical Sciences. Fifty patients with CSOM of all age groups and both sexes attending the Outpatient Department of ENT were selected randomly for the study. RESULTS From our study, we found mainly children of age group 10-11 years commonly affected. They belong to poor socioeconomic background. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common organism isolated in the present study. Ciprofloxacin was found to be the most sensitive antibiotic to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. CONCLUSION We noticed that drug resistance is on the rise due to misuse of antibiotics, over-the-counter treatment, inadequate period of therapy and less awareness among public regarding drug resistance. Constant monitoring of antibiotic sensitivity is needed to prevent drug resistance in CSOM.

  5. Prescribing Antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Kryger; Jepsen, Kim Sune

    2018-01-01

    The medical professions will lose an indispensable tool in clinical practice if even simple infections cannot be cured because antibiotics have lost effectiveness. This article presents results from an exploratory enquiry into “good doctoring” in the case of antibiotic prescribing at a time when...

  6. Forgotten antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pulcini, Céline; Bush, Karen; Craig, William A

    2012-01-01

    In view of the alarming spread of antimicrobial resistance in the absence of new antibiotics, this study aimed at assessing the availability of potentially useful older antibiotics. A survey was performed in 38 countries among experts including hospital pharmacists, microbiologists, and infectious...

  7. Antibiotic Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Hoffmann, Tammy C; McCullough, Amanda R

    2015-01-01

    Numerous opportunities are available in primary care for alleviating the crisis of increasing antibiotic resistance. Preventing patients from developing an acute respiratory infection (ARI) will obviate any need for antibiotic use downstream. Hygiene measures such as physical barriers and hand...... will greatly improve the use of antibiotics for ARIs. However, used in concert, combinations are likely to enable clinicians and health care systems to implement the strategies that will reduce antimicrobial resistance in the future....... antibiotic prescribing are a major factor in the prescribing for ARIs. Professional interventions with educational components are effective, although they have modest effects, and are expensive. GPs' perceptions - that mistakenly assume as a default that patients want antibiotics for their ARIs - are often...

  8. Expression of MexAB-OprM efflux pump system and susceptibility to antibiotics of different Pseudomonas aeruginosa clones isolated from patients hospitalized in two intensive care units at University Hospital in Bialystok (northeastern Poland) between January 2002 and December 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacha, Paweł; Wieczorek, Piotr; Ojdana, Dominika; Hauschild, Tomasz; Milewski, Robert; Czaban, Sławomir; Poniatowski, Bogusław; Tryniszewska, Elżbieta

    2014-10-01

    We investigated the genetic similarities and expression of the MexAB-OprM efflux pump system in different clones of multiresistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains collected from 2002 to 2009 at two intensive care units (ICU). Regulatory and structural genes mexB, mexR, and mexA were found in 99%, 98%, and 94% of tested strains, respectively. The presence of class 1 integron was found in 90% of the strains, while class 2 integron in only one strain (Psa506). Class 3 integron was not found in any of the tested strains. Among the eleven clones identified, only two clones, I and D, exhibited higher levels of mexB gene expression than the other clones. Clone I had the highest expression (FC = 10.36, p resistance to all tested antibiotics among the various clones. The high level of antimicrobial resistance may have been due to the coexistence of different resistance mechanisms among the studied P. aeruginosa strains. However, this does not exclude the contribution of the MexAB-OprM pump, particularly in resistance to meropenem and ciprofloxacin. © 2014 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Diversity of metabolic profiles of cystic fibrosis Pseudomonas aeruginosa during the early stages of lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Karin Meinike; Wassermann, Tina; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the dominant pathogen infecting the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. During the intermittent colonization phase, P. aeruginosa resembles environmental strains but later evolves to the chronic adapted phenotype characterized by resistance to antibiotics and mutat......Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the dominant pathogen infecting the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. During the intermittent colonization phase, P. aeruginosa resembles environmental strains but later evolves to the chronic adapted phenotype characterized by resistance to antibiotics...

  10. Antivirulence activity of azithromycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco eImperi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics represent our bulwark to combat bacterial infections, but the spread of antibiotic resistance compromises their clinical efficacy. Alternatives to conventional antibiotics are urgently needed in order to complement the existing antibacterial arsenal. The macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM provides a paradigmatic example of an unconventional antibacterial drug. Besides its growth-inhibiting activity, AZM displays potent anti-inflammatory properties, as well as antivirulence activity on some intrinsically resistant bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this bacterium, the antivirulence activity of AZM mainly relies on its ability to interact with the ribosome, resulting in direct and/or indirect repression of specific subsets of genes involved in virulence, quorum sensing, biofilm formation and intrinsic antibiotic resistance. Both clinical experience and clinical trials have shown the efficacy of AZM in the treatment of chronic pulmonary infections caused by P. aeruginosa. The aim of this review is to combine results from laboratory studies with evidence from clinical trials in order to unify the information on the in vivo mode of action of AZM in P. aeruginosa infection.

  11. Tolerating Zero Tolerance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Brian N.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of zero tolerance dates back to the mid-1990s when New Jersey was creating laws to address nuisance crimes in communities. The main goal of these neighborhood crime policies was to have zero tolerance for petty crime such as graffiti or littering so as to keep more serious crimes from occurring. Next came the war on drugs. In federal…

  12. Antibiotic resistance in community-acquired urinary tract infections

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dose or short-course (3 days) antibiotic therapy.7 Single- dose therapy, although marginally less effective than conventional therapy, is cost-effective and well tolerated.' The new fluoroquinolone antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin and ofloxacin) are effective agents for single- dose therapy.,a Beta-Iactam antibiotics in ...

  13. Pseudomonas matsuisoli sp. nov., isolated from a soil sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Yao; Hameed, Asif; Hung, Mei-Hua; Liu, You-Cheng; Hsu, Yi-Han; Young, Li-Sen; Young, Chiu-Chung

    2015-03-01

    An aerobic, Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped and polar-flagellated bacterium, designated strain CC-MHH0089(T), was isolated from a soil sample taken on Matsu Island (Taiwan). Strain CC-MHH0089(T) grew at 15-30 °C and pH 5.0-10.0 and tolerated ≤8 % (w/v) NaCl. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed high pairwise sequence similarity to Pseudomonas azotifigens 6H33b(T) (97.3 %) and Pseudomonas balearica SP1402(T) (96.7 %) and lower sequence similarity to other strains (Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas matsuisoli sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CC-MHH0089(T) ( = BCRC 80771(T) = JCM 30078(T)). © 2015 IUMS.

  14. Biosynthesis of Tetrahydroisoquinoline Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Gong-Li; Tang, Man-Cheng; Song, Li-Qiang; Zhang, Yue

    2016-01-01

    The tetrahydroisoquinoline (THIQ) alkaloids are naturally occurring antibiotics isolated from a variety of microorganisms and marine invertebrates. This family of natural products exhibit broad spectrum antimicrobial and strong antitumor activities, and the potency of clinical application has been validated by the marketing of ecteinascidin 743 (ET-743) as anticancer drug. In the past 20 years, the biosynthetic gene cluster of six THIQ antibiotics has been characterized including saframycin Mx1 from Myxococcus xanthus, safracin-B from Pseudomonas fluorescens, saframycin A, naphthyridinomycin, and quinocarcin from Streptomyces, as well as ET-743 from Ecteinascidia turbinata. This review gives a brief summary of the current status in understanding the molecular logic for the biosynthesis of these natural products, which provides new insights on the biosynthetic machinery involved in the nonribosomal peptide synthetase system. The proposal of the THIQ biosynthetic pathway not only shows nature's route to generate such complex molecules, but also set the stage to develop a different process for production of ET-743 by synthetic biology.

  15. Antibiotic Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Antibiotics www.healthsci.tufts.edu Georgia-Pacific Health Smart Institute www.gphealthsmart.com Special thanks to Rhonda ... effectiveness of other medications such as birth control pills? 7. Are there any possible adverse reactions if ...

  16. Antibiotic resistance of bacterial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoiby, N.; Bjarnsholt, T.; Givskov, M.

    2010-01-01

    A biofilm is a structured consortium of bacteria embedded in a self-produced polymer matrix consisting of polysaccharide, protein and DNA. Bacterial biofilms cause chronic infections because they show increased tolerance to antibiotics and disinfectant chemicals as well as resisting phagocytosis...... to antibiotics. Biofilm growth is associated with an increased level of mutations as well as with quorum-sensing-regulated mechanisms. Conventional resistance mechanisms such as chromosomal beta-lactamase, upregulated efflux pumps and mutations in antibiotic target molecules in bacteria also contribute...... to the survival of biofilms. Biofilms can be prevented by early aggressive antibiotic prophylaxis or therapy and they can be treated by chronic suppressive therapy. A promising strategy may be the use of enzymes that can dissolve the biofilm matrix (e.g. DNase and alginate lyase) as well as quorum...

  17. Pseudomonas Lipopeptide Biosurfactants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnichsen, Lise

    Pseudomonas lipopetide biosurfactants are amphiphilic molecules with a broad range of natural functions. Due to their surface active properties, it has been suggested that Pseudomonas lipopetides potentially play a role in biodegradation of hydrophobic compounds and have essential functions...... lipopetide biosurfactants in pollutant biodegradation and natural roles in biofilm formation. The work presented is a combination of environmental microbiology and exploiting genetic manipulation of pure cultures to achieve insightinto the effects and mechanisms of lipopeptides on microbial processes...

  18. Biological production of monoethanolamine by engineered Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foti, M.J.; Médici, R.; Ruijssenaars, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida S12 was engineered for the production of monoethanolamine (MEA) from glucose via the decarboxylation of the central metabolite l-serine, which is catalyzed by the enzyme l-serine decarboxylase (SDC).The host was first evaluated for its tolerance towards MEA as well as its

  19. Pseudomonas putida KT2440 as a host for biochemicals production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calero Valdayo, Patricia

    in industry.This thesis aims at contributing to developing and characterizing tools for the use of alternative hosts organisms with high tolerance towards toxic compounds, such as Pseudomonas putida. The thesis also focuses on identifying target compounds that may be relevant to produce in this strain...

  20. Antimicrobial Tolerance in Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curtis, Thomas Darwin

    bacteria. Antibiotic tolerance on the other hand, is the ability of bacteria to survive (but not grow) prolonged exposure to concentrations that should normally kill them. The predominant mechanism underlying tolerance is the so-called persister cell, a small subpopulation of dormant like cells......There are two ways in which bacteria survive killing by antibiotics. The most well-known, is antibiotic resistance, which results from the acquisition of a resistance gene or mutation that allows bacteria to grow and divide in the presence of antibiotic concentrations that would normally kill other...... mechanisms in this organism. The body of work over the course of this PhD study has been organized into three manuscripts, which are summarized below. The first manuscript sought to link the Small Colony Variant (SCV) to persister cells in L. monocytogenes. SCV cells of bacteria are a slow growing phenotype...

  1. Antibiotic Capture by Bacterial Lipocalins Uncovers an Extracellular Mechanism of Intrinsic Antibiotic Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Halfawy, Omar M; Klett, Javier; Ingram, Rebecca J; Loutet, Slade A; Murphy, Michael E P; Martín-Santamaría, Sonsoles; Valvano, Miguel A

    2017-03-14

    The potential for microbes to overcome antibiotics of different classes before they reach bacterial cells is largely unexplored. Here we show that a soluble bacterial lipocalin produced by Burkholderia cenocepacia upon exposure to sublethal antibiotic concentrations increases resistance to diverse antibiotics in vitro and in vivo These phenotypes were recapitulated by heterologous expression in B. cenocepacia of lipocalin genes from Pseudomonas aeruginosa , Mycobacterium tuberculosis , and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Purified lipocalin bound different classes of bactericidal antibiotics and contributed to bacterial survival in vivo Experimental and X-ray crystal structure-guided computational studies revealed that lipocalins counteract antibiotic action by capturing antibiotics in the extracellular space. We also demonstrated that fat-soluble vitamins prevent antibiotic capture by binding bacterial lipocalin with higher affinity than antibiotics. Therefore, bacterial lipocalins contribute to antimicrobial resistance by capturing diverse antibiotics in the extracellular space at the site of infection, which can be counteracted by known vitamins. IMPORTANCE Current research on antibiotic action and resistance focuses on targeting essential functions within bacterial cells. We discovered a previously unrecognized mode of general bacterial antibiotic resistance operating in the extracellular space, which depends on bacterial protein molecules called lipocalins. These molecules are highly conserved in most bacteria and have the ability to capture different classes of antibiotics outside bacterial cells. We also discovered that liposoluble vitamins, such as vitamin E, overcome in vitro and in vivo antibiotic resistance mediated by bacterial lipocalins, providing an unexpected new alternative to combat resistance by using this vitamin or its derivatives as antibiotic adjuvants. Copyright © 2017 El-Halfawy et al.

  2. Practical Management of Antibiotic Hypersensitivity in 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macy, Eric; Romano, Antonino; Khan, David

    Antibiotics are the most common class of medications that individuals report allergy or intolerance to. Adverse reactions are reported at a predictable rate with all antibiotic use that vary by antibiotic. Antibiotic allergy incidence rates are sex dependent, higher in females than in males. Most of these events are not reproducible or immunologically mediated. Antibiotic allergy prevalence increases with increasing age and is more common in hospitalized populations and in populations that use more antibiotics. Determining potential mechanisms for the observed symptoms of the adverse reactions is the starting point for effective management of antibiotic hypersensitivity. Skin testing and direct challenges are the primary tools used to determine acute tolerance in 2017. Commercially available in vitro testing is not currently clinically useful in determining antibiotic hypersensitivity, with rare exceptions. Desensitization can be used when acute-onset immunologically mediated hypersensitivity is confirmed to safely administer a needed antibiotic. Desensitization is not possible when clinically significant T-cell-mediated delayed-type hypersensitivity is present. Effective management of antibiotic allergy is an important part of a comprehensive antibiotic stewardship program. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Antibiotic allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caimmi, S; Caimmi, D; Lombardi, E; Crisafulli, G; Franceschini, F; Ricci, G; Marseglia, G L

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotics are commonly injected during the perioperative period and are responsible of 15 percent of the anaphylactic reactions. Anaphylaxis triggered by antibiotics primarily involves penicillin and cephalosporin. The management of patients with histories of allergic reactions to antibiotics is a common situation in clinical practice. The confirmation or invalidation of the allergic nature of the reported reaction is not based on in vitro tests, but on a rigorous allergological work-up based on detailed analysis of clinical history, skin tests and drug provocation test. Considering a possible cross-reactivity between penicillins, once an immediate penicillin allergy has been diagnosed, skin testing with the alternative molecule (cephalosporin, carbapenem, aztreonam) is mandatory and, if negative, the relevant drug should be given in an appropriate setting at increasing doses.

  4. An Antipersister Strategy for Treatment of Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeva, Martina; Gutu, Alina D; Hebert, Wesley; Wager, Jeffrey D; Yonker, Lael M; O'Toole, George A; Ausubel, Frederick M; Moskowitz, Samuel M; Joseph-McCarthy, Diane

    2017-12-01

    Bacterial persisters are a quasidormant subpopulation of cells that are tolerant to antibiotic treatment. The combination of the aminoglycoside tobramycin with fumarate as an antibacterial potentiator utilizes an antipersister strategy that is aimed at reducing recurrent Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections by enhancing the killing of P. aeruginosa persisters. Stationary-phase cultures of P. aeruginosa were used to generate persister cells. A range of tobramycin concentrations was tested with a range of metabolite concentrations to determine the potentiation effect of the metabolite under a variety of conditions, including a range of pH values and in the presence of azithromycin or cystic fibrosis (CF) patient sputum. In addition, 96-well dish biofilm and colony biofilm assays were performed, and the cytotoxicity of the tobramycin-fumarate combination was determined utilizing a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Enhanced killing of up to 6 orders of magnitude of P. aeruginosa persisters over a range of CF isolates, including mucoid and nonmucoid strains, was observed for the tobramycin-fumarate combination compared to killing with tobramycin alone. Furthermore, significant fumarate-mediated potentiation was seen in the presence of azithromycin or CF patient sputum. Fumarate also reduced the cytotoxicity of tobramycin-treated P. aeruginosa to human epithelial airway cells. Finally, in mucoid and nonmucoid CF isolates, complete eradication of P. aeruginosa biofilm was observed in the colony biofilm assay due to fumarate potentiation. These data suggest that a combination of tobramycin with fumarate as an antibacterial potentiator may be an attractive therapeutic for eliminating recurrent P. aeruginosa infections in CF patients through the eradication of bacterial persisters. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  5. Nanoindentation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilm using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baniasadi, Mahmoud; Xu, Zhe; Du, Yingjie; Lu, Hongbing; Minary-Jolandan, Majid; Gandee, Leah; Zimmern, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are a source of many chronic infections. Biofilms and their inherent resistance to antibiotics are attributable to a range of health issues including affecting prosthetic implants, hospital-acquired infections, and wound infection. Mechanical properties of biofilm, in particular, at micro- and nano-scales, are governed by microstructures and porosity of the biofilm, which in turn may contribute to their inherent antibiotic resistance. We utilize atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation and finite element simulation to investigate the nanoscale mechanical properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilm. This biofilm was derived from human samples and represents a medically relevant model. (paper)

  6. The implication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten T; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Høiby, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Biofilm formation by bacteria is recognized as a major problem in chronic infections due to their recalcitrance against the immune defense and available antibiotic treatment schemes. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has drawn special attention in this regard due to its severity......-up of the extracellular matrix encasing the biofilm-associated bacteria as well as the elaborate signaling mechanisms employed by the bacterium enables it to withstand the continuous stresses imposed by the immune defense and administered antibiotics resulting in a state of chronic inflammation that damages the host...

  7. Hydrid Antibiotics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Běhal, Vladislav

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 1 (2003), s. 17-25 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/01/1004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : hydrid * antibiotics Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.857, year: 2003

  8. Combating Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Farm Animals FDA: Cutting-Edge Technology Sheds Light on Antibiotic Resistance For More Information Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance Antimicrobial Resistance Information for Consumers and Health Professionals CDC: Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work More in Consumer Updates ...

  9. Assessment of Risk Factors, Treatment and Hospital Stay in Complicated Urinary Tract Infections in Men Caused by Pseudomonas: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Selçuk Özger

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: It is known that Pseudomonas has been isolated more frequently in health care-related urinary tract infections (UTIs. It was aimed to determine the risk factors and empiric therapies due to antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas-related male UTIs, and assess the effect of Pseudomonas isolation on treatment and length of hospital stay. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted between January 2011 and January 2013 with 228 male health care-related complicated UTI patients hospitalized in the Urology and Infectious Diseases Inpatient Clinics at Gazi University Faculty of Medicine. Three hundred UTI attacks in 228 patients were evaluated retrospectively with regard to agents. Results: Pseudomonas was isolated in 37 of 300 complicated UTI attacks in 228 male patients. Nephrolithiasis, recurrent UTI and internal urinary catheterization were determined as the risk factors for Pseudomonas related with health care-related UTI. It was understood that nephrolithiasis increased Pseudomonas isolated UTI risk 3.5 fold and recurrent UTI increased the risk 8.9 fold. The antibiotic resistance of Pseudomonas was higher than other agents. Pseudomonas related UTIs prolonged the duration of hospital stay and antibiotic treatment. Conclusion: In the presence of nephrolithiasis, recurrent UTI and internal urinary catheterization, drugs against Pseudomonas would be appropriate empiric treatment for health care-related complicated UTI. Ciprofloxacin use should be restricted when local antibiotic resistance, which leads empiric treatment, is taken into consideration. Increases in hospital stay and antibiotic treatment duration were thought to be associated with recurrent infection frequency and high antibiotics resistance in Pseudomonas related UTIs.

  10. The pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS balances life and death in Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Häussler

    Full Text Available When environmental conditions deteriorate and become inhospitable, generic survival strategies for populations of bacteria may be to enter a dormant state that slows down metabolism, to develop a general tolerance to hostile parameters that characterize the habitat, and to impose a regime to eliminate damaged members. Here, we provide evidence that the pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS mediates induction of all of these phenotypes. For individual cells, PQS, an interbacterial signaling molecule of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, has both deleterious and beneficial activities: on the one hand, it acts as a pro-oxidant and sensitizes the bacteria towards oxidative and other stresses and, on the other, it efficiently induces a protective anti-oxidative stress response. We propose that this dual function fragments populations into less and more stress tolerant members which respond differentially to developing stresses in deteriorating habitats. This suggests that a little poison may be generically beneficial to populations, in promoting survival of the fittest, and in contributing to bacterial multi-cellular behavior. It further identifies PQS as an essential mediator of the shaping of the population structure of Pseudomonas and of its response to and survival in hostile environmental conditions.

  11. Persistence and resistance as complementary bacterial adaptations to antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogwill, T; Comfort, A C; Furió, V; MacLean, R C

    2016-06-01

    Bacterial persistence represents a simple of phenotypic heterogeneity, whereby a proportion of cells in an isogenic bacterial population can survive exposure to lethal stresses such as antibiotics. In contrast, genetically based antibiotic resistance allows for continued growth in the presence of antibiotics. It is unclear, however, whether resistance and persistence are complementary or alternative evolutionary adaptations to antibiotics. Here, we investigate the co-evolution of resistance and persistence across the genus Pseudomonas using comparative methods that correct for phylogenetic nonindependence. We find that strains of Pseudomonas vary extensively in both their intrinsic resistance to antibiotics (ciprofloxacin and rifampicin) and persistence following exposure to these antibiotics. Crucially, we find that persistence correlates positively to antibiotic resistance across strains. However, we find that different genes control resistance and persistence implying that they are independent traits. Specifically, we find that the number of type II toxin-antitoxin systems (TAs) in the genome of a strain is correlated to persistence, but not resistance. Our study shows that persistence and antibiotic resistance are complementary, but independent, evolutionary adaptations to stress and it highlights the key role played by TAs in the evolution of persistence. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Society for Evolutionary Biology.

  12. Incidence and Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Bacterial Isolates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In vitro antibiotic susceptibility tests showed that Pseudomonas aeruginosa was susceptible to ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin and gentamicin while the enteric bacteria were generally more resistant to ceftazidime, gentamicin and ciprofloxacin. Conclusion: The findings show that there is a high rate of wound infection in Kano, ...

  13. Gentamicin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    infections by Ps. aeruginosa is contra-indicated. In our study only 2,3 % of the Ps. aeruginosa strains were resistant to gentamicin (MIC 25 Ilg/ml). In view of the synergy reported for combined gentamicin and carbeni- cillin therapy," a combination of these two drugs may be recommended in the treatment of all Pseudomonas.

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Maria; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Givskov, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The opportunistic gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is implicated in many chronic infections and is readily isolated from chronic wounds, medical devices, and the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. P. aeruginosa is believed to persist in the host organism due to its capacity to form...

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    the use of conventional antimicrobial compounds in many cases cannot eradicate biofilms, there is an urgent need to develop alternative measures to combat biofilm infections. The present review is focussed on the important opportunistic pathogen and biofilm model organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Initially...

  16. The Versatile Mutational Resistome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla López-Causapé

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the most striking features of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is its outstanding capacity for developing antimicrobial resistance to nearly all available antipseudomonal agents through the selection of chromosomal mutations, leading to the failure of the treatment of severe hospital-acquired or chronic infections. Recent whole-genome sequencing (WGS data obtained from in vitro assays on the evolution of antibiotic resistance, in vivo monitoring of antimicrobial resistance development, analysis of sequential cystic fibrosis isolates, and characterization of widespread epidemic high-risk clones have provided new insights into the evolutionary dynamics and mechanisms of P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistance, thus motivating this review. Indeed, the analysis of the WGS mutational resistome has proven to be useful for understanding the evolutionary dynamics of classical resistance pathways and to describe new mechanisms for the majority of antipseudomonal classes, including β-lactams, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, or polymixins. Beyond addressing a relevant scientific question, the analysis of the P. aeruginosa mutational resistome is expected to be useful, together with the analysis of the horizontally-acquired resistance determinants, for establishing the antibiotic resistance genotype, which should correlate with the antibiotic resistance phenotype and as such, it should be useful for the design of therapeutic strategies and for monitoring the efficacy of administered antibiotic treatments. However, further experimental research and new bioinformatics tools are still needed to overcome the interpretation limitations imposed by the complex interactions (including those leading to collateral resistance or susceptibility between the 100s of genes involved in the mutational resistome, as well as the frequent difficulties for differentiating relevant mutations from simple natural polymorphisms.

  17. Mutations in the central cavity and periplasmic domain affect efflux activity of the resistance-nodulation-division pump EmhB from Pseudomonas fluorescens cLP6a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearn, Elizabeth M; Gray, Murray R; Foght, Julia M

    2006-01-01

    The EmhABC efflux system in Pseudomonas fluorescens cLP6a is homologous to the multidrug and solvent efflux systems belonging to the resistance-nodulation-division (RND) family and is responsible for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon transport, antibiotic resistance, and toluene efflux. To gain a better understanding of substrate transport in RND efflux pumps, the EmhB pump was subjected to mutational analysis. Mutagenesis of amino acids within the central cavity of the predicted three-dimensional structure of EmhB showed selective activity towards antibiotic substrates. An A384P/A385Y double mutant showed increased susceptibility toward rhodamine 6G compared to the wild type, and F386A and N99A single mutants showed increased susceptibility to dequalinium compared to the wild type. As well, the carboxylic acid side chain of D101, located in the central cavity region, was found to be essential for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon transport and resistance to all antibiotic substrates of EmhB. Phenylalanine residues located within the periplasmic pore domain were also targeted for mutagenesis, and the F325A and F281A mutations significantly impaired efflux activity for all EmhB substrates. One mutation (A206S) in the outer membrane protein docking domain increased antibiotic resistance and toluene tolerance, demonstrating the important role of this domain in transport activity. These data demonstrate the roles of the central cavity and periplasmic domains in the function of the RND efflux pump EmhB.

  18. Antibiotic Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck, Christian

    of antimicrobial resistance: (1) adaptive mutations and (2) horizontal acquisition of resistance genes from antibiotic gene reservoirs. By studying the geno- and phenotypic changes of E. coli in response to single and drug-pair exposures, I uncover the evolutionary trajectories leading to adaptive resistance. I......Bacteria can avoid extinction during antimicrobial exposure by becoming resistant. They achieve this either via adaptive mutations or horizontally acquired resistance genes. If resistance emerges in clinical relevant species, it can lead to treatment failure and ultimately result in increasing...... morbidity and mortality as well as an increase in the cost of treatment. Understanding how bacteria respond to antibiotic exposure gives the foundations for a rational approach to counteract antimicrobial resistance. In the work presented in this thesis, I explore the two fundamental sources...

  19. Triclosan resistant bacteria in sewage effluent and cross-resistance to antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzee, I; Bezuidenhout, C C; Bezuidenhout, J J

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify triclosan tolerant heterotrophic plate count (HPC) bacteria from sewage effluent and to determine cross-resistance to antibiotics. R2 agar supplemented with triclosan was utilised to isolate triclosan resistant bacteria and 16S rRNA gene sequencing was conducted to identify the isolates. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of organisms were determined at selected concentrations of triclosan and cross-resistance to various antibiotics was performed. High-performance liquid chromatography was conducted to quantify levels of triclosan in sewage water. Forty-four HPC were isolated and identified as the five main genera, namely, Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Enterococcus, Brevibacillus and Paenibacillus. MIC values of these isolates ranged from 0.125 mg/L to >1 mg/L of triclosan, while combination of antimicrobials indicated synergism or antagonism. Levels of triclosan within the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) ranged between 0.026 and 1.488 ppb. Triclosan concentrations were reduced by the WWTP, but small concentrations enter receiving freshwater bodies. Results presented indicate that these levels are sufficient to maintain triclosan resistant bacteria under controlled conditions. Further studies are thus needed into the impact of this scenario on such natural receiving water bodies.

  20. Relationship between the Presence of the nalC Mutation and Multidrug Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Sadeghifard, Nourkhoda; Valizadeh, Azar; Zolfaghary, Mohammad Reza; Maleki, Mohammad Hossien; Maleki, Abbas; Mohebi, Reza; Ghafourian, Sobhan; Khosravi, Afra

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. The current study was conducted to determine the relationship between the presences of significant multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) having intact mexR genes (nalC) to different antibiotics. Methods. In order to identify nalC, fifty strains of P. aeruginosa were obtained. All isolates were found in urinary tract infections. They were evaluated against different antibiotics. The nalC mutant was identified by PCR. Results. The 50 clinical isolates of P. ...

  1. Antibiotics involved in the occurrence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria: a nationwide multilevel study suggests differences within antibiotic classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gbaguidi-Haore, Houssein; Dumartin, Catherine; L'Hériteau, François; Péfau, Muriel; Hocquet, Didier; Rogues, Anne-Marie; Bertrand, Xavier

    2013-02-01

    To identify the antibiotics potentially the most involved in the occurrence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria from an ecological perspective in French healthcare facilities (HCFs). This study was based on data from the French antimicrobial surveillance network (ATB-RAISIN, 2007-09). Antibiotics were expressed in defined daily doses per 1000 patient-days. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria were considered as count data adjusted for patient-days. These were third-generation cephalosporin (3GC)- and ciprofloxacin-resistant Escherichia coli, cefotaxime-resistant Enterobacter cloacae, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and ceftazidime-, imipenem- and ciprofloxacin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Three-level negative binomial regression models were built to take into account the hierarchical structure of data: level 1, repeated measures each year (count outcome, time, antibiotics); level 2, HCFs (type and size); and level 3, regions (geographical area). A total of 701 HCFs from 20 French regions and up to 1339 HCF-years were analysed. The use of ceftriaxone, but not of cefotaxime, was positively correlated with incidence rates of 3GC- and ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli. In contrast, both 3GCs were positively correlated with the incidence rate of cefotaxime-resistant E. cloacae. Higher levels of use of ciprofloxacin and/or ofloxacin, but not of levofloxacin, were associated with higher incidence rates of 3GC- and ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli, cefotaxime-resistant E. cloacae, methicillin-resistant S. aureus and ceftazidime- and ciprofloxacin-resistant P. aeruginosa. Our study suggests differences within antibiotic classes in promoting antibiotic resistance. We identified ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin as priority targets in public health strategies designed to reduce antibiotic use and antibiotic-resistant bacteria in French HCFs.

  2. Influence of mucoid coating on clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwood, L L; Pennington, J E

    1981-05-01

    Pulmonary infection with mucoid strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in present in the majority of cystic fibrosis patients with chronic lung disease. It has been postulated that this mucoid coating may act to decrease lung clearance of Pseudomonas by limiting access of phagocytes, antibodies, and antibiotics to the bacteria. To determine whether mucoid coating of Pseudomonas might decrease intrapulmonary killing, groups of guinea pigs were infected with intrabronchial instillations of equivalent numbers of mucoid and nonmucoid Pseudomonas. For this study, mucoid strains of Pseudomonas were obtained from cystic fibrosis sputa and passaged on blood agar plates to obtain their nonmucoid revertants. Animals were then sacrificed at timed intervals after infection, and quantitative cultures were performed on lung homogenates. In all cases, mucoid challenge strains retained their mucoid morphology after passage in guinea pig lungs. No difference in killing of mucoid and nonmucoid Pseudomonas could be detected at 6, 24, or 48 h after lung infection. Further challenge studies used guinea pigs that were either prevaccinated with lipopolysaccharide P. aeruginosa vaccine or else treated with tobramycin sulfate after infection. Nonvaccinated or untreated controls had reduced intrapulmonary killing of Pseudomonas compared with vaccinees or treated groups (P coating of Pseudomonas does not selectively impede mechanisms of intrapulmonary killing in guinea pig lungs.

  3. Antimicrobial resistance of Pseudomonas spp. isolated from wastewater and wastewater-impacted marine coastal zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luczkiewicz, Aneta; Kotlarska, Ewa; Artichowicz, Wojciech; Tarasewicz, Katarzyna; Fudala-Ksiazek, Sylwia

    2015-12-01

    In this study, species distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility of cultivated Pseudomonas spp. were studied in influent (INF), effluent (EFF), and marine outfall (MOut) of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). The susceptibility was tested against 8 antimicrobial classes, active against Pseudomonas spp.: aminoglycosides, carbapenems, broad-spectrum cephalosporins from the 3rd and 4th generation, extended-spectrum penicillins, as well as their combination with the β-lactamase inhibitors, monobactams, fluoroquinolones, and polymyxins. Among identified species, resistance to all antimicrobials but colistin was shown by Pseudomonas putida, the predominant species in all sampling points. In other species, resistance was observed mainly against ceftazidime, ticarcillin, ticarcillin-clavulanate, and aztreonam, although some isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes, and Pseudomonas protegens showed multidrug-resistance (MDR) phenotype. Among P. putida, resistance to β-lactams and to fluoroquinolones as well as multidrug resistance become more prevalent after wastewater treatment, but the resistance rate decreased in marine water samples. Obtained data, however, suggests that Pseudomonas spp. are equipped or are able to acquire a wide range of antibiotic resistance mechanisms, and thus should be monitored as possible source of resistance genes.

  4. Sensitivity of antibiotic resistant and antibiotic susceptible Escherichia coli, Enterococcus and Staphylococcus strains against ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heß, Stefanie; Gallert, Claudia

    2015-12-01

    Tolerance of antibiotic susceptible and antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli, Enterococcus and Staphylococcus strains from clinical and wastewater samples against ozone was tested to investigate if ozone, a strong oxidant applied for advanced wastewater treatment, will affect the release of antibiotic resistant bacteria into the aquatic environment. For this purpose, the resistance pattern against antibiotics of the mentioned isolates and their survival after exposure to 4 mg/L ozone was determined. Antibiotic resistance (AR) of the isolates was not correlating with higher tolerance against ozone. Except for ampicillin resistant E. coli strains, which showed a trend towards increased resistance, E. coli strains that were also resistant against cotrimoxazol, ciprofloxacin or a combination of the three antibiotics were similarly or less resistant against ozone than antibiotic sensitive strains. Pigment-producing Enterococcus casseliflavus and Staphylococcus aureus seemed to be more resistant against ozone than non-pigmented species of these genera. Furthermore, aggregation or biofilm formation apparently protected bacteria in subsurface layers from inactivation by ozone. The relatively large variance of tolerance against ozone may indicate that resistance to ozone inactivation most probably depends on several factors, where AR, if at all, does not play a major role.

  5. Garlic blocks quorum sensing and promotes rapid clearing of pulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Rasmussen, Thomas B; Christophersen, Lars; Calum, Henrik; Hentzer, Morten; Hougen, Hans-Petter; Rygaard, Jørgen; Moser, Claus; Eberl, Leo; Høiby, Niels; Givskov, Michael

    2005-12-01

    The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant micro-organism of chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. P. aeruginosa colonizes the lungs by forming biofilm microcolonies throughout the lung. Quorum sensing (QS) renders the biofilm bacteria highly tolerant to otherwise lethal doses of antibiotics, and protects against the bactericidal activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). It has been previously demonstrated that QS is inhibited by garlic extract. In this study, the synergistic effects of garlic and tobramycin, and PMNs activities have been evaluated. P. aeruginosa was grown in vitro in continuous-culture once-through flow chambers with and without garlic extract. The garlic-treated biofilms were susceptible to both tobramycin and PMN grazing. Furthermore, the PMNs showed an increase in respiratory burst activation, when incubated with the garlic-treated biofilm. Garlic extract was administered as treatment for a mouse pulmonary infection model. Mice were treated with garlic extract or placebo for 7 days, with the initial 2 days being prophylactic before P. aeruginosa was instilled in the left lung of the mice. Bacteriology, mortality, histopathology and cytokine production were used as indicators. The garlic treatment initially provoked a higher degree of inflammation, and significantly improved clearing of the infecting bacteria. The results indicate that a QS-inhibitory extract of garlic renders P. aeruginosa sensitive to tobramycin, respiratory burst and phagocytosis by PMNs, as well as leading to an improved outcome of pulmonary infections.

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in the respiratory tract of cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Fiandaca, Mark J

    2009-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the appearance and location of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung and in sputum. Samples include preserved tissues of CF patients who died due to chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection prior to the advent of intensive antibiotic...

  7. A proposed integrated approach for the preclinical evaluation of phage therapy in Pseudomonas infections

    OpenAIRE

    Danis-Wlodarczyk, Katarzyna; Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Jang, Ho Bin; Briers, Yves; Olszak, Tomasz; Arabski, Michal; Wasik, Slawomir; Drabik, Marcin; Higgins, Gerard; Tyrrell, Jean; Harvey, Brian J.; Noben, Jean-Paul; Lavigne, Rob; Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophage therapy is currently resurging as a potential complement/alternative to antibiotic treatment. However, preclinical evaluation lacks streamlined approaches. We here focus on preclinical approaches which have been implemented to assess bacteriophage efficacy against Pseudomonas biofilms and infections. Laser interferometry and profilometry were applied to measure biofilm matrix permeability and surface geometry changes, respectively. These biophysical approaches were combined with...

  8. Recent advances in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is caused by biofilm-growing mucoid strains. Biofilms can be prevented by early aggressive antibiotic prophylaxis or therapy, and they can be treated by chronic suppressive therapy. New results from one small trial...

  9. In vivo pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of colistin and imipenem in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hengzhuang, Wang; Wu, Hong; Ciofu, Oana

    2012-01-01

    Many Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are sensitive to antibiotics in susceptibility testing, but eradication of the infection is difficult. The main reason is the biofilm formation in the airways of patients with CF. The pharmacokinetics (PKs...

  10. The rare codon AGA is involved in regulation of pyoluteorin biosynthesis in Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 can colonize root and seed surfaces of many plants, protecting them from infection by plant pathogenic fungi and oomycetes. This capacity to suppress disease is attributed in part to Pf-5’s production of a large spectrum of antibiotics, which is controll...

  11. Adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to the cystic fibrosis airway: an evolutionary perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Anders; Jelsbak, Lars; Yang, Lei

    2012-01-01

    The airways of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are nearly always infected with many different microorganisms. This environment offers warm, humid and nutrient-rich conditions, but is also stressful owing to frequent antibiotic therapy and the host immune response. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is com...

  12. Genomic Evolution Of The Mdr Serotype O12 Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Clone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Sandra Wingaard; Taylor, Véronique L.; Freschi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Since the 1980’s the serotype O12 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa has emerged as the predominant serotype in clinical settings and in epidemic outbreaks. These serotype O12 isolates exhibit high levels of resistance to various classes of antibiotics.Methods: In this study, we explore how ......, and dangerous clones like O12 can be identified quickly....

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections in cystic fibrosis: insights into pathogenic processes and treatment strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassett, Daniel J; Korfhagen, Thomas R; Irvin, Randall T

    2010-01-01

    CF airway mucus can be infected by opportunistic microorganisms, notably Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Once organisms are established as biofilms, even the most potent antibiotics have little effect on their viability, especially during late-stage chronic infections. Better understanding of the mechani...... of the mechanisms used by P. aeruginosa to circumvent host defenses and therapeutic intervention strategies is critical for advancing novel treatment strategies....

  14. Clinical utilization of genomics data produced by the international Pseudomonas aeruginosa consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freschi, Luca; Jeukens, Julie; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena

    2015-01-01

    major groups that are further divided into subgroups, some not previously reported in the literature. We also provide the first snapshot of P. aeruginosa strain diversity with respect to antibiotic resistance. Our approach will allow us to draw potential links between environmental strains and those......The International Pseudomonas aeruginosa Consortium is sequencing over 1000 genomes and building an analysis pipeline for the study of Pseudomonas genome evolution, antibiotic resistance and virulence genes. Metadata, including genomic and phenotypic data for each isolate of the collection......, are available through the International Pseudomonas Consortium Database (http://ipcd.ibis.ulaval.ca/). Here, we present our strategy and the results that emerged from the analysis of the first 389 genomes. With as yet unmatched resolution, our results confirm that P. aeruginosa strains can be divided into three...

  15. Peptidoglycan transpeptidase inhibition in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli by Penicillins and Cephalosporins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, B A; Jevons, S; Brammer, K W

    1979-04-01

    Peptidoglycan transpeptidase activity has been studied in cells of Escherichia coli 146 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 56 made permeable to exogenous, nucleotide-sugar peptidoglycan precursors by ether treatment. Transpeptidase activity was inhibited, in both organisms, by a range of penicillins and cephalosporins, the Pseudomonas enzyme being more sensitive to inhibition in each case. Conversely, growth of E. coli 146 was more susceptible to these antibiotics than growth of P. aeruginosa 56. Furthermore, similar transpeptidase inhibition values were ob-obtained for the four penicillins examined against the Pseudomonas enzyme, although only two of these (carbenicillin and pirbenicillin) inhibited the growth of this organism. We therefore conclude that the high resistance of P. aeruginosa 56 to growth inhibition by most beta-lactam antibiotics cannot be due to an insensitive peptidoglycan transpeptidase.

  16. Antibiotic resistance pattern in uropathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta V

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Uropathogenic strains from inpatient and outpatient departments were studied from April 1997 to March 1999 for their susceptibility profiles. The various isolates were Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, Acinetobacter baumanii and Enterococcus faecalis. Antibiotic susceptibility pattern of these isolates revealed that for outpatients, first generation cephalosporins, nitrofurantoin, norfloxacin/ciprofloxacin were effective for treatment of urinary tract infection but for inpatients, parenteral therapy with newer aminoglycosides and third generation cephalosporins need to be advocated as the organisms for nosocomial UTI exhibit a high degree of drug resistance. Trimethoprim and sulphamethoxazole combination was not found to be effective for the treatment of urinary tract infections as all the uropathogens from inpatients and outpatients showed high degree of resistance to co-trimoxazole. Culture and sensitivity of the isolates from urine samples should be done as a routine before advocating the therapy.

  17. Generation of Persister Cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus by Chemical Treatment and Evaluation of Their Susceptibility to Membrane-Targeting Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Grassi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Persister cells (PCs are a subset of dormant, phenotypic variants of regular bacteria, highly tolerant to antibiotics. Generation of PCs in vivo may account for the recalcitrance of most chronic infections to antimicrobial treatment and demands for the identification of new antimicrobial agents able to target such cells. The present study explored the possibility to obtain in vitro PCs of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus at high efficiency through chemical treatment, and to test their susceptibility to structurally different antimicrobial peptides (AMPs and two clinically used peptide-based antibiotics, colistin and daptomycin. The main mechanism of action of these molecules (i.e., membrane-perturbing activity renders them potential candidates to act against dormant cells. Exposure of stationary-phase cultures to optimized concentrations of the uncoupling agent cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP was able to generate at high efficiency PCs exhibiting an antibiotic-tolerant phenotype toward different classes of antibiotics. The metabolic profile of CCCP-treated bacteria was investigated by monitoring bacterial heat production through isothermal microcalorimetry and by evaluating oxidoreductase activity by flow cytometry. CCCP-pretreated bacteria of both bacterial species underwent a substantial decrease in heat production and oxidoreductase activity, as compared to the untreated controls. After CCCP removal, induced persisters showed a delay in heat production that correlated with a lag phase before resumption of normal growth. The metabolic reactivation of bacteria coincided with their reversion to an antibiotic-sensitive phenotype. Interestingly, PCs generated by CCCP treatment resulted highly sensitive to three different membrane-targeting AMPs at levels comparable to those of CCCP-untreated bacteria. Colistin was also highly active against PCs of P. aeruginosa, while daptomycin killed PCs of S. aureus only at concentrations

  18. Exploring Marine Environments To Unravel Tolerance Mechanisms To Relevant Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Henrique; Cavaleiro, Mafalda; Nørholm, Morten

    2015-01-01

    of interest, HPLC analyses were performed in order to distinguish between compound-degrading and tolerant bacteria. This led to the identification of seven tolerant and non-degrading isolates, the most interesting ones belonging to the genera Bacillus and Pseudomonas. These will be studied using genomic...... and transcriptomic approaches to identify the tolerance mechanisms used. Exploring new ecological niches, as contaminated marine environments allows the identification of naturally tolerant bacteria to the compounds of interest and most likely to the discovery of new mechanisms of tolerance....

  19. Outcomes of hospitalized neutropenic oncology patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa bloodstream infections: focus on oral fluoroquinolone conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lily Z; Herrington, Jon D

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, especially in neutropenic oncology patients. Few studies have been published in the last decade on treatment outcomes of neutropenic oncology patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia. In addition, there is a lack of data addressing the role of oral fluoroquinolones in this patient setting. A retrospective chart review from 1999 to 2013 was conducted at a large academic medical center in neutropenic oncology patients with documented Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia, who were initially treated with intravenous anti-pseudomonal antibiotics and then converted to an oral anti-pseudomonal fluoroquinolone. Patients were evaluated for the rate of cure and for the time from onset of intravenous antibiotic therapy to conversion to oral fluoroquinolones. Twenty-nine patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia were evaluated. The median absolute neutrophil count at the time of the first positive blood culture was 50 cells/mm(3), and the median duration of time below an absolute neutrophil count of 1000 cells/mm(3) was five days. The change to oral fluoroquinolones occurred at a median (range) of six (2-18) days after initiation of intravenous antibiotics and at a median absolute neutrophil count of 2610 (110-24790) cells/mm(3). The initial cure was 93.1%, while ultimate cure was 91.7%. Converting to oral fluoroquinolones after initial intravenous antibiotic therapy for Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia in clinically stable neutropenic oncology patients appears to achieve successful outcomes. However, prospective trials are needed to validate these results in neutropenic oncology patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia who are converted to oral fluoroquinolones. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Polymorphisms within the prnD and pltC genes from pyrrolnitrin and pyoluteorin-producing Pseudomonas and Burkholderia spp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souza, J.T.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Pyrrolnitrin (PRN) and pyoluteorin (PLT) are broad-spectrum antibiotics produced by several strains of Pseudomonas and Burkholderia species. Both antibiotics play an important role in the suppression of multiple plant pathogenic fungi. Primers were developed from conserved sequences and amplified

  1. Antibiotic Adjuvants: Rescuing Antibiotics from Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Gerard D

    2016-11-01

    Rooted in the mechanism of action of antibiotics and subject to bacterial evolution, antibiotic resistance is difficult and perhaps impossible to overcome. Nevertheless, strategies can be used to minimize the emergence and impact of resistance. Antibiotic adjuvants offer one such approach. These are compounds that have little or no antibiotic activity themselves but act to block resistance or otherwise enhance antibiotic action. Antibiotic adjuvants are therefore delivered in combination with antibiotics and can be divided into two groups: Class I agents that act on the pathogen, and Class II agents that act on the host. Adjuvants offer a means to both suppress the emergence of resistance and rescue the activity of existing drugs, offering an orthogonal strategy complimentary to new antibiotic discovery VIDEO ABSTRACT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Physiology of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in biofilms as revealed by transcriptome analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parker Albert

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcriptome analysis was applied to characterize the physiological activities of Pseudomonas aeruginosa grown for three days in drip-flow biofilm reactors. Conventional applications of transcriptional profiling often compare two paired data sets that differ in a single experimentally controlled variable. In contrast this study obtained the transcriptome of a single biofilm state, ranked transcript signals to make the priorities of the population manifest, and compared ranki ngs for a priori identified physiological marker genes between the biofilm and published data sets. Results Biofilms tolerated exposure to antibiotics, harbored steep oxygen concentration gradients, and exhibited stratified and heterogeneous spatial patterns of protein synthetic activity. Transcriptional profiling was performed and the signal intensity of each transcript was ranked to gain insight into the physiological state of the biofilm population. Similar rankings were obtained from data sets published in the GEO database http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo. By comparing the rank of genes selected as markers for particular physiological activities between the biofilm and comparator data sets, it was possible to infer qualitative features of the physiological state of the biofilm bacteria. These biofilms appeared, from their transcriptome, to be glucose nourished, iron replete, oxygen limited, and growing slowly or exhibiting stationary phase character. Genes associated with elaboration of type IV pili were strongly expressed in the biofilm. The biofilm population did not indicate oxidative stress, homoserine lactone mediated quorum sensing, or activation of efflux pumps. Using correlations with transcript ranks, the average specific growth rate of biofilm cells was estimated to be 0.08 h-1. Conclusions Collectively these data underscore the oxygen-limited, slow-growing nature of the biofilm population and are consistent with antimicrobial tolerance due

  3. ANTAGONISTIC POTENTIAL OF FLUORESCENT Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    This study focused on the antagonistic potential of fluorescent Pseudomonas in vitro, and its inoculation effect on growth performance of Lycopersicon esculentum in Fusarium oxysporum and Rhizoctonia solani infested soil. Biochemical characteristics of fluorescent Pseudomonas showed that all ten isolates were positive ...

  4. Transcriptional Repressor PtvR Regulates Phenotypic Tolerance to Vancomycin in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Xue; Li, Jing-Wen; Feng, Zhixing; Luo, Youfu; Veening, Jan-Willem; Zhang, Jing-Ren

    Reversible or phenotypic tolerance to antibiotics within microbial populations has been implicated in treatment failure of chronic infections and development of persister cells. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating phenotypic drug tolerance are largely unknown. In this study, we identified a

  5. BIOSYNTHESIS AND PROPERTIES OF ANTIBIOTIC BATUMIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Klochko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Biosynthesis of antistaphylococcal antibiotic batumin under periodic conditions of Pseudomonas batumici growth has been studied. Antibiotic synthesis in fermenter occurred across the culture growth and achieved its maximal value after 50–55 hours. The active oxygen utilization by the producing strain was observed during 20–55 hours of fermentation with maximum after 40–45 hours. Antibiotic yield was 175–180 mg/l and depended on intensity of aeration. contrast to «freshly isolated» antibiotic after fermentation the long-term kept batumin has shown two identical by molecular mass peaks according to the chromato-mass spectrometric analysis. Taking into account of batumin molecule structure the conclusion has been made that the most probable isomerization type is keto-enolic tautomerism. At the same time batumin is diastereoisomer of kalimantacin A which has the same chemical structure. The optic rotation angle is [α]d25 = +56.3° for kalimantacin and [α]d25 = –13.5° for batumin. The simultaneous P. batumici growth and antibiotic biosynthesis and the ability of this molecule to optical isomerisation and keto-enolic forms formation allow us to suppose that batumin plays a certain role in metabolism of the producing strain.

  6. Severe Keratitis Caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Successfully Treated with Ceftazidime Associated with Acetazolamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Hue

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To report a case of microbial keratitis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa treated with a combination of acetazolamide and ceftazidime. Methods. Case report. Results. We report the case of a 17-year-old contact lens-wearing female who developed severe keratitis due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa temporarily healed with topical fortified antibiotic eye drops. After few days, the patient relapsed, and topical and intravenous ceftazidime were added. Concomitantly, oral administration of acetazolamide was prescribed. This carbonic anhydrase inhibitor was added to the antibiotic regimen in order to decrease the anterior chamber pH, and then, the ceftazidime ionization. By lowering the state of ionization of the antibiotic in the aqueous humor, its concentration was increased. This was confirmed by an improvement of the patient within few days and a rapid eradication of the infection. Conclusion. This is the first reported case of keratitis caused by P. aeruginosa successfully treated using acetazolamide as an enhancer of ceftazidime effectiveness.

  7. Genetic Diversity of Nitrogen-Fixing and Plant Growth Promoting Pseudomonas Species Isolated from Sugarcane Rhizosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Bi Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The study was designed to isolate and characterize Pseudomonas spp. from sugarcane rhizosphere, and to evaluate their plant- growth- promoting (PGP traits and nitrogenase activity. A biological nitrogen-fixing microbe has great potential to replace chemical fertilizers and be used as a targeted biofertilizer in a plant. A total of 100 isolates from sugarcane rhizosphere, belonging to different species, were isolated; from these, 30 isolates were selected on the basis of preliminary screening, for in vitro antagonistic activities against sugarcane pathogens and for various PGP traits, as well as nitrogenase activity. The production of IAA varied from 312.07 to 13.12 μg mL−1 in tryptophan supplemented medium, with higher production in AN15 and lower in CN20 strain. The estimation of ACC deaminase activity, strains CY4 and BA2 produced maximum and minimum activity of 77.0 and 15.13 μmoL mg−1 h−1. For nitrogenase activity among the studied strains, CoA6 fixed higher and AY1 fixed lower in amounts (108.30 and 6.16 μmoL C2H2 h−1 mL−1. All the strains were identified on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and the phylogenetic diversity of the strains was analyzed. The results identified all strains as being similar to Pseudomonas spp. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification of nifH and antibiotic genes was suggestive that the amplified strains had the capability to fix nitrogen and possessed biocontrol activities. Genotypic comparisons of the strains were determined by BOX, ERIC, and REP PCR profile analysis. Out of all the screened isolates, CY4 (Pseudomonas koreensis and CN11 (Pseudomonas entomophila showed the most prominent PGP traits, as well as nitrogenase activity. Therefore, only these two strains were selected for further studies; Biolog profiling; colonization through green fluorescent protein (GFP-tagged bacteria; and nifH gene expression using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR analysis. The

  8. Isolation of Pseudomonas cepacia in cystic fibrosis patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth de Andrade Marques

    1993-03-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary infection on cystic fibrosis (CF patients are associated with a limited qualitative number of microorganisms. During the colonization process, Staphylococcus aureus usually preceedes Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This latter is at first non-mucoid, being replaced or associated to a mucoid morphotype which is rare in other diseases. In 1980, Pseudomonas cepacia appeared as an important agent in CF pulmonary infections with a mean frequency of about 6.1% isolations in different parts of the world. The primus colonization mainly occurs in the presence of pre-existent tissue lesions and the clinical progress of the disease is variable. In some patients it can be fulminant; in others it can cause a gradual and slow decrease in their pulmonary functions. The concern with this germ isolation is justified by its antibiotic multiple resistence and the possibility of direct transmission from a colonized patient to a non-colonized one. We reported the first case of P. cepacia infection in a CF patient in our area. The microbiological attendance to this patient had been made from 1986 to 1991 and the first positive culture appeared in 1988. The sensitivity profile showed that the primus colonization strain was sensitive to 9 of 17 tested antibiotics, however in the last culture the strain was resistent to all antibiotics. These data corroborate the need for monitoring the bacterial flora on CF patients respiratory system.

  9. D-BMAP18 antimicrobial peptide is active in vitro, resists to pulmonary proteases but loses its activity in a murine model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardirossian, Mario; Pompilio, Arianna; Degasperi, Margherita; Runti, Giulia; Pacor, Sabrina; Di Bonaventura, Giovanni; Scocchi, Marco

    2017-06-01

    The spread of antibiotic resistant-pathogens is driving the search for new antimicrobial compounds. Pulmonary infections experienced by cystic fibrosis patients are a dramatic example of this health-care emergency. Antimicrobial peptides could answer the need for new antibiotics but translating them from basic research to the clinic is a challenge. We have previously evaluated the potential of the small membranolytic peptide BMAP-18 to treat CF-related infections, discovering that while this molecule had a good activity in vitro it was not active in vivo because of its rapid degradation by pulmonary proteases. In this study, we synthesized and tested the proteases-resistant all-D enantiomer. In spite of a good antimicrobial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia clinical isolates and of a tolerable cytotoxicity in vitro, D-BMAP18 was ineffective to treat P. aeruginosa pulmonary infection in mice, in comparison to tobramycin. We observed that different factors other than peptide degradation hampered its efficacy for pulmonary application. These results indicate that D-BMAP18 needs further optimization before being suitable for clinical application and this approach may represent a guide for optimization of other anti-infective peptides eligible for the treatment of pulmonary infections.

  10. Experimental investigation of activities and tolerance of denitrifying bacteria under alkaline and reducing condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mine, Tatsuya; Mihara, Morihiro; Ooi, Takao

    2000-07-01

    In the geological disposal system of TRU wastes, nitrogen generation by denitrifying bacteria could provide significant impact on the assessment of this system, because nitrate contained in process concentrated liquid waste might be electron acceptor for denitrifying bacteria. In this study, the activities and tolerance of denitrifying under disposal condition were investigated. Pseudomonas denitrificans as denitrifying bacteria was used. The results showed that Pseudomonas denitrificans had activity under reducing condition, but under high pH condition (pH>9.5), the activity of Pseudomonas denitrificans was not detected. It is possible that the activity of Pseudomonas denitrificans would be low under disposal condition. (author)

  11. [Colistin in the post-antibiotic era].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguayo, Alejandro; Mella, Sergio; Riedel, Gisela; Bello, Helia; Domínguez, Mariana; González-Rocha, Gerardo

    2016-04-01

    One of the most important features of the post-antibiotic era in the late 20th century is the resurgence of colistin for the treatment of extensively drug resistant gram-negative bacteria (XDR). Colistin is a narrow spectrum anti-biotic, active against microorganisms with clinical significance such as Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Nowadays its toxicity is lower, partly explained by better pharmaceuticals and management of the critically ill patients. However, there has been much confusion regarding the dosage of the drug, its name and labeling, therefore, experts have recommended using a common language about this polymyxin. The lack of PK/PD studies for colistin is perhaps the main weakness of this area of knowledge, even though the before mentioned approach has contributed with new ways to manage and calculate the dose of this antimicrobial. Indeed, the efficiency of colistin in association with a second agent in reducing mortality has not been demonstrated.

  12. The impact of nosocomially-acquired resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in a burn unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Alexis D; Shankowsky, Heather A; Swanson, Todd; Lee, Jonathan; Tredget, Edward E

    2007-07-01

    Nosocomially-acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa remains a serious cause of infection and septic mortality in burn patients. This study was conducted to quantify the impact of nosocomially-transmitted resistant P. aeruginosa in a burn population. Using a TRACS burn database, 48 patients with P. aeruginosa resistant to gentamicin were identified (Pseudomonas group). Thirty-nine were case-matched to controls without resistant P. aeruginosa cultures (control group) for age, total body surface area, admission year, and presence of inhalation injury. Mortality and various morbidity endpoints were examined, as well as antibiotic costs. There was a significantly higher mortality rate in the Pseudomonas group (33% vs. 8%, p products used (packed cells 51.1 +/- 8.0 vs. 21.1 +/- 3.4, p < 0.01; platelets 11.9 +/- 3.0 vs. 1.4 +/- 0.7, p < 0.01) were all significantly higher in the Pseudomonas group. Cost of antibiotics was also significantly higher ($2,658.52 +/- $647.93 vs. $829.22 +/- $152.82, p < 0.01). Nosocomial colonization or infection, or both, of burn patients with aminoglycoside-resistant P. aeruginosa is associated with significantly higher morbidity, mortality, and cost of care. Increased resource consumption did not prevent significantly higher mortality rates when compared with that of control patients. Thus, prevention, identification, and eradication of nosocomial Pseudomonas contamination are critical for cost-effective, successful burn care.

  13. Predictors of Pseudomonas and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in hospitalized patients with healthcare-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metersky, Mark L; Frei, Christopher R; Mortensen, Eric M

    2016-01-01

    Patients with healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) are at high risk of infection with multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens. Factors discriminating infection with MDR Gram-negative (MDR-GN) organism from infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are not well understood and patients are often treated for both organisms. This study was performed to determine risk factors predicting pneumonia due to Pseudomonas versus MRSA. Veterans age ≥65 hospitalized with HCAP between 2002 and 2012 were identified from the Veterans Affairs administrative databases. Patients were identified with Pseudomonas pneumonia, MRSA pneumonia or neither according to the International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification codes. We assessed unadjusted and adjusted associations of patient characteristics and HCAP due to Pseudomonas or MRSA. Of the 61,651 patients with HCAP, 1156 (1.9%) were diagnosed with Pseudomonas pneumonia, 641 (1.0%) with MRSA pneumonia and 59,854 (97.1%) with neither. MRSA pneumonia was positively associated with male gender, age >74, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), recent nursing home or hospital stay, recent exposure to fluoroquinolone or antibiotics treating Gram-positive organisms, and severe pneumonia. MRSA pneumonia was negatively associated with complicated diabetes. Pseudomonas pneumonia was positively associated with recent hospital stay, immunocompromise, COPD, hemiplegia, recent exposure to inhaled corticosteroids, β-lactam/cephalosporin/carbapenem antibiotics, antibiotics against Gram-positive organisms, 'other antibiotics' and severe pneumonia. Pseudomonas pneumonia was negatively associated with age >84, higher socioeconomic status, drug abuse and diabetes. Patient characteristics may assist in identifying patients at risk for HCAP due to Pseudomonas or MRSA. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  14. Analysis of the core genome and pangenome of Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udaondo, Zulema; Molina, Lázaro; Segura, Ana; Duque, Estrella; Ramos, Juan L

    2016-10-01

    Pseudomonas putida are strict aerobes that proliferate in a range of temperate niches and are of interest for environmental applications due to their capacity to degrade pollutants and ability to promote plant growth. Furthermore solvent-tolerant strains are useful for biosynthesis of added-value chemicals. We present a comprehensive comparative analysis of nine strains and the first characterization of the Pseudomonas putida pangenome. The core genome of P. putida comprises approximately 3386 genes. The most abundant genes within the core genome are those that encode nutrient transporters. Other conserved genes include those for central carbon metabolism through the Entner-Doudoroff pathway, the pentose phosphate cycle, arginine and proline metabolism, and pathways for degradation of aromatic chemicals. Genes that encode transporters, enzymes and regulators for amino acid metabolism (synthesis and degradation) are all part of the core genome, as well as various electron transporters, which enable aerobic metabolism under different oxygen regimes. Within the core genome are 30 genes for flagella biosynthesis and 12 key genes for biofilm formation. Pseudomonas putida strains share 85% of the coding regions with Pseudomonas aeruginosa; however, in P. putida, virulence factors such as exotoxins and type III secretion systems are absent. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Epistatic Mutations And Unpredictable Phenotypes In Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Eva Kammer; Abou Hachem, Maher; Jelsbak, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen, able to adapt to stressful environments such as the cystic fibrosis (CF) airways. Adaptation of P. aeruginosa to the CF environment is associated with phenotypic changes, such as switch in mucoidy, antibiotic resistance and loss of virulence...... factors. The phenotypic changes arise from mutations in trans-regulatory elements but are nearly impossible to predict from sequence data alone. Often, the combinatorial effects of few mutations in global regulators give rise to unexpected phenotypes. To understand the epistatic effect and how unexpected...... phenotypes arise from seemingly unrelated mutations, we have studied two mutations in P. aeruginosa transcriptional regulators, sigma factor rpoD and algT....

  16. Mutation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa specifying reduced affinity for penicillin G.

    OpenAIRE

    Godfrey, A J; Bryan, L E

    1982-01-01

    A mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO503 was isolated after ethane-methane-sulfonate mutagenesis and selection of ticarcillin. The mutant, PCC17, displayed reduced affinity for [14C] penicillin G at all of its penicillin-binding proteins as well as a general increase in resistance to all the beta-lactam antibiotics tested. The mutation designated pbpA has been mapped by FP-2-mediated conjugation and was located distal to the proA locus and 33% linked to it. The two loci were not cotra...

  17. Susceptibility trends of Pseudomonas species from corneal ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smitha S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To assess the changing trends in the antibiotic susceptibility of Pseudomonas spp . isolated from bacterial keratitis over a nine year period with special emphasis on fluoroquinolone susceptibilities. Methods : All corneal scraping cultures positive for Pseudomonas spp. (n=585 isolated from patients with bacterial keratitis at the Aravind Eye Hospital, Madurai from1995-2003 were evaluated. Cultures were performed in liquid and solid media and susceptibility testing was done against amikacin, gentamicin, tobramycin, ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Results: The susceptibility of Pseudomonas spp. was over 90% from 1995-1998 to ciprofloxacin which decreased to 83% from 1999-2003. The total number of isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin was 51(9.4%. No statistically significant increase in the number of isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin was noted. Ofloxacin showed 54% susceptibility from 1995-1998 but increased to 64% from 1999-2003. Analysis of in vitro activity of amikacin reveals that there was 43% sensitivity from 1995-1998 but later it increased to 76% from 1999-2003. In case of gentamicin, the sensitivity decreased marginally from 80% to 70% through the years. Tobramycin showed 45% sensitivity from 1995-1998 but increased to 75% from 1999-2003. Conclusions : The fluoroquinolones remain a good choice in the treatment of ocular infections, with high susceptibility of Pseudomonas spp. Among the aminoglycosides, gentamicin was found to be highly effective against Pseudomonas corneal ulcers when compared to amikacin and tobramycin. The results show a need for continuous monitoring of bacterial resistance trends.

  18. Synthesis and Antibacterial Activity of Antibiotic-Functionalized Graphite Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeline Rotella

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface functionalization of nanomaterials is an area of current investigation that supports the development of new biomaterials for applications in biology and medicine. Herein we describe the synthesis, characterization, and antibacterial properties of the first examples of antibiotic-labeled graphitic carbon nanofibers (GCNFs covalently functionalized with aminoglycoside and quinolone antibiotics. Ruthenium tetroxide oxidation of herringbone GCNFs gave higher amounts of surface carboxyl groups than previous methods. These carboxyl groups served as sites of attachment for antibiotics by acyl substitution. Bioassay of these novel, functionalized GCNFs using serial dilution and optical density methods demonstrated that antibiotic-labeled GCNFs possess significant antibacterial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The activity we observe for aminoglycoside-functionalized GCNFs suggests a membranolytic mechanism of action.

  19. Biofilm Induced Tolerance Towards Antimicrobial Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Anders; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Zampaloni, Claudia

    2008-01-01

    to the presence of IncF plasmids expressing altered forms of the transfer pili in two different biofilm model systems. The mature biofilms were subsequently treated with two antibiotics with different molecular targets, the peptide antibiotic colistin and the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin. The dynamics...... regulated tolerant subpopulation formation and not caused by a general biofilm property. No significant difference in survival was detected when the strains were challenged with ciprofloxacin. Our data show that biofilm formation confers increased colistin tolerance to cells within the biofilm structure...

  20. Nosocomial urinary tract infections and resistance profile to antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Naz

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the risk factors, laboratuary results, distrubition of pathogens and sensitivity to antibiotics in patients with hospital acquired urinary tract infections (HAUTI. 161 HAUTI patients were diagnosed. The most common predisposing factors were identified as long term hospitalization, urinary catheterization, hospitalization at intensive care unit and neurologic diseases. The most commom pathogens isolated were Escherichia coli 33 (29.5 %, Pseudomonas spp. 32 (28.6 % and Klebsiella spp. 12 (10.7 %. The lowest rates of resistance in E.coli, Pseudomonas spp. and Klebsiella spp. were observed to amikacin (respectively 3 %, 9 %, 8 %, to imipenem (9 %, 41 %, 8 %, to piperacilin/tazobactam (PIP/TAZ (24 %, 47 %, 17 % and to ciprofloxasin (52 %, 69 %, 25 %. Mortality was detected in 31(19% of 161 patients diagnosed with HAUTI. As a result, high rate resistance was found in bacterial microorganism, especially in Pseudomonas spp.

  1. Optimising the duration of antibiotic therapy for ventilator-associated pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chastre

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP has traditionally been treated with a 14–21-day course of antibiotics. However, prolonged antibiotic therapy is associated with the emergence of multidrug-resistant strains, as well as higher toxicity and costs. In a large, randomised, controlled trial in patients with microbiologically confirmed VAP who received appropriate empirical antibiotic therapy, an 8-day antibiotic regimen was not associated with excess mortality or more episodes of recurrent pulmonary infection compared with a 15-day regimen. Amongst patients who developed recurrent infection, multidrug-resistant pathogens emerged less frequently in the group receiving 8 days of antibiotic therapy. The 8-day regimen was also not associated with excess mortality in the subgroup with VAP caused by nonfermentative Gram-negative bacilli, mostly Pseudomonas aeruginosa, although recurrent infections occurred more often. Pending confirmatory studies, an 8-day course of antibiotic therapy may be appropriate for many patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia, providing that initial antibiotic therapy is appropriate, the clinical course is favourable and extreme vigilance is maintained after stopping antibiotics. Patients whose initial treatment regimen was inappropriate, those infected with difficult-to-treat pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and immunocompromised patients and others at high risk for relapse are likely to require a longer duration of antibiotic therapy.

  2. ECTHYMA GANGRENOSUM AND SEPTIC SHOCK CAUSED BY PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA IN A CYTOTOXIC NEUTROPENIC PATIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Kurmukov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an extremely dangerous cause of sepsis in patients with antitumor chemotherapyassociated neutropenia. Sometimes, the source of infection may be localized lesions of the skin (e.g. folliculitis or its derivatives, which are not of particular concern in the absence of neutropenia. The appearance of Ecthyma gangrenosum in a patient with neutropenia, even in the absence of any signs or symptoms of sepsis, requires emergency care and the appointment of antibiotics with high antipseudomonal activity. We are report the case of the complications of chemotherapy with the sequential development of Ecthyma gangrenosum and Pseudomonas aeruginosa septicemia in a patient with concomitant skin infection (folliculitis.

  3. Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa cervical osteomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujeet Kumar Meher

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a rare cause of osteomyelitis of the cervical spine and is usually seen in the background of intravenous drug use and immunocompromised state. Very few cases of osteomyelitis of the cervical spine caused by pseudomonas aeruginosa have been reported in otherwise healthy patients. This is a case presentation of a young female, who in the absence of known risk factors for cervical osteomyelitis presented with progressively worsening neurological signs and symptoms.

  4. C1 compounds as auxiliary substrate for engineered Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, F.W.; De Winde, J.H.; Ruijssenaars, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    The solvent-tolerant bacterium Pseudomonas putida S12 was engineered to efficiently utilize the C1 compounds methanol and formaldehyde as auxiliary substrate. The hps and phi genes of Bacillus brevis, encoding two key steps of the ribulose monophosphate (RuMP) pathway, were introduced to construct a

  5. Chemostat-based proteomic analysis of toluene-affected Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volkers, R.J.M.; Jong, A.L. de; Hulst, A.G.; Baar, B.L.M. van; Bont, J.A.M. de; Wery, J.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the cellular response of the solvent-tolerant Pseudomonas putida S12 to toluene as the single effector. Proteomic analysis (two-dimensional difference-in-gel-electrophoresis) was used to assess the response of P. putida S12 cultured in chemostats. This approach

  6. Pseudomonas and Beyond : Polyamine metabolism, lignin degradation and potential applications in industrial biotechnology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bandounas, L.

    2011-01-01

    Renewable resources such as lignocellulosic biomass are promising feedstocks for the production of bio-fuels and value-added products. Biocatalysts are considered important tools in such processes. Pseudomonas putida S12 has a broad metabolic potential and is exceptionally tolerant towards a range

  7. Engineering Pseudomonas putida S12 for efficient utilization of D-Xylose and L-Arabinose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijnen, J.P.; Winde, J.H. de; Ruijssenaars, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    The solvent-tolerant bacterium Pseudomonas putida S12 was engineered to utilize xylose as a substrate by expressing xylose isomerase (XylA) and xylulokinase (XylB) from Escherichia coli. The initial yield on xylose was low (9% [g CDW g substrate−1], where CDW is cell dry weight), and the growth rate

  8. Garlic blocks quorum sensing and promotes rapid clearing of pulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Rasmussen, Thomas B

    2005-01-01

    The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant micro-organism of chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. P. aeruginosa colonizes the lungs by forming biofilm microcolonies throughout the lung. Quorum sensing (QS) renders the biofilm bacteria highly tolerant...

  9. Complete Genome of the Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas putida BIRD-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matilla, M.A.; van der Lelie, D.; Pizarro-Tobias, P.; Roca, A.; Fernandez, M.; Duque, E.; Molina, L.; Wu, X.; Gomez, M. J.; Segura, A.; Ramos, J.-L.

    2011-03-01

    We report the complete sequence of the 5.7-Mbp genome of Pseudomonas putida BIRD-1, a metabolically versatile plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium that is highly tolerant to desiccation and capable of solubilizing inorganic phosphate and iron and of synthesizing phytohormones that stimulate seed germination and plant growth.

  10. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF PINEAPPLE (ANANAS COMOSUS L. MERR EXTRACT AGAINST MULTIDRUG-RESISTANT OF PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA: AN IN VITRO STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmat Sayyid Zharfan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the main cause of nosocomial infection which is responsible for 10% of hospital-acquired infection. Pseudomonas aeruginosa tends to mutate and displays potential for development of antibiotic resistance. Approximately, 10% of global bacterial isolates are found as Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Pseudomonas aeruginosa have a quite tremendous severity index, especially on pneumonia and urinary tract infections, even sepsis, which 50% mortality rate. Pineapple (Ananas comosus L. Merr has antimicrobial properties. The active antimicrobial compounds in Ananas comosus L. Merr include saponin and bromelain. This research aims to find the potency of antimicrobial effect of pineapple (Ananas comosus L. Merr extract towards Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa specimen is obtained from patient’s pus in orthopaedic department, Dr Soetomo Public Hospital, Surabaya. Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa specimen is resistant to all antibiotic agents except cefoperazone-sulbactam. This research is conducted by measuring the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC through dilution test with Mueller-Hinton broth medium. Pineapple extract (Ananas comosus L. Merr. is dissolved in aquadest, then poured into test tube at varying concentrations (6 g/ml; 3 g/ml; 1.5 g/ml; 0.75 g/ml, 0.375 g/ml; and 0.1875 g/ml. After 24 hours’ incubation, samples are plated onto nutrient agar plate, to determine the Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC. The extract of pineapple (Ananas comosus L. Merr has antimicrobial activities against Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC could not be determined, because turbidity changes were not seen. The Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC of pineapple extract (Ananas comosus L. Merr to Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa is 0.75 g/ml. Further study of in vivo is needed.

  11. Antibiotic resistance and the risk of recurrent bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woudt, Sjoukje H S; de Greeff, Sabine C; Schoffelen, Annelot F; Vlek, Anne L M; Bonten, Marc J M

    2017-12-07

    Direct health effects of antibiotic resistance are difficult to assess. We quantified the risk of recurrent bacteremia associated with antibiotic resistance. We extracted antimicrobial susceptibility testing data on blood isolates of Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas spp., Enterococcus spp. and Staphylococcus aureus from the Dutch surveillance system for antimicrobial resistance between 2008 and 2017. First and first recurrent (4-30days) bacteremia episodes were categorized as susceptible, single non-susceptible or co-non-susceptible (I/R), to 3rd generation cephalosporins -/+ carbapenems (Enterobacteriaceae), ceftazidime -/+ carbapenems (Pseudomonas spp.), aminopenicillins -/+ vancomycin (Enterococcus spp.), or MSSA/MRSA (S. aureus). We calculated absolute and relative risks of recurrent bacteremia after single- and co-non-susceptible vs. susceptible first bacteremia, estimated the crude population attributable effect of antibiotic resistance for the Netherlands, and calculated absolute risks of developing non-susceptible recurrent bacteremia after a susceptible first episode. Risk ratios for recurrent bacteremia after a first episode caused by a single- and co-non-susceptible bacteria, respectively, vs. susceptible first episodes, were 1.7 (95% CI 1.5-2.0) and 5.2 (2.1-12.4) for Enterobacteriaceae, 1.3 (0.5-3.1) and 5.0 (2.9-8.5) for Pseudomonas spp., 1.4 (1.2-1.7) and 1.6 (0.6-4.2) for Enterococcus spp., and 1.6 (1.1-2.4) for MRSA vs. MSSA. The estimated population annual number of recurrent bacteremias associated with non-susceptibility was 40. Risks of recurrent bacteremia caused by a non-susceptible pathogen after a susceptible first episode were at most 0.4% (Pseudomonas spp.). Although antibiotic non-susceptibility was consistently associated with higher risks of recurrent bacteremia, the estimated number of additional recurrent episodes in the Netherlands (40 per year) was rather limited. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the

  12. Inhaled Antibiotic Therapy in Chronic Respiratory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego J. Maselli

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The management of patients with chronic respiratory diseases affected by difficult to treat infections has become a challenge in clinical practice. Conditions such as cystic fibrosis (CF and non-CF bronchiectasis require extensive treatment strategies to deal with multidrug resistant pathogens that include Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Burkholderia species and non-tuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM. These challenges prompted scientists to deliver antimicrobial agents through the pulmonary system by using inhaled, aerosolized or nebulized antibiotics. Subsequent research advances focused on the development of antibiotic agents able to achieve high tissue concentrations capable of reducing the bacterial load of difficult-to-treat organisms in hosts with chronic respiratory conditions. In this review, we focus on the evidence regarding the use of antibiotic therapies administered through the respiratory system via inhalation, nebulization or aerosolization, specifically in patients with chronic respiratory diseases that include CF, non-CF bronchiectasis and NTM. However, further research is required to address the potential benefits, mechanisms of action and applications of inhaled antibiotics for the management of difficult-to-treat infections in patients with chronic respiratory diseases.

  13. Potential impacts of aquatic pollutants: Sub-clinical antibiotic concentrations induce genome changes and promote antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise eChow

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are disseminated into aquatic environments via human waste streams and agricultural run-off. Here they can persist at low, but biologically relevant, concentrations. Antibiotic pollution establishes a selection gradient for resistance and may also raise the frequency of events that generate resistance: point mutations; recombination; and lateral gene transfer. This study examined the response of bacteria to sub-inhibitory levels of antibiotics. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas protegens were exposed kanamycin, tetracycline or ciprofloxacin at 1/10 the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC in a serial streaking experiment over 40 passages. Significant changes in rep-PCR fingerprints were noted in both species when exposed to sub-inhibitory antibiotic concentrations. These changes were observed in as few as five passages, despite the fact that the protocols used sample less than 0.3% of the genome, in turn suggesting much more widespread alterations to sequence and genome architecture. Experimental lines also displayed variant colony morphologies. The final MICs were significantly higher in some experimental lineages of Ps. protegens, suggesting that 1/10 the MIC induces de-novo mutation events that generate resistance phenotypes. The implications of these results are clear: exposure of the environmental microbiome to antibiotic pollution will induce similar changes, including generating newly resistant species that may be of

  14. Physiology of solvent tolerance in Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isken, S.

    2000-01-01

    Hydrophobic organic solvents, like toluene, are toxic for living organisms. This toxicity is an important drawback in the environmental biotechnology as well as in the application of solvents in the production of fine chemicals by whole-cell biotransformations. The effects of organic

  15. Crafting tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchner, Antje; Freitag, Markus; Rapp, Carolin

    2011-01-01

    Ongoing changes in social structures, orientation, and value systems confront us with the growing necessity to address and understand transforming patterns of tolerance as well as specific aspects, such as social tolerance. Based on hierarchical analyses of the latest World Values Survey (2005...... results show that specific institutional qualities, which reduce status anxiety, such as inclusiveness, universality, and fairness, prevail over traditional socio-economic, societal, cultural, and democratic explanations....

  16. Application of Continuous Culture for Assessing Antibiotic Activity Against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendon-Dunn, Charlotte L; Anwar, Saba; Burton, Christopher; Bacon, Joanna

    2018-01-01

    There is a proportion of the M. tuberculosis population that is refractory to the bactericidal action of antituberculosis antibiotics due to phenotypic tolerance. This tolerance can be impacted by environmental stimuli and the subsequent physiological state of the organism. It may be the result of preexisting populations of slow growing/non replicating bacteria that are protected from antibiotic action. It still remains unclear how the slow growth of M. tuberculosis contributes to antibiotic resistance and antibiotic tolerance. Here, we present a method for assessing the activity of antibiotics against M. tuberculosis using continuous culture, which is the only system that can be used to control bacterial growth rate and study the impact of slow or fast growth on the organism's response to antibiotic exposure.

  17. Prophylactic anti-staphylococcal antibiotics for cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Alan R; Rosenfeld, Margaret

    2017-04-18

    Staphylococcus aureus causes pulmonary infection in young children with cystic fibrosis. Prophylactic antibiotics are prescribed hoping to prevent such infection and lung damage. Antibiotics have adverse effects and long-term use might lead to infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This is an update of a previously published review. To assess continuous oral antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent the acquisition of Staphylococcus aureus versus no prophylaxis in people with cystic fibrosis, we tested these hypotheses. Prophylaxis:1. improves clinical status, lung function and survival;2. causes adverse effects (e.g. diarrhoea, skin rash, candidiasis);3. leads to fewer isolates of common pathogens from respiratory secretions;4. leads to the emergence of antibiotic resistance and colonisation of the respiratory tract with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register, comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Companies manufacturing anti-staphylococcal antibiotics were contacted.Most recent search of the Group's Register: 29 September 2016. Randomised trials of continuous oral prophylactic antibiotics (given for at least one year) compared to intermittent antibiotics given 'as required', in people with cystic fibrosis of any disease severity. The authors assessed studies for eligibility and methodological quality and extracted data. We included four studies, with a total of 401 randomised participants aged zero to seven years on enrolment; one study is ongoing. The two older included studies generally had a higher risk of bias across all domains, but in particular due to a lack of blinding and incomplete outcome data, than the two more recent studies. We only regarded the most recent study as being generally free of bias, although even here we were not certain of the effect of the per protocol

  18. Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter STD on Facebook Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Threat Gonorrhea has progressively developed resistance to the antibiotic drugs prescribed to treat it. Following the spread ...

  19. Antibiotics and Resistance: Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Work Contact Us ABOUT THE ISSUE What is Antibiotic Resistance? General Background Science of Resistance Glossary References ... for Adaptation Genetics and Drug Resistance Reservoirs of Antibiotic Resistance Project (ROAR) INTERNATIONAL CHAPTERS APUA Chapter Network ...

  20. Biosurfactant production by Pseudomonas strains isolated from floral nectar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Belgacem, Z; Bijttebier, S; Verreth, C; Voorspoels, S; Van de Voorde, I; Aerts, G; Willems, K A; Jacquemyn, H; Ruyters, S; Lievens, B

    2015-06-01

    To screen and identify biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas strains isolated from floral nectar; to characterize the produced biosurfactants; and to investigate the effect of different carbon sources on biosurfactant production. Four of eight nectar Pseudomonas isolates were found to produce biosurfactants. Phylogenetic analysis based on three housekeeping genes (16S rRNA gene, rpoB and gyrB) classified the isolates into two groups, including one group closely related to Pseudomonas fluorescens and another group closely related to Pseudomonas fragi and Pseudomonas jessenii. Although our nectar pseudomonads were able to grow on a variety of water-soluble and water-immiscible carbon sources, surface active agents were only produced when using vegetable oil as sole carbon source, including olive oil, sunflower oil or waste frying sunflower oil. Structural characterization based on thin layer chromatography (TLC) and ultra high performance liquid chromatography-accurate mass mass spectrometry (UHPLC-amMS) revealed that biosurfactant activity was most probably due to the production of fatty acids (C16:0; C18:0; C18:1 and C18:2), and mono- and diglycerides thereof. Four biosurfactant-producing nectar pseudomonads were identified. The active compounds were identified as fatty acids (C16:0; C18:0; C18:1 and C18:2), and mono- and diglycerides thereof, produced by hydrolysis of triglycerides of the feedstock. Studies on biosurfactant-producing micro-organisms have mainly focused on microbes isolated from soils and aquatic environments. Here, for the first time, nectar environments were screened as a novel source for biosurfactant producers. As nectars represent harsh environments with high osmotic pressure and varying pH levels, further screening of nectar habitats for biosurfactant-producing microbes may lead to the discovery of novel biosurfactants with broad tolerance towards different environmental conditions. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. A copper-activated two-component system interacts with zinc and imipenem resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caille, Olivier; Rossier, Claude; Perron, Karl

    2007-07-01

    The effects of copper (Cu) on trace metal and antibiotic resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa have been investigated. Cu treatments induced resistance not only to this metal but also, surprisingly, to zinc (Zn). Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed that after Cu treatment the transcription of the czcRS two-component system (TCS) operon was enhanced as well as that of the czcCBA operon encoding an efflux pump specific for zinc, cadmium, and cobalt. Cu treatments at the same time caused a decrease in the production of OprD porin, resulting in resistance to the carbapenem antibiotic imipenem. The CzcR regulator was known to repress oprD. However, Cu was still able to decrease the production of OprD and induce imipenem resistance in a czcRS knockout mutant. This strongly suggested that another Cu-dependent regulatory system was acting negatively on oprD expression. TCS regulator genes copR-copS have been shown to be involved in Cu tolerance in P. aeruginosa. qRT-PCR showed that overproduction of the CopR or of the CzcR regulator resulted in increased transcription of the czcC gene as well as in a decrease in oprD gene transcription, either in the wild-type strain or in the czcRS knockout mutant. Overproduction experiments suggest that a metal-dependent mechanism operates at the posttranscriptional level to control the production of the CzcCBA efflux pump. This study shows that CopR is a new negative regulator of OprD porin and that it links Zn, Cu, and imipenem resistances by interacting with the CzcRS TCS.

  2. RNASeq Based Transcriptional Profiling of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 after Short- and Long-Term Anoxic Cultivation in Synthetic Cystic Fibrosis Sputum Medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tata, Muralidhar; Wolfinger, Michael T; Amman, Fabian; Roschanski, Nicole; Dötsch, Andreas; Sonnleitner, Elisabeth; Häussler, Susanne; Bläsi, Udo

    2016-01-01

    The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa can thrive under microaerophilic to anaerobic conditions in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. RNASeq based comparative RNA profiling of the clinical isolate PA14 cultured in synthetic cystic fibrosis medium was performed after planktonic growth (OD600 = 2.0; P), 30 min after shift to anaerobiosis (A-30) and after anaerobic biofilm growth for 96h (B-96) with the aim to reveal differentially regulated functions impacting on sustained anoxic biofilm formation as well as on tolerance towards different antibiotics. Most notably, functions involved in sulfur metabolism were found to be up-regulated in B-96 cells when compared to A-30 cells. Based on the transcriptome studies a set of transposon mutants were screened, which revealed novel functions involved in anoxic biofilm growth.In addition, these studies revealed a decreased and an increased abundance of the oprD and the mexCD-oprJ operon transcripts, respectively, in B-96 cells, which may explain their increased tolerance towards meropenem and to antibiotics that are expelled by the MexCD-OprD efflux pump. The OprI protein has been implicated as a target for cationic antimicrobial peptides, such as SMAP-29. The transcriptome and subsequent Northern-blot analyses showed that the abundance of the oprI transcript encoding the OprI protein is strongly decreased in B-96 cells. However, follow up studies revealed that the susceptibility of a constructed PA14ΔoprI mutant towards SMAP-29 was indistinguishable from the parental wild-type strain, which questions OprI as a target for this antimicrobial peptide in strain PA14.

  3. Evaluation of mannosidase and trypsin enzymes effects on biofilm production of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from burn wound infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banar, M. (Maryam); Emaneini, M. (Mohammad); Satarzadeh, M. (Mhboubeh); Abdellahi, N. (Nafiseh); Beigverdi, R. (Reza); W.B. van Leeuwen; Jabalameli, F. (Fereshteh)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBiofilm is an important virulence factor in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and has a substantial role in antibiotic resistance and chronic burn wound infections. New therapeutic agents against P. aeruginosa, degrading biofilms in burn wounds and improving the efficacy of current antimicrobial

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of an Invasive Multidrug-Resistant Strain, Pseudomonas aeruginosa BK1, Isolated from a Keratitis Patient

    KAUST Repository

    Jeganathan, Lakshmi Priya

    2014-03-27

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections are difficult to treat due to the presence of a multitude of virulence factors and antibiotic resistance. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa BK1, an invasive and multidrug-resistant strain, isolated from a bacterial keratitis patient in southern India.

  5. Conjugative type IVb pilus recognizes lipopolysaccharide of recipient cells to initiate PAPI-1 pathogenicity island transfer in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenicity island 1 (PAPI-1) is one of the largest genomic islands of this important opportunistic human pathogen. Previous studies have shown that PAPI-1 encodes several putative virulence factors, a major regulator of biofilm formation, and antibiotic-resistance traits, a...

  6. Assessment of DAPG-producing Pseudomonas fluorescens for management of Meloidogyne incognita and Fusarium oxysporum on watermelon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens isolates Clinto 1R, Wayne 1R and Wood 1R, which produce the antibiotic 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG), can suppress soilborne diseases and promote plant growth. Consequently, these beneficial bacterial isolates were tested on watermelon plants for suppression of Meloidogy...

  7. Exacerbation of bronchiectasis by Pseudomonas monteilii: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aditi; Shariff, Malini; Beri, Kiran

    2017-07-24

    Pseudomonas spp are important opportunistic and nosocomial pathogens. One such species is Pseudomonas monteilii (P. monteilii). It has been described as an environmental contaminant and potential pathogen. We identified this organism as the causative agent of an exacerbation of bronchiectasis and an environmental contaminant in our hospital on two separate occasions. P. monteilii was the cause of an exacerbation of bronchiectasis in a 30-year-old HIV negative male. Patient presented with cough with sputum production and exertional dyspnea. The isolate was recovered from a sputum sample in significant counts and definitively identified by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation- Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). He was treated with piperacillin-tazobactam and recovered clinically and microbiologically. Another two isolates of the organism were contaminants from the hospital environment. The three isolates were susceptible to all tested antibiotics. Typing by Random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) found no clonal relationship between them. Less common species of Pseudomonas need to be identified accurately. This organism is identified by commonly used phenotypic systems as P. putida which may have contributed to a lower reported prevalence. P. monteilii is a known environmental contaminant and must also be considered as a potential pathogen, particularly in patients with chronic lung disease.

  8. Biomolecular Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverty, Garry; Gorman, Sean P.; Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli are the most prevalent Gram-negative biofilm forming medical device associated pathogens, particularly with respect to catheter associated urinary tract infections. In a similar manner to Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative biofilm formation is fundamentally determined by a series of steps outlined more fully in this review, namely adhesion, cellular aggregation, and the production of an extracellular polymeric matrix. More specifically this review will explore the biosynthesis and role of pili and flagella in Gram-negative adhesion and accumulation on surfaces in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The process of biofilm maturation is compared and contrasted in both species, namely the production of the exopolysaccharides via the polysaccharide synthesis locus (Psl), pellicle Formation (Pel) and alginic acid synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and UDP-4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose and colonic acid synthesis in Escherichia coli. An emphasis is placed on the importance of the LuxR homologue sdiA; the luxS/autoinducer-II; an autoinducer-III/epinephrine/norepinephrine and indole mediated Quorum sensing systems in enabling Gram-negative bacteria to adapt to their environments. The majority of Gram-negative biofilms consist of polysaccharides of a simple sugar structure (either homo- or heteropolysaccharides) that provide an optimum environment for the survival and maturation of bacteria, allowing them to display increased resistance to antibiotics and predation. PMID:25438014

  9. Biomolecular Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Laverty

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli are the most prevalent Gram-negative biofilm forming medical device associated pathogens, particularly with respect to catheter associated urinary tract infections. In a similar manner to Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative biofilm formation is fundamentally determined by a series of steps outlined more fully in this review, namely adhesion, cellular aggregation, and the production of an extracellular polymeric matrix. More specifically this review will explore the biosynthesis and role of pili and flagella in Gram-negative adhesion and accumulation on surfaces in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The process of biofilm maturation is compared and contrasted in both species, namely the production of the exopolysaccharides via the polysaccharide synthesis locus (Psl, pellicle Formation (Pel and alginic acid synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and UDP-4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose and colonic acid synthesis in Escherichia coli. An emphasis is placed on the importance of the LuxR homologue sdiA; the luxS/autoinducer-II; an autoinducer-III/epinephrine/norepinephrine and indole mediated Quorum sensing systems in enabling Gram-negative bacteria to adapt to their environments. The majority of Gram-negative biofilms consist of polysaccharides of a simple sugar structure (either homo- or heteropolysaccharides that provide an optimum environment for the survival and maturation of bacteria, allowing them to display increased resistance to antibiotics and predation.

  10. Inadequate Empirical Antibiotic Therapy in Hospital Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, S; Rijal, B P; Yogi, K N; Sherchand, J B; Parajuli, K; Parajuli, N; Pokhrel, B M

    2015-01-01

    Inadequate empirical antibiotic therapy for HAP is a common phenomena and one of the indicators of the poor stewardship. This study intended to analyze the efficacy of empirical antibiotics in the light of microbiological data in HAP cases. Suspected cases of HAP were followed for clinico-bacterial evidence, antimicrobial resistance and pre and post culture antibiotic use. The study was taken from February,2014 to July 2014 in department of Microbiology and department of Respiratory medicine prospectively. Data was analyzed by Microsoft Office Excel 2007. Out of 758 cases investigated, 77(10 %) cases were HAP, 65(84%) of them were culture positive and 48(74 %) were late in onset. In early onset cases, isolates were Acinetobacter 10(42%), Escherichia coli 5(21%), S.aureus 4(17%), Klebsiella 1(4%) and Pseudomonas 1(4%). From the late onset cases Acinetobacter 15(28%), Klebsiella 17(32%) and Pseudomonas 13(24%) were isolated. All Acinetobacter, 78% Klebsiella and 36% Pseudomonas isolates were multi drug resistant. Empirical therapies were inadequate in 12(70%) of early onset cases and 44(92%) of late onset type. Cephalosporins were used in 7(41%) of early onset infections but found to be adequate only in 2(12%) cases. Polymyxins were avoided empirically but after cultures were used in 9(19%) cases. Empirical antibiotics were vastly inadequate, more frequently so in late onset infections. Use of cephalosporins empirically in early onset infections and avoiding empirical use of polymyxin antibiotics in late onset infections contributed largely to the findings. Inadequate empirical regimen is a real time feedback for a practitioner to update his knowledge on the local microbiological trends.

  11. Know When Antibiotics Work

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-04-15

    This podcast provides a brief background about antibiotics and quick tips to help prevent antibiotic resistance.  Created: 4/15/2015 by Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Disease (NCIRD), Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Program.   Date Released: 4/16/2015.

  12. Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... antibiotic-associated colitis, which can occur after the antibiotic therapy upsets the balance of good and bad bacteria in your intestinal tract. Besides loose stools, C. difficile infection can ... and symptoms of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. These signs and symptoms are common ...

  13. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF STREPTOMYCES RISHIRIENSIS (VY31 WITH ANTIBIOTIC ACTIVITY AGAINST VARIOUS PATHOGENIC MICROORGANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Charousová

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Actinomycete strain VY31 was isolated from agriculture soil of region Východná, Slovakia. Morphological, physiological and biochemical studies indicated that this isolate belongs to the genus Streptomyces. The 16S rRNA sequence data supported the assignment of the isolate to the genus Streptomyces rishiriensis (sequence similarity 97%. Tested isolate was able to produce melanin dark pigment and exopigments on ISP6, ISP7 and SSM+T cultivating media. The optimal pH range was from 6-8 and optimal temperature at 30 °C. The strain exhibited salt tolerance up to 5 % and utilized the carbon sources such as glucose, arabinose, xylose, inositol, mannose, fructose, rhamnose and rafinose. Using ApiZym® stripes, the highest production of enzymes was determined for phosphatase alkaline, leucinearylamidase, valinearylamidase, phosphatase acid, naphtol-AS-BI-phosphohydrolase, galactosidase and glucosidase (>40 nmol. According to ApiCoryne® results, positive reaction was confirmed in case of esculin, alkaline phosphatase, and this strain was also able to hydrolyze gelatine. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC of the purified extract of isolate was evaluated against Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecium, Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and against yeast Candida albicans. On the basis of MIC results, strain VY31 had noticeable antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aures N315 (MRSA from collection database of University Hospital in Hamburg, Germany. This isolate could be used in the development of new antibiotics for pharmaceutical purposes.

  14. ANTIBIOTIC COMPOUND FROM MARINE ACTINOMYCETES (Streptomyces sp A11: ISOLATION AND STRUCTURE ELUCIDATON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rofiq Sunaryanto

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Purification and structure elucidation of antibiotic produced by marine actinomycetes (Streptomyces sp A11 was conducted. Production of antibiotic was carried out by liquid fermentation using yeast and peptone medium for 5 days fermentation. Purification of antibiotic was carried out by silica gel 60 (Merck, 0.063-0.200 mm column chromatography and preparative HPLC. Structure elucidation was carried out using ESI-MS, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, DEPT 13C NMR, and FTIR. This antibiotic was identified as cyclo (tyrosyl-prolyl / (C14H16N2O3. This antibiotic had biological activity to Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC25923, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 66923, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC27853, and produced by extracellular secretion.   Keywords: antibiotic, actinomycetes, purification, structure elucidation

  15. Targeting phenotypically tolerant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Ben; Nathan, Carl

    2016-01-01

    While the immune system is credited with averting tuberculosis in billions of individuals exposed to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the immune system is also culpable for tempering the ability of antibiotics to deliver swift and durable cure of disease. In individuals afflicted with tuberculosis, host immunity produces diverse microenvironmental niches that support suboptimal growth, or complete growth arrest, of M. tuberculosis. The physiological state of nonreplication in bacteria is associated with phenotypic drug tolerance. Many of these host microenvironments, when modeled in vitro by carbon starvation, complete nutrient starvation, stationary phase, acidic pH, reactive nitrogen intermediates, hypoxia, biofilms, and withholding streptomycin from the streptomycin-addicted strain SS18b, render M. tuberculosis profoundly tolerant to many of the antibiotics that are given to tuberculosis patients in a clinical setting. Targeting nonreplicating persisters is anticipated to reduce the duration of antibiotic treatment and rate of post-treatment relapse. Some promising drugs to treat tuberculosis, such as rifampicin and bedaquiline, only kill nonreplicating M. tuberculosis in vitro at concentrations far greater than their minimal inhibitory concentrations against replicating bacilli. There is an urgent demand to identify which of the currently used antibiotics, and which of the molecules in academic and corporate screening collections, have potent bactericidal action on nonreplicating M. tuberculosis. With this goal, we review methods of high throughput screening to target nonreplicating M. tuberculosis and methods to progress candidate molecules. A classification based on structures and putative targets of molecules that have been reported to kill nonreplicating M. tuberculosis revealed a rich diversity in pharmacophores. However, few of these compounds were tested under conditions that would exclude the impact of adsorbed compound acting during the recovery phase of

  16. Amikacin loaded PLGA nanoparticles against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabaeifard, Parastoo; Abdi-Ali, Ahya; Soudi, Mohammad Reza; Gamazo, Carlos; Irache, Juan Manuel

    2016-10-10

    Amikacin is a very effective aminoglycoside antibiotic but according to its high toxicity, the use of this antibiotic has been limited. The aim of this study was to formulate and characterize amikacin loaded PLGA nanoparticles. Nanoparticles were synthetized using a solid-in-oil-in-water emulsion technique with different ratio of PLGA 50:50 (Resomer 502H) to drug (100:3.5, 80:3.5 and 60:3.5), two different concentrations of stabilizer (pluronic F68) (0.5% or 1%) and varied g forces to recover the final products. The most efficient formulation based on drug loading (26.0±1.3μg/mg nanoparticle) and encapsulation efficiency (76.8±3.8%) was the one obtained with 100:3.5 PLGA:drug and 0.5% luronic F68, recovered by 20,000×g for 20min. Drug release kinetic study indicated that about 50% of the encapsulated drug was released during the first hour of incubation in phospahte buffer, pH7.4, 37°C, 120rpm. Using different cell viability/cytotoxicity assays, the optimized formulation showed no toxicity against RAW macrophages after 2 and 24h of exposure. Furthermore, released drug was active and maintained its bactericidal activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro. These results support the effective utilization of the PLGA nanoparticle formulation for amikacin in further in vivo studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of Fitness Determinants during Energy-Limited Growth Arrest in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basta, David W; Bergkessel, Megan; Newman, Dianne K

    2017-11-28

    Microbial growth arrest can be triggered by diverse factors, one of which is energy limitation due to scarcity of electron donors or acceptors. Genes that govern fitness during energy-limited growth arrest and the extent to which they overlap between different types of energy limitation are poorly defined. In this study, we exploited the fact that Pseudomonas aeruginosa can remain viable over several weeks when limited for organic carbon (pyruvate) as an electron donor or oxygen as an electron acceptor. ATP values were reduced under both types of limitation, yet more severely in the absence of oxygen. Using transposon-insertion sequencing (Tn-seq), we identified fitness determinants in these two energy-limited states. Multiple genes encoding general functions like transcriptional regulation and energy generation were required for fitness during carbon or oxygen limitation, yet many specific genes, and thus specific activities, differed in their relevance between these states. For instance, the global regulator RpoS was required during both types of energy limitation, while other global regulators such as DksA and LasR were required only during carbon or oxygen limitation, respectively. Similarly, certain ribosomal and tRNA modifications were specifically required during oxygen limitation. We validated fitness defects during energy limitation using independently generated mutants of genes detected in our screen. Mutants in distinct functional categories exhibited different fitness dynamics: regulatory genes generally manifested a phenotype early, whereas genes involved in cell wall metabolism were required later. Together, these results provide a new window into how P. aeruginosa survives growth arrest. IMPORTANCE Growth-arrested bacteria are ubiquitous in nature and disease yet understudied at the molecular level. For example, growth-arrested cells constitute a major subpopulation of mature biofilms, serving as an antibiotic-tolerant reservoir in chronic

  18. Antibiotic Residues - A Global Health Hazard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha A.R.

    Full Text Available Use of Antibiotic that might result in deposition of residues in meat, milk and eggs must not be permitted in food intended for human consumption. If use of antibiotics is necessary as in prevention and treatment of animal diseases, a withholding period must be observed until the residues are negligible or no longer detected. The use of antibiotics to bring about improved performance in growth and feed efficiency, to synchronize or control of reproductive cycle and breeding performance also often lead to harmful residual effects. Concern over antibiotic residues in food of animal origin occurs in two times; one which produces potential threat to direct toxicity in human, second is whether the low levels of antibiotic exposure would result in alteration of microflora, cause disease and the possible development of resistant strains which cause failure of antibiotic therapy in clinical situations. A withdrawal period is established to safeguard human from exposure of antibiotic added food. The withdrawal time is the time required for the residue of toxicological concern to reach safe concentration as defined by tolerance. It is the interval from the time an animal is removed from medication until permitted time of slaughter. Heavy responsibility is placed on the veterinarian and livestock producer to observe the period for a withdrawal of a drug prior to slaughter to assure that illegal concentration of drug residue in meat, milk and egg do not occur. Use of food additives may improve feed efficiency 17% in beef cattle, 10% in lambs, 15% in poultry and 15% in swine. But their indiscriminate use will produce toxicity in consumers. WHO and FAO establish tolerances for a drug, pesticide or other chemical in the relevant tissues of food producing animals. The tolerance is the tissue concentration below, which a marker residue for the drug or chemical must fall in the target tissue before that animal edible tissues are considered safe for human

  19. Preliminary In Vitro Evaluation of an Adjunctive Therapy for Extremity Wound Infection Reduction: Rapidly Resorbing Local Antibiotic Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    expression of the PER-1 extended- spectrum beta - lactamase . BMC Infect Dis 6:52. 21. Schwalbe RS, Stapleton JT, Gilligan PH. 1987. Emergence of resistance...Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. by levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin alone and in combination with beta -lactams and amikacin. J Antimicrob...Fabre R, Leblanc F, et al. 2000. Antibiotic susceptibility and mechanisms of beta -lactam resistance in 1310 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a

  20. Prevalence and antibiotic sensitivity of Danish versus other European bacterial isolates from intensive care and hematology/oncology units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, A; Høiby, Niels; Friis, H M

    1995-01-01

    ICUs) or Enterococcus spp. and Klebsiella spp. (from hematology/oncology units), are the most prominent pathogens in these units today. Indicator organisms of antibiotic consumption (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci and Staphylococcus aureus) were more......, Escherichia coli was most prevalent in Denmark while coagulase-negative staphylococci were predominant in other countries. Urinary tract isolates were dominated by Escherichia coli in both Denmark and the other countries, but Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were more frequently isolated...

  1. A case of orbital apex syndrome due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusunoki, Takeshi; Kase, Kaori; Ikeda, Katsuhisa

    2011-09-28

    Orbital apex syndrome is commonly been thought to have a poor prognosis. Many cases of this syndrome have been reported to be caused by paranasal sinus mycosis. We encountered a very rare case (60-year-old woman) of sinusitis with orbital apex syndrome due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. She had received insulin and dialysis for diabtes and diabetic nephropathy, moreover anticoagulants after heart by-pass surgery. She underwent endoscopic sinus operation and was treated with antibiotics, but her loss of left vision did not improve. Recently, sinusitis cases due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa were reported to be a increasing. Therefore, we should consider the possibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa as well as mycosis as infections of the sinus, especially inpatients who are immunocompromised body.

  2. A case of orbital apex syndrome due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Kusunoki

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Orbital apex syndrome is commonly been thought to have a poor prognosis. Many cases of this syndrome have been reported to be caused by paranasal sinus mycosis. We encountered a very rare case (60-year-old woman of sinusitis with orbital apex syndrome due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. She had received insulin and dialysis for diabtes and diabetic nephropathy, moreover anticoagulants after heart by-pass surgery. She underwent endoscopic sinus operation and was treated with antibiotics, but her loss of left vision did not improve. Recently, sinusitis cases due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa were reported to be a increasing. Therefore, we should consider the possibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa as well as mycosis as infections of the sinus, especially inpatients who are immunocompromised body.

  3. Hot Tub Rash (Pseudomonas Dermatitis/Folliculitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page] Español [PDF – 1 page] “Hot Tub Rash” ( Pseudomonas Dermatitis / Folliculitis) If contaminated water comes in contact ... is often caused by infection with the germ Pseudomonas aeruginosa . This germ is common in the environment ( ...

  4. Frequency and antibiotic resistance patterns of isolated bacteria from positive blood culture of hospitalized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Vahedi

    2018-03-01

    Conclusion: The most prevalent bacterial isolate among the blood cultures of patients was Pseudomonas. The patients more than 50 years were more susceptible to blood stream infections. The most bacteria were isolated from the internal medicine department of hospital. The antibiotic resistance was also increasing especially in Acinetobacter, Staphylococcus coagulase negative, Escherichia coil and Klebsiella

  5. Countermeasures to Antibiotics Crisis: a Global Priority List of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria for Research and Development of New Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available On 27 Feb., 2017, the World Health Organization (WHO announced the first list of important antibiotic-resistant bacteria (http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2017/bacteria-antibiotics-needed/en/, which tremendously threat human-being’s health. This list included 12 kinds of bacteria that were categorized into three priority tiers: Critical, High and Medium. In the first tier, Critical, three Gram negative bacteria were included: Acinetobacter baumannii with carbapenem-resistant, Pseudomonas aeruginosa with carbapenem-resistant; and Enterobacteriaceae with carbapenem-resistant, the third generation cephalosporin-resistant. In the second tier, High, six bacteria were suggested: Enterococcus faecium with vancomycin-resistant, Staphylococcus aureus with methicillin-resistant, vancomycin intermediate and resistant, Helicobacter pylori with clarithromycin-resistant, Campylobacter with fluoroquinolone-resistant, Salmonella spp. with fluoroquinolone-resistant, Neisseria gonorrhoeae with the third generation cephalosporin-resistant, fluoroquinolone-resistant. In the third tier, Medium, three bacteria were listed: Streptococcus pneumonia with penicillin-non-susceptible, Haemophilus influenza with ampicillin-resistant, and Shigella spp. with fluoroquinolone-resistant. This list was proposed by an expert panel, chaired by Dr. E. Tacconelli from Infectious Diseases, DZIF Center, Tübingen University, Germany and Dr. N. Magrini from EMP Department of WHO. This proposal recommended some key steps to countermeasure the challenges posed by multi-drug- and extensively drug-resistant bacteria, including research and development of new classes of antibiotics for the paediatric population, for preventing cross- and co-resistance to existing classes of antibiotics, and for oral formulations for community-acquired diseases with a high morbidity burden. This list will guide our future research and development of new antibiotics in future.

  6. Conjunctival Chemosis as a Specific Feature of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Corneal Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Kaleena B; Rotchford, Alan; Ramaesh, Kanna

    2016-09-01

    Timely identification of a bacterial agent and its corresponding antibiotic sensitivity pattern is paramount in the management of infective corneal ulcers. Isolating the microbiological agents can take time; during this time, the initial therapy used is a chosen form of broad-spectrum antibiotics. There are no specific features of bacterial corneal ulcers that aid in identification of the involved pathogen with certainty. A clinical "marker" would undoubtedly be useful in the management of corneal ulcers. Early clinical photographs and clinical notes of 62 cases with confirmed infective corneal ulcers were examined by a masked reviewer. Conjunctival chemosis was observed in 14 out of 16 cases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-related corneal ulcers, as compared with 6 out of 46 cases caused by other organisms. The association between conjunctival chemosis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa is statistically significant, with P value corneal ulcers.

  7. Multiple Roles for Two Efflux Pumps in the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Pseudomonas putida Strain B6-2 (DSM 28064).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xuemei; Tao, Fei; Zhang, Kunzhi; Tang, Hongzhi; Xu, Ping

    2017-12-15

    Microbial bioremediation is a promising approach for the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminants. Many degraders of PAHs possess efflux pump genes in their genomes; however, their specific roles in the degradation of PAHs have not been clearly elucidated. In this study, two efflux pumps, TtgABC and SrpABC, were systematically investigated to determine their functions in a PAH-degrading Pseudomonas putida strain B6-2 (DSM 28064). The disruption of genes ttgABC or srpABC resulted in a defect in organic solvent tolerance. TtgABC was found to contribute to antibiotic resistance; SrpABC only contributed to antibiotic resistance under an artificial overproduced condition. Moreover, a mutant strain without srpABC did not maintain its activity in long-term biphenyl (BP) degradation, which correlated with the loss of cell viability. The expression of SrpABC was significantly upregulated in the course of BP degradation. BP, 2-hydroxybiphenyl, 3-hydroxybiphenyl, and 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl (2,3-DHBP) were revealed to be the inducers of srpABC 2,3-DHBP was verified to be a substrate of pump SrpABC; SrpABC can enhance the tolerance to 2,3-DHBP by pumping it out. The mutant strain B6-2Δ srpS prolonged BP degradation with the increase of srpABC expression. These results suggest that the pump SrpABC of strain B6-2 plays a positive role in BP biodegradation by pumping out metabolized toxic substances such as 2,3-DHBP. This study provides insights into the versatile physiological functions of the widely distributed efflux pumps in the biodegradation of PAHs. IMPORTANCE Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are notorious for their recalcitrance to degradation in the environment. A high frequency of the occurrence of the efflux pump genes was observed in the genomes of effective PAH degraders; however, their specific roles in the degradation of PAHs are still obscure. The significance of our study is in the identification of the function and mechanism of the

  8. Multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from nosocomial respiratory and urinary infections in Aleppo, Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfoud, Maysa; Al Najjar, Mona; Hamzeh, Abdul Rezzak

    2015-02-19

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa represents a serious clinical challenge due to its frequent involvement in nosocomial infections and its tendency towards multidrug resistance. This study uncovered antibiotic susceptibility patterns in 177 isolates from inpatients in three key hospitals in Aleppo, the largest city in Syria. Exceptionally low susceptibility to most routinely used antibiotics was uncovered; resistance to ciprofloxacin and gentamicin was 64.9% and 70.3%, respectively. Contrarily, susceptibility to colistin was the highest (89.1%). Multidrug resistance was rife, found at a rate of 53.67% among studied P. aeruginosa isolates.

  9. Inhibition of Cell Differentiation in Bacillus subtilis by Pseudomonas protegens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Matthew J.; Sanabria-Valentín, Edgardo; Bowers, Albert A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Interspecies interactions have been described for numerous bacterial systems, leading to the identification of chemical compounds that impact bacterial physiology and differentiation for processes such as biofilm formation. Here, we identified soil microbes that inhibit biofilm formation and sporulation in the common soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis. We did so by creating a reporter strain that fluoresces when the transcription of a biofilm-specific gene is repressed. Using this reporter in a coculture screen, we identified Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas protegens as bacteria that secrete compounds that inhibit biofilm gene expression in B. subtilis. The active compound produced by P. protegens was identified as the antibiotic and antifungal molecule 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG). Colonies of B. subtilis grown adjacent to a DAPG-producing P. protegens strain had altered colony morphologies relative to B. subtilis colonies grown next to a DAPG-null P. protegens strain (phlD strain). Using a subinhibitory concentration of purified DAPG in a pellicle assay, we saw that biofilm-specific gene transcription was delayed relative to transcription in untreated samples. These transcriptional changes also corresponded to phenotypic alterations: both biofilm biomass and spore formation were reduced in B. subtilis liquid cultures treated with subinhibitory concentrations of DAPG. Our results add DAPG to the growing list of antibiotics that impact bacterial development and physiology at subinhibitory concentrations. These findings also demonstrate the utility of using coculture as a means to uncover chemically mediated interspecies interactions between bacteria. IMPORTANCE Biofilms are communities of bacteria adhered to surfaces by an extracellular matrix; such biofilms can have important effects in both clinical and agricultural settings. To identify chemical compounds that inhibited biofilm formation, we used a fluorescent reporter to screen for bacteria that

  10. Sugar administration is an effective adjunctive therapy in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucior, Iwona; Abbott, Jason; Song, Yuanlin; Matthay, Michael A; Engel, Joanne N

    2013-09-01

    Treatment of acute and chronic pulmonary infections caused by opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is limited by the increasing frequency of multidrug bacterial resistance. Here, we describe a novel adjunctive therapy in which administration of a mix of simple sugars-mannose, fucose, and galactose-inhibits bacterial attachment, limits lung damage, and potentiates conventional antibiotic therapy. The sugar mixture inhibits adhesion of nonmucoid and mucoid P. aeruginosa strains to bronchial epithelial cells in vitro. In a murine model of acute pneumonia, treatment with the sugar mixture alone diminishes lung damage, bacterial dissemination to the subpleural alveoli, and neutrophil- and IL-8-driven inflammatory responses. Remarkably, the sugars act synergistically with anti-Pseudomonas antibiotics, including β-lactams and quinolones, to further reduce bacterial lung colonization and damage. To probe the mechanism, we examined the effects of sugars in the presence or absence of antibiotics during growth in liquid culture and in an ex vivo infection model utilizing freshly dissected mouse tracheas and lungs. We demonstrate that the sugar mixture induces rapid but reversible formation of bacterial clusters that exhibited enhanced susceptibility to antibiotics compared with individual bacteria. Our findings reveal that sugar inhalation, an inexpensive and safe therapeutic, could be used in combination with conventional antibiotic therapy to more effectively treat P. aeruginosa lung infections.

  11. "Hot Tub Rash" and "Swimmer's Ear" (Pseudomonas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facts About “Hot Tub Rash” and “Swimmer’s Ear” (Pseudomonas) What is Pseudomonas and how can it affect me? Pseudomonas (sue-doh- ... a major cause of infections commonly known as “hot tub rash” and “swimmer’s ear.” This germ is ...

  12. Intolerant tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khushf, G

    1994-04-01

    The Hyde Amendment and Roman Catholic attempts to put restrictions on Title X funding have been criticized for being intolerant. However, such criticism fails to appreciate that there are two competing notions of tolerance, one focusing on the limits of state force and accepting pluralism as unavoidable, and the other focusing on the limits of knowledge and advancing pluralism as a good. These two types of tolerance, illustrated in the writings of John Locke and J.S. Mill, each involve an intolerance. In a pluralistic context where the free exercise of religion is respected, John Locke's account of tolerance is preferable. However, it (in a reconstructed form) leads to a minimal state. Positive entitlements to benefits like artificial contraception or nontherapeutic abortions can legitimately be resisted, because an intolerance has already been shown with respect to those that consider the benefit immoral, since their resources have been coopted by taxation to advance an end that is contrary to their own. There is a sliding scale from tolerance (viewed as forbearance) to the affirmation of communal integrity, and this scale maps on to the continuum from negative to positive rights.

  13. Pseudomoniasis phytotherapy: A review on most important Iranian medicinal plants effective on Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud Bahmani; Mahmoud Rafieian-Kopaei; Hassan Hassanzadazar; Morovat Taherikalani

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative, aerobic bacterium found in water and soil. It is a normal flora in skin and gastrointestinal tract of human beings. P. aeruginosa as an opportunistic pathogen involved in nosocomial infections having multiple pathogenic factors and shows high rate of resistance to different antibiotics. The aim of this study was to identify the most important native medicinal plants of Iran effective on P. aeruginosa.Materials and Methods: ...

  14. Recent advances in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is caused by biofilm-growing mucoid strains. Biofilms can be prevented by early aggressive antibiotic prophylaxis or therapy, and they can be treated by chronic suppressive therapy. New results from one small trial sug...... patients without P. aeruginosa infection did not improve lung function. Here I review the recent advances in the treatment of P. aeruginosa lung infections with a focus on inhalation treatments targeted at prophylaxis and chronic suppressive therapy....

  15. [Research of differential expression of virulence-related proteins of T3SS in Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-qiang; Zhuo, Chao; Liao, Dong-jiang; Xiao, Shu-nian; Jin, Guang-yao; Zhong, Nan-shan

    2010-03-30

    To analyze the difference of virulence-related protein concerned with type III secretion system (T3SS) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa during the changes of antibiotic sensitivity and interpret the clinical patient data to explore the relationship between the changes in resistance and variance of virulence. The isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from the respiratory tract of a same patient with an altered sensitivity of antibiotics. It turned out to be one clone. The homolog of isolates was determined by ERIC-PCR. The Kirby-Bauer antibiotic testing was employed to detect the sensitivity of antibiotics of isolates. PCR was used to detect the gene of T3SS and virulence of isolates and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to compare the whole-cell proteins. The mass spectrometry was employed to analyze a variety of protein spots. The relevant information was retrieved from protein databases. Clinical record was collected to study the relationship of clinical features, bacteria resistance and virulence-associated protein. One subject was diagnosed with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) complicated with pneumonia. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from his respiratory tract three times in one year. Sensitivity spectrum of isolates were as follows: sensitivity, multi-drug resistant (MDR) and pan-drug resistance (PDR). Virulence gene was exo U+/exo S-. Twenty-one differentially expressed proteins were revealed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis in three isolates. The functions of 11 proteins were definite. Only 9 proteins were associated with basal bacterial metabolism. Disulfide oxidoreductase A (DsbA) corresponded to the variation of virulence and sensitivity spectrum. Clinical record revealed that the severe lung infection was caused by the PDR strain and the patient died within one month. The sensitivity spectrum and virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa may undergo changes when there is an alteration of eco

  16. A case of orbital apex syndrome due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection

    OpenAIRE

    Takeshi Kusunoki; Kaori Kase; Katsuhisa Ikeda

    2011-01-01

    Orbital apex syndrome is commonly been thought to have a poor prognosis. Many cases of this syndrome have been reported to be caused by paranasal sinus mycosis. We encountered a very rare case (60-year-old woman) of sinusitis with orbital apex syndrome due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. She had received insulin and dialysis for diabtes and diabetic nephropathy, moreover anticoagulants after heart by-pass surgery. She underwent endoscopic sinus operation and was treated with antibiotics,...

  17. Evolution and Adaptation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms Driven by Mismatch Repair System-Deficient Mutators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luján, Adela M.; Maciá, María D.; Yang, Liang

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen causing chronic airway infections, especially in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The majority of the CF patients acquire P. aeruginosa during early childhood, and most of them develop chronic infections resulting in severe lung disease......, which are rarely eradicated despite intensive antibiotic therapy. Current knowledge indicates that three major adaptive strategies, biofilm development, phenotypic diversification, and mutator phenotypes [driven by a defective mismatch repair system (MRS)], play important roles in P. aeruginosa chronic...

  18. Efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs as new antimicrobial agents against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momen Askoura

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen and one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections worldwide. The difficulty in treatment of pseudomonas infections arises from being multidrug resistant (MDR and exhibits resistance to most antimicrobial agents due to the expression of different mechanisms overcoming their effects. Of these resistance mechanisms, the active efflux pumps in Pseudomonas aeruginosa that belong to the resistance nodulation division (RND plays a very important role in extruding the antibiotics outside the bacterial cells providing a protective means against their antibacterial activity. Beside its role against the antimicrobial agents, these pumps can extrude biocides, detergents, and other metabolic inhibitors. It is clear that efflux pumps can be targets for new antimicrobial agents. Peptidomimetic compounds such as phenylalanine arginyl β-naphthylamide (PAβN have been introduced as efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs; their mechanism of action is through competitive inhibition with antibiotics on the efflux pump resulting in increased intracellular concentration of antibiotic, hence, restoring its antibacterial activity. The advantage of EPIs is the difficulty to develop bacterial resistance against them, but the disadvantage is their toxic property hindering their clinical application. The structure activity relationship of these compounds showed other derivatives from PAβN that are higher in their activity with higher solubility in biological fluids and decreased toxicity level. This raises further questions on how can we compact Pseudomonas infections. Of particular importance, the recent resurgence in the use of older antibiotics such as polymyxins and probably applying stricter control measures in order to prevent their spread in clinical sittings.

  19. Isolation, Identification, and Characterization of Cadmium Resistant Pseudomonas sp. M3 from Industrial Wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Syed Zaghum Abbas; Mohd Rafatullah; Norli Ismail; Japareng Lalung

    2014-01-01

    The present study deals with the isolation, identification, and characterization of the cadmium resistant bacteria from wastewater collected from industrial area of Penang, Malaysia. The isolate was selected based on high level of the cadmium and antibiotic resistances. On the basis of morphological, biochemical characteristics, 16S rDNA gene sequencing and phylogeny analysis revealed that the strain RZCd1 was authentically identified as Pseudomonas sp. M3. The industrial isolate showed more ...

  20. The Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal (PQS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sams, Thomas; Baker, Ysobel; Hodgkinson, James

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistichuman pathogen that routinely appears near the top ofpublic health threat lists worldwide. P. aeruginosa causes in-fections by secreting a wealth of exceptionally active exo-products, leading to tissue damage. The synthesis of manyof these virulence factors...... is now known to be under the con-trol of the quorum sensing (QS) system. Over the last15 years, the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) has beenfound to play a crucial role in QS by linking the two seg-ments (las and rhl) of the P. aeruginosa N-acylhomoserinelactone-dependent QS signaling pathways. Herein...

  1. Genetic Diversity of Nitrogen-Fixing and Plant Growth PromotingPseudomonasSpecies Isolated from Sugarcane Rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai-Bi; Singh, Rajesh K; Singh, Pratiksha; Song, Qi-Qi; Xing, Yong-Xiu; Yang, Li-Tao; Li, Yang-Rui

    2017-01-01

    The study was designed to isolate and characterize Pseudomonas spp. from sugarcane rhizosphere, and to evaluate their plant- growth- promoting (PGP) traits and nitrogenase activity. A biological nitrogen-fixing microbe has great potential to replace chemical fertilizers and be used as a targeted biofertilizer in a plant. A total of 100 isolates from sugarcane rhizosphere, belonging to different species, were isolated; from these, 30 isolates were selected on the basis of preliminary screening, for in vitro antagonistic activities against sugarcane pathogens and for various PGP traits, as well as nitrogenase activity. The production of IAA varied from 312.07 to 13.12 μg mL -1 in tryptophan supplemented medium, with higher production in AN15 and lower in CN20 strain. The estimation of ACC deaminase activity, strains CY4 and BA2 produced maximum and minimum activity of 77.0 and 15.13 μmoL mg -1 h -1 . For nitrogenase activity among the studied strains, CoA6 fixed higher and AY1 fixed lower in amounts (108.30 and 6.16 μmoL C 2 H 2 h -1 mL -1 ). All the strains were identified on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and the phylogenetic diversity of the strains was analyzed. The results identified all strains as being similar to Pseudomonas spp. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of nifH and antibiotic genes was suggestive that the amplified strains had the capability to fix nitrogen and possessed biocontrol activities. Genotypic comparisons of the strains were determined by BOX, ERIC, and REP PCR profile analysis. Out of all the screened isolates, CY4 ( Pseudomonas koreensis ) and CN11 ( Pseudomonas entomophila ) showed the most prominent PGP traits, as well as nitrogenase activity. Therefore, only these two strains were selected for further studies; Biolog profiling; colonization through green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged bacteria; and nifH gene expression using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis. The Biolog

  2. Improving antibiotic activity against wound pathogens with manuka honey in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowena Jenkins

    Full Text Available Following the discovery of synergistic action between oxacillin and manuka honey against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, this study was undertaken to search for further synergistic combinations of antibiotics and honey that might have potential in treating wounds. Fifteen antibiotics were tested with and without sublethal concentrations of manuka honey against each of MRSA and Pseudomonas aeruginosa using disc diffusion, broth dilution, E strip, chequerboard titration and growth curves. Five novel antibiotic and manuka honey combinations were found that improved antibacterial effectiveness in vitro and these offer a new avenue of future topical treatments for wound infections caused by these two important pathogens.

  3. In vitro interaction between Agrimonia eupatoria L.: Extracts and antibiotic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muruzović Mirjana Ž.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Synergistic activity between water, acetone, ethanol and diethyl ether extract of Agrimonia eupatoria L. and commonly used antibiotic (ampicillin were evaluated. Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were used. Interaction between plant extracts and antibiotic were tested by checkerboard method and expressed as fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC index showed indifferent, additive and synergistic effects. Synergism was observed against E. coli for every combination of agents. FICI values were ranged from 0.03 to 0.29. Inhibitory concentration (IC50 was evaluated for every combination of tested extracts and antibiotic and the best combinations for every tested bacteria were combination of diethyl ether extract + ampicillin and combination of acetone extract + ampicillin.

  4. Pseudomonas sagittaria sp. nov., a siderophore-producing bacterium isolated from oil-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Yao; Hameed, Asif; Liu, You-Cheng; Hsu, Yi-Han; Lai, Wei-An; Chen, Wen-Ming; Shen, Fo-Ting; Young, Chiu-Chung

    2013-07-01

    An aerobic, Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped bacterium with a single polar flagellum, designated CC-OPY-1(T), was isolated from an oil-contaminated site in Taiwan. CC-OPY-1(T) produces siderophores, and can grow at temperatures of 25-37 °C and pH 5.0-9.0 and tolerate Pseudomonas alcaligenes BCRC 11893(T) (97.1 %), Pseudomonas. alcaliphila DSM 17744(T) (97.1 %), Pseudomonas tuomuerensis JCM 14085(T) (97.1 %), Pseudomonas toyotomiensis JCM 15604(T) (96.9 %) and lower sequence similarity to remaining species of the genus Pseudomonas. The phylogenetic trees reconstructed based on gyrB and rpoB gene sequences supported the classification of CC-OPY-1(T) as a novel member of the genus Pseudomonas. The predominant quinone system of strain CC-OPY-1T was ubiquinone (Q-9) and the DNA G+C content was 68.4 ± 0.3 mol%. The major fatty acids were C12 : 0, C16 : 0, C17 : 0 cyclo and summed features 3 and 8 consisting of C16 : 1ω7c/C16 : 1ω6c and C18 : 1ω7c/C18 : 1ω6c, respectively. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG), phosphatidylcholine (PC) and two unknown phospholipids (PL1-2). Due to distinct phylogenetic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic features, CC-OPY-1(T) is proposed to represent a novel species within the genus Pseudomonas for which the name Pseudomonas sagittaria sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CC-OPY-1(T) ( = BCRC 80399(T) = JCM 18195(T)).

  5. Metabolomics Analysis Reveals the Participation of Efflux Pumps and Ornithine in the Response of Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E Cells to Challenge with Propranolol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayqal, Ali; Xu, Yun; Trivedi, Drupad K; AlMasoud, Najla; Ellis, David I; Rattray, Nicholas J W; Goodacre, Royston

    2016-01-01

    Efflux pumps are critically important membrane components that play a crucial role in strain tolerance in Pseudomonas putida to antibiotics and aromatic hydrocarbons that result in these toxicants being expelled from the bacteria. Here, the effect of propranolol on P. putida was examined by sudden addition of 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 mg mL-1 of this β-blocker to several strains of P. putida, including the wild type DOT-T1E and the efflux pump knockout mutants DOT-T1E-PS28 and DOT-T1E-18. Bacterial viability measurements reveal that the efflux pump TtgABC plays a more important role than the TtgGHI pump in strain tolerance to propranolol. Mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy was then used as a rapid, high-throughput screening tool to investigate any phenotypic changes resulting from exposure to varying levels of propranolol. Multivariate statistical analysis of these MIR data revealed gradient trends in resultant ordination scores plots, which were related to the concentration of propranolol. MIR illustrated phenotypic changes associated with the presence of this drug within the cell that could be assigned to significant changes that occurred within the bacterial protein components. To complement this phenotypic fingerprinting approach metabolic profiling was performed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to identify metabolites of interest during the growth of bacteria following toxic perturbation with the same concentration levels of propranolol. Metabolic profiling revealed that ornithine, which was only produced by P. putida cells in the presence of propranolol, presents itself as a major metabolic feature that has important functions in propranolol stress tolerance mechanisms within this highly significant and environmentally relevant species of bacteria.

  6. Spontaneous Nosocomial Pseudomonas aeruginosa Meningitis Presenting as Trismus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Parr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a 78-year-old female receiving adjuvant postsurgical chemotherapy for colon adenocarcinoma who spontaneously developed nosocomial Pseudomonas meningitis causing severe trismus. The patient was initially admitted for ileus, developing neck stiffness and trismus on the thirteenth day of admission. Cerebrospinal fluid grew pansensitive Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was consistent with bilateral subacute infarcts secondary to meningitis. The patient responded well to 21 days of broad spectrum antimicrobial therapy modified to ceftazidime alone following speciation and sensitivity. Outpatient follow-up at 46 days revealed normal maximal mouth opening with the ability to chew and tolerate a full diet. Trismus is a motor disturbance of the trigeminal nerve with difficulty in opening the mouth. Infectious etiologies commonly described include tetanus, odontogenic infections, or deep neck space infections. This is the first reported case of simultaneous nosocomial Pseudomonas meningitis and trismus in a patient with no history of neurosurgery or lumbar spinal manipulation.

  7. Social Interaction, Noise and Antibiotic-Mediated Switches in the Intestinal Microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucci, Vanni; Bradde, Serena; Biroli, Giulio; Xavier, Joao B.

    2012-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota plays important roles in digestion and resistance against entero-pathogens. As with other ecosystems, its species composition is resilient against small disturbances but strong perturbations such as antibiotics can affect the consortium dramatically. Antibiotic cessation does not necessarily restore pre-treatment conditions and disturbed microbiota are often susceptible to pathogen invasion. Here we propose a mathematical model to explain how antibiotic-mediated switches in the microbiota composition can result from simple social interactions between antibiotic-tolerant and antibiotic-sensitive bacterial groups. We build a two-species (e.g. two functional-groups) model and identify regions of domination by antibiotic-sensitive or antibiotic-tolerant bacteria, as well as a region of multistability where domination by either group is possible. Using a new framework that we derived from statistical physics, we calculate the duration of each microbiota composition state. This is shown to depend on the balance between random fluctuations in the bacterial densities and the strength of microbial interactions. The singular value decomposition of recent metagenomic data confirms our assumption of grouping microbes as antibiotic-tolerant or antibiotic-sensitive in response to a single antibiotic. Our methodology can be extended to multiple bacterial groups and thus it provides an ecological formalism to help interpret the present surge in microbiome data. PMID:22577356

  8. Social interaction, noise and antibiotic-mediated switches in the intestinal microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanni Bucci

    Full Text Available The intestinal microbiota plays important roles in digestion and resistance against entero-pathogens. As with other ecosystems, its species composition is resilient against small disturbances but strong perturbations such as antibiotics can affect the consortium dramatically. Antibiotic cessation does not necessarily restore pre-treatment conditions and disturbed microbiota are often susceptible to pathogen invasion. Here we propose a mathematical model to explain how antibiotic-mediated switches in the microbiota composition can result from simple social interactions between antibiotic-tolerant and antibiotic-sensitive bacterial groups. We build a two-species (e.g. two functional-groups model and identify regions of domination by antibiotic-sensitive or antibiotic-tolerant bacteria, as well as a region of multistability where domination by either group is possible. Using a new framework that we derived from statistical physics, we calculate the duration of each microbiota composition state. This is shown to depend on the balance between random fluctuations in the bacterial densities and the strength of microbial interactions. The singular value decomposition of recent metagenomic data confirms our assumption of grouping microbes as antibiotic-tolerant or antibiotic-sensitive in response to a single antibiotic. Our methodology can be extended to multiple bacterial groups and thus it provides an ecological formalism to help interpret the present surge in microbiome data.

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms exposed to imipenem exhibit changes in global gene expression and beta-lactamase and alginate production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, Niels; Schuster, Martin; Hentzer, Morten

    2004-01-01

    The lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are commonly colonized with Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Chronic endobronchial P. aeruginosa infections are impossible to eradicate with antibiotics, but intensive suppressive antibiotic therapy is essential to maintain the lung function of CF patients....... The treatment often includes beta-lactam antibiotics. How these antibiotics influence gene expression in the surviving biofilm population of P. aeruginosa is not clear. Thus, we used the microarray technology to study the effects of subinhibitory concentrations of a beta-lactam antibiotic, imipenem, on gene....... As expected, the most strongly induced gene was ampC, which codes for chromosomal beta-lactamase. We also found that genes coding for alginate biosynthesis were induced by exposure to imipenem. Alginate production is correlated to the development of impaired lung function, and P. aeruginosa strains isolated...

  10. In vitro transport activity of the fully assembled MexAB-OprM efflux pump from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verchère, Alice; Dezi, Manuela; Adrien, Vladimir; Broutin, Isabelle; Picard, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a major public health issue and many bacteria responsible for human infections have now developed a variety of antibiotic resistance mechanisms. For instance, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a disease-causing Gram-negative bacteria, is now resistant to almost every class of antibiotics. Much of this resistance is attributable to multidrug efflux pumps, which are tripartite membrane protein complexes that span both membranes and actively expel antibiotics. Here we report an in vitro procedure to monitor transport by the tripartite MexAB-OprM pump. By combining proteoliposomes containing the MexAB and OprM portions of the complex, we are able to assay energy-dependent substrate translocation in a system that mimics the dual-membrane architecture of Gram-negative bacteria. This assay facilitates the study of pump transport dynamics and could be used to screen pump inhibitors with potential clinical use in restoring therapeutic activity of old antibiotics.

  11. Antibiotics and Breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá Del Fiol, Fernando; Barberato-Filho, Silvio; de Cássia Bergamaschi, Cristiane; Lopes, Luciane Cruz; Gauthier, Timothy P

    2016-01-01

    During the breastfeeding period, bacterial infections can occur in the nursing mother, requiring the use of antibiotics. A lack of accurate information may lead health care professionals and mothers to suspend breastfeeding, which may be unnecessary. This article provides information on the main antibiotics that are appropriate for clinical use and the interference of these antibiotics with the infant to support medical decisions regarding the discontinuation of breastfeeding. We aim to provide information on the pharmacokinetic factors that interfere with the passage of antibiotics into breast milk and the toxicological implications of absorption by the infant. Publications related to the 20 most frequently employed antibiotics and their transfer into breast milk were evaluated. The results demonstrate that most antibiotics in clinical use are considered suitable during breastfeeding; however, the pharmacokinetic profile of each drug must be observed to ensure the resolution of the maternal infection and the safety of the infant. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lifestyle: A Paradigm for Adaptation, Survival, and Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradali, M. Fata; Ghods, Shirin; Rehm, Bernd H. A.

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen affecting immunocompromised patients. It is known as the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and as one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections. Due to a range of mechanisms for adaptation, survival and resistance to multiple classes of antibiotics, infections by P. aeruginosa strains can be life-threatening and it is emerging worldwide as public health threat. This review highlights the diversity of mechanisms by which P. aeruginosa promotes its survival and persistence in various environments and particularly at different stages of pathogenesis. We will review the importance and complexity of regulatory networks and genotypic-phenotypic variations known as adaptive radiation by which P. aeruginosa adjusts physiological processes for adaptation and survival in response to environmental cues and stresses. Accordingly, we will review the central regulatory role of quorum sensing and signaling systems by nucleotide-based second messengers resulting in different lifestyles of P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, various regulatory proteins will be discussed which form a plethora of controlling systems acting at transcriptional level for timely expression of genes enabling rapid responses to external stimuli and unfavorable conditions. Antibiotic resistance is a natural trait for P. aeruginosa and multiple mechanisms underlying different forms of antibiotic resistance will be discussed here. The importance of each mechanism in conferring resistance to various antipseudomonal antibiotics and their prevalence in clinical strains will be described. The underlying principles for acquiring resistance leading pan-drug resistant strains will be summarized. A future outlook emphasizes the need for collaborative international multidisciplinary efforts to translate current knowledge into strategies to prevent and treat P. aeruginosa infections while reducing the rate of antibiotic resistance

  13. Genetic Lineages and Antimicrobial Resistance in Pseudomonas spp. Isolates Recovered from Food Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estepa, Vanesa; Rojo-Bezares, Beatriz; Torres, Carmen; Sáenz, Yolanda

    2015-06-01

    Raw food is a reservoir of Pseudomonas isolates that could be disseminated to consumers. The presence of Pseudomonas spp. was studied in food samples, and the phenotypic and genotypic characterizations of the recovered isolates were analyzed. Two samples of meat (3%, turkey and beef) and 13 of vegetables (22%, 7 green peppers and 6 tomatoes) contained Pseudomonas spp. A total of 20 isolates were identified, and were classified as follows (number of isolates): P. aeruginosa (5), P. putida (5), P. nitroreducens (4), P. fulva (2), P. mosselli (1), P. mendocina (1), P. monteilii (1), and Pseudomonas sp. (1). These 20 Pseudomonas isolates were clonally different by pulsed-field-gel-electrophoresis, and were resistant to the following antibiotics: ticarcillin (85%), aztreonam (30%), cefepime (10%), imipenem (10%), and meropenem (5%), but were susceptible to ceftazidime, piperacillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, doripenem, gentamicin, tobramycin, amikacin, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, and colistin. Only one strain (Ps158) presented a class 1 integron lacking the 3' conserved segment. The five P. aeruginosa strains were typed by multilocus sequence typing in five different sequence-types (ST17, ST270, ST800, ST1455, and ST1456), and different mutations were detected in protein OprD that were classified in three groups. One strain (Ps159) showed a new insertion sequence (ISPa47) truncating the oprD gene, and conferring resistance to imipenem.

  14. Antibiotics as intermicrobial signaling agents instead of weapons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, J F; Gustafsson, I; Baquero, F; Martinez, J L

    2006-12-19

    It has been widely assumed that the ecological function of antibiotics in nature is fighting against competitors. This made them a good example of the Darwinian struggle-for-life in the microbial world. Based on this idea, it also has been believed that antibiotics, even at subinhibitory concentrations, reduce virulence of bacterial pathogens. Herein, using a combination of genomic and functional assays, we demonstrate that specific antibiotics (namely tobramycin, tetracycline, and norfloxacin) at subinhibitory concentrations trigger expression of determinants influencing the virulence of the major opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. All three antibiotics induce biofilm formation; tobramycin increases bacterial motility, and tetracycline triggers expression of P. aeruginosa type III secretion system and consequently bacterial cytotoxicity. Besides their relevance in the infection process, those determinants are relevant for the ecological behavior of this bacterial species in natural, nonclinical environments, either by favoring colonization of surfaces (biofilm, motility) or for fighting against eukaryotic predators (cytotoxicity). Our results support the notion that antibiotics are not only bacterial weapons for fighting competitors but also signaling molecules that may regulate the homeostasis of microbial communities. At low concentrations, they can even be beneficial for the behavior of susceptible bacteria in natural environments. This is a complete change on our vision on the ecological function of antibiotics with clear implications both for the treatment of infectious diseases and for the understanding of the microbial relationships in the biosphere.

  15. [Effect of Three Typical Disinfection Byproducts on Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Lu; Zhang, Meng-lu; Wang, Chun-ming; Lin, Hui-rong; Yu, Xin

    2015-07-01

    The effect of typical disinfection byproducts (DBPs) on bacterial antibiotic resistance was investigated in this study. chlorodibromomethane (CDBM), iodoacetic acid (IAA) and chloral hydrate (CH) were selected, which belong to trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HAAs) and aldehydes, respectively. After exposure to the selected DBPs, the resistance change of the tested strains to antibiotics was determined. As a result, all of the three DBPs induced Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 to gain increased resistance to the five antibiotics tested, and the DBPs ranked as IAA > CH > CDBM according to their enhancement effects. Multidrug resistance could also be enhanced by treatment with IAA. The same result was observed in Escherichia coli K12, suggesting that the effect of DBPs on antibiotic resistance was a common phenomenon. The mechanism was probably that DBPs stimulated oxidative stress, which induced mutagenesis. And the antibiotic resistance mutation frequency could be increased along with mutagenesis. This study revealed that the acquisition of bacterial antibiotic resistance might be related to DBPs in drinking water systems. Besides the genotoxicological risks, the epidemiological risks of DBPs should not be overlooked.

  16. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Pattern of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Patients Referring to Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynab Golshani

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Please cite this article as: Golshani Z, Ahadi AM, Sharifzadeh A. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Pattern of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Patients Referring to Hospitals. Arch Hyg Sci 2012;1(2:48-53. Abstract: Background & Aims of the Study: The aim of this study was to detect and survey the antibiotic resistance pattern of Pseudomonas (P. aeruginosa isolated from patients in Isfahan (located in central Iran hospitals. Materials & Methods : A Total of 50 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected from urine, wound, trachea, ear swab, and pus, and then were confirmed by standard tests. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Susceptibility data were compared by chi-square test using SPSS version 15. Results: Among the isolated strains, resistance to oxacillin was seen in 100%, ceftriaxone in 76%, amikacin in 70%, ceftazidime in 68%, cefepime in 68%, tobramycin in 62%, gentamicin in 60%, ciprofloxacin in 58%, and imipenem in 58% of the isolates. Conclusions: Comparison of the results showed that, patterns of antibiotic resistance are different from one hospital to another in various areas. Therefore, it is suggested that such studies should be performed in different hospitals. Also, prescribing correct medications is essential to prevent further increases in resistant bacteria. References: 1. Pagani L, Mantengoli E, Migliavacca R, Nucleo E, Pollini S, Spalla M, et al. Multifocal Detection of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Producing the PER-1 Extended- Spectrum β-Lactamase in Northern Italy. J Clin Microbiol 2004;42(6:2523–9. 2. Ling TKW, Xiong J, Yu Y, Lee CC, Ye H, Hawkey PM, et al. Multicenter Antimicrobial Susceptibility Survey of Gram-Negative Bacteria Isolated from Patients with Community-Acquired Infections in the People's Republic of China. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 2006;50(1:374–8. 3. Gupta V, Datta P, Agnihotri N, Chander J. Comparative in vitro Activities of Seven

  17. Demographics of antibiotic persistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kollerova, Silvia; Jouvet, Lionel; Steiner, Ulrich

    Persister cells, cells that can survive antibiotic exposure but lack heritable antibiotic resistance, are assumed to play a crucial role for the evolution of antibiotic resistance. Persistence is a stage associated with reduced metabolic activity. Most previous studies have been done on batch...... cultures, rather than the individual level. Here, we used individual level bacteria data to confirm previous studies in how fast cells switch into a persistence stage, but our results challenge the fundamental idea that persistence comes with major costs of reduced growth (cell elongation) and division due...... even play a more prominent role for the evolution of resistance and failures of medical treatment by antibiotics as currently assumed....

  18. Structure of polysaccharide antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matutano, L.

    1966-01-01

    Study of the structure of antibiotics having two or several sugars in their molecule. One may distinguish: the polysaccharide antibiotics themselves, made up of two or several sugars either with or without nitrogen, such as streptomycin, neomycins, paromomycine, kanamycin, chalcomycin; the hetero-polysaccharide antibiotics made up of one saccharide part linked to an aglycone of various type through a glucoside: macrolide, pigment, pyrimidine purine. Amongst these latter are: erythromycin, magnamycin, spiramycin, oleandomycin, cinerubin and amicetin. The sugars can either play a direct role in biochemical reactions or act as a dissolving agent, as far as the anti-microbe power of these antibiotics is concerned. (author) [fr

  19. [Antibiotic treatments in urology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaussade, H; Sunder, S; Bernard, L; Coloby, P; Guy, L; Karsenty, G; Bastide, C; Bruyère, F

    2013-11-01

    To define prescription modalities for the use of antibiotics in urology. A bibliographic research was performed using the MEDLINE database concerning all the antibiotics usable in urology. Treatments were classified by families; modes of action, indications in urology and adverse events have been detailed. Administrative files for commercial use have been consulted and associated with literature analysis. About 8 classes of antibiotics are usable in urology in a routine use. How they work, indications in urology and adverse events are discussed. Knowing that bacterial resistance to quinilones is increasing dramatically, it seems imperative to control the use of 8 classes of antibiotics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Antibiotics: Miracle Drugs

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-04-16

    The overuse of antibiotics has led to the development of resistance among bacteria, making antibiotics ineffective in treating certain conditions. This podcast discusses the importance of talking to your healthcare professional about whether or not antibiotics will be beneficial if you’ve been diagnosed with an infectious disease.  Created: 4/16/2015 by Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Disease (NCIRD), Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Program.   Date Released: 4/16/2015.