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Sample records for antibiotic resistant escherichia

  1. Antibiotic resistance properties of uropathogenic Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the antibiotic resistance pattern of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains isolated from pregnant women with history of recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTIs) and healthy pregnant women. Methods: A total of 485 high vaginal swab specimens were collected from pregnant women with ...

  2. Antibiotic resistance properties of uropathogenic Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research is indexed by Science Citation Index (SciSearch), Scopus, ..... and Argentina [28]. CONCLUSION. As far as we know, the present study is the first prevalence report on antibiotic resistance pattern of UPEC strains in ... serogroups profiles of uropathogenic Escherichia coli isolated ...

  3. Effects of ultraviolet disinfection on antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli from wastewater: inactivation, antibiotic resistance profiles and antibiotic resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chong-Miao; Xu, Li-Mei; Wang, Xiaochang C; Zhuang, Kai; Liu, Qiang-Qiang

    2017-04-29

    To evaluate the effect of ultraviolet (UV) disinfection on antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli). Antibiotic-resistant E. coli strains were isolated from a wastewater treatment plant and subjected to UV disinfection. The effect of UV disinfection on the antibiotic resistance profiles and the antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) of antibiotic-resistant E. coli was evaluated by a combination of antibiotic susceptibility analysis and molecular methods. Results indicated that multiple-antibiotic-resistant (MAR) E. coli were more resistant at low UV doses and required a higher UV dose (20 mJ cm -2 ) to enter the tailing phase compared with those of antibiotic-sensitive E. coli (8 mJ cm -2 ). UV disinfection caused a selective change in the inhibition zone diameters of surviving antibiotic-resistant E. coli and a slight damage to ARGs. The inhibition zone diameters of the strains resistant to antibiotics were more difficult to alter than those susceptible to antibiotics because of the existence and persistence of corresponding ARGs. The resistance of MAR bacteria to UV disinfection at low UV doses and the changes in inhibition zone diameters could potentially contribute to the selection of ARB in wastewater treatment after UV disinfection. The risk of spread of antibiotic resistance still exists owing to the persistence of ARGs. Our study highlights the acquisition of other methods to control the spread of ARGs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Antibiotic resistant Salmonella and Escherichia coli isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: A hundred and four indigenous chicken rectal swabs were analysed, of which 67.3% were contaminated with Escherichia coli and 12.5% with Salmonella typhimurium. Seventy Escherichia coli isolates showed resistance phenotypes to one, two or more antibiotics. The most common antimicrobial resistance pattern ...

  5. Preliminary studies on antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preliminary studies on antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from cattle and children in the pastoral community of Nyabushozi, Uganda. J Okwee-Acai, S Majalija, SG Okech, MBS Kisaka, J Acon ...

  6. Antibiotic Resistance and Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Escherichia coli Isolates from Hospital Wastewater in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Pham Thi; Chuc, Nguyen Thi Kim; Hoa, Nguyen Quynh; Nhung, Pham Hong; Thoa, Nguyen Thi Minh; Diwan, Vishal; Tamhankar, Ashok J.; Stålsby Lundborg, Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    The environmental spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has been recognised as a growing public health threat for which hospitals play a significant role. The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence of antibiotic resistance and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in Escherichia coli isolates from hospital wastewater in Vietnam. Wastewater samples before and after treatment were collected using continuous sampling every month over a year. Standard disk diffusion and E-test were used for antibiotic susceptibility testing. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) production was tested using combined disk diffusion. ARGs were detected by polymerase chain reactions. Resistance to at least one antibiotic was detected in 83% of isolates; multidrug resistance was found in 32%. The highest resistance prevalence was found for co-trimoxazole (70%) and the lowest for imipenem (1%). Forty-three percent of isolates were ESBL-producing, with the blaTEM gene being more common than blaCTX-M. Co-harbouring of the blaCTX-M, blaTEM and qepA genes was found in 46% of isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin. The large presence of antibiotic-resistant E. coli isolates combined with ARGs in hospital wastewater, even post-treatment, poses a threat to public health. It highlights the need to develop effective processes for hospital wastewater treatment plants to eliminate antibiotic resistant bacteria and ARGs. PMID:28661465

  7. Antibiotic Resistance and Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Escherichia coli Isolates from Hospital Wastewater in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, La Thi Quynh; Lan, Pham Thi; Chuc, Nguyen Thi Kim; Hoa, Nguyen Quynh; Nhung, Pham Hong; Thoa, Nguyen Thi Minh; Diwan, Vishal; Tamhankar, Ashok J; Stålsby Lundborg, Cecilia

    2017-06-29

    The environmental spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has been recognised as a growing public health threat for which hospitals play a significant role. The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence of antibiotic resistance and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in Escherichia coli isolates from hospital wastewater in Vietnam. Wastewater samples before and after treatment were collected using continuous sampling every month over a year. Standard disk diffusion and E-test were used for antibiotic susceptibility testing. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) production was tested using combined disk diffusion. ARGs were detected by polymerase chain reactions. Resistance to at least one antibiotic was detected in 83% of isolates; multidrug resistance was found in 32%. The highest resistance prevalence was found for co-trimoxazole (70%) and the lowest for imipenem (1%). Forty-three percent of isolates were ESBL-producing, with the bla TEM gene being more common than bla CTX-M . Co-harbouring of the bla CTX-M , bla TEM and qepA genes was found in 46% of isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin. The large presence of antibiotic-resistant E. coli isolates combined with ARGs in hospital wastewater, even post-treatment, poses a threat to public health. It highlights the need to develop effective processes for hospital wastewater treatment plants to eliminate antibiotic resistant bacteria and ARGs.

  8. Antibiotic Resistant Salmonella And Escherichia Coli Isolated From ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Our investigation revealed that Escherichia coli and Salmonella organisms were isolated in the outbreaks. A pattern of antibiotic resistance that seems to be increasing was also found. Considering the role of chickens and its products in the human food chain in Nigeria; and the close interaction between poultry and man, ...

  9. Antibiotic Resistant Salmonella And Escherichia Coli Isolated From ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We investigated the cause of death using several virological and bacteriological techniques, isolated the pathogenic agents and carried out sensitivity tests. Our investigation revealed that Escherichia coli and Salmonella organisms were isolated in the outbreaks. A pattern of antibiotic resistance that seems to be increasing ...

  10. Antibiotic resistance of Verotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolated from vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mojtaba boniadian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Human gastrointestinal disease caused by verotoxigenic Escherichia coli has been diagnosed for recent decades. Escherichia coli O157:H7 is the most important serotype of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli that cause hemolytic uremic syndrome and hemorrhagic colitis in humans. This study was conducted to determine the occurrence of verotoxigenic E. coli and antibiotic resistance of the isolates from vegetables. Materials and methods: A total of 500 fresh vegetable samples were collected randomly from retail shops in Shahrekord, Iran. E. coli was isolated and identified using bacteriological and biochemical tests. PCR method was used to identify the rbfE, stx1, stx2 and eae genes. Also, antibiotic resistance of the isolates was determined by disk diffusion method. Results: The results represented that among 25 isolates possess virulence genes, 40, 12 and 4% of the isolates contained eaeA, STx2, and both genes, respectively. But none of them contained H7, STx1, and rfbE genes. The antibiotic resistance pattern demonstrated that the isolates were highly resistant to Gentamycin and cefotoxime. Discussion and conclusion: The results of this study showed that the presence of verotoxigenic E.coli in vegetables; and high resistance of the isolates to antibiotics could be hazardous for public health.

  11. Impact of antibiotic restriction on resistance levels of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boel, Jonas; Andreasen, Viggo; Jarløv, Jens Otto

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We evaluated the effect of an antibiotic stewardship programme (ASP) on the use of antibiotics and resistance levels of Escherichia coli using a method that allowed direct comparison between an intervention hospital and a control hospital. METHODS: The study was conducted as a retrosp......OBJECTIVES: We evaluated the effect of an antibiotic stewardship programme (ASP) on the use of antibiotics and resistance levels of Escherichia coli using a method that allowed direct comparison between an intervention hospital and a control hospital. METHODS: The study was conducted...... as a retrospective controlled interrupted time series (ITS) at two university teaching hospitals, intervention and control, with 736 and 552 beds, respectively. The study period was between January 2008 and September 2014. We used ITS analysis to determine significant changes in antibiotic use and resistance levels......% CI -177, -126)] and fluoroquinolones [-44.5 DDDs/1000 bed-days (95% CI -58.9, -30.1)]. Resistance of E. coli showed a significant change in slope for cefuroxime [-0.13 percentage points/month (95% CI -0.21, -0.057)] and ciprofloxacin [-0.15 percentage points/month (95% CI -0.26, -0.038)]. CONCLUSIONS...

  12. Increased survival of antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli inside macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskinyte, Migla; Gordo, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Mutations causing antibiotic resistance usually incur a fitness cost in the absence of antibiotics. The magnitude of such costs is known to vary with the environment. Little is known about the fitness effects of antibiotic resistance mutations when bacteria confront the host's immune system. Here, we study the fitness effects of mutations in the rpoB, rpsL, and gyrA genes, which confer resistance to rifampin, streptomycin, and nalidixic acid, respectively. These antibiotics are frequently used in the treatment of bacterial infections. We measured two important fitness traits-growth rate and survival ability-of 12 Escherichia coli K-12 strains, each carrying a single resistance mutation, in the presence of macrophages. Strikingly, we found that 67% of the mutants survived better than the susceptible bacteria in the intracellular niche of the phagocytic cells. In particular, all E. coli streptomycin-resistant mutants exhibited an intracellular advantage. On the other hand, 42% of the mutants incurred a high fitness cost when the bacteria were allowed to divide outside of macrophages. This study shows that single nonsynonymous changes affecting fundamental processes in the cell can contribute to prolonged survival of E. coli in the context of an infection.

  13. Sensitivity of antibiotic resistant and antibiotic susceptible Escherichia coli, Enterococcus and Staphylococcus strains against ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heß, Stefanie; Gallert, Claudia

    2015-12-01

    Tolerance of antibiotic susceptible and antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli, Enterococcus and Staphylococcus strains from clinical and wastewater samples against ozone was tested to investigate if ozone, a strong oxidant applied for advanced wastewater treatment, will affect the release of antibiotic resistant bacteria into the aquatic environment. For this purpose, the resistance pattern against antibiotics of the mentioned isolates and their survival after exposure to 4 mg/L ozone was determined. Antibiotic resistance (AR) of the isolates was not correlating with higher tolerance against ozone. Except for ampicillin resistant E. coli strains, which showed a trend towards increased resistance, E. coli strains that were also resistant against cotrimoxazol, ciprofloxacin or a combination of the three antibiotics were similarly or less resistant against ozone than antibiotic sensitive strains. Pigment-producing Enterococcus casseliflavus and Staphylococcus aureus seemed to be more resistant against ozone than non-pigmented species of these genera. Furthermore, aggregation or biofilm formation apparently protected bacteria in subsurface layers from inactivation by ozone. The relatively large variance of tolerance against ozone may indicate that resistance to ozone inactivation most probably depends on several factors, where AR, if at all, does not play a major role.

  14. Virulence and antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli isolated from rooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kmet, Vladimir; Drugdova, Zuzana; Kmetova, Marta; Stanko, Michal

    2013-01-01

    With regard to antibiotic resistance studies in various model animals in the urban environment, the presented study focused on the rook, many behavioural and ecological aspects of which are important from an epidemiological point of view. A total of 130 Escherichia coli strains isolated from rook faeces during a two-year period (2011-2012) were investigated for antibiotic resistance and virulence. Resistance to ampicillin (60%) and streptomycin (40%) were the most frequent, followed by resistance to fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin-22% and enrofloxacin-24%), tetracycline (18%), cotrimoxazol (17%) and florfenicol (14%). Ceftiofur resistance occured in 10.7% of strains and cefquinom resistance in 1.5% of strains. Twenty-five E.coli strains with a higher level of MICs of cephalosporins (over 2mg/L of ceftazidime and ceftriaxon) and fluoroquinolones were selected for detection of betalactamase genes (CTX-M, CMY), plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance qnrS, integrase 1, and for APEC (avian pathogenic E.coli) virulence factors (iutA, cvaC, iss, tsh, ibeA, papC, kpsII). Genes of CTX-M1, CMY-2, integrase 1, papC, cvaC, iutA were detected in one strain of E.coli, and qnrS, integrase 1, iss, cvaC, tsh were detected in another E.coli. DNA microarray revealed the absence of verotoxin and enterotoxin genes and pathogenicity islands. The results show that rooks can serve as a reservoir of antibiotic-resistant E. coli with avian pathogenic virulence factors for the human population, and potentially transmit such E.coli over long distances.

  15. Multiple Antibiotic Resistance Patterns of Escherichia coli Isolates from Swine Farms

    OpenAIRE

    Mathew, A. G.; Saxton, A. M.; Upchurch, W. G.; Chattin, S. E.

    1999-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli from sows and pigs was determined to compare patterns between pigs of various ages and degrees of antibiotic use. Resistance patterns differed between farm types and pigs of differing ages, indicating that pig age and degree of antibiotic use affect resistance of fecal E. coli.

  16. Prevalence of Antibiotic Resistance in Escherichia coli Isolated from Poultry Meat Supply in Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Safarpordehkordi

    2014-08-01

    Conclusions: Despite the high contamination rate of chicken meat with Escherichia coli, majority of isolates had high resistance to common antibiotics. Complete cooking of meat and avoid indiscriminate prescribing of antibiotics, preventing the occurrence of food poisoning due to resistant Escherichia coli.

  17. Antibiotic resistance status of Escherichia coli isolated from healthy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The research revealed a high level of antibiotic resistance among E. coli. The percentage of resistance observed for the antibiotics included in this study reflected the degree of their respective uses in pig production in the study area. This work further supports the need for prudent use of each of the antibiotics in animal ...

  18. 51 original article antibiotic resistant salmonella and escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Oboro VO

    use of antibiotics in the food animals, especially poultry. Keywords: Escherichia coli, Salmonella paratyphi, poultry, Nigeria. INTRODUCTION .... legal classification of veterinary drugs to prevent continued abuse of these various products. More work need to be done to comprehensively assess the national prevalence of ...

  19. Chronological change of antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli causing urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemura, Katsumi; Tanaka, Kazushi; Adachi, Masayo; Yamashita, Masuo; Arakawa, Soichi; Fujisawa, Masato

    2011-10-01

    Overuse of antibiotics can cause the emergence of resistant bacterial strains. This study retrospectively investigated recent trends in Escherichia coli causing urinary tract infections (UTIs), focusing on antibiotic use and antibiotic susceptibilities. Patients diagnosed with UTIs caused by E. coli in Akashi Municipal Hospital between April 2004 and March 2010 were enrolled in the study. A total of 858 UTI cases were examined. Antibiotics used in our hospital during that period and the antibiotic susceptibilities of E. coli in UTI cases were assessed. We analyzed the data on a yearly basis, with the year being defined as the period from April to the following March (e.g., in this study the period from April 2004 to March 2005 represents 2004). The first 3 years (2004-2006) were compared to the last 3 years (2007-2009). The use of piperacillin, cephazolin, amikacin, oral cefotiam, and levofloxacin decreased significantly and the use of imipenem, gentamicin (GM), cefcapene, and oral minocycline (MINO) increased significantly in the last 3 years compared to the previous 3 years. The susceptibilities of MINO in complicated cystitis significantly increased and those of GM in uncomplicated pyelonephritis significantly decreased in these 3 years (2007-2009) compared to the previous 3 years (2004-2006) (P changes in our pattern of antibiotic use associated with changes in antibiotic susceptibilities and an increase in ESBL-producing E. coli isolated from our UTI cases. Monitoring of antibiotic use and emergence of resistant strains should be continued.

  20. Antibiotic Resistance and Virulence Properties in Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study determined E. coli resistance to commonly used antibiotics together with their virulence properties in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. A total of 137 E. coli isolates from cases of urinary tract infection were tested for their sensitivity to commonly used antibiotics and possession of virulence factors using standard methods.

  1. Antibiotic resistance profile of Escherichia coli isolated from five ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information on the resistance profiles of clinical and non clinical human bacteria isolates in the developing countries can serve as important means of understanding the human pathogens drug resistance interactions in the zone. Escherichia coli isolated from five geopolitical zones of Nigeria were screened for anti-microbial ...

  2. Prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes in antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli isolates in surface water of Taihu Lake Basin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Song He; Lv, Xiaoyang; Han, Bing; Gu, Xiucong; Wang, Pei Fang; Wang, Chao; He, Zhenli

    2015-08-01

    The rapid development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB) has been of concern worldwide. In this study, antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) were investigated in antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from surface water samples (rivers, n = 17; Taihu Lake, n = 16) and from human, chicken, swine, and Egretta garzetta sources in the Taihu Basin. E. coli showing resistance to at least five drugs occurred in 31, 67, 58, 27, and 18% of the isolates from surface water (n = 665), chicken (n = 27), swine (n = 29), human (n = 45), and E. garzetta (n = 15) sources, respectively. The mean multi-antibiotic resistance (MAR) index of surface water samples (0.44) was lower than that of chicken (0.64) and swine (0.57) sources but higher than that of human (0.30) and E. garzetta sources (0.15). Ten tetracycline, four sulfonamide, four quinolone, five β-lactamase, and two streptomycin resistance genes were detected in the corresponding antibiotic-resistant isolates. Most antibiotic-resistant E. coli harbored at least two similar functional ARGs. Int-I was detected in at least 57% of MAR E. coli isolates. The results of multiple correspondence analysis and Spearman correlation analysis suggest that antibiotic-resistant E. coli in water samples were mainly originated from swine, chicken, and/or human sources. Most of the ARGs detected in E. garzetta sources were prevalent in other sources. These data indicated that human activities may have contributed to the spread of ARB in the aquatic environment.

  3. Antibiotic Resistance Escherichia coli isolated from Faecal of Healthy Human

    OpenAIRE

    , S. Budiarti

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research was to examine antibiotic resistant of Escherechia coli as intestinal normal şora, isolated from healthy human. The samples were collected from faeces of new born children, children under 3 and 5years-old, and human adult. Bacteria were isolated at Eosin Methylen Blue solid media followed by biochemistry reaction for physiological E.coli identiŞcation. Antibiotic resistant test was carried out using Kirby-Bauer method. The result showed that 95 % bacterial strai...

  4. Effect of subtherapeutic administration of antibiotics on the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli bacteria in feedlot cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, T W; Yanke, L J; Topp, E; Olson, M E; Read, R R; Morck, D W; McAllister, T A

    2008-07-01

    Antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli in 300 feedlot steers receiving subtherapeutic levels of antibiotics was investigated through the collection of 3,300 fecal samples over a 314-day period. Antibiotics were selected based on the commonality of use in the industry and included chlortetracycline plus sulfamethazine (TET-SUL), chlortetracycline (TET), virginiamycin, monensin, tylosin, or no antibiotic supplementation (control). Steers were initially fed a barley silage-based diet, followed by transition to a barley grain-based diet. Despite not being administered antibiotics prior to arrival at the feedlot, the prevalences of steers shedding TET- and ampicillin (AMP)-resistant E. coli were >40 and combination with sulfamethazine increased the prevalence of tetracycline- and AMP-resistant E. coli in cattle. However, resistance to antibiotics may be related to additional environmental factors such as diet.

  5. Prevalence of Antibiotic-Resistant Escherichia coli in Drinking Water Sources in Hangzhou City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaojun Chen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the distribution of antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli and examined the possible relationship between water quality parameters and antibiotic resistance from two different drinking water sources (the Qiantang River and the Dongtiao Stream in Hangzhou city of China. E. coli isolates were tested for their susceptibility to 18 antibiotics. Most of the isolates were resistant to tetracycline (TE, followed by ampicillin (AM, piperacillin (PIP, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (SXT, and chloramphenicol (C. The antibiotic resistance rate of E. coli isolates from two water sources was similar; For E. coli isolates from the Qiantang River, their antibiotic resistance rates decreased from up- to downstream. Seasonally, the dry and wet season had little impact on antibiotic resistance. Spearman's rank correlation revealed significant correlation between resistance to TE and phenicols or ciprofloxacin (CIP, as well as quinolones (ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin and cephalosporins or gentamicin (GM. Pearson's chi-square tests found certain water parameters such as nutrient concentration were strongly associated with resistance to some of the antibiotics. In addition, tet genes were detected from all 82 TE-resistant E. coli isolates, and most of the isolates (81.87% contained multiple tet genes, which displayed 14 different combinations. Collectively, this study provided baseline data on antibiotic resistance of drinking water sources in Hangzhou city, which indicates drinking water sources could be the reservoir of antibiotic resistance, potentially presenting a public health risk.

  6. The cost of antibiotic resistance depends on evolutionary history in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The persistence of antibiotic resistance depends on the fitness effects of resistance elements in the absence of antibiotics. Recent work shows that the fitness effect of a given resistance mutation is influenced by other resistance mutations on the same genome. However, resistant bacteria acquire additional beneficial mutations during evolution in the absence of antibiotics that do not alter resistance directly but may modify the fitness effects of new resistance mutations. Results We experimentally evolved rifampicin-resistant and sensitive Escherichia coli in a drug-free environment, before measuring the effects of new resistance elements on fitness in antibiotic-free conditions. Streptomycin-resistance mutations had small fitness effects in rifampicin-resistant genotypes that had adapted to antibiotic-free growth medium, compared to the same genotypes without adaptation. We observed a similar effect when resistance was encoded by a different mechanism and carried on a plasmid. Antibiotic-sensitive bacteria that adapted to the same conditions showed the same pattern for some resistance elements but not others. Conclusions Epistatic variation of costs of resistance can result from evolution in the absence of antibiotics, as well as the presence of other resistance mutations. PMID:23914906

  7. Escherichia coli in Iran: An Overview of Antibiotic Resistance: A Review Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizade, Hesam

    2018-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the most prominent cause of infectious diseases that span from the gastrointestinal tract to extra-intestinal sites such as urinary tract infection, septicaemia, and neonatal meningitis. The emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance in E. coli is an increasing public health concern across the world. Rising resistance in E. coli isolates is also observed in Iran. This review summarizes the status of antibiotic resistance of E. coli isolates in Iran from 2007 to 2016. The data of the prevalence of E. coli antibiotic resistance were collected from databases such as Web of Science, PubMed, Scopus, Embase, Cochrane Library, Google Scholar and Scientific Information Database. Antibiotic resistance in E. coli is on the rise. Prevalence of antibiotic resistance of E. coli varies from region to region in Iran.

  8. Antibiotic resistance and plasmid carriage among Escherichia coli isolates from chicken meat in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tin Tin Myaing; Saleha, A.A.; Arifah, A.K.; Raha, A.R.

    2005-01-01

    Escherichia coli isolates from 131 raw chicken meat samples were tested for susceptibility to 12 antibiotics. Plasmids were isolated from many samples and their DNA molecular weight calculated. An 81.7% plasmid occurrence rate was observed among the isolates, ranging from 0 to 8 in number and with sizes from 1.2 to 118.6 MDa. Plasmids were detected in 93.8% of E. coIi isolates resistant to all 12 antibiotics, and in 90.5% of E. coli isolates resistant to 11. Three (2.8%) isolates harboured 8 plasmids and were resistant to all 12 antibiotics. Antibiotic resistant genes in bacteria are usually carried in extrachromosomal DNA and it is postulated that E. coli with a high number of plasmids possesses wider resistance to antibiotics. (author)

  9. Lytic phages obscure the cost of antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazzyman, Samuel J; Hall, Alex R

    2015-01-01

    The long-term persistence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria depends on their fitness relative to other genotypes in the absence of drugs. Outside the laboratory, viruses that parasitize bacteria (phages) are ubiquitous, but costs of antibiotic resistance are typically studied in phage-free experimental conditions. We used a mathematical model and experiments with Escherichia coli to show that lytic phages strongly affect the incidence of antibiotic resistance in drug-free conditions. Under phage parasitism, the likelihood that antibiotic-resistant genetic backgrounds spread depends on their initial frequency, mutation rate and intrinsic growth rate relative to drug-susceptible genotypes, because these parameters determine relative rates of phage-resistance evolution on different genetic backgrounds. Moreover, the average cost of antibiotic resistance in terms of intrinsic growth in the antibiotic-free experimental environment was small relative to the benefits of an increased mutation rate in the presence of phages. This is consistent with our theoretical work indicating that, under phage selection, typical costs of antibiotic resistance can be outweighed by realistic increases in mutability if drug resistance and hypermutability are genetically linked, as is frequently observed in clinical isolates. This suggests the long-term distribution of antibiotic resistance depends on the relative rates at which different lineages adapt to other types of selection, which in the case of phage parasitism is probably extremely common, as well as costs of resistance inferred by classical in vitro methods. PMID:25268496

  10. Threats to aquatic ecosystems caused by antibiotic-resistant isolate of Escherichia coli from sewage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frąk Magdalena

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of Escherichia coli isolate resistant to penicillin and streptomycin in sewage discharged into the environment was tested. Thirty three Escherichia coli isolate were isolated from sewage samples showed different susceptibility to tested antibiotics. All tested isolate show higher resistance to penicillin than streptomycin. Twenty four tested E. coli isolate showed resistance only to low concentrations of penicillin. Five E. coli isolate showed resistance to higher concentrations of penicillin as well (120 μg·dm−3. Five E. coli isolate showed resistance to penicillin and streptomycin. Discharging sewage that contains bacteria isolate resistant to antibiotics into the aquatic environment causes their spreading and increases threats to aquatic ecosystems.

  11. Antibiotic resistance patterns in Escherichia coli from gulls in nine European countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Stedt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of antibiotic resistant faecal indicator bacteria from humans and food production animals has increased over the last decades. In Europe, resistance levels in Escherichia coli from these sources show a south-to-north gradient, with more widespread resistance in the Mediterranean region compared to northern Europe. Recent studies show that resistance levels can be high also in wildlife, but it is unknown to what extent resistance levels in nature conform to the patterns observed in human-associated bacteria. Methods: To test this, we collected 3,158 faecal samples from breeding gulls (Larus sp. from nine European countries and tested 2,210 randomly isolated E. coli for resistance against 10 antibiotics commonly used in human and veterinary medicine. Results: Overall, 31.5% of the gull E. coli isolates were resistant to ≥1 antibiotic, but with considerable variation between countries: highest levels of isolates resistant to ≥1 antibiotic were observed in Spain (61.2% and lowest levels in Denmark (8.3%. For each tested antibiotic, the Iberian countries were either the countries with the highest levels or in the upper range in between-country comparisons, while northern countries generally had a lower proportion of resistant E. coli isolates, thereby resembling the gradient of resistance seen in human and food animal sources. Conclusion: We propose that gulls may serve as a sentinel of environmental levels of antibiotic resistant E. coli to complement studies of human-associated microbiota.

  12. Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs Resources for You Information for Consumers (Drugs) Buying & Using Medicine Safely Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance Antibiotics ... Antibiotic Resistance and Protect Public Health The White House Blog FDA’s Take on the Executive Order and ...

  13. Antibiotic Resistance in Escherichia coli from Pigs in Organic and Conventional Farming in Four European Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Österberg, Julia; Wingstrand, Anne; Jensen, Annette Nygaard

    2016-01-01

    in organic slaughter pigs in Denmark, France, Italy and Sweden. Samples were taken from the colon content and/or faeces and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of ten antibiotics were determined in isolates of Escherichia coli. In addition, the proportion of tetracycline (TET) resistant E. coli in colon...

  14. Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance to enrofloxacin in uropathogenic Escherichia coli in dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) urinary tract infections (UTIs) are becoming a serious problem both for pets and humans (zoonosis) due to the close contact and to the increasing resistance to antibiotics. Canine E. coli represents a good experimental model useful to study this pathology. Moreover, as des...

  15. Antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli in migratory birds inhabiting remote Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, Andy M.; Hernandez, Jorge; Tyrlöv, Veronica; Uher-Koch, Brian D.; Schmutz, Joel A.; Atterby, Clara; Järhult, Josef D.; Bonnedahl, Jonas

    2018-01-01

    We explored the abundance of antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli among migratory birds at remote sites in Alaska and used a comparative approach to speculate on plausible explanations for differences in detection among species. At a remote island site, we detected antibiotic-resistant E. coli phenotypes in samples collected from glaucous-winged gulls (Larus glaucescens), a species often associated with foraging at landfills, but not in samples collected from black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla), a more pelagic gull that typically inhabits remote areas year-round. We did not find evidence for antibiotic-resistant E. coli among 347 samples collected primarily from waterfowl at a second remote site in western Alaska. Our results provide evidence that glaucous-winged gulls may be more likely to be infected with antibiotic-resistant E. coli at remote breeding sites as compared to sympatric black-legged kittiwakes. This could be a function of the tendency of glaucous-winged gulls to forage at landfills where antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections may be acquired and subsequently dispersed. The low overall detection of antibiotic-resistant E. coli in migratory birds sampled at remote sites in Alaska is consistent with the premise that anthropogenic inputs into the local environment or the relative lack thereof influences the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria among birds inhabiting the area.

  16. Evolution of Escherichia coli rifampicin resistance in an antibiotic-free environment during thermal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Verdugo, Alejandra; Gaut, Brandon S; Tenaillon, Olivier

    2013-02-22

    Beneficial mutations play an essential role in bacterial adaptation, yet little is known about their fitness effects across genetic backgrounds and environments. One prominent example of bacterial adaptation is antibiotic resistance. Until recently, the paradigm has been that antibiotic resistance is selected by the presence of antibiotics because resistant mutations confer fitness costs in antibiotic free environments. In this study we show that it is not always the case, documenting the selection and fixation of resistant mutations in populations of Escherichia coli B that had never been exposed to antibiotics but instead evolved for 2000 generations at high temperature (42.2°C). We found parallel mutations within the rpoB gene encoding the beta subunit of RNA polymerase. These amino acid substitutions conferred different levels of rifampicin resistance. The resistant mutations typically appeared, and were fixed, early in the evolution experiment. We confirmed the high advantage of these mutations at 42.2°C in glucose-limited medium. However, the rpoB mutations had different fitness effects across three genetic backgrounds and six environments. We describe resistance mutations that are not necessarily costly in the absence of antibiotics or compensatory mutations but are highly beneficial at high temperature and low glucose. Their fitness effects depend on the environment and the genetic background, providing glimpses into the prevalence of epistasis and pleiotropy.

  17. Antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli isolated from retail raw chicken meat in Taif, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altalhi, Abdullah D; Gherbawy, Youssuf A; Hassan, Sabry A

    2010-03-01

    The present study was carried out to screen and analyze the genetic characteristics of antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli strains isolated from chicken meat marketed in the local markets of the Taif region in Saudi Arabia. A total of 119 samples were purchased from various supermarkets and examined for bacterial contamination with resistant E. coli. Thirty-seven E. coli isolates were evaluated for their antibiotic susceptibilities and the presence of class 1 integrons and antibiotic resistance genes. Results of antibiograms revealed that E. coli isolates were resistant to one or more of the antibiotics tested. Resistance was most frequently observed against sulphafurazole (89.2%), ampicillin (78.4%), nalidixic acid (70.3%), streptomycin (48.6%), chloramphenicol (32.4%), and gentamicin (24.3%). Fifteen E. coli strains have multidrug resistance phenotypes and harbored at least three antibiotic resistance genes. The bla(TEM) (beta-lactamase) and sul (sulfonamide) resistance encoding genes were detected in all the tested isolates. Polymerase chain reaction screening detected class 1 integrons in all multiresistant E. coli isolates. The present study provides an assessment of the occurrence of multidrug resistance of E. coli from raw chicken meat collected from local markets.

  18. Antibiotic Resistance Profile of Commensal Escherichia coli Isolated from Broiler Chickens in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltai, Nahla O; Abdfarag, Elmoubasher A; Al-Romaihi, Hamad; Wehedy, Eman; Mahmoud, Mahmoud H; Alawad, Osama K; Al-Hajri, Mohammed M; Al Thani, Asmaa A; Yassine, Hadi M

    2018-02-01

    Antibiotic resistance (AR) is a growing public health concern worldwide, and it is a top health challenge in the 21st century. AR among Enterobacteriaceae is rapidly increasing, especially in third-generation cephalosporins and carbapenems. Further, strains carrying mobilized colistin resistance ( mcr) genes 1 and 2 have been isolated from humans, food-producing animals, and the environment. The uncontrolled use of antibiotics in food-producing animals is a major factor in the generation and spread of AR. No studies have been done to evaluate AR in the veterinary sector of Qatar. This study aimed at establishing primary baseline data for the prevalence of AR among food-producing animals in Qatar. Fecal samples (172) were obtained from two broiler farms and one live bird market in Qatar, and 90 commensal Escherichia coli bacteria were isolated and subjected to susceptibility testing against 16 clinically relevant antibiotics by using the E-test method. The results found that 81 (90%) of 90 isolates were resistant to at least one antibiotic, 14 (15.5%) of 90 isolates were colistin resistant, 2 (2.2%) of 90 isolates were extended-spectrum β-lactamase producers, and 2 (2.2%) of 90 isolates were multidrug resistant to four antibiotic classes. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing E. coli and colistin-resistant isolates were confirmed by using double-disc susceptibility testing and PCR, respectively. Such a high prevalence of antibiotic-resistant E. coli could be the result of a long application of antibiotic treatment, and it is an indicator of the antibiotic load in food-producing animals in Qatar. Pathogens carrying AR can be easily transmitted to humans through consumption of undercooked food or noncompliance with hygiene practices, mandating prompt development and implementation of a stewardship program to control and monitor the use of antibiotics in the community and agriculture.

  19. u-CARE: user-friendly Comprehensive Antibiotic resistance Repository of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Saurav B; Uttam, Vishwas; Verma, Vivek

    2015-08-01

    Despite medical advancements, Escherichia coli-associated infections remain a major public health concern and although an abundant information about E. coli and its antibiotic resistance mechanisms is available, no effective tool exists that integrates gene and genomic data in context to drug resistance, thus raising a need to develop a repository that facilitates integration and assimilation of factors governing drug resistance in E. coli. User-friendly Comprehensive Antibiotic resistance Repository of Escherichia coli (u-CARE) is a manually curated catalogue of 52 antibiotics with reported resistance, 107 genes, transcription factors and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) involved in multiple drug resistance of this pathogen. Each gene page provides detailed information about its resistance mechanisms, while antibiotic page consists of summary, chemical description and structural descriptors with links to external public databases like GO, CDD, DEG, Ecocyc, KEGG, Drug Bank, PubChem and UniProt. Moreover, the database integrates this reductive information to holistic data such as strain-specific and segment-specific pathogenic islands and operons. In addition, the database offers rich user interface for the visualisation and retrieval of information using various search criteria such as sequence, keyword, image and class search. u-CARE is aimed to cater to the needs of researchers working in the field of antimicrobial drug resistance with minimal knowledge of bioinformatics. This database is also intended as a guide book to medical practitioners to avoid use of antibiotics against which resistance has already been reported in E. coli. The database is available from: http://www.e-bioinformatics.net/ucare. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. Compensation of the Metabolic Costs of Antibiotic Resistance by Physiological Adaptation in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Händel, Nadine; Schuurmans, J. Merijn; Brul, Stanley

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is often associated with metabolic costs. To investigate the metabolic consequences of antibiotic resistance, the genomic and transcriptomic profiles of an amoxicillin-resistant Escherichia coli strain and the wild type it was derived from were compared. A total of 125 amino acid substitutions and 7 mutations that were located resistant cells. However, broad induction and suppression of genes were observed when comparing the expression profiles of resistant and wild-type cells. Expression of genes involved in cell wall maintenance, DNA metabolic processes, cellular stress response, and respiration was most affected in resistant cells regardless of the absence or presence of amoxicillin. The SOS response was downregulated in resistant cells. The physiological effect of the acquisition of amoxicillin resistance in cells grown in chemostat cultures consisted of an initial increase in glucose consumption that was followed by an adaptation process. Furthermore, no difference in maintenance energy was observed between resistant and sensitive cells. In accordance with the transcriptomic profile, exposure of resistant cells to amoxicillin resulted in reduced salt and pH tolerance. Taken together, the results demonstrate that the acquisition of antibiotic resistance in E. coli is accompanied by specifically reorganized metabolic networks in order to circumvent metabolic costs. The overall effect of the acquisition of resistance consists not so much of an extra energy requirement, but more a reduced ecological range. PMID:23716056

  1. Multiple antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli from a tropical rain forest stream

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrasco, C.E.; Alvarez, H.J.; Ortiz, N.; Bisbal, M.; Arias, W.; Baerga, C. [Univ. of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras (Puerto Rico). Dept. of Biology; Hazen, T.C. [E.I. DuPont de Nemours and Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Lab.

    1988-12-31

    High densities of fecal coliforms were obtained from a pristine site and sewage contaminated site in a tropical rain forest watershed in Puerto Rico. Confirmation of fecal coliform isolates as Escherichia coli was significantly lower than for temperate waters. Antibiotic resistance and multiple antibiotic resistance were common for isolates at both sites; however, the site receiving sewage effluent had a greater proportion of multiple antibiotic resistant isolates. R. plasmids were recovered from 4 MAR isolates, 2 from each site. All recovered plasmids were approximately 1 kilobase. The recovered plasmid were also capable of transforming E. coli HB101 in vitro. The high concentrations of enterobacteriaceae, small R-plasmid size, R-plasmid transformability, and long term survival of fecal origin bacteria in tropical freshwater environments give increasing importance to adequate sewage treatment, and better indicator monitoring methods for tropical areas.

  2. Antibiotic resistance and integrons in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío Colello

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC cause hemorrhagic colitis (HC and hemolytic-uremic syndrome in humans (HUS. Cattle are the main reservoir of STEC and transmission to humans occurs through contaminated food and water. Antibiotics are used in pig production systems to combat disease and improve productivity and play a key role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes to the bacteria. Integrons have been identified in resistant bacteria allowing for the acquisition and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes. STEC strains isolated from humans and animals have developed antibiotic resistance. In our laboratory, 21 non-157 STEC strains isolated from pigs were analyzed to detect class 1 and 2 integrons by PCR. Eight carried integrons, 7 of them harbored intl2. In another study 545 STEC strains were also analyzed for the presence of intl1 and intl2. Strains carrying intl1 belonged to isolates from environment (n = 1, chicken hamburger (n = 2, dairy calves (n = 4 and pigs (n = 8. Two strains isolated from pigs harbored intl2 and only one intl1/intl2, highlighting the presence of intl2 in pigs. The selection for multiresistant strains may contribute to the emergence of antibiotic resistant pathogens and facilitate the spreading of the mobile resistance elements to other bacteria.

  3. Fitness tradeoffs of antibiotic resistance in extra-intestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basra, Prabh; Alsaadi, Ahlam; Bernal-Astrain, Gabriel; O'Sullivan, Michael Liam; Hazlett, Bryn; Clarke, Leah Marie; Schoenrock, Andrew; Pitre, Sylvain; Wong, Alex

    2018-02-07

    Evolutionary trade-offs occur when selection on one trait has detrimental effects on other traits. In pathogenic microbes, it has been hypothesized that antibiotic resistance trades off with fitness in the absence of antibiotic. While studies of single resistance mutations support this hypothesis, it is unclear whether trade-offs are maintained over time, due to compensatory evolution and broader effects of genetic background. Here, we leverage natural variation in 39 extra-intestinal clinical isolates of Escherichia coli to assess trade-offs between growth rates and resistance to fluoroquinolone and cephalosporin antibiotics. Whole genome sequencing identifies a broad range of clinically relevant resistance determinants in these strains. We find evidence for a negative correlation between growth rate and antibiotic resistance, consistent with a persistent trade-off between resistance and growth. However, this relationship is sometimes weak, and depends on the environment in which growth rates are measured. Using in vitro selection experiments, we find that compensatory evolution in one environment does not guarantee compensation in other environments. Thus, even in the face of compensatory evolution and other genetic background effects, resistance may be broadly costly, supporting the use of drug restriction protocols to limit the spread of resistance. Furthermore, our study demonstrates the power of using natural variation to study evolutionary trade-offs in microbes. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  4. Antibiotic Resistance in Salmonella sp and Escherichia coli Isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Strains of Salmonella sp and E. coli isolated were significantly resistant to gentamicin, erythromycin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, streptomycin, cefixine and ampicillin. Resistance to gentamicin was the least with 33-71% in Salmonella sp and 25-80% in E. coli. The level of drug resistance in these organisms is ascribed to ...

  5. Prevalence of Antibiotic-Resistant Strains of Escherichia coli in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of six bacteria species Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus cereus, Klebsiella pneumonia, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter aerogenes were ... Énumération de nombre de plaque standard a été effectuée par la méthode de la plaque de propagation sur des échantillons d'eau dilués en série.

  6. [Antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli from community-acquired urinary tract infections. What antimicrobial to use?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guajardo-Lara, Claudia Elena; González-Martínez, Pedro Mario; Ayala-Gaytán, Juan Jacobo

    2009-01-01

    Determine antibiotic resistance of community-acquired uropathogen Escherichia coli and infer therapeutic options. E. coli strains isolated from urine during a one-year period were studied. Identification and susceptibility tests were performed. A total of 652 isolates were included from patients in two institutions, a healthcare clinic 303 (46.5%) and a hospital 349 ( 53.5%). The antimicrobials with higher resistance rates were ampicillin 67.2%, trimethoprim-sulfametoxazole 59.2%, cefazolin 35.6% and ciprofloxacin 24.7%. Resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and ciprofloxacin used for empiric treatment in community urinary infections is high, and there are few available treatment options.

  7. Association of Antibiotic Resistance in Agricultural Escherichia coli Isolates with Attachment to Quartz▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; Soupir, Michelle L.; Zwonitzer, Martha; Huss, Bridgette; Jarboe, Laura R.

    2011-01-01

    Surface water can be contaminated by bacteria from various sources, including manure from agricultural facilities. Attachment of these bacteria to soil and organic particles contributes to their transport through the environment, though the mechanism of attachment is unknown. As bacterial attachment to human tissues is known to be correlated with antibiotic resistance, we have investigated here the relationship between bacterial attachment to environmental particles and antibiotic resistance in agricultural isolates. We evaluated 203 Escherichia coli isolates collected from swine facilities for attachment to quartz, resistance to 13 antibiotics, and the presence of genes encoding 13 attachment factors. The genes encoding type I, EcpA, P pili, and Ag43 were detected, though none was significantly related to attachment. Quartz attachment was positively and significantly (P quartz in agricultural isolates. We propose that this may be due to encoding by the responsible genes on a mobile genetic element. Further exploration of the relationship between antibiotic resistance and attachment to environmental particles will improve the understanding and modeling of environmental transport processes, with the goal of preventing human exposure to antibiotic-resistant or virulent microorganisms. PMID:21821756

  8. [Current antibiotic resistance profile of uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains and therapeutic consequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bouamri, M C; Arsalane, L; Kamouni, Y; Yahyaoui, H; Bennouar, N; Berraha, M; Zouhair, S

    2014-12-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are a very common reason for consultation and prescription in current practice. Excessive or inappropriate use of antibiotics in treating urinary tract infections is responsible for the emergence and spread of multiresistant uropathogenic bacteria. To evaluate the isolation frequency and antibiotic resistance of uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains isolated at the Marrakech region. We conducted a retrospective study over a period of three years (from 1st January 2010 to 31 December 2012). It included all non-redundant uropathogenic E. coli strains isolated in the microbiology laboratory of the Avicenne hospital of Marrakech, Morocco. During this study, 1472 uropathogenic enterobacteriaceae were isolated including 924 non-repetitive E. coli strains, an overall isolation frequency of 63%. Antibiotic resistance of isolated E. coli strains showed resistance rates to amoxicillin (65%), sulfamethoxazole-triméthropime (55%), amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (43%), ciprofloxacin (22%), gentamicin (14%), nitrofurans (11%), amikacin (8%) and fosfomycin (7%). The number of E. coli strains resistant to C3G by ESBL production was 67, an average frequency of 4.5% of all isolated uropathogenic enterobacteria. The associated antibiotic resistance in the case of ESBL-producing E. coli were 82% for ciprofloxacin, 76% for sulfamethozole trimethoprim, 66% for gentamicin and 56% for amikacin. No resistance to imipenem was recorded for the isolated E. coli strains, which represents an imipenem sensitivity of 100%. Antibiotic resistance of uropathogenic E. coli strains limits treatment options and therefore constitutes a real public health problem. The regular updating of antibiotic susceptibility statistics of E. coli strains allows a better adaptation of the probabilistic antibiotic therapy to local epidemiological data. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Prevalence and Antibiotic Resistance Patterns of Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Emerging resistance to antimicrobial drugs increases morbidity and mortality by hampering the provision of effective chemotherapy, and makes treatment more costly. The emergence of resistance to antimicrobial agents is a global public health problem, especially in pathogens causing nosocomial infections.

  10. Antibiotic Resistance of Escherichia coli Isolated from Healthy Food ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It was concluded from the study that healthy food animals form a reservoir of multiple resistant E. coli which may be transmitted to humans through the food chain. Thus, continued surveillance of E. coli obtained from food production continuum is merited to identify emerging antimicrobial-resistant phenotypes. The Kenya ...

  11. Antibiotic Resistance in Escherichia coli from Pigs in Organic and Conventional Farming in Four European Countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Österberg

    Full Text Available Organic pig production differs in many ways from conventional production of pigs, e.g., in antibiotic use, herd structure, feeding regimes, access to outdoor areas and space allowance per pig. This study investigated if these differences result in a lower occurrence of antibiotic resistance in organic slaughter pigs in Denmark, France, Italy and Sweden. Samples were taken from the colon content and/or faeces and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC of ten antibiotics were determined in isolates of Escherichia coli. In addition, the proportion of tetracycline (TET resistant E. coli in colon content and/or faeces from individual pigs was determined. In all four countries the percentage resistance to ampicillin, streptomycin, sulphonamides or trimethoprim was significantly lower in E. coli from organic pigs. In France and Italy, the percentage of isolates resistant to chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid or gentamicin was also significantly lower in the E. coli from organic pigs. Resistance to cefotaxime, was not found in any country. The percentage of E. coli isolates resistant to TET as well as the proportion of TET-resistant E. coli was significantly lower in organic than in conventional pigs, except in Sweden where TET-resistance was equally low in both production types. There were also differences between countries within production type in the percentage resistance to individual antibiotics as well as the proportion of TET-resistant E. coli with lower median proportions in Sweden and Denmark compared to France and Italy. The study shows that in each of the four countries resistance in intestinal E. coli was less common in organic than in conventional pigs, but that there were also large differences in resistance between countries within each production type, indicating that both country- and production-specific factors influence the occurrence of resistance.

  12. Antibiotic Resistance in Escherichia coli from Pigs in Organic and Conventional Farming in Four European Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Österberg, Julia; Wingstrand, Anne; Nygaard Jensen, Annette; Kerouanton, Annaelle; Cibin, Veronica; Barco, Lisa; Denis, Martine; Aabo, Sören; Bengtsson, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Organic pig production differs in many ways from conventional production of pigs, e.g., in antibiotic use, herd structure, feeding regimes, access to outdoor areas and space allowance per pig. This study investigated if these differences result in a lower occurrence of antibiotic resistance in organic slaughter pigs in Denmark, France, Italy and Sweden. Samples were taken from the colon content and/or faeces and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of ten antibiotics were determined in isolates of Escherichia coli. In addition, the proportion of tetracycline (TET) resistant E. coli in colon content and/or faeces from individual pigs was determined. In all four countries the percentage resistance to ampicillin, streptomycin, sulphonamides or trimethoprim was significantly lower in E. coli from organic pigs. In France and Italy, the percentage of isolates resistant to chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid or gentamicin was also significantly lower in the E. coli from organic pigs. Resistance to cefotaxime, was not found in any country. The percentage of E. coli isolates resistant to TET as well as the proportion of TET-resistant E. coli was significantly lower in organic than in conventional pigs, except in Sweden where TET-resistance was equally low in both production types. There were also differences between countries within production type in the percentage resistance to individual antibiotics as well as the proportion of TET-resistant E. coli with lower median proportions in Sweden and Denmark compared to France and Italy. The study shows that in each of the four countries resistance in intestinal E. coli was less common in organic than in conventional pigs, but that there were also large differences in resistance between countries within each production type, indicating that both country- and production-specific factors influence the occurrence of resistance.

  13. Identification of antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from a municipal wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanotto, Carlo; Bissa, Massimiliano; Illiano, Elena; Mezzanotte, Valeria; Marazzi, Francesca; Turolla, Andrea; Antonelli, Manuela; De Giuli Morghen, Carlo; Radaelli, Antonia

    2016-12-01

    The emergence and diffusion of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has been a major public health problem for many years now. In this study, antibiotic-resistance of coliforms and Escherichia coli were investigated after their isolation from samples collected in a municipal wastewater treatment plant in the Milan area (Italy) along different points of the treatment sequence: inflow to biological treatment; outflow from biological treatment following rapid sand filtration; and outflow from peracetic acid disinfection. The presence of E. coli that showed resistance to ampicillin (AMP) and chloramphenicol (CAF), used as representative antibiotics for the efficacy against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, was evaluated. After determining E. coli survival using increasing AMP and CAF concentrations, specific single-resistant (AMP R or CAF R ) and double-resistant (AMP R /CAF R ) strains were identified among E. coli colonies, through amplification of the β-lactamase Tem-1 (bla) and acetyl-transferase catA1 (cat) gene sequences. While a limited number of CAF R bacteria was observed, most AMP R colonies showed the specific resistance genes to both antibiotics, which was mainly due to the presence of the bla gene sequence. The peracetic acid, used as disinfection agent, showed to be very effective in reducing bacteria at the negligible levels of less than 10 CFU/100 mL, compatible with those admitted for the irrigation use of treated waters. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF SOME WILD MEDICAL PLANTS EXTRACT TO ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANT ESCHERICHIA COLI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukáš Hleba

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are probably the most successful family of drugs so far developed for improving human health. Because of increasing resistance to antibiotics of many bacteria, plant extracts and plant compounds are of new interest as antiseptics and antimicrobial agents in medicine. In this study, we researched antimicrobial effects of extracts of some medical plants (Tussilagofarfara, Equisetum arvense, Sambucusnigra, Aesculushippocastanumand Taraxacumofficinale from Slovakia to antibiotic resistant and antibiotic sensitive bacteria isolated from milk of cows and mare, which were breeded in different conditions. Microorganisms which were used in this experiment we isolated from milk from conventional breeding of cows (tenE. coli strains and from ecological breeding of Lipicanmare (tenE. coli strains by sterile cotton swabs. For antibiotic susceptibility testing was used disc diffusion method according by EUCAST. After dried at room temperature we weighed 50 g of crushed medical plants (parts and it were to extract in 400 ml methanol for two weeks at room temperature. For antimicrobial susceptibility testing of medical plants extract blank discs with 6 mm diameter disc diffusion method was used. We determined that all Escherichia coli strains isolated from milk of conventional breeding of cows were resistant to ampicillin and chloramphenicol. We determined that all tested ampicillin and chloramphenicol resistant E. coli strains isolated from conventional breeding of cow showed susceptibility to all used medical plants extracts. In difference, we determined that antibiotic susceptible E. coli strains isolated from ecological breeding of Lipicanmare were susceptible to Tussilagofarfara extract only. From these results we could be conclude some observations, which could be important step in treatment of bacterial infections caused by antibiotic resistant bacteria and it could be important knowledge for treatment of livestock in conventional breeding

  15. prevalence and antibiotic resistance patterns of escherichia coli

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-01

    Jun 1, 2014 ... Carbapenems however remain the drugs of choice against the strains investigated as reported in a related study (9). This study reveals that a significant proportion of isolates from wounds and burns are highly multidrug resistance. The burn patients are particularly predisposed to different infections which ...

  16. Antibiotic resistant Salmonella and Escherichia coli isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To characterise and investigate antimicrobial resistance of Esherichia coli and salmonella strains isolated from indigenous Gallus gallus in a leading slaughterhouse/market outlet in Nairobi-Kenya. Design: A repeated cross sectional study and based on random sampling was used. Setting: The study was carried ...

  17. Differential epigenetic compatibility of qnr antibiotic resistance determinants with the chromosome of Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María B Sánchez

    Full Text Available Environmental bacteria harbor a plethora of genes that, upon their horizontal transfer to new hosts, may confer resistance to antibiotics, although the number of such determinants actually acquired by pathogenic bacteria is very low. The founder effect, fitness costs and ecological connectivity all influence the chances of resistance transfer being successful. We examined the importance of these bottlenecks using the family of quinolone resistance determinants Qnr. The results indicate the epigenetic compatibility of a determinant with the host genome to be of great importance in the acquisition and spread of resistance. A plasmid carrying the widely distributed QnrA determinant was stable in Escherichia coli, whereas the SmQnr determinant was unstable despite both proteins having very similar tertiary structures. This indicates that the fitness costs associated with the acquisition of antibiotic resistance may not derive from a non-specific metabolic burden, but from the acquired gene causing specific changes in bacterial metabolic and regulatory networks. The observed stabilization of the plasmid encoding SmQnr by chromosomal mutations, including a mutant lacking the global regulator H-NS, reinforces this idea. Since quinolones are synthetic antibiotics, and since the origin of QnrA is the environmental bacterium Shewanella algae, the role of QnrA in this organism is unlikely to be that of conferring resistance. Its evolution toward this may have occurred through mutations or because of an environmental change (exaptation. The present results indicate that the chromosomally encoded Qnr determinants of S. algae can confer quinolone resistance upon their transfer to E. coli without the need of any further mutation. These results suggest that exaptation is important in the evolution of antibiotic resistance.

  18. The impact of fecal sample processing on prevalence estimates for antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omulo, Sylvia; Lofgren, Eric T; Mugoh, Maina; Alando, Moshe; Obiya, Joshua; Kipyegon, Korir; Kikwai, Gilbert; Gumbi, Wilson; Kariuki, Samuel; Call, Douglas R

    2017-05-01

    Investigators often rely on studies of Escherichia coli to characterize the burden of antibiotic resistance in a clinical or community setting. To determine if prevalence estimates for antibiotic resistance are sensitive to sample handling and interpretive criteria, we collected presumptive E. coli isolates (24 or 95 per stool sample) from a community in an urban informal settlement in Kenya. Isolates were tested for susceptibility to nine antibiotics using agar breakpoint assays and results were analyzed using generalized linear mixed models. We observed a 0.1). Prevalence estimates did not differ for five distinct E. coli colony morphologies on MacConkey agar plates (P>0.2). Successive re-plating of samples for up to five consecutive days had little to no impact on prevalence estimates. Finally, culturing E. coli under different conditions (with 5% CO 2 or micro-aerobic) did not affect estimates of prevalence. For the conditions tested in these experiments, minor modifications in sample processing protocols are unlikely to bias estimates of the prevalence of antibiotic-resistance for fecal E. coli. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Escherichia coli Population Structure and Antibiotic Resistance at a Buffalo/Cattle Interface in Southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercat, Mathilde; Clermont, Olivier; Massot, Méril; Ruppe, Etienne; de Garine-Wichatitsky, Michel; Miguel, Eve; Valls Fox, Hugo; Cornelis, Daniel; Andremont, Antoine; Denamur, Erick; Caron, Alexandre

    2015-12-28

    At a human/livestock/wildlife interface, Escherichia coli populations were used to assess the risk of bacterial and antibiotic resistance dissemination between hosts. We used phenotypic and genotypic characterization techniques to describe the structure and the level of antibiotic resistance of E. coli commensal populations and the resistant Enterobacteriaceae carriage of sympatric African buffalo (Syncerus caffer caffer) and cattle populations characterized by their contact patterns in the southern part of Hwange ecosystem in Zimbabwe. Our results (i) confirmed our assumption that buffalo and cattle share similar phylogroup profiles, dominated by B1 (44.5%) and E (29.0%) phylogroups, with some variability in A phylogroup presence (from 1.9 to 12%); (ii) identified a significant gradient of antibiotic resistance from isolated buffalo to buffalo in contact with cattle and cattle populations expressed as the Murray score among Enterobacteriaceae (0.146, 0.258, and 0.340, respectively) and as the presence of tetracycline-, trimethoprim-, and amoxicillin-resistant subdominant E. coli strains (0, 5.7, and 38%, respectively); (iii) evidenced the dissemination of tetracycline, trimethoprim, and amoxicillin resistance genes (tet, dfrA, and blaTEM-1) in 26 isolated subdominant E. coli strains between nearby buffalo and cattle populations, that led us (iv) to hypothesize the role of the human/animal interface in the dissemination of genetic material from human to cattle and toward wildlife. The study of antibiotic resistance dissemination in multihost systems and at anthropized/natural interface is necessary to better understand and mitigate its multiple threats. These results also contribute to attempts aiming at using E. coli as a tool for the identification of pathogen transmission pathway in multihost systems. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Antibiotic resistance and prevalence of Enterococcus spp. and Escherichia coli isolated from bryndza cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Vrabec

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at determining the prevalence antibiotic resistance of species – identified enterococci and Escherichia (E. coli isolated from typical fresh Slovak cheese, bryndza. Antibiotic resistance of enterococci was determined by disk diffusion method. Of isolated enterococci, 240 were obtained from bryndza cheese. The first two decimal dilutions from 24 bryndza cheese samples purchased at supermarkets in Košice (0.1 mL were spread on the surface of Slanetz and Bartley agar and incubated for 48±2 h at 37±1ºC. Species identification of enterococci and E. coli was detected by means of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS based on bacterial protein profiling. The following species of enterococci were identified by MALDI-TOF MS: Enterococcus (Ent. faecalis (22 strains, Ent. faecium (18 strains, Ent. sacharolyticus (6 strains, Ent. gilvus (4 strains, Ent. durans (9 strains, and Ent. casseliflavus (6 strains. All of the 45 E. coli strains and 74 strains of enterococci identified by MALDI-TOF MS were determined for occurrence of blaTEM, blaSHV and blaCTX-M genes. The results of our study suggest that the highest resistance of enterococci was on tetracycline (29.73% and any resistance was recorded on vancomycin (0%. The highest multidrug-resistance was recorded on two antibiotics (32.43%. Neither one isolate of enterococci was resistant to all 6 antibiotics used in the experiment. In total, 19 (42.22% E. coli were found to be producers of extended-spectrum β-lactamase.

  1. Phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of antibiotic resistance of commensal Escherichia coli isolates from healthy pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazurek Justyna

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to examine the characteristics of the resistance profiles of Escherichia coli isolated from healthy pigs from three farms in Western Poland. The sensitivity to 13 antimicrobial agents was tested by a disk diffusion method, and the presence of 13 resistance genes was determined by PCR. The majority of the isolates were multi-resistant. The most common multi-resistance patterns were streptomycin, trimethoprim, sulfisoxazole, ampicillin, tetracycline. Although some resistance genes, such as strA/strB, blaTEM, sul1, sul2, and tetA, were equally represented in isolates from each farm, differences in the distribution of tetB and tetC, hfrV, dhfrXII, and sul1 resistance genes were observed among the isolates from different farms. Approximately one-third (35.9% of the isolates possessed a class 1 integron. The four major different variable regions of the class 1 integron contained streptomycin (aadA1, aadA2, and aadA5 and/or trimethoprim (dhfrI, dhfrV and dhfrXVII, and/or sulphonamides (sul1 resistance genes. The results of this study emphasise that uncontrolled use of antibiotics causes the development of resistance and provides the evidence of frequent occurrence of more than one gene encoding the resistance to the same antimicrobial agent in the multi-resistant strains.

  2. Class 1 and 2 integrons, sul resistance genes and antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli isolated from Dongjiang River, South China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Haochang; Ying Guangguo; Tao Ran; Zhang Ruiquan; Zhao Jianliang; Liu Yousheng

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotic susceptibility, detection of sul gene types and presence of class 1, 2 and 3 integrons and gene cassettes using PCR assays were investigated in 3456 Escherichia coli isolates obtained from 38 sampling sites of the Dongjiang River catchment in the dry and wet seasons. 89.1% of the isolates were resistant and 87.5% showed resistance to at least three antibiotics. sul2 was detected most frequently in 89.2% of 1403 SXT-resistant isolates. The presence of integrons (class 1 and 2) was frequently observed (82.3%) while no class 3 integron was found. In these integrons, 21 resistance genes of 14 gene cassette arrays and 10 different families of resistance genes were identified. Three gene cassette arrays, aac(6')-Ib-cr-aar-3-dfrA27-aadA16, aacA4-catB3-dfrA1 and aadA2-lnuF, were detected for the first time in surface water. The results showed that bacterial resistance in the catchment was seriously influenced by human activities, especially discharge of wastewater. Highlights: ► Antibiotic resistance was investigated for a river catchment of southern China. ► 87.5% of E coli isolates showed resistance to at least three antibiotics. ► The presence of integrons (class 1 and 2) was frequently observed (82.3%). ► Bacterial resistance in the catchment was seriously influenced by human activities. - Bacterial resistance to antibiotics in a catchment is related to the discharge of wastewater into the aquatic environment.

  3. Influence of oral antibiotics on resistance and enterotoxigenicity of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourque, R; Lallier, R; Larivière, S

    1980-01-01

    Three groups of five piglets were formed and 1390 Escherichia coli isolates were obtained during the 45-day period of observation. One of the groups received feed without antibiotic whereas the second received feed containing 100 ppm neomycin and the third feed with 100 ppm neomycin plus 100 ppm tetracycline. Rectal swabbings for bacterial isolation were repeated ten times, twice during an adaptation period and eight times during the treatment period. Resistance among the isolates to tetracycline, streptomycin and triple sulfas remained high throughout this experiment whereas resistance to neomycin, chloramphenicol and ampicillin were found to increase significantly under the influence of antibiotic supplemented feed. This increase of antibiotic resistance was associated with an increase of the percentage of isolates harboring an R. factor. When comparing the ability of strains harboring an R factor to receive the plasmid Ent from the E. coli K12 (P155) with isolates not harboring such a plasmid, no significant difference was observed in their ability to receive the Ent plasmid. PMID:6994861

  4. Phylogenetic characterization of serum plus antibiotic-resistant extraintestinal Escherichia coli obtained from the liver of poultry carcasses in Pernambuco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata V. Vaz

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: In this study, avian extraintestinal Escherichia coli obtained from the liver of poultry carcasses approved for human consumption in the State of Pernambuco-Brazil were tested for antibiotic plus serum-resistance. Liver samples (n=110 were obtained from one slaughterhouse and 88 bacterial isolates were identified as Escherichia coli. The antibiotic-resistance profiles of antibiotics used in human and/or veterinary practice were accessed by the disk-diffusion method. Phenotypes with high resistance to streptomycin (84.0%, tetracycline (44.7%, amikacin (29.8%, gentamicin (21.3% and ciprofloxacin (21.3% were identified. Resistance to antibiotics such as ceftazidime, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and imipenem was also recorded. Twenty isolates with distinct antibiotic-resistance and susceptibility profiles were selected for serum resistance assays, phylogenetic characterization and detection of the iss gene. We have shown that multidrug resistant isolates were often simultaneously resistant to broiler and human sera. Phylogenetic characterization of serum- plus antibiotic-resistant isolates have shown three belonging to group D, eleven to group B1, one to group B2, and five to group A. We concluded that commensal E. coli strains isolated from the liver of healthy poultry carcasses can harbor and potentially share multidrug- plus virulence genes found in pathogenic pathotypes. This suspicion was not related to specific phylogenetic groups or presence of the iss gene.

  5. Decreased expression of LamB and Odp1 complex is crucial for antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiang-min; Yang, Man-jun; Li, Hui; Wang, Chao; Peng, Xuan-Xian

    2014-02-26

    We previously revealed a negative regulation of LamB in chlortetracycline-resistant Escherichia coli strain. In the present study, we first showed that the negative regulation, which was characterized by decreased abundance of LamB with elevated growth of its gene-deleted mutant in medium with antibiotics, was a general response in resistance to different classes of antibiotics using 2-DE based proteomics or/and genetically gene-deletion mutant of LamB. Then, we revealed the interaction of LamB and Odp1 which catalyzes the overall conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA and CO2, and found the decrease of the complex in antibiotic-resistant strains with a minimum inhibitory concentration dose-dependent manner. Further spectrofluorometry assay indicated that LamB served as a porin to influx an antibiotic. Finally, we showed that the decreased expression of LamB and Odp1 was detected in almost of all 34 multidrug-resistant strains, which suggested that LamB and Odp1 were biomarkers for identification of antibiotic-resistant E. coli. Our results indicated that the interaction of an outer membrane protein with an energy metabolic enzyme constructed an efficient pathway to resist antibiotics. These findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms of antibiotic resistance. Our data indicate that the negative regulation by LamB is widely detected in antibiotic-resistant E. coli. LamB serves as a porin to influx an antibiotic and is interacted with Odp1. The complex decreases in antibiotic-resistant strains with a MIC dose-dependent manner. Our findings indicate that interaction of outer membrane protein with energy metabolic enzyme constructs an efficient pathway to resist antibiotics and provides novel insights into the mechanisms of antibiotic resistance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. 3. Multiple Antibiotic Resistance Index ofEscherichiaColi Isolates in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Resistance index > 0.2, 61 % were from inpatient samples. Conclusion: The high Multiple Antibiotic. Resistance index of the E. coli isolates indicates previous exposure to antibiotics and development of resistance to commonly prescribed antibiotics, hence, antimicrobial susceptibility testing is imperative in selecting ...

  7. Antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli in a government piggery farm in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ). Total counts and antibiotic resistant counts declined with age (p<0.05), with the rate of decline in antibiotic resistant counts being greater than that for total counts (p<0.05). The cohort pigs rapidly acquired antibiotic-resistant bacteria shortly ...

  8. Zoonotic Potential and Antibiotic Resistance of Escherichia coli in Neonatal Calves in Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umpiérrez, Ana; Bado, Inés; Oliver, Martín; Acquistapace, Sofía; Etcheverría, Analía; Padola, Nora Lía; Vignoli, Rafael; Zunino, Pablo

    2017-09-27

    Escherichia coli is one of the main etiological agents of neonatal calf diarrhea (NCD). The objective of this study was to assess the presence of virulence genes, genetic diversity, and antibiotic resistance mechanisms in E. coli associated with NCD in Uruguay. PCR was used to assess the presence of intimin, Shiga-like toxin, and stable and labile enterotoxin genes. Resistance to fluoroquinolones and oxyimino-cephalosporins was estimated on Müller-Hinton agar plates. Further antibiotic disc-diffusion tests were performed to assess bacterial multi-resistance. The presence of PMQR, ESBL, MCR-1, and integron genes was evaluated. Isolates were typed using ERIC-PCR, and 20 were selected for MLST, adhesion to Hep-2 cells, in vitro biofilm formation, and eukaryotic cytotoxicity. The prevalence of ETEC genes was lower than 3% in each case (estA and elt). Six isolates were EPEC (eae+) and 2 were EHEC/STEC (eae+/stx1+). The results of a diversity analysis showed high genetic heterogenicity among isolates. Additionally, different sequence types, including ST10, ST21, and ST69, were assigned to selected isolates. Thirty-six percent (96/264) of the isolates were fluoroquinolone-resistant, with 61/96 (63.5%) being multidrug-resistant. Additionally, 6 were oxyimino-cephalosporin-resistant. The qnrB, qnrS1, and bla CTX-M-14 genes were detected, whereas no isolates carried the mcr-1 gene. Isolates had the ability to adhere to Hep-2 cells and form biofilms. Only 1 isolate expressed toxins in vitro. E. coli from NCD cases in Uruguay are very diverse, potentially virulent, and may interact with eukaryotic cells. Zoonotic potential, together with resistance traits and the presence of horizontal transfer mechanisms, may play a significant role in infections caused by these microorganisms.

  9. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longenecker, Nevin E.; Oppenheimer, Dan

    1982-01-01

    A study conducted by high school advanced bacteriology students appears to confirm the hypothesis that the incremental administration of antibiotics on several species of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermis, Bacillus sublitus, Bacillus megaterium) will allow for the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. (PEB)

  10. Effects of selection pressure and genetic association on the relationship between antibiotic resistance and virulence in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lixin; Levy, Karen; Trueba, Gabriel; Cevallos, William; Trostle, James; Foxman, Betsy; Marrs, Carl F; Eisenberg, Joseph N S

    2015-11-01

    Antibiotic selection pressure and genetic associations may lead to the cooccurrence of resistance and virulence in individual pathogens. However, there is a lack of rigorous epidemiological evidence that demonstrates the cooccurrence of resistance and virulence at the population level. Using samples from a population-based case-control study in 25 villages in rural Ecuador, we characterized resistance to 12 antibiotics among pathogenic (n = 86) and commensal (n = 761) Escherichia coli isolates, classified by the presence or absence of known diarrheagenic virulence factor genes. The prevalences of resistance to single and multiple antibiotics were significantly higher for pathogenic isolates than for commensal isolates. Using a generalized estimating equation, antibiotic resistance was independently associated with virulence factor carriage, case status, and antibiotic use (for these respective factors: odds ratio [OR] = 3.0, with a 95% confidence interval [CI] of 1.7 to 5.1; OR = 2.0, with a 95% CI of 1.3 to 3.0; and OR = 1.5, with a 95% CI of 0.9 to 2.5). Virulence factor carriage was more strongly related to antibiotic resistance than antibiotic use for all antibiotics examined, with the exception of fluoroquinolones, gentamicin, and cefotaxime. This study provides epidemiological evidence that antibiotic resistance and virulence factor carriage are linked in E. coli populations in a community setting. Further, these data suggest that while the cooccurrence of resistance and virulence in E. coli is partially due to antibiotic selection pressure, it is also genetically determined. These findings should be considered in developing strategies for treating infections and controlling for antibiotic resistance. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Effects of Selection Pressure and Genetic Association on the Relationship between Antibiotic Resistance and Virulence in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trueba, Gabriel; Cevallos, William; Trostle, James; Marrs, Carl F.; Eisenberg, Joseph N. S.

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic selection pressure and genetic associations may lead to the cooccurrence of resistance and virulence in individual pathogens. However, there is a lack of rigorous epidemiological evidence that demonstrates the cooccurrence of resistance and virulence at the population level. Using samples from a population-based case-control study in 25 villages in rural Ecuador, we characterized resistance to 12 antibiotics among pathogenic (n = 86) and commensal (n = 761) Escherichia coli isolates, classified by the presence or absence of known diarrheagenic virulence factor genes. The prevalences of resistance to single and multiple antibiotics were significantly higher for pathogenic isolates than for commensal isolates. Using a generalized estimating equation, antibiotic resistance was independently associated with virulence factor carriage, case status, and antibiotic use (for these respective factors: odds ratio [OR] = 3.0, with a 95% confidence interval [CI] of 1.7 to 5.1; OR = 2.0, with a 95% CI of 1.3 to 3.0; and OR = 1.5, with a 95% CI of 0.9 to 2.5). Virulence factor carriage was more strongly related to antibiotic resistance than antibiotic use for all antibiotics examined, with the exception of fluoroquinolones, gentamicin, and cefotaxime. This study provides epidemiological evidence that antibiotic resistance and virulence factor carriage are linked in E. coli populations in a community setting. Further, these data suggest that while the cooccurrence of resistance and virulence in E. coli is partially due to antibiotic selection pressure, it is also genetically determined. These findings should be considered in developing strategies for treating infections and controlling for antibiotic resistance. PMID:26282415

  12. Assessment of antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli isolates and screening of Salmonella spp. in wild ungulates from Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Diana; Torres, Rita T; Kronvall, Göran; Fonseca, Carlos; Mendo, Sónia; Caetano, Tânia

    2015-09-01

    Antibiotic resistance is an emerging global problem. Wild animals are rarely exposed to antibiotics and therefore low levels of antibiotic resistance are expected. However, the growing interactions of these animals with humans and livestock may have a huge impact on their bacterial flora. This study aimed to assess the levels of antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli isolated from widespread wild ungulates in Portugal. The interpretation of inhibition zone diameters was performed according to clinical breakpoints and epidemiological cut-offs, determined with the normalized resistance interpretation (NRI) method. For clinical breakpoints, 16% of the isolates were resistant to at least one antibiotic, including ampicillin (10%), tetracycline (9%), streptomycin (5%) co-trimoxazole (4%), amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (1%) and cefoxitin (1%). The levels of resistance detected in E. coli strains isolated from wild boar were statistically different for ampicillin and co-trimoxasol. According to NRI cut-offs, 10% of the population showed a non-wild-type phenotype against at least one antibiotic, also including tetracycline (9%), co-trimoxazole (6%), streptomycin (4%), ampicillin (2%) and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (1%). Considering this parameter of comparison, no statistically different levels of resistance were identified between E. coli recovered from the three wild ungulates. Screening of Salmonella spp., which can be potentially pathogenic, was also performed, revealing that its prevalence was very low (1.5%). The study demonstrated that wild ungulates from Portugal are also reservoirs of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Antibiotic resistance and resistance genes in Escherichia coli from poultry farms, southwest Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelowo, Olawale O; Fagade, Obasola E; Agersø, Yvonne

    2014-09-12

    This study investigated the mechanisms of resistance in 36 E. coli isolated from waste, litter, soil and water samples collected from poultry farms in Southwestern Nigeria. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) distributions of the isolates were determined using the methods of the Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute and resistance genes detected by PCR. A total of 30 isolates (94%) showed resistance to more than one antimicrobial. Percentage resistance was: tetracycline 81%, sulphamethoxazole 67%, streptomycin 56%, trimethoprim 47 %, ciprofloxacin 42%, ampicillin 36%, spectinomycin 28%, nalidixic acid 25%, chloramphenicol 22%, neomycin 14%, gentamicin 8%, amoxicillin-clavulanate, ceftiofur, cefotaxime, colistin, florfenicol and apramycin 0%. Resistance genes found among the isolates include bla-TEM (85%), sul2 (67%), sul3 (17%), aadA (65%), strA (70%), strB (61%), catA1 (25%), cmlA1 (13%), tetA (21%) and tetB (17%). Class 1 and 2 integrons were found in five (14%) and six (17%) isolates, respectively, while one isolate was positive for both classes of integrons. Seven out of eight isolates with resistance to ciprofloxacin and MIC ≤ 32 mg/L to nalidixic acid contained qnrS genes. Our findings provided additional evidence that the poultry production environment in Nigeria represents an important reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes such as qnrS that may spread from livestock production farms to human populations via manure and water.

  14. Compensation of the metabolic costs of antibiotic resistance by physiological adaptation in Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Händel, N.; Schuurmans, J.M.; Brul, S.; ter Kuile, B.H.

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is often associated with metabolic costs. To investigate metabolic consequences of antibiotic resistance, the genomic and transcriptomic profile was compared between an amoxicillin resistant E. coli strain and the wildtype it was derived from. 125 amino acid substitutions and 7

  15. Characterization of antibiotic resistant and pathogenic Escherichia coli in irrigation water and vegetables in household farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Susana; A T Silva, Isabel; Tacão, Marta; Patinha, Carla; Alves, Artur; Henriques, Isabel

    2017-09-18

    This study aimed to characterize Escherichia coli present in irrigation water and vegetables from 16 household farms. Isolates were obtained from 50% of water (n=210 isolates) and 38% of vegetable samples (n=239). Phylogroups B1 (56% of isolates) and A (22%) were the most prevalent both in water and vegetables. Diarrheagenic strains were detected in vegetables. Irrespective of the source (i.e. water or vegetables), the most common antibiotic resistance was against streptomycin (89% resistant isolates) and tetracycline (24%). Common acquired genes (e.g. bla TEM , tetA, tetB) were found in isolates from both sources. Class I integrons were detected in water (arrays dfrA1-aadA1 and dfr16-blaP1b-aadA2-ereA) and vegetables (unknown arrays). intI2 was detected in water (dfrA1-sat2-aadA1). Plasmids were detected in 14 isolates (IncFIC, IncFIB, IncFrep, IncI1 in both samples; IncY in vegetables). Plasmids from seven isolates were transferrable by conjugation, conferring resistance to antibiotics to the recipient strain. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains were isolated from water (12% of the unique isolates) and vegetables (21%). Predominant sequence types (STs) among MDR isolates were ST10, ST297 and ST2522. In some cases, the same STs and identical clones (as showed by rep-PCR typing) were detected in water and vegetables, suggesting cross-contamination. This study identified several risk factors in E. coli isolates from vegetables and irrigation water, raising health concerns. Also, results suggest that irrigation groundwater constitutes a source of E. coli that may enter the food chain through vegetables ingestion. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Antibiotic Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Hoffmann, Tammy C; McCullough, Amanda R

    2015-01-01

    Numerous opportunities are available in primary care for alleviating the crisis of increasing antibiotic resistance. Preventing patients from developing an acute respiratory infection (ARI) will obviate any need for antibiotic use downstream. Hygiene measures such as physical barriers and hand...... will greatly improve the use of antibiotics for ARIs. However, used in concert, combinations are likely to enable clinicians and health care systems to implement the strategies that will reduce antimicrobial resistance in the future....... antibiotic prescribing are a major factor in the prescribing for ARIs. Professional interventions with educational components are effective, although they have modest effects, and are expensive. GPs' perceptions - that mistakenly assume as a default that patients want antibiotics for their ARIs - are often...

  17. Prevalence of Veterinary Antibiotics and Antibiotic-Resistant Escherichia coli in the Surface Water of a Livestock Production Region in Northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuelian; Li, Yanxia; Liu, Bei; Wang, Jing; Feng, Chenghong; Gao, Min; Wang, Lina

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the occurrence of 12 veterinary antibiotics (VAs) and the susceptibility of Escherichia coli (E. coli) in a rural water system that was affected by livestock production in northern China. Each of the surveyed sites was determined with at least eight antibiotics with maximum concentration of up to 450 ng L−1. The use of VAs in livestock farming probably was a primary source of antibiotics in the rivers. Increasing total antibiotics were measured from up- to mid- and downstream in the two tributaries. Eighty-eight percent of the 218 E. coli isolates that were derived from the study area exhibited, in total, 48 resistance profiles against the eight examined drugs. Significant correlations were found among the resistance rates of sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, chloromycetin and ampicillin as well as between tetracycline and chlortetracycline, suggesting a possible cross-selection for resistance among these drugs. The E. coli resistance frequency also increased from up- to midstream in the three rivers. E. coli isolates from different water systems showed varying drug numbers of resistance. No clear relationship was observed in the antibiotic resistance frequency with corresponding antibiotic concentration, indicating that the antibiotic resistance for E. coli in the aquatic environment might be affected by factors besides antibiotics. High numbers of resistant E. coli were also isolated from the conserved reservoir. These results suggest that rural surface water may become a large pool of VAs and resistant bacteria. This study contributes to current information on VAs and resistant bacteria contamination in aquatic environments particularly in areas under intensive agriculture. Moreover, this study indicates an urgent need to monitor the use of VAs in animal production, and to control the release of animal-originated antibiotics into the environment. PMID:25372873

  18. Prevalence of veterinary antibiotics and antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli in the surface water of a livestock production region in northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuelian; Li, Yanxia; Liu, Bei; Wang, Jing; Feng, Chenghong; Gao, Min; Wang, Lina

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the occurrence of 12 veterinary antibiotics (VAs) and the susceptibility of Escherichia coli (E. coli) in a rural water system that was affected by livestock production in northern China. Each of the surveyed sites was determined with at least eight antibiotics with maximum concentration of up to 450 ng L(-1). The use of VAs in livestock farming probably was a primary source of antibiotics in the rivers. Increasing total antibiotics were measured from up- to mid- and downstream in the two tributaries. Eighty-eight percent of the 218 E. coli isolates that were derived from the study area exhibited, in total, 48 resistance profiles against the eight examined drugs. Significant correlations were found among the resistance rates of sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, chloromycetin and ampicillin as well as between tetracycline and chlortetracycline, suggesting a possible cross-selection for resistance among these drugs. The E. coli resistance frequency also increased from up- to midstream in the three rivers. E. coli isolates from different water systems showed varying drug numbers of resistance. No clear relationship was observed in the antibiotic resistance frequency with corresponding antibiotic concentration, indicating that the antibiotic resistance for E. coli in the aquatic environment might be affected by factors besides antibiotics. High numbers of resistant E. coli were also isolated from the conserved reservoir. These results suggest that rural surface water may become a large pool of VAs and resistant bacteria. This study contributes to current information on VAs and resistant bacteria contamination in aquatic environments particularly in areas under intensive agriculture. Moreover, this study indicates an urgent need to monitor the use of VAs in animal production, and to control the release of animal-originated antibiotics into the environment.

  19. Prevalence of veterinary antibiotics and antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli in the surface water of a livestock production region in northern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuelian Zhang

    Full Text Available This study investigated the occurrence of 12 veterinary antibiotics (VAs and the susceptibility of Escherichia coli (E. coli in a rural water system that was affected by livestock production in northern China. Each of the surveyed sites was determined with at least eight antibiotics with maximum concentration of up to 450 ng L(-1. The use of VAs in livestock farming probably was a primary source of antibiotics in the rivers. Increasing total antibiotics were measured from up- to mid- and downstream in the two tributaries. Eighty-eight percent of the 218 E. coli isolates that were derived from the study area exhibited, in total, 48 resistance profiles against the eight examined drugs. Significant correlations were found among the resistance rates of sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, chloromycetin and ampicillin as well as between tetracycline and chlortetracycline, suggesting a possible cross-selection for resistance among these drugs. The E. coli resistance frequency also increased from up- to midstream in the three rivers. E. coli isolates from different water systems showed varying drug numbers of resistance. No clear relationship was observed in the antibiotic resistance frequency with corresponding antibiotic concentration, indicating that the antibiotic resistance for E. coli in the aquatic environment might be affected by factors besides antibiotics. High numbers of resistant E. coli were also isolated from the conserved reservoir. These results suggest that rural surface water may become a large pool of VAs and resistant bacteria. This study contributes to current information on VAs and resistant bacteria contamination in aquatic environments particularly in areas under intensive agriculture. Moreover, this study indicates an urgent need to monitor the use of VAs in animal production, and to control the release of animal-originated antibiotics into the environment.

  20. Comparison of antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli obtained from drinking water sources in northern Tanzania: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyimo, Beatus; Buza, Joram; Subbiah, Murugan; Smith, Woutrina; Call, Douglas R

    2016-11-03

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a growing and significant threat to public health on a global scale. Escherichia coli comprises Gram-negative, fecal-borne pathogenic and commensal bacteria that are frequently associated with antibiotic resistance. AMR E. coli can be ingested via food, water and direct contact with fecal contamination. We estimated the prevalence of AMR Escherichia coli from select drinking water sources in northern Tanzania. Water samples (n = 155) were collected and plated onto Hi-Crome E. coli and MacConkey agar. Presumptive E. coli were confirmed by using a uidA PCR assay. Antibiotic susceptibility breakpoint assays were used to determine the resistance patterns of each isolate for 10 antibiotics. Isolates were also characterized by select PCR genotyping and macro-restriction digest assays. E. coli was isolated from 71 % of the water samples, and of the 1819 E. coli tested, 46.9 % were resistant to one or more antibiotics. Resistance to ampicillin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, and trimethoprim was significantly higher (15-30 %) compared to other tested antibiotics (0-6 %; P E. coli isolates obtained from these water sources were genetically diverse with few matching macro-restriction digest patterns. Water supplies in northern Tanzania may be a source of AMR E. coli for people and animals. Further studies are needed to identify the source of these contaminants and devise effective intervention strategies.

  1. High prevalence of multiple-antibiotic-resistant (MAR) Escherichia coli in river bed sediments of the Apies River, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abia, Akebe Luther King; Ubomba-Jaswa, Eunice; Momba, Maggy Ndombo Benteke

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed at investigating the presence of antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli in river bed sediments of the Apies River, Gauteng, South Africa, in order to better inform health management decisions designed to protect users of the river. Overall, 180 water and sediment samples were collected at 10 sites along the Apies River from January to February 2014. E. coli was enumerated using the Colilert® 18/Quanti-Tray® 2000 (IDEXX). Isolates were purified by streaking on eosin methylene blue agar followed by the indole test. Pure E. coli isolates were tested for resistance to nine antibiotics by the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Over 98% of the isolates were resistant to at least one of the antibiotics tested. The highest resistance was observed against nitrofurantoin (sediments) and ampicillin (water). Over 80% of all resistant isolates showed multiple antibiotic resistance (resistance to ≥3 antibiotics). The abundance of E. coli in the sediments not only adds to the evidence that sediments are a reservoir for bacteria and possibly other pathogens including antibiotic-resistant bacteria but also suggests that antibiotic-resistant genes could be transferred to pathogens due to the high prevalence of multiple-antibiotic-resistant (MAR) strains of E. coli observed in the sediment. Using untreated water from the Apies River following resuspension for drinking and other household purposes could pose serious health risks for users. Our results suggest that river bed sediments could serve as reservoirs for MAR bacteria including pathogens under different climatic conditions and their analysis could provide information of public health concerns.

  2. Antibiotic Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck, Christian

    of antimicrobial resistance: (1) adaptive mutations and (2) horizontal acquisition of resistance genes from antibiotic gene reservoirs. By studying the geno- and phenotypic changes of E. coli in response to single and drug-pair exposures, I uncover the evolutionary trajectories leading to adaptive resistance. I......Bacteria can avoid extinction during antimicrobial exposure by becoming resistant. They achieve this either via adaptive mutations or horizontally acquired resistance genes. If resistance emerges in clinical relevant species, it can lead to treatment failure and ultimately result in increasing...... morbidity and mortality as well as an increase in the cost of treatment. Understanding how bacteria respond to antibiotic exposure gives the foundations for a rational approach to counteract antimicrobial resistance. In the work presented in this thesis, I explore the two fundamental sources...

  3. [Study on antibiotic resistance ofEscherichia coliandEnterococcuscolonized in intestine of neonates from neonatal intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X F; Liu, Z J; Chen, X; Li, J; Cui, Z G; Kan, B; Ma, J R; Cui, J H

    2017-09-10

    Objective: To understand the antibiotic resistance of bacteria colonized in intestine of the neonates from neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and provide evidence to guide clinical antibiotic treatment. Methods: From May, 2014 to May, 2015, a total of 572 stool samples were collected from the neonates of NICU in our hospital. Escherichia coli and Enterococcus were detected with VITEK-2 system. Results: A total of 328 strains of E. coli and 243 strains of Enterococcus were isolated respectively in this study. The 199 strains of E. coli selected for drug susceptibility test showed lower resistant rate to imipenem, ertapenem, amikacin, nitrofurantoin, ranging from 0.50 % to 3.52 % and showed higher resistant rate to ampicillin, tetracycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and cefazolin, ranging from 54.27 % to 84.92 % . No meropenem resistant strainsere were found. The percentage of ESBLs production strains was 45 % . The multi drug resistance test showed that 34.6 % of the strains were resistant to four antibiotics. Three strains were resistant to seven antibiotics. The 243 strains of Enterococcus showed lower resistant rate to quinupristin/dalfopristin, nitrofurantoin, streptomycin, ranging from 0.41 % to 4.53 % and showed higher resistant rate to ampicillin, benzylpenicillin, ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, gentamicin and erythromycin, ranging from 70.78 % to 91.77 % . No strains which were resistant to tigecycline, vancomycin, rina thiazole amine/ketone were found. The multi drug-resistance test showed that 86.5 % of the strains were resistant to five antibiotics. Conclusions: According to the analysis of the 199 strains of E. coli and 243 strains of Enterococcus isolated from the neonates, we found that the resistance of intestinal bacteria in the neonates was very serious, showing multi drug resistance. It is necessary to use antibiotics according to the drug susceptibility test results in clinical treatment.

  4. Antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica in the beef production and processing chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Concerns have been raised that extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli (CefR EC), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-resistant E. coli (TxsR EC), extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant Salmonella enterica (CefR SE), and nalidixic acid-resistant S. enterica (NalR SE) in c...

  5. Antibiotic resistance of faecal Escherichia coli in poultry, poultry farmers and poultry slaughterers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaard, A.E. van den; London, N.; Driessen, C.A.G.G.; Stobberingh, E.E.

    2001-01-01

    The percentage of faecal samples containing resistant Echerichia coli and the proportion of resistant faecal E. coli were determined in three poultry populations: broilers and turkeys commonly given antibiotics, and laying hens treated with antibiotics relatively infrequently. Faecal samples of five

  6. Antibiotic Resistance Among Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli Isolated From Traditional and Industrial Food Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Arslani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Foodborne diseases are one of the serious problems in the world. Every year, more than 100 million people are affected by foodborne and waterborne diseases particularly immunocompromised diseases. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to evaluate bacterial load and antibiotic resistance pattern in bacterial isolates from food samples of meat, dairy, and pastry products from west of Tehran, Iran, during April 2007 to March 2008. Materials and Methods: A total of 1625 different food samples including dairy products, meat and pastries were collected randomly from different parts of the west of Tehran. All samples were kept at 4°C. The samples were first cultured according to the standard bacteriological methods and then Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli isolates were identified using standard bacteriological tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed by disk diffusion method according to Clinical & Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI guidelines. Results: During 2007 and 2008, 2.8% and 3% of the food samples were contaminated with S. aureus. Similarly, 3.5% and 6.4% of the food samples were contaminated with E. coli. E. coli isolates were highly resistant to amikacin and cephotaxime and this resistance was increased in 2008. Similarly S. aureus isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin, cephotaxime, gentamicin, and tetracyclin. There was no significant difference during 2007-2008. Conclusion: The rate of contamination during 2007 was 2.8% and during 2008 was 3% for S. aureus. This strain was isolated from the food samples. Further studies should be done to determine the changes of bacterial resistance pattern for various food samples. Thus, the baseline for comparison with future prospective studies should be established, enabling the determination of trends over time.

  7. A response regulator from a soil metagenome enhances resistance to the β-lactam antibiotic carbenicillin in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather K Allen

    Full Text Available Functional metagenomic analysis of soil metagenomes is a method for uncovering as-yet unidentified mechanisms for antibiotic resistance. Here we report an unconventional mode by which a response regulator derived from a soil metagenome confers resistance to the β-lactam antibiotic carbenicillin in Escherichia coli. A recombinant clone (βlr16 harboring a 5,169 bp DNA insert was selected from a metagenomic library previously constructed from a remote Alaskan soil. The βlr16 clone conferred specific resistance to carbenicillin, with limited increases in resistance to other tested antibiotics, including other β-lactams (penicillins and cephalosporins, rifampin, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, chloramphenicol, nalidixic acid, fusidic acid, and gentamicin. Resistance was more pronounced at 24°C than at 37°C. Zone-of-inhibition assays suggested that the mechanism of carbenicillin resistance was not due to antibiotic inactivation. The DNA insert did not encode any genes known to confer antibiotic resistance, but did have two putative open reading frames (ORFs that were annotated as a metallopeptidase and a two-component response regulator. Transposon mutagenesis and subcloning of the two ORFs followed by phenotypic assays showed that the response regulator gene was necessary and sufficient to confer the resistance phenotype. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR showed that the response regulator suppressed expression of the ompF porin gene, independently of the small RNA regulator micF, and enhanced expression of the acrD, mdtA, and mdtB efflux pump genes. This work demonstrates that antibiotic resistance can be achieved by the modulation of gene regulation by heterologous DNA. Functional analyses such as these can be important for making discoveries in antibiotic resistance gene biology and ecology.

  8. [Clinical features and antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli bloodstream infections in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shaoying; Guo, Lingyun; Liu, Linlin; Dong, Fang; Liu, Gang

    2016-02-01

    To analyze risk factors, clinical features, outcomes and antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli(E.coli) causing bloodstream infections in children. All inpatients with E. coli positive blood culture in Beijing Children's Hospital from January 2012 to May 2014 were enrolled; 112 cases were included, 66 cases (58.9%) were male, and 46 cases(41.1%) were female. Age range was 2 days to 16 years. Among them, 43 cases (38.4%) were neonates, 19 cases (17.0%) aged from 1 month to 1 year, 14 cases (12.5%) were 1-3 years old, and 36 cases (32.1%) were over three years old. We analyzed the divisions to which the patients were admitted, source of infection, underlying diseases, clinical characteristics, antibiotic resistance, and treatment outcomes, etc. Forty-six cases (41.1%) were treated in division of hematology, 42 (37.5%) in neonatology, 9 (8.0%) in internal medicine, 8 (7.1%) in surgery, and 7 (6.3%) in pediatric intensive care unit. Sixty-five cases(58.0%) had underlying diseases. Fever was the most frequently presented symptom, as it was seen in 91 cases (81.3%); 52 cases(46.4%) had respiratory symptoms. Among these, 43 cases had pneumonia, 3 cases had respiratory failure, 3 cases were diagnosed as upper respiratory tract infection, 2 had pulmonary hemorrhage and 1 case had bronchitis. Twenty-six cases (23.2%)were diagnosed as severe sepsis and purulent meningitis separately, 14 cases(12.5%) had urinary tract infection. There were 73 (65.2%) strains inducing extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), of which 6 (8.2%) and 10 (13.7%) strains were resistant to amikacin and carbapenems respectively. Resistance rate against other antimicrobial agents varied from 64.6% to 100%. 92 (82.1%) cases were cured or had improvement while 20 patients (17.9%) died or could not be cured at the end of treatment. Positive ESBLs (χ(2) = 6.609, P = 0.010), being complicated with severe sepsis (χ(2) = 40.253, P = 0.000) and requiring mechanical ventilation (χ(2) = 34.441, P = 0

  9. Antibiotic susceptibility-resistance profiles of super-shed Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Escherichia coli O157:H7 (O157) can cause diarrhea and serious secondary sequelae including kidney failure and death in humans. With antibiotics like fosfomycin, colistin and azithromycin, that do not stimulate toxin expression by O157, being considered for treatment of early gastroint...

  10. Longitudinal Comparison of Antibiotic Resistance in Diarrheagenic and Non-pathogenic Escherichia coli from Young Tanzanian Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidman, Jessica C; Johnson, Lashaunda B; Levens, Joshua; Mkocha, Harran; Muñoz, Beatriz; Silbergeld, Ellen K; West, Sheila K; Coles, Christian L

    2016-01-01

    Enteroaggregative, enteropathogenic, and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli contribute significantly to the burden of diarrheal infections particularly in developing countries. Antibiotic resistance is increasingly common among bacterial pathogens including pathogenic E. coli. We assessed the relationship between pathogenic E. coli carriage and resistance to six antibiotics in E. coli isolated from young children in rural Tanzania. We surveyed temporal stability in antibiotic resistance in 2492 E. coli isolated from fecal samples obtained from young children in rural Tanzania collected over a 6 months period. Approximately half of the 377 children sampled were exposed to an azithromycin mass treatment program for trachoma control and half resided in control villages. Children were sampled at baseline, 1-, 3-, and 6 months following azithromycin treatment. We compared resistance to six antibiotics in pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains at the population level, within fecal specimens, and within individuals over time using chi-square tests, paired odds ratios, and logistic regression, respectively. Resistance to ampicillin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole was highly prevalent (>65%). Resistance to 5 of 6 antibiotics tested and multi-drug resistance occurred more frequently in pathogenic isolates (p ≤ 0.001) within fecal specimens and overall. Azithromycin mass treatment exposure was significantly associated with increased odds of carriage of isolates resistant to erythromycin (OR 3.64, p resistant to erythromycin, ampicillin, or trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole compared to non-pathogenic isolates from the same fecal specimen. The potential linkage between resistance and virulence in E. coli suggests hygiene and sanitation interventions aimed at reducing disease burden could play a role in controlling transmission of antibiotic resistance.

  11. Extended spectrum β-lactamase producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae: critical tools for antibiotic resistance pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmini, Nagarajan; Ajilda, Antony Alex Kennedy; Sivakumar, Natesan; Selvakumar, Gopal

    2017-06-01

    Drug resistance is a phenomenon where by an organism becomes fully or partially resistant to drugs or antibiotics being used against it. Antibiotic resistance poses an exacting intimidation for people with underlying medical immune conditions or weakened immune systems. Infections caused by the enzyme extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing multi drug resistance (MDR) Enterobacteriaceae especially Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae are resistant to a broad range of beta lactams, including third generation cephalosporins. Among all the pathogens, these two MDR E. coli and K. pneumoniae have emerged as one of the world's greatest health threats in past two decades. The nosocomial infections caused by these ESBL producing MDR E. coli and K. pneumoniae complicated the therapy and limit treatment options. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Role of tetracycline speciation in the bioavailability to Escherichia coli for uptake and expression of antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingjie; Boyd, Stephen A; Teppen, Brian J; Tiedje, James M; Li, Hui

    2014-05-06

    Tetracycline contains ionizable functional groups that manifest several species with charges at different locales and differing net charge; the fractional distribution of each species depends on pH-pKa relationship in the aqueous phase. In nature, these species interact with naturally abundant cations (e.g., Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)) to form metal-tetracycline complexes in water. In this study, we used Escherichia coli MC4100/pTGM whole-cell bioreporter to investigate tetracycline uptake from solution under varying conditions of pH, salt composition and concentration by quantifying the corresponding expression of antibiotic resistance gene. The expression of antibiotic resistance gene in the E. coli bioreporter responded linearly to intracellular tetracycline concentration. Less tetracycline entered E. coli cells at solution pH of 8.0 than at pH 6.0 or 7.0 indicating reduced bioavailability of the antibiotic at higher pH. Both Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) in solution formed metal-tetracycline complexes which reduced uptake of tetracycline by E. coli hence diminishing the bioresponse. Among the various tetracycline species present in solution, including both metal-complexed and free (noncomplexed) species, zwitterionic tetracycline was identified as the predominant species that most readily passed through the cell membrane eliciting activation of the antibiotic resistance gene in E. coli. The results indicate that the same total concentration of tetracycline in ambient solution can evoke very different expression of antibiotic resistance gene in the exposed bacteria due to differential antibiotic uptake. Accordingly, geochemical factors such as pH and metal cations can modulate the selective pressure exerted by tetracycline for development and enrichment of antibiotic resistant bacteria. We suggest that tetracycline speciation analysis should be incorporated into the risk assessment framework for evaluating environmental exposure and the corresponding development of antibiotic

  13. Quantitative proteome analysis of an antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli exposed to tetracycline reveals multiple affected metabolic and peptidoglycan processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones-Dias, Daniela; Carvalho, Ana Sofia; Moura, Inês Barata; Manageiro, Vera; Igrejas, Gilberto; Caniça, Manuela; Matthiesen, Rune

    2017-03-06

    Tetracyclines are among the most commonly used antibiotics administrated to farm animals for disease treatment and prevention, contributing to the worldwide increase in antibiotic resistance in animal and human pathogens. Although tetracycline mechanisms of resistance are well known, the role of metabolism in bacterial reaction to antibiotic stress is still an important assignment and could contribute to the understanding of tetracycline related stress response. In this study, spectral counts-based label free quantitative proteomics has been applied to study the response to tetracycline of the environmental-borne Escherichia coli EcAmb278 isolate soluble proteome. A total of 1484 proteins were identified by high resolution mass spectrometry at a false discovery rate threshold of 1%, of which 108 were uniquely identified under absence of tetracycline whereas 126 were uniquely identified in presence of tetracycline. These proteins revealed interesting difference in e.g. proteins involved in peptidoglycan-based cell wall proteins and energy metabolism. Upon treatment, 12 proteins were differentially regulated showing more than 2-fold change and pcoli provides novel insight into tetracycline related stress. The lack of new antibiotics to fight infections caused by multidrug resistant microorganisms has motivated the use of old antibiotics, and the search for new drug targets. The evolution of antibiotic resistance is complex, but it is known that agroecosystems play an important part in the selection of antibiotic resistance bacteria. Tetracyclines are still used as phytopharmaceutical agents in crops, selecting resistant bacteria and changing the ecology of farm soil. Little is known about the metabolic response of genetically resistant populations to antibiotic exposure. Indeed, to date there are no quantitative tetracycline resistance studies performed with the latest generation of high resolution mass spectrometers allowing high mass accuracy in both MS and MS

  14. Serogrouping and antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli isolated from broiler chicken with colibacillosis in center of Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehor Halfaoui

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Colibacillosis is considered as one of the major bacterial infections in avian pathology. The excessive use of antibiotics reduced their effectiveness, which eventually led to the risk of emergence of antibiotic resistance. The aim of this study was to isolate, identify and serotype the pathogenic Escherichia coli strains and to determine their antibiotic susceptibility. Materials and Methods: A total of 180 samples from different organs of broilers with colibacillosis lesions were collected (liver, spleen, lung, and heart in center of Algeria. The isolation and identification of E. coli were carried out using conventional techniques. Then, these strains were serotyped and tested over 13 antibiotics. Results: A total of 156 strains of E. coli were isolated. Serotyping results showed that 50 strains belong to 3 serotypes (23 for O1, 11 for O2, 16 for O78 which represent 32% of isolates. The antimicrobial susceptibility test, presented high level of resistance to tetracyclines (94.12%, flumequine (91.5%, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (88.89%, enrofloxacin (86.27%, nalidixic acid (85.62%, ampicillin (83.01% and doxycycline (75.81%, medium level resistance to chloramphenicol (39.22%, and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (43.13%. All the strains were susceptible to cefotaxime, excepting three, which presented an extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL. In addition, the results of multi-resistance showed that all the strains were resistant at the minimum to two antibiotics and 66.66% of strains were resistant to at least seven antibiotics. Conclusion: The antibiotic resistance continues to rise at an alarming rate, and the emergence of ESBL is considered as a threat for public health.

  15. Toxin production and antibiotic resistances in Escherichia coli isolated from bathing areas along the coastline of the Oslo fjord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnock, Colin; Nordlie, Anne-Lise; Hjeltnes, Bjarne

    2014-09-01

    The presence of enterovirulent and/or antibiotic resistant strains of Escherichia coli in recreational bathing waters would represent a clear health issue. In total, 144 E. coli isolated from 26 beaches along the inner Oslo fjord were examined for virulence determinants and resistance to clinically important antibiotics. No isolates possessed the genetic determinants associated with enterotoxigenic strains and none showed the prototypic sorbitol negative, O157:H7 phenotype. A small number (∼1 %) produced alpha-hemolysin. Occurrences and patterns of antibiotic resistances were similar to those of E. coli isolated previously from environmental samples. In total, 6 % of the strains showed one or more clinically relevant resistances and 1.4 % were multi-drug resistant. Microarray analyses suggested that the resistance determinants were generally associated with mobile genetic elements. Resistant strains were not clonally related, and were, furthermore not concentrated at one or a few beach sites. This suggests that these strains are entering the waters at a low rate but in a widespread manner. The study demonstrates that resistant E. coli are present in coastal bathing waters where they can come into contact with bathers, and that the resistance determinants are potentially transferable. Some of the resistances registered in the study are to important antibiotics used in human medicine such as fluoroquinolones. The spread of antibiotic resistant genes, from the clinical setting to the environment, has clear implications with respect to the current management of bacterial infections and the long term value of antimicrobial therapy. The present study is the first of its kind in Norway.

  16. Effects of electron acceptors on removal of antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli, resistance genes and class 1 integrons under anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Heyang; Miller, Jennifer H; Abu-Reesh, Ibrahim M; Pruden, Amy; He, Zhen

    2016-11-01

    Anaerobic biotechnologies can effectively remove antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), but there is a need to better understand the mechanisms. Here we employ bioelectrochemical systems (BES) as a platform to investigate the fate of a native tetracycline and sulfonamide-resistant Escherichia coli strain and its ARGs. The E. coli strain carrying intI1, sulI and tet(E) was isolated from domestic wastewater and dosed into a tubular BES. The BES was first operated as a microbial fuel cell (MFC), with aeration in the cathode, which resulted in enhanced removal of E. coli and ARGs by ~2 log (i.e., order of magnitude) when switched from high current to open circuit operation mode. The BES was then operated as a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) to exclude the effects of oxygen diffusion, and the removal of E. coli and ARGs during the open circuit configuration was again 1-2 log higher than that at high current mode. Significant correlations of E. coli vs. current (R(2)=0.73) and ARGs vs. E. coli (R(2) ranged from 0.54 to 0.87), and the fact that the BES substrate contained no electron acceptors, implied that the persistence of the E. coli and its ARGs was determined by the availability of indigenous electron acceptors in the BES, i.e., the anode electrode or the electron shuttles generated by the exoelectrogens. Subsequent experiments with pure-culture tetracycline and sulfonamide-resistant E. coli being incubated in a two-chamber MEC and serum bottles demonstrated that the E. coli could survive by respiring anode electrode and/or electron shuttles released by exoelectrogens, and ARGs persisted with their host E. coli. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of restricted amoxicillin/clavulanic acid use on Escherichia coli resistance--antibiotic DU90% profiles with bacterial resistance rates: a visual presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimica Matanovic, Suzana; Bergman, Ulf; Vukovic, Dubravka; Wettermark, Björn; Vlahovic-Palcevski, Vera

    2010-10-01

    High use of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (AMC) at the University Hospital Osijek (Croatia) contributed to high rates of resistance in Enterobacteriaceae, in particular Escherichia coli (50%). Thus, in order to decrease bacterial resistance, AMC use was restricted. We present results of the restriction on resistance amongst antibiotics accounting for 90% of antibiotic use [drug utilisation 90% (DU90%)]. Data were analysed on antibiotic use and microbiological susceptibility of E. coli during two 9-month periods, before and after the restriction of AMC use. Drug use was presented as numbers of defined daily doses (DDDs) and DDDs/100 bed-days. Resistance of E. coli to antibiotics was presented as percentages of isolated strains in the DU90% segment. Use of AMC was 16 DDDs/100 bed-days or 30% of all antibiotics before the intervention. Use of AMC fell to 2 DDDs/100 bed-days or 4% after the intervention, and resistance of E. coli fell from 37% to 11%. In conclusion, restricted use of AMC resulted in a significant decrease of E. coli resistance. DU90% resistance profiles are simple and useful tools in highlighting problems in antibiotic use and resistance but may also be useful in long-term follow-up of antibiotic policy. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  18. [Evaluation of antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli in urinary tract infections in Primary Care Barbastro Sector (Huesca)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betrán, Ana; Cortés, Ana Ma; López, Concepción

    2015-10-01

    Evaluate the resistance of community-uropathogen, Escherichia coli to several antibiotics in our health sector and deduce empirical treatment options. E. coli strains isolated from urine cultures of patients from Primary Care Barbastro Sector, between January 2011 and December 2013, were studied. The resistances rates for nine common antibiotics were determined, and differences in sensitivity were analyzed, comparing confidence intervals for proportions by the method of Wilson. E. coli was the most frequently isolated bacteria (61.08% of positive urine cultures sent from Primary Care). Overall, there has been an increase in resistance of E. coli isolates in all antimicrobials studied. Still, resistance has remained below 4% compared to fosfomycin and nitrofurantoin and below 10% in cephalosporins second and third generation. Resistance to amoxicillin-clavulanate has increased progressively reaching 21.5% in 2013; only this antibiotic has presented a statistically significant increase. The maximum levels of resistance (over 30%) were found in the antibiotics administered orally and often indicated in uncomplicated urinary tract infections: trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, ciprofloxacin and ampicillin. Update knowledge susceptibility patterns of microorganisms most commonly isolated in urine samples in each health area allows to choose the most suitable and effective treatments trough empirical knowledge.

  19. Effects of electron acceptors on removal of antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli, resistance genes and class 1 integrons under anaerobic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Heyang; Miller, Jennifer H. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Abu-Reesh, Ibrahim M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Qatar University, P.O. Box 2713, Doha (Qatar); Pruden, Amy [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); He, Zhen, E-mail: zhenhe@vt.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Anaerobic biotechnologies can effectively remove antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), but there is a need to better understand the mechanisms. Here we employ bioelectrochemical systems (BES) as a platform to investigate the fate of a native tetracycline and sulfonamide-resistant Escherichia coli strain and its ARGs. The E. coli strain carrying intI1, sulI and tet(E) was isolated from domestic wastewater and dosed into a tubular BES. The BES was first operated as a microbial fuel cell (MFC), with aeration in the cathode, which resulted in enhanced removal of E. coli and ARGs by ~ 2 log (i.e., order of magnitude) when switched from high current to open circuit operation mode. The BES was then operated as a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) to exclude the effects of oxygen diffusion, and the removal of E. coli and ARGs during the open circuit configuration was again 1–2 log higher than that at high current mode. Significant correlations of E. coli vs. current (R{sup 2} = 0.73) and ARGs vs. E. coli (R{sup 2} ranged from 0.54 to 0.87), and the fact that the BES substrate contained no electron acceptors, implied that the persistence of the E. coli and its ARGs was determined by the availability of indigenous electron acceptors in the BES, i.e., the anode electrode or the electron shuttles generated by the exoelectrogens. Subsequent experiments with pure-culture tetracycline and sulfonamide-resistant E. coli being incubated in a two-chamber MEC and serum bottles demonstrated that the E. coli could survive by respiring anode electrode and/or electron shuttles released by exoelectrogens, and ARGs persisted with their host E. coli. - Highlights: • The fate of an antibiotic resistant E. coli stain and its ARGs in BES is studied. • The removal of the E. coli and its ARGs is enhanced with decreased current. • The ARGs are removed when the host E. coli dies and persist when the host survives. • The survival of the E. coli depends

  20. Effects of electron acceptors on removal of antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli, resistance genes and class 1 integrons under anaerobic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Heyang; Miller, Jennifer H.; Abu-Reesh, Ibrahim M.; Pruden, Amy; He, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic biotechnologies can effectively remove antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), but there is a need to better understand the mechanisms. Here we employ bioelectrochemical systems (BES) as a platform to investigate the fate of a native tetracycline and sulfonamide-resistant Escherichia coli strain and its ARGs. The E. coli strain carrying intI1, sulI and tet(E) was isolated from domestic wastewater and dosed into a tubular BES. The BES was first operated as a microbial fuel cell (MFC), with aeration in the cathode, which resulted in enhanced removal of E. coli and ARGs by ~ 2 log (i.e., order of magnitude) when switched from high current to open circuit operation mode. The BES was then operated as a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) to exclude the effects of oxygen diffusion, and the removal of E. coli and ARGs during the open circuit configuration was again 1–2 log higher than that at high current mode. Significant correlations of E. coli vs. current (R 2 = 0.73) and ARGs vs. E. coli (R 2 ranged from 0.54 to 0.87), and the fact that the BES substrate contained no electron acceptors, implied that the persistence of the E. coli and its ARGs was determined by the availability of indigenous electron acceptors in the BES, i.e., the anode electrode or the electron shuttles generated by the exoelectrogens. Subsequent experiments with pure-culture tetracycline and sulfonamide-resistant E. coli being incubated in a two-chamber MEC and serum bottles demonstrated that the E. coli could survive by respiring anode electrode and/or electron shuttles released by exoelectrogens, and ARGs persisted with their host E. coli. - Highlights: • The fate of an antibiotic resistant E. coli stain and its ARGs in BES is studied. • The removal of the E. coli and its ARGs is enhanced with decreased current. • The ARGs are removed when the host E. coli dies and persist when the host survives. • The survival of the E. coli depends on the

  1. Self-transmissible antibiotic resistance to ampicillin, streptomycin, and tetracyclin found in Escherichia coli isolates from contaminated drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walia, Satish K; Kaiser, Alan; Parkash, Mohinder; Chaudhry, G Rasul

    2004-01-01

    Presence and survival of cultivable bacteria in drinking water can act as a vehicle to disseminate virulence genes (adherence, enterotoxigenic and antibiotic resistance) to other bacteria. This can result in high morbidity and mortality, and the failure of the treatment of life threatening bacterial infections in humans and animals. In this study, antibiotic resistance (ABR) patterns and transferability of the ABR markers was investigated in Escherichia coli isolates obtained from drinking water and human urine samples. The ABR in E. coli isolates was determined against 15 antibiotics commonly used in human and veterinary medicine. A high frequency of ABR to carbenicillin (56%), tetracycline (53%) and streptomycin (49%) and a low frequency of cefizoxime (5%), amikacin (8%), cefazidine, (5%), chloramphenicol (9%), and kanamycin (18%) was found in the tested E. coli isolates. ABR to kanamycin (0% vs. 35%) and moxalactam (4% vs. 30%) was higher in drinking water isolates whereas resistance to streptomycin (92% vs. 15%), ampicillin (24% vs. 10%), and nalidixic acid (12% vs. 0%) was higher in human urine isolates. A large number of E. coli isolates (93%) exhibited resistance to two or more antibiotics. Two of E. coli isolates from drinking water showed resistances to six (Cb Cm Cx Ip Mx Tc and An Cb Km Mx Sm Tc) and one was resistant to seven antibiotics (Am An Cb Km Mx Sm Tc). A majority of the multiple antibiotic resistant E. coli isolates contained one or more plasmids (size ranged approximately 1.4 Kb to approximately 40 Kb). The ABR traits (Am and Tc) were transferable to other bacteria via conjugation. These data raise an important question about the impact of E. coli containing self-transmissible R-plasmids as a potential reservoir of virulence genes in drinking water.

  2. Combating Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Farm Animals FDA: Cutting-Edge Technology Sheds Light on Antibiotic Resistance For More Information Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance Antimicrobial Resistance Information for Consumers and Health Professionals CDC: Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work More in Consumer Updates ...

  3. Pathotyping and antibiotic resistance of porcine enterovirulent Escherichia coli strains from Switzerland (2014-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, P; Gobeli, S; Perreten, V

    2017-07-01

    A total of 131 porcine E. coli were isolated in 2014 and 2015 from the gut of 115 pigs raised in Switzerland and suffering from diarrhea. The isolates were tested for antibiotic resistance, serotypes, virulence factors and genetic diversity. Serotypes were assigned by agglutination tests and virulence genes were identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Antibiotic resistance profile was determined by the measurement of the MIC of 14 antibiotics and by the detection of the corresponding genes using microarray and PCR approaches. Genetic diversity was determined by repetitive palindromic PCR (rep- PCR) revealing a heterogenous population. Half of the E. coli isolates possessing virulence factors could not be assigned to any of the 19 serotypes tested, but contained toxins and adhesins similarly to the sero-typable E. coli isolates. The most prevalent E. coli serotypes found were K88ac (18%), O139:K82 (6%), O141:K85ac (5%), O108:K`V189` (5%), O119:K`V113` (3%) and O157:K`V17` (2%). The combination of toxins EAST-1, STb and LT-I and adhesin F4 characterizing ETEC was the most frequent. The shigatoxin Stx2e (STEC) and intimin Eae (EPEC) were also detected, but less frequently. Seventy percent of the isolates were resistant to at least one antibiotic and 29% were resistant to more than 3 antibiotics. Isolates exhibited resistance to tetracycline (50%) associated to resistance genes tet(A), tet(B) and tet(C), sulfamethoxazole (49%) [sul1, sul2 and sul3], trimethoprim (34%) [dfr], nalidixic acid (29%), ampicillin (26%) [blaTEM-1], gentamicin (17%) [aac(3) -IIc, aac(3) -IVa and aac(3) -VIa], chloramphenicol (17%) [catAI and catAIII], and ciprofloxacin (8%) [mutations in GyrA (S83L) and ParC (S80I)]. All isolates were susceptible to 3rd generation cephalosporins, carbapenems, colistin and tigecycline. Pathogenic E. coli isolates from pigs in Switzerland could frequently not be assigned to a known serotype even if they contained diarrhea-causing virulence factors. They

  4. De novo acquisition of resistance to three antibiotics by Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Horst, M.A.; Schuurmans, J.M.; Smid, M.C.; Koenders, B.B.; ter Kuile, B.H.

    2011-01-01

    The acquisition of resistance to amoxicillin, tetracycline, and enrofloxacin by Escherichia coli MG 1655 was examined by exposing growing cells to constant or stepwise increasing concentrations of these compounds. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of E. coli for amoxicillin increased from

  5. OCCURRENCE OF ANTIBIOTIC-RESISTANT UROPATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI CLONAL GROUP A IN WASTEWATER EFFLUENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isolates of Escherichia coli belonging to clonal group A (CGA), a recently described disseminated cause of drug-resistant urinary tract infections in humans, were present in four of seven sewage effluents collected from geographically dispersed areas of the United States. ...

  6. Hospitalization, a risk factor for antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli in the community?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinsma, N; Filius, PMG; van den Bogaard, AE; Nys, S; Degener, J; Endtz, HP; Stobberingh, EE

    Objective: The impact of hospitalization on the prevalence of resistant Escherichia coli in the intestinal flora of patients admitted to the surgical wards of three Dutch university-affiliated hospitals was analysed prospectively. Methods: Faecal samples were obtained on admission to the hospital,

  7. Antibiotic resistance and resistance genes in Escherichia coli from poultry farms, southwest Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Adelowo, Olawale O.; Fagade, Obasola E.; Agersø, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This study investigated the mechanisms of resistance in 36 E. coli isolated from waste, litter, soil and water samples collected from poultry farms in Southwestern Nigeria. Methodology: Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) distributions of the isolates were determined using the methods of the Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute and resistance genes detected by PCR. Results: A total of 30 isolates (94%) showed resistance to more than one antimicrobial. Percentage resista...

  8. Resistance to Antibiotics in Strains of Staphylococcus spp., Enterococcus spp. and Escherichia coli Isolated from Rectal Swabs of Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kolář

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at determining the level of resistance of selected bacterial species (Staphylococcus spp., Enterococcus spp., Escherichia coli isolated from rectal swabs of pigs to antimicrobial agents. The tested strains were isolated from piglets aged 7 to 30 days. Bacterial species were identified by standard microbiological techniques and susceptibility to antibiotics was determined quantitatively by the standard microdilution method. Resistance of the Staphylococcus aureus strain to oxacillin was confirmed by detection of the mecA gene and PBP2a. A total of 115 Staphylococcus spp. isolates were collected. In the case of Staphylococcus aureus, the methicillin-resistant strain (MRSA was identified. Moreover, higher frequency of coagulase-negative staphylococci with minimum inhibitory concentration of oxacillin ≥ 0.5 mg/l was noticed. Inducible resistance to clindamycin in the Staphylococcus hominis strain was also detected. The strains of Enterococcus spp. (61 isolates exhibited high resistance to tetracycline (98.5%, erythromycin (86.8% and chloramphenicol (54.4%. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci were not isolated. In the case of Escherichia coli strains (111 isolates, higher frequency of resistant strains to tetracycline (81.1% and ampicillin (62.2% was documented. Resistance to fluoroquinolones and production of broad-spectrum β-lactamases was not noticed. The presented study may be considered as a pilot project assessing the prevalence of resistant bacteria in piglets kept on a single farm. It demonstrated the presence of resistant strains of Staphylococcus spp., including one MRSA strain, Enterococcus spp. and Escherichia coli. These strains may be present as a result of postnatal colonization with both bacterial microflora of dams and environmental microflora.

  9. Multiple antibiotic resistance iIndex of EscherichiaColi isolates in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The effectiveness of available antibiotics is reducing as microorganisms device means of evading its effects, resulting in the development of superbugs. Pathogens previously susceptible are becoming resistant, and spreading beyond the hospital environment. This change is a major concern for infection ...

  10. Antibiotic resistance and resistance genes in Escherichia coli from poultry farms, southwest Nigeria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adelowo, Olawale O.; Fagade, Obasola E.; Agersø, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This study investigated the mechanisms of resistance in 36 E. coli isolated from waste, litter, soil and water samples collected from poultry farms in Southwestern Nigeria. Methodology: Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) distributions of the isolates were determined using...... the methods of the Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute and resistance genes detected by PCR. Results: A total of 30 isolates (94%) showed resistance to more than one antimicrobial. Percentage resistance was: tetracycline 81%, sulphamethoxazole 67%, streptomycin 56%, trimethoprim 47 %, ciprofloxacin 42......%, ampicillin 36%, spectinomycin 28%, nalidixic acid 25%, chloramphenicol 22%, neomycin 14%, gentamicin 8%, amoxicillin-clavulanate, ceftiofur, cefotaxime, colistin, florfenicol and apramycin 0%. Resistance genes found among the isolates include bla-TEM (85%), sul2 (67%), sul3 (17%), aadA (65%), strA (70%), str...

  11. Geographical Variation in Antibiotic-Resistant Escherichia coli Isolates from Stool, Cow-Dung and Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Krushna Chandra; Tamhankar, Ashok J.; Sahoo, Soumyakanta; Sahu, Priyadarshi Soumyaranjan; Klintz, Senia Rosales; Lundborg, Cecilia Stålsby

    2012-01-01

    Little information is available on relationships between the biophysical environment and antibiotic resistance. This study was conducted to investigate the antibiotic resistance pattern of Escherichia coli isolated from child stool samples, cow-dung and drinking water from the non-coastal (230 households) and coastal (187 households) regions of Odisha, India. Susceptibility testing of E. coli isolates (n = 696) to the following antibiotics: tetracycline, ampicillin/sulbactam, cefuroxime, cefotaxime, cefixime, cotrimoxazole, amikacin, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin and nalidixic acid was performed by the disk diffusion method. Ciprofloxacin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined for ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates (n = 83). Resistance to at least one antibiotic was detected in 90% or more of the E. coli isolates. Ciprofloxacin MIC values ranged from 8 to 32 µg/mL. The odds ratio (OR) of resistance in E. coli isolates from children’s stool (OR = 3.1, 95% CI 1.18–8.01), cow-dung (OR = 3.6, 95% CI 1.59–8.03, P = 0.002) and drinking water (OR = 3.8, 95% CI 1.00–14.44, P = 0.049) were higher in non-coastal compared to coastal region. Similarly, the co-resistance in cow-dung (OR = 2.5, 95% CI 1.39–4.37, P = 0.002) and drinking water (OR = 3.2, 95% CI 1.36–7.41, P = 0.008) as well as the multi-resistance in cow-dung (OR = 2.2, 95% CI 1.12–4.34, P = 0.022) and drinking water (OR = 2.7, 95% CI 1.06–7.07, P = 0.036) were also higher in the non-coastal compared to the coastal region. PMID:22690160

  12. [Antibiotic resistance patterns of Escherichia coli strains isolated from urine cultures in Turkey: a meta-analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aykan, Sadiye Berna; Ciftci, Ihsan Hakkı

    2013-10-01

    Escherichia coli is the most frequently isolated microorganism from both community-acquired and nosocomial urinary tract infections in Turkey. A large number of studies concerning antibiotic susceptibility of E.coli have been published from different centers throughout the country. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibiotic resistance patterns of E.coli strains isolated from urine cultures by a meta-analysis in published medical literature between the years of 1996-2012 in Turkey. The study was planned and conducted in accordance with the declaration of PRISMA and describes the methods of literature search, the determining criteria for inclusion and evaluation of articles, data collection and statistical analysis. To find the published series Google Scholar and PubMed international databases were used to access published manuscripts evaluated according to the determined criteria for acceptance and rejection. For each study, general data and antibiotic resistance rates were collected as a common unit. Publications considered as lacking in appropriate content was eliminated from the study. Statistical analysis of the data obtained were 95% confidence intervals, and p≤ 0.05 value was considered as significant difference. A total of 228 articles were found to be published during 1996-2012 period, while 101 of them were included in the meta-analysis according to the eligibility criteria. The analyses indicated that nitrofurantoin and piperacillin resistance rates have been decreased, whereas ciprofloxacin, cefepime, co-trimoxazole and extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) positivity rates have been increased during the study period. The increases in the rates of ciprofloxacin and cefepime resistance and and ESBL production were statistically-significant (pAntibiotic resistance rates, except for imipenem, in bacterial strains, isolated from hospitalized patients were found significantly higher in strains obtained from outpatients. The differences between

  13. Mecanismos moleculares de resistencia antibiótica en Escherichia coli asociadas a diarrea Molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli- associated diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Mosquito

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available La resistencia antibiótica es un problema emergente a nivel mundial presente en diversas bacterias, en especial en la Escherichia coli, que tiene altos porcentajes de resistencia hacia ampicilina, trimetoprim-sulfametoxazol, tetraciclina, cloramfenicol y ácido nalidíxico, lo que supone grandes complicaciones en el tratamiento antibiótico cuando este es requerido. Este aumento de resistencia antibiótica se debe a la adquisición de diferentes mecanismos moleculares de resistencia mediante mutaciones puntuales a nivel cromosómico o transferencia horizontal de material genético entre especies relacionadas o diferentes, facilitada por algunos elementos genéticos tales como los integrones. Esta revisión discute los efectos de los mecanismos moleculares de resistencia más comunes en E.coli: inactivación enzimática, alteraciones en el sitio blanco y alteraciones de la permeabilidad. El conocer los mecanismos de resistencia implicados, como lo recomienda la Organización Mundial de la Salud, permitirá optimizar la vigilancia de resistencia y las políticas de control y uso de antibióticos a nivel nacional.Antibiotic resistance is an emerging problem worldwide present in many bacteria, specially in Escherichia coli, which has high percentages of resistance to ampicilline, thrimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, chloramphenicol and nalidixic acid, which implies important complications in antibiotic treatment when required. The increasing antibiotic resistance is due to the acquisition of different molecular mechanisms of resistance through point chromosomal mutations and /or horizontal transfer of genetic material between related or different species facilitated by some genetic elements such as integrons. This review discusses the effects of the most common molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in E. coli: enzymatic inactivation, changes in the target site and permeability disturbances. Getting to know the mechanisms of

  14. Effect of ethnomedicinal plants used in folklore medicine in Jordan as antibiotic resistant inhibitors on Escherichia coli

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    Aburjai Talal A

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli occurs naturally in the human gut; however, certain strains that can cause infections, are becoming resistant to antibiotics. Multidrug-resistant E. coli that produce extended-spectrum β lactamases (ESBLs, such as the CTX-M enzymes, have emerged within the community setting as an important cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs and bloodstream infections may be associated with these community-onsets. This is the first report testing the antibiotic resistance-modifying activity of nineteen Jordanian plants against multidrug-resistant E. coli. Methods The susceptibility of bacterial isolates to antibiotics was tested by determining their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs using a broth microdilution method. Nineteen Jordanian plant extracts (Capparis spinosa L., Artemisia herba-alba Asso, Echinops polyceras Boiss., Gundelia tournefortii L, Varthemia iphionoides Boiss. & Blanche, Eruca sativa Mill., Euphorbia macroclada L., Hypericum trequetrifolium Turra, Achillea santolina L., Mentha longifolia Host, Origanum syriacum L., Phlomis brachydo(Boiss. Zohary, Teucrium polium L., Anagyris foetida L., Trigonella foenum-graecum L., Thea sinensis L., Hibiscus sabdariffa L., Lepidium sativum L., Pimpinella anisum L. were combined with antibiotics, from different classes, and the inhibitory effect of the combinations was estimated. Results Methanolic extracts of the plant materials enhanced the inhibitory effects of chloramphenicol, neomycin, doxycycline, cephalexin and nalidixic acid against both the standard strain and to a lesser extent the resistant strain of E. coli. Two edible plant extracts (Gundelia tournefortii L. and Pimpinella anisum L. generally enhanced activity against resistant strain. Some of the plant extracts like Origanum syriacum L.(Labiateae, Trigonella foenum- graecum L.(Leguminosae, Euphorbia macroclada (Euphorbiaceae and Hibiscus sabdariffa (Malvaceae did not enhance the activity of

  15. Persistence of Escherichia coli clones and phenotypic and genotypic antibiotic resistance in recurrent urinary tract infections in childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kõljalg, Siiri; Truusalu, Kai; Vainumäe, Inga

    2009-01-01

    We assessed the clonality of consecutive Escherichia coli isolates during the course of recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTI) in childhood in order to compare clonality with phenotypic antibiotic resistance patterns, the presence of integrons, and the presence of the sul1, sul2, and sul3 genes....... Altogether, 78 urinary E. coli isolates from 27 children, who experienced recurrences during a 1-year follow-up after the first attack of acute pyelonephritis, were investigated. The MICs of sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT), ampicillin, cefuroxime, cefotaxime, and gentamicin...

  16. Characterization of Cefotaxime- and Ciprofloxacin-Resistant Commensal Escherichia coli Originating from Belgian Farm Animals Indicates High Antibiotic Resistance Transfer Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrecht, Ellen; Van Meervenne, Eva; Boon, Nico; Van de Wiele, Tom; Wattiau, Pierre; Herman, Lieve; Heyndrickx, Marc; Van Coillie, Els

    2017-11-17

    Food-producing animals represent one of the sources of antibiotic resistant commensal bacteria. There is an increasing awareness that these bacteria might have the potential to transfer their resistance genes to other (pathogenic) bacteria. In this study, 50 commensal Escherichia coli strains originating from food-producing animals and resistant to the "highest priority, critically important antibiotics" cefotaxime and/or ciprofloxacin, were selected for further characterization. For each strain (i) an antibiogram, (ii) the phylogenetic group, (iii) plasmid replicon type, (iv) presence and identification of integrons, and (v) antibiotic resistance transfer ratios were determined. Forty-five of these strains were resistant to 5 or more antibiotics, and 6 strains were resistant to 10 or more antibiotics. Resistance was most common to ampicillin (100%), sulfamethoxazole, ciprofloxacin (82%), trimethoprim, tetracycline (74%), cefotaxime, (70%) and ceftazidime (62%). Phylogenetic groups A (62%) and B1 (26%) were most common, followed by C (8%) and E (4%). In 43 strains, more than 1 replicon type was detected, with FII (88%), FIB (70%), and I1 (48%) being the most encountered types. Forty strains, positive for integrons, all harbored a class I integron and seven of them contained an additional class II integron. No class III integrons were detected. The antibiotic resistance transfer was assessed by liquid mating experiments. The transfer ratio, expressed as the number of transconjugants per recipient, was between 10 -5 and 10 0 for cefotaxime resistance and between 10 -7 and 10 -1 for ciprofloxacin resistance. The results of the current study prove that commensal E. coli in food-production animals can be a source of multiple resistance genes and that these bacteria can easily spread their ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime resistance.

  17. Antibiotic resistance among Escherichia coli isolates from stool samples of children aged 3 to 14 years from Ujjain, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Antibiotic resistance is a major global public health concern, particularly in settings where few treatment options are available. Limited research has been done on antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli of Indian children at community level. Therefore we studied antibiotic resistance patterns in E. coli isolates from stool samples of children aged 3-14 years from Ujjain, Central India, to investigate associations of resistance with demographic variables. Methods Children, 3-14 years of age, were included from 30 randomly selected villages of Palwa demographic surveillance site, Ujjain, India. Parents were interviewed using a questionnaire, and stool samples were collected from participating children. E. coli were isolated from stool samples (n = 529), and susceptibility testing to 18 different antibiotics was done using standard methods. Results The proportions of isolates resistant to various antibiotics were, nalidixic acid, (45%), tetracycline (37%), ampicillin (37%), sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (29%) and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (29%). No isolates were resistant to imipenem. Overall, 72% of isolates were resistant to at least one antibiotic and 33% were multi-drug resistant. High rates of cross-resistance were seen for 15 (83%) of the antibiotics studied. E. coli isolates from children with literate mothers were more resistant to penicillins and fluoroquinolones. ESBL-producers comprised 9% of the isolates. Conclusion Antibiotic resistance and cross-resistance were common in E. coli from stools of children. Resistance rates were associated with maternal literacy. PMID:24124728

  18. The resistance to antibiotics of strains of Streptococcus viridans, Streptococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus and Klebsiella isolated in Poland*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeljaszewicz, J.; Hawiger, J.

    1966-01-01

    A nation-wide survey has been carried out in Poland into the susceptibility of six genera of bacteria to eight antibiotics. The antibiotic-resistance of streptococci differed from that of the Gram-negative rods studied. Escherichia coli, Klebsiella and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are known to be completely resistant to penicillin. Streptococcus faecalis was much more resistant to antibiotics than Streptococcus viridans (highest resistance to streptomycin — 90.3% and 74.9%, respectively; least resistance to chloramphenicol — 47.3% and 9.1%). More than 90% of all Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated were resistant to all the antibiotics; high resistance was also exhibited by E. coli (94.5% resistant to erythromycin and 59.5% to chloramphenicol), Proteus (92.3% to penicillin and 63.0% to chloramphenicol) and Klebsiella (84.0% to erythromycin and 62.8% to oxytetracycline). PMID:5332528

  19. Antibiotic Resistance in Escherichia Coli Strains Isolated from Urine of Inpatients and Outpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Davoodabadi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The urinary tract infections regarded as a health problem around the world and not only as an agent of nosocomial infections but also infections in the community. Community acquired UTIs cause significant illness in the first 2 years of life [1]. Urinary tract infections in both inpatient and outpatient are common and widespread use of antibiotics is often the cause of emerging one or more antibiotic-resistant microorganisms [2]. Most studies have shown higher antibiotic resistance in bacterial strains isolated from hospitalized patients than outpatients. In this study, antibiogram was performed using disk diffusion susceptibility method according to NCCLS standards of the International Committee [3]. 8 different antibiotics, including ciprofloxacin (CP: 30 μg, ceftriaxone (CRO: 30 μg, cephalotin (CF: 30 μg, cefixime (CFM: 5 μg, cotrimoxazole (SXT, nalidixic acid (NA: 30 μg, nitrofurantoin (FM: 300 μg, gentamicin (GM: 10 μg were used for antibiogram. During 1388 the total number of urine samples sent to hospital microbiology laboratories valiasr (aj of Arak was 5156, of which 446 samples (65.8% were positive for E. coli culture.

  20. A study on the role that quorum sensing play in antibiotic-resistant plasmid conjugative transfer in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yueheng; Ma, Qingping; Su, Bingmei; Chen, Rui; Lin, Juan; Lin, Zhifen; Wang, Dali; Yu, Yang

    2018-03-01

    Horizontal genes transfer (HGT) plays an important role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in the environment. However, the mechanisms of HGT of ARGs under the influence of antibiotics in sub-MIC remain rarely explored. Moreover, given its collective nature, HGT was considered to be relative to quorum sensing (QS) system. To investigate whether QS has any impact on horizontal gene transfer of ARGs, experiments were conducted to determine the conjugative efficiency of plasmid RP4 on Escherichia coli (E.coli) under the influences of tetracyclines (TCs), quorum sensing autoinducers (AIs) and quorum sensing inhibitors (QSIs). The results indicated that the sub-MIC TCs could facilitate the conjugative transfer of RP4, a process which could be enhanced by AIs but inhibited by QSIs. This study demonstrated the roles that QS played in the dissemination of ARGs, and provided theoretical insights into the mechanism of HGT of ARGs in the environment.

  1. [Resistence of Escherichia coli, the most frequent cause of urinary tract infection in children, to antibiotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanović, Vesna; Milosević, Biljana

    2010-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) take the second place in the incidence of bacterial infection in children. Escherichia coli is a cause of infection in 85-90%. A periodic evaluation of the resistance to antimicrobial drugs has to be performed in each geographic region, since investigations confirmed that the resistance of bacteria causing UTI has been in progress. A retrospective investigation has been performed, comprising the two time periods in the range of 10 years in order to identify the prevalence and resistance of the bacteria causing UTI in the patients treated at the Department of Nephrology of Institute for Child and Youth Health Care of Vojvodina. During the first investigated period from January 1996 up to December 1997, there were 163 urin analyses performed vs 134 urine analyses in the second period, starting from January 2006 to December 2007. In both periods, Escherichia coli, was the most frequent cause of UTI (82.1% in 1996/97 vs 86.50% in 2006/07). During this ten-year period, the resistance of Escherichia coli increased both to ampicillin (from 53% to 69% (p > 0.05) and to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (34% vs 55%; p resistance to ceftazidim, gentamycin and nalidixic acid, but significant increase to ampicillin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and cephalexin. For the initial therapy of UTI in the Province of Vojvodina we recommend: perorally--ephalosporins I, II and III generation, and in case when the child is not capable to get therapy perorally, or in the case of highly febrile infant--ephalosporins III generation parenterally.

  2. Temporal interplay between efflux pumps and target mutations in development of antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Renu; Swick, Michelle C; Ledesma, Kimberly R; Yang, Zhen; Hu, Ming; Zechiedrich, Lynn; Tam, Vincent H

    2012-04-01

    The emergence of resistance presents a debilitating change in the management of infectious diseases. Currently, the temporal relationship and interplay between various mechanisms of drug resistance are not well understood. A thorough understanding of the resistance development process is needed to facilitate rational design of countermeasure strategies. Using an in vitro hollow-fiber infection model that simulates human drug treatment, we examined the appearance of efflux pump (acrAB) overexpression and target topoisomerase gene (gyrA and parC) mutations over time in the emergence of quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli. Drug-resistant isolates recovered early (24 h) had 2- to 8-fold elevation in the MIC due to acrAB overexpression, but no point mutations were noted. In contrast, high-level (≥ 64× MIC) resistant isolates with target site mutations (gyrA S83L with or without parC E84K) were selected more readily after 120 h, and regression of acrAB overexpression was observed at 240 h. Using a similar dosing selection pressure, the emergence of levofloxacin resistance was delayed in a strain with acrAB deleted compared to the isogenic parent. The role of efflux pumps in bacterial resistance development may have been underappreciated. Our data revealed the interplay between two mechanisms of quinolone resistance and provided a new mechanistic framework in the development of high-level resistance. Early low-level levofloxacin resistance conferred by acrAB overexpression preceded and facilitated high-level resistance development mediated by target site mutation(s). If this interpretation is correct, then these findings represent a paradigm shift in the way quinolone resistance is thought to develop.

  3. Toward repurposing ciclopirox as an antibiotic against drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly M Carlson-Banning

    Full Text Available Antibiotic-resistant infections caused by gram-negative bacteria are a major healthcare concern. Repurposing drugs circumvents the time and money limitations associated with developing new antimicrobial agents needed to combat these antibiotic-resistant infections. Here we identified the off-patent antifungal agent, ciclopirox, as a candidate to repurpose for antibiotic use. To test the efficacy of ciclopirox against antibiotic-resistant pathogens, we used a curated collection of Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolates that are representative of known antibiotic resistance phenotypes. We found that ciclopirox, at 5-15 µg/ml concentrations, inhibited bacterial growth regardless of the antibiotic resistance status. At these same concentrations, ciclopirox reduced growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates, but some of these pathogens required higher ciclopirox concentrations to completely block growth. To determine how ciclopirox inhibits bacterial growth, we performed an overexpression screen in E. coli. This screen revealed that galE, which encodes UDP-glucose 4-epimerase, rescued bacterial growth at otherwise restrictive ciclopirox concentrations. We found that ciclopirox does not inhibit epimerization of UDP-galactose by purified E. coli GalE; however, ΔgalU, ΔgalE, ΔrfaI, or ΔrfaB mutant strains all have lower ciclopirox minimum inhibitory concentrations than the parent strain. The galU, galE, rfaI, and rfaB genes all encode enzymes that use UDP-galactose or UDP-glucose for galactose metabolism and lipopolysaccharide (LPS biosynthesis. Indeed, we found that ciclopirox altered LPS composition of an E. coli clinical isolate. Taken together, our data demonstrate that ciclopirox affects galactose metabolism and LPS biosynthesis, two pathways important for bacterial growth and virulence. The lack of any reported fungal resistance to ciclopirox in over twenty years of use in the clinic

  4. Toward repurposing ciclopirox as an antibiotic against drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson-Banning, Kimberly M; Chou, Andrew; Liu, Zhen; Hamill, Richard J; Song, Yongcheng; Zechiedrich, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant infections caused by gram-negative bacteria are a major healthcare concern. Repurposing drugs circumvents the time and money limitations associated with developing new antimicrobial agents needed to combat these antibiotic-resistant infections. Here we identified the off-patent antifungal agent, ciclopirox, as a candidate to repurpose for antibiotic use. To test the efficacy of ciclopirox against antibiotic-resistant pathogens, we used a curated collection of Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolates that are representative of known antibiotic resistance phenotypes. We found that ciclopirox, at 5-15 µg/ml concentrations, inhibited bacterial growth regardless of the antibiotic resistance status. At these same concentrations, ciclopirox reduced growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates, but some of these pathogens required higher ciclopirox concentrations to completely block growth. To determine how ciclopirox inhibits bacterial growth, we performed an overexpression screen in E. coli. This screen revealed that galE, which encodes UDP-glucose 4-epimerase, rescued bacterial growth at otherwise restrictive ciclopirox concentrations. We found that ciclopirox does not inhibit epimerization of UDP-galactose by purified E. coli GalE; however, ΔgalU, ΔgalE, ΔrfaI, or ΔrfaB mutant strains all have lower ciclopirox minimum inhibitory concentrations than the parent strain. The galU, galE, rfaI, and rfaB genes all encode enzymes that use UDP-galactose or UDP-glucose for galactose metabolism and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis. Indeed, we found that ciclopirox altered LPS composition of an E. coli clinical isolate. Taken together, our data demonstrate that ciclopirox affects galactose metabolism and LPS biosynthesis, two pathways important for bacterial growth and virulence. The lack of any reported fungal resistance to ciclopirox in over twenty years of use in the clinic, its excellent safety

  5. Phenotypic Assays to Determine Virulence Factors of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) Isolates and their Correlation with Antibiotic Resistance Pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabasi, Mohsen; Asadi Karam, Mohammad Reza; Habibi, Mehri; Yekaninejad, Mir Saeed; Bouzari, Saeid

    2015-08-01

    Urinary tract infection caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains is one of the most important infections in the world. UPEC encode widespread virulence factors closely related with pathogenesis of the bacteria. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the presence of different phenotypic virulence markers in UPEC isolates and determine their correlation with antibiotic resistance pattern. UPEC isolates from patients with different clinical symptoms of UTI were collected and screened for biofilm and hemolysin production, mannose resistant, and mannose sensitive hemagglutination (MRHA and MSHA, respectively). In addition, antimicrobial resistance pattern and ESBL-producing isolates were recorded. Of the 156 UPEC isolates, biofilm and hemolysin formation was seen in 133 (85.3%) and 53 (34%) isolates, respectively. Moreover, 98 (62.8%) and 58 (37.2%) isolates showed the presence of Types 1 fimbriae (MSHA) and P fimbriae (MRHA), respectively. Our results also showed a relationship between biofilm formation in UPEC isolated from acute cystitis patients and recurrent UTI cases. Occurrence of UTI was dramatically correlated with the patients' profiles. We observed that the difference in antimicrobial susceptibilities of the biofilm and nonbiofilm former isolates was statistically significant. The UPEC isolates showed the highest resistance to ampicillin, tetracycline, amoxicillin, and cotrimoxazole. Moreover, 26.9% of isolates were ESBL producers. This study indicated that there is a relationship between the phenotypic virulence traits of the UPEC isolates, patients' profiles, and antibiotic resistance. Detection of the phenotypic virulence factors could help to improve understanding of pathogenesis of UPEC isolates and better medical intervention.

  6. Organic acids enhance bioavailability of tetracycline in water to Escherichia coli for uptake and expression of antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingjie; Boyd, Stephen A; Teppen, Brian J; Tiedje, James M; Li, Hui

    2014-11-15

    Tetracyclines are a large class of antimicrobials used most extensively in livestock feeding operations. A large portion of tetracyclines administered to livestock is excreted in manure and urine which is collected in waste lagoons. Subsequent land application of these wastes introduces tetracyclines into the soil environment, where they could exert selective pressure for the development of antibiotic resistance genes in bacteria. Tetracyclines form metal-complexes in natural waters, which could reduce their bioavailability for bacterial uptake. We hypothesized that many naturally-occurring organic acids could effectively compete with tetracyclines as ligands for metal cations, hence altering the bioavailability of tetracyclines to bacteria in a manner that could enhance the selective pressure. In this study, we investigated the influence of acetic acid, succinic acid, malonic acid, oxalic acid and citric acid on tetracycline uptake from water by Escherichia coli bioreporter construct containing a tetracycline resistance gene which induces the emission of green fluorescence when activated. The presence of the added organic acid ligands altered tetracycline speciation in a manner that enhanced tetracycline uptake by E. coli. Increased bacterial uptake of tetracycline and concomitant enhanced antibiotic resistance response were quantified, and shown to be positively related to the degree of organic acid ligand complexation of metal cations in the order of citric acid > oxalic acid > malonic acid > succinic acid > acetic acid. The magnitude of the bioresponse increased with increasing aqueous organic acid concentration. Apparent positive relation between intracellular tetracycline concentration and zwitterionic tetracycline species in aqueous solution indicates that (net) neutral tetracycline is the species which most readily enters E. coli cells. Understanding how naturally-occurring organic acid ligands affect tetracycline speciation in solution, and how speciation

  7. Antibiotic stress-induced modulation of the endoribonucleolytic activity of RNase III and RNase G confers resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wooseok; Kim, Yong-Hak; Sim, Se-Hoon; Hwang, Soonhye; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Younghoon; Bae, Jeehyeon; Hwang, Jihwan; Lee, Kangseok

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report a resistance mechanism that is induced through the modulation of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) processing on the exposure of Escherichia coli cells to aminoglycoside antibiotics. We observed decreased expression levels of RNase G associated with increased RNase III activity on rng mRNA in a subgroup of E. coli isolates that transiently acquired resistance to low levels of kanamycin or streptomycin. Analyses of 16S rRNA from the aminoglycoside-resistant E. coli cells, in addition to mutagenesis studies, demonstrated that the accumulation of 16S rRNA precursors containing 3–8 extra nucleotides at the 5’ terminus, which results from incomplete processing by RNase G, is responsible for the observed aminoglycoside resistance. Chemical protection, mass spectrometry analysis and cell-free translation assays revealed that the ribosomes from rng-deleted E. coli have decreased binding capacity for, and diminished sensitivity to, streptomycin and neomycin, compared with wild-type cells. It was observed that the deletion of rng had similar effects in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain SL1344. Our findings suggest that modulation of the endoribonucleolytic activity of RNase III and RNase G constitutes a previously uncharacterized regulatory pathway for adaptive resistance in E. coli and related gram-negative bacteria to aminoglycoside antibiotics. PMID:24489121

  8. Antibiotic stress-induced modulation of the endoribonucleolytic activity of RNase III and RNase G confers resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wooseok; Kim, Yong-Hak; Sim, Se-Hoon; Hwang, Soonhye; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Younghoon; Bae, Jeehyeon; Hwang, Jihwan; Lee, Kangseok

    2014-04-01

    Here, we report a resistance mechanism that is induced through the modulation of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) processing on the exposure of Escherichia coli cells to aminoglycoside antibiotics. We observed decreased expression levels of RNase G associated with increased RNase III activity on rng mRNA in a subgroup of E. coli isolates that transiently acquired resistance to low levels of kanamycin or streptomycin. Analyses of 16S rRNA from the aminoglycoside-resistant E. coli cells, in addition to mutagenesis studies, demonstrated that the accumulation of 16S rRNA precursors containing 3-8 extra nucleotides at the 5' terminus, which results from incomplete processing by RNase G, is responsible for the observed aminoglycoside resistance. Chemical protection, mass spectrometry analysis and cell-free translation assays revealed that the ribosomes from rng-deleted E. coli have decreased binding capacity for, and diminished sensitivity to, streptomycin and neomycin, compared with wild-type cells. It was observed that the deletion of rng had similar effects in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain SL1344. Our findings suggest that modulation of the endoribonucleolytic activity of RNase III and RNase G constitutes a previously uncharacterized regulatory pathway for adaptive resistance in E. coli and related gram-negative bacteria to aminoglycoside antibiotics.

  9. Molecular characterization and antibiotic resistance of enterotoxigenic and entero-aggregative Escherichia coli isolated from raw milk and unpasteurized cheeses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Bonyadian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of enterotoxigenic and enteroaggregative Escherichia coli strains and antibiotic resistance of the isolates in raw milk and unpasteurized cheese. Out of 200 samples of raw milk and 50 samples of unpasteurized cheeses, 96 and 24 strains of E. coli were isolated, respectively. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR was used to detect the genes encoding heat-stable enterotoxin a (STa, heat-stable enterotoxin b (STb, heat labile toxin (LT and enteroaggregative heat-stable toxin1 (EAST1. Twelve out of 120 (10.00% isolates harbored the gene for EAST1, 2(1.66% isolates were detected as producing STb and LT toxins and 12 (10.00% strains contained STb and EAST1 genes. None of the strains contain the STa gene. All of the strains were tested for antibiotic resistance by disk diffusion method. Disks included: ciprofloxacin (CFN, trimetoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TSX, oxytetracycline (OTC, gentamicin (GMN, cephalexin (CPN, nalidixic acid (NDA and nitrofurantoin (NFN, ampicillin (AMP, neomycin (NEO and streptomycin (STM. Among 120 isolated strains of E. coli, the resistance to each antibiotics were as follows: OTC100%, CPN 86.00%, NDA 56.00%, NFN 42.00%, GMN 30.00%, TSX 28.00%, CFN 20%, AM 23.40% and STM 4.25%. None of the isolates were resistant to NEO. The present data indicate that different resistant E. coli pathogens may be found in raw milk and unpasteurized cheese. It poses an infection risk for human and transferring the resistant factors to microflora of the consumers gut.

  10. Effects of therapeutical and reduced levels of antibiotics on the fraction of antibiotic-resistant strains of Escherichia coli in the chicken gut

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Horst, M.A.; Fabri, T.H.; Schuurmans, J.M.; Koenders, B.B.; Brul, S.; ter Kuile, B.H.

    2013-01-01

    Development of antibiotic resistance in the microbiota of farm animals and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the agricultural sector not only threaten veterinary use of antibiotics, but jeopardize human health care as well. The effects of exposure to antibiotics on spread and development of

  11. The contribution of small cryptic plasmids to the antibiotic resistance of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli E2348/69.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handford, Cynthia L; Stang, Charma T; Raivio, Tracy L; Dennis, Jonathan J

    2009-11-01

    Two uncharacterized small cryptic plasmids (SCPs) were isolated from enteropathogenic Escherichia coli strain E2348/69. Genomic DNA sequence analysis of both SCPs indicated that the smaller plasmid, p5217, encoded several mobilization genes, whereas the larger plasmid, p6148, encoded several putative antibiotic resistance determinants. Complementation analysis showed that p6148 encodes functional streptomycin resistance genes but, owing to the presence of several frameshift mutations, a nonfunctional sulfonamide resistance determinant. A plasmid similar to p6148 has previously been shown to confer a slight growth advantage on E. coli. However, we were unable to observe any significant growth advantage in different E. coli strains transformed with p6148. The p6148 DNA sequence is homologous in sequence and arrangement to DNA from other plasmid families, including large conjugative plasmids and SXT integrative and conjugative elements. This study suggests that gene clusters of the sul2-strAB antibiotic resistance genes are widespread and highly transferable, owing to their presence in a wide variety of mobile genetic elements.

  12. Comparative analysis of antibiotic resistance and phylogenetic group patterns in human and porcine urinary tract infectious Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Viktoria; Nielsen, E.M.; Krag, L.

    2009-01-01

    to relatively benign asymptomatic bacteriuria strains. Here we analyse a spectrum of porcine and human UTI E. coli strains with respect to their antibiotic resistance patterns and their phylogenetic groups, determined by multiplex PCR. The clonal profiles of the strains differed profoundly; whereas human......Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common infectious diseases in humans and domestic animals such as pigs. The most frequent infectious agent in such infections is Escherichia coli. Virulence characteristics of E. coli UTI strains range from highly virulent pyelonephritis strains...... strains predominantly belonged to clonal types B2 and D, these were not seen among the porcine strains, which all belonged to the E. coli clonal groups A and B1. Contrary to the human strains, the majority of the porcine strains were multidrug resistant. The distinct profiles of the porcine strains...

  13. High prevalence of multiple-antibiotic-resistant (MAR) Escherichia coli in river bed sediments of the Apies River, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Abia, ALK

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available that sediments are a reservoir for bacteria and possibly other pathogens including antibiotic-resistant bacteria but also suggests that antibiotic-resistant genes could be transferred to pathogens due to the high prevalence of multiple-antibiotic-resistant (MAR...

  14. Resistance-resistant antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldfield, Eric; Feng, Xinxin

    2014-12-01

    New antibiotics are needed because drug resistance is increasing while the introduction of new antibiotics is decreasing. We discuss here six possible approaches to develop 'resistance-resistant' antibiotics. First, multitarget inhibitors in which a single compound inhibits more than one target may be easier to develop than conventional combination therapies with two new drugs. Second, inhibiting multiple targets in the same metabolic pathway is expected to be an effective strategy owing to synergy. Third, discovering multiple-target inhibitors should be possible by using sequential virtual screening. Fourth, repurposing existing drugs can lead to combinations of multitarget therapeutics. Fifth, targets need not be proteins. Sixth, inhibiting virulence factor formation and boosting innate immunity may also lead to decreased susceptibility to resistance. Although it is not possible to eliminate resistance, the approaches reviewed here offer several possibilities for reducing the effects of mutations and, in some cases, suggest that sensitivity to existing antibiotics may be restored in otherwise drug-resistant organisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The antibiotic resistance and virulence factors of Escherichia coli of serogroup O1 isolated from Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Eslami

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To detect several virulence genes among Escherichia coli (E. coli isolates of serogroup O1 collected in Tehran, Iran. Methods: In this study, 100 clinical isolates of E. coli were collected in Tehran, Iran. The antibiotic susceptibility test was done for 14 antibiotics according to CLSI guidelines. Phylogenetic grouping was performed by PCR according to the chuA, yjaA and TspE4.C2 genes. Serogroup typing was performed using the 12 O-antigens. The virulence genes were detected by PCR. Results: A total of 37 isolates belonged to serogroup O1. All of E. coli isolates were sensitive to phosphomycin. Phylogroups A (30%, B1 (21%, B2 (39%, and D (10% were detected. The prevalence rates of cnf, cdt, iutA, csgA, kpsMII, ibeA, vat, traT, TcpC, sat, hlyA and pic were 19%, 8%, 78%, 84%, 43%, 8%, 16%, 81%, 0%, 38%, 92% and 8%, respectively. Also, the vat gene was the most dominant gene in A phylogroup, and the genes of sat and pic were the most dominant virulence genes in the B2 phylogroup. Conclusions: The phosphomycin, imipenem, and meropenem were the most effective antibiotics. Half of the isolates were multidrug resistant. The predominant virulence factors of E. coli isolates were the genes hlyA, iutA, traT, and csgA. Detection of virulent strains which exhibit wide antibiotic resistance can help the control programs in order to prevent the spread of infections. According to the results, the B2 phylogroup was the most common phylogroup and strains belonging to B1 phylogroup were the most resistant strains in O1 serogroup E. coli strains.

  16. Antibiotics and Resistance: Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Work Contact Us ABOUT THE ISSUE What is Antibiotic Resistance? General Background Science of Resistance Glossary References ... for Adaptation Genetics and Drug Resistance Reservoirs of Antibiotic Resistance Project (ROAR) INTERNATIONAL CHAPTERS APUA Chapter Network ...

  17. The effect of environmental factors and migration dynamics on the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli in estuary environments

    OpenAIRE

    Na, Guangshui; Lu, Zihao; Gao, Hui; Zhang, Linxiao; Li, Qianwei; Li, Ruijing; Yang, Fan; Huo, Chuanlin; Yao, Ziwei

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the antibiotic resistance transmission mechanisms and migration dynamics of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB) in the natural environment is critical given the increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance. The aim of this study was to examine the fate of sulfonamide-resistant fecal bacteria (E. coli) in an estuary ecosystem and to explore the role and contribution of environmental factors in this process. The prevalence of sulfonamide-resistance status of E. coli was analyzed...

  18. Virulence factors, antibiotic resistance genes and genetic relatedness of commensal Escherichia coli isolates from dogs and their owners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derakhshandeh, Abdollah; Eraghi, Vida; Boroojeni, Azar Motamedi; Niaki, Malihe Akbarzadeh; Zare, Sahar; Naziri, Zahra

    2018-03-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) is a normal flora of gastrointestinal tracts of humans and warm-blooded animals including dogs that has close vicinity with humans. Because the inter-species transmission of E. coli between pets and human beings, within a household, obtaining more information about the epidemiology, genetics, virulence factors, and antibiotic resistance of E. coli from dogs and their owners will help to control the inter-species transmission and treatment of E. coli infections. In this study we characterize and compare the antibiotic resistance and virulence profiles of fecal E. coli isolates from dogs and their owners. A total of 149 commensal E. coli isolates comprised 62 isolates from dogs, 56 isolates from their owners and 31 isolates from humans with no pet as control were collected. Extracted DNA was assessed for the presence of antibiotic resistance genes cmlA (chloramphenicol), sulI (sulfamethoxazole), floR (florfenicol) and blaCTX-M1 (cefotaxime) and virulence genes (papA, ompT, hlyD, traT, tsh and cnf1). To determine the extent of genetic relatedness of isolates, RAPD-PCR was performed. sulI and traT genes were the most dominant resistance profile and the most prevalent virulence gene in all groups, respectively, while hlyD had the lowest frequency among investigated virulence genes. Based on RAPD-PCR analysis clonal sharing between dogs and their owners were observed in 2/28 (7.1%) potential within-household clone-sharing pairs. Allowing dog to lick on owner's face, dog sex (female dogs), dog's sexual status (intact dogs) and times of disposing the feces (≥twice a day) were associated with a higher percentage of RAPD profile similarity (P E. coli from dogs to their owners. But in two households, there were relationship between isolates from dogs and their owners. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Antibiotic resistance patterns of Escherichia coli urinary isolates and comparison with antibiotic consumption data over 10 years, 2005-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, P J; Lundon, D J; McWade, R; Scanlon, N; Hannan, M M; O'Kelly, F; Lynch, M

    2017-08-01

    Escherichia coli is a common cause of urinary tract infections (UTI). Reviews of antibiotic resistance of this organism can inform choice of empiric treatment of UTI and other infections and strategies for combating antimicrobial resistance. We reviewed laboratory and hospital pharmacy records to assess trends in non-susceptibility rates and the effect of antimicrobial stewardship interventions. A retrospective observational study of isolates of E. coli from MSU samples at a Dublin teaching hospital from inpatients and community, obtained from January 2005 to December 2014. Susceptibility to a panel of antibiotics was determined using the disc diffusion method, as well as extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) production status. Trends in resistance were plotted graphically and analysed in a descriptive manner. Except for nitrofurantoin and gentamicin, non-susceptibility increased for all antimicrobials tested. Co-amoxiclav non-susceptibility reached 48% in hospital and 32.6% in the community by 2014. Piperacillin-tazobactam non-susceptibility increased from 6.8 to 23.8% in hospital and from coli isolates from community MSU samples have high rates of non-susceptibility to trimethoprim and co-amoxiclav. Nitrofurantoin remains the best empiric therapy for cystitis. Increasing non-susceptibility to co-amoxiclav and piperacillin-tazobactam in hospital isolates is concerning. Ciprofloxacin non-susceptibility is increasing faster in the community than in hospital. A sharp reduction in hospital fluoroquinolone consumption did not result in a significant reduction in ciprofloxacin non-susceptibility of hospital E. coli isolates.

  20. Impact of long-term care facility residence on the antibiotic resistance of urinary tract Escherichia coli and Klebsiella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosello, Alicia; Hayward, Andrew C; Hopkins, Susan; Horner, Carolyne; Ironmonger, Dean; Hawkey, Peter M; Deeny, Sarah R

    2017-04-01

    Long-term care facilities (LTCFs) are thought to be important reservoirs of antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) bacteria; however, there is no routine surveillance of resistance in LTCF residents, or large population-based studies comparing AMR in LTCFs with the community, so the relative burden of AMR in LTCFs remains unknown. To compare the frequency of antibiotic resistance of urinary tract bacteria from residents of LTCFs for the elderly and adults aged 70 years or older living in the community. Positive urine specimens reported to any diagnostic microbiology laboratory in the West Midlands region (England) from 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2014 collected from individuals aged 70 years or older were analysed. The resistance of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella to trimethoprim, nitrofurantoin, third-generation cephalosporins and ciprofloxacin and the rate of laboratory-confirmed E. coli and Klebsiella urinary tract infection (UTI) were assessed in LTCF residents and in the community. LTCF residents had a laboratory-confirmed E. coli and Klebsiella UTI rate of 21 per 100 person years compared with 8 per 100 person years in the elderly living in the community [rate ratio (RR)=2.66, 95% CI = 2.58-2.73] and a higher rate of developing E. coli and Klebsiella UTIs caused by bacteria resistant to trimethoprim (RR = 4.41, 95% CI = 4.25-4.57), nitrofurantoin (RR = 4.38, 95% CI = 3.98-4.83), ciprofloxacin (RR = 5.18, 95% CI = 4.82-5.57) and third-generation cephalosporins (RR = 4.49, 95% CI = 4.08-4.94). Residents of LTCFs for the elderly had more than double the rate of E. coli and Klebsiella UTI and more than four times the rate of E. coli and Klebsiella UTI caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria compared with those living in the community.

  1. Antibiotic resistance in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Mary D; Pratt, Rachael; Hart, Wendy S

    2003-01-01

    There is currently no systematic surveillance or monitoring of antibiotic resistance in Australian animals. Registration of antibiotics for use in animals is tightly controlled and has been very conservative. Fluoroquinolones have not been registered for use in food producing animals and other products have been removed from the market because of human health concerns. In the late 1970s, the Animal Health Committee coordinated a survey of resistance in Salmonella and Escherichia coli isolates from cattle, pigs and poultry and in bovine Staphylococcus aureus. Some additional information is available from published case reports. In samples collected prior to the withdrawal of avoparcin from the market, no vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecium or Enterococcus faecalis were detected in samples collected from pigs, whereas some vanA enterococci, including E. faecium and E. faecalis, were found in chickens. No vanB enterococci were detected in either species. Virginiamycin resistance was common in both pig and poultry isolates. Multiple resistance was common in E. coli and salmonellae isolates. No fluoroquinolone resistance was found in salmonellae, E. coli or Campylobacter. Beta-lactamase production is common in isolates from bovine mastitis, but no methicillin resistance has been detected. However, methicillin resistance has been reported in canine isolates of Staphylococcus intermedius and extended spectrum beta-lactamase producing E. coli has been found in dogs.

  2. Antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli in husbandry animals: the African perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, C A; Zarazaga, M; Ben Sallem, R; Jouini, A; Ben Slama, K; Torres, C

    2017-05-01

    In the last few years, different surveillances have been published in Africa, especially in northern countries, regarding antimicrobial resistance among husbandry animals. Information is still scarce, but the available data show a worrying picture. Although the highest resistance rates have been described against tetracycline, penicillins and sulphonamides, prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes and extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) are being increasingly reported. Among ESBLs, the CTX-M-1 group was dominant in most African surveys. Within this group, CTX-M-15 was the main variant both in animals and humans, except in Tunisia where CTX-M-1 was more frequently detected among Escherichia coli from poultry. Certain bla CTX -M-15 -harbouring clones (ST131/B2 or ST405/D) are mainly identified in humans, but they have also been reported in livestock species from Tanzania, Nigeria or Tunisia. Moreover, several reports suggest an inter-host circulation of specific plasmids (e.g. bla CTX -M-1 -carrying IncI1/ST3 in Tunisia, IncY- and Inc-untypeable replicons co-harbouring qnrS1 and bla CTX -M-15 in Tanzania and the worldwide distributed bla CTX -M-15 -carrying IncF-type plasmids). International trade of poultry meat seems to have contributed to the spread of other ESBL variants, such as CTX-M-14, and clones. Furthermore, first descriptions of OXA-48- and OXA-181-producing E. coli have been recently documented in cattle from Egypt, and the emergent plasmid-mediated colistin resistance mcr-1 gene has been also identified in chickens from Algeria, Tunisia and South Africa. These data reflect the urgent need of a larger regulation in the use of veterinary drugs and the implementation of surveillance programmes in order to decelerate the advance of antimicrobial resistance in this continent. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Outer membrane proteomics of kanamycin-resistant Escherichia coli identified MipA as a novel antibiotic resistance-related protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Zhang, Dan-feng; Lin, Xiang-min; Peng, Xuan-xian

    2015-06-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are a great threat to human health and food safety and there is an urgent need to understand the mechanisms of resistance for combating these bacteria. In the current study, comparative proteomic methodologies were applied to identify Escherichia coli K-12 outer membrane (OM) proteins related to kanamycin resistance. Mass spectrometry and western blotting results revealed that OM proteins TolC, Tsx and OstA were up-regulated, whereas MipA, OmpA, FadL and OmpW were down-regulated in kanamycin-resistant E. coli K-12 strain. Genetic deletion of tolC (ΔtolC-Km) led to a 2-fold decrease in the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of kanamycin and deletion of mipA (ΔmipA-Km) resulted in a 4-fold increase in the MIC of kanamycin. Changes in the MICs for genetically modified strains could be completely recovered by gene complementation. Compared with the wild-type strain, the survival capability of ΔompA-Km was significantly increased and that of Δtsx-Km was significantly decreased. We further evaluated the role and expression of MipA in response to four other antibiotics including nalidixic acid, streptomycin, chloramphenicol and aureomycin, which suggested that MipA was a novel OM protein related to antibiotic resistance. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. The effect of environmental factors and migration dynamics on the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli in estuary environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Guangshui; Lu, Zihao; Gao, Hui; Zhang, Linxiao; Li, Qianwei; Li, Ruijing; Yang, Fan; Huo, Chuanlin; Yao, Ziwei

    2018-01-26

    Understanding the antibiotic resistance transmission mechanisms and migration dynamics of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB) in the natural environment is critical given the increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance. The aim of this study was to examine the fate of sulfonamide-resistant fecal bacteria (E. coli) in an estuary ecosystem and to explore the role and contribution of environmental factors in this process. The prevalence of sulfonamide-resistance status of E. coli was analyzed over different seasons in two estuary systems. Environmental factors and disturbance indices of anthropogenic activities were evaluated by detecting antibiotic concentrations, heavy metal abundance and other physicochemical parameters. The abundances of antibiotic-resistant E. coli were significantly attenuated during land-sea migration suggesting that estuary environments play a natural mitigation role in the contamination of freshwaters by antibiotic-resistant E. coli. Additionally, environmental factors and disturbance indices of anthropogenic activities significantly correlated with the distribution and migration of antibiotic-resistant E. coli in the estuaries. Lastly, simulation experiments suggested differential adaptability between antibiotic-resistant and non-resistant E. coli towards environmental changes in estuary environments. Meanwhile, our results indicate that low concentrations of antibiotics will not increase the competitive advantage of resistant E. coli in estuaries.

  5. Antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli isolates from roof-harvested rainwater tanks and urban pigeon faeces as the likely source of contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidamba, Lizyben; Korsten, Lise

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the risks associated with the use of roof-harvested rainwater (RHRW) and the implication of pigeons as the most likely source of contamination by testing for antibiotic resistance profiles of Escherichia coli. A total of 239 E. coli were isolated from thirty fresh pigeon faecal samples (130 isolates), 11 RHRW tanks from three sites in Pretoria (78) and two in Johannesburg (31). E. coli isolates were tested against a panel of 12 antibiotics which included ampicillin, amoxicillin, amikacin, cefoxitin, ceftriaxone, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, cotrimoxazole, enrofloxacin, gentamicin, nalidixic acid and tetracycline. In all samples, resistance to ampicillin (22.7.9%), gentamicin (23.6%), amikacin (24%), tetracycline (17.4) and amoxicillin (16.9%) were the most frequently encountered form of resistance. However, a relatively higher proportion of isolates from pigeon faeces (67.3%) were antibiotic resistant than those from RHRW (53.3%). The highest number of phenotypes was observed for single antibiotics, and no single antibiotic resistance was observed for chloramphenicol, ceftriaxone, gentamicin, cefoxitin, cotrimoxazole, although they were detected in multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR) phenotypes. The highest multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR) phenotypes were observed for a combination of four antibiotics, on isolates from JHB (18.8%), pigeon faeces (15.2%) and Pretoria (5.1%). The most abundant resistance phenotype to four antibiotics, Ak-Gm-Cip-T was dominated by isolates from pigeon faeces (6.8%) with Pretoria and Johannesburg isolates having low proportions of 1.3 and 3.1%, respectively. Future studies should target isolates from various environmental settings in which rainwater harvesting is practiced and the characterisation of the antibiotic resistance determinant genes among the isolates.

  6. Molecular epidemiology and antibiotic resistance pattern of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli isolated from bovines and their handlers in Jammu, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majueeb U Rehman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed to investigate the molecular epidemiology and antibiotic resistance pattern of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC in bovines and their handlers in Jammu, India. A total of 173 samples comprising of 103 fecal samples from bovines (60 from cattle and 43 from buffaloes, 28 stools and 42 fingertip rinses from bovine handlers were collected during August 2011 to March 2012. The isolated 126 E. coli strains (86 from bovines and 40 from handlers belonged to 25 different serogroups in addition to rough and untypeable strains. Using multiplex polymerase chain reaction, four EPEC strains were isolated; two each from bovines and their handlers, of which two possessed the hemolysin (hlyA gene. The prevalence of EPEC was recorded as 1.66% (n=1/60 in cattle, 2.32% (n=1/43 in buffaloes, and 2.85% (n=2/70 in their handlers. Antibiogram studies with the EPEC revealed the presence of multi-drug resistant E. coli. The isolates were mostly resistant to Amikacin, Amoxicillin, Cefixime and Streptomycin, and sensitive to Chloramphenicol. This study indicates that bovines as well as their handlers in Jammu region harbor EPEC, many of which being multi-drug resistant and carrying the hemolysin gene could be of high pathogenic potential for humans.

  7. The impact of the increased use of piperacillin/tazobactam on the selection of antibiotic resistance among invasive Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jina; Oh, Chi Eun; Choi, Eun Hwa; Lee, Hoan Jong

    2013-08-01

    Increasing antimicrobial resistance is related to the selective pressure exerted by antibiotic usage. This study evaluated the impact of the increased use of piperacillin/tazobactam (TZP) on the selection of antibiotic resistance. From 1999 to 2010, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae invasive isolates obtained from hospitalized Korean children were analyzed in antibiotic susceptibility tests and subjected to characterization of the β-lactamase types. Antibiotic consumption data were also analyzed. Between January 1999 and December 2010, 409 invasive isolates of E. coli (n=170) and K. pneumoniae (n=239) were obtained. A rebound of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) prevalence with an increase in total antibiotics was noted. Non-susceptibility to TZP was determined in 7.6% of E. coli isolates and 20.9% of K. pneumoniae isolates. Despite the increase in TZP usage, the overall prevalence of TZP resistance did not significantly increase over time, especially in E. coli. The mechanisms for TZP resistance included the presence of AmpC producers, possible TEM-1 hyperproducers, and multiple β-lactamases in individual organisms of a given isolate. Replacement of only the antibiotic class appears to be insufficient to control antibiotic resistance, and continued efforts to decrease overall antibiotic pressure are needed, especially in highly endemic situations. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Relationship between virulence factors, resistance to antibiotics and phylogenetic groups of uropathogenic Escherichia coli in two locations in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Estrada, Laura Iveth; Ruíz-Rosas, María; Molina-López, José; Parra-Rojas, Isela; González-Villalobos, Edgar; Castro-Alarcón, Natividad

    Escherichia coli is the major causative agent of urinary tract infections (UTI), and virulence factors are responsible for the severity of these emerging infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between virulence determinants and antibiotic susceptibility with phylogenetic groups of E.coli isolates of UTI in two locations in Mexico. An analysis was performed on 50 isolates of E.coli from the centre of the country and 57 from a town in the southwest. The isolates were characterized by phenotype (serotyping assays, in vitro adhesion, biofilm formation, production of haemolysin, and antibiotic susceptibility) and genotype (phylogenetic groups and virulence genes). In the centre of the country location the phylogenetic group B2 (60%) and F (12%) were significantly more prevalent and had a higher frequency of genes, fimH (96%), iutA (66%), sat (36%), compared to the southwest location, where the group A (35%) and B1 (21%) were significantly predominant and had fewer virulence genes. About one-fifth (21.5%) of all isolates belonged to the O25-ST131 group. Haemolysin and biofilm producing strains were significantly higher in the southwest location. Resistance to ampicillin (92.5%), tetracycline (76.6%), and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (70.1%) were the most common in both groups. The phylogenetic group, virulence factors, and antibiotic susceptibility of the E.coli that causes UTI in the community, varies significantly among the Mexican populations studied. Phylogenetic groups A and B1 may be multidrug resistant and have the ability to produce UTI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  9. Antibiotic resistance profiles of Escherichia coli O26, O145, and O157:H7 isolated from swine in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinwe Juliana Iwu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To conduct antimicrobial resistance profile of Escherichia coli (E. coli serogroups isolated from swine that are regularly exposed to clinically important antibiotics in the farms, calculate multiple antibiotic resistance index and determine the presence of resistance determinants. Methods: Identification of the E. coli isolates (n = 169, delineation into serogroups, and resistance genes determination were done using PCR technique. Antibiotic susceptibility testing against 16 antibiotics was done using the disk diffusion method. Results: The susceptibility test showed that most of the isolates were highly resistant to tetracycline (long-acting counterpart, oxytetracycline and also to ampicillin (84%–100%. On the other hand, a relatively high susceptibility to norfloxacin (83%–100%, ciprofloxacin (63%–100%, gentamicin (77%–100%, and chloramphenicol (77%–100% was observed among the isolates. The multiple antibiotic resistance indices ranged from 0.2 to 0.7 while genes encoding resistances to tetracycline, streptomycin and ampicillin were detected in 48%, 22%, and 78% of all the E. coli isolates, respectively. Conclusions: Findings from this study revealed that swine from this area can be reservoirs of multiple antibiotic resistances. There is need for regular surveillance of antimicrobial usage in swine industries and the use of sub-therapeutic doses of these agents should be discouraged.

  10. Antibiotic resistance, virulence factors and biofilm formation ability in Escherichia coli strains isolated from chicken meat and wildlife in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlickova, Silvie; Klancnik, Anja; Dolezalova, Magda; Mozina, Sonja Smole; Holko, Ivan

    2017-08-03

    Attachment of pathogenic bacteria to food contact surfaces and the subsequent biofilm formation represent a serious threat for the food industry, since these bacteria are more resistant to antimicrobials or possess more virulence factors. The main aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between antibiotic resistance against 13 antibiotics, distribution of 10 virulence factors and biofilm formation in 105 Escherichia coli strains according to their origin. The high prevalence of antibiotic resistance that we have found in wildlife isolates could be acquired by horizontal transfer of resistance genes from human or domestic or farm animals. Consequently, these commensal bacteria might serve as indicator of antimicrobial usage for human and veterinary purposes in the Czech Republic. Further, 46 out of 66 resistant isolates (70%) were able to form biofilm and we found out statistically significant correlation between prevalence of antibiotic resistance and biofilm formation ability. The highest prevalence of antibiotic resistance was observed in weak biofilm producers. Biofilm formation was not statistically associated with any virulence determinant. However, we confirmed the correlation between prevalence of virulence factors and host origin. Chicken isolates possessed more virulence factors (66%), than isolates from wildlife (37%). We can conclude that the potential spread of antibiotic resistance pattern via the food chain is of high concern for public health. Even more, alarming is that E. coli isolates remain pathogenic potential with ability to form biofilm and these bacteria may persist during food processing and consequently lead to greater risks of food contamination.

  11. Zinc blocks SOS-induced antibiotic resistance via inhibition of RecA in Escherichia coli.

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    Bryan E Bunnell

    Full Text Available Zinc inhibits the virulence of diarrheagenic E. coli by inducing the envelope stress response and inhibiting the SOS response. The SOS response is triggered by damage to bacterial DNA. In Shiga-toxigenic E. coli, the SOS response strongly induces the production of Shiga toxins (Stx and of the bacteriophages that encode the Stx genes. In E. coli, induction of the SOS response is accompanied by a higher mutation rate, called the mutator response, caused by a shift to error-prone DNA polymerases when DNA damage is too severe to be repaired by canonical DNA polymerases. Since zinc inhibited the other aspects of the SOS response, we hypothesized that zinc would also inhibit the mutator response, also known as hypermutation. We explored various different experimental paradigms to induce hypermutation triggered by the SOS response, and found that hypermutation was induced not just by classical inducers such as mitomycin C and the quinolone antibiotics, but also by antiviral drugs such as zidovudine and anti-cancer drugs such as 5-fluorouracil, 6-mercaptopurine, and azacytidine. Zinc salts inhibited the SOS response and the hypermutator phenomenon in E. coli as well as in Klebsiella pneumoniae, and was more effective in inhibiting the SOS response than other metals. We then attempted to determine the mechanism by which zinc, applied externally in the medium, inhibits hypermutation. Our results show that zinc interferes with the actions of RecA, and protects LexA from RecA-mediated cleavage, an early step in initiation of the SOS response. The SOS response may play a role in the development of antibiotic resistance and the effect of zinc suggests ways to prevent it.

  12. Evidence for a complex relationship between antibiotics and antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli: from medical center patients to a receiving environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlé, Kenny; Capdeville, Marion-Justine; Berthe, Thierry; Budzinski, Hélène; Petit, Fabienne

    2012-02-07

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between antibiotics and antibiotic-resistant fecal bacteria (E. coli) in water along a medical center-wastewater treatment plant-river continuum (4 km). A multiresidue chemical analysis methodology, using solid phase extraction coupled with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, was performed to detect whether low levels of contamination by 34 antibiotics were related to antibiotic resistance of E. coli and antibiotic use. The contamination of water by antibiotics and antibiotic-resistant E. coli decreased along the continuum. Although amoxicillin was predominantly prescribed, only ofloxacin (1 ng·L(-1)) and sulfamethoxazole (4 ng·L(-1)) persisted in the river. At the retirement home, in the medical center, even though no tetracycline and sulfamethoxazole were consumed, the highest occurrences of antibiotic resistance were in classes of quinolones (42.0%), sulfonamides (24.0%), tetracyclines (38.0%), and penicillins (38.0%), mainly due to the presence of multiple antibiotic-resistance genes on class 1 integrons. Along the continuum, the occurrence of E. coli resistant to antibiotics and those carrying class 1 integrons decreased in water samples (p-value antibiotic compounds (ofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole) were found, but they did not correspond to the major resistances (tetracycline, amoxicillin) of E. coli.

  13. Thiophene-degrading Escherichia coli mutants possess sulfone oxidase activity and show altered resistance to sulfur-containing antibiotics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juhl, M.J.; Clark, D.P. (Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale (USA))

    1990-10-01

    The authors have previously isolated mutants of Escherichia coli which show increased oxidation of heterocyclic furan and thiophene substrates. They have now found that strains carrying the thdA mutation express a novel enzyme activity which oxidizes a variety of substrates containing a sulfone (e.g., ethyl sulfone) were oxidized. The thdA mutants were more resistant than wild-type strains to aromatic sulfone antibiotics such as dapsone. In contrast they showed increased susceptibility to thiolutin, a cyclic antibiotic containing sulfur at the sulfide level of oxidation. Several new thdA mutant alleles were isolated by selecting for increased oxidation of various aliphatic sulfur compounds. These new thdA mutants showed similar sulfone oxidase activity and the same map location (at 10.7 min) as the original thdA1 mutation. The constitutive fadR mutation was required for the phenotypic expression of thdA-mediated oxidation of sulfur compounds. However, the thdA-directed expression of sulfone oxidase activity was not fadR dependent. The thdC and thdD mutations probably protect against the toxicity of thiophene derivatives rather than conferring improved metabolic capability.

  14. Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter STD on Facebook Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Threat Gonorrhea has progressively developed resistance to the antibiotic drugs prescribed to treat it. Following the spread ...

  15. Bactericidal effect of bovine lactoferrin, LFcin, LFampin and LFchimera on antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flores-Villaseñor, H.; Canizalez-Román, A.; Reyes-Lopez, M.; Nazmi, K.; de la Garza, M.; Zazueta-Beltrán, J.; León-Sicairos, N.; Bolscher, J.G.M.

    2010-01-01

    Increased prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has become a major threat to the health sector worldwide due to their virulence, limited therapeutic options and distribution in both hospital and community settings. Discovery and development of new agents to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria

  16. Benzoate- and Salicylate-Tolerant Strains of Escherichia coli K-12 Lose Antibiotic Resistance during Laboratory Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creamer, Kaitlin E; Ditmars, Frederick S; Basting, Preston J; Kunka, Karina S; Hamdallah, Issam N; Bush, Sean P; Scott, Zachary; He, Amanda; Penix, Stephanie R; Gonzales, Alexandra S; Eder, Elizabeth K; Camperchioli, Dominic W; Berndt, Adama; Clark, Michelle W; Rouhier, Kerry A; Slonczewski, Joan L

    2017-01-15

    Escherichia coli K-12 W3110 grows in the presence of membrane-permeant organic acids that can depress cytoplasmic pH and accumulate in the cytoplasm. We conducted experimental evolution by daily diluting cultures in increasing concentrations of benzoic acid (up to 20 mM) buffered at external pH 6.5, a pH at which permeant acids concentrate in the cytoplasm. By 2,000 generations, clones isolated from evolving populations showed increasing tolerance to benzoate but were sensitive to chloramphenicol and tetracycline. Sixteen clones grew to stationary phase in 20 mM benzoate, whereas the ancestral strain W3110 peaked and declined. Similar growth occurred in 10 mM salicylate. Benzoate-evolved strains grew like W3110 in the absence of benzoate, in media buffered at pH 4.8, pH 7.0, or pH 9.0, or in 20 mM acetate or sorbate at pH 6.5. Genomes of 16 strains revealed over 100 mutations, including single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), large deletions, and insertion knockouts. Most strains acquired deletions in the benzoate-induced multiple antibiotic resistance (Mar) regulon or in associated regulators such as rob and cpxA, as well as the multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps emrA, emrY, and mdtA Strains also lost or downregulated the Gad acid fitness regulon. In 5 mM benzoate or in 2 mM salicylate (2-hydroxybenzoate), most strains showed increased sensitivity to the antibiotics chloramphenicol and tetracycline; some strains were more sensitive than a marA knockout strain. Thus, our benzoate-evolved strains may reveal additional unknown drug resistance components. Benzoate or salicylate selection pressure may cause general loss of MDR genes and regulators. Benzoate is a common food preservative, and salicylate is the primary active metabolite of aspirin. In the gut microbiome, genetic adaptation to salicylate may involve loss or downregulation of inducible multidrug resistance systems. This discovery implies that aspirin therapy may modulate the human gut microbiome to

  17. MOLECULAR DETECTION OF ANTIBIOTIC-RESISTANCE DETERMINANTS IN ESCHERICHIA COLI ISOLATED FROM THE ENDANGERED AUSTRALIAN SEA LION (NEOPHOCA CINEREA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delport, Tiffany C; Harcourt, Robert G; Beaumont, Linda J; Webster, Koa N; Power, Michelle L

    2015-07-01

    Greater interaction between humans and wildlife populations poses significant risks of anthropogenic impact to natural ecosystems, especially in the marine environment. Understanding the spread of microorganisms at the marine interface is therefore important if we are to mitigate adverse effects on marine wildlife. We investigated the establishment of Escherichia coli in the endangered Australian sea lion (Neophoca cinerea) by comparing fecal isolation from wild and captive sea lion populations. Fecal samples were collected from wild colonies March 2009-September 2010 and from captive individuals March 2011-May 2013. Using molecular screening, we assigned a phylotype to E. coli isolates and determined the presence of integrons, mobile genetic elements that capture gene cassettes conferring resistance to antimicrobial agents common in fecal coliforms. Group B2 was the most abundant phylotype in all E. coli isolates (n = 37), with groups A, B1, and D also identified. Integrons were not observed in E. coli (n = 21) isolated from wild sea lions, but were identified in E. coli from captive animals (n = 16), from which class I integrases were detected in eight isolates. Sequencing of gene cassette arrays identified genes conferring resistance to streptomycin-spectinomycin (aadA1) and trimethoprim (dfrA17, dfrB4). Class II integrases were not detected in the E. coli isolates. The frequent detection in captive sea lions of E. coli with resistance genes commonly identified in human clinical cases suggests that conditions experienced in captivity may contribute to establishment. Identification of antibiotic resistance in the microbiota of Australian sea lions provides crucial information for disease management. Our data will inform conservation management strategies and provide a mechanism to monitor microorganism dissemination to sensitive pinniped populations.

  18. Resistance of uropathogenic strains of Escherichia coli in pregnant women and other women in generative ages in comparison with antibiotics consumption in Zagreb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Leppée,

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim To compare resistance of uropathogenic strains of Escherichia coli (UPEC to antibiotics in women in generative ages and pregnant women during two year period (2004 and 2008 in Zagreb, andcomparison of resistance and the consumption of antibiotics. Methods The standard disk-diffusion method was used for sensitivity testing to 16 different antibiotics.Data on antibiotic utilization were used to calculate the number of defined daily doses (DDD and DDD per 1000 inhabitants using Anatomical-Therapeutic-Chemical/DDD methodology.Data on antibiotic consumption during pregnancy were collected using a questionnaire filled in by 893 women after delivery.Results During 2004 resistance of UPEC to antimicrobial drugs was not different in pregnant and in non-pregnant women, with the exception of amoxicillin and nitrofurantoin, with statistically higher resistance in pregnant women (p <0.01. Four years later the statistically higher resistance to norfloxacin was observed in non-pregnant women (p <0.01. Comparing the resistance in 2004 and 2008, in the both groups of women a statistically significant decrease of resistance to cefalexin and nitrofurantoin was detected (p <0.01. Outpatient utilization of antimicrobial drugs in Zagreb increased significantly, from 32 to 39 DDD/1000 inhabitants per day. The most used antibiotic was co-amoxiclav, and its utilization increased from 9.6 to 12.2 DDD/1000/day. Amoxicillin and co-amoxiclav were used during pregnancy by 9.6% interviewed women. Conclusion The observed significant decrease of resistance to cefalexin makes that antibiotic the drug of choice for treatment of urinary tract infections in women in generative ages, and together with coamoxiclavcan be administered in pregnancy. Constant monitoring of urinary tract pathogens resistance to antimicrobial agents ensures the effectiveness of empirical therapy, whose versatile use is limited due the potentially harmful effects of antimicrobial drugs on fetus.

  19. Characterization of a Large Antibiotic Resistance Plasmid Found in Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Strain B171 and Its Relatedness to Plasmids of Diverse E. coli and Shigella Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazen, Tracy H; Michalski, Jane; Nagaraj, Sushma; Okeke, Iruka N; Rasko, David A

    2017-09-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a leading cause of severe infantile diarrhea in developing countries. Previous research has focused on the diversity of the EPEC virulence plasmid, whereas less is known regarding the genetic content and distribution of antibiotic resistance plasmids carried by EPEC. A previous study demonstrated that in addition to the virulence plasmid, reference EPEC strain B171 harbors a second, larger plasmid that confers antibiotic resistance. To further understand the genetic diversity and dissemination of antibiotic resistance plasmids among EPEC strains, we describe the complete sequence of an antibiotic resistance plasmid from EPEC strain B171. The resistance plasmid, pB171_90, has a completed sequence length of 90,229 bp, a GC content of 54.55%, and carries protein-encoding genes involved in conjugative transfer, resistance to tetracycline ( tetA ), sulfonamides ( sulI ), and mercury, as well as several virulence-associated genes, including the transcriptional regulator hha and the putative calcium sequestration inhibitor ( csi ). In silico detection of the pB171_90 genes among 4,798 publicly available E. coli genome assemblies indicates that the unique genes of pB171_90 ( csi and traI ) are primarily restricted to genomes identified as EPEC or enterotoxigenic E. coli However, conserved regions of the pB171_90 plasmid containing genes involved in replication, stability, and antibiotic resistance were identified among diverse E. coli pathotypes. Interestingly, pB171_90 also exhibited significant similarity with a sequenced plasmid from Shigella dysenteriae type I. Our findings demonstrate the mosaic nature of EPEC antibiotic resistance plasmids and highlight the need for additional sequence-based characterization of antibiotic resistance plasmids harbored by pathogenic E. coli . Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  20. Detection, Virulence Gene Assessment and Antibiotic Resistance Pattern of O157 Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli in Tabriz, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Ostadgavahi, Ali Toloue; Ghotaslou, Reza; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Pirzadeh, Tahereh; Sorayaei Sowmesarayi, Vida; Memar, Mohammad Yousef

    2015-11-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is a food-borne pathogen and infection with this organism causes illnesses such as bloody diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic-uremic syndrome. Considering the lack of any information about the prevalence rate and the antibiotic resistance pattern of O157:H7 serotype in Tabriz, finding answers to the above mentioned subjects was among the goals of this study. Two hundred E. coli strains from diarrheal or non-diarrheal stools of outpatients and hospitalized cases in Tabriz Imam Reza hospital were isolated between September and December 2014 using MacConkey agar and standard biochemical tests and then cultured on sorbitol MacConkey agar. The sorbitol-negative isolates were confirmed as the O157 serotype using O157 antisera. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was used for the detection of stx-1, stx-2, eae, and mdh genes and the antibiotic resistance pattern of these isolates was determined using Kirby-Bauer method and clinical and laboratory standards institute (CLSI) standards. Of the isolates 11 (5.5%) were sorbitol-negative, which were later analyzed by multiplex PCR and the results revealed that 2 (18.18%) isolates contained the stx-1 gene, 10 (90.91%) contained the stx-2 gene, and 5 (45.45%) contained the eae gene. The stx-2 and eae genes were the most commonly encountered virulence factors. All or most of the isolates were susceptible to ceftazidime (100%), gentamicin (100%), ciprofloxacin (100%), nalidixic acid (90.9%), trimetoprim sulfamethoxazole (90.9%), chloramphenicol (90.9%), ampicillin (81.8%), and cephalothin (72.7%). On the contrary, moderate susceptibility of the isolates to doxycycline (54.5%) was observed. Due to the low frequency of STEC O157 and the high susceptibility rates of the isolates to the tested antibiotics in this study, STEC O157 has not become a major problem in Tabriz yet, but comprehensive microbiological surveillance programs that provide early warning and limit

  1. Antibiotic resistance profiles of Escherichia coli isolated from different water sources in the Mmabatho locality, Northwest Province, South Africa

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    C. Njie Ateba

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The antibiotic resistance profiles of Escherichia coli (E. coli, isolated from different water sources in the Mmabatho locality were evaluated. Water samples were collected from the local wastewater- and water-treatment plants, the Modimola Dam and homes in the area, and then analysed for the presence of E. coli, using standard methods. Presumptive isolates obtained were confirmed by the analytical profile index test. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by the disc diffusion method. Of the 230 E. coli isolates tested, marked antibiotic resistances (over 70% were observed for erythromycin, tetracycline, ampicillin, chloramphenicol and norfloxacin. Multiple antibiotic resistance patterns were also compiled. Overall, the phenotype T-Ap-E was frequent for E. coli isolated from the local wastewater and water-treatment plants, Modimola Dam and tap water. Cluster analysis performed showed a unique antibiotic resistance pattern which suggested a link between isolates from all sampling points. The findings indicated that improper wastewater treatment may have a potential impact on the dissemination and survival of E. coli, as well as other pathogenic bacteria in water for human and animal consumption. This may result in water- and food-borne disease outbreaks with a negative effect on antibiotic therapy.

  2. Determination of antibiotic resistance genes in relation to phylogenetic background in Escherichia coli isolates from fecal samples of healthy pet cats in Kerman city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtardanesh, Baharak; Ghanbarpour, Reza; Ganjalikhani, Sadaf; Gazanfari, Parisa

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine antibiotic resistance genes, phylogenetic groups and anti-microbial resistance patterns of Escherichia coli isolates from fecal samples of healthy pet cats in Kerman city. Ninety E. coli isolates were recovered from obtained rectal swabs. Antibiotic resistance pattern of the isolates against seven selected antibiotic was determined using disc diffusion method. Phylogenetic background of the isolates was determined according to the presence of the chuA , yjaA and TspE4C2 markers. Theisolates were examined to determine a selection of antibiotic resistance genes including tetA, tetB, aadA, sulI and dhfrV by polymerase chain reaction. Forty two isolates (46.6%) were positive at least for one of the examined genes. Phylotyping revealed that the isolates are segregated in phylogenetic groups A (66.7%), B1 (1.2%), B2 (13.4%) and D (18.9%). Among 90 isolates, 26.6% were positive for tetB gene, 10.0% for c qnrS gene, 12.3% for sulI and aadA genes, 8.9% for tetA and 2.2% for dhfrV gene. None of the E. coli isolates were positive for qnrA and qnrB genes. Sixteen combination patterns of antibiotic resistance genes were identified which belonged to four phylogroups. Maximum and minimum resistant isolates were recorded against to tetracycline (82.3%) and gentamycin (1.2%), respectively. Fifteen antibiotic resistance patterns were determined in different phylo-genetic groups. In conclusion, feces of healthy pet cat in Kerman could be a source of antibiotic resistant E. coli isolates, whereas these isolates were distributed all over the main phylogroups.

  3. Tunable stochastic pulsing in the Escherichia coli multiple antibiotic resistance network from interlinked positive and negative feedback loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Bernardo, Javier; Dunlop, Mary J

    2013-01-01

    Cells live in uncertain, dynamic environments and have many mechanisms for sensing and responding to changes in their surroundings. However, sudden fluctuations in the environment can be catastrophic to a population if it relies solely on sensory responses, which have a delay associated with them. Cells can reconcile these effects by using a tunable stochastic response, where in the absence of a stressor they create phenotypic diversity within an isogenic population, but use a deterministic response when stressors are sensed. Here, we develop a stochastic model of the multiple antibiotic resistance network of Escherichia coli and show that it can produce tunable stochastic pulses in the activator MarA. In particular, we show that a combination of interlinked positive and negative feedback loops plays an important role in setting the dynamics of the stochastic pulses. Negative feedback produces a pulsatile response that is tunable, while positive feedback serves to amplify the effect. Our simulations show that the uninduced native network is in a parameter regime that is of low cost to the cell (taxing resistance mechanisms are expressed infrequently) and also elevated noise strength (phenotypic variability is high). The stochastic pulsing can be tuned by MarA induction such that variability is decreased once stresses are sensed, avoiding the detrimental effects of noise when an optimal MarA concentration is needed. We further show that variability in the expression of MarA can act as a bet hedging mechanism, allowing for survival in time-varying stress environments, however this effect is tunable to allow for a fully induced, deterministic response in the presence of a stressor.

  4. Tunable stochastic pulsing in the Escherichia coli multiple antibiotic resistance network from interlinked positive and negative feedback loops.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Garcia-Bernardo

    Full Text Available Cells live in uncertain, dynamic environments and have many mechanisms for sensing and responding to changes in their surroundings. However, sudden fluctuations in the environment can be catastrophic to a population if it relies solely on sensory responses, which have a delay associated with them. Cells can reconcile these effects by using a tunable stochastic response, where in the absence of a stressor they create phenotypic diversity within an isogenic population, but use a deterministic response when stressors are sensed. Here, we develop a stochastic model of the multiple antibiotic resistance network of Escherichia coli and show that it can produce tunable stochastic pulses in the activator MarA. In particular, we show that a combination of interlinked positive and negative feedback loops plays an important role in setting the dynamics of the stochastic pulses. Negative feedback produces a pulsatile response that is tunable, while positive feedback serves to amplify the effect. Our simulations show that the uninduced native network is in a parameter regime that is of low cost to the cell (taxing resistance mechanisms are expressed infrequently and also elevated noise strength (phenotypic variability is high. The stochastic pulsing can be tuned by MarA induction such that variability is decreased once stresses are sensed, avoiding the detrimental effects of noise when an optimal MarA concentration is needed. We further show that variability in the expression of MarA can act as a bet hedging mechanism, allowing for survival in time-varying stress environments, however this effect is tunable to allow for a fully induced, deterministic response in the presence of a stressor.

  5. Antibiotic Resistance Profile in Relation to Phylogenetic Background in Escherichia coli Isolated From Fecal Samples of Healthy Ostrich

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    Elham Mohamadi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: E. coli is regarded as a reservoir for antibiotic resistance in foods of animal origin. E. coli can be categories into four mainphylogenetic groups (A, B1, B2 and D. The commensal E. coli strains mostly are assigned to the phylo-groups A and B1. Objectives: The purposes of this study were to determine the phylogenetic group/subgroups and antibiotic resistance patterns of ostrich E. coli isolates in Iran. Materials and Methods: A total of 126 E. coli isolates were obtained from cloacae swabs of the healthy ostrich in Kerman, Iran. The E. coliisolates were confirmed using biochemical API 20E identification system. The confirmed isolates were studied to determine phylogeneticbackground by PCR. The isolates were tested for antibiotic resistance against 12 different antibiotic disk by disk diffusion method. Results: Phylotyping of E. coli isolates indicated that 74 isolates belonged to A, 27 isolates to B1, 7 isolates to B2, and 18 isolates to D groups.Also the isolates fell into six phylogenetic subgroups, including 34 isolates in A0, 40 isolates in A1, one isolate in B22, 6 isolates in B23, 11isolates in D1 and 7 isolates in subgroup D2. In the examined E. coli isolates, the maximum rate of resistance was against tetracycline, andthe minimum rate of resistance was against amoxicillin. Twenty three antibiotic resistance patterns were detected among the isolates. Thecefoxitin and tetracycline resistance pattern was the most prevalent in the isolates that belonged to phylo-group A. Conclusions: In conclusion, the result of the present study revealed a low frequency of antibiotic resistance in ostrich E. coli isolates.The antibiotic resistance patterns were in relation to A and D phylogenetic groups. Further studies are needed to better understand thedistribution of phylogenetic groups in poultry isolates.

  6. Characterization of antibiotic-resistant and potentially pathogenic Escherichia coli from soil fertilized with litter of broiler chickens fed antimicrobial-supplemented diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Laura E; Rempel, Heidi; Forge, Tom; Kannangara, Tissa; Bittman, Shabtai; Delaquis, Pascal; Topp, Edward; Ziebell, Kim A; Diarra, Moussa S

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize antimicrobial resistance and virulence determinants of Escherichia coli from soil amended with litter from 36-day-old broiler chickens ( Gallus gallus domesticus ) fed with diets supplemented with a variety of antimicrobial agents. Soil samples were collected from plots before and periodically after litter application in August to measure E. coli numbers. A total of 295 E. coli were isolated from fertilized soil samples between August and March. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by Sensititre, and polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect the presence of resistance and virulence genes. The results confirmed that E. coli survived and could be quantified by direct plate count for at least 7 months in soil following litter application in August. The effects of feed supplementation were observed on E. coli numbers in November and January. Among the 295 E. coli, the highest antibiotic resistance level was observed against tetracycline and β-lactams associated mainly with the resistance genes tetB and bla(CMY-2), respectively. Significant treatment effects were observed for phylogenetic groups, antibiotic resistance profiles, and virulence gene frequencies. Serotyping, phylogenetic grouping, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis confirmed that multiple-antibiotic-resistant and potentially pathogenic E. coli can survive in soil fertilized with litter for several months regardless of antimicrobials used in the feed.

  7. Antibiotic resistance pattern of different Escherichia coli phylogenetic groups isolated from human urinary tract infection and avian colibacillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemnia, Ali; Ahmadi, Malahat; Dilmaghani, Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    The emergence and propagation of different phylogenetic groups of antimicrobial-resistant E. coli have become a worldwide health concern in human and veterinary medicine. Therefore, the evaluation of the phylogenetic distribution of antibiotic-resistant E. coli is important for therapeutic and economic purposes. The aims of this study were to determine phylogenetic groups and patterns of antibiotic resistance of E. coli strains isolated from human urinary tract infection and avian colibacillosis. A total of 50 E. coli isolates (25 from human urinary tract infection and 25 from avian colibacillosis) were characterized by culture and assigned as different phylogenetic groups (A, B1, B2, and D) by triplex PCR assay. Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method was used to assess the susceptibility of all isolates to ten antibiotics. RESULTS showed that the majority of the human and poultry isolates belonged to phylogenetic groups A and B2 and phylogenetic group B1 of the avian pathogenic strain isolates were the most drug-resistant isolates. Most of the isolates were resistant to at least five antibiotics, and multiple drug resistance was observed in 98% of E. coli isolates. A high degree of resistance was seen against penicillin and erythromycin. According to the results of this study, multidrug-resistance among isolates and high relation between phylogenetic groups and resistance in both human and poultry isolates were observed.

  8. Prevalence and antibiotic resistance profiles of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli strains isolated from food items in northwestern Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canizalez-Roman, Adrian; Gonzalez-Nuñez, Edgar; Vidal, Jorge E; Flores-Villaseñor, Héctor; León-Sicairos, Nidia

    2013-06-03

    Diarrheogenic Escherichia coli (DEC) strains are an important cause of intestinal syndromes in the developing world mainly affecting children. DEC strains often infect tourists from developed countries traveling to Mexico, causing so-called "traveler diarrhea". DEC strains are typically transmitted by contaminated food and water; however, the prevalence of these strains in food items that are produced, consumed and sometimes exported in northwestern Mexico has not been evaluated. In this study, we conducted a large microbiological survey of DEC strains in 5162 food items and beverages consumed throughout Sinaloa state during 2008 and 2009. We developed a panel of eight sequential PCR reactions that detected the presence of all DEC categories, including typical or atypical variants. Thermotolerant coliforms (also known as fecal coliforms) and E. coli were detected by conventional bacteriology in 13.4% (692/5162) and 7.92% (409/5162) of food items, respectively. Among 409 E. coli isolates, 13.6% (56/409) belonged to DEC strains. Dairy products (2.8%) were the most contaminated with DEC, while DEC strains were not detected in beverages and ice samples. The pathogenic type that was most commonly isolated was EPEC (78.5%), followed by EAEC (10.7%), STEC (8.9%) and ETEC (1.7%). EHEC, DAEC and EIEC strains were not detected. Approximately 80% of EPEC and EAEC strains were classified as atypical variants; they did not adhere to a culture of HEp-2 cell. Of the isolated DEC strains, 66% showed resistance to at least one commonly prescribed antibiotic. In conclusion, the presence of DEC strains in food items and beverages available in northwestern Mexico is low and may not represent a threat for the general population or those traveling to tourist areas. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Antibiotic resistance patterns and beta-lactamase identification in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Antibiotic resistance is a growing problem worldwide. Mechanisms of resistance vary, and some can confer resistance to multiple classes of antibiotics. Objective. To characterise the antibiotic resistance profiles of Escherichia coli isolates obtained from stool samples of young rural children exposed or ...

  10. Impact of Some Ecological Factors on Fecal Contamination of Drinking Water by Diarrheagenic Antibiotic-Resistant Escherichia coli in Zagazig City, Egypt

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    Ahmed Elsadek Fakhr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fecal contamination of drinking water is a major health problem which accounts for many cases of diarrhea mainly in infants and foreigners. This contamination is a complex interaction of many parameters. Antibiotic resistance among bacterial isolates complicates the problem. The study was done to identify fecal contamination of drinking water by Diarrheagenic Antibiotic-Resistant Escherichia coli in Zagazig city and to trace reasons for such contamination, three hundred potable water samples were investigated for E. coli existence. Locations of E. coli positive samples were investigated in relation to population density, water source, and type of water pipe. Sixteen E. coli strains were isolated. Antibiotic sensitivity was done and enterotoxigenic, enteropathogenic, and enterohaemorrhagic virulence genes were investigated by PCR. Probability of fecal contamination correlated with higher population density, with increased distance from Zagazig water plant, and with asbestos cement water pipes. Resistance to at least one antimicrobial drug was found in all isolates. Virulence genes were detected in a rate of 26.27%, 13.13%, 20%, 6.67%, and 33.33% for LT, ST, stx1, stx2, and eae genes, respectively. This relatively high frequency of fecal contamination points towards the high risk of developing diarrhea by antibiotic resistant DEC in low socioeconomic communities particularly with old fashion distribution systems.

  11. Antibiotic resistance in probiotic bacteria

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    Miguel eGueimonde

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. The main probiotic bacteria are strains belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, although other representatives, such as Bacillus or Escherichia coli strains, have also been used. Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium are two common inhabitants of the human intestinal microbiota. Also, some species are used in food fermentation processes as starters, or as adjunct cultures in the food industry. With some exceptions, antibiotic resistance in these beneficial microbes does not constitute a safety concern in itself, when mutations or intrinsic resistance mechanisms are responsible for the resistance phenotype. In fact, some probiotic strains with intrinsic antibiotic resistance could be useful for restoring the gut microbiota after antibiotic treatment. However, specific antibiotic resistance determinants carried on mobile genetic elements, such as tetracycline resistance genes, are often detected in the typical probiotic genera, and constitute a reservoir of resistance for potential food or gut pathogens, thus representing a serious safety issue.

  12. Simulation of the rate of transfer of antibiotic resistance between Escherichia coli strains cultured under well controlled environmental conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smelt, J.P.; Hoefsloot, H.C.; de Koster, C.G.; Schuurmans, J.M.; ter Kuile, B.H.; Brul, S.

    2015-01-01

    It was demonstrated that the tetracycline resistance plasmid in Escherichia coli resembling K-12 23:06 containing the E. coli plasmid DM0133 could be transferred to tetracycline sensitive E. coli K-12 MG1655 YFP. The sensitive recipient strain has a slight metabolic advantage in continuous

  13. Diabetes mellitus in itself is not a risk factor for antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli isolated from patients with bacteriuria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meiland, R.; Geerlings, S. E.; de Neeling, A. J.; Hoepelman, A. I. M.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for resistance in Escherichia coli isolated from patients with bacteriuria. METHODS: Data were obtained from a multicentre study. A clean-voided midstream urine culture was collected from 636 women with diabetes, who were between 18 and

  14. Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea (ARG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter STD on Facebook Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea Basic Information Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea: An Overview Antibiotic resistance is the ...

  15. Phenotypic antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli and E. coli O157 isolated from water, sediment and biofilms in an agricultural watershed in British Columbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maal-Bared, Rasha; Bartlett, Karen H; Bowie, William R; Hall, Eric R

    2013-01-15

    This study examined the distribution of antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli and E. coli O157 isolated from water, sediment and biofilms in an intensive agricultural watershed (Elk Creek, British Columbia) between 2005 and 2007. It also examined physical and chemical water parameters associated with antibiotic resistance. Broth microdilution techniques were used to determine minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) for E. coli (n=214) and E. coli O157 (n=27) recovered isolates for ampicillin, cefotaxime, ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid, streptomycin and tetracycline. Both E. coli and E. coli O157 isolates showed highest frequency of resistance to tetracycline, ampicillin, streptomycin and nalidixic acid; respectively. For E. coli, the highest frequency of resistance was observed at the most agriculturally-impacted site, while the lowest frequency of resistance was found at the headwaters. Sediment and river rock biofilms were the most likely to be associated with resistant E. coli, while water was the least likely. While seasonality (wet versus dry) had no relationship with resistance frequency, length of biofilm colonization of the substratum in the aquatic environment only affected resistance frequency to nalidixic acid and tetracycline. Multivariate logistic regressions showed that water depth, nutrient concentrations, temperature, dissolved oxygen and salinity had statistically significant associations with frequency of E. coli resistance to nalidixic acid, streptomycin, ampicillin and tetracycline. The results indicate that antibiotic resistant E. coli and E. coli O157 were prevalent in an agricultural stream. Since E. coli is adept at horizontal gene transfer and prevalent in biofilms and sediment, where ample opportunities for genetic exchange with potential environmental pathogens present themselves, resistant isolates may present a risk to ecosystem, wildlife and public health. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Quality of Water and Antibiotic Resistance of Escherichia coli from Water Sources of Hilly Tribal Villages with and without Integrated Watershed Management—A One Year Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep S. Nerkar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In many hilly tribal areas of the world, water scarcity is a major problem and diarrhoea is common. Poor quality of water also affects the environment. An integrated watershed management programme (IWMP aims to increase availability of water and to improve life conditions. Globally, there is a lack of information on water contamination, occurrence of diarrhoea and antibiotic resistance, a serious global concern, in relation to IWMP in hilly tribal areas. Therefore, a prospective observational study was conducted during 2011–2012 in six villages in a hilly tribal belt of India, three with and three without implementation of an IWMP, to explore quality of water, diarrhoeal cases in the community and antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli from water sources. The results showed that physico-chemical quality of water was within limits of safe consumption in all samples. The odds of coliform contamination in water samples was 2.3 times higher in non-watershed management villages (NWMV compared to integrated watershed management villages (IWMV (95% CI 0.8–6.45, p = 0.081. The number of diarrhoeal cases (18/663 vs. 42/639, p < 0.05 was lower in IWMV as compared to NWMV. Overall E. coli isolates showed high susceptibility to antibiotics. Resistance to a wider range of antibiotics was observed in NWMV.

  17. Quality of water and antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli from water sources of hilly tribal villages with and without integrated watershed management-a one year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerkar, Sandeep S; Tamhankar, Ashok J; Khedkar, Smita U; Lundborg, Cecilia Stålsby

    2014-06-01

    In many hilly tribal areas of the world, water scarcity is a major problem and diarrhoea is common. Poor quality of water also affects the environment. An integrated watershed management programme (IWMP) aims to increase availability of water and to improve life conditions. Globally, there is a lack of information on water contamination, occurrence of diarrhoea and antibiotic resistance, a serious global concern, in relation to IWMP in hilly tribal areas. Therefore, a prospective observational study was conducted during 2011–2012 in six villages in a hilly tribal belt of India, three with and three without implementation of an IWMP, to explore quality of water, diarrhoeal cases in the community and antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli from water sources. The results showed that physico-chemical quality of water was within limits of safe consumption in all samples. The odds of coliform contamination in water samples was 2.3 times higher in non-watershed management villages (NWMV) compared to integrated watershed management villages (IWMV) (95% CI 0.8–6.45, p = 0.081). The number of diarrhoeal cases (18/663 vs. 42/639, p < 0.05) was lower in IWMV as compared to NWMV. Overall E. coli isolates showed high susceptibility to antibiotics. Resistance to a wider range of antibiotics was observed in NWMV.

  18. Quality of Water and Antibiotic Resistance of Escherichia coli from Water Sources of Hilly Tribal Villages with and without Integrated Watershed Management—A One Year Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerkar, Sandeep S.; Tamhankar, Ashok J.; Khedkar, Smita U.; Stålsby Lundborg, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    In many hilly tribal areas of the world, water scarcity is a major problem and diarrhoea is common. Poor quality of water also affects the environment. An integrated watershed management programme (IWMP) aims to increase availability of water and to improve life conditions. Globally, there is a lack of information on water contamination, occurrence of diarrhoea and antibiotic resistance, a serious global concern, in relation to IWMP in hilly tribal areas. Therefore, a prospective observational study was conducted during 2011–2012 in six villages in a hilly tribal belt of India, three with and three without implementation of an IWMP, to explore quality of water, diarrhoeal cases in the community and antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli from water sources. The results showed that physico-chemical quality of water was within limits of safe consumption in all samples. The odds of coliform contamination in water samples was 2.3 times higher in non-watershed management villages (NWMV) compared to integrated watershed management villages (IWMV) (95% CI 0.8–6.45, p = 0.081). The number of diarrhoeal cases (18/663 vs. 42/639, p < 0.05) was lower in IWMV as compared to NWMV. Overall E. coli isolates showed high susceptibility to antibiotics. Resistance to a wider range of antibiotics was observed in NWMV. PMID:24991664

  19. Mortality and hospital stay associated with resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli bacteremia: estimating the burden of antibiotic resistance in Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlieke E A de Kraker

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The relative importance of human diseases is conventionally assessed by cause-specific mortality, morbidity, and economic impact. Current estimates for infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria are not sufficiently supported by quantitative empirical data. This study determined the excess number of deaths, bed-days, and hospital costs associated with blood stream infections (BSIs caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and third-generation cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli (G3CREC in 31 countries that participated in the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System (EARSS.The number of BSIs caused by MRSA and G3CREC was extrapolated from EARSS prevalence data and national health care statistics. Prospective cohort studies, carried out in hospitals participating in EARSS in 2007, provided the parameters for estimating the excess 30-d mortality and hospital stay associated with BSIs caused by either MRSA or G3CREC. Hospital expenditure was derived from a publicly available cost model. Trends established by EARSS were used to determine the trajectories for MRSA and G3CREC prevalence until 2015. In 2007, 27,711 episodes of MRSA BSIs were associated with 5,503 excess deaths and 255,683 excess hospital days in the participating countries, whereas 15,183 episodes of G3CREC BSIs were associated with 2,712 excess deaths and 120,065 extra hospital days. The total costs attributable to excess hospital stays for MRSA and G3CREC BSIs were 44.0 and 18.1 million Euros (63.1 and 29.7 million international dollars, respectively. Based on prevailing trends, the number of BSIs caused by G3CREC is likely to rapidly increase, outnumbering the number of MRSA BSIs in the near future.Excess mortality associated with BSIs caused by MRSA and G3CREC is significant, and the prolongation of hospital stay imposes a considerable burden on health care systems. A foreseeable shift in the burden of antibiotic resistance from Gram

  20. Detection of coliform bacteria, determination of phylogenetic typing and antibiotic resistance profile of Escherichia coli in qanats and springs of East-Azerbaijan province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Shabani Lokarani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli as a fecal contamination and is considered as an index in water. The aim of this study was to determine the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of E. coli and antibiotic resistance of the isolates collected from qanats and springs in East-Azerbaijan province. For this purpose, 118 samples were selected from above mentioned area and examined by MPN method. The positive coliform samples were identified by phenotypic and genotypic methods. Afterwards, to determine the genetic diversity of E. coli isolates, phylogenetic typing we conducted by means of multiplex PCR. To determine the antibiotic resistance profile, antibiotic discs of Nalidixic Acid, Co-trimoxazol, Amoxicillin, Gentamaicin Ciprofloxacin, Chloramphenicol, Imipenem, Cefotaxime and Ceftazidime antibiogram were used. Based on results, 48% of the samples were evaluated as positive for coliform including 40% for E. coli and 19% for Klebsiella. Amongst 23 isolates confirmed as E. coli by PCR. Phylogenetic typing revealed  that 44% of E. coli strains belonged to type D and B2 and 56% belonged to A and B1 phylotypes. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern showed that 92% of E. coli isolates were resistant to Amoxicillin. All E. coli isolates were sensitive to Imipenem. It was concluded that presence of pathogenic E. coli with high rate of antibacterial resistance in waters source could be considered as a human health hazard.

  1. Sex- and age-specific trends in antibiotic resistance patterns of Escherichia coli urinary isolates from outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Jessina C; Elman, Miriam R; Bearden, David T; Smith, David H

    2013-02-22

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common infections treated in ambulatory care settings, however the epidemiology differs by age and sex. The incidence of UTI is far greater in females than males, and infection in pediatric patients is more often due to anatomical abnormalities. The purpose of this research was to describe age- and sex-specific trends in antibiotic susceptibility to common urinary anti-infectives among urinary isolates of Escherichia coli from ambulatory primary care patients in a regional health maintenance organization. Clinical microbiology data were collected for all urine cultures from patients with visits to primary care clinics in a regional health maintenance organization between 2005 and 2010. The first positive culture for E. coli tested for antibiotic susceptibilities per patient per year was included in the analysis dataset. The frequency of susceptibility to ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, ciprofloxacin, nitrofurantoin, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX) was calculated for male and female patients. The Cochrane-Mantel-Haenzel test was used to test for differences in age-stratified susceptibility to each antibiotic between males and females. A total of 43,493 E. coli isolates from 34,539 unique patients were identified for study inclusion. After stratifying by age, E. coli susceptibility to ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, ciprofloxacin, and nitrofurantoin differed significantly between males and females. However, the magnitude of the differences was less than 10% for all strata except amoxicillin-clavulanate susceptibility in E. coli isolated from males age 18-64 compared to females of the same age. We did not observe clinically meaningful differences in antibiotic susceptibility to common urinary anti-infectives among E. coli isolated from males versus females. These data suggest that male sex alone should not be used as an indication for empiric use of second-line broad-spectrum antibiotic agents

  2. Antibiotic resistance reservoirs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versluis, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    One of the major threats to human health in the 21st century is the emergence of pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to multiple antibiotics, thereby limiting treatment options. An important route through which pathogens become resistant is via acquisition of resistance genes from environmental

  3. Antibiotic resistance reservoirs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versluis, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    One of the major threats to human health in the 21st century is the emergence of pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to multiple antibiotics, thereby limiting treatment options. An important route through which pathogens become resistant is via acquisition of resistance genes from

  4. Accumulation of antibiotics and heavy metals in meat duck deep litter and their role in persistence of antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli in different flocks on one duck farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y; Zhao, W; Shi, Z D; Gu, H R; Zhang, X T; Ji, X; Zou, X T; Gong, J S; Yao, W

    2017-04-01

    Meat duck deep litter is considered to be an ideal environment for the evolution of bacterial antibiotic resistance if it is under poor management. The aim of this study was to characterize the accumulation of antibiotics and heavy metals in the deep litter and their role in the persistence of antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli, and evaluate the service life of the deep litter. Samples were collected from initial, middle, and final stages of deep litter within 3 barns (zero, 4, and 8 rounds of meat duck fattening, d 34) and 9 flocks, with known consumption of antibiotics in the controlled trail. The feed and litter levels of consumed antibiotics and heavy metals were measured. E. coli (n = 147) was isolated and typed by Eric-PCR and the phylogenetic grouping technique, while minimal inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics and heavy metals were measured. This study confirmed the continuous accumulation of doxycycline and many heavy metals in the deep litter. The population of resistant certain bacteria to doxycycline (16 mg/L, 100 mg/L) or ofloxacin (8 g/mL, 50 g/mL) increased in the used deep litter (rounds 4 and 8). E. coli isolated from the 3 stages of sampling were highly resistant to ampicillin, tetracycline, florfenicol, and doxycycline. Increased resistance to ceftiofur, enrofloxacin, ofloxacin, and gentamicin were seen in the isolates from the final stage of deep litter. In addition, the percentage of isolates tolerant to zinc, copper, and cadmium and the numbers of Group-B2 isolates all increased in the used deep litter, and the isolates of each stage belonged predominantly to commensal groups. The antibiotic resistance of isolates with identical Eric-PCR patterns had improved from round 4 to 8, and differences still existed in the resistance profiles of isolates with identical Eric-PCR patterns from different barns of the same round. This study concluded that deep litter could be suitable for the evolution of bacterial antibiotic-resistance

  5. Antimicrobial resistance in Staphylococcus spp., Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. in dogs given antibiotics for chronic dermatological disorders, compared with non-treated control dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saijonmaa-Koulumies L

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate antimicrobial resistance in canine staphylococci, Escherichia coli and enterococci, which were isolated from 22 dogs with pyoderma and a history of previous antibiotic treatment, compared to bacterial isolates from 56 non-treated control dogs. Two isolates of each bacterial species per dog were investigated, if detected. Staphylococcal isolates from dogs with pyoderma (35 isolates were more resistant to sulphatrimethoprim than the isolates from controls (56 isolates (57% vs. 25%, p E. coli was detected (24 and 74 isolates from treated and control dogs, respectively, but the differences were not significant. Resistance for macrolide-lincosamides was approximately 20% among staphylococci in both groups. Resistance to ampicillin among enterococci was 4%–7%. The age of the dogs might have an impact on resistance: multiresistance among staphylococcal isolates from younger dogs (≤5 years was more common than in older dogs (≥6 years (24%, vs. 0%, 63 and 27 isolates, respectively, p = 0.02. Staphylococci in younger dogs were more resistant to tetracycline (48% vs. 11%, p E. coli from older dogs tended to be more resistant, although a significant difference was detected only in resistance to tetracycline (13% vs. 2% of 40 and 50 isolates respecthely, p = 0.04. The results of this small study indicate that resistance in canine staphylococci in the capital area of Finland is comparable with many other countries in Europe. Resistance in indicator bacteria, E. coli and enterococci, was low.

  6. Antibiotic Adjuvants: Rescuing Antibiotics from Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Gerard D

    2016-11-01

    Rooted in the mechanism of action of antibiotics and subject to bacterial evolution, antibiotic resistance is difficult and perhaps impossible to overcome. Nevertheless, strategies can be used to minimize the emergence and impact of resistance. Antibiotic adjuvants offer one such approach. These are compounds that have little or no antibiotic activity themselves but act to block resistance or otherwise enhance antibiotic action. Antibiotic adjuvants are therefore delivered in combination with antibiotics and can be divided into two groups: Class I agents that act on the pathogen, and Class II agents that act on the host. Adjuvants offer a means to both suppress the emergence of resistance and rescue the activity of existing drugs, offering an orthogonal strategy complimentary to new antibiotic discovery VIDEO ABSTRACT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Phylogenetic, virulence and antibiotic resistance characteristics of commensal strain populations of Escherichia coli from community subjects in the Paris area in 2010 and evolution over 30 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massot, Méril; Daubié, Anne-Sophie; Clermont, Olivier; Jauréguy, Françoise; Couffignal, Camille; Dahbi, Ghizlane; Mora, Azucena; Blanco, Jorge; Branger, Catherine; Mentré, France; Eddi, Alain; Picard, Bertrand; Denamur, Erick; The Coliville Group

    2016-04-01

    It is important to study commensal populations of Escherichia coli because they appear to be the reservoir of both extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli and antibiotic resistant strains of E. coli. We studied 279 dominant faecal strains of E. coli from 243 adults living in the community in the Paris area in 2010. The phylogenetic group and subgroup [sequence type complex (STc)] of the isolates and the presence of 20 virulence genes were determined by PCR assays. The O-types and resistance to 18 antibiotics were assessed phenotypically. The B2 group was the most frequently recovered (34.0 %), followed by the A group (28.7 %), and other groups were more rare. The most prevalent B2 subgroups were II (STc73), IV (STc141), IX (STc95) and I (STc131), with 22.1, 21.1, 16.8 and 13.7 %, respectively, of the B2 group strains. Virulence factors (VFs) were more common in B2 group than other strains. One or more resistances were found in 125 strains (44.8 % of the collection) but only six (2.2 % of the collection) were multiresistant; no extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing strain was isolated. The C phylogroup and clonal group A strains were the most resistant. No trade-off between virulence and resistance was evidenced. We compared these strains with collections of strains gathered under the same conditions 30 and 10 years ago. There has been a parallel and linked increase in the frequency of B2 group strains (from 9.4 % in 1980, to 22.7 % in 2000 and 34.0 % in 2010) and of VFs. Antibiotic resistance also increased, from 22.6 % of strains resistant to at least one antibiotic in 1980, to 31.8 % in 2000 and 44.8 % in 2010; resistance to streptomycin, however, remained stable. Commensal human E. coli populations have clearly evolved substantially over time, presumably reflecting changes in human practices, and particularly increasing antibiotic use.

  8. Mechanisms of Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munita, Jose M.; Arias, Cesar A.

    2015-01-01

    Emergence of resistance among the most important bacterial pathogens is recognized as a major public health threat affecting humans worldwide. Multidrug-resistant organisms have emerged not only in the hospital environment but are now often identified in community settings, suggesting that reservoirs of antibiotic-resistant bacteria are present outside the hospital. The bacterial response to the antibiotic “attack” is the prime example of bacterial adaptation and the pinnacle of evolution. “Survival of the fittest” is a consequence of an immense genetic plasticity of bacterial pathogens that trigger specific responses that result in mutational adaptations, acquisition of genetic material or alteration of gene expression producing resistance to virtually all antibiotics currently available in clinical practice. Therefore, understanding the biochemical and genetic basis of resistance is of paramount importance to design strategies to curtail the emergence and spread of resistance and devise innovative therapeutic approaches against multidrug-resistant organisms. In this chapter, we will describe in detail the major mechanisms of antibiotic resistance encountered in clinical practice providing specific examples in relevant bacterial pathogens. PMID:27227291

  9. Tetracycline Antibiotics and Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Trudy H

    2016-04-01

    Tetracyclines possess many properties considered ideal for antibiotic drugs, including activity against Gram-positive and -negative pathogens, proven clinical safety, acceptable tolerability, and the availability of intravenous (IV) and oral formulations for most members of the class. As with all antibiotic classes, the antimicrobial activities of tetracyclines are subject to both class-specific and intrinsic antibiotic-resistance mechanisms. Since the discovery of the first tetracyclines more than 60 years ago, ongoing optimization of the core scaffold has produced tetracyclines in clinical use and development that are capable of thwarting many of these resistance mechanisms. New chemistry approaches have enabled the creation of synthetic derivatives with improved in vitro potency and in vivo efficacy, ensuring that the full potential of the class can be explored for use against current and emerging multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens, including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, MDR Acinetobacter species, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Copyright © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  10. Virulence factors, antibiotic resistance phenotypes and O-serogroups of Escherichia coli strains isolated from community-acquired urinary tract infection patients in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paniagua-Contreras, Gloria Luz; Monroy-Pérez, Eric; Rodríguez-Moctezuma, José Raymundo; Domínguez-Trejo, Pablo; Vaca-Paniagua, Felipe; Vaca, Sergio

    2017-08-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains isolated from patients with community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs) were assessed to determine the prevalence of virulence genes, antibiotic resistance, and the O-serogroup of the strains. Consenting patients with community-acquired UTI were enrolled at Unidad Médica Familiar Number 64 (Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Estado de Mexico, Mexico) and 321 urine samples were collected. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to assess 24 virulence genes and 14 O-serogroups. The Kirby-Bauer method was used to evaluate the antibiotic susceptibility of the isolated strains to 12 commonly used antibiotics. A total of 194 strains were identified as E. coli using standard biochemical tests, followed by PCR amplification of 16S ribosomal RNA gene. Only 58.2% of the strains belonged to the assessed 14 O-serogroups. The serogroups O25, O15, O8, and O75 were present in 20.6%, 17%, 6.1%, and 4.6% of strains, respectively. The most frequently occurring virulence genes among UPEC strains included kpsMT (92.2% strains), usp (87.1%), irp2 (79.3%), iha (64.9%), fim (61.3%), set (36%), astA (33.5%), pap (24.7%), and papGII (21.1%). In addition, 97% of the strains were multi-drug resistant (coresistance to 3-11 antibiotics). The isolated UPEC strains predominantly belonged to three serogroups (O25, O15, and O8), harboured numerous virulence genes, and are multiresistant to antibiotics. The findings of this study could be used to orient UTI treatment strategies and in epidemiological studies in Mexico. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Preliminary survey of antibiotic-resistant fecal indicator bacteria and pathogenic Escherichia coli from river-water samples collected in Oakland County, Michigan, 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Lisa R.; Duris, Joseph W.; Aichele, Stephen S.

    2005-01-01

    A preliminary study was done in Oakland County, Michigan, to determine the concentration of fecal indicator bacteria (fecal coliform bacteria and enterococci), antibiotic resistance patterns of these two groups, and the presence of potentially pathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli). For selected sites, specific members of these groups [E. coli, Enterococcus faecium (E. faecium) and Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis)] were isolated and tested for levels of resistance to specific antibiotics used to treat human infections by pathogens in these groups and for their potential to transfer these resistances. In addition, water samples from all sites were tested for indicators of potentially pathogenic E. coli by three assays: a growth-based assay for sorbitol-negative E. coli, an immunological assay for E. coli O157, and a molecular assay for three virulence and two serotype genes. Samples were also collected from two non-urbanized sites outside of Oakland County. Results from the urbanized Oakland County area were compared to those from these two non-urbanized sites. Fecal indicator bacteria concentrations exceeded State of Michigan recreational water-quality standards and (or) recommended U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) standards in samples from all but two Oakland County sites. Multiple-antibiotic-resistant fecal coliform bacteria were found at all sites, including two reference sites from outside the county. Two sites (Stony Creek and Paint Creek) yielded fecal coliform isolates resistant to all tested antibiotics. Patterns indicative of extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)- producing fecal coliform bacteria were found at eight sites in Oakland County and E. coli resistant to clinically significant antibiotics were recovered from the River Rouge, Clinton River, and Paint Creek. Vancomycin-resistant presumptive enterococci were found at six sites in Oakland County and were not found at the reference sites. Evidence of acquired antibiotic resistances was

  12. Antibiotic Resistance in Foodborne Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Ciara; Duffy, Geraldine

    2013-01-01

    Wide-spread antibiotic resistance among bacterial pathogens is now a serious public health issue and multi-antibiotic resistance has been reported in many foodborne pathogens including Salmonella and E. coli. A study to determine antibiotic resistance profiles of a range of Salmonella and Verocytotoxigenic E.coli (VTEC) isolated from Irish foods revealed significant levels of antibiotic resistance in the strains. S. typhimurium DT104 were multiantibiotic resistant with 97% resistant to 7 anti...

  13. Occurrence ofSalmonella entericaandEscherichia coliin raw chicken and beef meat in northern Egypt and dissemination of their antibiotic resistance markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moawad, Amira A; Hotzel, Helmut; Awad, Omnia; Tomaso, Herbert; Neubauer, Heinrich; Hafez, Hafez M; El-Adawy, Hosny

    2017-01-01

    The global incidence of foodborne infections and antibiotic resistance is recently increased and considered of public health concern. Currently, scarcely information is available on foodborne infections and ESBL associated with poultry and beef meat in Egypt. In total, 180 chicken and beef meat samples as well as internal organs were collected from different districts in northern Egypt. The samples were investigated for the prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Salmonella enterica serovars and Escherichia coli . All isolates were investigated for harbouring class 1 and class 2 integrons. Out of 180 investigated samples 15 S. enterica (8.3%) and 21 E. coli (11.7%) were isolated and identified. S. enterica isolates were typed as 9 S. Typhimurium (60.0%), 3 S. Paratyphi A (20.0%), 2 S . Enteritidis (13.3%) and 1 S. Kentucky (6.7%). Twenty-one E. coli isolates were serotyped into O1, O18, O20, O78, O103, O119, O126, O145, O146 and O158. The phenotypic antibiotic resistance profiles of S. enterica serovars to ampicillin, cefotaxime, cefpodoxime, trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole and tetracycline were 86.7, 80.0, 60.0, 53.3 and 40.0%, respectively. Isolated E. coli were resistant to tetracycline (80.9%), ampicillin (71.4%), streptomycin, trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole (61.9% for each) and cefotaxime (33.3%). The dissemination of genes coding for ESBL and AmpC β-lactamase in S. enterica isolates included bla CTX-M (73.3%), bla TEM (73.3%) and bla CMY (13.3%). In E. coli isolates bla TEM , bla CTX-M and bla OXA were identified in 52.4, 42.9 and 14.3%, respectively. The plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes identified in S. enterica were qnr A (33.3%), qnr B (20.0%) and qnr S (6.7%) while qnr A and qnr B were detected in 33.3% of E. coli isolates. Class 1 integron was detected in 13.3% of S. enterica and in 14.3% of E. coli isolates. Class 2 integron as well as the colistin resistance gene mcr -1 was not found in any of E. coli or S. enterica isolates. This study

  14. Antibiotics Susceptibility Pattern of Escherichia coli Strains Isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibiotics Susceptibility Pattern of Escherichia coli Strains Isolated from Broiler and Layer Chicken with Colisepticemia in Sudan. ... management of collibacillosis in the farms should be based on the result of susceptibility tests because other than poultry health problems transmission of resistant e coli to human can occur.

  15. Characterization of Escherichia coli Isolates from an Urban Lake Receiving Water from a Wastewater Treatment Plant in Mexico City: Fecal Pollution and Antibiotic Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Irma; Salinas, Eva; Martínez, Leticia; Cruz-Córdova, Ariadnna; González-Pedrajo, Bertha; Espinosa, Norma; Amábile-Cuevas, Carlos F

    2015-10-01

    The presence of enteric bacteria in water bodies is a cause of public health concerns, either by directly causing water- and food-borne diseases, or acting as reservoirs for antibiotic resistance determinants. Water is used for crop irrigation; and sediments and aquatic plants are used as fertilizing supplements and soil conditioners. In this work, the bacterial load of several micro-environments of the urban lake of Xochimilco, in Mexico City, was characterized. We found a differential distribution of enteric bacteria between the water column, sediment, and the rhizoplane of aquatic plants, with human fecal bacteria concentrating in the sediment, pointing to the need to assess such bacterial load for each micro-environment, for regulatory agricultural purposes, instead of only the one of the water, as is currently done. Resistance to tetracycline, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was common among Escherichia coli isolates, but was also differentially distributed, being again higher in sediment isolates. A distinct distribution of chloramphenicol minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) among these isolates suggests the presence of a local selective pressure favoring lower MICs than those of isolates from treated water. Fecal bacteria of human origin, living in water bodies along with their antibiotic resistance genes, could be much more common than typically considered, and pose a higher health risk, if assessments are only made on the water column of such bodies.

  16. Threading the Needle: Small-Molecule Targeting of a Xenobiotic Receptor to Ablate Escherichia coli Polysaccharide Capsule Expression Without Altering Antibiotic Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Mehreen; Goller, Carlos C; Pilla, Danielle; Schoenen, Frank J; Seed, Patrick C

    2016-04-15

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), a leading cause of urinary tract and invasive infections worldwide, is rapidly acquiring multidrug resistance, hastening the need for selective new anti-infective agents. Here we demonstrate the molecular target of DU011, our previously discovered potent, nontoxic, small-molecule inhibitor of UPEC polysaccharide capsule biogenesis and virulence. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis and a target-overexpression drug-suppressor screen were used to localize the putative inhibitor target. A thermal shift assay quantified interactions between the target protein and the inhibitor, and a novel DNase protection assay measured chemical inhibition of protein-DNA interactions. Virulence of a regulatory target mutant was assessed in a murine sepsis model. MprA, a MarR family transcriptional repressor, was identified as the putative target of the DU011 inhibitor. Thermal shift measurements indicated the formation of a stable DU011-MprA complex, and DU011 abrogated MprA binding to its DNA promoter site. Knockout of mprA had effects similar to that of DU011 treatment of wild-type bacteria: a loss of encapsulation and complete attenuation in a murine sepsis model, without any negative change in antibiotic resistance. MprA regulates UPEC polysaccharide encapsulation, is essential for UPEC virulence, and can be targeted without inducing antibiotic resistance. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. An Investigation of beta-lactam antibiotics resistance in Escherichia coli isolates and molecular detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in cage birds from Shahrekord, Iran

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    Hossein Tahmasby

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cage birds can harbor human pathogens and contribute to the transmission and spread of drug resistant infectious agents to human. Since many people are interested in keeping cage birds, present study was conducted in cage birds from Shahrekord to investigate the beta-lactam antibiotics resistant E. coli and molecular detection of E. coli O157:H7 that is responsible for outbreaks of human intestinal diseases and fatal haemolytic-uraemic syndrome worldwide. Materials and methods: Altogether 256 samples of cage birds (lovebirds, quails, nightingales, parrots, mynahs, goldfinchs, finches, kingbirds, peacocks, and pheasants faeces were collected with sterile cotton swabs from different areas of Shahrekord, Iran. Swabs were placed directly into Tryptone Soya Broth (TSB. In the laboratory, samples were streaked onto MacConkey agar and also Sorbitol MacConkey agar as selective plating media. Then, antibiogram tests were performed using disc diffusion method. Suspected colonies to E. coli O157:H7 were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results: E. coli was isolated from 31 (12.1% out of 256 the samples. Resistance of isolates to Imipenem, Cefotaxime, Cefixime, Cefalexin, Amoxicillin, Penicillin G and Oxacillin was 0, 3.2, 16.1, 90.3, 100, 100 and 100% respectively. E. coli O157:H7 was not found in any samples. Discussion and conclusion: Although cage birds were not sourcee or carriers of E. coli O157:H7 in the studied region, they harbored beta-lactam antibiotics resistant E. coli and could be an important component of drug-resistant infections transmission from cage-birds to human, especially to kids and can pose a potential risk to human health. For this reason, it is recommended to make pet birds owners and general public aware of potential dangers of cage bird keeping.

  18. Comparison of Antibiotic Resistance and Virulence Factors among Escherichia coli Isolated from Conventional and Free-Range Poultry

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    Vanessa L. Koga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbiological contamination in commercial poultry production has caused concerns for human health because of both the presence of pathogenic microorganisms and the increase in antimicrobial resistance in bacterial strains that can cause treatment failure of human infections. The aim of our study was to analyze the profile of antimicrobial resistance and virulence factors of E. coli isolates from chicken carcasses obtained from different farming systems (conventional and free-range poultry. A total of 156 E. coli strains were isolated and characterized for genes encoding virulence factors described in extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed for 15 antimicrobials, and strains were confirmed as extended spectrum of β-lactamases- (ESBLs- producing E. coli by phenotypic and genotypic tests. The results indicated that strains from free-range poultry have fewer virulence factors than strains from conventional poultry. Strains from conventionally raised chickens had a higher frequency of antimicrobial resistance for all antibiotics tested and also exhibited genes encoding ESBL and AmpC, unlike free-range poultry isolates, which did not. Group 2 CTX-M and CIT were the most prevalent ESBL and AmpC genes, respectively. The farming systems of poultries can be related with the frequency of virulence factors and resistance to antimicrobials in bacteria.

  19. Global prevalence of antibiotic resistance in paediatric urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli and association with routine use of antibiotics in primary care: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, Ashley; Hay, Alastair D; Lane, Isabel F; Thornton, Hannah V; Wootton, Mandy; Costelloe, Céire

    2016-03-15

    To systematically review studies investigating the prevalence of antibiotic resistance in urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli in children and, when appropriate, to meta-analyse the relation between previous antibiotics prescribed in primary care and resistance. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Pooled percentage prevalence of resistance to the most commonly used antibiotics in children in primary care, stratified by the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) status of the study country. Random effects meta-analysis was used to quantify the association between previous exposure to antibiotics in primary care and resistance. Observational and experimental studies identified through Medline, Embase, Cochrane, and ISI Web of Knowledge databases, searched for articles published up to October 2015. Studies were eligible if they investigated and reported resistance in community acquired urinary tract infection in children and young people aged 0-17. Electronic searches with MeSH terms and text words identified 3115 papers. Two independent reviewers assessed study quality and performed data extraction. 58 observational studies investigated 77,783 E coli isolates in urine. In studies from OECD countries, the pooled prevalence of resistance was 53.4% (95% confidence interval 46.0% to 60.8%) for ampicillin, 23.6% (13.9% to 32.3%) for trimethoprim, 8.2% (7.9% to 9.6%) for co-amoxiclav, and 2.1% (0.8 to 4.4%) for ciprofloxacin; nitrofurantoin was the lowest at 1.3% (0.8% to 1.7%). Resistance in studies in countries outside the OECD was significantly higher: 79.8% (73.0% to 87.7%) for ampicillin, 60.3% (40.9% to 79.0%) for co-amoxiclav, 26.8% (11.1% to 43.0%) for ciprofloxacin, and 17.0% (9.8% to 24.2%) for nitrofurantoin. There was evidence that bacterial isolates from the urinary tract from individual children who had received previous prescriptions for antibiotics in primary care were more likely to be resistant to antibiotics, and

  20. Characteristics of Integrons and Associated Gene Cassettes in Antibiotic-Resistant Escherichia coli Isolated from Free-Ranging Food Animals in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Mujeeb Ur; Zhang, Hui; Huang, Shucheng; Iqbal, Muhammad Kashif; Mehmood, Khalid; Luo, Houqiang; Li, Jiakui

    2017-08-01

    We investigated the occurrence of integrons in antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli strains isolated from free-ranging food animals, including yaks, piglets, and chickens, in China, and characterized the gene cassettes harbored within the integrons. We examined 432 E. coli strains that exhibited resistance to at least one class of antibiotics. Integrase genes and associated gene cassettes were characterized by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis, restriction fragment-length polymorphism, DNA sequencing, conjugation experiments, and plasmid analysis. Twenty-nine (6.7%) integrons were amplified from the 432 antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) isolates evaluated. Specifically, class 1 and 2 integrons were detected in 26 (6%) and 3 (0.7%) strains, respectively. Meanwhile, 6 different gene cassettes, dfrA1, dfr12, aadA1, aadA2, sat1, and orfF, were detected within 6 variable regions (VRs), of which the dfrA1 + aadA1 array was the most common, identified in 12 of 26 class 1 integrons (46.1%). Meanwhile, only one class 2 integron contained a cassette, and the remaining two contained undetermined VRs. Finally, a conjugation assay confirmed the transfer of 4 different types of class 1 integrons into recipient strains, with plasmid sizes ranging from 20 to 30 kb. This is the first report examining the baseline AMR characteristics of E. coli within an extensive farming system of livestock animals in China. Given that integrons were detected in >6% of resistant E. coli strains, precautionary measures are required to prevent the spread of mobile genetic resistance determinants in food animals and monitor their emergence. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  1. Occurrence of virulent and antibiotic-resistant Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in some food products and human stool in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Osman Mohamed; Sabry, Maha Ahmed; Hassanain, Nawal A; Hamza, Eman; Hegazi, Ahmed G; Salman, Marwa Badawy

    2017-10-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) represent a severe public health issue worldwide, causing life-threatening diseases in the human gastrointestinal tract. This study aimed to determine the occurrence of virulent and antibiotic-resistant STEC in retail meat and milk products and human stool samples and to characterize the genes encoding for virulence and antibiotic resistance among the identified STEC isolates. A total of 260 food samples were randomly collected from retail markets in different localities of El Giza Governorate, Egypt. 50 stool specimens were obtained from children that had diarrhea at Embaba Fever Hospital. All collected samples were initially subjected to bacteriological examination and serotyping, and then subsequently, the isolates were exposed to polymerase chain reaction application and sequencing for the identification of the virulence-related genes. Finally, the virulent STEC isolates were tested for antibiotic susceptibility. Serotyping of the 76 biochemically identified isolates showed that 18 were STEC with a predominance of non-O157 (16) while 2 O157:K-serotype was detected only in one food and one human isolate. Molecular identification of the virulence genes illustrated that the minced meat showed the highest prevalence of STEC (8%) as compared to the other food products. In the humans, the O157 was the only serotype that expresses the Shiga toxin-associated gene ( eaeA ). Antibiotic susceptibility test displayed that 13 of the 17 food and human isolates (76.47%) were resistant to cephalothin (KF30). 9 of the 13 cephalothin-resistant isolates harbor the β lactamase ( bla TEM )-resistant gene. All isolates were sensitive to chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, amikacin, and gentamicin. DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the stx2- positive minced meat isolate revealed a high genetic relatedness with beef minced meat from the USA and Australia. This study showed the predominance of non-O157 among the identified isolates

  2. Antibiotic resistance pattern in uropathogens

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    Gupta V

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Uropathogenic strains from inpatient and outpatient departments were studied from April 1997 to March 1999 for their susceptibility profiles. The various isolates were Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, Acinetobacter baumanii and Enterococcus faecalis. Antibiotic susceptibility pattern of these isolates revealed that for outpatients, first generation cephalosporins, nitrofurantoin, norfloxacin/ciprofloxacin were effective for treatment of urinary tract infection but for inpatients, parenteral therapy with newer aminoglycosides and third generation cephalosporins need to be advocated as the organisms for nosocomial UTI exhibit a high degree of drug resistance. Trimethoprim and sulphamethoxazole combination was not found to be effective for the treatment of urinary tract infections as all the uropathogens from inpatients and outpatients showed high degree of resistance to co-trimoxazole. Culture and sensitivity of the isolates from urine samples should be done as a routine before advocating the therapy.

  3. Strategies to Minimize Antibiotic Resistance

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    Sang Hee Lee

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance can be reduced by using antibiotics prudently based on guidelines of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs and various data such as pharmacokinetic (PK and pharmacodynamic (PD properties of antibiotics, diagnostic testing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST, clinical response, and effects on the microbiota, as well as by new antibiotic developments. The controlled use of antibiotics in food animals is another cornerstone among efforts to reduce antibiotic resistance. All major resistance-control strategies recommend education for patients, children (e.g., through schools and day care, the public, and relevant healthcare professionals (e.g., primary-care physicians, pharmacists, and medical students regarding unique features of bacterial infections and antibiotics, prudent antibiotic prescribing as a positive construct, and personal hygiene (e.g., handwashing. The problem of antibiotic resistance can be minimized only by concerted efforts of all members of society for ensuring the continued efficiency of antibiotics.

  4. Occurrence of multidrug resistance to oral antibiotics among Escherichia coli urine isolates from outpatient departments in Germany: extended-spectrum β-lactamases and the role of fosfomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresken, Michael; Pfeifer, Yvonne; Hafner, Dieter; Wresch, Rebecca; Körber-Irrgang, Barbara

    2014-10-01

    The in vitro activities of fosfomycin and seven other antibiotics commonly used for oral treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs) were evaluated for 499 Escherichia coli isolated from urine samples during a nationwide laboratory-based surveillance study in 2010. Overall, the highest resistance rates were found for amoxicillin (42.9%), followed by amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (32.7%), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (SXT) (30.9%), ciprofloxacin (19.8%), cefuroxime (10.0%), cefpodoxime (8.6%) and cefixime (8.2%). One-half of the isolates (n=252; 50.5%) were fully susceptible to the eight drugs, whilst only 6 strains (1.2%) were resistant to fosfomycin. Combined resistance to amoxicillin, cefuroxime, ciprofloxacin and SXT was detected in 29 isolates (5.8%). Moreover, 40 isolates (8.0%) produced an extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL), including CTX-M-type ESBLs detected in 39/40 isolates (97.5%) and a TEM-52 ESBL in 1 strain (2.5%). The predominant CTX-M-type ESBL was CTX-M-15 (27/39; 69.2%). Of the 27 CTX-M-15 producers, 19 (70.4%) belonged to the clonal lineage E. coli O25b-ST131. All but one ESBL-producing strains were fosfomycin-susceptible. In view of the emergence of multidrug resistance to standard oral antibiotics, these data support that oral fosfomycin (trometamol salt) may represent a valuable option in the treatment of uncomplicated UTIs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  5. Surveillance of antibiotic resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Alan P.

    2015-01-01

    Surveillance involves the collection and analysis of data for the detection and monitoring of threats to public health. Surveillance should also inform as to the epidemiology of the threat and its burden in the population. A further key component of surveillance is the timely feedback of data to stakeholders with a view to generating action aimed at reducing or preventing the public health threat being monitored. Surveillance of antibiotic resistance involves the collection of antibiotic susceptibility test results undertaken by microbiology laboratories on bacteria isolated from clinical samples sent for investigation. Correlation of these data with demographic and clinical data for the patient populations from whom the pathogens were isolated gives insight into the underlying epidemiology and facilitates the formulation of rational interventions aimed at reducing the burden of resistance. This article describes a range of surveillance activities that have been undertaken in the UK over a number of years, together with current interventions being implemented. These activities are not only of national importance but form part of the international response to the global threat posed by antibiotic resistance. PMID:25918439

  6. Synergistic effect of artocarpin on antibacterial activity of some antibiotics against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septama, Abdi Wira; Panichayupakaranant, Pharkphoom

    2016-01-01

    Antibacterial resistance has dramatically increased and resulted in serious health problems worldwide. One appealing strategy to overcome this resistance problem is the use of combinations of antibacterial compounds to increase their potency. The objective of this study is to determine the synergistic effects of artocarpin for ampicillin, norfloxacin, and tetracycline against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) as well as the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. A broth microdilution method (1.95-250 µg/mL) was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of artocarpin and the antibiotics. Any synergistic effects were evaluated at their own MIC using the checkerboard method and a time-kill assay at 37 °C for 24 h. Artocarpin showed antibacterial activity against MRSA and E. coli with an MIC value of 62.5 µg/mL, and against P. aeruginosa with an MIC value of 250 µg/mL. The interaction of artocarpin with all tested antibiotics produced synergistic effects against MRSA with a fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) of 0.15-0.37. In addition, a combination of artocarpin and norfloxacin showed a synergistic effect against E. coli with an FICI value of 0.37, while the combinations of artocarpin and tetracycline as well as artocarpin and norfloxacin exhibited synergy interactions against P. aeruginosa with FICI values of 0.24 and 0.37, respectively. Time-kill assays indicated that artocarpin enhanced the antimicrobial activities of tetracycline, ampicillin, and norfloxacin against MRSA as well as Gram-negative bacteria.

  7. A role for Tn6029 in the evolution of the complex antibiotic resistance gene loci in genomic island 3 in enteroaggregative hemorrhagic Escherichia coli O104:H4.

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    Piklu Roy Chowdhury

    Full Text Available In enteroaggregative hemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EAHEC O104 the complex antibiotic resistance gene loci (CRL found in the region of divergence 1 (RD1 within E. coli genomic island 3 (GI3 contains blaTEM-1, strAB, sul2, tet(AA, and dfrA7 genes encoding resistance to ampicillin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline and trimethoprim respectively. The precise arrangement of antibiotic resistance genes and the role of mobile elements that drove the evolutionary events and created the CRL have not been investigated. We used a combination of bioinformatics and iterative BLASTn searches to determine the micro-evolutionary events that likely led to the formation of the CRL in GI3 using the closed genome sequences of EAHEC O104:H4 strains 2011C-3493 and 2009EL-2050 and high quality draft genomes of EAHEC E. coli O104:H4 isolates from sporadic cases not associated with the initial outbreak. Our analyses indicate that the CRL in GI3 evolved from a progenitor structure that contained an In2-derived class 1 integron in a Tn21/Tn1721 hybrid backbone. Within the hybrid backbone, a Tn6029-family transposon, identified here as Tn6029C abuts the sul1 gene in the 3'-Conserved Segment (-CS of a class 1 integron generating a unique molecular signature that has only previously been observed in pASL01a, a small plasmid found in commensal E. coli in West Africa. From this common progenitor, independent IS26-mediated events created two novel transposons identified here as Tn6029D and Tn6222 in 2011C-3493 and 2009EL-2050 respectively. Analysis of RD1 within GI3 reveals IS26 has played a crucial role in the assembly of regions within the CRL.

  8. Vegetables and Restaurant Salads as a Reservoir for Shiga Toxigenic Escherichia coli: Distribution of Virulence Factors, O-Serogroups, and Antibiotic Resistance Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakerian, Amir; Rahimi, Ebrahim; Emad, Pardis

    2016-07-01

    Close contact of vegetables with soil, polluted water, and animal manure and unsanitary conditions during processing of restaurant salads led us to study the distribution of virulence factors, O-serogroups, and antibiotic resistance properties in Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) isolated from vegetables and salads. Samples of vegetables and salad (n = 420) were collected and evaluated for the presence of E. coli using culture and a PCR assay. Total prevalence of E. coli in studied samples was 49.5%. E. coli was found in 49.6% of vegetable samples and 49% of salad samples. Leek and traditional salad had the highest incidence of E. coli. Significant differences in the incidence of E. coli were found between the hot and cold seasons. Of the 149 E. coli isolates from vegetable samples, 130 (87%) were STEC, and of the 59 E. coli isolates from salad samples, 50 (84%) were STEC. The most commonly detected virulence factors were stx1 and eaeA. A significant difference was found between the frequency of the attaching and effacing and the enterohemorrhagic E. coli subtypes. Serogroups O26 (46% of isolates), O157 (14%), O121 (10%), and O128 (9%) were the most commonly detected serogroups among the STEC strains. The tetA, sul1, aac(3)-IV, dfrA1, blaSHV, and CITM antibiotic resistance genes were found in 96, 47.7, 90, 51, 27, and 93% of isolates, respectively. The highest levels of resistance were found against ampicillin (96.6% of isolates), tetracycline (87%), and gentamicin (90%). This study shows the importance of vegetables and salads as potential sources of E. coli infection.

  9. Bacterial cheating limits antibiotic resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao Chao, Hui; Yurtsev, Eugene; Datta, Manoshi; Artemova, Tanya; Gore, Jeff

    2012-02-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics has led to the evolution of resistance in bacteria. Bacteria can gain resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin by acquiring a plasmid carrying the gene beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. This inactivation may represent a cooperative behavior, as the entire bacterial population benefits from removing the antibiotic. The cooperative nature of this growth suggests that a cheater strain---which does not contribute to breaking down the antibiotic---may be able to take advantage of cells cooperatively inactivating the antibiotic. Here we find experimentally that a ``sensitive'' bacterial strain lacking the plasmid conferring resistance can invade a population of resistant bacteria, even in antibiotic concentrations that should kill the sensitive strain. We observe stable coexistence between the two strains and find that a simple model successfully explains the behavior as a function of antibiotic concentration and cell density. We anticipate that our results will provide insight into the evolutionary origin of phenotypic diversity and cooperative behaviors.

  10. Sequences of two related multiple antibiotic resistance virulence plasmids sharing a unique IS26-related molecular signature isolated from different Escherichia coli pathotypes from different hosts.

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    Carola Venturini

    Full Text Available Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC and atypical enteropathogenic E. coli (aEPEC are important zoonotic pathogens that increasingly are becoming resistant to multiple antibiotics. Here we describe two plasmids, pO26-CRL125 (125 kb from a human O26:H- EHEC, and pO111-CRL115 (115kb from a bovine O111 aEPEC, that impart resistance to ampicillin, kanamycin, neomycin, streptomycin, sulfathiazole, trimethoprim and tetracycline and both contain atypical class 1 integrons with an identical IS26-mediated deletion in their 3´-conserved segment. Complete sequence analysis showed that pO26-CRL125 and pO111-CRL115 are essentially identical except for a 9.7 kb fragment, present in the backbone of pO26-CRL125 but absent in pO111-CRL115, and several indels. The 9.7 kb fragment encodes IncI-associated genes involved in plasmid stability during conjugation, a putative transposase gene and three imperfect repeats. Contiguous sequence identical to regions within these pO26-CRL125 imperfect repeats was identified in pO111-CRL115 precisely where the 9.7 kb fragment is missing, suggesting it may be mobile. Sequences shared between the plasmids include a complete IncZ replicon, a unique toxin/antitoxin system, IncI stability and maintenance genes, a novel putative serine protease autotransporter, and an IncI1 transfer system including a unique shufflon. Both plasmids carry a derivate Tn21 transposon with an atypical class 1 integron comprising a dfrA5 gene cassette encoding resistance to trimethoprim, and 24 bp of the 3´-conserved segment followed by Tn6026, which encodes resistance to ampicillin, kanymycin, neomycin, streptomycin and sulfathiazole. The Tn21-derivative transposon is linked to a truncated Tn1721, encoding resistance to tetracycline, via a region containing the IncP-1α oriV. Absence of the 5 bp direct repeats flanking Tn3-family transposons, indicates that homologous recombination events played a key role in the formation of this complex

  11. Molecular characterization of a 21.4 kilobase antibiotic resistance plasmid from an α-hemolytic Escherichia coli O108:H- human clinical isolate.

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    Fay E Dawes

    Full Text Available This study characterizes the 21.4 kilobase plasmid pECTm80 isolated from Escherichia coli strain 80, an α hemolytic human clinical diarrhoeal isolate (serotype O108:H-. DNA sequence analysis of pECTm80 revealed it belonged to incompatibility group X1, and contained plasmid partition and toxin-antitoxin systems, an R6K-like triple origin (ori replication system, genes required for replication regulation, insertion sequences IS1R, ISEc37 and a truncated transposase gene (Tn3-like ΔtnpA of the Tn3 family, and carried a class 2 integron. The class 2 integron of pECTm80 contains an intact cassette array dfrA1-sat2, encoding resistance to trimethoprim and streptothricin, and an aadA1 gene cassette truncated by the insertion of IS1R. The complex plasmid replication system includes α, β and γ origins of replication. Pairwise BLASTn comparison of pECTm80 with plasmid pE001 reveals a conserved plasmid backbone suggestive of a common ancestral lineage. Plasmid pECTm80 is of potential clinical importance, as it carries multiple genes to ensure its stable maintenance through successive bacterial cell divisions and multiple antibiotic resistance genes.

  12. The Comprehensive Antibiotic Resistance Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Andrew G.; Waglechner, Nicholas; Nizam, Fazmin; Yan, Austin; Azad, Marisa A.; Baylay, Alison J.; Bhullar, Kirandeep; Canova, Marc J.; De Pascale, Gianfranco; Ejim, Linda; Kalan, Lindsay; King, Andrew M.; Koteva, Kalinka; Morar, Mariya; Mulvey, Michael R.; O'Brien, Jonathan S.; Pawlowski, Andrew C.; Piddock, Laura J. V.; Spanogiannopoulos, Peter; Sutherland, Arlene D.; Tang, Irene; Taylor, Patricia L.; Thaker, Maulik; Wang, Wenliang; Yan, Marie; Yu, Tennison

    2013-01-01

    The field of antibiotic drug discovery and the monitoring of new antibiotic resistance elements have yet to fully exploit the power of the genome revolution. Despite the fact that the first genomes sequenced of free living organisms were those of bacteria, there have been few specialized bioinformatic tools developed to mine the growing amount of genomic data associated with pathogens. In particular, there are few tools to study the genetics and genomics of antibiotic resistance and how it impacts bacterial populations, ecology, and the clinic. We have initiated development of such tools in the form of the Comprehensive Antibiotic Research Database (CARD; http://arpcard.mcmaster.ca). The CARD integrates disparate molecular and sequence data, provides a unique organizing principle in the form of the Antibiotic Resistance Ontology (ARO), and can quickly identify putative antibiotic resistance genes in new unannotated genome sequences. This unique platform provides an informatic tool that bridges antibiotic resistance concerns in health care, agriculture, and the environment. PMID:23650175

  13. Selective conditions for a multidrug resistance plasmid depend on the sociality of antibiotic resistance"

    OpenAIRE

    Bottery, Michael; Wood, A. Jamie; Brockhurst, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) plasmids frequently carry antibiotic resistance genes conferring qualitatively different mechanisms of resistance. We show here that the antibiotic concentrations selecting for the RK2 plasmid in Escherichia coli depend upon the sociality of the drug resistance: the selection for selfish drug resistance (efflux pump) occurred at very low drug concentrations, just 1.3% of the MIC of the plasmid-free antibiotic-sensitive strain, whereas selection for cooperative drug ...

  14. Super-Shed Escherichia coli O157:H7 have potential for increased pathogen persistence and antibiotic resistance dissemination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattle are primary reservoirs of Escherichia coli O157:H7 (O157), and super-shedding cattle shed O157 at greater than or equal to 10,000 colony-forming units/g feces. Host, bacteria, and/or the environment reportedly influence the super-shedding phenomenon. We recently demonstrated that a super-she...

  15. Antibiotic resistance, phylogenetic grouping and virulence potential of Escherichia coli isolated from the faeces of intensively farmed and free range poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeng, Akua Serwaah; Rickard, Heather; Ndi, Olasumbo; Sexton, Margaret; Barton, Mary

    2012-01-27

    Antibiotic use in poultry production is a risk factor for promoting the emergence of resistant Escherichia coli. To ascertain differences in different classes of chickens, the resistance profile, some virulence genes and phylogenetic grouping on 251 E. coli isolates from intensive meat (free range and indoor commercial) and free range egg layer chickens collected between December 2008 and June 2009 in South Australia were performed. Among the 251 strains, 102 (40.6%) and 67 (26.7%) were found to be resistant to tetracycline and ampicillin respectively. Resistance was also observed to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (12.4%), streptomycin (10.8%), spectinomycin (9.6%), neomycin (6.0%) and florfenicol (2.0%) but no resistance was found to ceftiofur, ciprofloxacin or gentamicin. Amplification of DNA of the isolates by polymerase chain reaction revealed the presence of genes that code for resistant determinants: tetracycline (tet(A), tet(B) and tet(C)), ampicillin (bla(TEM) and bla(SHV)), trimethoprim (dhfrV and dhfrXIII), sulphonamide (sulI and sulII), neomycin (aph(3)-Ia(aphA1)), and spectinomycin-streptinomycin (aadA2). In addition, 32.3-39.4% of the isolates were found to belong to commensal groups (A and B1) and 11.2-17.1% belonged to the virulent groups (B2 and D). Among the 251 E. coli isolates, 25 (10.0%) carried two or more virulence genes typical of Extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC). Furthermore, 17 of the isolates with multi-resistance were identified to be groups B2 and D. Although no significant difference was observed between isolates from free range and indoor commercial meat chickens (P>0.05), significant differences was observed between the different classes of meat chickens (free range and indoor commercial) and egg layers (P<0.05). While this study assessed the presence of a limited number of virulence genes, our study re emphasises the zoonotic potential of poultry E. coli isolates. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Antibiotic resistance is linked to carriage of papC and iutA virulence genes and phylogenetic group D background in commensal and uropathogenic Escherichia coli from infants and young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karami, N; Wold, A E; Adlerberth, I

    2017-04-01

    P fimbriae, enabling adherence to colonic and urinary epithelium, and aerobactin, an iron sequestering system, are both colonization factors in the human colon and virulence factors for urinary tract infection. The colonic microbiota is suggested to be a site suitable for the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes. We investigated whether phenotypic resistance to antibiotics in commensal and uropathogenic Escherichia coli from infants and young children is associated with carriage of virulence genes and to phylogenetic group origin and, in the case of fecal strains, to persistence in the gut and fecal population levels. The commensal strains (n = 272) were derived from a birth cohort study, while the urinary isolates (n = 205) were derived from outpatient clinics. Each strain was assessed for phenotypic antibiotic resistance and for carriage of virulence genes (fimA, papC, sfaD/E, hlyA, iutA, kfiC, and neuB), phylogenetic group (A, B1, B2, or D), and markers of particular virulent clones (CGA-D-ST69, O15:H1-D-ST393, and O25b:H4-B2-ST131). Resistance to ampicillin, tetracycline, and trimethoprim was most prevalent. Multivariate analysis showed that resistance to any antibiotic was significantly associated with carriage of genes encoding P fimbriae (papC) and aerobactin (iutA), and a phylogenetic group D origin. Neither fecal population numbers nor the capacity for long-term persistence in the gut were related to antibiotic resistance among fecal strains. Our study confirms the importance of phylogenetic group D origin for antibiotic resistance in E. coli and identifies the virulence genes papC and iutA as determinants of antibiotic resistance. The reason for the latter association is currently unclear.

  17. The Prehistory of Antibiotic Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Julie; Waglechner, Nicholas; Wright, Gerard

    2016-06-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global problem that is reaching crisis levels. The global collection of resistance genes in clinical and environmental samples is the antibiotic "resistome," and is subject to the selective pressure of human activity. The origin of many modern resistance genes in pathogens is likely environmental bacteria, including antibiotic producing organisms that have existed for millennia. Recent work has uncovered resistance in ancient permafrost, isolated caves, and in human specimens preserved for hundreds of years. Together with bioinformatic analyses on modern-day sequences, these studies predict an ancient origin of resistance that long precedes the use of antibiotics in the clinic. Understanding the history of antibiotic resistance is important in predicting its future evolution. Copyright © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  18. Antibiotic Resistance in Nephrological Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.I. Taran

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The problem of antibiotic resistance is a serious threat to the global public health and requires action by both the state and the public. The World Health Organization identified 15 most dangerous and prevalent superbugs, which it ranked based on three levels of threat they present to the public health. At the heart of the fight against antibiotic resistance lies the increased awareness of the health professionals and general public that incorrect and excessive use of antibiotics amid poor practices in infection prevention and control contributes to the acceleration of antibiotic resistance.

  19. Cross-sectional survey of antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli isolated from diseased farm livestock in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheney, T E A; Smith, R P; Hutchinson, J P; Brunton, L A; Pritchard, G; Teale, C J

    2015-09-01

    Between 2005 and 2007, E. coli obtained from clinical diagnostic submissions from cattle, goats, pigs and sheep to government laboratories in England and Wales were tested for sensitivity to 16 antimicrobials. Resistance was most commonly observed against ampicillin, streptomycin, sulphonamides and tetracyclines. Resistance levels varied significantly between species, with isolates from cattle frequently showing the highest levels. Verocytotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC) expressed less resistance than non-VTEC. Only 19·3% of non-VTEC and 43·5% of VTEC were susceptible to all antimicrobials, while 47·1% and 30·4%, respectively, were resistant to ⩾5 antimicrobials. The resistance phenotype SSuT was commonly observed, and isolates resistant to third-generation cephalosporins were also identified. We recommend judicious antimicrobial usage in the livestock industry in order to preserve efficacy.

  20. Antibiotic Resistance and Virulence Potentials of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Isolates from Raw Meats of Slaughterhouses and Retail Markets in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun-Jung; Yoon, Jang Won; Heo, Eun-Jeong; Ko, Eun-Kyoung; Kim, Ki-Yeon; Kim, Young-Jo; Yoon, Hyang-Jin; Wee, Sung-Hwan; Park, Yong Ho; Moon, Jin San

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the prevalence of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) was investigated among raw meat or meat products from slaughterhouses and retail markets in South Korea, and their potential for antibiotic resistance and virulence was further analyzed. A total of 912 raw meats, including beef, pork, and chicken, were collected from 2008 to 2009. E. coli strains were frequently isolated in chicken meats (176/233, 75.9%), beef (102/217, 42.3%), and pork (109/235, 39.2%). Putative STEC isolates were further categorized, based on the presence or absence of the Shiga toxin (stx) genes, followed by standard O-serotyping. Polymerase chain reaction assays were used to detect the previously defined virulence genes in STEC, including Shiga toxins 1 and Shiga toxin 2 (stx1 and 2), enterohemolysin (ehxA), intimin (eaeA), STEC autoagglutination adhesion (saa), and subtilase cytotoxin (subAB). All carried both stx1 and eae genes, but none of them had the stx2, saa, or subAB genes. Six (50.0%) STEC isolates possessed the ehxA gene, which is known to be encoded by the 60-megadalton virulence plasmid. Our antibiogram profiling demonstrated that some STEC strains, particularly pork and chicken isolates, displayed a multiple drug-resistance phenotype. RPLA analysis revealed that all the stx1-positive STEC isolates produced Stx1 only at the undetectable level. Altogether, these results imply that the locus of enterocyte and effacement (LEE)-positive strains STEC are predominant among raw meats or meat products from slaughterhouses or retail markets in Korea.

  1. An 11-year analysis of the prevalent uropathogens and the changing pattern of Escherichia coli antibiotic resistance in 38,530 community urinary tract infections, Dublin 1999-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, I M; Manecksha, R P; McCullagh, E; Ahmad, S; O'Kelly, F; Flynn, R; McDermott, T E D; Murphy, P; Grainger, R; Fennell, J P; Thornhill, J A

    2013-03-01

    Knowledge of local antimicrobial resistance patterns is essential for evidence-based empirical antibiotic prescribing, and a cutoff point of 20% has been suggested as the level of resistance at which an agent should no longer be used empirically. We sought to identify the changing incidence of causative uropathogens over an 11-year period. We also examined the trends in antibiotic resistance encountered in both the pooled urine samples and those where the causative organism was Escherichia coli. A retrospective analysis of the antimicrobial resistance within the positive community urine isolates over the 11-year period, 1999 to 2009, in a single Dublin teaching hospital was performed. In total 38,530 positive urine samples processed at our laboratory originated in the community of which 23,838 (56.7%) had E. coli as the infecting organism. The prevalence of E. coli has been increasing in recent years in community UTIs with 70.4% of UTIs in the community caused by E.coli in 2009. Ampicillin and trimethoprim were the least-active agents against E. coli with mean 11-year resistance rates of 60.8 and 31.5%, respectively. Significant trends of increasing resistance over the 11-year period were identified for trimethoprim, co-amoxyclav, cefuroxime and gentamicin. Ciprofloxacin remains a reasonable empirical antibiotic choice in this community with an 11-year resistance rate of 10.6%. Higher antibiotic resistance rates were identified in the male population and in children. Resistance rates to commonly prescribed antibiotics are increasing significantly. This data will enable evidence-based empirical prescribing which will ensure more effective treatment and lessen the emergence of resistant uropathogens in the community.

  2. Fighting antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit using antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantinga, Nienke L; Wittekamp, Bastiaan H J; van Duijn, Pleun J; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global and increasing problem that is not counterbalanced by the development of new therapeutic agents. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is especially high in intensive care units with frequently reported outbreaks of multidrug-resistant organisms. In addition to classical infection prevention protocols and surveillance programs, counterintuitive interventions, such as selective decontamination with antibiotics and antibiotic rotation have been applied and investigated to control the emergence of antibiotic resistance. This review provides an overview of selective oropharyngeal and digestive tract decontamination, decolonization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic rotation as strategies to modulate antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit.

  3. PREVALENCE OF ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANT STRAINS OF ESCHERICHIA COLI AND ENTEROCOCCUS SPP. IN ROE DEER (CAPREOLUS CAPREOLUS AND RED DEER (CERVUS ELAPHUS AT THE PARCO NAZIONALE DEI MONTI SIBILLINI, ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Pisano

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A case control study was performed in the Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini, Italy, to find out whether roe deer (Capreolus capreolus and red deer (Cervus elaphus were more likely to harbour antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli in their faeces, compared to Enterococcus spp. Ten areas were selected and samples were collected during a fourmonths (May to August, 2008 sampling period. Samples of water (n=12 and feces (n=59, collected at 10 different sites, were cultured for E. coli and Enterococcus spp. The resulting colonies were screened for tetracycline, ampicillin and kanamycin resistance using the Lederberg Replica Plating method (breakpoint 4 μg/ml. All resistant isolates were then selected, and subjected to the CLSI antimicrobial plate susceptibility test (7. Among the water specimens contaminated by E. coli, 80% were found to be resistant to ampicillin, 80% to tetracycline and 40% to kanamycin. Among the water specimens contaminated by Enterococcus spp., 14.29% were found to be resistant to ampicillin, 14.29% to tetracycline and 71.3% to kanamycin. Among the 39 strains of E. coli isolated from red deer feces, 12 were resistant to ampicillin (30.77%, 5 to tetracycline (12,82% and 3 to kanamycin (7.69%. Among the 19 strains of Enterococcus spp. isolated from red deer feces, 0 were resistant to ampicillin (0%, 1 to tetracycline (5.26% and 19 to kanamycin (100. These are significant findings, indicating that antibiotic resistance can be found in naïve animal populations and that red deer and fallow deer could act as sentinels for antimicrobial resistance. Key words Antibiotic-resistance, red deer, fallow deer, Escherichia

  4. Heavy Metal Induced Antibiotic Resistance in Bacterium LSJC7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Songcan; Li, Xiaomin; Sun, Guoxin; Zhang, Yingjiao; Su, Jianqiang; Ye, Jun

    2015-09-29

    Co-contamination of antibiotics and heavy metals prevails in the environment, and may play an important role in disseminating bacterial antibiotic resistance, but the selective effects of heavy metals on bacterial antibiotic resistance is largely unclear. To investigate this, the effects of heavy metals on antibiotic resistance were studied in a genome-sequenced bacterium, LSJC7. The results showed that the presence of arsenate, copper, and zinc were implicated in fortifying the resistance of LSJC7 towards tetracycline. The concentrations of heavy metals required to induce antibiotic resistance, i.e., the minimum heavy metal concentrations (MHCs), were far below (up to 64-fold) the minimum inhibition concentrations (MIC) of LSJC7. This finding indicates that the relatively low heavy metal levels in polluted environments and in treated humans and animals might be sufficient to induce bacterial antibiotic resistance. In addition, heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance was also observed for a combination of arsenate and chloramphenicol in LSJC7, and copper/zinc and tetracycline in antibiotic susceptible strain Escherichia coli DH5α. Overall, this study implies that heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance might be ubiquitous among various microbial species and suggests that it might play a role in the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance in metal and antibiotic co-contaminated environments.

  5. The effects of antibiotic usage in food animals on the development of antimicrobial resistance of importance for humans in Campylobacter and Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    1999-01-01

    Modern food animal production depends on use of large amounts of antibiotics for disease control. This provides favourable conditions for the spread and persistence of antimicrobial-resistant zoonotic bacteria such as Campylobacter and E. coli O157. The occurrence of antimicrobial resistance...... to antimicrobials used in human therapy is increasing in human pathogenic Campylobacter and E. coli from animals. There is an urgent need to implement strategies for prudent use of antibiotics in food animal production to prevent further increases in the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance in food-borne human...

  6. The effects of antibiotic usage in food animals on the development of antimicrobial resistance of importance for humans in Campylobacter and Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    1999-01-01

    Modern food animal production depends on use of large amounts of antibiotics for disease control. This provides favourable conditions for the spread and persistence of antimicrobial-resistant zoonotic bacteria such as Campylobacter and E. coli O157. The occurrence of antimicrobial resistance...... to antimicrobials used in human therapy is increasing in human pathogenic Campylobacter and E. coli from animals. There is an urgent need to implement strategies for prudent use of antibiotics in food animal production to prevent further increases in the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance in food-borne human...... pathogenic bacteria such as Campylobacter and E, coli. (C) Elsevier, Paris....

  7. Antibiotics and the resistant microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Morten; Dantas, Gautam

    2011-01-01

    Since the discovery and clinical application of antibiotics, pathogens and the human microbiota have faced a near continuous exposure to these selective agents. A well-established consequence of this exposure is the evolution of multidrug-resistant pathogens, which can become virtually untreatable....... Less appreciated are the concomitant changes in the human microbiome in response to these assaults and their contribution to clinical resistance problems. Studies have shown that pervasive changes to the human microbiota result from antibiotic treatment and that resistant strains can persist for years...... expand our understanding of the interplay between antibiotics and the microbiome....

  8. Handling Time-dependent Variables : Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munoz-Price, L. Silvia; Frencken, Jos F.; Tarima, Sergey; Bonten, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating quantitative associations between antibiotic exposure and antibiotic resistance development is important. In the absence of randomized trials, observational studies are the next best alternative to derive such estimates. Yet, as antibiotics are prescribed for varying time periods,

  9. The phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli populations isolated from farm animals with different exposure to antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurek, Justyna; Pusz, Paweł; Bok, Ewa; Stosik, Michał; Baldy-Chudzik, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the influence of the presence or the absence of antibiotic input on the emergence and maintenance of resistance in commensal bacteria from food producing animals. The research material constituted E. coli isolates from two animal species: swine at different age from one conventional pig farm with antibiotic input in young pigs and from beef and dairy cattle originated from organic breeding farm. The sensitivity to 16 antimicrobial agents was tested, and the presence of 15 resistance genes was examined. In E. coli from swine, the most prevalent resistance was resistance to streptomycin (88.3%), co-trimoxazole (78.8%), tetracycline (57.3%) ampicillin (49.3%) and doxycycline (44.9%) with multiple resistance in the majority. The most commonly observed resistance genes were: bla(TEM) (45.2%), tetA (35.8%), aadA1 (35.0%), sul3 (29.5%), dfrA1 (20.4%). Differences in phenotypes and genotypes of E. coli between young swine undergoing prevention program and the older ones without the antibiotic pressure occurred. A disparate resistance was found in E. coli from cattle: cephalothin (36.9%), cefuroxime (18.9%), doxycycline (8.2%), nitrofurantoin (7.7%), and concerned mainly dairy cows. Among isolates from cattle, multidrug resistance was outnumbered by resistance to one or two antibiotics and the only found gene markers were: bla(SHV), (3.4%), tetA (1.29%), bla(TEM) (0.43%) and tetC (0.43%). The presented outcomes provide evidence that antimicrobial pressure contributes to resistance development, and enteric microflora constitutes an essential reservoir of resistance genes.

  10. Antibiotic Trapping by Plasmid-Encoded CMY-2 beta-Lactamase Combined with Reduced Outer Membrane Permeability as a Mechanism of Carbapenem Resistance in Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goessens, W.H.F.; van der Bij, A.K.; van Boxtel, R.; Pitout, J.D.D.; van Ulsen, J.P.; Melles, D.C.; Tommassen, J.

    2013-01-01

    A liver transplant patient was admitted with cholangitis, for which meropenem therapy was started. Initial cultures showed a carbapenem-susceptible (CS) Escherichia coli strain, but during admission, a carbapenem-resistant (CR) E. coli strain was isolated. Analysis of the outer membrane protein

  11. Antibiotic trapping by plasmid-encoded cmy-2-lactamase combined with reduced outer membrane permeability as a mechanism of carbapenem resistance in escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.H.F. Goessens (Wil); A.K. van der Bij (Akke); R. van Boxtel (Ria); J.D.D. Pitout (J. D D); P. van Ulsen (Peter); D.C. Melles (Damian); J. Tommassen (Jan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractA liver transplant patient was admitted with cholangitis, for which meropenem therapy was started. Initial cultures showed a carbapenem-susceptible (CS) Escherichia coli strain, but during admission, a carbapenem-resistant (CR) E. coli strain was isolated. Analysis of the outer membrane

  12. Addressing resistance to antibiotics in systematic reviews of antibiotic interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leibovici, Leonard; Paul, Mical; Garner, Paul; Sinclair, David J; Afshari, Arash; Pace, Nathan Leon; Cullum, Nicky; Williams, Hywel C; Smyth, Alan; Skoetz, Nicole; Del Mar, Chris; Schilder, Anne G M; Yahav, Dafna; Tovey, David

    Antibiotics are among the most important interventions in healthcare. Resistance of bacteria to antibiotics threatens the effectiveness of treatment. Systematic reviews of antibiotic treatments often do not address resistance to antibiotics even when data are available in the original studies. This

  13. PREVALENCE AND ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    9 mars 2015 ... strategy to prevent the spread of this resistance. Keywords: Staphylococci; Staphylococcus aureus; Oxacillin; Antibiotic resistance; Disc diffusion. Author Correspondence, e-mail: mn.boukhatem@yahoo.fr. ICID: 1142924. Journal of Fundamental and Applied Sciences. ISSN 1112-9867. Available online at.

  14. The determinants of the antibiotic resistance process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Beatriz Espinosa; Altagracia Martínez, Marina; Sánchez Rodríguez, Martha A; Wertheimer, Albert I

    2009-01-01

    The use of antibiotic drugs triggers a complex interaction involving many biological, sociological, and psychological determinants. Resistance to antibiotics is a serious worldwide problem which is increasing and has implications for morbidity, mortality, and health care both in hospitals and in the community. To analyze current research on the determinants of antibiotic resistance and comprehensively review the main factors in the process of resistance in order to aid our understanding and assessment of this problem. We conducted a MedLine search using the key words "determinants", "antibiotic", and "antibiotic resistance" to identify publications between 1995 and 2007 on the determinants of antibiotic resistance. Publications that did not address the determinants of antibiotic resistance were excluded. The process and determinants of antibiotic resistance are described, beginning with the development of antibiotics, resistance and the mechanisms of resistance, sociocultural determinants of resistance, the consequences of antibiotic resistance, and alternative measures proposed to combat antibiotic resistance. Analysis of the published literature identified the main determinants of antibiotic resistance as irrational use of antibiotics in humans and animal species, insufficient patient education when antibiotics are prescribed, lack of guidelines for treatment and control of infections, lack of scientific information for physicians on the rational use of antibiotics, and lack of official government policy on the rational use of antibiotics in public and private hospitals.

  15. Antibiotic resistance of bacterial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoiby, N.; Bjarnsholt, T.; Givskov, M.

    2010-01-01

    A biofilm is a structured consortium of bacteria embedded in a self-produced polymer matrix consisting of polysaccharide, protein and DNA. Bacterial biofilms cause chronic infections because they show increased tolerance to antibiotics and disinfectant chemicals as well as resisting phagocytosis...... to antibiotics. Biofilm growth is associated with an increased level of mutations as well as with quorum-sensing-regulated mechanisms. Conventional resistance mechanisms such as chromosomal beta-lactamase, upregulated efflux pumps and mutations in antibiotic target molecules in bacteria also contribute...... to the survival of biofilms. Biofilms can be prevented by early aggressive antibiotic prophylaxis or therapy and they can be treated by chronic suppressive therapy. A promising strategy may be the use of enzymes that can dissolve the biofilm matrix (e.g. DNase and alginate lyase) as well as quorum...

  16. Antibiotic resistance: the Iowa experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Nancy

    2002-11-01

    In the past 10 years, the number of strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae and other common respiratory pathogens that are resistant to penicillin has increased. The Iowa Department of Public Health convened a multidisciplinary task force in January 1998 to develop strategies to combat antibiotic resistance in the state because they were alarmed by these reports. Within 18 months, the task force implemented statewide surveillance of resistant organisms and posted information about the surveillance on the Internet, distributed a public health guide on judicious antibiotic use and infection control measures to 7500 healthcare providers, and held a press conference to inform the public about antibiotic resistance. The task force collaborated with several major insurers in the state to profile the top prescribers of antibiotic agents in their plan. The profiling and educational interventions led to a substantial decrease in both overall antibiotic prescribing and drug costs. Other states may want to undertake similar programs to help protect their citizens from infections caused by resistant pathogens.

  17. Study of Antibiotic Resistance Pattern and Mutation in Genes gyrA and parC of Escherichia Coli Causing Urinary Tract Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Faghri

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Fluoroquinolones are essential antimicrobial agents used to treat UTIs. Clinical experiences have shown a high rate of antibiotic resistance among uropatho-gens. These resistance are usually the consequence of mutations involving genes encoding gyrA and parC. The aim of this study was to determine antimicrobial resistance pattern and the presence of mutations in regions that code for quinolone resistance in the genes gyrA and parC in clinical isolates of E. coli from a hospital in Isfahan, Iran. Materials & Methods: A total of 135 isolates of E.coli (from urine were collected from Sep-tember to February 2013 from Alzahra Hospital (Isfahan, Iran. Bacterial susceptibility to an-timicrobial agents was determined using disk diffusion method. PCR was performed to detect genes gyrA and parC. Then, 13 isolates were randomly chosen for genetic characterization of the quinolone-determining region (QRDR of the parC and gyrA genes. Results: Among 135 E. coli isolates, 61 isolates ( 45 % were resistant to fluoroquinolones. From 13 isolates, 11 isolates showed two mutations (Ser83Leu/ Asp87Asn and 2 isolates showed a single mutation (Ser83Leu in gyrA gene. Also, five different mutations were de-tected in parC gene in the E. coli isolates, encoding Ser80Ile, Ser80Val, Ser80Arg, Glu84Val, Gly78Ser. Conclusion: More research on the molecular basis of FQ resistance is required to develop new therapeutic strategies for FQ-resistant E. coli. To overcome antibiotic resistance antibiotic therapy should be limited and based on the susceptibility patterns of microorganisms. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2016; 23 (2:118-125

  18. Antibiotic resistance in Salmonella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vo, A.T.T.

    2007-01-01

    Immediately after their introduction in the beginning of the fourties of the previous century, the agents used to combat infectious diseases caused by bacteria were regarded with suspicion, but not long thereafter antibiotics had the status of miracle drugs. For decades mankind has lived under the

  19. Adaptive Laboratory Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance Using Different Selection Regimes Lead to Similar Phenotypes and Genotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahn, Leonie Johanna; Munck, Christian; Ellabaan, Mostafa M Hashim

    2017-01-01

    compare the geno- and phenotypes of Escherichia coli after evolution to Amikacin, Piperacillin, and Tetracycline under four different selection regimes. Interestingly, key mutations that confer antibiotic resistance as well as phenotypic changes like collateral sensitivity and cross-resistance emerge...

  20. Antibiotics involved in the occurrence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria: a nationwide multilevel study suggests differences within antibiotic classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gbaguidi-Haore, Houssein; Dumartin, Catherine; L'Hériteau, François; Péfau, Muriel; Hocquet, Didier; Rogues, Anne-Marie; Bertrand, Xavier

    2013-02-01

    To identify the antibiotics potentially the most involved in the occurrence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria from an ecological perspective in French healthcare facilities (HCFs). This study was based on data from the French antimicrobial surveillance network (ATB-RAISIN, 2007-09). Antibiotics were expressed in defined daily doses per 1000 patient-days. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria were considered as count data adjusted for patient-days. These were third-generation cephalosporin (3GC)- and ciprofloxacin-resistant Escherichia coli, cefotaxime-resistant Enterobacter cloacae, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and ceftazidime-, imipenem- and ciprofloxacin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Three-level negative binomial regression models were built to take into account the hierarchical structure of data: level 1, repeated measures each year (count outcome, time, antibiotics); level 2, HCFs (type and size); and level 3, regions (geographical area). A total of 701 HCFs from 20 French regions and up to 1339 HCF-years were analysed. The use of ceftriaxone, but not of cefotaxime, was positively correlated with incidence rates of 3GC- and ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli. In contrast, both 3GCs were positively correlated with the incidence rate of cefotaxime-resistant E. cloacae. Higher levels of use of ciprofloxacin and/or ofloxacin, but not of levofloxacin, were associated with higher incidence rates of 3GC- and ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli, cefotaxime-resistant E. cloacae, methicillin-resistant S. aureus and ceftazidime- and ciprofloxacin-resistant P. aeruginosa. Our study suggests differences within antibiotic classes in promoting antibiotic resistance. We identified ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin as priority targets in public health strategies designed to reduce antibiotic use and antibiotic-resistant bacteria in French HCFs.

  1. The multifaceted roles of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saswati eSengupta

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are chemotherapeutic agents, which have been a very powerful tool in the clinical management of bacterial diseases since the 1940s. However, benefits offered by these magic bullets have been substantially lost in subsequent days following the widespread emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistant strains. While it is obvious that excessive and imprudent use of antibiotics significantly contributes to the emergence of resistant strains, antibiotic-resistance is also observed in natural bacteria of remote places unlikely to be impacted by human intervention. Both antibiotic biosynthetic genes and resistance-conferring genes have been known to evolve billions of years ago, long before clinical use of antibiotics. Hence it appears that antibiotics and antibiotics resistance determinants have some other roles in nature, which often elude our attention because of overemphasis on the therapeutic importance of antibiotics and the crisis imposed by the antibiotic-resistance in pathogens. In the natural milieu, antibiotics are often found to be present in subinhibitory concentrations acting as signalling molecules supporting quorum sensing and biofilm formation. They also play an important role in the production of virulence factors and influence host-parasite interactions (e.g., phagocytosis, adherence to the target cell and so on. The evolutionary and ecological aspects of antibiotics and antibiotic-resistance in the naturally occurring microbial community are little understood. Therefore, the actual role of antibiotics in nature warrants in-depth investigations. Studies on such an intriguing behaviour of the microorganisms promise insight into the intricacies of the microbial physiology and are likely to provide some lead in controlling the emergence and subsequent dissemination of antibiotic resistance. This article highlights some of the recent findings on the role of antibiotics and genes that confer resistance to antibiotics in

  2. Selection of antibiotic resistance at very low antibiotic concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandegren, Linus

    2014-05-01

    Human use of antibiotics has driven the selective enrichment of pathogenic bacteria resistant to clinically used drugs. Traditionally, the selection of resistance has been considered to occur mainly at high, therapeutic levels of antibiotics, but we are now beginning to understand better the importance of selection of resistance at low levels of antibiotics. The concentration of an antibiotic varies in different body compartments during treatment, and low concentrations of antibiotics are found in sewage water, soils, and many water environments due to natural production and contamination from human activities. Selection of resistance at non-lethal antibiotic concentrations (below the wild-type minimum inhibitory concentration) occurs due to differences in growth rate at the particular antibiotic concentration between cells with different tolerance levels to the antibiotic. The minimum selective concentration for a particular antibiotic is reached when its reducing effect on growth of the susceptible strain balances the reducing effect (fitness cost) of the resistance determinant in the resistant strain. Recent studies have shown that resistant bacteria can be selected at concentrations several hundred-fold below the lethal concentrations for susceptible cells. Resistant mutants selected at low antibiotic concentrations are generally more fit than those selected at high concentrations but can still be highly resistant. The characteristics of selection at low antibiotic concentrations, the potential clinical problems of this mode of selection, and potential solutions will be discussed.

  3. Suppression of antibiotic resistance acquisition by combined use of antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shingo; Horinouchi, Takaaki; Furusawa, Chikara

    2015-10-01

    We analyzed the effect of combinatorial use of antibiotics with a trade-off relationship of resistance, i.e., resistance acquisition to one drug causes susceptibility to the other drug, and vice versa, on the evolution of antibiotic resistance. We demonstrated that this combinatorial use of antibiotics significantly suppressed the acquisition of resistance. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. [Antibiotic resistance: A global crisis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alós, Juan-Ignacio

    2015-12-01

    The introduction of antibiotics into clinical practice represented one of the most important interventions for the control of infectious diseases. Antibiotics have saved millions of lives and have also brought a revolution in medicine. However, an increasing threat has deteriorated the effectiveness of these drugs, that of bacterial resistance to antibiotics, which is defined here as the ability of bacteria to survive in antibiotic concentrations that inhibit/kill others of the same species. In this review some recent and important examples of resistance in pathogens of concern for mankind are mentioned. It is explained, according to present knowledge, the process that led to the current situation in a short time, evolutionarily speaking. It begins with the resistance genes, continues with clones and genetic elements involved in the maintenance and dissemination, and ends with other factors that contribute to its spread. Possible responses to the problem are also reviewed, with special reference to the development of new antibiotics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  5. Antibiotics and antibiotic-resistant bacteria in waters associated with a hospital in Ujjain, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marothi Yogyata

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Concerns have been raised about the public health implications of the presence of antibiotic residues in the aquatic environment and their effect on the development of bacterial resistance. While there is information on antibiotic residue levels in hospital effluent from some other countries, information on antibiotic residue levels in effluent from Indian hospitals is not available. Also, concurrent studies on antibiotic prescription quantity in a hospital and antibiotic residue levels and resistant bacteria in the effluent of the same hospital are few. Therefore, we quantified antibiotic residues in waters associated with a hospital in India and assessed their association, if any, with quantities of antibiotic prescribed in the hospital and the susceptibility of Escherichia coli found in the hospital effluent. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in a teaching hospital outside the city of Ujjain in India. Seven antibiotics - amoxicillin, ceftriaxone, amikacin, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin and levofloxacin - were selected. Prescribed quantities were obtained from hospital records. The samples of the hospital associated water were analysed for the above mentioned antibiotics using well developed and validated liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry technique after selectively isolating the analytes from the matrix using solid phase extraction. Escherichia coli isolates from these waters were tested for antibiotic susceptibility, by standard Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method using Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute breakpoints. Results Ciprofloxacin was the highest prescribed antibiotic in the hospital and its residue levels in the hospital wastewater were also the highest. In samples of the municipal water supply and the groundwater, no antibiotics were detected. There was a positive correlation between the quantity of antibiotics prescribed in the hospital and antibiotic residue levels in

  6. Escherichia coli resistance in uncomplicated urinary tract infection: a model for determining when to change first-line empirical antibiotic choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfetto, Eleanor M; Gondek, Kathleen

    2002-06-01

    Escherichia coli is typically the causative organism in uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI). Resistance rates of E. coli to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX) are increasing, exceeding 10% in many communities. Guidelines recommend using alternative treatments in these areas. Providers must reevaluate policies to include considerations for E. coli resistance. A model was developed, with cases for illustration, to help organizations determine the resistance rate threshold, where TMP/SMX is no longer first-line therapy. Using published data, a 19% to 21% threshold was derived, supporting a previous report of 22%. The model can aid decision makers updating internal policies to conform with guidelines for the treatment of uncomplicated UTI and to improve care.

  7. Dielectrophoretic assay of bacterial resistance to antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johari, Juliana; Huebner, Yvonne; Hull, Judith C; Dale, Jeremy W; Hughes, Michael P

    2003-01-01

    The dielectrophoretic collection spectra of antibiotic-sensitive and antibiotic-resistant strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis have been determined. These indicate that in the absence of antibiotic treatment there is a strong similarity between the dielectric properties of sensitive and resistant strains, and that there is a significant difference between the sensitive strains before and after treatment with the antibiotic streptomycin after 24 h exposure. This method offers possibilities for the assessment of bacterial resistance to antibiotics. (note)

  8. Antibiotic and Antimicrobial Resistance: Threat Report 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Role What CDC is Doing: AR Solutions Initiative Investing in States: Map Antibiotic Resistance Lab Network Antibiotic ... CDC and Partners Tackle Drug-Resistant TB in India Newly Reported Gene, mcr -1, Threatens Last-Resort ...

  9. Antibiotic Resistance in Urinary Tract Infections in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Ronald P.; Haith, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine resistance to antibiotics of "Escherichia coli" in uncomplicated urinary tract infections (uUTIs) in female college students. Participants: Symptomatic patients presenting to a student health service from September 2008 to December 2009. Methods: Clean catch midstream urine samples were tested for urinalysis (UA) and…

  10. Molecular Detection of Virulence Genes and Antibiotic Resistance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is an important food-borne pathogen that can cause diarrhea, haemorrhagic colitis and haemolytic uremic syndrome. This study was conducted to investigate the prevalence, virulence genes and antibiotic resistance patterns of E. coli O157:H7 in raw beef meat sold in Abeokuta, South west Nigeria ...

  11. Antibiotic Resistance in Modern World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyla S. Namazova-Baranova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article brings up the topic not only vital and urgent for further development of modern medical science, but also affecting the interests of mankind as a whole and of every inhabitant of the Earth in particular: that is the irrational use of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance which rate is growing rapidly. We investigate the reasons for the epidemic of antibiotic resistance and discuss in detail all the necessary measures in order to cope with this problem. The shocking data on the almost universal irrational use of antibiotics by both medical workers and parents is provided. We demonstrate the microbiome changes that follow antibacterial drugs application resulting in the development of severe chronic pediatric diseases which cause severe disability or life-threatening conditions in children with long-term results in adult age. In conclusion, we summarize the evidence-based research in phytomedicine that present the phytopreparations as a serious alternative to antibiotics in a number of clinical settings. 

  12. Antibiotic Resistance and Fungus

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-02-28

    Dr. David Denning, President of the Global Action Fund for Fungal Infections and an infectious diseases clinician, discusses antimicrobial resistance and fungus.  Created: 2/28/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/28/2017.

  13. Addressing resistance to antibiotics in systematic reviews of antibiotic interventions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leibovici, Leonard; Paul, Mical; Garner, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotics are among the most important interventions in healthcare. Resistance of bacteria to antibiotics threatens the effectiveness of treatment. Systematic reviews of antibiotic treatments often do not address resistance to antibiotics even when data are available in the original studies....... This omission creates a skewed view, which emphasizes short-term efficacy and ignores the long-term consequences to the patient and other people. We offer a framework for addressing antibiotic resistance in systematic reviews. We suggest that the data on background resistance in the original trials should...... be reported and taken into account when interpreting results. Data on emergence of resistance (whether in the body reservoirs or in the bacteria causing infection) are important outcomes. Emergence of resistance should be taken into account when interpreting the evidence on antibiotic treatment in randomized...

  14. Fighting antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit using antibiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, Nienke L.; Wittekamp, Bastiaan H J; Van Duijn, Pleun J.; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global and increasing problem that is not counterbalanced by the development of new therapeutic agents. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is especially high in intensive care units with frequently reported outbreaks of multidrug-resistant organisms. In addition to

  15. Antibiotic Resistance in Sepsis Patients: Evaluation and Recommendation of Antibiotic Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradipta, Ivan Surya; Sodik, Dian Chairunnisa; Lestari, Keri; Parwati, Ida; Halimah, Eli; Diantini, Ajeng; Abdulah, Rizky

    2013-01-01

    Background: The appropriate selection of empirical antibiotics based on the pattern of local antibiotic resistance can reduce the mortality rate and increase the rational use of antibiotics. Aims: We analyze the pattern of antibiotic use and the sensitivity patterns of antibiotics to support the rational use of antibiotics in patients with sepsis. Materials and Methods: A retrospective observational study was conducted in adult sepsis patient at one of Indonesian hospital during January-December 2011. Data were collected from the hospital medical record department. Descriptive analysis was used in the processing and interpretation of data. Results: A total of 76 patients were included as research subjects. Lung infection was the highest source of infection. In the 66.3% of clinical specimens that were culture positive for microbes, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus hominis were detected with the highest frequency. The six most frequently used antibiotics, levofloxacin, ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, and erythromycin, showed an average resistance above 50%. Conclusions: The high use of antibiotic with a high level resistance requires a policy to support its rational use. Local microbial pattern based on site infection and pattern of antibiotics sensitivity test can be used as supporting data to optimize appropriateness of empirical antibiotics therapy in sepsis patients. PMID:23923107

  16. Isolation and Antibiotics Susceptibility Patterns of Escherichia Coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibiotic Susceptibility profile showed that all the isolates were resistant to one or multiple antibiotics, resulting in six different resistance patterns. Sulphadimidine resistance was the highest with all the isolates (100%) exhibited resistance to this drug while streptomycin had the highest sensitivity. Out of the seventeen E .coli ...

  17. Cemaran Escherichia coli pada Tepung Telur yang Diimpor Melalui Pelabuhan Tanjung Priok, dan Resistensinya Terhadap Antibiotik (ESCHERICHIA COLI CONTAMINATION ON EGG POWDER IMPORTED THROUGH PORT OF TANJUNG PRIOK AND ITS RESISTANCE AGAINST ANTIBIOTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Riski Sidik

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Eschericia coli contamination was found on egg powder imported to Indonesia during microbialexamination. The study was conducted to describe the presence of E. coli and its resistance to antibioticsin egg powder imported to Indonesia through The port of Tanjung Priok. Samples was determined usingcross sectional study and the sample size was calculated based on assumption of confidence level of 95%with margin of error of 10% and predicted prevalence of 50%. Total of 100 egg powder samples wascollected in August 2014 from two exporting countries, Ukraine (whole egg powder, n=30 and India (wholeegg powder, n=40 and egg yolk powder, n=30. Examination was performed by packaging and label inspectionof the product followed by samples collection and testing for bacterial contamination using rapid test andconventional isolation and identification methods. Detected E. coli was isolated and then tested forantibiotic resistance. Examination results showed that 4 samples were positive to E. coli. E. coli isolatesshowed resistance against 6 types of antibiotics and 75% of the isolates had resistance against minimumof 3 types of antibiotics. These conditions should be taken into consideration since antibiotic resistance inE. coli would cause negative impacts on human, animal and environmental health.

  18. Mathematical analysis of multi-antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-09-15

    Multi-antibiotic resistance in bacterial infections is a growing threat to public health. Some experiments were carried out to study the multi-antibiotic resistance. The changes of the multi-antibiotic resistance with time were achieved by numerical simulations and the mathematical models, with the calculated temperature field, velocity field, and the antibiotic concentration field. The computed results and experimental results are compared. Both numerical simulations and the analytic models suggest that minor low concentrations of antibiotics could induce antibiotic resistance in bacteria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Multiple-Resistant Commensal Escherichia Coli from Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The antimicrobial susceptibility and virulence traits of 150 strains of Escherichia coli characterized as commensals recovered from faecal samples from pre-school age children in Ile-Ife,. Nigeria were evaluated in order to determine their potentials for pathogenicity and their contribution to antibiotic resistance in the ...

  20. Antimicrobial resistance of non-clinical Escherichia coli strains from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to determine resistance profiles of Escherichia coli strains isolated from clinically healthy chickens in Nsukka, southeast Nigeria. A total of 324 E. coli strains isolated from cloaca swabs from 390 chickens were tested against 16 antimicrobial agents using the disc diffusion method. The antibiotics ...

  1. Healthy Farms in Slovakia: Antibiotic Sensitivity of Escherichia coli Isolated from Rectal Swabs of Chicken and Ram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Pochop

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this experiment was determine of antibiotic resistance profile of Escherichia coli isolated from rectal swabs of chicken and ram from two different conventional breeding from Slovakia. For the antibiotic susceptibility testing disk diffusion method was used. A tested bacterium, Escherichia coli was exposed against four antibiotics: amikacin, gentamycin, tetracycline and chloramphenicol. For the identification of this strain, we used Chromogenic coliform agar, Triple sugar iron agar and biochemical test (ENTEROtest 24. For genetic identification of Escherichia coli Step One Real Time PCR with using special primer was used. Was determined that antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli was not found. Was found susceptibility in all cases of Escherichia coli isolates. Antibiotic resistance is a biological danger. Bacteria, which we study, are considered to reservoirs of resistant genes and they are facultative and obligate pathogens. If these pathogen bacteria cause diseases those these diseases are difficult to treat. In this study, we determined that we have healthy farms in Slovakia too. In this farm antibiotic was not use and we do not determined any resistance to antibiotics, which we used in experiment.

  2. Environmental pollution by antibiotics and by antibiotic resistance determinants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Jose Luis

    2009-01-01

    Antibiotics are among the most successful drugs used for human therapy. However, since they can challenge microbial populations, they must be considered as important pollutants as well. Besides being used for human therapy, antibiotics are extensively used for animal farming and for agricultural purposes. Residues from human environments and from farms may contain antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes that can contaminate natural environments. The clearest consequence of antibiotic release in natural environments is the selection of resistant bacteria. The same resistance genes found at clinical settings are currently disseminated among pristine ecosystems without any record of antibiotic contamination. Nevertheless, the effect of antibiotics on the biosphere is wider than this and can impact the structure and activity of environmental microbiota. Along the article, we review the impact that pollution by antibiotics or by antibiotic resistance genes may have for both human health and for the evolution of environmental microbial populations. - The article reviews the current knowledge on the effects that pollution by antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes may have for the microbiosphere.

  3. Environmental pollution by antibiotics and by antibiotic resistance determinants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Jose Luis, E-mail: jlmtnez@cnb.csic.e [Departamento de Biotecnologia Microbiana, Centro Nacional de Biotecnologia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Darwin 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid, and CIBERESP (Spain)

    2009-11-15

    Antibiotics are among the most successful drugs used for human therapy. However, since they can challenge microbial populations, they must be considered as important pollutants as well. Besides being used for human therapy, antibiotics are extensively used for animal farming and for agricultural purposes. Residues from human environments and from farms may contain antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes that can contaminate natural environments. The clearest consequence of antibiotic release in natural environments is the selection of resistant bacteria. The same resistance genes found at clinical settings are currently disseminated among pristine ecosystems without any record of antibiotic contamination. Nevertheless, the effect of antibiotics on the biosphere is wider than this and can impact the structure and activity of environmental microbiota. Along the article, we review the impact that pollution by antibiotics or by antibiotic resistance genes may have for both human health and for the evolution of environmental microbial populations. - The article reviews the current knowledge on the effects that pollution by antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes may have for the microbiosphere.

  4. The determinants of the antibiotic resistance process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Espinosa Franco

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Beatriz Espinosa Franco1, Marina Altagracia Martínez2, Martha A Sánchez Rodríguez1, Albert I Wertheimer31Facultad de Estudios Superiores Zaragoza (UNAM, Mexico; 2Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Unidad Xochimilco, Mexico; 3Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USABackground: The use of antibiotic drugs triggers a complex interaction involving many biological, sociological, and psychological determinants. Resistance to antibiotics is a serious worldwide problem which is increasing and has implications for morbidity, mortality, and health care both in hospitals and in the community.Objectives: To analyze current research on the determinants of antibiotic resistance and comprehensively review the main factors in the process of resistance in order to aid our understanding and assessment of this problem.Methods: We conducted a MedLine search using the key words “determinants”, “antibiotic”, and “antibiotic resistance” to identify publications between 1995 and 2007 on the determinants of antibiotic resistance. Publications that did not address the determinants of antibiotic resistance were excluded.Results: The process and determinants of antibiotic resistance are described, beginning with the development of antibiotics, resistance and the mechanisms of resistance, sociocultural determinants of resistance, the consequences of antibiotic resistance, and alternative measures proposed to combat antibiotic resistance.Conclusions: Analysis of the published literature identified the main determinants of antibiotic resistance as irrational use of antibiotics in humans and animal species, insufficient patient education when antibiotics are prescribed, lack of guidelines for treatment and control of infections, lack of scientific information for physicians on the rational use of antibiotics, and lack of official government policy on the rational use of antibiotics in public and private hospitals.Keywords: antibiotic drug resistance

  5. Environmental and Public Health Implications of Water Reuse: Antibiotics, Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, and Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Pei-Ying

    2013-07-31

    Water scarcity is a global problem, and is particularly acute in certain regions like Africa, the Middle East, as well as the western states of America. A breakdown on water usage revealed that 70% of freshwater supplies are used for agricultural irrigation. The use of reclaimed water as an alternative water source for agricultural irrigation would greatly alleviate the demand on freshwater sources. This paradigm shift is gaining momentum in several water scarce countries like Saudi Arabia. However, microbial problems associated with reclaimed water may hinder the use of reclaimed water for agricultural irrigation. Of particular concern is that the occurrence of antibiotic residues in the reclaimed water can select for antibiotic resistance genes among the microbial community. Antibiotic resistance genes can be associated with mobile genetic elements, which in turn allow a promiscuous transfer of resistance traits from one bacterium to another. Together with the pathogens that are present in the reclaimed water, antibiotic resistant bacteria can potentially exchange mobile genetic elements to create the “perfect microbial storm”. Given the significance of this issue, a deeper understanding of the occurrence of antibiotics in reclaimed water, and their potential influence on the selection of resistant microorganisms would be essential. In this review paper, we collated literature over the past two decades to determine the occurrence of antibiotics in municipal wastewater and livestock manure. We then discuss how these antibiotic resistant bacteria may impose a potential microbial risk to the environment and public health, and the knowledge gaps that would have to be addressed in future studies. Overall, the collation of the literature in wastewater treatment and agriculture serves to frame and identify potential concerns with respect to antibiotics, antibiotic resistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance genes in reclaimed water.

  6. Antibiotic usage and resistance in different regions of the Dutch community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinsma, N; Filius, PMG; De Smet, PAGM; Degener, J; Endtz, P; Van den Bogaard, AE; Stobberingh, EE

    2002-01-01

    Regional differences of antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance in the fecal indicator bacteria Escherichia coli and enterococci were determined in different cities in the south, west, and north of The Netherlands. In 1999, differences in antibiotic consumption were observed between the different

  7. Antibiotic usage and resistance in different regions of the Dutch community.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinsma, N.; Filius, P.M.; Smet, P.A.G.M. de; Degener, J.E.; Endtz, P.; Bogaard, A.E. van den; Stobberingh, E.E.

    2002-01-01

    Regional differences of antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance in the fecal indicator bacteria Escherichia coli and enterococci were determined in different cities in the south, west, and north of The Netherlands. In 1999, differences in antibiotic consumption were observed between the different

  8. Bacterial biofilms and antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Caldas-Arias

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms give to bacteria micro-environmental benefits; confers protection against antimicrobials. Bacteria have antibiotic resistance by conventional and unusual mechanisms leading to delayed wound healing, to increase recurrent chronic infections and nosocomial contamination of medical devices. Objective: This narrative review aims to introduce the characteristics of Bacteria-biofilms, antimicrobial resistance mechanisms and potential alternatives for prevention and control of its formation. Methods: Search strategy was performed on records: PubMed / Medline, Lilacs, Redalyc; with suppliers such as EBSCO and thesaurus MeSH and DeCS. Conclusions: Knowledge and research performance of biofilm bacteria are relevant in the search of technology for detection and measuring sensitivity to antibiotics. The identification of Bacterial-biofilms needs no-traditional microbiological diagnosis.

  9. Urine Antibiotic Activity in Patients Presenting to Hospitals in Laos: Implications for Worsening Antibiotic Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Khennavong, Manisone; Davone, Viengmon; Vongsouvath, Manivanh; Phetsouvanh, Rattanaphone; Silisouk, Joy; Rattana, Olay; Mayxay, Mayfong; Castonguay-Vanier, Josée; Moore, Catrin E.; Strobel, Michel; Newton, Paul N.

    2011-01-01

    Widespread use of antibiotics may be important in the spread of antimicrobial resistance. We estimated the proportion of Lao in- and outpatients who had taken antibiotics before medical consultation by detecting antibiotic activity in their urine added to lawns of Bacillus stearothermophilus, Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus pyogenes. In the retrospective (N = 2,058) and prospective studies (N = 1,153), 49.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 47.4–52.0) and 36.2% (95% CI = 33.4–38.9), respec...

  10. Antibiotic resistance of lactic acid bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Bulajić Snežana; Mijačević Zora; Savić-Radovanović Radoslava

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge on the antibiotic resistance of lactic acid bacteria is still limited, possibly because of the large numbers of genera and species encountered in this group, as well as variances in their resistance spectra. The EFSA considers antibiotic resistances, especially transferable resistances, an important decision criterion for determining a strain's QPS status. There are no approved standards for the phenotypic or genotypic evaluation of antibiotic resistances in food isolat...

  11. Transmission of antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli between cattle, humans and the environment in peri-urban livestock keeping communities in Morogoro, Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lupindu, Athumani M; Dalsgaard, Anders; Msoffe, Peter L. M.

    2015-01-01

    Urban and peri-urban livestock farming is expanding world-widely because of increased urbanization and demands for food of animal origin. Such farming practices pose a public health risk as livestock are reservoirs of several zoonotic pathogens. In an attempt to determine the fecal transmission...... infrastructures (Odd Ratio=11.2, 95% CI=1.1-119.3) were associated with E. coli showing identical PFGE types within and between clusters. There is a need to improve animal husbandry and manure management practices to reduce risks of transmission of enteropathogens between livestock and humans in urban and peri-urban...... between livestock and people, 100 household clusters keeping cattle in close proximity of humans were selected in urban and peri-urban areas of Morogoro in Tanzania. One hundred eighteen ampicillin and tetracycline resistant Escherichia coli (40 from human stool, 50 from cattle feces, 21 from soil...

  12. Detection of Class I and II integrons for the assessment of antibiotic and multidrug resistance among Escherichia coli isolates from agricultural irrigation waters in Bulacan, Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraoan, Cielo Emar M; Rivera, Windell L; Vital, Pierangeli G

    2017-05-04

    Contaminated irrigation water may greatly affect not only the quality of produce but also the people exposed to it. In this study, agricultural irrigation waters in Bulacan, Philippines were assessed and found to be contaminated with Escherichia coli (E. coli) ranging from 0.58 to 4.51 log 10 CFU/mL. A total of 79 isolates of E. coli were confirmed through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplifying the uidA gene and were tested for phenotypic resistance using 10 antimicrobials through the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Forty-six isolates (58.22%) were noted to be multidrug resistant (MDR) with high resistance rate to cephalothin, tetracycline, streptomycin, ampicillin, trimethoprim, nalidixic acid, and chloramphenicol. Moreover, this study also examined the prevalence of Class I and II integrons accounting to 67.39% and 17.39%, respectively, of the MDR E. coli strains using multiplex PCR. The results imply that the agricultural water used in Bulacan is contaminated with the fecal material of man or other animals present in the area, and the presence of MDR bacteria, which pose a potential threat to individuals in these areas, is alarming. In addition, detection of integrons could be a good marker for the identification of MDR isolates. Lastly, this study could develop strategies for the proper management of farming sites leading to the detection of food-borne pathogens and prevention of infectious diseases.

  13. Probiotic approach to prevent antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouwehand, Arthur C; Forssten, Sofia; Hibberd, Ashley A; Lyra, Anna; Stahl, Buffy

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms, mainly belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, although also strain of other species are commercialized, that have a beneficial effect on the host. From the perspective of antibiotic use, probiotics have been observed to reduce the risk of certain infectious disease such as certain types of diarrhea and respiratory tract infection. This may be accompanied with a reduced need of antibiotics for secondary infections. Antibiotics tend to be effective against most common diseases, but increasingly resistance is being observed among pathogens. Probiotics are specifically selected to not contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance and not carry transferable antibiotic resistance. Concomitant use of probiotics with antibiotics has been observed to reduce the incidence, duration and/or severity of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. This contributes to better adherence to the antibiotic prescription and thereby reduces the evolution of resistance. To what extent probiotics directly reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance is still much under investigation; but maintaining a balanced microbiota during antibiotic use may certainly provide opportunities for reducing the spread of resistances. Key messages Probiotics may reduce the risk for certain infectious diseases and thereby reduce the need for antibiotics. Probiotics may reduce the risk for antibiotic-associated diarrhea Probiotics do not contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance and may even reduce it.

  14. [Effect of Three Typical Disinfection Byproducts on Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Lu; Zhang, Meng-lu; Wang, Chun-ming; Lin, Hui-rong; Yu, Xin

    2015-07-01

    The effect of typical disinfection byproducts (DBPs) on bacterial antibiotic resistance was investigated in this study. chlorodibromomethane (CDBM), iodoacetic acid (IAA) and chloral hydrate (CH) were selected, which belong to trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HAAs) and aldehydes, respectively. After exposure to the selected DBPs, the resistance change of the tested strains to antibiotics was determined. As a result, all of the three DBPs induced Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 to gain increased resistance to the five antibiotics tested, and the DBPs ranked as IAA > CH > CDBM according to their enhancement effects. Multidrug resistance could also be enhanced by treatment with IAA. The same result was observed in Escherichia coli K12, suggesting that the effect of DBPs on antibiotic resistance was a common phenomenon. The mechanism was probably that DBPs stimulated oxidative stress, which induced mutagenesis. And the antibiotic resistance mutation frequency could be increased along with mutagenesis. This study revealed that the acquisition of bacterial antibiotic resistance might be related to DBPs in drinking water systems. Besides the genotoxicological risks, the epidemiological risks of DBPs should not be overlooked.

  15. Overcoming resistance to β-lactam antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Roberta J; Melander, Christian

    2013-05-03

    β-Lactam antibiotics are one of the most important antibiotic classes but are plagued by problems of resistance, and the development of new β-lactam antibiotics through side-chain modification of existing β-lactam classes is not keeping pace with resistance development. In this JOCSynopsis, we summarize small molecule strategies to overcome resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. These approaches include the development of β-lactamase inhibitors and compounds that interfere with the ability of the bacteria to sense an antibiotic threat and activate their resistance mechanisms.

  16. Rationalizing antibiotic use to limit antibiotic resistance in India+

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance, a global concern, is particularly pressing in developing nations, including India, where the burden of infectious disease is high and healthcare spending is low. The Global Antibiotic Resistance Partnership (GARP) was established to develop actionable policy recommendations specifically relevant to low- and middle-income countries where suboptimal access to antibiotics - not a major concern in high-income countries - is possibly as severe a problem as is the spread of resistant organisms. This report summarizes the situation as it is known regarding antibiotic use and growing resistance in India and recommends short and long term actions. Recommendations aim at (i) reducing the need for antibiotics; (ii) lowering resistance-enhancing drug pressure through improved antibiotic targeting, and (iii) eliminating antibiotic use for growth promotion in agriculture. The highest priority needs to be given to (i) national surveillance of antibiotic resistance and antibiotic use - better information to underpin decisions on standard treatment guidelines, education and other actions, as well as to monitor changes over time; (ii) increasing the use of diagnostic tests, which necessitates behavioural changes and improvements in microbiology laboratory capacity; (iii) setting up and/or strengthening infection control committees in hospitals; and (iv) restricting the use of antibiotics for non-therapeutic uses in agriculture. These interventions should help to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance, improve public health directly, benefit the populace and reduce pressure on the healthcare system. Finally, increasing the types and coverage of childhood vaccines offered by the government would reduce the disease burden enormously and spare antibiotics. PMID:21985810

  17. Antibiotic Resistance in Human Chronic Periodontitis Microbiota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rams, Thomas E.; Degener, John E.; van Winkelhoff, Arie J.

    Background: Patients with chronic periodontitis (CP) may yield multiple species of putative periodontal bacterial pathogens that vary in their antibiotic drug susceptibility. This study determines the occurrence of in vitro antibiotic resistance among selected subgingival periodontal pathogens in

  18. Occurrence, virulence genes and antibiotic resistance of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) from twelve bovine farms in the north-east of Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, D J; Ennis, C; McDowell, D

    2014-03-01

    Cattle faecal samples (n = 480) were collected from a cluster of 12 farms, and PCR screened for the presence of the intimin gene (eae). Positive samples were cultured, and colonies were examined for the presence of eae and verocytotoxin (vtx) genes. Colonies which were positive for the intimin gene and negative for the verocytotoxin genes were further screened using PCR for a range of virulence factors including bfpA, espA, espB, tir ehxA, toxB, etpD, katP, saa, iha, lpfAO157/OI-141 and lpfAO157/OI-154. Of the 480 faecal samples, 5.8% (28/480) were PCR positive, and one isolate was obtained from each. All 28 isolates obtained were bfpA negative and therefore atypical EPEC (aEPEC). The serotypes detected included O2:H27, O8:H36, O15:H2, O49:H+, O84:H28, O105:H7 and O132:H34 but half of the isolates could not be serogrouped using currently available antisera. Twenty-two (79%) of the isolates carried the tir gene but only 25% were espB positive, and all other virulence genes tested for were scarce or absent. Several isolates showed intermediate resistance to ciprofloxacin, kanamycin, nalidixic acid, minocycline and tetracycline; full resistance to nalidixic acid or tetracycline with one isolate (O-:H8) displaying resistance to aminoglycosides (kanamycin and streptomycin), quinolones (nalidixic acid) and sulphonamides. This study provides further evidence that cattle are a potential source of aEPEC and add to the very limited data currently available on virulence genes and antibiotic resistance in this pathogenic E. coli group in animals. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes from antibiotic producers to pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Xinglin; Ellabaan, Mostafa M Hashim; Charusanti, Pep

    2017-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that some antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) found in pathogenic bacteria derive from antibiotic-producing actinobacteria. Here we provide bioinformatic and experimental evidence supporting this hypothesis. We identify genes in proteobacteria, including some pathogens......, that appear to be closely related to actinobacterial ARGs known to confer resistance against clinically important antibiotics. Furthermore, we identify two potential examples of recent horizontal transfer of actinobacterial ARGs to proteobacterial pathogens. Based on this bioinformatic evidence, we propose...... results support the existence of ancient and, possibly, recent transfers of ARGs from antibiotic-producing actinobacteria to proteobacteria, and provide evidence for a defined mechanism....

  20. Resistance diagnosis and the changing epidemiology of antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdams, David

    2017-01-01

    Widespread adoption of point-of-care resistance diagnostics (POCRD) reduces ineffective antibiotic use but could increase overall antibiotic use. Indeed, in the context of a standard susceptible-infected epidemiological model with a single antibiotic, POCRD accelerates the rise of resistance in the disease-causing bacterial population. When multiple antibiotics are available, however, POCRD may slow the rise of resistance even as more patients receive antibiotic treatment, belying the conventional wisdom that antibiotics are "exhaustible resources" whose increased use necessarily promotes the rise of resistance. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  1. Effects of single and combined use of bacteriophages and antibiotics to inactivate Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valério, Nádia; Oliveira, Cristiana; Jesus, Vânia; Branco, Tatiana; Pereira, Carla; Moreirinha, Catarina; Almeida, Adelaide

    2017-08-15

    A major concern of phage therapy is the emergency of phage-resistant mutants. This limitation can be overcome by the combined use of phages and antibiotics. It has been shown that the combination of antibiotics and phages is an alternative that cannot only be effective at reducing bacterial numbers, but also to contribute to the management of resistance levels. However, this view has only been discussed with regard to antibiotic resistance and not to control phage-mutant emergence. In our study we compared not only the resistance of the bacteria to the four antibiotics tested with and without phages addition, but also the resistance to the phages in the presence and absence of antibiotics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential synergistic effect of phages and antibiotics in the inactivation of Escherichia coli in order to control infections, namely urinary tract infection (UTI), and to reduce the development of bacterial resistance to phages. Phage therapy combined with antibiotics (ampicillin, piperacillin, kamanycin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol and ciprofloxacin) was evaluated in the inactivation of E. coli, both in saline solution and urine samples. Phage and antibiotic combinations could result in high synergistic effects in the inactivation of bacteria. The combination of phage and ciprofloxacin at sublethal concentration decreased the bacterial counts in urine samples by 7.8±0.1 log CFU/ml after 8h, but when phages or the antibiotic were tested alone, the decrease was of 3.9±0.3 log CFU/mL and 1.2±0.1 log CFU/mL, respectively, after the same time. The efficacy of the combination of the two therapies depends on the antibiotic resistance status of the targeted bacteria to the employed antibiotic and of the antibiotic type (bactericide or bacteriostatic), causing the same or less bacterial resistance than phages and antibiotics applied alone (1.2±1.0×10 -5 to 2.4±1.5×10 -7 CFU/mL for the combined treatment, 2.7±0.2×10 -4 CFU/mL for the

  2. Antibiotic and disinfectant resistance of Salmonella serovars ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Salmonella isolates tested displayed multiple antibiotic resistance to a number of antibiotics used to treat both humans and animals. No resistance was seen to disinfectants used at the manufacturer\\'s recommended rate of dilution. The bacteria were resistant, though, at lower dilutions, highlighting the necessity of ...

  3. How Economic Development Affects Antibiotic Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    John B. Horowitz; H. Brian Moehring

    2014-01-01

    Initially, economic development increases resistance because migration of people to urban areas in developing countries increases incomes, crowding and the use of antibiotics. Also, developing countries often don't require prescriptions or distribute high quality antibiotics. In developed countries, antibiotic resistance often falls or there is a decline in the rate of growth of resistance because infections decline with improvements in water quality, sanitation, housing and nutrition. Howeve...

  4. [Pathogenic microbes of biliary infection and their resistance to antibiotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J; Tang, Y; Song, X; Wang, Y

    2000-05-01

    To understand the change of the main pathogenic microbes of biliary infection and their resistance rates to 12 antibiotics so as to instruct rational application of antibiotics clinically. All isolates were identified by analytic products incorporation (API) bioMerieux. The susceptibility of antibiotics to 470 pathogenic microbes was tested by minimal inhibition concentration (MIC). There were 470 pathogenic microbes with positive biliary culture. The percentage of Escherichia coli, intestinal cocci and Klebsiella pneumoniae was 129 (27.4%), 82 (17.4%) and 76 (16.2%), respectively. In the resistance rates of the gram negative bacilli to 12 antibiotics, the lowest was 4.0% for imipenem followed by. 14.1% Ceftazidime and 16.9% amikacin. In the resistant rates of the gram positive cocci to 12 antibiotics, and had the lowest rate was 6.0% for vancomycin and 16.4% for imipenem. The main pathogenic microbes of biliary infection were Escherichia coli, intestinal cocci and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Imipenem is the first used for biliary infection in dealing with multiresistant intestinal cocci.

  5. Antibiotic resistance along an urban river impacted by treated wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proia, Lorenzo; Anzil, Adriana; Subirats, Jessica; Borrego, Carles; Farrè, Marinella; Llorca, Marta; Balcázar, Jose Luis; Servais, Pierre

    2018-07-01

    Urban rivers are impacted ecosystems which may play an important role as reservoirs for antibiotic-resistant (AR) bacteria. The main objective of this study was to describe the prevalence of antibiotic resistance along a sewage-polluted urban river. Seven sites along the Zenne River (Belgium) were selected to study the prevalence of AR Escherichia coli and freshwater bacteria over a 1-year period. Culture-dependent methods were used to estimate E. coli and heterotrophic bacteria resistant to amoxicillin, sulfamethoxazole, nalidixic acid and tetracycline. The concentrations of these four antibiotics have been quantified in the studied river. The antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), sul1, sul2, tetW, tetO, blaTEM and qnrS were also quantified in both particle-attached (PAB) and free-living (FLB) bacteria. Our results showed an effect of treated wastewaters release on the spread of antibiotic resistance along the river. Although an increase in the abundance of both AR E. coli and resistant heterotrophic bacteria was observed from upstream to downstream sites, the differences were only significant for AR E. coli. A significant positive regression was also found between AR E. coli and resistant heterotrophic bacteria. The concentration of ARGs increased from upstream to downstream sites for both particle-attached (PAB) and free-living bacteria (FLB). Particularly, a significant increase in the abundance of four among six ARGs analyzed was observed after crossing urban area. Although concentrations of tetracycline significantly correlated with tetracycline resistance genes, the antibiotic levels were likely too low to explain this correlation. The analysis of ARGs in different fractions revealed a significantly higher abundance in PAB compared to FLB for tetO and sul2 genes. This study demonstrated that urban activities may increase the spread of antibiotic resistance even in an already impacted river. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Determination of antibiotics using luminescent Escherichia coli and serum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasova, I I; Asrieli, T V; Gavrilova, E M; Danilov, V S

    2007-01-01

    The methodical bases for detecting antibiotics using a bioluminescent assay and blood serum are briefed. Antibiotics inhibit the luminescence of a genetically engineered Escherichia coli strain. The degree of inhibition depended on the type of antibiotic, its concentration, and the time of cell incubation with antibiotic. The highest cell sensitivity was recorded towards the aminoglycoside antibiotics, which amounted to 85 +/- 10 ng/ml for gentamicin and streptomycin. The sensitivity of this system to a number of antibiotics essentially increased when the cells were previously activated with blood serum. The sensitivity of this method for gentamicin and streptomycin in the presence of blood serum amounted to 2.5 +/- 0.5 ng/ml; for tetracycline, 45 +/- 8 ng/ml. Use of the sera containing specific antibodies to the antibiotic detected provided a high sensitivity of the biosensor tested. Comparison of the luminescences of E. coli cells activated with normal and specific antisera upon incubation with an antibiotic allows the type of antibiotic and its quantitative content in the sample to be determined. Characteristic of the analysis of antibiotics with the help of recombinant E. coli are a high accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, simplicity, and a short time needed for measurement.

  7. "Population structure of drug-susceptible, -resistant and ESBL-producing Escherichia coli from community-acquired urinary tract infections"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Frederik Boetius; Nielsen, Jesper Boye; Schønning, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Escherichia coli is the most common cause of urinary tract infection (UTI). The pathogenic isolates are becoming increasingly resistant to antibiotics; with a worldwide dissemination of resistant sequence types (ST). We characterized three different uropathogenic E. coli populations...

  8. Density-dependent adaptive resistance allows swimming bacteria to colonize an antibiotic gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hol, Felix J H; Hubert, Bert; Dekker, Cees; Keymer, Juan E

    2016-01-01

    During antibiotic treatment, antibiotic concentration gradients develop. Little is know regarding the effects of antibiotic gradients on populations of nonresistant bacteria. Using a microfluidic device, we show that high-density motile Escherichia coli populations composed of nonresistant bacteria can, unexpectedly, colonize environments where a lethal concentration of the antibiotic kanamycin is present. Colonizing bacteria establish an adaptively resistant population, which remains viable for over 24 h while exposed to the antibiotic. Quantitative analysis of multiple colonization events shows that collectively swimming bacteria need to exceed a critical population density in order to successfully colonize the antibiotic landscape. After colonization, bacteria are not dormant but show both growth and swimming motility under antibiotic stress. Our results highlight the importance of motility and population density in facilitating adaptive resistance, and indicate that adaptive resistance may be a first step to the emergence of genetically encoded resistance in landscapes of antibiotic gradients.

  9. Biofilm production and antibiotic susceptibility profile of Escherichia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Samie.Amidou

    2012-04-26

    Apr 26, 2012 ... Full Length Research Paper. Biofilm production and antibiotic susceptibility profile of Escherichia coli isolates from HIV and AIDS patients in the Limpopo Province. Samie, A. and Nkgau, T. F.. Department of Microbiology, University of Venda, Private Bag X5050, Thohoyandou 0950, Limpopo, South Africa.

  10. Antibiotic Sensitivity Profile of Escherichia coli Isolated from Poultry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A cross sectional study involving 300 cloaca swabs from apparently healthy birds from 8 small-medium scale poultry farms in Ibadan Oyo State was carried out. A total of 201 (67%) Escherichia coli isolates were recovered from the birds and they were subjected to in-vitro antibiotic sensitivity test by agar gel diffusion method.

  11. Addressing resistance to antibiotics in systematic reviews of antibiotic interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibovici, Leonard; Paul, Mical; Garner, Paul; Sinclair, David J; Afshari, Arash; Pace, Nathan Leon; Cullum, Nicky; Williams, Hywel C; Smyth, Alan; Skoetz, Nicole; Del Mar, Chris; Schilder, Anne G M; Yahav, Dafna; Tovey, David

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotics are among the most important interventions in healthcare. Resistance of bacteria to antibiotics threatens the effectiveness of treatment. Systematic reviews of antibiotic treatments often do not address resistance to antibiotics even when data are available in the original studies. This omission creates a skewed view, which emphasizes short-term efficacy and ignores the long-term consequences to the patient and other people. We offer a framework for addressing antibiotic resistance in systematic reviews. We suggest that the data on background resistance in the original trials should be reported and taken into account when interpreting results. Data on emergence of resistance (whether in the body reservoirs or in the bacteria causing infection) are important outcomes. Emergence of resistance should be taken into account when interpreting the evidence on antibiotic treatment in randomized controlled trials or systematic reviews. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Antibiotic adjuvants - A strategy to unlock bacterial resistance to antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Bello, Concepción

    2017-09-15

    Resistance to available antibiotics in pathogenic bacteria is currently a global challenge since the number of strains that are resistant to multiple types of antibiotics has increased dramatically each year and has spread worldwide. To unlock this problem, the use of an 'antibiotic adjuvant' in combination with an antibiotic is now being exploited. This approach enables us to prolong the lifespan of these life-saving drugs. This digests review provides an overview of the main types of antibiotic adjuvants, the basis of their operation and the remaining issues to be tackled in this field. Particular emphasis is placed on those compounds that are already in clinical development, namely β-lactamase inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Antibiotic resistance mechanisms of Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaoka, Maya; Miyata, Sarah T; Unterweger, Daniel; Pukatzki, Stefan

    2011-04-01

    As the causative agent of cholera, the bacterium Vibrio cholerae represents an enormous public health burden, especially in developing countries around the world. Cholera is a self-limiting illness; however, antibiotics are commonly administered as part of the treatment regimen. Here we review the initial identification and subsequent evolution of antibiotic-resistant strains of V. cholerae. Antibiotic resistance mechanisms, including efflux pumps, spontaneous chromosomal mutation, conjugative plasmids, SXT elements and integrons, are also discussed. Numerous multidrug-resistant strains of V. cholerae have been isolated from both clinical and environmental settings, indicating that antibiotic use has to be restricted and alternative methods for treating cholera have to be implemented.

  14. SURVEILLANCE AND CONTROL OF ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE IN THE MEDITERRANEAN REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Ricciardi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is one of the most relevant problems in the healthcare: the growth of resistant micro-organisms in healthcare settings is a worrisome threat, raising length to stay (LOS, morbidity and mortality in those patients. The importance of the antibiotic resistance and its spread around the world, gave rise to the activation of several surveillance systems, based especially on the collection of laboratory data to local or national level. The objective of this work is to carry out a review of the scientific literature existing on the topic and scientific activities related to surveillance on antibiotic resistance in countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea. Recent Data from European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (November 2015 show, for different combinations bacterium-drug, an increase of resistance from North to South and from West to East of Europe; it is particularly worrying the phenomenon of resistance carried out by some gram negative, specifically Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli to third-generation cephalosporin, often combined in opposition to fluoroquinolones and amino glycosides. Is particularly relevant the incidence of resistance to carbapenems by strains of Enterobacteriaceae (Klebsiella included. The resistance exerted by MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus continues to be relevant, albeit showing some decline in recent years. The incidence of resistance carried on by Streptococcus pneumoniae is stable and is mainly relevant to macrolides. Finally, a significant increase in recording relatively exercised by Enterococcus faecium to Vancomycin. Detecting, preventing, and controlling antibiotic resistance requires strategic, coordinated, and sustained efforts. It also depends on the engagement of governments, academia, industry, healthcare providers, the general public, and the agricultural community, as well as international partners. Committing to combating antibiotic-resistant

  15. An underappreciated hotspot of antibiotic resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Qing-Lin; Li, Hu; Zhou, Xin-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Landfills are so far the most common practice for the disposals of municipal solid waste (MSW) worldwide. Since MSW landfill receives miscellaneous wastes, including unused/expired antibiotics and bioactive wastes, it gradually becomes a huge potential bioreactor for breeding antibiotic resistance...... be the potential hosts of ARGs. These findings provide evidence that groundwater near MSW landfill is an underappreciated hotspot of antibiotic resistance and contribute to the spread of ARGs via the flowing contaminated groundwater....

  16. Antibiotic resistance: a physicist’s view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Rosalind; Waclaw, Bartłomiej

    2016-08-01

    The problem of antibiotic resistance poses challenges across many disciplines. One such challenge is to understand the fundamental science of how antibiotics work, and how resistance to them can emerge. This is an area where physicists can make important contributions. Here, we highlight cases where this is already happening, and suggest directions for further physics involvement in antimicrobial research.

  17. Klebsiella pneumoniae antibiotic resistance identified by atomic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vincenzo Ierardi

    2017-10-03

    Oct 3, 2017 ... In the last decade the detection of the resistance of bacteria to antibiotics treatment, developed by different kind of bacteria, is becoming a huge problem. We hereby present a different approach to the current problem of detection of bacteria resistance to antibiotics. Our aims were to use the atomic force ...

  18. Isolation, Characterization and Antibiotic Resistance of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Hamburger and Evolution of Virulence Genes stx1, stx2, eaeA and hly by Multiplex PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kargar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC O157:H7 have emerged as pathogens that can cause food-borne infections and severe and potentially fatal illnesses in humans. E.coli O157:H7 colonizes the digestive tract of cattle and is transmitted to humans by food and water. The objectives of this study were to characterize the prevalence of E.coli O157:H7 isolates in hamburger in Shiraz and to test their antimicrobial sensitivity. Material & Methods: In this research, 428 samples of hamburger were collected from 7 main factories of meat products and enriched in TSB with novobiocin medium at 37ºC. Fermentation of sorbitol and lactose and activities of β- glucuronidase of separated bacteria were examined by using the SMAC and VRBA media and CHROMagar medium. Then isolation of E.coli O157:H7 was confirmed with the use of specific antisera; and with the multiplex PCR method, the presence of E.coli O157:H7 virulence genes – including stx1, stx2, eaeA, and hly – was analyzed. Finally, antibiotic resistance strains were tested with disk diffusion methods. Results: Out of all the examined samples, 264 (61.68% sorbitol-negative bacteria were separated in the CT-SMAC medium. After evaluation with specific antisera, the rate of the recognition of E.coli O157:H7 was 5 (1.17%. The stx1 and eaeA genes were diagnosed in 2 (0.47% cases of these samples. All the isolated bacteria were resistant to penicillin, clindamycin, and erythromycin antibiotics.Conclusion: The presence of STEC in animal products suggests that they may be a potential hazard for human health. A regular monitoring of STEC O157, mainly in hamburger, should be performed to prevent a possible consumer health threat.

  19. Helicobacter pylori Antibiotic Resistance: Trends Over Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond G Lahaie

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to antibiotics can be a major problem in the treatment of bacterial infections. As the use of antibiotics increases, bacterial resistance to these agents is rising and in many cases is responsible for the failure of treatment regimens. Although the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection requires the use of more than one antibiotic to obtain adequate eradication rates, the efficacy of the currently used antibiotic combinations has been shown to be decreased by resistance to one of the antibiotics. The use of antibiotics in regimens for the treatment of H pylori is increasing in many countries, including Canada. This increase is both in the use of these antibiotics alone for the treatment of nongastrointestinal infections and in their use in association with proton pump inhibitors for the treatment of H pylori infection. In several European and Asian countries, where resistance to antibiotics is being monitored, it has been demonstrated that H pylori resistance to metronidazole and to clarithromycin increased throughout the 1990s. Thus far, the data available in Canada do not show increased resistance to either of these antibiotics. As for other antibiotics used in the treatment of H pylori infection, such as tetracycline and amoxicillin, the rate of resistance to these agents is still very low and does not constitute a significant problem. Because the efficacy of the regimens used in the treatment of H pylori infection is compromised by resistance to the antibiotics used, it is important that H pylori resistance rates in Canada and throughout the world continue to be monitored. Only with such reliable data can the most optimal regimens be recommended.

  20. Resistant plasmid profile analysis of multidrug resistant Escherichia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli has become a major threat and cause of many urinary tract infections (UTIs) in Abeokuta, Nigeria. Objectives: This study was carried out to determine the resistant plasmids of multidrug resistant Escherichia coli isolated from (Urinary tract infections)UTIs in Abeokuta.

  1. Background antibiotic resistance patterns in antibiotic-free pastured poultry production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibiotic resistance (AR) is a significant public health issue, and agroecosystems are often viewed as major environmental sources of antibiotic resistant foodborne pathogens. While the use of antibiotics in agroecosystems can potentially increase AR, appropriate background resistance levels in th...

  2. [Biorhythms of antibiotic resistance of microorganisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukharin, O V; Perunova, N B; Fadeev, S B; Timokhina, T Kh; Iavnova, S V

    2008-01-01

    To study of circadian dynamics of antibiotic susceptibility and resistance of Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms. Circadian dynamics of antibiotic susceptibility was studied on clinical strains of enterobacteria, non-fermenting Gram-negative bacteria, and staphylococci which were isolated and identified by common methods. During a day, with 3-hours intervals, studied strains were tested on susceptibility to ampicillin, oxacillin, ceftriaxone, meropenem, gentamycin, and ciprofloxacin using method of serial dilutions in agar. Circadian biorhythms of resistance to antibiotics in studied microorganisms were revealed. Along with common patterns, differences in temporal changes of microrganisms' susceptibility to antibacterial drugs were noted. Chronobiologic approach allowed to reveal significant amplitude of changes of minimal inhibitoryconcentration (MIC) of antibiotics versus resistant Gram-positive cocci reflecting presence of susceptibility periods, whereas in susceptible Gram-negative bacteria peaks of resistance were observed. Circadian dynamics of MIC of majority of antibiotics versus resistant Gram-negative bacteria and susceptible Gram-positive cocci was characterized by lower amplitude of changes without shifts from antibiotic resistance to susceptibility and vice versa. Obtained data open perspective of using biorhythmological approach in study of susceptibility of microorganisms to antibiotics during the elucidation of mechanisms of pathogens adaptation to environmental conditions and creation of new strategies of control for antibiotic resistance strains.

  3. Rapid determination of antibiotic resistance in E. coli using dielectrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoettges, Kai F; Dale, Jeremy W; Hughes, Michael P

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, infections due to antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria such as methillicin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and ciprofloxacin-resistant Escherichia coli are on the rise, and with them the demand for rapid antibiotic testing is also rising. Conventional tests, such as disc diffusion testing, require a primary sample to be tested in the presence of a number of antibiotics to verify which antibiotics suppress growth, which take approximately 24 h to complete and potentially place the patient at severe risk. In this paper we describe the use of dielectrophoresis as a rapid marker of cell death, by detecting changes in the electrophysiology of the cell caused by the administration of an antibiotic. In contrast to other markers, the electrophysiology of the cell changes rapidly during cell death allowing live cells to be distinguished from dead (or dying) cells without the need for culturing. Using polymyxin B as an example antibiotic, our studies indicate that significant changes in cell characteristics can be observed as soon as 1 h passes after isolating a culture from nutrient broth

  4. Ready for a world without antibiotics? The Pensières Antibiotic Resistance Call to Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlet Jean

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Resistance to antibiotics has increased dramatically over the past few years and has now reached a level that places future patients in real danger. Microorganisms such as Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae, which are commensals and pathogens for humans and animals, have become increasingly resistant to third-generation cephalosporins. Moreover, in certain countries, they are also resistant to carbapenems and therefore susceptible only to tigecycline and colistin. Resistance is primarily attributed to the production of beta-lactamase genes located on mobile genetic elements, which facilitate their transfer between different species. In some rare cases, Gram-negative rods are resistant to virtually all known antibiotics. The causes are numerous, but the role of the overuse of antibiotics in both humans and animals is essential, as well as the transmission of these bacteria in both the hospital and the community, notably via the food chain, contaminated hands, and between animals and humans. In addition, there are very few new antibiotics in the pipeline, particularly for Gram-negative bacilli. The situation is slightly better for Gram-positive cocci as some potent and novel antibiotics have been made available in recent years. A strong and coordinated international programme is urgently needed. To meet this challenge, 70 internationally recognized experts met for a two-day meeting in June 2011 in Annecy (France and endorsed a global call to action ("The Pensières Antibiotic Resistance Call to Action". Bundles of measures that must be implemented simultaneously and worldwide are presented in this document. In particular, antibiotics, which represent a treasure for humanity, must be protected and considered as a special class of drugs.

  5. Induction of Streptomycin Uptake in Resistant Strains of Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höltje, Joachim-Volker

    1979-01-01

    Different streptomycin-resistant strains of Escherichia coli, including an R100 plasmid-carrying strain of E. coli W3110, the ribosomally resistant mutant SM10, and the spontaneous revertant from dependence to independence d1023, exhibited poor accumulation capacity for aminoglycoside antibiotics. This was due to a failure of these mutants to induce the general polyamine transport system that is utilized by streptomycin to enter the cell. It is shown that the aminoglycoside kanamycin, which is effective on these streptomycin-resistant strains, was capable of inducing the uptake of streptomycin, thus giving rise to streptomycin accumulation up to wild-type levels. Plasmid-determined resistance, which has been speculated to be the result of a blockage of the uptake system by modified antibiotic molecules, cannot be overcome by the induction of streptomycin transport. Increase in permeability of the antibiotic does not affect the susceptibility of the bacteria. It is shown that all of the antibiotic taken up was enzymatically modified. R-plasmid-conferred resistance to aminoglycosides is therefore explained by the inactivation of the antibiotic entering the bacterial cell. PMID:371542

  6. Drug-resistant Escherichia coli, Rural Idaho

    OpenAIRE

    Hannah, Elizabeth L.; Angulo, Frederick J.; Johnson, James R.; Haddadin, Bassam; Williamson, Jacquelyn; Samore, Matthew H.

    2005-01-01

    Stool carriage of drug-resistant Escherichia coli in home-living residents of a rural community was examined. Carriage of nalidixic acid–resistant E. coli was associated with recent use of antimicrobial agents in the household. Household clustering of drug-resistant E. coli was observed. Most carriers of drug-resistant E. coli lacked conventional risk factors.

  7. Emergence of Quinolone Resistance amongst Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two hundred and seventy three isolates of Escherichia coli obtained from 7 hospitals in Lagos were screened for Fluoroquinolone resistance (FQR). Rate of resistance was 22.3% showing an increase in quinolone resistance when compared with resistant rates between 1994 and 1999 which ranged from 0 – 2% then.

  8. Diversity in Biochemical Characteristics and Antibiotics Resistant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, biochemical and antibiotic susceptibility tests were carried out on one hundred and fifty poultry isolates of Escherichia coli using Microscan® Dried Gram-negative Breakpoint Combo Pannels. The microscan panel analysed bacterial isolates for 24 biochemical tests and 23 to 25 antimicrobial agents following ...

  9. Antibiotic Resistance in Severe Orofacial Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Kyoung; Chuang, Sung-Kiang; August, Meredith

    2017-05-01

    This study assessed the antibiotic resistance profile in patients with severe orofacial infections treated at a single institution from 2009 through 2014. Factors contributing to resistance were studied. The resistance profile was compared with that of a cohort of similar patients treated a decade previously to identify changes in antibiotic resistance. In addition, the effect of antibiotic resistance on in-hospital course was studied. This was a 5-year retrospective cohort study. Patients were identified through the oral and maxillofacial surgery data registry. Inclusion criteria were patients treated for orofacial infection requiring hospital admission, surgical drainage, and availability of complete medical, surgical, and microbiological data. Patients with incomplete data or treated as outpatients or nonsurgically were excluded. Sixty patient charts were identified for review. Demographic data; medical, dental, and surgical histories; and hospital course and treatment specifics were obtained for each patient. Linear regression and logistic analyses were used to analyze the data. Men composed 60% of the cohort (mean age, 45 yr). Average hospital stay was 5.5 days. Penicillin resistance was found in 32.5% of aerobic isolates and clindamycin resistance was found in 29.3%. Streptococcus viridans and Staphylococcus species showed increased resistance to clindamycin and erythromycin compared with historic controls. Younger patient age, surgical history, and number of cultured aerobes showed a relevant correlation to antibiotic resistance. The need for changes in antibiotics, repeat surgical drainage, and increased serum urea nitrogen levels correlated with longer hospital stay. A serious increase in clindamycin and erythromycin resistance was found for S viridans and Staphylococcus species. Age, surgical history, and number of cultured aerobes showed a statistically meaningful correlation to antibiotic resistance. Presence of antibiotic resistance failed to show

  10. Linking microbial community structure and function to characterize antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistant genes from cattle feces

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is widespread interest in monitoring the development of antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes in agriculturally impacted environments, however little is known about the relationships between bacterial community structure, and antibiotic resistance gene profiles. Cattl...

  11. Metal Resistance and Its Association With Antibiotic Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Chandan; Asiani, Karishma; Arya, Sankalp; Rensing, Christopher; Stekel, Dov J; Larsson, D G Joakim; Hobman, Jon L

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is recognised as a major global threat to public health by the World Health Organization. Currently, several hundred thousand deaths yearly can be attributed to infections with antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The major driver for the development of antibiotic resistance is considered to be the use, misuse and overuse of antibiotics in humans and animals. Nonantibiotic compounds, such as antibacterial biocides and metals, may also contribute to the promotion of antibiotic resistance through co-selection. This may occur when resistance genes to both antibiotics and metals/biocides are co-located together in the same cell (co-resistance), or a single resistance mechanism (e.g. an efflux pump) confers resistance to both antibiotics and biocides/metals (cross-resistance), leading to co-selection of bacterial strains, or mobile genetic elements that they carry. Here, we review antimicrobial metal resistance in the context of the antibiotic resistance problem, discuss co-selection, and highlight critical knowledge gaps in our understanding. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Anthropogenic antibiotic resistance genes mobilization to the polar regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Jorge; González-Acuña, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic influences in the southern polar region have been rare, but lately microorganisms associated with humans have reached Antarctica, possibly from military bases, fishing boats, scientific expeditions, and/or ship-borne tourism. Studies of seawater in areas of human intervention and proximal to fresh penguin feces revealed the presence of Escherichia coli strains least resistant to antibiotics in penguins, whereas E. coli from seawater elsewhere showed resistance to one or more of the following antibiotics: ampicillin, tetracycline, streptomycin, and trim-sulfa. In seawater samples, bacteria were found carrying extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-type CTX-M genes in which multilocus sequencing typing (MLST) showed different sequence types (STs), previously reported in humans. In the Arctic, on the contrary, people have been present for a long time, and the presence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) appears to be much more wide-spread than was previously reported. Studies of E coli from Arctic birds (Bering Strait) revealed reduced susceptibility to antibiotics, but one globally spreading clone of E. coli genotype O25b-ST131, carrying genes of ESBL-type CTX-M, was identified. In the few years between sample collections in the same area, differences in resistance pattern were observed, with E. coli from birds showing resistance to a maximum of five different antibiotics. Presence of resistance-type ESBLs (TEM, SHV, and CTX-M) in E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae was also confirmed by specified PCR methods. MLST revealed that those bacteria carried STs that connect them to previously described strains in humans. In conclusion, bacteria previously related to humans could be found in relatively pristine environments, and presently human-associated, antibiotic-resistant bacteria have reached a high global level of distribution that they are now found even in the polar regions.

  13. Anthropogenic antibiotic resistance genes mobilization to the polar regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Hernández

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic influences in the southern polar region have been rare, but lately microorganisms associated with humans have reached Antarctica, possibly from military bases, fishing boats, scientific expeditions, and/or ship-borne tourism. Studies of seawater in areas of human intervention and proximal to fresh penguin feces revealed the presence of Escherichia coli strains least resistant to antibiotics in penguins, whereas E. coli from seawater elsewhere showed resistance to one or more of the following antibiotics: ampicillin, tetracycline, streptomycin, and trim-sulfa. In seawater samples, bacteria were found carrying extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL-type CTX-M genes in which multilocus sequencing typing (MLST showed different sequence types (STs, previously reported in humans. In the Arctic, on the contrary, people have been present for a long time, and the presence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs appears to be much more wide-spread than was previously reported. Studies of E coli from Arctic birds (Bering Strait revealed reduced susceptibility to antibiotics, but one globally spreading clone of E. coli genotype O25b-ST131, carrying genes of ESBL-type CTX-M, was identified. In the few years between sample collections in the same area, differences in resistance pattern were observed, with E. coli from birds showing resistance to a maximum of five different antibiotics. Presence of resistance-type ESBLs (TEM, SHV, and CTX-M in E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae was also confirmed by specified PCR methods. MLST revealed that those bacteria carried STs that connect them to previously described strains in humans. In conclusion, bacteria previously related to humans could be found in relatively pristine environments, and presently human-associated, antibiotic-resistant bacteria have reached a high global level of distribution that they are now found even in the polar regions.

  14. Predation and selection for antibiotic resistance in natural environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leisner, Jørgen; Jørgensen, Niels O. G.; Middelboe, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Genes encoding resistance to antibiotics appear, like the antibiotics themselves, to be ancient, originating long before the rise of the era of anthropogenic antibiotics. However, detailed understanding of the specific biological advantages of antibiotic resistance in natural environments is still......, predation is potentially an important mechanism for driving antibiotic resistance during slow or stationary phase of growth when nutrients are deprived. This adds to explain the ancient nature and widespread occurrence of antibiotic resistance in natural environments unaffected by anthropogenic antibiotics...

  15. Antibiotic resistance: are we all doomed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collignon, P

    2015-11-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a growing and worrying problem associated with increased deaths and suffering for people. Overall, there are only two factors that drive antimicrobial resistance, and both can be controlled. These factors are the volumes of antimicrobials used and the spread of resistant micro-organisms and/or the genes encoding for resistance. The One Health concept is important if we want to understand better and control antimicrobial resistance. There are many things we can do to better control antimicrobial resistance. We need to prevent infections. We need to have better surveillance with good data on usage patterns and resistance patterns available across all sectors, both human and agriculture, locally and internationally. We need to act on these results when we see either inappropriate usage or resistance levels rising in bacteria that are of concern for people. We need to ensure that food and water sources do not spread multi-resistant micro-organisms or resistance genes. We need better approaches to restrict successfully what and how antibiotics are used in people. We need to restrict the use of 'critically important' antibiotics in food animals and the entry of these drugs into the environment. We need to ensure that 'One Health' concept is not just a buzz word but implemented. We need to look at all sectors and control not only antibiotic use but also the spread and development of antibiotic resistant bacteria - both locally and internationally. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  16. Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in enterococci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William R; Munita, Jose M; Arias, Cesar A

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) enterococci are important nosocomial pathogens and a growing clinical challenge. These organisms have developed resistance to virtually all antimicrobials currently used in clinical practice using a diverse number of genetic strategies. Due to this ability to recruit antibiotic resistance determinants, MDR enterococci display a wide repertoire of antibiotic resistance mechanisms including modification of drug targets, inactivation of therapeutic agents, overexpression of efflux pumps and a sophisticated cell envelope adaptive response that promotes survival in the human host and the nosocomial environment. MDR enterococci are well adapted to survive in the gastrointestinal tract and can become the dominant flora under antibiotic pressure, predisposing the severely ill and immunocompromised patient to invasive infections. A thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying antibiotic resistance in enterococci is the first step for devising strategies to control the spread of these organisms and potentially establish novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:25199988

  17. Virulence factors, antibiotic resistance phenotypes and O-serogroups of Escherichia coli strains isolated from community-acquired urinary tract infection patients in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Luz Paniagua-Contreras

    2017-08-01

    Conclusion: The isolated UPEC strains predominantly belonged to three serogroups (O25, O15, and O8, harboured numerous virulence genes, and are multiresistant to antibiotics. The findings of this study could be used to orient UTI treatment strategies and in epidemiological studies in Mexico.

  18. Time-programmable drug dosing allows the manipulation, suppression and reversal of antibiotic drug resistance in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshida, Mari; Galiñanes Reyes, Sabrina Galiñanes; Tsuda, Soichiro; Horinouchi, Takaaki; Furusawa, Chikara; Cronin, Leroy

    2017-01-01

    Multi-drug strategies have been attempted to prolong the efficacy of existing antibiotics, but with limited success. Here we show that the evolution of multi-drug-resistant Escherichia coli can be manipulated in vitro by administering pairs of antibiotics and switching between them in ON/OFF manner. Using a multiplexed cell culture system, we find that switching between certain combinations of antibiotics completely suppresses the development of resistance to one of the antibiotics. Using thi...

  19. Overview: Global and Local Impact of Antibiotic Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Richard R; Bonomo, Robert A

    2016-06-01

    The rapid and ongoing spread of antibiotic resistance poses a serious threat to global public health. The indiscriminant use of antibiotics in agriculture and human medicine along with increasingly connected societies has fueled the distribution of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. These factors together have led to rising numbers of infections caused by multidrug-resistant and pan-resistant bacteria, with increases in morbidity and mortality. This article summarizes the trends in antibiotic resistance, discusses the impact of antibiotic resistance on society, and reviews the use of antibiotics in agriculture. Feasible ways to tackle antibiotic resistance to avert a post-antibiotic era are suggested. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Induction of bacterial antibiotic resistance by mutagenic halogenated nitrogenous disinfection byproducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv, Lu; Yu, Xin; Xu, Qian; Ye, Chengsong

    2015-01-01

    Halogenated nitrogenous disinfection byproducts (N-DBPs) raise concerns regarding their mutagenicity and carcinogenicity threatening public health. However, environmental consequence of their mutagenicity has received less attention. In this study, the effect of halogenated N-DBPs on bacterial antibiotic resistance (BAR) was investigated. After exposure to bromoacetamide (BAcAm), trichloroacetonitrile (TCAN) or tribromonitromethane (TBNM), the resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 to both individual and multiple antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, polymyxin B, rifampin, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin + gentamicin and ciprofloxacin + tetracycline) was increased, which was predominantly ascribed to the overexpression of efflux pumps. The mechanism of this effect was demonstrated to be mutagenesis through sequencing and analyzing antibiotic resistance genes. The same induction phenomena also appeared in Escherichia coli, suggesting this effect may be universal to waterborne pathogens. Therefore, more attention should be given to halogenated N-DBPs, as they could increase not only genotoxicological risks but also epidemiological risks of drinking water. - Highlights: • The halogenated N-DBPs could induce bacterial antibiotic resistance. • Both individual and multiple resistances could be induced. • Efflux mechanism played an important role in the induced antibiotic resistance. • The halogenated N-DBPs induced bacterial antibiotic resistance via mutagenesis. • Effects of N-DBPs on antibiotic resistance may be universal to waterborne pathogens. - Halogenated N-DBPs could increase antibiotic resistance, even multidrug resistance via mutagenesis, contributing to the enrichment of antibiotic resistant bacteria in drinking water

  1. Plasmid profiling and antibiotics resisitance of Escherichia coli strains isolated from Mytilus galloprovincialis and seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cumhur Avşar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate plasmid DNA profiles and the antibiotic resistance of a total of 41 strains of Escherichia coli (E. coli isolated from seawater and mussel collected from 15 different sampling stations in Sinop, Turkey. Methods: Most probable number technique was used for detection of E. coli. Antibiotic susceptibilities of the isolates were determined by the disc diffusion method. Plasmid DNA of the strains was extracted by the alkaline lyses procedure. Results: According to morphological and physiological properties, it was determined that the isolates belonged to E. coli species. Antibiotic susceptibility of the strains was determined against seven standard drugs using disc diffusion method. All isolates were resistant to bacitracin (100%, novobiocin (100%, ampicillin (12.5%, tetracycline (7.5%, ceftazidime (5% and imipenem (2.5%, respectively, whereas the strains were susceptible to polymyxin B (100%. The multiple antibiotic resistance values for the strains were found in range from 0.28 to 0.57. In addition, plasmid DNA analyses results confirmed that 22 strains harbored a single or more than two plasmids sized approximately between 24.500 to 1.618 bp. The high-size plasmid (14.700 bp was observed as common in 21 of all strains. Conclusions: As a result, our study indicated that the presence of antibiotic resistant E. coli strains in seawater and mussel might be potential risk for public health issue.

  2. Antibiotic residues and resistance in the environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pikkemaat, M.G.; Yassin, H.; Fels-Klerkx, H.J.; Berendsen, B.J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic usage has benefited the animal industry and helped providing affordable animal proteins to the growing human population. However, since extensive use of antibiotics results in the inhibition of susceptible organisms while selecting for the resistant ones, agricultural use is contributing

  3. Klebsiella pneumoniae antibiotic resistance identified by atomic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In particular, we studied Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteria provided by the Lavagna Hospital ASL4Liguria (Italy), where there are cases linked with antibiotics resistance of the Klebsiella pneumoniae. By comparing AFMimages of bacteria strains treated with different antibiotics is possible to identify unambiguously the ...

  4. Klebsiella pneumoniae antibiotic resistance identified by atomic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the last decade the detection of the resistance of bacteria to antibiotics treatment, developed by different kind of bacteria,is becoming a huge problem. We hereby present a different approach to the current problem of detection of bacteriaresistance to antibiotics. Our aims were to use the atomic force microscopy (AFM) to ...

  5. Altered membrane permeability in multidrug resistant Escherichia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-02

    Nov 2, 2009 ... involvement during the transport of β - lactams in multidrug resistant Escherichia coli isolated from extra-intestinal infections. Also, the ... lactam resistance in multidrug resistant E. coli in ESBL and non-ESBL isolates. .... and decreased susceptibility to carbapenems, particularly ertapenem (Perez et al.,.

  6. Management Options For Reducing The Release Of Antibiotics And Antibiotic Resistance Genes To The Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: There is growing concern worldwide about the role of polluted soil and water - 77 environments in the development and dissemination of antibiotic resistance. 78 Objective: To identify management options for reducing the spread of antibiotics and 79 antibiotic resist...

  7. Antibiotic Resistance: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Health Topics → Antibiotic Resistance URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/antibioticresistance. ...

  8. Molecular analysis and antibiotic resistance investigation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular analysis and antibiotic resistance investigation of Staphylococcus aureus isolates associated with staphylococcal food poisoning and nosocomial infections. Y Zhang, S Cheng, G Ding, M Zhu, X Pan, L Zhang ...

  9. minimising antibiotic resistance to staphylococcus aureus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-11-02

    (26). Prevention of emergence of antibiotic resistance during treatment is therefore an important goal when prescribing antimicrobials. Problems affecting the operation of laboratories at the peripheral level are widespread.

  10. Transfer of Antibiotic Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaber, Jakob; Penadés, José R; Ingmer, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a serious human pathogen with remarkable adaptive powers. Antibiotic-resistant clones rapidly emerge mainly by acquisition of antibiotic-resistance genes from other S. aureus strains or even from other genera. Transfer is mediated by a diverse complement of mobile genetic...... of plasmids that can be transferred by conjugation and the efficiency with which transduction occurs. Here, we review the main routes of antibiotic resistance gene transfer in S. aureus in the context of its biology as a human commensal and a life-threatening pathogen. Staphylococcus aureus cells...... are effective in exchanging mobile genetic elements, including antibiotic-resistance genes.During colonization or infection of host organisms, the exchange appears to be particularly effective.Bacteriophage-mediated transfer involves both transduction and autotransduction, which may enable lysogenic S. aureus...

  11. Selective decontamination and antibiotic resistance in ICUs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, Nienke L.; Bonten, Marc J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Selective digestive decontamination (SDD) and selective oropharyngeal decontamination (SOD) have been associated with reduced mortality and lower ICU-acquired bacteremia and ventilator-associated pneumonia rates in areas with low levels of antibiotic resistance. However, the effect of selective

  12. The Antibiotic Resistance Problem Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    The term "antibiotic" was first proposed by Vuillemin in 1889 but was first used in the current sense by Walksman in 1941. An antibiotic is defined as a "derivative produced by the metabolism of microorganisms that possess antibacterial activity at low concentrations and is not toxic to the host." In this article, the author describes how…

  13. Antibiotic treatment of verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Morten; Scheutz, Flemming; Villumsen, Steen

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: A consensus has existed on not to treat verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC)-infected individuals with antibiotics because of possible subsequent increased risk of developing haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS). The aim of this systematic review is to clarify the risk...... associated with antibiotic treatment during acute VTEC infection and in chronic VTEC carrier states. METHODS: A systematic search in PubMed identified 1 meta-analysis, 10 clinical studies and 22 in vitro/in vivo studies. RESULTS: Four clinical studies found an increased risk of HUS, four studies found...... no altered risk of HUS and two studies found a protective effect of antibiotics. In vitro and clinical studies suggest that DNA synthesis inhibitors should be avoided, whereas evidence from in vitro studies indicates that certain protein and cell wall synthesis inhibitors reduce the release of toxins from...

  14. Antibiotic resistance in children with complicated urinary tract infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yildiz, B.; Kural, N.; Yarar, C.; Ak, I.; Akcar, N.

    2007-01-01

    Objective was to determine the resistance of antibiotics for complicated urinary tract infection (UTI), including urinary tract anomaly (UTA), for empirical antibiotic therapy of complicated UTI. Four hundred and twenty two urine isolates were obtained from 113 patients with recurrent UTI, who used prophylactic antibiotics between February 1999 and November 2004 in the Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Eskisehir, Turkey. Reflux was found to be most important predisposing factor for recurrent UTI (31.9%). Renal scar was detected more in patients with UTA than without UTA (59.2% versus 12.4%, p<0.05). Gram-negative organisms were dominant in patients with and without UTA (91.5% and 79.2%). Enterococci and Candida spp. were more prevalent in children with UTA than without UTA (p<0.001). Isolates were significantly more resistant to ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, amikacin, co-amoxiclav, ticarcillin-clvalanate and piperacillin-tazobactam in patients with UTA than without UTA. We found low resistance to ciprofloxacin and nitrofurantoin in UTI with and without UTA. Enterococci spp. was highly resistance to ampicillin and amikacin in patients with UTA. Aztreonam, meropenem and ciprofloxacin seemed to be the best choice for treatment of UTI with UTA due to Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. Nitrofurantoin and nalidixic acid may be first choice antibiotics for prophylaxis in UTI with and without UTA. The UTI with UTA caused by Enterococci spp. might not benefit from a combination of amikacin and ampicillin, it could be treated with glycopeptides. (author)

  15. The effectiveness of antibiotics against a major uropathogen- Escherichia coli and its biofilm assay by phenotypic methods

    OpenAIRE

    Nachammai S. M.; Karthika Jayakumar; Anbu N. Aravazhi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infection (UTI), an inflammatory disease occurs to a high multiplication of pathogenic microbes in the urinary system. Escherichia coli, a major uropathogen accounting for up to 80% UTI. Activity of antibiotics against E.coli is decreasing due to enzymatic, genetic and various other factors resulting in multidrug resistance. Biofilm is a great threat as it interferes antibiotic therapy, undergoes gene transformation, making the bacteria more virulent. Objectives of t...

  16. How to Fight Back Against Antibiotic Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dantas, Gautam; Sommer, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Mapping the exchange of genes between pathogens and nonpathogens offers new ways to understand and manage the spread of drug-resistant strains. In reality, the development of new antibiotics is only part of the solution, as pathogens will inevitably develop resistance to even the most promising new...... compounds. To save the era of antibiotics, scientists must figure out what it is about bacterial pathogens that makes resistance inevitable. Although most studies on drug resistance have focused on disease causing pathogens, recent efforts have shifted attention to the resistomes of nonpathogenic bacteria...

  17. Urinary Escherichia coli antimicrobial susceptibility profiles and their relationship with community antibiotic use in Tasmania, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meumann, Ella M; Mitchell, Brett G; McGregor, Alistair; McBryde, Emma; Cooley, Louise

    2015-10-01

    This study assessed urinary Escherichia coli antibiotic susceptibility patterns in Tasmania, Australia, and examined their association with community antibiotic use. The susceptibility profiles of all urinary E. coli isolates collected in Tasmania between January 2010 and December 2012 were included. The amount of Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS)-subsidised use of amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (AMC), cefalexin, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin and trimethoprim was retrieved (at the Tasmanian population level) and the number of defined daily doses per 1000 population per day in Tasmania for these antibiotics was calculated for each month during the study period. Antimicrobial susceptibility data were assessed for changes over time in the 3-year study period. Antimicrobial use and susceptibility data were assessed for seasonal differences and lag in resistance following antibiotic use. Excluding duplicates, 28145 E. coli isolates were included. Resistance levels were low; 35% of isolates were non-susceptible to amoxicillin, 14% were non-susceptible to trimethoprim and antibiotics for treatment of respiratory tract infections in winter. Quinolone use is restricted by the PBS in Australia, which is the likely explanation for the low levels of quinolone use and resistance identified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  18. Curing bacteria of antibiotic resistance: reverse antibiotics, a novel class of antibiotics in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Keiichi; Igarashi, Masayuki; Morimoto, Yuh; Baba, Tadashi; Umekita, Maya; Akamatsu, Yuzuru

    2012-06-01

    By screening cultures of soil bacteria, we re-discovered an old antibiotic (nybomycin) as an antibiotic with a novel feature. Nybomycin is active against quinolone-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains with mutated gyrA genes but not against those with intact gyrA genes against which quinolone antibiotics are effective. Nybomycin-resistant mutant strains were generated from a quinolone-resistant, nybomycin-susceptible, vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA) strain Mu 50. The mutants, occurring at an extremely low rate (generation), were found to have their gyrA genes back-mutated and to have lost quinolone resistance. Here we describe nybomycin as the first member of a novel class of antibiotics designated 'reverse antibiotics'. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  19. Resistance of Bacteria Isolated from Otamiri River to Heavy Metals and Some Selected Antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    I.C. Mgbemena; J.C. Nnokwe; L.A. Adjeroh; N.N. Onyemekara

    2012-01-01

    This study is aimed at determining the resistance of bacteria to heavy metals and some antibiotics. The ability of aquatic bacteria isolates from Otamiri River at Ihiagwa in Owerri North, Imo State to tolerate or resist the presence of certain selected heavy metals: Pb+, Zn2+ and Fe2+ and some antibiotics was investigated. Identification tests for the bacteria isolates from Otamiri River revealed them to belong to the genera Pseudomonas, Aeromonas, Bacillus, Escherichia, Micrococcus and Prote...

  20. Relationship between antibiotic- and disinfectant-resistance profiles in bacteria harvested from tap water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sadia; Beattie, Tara K; Knapp, Charles W

    2016-06-01

    Chlorination is commonly used to control levels of bacteria in drinking water; however, viable bacteria may remain due to chlorine resistance. What is concerning is that surviving bacteria, due to co-selection factors, may also have increased resistance to common antibiotics. This would pose a public health risk as it could link resistant bacteria in the natural environment to human population. Here, we investigated the relationship between chlorine- and antibiotic-resistances by harvesting 148 surviving bacteria from chlorinated drinking-water systems and compared their susceptibilities against chlorine disinfectants and antibiotics. Twenty-two genera were isolated, including members of Paenibacillus, Burkholderia, Escherichia, Sphingomonas and Dermacoccus species. Weak (but significant) correlations were found between chlorine-tolerance and minimum inhibitory concentrations against the antibiotics tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole and amoxicillin, but not against ciprofloxacin; this suggest that chlorine-tolerant bacteria are more likely to also be antibiotic resistant. Further, antibiotic-resistant bacteria survived longer than antibiotic-sensitive organisms when exposed to free chlorine in a contact-time assay; however, there were little differences in susceptibility when exposed to monochloramine. Irrespective of antibiotic-resistance, spore-forming bacteria had higher tolerance against disinfection compounds. The presence of chlorine-resistant bacteria surviving in drinking-water systems may carry additional risk of antibiotic resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Antibiotic-Resistance Genes in Waste Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkman, Antti; Do, Thi Thuy; Walsh, Fiona; Virta, Marko P J

    2018-03-01

    Waste water and waste water treatment plants can act as reservoirs and environmental suppliers of antibiotic resistance. They have also been proposed to be hotspots for horizontal gene transfer, enabling the spread of antibiotic resistance genes between different bacterial species. Waste water contains antibiotics, disinfectants, and metals which can form a selection pressure for antibiotic resistance, even in low concentrations. Our knowledge of antibiotic resistance in waste water has increased tremendously in the past few years with advances in the molecular methods available. However, there are still some gaps in our knowledge on the subject, such as how active is horizontal gene transfer in waste water and what is the role of the waste water treatment plant in the environmental resistome? The purpose of this review is to briefly describe some of the main methods for studying antibiotic resistance in waste waters and the latest research and main knowledge gaps on the issue. In addition, some future research directions are proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Chemical communication of antibiotic resistance by a highly resistant subpopulation of bacterial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar M El-Halfawy

    Full Text Available The overall antibiotic resistance of a bacterial population results from the combination of a wide range of susceptibilities displayed by subsets of bacterial cells. Bacterial heteroresistance to antibiotics has been documented for several opportunistic Gram-negative bacteria, but the mechanism of heteroresistance is unclear. We use Burkholderia cenocepacia as a model opportunistic bacterium to investigate the implications of heterogeneity in the response to the antimicrobial peptide polymyxin B (PmB and also other bactericidal antibiotics. Here, we report that B. cenocepacia is heteroresistant to PmB. Population analysis profiling also identified B. cenocepacia subpopulations arising from a seemingly homogenous culture that are resistant to higher levels of polymyxin B than the rest of the cells in the culture, and can protect the more sensitive cells from killing, as well as sensitive bacteria from other species, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. Communication of resistance depended on upregulation of putrescine synthesis and YceI, a widely conserved low-molecular weight secreted protein. Deletion of genes for the synthesis of putrescine and YceI abrogate protection, while pharmacologic inhibition of putrescine synthesis reduced resistance to polymyxin B. Polyamines and YceI were also required for heteroresistance of B. cenocepacia to various bactericidal antibiotics. We propose that putrescine and YceI resemble "danger" infochemicals whose increased production by a bacterial subpopulation, becoming more resistant to bactericidal antibiotics, communicates higher level of resistance to more sensitive members of the population of the same or different species.

  3. Bacterial infections in Lilongwe, Malawi: aetiology and antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makoka, Mwai H; Miller, William C; Hoffman, Irving F; Cholera, Rushina; Gilligan, Peter H; Kamwendo, Debbie; Malunga, Gabriel; Joaki, George; Martinson, Francis; Hosseinipour, Mina C

    2012-03-21

    Life-threatening infections present major challenges for health systems in Malawi and the developing world because routine microbiologic culture and sensitivity testing are not performed due to lack of capacity. Use of empirical antimicrobial therapy without regular microbiologic surveillance is unable to provide adequate treatment in the face of emerging antimicrobial resistance. This study was conducted to determine antimicrobial susceptibility patterns in order to inform treatment choices and generate hospital-wide baseline data. Culture and susceptibility testing was performed on various specimens from patients presenting with possible infectious diseases at Kamuzu Central Hospital, Lilongwe, Malawi. Between July 2006 and December 2007 3104 specimens from 2458 patients were evaluated, with 60.1% from the adult medical service. Common presentations were sepsis, meningitis, pneumonia and abscess. An etiologic agent was detected in 13% of patients. The most common organisms detected from blood cultures were Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella species and Streptococcus pneumoniae, whereas Streptococcus pneumoniae and Cryptococcus neoformans were most frequently detected from cerebrospinal fluid. Haemophilus influenzae was rarely isolated. Resistance to commonly used antibiotics was observed in up to 80% of the isolates while antibiotics that were not commonly in use maintained susceptibility. There is widespread resistance to almost all of the antibiotics that are empirically used in Malawi. Antibiotics that have not been widely introduced in Malawi show better laboratory performance. Choices for empirical therapy in Malawi should be revised accordingly. A microbiologic surveillance system should be established and prudent use of antimicrobials promoted to improve patient care.

  4. Detection of Florfenicol Resistance Genes in Escherichia coli Isolated from Sick Chickens

    OpenAIRE

    Keyes, Kathleen; Hudson, Charlene; Maurer, John J.; Thayer, Stephan; White, David G.; Lee, Margie D.

    2000-01-01

    Florfenicol is an antibiotic approved for veterinary use in cattle in the United States in 1996. Although this drug is not used in poultry, we have detected resistance to florfenicol in clinical isolates of avian Escherichia coli. Molecular typing demonstrated that the florfenicol resistance gene, flo, was independently acquired and is plasmid encoded.

  5. Detection of Florfenicol Resistance Genes in Escherichia coli Isolated from Sick Chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Kathleen; Hudson, Charlene; Maurer, John J.; Thayer, Stephan; White, David G.; Lee, Margie D.

    2000-01-01

    Florfenicol is an antibiotic approved for veterinary use in cattle in the United States in 1996. Although this drug is not used in poultry, we have detected resistance to florfenicol in clinical isolates of avian Escherichia coli. Molecular typing demonstrated that the florfenicol resistance gene, flo, was independently acquired and is plasmid encoded. PMID:10639375

  6. Effects of antibiotic resistance alleles on bacterial evolutionary responses to viral parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Sánchez, Flor I; Hall, Alex R

    2016-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance has wide-ranging effects on bacterial phenotypes and evolution. However, the influence of antibiotic resistance on bacterial responses to parasitic viruses remains unclear, despite the ubiquity of such viruses in nature and current interest in therapeutic applications. We experimentally investigated this by exposing various Escherichia coli genotypes, including eight antibiotic-resistant genotypes and a mutator, to different viruses (lytic bacteriophages). Across 960 populations, we measured changes in population density and sensitivity to viruses, and tested whether variation among bacterial genotypes was explained by their relative growth in the absence of parasites, or mutation rate towards phage resistance measured by fluctuation tests for each phage. We found that antibiotic resistance had relatively weak effects on adaptation to phages, although some antibiotic-resistance alleles impeded the evolution of resistance to phages via growth costs. By contrast, a mutator allele, often found in antibiotic-resistant lineages in pathogenic populations, had a relatively large positive effect on phage-resistance evolution and population density under parasitism. This suggests costs of antibiotic resistance may modify the outcome of phage therapy against pathogenic populations previously exposed to antibiotics, but the effects of any co-occurring mutator alleles are likely to be stronger. © 2016 The Authors.

  7. Antimicrobial resistance among commensal Escherichia coli from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Commensal bacteria contribute to the distribution and persistence of antimicrobial resistance in the environment. This study monitored antimicrobial resistance in commensal Escherichia coli from the faeces of on-farm and slaughter cattle and beef. A total of 342 (89.5%) E. coli isolates were obtained from 382 samples.

  8. Antimicrobial resistance among commensal Escherichia coli from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user1

    2012-07-19

    Jul 19, 2012 ... Commensal bacteria contribute to the distribution and persistence of antimicrobial resistance in the environment. This study monitored antimicrobial resistance in commensal Escherichia coli from the faeces of on-farm and slaughter cattle and beef. A total of 342 (89.5%) E. coli isolates were obtained.

  9. The Frequency of Antibiotic Resistant Coliforms Isolated from Sewage of Qom City, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somaye Nikoogoftar Ranjbar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Antibiotics are among the most effective drugs used to treat humans. These materials enter in different ways into sewage and known as important biological contaminants in aquatic and agricultural environment. The availability of conditions for antibiotic resistance gene transfer to sewage bacteria, converted human environmental wastes to an important source of antibiotic resistant bacteria. Considering the spread of antibiotic resistant strains in treatment centers of Qom province, the aim of this study is to investigate the frequency and antibiotic resistance pattern in coliform bacteria isolated from wastewater treatment system of Qom city in different seasons. Methods: This study was carried out on 120 samples of municipal wastewater treatment plant (incoming and outgoing in Qom. After sampling, transport of samples to the laboratory, isolation and phenotypic identification of bacteria, and Determination of antibiotic resistance pattern, were performed according to CLSI standards. The frequency of bacteria was determined using most probable number (MPN method. Results: In this study, of 384 strains of bacteria (isolated in spring, summer, and winter, Escherichia coli (50%, Citrobacter (30%, Enterobacter (11%, Klebsiella (1% and non-coliform bacteria (Proteus sp. 8%, were identified. The most antibiotic resistance was observed in Citrobacter and Enterobacter bacteria (isolated in summer to penicillin G with a frequency of 94%. Conclusion: Due to the high frequency of antibiotic resistance in Citrobacter and Enterobacter strains in the sewage treatment plant in Qom province, especially in the summer, this ecosystem can be reported as an important source of spread of antibiotic-resistant strains.

  10. Convergent acquisition of antibiotic resistance determinants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Convergent acquisition of antibiotic resistance determinants amongst the Enterobacteriaceae isolates of the Mhlathuze River, KwaZulu-Natal (RSA) ... The possibility of transmission of resistant genes between bacteria (especially pathogenic) which invade human and animal populations within this river poses a health risk ...

  11. Antibiotic resistance profiles of environmental isolates from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... resistance in the environment. The strong correlation (r=0.97) between the ARPs of the clinical and the environmental isolates may suggest a link between diarrhoeal incidence and the water quality in the region. It is thus imperative that the determination of antibiotic susceptibility/resistance patterns of isolated microbes is ...

  12. Antibiotic Resistance of Bacteria: A Global Challenge

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    vealed several aminoglycoside resistances in nonculturable bac- teria. Notwithstanding the availability of so many antimicrobial agents, infectious diseases still remain the second leading cause of death worldwide. Eventually, the widespread occurrence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has added a new dimension to the.

  13. Antibiotic Resistance of Bacteria: A Global Challenge

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    provided a distinct advantage to the physicians in controlling bacterial infections. Discovery of streptomycin, the ... resistance to virtually all the therapeutically useful antibiotics had been evidenced. Emergence of ..... Genomic tools are helping us to select for antibacterial targets and understand bacterial resistance. On the ...

  14. Antibiotic resistance and pathogenicity factors in Staphylococcus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) poses a serious problem in dairy animals suffering from mastitis. In the present study, the distribution of mastitic MRSA and antibiotic resistance was studied in 107 strains of. S. aureus isolated from milk samples from 195 infected udders. The characterizations pathogenic ...

  15. Prevalence of nasopharyngeal antibiotic-Resistant pneumococcal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Pneumococcal resistance was significant in this group of children with easy access to paediatric services and antibiotic use. The implication of such high resistance for the treatment of pneumococcal diseases is that high-dose amoxicillin is the preferred empirical oral therapy for treatment of otitis media.

  16. Antibiotic resistance and pathogenicity factors in Staphylococcus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) poses a serious problem in dairy animals suffering from mastitis. In the present study, the distribution of mastitic MRSA and antibiotic resistance was studied in 107 strains of S. aureus isolated from milk samples from 195 infected udders. The characterizations pathogenic ...

  17. Antibiotic Resistance and the Biology of History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landecker, Hannah

    2016-12-01

    Beginning in the 1940s, mass production of antibiotics involved the industrial-scale growth of microorganisms to harvest their metabolic products. Unfortunately, the use of antibiotics selects for resistance at answering scale. The turn to the study of antibiotic resistance in microbiology and medicine is examined, focusing on the realization that individual therapies targeted at single pathogens in individual bodies are environmental events affecting bacterial evolution far beyond bodies. In turning to biological manifestations of antibiotic use, sciences fathom material outcomes of their own previous concepts. Archival work with stored soil and clinical samples produces a record described here as 'the biology of history': the physical registration of human history in bacterial life. This account thus foregrounds the importance of understanding both the materiality of history and the historicity of matter in theories and concepts of life today.

  18. Prevalence and antibiotic profile of Escherichia coli in traditionally made ice cream in retails of Khoy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Molaabaszadeh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli is among the most important intestinal foodborne bacterial pathogens. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of E. coli in traditionally-made ice creams at retails of Khoy city. Moreover, the antibiotic profile of the isolates was investigated. For this, during April to September 2012, 150 ice cream samples collected from markets and confectionery shops. The samples were analyzed for the presence of E. coli. Afterwards, the antibiotic susceptibility and resistance of the isolates was evaluated on 10 different antibiotic using Kirby-Bauer test.According tothe results, 31.33% (47.150 of the samples were found positive for E. coli. The results of antibiogram test indicated that the highest level of sensitivity was determined for ceftizoxim (80.85%, ciprofloxacin (78.73%, and ceftriaxone (74.47%, respectively. In contrast, the most resistance antibiotics were amoxicillin (95.74%, oxacilin (82.98%, kanamycin (61.7%, respectively. The results revealed that the prevalence of E. coli, as the indication of fecal contamination, in traditionally made ice cream in Khoy retails and the antibiotic profile of the isolates were noticeable.

  19. Microbial resistance to antibiotics | Chinedum | African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microbial resistance to antibiotics. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... Microorganisms develop resistance to antibiotics by any of the following mechanisms: selection, mutation, phage transduction, and transference while microbial resistance can either be inherent in the organism or acquired through the environment.

  20. Antibiotic-mediated changes in the fecal microbiome of broiler chickens define the incidence of antibiotic resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wenguang; Wang, Yulin; Sun, Yongxue; Ma, Liping; Zeng, Qinglin; Jiang, Xiaotao; Li, Andong; Zeng, Zhenling; Zhang, Tong

    2018-02-13

    Antimicrobial agents have been widely used in animal farms to prevent and treat animal diseases and to promote growth. Antimicrobial agents may change the bacterial community and enhance the resistome in animal feces. We used metagenome-wide analysis to investigate the changes in bacterial community, variations in antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), and their bacterial hosts in the feces of broiler chickens over a full-treatment course of chlortetracycline at low and therapeutic dose levels. The effects of chlortetracycline on resistome were dependent on the specific ARG subtypes and not simply the overall community-level ARGs. Therapeutic dose of chlortetracycline promoted the abundance of tetracycline resistance genes (tetA and tetW) and inhibited multidrug resistance genes (mdtA, mdtC, mdtK, ompR, and TolC). The therapeutic dose of chlortetracycline led to loss of Proteobacteria mainly due to the decrease of Escherichia/Shigella (from 72 to 58%). Inhibition of Escherichia by chlortetracycline was the primary reason for the decrease of genes resistant to multiple drugs in the therapeutic dose group. The ARG host Bifidobacterium were enriched due to tetW harbored by Bifidobacterium under chlortetracycline treatment. Escherichia was always the major host for multidrug resistance genes, whereas the primary host was changed from Escherichia to Klebsiella for aminoglycoside resistance genes with the treatment of therapeutic dose of chlortetracycline. We provided the first metagenomic insights into antibiotic-mediated alteration of ARG-harboring bacterial hosts at community-wide level in chicken feces. These results indicated that the changes in the structure of antibiotic-induced feces microbial communities accompany changes in the abundance of bacterial hosts carrying specific ARGs in the feces microbiota. These findings will help to optimize therapeutic schemes for the effective treatment of antibiotic resistant pathogens in poultry farms. Resistome variations in

  1. Genomic and metagenomic diversity of antibiotic resistance in dairy animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibiotic resistance in food animals has received increased scrutiny in recent years due to the increased prevalence of antibiotic resistant infections in the human clinical setting. The extent to which antibiotic usage in food animals is responsible for the burden of antibiotic resistance in human...

  2. Strength of Selection Pressure Is an Important Parameter Contributing to the Complexity of Antibiotic Resistance Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oz, Tugce; Guvenek, Aysegul; Yildiz, Sadik; Karaboga, Enes; Tamer, Yusuf Talha; Mumcuyan, Nirva; Ozan, Vedat Burak; Senturk, Gizem Hazal; Cokol, Murat; Yeh, Pamela; Toprak, Erdal

    2014-01-01

    Revealing the genetic changes responsible for antibiotic resistance can be critical for developing novel antibiotic therapies. However, systematic studies correlating genotype to phenotype in the context of antibiotic resistance have been missing. In order to fill in this gap, we evolved 88 isogenic Escherichia coli populations against 22 antibiotics for 3 weeks. For every drug, two populations were evolved under strong selection and two populations were evolved under mild selection. By quantifying evolved populations’ resistances against all 22 drugs, we constructed two separate cross-resistance networks for strongly and mildly selected populations. Subsequently, we sequenced representative colonies isolated from evolved populations for revealing the genetic basis for novel phenotypes. Bacterial populations that evolved resistance against antibiotics under strong selection acquired high levels of cross-resistance against several antibiotics, whereas other bacterial populations evolved under milder selection acquired relatively weaker cross-resistance. In addition, we found that strongly selected strains against aminoglycosides became more susceptible to five other drug classes compared with their wild-type ancestor as a result of a point mutation on TrkH, an ion transporter protein. Our findings suggest that selection strength is an important parameter contributing to the complexity of antibiotic resistance problem and use of high doses of antibiotics to clear infections has the potential to promote increase of cross-resistance in clinics. PMID:24962091

  3. The determinants of the antibiotic resistance process

    OpenAIRE

    Beatriz Espinosa Franco; Marina Altagracia Martínez; Martha A Sánchez Rodríguez; Albert I Wertheimer

    2009-01-01

    Beatriz Espinosa Franco1, Marina Altagracia Martínez2, Martha A Sánchez Rodríguez1, Albert I Wertheimer31Facultad de Estudios Superiores Zaragoza (UNAM), Mexico; 2Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Unidad Xochimilco, Mexico; 3Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USABackground: The use of antibiotic drugs triggers a complex interaction involving many biological, sociological, and psychological determinants. Resistance to antibiotics is a se...

  4. [Sensitivity and antibiotic resistance in infections of the musculoskeletal system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Hernández, Argenis; Rivera-Villa, Adrián Huematzin; Miguel-Pérez, Adrián; Pérez-Atanasio, José Manuel; Torres-González, Rubén

    2016-01-01

    Infections of the musculoskeletal system are a devastating complication for patients, due to it's long rehabilitation process and even sometimes the removal of the implant, the chronicity of infection, is often due to lack of coverage in empirical antibiotics. A retrospective, observational, descriptive cohort study was performed. All cultures form musculoskeletal system infected patients reported of sensitivity and resistance of germs isolated were analyzed. A total of 143 positive results were included. Reported more frequent germ Staphylococcus aureus accounted for 75 positive cases, followed by Escherichia coli with 31 positive results. Antibiotics with better sensitivity according to the type of microorganisms were trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and vancomycin, levofloxacin and linezolid, gentamicin, erythromycin and amikacin. Regarding antibiotic resistance, those reported with the highest percentage were penicillin G, amoxicillin with clavulanic acid and ampicillin. We recommend using empirical treatments in musculoskeletal system infections, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole are the best choice because they have the same sensitivity compare with vancomycin and a resistance rate of 7.6%. Betalactamics have a high percentage of resistance and low sensitivity so we must consider alternatives.

  5. Antibiotic-Resistant Enteric Bacteria in Environmental Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M. Casanova

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Sources of antibiotic resistant organisms, including concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs, may lead to environmental surface and groundwater contamination with resistant enteric bacteria of public health concern. The objective of this research is to determine whether Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Yersinia enterocolitica, and enterococci resistant to clinically relevant antibiotics are present in surface and groundwater sources in two eastern North Carolina counties, Craven and Wayne. 100 surface and groundwater sites were sampled for Salmonella, E. coli, and enterococci, and the bacteria isolated from these samples were tested for susceptibility to clinically relevant antibiotics. Salmonella were detected at low levels in some surface but not groundwater. E. coli were in surface waters but not ground in both counties. Enterococci were present in surface water and a small number of groundwater sites. Yersinia was not found. Bacterial densities were similar in both counties. For Salmonella in surface water, the most frequent type of resistance was to sulfamethoxazole. There was no ciprofloxacin resistance. There were a few surface water E. coli isolates resistant to chloramphenicol, gentamicin, and ampicillin. Enterococci in surface water had very low levels of resistance to vancomycin, chloramphenicol, ampicillin, and streptomycin. E. coli and enterococci are present more frequently and at higher levels in surface water than Salmonella, but groundwater contamination with any of these organisms was rare, and low levels of resistance can be found sporadically. Resistant bacteria are relatively uncommon in these eastern N.C. surface and groundwaters, but they could pose a risk of human exposure via ingestion or primary contact recreation.

  6. Cold Stress Makes Escherichia coli Susceptible to Glycopeptide Antibiotics by Altering Outer Membrane Integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Jonathan M; French, Shawn; Ovchinnikova, Olga G; Bouwman, Catrien; Whitfield, Chris; Brown, Eric D

    2016-02-18

    A poor understanding of the mechanisms by which antibiotics traverse the outer membrane remains a considerable obstacle to the development of novel Gram-negative antibiotics. Herein, we demonstrate that the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli becomes susceptible to the narrow-spectrum antibiotic vancomycin during growth at low temperatures. Heterologous expression of an Enterococcus vanHBX vancomycin resistance cluster in E. coli confirmed that the mechanism of action was through inhibition of peptidoglycan biosynthesis. To understand the nature of vancomycin permeability, we screened for strains of E. coli that displayed resistance to vancomycin at low temperature. Surprisingly, we observed that mutations in outer membrane biosynthesis suppressed vancomycin activity. Subsequent chemical analysis of lipopolysaccharide from vancomycin-sensitive and -resistant strains confirmed that suppression was correlated with truncations in the core oligosaccharide of lipopolysaccharide. These unexpected observations challenge the current understanding of outer membrane permeability, and provide new chemical insights into the susceptibility of E. coli to glycopeptide antibiotics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistance: a global problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, R; Panda, S; Singh, D V

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a major problem in clinical health settings. Interestingly the origin of many of antibiotic resistance mechanisms can be traced back to non-pathogenic environmental organisms. Important factors leading to the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance include absence of regulation in the use of antibiotics, improper waste disposal and associated transmission of antibiotic resistance genes in the community through commensals. In this review, we discussed the impact of globalisation on the transmission of antibiotic resistance genes in bacteria through immigration and export/import of foodstuff. The significance of surveillance to define appropriate use of antibiotics in the clinic has been included as an important preventive measure.

  8. beta-Lactamases and beta-lactam resistance in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Jacoby, G A; Sutton, L

    1985-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains determining 17 different plasmid-determined beta-lactamases were tested for resistance to new broad-spectrum beta-lactam antibiotics. Several beta-lactamases demonstrated enhanced resistance to cefamandole but only low-level resistance to other agents. High production of cloned E. coli chromosomal beta-lactamase, however, provided resistance to cefamandole, cefoxitin, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, and aztreonam but not to BMY-28142 or imipenem.

  9. High-throughput screening of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in picodroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X; Painter, R E; Enesa, K; Holmes, D; Whyte, G; Garlisi, C G; Monsma, F J; Rehak, M; Craig, F F; Smith, C A

    2016-04-26

    The prevalence of clinically-relevant bacterial strains resistant to current antibiotic therapies is increasing and has been recognized as a major health threat. For example, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus are of global concern. Novel methodologies are needed to identify new targets or novel compounds unaffected by pre-existing resistance mechanisms. Recently, water-in-oil picodroplets have been used as an alternative to conventional high-throughput methods, especially for phenotypic screening. Here we demonstrate a novel microfluidic-based picodroplet platform which enables high-throughput assessment and isolation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in a label-free manner. As a proof-of-concept, the system was used to isolate fusidic acid-resistant mutants and estimate the frequency of resistance among a population of Escherichia coli (strain HS151). This approach can be used for rapid screening of rare antibiotic-resistant mutants to help identify novel compound/target pairs.

  10. Effects of UV light disinfection on antibiotic-resistant coliforms in wastewater effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meckes, M.C.

    1982-01-01

    Total coliforms and total coliforms resistant to streptomycin, tetracycline, or chloramphenicol were isolated from filtered activated sludge effluents before and after UV light irradiation. Although the UV irradiation effectively disinfected the wastewater effluent, the percentage of the total surviving coliform population resistant to tetracycline or chloramphenicol was significantly higher than the percentage of the total coliform population resistant to those antibiotics before UV irradiation. This finding was attributed to the mechanism of R-factor mediated resistance to tetracycline. No significant difference was noted for the percentage of the surviving total coliform population resistant to streptomycin before or after UV irradiation. Multiple drug resistant to patterns of 300 total coliform isolates revealed that 82% were resistant to two or more antibiotics. Furthermore, 46% of these isolates were capable of transferring antibiotic resistance to a sensitive strain of Escherichia coli

  11. Impact of extensive antibiotic treatment on faecal carriage of antibiotic-resistant enterobacteria in children in a low resistance prevalence setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Per Kristian; Brandtzaeg, Petter; Høiby, E Arne; Bohlin, Jon; Samuelsen, Ørjan; Steinbakk, Martin; Abrahamsen, Tore G; Müller, Fredrik; Gammelsrud, Karianne Wiger

    2017-01-01

    We prospectively studied the consequences of extensive antibiotic treatment on faecal carriage of antibiotic-resistant enterobacteria in a cohort of children with cystic fibrosis (CF) and a cohort of children with cancer compared to healthy children with no or low antibiotic exposure. The study was conducted in Norway in a low resistance prevalence setting. Sixty longitudinally collected faecal samples from children with CF (n = 32), 88 samples from children with cancer (n = 45) and 127 samples from healthy children (n = 70) were examined. A direct MIC-gradient strip method was used to detect resistant Enterobacteriaceae by applying Etest strips directly onto agar-plates swabbed with faecal samples. Whole genome sequencing (WGS) data were analysed to identify resistance mechanisms in 28 multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli isolates. The prevalence of resistance to third-generation cephalosporins, gentamicin and ciprofloxacin was low in all the study groups. At inclusion the prevalence of ampicillin-resistant E. coli and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-resistant E. coli in the CF group compared to healthy controls was 58.6% vs. 28.4% (p = 0.005) and 48.3% vs. 14.9% (p = 0.001), respectively, with a similar prevalence at the end of the study. The prevalence of resistant enterobacteria was not significantly different in the children with cancer compared to the healthy children, not even at the end of the study when the children with cancer had been treated with repeated courses of broad-spectrum antibiotics. Children with cancer were mainly treated with intravenous antibiotics, while the CF group mainly received peroral treatment. Our observations indicate that the mode of administration of antibiotics and the general level of antimicrobial resistance in the community may have an impact on emergence of resistance in intestinal enterobacteria during antibiotic treatment. The WGS analyses detected acquired resistance genes and/or chromosomal mutations that explained the

  12. Impact of extensive antibiotic treatment on faecal carriage of antibiotic-resistant enterobacteria in children in a low resistance prevalence setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandtzaeg, Petter; Høiby, E. Arne; Bohlin, Jon; Samuelsen, Ørjan; Steinbakk, Martin; Abrahamsen, Tore G.; Müller, Fredrik; Gammelsrud, Karianne Wiger

    2017-01-01

    We prospectively studied the consequences of extensive antibiotic treatment on faecal carriage of antibiotic-resistant enterobacteria in a cohort of children with cystic fibrosis (CF) and a cohort of children with cancer compared to healthy children with no or low antibiotic exposure. The study was conducted in Norway in a low resistance prevalence setting. Sixty longitudinally collected faecal samples from children with CF (n = 32), 88 samples from children with cancer (n = 45) and 127 samples from healthy children (n = 70) were examined. A direct MIC-gradient strip method was used to detect resistant Enterobacteriaceae by applying Etest strips directly onto agar-plates swabbed with faecal samples. Whole genome sequencing (WGS) data were analysed to identify resistance mechanisms in 28 multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli isolates. The prevalence of resistance to third-generation cephalosporins, gentamicin and ciprofloxacin was low in all the study groups. At inclusion the prevalence of ampicillin-resistant E. coli and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-resistant E. coli in the CF group compared to healthy controls was 58.6% vs. 28.4% (p = 0.005) and 48.3% vs. 14.9% (p = 0.001), respectively, with a similar prevalence at the end of the study. The prevalence of resistant enterobacteria was not significantly different in the children with cancer compared to the healthy children, not even at the end of the study when the children with cancer had been treated with repeated courses of broad-spectrum antibiotics. Children with cancer were mainly treated with intravenous antibiotics, while the CF group mainly received peroral treatment. Our observations indicate that the mode of administration of antibiotics and the general level of antimicrobial resistance in the community may have an impact on emergence of resistance in intestinal enterobacteria during antibiotic treatment. The WGS analyses detected acquired resistance genes and/or chromosomal mutations that explained the

  13. Does antifouling paint select for antibiotic resistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flach, Carl-Fredrik; Pal, Chandan; Svensson, Carl Johan; Kristiansson, Erik; Östman, Marcus; Bengtsson-Palme, Johan; Tysklind, Mats; Larsson, D G Joakim

    2017-07-15

    There is concern that heavy metals and biocides contribute to the development of antibiotic resistance via co-selection. Most antifouling paints contain high amounts of such substances, which risks turning painted ship hulls into highly mobile refuges and breeding grounds for antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The objectives of this study were to start investigate if heavy-metal based antifouling paints can pose a risk for co-selection of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and, if so, identify the underlying genetic basis. Plastic panels with one side painted with copper and zinc-containing antifouling paint were submerged in a Swedish marina and biofilms from both sides of the panels were harvested after 2.5-4weeks. DNA was isolated from the biofilms and subjected to metagenomic sequencing. Biofilm bacteria were cultured on marine agar supplemented with tetracycline, gentamicin, copper sulfate or zinc sulfate. Biofilm communities from painted surfaces displayed lower taxonomic diversity and enrichment of Gammaproteobacteria. Bacteria from these communities showed increased resistance to both heavy metals and tetracycline but not to gentamicin. Significantly higher abundance of metal and biocide resistance genes was observed, whereas mobile antibiotic resistance genes were not enriched in these communities. In contrast, we found an enrichment of chromosomal RND efflux system genes, including such with documented ability to confer decreased susceptibility to both antibiotics and biocides/heavy metals. This was paralleled by increased abundances of integron-associated integrase and ISCR transposase genes. The results show that the heavy metal-based antifouling paint exerts a strong selection pressure on marine bacterial communities and can co-select for certain antibiotic-resistant bacteria, likely by favoring species and strains carrying genes that provide cross-resistance. Although this does not indicate an immediate risk for promotion of mobile antibiotic resistance, the

  14. Distribution of antibiotic resistance in urban watershed in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, Young-Sik; Kobori, Hiromi; Kang, Joo-Hyon; Matsuzaki, Takayuki; Iino, Michiyo; Nomura, Hayashi

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant E. coli concentrations showed large spatial and temporal variations, with greater concentrations observed in tributaries and downstream than in the upstream and midstream. Twenty percent of the geometric mean concentrations of antibiotic-resistant E. coli in the Tama River basin (Japan) exceeded the maximum acceptable concentration of indicator E. coli established by the USEPA. The indicator E. coli concentrations were positively correlated with those of antibiotic-resistant E. coli and multiple-antibiotic-resistant E. coli (resistance to more than two kinds of antibiotics), respectively, but not the detection rate of antibiotic-resistant E. coli, implying that use of antibiotic-resistant E. coli concentration rather than the detection rate can be a better approach for water quality assessment. Multiple-antibiotic-resistant E. coli is a useful indicator for estimating the resistance diffusion, water quality degradation and public health risk potential. This assessment provides beneficial information for setting national regulatory or environmental standards and managing integrated watershed areas. - Highlights: ► We extensively observed antibiotic-resistant E. coli (AREc) in Tama River (Japan). ► AREc count rather than the detection rate is better approach for water quality test. ► Multiple-AREc is resistant to the antibiotic to which single-AREc has no resistance. ► Multiple-AREc increase will accelerate the diffusion of antibiotic resistance. - Multiple-antibiotic-resistant E. coli in the watershed can cause the diffusion of conventionally rare antibiotic resistance.

  15. Resistencia antimicrobiana en la infección urinaria por Escherichia coli adquirida en la comunidad: ¿Cuál antibiótico voy a usar? Antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli from community-acquired urinary tract infections: What antimicrobial to use?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Elena Guajardo-Lara

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar la resistencia del uropatógeno comunitario más frecuente, Escherichia coli, a diversos antimicrobianos y deducir opciones de manejo empírico. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Del 14 de julio de 2005 al 13 julio de 2006 se estudiaron cepas de Escherichia coli aisladas de urocultivos de pacientes que asistieron a la consulta externa de la Clínica Nova y del Hospital San José, en Monterrey, Nuevo León, México. Se identificó la bacteria y se determinó susceptibilidad a antibióticos mediante método automatizado. Se compararon los resultados entre las dos instituciones y la frecuencia de resistencia a antimicrobianos entre mujeres de entre 15 a 50 años de edad y > 50. RESULTADOS: Se analizaron 652 urocultivos: 303 (46.5% de Clínica Nova y 349 (53.5% del Hospital San José. Las cepas aisladas fueron resistentes a ampicilina, en 67.2%; a trimetoprim-sulfametoxazol, en 59.2%; a cefazolina, en 35.6%, y a ciprofloxacino, en 24.7%. CONCLUSIONES: La resistencia a trimetoprim-sulfametoxazol y ciprofloxacino, considerados de elección en el manejo empírico de las infecciones de vías urinarias adquiridas en la comunidad, es alta. Las opciones de manejo son pocas.OBJECTIVE: Determine antibiotic resistance of community-acquired uropathogen Escherichia coli and infer therapeutic options. MATERIAL AND METHODS: E. coli strains isolated from urine during a one-year period were studied. Identification and susceptibility tests were performed. RESULTS: A total of 652 isolates were included from patients in two institutions, a healthcare clinic 303 (46.5% and a hospital 349 ( 53.5%. The antimicrobials with higher resistance rates were ampicillin 67.2%, trimethoprim-sulfametoxazole 59.2%, cefazolin 35.6% and ciprofloxacin 24.7%. CONCLUSIONS: Resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and ciprofloxacin used for empiric treatment in community urinary infections is high, and there are few available treatment options.

  16. Vanillin selectively modulates the action of antibiotics against resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Camila Fonseca; Camilo, Cicera Janaine; do Nascimento Silva, Maria Karollyna; de Freitas, Thiago Sampaio; Ribeiro-Filho, Jaime; Coutinho, Henrique Douglas Melo

    2017-12-01

    The treatment of infections caused by microorganisms that are resistant to antibiotics represent one of the main challenges of medicine today, especially due to the inefficacy of long-term drug therapy. In the search for new alternatives to treat these infections, many researchers have been looking for new substances derived from natural products to replace, or be used in combination with conventional antibiotics. Vanillin is a phenolic compound whose antimicrobial activity has been used in the elimination of pathogens present in fruits and vegetables. However, its antibacterial and modulating properties remain to be characterized. Therefore, this work aimed to evaluate the antibacterial activity and analyze the modulator activity of vanillin in association with conventional antibiotics. The antimicrobial activity of vanillin was evaluated using the microdilution method to determine the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) Standard strains of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and multi-resistant strains of Escherichia coli 06, Staphylococcus aureus 10, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 24 were used in this study. The antibiotic modulating effect was analyzed by combining vanillin with Norfloxacin, Imipenem, Gentamicin, Erythromycin and Tetracycline against the following multiresistant bacteria strains: Escherichia coli 06, Staphylococcus aureus 10 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 24. Data were analyzed using the ANOVA test of two tracks followed by the post hoc Bonferroni test. Vanillin presented CIMs ≥1024μg/mL against all tested strains demonstrating that it did not present significant antibacterial activity. However, modulated the activity of gentamicin and imipenem against S. aureus and E. coli, causing a synergistic effect, but did not affect the activity of norfloxacin, tetracycline and erythromycin against these same microorganisms. A synergistic effect was also obtained from the association of vanillin with norfloxacin against P

  17. Antibiotic policies and control of resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Ian M

    2002-08-01

    The current worldwide pandemic of antibiotic resistance shows no signs of abating. It is clear that it is driven mainly by heavy and often inappropriate antibiotic use. Although control measures are widely practised, it is important that we assess their efficacy critically in order to concentrate expensive control efforts where they will be most effective. The past year has seen much activity in this area, with evidence-based assessments of the literature according to strict guidelines, as well as progress in basic science studies of mechanisms of resistance, and their causes and relations to pathogenicity and adaptability. The present review summarizes current developments in the causes of antibiotic resistance, the classification of antibiotic stewardship and control measures, the evidence base for their efficacy, current problems in hospital practice, the adaptability of bacteria, the content of antibiotic policies and anticipated activities. The conclusions from the published literature are that much of it that pertains to changing prescribing practices does not stand up to modern evidence-based analysis concepts. Nevertheless, we can learn from experience in changing other areas of medical practice. We must be pragmatic and must not expect to change the world, but rather take it step by step, recognizing barriers and measuring outcomes and quality indicators. Studies into the molecular basis of resistance confirm the superb genetic adaptability of micro-organisms. They will always be several steps ahead of us. Nevertheless, we are learning how to modify our prescribing habits to minimize resistance, not only by using antibiotics less frequently but also by altering dosing schedules in various ways.

  18. Plasmid profile of multi antibiotic resistant staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multi-drug resistant bacterial strains evolving worldwide has created a great public health problem that needs urgent attention; as such bacteria show resistance to the drug of choice for treatment as well as being resistant to newer and last line antibiotics. In this study, the antibiotic susceptibility, multi antibiotic resistance ...

  19. Multiple antimicrobial resistance among Avian Escherichia coli strains in Albania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Camarda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 101 Escherichia (E. coli isolates from broilers, laying hens and turkeys which had died from colibacillosis, collected from 37 intensive and rural farms in Albania, were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility toward 12 different molecules. The highest levels of resistance were observed for Erythromycin (E (100% Amoxicillin (AMX (99.1%, Tetracycline (TE 30 (96.07%, Streptomycin (STR (93.07% and Neomycin (N30 (85.15%. Considerable resistance was also detected for fluoroquinolones. Moreover, 73.33% of E. coli resistant to at least one fluoroquinolone were also resistant to the two other fluoroquinolones checked. No evident differences were found between the E. coli from intensive and from rural farms. Multiple antibiotic resistance was expressed by all the E. coli tested. 23.63% and 17.39% of E. coli isolated from intensive and rural farms, respectively, were resistant towards all the drugs tested. These data would seem to indicate incorrect use of antibiotics on poultry farms in Albania.

  20. The contribution of common rpsL mutations in Escherichia coli to sensitivity to ribosome targeting antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelchovich, Gidi; Schreiber, Rachel; Zhuravlev, Alina; Gophna, Uri

    2013-12-01

    Point mutations in the rpsL gene encoding ribosomal protein S12 can generate resistance to streptomycin, resulting in rapid emergence of resistance to this antibiotic during treatment. In this work, we demonstrate that while spontaneous rpsL mutants in Escherichia coli are resistant to streptomycin, they are more sensitive to the ribosome-targeting antibiotics chloramphenicol, tetracycline and erythromycin. Moreover, combinations of these antibiotics, even in low concentrations were enough to achieve complete growth inhibition of both wild type and rpsL mutant strains. Thus, combining ribosome-targeting drugs can be used as a new treatment strategy that may be effective against streptomycin-resistant ribosome mutants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular characterization of antibiotic resistance in cultivable multidrug-resistant bacteria from livestock manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qingxiang; Tian, Tiantian; Niu, Tianqi; Wang, Panliang

    2017-10-01

    Diverse antibiotic-resistance genes (ARGs) are frequently reported to have high prevalence in veterinary manure samples due to extensive use of antibiotics in farm animals. However, the characteristics of the distribution and transmission of ARGs among bacteria, especially among different species of multiple antibiotic-resistant bacteria (MARB), have not been well explored. By applying high-throughput sequencing methods, our study uncovered a vast MARB reservoir in livestock manure. The genera Escherichia, Myroides, Acinetobacter, Proteus, Ignatzschineria, Alcaligenes, Providencia and Enterococcus were the predominant cultivable MARB, with compositions of 40.6%-85.7%. From chicken manure isolates, 33 MARB were selected for investigation of the molecular characteristics of antibiotic resistance. A total of 61 ARGs and 18 mobile genetic elements (MGEs) were investigated. We found that 47 ARGs were widely distributed among the 33 MARB isolates. Each isolate carried 27-36 genes responsible for resistance to eight classes of antibiotics frequently used in clinic or veterinary settings. ARGs to the six classes of antibiotics other than streptogramins and vancomycin were present in all 33 MARB isolates with a prevalence of 80%-100%. A total of 12 MGEs were widely distributed among the 33 MARB, with intI1, IS26, ISaba1, and ISEcp1 simultaneously present in 100% of isolates. In addition, 9 gene cassettes within integrons and ISCR1 were detected among MARB isolates encoding resistance to different antibiotic classes. This is the first report revealing the general co-presence of multiple ARGs, various MGEs and ARG cassettes in different species of individual MARB isolates in chicken manure. The results highlight a much higher risk of ARGs spreading through livestock manure to humans than we expected. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancak, Banu

    2011-07-01

    After the report of first case of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in 1961, MRSA become a major problem worldwide. Over the last decade MRSA strains have emerged as serious pathogens in nosocomial and community settings. Glycopeptides (vancomycin and teicoplanin) are still the current mainstay of therapy for infections caused by MRSA. In the last decade dramatic changes have occurred in the epidemiology of MRSA infections. The isolates with reduced susceptibility and in vitro resistance to vancomycin have emerged. Recently, therapeutic alternatives such as quinupristin/dalfopristin, linezolid, tigecycline and daptomycin have been introduced into clinical practice for treating MRSA infections. Nevertheless, these drugs are only approved for certain indication and resistance has already been reported. In this review, the new information on novel drugs for treating MRSA infections and the resistance mechanisms of these drugs were discussed.

  3. Resensitizing Resistant Bacteria to Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Next, we added the phage displaying #39 or a randomized version of #39 to growing staphylococci and showed that #39, but not the randomized...synergy with oxacillin against methicillin-resistant staphylococci as well as synergy with vancomycin against vancomycin-resistant staphylococci . We...below in Task 3).   2 Task 3. Test top binding display phage against whole staphylococci . (months 7-9) Despite being covalently attached to a

  4. Antibiotic Cycling and Antibiotic Mixing: Which One Best Mitigates Antibiotic Resistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Miller, Rafael; Gori, Fabio; Iredell, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Can we exploit our burgeoning understanding of molecular evolution to slow the progress of drug resistance? One role of an infection clinician is exactly that: to foresee trajectories to resistance during antibiotic treatment and to hinder that evolutionary course. But can this be done at a hospital-wide scale? Clinicians and theoreticians tried to when they proposed two conflicting behavioral strategies that are expected to curb resistance evolution in the clinic, these are known as “antibiotic cycling” and “antibiotic mixing.” However, the accumulated data from clinical trials, now approaching 4 million patient days of treatment, is too variable for cycling or mixing to be deemed successful. The former implements the restriction and prioritization of different antibiotics at different times in hospitals in a manner said to “cycle” between them. In antibiotic mixing, appropriate antibiotics are allocated to patients but randomly. Mixing results in no correlation, in time or across patients, in the drugs used for treatment which is why theorists saw this as an optimal behavioral strategy. So while cycling and mixing were proposed as ways of controlling evolution, we show there is good reason why clinical datasets cannot choose between them: by re-examining the theoretical literature we show prior support for the theoretical optimality of mixing was misplaced. Our analysis is consistent with a pattern emerging in data: neither cycling or mixing is a priori better than the other at mitigating selection for antibiotic resistance in the clinic. Key words: antibiotic cycling, antibiotic mixing, optimal control, stochastic models. PMID:28096304

  5. Antibiotic Cycling and Antibiotic Mixing: Which One Best Mitigates Antibiotic Resistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beardmore, Robert Eric; Peña-Miller, Rafael; Gori, Fabio; Iredell, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    Can we exploit our burgeoning understanding of molecular evolution to slow the progress of drug resistance? One role of an infection clinician is exactly that: to foresee trajectories to resistance during antibiotic treatment and to hinder that evolutionary course. But can this be done at a hospital-wide scale? Clinicians and theoreticians tried to when they proposed two conflicting behavioral strategies that are expected to curb resistance evolution in the clinic, these are known as "antibiotic cycling" and "antibiotic mixing." However, the accumulated data from clinical trials, now approaching 4 million patient days of treatment, is too variable for cycling or mixing to be deemed successful. The former implements the restriction and prioritization of different antibiotics at different times in hospitals in a manner said to "cycle" between them. In antibiotic mixing, appropriate antibiotics are allocated to patients but randomly. Mixing results in no correlation, in time or across patients, in the drugs used for treatment which is why theorists saw this as an optimal behavioral strategy. So while cycling and mixing were proposed as ways of controlling evolution, we show there is good reason why clinical datasets cannot choose between them: by re-examining the theoretical literature we show prior support for the theoretical optimality of mixing was misplaced. Our analysis is consistent with a pattern emerging in data: neither cycling or mixing is a priori better than the other at mitigating selection for antibiotic resistance in the clinic. : antibiotic cycling, antibiotic mixing, optimal control, stochastic models. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  6. Combined treatment with the antibiotics kanamycin and streptomycin promotes the conjugation of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng-Yi; Xu, Pei-Pei; Xia, Zhi-Jie; Wang, Jing; Xiong, Juan; Li, Yue-Zhong

    2013-11-01

    It is widely accepted that antibiotics provide a critical selective pressure for the horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance between bacterial species. This study demonstrated that a combination of low doses of kanamycin and streptomycin, which inhibited the growth of recipient and donor cells, respectively, had positive effects on the transmission of the conjugation plasmids pRK2013, pSU2007, and RP4 from Escherichia coli DH5α to HB101 at their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). Administration of either antibiotic alone as well as other antibiotics in combination or alone did not have this effect. Two-dimensional electrophoresis revealed that 60 proteins were downregulated and 14 proteins were upregulated in the conjugation of E. coli DH5α (pRK2013) and HB101 in the presence of kanamycin and streptomycin. Of these proteins, 64 were subsequently identified by mass spectrometry. Two antibiotic-induced genes encoding oligopeptide-binding protein (OppA) and ribose-binding protein (RbsB) were further confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. When these genes were deleted, the number of transconjugants decreased in the same fashion as when the cells were treated with kanamycin and streptomycin. These results indicate that the process of E. coli conjugation may be promoted by combination treatment with kanamycin and streptomycin and that two proteins potentially participated in this process. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of Prophylactic Antibiotic Use in the Development of Antibiotic Resistance in Children with Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Karacı

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Although prophylactic antibiotic treatment is still debatable, it is currently in use in recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs. In the present study, we aimed to observe if prophylactic antibiotic use had any effect on the development of antibiotic resistance in patients with recurrent UTIs who we followed up in our clinic. Methods: The present study was performed on patients aged between one month and 16 years, who had recurrent UTIs, and were followed up by the Department of Pediatrics at Bülent Ecevit University Medical School. Patient files were retrospectively reviewed, and 50 patients who received antibiotic prophylaxis and 100 patients without prophylaxis were enrolled in the study. Urinary tests, subsequent urinary culture results, and antibiotic resistances were compared between the groups. Results: The mean age was 42.7±44.2 months. The most frequently cultured isolated bacterium was Escherichia coli (E. coli (58.4%. No difference was determined in bacteria in cultures between prophylaxis receivers and non-receivers. Isolation rate of E. coli was higher in urinary cultures in females than in males (p<0.001. When antibiotic resistance of all urinary culture-isolated bacteria was compared between the two groups, there was no statistically significant difference. However, an increased resistance against amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ceftriaxone, and piperacillin was determined in prophylaxis group in whom E. coli was grown. In this study, general antibiotic resistance was most frequently observed against ampicillin (71.9%. Conclusion: In the present study, we observed that prophylaxis did not contribute so much to resistance other than E. coli. We recommend not preferring antibiotics which have increased resistance in our institution especially in children receiving prophylaxis for empirical treatment.

  8. Photodynamic inactivation of antibiotic-resistant pathogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paronyan, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays methicillin-resistant strain Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most widespread multiresistant bacteria. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) of microorganisms by photosensitizers (PS) may be an effective and alternative therapeutic option against antibiotic resistant bacteria. The effectiveness of new PS cationic porphyrin Zn-TBut4PyP was tested on two strains of S. aureus (MRSA and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus). It is shown that Zn-TBut4PyP has high photodynamic activity against both strains

  9. Altered membrane permeability in multidrug resistant Escherichia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted with the objective of examining the outer membrane proteins and their involvement during the transport of β - lactams in multidrug resistant Escherichia coli isolated from extra-intestinal infections. Also, the response of gram negative bacterial biomembrane alteration was studied using extended ...

  10. Antibiotic resistance in Candida albicans and Staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nowadays, vaginal candidiasis and bacterial vaginosis are frequently encountered in medical practice and antibiotic resistance in implicated pathogens has not been reported in Dschang. This study sought to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of 198 isolates of Candida albicans and 300 strains of ...

  11. Antibiotics resistance of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strains ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is a resistant pathogen that can cause bacteremia, endocarditis, respiratory system, central nervous system and urinary tract infections in patients with risk factors like malignancy or neutrope- nia, use of broad-spectrum antibiotics like carbapenem or long-term hospitalization1,2.

  12. [Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antibiotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolska, Katarzyna; Kot, Barbara; Piechota, Małgorzata; Frankowska, Aneta

    2013-12-16

    The main problem in the treatment of nosocomial infections is the increasing drug resistance of microorganisms that cause them, limiting the number of effective antibiotics. Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacilli are the cause of many serious hospital-acquired infections occurring primarily in patients within high-risk groups. The most vulnerable are those with weakened immune systems, as well as those with extensive surgical wounds and burn wounds. Infections are usually of the nature of secondary infections, caused by multidrug strains. Due to the high antimicrobial activity, beta-lactams, aminoglycosides and quinolones are drugs commonly used in hospitals, both in prevention and treatment of infections with P. aeruginosa. However, their irrational use is associated with selection and spread of strains resistant to these antibiotics. Resistance of P. aeruginosa to antibiotics is the result of a number of independent co-occurring mechanisms. These are: reducing the membrane permeability, the efflux system, and production of enzymes inactivating and degrading antibiotics. The paper devotes special attention to the determination of resistance mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon.

  13. Carriage rates, circulating serotypes and antibiotic resistance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae, serotypes, antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and disease development are poorly understood in Yei. Availability of affordable antibiotics over the counter, lack of laboratory infrastructure and high rates of penicillin resistance have the potential to aggravate rates of childhood ...

  14. Antibiotics as CECs: An Overview of the Hazards Posed by Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Ivan Scott

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTMonitoring programs have traditionally monitored legacy contaminants but are shifting focus to Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CECs. CECs present many challenges for monitoring and assessment, because measurement methods don't always exist nor have toxicological studies been fully conducted to place results in proper context. Also some CECs affect metabolic pathways to produce adverse outcomes that are not assessed through traditional toxicological evaluations. Antibiotics are CECs that pose significant environmental risks including development of both toxic effects at high doses and antibiotic resistance at doses well below the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC which kill bacteria and have been found in nearly half of all sites monitored in the US. Antimicrobial resistance has generally been attributed to the use of antibiotics in medicine for humans and livestock as well as aquaculture operations. The objective of this study was to assess the extent and magnitude of antibiotics in the environment and estimate their potential hazards in the environment. Antibiotics concentrations were measured in a number of monitoring studies which included Waste Water Treatment Plants (WWTP effluent, surface waters, sediments and biota. A number of studies reported levels of Antibiotic Resistant Microbes (ARM in surface waters and some studies found specific ARM genes (e.g. the blaM-1 gene in E. coli which may pose additional environmental risk. High levels of this gene were found to survive WWTP disinfection and accumulated in sediment at levels 100-1000 times higher than in the sewerage effluent, posing potential risks for gene transfer to other bacteria.in aquatic and marine ecosystems. Antibiotic risk assessment approaches were developed based on the use of MICs and MIC Ratios [High (Antibiotic Resistant/Low (Antibiotic Sensitive MIC] for each antibiotic indicating the range of bacterial adaptability to each antibiotic to help define the No

  15. Evaluation of Escherichia coli viability by flow cytometry: A method for determining bacterial responses to antibiotic exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boi, Paola; Manti, Anita; Pianetti, Anna; Sabatini, Luigia; Sisti, Davide; Rocchi, Marco Bruno; Bruscolini, Francesca; Galluzzi, Luca; Papa, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we check for the presence of specific resistance genes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and then we used flow cytometry (FCM) to evaluate antibiotic-induced effects in different strains of Escherichia coli (E. coli). The presence of resistance genes was investigated by PCR in 10 strains of E. coli isolated from Foglia River. Bacterial responses to different antibiotics were also tested with FCM techniques by evaluating both the degree of decrease in viability and the light scatter changes in all of the strains. PCR revealed that only one strain exhibits the presence of one resistance gene. Despite this, analyses of strains using FCM evidenced the presence of viable subpopulations after antibiotic treatment. Furthermore, analyses of scatter signals revealed profound changes in the Forward Scatter and Side Scatter of the bacterial populations as a consequence of antibiotic exposure, confirming the viability and membrane potential data. The riverine strains were in general less sensitive to antibiotics than the reference strain (ATCC 25922). Antibiotic resistance is a widespread phenomena. The multiparametric approach based on FCM used in this study, providing results about different aspects (cell viability, membrane potential, light scatter changes), may overcome the limitation of PCR and could represent an adequate method for the evaluation of bacteria responses to antibiotic exposure. © 2014 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  16. Prevalence and antibiotic resistance patterns of methicillin-resistant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence and antibiotic resistance patterns of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in raw milk and soft cheese (wara) sold in Abeokuta, Nigeria. ... (100%), ampicillin 16 (94.1%), doxycycline 11 (64.7%), tetracycline 17 (100%), oxacillin 15 (88.2%), augmentin 17 (100%), gentamycin 15 (88.2%), colistin 15 (88.2%), ...

  17. Antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli isolated from chickens with colibacillosis in and around Harare, Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidi, Bamusi; Mafirakureva, Prettimore; Mbanga, Joshua

    2013-03-01

    Colibacillosis, a disease caused by avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC), can lead to great economic losses in the poultry industry. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of antibiotic resistance and antibiotic resistance patterns in APEC in Zimbabwe. From 503 chickens diagnosed with colibacillosis, 103 E. coli isolates were obtained. Isolation and identification of E. coli were carried out using microscopy and biochemical tests. The disc diffusion method was used to determine antibiotic susceptibility of the isolates to 8 commercial antibiotics. Many isolates exhibited resistance to more than one antibiotic. Antibiogram profiles indicated maximum resistance to tetracycline (100%), bacitracin (100%), and cloxacillin (100%) and a high prevalence of resistance to ampicillin (94.1%). However; there were high prevalences of sensitivity to ciprofloxacin (100%) and gentamycin (97.1%). The isolates showed moderate rates of sensitivity to chloramphenicol and neomycin. All isolates in this study showed multidrug resistance because they were all resistant to 3 or more antibiotics. Seven multidrug resistance patterns were observed. The most common pattern (resistance to ampicillin, bacitracin, cloxacillin, and tetracycline) was exhibited by 30 isolates. Our findings show that there is emerging drug resistance in APEC associated with colibacillosis in Zimbabwe. The observed high level of multidrug resistance could hamper the treatment of colibacillosis in Zimbabwe.

  18. Association between antimicrobial resistance and virulence in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Gabriela Jorge; Mendonça, Nuno

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The treatment of E. coli infections is now threatened by the emergence of antimicrobial resistance. The dissemination of resistance is associated with genetic mobile elements, such as plasmids, that may also carry virulence determinants. A proficient pathogen should be virulent, resistant to antibiotics, and epidemic. However, the interplay between resistance and virulence is poorly understood. This review aims to critically discuss the association and linked transmission of both resistance and virulence traits in strains from extraintestinal infections in E. coli, and intestinal pathotypes. Despite the numerous controversies on this topic, findings from research published to date indicate that there is a link between resistance and virulence, as illustrated by the successful E. coli ST131 epidemic clone. Perhaps the most commonly accepted view is that resistance to quinolones is linked to a loss of virulence factors. However, the low virulent phylogenetic groups might be more prone to acquire resistance to quinolones. Specific characteristics of the E. coli genome that have yet to be identified may contribute to such genetic linkages. Research based on bacterial populations is sorely needed to help understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the association between resistance and virulence, that, in turn, may help manage the future disseminations of infectious diseases in their entirety.

  19. Antibiotic-resistant fecal bacteria, antibiotics, and mercury in surface waters of Oakland County, Michigan, 2005-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Lisa R.; Duris, Joseph W.; Crowley, Suzanne L.; Hardigan, Nicole

    2007-01-01

    Water samples collected from 20 stream sites in Oakland and Macomb Counties, Mich., were analyzed to learn more about the occurrence of cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and the co-occurrence of antibiotics and mercury in area streams. Fecal indicator bacteria concentrations exceeded the Michigan recreational water-quality standard of 300 E. coli colony forming units (CFU) per 100 milliliters of water in 19 of 35 stream-water samples collected in Oakland County. A gene commonly associated with enterococci from humans was detected in samples from Paint Creek at Rochester and Evans Ditch at Southfield, indicating that human fecal waste is a possible source of fecal contamination at these sites. E. coli resistant to the cephalosporin antibiotics (cefoxitin and/ or ceftriaxone) were found at all sites on at least one occasion. The highest percentages of E. coli isolates resistant to cefoxitin and ceftriaxone were 71 percent (Clinton River at Auburn Hills) and 19 percent (Sashabaw Creek near Drayton Plains), respectively. Cephalosporin-resistant E. coli was detected more frequently in samples from intensively urbanized or industrialized areas than in samples from less urbanized areas. VRE were not detected in any sample collected in this study. Multiple antibiotics (azithromycin, erythromycin, ofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim) were detected in water samples from the Clinton River at Auburn Hills, and tylosin (an antibiotic used in veterinary medicine and livestock production that belongs to the macrolide group, along with erythromycin) was detected in one water sample from Paint Creek at Rochester. Concentrations of total mercury were as high as 19.8 nanograms per liter (Evans Ditch at Southfield). There was no relation among percentage of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and measured concentrations of antibiotics or mercury in the water. Genetic elements capable of exchanging multiple antibiotic-resistance

  20. Prevalence of Antibiotic Resistance of the Commensal Flora in Dutch Nursing Homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendoorn, M.; Smalbrugge, M.; Stobberingh, E.E.; van Rossum, S.V.; Vlaminckx, B.J.; Thijsen, S.F.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of antibiotic resistance and multiresistance of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus in nursing homes and to determine which factors are associated with this prevalence. Design: Cohort study. Setting: Nursing homes. Participants: Residents of long-stay

  1. Frequency and antibiotic resistance patterns of isolated bacteria from positive blood culture of hospitalized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Vahedi

    2018-03-01

    Conclusion: The most prevalent bacterial isolate among the blood cultures of patients was Pseudomonas. The patients more than 50 years were more susceptible to blood stream infections. The most bacteria were isolated from the internal medicine department of hospital. The antibiotic resistance was also increasing especially in Acinetobacter, Staphylococcus coagulase negative, Escherichia coil and Klebsiella

  2. Antibiotic resistance profile of bacterial isolates from food sold on a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antibiotic resistance profile of bacterial isolates from cooked food samples sold in different eateries on the campus of the University of Ado-Ekiti was investigated. A total of seventy-eight bacterial isolates belonging to six genera were encountered in the following proportion: Escherichia coli (29.5%), Klebsiella spp.

  3. Antibiotic Resistance in Children with Bloody Diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamedi Abdolkarim

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Shigellosis is an important public health problem, especially in developing countries. Antibiotic treatment of bacterial dysentery, aimed at resolving diarrhea or reducing its duration is especially indicated whenever malnutrition is present. First-line drugs include ampicillin and trimethoprim sulfamethoxazole(TMP-SMX; however multidrug-resistance has occurred and careful antibiotic selection must be considered in prescribing .When epidemiologic data indicate a rise in resistancy, fluoroquinolones may be used in adults and oral third-generation cephalosporins and nalidixic acid in children. All children (n=2400 with acute diarrhea who were admitted to the Pediatric department of Dr.sheykh Hospital Mashhad, Iran from March 2004 to March 2005 were selected and their stool culture were obtained, then positive cultures (312 cases,13% were evaluated by antibiogram. This study showed that in heavily populated areas of IRAN like Mashhad, 97% shigella strain isolated from children with bloody diarrhea were sensitive to nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin and cefixime and rarely susceptible to ampicillin and cotrimoxazole. There is increasing resistance of Shigella to most of the antibiotics in use, and for this reason, careful selection of antibiotics must use considered in each area. Development and use of new drugs are expensive and have severe limitations in the third world. Simple prophylactic alternatives are therefore, required, such as awareness of hygienic child care practices and early promotion of breast feeding. For treatment of shigellosis in infants Ceftriaxon, and in children Nalidixic Acid is recommended.

  4. Management options for reducing the release of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes to the environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pruden, Amy; Larsson, D.G. Joakim; Amézquita, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is growing concern worldwide about the role of polluted soil and water environments in the development and dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Objective: Our aim in this study was to identify management options for reducing the spread of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance...... of management strategies is also highlighted. Finally, we describe a case study in Sweden that illustrates the critical role of communication to engage stakeholders and promote action. Conclusions: Environmental releases of antibiotics and antibiotic-resistant bacteria can in many cases be reduced at little...... associated with antibiotic resistance strongly indicate the need for action....

  5. Nosocomial urinary tract infections and resistance profile to antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Naz

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the risk factors, laboratuary results, distrubition of pathogens and sensitivity to antibiotics in patients with hospital acquired urinary tract infections (HAUTI. 161 HAUTI patients were diagnosed. The most common predisposing factors were identified as long term hospitalization, urinary catheterization, hospitalization at intensive care unit and neurologic diseases. The most commom pathogens isolated were Escherichia coli 33 (29.5 %, Pseudomonas spp. 32 (28.6 % and Klebsiella spp. 12 (10.7 %. The lowest rates of resistance in E.coli, Pseudomonas spp. and Klebsiella spp. were observed to amikacin (respectively 3 %, 9 %, 8 %, to imipenem (9 %, 41 %, 8 %, to piperacilin/tazobactam (PIP/TAZ (24 %, 47 %, 17 % and to ciprofloxasin (52 %, 69 %, 25 %. Mortality was detected in 31(19% of 161 patients diagnosed with HAUTI. As a result, high rate resistance was found in bacterial microorganism, especially in Pseudomonas spp.

  6. Comparative Analysis Of Antibiotic Resistance And R-Plasmids Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics constitutes a major cause of failure in the treatment of bacterial infections. The genetic exchange of plasmids containing antibiotic resistant determinants between bacteria is believed to play a critical role in the evolution of antibiotics resistant bacteria and this has been shown in S. aureus.

  7. Fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria and genes during wastewater chlorination: implication for antibiotic resistance control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Bin Yuan

    Full Text Available This study investigated fates of nine antibiotic-resistant bacteria as well as two series of antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater treated by various doses of chlorine (0, 15, 30, 60, 150 and 300 mg Cl2 min/L. The results indicated that chlorination was effective in inactivating antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Most bacteria were inactivated completely at the lowest dose (15 mg Cl2 min/L. By comparison, sulfadiazine- and erythromycin-resistant bacteria exhibited tolerance to low chlorine dose (up to 60 mg Cl2 min/L. However, quantitative real-time PCRs revealed that chlorination decreased limited erythromycin or tetracycline resistance genes, with the removal levels of overall erythromycin and tetracycline resistance genes at 0.42 ± 0.12 log and 0.10 ± 0.02 log, respectively. About 40% of erythromycin-resistance genes and 80% of tetracycline resistance genes could not be removed by chlorination. Chlorination was considered not effective in controlling antimicrobial resistance. More concern needs to be paid to the potential risk of antibiotic resistance genes in the wastewater after chlorination.

  8. Fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria and genes during wastewater chlorination: implication for antibiotic resistance control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Qing-Bin; Guo, Mei-Ting; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated fates of nine antibiotic-resistant bacteria as well as two series of antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater treated by various doses of chlorine (0, 15, 30, 60, 150 and 300 mg Cl2 min/L). The results indicated that chlorination was effective in inactivating antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Most bacteria were inactivated completely at the lowest dose (15 mg Cl2 min/L). By comparison, sulfadiazine- and erythromycin-resistant bacteria exhibited tolerance to low chlorine dose (up to 60 mg Cl2 min/L). However, quantitative real-time PCRs revealed that chlorination decreased limited erythromycin or tetracycline resistance genes, with the removal levels of overall erythromycin and tetracycline resistance genes at 0.42 ± 0.12 log and 0.10 ± 0.02 log, respectively. About 40% of erythromycin-resistance genes and 80% of tetracycline resistance genes could not be removed by chlorination. Chlorination was considered not effective in controlling antimicrobial resistance. More concern needs to be paid to the potential risk of antibiotic resistance genes in the wastewater after chlorination.

  9. Acquisition of carbapenem resistance by plasmid-encoded-AmpC-expressing Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tommassen - van Boxtel, Ria; Wattel, Agnes A.; Arenas Busto, Jesus; Goessens, Wil H.F.; Tommassen, J

    2017-01-01

    Although AmpC β-lactamases can barely degrade carbapenems, if at all, they can sequester them and prevent them from reaching their targets. Thus, carbapenem resistance in Escherichia coli and other Enterobacteriaceae can result from AmpC production and simultaneous reduction of antibiotic influx

  10. A Review on Antibiotic Resistance: Alarm Bells are Ringing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Sojib Bin; Hussain, Muhammed Awlad; Nye, Rachel; Mehta, Varshil; Mamun, Kazi Taib; Hossain, Naznin

    2017-06-28

    Antibiotics are the 'wonder drugs' to combat microbes. For decades, multiple varieties of antibiotics have not only been used for therapeutic purposes but practiced prophylactically across other industries such as agriculture and animal husbandry. Uncertainty has arisen, as microbes have become resistant to common antibiotics while the host remains unaware that antibiotic resistance has emerged. The aim of this review is to explore the origin, development, and the current state of antibiotic resistance, regulation, and challenges by examining available literature. We found that antibiotic resistance is increasing at an alarming rate. A growing list of infections i.e., pneumonia, tuberculosis, and gonorrhea are becoming harder and at times impossible to treat while antibiotics are becoming less effective. Antibiotic-resistant infections correlate with the level of antibiotic consumption. Non-judicial use of antibiotics is mostly responsible for making the microbes resistant. The antibiotic treatment repertoire for existing or emerging hard-to-treat multidrug-resistant bacterial infections is limited, resulting in high morbidity and mortality report. This review article reiterates the optimal use of antimicrobial medicines in human and animal health to reduce antibiotic resistance. Evidence from the literature suggests that the knowledge regarding antibiotic resistance in the population is still scarce. Therefore, the need of educating patients and the public is essential to fight against the antimicrobial resistance battle.

  11. Assessment of Antibiotic Resistant Commensal Bacteria in Food

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lehman, Mark

    2006-01-01

    .... Although antibiotic resistance (AR) in foodborne pathogens has been studied extensively, the contribution of foodborne commensals in disseminating the resistance genes has been neglected in the past...

  12. Optimal use of antibiotic resistance surveillance systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critchley, I A; Karlowsky, J A

    2004-06-01

    Increasing concern about the emergence of resistance in clinically important pathogens has led to the establishment of a number of surveillance programmes to monitor the true extent of resistance at the local, regional and national levels. Although some programmes have been operating for several years, their true usefulness is only now being realised. This review describes some of the major surveillance initiatives and the way in which the data have been used in a number of different settings. In the hospital, surveillance data have been used to monitor local antibiograms and determine infection control strategies and antibiotic usage policies. In the community, surveillance data have been used to monitor public health threats, such as infectious disease outbreaks involving resistant pathogens and the effects of bioterrorism countermeasures, by following the effects of prophylactic use of different antibiotics on resistance. Initially, the pharmaceutical industry sponsored surveillance programmes to monitor the susceptibility of clinical isolates to marketed products. However, in the era of burgeoning resistance, many developers of antimicrobial agents find surveillance data useful for defining new drug discovery and development strategies, in that they assist with the identification of new medical needs, allow modelling of future resistance trends, and identify high-profile isolates for screening the activity of new agents. Many companies now conduct pre-launch surveillance of new products to benchmark activity so that changes in resistance can be monitored following clinical use. Surveillance data also represent an integral component of regulatory submissions for new agents and, together with clinical trial data, are used to determine breakpoints. It is clear that antibiotic resistance surveillance systems will continue to provide valuable data to health care providers, university researchers, pharmaceutical companies, and government and regulatory agencies.

  13. Development of botanicals to combat antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja D. Gupta

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of antibiotics in the previous century lead to reduction in mortality and morbidity due to infectious diseases but their inappropriate and irrational use has resulted in emergence of resistant microbial populations. Alteration of target sites, active efflux of drugs and enzymatic degradations are the strategies employed by the pathogenic bacteria to develop intrinsic resistance to antibiotics. This has led to an increased interest in medicinal plants since 25–50% of current pharmaceuticals are plant derived. Crude extracts of medicinal plants could serve as an alternate source of resistance modifying agents owing to the wide variety of secondary metabolites. These metabolites (alkaloids, tannins, polyphenols etc. could act as potentials for antimicrobials and resistance modifiers. Plant extracts have the ability to bind to protein domains leading to modification or inhibition protein–protein interactions. This enables the herbals to also present themselves as effective modulators of host related cellular processes viz immune response, mitosis, apoptosis and signal transduction. Thus they may exert their activity not only by killing the microorganism but by affecting key events in the pathogenic process, thereby, the bacteria, fungi and viruses may have a reduced ability to develop resistance to botanicals. The article is meant to stimulate research wherein the cidal activity of the extract is not the only parameter considered but other mechanism of action by which plants can combat drug resistant microbes are investigated. The present article emphasizes on mechanisms involved in countering multi drug resistance.

  14. Enteric dysbiosis promotes antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection: systemic dissemination of resistant and commensal bacteria through epithelial transcytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Linda Chia-Hui; Shih, Yi-An; Wu, Li-Ling; Lin, Yang-Ding; Kuo, Wei-Ting; Peng, Wei-Hao; Lu, Kuo-Shyan; Wei, Shu-Chen; Turner, Jerrold R; Ni, Yen-Hsuan

    2014-10-15

    Antibiotic usage promotes intestinal colonization of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. However, whether resistant bacteria gain dominance in enteric microflora or disseminate to extraintestinal viscera remains unclear. Our aim was to investigate temporal diversity changes in microbiota and transepithelial routes of bacterial translocation after antibiotic-resistant enterobacterial colonization. Mice drinking water with or without antibiotics were intragastrically gavaged with ampicillin-resistant (Amp-r) nonpathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) and given normal water afterward. The composition and spatial distribution of intestinal bacteria were evaluated using 16S rDNA sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Bacterial endocytosis in epithelial cells was examined using gentamicin resistance assay and transmission electromicroscopy. Paracellular permeability was assessed by tight junctional immunostaining and measured by tissue conductance and luminal-to-serosal dextran fluxes. Our results showed that antibiotic treatment enabled intestinal colonization and transient dominance of orally acquired Amp-r E. coli in mice. The colonized Amp-r E. coli peaked on day 3 postinoculation and was competed out after 1 wk, as evidenced by the recovery of commensals, such as Escherichia, Bacteroides, Lachnospiraceae, Clostridium, and Lactobacillus. Mucosal penetration and extraintestinal dissemination of exogenous and endogenous enterobacteria were correlated with abnormal epithelial transcytosis but uncoupled with paracellular tight junctional damage. In conclusion, antibiotic-induced enteric dysbiosis predisposes to exogenous infection and causes systemic dissemination of both antibiotic-resistant and commensal enterobacteria through transcytotic routes across epithelial layers. These results may help explain the susceptibility to sepsis in antibiotic-resistant enteric bacterial infection. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Bacterial infections in Lilongwe, Malawi: aetiology and antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoka Mwai H

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Life-threatening infections present major challenges for health systems in Malawi and the developing world because routine microbiologic culture and sensitivity testing are not performed due to lack of capacity. Use of empirical antimicrobial therapy without regular microbiologic surveillance is unable to provide adequate treatment in the face of emerging antimicrobial resistance. This study was conducted to determine antimicrobial susceptibility patterns in order to inform treatment choices and generate hospital-wide baseline data. Methods Culture and susceptibility testing was performed on various specimens from patients presenting with possible infectious diseases at Kamuzu Central Hospital, Lilongwe, Malawi. Results Between July 2006 and December 2007 3104 specimens from 2458 patients were evaluated, with 60.1% from the adult medical service. Common presentations were sepsis, meningitis, pneumonia and abscess. An etiologic agent was detected in 13% of patients. The most common organisms detected from blood cultures were Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella species and Streptococcus pneumoniae, whereas Streptococcus pneumoniae and Cryptococcus neoformans were most frequently detected from cerebrospinal fluid. Haemophilus influenzae was rarely isolated. Resistance to commonly used antibiotics was observed in up to 80% of the isolates while antibiotics that were not commonly in use maintained susceptibility. Conclusions There is widespread resistance to almost all of the antibiotics that are empirically used in Malawi. Antibiotics that have not been widely introduced in Malawi show better laboratory performance. Choices for empirical therapy in Malawi should be revised accordingly. A microbiologic surveillance system should be established and prudent use of antimicrobials promoted to improve patient care.

  16. [State-of-the-art status on airborne antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J; Yao, M S

    2018-04-06

    The world is facing more deaths due to increasing antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections and the shortage of new highly effective antibiotics, however the air media as its important transmission route has not been adequately studied. Based on the latest literature acquired in this work, we have discussed the state-of-the-art research progress of the concentration, distribution and spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in different environmental air media, and also analyzed some future prevention and control measures. The large use of antibiotics in the medical settings and animal husbandry places has resulted in higher abundances of ARB and ARGs in the relevant and surrounding atmosphere than in urban and general indoor air environments. ARGs can be spread by adhering to airborne particles, and researchers have also found that air media contain more abundant ARGs than other environmental media such as soil, water and sediment. It was suggested in this review that strengthening the monitoring, study on spreading factors and biological toxicity, and also research and development on pathogen accurate diagnosis and new green antibiotic are expected to help effectively monitor, prevent and control of the impacts of airborne resistant bacteria and resistance genes on both human and ecologies.

  17. Multiple Antimicrobial Resistance and Novel Point Mutation in Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Escherichia coli Isolates from Mangalore, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, Kogaluru Shivakumaraswamy; Deekshit, Vijaya Kumar; Venugopal, Moleyuru Nagarajappa; Karunasagar, Iddya; Karunasagar, Indrani

    2017-12-01

    Fluoroquinolone resistance in bacteria is usually associated with mutations in the topoisomerase regions. We report a novel point mutation in fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli strains. E. coli isolated from the environment in and around Mangalore, India, were examined for their antimicrobial resistance profile to 12 antibiotics and for the antibiotic resistance genes by polymerase chain reaction. Of the 67 E. coli isolated, 24 (35.8%) were sensitive to all antibiotics and 43 (64.2%) showed resistance to at least one of the 12 antibiotics used in the study. One isolate (EC10) was resistant to nine of the 12 antibiotics used. Resistance to nalidixic acid was the most common (34.32%), followed by nitrofurantoin (26.86%), tetracycline (22.38%), ampicillin (20.89%), cotrimoxazole (13.43%), ciprofloxacin (11.94%), gentamicin (10.44%), piperacillin/tazobactam (7.46%), chloramphenicol (7.46%), and cefotaxime (4.47%). Least resistance was observed for meropenem (1.49%) and none of the isolates showed resistance to imipenem. All the isolates harbored resistance genes corresponding to their antimicrobial resistance. Few quinolone-resistant isolates carried single point mutation (ser83Leu) and some had double point mutation (Ser83Leu and Asp87Asn) in gyrA. A third novel point mutation was also observed at position 50 with the change in the amino acid from tyrosine to cysteine (Tyr50Cys) in gyrA region. The study throws light on a novel point mutation in fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates. While the study helps to understand the risk and occurrence of antibiotic resistance among gram-negative bacteria from the environment, the alarming rate of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a cause of concern in addressing infections.

  18. A Review on Antibiotic Resistance: Alarm Bells are Ringing

    OpenAIRE

    Zaman, Sojib Bin; Hussain, Muhammed Awlad; Nye, Rachel; Mehta, Varshil; Mamun, Kazi Taib; Hossain, Naznin

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotics are the ?wonder drugs? to combat microbes. For decades, multiple varieties of antibiotics have not only been used for therapeutic purposes but practiced prophylactically across other industries such as agriculture and animal husbandry. Uncertainty has arisen, as microbes have become resistant to common antibiotics while the host remains unaware that antibiotic resistance has emerged. The aim of this review is to explore the origin, development, and the current state of antibiotic ...

  19. Risk of resistance related to antibiotic use before admission in patients with community-acquired bacteraemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Gitte; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl; Steffensen, Flemming Hald

    1999-01-01

    %), Streptococcus pneumoniae (23%) Staphylococcus aureus (10%). Of the 575 isolates of E. coli, 425 (74%), 432 (75%) and 518 (90%) were susceptible to ampicillin, sulphonamides and trimethoprim, respectively. Previous antibiotic prescriptions were strongly associated with resistance to ampicillin, sulphonamides...... and trimethoprim in E. coli. The association was less pronounced for S. aureus and enteric rods other than E. coli. Antibiotic prescriptions within the last 3 months predicted antibiotic resistance, and this should be taken into account when selecting empirical antibiotic therapy of severe community...... admission and to 37% during the 6 months. The most frequently prescribed antibiotics within 30 days were ampicillin (28%), penicillin G (27%), sulphonamides and/or trimethoprim (16%) and macrolides (14%). The most frequent blood isolates were Escherichia coli (33%), other Enterobacteriaceae 8...

  20. Selective Advantage of Resistant Strains at Trace Levels of Antibiotics: a Simple and Ultrasensitive Color Test for Detection of Antibiotics and Genotoxic Agents▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Anne; Fong, Amie; Becket, Elinne; Yuan, Jessica; Tamae, Cindy; Medrano, Leah; Maiz, Maria; Wahba, Christine; Lee, Catherine; Lee, Kim; Tran, Katherine P.; Yang, Hanjing; Hoffman, Robert M.; Salih, Anya; Miller, Jeffrey H.

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have examined the evolution of bacterial mutants that are resistant to specific antibiotics, and many of these focus on concentrations at and above the MIC. Here we ask for the minimum concentration at which existing resistant mutants can outgrow sensitive wild-type strains in competition experiments at antibiotic levels significantly below the MIC, and we define a minimum selective concentration (MSC) in Escherichia coli for two antibiotics, which is near 1/5 of the MIC for ciprofloxacin and 1/20 of the MIC for tetracycline. Because of the prevalence of resistant mutants already in the human microbiome, allowable levels of antibiotics to which we are exposed should be below the MSC. Since this concentration often corresponds to low or trace levels of antibiotics, it is helpful to have simple tests to detect such trace levels. We describe a simple ultrasensitive test for detecting the presence of antibiotics and genotoxic agents. The test is based on the use of chromogenic proteins as color markers and the use of single and multiple mutants of Escherichia coli that have greatly increased sensitivity to either a wide range of antibiotics or specific antibiotics, antibiotic families, and genotoxic agents. This test can detect ciprofloxacin at 1/75 of the MIC. PMID:21199928

  1. A Hybrid Drug Limits Resistance by Evading the Action of the Multiple Antibiotic Resistance Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kathy K; Stone, Laura K; Lieberman, Tami D; Shavit, Michal; Baasov, Timor; Kishony, Roy

    2016-02-01

    Hybrid drugs are a promising strategy to address the growing problem of drug resistance, but the mechanism by which they modulate the evolution of resistance is poorly understood. Integrating high-throughput resistance measurements and genomic sequencing, we compared Escherichia coli populations evolved in a hybrid antibiotic that links ciprofloxacin and neomycin B with populations evolved in combinations of the component drugs. We find that populations evolved in the hybrid gain less resistance than those evolved in an equimolar mixture of the hybrid's components, in part because the hybrid evades resistance mediated by the multiple antibiotic resistance (mar) operon. Furthermore, we find that the ciprofloxacin moiety of the hybrid inhibits bacterial growth whereas the neomycin B moiety diminishes the effectiveness of mar activation. More generally, comparing the phenotypic and genotypic paths to resistance across different drug treatments can pinpoint unique properties of new compounds that limit the emergence of resistance. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. The etiology of neonatal sepsis and patterns of antibiotic resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waheed, M.; Laeeq, A.; Maqbool, S.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the patterns of causative bacteria and antibiotic resistance in neonatal sepsis. Results: Among 228 cases included in the study, the male to female ratio was 2.1 to 1. The gestational age was less than 36 weeks in 68 (30%) cases and low birth weight babies were 143 (62.6%). History of birth asphyxia was present in 103 (45%) cases. There were 142 (62.3%) cases of early onset ( 7 days). Out of 233 positive blood cultures Escherichia coli was found to be commonest (47.8%, n =111, p<0.05) both in early onset (47.8%, n=68, p <0.05) and late onset sepsis (47.3%,n=43, p<0.05). Staphylococcus aureus was the most common among gram positive organism. Resistance to cefotaxime, ceftazidime and amikacin was 34% to 80% and to ciprofloxacin 13% to 72%. A total of 64 cases (28%) died. Mortality was four times higher in early onset sespis. Conclusion: Gram negative bacteria are the commenst cause of neonatal sepsis. The resistance to the commonly used antibiotics is alarmingly high. Mortality is four times higher in early one set sepsis. (author)

  3. FabV/Triclosan Is an Antibiotic-Free and Cost-Effective Selection System for Efficient Maintenance of High and Medium -Copy Number Plasmids in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Syed A.; Chew, Yik Wei

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes and antibiotics are frequently used to maintain plasmid vectors in bacterial hosts such as Escherichia coli. Due to the risk of spread of antibiotic resistance, the regulatory authorities discourage the use of antibiotic resistance genes/antibiotics for the maintenance of plasmid vectors in certain biotechnology applications. Overexpression of E. coli endogenous fabI gene and subsequent selection on Triclosan has been proposed as a practical alternative to traditional antibiotic selection systems. Unfortunately, overexpression of fabI cannot be used to select medium –copy number plasmids, typically used for the expression of heterologous proteins in E. coli. Here we report that Vibrio cholera FabV, a functional homologue of E. coli FabI, can be used as a suitable marker for the selection and maintenance of both high and medium -copy number plasmid vectors in E. coli. PMID:26057251

  4. Banning antibiotics, reducing resistance, preventing and fighting infections : White paper on research enabling an 'antibiotic-free' animal husbandry

    OpenAIRE

    Kimman, T.G.; Smits, M.A.; Kemp, B.; Wever, P.; Verheijden, J.

    2010-01-01

    Resistance of bacteria to antibiotics in animal husbandry is increasing and a point of growing concern. The large use of antibiotics in agriculture undoubtedly leads to the development of antibiotic resistance. This has resulted in a growing public concern on the rise of antibiotic resistance, and in particular on the transmission of resistant bacteria and resistance markers from animals to humans. Large antibiotic use in animal husbandry and antibiotic resistance threatens the health and wel...

  5. Multiple antibiotic resistance indexing of coliforms to identify high risk contamination sites in aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitanand, M P; Kadam, T A; Gyananath, G; Totewad, N D; Balhal, D K

    2010-06-01

    Bacteriological analysis of the water samples collected from upstream, midstream and downstream points along the bank of the river revealed high populations of Escherichia coli, Citrobacter freundii, Citrobacter diversus, Enterobacter aerogens and Klebsiella species. All these isolates were screened against eight antibiotics to determine the prevalence of multiple antibiotic resistance among isolates at different sites of the river. The study revealed that multiple antibiotic resistance was prominently seen in coliforms at downstream sites (Average multiple antibiotic resistance index, MAR Index = 0.43) while it was low in coliforms at upstream sites (MAR Index = 0.15). These differences in MAR indices provide a method for distinguishing high risk contamination sites in aquatic environment.

  6. Prevalence, molecular typing, and antibiotic sensitivity of enteropathogenic, enterohaemorrhagic, and verotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolated from veal calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardiau, Marjorie; Muylaert, Adeline; Duprez, Jean-Noël; Labrozzo, Sabrina; Mainil, Jacques G

    Cattle are considered to be an important reservoir of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) and verotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC) strains that can cause disease in humans, and numerous studies of the prevalence of these strains in cattle (focusing mainly on dairy and beef cattle) have been carried out in different regions of Europe, Asia, and America. To date, only a few studies of veal calves have been published focusing on EHEC strains belonging to the O157 serogroup EHEC, whereas EHEC and VTEC can belong to hundreds of different serotypes (many of which are as dangerous to humans as the O157:H7 EHEC, such as strains of the O26, O91, O103, O111, O113 and O145 serogroups). The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), EHEC, and VTEC strains in veal calves in Belgium and to characterize the positive isolates (serogroups, virulence-associated factor-encoding genes and antibiotic resistance profiles). The prevalence of EPEC, EHEC, and VTEC strains in faecal samples from veal calves in Belgium was found to be 11.7% (6.5% of the calves were found to be positive for EPEC strains, 2.6% for EHEC, and 3.9% for VTEC strains). No O157:H7 EHEC Strain was identified, but three calves were found to carry strains belonging to the O26 and O111 serogroups. The results of antibiotic sensitivity tests showed a high level of resistance (83% of strains were resistant or intermediate resistant to five or more antibiotics of the 13 tested antibiotics), which might be caused by the frequent use of antibiotics in veterinary practice.

  7. WGS accurately predicts antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Gregory H; McDermott, Patrick F; Li, Cong; Chen, Yuansha; Tadesse, Daniel A; Mukherjee, Sampa; Bodeis-Jones, Sonya; Kabera, Claudine; Gaines, Stuart A; Loneragan, Guy H; Edrington, Tom S; Torrence, Mary; Harhay, Dayna M; Zhao, Shaohua

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of WGS in identifying resistance genotypes of MDR Escherichia coli and whether these correlate with observed phenotypes. Seventy-six E. coli strains were isolated from farm cattle and measured for phenotypic resistance to 15 antimicrobials with the Sensititre(®) system. Isolates with resistance to at least four antimicrobials in three classes were selected for WGS using an Illumina MiSeq. Genotypic analysis was conducted with in-house Perl scripts using BLAST analysis to identify known genes and mutations associated with clinical resistance. Over 30 resistance genes and a number of resistance mutations were identified among the E. coli isolates. Resistance genotypes correlated with 97.8% specificity and 99.6% sensitivity to the identified phenotypes. The majority of discordant results were attributable to the aminoglycoside streptomycin, whereas there was a perfect genotype-phenotype correlation for most antibiotic classes such as tetracyclines, quinolones and phenicols. WGS also revealed information about rare resistance mechanisms, such as structural mutations in chromosomal copies of ampC conferring third-generation cephalosporin resistance. WGS can provide comprehensive resistance genotypes and is capable of accurately predicting resistance phenotypes, making it a valuable tool for surveillance. Moreover, the data presented here showing the ability to accurately predict resistance suggest that WGS may be used as a screening tool in selecting anti-infective therapy, especially as costs drop and methods improve. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  8. Neonatal Escherichia coli Bloodstream Infections: Clinical Outcomes and Impact of Initial Antibiotic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergin, Stephen P; Thaden, Joshua T; Ericson, Jessica E; Cross, Heather; Messina, Julia; Clark, Reese H; Fowler, Vance G; Benjamin, Daniel K; Hornik, Christoph P; Smith, P Brian

    2015-09-01

    Escherichia coli is a common cause of bloodstream infections (BSIs) in infants and is associated with high mortality and morbidity among survivors. The clinical significance of antibiotic resistance and timing of appropriate antimicrobial therapy in this population is poorly understood. We identified all infants with E. coli BSIs discharged from 77 neonatal intensive care units managed by the Pediatrix Medical Group in 2012. We used multivariable logistic regression to evaluate the association between 30-day mortality and ampicillin-resistant E. coli BSI, as well as the number of active empiric antimicrobial agents administered, controlling for gestational age, small-for-gestational age status, early-onset versus late-onset BSI, oxygen requirement, ventilator support and inotropic support on the day of the first positive blood culture. We identified 258 episodes of E. coli BSI, including 123 (48%) ampicillin-resistant isolates. Unadjusted 30-day mortality did not significantly differ between infants with ampicillin-resistant versus ampicillin-susceptible E. coli BSI [11 of 123 (9%) vs. 7 of 135 (5%); P = 0.33; adjusted odds ratio = 1.37 (95% confidence interval: 0.39, 4.77)]. Among ampicillin-resistant E. coli BSIs, 30-day mortality was not significantly lower for infants treated with at least one empiric antimicrobial active against ampicillin-resistant E. coli versus infants receiving no active empiric agent [adjusted odds ratio = 1.50 (0.07, 33.6)]. In this population of infants with E. coli BSI, ampicillin resistance was not associated with significantly increased mortality. Among the subset of infants with ampicillin-resistant E. coli, appropriate empirical antibiotic therapy was not associated with lower mortality.

  9. Genetic diversity and antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli from Tagus estuary (Portugal).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Anabela; Santos, André; Tacão, Marta; Alves, Artur; Henriques, Isabel; Correia, António

    2013-09-01

    Fecal pollution of surface waters is a current world-wide public health concern and may contribute for the dissemination of antibiotic resistance. The Tagus estuary located in the south of Portugal is one of the largest wetlands in the west coast of Europe. In this study, water samples were collected from seven stations with different anthropic pressures along the estuary and evaluated for water quality indicator bacteria. Escherichia coli isolates (n=350) were typed by REP-PCR. Representatives of each REP profile (n=220) were evaluated phenotypically for resistance to 17 antibiotics and characterized in terms of phylogenetic group. Resistant isolates were screened for the presence of antibiotic resistance genes (tet(A), tet(B), sul1, sul2, qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, aacA4-cr, bla(TEM), bla(SHV), bla(CTX-M), bla(CMY-like), bla(IMP), bla(VIM)) and integrase genes (intI1 and intI2). The highest antibiotic resistance prevalence was observed for streptomycin and tetracycline followed by β-lactams and sulphonamides. Among E. coli isolates, 65.16% were resistant to at least one of the 17 antibiotics tested and approximately 19% were multiresistant. In our E. coli population phylo-groups A and D were predominant and characterized by higher prevalence of the antibiotic resistance. intI1 and intI2 genes were found in 12% of the isolates with prevalence of class 1 integrons. A strong correlation between the prevalence of integrons and multiresistance was observed. Differences in terms of antibiotic resistance between phylogenetic groups and between sampling sites were statistically significant. The results demonstrate a high prevalence of antibiotic resistance among E. coli circulating in the Tagus estuary with emphasis on the occurrence of resistance to last-resort antibiotics and on the high incidence of multiresistance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Survival of Antibiotic Resistant and Antibiotic Sensitive Strains of E. coli O157 and E. coli O26 in Food Matrices.

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Ciara; Duffy, Geraldine; Blair, I. S.; McDowell, D. A.

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 or E. coli O26, which were AS (antibiotic sensitive), AR (laboratory created antibiotic resistant mutants), or naturally MAR (multi-antibiotic resistant), were inoculated into laboratory media, yoghurt or orange juice and their growth/survival monitored during enrichment at 37 °C or storage at 4 °C. The strains were also inoculated into minced beef and their thermal inactivation (D-values) examined at 55 °C, with and without a prior heat shock at 48 °C. The growth kin...

  11. Cooperative Antibiotic Resistance in a Multi-Drug Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurtsev, Eugene; Dai, Lei; Gore, Jeff

    2013-03-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance in bacteria is a significant health concern. A frequent mechanism of antibiotic resistance involves the production of an enzyme which inactivates the antibiotic. By inactivating the antibiotic, resistant cells can ``share'' their resistance with other cells in the bacterial population, suggesting that it may be possible to observe cooperation between strains that inactivate different antibiotics. Here, we experimentally track the population dynamics of two E. coli strains in the presence of two different antibiotics. We find that together the strains are able to grow in antibiotic concentrations that inhibit growth of either of the strains individually. We observe that even when there is stable coexistence between the two strains, the population size of each strain can undergo large oscillations. We expect that our results will provide insight into the evolution of antibiotic resistance and the evolutionary origin of phenotypic diversity and cooperative behaviors.

  12. Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance Genes in Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    PMQR) genes and the prevalence of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) types in Escherichia coli clinical isolates. Methods: Sixty-one ESBL-producing urinary E. coli isolates were studied. An antibiotic susceptibility test was performed ...

  13. The resistance to chemotherapeutic agents of Escherichia coli from domestic dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, S; Frost, A J

    1984-03-01

    The prevalence of antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli in the rectal flora of 168 healthy dogs and 93 cats in the Brisbane area was investigated. Rectal swabs were plated on MacConkey agar with and without antibiotics, and 690 isolates confirmed as faecal E. coli were tested for resistance to tetracycline, streptomycin, chloramphenicol, ampicillin, neomycin, furazolidone and sulphanilamide. Resistant isolates were obtained from 101 (60%) of the dogs and 24 (26%) of the cats sampled. A high percentage of the isolates was resistant to tetracycline, streptomycin, ampicillin and sulphanilamide. Multiple resistance to 3 or more of the drugs was exhibited by the majority of isolates and a total of 31 different multiple resistance patterns was demonstrated. Of the 50 strains tested for transfer of resistance, 30 (60%) transferred some or all of their resistance determinants to an E. coli K12F - recipient.

  14. Antibiotics and common antibacterial biocides stimulate horizontal transfer of resistance at low concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutkina, J; Marathe, N P; Flach, C-F; Larsson, D G J

    2018-03-01

    There is a rising concern that antibiotics, and possibly other antimicrobial agents, can promote horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes. For most types of antimicrobials their ability to induce conjugation below minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) is still unknown. Our aim was therefore to explore the potential of commonly used antibiotics and antibacterial biocides to induce horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance. Effects of a wide range of sub-MIC concentrations of the antibiotics cefotaxime, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, erythromycin, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim and the antibacterial biocides chlorhexidine digluconate, hexadecyltrimethylammoniumchloride and triclosan were investigated using a previously optimized culture-based assay with a complex bacterial community as a donor of mobile resistance elements and a traceable Escherichia coli strain as a recipient. Chlorhexidine (24.4μg/L), triclosan (0.1mg/L), gentamicin (0.1mg/L) and sulfamethoxazole (1mg/L) significantly increased the frequencies of transfer of antibiotic resistance whereas similar effects were not observed for any other tested antimicrobial compounds. This corresponds to 200 times below the MIC of the recipient for chlorhexidine, 1/20 of the MIC for triclosan, 1/16 of the MIC for sulfamethoxazole and right below the MIC for gentamicin. To our best knowledge, this is the first study showing that triclosan and chlorhexidine could stimulate the horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance. Together with recent research showing that tetracycline is a potent inducer of conjugation, our results indicate that several antimicrobials including both common antibiotics and antibacterial biocides at low concentrations could contribute to antibiotic resistance development by facilitating the spread of antibiotic resistance between bacteria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Occurrence and reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes in the environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seveno, N.; Kallifidas, D.; Smalla, K.; Elsas, van J.D.; Collard, J.M.; Karagouni, A.; Wellington, E.M.H.

    2002-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes have become highly mobile since the development of antibiotic chemotherapy. A considerable body of evidence exists proving the link between antibiotic use and the significant increase in drug-resistant human bacterial pathogens. The application of molecular detection and

  16. Time-programmable drug dosing allows the manipulation, suppression and reversal of antibiotic drug resistance in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Mari; Reyes, Sabrina Galiñanes; Tsuda, Soichiro; Horinouchi, Takaaki; Furusawa, Chikara; Cronin, Leroy

    2017-06-01

    Multi-drug strategies have been attempted to prolong the efficacy of existing antibiotics, but with limited success. Here we show that the evolution of multi-drug-resistant Escherichia coli can be manipulated in vitro by administering pairs of antibiotics and switching between them in ON/OFF manner. Using a multiplexed cell culture system, we find that switching between certain combinations of antibiotics completely suppresses the development of resistance to one of the antibiotics. Using this data, we develop a simple deterministic model, which allows us to predict the fate of multi-drug evolution in this system. Furthermore, we are able to reverse established drug resistance based on the model prediction by modulating antibiotic selection stresses. Our results support the idea that the development of antibiotic resistance may be potentially controlled via continuous switching of drugs.

  17. Emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in patients with Fournier gangrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Ting; Chao, Chien-Ming; Lin, Hsin-Lan; Hung, Ming-Chran; Lai, Chih-Cheng

    2015-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the bacteriology and associated patterns of antibiotic resistance Fournier gangrene. Patients with Fournier's gangrene from 2008 to 2012 were identified from the computerized database in a medical center in southern Taiwan. The medical records of all patients with Fournier's gangrene were reviewed retrospectively. There were 61 microorganisms, including 60 bacteria and one Candida spp, isolated from clinical wound specimens from 32 patients. The most common isolates obtained were Streptococcus spp. (n=12), Peptoniphilus spp. (n=8), Staphylococcus aureus (n=7), Escherichia coli (n=7), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=7). Among 21 strains of gram-negative bacilli, five (23.8%) were resistant to fluoroquinolones, and three isolates were resistant to ceftriaxone. Two E. coli strains produced extended-spectrum beta-lactamase. Four of the seven S. aureus isolates were methicillin-resistant. Among 15 anaerobic isolates, nine (60%) were resistant to penicillin, and eight (53.3%) were resistant to clindamycin. Four (26.7%) isolates were resistant to metronidazole. The only independent risk factor associated with mortality was inappropriate initial antibiotic treatment (p=0.021). Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are emerging in the clinical setting of Fournier gangrene. Clinicians should use broad-spectrum antibiotics initially to cover possible antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  18. Action and resistance mechanisms of antibiotics: A guide for clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima Kapoor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Infections account for a major cause of death throughout the developing world. This is mainly due to the emergence of newer infectious agents and more specifically due to the appearance of antimicrobial resistance. With time, the bacteria have become smarter and along with it, massive imprudent usage of antibiotics in clinical practice has resulted in resistance of bacteria to antimicrobial agents. The antimicrobial resistance is recognized as a major problem in the treatment of microbial infections. The biochemical resistance mechanisms used by bacteria include the following: antibiotic inactivation, target modification, altered permeability, and “bypass” of metabolic pathway. Determination of bacterial resistance to antibiotics of all classes (phenotypes and mutations that are responsible for bacterial resistance to antibiotics (genetic analysis are helpful. Better understanding of the mechanisms of antibiotic resistance will help clinicians regarding usage of antibiotics in different situations. This review discusses the mechanism of action and resistance development in commonly used antimicrobials.

  19. Bacterial Cheating Limits the Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurtsev, Eugene; Xiao Chao, Hui; Datta, Manoshi; Artemova, Tatiana; Gore, Jeff

    2012-02-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance in bacteria is a significant health concern. Bacteria can gain resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin by acquiring a plasmid carrying the gene beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. This inactivation may represent a cooperative behavior, as the entire bacterial population benefits from removal of the antibiotic. The presence of a cooperative mechanism of resistance suggests that a cheater strain - which does not contribute to breaking down the antibiotic - may be able to take advantage of resistant cells. We find experimentally that a ``sensitive'' bacterial strain lacking the plasmid conferring resistance can invade a population of resistant bacteria, even in antibiotic concentrations that should kill the sensitive strain. We use a simple model in conjunction with difference equations to explain the observed population dynamics as a function of cell density and antibiotic concentration. Our experimental difference equations resemble the logistic map, raising the possibility of oscillations or even chaotic dynamics.

  20. Environmental dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and correlation to anthropogenic contamination with antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Björn

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a growing problem which threatens modern healthcare globally. Resistance has traditionally been viewed as a clinical problem, but recently non-clinical environments have been highlighted as an important factor in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events are likely to be common in aquatic environments; integrons in particular are well suited for mediating environmental dissemination of ARGs. A growing body of evidence suggests that ARGs are ubiquitous in natural environments. Particularly, elevated levels of ARGs and integrons in aquatic environments are correlated to proximity to anthropogenic activities. The source of this increase is likely to be routine discharge of antibiotics and resistance genes, for example, via wastewater or run-off from livestock facilities and agriculture. While very high levels of antibiotic contamination are likely to select for resistant bacteria directly, the role of sub-inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics in environmental antibiotic resistance dissemination remains unclear. In vitro studies have shown that low levels of antibiotics can select for resistant mutants and also facilitate HGT, indicating the need for caution. Overall, it is becoming increasingly clear that the environment plays an important role in dissemination of antibiotic resistance; further studies are needed to elucidate key aspects of this process. Importantly, the levels of environmental antibiotic contamination at which resistant bacteria are selected for and HGT is facilitated at should be determined. This would enable better risk analyses and facilitate measures for preventing dissemination and development of antibiotic resistance in the environment. PMID:26356096

  1. Lethal Neonatal Meningoencephalitis Caused by Multi-Drug Resistant, Highly Virulent Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Iqbal, Junaid; Dufendach, Kevin R.; Wellons, John C.; Kuba, Maria G.; Nickols, Hilary H.; G��mez-Duarte, Oscar G.; Wynn, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal meningitis is a rare but devastating condition. Multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria represent a substantial global health risk. We report on an aggressive case of lethal neonatal meningitis due to a MDR Escherichia coli (serotype O75:H5:K1). Serotyping, MDR pattern, and phylogenetic typing revealed that this strain is an emergent and highly virulent neonatal meningitis E. coli isolate. The isolate was resistant to both ampicillin and gentamicin; antibiotics currently used for empiric...

  2. A clinical isolate of transposon Tn5 expressing streptomycin resistance in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Genilloud, O; Blázquez, J; Mazodier, P; Moreno, F

    1988-01-01

    The central region of transposon Tn5 carries three antibiotic resistance markers: neo, ble, and str. The str gene codes for a phosphotransferase that inactivates streptomycin. This activity is phenotypically expressed in several gram-negative bacteria but not in Escherichia coli. We identified a Tn5 variant in E. coli clinical isolates that express streptomycin resistance. This transposon carries a 6-base-pair deletion within the str gene, near the 3' end. The same kind of mutation had been p...

  3. Antimicrobial-resistant faecal Escherichia coli in wild mammals in central Europe: multiresistant Escherichia coli producing extended-spectrum ß-lactamases in wild boars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Literak, I.; Dolejska, Monika; Radimersky, T.

    2010-01-01

    mg l-1 of cefotaxime. From plates with positive growth, one isolate was recovered and identified as E. coli. Susceptibility to 12 antibiotics was tested using the disk diffusion method. Resistance genes, class 1 and 2 integrons and gene cassettes were detected in resistant isolates by polymerase......(TEM-52b). The bla(CTX-M-1) genes were carried on approx. 90 kb IncI1 conjugative plasmids. Conclusions: Antibiotic-resistant E. coli occured in populations of wild mammals in various prevalences. Significance and Impact of the Study: Wild mammals are reservoirs of antibiotic-resistant E. coli including......Aims: To determine the presence of antibiotic-resistant faecal Escherichia coli in populations of wild mammals in the Czech Republic and Slovakia. Methods and Results: Rectal swabs or faeces collected during 2006-2008 from wild mammals were spread on MacConkey agar and MacConkey agar containing 2...

  4. ENTEROCOCCI AND THEIR RESISTANCE TO ANTIBIOTICS AND THYME ESSENTIAL OIL

    OpenAIRE

    Viera Ducková; Margita Čanigová; Miroslav Kročko

    2014-01-01

    Enterococci are important part of microflora of food animal origin. They have positive (probiotic effect, production flavor compounds during food ripening) and also negative (production biogenic amine, antibiotic resistance, biofilm production) properties. The aim of this work was to determine resistance to different concentrations of thyme essential oil and antibiotic resistance of enterococci isolated from pork (n=3) and poultry (n=17). The antibiotic resistance of isolates was determined b...

  5. Fecal Microbial Transplants Reduce Antibiotic-resistant Genes in Patients With Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan, Braden; Park, Heekuk; Hotte, Naomi; Mathieu, Olivier; Burguiere, Pierre; Tompkins, Thomas A; Kao, Dina; Madsen, Karen L

    2016-06-15

    Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (RCDI) is associated with repeated antibiotic treatment and the enhanced growth of antibiotic-resistant microbes. This study tested the hypothesis that patients with RCDI would harbor large numbers of antibiotic-resistant microbes and that fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) would reduce the number of antibiotic-resistant genes. In a single center study, patients with RCDI (n = 20) received FMT from universal donors via colonoscopy. Stool samples were collected from donors (n = 3) and patients prior to and following FMT. DNA was extracted and shotgun metagenomics performed. Results as well as assembled libraries from a healthy cohort (n = 87) obtained from the Human Microbiome Project were aligned against the NCBI bacterial taxonomy database and the Comprehensive Antibiotic Resistance Database. Results were corroborated through a DNA microarray containing 354 antibiotic resistance (ABR) genes. RCDI patients had a greater number and diversity of ABR genes compared with donors and healthy controls. Beta-lactam, multidrug efflux pumps, fluoroquinolone, and antibiotic inactivation ABR genes were increased in RCDI patients, although donors primarily had tetracycline resistance. RCDI patients were dominated by Proteobacteria with Escherichia coli and Klebsiella most prevalent. FMT resulted in a resolution of symptoms that correlated directly with a decreased number and diversity of ABR genes and increased Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes with reduced Proteobacteria. ABR gene profiles were maintained in recipients for up to a year following FMT. RCDI patients have increased numbers of antibiotic-resistant organisms. FMT is effective in the eradication of pathogenic antibiotic-resistant organisms and elimination of ABR genes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  6. Antibiotic resistance - the interplay between antibiotic use in animals and human beings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singer, R.S.; Finch, R.; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    2003-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria were first identified in the 1940s, but while new antibiotics were being discovered at a steady rate, the consequences of this phenomenon were slow to be appreciated. Today, the excessive use of antibiotics compounded by the paucity of new agents on the market has...... meant the problem of antibiotic resistance is fast escalating into a global health crisis. There is no doubt that misuse of these drugs in human beings has contributed to the increasing rates of resistance, but recently the use of antibiotics in food animals and its consequent effect on resistance....... There is a growing concern over the transmission of resistant bacteria via the food chain. Many questions will be difficult to resolve, such as how do you distinguish the fraction of resistance in human beings that originated from animals? If we wait to see evidence that a significant amount of antibiotic resistance...

  7. Assessment of antibiotic resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae exposed to sequential in vitro antibiotic treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jeongjin; Jo, Ara; Chukeatirote, Ekachai; Ahn, Juhee

    2016-01-01

    Background Bacteria treated with different classes of antibiotics exhibit changes in susceptibility to successive antibiotic treatments. This study was designed to evaluate the influence of sequential antibiotic treatments on the development of antibiotic resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae associated with ?-lactamase and efflux pump activities. Methods The antibiotic susceptibility, ?-lactamase activity, and efflux activity were determined in K. pneumoniae grown at 37??C by adding initial (0...

  8. Re-sensitizing drug-resistant bacteria to antibiotics by designing Antisense Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Colleen; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2014-03-01

    ``Super-bugs'' or ``multi-drug resistant organisms'' are a serious international health problem, with devastating consequences to patient health care. The Center for Disease Control has identified antibiotic resistance as one of the world's most pressing public health problems as a significant fraction of bacterial infections contracted are drug resistant. Typically, antibiotic resistance is encoded by ``resistance-genes'' which express proteins that carryout the resistance causing functions inside the bacterium. We present a RNA based therapeutic strategy for designing antimicrobials capable of re-sensitizing resistant bacteria to antibiotics by targeting labile regions of messenger RNAs encoding for resistance-causing proteins. We perform in silico RNA secondary structure modeling to identify labile target regions in an mRNA of interest. A synthetic biology approach is then used to administer antisense nucleic acids to our model system of ampicillin resistant Escherichia coli. Our results show a prolonged lag phase and decrease in viability of drug-resistant E. colitreated with antisense molecules. The antisense strategy can be applied to alter expression of other genes in antibiotic resistance pathways or other pathways of interest.

  9. CURRENT ISSUES REGARDING ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS AND ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently public concern has increased regarding industrial and environmental substances that may have adverse hormonal effects in human and wildlife populations. This concern has also been expanded to include antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the presence of various antibiotics a...

  10. Antibiotic use and resistance in long term care facilities.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buul, L.W. van; Steen, J.T. van der; Veenhuizen, R.B.; Achterberg, W.P.; Schellevis, F.G.; Essink, R.T.G.M.; Benthem, B.H.B. van; Natsch, S.; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The common occurrence of infectious diseases in nursing homes and residential care facilities may result in substantial antibiotic use, and consequently antibiotic resistance. Focusing on these settings, this article aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the literature available

  11. Surgical Antibiotic Prophylaxis and Risk for Postoperative Antibiotic-Resistant Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Margot E; Salmasian, Hojjat; Li, Jianhua; Liu, Jianfang; Zachariah, Philip; Wright, Jason D; Freedberg, Daniel E

    2017-11-01

    Antibiotic-resistant infections have high rates of morbidity and mortality, and exposure to antibiotics is the crucial risk factor for development of antibiotic resistance. If surgical antibiotic prophylaxis (SAP) increases risk for antibiotic-resistant infections, prophylaxis may cause net harm, even if it decreases overall infection rates. This retrospective cohort study included adults who underwent elective surgical procedures and developed infections within 30 postoperative days. Procedures from multiple disciplines were included if SAP was considered discretionary by current guidelines. Postoperative antibiotic-resistant infections were defined as positive culture results from any site within 30 postoperative days, showing intermediate or nonsusceptibility across 1 or more antibiotic classes. Surgical antibiotic prophylaxis included use of antibiotics within any class and at any dose from 1 hour before first incision until the end of the operation. Among 689 adults with postoperative infections, 338 (49%) had postoperative resistant infections. Use of SAP was not associated with postoperative antibiotic-resistant infections (odds ratio [OR] 0.99; 95% CI 0.67 to 1.46). This result remained robust when the SAP definition was extended to antibiotics given within 4 hours before first incision (OR 0.94; 95% CI 0.63 to 1.40) and when the follow-up window was narrowed to 14 days (OR 0.82; 95% CI 0.50 to 1.34). Previous antibiotic-resistant infections were associated with risk for postoperative antibiotic-resistant infections (OR 1.81; 95% CI 1.16 to 2.83). Use of SAP was not associated with risk for postoperative antibiotic-resistant infections in a large cohort of patients with postoperative infections. This provides important reassurance regarding use of surgical antibiotic prophylaxis. Copyright © 2017 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterization of novel antibiotic resistance genes identified by functional metagenomics on soil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Cortés, Gloria; Millán, Vicenta; Ramírez-Saad, Hugo C; Nisa-Martínez, Rafael; Toro, Nicolás; Martínez-Abarca, Francisco

    2011-04-01

    The soil microbial community is highly complex and contains a high density of antibiotic-producing bacteria, making it a likely source of diverse antibiotic resistance determinants. We used functional metagenomics to search for antibiotic resistance genes in libraries generated from three different soil samples, containing 3.6 Gb of DNA in total. We identified 11 new antibiotic resistance genes: 3 conferring resistance to ampicillin, 2 to gentamicin, 2 to chloramphenicol and 4 to trimethoprim. One of the clones identified was a new trimethoprim resistance gene encoding a 26.8 kDa protein closely resembling unassigned reductases of the dihydrofolate reductase group. This protein, Tm8-3, conferred trimethoprim resistance in Escherichia coli and Sinorhizobium meliloti (γ- and α-proteobacteria respectively). We demonstrated that this gene encoded an enzyme with dihydrofolate reductase activity, with kinetic constants similar to other type I and II dihydrofolate reductases (K(m) of 8.9 µM for NADPH and 3.7 µM for dihydrofolate and IC(50) of 20 µM for trimethoprim). This is the first description of a new type of reductase conferring resistance to trimethoprim. Our results indicate that soil bacteria display a high level of genetic diversity and are a reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes, supporting the use of this approach for the discovery of novel enzymes with unexpected activities unpredictable from their amino acid sequences. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Transfer of antibiotic resistant bacteria from animals to man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Gerner-Smidt, P.

    1999-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance develops in zoonotic bacteria in response to antibiotics used in food animals. A close association exists between the amounts of antibiotics used and the levels of resistance observed. The classes of antibiotics routinely used for treatment of human infections are also used...... for animals either for therapy or for growth promotion. Antibiotic resistance in zoonotic bacteria constitute a public health hazard, primarily through the increased risk of treatment failures. This paper describes the zoonotic bacteria, salmonella, campylobacter, yersinia and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC......). Infections with these agents do not generally require antibiotic therapy, but in some cases antibiotics are essential to obtain a successful cure. The levels and types of resistance observed in zoonotic bacteria in some countries, especially the increasing levels of fluoroquinolone resistance in salmonella...

  14. Emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistance: A global problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Choudhury

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is a major problem in clinical health settings. Interestingly the origin of many of antibiotic resistance mechanisms can be traced back to non-pathogenic environmental organisms. Important factors leading to the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance include absence of regulation in the use of antibiotics, improper waste disposal and associated transmission of antibiotic resistance genes in the community through commensals. In this review, we discussed the impact of globalisation on the transmission of antibiotic resistance genes in bacteria through immigration and export/import of foodstuff. The significance of surveillance to define appropriate use of antibiotics in the clinic has been included as an important preventive measure.

  15. Sequence-Specific Targeting of Bacterial Resistance Genes Increases Antibiotic Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayhan, Dilay Hazal; Tamer, Yusuf Talha; Akbar, Mohammed; Bailey, Stacey M; Wong, Michael; Daly, Seth M; Greenberg, David E; Toprak, Erdal

    2016-09-01

    The lack of effective and well-tolerated therapies against antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a global public health problem leading to prolonged treatment and increased mortality. To improve the efficacy of existing antibiotic compounds, we introduce a new method for strategically inducing antibiotic hypersensitivity in pathogenic bacteria. Following the systematic verification that the AcrAB-TolC efflux system is one of the major determinants of the intrinsic antibiotic resistance levels in Escherichia coli, we have developed a short antisense oligomer designed to inhibit the expression of acrA and increase antibiotic susceptibility in E. coli. By employing this strategy, we can inhibit E. coli growth using 2- to 40-fold lower antibiotic doses, depending on the antibiotic compound utilized. The sensitizing effect of the antisense oligomer is highly specific to the targeted gene's sequence, which is conserved in several bacterial genera, and the oligomer does not have any detectable toxicity against human cells. Finally, we demonstrate that antisense oligomers improve the efficacy of antibiotic combinations, allowing the combined use of even antagonistic antibiotic pairs that are typically not favored due to their reduced activities.

  16. Sequence-Specific Targeting of Bacterial Resistance Genes Increases Antibiotic Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Michael; Daly, Seth M.; Greenberg, David E.; Toprak, Erdal

    2016-01-01

    The lack of effective and well-tolerated therapies against antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a global public health problem leading to prolonged treatment and increased mortality. To improve the efficacy of existing antibiotic compounds, we introduce a new method for strategically inducing antibiotic hypersensitivity in pathogenic bacteria. Following the systematic verification that the AcrAB-TolC efflux system is one of the major determinants of the intrinsic antibiotic resistance levels in Escherichia coli, we have developed a short antisense oligomer designed to inhibit the expression of acrA and increase antibiotic susceptibility in E. coli. By employing this strategy, we can inhibit E. coli growth using 2- to 40-fold lower antibiotic doses, depending on the antibiotic compound utilized. The sensitizing effect of the antisense oligomer is highly specific to the targeted gene’s sequence, which is conserved in several bacterial genera, and the oligomer does not have any detectable toxicity against human cells. Finally, we demonstrate that antisense oligomers improve the efficacy of antibiotic combinations, allowing the combined use of even antagonistic antibiotic pairs that are typically not favored due to their reduced activities. PMID:27631336

  17. Survival of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Horizontal Gene Transfer Control Antibiotic Resistance Gene Content in Anaerobic Digesters

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Jennifer H.; Novak, John T.; Knocke, William R.; Pruden, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) versus their antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during wastewater sludge treatment is critical in order to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance through process optimization. Here, we spiked high concentrations of tetracycline-resistant bacteria, isolated from mesophilic (Iso M1-1- a Pseudomonas sp.) and thermophilic (Iso T10- a Bacillus sp.) anaerobic digested sludge, into batch digesters and monitored their fate by plate counts ...

  18. Influence of antibiotic selection on genetic composition of Escherichia coli populations from conventional and organic dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walk, Seth T; Mladonicky, Janice M; Middleton, Jaclyn A; Heidt, Anthony J; Cunningham, Julie R; Bartlett, Paul; Sato, Kenji; Whittam, Thomas S

    2007-10-01

    The widespread agricultural use of antimicrobials has long been considered a crucial influence on the prevalence of resistant genes and bacterial strains. It has been suggested that antibiotic applications in agricultural settings are a driving force for the development of antimicrobial resistance, and epidemiologic evidence supports the view that there is a direct link between resistant human pathogens, retail produce, farm animals, and farm environments. Despite such concerns, little is understood about the population processes underlying the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance and the reversibility of resistance when antibiotic selective pressure is removed. In this study, hierarchical log-linear modeling was used to assess the association between farm type (conventional versus organic), age of cattle (calf versus cow), bacterial phenotype (resistant versus susceptible), and the genetic composition of Escherichia coli populations (E. coli Reference Collection [ECOR] phylogroup A, B1, B2, or D) among 678 susceptible and resistant strains from a previously published study of 60 matched dairy farms (30 conventional and 30 organic) in Wisconsin. The analysis provides evidence for clonal resistance (ampicillin resistance) and genetic hitchhiking (tetracycline resistance [Tet(r)]), estimated the rate of compositional change from conventional farming to organic farming (mean, 8 years; range, 3 to 15 years), and discovered a significant association between low multidrug resistance, organic farms, and strains of the numerically dominant phylogroup B1. These data suggest that organic farming practices not only change the frequency of resistant strains but also impact the overall population genetic composition of the resident E. coli flora. In addition, the results support the hypothesis that the current prevalence of Tet(r) loci on dairy farms has little to do with the use of this antibiotic.

  19. A Peptidomimetic Antibiotic Targets Outer Membrane Proteins and Disrupts Selectively the Outer Membrane in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urfer, Matthias; Bogdanovic, Jasmina; Lo Monte, Fabio; Moehle, Kerstin; Zerbe, Katja; Omasits, Ulrich; Ahrens, Christian H; Pessi, Gabriella; Eberl, Leo; Robinson, John A

    2016-01-22

    Increasing antibacterial resistance presents a major challenge in antibiotic discovery. One attractive target in Gram-negative bacteria is the unique asymmetric outer membrane (OM), which acts as a permeability barrier that protects the cell from external stresses, such as the presence of antibiotics. We describe a novel β-hairpin macrocyclic peptide JB-95 with potent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli. This peptide exhibits no cellular lytic activity, but electron microscopy and fluorescence studies reveal an ability to selectively disrupt the OM but not the inner membrane of E. coli. The selective targeting of the OM probably occurs through interactions of JB-95 with selected β-barrel OM proteins, including BamA and LptD as shown by photolabeling experiments. Membrane proteomic studies reveal rapid depletion of many β-barrel OM proteins from JB-95-treated E. coli, consistent with induction of a membrane stress response and/or direct inhibition of the Bam folding machine. The results suggest that lethal disruption of the OM by JB-95 occurs through a novel mechanism of action at key interaction sites within clusters of β-barrel proteins in the OM. These findings open new avenues for developing antibiotics that specifically target β-barrel proteins and the integrity of the Gram-negative OM. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Genetic Mechanisms of Antibiotic Resistance and the Role of Antibiotic Adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Daniela Santos; de Araujo, Rodrigo Santos Aquino; Dantas, Natalina; Scotti, Luciana; Scotti, Marcus Tullius; de Moura, Ricardo Olimpio; Mendonca-Junior, Francisco Jaime Bezerra

    2018-01-01

    The ever increasing number of multidrug-resistant microorganism pathogens has become a great and global public health threat. Antibiotic mechanisms of action and the opposing mechanisms of resistance are intimately associated, but comprehension of the biochemical and molecular functions of such drugs is not a simple exercise. Both the environment, and genetic settings contribute to alterations in phenotypic resistance (natural bacterial evolution), and make it difficult to control the emergence and impacts of antibiotic resistance. Under such circumstances, comprehension of how bacteria develop and/or acquire antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) has a critical role in developing propositions to fight against these superbugs, and to search for new drugs. In this review, we present and discuss both general information and examples of common genetic and molecular mechanisms related to antibiotic resistance, as well as how the expression and interactions of ARGs are important to drug resistance. At the same time, we focus on the recent achievements in the search for antibiotic adjuvants, which help combat antibiotic resistance through deactivation of bacterial mechanisms of action such as β-lactamases. Recent advances involving the use of anti-resistance drugs such as: efflux pump inhibitors; anti-virulence drugs; drugs against quorum sensing; and against type II/III secretion systems are revealed. Such antibiotic adjuvants (as explored herein) collaborate against the problems of antibiotic resistance, and may restore or prolong the therapeutic activity of known antibiotics. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Removal of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria and Antibiotic Resistance Genes Affected by Varying Degrees of Fouling on Anaerobic Microfiltration Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hong; Hong, Pei-Ying

    2017-11-07

    An anaerobic membrane bioreactor was retrofitted with polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) microfiltration membrane units, each of which was fouled to a different extent. The membranes with different degrees of fouling were evaluated for their efficiencies in removing three antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB), namely, bla NDM-1 -positive Escherichia coli PI-7, bla CTX-M-15 -positive Klebsiella pneumoniae L7, and bla OXA-48 -positive E. coli UPEC-RIY-4, as well as their associated plasmid-borne antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). The results showed that the log removal values (LRVs) of ARGs correlated positively with the extent of membrane fouling and ranged from 1.9 to 3.9. New membranes with a minimal foulant layer could remove more than 5 log units of ARB. However, as the membranes progressed to subcritical fouling, the LRVs of ARB decreased at increasing operating transmembrane pressures (TMPs). The LRV recovered back to 5 when the membrane was critically fouled, and the achieved LRV remained stable at different operating TMPs. Furthermore, characterization of the surface attributed the removal of both the ARB and ARGs to adsorption, which was facilitated by an increasing hydrophobicity and a decreasing surface ζ potential as the membranes fouled. Our results indicate that both the TMP and the foulant layer synergistically affected ARB removal, but the foulant layer was the main factor that contributed to ARG removal.

  2. Removal of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes affected by varying degrees of fouling on anaerobic microfiltration membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Hong

    2017-09-28

    An anaerobic membrane bioreactor was retrofitted with polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) microfiltration membrane units, each of which was fouled to a different extent. The membranes with different degrees of fouling were evaluated for their efficiencies in removing three antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB), namely, blaNDM-1-positive Escherichia coli PI-7, blaCTX-M-15-positive Klebsiella pneumoniae L7, and blaOXA-48-positive E. coli UPEC-RIY-4, as well as their associated plasmid-borne antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). The results showed that the log removal values (LRVs) of ARGs correlated positively with the extent of membrane fouling and ranged from 1.9 to 3.9. New membranes with a minimal foulant layer could remove more than 5 log units of ARB. However, as the membranes progressed to subcritical fouling, the LRVs of ARB decreased at increasing operating transmembrane pressures (TMPs). The LRV recovered back to 5 when the membrane was critically fouled, and the achieved LRV remained stable at different operating TMPs. Furthermore, characterization of the surface attributed the removal of both the ARB and ARGs to adsorption, which was facilitated by an increasing hydrophobicity and a decreasing surface ζ potential as the membranes fouled. Our results indicate that both the TMP and the foulant layer synergistically affected ARB removal, but the foulant layer was the main factor that contributed to ARG removal.

  3. Fungal treatment for the removal of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes in veterinary hospital wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, D; Badia-Fabregat, M; Vicent, T; Caminal, G; Rodríguez-Mozaz, S; Balcázar, J L; Barceló, D

    2016-06-01

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance represents one of the most important public health concerns and has been linked to the widespread use of antibiotics in veterinary and human medicine. The overall elimination of antibiotics in conventional wastewater treatment plants is quite low; therefore, residual amounts of these compounds are continuously discharged to receiving surface waters, which may promote the emergence of antibiotic resistance. In this study, the ability of a fungal treatment as an alternative wastewater treatment for the elimination of forty-seven antibiotics belonging to seven different groups (β-lactams, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, metronidazoles, sulfonamides, tetracyclines, and trimethoprim) was evaluated. 77% of antibiotics were removed after the fungal treatment, which is higher than removal obtained in conventional treatment plants. Moreover, the effect of fungal treatment on the removal of some antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) was evaluated. The fungal treatment was also efficient in removing ARGs, such as ermB (resistance to macrolides), tetW (resistance to tetracyclines), blaTEM (resistance to β-lactams), sulI (resistance to sulfonamides) and qnrS (reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones). However, it was not possible to establish a clear link between concentrations of antibiotics and corresponding ARGs in wastewater, which leads to the conclusion that there are other factors that should be taken into consideration besides the antibiotic concentrations that reach aquatic ecosystems in order to explain the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Profile of antibiotic consumption, sensitivity and resistance in an urban area of Andhra Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peripi, Sunita Bhargavi; Thadepalli, Venu Gopala Rao; Khagga, Mukkanti; Tripuraribhatla, Prasanna Krishna; Bharadwaj, Dinesh Kumar

    2012-04-01

    Antibiotics are an important category of drugs in which indiscriminate use can affect the susceptibility patterns among infectious organisms, resulting in antibiotic resistance. Data on antibiotic usage and susceptibility patterns were collected from public and private health centres in Vijayawada, Andhra Pradesh, India, through the use of questionnaires. The data collected were then coded, tabulated, computed and evaluated using statistical analysis. The consumption profile of the different categories of drugs used in public and private hospitals was as follows: nutrition and metabolism products 19.0%; gastrointestinal disorder-related drugs 18.5%; antibiotics 16.8%; anti-pyretics and anti-analgesics 20.6%. These drugs were found to be in high demand. Among the antibiotics, aminoglycosides (amikacin), quinolones (ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin), tetracyclines (doxycycline), penicillin (ampicillin) and sulphonamides (co-trimoxazole) were the most commonly prescribed drugs for antibiotic therapy. 46% of the culture laboratory reports were positive with the following organism profile: Escherichia coli (36%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (16%), Staphylococcus aureus (29%), Enterococcus faecalis (9%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (10%). In terms of the sensitivity profile of antibacterials, amikacin (66.9%) was the only antibiotic showing sensitivity patterns, while the majority of antibiotics, such as cotrimoxazole, nalidixic acid, amoxicillin, gentamycin and norfloxacin, had acquired a resistance rate of 55.1%-80.6%. The results of this study suggest that indiscriminate prescription and consumption of new broad-spectrum antibiotics against sensitive organisms results in the development of antimicrobial resistance. Therefore, there is an urgent need to curb the excessive use of antibiotics in local hospitals in order to control the trend of increasing antimicrobial resistance to antibiotics.

  5. Multiple Antimicrobial Resistance of Escherichia coli Isolated from Chickens in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Talebiyan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial agents are used extremely in order to reduce the great losses caused by Escherichia coli infections in poultry industry. In this study, 318 pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC strains isolated from commercial broiler flocks with coli-septicemia were examined for antimicrobials of both veterinary and human significance by disc diffusion method. Multiple resistances to antimicrobial agents were observed in all the isolates. Resistance to the antibiotics was as follows: Tylosin (88.68%, Erythromycin (71.70%, Oxytetracycline (43.40%, Sulfadimethoxine-Trimethoprim (39.62%, Enrofloxacin (37.74%, Florfenicol (35.85%, Chlortetracycline (33.96%, Doxycycline (16.98%, Difloxacin (32.08%, Danofloxacin (28.30%, Chloramphenicol (20.75%, Ciprofloxacin (7.55%, and Gentamicin (5.66%. This study showed resistance against the antimicrobial agents that are commonly applied in poultry, although resistance against the antibiotics that are only applied in humans or less frequently used in poultry was significantly low. This study emphasizes on the occurrence of multiple drug resistant E. coli among diseased broiler chickens in Iran. The data revealed the relative risks of using antimicrobials in poultry industry. It also concluded that use of antibiotics must be limited in poultry farms in order to reduce the antibiotic resistances.

  6. Antibiotic resistance shaping multi-level population biology of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquero, Fernando; Tedim, Ana P.; Coque, Teresa M.

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotics have natural functions, mostly involving cell-to-cell signaling networks. The anthropogenic production of antibiotics, and its release in the microbiosphere results in a disturbance of these networks, antibiotic resistance tending to preserve its integrity. The cost of such adaptation is the emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes, and of all genetic and cellular vehicles in which these genes are located. Selection of the combinations of the different evolutionary units (genes, integrons, transposons, plasmids, cells, communities and microbiomes, hosts) is highly asymmetrical. Each unit of selection is a self-interested entity, exploiting the higher hierarchical unit for its own benefit, but in doing so the higher hierarchical unit might acquire critical traits for its spread because of the exploitation of the lower hierarchical unit. This interactive trade-off shapes the population biology of antibiotic resistance, a composed-complex array of the independent “population biologies.” Antibiotics modify the abundance and the interactive field of each of these units. Antibiotics increase the number and evolvability of “clinical” antibiotic resistance genes, but probably also many other genes with different primary functions but with a resistance phenotype present in the environmental resistome. Antibiotics influence the abundance, modularity, and spread of integrons, transposons, and plasmids, mostly acting on structures present before the antibiotic era. Antibiotics enrich particular bacterial lineages and clones and contribute to local clonalization processes. Antibiotics amplify particular genetic exchange communities sharing antibiotic resistance genes and platforms within microbiomes. In particular human or animal hosts, the microbiomic composition might facilitate the interactions between evolutionary units involved in antibiotic resistance. The understanding of antibiotic resistance implies expanding our knowledge on multi

  7. Fate of antibiotic resistant cultivable heterotrophic bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater treatment processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Songhe; Han, Bing; Gu, Ju; Wang, Chao; Wang, Peifang; Ma, Yanyan; Cao, Jiashun; He, Zhenli

    2015-09-01

    Antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are emerging contaminants of environmental concern. Heterotrophic bacteria in activated sludge have an important role in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). However, the fate of cultivable heterotrophic ARB and ARGs in WWPTs process remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the antibiotic-resistant phenotypes of cultivable heterotrophic bacteria from influent and effluent water of three WWTPs and analysed thirteen ARGs in ARB and in activated sludge from anoxic, anaerobic and aerobic compartments. From each influent or effluent sample of the three plants, 200 isolates were randomly tested for susceptibility to 12 antibiotics. In these samples, between 5% and 64% isolates showed resistance to >9 antibiotics and the proportion of >9-drug-resistant bacteria was lower in isolates from effluent than from influent. Eighteen genera were identified in 188 isolates from influent (n=94) and effluent (n=94) of one WWTP. Six genera (Aeromonas, Bacillus, Lysinibacillus, Microbacterium, Providencia, and Staphylococcus) were detected in both influent and effluent samples. Gram-negative and -positive isolates dominated in influent and effluent, respectively. The 13 tetracycline-, sulphonamide-, streptomycin- and β-lactam-resistance genes were detected at a higher frequency in ARB from influent than from effluent, except for sulA and CTX-M, while in general, the abundances of ARGs in activated sludge from two of the three plants were higher in aerobic compartments than in anoxic ones, indicating abundant ARGs exit in the excess sledges and/or in uncultivable bacteria. These findings may be useful for elucidating the effect of WWTP on ARB and ARGs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of Drug Resistance Pattern of Escherichia coli Strains Isolated from Fasa Vali-e-Asr Hospital Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Abdollahi Kheirabadi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Antibiotic resistance due to the widespread use of antibiotics is one of the major causes of failure in antibiotic treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the rates of antibiotic resistance among Escherichia coli isolates from Fasa Vali-e-Asr Hospital patients.   Materials & Methods : In total, 234 isolates of Escherichia coli strains, obtained from inpatients and outpatients, were studied. The identity of the isolated strains was confirmed by bacteriologic methods. T he drug sensitivity definition test to 17 antibiotics was done via the disk diffusion antibiogram method. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of the resistant isolates to Ciprofloxacin and Imipenem was measured using the s erial dilution method according to the CLSI standards.   Results : The resistance rates of the isolates to Ciprofloxacin and Imipenem by disk diffusion antibiogram method were 22.65% and 11.11% and by serial dilution method were 19.66 % and 9.4% of all the isolates, respectively.   Conclusion: These results show higher resistance of Escherichia coli to Ciprofloxacin and Imipenem as compared to the results in previous studies. Further investigation will shed light on how to more effectively battle antibiotic resistance of virulent microorganisms.

  9. Antibiotic resistance in community-acquired urinary tract infections

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the treatment of other infections would inevitably lead to the development of resistance. S Afr Med J 1994; 84: 600-602. Antibiotic resistance is a major problem in developing countries.' There are many reasons for this, including antibiotic use in animal feeds, inappropriate prescribing and poor sanitation. Resistance rates in ...

  10. Genomic and metagenomic analysis of antibiotic resistance in dairy animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    The extent to which carriage of antibiotic resistant bacteria in food animals is responsible for the burden of antibiotic resistance in human infections is currently not well known. Thus, there is a need to further evaluate the genomic diversity of multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria and the microbi...

  11. Antibiotic resistance trends and mechanisms in the foodborne pathogen, Campylobacter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yizhi; Fang, Liangxing; Xu, Changyun; Zhang, Qijing

    2017-11-23

    Campylobacter is a major foodborne pathogen and is commonly present in food producing animals. This pathogenic organism is highly adaptable and has become increasingly resistant to various antibiotics. Recently, both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization have designated antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter as a serious threat to public health. For the past decade, multiple mechanisms conferring resistance to clinically important antibiotics have been described in Campylobacter, and new resistance mechanisms constantly emerge in the pathogen. Some of the recent examples include the erm(B) gene conferring macrolide resistance, the cfr(C) genes mediating resistance to florfenicol and other antimicrobials, and a functionally enhanced variant of the multidrug resistance efflux pump, CmeABC. The continued emergence of new resistance mechanisms illustrates the extraordinary adaptability of Campylobacter to antibiotic selection pressure and demonstrate the need for innovative strategies to control antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter. In this review, we will briefly summarize the trends of antibiotic resistance in Campylobacter and discuss the mechanisms of resistance to antibiotics used for animal production and important for clinical therapy in humans. A special emphasis will be given to the newly discovered antibiotic resistance.

  12. Antibiotic Resistance Patterns of Common Gram-negative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The resistance of bacteria causing urinary tract infection (UTI) to commonly prescribed antibiotics is increasing both in developing and developed countries. Resistance has emerged even to more potent antimicrobial agents. This study was undertaken to determine the current antibiotic resistance pattern ...

  13. Synergistic effects of antimicrobial peptide DP7 combined with antibiotics against multidrug-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaozhe; Li, Zhan; Li, Xiaolu; Tian, Yaomei; Fan, Yingzi; Yu, Chaoheng; Zhou, Bailing; Liu, Yi; Xiang, Rong; Yang, Li

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria present a great threat to public health. In this study, the synergistic effects of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and antibiotics on several multidrug-resistant bacterial strains were studied, and their synergistic effects on azithromycin (AZT)-resistance genes were analyzed to determine the relationships between antimicrobial resistance and these synergistic effects. A checkerboard method was used to evaluate the synergistic effects of AMPs (DP7 and CLS001) and several antibiotics (gentamicin, vancomycin [VAN], AZT, and amoxicillin) on clinical bacterial strains ( Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii , and Escherichia coli ). The AZT-resistance genes ( ermA, ermB, ermC, mefA , and msrA ) were identified in the resistant strains using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. For all the clinical isolates tested that were resistant to different antibiotics, DP7 had high antimicrobial activity (≤32 mg/L). When DP7 was combined with VAN or AZT, the effect was most frequently synergistic. When we studied the resistance genes of the AZT-resistant isolates, the synergistic effect of DP7-AZT occurred most frequently in highly resistant strains or strains carrying more than two AZT-resistance genes. A transmission electron microscopic analysis of the S. aureus strain synergistically affected by DP7-AZT showed no noteworthy morphological changes, suggesting that a molecular-level mechanism plays an important role in the synergistic action of DP7-AZT. AMP DP7 plus the antibiotic AZT or VAN is more effective, especially against highly antibiotic-resistant strains.

  14. Urinary tract infections in hospital pediatrics: many previous antibiotherapy and antibiotics resistance, including fluoroquinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garraffo, A; Marguet, C; Checoury, A; Boyer, S; Gardrat, A; Houivet, E; Caron, F

    2014-02-01

    We studied antibiotic resistance in pediatric UTIs and we evaluated the impact of antibiotic exposure in the previous 12 months, very little French data being available for this population. We conducted a multicenter prospective study including children consulting for, or admitted in 2 hospitals. Prior antibiotic exposure was documented from their health record. One hundred and ten patients (73 girls), 11 days to 12 years of age, were included in 10 months. Ninety-six percent presented with pyelonephritis, associated to uropathy for 25%. Escherichia coli was predominant (78%), followed by Proteus spp. and Enterococcus spp. The antibiotic resistance rate of E. coli was high and close to that reported for adults with complicated UTIs: amoxicillin 60%, amoxicillin-clavulanate 35%, cefotaxim 5%, trimethoprim-sulfametoxazole 26%, nalidixic acid 9%, ciprofloxacin 7%, gentamycin 1%, nitrofurantoin and fosfomycin 0%. The antibiotic exposure in the previous 12 months involved 62 children (56%) most frequently with β-lactams (89%) for a respiratory tract infection (56%). A clear relationship between exposure and resistance was observed for amoxicillin (71% vs. 46%), first generation (65% vs. 46%) and third generation (9% vs. 3%) cephalosporins, or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (36% vs. 15%). However, antibiotic exposure could not account alone for the results, as suggested by the 7% of ciprofloxacin resistance, observed without any identified previous treatment. Bacterial species and antibiotic resistance level in children are similar to those reported for adults. Antibiotic exposure in the previous 12 months increases the risk of resistance but other factors are involved (previous antibiotic therapies and fecal-oral or mother-to-child transmission). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Antibiotic resistance is prevalent in an isolated cave microbiome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirandeep Bhullar

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is a global challenge that impacts all pharmaceutically used antibiotics. The origin of the genes associated with this resistance is of significant importance to our understanding of the evolution and dissemination of antibiotic resistance in pathogens. A growing body of evidence implicates environmental organisms as reservoirs of these resistance genes; however, the role of anthropogenic use of antibiotics in the emergence of these genes is controversial. We report a screen of a sample of the culturable microbiome of Lechuguilla Cave, New Mexico, in a region of the cave that has been isolated for over 4 million years. We report that, like surface microbes, these bacteria were highly resistant to antibiotics; some strains were resistant to 14 different commercially available antibiotics. Resistance was detected to a wide range of structurally different antibiotics including daptomycin, an antibiotic of last resort in the treatment of drug resistant Gram-positive pathogens. Enzyme-mediated mechanisms of resistance were also discovered for natural and semi-synthetic macrolide antibiotics via glycosylation and through a kinase-mediated phosphorylation mechanism. Sequencing of the genome of one of the resistant bacteria identified a macrolide kinase encoding gene and characterization of its product revealed it to be related to a known family of kinases circulating in modern drug resistant pathogens. The implications of this study are significant to our understanding of the prevalence of resistance, even in microbiomes isolated from human use of antibiotics. This supports a growing understanding that antibiotic resistance is natural, ancient, and hard wired in the microbial pangenome.

  16. Antibiotic resistance is prevalent in an isolated cave microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhullar, Kirandeep; Waglechner, Nicholas; Pawlowski, Andrew; Koteva, Kalinka; Banks, Eric D; Johnston, Michael D; Barton, Hazel A; Wright, Gerard D

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global challenge that impacts all pharmaceutically used antibiotics. The origin of the genes associated with this resistance is of significant importance to our understanding of the evolution and dissemination of antibiotic resistance in pathogens. A growing body of evidence implicates environmental organisms as reservoirs of these resistance genes; however, the role of anthropogenic use of antibiotics in the emergence of these genes is controversial. We report a screen of a sample of the culturable microbiome of Lechuguilla Cave, New Mexico, in a region of the cave that has been isolated for over 4 million years. We report that, like surface microbes, these bacteria were highly resistant to antibiotics; some strains were resistant to 14 different commercially available antibiotics. Resistance was detected to a wide range of structurally different antibiotics including daptomycin, an antibiotic of last resort in the treatment of drug resistant Gram-positive pathogens. Enzyme-mediated mechanisms of resistance were also discovered for natural and semi-synthetic macrolide antibiotics via glycosylation and through a kinase-mediated phosphorylation mechanism. Sequencing of the genome of one of the resistant bacteria identified a macrolide kinase encoding gene and characterization of its product revealed it to be related to a known family of kinases circulating in modern drug resistant pathogens. The implications of this study are significant to our understanding of the prevalence of resistance, even in microbiomes isolated from human use of antibiotics. This supports a growin