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Sample records for antibiotic prophylaxis

  1. [Antibiotical prophylaxy in gynecology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Záhumenský, J; Menzlová, E; Zmrhal, J; Kučera, E

    2013-08-01

    Gynecological surgery is considered to be clear with possible contamination by gram-positive cocci from the skin, gram-negatives from the perineum or groins or polymicrobial biocenosis from vagina, depending on the surgical approach. Antibiotical prophylaxy enforces the natural mechanisms of immunity and helps to exclude present infection. There were presented many studies comparing useful effect of prophylaxis in gynecological surgery. The benefits of antibiotical prophylaxy before IUD insertion, before the cervical surgery and before hysteroscopies were not verified. On the other hand the prophylaxy of vaginal surgery including vaginal hysterectomy decreases the number of postoperative febrile complications. The positive influence of prophylaxis before the simple laparoscopy and laparoscopy without bowel injury or the opening of the vagina was not evidently verified. In abdominal hysterectomy the antibiotical prophylaxy decreases the incidence of postoperative complications significantly. The administration of 2 g of cefazolin can be recommended. In procedures taking more than 3 hours the repeated administration of cefazolin is suitable. New urogynecological procedures, using mesh implants, were not sufficiently evaluated as for postoperative infections and the posible antibiotical effect. The presence of implant in possibly non sterile area should be considered as high risc of postoperative complications. PMID:24040985

  2. Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Pediatric Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Davydova N.V.; Suyetenkov D.Ye.; Firsova I.V.; Oleynikova N.M.

    2011-01-01

    Identify options for the indications for antibiotic prophylaxis in children's dental reception. The analysis of publications shows that the basis of current trends prevention of postoperative wound infection in pediatric surgery should be measures aimed at eliminating or reducing the influence of risk factors, as well as the use of antibiotic prophylaxis

  3. Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Pediatric Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davydova N.V.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Identify options for the indications for antibiotic prophylaxis in children's dental reception. The analysis of publications shows that the basis of current trends prevention of postoperative wound infection in pediatric surgery should be measures aimed at eliminating or reducing the influence of risk factors, as well as the use of antibiotic prophylaxis

  4. Antibiotic prophylaxis in clean general surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To find out the incidence of surgical site infection in clean general surgery cases operated without prophylactic antibiotics. One hundred and twenty-four clean surgical cases operated without antibiotic prophylaxis between July 2003 and December 2004, were studied and these were compared with similar number of cases who received antibiotics. The data was collected and analyzed using software SPSS (version 10.0). Chi-square and student-t test were used to analyze the association between antibiotics and wound infection. The most frequent operation was repair of various hernias, 69.3% in group A and 75% in group B. More operations were carried out between 21-30 years, 38.7% in group A and 41.9% in group B. Surgical site infection occurred in one patient (0.8%) in each group. Chi-square test (0.636) applied to group A and B showed no association of infection and administration/ no administration of antibiotics (p > 0.25). The t-test applied on group A and B (t=0) also showed no significant difference between administration of antibiotics/ no-antibiotics and infection (p > 0.25). The use of prophylactic antibiotic in clean, non implant and elective cases is unnecessary. (author)

  5. Antibiotic Prophylaxis in the Management of Vesicoureteral Reflux

    OpenAIRE

    Cendron, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis has been, since 1960s, one of the management options in treating vesicoureteral reflux. The purpose of this review article is to provide a concise overview of the rational for antiobiotic prophylaxis and to discuss the various agents used. Some of the current controversies regarding use of antibiotics for reflux will also be presented.

  6. Evaluation of the appropriate perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis in Italy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Napolitano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The appropriate use of antibiotics prophylaxis in the prevention and reduction in the incidence of surgical site infection is widespread. This study evaluates the appropriateness of the prescription of antibiotics prophylaxis prior to surgery amongst hospitalized patients in the geographic area of Avellino, Caserta, and Naples (Italy and the factors associated with a poor adherence. METHODS: A sample of 382 patients admitted to 23 surgical wards and undergoing surgery in five hospitals were randomly selected. RESULTS: Perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis was appropriate in 18.1% of cases. The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that patients with hypoalbuminemia, with a clinical infection, with a wound clean were more likely to receive an appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis. Compared with patients with an American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA score ≥4, those with a score of 2 were correlated with a 64% reduction in the odds of having an appropriate prophylaxis. The appropriateness of the timing of prophylactic antibiotic administration was observed in 53.4% of the procedures. Multivariate logistic regression model showed that such appropriateness was more frequent in older patients, in those admitted in general surgery wards, in those not having been underwent an endoscopic surgery, in those with a higher length of surgery, and in patients with ASA score 1 when a score ≥4 was chosen as the reference category. The most common antibiotics used inappropriately were ceftazidime, sultamicillin, levofloxacin, and teicoplanin. CONCLUSIONS: Educational interventions are needed to improve perioperative appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis.

  7. Improving the prescription of antibiotics : focus on surgical prophylaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasteren, Maria Engelina Elisabeth van

    2007-01-01

    This thesis comprises several studies on the implementation of guidelines for antimicrobial use in prophylaxis as well as in therapy. The main part focuses on the data of the CHIPS-study; a quality improvement project of surgical prophylaxis in the Netherlands promoting prudent use of antibiotics an

  8. Pharmacoeconomic evaluation of the antibiotic prophylaxis in orthopedic surgeries

    OpenAIRE

    Atanasova, Dijana; Angelovska, Bistra; Lazarova, Bilijana

    2015-01-01

    Infections in orthopedic surgery are large problem in the medicine and are present all around the world.The main objective of the antibiotic prophylaxis in orthopedic surgeries is to prevent infection during the surgical intervention with antimicrobial agent that is safe, effective, and has a spectrum of activity that covers the most common pathogens that may occur during surgical procedures. Rational use of antibiotic prophylaxis in orthopedic surgeries has an important role in the preventio...

  9. Prophylaxis for infective endocarditis: antibiotic sensitivity of dental plaque.

    OpenAIRE

    MacFarlane, T W; McGowan, D. A.; Hunter, K; MacKenzie, D.

    1983-01-01

    The antibiotic sensitivity pattern of bacteria isolated from bacteraemia after dental extraction was compared with that of bacteria isolated from dental plaque samples from the same patient. The results supported the current practice of using penicillin and erythromycin empirically for prophylaxis. The prediction of the most appropriate antibiotic for prophylaxis using dental plaque samples was most accurate when the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of plaque isolates were used. It appe...

  10. Reasonable application of antibiotic prophylaxis in maxillofacial trauma: Literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Yadegari Naeeni

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Despite advances in trauma management, treatment of the consequent infections has remained a major challenge. Antibiotic prophylaxis has been widely applied to reduce such infections. Although bacteria are present in most body parts, severe infections after treatment are less frequent in the head and neck of healthy individuals. The aim of the present study was to review the reasonable application of antibiotic prophylaxis in maxillofacial trauma. Materials and Methods: In this review article, PubMed and Google Scholar databases were searched for studies on antibiotic prophylaxis in maxillofacial trauma published during 2000-2014. Conclusion: Antibiotics were not prescribed for tears and small clean wounds in the face and mouth. However, prophylaxis was applied for extensive mouth injuries which involved the facial skin. In case of maxillofacial fractures, 24-hour administration of antibiotics sufficed for compound fractures of the mandible and other parts of the face. Antibiotics were not required in other types of fractures. Prophylaxis should be applied over short pre- or post-operative periods based on the severity and complexity of maxillofacial fractures and their relations with intra- and extraoral environments. Apparently, more detailed studies are warranted to further clarify the subject.

  11. [Antibiotic prophylaxis with ++vancomycin in corrective surgery with alloplastic material].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaioli, N; Marchesa, P; Bacino, A; Galliano, R; Borello, G; Bonatti, L; Lorenzini, L

    1995-09-01

    The authors report a controlled series of 40 patients treated for recidivating inguinal hernia and laparocele with the implant of alloplastic material. Short-term prophylaxis with vancomycin was performed in all cases. The antibiotic was found to be well tolerated at the doses used and this was associated with a good clinical success rate. The use of vancomycin in prophylaxis for this type of surgery is considered a rational choice and the use of short-term prophylaxis reduces the risks linked to possible collateral effects. PMID:8587722

  12. Adherence to Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Children with Vesicoureteral Reflux

    OpenAIRE

    Copp, Hillary L.; Esequiel Rodriguez; Weiss, Dana A.

    2011-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) affects approximately 1% of children and may predispose a child with a bladder infection to develop pyelonephritis and renal scarring. To prevent these potential sequelae, one accepted treatment option for VUR includes low-dose continuous antibiotic prophylaxis (CAP) to maintain urine sterility until the condition resolves. Despite the widespread use of CAP, little data exists regarding adherence to long-term antibiotic therapy. Not only will poor adherence to CAP ...

  13. Antibiotic prophylaxis in infective endocarditis: Use or abuse?

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    Nisha Thakur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The American Heart Association (AHA recommendations for antimicrobial prophylaxis for infective endocarditis (IE are controversial. According to the new guidelines released by the AHA now, the only patients to receive antibiotics will be those at highest risk, i.e. those with a prosthetic heart valve, a history of endocarditis, certain forms of congenital heart disease or valvulopathy after heart transplantation, and only before certain dental procedures. Unfortunately, these guidelines are still based largely on expert opinion, with very little hard evidence to show that antibiotic therapy actually prevents IE. The Hypothesis: The reported incidence of bacteremia during dental intervention ranges from 10% to 100% and, with daily brushing and flossing, from 20% to 68%. Because bacteremia also occurs during brushing and flossing of teeth, why give prophylaxis just for dental procedures? Moreover, the risks of causing adverse or anaphylactic reactions from antibiotics as well as contributing to the nationwide antibiotic resistance problem are issues not to be taken lightly. Evaluation of the Hypothesis: The hypothesis discusses the AHA recommendations for antimicrobial prophylaxis for IE, indicating some inherent limitations associated with it, and stresses upon the fact that these recommendation should also be updated, if not completely changed, to cope up with the advancements in the proper treatment plan.

  14. Short-course postexposure antibiotic prophylaxis combined with vaccination protects against experimental inhalational anthrax

    OpenAIRE

    Vietri, Nicholas J.; Purcell, Bret K; Lawler, James V; Leffel, Elizabeth K.; Rico, Pedro; Gamble, Christopher S.; Twenhafel, Nancy A; Ivins, Bruce E.; Heine, Henry S.; Sheeler, Ryan; Wright, Mary E.; Friedlander, Arthur M.

    2006-01-01

    Prevention of inhalational anthrax after Bacillus anthracis spore exposure requires a prolonged course of antibiotic prophylaxis. In response to the 2001 anthrax attack in the United States, ≈10,000 people were offered 60 days of antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent inhalational anthrax, but adherence to this regimen was poor. We sought to determine whether a short course of antibiotic prophylaxis after exposure could protect non-human primates from a high-dose spore challenge if vaccination was...

  15. Selection of dental procedures for antibiotic prophylaxis against infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S Y; Gill, G

    1992-12-01

    A dental source of infection remains the most common identifiable risk factor in infective endocarditis and this may be particularly important in patients at 'high risk'. We therefore performed a questionnaire survey of dental practitioners to assess acceptance of The British Society of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (BSAC) recommendations, especially with regards to selection of dental procedures for antibiotic prophylaxis. The results showed that the dental practitioners surveyed treated the 'high risk' patient group differently by extending the range of dental procedures covered by antibiotics but the BSAC only recommend that they be treated differently by hospital treatment and/or parenteral antibiotics. This must be an area of concern and deserves further attention, especially with regards to the need for wider publicity and the range of dental procedures that should be covered in the 'high risk' group where morbidity and mortality from infective endocarditis are higher. PMID:1452880

  16. CT colonography and transient bacteraemia: implications for antibiotic prophylaxis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ridge, C A

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of transient bacteraemia after CT colonography (CTC). METHODS: Blood cultures were obtained at 5, 10 and 15 min after CTC from 100 consecutive consenting patients. Blood samples were cultured in both aerobic and anaerobic media and positive blood culture samples were analysed by a microbiologist. RESULTS: Blood culture samples were positive for growth in sixteen patients. All positive blood culture samples were confirmed skin contaminants. There were no cases of significant bacteraemia. The estimated significant bacteraemia rate as a result of CTC is 0-3.7%, based on 95% confidence intervals around extreme results using Wilson\\'s score method. CONCLUSIONS: American Heart Association and National Institute for Clinical Excellence guidelines advise that antibiotic prophylaxis before lower gastrointestinal endoscopy is not indicated in patients with at risk cardiac lesions (ARCL) as the risk of a transient bacteraemia leading to infective endocarditis is low. These data show that the prevalence of transient bacteraemia after CTC is also low. It follows that patients with ARCL do not require antibiotic prophylaxis before CTC.

  17. CT colonography and transient bacteraemia: implications for antibiotic prophylaxis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the prevalence of transient bacteraemia after CT colonography (CTC). Blood cultures were obtained at 5, 10 and 15 min after CTC from 100 consecutive consenting patients. Blood samples were cultured in both aerobic and anaerobic media and positive blood culture samples were analysed by a microbiologist. Blood culture samples were positive for growth in sixteen patients. All positive blood culture samples were confirmed skin contaminants. There were no cases of significant bacteraemia. The estimated significant bacteraemia rate as a result of CTC is 0-3.7%, based on 95% confidence intervals around extreme results using Wilson's score method. American Heart Association and National Institute for Clinical Excellence guidelines advise that antibiotic prophylaxis before lower gastrointestinal endoscopy is not indicated in patients with at risk cardiac lesions (ARCL) as the risk of a transient bacteraemia leading to infective endocarditis is low. These data show that the prevalence of transient bacteraemia after CTC is also low. It follows that patients with ARCL do not require antibiotic prophylaxis before CTC. (orig.)

  18. CT colonography and transient bacteraemia: implications for antibiotic prophylaxis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridge, C.A.; Carter, M.R.; Ryan, R.; Hegarty, C.; Malone, D.E. [St Vincent' s University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Browne, L.P. [Texas Children' s Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States); Schaffer, K. [St Vincent' s University Hospital, Department of Microbiology, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2011-02-15

    To determine the prevalence of transient bacteraemia after CT colonography (CTC). Blood cultures were obtained at 5, 10 and 15 min after CTC from 100 consecutive consenting patients. Blood samples were cultured in both aerobic and anaerobic media and positive blood culture samples were analysed by a microbiologist. Blood culture samples were positive for growth in sixteen patients. All positive blood culture samples were confirmed skin contaminants. There were no cases of significant bacteraemia. The estimated significant bacteraemia rate as a result of CTC is 0-3.7%, based on 95% confidence intervals around extreme results using Wilson's score method. American Heart Association and National Institute for Clinical Excellence guidelines advise that antibiotic prophylaxis before lower gastrointestinal endoscopy is not indicated in patients with at risk cardiac lesions (ARCL) as the risk of a transient bacteraemia leading to infective endocarditis is low. These data show that the prevalence of transient bacteraemia after CTC is also low. It follows that patients with ARCL do not require antibiotic prophylaxis before CTC. (orig.)

  19. Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Urinary Tract Infections in Children With Spina Bifida on Intermittent Catheterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, Bas; Uiterwaal, Cuno; Kimpen, Jan; van Gool, Jan; de Jong, Tom; Winkler-Seinstra, Pauline; Houterman, Saskia; Verpoorten, Carla; van Steenwijk, Catharine de Jong-de Vos

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Antibiotic prophylaxis (low dose chemoprophylaxis) has been prescribed since the introduction of clean intermittent catheterization in children with spina bifida. We hypothesized that stopping low dose chemoprophylaxis does not increase the number of urinary tract infections in these patien

  20. Meta-analysis: antibiotic prophylaxis for cirrhotic patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding - an updated Cochrane review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chavez-Tapia, N C; Barrientos-Gutierrez, T; Tellez-Avila, F; Soares-Weiser, K; Mendez-Sanchez, N; Gluud, C; Uribe, M

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis seems to decrease the incidence of bacterial infections in patients with cirrhosis and upper gastrointestinal bleeding and is considered standard of care. However, there is no updated information regarding the effects of this intervention.......Antibiotic prophylaxis seems to decrease the incidence of bacterial infections in patients with cirrhosis and upper gastrointestinal bleeding and is considered standard of care. However, there is no updated information regarding the effects of this intervention....

  1. Burns injury in children: Is antibiotic prophylaxis recommended?

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    Jamila Chahed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Wound infection is the most frequent complication in burn patients. There is a lack of guidelines on the use of systemic antibiotics in children to prevent this complication. Patients and Methods: A prospective study is carried out on 80 patients to evaluate the role of antibiotic prophylaxis in the control of infections. Results: The mean age was 34 months (9 months to 8 years. There was a male predominance with sex ratio of 1.66. The mean burn surface size burn was 26.5% with total burn surface area ranging from 5% to 33%, respectively. According to American Burn Association 37% (30/80 were severe burns with second and third degree burns >10% of the total surface body area in children aged <10 years old. Scalds represented 76.2% (61/80 of the burns. Burns by hot oil were 11 cases (13.7%, while 8 cases (10% were flame burns. The random distribution of the groups was as follow: Group A (amoxicilline + clavulanic acid = 25 cases, Group B (oxacilline = 20 cases and Group C (no antibiotics = 35 cases. Total infection rate was 20% (16/80, distributed as follow: 8 cases (50% in Group C, 5 cases (31.2% in Group A and 3 cases in Group B (18.7%. Infection rate in each individual group was: 22.9% (8 cases/35 in Group C, 20% (5 cases/25 in Group A and 15% (3 cases/20 in Group B (P = 0.7. They were distributed as follow: Septicaemia 12 cases/16 (75%, wound infection 4 cases/16 (25%. Bacteria isolated were with a decreasing order: Staphylococcus aureus (36.3%, Pseudomonas (27.2%, Escherichia coli (18.1%, Klebsiella (9% and Enterobacteria (9%. There is a tendency to a delayed cicatrisation (P = 0.07 in case of hot oil burns (65.18 ± 120 days than by flame (54.33 ± 19.8 days than by hot water (29.55 ± 26.2 days. Otherwise no toxic shock syndrome was recorded in this study. Conclusion: It is concluded that adequate and careful nursing of burn wounds seems to be sufficient to prevent complications and to obtain cicatrisation. Antibiotics are

  2. The role of topical antibiotics used as prophylaxis in surgical site infection prevention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2011-04-01

    Compared with systemic antibiotic therapy, the topical or local delivery of an antibiotic has many potential advantages. However, local antibiotics at the surgical site have received very limited approval in any of the surgical prophylaxis consensus guidelines that we are aware of. A review of the literature was carried out through searches of peer-reviewed publications in PubMed in the English language over a 30 year period between January 1980 and May 2010. Both retrospective and prospective studies were included, as well as meta-analyses. With regard to defining \\'topical\\' or \\'local\\' antibiotic application, the application of an antibiotic solution to the surgical site intraoperatively or immediately post-operatively was included. A number of surgical procedures have been shown to significantly benefit from perioperative topical prophylaxis, e.g. joint arthroplasty, cataract surgery and, possibly, breast augmentation. In obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery, topical surgical prophylaxis is also proven to be beneficial. The selective use of topical antibiotics as surgical prophylaxis is justified for specific procedures, such as joint arthroplasty, cataract surgery and, possibly, breast augmentation. In selective cases, such as obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery, topical surgical prophylaxis is also proven to be beneficial. Apart from these specific indications, the evidence for use of topical antibiotics in surgery is lacking in conclusive randomized controlled trials.

  3. The role of topical antibiotics used as prophylaxis in surgical site infection prevention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2012-02-01

    Compared with systemic antibiotic therapy, the topical or local delivery of an antibiotic has many potential advantages. However, local antibiotics at the surgical site have received very limited approval in any of the surgical prophylaxis consensus guidelines that we are aware of. A review of the literature was carried out through searches of peer-reviewed publications in PubMed in the English language over a 30 year period between January 1980 and May 2010. Both retrospective and prospective studies were included, as well as meta-analyses. With regard to defining \\'topical\\' or \\'local\\' antibiotic application, the application of an antibiotic solution to the surgical site intraoperatively or immediately post-operatively was included. A number of surgical procedures have been shown to significantly benefit from perioperative topical prophylaxis, e.g. joint arthroplasty, cataract surgery and, possibly, breast augmentation. In obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery, topical surgical prophylaxis is also proven to be beneficial. The selective use of topical antibiotics as surgical prophylaxis is justified for specific procedures, such as joint arthroplasty, cataract surgery and, possibly, breast augmentation. In selective cases, such as obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery, topical surgical prophylaxis is also proven to be beneficial. Apart from these specific indications, the evidence for use of topical antibiotics in surgery is lacking in conclusive randomized controlled trials.

  4. Survey of Intraocular Antibiotics Prophylaxis Practice after Open Globe Injury in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingsheng Lou

    Full Text Available To elucidate the Chinese practice of intraocular antibiotics administration for prophylaxis after open globe injury.A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was performed online by scanning a Quickmark (QR code with smartphones at the 20th Chinese National Conference of Ocular Trauma in November 2014.A total of 153 (30.6% of all participators at the conference responded. Of the respondents, 20.9% were routinely administered with prophylactic intraocular injection of antibiotics at the conclusion of the primary eye repair, and 56.9% were used only in cases with high risk of endophthalmitis development. The intraocular route of delivery was mainly included with intracameral injection (47.9% and intravitreal injection (42.0%. Cephalosporins (53.8% and vancomycin (42.0% were the main choices of antibiotic agents, followed by fluoroquinolones (24.3%, and aminoglycosides (13.4%. Only 21.9% preferred a combination of two or more two drugs routinely. In addition, significantly more respondents from the referral eye hospital (92.7% replied using intraocular antibiotics injection for prophylaxis compared to those respondents from the primary hospital (69.4% (p = 0.001, Fisher's exact test.Intraocular antibiotics injection for post-traumatic endophthalmitis prophylaxis is widely used in China. However, the choice of antibiotic agents and the intraocular route of delivery vary. A well-designed clinical trial is needed to establish a standardized protocol of intraocular antibiotics administration for post-traumatic endophthalmitis prophylaxis.

  5. Survey of Intraocular Antibiotics Prophylaxis Practice after Open Globe Injury in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Junlian; Yang, Yao; Yuan, Zhaohui; Lin, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To elucidate the Chinese practice of intraocular antibiotics administration for prophylaxis after open globe injury. Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was performed online by scanning a Quickmark (QR) code with smartphones at the 20th Chinese National Conference of Ocular Trauma in November 2014. Results A total of 153 (30.6%) of all participators at the conference responded. Of the respondents, 20.9% were routinely administered with prophylactic intraocular injection of antibiotics at the conclusion of the primary eye repair, and 56.9% were used only in cases with high risk of endophthalmitis development. The intraocular route of delivery was mainly included with intracameral injection (47.9%) and intravitreal injection (42.0%). Cephalosporins (53.8%) and vancomycin (42.0%) were the main choices of antibiotic agents, followed by fluoroquinolones (24.3%), and aminoglycosides (13.4%). Only 21.9% preferred a combination of two or more two drugs routinely. In addition, significantly more respondents from the referral eye hospital (92.7%) replied using intraocular antibiotics injection for prophylaxis compared to those respondents from the primary hospital (69.4%) (p = 0.001, Fisher’s exact test). Conclusions Intraocular antibiotics injection for post-traumatic endophthalmitis prophylaxis is widely used in China. However, the choice of antibiotic agents and the intraocular route of delivery vary. A well-designed clinical trial is needed to establish a standardized protocol of intraocular antibiotics administration for post-traumatic endophthalmitis prophylaxis. PMID:27275777

  6. Antibiotic prophylaxis for transrectal prostate biopsy-a new strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antsupova, Valeria; Nørgaard, Nis; Bisbjerg, Rasmus;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fluoroquinolones are extensively used as prophylaxis for transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate (TRUBP). Emerging fluoroquinolone resistance and selection of multiresistant organisms warrant new prophylactic strategies. Pivmecillinam and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid have...

  7. Evaluation of the Practice of Antibiotic Prophylaxis in a State Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Orak, Yavuz; Akkus, Sultan; Orak, Filiz; Suner, Aynur

    2015-01-01

    AbstractIn terms of antibiotic prophylaxis in surgical patients, incorrect application in hospitals is still one of the most frequently made errors in the medical practice.  Surgical site infections, with a rate of 15%-18%, are seen as the second most prevalent of all nosocomial infections.The aim of our study was to investigate the use of antibiotics implemented in surgical prophylaxis. The study was conducted on 180 patients on whom elective surgery was performed in Mardin State Hospital be...

  8. Role of phytotherapy associated with antibiotic prophylaxis in female patients with recurrent urinary tract infections

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    Emanuela Frumenzio

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of a phytotherapic which includes Solidago, Orthosiphon and Birch extract (Cistimev® in association with antibiotic prophylaxis in female patients affected by recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIr. Materials and methods: Patients affected by UTIr older than 18 years started a 3-months antibiotic prophylaxis (Prulifloxacin 600 mg, 1 cps/week or Phosphomicyn 1 cachet/week according to antibiogram after urine culture. The patients were divided in 2 groups: Group A: antibiotic prophylaxis plus phytotherapy (1 cps/die for 3 months and Group B: antibiotic prophylaxis alone. Results: 164 consecutive patients were studied: 107 were included in group A (mean age 59 ± 17.3 years and 57 (mean age 61 ± 15.7 in group B. During the treatment period the relapse frequencies between the two groups were not significantly different (p = 0.854: 12/107 (11.21% patients interrupted the treatment for UTIr in group A and 6/57 (10.52% in group B. In the long term follow-up the relapse UTI risk was significant different in the two groups with a relapse risk 2.5 greater in group B than in group A (p < 0.0001. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that in female patients affected by recurrent UTI, the association between antibiotic prophylaxis and of a phytotherapic which includes Solidago, Orthosiphon and Birch extract reduced the number of UTI in the 12 months following the end of prophylaxis and obtained a longer relapsing time, greatly improving the quality of life of the patients.

  9. ANTIBIOTIC PROPHYLAXIS IN BARIATRIC SURGERY: a continuous infusion of cefazolin versus ampicillin/sulbactam and ertapenem

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background The incidence of surgical site infection in bariatric patients is significant and the current recommendations for antibiotic prophylaxis are sometimes inadequate. Objective The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of three prophylactic antibiotic regimens on the incidence of surgical site infection. Methods A prospective, cross-sectional study was conducted between January 2009 and January 2013 in which 896 Roux-en-Y gastric bypasses were performed to treat obesity. The stud...

  10. Effect of optimized antibiotic prophylaxis on the incidence of surgical site infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mannien, J.; Kasteren, M.E.E. van; Nagelkerke, N.J.; Gyssens, I.C.J.; Kullberg, B.J.; Wille, J.C.; Boer, A.S. de

    2006-01-01

    Objective. To compare the rate of surgical site infection (SSI) before and after an intervention period in which an optimized policy for antibiotic prophylaxis was implemented. To demonstrate that a more prudent, restrictive policy would not have a detrimental effect on patient outcomes.Design. Befo

  11. Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Severe Acute Pancreatitis: Do We Need More Meta-Analytic Studies?

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    Raffaele Pezzilli

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Several guidelines on acute pancreatitis suggest that carbapenems should be used prophylactically and should be continued for 14 days, and that the development of infected necrosis should be assessed using fine-needle aspiration and the sample should be cultured for germ isolation and characterization [1]. In routine clinical practice, antibiotics are used to cure both extrapancreatic infections which appear during the course of acute pancreatitis and infected pancreatic necrosis and also as a prophylaxis in those patients who have pancreatic necrosis in order to prevent possible infection from the necrosis. In the treatment of extrapancreatic infections, the most used antibiotics were cephalosporins whereas carbapenems, glycopeptides and antifungal antibiotics were the most used antibiotics in the treatment of proven infected pancreatic necrosis [2]. Moreover, there are very few topics in pancreatology which cause as much debate as that regarding the utility of antibiotic prophylaxis in severe acute pancreatitis. There are very few human randomized studies and there are more meta-analyses published than studies published. Of course, the cost of a meta-analysis is much less than carrying out a study on the efficacy of antibiotics in severe acute pancreatitis.

  12. NICE guideline on antibiotic prophylaxis against infective endocarditis: attitudes to the guideline and implications for dental practice in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2009-03-28

    To investigate attitudes of Irish dental practitioners, cardiologists and patients with cardiac lesions to the new NICE guideline for antibiotic prophylaxis against infective endocarditis and to determine the implications of this guideline for dental practice in Ireland.

  13. Correlation of antibiotic prophylaxis and difficulty of extraction with postoperative inflammatory complications in the lower third molar surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J Y; Do, H S; Lim, J H; Jang, H S; Rim, J S; Kwon, J J; Lee, E S

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the correlation among antibiotic prophylaxis, difficulty of extraction, and postoperative complications in the removal of lower 3rd molars. A total of 1222 such extractions in 890 patients between January 2010 and January 2012 were analysed retrospectively. The difficulty of extraction measured by Pederson's index, antibiotic prophylaxis with cefditoren, and postoperative complications were recorded. The difficulty of extraction was significantly associated with postoperative complications (p=0.03). There were no significant associations between antibiotic prophylaxis and postoperative complications in groups of equal difficulty ("easy" group (class I) p=1.00; "moderate" group (class II) p=1.00; and "difficult" group (class III) p=0.65). There was a small but insignificant increase in the number of dry sockets and infections in class III cases. In conclusion, this study provides further evidence that antibiotic prophylaxis for the prevention of postoperative inflammatory complications is unnecessary for extraction of 3rd molars. PMID:24029441

  14. Should patients with hip joint prosthesis receive antibiotic prophylaxis before dental treatment?

    OpenAIRE

    Olsen, Ingar; Snorrason, Finnur; Lingaas, Egil

    2010-01-01

    The safety committee of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS) recommended in 2009 that clinicians should consider antibiotic prophylaxis for all patients with total joint replacement before any invasive procedure that may cause bacteremia. This has aroused confusion and anger among dentists asking for the evidence. The present review deals with different aspects of the rationale for this recommendation giving attention to views both in favor of and against it. Keywords: hip joint...

  15. A validated measure of adherence to antibiotic prophylaxis in children with sickle cell disease

    OpenAIRE

    Duncan NA; Kronenberger WG; Hampton KC; Bloom EM; Rampersad AG; Roberson CP; Shapiro AD

    2016-01-01

    Natalie A Duncan,1 William G Kronenberger,2 Kisha C Hampton,1 Ellen M Bloom,1 Angeli G Rampersad,1 Christopher P Roberson,1 Amy D Shapiro11Department of Hematology, Indiana Hemophilia and Thrombosis Center, 2Department of Psychiatry, Indiana University School of Medicine Riley and Child Adolescent Psychiatry Clinic, Indianapolis, IN, USABackground: Antibiotic prophylaxis is a mainstay in sickle cell disease management. However, adherence is estimated at only 66%. This study aimed to develop a...

  16. Antibiotic prophylaxis for transrectal ultrasound biopsy of the prostate in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smyth, L G

    2012-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common solid cancer affecting men in Ireland. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) biopsies of the prostate are routinely performed to diagnose prostate cancer. They are, in general, a safe procedure but are associated with a significant risk of infective complications ranging from fever, urinary tract infection to severe urosepsis. At present, there are no recommended national guidelines on the use of antibiotic prophylaxis to minimise the risk of infective complications post-TRUS biopsy.

  17. Antibiotic prophylaxis: different practice patterns within and outside the United States

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    Schwartz SG

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stephen G Schwartz,1 Andrzej Grzybowski,2 Harry W Flynn Jr1 1Department of Ophthalmology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Poznan City Hospital, Poznan, Poland Abstract: Endophthalmitis remains a rare but important cause of visual loss. Prophylaxis strategies are important to reduce rates of endophthalmitis after cataract surgery, intravitreal injection, and other procedures. There is substantial variability between the US and the rest of the world. During cataract surgery, intracameral antibiotics are commonly used in many nations, especially in Europe, but are less commonly used in the US. A randomized clinical trial from the European Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons reported an approximately fivefold reduction in endophthalmitis rates associated with intracameral cefuroxime but these results are controversial. There are no randomized clinical trials regarding endophthalmitis associated with intravitreal injection. Topical antibiotics are commonly used in many nations, but are less commonly used in the US. At this time, there is no global consensus and it appears unlikely that additional major clinical trials will conclusively define the optimal endophthalmitis prophylaxis techniques. Keywords: cataract surgery, endophthalmitis, intracameral antibiotic, intravitreal injection, prophylaxis

  18. Antibiotic prophylaxis in orthopedic surgeries: the results of an implemented protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Queiroz

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Though the basic principles of antibiotic prophylaxis have been well established, there is still considerable incorrect usage, including how much is prescribed and especially in the duration of treatment, which is generally superior to what is indicated. The adequate use of these drugs contributes towards decreasing the time of internment of the patient, prevents surgical site infection (SSI, decreasing the development of resistant microorganisms, and towards reduced costs for the hospital pharmacy. A protocol for the use of antibiotic prophylaxis in the Orthopedics and Traumatology Service of the Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual de São Paulo was developed. The objectives of the study were to promote rational antibiotic surgical prophylaxis, through the implantation of a protocol for the use of these drugs in a surgical unit, with the direct contribution of a druggist in collaboration with the Infection Control Committee, to evaluate the adhesion of the health team to the protocol during three distinct periods (daily pre-protocol, early post-protocol and late post-protocol and to define the consumption of antimicrobials used, measured as daily defined dose.

  19. Antibiotic prophylaxis compliance for clean-contaminated wounds in a district hospital in Jakarta

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    Syachroni Syachroni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakLatar belakang: Insidens infeksi luka operasi (ILO masih menjadi masalah namun kejadiannya dapatdikurangi dengan tindakan pencegahan yaitu antara lain dengan pemberian antibiotik profilaksis.Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menilai kesesuaian penggunaan antibiotik profilaksis pada pasien bedahbersih-terkontaminasi.Metode: Penelitian potong lintang di sebuah rumah sakit umum daerah (RSUD di Jakarta pada periode1 Januari sampai 31 Desember 2013. Data berasal dari rekam medik pasien dewasa yang menjalanipembedahan dengan kriteria kelas luka bedah bersih-terkontaminasi kecuali bedah sesar. Analisis datadilakukan secara deskriptif. Sebagai standar penggunaan antibiotika digunakan Permenkes RI No.2406/2011 tentang pedoman antibiotik nasional dan pedoman standar internasional untuk profilaksis bedah.Hasil: Sebanyak 626 subjek diikutsertakan dalam penelitian dengan bedah ginekologi (49,5% dangenitourinari (32,6% merupakan tindakan bedah terbanyak dan lebih dari 80% bedah elektif. Jenisantibiotik yang paling umum digunakan baik preoperatif maupun postoperatif adalah seftriakson (49,8%,ampisilin/sulbaktam (11,7% dan sefuroksim (8,3%. Keseluruhan ketepatan antibiotik profilaksis diketahui96,8% tepat indikasi prosedur bedah, 21,5% tepat obat dan hanya 2,3% tepat waktu pemberiannya 60menit sebelum operasi.Kesimpulan: Kepatuhan antibiotik profilaksis untuk bedah bersih-terkontaminasi di suatu RSUD Jakartabelum sesuai dengan pedoman nasional dan standar internasional. (Health Science Journal of Indonesia2015;6:57-62Kata kunci: antibiotik, bedah, bersih-terkontaminasi, kepatuhan, profilaksis. AbstractBackground: The incidence of surgical site infection (SSI is still a problem, but its occurrence can bereduced by preventive action such as the provision of antibiotic prophylaxis in surgery. This study aimedto describe the compliance of antibiotic prophylaxis in clean-contaminated wounds.Methods: This cross-sectional study design was conducted in a district

  20. ANTIBIOTIC PROPHYLAXIS IN BARIATRIC SURGERY: a continuous infusion of cefazolin versus ampicillin/sulbactam and ertapenem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Antônio Bandeira FERRAZ

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background The incidence of surgical site infection in bariatric patients is significant and the current recommendations for antibiotic prophylaxis are sometimes inadequate. Objective The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of three prophylactic antibiotic regimens on the incidence of surgical site infection. Methods A prospective, cross-sectional study was conducted between January 2009 and January 2013 in which 896 Roux-en-Y gastric bypasses were performed to treat obesity. The study compared three groups of patients according to the perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis administered intravenously and beginning at anesthesia induction: Group I consisting of 194 patients treated with two 3-g doses of ampicillin/sulbactam; Group II with 303 patients treated with a single 1-g dose of ertapenem; and Group III with 399 patients treated with a 2-g dose of cefazolin at anesthesia induction followed by a continuous infusion of cefazolin 1g throughout the surgical procedure. The rate of surgical site infection was analyzed, as well as its association with age, sex, preoperative weight, body mass index and comorbidities. Results The rates of surgical site infection were 4.16% in the group treated prophylactically with ampicillin/sulbactam, 1.98% in the ertapenem group and 1.55% in the continuous cefazolin group. Conclusion The prophylactic use of continuous cefazolin in surgeries for morbid obesity shows very promising results. These findings suggest that some prophylactic regimens need to be reconsidered and even substituted by more effective therapies for the prevention of surgical site infections in bariatric patients.

  1. Preventing neonatal group B streptococcal infection. Intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis in some high-risk situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Group B streptococci (GBS) are the leading cause of life-threatening neonatal bacterial infections in developed countries. The newborn is initially colonised during passage through the birth canal. Maternal vaginal carriage is usually asymptomatic. How safe and effective are strategies aimed at preventing severe neonatal GBS infection? To answer these questions, we conducted a review of the literature using the standard Prescrire methodology. In France, Group B streptococci are present in the vagina of about 10-15% of women towards the end of pregnancy. Mother-to-child transmission can occur when the membranes rupture, or during delivery. About one-third of infants born to mothers who carry Group B streptococci are colonised at birth. GBS colonisation rarely affects the newborn's health but, during the first 7 days of life, about 3% of colonised children develop a serious early-onset infection, particularly meningitis, which may be fatal or leave sequelae. Late-onset infections (after 7 days of life) do not appear to be linked to intrapartum colonisation. The risk of early neonatal GBS infection increases in cases of preterm delivery, maternal fever during delivery, and membrane rupture more than 18 hours before delivery. These situations account for 50% to 75% of early neonatal GBS infections. Several randomised trials suggest that intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis in women who carry Group B streptococci, from the onset of labour until delivery, reduces the risk of early-onset neonatal GBS infection from 4.7% to 0.4% (p = 0.02). Other antibiotic strategies are less well assessed or appear to be less effective. Penicillin G (benzylpenicillin) is the antibiotic of choice, while penicillin A (ampicillin or amoxicillin) is an alternative. In case of penicillin allergy, erythromycin or clindamycin are generally active against Group B streptococci and carry no particular risks for the infant. The greatest risk associated with penicillin, especially injectable forms, is

  2. Comparative Effectiveness of Single versus Combination Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Infections after Transrectal Prostate Biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Kaylee; Parlee, Anne; Orlando, Ralph; Lerner, Lori; Strymish, Judith; Gupta, Kalpana

    2015-12-01

    An increase in fluoroquinolone resistance and transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate (TRUS) biopsy infections has prompted the need for alternative effective antibiotic prophylaxis. We aimed to compare ciprofloxacin and other single-agent therapies to combination therapy for efficacy and adverse effects. Men who underwent a TRUS biopsy within the VA Boston health care system with documented receipt of prophylactic antibiotics periprocedure were eligible for inclusion. Postprocedure infections within 30 days were ascertained by chart review from electronic records, including any inpatient, outpatient, or urgent-care visits. Among 455 evaluable men over a 3-year period, there were 25 infections (5.49%), with sepsis occurring in 2.4%, urinary tract infections (UTI) in 1.54%, and bacteremia in 0.44% of patients. Escherichia coli was the most common urine (89%) and blood (92%) pathogen, with fluoroquinolone resistance rates of 88% and 91%, respectively. Ciprofloxacin alone was associated with significantly more infections than ciprofloxacin plus an additional agent (P = 0.014). Intramuscular gentamicin alone was also significantly associated with a higher infection rate obtained with all other regimens (P = 0.004). Any single-agent regimen, including ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone, or gentamicin, was associated with significantly higher infection rates than any combination regimen (odds ratio [OR], 4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.47, 10.85; P = 0.004). Diabetes, immunosuppressive condition or medication, hospitalization within the previous year, and UTI within the previous 6 months were not associated with infection risk. Clostridium difficile infections were similar. These findings suggest that ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone, and gentamicin alone are inferior to a combination regimen. Institutions with high failure rates of prophylaxis for TRUS biopsies should consider combination regimens derived from their local data. PMID:26369958

  3. Prospective study of antibiotic prophylaxis for prostate biopsy involving >1100 men.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Manecksha, Rustom P

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to compare infection rates for two 3-day antibiotic prophylaxis regimens for transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (TRUSgbp) and demonstrate local microbiological trends. In 2008, 558 men and, in 2009, 625 men had TRUSgpb. Regimen 1 (2008) comprised 400 mg Ofloxacin immediately before biopsy and 200 mg 12-hourly for 3 days. Regimen 2 (2009) comprised Ofloxacin 200 mg 12-hourly for 3 days commencing 24 hours before biopsy. 20\\/558 (3.6%) men had febrile episodes with regimen 1 and 10\\/625 (1.6%) men with regimen 2 (P = 0.03). E. coli was the most frequently isolated organism. Overall, 7\\/13 (54%) of positive urine cultures were quinolone resistant and (5\\/13) 40% were multidrug resistant. Overall, 5\\/9 (56%) patients with septicaemia were quinolone resistant. All patients were sensitive to Meropenem. There was 1 (0.2%) death with regimen 1. Commencing Ofloxacin 24 hours before TRUSgpb reduced the incidence of febrile episodes significantly. We observed the emergence of quinolone and multidrug-resistant E. coli. Meropenem should be considered for unresolving sepsis.

  4. Profilaxia antimicrobiana na cirurgia bariátrica Antibiotic prophylaxis in bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Antonio Bandeira Ferraz

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar os resultados da incidência de infecção do sítio cirúrgico com três diferentes esquemas antimicrobianos. MÉTODO: No período de Janeiro de 1999 a Dezembro de 2004 foram realizadas 716 cirurgias para o tratamento da Obesidade mórbida, seguindo a técnica proposta por Fobi/Capella. Foram estudados comparativamente três grupos de pacientes: Grupo I - (185 em que foi realizada a profilaxia antimicrobiana com ampicilina/sulbactam, na dose de 3g em duas doses; Grupo II (280 em que a profilaxia foi com ceftriaxona na dose de 1g (dose única; e Grupo III (251 em que a profilaxia foi com ertapenem, na dose de 1 g (dose única. RESULTADOS: O resultado do presente estudo demonstra taxas de infecção do sítio cirúrgico de 3,78% no grupo de profilaxia com ampicilina-sulbactam, 6,81% no grupo de profilaxia com ceftriaxona e de 1,99% no grupo de ertapenem. Não houve diferença estatisticamente significativa entre o uso da associação ampicilina/sulbactam ou ceftriaxona com relação à incidência de infecção do sítio cirúrgico. No entanto, quando comparados os resultados do Grupo II (Ceftriaxona com o Grupo III (Ertapenem, houve uma diferença estatisticamente sisgnificante. CONCLUSÃO: A utilização do ertapenem, de maneira profilática, no tratamento cirúrgico da obesidade mórbida, determinou taxas de infecção do sítio cirúrgico estatisticamente inferiores ao grupo de ceftriaxona e similar ao de ampicilina-sulbactam.BACKGROUND:To analyze the results of the incidence of wound infection under 3 different antibiotics regiments. METHODS: Between January, 1999 and December, 2004, 716 bariatric surgeries had been performed using the technique proposed by Fobi/Capella. Three groups of patients had been compared, according to the antibiotic prophylaxys regimen: Group I: (n=185 ampicillin/sulbactam, 3g in two doses; Group II (n=280: ceftriaxone, 1g (single dose; and Group III: (n=251 ertapenem, 1 g (single dose. RESULTS

  5. Antibiotic Prescriptions and Prophylaxis in Italian Children. Is It Time to Change? Data from the ARPEC Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagnani, Carlotta; Lo Vecchio, Andrea; Romanengo, Marta; Tagliabue, Claudia; Centenari, Chiara; D’Argenio, Patrizia; Lundin, Rebecca; Giaquinto, Carlo; Galli, Luisa; Guarino, Alfredo; Esposito, Susanna; Sharland, Mike; Versporten, Ann; Goossens, Herman; Nicolini, Giangiacomo

    2016-01-01

    Background Antimicrobials are the most commonly prescribed drugs. Many studies have evaluated antibiotic prescriptions in the paediatric outpatient but few studies describing the real antibiotic consumption in Italian children’s hospitals have been published. Point-prevalence survey (PPS) has been shown to be a simple, feasible and reliable standardized method for antimicrobials surveillance in children and neonates admitted to the hospital. In this paper, we presented data from a PPS on antimicrobial prescriptions carried out in 7 large Italian paediatric institutions. Methods A 1-day PPS on antibiotic use in hospitalized neonates and children was performed in Italy between October and December 2012 as part of the Antibiotic Resistance and Prescribing in European Children project (ARPEC). Seven institutions in seven Italian cities were involved. The survey included all admitted patients less than 18 years of age present in the ward at 8:00 am on the day of the survey, who had at least one on-going antibiotic prescription. For all patients data about age, weight, underlying disease, antimicrobial agent, dose and indication for treatment were collected. Results The PPS was performed in 61 wards within 7 Italian institutions. A total of 899 patients were eligible and 349 (38.9%) had an on-going prescription for one or more antibiotics, with variable rates among the hospitals (25.7% - 53.8%). We describe antibiotic prescriptions separately in neonates ( = 30 days to <18 years old). In the neonatal cohort, 62.8% received antibiotics for prophylaxis and only 37.2% on those on antibiotics were treated for infection. Penicillins and aminoglycosides were the most prescribed antibiotic classes. In the paediatric cohort, 64.4% of patients were receiving antibiotics for treatment of infections and 35.5% for prophylaxis. Third generation cephalosporins and penicillin plus inhibitors were the top two antibiotic classes. The main reason for prescribing antibiotic therapy in

  6. An abscess due to Pasteurella multocida after a cat scratch: Case report and evaluation of antibiotic prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeşim Alpay

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pasteurella multocida has been isolated from 50% to 70% of healthy cats and most commonly associated with acute skin and soft tissue infections following an animal bite or scratch. As the zone and depth of injury can lead to more serious infections such as deep tissue infections, septic arthritis, osteomyelitis. However, no predictive factor showing which wound would be infected. In our case, patient whom applied with abscess after a cat scratch and P. multocida was found as a causative agent. This situation has caused to review us, once more, that which cases should be taken antibiotic pro­phylaxis in addition to immunoprophylaxis (for rabies post-exposure prophylaxis, and anti-tetanus prophylaxis in the first admission. Antibiotic prophylaxis should be used for 3-5 days in selected cases if they include; moderate to severe crushing injuries especially edematous form, less than 8 hours old, bone or joint penetration, hand wounds, especially emphasizes the importance of hand injuries and deep penetrations. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2014; 4(4: 159-161

  7. Is Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) of Primary Liver Tumors Necessary? Results From a Single-Center Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatia, Shivank S., E-mail: sbhatia1@med.miami.edu [University of Miami, Vascular/Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Miller School of Medicine (United States); Spector, Seth, E-mail: sspector@med.miami.edu [University of Miami, Department of Surgery, VA Hospital (Veterans Affairs Medical Center) (United States); Echenique, Ana, E-mail: aechenique@med.miami.edu; Froud, Tatiana, E-mail: tfroud@med.miami.edu; Suthar, Rekha, E-mail: rsuthar@med.miami.edu; Lawson, Ivy, E-mail: i.lawson1@med.miami.edu; Dalal, Ravi, E-mail: rdalal@med.miami.edu [University of Miami, Vascular/Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Miller School of Medicine (United States); Dinh, Vy, E-mail: vdinh@med.miami.edu [VA Hospital (Veterans Affairs Medical Center), Department of Medicine (United States); Yrizarry, Jose, E-mail: jyrizarr@med.miami.edu; Narayanan, Govindarajan, E-mail: gnarayanan@med.miami.edu [University of Miami, Vascular/Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Miller School of Medicine (United States)

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to evaluate need for antibiotic prophylaxis for radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of liver tumors in patients with no significant co-existing risk factors for infection.Materials and MethodsFrom January 2004 to September 2013, 83 patients underwent 123 percutaneous RFA procedures for total of 152 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) lesions. None of the patients had pre-existing biliary enteric anastomosis (BEA) or any biliary tract abnormality predisposing to ascending biliary infection or uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. No pre- or post-procedure antibiotic prophylaxis was provided for 121 procedures. Data for potential risk factors were reviewed retrospectively and analyzed for the frequency of infectious complications, including abscess formation.ResultsOne patient (1/121 (0.8 %) RFA sessions) developed a large segment 5 liver abscess/infected biloma communicating with the gallbladder 7 weeks after the procedure, successfully treated over 10 weeks with IV and PO antibiotic therapy and percutaneous catheter drainage. This patient did not receive any antibiotics prior to RFA. During the procedure, there was inadvertent placement of RFA probe tines into the gallbladder. No other infectious complications were documented.ConclusionThese data suggest that the routine use of prophylactic antibiotics for liver RFA is not necessary in majority of the patients undergoing liver ablation for HCC and could be limited to patients with high-risk factors such as the presence of BEA or other biliary abnormalities, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, and large centrally located tumors in close proximity to central bile ducts. Larger randomized studies are needed to confirm this hypothesis.

  8. Is Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) of Primary Liver Tumors Necessary? Results From a Single-Center Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to evaluate need for antibiotic prophylaxis for radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of liver tumors in patients with no significant co-existing risk factors for infection.Materials and MethodsFrom January 2004 to September 2013, 83 patients underwent 123 percutaneous RFA procedures for total of 152 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) lesions. None of the patients had pre-existing biliary enteric anastomosis (BEA) or any biliary tract abnormality predisposing to ascending biliary infection or uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. No pre- or post-procedure antibiotic prophylaxis was provided for 121 procedures. Data for potential risk factors were reviewed retrospectively and analyzed for the frequency of infectious complications, including abscess formation.ResultsOne patient (1/121 (0.8 %) RFA sessions) developed a large segment 5 liver abscess/infected biloma communicating with the gallbladder 7 weeks after the procedure, successfully treated over 10 weeks with IV and PO antibiotic therapy and percutaneous catheter drainage. This patient did not receive any antibiotics prior to RFA. During the procedure, there was inadvertent placement of RFA probe tines into the gallbladder. No other infectious complications were documented.ConclusionThese data suggest that the routine use of prophylactic antibiotics for liver RFA is not necessary in majority of the patients undergoing liver ablation for HCC and could be limited to patients with high-risk factors such as the presence of BEA or other biliary abnormalities, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, and large centrally located tumors in close proximity to central bile ducts. Larger randomized studies are needed to confirm this hypothesis

  9. Discrete Choice Experiment to Evaluate Factors That Influence Preferences for Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Pediatric Oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Regier, Dean A; Caroline Diorio; Marie-Chantal Ethier; Amanda Alli; Sarah Alexander; Boydell, Katherine M.; Adam Gassas; Jonathan Taylor; Charis Kellow; Denise Mills; Lillian Sung

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bacterial and fungal infections in pediatric oncology patients cause morbidity and mortality. The clinical utility of antimicrobial prophylaxis in children is uncertain and the personal utility of these agents is disputed. Objectives were to use a discrete choice experiment to: (1) describe the importance of attributes to parents and healthcare providers when deciding between use and non-use of antibacterial and antifungal prophylaxis; and (2) estimate willingness-to-pay for proph...

  10. Adoption of intracameral antibiotic prophylaxis of endophthalmitis following cataract surgery: update on the ESCRS Endophthalmitis Study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barry, Peter

    2014-01-01

    To determine the use of intracameral cefuroxime at the end of cataract surgery since the beneficial results were first reported by the European Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons Endophthalmitis Study Group in 2006, 250 ophthalmic surgeons affiliated with both public and private hospitals and clinics across Europe were surveyed. The questions regarded their awareness of the results of the ESCRS endophthalmitis study and their current use or non-use of intracameral antibiotics in their cataract procedures. Seventy-four percent of respondents said they always or usually use intracameral antibiotics in their cataract surgery procedures. The most frequently cited reasons for not using cefuroxime or other intracameral antibiotics was the lack of an approved commercial preparation and related anxieties regarding the risk of dilution errors and contamination. More than 90% of respondents said they would use cefuroxime if an approved single-unit dose product were commercially available.

  11. Ciprofloxacin prophylaxis delays initiation of broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy and reduces the overall use of antimicrobial agents during induction therapy for acute leukaemia: A single-centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallböök, Helene; Lidström, Anna-Karin; Pauksens, Karlis

    2016-06-01

    Background Due to an outbreak of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae, the routine use of fluoroquinolone prophylaxis was questioned. As a result, this study was conducted with the aim to evaluate the impact of ciprofloxacin-prophylaxis on the use of broad-spectrum antibioctics and anti-mycotics. Methods A cohort of 139 consecutive patients with acute leukaemia treated with remission-inducing induction chemotherapy between 2004-2012 at the Department of Haematology in Uppsala University Hospital was analysed. Results Fifty-three patients (38%) received broad-spectrum antibiotics at the initiation of chemotherapy and were not eligible for prophylaxis. Of the remaining patients, the initiation of broad-spectrum antibiotics was delayed by 3 days in those receiving ciprofloxacin prophylaxis (n = 47) compared with those receiving no prophylaxis (n = 39). The median duration of systemic antibiotic treatment was 6 days shorter in patients receiving ciprofloxacin prophylaxis (12 vs 18 days; p = 0.0005) and the cumulative (total) median days on systemic antibiotic treatment was shortened by 8 days (15 vs 23 days, p = 0.0008). Piperacillin/tazobactam (p = 0.02), carbapenems (p = 0.05) and empiric broad-spectrum antifungals (p antibiotic use in this study. These benefits must be evaluated vs the risks of development of resistant bacterial strains, making fluoroquinolone prophylaxis an open question for debate. PMID:27030917

  12. Antibiotic prophylaxis for bacterial endocarditis: A study of knowledge of guidelines among dentists participated in the 47th international congress of dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashemipour M.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Infective endocarditis is a rare disease resulted in mortality and morbidity in 10-80% of patients. The purpose of present study was to investigate the knowledge of guidelines on antibiotic prophylaxis for bacterial endocarditis in a group of Iranian dentists. "nMaterials and Methods: This was a descriptive study in which the population under study was 205 who were participated in the 47th international congress of dentistry (Tehran-Spring 2007 and they were chosen by census sampling methods. Nameless questionnaires were designed and were given to the dentists to complete. The t-test, χ² and spearman with the SPSS 13.5 program were used in the data analysis. P<0.05 was considered as the level of significance. "nResults: Regarding to the prescribing of prophylactic antibiotic for patients with prosthetic cardiac valves, 94.6% of all answers were correct. Also, the most common procedures in which the prophylaxis antibiotic was distinguished to be necessary were periodontal surgery, scaling, dental extraction and using subgingival cord, respectively. More than half of the dentists (65.8% had chosen amoxicillin as a prophylactic antibiotic. Mean knowledge score was 38.77±12.4. "nConclusion: Results of the present study showed that the knowledge of dentists about prescribing antibiotics for prevention of bacterial endocarditis is relatively low. It was also found that the level of knowledge decreases by passing time from graduation.

  13. Antibiotic prophylaxis in variceal hemorrhage:Timing,effectiveness and Clostridium difficile rates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthew; RL; Brown; Graeme; Jones; Kathryn; L; Nash; Mark; Wright; Indra; Neil; Guha

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate if antibiotics administered within 8 h of endoscopy reduce mortality or increase the incidence of Clostridium difficile infection(CDI).METHODS:A 2-year retrospective analysis of all patients who presented with first variceal hemorrhage was undertaken.The primary outcome measure was 28-d mortality.Secondary outcome measures were 28-d rebleeding rates and 28-d incidence of CDI.All patients were admitted to a tertiary liver unit with a consultantled,24-h endoscopy service.Patients received s...

  14. Study to identify and rectify the causes of failure to administer Intra partum antibiotic prophylaxis in Group B streptococcus positive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To perform an audit to review and minimize the reasons of failure to administer Intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis (IAP) to all GBS positive mothers who presented in labor and it?s effect on fetal outcome. Methodology: A review of all the electronic charts at Tawam Hospital during a 6 month period from 6th April till 6th October 2009. It included women who presented in labor with a GBS positive status who needed to receive IAP and their babies blood cultures were performed postnatal. Results: There were 2405 deliveries during this period. Two hundred and nine cases were GBS positive. IAP was given only to 48 patients i.e 23% while 161 (77%) did not receive any treatment. The various reasons documented were patient presented late in active labor were 59%. Medication (Penicillin) was ordered but delayed from pharmacy. Penicillin ordered late or not ordered by the doctor in 14% and 1% were the patients who underwent elective c-section. All the babies had no growth of GBS with blood culture postnatal. Conclusion: The various strategies to improve the rate of administration of IAP which have been discussed above including patient education, patient information leaflet, physician order from antenatal clinic and midwife ordering the IAP need to be addressed and implement a new guideline. (author)

  15. Randomized controlled trial of antibiotic prophylaxis regimens for transrectai ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAN Eddie Shu-yin; LO Ka-lun; NG Chi-fai; HOU See-ming; YIP Sidney Kam-hung

    2012-01-01

    Background A prior study showed significant antibioti resistance to quinotone in our poputation.In this study we aimed to evaluate and compare the efficacy of a single versus a combined prophylactic antibiotic regimen before transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy(TRUGPB).Methods A prospective randomized study was conducted at a university hospital.Patients undergoing TRUGPB were randomized into an amoicillin-clavulanate alone(1mg;one dose before and two doses after biopsy)or an amoxicllin-clavulanate+ciprofloxacin group(250mg;one dose before and two doses after biopsy).Patients were surveyed for infection symptoms by phine on days 3 and 30 after TRUGPB.We defined an infective complication as the iccurrence of symptoms including fever,chills or rigor within 30 days after prostate biopsy,requiring medical treatment or hospitalization,aided by a tertiory-wide etectronic medical record system.Results Between November 2007 and July 2009,367 patients were randomized to either amoxicillin-clavulanate alone or amoxicillin-caavulanate+ciprofloxacin group.The infection rates after TRUGPB were 3.9%in the former group(7 out of 179 patoents)versus 0.53%(1 out of 188 patients)in the latter.Sixty-three percent(5/8)of patients with infective complications needed hospitalization.There was no intensive care unit admission or mortality during the study period.Conclusions Combining prophylactic antibiotics with amoxicllin-clavulanate+soprofloxacin significantly reduced the in cidence of infective complications after TRUGPB.We recommended a combination regimen,especially in centre with high incidence of post-TRUGPB infection.

  16. Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariprasad, Seenu M; Mieler, William F

    2016-01-01

    The Endophthalmitis Vitrectomy Study (EVS) provided ophthalmologists with evidence-based management strategies to deal with endophthalmitis for the first time. However, since the completion of the EVS, numerous unresolved issues remain. The use of oral antibiotics has important implications for the ophthalmologist, particularly in the prophylaxis and/or management of postoperative, posttraumatic, or bleb-associated bacterial endophthalmitis. One can reasonably conclude that significant intraocular penetration of an antibiotic after oral administration may be a property unique to the newer-generation fluoroquinolones. Prophylactic use of mupirocin nasal ointment resulted in significant reduction of conjunctival flora with or without preoperative topical 5% povidone-iodine preparation. Ocular fungal infections have traditionally been very difficult to treat due to limited therapeutic options both systemically and intravitreally. Because of its broad spectrum of coverage, low MIC90 levels for the organisms of concern, good tolerability, and excellent bioavailability, voriconazole through various routes of administration may be useful to the ophthalmologist in the primary treatment of or as an adjunct to the current management of ocular fungal infections. PMID:26501865

  17. Revisões sistemáticas de antibioticoprofilaxia em cesarianas Systematic reviews of antibiotic prophylaxis in cesareans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Marques Martins

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do trabalho foi analisar a evidência científica disponível sobre os efeitos da antibioticoprofilaxia em cesarianas. As presentes revisões sistemáticas compreenderam um exame detalhado da qualidade do desenho e da execução assim como da heterogeneidade clínica entre os ensaios. A meta-análise dos ensaios placebo-controlados (27 estudos apontou eficácia aproximada de 65% para ambos os desfechos estudados, endometrite e infecção da ferida cirúrgica (IFC, correspondendo a uma queda da incidência de 11% e 5%, respectivamente. As análises de sensibilidade mostraram efeitos sumários semelhantes aos observados para o conjunto dos ensaios. O subgrupo dos 12 ensaios de cesáreas não eletivas indicou benefício importante da antibioticoprofilaxia para ambos os desfechos, correspondente a uma queda de 14% (endometrite e 5% (IFC. Para cesáreas eletivas (dois ensaios, não foi mostrado benefício relevante. A evidência obtida dos ensaios comparativos de doses foi limitada devido a falhas metodológicas importantes e ao pequeno número de pacientes envolvidas (três ensaios. Os ensaios comparativos de antimicrobianos (sete estudos não evidenciaram diferença de eficácia entre os dois esquemas analisados, cefalosporinas de 1ª e de 2ª geração.This study reviews the available evidence on the efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis in cesarean sections. The study included a detailed analysis of the quality of design and performance and the clinical heterogeneity of selected clinical trials. Meta-analysis of placebo-controlled trials estimated an efficacy of some 65% for the two study endpoints, endometritis and surgical wound infection, corresponding to a decrease in infection rates of some 11% and 5%, respectively. Sensitivity analyses showed summary effects similar to those observed for all studies. Results for the non-elective cesarean sections subgroup (12 studies indicated a relevant benefit for both endpoints, corresponding to

  18. THE EFFECTS OF ANTIBIOTIC PROPHYLAXIS ON INFECTIOUS COMPLICATIONS AFTER CAESAREAN SECTION: A RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL IN A TERTIARY HOSPITAL OF EASTERN INDIA

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    Shelley

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: CONTEXT: Infectious complications after caesarean deliveries are an important and substantial cause of maternal morbidity and inc rease in the hospital stay and cost of treatment. Routine prophylaxis with antibiotics may reduce this risk. AIMS: To determine whether prophylactic antibiotic administration using ceftriaxone at the time of caesarean section significantly reduces maternal and neonatal infectious complications . SETTINGS AND DESIGN: The study was conducted in a tertiary teaching hospi tal of eastern India during March 2011 to October 2011. It was a prospective, double-b lind randomised placebo-controlled trial. METHODS AND MATERIAL: After exclusion due to different reasons, 288 patien ts were enrolled in study group and received prophylactic inje ction ceftriaxone. 293 patients were enrolled in control group who received placebo. Patie nts were randomly selected according to computerized randomization protocol. Postpartum infect ious complications were recorded, as were the duration of hospital stay and neonatal compl ications. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED: Analysis of statistical data was done by using stat istical software Open Epi, 8version 2.3.1. RESULTS: Wound indurations, discharge, erythema were 2.43% a nd 5.80% in study and control group respectively and it was statistically significa nt with p value 0.043 (RR=0.419, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.405. Endomyometritis was more in control group (1.04% vs. 3.75% with p value 0.036 and RR=0.279 and CMLE OR= 0.272. No significant relationship with neonatal morbidities was found. Maternal stay in ho spital was significantly more with p=0.01 in control group. CONCLUSIONS: Antibiotic prophylaxis prior to skin incision of caes arean sections resulted in better maternal outcome when i nfectious morbidity and postoperative hospital stay were concerned, without influencing th e neonatal outcome.

  19. Antibioticoprofilaxia na colecistectomia videolaparoscópica eletiva: estudo prospectivo randomizado e duplo cego Antibiotic prophylaxis in elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a prospective, randomized and double blind study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamilton Petry de Souza

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar a necessidade de profilaxia antibiótica em colecistectomias videolaparoscópicas eletivas. MÉTODO: Estudo prospectivo, randomizado e duplo-cego, em pacientes submetidos à colecistectomia videolaparoscópica eletiva, durante o período de Junho de 2003 a Julho de 2007, com alocação de 163 pacientes em dois grupos: A (n=82, recebeu profilaxia com cefoxitina 2g intravenoso na indução anestésica; B (n=81, recebeu solução salina 2 mililitros intravenoso. A equipe e a técnica cirúrgica utilizadas foram as mesmas. O desfecho avaliado foram complicações infecciosas de sítio cirúrgico, isto é, infecção de ferida operatória e abscessos superficiais e/ou profundos. Os pacientes foram revisados em sete e 28 dias pós-operatório. Os dados foram analisados pelo Teste exato de Fisher (pBACKGROUND: To identify the need for antibiotic prophylaxis usage in routine laparoscopic cholecystectomy. METHODS: A prospective, randomized double-blind study was done in patients submitted to routine laparoscopic cholecystectomy from June 2003 to July 2007, with 163 patients divided in two groups: Group A (n=82 received antibiotic prophylaxis with Cefoxitin 2g IV at anesthesia induction; Group B (n=81 received 2 mL of isotonic sodium chloride solution at same time. Surgical technique and team were the same. The purpose of this study was to search the outcome for surgical site infections and superficial or deep abscesses. The patients were examined at 7 and 28 days after surgery. Data were analyzed by Fisher's exact test. RESULTS: This study showed infection complication rates of 4.76% in group A and 6.17% in group B. There were no statistical significant differences (p = 0.746 for infection complication rates in both groups. The groups were homogeneous and comparable. CONCLUSIONS: Patients submitted to routine laparoscopic cholecystectomy with low surgical risk do not need antibiotic prophylaxis, because it will not result in lower

  20. The incidence of deep brain stimulator hardware infection: the effect of change in antibiotic prophylaxis regimen and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Robin; Dalton, Arthur; Richards, Mike; Hopkins, Chris; Aziz, Tipu; Nandi, Dipankar

    2011-10-01

    The complication of hardware infection related to deep brain stimulator implantation (or revision) varies between 0 and 15.2% in the literature. However, no national guidelines exist at present to define an average or acceptable rate of infection associated with, nor the preferred antibiotic prophylaxis required for, this procedure. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of changing the antibiotic prophylaxis regimen used in a single neurosurgical centre on the incidence and outcome of hardware infection. A prospective cohort of 38 patients undergoing deep brain stimulation (DBS) implantation or internal pulse generator (IPG) replacement and receiving perioperative vancomycin (including intravenous gentamicin on induction) and pouch-installed gentamicin, was compared to a historical cohort of 35 patients receiving perioperative cefuroxime in the same unit. The infection rate over 2 years in the prospective group for DBS surgery was 0 compared to 1 (5.6%) in the historical cohort (p = 0.11, χ(2)); the infection rate for IPG replacements was 1(3.6%) in the prospective cohort, versus 3 (17.6%) in the historical (p = 0.44, χ(2)). In this article, we have also systematically reviewed the literature to date and derived an average infection rate of 4.7% (PI 0.9-22%, Random Effects Meta-analysis, Stata) for 35 studies comprising 3550 patients. There is no significant difference in infection rates between DBS procedures that are primarily internalised (n = 9) compared to those in which there is a period of electrode externalisation (n = 23) (p = 0.9, Meta-regression analysis, Stata). PMID:21501065

  1. Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibiotics are powerful medicines that fight bacterial infections. Used properly, antibiotics can save lives. They either kill bacteria or ... natural defenses can usually take it from there. Antibiotics do not fight infections caused by viruses, such ...

  2. Evaluation of the effects of intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis on newborn intestinal microbiota using a sequencing approach targeted to multi hypervariable 16S rDNA regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloisio, Irene; Quagliariello, Andrea; De Fanti, Sara; Luiselli, Donata; De Filippo, Carlotta; Albanese, Davide; Corvaglia, Luigi Tommaso; Faldella, Giacomo; Di Gioia, Diana

    2016-06-01

    Different factors are known to influence the early gut colonization in newborns, among them the perinatal use of antibiotics. On the other hand, the effect on the baby of the administration of antibiotics to the mother during labor, referred to as intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis (IAP), has received less attention, although routinely used in group B Streptococcus positive women to prevent the infection in newborns. In this work, the fecal microbiota of neonates born to mothers receiving IAP and of control subjects were compared taking advantage for the first time of high-throughput DNA sequencing technology. Seven different 16S rDNA hypervariable regions (V2, V3, V4, V6 + V7, V8, and V9) were amplified and sequenced using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine. The results obtained showed significant differences in the microbial composition of newborns born to mothers who had received IAP, with a lower abundance of Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes as well as an overrepresentation of Proteobacteria. Considering that the seven hypervariable regions showed different discriminant ability in the taxonomic identification, further analyses were performed on the V4 region evidencing in IAP infants a reduced microbial richness and biodiversity, as well as a lower number of bacterial families with a predominance of Enterobacteriaceae members. In addition, this analysis pointed out a significant reduction in Bifidobacterium spp. strains. The reduced abundance of these beneficial microorganisms, together with the increased amount of potentially pathogenic bacteria, may suggest that IAP infants are more exposed to gastrointestinal or generally health disorders later in age. PMID:26971496

  3. Comparative evaluation of short-term versus long-term post-operative antibiotic prophylaxis after mandibular fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Goel

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: No significant difference in post-operative infection rates was seen between two groups which suggests short-term post-operative antibiotic treatment is equally efficacious as long-term treatment. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2015; 4(4.000: 761-764

  4. Antibioticoprofilaxia em cirurgias de cães e gatos: necessidade e realidade Antibiotic prophylaxis in surgery of dogs and cats: the necessity and the reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Pontes Braga

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A administração profilática de antimicrobianos tem por objetivo evitar a contaminação do ferimento cirúrgico, após exposição a algum micro-organismo e antes da instalação do processo de infecção, devendo alcançar e manter concentrações antimicrobianas inibitórias, no local da incisão, durante todo o procedimento cirúrgico, a fim de evitar o crescimento de patógenos contaminantes. Na medicina veterinária, a antibioticoprofilaxia é claramente aceita como importante medida da redução e controle da incidência de infecções do sítio cirúrgico. Este estudo objetivou avaliar a utilização de antibióticos nos procedimentos cirúrgicos, realizados na clínica cirúrgica de cães e gatos do Hospital Veterinário da Universidade Federal de Viçosa, considerando a sua necessidade e a realidade. A população para o estudo foi constituída dos pacientes submetidos a tratamento cirúrgico, no período de 11 de maio a 11 de novembro de 2007. A utilização de antibióticos nos procedimentos estudados não foi padronizada ou alterada, para realização deste estudo. Assim, concluiu-se que é necessário estabelecer critérios para a antibioticoprofilaxia, bem como sua padronização no Hospital Veterinário da Universidade Federal de Viçosa, para corrigir possíveis falhas no processo de prevenção das infecções do sítio cirúrgico.Antimicrobial prophylaxis aim at preventing surgical wound contamination after the exposure to any microorganism and before infection is established. Inhibitory antimicrobial concentrations should be reached and maintained on the incision throughout the entire surgical procedure in order to prevent microbial growth. In veterinary medicine, antimicrobial prophylaxis is clearly disclosure and accepted as an important action to control and reduce the incidence of surgical wound infection. This study evaluated the use of antibiotics in small animals' surgeries at the Veterinary Hospital of the

  5. Tinidazol versus cefazolina na antibioticoprofilaxia de histerectomia vaginal e abdominal Tinidazole versus cefazolin in antibiotic prophylaxis of vaginal and abdominal hysterectomy

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    José Antonio Simões

    2008-11-01

    das mulheres submetidas à histerectomia vaginal sugere que essa infecção deve ser melhor pesquisada e devidamente tratada antes da cirurgia.PURPOSE: to compare the efficacy of tinidazole and cephazolin on the febrile and infectious morbidity of post vaginal and abdominal hysterectomy antibiotic prophylaxis. METHODS: randomized clinical study, where women admitted to hospital for hysterectomy were randomly allocated in one of the following antibiotic prophylaxis groups: Group C (2 g of IV cephazolin in the anesthetic induction; Group T (2 g of tinidazole orally, 12 hours before the surgery; or Group C+T (2 g of tinidazole orally 12 hours before the surgery and 2g of IV cephazolin in the anesthetic induction. Cervicovaginal smears were collected for specific cultures and the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis (BV was based in Amsel and Nugent's criteria. The patients were reevaluated 7 and 30 days after the surgery for signs of febrile and/or infectious morbidity. The χ2 or the Fisher's exact test was used to assess differences among the three groups, with a significance level of 5%. The sample power (1-β was calculated through the SAS program. RESULTS: seven days after the hysterectomy, infectious morbidity was diagnosed in 6.6% of the women, but with no significant difference among the three groups studied (p=0.12. There was no febrile or infectious morbidity at the immediate post-surgical period or after 30 days from the surgery. BV ratio at the pre-surgical period was significantly higher among the women submitted to vaginal hysterectomy, rather than among the ones submitted to abdominal hysterectomy (27 versus 7%, p=0.02. BV ratio was also higher after 30 days, among the women submitted to vaginal hysterectomy (20 versus 8%, though without statistical significance (p=0.19. CONCLUSIONS: the use of tinidazole, isolated or associated with cephazolin has not presented higher efficacy, than the use of cephazolin, alone to prevent febrile or infectious morbidity post

  6. An outbreak of scrub typhus in military personnel despite protocols for antibiotic prophylaxis: doxycycline resistance excluded by a quantitative PCR-based susceptibility assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Patrick N A; Oltvolgyi, Csongor; Islam, Aminul; Hussain-Yusuf, Hazizul; Loewenthal, Mark R; Vincent, Gemma; Stenos, John; Graves, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    Scrub typhus is caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium Orientia tsutsugamushi and is endemic to many countries in the Asia-Pacific region, including tropical Australia. We describe a recent large outbreak amongst military personnel in north Queensland. A total of 45 clinical cases were identified (36% of all potentially exposed individuals). This occurred despite existing military protocols stipulating the provision of doxycycline prophylaxis. Doxycycline resistance in O. tsutsugamushi has been described in South-East Asia, but not Australia. In one case, O. tsutsugamushi was cultured from eschar tissue and blood. Using quantitative real-time PCR to determine susceptibility to doxycycline for the outbreak strain, a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ≤0.04 μg/mL was found, indicating susceptibility to this agent. It seems most probable that failure to adhere to adequate prophylaxis over the duration of the military exercise accounted for the large number of cases encountered rather than doxycycline resistance. PMID:27005452

  7. Documento de consenso sobre la utilización de profilaxis antibiótica en cirugía y procedimientos dentales Consensus document on the use of antibiotic prophylaxis in dental surgery and procedures

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    JL Gutiérrez

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available La profilaxis antibiótica en Odontología tiene como objetivo prevenir la aparición de infección a partir de la puerta de entrada que produce la actuación terapéutica, por lo que se encuentra indicada siempre que exista un riesgo importante de infección, ya sea por las características mismas de la operación o por las condiciones locales o generales del paciente. Sin embargo, los ensayos clínicos con antibióticos en patologías dentarias responden poco a los criterios metodológicos requeridos, y además no son lo suficientemente numerosos. Se presentan los resultados de una conferencia de expertos integrada por los Presidentes de Sociedades científicas españolas más representativas que han analizado la bibliografía existente y han aportado sus valiosas experiencias profesionales. Se describen las circunstancias técnicas, se analizan los fundamentos biológicos y farmacológicos y se aplican a las situaciones médicas más representativas. Se concluye que la profilaxis antibiótica en Odontología cuenta con indicaciones bien fundamentadas y precisas, ofreciendo a la comunidad científica internacional un protocolo práctico de actuación.The goal of antibiotic prophylaxis in Odontology is to prevent the onset of infections through the entrance way provided by the therapeutic action, therefore it is indicated provided there is a considerable risk of infection, either because of the characteristics of the operation itself or the patient’s local or general condition. Nonetheless, clinical trials with antibiotics in dental pathologies scarcely adhere to the required methodological criteria and, in addition, are not sufficiently numerous. This text presents the results of an expert conference comprising the Presidents of the most representative Scientific Societies in Spain who have analyzed the existing literature and have drawn on their valuable professional experience. It describes the technical circumstances, analyzes the

  8. Documento de consenso sobre la utilización de profilaxis antibiótica en cirugía y procedimientos dentales Consensus document on the use of antibiotic prophylaxis in dental surgery and procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.L. Gutiérrez

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available La profilaxis antibiótica en Odontología tiene como objetivo prevenir la aparición de infección a partir de la puerta de entrada que produce la actuación terapéutica, por lo que se encuentra indicada siempre que exista un riesgo importante de infección, ya sea por las características mismas de la operación o por las condiciones locales o generales del paciente. Sin embargo, los ensayos clínicos con antibióticos en patologías dentarias responden poco a los criterios metodológicos requeridos, y además no son lo suficientemente numerosos. Se presentan los resultados de una conferencia de expertos integrada por los Presidentes de Sociedades Científicas Españolas más representativas que han analizado la bibliografía existente y han aportado sus valiosas experiencias profesionales. Se describen las circunstancias técnicas, se analizan los fundamentos biológicos y farmacológicos y se aplican a las situaciones médicas más representativas. Se concluye que la profilaxis antibiótica en Odontología cuenta con indicaciones bien fundamentadas y precisas, ofreciendo a la comunidad científica internacional un protocolo práctico de actuación.The goal of antibiotic prophylaxis in Odontology is to prevent the onset of infections through the entranceway provided by the therapeutic action, therefore it is indicated providing there is a considerable risk of infection, either because of the characteristics of the operation itself or the patient’s local or general condition. Nonetheless, clinical trials with antibiotics in dental pathologies have had scant regard for the required methodological criteria and, in addition, are not sufficiently numerous. This text presents the results of an expert conference comprising the Presidents of the most representative Scientific Societies in Spain who have analyzed the existing literature and have drawn on their valuable professional experience. It describes the technical circumstances, analyzes the

  9. Anti-toxin antibodies in prophylaxis and treatment of inhalation anthrax

    OpenAIRE

    Schneemann, Anette; Manchester, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    The CDC recommend 60 days of oral antibiotics combined with a three-dose series of the anthrax vaccine for prophylaxis after potential exposure to aerosolized Bacillus anthracis spores. The anthrax vaccine is currently not licensed for anthrax postexposure prophylaxis and has to be made available under an Investigational New Drug protocol. Postexposure prophylaxis based on antibiotics can be problematic in cases where the use of antibiotics is contraindicated. Furthermore, there is a concern ...

  10. 心脏起搏器围术期预防性应用抗生素现状调查%Current status of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis for permanent pacemaker implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈柯萍; 樊晓寒; 华伟; 张澍

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this survey was to describe the current status of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis for permanent pacemaker (PPM) implantation in our clinical practice.Methods From January to March in 2012,questionnaires were sent by e-mails to directors of PPM implanting hospitals,for clinical details with respect to use of antibiotics around implantation.Data would be verified via telephone,e-mail or follow-up if no response or some doubts existed.Results Available questionnaires were returned from135 hospitals.Before or during procedure,112 of the 135 centers (82.9%) gave prophylactic antibiotics to patients,while 14 hospitals (10.4%) used postoperative antibiotics and 9 (6.7%) with no prescription of antibiotics.The first/second generation cephalosporins or penicillins were used in significant proportion (79.2%) of hospitals.Other options included the third generation cephalosporins (6.7%) and quinolones (2.2%).As for the onset time,in 74.1% of the hospitals antibiotics were administered 0.5 to 2.0 hours prior to implantation,with 5.2% 3 to 6 hours before procedure,3.7% at implantation,10.3% post operation.The duration also showed great variation in different hospitals.Single dose of antibiotics prescription before or during procedure was given in 10 centers (7.9%).The duration was over 72 hours in seventeen hospitals and ranged from 24 to 72 hours in the rest hospitals.Intra-pocket antibiotic infusion at implantation was used in forty-eight centers (35.6%),and most (81.3%) were gentamicin.Conclusion There are no guidelines on the antibiotics prophylaxis in PPM implantation,such as indication,choice,timing and duration,resulting in wide variation in practice.In majority of the hospitals prophylactic antibiotics were used prior to implantation and β-lactam antibiotic for a board antibacterial spectrum was selected which covering staphylococcus aureus.However,further studies are required to determine the duration of antibiotics

  11. 心血管介入手术预防性使用抗菌药物的干预研究%Study on interventions to antibiotics prophylaxis of patients undergoing cardiovascular interventional surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵莹; 李玉英; 桑博默; 关永冠; 陆青

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To take the intensified interventions to standardize the prophylactic use of antimicrobial agents of the patients undergoing cardiovascular interventional surgery so as to reasonably use antimicrobial agents .METHODS The related data of the patients who underwent the cardiovascular interventional surgery from Jan to Dec ,2012 and from Jan to Dec ,2014 were collected by using the computer‐network information system , then the statistical analysis of the data was performed with the use of SPSS 16 .0 software ,the relationship between the perioperative antibiotics prophylaxis and the incidence of postoperative infections and length of hospital stay was observed before and after the intensified interventions were taken ,and the intervention effects were evaluated . RESULTS A total of 1 078 patients who underwent the cardiovascular interventional surgery were investigated ,of whom 534 were investigated before the intervention and 544 were investigated after the intervention ;the length of hospital stay was (12 .5 ± 6 .6)days ;there were 792 (73 .5% ) patients who underwent the coronary angiography and 286 (26 .5% ) patients who underwent the percutaneous coronary intervention .Totally 64 patients were given antibiotics prophylaxis before the intervention and were administrated after the surgery ,of whom 93 .8% were given one‐drug therapy ,50 .0% were given the postoperative medication for no less than 3 days ,the longest up to 12 days ,5 categories of antibiotics covering 8 types were used ,and the cephalosporins were dominant ,accounting for 50 .0% .None of the patients was treated with antibiotics prophylaxis after the intervention .The average length of hospital stay was 14 .9 days before the interventions were taken ,10 .2 days after the interventions were taken;the rate of prophylactic use of antibiotics was 12 .0% before the intervention ,0 after the intervention (P=0 .000 ) , and no patient had the infections .CONCLUSIONS It is a powerful mean to

  12. Antibacterial prophylaxis in neutropenic children with cancer

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    Angelica Barone

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available During the period of neutropenia due to chemotherapy, patients have high risk of infections. The use of antibiotic prophylaxis to reduce neutropenia-related complications in oncologic patients is still disputed. Recent meta-analysis and clinical trials demonstrated that antibiotic prophylaxis with chinolons reduces fever episodes, bacterial infections and mortality in adult oncologic patients with neutropenia due to chemotherapy for acute leukaemia. In paediatric patients, the only randomized, double-blind, prospective study up till now suggested that Amoxicillin clavulanate may represent an effective prophylactic treatment to reduce fever and infections in oncologic children with neutropenia, with an efficacy statistically demonstrated only in patients with acute leukaemia. Considering the risk of resistances, antibiotic-prophylaxis should be used only in selected patients.

  13. Meta分析抗生素对经直肠前列腺活检术后感染性并发症的预防效果%Meta-analysis of antibiotic prophylaxis use in transrectal prostatic biopsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨明根; 赵晓昆; 吴志平; 肖宁; 吕晨

    2009-01-01

    ObjectiveTo determine whether antibiotic prophylaxis can reduce the risk of postoperative infective complications in men undergoing transrectal prostatic biopsy (TPB) who had sterile preoperative urine.MethodsMEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Collaboration Reviews, Chinese Medical Current Contents (CMCC), and National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) were searched for rando-mized controlled trials that compared the effect of antibiotic prophylaxis with placebo or active controls for men undergoing TPB with preoperative sterile urine. Two reviewers independently extracted the data of patient characteristics and outcomes based on a prospectively developed protocol.ResultsA total of 12 trials (3 placebo controlled, 3 non-treatment controlled, and 6 activly controlled) involving 1 987 patients, met the inclusion criteria. Prophylactic antibiotic use in patients at low risk undergoing TPB significantly decreased bacteriuria and middle degree fever incidence, but could not decrease the incidence of bacteremia. The relative risk for post-TPB bacteriuria, middle degree fever, and bacteremia were 0.32 (95% CI 0.23 to 0.46), 0.37 (95% CI 0.17 to 0.77), and 0.96 (95% CI 0.61 to 1.50), respectively. Effective antibiotic classes included quinolone, co-quinolone and nitroimidazole, and co-trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole. Treatment protocols of any duration were effective.ConclusionAntibiotic prophylaxis obviously decreases the incidence of bacteriuria and middle degree fever but not bacteremia in men with preoperative sterile urine undergoing TPB. A significant decrease in bacteriuria incidence can be achieved with a range of antibiotic agents, including quinolones and co-quinolone and nitroimidazole. Treatment protocols of any duration are effective with no heterogeneity.%目的:分析预防性抗生素能否减少术前为清洁尿、行经直肠前列腺活检术(TPB)患者的术后感染性并发症.方法:制定原始文献的纳入标准、排除标准及检索策略,

  14. Antimicrobial prophylaxis related to otorhinolaryngology elective major surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    INTRODUCTION. Antimicrobial prophylaxis decreases the surgical infections, but its indiscriminate use to favors the increment of infection rates and the bacterial resistance is much more probable in presence of antibiotics. The aim of present research was to evaluate the results of antibiotic prophylaxis in the otorhinolaryngology elective major surgery. METHODS. A retrospective-descriptive research was made on the prophylactic use of antibiotics in this type of surgery in the Otorhinolaryngology Service of the ''Comandant Manuel Fajardo'' during 6 years (2001-2006). Sample included 661 patients and the following variables were studied: sex, age and therapeutic response criteria (satisfactory and non-satisfactory). According to the intervention complexity oral antibiotic or parenteral prophylaxis was administered carrying out a surgical hound site culture. RESULTS. There was a predominance of male sex (54,1%) and the 31 and 62 age group. The 41,90% of patients operated on required antibiotic prophylaxis. The was a 7,9% of surgical wound infections. The more frequent microorganisms were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter and Escherichia. In head and neck oncology surgeries infection average was high (42,3%). Torpid course was due to concurrence of infection risk factors. There were neither adverse events nor severe complications. CONCLUSIONS. In Otorhinolaryngology, antimicrobial prophylaxis works against a wide variety of microorganisms but not in the Oncology surgeries. (author)

  15. Prophylaxis of Malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, Eli

    2012-01-01

    Malaria prevention in travelers to endemic areas remains dependent principally on chemoprophylaxis. Although malaria chemoprophylaxis refers to all malaria species, a distinction should be drawn between falciparum malaria prophylaxis and the prophylaxis of the relapsing malaria species (vivax & ovale). While the emergence of drug resistant strains, as well as the costs and adverse reactions to medications, complicate falciparum prophylaxis use, there are virtually no drugs available for vivax...

  16. Clinical aspects of antimicrobial prophylaxis for invasive urological procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirone, Vincenzo; Franco, Marco

    2014-10-01

    The essential value of antimicrobial prophylaxis is to defend the patient undergoing invasive diagnostic procedures or surgery against infectious complications by reducing the bacterial load. Escherichia coli remains the predominant uropathogen (70-80%) isolated in acute community-acquired uncomplicated infections, followed by Staphylococcus saprophyticus (10 to 15%). Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Proteus species, and enterococci infrequently cause uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis. The pathogens traditionally associated with UTI are altering many of their features, particularly because of antimicrobial resistance. Currently, only transurethral resection of prostate and prostate biopsy has been well studied and has high and moderately high levels of evidence in favor of using antibiotic prophylaxis. Other urological interventions have not been well studied. The moderate to low evidence suggests that there is no need for antibiotic prophylaxis in cystoscopy, urodynamic investigations, and extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy, whereas the low evidence favors the use of antibiotic prophylaxis for therapeutic ureterorenoscopy and percutaneous nephrolithotomy. The scarce data from studies on transurethral resection of bladder tumors cannot provide a definitive indication for antibiotic prophylaxis for this intervention. PMID:25245706

  17. Antimicrobial prophylaxis in minor and major surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassetti, M; Righi, E; Astilean, A; Corcione, S; Petrolo, A; Farina, E C; De Rosa, F G

    2015-01-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a frequent cause of morbidity following surgical procedures. Gram-positive cocci, particularly staphylococci, cause many of these infections, although Gram-negative organisms are also frequently involved. The risk of developing a SSI is associated with a number of factors, including aspects of the operative procedure itself, such as wound classification, and patient-related variables, such as preexisting medical conditions. Antimicrobial prophylaxis (AP) plays an important role in reducing SSIs, especially if patient-related risk factors for SSIs are present. The main components of antimicrobial prophylaxis are: timing, selection of drugs and patients, duration and costs. Compliance with these generally accepted preventive principles may lead to overall decreases in the incidence of these infections. Ideally the administration of the prophylactic agent should start within 30 minutes from the surgical incision. The duration of the AP should not exceed 24 hours for the majority of surgical procedures. The shortest effective period of prophylactic antimicrobial administration is not known and studies have demonstrated that post-surgical antibiotic administration is unnecessary. Furthermore, there were no proven benefits in multiple dose regimens when compared to single-dose regimens. The choice of an appropriate prophylactic antimicrobial agent should be based primarily on efficacy and safety. Broad spectrum antibiotics should be avoided due to the risk of promoting bacterial resistance. Cephalosporins are the most commonly used antibiotics in surgical prophylaxis; specifically, cefazolin or cefuroxime are mainly used in the prophylaxis regimens for cardio-thoracic surgery, vascular surgery, hip or knee arthroplasty surgery, neurosurgical procedures and gynecologic and obstetric procedures. A review of the prophylactic regimens regarding the main surgical procedures is presented. PMID:24561611

  18. Antibiotics in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The range and number of interventional procedures is rapidly increasing each year. A major complication associated with many procedures is infection, which can result in serious adverse outcomes for the patient. Consequently, antibiotics are amongst the most common pharmaceuticals used by the interventionist, particularly for non-vascular procedures, yet almost no randomized controlled trial data exist to inform our decision when formulating appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis regimens. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the utilization of antibiotics for common interventional radiology procedures, focusing on timing and duration of antibiotic prophylaxis. - Highlights: • Prophylaxis when necessary should be given immediately prior to the procedure for optimum effect. • Where possible single agents with a narrow spectrum of activity should be used. • Account should be taken of the clinical circumstances of the patient, including surgical history. • Continuous review of agents is necessary, ideally with input from the local microbiology department. • The importance of maximum sterile precautions cannot be overstated

  19. [Prophylactic antibiotics in neurosurgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacob, G; Iacob, Simona; Cojocaru, Inimioara

    2007-01-01

    Because of a low risk of infection (around 2-3%), prophylactic use of antibiotics in neurosurgery is a controversial issue. Some neurosurgeons consider that there are strong arguments against the use of antimicrobials (promotion of antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria, superinfection and adverse drug reactions) and meticulous aseptic techniques could be more usefully than prophylactic antibiotics. On the other hand, despite of being rare, the consequences of a neurosurgical infection can be dramatic and may result in a rapid death, caused by meningitis, cerebritis, abscess formation or sepsis. Clinical studies emphasized that the most important factors influencing the choice of antibiotic prophylaxis in neurosurgery is the patient's immune status, virulence of the pathogens and the type of surgery ("clean contaminated"--procedure that crosses the cranial sinuses, "clean non-implant"--procedure that does not cross the cranial sinuses, CSF shunt surgery, skull fracture). Prophylaxis has become the standard of care for contaminated and clean-contaminated surgery, also for surgery involving insertion of artificial devices. The antibiotic (first/second generation of cephalosporins or vancomycin in allergic patients) should recover only the cutaneous possibly contaminating flora (S. aureus, S. epidermidis) and should be administrated 30' before the surgical incision, intravenously in a single dose. Most studies pointed that identification of the risk factors for infections, correct asepsis and minimal prophylactic antibiotic regimen, help neurosurgeons to improve patient care and to decrease mortality without selecting resistant bacteria. PMID:18293694

  20. Iodine prophylaxis following nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These proceedings of the Joint WHO/CEC workshop on iodine prophylaxis following nuclear accidents are presented under the following headings: normal thyroid function and the response to iodine, theoretical basis for stable iodine prophylaxis, risks and benefits of stable iodine prophylaxis, indications for the use of stable iodine, recommendations and rationale for the use of stable iodine prophylaxis in event of future accidents. (UK)

  1. Cost-effectiveness of culture-guided antimicrobial prophylaxis for the prevention of infections after prostate biopsy

    OpenAIRE

    Chi-kong Li; Brian C.Y. Tong; You, Joyce H S

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clinical findings suggest that the use of rectal culture-guided antibiotic prophylaxis reduces the infection rate following transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (TRUSBx). Methods: A decision-analytic model was designed to compare the outcomes of TRUSBx performed with (rectal culture-guided group) and without (standard ciprofloxacin prophylaxis) rectal swab culture-guided antimicrobial prophylaxis in Hong Kong. The post-biopsy infection rate, infection-related costs, qu...

  2. Compliance of vaginal delivery puerpera for antibiotic prophylaxis%阴道分娩产妇对预防性应用抗菌药物的依从性调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白灵波

    2012-01-01

    目的 了解阴道分娩产妇对会阴切口预防性应用抗菌药物的依从性,以期促进抗菌药物的合理使用.方法 选择医院正常阴道分娩有会阴切口的产妇共2000例为研究对象,以问卷形式调查其在产后对应用抗菌药物的依从性,包括是否接受使用抗菌药物、选择药物的种类、用药途径、用药时间及用药费用等.结果 产妇接受抗菌药物者1686例占84.3%,其中1258例占62.9%接受口服头孢类药物,404例占20.2%要求静脉用药,用药时间2~3 d,80.0%不计较用药费用;15.7%的产妇不接受抗菌药物,其中112例,占5.6%认为药物对哺乳有不良影响.结论 产妇对会阴切口预防性应用抗菌药物的依从性方面存在误区,需要开展有效的合理用药宣传教育,合理使用抗菌药物,避免不必要的医疗开支.%OBJECTIVE To improve the compliance of preventive application of antibiotics for perineum of vaginal delivery with perineum incision so that it can promote the rational use of antibiotics. METHODS The puerpera with normal perineum incision 2000 cases were researched and their compliance of application antibiotics to prevent infections was investigated by using questionnaire. The questions included the following aspects: whether or.not to accept the application of antibiotics, select the type of medicine, route, time and costs of administrating medicine, and so on. RESULTS There were 1686 puerpera accepting antibiotics (accounting for 84. 3%). There were 1258 cases accepting antibiotics (62. 9%) by oral and 404 cases by intravenous among these puerpera. The duration of using antibiotics was 2 to 3 days and they (80%) did not worry the costs. There were 404 puerpera without accepting antibiotics (20. 2%). They( 112 cases) were afraid that medicine had an adverse effect on lactation among 404 puerpera. CONCLUSION There exists the error on the aspect of compliance of prophylactic use of antibiotics for perineum incision, it

  3. [Urinary antimicrobial prophylaxis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathanson, S; Deschênes, G

    2002-05-01

    Antibiotics are usually used to prevent childhood recurrent urinary tract infections: cystitis or pyelonephritis. The mechanism of action of these antibiotics, although imperfectly known, seems to be double: the antibiotic acts by its bactericidal effect, but also probably for minimal concentrations by reducing adhesion capability of bacteria to the urothelium. The most commonly used molecules are cotrimoxazole, trimethoprime, pivmecillinam, cefaclor and nalidixic acid. However all have not been studied rigorously as for their prophylactic capacity, and in particular very little is known for patients presenting with vesico-ureteral reflux. PMID:12053547

  4. Meta-analysis of antibiotic prophylaxis for postoperative bacteriuria in patients undergoing transrectal prostatic biopsy%抗生素对经直肠前列腺活检术后菌尿预防效果的荟萃分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨明根; 赵晓昆; 吴志平; 肖宁; 吕晨; 侯轶

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether antibiotic prophylaxis can reduce the risk of postoperative bacteriuria in patients undergoing transrectal prostatic biopsy (TPB) who have sterile preoperative urine. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Collaboration Reviews, CMCC, and CNKI were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing antibiotic prophylaxis with placebo/blank controls for patients undergoing TPB with preoperative sterile urine. The search strategy was made according to the Collaborative Review Group search strategy. Data were extracted by two reviewers using the designed extraction form. The software RevMan4.2 was used to review management and data analysis. Results 67 relevant RCTs were found, of which 12 qualified ones were included into the analysis. Antibiotic prophylaxis significantly decreased the rate of bacteriuria within the period 1 week after TPB (corresponding pooled relative risk (RR) and 95% CI was 0. 32 ( 0. 23 - 0. 46, P < 0. 01 ). The effective antibiotics included quinolones and quinolones combined with nitroimidazole , with the pooled RR and 95% CI of 0. 31 (0. 18 - 0. 53, P<0. 01) and 0. 32 (0. 17 -0. 60, P=0. 0004) respectively. There was no significant difference in the effect between short treatment course protocol and long course protocol (P = 0. 41 ). Conclusion Prophylactic antibiotics can significantly decrease the incidence of post-TPB bacteriuria. A significant decrease in bacteriuria incidence can be achieved with a range of antibiotic agents, including quinolones and-quinolones combined with nitroimidazole. Treatment protocols of any duration are effective.%目的 分析预防性抗生素能否减少术前为清洁尿、行经直肠前列腺活检术(TPB)患者术后菌尿的发生率.方法 制定原始文献的纳入标准、排除标准及检索策略,在美国医学索引MEDLINE(1966年1月至2007年12月)、荷兰医学文摘EMBASE(1988年1月至2007年12月)、Cochrane图书馆、中国生物

  5. Infection Prophylaxis Update

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Patrick; Bullocks, Jamal; Matthews, Martha

    2006-01-01

    The use of prophylactic antibiotics in surgery has been debated for numerous years. Although their indications have been elucidated in the general surgery literature, their role in plastic surgery has yet to be clearly defined. Although the incidence of surgical site infections in clean, elective plastic surgery procedures has been reported to be as low as 1.1%, the use of antibiotics has surged over the past 20 years. Much of the increased use has been attributed to common surgical practice ...

  6. Awareness of Iranian’s General Dentists Regarding the Latest Prophylaxis Guideline for Prevention of Infective Endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaderi F.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Dental procedures leading to oral tissue injuries may provoke bacterial release to the blood stream causing infective endocarditis (IE in vulnerable patients. The guideline which was proposed by AHA has been updated 9 times having the last update published in 2007. This study was endeavored to uncover the level of knowledge of general dental practitioners in Shiraz, concerning the 2007 AHA guidelines for endocarditis prophylaxis in patients with cardiac problems receiving dental treatments.Materials and Method: This cross- sectional and descriptive analytical study included 150 dentists as participants. All practitioners were given a self –report questionnaire which consisted of three sections. Questions were designed to assess their knowledge of antibiotic prophylaxis in patients with cardiac disease. Results: Almost all participants (93% were aware of antibiotic prophylaxis to be essential for tooth extraction. Most participants did not believe in prophylaxis for noninvasive procedures (such as shedding of primary teeth, impression, intraoral radiography. From all of the respondents, 75% considered Amoxicillin to be the anti-biotic of choice and 57% were acquainted with the correct dose of Amoxicillin for high risk patients.Conclusion: The study identified a potential for under/over prescription of antibiotic prophylaxis under the current guideline. Burden of IE necessitates more accurate knowledge of antibiotic prophylaxis in the undergraduate curriculum and continuing education programs of dentistry.

  7. Antibiotics Cure Anthrax in Animal Models▿

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, Shay; Kobiler, David; Levy, Haim; Pass, Avi; Ophir, Yakir; Rothschild, Nili; Tal, Arnon; Schlomovitz, Josef; Altboum, Zeev

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory anthrax, in the absence of early antibiotic treatment, is a fatal disease. This study aimed to test the efficiency of antibiotic therapy in curing infected animals and those sick with anthrax. Postexposure prophylaxis (24 h postinfection [p.i.]) of guinea pigs infected intranasally with Bacillus anthracis Vollum spores with doxycycline, ofloxacin, imipenem, and gentamicin conferred protection. However, upon termination of treatment, the animals died from respiratory anthrax. Combi...

  8. Antibiotic resistance of bacterial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoiby, N.; Bjarnsholt, T.; Givskov, M.;

    2010-01-01

    A biofilm is a structured consortium of bacteria embedded in a self-produced polymer matrix consisting of polysaccharide, protein and DNA. Bacterial biofilms cause chronic infections because they show increased tolerance to antibiotics and disinfectant chemicals as well as resisting phagocytosis...... to antibiotics. Biofilm growth is associated with an increased level of mutations as well as with quorum-sensing-regulated mechanisms. Conventional resistance mechanisms such as chromosomal beta-lactamase, upregulated efflux pumps and mutations in antibiotic target molecules in bacteria also contribute...... to the survival of biofilms. Biofilms can be prevented by early aggressive antibiotic prophylaxis or therapy and they can be treated by chronic suppressive therapy. A promising strategy may be the use of enzymes that can dissolve the biofilm matrix (e.g. DNase and alginate lyase) as well as quorum...

  9. 21 CFR 872.6290 - Prophylaxis cup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prophylaxis cup. 872.6290 Section 872.6290 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6290 Prophylaxis cup. (a) Identification. A prophylaxis... agents during prophylaxis (cleaning). The dental handpiece spins the rubber cup holding the...

  10. Pharmacist initiation of postexposure doxycycline for Lyme disease prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Anita N; Orr, K Kelly; Bratberg, Jeffrey P; Silverblatt, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To enhance public access to prophylaxis for Lyme disease following an identified Ixodes scapularis tick bite through pharmacist-initiated antibiotic therapy and to assess patient satisfaction with the pharmacy-based service provided. SETTING Independent community pharmacy in Charlestown, RI, from May to October 2012. PRACTICE DESCRIPTION Under a collaborative practice agreement, trained pharmacists at an independent pharmacy identified patients eligible for postexposure antibiotic prophylaxis following attachment and removal of an I. scapularis tick (commonly known as a deer tick) and dispensed two 100 mg tablets of doxycycline. Patients were included if they were 18 years or older, provided informed consent, had an estimated time of tick attachment of 36 hours or more, had the tick removed within 72 hours of visit, denied contraindications to doxycycline therapy, and reported telephone access for follow-up. Patients enrolled in the study protocol were given counseling related to doxycycline, signs and symptoms of Lyme disease, and future tick prevention strategies. PRACTICE INNOVATION Pharmacist initiation of doxycycline prophylaxis has not been described in the literature previously. Successful pharmacist initiation of antibiotic prophylaxis may have broader implications for states with endemic Lyme disease or other infectious disease public health concerns. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Patient self-reported adverse outcomes and satisfaction with the pharmacy-based service. RESULTS Eight patients enrolled in the study and completed the follow-up survey. The results indicated a high level of satisfaction with the pharmacy services provided, with no reports of the subsequent development of Lyme disease symptoms or major adverse events. CONCLUSION The project has expanded to three community pharmacy sites in southern Rhode Island based on this experience. Similar pharmacy-based collaborative practice models should be considered in highly endemic Lyme disease

  11. Prophylaxis against colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Steffen; Kronborg, O

    1996-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is diagnosed in more than 3000 people every year in Denmark, with a population of 5 million, and 2000 die from this disease every year. The aetiology of the disease is complex, but an increasing number of cancers have been related to genetics and Denmark is contributing with a...... well-established register of familial adenomatous polyposis and a recently founded register for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, both with major international relationships. The Danish tradition of epidemiology and clinical trials has also been demonstrated in population screening trials for...... colorectal cancer in average-risk persons as well as high-risk groups with precursors of the disease. The present review places Danish contributions within the prophylaxis of colorectal cancer during the last decade in an international context....

  12. Prophylaxis against colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Steffen; Kronborg, O

    1996-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is diagnosed in more than 3000 people every year in Denmark, with a population of 5 million, and 2000 die from this disease every year. The aetiology of the disease is complex, but an increasing number of cancers have been related to genetics and Denmark is contributing...... with a well-established register of familial adenomatous polyposis and a recently founded register for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, both with major international relationships. The Danish tradition of epidemiology and clinical trials has also been demonstrated in population screening trials...... for colorectal cancer in average-risk persons as well as high-risk groups with precursors of the disease. The present review places Danish contributions within the prophylaxis of colorectal cancer during the last decade in an international context....

  13. Antibiotics Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recommendations Pediatric Treatment Recommendations Inpatient Healthcare Professionals Community Pharmacists Continuing Education & Curriculum Opportunities Weighing in on Antibiotic Resistance Improving Prescribing Outpatient Antibiotic Stewardship Interventions That Work Systematic Reviews ...

  14. Survey of stress ulcer prophylaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Erstad, Brian L; Barletta, Jeffrey F; Jacobi, Judith; Killian, Aaron D; Kramer, Katherine M; Martin, Steven J.

    1999-01-01

    Background: No surveys of stress ulcer prophylaxis prescribing in the USA have been conducted since 1995. Since that time, the most comprehensive meta-analysis and largest randomized study to date concerning stress ulcer prophylaxis have been published. Results: Three hundred sixty-eight surveys were sent to all members of the Section of Pharmacy and Pharmacology of the Society of Critical Care Medicine. One hundred fifty-three (42%) surveys were returned. Representatives from 86% of institut...

  15. Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibiotics are medicines that fight bacterial infections. Used properly, they can save lives. But there is a growing problem of antibiotic resistance. It happens when bacteria change and become able to resist the effects of an antibiotic. Using antibiotics can lead to resistance. ...

  16. Current Concepts of Prophylactic Antibiotics for Dental Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossaini-zadeh, Mehran

    2016-04-01

    Despite numerous guidelines, joint interprofessional collaboration, and years of data collection, the use of antibiotic prophylaxis before dental procedures remains controversial. There continues to be disagreement on indications, justification, and outcome of the use of various antibiotic prophylaxis regiments. This is complicated by the lack of data demonstrating any positive or negative impact on the care of patients. The dental community has distanced itself from a leadership role in this conversation, based on multiple concerns including fear of litigation, lack of clear pathophysiology, and unclear cause-effect relationship. PMID:27040296

  17. Is antibiotic prophylaxis beneficial in acute pancreatitis? - First update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Rada

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Resumen Este resumen Epistemonikos (Living FRISBEE: Living FRIendly Summary of the Body of Evidence using Epistemonikos es una actualización del resumen publicado en Agosto de 2014, basado en dos nuevas revisiones sistemáticas aparecidas en Enero y Febrero de 2015. Existe controversia sobre los efectos del uso de antibióticos profilácticos en pacientes con pancreatitis aguda. Utilizando la base de datos Epistemonikos, la cual es mantenida mediante búsquedas en 30 bases de datos, identificamos 18 revisiones sistemáticas que en conjunto incluyen 19 estudios aleatorizados. Los combinamos mediante un metanálisis y generamos tablas de resumen de resultados utilizando el método GRADE. Concluimos que el uso de antibióticos profilácticos podría disminuir la mortalidad y el tiempo de hospitalización en pacientes con pancreatitis aguda, pero la certeza de la evidencia es baja. La probabilidad que la aparición de nueva evidencia cambie lo que sabemos es alta.

  18. Influenza: diagnosis, management, and prophylaxis.

    OpenAIRE

    WISELKA, M.

    1994-01-01

    Influenza causes enormous morbidity, death, and economic loss. Annual vaccination is strongly recommended for groups at high risk. Amantadine is effective treatment for and prophylaxis against influenza A during epidemics. New developments include rapid laboratory diagnosis, live attenuated vaccines, and antiviral drugs.

  19. Peripheral Polyneuropathy and Mefloquine Prophylaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Chester, Alexander C.; Sandroni, Paola

    2011-01-01

    We describe a case of a woman who developed a peripheral polyneuropathy shortly after completing 4 weekly doses of mefloquine hydrochloride (250 mg) malaria prophylaxis. Although mefloquine-related central nervous system neuropathy is well described in the literature, peripheral polyneuropathy similar to this case has been documented only once before, to our knowledge.

  20. Intracameral cefuroxime and moxifloxacin used as endophthalmitis prophylaxis after cataract surgery: systematic review of effectiveness and cost-effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linertová R

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Renata Linertová,1,2 Rodrigo Abreu-González,3 Lidia García-Pérez,1,2 Marta Alonso-Plasencia,3 Luis Mateo Cordovés-Dorta,4 José Augusto Abreu-Reyes,4 Pedro Serrano-Aguilar2,5 1Fundación Canaria de Investigación y Salud (FUNCIS, Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Spain; 2Red de Investigación en Servicios Sanitarios en Enfermedades Crónicas (REDISSEC, Madrid, Spain; 3Ophthalmology Service, University Hospital Ntra Sra de La Candelaria, Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Spain; 4Ophthalmology Service, University Hospital of Canary Islands, La Laguna, Spain; 5HTA Unit, Canary Health Service, Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Spain Abstract: Postoperative endophthalmitis is one of the most serious potential complications of ocular lens surgery. Its incidence can be reduced by means of antibiotic prophylaxis. Although the prophylactic use of intracameral cefuroxime has been extended, other drugs, such as moxifloxacin, have arisen as alternatives. We performed a systematic literature review on the effectiveness and efficiency of intracameral cefuroxime and moxifloxacin for the prophylaxis of postoperative endophthalmitis after cataract surgery. Several bibliographic databases were searched up to October 2010 and were updated up to January 2013. Outcomes were the onset of endophthalmitis after surgery and the cost-effectiveness ratio of using both antibiotic prophylaxis alternatives. The following were included: a clinical trial reported in two papers, six observational studies, and an economic evaluation. All studies assessed cefuroxime compared with another antibiotic prophylaxis or no prophylaxis. The only randomized controlled trial performed by the European Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery found that intracameral cefuroxime is significantly more effective than not using prophylaxis or the use of a topical antibiotic. The observational studies support these results. The economic evaluation compared different prophylaxis regimens and concluded that intracameral

  1. Antimicrobial prophylaxis in colorectal surgery: focus on ertapenem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto de Lalla

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Fausto de LallaLibero Docente of Infectious Diseases, University of Milano, Milano, ItalyAbstract: Despite improvement in infection control measures and surgical practice, surgical site infections (SSIs remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality. In colorectal surgery, perioperative administration of a suitable antimicrobial regimen that covers both anaerobic and aerobic bacteria is universally accepted. In a prospective, double-blind, randomized study ertapenem was recently found to be more effective than cefotetan, a parenteral cephalosporin so broadly used as to be considered as gold standard in the prevention of SSIs following colorectal surgery. In this adequate and well controlled study, the superiority of ertapenem over cefotetan was clearly demonstrated from the clinical and bacteriological points of view. However, data that directly compares ertapenem with other antimicrobial regimen effective in preventing SSIs following colorectal surgery are lacking; furthermore, the possible risk of promotion of carbapenem resistance associated with widespread use of ertapenem prophylaxis as well as the ertapenem effects on the intestinal gut flora are of concern. Further comparative studies of ertapenem versus other widely used prophylactic regimens for colorectal surgery in patients submitted to mechanical bowel preparation versus no preparation as well as further research on adverse events of antibiotic prophylaxis, including emergence of resistance and Clostridium difficile infection, seem warranted.Keywords: colorectal surgery, surgical prophylaxis, ertapenem

  2. Nuclear accident countermeasures: iodine prophylaxis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In January 1989 the Department of Health convened a working group to consider and advise on the indications for the use of stable iodine, in the United Kingdom, in the event of nuclear accident. In formulating its advice the working group was to consider the International Guidelines for Iodine Prophylaxis following Nuclear Accidents, drawn by the World Health Organisation, and their applicability to the UK. This report summarises the findings of the working group and gives its conclusions and recommendations. (author)

  3. Patients' request for and emergency physicians' prescription of antimicrobial prophylaxis for anthrax during the 2001 bioterrorism-related outbreak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aber Robert C

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inappropriate use of antibiotics by individuals worried about biological agent exposures during bioterrorism events is an important public health concern. However, little is documented about the extent to which individuals with self-identified risk of anthrax exposure approached physicians for antimicrobial prophylaxis during the 2001 bioterrorism attacks in the United States. Methods We conducted a telephone survey of randomly selected members of the Pennsylvania Chapter of the American College of Emergency Physicians to assess patients' request for and emergency physicians' prescription of antimicrobial agents during the 2001 anthrax attacks. Results Ninety-seven physicians completed the survey. Sixty-four (66% respondents had received requests from patients for anthrax prophylaxis; 16 (25% of these physicians prescribed antibiotics to a total of 23 patients. Ten physicians prescribed ciprofloxacin while 8 physicians prescribed doxycycline. Conclusion During the 2001 bioterrorist attacks, the majority of the emergency physicians we surveyed encountered patients who requested anthrax prophylaxis. Public fears may lead to a high demand for antibiotic prophylaxis during bioterrorism events. Elucidation of the relationship between public health response to outbreaks and outcomes would yield insights to ease burden on frontline clinicians and guide strategies to control inappropriate antibiotic allocation during bioterrorist events.

  4. Stress ulcer prophylaxis in trauma patients

    OpenAIRE

    Barletta, Jeffrey F; Erstad, Brian L; Fortune, John B

    2002-01-01

    Introduction A number of issues concerning stress ulcer prophylaxis remain unresolved despite numerous randomized, controlled trials and several meta-analyses. The role of stress ulcer prophylaxis, particularly in trauma patients, is further complicated by the lack of trials utilizing clinically important bleeding as an endpoint. Given the lack of consensus regarding stress ulcer prophylaxis in trauma patients, prescribing practices at Level I trauma centers in the United States were assessed...

  5. An Evaluation of Surgical Prophylaxis Procedures in Turkey: A Multi-Center Point Prevalence Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Selcuk; Aktas, Seyhan; Senbayrak, Seniha; Tekin, Recep; Oztoprak, Nefise; Aksoy, Firdevs; Firat, Pinar; Yenice, Sevinc; Oncul, Ahsen; Gunduz, Alper; Solak, Semiha; Kadanali, Ayten; Cakar, Sule Eren; Caglayan, Derya; Yilmaz, Hava; Bozkurt, Ilkay; Elmaslar, Tulin; Tartar, Ayse Sagmak; Aynioglu, Aynur; Kocyigit, Nilgun Fidan; Koksal, Iftihar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate compliance with guidelines in surgical prophylaxis (SP) procedures in Turkey. Materials and Methods: A point prevalence study involving 4 university, 5 education and research and 7 public hospitals was performed assessing compliance with guidelines for antibiotic use in SP. Compliance was based on the “Clinical Practice Guidelines for Antimicrobial Surgery (CPGAS) 2013” guideline. Results: Sixteen centers were included in the study, with 166 operations performed at these being evaluated. Parenteral antibiotic for SP was applied in 161 (96.9%) of these. Type of antibiotic was inappropriate in 66 (40.9%) cases and duration of use in 47 (29.1%). The main antibiotics used inappropriately in SP were ceftriaxone, glycopeptides and aminoglycosides. No significant difference was observed between secondary and tertiary hospitals in terms of inappropriate selection. Duration of prophylaxis was also incompatible with guideline recommendations in approximately half of surgical procedures performed in both secondary and tertiary hospitals, however statistical significance was observed between institutions in favor of tertiary hospitals. Conclusion: Antibiotics are to a considerable extent used in a manner incompatible with guidelines even in tertiary hospitals in Turkey. It must not be forgotten that several pre-, intra- and postoperative factors can be involved in the development of surgical site infections (SSI), and antibiotics are not the only option available for preventing these. A significant improvement can be achieved in prophylaxis with close observation, educational activities, collaboration with the surgical team and increasing compliance with guidelines. All health institutions must establish and apply their own SP consensus accompanied by the guidelines in order to achieve success in SP. PMID:27026760

  6. Surgeon`s adherence to guidelines for surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis-a review

    OpenAIRE

    Ru Shing Ng; Chee Ping Chong

    2012-01-01

    AbstractSurgical site infections are the most common nosocomial infection among surgical patients. Patients who experience surgical site infections are associated with prolonged hospital stay, rehospitalisation, increased morbidity and mortality, and costs. Consequently, surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis (SAP), which is a very brief course of antibiotic given just before the surgery, has been introduced to prevent the occurrence of surgical site infections. The efficacy of SAP depends on sev...

  7. Surgeons' adherence to guidelines for surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis – a review

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Ru Shing; Chong, Chee Ping

    2012-01-01

    Surgical site infections are the most common nosocomial infection among surgical patients. Patients who experience surgical site infections are associated with prolonged hospital stay, rehospitalisation, increased morbidity and mortality, and costs. Consequently, surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis (SAP), which is a very brief course of antibiotic given just before the surgery, has been introduced to prevent the occurrence of surgical site infections. The efficacy of SAP depends on several fac...

  8. The role of prophylaxis of bacterial infections in children with acute leukemia/non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elio Castagnola

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Infections represent a well-known complication of antineoplastic chemotherapy that may cause delay of treatment, with alteration of the antineoplastic program and dose-intensity, or even the death of a patient that could heal from his/her neoplasia. Bacterial infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients who are neutropenic following chemotherapy for malignancy. Therefore a program of antibiotic prophylaxis for febrile neutropenia may be considered in the management strategy of cancer patients.

  9. The Role of Prophylaxis of Bacterial Infections in Children With Acute Leukemia/Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Elio Castagnola

    2014-01-01

    Infections represent a well-known complication of antineoplastic chemotherapy that may cause delay of treatment, with alteration of the antineoplastic program and dose-intensity, or even the death of a patient that could heal from his/her neoplasia. Bacterial infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients who are neutropenic following chemotherapy for malignancy. Therefore a program of antibiotic prophylaxis for febrile neutropenia may be considered in the management stra...

  10. Forgotten antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pulcini, Céline; Bush, Karen; Craig, William A;

    2012-01-01

    disease specialists in Europe, the United States, Canada, and Australia. An international expert panel selected systemic antibacterial drugs for their potential to treat infections caused by resistant bacteria or their unique value for specific criteria. Twenty-two of the 33 selected antibiotics were...... available in fewer than 20 of 38 countries. Economic motives were the major cause for discontinuation of marketing of these antibiotics. Fourteen of 33 antibiotics are potentially active against either resistant Gram-positive or Gram-negative bacteria. Urgent measures are then needed to ensure better...

  11. Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Antibiotic Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  12. PROPHYLAXIS OF VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM IN ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY

    OpenAIRE

    Leme, Luiz Eugênio Garcez; Sguizzatto, Guilherme Turolla

    2015-01-01

    The relevance of prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism and its complications in orthopedic surgery is increasingly significant. This review discusses the pathophysiology of thrombus formation in general and orthopedic surgery, its incidence, predisposing factors and complications. It also presents an updated presentation and critique of prophylaxis currently available in our environment.

  13. Perioperative prophylaxis for endophthalmitis after cataract surgery in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Katibeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To describe prophylactic patterns employed against endophthalmitis after cataract surgery in Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 486 ophthalmologists filling in a self-administered questionnaire during the 20 th Annual Congress of the Iranian Society of Ophthalmology in December 2010, Tehran, working in both private and academic medical centers. Prophylactic measures used preoperatively, intraoperatively and postoperatively and self-reported rates of endophthalmitis were assessed as the main outcome measurements. Results: In the preoperative phase, 75.5% of surgeons used povidone-iodine in the conjunctival sac and 71.4% of them did not use antibiotics. The rate of intraoperative prophylaxis was 61.9% either in the form of intracameral antibiotics or subconjunctival injection (mostly cephazolin or gentamicin. Only 7.8% of participants used intracameral cephalosporins. Postoperative antibiotics [mostly chloramphenicol (57% and ciprofloxacin (28%] were used by 94.2% of surgeons. On average, ten years of practice were required to observe one case of endophthalmitis. Conclusion: The surgeons in present setting used various prophylactic regimens against endophthalmitis after cataract surgery. Setting a local and evidence-based clinical practice guideline seems necessary.

  14. Antibiotic Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck, Christian

    morbidity and mortality as well as an increase in the cost of treatment. Understanding how bacteria respond to antibiotic exposure gives the foundations for a rational approach to counteract antimicrobial resistance. In the work presented in this thesis, I explore the two fundamental sources of...... antimicrobial resistance: (1) adaptive mutations and (2) horizontal acquisition of resistance genes from antibiotic gene reservoirs. By studying the geno- and phenotypic changes of E. coli in response to single and drug-pair exposures, I uncover the evolutionary trajectories leading to adaptive resistance. I...... to rationally design drug combinations that limit the evolution of antibiotic resistance due to counteracting evolutionary trajectories. My results highlight that an in-depth knowledge about the genetic responses to the individual antimicrobial compounds enables the prediction of responses to drug...

  15. Use of Probiotics as Prophylaxis for Postoperative Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Mangell

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative bacterial infections are common despite prophylactic administration of antibiotics. The wide-spread use of antibiotics in patients has contributed to the emergence of multiresistant bacteria. A restricted use of antibiotics must be followed in most clinical situations. In surgical patients there are several reasons for an altered microbial flora in the gut in combination with an altered barrier function leading to an enhanced inflammatory response to surgery. Several experimental and clinical studies have shown that probiotics (mainly lactobacilli may reduce the number of potentially pathogenia bacteria (PPM and restore a deranged barrier function. It is therefore of interest to test if these abilities of probiotics can be utilized in preoperative prophylaxis. These factors may be corrected by perioperative administration of probiotics in addition to antibiotics. Fourteen randomized clinical trials have been presented in which the effect of such regimens has been tested. It seems that in patients undergoing liver transplantation or elective surgery in the upper gastrointestinal tract prophylactic administration of different probiotic strains in combination with different fibers results in a three-fold reduction in postoperative infections. In parallel there seems to be a reduction in postoperative inflammation, although that has not been studied in a systematic way. The use of similar concepts in colorectal surgery has not been successful in reducing postoperative infections. Reasons for this difference are not obvious. It may be that higher doses of probiotics with longer duration are needed to influence microbiota in the lower gastrointestinal tract or that immune function in colorectal patients may not be as important as in transplantation or surgery in the upper gastrointestinal tract. The favorable results for the use of prophylactic probiotics in some settings warrant further controlled studies to elucidate potential

  16. Using a point-of-dispensing clinic for prophylaxis of meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Van P; Civen, Rachel H; Dassey, David E; Davenport, Deborah; Mascola, Laurene

    2010-03-01

    A point-of-dispensing clinic was held to distribute ciprofloxacin prophylaxis when 2 high school students were reported to the health department with invasive meningococcal disease. Of more than 3,100 school staff and students in attendance, 2,861 received prophylaxis. A survey was administered to students 2 weeks postclinic to better understand the motivations for clinic attendance and to quantify side effects of oral 500-mg ciprofloxacin prophylaxis. Data collected included reasons for attendance and perception of risk for acquiring meningococcal disease, rated on a 1-to-5 scale; type of contact with cases; and side effects. Of 2,888 students, 1,624 completed surveys; 1,390 took ciprofloxacin. The students rated parental influence and directives from the high school as reasons for attendance a mean of 3.97 and 3.34, respectively. The mean rating for risk of acquiring meningococcal disease was 1.49. Only 3% reported direct contact with case(s). Side effects, most commonly headache (17%) and stomachache (10%), were reported in 40% of students. Serious side effects such as rash and facial swelling were reported in ciprofloxacin; however, many received the prophylaxis unnecessarily. Students were motivated by parents and school officials. Health departments should collaborate with schools to prepare and disseminate messages that balance the risks of unnecessary antibiotic use with those of exposure to disease. PMID:20230232

  17. PEP (Post-Exposure Prophylaxis) 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS PEP Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir PEP (post-exposure prophylaxis) means taking antiretroviral medicines (ART) after being potentially exposed to HIV to prevent ...

  18. The polymethylmethacrylate antibiotic spacer for treatment of joint infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Bondi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Joint prostheses chronic infection requires surgical removal of the implant, in order to eradicate the infection process. The Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA bone cement is a good carrier for the sustained antibiotic release at the site of infection. PMMA cements pre-loaded with antibiotics are utilized for prophylaxis, primary surgical procedure and the treatment of prosthetic joint infections. The mechanical and functional characteristics of the spacers allow a good joint range of motion, weight-bearing in selected cases and a sustained release of antibiotic at the site of infection. These drug delivery systems offer the advantage of local release of high antibiotic concentrations, which considerably exceed those obtained after systemic administration. Nowadays treatment with a preformed antibiotic loaded spacer can be considered a good option for joint prostheses infection maintaining joint function at the intermediate stage in two-stage treatment.

  19. Rabies postexposure prophylaxis survey--Kentucky, 1994.

    OpenAIRE

    Auslander, M.; Kaelin, C.

    1997-01-01

    A survey of rabies postexposure prophylaxis administered by local health departments for a 1-year period showed that very few patients received treatment as a result of exposure to a confirmed rabid animal. Most prophylaxis was administered for contact with domestic animals in situations where existing recommendations for quarantine or laboratory testing of the animal were not followed. Because rabies in domestic animals in Kentucky is uncommon, these findings suggest that had the existing re...

  20. Therapy and prophylaxis in newborn patients

    OpenAIRE

    Paolo Manzoni

    2013-01-01

    Fluconazole is the most used drug for antifungal prophylaxis in neonatal population. Despite its effectiveness, sometimes fungal infections occur also in newborn patients undergoing fluconazole prophylaxis: this is mainly due both to biofilm formation in patients who carry a central venous catheter (CVC), a common condi­tion among premature babies, and to the occurrence of an infection by a Candida subspecies with intrinsic resistance to fluconazole (e.g.: C. glabrata and C. krusei). A ...

  1. Optimizing Prophylactic Antibiotic Practice for Cardiothoracic Surgery by Pharmacists' Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ling; Ma, Jingjing; Gao, Jie; Chen, Shiqi; Bao, Jianan

    2016-03-01

    Pharmacists' role may be ideal for improving rationality of drug prescribing practice. We aimed to study the impact of multifaceted pharmacist interventions on antibiotic prophylaxis in patients undergoing clean or clean-contaminated operations in cardiothoracic department. A pre-test-post-test quasiexperimental study was conducted in a cardiothoracic ward at a tertiary teaching hospital in Suzhou, China. Patients admitted to the ward were collected as baseline group (2011.7-2012.12) and intervention group (2013.7-2014.12), respectively. The criteria of prophylaxis antibiotic utilization were established on the basis of the published guidelines and official documents. During the intervention phase, a dedicated pharmacist was assigned and multifaceted interventions were implemented in the ward. Then we compared the differences in antibiotic utilization, bacterial resistance, clinical and economic outcomes between the 2 groups. Furthermore, patients were collected after the intervention (2015.1-2015.6) to evaluate the sustained effects of pharmacist interventions. 412 and 551 patients were included in the baseline and intervention groups, while 156 patients in postintervention group, respectively. Compared with baseline group, a significant increase was found in the proportion of antibiotic prophylaxis, the proportion of rational antibiotic selection, the proportion of suitable prophylactic antibiotic duration, and the proportion of suitable timing of administration of the first preoperative dose (P pharmacist intervention resulted in favorable outcomes with significantly decreased rates of surgical site infections, prophylactic antibiotic cost, and significantly shortened length of stay (P Pharmacist interventions in cardiothoracic surgery result in a high adherence to evidence-based treatment guidelines and a profound culture change in drug prescribing with favorable outcomes. The effects of pharmacist intervention are sustained and the role of pharmacists is

  2. Use of antibiotic agents in a large teaching hospital. The impact of Antibiotic Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, K; Stewart, R; Hemming, M; Moulds, R

    1983-09-01

    Three surveys of antibiotic use have been conducted at The Royal Melbourne Hospital. The first was conducted in 1978, before the introduction of the booklet, Antibiotic Guidelines; the second was conducted eight months after, and the most recent, four years after, its distribution. In 1978, 30% of 563 patients surveyed were receiving antibiotic therapy; this proportion declined to 28% of 967 patients studied in 1982. At the beginning of 1978, 52% of all treatments audited were judged appropriate when compared with those recommended in the Guidelines; this proportion rose to 72% in the second survey and was maintained at 70% in 1982. Certain inappropriate prescribing patterns persisted, such as the use of amoxycillin for the treatment of primary pneumonia, surgical antibiotic prophylaxis which was started too late, and the failure to simplify therapy when the results of microbiological investigations became available. Antibiotic guidelines facilitate the auditing of antibiotic usage and aid rational prescribing. Nevertheless, additional measures appear necessary if specific patterns of misuse of antibiotic agents are to be corrected. PMID:6678384

  3. Compliance with RSV prophylaxis: Global physicians’ perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari S Anderson

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Kari S Anderson, Victoria M Mullally, Linda M Fredrick, Andrew L CampbellAbbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL, USAAbstract: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is a significant cause of morbidity in high-risk infants. Palivizumab is proven to prevent serious RSV disease, but compliance with prophylaxis (monthly doses during the RSV season is essential to ensure protection. We invited 453 pediatricians to participate in a survey to identify their perspectives of barriers to compliance and interventions to improve compliance with palivizumab prophylaxis schedules. One hundred physicians from five continents completed the survey, identifying caregiver inconvenience, distance to clinic, cost of prophylaxis, and lack of understanding of the severity of RSV as the most common reasons for noncompliance. They recommended provision of educational materials about RSV, reminders from hospital or clinic, and administration of prophylaxis at home to increase compliance. Globally, physicians recognize several obstacles to prophylaxis compliance. This survey suggests that focused proactive interventions such as empowering caregivers with educational materials and reducing caregiver inconvenience may be instrumental to increase compliance.Keywords: medication adherence, respiratory syncytial virus infections, infant, premature, immunization, passive

  4. Beyond Antibiotics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LE Nicolle

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The AMMI Canada meeting in March 2006 hosted a symposium exploring the potential alternatives to antibiotics for the prevention and treatment of infection. Four papers summarizing talks from that session are published in this issue of the Journal (1-4. These reviews address the scientific underpinnings for a number of proposed concepts, and summarize the current status of clinical use. The approaches - probiotics, bacteriophage therapy, and manipulation of innate immunity - are all intriguing but are still removed from immediate practical applications.

  5. The Evidence Base for Prophylactic Antibiotics in Patients Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Horo, John C; Cawcutt, Kelly A; De Moraes, Alice Gallo; Sampathkumar, Priya; Schears, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review was to evaluate evidence for the use of antibiotic prophylaxis in patients receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) therapy. We systematically reviewed MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, and other major databases and included any study that reported rates of infection and whether antibiotic prophylaxis was a part of therapy for patients receiving ECMO. We abstracted rates of infection, microbiology of isolates, prophylactic practices, and individual study inclusion and exclusion criteria. Among 11 studies identified, rates of infection were fairly uniform regardless of prophylaxis use, and the only two studies that directly compared outcomes with and without prophylaxis found no benefit. The causative infectious organisms were heterogeneous, which gives no clear rationale for any particular prophylactic strategy. Although infections during ECMO are serious complications that must be prevented, there is no good evidence to support routine use of prophylactic antibiotics in most patients. Certain subpopulations, such as those with open chests, may have an indication for prophylaxis, but evidence is poor. Future studies should investigate the role of other approaches to infection prevention, such as chlorhexidine bathing and preferential elective cannulation. PMID:26461238

  6. Optimizing Prophylactic Antibiotic Practice for Cardiothoracic Surgery by Pharmacists’ Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Ling; Ma, Jingjing; Gao, Jie; Chen, Shiqi; Bao, Jianan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pharmacists’ role may be ideal for improving rationality of drug prescribing practice. We aimed to study the impact of multifaceted pharmacist interventions on antibiotic prophylaxis in patients undergoing clean or clean-contaminated operations in cardiothoracic department. A pre-test–post-test quasiexperimental study was conducted in a cardiothoracic ward at a tertiary teaching hospital in Suzhou, China. Patients admitted to the ward were collected as baseline group (2011.7–2012.12)...

  7. COMPARISON OF SINGLE DOSE PROPHYLACTIC ANTIBIOTICS VERSUS FIVE DAYS ANTIBIOTIC IN CESAREAN SECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To compare if single dose antibiotic is as effective as multiple doses in prevention of post-operative infection in caesarean section. To compare the cost effectiveness of drugs in both the groups. MATERIAL AND METHOD: This prospective randomized controlled study was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of single dose antibiotic versus multiple doses in caesarean section. The study population consisted of 600 patients that were randomly allocated to single or multiple dose groups. All potentially infected cases were excluded from this study. All patients received inj Cefotaxime IV half hour before surgery. In addition the multiple dose group received antibiotics for five days post-operatively. Each patient in the study was observed till discharge for presence of any morbidity like endometritis, urinary tract infections, and wound infections. STATISTICAL ANALYSISIS: Fischer exact test, unpaired t test used for analysis. RESULTS: There was no statistically significance in the rate of infections in both the groups. The rate of febrile morbidity, endometritis, urinary tract infection and wound infections were statistically not significant. However the difference in cost of antibiotic in both the groups was significant. CONCLUSIONS: Single dose antibiotics are effective as multiple doses in prevention of post-operative infections in caesarean sections Careful periodic surveillance of antibiotic prophylaxis is necessary to detect the emergence of drug resistant strains of bacteria in our institution because it caters to the needs of local population.

  8. Prophylaxis with levofloxacin: impact on bacterial susceptibility and epidemiology in a hematopoietic stem cell transplant unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Amaral Alonso Lopes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The emergence of resistance has been demonstrated in cancer treatment centers where prophylaxis with fluoroquinolone is used. Objective: Considering the importance of epidemiological monitoring as a strategy in choosing protocols involving antibiotics, this study aimed to evaluate the emergence of quinolone resistance and changes in the local epidemiology in a hematopoietic stem cell transplant service. Methods: For this study, 60 positive cultures before the prophylactic use of levofloxacin (period A: 2007-2008 and 118 cultures after starting the use of prophylactic levofloxacin (period B: 2010-2011 were evaluated. Results: Resistance increased for all the different types of bacteria isolated (from 46.0% to 76.5%; p-value = 0.0002. Among Gram-negative bacteria, resistance increased from 21.4% to 60.7% (p-value = 0.0163 and among Gram-positive bacteria, it increased from 55.6% to 82.9% (p-value = 0.0025. The use of levofloxacin increased from 19.44 defined daily doses per 1,000 patient-days in period A to 166.64 in period B. The use of broad spectrum antibiotics remained unchanged. Considering bacteria associated with infection, 72 and 76 were isolated in periods A and B, respectively. There was a reduction in the rate of Gramnegative bacteria in cultures associated with infection (3.81 vs. 2.00 cultures/1,000 patientdays; p-value = 0.008. Conclusion: The study of prophylaxis with levofloxacin demonstrated that there was a decrease in infections by Gram-negative bacteria; however, bacterial resistance increased, even though the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics remained unchanged. Constant monitoring of local epidemiology combined with research on clinical outcomes is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of prophylaxis.

  9. Topical azithromycin or ofloxacin for endophthalmitis prophylaxis after intravitreal injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romero-Aroca P

    2012-10-01

    observed in 12 cases in the azithromycin group and none in the ofloxacin group.Conclusion: The risk of endophthalmitis was significantly greater with ofloxacin than with azithromycin. These findings provide a valuable addition to the ever-increasing pool of information on endophthalmitis prophylaxis after intravitreal injection, although further large-scale studies are required to provide definitive conclusions.Keywords: endophthalmitis prophylaxis, intravitreal injections, azithromycin, ofloxacin, antibiotics

  10. Study of Iodine Prophylaxis Following Nuclear Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Study of iodine prophylaxis following nuclear accidents has been done. Giving stable iodine to a population exposed by I-131 is one of preventive action from internal radiation to the thyroid gland. Stable iodine could be given as Kl tablet in a range of dose of 30 mg/day to 130 mg/day. Improper giving of stable iodine could cause side effect to health, so then some factors should be considered i. e. dose estimation, age, dose of stable iodine to be given, duration of stable iodine prophylaxis and risk of health. (author)

  11. Post-exposure prophylaxis during pandemic outbreaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fisman David N

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the rise of the second pandemic wave of the novel influenza A (H1N1 virus in the current season in the Northern Hemisphere, pandemic plans are being carefully re-evaluated, particularly for the strategic use of antiviral drugs. The recent emergence of oseltamivir-resistant in treated H1N1 patients has raised concerns about the prudent use of neuraminidase inhibitors for both treatment of ill individuals and post-exposure prophylaxis of close contacts. Methods We extended an established population dynamical model of pandemic influenza with treatment to include post-exposure prophylaxis of close contacts. Using parameter estimates published in the literature, we simulated the model to evaluate the combined effect of treatment and prophylaxis in minimizing morbidity and mortality of pandemic infections in the context of transmissible drug resistance. Results We demonstrated that, when transmissible resistant strains are present, post-exposure prophylaxis can promote the spread of resistance, especially when combined with aggressive treatment. For a given treatment level, there is an optimal coverage of prophylaxis that minimizes the total number of infections (final size and this coverage decreases as a higher proportion of infected individuals are treated. We found that, when treatment is maintained at intermediate levels, limited post-exposure prophylaxis provides an optimal strategy for reducing the final size of the pandemic while minimizing the total number of deaths. We tested our results by performing a sensitivity analysis over a range of key model parameters and observed that the incidence of infection depends strongly on the transmission fitness of resistant strains. Conclusion Our findings suggest that, in the presence of transmissible drug resistance, strategies that prioritize the treatment of only ill individuals, rather than the prophylaxis of those suspected of being exposed, are most effective in reducing

  12. HIV Prevention by Oral Preexposure Prophylaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Heneine, Walid; Kashuba, Angela

    2012-01-01

    The impressive advances in antiretroviral (ARV) therapy of chronic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections during the last decade and the availability of potent ARV drugs have fueled interest in using chemoprophylaxis as a novel HIV prevention strategy. Preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) refers to the use of ARV drugs in HIV-negative persons to prevent HIV infection. The rationale for PrEP builds on the success of ARV prophylaxis in preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV and on a la...

  13. Considerations regarding iodine prophylaxis in radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The indication for the blockade of thyroid gland by the administration of stable iodide is the main countermeasure for diminishing the thyroid uptake of radioiodine following radiological accidents with potential release of radioiodine into the environment in order to avoid deterministic effects and to decrease the probability of stochastic effects. Iodine prophylaxis should be considered along with other countermeasures like sheltering indoors, evacuation and control on contaminated foods. In this communication different factors related to accidental situations regarding iodine prophylaxis are evaluated. A therapeutical scheme is proposed in order to be applied in countries of this region. (author). 4 refs

  14. Approaches to Improving Adherence to Secondary Prophylaxis for Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatic Heart Disease: A Literature Review with a Global Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rémond, Marc G W; Coyle, Meaghan E; Mills, Jane E; Maguire, Graeme P

    2016-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are autoimmune conditions resulting from infection with group A streptococcus. Current management of these conditions includes secondary antibiotic prevention. This comprises regular 3 to 4 weekly long-acting intramuscular benzathine penicillin injections. Secondary antibiotic prevention aims to protect individuals against reinfection with group A streptococcus, thereby preventing recurrent ARF and the risk of further damage to the heart valves. However, utilization of benzathine penicillin can be poor leaving patients at risk of avoidable and progressive heart damage. This review utilizes the Chronic Care Model as a framework to discuss initiatives to enhance the delivery of secondary antibiotic prophylaxis for ARF and RHD. Results from the search strategy utilized revealed that there is limited pertinent published evidence. The evidence that is available suggests that register/recall systems, dedicated health teams for delivery of secondary antibiotic prophylaxis, education about ARF and RHD, linkages with the community (particularly between health services and schools), and strong staff-patient relationships may be important. However, it is difficult to generalize findings from individual studies to other settings and high quality studies are lacking. Although secondary antibiotic prophylaxis is an effective treatment for those with ARF or RHD, the difficulties in implementing effective programs that reduce the burden of ARF and RHD demonstrates the importance of ongoing work in developing and evaluating research translation initiatives. PMID:25807106

  15. An Analogue of the Antibiotic Teicoplanin Prevents Flavivirus Entry In Vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Burghgraeve, Tine; Kaptein, Suzanne J. F.; Ayala Nunez, Vanesa; Mondotte, Juan A.; Pastorino, Boris; Printsevskaya, Svetlana S.; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Jacobs, Michael; Preobrazhenskaya, Maria; Gamarnik, Andrea V.; Smit, Jolanda M.; Neyts, Johan

    2012-01-01

    There is an urgent need for potent inhibitors of dengue virus (DENV) replication for the treatment and/or prophylaxis of infections with this virus. We here report on an aglycon analogue of the antibiotic teicoplanin (code name LCTA-949) that inhibits DENV-induced cytopathic effect (CPE) in a dose-d

  16. Facts about Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recommendations Pediatric Treatment Recommendations Inpatient Healthcare Professionals Community Pharmacists Continuing Education & Curriculum Opportunities Weighing in on Antibiotic Resistance Improving Prescribing Outpatient Antibiotic Stewardship Interventions That Work Systematic Reviews ...

  17. Antibiotic / Antimicrobial Resistance Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recommendations Pediatric Treatment Recommendations Inpatient Healthcare Professionals Community Pharmacists Continuing Education & Curriculum Opportunities Weighing in on Antibiotic Resistance Improving Prescribing Outpatient Antibiotic Stewardship Interventions That Work Systematic Reviews ...

  18. Prophylaxis after Exposure to Coxiella burnetii

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-10-02

    In this podcast, Dr. David Swerdlow discusses prophylaxis after exposure to Coxiella burnetii. It is important to know who should be treated and how they should be treated after an intentional release with possible bioterrorism agents, including Coxiella burnetii.  Created: 10/2/2008 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 10/2/2008.

  19. Effectiveness and risks of stable iodine prophylaxis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The factors upon which the efficacy of stable iodine prophylaxis depends are reviewed, with particular reference to the dose of stable iodine, the timing of the dose, the influence of dietary iodine and the impact of the other prospective actions. The risks of stable iodine ingestion are estimated, and their application to the principle of Justification in outlined. (Author)

  20. Antiviral Prophylaxis and H1N1

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-07-14

    Dr. Richard Pebody, a consultant epidemiologist at the Health Protection Agency in London, UK, discusses the use of antiviral post-exposure prophylaxis and pandemic H1N1.  Created: 7/14/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 7/18/2011.

  1. Prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism in orthopedic surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Lin-tao; MA Bao-tong

    2006-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism ( VTE), which is manifested as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), represents a significant cause of death, disability,and discomfort. They are frequent complications of various surgical procedures. The aging population and the survival of more severely injured patients may suggest an increasing risk of thromboembolism in the trauma patients. Expanded understanding of the population at risk challenges physicians to carefully examine risk factors for VTE to identify high-risk patients who can benefit from prophylaxis. An accurate knowledge of evidence-based risk factors is important in predicting and preventing postoperative DVT, and can be incorporated into a decision support system for appropriate thromboprophylaxis use.Standard use of DVT prophylaxis in a high-risk trauma population leads to a low incidence of DVT. The incidence of VTE is common in Asia. The evaluation includes laboratory tests, Doppler test and phlebography. Screening Doppler sonography should be performed for surveillance on all critically injured patients to identify DVT. D-Dimer is a useful marker to monitor prophylaxis in trauma surgery patients. The optimal time to start prophylaxis is between 2 hours before and 10 hours after surgery, but the risk of PE continues for several weeks. Thromboprophylaxis includes graduated compression stockings and anticoagulants for prophylaxis. Anticoagulants include Warfarin, which belongs to Vitamin K antagonists, unfractionated heparin,low molecular weight heparins, factor Xa indirect inhibitor Fondaparinux, and the oral Ⅱa inhibitor Melagatran and ximelagatran. Recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin is a new and highly effective antithrombotic agent. Prophylactic placement of vena caval filters in selected trauma patients may decrease the incidence of PE. The indications for prophylactic inferior vena cava filter insertion include prolonged immobilization with multiple injuries, closed head injury, pelvic

  2. Prophylaxis against febrile neutropenia with pegfilgrastim in Italy: a budget impact analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Rosti

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: prophylaxis with granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF is indicated for reduction in the duration of neutropenia and the incidence of febrile neutropenia in patients treated with cytotoxic chemotherapy for malignancy.
Objective: to evaluate the budgetary impact for the Italian NHS.
Design: a decision-analytic model has been developed to analyze the budget impact from the national health care system perspective. Costs include direct healthcare costs to the public payer of G-CSFs as well as their administration costs and costs of FN-related events. The comparison has been done using prophylaxis with G‑CSF (filgrastim for 11 days, pegfilgrastim, lenograstim for 11 days and antibiotics.
Patients and participants: The population of interest for the analysis were patients with breast cancer in stage II and III and patients with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL.
Main outcome measures and results: for all the three patients group (NHL, Breast II and III, and for all the chemotherapy regimens (CHOP 21 and R-CHOP 21 for NHL, AC-T, TAC and TC for Breast stage II and III the budget impact analyses shows a cost reduction for the Italian NHS, as a result of an increase of the use of pegfilgrastim.
Conclusions: in Italy, a treatment strategy including pegfilgrastim as either primary or secondary prophylaxis provides value for money.


  3. Comparison of Infection and Urosepsis Rates of Ciprofloxacin and Ceftriaxone Prophylaxis before Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy: A Prospective and Randomised Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Demirtas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at determining the choice and administration duration of ideal antibiotic prophylaxis before percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL operation, a treatment modality for nephrolithiasis. The study included 90 patients who had no internal problem, yet had a negative urine culture and underwent a PNL operation. We compared infection rates between ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone groups and their subgroups. The results showed no statistical difference between ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone groups in terms of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS (CIPP=0.306, CTX P=0.334. As a result of this study no statistical difference was observed between ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone in terms of SIRS. It seems, however, reasonable to choose ceftriaxone, considering antibiotic sensitivity of microorganisms and detection of three cases accepted as urosepsis in the ciprofloxacin group. As there is no difference between short, and long-term prophylactic use of these antibiotics, preference of short-term prophylaxis for patients with no risk of infection will be important to avoid inappropriate antibiotic usage.

  4. [Successes and failures in rhesus-prophylaxis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speiser, P

    1983-12-31

    The medical history of hemolytic disease of the newborn (h. d. n.) due to Rh is reviewed from 1928-1963 and a very common and widespread error in the international literature on statistical data of h. d. n. has been critically analysed and corrected on the basis of the Viennese material over a period of 25 years. It is shown the first time that the morbidity is not as high as 6 to 7 in 1000 newborns but approximately 3 to 4 taking into account the origin of their mothers. The frequency of h. d. n. in Vienna is strongly influenced by mothers who come from abroad with and without foreign citizenship. In 13,34% of h. d. n. the women produce Rh antibodies during pregnancy, and therefore the Rh prophylaxis given after birth is not able to prevent the immunization which means that 0,55 per thousand of the h. d. n. rate of 4,1 per thousand is caused by Rh antibodies developed intra graviditatem and 3,55 per thousand post partum. These figures are derived from observations between 1948 and 1971 in the Pre-Prophylaxis-Time. The success of the Anti-D-IgG application dropped the h. d. n. rate from 4,1 per thousand to 1,7 per thousand in 1981. If the figure of 0,55 per thousand is taken into account as a wrong "failure" of the post partum prophylaxis, 1,15 per thousand (1,7-0,55) of h. d. n. have to be noted as true failures. There are many causes possible for the high rate of failure in the post partum prophylaxis which is to be eliminated before one could think of a systematic ante partum Rh prophylaxis. In our population 17% are Rh negative, 10% of all mothers are Rh negative giving birth to a Rh positive child and 3,5 per thousand of mothers of h. d. n. develop Rh antibodies post partum, 0,55 per thousand before. Out of 1000 Anti-D-IgG injections given after birth 965 are without any consequence and therefore only 35 are effective. Making use of the ante partum prophylaxis (mother Rh negative, baby's Rh factor unknown) 17% of all pregnant women have to be treated for

  5. Early Antibiotic Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis: More News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan J De Waele

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Early antibiotic treatment still remains a therapeutic challenge in the clinical management of acute pancreatitis and several papers have been published in this field [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14]. In particular, the antibiotic of choice in preventing the infection of pancreatic necrosis seems to be imipenem [4, 9, 10, 11, 13]. Subsequently, Manes et al. [15] have reported that meropenem, an antibiotic of the same family as imipenem having considerable stability in the presence of renal dehydropeptidase-I and enhanced activity against gram-negative bacteria including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, has an efficacy similar to imipenem in terms of the incidence of pancreatic infection and extrapancreatic infections. We have previously emphasized that further studies should be carried out to specifically decide on the optimal doses of meropenem in patients with acute pancreatitis and that there is a need for studies which answer the following questions. What should the timing of early antibiotic treatment be?. What are the resistant strains selected by meropenem?. Which are the nosocomial infections and fungal superinfections resulting from this new treatment? [16, 17]. These questions are still open and the study from Manes et al. is welcome to attempt to answer some of the aforementioned questions [18]. In this study, the authors compared antibiotic prophylaxis with early antibiotic treatment started after the demonstration of pancreatic necrosis. They studied 215 consecutive patients with acute pancreatitis who were randomized to either Group A (n=108, who started antibiotic therapy (meropenem 500 mg tid at admission, or Group B (n=107, who received antibiotics after computed tomography showed necrosis. C-reactive protein was determined in all patients within 48 hours from the onset of symptoms and computed tomography was performed in both groups after at least 48 h of hospitalization; the clinical course of disease was also compared

  6. Thromboembolism prophylaxis practices in orthopaedic arthroplasty patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cawley, D

    2010-10-01

    Thromboembolic events are a post-operative complication of arthroplasty surgery for up to 3 months. The incidence however, is not fully known. Some form of prophylaxis should be provided to all arthroplasty patients. Clinicians are wary of side effects, compliance profile and the associated cost. The objective of this study is to investigate practice patterns and their relevance to 3 risk groups. Ninety questionnaires were sent to orthopaedic surgeons with 3 hypothetical clinical scenarios and 10 prophylaxis regimes for thromboembolism across different risk groups. The response rate was 81\\/90 (90%). The most popular options in all 3 cases were early mobilisation, thrombo-embolism deterrant (TED) stockings and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) (51\\/81, 62% of all cases). An inconsistent relationship exists between preferred practice and relevant guidelines. Preferred practice does not correlate with each level of risk.

  7. Self-assessment of striae gravidarum prophylaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Antoszewski, Bogusław; Sobczak, Małgorzata; Kasielska-Trojan, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Striae are the most frequently occurring pathology of connective tissue during pregnancy. According to the statistical data, 70–90% of women suffer from striae gravidarum. Aim To assess effectiveness of topical products and massage used by pregnant women in striae gravidarum prophylaxis. Material and methods The questionnaire study was conducted among 299 women who were maximum 6 months after delivery at term. The questionnaire included questions concerning age, occurrence of str...

  8. Acute Pancreatitis: Surgery, Pathophysiology and Probiotic Prophylaxis

    OpenAIRE

    van Minnen, L. P.

    2006-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a challenging disease with a clinical course that is often difficult to predict. In severe acute pancreatitis, mortality increases significantly if intestinal bacteria translocate from the intestine and infect pancreatic necrosis. Surgical and prophylactic treatment strategies are challenged by complex pathophysiology of the disease. This thesis addresses some key aspects of acute pancreatitis: surgical management, pathophysiology and probiotic prophylaxis. Outcome in pa...

  9. Secondary prophylaxis in adolescent and adult haemophiliacs

    OpenAIRE

    Tagliaferri, Annarita; Di Perna, Caterina; Rivolta, Gianna Franca

    2008-01-01

    Progressive arthropathy of large joints of the limbs (knees, ankles, elbows), resulting from recurrent joint bleeds and subsequent long-term degenerative phenomena, is one of the main causes of morbidity and of deterioration of quality of life in adult severe hemophiliacs. While primary prophylaxis (i.e. the regular continuous long-term infusion of factor concentrates started before the age of two years and/or after no more than one joint bleed) is nowadays considered the gold standard for pr...

  10. Fatal rabies despite post-exposure prophylaxis

    OpenAIRE

    D G Deshmukh; Damle, A. S.; J K Bajaj; J B Bhakre; N S Patil

    2011-01-01

    Only sporadic reports of failure of post-exposure prophylaxis for rabies exist in the published literature. We are reporting such a case in a 3-year-old boy. The child had Category III dog bite on his right thigh. He presented with progressive ascending paralysis, finally developing quadriplegia and respiratory paralysis. Typical hydrophobia and aerophobia were absent. He received four doses of antirabies cell culture vaccine. He did not receive antirabies immunoglobulin. The boy succumbed on...

  11. Therapy and prophylaxis in newborn patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Manzoni

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Fluconazole is the most used drug for antifungal prophylaxis in neonatal population. Despite its effectiveness, sometimes fungal infections occur also in newborn patients undergoing fluconazole prophylaxis: this is mainly due both to biofilm formation in patients who carry a central venous catheter (CVC, a common condi­tion among premature babies, and to the occurrence of an infection by a Candida subspecies with intrinsic resistance to fluconazole (e.g.: C. glabrata and C. krusei. A number of antifungal agents are approved for pediatric use, and their limits and advantages are analyzed in this article, but only micafungin is authorized for use in neonatal patients. Further trials are required in order to assess whether additional drugs could have a similar indication for neonatal use. A big issue is the correct identification of the most effective dosing regimen, because the drug pharmacokinetics is peculiar and somewhat unpredictable in newborn patients. In addition to fluconazole prophylaxis, other measures could be taken to prevent fungal infections in at-risk neonates, such as increasing hygienic measures, encouraging breast-feeding, removing CVCs, using probiotics, and decreasing or avoiding the use of drugs promoting the development of systemic mycoses.http://dx.doi.org/10.7175/rhc.v4i1S.858

  12. Discussion about some aspects on iodine prophylaxis after nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The iodine prophylaxis is one of the main interventions for public protection after a nuclear accident. Due to the differences in iodine side effect, contraindication, crowd's sensitivity, iodine supplies, ect., various countries have very big difference in plan and implementation of iodine prophylaxis. The paper applies the domestic and foreign experiences, discusses iodine prophylaxis intervention level, the dosage and opportunity of taking stable iodine, stable iodine storage and provision, expense of iodine prophylaxis and so on. Some suggestions such as expert decision based on intervention level, the stable iodine expense share are also made. (authors)

  13. 77 FR 10748 - Scientific Information Request on Mechanical Prophylaxis of Venous Thromboembolism (VTE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-23

    ... Prophylaxis of Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS... Pharmacologic and Mechanical Prophylaxis of Venous Thromboembolism Among Special Populations Review, which is... review of the evidence for pharmacologic and mechanical prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism (VTE)...

  14. Detection of antibiotic residues in food by Charm II test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antibiotics are used in food to: -therapy and prophylaxis, -increase the productivity of the food producing animals. The presence of antimicrobial residues: -constitutes a potential human health hazard. has significant impact on international food trade. has implications on technological process in dairy industry. Detection of antibiotic residues is of great interest. It helps protect humans against the effects of such residues, the more it can support the participation of our country in international trade. Charm II test is one of the methods of detection of antimicrobial residues. The tests utilize microbial or antibody receptor assay technology. The sample is incubated with a binding agent (microbial cells with specific receptor sites or with specific antibodies attached) and a tracer (the radio-labeled version of the antibiotic to be detected). The amount of tracer on the binding agent is measured using a scintillation counter and is compared to a pre-determined cut-off or control point. If contaminating antibiotic is present, it will prevent the binding of the tracer by occupying the receptors on the binding agent. The less labeled tracer detected, the more contaminating antibiotic there is present in the sample. This work, carried out at the Radiochemical Laboratory of the National Centre of Nuclear Science and Technology, has two parts: 1/ The first is reserved to a literature review provides an overview on antibiotics and the charm II method. 2/ The second is devoted to the experimental study and presentation of results.

  15. Strengthening Control of Antibiotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EthelLu

    2005-01-01

    IT is a well-known fact that buy-ng guns is much easier than purchasing antibiotics in the United States. In China, however, the situation is different. According to a recent WHO survey,about 80 percent of Chinese inpatients take antibiotic medicines, and 58 percent of them are prescribed multifunctional antibiotics,

  16. Know When Antibiotics Work

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-04-15

    This podcast provides a brief background about antibiotics and quick tips to help prevent antibiotic resistance.  Created: 4/15/2015 by Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Disease (NCIRD), Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Program.   Date Released: 4/16/2015.

  17. Antibiotic resistant in microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antimicrobial agents are necessary for use in veterinary medicine including the production of food producing animals. Antibiotic use is indicated for the treatment of bacterial target organisms and/or disease for which the antibiotic was developed. However, an unintended consequence of antibiotic ...

  18. Prophylaxis of Human Hydrophobia in South Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yang Ree

    2014-01-01

    Domestic human hydrophobia has not been reported since the one case of 2004 in South Korea, but still a few animal rabies occur persistently since the reemerging stage of rabies from 1993. The government has made efforts to control animal rabies in many aspects, but whether prophylactic strategy for human hydrophobia is performed adequately is in question. The rate of proper post-exposure prophylaxis for animal bite case in 'high-risk region' of rabies is very low with 20% between 2011 and 20...

  19. Surveillance of antibiotic consumption using the "focus of infection" approach in 2 hospitals in Ujjain, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Pathak

    Full Text Available Antibiotic surveillance initiatives are limited in resource-constrained settings. In the present study, a quantitative comparison of antibiotic use rates for suspected infections in 2 hospitals in India was performed using the "focus of infection" approach to identify targets for quality improvement in antibiotic prescription patterns in hospitalized patients.This observational study was carried out in one teaching and one nonteaching hospital. All the patients with suspected bacterial etiology were included. Data on the prescribed antibiotics and the focus of infection were prospectively collected using a structured questionnaire. Each diagnosis was further reviewed and confirmed by an independent consultant. The prescribed antibiotics were coded according to the World Health Organization Anatomic Therapeutic Classification (ATC index with the defined daily dose (DDD methodology. Focus-specific DDDs were calculated per hundred patient days (DDD/HPD.A total of 6026 patients were included from 72 participating physicians out of available 75 physicians. Overall antibiotic prescribing was higher by 5 percentage points in the teaching hospital (95% than in the nonteaching hospital (90%. Quinolones (ciprofloxacin constituting 86% of DDD/HPD were the highest prescribed class in the teaching hospital, and third-generation cephalosporins (with ceftriaxone and ceftriaxone/sulbactam constituting 40% and 28% of the DDD/HPD, respectively, in the nonteaching hospital. The targets identified for improvement were the following: longer than recommended duration of prophylaxis and lack of distinction between prophylaxis and therapy among surgical patients; irrational antibiotic prescribing in gastroenteritis; overuse of quinolones and lack of use of penicillin in pneumonia; overuse of quinolones and lack of use of doxycycline and macrolides in genital infections; and overreliance on antibiotics for treating skin and soft tissue infections.Providing a

  20. PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis) 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Pre-exposure prophylaxis (or PrEP) is when people at very high ... of getting infected. What is PrEP? Pre-exposure prophylaxis (or PrEP) is when people at very high ...

  1. Iodine prophylaxis in case of nuclear incidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1999 the Dutch government made a start on the revision of the National Nuclear Emergency Response Plan. This revision includes recommendations for iodine prophylaxis in case of a radioactive iodine release. The strategy set out for the Dutch situation will be described here. The first step was to carry out a threat analysis to calculate the area around nuclear power plants, where thyroid doses for children are sufficiently high as to warrant iodine prophylaxis. Calculations were based on scenarios and source terms. Analyses were conducted for accidental releases of the power plants of Borssele (the Netherlands), Doel (Belgium) and Emsland (Germany). Two zones were defined for each nuclear power plant: one in the direct vicinity of the power plant and a second one, forming a circle around the first zone. In the first zone predistribution of iodine tablets is advocated. In the second zone, around the first one, we advice local storage at offices of general practitioners, pharmacies, drugstores and at municipal health services ( GGD's) and at medical accident and disaster assistance service points (GHOR's)

  2. Fungal infections in marrow transplant recipients under antifungal prophylaxis with fluconazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira J.S.R.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal infection is one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in bone marrow transplant (BMT recipients. The growing incidence of these infections is related to several factors including prolonged granulocytopenia, use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, conditioning regimens, and use of immunosuppression to avoid graft-versus-host disease (GvHD. In the present series, we report five cases of invasive mold infections documented among 64 BMT recipients undergoing fluconazole antifungal prophylaxis: 1 A strain of Scedosporium prolificans was isolated from a skin lesion that developed on day +72 after BMT in a chronic myeloid leukemic patient. 2 Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (Aspergillus fumigatus was diagnosed on day +29 in a patient with a long period of hospitalization before being transplanted for severe aplastic anemia. 3 A tumoral lung lesion due to Rhizopus arrhizus (zygomycosis was observed in a transplanted patient who presented severe chronic GvHD. 4 A tumoral lesion due to Aspergillus spp involving the 7th, 8th and 9th right ribs and local soft tissue was diagnosed in a BMT patient on day +110. 5 A patient with a history of Ph1-positive acute lymphocytic leukemia exhibited a cerebral lesion on day +477 after receiving a BMT during an episode of severe chronic GvHD. At that time, blood and spinal fluid cultures yielded Fusarium sp. Opportunistic infections due to fungi other than Candida spp are becoming a major problem among BMT patients receiving systemic antifungal prophylaxis with fluconazole.

  3. Treatment Utility of Postpartum Antibiotics in Chorioamnionitis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, Anthony L; Mehra, Suwan; Gross, Gil; Colvin, Ryan; Harper, Lorie M; Tuuli, Methodius G

    2016-07-01

    Objective To determine if postpartum antibiotics are necessary for patients with chorioamnionitis after a cesarean delivery (CD). Study Design Multicenter randomized controlled trial. Laboring patients with singleton gestations and chorioamnionitis who underwent CD were eligible. Patients were treated with ampicillin and gentamicin per standard protocol, then given clindamycin prior to skin incision. Patients were randomized to either postpartum antibiotic prophylaxis or no treatment following delivery. The primary outcome was the rate of endometritis. Assuming a 30% risk of endometritis in patients with chorioamnionitis who undergo CD, 119 patients per arm would be required to detect a 50% decrease in endometritis. Results The trial was stopped for futility following a planned interim analysis after 80 patients were randomized. There was no difference in the rate of the primary outcome between the two groups (9.8 vs. 7.7%, relative risk [RR]: 1.27; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.30, 5.31). A meta-analysis comparing post-CD antibiotics versus no treatment did not find a statistically significant difference between the groups (16.7 vs. 12.0%, pooled RR: 1.43; 95% CI: 0.72, 2.84). Conclusion Additional postpartum antibiotics do not decrease the rate of endometritis in patients with chorioamnionitis who undergo CD. The current preoperative antibiotic regimen including clindamycin should remain the standard of care in these patients. PMID:26890440

  4. Frontline antibiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGowan, Alasdair; Albur, Maha

    2013-06-01

    The need to use front-line antibiotics wisely has never been greater. Antibiotic resistance and multi-drug resistant infection, driven by antibiotic use, remain major public health and professional concerns. To overcome these infection problems, use of older antibiotics active against multi drug-resistant pathogens is increasing - for example, colistin, fosfomycin, pivmecillinam, pristinamycin, temocillin and oral tetracyclines. The number of new antibacterials reaching clinical practice has reduced significantly in the last 20 years, most being focused on therapy of Gram-positive infection - eg linezolid, daptomycin, telavancin and ceftaroline. Recent guidance on antibiotic stewardship in NHS trusts in England is likely to provide a backdrop to antibiotic use in hospitals in the next 5 years. PMID:23760700

  5. High Antibiotic Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malo, Sara; José Rabanaque, María; Feja, Cristina;

    2014-01-01

    a high proportion of antibiotics not recommended as first choice in primary health care. In conclusion, heavy antibiotic users consisted mainly of children and old adults. Inappropriate overuse of antibiotics (high quantity, high frequency, and inappropriate antibiotic choice) leads to a substantial...... individuals with highest consumption) were responsible for 21% of the total DDD consumed and received ≥6 packages per year. Elderly adults (≥60 years) and small children (0-9 years) were those exposed to the highest volume of antibiotics and with the most frequent exposure, respectively. Heavy users received...... risk of the emergence and spread of resistant bacteria, and interventions to reduce overuse of antibiotics should therefore primarily be targeted children and elderly people....

  6. Caspofungin as secondary antifungal prophylaxis and subsequent maintenance antifungal prophylaxis therapy in hematological malignancy patients

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Mingjuan; Li, Yan; Zhao, Xiaoli; Zhang, Yongqing; Zhai, Bing; Zhang, Qingyi; Wang, Lijun; Zhao, Yu; Li, Honghua; Wang, Quanshun; Gao, Chunji; Huang, Wenrong; Yu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to investigate the efficacy and safety of caspofungin as secondary antifungal prophylaxis (SAP) and subsequent maintenance therapy for SAP in hematological malignancy patients. Methods: Forty four patients receiving caspofungin for SAP and 43 patients not receiving any SAP agents during their subsequent chemotherapy or HSCT were reviewed retrospectively. The clinical characteristics and diagnosis were analyzed according to the diagnostic criteria for IFD. Results: The re...

  7. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia prophylaxis for HIV-exposed neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennett NJ

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nicholas J Bennett Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, Connecticut Childrens Medical Center, Hartford, CT, USA Abstract: Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP is a common, usually fatal opportunistic infection of HIV-infected infants. This review summarizes the current knowledge and recommended practices regarding PCP prophylaxis in HIV-exposed infants. The incidence of PCP has dropped dramatically in areas of the world where widespread testing for HIV and empiric prophylaxis for PCP in HIV-exposed neonates have been adopted. The recommended drug for PCP prophylaxis is trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX, and all HIV-infected infants under a year of age should receive PCP prophylaxis as well as combination anti-retroviral therapy. With the advent of accurate, timely testing that can reliably rule out infection with HIV at an early age, PCP prophylaxis can be safely avoided in the majority of HIV-exposed infants. Resource-poor settings should employ universal PCP prophylaxis for HIV-exposed infants and have a need for rapid, accurate, molecular testing approaches to diagnose HIV infection in exposed neonates. Keywords: pneumocystis, jirovecii, PCP, HIV, prophylaxis, neonate

  8. Understanding Antibiotic Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Goulart-Touma, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of antibiotic resistance among bacteria threatens our continued ability to treat infectious diseases. The need for sustainable strategies to cure bacterial infections has never been greater. So far, all attempts to restore susceptibility after resistance arises have been unsuccessful, including restrictions on prescribing antibiotics (Andersson DI et al.2011) and antibiotic cycling (Andersson DI et al. 2005, Bergstrom CT et al. 2004). Part of the problem may be that those effor...

  9. Recurrent urinary tract infections in children: Preventive interventions other than prophylactic antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Tewary, Kishor; Narchi, Hassib

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common childhood infections. Permanent renal cortical scarring may occur in affected children, especially with recurrent UTIs, leading to long-term complications such as hypertension and chronic renal failure. To prevent such damage, several interventions to prevent UTI recurrences have been tried. The most established and accepted prevention at present is low dose long-term antibiotic prophylaxis. However it has a risk of break through infecti...

  10. New drugs in migraine treatment and prophylaxis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, Lars; Linde, Mattias

    2010-01-01

    Although the triptan drugs provide effective relief from migraine for many patients, a substantial number of affected individuals are unresponsive to these compounds, and such therapy can also lead to a range of adverse effects. Telcagepant represents a new class of antimigraine drug-the calcitonin...... triptans. Comparisons with triptans in clinical trials for acute treatment of migraine attacks revealed clinical effects similar to those of triptans but better than those of placebo. Telcagepant might provide hope for those who have a poor response to, or are unable to use, older drugs. In patients who...... need prophylaxis because of frequent attacks of migraine, topiramate is a first-line drug for migraine prevention inmany countries; it is generally safe and reasonably well tolerated. Data suggest that topiramate could aid reversion of chronic migraine to episodic migraine....

  11. Fatal rabies despite post-exposure prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D G Deshmukh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Only sporadic reports of failure of post-exposure prophylaxis for rabies exist in the published literature. We are reporting such a case in a 3-year-old boy. The child had Category III dog bite on his right thigh. He presented with progressive ascending paralysis, finally developing quadriplegia and respiratory paralysis. Typical hydrophobia and aerophobia were absent. He received four doses of antirabies cell culture vaccine. He did not receive antirabies immunoglobulin. The boy succumbed on the 23 rd day of the dog bite. Diagnosis of rabies was confirmed in the laboratory by demonstration of Negri bodies, direct fluorescent antibody test and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction either on impression smear of brain or a piece of brain taken during autopsy.

  12. Antibiotics: Miracle Drugs

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-04-16

    The overuse of antibiotics has led to the development of resistance among bacteria, making antibiotics ineffective in treating certain conditions. This podcast discusses the importance of talking to your healthcare professional about whether or not antibiotics will be beneficial if you’ve been diagnosed with an infectious disease.  Created: 4/16/2015 by Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Disease (NCIRD), Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Program.   Date Released: 4/16/2015.

  13. Structure of polysaccharide antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Study of the structure of antibiotics having two or several sugars in their molecule. One may distinguish: the polysaccharide antibiotics themselves, made up of two or several sugars either with or without nitrogen, such as streptomycin, neomycins, paromomycine, kanamycin, chalcomycin; the hetero-polysaccharide antibiotics made up of one saccharide part linked to an aglycone of various type through a glucoside: macrolide, pigment, pyrimidine purine. Amongst these latter are: erythromycin, magnamycin, spiramycin, oleandomycin, cinerubin and amicetin. The sugars can either play a direct role in biochemical reactions or act as a dissolving agent, as far as the anti-microbe power of these antibiotics is concerned. (author)

  14. Identification of Antibiotics used in Clinical Surgery and Orthopedic Unit from Midsized Hospital in Mato Grosso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. Lima

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This study aimed to identify the pattern of antimicrobial use in a unit and orthopedic surgical clinic of a medium-sized hospital in Mato Grosso. The study based in analysis of 500 medical charts and filling out forms previously prepared from Regional Hospital of Sorriso, between March and April 2012, after approval of the project by CEP Julio Muller University Hospital (Protocol No. 219/2011. It was observed that 69% (345 of the sample were male, with ages ranging between 18 and 112 years. In all the charts can observe the prescription of antibiotics, the most prescribed the cephalothin 49.2% (297, Amikacin 12.27% (74 5.3% Gentamicin (32, Ciprofloxacin 4.31 % (26 and Clindamycin 3.31% (20. Among the 500 records analyzed only 9 (1.8% underwent antimicrobial prophylaxis and 491 (98.2 did not receive prophylaxis. Among the antimicrobials used in surgical prophylaxis met the cephalothin, used in 77.8% of cases and Clindamycin in 22.2% of cases, these drugs of second choice within the parameters of the National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA. The rational use of antibiotics reduce any risk of emergence of resistant microbial strains and still be profitable in terms pharmacoeconomicsKeywords: Antimicrobial; Surgical Clinic, Nursing; Antibiotic.

  15. Is degradable antibiotic coating for synthetic meshes provide protection against experimental animal infection after fascia repair?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letouzey, Vincent; Lavigne, Jean Philippe; Garric, Xavier; Coudane, Jean; de Tayrac, Renaud; Callaghan, David O

    2012-02-01

    The surgical repair of pelvic organ prolapse using synthetic mesh can fail because of slow or partial implant integration due to poor biocompatibility or infection. As systemic antibiotic prophylaxis has only limited success, we have developed a system that coats standard polypropylene mesh with clinically relevant antibiotics. Amoxicillin and ofloxacin are both released from the mesh in vitro at high levels over 3 days, preventing adhesion and biofilm formation by a clinical isolate of E. coli. In an in vivo incisional hernia repair model in rats, the antibiotic-coated mesh results in appropriate tissue integration with adequate vascularization and collagen formation. When implanted animals are infected with virulent E. coli, both antibiotic coatings provide full protection against infection (as assessed both clinically and microbiologically), thus demonstrating their bioavailability. This method is a specific approach for producing a therapeutic coating that could reduce postsurgical infections. PMID:22102417

  16. The future of antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spellberg, Brad

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance continues to spread even as society is experiencing a market failure of new antibiotic research and development (R&D). Scientific, economic, and regulatory barriers all contribute to the antibiotic market failure. Scientific solutions to rekindle R&D include finding new screening strategies to identify novel antibiotic scaffolds and transforming the way we think about treating infections, such that the goal is to disarm the pathogen without killing it or modulate the host response to the organism without targeting the organism for destruction. Future economic strategies are likely to focus on 'push' incentives offered by public-private partnerships as well as increasing pricing by focusing development on areas of high unmet need. Such strategies can also help protect new antibiotics from overuse after marketing. Regulatory reform is needed to re-establish feasible and meaningful traditional antibiotic pathways, to create novel limited-use pathways that focus on highly resistant infections, and to harmonize regulatory standards across nations. We need new antibiotics with which to treat our patients. But we also need to protect those new antibiotics from misuse when they become available. If we want to break the cycle of resistance and change the current landscape, disruptive approaches that challenge long-standing dogma will be needed. PMID:25043962

  17. Immunomodulatory actions of antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minić Svetlana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Antimicrob drugs and immune system interaction has been studied since the pioneer works of Metchnikoff. After the introduction of antibiotics in clinical practice this area has attracted little attention of investigators, because of the lack of standards. This is the reason that the studying of the influence of antibiotics on immune system is still at its beginning. Aim: To point out the immunomodulatory action of some antibiotics on certain components of immune system. Methods and results. The literaure findings show that antibiotics exspress immunomodulatory action on some components of immune system such as fagocytes (polymorphonucleary, macrophages, monocytes, cytokines, immunoglobulines, and on cellular immunity. The principles of antibiotics action on phagocyte are the inhibition of chemotaxis and oxidants production. Macrolides applied for a short time enchance the phagocytic functions while their long use leads to immunosupression. Some cephalosporines and rifampicin in therapeutic doses inhibit the oxydative metabolism of macrophages. Tetracyclines, clindamycines, chloramphenicol and tobramycin inhibit the synthesis of superoxyd anione. The action of some antibiotics on cytokine and specific antibodies is also important. Cellular immunity can be affected as well. After administration of certain antibiotics it takes 1-2 weeks to reestablish normal cellular immunity, and for other even more. Conclusion. There is still no clear standing on real effects of antibiotics on the immune system. Clinicians should search for more information from this new-old field of investigation in order to give more adequate therapy to patients.

  18. Fosfluconazole for Antifungal Prophylaxis in Very Low Birth Weight Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daijiro Takahashi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a retrospective case series study to evaluate the safety of fosfluconazole prophylaxis for preventing invasive fungal infection in VLBW infants with a central vascular access. Fosfluconazole was administered intravenously at a dose of 6 mg/kg everyday during which time a central venous catheter was placed. A total of 23 infants met the criteria for enrollment in our study. No cases of fungal infection were detected during the central venous catheter placement in the group. None of the infants had an elevated β-D-glucan, and all of them were still alive at discharge. Regarding the liver and renal function, no statistically significant differences were observed before and at the end of fosfluconazole prophylaxis. The results of this study demonstrate that fosfluconazole prophylaxis in preventing invasive fungal infection was well tolerated by VLBW infants. This is a first report to describe antifungal prophylaxis using fosfluconazole for VLBW infants.

  19. Domiciliary nebulized pentamidine for secondary prophylaxis against Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia.

    OpenAIRE

    Green, S. T.; Nathwani, D.; Christie, P.R; Goldberg, D J; Kennedy, D. H.; Love, W C

    1990-01-01

    The viability of a programme for delivering aerosolized pentamidine within the patient's home setting for the secondary prophylaxis of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) has been explored with seven homosexual AIDS patients, the major objectives being the assessment of the safety and acceptability of the treatment and the discovery of the most suitable care setting (home, ward, outpatient clinic) for the administration of therapy. It is concluded that a domiciliary prophylaxis programme is ...

  20. Pentamidine in Pneumocystis jirovecii prophylaxis in heart transplant recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Diken, Adem Ilkay; Diken, Ozlem Erçen; Hanedan, Onur; Yılmaz, Seyhan; Ecevit, Ata Niyazi; Erol, Emir; Yalçınkaya, Adnan

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in transplantation techniques and the quality of post-transplantation care, opportunistic infections remain an important cause of complications. Pneumocystis jirovecii (P. jirovecii) is an opportunistic organism, represents an important cause of infections in heart transplantation patients. Almost 2% to 10% of patients undergoing cardiac transplantation have Pneumocystis pneumonia. Prophylaxis is essential after surgery. Various prophylaxis regimes had been defined in past an...

  1. DIAGNOSTIC AND THERAPEUTIC POSSIBILITIES IN THE PROPHYLAXIS OF CERVICAL CANCER

    OpenAIRE

    Marzena Wrześniewska; Olga Adamczyk-Gruszka; Jakub Gruszka; Beata Bąk

    2013-01-01

    Poland is one of the countries with high cervical cancer morbidity and mortality. The main means to change this situation is to manage an active and modern programme of cervical cancer prophylaxis and diagnostics. To a large extent, the effectiveness of a cervical cancer prophylaxis programme is decided by the availability of modern diagnostic research. The conventional Papanicolaou test and modern LBC cytology techniques were discussed in the article, taking into consideration HPV diagno...

  2. Profilaxia antimicrobiana na cirurgia bariátrica Antibiotic prophylaxis in bariatric surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Álvaro Antonio Bandeira Ferraz; Cristiano de Souza Leão; Josemberg Marins Campos; Euclides Martins Filho; Antonio Cavalcanti de Albuquerque; Edmundo Machado Ferraz

    2007-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Analisar os resultados da incidência de infecção do sítio cirúrgico com três diferentes esquemas antimicrobianos. MÉTODO: No período de Janeiro de 1999 a Dezembro de 2004 foram realizadas 716 cirurgias para o tratamento da Obesidade mórbida, seguindo a técnica proposta por Fobi/Capella. Foram estudados comparativamente três grupos de pacientes: Grupo I - (185) em que foi realizada a profilaxia antimicrobiana com ampicilina/sulbactam, na dose de 3g em duas doses; Grupo II (280) em qu...

  3. Antibiotic prophylaxis compliance for clean-contaminated wounds in a district hospital in Jakarta

    OpenAIRE

    Syachroni Syachroni

    2016-01-01

    AbstrakLatar belakang: Insidens infeksi luka operasi (ILO) masih menjadi masalah namun kejadiannya dapatdikurangi dengan tindakan pencegahan yaitu antara lain dengan pemberian antibiotik profilaksis.Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menilai kesesuaian penggunaan antibiotik profilaksis pada pasien bedahbersih-terkontaminasi.Metode: Penelitian potong lintang di sebuah rumah sakit umum daerah (RSUD) di Jakarta pada periode1 Januari sampai 31 Desember 2013. Data berasal dari rekam medik pasien dewas...

  4. Antibiotics for prophylaxis of Plasmodium falciparum infections : in vitro activity of doxycycline against Senegalese isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Pradines, B; Spiegel, A.; Rogier, C; Tall, A; Mosnier, J.; Fusai, T.; Trape, Jean-François; Parzy, D

    2000-01-01

    The in vitro acivities of doxycycline, chloroquine, quinine, amodiaquine, artemether, pyrimethamine, and cycloguanil were evaluated against #Plasmodium falciparum$ isolates from Senegal (Dielmo and Ndiop), using an isotopic, micro, drug susceptibility test. The 71 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values for doxycycline ranged from 0.7 to 108.0 microMol and the geometric mean IC50 for the 71 isolates was 11.3 microMol (95% confidence interval = 9.5-13.4 microM). The activity of doxycycline ...

  5. Antibiotic resistance in children with complicated urinary tract infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective was to determine the resistance of antibiotics for complicated urinary tract infection (UTI), including urinary tract anomaly (UTA), for empirical antibiotic therapy of complicated UTI. Four hundred and twenty two urine isolates were obtained from 113 patients with recurrent UTI, who used prophylactic antibiotics between February 1999 and November 2004 in the Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Eskisehir, Turkey. Reflux was found to be most important predisposing factor for recurrent UTI (31.9%). Renal scar was detected more in patients with UTA than without UTA (59.2% versus 12.4%, p<0.05). Gram-negative organisms were dominant in patients with and without UTA (91.5% and 79.2%). Enterococci and Candida spp. were more prevalent in children with UTA than without UTA (p<0.001). Isolates were significantly more resistant to ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, amikacin, co-amoxiclav, ticarcillin-clvalanate and piperacillin-tazobactam in patients with UTA than without UTA. We found low resistance to ciprofloxacin and nitrofurantoin in UTI with and without UTA. Enterococci spp. was highly resistance to ampicillin and amikacin in patients with UTA. Aztreonam, meropenem and ciprofloxacin seemed to be the best choice for treatment of UTI with UTA due to Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. Nitrofurantoin and nalidixic acid may be first choice antibiotics for prophylaxis in UTI with and without UTA. The UTI with UTA caused by Enterococci spp. might not benefit from a combination of amikacin and ampicillin, it could be treated with glycopeptides. (author)

  6. Diet as prophylaxis and treatment for venous thromboembolism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cundiff David K

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both prophylaxis and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE: deep venous thrombosis (DVT and pulmonary emboli (PE with anticoagulants are associated with significant risks of major and fatal hemorrhage. Anticoagulation treatment of VTE has been the standard of care in the USA since before 1962 when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration began requiring randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs showing efficacy, so efficacy trials were never required for FDA approval. In clinical trials of 'high VTE risk' surgical patients before the 1980s, anticoagulant prophylaxis was clearly beneficial (fatal pulmonary emboli (FPE without anticoagulants = 0.99%, FPE with anticoagulants = 0.31%. However, observational studies and RCTs of 'high VTE risk' surgical patients from the 1980s until 2010 show that FPE deaths without anticoagulants are about one-fourth the rate that occurs during prophylaxis with anticoagulants (FPE without anticoagulants = 0.023%, FPE while receiving anticoagulant prophylaxis = 0.10%. Additionally, an FPE rate of about 0.012% (35/28,400 in patients receiving prophylactic anticoagulants can be attributed to 'rebound hypercoagulation' in the two months after stopping anticoagulants. Alternatives to anticoagulant prophylaxis should be explored. Methods and Findings The literature concerning dietary influences on VTE incidence was reviewed. Hypotheses concerning the etiology of VTE were critiqued in relationship to the rationale for dietary versus anticoagulant approaches to prophylaxis and treatment. Epidemiological evidence suggests that a diet with ample fruits and vegetables and little meat may substantially reduce the risk of VTE; vegetarian, vegan, or Mediterranean diets favorably affect serum markers of hemostasis and inflammation. The valve cusp hypoxia hypothesis of DVT/VTE etiology is consistent with the development of VTE being affected directly or indirectly by diet. However, it is less consistent with

  7. Functional anatomy of the colonic bioreactor: Impact of antibiotics and Saccharomyces boulardii on bacterial composition in human fecal cylinders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swidsinski, Alexander; Loening-Baucke, Vera; Schulz, Stefan; Manowsky, Julia; Verstraelen, Hans; Swidsinski, Sonja

    2016-02-01

    Sections of fecal cylinders were analyzed using fluorescence in situ hybridization targeting 180 bacterial groups. Samples were collected from three groups of women (N=20 each) treated for bacterial vaginosis with ciprofloxacin+metronidazole. Group A only received the combined antibiotic regimen, whereas the A/Sb group received concomitant Saccharomyces boulardii CNCM I-745 treatment, and the A_Sb group received S. boulardii prophylaxis following the 14-day antibiotic course. The number of stool cylinders analyzed was 188 out of 228 in group A, 170 out of 228 in group A/Sb, and 172 out of 216 in group A_Sb. The colonic biomass was organized into a separate mucus layer with no bacteria, a 10-30μm broad unstirred transitional layer enriched with bacteria, and a patchy fermentative area that mixed digestive leftovers with bacteria. The antibiotics suppressed bacteria mainly in the fermentative area, whereas abundant bacterial clades retreated to the transitional mucus and survived. As a result, the total concentration of bacteria decreased only by one order. These effects were lasting, since the overall recovery of the microbial mass, bacterial diversity and concentrations were still below pre-antibiotic values 4 months after the end of antibiotic treatment. Sb-prophylaxis markedly reduced antibiotic effects and improved the recovery rates. Since the colon is a sophisticated bioreactor, the study indicated that the spatial anatomy of its biomass was crucial for its function. PMID:26723852

  8. Targeting Antibiotic Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellat, Mathieu F; Raguž, Luka; Riedl, Rainer

    2016-06-01

    Finding strategies against the development of antibiotic resistance is a major global challenge for the life sciences community and for public health. The past decades have seen a dramatic worldwide increase in human-pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to one or multiple antibiotics. More and more infections caused by resistant microorganisms fail to respond to conventional treatment, and in some cases, even last-resort antibiotics have lost their power. In addition, industry pipelines for the development of novel antibiotics have run dry over the past decades. A recent world health day by the World Health Organization titled "Combat drug resistance: no action today means no cure tomorrow" triggered an increase in research activity, and several promising strategies have been developed to restore treatment options against infections by resistant bacterial pathogens. PMID:27000559

  9. Antibiotics for uncomplicated diverticulitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shabanzadeh, Daniel M; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer

    2012-01-01

    Diverticulitis is an inflammatory complication to the very common condition diverticulosis. Uncomplicated diverticulitis has traditionally been treated with antibiotics with reference to the microbiology, extrapolation from trials on complicated intra-abdominal infections and clinical experience....

  10. Antibiotic induced meningitis.

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    Three patients with antibiotic induced meningitis, one following penicillin with seven episodes, are reported on--the first well documented description of penicillin induced meningitis. In this patient episodes of headache and nuchal rigidity appeared with and without CSF pleocytosis. Two patients had a total of five episodes of antibiotic induced meningitis after trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole (co-trimoxazole) administration. The features common to all three patients were myalgia, confusion ...

  11. Antibiotic Precautions in Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Fayock, Kristopher; Voltz, Matthew; Sandella, Bradley; Close, Jeremy; Lunser, Matthew; Okon, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Context: Antibiotics are the mainstay of treatment for bacterial infections in patients of all ages. Athletes who maximally train are at risk for illness and various infections. Routinely used antibiotics have been linked to tendon injuries, cardiac arrhythmias, diarrhea, photosensitivity, cartilage issues, and decreased performance. Evidence Acquisition: Relevant articles published from 1989 to 2012 obtained through searching MEDLINE and OVID. Also, the Food and Drug Administration website w...

  12. [Analysis of antibiotic usage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balpataki, R; Balogh, J; Zelkó, R; Vincze, Z

    2001-01-01

    Economic analysis is founded on the assumption that resources are limited and that should be used in a way that maximizes the benefits gained. Pharmacoeconomics extends these assumptions to drug treatment. Therefore, a full pharmacoeconomic analysis must consider two or more alternative treatments and should be founded on measurement of incremental cost, incremental efficacy, and the value of successful outcome. Antibiotic policy based only on administrative restrictions is failed, instead of it disease formularies and infectologist consultation system are needed. Equally important are various programmes that encourage the cost-conscious use of the antibiotics chosen. Some of the methods evaluated in the literature include: streamlining from combination therapy to a single agent, early switching from parenteral to oral therapy, initiating treatment with oral agents, administering parenteral antibiotic at home from outset of therapy, and antibiotic streamlining programmes that are partnered with infectious disease physicians. The solution is the rational and adequate use of antibiotics, based on the modern theory and practice of antibiotic policy and infection control, that cannot be carried out without the activities of experts in this field. PMID:11769090

  13. Phenotypic Resistance to Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose L. Martinez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of antibiotic resistance is usually associated with genetic changes, either to the acquisition of resistance genes, or to mutations in elements relevant for the activity of the antibiotic. However, in some situations resistance can be achieved without any genetic alteration; this is called phenotypic resistance. Non-inherited resistance is associated to specific processes such as growth in biofilms, a stationary growth phase or persistence. These situations might occur during infection but they are not usually considered in classical susceptibility tests at the clinical microbiology laboratories. Recent work has also shown that the susceptibility to antibiotics is highly dependent on the bacterial metabolism and that global metabolic regulators can modulate this phenotype. This modulation includes situations in which bacteria can be more resistant or more susceptible to antibiotics. Understanding these processes will thus help in establishing novel therapeutic approaches based on the actual susceptibility shown by bacteria during infection, which might differ from that determined in the laboratory. In this review, we discuss different examples of phenotypic resistance and the mechanisms that regulate the crosstalk between bacterial metabolism and the susceptibility to antibiotics. Finally, information on strategies currently under development for diminishing the phenotypic resistance to antibiotics of bacterial pathogens is presented.

  14. A biodegradable gentamicin-hydroxyapatite-coating for infection prophylaxis in cementless hip prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Neut

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A degradable, poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA, gentamicin-loaded prophylactic coating for hydroxyapatite (HA-coated cementless hip prostheses is developed with similar antibacterial efficacy as offered by gentamicin-loaded cements for fixing traditional, cemented prostheses in bone. We describe the development pathway, from in vitro investigation of antibiotic release and antibacterial properties of this PLGA-gentamicin-HA-coating in different in vitro models to an evaluation of its efficacy in preventing implant-related infection in rabbits. Bone in-growth in the absence and presence of the coating was investigated in a canine model. The PLGA-gentamicin-HA-coating showed high-burst release, with antibacterial efficacy in agar-assays completely disappearing after 4 days, minimising risk of inducing antibiotic resistance. Gentamicin-sensitive and gentamicin-resistant staphylococci were killed by the antibiotic-loaded coating, in a simulated prosthesis-related interfacial gap. PLGA-gentamicin-HA-coatings prevented growth of bioluminescent staphylococci around a miniature-stem mounted in bacterially contaminated agar, as observed using bio-optical imaging. PLGA-gentamicin-HA-coated pins inserted in bacterially contaminated medullary canals in rabbits caused a statistically significant reduction in infection rates compared to HA-coated pins without gentamicin. Bone ingrowth to PLGA-gentamicin-HA-coated pins, in condylar defects of Beagle dogs was not impaired by the presence of the degradable, gentamicin-loaded coating. In conclusion, the PLGA-gentamicin-HA-coating constitutes an effective strategy for infection prophylaxis in cementless prostheses.

  15. Strategies to Minimize Antibiotic Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Hee Lee

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance can be reduced by using antibiotics prudently based on guidelines of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs and various data such as pharmacokinetic (PK and pharmacodynamic (PD properties of antibiotics, diagnostic testing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST, clinical response, and effects on the microbiota, as well as by new antibiotic developments. The controlled use of antibiotics in food animals is another cornerstone among efforts to reduce antibiotic resistance. All major resistance-control strategies recommend education for patients, children (e.g., through schools and day care, the public, and relevant healthcare professionals (e.g., primary-care physicians, pharmacists, and medical students regarding unique features of bacterial infections and antibiotics, prudent antibiotic prescribing as a positive construct, and personal hygiene (e.g., handwashing. The problem of antibiotic resistance can be minimized only by concerted efforts of all members of society for ensuring the continued efficiency of antibiotics.

  16. [Antibody detection after antepartal rhesus prophylaxis: normal values or sensitization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, O; Bader, W; Holle, W; Maas, D H; Schneider, J

    1993-05-01

    Antibody screening tests were performed in 29 unsensitized pregnant women after antepartum Rh immune prophylaxis, using the indirect Coombs test (ICT) and a more sensitive ID-microtyping-system (IDM). With the ICT, anti-D antibodies were detected in 85% for at least 4 weeks and at most 8 weeks after immunisation. The maximum titer was 1:8. With the IDM, 97% showed antibodies against 'D' for at least 4 weeks and at most 11 weeks with a maximum of 1:16. The IDM titer was always 1 to 3 steps more sensitive than the ICT. After postpartum Rh immune prophylaxis, anti-D titers were again positive in many of the patients (ICT: 42%; IDM: 60%). In conclusion, it is nearly always possible to measure antibodies against 'D' after antepartum Rh immune prophylaxis and IDM was superior in comparison to ICT. However, maternal isoimmunisation to the rhesus antigen cannot be excluded for sure and patients have then to be controlled. As isoimmunisation could not be confirmed in any of our patients, postpartum Rh immune prophylaxis has to be administered even after detection of an antibody titer against 'D' after antepartum Rh prophylaxis. PMID:8514107

  17. Efficacy of enalapril in migraine prophylaxis: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ali Sonbolestan

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Enalapril may be effective in migraine prophylaxis according to its effect in decreasing the frequency, severity, and duration of headaches. The results support the previous suggestions on usage of ACE inhibitors in migraine prophylaxis.

  18. DIAGNOSTIC AND THERAPEUTIC POSSIBILITIES IN THE PROPHYLAXIS OF CERVICAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzena Wrześniewska

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Poland is one of the countries with high cervical cancer morbidity and mortality. The main means to change this situation is to manage an active and modern programme of cervical cancer prophylaxis and diagnostics. To a large extent, the effectiveness of a cervical cancer prophylaxis programme is decided by the availability of modern diagnostic research. The conventional Papanicolaou test and modern LBC cytology techniques were discussed in the article, taking into consideration HPV diagnostics in the procedures for carefully selected cytological diagnosis, in the so called in-depth stage of preventive screening tests and the role of the p16 biomarker in predicting the development of a higher degree of epithelial-cell pathologies of the cervix. Colposcopy as a diagnostic method for the verification of cytological and virological abnormalities. The modern LEEP/LLETZ procedure used in diagnosis and treatment of cervical changes is used to realise the in-depth stage of cervical cancer prophylaxis programmes.

  19. From intermittent antibiotic point prevalence surveys to quality improvement: experience in Scottish hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm William

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2008, the Scottish Antimicrobial Prescribing Group (SAPG was established to coordinate a national antimicrobial stewardship programme. In 2009 SAPG led participation in a European point prevalence survey (PPS of hospital antibiotic use. We describe how SAPG used this baseline PPS as the foundation for implementation of measures for improvement in antibiotic prescribing. Methods In 2009 data for the baseline PPS were collected in accordance with the European Surveillance of Antimicrobial Consumption [ESAC] protocol. This informed the development of two quality prescribing indicators: compliance with antibiotic policy in acute admission units and duration of surgical prophylaxis. From December 2009 clinicians collected these data on a monthly basis. The prescribing indicators were reviewed and further modified in March 2011. Data for the follow up PPS in September 2011 were collected as part of a national PPS of healthcare associated infection and antimicrobial use developed using ECDC protocols. Results In the baseline PPS data were collected in 22 (56% acute hospitals. The frequency of recording the reason for treatment in medical notes was similar in Scotland (75.9% and Europe (75.7%. Compliance with policy (81.0% was also similar to Europe (82.5% but duration of surgical prophylaxis Conclusions The baseline PPS identified priorities for quality improvement. SAPG has demonstrated that implementation of regularly reviewed national prescribing indicators, acceptable to clinicians, implemented through regular systematic measurement can drive improvement in quality of antibiotic use in key clinical areas. However, our data also show that the ESAC PPS method may underestimate the proportion of surgical prophylaxis with duration

  20. Stable iodine prophylaxis. Recommendations of the 2nd UK Working Group on Stable Iodine Prophylaxis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Working Group reviewed the revised Who guidance and the information published since 1991 on the risks of thyroid cancer in children from radioiodine and the risks of side effects from stable iodine. In particular, it reviewed data compiled on the incidence of thyroid cancers in children following the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in 1986. It considered whether the NRPB Earls were still appropriate, in the light of the new data. It also reviewed a range of other recommendations given by the 1st Working Group, concerning the chemical form of stable iodine tablets and practical issues concerning implementation of stable iodine prophylaxis. Finally, it reviewed the Patient Information Leaflet that is required, by law, to be included in each box of tablets and provided suggestions for information to be included in a separate information leaflet to be handed out to the public when stable iodine tablets are distributed

  1. Improving adherence to venous thromoembolism prophylaxis using multiple interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Tawfiq Jaffar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : In hospital, deep vein thrombosis (DVT increases the morbidity and mortality in patients with acute medical illness. DVT prophylaxis is well known to be effective in preventing venous thromoembolism (VTE. However, its use remains suboptimal. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of quality improvement project on adherence with VTE prophylaxis guidelines and on the incidence of hospital-acquired VTEs in medical patients. Methods : The study was conducted at Saudi Aramco Medical Services Organization from June 2008 to August 2009. Quality improvement strategies included education of physicians, the development of a protocol, and weekly monitoring of compliance with the recommendations for VTE prophylaxis as included in the multidisciplinary rounds. A feedback was provided whenever a deviation from the protocol occurs. Results : During the study period, a total of 560 general internal medicine patients met the criteria for VTE prophylaxis. Of those, 513 (91% patients actually received the recommended VTE prophylaxis. The weekly compliance rate in the initial stage of the intervention was 63% (14 of 22 and increased to an overall rate of 100% (39 of 39 (P = 0.002. Hospital-acquired DVT rate was 0.8 per 1000 discharges in the preintervention period and 0.5 per 1000 discharges in the postintervention period, P = 0.51. However, there was a significant increase in the time-free period of the VTE and we had 11 months with no single DVT. Conclusion : In this study, the use of multiple interventions increased VTE prophylaxis compliance rate.

  2. Ecological antibiotic policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høiby, N

    2000-09-01

    Development of resistance to antibiotics is a major problem worldwide. The normal oropharyngeal flora, the intestinal flora and the skin flora play important roles in this development. Within a few days after the onset of antibiotic therapy, resistant Escherichia coli, Haemophilus influenzae and Staphylococcus epidermidis can be detected in the normal flora of volunteers or patients. Horizontal spread of the resistance genes to other species, e.g. Salmonella spp., Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae, occurs by conjugation or transformation. An ecologically sound antibiotic policy favours the use of antibiotics with little or no impact on the normal flora. Prodrug antibiotics which are not active against the bacteria in the mouth and the intestine (before absorption) and which are not excreted to a significant degree via the intestine, saliva or skin are therefore preferred. Prodrugs such as pivampicillin, bacampicillin, pivmecillinam and cefuroxime axetil are favourable from an ecological point of view. Experience from Scandinavia supports this, since resistance to mecillinam after 20 years of use is low (about 5%) and stable. PMID:11051626

  3. Management of Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) Prophylaxis in Trauma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paydar, Shahram; Sabetian, Golnar; Khalili, Hosseinali; Fallahi, Javad; Tahami, Mohammad; Ziaian, Bizhan; Abbasi, Hamid Reza; Bolandparvaz, Shahram; Ghaffarpasand, Fariborz; Ghahramani, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PTE) are known as venous thromboembolism (VTE). DVT occurs when a thrombus (a blood clot) forms in deep veins of the body, usually in the lower extremities. It can cause swelling or leg pain, but sometimes may occur with no symptoms. Awareness of DVT is the best way to prevent the VTE. Patients with trauma are at increased risk of DVT and subsequent PE because of coagulopathy in patients with multiple trauma, DVT prophylaxis is essential but the VTE prophylaxis strategy is controversial for the trauma patients. The risk factors for VTE includes pelvic and lower extremity fractures, and head injury. PMID:27162921

  4. [Postoperative prophylaxis of thromboembolism. Present position.(author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemming, F; Thomas, E; Widera, R

    1976-01-01

    Only anti-coagulators and aggregation-stoppers may be said to be the medicamental prophylaxis of thromboembolism. The Cumarin-Indandion group is burdened with continuous laboratory controls. Contraindications excluding a general prophylaxis for this group as well as for Heparin and ASS exist. Infukoll, which is virtually always applicable, has the disadvantage that it has to be infused. Heparin- and Dextranspreparations however can already be used preoperatively, which means that a further decline of the coagulation complications can be expected. PMID:952105

  5. Pre-exposure prophylaxis of HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smriti Naswa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP is an experimental approach to HIV prevention and consists of antiretroviral drugs to be taken before potential HIV exposure in order to reduce the risk of HIV infection and continued during periods of risk. An effective PrEP could provide an additional safety net to sexually active persons at risk, when combined with other prevention strategies. Women represent nearly 60% of adults infected with HIV and PrEP can be a female-controlled prevention method for women who are unable to negotiate condom use. Two antiretroviral nucleoside analog HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor drugs are currently under trial as PrEP drugs, namely tenofovirdisoproxilfumarate (TDF alone and TDF in combination with emricitabine (FTC, to be taken as daily single dose oral drugs. There are 11 ongoing trials of ARV-based prevention in different at risk populations across the world. The iPrex trial showed that daily use of oral TDF/FTC by MSM resulted in 44% reduction in the incidence of HIV. This led to publication of interim guidance by CDC to use of PrEP by health providers for MSM. Few other trials are Bangkok Tenofovir Study, Partners PrEP Study, FEM-PrEP study, and VOICE (MTN-003 study. Future trials are being formulated for intermittent PrEP (iPrEP where drugs are taken before and after sex, "stand-in dose" iPrEP, vaginal or rectal PrEP, etc. There are various issues/concerns with PrEP such as ADRs and resistance to TDF/FTC, adherence to drugs, acceptability, sexual disinhibition, use of PrEP as first line of defense for HIV without other prevention strategies, and cost. The PrEP has a potential to address unmet need in public health if delivered as a part of comprehensive toolkit of prevention services, including risk-reduction, correct and consistent use of condoms, and diagnosis and treatment of sexually transmitted infections.

  6. The multifaceted roles of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saswati eSengupta

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are chemotherapeutic agents, which have been a very powerful tool in the clinical management of bacterial diseases since the 1940s. However, benefits offered by these magic bullets have been substantially lost in subsequent days following the widespread emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistant strains. While it is obvious that excessive and imprudent use of antibiotics significantly contributes to the emergence of resistant strains, antibiotic-resistance is also observed in natural bacteria of remote places unlikely to be impacted by human intervention. Both antibiotic biosynthetic genes and resistance-conferring genes have been known to evolve billions of years ago, long before clinical use of antibiotics. Hence it appears that antibiotics and antibiotics resistance determinants have some other roles in nature, which often elude our attention because of overemphasis on the therapeutic importance of antibiotics and the crisis imposed by the antibiotic-resistance in pathogens. In the natural milieu, antibiotics are often found to be present in subinhibitory concentrations acting as signalling molecules supporting quorum sensing and biofilm formation. They also play an important role in the production of virulence factors and influence host-parasite interactions (e.g., phagocytosis, adherence to the target cell and so on. The evolutionary and ecological aspects of antibiotics and antibiotic-resistance in the naturally occurring microbial community are little understood. Therefore, the actual role of antibiotics in nature warrants in-depth investigations. Studies on such an intriguing behaviour of the microorganisms promise insight into the intricacies of the microbial physiology and are likely to provide some lead in controlling the emergence and subsequent dissemination of antibiotic resistance. This article highlights some of the recent findings on the role of antibiotics and genes that confer resistance to antibiotics in

  7. Prophylaxis of Childhood Migraine: Topiramate Versus Propranolol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hassan TONEKABONI

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite this Article: Tonekaboni SH, Ghazavi A, Fayyazi A, Khajeh A, Taghdiri MM, Abdollah Gorji F, Azargashb E. Prophylaxis of Childhood Migraine: Topiramate Versus Propranolol. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Winter; 7 (1:9-14. ObjectiveHeadache is a common disabling neurological disorder and migraine comprises more than half the causes of recurrent headaches in children. Despite extended prevalence of this type of headache there is lack of evidence about best drug treatment for migraine. So we aimed to compare the therapeutic effects of these drugs on childhood migraine.Materials & MethodsIn the current study, a randomized clinical trial consisting of 78 patients according to 2004 International Headache Association criteria were randomly assigned to two groups that matched by age and sex. One of these two groups was treated with Topiramate, while the other was given Propranolol. After one and four months, the efficiency of these treatments was measured in terms of frequency, severity and duration of migraine attacks.ResultsResults obtained from the data collected showed that of these 78 studied patients, 38 patients received Topiramate treatment (group A and the rest (40 patients; group B was treated with Propranolol. The average age of group A was 8.5± 2.9 years and that of group B was 8.3 ± 2.8 years. No significant difference was observed between these two groups in terms of reduction in frequency, severity and duration of migraine attacks.ConclusionResults showed that both treatments had the same efficiency in healing migraine headaches and there was no significant difference between their treating results. However, further studies are needed to examine medical effects of these two medicines. ReferencesAbu-Arefeh  I,  Russell  G.  Prevalence  of  headache  and migraine in schoolchildren. BMJ 1994 Sep 24; 309 (6957: 765-9.Lipton RB, Silberstein SD, Stewart WF. An update on the epidemiology of migraine. Headache 1994 Jun; 34 (6

  8. Moxifloxacin Prophylaxis against MDR TB, New York, New York, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Trieu, Lisa; Proops, Douglas C.; Shama D. Ahuja

    2015-01-01

    Contacts of persons infected with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) have few prophylaxis options. Of 50 contacts of HIV- and MDR TB–positive persons who were treated with moxifloxacin, 30 completed treatment and 3 discontinued treatment because of gastrointestinal symptoms. Moxifloxacin was generally well-tolerated; further research of its efficacy against MDR TB is needed.

  9. Risperidone Mono - Therapy as Prophylaxis in Bipolar Affective Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Mohit; Pinto, Denzil; Safeekh, A.T.

    2004-01-01

    Risperidone has been found to be useful in the treatment of acute bipolar disorders. This is a case report where risperidone mono therapy has been found to be effective in prophylaxis of bipolar affective disorder. The pharmacological and clinical implications of risperidone in the management of BPAD are discussed

  10. Pentamidine in Pneumocystis jirovecii prophylaxis in heart transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diken, Adem Ilkay; Diken, Ozlem Erçen; Hanedan, Onur; Yılmaz, Seyhan; Ecevit, Ata Niyazi; Erol, Emir; Yalçınkaya, Adnan

    2016-03-24

    Despite advances in transplantation techniques and the quality of post-transplantation care, opportunistic infections remain an important cause of complications. Pneumocystis jirovecii (P. jirovecii) is an opportunistic organism, represents an important cause of infections in heart transplantation patients. Almost 2% to 10% of patients undergoing cardiac transplantation have Pneumocystis pneumonia. Prophylaxis is essential after surgery. Various prophylaxis regimes had been defined in past and have different advantages. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX) has a key role in prophylaxis against P. jirovecii. Generally, although TMP/SMX is well tolerated, serious side effects have also been reported during its use. Pentamidine is an alternative prophylaxis agent when TMP/SMX cannot be tolerated by the patient. Structurally, pentamidine is an aromatic diamidine compound with antiprotozoal activity. Since it is not effectively absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, it is frequently administered via the intravenous route. Pentamidine can alternatively be administered through inhalation at a monthly dose in heart transplant recipients. Although, the efficiency and safety of this drug is well studied in other types of solid organ transplantations, there are only few data about pentamidine usage in heart transplantation. We sought to evaluate evidence-based assessment of the use of pentamidine against P. jirovecii after heart transplantation. PMID:27011917

  11. Rabies Postexposure Prophylaxis, Marseille, France, 1994–2005

    OpenAIRE

    Gautret, Philippe; Soula, Georges; Adamou, Hamadou; Soavi, Marie-José; Delmont, Jean; Rotivel, Yolande; Parola, Philippe; Brouqui, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    The administration of human rabies postexposure prophylaxis near Marseille (southern France) has changed since the eradication of terrestrial mammal rabies in 2001. Most injuries were associated with indigenous dogs; rabies vaccine was overprescribed. We suggest that the World Health Organization guidelines be adapted for countries free of terrestrial mammal rabies.

  12. Policy on stable iodine prophylaxis following nuclear reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This policy considers the alleviation of possible hazards that may arise from any radioiodines inhaled from a plume of fission products emanating from a nuclear reactor accident. The only countermeasure that provides effective prophylaxis against the effects of radioiodines on the thyroid gland is considered to be oral stable iodine therapy. Recommended doses are indicated along with possible side-effects and contraindications

  13. Risk of surgical site infection in paediatric herniotomies without any prophylactic antibiotics: A preliminary experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhananjay Vaze

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Different studies underline the use of pre-operative antibiotic prophylaxis in clean surgeries like herniotomy and inguinal orchiopexy. But, the meta-analyses do not recommend nor discard the use of prophylactic pre-operative antibiotics. The scarcity of controlled clinical trials in paediatric population further vitiates the matter. This study assessed the difference in the rate of early post-operative wound infection cases in children who received single dose of pre-operative antibiotics and children who did not receive antibiotics after inguinal herniotomy and orchiopexy. Materials and Methods: This randomised prospective study was conducted in Paediatric Surgery department of PGIMER Chandigarh. Out of 251 patients, 112 patients were randomised to the case group and 139 were ascribed to the control group. The patients in control group were given a standard regimen of single dose of intravenous antibiotic at the time of induction followed by 3-4 days of oral antibiotic. Case group patients underwent the surgical procedure in similar manner with no antibiotic either at the time of induction or post-operatively. Results: The incidence of surgical site infection in case group was 3.73 % and that in control group was 2.22%. The observed difference in the incidence of surgical site infection was statistically insignificant (P value = 0.7027. The overall infection rate in case and control group was 2.89%. Conclusions: Our preliminary experience suggests that there is no statistically significant difference in the proportion of early post-operative wound infection between the patients who received single dose of pre-operative antibiotics and the patients who received no antibiotics after inguinal herniotomy and orchiopexy. The risk of surgical site infection in paediatric heriotomies does not increase even if the child′s weight is less than his/her expected weight for age.

  14. Polylactide-polyglycolide antibiotic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, Kevin; Feschuk, Connie

    2005-08-01

    Surgeons continually struggle to reduce orthopaedic infections, but no current treatment offers minimum side effects with maximum effectiveness. Antibiotics mixed in plaster of paris have been successful in treating large bony defects in patients with chronic osteomyelitis, and have the advantage of being well tolerated and absorbed by the body. Antibiotics impregnated in polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) have offered local antibiotic delivery with some success. However, the effect of the antibiotic on the bone cement, the inconsistent elution of the antibiotic, and the need to remove the PMMA implant drives the need for a better system of antibiotic delivery. Polymers or copolymers of antibiotic-impregnated polylactic acid, polyglycolic acid or polyparadioxanone may provide an absorbable system for localized antibiotic delivery. Similar biodegradable systems used to treat small bone fractures have been successful with minimal side effects. In vitro studies have shown promising results of antibiotic elution from bioabsorbable microspheres and beads. Animal in vivo tests have shown that antibiotic impregnated polymers can successfully treat induced osteomyelitis in rabbits and dogs. These studies have provided consistent reproducible results, and now it is time to plan human trials to assess the efficacy of antibiotic microspheres implanted in infected bone and to plan in vivo and in vitro animal testing to investigate the feasibility of antibiotic-polymer-coated components. PMID:16056034

  15. Impact of using prophylactic antibiotic on prevention of wound infection in inguinal herniorrhaphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the effect of antibiotic prophylaxis with placebo in prevention of wound infection amongst patients undergoing clean open inguinal herniorrhaphy (without mesh). Study Design: Randomized Controlled Trial. Place and Duration of Study: Pakistan Air Force Hospital, Faisal Base Karachi from October 2009 to November 2011. Material and Methods: One hundred and fifty patients undergoing inguinal herniorrhaphy were included and randomly assigned to one of the two groups using random numbers table. Group A patients were given intravenous antibiotic while those in Group B were given equal volume of normal saline just before the induction of anaesthesia. Patients from both groups were observed for the presence of wound infection. Results: Total seven cases (4.7%) of surgical site infection were detected; two cases (2.7%) occurred in group A whereas five cases (6.7%) occurred in group B. The low frequency of post-operative wound infection was seen in group A as compared to group B but the difference was statistically insignificant. Conclusion: Antibiotic prophylaxis has no significant effect on prevention of wound infection in inguinal herniorrhaphy. (author)

  16. Environmental pollution by antibiotics and by antibiotic resistance determinants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antibiotics are among the most successful drugs used for human therapy. However, since they can challenge microbial populations, they must be considered as important pollutants as well. Besides being used for human therapy, antibiotics are extensively used for animal farming and for agricultural purposes. Residues from human environments and from farms may contain antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes that can contaminate natural environments. The clearest consequence of antibiotic release in natural environments is the selection of resistant bacteria. The same resistance genes found at clinical settings are currently disseminated among pristine ecosystems without any record of antibiotic contamination. Nevertheless, the effect of antibiotics on the biosphere is wider than this and can impact the structure and activity of environmental microbiota. Along the article, we review the impact that pollution by antibiotics or by antibiotic resistance genes may have for both human health and for the evolution of environmental microbial populations. - The article reviews the current knowledge on the effects that pollution by antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes may have for the microbiosphere.

  17. An investigation on the level of dental senior students knowledge about endocarditis prophylaxis incases with cardiac disease receiving dental treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhraee AH

    2004-02-01

    cardiac"ndiseases, dental procedures requiring endocarditis prophylaxis and antibiotic diets.

  18. Awareness and knowledge of prophylaxis for infective endocarditis in patients with severe rheumatic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharaj, B; Vayej, A C

    2013-03-01

    Prevention of infective endocardit s (IE) is mportant because it has a high mortalty rate.This study sets out to to gather information from patients who were at risk of developing IE of their knowledge of the need for prophylaxis for the disease. Forty-one black patients suffering from severe rheumatic heart disease (RHD) were interviewed. Only one patient (2.4%) was regularly visiting a dentist to maintain good oral health and only five (12.2%) had received advice about the need for antibiotic cover prior to dental extraction. The vast majority of patients (97.5%) visited a dentist only when driven by dental pain, 36.6 % had to travel for more than an hour to reach their nearest dentist, and 87.8% indicated that they brushed their teeth. It may be concluded that in this group of black patients with severe RHD there was a lack of knowledge of the need for and of measures recommended for prophylaxs against IE. In addition, attempts by the health care team to ensure good oral health and access to dental care for these patients were inadequate, if not non-existent. PMID:23951767

  19. Pneumococcal resistance to antibiotics.

    OpenAIRE

    Klugman, K P

    1990-01-01

    The geographic distribution of pneumococci resistant to one or more of the antibiotics penicillin, erythromycin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline appears to be expanding, and there exist foci of resistance to chloramphenicol and rifampin. Multiply resistant pneumococci are being encountered more commonly and are more often community acquired. Factors associated with infection caused by resistant pneumococci include young age, duration of hospitalization, infection with a pneumo...

  20. Antibiotics in dental practice

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The oral cavity and it surrounding tissue are habitats for many bacteria. Therefore a rationale for the use of antibacterial agents rises. During my time as a dental student, me often meet conditions were antibiotics are pointed out as the treatment of chose, as indicated or not recommended. According to Norwegian drug regulations (Tørisen 2007) dentists have: The right to requisition necessary medical agents in connection with dental treatment and prevention and treatment of diseases in the...

  1. Patient outcome in migraine prophylaxis: the role of psychopharmacological agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Pompili

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Maurizio Pompili1,2, Gianluca Serafini1, Marco Innamorati1, Giulia Serra1, Giovanni Dominici1, Juliana Fortes-Lindau1, Monica Pastina1, Ludovica Telesforo1, David Lester3, Paolo Girardi1, Roberto Tatarelli1, Paolo Martelletti41Department of Neurosciences, Mental Health and Sensory Functions, Suicide Prevention Center, Sant’Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy; 2McLean Hospital – Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 3The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, Pomona, NJ, USA; 4Department of Medical and Molecular Sciences, 2nd School of Medicine, Sant’Andrea Hospital, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Rome, ItalyIntroduction: Migraine is a serious illness that needs correct treatment for acute attacks and, in addition, a treatment prophylaxis, since patients with migraine suffer during acute attacks and also between attacks.Methods: A systematic review of the most relevant clinical trials of migraine headache and its epidemiology, pathophysiology, comorbidity, and prophylactic treatment (medical and nonmedical was carried out using “Medline” and “PsychINFO” from 1973 to 2009. Approximately 110 trials met our inclusion criteria and were included in the current review.Results: The most effective pharmacological treatment for migraine prophylaxis is propranolol and anticonvulsants such as topiramate, valproic acid, and amitriptyline. Nonmedical treatments such as acupuncture, biofeedback, and melatonin have also been proposed. Peripheral neurostimulation has been suggested for the treatment of chronic daily headache that does not respond to prophylaxis and for the treatment of drug-resistant primary headache. The majority of the pharmacological agents available today have limited efficacy and may cause adverse effects incompatible with long-term use.Limitations: The review was limited by the highly variable and often insufficient reporting of the complex outcome data and by the fact that migraine prophylaxis trials

  2. Integrating Preexposure Prophylaxis for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prevention Into Women's Health Care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidman, Dominika; Weber, Shannon

    2016-07-01

    Women comprise one in five new human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) diagnoses in the United States. Trials and implementation projects demonstrate preexposure prophylaxis for HIV prevention is effective in women. Preexposure prophylaxis is a method of preventing HIV acquisition by having an HIV-negative individual take antiretroviral medication before exposure. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved daily oral tenofovir disoproxil fumarate coformulated with emtricitabine as preexposure prophylaxis for HIV prevention in 2012. Preexposure prophylaxis is highly dependent on adherence for effectiveness. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends offering preexposure prophylaxis to individuals at significant risk of infection and estimates 468,000 women in the United States are eligible for preexposure prophylaxis. Although variable individual and structural forces affect each woman's medication adherence, and therefore the effectiveness of preexposure prophylaxis, women's health care providers are uniquely positioned to screen, counsel about, and offer preexposure prophylaxis. Shared decision-making provides a framework for these clinical encounters, allowing patients and clinicians to make health care decisions together based on scientific evidence and patient experiences. By incorporating fertility desires and contraceptive needs, health care providers effectively integrate sexual and reproductive health care. Including preexposure prophylaxis in women's health services requires health care provider training and attention to lessons learned from family planning and HIV prevention. Nevertheless, obstetrician-gynecologists have an opportunity to play a critical role in reducing sexual transmission of HIV in the United States by integrating preexposure prophylaxis education and provision into their practices. PMID:27275793

  3. Prophylactic antibiotics for endoscopy-associated peritonitis in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Hsu Wu

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD peritonitis may develop after endoscopic procedures, and the benefit of prophylactic antibiotics is unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether prophylactic antibiotics reduce the incidence of peritonitis in these patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed all endoscopic procedures, including esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD, colonoscopy, sigmoidoscopy, cystoscopy, hysteroscopy, and hysteroscopy-assisted intrauterine device (IUD implantation/removal, performed in CAPD patients at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan, between February 2001 and February 2012. RESULTS: Four hundred and thirty-three patients were enrolled, and 125 endoscopies were performed in 45 patients. Eight (6.4% peritonitis episodes developed after the examination. Antibiotics were used in 26 procedures, and none of the patients had peritonitis (0% vs. 8.1% without antibiotic use; p=0.20. The peritonitis rate was significantly higher in the non-EGD group than in the EGD group (15.9% [7/44] vs. 1.2% [1/81]; p<0.005. Antibiotic use prior to non-EGD examinations significantly reduced the endoscopy-associated peritonitis rate compared to that without antibiotic use (0% [0/16] vs. 25% [7/28]; p<0.05. Peritonitis only occurred if invasive procedures were performed, such as biopsy, polypectomy, or IUD implantation, (noninvasive procedures, 0% [0/20] vs. invasive procedures, 30.4% [7/23]; p<0.05. No peritonitis was noted if antibiotics were used prior to examination with invasive procedures (0% [0/10] vs. 53.8% [7/13] without antibiotic use; p<0.05. Although not statistically significant, antibiotics may play a role in preventing gynecologic procedure-related peritonitis (antibiotics, 0% [0/4] vs. no antibiotics, 55.6% [5/9]; p=0.10. CONCLUSION: Antibiotic prophylaxis significantly reduced endoscopy-associated PD peritonitis in the non-EGD group. Endoscopically assisted invasive procedures, such

  4. Prophylaxis of venous thrombosis in patients with spontaneous intracerebral bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele Rezoagli

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage (SIH represents a severe clinical event that is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity. Only a minority of SIH patients receive surgical treatment, whereas the majority are treated conservatively. Venous thromboembolism (VTE is one of the most common complications in SIH patients and a potential cause of death. Because of the lack of adequate evidences from the literature, the risk to benefit ratio of pharmacologic prophylaxis of VTE, represented on the one hand by hematoma enlargement and/or rebleeding and on the other hand by an expected reduction of the risk of VTE, remains controversial. Mechanical prophylaxis is a potentially safer alternative, but the efficacy of this approach is uncertain. In the absence of specific clinical guidelines containing clear-cut recommendations, physicians have insufficient tools to assist their therapeutic decisions.

  5. [PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTION: PRINCIPLE CHARACTERISTICS, CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS, VACCINE PROPHYLAXIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopukhov, P D; Briko, N I; Khaldin, A A; Tsapkova, N N; Lupashko, O V

    2016-01-01

    Papillomaviruses are a large and diverse group of viruses. It includes approximately 200 fully described types that have been detected in humans. Human papilloma viruses (HPV) are etiologic agents during various, benign and malignant lesions of mucous membrane and skin epithelium. Very importantly, persistent HPV infection of certain types is a leading cause of carcinoma of uterine cervix, penis, vulva; vagina, anal canal and fauces (including tongue base and tonsils). HPV infection prophylaxis is the best means to control HPV-conditioned diseases, and vaccination, as had been demonstrated, --the most effective method of its prophylaxis. In this paper principle characteristics and clinical manifestations of papillomavirus infection, as well as effectiveness of vaccination against HPV are examined. PMID:27029121

  6. Nuclear detonation, thyroid cancer and potassium iodide prophylaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2011-01-01

    The recent nuclear disaster at Japan has raised global concerns about effects of radioactive leakage in the environment, associated hazards, and how they can be prevented. In this article, we have tried to explain about the guidelines laid down by World Health Organization for a potassium iodide prophylaxis following a nuclear disaster, and its mechanism of action in preventing thyroid cancer. Data was collected mainly from the studies carried out during the Chernobyl disaster of Russia in 19...

  7. Parsonage-Turner syndrome following post-exposure prophylaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Fransz, Duncan P; Schönhuth, Casper P; Postma, Tjeerd J.; van Royen, Barend J.

    2014-01-01

    Background The ‘Parsonage-Turner syndrome’ (PTS) is a rare but distinct disorder with an abrupt onset of shoulder pain, followed by weakness and atrophy of the upper extremity musculature, and a slow recovery requiring months to years. To our best knowledge, this is the first case describing symptoms and signs of PTS following the administration of a post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) regimen against possible human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Case presenta...

  8. HIV postexposure prophylaxis in the 21st century.

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson, D K

    2001-01-01

    The administration of postexposure prophylaxis has become the standard of care for occupational exposures to HIV. We have learned a great deal about the safety and potential efficacy of these agents, as well as the optimal management of health-care workers occupationally exposed to HIV. This article describes the current state of knowledge in this field, identifies substantive questions to be answered, and summarizes basic principles of postexposure management.

  9. Antiretrovirals to Prevent HIV Infection: Pre- and Postexposure Prophylaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Gay, Cynthia L.; Cohen, Myron S.

    2008-01-01

    More than 3 million people are now receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) worldwide. Currently, the indications for ART depend primarily on CD4 count, blood viral burden, and clinical signs and symptoms suggesting advanced HIV disease. However, interest is increasing in ART’s preventive potential. Postexposure prophylaxis following both occupational and nonoccupational exposure to HIV is the standard-of-care in many settings. Observational and ecologic studies suggest that ART administered to...

  10. Compliance with RSV prophylaxis: Global physicians’ perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Kari S; Mullally, Victoria M; Linda M Fredrick; Campbell, Andrew L

    2009-01-01

    Kari S Anderson, Victoria M Mullally, Linda M Fredrick, Andrew L CampbellAbbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL, USAAbstract: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a significant cause of morbidity in high-risk infants. Palivizumab is proven to prevent serious RSV disease, but compliance with prophylaxis (monthly doses during the RSV season) is essential to ensure protection. We invited 453 pediatricians to participate in a survey to identify their perspectives of barriers to compliance and inter...

  11. Prophylaxis of venous thrombosis in patients with spontaneous intracerebral bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    Emanuele Rezoagli; Walter Ageno; Luca Masotti; Daniel Godoy; Mario Di Napoli; Maurizio Paciaroni; Alejandro Rabinstein

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage (SIH) represents a severe clinical event that is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity. Only a minority of SIH patients receive surgical treatment, whereas the majority are treated conservatively. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is one of the most common complications in SIH patients and a potential cause of death. Because of the lack of adequate evidences from the literature, the risk to benefit ratio of pharmacologic prophylaxis of VTE, rep...

  12. Use of loteprednol for routine prophylaxis after photorefractive keratectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Moshirfar M; Hsu M; Sikder S; Christiansen SM; Mifflin MD; Leishman LL

    2012-01-01

    Mark D Mifflin1, Lisa L Leishman1, Steven M Christiansen1, Shameema Sikder2, Maylon Hsu1, Majid Moshirfar11Department of Ophthalmology, John A Moran Eye Center, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT, 2Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USABackground: The purpose of this work is to report our experience using loteprednol 0.5% for routine prophylaxis after photorefractive keratectomy in an academic refractive surgery center...

  13. Medical rota changes and venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in orthopaedic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Bohler, Iain; George Mackenzie Jardine, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Efficacy of clinical guidelines to improve patient care is highly dependent on the ability of hospital teams to interpret and implement advised standards of care. Trimester and bi-annual rotation changes often see transference and loss of acquired experience and knowledge from wards with ensuing shortfalls in patient safety and care quality. Such shortfalls were noticed in the ability of our unit to adhere to national venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis measures. A prospective quality im...

  14. Nutrition Reconciliation and Nutrition Prophylaxis: Toward Total Health

    OpenAIRE

    Tuso, Phillip; Beattie, Sam

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition by definition may be an abnormality in either under- or overnutrition. Nutrition reconciliation means that all patients have their nutritional status reconciled on admission to and discharge from the hospital. Nutrition reconciliation is defined as the process of maximizing health by helping align an individual’s current diet to the diet prescribed for him or her by the health care team. Nutrition prophylaxis is a proactive intervention to prevent a medical complication.

  15. Radiohygienic importance of large scale iodine prophylaxis of the population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intensive development of nuclear energy programme in Hungary and the general use of radioisotopes involve suitable methods of pharmacological radioprotective prophylaxis of the population for the case of an accident caused by radioiodine release. A detailed method for diminishing radiation burden of the organism from incorporated radioiodines was elaborated in connection with radiohygienic provisions of both the Paks nuclear power plant and the isotope laboratories producing and using radioiodine labelled pharmaceuticals. (author)

  16. Radiation reactions and injuries, their prophylaxis and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most frequent local and total radiation reactions (epithema, dry and wet epidermitises, esophagitises, radiation variations of pulmonary tissues, the reaction of mucous membrane of the rectum, radiation cystitises) are described. The problems on delayed radiation injuries (delayed skin injuries, injuries of intestine, limbs, lungs, heart, organs of urochesia) are considered. Delayed radiation injuries are shown to be expected, if the tolerant level of healthy tissues irradiated increases during radiotherapy. Special attention is paid to prophylaxis and radiation injuries therapy

  17. Diet as prophylaxis and treatment for venous thromboembolism?

    OpenAIRE

    Cundiff David K; Agutter Paul S; Malone P; Pezzullo John C

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Both prophylaxis and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE: deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary emboli (PE)) with anticoagulants are associated with significant risks of major and fatal hemorrhage. Anticoagulation treatment of VTE has been the standard of care in the USA since before 1962 when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration began requiring randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) showing efficacy, so efficacy trials were never required for FDA approval...

  18. Terrestrial Rabies and Human Postexposure Prophylaxis, New York, USA

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-03-15

    This podcast describes a 10-year study of the use of postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) for rabies in New York State. CDC's Dr. Brett Petersen discusses the prevalence of rabies in the United States and how the study lends support to recent changes in the recommended PEP protocol.  Created: 3/15/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/15/2010.

  19. The cost of rabies postexposure prophylaxis: one state's experience.

    OpenAIRE

    Kreindel, S M; McGuill, M; Meltzer, M.; Rupprecht, C.; DeMaria, A.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was undertaken to evaluate trends in the use of rabies postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) before, during, and following an epidemic of raccoon rabies in Massachusetts. METHODS: The authors reviewed initiation of PEP as reported to the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH) from August 1994 to December 1995 and surveyed hospital pharmacies to determine the number of vials of Human Rabies Immune Globulin (HRIG) dispensed from 1991 through 1995 and charges to patients...

  20. Optimizing Antibiotic Use in Nursing Homes Through Antibiotic Stewardship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloane, Philip D; Huslage, Kirk; Kistler, Christine E; Zimmerman, Sheryl

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic stewardship is becoming a requirement for nursing homes. Programs should be interdisciplinary and multifaceted; should have support from nursing home administrators; and should aim to promote antibiotics only when needed, not just in case. Recommended components include use of evidence-based guidelines; ongoing monitoring of antibiotic prescriptions, cultures, and study results; monitoring of health outcomes; use of nursing home-specific antibiograms; regular reporting and feedback to medical providers and nurses; and education of residents and families. PMID:27621341

  1. Can migraine prophylaxis prevent acute mountain sickness at high altitude?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M W; Kim, M

    2011-11-01

    Acute mountain sickness (AMS) develops in people trekking at high altitude. The underlying mechanism is vasodilation due to low pressure of oxygen. However, individual susceptibility for AMS is unknown, thus, one cannot predict when or to whom it happens. Because AMS usually begins with headache, and because migraineurs are more vulnerable to AMS, we studied by the literatures review on the mechanism and clinical features in common, and assessed the treatment modalities for both disorders. This led to us the following hypothesis that, migraine prophylaxis may prevent or delay the onset of AMS at high altitude. Clinical features of AMS include nausea or vomiting when it progresses. Hypobaric hypoxia, dehydration or increased physical exertion trigger or aggravate both disorders. In migraine, cerebral vasodilation can happen following alteration of neuronal activity, whereas the AMS is associated with peripheral vessel dilation. Medications that dilate the vessels worsen both conditions. Acute treatment strategies for migraine overlap with to those of AMS, including drugs such as vasoconstrictors, or other analgesics. To prevent AMS, adaptation to high altitude or pharmacological prophylaxis, i.e., acetazolamide has been recommended. This carbonic anhydrase inhibitor lowers serum potassium level, and thus stabilizes membrane excitability. Acetazolamide is also effective on specific forms of migraine. Taken together, these evidences implicate that migraine prophylaxis may prevent or delay the onset of AMS by elevating the threshold for high altitude. PMID:21856088

  2. Late-onset CMV disease following CMV prophylaxis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donnelly, C

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most common opportunistic infection after solid-organ transplantation, increasing morbidity and mortality. Three months of oral valganciclovir have been shown to provide effective prophylaxis. Late-onset CMV disease, occurring after the discontinuation of prophylaxis, is now increasingly recognised. AIMS: To investigate the incidence and the time of detection of CMV infections in liver transplant recipients who received CMV prophylaxis. METHODS: Retrospective review of 64 high- and moderate-risk patients with 1 year of follow-up. RESULTS: The incidence of CMV infection was 12.5%, with 4.7% disease. All cases of symptomatic CMV disease were of late-onset. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of CMV infections in this study was low compared with literature reports; however, the late-onset disease is an emerging problem. Detection of late-onset disease may be delayed because of less frequent clinic follow-up visits. Increased regular laboratory monitoring may allow earlier detection at the asymptomatic infection stage.

  3. Prophylaxis in hereditary angioedema (HAE) with C1 inhibitor deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greve, Jens; Strassen, Ulrich; Gorczyza, Marina; Dominas, Nina; Frahm, Uta-Marie; Mühlberg, Heike; Wiednig, Michaela; Zampeli, Vasiliki; Magerl, Markus

    2016-03-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of subcutaneous or submucosal edema. Laryngeal manifestations can be life-threatening. In the majority of cases, the disease can be adequately treated with an on-demand approach - in some cases, however, short- or long-term prophylaxis is indicated. Attenuated androgens used to be the drugs of choice, but they are associated with considerable side effects and no longer commercially available in the German-speaking countries of the EU. They are currently being replaced by more effective and more tolerable agents such C1-inhibitors, the kallikrein inhibitor ecallantide, and the B2 receptor antagonist icatibant, which have recently obtained market authorization. These new drugs have had a major impact, especially on the indications and procedures for long-term prophylaxis. According to the most recent international consensus papers and our own experience, self-administered C1-inhibitors are now the first option for long-term prophylactic therapy. The decision for prophylaxis should no longer be based on single parameters such as the frequency of attacks but on adequate overall disease control including quality of life. More drugs are currently being developed, which may lead to further changes in the treatment algorithms of HAE. PMID:26972189

  4. Prophylaxis of meningosis leukemia via intrathecal radioactive colloid gold injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prophylaxis against meningosis leukemia (ML) via intrathecal radioactive colloid gold injection was carried out for a period of three years (January 1974 - September 1976) in 21 children with acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL). The analysis of those patients after one relatively long period of observation (28 months after the last case) reveals that ML developed as a primary isolated manifestation of a recurrence in three children, i.e. in 14.2 per cent versus 68 per cent in the control group without prophylaxis. In another child ML development is in parallel with bone marrow recurrence. The reduction of ML incidence is accompanied with a prolongation of the first remission (in 24 per cent over 2 years and 6 months) and a lengthening of survival for 50 per cent of the patients (62 per cent of the treated patients are alive two years and 4 months during the period of observation). The advantages of the prophylaxis with radioactive colloid gold is emphasized in comparison with the other prophylactic programmes. (author)

  5. Recent changes in bacteremia in patients with cancer: a systematic review of epidemiology and antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montassier, E; Batard, E; Gastinne, T; Potel, G; de La Cochetière, M F

    2013-07-01

    Bacteremia remains a major cause of life-threatening complication in patients with cancer. Significant changes in the spectrum of microorganisms isolated from blood culture have been reported in cancer patients over the past years. The aim of our systematic review was to inventory the recent trends in epidemiology and antibiotic resistance of microorganisms causing bacteremia in cancer patients. Data for this review was identified by searches of Medline, Scopus and Cochrane Library for indexed articles and abstracts published in English since 2008. The principal search terms were: "antimicrobial resistance", "bacteremia", "bacterial epidemiology", "bloodstream infection", "cancer patients", "carbapenem resistance", "Escherichia coli resistance", "extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing E. coli", "febrile neutropenia", "fluoroquinolone resistance", "neutropenic cancer patient", "vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus", and "multidrug resistance". Boolean operators (NOT, AND, OR) were also used in succession to narrow and widen the search. Altogether, 27 articles were selected to be analyzed in the review. We found that Gram-negative bacteria were the most frequent pathogen isolated, particularly in studies with minimal use of antibiotic prophylaxis. Another important trend is the extensive emergence of antimicrobial-resistant strains associated with increased risk of morbidity, mortality and cost. This increasing incidence of antibiotic resistance has been reported in Gram-negative bacteria as well as in Gram-positive bacteria. This exhaustive review, reporting the recent findings in epidemiology and antibiotic resistance of bacteremia in cancer patients, highlights the necessity of local continuous surveillance of bacteremia and stringent enforcement of antibiotic stewardship programs in cancer patients. PMID:23354675

  6. Antibiotic prevention of postcataract endophthalmitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Flesner, Per; Andresen, Jens;

    2015-01-01

    Endophthalmitis is one of the most feared complications after cataract surgery. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the effect of intracameral and topical antibiotics on the prevention of endophthalmitis after cataract surgery. A systematic literature review in the MEDLINE, CINAHL......, Cochrane Library and EMBASE databases revealed one randomized trial and 17 observational studies concerning the prophylactic effect of intracameral antibiotic administration on the rate of endophthalmitis after cataract surgery. The effect of topical antibiotics on endophthalmitis rate was reported by one...... with the use of intracameral antibiotic administration of cefazolin, cefuroxime and moxifloxacin, whereas no effect was found with the use of topical antibiotics or intracameral vancomycin. Endophthalmitis occurred on average in one of 2855 surgeries when intracameral antibiotics were used compared to...

  7. DOUBLE J STENTS AND ANTIBIOTICS IN MINIMALLY INVASIVE UROSURGERY: PERI-INTERVENTIONAL VS. CONTINUOUS LOW-DOSE: A SINGLE CENTRE EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suraj

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE Ureteral stents are the basic and the most frequently used agents in the area of urology. The specialty has bloomed after its invention. A ureteric stent is a specially designed hollow tube, made of a flexible plastic material that is placed in the ureter. Its length varies from 24 to 30 cm. Additionally, they come in different diameters to fit different size ureters. Over the last two decades, different types of stents have been used, all of them serve the same purpose i.e., urinary diversion, ureteral obstruction relief, and postoperative drainage, thus issues related to their use have also increased. Peri-interventional antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended by the European Association of Urology for prevention of urinary tract infections, but there is no adequate evidence supporting the role of low-dose empiric antibiotics with respect to the time of indwelling. Drugs and doses are catered to each patient with the conception that it will have a positive effect on controlling SRS; this is yet to be proved. OBJECTIVES In this study, we analyse UTI and SRS rates in patients and study the advantages and disadvantages of a peri-interventional antibiotic prophylaxis only vs. a continuous low-dose antibiotic treatment for the entire stent-indwelling time. PLACE AND DURATION This randomised prospective study included 500 patients admitted to the Department of Urology, Mahatma Gandhi Hospital from January 2015 to December 2015 undergoing ureteroscopy (URS and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL for urolithiasis. METHODS This randomised prospective study included 500 patients admitted to the Department of Urology, Mahatma Gandhi Hospital from January 2015 to December 2015 undergoing ureteroscopy (URS and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL for urolithiasis. Patients were randomly allocated into two groups on lottery basis at the time of admission: Group A with 250 patients were given peri-operative antibiotic and Group B with 250 patients were

  8. Antibiotics in otorhinolaryngology practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan-Mikić Sandra

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction This study investigated utilization of antibacterial agents at the Ear, Nose and Throat Department of the Outpatient Service of the Health Center Novi Sad - Liman and at the Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic of the Clinical Center Novi Sad, in the period February - March 2001. Material and methods All antibacterial agents were classified as group J, regarding Anatomic-Therapeutic-Chemical Classification. Data on drug utilization were presented in Defined Daily Doses (DDD. Patients who were under observation were all treated with antibiotics. Results In regard to prescribed treatment in the Ear, Nose and Throat Department of the Outpatient Service of the Health Center Novi Sad - Liman, most outpatients were treated with macrolide antibiotics - in 26.21%; combination of penicillin and beta-lactamase inhibitors in 20.83% and pyranosides in 16.12%. At the Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic of the Clinical Center Novi Sad, macrolides and lincosamines were most frequently used - in 20.46%; cephalosporins in 19.87% and penicillins susceptible to beta-lactamase in 18.85%. It is extremely positive and in agreement with current pharmacotherapeutic principles that in both institutions peroral ampicillins have not been prescribed. Aminoglycosides have been prescribed in less than 1% of patients of the Ear, Nose and Throat Department of the Outpatient Service of the Health Center Novi Sad - Liman, whereas they were much more frequently prescribed at the Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic of the Clinical Center Novi Sad - in 11.25%. Although there is a positive postantibiotic effect in regard to these antibiotics and it is recommended to use them once a day, in both examined institutions aminoglycosides were given twice a day. In regard to bacterial identification it was done in 80.76% of patients of the Ear, Nose and Throat Department of the Outpatient Service of the Health Center Novi Sad - Liman, while in the Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic of the Clinical Center

  9. Inappropriate Use of Intravenous PPI for Stress Ulcer Prophylaxis in an Inner City Community Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Perwaiz, Muhammad K.; Posner, Gerald; Hammoudeh, Fadi; Schmidt, Frances; Neupane, Narayan; Enriquez, Danilo; Gulati, Neerja

    2010-01-01

    Background Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are used for the treatment and prophylaxis of variety of acid peptic conditions including stress ulcers. There has been a persistent practice of their inappropriate use for stress ulcer prophylaxis. Purpose of our study was to measure the inappropriate use of Intravenous Proton Pump Inhibitors for stress ulcer prophylaxis and to estimate the financial burden. Methods We carried out a retrospective, analytic study from July 2008 to June 2009 in internal...

  10. Practical considerations in choosing a factor VIII prophylaxis regimen: Role of clinical phenotype and trough levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljung, Rolf; Fischer, Kathelijn; Carcao, Manuel; Santagostino, Elena; Manco-Johnson, Marilyn J; Mathew, Prasad

    2016-05-01

    Current therapy for haemophilia A is guided by severity of the disease, which in turn is best reflected in patients' endogenous factor VIII activity levels. For patients with severe haemophilia (particularly children), prophylaxis with continuous routine factor replacement has become standard of care in developed countries and is gradually becoming the standard of care in developing countries. The question arises then: what is an appropriate prophylaxis regimen to prevent bleeding events and arthropathy, while also maximizing patient quality of life and taking into consideration the costs of prophylaxis? Should all patients be treated with one standard, fixed prophylaxis regimen, or should prophylaxis be individualised for each patient? If so, what factors need to be considered in choosing the appropriate dose and frequency of factor administration? If prophylaxis is tailored to the individual patient, then patient-related factors (bleeding phenotype, activity profiles, age, joint status) and product-specific factors (half-life of the replacement factor in the individual patient) will determine the choice of regimen, whether it be a fixed-regimen prophylaxis or prophylaxis that is tailored to patient activity and bleeding risk. Regardless of the choice of prophylaxis regimen, for any regimen to be effective, adherence to therapy is key to optimising outcomes. PMID:26791493

  11. Antibiotics and oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, D F

    1981-04-01

    Dermatologists often prescribe oral tetracycline for the control of acne, primarily, and to a much lesser extent, for the treatment of cutaneous infections. A number of the patients taking tetracycline are also taking birth control pills. A recent article in the British Medical Journal (1980;1:293) indicates that this combination can lead to a failure of the (OC) oral contraceptive. Such failure had been associated with ampicillin as well. It is believed that the mechanism for this was the disturbance in normal gut flora, with consequent effects on bacterial hydrolysis of steroid conjugates. This would interrupt the enterohepatic circulation of contraceptive steroids, resulting in a less than normal concentration of circulating steroids. It was recommended that women taking low-dose OCs take extra precautions against pregnancy during any cycle in which antibiotics are given. In regard to our care of and responsibilities to our patients, and in an era when malpractice suits for all types of reasons are more common, it certainly behooves dermatologists to recognize and be concerned about this potential consequence of prescribing oral antibiotics. PMID:7212735

  12. The efficacy of prophylactic outpatient antibiotics for the prevention of neutropenic fever associated with high-dose etoposide (VP-16) for stem cell mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, R K; Pohlman, B L; Mossad, S B; Goormastic, M; Longworth, D L; Kalaycio, M E; Sobecks, R M; Andresen, S W; Kuczkowski, E; Bernhard, L; Ostendorf, H; Wise, K; Bolwell, B J

    2002-09-01

    High-dose etoposide (2 g/m(2)) plus G-CSF is a very effective regimen for peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC) mobilization. Unfortunately, neutropenia is common. The infectious complications associated with high-dose etoposide have not been previously described. After noting a high incidence of hospitalizations for neutropenic fever, we began a vigorous prophylactic antibiotic regimen for patients receiving high-dose etoposide plus G-CSF, attempting to reduce infectious complications. Ninety-eight patients underwent etoposide mobilization between December 1997 and June 2000. Three chronological patient groups received: (1) no specific antibiotic prophylaxis (n = 44); (2) vancomycin i.v., cefepime i.v., clarithromycin p.o., and ciprofloxacin p.o. (n = 27); and (3) vancomycin i.v., clarithromycin p.o., and ciprofloxacin p.o. (n = 27). The patients not receiving antibiotic prophylaxis had a 68% incidence of hospitalization for neutropenic fever. In the patients receiving prophylaxis, the incidence was reduced to 26% and 15% respectively, for an overall incidence of 20% (P < 0.001 for comparison between prophylaxed and unprophylaxed groups). We conclude that etoposide mobilization is associated with a significant incidence of neutropenic fever, which can be substantially reduced by a vigorous antimicrobial prophylactic program. PMID:12209353

  13. Probiotic prophylaxis in patients with predicted severe acute pancreatitis (PROPATRIA: design and rationale of a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomised multicenter trial [ISRCTN38327949

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akkermans Louis MA

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infectious complications are the major cause of death in acute pancreatitis. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth and subsequent bacterial translocation are held responsible for the vast majority of these infections. Goal of this study is to determine whether selected probiotics are capable of preventing infectious complications without the disadvantages of antibiotic prophylaxis; antibiotic resistance and fungal overgrowth. Methods/design PROPATRIA is a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomised multicenter trial in which 200 patients will be randomly allocated to a multispecies probiotic preparation (Ecologic 641 or placebo. The study is performed in all 8 Dutch University Hospitals and 7 non-University hospitals. The study-product is administered twice daily through a nasojejunal tube for 28 days or until discharge. Patients eligible for randomisation are adult patients with a first onset of predicted severe acute pancreatitis: Imrie criteria 3 or more, CRP 150 mg/L or more, APACHE II score 8 or more. Exclusion criteria are post-ERCP pancreatitis, malignancy, infection/sepsis caused by a second disease, intra-operative diagnosis of pancreatitis and use of probiotics during the study. Administration of the study product is started within 72 hours after onset of abdominal pain. The primary endpoint is the total number of infectious complications. Secondary endpoints are mortality, necrosectomy, antibiotic resistance, hospital stay and adverse events. To demonstrate that probiotic prophylaxis reduces the proportion of patients with infectious complications from 50% to 30%, with alpha 0,05 and power 80%, a total sample size of 200 patients was calculated. Conclusion The PROPATRIA study is aimed to show a reduction in infectious complications due to early enteral use of multispecies probiotics in severe acute pancreatitis.

  14. Is Antibiotic Usage Necessary after Donor Nephrectomy? A Single Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zomorrodi Afshar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Proper management of living kidney donors is a very important aspect of all renal transplants. To date, approximately 60,000 living donor nephrectomies have been performed worldwide and about 20 deaths directly related to the operation have been reported. The most common cause of death has been pulmonary embolism. Wound infection following surgery is the third most common nosocomial infection, and is dependent on the surgeon and his/her team, the operating room, number and virulence of contaminated bacteria, patient characteristics (immunity and defense, as well as time and duration of administration of antibiotics. Approach to the prophylaxis of wound infection in kidney donors varies in different transplant centers. This study was conducted at the Emam Hospital, Tabriz, Iran in order to delineate the protocol regarding antibiotic usage after donor nephrectomy. One hundred kidney donors were enrolled in the study. They were classified randomly in two groups: Group-1, comprising 50 donors, who received antibiotics immediately following surgery and for at least seven days thereafter. Group-2, comprised of 50 donors, in whom one gram of cephazoline was injected intravenously before anesthesia and continued for 24 hours after surgery. The patients were followed-up for one month with particular emphasis on occurrence of wound infection. One patient in Group-1, and two in Group-2 had wound infection; the difference was not statistically significant (p = > 0.5. Our study suggests that antibiotic prophylaxis started before incision and continued for 24 hours after donor nephrectomy is safe and effective in preventing wound infection.

  15. Safety of undiluted intracameral moxifloxacin without postoperative topical antibiotics in cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Andrew Xingyu; Messenger, Wyatt Boyer; Sargent, Steven; Ambati, Balamurali Krishna

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the safety of undiluted 0.5 % intracameral moxifloxacin for postoperative endophthalmitis prophylaxis in cataract surgery patients without the use of additional postoperative topical antibiotics. All phacoemulsification cataract surgeries performed by a single surgeon (B.A.) at the John A. Moran Eye Center from June 2012 to May 2015 were reviewed retrospectively. From June 2012 to April 2014, patients were given topical 0.5 % moxifloxacin postoperatively. From May 2014 to May 2015, all patients were given moxifloxacin intracamerally with no antibiotics postoperatively. The follow-up period was 1 month after surgery. Preoperative visual acuity and postoperative visual acuity, corneal edema, and anterior chamber reaction were recorded and compared between the two groups. 384 cataract surgeries were performed during the study period. None of the 384 eyes in the study developed endophthalmitis. Of those 384 eyes, 222 were included in the study for analysis based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. 131 were part of the topical antibiotic group and 91 were part of the intracameral group. The differences in uncorrected visual acuity at 1 day postoperatively (p = 0.595) and best corrected visual acuity at 1 month postoperatively (p = 0.099) were not statistically significant. Differences in corneal edema (p = 0.370) and anterior chamber reaction (p = 0.069) at 1 day postoperatively and corneal edema (p = 0.512) and anterior chamber reaction (p = 0.512) at 1 month postoperatively were also not statistically significant. Undiluted 0.5 % moxifloxacin can be safely injected intracamerally following cataract surgery without additional postoperative antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent endophthalmitis without adverse effects on patient outcomes. PMID:26577588

  16. [Antibiotic stability in magistral collyria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tihărău, A; Voiculescu, E; Vancea, S; Teodorescu, A; Cherecheş, S

    1990-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a study on physicochemical and and microbiological stability of collyria with such antibiotics as: Kanamicin, Oxacilin, Colistin, Erythromycin and Rifampicin. The authors insist on the necessity of preparing the ophthalmic solution with the antibiotics studies, with solvent for eye drops as provided for by RF IX and keeping at +4 degrees C, at dark. PMID:2101048

  17. The Antibiotic Resistance Problem Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    The term "antibiotic" was first proposed by Vuillemin in 1889 but was first used in the current sense by Walksman in 1941. An antibiotic is defined as a "derivative produced by the metabolism of microorganisms that possess antibacterial activity at low concentrations and is not toxic to the host." In this article, the author describes how…

  18. The Prehistory of Antibiotic Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Julie; Waglechner, Nicholas; Wright, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global problem that is reaching crisis levels. The global collection of resistance genes in clinical and environmental samples is the antibiotic "resistome," and is subject to the selective pressure of human activity. The origin of many modern resistance genes in pathogens is likely environmental bacteria, including antibiotic producing organisms that have existed for millennia. Recent work has uncovered resistance in ancient permafrost, isolated caves, and in human specimens preserved for hundreds of years. Together with bioinformatic analyses on modern-day sequences, these studies predict an ancient origin of resistance that long precedes the use of antibiotics in the clinic. Understanding the history of antibiotic resistance is important in predicting its future evolution. PMID:27252395

  19. Antibiotic tolerance and microbial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Anders

    Increased tolerance to antimicrobial agents is thought to be an important feature of microbes growing in biofilms. We study the dynamics of antibiotic action within hydrodynamic flow chamber biofilms of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa using isogenic mutants and fluorescent gene...... expression reporters and we address the question of how biofilm organization affects antibiotic susceptibility. The dynamics of microbial killing is monitored by viable count determination, and confocal laser microscopy. Our work shows that the apparent increased antibiotic tolerance is due to the formation...... of antibiotic tolerant subpopulations within the biofilm. The formation of these subpopulations is highly variable and dependent on the antibiotic used, the biofilm structural organization and the induction of specific tolerance mechanisms....

  20. Antibiotics for acute maxillary sinusitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahovuo-Saloranta, Anneli; Borisenko, Oleg V; Kovanen, Niina;

    2008-01-01

    antibiotics from different classes for acute maxillary sinusitis in adults. We included trials with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, whether or not confirmed by radiography or bacterial culture. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: At least two review authors independently screened search results, extracted......BACKGROUND: Expert opinions vary on the appropriate role of antibiotics for sinusitis, one of the most commonly diagnosed conditions among adults in ambulatory care. OBJECTIVES: We examined whether antibiotics are effective in treating acute sinusitis, and if so, which antibiotic classes are the...... most effective. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, 2007, Issue 3); MEDLINE (1950 to May 2007) and EMBASE (1974 to June 2007). SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing antibiotics with placebo or...

  1. Antibiotic Resistance of Shigella Species in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    A.Mehr-Movahed; J. Nikkhah

    1987-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance in Shigella species has been showing a rising trend all over the world. This study was performed to discover the state of antibiotic resistance of Shigella species with regards to six common antibiotics in use in Iran.

  2. Nonadherence to primary prophylaxis against Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Heffelfinger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the effectiveness of prophylaxis, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP continues to be the most common serious opportunistic infection among HIV-infected persons. We describe factors associated with nonadherence to primary PCP prophylaxis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used 2000-2004 data from the Supplement to HIV/AIDS Surveillance (SHAS project, a cross-sectional interview project of HIV-infected persons >or=18 years conducted in 18 states. We limited the analysis to persons who denied having prior PCP, reported having a current prescription to prevent PCP, and answered the question "In the past 30 days, how often were you able to take the PCP medication(s exactly the way your doctor told you to take them?" We used multivariable logistic regression to describe factors associated with nonadherence. Of 1,666 subjects prescribed PCP prophylaxis, 305 (18.3% were nonadherent. Persons were more likely to be nonadherent if they reported using marijuana (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.1-2.4, non-injection drugs other than marijuana (aOR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.0-2.1, or injection drugs (aOR = 2.3, 95% CI = 1.3-4.1 in the past year; their mental health was "not good" for >or=1 day during the past month (aOR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.2-2.2; their most recent CD4 count was <200 cells/microL (aOR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.1-2.2; or taking ART usually (aOR = 9.6, 95% CI = 6.7-13.7 or sometimes/rarely/never (aOR = 18.4, 95% CI = 11.1-30.4, compared with always, as prescribed. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Providers should inquire about and promote strategies to improve adherence to PCP prophylaxis, particularly among persons who use illicit drugs, have mental health issues, and who are not compliant with ART to reduce the occurrence of PCP.

  3. Guideline for stress ulcer prophylaxis in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian Rørbaek; Lorentzen, Kristian; Clausen, Niels; Oberg, Emilie; Kirkegaard, Peter Roy Casparij; Maymann-Holler, Nana; Møller, Morten Hylander

    2014-01-01

    Stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) is commonly used in the intensive care unit (ICU), and is recommended in the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines 2012. The present guideline from the Danish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and the Danish Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine sums...... critically ill patients in the ICU outside the context of randomized controlled trials (GRADE 1C). No robust evidence supports recommendations for subpopulations in the ICU such as septic, burn, trauma, cardiothoracic or enterally fed patients. However, if SUP is considered clinically indicated in individual...

  4. A community perspective on pre-exposure prophylaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Simon Collins

    2014-01-01

    The history of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is notable for being a community rather than industry-driven development. This talk will review this history, covering factors that include community demand, study results, regulatory challenges, commercial interests and practical issues of public health. It will also look at some of the controversies that appear to limit broader access, and important changes since US approval for PrEP in 2012. If PrEP had been discovered in the 1980s, the demand...

  5. Chemical prophylaxis of radiation in uries. 2 ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book is devoted to medicinal prophylaxis of acute radiation injury, caused by external X-ray gamma-and neutron irradiation of lethal dose. The book deals with the problems of finding, testing and mechanism of action of radioprotectors in the investigations on different kinds of animals. Special attention is paid to sulphur-bearing compounds, but the paper also includes data on all the classes of the effective enough radioprotective chemical compounds. New data on efficiency of different radioprotector combinations are presented

  6. Tinidazole in the prophylaxis of post-appendicectomy infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo, J; Silvennoinen, E; Hulkko, A; Ervasti, E; Holopainen, O

    1981-01-01

    A total of 223 consecutive suspected appendicitis patients were treated preoperatively with parenteral tinidazole or physiological saline (control group). An infusion of 500 mg tinidazole was given to 110 patients over 30 minutes beginning about 30 minutes before the start of the operation, the control group comprised 111 patients. Postoperative infections were diagnosed in three patients in the group receiving tinidazole (3%) and in 17 patients in the control group (15%). The difference was statistically significant. There were no side-effects due to the drugs. Tinidazole appears to be well suited to the prophylaxis of post-appendicectomy infections. PMID:7032413

  7. Stress ulcer prophylaxis in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, M; Perner, A; Wetterslev, J;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) may decrease the incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients in the intensive care unit (ICU), but the risk of infection may be increased. In this study, we aimed to describe SUP practices in adult ICUs. We hypothesised that patient selection...... adverse effects. Fisher's exact test was used to assess differences between groups. RESULTS: Ninety-seven adult ICUs in 11 countries participated (eight European). All but one ICU used SUP, and 64% (62/97) reported having a guideline for the use of SUP. Proton pump inhibitors were the most common SUP...

  8. Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in meningioma surgery - a population based comparative effectiveness study of routine mechanical prophylaxis with or without preoperative low molecular weight heparin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjåvik, Kristin; Bartek, Jiri; Solheim, Ole;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECT: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a serious complication after intracranial meningioma surgery. To what extent systemic prophylaxis with pharmacotherapy is beneficial with respect to VTE risk, or associated with increased risk of bleeding and postoperative hemorrhage, remains debated. The c...

  9. Banding ligation versus beta-blockers as primary prophylaxis in esophageal varices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise L; Klingenberg, Sarah; Nikolova, Dimitrinka;

    2007-01-01

    To compare banding ligation versus beta-blockers as primary prophylaxis in patients with esophageal varices and no previous bleeding.......To compare banding ligation versus beta-blockers as primary prophylaxis in patients with esophageal varices and no previous bleeding....

  10. Awareness of infective endocarditis prophylaxis in parents of children with congenital heart disease: A prospective survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prospective survey of parents of the children with congenital heart disesease was conducted to determine their awareness as regards the importance of oral hygiene and prophylaxis against infective endocarditis (IE). The results of this study demonstrated that only 8% of the parents were aware of the importance of good oro-dental hygiene and need for IE prophylaxis

  11. Awareness of infective endocarditis prophylaxis in parents of children with congenital heart disease: A prospective survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nath Parrimala

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A prospective survey of parents of the children with congenital heart disesease was conducted to determine their awareness as regards the importance of oral hygiene and prophylaxis against infective endocarditis (IE. The results of this study demonstrated that only 8% of the parents were aware of the importance of good oro-dental hygiene and need for IE prophylaxis.

  12. Awareness of infective endocarditis prophylaxis in parents of children with congenital heart disease: A prospective survey

    OpenAIRE

    Nath Parrimala; Kiran V; Maheshwari Sunita

    2008-01-01

    A prospective survey of parents of the children with congenital heart disesease was conducted to determine their awareness as regards the importance of oral hygiene and prophylaxis against infective endocarditis (IE). The results of this study demonstrated that only 8% of the parents were aware of the importance of good oro-dental hygiene and need for IE prophylaxis.

  13. ONE WEEK VERSUS FOUR WEEK HEPARIN PROPHYLAXIS AFTER LAPAROSCOPIC SURGERY FOR COLORECTAL CANCER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-28

    The Primary Study Objective is to Assess the Efficacy and; Safety of Extended 4-week Heparin Prophylaxis Compared to; Prophylaxis Given for 8±2 Days After Planned Laparoscopic; Surgery for Colorectal Cancer.; The Clinical Benefit Will be Evaluated as the Difference in; the Incidence of VTE or VTE-related Death Occurring Within 30 Days; From Surgery in the Two Study Groups.

  14. Novel Oral Anticoagulants for Stroke Prophylaxis and Venous Thromboembolism Prevention and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laith G. Alsayegh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs are becoming popular management options for stroke prophylaxis in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation as well as deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism treatment and prophylaxis. NOACs have similar efficacy to warfarin along with noninferior safety profiles. Patient comorbidities, size, renal and hepatic function, and concomitant drug regimen play a role in which NOAC a physician may choose.

  15. Novel Oral Anticoagulants for Stroke Prophylaxis and Venous Thromboembolism Prevention and Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Laith G. Alsayegh

    2015-01-01

    Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are becoming popular management options for stroke prophylaxis in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation as well as deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism treatment and prophylaxis. NOACs have similar efficacy to warfarin along with noninferior safety profiles. Patient comorbidities, size, renal and hepatic function, and concomitant drug regimen play a role in which NOAC a physician may choose.

  16. Environmental and Public Health Implications of Water Reuse: Antibiotics, Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, and Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roderick I. Mackie

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Water scarcity is a global problem, and is particularly acute in certain regions like Africa, the Middle East, as well as the western states of America. A breakdown on water usage revealed that 70% of freshwater supplies are used for agricultural irrigation. The use of reclaimed water as an alternative water source for agricultural irrigation would greatly alleviate the demand on freshwater sources. This paradigm shift is gaining momentum in several water scarce countries like Saudi Arabia. However, microbial problems associated with reclaimed water may hinder the use of reclaimed water for agricultural irrigation. Of particular concern is that the occurrence of antibiotic residues in the reclaimed water can select for antibiotic resistance genes among the microbial community. Antibiotic resistance genes can be associated with mobile genetic elements, which in turn allow a promiscuous transfer of resistance traits from one bacterium to another. Together with the pathogens that are present in the reclaimed water, antibiotic resistant bacteria can potentially exchange mobile genetic elements to create the “perfect microbial storm”. Given the significance of this issue, a deeper understanding of the occurrence of antibiotics in reclaimed water, and their potential influence on the selection of resistant microorganisms would be essential. In this review paper, we collated literature over the past two decades to determine the occurrence of antibiotics in municipal wastewater and livestock manure. We then discuss how these antibiotic resistant bacteria may impose a potential microbial risk to the environment and public health, and the knowledge gaps that would have to be addressed in future studies. Overall, the collation of the literature in wastewater treatment and agriculture serves to frame and identify potential concerns with respect to antibiotics, antibiotic resistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance genes in reclaimed water.

  17. Environmental and Public Health Implications of Water Reuse: Antibiotics, Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, and Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Pei-Ying

    2013-07-31

    Water scarcity is a global problem, and is particularly acute in certain regions like Africa, the Middle East, as well as the western states of America. A breakdown on water usage revealed that 70% of freshwater supplies are used for agricultural irrigation. The use of reclaimed water as an alternative water source for agricultural irrigation would greatly alleviate the demand on freshwater sources. This paradigm shift is gaining momentum in several water scarce countries like Saudi Arabia. However, microbial problems associated with reclaimed water may hinder the use of reclaimed water for agricultural irrigation. Of particular concern is that the occurrence of antibiotic residues in the reclaimed water can select for antibiotic resistance genes among the microbial community. Antibiotic resistance genes can be associated with mobile genetic elements, which in turn allow a promiscuous transfer of resistance traits from one bacterium to another. Together with the pathogens that are present in the reclaimed water, antibiotic resistant bacteria can potentially exchange mobile genetic elements to create the “perfect microbial storm”. Given the significance of this issue, a deeper understanding of the occurrence of antibiotics in reclaimed water, and their potential influence on the selection of resistant microorganisms would be essential. In this review paper, we collated literature over the past two decades to determine the occurrence of antibiotics in municipal wastewater and livestock manure. We then discuss how these antibiotic resistant bacteria may impose a potential microbial risk to the environment and public health, and the knowledge gaps that would have to be addressed in future studies. Overall, the collation of the literature in wastewater treatment and agriculture serves to frame and identify potential concerns with respect to antibiotics, antibiotic resistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance genes in reclaimed water.

  18. Impact of Prematurity and Perinatal Antibiotics on the Developing Intestinal Microbiota: A Functional Inference Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Arboleya

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The microbial colonization of the neonatal gut provides a critical stimulus for normal maturation and development. This process of early microbiota establishment, known to be affected by several factors, constitutes an important determinant for later health. Methods: We studied the establishment of the microbiota in preterm and full-term infants and the impact of perinatal antibiotics upon this process in premature babies. To this end, 16S rRNA gene sequence-based microbiota assessment was performed at phylum level and functional inference analyses were conducted. Moreover, the levels of the main intestinal microbial metabolites, the short-chain fatty acids (SCFA acetate, propionate and butyrate, were measured by Gas-Chromatography Flame ionization/Mass spectrometry detection. Results: Prematurity affects microbiota composition at phylum level, leading to increases of Proteobacteria and reduction of other intestinal microorganisms. Perinatal antibiotic use further affected the microbiota of the preterm infant. These changes involved a concomitant alteration in the levels of intestinal SCFA. Moreover, functional inference analyses allowed for identifying metabolic pathways potentially affected by prematurity and perinatal antibiotics use. Conclusion: A deficiency or delay in the establishment of normal microbiota function seems to be present in preterm infants. Perinatal antibiotic use, such as intrapartum prophylaxis, affected the early life microbiota establishment in preterm newborns, which may have consequences for later health.

  19. Impact of Prematurity and Perinatal Antibiotics on the Developing Intestinal Microbiota: A Functional Inference Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arboleya, Silvia; Sánchez, Borja; Solís, Gonzalo; Fernández, Nuria; Suárez, Marta; Hernández-Barranco, Ana M.; Milani, Christian; Margolles, Abelardo; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G.; Ventura, Marco; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Background: The microbial colonization of the neonatal gut provides a critical stimulus for normal maturation and development. This process of early microbiota establishment, known to be affected by several factors, constitutes an important determinant for later health. Methods: We studied the establishment of the microbiota in preterm and full-term infants and the impact of perinatal antibiotics upon this process in premature babies. To this end, 16S rRNA gene sequence-based microbiota assessment was performed at phylum level and functional inference analyses were conducted. Moreover, the levels of the main intestinal microbial metabolites, the short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) acetate, propionate and butyrate, were measured by Gas-Chromatography Flame ionization/Mass spectrometry detection. Results: Prematurity affects microbiota composition at phylum level, leading to increases of Proteobacteria and reduction of other intestinal microorganisms. Perinatal antibiotic use further affected the microbiota of the preterm infant. These changes involved a concomitant alteration in the levels of intestinal SCFA. Moreover, functional inference analyses allowed for identifying metabolic pathways potentially affected by prematurity and perinatal antibiotics use. Conclusion: A deficiency or delay in the establishment of normal microbiota function seems to be present in preterm infants. Perinatal antibiotic use, such as intrapartum prophylaxis, affected the early life microbiota establishment in preterm newborns, which may have consequences for later health. PMID:27136545

  20. 75 FR 32490 - Issues in the Development of Medical Products for the Prophylaxis and/or Treatment of Acute...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ... Prophylaxis and/or Treatment of Acute Antibody Mediated Rejection in Kidney Transplant Recipients; Public... prophylaxis and/or treatment of acute antibody mediated rejection (AMR) in kidney transplant recipients. This..., academia, and industry on various aspects of development of medical products for prophylaxis...

  1. Nuclear detonation, thyroid cancer and potassium iodide prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2011-04-01

    The recent nuclear disaster at Japan has raised global concerns about effects of radioactive leakage in the environment, associated hazards, and how they can be prevented. In this article, we have tried to explain about the guidelines laid down by World Health Organization for a potassium iodide prophylaxis following a nuclear disaster, and its mechanism of action in preventing thyroid cancer. Data was collected mainly from the studies carried out during the Chernobyl disaster of Russia in 1986 and the hazardous effects especially on the thyroid gland were studied. It was seen that radioactive iodine leakage from the nuclear plants mainly affected the thyroid gland, and especially children were at a higher risk at developing the cancers. Potassium Iodide prophylaxis can be administered in order to prevent an increase in the incidence of thyroid cancers in the population of an area affected by a nuclear disaster. However, one has to be cautious while giving it, as using it without indication has its own risks. PMID:21731865

  2. [Thrombosis prophylaxis with heparins in intensive care patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greinacher, A; Janssen, D

    2005-03-01

    Venous thromboembolism is a common complication in critically ill patients, resulting in high morbidity and mortality. Most patients treated in intensive care units (ICU) face a high risk of thromboembolic complications. There is a need for well-defined strategies for prevention of thrombosis in ICU patients. Mechanical methods such as compression stockings are frequently used, even though evidence for these measures in ICU patients is limited. Unfractionated heparin (UFH) is still the leading drug for thromboprophylaxis in ICU patients, but pharmacokinetic disadvantages such as low predictability of effect on anticoagulation are relevant, especially in ICU patients. Additionally, there is no sufficient evidence from clinical trials to support subcutaneous or intravenous prophylaxis with UFH. At least equivalent efficacy and safety of subcutaneous low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) compared with subcutaneous UFH have been shown in numerous studies investigating non-ICU high-risk groups. First studies on the use of LMWH in critically ill patients are promising. Some conclusions for safe use of subcutaneous LMWH in ICU patients can be drawn. Intravenous LMWH may be the optimal prophylaxis in most ICU patients, but there is a lack of sufficient data on dosing. Precautions such as monitoring of anticoagulation in patients with renal insufficiency are fundamental if LMWH is given. Further investigations into prevention of venous thromboembolism in ICU patients are urgently needed. PMID:15770559

  3. Nuclear detonation, thyroid cancer and potassium iodide prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent nuclear disaster at Japan has raised global concerns about effects of radioactive leakage in the environment, associated hazards, and how they can be prevented. In this article, we have tried to explain about the guidelines laid down by World Health Organization for a potassium iodide prophylaxis following a nuclear disaster, and its mechanism of action in preventing thyroid cancer. Data was collected mainly from the studies carried out during the Chernobyl disaster of Russia in 1986 and the hazardous effects especially on the thyroid gland were studied. It was seen that radioactive iodine leakage from the nuclear plants mainly affected the thyroid gland, and especially children were at a higher risk at developing the cancers. Potassium Iodide prophylaxis can be administered in order to prevent an increase in the incidence of thyroid cancers in the population of an area affected by a nuclear disaster. However, one has to be cautious while giving it, as using it without indication has its own risks.

  4. Renin angiotensin system: A novel target for migraine prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchika Nandha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Migraine constitutes 16% of primary headaches affecting 10-20% of general population according to International Headache Society. Till now nonsteroidalanti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS, opioids and triptans are the drugs being used for acute attack of migraine. Substances with proven efficacy for prevention include β-blockers, calcium channel blockers, antiepileptic drugs and antidepressants. All the already available drugs have certain limitations. Either they are unable to produce complete relief or 30-40% patients are no responders or drugs produce adverse effects. This necessitates the search for more efficacious and well-tolerated drugs. A new class of drugs like angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor antagonists have recently been studied for their off label use in prophylaxis of migraine. Studies, done so far, have shown results in favour of their clinical use because of the ability to reduce number of days with headache, number of days with migraine, hours with migraine, headache severity index, level of disability, improved Quality of life and decrease in consumption of specific or nonspecific analgesics. This article reviews the available evidence on the efficacy and safety of these drugs in prophylaxis of migraine and can give physician a direction to use these drugs for chronic migraineurs. Searches of pubmed, Cochrane database, Medscape, Google and clinicaltrial.org were made using terms like ACE inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor antagonists and migraine. Relevant journal articles were chosen to provide necessary information.

  5. Pharmacologic Considerations for Preexposure Prophylaxis in Transgender Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Peter L; Reirden, Daniel; Castillo-Mancilla, Jose

    2016-08-15

    Studies of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF)-emtricitabine (FTC)-based preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) have not focused on transgendered women who are at disproportionate risk of HIV acquisition. Concerns exist for drug interactions between cross-sex therapy (estradiol, progestins, and spironolactone) with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate-emtricitabine. This review assessed the experimental and theoretical risk for such drug interactions. It was found that none of these medications are implicated as major perpetrators of drug interactions, and the classes use different metabolic pathways for clearance, suggesting a low likelihood for interactions in either direction. Subanalyses of transgender women in Preexposure Prophylaxis Initiative suggested PrEP efficacy if adherence was high. Nevertheless, several research gaps were identified, particularly the need for controlled interaction studies in transgendered women, including effects on renal clearance, intracellular tenofovir diphosphate and emtricitabine triphosphate in target cells, as well as hormone effects on HIV susceptibility and immunity. PrEP should continue to be offered to transgender women while additional research is planned or pending. PMID:27429188

  6. Anti-D prophylaxis: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haas, M; Finning, K; Massey, E; Roberts, D J

    2014-02-01

    The new British Committee for Standards in Haematology (BCSH) guidelines for the use of anti-D immunoglobulin in pregnancy provide a welcome clarification of the use of anti-D in ectopic pregnancy and after red cell salvage during caesarean section, of dosing with different preparations and distinguishing non-immune and immune anti-D. The routine use of anti-D prophylaxis (RAADP) to prevent Rhesus (Rh) D alloimmunisation during the third trimester is well established and requires careful and well-audited local implementation to achieve the maximum public health benefit. In the UK, such scrutiny may be provided by the reporting of failed anti-D prophylaxis at women who have produced an immune anti-D that is detectable for the first time in the current pregnancy through the voluntary Serious Hazards of Transfusion reporting scheme (SHOT). Application of fetal RHD genotyping would avoid giving anti-D to RhD negative women carrying an RhD negative fetus. RAADP is directed by fetal RHD genotyping in some countries in Northern Europe led by the Netherlands and Denmark. The economic case for RAADP directed by fetal RHD genotyping needs to be carefully evaluated and in England is under consideration by National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE). Possible future developments include the use of monoclonal anti-D preparations, now in advanced clinical trials, and also testing the hypothesis that directed RAADP from early in the second trimester may further reduce anti-D immunisation. PMID:25121157

  7. Antimicrobial Drugs in Prophylaxis of Complications after Cataract Phacoemulsification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.N. Okolov

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose To study effectiveness of topical antimicrobial drugs in combination with antiseptic agents for prevention of postoperative infectious complications of cataract phacoemulsification. Material and methods We examined 240 patients prior to elective cataract phacoemulsification. All patients instilled antimicrobal drops into the eye to be operated according to two schemes. Microbiological examination of the content of the conjunctival sac after drop administration before the surgery and immediately after the surgery was performed in all patients. Results Preoperatively, microbial contamination on the conjunctiva was found in 128 patients (53,3%. Coagulase-negative staphylococcus (31,2% and diphtheroids (41,4% were the most abundant. In the first scheme of treatment, significant reduction of microbial contamination is recorded only after Tobrex instillations. Two-days prophylaxis significantly reduced microbial contamination in all studied groups. No reliable difference between drugs was found. There was no significant difference between two schemes. Conclusions Administration of local antimicrobal drugs significantly inhibits bacterial contamination of the conjunctiva. Torbex had the highest antimicrobial effect in one-hour scheme of prophylaxis while all drugs were similar by effectiveness in three-day scheme.

  8. Osteosarcoma following single fraction radiation prophylaxis for heterotopic ossification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy for prophylaxis of heterotopic ossification (HO) is commonly used in high risk patients following orthopedic surgery. While treatment is effective and can prevent morbidity associated with HO, with any dose of radiation there is a concern of a radiation induced malignancy. Here we a report a case of radiation induced osteosarcoma which developed 11 years after a single fraction of 700 cGy. We performed dosimetric analysis by superimposing the patient’s original treatment field on a CT scan performed after the diagnosis. The radiotherapy dose for this patient is lower than classically reported for radiation induced sarcomas. We identified greatest bony destruction that was thought to be the epicenter of the tumor, and this was specially contoured on the diagnostic CT scan. This volume appears to be located at the edge of the radiotherapy field. Fifty percent of the treated volume received 240 cGy, the mean dose was 333 cGy. There was a variation across the treatment volume, between 21.8 cGy and 717 cGy. While a rare complication, we stress the importance of informing regarding the risk of a radiation induced malignancy following HO prophylaxis

  9. Systemic antibiotic therapy in periodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoop Kapoor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic antibiotics in conjunction with scaling and root planing (SRP, can offer an additional benefit over SRP alone in the treatment of periodontitis, in terms of clinical attachment loss (CAL and pocket depth change, and reduced risk of additional CAL loss. However, antibiotics are not innocuous drugs. Their use should be justified on the basis of a clearly established need and should not be substituted for adequate local treatment. The aim of this review is to discuss the rationale, proper selection, dosage and duration for antibiotic therapy so as to optimize the usefulness of drug therapy.

  10. Antibiotics as CECs: An Overview of the Hazards Posed by Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Ivan Scott

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTMonitoring programs have traditionally monitored legacy contaminants but are shifting focus to Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CECs. CECs present many challenges for monitoring and assessment, because measurement methods don't always exist nor have toxicological studies been fully conducted to place results in proper context. Also some CECs affect metabolic pathways to produce adverse outcomes that are not assessed through traditional toxicological evaluations. Antibiotics are CECs that pose significant environmental risks including development of both toxic effects at high doses and antibiotic resistance at doses well below the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC which kill bacteria and have been found in nearly half of all sites monitored in the US. Antimicrobial resistance has generally been attributed to the use of antibiotics in medicine for humans and livestock as well as aquaculture operations. The objective of this study was to assess the extent and magnitude of antibiotics in the environment and estimate their potential hazards in the environment. Antibiotics concentrations were measured in a number of monitoring studies which included Waste Water Treatment Plants (WWTP effluent, surface waters, sediments and biota. A number of studies reported levels of Antibiotic Resistant Microbes (ARM in surface waters and some studies found specific ARM genes (e.g. the blaM-1 gene in E. coli which may pose additional environmental risk. High levels of this gene were found to survive WWTP disinfection and accumulated in sediment at levels 100-1000 times higher than in the sewerage effluent, posing potential risks for gene transfer to other bacteria.in aquatic and marine ecosystems. Antibiotic risk assessment approaches were developed based on the use of MICs and MIC Ratios [High (Antibiotic Resistant/Low (Antibiotic Sensitive MIC] for each antibiotic indicating the range of bacterial adaptability to each antibiotic to help define the No

  11. Prophylactic antibiotics versus post- operative antibiotics in herniorraphy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abedulla Khan Kayamkani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative surgical site infections are a major source of illness.  Infection results in longer hospital stay and higher costs.  Uses of preoperative antibiotics have been standardized and are being used routinely in most clinical surgeries and include controversial areas like breast surgery and herniorraphy. Objective of the study is to find out the benefit of prophylactic use of antibiotics in the management of herniorraphy.This project was carried out in a multispeciality tertiary care teaching hospital from 1st-30th April in 2002. Group 1 patients were treated prophylactically half an hour before surgery with single dose of I.V. antibiotics (injection.  Ampicillin 1gm + injection.  Gentamicin 80mg. Group 2 patients were treated post surgery with capsule. Ampicillin 500mg 4 times a day for 7 days and injection. Gentamicin twice a day for first 4 days. In case of group 1 patients only one out of 20 patients (5% was infected.  Whereas in-group 2 patients 5 out of 20 patients (25% were infected. The cost of prophylactic antibiotic treatment was Rs. 25.56 per patient.  The postoperative antibiotic treatment cost was Rs. 220.4 per patient.  That means postoperative treatment is around 8.62 times costlier than prophylactic treatment.             From this study it is evident that prophylactic (preoperative treatment is better than postoperative treatment with antibiotics.

  12. Encouraging good antimicrobial prescribing practice: A review of antibiotic prescribing policies used in the South East Region of England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayon White Richard T

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Good prescribing practice has an important part to play in the fight against antimicrobial resistance. Whilst it was perceived that most hospitals and Health Authorities possessed an antibiotic policy, a review of antibiotic policies was conducted to gain an understanding of the extent, quality and usefulness of these policies. Methods Letters were sent to pharmacists in hospitals and health authorities in across the South East region of the National Health Service Executive (NHSE requesting antibiotic policies. data were extracted from the policies to assess four areas; antibiotic specific, condition specific, patient specific issues and underpinning evidence. Results Of a possible 41 hospital trusts and 14 health authorities, 33 trusts and 9 health authorities (HAs provided policies. Both trust and HA policies had a median publication date of 1998 (trust range 1993-99, HA 1994-99. Eleven policies were undated. The majority of policies had no supporting references for the statements made. All policies provided some details on specific antibiotics. Gentamicin and ciprofloxacin were the preferred aminoglycoside and quinolone respectively with cephalosporins being represented by cefuroxime or cefotaxime in trusts and cephradine or cephalexin in HAs. 26 trusts provided advice on surgical prophylaxis, 17 had meningococcal prophylaxis policies and 11 covered methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. There was little information for certain groups such as neonates or children, the pregnant or the elderly. Conclusion There was considerable variation in content and quality across policies, a clear lack of an evidence base and a need to revise policies in line with current recommendations.

  13. Mission Critical: Preventing Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Remember antibiotics have side effects. Prevent infections by practicing good hand hygiene and getting recommended vaccines. View ... program that includes, at a minimum, this checklist : Leadership commitment: Dedicate necessary human, financial, and IT resources. ...

  14. Antibiotic associated diarrhoea: Infectious causes

    OpenAIRE

    Ayyagari A; Agarwal J; Garg A

    2003-01-01

    Nearly 25% of antibiotic associated diarrhoeas (AAD) is caused by Clostridium difficile, making it the commonest identified and treatable pathogen. Other pathogens implicated infrequently include Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella oxytoca, Candida spp. and Salmonella spp. Most mild cases of AAD are due to non-infectious causes which include reduced break down of primary bile acids and decrease metabolism of carbohydrates, allergic or toxic effects of antibiotic ...

  15. Systemic antibiotic therapy in periodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Anoop Kapoor; Ranjan Malhotra; Vishakha Grover; Deepak Grover

    2012-01-01

    Systemic antibiotics in conjunction with scaling and root planing (SRP), can offer an additional benefit over SRP alone in the treatment of periodontitis, in terms of clinical attachment loss (CAL) and pocket depth change, and reduced risk of additional CAL loss. However, antibiotics are not innocuous drugs. Their use should be justified on the basis of a clearly established need and should not be substituted for adequate local treatment. The aim of this review is to discuss the rationale, pr...

  16. Antibiotic resistance in wild birds

    OpenAIRE

    Bonnedahl, Jonas; Järhult, Josef D.

    2014-01-01

    Wild birds have been postulated as sentinels, reservoirs, and potential spreaders of antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria have been isolated from a multitude of wild bird species. Several studies strongly indicate transmission of resistant bacteria from human rest products to wild birds. There is evidence suggesting that wild birds can spread resistant bacteria through migration and that resistant bacteria can be transmitted from birds to humans and vice versa. Through further...

  17. [Self-medication with antibiotics in Poland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olczak, A.; Grzesiowski, P.; Hryniewicz, W.; Haaijer-Ruskamp, F.M.

    2006-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance, the important public health threat, depends on antibiotic overuse/misuse. Self-medication with antibiotics is of serious medical concern. The aim of the study, as a part of SAR project (Self-medication with antibiotic in Europe) was to survey the incidence of this phenomenon.

  18. Expedient antibiotics production: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bienkowski, P.R.; Byers, C.H.; Lee, D.D.

    1988-05-01

    The literature on the manufacture, separation and purification, and clinical uses of antibiotics was reviewed, and a bibliography of the pertinent material was completed. Five antimicrobial drugs, penicillin V and G, (and amoxicillin with clavulanic acid), Cephalexin (a cephalosporin), tetracycline and oxytetracycline, Bacitracin (topical), and sulfonamide (chemically produced) were identified for emergency production. Plants that manufacture antibiotics in the continental United States, Mexico, and Puerto Rico have been identified along with potential alternate sites such as those where SCP, enzyme, and fermentation ethanol are produced. Detailed process flow sheets and process descriptions have been derived from the literature and documented. This investigation revealed that a typical antibiotic-manufacturing facility is composed of two main sections: (1) a highly specialized, but generic, fermentation unit and (2) a multistep, complex separation and purification unit which is specific to a particular antibiotic product. The fermentation section requires specialized equipment for operation in a sterile environment which is not usually available in other industries. The emergency production of antibiotics under austere conditions will be feasible only if a substantial reduction in the complexity and degree of separation and purity normally required can be realized. Detailed instructions were developed to assist state and federal officials who would be directing the resumption of antibiotic production after a nuclear attack. 182 refs., 54 figs., 26 tabs.

  19. The methods in infections prophylaxis of burn department and its significance%烧伤病区感染防控的措施及重要性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹卫红; 蒋玉洁; 邹晓防; 盛志勇

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive methods were used in prophylaxis and control of infection in burn department, which related with out-patient clinics,emergency department, wards, in-patients, professionals, reasonable usage of antibiotics, and air purification, and so on. The methods showed satisfactory effect on controlling infection in burn department.%采用综合性措施防控烧伤病区感染,从门急诊、病房、手术室、患者、医护人员、合理使用抗生素、空气净化等多方面、多层次进行干预,采取多种措施预防与控制感染,取得了满意的效果.

  20. Macrolide antibiotics and the airway: antibiotic or non-antibiotic effects?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, D M

    2010-03-01

    The macrolides are a class of antibiotics widely prescribed in infectious disease. More recently, there has been considerable interest in potential indications for these agents, in addition to their simple antibacterial indications, in a number of lung pathophysiologies.

  1. Spanish Consensus Guidelines on prophylaxis with bypassing agents in patients with haemophilia and inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Fernández, Maria Fernanda; Altisent Roca, Carmen; Álvarez-Román, Maria Teresa; Canaro Hirnyk, Mariana Isabel; Mingot-Castellano, Maria Eva; Jiménez-Yuste, Víctor; Cid Haro, Ana Rosa; Pérez-Garrido, Rosario; Sedano Balbas, Carmen

    2016-05-01

    Prophylaxis with the blood clotting factor, factor VIII (FVIII) is ineffective for individuals with haemophilia A and high-titre inhibitors to FVIII. Prophylaxis with the FVIII bypassing agents activated prothrombin complex concentrates (aPCC; FEIBA® Baxalta) or recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa; Novo-Seven®, Novo Nordisk) may be an effective alternative. It was our aim to develop evidence -and expert opinion- based guidelines for prophylactic therapy for patients with high-titre inhibitors to FVIII. A panel of nine Spanish haematologists undertook a systematic review of the literature to develop consensus-based guidance. Particular consideration was given to prophylaxis in patients prior to undergoing immune tolerance induction (ITI) (a process of continued exposure to FVIII that can restore sensitivity for some patients), during the ITI period and for those not undergoing ITI or for whom ITI had failed. These guidelines offer guidance for clinicians in deciding which patients might benefit from prophylaxis with FVIII bypassing agents, the most appropriate agents in various clinical settings related to ITI, doses and dosing regimens and how best to monitor the efficacy of prophylaxis. The paper includes recommendations on when to interrupt or stop prophylaxis and special safety concerns during prophylaxis. These consensus guidelines offer the most comprehensive evaluation of the clinical evidence base to date and should be of considerable benefit to clinicians facing the challenge of managing patients with severe haemophilia A with high-titre FVIII inhibitors. PMID:26842562

  2. Antibiotic use in Lithuania, 2003 - 2008

    OpenAIRE

    Beržanskytė, Aušra

    2009-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is mainly caused by inappropriate and abundant use of antibiotics. To enlighten the most relevant problematic areas in antibiotic use, where the decisions should be made, the different levels were analysed in this study: the self-medication with antibiotics of the population, ambulatory and also hospital antibiotic use. The results showed that wrong perception about antibiotics is characteristic to Lithuanian population, as there is lack of privity, while traditions o...

  3. Antibiotics: Use and misuse in pediatric dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F C Peedikayil

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are commonly used in dentistry for prophylactic as well as for therapeutic purposes. Most often antibiotics are used in unwarranted situations, which may give rise to resistant bacterial strains. Dentists want to make their patients well and to prevent unpleasant complications. These desires, coupled with the belief that many oral problems are infectious, stimulate the prescribing of antibiotics. Good knowledge about the indications of antibiotics is the need of the hour in prescribing antibiotics for dental conditions.

  4. Nystatin prophylaxis and treatment in severely immunodepressed patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nystatin is sometimes used prophylactically in patients with severe immunodeficiency or in the treatment of fungal infection in such patients, although its effect seems to be equivocal. OBJECTIVES: To study whether nystatin decreases morbidity and mortality when given prophylactically......' CONCLUSIONS: Nystatin cannot be recommended for prophylaxis or the treatment of Candida infections in immunodepressed patients.......BACKGROUND: Nystatin is sometimes used prophylactically in patients with severe immunodeficiency or in the treatment of fungal infection in such patients, although its effect seems to be equivocal. OBJECTIVES: To study whether nystatin decreases morbidity and mortality when given prophylactically...... amphotericin B. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Data on mortality, invasive fungal infection and colonisation were independently extracted by both authors. A random-effects model was used unless the P value was greater than 0.10 for the test of heterogeneity. MAIN RESULTS: We included 14 trials (1569 patients...

  5. Stress ulcer prophylaxis in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Morten Brøgger; Perner, A; Wetterslev, J;

    2013-01-01

    Stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) is regarded as standard of care in the intensive care unit (ICU). However, recent randomized, clinical trials (RCTs) and meta-analyses have questioned the rationale and level of evidence for this recommendation. The aim of the present systematic review was to evaluate...... Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation, and risk of random errors in cumulative meta-analyses was assessed with trial sequential analysis. A total of 57 studies were included in the review. The literature on SUP in the ICU includes limited trial data and methodological weak...... intervention?; (4) Do intensive care patients benefit from SUP with proton pump inhibitors as compared with other SUP interventions? Systematic reviews of possible interventions and well-powered observational studies and RCTs are needed....

  6. Flu pandemics: homeopathic prophylaxis and definition of the epidemic genius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renan Marino

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on viral genetics establish swine-H1N1 – responsible for the ongoing pandemics – as a remainder or continuation of the agent causing the flu epidemics of 1918. This study aimed at analyzing whether this common etiology also result in significant correlations of clinical manifestations. To do so, data were collected to compare the clinical evolution of cases in the 1918 and 2009 epidemics.  This historical revision was the ground for evaluating the response to treatment including homeopathy in the former epidemics. It is discussed the convenience of including homeopathic prophylaxis grounded on the diagnosis of the epidemic genius among public health actions.

  7. Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis in Plastic Surgery: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Sergio; Valdes, Jorge; Salama, Moises

    2016-06-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major health concern because it increases morbidity and mortality after a surgical procedure. A number of well-defined, evidence-based guidelines are available delineating suitable use of prophylaxis to prevent deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Despite the available literature, there are clear gaps between recommendations and clinical practice, affecting the incidence of VTE. Plastic surgeons underuse the substantiated literature and risk stratification tools that are available to decrease the incidence of VTE in the office-based surgical setting because of fear of bleeding or hematoma complications postoperatively. Venous thromboembolism creates an economic burden on both the patient and the healthcare system. The intent of this literature review is to determine existing VTE risk using assessment models available to aid in the implementation of protocols for VTE prevention, specifically for high-risk cosmetic surgical patients in office-based settings. PMID:27501651

  8. Animal Bites and Rabies Prophylaxis in Rural Children: Indian Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Moumita; Mondal, Rakesh; Shah, Ankit; Hazra, Avijit; Ray, Somosri; Dhar, Goutam; Biswas, Rupa; Sabui, Tapas Kumar; Raychaudhuri, Dibyendu; Chatterjee, Kaushani; Kundu, Chanchal; Sarkar, Sumantra

    2016-02-01

    A prospective observational study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital to study clinicoepidemiological profile of potentially rabid animal bite cases from rural India. Total of 308 children (median age 6 years) admitted to hospital, were recruited over 1 year and followed up till completion of antirabies vaccine course. Dog was the commonest (77.27%) offending animal. Of the exposures, 66.88% were scratches, 88.96% were unprovoked and 27.27% were categorized as Class III. The median times to wound toileting and reporting to health facility were 1 and 6 h, respectively. Majority received prompt PEP in hospital, and RIG was administered in 34.55% of Class II and 90.48% of Class III exposures. Compared with their older counterparts, children aged rabies prophylaxis scenario is encouraging, when compared with earlier studies, but there are gaps to be addressed. PMID:26510700

  9. Side effects of iodine prophylaxis in pregnant rats (experimental studies)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The embryotoxic effect of single treatment of rats with potassium iodide was studied. The dose being used provided thyroid protecting parameters, comparable to those of the dose adapted for iodine prophylaxis of adults in Bulgaria. The embryotoxic effect of a combination of a much lower dose of potassium iodide with potassium perchlorate was also studied. Data for selected days of the first half of rat pregnancy, corresponding to the first phase of pituitary-hypothalamo-thyroid system development, were presented. The parameters being studied on prenatal damage, including visible malformations of the central nervous system and the extremities, as well as changes in the fetal body mass, showed no deviations from those in the respective controls. In comparison with the authors' results of previous studies showing embryotoxicity of repeated treatment, the single treatment at this early stage of the study might be considered harmless. 2 tabs. 8 refs

  10. Prophylaxis of radiogenic osteomyelitis of the jaw by thyrocalcitonine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of exogenous thyrocalcitonine (TC) on the result of a fractionated gamma irradiation of the system of teeth and jaws of dogs with a total dose of 60 Gy (756 ret) with a functional overload of their parodontium (FOP) was studied. The FOP was found to intensify radiation injuries, even an osteomyelitis of the jaw may develop. A prophylactic 30-day treatment with parenteral administration of TC in an amount of 1 MRC unit per 1 kg body weight decreased the extent of radiation injuries to the structures of the dental bed, normalized the metabolism of tissues of the region studied and prevented osteomyelitis of the jaw. A repeated prophylactic treatment further improved the results. It is concluded that TC can be recommended as an agent for the prophylaxis of a radioosteomyelitis. (author)

  11. Interest of stable iodine prophylaxis in accidental situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the case of an accident on a nuclear reactor, radioactive substances could be released in atmosphere. among these substances, the presence of radioactive isotopes of iodine is a constant, that, in the lack of efficient counter measures could lead to an internal contamination, principally by inhalation but also by contaminated food ingestion. The radioactive iodine accumulate in the thyroid, leading to an exposure that at term can induce an increase of a cancer risk for this gland among the most sensitive persons, especially the children. It exists a simple and efficient protection mean: the taking of a tablet of stable iodine. In this article, the interest of the prophylaxis by stable iodine in accidental situation is tackled under the shape of eleven independent questions/answers, allowing a reading in several times but also the research of response elements to a question that the reader could wonder. (N.C.)

  12. Thyroid cancers after Chernobyl: importance of prophylaxis by KI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1990, more than 400 thyroid cancers have been observed in children in southern Belarus and northern Ukraine. Screening is of minor significance on account of the highly increased incidence of these cancers, their agressivity and frequent diagnosis at a metastatic stage. Several arguments speak for the responsibility of the Chernobyl accident: (1) importance of the initial contamination; (2) geographical distribution, the incidence being higher in the more severely contaminated areas; (3) time distribution, the incidence increasing steadily since 1990. Iodine 131 is very likely the agent responsible for this increase. These data underline the significance of KI prophylaxis of thyroid irradiation in case of nuclear power plant accident, especially for children on whom it is practically without any danger. (author). 23 refs., 1 tab

  13. Cranial radiation necessary for CNS prophylaxis in pediatric NHL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The records of 95 consecutive children less than or equal to 21 years of age with previously untreated diffuse histology NHL registered in our protocols from 1978 to 1983 were reviewed. Seventy-nine patients were considered eligible for analysis. The histologic subtypes represented included lymphoblastic (LB) 37%; histiocytic (DHL) 29%; undifferentiated (DU) 19%; poorly differentiated (DPDL) 9%; and unclassified (UNHL) 6%. Distribution of the patients according to stage showed Stage I, 0%; Stage II, 11%; Stage III, 53%; Stage IV, 36%. Four different Memorial Hospital protocols for systemic chemotherapy were used (LSA2L2 73%; L10 9%; L17 10%; L17M 8%); however, the IT (intrathecal) chemotherapy was uniform (Methotrexate: 6.0-6.25 mg/M2 per treatment course) and was included in the induction, consolidation, and maintenance phases of all treatment protocols. Cranial radiation was included in the induction, consolidation, and maintenance phases of all treatment protocols. Cranial radiation was not included in the CNS prophylaxis program. The overall median time of follow-up was 43 months. The overall CNS relapse rate was 6.3%; however, the incidence of CNS lymphoma presenting as the first isolated site of relapse in patients in otherwise complete remission (minimum follow-up of 19 months with 97% of patients off treatment) was only 1/58 (1.7%). Our data suggest that IT chemotherapy when given in combination with modern aggressive systemic combination chemotherapy, and without cranial radiation appears to be a highly effective modality for CNS prophylaxis regardless of stage, histology, or bone marrow or mediastinal involvement. (Abstract Truncated)

  14. Acute ischaemias as a result of vasospasm following thrombosis prophylaxis with Dihydroergotamine/Heparin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meybier, H.; Kraemer, K.L.; Maeder, N.; Allenberg, J.R.; Kretzschmar, U.

    1987-08-01

    Vasospastic reactions with ischaemia following combined thrombosis prophylaxis with dihydroergotamine and heparin were reported in literature several times. This article reports 3 cases involving ischaemia following traumas to the limb, and 2 cases with ischaemia developing after surgical traumas. Acute renal insufficiency was observed in a patient with spasms of the renal arteries for the first time who sustained renal insufficiency requiring dialysis as a late sequela. Though rare, thromboembolism prophylaxis using dihydroergotamine/heparin may cause serious sequelae; hence, any combined thrombosis prophylaxis with require a critical indication. (orig.)

  15. Acute ischaemias as a result of vasospasm following thrombosis prophylaxis with Dihydroergotamine/Heparin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasospastic reactions with ischaemia following combined thrombosis prophylaxis with dihydroergotamine and heparin were reported in literature several times. This article reports 3 cases involving ischaemia following traumas to the limb, and 2 cases with ischaemia developing after surgical traumas. Acute renal insufficiency was observed in a patient with spasms of the renal arteries for the first time who sustained renal insufficiency requiring dialysis as a late sequela. Though rare, thromboembolism prophylaxis using dihydroergotamine/heparin may cause serious sequelae; hence, any combined thrombosis prophylaxis with require a critical indication. (orig.)

  16. Contemporary approach in diagnostics, prophylaxis and treatment of footrot in sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radojičić Biljana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Footrot in sheep is a chronic, infectious disease of the acropodium in sheep, less frequently in goats and mountain goats, of a multifactor nature, which is also considered to be a disease of poor management in sheep breeding. Over the recent years, Dichelobacter nodosus is given as the main cause, previously known as Bacteroides nodosus. Coaction with several other saprophytic and pathogenic bacteria is no longer so significant in etiopathogenesis, and it is considered more important to determine the virulence of the strain D. nodosus. The disease is called contagiousus ovine digital dermatitis (CODD if the infection was caused by a very virulent strain of D. nodosus, and the disease often ends with the so-called removal of the foot. A speedy identification of the agent can provide insight into the clinical form of the disease, its course and predicted outcome. A benign strain of the agent causes only a mild to medium virulent laminitis, with poorly expressed interdigital dermatitis, when the animal openly limps on one or two legs. A very virulent strain leads to a grave form of infectious interdigital dermatitis, as a supurous-necrotic dermatitis, with significant damage to the bone and expressed limping of the animal. Footrot is present in sheep in almost all countries of the world, in particular in countries with a developed sheep production (New Zealand, Australia and the United Kingdom, where it causes significant economic damages. In our country, footrot in sheep occurs mainly in the Raska district, eastern Serbia and Vojvodina province, but the percentage varies from herd to herd. The irregular and incorrect processing of hoofs (an important zootechnical measure significantly contributes to the occurrence and spreading of this disease, as well as a series of other contributing factors, such as soft and moist earch, bad climatic conditions (warm and humid weather. In activities on prevention and prophylaxis of this disease, as well as the

  17. Management Options For Reducing The Release Of Antibiotics And Antibiotic Resistance Genes To The Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: There is growing concern worldwide about the role of polluted soil and water - 77 environments in the development and dissemination of antibiotic resistance. 78 Objective: To identify management options for reducing the spread of antibiotics and 79 antibiotic resist...

  18. Background antibiotic resistance patterns in antibiotic-free pastured poultry production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibiotic resistance (AR) is a significant public health issue, and agroecosystems are often viewed as major environmental sources of antibiotic resistant foodborne pathogens. While the use of antibiotics in agroecosystems can potentially increase AR, appropriate background resistance levels in th...

  19. Antibiotic allergy in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, J S; Nasser, S

    2005-06-01

    Allergic reactions to antibiotics are more common in cystic fibrosis (CF) than in the general population. This in part is due to the improving survival in adults with CF and the increased use of high dose intravenous antibiotics. While some are immediate anaphylaxis type (IgE mediated) reactions, the majority are late onset and may have non-specific features such as rash and fever. Piperacillin has consistently been found to have the highest rate of reported reactions (30-50%). There is a low risk of cross reactions between penicillins and other non-beta-lactam classes of antibiotics in penicillin skin prick positive patients. Carbapenems should only be used with extreme caution in patients with positive skin prick tests to penicillin. However, aztreonam can be used safely in patients who are penicillin allergic with positive skin prick reactions. The aminoglycosides are a relatively uncommon cause of allergic reactions, but patients who react to one member of the family may cross react with other aminoglycosides. Desensitisation relies on the incremental introduction of small quantities of the allergen and has been used for penicillins, ceftazidime, tobramycin and ciprofloxacin and must be repeated before each course. Personalized cards should be regularly updated for patients who develop allergic reactions. Written instructions on the emergency treatment of allergic reactions should be provided to patients self-administering intravenous antibiotics at home. Further research is required to identify risk factors and predictors for antibiotic allergy. PMID:15923254

  20. Fungal Biotransformation of Tetracycline Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Zhuo; Salim, Angela A; Khalil, Zeinab; Bernhardt, Paul V; Capon, Robert J

    2016-08-01

    The commercial antibiotics tetracycline (3), minocycline (4), chlortetracycline (5), oxytetracycline (6), and doxycycline (7) were biotransformed by a marine-derived fungus Paecilomyces sp. to yield seco-cyclines A-H (9-14, 18 and 19) and hemi-cyclines A-E (20-24). Structures were assigned by detailed spectroscopic analysis, and in the case of 10 X-ray crystallography. Parallel mechanisms account for substrate-product specificity, where 3-5 yield seco-cyclines and 6 and 7 yield hemi-cyclines. The susceptibility of 3-7 to fungal biotransformation is indicative of an unexpected potential for tetracycline "degradation" (i.e., antibiotic resistance) in fungal genomes. Significantly, the fungal-derived tetracycline-like viridicatumtoxins are resistant to fungal biotransformation, providing chemical insights that could inform the development of new tetracycline antibiotics resistant to enzymatic degradation. PMID:27419475

  1. Hospital admission of high risk infants for respiratory syncytial virus infection: implications for palivizumab prophylaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Heikkinen, T.; Valkonen, H; Lehtonen, L; Vainionpaa, R; Ruuskanen, O.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the rates of hospital admission for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection among children born at different gestational ages. To assess the theoretical impact of palivizumab prophylaxis on admissions for RSV infection.

  2. Itraconazole for secondary prophylaxis of invasive fungal infection in patients undergoing chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施继敏

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of itraconazole for secondary prophylaxis of previous proven or probable invasive fungal infection (IFI) in patients undergoing chemotherapy or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in agranulocytosis state.

  3. Prophylaxis and treatment of the endemic goiter in groups of the high risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article describes particularities of pregnancy of women who have endemic goiter and efficiency of on going therapy, and different methods of prophylaxis among pregnant women from high risk groups on development of such pathology

  4. Stress ulcer prophylaxis versus placebo or no prophylaxis in critically ill patients. A systematic review of randomised clinical trials with meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Mette; Perner, Anders; Wetterslev, Jørn;

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the effects of stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) versus placebo or no prophylaxis on all-cause mortality, gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and hospital-acquired pneumonia in adult critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). METHODS: We performed a systematic review using...... meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis (TSA). Eligible trials were randomised clinical trials comparing proton pump inhibitors or histamine 2 receptor antagonists with either placebo or no prophylaxis. Two reviewers independently assessed studies for inclusion and extracted data. The Cochrane...... finding. CONCLUSIONS: This systematic review using meta-analysis and TSA demonstrated that both the quality and the quantity of evidence supporting the use of SUP in adult ICU patients is low. Consequently, large randomised clinical trials are warranted....

  5. Antibiotics and the resistant microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Morten; Dantas, Gautam

    2011-01-01

    . Less appreciated are the concomitant changes in the human microbiome in response to these assaults and their contribution to clinical resistance problems. Studies have shown that pervasive changes to the human microbiota result from antibiotic treatment and that resistant strains can persist for years....... Additionally, culture-independent functional characterization of the resistance genes from the microbiome has demonstrated a close evolutionary relationship between resistance genes in the microbiome and in pathogens. Application of these techniques and novel cultivation methods are expected to significantly...... expand our understanding of the interplay between antibiotics and the microbiome....

  6. Antibiotic allergy in cystic fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Parmar, J.; Nasser, S.

    2005-01-01

    Allergic reactions to antibiotics are more common in cystic fibrosis (CF) than in the general population. This in part is due to the improving survival in adults with CF and the increased use of high dose intravenous antibiotics. While some are immediate anaphylaxis type (IgE mediated) reactions, the majority are late onset and may have non-specific features such as rash and fever. Piperacillin has consistently been found to have the highest rate of reported reactions (30–50%). There is a low...

  7. No Recurrence of Pneumocystis jirovecii Pneumonia after Solid Organ Transplantation Regardless of Secondary Prophylaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Tark; Sung, Heungsup; Lee, Yu-Mi; Hong, Hyo-Lim; Kim, Sung-Han; Choi, Sang-Ho; Woo, Jun Hee; Kim, Yang Soo; Lee, Sang-Oh

    2012-01-01

    There are no data on the efficacy of secondary prophylaxis against Pneumocystis pneumonia after solid organ transplantation. Therefore, we investigated the rate of recurrence of Pneumocystis pneumonia after solid organ transplantation in a retrospective cohort study. Between 2005 and 2011, a total of 41 recipients recovered from Pneumocystis pneumonia. Of these, 22 (53.7%) received secondary prophylaxis. None of the 41 recipients experienced recurrence of Pneumocystis pneumonia during the fol...

  8. Method of the Autoimmune Process Development Prophylaxis at Operative Treatment of a Nodular Goiter

    OpenAIRE

    Menkov A.V.

    2010-01-01

    Aim of investigation is a detection of the autoimmune process development prophylaxis new method effectiveness at operative treatment of a nodular goiter. Materials and Methods. The results of a clinical observation of 19 patients, undergoing the extracapsular hemithyroidectomy, are analyzed. A new method of the autoimmune process prophylaxis was used in 9 cases at operative interventions. Results. There were no complications after operations. The titers of antibodies to a thyroid per...

  9. Prophylaxis and treatment of invasive aspergillosis with voriconazole, posaconazole and caspofungin - review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Karthaus M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Major progress for the management of invasive aspergillosis has come from the introduction of new antifungals since the late 1990s. Although mortality of invasive aspergillosis remains as high as 30-50%. Backbone of management are prophylaxis, early diagnosis and early initiation of antifungals for reduction of invasive aspergillosis related mortality. Randomized trials have been undertaken for the prophylaxis as well as treatment of invasive aspergillosis in the last two decades. Po...

  10. Clinical Utility of Antithrombotic Prophylaxis in ART Procedures: An Italian Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Elvira Grandone; Michela Villani; Tiscia, Giovanni L.; Francesco Dentali; Donatella Colaizzo; Filomena Cappucci; Lucia Fischetti; Walter Ageno; Maurizio Margaglione

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The usefulness of antithrombotic prophylaxis in management of Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART) is questionable. OBJECTIVES: We prospectively examined the contribution of an antithrombotic prophylaxis in influencing clinical pregnancy and live-birth in an unselected cohort of women approaching ART. PATIENTS/METHODS: 1107 women with fertility problems and a valid indication for ART were recruited. Baseline and follow-up information of obstetric outcomes and antithrombotic tr...

  11. [SOME ASPECTS OF NON-SPECIFIC PROPHYLAXIS AND THERAPY OF ESPECIALLY DANGEROUS INFECTIONS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippenko, A V; Omelchenko, N D; Ivanova, I A; Bespalova, I A; Doroshenko, E P; Galicheva, A L

    2015-01-01

    Recently, due to spread of dangerous and especially dangerous infections much attention is given to development of complex approaches to their prophylaxis and therapy. Data on use of immune modulators, cytokines, probiotics, preparations of plant origin for non-specific prophylaxis of especially dangerous infections are analyzed in the review, and expediency of their combined use with specific and emergency prophlaxis of these diseases is evaluated. PMID:26829862

  12. Clozapine Therapy for Long-Term Prophylaxis in Bipolar Patients; Prescription Rates and Efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Tonguc Berkol

    2014-01-01

    Aim: It is reported that clozapine maintenance treatment could be effective in treatment-resistant bipolar patients. The aim of this study is to evaluate the prescription rates of clozapine, features of patients on clozapine prophylaxis and efficacy of clozapine prophylaxis in patients with bipolar disorder. Material and Method: 280 patients with DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for bipolar disorder, type I were included in the study. The patients%u2019 medical records and life-charts were reviewed...

  13. Prophylaxis of thromboembolism in pulmonary artery by means of a filter implanted through the skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Implantation of REPTELA intravenous filter (X-ray-endovascular prophylaxis of thromboembolism in pulmonary arterie) was applied to 53 patients. Diagnosis of pulmonary artery thromboembolism (TELA) was verified by contrast angiopulmonography and perfussion scintigraphy of the lungs. Description of through-skin implantation of REPTELA filter is given. It is shown, that the given method provides for reliable prophylaxis of repeated thromboembolisms in pulmonary artery

  14. Increase in prophylaxis of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis by pharmacist feedback : a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Klop, C.; de Vries, F.; Vinks, T; Kooij, M. J.; Van Staa, T. P.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Egberts, A C G; Bouvy, M.L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study was to determine whether feedback by pharmacists to prescribers of patients eligible for glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis prophylaxis would stimulate the prescribing of osteoporosis prophylaxis. The intervention did not significantly increase the prescribing of bisphosphonates in the total study population, but a significant increase was seen in men and in the elderly. However, the proportion of bisphosphonate-treated patients remained low. Introduction The ai...

  15. Clozapine Therapy for Long-Term Prophylaxis in Bipolar Patients; Prescription Rates and Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonguc Berkol

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: It is reported that clozapine maintenance treatment could be effective in treatment-resistant bipolar patients. The aim of this study is to evaluate the prescription rates of clozapine, features of patients on clozapine prophylaxis and efficacy of clozapine prophylaxis in patients with bipolar disorder. Material and Method: 280 patients with DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for bipolar disorder, type I were included in the study. The patients%u2019 medical records and life-charts were reviewed retrospectively and patients who took clozapine for maintenance treatment for at least one year were identified. Results: Twelve of 280 patients (4.8 % took clozapine for prophylaxis for at least one period during lifetime. Among them 7 patients have only received clozapine, while 5 patients have used combination of clozapine and valproic acid. All of these twelve patients had resistance to at least two different maintenance treatments before clozapine prophylaxis. However, positive results were observed in all of the patients with clozapine prophylaxis. Discussion: These findings suggest that clozapine is regarded as an effective prophylactic choice for treatment of resistant patients with bipolar disorder. Consequently, this study demonstrates effectiveness and safety of clozapine use even in severe patients refractory to various strategies of prophylaxis. Retrospective nature of our study constitutes a limitation. However, when considering limited number of studies on this subject, it may still have a significant contribution. But more comprehensive prospective controlled studies are still needed.

  16. Incidence of deep vein thrombosis and quality of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Okuhara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to determine the incidence of deep vein thrombosis and prophylaxis quality in hospitalized patients undergoing vascular and orthopedic surgical procedures. METHODS: we evaluated 296 patients, whose incidence of deep venous thrombosis was studied by vascular ultrasonography. Risk factors for venous thrombosis were stratified according the Caprini model. To assess the quality of prophylaxis we compared the adopted measures with the prophylaxis guidelines of the American College of Chest Physicians. RESULTS: the overall incidence of deep venous thrombosis was 7.5%. As for the risk groups, 10.8% were considered low risk, 14.9%moderate risk, 24.3% high risk and 50.5% very high risk. Prophylaxis of deep venous thrombosis was correct in 57.7%. In groups of high and very high risk, adequate prophylaxis rates were 72.2% and 71.6%, respectively. Excessive use of chemoprophylaxis was seen in 68.7% and 61.4% in the low and moderate-risk groups, respectively. CONCLUSION: although most patients are deemed to be at high and very high risk for deep vein thrombosis, deficiency in the application of prophylaxis persists in medical practice.

  17. Comparison of Chemical and Mechanical Prophylaxis of Venous Thromboembolism in Nonsurgical Mechanically Ventilated Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dany Gaspard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Thromboembolic events are major causes of morbidity, and prevention is important. We aimed to compare chemical prophylaxis (CP and mechanical prophylaxis (MP as methods of prevention in nonsurgical patients on mechanical ventilation. Methods. We performed a retrospective study of adult patients admitted to the Cooper University Hospital ICU between 2002 and 2010. Patients on one modality of prophylaxis throughout their stay were included. The CP group comprised 329 patients and the MP group 419 patients. The primary outcome was incidence of thromboembolic events. Results. Acuity measured by APACHE II score was comparable between the two groups (p=0.215. Univariate analysis showed 1 DVT/no PEs in the CP group and 12 DVTs/1 PE in the MP group (p=0.005. Overall mortality was 34.3% and 50.6%, respectively. ICU LOS was similar. Hospital LOS was shorter in the MP group. Multivariate analysis showed a significantly higher incidence of events in the MP prophylaxis group (odds ratio 9.9. After excluding patients admitted for bleeding in both groups, repeat analysis showed again increased events in the MP group (odds ratio 2.9 but this result did not reach statistical significance. Conclusion. Chemical methods for DVT/PE prophylaxis seem superior to mechanical prophylaxis in nonsurgical patients on mechanical ventilation and should be used when possible.

  18. Probiotic approach to prevent antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouwehand, Arthur C; Forssten, Sofia; Hibberd, Ashley A; Lyra, Anna; Stahl, Buffy

    2016-06-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms, mainly belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, although also strain of other species are commercialized, that have a beneficial effect on the host. From the perspective of antibiotic use, probiotics have been observed to reduce the risk of certain infectious disease such as certain types of diarrhea and respiratory tract infection. This may be accompanied with a reduced need of antibiotics for secondary infections. Antibiotics tend to be effective against most common diseases, but increasingly resistance is being observed among pathogens. Probiotics are specifically selected to not contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance and not carry transferable antibiotic resistance. Concomitant use of probiotics with antibiotics has been observed to reduce the incidence, duration and/or severity of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. This contributes to better adherence to the antibiotic prescription and thereby reduces the evolution of resistance. To what extent probiotics directly reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance is still much under investigation; but maintaining a balanced microbiota during antibiotic use may certainly provide opportunities for reducing the spread of resistances. Key messages Probiotics may reduce the risk for certain infectious diseases and thereby reduce the need for antibiotics. Probiotics may reduce the risk for antibiotic-associated diarrhea Probiotics do not contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance and may even reduce it. PMID:27092975

  19. Cohort Study of Intracameral Moxifloxacin in Postoperative Endophthalmitis Prophylaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Virgilio Galvis; Alejandro Tello; Mary Alejandra Sánchez; Paul Anthony Camacho

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a cohort study to evaluate post-cataract surgery endophthalmitis rates in relation to prophylactic intracameral moxifloxacin administration. A total of 2332 patients (2674 eyes) who underwent phacoemulsification by a single surgeon from January 2007 through December 2012 were included in the study. A total of 1056 eyes did not receive intracameral prophylactic moxifloxacin and the antibiotic was injected in 1618 eyes. The incidence of presumed postoperative endophthalmitis in the...

  20. Use of Antibiotics in Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, Anton; Broe, Anne; Aabenhus, Rune;

    2015-01-01

    Background: We aimed to describe the use of systemic antibiotics among children in Denmark. Methods: National data on drug use in Denmark were extracted from the Danish National Prescription Database. We used prescription data for all children in Denmark aged 0 to 11 years from January 1, 2000 to...

  1. ANTIBIOTIC THERAPY FOR ENT INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Turovsky

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper outlines basic principles of and new approaches to antibiotic therapy for ENT and upper respiratory tract infections, from point of view of the authors, on the basis of the data available in Russian and foreign literature.

  2. Antibiotics and the burn patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravat, François; Le-Floch, Ronan; Vinsonneau, Christophe; Ainaud, Pierre; Bertin-Maghit, Marc; Carsin, Hervé; Perro, Gérard

    2011-02-01

    Infection is a major problem in burn care and especially when it is due to bacteria with hospital-acquired multi-resistance to antibiotics. Moreover, when these bacteria are Gram-negative organisms, the most effective molecules are 20 years old and there is little hope of any new product available even in the distant future. Therefore, it is obvious that currently available antibiotics should not be misused. With this aim in mind, the following review was conducted by a group of experts from the French Society for Burn Injuries (SFETB). It examined key points addressing the management of antibiotics for burn patients: when to use or not, time of onset, bactericidia, combination, adaptation, de-escalation, treatment duration and regimen based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of these compounds. The authors also considered antibioprophylaxis and some other key points such as: infection diagnosis criteria, bacterial inoculae and local treatment. French guidelines for the use of antibiotics in burn patients have been designed up from this work. PMID:20510518

  3. Do We Need New Antibiotics?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Spížek, Jaroslav; Novotná, Jitka; Janata, Jiří

    Seoul : COEX Convention and Exhibition Center , 2009. s. 218-218. [Annual World Congress of Industrial Biotechnology 2009 /2./. 05.04.2009-07.04.2009, Seoul] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500200810 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : antibiotics Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  4. Antibiotic associated diarrhoea: Infectious causes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayyagari A

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Nearly 25% of antibiotic associated diarrhoeas (AAD is caused by Clostridium difficile, making it the commonest identified and treatable pathogen. Other pathogens implicated infrequently include Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella oxytoca, Candida spp. and Salmonella spp. Most mild cases of AAD are due to non-infectious causes which include reduced break down of primary bile acids and decrease metabolism of carbohydrates, allergic or toxic effects of antibiotic on intestinal mucosa and pharmacological effect on gut motility. The antibiotics most frequently associated with C. difficile associated diarrhoea are clindamycin, cephalosporin, ampicillin and amoxicillin. Clinical presentation may vary from mild diarrhoea to severe colitis and pseudomembranous colitis associated with high morbidity and mortality. The most sensitive and specific diagnostic test for C. difficile infection is tissue culture assay for cytotoxicity of toxin B. Commercial ELISA kits are available. Though less sensitive, they are easy to perform and are rapid. Withdrawal of precipitating antibiotic is all that is needed for control of mild to moderate cases. For severe cases of AAD, oral metronidazole is the first line of treatment, and oral vancomycin is the second choice. Probiotics have been used for recurrent cases.

  5. Antibiotic resistance pattern in uropathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta V; Yadav A; Joshi R

    2002-01-01

    Uropathogenic strains from inpatient and outpatient departments were studied from April 1997 to March 1999 for their susceptibility profiles. The various isolates were Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, Acinetobacter baumanii and Enterococcus faecalis. Antibiotic susceptibility pattern of these isolates revealed that for outpatients, first generation cephalosporins, nitrofurantoin, norfloxacin/ciprofloxacin were effective for treatment of urina...

  6. A study of antibiotic prescribing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaruseviciene, L.; Radzeviciene-Jurgute, R.; Jurgutis, A.; Lazarus, J.V.; Ovhed, I.; Strandberg, E.L.; Bjerrum, L.

    2012-01-01

    clinically or pharmacologically. Methods. 22 Lithuanian and 29 Russian GPs participated in five focus group discussions. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Results. We identified four main thematic categories: patients' faith in antibiotics as medication for upper respiratory tract infections...

  7. Antibiotics, Formula Feeding Might Change Baby's 'Microbiome'

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159392.html Antibiotics, Formula Feeding Might Change Baby's 'Microbiome' C-section birth ... microbiomes" are altered by cesarean births, antibiotics and formula feeding. "The microbiome is really important in how ...

  8. Antibiotic 'Report Card' Drills Guidelines into Dentists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 160702.html Antibiotic 'Report Card' Drills Guidelines Into Dentists Seeing their prescription rates leads some to change ... 30, 2016 TUESDAY, Aug. 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Dentists are less likely to prescribe antibiotics for patients ...

  9. FDA Bolsters Warnings about Class of Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html FDA Bolsters Warnings About Class of Antibiotics Fluoroquinolones such as Cipro, Levaquin should be reserved for ... label warnings on a class of antibiotics called fluoroquinolones because the drugs can lead to disabling side ...

  10. Danger of Antibiotic Overuse (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... don’t work against them. This is called bacterial resistance or antibiotic resistance. Treating these resistant bacteria requires ... child gets sick? To minimize the risk of bacterial resistance, keep these tips in mind: Take antibiotics only ...

  11. Antibiotic and Antimicrobial Resistance: Threat Report 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Antibiotic Resistance Threats in the United States, 2013 Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir This report, Antibiotic resistance threats in the United States, 2013 gives a first- ...

  12. Antibiotics: Use and misuse in pediatric dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    F C Peedikayil

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotics are commonly used in dentistry for prophylactic as well as for therapeutic purposes. Most often antibiotics are used in unwarranted situations, which may give rise to resistant bacterial strains. Dentists want to make their patients well and to prevent unpleasant complications. These desires, coupled with the belief that many oral problems are infectious, stimulate the prescribing of antibiotics. Good knowledge about the indications of antibiotics is the need of the hour in prescr...

  13. Squalamine: an aminosterol antibiotic from the shark.

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, K.S.; Wehrli, S; Roder, H; Rogers, M.; Forrest, J N; McCrimmon, D; Zasloff, M.

    1993-01-01

    In recent years, a variety of low molecular weight antibiotics have been isolated from diverse animal species. These agents, which include peptides, lipids, and alkaloids, exhibit antibiotic activity against environmental microbes and are thought to play a role in innate immunity. We report here the discovery of a broad-spectrum steroidal antibiotic isolated from tissues of the dogfish shark Squalus acanthias. This water-soluble antibiotic, which we have named squalamine, exhibits potent bact...

  14. Cost–utility analysis of prophylaxis versus treatment on demand in severe hemophilia A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elisa Mancuso

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Giorgio L Colombo1,2, Sergio Di Matteo2, Maria Elisa Mancuso3, Elena Santagostino31University of Pavia, School of Pharmacy, Pavia, Italy; 2S.A.V.E. Studi Analisi Valutazioni Economiche, Milan, Italy; 3Angelo Bianchi Bonomi Hemophilia and Thrombosis Center, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, ItalyBackground: Individuals with severe hemophilia A have reduced blood levels of clotting factor VIII (FVIII leading to recurrent bleeding into joints and muscles. Primary prophylaxis with clotting factor concentrates started early in childhood prevents joint bleeds, thus avoiding joint damage and improving people's quality of life. There remain significant differences in the implementation of primary prophylaxis worldwide mainly due to the cost of prophylaxis compared with treatment on demand.Objective: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of primary prophylaxis with FVIII concentrates versus secondary prophylaxis, versus treatment on demand, and versus a "hybrid" (primary prophylaxis followed by on-demand treatment in adults in individuals with severe hemophilia A.Methods: A Markov model was developed and run using different sources of clinical, cost, and utility data. The model was populated with a hypothetical cohort of 100 individuals with severe hemophilia A. The perspective of the Italian National Health System was used.Results: The baseline results showed that primary and secondary prophylaxis is cost-effective compared both with treatment on demand and with a hybrid strategy. The incremental costs per quality-adjusted life-year gained for individuals with hemophilia A receiving primary and secondary prophylaxis were €40,229 to €40,236 versus an on-demand strategy. However, the sensitivity analyses performed showed that the results were sensitive to the unit cost of clotting FVIII, bleeding frequency, and the discount rate.Conclusion: Although primary prophylaxis is a costly treatment, our results show that it is

  15. Social prophylaxis through distant corpse removal in ants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, Lise; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis; Detrain, Claire

    2012-10-01

    Living in groups raises important issues concerning waste management and related sanitary risks. Social insects such as ants live at high densities with genetically related individuals within confined and humid nests, all these factors being highly favorable for the spread of pathogens. Therefore, in addition to individual immunity, a social prophylaxis takes place, namely, by the removal of risky items such as corpses and their rejection at a distance from the ant nest. In this study, we investigate how Myrmica rubra workers manage to reduce encounters between potentially hazardous corpses and nestmates. Using both field and laboratory experiments, we describe how the spatial distribution and the removal distance of waste items vary as a function of their associated sanitary risks (inert item vs. corpse). In the field, corpse-carrying ants walked in a rather linear way away from the nest entrance and had an equal probability of choosing any direction. Therefore, they did not aggregate corpses in dedicated areas but scattered them in the environment. In both field and laboratory experiments, ants carrying corpses dropped their load in more remote—and less frequented—areas than workers carrying inert items. However, for equidistant areas, ants did not avoid dropping corpses at a location where they perceived area marking as a cue of high occupancy level by nestmates. Our results suggest that ants use distance to the nest rather than other occupancy cues to limit sanitary risks associated with dead nestmates.

  16. [Prophylaxis of thromboembolic complications in gynecological surgery (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorr, D M; Gruber, U F

    1977-04-01

    Eight prospective, controlled, randomised studies on the incidence of postoperative thrombosis in gynaecological patients receiving various drugs for prevention of thromboembolism are analysed. In all patients diagnosis had been established by objective means. The rate of thrombosis in patients without drug prophylaxis has been found to vary between 14 and 29%. Infusions of dextran as well as administration of low-dose subcutaneous heparin significantly reduce the incidence of deep vein thrombosis, even as compared to postoperative oral anticoagulation with cumarins. No difference has been found between dextran and oral anticoagulants, when cumarin adminstration was started before operation, nor between dextran and heparin. Aescin did not show any prophylactic effect. High age, severe leg-vein varicosis as well as surgery for malignant disease increase the risk of thrombosis. No significant influence of overweight, previous deep venous thrombosis, epidural anaesthesia or vaginal operation as compared to abdominal approach could be demonstrated. There are no properly controlled, prospective, randomised studies on the incidence of postoperative fatal pulmonary embolism as influenced by drugs in gynaecological surgery. PMID:870388

  17. Intrathecal therapy with 198Au-colloid for meningosis prophylaxis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telecobalt irradiation in combination with intrathecal (IT) methotrexate has been replaced by IT 198Au-colloid and methotrexate for meningosis prophylaxis in leukemia. Seventy-seven children received 56-200 MBq 198Au-colloid. The distribution was measured with a scintillation camera having a data processing facility. The radiopharmaceutical is adsorbed at the surface of the spaces with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) 10-20 h after application. The normal retention of the administered radioactivity in the intracranial subarachnoid space (ISS) and in the spinal subarachnoid space (SSS) were 52+-10% and 26+-9%, respectively. An impairment of the normal distribution was observed after IT methotrexate because of postinjection CSF leakage. The calculated readiation absorbed doses in the cerebral and spinal meninges at a depth of 0.01 cm, i.e. the thickness of the pia, were 45+-17 mGy and 189+-91 mGy, respectively, for 1 MBq administered 198Au-colloid. The dosimetry shows that an effective radiation absorbed dose of 18 Gy can be delivered to the cerebral meninges by the application of 400 MBq 198Au-colloid. (orig.)

  18. Prophylaxis of cytomegalovirus infection with ganciclovir in allogeneic marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic marrow transplantation. We studied 14 consecutive CMV-seropositive patients adding ganciclovir (2.5 mg/kg i.v. every 8 hours for 7 days prior to transplant and 6 mg/kg three times a week after neutrophils became >0.5x109/l and the patients were platelet transfusion-independent until d 70) to our previous prophylaxis regimen which consisted of intravenous immunoglobulin and acyclovir. The result was compared with 30 consecutive patients whom we studied with our previous regimen. The addition of ganciclovir did not cause any extra toxicities. The incidence of interstitial pneumonitis and cumulative probability of CMV excretion in the first 100 d post-transplantation was significantly reduced (p = 0.038 and p = 0.035 respectively). The result shows that addition of ganciclovir significantly decreased the incidence of CMV infection in the early post-transplantation period. (au)

  19. Osteoporosis prophylaxis in patients receiving chronic glucocorticoid therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIOP) is the most common form of secondary osteoporosis, yet few patients receive proper measures to prevent its development. We retrospectively searched prescription records to determine if patients receiving oral prednisolone were receiving prophylaxis or treatment for osteopenia and osteoporosis. Patients who were prescribed greater or equal to 7.5 milligrams of prednisolone for 6 months or longer during a 6- month period were identified through the prescription monitoring system. Demographic and clinical data were extracted from the patient records, and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scans were retrieved, when available. Use of oral calcium, vitamin D and anti-resorptives was recorded. One hundred males and 65 females were receiving oral prednisolone for a mean (SD) duration of 40.4 (29.9) months in males and 41.2 (36.4) months in females. Twenty-one females (12.7%) and 5 (3%) males had bone mineral density measured by DEXA. Of those, 10 (47.6%) females and 3 (50%) males were osteoporotic and 11(52.4%) females and 2 (40%) males were osteopenic. Calcium and vitamin D were prescribed to the majority of patients (60% to 80%), but none were prescribed antiresorptive/anabolic therapy. Patients in this study were neither investigated properly nor treated according to the minimum recommendations for the management of GIOP. Physician awareness about the prevention and treatment of GIOP should be a priority for the local health care system. (author)

  20. Antibiotic Resistance of Shigella Species in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Mehr-Movahed

    1987-07-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance in Shigella species has been showing a rising trend all over the world. This study was performed to discover the state of antibiotic resistance of Shigella species with regards to six common antibiotics in use in Iran.

  1. Excretion of Antibiotic Resistance Genes by Dairy Calves Fed Milk Replacers with Varying Doses of Antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Thames, Callie H; Pruden, Amy; James, Robert E.; Ray, Partha P.; Knowlton, Katharine F.

    2012-01-01

    Elevated levels of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in soil and water have been linked to livestock farms and in some cases feed antibiotics may select for antibiotic resistant gut microbiota. The purpose of this study was to examine the establishment of ARGs in the feces of calves receiving milk replacer containing no antibiotics versus subtherapeutic or therapeutic doses of tetracycline and neomycin. The effect of antibiotics on calf health was also of interest. Twenty-eight male and fema...

  2. Surface modeling of soil antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wen-jiao; Yue, Tian-xiang; Du, Zheng-ping; Wang, Zong; Li, Xue-wen

    2016-02-01

    Large numbers of livestock and poultry feces are continuously applied into soils in intensive vegetable cultivation areas, and then some veterinary antibiotics are persistent existed in soils and cause health risk. For the spatial heterogeneity of antibiotic residues, developing a suitable technique to interpolate soil antibiotic residues is still a challenge. In this study, we developed an effective interpolator, high accuracy surface modeling (HASM) combined vegetable types, to predict the spatial patterns of soil antibiotics, using 100 surface soil samples collected from an intensive vegetable cultivation area located in east of China, and the fluoroquinolones (FQs), including ciprofloxacin (CFX), enrofloxacin (EFX) and norfloxacin (NFX), were analyzed as the target antibiotics. The results show that vegetable type is an effective factor to be combined to improve the interpolator performance. HASM achieves less mean absolute errors (MAEs) and root mean square errors (RMSEs) for total FQs (NFX+CFX+EFX), NFX, CFX and EFX than kriging with external drift (KED), stratified kriging (StK), ordinary kriging (OK) and inverse distance weighting (IDW). The MAE of HASM for FQs is 55.1 μg/kg, and the MAEs of KED, StK, OK and IDW are 99.0 μg/kg, 102.8 μg/kg, 106.3 μg/kg and 108.7 μg/kg, respectively. Further, RMSE simulated by HASM for FQs (CFX, EFX and NFX) are 106.2 μg/kg (88.6 μg/kg, 20.4 μg/kg and 39.2 μg/kg), and less 30% (27%, 22% and 36%), 33% (27%, 27% and 43%), 38% (34%, 23% and 41%) and 42% (32%, 35% and 51%) than the ones by KED, StK, OK and IDW, respectively. HASM also provides better maps with more details and more consistent maximum and minimum values of soil antibiotics compared with the measured data. The better performance can be concluded that HASM takes the vegetable type information as global approximate information, and takes local sampling data as its optimum control constraints. PMID:26613514

  3. Recurrent urinary tract infections in children: Preventive interventions other than prophylactic antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewary, Kishor; Narchi, Hassib

    2015-06-26

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common childhood infections. Permanent renal cortical scarring may occur in affected children, especially with recurrent UTIs, leading to long-term complications such as hypertension and chronic renal failure. To prevent such damage, several interventions to prevent UTI recurrences have been tried. The most established and accepted prevention at present is low dose long-term antibiotic prophylaxis. However it has a risk of break through infections, adverse drug reactions and also the risk of developing antibiotic resistance. The search is therefore on-going to find a safer, effective and acceptable alternative. A recent meta-analysis did not support routine circumcision for normal boys with no risk factors. Vaccinium Macrocarpon (cranberry), commonly used against UTI in adult women, is also effective in reducing the number of recurrences and related antimicrobial use in children. Sodium pentosanpolysulfate, which prevents bacterial adherence to the uroepithelial cells in animal models, has shown conflicting results in human trials. When combined with antibiotic, Lactobacillus acidophilus (LA-5) and Bifidobacterium, by blocking the in vitro attachment of uropathogenic bacteria to uroepithelial cells, significantly reduce in the incidence of febrile UTIs. Deliberate colonization of the human urinary tract of patients with recurrent UTI with Escherichia-coli (E. coli) 83972 has resulted in subjective benefit and less UTI requiring treatment. The non-pathogenic E. coli isolate NU14 DeltawaaL is a candidate to develop live-attenuated vaccine for the treatment and prevention of acute and recurrent UTI. Diagnosing and treating dysfunctional elimination syndromes decrease the incidence of recurrent UTI. A meta-analysis found the lack of robust prospective randomized controlled trials limited the strength of the established guidelines for surgical management of vesicoureteral reflux. In conclusion, several interventions

  4. Use of antibiotics in plant agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockwell, V O; Duffy, B

    2012-04-01

    Antibiotics are essential for control of bacterial diseases of plants, especially fire blight of pear and apple and bacterial spot of peach. Streptomycin is used in several countries; the use of oxytetracycline, oxolinic acid and gentamicin is limited to only a few countries. Springtime antibiotic sprays suppress pathogen growth on flowers and leaf surfaces before infection; after infection, antibiotics are ineffective. Antibiotics are applied when disease risk is high, and consequently the majority of orchards are not treated annually. In 2009 in the United States, 16,465 kg (active ingredient) was applied to orchards, which is 0.12% of the total antibiotics used in animal agriculture. Antibiotics are active on plants for less than a week, and significant residues have not been found on harvested fruit. Antibiotics have been indispensable for crop protection in the United States for more than 50 years without reports of adverse effects on human health or persistent impacts on the environment. PMID:22849276

  5. Biosynthesis of Enediyne Antitumor Antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Van Lanen, Steven G.; Shen, Ben

    2008-01-01

    The enediyne polyketides are secondary metabolites isolated from a variety of Actinomycetes. All members share very potent anticancer and antibiotic activity, and prospects for the clinical application of the enediynes has been validated with the recent marketing of two enediyne derivatives as anticancer agents. The biosynthesis of these compounds is of interest because of the numerous structural features that are unique to the enediyne family. The gene cluster for five enediynes has now been...

  6. Uncialamycin, a new enediyne antibiotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Julian; Wang, Hao; Taylor, Terry; Warabi, Kaoru; Huang, Xin-Hui; Andersen, Raymond J

    2005-11-10

    [structure: see text] Laboratory cultures of an undescribed streptomycete obtained from the surface of a British Columbia lichen produce uncialamycin (1), a new enediyne antibiotic. The structure of uncialamycin (1) has been elucidated by analysis of spectroscopic data. Uncialamycin (1) exhibits potent in vitro antibacterial activity against gram-positive and gram-negative human pathogens, including Burkholderia cepacia, a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:16268546

  7. Minocycline: far beyond an antibiotic

    OpenAIRE

    Garrido-Mesa, N; Zarzuelo, A; Gálvez, J

    2013-01-01

    Minocycline is a second-generation, semi-synthetic tetracycline that has been in therapeutic use for over 30 years because of its antibiotic properties against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. It is mainly used in the treatment of acne vulgaris and some sexually transmitted diseases. Recently, it has been reported that tetracyclines can exert a variety of biological actions that are independent of their anti-microbial activity, including anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic acti...

  8. Bacterial infections: antibiotics and decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Dinah

    Infectious disease is caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa and micro-organisms including the mycoplasmas, rickettsiae and chlamydiae. Most of the infections commonly encountered in the UK are caused either by bacteria or viruses. This article describes bacterial structure and function to explain how antibiotics work and the processes of decontamination such as cleaning, disinfection and sterilisation, which are important in infection control. PMID:15224613

  9. Primary or secondary antifungal prophylaxis in patients with hematological maligancies: efficacy and damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gedik H

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Habip Gedik,1 Funda Şimşek,1 Taner Yildirmak,1 Arzu Kantürk,1 Deniz Arica,2 Demet Aydin,2 Naciye Demirel,2 Osman Yokuş21Department of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, 2Department of Hematology, Ministry of Health Okmeydani Training and Research Hospital, İstanbul, TurkeyBackground: Patients with hematological malignancies often develop febrile neutropenia (FN as a complication of cancer chemotherapy. Primary or secondary antifungal prophylaxis is recommended for patients with hematological malignancies to reduce the risk of invasive fungal infection (IFI. This study retrospectively evaluated the efficacy and potential harm of administration of primary and secondary antifungal prophylaxis to patients with hematological malignancies at one hospital.Methods: All patients with hematological malignancies older than 14 years of age who had experienced at least one FN attack during chemotherapy while being treated at one hospital between November 2010 and November 2012 were retrospectively evaluated.Results: A total of 282 FN episodes in 126 consecutive patients were examined during a 2-year study period. The mean patient age was 51.73±14.4 years (range: 17–82 years, and 66 patients were male. Primary prophylaxis with posaconazole was administered to 13 patients and systemic antifungal treatment under induction or consolidation chemotherapy to seven patients. Of 26 patients who received secondary antifungal prophylaxis with either oral voriconazole (n=17 or posaconazole (n=6 during 46 FN episodes, systemic antifungal therapy was administered in 16 of 38 episodes and three of eight episodes, respectively. Secondary antifungal prophylaxis with caspofungin was found effective in treating six FN episodes in three patients who had experienced at least two persistent candidemia attacks. The mortality rates associated with IFI were 9% in the first year, 2% in the second year, and 6% overall. The mortality rates associated with candidemia

  10. Pre-exposure prophylaxis: where are we in Europe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molina JM

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite major advances in HIV therapy, the number of new HIV infections remains very high, even in high-income countries where resurgence among men who have sex with men (MSM has been witnessed. New prevention strategies have therefore to be assessed in order to curb the incidence of HIV infection. Recent studies have explored the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy (ART for HIV prevention and have generally yielded encouraging results. ART has been used successfully to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV, HIV acquisition following occupational or sexual exposure to HIV (post-exposure prophylaxis, and more recently, to reduce the risk of HIV transmission within a serodiscordant couple by treating the HIV-positive partner (HPTN 052 study. Another possible use of ART in prevention is pre-exposure prophylaxis, where ART is taken by an HIV-seronegative individual before HIV exposure. This PrEP strategy has been validated in animal models and more recently assessed in clinical trials in humans. The results of six large efficacy trials of PrEP are now available, but results have been inconsistent. The use of tenofovir gel in women at higher risk in Sub-Saharan Africa has shown efficacy when given before and after sex in the Caprisa 004 study (reduction of 39% of the incidence of HIV, whereas no efficacy was shown with daily use in the VOICE trial. Similarly, daily oral PrEP with tenofovir or tenofovir and emtricitabine has proved effective in the Iprex trial in MSM (reduction of 42% of HIV incidence, in the Partners PrEP study (reduction of 67 to 75% in HIV incidence and in the TDF-2 trial (reduction of 63% in HIV incidence, but not in the Fem-PrEP or the VOICE trials in women. There are many potential explanations for these apparently conflicting results, such as the populations in which these strategies have been assessed, the differential pharmacokinetics of ART in the male and female genital tracts and most likely the high level of

  11. Transgender Women in Clinical Trials of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Robert M; Sevelius, Jae M; Guanira, Juan V; Aguilar, Jana Villayzan; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Deutsch, Madeline B

    2016-08-15

    Lessons were learned with trans women who participated (as volunteers and investigators) in trials of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Trans women are not men. Compared with men who have sex with men, trans women trial participants were more likely to be involved with transactional sex, had more sexual partners, and were less likely to have PrEP medications detected in blood. Trans women define themselves differently in different cultures. One best practice is to ask at least 2 gender questions: sex assigned at birth and current gender. More information is needed to fully situate PrEP efficacy for trans women, including analysis of drug-drug interactions between PrEP medications and feminizing hormones and PrEP drug penetration into neovaginal tissues. Including trans women in studies is helpful only if their participation is specifically reported, as could occur in a table of baseline characteristics of the enrolled cohort. Gender-affirming care is important to foster appropriate uptake and use of PrEP. Such care includes use of preferred pronouns and names, safety to use the bathroom of choice, and access to gender-affirming hormone therapy and surgery. The consistent finding that PrEP works when taken across diverse populations having diverse practices related to gender, sexual intercourse, and hormone use provides a basis for offering PrEP to people at substantial risk of acquiring HIV although some subgroups may not have been fully represented in trials. Nonetheless, specific PrEP implementation science for trans women (and men) is essential to develop best practices for PrEP delivery and use. PMID:27429187

  12. Parsonage-Turner syndrome following post-exposure prophylaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The ‘Parsonage-Turner syndrome’ (PTS) is a rare but distinct disorder with an abrupt onset of shoulder pain, followed by weakness and atrophy of the upper extremity musculature, and a slow recovery requiring months to years. To our best knowledge, this is the first case describing symptoms and signs of PTS following the administration of a post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) regimen against possible human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Case presentation A 25-year-old Caucasian man presented with pain and unilateral scapular winging following PEP against possible HIV and HBV infection. Although atrophy and weakness were observed for the right supraspinatus muscle, a full range of motion was achievable. Neurological examination, plain radiography of the right shoulder and electromyography showed no additional abnormalities. The patient was diagnosed with post-vaccination PTS and treated non-operatively. During the following 15 months the scapular winging receded and full muscle strength was regained. Conclusion Parsonage-Turner syndrome is a rare clinical diagnosis. The precise pathophysiological mechanism of PTS remains unclear, but it seems to involve an interaction between genetic predisposition, mechanical vulnerability and an autoimmune trigger. An immunological event, such as – in this case – a vaccination as part of PEP treatment, can trigger the onset of PTS. The clinical presentation is distinctive with acute severe pain followed by patchy paresis, atrophy and sensory symptoms that persist for months to years. No currently available tests can provide a definite confirmation or exclusion of PTS. Routine blood examination, electromyography (EMG), and computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) serve mainly to exclude other disorders. The recovery can be quite lengthy, non-operative treatment is the accepted practice. Supplementary administration of oral prednisolone could shorten the

  13. A community perspective on pre-exposure prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The history of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is notable for being a community rather than industry-driven development. This talk will review this history, covering factors that include community demand, study results, regulatory challenges, commercial interests and practical issues of public health. It will also look at some of the controversies that appear to limit broader access, and important changes since US approval for PrEP in 2012. If PrEP had been discovered in the 1980s, the demand for access is likely to have been very different and it would now be universally available. Yet in many health settings, the willingness to include the option of PrEP appears to be inversely correlated with the increasingly impressive data showing its effectiveness. The limitations of condoms are shown in continued rates of new HIV infections in high-risk populations. These rates have remained persistently high for the last decade, even with the dramatic impact of treatment as prevention (TasP) on reducing further transmission. Within the last year, the polarized debate about PrEP appears to be shifting to a middle ground focused on individual choice. Together with TasP, this has started a new dialogue on the potential benefits on quality of life. This has brought a new focus on the cumulative and largely unmeasured impact for HIV negative gay men who live for decades focused on a fear of HIV. Looking forwards, the rate-limiting steps of cost and adherence have the potential to be overcome with lower priced generic tenofovir in 2017 and the development of long-acting formulations. PMID:25394031

  14. A community perspective on pre-exposure prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Collins

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The history of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP is notable for being a community rather than industry-driven development. This talk will review this history, covering factors that include community demand, study results, regulatory challenges, commercial interests and practical issues of public health. It will also look at some of the controversies that appear to limit broader access, and important changes since US approval for PrEP in 2012. If PrEP had been discovered in the 1980s, the demand for access is likely to have been very different and it would now be universally available. Yet in many health settings, the willingness to include the option of PrEP appears to be inversely correlated with the increasingly impressive data showing its effectiveness. The limitations of condoms are shown in continued rates of new HIV infections in high-risk populations. These rates have remained persistently high for the last decade, even with the dramatic impact of treatment as prevention (TasP on reducing further transmission. Within the last year, the polarized debate about PrEP appears to be shifting to a middle ground focused on individual choice. Together with TasP, this has started a new dialogue on the potential benefits on quality of life. This has brought a new focus on the cumulative and largely unmeasured impact for HIV negative gay men who live for decades focused on a fear of HIV. Looking forwards, the rate-limiting steps of cost and adherence have the potential to be overcome with lower priced generic tenofovir in 2017 and the development of long-acting formulations.

  15. Effect of Different Prophylaxis Methods on Microleakage of Microfilled Composite Restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimyai, Soodabeh; Mohammadi, Narmin; Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Pournaghi-Azar, Fatemeh; Ebrahimi Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeel; Amini, Melina

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims This study was aimed at evaluating the effect of different prophylaxis methods on microleak-age of microfilled composite restorations. Materials and methods In this in vitro study, class V cavities were prepared on buccal surfaces of 84 bovine teeth. The teeth were restored with Tetric N-Bond adhesive and Heliomolar composite resin. Subsequent to a thermocycling procedure and three months of storage in distilled water, the teeth were randomly assigned to four groups (n=21): (1) prophylaxis with a rubber cup and pumice; (2) prophylaxis with a brush and pumice; (3) prophylaxis with air/powder polishing device; and (4) no prophylaxis (the control group). Then the teeth were immersed in 2% basic fuchsin for 24 hours and sectioned for microleakage evaluation under a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon Signed Rankstests. Statistical significance was defined at pmargins exhibited significantly higher microleakage values compared to occlusal margins (peffect on marginal leakage of microfilled composite resin restorations. PMID:22991639

  16. Thromboembolic prophylaxis as a risk factor for postoperative complications after breast cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friis, Esbern; Hørby, John; Sørensen, Lars Tue; Pilsgaard, Bo; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer; Johansen, Lars; Jørgensen, Torben

    2004-06-01

    Hematoma and bruising (sugillation) are frequent problems after operations for primary breast cancer. In the present study we evaluated the influence of various methods of perioperative thromboembolic prophylaxis on the postoperative incidence of hematoma and suggilation. From June 1994 through August 1996, a series of 425 patients consecutively operated on for primary breast cancer were included. Thromboembolic prophylaxis was low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) in 310 patients and thigh-long graded compression (TED) stockings in 102 patients. Postoperative complications including deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, wound hematoma, and sugillation were recorded, and 17 variables with a potential influence on complications were analyzed by logistic regression analysis. Heparin prophylaxis compared to prophylaxis with TED stockings was significantly and independently associated with postoperative hematoma [odds ratio (OR) 3, 13; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.38-7.13] or sugillation (OR 3.34; 95% CI 1.93-5.78). No clinically overt thromboembolic complications were diagnosed. After operations for breast cancer we found that LMWH was significantly associated with postoperative hematoma and sugillation compared to TED stockings for perioperative thromboembolic prophylaxis. PMID:15366741

  17. Possibilities of the primary and secondary prophylaxis in treatment of childhood asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Slobodanka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The natural course of asthma is unpredictable and appears to be unaffected by any therapeutic strategy. Under such circumstances, the attention must be focused on the opportunities for prevention of a disease which is chronic, life long and incurable, even thought it can be very effectively controlled. During the past decades, a lot of a studies have been performed and started, in which relatively large numbers of children were included and followed prospectively to determine the incidence of risk factors for asthma in childhood. All these studies have contributed significant new information. The levels of prevention must be considered in all patients. There are two main separate components to the strategy. Primary prophylaxis Primary prophylaxis (time course of allergic sensitization, timing of exposure to allergens, influence of tobacco smoke, maternal health and allergen exposure is introduced before there is any evidence of sensitization to factors which might have caused the disease. There is increasing evidence that allergic sensitization is a very common precursor to the development of asthma. Secondary prophylaxis Secondary prophylaxis (allergen avoidance, hygiene hypothesis is important after primary sensitization to allergen has occurred, but before there is any evidence of asthma. Conclusion In this article the authors reviewed all results of studies about primary and secondary prophylaxis of asthma and its influence on the course of disease.

  18. Antibiotics as CECs: An Overview of the Hazards Posed by Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Geoffrey Ivan Scott; Porter, Dwayne E.; R. Sean Norman; C. Hart Scott; Miguel Ignacio Uyaguari-Diaz; Keith eMaruya; Steve B. Weisberg; Fulton, Michael H.; Ed F. Wirth; Janet eMooore; Pennington , Paul L.; Daniel eSchlenk; Cobb, George P.; Denslow, Nancy D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACTMonitoring programs have traditionally monitored legacy contaminants but are shifting focus to Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CECs). CECs present many challenges for monitoring and assessment, because measurement methods don't always exist nor have toxicological studies been fully conducted to place results in proper context. Also some CECs affect metabolic pathways to produce adverse outcomes that are not assessed through traditional toxicological evaluations. Antibiotics are CEC...

  19. Is selective prenatal iron prophylaxis better than routine prophylaxis: final results of a trial (PROFEG) in Maputo, Mozambique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemminki, Elina; Nwaru, Bright I; Salomé, Graca; Parkkali, Saara; Abacassamo, Fatima; Augusto, Orvalho; Cliff, Julie; Regushevskaya, Elena; Dgedge, Martinho; Sousa, Cesar; Chilundo, Baltazar

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare routine versus selective (ie, screening and treatment for anaemia) prenatal iron prophylaxis in a malaria-endemic and HIV-prevalent setting, an extended analysis including previously missing data. Design A pragmatic randomised controlled clinical trial. Setting 2 health centres in Maputo, Mozambique. Participants Pregnant women (≥18 years old; non-high-risk pregnancy) were randomly allocated to routine iron (n=2184) and selective iron (n=2142) groups. Interventions In the routine group, women received 60 mg ferrous sulfate plus 400 μg folic acid daily. In the selective group, women received 1 mg of folic acid daily and haemoglobin (Hb) screening at each visit; with low Hb (cut-off 9 g/dL) treatment (120 mg+800 μg of folic acid daily) for a month. Outcome measures Primary outcomes: preterm birth, low birth weight; secondary outcomes: self-reported malaria, labour complications, caesarean section, perinatal death, woman's death. Nurses collected pregnancy data. Birth data were abstracted from hospital records for 52% of women and traced using various methods and linked with probabilistic matching for 24%. Women's deaths were collected from death registers. Results Birth data were available for 3301 (76%) of the women. Outcomes were similar in the two groups: preterm births (27.1% in the selective vs 25.3% in the routine group), low birthweight infants (11.0% vs 11.7%), perinatal deaths (2.4% vs 2.4%) and caesarean sections (4.0% vs 4.5%). Women's deaths during pregnancy or iron groups. There might have been more women's deaths in the selective iron group, but it is unclear whether this was due to the intervention, other factors or chance finding. Trial registration number NCT00488579. PMID:27297013

  20. Heterotopic ossification: Pathophysiology, clinical features, and the role of radiotherapy for prophylaxis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a benign condition of abnormal formation of bone in soft tissue. HO is frequently asymptomatic, though when it is more severe it typically manifests as decreased range of motion at a nearby joint. HO has been recognized to occur in three distinct contexts-trauma, neurologic injury, and genetic abnormalities. The etiology of HO is incompletely understood. A posited theory is that HO results from the presence of osteoprogenitor cells pathologically induced by an imbalance in local or systemic factors. Individuals at high risk for HO development frequently undergo prophylaxis to prevent HO formation. The two most commonly employed modalities for prophylaxis are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and radiation therapy. This review discusses HO pathophysiology, clinical features, and the role of radiotherapy for prophylaxis

  1. Respiratory syncytial virus escape mutant derived in vitro resists palivizumab prophylaxis in cotton rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palivizumab (PZ) is the only monoclonal antibody in human use against an infectious disease. PZ is a humanized monoclonal antibody that recognizes the fusion protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). PZ prophylaxis reduces the likelihood of hospitalization for young children at risk for severe RSV infections. The quasispecies nature of RNA viruses allows rapid emergence of viruses with a selective advantage. A PZ resistant virus was selected by passage of RSV in the presence of PZ in cell culture. The cell culture-derived virus was completely resistant to PZ prophylaxis in cotton rats. The increasing use of PZ, and in particular, the use of PZ in immunosuppressed patients, provide opportunities for resistant viruses to emerge. Whether such viruses will appear and be of clinical significance for humans is unknown. Preclinical studies in cotton rats predicted the efficacy of PZ in humans; these results suggest that if PZ resistant viruses arise in humans, PZ prophylaxis may be ineffective

  2. The effect of long-term danazol prophylaxis on liver function in hereditary angioedema?a longitudinal study

    OpenAIRE

    Farkas, Henriette; Czaller, Ibolya; Csuka, Dorottya; Vas, Anikó; Valentin, Szilvia; Varga, Lilian; Széplaki, Gábor; Jakab, László; Füst, George; Prohászka, Zoltán; Harmat, George; Visy, Beata; Karádi, István

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Danazol is a drug most widely used for the prophylaxis of hereditary angioedema resulting from the deficiency of the C1-inhibitor. Potential hepatotoxic or liver tumor-inducing side effects of long-term danazol prophylaxis have been investigated during the follow-up of hereditary angioedema patients. Methods Characteristic parameters of liver function (including bilirubin, GOT, GPT, ?GT...

  3. 76 FR 20689 - Guidance for Industry on Influenza: Developing Drugs for Treatment and/or Prophylaxis; Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a guidance for industry entitled ``Influenza: Developing Drugs for Treatment and/or Prophylaxis.'' This guidance is intended to assist sponsors in the clinical development of drugs and therapeutic biological products for the treatment and/or prophylaxis of illness caused by influenza viruses A and B, including both......

  4. Drugs in development for prophylaxis of rejection in kidney-transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanders ML

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Marion Lee Sanders,1 Anthony James Langone2 1Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, 2Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA Abstract: Transplantation is the preferred treatment option for individuals with end-stage renal disease. Individuals who undergo transplantation must chronically be maintained on an immunosuppression regimen for rejection prophylaxis to help ensure graft survival. Current rejection prophylaxis consists of using a combination of calcineurin inhibitors, mTOR inhibitors, antimetabolite agents, and/or corticosteroids. These agents have collectively improved the short-term outcomes of renal transplantation, but improvements in late/chronic graft loss and recipient survival have lagged significantly behind challenging the field of transplantation to develop novel prophylactic agents. There have been several clinical trials conducted within the last 5 years in an attempt to bring such novel agents to the commercial market. These trials have resulted in the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA approval of extended-release tacrolimus, as well as belatacept, which has the potential to replace calcineurin inhibitors for rejection prophylaxis. Other trials have focused on the development of novel calcineurin inhibitors (voclosporin, costimulation blockade (ASKP1240 and alefacept, kinase inhibitors (tofacitinib and sotrastaurin, and inhibitors of leukocyte migration (efalizumab. While these later agents have not been FDA-approved for use in transplantation, they remain noteworthy, as these agents explore pathways not previously targeted for allograft-rejection prophylaxis. The purpose of this review was to consolidate available clinical trial data with regard to the recent developments in rejection prophylaxis in kidney transplantation. Keywords: rejection, prophylaxis, immunosuppression

  5. Prophylaxis and therapeutic potential of ozone in buiatrics: Current knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Đuričić, Dražen; Valpotić, Hrvoje; Samardžija, Marko

    2015-08-01

    Ozone therapy has been in use since 1896 in the USA. As a highly reactive molecule, ozone may inactivate bacteria, viruses, fungi, yeasts and protozoans, stimulate the oxygen metabolism of tissue, treat diseases, activate the immune system, and exhibit strong analgesic activity. More recently, ozone has been used in veterinary medicine, particularly in buiatrics, but still insufficiently. Medical ozone therapy has shown effectiveness as an alternative to the use of antibiotics, which are restricted to clinical use and have been withdrawn from non-clinical use as in-feed growth promoters in animal production. This review is an overview of current knowledge regarding the preventive and therapeutic effects of ozone in ruminants for the treatment of puerperal diseases and improvement in their fertility. In particular, ozone preparations have been tested in the treatment of reproductive tract lesions, urovagina and pneumomovagina, metritis, endometritis, fetal membrane retention and mastitis, as well as in the functional restoration of endometrium in dairy cows and goats. In addition, the preventive use of the intrauterine application of ozone has been assessed in order to evaluate its effectiveness in improving reproductive efficiency in dairy cows. No adverse effects were observed in cows and goats treated with ozone preparations. Moreover, there is a lot of evidence indicating the advantages of ozone preparation therapy in comparison to the application of antibiotics. However, there are certain limitations on ozone use in veterinary medicine and buiatrics, such as inactivity against intracellular microbes and selective activity against the same bacterial species, as well as the induction of tissue inflammation through inappropriate application of the preparation. PMID:26059777

  6. Outbreak of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in renal transplant recipients on prophylaxis: Our observation and experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Chandola

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumocystis jirovecii is a life-threatening opportunistic pathogen affecting immunocompromised hosts, especially renal transplant recipients. This study reports an outbreak of seven such cases, both inpatients and outpatients, occurring in our hospital over a period of 4 months (January-April 2013. All patients were male with a median age of 38 years (range, 28-58 years; the median period between transplantation and diagnosis was 39.5 months (range, 11-123 months. One patient succumbed to the infection. Two were breakthrough cases, developing the infection while on prophylaxis, highlighting the need to view prophylaxis in light of the immunosuppression and clinical picture of such patients.

  7. Risk factors for RhD immunisation despite antenatal and postnatal anti-D prophylaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Koelewijn, JM; de Haas, M.; Vrijkotte, TGM; van der Schoot, CE; Bonsel, GJ

    2009-01-01

    Objective To identify risk factors for Rhesus D (RhD) immunisation in pregnancy, despite adequate antenatal and postnatal anti-D prophylaxis in the previous pregnancy. To generate evidence for improved primary prevention by extra administration of anti-D Ig in the presence of a risk factor. Design Case–control study. Setting Nation-wide evaluation of the Dutch antenatal anti-D-prophylaxis programme. Population Cases: 42 RhD-immunised parae-1, recognised by first-trimester routine red cell ant...

  8. Vitamin K prophylaxis for prevention of vitamin K deficiency bleeding: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, M J; Chandrasekaran, A; Kumar, P; Thukral, A; Agarwal, R; Paul, V K

    2016-05-01

    We conducted a systematic review to evaluate the burden of late vitamin K deficiency bleeding (VKDB) and the effect of vitamin K prophylaxis on the incidence of VKDB. We searched MEDLINE and other electronic databases, and included all observational studies including population surveys as well as randomized controlled trials (RCT). The median (interquartile range) burden of late VKDB was 35 (10.5 to 80) per 100 000 live births in infants who had not received prophylaxis at birth; the burden was much higher in low- and middle-income countries as compared with high-income countries-80 (72 to 80) vs 8.8 (5.8 to 17.8) per 100 000 live births. Two randomized trials evaluated the effect of intramuscular (IM) prophylaxis on the risk of classical VKDB. Although one trial reported a significant reduction in the incidence of any bleeding (relative risk (RR) 0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.56 to 0.96) and moderate to severe bleeding (RR 0.19, 0.08 to 0.46; number needed to treat (NNT) 74, 47 to 177), the other trial demonstrated a significant reduction in the risk of secondary bleeding after circumcision in male neonates (RR 0.18, CI 0.08 to 0.42; NNT 9, 6 to 15). No RCTs evaluated the effect of vitamin K prophylaxis on late VKDB. Data from four surveillance studies indicate that the use of IM/subcutaneous vitamin K prophylaxis could significantly reduce the risk of late VKDB when compared with no prophylaxis (pooled RR 0.02; 95% CI 0.00 to 0.10). When compared with IM prophylaxis, a single oral dose of vitamin K increased the risk of VKDB (RR 24.5; 95% CI 7.4 to 81.0) but multiple oral doses did not (RR 3.64; CI 0.82 to 16.3). There is low-quality evidence from observational studies that routine IM administration of 1 mg of vitamin K at birth reduces the incidence of late VKDB during infancy. Given the high risk of mortality and morbidity in infants with late VKDB, it seems appropriate to administer IM vitamin K prophylaxis to all neonates at birth. Future studies

  9. Should we definitively abandon prophylaxis for patent ductus arteriosus in preterm new-borns?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilios Fanos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the prophylactic administration of indomethacin in extremely low-birth weight infants reduces the frequency of patent ductus arteriosus and severe intraventricular hemorrhage, it does not appear to provide any long-term benefit in terms of survival without neurosensory and cognitive outcomes. Considering the increased drug-induced reduction in renal, intestinal, and cerebral blood flow, the use of prophylaxis cannot be routinely recommended in preterm neonates. However, a better understanding of the genetic background of each infant may allow for individualized prophylaxis using NSAIDs and metabolomics.

  10. Tailored Antibiotic Combination Powders for Inhaled Rotational Antibiotic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sie Huey; Teo, Jeanette; Heng, Desmond; Ng, Wai Kiong; Zhao, Yanli; Tan, Reginald B H

    2016-04-01

    Respiratory lung infections due to multidrug-resistant (MDR) superbugs are on a global upsurge and have very grim clinical outcomes. Their MDR profile makes therapeutic options extremely limited. Although a highly toxic antibiotic, colistin, is favored today as a "last-line" therapeutic against these hard-to-treat MDR pathogens, it is fast losing its effectiveness. This work therefore seeks to identify and tailor-make useful combination regimens (that are potentially rotatable and synergistic) as attractive alternative strategies to address the rising rates of drug resistance. Three potentially rotatable ternary dry powder inhaler constructs (each involving colistin and 2 other different-classed antibiotics chosen from rifampicin, meropenem, and tigecycline) were identified (with distinct complementary killing mechanisms), coformulated via spray drying, evaluated on their aerosol performance using a Next-Generation Impactor and tested for their efficacies against a number of MDR pathogens. The powder particles were of respirable size (d50, 3.1 ± 0.3 μm-3.4 ± 0.1 μm) and predominantly crumpled in morphology. When dispersed via a model dry powder inhaler (Aerolizer(®)) at 60 L/min, the powders showed concomitant in vitro deposition with fine particle fractions of ∼53%-70%. All formulations were successfully tested in the laboratory to be highly effective against the MDR pathogens. In addition, a favorable synergistic interaction was detected across all 3 formulations when tested against MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:27019964

  11. Response to "Antibiotic Use and Resistance"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malo, Sara; Rabanaque, María José; Feja, Christina; Lallana, María Jesús; Aguilar, Isabel; Bjerrum, Lars

    2014-01-01

    As mentioned, antibiotic consumption in heavy users, especially in children, is really striking. Certainly, our results revealed an antibiotic use in this age group higher than published in previous studies, and in line with different reports repeatedly presenting the high antibiotic consumption...... existing in Spain compared with other European countries (1). Determinants involved in antibiotic prescribing are numerous and varied. It is true that therapeutic failures lead to repeated courses of antibiotic treatment. However, it is not probably the only reason. Frequent and high consumption of...... antibiotics, as observed in heavy users, could also be due to factors related to the GP, patient and parents' expectations or the influence exerted by the pharmaceutical industry (2). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  12. Factors Affecting the Cost Effectiveness of Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Simoens

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In an era of spiraling health care costs and limited resources, policy makers and health care payers are concerned about the cost effectiveness of antibiotics. The aim of this study is to draw on published economic evaluations with a view to identify and illustrate the factors affecting the cost effectiveness of antibiotic treatment of bacterial infections. The findings indicate that the cost effectiveness of antibiotics is influenced by factors relating to the characteristics and the use of antibiotics (i.e., diagnosis, comparative costs and comparative effectiveness, resistance, patient compliance with treatment, and treatment failure and by external factors (i.e., funding source, clinical pharmacy interventions, and guideline implementation interventions. Physicians need to take into account these factors when prescribing an antibiotic and assess whether a specific antibiotic treatment adds sufficient value to justify its costs.

  13. Naphthyridinomycin, a DNA-reactive antibiotic.

    OpenAIRE

    Zmijewski, M J; Miller-Hatch, K; Goebel, M.

    1982-01-01

    Naphthyridinomycin is a novel quinone antibiotic that is produced in liquid shake cultures by Streptomyces lusitanus. Fermentation studies have shown that this antibiotic is produced maximally after 96 h of cell growth. L-[methyl-3H]methionine efficiently labels naphthyridinomycin when it is added to a fermentation mixture 24 h before culture is harvested. Unlabeled and radioactively labeled naphthyridinomycin were used to determine the mechanism of action of this unique antibiotic. Naphthyri...

  14. Antibiotics for the Treatment of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Patidar, Kavish R.; Bajaj, Jasmohan S.

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is complex and therapeutic regimens vary according to the acuity of presentation and the goals of therapy. Most treatments for HE rely on manipulating the intestinal milieu and therefore antibiotics that act on the gut form a key treatment strategy. Prominent antibiotics studied in HE are neomycin, metronidazole, vancomycin and rifaximin. For the management of the acute episode, all antibiotics have been tested. However the limited numbers studied,...

  15. DETECTION OF ANTIBIOTIC RESIDUES IN RAW MILK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Karim

    1978-06-01

    Full Text Available Milk and milk products containing antibiotics especially penicillin may present a health hazard to individuals who are super sensitized to penicillin. A total of 620 samples of raw milk which were delivered to Tehran pasteurization plant were examined. 294 samples were antibiotic-negative and 326 samples showed to contain antibiotic. Considering the results obtained, certain recommendations were made to prevent public health hazards and economic losses.

  16. Superbugs and antibiotics in the newborn

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandro Borghesi; Mauro Stronati

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance has become an urgent and global issue, with 700,000 deaths attributable to multidrug-resistance occurring each year worldwide. The overuse of antibiotics, both in animal industry and in clinical settings, and the generated selective pressure, are the main factors implicated in the emergence of resistant strains. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have pointed out that more than half of hospital patients receive an antibiotic during their stay, and nearl...

  17. Antibiotic Resistance in Childhood with Pneumococcal Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Gunes

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Resistance to antibiotics is better. Between should not be in capitals. Antibiotics resistant has been increasing in pneumococci that cause serious diseases such as pneumonia, meningitis in recent years. The resistance rates vary between geographic regions. In this study, we aimed to determine antibiotic resistance rates in pneumococcal infections in our region. Material and Method: This study included 31 pneumococcal strains isolated from blood, CSF and urine samples of patients with me...

  18. Antibiotic research and development: business as usual?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbarth, S; Theuretzbacher, U; Hackett, J

    2015-01-01

    The global burden of antibiotic resistance is tremendous and, without new anti-infective strategies, will continue to increase in the coming decades. Despite the growing need for new antibiotics, few pharmaceutical companies today retain active antibacterial drug discovery programmes. One reason is that it is scientifically challenging to discover new antibiotics that are active against the antibiotic-resistant bacteria of current clinical concern. However, the main hurdle is diminishing economic incentives. Increased global calls to minimize the overuse of antibiotics, the cost of meeting regulatory requirements and the low prices of currently marketed antibiotics are strong deterrents to antibacterial drug development programmes. New economic models that create incentives for the discovery of new antibiotics and yet reconcile these incentives with responsible antibiotic use are long overdue. DRIVE-AB is a €9.4 million public-private consortium, funded by the EU Innovative Medicines Initiative, that aims to define a standard for the responsible use of antibiotics and to develop, test and recommend new economic models to incentivize investment in producing new anti-infective agents. PMID:25673635

  19. Deliberations on the impact of antibiotic contamination on dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes in aquatic environments

    OpenAIRE

    Berglund, Björn

    2014-01-01

    The great success of antibiotics in treating bacterial infectious diseases has been hampered by the increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistant bacteria. Not only does antibiotic resistance threaten to increase the difficulty in treating bacterial infectious diseases, but it could also make medical procedures such as routine surgery and organ transplantations very dangerous to perform. Traditionally, antibiotic resistance has been regarded as a strictly clinical problem and studies of the p...

  20. Antibiotic Resistance in Wastewater : Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)and antibiotic resistance genes

    OpenAIRE

    Börjesson, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    A large part of the antibiotics consumed ends up in wastewater, and in the wastewater the antibiotics may exert selective pressure for or maintain resistance among microorganisms. Antibiotic resistant bacteria and genes encoding antibiotic resistance are commonly detected in wastewater, often at higher rates and concentrations compared to surface water. Wastewater can also provide favourable conditions for the growth of a diverse bacterial community, which constitutes a basis for the selectio...

  1. [Health economics and antibiotic therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, P; Bigdéli, M

    1995-01-01

    In the field of antibiotic therapy, particularly the methods of economic evaluation hold one's attention within the wide range of health economics' applications. Several tools allow a comparison of the outcomes of alternative strategies and thereby guide choices to the most appropriate solutions. After a brief recall of the methods classically used to evaluate health care strategy, the authors stress the importance and difficulty of fixing and applying a correct and satisfactory procedure for evaluation. An evaluation example of antibiotic therapy allows to illustrate the application of the principles confronting a field in which competition is intense and economic stakes stay large--a fact which naturally yields to seek after objective decision making criteria. The health care policies drawn by public authorities as well as the marketing strategies of the health sector trade are partly based on such evaluations. If these techniques are not intended for the practitioner in the first place, they should not be indifferent to him since they influence health authorities and thereby indirectly affect the therapeutic freedom of the physician. PMID:7481251

  2. Molecular modelling of betalactamic antibiotic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elso Manuel Cruz Cruz

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The antibacterial properties of a compound are the result of its molecular structure. To establish the structural and electronic characteristics makes possible to understand the mechanisms of its action and becomes paramount for the rational design new drugs. Objective: To model some of the molecular properties of betalactamic antibiotics and inhibitors of the betalactamases and to relate them with their pharmacological actions. Method: The molecular structures were optimized with PM3• semiempiric calculus. The structure of the betalactamic ring in the different compounds was compared. The molecular properties were calculated according to the Density Functional Theory at a B3LYP/6-31G(d level. The density of the atomic charges and the frontier orbitals were analyzed. Results There are variations in the calculated properties that make possible to define two groups of compounds: one for the monobactams and the inhibitors of the betalactamases, with less planarity in the ring and less reactivity and another one with the penicillins, cephalosporins and carbapenems, planer, more structurally stable and reactive. Conclusions: The modelled molecular properties of the betalactamic antibiotics and inhibitors of the betalactamases show agreement with its pharmacological action.

  3. Superbugs and antibiotics in the newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Borghesi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance has become an urgent and global issue, with 700,000 deaths attributable to multidrug-resistance occurring each year worldwide. The overuse of antibiotics, both in animal industry and in clinical settings, and the generated selective pressure, are the main factors implicated in the emergence of resistant strains. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC have pointed out that more than half of hospital patients receive an antibiotic during their stay, and nearly a third receive a broad-spectrum antibiotic. In neonatal units, previous antibiotic exposure to third-generation cephalosporin and carbapenem were identified as independent risk factors for infection caused by multi-drug resistant strains. While resistant ‘superbugs’ emerge, the arsenal to fight these microorganisms is progressively shrinking, as the number of newly discovered antibiotics approved by the Food and Drug administration each year is dropping. In face of global spread of antibiotic resistance and of the limited development of new drugs, policies and rules are under study by agencies (CDC, World Health Organization and governments, in order to: i facilitate and foster the discovery of new antibiotic compounds; ii develop new, alternative therapies able to potentiate or modulate the host immune response or to abrogate the resistance and virulence factors in the microorganisms; and iii prevent the emergence of resistance through antibiotic stewardship programs, educational programs, and reduction of antibiotic use in livestock; the field of neonatal medicine will need its own, newborn-tailored, antibiotic stewardship programs to be implemented in the NICUs. Proceedings of the 11th International Workshop on Neonatology and Satellite Meetings · Cagliari (Italy · October 26th-31st, 2015 · From the womb to the adultGuest Editors: Vassilios Fanos (Cagliari, Italy, Michele Mussap (Genoa, Italy, Antonio Del Vecchio (Bari, Italy, Bo Sun (Shanghai

  4. Optimizing antibiotic selection in treating COPD exacerbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attiya Siddiqi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Attiya Siddiqi, Sanjay SethiDivision of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Veterans Affairs Western New York Health Care System and University of Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York, USAAbstract: Our understanding of the etiology, pathogenesis and consequences of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD has increased substantially in the last decade. Several new lines of evidence demonstrate that bacterial isolation from sputum during acute exacerbation in many instances reflects a cause-effect relationship. Placebo-controlled antibiotic trials in exacerbations of COPD demonstrate significant clinical benefits of antibiotic treatment in moderate and severe episodes. However, in the multitude of antibiotic comparison trials, the choice of antibiotics does not appear to affect the clinical outcome, which can be explained by several methodological limitations of these trials. Recently, comparison trials with nontraditional end-points have shown differences among antibiotics in the treatment of exacerbations of COPD. Observational studies that have examined clinical outcome of exacerbations have repeatedly demonstrated certain clinical characteristics to be associated with treatment failure or early relapse. Optimal antibiotic selection for exacerbations has therefore incorporated quantifying the risk for a poor outcome of the exacerbation and choosing antibiotics differently for low risk and high risk patients, reserving the broader spectrum drugs for the high risk patients. Though improved outcomes in exacerbations with antibiotic choice based on such risk stratification has not yet been demonstrated in prospective controlled trials, this approach takes into account concerns of disease heterogeneity, antibiotic resistance and judicious antibiotic use in exacerbations.Keywords: COPD, exacerbation, bronchitis, antibiotics

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of ergotism following Heparin-DHE thrombosis prophylaxis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasospastic complications have been reported in five patients following the use of heparin-dihydroergotamin for thrombo-embolic prophylaxis. The most important diagnostic procedure is angiography, which shows characteristic findings. Intraarterial prostaglandin is a promising form of treatment. Experience with two patients is reported. (orig.)

  6. Introduction of HIV post‐exposure prophylaxis for sexually abused children in Malawi

    OpenAIRE

    Ellis, J.; Ahmad, S.; Molyneux, E

    2006-01-01

    Aims: To improve the care of children who are victims of child sexual abuse (CSA) by routinely assessing eligibility for HIV post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) and to investigate the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of such treatment started in a paediatric emergency department in Malawi.

  7. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Dentists towards Prophylaxis after Exposure to Blood and Body Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Shaghaghian

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Post-exposure prophylaxis plays an important role in prevention of bloodborne diseases after occupational exposures.Objective: To evaluate the knowledge, attitude and practice of dentists towards post-exposure prophylaxis.Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 140 dentists in Shiraz were selected through a systematic randomized sampling. They filled out a self-made questionnaire including 30 knowledge, 4 attitude and 10 practice questions. Mean of knowledge and percentage of various items of attitude and practice were reported.Results: The mean±SD knowledge score of dentists was 18.5±6.2. Knowledge had a significant relationship with the level of education (p<0.001, attending infection control seminars (p<0.001, and working in public clinics (p<0.001. A total of 63 (43% dentists believed that immediate washing of the exposed area has no effect on the prevention of hepatitis and AIDS. Of the studied dentists, 13%, 11%, and 34% believed that prophylaxis after exposure to patients' blood had no effect on prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, hepatitis B virus, and hepatitis C virus infections, respectively. Only 170 (53% exposed dentists immediately washed the exposed area and only 43 (13.4% of them evaluated the source patient for risk factors of hepatitis and AIDS.Conclusion: Knowledge, attitude and practice of dentists working in Shiraz towards postexposure prophylaxis are not desirable. Interventions to raise their awareness are therefore warranted.

  8. Antifungal prophylaxis in lung transplantation--a world-wide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neoh, C F; Snell, G I; Kotsimbos, T; Levvey, B; Morrissey, C O; Slavin, M A; Stewart, K; Kong, D C M

    2011-02-01

    While variations in antifungal prophylaxis have been previously reported in lung transplant (LTx) recipients, recent clinical practice is unknown. Our aim was to determine current antifungal prophylactic practice in LTx centers world-wide. One nominated LTx clinician from each active center was invited by e-mail to participate in a web-based survey between September 2009 and January 2010. Fifty-seven percent (58/102) responded. The majority of responses were from medical directors of LTx centers (72.4%), and from the United States (44.8%). Within the first 6 months post-LTx, most centers (58.6%) employed universal prophylaxis, with 97.1% targeting Aspergillus species. Voriconazole alone, and in combination with inhaled amphotericin B (AmB), were the preferred first-line agents. Intolerance to side effects of voriconazole (69.2%) was the main reason for switching to alternatives. Beyond 6 months post-LTx, most (51.8%) did not employ antifungal prophylaxis. Fifteen centers (26.0%) conducted routine antifungal therapeutic drug monitoring during prophylactic period. There are differences in strategies employed between U.S. and European centers. Most respondents indicated a need for antifungal prophylactic guidelines. In comparison to earlier findings, there was a major shift toward prophylaxis with voriconazole and an increased use of echinocandins, posaconazole and inhaled lipid formulation AmB. PMID:21272239

  9. Prophylaxis and treatment of invasive aspergillosis with voriconazole, posaconazole and caspofungin - review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthaus M

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Major progress for the management of invasive aspergillosis has come from the introduction of new antifungals since the late 1990s. Although mortality of invasive aspergillosis remains as high as 30-50%. Backbone of management are prophylaxis, early diagnosis and early initiation of antifungals for reduction of invasive aspergillosis related mortality. Randomized trials have been undertaken for the prophylaxis as well as treatment of invasive aspergillosis in the last two decades. Posaconazole is recommended for prophylaxis against aspergillosis in patients treated for acute myelogenous leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome or patients with graft versus host disease after allogeneic transplantation. Efficacy has been shown for first-line therapy of invasive aspergillosis with voriconazole and liposomal amphotericin B. Gastrointestinal resorption for the azoles posaconazole, voriconazole and itraconazole differ considerably. While oral voriconazole resportion is reduced when taken with food, posaconazole has to be taken with fatty food for optimal intestinal resorption. Beside all advances in the management of invasive aspergillosis important questions remain unresolved. This article reviews the current state of prophylaxis and treatment of invasive aspergillosis and points out clinicians unmet needs.

  10. Risk factors for RhD immunisation despite antenatal and postnatal anti-D prophylaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Koelewijn; M. de Haas; T.G.M. Vrijkotte; C.E. van der Schoot; G.J. Bonsel

    2009-01-01

    Objective To identify risk factors for Rhesus D (RhD) immunisation in pregnancy, despite adequate antenatal and postnatal anti-D prophylaxis in the previous pregnancy. To generate evidence for improved primary prevention by extra administration of anti-D Ig in the presence of a risk factor. Design C

  11. Assessing safety and immunogenicity of post-exposure prophylaxis following interchangeability of rabies vaccines in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravish, Hardanahalli S; Sudarshan, Mysore K; Madhusudana, Shampur N; Annadani, Rachana R; Narayana, Doddabele H Ashwath; Belludi, Ashwin Y; Anandaiah, Gangaboraiah; Vijayashankar, Veena

    2014-01-01

    Rabies post exposure prophylaxis with cell culture vaccines by either intramuscular route or intradermal route spans over a period of one month. World Health Organization recommends completing post exposure prophylaxis against rabies with the same cell culture or embryonated egg rabies vaccine and with same route of administration and any deviation from this shall be an exception. In the present study, the safety and immunogenicity of rabies post-exposure prophylaxis was studied prospectively in 90 animal bite cases that had interchangeability of rabies vaccines either by route of administration or brand/type and such changes had occurred due to logistical/financial problems. Among them, 47 had change in route of administration from intramuscular to intradermal or vice versa and 43 had change in the brand/type of cell culture rabies vaccine. All of them had category III rabies exposure and received equine rabies immunoglobulin along with the rabies vaccine. None of the study subjects had any adverse reactions. The rabies virus neutralizing antibody titers was assessed by rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test and all the vaccinees had titers ≥0.5 IU per mL on day 14 which is considered as adequate for protection against rabies. Thus, the present study showed that, rabies post-exposure prophylaxis was safe and immunogenic despite changes in the route of administration and brand/type of rabies vaccine. PMID:24584134

  12. Efficacy assessment of the activities for prophylaxis of micro nutrients deficit in children

    OpenAIRE

    ASHUROVA DILFUZA TASHPULATOVNA

    2015-01-01

    Programs in the field of nutrition implemented in Uzbekistan, such as supplementation of children from 6 to 59 months old with vitamin A, rational nutrition and consumption of fortified flour promote the improvement of immunity indicators and normalization of serum retinol. It conditions the prophylaxis and liquidation of nutrition disorders and harmonic development of children during initial 5 years of life.

  13. Antifungal prophylaxis during treatment for haematological malignancies: are we there yet?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogers, T.R.; Slavin, M.A.; Donnelly, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    Antifungal prophylaxis during treatment for haematological malignancies has been studied for 50 years, yet it has not been wholly effective even when using antifungal drugs that exhibit potent activity in vitro against a broad range of fungal pathogens. Trials have demonstrated that it can reduce th

  14. Improving venous thromboembolic disease prophylaxis in medical inpatients: a role for education and audit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kent, B D

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Venous thromboembolic disease (VTED) prophylaxis is a key strategy in reducing preventable deaths in medical inpatients. We assessed compliance with internationally published guidelines for VTED prophylaxis in at-risk medical patients before and 1 month after an educational intervention to enhance compliance with such guidelines. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty patients were assessed on each occasion. Pre-intervention, VTED prophylaxis was prescribed in only 48% of at-risk cases. Compliance was best among patients under stroke services and worst for those under acute medical teams. Patients within specialist units were more likely to be prescribed prophylaxis than those in general wards (75 vs. 53%; p = 0.0019). Post-intervention, overall compliance improved to 63% (p = 0.041 for comparison). There was a significant improvement among general medical teams (48 vs. 75%; p = 0.001), and in general wards (52 vs. 74%; p = 0.003). CONCLUSIONS: Thromboprophylaxis is under-prescribed in medical inpatients, but compliance with international guidelines can be significantly enhanced with targeted educational intervention.

  15. Reactivation of hepatitis D virus after chemotherapy for diffuse large B cell lymphoma despite lamivudine prophylaxis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ellen Sloth; Gerstoft, Jan; Weis, Nina Margrethe

    2010-01-01

    We describe a case of reactivation of hepatitis D virus (HDV) in a patient treated with chemotherapy for a diffuse large B cell lymphoma despite lamivudine prophylaxis. This case suggests that previously cleared HDV should be considered when administering chemotherapy to patients with lymphoma....

  16. Ergotism of the lower limb complicating DHE-heparin thrombosis prophylaxis. Observation by serial angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warmuth-Metz, M.

    1988-10-01

    Today ergotism is becoming more and more important as a complication in the treatment of migraine headache or thrombosis prophylaxis with DHE heparin. Although complete recovery is seldom reported in the current literature, in our case it was possible to resolve a spasm of the left lower limb completely by early diagnosis and adaequate pharmacological treatment. The case was well documented by serial angiography.

  17. Diagnosis and treatment of ergotism following Heparin-DHE thrombosis prophylaxis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesmann, W.; Peters, P.E.; Irskens, U.; Schwering, H.

    1987-10-01

    Vasospastic complications have been reported in five patients following the use of heparin-dihydroergotamin for thrombo-embolic prophylaxis. The most important diagnostic procedure is angiography, which shows characteristic findings. Intraarterial prostaglandin is a promising form of treatment. Experience with two patients is reported.

  18. Hydrophobia following antirabic prophylaxis - (A case report with a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maheshwari S

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of hydrophobia following sero-vaccine prophylaxis is reported. The probable reason was delayed and insufficient treat-ment of extensive severe facial wounds involving conjunctiva and/ or a failure on the part of sero-vaccine treatment.

  19. The significance of iodine prophylaxis and the values of radioiodine uptake by the thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of iodine prophylaxis is assessed with regard to the considerably altered nutritional conditions of our population. The values of radioisotope tests were chosen as the functional indicators of the thyroid gland. Their changes during iodine prophylaxis (25 mg KI/kg of salt), after its temporary interruption and re-inducement, were studied. The temporary interruption of iodine prophylaxis induced a considerable iodine deficiency manifested by a decrease of iodine excretion into the urine and by an increase of the mean value of 131I accumulation and its range, to 48.3% and 23.5 to 73%, respectively. However, nutrition alone could not maintain these parameters at the initial level. After the re-inducement of the distribution of iodinated salt an increased iodine excretion into the urine and a decrease of the mean uptake to 27%/24 hours, with the range 14 to 40%, was observed. These findings suggest that: 1. iodine prophylaxis is so far the only way that can ensure the proper daily iodine intake for our population, 2. observing the set KI content in salt (15 to 35 mg/kg) the present norms of radioiodine uptake by the thyroid should be revised. (author)

  20. Effects of different forms of central nervous system prophylaxis on neuropsychologic function in childhood leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison of the late effects on intellectual and neuropsychologic function of three different CNS prophylaxis regimens was conducted in 104 patients treated for childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia. Of the children studied, 33 were randomized to treatment with intrathecal (IT) methotrexate alone, 36 to IT methotrexate plus 2,400 rad cranial irradiation, and 35 to IT methotrexate plus intravenous intermediate dose methotrexate. All patients were in their first (complete) continuous remission, were a minimum of one year post-CNS prophylaxis and had no evidence of CNS disease at the time of evaluation. In contrast to the other two treatment groups, children whose CNS prophylaxis included cranial irradiation attained significantly lower mean Full Scale IQs, performed more poorly on the Wide Range Achievement Test, a measure of school abilities, and exhibited a greater number of difficulties on a variety of other neuropsychologic measures. The poorer performance of the irradiated group was independent of sex of the patient, time since treatment and age at diagnosis. These data suggest that the addition of 2,400 rad cranial irradiation to CNS prophylaxis in ALL puts these children at greater risk for mild global loss in intellectual and neuropsychologic ability

  1. Increased radiation reactions of the urinary system following gynecological radiotherapy. Incidence, prophylaxis, therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By means of modern literature and own experience a survey is given concerning radiation reactions occasionally to be seen in kidneys, ureter, urinary bladder and urethra in connection with gynecological therapy. Prophylaxis and therapy of these radiation reactions with special emphasis of the treatment with instillation solutions in cases of raised reactions of the urinary bladder are discussed. (author)

  2. Neuropsychological sequelae of central nervous system prophylaxis in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We assessed neuropsychologically 106 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who had all received cranial irradiation for the prevention of central nervous system (CNS) leukemia 1-13 years previously. Children were assessed for adverse late effects of their therapy, using age-appropriate Wechsler measures of overall intellectual ability and supplementary tests. Forty-five siblings near in age to the patients were tested as controls. The patients who had had the most intensive central nervous system (CNS) prophylaxis were found to have a WISC-R Full Scale IQ 17 points lower than the sibling control group. Performance IQ was more affected than verbal IQ. The patients were more easily distracted and less able to concentrate. The severity of the aftereffects was related to younger age at the time of CNS prophylaxis and to a higher dose of cranial irradiation but not to time since CNS prophylaxis. CNS prophylaxis using a combination of cranial irradiation and intrathecal methotrexate has lowered the incidence of CNS relapse in childhood ALL but is associated with considerable long-term morbidity in survivors

  3. A Model-based Assessment of Oseltamivir Prophylaxis Strategies to Prevent Influenza in Nursing Homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Dool, Carline; Hak, Eelko; Bonten, Marc J. M.; Wallinga, Jacco

    2009-01-01

    Prophylaxis with neuraminidase inhibitors is important for controlling seasonal influenza outbreaks in long-term care settings. We used a stochastic individual-based model that simulates influenza virus transmission in a long-term care nursing home department to study the protection offered to patie

  4. A PROSPECTIVE STUDY OF PHARMACOLOGICAL PROPHYLAXIS OF DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS IN ARTHROPLASTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopalakrishna

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Joint replacement surgeries were associated with significant risk of deep vein thrombosis further leading to complications like pulmonary embolism, a need for prevention of complications by using DVT prophylaxis among Indian patients. OBJECTIVE: The risk of DVT & pulmonary embolism following joint replacement surgeries were largely studied in western countries whereas the same following arthroplasty was studied to a lesser extent in India. To find out the efficacy of Pharmacological Prophylaxis against DVT (Deep Venous Thrombosis or PE (Pulmonary Embolism.To find out incidence of DVT (Deep Venous Thrombosis or PE (Pulmonary Embolism Despite prophylaxis. METHODS: prospective study of pharmacological prophylaxis of deep venous thrombosis in arthroplasty using low molecular weight heparin and aspirin .patients were investigated pre & post operatively with Doppler study for evidence of venous thrombosis. RESULTS: Distal DVT was found in two patients who underwent THR; there was no case of proximal DVT with THR and TKR. No DVT was detected in any patient who had undergone TKR preoperatively or postoperatively. CONCLUSION: We believe that though there is enough evidence in the Western literature to advocate routine thromboprophylaxis for patients undergoing total joint replacement and surgery for fractures of lower limb, there is not yet enough evidence to justify the same for Indian patients undergoing major lower limb surgery. A duplex sonography should be preferably carried out on all the elderly and high-risk patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty, Trials involving a larger number of patients in future are required.

  5. Adherence to prophylaxis and bleeding outcome in haemophilia: a multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrijvers, LieSbeth H; Beijlevelt-van der Zande, Marlene; Peters, Marjolein; Lock, Janske; Cnossen, Marjon H; Schuurmans, Marieke J; Fischer, Kathelijn

    2016-08-01

    Prevention of bleeding and joint damage in severe haemophilia is dependent on adherence to prophylactic replacement therapy. The aim of this study was to assess adherence to prophylaxis, including associations with age, bleeding and clotting factor consumption (CFC). In three Dutch haemophilia centres, semi-structured interviews about adherence to prophylaxis in the previous 2 weeks were conducted with patients or parents of a child with haemophilia. Patients were classified, according to pre-specified definitions, as adherent, sub-optimally adherent or non-adherent based on missing, timing, and dose of infusions. Association of annual bleeding rates, mean CFC, person performing the infusion (parents verus patients) with adherence categories were analysed. Overall, 241 patients with haemophilia using prophylaxis were studied. Parents were more adherent (66%; n = 48/73) than patients (43%; n = 72/168). Sub-optimal adherence occurred in 29% of parents and 37% of patients and was characterized by changes in timing of infusion (mostly from morning to evening), while missing parents and 20% of patients. Reduced adherence was associated with lower CFC, but not with joint bleeding. In conclusion, non-adherence in haemophilia was relatively rare, yet 1/3 of patients struggled to administer prophylaxis at the appropriate time of day. PMID:27098446

  6. Nosocomial Pneumonia in Mechanically Ventilated Patients Receiving Ranitidine or Sucralfate as Stress Ulcer Prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smita Prakash

    2008-01-01

    We concluded that stress ulcer prophylaxis with ranitidine increases the risk for late- onset pneumonia in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients by favoring gastric colonization by gram- negative bacilli compared with sucralfate. In patients receiving mechanical ventilation, the use of sucralfate may be preferable to H 2 blockers.

  7. Impact of a pharmacist/physician cooperative target drug monitoring program on prophylactic antibiotic prescribing in obstetrics and gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, K A; Henderson, P L; Newman, R B; Blackwelder, E N; Caldwell, R D

    1992-03-01

    The pharmacist's role in promoting rational, cost-effective use of drugs has been described in the literature. In a target drug monitoring program (TDMP), a single agent or group of agents becomes targeted for review. Antibiotics have been the primary focus of TDMP because of their therapeutic impact and cost considerations. The objectives of this project were to assess the prophylactic antibiotic prescribing habits of OB/GYN physicians and to evaluate the impact of a pharmacist/physician cooperative TDMP on prophylactic antibiotic prescribing and cost. The study was conducted in three phases: 1) a retrospective chart review of 150 patients, 2) an in-service education session, and 3) a concurrent chart review of 107 patients. Patient selection, timing of preoperative dose, and use of single dose prophylaxis were according to criteria in greater than 90% of patients both before and after the in-service training. Compliance with recommended regimens increased from 45 to 73% after the in-service training. A cost savings was not realized because the physicians wished to use a regimen with anti-anaerobic coverage (i.e., cefotetan) rather than a less expensive agent. However, the cost of selection of resistant organisms must be considered when discouraging the use of multiple broad spectrum agents. Active involvement of the medical staff in a pharmacy-based TDMP produces a cooperative atmosphere in which to educate clinicians and promote rational prescribing habits. PMID:10116721

  8. Efeito dos antimicrobianos sobre a eficácia dos contraceptivos orais Effect of antibiotics over oral contraceptive effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabete Míriam de Carvalho CORRÊA

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available O uso dos antimicrobianos para a profilaxia e tratamento de infecções orais é uma prática comum em odontologia. Sendo assim, é importante que o dentista conheça os riscos potenciais de seu uso, como reações adversas e interações medicamentosas. Uma importante interação envolve o uso concomitante de antimicrobianos e contraceptivos orais, podendo resultar em perda da eficácia contraceptiva e gravidez inesperada. Este artigo faz uma revisão sobre os principais antimicrobianos e possíveis mecanismos envolvidos no processo, assim como analisa a responsabilidade do dentista e os meios de se prevenir tal complicação.The use of antibiotics for prophylaxis and treatment of oral infections is a normal practice in Dentistry. So, it is important that dentists be aware of the potential risks of their use such as adverse reactions and drug interactions. An important interaction involves the concomitant use of antibiotics and oral contraceptives, resulting in reduced contraceptive effectiveness and unexpected pregnancy. This paper reviews the antibiotics most often associated with this problem and possible mechanisms involved in causing failure of contraception. It also examines the dentist's responsibility and the means of preventing such complications.

  9. Status Report from the Scientific Panel on Antibiotic Use in Dermatology of the American Acne and Rosacea Society: Part 1: Antibiotic Prescribing Patterns, Sources of Antibiotic Exposure, Antibiotic Consumption and Emergence of Antibiotic Resistance, Impact of Alterations in Antibiotic Prescribing, and Clinical Sequelae of Antibiotic Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rosso, James Q; Webster, Guy F; Rosen, Ted; Thiboutot, Diane; Leyden, James J; Gallo, Richard; Walker, Clay; Zhanel, George; Eichenfield, Lawrence

    2016-04-01

    Oral and topical antibiotics are commonly prescribed in dermatologie practice, often for noninfectious disorders, such as acne vulgaris and rosacea. Concerns related to antibiotic exposure from both medical and nonmedical sources require that clinicians consider in each case why and how antibiotics are being used and to make appropriate adjustments to limit antibiotic exposure whenever possible. This first article of a three-part series discusses prescribing patterns in dermatology, provides an overview of sources of antibiotic exposure, reviews the relative correlations between the magnitude of antibiotic consumption and emergence of antibiotic resistance patterns, evaluates the impact of alterations in antibiotic prescribing, and discusses the potential relevance and clinical sequelae of antibiotic use, with emphasis on how antibiotics are used in dermatology. PMID:27462384

  10. [WHO recommended pre-exposure prophylaxis for rabies using Japanese rabies vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Naoki; Takayama, Naohide; Suganuma, Akihiko

    2008-09-01

    After severe exposure to suspected rabid animal, WHO recommends a complete vaccine series using a potent effective vaccine that meets WHO criteria, and administration of rabies immunoglobulin (RIG). RIG is not available globally, and is not marketed in Japan. If pre-exposure prophylaxis for rabies is given, RIG is unnecessary even after severe exposure. It is thus important to give pre-exposure prophylaxis for rabies to people who plan to go to rabies-endemic areas. In Japan, pre-exposure prophylaxis for rabies consists of 3 doses of cell-culture rabies vaccine. The first two doses are given 4 weeks apart, and the third dose is given 6-12 months after the first dose, all of which are injected subcutaneously (standard regimen). People who plan to travel abroad to rabies-endemic areas may know of their destinations only 1 or 2 months in advance at best. Therefore, it is virtually impossible to complete the 3 dose regimen for rabies in Japan. Pre-exposure prophylaxis recommended by WHO consists of 3 doses given intramuscularly on days 0, 7, and 28, making it possible to complete pre-exposure prophylaxis in one month. This WHO recommended pre-exposure prophylaxis using Japanese cell-cultured rabies vaccine (PCEC-K) has not been studied, so we elected to fill the gap using PCEC-K, administered based on the WHO recommendation and examined its efficacy and safety. Subjects were 26 healthy volunteers with no previous rabies vaccination giving oral and written consent. Vaccine was administered on days 0, 7, and 28, and rabies antibody levels were tested on days 7, 28, and 42. On day 7, every antibody level was negative. On day 28, antibody levels were between 0.7-3.5 EU/ mL, with the exception of 3 cases still negative. On day 42, all cases, including the 3 negative cases, exceeded 1.6 EU/mL, providing sufficient protection against rabies. This result was not inferior compared to the standard regimen. Local adverse effects such as erythema and pain were noted, but none were

  11. Topical and oral antibiotics for acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rosso, James Q

    2016-06-01

    Antibiotics, both oral and topical, have been an integral component of the management of acne vulgaris (AV) for approximately 6 decades. Originally thought to be effective for AV due to their ability to inhibit proliferation of Propionibacterium acnes, it is now believed that at least some antibiotics also exert anti-inflammatory effects that provide additional therapeutic benefit. To add, an increase in strains of P acnes and other exposed bacteria that are less sensitive to antibiotics used to treat AV have emerged, with resistance directly correlated geographically with the magnitude of antibiotic use. Although antibiotics still remain part of the therapeutic armamentarium for AV treatment, current recommendations support the following when used to treat AV: 1) monotherapy use should be avoided; 2) use benzoyl peroxide concomitantly to reduce emergence of resistant P acnes strains; 3) oral antibiotics should be used in combination with a topical regimen for moderate-to-severe inflammatory AV; and 4) use oral antibiotics over a limited duration to achieve control of inflammatory AV with an exit plan in place to discontinue their use as soon as possible. When selecting an oral antibiotic to treat AV, potential adverse effects are important to consider. PMID:27416309

  12. [Modification of antibiotic resistance in microbial symbiosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznabaeva, L M; Usviatsov, B Ia; Bukharin, O V

    2010-01-01

    In antibiotic therapy it is necessary to use drugs active against the pathogen in its association with the host normal microflora. The aim of the study was to investigate modification of antibiotic resistance under conditions of the pathogen association with the representatives of the host normal microflora and to develop the microbiological criteria for determining effectiveness of antibacterials. Modification of microbial antibiotic resistance was investigated in 408 associations. Various changes in the antibiotic resistance of the strains were revealed: synergism, antagonism and indifference. On the basis of the results it was concluded that in the choice of the antibiotic active against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes the preference should be given to oxacillin, gentamicin and levomycetin, since the resistance of the pathogens to these antibiotics under the association conditions did not increase, which could contribute to their destruction, whereas the resistance of the normoflora increased or did not change, which was important for its retention in the biocenosis. The data on changeability of the antibiotic resistance of the microbial strains under the association conditions made it possible to develop microbiological criteria for determining effectiveness of antibiotics in the treatment of inflammatory diseases of microbial etiology (RF Patent No. 2231554). PMID:21033469

  13. Antibiotics: Pharmacists Can Make the Difference

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-04-16

    In this podcast, a pharmacist counsels a frustrated father about appropriate antibiotic use and symptomatic relief options for his son's cold.  Created: 4/16/2015 by Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Disease (NCIRD), Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Program.   Date Released: 4/16/2015.

  14. Mining metagenomic datasets for antibiotic resistance genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibiotics are medicines that are used to kill, slow down, or prevent the growth of susceptible bacteria. They became widely used in the mid 20th century for controlling disease in humans, animals, and plants, and for a variety of industrial purposes. Antibiotic resistance is a broad term. There ...

  15. Antibiotic resistance: a physicist’s view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Rosalind; Waclaw, Bartłomiej

    2016-08-01

    The problem of antibiotic resistance poses challenges across many disciplines. One such challenge is to understand the fundamental science of how antibiotics work, and how resistance to them can emerge. This is an area where physicists can make important contributions. Here, we highlight cases where this is already happening, and suggest directions for further physics involvement in antimicrobial research.

  16. Antibiotic tolerance and resistance in biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    One of the most important features of microbial biofilms is their tolerance to antimicrobial agents and components of the host immune system. The difficulty of treating biofilm infections with antibiotics is a major clinical problem. Although antibiotics may decrease the number of bacteria in...

  17. Snort Sniffle Sneeze: No Antibiotics Please

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-09-29

    Antibiotics aren't always the answer for sneezes or sore throats. This podcast discusses ways to feel better without antibiotics.  Created: 9/29/2009 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 9/29/2009.

  18. Antibiotic RX in Hospitals: Proceed with Caution

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-03-04

    This podcast is based on the March 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Antibiotics save lives, but poor prescribing practices can put patients at risk for health problems. Learn how to protect patients by protecting antibiotics.  Created: 3/4/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 3/4/2014.

  19. Analysis of antibiotic consumption in burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleymanzadeh-Moghadam, Somayeh; Azimi, Leila; Amani, Laleh; Rastegar Lari, Aida; Alinejad, Faranak; Rastegar Lari, Abdolaziz

    2015-01-01

    Infection control is very important in burn care units, because burn wound infection is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality among burn patients. Thus, the appropriate prescription of antibiotics can be helpful, but unreasonable prescription can have detrimental consequences, including greater expenses to patients and community alike. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of antibiotic therapy on the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. 525 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii and Staphylococcus aureus were isolated from 335 hospitalized burn patients. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed after identification the strains. The records of patients were audited to find the antibiotic used. The results indicated that P. aeruginosa is the most prevalent Gram-negative bacteria. Further, it showed a relation between abuse of antibiotics and emergence of antibiotic resistance. Control of resistance to antibiotics by appropriate prescription practices not only facilitates prevention of infection caused by multi-drug resistant (MDR) microorganisms, but it can also decrease the cost of treatment. PMID:26124986

  20. Analysis of antibiotic consumption in burn patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soleymanzadeh-Moghadam, Somayeh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Infection control is very important in burn care units, because burn wound infection is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality among burn patients. Thus, the appropriate prescription of antibiotics can be helpful, but unreasonable prescription can have detrimental consequences, including greater expenses to patients and community alike. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of antibiotic therapy on the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. 525 strains of and were isolated from 335 hospitalized burn patients. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed after identification the strains. The records of patients were audited to find the antibiotic used.The results indicated that is the most prevalent Gram-negative bacteria. Further, it showed a relation between abuse of antibiotics and emergence of antibiotic resistance. Control of resistance to antibiotics by appropriate prescription practices not only facilitates prevention of infection caused by multi-drug resistant (MDR microorganisms, but it can also decrease the cost of treatment.

  1. Antibiotic research and development: business as usual?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harbarth, S.; Theuretzbacher, U.; Hackett, J.; Hulscher, M.

    2015-01-01

    The global burden of antibiotic resistance is tremendous and, without new anti-infective strategies, will continue to increase in the coming decades. Despite the growing need for new antibiotics, few pharmaceutical companies today retain active antibacterial drug discovery programmes. One reason is

  2. Feasibility of intermittent pneumatic compression for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis during magnetic resonance imaging-guided interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •The controller of a standard SCD is labeled as an “MR-unsafe”. •No commercially available “MR-safe” SCDs. •Standard SCDs can be used in iMRI by placing the device outside the MRI scanner room. •Using serial extension tubing did not cause device failure. -- Abstract: Purpose: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized and surgical patients. To reduce risk, perioperative VTE prophylaxis is recommended for cancer patients undergoing surgical or interventional procedures. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used in interventional oncology when alternative imaging modalities do not adequately delineate malignancies. Extended periods of immobilization during MRI-guided interventions necessitate an MR compatible sequential compression device (SCD) for intra-procedural mechanical VTE prophylaxis. Such devices are not commercially available. Materials and methods: A standard SCD routinely used at our institution for VTE prophylaxis during interventional procedures was used. To satisfy MR safety requirements, the SCD controller was placed in the MR control room and connected to the compression sleeves in the magnet room through the wave guide using tubing extensions. The controller pressure sensor was used to monitor adequate pressure delivery and detect ineffective low or abnormal high pressure delivery. VTE prophylaxis was provided using the above mentioned device for 38 patients undergoing MR-guided ablations. Results: There was no evidence of device failure due to loss of pressure in the extension tubing assembly. No interference with the anesthesia or interventional procedures was documented. Conclusion: Although the controller of a standard SCD is labeled as “MR-unsafe”, the SCD can be used in interventional MR settings by placing the device outside the MR scanner room. Using serial tubing extensions did not cause device failure. The described method can be used to provide

  3. Breakthrough invasive fungal disease in patients receiving posaconazole primary prophylaxis: a 4-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerolle, N; Raffoux, E; Socie, G; Touratier, S; Sauvageon, H; Porcher, R; Bretagne, S; Bergeron, A; Azoulay, E; Molina, J-M; Lafaurie, M

    2014-11-01

    Posaconazole (PSC) is currently recommended as primary prophylaxis in neutropenic patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and in allogenic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) recipients with graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Studies focusing on breakthrough invasive fungal disease (IFD) upon PSC prophylaxis show disparate results. In order to evaluate the incidence of IFD in patients on PSC prophylaxis and identify IFD risk factors, we carried out a retrospective study of all consecutive patients on PP from January 2007 to December 2010 in our hospital. Breakthrough IFDs were identified from the database of the central pharmacy and the French administrative database (PMSI), registering final medical diagnoses of hospitalized patients. Medical data were reviewed to study proven or probable IFD, according to EORTC/MSG definition. PSC plasma concentrations (PPC) were also retrieved. Poisson models were used for statistical analysis. Two hundred and seventy-nine patients received PSC prophylaxis for a median duration of 1.4 months (range 0.2-17.9). Proven (n=6) or probable (n=3) IFDs were diagnosed in nine cases (3.2%). IFD incidence rate per 100 person-month was 1.65 (95% CI, 0.79-2.97). IFDs were candidaemia (Candida glabrata, n=2), pulmonary invasive aspergillosis (n=3), disseminated fusariosis (n=2) and pulmonary mucormycosis (n=2). Seven deaths were reported, directly related to IFD in three patients (33.3%). First dosage of PPC under 0.3 mg/L was the single significant risk factor for IFD (RR, 7.77; 95% CI, 1.30-46.5; p 0.025). Breakthrough IFD in patients receiving PSC prophylaxis is rare but associated with a poor outcome. Low PSC plasma concentrations are associated with an increased risk of IFD. PMID:24861577

  4. Feasibility of intermittent pneumatic compression for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis during magnetic resonance imaging-guided interventions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maybody, Majid, E-mail: maybodym@mskcc.org [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Taslakian, Bedros, E-mail: bt05@aub.edu.lb [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Riad El-Solh, 1107 2020 Beirut (Lebanon); Durack, Jeremy C., E-mail: durackj@mskcc.org [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Kaye, Elena A., E-mail: kayee@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Erinjeri, Joseph P., E-mail: erinjerj@mskcc.org [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Srimathveeravalli, Govindarajan, E-mail: srimaths@mskcc.org [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Solomon, Stephen B., E-mail: solomons@mskcc.org [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •The controller of a standard SCD is labeled as an “MR-unsafe”. •No commercially available “MR-safe” SCDs. •Standard SCDs can be used in iMRI by placing the device outside the MRI scanner room. •Using serial extension tubing did not cause device failure. -- Abstract: Purpose: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized and surgical patients. To reduce risk, perioperative VTE prophylaxis is recommended for cancer patients undergoing surgical or interventional procedures. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used in interventional oncology when alternative imaging modalities do not adequately delineate malignancies. Extended periods of immobilization during MRI-guided interventions necessitate an MR compatible sequential compression device (SCD) for intra-procedural mechanical VTE prophylaxis. Such devices are not commercially available. Materials and methods: A standard SCD routinely used at our institution for VTE prophylaxis during interventional procedures was used. To satisfy MR safety requirements, the SCD controller was placed in the MR control room and connected to the compression sleeves in the magnet room through the wave guide using tubing extensions. The controller pressure sensor was used to monitor adequate pressure delivery and detect ineffective low or abnormal high pressure delivery. VTE prophylaxis was provided using the above mentioned device for 38 patients undergoing MR-guided ablations. Results: There was no evidence of device failure due to loss of pressure in the extension tubing assembly. No interference with the anesthesia or interventional procedures was documented. Conclusion: Although the controller of a standard SCD is labeled as “MR-unsafe”, the SCD can be used in interventional MR settings by placing the device outside the MR scanner room. Using serial tubing extensions did not cause device failure. The described method can be used to provide

  5. The 'liaisons dangereuses' between iron and antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezraty, Benjamin; Barras, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    The decline in the rate of new antibiotic discovery is of growing concern, and new antibacterial strategies must now be explored. This review brings together research in two fields (metals in biology and antibiotics) in the hope that collaboration between scientists working in these two areas will lead to major advances in understanding and the development of new approaches to tackling microbial pathogens. Metals have been used as antiseptics for centuries. In this review, we focus on iron, an essential trace element that can nevertheless be toxic to bacteria. We review the many situations in which iron and antibiotics have combinatorial effects when used together. Understanding the molecular relationships between iron and antibiotics, from pure chemistry to gene reprogramming via biochemical competition, is important not only to increase basic knowledge, but also for the development of treatments against pathogens, with a view to optimizing antibiotic efficacy. PMID:26945776

  6. Biosynthesis of enediyne antitumor antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lanen, Steven G; Shen, Ben

    2008-01-01

    The enediyne polyketides are secondary metabolites isolated from a variety of Actinomycetes. All members share very potent anticancer and antibiotic activity, and prospects for the clinical application of the enediynes has been validated with the recent marketing of two enediyne derivatives as anticancer agents. The biosynthesis of these compounds is of interest because of the numerous structural features that are unique to the enediyne family. The gene cluster for five enediynes has now been cloned and sequenced, providing the foundation to understand natures' means to biosynthesize such complex, exotic molecules. Presented here is a review of the current progress in delineating the biosynthesis of the enediynes with an emphasis on the model enediyne, C-1027. PMID:18397168

  7. Prophylactic antibiotics in transurethral prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, N; Christiansen, H.M.; Ehlers, D

    1984-01-01

    The study included 88 patients with sterile urine prior to transurethral prostatectomy. Forty-five received a preoperative dose of 2 g of cefotaxime (Claforan) and the remaining 43 were given 10 ml of 0.9% NaCl. The two groups did not differ in frequency of postoperative urinary infection (greate...... of infection and the few side effects of the infections that did occur, prophylactic treatment with an antibiotic is not indicated for transurethral prostatectomy in patients with sterile urine.......The study included 88 patients with sterile urine prior to transurethral prostatectomy. Forty-five received a preoperative dose of 2 g of cefotaxime (Claforan) and the remaining 43 were given 10 ml of 0.9% NaCl. The two groups did not differ in frequency of postoperative urinary infection (greater...

  8. Antibiotic resistance pattern in uropathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta V

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Uropathogenic strains from inpatient and outpatient departments were studied from April 1997 to March 1999 for their susceptibility profiles. The various isolates were Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, Acinetobacter baumanii and Enterococcus faecalis. Antibiotic susceptibility pattern of these isolates revealed that for outpatients, first generation cephalosporins, nitrofurantoin, norfloxacin/ciprofloxacin were effective for treatment of urinary tract infection but for inpatients, parenteral therapy with newer aminoglycosides and third generation cephalosporins need to be advocated as the organisms for nosocomial UTI exhibit a high degree of drug resistance. Trimethoprim and sulphamethoxazole combination was not found to be effective for the treatment of urinary tract infections as all the uropathogens from inpatients and outpatients showed high degree of resistance to co-trimoxazole. Culture and sensitivity of the isolates from urine samples should be done as a routine before advocating the therapy.

  9. Surgical site infection and pattern of antibiotic use in a tertiary care hospital in Peshawar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is most common complication following surgical procedures. The objective of the study was to collect information on SSI regarding the most frequent pathogen in cases operated in casualty of Lady Read ing Hospital (LRH) Peshawar, and sensitivity of the isolated pathogens to different antibiotics used. Methods: The study was carried out at surgical 'B' unit (SBU) LRH from Jan 1, 2009 till Dec 31, 2009. A total of 100 patients who developed SSI after being operated for peritonitis following traumatic gut perforations, perforated appendix and enteric perforation. The patients included presented to casualty, operated in casualty OT and were shifted to the SBU, LRH. Children and patients operated on the elective list were excluded. Data was collected on specially designed proforma. Demographic details, details of SSI, culture/sensitivity reports and antibiotic used for prophylaxis and after C/S report were recorded. Results: Out of a total of 100, 72 had superficial, 20 had organ/space and 8 had deep SSI. Organisms were isolated in 77 cases (77%). E. coli being most common pathogen (46%), followed by Pseudomonas (23%), mixed growth of Staph. Aureus or MRSA (13%), MRSA (5%) and Staph aureus (4%) in descending order. No growth was reported in 23% of cases. Conclusion: E.coli was the most common organism involved in SSI in SBU LRH. The incidence of infection with MRSA in our unit is high. Combination of antibiotics like pipreacillin/Tazobactam, Cefoperazone/Sulbactam, were most effective against the isolated organisms, except MRSA where Linezolid, vancomycin and Tiecoplanin were effective. (author)

  10. Antibiotics in Animal Feed Contribute to Drug-Resistant Germs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_158316.html Antibiotics in Animal Feed Contribute to Drug-Resistant Germs: Study Individual farm ... HealthDay News) -- Use of antibiotics in farm animal feed is helping drive the worldwide increase in antibiotic- ...

  11. Enabling factors for antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaruseviciene, Lina; Radzeviciene Jurgute, Ruta; Bjerrum, Lars;

    2013-01-01

    necessity for political leadership to encourage clinically grounded antibiotic use; over-the-counter sale of antibiotics; designation of antibiotics as reimbursable medications; supervision by external oversight institutions; lack of guidelines for the treatment of upper respiratory tract infections; and...

  12. Identification of Antibiotic Use Pattern as an Effort to Control Antibiotic Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan S. Pradipta

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to determine quantity and pattern of antibiotic use in hospitalized patients at one of Bandung’s private hospital that can give benefit in control of antibiotic resistance and procurement planning of antibiotic. Data of antibiotic consumption were obtained from hospital pharmacy department on February–September 2011. Data were processed using the ATC/DDD and DU90% method. There were 390,98 DDD/100 bed days and 381,34 DDD/100 bed days total of an-tbiotic use in 2009 and 2010. Thirty nine antibiotic were consumed in 2009 within 11 kind of antibiotics in DU90% segment (ceftriaxone, amoxicillin, cefotaxime, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, metronidazole, cefixime, doxycycline, thiamphenicol, cefodoxime, cefalexin and 44 antibiotic were consumed in 2010 within 18 kind of antibiotics in DU90% segment (ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, amoxicillin, cefixime, levofloxacin, cefadroxil, cefotaxime, metronidazole, thiamphenicol, doxycycline, clindamycin, chloramphenicol, amikacin, sulbactam, gentamycin, streptomycin, cefoperazone, canamycin. There were decline of antibiotic use that followed decline number of bed days/year in 2009–2010, but in both antibiotic kind and quantity of DU90% antibiotic group were increased.

  13. Abiotic degradation of antibiotic ionophores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrolytic and photolytic degradation were investigated for the ionophore antibiotics lasalocid, monensin, salinomycin, and narasin. The hydrolysis study was carried out by dissolving the ionophores in solutions of pH 4, 7, and 9, followed by incubation at three temperatures of 6, 22, and 28 °C for maximum 34 days. Using LC–MS/MS for chemical analysis, lasalocid was not found to hydrolyse in any of the tested environments. Monensin, salinomycin, and narasin were all stable in neutral or alkaline solution but hydrolysed in the solution with a pH of 4. Half-lives at 25 °C were calculated to be 13, 0.6, and 0.7 days for monensin, salinomycin, and narasin, respectively. Absorbance spectra from each compound indicated that only lasalocid is degraded by photolysis (half-life below 1 h) due to an absorbance maximum around 303 nm, and monensin, salinomycin, and narasin are resistant to direct photolysis because they absorb light of environmentally irrelevant wavelengths. -- Highlights: •Constants for calculation of hydrolysis rates are estimated. •At 25 °C and a pH of 4, monensin hydrolyses with a half-life (t1/2) of 13 days. •Salinomycin and narasin hydrolyse with t1/2 of half a day at 25 °C and a pH of 4. •Lasalocid does not hydrolyse, but is likely to be susceptible to direct photolysis. •Monensin, salinomycin and narasin are not susceptible to direct photolysis. -- Antibiotic ionophores were found to undergo either hydrolysis in acidic environments (monensin, salinomycin, and narasin) or photolysis (lasalocid)

  14. Systems, not pills: The options market for antibiotics seeks to rejuvenate the antibiotic pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogan, David M; Mossialos, Elias

    2016-02-01

    Over the past decade, there has been a growing recognition of the increasing growth of antibiotic resistant bacteria and a relative decline in the production of novel antibacterial therapies. The combination of these two forces poses a potentially grave threat to global health, in both developed and developing countries. Current market forces do not provide appropriate incentives to stimulate new antibiotic development, thus we propose a new incentive mechanism: the Options Market for Antibiotics. This mechanism, modelled on the principle of financial call options, allows payers to buy the right, in early stages of development, to purchase antibiotics at a discounted price if and when they ever make it to market approval. This paper demonstrates the effect of such a model on the expected Net Present Value of a typical antibacterial project. As part of an integrated strategy to confront the impending antibiotic crisis, the Options Market for Antibiotics may effectively stimulate corporate and public investment into antibiotic research and development. PMID:26808335

  15. Antibiotics and antibiotic-resistant bacteria in waters associated with a hospital in Ujjain, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marothi Yogyata

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Concerns have been raised about the public health implications of the presence of antibiotic residues in the aquatic environment and their effect on the development of bacterial resistance. While there is information on antibiotic residue levels in hospital effluent from some other countries, information on antibiotic residue levels in effluent from Indian hospitals is not available. Also, concurrent studies on antibiotic prescription quantity in a hospital and antibiotic residue levels and resistant bacteria in the effluent of the same hospital are few. Therefore, we quantified antibiotic residues in waters associated with a hospital in India and assessed their association, if any, with quantities of antibiotic prescribed in the hospital and the susceptibility of Escherichia coli found in the hospital effluent. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in a teaching hospital outside the city of Ujjain in India. Seven antibiotics - amoxicillin, ceftriaxone, amikacin, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin and levofloxacin - were selected. Prescribed quantities were obtained from hospital records. The samples of the hospital associated water were analysed for the above mentioned antibiotics using well developed and validated liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry technique after selectively isolating the analytes from the matrix using solid phase extraction. Escherichia coli isolates from these waters were tested for antibiotic susceptibility, by standard Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method using Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute breakpoints. Results Ciprofloxacin was the highest prescribed antibiotic in the hospital and its residue levels in the hospital wastewater were also the highest. In samples of the municipal water supply and the groundwater, no antibiotics were detected. There was a positive correlation between the quantity of antibiotics prescribed in the hospital and antibiotic residue levels in

  16. Evaluation of efficacy of iodine prophylaxis in Poland based on the examination of schoolchildren living in Opoczno Town (Lodz Voivodship)

    OpenAIRE

    Zygmunt Arkadiusz; Adamczewski Zbigniew; Wojciechowska-Durczyńska Katarzyna; Cyniak-Magierska Anna; Krawczyk-Rusiecka Kinga; Zygmunt Agnieszka; Karbownik-Lewińska Małgorzata; Lewiński Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background In 1997 a currently obligatory model of iodine prophylaxis, based on mandatory iodization of household salt with 30 mg KI/kg, was introduced. The aim of our study was to assess the iodine intake among school-age children living in Opoczno in 3 subsequent time points – in 1994, before establishment of currently operating model of iodine prophylaxis, in 1999 – 2 years after implementation of iodine prophylaxis and in 2010, – 14 years after its implementation. Methods We asse...

  17. Complete withdrawal of hepatitis B virus prophylaxis after liver transplantation in a recipient at high risk of recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Tian; Ye, Yufu; Geng, Lei; Zheng, Shusen

    2015-01-01

    With the potent nucleos (t) ide analogues developed, necessity of life-long combined prophylaxis against hepatitis B virus (HBV) recurrence after HBV-related liver transplantation has been challenged. But complete withdrawal of HBV prophylaxis has not been previously observed in patients at high recurrence risk who showed active HBV replication before transplant. Herein, we describe a patient with positive HBeAg and HBV-DNA at the time of liver transplantation, who experienced complete HBV prophylaxis withdrawal after 3 years’ application of hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) and entecavir, and showed no HBV recurrence during a long term of follow-up. PMID:26221402

  18. [Antibiotic sensitivity to epidemic strains of Vibrio cholerae and Shigella dysenteriae 1 isolated in Rwandan refugee camps in Zaire].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, J D; Niel, L; Talarmin, A; Dubrous, P

    1995-01-01

    Multiresistance or epidemic enteric bacteria to antibiotics greatly complicates treatment, and in some cases prophylaxis, of severe invasive gastroenteritis. During the summer of 1994, two epidemics of diarrhea, one due to Vibrio cholerae and the other to Shigella dysenteriae 1 isolated from the Goma and Bukavu camps was determined by measurement of the Agar Minimal Inhibitory Concentration. Multiresistance to tetracyclins, aminopenicillins, trimethoprimsulfamethoxazole, and nifuroxazide was observed. After intensive treatment mutant forms of both bacteria resistant to nalidixic acid rapidly appeared. Only fluoroquinolones remained active on these mutant strains, but the availability of this agent in Africa is restricted due to cost. The most effective way of preventing resistance is to limit the spread of enteric infections by health education and improvement of hygiene. This can be difficult during wartime. PMID:8830219

  19. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work - Sinus Infection (Sinusitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recommendations Pediatric Treatment Recommendations Inpatient Healthcare Professionals Community Pharmacists Continuing Education & Curriculum Opportunities Weighing in on Antibiotic Resistance Improving Prescribing Outpatient Antibiotic Stewardship Interventions That Work Systematic Reviews ...

  20. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work - Influenza (Flu)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recommendations Pediatric Treatment Recommendations Inpatient Healthcare Professionals Community Pharmacists Continuing Education & Curriculum Opportunities Weighing in on Antibiotic Resistance Improving Prescribing Outpatient Antibiotic Stewardship Interventions That Work Systematic Reviews ...

  1. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work - Ear Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recommendations Pediatric Treatment Recommendations Inpatient Healthcare Professionals Community Pharmacists Continuing Education & Curriculum Opportunities Weighing in on Antibiotic Resistance Improving Prescribing Outpatient Antibiotic Stewardship Interventions That Work Systematic Reviews ...

  2. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work - Urinary Tract Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recommendations Pediatric Treatment Recommendations Inpatient Healthcare Professionals Community Pharmacists Continuing Education & Curriculum Opportunities Weighing in on Antibiotic Resistance Improving Prescribing Outpatient Antibiotic Stewardship Interventions That Work Systematic Reviews ...

  3. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work - Sore Throat

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recommendations Pediatric Treatment Recommendations Inpatient Healthcare Professionals Community Pharmacists Continuing Education & Curriculum Opportunities Weighing in on Antibiotic Resistance Improving Prescribing Outpatient Antibiotic Stewardship Interventions That Work Systematic Reviews ...

  4. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work - Symptom Relief

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recommendations Pediatric Treatment Recommendations Inpatient Healthcare Professionals Community Pharmacists Continuing Education & Curriculum Opportunities Weighing in on Antibiotic Resistance Improving Prescribing Outpatient Antibiotic Stewardship Interventions That Work Systematic Reviews ...

  5. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work - What You Can Do

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recommendations Pediatric Treatment Recommendations Inpatient Healthcare Professionals Community Pharmacists Continuing Education & Curriculum Opportunities Weighing in on Antibiotic Resistance Improving Prescribing Outpatient Antibiotic Stewardship Interventions That Work Systematic Reviews ...

  6. The incidence and risk factors of resistant E. coli infections after prostate biopsy under fluoroquinolone prophylaxis: a single-centre experience with 2215 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandemir, Özlem; Bozlu, Murat; Efesoy, Ozan; Güntekin, Onur; Tek, Mesut; Akbay, Erdem

    2016-08-01

    We evaluated the incidence and risk factors of resistant Escherichia coli infections after the prostate biopsy under flouroquinolone prophylaxis. From January 2003 to December 2012, we retrospectively evaluated the records of 2215 patients. The risk factors were described for infective complications and resistant E. coli in positive cultures was calculated. Of 2215 patients, 153 had positive urine cultures, such as 129 (84·3%) E. coli, 8 (5·2%) Enterococcus spp., 6 (3·9%) Enterobacter spp., 5 (3·2%) Pseudomonas spp., 3 (1·9%) MRCNS, and 2 (1·3%) Klebsiella spp. Of the positive urine cultures which yielded E. coli, 99 (76·7%) were evaluated for fluoroquinolone resistance. Of those, 83 (83·8%) were fluoroquinolone-resistant and composed of 51 (61·4%) extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-positive. Fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli ratios were 73·4 and 95·9% before 2008 and after 2008, respectively (P = 0·002). The most sensitive antibiotics for fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli strains were imipenem (100%), amikacin (84%) and cefoperazone (83%). The use of quinolones in the last 6 months and a history of hospitalization in the last 30 days were found to be significant risk factors. We found that resistant E. coli strains might be a common microorganism in patients with this kind of complication. The risk factors for development of infection with these resistant strains were history of the use of fluoroquinolones and hospitalization. PMID:25630553

  7. "Practical knowledge" and perceptions of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance among drugsellers in Tanzanian private drugstores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomson Göran

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies indicate that antibiotics are sold against regulation and without prescription in private drugstores in rural Tanzania. The objective of the study was to explore and describe antibiotics sale and dispensing practices and link it to drugseller knowledge and perceptions of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance. Methods Exit customers of private drugstores in eight districts were interviewed about the drugstore encounter and drugs bought. Drugsellers filled in a questionnaire with closed- and open-ended questions about antibiotics and resistance. Data were analyzed using mixed quantitative and qualitative methods. Results Of 350 interviewed exit customers, 24% had bought antibiotics. Thirty percent had seen a health worker before coming and almost all of these had a prescription. Antibiotics were dispensed mainly for cough, stomachache, genital complaints and diarrhea but not for malaria or headache. Dispensed drugs were assessed as relevant for the symptoms or disease presented in 83% of all cases and 51% for antibiotics specifically. Non-prescribed drugs were assessed as more relevant than the prescribed. The knowledge level of the drugseller was ranked as high or very high by 75% of the respondents. Seventy-five drugsellers from three districts participated. Seventy-nine percent stated that diseases caused by bacteria can be treated with antibiotics but 24% of these also said that antibiotics can be used for treating viral disease. Most (85% said that STI can be treated with antibiotics while 1% said the same about headache, 4% general weakness and 3% 'all diseases'. Seventy-two percent had heard of antibiotic resistance. When describing what an antibiotic is, the respondents used six different kinds of keywords. Descriptions of what antibiotic resistance is and how it occurs were quite rational from a biomedical point of view with some exceptions. They gave rise to five categories and one theme: Perceiving antibiotic

  8. [Antibiotic resistance of bacteria to 6 antibiotics in secondary effluents of municipal wastewater treatment plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Sun-Qin; Li, Yi; Huang, Jing-Jing; Wei, Bin; Hu, Hong-Ying

    2011-11-01

    Prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in wastewater effluents is concerned as an emerging contaminant. To estimate antibiotic resistance in secondary effluents of municipal wastewater treatment plants, antibiotic tolerance of heterotrophic bacteria, proportion of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and hemi-inhibitory concentrations of six antibiotics (penicillin, ampicillin, cefalexin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline and rifampicin) were determined at two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Beijing. The results showed that proportions of ampicillin-resistant bacteria in WWTP-G and chloramphenicol-resistant bacteria in WWTP-Q were highest to 59% and 44%, respectively. The concentrations of ampicillin-resistant bacteria in the effluents of WWTP-G and WWTP-Q were as high as 4.0 x 10(3) CFU x mL(-1) and 3.5 x 10(4) CFU x mL(-1), respectively; the concentrations of chloramphenicol-resistant bacteria were 4.9 x 10(2) CFU x mL(-1) and 4.6 x 10(4) CFU x mL(-1), respectively. The data also indicated that the hemi-inhibitory concentrations of heterotrophic bacteria to 6 antibiotics were much higher than common concentrations of antibiotics in sewages, which suggested that antibiotic-resistant bacteria could exist over a long period in the effluents with low concentrations of antibiotics. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria could be a potential microbial risk during sewage effluent reuse or emission into environmental waters. PMID:22295644

  9. Environmental dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and correlation to anthropogenic contamination with antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Berglund

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is a growing problem which threatens modern healthcare globally. Resistance has traditionally been viewed as a clinical problem, but recently non-clinical environments have been highlighted as an important factor in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs. Horizontal gene transfer (HGT events are likely to be common in aquatic environments; integrons in particular are well suited for mediating environmental dissemination of ARGs. A growing body of evidence suggests that ARGs are ubiquitous in natural environments. Particularly, elevated levels of ARGs and integrons in aquatic environments are correlated to proximity to anthropogenic activities. The source of this increase is likely to be routine discharge of antibiotics and resistance genes, for example, via wastewater or run-off from livestock facilities and agriculture. While very high levels of antibiotic contamination are likely to select for resistant bacteria directly, the role of sub-inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics in environmental antibiotic resistance dissemination remains unclear. In vitro studies have shown that low levels of antibiotics can select for resistant mutants and also facilitate HGT, indicating the need for caution. Overall, it is becoming increasingly clear that the environment plays an important role in dissemination of antibiotic resistance; further studies are needed to elucidate key aspects of this process. Importantly, the levels of environmental antibiotic contamination at which resistant bacteria are selected for and HGT is facilitated at should be determined. This would enable better risk analyses and facilitate measures for preventing dissemination and development of antibiotic resistance in the environment.

  10. Fungal treatment for the removal of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes in veterinary hospital wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, D; Badia-Fabregat, M; Vicent, T; Caminal, G; Rodríguez-Mozaz, S; Balcázar, J L; Barceló, D

    2016-06-01

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance represents one of the most important public health concerns and has been linked to the widespread use of antibiotics in veterinary and human medicine. The overall elimination of antibiotics in conventional wastewater treatment plants is quite low; therefore, residual amounts of these compounds are continuously discharged to receiving surface waters, which may promote the emergence of antibiotic resistance. In this study, the ability of a fungal treatment as an alternative wastewater treatment for the elimination of forty-seven antibiotics belonging to seven different groups (β-lactams, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, metronidazoles, sulfonamides, tetracyclines, and trimethoprim) was evaluated. 77% of antibiotics were removed after the fungal treatment, which is higher than removal obtained in conventional treatment plants. Moreover, the effect of fungal treatment on the removal of some antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) was evaluated. The fungal treatment was also efficient in removing ARGs, such as ermB (resistance to macrolides), tetW (resistance to tetracyclines), blaTEM (resistance to β-lactams), sulI (resistance to sulfonamides) and qnrS (reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones). However, it was not possible to establish a clear link between concentrations of antibiotics and corresponding ARGs in wastewater, which leads to the conclusion that there are other factors that should be taken into consideration besides the antibiotic concentrations that reach aquatic ecosystems in order to explain the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance. PMID:26991378

  11. Antibiotic sensitivity profiles determined with an Escherichia coli gene knockout collection: generating an antibiotic bar code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Anne; Tran, Lillian; Becket, Elinne; Lee, Kim; Chinn, Laney; Park, Eunice; Tran, Katherine; Miller, Jeffrey H

    2010-04-01

    We have defined a sensitivity profile for 22 antibiotics by extending previous work testing the entire KEIO collection of close to 4,000 single-gene knockouts in Escherichia coli for increased susceptibility to 1 of 14 different antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, rifampin [rifampicin], vancomycin, ampicillin, sulfamethoxazole, gentamicin, metronidazole, streptomycin, fusidic acid, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, nitrofurantoin, erythromycin, and triclosan). We screened one or more subinhibitory concentrations of each antibiotic, generating more than 80,000 data points and allowing a reduction of the entire collection to a set of 283 strains that display significantly increased sensitivity to at least one of the antibiotics. We used this reduced set of strains to determine a profile for eight additional antibiotics (spectinomycin, cephradine, aztreonem, colistin, neomycin, enoxacin, tobramycin, and cefoxitin). The profiles for the 22 antibiotics represent a growing catalog of sensitivity fingerprints that can be separated into two components, multidrug-resistant mutants and those mutants that confer relatively specific sensitivity to the antibiotic or type of antibiotic tested. The latter group can be represented by a set of 20 to 60 strains that can be used for the rapid typing of antibiotics by generating a virtual bar code readout of the specific sensitivities. Taken together, these data reveal the complexity of intrinsic resistance and provide additional targets for the design of codrugs (or combinations of drugs) that potentiate existing antibiotics. PMID:20065048

  12. Long-term antibiotic exposure in soil is associated with changes in microbial community structure and prevalence of class 1 integrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, David W; Bishop, Alistair H; Zhang, Lihong; Topp, Edward; Wellington, Elizabeth M H; Gaze, William H

    2016-10-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is one of the most significant challenges facing the global medical community and can be attributed to the use and misuse of antibiotics. This includes use as growth promoters or for prophylaxis and treatment of bacterial infection in intensively farmed livestock from where antibiotics can enter the environment as residues in manure. We characterised the impact of the long-term application of a mixture of veterinary antibiotics alone (tylosin, sulfamethazine and chlortetracycline) on class 1 integron prevalence and soil microbiota composition. Class 1 integron prevalence increased significantly (P Soil microbiota was analysed using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and revealed significant alterations in composition. Of the 19 significantly different (P < 0.05) OTUs identified, 16 were of the Class Proteobacteria and these decreased in abundance relative to the control plots. Only one OTU, of the Class Cyanobacteria, was shown to increase in abundance significantly; a curiosity given the established sensitivity of this class to antibiotics. We hypothesise that the overrepresentation of Proteobacteria as OTUs that decreased significantly in relative abundance, coupled with the observations of an increase in integron prevalence, may represent a strong selective pressure on these taxa. PMID:27495240

  13. A Systematic Appraisal of Neurosurgical Seizure Prophylaxis: Guidance for Critical Care Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, David; Singatullina, Nataliya; Reilly, Charles

    2016-07-01

    Clinical decisions are often made in the presence of some uncertainty. Health care should be based on a combination of scientific evidence, clinical experience, economics, patient value judgments, and preferences. Seizures are not uncommon following brain injury, surgical trauma, hemorrhage, altered brain metabolism, hypoxia, or ischemic events. The impact of seizures in the immediate aftermath of injury may be a prolonged intensive care stay or compounding of the primary injury. The aim of brain injury management is to limit the consequences of the secondary damage. The original intention of seizure prophylaxis was to limit the incidence of early-onset seizures. However, clinical trials have been equivocal on this point, and there is concern about the adverse effects of antiepileptic drug therapy. This review of the literature raises concerns regarding the arbitrary division of seizures into early onset (7 d) and late onset (8 d and beyond). In many cases it would appear that seizures present within 24 hours of the injury or after 7 days, which would be outside of the scope of current seizure prophylaxis guidance. There also does not appear to be a pathophysiological reason to divide brain injury-related seizures into these timeframes. Therefore, a solution to the conundrum is to reevaluate current practice. Prophylaxis could be offered to those receiving intensive care for the primary brain injury, where the impact of seizure would be detrimental to the management of the brain injury, or other clinical judgments where prophylaxis is prudent. Neurosurgical seizure management can then focus attention on which agent has the best adverse effect profile and the duration of therapy. The evidence seems to support levetiracetam as the most appropriate agent. Although previous reviews have identified an increase cost associated with the use of levetiracetam, current cost comparisons with phenytoin demonstrate a marginal price differential. The aim of this review is to

  14. Broad spectrum antibiotic compounds and use thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koglin, Alexander; Strieker, Matthias

    2016-07-05

    The discovery of a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene cluster in the genome of Clostridium thermocellum that produces a secondary metabolite that is assembled outside of the host membrane is described. Also described is the identification of homologous NRPS gene clusters from several additional microorganisms. The secondary metabolites produced by the NRPS gene clusters exhibit broad spectrum antibiotic activity. Thus, antibiotic compounds produced by the NRPS gene clusters, and analogs thereof, their use for inhibiting bacterial growth, and methods of making the antibiotic compounds are described.

  15. Venous thromboembolism risk and prophylaxis in the acute hospital care setting: the Irish results of the ENDORSE study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, O

    2012-05-01

    ENDORSE (Epidemiologic International Day for the Evaluation of Patients at Risk for Venous Thromboembolism in the Acute Hospital Care Setting), is a multinational, cross-sectional survey of venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk prevalence and effective prophylaxis in the acute hospital care setting. Three Irish hospitals enrolled in the study. The American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) guidelines were employed to evaluate VTE risk and prophylaxis. Of 552 patients, 297 (53.8%) and 255 (46.2%) were categorised as surgical or medical, respectively, with 175 (59%) surgical and 109 (43%) medical patients deemed to be at risk for VTE. Of these, only 112 (64%) and 51 (47%) received recommended VTE prophylaxis, respectively. The results are consistent with those observed in other countries and demonstrate a high prevalence of risk for VTE and a low rate of prophylaxis use, particularly in medical patients. Awareness of VTE guidelines should be an integral component of health policy.

  16. Secondary prophylaxis with rFVIIa in hemophilia and inhibitors: Recommendations from an Experts Committee from Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Pérez Bianco

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Secondary prophylaxis with rFVIIa has been the subject of several publications in the past few years. However, there is no general consensus on how this treatment should be put into practice, as publications have been very heterogeneous in the dosing schedule they report. Furthermore, the mechanism of action of rFVIIa and its short half life have been used as arguments against its role in prophylaxis. There have been a series of recent publications that show that rFVIIa can traffic through the intact endothelium and be stored in the subendothelium of several organs for a prolonged period of time. In order to consensuate the role of rFVIIa in prophylaxis, a group of experts from Argentina, resumed available information regarding pharmacology and clinical experience with this treatment, and developed a series of recommendations to use this drug in the prophylaxis setting.

  17. Central nervous system prophylaxis in patients with aggressive diffuse large B cell lymphoma: an analysis of 3,258 patients in a single center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avilés, Agustin; Jesús Nambo, M; Neri, Natividad

    2013-06-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) relapse continues to be a frequent and usually fatal complication in patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Multiple factors identify the possibility of relapse and justify neurological prophylaxis; however, most of these have not been confirmed. Thus, the use of prophylaxis has not been defined. From 1988 to 2008, 3,258 patients with DLBCL with higher clinical risks and multiple extranodal involvement that have been treated with standard anthracycline-based chemotherapy: CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone) or CHOP-R (CHOP plus rituximab) and that achieve complete response were retrospectively analyzed to assess the efficacy of CNS prophylaxis. One thousand five patients received different schedules for CNS prophylaxis, and 2,253 patients did not receive CNS prophylaxis. CNS relapse was similar in patients who receive prophylaxis (6 %) compared to patients who did not receive prophylaxis (5.9 %). Overall survival of patients who either receive or did not receive prophylaxis was not statistically significant: 49 % versus 53 % (p = 0.802). Thus, it seems that CNS prophylaxis did not improve outcome in this special setting of patients, and no prognostic factors to predict the presence of CNS relapse were identified. It is evident that multicentric studies are necessary to define the role of prophylaxis in order to prevent CNS relapse and that the therapeutic procedure will be carefully revised. PMID:23456620

  18. Stress ulcer prophylaxis with a proton pump inhibitor versus placebo in critically ill patients (SUP-ICU trial)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Mette; Perner, Anders; Wetterslev, Jørn; Wise, Matt P; Borthwick, Mark; Bendel, Stepani; Pelosi, Paolo; Keus, Frederik; Guttormsen, Anne Berit; Schefold, Joerg C; Møller, Morten Hylander

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) are at risk of clinically important gastrointestinal bleeding, and acid suppressants are frequently used prophylactically. However, stress ulcer prophylaxis may increase the risk of serious adverse events and, additionally, the...... benefits and harms of stress ulcer prophylaxis with a proton pump inhibitor in critically ill adult patients admitted in the ICU. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02467621 ....

  19. Outbreak of Trichinellosis Due to Wild Boar Meat and Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Post Exposure Prophylaxis, Germany, 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Faber, Mirko; Schink, Susanne; Mayer-Scholl, Anne; Ziesch, Christoph; Schönfelder, Ralph; Wichmann-Schauer, Heidi; Stark, Klaus; Nöckler, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    Background: Food safety authorities discovered that wild boar meat products contaminated with Trichinella spiralis had entered the food chain in Germany in March 2013. Public health authorities issued guidelines for health professionals including post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) using mebendazole and advised the public to seek medical advice if exposed. Our objective was to identify factors associated with the development of trichinellosis and to evaluate post exposure prophylaxis. Methods:...

  20. Complete withdrawal of hepatitis B virus prophylaxis after liver transplantation in a recipient at high risk of recurrence

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Tian; Ye, Yufu; Geng, Lei; Zheng, Shusen

    2015-01-01

    With the potent nucleos (t) ide analogues developed, necessity of life-long combined prophylaxis against hepatitis B virus (HBV) recurrence after HBV-related liver transplantation has been challenged. But complete withdrawal of HBV prophylaxis has not been previously observed in patients at high recurrence risk who showed active HBV replication before transplant. Herein, we describe a patient with positive HBeAg and HBV-DNA at the time of liver transplantation, who experienced complete HBV pr...

  1. Substantial variation in post-engraftment infection prophylaxis and revaccination practice in autologous stem cell transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, H Y; Grigg, A

    2016-03-01

    There is a paucity of evidence supporting the necessity or duration of Pneumocystis jirovecii and antiviral prophylaxis as well as revaccination following autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT). A survey aimed at evaluating these policies was distributed to 34 ASCT centres across Australasia. The 26 survey respondents demonstrated significant heterogeneity in their infection prophylaxis and revaccination strategy post-transplant despite the availability of consensual guidelines. PMID:26968596

  2. Is travel prophylaxis worth while? Economic appraisal of prophylactic measures against malaria, hepatitis A, and typhoid in travellers.

    OpenAIRE

    Behrens, R. H.; Roberts, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To estimate the costs and benefits of prophylaxis against travel acquired malaria, typhoid fever, and hepatitis A in United Kingdom residents during 1991. DESIGN--Retrospective analysis of national epidemiological and economic data. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Incidence of travel associated infections in susceptible United Kingdom residents per visit; costs of prophylaxis provision from historical data; benefits to the health sector, community, and individuals in terms of avoided morbi...

  3. Comparison of itraconazole, voriconazole, and posaconazole as oral antifungal prophylaxis in pediatric patients following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    M. Döring; Blume, O; Haufe, S.; Hartmann, U; Kimmig, A.; Schwarze, C.-P.; Lang, P; Handgretinger, R; Müller, I

    2013-01-01

    Oral antifungal prophylaxis with extended-spectra azoles is widely used in pediatric patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), while controlled studies for oral antifungal prophylaxis after bone marrow transplantation in children are not available. This survey analyzed patients who had received either itraconazole, voriconazole, or posaconazole. We focused on the safety, feasibility, and initial data of efficacy in a cohort of pediatric patients and adolescents...

  4. Short-term intravenous antimicrobial prophylaxis for elective rectal cancer surgery: results of a prospective randomized non-inferiority trial

    OpenAIRE

    ISHIBASHI, KEIICHIRO; Ishida, Hideyuki; KUWABARA, KOUKI; OHSAWA, TOMONORI; OKADA, NORIMICHI; Yokoyama, Masaru; Kumamoto, Kensuke

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the non-inferiority of postoperative single-dose intravenous antimicrobial prophylaxis to multiple-dose intravenous antimicrobial prophylaxis in terms of the incidence of surgical site infections (SSIs) in patients undergoing elective rectal cancer surgery by a prospective randomized study. Methods Patients undergoing elective surgery for rectal cancer were randomized to receive a single intravenous injection of flomoxef (group 1) or five additional doses (group 2) of f...

  5. Reduction in gastrointestinal bleeding by development and implementation of a protocol for stress ulcer prophylaxis: a before-after study

    OpenAIRE

    Ikemura, Mai; Nakasako, Shinji; Seo, Ryutaro; Atsumi, Takahiro; Ariyoshi, Koichi; Hashida, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Background The implementation of a protocol has been associated with improvements in the processes of care in clinical settings. Although stress ulcer prophylaxis is recommended for critically ill patients at high risk, there is currently no consensus on its use. Therefore, we herein developed a protocol for stress ulcer prophylaxis, and evaluated therapeutic outcomes in a before-after study. Methods The protocol was developed by considering the effectiveness, disadvantages (including adverse...

  6. Effects of antibiotic treatment of nonlactating dairy cows on antibiotic resistance patterns of bovine mastitis pathogens.

    OpenAIRE

    Berghash, S R; Davidson, J. N.; Armstrong, J. C.; Dunny, G M

    1983-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance patterns of the major groups of bovine mastitis pathogens (Streptococcus agalactiae, other streptococci, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis) were examined by determining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 13 different antibiotics against bacterial isolates from dairy cattle. The bacterial strains were obtained from milk samples from each cow in 21 New York state dairy herd surveys. In 12 herd surveys (high antibiotic-use group), all 365 cows...

  7. Metagenomic exploration of antibiotic resistance in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monier, Jean-Michel; Demanèche, Sandrine; Delmont, Tom O; Mathieu, Alban; Vogel, Timothy M; Simonet, Pascal

    2011-06-01

    The ongoing development of metagenomic approaches is providing the means to explore antibiotic resistance in nature and address questions that could not be answered previously with conventional culture-based strategies. The number of available environmental metagenomic sequence datasets is rapidly expanding and henceforth offer the ability to gain a more comprehensive understanding of antibiotic resistance at the global scale. Although there is now evidence that the environment constitutes a vast reservoir of antibiotic resistance gene determinants (ARGDs) and that the majority of ARGDs acquired by human pathogens may have an environmental origin, a better understanding of their diversity, prevalence and ecological significance may help predict the emergence and spreading of newly acquired resistances. Recent applications of metagenomic approaches to the study of ARGDs in natural environments such as soil should help overcome challenges concerning expanding antibiotic resistances. PMID:21601510

  8. Race against time to develop new antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The second part of a series of three news features on antimicrobial resistance looks at how the antibiotics pipeline is drying up while resistance to existing drugs is increasing. Theresa Braine reports.

  9. What Can Be Done about Antibiotic Resistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... WHO issued its Global Strategy for Containment of Antimicrobial Resistance , a document aimed at policy-makers that urges ... of existing antibiotics by modifying them so the bacterial enzymes that cause resistance cannot attack them. Alternately, "decoy" molecules can be ...

  10. Do antibiotics decrease effectiveness of oral contraceptives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottet, C

    1996-09-01

    The number of accidental pregnancies occurring in oral contraceptive (OC) users who are concurrently taking certain antibiotics and antifungal agents exceeds the 1% failure rate associated with OCs, suggesting some form of drug interaction. Two mechanisms of action have been proposed to explain this phenomenon. First, drugs such as rifampin and griseofulvin induce liver enzymes that break down the estrogen and progestin contained in OCs, reducing plasma hormone levels. Second, changes in the intestinal bacterial flora induced by penicillin and tetracycline may reduce the gut's absorption of hormones, also compromising efficacy. Since rifampin and griseofulvin are the medications most frequently implicated in accidental pregnancies in OC users, the induction of liver enzymes is the more probable, potent cause of failure. Although the risk of pregnancy due to OC-antibiotic interactions is extremely small, OC users prescribed antibiotics should be warned to use condoms or spermicides until the antibiotics are discontinued. PMID:9006212

  11. Antibiotics May Blunt Breast-Feeding's Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fighting infection because of the immunity offered in mother's milk," said Dr. William Muinos, a pediatric gastroenterologist at Nicklaus Children's Hospital in Miami. Antibiotics kill the bacteria in the gut, he said. "If ...

  12. Too Many People Still Take Unneeded Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of short-term respiratory conditions, such as colds, bronchitis, sore throats, and sinus and ear infections, the researchers reported. "About half of antibiotic prescriptions for acute respiratory conditions were unnecessary," Fleming-Dutra said. In ...

  13. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-09-10

    This podcast answers questions from the public about appropriate antibiotic use.  Created: 9/10/2008 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 9/15/2008.

  14. Prophylactic antibiotic regimens in tumour surgery (PARITY)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Michael Mørk; Hettwer, Werner H; Grum-Schwensen, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    conceal treatment allocation and sham antibiotics to blind participants, surgeons, and data collectors. We determined feasibility by measuring patient enrolment, completeness of follow-up, and protocol deviations for the antibiotic regimens. RESULTS: We screened 96 patients and enrolled 60 participants......-day regimen of post-operative antibiotics, in comparison to a 24-hour regimen, decreases surgical site infections in patients undergoing endoprosthetic reconstruction for lower extremity primary bone tumours. METHODS: We performed a pilot international multi-centre RCT. We used central randomisation to......% at one year (the remainder with partial data or pending queries). In total, 18 participants missed at least one dose of antibiotics or placebo post-operatively, but 93% of all post-operative doses were administered per protocol. CONCLUSIONS: It is feasible to conduct a definitive multi-centre RCT of...

  15. Controlling antibiotic resistance in the ICU

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derde, L.P.G.

    2013-01-01

    Patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) are frequently colonized with (antibiotic-resistant) bacteria, which may lead to healthcare associated infections. Antimicrobial-resistant bacteria (AMRB), such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (V

  16. Priorities for antibiotic resistance surveillance in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fluit, A. C.; van der Bruggen, J. T.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Verhoef, J.; Jansen, W. T. M.

    2006-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is an increasing global problem. Surveillance studies are needed to monitor resistance development, to guide local empirical therapy, and to implement timely and adequate countermeasures. To achieve this, surveillance studies must have standardised methodologies, be longitud......Antibiotic resistance is an increasing global problem. Surveillance studies are needed to monitor resistance development, to guide local empirical therapy, and to implement timely and adequate countermeasures. To achieve this, surveillance studies must have standardised methodologies, be...... various reservoirs of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, such as hospitalised patients, nursing homes, the community, animals and food. Two studies that could serve as examples of tailored programmes are the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System (EARSS), which collects resistance data during...... development of antibiotic resistance....

  17. Compliance to anti-rabies vaccination in post-exposure prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravish Haradanahalli Shankaraiah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Complete post-exposure prophylaxis is necessary to prevent rabies among all animal bite victims. It is essential for the bite victims to complete the full course of vaccination as recommended for complete protection. The present study was conducted to determine the compliance rate for anti-rabies vaccination by both intramuscular route and intradermal route and to determine the major constraints. The study was done at two municipal corporation hospitals in Bangalore, India. The compliance rate for intramuscular rabies vaccination was 60.0% and for intradermal rabies vaccination 77.0%. The major constraints were loss of wages, forgotten dates, cost incurred and distance from the hospital. Hence, the present study showed that the compliance to anti-rabies vaccination for post-exposure prophylaxis is low and is a cause of concern, as animal bite victims who do not complete the full course of vaccination are still at risk of developing rabies.

  18. Indomethacin for post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis prophylaxis: Is it the magic bullet?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dennis Yang; Peter V Draganov

    2012-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP).Pancreatic duct stent insertion after ERCP has been widely accepted as the standard of care for the prevention of this complication in high-risk patients.Unfortunately,the placement of pancreatic stents requires higher level of endoscopic expertise and is not always feasible due to anatomic considerations.Therefore,effective non-invasive pharmacologic prophylaxis remains appealing,particularly if it is inexpensive,easily administered,has a low risk side effect profile and is widely available.There have been multiple studies evaluating potential pharmacologic candidates for post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP) prophylaxis,most of them yielding disappointing results.A recently published large,multicenter,randomized controlled trial reported that in high risk patients a single dose of rectal indomethacin administered immediately after the ERCP significantly decreased the incidence of PEP compare to placebo.

  19. Method of the Autoimmune Process Development Prophylaxis at Operative Treatment of a Nodular Goiter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menkov A.V.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim of investigation is a detection of the autoimmune process development prophylaxis new method effectiveness at operative treatment of a nodular goiter. Materials and Methods. The results of a clinical observation of 19 patients, undergoing the extracapsular hemithyroidectomy, are analyzed. A new method of the autoimmune process prophylaxis was used in 9 cases at operative interventions. Results. There were no complications after operations. The titers of antibodies to a thyroid peroxidase in a month after operation were within the reference meaning limits in all the 9 cases. Conclusion. An infusion of a hydrocortisone acetate suspension with a hydrochloride lidocaine permits to prevent the autoimmune process development in a conserved thyroid tissue at operative interventions on occasion of a nodular goiter and decrease a probability of a postoperative hypothyrosis appearance.

  20. A double blind controlled study of propranolol and cyproheptadine in migraine prophylaxis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao B

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Role of propranolol and cyproheptadine in the prophylaxis of migraine was studied in a controlled double blind trial. Two hundred fifty-nine patients were divided into four groups. Each group was either given a placebo, cyproheptadine, propranolol or a combination of the latter two drugs. The patients were followed for a period of three months. Significant relief in frequency, duration and severity from migranous attacks was seen in all drug treated groups over placebo. Significant correlation in response was seen in frequency, duration and severity in all the groups which received drugs. Statistically more significant relief was seen in cyproheptadine and propranolol treated group as compared to individual drug treated groups. In cyproheptadine and propranolol treated groups, the dropout rate was lower and associated symptoms were better relieved than in other groups. The study shows efficacy of combination of cyproheptadine and propranolol in migraine prophylaxis.