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Sample records for antibacterial anticoagulant antifungal

  1. Marine pharmacology in 2001--2002: marine compounds with anthelmintic, antibacterial, anticoagulant, antidiabetic, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antimalarial, antiplatelet, antiprotozoal, antituberculosis, and antiviral activities; affecting the cardiovascular, immune and nervous systems and other miscellaneous mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Alejandro M S; Hamann, Mark T

    2005-01-01

    During 2001--2002, research on the pharmacology of marine chemicals continued to be global in nature involving investigators from Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Denmark, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Israel, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Pakistan, the Philippines, Russia, Singapore, Slovenia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, United Kingdom, and the United States. This current article, a sequel to the authors' 1998, 1999 and 2000 marine pharmacology reviews, classifies 106 marine chemicals derived from a diverse group of marine animals, algae, fungi and bacteria, on the basis of peer-reviewed preclinical pharmacology. Anthelmintic, antibacterial, anticoagulant, antifungal, antimalarial, antiplatelet, antiprotozoal, antituberculosis or antiviral activities were reported for 56 marine chemicals. An additional 19 marine compounds were shown to have significant effects on the cardiovascular, immune and nervous system as well as to possess anti-inflammatory and antidiabetic effects. Finally, 31 marine compounds were reported to act on a variety of molecular targets and thus may potentially contribute to several pharmacological classes. Thus, during 2001--2002 pharmacological research with marine chemicals continued to contribute potentially novel chemical leads for the ongoing global search for therapeutic agents for the treatment of multiple disease categories.

  2. Studies on Buddleja asiatica antibacterial, antifungal, antispasmodic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-27

    Jul 27, 2011 ... Crude extract of Buddleja asiatica Lour and its fractions, chloroform (F1), ethyl acetate (F2) and n- butanol (F3) were evaluated for antibacterial, antifungal, antispasmodic and Ca++ antagonist activities. The antibacterial activity was performed against 11 types of bacteria. The crude extract and fractions F2.

  3. Antibacterial and antifungal properties of guanylhydrazones

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    Ajdačić Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of novel guanylhydrazones were designed, synthesized and characterized. All the compounds were screened for their antibacterial and antifungal activity. Compounds 26 and 27 showed excellent antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Micrococcus luteus ATCC 379 with minimal inhibitory concentrations of 4 μg mL-1, and good antifungal activity against Candida parapsilosis ATCC 22019. These results suggested that the selected guanylhydrazones could serve as promising leads for improved antimicrobial development. [Project of the Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development of the Republic of Serbia, Grant No. 172008 and Grant No. 173048

  4. Antibacterial and Antifungal Activities of Spices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Meng, Xiao; Li, Ya; Zhao, Cai-Ning; Tang, Guo-Yi; Li, Hua-Bin

    2017-06-16

    Infectious diseases caused by pathogens and food poisoning caused by spoilage microorganisms are threatening human health all over the world. The efficacies of some antimicrobial agents, which are currently used to extend shelf-life and increase the safety of food products in food industry and to inhibit disease-causing microorganisms in medicine, have been weakened by microbial resistance. Therefore, new antimicrobial agents that could overcome this resistance need to be discovered. Many spices-such as clove, oregano, thyme, cinnamon, and cumin-possessed significant antibacterial and antifungal activities against food spoilage bacteria like Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas fluorescens , pathogens like Staphylococcus aureus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus, harmful fungi like Aspergillus flavus, even antibiotic resistant microorganisms such as methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Therefore, spices have a great potential to be developed as new and safe antimicrobial agents. This review summarizes scientific studies on the antibacterial and antifungal activities of several spices and their derivatives.

  5. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of andrachne cordifolia muell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Bashir; Hassan Shah, S M; Bashir, Shumaila; Nisar, Muhammad; Chaudry, M Iqbal

    2007-12-01

    The crude methanolic extract of Andrachne cordifolia Muell. (Euphorbiaceae) and its various fractions in different solvent systems (chloroform, ethyl acetate and n-butanol) were screened for antibacterial and antifungal activities. Crude extract and subsequent fractions demonstrated moderate to excellent antibacterial activities against the tested pathogens. Highest antibacterial activity was displayed by both chloroform and ethyl acetate fractions (100%) followed by the crude extract (68%) against Salmonella typhi. Similarly, crude extract and its subsequent fractions showed mild to excellent activities in antifungal bioassay with maximum (76%) antifungal activity against Microsporum canis by the chloroform fraction followed by the crude extract (65%).

  6. Antifungal and antibacterial activities of the ethanolic and aqueous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-07-18

    Jul 18, 2007 ... psoriasis and eczema, through to the more serious disease like leprosy, syphilis and skin cancer (Burkill,. 1985). Previous studies of the fruits of K. africana showed some antibacterial activity (Grace et al., 2002). However there is no report on the antibacterial and antifungal properties of the stem bark of this ...

  7. Parasiticidal, antifungal and antibacterial activities of Onosma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-05

    Oct 5, 2009 ... neubauer counting chamber and IC50 values of compounds pos- sessing antileishmanial activity were calculated by Software Ezfit. 5.03 Perella Scientific. IC50 values of different fractions against the test pathogen are mentioned in Table 1. Antifungal activity. Similarly antifungal activity was evaluated by ...

  8. Antifungal and antibacterial activities of an alcoholic extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methanolic, ethanolic and petroleum ether extracts of Senna alata leaves were screened for phytochemicals, antibacterial and antifungal activities. Out of the three crude extracts, the methanolic extract showed the highest activity than the ethanolic and petroleum ether extracts. The unidentified active components purified ...

  9. Chemical constituents, antibacterial, antifungal and antioxidant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... penicillium notatum and Rhizopus stolonifer) at different concentrations, except ethyl acetate extract which showed no antifungal property on Rhizopus stolonifer. Ethyl acetate and methanol extracts exhibited significant antioxidant activities by scavenging DPPH free radicals with IC of 12.14 and 93.85 μg/ml respectively.

  10. Antifungal and antibacterial compounds from Streptomyces strains ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In addition, antibacterial activity of this strain was determined against human pathogenic bacteria such as. Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Kocuria ... aureus (MRSA). The present results indicate that isolate KEH23 is a potential antibiotic producer agent for the biocontrol of plant and human pathogens.

  11. Antibacterial, antifungal, insecticidal, cytotoxicity and phytotoxicity studies on Indigofera gerardiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisar, Muhammad; Tariq, Shafiq Ahmad; Marwat, Inamullah Khan; Shah, Muhammad Raza; Khan, Ihsan Ali

    2009-02-01

    The antibacterial, antifungal, acute cytotoxicity, phytotoxicity and insecticidal profile of the crude extract and various fractions of Indigofera gerardiana have been studied. Six bacterial and fungal strains were used, of which Samonella typhi and Microsporum canis were the most susceptible strains with MICs 0.37 mg/mL and 0.09 mg/mL, respectively. The crude extract and the fractions showed low insecticidal activity against Sitophilus oryzae, Rhyzopertha dominica and Callosbruchus analis but no activity against Tribolium castaneum. The brine shrimp lethality assay showed absence of any measurable cytotoxicity of the crude extract and fractions, showing a good safety profile at a preliminary level. All the fractions except crude extract revealed profound and highly significant herbicidal activity against Lemna minor at the concentration of 1000 microg/mL. Indigofera gerardiana was shown by in-vitro assays to be a potential source for natural antifungal, antibacterial and herbicidal agents.

  12. Antifungal and Antibacterial Metabolites from a French Poplar Type Propolis

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    Séverine Boisard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During this study, the in vitro antifungal and antibacterial activities of different extracts (aqueous and organic obtained from a French propolis batch were evaluated. Antifungal activity was evaluated by broth microdilution on three pathogenic strains: Candida albicans, C. glabrata, and Aspergillus fumigatus. Antibacterial activity was assayed using agar dilution method on 36 Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains including Staphylococcus aureus. Organic extracts showed a significant antifungal activity against C. albicans and C. glabrata (MIC80 between 16 and 31 µg/mL but only a weak activity towards A. fumigatus (MIC80 = 250 µg/mL. DCM based extracts exhibited a selective Gram-positive antibacterial activity, especially against S. aureus (SA and several of its methicillin-resistant (MRSA and methicillin-susceptible (MSSA strains (MIC100 30–97 µg/mL. A new and active derivative of catechin was also identified whereas a synergistic antimicrobial effect was noticed during this study.

  13. Antibacterial and antifungal effect of high pH and paraffin wax ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antibacterial and antifungal effects of high pH (9, 10) and paraffin wax were determined. Determination of antibacterial and antifungal activity of the combined treatments was achieved by aerobic mesophilic count of bacteria and fungi on the surface of the tomatoes, peppers and oranges using serial dilution and pour ...

  14. Antibacterial and antifungal activity of endodontic intracanal medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    TONEA, ANDRADA; BADEA, MANDRA; OANA, LIVIU; SAVA, SORINA; VODNAR, DAN

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims The sterilization of the entire root canal system represents the main goal of every endodontist, given the fact that the control of the microbial flora is the key point of every root canal treatment. The diversity of microorganisms found inside the root canal and also the resistance of some bacterial species to intracanal medications led to a continuous development of new endodontic products. The present study focuses on the comparison of the antibacterial and antifungal properties of different endodontic products, two commercially available, one experimental plant based extract, and two control substances. Methods The disc diffusion assay was used to determine the antibacterial and antifungal properties of chlorhexidine, calcium hydroxide, a mix extract between Arctium lappa root powder and Aloe barbadensis Miller gel, Amoxicillin with clavulanic acid and Fluconazole (as control substances). Two of the most common microorganisms found in endodontic infections were chosen: Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 29212) and Candida albicans ATCC(10231). Results All tested substances showed inhibition zones around the discs, for Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans, including the experimental mix extract of Arctium lappa root powder with Aloe vera gel. Conclusion The experimental mix extract of Arctium lappa root powder and Aloe vera gel is able to inhibit very resistant microorganisms, like Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans. PMID:28781531

  15. Recent patents on antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral properties of tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiannakopoulou, Eugenia Ch

    2012-04-01

    Teas have beneficial effects on human health including cardioprotective, anticarcinogenic, antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal activity. The precise antimicrobial spectrum of tea is difficult to be defined due to variation in the methods of testing that have been used. Antibacterial effects of tea have been demonstrated against a number of microorganisms including Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio cholerae, Escherichia coli, Shigella spp., Salmonella spp., Bacillus spp., Klebsiella spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Teas and tea ingredients seem to have both bactericidal and bacteriostatic actions. In addition, tea catechins have been shown to modify the antibiotic sensitivity of bacteria and to alter the expression of factors that determine bacterial virulence. Antiviral effects of green tea have been demonstrated against the influenza virus, as well as against the Herpes simplex virus, tobacco mosaic virus, enterovirus, rotavirus, Epstein Barr virus, HIV virus. Yet, green tea catechins have been shown to have antiviral activities against HIV infection. Antifungal effects of tea have been reported against Candida albicans, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, and Trichophyton rubrum. The present paper describes recent patents on antimicrobial effect of teas and tea ingredients.

  16. Antibacterial, Antifungal and antioxidant activities of some medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wazir, Asma; Mehjabeen, -; Jahan, Noor; Sherwani, Sikander Khan; Ahmad, Mansoor

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial, antifungal and antioxidant activities of medicinal plants. The antibacterial activity of methanolic extracts of three medicinal plants (Swertia chirata, Terminalia bellerica and Zanthoxylum armatum) were tested against Gentamicin (standard drug) on eleven gram positive and seventeen gram negative bacteria by agar well method. It was revealed that seven-gram negative and six gram positive bacterial species were inhibited by these plant extracts. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of the extracts were determined by broth micro-dilution method. The significant MIC value of Swertia chirata was 20mg/ml against Serratia marcesens, Zanthoxylum armatum was 10 mg/ml against Aeromonas hydrophila and Terminali bellerica was 20mg/ml against Acinetobacter baumanii as well as Serratia marcesens. Antifungal screening was done for methanolic extracts of these plants by agar well method with the 6 saprophytic, 5 dermatophytic and 6 yeasts. In this case Griseofulvin was used as a standard. All saprophytes and dermatophytes were showed resistance by these plants extracts except Microsporum canis, which was inhibited by Z. armatum and S. chirata extracts. The significant MIC value of Zanthoxylum armatum was 10mg/ml against Microsporum canis and Swertia chirata was 10mg/ml against Candida tropicalis. The anti-oxidant study was performed by DPPH free radical scavenging assay using ascorbic acid as a reference standard. Significant antioxidant activities were observed by Swertia chirata and Zanthoxylum armatum at concentration 200μg/ml was 70% DPPH scavenging activity (EC50=937.5μg/ml) while Terminalia bellerica showed 55.6% DPPH scavenging activity (EC50=100μg/ml). This study has shown that these plants could provide potent antibacterial compounds and may possible preventive agents in ROS related ailments.

  17. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of some Mexican medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Bustos, E; Velazquez, C; Garibay-Escobar, A; García, Z; Plascencia-Jatomea, M; Cortez-Rocha, M O; Hernandez-Martínez, J; Robles-Zepeda, R E

    2009-12-01

    In Mexico about 4,000 plant species have some medicinal use. The aim of this work was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of six Mexican medicinal plants against fungi and Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Methanolic extracts were prepared from the Mexican medicinal plants Amphypteringium adstrigens, Castella tortuosa, Coutarea latiflora, Ibervillea sonorae, Jatropha cuneata, and Selaginella lepidophylla. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the plants were determined by the broth microdilution method and the radial growth inhibition assay, respectively. All Mexican plants tested showed antimicrobial activity. Among the six plant extracts analyzed, J. cuneata showed the highest growth-inhibitory activity against fungi, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (J. cuneata > A. adstrigens > C. latiflora > C. tortuosa > I. sonorae approximately S. lepidophylla). Shigella flexneri and Staphylococcus aureus were the most susceptible bacteria to plant extracts. Complete inhibition of S. flexneri growth was observed with J. cuneata methanolic extract at 90 microg/mL. This plant extract also showed the strongest antifungal activity against Fusarium verticillioides and Aspergillus niger. Our data suggest that the medicinal plants tested have important antimicrobial properties. This is the first report describing the antimicrobial activities of several of the Mexican medicinal plants used in this study.

  18. In Vitro Antibacterial and Antifungal Activity and Datura Innoxia Extracts

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    Adam IY Shama

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was evaluated the Antimicrobial Activity of extraction of Datura innoxia (Seeds, leaves and roots. Datura innoxia Seeds, leaves and roots were collected to examine their antimicrobial activity. Extracts of different parts of the plant were tested against standard microorganisms by using the agar- well diffusion method. Extracts of methanol, and aqueous of seeds, leaves and roots were prepared and tested against four types of bacteria namely: Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus vulgaris and two types of fungi namely: Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans. The methanolic and aqueous extracts of leaves showed high activities against fungi (A. niger and less effect on the all bacteria. The methanolic extracts of seeds showed high activities against all organisms except fungi (C. albicanas, while the aqueous extracts of seeds showed no activity on the bacteria. All organisms were examined against known standard antibiotics and then compare the results of plant extracts with standard antibiotics. The results indicated that the antibacterial drug is less active than the plant extracts, while the antifungal drugs are more active than the plant extracts. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/ije.v3i3.11077 International Journal of Environment Vol.3(3 2014: 173-185

  19. Synthesis, antibacterial and antifungal activity of some derivatives of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    -4-one; antibacterial ..... Kanamycin was used as standard antibiotic for antibacterial activities. Nutrient agar (NA) was used as ... (mould) and Penicillium sp. (blue mould). Antifun- gal activity was assessed by the poisoned food tech- nique,17.

  20. Methoxybifurcarenone: an antifungal and antibacterial meroditerpenoid from the brown alga Cystoseira tamariscifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennamara, A; Abourriche, A; Berrada, M; Charrouf, M; Chaib, N; Boudouma, M; Garneau, F X

    1999-09-01

    A meroditerpenoid metabolite has been isolated from the brown alga Cystoseira tamariscifolia and characterized as methoxybifurcarenone, by spectral analysis. Methoxybifurcarenone possesses antifungal activity against three tomato pathogenic fungi: Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium oxysporum sp. mycopersici and Verticillium alboatrum and antibacterial activity against Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Escherichia coli.

  1. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of the endemic species Glaucium vitellinum Boiss. and Buhse

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    Mina Mehrara

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Belonging to Papaveraceae family, Glaucium vitellinum is one of the Persian endemic plants which has not been investigated biologically. The present paper focused on the assessment of the antibacterial and antifungal activities of the total methanol extract and alkaloid sub-fraction of the flowering aerial parts of G. vitellinum. Materials and Methods: The antibacterial and antifungal activities were investigated using cup plate method and disc diffusion assay, respectively. The MIC values of the active samples were determined using micro plate dilution method. Results: The crude extract and alkaloid sub-fraction of G. vitellinum had significant inhibition activity on the growth of S. aureus and S. typhi. From antifungal assay, it is concluded that only the yeast C. albicans, showed a high sensitivity to the extract and especially to the related alkaloid sub-fraction. Conclusions: Regarding the results, G. vitellinum could be employed as a natural antibacterial and antifungal agent against S. aureus, S. typhi, and C. albicans, respectively. Moreover, based on the results of this study, further in vivo and ex vivo confirmatory tests for total methanol extract and alkaloid sub-fraction are recommended.

  2. Evaluation of antibacterial, antifungal and modulatory activity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: The tests for the minimum inhibitory concentration and modulation of microbial resistance, with the use of ethanolic and methanolic extracts of Padina Sanctae-cruces combined with drugs of the class of aminoglycosides and antifungal were used to evaluate the activity against the cited microorganisms. Results: ...

  3. In vitro assay of potential antifungal and antibacterial activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the dermatophytes strains Trichophyton rubrum, Trichophyton interdigitale, Trichophyton soudanense, Microsporum langeronii, and Epidermophyton floccosum were used. The E2F2 extract showed strong inhibitory activity on four of the five fungal species used against ketoconazole, a standard antifungal drug. However ...

  4. Antibacterial and Antifungal Activities of Cyanobacterial Strains Isolated from Hot Springs in Oman

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    Neelam Sherwani1

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, cyanobacterial microbial mats from five hot springs in Oman, namely Al Kasfah Rustaq, Al Thwara Nakhl, Al–Ali Hammam, Gala and Bowsher, were characterized using direct microscopy. Nine monoclonal cyanobacterial cultures were obtained and their extracts in butanol, dichloromethane (DCM and hexane were screened for antibacterial and antifungal activities. Direct microscopy revealed the presence of 12 different unicellular and filamentous morphotypes, with different distribution in the various mats. Temperature seems to be one of the most important parameters that accounts for the differences in cyanobacterial composition of the mats. Cells of the nine isolates and their aqueous supernatants were subsequently extracted with butanol, DCM and hexane. Dried extracts were tested against nine bacterial (i.e. gram +ve Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and gram –ve, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella choleraesuis, S. enterica, Psuedomonas aeruginosa, Providencia stuartii, and  Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and two fungal pathogens (Rhizoctonia solani and Pythium sp.. All isolates exhibited antibacterial and antifungal activities, which depended mainly on the type of cyanobacterial culture, type of solvent used and the pathogen tested. The highest antibacterial activity was observed in Phormidium species, and butanol was found to be the most appropriate solvent to extract bioactivity from these cyanobacterial species. The results of this study suggest that thermal springs in Oman harbor diverse types of cyanobacteria, which may constitute an important source of antibacterial and antifungal compounds. Further investigation is needed to purify these compounds and find their chemical compositions and modes of action.

  5. Antibacterial and antifungal potentials of the solvents extracts from Eryngium caeruleum, Notholirion thomsonianum and Allium consanguineum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiq, Abdul; Ahmad, Sadiq; Ali, Rahmat; Ahmad, Fawad; Ahmad, Sajjad; Zeb, Anwar; Ayaz, Muhammad; Ullah, Farhat; Siddique, Abu Nasar

    2016-11-24

    Herbal medicines have long been used for various ailments in various societies and natural bioactive compounds are gaining more and more importance due to various factors. In this context, three plant species i.e., Eryngium caeruleum, Notholirion thomsonianum and Allium consanguineum have been aimed for the scientific verification of their purported traditional uses against various infectious diseases. In this study, three plants were assayed for antibacterial and antifungal potentials. The antibacterial investigations were performed via well diffusion method and nutrient broth dilution method. The bacterial strains used in the study were Enterococcus faecalis, Proteus mirabilis, Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Klebsiella pneumonia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The antifungal potential was investigated by dilution method of Muller-Hinton agar media of the plants' samples. The fungal strains used were Aspergillis fumigatus, Aspergillis flavus and Aspergillis niger. Ceftriaxone and nystatin were used as standard drugs in antibacterial and antifungal assays respectively. Different fractions from N. thomsonianum were tested against five bacterial strains while the samples from A. consanguineum and E. caeruleum were tested against six bacterial strains. All the samples exhibited prominent antibacterial activity against the tested strains. Overall, chloroform and ethyl acetate fractions were found most potent among the three plants' samples. N. thomsonianum excelled among the three plants in antibacterial activity. Similarly, in antifungal assay, N. thomsonianum exhibited strong antifungal activity against the fungal strains. The chloroform fraction displayed MFCs of 175.67 ± 5.20***, 29.33 ± 5.48*** and 63.00 ± 4.93*** μg/ml against Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus niger respectively. The whole study demonstrates that all the three plant species were active against tested bacterial and fungal strains. It can be concluded from

  6. Synthesis, Anti-Bacterial and Anti-Fungal Evaluation of Pyrazoline Derivatives

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    Ashvin D. Panchal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Series of N-(5-(Substituted phenyl-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazol-3-yl-4H-1,2,4-triazol-4-amine compounds were prepared by reaction of 4-amino-1,2,4-Triazole with Acetyl Chloride followed by different aromatic aldehydes and cyclization with hydrazine hydrate. The structures of new compounds were confirmed by IR and 1H-NMR spectral data. Anti-bacterial and Anti-fungal activities were evaluated and compared with the standard drugs, some compounds of the series exhibited promising anti-microbial and anti-fungal activity compared to standard drugs.

  7. Synthesis, Spectral Characterization, and Antibacterial and Antifungal Studies of PANI/V2O5 Nanocomposites

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    Chakradhar Sridhar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the synthesis and characterization of nanocrystalline vanadium pentoxide (V2O5 nanoparticles and their antibacterial and antifungal activity on Staphylococcus aureus and Aspergillus niger, respectively, by agar diffusion method. The metal oxide has been synthesized by employing the sol-gel method, polyaniline (PANI has been synthesized by chemical oxidation, and PANI/V2O5 composites have been synthesized by in situ polymerization method with different ratios (10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 weight% of V2O5 in PANI. The newly prepared composites were characterized by FTIR and powder X-ray diffraction (P-XRD techniques and are found to be formed of PANI/V2O5 nanocomposites, and also the compounds showed moderate antibacterial and antifungal activity.

  8. 2,2'-Dithienyl diselenide pro-oxidant activity accounts for antibacterial and antifungal activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesarico, Ana Paula; Sartori, Gláubia; dos Santos, Camilla F A; Neto, José S S; Bortolotto, Vandreza; Santos, Roberto Christ Vianna; Nogueira, Cristina W; Prigol, Marina

    2013-11-07

    The aim of this study was to explore if 2,2'-dithienyl diselenide (DTDS) pro-oxidant activity is related to its antibacterial and antifungal actions. The antimicrobial activity of DTDS against bacterial and fungal was investigated in the broth microdilution assay (3.02-387 μg/ml). Additionally, the survival curve of microorganisms in the presence of DTDS (12.09-193.5 μg/ml) was performed. The involvement of pro-oxidant activity in the DTDS antimicrobial action was investigated by supplementing the growth medium with 10 mM glutathione or ascorbic acid in the disk diffusion technique (0.64-640 μgDTDS/discs). The levels of reactive species (RS) induced by 25 mM DTDS were also determined. The results demonstrated that DTDS was effective in preventing the Gram-positive bacteria and Candida albicans growth. The minimum inhibitory concentration, twice and half concentrations of DTDS confirmed that the activity of compound was bactericidal for some microorganisms (Enterococcus faecalis, and Staphylococcus saprophyticus), bacteriostatic for Bacillus cereus and fungistatic for C. albicans. Antibacterial and antifungal actions of DTDS are related to the increase of reactive species levels. The presence of antioxidants in the growth medium avoided the DTDS antimicrobial action. In conclusion, DTDS showed promising antibacterial and antifungal actions, possibly related to its pro-oxidant activity. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Antibacterial and antifungal activities from leaf extracts of Cassia fistula l.: An ethnomedicinal plant

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    Nayan R Bhalodia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out with an objective to investigate the antibacterial and antifungal potentials of leaves of Cassia fistula Linn. The aim of the study is to assess the antimicrobial activity and to determine the zone of inhibition of extracts on some bacterial and fungal strains. In the present study, the microbial activity of hydroalcohol extracts of leaves of Cassia fistula Linn. (an ethnomedicinal plant was evaluated for potential antimicrobial activity against medically important bacterial and fungal strains. The antimicrobial activity was determined in the extracts using agar disc diffusion method. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of extracts (5, 25, 50, 100, 250 ΅g/ml of Cassia fistula were tested against two Gram-positive--Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes; two Gram-negative--Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa human pathogenic bacteria; and three fungal strains--Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus clavatus, Candida albicans. Zone of inhibition of extracts were compared with that of different standards like ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, and chloramphenicol for antibacterial activity and nystatin and griseofulvin for antifungal activity. The results showed that the remarkable inhibition of the bacterial growth was shown against the tested organisms. The phytochemical analyses of the plants were carried out. The microbial activity of the Cassia fistula was due to the presence of various secondary metabolites. Hence, these plants can be used to discover bioactive natural products that may serve as leads in the development of new pharmaceuticals research activities.

  10. Antibacterial and antifungal screening of four medicinal plants

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    Nadjib Mohammed Rahmoun

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the ethnopharmacology study and screening of the antimicrobial activity of hydroalcoholic and chloroform extracts of the four plants Ceratonia siliqua (C. siliqua, Salvadora persica, Aloe vera and Anastatica hierochuntica. Methods: The antimicrobial activity was determined using diffusion disk and solid agar dilution methods against 12 bacteria, according to the recommendations of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Results: The ethnopharmacology study provided useful information about how the parts used for the preparation of extracts. The extracts obtained by maceration reveal variable yields depending on the polarity of the solvent used. The higher yields were those extracts obtained by the hydroalcoholic solvents. The Anastatica hierochuntica and C. siliqua extracts were by far the most interesting and exerted significant antibacterial activity (minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.07 to 0.13 mg/mL. Conclusions: These results suggest that C. siliqua could serve as an alternative source of antibacterial agents for human protection against infectious diseases.

  11. Antibacterial, cytotoxicity and anticoagulant activities from Hypnea esperi and Caulerpa prolifera marine algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selim, Samy; Amin, Abeer; Hassan, Sherif; Hagazey, Mohamed

    2015-03-01

    Extracts from 2 algal species (Hypnea esperi and Caulerpa prolifera) from Suez Canal region, Egypt were screened for the production of antibacterial compounds against some pathogenic bacteria. The bacteria tested included Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhimurium, Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. Algal species displayed antibacterial activity. The methanolic extracts showed variable response by producing various zones of inhibition against studied bacteria. The tested Gram-negative bacteria were less affected by studied algal extracts than Gram-positive bacteria. We determined some biopotentials properties such as cytotoxicity and anticoagulant activity of most potent algal active extracts. The secondary metabolites of only Hypnea esperi algal extract effectively prevented the blood clotting to the extent of 120 seconds. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) indicated that all potent tested algal extract C inhibits Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. Minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was between 1 and 1.4mg/ml. The algal isolates from Egypt have been found showing promising results against infectious bacteria instead of some synthetic antibiotics.

  12. Phytochemical analysis, antibacterial, and antifungal assessment of aerial parts of Polygonatum verticillatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Haroon; Saeed, Muhammad; Muhammad, Naveed; Perviz, Samreen

    2016-05-01

    The current study was designed to assess the phytochemical profile, antibacterial, and antifungal activities of the crude methanol extract of the aerial parts of Polygonatum verticillatum (PA) and its various subsequent solvent fractions using agar well diffusion, agar tube dilution, and microdilution methods. Phytochemical analysis showed positive for different chemical groups and also contained marked quantity of saponin and flavonoid contents. Significant antibacterial activity was observed against various tested pathogenic bacteria. The only susceptible Gram-positive bacterium was Bacillus subtilis and their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) measured ranged from 11-50 µg/ml. The sensitive Gram-negative bacteria were Salmonella typhi and Shigella flexeneri The estimated MICs were in the range of 2-7 µg/ml and 8-50 µg/ml for S. typhi and S. flexeneri, respectively. However, the antifungal activity of the plant was limited to Microsporum canis and their MICs ranged from 60 to 250 µg/ml. Our study confirmed significant antibacterial potential of the plant and substantiated its folk use in dysentery and pyrexia of multiple origins. © The Author(s) 2013.

  13. Phytochemical, Antibacterial, Antifungal and Antioxidant Properties of Agastache foeniculum Essential Oil

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    Mohammad Hashemi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Phytochemicals are good sources of natural antioxidants and have beneficial effects on human health. Many of phenolic phytochemicals have shown antimicrobial and antifungal activity. Anise hyssop (Agastache foeniculum [Pursh] Kuntze is a perennial aromatic plant of the Lamiaceae family with antimicrobial and antifungal properties and useful for gastrointestinal problems. In this investigation, the antioxidant activity of extracts, their antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus, B. subtilis, Salmonella thyphimurium, S. enteritidis, Escherichia coli strains and their antifungal activity against Aspergillus niger and A. flavus was evaluated. Seven components were identified, representing 95.4% of the oils including methyl chavicol (83.1%, limonene (3.4%, spathulenol (3.1% and caryophyllene oxide (3.1%. Agar disk diffusion and broth micro-well dilution assays showed that B. subtilis was the most resistant strain against both of the EOs and E. coli was the most sensitive bacteria. Results of both disc diffusion and MIC showed that the EO was more effective against A. flavus than A. niger. Antioxidant activity of A. foeniculum by DPPH and ABTS assays revealed remarkable antioxidant activities of this EO comparing with BHT. Results of current study indicated that A. foeniculum EOs can be used as a food preservative in having antibacterial, antifungal and antioxidant activity for the control of food deterioration.

  14. Synthesis and in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activities of benzoxazole derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, K.M.; Ambreen, N.; Ahmad, A.; Amyn, A.

    2013-01-01

    The in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activities of twenty-nine (29) benzoxazole derivatives were tested against fifteen Gram-positive and sixteen Gram-negative strains. Out of the twenty-nine compounds, eighteen compounds 3-5, 7-9, 11-13, 15-25 showed a broad range of activity against tested Gram-positive microorganisms, whereas rest of the compounds 6, 10, 14 and 26-31 were found to be completely inactive against all the tested strains of Gram-positive bacteria. Five compounds 8, 11-13, and 15 showed activities against Gram-negative strains whereas the rest were devoid of any activity. Twenty-one (21) out of twenty-nine (29) compounds possessed antifungal activity. The structures of the synthetic compounds were confirmed by IR, EIMS and /sup 1/H-NMR spectral data. (author)

  15. Synthesis, Antibacterial and Antifungal Activity of 4-Substituted-5-Aryl-1,2,4-Triazoles

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    Aleksandra Buzarovska

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available A few 4-allyl/amino-5-aryl-1,2,4-triazoles were synthesized and tested for antibacterial and antifungal effects against Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Salmonella enteritidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans. 4-Allyl-5-aryl-1,2,4-triazoles were obtained by the oxidative cyclization of the appropriate 1-substituted-4-allylthiosemicarbazides and 4-amino-5-aryl-1,2,4-triazoles were obtained by cyclization of the potassium salts of appropriately substituted dithiocarbazinic acids with hydrazine hydrate. The new synthesized compounds were characterized using IR, 1H- NMR, 13C-NMR and UV spectral data together with elemental analysis.

  16. Antibacterial and antifungal activity of sulfur-containing compounds from Petiveria alliacea L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seokwon; Kubec, Roman; Musah, Rabi A

    2006-03-08

    A total of 18 organosulfur compounds originating from Petiveria alliacea L. roots have been tested for their antibacterial and antifungal activities. These represent compounds occurring in fresh homogenates as well as those present in various macerates, extracts and other preparations made from Petiveria alliacea. Of the compounds assayed, the thiosulfinates, trisulfides and benzylsulfinic acid were observed to be the most active, with the benzyl-containing thiosulfinates exhibiting the broadest spectrum of antimicrobial activity. The effect of plant sample preparation conditions on the antimicrobial activity of the extract is discussed.

  17. Antibacterial and antifungal activity of a soda-lime glass containing copper nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteban-Tejeda, L; Pecharroman, C; Moya, J S [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Malpartida, F [Centro Nacional de Biotecnologia, CSIC, Darwin 3, Cantoblanco, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Esteban-Cubillo, A, E-mail: jsmoya@icmm.csic.es [Tolsa S A R and D Department, Camino de Vallecas-Mejorada del Campo Km 1.6, 28031 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-12-16

    A low melting point soda-lime glass powder containing copper nanoparticles with high antibacterial (against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria) and antifungal activity has been obtained. Sepiolite fibres containing monodispersed copper nanoparticles (d{sub 50}{approx}30 {+-} 5 nm) were used as the source of the copper nanoparticles. The observed high activity of the obtained glass powder, particularly against yeast, has been explained by considering the inhibitory synergistic effect of the Ca{sup 2+} lixiviated from the glass on the growth of the colonies.

  18. In vitro antibacterial and antifungal activities of twelve sponges collected from the Anambas Islands, Indonesia

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    Masteria Yunovilsa Putra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate antimicrobial activities in methanolic extracts of twelve sponges collected from the Anambas Islands, Indonesia. Methods: The antibacterial activity of methanolic extracts was tested against two Grampositive bacteria, viz. Bacillus subtilis (ATCC 6633 and Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923, and two Gram-negative bacteria, viz. Eschericia coli (ATCC 25922 and Vibrio anguillarum (ATCC 19264 using the disk diffusion assay. The antifungal activity was similarly tested against Candida albicans (ATCC 10231 and Aspergillus niger (ATCC 16404. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of promising sponges extracts were determined by the microdilution technique. Results: All the sponge species in this study showed antimicrobial activities against at least one of the test strains. Antibacterial activities were observed in 66.7% of the sponges extracts, while 30.0% of the extracts exhibited antifungal activities. Among them, the extracts of the sponges Stylissa massa and Axinyssa sp. were the most active against four tested bacteria and the yeast Candida albicans. The sponge Theonella swinhoei and two species of Xestospongia also displayed significant activities against two fungal pathogens Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger. Conclusions: Antimicrobial activities were demonstrated in extracts from various marine sponges collected from the Anambas Islands, Indonesia. The most promising sponges among them were Stylissa massa and Axinyssa sp. This is the first report of antimicrobial activity in extracts of marine sponges from the Indonesian Anambas Islands.

  19. Study of the antibacterial and antifungal activities of synthetic benzyl bromides, ketones, and corresponding chalcone derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakhatreh, Muhamad Ali K; Al-Smadi, Mousa L; Khabour, Omar F; Shuaibu, Fatima A; Hussein, Emad I; Alzoubi, Karem H

    2016-01-01

    Several applications of chalcones and their derivatives encouraged researchers to increase their synthesis as an alternative for the treatment of pathogenic bacterial and fungal infections. In the present study, chalcone derivatives were synthesized through cross aldol condensation reaction between 4-( N , N -dimethylamino)benzaldehyde and multiarm aromatic ketones. The multiarm aromatic ketones were synthesized through nucleophilic substitution reaction between 4-hydroxy acetophenone and benzyl bromides. The benzyl bromides, multiarm aromatic ketones, and corresponding chalcone derivatives were evaluated for their activities against eleven clinical pathogenic Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria, and three pathogenic fungi by the disk diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentration was determined by the microbroth dilution technique. The results of the present study demonstrated that benzyl bromide derivatives have strong antibacterial and antifungal properties as compared to synthetic chalcone derivatives and ketones. Benzyl bromides (1a and 1c) showed high ester activity against Gram-positive bacteria and fungi but moderate activity against Gram-negative bacteria. Therefore, these compounds may be considered as good antibacterial and antifungal drug discovery. However, substituted ketones (2a-b) as well as chalcone derivatives (3a-c) showed no activity against all the tested strains except for ketone (2c), which showed moderate activity against Candida albicans .

  20. Antibacterial and antifungal activity of Isatis tinctoria L. (Brassicaceae) using the micro-plate method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullah, I.; Wakeel, A.; Jan, S.A.

    2017-01-01

    Isatis tinctoria L. has well-documented history as conventional therapeutic herb. In present study its crude extract was examined for broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity using micro-titer plate method. Four different plant parts were extracted with 14 different solvents. All fractions were analyzed against seven bacterial and four fungal strains. Ethyl acetate, chloroform, n-hexane and acetone showed maximum antibacterial activity with minimum IC50 value (=200 mu g/ml). Leaves>branches> roots>flower is the order of different parts based on antibacterial activity. Although, in some cases like against Klebsiella pneumonia and Micrococcus luteus the flower showed better results as compared to other parts. Roots showed better results against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Extracts showed better antimicrobial activity as compared to antibiotics (cefotaxime). The activity of the extracts against gram positive was better than gram negative. For antifungal activity, ethyl acetate > n-hexane-ethyl acetate (1:1) > chloroform> acetone was the order of the fraction with increasing growth inhibition rate. All the parts (except branches) were observed having antifungal activity. The most resistant strains found in this study were Mucor mycosis, none of the fraction have more than 30% inhibition on used concentration. Plant crude extract being having broad spectrum antimicrobial activity is suggested for pre-clinical and clinical trials. (author)

  1. Metal based new triazoles: Their synthesis, characterization and antibacterial/antifungal activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumrra, Sajjad H.; Chohan, Zahid H.

    2012-12-01

    A series of new triazoles and their oxovanadium(IV) complexes have been synthesized, characterized and evaluated for antibacterial/antifungal properties. The new Schiff bases ligands (L1)-(L5) were prepared by the condensation reaction of 3,5-diamino-1,2,4-triazole with 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde, pyrrole-2-carboxaldehyde, pyridine-2-carboxaldehyde, 2-acetyl pyridine and 2-methoxy benzaldehyde. The structures of the ligands have been established on the basis of their physical, spectral (IR, 1H and 13C NMR and mass spectrometry) and elemental analytical data. The prepared ligands were used to synthesize their oxovanadium(IV) complexes (1)-(5) which were also characterized by their physical, spectral and analytical data and proposed to have a square pyramidal geometry. The ligands and their complexes were screened for in vitro antibacterial activity against six bacterial species such as, Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus subtilis and for in vitro antifungal activity against six fungal strains, Trichophyton longifusus, Candida albicans, Aspergillus flavus, Microsporum canis, Fusarium solani, and Candida glabrata. Cytotoxic nature of the compounds was also reported using brine shrimp bioassay method against Artemia salina.

  2. Antibacterial and Antifungal Potential of Himalayan Medicinal Plants for Treating Wound Infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habiba, U.; Ahmad, M.; Shinwari, S.; Sultana, S.; Zafar, M.; Shinwari, Z. K.

    2016-01-01

    Many bacterial and fungal strains are involved in wound infectious diseases as most of these strains become resistant to the most commonly used synthetic drugs in Himalayan region. Plant based natural products seem to be an alternative to this problem. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the In vitro antibacterial and antifungal activities of 30 medicinal plants used in folk recipes by Himalayan people to treat wound infections against multi-drug resistant pathogens. In total of six medically important Myco-bacterial strains Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger were tested against methanolic plant extracts at 5 mg/ml concentration using agar disc well diffusion method to determined Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). The plant extracts showed varied levels of MICs against test microorganisms. The strongest antibacterial activity was reported in methanolic extract of Cynadon dactylon (L.) Pers. against Klebsiella pneumoniae with 20.67±1.36 mm MICs, while Candida albicans was considered to be the most resistant pathogen with MICs 9.6±0.57 mm. The findings were compared with results obtained using standard antibiotics, aminooxanilic, ciprofloxacin, cefotaxime, fluconazole and itraconazole at conc. 5mg/ ml. The results provide an evidence of folk medicinal uses of plants among the Himalayan communities to treat wounds. Further research needs to be carried out to identify the active molecules and evaluate the in vivo antibacterial and antifungal activities as well as toxicity level with clinical trials to use full potential of these plants for drug discovery development to control wounds globally. (author)

  3. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of crude plant extracts from Colombian biodiversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Niño

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available On a global scale, people have used plants to treat diseases and infections, and this has raised interest on the plant biodiversity potencial in the search of antimicrobial principles. In this work, 75 crude n-hexanes, dichloromethane and methanol extracts from the aerial parts of 25 plants belonging to four botanical families (Asteraceae, Euphorbiaceae, Rubiaceae and Solanaceae, collected at the Natural Regional Park Ucumari (Risaralda, Colombia, were evaluated for their antibacterial and antifungal activities by the agar well diffusion method. The antibacterial activities were assayed against two Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis, and three Gram-negative ones named, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In addition, the same plant extracts were tested against the yeast Candida albicans and the fungi Aspergillus fumigatus and Fusarium solani. Overall, the plant extracts examined displayed better bactericide rather than fungicide activities. In general, the best antibacterial activity was showed by the plant extracts from the Rubiaceae family, followed in order by the extracts from the Euphorbiaceae and Solanaceae ones. It is important to emphasize the great activity displayed by the methanol extract of Alchornea coelophylla (Euphorbiaceae that inhibited four out of five bacteria tested (B. Subtilis, P. aeruginosa, S. aureus and E. coli. Furthermore, the best Minimal Inhibitory Concentration for the extracts with antifungal activities were displayed by the dichloromethane extracts from Acalypha diversifolia and Euphorbia sp (Euphorbiaceae. The most susceptible fungus evaluated was F. Solani since 60% and 20% of the dichloromethane and methanol extracts evaluated inhibited the growth of this phytopathogenic fungus. The antimicrobial activity of the different plant extracts examined in this work could be related to the secondary metabolites contents and their interaction and

  4. Syntheses, in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activities of a series of N-alkyl, 1,4-dithiines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentz, F; Labia, R; Sirot, D; Faure, O; Grillot, R; Valla, A

    2005-01-01

    A series of dithiines were synthesized by cyclization of 4-(alkylamino)-4-oxobutanoic acids under the action of SOCl2. Their in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activities have been evaluated against reference strains and versus reference compounds. The so-called 'isoimides' 2a, 2b were totally inactive whereas some imides had low MICs for few bacteria and for few fungal microorganisms.

  5. Quinoline derivatives bearing pyrazole moiety: Synthesis and biological evaluation as possible antibacterial and antifungal agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Shehry, Mohamed F; Ghorab, Mostafa M; Abbas, Samir Y; Fayed, Eman A; Shedid, Said A; Ammar, Yousry A

    2018-01-01

    In an attempt for development of new antimicrobial agents, three series of quinoline derivatives bearing pyrazole moiety have been synthesized. The first series was synthesized through the synthesis of 4-(quinolin-2-yloxy)benzaldehyde and 4-(quinolin-2-yloxy)acetophenone and then treatment with ketone or aldehyde derivatives to afford the corresponding chalcones. Cyclization of the latter chalcones with hydrazine derivatives led to the formation of new pyrazoline derivatives. The second series was synthesized via the synthesis of 2-hydrazinylquinoline and then treatment with formylpyrazoles to afford the corresponding hydrazonyl pyrazole derivatives. The third series was synthesized through the treatment of 2-hydrazinylquinoline with ethoxyethylidene, dithioacetal and arylidene derivatives to afford the corresponding pyrazole derivatives. The synthesized compounds were evaluated for their expected antibacterial and antifungal activities; where, the majority of these compounds showed potent antibacterial and antifungal activities against the tested strains of bacteria and fungi. Pyrazole derivative 13b showed better results when compared with the reference drugs as revealed from their MIC values (0.12-0.98 μg/mL). The pyrazole derivative 13b showed fourfold potency of gentamycin in inhibiting the growth of S. flexneri (MIC 0.12 μg/mL). Also, compound 13b showed fourfold potency of amphotericin B in inhibiting the growth of A. clavatus (MIC 0.49 μg/mL) and C. albicans (MIC 0.12 μg/mL), respectively. The same compound showed twofold potency of gentamycin in inhibiting the growth of P. vulgaris (MIC 0.98 μg/mL), equipotent to the ampicillin and amphotericin B in inhibiting the growth of S. epidermidis (MIC 0.49 μg/mL), A. fumigatus (MIC 0.98 μg/mL), respectively. Thus, these studies suggest that quinoline derivatives bearing pyrazole moiety are interesting scaffolds for the development of novel antibacterial and antifungal agents. Copyright © 2017

  6. In Vitro Antibacterial and Antifungal Activity of Lavandula x intermedia Emeric ex Loisel. ‘Budrovka’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanda Vladimir-Knezevic

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activities of Lavandula x intermedia Emeric ex Loisel. ‘Budrovka’, an indigenous Croatian cultivar of lavandin. For that purpose the activity of ethanolic extracts of flowers, inflorescence stalks and leaves against thirty one strains of bacteria, yeasts, dermatophytes and moulds were studied using both the agar well diffusion and broth dilution assays. Among the investigated extracts found to be effective against a broad spectrum of microorganisms, the flower extract was considered to be the most potent one. Linalool and rosmarinic acid, as the most abundant constituents found, are very likely major contributors to the observed antimicrobial effects. The results suggest that flowers of lavandin ‘Budrovka’ could serve as a rich source of natural terpene and polyphenol antimicrobial agents.

  7. Carboxymethylated chitosan-stabilized copper nanoparticles: a promise to contribute a potent antifungal and antibacterial agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tantubay, Sangeeta, E-mail: sang.chem2@gmail.com [Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Department of Chemistry (India); Mukhopadhyay, Sourav K. [Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Department of Biotechnology (India); Kalita, Himani; Konar, Suraj [Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Department of Chemistry (India); Dey, Satyahari [Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Department of Biotechnology (India); Pathak, Amita, E-mail: ami@chem.iitkgp.ernet.in; Pramanik, Panchanan, E-mail: ppramanik1946@yahoo.in, E-mail: pramanik1946@gmail.com [Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Department of Chemistry (India)

    2015-06-15

    Carboxymethylated chitosan (CMC)-stabilized copper nanoparticles (Cu-NPs) have been synthesized via chemical reduction of copper(II)–CMC complex in aqueous medium by hydrazine under microwave irradiation in ambient atmosphere. Structural morphology, phase, and chemical compositions of CMC-stabilized Cu-NPs (CMC–Cu-NPs) have been analyzed through high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Antifungal and antibacterial activities of CMC–Cu-NPs have been evaluated against Candida tropicalis and Escherichia coli through agar well diffusion method, broth microdilution assay, live–dead assay, and microscopic observation. Antimicrobial activity of spherical CMC–Cu-NPs (∼4–15 nm of diameters) has been observed to be significant for both C. tropicalis and E. coli. The cytotoxicity study indicates that CMC–Cu-NPs have no significant toxic effect against normal cell line, L929.

  8. Authenticating apple cider vinegar's home remedy claims: antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral properties and cytotoxicity aspect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Judy; Anthonydhason, Vimala; Muthu, Manikandan; Gansukh, Enkhtaivan; Jung, Somang; Chul, Sechul; Iyyakkannu, Sivanesan

    2017-12-11

    These are the days when one would go online first seeking home remedies before seeing a doctor. Apple cider vinegar (ACV) is one such popular yet scientifically under-validated remedy. Our results prove the unequivocal antimicrobial activity of ACV to be true at full strength concentrations. However, the activity cannot be generalised because although strong antibacterial activity was observed at 25% concentrations, in terms of antifungal activity, yeasts, especially Candida were found to be less susceptible. The antimicrobial/antioxidant properties are ascertained to the total phenolic contents of ACV, as confirmed by our characterisation of the bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity. When checking for its cytotoxicity, ACV exhibited toxicity even at concentrations as low as 0.7%. These results indicate that there is no question of generalising the idea of ACV usage, instead more in vitro and in vivo validations are necessary in order to precisely weigh the pros and cons of ACV.

  9. Screening of antibacterial and antifungal activities of selected Macedonian wild mushrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolovska-Nedelkoska Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Regarding the development of novel safe antimicrobials of natural origin, macrofungi became attractive for the researchers in the last decade. In this study, antimicrobial potential of methanolic extracts of six wild macromycetes (Boletus lupinus, Flammulina velutypes, Phellinus igniarius, Sarcodon imbricatus, Tricholoma aurantium, Xerocomus ichnusanus was evaluated. In vitro antimicrobial activity was investigated by the microdilution method and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC was determined. Testing was conducted against eleven microorganisms, including six strains of bacteria and five species of fungi. Extracts showed selective antimicrobial properties while the activities depended both on the species of microorganism and on the type and concentration of extract. The evaluated extracts demonstrated antimicrobial activity, exhibiting more potent inhibitory effects on the growth of bacteria than on fungi. The highest antibacterial and antifungal activity was observed in methanolic extract of polypore fungus P. igniarius.

  10. Antibacterial and antifungal screening of the root extracts of nardostachys jatamansi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohail, T.; Yaqeen, Z.; Imran, H.; Shaukat, S.

    2007-01-01

    Antimicrobial activity of ethanol, ethyl acetate and hexane extracts of Nardostachys roots were studied in vitro against six pathogenic gram positive bacteria (Stayphylococcus aureus, streptococcus intermedius, S. faecalis, Bacillus Pumilus, B. cereus B. subtilus), six gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, S. Paratyphi B, Klebsiella Pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilus, Shigella flexneri) and five fungi (Trichophyton rubrum, T. schoenleinii, Aspergillus niger, Candida albicans, C. glabrata). Ethanolic root extract exhibited maximum antimicrobial activity against all the tested bacteria and gungi, at concentration of 5, 10 and 20 mg/ml as compared to ethyl acetate and hexane extract, which did not show marked activity. Antimicrobial activity was compared with the activities of standard antibacterial and antifungal drugs, namely Ampicillin and Nystatin, respectively. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) were between 0.5-1 mg/ml against all the studied microorganisms. (author)

  11. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of pyroligneous acid from wood of Eucalyptus urograndis and Mimosa tenuiflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Araújo, E; Pimenta, A S; Feijó, F M C; Castro, R V O; Fasciotti, M; Monteiro, T V C; de Lima, K M G

    2018-01-01

    This work aimed to evaluate the antibacterial and antifungal activities of two types of pyroligneous acid (PA) obtained from slow pyrolysis of wood of Mimosa tenuiflora and of a hybrid of Eucalyptus urophylla × Eucalyptus grandis. Wood wedges were carbonized on a heating rate of 1·25°C min -1 until 450°C. Pyrolysis smoke was trapped and condensed to yield liquid products. Crude pyrolysis liquids were bidistilled under 5 mmHg vacuum yielding purified PA. Multi-antibiotic-resistant strains of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853) and Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) had their sensitivity to PA evaluated using agar diffusion test. Two yeasts were evaluated as well, Candida albicans (ATCC 10231) and Cryptococcus neoformans. GC-MS analysis of both PAs was carried out to obtain their chemical composition. Regression analysis was performed, and models were adjusted, with diameter of inhibition halos and PA concentration (100, 50 and 20%) as parameters. Identity of regression models and equality of parameters in polynomial orthogonal equations were verified. Inhibition halos were observed in the range 15-25 mm of diameter. All micro-organisms were inhibited by both types of PA even in the lowest concentration of 20%. The feasibility of the usage of PAs produced with wood species planted in large scale in Brazil was evident and the real potential as a basis to produce natural antibacterial and antifungal agents, with real possibility to be used in veterinary and zootechnical applications. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Chemical Composition, Antibacterial and Antifungal Activities of Crude Dittrichia viscosa (L. Greuter Leaf Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wafa Rhimi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The small amount of data regarding the antifungal activity of Dittrichia viscosa (L. Greuter against dermatophytes, Malassezia spp. and Aspergillus spp., associated with the few comparative studies on the antimicrobial activity of methanolic, ethanolic, and butanolic extracts underpins the study herein presented. The total condensed tannin (TCT, phenol (TPC, flavonoid (TFC, and caffeoylquinic acid (CQC content of methanol, butanol, and ethanol (80% and 100% extracts of D. viscosa were assessed and their bactericidal and fungicidal activities were evaluated. The antibacterial, anti-Candida and anti-Malassezia activities were evaluated by using the disk diffusion method, whereas the anti-Microsporum canis and anti-Aspergillus fumigatus activities were assessed by studying the toxicity effect of the extracts on vegetative growth, sporulation and germination. The methanolic extract contained the highest TPC and CQC content. It contains several phytochemicals mainly caffeoylquinic acid derivatives as determined by liquid chromatography with photodiode array and electrospray ionisation mass spectrometric detection (LC/PDA/ESI-MS analysis. All extracts showed an excellent inhibitory effect against bacteria and Candida spp., whereas methanolic extract exhibited the highest antifungal activities against Malassezia spp., M. canis and A. fumigatus strains. The results clearly showed that all extracts, in particular the methanolic extract, might be excellent antimicrobial drugs for treating infections that are life threatening (i.e., Malassezia or infections that require mandatory treatments (i.e., M. canis or A. fumigatus.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of anti-bacterial and anti-fungal citrate-based mussel-inspired bioadhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinshan; Wang, Wei; Hu, Jianqing; Xie, Denghui; Gerhard, Ethan; Nisic, Merisa; Shan, Dingying; Qian, Guoying; Zheng, Siyang; Yang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial and fungal infections in the use of surgical devices and medical implants remain a major concern. Traditional bioadhesives fail to incorporate anti-microbial properties, necessitating additional anti-microbial drug injection. Herein, by the introduction of the clinically used and inexpensive anti-fungal agent, 10-undecylenic acid (UA), into our recently developed injectable citrate-based mussel-inspired bioadhesives (iCMBAs), a new family of anti-bacterial and anti-fungal iCMBAs (AbAf iCs) was developed. AbAf iCs not only showed strong wet tissue adhesion strength, but also exhibited excellent in vitro cyto-compatibility, fast degradation, and strong initial and considerable long-term anti-bacterial and anti-fungal ability. For the first time, the biocompatibility and anti-microbial ability of sodium metaperiodate (PI), an oxidant used as a cross-linking initiator in the AbAf iCs system, was also thoroughly investigated. Our results suggest that the PI-based bioadhesives showed better anti-microbial properties compared to the unstable silver-based bioadhesive materials. In conclusion, AbAf iCs family can serve as excellent anti-bacterial and anti-fungal bioadhesive candidates for tissue/wound closure, wound dressing, and bone regeneration, especially when bacterial or fungal infections are a major concern. PMID:26874283

  14. Antiproliferative, Antibacterial and Antifungal Activity of the Lichen Xanthoria parietina and Its Secondary Metabolite Parietin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Basile

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Lichens are valuable natural resources used for centuries throughout the world as medicine, food, fodder, perfume, spices and dyes, as well as for other miscellaneous purposes. This study investigates the antiproliferative, antibacterial and antifungal activity of the acetone extract of the lichen Xanthoria parietina (Linnaeus Theodor Fries and its major secondary metabolite, parietin. The extract and parietin were tested for antimicrobial activity against nine American Type Culture Collection standard and clinically isolated bacterial strains, and three fungal strains. Both showed strong antibacterial activity against all bacterial strains and matched clinical isolates, particularly against Staphylococcus aureus from standard and clinical sources. Among the fungi tested, Rhizoctonia solani was the most sensitive. The antiproliferative effects of the extract and parietin were also investigated in human breast cancer cells. The extract inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis, both effects being accompanied by modulation of expression of cell cycle regulating genes such as p16, p27, cyclin D1 and cyclin A. It also mediated apoptosis by activating extrinsic and intrinsic cell death pathways, modulating Tumor Necrosis Factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2, and inducing Bcl-2-associated agonist of cell death (BAD phosphorylation. Our results indicate that Xanthoria parietina is a major potential source of antimicrobial and anticancer substances.

  15. Antibacterial and antifungal activity of streptomycetes isolated from Portonova coastal environment. Papers presented in the symposium held at Cochin, India, 16-17 September 1993

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Lakshmanaperumalsamy, P.; Chandramohan, D.; Natarajan, R.

    The antibacterial and antifungal activities of 518 streptomycetes strains were tested against Bacillus circulans, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Fusarium oxysporum. 27.03% of the strains...

  16. Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of Some 1,3,4-Oxadiazole Derivatives and Evaluation of Their Antibacterial and Antifungal Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Swarnkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of substituted 1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives (3a–f and (6a–f have been synthesized from diphenylacetic acid hydrazide under microwave irradiation in various reaction conditions. The structures of the synthesized compounds were assigned on the basis of elemental analysis, IR, and 1H NMR. These targeted compounds have been tested for their antibacterial and antifungal activities compared to ampicillin and griseofulvin as standard drug. Compounds 3a, 3e, 3f, 6c, 6d, 6e, and 6d exhibited the maximum antibacterial activities while 3b, 3c, 3d, 3e, 6a, 6d, and 6e exhibited the maximum antifungal activities.

  17. Plastering mortar with antibacterial and antifungal properties studied by 1H NMR relaxometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumate, E.; Aciu, C.; Manea, D. L.; Moldovan, D.; Chelcea, R.; Fechete, R.

    2017-12-01

    The Plastering mortars, with good antibacterial (in particular Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and antifungal (Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum) properties, were studied by 1D NMR relaxometry and internal humidity measurements. Three recipes based on plastering mortar with variable content (0, 5 and 10 %) of Ag/ZnO nanopowders and with adequate physical characteristics regarding the mechanical strengths (CS IV), good adhesion to the substrate and low water absorption by capillarity (W2) were considered. The distributions of transverse relaxation times T2 were measured at 2 h after preparation (for mortar pasta) and then for the same samples at 2, 7, and 28 days during the hydration of mineralogical components. The T2 distributions are characterized by four components associated with hydration water and water in three types of pores of different dimension. The dimension of pores formed during hydration process are strongly dependent on the Ag/ZnO nanopowders content but finally at 28 days the pores distributions, as resulted from the T2 distributions, looks similar. Finally, the transverse relaxation ratio was linearly correlated to the compressive strength and the hydration behaviour during 132 days measured with a dedicated humidity sensor embedded inside sampled was discussed.

  18. Biotechnological Screening of Microalgal and Cyanobacterial Strains for Biogas Production and Antibacterial and Antifungal Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudimu, Opayi; Rybalka, Nataliya; Bauersachs, Thorsten; Born, Jens; Friedl, Thomas; Schulz, Rüdiger

    2014-01-01

    Microalgae and cyanobacteria represent a valuable natural resource for the generation of a large variety of chemical substances that are of interest for medical research, can be used as additives in cosmetics and food production, or as an energy source in biogas plants. The variety of potential agents and the use of microalgae and cyanobacteria biomass for the production of these substances are little investigated and not exploited for the market. Due to the enormous biodiversity of microalgae and cyanobacteria, they hold great promise for novel products. In this study, we investigated a large number of microalgal and cyanobacterial strains from the Culture Collection of Algae at Göttingen University (SAG) with regard to their biomass and biogas production, as well antibacterial and antifungal effects. Our results demonstrated that microalgae and cyanobacteria are able to generate a large number of economically-interesting substances in different quantities dependent on strain type. The distribution and quantity of some of these components were found to reflect phylogenetic relationships at the level of classes. In addition, between closely related species and even among multiple isolates of the same species, the productivity may be rather variable. PMID:24957031

  19. Antifungal and antibacterial activity of endophytic penicillium species isolated from salvadora species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korejo, F.; Shafique, H.A.; Haque, S.E.; Ali, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    Salvadora persica and S. S.oleoides are facultative holophytic plants, well known as miswak, are traditionally used to ensure oral hygiene among Muslim people in Asian and African counties. Species of Salvadora have a number of proven pharmacological importance. Besides, terrestrial fungi endophytic fungi are also gaining importance for the isolation of bioactive compounds. In this study 74 samples (root, shoot and leaves) from S. persica and S. oleoides were examined for endophytic fungi, 22 samples showed presence of Penicillium spp., 48 were found positive for aspergilli, whereas 10 samples showed infection of Fusarium solani, 4 were found infected with Macrophomina phaseolina and one with Rhizoctonia solani. Most of the Penicillium isolated were identified as P. restrictum, P. citrinum and P. canescens. In dual culture plate assay out of four Penicillium isolates tested, P. citrinum and one isolate of P. restrictum caused growth inhibition of all four test root rotting fungi, Fusarium solani, F. oxysporum, Macrophomina phaseolina and Rhizoctonia solani. Culture filtrates of Penicillium spp., were also evaluated against four common laboratory bacteria namely Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli and above mentioned root rotting fungi. Culture filtrates of endophytic Penicillium spp., also showed significant antibacterial and antifungal activity. Secondary metabolites of endophytic Penicillium spp., offer an exciting area of research for the discovery of novel antimicrobial compounds. (author)

  20. Biotechnological Screening of Microalgal and Cyanobacterial Strains for Biogas Production and Antibacterial and Antifungal Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Opayi Mudimu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae and cyanobacteria represent a valuable natural resource for the generation of a large variety of chemical substances that are of interest for medical research, can be used as additives in cosmetics and food production, or as an energy source in biogas plants. The variety of potential agents and the use of microalgae and cyanobacteria biomass for the production of these substances are little investigated and not exploited for the market. Due to the enormous biodiversity of microalgae and cyanobacteria, they hold great promise for novel products. In this study, we investigated a large number of microalgal and cyanobacterial strains from the Culture Collection of Algae at Göttingen University (SAG with regard to their biomass and biogas production, as well antibacterial and antifungal effects. Our results demonstrated that microalgae and cyanobacteria are able to generate a large number of economically-interesting substances in different quantities dependent on strain type. The distribution and quantity of some of these components were found to reflect phylogenetic relationships at the level of classes. In addition, between closely related species and even among multiple isolates of the same species, the productivity may be rather variable.

  1. Vegetable Peel Waste for the Production of ZnO Nanoparticles and its Toxicological Efficiency, Antifungal, Hemolytic, and Antibacterial Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surendra, T. V.; Roopan, Selvaraj Mohana; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Sarkar, Gargi; Suthindhiran, K.

    2016-12-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) are important materials when making different products like sun screens, textiles, and paints. In the current study, the photocatalytic effect of prepared ZnO NPs from Moringa oleifera ( M. oleifera) was evaluated on degradation of crystal violet (CV) dye, which is largely released from textile industries and is harmful to the environment. Preliminarily, ZnO NP formation was confirmed using a double beam ultraviolet visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometer; further, the NP size was estimated using XRD analysis and the functional group analysis was determined using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The morphology of the synthesized NPs was found to be a hexagonal shape using SEM and TEM analysis and elemental screening was analyzed using EDX. ZnO NPs were shown sized 40-45 nm and spherical in shape. The degradation percentage of ZnO NPs was calculated as 94% at 70 min and the rate of the reaction -k = 0.0282. The synthesized ZnO NPs were determined for effectiveness on biological activities such as antifungal, hemolytic, and antibacterial activity. ZnO NPs showed good antifungal activity against Alternaria saloni and Sclerrotium rolfii strains. Further, we have determined the hemolytic and antibacterial activity of ZnO NPs and we got successive results in antibacterial and hemolytic activities.

  2. Design and quality control of a pharmaceutical formulation containing natural products with antibacterial, antifungal and antioxidant properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordoñez, Adriana A L; Ordoñez, Roxana M; Zampini, Iris C; Isla, María I

    2009-08-13

    The aims of the present study were to determine the antibacterial and antifungal activity as well as mutagenicity of Sechium edule fluid extract and to obtain a pharmaceutical formulation with them. The extract exhibited antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Enterobacter cloacae, Serratia marcescens, Morganella morganii, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp. isolated from clinical samples from two hospitals of Tucuman, Argentina. Non-toxicity and mutagenicity on both Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA 100 strains until 100 microg/plate were observed. A hydrogel with carbopol acrylic acid polymer containing S. edule fluid extract as antibacterial, antimycotic and antioxidant agent was obtained. Microbiological, physical and functional stability of pharmaceutical formulation conserved at room temperature for 1 year were determined. Addition of antioxidant preservatives to store the pharmaceutical formulation was not necessary. The semisolid system showed antimicrobial activity against all gram positive and gram negative bacteria and fungi assayed. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranged from 20 to 800 microg/mL. Its activity was compared with a pharmaceutical formulation containing commercial antibiotic and antifungal. A pseudoplastic behavior and positive thixotropy were observed. Our current finding shows an antimicrobial activity of hydrogel containing S. edule extract on a large range of gram negative and gram positive multi-resistant bacteria and fungi. This topical formulation may be used as antimycotic and as antibacterial in cutaneous infections.

  3. Chemical composition, antibacterial and antifungal activities of flowerhead and root essential oils of Santolina chamaecyparissus L., growing wild in Tunisia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karima Bel Hadj Salah-Fatnassi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial properties of essential oil from various Santolina species have not been investigated enough in the previous studies dealing with the biological activities of medicinal plants. In Tunisia, Santolina chamaecyparissus L. (Asteraceae is the only Santolina species recorded and is used as vermifuge and emmenagogue. The chemical composition, antibacterial and antifungal properties of essential oils from the flowerheads and roots of spontaneous S. chamaecyparissus growing in Tunisia and the chemical composition which leads to the Tunisian chemotype are investigated here for the first time. Essential oils isolated by hydro distillation from flowerheads and roots of S. chamaecyparissus were analyzed by GC and GC/MS. Two methods served for antimicrobial assays of the essential oils: diffusion in a solid medium and micro-well dilution assay. Antifungal tests were carried out by the agar incorporation method. Sixty-seven constituents were identified from the essential oil of the flowerhead. The major constituents were: 1,8-cineole and β-eudesmol. Two non identified compounds were present at the highest concentration in root oil. Flowerhead oil was characterized by high contents in monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes oxygenated compounds. The flowerhead essential oil demonstrated potent of antibacterial properties against Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC, with MIC of 0.625 μg/ml. These findings demonstrate that the flowerhead essential oils of S. chamaecyparissus have excellent antibacterial properties and for this reason they could contribute to decrease the problem of microbial resistance to antibiotics.

  4. In-vitro antibacterial, antifungal, antioxidant and functional properties of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadaikunnan, Shine; Rejiniemon, Thankappan; Khaled, Jamal M; Alharbi, Naiyf S; Mothana, Ramzi

    2015-02-22

    Food born pathogenic bacteria and filamentous fungi are able to grow on most foods, including natural foods, processed foods, and fermented foods and create considerable economic loss. The aim of this study was to determine the antibacterial, antifungal, antioxidant and functional properties of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens recovered from silage. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of the compounds was assessed by using broth micro dilution method. The 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH)-radical scavenging and hydroxyl radical-scavenging abilities were measured to evaluate antioxidant activity of the strain. Primary antimicrobial compound production screening revealed that B. amyloliquefaciens exhibited significant activity against all the tested bacteria and fungi compared to other strains. The 16S rRNA and gyrase A gene sequence analysis determined using molecular biological tools confirmed that the strain was 99% similarity towards B. amyloliquefaciens. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of ethyl acetate extract against Bacillus subtilis, Enterococcus cloacae and Staphylococcus aureus were 25.0 μg ml-1, and S, epidermidis were 12.5 μg ml-1, respectively. Filamentous fungi Aspergillus clavatus, A. fumigates, A. niger and Gibberella moniliformis showed 25 μg ml-1. VJ-1 was able to survive the gastrointestinal conditions simulating the stomach and duodenum passage with the highest percentage of hydrophobicity. In addition, its resistance to hydrogen peroxide and highest hydroxyl radical and 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging activities, with inhibition rates of 56.84% and 67.12% respectively, were its advantage. An antimicrobial susceptibility pattern was an intrinsic feature of this strain, and thus, consumption does not represent a health risk to humans. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens might be a promising candidate for new pharmaceutical agents and probiotics.

  5. Antibacterial, antifungal and cytotoxic activities exhibited by endophytic fungi from the Brazilian marine red alga Bostrychia tenella (Ceramiales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael de Felício

    Full Text Available Abstract Marine environment is one of the most important sources regarding natural products research. Besides, marine microorganisms have been denominated as a talented natural source for discovery of new leads. Although the association of macroalgae and fungi has been described regarding ecological issues, there is a lack of studies about marine seaweed endophytic fungi. In this context, the goal of this study was to evaluate cytotoxic, antifungal and antibacterial activities of endophytic fungi isolated from the Brazilian marine seaweed Bostrychia tenella (J.V. Lamouroux J. Agardh (Ceramiales, Rhodophyta. Forty-five endophytic microorganism strains were isolated from B. tenella. Crude extracts and organic fractions of ten selected strains were obtained after growth in rice medium. Samples were evaluated for cytotoxicity, antifungal and antibacterial assays. Penicillium strains showed positive results in a diversity of assays, and other five strains were active in at least one test. In addition, cytochalasin D was isolated from Xylaria sp. This alga is composed of a microbiological potential, since its endophytic strains exhibited remarkable biological properties. Moreover, cytochalasin D isolation has confirmed chemical potential of marine endophytic strains. This is the first study in which cultured fungi isolates from the Brazilian macroalga B. tenella were evaluated concerning biological properties. Results corroborated that this species could be a pharmaceutical source from marine environment. Furthermore, Acremonium implicatum is being firstly described as marine endophyte and Xylaria sp., Trichoderma atroviride and Nigrospora oryzae as marine seaweed endophytes. Thus, this work reports the first study relating detailed isolation, cultivation and biological evaluation (cytotoxic, antifungal and antibacterial of endophytes Penicillium decaturense and P. waksmanii from the Brazilian marine red alga B. tenella. We are also reporting the

  6. Screening for antibacterial and antifungal activities in some marine algae from the Fujian coast of China with three different solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yi; Chen, Yin-Shan; Lu, Hai-Sheng

    2001-12-01

    Three different solvents viz ethanol, acetone and methanol-toluene (3:1) were used to extract antibiotics from 23 species of marine algae belonging to the Chlorophyta, Phaeophyta and Rhodophyta. Their crude extracts were tested for antibacterial and antifungal activities. Among them, the ethanol extract showed the strongest activity against the bacteria and fungi tested. Four species of the Rhodophyta ( Laurencia okamurai, Dasya scoparia, Grateloupia filicina and plocamium telfairiae) showed a wide spectrum of antibacterial activity. Every solvent extract from the four species was active against all the bacteria tested. The test bacterium Pseudomonas solancearum and the fungus Penicilium citrinum were most sensitive to the extracts of marine algae. In general, the extracts of seaweeds inhibited bacteria more strongly than fungi and species of the Rhodophyta showed the greatest activity against the bacteria and fungi tested.

  7. Silsesquioxane-based hybrid nanocomposites with methacrylate units containing titania and/or silver nanoparticles as antibacterial/antifungal coatings for monumental stones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aflori, Magdalena [“Petru Poni” Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41A Grigore Ghica Voda Alley, 700487 Iasi (Romania); Simionescu, Bogdana [“Petru Poni” Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41A Grigore Ghica Voda Alley, 700487 Iasi (Romania); “Costin D. Nenitescu” Centre of Organic Chemistry, 202B Splaiul Independentei, 7114 Bucharest (Romania); Bordianu, Irina-Elena; Sacarescu, Liviu; Varganici, Cristian-Dragos; Doroftei, Florica; Nicolescu, Alina [“Petru Poni” Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41A Grigore Ghica Voda Alley, 700487 Iasi (Romania); Olaru, Mihaela, E-mail: olaruma@icmpp.ro [“Petru Poni” Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41A Grigore Ghica Voda Alley, 700487 Iasi (Romania)

    2013-11-20

    Highlights: • Synthesis of nanocomposites with noble metals having high antibacterial efficiency. • Silver nanoparticles antibacterial activity for monumental stone conservation. • A high antibacterial activity while assuring good stone protection. -- Abstract: The present paper reports on the evaluation of two silsesquioxane-based hybrid nanocomposites with methacrylate units containing titania and/or silver nanoparticles aimed as antibacterial coatings for monumental stones. Sol–gel reaction of titanium isopropoxide and/or 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate, in the presence of silver nitrate and a primary amine surfactant, yielded new types of hybrid nanocomposites with high antibacterial/antifungal efficacy. Different polymer behaviours regarding a frequently used monumental stone originating from Romania were evidenced through Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) technique. Conclusions regarding the stones acid-resistant character and lower influence of salt weathering on its durability, as well as a better protective coating containing titania units were revealed.

  8. Synthesis of selected 5-thio-substituted tetrazole derivatives and evaluation of their antibacterial and antifungal activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NALILU SUCHETHA KUMARI

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Several 5-thio-substituted tetrazole derivatives were efficiently synthesized by a three-step process. The substituted tetrazol-5-thiol, namely, 1-benzyl-1H-tetrazole-5-thiol (2 was prepared by refluxing commercially available benzyl isothiocyanate (1 with sodium azide in water. The second step was the synthesis of 1-benzyl-5-[(3-bromopropylthio]-1H-tetrazole (3 by thioalkylation of tetrazole-5-thiol 2 with 1,3-dibromopropane in tetrahydrofuran. Finally, the 5-thio-substituted tetrazole derivatives 4a–i were prepared by condensation of 3 with the corresponding amine or thiol. The structures of the newly synthesized compounds were characterized by NMR, LC/MS/MS, IR spectral data and elemental analysis. All the synthesized compounds were screened for their antibacterial and antifungal activities.

  9. Biological activities of leaves of ethnomedicinal plant, Borassus flabellifer Linn. (Palmyra palm: An antibacterial, antifungal and antioxidant evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad G. Jamkhande

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Plants contain a variety of phytochemicals that have the ability to exert effect on human body. Among them Borassus flabellifer Linn. is a medicinally important plant. In traditional medicine different parts of plants are being used for their medicinal properties. The methanol extract was obtained from powdered leaves and further fractions were prepared. Antimicrobial potential was investigated using eight pathogenic strains of bacteria and fungi by agar well diffusion method. Broth dilution method was employed to MIC and MMC of active samples and MIC index value was determined. ME was subjected to preliminary phytochemical analysis; and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 radical scavenging activity. Phytochemical screening revealed the presence of several phytochemicals. The ME showed dose dependent radical scavenging activity as evidenced by IC50 values for DPPH (40.19 μg/ml and H2O2 (30.92 μg/ml radicals. The inhibition zones and MIC values for bacterial strains were in the range of 10–16 mm and 50–70 μg/ml, respectively. All the samples showed an inhibitory effect on fungal strains with inhibition zone (10–17 mm and MFC (50–70 μg/ml. Samples exhibited diverse patterns of antibacterial and antifungal effects. Among the tested samples, methanol extract and acetone fraction (AF had potent antibacterial and antifungal activities. These results lead to the conclusion that the plant has a broad spectrum antimicrobial and antioxidant activity and could be a potential option for treating various infectious diseases. The strong antioxidant property of methanol extract might be employed in the development of natural antioxidants for agro-food and pharmaceutical industries.

  10. The Antibacterial and Antifungal Textile Properties Functionalized by Bimetallic Nanoparticles of Ag/Cu with Different Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Paszkiewicz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We reported a preparation and characterization of five kinds of impregnation solutions, containing Ag/Cu in the form of bimetallic nanoparticles (alloy and core-shell as well as ionic species. The cotton-polyester textiles were successfully impregnated during the washing and ironing process by as-prepared solutions to have antibacterial and antifungal properties against to Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans. Moreover, we have reported the effect of type of the fabric used and number of washing/impregnation cycles (in a laboratory scale on the bactericidal and fungicidal activity of obtained textiles. The results indicated that all tested samples after 5, 10, 15, and 20 washing/impregnated cycles exhibited an antimicrobial activity. The antifungal tests showed that only textile impregnated with solutions containing Ag+/Cu2+ and Ag NPs/Cu2+ exhibited a strong inhibition of fungi growth of the after 5 (99.99% and 15 (100% washing/impregnation cycles, respectively.

  11. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of 5-arylidene-n,n-dimethylbarbiturates derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahim, F.; Haider, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    A series of N,N-dimethyl-arylidene barbiturates 1-22 has been re-synthesized and evaluated against a number of Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria and some fungal strains. Most of the compounds were found to be active against a number of Gram-positive, Gram-negative and also displayed anti-fungal activities. (author)

  12. ANTIBACTERIAL AND ANTIFUNGAL EFFECT OF ETHANOL EXTRACTS, HEXANE AND METHANOLIC FROM THE LEAVES OF Kalanchoe pinnata (Lam. PERS (Malva corama AGAINST MULTI-DRUG RESISTANT STRAINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma de Souza Santana

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The infections caused by bacteria and fungi, as well as the subsequent resistance of these microorganisms continue with high incidencesthus studies of medicinal plants and their combination with conventional therapy, are becoming essential. This study examined the antibacterial, antifungal and modifier of resistance to antibiotics and antifungal extracts of ethanol, hexane and methanol from the leaves of Kalanchoe pinnata, used in folk medicine. The phytochemical was performed qualitatively by visual observation of color changes and formation of precipitates after addition of specific reagents, such as ferric chloride (Fecl310% sodium hydroxide (NaOH10%, hydrochloric acid (HCl 1%, acid  acetic acid 5%, ammonium hydroxide (NH4OH 10%, chloroform and  reagent Draggendorff 10%. The analysis for antimicrobial activity was through the microdilution test for determination of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and modifying the action of antibiotics (gentamicin and amikacin and antifungals (ketoconazole and fluconazole in association with the extracts. The phytochemicals assays indicated the presence of secondary metabolites such as flavonoids, alkaloids and flabobênicos tannins. In assessing the MIC results were obtained <1024μg/ mL for Candida albicans and Candida krusei. There was synergism between extracts of Kalanchoe pinnata leaves with aminoglycosides and antifungal, reducing the concentration of CIM of multidrug-resistant strains. Our results demonstrate that the extracts of Kalanchoe pinnata have bioactive constituents with antimicrobial activity in vitro. Keywords: Kalcinchoe pinnata, Microorganisms, Synergistic effect, Antifungal, Antibacterial.

  13. The antibacterial and antifungal activity of six essential oils and their cyto/genotoxicity to human HEL 12469 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puškárová, Andrea; Bučková, Mária; Kraková, Lucia; Pangallo, Domenico; Kozics, Katarína

    2017-08-15

    Six essential oils (from oregano, thyme, clove, lavender, clary sage, and arborvitae) exhibited different antibacterial and antifungal properties. Antimicrobial activity was shown against pathogenic (Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Yersinia enterocolitica, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Enterococcus faecalis) and environmental bacteria (Bacillus cereus, Arthrobacter protophormiae, Pseudomonas fragi) and fungi (Chaetomium globosum, Penicillium chrysogenum, Cladosporium cladosporoides, Alternaria alternata, and Aspergillus fumigatus). Oregano, thyme, clove and arborvitae showed very strong antibacterial activity against all tested strains at both full strength and reduced concentrations. These essential oils showed different fungistatic and fungicidal activities when tested by direct application and in the vapor phase. The genotoxic effects of these oils on HEL 12469 human embryo lung cells were evaluated using an alkaline comet assay for the first time, revealing that none of the oils induced significant DNA damage in vitro after 24 h. This study provides novel approaches for assessing the antimicrobial potential of essential oils in both direct contact and the vapor phase and also demonstrates the valuable properties of the phenol-free arborvitae oil. These results suggest that all the tested essential oils might be used as broad-spectrum anti-microbial agents for decontaminating an indoor environment.

  14. Synthesis and preliminary evaluation of N-acylhydrazone compounds as antibacterial and antifungal agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cachiba, Thomas Haruo; Carvalho, Bruno Demartini; Carvalho, Diogo Teixeira; Cusinato, Marina; Prado, Clara Gaviao; Dias, Amanda Latercia Tranches

    2012-01-01

    We describe the synthesis and evaluation of N-acylhydrazone compounds bearing different electron-donating groups in one of its aromatic rings, obtained using a four-step synthetic route. IC 50 values against pathogenic fungi and bacteria were determined by serial microdilution. Compounds showed low activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. By contrast, a derivative with a meta-oriented electron-donating group showed significant activity (IC50) against Candida albicans (17 μM), C. krusei (34 μM) and C. tropicalis (17 μM). Results suggest this is a promising lead-compound for synthesis of potent antifungal agents. (author)

  15. [Antibacterial and antifungal activity of Salvia apiana against clinically important microorganisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdova-Guerrero, Iván; Aragon-Martinez, Othoniel H; Díaz-Rubio, Laura; Franco-Cabrera, Santiago; Serafín-Higuera, Nicolas A; Pozos-Guillén, Amaury; Soto-Castro, Tely A; Martinez-Morales, Flavio; Isiordia-Espinoza, Mario

    Due to the great global concern regarding bacterial resistance to antibiotics, an ongoing search for new molecules having antibacterial activity is necessary. This study evaluated the antibacterial and anticandidal effects of a hexane extract from the root of Salvia apiana. Salvia extracts at concentrations of 27, 13.5, 6.8 and 3.4mg/ml caused growth inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans. However, no significant effect was observed on Escherichia coli and Candida tropicalis in comparison to vehicle. It was here demonstrated for the first time that Salvia apiana has an important antimicrobial effect on human pathogens of great clinical value, thus opening the field to continue the evaluation of this lamiaceous plant for its future use as a therapeutic agent. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Dynamic membrane interactions of antibacterial and antifungal biomolecules, and amyloid peptides, revealed by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Akira; Matsumori, Nobuaki; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2018-02-01

    A variety of biomolecules acting on the cell membrane folds into a biologically active structure in the membrane environment. It is, therefore, important to determine the structures and dynamics of such biomolecules in a membrane environment. While several biophysical techniques are used to obtain low-resolution information, solid-state NMR spectroscopy is one of the most powerful means for determining the structure and dynamics of membrane bound biomolecules such as antibacterial biomolecules and amyloidogenic proteins; unlike X-ray crystallography and solution NMR spectroscopy, applications of solid-state NMR spectroscopy are not limited by non-crystalline, non-soluble nature or molecular size of membrane-associated biomolecules. This review article focuses on the applications of solid-state NMR techniques to study a few selected antibacterial and amyloid peptides. Solid-state NMR studies revealing the membrane inserted bent α-helical structure associated with the hemolytic activity of bee venom melittin and the chemical shift oscillation analysis used to determine the transmembrane structure (with α-helix and 3 10 -helix in the N- and C-termini, respectively) of antibiotic peptide alamethicin are discussed in detail. Oligomerization of an amyloidogenic islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP, or also known as amylin) resulting from its aggregation in a membrane environment, molecular interactions of the antifungal natural product amphotericin B with ergosterol in lipid bilayers, and the mechanism of lipid raft formation by sphingomyelin studied using solid state NMR methods are also discussed in this review article. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Biophysical Exploration of Dynamical Ordering of Biomolecular Systems" edited by Dr. Koichi Kato. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. In Vitro Antibacterial, Antifungal, Antibiofilm, Antioxidant, and Anticancer Properties of Isosteviol Isolated from Endangered Medicinal Plant Pittosporum tetraspermum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naif Abdullah Al-Dhabi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the in vitro antibacterial, antifungal, antibiofilm, antioxidant, and anticancer properties of isosteviol isolated from endangered medicinal plant Pittosporum tetraspermum. Pure compound was obtained and characterized by column chromatography followed by 1H NMR, 13C NMR, IR, and mass spectral analysis. The antimicrobial activities of the compound were assessed by the broth microdilution method and the antioxidant properties were determined using reducing ability assay, DPPH scavenging assay, hydroxyl radical scavenging activity, and superoxide radical scavenging assay. Anticancer study was evaluated by following MTT assay. Column purification and spectrocopical analysis lead to identifying isosteviol from the crude ethyl acetate extract. The compound exhibited significant activity against bacteria such as Staphylococcus epidermidis (125 µg/mL, Staphylococcus aureus (125 µg/mL, and Klebsiella pneumoniae (62.5 µg/mL. The MIC of the compound against Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger, and Trichophyton mentagrophytes was 62.5, 125, and 500 µg/mL, respectively. The compound showed comparatively better antibiofilm activity against E. coli, S. typhi, and P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, it exhibited good antioxidant properties. Anticancer properties of the compound against Vero and MCF7 cell lines were its advantage. Novel isosteviol would be useful to reduce the infectious diseases caused by pathogenic microorganisms or slow the progress of various oxidative stress-related diseases.

  18. Antibacterial/Antifungal Activity and Synergistic Interactions between Polyprenols and Other Lipids Isolated from Ginkgo Biloba L. Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Tao

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Polyprenols separated from lipids are promising new components from Ginkgo biloba L. leaves (GBL. In this paper, ginkgo lipids were isolated by extraction with petroleum ether, saponification, and molecular distillation. Eight known compounds: isophytol (1, nerolidol (2, linalool (3, β-sitosterol acetate (4, β-sitosterol (5, stigmasterol (6, ergosterol (7, β-sitosterol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (8 and Ginkgo biloba polyprenols (GBP were separated from GBL by chromatography and identified mainly by NMR. The separated and identified compounds 1, 2 and 3 are reported here for the first time in GBL. The 3D-DAD-HPLC-chromatogram (190–232 nm of GBP was recorded. This study provides new evidence as there are no previous reports on antibacterial/antifungal activities and synergistic interactions between GBP and the compounds separated from GBL lipids against Salmonella enterica, Staphylocococus aureus and Aspergillus niger. Nerolidol (2 showed the highest activity among all the tested samples and of all mixture groups tested the GBP with isophytol (1 mixture had the strongest synergistic effect against Salmonella enterica among the three tested strains. A proportion of isophytol and GBP of 38.19%:61.81% (wt/wt was determined by mixture design as the optimal proportion for the synergistic effect of GBP with isophytol against Salmonella enterica.

  19. Antibacterial and Antifungal Activities of Punica Granatum Peel Extracts Against Oral Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahzadeh, Sh.; Mashouf, RY.; Mortazavi, H.; Moghaddam, MH.; Roozbahani, N.; Vahedi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Punica granatum has been used for many years in folk medicine due to several purposes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of methanolic extract of Punica granatum peel (MEPGP) against Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus sanguinis, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Actynomyces viscosus, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Candida albicans. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, the mentioned oral organisms were cultured in blood agar and mueller-hinton media and then paper disks containing MEPGP at concentrations of 4 mg/ml, 8 mg/ml and 12 mg/ml were inserted on medias. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated by agar disk diffusion method. The effects of three different concentrations of MEPGP against microorganisms were compared using one-way ANOVA and Tukey tests. Results: All concentrations of MEPGP had antibacterial activity against S. aureus and S. epidermidis. Only at concentration of 8 mg/ml and 12 mg/ml MEPGP was effective against L. acidophilus, S. mutans and S. salivarius. Furthermore; no concentrations of MEPGP inhibited A. viscosus and C. albicans. Conclusion: This study suggests that MEPGP might be used as an antibacterial agent in controlling oral infections. PMID:21998800

  20. Antibacterial and Antifungal Activities of Punica Granatum Peel Extracts Against Oral Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Abdollahzadeh

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Punica granatum has been used for many years in folk medicine due to several purposes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of methanolic extract of Punica granatum peel (MEPGP against Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus aureus,Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus sanguinis, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Actynomyces viscosus, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Candida albicans.Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, the mentioned oral organisms were cultured in blood agar and mueller-hinton media and then paper disks containing MEPGP at concentrations of 4 mg/ml, 8 mg/ml and 12 mg/ml were inserted on medias. The antimicrobialactivity was evaluated by agar disk diffusion method. The effects of three different concentrations of MEPGP against microorganisms were compared using one-way ANOVA and Tukey tests.Results: All concentrations of MEPGP had antibacterial activity against S. aureus and S.epidermidis. Only at concentration of 8 mg/ml and 12 mg/ml MEPGP was effective against L. acidophilus, S. mutans and S. salivarius. Furthermore; no concentrations ofMEPGP inhibited A. viscosus and C. albicans.Conclusion: This study suggests that MEPGP might be used as an antibacterial agent in controlling oral infections.

  1. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of different parts of Tribulus terrestris L. growing in Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bayati, Firas A.; Al-Mola, Hassan F.

    2008-01-01

    Antimicrobial activity of organic and aqueous extracts from fruits, leaves and roots of Tribulus terrestris L., an Iraqi medicinal plant used as urinary anti-infective in folk medicine, was examined against 11 species of pathogenic and non-pathogenic microorganisms: Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Corynebacterium diphtheriae, Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Serratia marcescens, Salmonella typhimurium, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans using microdilution method in 96 multiwell microtiter plates. All the extracts from the different parts of the plant showed antimicrobial activity against most tested microorganisms. The most active extract against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria was ethanol extract from the fruits with a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of 0.15 mg/ml against B. subtilis, B. cereus, P. vulgaris and C. diphtheriae. In addition, the same extract from the same plant part demonstrated the strongest antifungal activity against C. albicans with an MIC value of 0.15 mg/ml. PMID:18257138

  2. The wheat multidomain cystatin TaMDC1 displays antifungal, antibacterial, and insecticidal activities in planta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christova, P K; Christov, N K; Mladenov, P V; Imai, R

    2018-03-12

    Expression of the TaMDC1 in transgenic tomato plants confer resistance to bacterial and fungal pathogens, as well as an insect pest and thus prove in planta function of the wheat cystatin. Cystatins are the polypeptides with cysteine proteinase inhibitory activities. Plant cystatins or phytocystatins are known to contribute to plant resistance against insect pests. Recently, increasing data proved that some of the phytocystatins also have antifungal activities in vitro. Here, we functionally characterized a wheat multidomain cystatin, TaMDC1, using in planta assays. Expression of TaMDC1 in wheat seedlings is up-regulated in response to methyl jasmonate and salicylic acid, indicating that TaMDC1 is involved in biotic stress responses mediated by these plant hormones. The TaMDC1 cDNA was integrated in tomato genome and expressed under cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Four transgenic plants that show high level of the transgene expression were selected by RNA gel blot and immunoblot analysis and utilized to assess biotic stress resistance against the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae, the fungal pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Alternaria alternata, and the insect pest Colorado potato beetle (CPB, Leptinotarsa decemlineata). Detached leaf inoculation assays revealed that the tomato plants expressing TaMDC1 showed high levels of resistance against P. syringae and A. alternata, and elevated tolerance against B. cinerea. Sustenance of L. decemlineata larvae to the transgenic plants demonstrated inhibition of CPB larvae growth. Inhibitory activity of TaMDC1 against selected pathogens was also demonstrated by in vitro assays with total protein extracted from transgenic tomato plants. Taken together, the presented data suggest that TaMDC1 is involved in a broad spectrum biotic stress resistance in planta.

  3. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of new acylated derivatives of epigallocatechin gallate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimi eMatsumoto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available (--Epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG has useful antiviral, antimicrobial, antitoxin, and antitumor properties. Previously, Mori, S. et al. (Bioorg Med Chem Lett 18:4249-4252, 2008 found that addition of long acyl chains (C16–18 to EGCG enhanced its anti-influenza virus activity up to 44-fold. The chemical stability of EGCG against oxidative degradation was also enhanced by acylation. We further evaluated the in vitro activity spectrum of the EGCG derivatives against a wide range of bacteria and fungi. A series of EGCG O-acyl derivatives were synthesized by lipase-catalyzed transesterification. These derivatives exhibited several-fold higher activities than EGCG, particularly against Gram-positive organisms. Antifungal activities of the derivatives were also 2 to 4-fold superior to those of EGCG. The activities of the EGCG derivatives against Gram-negative bacteria were not distinguishable from those of EGCG. Among the derivatives evaluated, MICs of dioctanoate, palmitate (C16, palmitoleate, and linolenate for 17 Staphylococcus aureus strains were 4–32 μg/ml, although MIC of EGCG for these 17 strains was >128 μg/ml. C16 demonstrated rapid bactericidal activity against MRSA at 25 μg/ml. The enhanced activity of C16 against S. aureus was supported by its increased membrane permeabilizing activity determined by increased SYTOX Green uptake. The EGCG derivatives were exported by the efflux pump AcrAB-TolC of Escherichia coli. The tolC deletion mutant exhibited higher sensitivity to C16 than to EGCG. Addition of long alkyl chains to EGCG significantly enhanced its activities against various bacteria and fungi, particularly against S. aureus including MRSA. C16 would be an alternative to antibiotics and disinfectants.

  4. One-step synthesis of carbohydrate esters as antibacterial and antifungal agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlFindee, Madher N; Zhang, Qian; Subedi, Yagya Prasad; Shrestha, Jaya P; Kawasaki, Yukie; Grilley, Michelle; Takemoto, Jon Y; Chang, Cheng-Wei Tom

    2018-02-01

    Carbohydrate esters are biodegradable, and the degraded adducts are naturally occurring carbohydrates and fatty acids which are environmentally friendly and non-toxic to human. A simple one-step regioselective acylation of mono-carbohydrates has been developed that leads to the synthesis of a wide range of carbohydrate esters. Screening of these acylated carbohydrates revealed that several compounds were active against a panel of bacteria and fungi, including Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus flavus and Fusarium graminearum. Unlike prior studies on carbohydrate esters that focus only on antibacterial applications, our compounds are found to be active against both bacteria and fungi. Furthermore, the synthetic methodology is suitable to scale-up production for a variety of acylated carbohydrates. The identified lead compound, MAN014, can be used as an antimicrobial in applications such as food processing and preservation and for treatment of bacterial and fungal diseases in animals and plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Antiproliferative, antifungal, and antibacterial activities of endophytic alternaria species from cupressaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Jalal; Hosseyni Moghaddam, Mahdieh S

    2014-09-01

    Recent research has shown the bioprospecting of endophytic fungi from Cupressaceae. Here, we further uncover that the healthy cypress plants such as Cupressus arizonica, Cupressus sempervirens var. cereiformis, and Thuja orientalis host highly bioactive endophytic Alternaria fungal species. Indeed, endophytic Alternaria alternata, Alternaria pellucida, and Alternaria tangelonis were recovered from healthy Cupressaceous trees. Biodiversity and bioactivity of recovered endophytic Alternaria species were a matter of biogeography and host identity. We further extracted such Alternaria's metabolites and highlighted their significant antiproliferative, growth inhibitory, and antibacterial activities against the model target fungus Pyricularia oryzae and the model pathogenic bacteria Bacillus sp., Erwinia amylovora, and Pseudomonas syringae. In vitro assays also indicated that endophytic Alternaria species significantly inhibited the growth of cypress fungal phytopathogens Diplodia seriata, Phaeobotryon cupressi, and Spencermartinsia viticola. In conclusion, since the recovered Alternaria species were originally reported as pathogenic and allergenic fungi, our findings suggest a possible ecological niche for them inside the foliar tissues of Cupressaceous trees. Moreover, in this study, the significant bioactivities of endophytic Alternaria species in association with Cupressaceae plant family are reported.

  6. Synthesis, antibacterial, antifungal and anti-HIV activities of norfloxacin mannich bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandeya, S N; Sriram, D; Nath, G; De Clercq, E

    2000-02-01

    Mannich bases of norfloxacin were synthesized by reacting them with formaldehyde and several isatin derivatives. Their chemical structures have been confirmed by means of their IR, 1H-NMR data and by elemental analysis. Investigation of in vitro antimicrobial activity of compounds was done by the agar dilution method against 28 pathogenic bacteria, eight pathogenic fungi and anti-HIV activity against replication of HIV-1 (III B) in MT-4 cells. The in vivo antibacterial efficacy of selected derivatives was determined using a mouse infection model. All the synthesized compounds are more active than norfloxacin against the 13 bacteria tested. The compounds are also more active than the standard drug clotrimazole against Histoplasma capsulatum. Two compounds S-8 and S-9 have shown inhibition against HIV-1 (III B) with EC(50) values of 11.3 and 13.9 microgram/mL, respectively. In the mouse protection test, two compounds S-4 (ED(50): 1.25 mg/kg) and S-9 (ED(50): 1.62 mg/kg) are more active than norfloxacin (ED(50): 6mg/kg). Among the compounds tested, 1-ethyl-6-fluoro-1, 4-dihydro-4-oxo-7[[N(4)-[5'-bromo-3'-(4'-amino-5'-trimethoxybenzylpyr imidin-2'-yl]-imino-1'-isatinyl]methyl]N(1)-piperazinyl]-3-q uinoline carboxylicacid (S-9) showed promising activity in all the three tests.

  7. The in-vitro evaluation of antibacterial, antifungal and cytotoxic properties of Marrubium vulgare L. essential oil grown in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarai, Zied; Kadri, Adel; Ben Chobba, Ines; Ben Mansour, Riadh; Bekir, Ahmed; Mejdoub, Hafedh; Gharsallah, Néji

    2011-09-21

    In order to validate its antiseptic and anticancer properties with respect to traditional uses, we have screened for the first time the antimicrobial activity of aerial parts of M. vulgare L. essential oil against different pathogenic microorganisms and the cytotoxic activity against HeLa cell lines. The agar disk diffusion method was used to study the antibacterial activity of M. vulgare essential oil against 12 bacterial and 4 fungi strains. The disc diameters of zone of inhibition (DD), the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and the concentration inhibiting 50% (IC50) were investigated to characterize the antimicrobial activities of this essential oil. The in vitro cytotoxicity of M. vulgare essential oil was examined using a modified MTT assay; the viability and the IC50 were used to evaluate this test. The antimicrobial activity of the essential oil was investigated in order to evaluate its efficacy against the different tested microorganisms. The present results results showed a significant activity against microorganisms especially Gram (+) bacteria with inhibition zones and minimal inhibitory concentration values in the range of 6.6-25.2 mm and 1120-2600 μg/ml, respectively, whereas Gram (-) bacteria exhibited a higher resistance. As far as the antifungal activity, among four strains tested, Botrytis cinerea exhibited the strongest activity with inhibition zones of 12.6 mm. However, Fusarium solani, Penicillium digitatum and Aspergillus niger were less sensitive to M. vulgare essential oil. About the citotoxicity assay, this finding indicate the capability of this essential oil to inhibited the proliferation of HeLa cell lines under some conditions with IC50 value of 0.258 μg/ml. This investigation showed that the M. vulgare essential oil has a potent antimicrobial activity against some Gram (+) pathogenic bacteria and Botrytis cinerea fungi. The present studies confirm the use of this essential oil as anticancer agent. Further research is required

  8. The in-vitro evaluation of antibacterial, antifungal and cytotoxic properties of Marrubium vulgare L. essential oil grown in Tunisia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mejdoub Hafedh

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to validate its antiseptic and anticancer properties with respect to traditional uses, we have screened for the first time the antimicrobial activity of aerial parts of M. vulgare L. essential oil against different pathogenic microorganisms and the cytotoxic activity against HeLa cell lines. Methods The agar disk diffusion method was used to study the antibacterial activity of M. vulgare essential oil against 12 bacterial and 4 fungi strains. The disc diameters of zone of inhibition (DD, the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC and the concentration inhibiting 50% (IC50 were investigated to characterize the antimicrobial activities of this essential oil. The in vitro cytotoxicity of M. vulgare essential oil was examined using a modified MTT assay; the viability and the IC50 were used to evaluate this test. Results The antimicrobial activity of the essential oil was investigated in order to evaluate its efficacy against the different tested microorganisms. The present results results showed a significant activity against microorganisms especially Gram (+ bacteria with inhibition zones and minimal inhibitory concentration values in the range of 6.6-25.2 mm and 1120-2600 μg/ml, respectively, whereas Gram (- bacteria exhibited a higher resistance. As far as the antifungal activity, among four strains tested, Botrytis cinerea exhibited the strongest activity with inhibition zones of 12.6 mm. However, Fusarium solani, Penicillium digitatum and Aspergillus niger were less sensitive to M. vulgare essential oil. About the citotoxicity assay, this finding indicate the capability of this essential oil to inhibited the proliferation of HeLa cell lines under some conditions with IC50 value of 0.258 μg/ml. Conclusion This investigation showed that the M. vulgare essential oil has a potent antimicrobial activity against some Gram (+ pathogenic bacteria and Botrytis cinerea fungi. The present studies confirm the use of this

  9. Ultrasound mediation for one-pot sonosynthesis and deposition of magnetite nanoparticles on cotton/polyester fabric as a novel magnetic, photocatalytic, sonocatalytic, antibacterial and antifungal textile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastgoo, Madine; Montazer, Majid; Malek, Reza M A; Harifi, Tina; Mahmoudi Rad, Mahnaz

    2016-07-01

    A magnetic cotton/polyester fabric with photocatalytic, sonocatalytic, antibacterial and antifungal activities was successfully prepared through in-situ sonosynthesis method under ultrasound irradiation. The process involved the oxidation of Fe(2+) to Fe(3+) via hydroxyl radicals generated through bubbles collapse in ultrasonic bath. The treated samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry. Photocatalytic and sonocatalytic activities of magnetite treated fabrics were also evaluated toward Reactive Blue 2 decoloration under sunlight and ultrasound irradiation. Central composite design based on response surface methodology was applied to study the influence of iron precursor, pH and surfactant concentration to obtain appropriate amount for the best magnetism. Findings suggested the potential of one-pot sonochemical method to synthesize and fabricate Fe3O4 nanoparticles on cotton/polyester fabric possessing appropriate saturation magnetization, 95% antibacterial efficiency against Staphylococcus aureus and 99% antifungal effect against Candida albicans, 87% and 70% dye photocatalytic and sonocatalytic decoloration along with enhanced mechanical properties using only one iron rich precursor at low temperature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparative biorelease study of fluticasone in combination with antibacterial (Neomycin and or antifungal (coltrimazol, miconazole agents by histamine percutaneous reaction method in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahani S

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluticasone propionate is a novel, potent and topically active synthetic corticosteroid preparation with a much reduced potential, in relation to its anti-inflammatory potency, for unwanted systemic side effects. It is indicated for the treatment of eczema, dermatitis etc. The objective of the present study was to evaluate and compare the biorelease of fluticassone with placebo (base formulation; its combination with antifungal (miconazole, clotrimazole and / or antibacterial agents based on the attenuation of histamine induced wheal and flare reaction and flare intensity (on visual analouge scale by McNemar test. In the present study, fluticasone alone and in combination with clotrimazole, miconazole and neomycin significantly reduced the wheal and flare response of histamine prick test. The flare intensity response was also significantly inhibited by these treatments. Furthermore, there was no difference in the anti-inflammatory activity of various treatment groups. It may, therefore, be concluded that antibacterial (neomycin and / or antifungal (miconazole, clotrimazole agents in combination with steroid (fluticasone do not alter the pharmacodynamic response of the latter.

  11. Biogenic nanosilver incorporated reverse osmosis membrane for antibacterial and antifungal activities against selected pathogenic strains: an enhanced eco-friendly water disinfection approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjumeena, R; Duraibabu, D; Sudha, J; Kalaichelvan, P T

    2014-01-01

    Reverse osmosis (RO) membranes have been used extensively in water desalination plants, waste water treatment in industries, agricultural farms and drinking water production applications. The objective of this work is to impart antibacterial and antifungal activities to commercially available RO membrane used in water purification systems by incorporating biogenic silver nanoparticles(AgNPs) synthesized using Rosa indica wichuriana hybrid leaf extract. The morphology and surface topography of uncoated and AgNPs-coated RO membrane were studied using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Elemental composition of the AgNPs-coated RO membrane was analyzed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX). The functional groups were identified by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Hydrophilicity of the uncoated and AgNPs-coated RO membrane was analyzed using water contact angle measurements. The thermal properties were studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The AgNPs incorporated RO membrane exhibited good antibacterial and antifungal activities against pathogenic bacterial strains such as E. coli, S. aureus, M. luteus, K. pneumoniae, and P. aeruginosa and fungal strains such as Candida tropicalis, C. krusei, C. glabrata, and C. albicans.

  12. Facile-one pot-green synthesis, antibacterial, antifungal, antioxidant and antiplatelet activities of lignin capped silver nanoparticles: A promising therapeutic agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marulasiddeshwara, M B; Dakshayani, S S; Sharath Kumar, M N; Chethana, R; Raghavendra Kumar, P; Devaraja, S

    2017-12-01

    The current work portrays the green synthesis of Lignin Capped Silver Nanoparticles (LCSN) and their antibacterial, antifungal, antioxidant and antiplatelet potential. The LCSN was synthesized in water using a carbohydrate based polymer 'lignin' as the reducing and capping agents. The peak at 406nm (λ max ) in the UV-Vis., spectrum and EDX analysis confirmed 1.68% (w/w) of silver was found to be loaded on lignin. The characteristic sharp peaks appeared in the PXRD spectrum showed fcc crystalline structure LCSN. SEM and TEM images indicated that the spherical Ag-NPs were well dispersed on lignin with an average particle size of ~10-15nm. LCSN showed antibacterial and antifungal activity against human pathogens S. aureus, E. coli and A. niger and the percentage of zone of inhibition was found to be 10%, 12% and 80% respectively. Further, LCSN was evaluated for antioxidant potential using DPPH scavenging assay, interestingly it showed antioxidant activity and the percentage against positive control vitamin C was found to be 70%. Furthermore, LCSN did not interfere in plasma coagulation; however, it found to inhibit agonist ADP induced platelet aggregation of human platelet rich plasma. The observed inhibition was found to be 37% and the calculated IC50 value was found to be 9mg/mL. LCSN did not lyses RBC membrane when assayed hemolytic activity suggesting its non-toxic nature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of the cytotoxic effect and antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral activities of Hypericum triquetrifolium Turra essential oils from Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background A number of bio-active secondary metabolites have been identified and reported for several Hypericum species. Many studies have reported the potential use of the plant extracts against several pathogens. However, Hypericum triquetrifolium is one of the least studied species for its antimicrobial activity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of the essential oils of Hypericum triquetrifolium as well as their antimicrobial potential against coxsakievirus B3 and a range of bacterial and fungal strains. Methods The essential oils of Hypericum triquetrifolium harvested from five different Tunisian localities (Fondouk DJedid, Bou Arada, Bahra, Fernana and Dhrea Ben Jouder) were evaluated for their antimicrobial activities by micro-broth dilution methods against bacterial and fungal strains. In addition, the cytotoxic effect and the antiviral activity of these oils were carried out using Vero cell lines and coxsakievirus B3. Results The results showed a good antibacterial activities against a wide range of bacterial strains, MIC values ranging between 0.39-12.50 mg/ml and MBC values between 1.56-25.0 mg/ml. In addition, the essential oils showed promising antifungal activity with MIC values ranging between 0.39 μg/mL and 12.50 μg/mL; MFC values ranged between 3.12 μg/mL and 25.00 μg/mL; a significant anticandidal activity was noted (MIC values comprised between 0.39 μg/mL and 12.50 μg/mL). Although their low cytotoxic effect (CC50 ranged between 0.58 mg/mL and 12.00 mg/mL), the essential oils did not show antiviral activity against coxsakievirus B3. Conclusion The essential oils obtained from Hypericum triquetrifolium can be used as antimicrobial agents and could be safe at non cytotoxic doses. As shown for the tested essential oils, comparative analysis need to be undertaken to better characterize also the antimicrobial activities of Hypericum triquetrifolium extracts with different solvents as well as their

  14. Is there any difference in quality of prescribing between antibacterials and antifungals? Results from the first global point prevalence study (Global PPS) of antimicrobial consumption and resistance from 53 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Erlangga; Versporten, Ann; Goossens, Herman

    2017-10-01

    To compare the quality of antibacterial with antifungal prescribing in the world. Data from the global point prevalence study (Global PPS) were used. The Global PPS took place on any one day between February and June 2015 in 335 participating hospitals from 53 countries. It collected demographic data on patients treated with antimicrobials and data on prescription characteristics of the antimicrobials. For the present study, the quality of antibiotic prescription was compared with antifungal prescription using logistic regression analysis. The following indicators were compared: the presence of the reason for prescription and stop/review date in notes, and compliance with a local guideline. There were 48565 antimicrobial prescriptions for 34731 patients [median age 63 years (range 0-106); 52.6% male] in the Global PPS. Among these antimicrobials, 43513 (89.6%) were antibacterials and 2062 were antifungals for systematic use, and these data were used in this study. Reasons for prescriptions [77.7% versus 71.8%, OR 1.4 (95% CI 1.2-1.5)] and stop/review dates [38.3% versus 31.9%, OR 1.3 (1.2-1.5)] were found more often in notes for antibacterials than for antifungals. Antibacterials were prescribed less often according to local guidelines than antifungals [57.0% versus 71.0%, OR 0.6 (0.5-0.6)]. There are differences in the quality of antibacterial and antifungal prescribing and we identified opportunities that can be used to improve the quality of antimicrobial prescribing. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Synthesis, characterization and thermal behavior of antibacterial and antifungal active zinc complexes of bis (3(4-dimethylaminophenyl)-allylidene-1,2-diaminoethane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montazerozohori, Morteza, E-mail: mmzohori@mail.yu.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Yasouj University, Yasouj 75918-74831 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zahedi, Saeedeh [Department of Chemistry, Yasouj University, Yasouj 75918-74831 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Naghiha, Asghar [Department of Animal Sciences, Faculty of Agriculture, Yasouj University, Yasouj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zohour, Mostafa Montazer [Genetics of Non-Communicable Disease Research Center, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Zahedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-02-01

    In this work, synthesis of a new series of zinc halide/pseudohalide complexes of a bidentate Schiff base ligand entitled as bis (3-(4-dimethylaminophenyl)-allylidene)-1,2-diaminoethane(L) is described. The ligand and its zinc complexes were characterized by various techniques such as elemental analysis, FT-IR, UV–visible, {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectra, cyclic voltammetry, and conductometry. Accordingly ZnLX{sub 2} (X = Cl{sup −}, Br{sup −}, I{sup −}, SCN{sup −} and N{sub 3}{sup −}) was suggested as molecular formula of the complexes. Redox behaviors of ligand and its zinc complexes were investigated by cyclic voltammetry method. Furthermore, the ligand and its zinc halide/pseudohalide complexes were tested for their in vitro antibacterial activities against two gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) and two gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Also in vitro antifungal activities of them against Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger were investigated. The results indicated that all compounds are antibacterial and antifungal active. Thermal behaviors of ligand and its zinc complexes were studied from room temperature to 1100 °C under argon atmosphere. It was found that the ligand and zinc iodide are decomposed completely via three and four steps respectively while other zinc complexes leave out the metal or organometallic compounds as final residuals after 3–4 decomposition steps at above temperature range. Moreover evaluation of some thermo-kinetic parameters such as activation energy (∆E{sup ⁎}), enthalpy (∆H{sup ⁎}), entropy (∆S{sup ⁎}) and Gibbs free energy change (∆G{sup ⁎}) of the thermal decomposition steps were performed based on the Coats–Redfern relation. - Highlights: • Some novel complexes of Zn(II) with a bidentate Schiff base ligand have been synthesized. • Redox behavior of ligand and zinc complexes was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. • The

  16. Synthesis, characterization and thermal behavior of antibacterial and antifungal active zinc complexes of bis (3(4-dimethylaminophenyl)-allylidene-1,2-diaminoethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montazerozohori, Morteza; Zahedi, Saeedeh; Naghiha, Asghar; Zohour, Mostafa Montazer

    2014-01-01

    In this work, synthesis of a new series of zinc halide/pseudohalide complexes of a bidentate Schiff base ligand entitled as bis (3-(4-dimethylaminophenyl)-allylidene)-1,2-diaminoethane(L) is described. The ligand and its zinc complexes were characterized by various techniques such as elemental analysis, FT-IR, UV–visible, 1 H and 13 C NMR spectra, cyclic voltammetry, and conductometry. Accordingly ZnLX 2 (X = Cl − , Br − , I − , SCN − and N 3 − ) was suggested as molecular formula of the complexes. Redox behaviors of ligand and its zinc complexes were investigated by cyclic voltammetry method. Furthermore, the ligand and its zinc halide/pseudohalide complexes were tested for their in vitro antibacterial activities against two gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) and two gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Also in vitro antifungal activities of them against Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger were investigated. The results indicated that all compounds are antibacterial and antifungal active. Thermal behaviors of ligand and its zinc complexes were studied from room temperature to 1100 °C under argon atmosphere. It was found that the ligand and zinc iodide are decomposed completely via three and four steps respectively while other zinc complexes leave out the metal or organometallic compounds as final residuals after 3–4 decomposition steps at above temperature range. Moreover evaluation of some thermo-kinetic parameters such as activation energy (∆E ⁎ ), enthalpy (∆H ⁎ ), entropy (∆S ⁎ ) and Gibbs free energy change (∆G ⁎ ) of the thermal decomposition steps were performed based on the Coats–Redfern relation. - Highlights: • Some novel complexes of Zn(II) with a bidentate Schiff base ligand have been synthesized. • Redox behavior of ligand and zinc complexes was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. • The ligand and its zinc complexes are antibacterial and

  17. Fungal Root Microbiome from Healthy and Brittle Leaf Diseased Date Palm Trees (Phoenix dactylifera L.) Reveals a Hidden Untapped Arsenal of Antibacterial and Broad Spectrum Antifungal Secondary Metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mefteh, Fedia B.; Daoud, Amal; Chenari Bouket, Ali; Alenezi, Faizah N.; Luptakova, Lenka; Rateb, Mostafa E.; Kadri, Adel; Gharsallah, Neji; Belbahri, Lassaad

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to explore and compare the composition, metabolic diversity and antimicrobial potential of endophytic fungi colonizing internal tissues of healthy and brittle leaf diseased (BLD) date palm trees (Phoenix dactylifera L.) widely cultivated in arid zones of Tunisia. A total of 52 endophytic fungi were isolated from healthy and BLD roots of date palm trees, identified based on internal transcribed spacer-rDNA sequence analysis and shown to represent 13 species belonging to five genera. About 36.8% of isolates were shared between healthy and diseased root fungal microbiomes, whereas 18.4 and 44.7% of isolates were specific to healthy and BLD root fungal microbiomes, respectively. All isolates were able to produce at least two of the screened enzymes including amylase, cellulase, chitinase, pectinase, protease, laccase and lipase. A preliminary screening of the isolates using disk diffusion method for antibacterial activity against four Gram-positive and three Gram-negative bacteria and antifungal activities against three phytopathogenic fungi indicated that healthy and BLD root fungal microbiomes displayed interesting bioactivities against examined bacteria and broad spectrum bioactivity against fungal pathogens. Some of these endophytic fungi (17 isolates) were fermented and their extracts were evaluated for antimicrobial potential against bacterial and fungal isolates. Results revealed that fungal extracts exhibited antibacterial activities and were responsible for approximately half of antifungal activities against living fungi. These results suggest a strong link between fungal bioactivities and their secondary metabolite arsenal. EtOAc extracts of Geotrichum candidum and Thielaviopsis punctulata originating from BLD microbiome gave best results against Micrococcus luteus and Bacillus subtilis with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC, 0.78 mg/mL) and minimum bactericidal concentration (6.25 mg/mL). G. candidum gave the best result against

  18. Anti-Bacterial and Anti-Fungal Activity of Xanthones Obtained via Semi-Synthetic Modification of α-Mangostin from Garcinia mangostana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan Narasimhan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The microbial contamination in food packaging has been a major concern that has paved the way to search for novel, natural anti-microbial agents, such as modified α-mangostin. In the present study, twelve synthetic analogs were obtained through semi-synthetic modification of α-mangostin by Ritter reaction, reduction by palladium-carbon (Pd-C, alkylation, and acetylation. The evaluation of the anti-microbial potential of the synthetic analogs showed higher bactericidal activity than the parent molecule. The anti-microbial studies proved that I E showed high anti-bacterial activity whereas I I showed the highest anti-fungal activity. Due to their microbicidal potential, modified α-mangostin derivatives could be utilized as active anti-microbial agents in materials for the biomedical and food industry.

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of Some New Cu(II, Ni(II and Zn(II Complexes with Salicylidene Thiosemicarbazones: Antibacterial, Antifungal and in Vitro Antileukemia Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudor Rosu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Thirty two new Cu(II, Ni(II and Zn(II complexes (1–32 with salicylidene thiosemicarbazones (H2L1–H2L10 were synthesized. Salicylidene thiosemicarbazones, of general formula (XN-NH-C(S-NH(Y, were prepared through the condensation reaction of 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde and its derivatives (X with thiosemicarbazide or 4-phenylthiosemicarbazide (Y = H, C6H5. The characterization of the new formed compounds was done by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, magnetochemical, thermoanalytical and molar conductance measurements. In addition, the structure of the complex 5 has been determined by X-ray diffraction method. All ligands and metal complexes were tested as inhibitors of human leukemia (HL-60 cells growth and antibacterial and antifungal activities.

  20. Synthesis of ZnO-nanorod-based materials for antibacterial, antifungal activities, DNA cleavage and efficient ultrasound-assisted dyes adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazrafshan, Ali Akbar; Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Hajati, Shaaker; Naghiha, Reza; Asfaram, Arash

    2017-08-01

    Undoped and Au-doped ZnO-nanorods were synthesized in the presence of ultrasound and loaded on activated carbon following characterization by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmittance electron microscopy (TEM), UV-vis spectrophotometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The Au-doped ZnO-nanorod-loaded activated carbon (Au-ZnO-NRs-AC) was used for the simultaneous removal of methylene blue (MB) and auramine O (AO) from aqueous solutions. Central composite design (CCD) under response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to model and optimize the dyes removal versus adsorbent mass, pH, and initial dyes concentration and sonication time as well as to investigate the possible interaction between these variables. The optimum values of the initial MB and AO dyes concentration, adsorbent mass, pH and sonication time were found to be 12 and 10mgL -1 , 0.0124g, 6.4, and 4min respectively. The rapid adsorption process at neutral pH using very small amount of the adsorbent makes it promising for the wastewater treatment applications. More than 99.5% of both dyes was removed with maximum adsorption capacities in binary-component system (107.5 and 95.7mgg -1 for MB and AO, respectively). The kinetics and isotherm studies showed that the second-order and Langmuir models apply for the kinetics and isotherm of the adsorption of MB and AO on the adsorbent used here. Moreover, the wastewater treatment by using an antibacterial/antifungal adsorbent makes the process much more valuable. Therefore, additional studies were performed which showed efficient antibacterial/antifungal activities and DNA cleavage of undoped and Au-doped ZnO nanorods as constituent of the adsorbent applied here. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Synthesis, spectroscopic and thermal characterization of sulpiride complexes of iron, manganese, copper, cobalt, nickel, and zinc salts. Antibacterial and antifungal activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Gehad G.; Soliman, Madiha H.

    2010-08-01

    Sulpiride (SPR; L) is a substituted benzamide antipsychotic which is reported to be a selective antagonist of central dopamine receptors and claimed to have mood-elevating properties. The ligation behaviour of SPR drug is studied in order to give an idea about its potentiality towards some transition metals in vitro systems. Metal complexes of SPR have been synthesized by reaction with different metal chlorides. The metal complexes of SPR with the formula [MCl 2(L) 2(H 2O) 2]· nH 2O [M = Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II); n = 0-2] and [FeCl 2(HL)(H 2O) 3]Cl·H 2O have been synthesized and characterized using elemental analysis (CHN), electronic (infrared, solid reflectance and 1H NMR spectra) and thermal analyses (TG and DTA). The molar conductance data reveal that the bivalent metal chelates are non-electrolytes while Fe(III) complex is 1:1 electrolyte. IR spectra show that SPR is coordinated to the metal ions in a neutral monodentate manner with the amide O. From the magnetic and solid reflectance spectra, octahedral geometry is suggested. The thermal decomposition processes of these complexes were discussed. The correlation coefficient, the activation energies, E*, the pre-exponential factor, A, and the entropies, Δ S*, enthalpies, Δ H*, Gibbs free energies, Δ G*, of the thermal decomposition reactions have been derived from thermogravimetric (TG) and differential thermogravimetric (DTG) curves. The synthesized ligand and its metal complexes were also screened for their antibacterial and antifungal activity against bacterial species ( Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus) and fungi ( Aspergillus flavus and Candida albicans). The activity data show that the metal complexes are found to have antibacterial and antifungal activity than the parent drug and less than the standard.

  2. Roll-to-roll, shrink-induced superhydrophobic surfaces for antibacterial applications, enhanced point-of-care detection, and blood anticoagulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokes, Jolie McLane

    Superhydrophobic (SH) surfaces are desirable because of their unique anti-wetting behavior. Fluid prefers to bead up (contact angle >150°) and roll off (contact angle hysteresis micro- and nanostructure features trap air pockets. Fluid only adheres to the peaks of the structures, causing minimal adhesion to the surface. Here, shrink-induced SH plastics are fabricated for a plethora of applications, including antibacterial applications, enhanced point-of-care (POC) detection, and reduced blood coagulation. Additionally, these purely structural SH surfaces are achieved in a roll-to-roll (R2R) platform for scalable manufacturing. Because their self-cleaning and water resistant properties, structurally modified SH surfaces prohibit bacterial growth and obviate bacterial chemical resistance. Antibacterial properties are demonstrated in a variety of SH plastics by preventing gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacterial growth >150x compared to flat when fluid is rinsed and >20x without rinsing. Therefore, a robust and stable means to prevent bacteria growth is possible. Next, protein in urine is detected using a simple colorimetric output by evaporating droplets on a SH surface. Contrary to evaporation on a flat surface, evaporation on a SH surface allows fluid to dramatically concentrate because the weak adhesion constantly decreases the footprint area. On a SH surface, molecules in solution are confined to a footprint area 8.5x smaller than the original. By concentrating molecules, greater than 160x improvements in detection sensitivity are achieved compared to controls. Utility is demonstrated by detecting protein in urine in the pre-eclampsia range (150-300microgmL -1) for pregnant women. Further, SH surfaces repel bodily fluids including blood, urine, and saliva. Importantly, the surfaces minimize blood adhesion, leading to reduced blood coagulation without the need for anticoagulants. SH surfaces have >4200x and >28x reduction of blood residue area and

  3. Indole-3-acetic acid/diol based pH-sensitive biological macromolecule for antibacterial, antifungal and antioxidant applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    G, Chitra; D S, Franklin; S, Sudarsan; M, Sakthivel; S, Guhanathan

    2017-02-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA)/diol based pH-sensitive biopolymeric hydrogels with tunable biological properties (cytotoxicity, anti-oxidant and anti-fungal) have been synthesized via condensation polymerization. The present study focused on the synthesis of heterocyclic hydrogel using citric acid (CA), indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and diethylene glycol (DEG) by condensation polymerization. The hydrogels revealed a pH-sensitive swelling behaviour, with increased swelling in acidic media, then turns to decreased the swelling in the basic media. The hydrogel samples were tested for antifungal activity against Aspergillus fumigates, Rhizopusoryzae and Candida albicans at different concentrations using ketoconazole as positive control and DMSO as negative control for antifungal activity. Antioxidant activity increasing nature in DPPH than NO radical compared with rutin and confirmed non toxic property using cytotoxicity analysis. The biopolymeric hydrogels were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, 1 H NMR, 13 C NMR, TGA, DSC followed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Such hydrogels with antioxidant properties is recommended for medical applications such as bandages, catheters, drains and tubes to prevent infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Green Route for Efficient Synthesis of Novel Amino Acid Schiff Bases as Potent Antibacterial and Antifungal Agents and Evaluation of Cytotoxic Effects

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    Harshita Sachdeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Green chemical one-pot multicomponent condensation reaction of substituted 1H-indole-2,3-diones (1, various amino acids (2, and thiosemicarbazide (3 is found to be catalyzed by lemon juice as natural acid using water as a green solvent to give the corresponding Schiff bases (4 in good to excellent yields. This method is experimentally simple, clean, high yielding, and green, with reduced reaction times. The product is purified by simple filtration followed by washing with water and drying process. The synthesized compounds are characterized by FT-IR, 13CNMR, and 1HNMR spectroscopy and are screened for their antifungal activity against Aspergillus niger, Penicillium notatum, Fusarium oxysporum, Alternaria brassicicola, Chaetomium orium, and Lycopodium sp. and antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria, Bacillus licheniformis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Micrococcus luteus, and Gram-negative bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. Compounds have also been evaluated for cytotoxic effects against human colon cancer cell line Colo205.

  5. Antibacterial and Antifungal Activity of Essential Oils against Pathogens Responsible for Otitis Externa in Dogs and Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebani, Valentina V; Nardoni, Simona; Bertelloni, Fabrizio; Najar, Basma; Pistelli, Luisa; Mancianti, Francesca

    2017-04-21

    Background: Essential oils (EOs) are recommended by some veterinarians to treat otitis externa in pets, but data about their efficacy in scientific literature are very scant. Methods: Nine commercial EOs, from roman chamomile ( Anthemis nobilis L.), star anise ( Illicium verum ), lavender ( Lavandula hybrida ), litsea ( Litsea cubeba (Lour.) Pers.), basil ( Ocimum basilicum L.), oregano ( Origanum vulgare L. subsp. hirticum ), rosemary ( Rosmarinus officinalis L.), clary sage ( Salvia sclarea L.), and thyme ( Thymus vulgaris L.) were tested against bacterial and fungal pathogens previously isolated from dogs and cats with otitis externa. In particular, the analyses were carried out against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus pseudointermedius , Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus terreus, Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Trichosporon sp., and Rhodotorula sp. Results: O. vulgare and S. sclarea showed superior antibacterial activity, even if not against all the strains. Trichosporon sp., C. albicans , and A. terreus were insensitive to most Eos, while other yeasts and molds showed different degrees of sensitivity. In particular, most fungi were inhibited by O. vulgare and R. officinalis . Conclusions: The obtained results suggest that some EOs could be included in treatment as an alternative therapeutic option in bacterial otitis complicated by fungi, in association with conventional drugs.

  6. Synthesis, characterization, antibacterial and antifungal studies of some transition and rare earth metal complexes of N-benzylidene-2-hydroxybenzohydrazide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.K. Chondhekar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The solid complexes of Cu(II, Co(II, Mn(II, La(III and Ce(III were prepared from bidentate Schiff base, N-benzylidene-2-hydroxybenzohydrazide. The Schiff base ligand was synthesized from 2-hyhdroxybenzohydrazide and benzaldehyde. These metal complexes were characterized by molar conductivity, magnetic susceptibility, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, FTIR, 1H-NMR, UV-Vis and mass spectroscopy. The analytical data of these metal complexes showed metal:ligand ratio of 1:2. The physico-chemical study supports the presence of square planar geometry around Cu(II and octahedral geometry around Mn(II, Co(II, La(III and Ce(III ions. The IR spectral data reveal that the ligand behaves as bidentate with ON donor atom sequence towards central metal ion. The molar conductance values of metal complexes suggest their non-electrolyte nature. The X-ray diffraction data suggest monoclinic crystal system for these complexes. Thermal behavior (TG/DTA and kinetic parameters calculated by Coats-Redfern method are suggestive of more ordered activated state in complex formation. The ligand and their metal complexes were screened for antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli and fungicidal activity against Aspergillus niger and Trichoderma.

  7. Comparison of Chemical Composition, Antifungal and Antibacterial Activities of Two Populations of Salvia macilenta Boiss. Essential Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foroogh Mirzania

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available Salvia macilenta Boiss. is a fragrant subshrub which grows wild in some regions of Iran. In this work, we contrasted essential oil contents and components of two wild populations under two different ecological situations (Kerman and Baluchistan Provinces, Center and South East of Iran, respectively. For the first time the antibacterial and the antimycotic properties of these essential oils were also evaluated against seven bacterial and fungal strains. The essential oils were isolated by hydrodistillation method and the chemical compositions of the samples were examined by GC and GC-MS. Kerman (K specimen was found to be rich in α -pinene (29.0%, p-cymene (10.7%, veridiflorol (9.1%, α-eudesmol (8.7%, bornyl acetate (7.3% with lesser concentrations of borneol (4.9% . Principal components were identified as α -eudesmol (35.6%, α-pinene (7.7%, bornyl acetate (7.6%, ( E -nerolidol (6.5% and veridiflorol (5.9% from Baluchistan (B sample. Oxygenated sesquiterpenes were found to be the principal class of components in the oil of Baluchistan sample (53.0% whereas monoterpene hydrocarbons were the main class in Kerman specimen (46.6%. The results demonstrated that the variety in the volatile compounds could be considered as chemotaxonomic importance and it may be ascribed to their different ecological and geographical source.

  8. Synthesis of novel quinoline-based 4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazoles as potential anticancer, antifungal, antibacterial and antiprotozoal agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Prada, Jonathan; Robledo, Sara M; Vélez, Iván D; Crespo, María Del Pilar; Quiroga, Jairo; Abonia, Rodrigo; Montoya, Alba; Svetaz, Laura; Zacchino, Susana; Insuasty, Braulio

    2017-05-05

    A new series of N-substituted 2-pyrazolines 9a-f, 10a-f, 11a-f, 12a-f and 13a-f were obtained from the cyclocondensation reaction of [(7-chloroquinolin-4-yl)amino]chalcones 8a-f with hydrazine hydrate and its derivatives. Fourteen of the synthesized compounds including the starting chalcones were selected by US National Cancer Institute (NCI) for testing their anticancer activity against 60 different human cancer cell lines, with the most important GI 50 values ranging from 0.28 to 11.7 μM (0.13-6.05 μg/mL) and LC 50 values ranging from 2.6 to > 100 μM (1.2 to > 51.7 μg/mL), for chalcones 8a,d and pyrazolines 10c,d. All compounds were assessed for antibacterial activity against wild type and multidrug resistant gram negative and gram positive bacteria, with MIC values ranging from 31.25 to 500 μg/mL. Additionally, the novel compounds were tested for antifungal and antiparasitic properties. Although these compounds showed mild activity against Candida albicans, chalcones 8a and 8e showed high activity against Cryptococcus neoformans with MIC 50  = 7.8 μg/mL. For anti-Plasmodium falciparum activity the 2-pyrazoline 11b was the most active with EC 50  = 5.54 μg/mL. Regarding the activity against Trypanosoma cruzi, compound 10a was highly active with EC 50  = 0.70 μg/mL. Chalcone 8a had good activity against Leishmania panamensis amastigotes with EC 50  = 0.79 μg/mL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Essential oils of medicinal plants from the central andes of Argentina: chemical composition, and antifungal, antibacterial, and insect-repellent activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Beatriz; López, Sandra; Luna, Lorena; Agüero, María B; Aragón, Liliana; Tapia, Alejandro; Zacchino, Susana; López, María L; Zygadlo, Julio; Feresin, Gabriela E

    2011-05-01

    The antifungal, antibacterial, and insect-repellent activities of the essential oils (EOs) of Acantholippia seriphioides, Artemisia mendozana, Gymnophyton polycephalum, Satureja parvifolia, Tagetes mendocina, and Lippia integrifolia, collected in the Central Andes area, province of San Juan, Argentina, were investigated. The dermatophytes Microsporum gypseum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, and T. rubrum were inhibited by the EOs of G. polycephalum, L. integrifolia, and S. parvifolia, with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) between 31.2 and 1000 μg/ml. Moreover, all EOs presented moderate activity against the bacteria tested, and the L. integrifolia and G. polycephalum EOs showed excellent repellent properties against Triatoma infestans, the Chagas disease vector, with repellency values between 60 and 100%. The A. seriphioides, G. polycephalum, and L. integrifolia EOs, obtained by hydrodistillation, were characterized by GC-FID and GC/MS analyses. The highest number of components (40) was identified in L. integrifolia EO, which, along with that of A. seriphioides, contained important amounts of oxygenated monoterpenes (44.35 and 29.72%, resp.). Thymol (27.61%) and carvacrol (13.24%) were the main components of A. seriphioides EO, and borneol, lippifoli-1(6)-en-5-one, and terpinen-4-ol (>8.5%) were the principal compounds of L. integrifolia EO. These results support the idea that oxygenated monoterpenes are the bioactive fractions of the EOs. Finally, the study shows that these Andean species might be used to treat superficial fungal infections and to improve the local Chagas disease situation by vector-control. Copyright © 2011 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  10. Design, characterization, teratogenicity testing, antibacterial, antifungal and DNA interaction of few high spin Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Laila H.; El-Khatib, Rafat M.; Nassr, Lobna A. E.; Abu-Dief, Ahmed M.; Lashin, Fakhr El-Din

    2013-07-01

    In this study, new Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid chelates derived from the condensation of o-hydroxynaphthaldehyde with L-alanine, L-phenylalanine, L-aspartic acid, L-histidine and L-arginine were synthesized and characterized via elemental, thermogravimetric analysis, molar conductance, IR, electronic, mass spectra and magnetic moment measurements. The stoichiometry and the stability constants of the complexes were determined spectrophotometrically. Correlation of all spectroscopic data suggested that Schiff bases ligands exhibited tridentate with ONO sites coordinating to the metal ions via protonated phenolic-OH, azomethine-N and carboxylate-O with the general formulae [Fe(HL)2]·nH2O. But in case of L-histidine, the ligand acts as tetradentate via deprotonated phenolic-OH, azomethine-N, carboxylate-O and N-imidazole ring ([FeL(H2O)2]·2H2O), where HL = mono anion and L = dianion of the ligand. The structure of the prepared complexes is suggested to be octahedral. The prepared complexes were tested for their teratogenicity on chick embryos and found to be safe until a concentration of 100 μg/egg with full embryos formation. Moreover, the interaction between CT-DNA and the investigated complexes were followed by spectrophotometric and viscosity measurements. It was found that, the prepared complexes bind to DNA via classical intercalative mode and showed a different DNA activity with the sequence: nhi > nari > nali > nasi > nphali. Furthermore, the free ligands and their complexes are screened for their in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activity against three types of bacteria, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus cereus and three types of anti fungal cultures, Penicillium purpurogenium, Aspergillus flavus and Trichotheium rosium in order to assess their antimicrobial potential. The results show that the metal complexes are more reactive with respect to their corresponding Schiff base amino acid ligands.

  11. Anticoagulant Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte

    Although sewer rat control is carried out in more than 80 % of all Danish municipalities, with usage of large amounts of anticoagulant rodenticides, knowledge on anticoagulant resistance among rats living in the sewers is limited. As rat problems in urban areas are believed to be related to sewer...... problems (70-90 % in UK and DK) unawareness of resistance amongst these populations of Brown rats may constitute a future control problem and knowledge on this issue has become crucial. Rats were captured in sewers from seven different locations in the suburban area of Copenhagen. Locations was chosen...... to represent different sewer rat management strategies i) no anticoagulants for approx. 20 years ii) no anticoagulants for the last 5 years and iii) continuous control for many years. Animals were tested for resistance to bromadiolone by Blood-Clotting Response test, as bromadiolone is the most frequently used...

  12. Chemical composition of 8 eucalyptus species' essential oils and the evaluation of their antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background In 1957, Tunisia introduced 117 species of Eucalyptus; they have been used as fire wood, for the production of mine wood and to fight erosion. Actually, Eucalyptus essential oil is traditionally used to treat respiratory tract disorders such as pharyngitis, bronchitis, and sinusitis. A few investigations were reported on the biological activities of Eucalyptus oils worldwide. In Tunisia, our previous works conducted in 2010 and 2011 had been the first reports to study the antibacterial activities against reference strains. At that time it was not possible to evaluate their antimicrobial activities against clinical bacterial strains and other pathogens such as virus and fungi. Methods The essential oils of eight Eucalyptus species harvested from the Jbel Abderrahman, Korbous (North East Tunisia) and Souinet arboreta (North of Tunisia) were evaluated for their antimicrobial activities by disc diffusion and microbroth dilution methods against seven bacterial isolates: Haemophilus influenzae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes. In addition, the bactericidal, fungicidal and the antiviral activities of the tested oils were carried out. Results Twenty five components were identified by GC/FID and GC/MS. These components were used to correlate with the biological activities of the tested oils. The chemical principal component analysis identified three groups, each of them constituted a chemotype. According to the values of zone diameter and percentage of the inhibition (zdi, % I, respectively), four groups and subgroups of bacterial strains and three groups of fungal strains were characterized by their sensitivity levels to Eucalyptus oils. The cytotoxic effect and the antiviral activity varied significantly within Eucalyptus species oils. Conclusions E. odorata showed the strongest activity against S. aureus, H. influenzae, S. agalactiae, S. pyogenes

  13. Chemical composition of 8 eucalyptus species' essential oils and the evaluation of their antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaissi Ameur

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 1957, Tunisia introduced 117 species of Eucalyptus; they have been used as fire wood, for the production of mine wood and to fight erosion. Actually, Eucalyptus essential oil is traditionally used to treat respiratory tract disorders such as pharyngitis, bronchitis, and sinusitis. A few investigations were reported on the biological activities of Eucalyptus oils worldwide. In Tunisia, our previous works conducted in 2010 and 2011 had been the first reports to study the antibacterial activities against reference strains. At that time it was not possible to evaluate their antimicrobial activities against clinical bacterial strains and other pathogens such as virus and fungi. Methods The essential oils of eight Eucalyptus species harvested from the Jbel Abderrahman, Korbous (North East Tunisia and Souinet arboreta (North of Tunisia were evaluated for their antimicrobial activities by disc diffusion and microbroth dilution methods against seven bacterial isolates: Haemophilus influenzae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes. In addition, the bactericidal, fungicidal and the antiviral activities of the tested oils were carried out. Results Twenty five components were identified by GC/FID and GC/MS. These components were used to correlate with the biological activities of the tested oils. The chemical principal component analysis identified three groups, each of them constituted a chemotype. According to the values of zone diameter and percentage of the inhibition (zdi, % I, respectively, four groups and subgroups of bacterial strains and three groups of fungal strains were characterized by their sensitivity levels to Eucalyptus oils. The cytotoxic effect and the antiviral activity varied significantly within Eucalyptus species oils. Conclusions E. odorata showed the strongest activity against S. aureus, H. influenzae

  14. Synthesis of new oxadiazole, pyrazole and pyrazolin-5-one bearing 2-((4-methyl-2-oxo-2H-chromen-7-yl)oxy)acetohydrazide analogs as potential antibacterial and antifungal agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahesh, M; Bheemaraju, G; Manjunath, G; Venkata Ramana, P

    2016-01-01

    Two series of diversely substituted phenyldiazenyl(2-(4-methyl-2-oxo-2H-chromen-7-yloxy)acetyl)3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrazole 11a-g and phenyldiazenyl-1-(2-(4-methyl-2-oxo-4-chromen-7-yloxy)acetyl)-3-methyl-1H-pyrazol-5(4)H-one 12a-j were synthesized. All these compounds were characterized by IR, NMR, mass spectra and elemental analyses. The compounds were evaluated for their in vitro antibacterial activity against some Gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi and screened for antifungal activity against A. niger, U. maydis. The compounds showed moderate to very good antibacterial activities. Copyright © 2015 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Screening of antifungal azole drugs and agrochemicals with an adapted alamarBlue-based assay demonstrates antibacterial activity of croconazole against Mycobacterium ulcerans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Nicole; Röltgen, Katharina; Witschel, Matthias; Pluschke, Gerd

    2012-12-01

    An alamarBlue-based growth inhibition assay has been adapted for the thermosensitive and slow-growing pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans. The standardized test procedure enables medium-throughput screening of preselected compound libraries. Testing of a set of 48 azoles with known antifungal activity led to the identification of an imidazole antifungal displaying an inhibitory dose (ID) of 9 μM for M. ulcerans.

  16. Antifungal therapy in European hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarb, P; Amadeo, B; Muller, A

    2012-01-01

    The study aimed to identify targets for quality improvement in antifungal use in European hospitals and determine the variability of such prescribing. Hospitals that participated in the European Surveillance of Antimicrobial Consumption Point Prevalence Surveys (ESAC-PPS) were included. The WHO...... of 40,878 (3.7%) antimicrobials. Antifungals were mainly (54.2%) administered orally. Hospital-acquired infections represented 44.5% of indications for antifungals followed by medical prophylaxis at 31.2%. The site of infection was not defined in 36.0% of cases but the most commonly targeted sites were...... respiratory (19.2%) and gastrointestinal (18.8%). The most used antifungal was fluconazole (60.5%) followed by caspofungin (10.5%). Antifungal-antibacterial combinations were frequently used (77.5%). The predominance of fluconazole use in participating hospitals could result in an increase in prevalence...

  17. Marine Pharmacology in 2012–2013: Marine Compounds with Antibacterial, Antidiabetic, Antifungal, Anti-Inflammatory, Antiprotozoal, Antituberculosis, and Antiviral Activities; Affecting the Immune and Nervous Systems, and Other Miscellaneous Mechanisms of Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro M. S. Mayer

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The peer-reviewed marine pharmacology literature from 2012 to 2013 was systematically reviewed, consistent with the 1998–2011 reviews of this series. Marine pharmacology research from 2012 to 2013, conducted by scientists from 42 countries in addition to the United States, reported findings on the preclinical pharmacology of 257 marine compounds. The preclinical pharmacology of compounds isolated from marine organisms revealed antibacterial, antifungal, antiprotozoal, antituberculosis, antiviral and anthelmitic pharmacological activities for 113 marine natural products. In addition, 75 marine compounds were reported to have antidiabetic and anti-inflammatory activities and affect the immune and nervous system. Finally, 69 marine compounds were shown to display miscellaneous mechanisms of action which could contribute to novel pharmacological classes. Thus, in 2012–2013, the preclinical marine natural product pharmacology pipeline provided novel pharmacology and lead compounds to the clinical marine pharmaceutical pipeline, and contributed significantly to potentially novel therapeutic approaches to several global disease categories.

  18. Simultaneous antibacterial and anticoagulant properties of polypropylene non-woven textiles Elaboration d'un textile polypropylène non-tissé présentant simultanément des propriétés antibactériennes et anticoagulantes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimenez Maude

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to prepare a non-woven Polypropylene (PP textile functionalized with bioactive molecules to improve simultaneously its anticoagulation and antibacterial properties. The immobilization of either heparin (anticoagulation agent or gentamicin (aminoglycoside antibiotic was already proven to be effective on non-woven PP textiles. This work details how we managed to immobilize both gentamicin and heparin on the textile [1]. The immobilization times were studied in order to determine the best compromise between cytocompatibility, anticoagulant effect and antimicrobial activity. Cetté étude décrit le procédé de fonctionnalisation d'un textile polypropylène (PP non-tissé afin d'améliorer à la fois ses propriétés antibactériennes et anticoagulantes. Dans des précédents travaux, l'immobilisation soit de l'héparine (agent anticoagulant, soit de la gentamicine (agent antibiotique aminoglycoside a déjà été reportée. Des effets respectivement anticoagulants et antibactériens ont été obtenus. Cette étude décrit la faç on d'immobiliser ces deux principes actifs sur un même textile. L'effet des temps d'imprégnation sur les propriétés antibactériennes et anticoagulantes a été étudié afin d'obtenir le meilleur compromis possible en termes de cytocompatibilité, effet anticoagulant et activité antimicrobienne.

  19. Chalcone derivatives as potential antifungal agents: Synthesis, and antifungal activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Much research has been carried out with the aim to discover the therapeutic values of chalcone derivatives. Chalcones possess wide range of pharmacological activity such as antibacterial, antimalarial, antiprotozoal, antitubercular, anticancer, and antifungal agents etc. The presence of reactive α,β-unsaturated keto group in chalcones is found to be responsible for their biological activity. The rapid developments of resistance to antifungal agents, led to design, and synthesize the new antifungal agents. The derivatives of chalcones were prepared using Claisen-Schmidt condensation scheme with appropriate tetralone and aldehyde derivatives. Ten derivatives were synthesized and were biologically screened for antifungal activity. The newly synthesized derivatives of chalcone showed antifungal activity against fungal species, Microsporum gypseum. The results so obtained were superior or comparable to ketoconazole. It was observed that none of the compounds tested showed positive results for fungi Candida albicans nor against fungi Aspergillus niger. Chalcone derivatives showed inhibitory effect against M. gypseum species of fungus. It was found that among the chalcone derivatives so synthesized, two of them, that is, 4-chloro derivative, and unsubstituted derivative of chalcone showed antifungal activity superior to ketoconazole. Thus, these can be the potential new molecule as antifungal agent.

  20. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of fatty acid methyl esters of the blind-your-eye mangrove from India Atividade antibacteriana e antifúngica de ésteres metílicos de acidos graxos de mangue"blind-your-eye" da India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Agoramoorthy

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acids are widely occurring in natural fats and dietary oils and they are known to have antibacterial and antifungal properties. However, little is known on the antibacterial and antifungal properties of the blind-your-eye mangrove (Excoecaria agallocha and this study for the first time determines the fatty acid composition and the antibacterial and antifungal activities of Fatty Acid Methyl Esters (FAME of the blind-your-eye mangrove plant found along the coastal areas of south India.Gorduras naturais e óleos são abundantes em ácidos graxos que apresentam atividade antibacteriana e antifúngica. Entretanto, pouco se sabe sobre a atividade antibacteriana e antifúngica de ésteres metílicos de ácidos graxos de mangue "blind-your-eye" (Excoecaria agallocha. Esse estudo relata, pela primeira vez, a composição em ácidos graxos e a atividade antibacteriana e antifúngica de ésteres metílicos de ácidos graxos (FAME de mangue "blind-your-eye" encontrado ao longo de áreas costeiras do sul da India.

  1. Synthesis and preliminary evaluation of N-acylhydrazone compounds as antibacterial and antifungal agents; Sintese e avaliacao preliminar da atividade antibacteriana e antifungica de derivados N-acilidrazonicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cachiba, Thomas Haruo; Carvalho, Bruno Demartini; Carvalho, Diogo Teixeira [Universidade Federal de Alfenas, MG (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Farmaceuticas. Dept. de Alimentos e Medicamentos; Cusinato, Marina; Prado, Clara Gaviao; Dias, Amanda Latercia Tranches, E-mail: diogo.carvalho@unifal-mg.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Alfenas, MG (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biomedicas

    2012-07-01

    We describe the synthesis and evaluation of N-acylhydrazone compounds bearing different electron-donating groups in one of its aromatic rings, obtained using a four-step synthetic route. IC{sub 50} values against pathogenic fungi and bacteria were determined by serial microdilution. Compounds showed low activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. By contrast, a derivative with a meta-oriented electron-donating group showed significant activity (IC50) against Candida albicans (17 {mu}M), C. krusei (34 {mu}M) and C. tropicalis (17 {mu}M). Results suggest this is a promising lead-compound for synthesis of potent antifungal agents. (author)

  2. Association between Oral Anticoagulation Knowledge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Association between Oral Anticoagulation Knowledge, Anticoagulation Control, and Demographic Characteristics of Patients Attending an Anticoagulation Clinic in Saudi Arabia: A Cross-Sectional Prospective Evaluation.

  3. Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood clots - lupus anticoagulants; DVT - anticoagulants ... Most often, lupus anticoagulants and aPL are found in people with diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Lupus anticoagulants and ...

  4. Marine Pharmacology in 2009–2011: Marine Compounds with Antibacterial, Antidiabetic, Antifungal, Anti-Inflammatory, Antiprotozoal, Antituberculosis, and Antiviral Activities; Affecting the Immune and Nervous Systems, and other Miscellaneous Mechanisms of Action †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Alejandro M. S.; Rodríguez, Abimael D.; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio; Fusetani, Nobuhiro

    2013-01-01

    The peer-reviewed marine pharmacology literature from 2009 to 2011 is presented in this review, following the format used in the 1998–2008 reviews of this series. The pharmacology of structurally-characterized compounds isolated from marine animals, algae, fungi and bacteria is discussed in a comprehensive manner. Antibacterial, antifungal, antiprotozoal, antituberculosis, and antiviral pharmacological activities were reported for 102 marine natural products. Additionally, 60 marine compounds were observed to affect the immune and nervous system as well as possess antidiabetic and anti-inflammatory effects. Finally, 68 marine metabolites were shown to interact with a variety of receptors and molecular targets, and thus will probably contribute to multiple pharmacological classes upon further mechanism of action studies. Marine pharmacology during 2009–2011 remained a global enterprise, with researchers from 35 countries, and the United States, contributing to the preclinical pharmacology of 262 marine compounds which are part of the preclinical pharmaceutical pipeline. Continued pharmacological research with marine natural products will contribute to enhance the marine pharmaceutical clinical pipeline, which in 2013 consisted of 17 marine natural products, analogs or derivatives targeting a limited number of disease categories. PMID:23880931

  5. Chalcone dendrimer stabilized core–shell nanoparticles—a comparative study on Co@TiO2, Ag@TiO2 and Co@AgCl nanoparticles for antibacterial and antifungal activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanathi Vijayalakshmi, R.; Praveen Kumar, P.; Selvarani, S.; Rajakumar, P.; Ravichandran, K.

    2017-10-01

    A series of core@shell nanoparticles (Co@TiO2, Ag@TiO2 and Co@AgCl) stabilized with zeroth generation triazolylchalcone dendrimer was synthesized using reduction transmetalation method. The coordination of chalcone dendrimer with silver ions was confirmed by UV–vis spectroscopy. The NMR spectrum ensures the number of protons and carbon signals in the chalcone dendrimer. The prepared samples were structurally characterized by XRD, FESEM and HRTEM analysis. The SAED and XRD analyses exhibited the cubic structure with d hkl   =  2.2 Å, 1.9 Å and 1.38 Å. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the dendrimer stabilized core@shell nanoparticles (DSCSNPs) were tested against the pathogens Bacillus subtilis, Proteus mirabilis, Candida albicans and Aspergillus nigir from which it is identified that the dendrimer stabilized core shell nanoparticles with silver ions at the shell (Co@AgCl) shows effectively high activity against the tested pathogen following the other core@shell nanoparticles viz Ag@TiO2 and Co@TiO2.

  6. Antifungal activity of extracts and phenolic compounds from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-17

    Jun 17, 2009 ... (naringin, rutin, luteolin and kaempferol). The results of present study provide scientific basis for the use of the plant extract in the future development as antifungal, antibacterial, antioxidant and anti- inflammatory agent. Key words: Barringtonia racemosa, antifungal, HPLC, phenolic acids, flavonoids.

  7. TmSR-C, scavenger receptor class C, plays a pivotal role in antifungal and antibacterial immunity in the coleopteran insect Tenebrio molitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Gon; Jo, Yong Hun; Seong, Jeong Hwan; Park, Ki Beom; Noh, Mi Young; Cho, Jun Ho; Ko, Hye Jin; Kim, Chang Eun; Tindwa, Hamisi; Patnaik, Bharat Bhusan; Bang, In Seok; Lee, Yong Seok; Han, Yeon Soo

    2017-10-01

    Scavenger receptors (SRs) constitute a family of membrane-bound receptors that bind to multiple ligands. The SR family of proteins is involved in removing cellular debris, oxidized low-density lipoproteins, and pathogens. Specifically, class C scavenger receptors (SR-C) have also been reported to be involved in phagocytosis of gram-positive and -negative bacteria in Drosophila and viruses in shrimp. However, reports are unavailable regarding the role of SR-C in antifungal immune mechanisms in insects. In this study, a full-length Tenebrio molitor SR-C (TmSR-C) sequence was obtained by 5'- and 3'-Rapid amplification of cDNA ends-polymerase chain reaction (RACE-PCR). The TmSR-C full-length cDNA comprised 1671 bp with 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions of 23- and 107-bp, respectively. TmSR-C encodes a putative protein of 556 amino acid residues that is constitutively expressed in all tissues of late instar larvae and 2-day-old adults, with the highest transcript levels observed in hemocytes of larvae and adults. TmSR-C mRNA showed a 2.5-fold and 3-fold increase at 24 and 6 h after infection with Candida albicans and β-glucan, respectively. Immunoassay with TmSR-C polyclonal antibody showed induction of the putative protein in the cytosols of hemocytes at 3 h after inoculation of C. albicans. RNA interference (RNAi)-based gene silencing and phagocytosis assays were used to understand the role of TmSR-C in antifungal immunity. Silencing of TmSR-C transcripts reduced the survivability of late instar larvae at 2 days post-inoculation of C. albicans, Escherichia coli, or Staphylococcus aureus. Furthermore, in TmSR-C-silenced larvae, there was a decline in the rate of microorganism phagocytosis. Taken together, results of this study suggest that TmSR-C plays a pivotal role in phagocytosing not only fungi but also gram-negative and -positive bacteria in T. molitor. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Regeneration of Centella asiatica plants from non-embryogenic cell lines and evaluation of antibacterial and antifungal properties of regenerated calli and plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The threatened plant Centella asiatica L. is traditionallyused for a number of remedies. In vitro plant propagation and enhanced metabolite production of active metabolites through biotechnological approaches has gained attention in recent years. Results Present study reveals that 6-benzyladenine (BA) either alone or in combination with 1-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) supplemented in Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium at different concentrations produced good quality callus from leaf explants of C. asiatica. The calli produced on different plant growth regulators at different concentrations were mostly embryogenic and green. Highest shoot regeneration efficiency; 10 shoots per callus explant, from non-embryogenic callus was observed on 4.42 μM BA with 5.37 μM NAA. Best rooting response was observed at 5.37 and 10.74 μM NAA with 20 average number of roots per explant. Calli and regenerated plants extracts inhibited bacterial growth with mean zone of inhibition 9-13 mm diameter when tested against six bacterial strains using agar well diffusion method. Agar tube dilution method for antifungal assay showed 3.2-76% growth inhibition of Mucor species, Aspergillus fumigatus and Fusarium moliniformes. Conclusions The present investigation reveals that non-embryogenic callus can be turned into embryos and plantlets if cultured on appropriate medium. Furthermore, callus from leaf explant of C. asiatica can be a good source for production of antimicrobial compounds through bioreactor. PMID:21989222

  9. Regeneration of Centella asiatica plants from non-embryogenic cell lines and evaluation of antibacterial and antifungal properties of regenerated calli and plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib Darima

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The threatened plant Centella asiatica L. is traditionallyused for a number of remedies. In vitro plant propagation and enhanced metabolite production of active metabolites through biotechnological approaches has gained attention in recent years. Results Present study reveals that 6-benzyladenine (BA either alone or in combination with 1-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA supplemented in Murashige and Skoog (MS medium at different concentrations produced good quality callus from leaf explants of C. asiatica. The calli produced on different plant growth regulators at different concentrations were mostly embryogenic and green. Highest shoot regeneration efficiency; 10 shoots per callus explant, from non-embryogenic callus was observed on 4.42 μM BA with 5.37 μM NAA. Best rooting response was observed at 5.37 and 10.74 μM NAA with 20 average number of roots per explant. Calli and regenerated plants extracts inhibited bacterial growth with mean zone of inhibition 9-13 mm diameter when tested against six bacterial strains using agar well diffusion method. Agar tube dilution method for antifungal assay showed 3.2-76% growth inhibition of Mucor species, Aspergillus fumigatus and Fusarium moliniformes. Conclusions The present investigation reveals that non-embryogenic callus can be turned into embryos and plantlets if cultured on appropriate medium. Furthermore, callus from leaf explant of C. asiatica can be a good source for production of antimicrobial compounds through bioreactor.

  10. Marine Pharmacology in 2000: Marine Compounds with Antibacterial, Anticoagulant, Antifungal, Anti-inflammatory, Antimalarial, Antiplatelet, Antituberculosis, and Antiviral Activities; Affecting the Cardiovascular, Immune, and Nervous Systems and Other Miscellaneous Mechanisms of Action

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, Alejandro M. S.; Hamann, Mark T.

    2003-01-01

    During 2000 research on the pharmacology of marine chemicals involved investigators from Australia, Brazil, Canada, Egypt, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Israel, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Phillipines, Singapore, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and the United States. This current review, a sequel to the authors’ 1998 and 1999 reviews, classifies 68 peer-reviewed articles on the basis of the reported preclinical pharmacologic properties o...

  11. Antibacterial and cytotoxic compounds from the bark of Cananga odorata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M Mukhlesur; Lopa, Simin S; Sadik, Golam; Harun-Or-Rashid; Islam, Robiul; Khondkar, Proma; Alam, A H M Khurshid; Rashid, Mohammad A

    2005-12-01

    O-Methylmoschatoline, liriodenine and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid isolated from the barks of Cananga odorata showed antibacterial activities against a number of Gram (+) and Gram (-) bacteria. The compounds also showed antifungal and cytotoxic activities.

  12. synthesis, characterization, antibacterial and antifungal studies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    Ce(III) ions. The IR spectral data reveal that the ligand behaves as bidentate with ON donor atom sequence towards central metal ion. The molar conductance values of metal ... and kinetic parameters calculated by Coats-Redfern method are suggestive of more ordered activated state in ..... concentration of metal complex.

  13. Antifungal and antibacterial compounds from Streptomyces strains ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Biotechnology. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 8, No 13 (2009) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  14. Antibacterial and Antifungal Activities of Spices

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Qing; Meng, Xiao; Li, Ya; Zhao, Cai-Ning; Tang, Guo-Yi; Li, Hua-Bin

    2017-01-01

    Infectious diseases caused by pathogens and food poisoning caused by spoilage microorganisms are threatening human health all over the world. The efficacies of some antimicrobial agents, which are currently used to extend shelf-life and increase the safety of food products in food industry and to inhibit disease-causing microorganisms in medicine, have been weakened by microbial resistance. Therefore, new antimicrobial agents that could overcome this resistance need to be discovered. Many spi...

  15. Synthesis, characterization, antibacterial and antifungal studies of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The analytical data of these metal complexes showed metal:ligand ratio of 1:2. The physico-chemical study supports the presence of square planar geometry around Cu(II) and octahedral geometry around Mn(II), Co(II), La(III) and Ce(III) ions. The IR spectral data reveal that the ligand behaves as bidentate with ON donor ...

  16. Anticoagulant effect of marine algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-Kwon; Wijesekara, Isuru

    2011-01-01

    Recently, a great deal of interest has been developed in the nutraceutical and pharmaceutical industries to isolate natural anticoagulant compounds from marine resources. Among marine resources, marine algae are valuable sources of novel bioactive compounds with anticoagulant effect. Phlorotannins and sulfated polysaccharides such as fucoidans in brown algae, carrageenans in red algae, and ulvans in green algae have been recognized as potential anticoagulant agents. Therefore, marine algae-derived phlorotannins and SPs have great potential for developing as anticoagulant drugs in nutraceutical and pharmaceutical areas. This chapter focuses on the potential anticoagulant agents in marine algae and presents an overview of their anticoagulant effect. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of hydrophobicity on the antifungal activity of alpha-helical antimicrobial peptides.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, Z.; Kullberg, B.J.; Lee, H. van der; Vasil, A.I.; Hale, J.D.; Mant, C.T.; Hancock, R.E.; Vasil, M.L.; Netea, M.G.; Hodges, R.S.

    2008-01-01

    We utilized a series of analogs of D-V13K (a 26-residue amphipathic alpha-helical antimicrobial peptide, denoted D1) to compare and contrast the role of hydrophobicity on antifungal and antibacterial activity to the results obtained previously with Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Antifungal activity

  18. lupus anticoagulants: pathophysiology, clinical

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2003-11-02

    Nov 2, 2003 ... report. East Afr. Med. J. 1998; 75:619-620. procainamide induced lupus anticoagulant. Acta Haematol. 13. Mateo, 1., Oliver, A., Borell, M. et al. Laboratory evaluation 1989; 82:50-52. and clinical characteristics of 2, 132 consecutive unselected 29. Rai, R., Cohen H., Dave M., and Regan, L. Randomised.

  19. Antibacterial activity of secondary metabolites isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    2015-10-28

    Oct 28, 2015 ... The aims of this study were the analysis of the secondary metabolites and evaluation of the antibacterial and antifungal activity of Alternaria alternata. Twenty six bioactive compounds were identified in methanolic extract of Alternaria alternata. The identification of bioactive chemical compounds is based on ...

  20. Antibacterial activity of secondary metabolites isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aims of this study were the analysis of the secondary metabolites and evaluation of the antibacterial and antifungal activity of Alternaria alternata. Twenty six bioactive compounds were identified in methanolic extract of Alternaria alternata. The identification of bioactive chemical compounds is based on the peak area, ...

  1. New Trends in Anticoagulation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Margaret; Wakam, Glenn; Wakefield, Thomas; Obi, Andrea

    2018-04-01

    Anticoagulation pharmacy has been dramatically altered with US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of 5 direct oral anticoagulants, 1 novel reversal agent and, a second designated for fast-track approval. Trial data surrounding current trends in anticoagulant choice for VTE, reversal, and bridging are constantly redefining practice. Extended therapy for unprovoked VTE has expanded to include low-dose direct oral anticoagulants, aspirin, and the use of the HERDOO2 system to identify women who can stop anticoagulant therapy without increased risk of recurrent VTE. Trends in thromboprophylaxis include extended duration low-dose direct oral anticoagulants to prevent VTE in high-risk patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Chronic kidney disease and anticoagulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sciascia, Savino; Radin, Massimo; Schreiber, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Anticoagulation in patients with impaired kidney function can be challenging since drugs' pharmacokinetics and bioavailability are altered in this setting. Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) treated with conventional anticoagulant agents [vitamin K antagonist (VKA), low-molecular weight...... are eliminated via the kidneys pose additional challenges. More recently, two classes of direct oral anticoagulant agents (DOACs) have been investigated for the prevention and management of venous thromboembolic events: the direct factor Xa inhibitors rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban, and the direct thrombin...

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus velezensis GQJK49, a Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium with Antifungal Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jinjin; Liu, Hu; Liu, Kai; Wang, Chengqiang; Li, Yuhuan; Hou, Qihui; Yao, Liangtong; Cui, Yanru; Zhang, Tongrui; Wang, Haide; Wang, Beibei; Wang, Yun; Ge, Ruofei; Xu, Baochao; Yao, Gan; Xu, Wenfeng; Fan, Lingchao; Ding, Yanqin; Du, Binghai

    2017-08-31

    Bacillus velezensis GQJK49 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium with antifungal activity, which was isolated from Lycium barbarum L. rhizosphere. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of B. velezensis GQJK49. Twelve gene clusters related to its biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, including antifungal and antibacterial antibiotics, were predicted. Copyright © 2017 Ma et al.

  4. Nylon-3 polymers with selective antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Runhui; Chen, Xinyu; Hayouka, Zvi; Chakraborty, Saswata; Falk, Shaun P; Weisblum, Bernard; Masters, Kristyn S; Gellman, Samuel H

    2013-04-10

    Host-defense peptides inhibit bacterial growth but show little toxicity toward mammalian cells. A variety of synthetic polymers have been reported to mimic this antibacterial selectivity; however, achieving comparable selectivity for fungi is more difficult because these pathogens are eukaryotes. Here we report nylon-3 polymers based on a novel subunit that display potent antifungal activity (MIC = 3.1 μg/mL for Candida albicans ) and favorable selectivity (IC10 > 400 μg/mL for 3T3 fibroblast toxicity; HC10 > 400 μg/mL for hemolysis).

  5. Coagulation assays and anticoagulant monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Dorothy M Adcock

    2012-01-01

    Anticoagulant therapy, including conventional agents and a variety of new oral, fast-acting drugs, is prescribed for millions of patients annually. Each anticoagulant varies in its effect on routine and specialty coagulation assays and each drug may require distinct laboratory assay(s) to measure drug concentration or activity. This review provides an overview of the assorted assays that can measure anticoagulant drug concentration or activity and includes key assay interferences. The effect of these conventional and new anticoagulant agents on specialty coagulation assays used to evaluate for bleeding or clotting disorders, and whether this impact is physiological or factitious, is included. Also provided is a short review of superwarfarin poisoning and features distinguishing this from warfarin overdose. Knowledge of clinically significant pearls and pitfalls pertinent to coagulation assays in relation to anticoagulant therapy are important to optimize patient care.

  6. Direct oral anticoagulants: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco Moreno, Ana Isabel; Martín Díaz, Rosa María; García Navarro, María José

    2017-12-30

    Vitamin K antagonists were the only choice for chronic oral anticoagulation for more than half a century. Over the past few years, direct oral anticoagulants have emerged, including one direct thrombin inhibitor (dabigatran etexilate) and three factor Xa inhibitors (apixaban, edoxaban and rivaroxaban). In randomised controlled trials comparing direct oral anticoagulants with traditional vitamin K antagonists, the direct oral anticoagulants all showed a favourable benefit-risk balance in their safety and efficacy profile, in prevention of thromboembolic events in patients with atrial fibrillation and in the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and acute coronary syndrome. In 2008, dabigatran was the first direct oral anticoagulant approved by the European Medicine Agency. Subsequently, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban were also authorised. This article reviews the evidence related to the use of these drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Dihydroxo-bridged dimeric Cu(II) system containing sandwiched non-coordinating phenylacetate anion: Crystal structure, spectroscopic, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal and DNA-binding studies of [(phen)(H2O)Cu(OH)2Cu(H2O)(phen)]2L.6H2O: (HL = phenylacetic acid; phen = 1,10-phenanthroline)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Muhammad; Ali, Saqib; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Shah, Naseer Ali

    2017-09-01

    This paper reports the synthesis, X-ray crystal structure, DNA-binding, antibacterial and antifungal studies of a rare dihydroxo-bridged dinuclear copper(II) complex including 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen) ligands and phenylacetate (L) anions, [Cu2(Phen)2(OH)2(H2O)2].2L.6H2O. Structural data revealed distorted square-pyramidal geometry for each copper(II) atom with the basal plane formed by the two nitrogen atoms of the phenantroline ligand and the oxygen atoms of two bridging hydroxyl groups. The apical positions are filled by the oxygen atom from a water molecule. This forms a centrosymmetric cationic dimer where the uncoordinated phenylacetate ligands serve to balance the electrical charge. The dimers interact by means of hydrogen bonds aided by the coordinated as well as uncoordinated water molecules and phenyl-acetate moieties in the crystal lattice. The binding ability of the complex with salmon sperm DNA was determined using cyclic voltammetry and absorption spectroscopy yielding binding constants 2.426 × 104 M-1 and 1.399 × 104 M-1, respectively. The complex was screened against two Gram-positive (Micrococcus luteus and Bacillus subtilis) and one Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacterial strains exhibiting significant activity against all the three strains. The complex exhibited significant, moderate and no activity against fungal strains Mucor piriformis, Helminthosporium solani and Aspergillus Niger, respectively. These preliminary tests indicate the competence of the complex towards the development of a potent biological drug.

  8. Design, synthesis, characterization and antibacterial and antifungal activity of a new 2-{(E-[(4-aminophenylimino]-methyl}-4,6-dichlorophenol and its complexes with Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II and Zn(II: An experimental and DFT study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakirdere Emine Gulhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the complexes of Co (II, Ni (II, Cu (II and Zn (II with 2-(E-(4-aminophenyliminomethyl-4,6-dichlorophenol were prepared and characterized by physical, spectral and analytical data. The metal: ligand stoichiometric ratio is 1:2 in all the complexes. The results suggested that the Schiff bases are coordinated to the metal ions through the phenolic oxygens and azomethine nitrogen to give mononuclear complexes. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of elemental analysis, IR, 1H and 13C NMR spectra, UV-VIS, magnetic susceptibility measurements and thermogravimetric analyses. Both the antibacterial and antifungal activities and MIC values of compounds were reported. Among the tested compounds, the most effective compound providing a MIC value of 64 μg/mL is Zn(L2 against C. tropicalis and B. subtilis. The theoretically optimized geometries of complexes have tetrahedral structures. The computed stretching frequencies of C=N, C-O and N-H bonds were found to be in good agreement with experimental data. All calculated frequencies fall within about 5% of the experimental frequency regions.

  9. Design, Synthesis, Antibacterial and Antifungal Activity of Novel 2-[(E-2-aryl-1-ethenyl]-3-(2-sulfanyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazole-5-yl-3,4- dihydro-4-quinolinones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anisetti Ravinder Nath

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The novel 2-[(E-2-aryl-1-ethenyl]-3-(2-sulfanyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazole-5-yl-3,4- dihydro-4-quinolinones (4a-j analogs were synthesized by Knoevenagel condensation of a solution of 2-methyl-3-(2-sulfanyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazole-5-yl-3,4-dihydro-4-quinazolinone (3 with aromatic aldehyde in presence of catalytic amount of piperidine. Compounds (4a-j showed significant biological activity against all the standard strains. All the synthesized compounds were characterized on the basis of their IR, 1H NMR, MASS spectroscopic data and elemental analyses. All the compounds have been tested for antimicrobial and antifungal activity by the cup-plate method.

  10. Acylated Flavone Glycosides from the Roots of Saussurea lappa and Their Antifungal Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yemireddy Venkata Ramnareddy

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The isolation of four novel acylated flavonoid glycosides from the roots of Saussurea lappa and their identification using a combination of 1D and 2D NMR and mass spectrometry is described. The in vitro antifungal and antibacterial activities of the isolated compounds and their mixture were tested on nine fungal and four bacterial strains, using the microdilution method. The compounds and mixture showed moderate to high antifungal activity against most of the fungi tested, compared to a miconazole standard, while only one compound and the mixture showed antibacterial activity against all strains tested.

  11. Antifungal compounds from cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishido, Tânia K; Humisto, Anu; Jokela, Jouni; Liu, Liwei; Wahlsten, Matti; Tamrakar, Anisha; Fewer, David P; Permi, Perttu; Andreote, Ana P D; Fiore, Marli F; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2015-04-13

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes found in a range of environments. They are infamous for the production of toxins, as well as bioactive compounds, which exhibit anticancer, antimicrobial and protease inhibition activities. Cyanobacteria produce a broad range of antifungals belonging to structural classes, such as peptides, polyketides and alkaloids. Here, we tested cyanobacteria from a wide variety of environments for antifungal activity. The potent antifungal macrolide scytophycin was detected in Anabaena sp. HAN21/1, Anabaena cf. cylindrica PH133, Nostoc sp. HAN11/1 and Scytonema sp. HAN3/2. To our knowledge, this is the first description of Anabaena strains that produce scytophycins. We detected antifungal glycolipopeptide hassallidin production in Anabaena spp. BIR JV1 and HAN7/1 and in Nostoc spp. 6sf Calc and CENA 219. These strains were isolated from brackish and freshwater samples collected in Brazil, the Czech Republic and Finland. In addition, three cyanobacterial strains, Fischerella sp. CENA 298, Scytonema hofmanni PCC 7110 and Nostoc sp. N107.3, produced unidentified antifungal compounds that warrant further characterization. Interestingly, all of the strains shown to produce antifungal compounds in this study belong to Nostocales or Stigonematales cyanobacterial orders.

  12. Anticoagulation Considerations for Travel to High Altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLoughery, Thomas G

    2015-09-01

    DeLoughery, Thomas G. Anticoagulation considerations for travel to high altitude. High Alt Med Biol 16:181-185, 2015.-An increasing percentage of the population are on anticoagulation medicine for clinical reasons ranging from stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation to long term prevention of deep venous thrombosis. In recent years, several new direct oral anticoagulants have entered the market. The key questions that should be kept in mind when approaching a potential traveler on anticoagulation are: 1) why is the patient on anticoagulation? 2) do they need to stay on anticoagulation? 3) what are the choices for their anticoagulation? 4) will there be any drug interactions with medications needed for travel? and 5) how will they monitor their anticoagulation while traveling? Knowing the answers to these questions then can allow for proper counseling and planning for the anticoagulated traveler's trip.

  13. RETRACTED: Facile, eco-friendly and template free photosynthesis of cauliflower like ZnO nanoparticles using leaf extract of Tamarindus indica (L.) and its biological evolution of antibacterial and antifungal activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elumalai, K; Velmurugan, S; Ravi, S; Kathiravan, V; Ashokkumar, S

    2015-02-05

    In the present investigation, we chose the very simple and eco-friendly chemical method for synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles from leaf extract of Tamarindus indica (L.) (T. indica) and developed the new green route for synthesis of nanoparticles. Formed product has been studied by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and with corresponding energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). Mainly, the present results depicted that the synthesized nanoproducts are moderately stable, hexagonal phase, roughly spherical with maximum particles in size range within 19-37 nm in diameter. The antibacterial and fungal activities of aqueous extracts of T. indica were ended with corresponding disk diffusion and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC). The highest mean zones of inhibition were observed in the ZnO NPs (200 μg/mL) against Staphylococcus aureus (13.1±0.28). Finally, it can be concluded that microbial activity of ZnO NPs has more susceptible S. aureus than the other micro organisms. Further, the present investigation suggests that ZnO NPs has the potential applications for various medical and industrial fields. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Does plasmin have anticoagulant activity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Hoover-Plow

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Jane Hoover-PlowJoseph J Jacobs Center for Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, Departments of Cardiovascular Medicine and Molecular Cardiology, Lerner Research Institute Cleveland Clinic, Ohio, USAAbstract: The coagulation and fibrinolytic pathways regulate hemostasis and thrombosis, and an imbalance in these pathways may result in pathologic hemophilia or thrombosis. The plasminogen system is the primary proteolytic pathway for fibrinolysis, but also has important proteolytic functions in cell migration, extracellular matrix degradation, metalloproteinase activation, and hormone processing. Several studies have demonstrated plasmin cleavage and inactivation of several coagulation factors, suggesting plasmin may be not only be the primary fibrinolytic enzyme, but may have anticoagulant properties as well. The objective of this review is to examine both in vitro and in vivo evidence for plasmin inactivation of coagulation, and to consider whether plasmin may act as a physiological regulator of coagulation. While several studies have demonstrated strong evidence for plasmin cleavage and inactivation of coagulation factors FV, FVIII, FIX, and FX in vitro, in vivo evidence is lacking for a physiologic role for plasmin as an anticoagulant. However, inactivation of coagulation factors by plasmin may be useful as a localized anticoagulant therapy or as a combined thrombolytic and anticoagulant therapy.Keywords: thrombosis, anticoagulant, cardiovascular disease, plasminogen’s protease, blood

  15. Anticoagulant and antimicrobial finishing of non-woven polypropylene textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degoutin, S; Jimenez, M; Casetta, M; Bellayer, S; Chai, F; Blanchemain, N; Neut, C; Kacem, I; Traisnel, M; Martel, B

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this work is to prepare non-woven polypropylene (PP) textile functionalized with bioactive molecules in order to improve its anticoagulation and antibacterial properties. This paper describes the optimization of the grafting process of acrylic acid (AA) on low-pressure cold-plasma pre-activated PP, the characterization of the modified substrates and the effect of these modifications on the in vitro biological response towards cells. Then, the immobilization of gentamicin (aminoglycoside antibiotic) and heparin (anticoagulation agent) has been carried out on the grafted samples by either ionic interactions or covalent linkages. Their bioactivity has been investigated and related to the nature of their interactions with the substrate. For gentamicin-immobilized AA-grafted samples, an inhibition radius and a reduction of 99% of the adhesion of Escherichia coli have been observed when gentamicin was linked by ionic interactions, allowing the release of the antibiotic. By contrast, for heparin-immobilized AA-grafted PP samples, a strong increase of the anticoagulant effect up to 35 min has been highlighted when heparin was covalently bonded on the substrate, by contact with the blood drop.

  16. Anticoagulant and antimicrobial finishing of non-woven polypropylene textiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degoutin, S; Jimenez, M; Casetta, M; Bellayer, S; Chai, F; Blanchemain, N; Neut, C; Kacem, I; Traisnel, M; Martel, B

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to prepare non-woven polypropylene (PP) textile functionalized with bioactive molecules in order to improve its anticoagulation and antibacterial properties. This paper describes the optimization of the grafting process of acrylic acid (AA) on low-pressure cold-plasma pre-activated PP, the characterization of the modified substrates and the effect of these modifications on the in vitro biological response towards cells. Then, the immobilization of gentamicin (aminoglycoside antibiotic) and heparin (anticoagulation agent) has been carried out on the grafted samples by either ionic interactions or covalent linkages. Their bioactivity has been investigated and related to the nature of their interactions with the substrate. For gentamicin-immobilized AA-grafted samples, an inhibition radius and a reduction of 99% of the adhesion of Escherichia coli have been observed when gentamicin was linked by ionic interactions, allowing the release of the antibiotic. By contrast, for heparin-immobilized AA-grafted PP samples, a strong increase of the anticoagulant effect up to 35 min has been highlighted when heparin was covalently bonded on the substrate, by contact with the blood drop. (paper)

  17. Antibacterial activity of the active Component of Cassia alata (Linn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    antibacterial, antifungal, antimicrobial and analgesic. The leaves of this plant are used in the treatment of ringworm. The plant is traditionally acclaimed to be effective in treating skin infections in man (Igoli et al.,. 2005) and animals. C. alata leaf is also credited for the treatment of haemorrhoids, constipation, inguinal hernia,.

  18. Phytochemical and Antibacterial Evaluations of the Stem Bark of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    editors. Textbook of Therapeutics: Drug and. Disease Management, 6th edition, Williams and. Wilkins, USA, 1996; p 937. 12. Al-Bayati FA, Al-Mola HF. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of different parts of. Tribulus terrestris L. growing in Iraq. J. Zhejiang Univ. Sci. B 2008; 9(2): 154–159. 13. Evans WC. Pharmacognosy.

  19. Development of fungus resistant sealant mixed with antibacterial zeolite; Kokinsei zeolite wo riyoshita bokabi sealing zai no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takei, Y.; Shimazu, T.; Terauchi, S.; Sasaki, M. [Kajima Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-12-20

    The application of antibacterial zeolite was studied for development of antifungal sealants which are highly antifungal and non-harmful to human body. Various kinds of the conventional antifungal construction materials have accomplished the duty by the addition of organic antifungal agents. However, those were generally short in sustainability of effectiveness in the beginning even if having excellent antifungal property, and the higher the antifungal property is, the more strongly they affect human body. As a result of the study on tensile strength and storage stability, the maximum amount of antibacterial zeolite to be added was 6200 ppm for not reducing the basic performance of sealants. From various promotion tests and exposure tests such as JIS, it was confirmed that the sealant with the antibacterial zeolite added has antifungal property the same as or more than that of the existing antifungal sealants and the sustainability. Further, it was confirmed that the developed antifungal sealant is effective to suppress MRSA which causes infection in the hospital. 2 refs., 7 figs., 10 tabs.

  20. Heparin mimetics with anticoagulant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahain, Abdullah Al; Ignjatovic, Vera; Monagle, Paul; Tsanaktsidis, John; Ferro, Vito

    2018-02-15

    Heparin, a sulfated polysaccharide belonging to the glycosaminoglycan family, has been widely used as an anticoagulant drug for decades and remains the most commonly used parenteral anticoagulant in adults and children. However, heparin has important clinical limitations and is derived from animal sources which pose significant safety and supply problems. The ever growing shortage of the raw material for heparin manufacturing may become a very significant issue in the future. These global limitations have prompted much research, especially following the recent well-publicized contamination scandal, into the development of alternative anticoagulants derived from non-animal and/or totally synthetic sources that mimic the structural features and properties of heparin. Such compounds, termed heparin mimetics, are also needed as anticoagulant materials for use in biomedical applications (e.g., stents, grafts, implants etc.). This review encompasses the development of heparin mimetics of various structural classes, including synthetic polymers and non-carbohydrate small molecules as well as sulfated oligo- and polysaccharides, and fondaparinux derivatives and conjugates, with a focus on developments in the past 10 years. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Transitions of care in anticoagulated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michota F

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Franklin Michota Department of Hospital Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Anticoagulation is an effective therapeutic means of reducing thrombotic risk in patients with various conditions, including atrial fibrillation, mechanical heart valves, and major surgery. By its nature, anticoagulation increases the risk of bleeding; this risk is particularly high during transitions of care. Established anticoagulants are not ideal, due to requirements for parenteral administration, narrow therapeutic indices, and/or a need for frequent therapeutic monitoring. The development of effective oral anticoagulants that are administered as a fixed dose, have low potential for drug-drug and drug-food interactions, do not require regular anticoagulation monitoring, and are suitable for both inpatient and outpatient use is to be welcomed. Three new oral anticoagulants, the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran etexilate, and the factor Xa inhibitors, rivaroxaban and apixaban, have been approved in the US for reducing the risk of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation; rivaroxaban is also approved for prophylaxis and treatment of deep vein thrombosis, which may lead to pulmonary embolism in patients undergoing knee or hip replacement surgery. This review examines current options for anticoagulant therapy, with a focus on maintaining efficacy and safety during transitions of care. The characteristics of dabigatran etexilate, rivaroxaban, and apixaban are discussed in the context of traditional anticoagulant therapy. Keywords: hemorrhagic events, oral anticoagulation, parenteral anticoagulation, stroke, transitions of care

  2. Oral anticoagulation in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altirriba, J; Aparicio, P

    2017-06-01

    Oral anticoagulant therapy is currently widespread in the population and primary care plays an important role in its control in Spain. Younger populations, such as those in prisons, often require this treatment for reasons other than atrial fibrillation, often in relation to valvular or congenital or acquired hypercoagulability situations. The possibility of obtaining the INR by portable coagulometers has allowed primary care physicians to tackle the indication of this therapy and the control of these patients in coordination with haematology services. The emergence of new therapeutic alternatives (Dabigatran, Rivaroxaban, Apixaban and Edoxaban, the so called "ACOD") has permitted the expansion of options for oral anticoagulation in some cases, since they do not require systematic monitoring of their effect and interact with far fewer drugs than their predecessors, although there are still restrictions by the health authorities on their widespread use. This article reviews the different indications of oral anticoagulant therapy according to the new recommendations as well as the clinical scenarios in which it should be used.

  3. Anticoagulant rodenticides and wildlife: Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brink, Nico W.; Elliott, John E.; Shore, Richard F.; Rattner, Barnett A.; van den Brink, Nico W.; Elliott, John E.; Shore, Richard F.; Rattner, Barnett A.

    2018-01-01

    Rodents have interacted with people since the beginning of systematic food storage by humans in the early Neolithic era. Such interactions have had adverse outcomes such as threats to human health, spoiling and consumption of food sources, damage to human infrastructure and detrimental effects on indigenous island wildlife (through inadvertent anthropogenic assisted introductions). These socio/economic and environmental impacts illustrate the clear need to control populations of commensal rodents. Different methods have been applied historically but the main means of control in the last decades is through the application of rodenticides, mainly anticoagulant rodenticides (ARs) that inhibit blood clotting. The so-called First Generation Anticoagulant Rodenticides (FGARs) proved highly effective but rodents increasingly developed resistance. This led to a demand for more effective alternative compounds and paved the way to the development of Second Generation Anticoagulant Rodenticides (SGARs). These were more acutely toxic and persistent, making them more effective but also increasing the risks of exposure of non-target species and secondary poisoning of predatory species. SGARs often fail the environmental thresholds of different regulatory frameworks because of these negative side-effects, but their use is still permitted because of the overwhelming societal needs for rodent control and the lack of effective alternatives. This book provides a state-of-the-art overview of the scientific advancements in assessment of environmental exposure, effects and risks of currently used ARs. This is discussed in relation to the societal needs for rodent control, including risk mitigation and development of alternatives.

  4. Managing reversal of direct oral anticoagulants in emergency situations Anticoagulation Education Task Force White Paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ageno, Walter; Büller, Harry R.; Falanga, Anna; Hacke, Werner; Hendriks, Jeroen; Lobban, Trudie; Merino, Jose; Milojevic, Ivan S.; Moya, Francisco; van der Worp, H. Bart; Randall, Gary; Tsioufis, Konstantinos; Verhamme, Peter; Camm, A. John

    2016-01-01

    Anticoagulation is the cornerstone of prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the mechanisms by which anticoagulants confer therapeutic benefit also increase the risk of bleeding. As such, reversal strategies

  5. Direct oral anticoagulants and venous thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Franchini

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolism (VTE, consisting of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is a major clinical concern associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The cornerstone of management of VTE is anticoagulation, and traditional anticoagulants include parenteral heparins and oral vitamin K antagonists. Recently, new oral anticoagulant drugs have been developed and licensed, including direct factor Xa inhibitors (e.g. rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban and thrombin inhibitors (e.g. dabigatran etexilate. This narrative review focusses on the characteristics of these direct anticoagulants and the main results of published clinical studies on their use in the prevention and treatment of VTE.

  6. Antibacterial and antifungal activity and Bone healing Potency of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EDEMA

    proliferative physiological process in which the body facilitates the repair of bone fracture. The phases of fracture healing include; the reactive phase, reparative and remodeling. 1 . Cissus arguta a creeping plant found in the rain forest of southern Nigeria, is been extensively utilized locally in the treatment of certain.

  7. Evaluation of antibacterial and antifungal activity of root and root ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staphylococcus aureus, Staph. epidermis and also against the other spp. of Gram negative bacteria viz., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebseilla pneumonia, Alcaligens faecalis, Proteus vulgaris Enterobacter aerogenes, Salmonella typhi, Salmonella tyhimurium, Salmonella paratyphi A and Salmonella enterica subsp.

  8. Traditional use, antibacterial activity and antifungal activity of crude ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fleshy leaves and roots of most species within the Aloe family are used in many traditional treatments (Mabberley, 1987). Traditional healers and indigenous people utilize mainly the leaf sap of this genus widely for the treatment of wounds, burns, rashes, itches, cracked lips and cracked skin (Cera et al., 1980).

  9. Traditional use, antibacterial activity and antifungal activity of crude ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-10-18

    Oct 18, 2007 ... tested for in Aloe vera. Acemannan is a complex carbo- hydrate with immune stimulating and antiviral properties. (Cappasso et al., 1998). Certain lectins, which, are found, for example, in the Aloe pith, are assumed to help in stimulation of immune response by increasing the pro- duction of lymphocytes that ...

  10. Synthesis, antibacterial and antifungal activity of some derivatives of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Sayed Alam1 2. Department of Chemistry, Rajshahi University of Engineering and Technology, Rajshahi 6204, Bangladesh; Department of Life Science and Biotechnology, Shimane University, Matsue, Shimane 690-8504, Japan ...

  11. Antibacterial, antifungal and antioxidant activity of the roots and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-16

    Nov 16, 2009 ... sed by bacteria living in the intestine (Wheeler, 2003). Alcohol consumption can lead to increased ... species (ROS), which can damage liver cells. Endotoxin activates kupffer cells by .... Salmonella pooni, Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumonia). Each organism was ...

  12. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of 3, 5-Dihydroxy-4 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Taiwo Festus Osho

    2013-03-06

    Mar 6, 2013 ... 1Department of Microbiology, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria. 2Department of ... This effluent constitutes serious hazards to the environment and aquatic life in receiving water bodies. Enzymatic ..... management technology aimed at reducing occupational and environmental hazards: 11-20.

  13. Synthesis, antibacterial and antifungal activity of some derivatives of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    founds in fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds and flowers as well as in teas and wines, and are an important con- stituent of human diet. They have been demonstrated .... for 20 min on a silicon oil bath and diluted with water. The solid obtained was filtered off and washed with. 20% aq. sodium thiosulphate. It was purified by pre-.

  14. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of selected microalgae and cyanobacteria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Najdenski, H. M.; Gigova, L. G.; Iliev, I. I.; Pilarski, P. S.; Lukavský, Jaromír; Tsvetkova, I. V.; Ninova, M. S.; Kussovski, V. K.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 7 (2013), s. 1533-1540 ISSN 0950-5423 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : antimicrobial activity * cyanobacteria * microalgae Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.354, year: 2013

  15. A Review on Antibacterial, Antiviral, and Antifungal Activity of Curcumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorofchian Moghadamtousi, Soheil; Abdul Kadir, Habsah; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Tajik, Hassan; Abubakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2014-01-01

    Curcuma longa L. (Zingiberaceae family) and its polyphenolic compound curcumin have been subjected to a variety of antimicrobial investigations due to extensive traditional uses and low side effects. Antimicrobial activities for curcumin and rhizome extract of C. longa against different bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites have been reported. The promising results for antimicrobial activity of curcumin made it a good candidate to enhance the inhibitory effect of existing antimicrobial agents through synergism. Indeed, different investigations have been done to increase the antimicrobial activity of curcumin, including synthesis of different chemical derivatives to increase its water solubility as well ass cell up take of curcumin. This review aims to summarize previous antimicrobial studies of curcumin towards its application in the future studies as a natural antimicrobial agent. PMID:24877064

  16. Evaluation of antibacterial, antifungal and modulatory activity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-02

    Jun 2, 2014 ... Laboratório de Tecnologia Farmacêutica, Universidade Federal da Paraíba – UFPB, João Pessoa – PB, Brasil. Abstract. Background: Multi-resistant microorganisms such as Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida tropicalis e Candida krusei are the main causes of ...

  17. Antifungal and antibacterial effects of some acrocarpic mosses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of the number of microorganism affected. Tortella tortuosa (Hedw.) Limpr. only has effect on Candida albicans ATCC 16231 strain. All the results were compared with standard antibiotic discs, ketoconazole (50 ìg), ampicillin (10 ìg), eritromycin (15 ìg) and vancomycin (30 ìg). Key words: Moss, acrocarpous, antimicrobial ...

  18. Antibacterial, antifungal and insecticidal activities of some selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-08-02

    Aug 2, 2010 ... some selected medicinal plants of polygonaceae. Farrukh Hussain2 ... infectious diseases. About 43% of total deaths occurred in developing countries due to infectious diseases in recent years (Carballo et al., 2002). Similarly ..... Antimicrobial screening of Rumex abyssinicus and Rumex nervosus. Eastern ...

  19. Antibacterial and Antifungal Activities of the extract and fractions of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SOHAIL

    Five (5) fungal strains, Trichoderma longibrachiantum,. Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium solani and Candida albican were used for this activity. The fungal strains were cultured on Nutrient. Agar. Five dilutions (4, 2, 1, 0.5and 0.25 mg/ml) of the crude and its fractions were prepared in Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) ...

  20. A Review on Antibacterial, Antiviral, and Antifungal Activity of Curcumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheil Zorofchian Moghadamtousi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Curcuma longa L. (Zingiberaceae family and its polyphenolic compound curcumin have been subjected to a variety of antimicrobial investigations due to extensive traditional uses and low side effects. Antimicrobial activities for curcumin and rhizome extract of C. longa against different bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites have been reported. The promising results for antimicrobial activity of curcumin made it a good candidate to enhance the inhibitory effect of existing antimicrobial agents through synergism. Indeed, different investigations have been done to increase the antimicrobial activity of curcumin, including synthesis of different chemical derivatives to increase its water solubility as well ass cell up take of curcumin. This review aims to summarize previous antimicrobial studies of curcumin towards its application in the future studies as a natural antimicrobial agent.

  1. Screening of antibacterial and antifungal activities in green and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... bacteria: Bacillus cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis, Bacillus subtillus, Clostridium sporogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Mycobacterium smegmatis, Streptococcus faecalis and Bacillus sp, two Gram-negative bacteria: Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas sp and against fungi: Candida tropicalis and Cryptococcus neoformans.

  2. ["Lupus anticoagulant" in immune hyperthyroidism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, G; Alexopoulos, A; Hasler, K; Kerp, L

    1990-10-05

    A 56-year-old woman with autoimmune hyperthyroidism (Basedow) whose blood coagulation had at first been normal developed prolonged partial thromboplastin time (PTT) of 48 s and a fall in prothrombin time (Quick value) to 52%. At the same time, total activity of factor VIII was reduced to 18% and factor IX to 16%. These values not having changed after the addition of normal plasma, it is assumed that an acquired inhibitor of plasmatic coagulation was responsible. Such inhibitors were first described in lupus erythematodes and therefore called lupus anticoagulant, but later also demonstrated in other autoimmune diseases.

  3. Anticoagulant Control Results among Patients with Mechanical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Patients with mechanical heart valves receive life long, oral anticoagulant therapy to prevent thromboembolic complications, but this treatment is associated with an increased risk of bleeding (1). However no study in Tanzania has been done to review the adequacy of anticoagulation monitoring and risk factors ...

  4. Isolation and characterization of anticoagulant compound from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GIS

    2013-10-02

    Oct 2, 2013 ... The structural characterization of anticoagulant GAG was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Among the marine bivalve, D. faba purified showed more anticoagulant activity than that of crude sample. The results of this study suggest that the GAG from D. faba could be an alternative.

  5. Anticoagulant activity of ginger ( Zingiber officinale Rosc ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Herbal medicines with anticoagulant therapeutic claims could serve as veritable sources of new oral anticoagulant drugs with possible wider safety margins than the currently available ones. Objectives: This work was aimed at evaluating a Ginger Rhizome Methanolic Extract in vivo in rats for its potential ...

  6. Anticoagulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... they last a long time. You participate in sports or other activities that put you at risk for bleeding or bruising. What are the side effects? Sometimes a medicine causes unwanted effects. These are ...

  7. Anticoagulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be hazardous. These medicines include most antibiotics, several pain medicines (e.g., non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) and medications for acid reflux such as cimetidine (Tagamet). If you're taking warfarin and start a new prescription or over-the-counter medication, check with ...

  8. HEEADSSS assessment for adolescents requiring anticoagulation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sophie; Mertyn, Eliza; Alhucema, Paulina; Monagle, Paul; Newall, Fiona

    2012-05-01

    The care of adolescents with complex chronic illness needs to be developmentally appropriate to encourage adherence, knowledge retention and self-management. There has been an increase in the number of adolescents requiring long-term or lifelong anticoagulation therapy, related to either an underlying illness or idiopathic deep vein thrombosis. The burden of anticoagulant therapy, the associated risks and the required lifestyle changes can significantly impact on psychosocial well-being in the adolescent patient. This review identifies issues pertinent to adolescent anticoagulation management and discusses strategies to support optimal management. The HEEADSSS (Home, Education and employment, Eating, Activities with peers, Drugs, Sexual activity, Suicide and depression, and Safety) framework was used to provide guidance in undertaking a psychosocial assessment of adolescents requiring anticoagulant therapy in conjunction with a structured education strategy. Adolescent anticoagulant management strategies employing developmentally appropriate assessment and education will likely result in improved therapeutic outcomes for the patient and potentially facilitate transition to adult-based care.

  9. Antifungal pharmacodynamics: Latin America's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Javier M; Rodriguez, Carlos A; Agudelo, Maria; Zuluaga, Andres F; Vesga, Omar

    The current increment of invasive fungal infections and the availability of new broad-spectrum antifungal agents has increased the use of these agents by non-expert practitioners, without an impact on mortality. To improve efficacy while minimizing prescription errors and to reduce the high monetary cost to the health systems, the principles of pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) are necessary. A systematic review of the PD of antifungals agents was performed aiming at the practicing physician without expertise in this field. The initial section of this review focuses on the general concepts of antimicrobial PD. In vitro studies, fungal susceptibility and antifungal serum concentrations are related with different doses and dosing schedules, determining the PD indices and the magnitude required to obtain a specific outcome. Herein the PD of the most used antifungal drug classes in Latin America (polyenes, azoles, and echinocandins) is discussed. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Antifungal pharmacodynamics: Latin America's perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier M. Gonzalez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The current increment of invasive fungal infections and the availability of new broad-spectrum antifungal agents has increased the use of these agents by non-expert practitioners, without an impact on mortality. To improve efficacy while minimizing prescription errors and to reduce the high monetary cost to the health systems, the principles of pharmacokinetics (PK and pharmacodynamics (PD are necessary. A systematic review of the PD of antifungals agents was performed aiming at the practicing physician without expertise in this field. The initial section of this review focuses on the general concepts of antimicrobial PD. In vitro studies, fungal susceptibility and antifungal serum concentrations are related with different doses and dosing schedules, determining the PD indices and the magnitude required to obtain a specific outcome. Herein the PD of the most used antifungal drug classes in Latin America (polyenes, azoles, and echinocandins is discussed.

  11. [Factors influenceing the activity of oral anticoagulants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Caamaño, A; Díaz Barreiro, L A

    1976-01-01

    Anticoagulants are drugs capable to retard or even cancell the process of blood coagulation. They are many factors who influences the intensity and duration of oral anticoagulant acitivity, such as drugs, body constitution, physical agents, diseases, etc. The oral anticoagulants interacts with other drugs at differents levels: at the gut, at the plasma, modiffing the protein binding or the metabolism of such drugs, at the enzimatic induction or inhibition, or at unknown places with many other drugs. These paper deals with the description of such interactions.

  12. Antimicrobial and antifungal activities of the extracts and essential oils of Bidens tripartita.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Tomczyk

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the antibacterial and antifungal properties of the extracts, subextracts and essential oils of Bidens tripartita flowers and herbs. In the study, twelve extracts and two essential oils were investigated for activity against different Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus, Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, E. coli (beta-laktamase+, Klebsiella pneumoniae (ESBL+, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and some fungal organisms Candida albicans, C. parapsilosis, Aspergillus fumigatus, A. terreus using a broth microdilution and disc diffusion methods. The results obtained indicate antimicrobial activity of the tested extracts (except butanolic extracts, which however did not inhibit the growth of fungi used in this study. Bacteriostatic effect of both essential oils is insignificant, but they have strong antifungal activity. These results support the use of B. tripartita to treat a microbial infections and it is indicated as an antimicrobial and antifungal agent, which may act as pharmaceuticals and preservatives.

  13. Synthesis, structure analysis, anti-bacterial and in vitro anti-cancer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... as anti-bacterial and anti-fungal agents against various microorganisms. The in vitro cytotoxicity tests of the ligand and its copper complex were carried out in two different human tumour cell lines, HCT-116 and MDA – MB - 231. The cytotoxicity studies showed that the complex exhibited higher activity than cisplatin and ...

  14. Synthesis, structure analysis, anti-bacterial and in vitro anti-cancer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    copper complex have been investigated as anti-bacterial and anti-fungal agents against various microorganisms. The in vitro cytotoxicity tests of the ..... integration curves and those obtained from the values of the expected CHN analysis, ... two imino nitrogen atoms to form the equatorial plane, with atoms of the same type in ...

  15. Antifungal amphiphilic aminoglycoside K20: bioactivities and mechanism of action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjib K. Shrestha

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available K20 is a novel amphiphilic antifungal aminoglycoside that is synthetically derived from the antibiotic kanamycin A. Reported here are investigations of K20’s antimicrobial activities, cytotoxicity, and fungicidal mechanism of action. In vitro growth inhibitory activities against a variety of human and plant pathogenic yeasts, filamentous fungi, and bacteria were determined using microbroth dilution assays and time-kill curve analyses, and hemolytic and animal cell cytotoxic activities were determined. Effects on Cryptococcus neoformans H-99 infectivity were determined with a preventive murine lung infection model. The antifungal mechanism of action was studied using intact fungal cells, yeast lipid mutants, and small unilamellar lipid vesicles. K20 exhibited broad-spectrum in vitro antifungal activities but not antibacterial activities. Pulmonary, single dose-administration of K20 reduced C. neoformans lung infection rates 4-fold compared to controls. Hemolysis and half-maximal cytotoxicities of mammalian cells occurred at concentrations that were 10 to 32-fold higher than fungicidal MICs. With fluorescein isothiocyanate, 20 to 25 mg/L K20 caused staining of >95% of C. neoformans and Fusarium graminearum cells and at 31.3 mg/L caused rapid leakage (30 to 80% in 15 min of calcein from preloaded small unilamellar lipid vesicles. K20 appears to be a broad-spectrum fungicide, capable of reducing the infectivity of C. neoformans, and exhibits low hemolytic activity and mammalian cell toxicity. It perturbs the plasma membrane by mechanisms that are lipid modulated. K20 is a novel amphiphilic aminoglycoside amenable to scalable production and a potential lead antifungal for therapeutic and crop protection applications.

  16. Overview of a pharmacist anticoagulation certificate program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Julienne K; Edwards, Rebecca; Brewer, Andrew; Miller, Cathey; Bray, Bryan; Groce, James B

    2017-07-01

    To describe the design of an ongoing anticoagulation certificate program and annual renewal update for pharmacists. Components of the anticoagulation certificate program include home study, pre- and posttest, live sessions, case discussions with evaluation and presentation, an implementation plan, and survey information (program evaluation and use in practice). Clinical reasoning skills were assessed through case work-up and evaluation prior to live presentation. An annual renewal program requires pharmacists to complete home study and case evaluations. A total of 361 pharmacists completed the anticoagulation certificate program between 2002 and 2015. Most (62%) practiced in ambulatory care and 38% in inpatient care settings (8% in both). In the past four years, 71% were working in or starting anticoagulation clinics in ambulatory and inpatient settings. In their evaluations of the program, an average of 90% of participants agreed or strongly agreed the lecture material was relevant and objectives were met. Pharmacists are able to apply knowledge and skills in management of anticoagulation. This structured practice-based continuing education program was intended to enhance pharmacy practice and has achieved that goal. The certificate program in anticoagulation was relevant to pharmacists who attended the program. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Zinc oxide nanoparticle-coated films: fabrication, characterization, and antibacterial properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yunhong, E-mail: y.jiang@leeds.ac.uk [University of Leeds, Institute of Particle Science and Engineering (United Kingdom); O’Neill, Alex J. [University of Leeds, School of Molecular and Cellular Biology (United Kingdom); Ding, Yulong [University of Leeds, Institute of Particle Science and Engineering (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-15

    In this article, novel antibacterial PVC-based films coated with ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) were fabricated, characterized, and studied for their antibacterial properties. It was shown that the ZnO NPs were coated on the surface of the PVC films uniformly and that the coating process did not affect the size and shape of the NPs on the surface of PVC films. Films coated with concentrations of either 0.2 or 0.075 g/L of ZnO NPs exhibited antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria, but exhibited no antifungal activity against Aspergillus flavus and Penicillium citrinum. Smaller particles (100 nm) exhibited more potent antibacterial activity than larger particles (1000 nm). All ZnO-coated films maintained antibacterial activity after 30 days in water.

  18. Candida Species Biofilms’ Antifungal Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Sónia; Rodrigues, Célia F.; Araújo, Daniela; Rodrigues, Maria Elisa; Henriques, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    Candida infections (candidiasis) are the most prevalent opportunistic fungal infection on humans and, as such, a major public health problem. In recent decades, candidiasis has been associated to Candida species other than Candida albicans. Moreover, biofilms have been considered the most prevalent growth form of Candida cells and a strong causative agent of the intensification of antifungal resistance. As yet, no specific resistance factor has been identified as the sole responsible for the increased recalcitrance to antifungal agents exhibited by biofilms. Instead, biofilm antifungal resistance is a complex multifactorial phenomenon, which still remains to be fully elucidated and understood. The different mechanisms, which may be responsible for the intrinsic resistance of Candida species biofilms, include the high density of cells within the biofilm, the growth and nutrient limitation, the effects of the biofilm matrix, the presence of persister cells, the antifungal resistance gene expression and the increase of sterols on the membrane of biofilm cells. Thus, this review intends to provide information on the recent advances about Candida species biofilm antifungal resistance and its implication on intensification of the candidiasis. PMID:29371527

  19. Penetratin and derivatives acting as antifungal agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masman, Marcelo F.; Rodriguez, Ana M.; Raimondi, Marcela; Zacchino, Susana A.; Luiten, Paul G. M.; Somlai, Csaba; Kortvelyesi, Tamas; Penke, Botond; Enriz, Ricardo D.

    The synthesis, in vitro evaluation, and conformational study of RQIKTWFQNRRMKWKK-NH(2) (penetratin) and related derivatives acting as antifungal agents are reported. Penetratin and some of its derivatives displayed antifungal activity against the human opportunistic pathogenic standardized ATCC

  20. SHORT COMMUNICATION EVALUATION OF ANTIFUNGAL AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    Pakistan) and chloramphenicol from Sigma St. Louis. (USA) was used as standard. Antifungal activity of monoesters. The antifungal activities of the monoesters (1-29) were determined by employing hanging drop method considering ketoconazole ...

  1. Special Issue: Novel Antifungal Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Del Poeta

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This Special Issue is designed to highlight the latest research and development on new antifungal compounds with mechanisms of action different from the ones of polyenes, azoles, and echinocandins. The papers presented here highlight new pathways and targets that could be exploited for the future development of new antifungal agents to be used alone or in combination with existing antifungals. A computational model for better predicting antifungal drug resistance is also presented.

  2. APOLLO I: Anticoagulation control in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho-Costa, Luís; Moreira, Sónia; Azevedo, Cristiana; Azevedo, Pedro; Castro, Elisabete; Sousa, Hélder; Melo, Miguel

    2015-05-01

    Anticoagulation control as assessed by time in therapeutic range (TTR) correlates positively with the safety and efficacy of thromboprophylaxis in atrial fibrillation. We set out to assess TTR in our unit and to investigate determinants of better control. This was a case series study of atrial fibrillation patients anticoagulated with warfarin or acenocoumarol at the Family Health Unit of Fânzeres. Sociodemographic and clinical data were collected and TTR was calculated by the Rosendaal method, based on international normalized ratio tests performed in external laboratories in the preceding six months. SPSS 21.0 was used for the statistical analysis, with descriptive statistics, Spearman's correlation, and the Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Of the 106 eligible patients, 70% participated in the study. Median TTR was 65.3% (P25=48.3%, P75=86.8%). We found a positive association between this variable and duration of atrial fibrillation (ρ=0.477, p0.05). Median TTR in our unit is similar to that in southern European countries and close to the good control threshold (70%) proposed by the European Society of Cardiology. The duration of atrial fibrillation and of anticoagulation explains only a small part of the measure's variability. Other determinants of anticoagulation control must be investigated in future studies and comparative studies should be carried out in family health units monitoring anticoagulation on the premises. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. Antifungal Treatment for Pityriasis Versicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Aditya K; Foley, Kelly A

    2015-03-12

    Pityriasis versicolor (PV), also known as tinea versicolor, is caused by Malassezia species. This condition is one of the most common superficial fungal infections worldwide, particularly in tropical climates. PV is difficult to cure and the chances for relapse or recurrent infections are high due to the presence of Malassezia in the normal skin flora. This review focuses on the clinical evidence supporting the efficacy of antifungal treatment for PV. A systematic review of literature from the PubMed database was conducted up to 30 September 2014. The search criteria were "(pityriasis versicolor OR tinea versicolor) AND treatment", with full text available and English language required. Topical antifungal medications are the first-line treatment for PV, including zinc pyrithione, ketoconazole, and terbinafine. In cases of severe or recalcitrant PV, the oral antifungal medications itraconazole and fluconazole may be more appropriate, with pramiconazole a possible future option. Oral terbinafine is not effective in treating PV and oral ketoconazole should no longer be prescribed. Maintenance, or prophylactic, therapy may be useful in preventing recurrent infection; however, at this time, there is limited research evaluating the efficacy of prophylactic antifungal treatment.

  4. [A new deal with new anticoagulants?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godier, A; Samama, C-M

    2010-06-01

    The anticoagulant market has been very active recently with the development of new compounds including injectable anti-Xa such as fondaparinux, already available, and idraparinux, already replaced by its new biotynilateed form, and new oral drugs which can be divided into anti-IIa with dabigatran already available, and anti-Xa, such as the recently marketed rivaroxaban and apixaban still in the development stage. Others are coming forward. The competition is strong and the place for each drug remains to be determined. This review discusses these new anticoagulants in terms of efficacy and tolerance based on data in the literature. These recent reports mainly concern prophylaxis for orthopedic surgery but also consider treatment of deep venous thrombosis. The results of studies in heart patients have raised much curiosity since they will be determinant in the future use of innovating compounds, which could replace current oral anticoagulants. This will be upcoming but not yet for tomorrow.

  5. Reversal of target-specific oral anticoagulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, D.M.; Cuker, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Target-specific oral anticoagulants (TSOACs) provide safe and effective anticoagulation for the prevention and treatment of thrombosis in a variety of clinical settings by interfering with the activity of thrombin (dabigatran) or factor Xa (rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban, betrixaban). Although TSOACs have practical advantages over vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), there are currently no antidotes to reverse their anticoagulant effect. Herein we summarize the available evidence for TSOAC reversal using nonspecific and specific reversal agents. We discuss important limitations of existing evidence, which is derived from studies in human volunteers, animal models and in vitro experiments. Studies evaluating the safety and efficacy of reversal agents on clinical outcomes such as bleeding and mortality in patients with TSOAC-associated bleeding are needed. PMID:24880102

  6. Citrate Anticoagulation during Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Davide; Panicali, Laura; Facchini, Maria Grazia; Mancini, Elena

    2017-01-01

    During extracorporeal dialysis, some anticoagulation strategy is necessary to prevent the coagulation of blood. Heparin has historically been used as an anticoagulant because of its efficacy combined with low cost. However, a variable incidence of hemorrhagic complications (5-30%) has been documented in patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) with heparin as an anticoagulant. Citrate has anticoagulation properties secondary to its ability to chelate calcium, which is necessary for the coagulation cascade. Citrate may thus be used in a regional anticoagulation (RCA), limited to the extracorporeal circuit of CRRT, to avoid systemic anticoagulation. Recent meta-analysis confirmed the advantage of RCA over heparin in terms of incidence of bleeding during CRRT. Moreover, an increase in filter lifespan is documented, with a secondary advantage in reaching the prescribed dialysis dose. In our experience, we could confirm this positive effect. In fact, with a progressive increase in the proportion of CRRT with citrate as RCA, we obtained a reduction in the number of filters used for every 72 h of treatment (from 2.4 in 2011 to 1.3 in 2015), and most importantly, a reduction in the difference between the prescribed and delivered dialysis doses (from 22 to 7%). Citrate has an intense effect on the acid-base balance as well, if fully metabolized through the Krebs cycle, due to the production of bicarbonate. Even more severely ill patients, such as those with liver dysfunction, may be treated with RCA without severe complications, because modern machines for CRRT are equipped with simple systems that are able to manage the citrate infusion and control the calcium levels, with minimal risks of metabolic derangements. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Fatal pulmonary hemorrhage after taking anticoagulation medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel P. Hammar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a 64-year-old man with extensive diffuse acute lung hemorrhage, presumably as a result of anticoagulation therapy. We evaluated reports in the literature concerning acute exacerbation (acute lung injury of unknown cause in UIP and other forms of fibrotic interstitial pneumonias. We also evaluated autopsy tissue in this case in order to determine the cause of death in this 64-year-old man, who was initially thought to have an asbestos-related disease. Based on the autopsy findings, this man died as a result of anticoagulation therapy; specifically, the use of Xarelto® (rivaroxaban.

  8. Current State of Anticoagulants to Treat Deep Venous Thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    Vo, Timothy; Vazquez, Sara; Rondina, Matthew T.

    2014-01-01

    Anticoagulation remains the cornerstone of treatment in patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT). While parenteral anticoagulants and oral vitamin K antagonists (e.g. warfarin) have been used for many decades, the recent development of novel oral anticoagulants have provided clinicians with an expanding set of therapeutic options for DVT. This review summarizes the pharmacology and clinical trial results of these new oral anticoagulants. Several practical considerations to the use of these or...

  9. Potential Applications and Antifungal Activities of Engineered Nanomaterials against Gray Mold Disease Agent Botrytis cinerea on Rose Petals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Hao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles (NPs have great potential for use in the fields of biomedicine, building materials, and environmental protection because of their antibacterial properties. However, there are few reports regarding the antifungal activities of NPs on plants. In this study, we evaluated the antifungal roles of NPs against Botrytis cinerea, which is a notorious worldwide fungal pathogen. Three common carbon nanomaterials, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, fullerene, and reduced graphene oxide, and three commercial metal oxidant NPs, copper oxide (CuO NPs, ferric oxide (Fe2O3 NPs, and titanium oxides (TiO2 NPs, were independently added to water-agar plates at 50 and 200-mg/L concentrations. Detached rose petals were inoculated with spores of B. cinerea and co-cultured with each of the six nanomaterials. The sizes of the lesions on infected rose petals were measured at 72 h after inoculation, and the growth of fungi on the rose petals was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The six NPs inhibited the growth of B. cinerea, but different concentrations had different effects: 50 mg/L of fullerene and CuO NPs showed the strongest antifungal properties among the treatments, while 200 mg/L of CuO and Fe2O3 showed no significant antifungal activities. Thus, NPs may have antifungal activities that prevent B. cinerea infections in plants, and they could be used as antifungal agents during the growth and post-harvesting of roses and other flowers.

  10. Candida albicans infection of Caenorhabditis elegans induces antifungal immune defenses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Read Pukkila-Worley

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans yeast cells are found in the intestine of most humans, yet this opportunist can invade host tissues and cause life-threatening infections in susceptible individuals. To better understand the host factors that underlie susceptibility to candidiasis, we developed a new model to study antifungal innate immunity. We demonstrate that the yeast form of C. albicans establishes an intestinal infection in Caenorhabditis elegans, whereas heat-killed yeast are avirulent. Genome-wide, transcription-profiling analysis of C. elegans infected with C. albicans yeast showed that exposure to C. albicans stimulated a rapid host response involving 313 genes (124 upregulated and 189 downregulated, ~1.6% of the genome many of which encode antimicrobial, secreted or detoxification proteins. Interestingly, the host genes affected by C. albicans exposure overlapped only to a small extent with the distinct transcriptional responses to the pathogenic bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Staphylococcus aureus, indicating that there is a high degree of immune specificity toward different bacterial species and C. albicans. Furthermore, genes induced by P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were strongly over-represented among the genes downregulated during C. albicans infection, suggesting that in response to fungal pathogens, nematodes selectively repress the transcription of antibacterial immune effectors. A similar phenomenon is well known in the plant immune response, but has not been described previously in metazoans. Finally, 56% of the genes induced by live C. albicans were also upregulated by heat-killed yeast. These data suggest that a large part of the transcriptional response to C. albicans is mediated through "pattern recognition," an ancient immune surveillance mechanism able to detect conserved microbial molecules (so-called pathogen-associated molecular patterns or PAMPs. This study provides new information on the evolution and regulation of the innate

  11. The pharmacology of recombinant hirudin, a new anticoagulant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A new anticoagulant, recombinant hirudin, was given to healthy volunteers (5 per test dose) in single .intravenous doses of 0,01, 0,02, 0,04, 0,07 and 0,1 mg/kg to study its anticoagulant effects, how it was tolerated and its pharmacokinetics. Hirudin proved to be a potent anticoagulant with important effects on thrombin ...

  12. Anticoagulant Medicine: Potential for Drug-Food Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medications Anticoagulants and Drug-Food Interactions Anticoagulants and Drug-Food Interactions Make an Appointment Ask a Question Refer Patient ... Jewish Health wants you to be aware these drug-food interactions when taking anticoagulant medicine. Ask your health care ...

  13. Improving the quality of oral anticoagulant therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gadisseur, Alain Peter Anton

    2006-01-01

    Oral anticoagulant therapy has changed little since the development of the coumarin drugs after the Second World War. The basic nature of the therapy, i.e. the balancing between thrombosis and haemorrhage, makes it a therapy difficult to manage. Add to this the many influences from co-morbidity,

  14. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Guideline for Prophylactic Anticoagulation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    situation. It is hoped that this will lead to improved anticoagulation practice in this country, which we believe will directly benefit patient outcome. S Afr Med J 2004; 94: 691-695. • Certain thrombophilic states (antithrombin/protein C/ protein S deficiency, antiphospholipid syndrome). • Inflammatory bowel disease. • Pregnancy.

  15. Anticoagulant property of sulphated polysaccharides extracted from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The marine brown algae: Sargassum tenerrimum, Sargassum wightii, Turbinaria conoides, Turbinaria ornata and Padina tetrastromatica were collected from Mandapam Island, India. The crude sulphated polysaccharides (SPS) were extracted using hot water and examined for anticoagulation activity. The sugar, sulphate ...

  16. Periprocedural reversal and bridging of anticoagulant treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levi, M.; Eerenberg, E.; Kamphuisen, P.W.

    2011-01-01

    Anticoagulants are effective agents in reducing the risk of thromboembolism but the most important adverse effect of these agents is the occurrence of bleeding. Bleeding complications may occur spontaneously but the risk of bleeding is particularly increased in case of trauma or around invasive

  17. Antibacterial components of honey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwakman, Paulus H. S.; Zaat, Sebastian A. J.

    2012-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of honey has been known since the 19th century. Recently, the potent activity of honey against antibiotic-resistant bacteria has further increased the interest for application of honey, but incomplete knowledge of the antibacterial activity is a major obstacle for clinical

  18. Anticoagulation duration in heterozygous factor V Leiden: a decision analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Anna K; Smith, Kenneth J; Ragni, Margaret V

    2013-01-01

    Current anticoagulation guidelines suggest that optimal anticoagulation duration for unprovoked venous thromboembolism is determined by an individual risk assessment, balancing risks of anticoagulation bleeding with venous thromboembolism recurrence. Among individuals heterozygous for the factor V Leiden mutation, while venous thromboembolism recurrence risk is greater, the risk for bleeding is recognized to be lower, suggesting longer duration anticoagulation could be considered. The objective of this study was to compare standard vs. lifelong anticoagulation in 20-year-old factor V Leiden heterozygotes with unprovoked venous thromboembolism. A Markov state-transition model was used, incorporating risks of major, minor, and fatal anticoagulation bleeding, bleeding and thromboembolism morbidity and mortality, and quality of life utilities. Model parameter values favoring lifelong anticoagulation in factor V Leiden heterozygotes were determined in sensitivity analyses. Outcomes were in quality-adjusted life years, discounted at 3% per year. In general population groups with odds ratios for venous thromboembolism recurrence and anticoagulation bleeding of 1.0, a short-term anticoagulation strategy gained 0.09 quality-adjusted life years more than a lifelong anticoagulation strategy. By contrast, in factor V Leiden heterozygotes, lifetime anticoagulation was favored if their relative risk of venous thromboembolism was greater than 1.07 or their relative risk for bleeding was less than 0.91. Results were relatively insensitive to individual variation in other parameter values. Lifelong anticoagulation may benefit individuals heterozygous for factor V Leiden and previous idiopathic venous thromboembolism. Studies assessing bleeding risk with anticoagulation in factor V Leiden heterozygotes and the costs of indefinite anticoagulation are needed to determine if lifelong anticoagulation is the optimal strategy. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Microwave assisted one-pot catalyst free green synthesis of new methyl-7-amino-4-oxo-5-phenyl-2-thioxo-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-pyrano[2,3-d]pyrimidine-6-carboxylates as potent in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajmal R. Bhat

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available An efficiently simple protocol for the synthesis of methyl 7 amino-4-oxo-5-phenyl-2-thioxo-2, 3, 4,5-tetrahydro-1H-pyrano[2,3-d]pyrimidine-6-carboxylates via one-pot three component condensation pathway is established via microwave irradiation using varied benzaldehyde derivatives, methylcyanoacetate and thio-barbituric acid in water as a green solvent. A variety of functionalized substrates were found to react under this methodology due to its easy operability and offers several advantages like, high yields (78–94%, short reaction time (3–6 min, safety and environment friendly without used any catalyst. The synthesized compounds (4a–4k showed comparatively good in vitro antimicrobial and antifungal activities against different strains. The Compounds 4a, 4b, 4c, 4d 4e and 4f showed maximum antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus (gram-positive bacteria, Escherichia coli, Klebshiella pneumonia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (gram-negative bacteria. The synthesized compound 4f showed maximum antifungal activity against Aspergillus Niger and Penicillium chrysogenum strains. Streptomycin is used as standard for bacterial studies and Mycostatin as standards for fungal studies. Structure of all newly synthesized products was characterized on the basis of IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and mass spectral analysis.

  20. Antifungal activity of some tetranortriterpenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindachari, T R; Suresh, G; Gopalakrishnan, G; Masilamani, S; Banumathi, B

    2000-06-01

    Natural tetranortriterpenoids such as cedrelone from Toona ciliata, azadiradione from Azadirachta indica, limonin, limonol and nomilinic acid from Citrus medica, along with some cedrelone derivatives were tested for their antifungal activity against Puccinia arachidis, a groundnut rust pathogen. Results show that cedrelone was the most effective in reducing rust pustule emergence. Replacement of functional groups or modification of the A or the B ring in cedrelone reduced the effectiveness indicating the importance of specific structural features for activity.

  1. Cloning, Overexpression andin vitroAntifungal Activity ofZea MaysPR10 Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandvakili, Niloofar; Zamani, Mohammadreza; Motallebi, Mostafa; Moghaddassi Jahromi, Zahra

    2017-03-01

    Plants have various defense mechanisms such as production of antimicrobial peptides, particularly pathogenesis related proteins (PR proteins). PR10 family is an essential member of this group, with antifungal, antibacterial and antiviral activities. The goal of this study is to assess the antifungal activity of maize PR10 against some of fungal phytopathogens. Zea mays PR10 gene (TN-05-147) was cloned from genomic DNA and cDNA and overexpressed in Escherichia coli . The existence of a 77- bp intron and two exons in PR10 was confi rmed by comparing the genomic and cDNA sequences. The PR10 cDNA was cloned in pET26b (+) expression vector and transformed into E. coli strain Rosetta DE3 in order to express PR10 recombinant protein. Expression of the recombinant protein was checked by western analysis. Recombinant PR10 appeared as insoluble inclusion bodies and thus solubilized and refolded. PR10 was isolated using Ni- NTA column. The activity of the refolded protein was confi rmed by DNA degradation test. The antifungal activity of PR10 was assessed using radial diff usion, disc diff usion and spore germination. The hemolytic assay was performed to investigate the biosafety of recombinant PR10. Recombinant maize PR10 exerted broad spectrum antifungal activity against Botrytis cinerea, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Fusarium oxysporum, Verticillium dahlia and Alternaria solani . Hemolysis biosafety test indicated that the protein is not poisonous to mammalian cells. Maize PR10 has the potential to be used as the antifungal agent against diff erent fungal phytopathogens. Therefore, this protein can be used in order to produce antifungal agents and fungi resistance transgenic plants.

  2. Defensins: antifungal lessons from eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia M. Silva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the last years, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs have been the focus of intense research towards the finding of a viable alternative to current antifungal drugs. Defensins are one of the major families of AMPs and the most represented among all eukaryotic groups, providing an important first line of host defense against pathogenic microorganisms. Several of these cysteine-stabilized peptides present a relevant effect against fungi. Defensins are the AMPs with the broader distribution across all eukaryotic kingdoms, namely, Fungi, Plantæ and Animalia, and were recently shown to have an ancestor in a bacterial organism. As a part of the host defense, defensins act as an important vehicle of information between innate and adaptive immune system and have a role in immunomodulation. This multidimensionality represents a powerful host shield, hard for microorganisms to overcome using single approach resistance strategies. Pathogenic fungi resistance to conventional antimycotic drugs is becoming a major problem. Defensins, as other AMPs, have shown to be an effective alternative to the current antimycotic therapies, demonstrating potential as novel therapeutic agents or drug leads. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on some eukaryotic defensins with antifungal action. An overview of the main targets in the fungal cell and the mechanism of action of these AMPs (namely, the selectivity for some fungal membrane components are presented. Additionally, recent works on antifungal defensins structure, activity and citotoxicity are also reviewed.

  3. The place of new oral anticoagulants in travel medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringwald, Juergen; Grauer, Martin; Eckstein, Reinhold; Jelinek, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    New oral anticoagulants are increasingly used instead of vitamin K antagonists or low molecular weight heparins. Hence, more individuals treated with new oral anticoagulants will seek travel medicine advice. Travel medicine experts should therefore become familiar with new oral anticoagulants and with their impact and role in travel medicine. This review summarizes pharmacological characteristics and approved indications of dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban, and highlights their relevance for travellers on permanent oral anticoagulation and for the prophylaxis of travellers' thrombosis. Compared to vitamin K antagonists, the new oral anticoagulants have many advantages: they do not have interactions with food, they have lower potential for drug-drug interactions and do not require regularly performed laboratory tests. The oral administration, obviating the need to carry needles and syringes during travel may give the new oral anticoagulants a further advantage over low molecular weight heparins. Clinical experience with the new oral anticoagulants, however, is still rather limited and there is concern regarding the clinical management of patients treated with new oral anticoagulants who suffer from severe bleeding or who need urgent invasive procedures. Overall, it remains an individual decision based on a risk/benefit analysis as to whether or not patients on long-term treatment with vitamin K antagonists should be switched to new oral anticoagulants for intended travel. Further caution is also indicated so that the availability of orally administered new anticoagulants should not lead to undifferentiated and unjustified prescription of anticoagulants for the prophylaxis of traveller's thrombosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Antifungal potential of marine natural products

    OpenAIRE

    El-Hossary, Ebaa M.; Cheng, Cheng; Hamed, Mostafa M.; El-Sayed Hamed, Ashraf Nageeb; Ohlsen, Knut; Hentschel, Ute; Abdelmohsen, Usama Ramadan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Fungal infections represent an increasing threat to human health. • Fungal infections in plants are a worldwide problem to the agricultural industry. • Diverse antifungal compounds were isolated from different marine organisms. • The number of new antifungal marine natural products is rapidly developing. • Marine sponges and bacteria are the predominant sources for antifungal compounds. Abstract: Fungal diseases represent an increasing threat to human healt...

  5. Synthesis of novel ferrocenyl Mannich bases and their antibacterial activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuting; Xin, Hong; Yin, Jingyi; Yin, Dawei; Yang, Zijiang; Li, Jie

    2018-04-01

    In this work, a series of Mannich bases bearing ferrocenyl groups were synthesized via Mannich reactions. The effects of different conditions on the reaction were explored, and the newly synthesized compounds were well characterized by NMR and FT-IR. All compounds have been screened for in vitro antibacterial and antifungal, and the compounds 1-ferrocenyl-3-phenyl-3-(m-nitrophenylamino)-1-acetone (2f) and 1-ferrocenyl-3-phenyl-3-(p-nitrophenylamino)-1-acetone (2g) were shown to be significant activity against all the tested bacterial strains, such as Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus, Actinomycete, Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  6. Screening of Endophytic Fungi from Chlorophyta and Phaeophyta for Antibacterial Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaweman, A. C.; Pamungkas, J.; Madduppa, H.; Thoms, C.; Tarman, K.

    2016-01-01

    Chlorophyta and Phaeophyta macroalgae are important sources of secondary metabolites with pharmaceutically relevant antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral bioactivities. Oftentimes, these algae-derived compounds are, in fact, produced by endophytic fungi living inside the macroalgal tissue. Numerous studies have shown that endophytic fungi can produce a broad range of active metabolites such as terpenes, alkaloids, and quinones. The aim of the present study was to screen fungal strains isolated from a variety of Caulerpa spp., Halimeda spp., and Sargassum spp. for antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Thirteen morphologically different isolates were tested. Two of them showed pronounced activity against S. aureus in agar diffusion assays.

  7. Monitoring Oral Anticoagulant Therapy: Measuring Coagulant Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Attermann, Jorn

    daily anticoagulant therapy. The therapy necessitates close monitoring of coagulant activity, since excess doses of anticoagulant medicine may lead to life-threatening bleedings. Traditionally, patients on OAT are required to pay regular visits to a physician, who decides on drug dosage adjustments....... There is general agreement that the quality of the therapy is too low, and often unexpected fluctuations in the coagulant activity are seen. Recently, OAT based on patient self-management has become a realistic alternative by the availability of small portable whole blood coagulometers. An important part...... of the new concept is the training and continuous support and monitoring of the patients, and a center with these purposes has been established at Skejby Sygehus. The main instrument for monitoring the coagulant activity is the prothrombin time (PT). This is the time until clotting can be observed...

  8. Anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A S; Idorn, L; Nørager, B

    2015-01-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease are a growing population. One of the major challenges in the care of these patients is to prevent thromboembolic episodes. Despite relative young age and no typical cardiovascular risk factors, this cohort has a high prevalence of thrombotic events....... Furthermore, there is a lack of scientific evidence regarding how to prevent thromboembolic events with anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature pertaining to anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease and hence enable....... It is difficult to use treatment algorithms from the general adult population with acquired heart disease in this heterogeneous population due to special conditions such as myocardial scarring after previous surgery, atypical atrial flutter, prothrombotic conditions and the presence of interatrial shunts...

  9. Frontiers of anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Takeshi

    2011-07-01

    In the management of atrial fibrillation (AF), stroke prevention has been proved to play a pivotal role in addition to therapy for concomitant diseases. And, hitherto, anticoagulation by warfarin has been the only effective choice that is known to decrease the stroke rate with ∼70% risk reduction. Although the evidence has been rigid, there are many barriers not to make warfarin therapy pervasive. However, the principle of "KISS (keep it short and simple)" seems to alter our situations. Changing the complex pharmacology with warfarin into the simple pharmacology with new anticoagulants would lead us to a new paradigm, where the old book is now rewritten by a new language. Copyright © 2011 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Antifungal stewardship in a tertiary hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Antonio; Pérez-Velilla, Claudia; Asensio, Angel; Ruiz-Antorán, Belén; Folguera, Carlos; Cantero, Mireia; Orden, Beatriz; Muñez, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The inappropriate use of antifungals is an important health problem related to increasing adverse effects, unnecessary cost and promotion of resistant and emerging fungal infections. Despite its relevance, many health institutions assign few resources to improve prescribing practices. To evaluate the efficiency of an antifungal stewardship programme (ASP) centered on restricted antifungal agents. The main activity during the eight-month study was to perform a programmed review of restricted antifungals (lipid formulations of amphotericin B, echinocandins and voriconazole) prescribed in hospitalized patients. In the case of amendable antifungal treatment, a recommendation was included in the electronic medical record. A total of 280 antifungal prescriptions for 262 patients were revised during the study period. The indications were prophylactic in 85 cases (30.4%), pre-emptive in 10 cases (3.5%), empiric in 122 cases (43.6%), and directed in 63 cases (22.5%). A total of 70 prescriptions (25%) in 61 patients were considered to be amendable. In most of these cases, treatment could have been reduced considering the patient's clinical improvement and microbiological results. The most common advice was antifungals change (70%), antifungal withdrawal (21%), removal of one antifungal drug in cases of combined therapy (7%), and switching to oral route (1%). Proposed recommendations were addressed in 28 cases (40%). There was no significant difference in adherence with respect to the type of recommendation (p=0.554). There was a 42% lower use of antifungals during the period of the study compared to that observed during a similar previous period. Mortality among patients who were treated according to the recommendations of the ASP was 17% and in whom treatment was not modified it was 30% (p=0.393). ASPs centered on hospitalized patients may be an efficient strategy to ameliorate antifungal use in hospitals. Copyright © 2014 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by

  11. Anticoagulation in acute ischemic stroke: A systematic search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayara L. Froio

    Full Text Available Summary Introduction: Stroke is one of the most important diseases worldwide. Several clinical scenarios demand full dose of anticoagulants primary to stroke etiology or to the treatment of comorbidity. However, controversy exists over many issues regarding anticoagulation treatment in stroke such as time for initiation, efficacy according to stroke etiology, the ideal dose of anticoagulants, and whether novel anticoagulants should be used. Method: Computerized search for clinical trials and randomized controlled clinical trials was done to the present date at Medline, Scielo, Embase, PsychInfo, and Cochrane Library using MeSH terms and the keywords stroke, ischemic stroke, anticoagulation, anticoagulants, heparin, low-molecular-weight heparin, warfarin, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban. The PRISMA statement was used to evaluate clinical trials. Results: Fourteen clinical trials were selected based on inclusion criteria. No evidence was found supporting the early use of heparin, heparinoids or low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH early after stroke. No consistent evidence for the use of warfarin and the newer oral anticoagulants were found. Argatroban was the only anticoagulant with significant positive results early after large-artery ischemic stroke. Conclusion: The ideal time for initiating anticoagulation remains undefined, requiring further investigation. Early anticoagulation for ischemic stroke is not recommended, with few exceptions, such as that of argatroban.

  12. New oral anticoagulants--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanima, Waleed; Atar, Dan; Sandset, Per Morten

    2013-10-01

    Dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban are three new oral anticoagulants that have recently been approved in Norway. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the mechanisms of action, the most important indications and practical advice on the use of these drugs. The review is based on published phase 3 studies, a literature search in PubMed and the authors' clinical experience. Indications for use of the new anticoagulants include thromboprophylaxis after total hip and knee replacement surgery (all three), prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (all three), treatment of acute venous thrombosis and secondary prophylaxis after venous thrombosis (currently only rivaroxaban). For the aforementioned indications, these drugs have proven to be non-inferior to standard established anticoagulation therapy. For atrial fibrillation, all three drugs have also shown a lower incidence of intracranial bleeding compared with standard treatment. It is important to limit the use of these drugs to approved indications, to select patients who show good compliance, to rule out contraindications and to identify drug interactions. Monitoring of coagulation is not required, but patients should be followed up regularly to detect conditions that may lead to changes in the expected efficacy or safety.

  13. Antiplatelet and Anticoagulant Drugs in Interventional Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altenburg, Alexander; Haage, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    In treating peripheral arterial disease, a profound knowledge of antiplatelet and anticoagulative drug therapy is helpful to assure a positive clinical outcome and to anticipate and avoid complications. Side effects and drug interactions may have fatal consequences for the patient, so interventionalists should be aware of these risks and able to control them. Aspirin remains the first-line agent for antiplatelet monotherapy, with clopidogrel added where dual antiplatelet therapy is required. In case of suspected antiplatelet drug resistance, the dose of clopidogrel may be doubled; prasugrel or ticagrelor may be used alternatively. Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors (abciximab or eptifibatide) may help in cases of hypercoagulability or acute embolic complications. Desmopressin, tranexamic acid, or platelet infusions may be used to decrease antiplatelet drug effects in case of bleeding. Intraprocedurally, anticoagulant therapy treatment with unfractionated heparin (UFH) still is the means of choice, although low molecular-weight heparins (LMWH) are suitable, particularly for postinterventional treatment. Adaption of LMWH dose is often required in renal insufficiency, which is frequently found in elderly patients. Protamine sulphate is an effective antagonist for UFH; however, this effect is less for LMWH. Newer antithrombotic drugs, such as direct thrombin inhibitors or factor X inhibitors, have limited importance in periprocedural treatment, with the exception of treating patients with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). Nevertheless, knowing pharmacologic properties of the newer drugs facilitate correct bridging of patients treated with such drugs. This article provides a comprehensive overview of antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs for use before, during, and after interventional radiological procedures.

  14. SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION AND ANTIBACTERIAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    E-mail: a-ahmadi@kiau.ac.ir; ahmadikiau@yahoo.com. SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION AND ANTIBACTERIAL EVALUATION OF. SOME NOVEL DERIVATIVES OF 2-BROMOMETHYL-BENZIMIDAZOLE. Abbas Ahmadi*. Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Pharmaceutical Sciences Branch, Islamic Azad University,.

  15. Hydrogen peroxide-dependent antibacterial action of Melilotus albus honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowa, P; Grabek-Lejko, D; Wesołowska, M; Swacha, S; Dżugan, M

    2017-07-01

    Honey originating from different floral sources exhibits the broad spectrum of antibacterial activity as a result of the presence of hydrogen peroxide as well as nonperoxide bioactive compounds. The mechanisms of antibacterial activity of Polish melilot honey were investigated for the first time. Polish melilot honey samples (Melilotus albus biennial = 3 and annual = 5, Melilotus officinalis = 1) were collected directly from beekeepers and analysed for pollen profile, basic physicochemical parameters, antioxidant capacity, radical scavenging activity, total phenolic contents as well as antibacterial properties against pathogenic bacteria Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella spp. The physicochemical properties of melilot honey were specific for light-coloured unifloral honey samples and were not dependent on its botanical and geographical origin (P > 0·05). All tested honey samples exhibited inhibitory activity (above 90%) against Gram-positive bacteria at the concentration of 12·5-25%. Above 30-50% of antibacterial activity of melilot honey was connected with glucose oxidase enzyme action and was destroyed in the presence of catalase. Hydrogen peroxide-dependent antibacterial activity of honey was inversely correlated with its radical scavenging activity (r = -0·67) and phenolic compounds (r = -0·61). Antibacterial action of melilot honey depends not only on hydrogen peroxide produced by glucose oxidase, but also on other nonperoxide bioactive components of honey. Melilot honey is used in traditional medicine as an anticoagulant agent due to the possibility of the presence of the coumarin compounds which are specific for Melilotus plant. Melilotus albus is rarely used to produce honey, and antibacterial properties of this variety of honey had not been studied yet. Nine samples of melilot honey produced in different regions of Poland were analysed according to their antibacterial activity which was correlated

  16. Antimicrobial and Antifungal Effects of Acid and Water-Soluble Chitosan Extracted from Indian Shrimp (Fenneropenaeus indicus Shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Taheri

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective : Currently, efforts are underway to seek new and effective antimicrobial agents, and marine resources are potent candidates for this aim. The following study was conducted to investigate the efficacy of water-soluble and acid-soluble chitosan against some pathogenic organisms.   Materials & Method s: Inhibition zone of different concentrations (5, 7.5, and 10 mg/ml of acid- soluble and water-soluble chitosan were examined for in vitro antibacterial activity against 4 kinds of hospital bacteria and penicillium sp. Results were compared with 4 standard antibiotics: streptomycin, gentamicin, tetracycline, and erythromycin. Furthermore, minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum lethal concentration were determined.   Results: Inhibition activity of acid-soluble chitosan (10% showed the best result (p value < 0.05, whereas water-soluble chitosan exhibited the least antibacterial effects (p value < 0.05. Chitosan demonstrated maximum effect on V. cholera cerotype ogava , and the least effect was seen on E. coli (p value < 0.05. Acid-soluble chitosan had a more potent effect than the standard antibiotics. Also, acid-soluble chitosan (10% and water-soluble chitosan showed maximum inhibitory effects on penicillium sp.   Conclusion: Chitosan showed maximum antibacterial effect against S. aureus, V. cholerae cerotype ogava, and water-soluble chitosan demonstrated good antifungal effects, revealing a statistically significant difference with common antibacterial and antifungal medicines.

  17. INVESTIGATION OF ANTIFUNGAL ACTIVITY OF QUINOLINIUM DERIVATIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Alexandrova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Antifungal activity (Candida albicans, Candida krusei of some substituted quinolinium derivatives has been investigated. It was established that the most perspective compound for detail investigation of antifungal activity by labeled biomarkers method was N-phenylbenzoquinaldinium tetrafluoroborate.

  18. Natural and synthetic peptides with antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciociola, Tecla; Giovati, Laura; Conti, Stefania; Magliani, Walter; Santinoli, Claudia; Polonelli, Luciano

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, the increase of invasive fungal infections and the emergence of antifungal resistance stressed the need for new antifungal drugs. Peptides have shown to be good candidates for the development of alternative antimicrobial agents through high-throughput screening, and subsequent optimization according to a rational approach. This review presents a brief overview on antifungal natural peptides of different sources (animals, plants, micro-organisms), peptide fragments derived by proteolytic cleavage of precursor physiological proteins (cryptides), synthetic unnatural peptides and peptide derivatives. Antifungal peptides are schematically reported based on their structure, antifungal spectrum and reported effects. Natural or synthetic peptides and their modified derivatives may represent the basis for new compounds active against fungal infections.

  19. Laboratory Assessment of the Anticoagulant Activity of Direct Oral Anticoagulants: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelson, Bethany T; Cuker, Adam; Siegal, Deborah M; Crowther, Mark; Garcia, David A

    2017-01-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are the treatment of choice for most patients with atrial fibrillation and/or noncancer-associated venous thromboembolic disease. Although routine monitoring of these agents is not required, assessment of anticoagulant effect may be desirable in special situations. The objective of this review was to summarize systematically evidence regarding laboratory assessment of the anticoagulant effects of dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban. PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science were searched for studies reporting relationships between drug levels and coagulation assay results. We identified 109 eligible studies: 35 for dabigatran, 50 for rivaroxaban, 11 for apixaban, and 13 for edoxaban. The performance of standard anticoagulation tests varied across DOACs and reagents; most assays, showed insufficient correlation to provide a reliable assessment of DOAC effects. Dilute thrombin time (TT) assays demonstrated linear correlation (r 2  = 0.67-0.99) across a range of expected concentrations of dabigatran, as did ecarin-based assays. Calibrated anti-Xa assays demonstrated linear correlation (r 2  = 0.78-1.00) across a wide range of concentrations for rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban. An ideal test, offering both accuracy and precision for measurement of any DOAC is not widely available. We recommend a dilute TT or ecarin-based assay for assessment of the anticoagulant effect of dabigatran and anti-Xa assays with drug-specific calibrators for direct Xa inhibitors. In the absence of these tests, TT or APTT is recommended over PT/INR for assessment of dabigatran, and PT/INR is recommended over APTT for detection of factor Xa inhibitors. Time since last dose, the presence or absence of drug interactions, and renal and hepatic function should impact clinical estimates of anticoagulant effect in a patient for whom laboratory test results are not available. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier

  20. Cinnamon from the selection of traditional applications to its novel effects on the inhibition of angiogenesis in cancer cells and prevention of Alzheimer's disease, and a series of functions such as antioxidant, anticholesterol, antidiabetes, antibacterial, antifungal, nematicidal, acaracidal, and repellent activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafie Hamidpour

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to use search engines such as PubMed and Scifinder to locate scholarly articles and reports pertaining to Cinnamon (肉桂 ròu guì, its novel effects, preparation, analysis, and use in the prevention and treatment of serious illnesses, such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, Alzheimer’s disease, and cancer. Cinnamon has been used traditionally in food preparations and as an herbal medicine to treat a variety of ailments and their symptoms. Cinnamon is known to have antioxidant, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and other therapeutic properties. New studies reaffirm the importance of cinnamon as a spice but also suggest that it may be a natural remedy to treat serious diseases such as type 2 diabetes, chronic digestion problems, cardiovascular diseases, and even cancer and Alzheimer’s disease. This article presents a comprehensive analysis of the botanical, chemical, and pharmacological aspects of cinnamon.

  1. Cinnamon from the selection of traditional applications to its novel effects on the inhibition of angiogenesis in cancer cells and prevention of Alzheimer's disease, and a series of functions such as antioxidant, anticholesterol, antidiabetes, antibacterial, antifungal, nematicidal, acaracidal, and repellent activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidpour, Rafie; Hamidpour, Mohsen; Hamidpour, Soheila; Shahlari, Mina

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to use search engines such as PubMed and Scifinder to locate scholarly articles and reports pertaining to Cinnamon ( ròu guì), its novel effects, preparation, analysis, and use in the prevention and treatment of serious illnesses, such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, Alzheimer's disease, and cancer. Cinnamon has been used traditionally in food preparations and as an herbal medicine to treat a variety of ailments and their symptoms. Cinnamon is known to have antioxidant, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and other therapeutic properties. New studies reaffirm the importance of cinnamon as a spice but also suggest that it may be a natural remedy to treat serious diseases such as type 2 diabetes, chronic digestion problems, cardiovascular diseases, and even cancer and Alzheimer's disease. This article presents a comprehensive analysis of the botanical, chemical, and pharmacological aspects of cinnamon.

  2. Use of anticoagulants in elderly patients: practical recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helia Robert-Ebadi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Helia Robert-Ebadi, Grégoire Le Gal, Marc RighiniDivision of Angiology and Hemostasis (HRE, MR, Department of Internal Medicine, Geneva University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland, and Department of Internal Medicine and Chest Diseases, EA 3878 (GETBO, Brest University Hospital, Brest, France (GLGAbstract: Elderly people represent a patient population at high thromboembolic risk, but also at high hemorrhagic risk. There is a general tendency among physicians to underuse anticoagulants in the elderly, probably both because of underestimation of thromboembolic risk and overestimation of bleeding risk. The main indications for anticoagulation are venous thromboembolism (VTE prophylaxis in medical and surgical settings, VTE treatment, atrial fibrillation (AF and valvular heart disease. Available anticoagulants for VTE prophylaxis and initial treatment of VTE are low molecular weight heparins (LMWH, unfractionated heparin (UFH or synthetic anti-factor Xa pentasaccharide fondaparinux. For long-term anticoagulation vitamin K antagonists (VKA are the first choice and only available oral anticoagulants nowadays. Assessing the benefit-risk ratio of anticoagulation is one of the most challenging issues in the individual elderly patient, patients at highest hemorrhagic risk often being those who would have the greatest benefit from anticoagulants. Some specific considerations are of utmost importance when using anticoagulants in the elderly to maximize safety of these treatments, including decreased renal function, co-morbidities and risk of falls, altered pharmacodynamics of anticoagulants especially VKAs, association with antiplatelet agents, patient education. Newer anticoagulants that are currently under study could simplify the management and increase the safety of anticoagulation in the future.Keywords: anticoagulation, elderly patients, venous thromboembolism, hemorrhagic risk, atrial fibrillation, thrombin inhibitors, factor Xa

  3. Citrate anticoagulation in the ICU: the Leeds experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumper, Charlotte

    2016-09-08

    Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is widely used in the management of critically ill patients with acute kidney injury. It requires effective anticoagulation of the extracorporeal blood circuit. Although heparin is the most commonly prescribed anticoagulant, there are issues associated with heparin, and there has been increasing interest in regional citrate anticoagulation as an alternative. In 2013, The Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust switched from heparin to citrate anticoagulant for CRRT in intensive care units (ICUs) across the Trust. This article examines the reasons for the switch, the implementation of citrate and the impact of this quality-improvement project in terms of patient outcome data and feedback from the ICU nursing team.

  4. The mythology of anticoagulation therapy interruption for dental surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Michael J

    2018-01-01

    Continuous anticoagulation therapy is used to prevent heart attacks, strokes, and other embolic complications. When patients receiving anticoagulation therapy undergo dental surgery, a decision must be made about whether to continue anticoagulation therapy and risk bleeding complications or briefly interrupt anticoagulation therapy and increase the risk of developing embolic complications. Results from decades of studies of thousands of dental patients receiving anticoagulation therapy reveal that bleeding complications requiring more than local measures for hemostasis have been rare and never fatal. However, embolic complications (some of which were fatal and others possibly permanently debilitating) sometimes have occurred in patients whose anticoagulation therapy was interrupted for dental procedures. Although there is now virtually universal consensus among national medical and dental groups and other experts that anticoagulation therapy should not be interrupted for most dental surgery, there are still some arguments made supporting anticoagulation therapy interruption. An analysis of these arguments shows them to be based on a collection of myths and half-truths rather than on logical scientific conclusions. The time has come to stop anticoagulation therapy interruption for dental procedures. Copyright © 2018 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Synergistic activity of antifungal drugs and lipopeptide AC7 against Candida albicans biofilm on silicone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Ceresa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of Candida albicans device-associated infections is tightly correlated to the ability of this fungus to form biofilms. The presence of this three-dimensional structure protects cells from host defenses, and significantly increases their resistance to antifungal agents. Lipopeptide biosurfactants are microbial products with interesting antibacterial, antifungal and anti-adhesive properties. Aim of the present study was to investigate a possible synergistic effect of lipopeptide AC7BS in combination with amphotericin B or fluconazole against C. albicans planktonic cells, biofilm formation and 24 h-old biofilms on medical-grade silicone elastomer disks, in simulated physiological conditions. In co-incubation experiments, AC7BS alone was not effective. However, the combination of AC7BS with the antifungal compounds resulted in a synergistic increase in the efficacy of the drugs against planktonic cells and biofilm, leading to a reduction of MICs and SMICs50. In pre-coating conditions, amphotericin B alone and AC7BS alone significantly inhibited C. albicans biofilms. When the two molecules were tested in association, a synergistic effect was observed on different phases of biofilm formation and a lower SMIC50 was detected. The observed synergism could be related to the combination of the AC7BS anti-adhesive activity and the AMB antifungal effect, but also to the ability of the biosurfactant to affect membranes, thus facilitating AMB entry in the cells. These results suggest that AC7BS can be considered a potential inhibitor of C. albicans biofilm on medical insertional materials and its use as coating agent may potentiate the effect of antifungal compounds such as AMB, when applied in combination.

  6. PHARMACOGENETIC ASPECTS OF NEW ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Kryukov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review is to assess the effect of genetic factors on the pharmacokinetic parameters of new oral anticoagulants. The review presents data from studies investigating the effect of gene polymorphisms that encode biotransformation enzymes and transporter proteins of new oral anticoagulants on the pharmacokinetics of these drugs. RE-LY study showed a 15% decrease in trough dabigatran concentration and 27% lower risk of bleeding in carriers of CES1 gene rs2244613 polymorphism, there was also a tendency to reduce the risk of major bleeding. Further study of CES1 gene rs8192935 polymorphism showed a 3% decrease in trough dabigatran concentration in heterozygotes and 11% in homozygotes. There was found a 2% and 3% decrease in trough concentrations in hetero- and homozygotes for the minor allele of CES1 gene rs2244613 polymorphism, respectively. There was no significant effect of ABCB1 gene rs2032582 and rs1045642 polymorphisms on dabigatran pharmacokinetics. It is known the case of gastrointestinal bleeding in the carrier of allelic variants of ABCB1 gene rs2032582 and rs1045642 polymorphisms. However, there was no significant effect of genotype on rivaroxaban pharmacokinetics in the study involving the carriers of ABCB1 gene rs2032582 and rs1045642 polymorphisms. ABCB1 gene rs4148738 polymorphism was associated with higher apixaban peak concentration. But groups of patients with acute cardioembolic stroke showed no statistically significant difference of apixaban peak concentration depending on ABCB1 gene rs1045642 polymorphism genotype. ABCB1 gene rs1045642 and SLCO1B1 gene rs4149056 polymorphisms have no effect on edoxaban pharmacokinetics. Elevation of edoxaban metabolite concentration in carriers of SLCO1B1 gene allelic variants was not clinically significant because the proportion of metabolite is about 10% of the concentration of the main substance. It is necessary to provide large population studies with control of treatment

  7. The Role of Anticoagulation Clinics in the Era of New Oral Anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Testa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anticoagulation Clinics (ACs are services specialized in management of patients on anticoagulant treatment. At present, ACs manage patients chiefly on antivitamin K antagonists (AVKs, but patient population has already changed in the last few years, because of an increase of treatments with other anticoagulant drugs, which require different management systems. The strong increase in the number of patients at AC, mainly on long-term treatment, has determined the development of web management, through telemedicine systems, improving the quality of life and maintaining the same clinical quality levels. New oral anticoagulants (NOAs have shown to be as effective as AVK antagonists in stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and for treatment of venous thromboembolism in addition to VTE prophylaxis in orthopaedic surgery, when administered at a fixed dose, but patient adherence and compliance are crucial for good quality treatment. At present, lacking data from the real world, an oversimplification of treatment with NOAs could cause unjustified risks for patients and also a possible future underuse of good drugs. For these reasons the vigilance must be high and ACs can have a crucial role in defining which is the best management for NOA patients and how to do it, as it happened for AVKs.

  8. MONITORING OF ANTICOAGULATION IN APROTININ-TREATED PATIENTS DURING HEART OPERATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TABUCHI, N; NJO, TL; TIGCHELAAR, [No Value; HUYZEN, RJ; BOONSTRA, PW; VANOEVEREN, W

    Since aprotinin has become extensively used during cardiopulmonary bypass the maintenance of safe anticoagulation is a concern. Aprotinin affects anticoagulation measurement by the activated clotting time. Therefore, a reliable new measurement is needed to monitor anticoagulation during

  9. The Elements of Antifungal Drug Discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjellerup, Lasse

    compounds (ZACs). Zinc is an important micronutrient and the immune system is known to operate with a similar mechanism to the ZACs by scavenging zinc from the site of infection, thus preventing the growth of pathogens through zinc starvation. In addition to the observations made about the ZAC compounds......In this PhD thesis I will explore the development of antifungal drugs. Fungal infections are estimated to cause the death of 1.5 million patients each year. There is currently a need for new antifungal drugs as the existing drugs are hampered by lack of broad-spectrum antifungal activity...

  10. Antifungal isopimaranes from Hypoestes serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasoamiaranjanahary, L; Guilet, D; Marston, A; Randimbivololona, F; Hostettmann, K

    2003-09-01

    Five isopimarane diterpenes (7beta-hydroxyisopimara-8,15-dien-14-one, 14alpha-hydroxyisopimara-7,15-dien-1-one, 1beta,14alpha-dihydroxyisopimara-7,15-diene, 7beta-hydroxyisopimara-8(14),15-dien-1-one and 7beta-acetoxyisopimara-8(14),15-dien-1-one) have been isolated from the leaves of Hypoestes serpens (Acanthaceae). All compounds exhibited antifungal activity against both the plant pathogenic fungus Cladosporium cucumerinum and the yeast Candida albicans; two of them also displayed an acetylcholinesterase inhibition. The structures of the compounds were determined by means of spectrometric methods, including 1D and 2D NMR experiments and MS analysis.

  11. Antibacterial Structural Color Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuoyue; Mo, Min; Fu, Fanfan; Shang, Luoran; Wang, Huan; Liu, Cihui; Zhao, Yuanjin

    2017-11-08

    Structural color hydrogels with lasting survivability are important for many applications, but they still lack anti-biodegradation capability. Thus, we herein present novel antibacterial structural color hydrogels by simply integrating silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in situ into the hydrogel materials. Because the integrated AgNPs possessed wide and excellent antibacterial abilities, the structural color hydrogels could prevent bacterial adhesion, avoid hydrogel damage, and maintain their vivid structural colors during their application and storage. It was demonstrated that the AgNP-tagged poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) structural color hydrogels could retain their original thermal-responsive color transition even when the AgNP-free hydrogels were degraded by bacteria and that the AgNP-integrated self-healing structural color protein hydrogels could save their self-repairing property instead of being degraded by bacteria. These features indicated that the antibacterial structural color hydrogels could be amenable to a variety of practical biomedical applications.

  12. Vitamin K requirement in Danish anticoagulant-resistant Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Mette D.; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Nielsen, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Norway rats, Rattus norvegicus, Denmark, anticoagulant rodenticide resistance, vitamin K requirement......Norway rats, Rattus norvegicus, Denmark, anticoagulant rodenticide resistance, vitamin K requirement...

  13. The pharmacology of recombinant hirudin, a new anticoagulant

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-09-01

    Sep 1, 1990 ... The pharmacology of recombinant hirudin, a new anticoagulant. B. H. MEYER, H. G. LUUS, F. O. MULLER, P. N. BADENHORST, H.-J. ROTHIG. Summary. A new anticoagulant, recombinant hirudin, was given to hea"hy volunteers (5 per test dose) in single .intravenous doses of 0,01, 0,02, 0,04, 0,07 and 0 ...

  14. MRI screening for chronic anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark eFisher

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Anticoagulation is highly effective in preventing stroke due to atrial fibrillation, but numerous studies have demonstrated low utilization of anticoagulation for these patients. Assessment of clinicians’ attitudes on this topic indicate that fear of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH, rather than appreciation of anticoagulant benefits, largely drives clinical decision-making for treatment with anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation. Risk stratification strategies have been used for anticoagulation benefits and hemorrhage risk, but ICH is not specifically addressed in the commonly used hemorrhage risk stratification systems. Cerebral microbleeds are cerebral microscopic hemorrhages demonstrable by brain MRI, indicative of prior microhemorrhages, and predictive of future risk of ICH. Prevalence of cerebral microbleeds increases with age; and cross-sectional and limited prospective studies generally indicate that microbleeds confer substantial risk of ICH in patients treated with chronic anticoagulation. MRI thus is a readily available and appealing modality that can directly assess risk of future ICH in patients receiving anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation. Incorporation of MRI into routine practice is, however, fraught with difficulties, including the uncertain relationship between number and location of microbleeds and ICH risk, as well as cost-effectiveness of MRI. A proposed algorithm is provided, and relevant advantages and disadvantages are discussed. At present, MRI screening appears most appropriate for a subset of atrial fibrillation patients, such as those with intermediate stroke risk, and may provide reassurance for clinicians whose concerns for ICH tend to outweigh benefits of anticoagulation.

  15. Utilization of oral anticoagulation in a teaching hospital in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mean age of the patients was 53.4 years and more females than males were on anticoagulation and monitoring (F14:M12). The most common indications for anticoagulation include deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolism, congestive heart failure with atrial fibrillation and mitral valve disease with atrial fibrillation.

  16. Atrial Fibrillation in Embolic Stroke: Anticoagulant Therapy at UNTH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The decision to commence anticoagulation in a patient with embolic stroke and atrial fibrillation (AF) is often a difficult one for many clinicians. The result can have significant impact on the patient. This study was therefore undertaken to review the use of anticoagulation in embolic stroke in the setting of atrial ...

  17. [Therapeutic equivalence of the new oral anticoagulants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Villar, A; Nacle López, I; Barbero Hernández, M J; Lizan Tudela, L

    2015-10-01

    In an attempt to minimize the economic impact due to the incorporation of innovative drugs, health authorities have promoted and supported the evaluation and market positioning of drugs, as equivalent therapeutic alternatives. This issue has recently gained importance, possibly due to the current economic crisis. The equivalent therapeutic alternatives are justified by the need to compete on price, and by the authorities recommendation to establish therapeutic equivalence, price and financing of medicinal products at the same time. The establishment of the new oral anticoagulants and the equivalent therapeutic alternatives is a problematic issue if it is based on the absence of direct comparisons between different drugs and the questionable methodology used in the current indirect comparisons. Currently, it is difficult to determine when a new oral anticoagulant is more recommendable than others, but efforts are being made in order to propose alternatives for the decision based on patient characteristics. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Production, optimization, characterization and antifungal activity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-04-02

    Apr 2, 2014 ... the present study, the antifungal activity of crude A. terrus chitinase was investigated against Apergillus niger, Aspergillus oryzae .... Chitinase activity was determined spectrophotometrically by estimating the amount of ..... characterization of two. Bifunctional chitinases lysozyme extracellularly produced by.

  19. Anticoagulant rodenticide poisoning in animals of Apulia and Basilicata, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscarella, Marilena; Armentano, Antonio; Iammarino, Marco; Palermo, Carmen; Amorena, Michele

    2016-06-30

    This study evaluates the presence of anticoagulant rodenticides in animals with a diagnosis of suspected poisoning and in bait samples. The survey was carried out from 2010 to 2012, in 2 regions of South Italy (Puglia and Basilicata) on 300 organs of animals and 90 suspected bait samples. The qualitative and quantitative analyses were conducted using an analytical method based on high‑performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorimetric detection (FLD) for the simultaneous determination of 8 anticoagulant rodenticides (bromadiolone, brodifacoum, coumachlor, coumafuryl, coumatetralyl, difenacoum, flocoumafen, and warfarin). The presence of anticoagulant rodenticides was detected in 33 organs of animals (11% of the total) and 6 bait samples (7% of the total). The most commonly detected compound was coumachlor (47% of 39 positive samples) followed by bromadiolone (24%), and brodifacoum (11%). The species mostly involved in anticoagulant rodenticide poisoning were dogs and cats. This study emphasizes the relevance of the determinations of anticoagulant rodenticides in cases of suspected poisoning in veterinary practice.

  20. Effects of computer-assisted oral anticoagulant therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard; Corell, Pernille; Madsen, Poul

    2012-01-01

    : Patients randomized to computer-assisted anticoagulation and the CoaguChek® system reached the therapeutic target range after 8 days compared to 14 days by prescriptions from physicians (p = 0.04). Time spent in the therapeutic target range did not differ between groups. The median INR value measured...... prescribed by physicians, and the total time spent within the therapeutic target range was similar. Thus computer-assisted oral anticoagulant therapy may reduce the cost of anticoagulation therapy without lowering the quality. INR values measured by CoaguChek® were reliable compared to measurements......UNLABELLED: BACKGROUND: Computer-assistance and self-monitoring lower the cost and may improve the quality of anticoagulation therapy. The main purpose of this clinical investigation was to use computer-assisted oral anticoagulant therapy to improve the time to reach and the time spent within...

  1. Acupuncture safety in patients receiving anticoagulants: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcculloch, Michael; Nachat, Arian; Schwartz, Jonathan; Casella-Gordon, Vicki; Cook, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Theoretically, acupuncture in anticoagulated patients could increase bleeding risk. However, precise estimates of bleeding complication rates from acupuncture in anticoagulated patients have not been systematically examined. To critically evaluate evidence for safety of acupuncture in anticoagulated patients. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, the Physiotherapy Evidence Database, and Google Scholar. Of 39 potentially relevant citations, 11 met inclusion criteria: 2 randomized trials, 4 case series, and 5 case reports. Seven provided reporting quality sufficient to assess acupuncture safety in 384 anticoagulated patients (3974 treatments). Minor-moderate bleeding related to acupuncture in an anticoagulated patient occurred in one case: a large hip hematoma, managed with vitamin K reversal and warfarin discontinuation following reevaluation of its medical justification. Blood-spot bleeding, typical for any needling/injection and controlled with pressure/cotton, occurred in 51 (14.6%) of 350 treatments among a case series of 229 patients. Bleeding deemed unrelated to acupuncture during anticoagulation, and more likely resulting from inappropriately deep needling damaging tissue or from complex anticoagulation regimens, occurred in 5 patients. No bleeding was reported in 2 studies (74 anticoagulated patients): 1 case report and 1 randomized trial prospectively monitoring acupuncture-associated bleeding as an explicit end point. Altogether, 1 moderate bleeding event occurred in 3974 treatments (0.003%). Acupuncture appears to be safe in anticoagulated patients, assuming appropriate needling location and depth. The observed 0.003% complication rate is lower than the previously reported 12.3% following hip/knee replacement in a randomized trial of 27,360 anticoagulated patients, and 6% following acupuncture in a prospective study of 229,230 all-type patients. Prospective trials would help confirm our findings.

  2. Herbal Antibacterials: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirag Modi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Plants are rich source of antibacterial agents because they produce wide array of bioactive molecules, most of which probably evolved as chemical defense against predation or infection. A major part of the total population in developing countries still uses traditional folk medicine obtained from plant resources With an estimation of WHO that as many as 80% of world population living in rural areas rely on herbal traditional medicines as their primary health care, the study on properties and uses of medicinal plants are getting growing interests. In recent years this interest to evaluate plants possessing antibacterial activity for various diseases is growing. Different solvent extracts (aqueous, alcohol and ethanol of leaves, flower and seed of various plants selected based on an ethnobotanical survey from India were subjected to in vitro antibacterial activity assay against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria employing different diffusion method. Based on local use of common diseases and Ethnobotanical knowledge, an attempt has been made to assess the antibacterial properties of selected medicinal plants viz. Argemone mexicana (Shialkanta, Aster lanceolatus (White panicle, Capparis thonningii and Capparis tomentosa (Woolly caper bush, Cardiospermum halicacabum (Balloonvine, Cassia alata (Herpetic alata, Centaurea sclerolepis, Cinnamomum zeylanicum (Cinnamon, Curcuma longa (Turmeric, Cymbopogon nervatus, Ficus religiosa (Peepal, Indigofera aspalathoides (Ajara, Marrubium vulgare (Horehound, Medicago Spp.(Medick, Burclover, Morus alba (Mulberry, Ocimum sanctum (Tulsi, Origanum marjorana (Marjoram, Oxalis corniculata (Amli, Piper nigrum (Kala mirch, Plectranthus amboinicus (Indian borage, Patharchur, Plumeria acutifolia (Kachuchi, Salvadora persica (Piludi, Salvia repens and Syzygium aromaticum (Clove for potential antibacterial activity against some important bacterial strains, namely Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus

  3. Review on Synthetic Chemistry and Antibacterial Importance of Thiazole Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Ankita; Adhikari, Nayana; Das, Arpita; Shakya, Anshul; Ghosh, Surajit Kumar; Singh, Udaya Pratap; Bhat, Hans Raj

    2017-09-11

    The heterocyclic compounds include a vast subject in chemistry and thiazole is one of the leading heterocyclic compounds which have a five-member ring with the molecular formula C3H3NS containing sulphur and nitrogen atoms, occupies an important place in pharmaceutical chemistry. Many natural and synthetic medicinally important compounds contain thiazole as essential moieties with a broad range of therapeutic activities. Diverse modifications of the thiazole ring at various positions led to a variety of novel compounds with a wide spectrum of pharmacological activities such as antibacterial, antioxidant, diuretic, antifungal, antitubercular, anti-inflammatory, anticonvulsant, anti-HIV, antidiabetic, antihypertensive, anti-Alzheimer and anticancer activities. Research has been carried out with an aim to discover the therapeutic values of thiazole moiety and a number of these compounds became famous in the antibacterial market due to their therapeutic efficacy which has great pharmaceutical importance. The present review describes chemistry and the antibacterial importance of thiazole moieties and its derivatives with different synthetic procedures. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Facile Syntheses and Molecular-Docking of Novel Substituted 3,4-Dimethyl-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxamide/carbohydrazide Analogues with Antimicrobial and Antifungal Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra D. Bhosale

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the use of facile one-pot, high-yielding reactions to synthesize substituted 3,4-dimethyl-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxamides 3a–m and carbohydrazide analogues 5a–l as potential antifungal and antimicrobial agents. The structural identity and purity of the synthesized compounds were assigned based on appropriate spectroscopic techniques. Synthesized compounds were assessed in vitro for antifungal and antibacterial activity. The compounds 5h, 5i and 5j were found to be the most potent against Aspergillus fumigatus, with MIC values of 0.039 mg/mL. The compound 5f bearing a 2, 6-dichloro group on the phenyl ring was found to be the most active broad spectrum antibacterial agent with a MIC value of 0.039 mg/mL. The mode of action of the most promising antifungal compounds (one representative from each series; 3j and 5h was established by their molecular docking with the active site of sterol 14α-demethylase. Molecular docking studies revealed a highly spontaneous binding ability of the tested compounds in the access channel away from catalytic heme iron of the enzyme, which suggested that the tested compounds inhibit this enzyme and would avoid heme iron-related deleterious side effects observed with many existing antifungal compounds.

  5. New oral anticoagulants: key messages for clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Giorgi-Pierfranceschi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available New oral anticoagulants are an effective and safe alternative to vitamin K antagonists in many fields of clinical practice. The use of the direct inhibitors of activated Factor II (dabigatran and activated Factor X (apixaban and rivaroxaban, both in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF and those with acute venous thromboembolism (VTE, is of great interest for internal medicine physicians. This paper aims to give practical guidance on management (starting therapy, follow up and bleeding complications of patients treated with dabigatran, rivaroxaban or apixaban for NVAF or acute VTE providing practical tables concerning the phases of therapy, management of complications, drug interaction and dose adjustment if renal impairment occurs.

  6. Initiation of anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundlund, A.; Staerk, L.; Fosbøl, E. L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The use of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) for stroke prophylaxis in atrial fibrillation (AF) is increasing rapidly. We compared characteristics of AF patients initiated on NOACs versus vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). Methods: Using Danish nationwide registry data, we...... identified AF patients initiating either a VKA or a NOAC from 22 August 2011 until 30 September 2016. We compared patient characteristics including age, gender, comorbidities, concomitant pharmacotherapy and CHA2DS2-VASc and HAS-BLED scores in patients initiated on a VKA, dabigatran, rivaroxaban or apixaban....... Differences were examined using multivariable logistic regression models. Results: The study population comprised 51 981 AF patients of whom 19 989 (38.5%) were initiated on a VKA, 13 242 (25.5%) on dabigatran, 8475 (16.3%) on rivaroxaban and 10 275 (19.8%) on apixaban. Those patients initiated on apixaban...

  7. Radiation-induced enhancement of antifungal activity of chitosan on fruit-spoiling fungi during postharvest storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diep, Tran Bang; Lam, Nguyen Duy; Quynh, Tran Minh; Kume, Tamikazu

    2001-01-01

    Experiment conducted four fruit-spoiling fungal strains that were isolated from spoilt fruits (mango and dragon fruit) and were identified as follows: Fusarium dimerum Penzig, Aspergillus nidulans Wint, Aspergillus fumigatus Fresenius and Aspergillus japonicus Saito. Chitosan samples with various deacetylation degree (70-99%) were irradiated at doses ranging from 20 to 200kGy, then were supplemented to liquid medium for growth of fungi. We have found that chitosan possesses not only well known antibacterial activity but also the antifungal one on fruit-spoiling fungi. Method of fungal cultivation using liquid medium showed that it has higher sensitivity compared with the cultivation on agar plate, so we recommend this method should be used for evaluation of antimicrobial activity of chitosan. Our study also indicated that deacetylation degree of chitosan clearly affects its antifungal activity, the higher the deacetylation of chitosan, stronger antifungal activity can be observed. This finding recommends the use of chitosan with higher deacetylation for fruit coating and other pharmacology utilization. Results from the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) on fungal growth showed that radiation treatment increased antifungal activity of chitosan and dose of 60kGy gave highest activity. (author)

  8. Radiation-induced enhancement of antifungal activity of chitosan on fruit-spoiling fungi during postharvest storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diep, Tran Bang; Lam, Nguyen Duy; Quynh, Tran Minh [Institute for Nuclear Science and Technique-VAEC, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Kume, Tamikazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    Experiment conducted four fruit-spoiling fungal strains that were isolated from spoilt fruits (mango and dragon fruit) and were identified as follows: Fusarium dimerum Penzig, Aspergillus nidulans Wint, Aspergillus fumigatus Fresenius and Aspergillus japonicus Saito. Chitosan samples with various deacetylation degree (70-99%) were irradiated at doses ranging from 20 to 200kGy, then were supplemented to liquid medium for growth of fungi. We have found that chitosan possesses not only well known antibacterial activity but also the antifungal one on fruit-spoiling fungi. Method of fungal cultivation using liquid medium showed that it has higher sensitivity compared with the cultivation on agar plate, so we recommend this method should be used for evaluation of antimicrobial activity of chitosan. Our study also indicated that deacetylation degree of chitosan clearly affects its antifungal activity, the higher the deacetylation of chitosan, stronger antifungal activity can be observed. This finding recommends the use of chitosan with higher deacetylation for fruit coating and other pharmacology utilization. Results from the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) on fungal growth showed that radiation treatment increased antifungal activity of chitosan and dose of 60kGy gave highest activity. (author)

  9. Antifungal and antioxidant activity of Crassocephalum bauchiense (Hutch.) Milne-Redh ethyl acetate extract and fractions (Asteraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouokeu, Raymond Simplice; Ngane, Rosalie A Ngono; Njateng, Guy S S; Kamtchueng, Monique O; Kuiate, Jules-Roger

    2014-04-17

    Crassocephalum bauchiense is a flowering plant, found in the West Region of Cameroon. Previous studied has highlighted the antibacterial and the dermal toxicological safety as well as the immunomodulatory activities of the ethyl acetate extract of its dry leaves. As an extension of the previous researches, the current work has been undertaken to evaluate the in vitro antifungal and antioxidant activities of C. bauchiense dried leaves ethyl acetate extract and fractions. The extract was obtained by maceration in ethyl acetate and further fractionated into six fractions labeled F1 to F6 by flash chromatography. The antifungal activity of the extract and fractions against yeasts and dermatophytes was evaluated using broth microdilution method. Antioxidant activity was evaluated using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), nitric oxide (NO) and β-carotene - linoleic acid assays. The extract (MIC = 0.125 - 4 mg/ml) was found to be more active on dermatophytes and yeasts compared to the fractions. The ethyl acetate extract and fractions exhibited strong scavenging activity on DPPH (CI50 = 28.57 - 389.38 μg/ml). The fractions F3 and F6 expressed best antioxidant activity on DPPH radicals compared to the crude extract. The results of these findings clearly showed that C. bauchiense ethyl acetate extract has a significant antifungal and antioxidant activity. It is therefore a source of active compounds that might be used as antifungal and antioxidant agents.

  10. Hemorrhagic stroke and oral anticoagulants: What is to be done?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Domashenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic stroke (HS is associated with high mortality and disability rates. Due to the introduction of the current guidelines for the prevention of systemic thromboembolic events in patients with atrial fibrillations and to an increase in the number of older patients, there has been a rise in the incidence of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH associated with the use of oral anticoagulants. The paper discusses medical treatment in patients with HS during therapy with vitamin K antagonists (warfarin and novel oral anticoagulants (dabigatran. rivaroxaban, apixaban, as well as an anticoagulant resumption policy after prior ICH in patients at high risk for thromboembolic events.

  11. Antibacterial Applications of Nanodiamonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Szunerits

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infectious diseases, sharing clinical characteristics such as chronic inflammation and tissue damage, pose a major threat to human health. The steady increase of multidrug-resistant bacteria infections adds up to the current problems modern healthcare is facing. The treatment of bacterial infections with multi-resistant germs is very difficult, as the development of new antimicrobial drugs is hardly catching up with the development of antibiotic resistant pathogens. These and other considerations have generated an increased interest in the development of viable alternatives to antibiotics. A promising strategy is the use of nanomaterials with antibacterial character and of nanostructures displaying anti-adhesive activity against biofilms. Glycan-modified nanodiamonds (NDs revealed themselves to be of great promise as useful nanostructures for combating microbial infections. This review summarizes the current efforts in the synthesis of glycan-modified ND particles and evaluation of their antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities.

  12. Antibacterial Applications of Nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szunerits, Sabine; Barras, Alexandre; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2016-04-12

    Bacterial infectious diseases, sharing clinical characteristics such as chronic inflammation and tissue damage, pose a major threat to human health. The steady increase of multidrug-resistant bacteria infections adds up to the current problems modern healthcare is facing. The treatment of bacterial infections with multi-resistant germs is very difficult, as the development of new antimicrobial drugs is hardly catching up with the development of antibiotic resistant pathogens. These and other considerations have generated an increased interest in the development of viable alternatives to antibiotics. A promising strategy is the use of nanomaterials with antibacterial character and of nanostructures displaying anti-adhesive activity against biofilms. Glycan-modified nanodiamonds (NDs) revealed themselves to be of great promise as useful nanostructures for combating microbial infections. This review summarizes the current efforts in the synthesis of glycan-modified ND particles and evaluation of their antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities.

  13. The behavior of active bactericidal and antifungal coating under visible light irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Gang; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhao, Yan; Su, Haijia, E-mail: suhj@mail.buct.edu.cn; Tan, Tianwei

    2014-02-15

    In the present paper, the novel active bactericidal and antifungal coatings (ABAC) have been prepared through the immobilization of Fe-doped TiO{sub 2} (anatase) with chitosan. The characterization of ABAC using optical microscope imaging, SEM, AFM and FTIR shows that the Fe doped TiO{sub 2} is embedded into the chitosan coating with favorable dispersion through the hydrogen bonds interaction between chitosan molecules and TiO{sub 2}. The contact angle measurement demonstrated the hydrophilicity of ABAC (θ = 34.5 ± 4.1°). The bactericidal activity of ABAC has been evaluated by inactivating three different test strains: Escherichia coli, Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger which illustrates the apparently higher bactericidal ability than chitosan, Fe-TiO{sub 2} and chitosan/TiO{sub 2} (pure) under visible light irradiation and its bactericidal activity is lasting for at least 24 h. ABAC showed rapid and efficient antibacterial ability for the three tested strains and its antibacterial ratio in 2 h for E. coli, C. albicans and A. niger was 99.9%, 97.0% and 95.0%, respectively. The prepared chitosan/TiO{sub 2} composite emulsion shows favorable storage stability and can be stored up to 1 year without losing its bactericidal activity. ABAC is a low-cost and eco-friendly antibacterial coating products and promising for domestic, medical and industrial applications.

  14. Antibacterial properties of nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Hajipour Mohammad J.; Fromm Katharina M.; Ashkarran Ali A.; de Aberasturi Dorleta J.; de Larramendi Idoia R.; Rojo Teofilo; Serpooshan Vahid; Parak Wolfgang J.; Mahmoudi Morteza

    2012-01-01

    Antibacterial agents are very important in the textile industry, water disinfection, medicine, and food packaging. Organic compounds used for disinfection have some disadvantages, including toxicity to the human body, therefore, the interest in inorganic disinfectants such as metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) is increasing. This review focuses on the properties and applications of inorganic nanostructured materials and their surface modifications, with good antimicrobial activity. Such improved...

  15. How to manage new oral anticoagulants in case of surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Imberti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available When a patient receiving new oral anticoagulants (NOACs requires an invasive procedure, the consequences of bleeding if anticoagulation is continued and the risk of thrombosis if it is omitted need to be carefully considered. In addition to the bleeding risk of the procedure, it is of paramount importance to evaluate the renal function, especially for dabigatran that is eliminated predominantly via the renal pathway. NOAC therapy should be stopped for at least 24 h before the intervention, and a longer interruption should be considered in cases of high bleeding risk procedures and/or renal failure. A base-line assessment of coagulation should be performed and intervention should be postponed (if possible if high levels of anticoagulation parameters are found. In the post-surgical period, if oral anticoagulant therapy cannot be re-started, patients should temporarily receive low molecular weight heparins and re-start NOACs as soon as possible.

  16. Do we have to anticoagulated patients with cerebral venous thrombosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feher, G; Illes, Z; Hargroves, D

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare form of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Although anticoagulation is recommended for the initial and long term treatment with regards to thrombotic risks for patients with CVT, the role of anticogalution has not been fully elucidated. The aim...... of our literature based review was collect articles showing the benefit of anticoagulation in CVT and gathering the data of follow-up studies focusing on the recurrence of CVT and other thrombotic events. RESULTS: We have identified 15 follow-up studies studies with 2422 patients . The mean duration...... of follow up was 37,9 months. Death occured in 6,5% and 76,4 % of the patients had favourable outcome. 85,5 % received initial anticoagulation with ultrafractionated or low molecular weight heparin and 82,1 % received long-term anticoagulation. Recurent CVT occured in 3,7% and other thrombotic event occured...

  17. [Management of new oral anticoagulants in gastrointestinal bleeding and endoscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Molino, Fátima; Gonzalez, Isabel; Saperas, Esteve

    2015-10-01

    New oral direct anticoagulants agents are alternatives to warfarin for long-term anticoagulation in a growing number of patients that require long-term anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation, deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. These new agents with predictable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics profiles offer a favorable global safety profile, but increased gastrointestinal bleeding compared to the vitamin K antagonists. Many gastroenterologists are unfamiliar and may be wary of these newer drugs, since Clinical experience is limited and no specific antidote is available to reverse their anticoagulant effect. In this article the risk of these new agents and, how to manage these agents in both the presence of acute gastrointestinal bleeding and in patients undergoing endoscopic procedures is reviewed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  18. Generic switching of warfarin and risk of excessive anticoagulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellfritzsch, Maja; Rathe, Jette; Stage, Tore Bjerregaard

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Generic switching of warfarin was recently repealed in Denmark, as adverse drug reaction (ADR) reports suggested risk of excessive anticoagulation following switches from branded to generic warfarin. We investigated this putative association in a formalized pharmacoepidemiological analys...

  19. Utilization of Oral Anticoagulation in a Teaching Hospital in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    : Anticoagulation, Barriers, Nigeria, .... Cardiovascular disease (thromboembolic stroke). 2/26 (7.7). Heart valve replacement. 2/26 (7.7) ... accounts for approximately 2% of the reported hemorrhagic complications of warfarin therapy and is ...

  20. Nepenthes rafflesiana pitcher liquid has antifungal activity against Candida spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Hanna Yolanda; Ingrid M. Makahinda; Maureen Aprilia; Nikki Sanjaya; Harry Gunawan; Rita Dewi

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND To develop new effective antifungals, it is essential to search for antifungal compounds from plants such as Nepenthes spp., which have their greatest diversity in Indonesia. Since chitin-induced liquid (CIL) from Nepenthes khasiana pitchers has antifungal activity, due to their naphthoquinone content, this study aimed to evaluate antifungal activity of Nepenthes rafflesiana pitcher liquids on Candida spp. METHODS Collected pitcher liquids were of 3 types: non-induced l...

  1. Extractions without eliminating anticoagulant treatment : a literature review.

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Cabrera, Manuel Alejandro; Barona Dorado, Cristina; Leco Berrocal, María Isabel; Gómez Moreno, Gerardo; Martínez González, José María

    2011-01-01

    To establish whether there is a high enough risk of bleeding in patients who take oral anticoagulants, such that it would justify not using oral anticoagulants when performing a dental extraction, as well as if the reason for and anatomical location of the extraction increases such risk. Study We performed a bibliographic search in order to carry out a meta-analytic study using descriptive statistics. We compiled a sample of 1194 patients from the articles selected. Of these patients, a total...

  2. [Risk and benefit of oral anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotova, I V; Zateĭshchikov, D A

    2011-01-01

    Thromboembolism is the main cause of death and disability of patients with atrial fibrillation. Indirect anticoagulants are effective means of primary and secondary prevention of thromboembolic complications. However in a number of patients risk associated with therapy with indirect anticoagulants might exceed potential benefit. The principle problem requiring solution in a patient with atrial fibrillation is individual comparative assessment of risk of development of thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications. Modern stratification scales which allow solving this problem are considered in this review.

  3. Lupus Anticoagulant and Anticardiolipin Antibodies in Unexplained Fetal Losses

    OpenAIRE

    ALPER, Gülinnaz

    2014-01-01

    Lupus anticoagulant (LA) and anti-cardiolipin antibodies (ACAs) are acquired antiphospholipid antibodies (APAs), which are considered to be important markers for pregnancy losses and intrauterine fetal demise. LA and ACAs have anticoagulant effects in vitro and thrombotic effects in vivo and are considered to be the cause of recur-rent pregnancy losses (RPLs), resulting from placental vascular thrombosis and infarction. The aim of this study was to identify the most sensitive and specific met...

  4. Antibacterial effect of clove (Eugenia aromaticum oil extracted from clove cigarettes towards Streptococcus mutans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Alif Wazir bin Jumali

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus mutans is a commensal bacteria of the oral cavity, particularly found in dental plaque attached to the tooth surface, and can also found in the saliva, buccal mucosa, tongue, and the gingival sulcus. Clove cigarette contains the clove oil used worldwide as a herbal remedy for a variety of health disorders due to its antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral properties. The purpose of this study was to determined the antibacterial effect of the clove oil contained in the clove cigarette towards Streptococcus mutans as a cariogenic bacteria. The research was an experimental laboratory, which tested the sensitivity of the Streptococcus mutans bacteria taken from the saliva of 10 clove cigarette smokers towards the clove oil extract of the clove cigarette in-vitro by using the Kirby-Bauer method. The study showed that the clove oil extract of the clove cigarette which contained eugenol has antibacterial towards the growth of Streptococcus mutans, and there was a difference of the antibacterial activity between clove oil extracted from minced and combusted clove cigarette. The conclusion of this study was the clove oil extracted from minced clove cigarette had a better antibacterial effect than the combusted clove cigarette.

  5. Adherence to a new oral anticoagulant treatment prescription: dabigatran etexilate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Bellamy

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available L Bellamy1, N Rosencher1, BI Eriksson21Anaesthesiology Department, Hôpital Cochin (AP-HP, René Descartes University, Paris 75014 France; 2Orthopaedic Department, University Hospital Sahlgrenska/Ostra, Gothenburg, SwedenAbstract: The recent development of new oral anticoagulants, of which dabigatran etexilate is currently at the most advanced stage of development, is the greatest advance in the provision of convenient anticoagulation therapy for many years. A new oral anticoagulation treatment, dabigatran etexilate, is already on the market in Europe. The main interest probably will be to improve the prescription and the adherence to an effective thromboprophylaxis in medical conditions such as atrial fibrillation without bleeding side effects, without the need for monitoring coagulation, and without drug and food interactions such as vitamin K anticoagulant (VKA treatment. Dabigatran is particularly interesting for extended thromboprophylaxis after major orthopedic surgery in order to avoid daily injection for a month. However, oral long-term treatments such as VKA are not systematically associated with a higher compliance level than injected treatments such as low-molecular-weight heparins. Indeed, adherence to an oral treatment, instead of the usual daily injection in major orthopedic surgery, is complex, and based not only on the frequency of dosing but also on patient motivation, understanding, and socio-economic status. New oral anticoagulants may be useful in this way but education and detection of risk factors of nonadherence to treatment are still essential.Keywords: oral anticoagulant, adherence, compliance, education, dabigatran

  6. [Progress of anticoagulation therapy in atrial fibrillation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Olmedo, Miguel; Suárez Fernández, Carmen

    2015-08-07

    Atrial fibrillation is currently a very prevalent disease and it represents one of the most common causes of disabling stroke. Antithrombotic therapies have reduced the incidence of this complication although they pose many limitations and difficulties. As a result, a large number of high risk patients do not receive an appropriate treatment. In recent years, four new oral anticoagulants (NOAC) with relevant advantages in comparison to vitaminK antagonists have been released. Four large phaseiii clinical trials have demonstrated that NOAC are at least as safe and efficacious as warfarin in stroke prevention in non-valve atrial fibrillation patients with moderate-high thrombotic risk, being their main advantage the reduction in intracranial hemorrhage. The arrival of these drugs has caused great expectations in the management of these patients but also new doubts. Lacking data in some subgroups of frail patients, the absence of specific antidotes available and specially their high cost represent nowadays the main limitations for their generalization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Novel oral anticoagulants in acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costopoulos, Charis; Niespialowska-Steuden, Maria; Kukreja, Neville; Gorog, Diana A

    2013-09-10

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide with a prevalence that has now reached pandemic levels as a consequence of the rapid modernization of the developing world. Its presentation as an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a frequent reason for hospital admission and of profound implications for personal, societal and global health. Despite improvements in the management of ACS with anti-platelet and anticoagulant therapy and revascularization techniques, many patients continue to suffer recurrent ischemic events. The need to reduce future cardiovascular events has led to the development of novel therapies to prevent coronary thrombosis, targeting thrombin-mediated pathways. These include direct Xa inhibitors (apixaban, rivaroxaban and darexaban), direct thrombin inhibitors (dabigatran) and PAR 1 antagonists (vorapaxar and atopaxar). This article critically reviews the comparative mechanisms of action, the risks and benefits, together with the clinical evidence base for the use of these novel oral agents in the management of ACS patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Liquid and vapour-phase antifungal activities of essential oils against Candida albicans and non-albicans Candida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandras, Narcisa; Nostro, Antonia; Roana, Janira; Scalas, Daniela; Banche, Giuliana; Ghisetti, Valeria; Del Re, Simonetta; Fucale, Giacomo; Cuffini, Anna Maria; Tullio, Vivian

    2016-08-30

    The management of Candida infections faces many problems, such as a limited number of antifungal drugs, toxicity, resistance of Candida to commonly antifungal drugs, relapse of Candida infections, and the high cost of antifungal drugs. Though azole antifungal agents and derivatives continue to dominate as drugs of choice against Candida infections, there are many available data referring to the anticandidal activity of essential oils. Since we have previous observed a good antimicrobial activity of some essential oils against filamentous fungi, the aim of this study was to extend the research to evaluate the activity of the same oils on Candida albicans, C.glabrata and C.tropicalis clinical strains, as well as the effects of related components. Essential oils selection was based both on ethnomedicinal use and on proved antibacterial and/or antifungal activity of some of these oils. Fluconazole and voriconazole were used as reference drugs. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC) of essential oils (thyme red, fennel, clove, pine, sage, lemon balm, and lavender) and their major components were investigated by the broth microdilution method (BM) and the vapour contact assay (VC). Using BM, pine oil showed the best activity against all strains tested, though C.albicans was more susceptible than C.glabrata and C.tropicalis (MIC50-MIC90 = 0.06 %, v/v). On the contrary, sage oil displayed a weak activity (MIC50-MIC90 = 1 %, v/v). Thyme red oil (MIC50-MIC90 ≤ 0.0038 %, v/v for C.albicans and C.tropicalis, and 0.0078- Candida spp., including fluconazole/voriconazole resistant strains. These data encourage adequately controlled and randomized clinical investigations. The use in vapour phase could have additional advantages without requiring direct contact, resulting in easy of environmental application such as in hospital, and/or in school.

  9. Carbon Nanomaterials as Antibacterial Colloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Maas

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanomaterials like graphene, carbon nanotubes, fullerenes and the various forms of diamond have attracted great attention for their vast potential regarding applications in electrical engineering and as biomaterials. The study of the antibacterial properties of carbon nanomaterials provides fundamental information on the possible toxicity and environmental impact of these materials. Furthermore, as a result of the increasing prevalence of resistant bacteria strains, the development of novel antibacterial materials is of great importance. This article reviews current research efforts on characterizing the antibacterial activity of carbon nanomaterials from the perspective of colloid and interface science. Building on these fundamental findings, recent functionalization strategies for enhancing the antibacterial effect of carbon nanomaterials are described. The review concludes with a comprehensive outlook that summarizes the most important discoveries and trends regarding antibacterial carbon nanomaterials.

  10. Synthetic multivalent antifungal peptides effective against fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajamani Lakshminarayanan

    Full Text Available Taking advantage of the cluster effect observed in multivalent peptides, this work describes antifungal activity and possible mechanism of action of tetravalent peptide (B4010 which carries 4 copies of the sequence RGRKVVRR through a branched lysine core. B4010 displayed better antifungal properties than natamycin and amphotericin B. The peptide retained significant activity in the presence of monovalent/divalent cations, trypsin and serum and tear fluid. Moreover, B4010 is non-haemolytic and non-toxic to mice by intraperitoneal (200 mg/kg or intravenous (100 mg/kg routes. S. cerevisiae mutant strains with altered membrane sterol structures and composition showed hyper senstivity to B4010. The peptide had no affinity for cell wall polysaccharides and caused rapid dissipation of membrane potential and release of vital ions and ATP when treated with C. albicans. We demonstrate that additives which alter the membrane potential or membrane rigidity protect C. albicans from B4010-induced lethality. Calcein release assay and molecular dynamics simulations showed that the peptide preferentially binds to mixed bilayer containing ergosterol over phophotidylcholine-cholesterol bilayers. The studies further suggested that the first arginine is important for mediating peptide-bilayer interactions. Replacing the first arginine led to a 2-4 fold decrease in antifungal activities and reduced membrane disruption properties. The combined in silico and in vitro approach should facilitate rational design of new tetravalent antifungal peptides.

  11. Prevalence and Antifungal Susceptibility of Candida Species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Candidal vulvovaginitis causes extreme discomfort and affects the well being of women. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Candida infections among women attending gynaecological clinic at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH) in Kumasi and the antifungal susceptibility patterns of the ...

  12. Interactions between antifungal and antiretroviral agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Christine A; Foisy, Michelle; Tseng, Alice

    2010-09-01

    Since the advent of combination antiretroviral therapy, the incidence of opportunistic infections has declined and the life expectancy of HIV-infected people has significantly increased. However, opportunistic infections, including fungal diseases, remain a leading cause of hospitalizations and mortality in HIV-infected people. With the availability of several new antiretroviral and antifungal agents, drug-drug interactions emerge as a potential safety concern. Relevant literature was identified using a Medline search of articles published up to March 2010 and a review of conference abstracts. Search terms included HIV, antifungal agents and drug interactions. Original papers and relevant citations were considered for this review. Readers will gain an understanding of the pharmacokinetic properties of antiretroviral and antifungal agents, and insight into significant drug-drug interactions which may require dosage adjustments or a change in therapy. Azole antifungal drugs, with the exception of fluconazole, pose the greatest risk of two-way interactions with antiretroviral drugs through CYP450 enzymes effects. Limited studies suggest the risk of interactions between antiretroviral drugs and echinocandins is much lower. The combination of tenofovir and amphotericin B should be used with caution and close monitoring of renal function is required.

  13. Antifungal diterpenes from Hypoestes serpens (Acanthaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasoamiaranjanahary, Lalao; Marston, Andrew; Guilet, David; Schenk, Kurt; Randimbivololona, Fanantenanirainy; Hostettmann, Kurt

    2003-02-01

    Two new diterpenes, fusicoserpenol A and dolabeserpenoic acid A, with antifungal activity, were isolated from leaves of Hypoestes serpens (Acanthaceae). Their structures were elucidated by means of spectrometric methods including 1D and 2D NMR experiments and MS analysis. X-ray crystallographic analysis confirmed the structure of fusicoserpenol A and established the relative configuration.

  14. Species identification and antifungal susceptibility pattern of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dalia Saad ElFeky

    2015-10-23

    Oct 23, 2015 ... Abstract Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) remains one of the most common infections of the female genital tract. Correct identification of the isolated Candida species is essential to direct the empirical antifungal therapy. Objectives: This local study was conducted to identify the spectrum of Candida species ...

  15. Antimycotoxigenic and antifungal activities of Citrullus colocynthis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2013-10-23

    Oct 23, 2013 ... 2Laboratory of Technology and Animal Production, University of Abdelhamid Ibn Badis, Mostaganem (27000), Algeria. 3Laboratory of ... results suggest that the extracts showed a very good antifungal activity against A. ochraceus, but for A. ..... activity of essential oil and its constituents from Calocedrus.

  16. Antifungal potentials of Azardirachta indica and Ocimum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antifungal potentials of Azardirachta indica and Ocimum grattissimum leaf extracts in the control of yam rot. ... Fusarium oxysporium, Botryodiplodia theobromae, Rhizopus stolonifer, Penicilluim notatum and Aspergillus niger were isolated from the rotted yams. Both fresh and dry extracts of the leaves had significant effects ...

  17. Species identification and antifungal susceptibility pattern of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Species identification of Candida isolates was done using phenotypic methods including germ tube test, Rice Tween-80 agar, Chrom ID (CAN2) agar and API 20C AUX, while PCR-RFLP was used as the gold standard method. Antifungal susceptibility testing was done using the disk diffusion method. Results: Vaginal swab ...

  18. Antifungal evaluation and phytochemical screening of methanolic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of the study was to further examine the medicinal value of Boswellia dalzielii plant by evaluating the antifungal activity and carrying out phytochemical screening of methanolic extract, hexane, ethyl acetate, aqueous fractions and the sub-fractions of the stem bark of the plant. Standard methods were used for ...

  19. Idarucizumab for Reversing Dabigatran-Induced Anticoagulation: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Nathan; Morrill, Amanda M; Willett, Kristine C

    2016-05-12

    The approval of the oral direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran etexilate, gave patients an alternative to oral anticoagulation with warfarin. Like all anticoagulants, the primary adverse event (AE) associated with dabigatran is bleeding. Until the FDA approval of idarucizumab, there had been no reversal agent for dabigatran-induced anticoagulation in patients with life-threatening or uncontrollable bleeding, or those requiring emergent procedures. The primary purpose of this review is to summarize the safety and efficacy of idarucizumab, a monoclonal antibody fragment, and its use as a reversal agent for dabigatran. A literature search was conducted through MEDLINE (1946 to November week 1 2015) and Embase (1980-2015 week 46) using the search term idarucizumab. Clinicaltrials.gov was consulted for a comprehensive list of ongoing and completed studies. Additional studies were identified through bibliographical citations. Clinical trials in animals and humans published in English evaluating the safety and efficacy of idarucizumab for reversal of anticoagulant treatment with dabigatran were included for review. Idarucizumab has been shown to significantly reverse the anticoagulant effects of dabigatran in both healthy volunteers and patients requiring a reversal agent because of either overt bleeding or an emergency surgery or invasive procedure. The most common AEs were headache, nasopharyngitis, back pain, skin irritation, hypokalemia, delirium, constipation, pyrexia, and pneumonia. Deaths reported in idarucizumab studies were attributed to either the index event or a preexisting comorbidity. Most adverse effects were minor, but 21 serious AEs have been reported in the published data including thrombotic events. Given the increased use of direct oral anticoagulants, such as dabigatran, a need for specific reversal agents exists. Idarucizumab has been shown to be safe and effective in the reversal of dabigatran-induced anticoagulation in patients requiring emergent

  20. Anticoagulant rodenticides and wildlife: Concluding remarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brink, Nico W.; Elliott, John E.; Shore, Richard F.; Rattner, Barnett A.

    2018-01-01

    Rodents are known to affect human society globally in various adverse ways, resulting in a widespread demand for their continuous control. Anticoagulant rodenticides (ARs) have been, and currently remain, the cornerstone of rodent control throughout the world. Although alternative control methods exist, they are generally less effective. ARs work by affecting vitamin K metabolism, thereby preventing the activation of blood clotting factors and eventual coagulopathy. Since ARs are non-selective, their undoubted benefits for rodent control have to be balanced against the environmental risks that these compounds pose. Although they have been used for decades, pharmacokinetic and toxicokinetic data are mainly available for laboratory mammals and have concentrated on acute effects. Limited information is available on chronic exposure scenarios and for wildlife species. Important gaps exist in our understanding of the large inter- and intra-species differences in sensitivity to ARs, especially for non-target species, and in our knowledge about the occurrence and importance of sub-lethal effects in wildlife. It is clear that mere presence of AR residues in the body tissues may not indicate the occurrence of effects, although unequivocal assessment of effects under field conditions is difficult. Ante-mortem symptoms, like lethargy, subdued behaviour and unresponsiveness are generally not very specific as is true for more generic post-mortem observations (e.g. pallor of the mucous membranes or occurrence of haemorrhages). It is only by combining ante or post-mortem data with information on exposure that effects in the field may be confirmed. We do know however that a wide variety of non-target species are directly exposed to ARs. Secondary exposure in predators is also widespread although there is limited information on whether this exposure causes actual effects. Exposure is driven by ecological factors and is context specific with respect to spatial habitat configuration

  1. Antifungal effect of kefir fermented milk and shelf life improvement of corn arepas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamba, Raúl Ricardo; Caro, Carlos Andrés; Martínez, Olga Lucía; Moretti, Ana Florencia; Giannuzzi, Leda; De Antoni, Graciela Liliana; León Peláez, Angela

    2016-10-17

    Fungal contamination negatively affects the production of cereal foods such as arepa loaf, an ancient corn bread consumed daily in several countries of Latin-America. Chemical preservatives such as potassium sorbate are applied in order to improve the arepa's shelf life and to reduce the health risks. The use of natural preservatives such as natural fermented products in food commodities is a common demand among the consumers. Kefir is a milk fermented beverage obtained by fermentation of kefir grains. Its antibacterial and probiotic activity has been exhaustively demonstrated. Our objectives were to determine the antifungal effect of kefir fermented milk on Aspergillus flavus AFUNL5 in vitro and to study if the addition of kefir fermented milk to arepas could produce shelf life improvement. We determined the antifungal effect on solid medium of kefir cell-free supernatants (CFS) obtained under different fermentation conditions. Additionally, we compared the antifungal effect of kefir CFS with that obtained with unfermented milk artificially acidified with lactic plus acetic acids (lactic and acetic acids at the same concentration determined in kefir CFS) or with hydrochloric acid. Finally, kefir was added to the corn products either in the loaf recipe (kefir-baked arepas) or sprayed onto the baked-loaf surface (kefir-sprayed arepas). The loaves' resistance to natural and artificial fungal contamination and their organoleptic profiles were studied. The highest fungal inhibition on solid medium was achieved with kefir CFS produced by kefir grains CIDCA AGK1 at 100 g/L, incubated at 30 °C and fermented until pH 3.3. Other CFS obtained from different fermentation conditions achieved less antifungal activity than that mentioned above. However, CFS of milk fermented with kefir grains, until pH 4.5 caused an increase of growth rates. Additionally, CFS produced by kefir grains CIDCA AGK1 at 100 g/L, incubated at 30 °C and fermented until pH 3.3 achieved higher

  2. Chemical composition, cytotoxicity, antimicrobial and antifungal activity of several essential oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannas, Sara; Usai, Donatella; Tardugno, Roberta; Benvenuti, Stefania; Pellati, Federica; Zanetti, Stefania; Molicotti, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Essential oils (EOs) are known and used for their biological, antibacterial, antifungal and antioxidant properties. Numerous studies have shown that EOs exhibit a large spectrum of biological activities in vitro. The incidence of drug-resistant pathogens and the toxicity of antibiotics have drawn attention to the antimicrobial activity of natural products, encouraging the development of alternative treatments. The aim of this study was to analyse the phytochemical and the cytotoxic characteristic of 36 EOs; we then evaluated the antimicrobial activity of the less-toxic EOs on Gram-positive, Gram-negative and fungi strains. The results showed low cytotoxicity in seven EOs and good activity against Gram-negative and Candida spp. strains. Based on our results, EOs could be proposed as a novel group of therapeutic agents. Further experiments are necessary to confirm their pharmacological effectiveness, and to determine potential toxic effects and the mechanism of their activity in in vivo models.

  3. Extractions without eliminating anticoagulant treatment: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cabrera, Manuel-Alejandro; Barona-Dorado, Cristina; Leco-Berrocal, Isabel; Gómez-Moreno, Gerardo; Martínez-González, José-Maria

    2011-09-01

    To establish whether there is a high enough risk of bleeding in patients who take oral anticoagulants, such that it would justify not using oral anticoagulants when performing a dental extraction, as well as if the reason for and anatomical location of the extraction increases such risk. We performed a bibliographic search in order to carry out a meta-analytic study using descriptive statistics. We compiled a sample of 1194 patients from the articles selected. Of these patients, a total of 2392 simple, serial surgical extractions were performed; none of the patients interrupted their anticoagulant treatment with warfarin sodium. Of the sample, 83 patients presented a certain degree of bleeding; in 77 of such cases, the bleeding was controlled with local hemostasis, whereas 6 patients required their dose of oral anticoagulants to be adjusted. There was a higher incidence of bleeding in patients presenting a periodontal pathology, compared to deep caries and pericoronitis. Patients being treated with oral anticoagulants represent a risk that we should be aware of, but local hemostasis has proven to be effective when performing extractions, provided that the INR value is less than 4. There is an increased incidence of bleeding in patients with periodontal problems, due to the greater presence of inflammation in the soft tissues. If the extraction is performed in the maxilla, the incidence of hemorrhagic complications is slightly higher than in the mandible, although this difference is considered to be insignificant.

  4. Adherence to oral anticoagulant therapy in secondary stroke prevention – impact of the novel oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luger S

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sebastian Luger,1 Carina Hohmann,2 Daniela Niemann,1 Peter Kraft,3 Ignaz Gunreben,3 Tobias Neumann-Haefelin,2 Christoph Kleinschnitz,3 Helmuth Steinmetz,1 Christian Foerch,1 Waltraud Pfeilschifter1 1Department of Neurology, University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, 2Department of Neurology, Klinikum Fulda gAG, Fulda, 3Department of Neurology, University Hospital Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany Background: Oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT potently prevents strokes in patients with atrial fibrillation. Vitamin K antagonists (VKA have been the standard of care for long-term OAT for decades, but non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOAC have recently been approved for this indication, and raised many questions, among them their influence on medication adherence. We assessed adherence to VKA and NOAC in secondary stroke prevention. Methods: All patients treated from October 2011 to September 2012 for ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack with a subsequent indication for OAT, at three academic hospitals were entered into a prospective registry, and baseline data and antithrombotic treatment at discharge were recorded. At the 1-year follow-up, we assessed the adherence to different OAT strategies and patients’ adherence to their respective OAT. We noted OAT changes, reasons to change treatment, and factors that influence persistence to the prescribed OAT. Results: In patients discharged on OAT, we achieved a fatality corrected response rate of 73.3% (n=209. A total of 92% of these patients received OAT at the 1-year follow-up. We observed good adherence to both VKA and NOAC (VKA, 80.9%; NOAC, 74.8%; P=0.243 with a statistically nonsignificant tendency toward a weaker adherence to dabigatran. Disability at 1-year follow-up was an independent predictor of lower adherence to any OAT after multivariate analysis, whereas the choice of OAT did not have a relevant influence. Conclusion: One-year adherence to OAT after stroke is strong (>90% and patients

  5. Anti-bacterial and cytotoxic properties of plasma sprayed silver-containing HA coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yikai; Zheng, Xuebin; Xie, Youtao; Ding, Chuanxian; Ruan, Hongjiang; Fan, Cunyi

    2008-12-01

    Silver-containing hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings have been prepared on titanium substrate by vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) method and anti-bacterial properties of the coatings were examined. Three types of bacteria stains, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus, were employed in this test. The results showed that the silver-containing HA coatings exhibited significant anti-bacterial effects against the three bacteria with anti-bacterial ratios higher than 95%. The release of silver ions in the physiological environment ensured excellent anti-bacterial properties of the silver-containing HA coatings. International standard ISO 10993-12 was adopted for cytotoxicity evaluation using fibroblast cell line L929, and it was found that the cytotoxicity for the coatings ranked 0 that showed no cytotoxicity for the coatings. Hemolysis test was processed according to ASTM F 756 standard with anti-coagulated rabbit blood, and the hemolysis ratios of the coatings were below 0.4%, indicating of non-hemolysis for the coatings.

  6. Cultivation of entomopathogenic fungi for the search of antibacterial compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Si-Young; Nakajima, Ikuo; Ihara, Fumio; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Nihira, Takuya

    2005-11-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi are a rich source of natural bioactive compounds. To establish cultivation conditions which facilitate the production of bioactive compounds and to select good genera among entomopathogenic fungi as the producer, 47 typical entomopathogenic fungi were tested for their ability to produce antibiotic activity. Thirty-eight strains (81%) and 30 strains (64%) of these fungi produced either anti-Bacillus compounds or anti-Staphylococcus compounds, respectively, indicating that the majority of the entomopathogenic fungi tested possessed the ability to produce antibacterial compounds. Using 9 representative strains (Aschersonia sp. HF724, Beauveria bassiana HF338, Cordyceps ramosopulvinata HF746, Metarhizium anisopliae HF293, Metarhizium flavoviride HF698, Nomuraea rileyi HF588, Paecilomyces fumosoroseus HF254, Paecilomyces tenuipes HF419, and Verticillium lecanii HF238), the cultivation conditions in liquid medium were surveyed with respect to the cultivation procedure and medium composition, particularly in terms of the presence or absence of insect-derived materials. At 26 degrees C, M. anisopliae HF293, N. rileyi HF588, and V. lecanii HF238 strains produced clear antibiotic activity against Bacillus and Saccharomyces, but only in the presence of insect-derived materials, suggesting that the production of antibacterial/antifungal compounds by entomopathogenic fungi is triggered by the presence of insect-derived materials.

  7. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of Opuntia ficus-indica f. inermis (cactus pear) flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennouri, Monia; Ammar, Imene; Khemakhem, Bassem; Attia, Hamadi

    2014-08-01

    Opuntia ficus-indica f. inermis (cactus pear) flowers have wide application in folk medicine. However, there are few reports focusing on their biological activity and were no reports on their chemical composition. The nutrient composition and hexane extracts of Opuntia flowers at 4 flowering stages and their antibacterial and antifungal activities were investigated. The chemical composition showed considerable amounts of fiber, protein, and minerals. Potassium (K) was the predominant mineral followed by calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), sodium (Na), iron (Fe), and zinc (Zn). The main compounds in the various hexane extracts were 9.12-octadecadienoic acid (29-44%) and hexadecanoic acid (8.6-32%). The antibacterial activity tests showed that O. inermis hexane extracts have high effectiveness against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, making this botanical source a potential contender as a food preservative or food control additive.

  8. Studies on antimicrobial and antifungal activities of ziziphus mauritiana human clinical bacterial and fungal pathogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, A.; Shah, S.; Khan, M.A.; Khan, M.M.

    2012-01-01

    The antimicrobial and antifungal activities of crude extracts of Ziziphus mauritiana leaves were investigated against six selected bacterial (Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus luteus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter, Klebsiella pneumoniae) and one fungal pathogen (Aspel-gillus niger). The crude extract was further fractionated in butanol, choloroform, n-hexane and methanol. Agar well diffusion and agar dilution assay were employed for determination of zones of inhibition and MICs, respectively, whereas MBC was determined using broth dilution test. The butanol fraction presented encouraging antimicrobial activity (15.0%0.02), while methanol (7.03:1:0.05) and chloroform (7.0%0,05) fractions emerged with significantly low susceptibility. The n-hexane fraction was recorded as almost inactive (0%0) against all bacterial pathogens. Unlike the antibacterial activities, all fractions possessed momentous antifungal activities except the methanol fraction (0%0). The n-hexane fraction showed widest zone of inhibition (11:1:0.05) followed by butanol (8.0%0.02) and chloroform (7.0%0.02). (author)

  9. Efficiency of three anti-coagulant rodenticides on commensal rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhail, M W; Kamilia; Allam, A M; Soliman, M I

    2007-08-01

    Susceptibiliy level to bromadilone, difencoum and coumtertraly anticoagulants were studied in different species of Norway rat Rattus norvegicus and roof rat Rattus rattus trapped from El-Qualyobia Governorate in which the anticoagulant rodenticides were used to control rodents for long periods in some rural regions at Qualyobia. Complete mortality was showed for both species and sex within a standard feeding period (6 days) indicated to be susceptible to the three anticoagulant rodenticides. The bait eaten and corresponding active ingredient showed a noticeable more intake for R. rattus than R. norvegicus for the three compounds. The time to death showed highest mean values for R. rattus comparison to R. norvegicus. Difencoum recorded highest values of time to death compare with bromadilone and coumatetralyl.

  10. Extended anticoagulation in venous thromboembolism disease. In favour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Capitan, M C

    Venous thromboembolism disease can be considered a chronic disease because, after the first episode, there is a life-long risk of recurrence. Recurrence is a severe complication. Anticoagulation is effective while it is maintained, but when it is discontinued, the risk of new thrombotic events persists indefinitely. Clinical practice guidelines offer specific recommendations on the treatment duration for patients with provoked or recurrent disease but are not specific for those with a first unprovoked episode. The decision should be made after a careful individual assessment of the risk-benefit of anticoagulation. This article reviews the evidence in favour of extending the anticoagulation and the current therapeutic options. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  11. [Tranexamic acid gel in patients treated with oral anticoagulants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripollés-de Ramón, Jorge; Muñoz-Corcuera, Marta; Bravo-Llatas, Carmen; Bascones-Martínez, Antonio

    2014-12-09

    Patients treated with oral anticoagulants have increased susceptibility to bleeding, and therefore any surgical medical procedure and especially oral surgery requires a therapeutic approach that minimizes bleeding effects in these patients. The working hypothesis was based on studies of local application of tranexamic acid after maxillofacial interventions as effective therapeutic alternative for the prevention and control of bleeding. The aim was to assess the effectiveness of the application of a gel solution tranexamic acid after tooth extraction in anticoagulated patients in terms of healing time and degree of healing. The results indicate that application of tranexamic acid gel is very effective for consistency and maintenance in the place of action and shows its efficacy as a procoagulant material. The application of a gel solution of tranexamic acid in oral anticoagulants patients ameliorates healing time and the bleeding time within the first 48-72 h. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. [Novel anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumhäkel, M; Schirmer, S H; Böhm, M

    2010-11-01

    The most frequent cardiac arrhythmia and main cause for cardio-embolic stroke is atrial fibrillation. Prophylaxis for thrombembolic events is performed regarding individual risk of patients with either ASS or vitamin-K-antagonists. Efficacy and safety of oral anticoagulation is limited by a narrow therapeutical range as well as by inter- and intraindividual variability of INR-values due to genetic disposition, differences in alimentation, dosage errors, rare control of INR-levels and drug-interactions. New oral anticoagulants with different mechanisms of action may be a promising therapeutic option in future. This review addresses the new anticoagulants Apixaban, Rivaroxban and Dabigatranetexilat with the design and as available the results of the corresponding phase-III-trials in atrial fibrillation (ARISTOTLE, ROCKET-AF, RE-LY). © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Management of Periprocedural Anticoagulation: A Survey of Contemporary Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaker, Greg C; Theriot, Paul; Binder, Lea G; Dobesh, Paul P; Cuker, Adam; Doherty, John U

    2016-07-12

    Interruption of oral anticoagulation (AC) for surgery or an invasive procedure is a complicated process. Practice guidelines provide only general recommendations, and care of such patients occurs across multiple specialties. The availability of direct oral anticoagulants further complicates decision making and guidance here is limited. To evaluate current practice patterns in the United States for bridging AC, a survey was developed by the American College of Cardiology Anticoagulation Work Group. The goal of the survey was to assess how general and subspecialty cardiologists, internists, gastroenterologists, and orthopedic surgeons currently manage patients who receive AC and undergo surgery or an invasive procedure. The survey was completed by 945 physicians involved in the periprocedural management of AC. The results provide a template for educational and research projects geared toward the development of clinical pathways and point-of-care tools to improve this area of health care. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mechanical Prosthetic Valves and Pregnancy: A therapeutic dilemma of anticoagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Panduranga

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Choosing the best anticoagulant therapy for a pregnant patient with a mechanical prosthetic valve is controversial and the published international guidelines contain no clear-cut consensus on the best approach. This is due to the fact that there is presently no anticoagulant which can reliably decrease thromboembolic events while avoiding damage to the fetus. Current treatments include either continuing oral warfarin or substituting warfarin for subcutaneous unfractionated heparin or low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH in the first trimester (6–12 weeks or at any point throughout the pregnancy. However, LMWH, while widely-prescribed, requires close monitoring of the blood anti-factor Xa levels. Unfortunately, facilities for such monitoring are not universally available, such as within hospitals in developing countries. This review evaluates the leading international guidelines concerning anticoagulant therapy in pregnant patients with mechanical prosthetic valves as well as proposing a simplified guideline which may be more relevant to hospitals in this region.

  15. Antibacterial Metallic Touch Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor M. Villapún

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Our aim is to present a comprehensive review of the development of modern antibacterial metallic materials as touch surfaces in healthcare settings. Initially we compare Japanese, European and US standards for the assessment of antimicrobial activity. The variations in methodologies defined in these standards are highlighted. Our review will also cover the most relevant factors that define the antimicrobial performance of metals, namely, the effect of humidity, material geometry, chemistry, physical properties and oxidation of the material. The state of the art in contact-killing materials will be described. Finally, the effect of cleaning products, including disinfectants, on the antimicrobial performance, either by direct contact or by altering the touch surface chemistry on which the microbes attach, will be discussed. We offer our outlook, identifying research areas that require further development and an overview of potential future directions of this exciting field.

  16. Antifungal properties of durancins isolated from Enterococcus durans A5-11 and of its synthetic fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belguesmia, Y; Choiset, Y; Rabesona, H; Baudy-Floc'h, M; Le Blay, G; Haertlé, T; Chobert, J-M

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work was to study the antifungal properties of durancins isolated from Enterococcus durans A5-11 and of their chemically synthesized fragments. Enterococcus durans A5-11 is a lactic acid bacteria strain isolated from traditional Mongolian airag cheese. This strain inhibits the growth of several fungi including Fusarium culmorum, Penicillium roqueforti and Debaryomyces hansenii. It produces two bacteriocins: durancin A5-11a and durancin A5-11b, which have similar antimicrobial properties. The whole durancins A5-11a and A5-11b, as well as their N- and C-terminal fragments were synthesized, and their antifungal properties were studied. C-terminal fragments of both durancins showed stronger antifungal activities than other tested peptides. Treatment of D. hansenii LMSA2.11.003 strain with 2 mmol l(-1) of the synthetic peptides led to the loss of the membrane integrity and to several changes in the ultra-structure of the yeast cells. Chemically synthesized durancins and their synthetic fragments showed different antimicrobial properties from each other. N-terminal peptides show activities against both bacterial and fungal strains tested. C-terminal peptides have specific activities against tested fungal strain and do not show antibacterial activity. However, the C-terminal fragment enhances the activity of the N-terminal fragment in the whole bacteriocins against bacteria. © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Differences in patient outcomes and chronic care management of oral anticoagulant therapy: an explorative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drewes, H.W.; Lambooij, M.S.; Baan, C.A.; Meijboom, B.R.; Graafmans, W.C.; Westert, G.P.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The oral anticoagulant therapy - provided to prevent thrombosis - is known to be associated with substantial avoidable hospitalization. Improving the quality of the oral anticoagulant therapy could avoid drug related hospitalizations. Therefore, this study compared the patient outcomes

  18. Differences in patient outcomes and chronic care management of oral anticoagulant therapy : An explorative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drewes, H.W.; Lambooij, M.; Baan, C.A.; Meijboom, B.R.; Graafmans, W.C.; Westert, G.P.

    2011-01-01

    Background The oral anticoagulant therapy - provided to prevent thrombosis - is known to be associated with substantial avoidable hospitalization. Improving the quality of the oral anticoagulant therapy could avoid drug related hospitalizations. Therefore, this study compared the patient outcomes

  19. Anticoagulation activity of salivary gland extract of oriental blackfly Simulium indicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhalaxmi Borah

    2014-05-01

    Conclusions: The present study demonstrated that the mode of action of the anticoagulant(s is mainly on the inhibition of thrombin and factor Xa along with other target factors of the coagulation cascade.

  20. A comparative assessment of efficacy of three anticoagulant rodenticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renapurkar, D M

    1982-01-01

    Results are presented of feeding tests carried out with three common anticoagulant rodenticides viz., coumatetralyl, fumarin and warfarin on three common species of commensal rodents i.e., Rattus rattus, Rattus norvegicus and Bandicota bengalensis. All three species of rodents were susceptible to anticoagulant rodenticides. However, the action of these compounds in B. bengalensis was comparatively slow. Coumatetralyl was found to be the most effective rodenticide followed by fumarin and warfarin. Liquid baits of these compounds are more effective in comparison to food baits.

  1. Inhibition of warfarin anticoagulation associated with chelation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebe, Heidi Braun; Gregory, Philip J

    2002-08-01

    Chelation therapy originally was administered exclusively to patients with heavy metal poisoning. Now some physicians are administering this therapy for numerous conditions, most commonly coronary heart disease. A 64-year-old man experienced impaired warfarin anticoagulation after undergoing chelation therapy His international normalized ratio (INR) fell from 2.6 the day before to 1.6 the day after therapy was administered. Whether chelation therapy decreases the effectiveness of warfarin anticoagulation is uncertain. However, because of this potential interaction, clinicians should consider increased INR monitoring in patients undergoing chelation therapy.

  2. Novel oral anticoagulants in the treatment of cerebral venous thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feher, G; Illes, Z; Komoly, S

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is an uncommon cause of stroke with extremely diverse clinical features, predisposing factors, brain imaging findings, and outcome. Anticoagulation is the cornerstone of CVT management, however, it is not supported by high-quality evicence. Novel oral anticoagulants...... (NOACs) have been extensively studied in patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE) and non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). The aim of our work to review the available evidence for NOACs in the treatment of CVT. Based on our literature search there is insufficient evidence...... to support the use of NOACs in CVT, although case series with rivaroxaban and dabigatran have showed promising results....

  3. Direct anticoagulants and nursing: an approach from patient's safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Ruiz, Adolfo; Romero-Arana, Adolfo; Gómez-Salgado, Juan

    In recent years, a new line of treatment for the prevention of stroke in non-valvular atrial fibrillation, the so-called direct anticoagulants or new anticoagulants has appeared. The proper management and follow-up of these patients is essential to minimize their side effects and ensure patient safety. In this article, a description of these drugs is given, analyzing their characteristics, functioning and interactions together with the most habitual nursing interventions, as well as a reflection on the implications for the practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. New oral anticoagulants in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmar Vega, Lara; de Francisco, A L M; Bada da Silva, Jairo; Galván Espinoza, Luis; Fernández Fresnedo, Gema

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) develop bleeding and thrombotic tendencies, so the indication of anticoagulation at the onset of atrial fibrillation (AF) is complex. AF is the most common chronic cardiac arrhythmia, and thromboembolism and ischemic stroke in particular are major complications. In recent years, new oral anticoagulant drugs have been developed, and they have shown superiority over the classical AVK in preventing stroke, systemic embolism and bleeding risk, constituting an effective alternative to those resources. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Fibrinolytic and anticoagulative activities from the earthworm Eisenia foetida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrzenjak, T; Popović, M; Bozić, T; Grdisa, M; Kobrehel, D; Tiska-Rudman, L

    1998-04-01

    Biologically active glycolipoprotein complex (G-90) isolated from whole earthworm tissue extract shows anticoagulative and fibrinolytic activities. We isolated two tyrosine like serine peptidases with molecular masses of 34 kDa (P I) and 23 kDa (P II), respectively. P I peptidase is autocatalytically degraded to P II. Both peptidases exhibit fibrinolytic and anticoagulative activities. The activity of P I is much higher. P I in concentration of 10(5) ng ml-1 of plasma shortened the physiological time of fibrin clot lysis by 54% and completely inhibited blood clotting at a concentration of 10(3) ng ml-1 of venous blood.

  6. Regulatory, legislative, and policy updates with anticoagulant use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanikos, John; Buckley, Leo F; Aldemerdash, Ahmed; Terry, Kimberly J; Piazza, Gregory; Connors, Jean M; Goldhaber, Samuel Z

    2015-04-01

    Thromboembolism afflicts millions of patients annually in the United States and is associated with a significant cost burden. Recent advances in oral anticoagulation have provided clinicians with more options for management of these diseases. Accordingly, regulatory, legislative, and policy-making organizations have intervened with the aim of improving patient outcomes, ensuring patient safety, and reducing costs. There have been a number of recent developments in surveillance, litigation, and regulatory oversight that clinicians should recognize. In this review article we summarize key updates related to the management of anticoagulant therapy as it relates to thrombosis prevention and treatment.

  7. Anticoagulant therapy duration. In favour of short-term courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto Rodríguez, J A; Ramírez Luna, J C

    In recent years, we have observed a tendency to extend anticoagulant therapy for patients with venous thromboembolism disease (VTE). This practice exposes patients to a greater risk of severe and fatal haemorrhage, which, in certain conditions, outweighs the benefits related to the reduction in disease recurrence. This review examines the evidence in favour of reducing anticoagulant therapy as much as possible, especially for patients with VTE "caused" by temporary risk factors, with isolated deep vein thrombosis and with unprovoked VTE and a high risk of haemorrhage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  8. In vitro antifungal activity of topical and systemic antifungal drugs against Malassezia species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Muñoz, Alfonso Javier; Rojas, Florencia; Tur-Tur, Cristina; de Los Ángeles Sosa, María; Diez, Gustavo Ortiz; Espada, Carmen Martín; Payá, María Jesús; Giusiano, Gustavo

    2013-09-01

    The strict nutritional requirements of Malassezia species make it difficult to test the antifungal susceptibility. Treatments of the chronic and recurrent infections associated with Malassezia spp. are usually ineffective. The objective of this study was to obtain in vitro susceptibility profile of 76 clinical isolates of Malassezia species against 16 antifungal drugs used for topical or systemic treatment. Isolates were identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were obtained by a modified microdilution method based on the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute reference document M27-A3. The modifications allowed a good growth of all tested species. High in vitro antifungal activity of most tested drugs was observed, especially triazole derivatives, except for fluconazole which presented the highest MICs and widest range of concentrations. Ketoconazole and itraconazole demonstrated a great activity. Higher MICs values were obtained with Malassezia furfur indicating a low susceptibility to most of the antifungal agents tested. Malassezia sympodialis and Malassezia pachydermatis were found to be more-susceptible species than M. furfur, Malassezia globosa, Malassezia slooffiae and Malassezia restricta. Topical substances were also active but provide higher MICs than the compounds for systemic use. The differences observed in the antifungals activity and interspecies variability demonstrated the importance to studying the susceptibility profile of each species to obtain reliable information for defining an effective treatment regimen. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. Preparations based on minerals extracts of Calicotome villosa roots and bovine butyrate matter: Evaluation in vitro of their antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhouchi, B; Aouadi, S; Abdi, A

    2017-06-01

    The use of preparations based on minerals extracts of Calicotome villosa and butter is born from the misuse of drugs without specific microbiological analyzes. Seventeen different preparations were performed. The antibacterial and antifungal activities were determined on five bacteria and two fungi strains respectively. C. villosa ashes are obtained by incineration of roots plant at 498°C for 4hours. They are analyzed to determine the shape of the particles and the mineral constituents by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) techniques respectively. The effectiveness of preparations or tablets is measured in solid medium. It allows to measure the diameter of the inhibition zone for the antibacterial activity as well as the diameter of mycelia growth and the critical values (MIC, MFC, IC 50 and IC 90 ) for the antifungal activity. Finally, the results are compared to the activity of a commercial positive control aiming to give value of the observed activity. SEM observations reveal the presence of nanoparticles agglomerated with size of about 50nm. The EDX analyzes indicate the presence of Fe, Na, Al, Mg, Si, K, Ca, O 2 and C. Among all the results, the preparation (B s +A) or (B sd +A) can completely inhibit the growth of two fungal pathogens. The activity of the preparation is faced with the activity of the synthetic fungicide nystatin. The efficacy of the preparation (B s +A) or (B sd +A) is higher than that of nystatin against Aspergillus sp. and Fusarium sp. The preparation could serve as natural antifungal for the pharmaceutical industry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Antifungal activity of 10 Guadeloupean plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biabiany, Murielle; Roumy, Vincent; Hennebelle, Thierry; François, Nadine; Sendid, Boualem; Pottier, Muriel; Aliouat, El Moukhtar; Rouaud, Isabelle; Lohézic-Le Dévéhat, Françoise; Joseph, Henry; Bourgeois, Paul; Sahpaz, Sevser; Bailleul, François

    2013-11-01

    Screening of the antifungal activities of ten Guadeloupean plants was undertaken to find new extracts and formulations against superficial mycoses such as onychomycosis, athlete's foot, Pityriasis versicolor, as well as the deep fungal infection Pneumocystis pneumonia. For the first time, the CMI of these plant extracts [cyclohexane, ethanol and ethanol/water (1:1, v/v)] was determined against five dermatophytes, five Candida species, Scytalidium dimidiatum, a Malassezia sp. strain and Pneumocystis carinii. Cytotoxicity tests of the most active extracts were also performed on an HaCat keratinocyte cell line. Results suggest that the extracts of Bursera simaruba, Cedrela odorata, Enterolobium cyclocarpum and Pluchea carolinensis have interesting activities and could be good candidates for developing antifungal formulations. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Tolerability and safety of antifungal drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Scaglione

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available When treating critically ill patients, as those with fungal infections, attention should be focused on the appropriate use of drugs, especially in terms of dose, safety, and tolerability. The fungal infection itself and the concomitant physiological disorders concur to increase the risk of mortality in these patients, therefore the use of any antifungal agent should be carefully evaluated, considering both the direct action on the target fungus and the adverse effects eventually caused. Among antifungal drugs, echinocandins have the greatest tolerability. In fact, unlike amphotericin B, showing nephrotoxicity, and azoles, which are hepatotoxic, the use of echinocandins doesn’t result in major adverse events.http://dx.doi.org/10.7175/rhc.v4i2s.873

  12. Antifungal Activity of Homoaconitate and Homoisocitrate Analogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sławomir Milewski

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Thirteen structural analogs of two initial intermediates of the L-a-aminoadipate pathway of L-lysine biosynthesis in fungi have been designed and synthesized, including fluoro- and epoxy-derivatives of homoaconitate and homoisocitrate. Some of the obtained compounds exhibited at milimolar range moderate enzyme inhibitory properties against homoaconitase and/or homoisocitrate dehydrogenase of Candida albicans. The structural basis for homoisocitrate dehydrogenase inhibition was revealed by molecular modeling of the enzyme-inhibitor complex. On the other hand, the trimethyl ester forms of some of the novel compounds exhibited antifungal effects. The highest antifungal activity was found for trimethyl trans-homoaconitate, which inhibited growth of some human pathogenic yeasts with minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC values of 16–32 mg/mL.

  13. Antibacterial diterpenoids from Astragalus brachystachys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jassbi, Amir Reza; Zamanizadehnajari, Simin; Azar, Parviz Aberoomand; Tahara, Satoshi

    2002-01-01

    Antibacterial bioassay guided fractionation of acetone extracts of Astragalus brachystachys resulted in isolation of sclareol and two related labdane-type diterpenoids, 14R-epoxysclareol and 6beta-hydroxysclareol. The antibacterial activity of the isolated compounds was measured and it was deduced that the epoxidation at the double bond of sclareol or hydroxylation at C-6 decreased the activity of the resulting compounds. Salvigenin (5-hydroxy-4',6,7-trimethoxyflavone) was also separated from this plant for the first time.

  14. Antibacterial triterpenoids from Melia toosendan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new lanostan-type triterpenoid with hydroperoxy group, toosendanin A (1, together with two known triterpenoids, meliastatin 3 (2 and ursolic acid (3, w ere isolated and identified from the stems of Melia toosendan. The structures of these compounds were elucidated by 1D- and 2D-NMR spectra and other spectroscopic studies. These compounds were assayed for the antibacterial activities against some hospital pathogenic bacteria. Toosendanin A (1 exhibited strong antibacterial activity against K. pneumoniae .

  15. Antibacterial resistance: an emerging 'zoonosis'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labro, Marie-Thérèse; Bryskier, Jean-Marie

    2014-12-01

    Antibacterial resistance is a worldwide threat, and concerns have arisen about the involvement of animal commensal and pathogenic bacteria in the maintenance and spread of resistance genes. However, beyond the facts related to the occurrence of resistant microorganisms in food, food-producing animals and companion animals and their transmission to humans, it is important to consider the vast environmental 'resistome', the selective pathways underlying the emergence of antibacterial resistance and how we can prepare answers for tomorrow.

  16. Antifungal activity of streptomycetes isolated bentonite clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Shirobokov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the biological activity of streptomycetes, isolated from Ukrainian bentonite clay. Methods. For identification of the investigated microorganisms there were used generally accepted methods for study of morpho-cultural and biochemical properties and sequencing of 16Ѕ rRNA producer. Antagonistic activity of the strain was determined by agar diffusion and agar block method using gram-positive, gram-negative microorganisms and fungi. Results. Research of autochthonous flora from bentonite clay of Ukrainian various deposits proved the existence of stable politaxonomic prokaryotic-eukaryotic consortia there. It was particularly interesting that the isolated microorganisms had demonstrated clearly expressed antagonistic properties against fungi. During bacteriological investigation this bacterial culture was identified like representative of the genus Streptomyces. Bentonite streptomycetes, named as Streptomyces SVP-71, inagar mediums (agar block method inhibited the growth of fungi (yeast and mold; zones of growth retardation constituted of 11-36 mm, and did not affect the growth of bacteria. There were investigated the inhibitory effects of supernatant culture fluid, ethanol and butanol extracts of biomass streptomycetes on museum and clinical strains of fungi that are pathogenic for humans (Candida albicans, C. krusei, C. utilis, C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, C. kefir, S. glabrata, C. lusitaniae, Aspergillus niger, Mucor pusillus, Fusarium sporotrichioides. It has been shown that research antifungal factor had 100% of inhibitory effect against all fungi used in experiments in vitro. In parallel, it was found that alcohol extracts hadn’t influence to the growth of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria absolutely. It was shown that the cultural fluid supernatant and alcoholic extracts of biomass had the same antagonistic effect, but with different manifestation. This evidenced about identity of antifungal substances

  17. Combination Antifungal Therapy for Cryptococcal Meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Day, Jeremy N.; Chau, Tran T.H.; Wolbers, Marcel; Mai, Pham P.; Dung, Nguyen T.; Mai, Nguyen H.; Phu, Nguyen H.; Nghia, Ho D.; Phong, Nguyen D.; Thai, Cao Q.; Thai, Le H.; Chuong, Ly V.; Sinh, Dinh X.; Duong, Van A.; Hoang, Thu N.

    2013-01-01

    Background\\ud Combination antifungal therapy (amphotericin B deoxycholate and flucytosine) is the recommended treatment for cryptococcal meningitis but has not been shown to reduce mortality, as compared with amphotericin B alone. We performed a randomized, controlled trial to determine whether combining flucytosine or high-dose fluconazole with high-dose amphotericin B improved survival at 14 and 70 days.\\ud Methods\\ud We conducted a randomized, three-group, open-label trial of induction the...

  18. Antifungal Efficacy of Myrtus communis Linn

    OpenAIRE

    Sadeghi Nejad; Erfani Nejad; Yusef Naanaie; Zarrin

    2014-01-01

    Background The ethanolic extract of Myrtus communis Linn. leaves was assayed in vitro as a growth inhibitor against opportunistic fungi such as Candida and Aspergillus species. Myrtus communis Linn. (Family, Myrtaceae) is an aromatic evergreen shrub or small tree. It is native to the Mediterranean region. Objectives This study aimed to assess antifungal activity (in vitro) of the ethanolic extracts of Myrtus communis leaves as a g...

  19. Synthesis, characterization and antibacterial properties of dihydroxy quaternary ammonium salts with long chain alkyl bromides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-Shuai; Wang, Chun-Hua; Sun, Ju-Feng; Hou, Gui-Ge; Wang, Yu-Peng; Qu, Rong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Five N-methyl-N-R-N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl) ammonium bromides (R = -benzyl (chloride, BNQAS), -dodecyl (C12QAS), -tetradecyl (C14QAS), -hexadecyl (C16QAS), -octadecyl (C18QAS)) were prepared based on N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and halohydrocarbon. Five QAS were characterized by FTIR, NMR, and MS. BNQAS, C12QAS, C14QAS, and C16QAS were confirmed by X-ray single-crystal diffraction. Their antibacterial properties indicated good antibacterial abilities against E. coli, S. aureus, B. subtilis, especially C12QAS with the best antibacterial ability (100% to E. coli, 95.65% to S. aureus, and 91.41% to B. subtilis). In addition, C12QAS also displayed the best antifungal activities than BNQAS and C18QAS against Cytospora mandshurica, Botryosphaeria ribis, Physalospora piricola, and Glomerella cingulata with the ratio of full marks. The strategy provides a facile way to design and develop new types of antibacterial drugs for application in preventing the fruit rot, especially apple. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Antifungal Activity of Maytenin and Pristimerin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullo, Fernanda P.; Sardi, Janaina C. O.; Santos, Vânia A. F. F. M.; Sangalli-Leite, Fernanda; Pitangui, Nayla S.; Rossi, Suélen A.; de Paula e Silva, Ana C. A.; Soares, Luciana A.; Silva, Julhiany F.; Oliveira, Haroldo C.; Furlan, Maysa; Silva, Dulce H. S.; Bolzani, Vanderlan S.; Mendes-Giannini, Maria José S.; Fusco-Almeida, Ana Marisa

    2012-01-01

    Fungal infections in humans have increased alarmingly in recent years, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. Among the infections systemic candidiasis, aspergillosis, cryptococcosis, paracoccidioidomycosis, and histoplasmosis mortality are more prevalent and more severe in humans. The current high incidence of dermatophytosis is in humans, especially as the main etiologic agents Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Molecules pristimerin and maytenin obtained from the plant Maytenus ilicifolia (Celastraceae) are known to show various pharmacological activities. This study aimed to evaluate the spectrum of antifungal activity of maytenin and pristimerin and their cytotoxicity in human keratinocytes (NOK cells of the oral mucosa). It was concluded that the best spectrum of antifungal activity has been shown to maytenin with MIC varying from 0.12 to 125 mg/L, although it is also active with pristimerin MIC ranging between 0.12 and 250 mg/L. Regarding the toxicity, both showed to have high IC50. The SI showed high pristimerin against some species of fungi, but SI maytenin was above 1.0 for all fungi tested, showing a selective action of fungi. However, when comparing the two substances, maytenin also showed better results. The two molecules can be a possible prototype with a broad spectrum of action for the development of new antifungal agents. PMID:22675379

  1. Antifungal Activity of Maytenin and Pristimerin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda P. Gullo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal infections in humans have increased alarmingly in recent years, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. Among the infections systemic candidiasis, aspergillosis, cryptococcosis, paracoccidioidomycosis, and histoplasmosis mortality are more prevalent and more severe in humans. The current high incidence of dermatophytosis is in humans, especially as the main etiologic agents Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Molecules pristimerin and maytenin obtained from the plant Maytenus ilicifolia (Celastraceae are known to show various pharmacological activities. This study aimed to evaluate the spectrum of antifungal activity of maytenin and pristimerin and their cytotoxicity in human keratinocytes (NOK cells of the oral mucosa. It was concluded that the best spectrum of antifungal activity has been shown to maytenin with MIC varying from 0.12 to 125 mg/L, although it is also active with pristimerin MIC ranging between 0.12 and 250 mg/L. Regarding the toxicity, both showed to have high IC50. The SI showed high pristimerin against some species of fungi, but SI maytenin was above 1.0 for all fungi tested, showing a selective action of fungi. However, when comparing the two substances, maytenin also showed better results. The two molecules can be a possible prototype with a broad spectrum of action for the development of new antifungal agents.

  2. Antifungal Efficacy of Myrtus communis Linn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadeghi Nejad

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background The ethanolic extract of Myrtus communis Linn. leaves was assayed in vitro as a growth inhibitor against opportunistic fungi such as Candida and Aspergillus species. Myrtus communis Linn. (Family, Myrtaceae is an aromatic evergreen shrub or small tree. It is native to the Mediterranean region. Objectives This study aimed to assess antifungal activity (in vitro of the ethanolic extracts of Myrtus communis leaves as a growth inhibitor against 24 clinical isolates of Candida, including C. albicans, C. glabrata, and C. tropicalis also three species of Aspergillus, including A. niger, A. flavus, and A. terreus. Materials and Methods The ethanolic extract of myrtle leaves was prepared by maceration method and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC of Myrtus communis leaves extract was determined by agar-well diffusion technique. Amphotericin B and clotrimazole were used as the positive control in this assay. Results The minimal inhibitory concentration (MICs values of Myrtus communis leaves extract ranged 0.625-5.0 µg/µL and 5-40 µg/µL against tested Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp., respectively. Conclusions Results revealed that the ethanolic extract of Myrtus communis leaves have antifungal potency against both pathogenic tested fungi, and it can be used as a natural antifungal agent.

  3. Econazole imprinted textiles with antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mirza Akram; Lalloz, Augustine; Benhaddou, Aicha; Pagniez, Fabrice; Raymond, Martine; Le Pape, Patrice; Simard, Pierre; Théberge, Karine; Leblond, Jeanne

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we propose pharmaceutical textiles imprinted with lipid microparticles of Econazole nitrate (ECN) as a mean to improve patient compliance while maintaining drug activity. Lipid microparticles were prepared and characterized by laser diffraction (3.5±0.1 μm). Using an optimized screen-printing method, microparticles were deposited on textiles, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The drug content of textiles (97±3 μg/cm(2)) was reproducible and stable up to 4 months storage at 25 °C/65% Relative Humidity. Imprinted textiles exhibited a thermosensitive behavior, as witnessed by a fusion temperature of 34.8 °C, which enabled a larger drug release at 32 °C (temperature of the skin) than at room temperature. In vitro antifungal activity of ECN textiles was compared to commercial 1% (wt/wt) ECN cream Pevaryl®. ECN textiles maintained their antifungal activity against a broad range of Candida species as well as major dermatophyte species. In vivo, ECN textiles also preserved the antifungal efficacy of ECN on cutaneous candidiasis infection in mice. Ex vivo percutaneous absorption studies demonstrated that ECN released from pharmaceutical textiles concentrated more in the upper skin layers, where the fungal infections develop, as compared to dermal absorption of Pevaryl®. Overall, these results showed that this technology is promising to develop pharmaceutical garments textiles for the treatment of superficial fungal infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Antifungal immunity in selected fungal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Trzeciak-Ryczek

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Fungi are omnipresent in the environment; hence they are frequent factors causing infections in humans and animals even if their immune system works correctly. These facts stimulated interest in and the will to understand the antifungal immunity mechanisms. It has been, however, evidenced that the immunological response to mycotic pathogens is related to the species and morphological form of the fungus. Nevertheless, it is assumed that always in the antifungal response, there are mechanisms of innate and adaptive immunity that cooperate with one another to eliminate such pathogens. It has been evidenced that the main elements of antifungal immunity are physical barriers of the organism, phagocytosis, cytotoxicity, and possibly trogocytosis of PMN and MN cells, as well as T-cells, and to a smaller extent B-cells, the proportion of which is principally related to their products activating the processes of PMN and MN cells. An important role in this immunity also belongs to PRR, which activate the main processes of phagocytosis and cytotoxicity of PMN, MN, NK and DC cells.

  5. In vitro evaluation of Portuguese propolis and floral sources for antiprotozoal, antibacterial and antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcão, Soraia I; Vale, Nuno; Cos, Paul; Gomes, Paula; Freire, Cristina; Maes, Louis; Vilas-Boas, Miguel

    2014-03-01

    Propolis is a beehive product with a very complex chemical composition, used since ancient times in several therapeutic treatments. As a contribution to the improvement of drugs against several tropical diseases caused by protozoa, we screened Portuguese propolis and its potential floral sources Populus x Canadensis and Cistus ladanifer against Plasmodium falciparum, Leishmania infantum, Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma cruzi. The toxicity against MRC-5 fibroblast cells was evaluated to assess selectivity. The in vitro assays were performed following the recommendations of WHO Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) and revealed moderate activity, with the propolis extracts presenting the relatively highest inhibitory effect against T. brucei. Additionally, the antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans, Trichophyton rubrum and Aspergillus fumigatus was also verified with the better results observed against T. rubrum. The quality of the extracts was controlled by evaluating the phenolic content and antioxidant activity. The observed biological activity variations are associated with the variable chemical composition of the propolis and the potential floral sources under study. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Antibacterial and Antifungal Effect of 405 nm Monochromatic Laser on Endodontopathogenic Microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Imamura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of 405 nm monochromatic laser irradiation as an alternative management for prevention and/or treatment of endodontic infections. A monochromatic laser-emitting device equipped with a 405-nm laser diode was developed. Using this device, the effect of 405 nm laser irradiation on the growth of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Enterococcus faecalis, and Candida albicans, which are microorganisms associated with persistent endodontic infections, was evaluated by viable colony counting. As a result, the irradiation with a 405 nm laser had a significant bactericidal/fungicidal effect on P. gingivalis, P. intermedia, and C. albicans, whereas the growth of E. faecalis was not affected by the irradiation. The inhibition rate in P. gingivalis and P. intermedia was ~60% and ~80%, respectively, following irradiation at 0.2 W for 300 sec. The inhibition rate in C. albicans was ~90% following irradiation at 0.2 W for 1200 sec. These results indicate that 405 nm monochromatic laser irradiation exerts a bactericidal/fungicidal effect on these microorganisms. The present study clearly demonstrates that 405 nm laser irradiation is a promising alternative management strategy for prevention and/or treatment of endodontic infections.

  7. Synthesis, Antibacterial and Antifungal Activity of Some New Pyrazoline and Pyrazole Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seham Y. Hassan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A series of 2-pyrazolines 5–9 have been synthesized from α,β-unsaturated ketones 2–4. New 2-pyrazoline derivatives 13–15 bearing benzenesulfonamide moieties were then synthesized by condensing the appropriate chalcones 2–4 with 4-hydrazinyl benzenesulfonamide hydrochloride. Ethyl [1,2,4] triazolo[3,4-c][1,2,4]triazino[5,6-b]-5H-indole-5-ethanoate (26 and 1-(5H-[1,2,4]triazino[5,6-b] indol-3-yl-3-methyl-1H-pyrazol-5(4H-one (32 were synthesized from 3-hydrazinyl-5H-[1,2,4]triazino[5,6-b]indole (24. On the other hand ethyl[1,2,4]triazolo[3,4-c][1,2,4]triazino[5,6-b]-5,10-dihydroquinoxaline- 5-ethanoate (27 and 1-(5,10-dihydro-[1,2,4]triazino[5,6-b]quinoxalin-3-yl-3-methyl-1H-pyrazol-5(4H-one (33 were synthesized from 3-hydrazinyl-5,10-dihydro-[1,2,4]triazino[5,6-b]quinoxaline (25 by reaction with diethyl malonate or ethyl acetoacetate, respectively. Condensation of 6,6-dimethyl-4-oxo-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1H-indole-2-carbaldehyde (1' with compound 24 or 25 afforded the corresponding Schiff's bases 36 and 37, respectively. Reaction of the Schiff's base 37 with benzoyl hydrazine or acetic anhydride afforded benzohydrazide derivative 39 and the cyclized compound 40, respectively. Furthermore, the pyrazole derivatives 42–44 were synthesized by cyclization of hydrazine derivative 25 with the prepared chalcones 2–4. All the newly synthesized compounds have been characterized on the basis of IR and 1H-NMR spectral data as well as physical data. Antimicrobial activity against the organisms E. coli ATCC8739 and P. aeruginosa ATCC 9027 as examples of Gram-negative bacteria, S. aureus ATCC 6583P as an example of Gram-positive bacteria and C. albicans ATCC 2091 as an example of a yeast-like fungus have been studied using the Nutrient Agar (NA and Sabouraud Dextrose Agar (SDA diffusion methods. The best performance was found for the compounds 16, 17, 19 and 20.

  8. Antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal properties of wines and winery byproducts in relation to their flavonoid content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Mendel

    2014-07-02

    Grapes produce organic compounds that may be involved in the defense of the plants against invading phytopathogens. These metabolites include numerous phenolic compounds that are also active against human pathogens. Grapes are used to produce a variety of wines, grape juices, and raisins. Grape pomace, seeds, and skins, the remains of the grapes that are a byproduct of winemaking, also contain numerous bioactive compounds that differ from those found in grapes and wines. This overview surveys and interprets our present knowledge of the activities of wines and winery byproducts and some of their bioactive components against foodborne (Bacillus cereus, Campylobacter jejuni, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enterica, Staphylococcus aureus, Yersinia enterocolitica, Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio vulnificus), medical (Helicobacter pylori, Klebsiella pneumoniae), and oral pathogenic bacteria, viruses (adeno, cytomegalo, hepatitis, noro, rota), fungi (Candida albicans, Botrytis cinerea), parasites (Eimeria tenella, Trichomonas vaginalis), and microbial toxins (ochratoxin A, Shiga toxin) in culture, in vivo, and in/on food (beef, chicken, frankfurters, hot dogs, lettuce, oysters, peppers, pork, sausages, soup, spinach) in relation to composition and sensory properties. Also covered are antimicrobial wine marinades, antioxidative and immunostimulating aspects, and adverse effects associated with wine consumption. The collated information and suggested research needs might facilitate and guide further studies needed to optimize the use of wines and byproducts to help improve microbial food safety and prevent or treat animal and human infections.

  9. Antibacterial and antifungal effect of high pH and paraffin wax ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGO

    2007-03-19

    Mar 19, 2007 ... digest the skin (by pecteolytic enzymes) and penetrate through it to the tissue below. In nearly all cases, the pre-. *Corresponding Author's E-mail: al_amsak2004@yahoo.com. sence of spoilage organisms in fruits and vegetables is a result of contamination of their surfaces. Therefore, one of the major ...

  10. Essential oils of aromatic plants with antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and cytotoxic properties--an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichling, Jürgen; Schnitzler, Paul; Suschke, Ulrike; Saller, Reinhard

    2009-04-01

    The abundant use of anti-infective agents resulted in the emergence of drug-resistant bacteria, fungi, and viruses. To overcome the increasing resistance of pathogenic microbes, a variety of medicinal plants have been screened worldwide for their antimicrobial properties. The aim is to find new, effective antimicrobial agents with novel modes of actions. Essential oils derived from aromatic medicinal plants have been reported to exhibit exceptionally good antimicrobial effects against bacteria, yeasts, filamentous fungi, and viruses. The progress of this expanding scientific field will be documented by the most important results published in the last decade. Copyright (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. The antibacterial and antifungal activity of essential oils extracted from Guatemalan medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Andrew B; Cates, Rex G; Lawrence, Michael; Soria, J Alfonso Fuentes; Espinoza, Luis V; Martinez, Jose Vicente; Arbizú, Dany A

    2015-04-01

    Essential oils are prevalent in many medicinal plants used for oral hygiene and treatment of diseases. Medicinal plant species were extracted to determine the essential oil content. Those producing sufficient oil were screened for activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus acidophilus, and Candida albicans. Plant samples were collected, frozen, and essential oils were extracted by steam distillation. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined using a tube dilution assay for those species yielding sufficient oil. Fifty-nine of the 141 plant species produced sufficient oil for collection and 12 species not previously reported to produce essential oils were identified. Essential oil extracts from 32 species exhibited activity against one or more microbes. Oils from eight species were highly inhibitory to S. mutans, four species were highly inhibitory to C. albicans, and 19 species yielded MIC values less than the reference drugs. RESULTS suggest that 11 species were highly inhibitory to the microbes tested and merit further investigation. Oils from Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume (Lauraceae), Citrus aurantiifolia (Christm.) Swingle (Rutaceae), Lippia graveolens Kunth (Verbenaceae), and Origanum vulgare L. (Lamiaceae) yielded highly significant or moderate activity against all microbes and have potential as antimicrobial agents. Teas prepared by decoction or infusion are known methods for extracting essential oils. Oils from 11 species were highly active against the microbes tested and merit investigation as to their potential for addressing health-related issues and in oral hygiene.

  12. Synthesis, antibacterial and antifungal activity of pyrazolyl-quinazolin-4(3H-one derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navin B. Patel

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of pyrazolyl-quinazolin-4(3H-ones 6a-m have been synthesized from 2-[2-(phenylaminophenyl]acetic acid by using efficient methods. An acid chloride of 2-[2-(phenylaminophenyl]acetic acid on cyclization reaction with 5-iodo anthranilic acid yielded benzoxazinone 2, which on condensation reaction with hydrazine hydrate afforded quinazolin-4(3H-one 3. Acetylation of compound 3 and then condensation with aromatic aldehydes led to the formation of chalcones 5a-m which on subjected to reaction with phenyl hydrazine yielded the disired compounds 6a-m. All the synthesized componds have been characterized by elemental analyses, IR and NMR spectra data. The title compounds have been screened against bacterial as well as fungal microorganisms. The potency of these compounds was calculated and compared with standard drugs i.e. Penicillin-G and Fluconazole. Some of the compounds showed very good antimicrobial activity.

  13. Bleeding in patients using new anticoagulants or antiplatelet agents: Risk factors and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levi, M.M.; Eerenberg, E.; Löwenberg, E.; Kamphuisen, P.W.

    2010-01-01

    The most important adverse effect of antithrombotic treatment is the occurrence of bleeding. in case of serious or even life-threatening bleeding in a patient who uses anticoagulant agents or when patient on anticoagulants needs to undergo an urgent invasive procedure, anticoagulant treatment can be

  14. Catalytic Synthesis and Antifungal Activity of New Polychlorinated Natural Terpenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Ighachane

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Various unsaturated natural terpenes were selectively converted to the corresponding polychlorinated products in good yields using iron acetylacetonate in combination with nucleophilic cocatalyst. The synthesized compounds were evaluated for their in vitro antifungal activity. The antifungal bioassays showed that 2c and 2d possessed significant antifungal activity against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. albedinis (Foa, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. canariensis (Foc, and Verticillium dahliae (Vd.

  15. Molecular basis of antifungal drug resistance in yeasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morio, Florent; Jensen, Rasmus Hare; Le Pape, Patrice

    2017-01-01

    Besides inherent differences in in vitro susceptibilities, clinically-relevant yeast species may acquire resistance upon exposure to most antifungal drugs used in the clinic. In recent years, major fundamental research studies have been conducted to improve our understanding of the molecular basis......., in the context of antifungal drug resistance. Also included are the methods currently available for in vitro antifungal susceptibility testing and for molecular detection of mutations associated with resistance. Finally, the genetic drivers of antifungal resistance are discussed in light of the spectra...

  16. Antifungal activity and molecular identification of endophytic fungi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antifungal activity and molecular identification of endophytic fungi from the angiosperm Rhodomyrtus tomentosa. Juthatip Jeenkeawpieam, Souwalak Phongpaichit, Vatcharin Rukachaisirikul, Jariya Sakayaroj ...

  17. Anticoagulant rodenticide toxicity in six dogs presenting for ocular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Angela N; Allbaugh, Rachel A; Tofflemire, Kyle L; Ben-Shlomo, Gil; Whitley, David; Paulsen, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    To describe cases of suspected anticoagulant rodenticide toxicity manifesting with predominantly ocular signs. Six canine cases that presented to veterinary referral hospitals for ocular abnormalities and were diagnosed with suspected or confirmed anticoagulant rodenticide ingestion were reviewed for commonalities in presentation and outcome. Five dogs had unilateral ocular signs and one dog had bilateral manifestations. Signs included subconjunctival hemorrhage, exophthalmos, and commonly orbital pain without other significant physical examination findings. Prothrombin time was measured in 5 of 6 dogs and was prolonged in all. Partial thromboplastin time was measured in 4 of 6 dogs and was prolonged in all. Complete blood cell count and serum chemistry profiles demonstrated mild, if any, abnormalities. Five dogs had known anticoagulant rodenticide exposure, and rodenticide ingestion was suspected in 1 additional case based on clinical signs, clinical pathologic abnormalities, and response to treatment. Five of 6 cases were hospitalized overnight for plasma transfusions along with oral or injectable vitamin K1 , and all dogs were treated with oral vitamin K1 for 30 days. All dogs experienced complete resolution of clinical signs within 6 weeks of initiating treatment. Anticoagulant rodenticide toxicity can present with predominantly ocular manifestations. Rodenticide ingestion should be considered in dogs with unilateral or bilateral subconjunctival hemorrhage, exophthalmos, and orbital pain. © 2015 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  18. Prevalence of Lupus Anticoagulant in Women with Spontaneous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-10-26

    Oct 26, 2017 ... Presence of lupus anticoagulant (LA), one of the antiphospholipid antibodies, has been associated with SA in many ... (a hexagonal-phase phospholipid) test and calculated Rosner index for prolonged. KCT were used for the ... marker for APL syndrome, the demonstration that β2-GPI can bind to anionic ...

  19. Citrate Anticoagulation for CRRT in Children: Comparison with Heparin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Nicole Fernández

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Regional anticoagulation with citrate is an alternative to heparin in continuous renal replacement therapies, which may prolong circuit lifetime and decrease hemorrhagic complications. A retrospective comparative cohort study based on a prospective observational registry was conducted including critically ill children undergoing CRRT. Efficacy, measured as circuit survival, and secondary effects of heparin and citrate were compared. 12 patients on CRRT with citrate anticoagulation and 24 patients with heparin anticoagulation were analyzed. Median citrate dose was 2.6 mmol/L. Median calcium dose was 0.16 mEq/kg/h. Median heparin dose was 15 UI/kg/h. Median circuit survival was 48 hours with citrate and 31 hours with heparin (P=0.028. 66.6% of patients treated with citrate developed mild metabolic alkalosis, which was directly related to citrate dose. There were no cases of citrate intoxication: median total calcium/ionic calcium index (CaT/I of 2.16 and a maximum CaT/I of 2.33, without metabolic acidosis. In the citrate group, 45.5% of patients developed hypochloremia and 27.3% hypomagnesemia. In the heparin group, 27.8% developed hypophosphatemia. Three patients were moved from heparin to citrate to control postoperatory bleeding. In conclusion citrate is a safe and effective anticoagulation method for CRRT in children and it achieves longer circuit survival than heparin.

  20. Anticoagulant activity of a natural protein purified from Hypomesus olidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Mengxing; Wang, Liyan; Liu, Xuejun

    2017-05-01

    A novel anticoagulant protein (E-II-1) was separated and purified from Hypomesus olidus, a unique freshwater fish in northern China. E-II-1 had a molecular mass of approximately 40 kDa with no subunits. The high content of hydrophobic amino acids and negatively charged amino acids in E-II-1 demonstrated that the amino acid compositions might contribute to the anticoagulant activity. E-II-1 contained α-helices 16.75%, β-sheets 42.67%, β-turn 25.58% and random coil 15.00%. In vitro blood coagulation time assay, E-II-1 significantly prolonged the activated partial thrombin time in a dose-dependent manner. Results indicated that E-II-1 acted as anticoagulants through the endogenous pathway with an inhibition of FXa. The specific activity of E-II-1 was 103.50 U/mg at a concentration of 1.00 mg/mL. Therefore, E-II-1 might be one of the promising anticoagulants originated from natural food sources with more safety and less side effects.

  1. Haemorrhage in the labyrinth caused by anticoagulant therapy: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callonnec, F.; Gerardin, E.; Thiebot, J. [Department of Radiology, Rouen University Hospital, 1 rue de Germont, F-76031 Rouen cedex (France); Marie, J.P.; Andrieu Guitrancourt, J. [Department of Otolaryngology, Rouen University Hospital (France); Marsot-Dupuch, K. [Department of Radiology, St. Antoine, Paris University Hospital (France)

    1999-06-01

    We report a patient who experienced a severe vertiginous episode with bilateral tinnitus and progressive right-sided hearing loss. She had Marfan`s disease and was on anticoagulant treatment. The fluid in the labyrinth gave higher signal than cerebrospinal fluid on T1-weighted images, suggesting haemorrhage. The radiological follow-up is discussed. (orig.) With 2 figs., 11 refs.

  2. Vitamin K and stability of oral anticoagulant therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rombouts, Eva Karolien

    2011-01-01

    One of the causes of unstable anticoagulation is a variable vitamin K intake. The main objective of this thesis was to test the hypothesis that the INR is particularly sensitive to changes in vitamin K intake when vitamin K status is low, and that patients with a low vitamin K intake would therefore

  3. Synthesis and anticoagulant activity of the quaternary ammonium chitosan sulfates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lihong; Wu, Penghui; Zhang, Jinrong; Gao, Song; Wang, Libo; Li, Mingjia; Sha, Mingming; Xie, Weiguo; Nie, Min

    2012-01-01

    Quaternary ammonium chitosan sulfates with diverse degrees of substitution (DS) ascribed to sulfate groups between 0.52 and 1.55 were synthesized by reacting quaternary ammonium chitosan with an uncommon sulfating agent (N(SO(3)Na)(3)) that was prepared from sodium bisulfite (NaHSO(3)) through reaction with sodium nitrite (NaNO(2)) in the aqueous system homogeneous. The structures of the derivatives were characterized by FTIR, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR. The factors affecting DS of quaternary ammonium chitosan sulfates which included the molar ratio of NaNO(2) to quaternary ammonium chitosan, sulfated temperature, sulfated time and pH of sulfated reaction solution were investigated in detail. Its anticoagulation activity in vitro was determined by an activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) assay, a thrombin time (TT) assay and a prothrombin time (PT) assay. Results of anticoagulation assays showed quaternary ammonium chitosan sulfates significantly prolonged APTT and TT, but not PT, and demonstrated that the introduction of sulfate groups into the quaternary ammonium chitosan structure improved its anticoagulant activity obviously. The study showed its anticoagulant properties strongly depended on its DS, concentration and molecular weight. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Prevalence of Lupus Anticoagulant in Women with Spontaneous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Spontaneous abortion (SA) is a common complication of pregnancy. Presence of lupus anticoagulant (LA), one of the antiphospholipid antibodies, has been associated with SA in many studies, especially in Caucasians. This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of LA in women with SA in ABUTH, ...

  5. Challenges in management of Warfarin anti-coagulation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Challenges in management of Warfarin anti-coagulation in advanced HIV/AIDS patients with venous thrombotic events - A case series from a research clinic in rural Kericho, Kenya. ... VTE was diagnosed 52 (1-469) days after ART initiation, and 81.8% of cases were outpatients at presentation. All patients received at least ...

  6. pattern of anticoagulation control after heart valve surgery at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-07-07

    Jul 7, 2000 ... Regular attendance by the patients, supplemented by a system of quality control anticaogulation are the prerequisites of such a service. In some centres where such quality control systems are in place, levels of adequate. INR control maintained up to 80% of the patients attending the anticoagulation clinic ...

  7. Perioperative anticoagulation for children with prosthetic mechanical valves

    OpenAIRE

    Grech, Victor E.; Rees, Philip G.

    2000-01-01

    The insertion of a mechanical heart valve predisposes to thrombosis and embolism, and for this reason, individuals with mechanical valves who undergo dental/surgical procedures must take special precautions. In this article, we illustrate a protocol for anticoagulation during such procedures in individuals with mechanical valves.

  8. Anticoagulant drugs increase natural killer cell activity in lung cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bobek, M.; Boubelík, Michael; Fišerová, Anna; Luptovcová, Martina; Vannucci, Luca; Kacprzak, G.; Kolodzej, J.; Majewski, A.M.; Hoffman, R. M.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 2 (2005), s. 215-223 ISSN 0169-5002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : anticoagulant drugs * lung cancer * NK cells Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.172, year: 2005

  9. New developments in parenteral anticoagulation for arterial and venous thromboembolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Es, Nick; Bleker, Suzanne M.; Büller, Harry R.; Coppens, Michiel

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of heparin and low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs) are well documented in venous and arterial thromboembolism. Several drawbacks of heparins have inspired the development of newer parenteral anticoagulants for specific indications, including heparin-induced thrombocytopenia

  10. Antithrombotic/anticoagulant and anticancer activities of selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nine plants available in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa were tested for antithrombotic and/or anticoagulant activity. Organic (methanol) and aqueous (distilled water) extractions were performed on the various plant parts. The thrombin assay and clotting time assays (thrombin-induced and CaCl2-induced) were ...

  11. Standardisation of the Laboratory Control of Anticoagulant Therapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-09-11

    Sep 11, 1974 ... Anticoagulant therapy with the coumarin group of drugs has been used in clinical practice for more than a quarter of a century. The most widely used form of laboratory control of the treatment is the Quick one-stage prothrom·- bin time. I. This simple test proved to be satisfactory in most cases, but discrepant ...

  12. Risk of bleeding after dentoalveolar surgery in patients taking anticoagulants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekema, Ferdinand I.; van Minnen, Baucke; Jansma, Johan; Bos, Rudolf R. M.

    To avoid increasing the risk of thromboembolic events, it is recommended that treatment with anticoagulants should be continued during dentoalveolar operations. We have evaluated the incidence of bleeding after dentoalveolar operations in a prospective study of 206 patients, 103 who were, and 103

  13. Primary care monitoring of patients under oral anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnelo, Pedro; Alexandra, Denise; Matias, Sara

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of new oral anticoagulants that do not require regular laboratory control but are significantly more expensive, there has been renewed interest in the quality of the classic agents and the monitoring of patients taking them. We set out to analyze time in therapeutic range of patients under oral anticoagulation monitored in our health unit, to determine whether primary care monitoring is comparable to that in anticoagulation clinics. At the same time, we aimed to ascertain whether there was any association between the dosing method (unit protocol vs. computer-assisted) and the time in therapeutic range achieved.Methods We analyzed all INR values determined in our health unit during the first six months of 2012, using Excel 2007 and SPSS version 17.0, and applying the Student's t test for a level of significance of 0.05. All INR assessments during the first six months of 2012 were recorded, a total of 320 tests; mean patient age was 69.9±11.25 years, 63% male. Dose adjustments were made according to the unit protocol in 77% of cases. Atrial fibrillation was the most prevalent indication. Most values (65.3%) were within the target therapeutic range; 24.1% were subtherapeutic and 10.6% supratherapeutic. Computer-assisted dosing achieved better control than the protocol (72.5% vs. 62.9%), without statistical significance. Primary care monitoring of oral anticoagulation appears to be comparable to that in anticoagulation clinics, while affording better access and cost reductions. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  14. Adverse effects of anticoagulation treatment: clinically significant upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Skok

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the last years, the use of oral anticoagulant treatment has increased dramatically, principally for the prevention of venous thrombosis and thrombembolic events. This treatment is demanding, especially among the elderly with concommitant diseases and different medication. Aim of the study to evaluate the rate of serious complications, clinically significant hemorrhage from upper gastointestinal tract in patients treated with oral antiocoagulants in a prospective cohort study.Patients and methods: Included were patients admitted to our institution between January 1, 1994 and December 31, 2003 due to gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Emergency endoscopy and laboratory testing was performed in all patients.Results: 6416 patients were investigated: 2452 women (38.2 % and 3964 men (61.8 %, mean age 59.1 years, SD 17.2. Among our patients, 55 % were aged over 60 years. In 86.4 % of patients the source of bleeding was confirmed in the upper gastrointestinal tract. In the last week prior to bleeding, 20.4 % (1309/6416 of all patients were regularly taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, anticoagulant therapy or antiplatelet agents in single daily doses at least. 6.3 % of patients (82/1309 with abundant hemorrhage from upper gastrointestinal tract were using oral anticoagulant therapy and had INR > 5 at admission, 25.6 % of them had INR > 10. The mortality of patients using oral anticoagulants and INR > 5 was 17.1 %.Conclusions: Upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage is a serious complication of different medications, particularly in elderly patients. Safe use of anticoagulant therapy is based on careful selection of patients and correct intake of the prescribed drugs.

  15. THE ANTICOAGULANT AND ANTILYMPHOMA PROPERTIES OF ARSENIC AZOPROTEINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broome, J. D.; Kidd, John G.

    1964-01-01

    Experiments given in this paper have shown that 4-arsonophenylazoproteins possess marked anticoagulant activity both in vivo and in vitro. Mice and rabbits given moderate amounts of the arsenic azoprotein, for example, often bled to death from injuries that proved trivial in control animals, and their blood remained liquid during many hours' postmortem even when left in contact with transected tissues, fibrinolysis having no part in the outcome. So, too, the addition of minute amounts of 4-arsonophenylazoprotein to plasma procured from citrated rabbit or human blood greatly prolonged the time required for clotting after recalcification. Other arsenic-containing compounds,—for example, those in which arsenic See PDF for Structure was joined to amino acids or peptides through the azo linkage, or to proteins through couplings other than the azo linkage,—were largely devoid of anticoagulant and antilymphoma effects. The findings as a whole show clearly that the structural requirements for anticoagulant and antilymphoma effects are: (a) possession of negatively charged arsonic or arsinoso groups, (b) large molecular size (protein), and (c) linkage of arsenic-containing groups to protein through the azo bond. Two acidic azoproteins that were devoid of arsenic,—namely 4-carboxyphenylazoprotein and 4-sulfonophenylazoprotein,—were also found to have marked anticoagulant effects in vitro, but they had no inhibitory action against cells of Lymphoma 6C3HED in vivo, even when they were given to mice in maximum tolerated amounts. The essential part played by arsenic in the antilymphoma activity of arsenic azoproteins was further emphasized by the action of dimercaprol (BAL) in preventing the antilymphoma effects of 4-arsonophenylazoprotein on Lymphoma 6C3HED cells in vivo. In an associated paper the anticoagulant and antilymphoma effects of 4-arsonophenylazoproteins are studied further, and consideration is given to the ways in which these effects may be brought about

  16. Clinicomycological Profile and Antifungal Sensitivity Pattern of Commonly Used Azoles in Dermatophytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Mathur

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: This study highlighted the increasing resistance of the antifungals, which is responsible for the treatment failure in dermatophye infections. Keywords: antifungal resistance; dermatophyte; epidemiology.

  17. phytochemical screening, antibacterial and toxicological activities

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dealer

    The phytochemical screening, antibacterial and toxicological activities of extracts of the stem bark of Acacia senegal were investigated. ... Keywords: Phytochemical Screening, Antibacterial Activity, Toxicological Activity Acacia senegal,. Extracts. INTRODUCTION ..... Vegetable Drugs; Chemical Industries. Branch; Division of ...

  18. Antibacterial liamocins with alternative carbohydrate headgroups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liamocins are unique polyol lipids with biosurfactant, anticancer, and antibacterial properties, produced by certain strains of the fungus Aureobasidium pullulans. Liamocins have potential agricultural and pharmaceutical applications as antibacterials with specificity against Streptococcus sp. There...

  19. Antibacterial surface design - Contact kill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Rajbir; Liu, Song

    2016-08-01

    Designing antibacterial surfaces has become extremely important to minimize Healthcare Associated Infections which are a major cause of mortality worldwide. A previous biocide-releasing approach is based on leaching of encapsulated biocides such as silver and triclosan which exerts negative impacts on the environment and potentially contributes to the development of bacterial resistance. This drawback of leachable compounds led to the shift of interest towards a more sustainable and environmentally friendly approach: contact-killing surfaces. Biocides that can be bound onto surfaces to give the substrates contact-active antibacterial activity include quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs), quaternary phosphoniums (QPs), carbon nanotubes, antibacterial peptides, and N-chloramines. Among the above, QACs and N-chloramines are the most researched contact-active biocides. We review the engineering of contact-active surfaces using QACs or N-chloramines, the modes of actions as well as the test methods. The charge-density threshold of cationic surfaces for desired antibacterial efficacy and attempts to combine various biocides for the generation of new contact-active surfaces are discussed in detail. Surface positive charge density is identified as a key parameter to define antibacterial efficacy. We expect that this research field will continue to attract more research interest in view of the potential impact of self-disinfective surfaces on healthcare-associated infections, food safety and corrosion/fouling resistance required on industrial surfaces such as oil pipes and ship hulls.

  20. Substituted Hydroxyapatites with Antibacterial Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Kolmas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reconstructive surgery is presently struggling with the problem of infections located within implantation biomaterials. Of course, the best antibacterial protection is antibiotic therapy. However, oral antibiotic therapy is sometimes ineffective, while administering an antibiotic at the location of infection is often associated with an unfavourable ratio of dosage efficiency and toxic effect. Thus, the present study aims to find a new factor which may improve antibacterial activity while also presenting low toxicity to the human cells. Such factors are usually implemented along with the implant itself and may be an integral part of it. Many recent studies have focused on inorganic factors, such as metal nanoparticles, salts, and metal oxides. The advantages of inorganic factors include the ease with which they can be combined with ceramic and polymeric biomaterials. The following review focuses on hydroxyapatites substituted with ions with antibacterial properties. It considers materials that have already been applied in regenerative medicine (e.g., hydroxyapatites with silver ions and those that are only at the preliminary stage of research and which could potentially be used in implantology or dentistry. We present methods for the synthesis of modified apatites and the antibacterial mechanisms of various ions as well as their antibacterial efficiency.

  1. Substituted Hydroxyapatites with Antibacterial Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmas, Joanna; Groszyk, Ewa; Kwiatkowska-Różycka, Dagmara

    2014-01-01

    Reconstructive surgery is presently struggling with the problem of infections located within implantation biomaterials. Of course, the best antibacterial protection is antibiotic therapy. However, oral antibiotic therapy is sometimes ineffective, while administering an antibiotic at the location of infection is often associated with an unfavourable ratio of dosage efficiency and toxic effect. Thus, the present study aims to find a new factor which may improve antibacterial activity while also presenting low toxicity to the human cells. Such factors are usually implemented along with the implant itself and may be an integral part of it. Many recent studies have focused on inorganic factors, such as metal nanoparticles, salts, and metal oxides. The advantages of inorganic factors include the ease with which they can be combined with ceramic and polymeric biomaterials. The following review focuses on hydroxyapatites substituted with ions with antibacterial properties. It considers materials that have already been applied in regenerative medicine (e.g., hydroxyapatites with silver ions) and those that are only at the preliminary stage of research and which could potentially be used in implantology or dentistry. We present methods for the synthesis of modified apatites and the antibacterial mechanisms of various ions as well as their antibacterial efficiency. PMID:24949423

  2. Oral Anticoagulant Use After Bariatric Surgery: A Literature Review and Clinical Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Karlyn A; Lee, Craig R; Farrell, Timothy M; Moll, Stephan

    2017-05-01

    Bariatric surgery may alter the absorption, distribution, metabolism, or elimination (disposition) of orally administered drugs via changes to the gastrointestinal tract anatomy, body weight, and adipose tissue composition. As some patients who have undergone bariatric surgery will need therapeutic anticoagulation for various indications, appropriate knowledge is needed regarding anticoagulant drug disposition and resulting efficacy and safety in this population. We review general considerations about oral drug disposition in patients after bariatric surgery, as well as existing literature on oral anticoagulation after bariatric surgery. Overall, available evidence on therapeutic anticoagulation is very limited, and individual drug studies are necessary to learn how to safely and effectively use the direct oral anticoagulants. Given the sparsity of currently available data, it appears most prudent to use warfarin with international normalized ratio monitoring, and not direct oral anticoagulants, when full-dose anticoagulation is needed after bariatric surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Chemical modification of antifungal polyene macrolide antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solovieva, S E; Olsufyeva, E N; Preobrazhenskaya, M N

    2011-01-01

    The review summarizes advances in the methods for the synthesis of polyene antibiotics (amphotericin B, partricin A, etc.) and investigations of the structure-activity relationship made in the last 15 years. State-of-the-art approaches based on the combination of the chemical synthesis and genetic engineering are considered. Emphasis is given to the design of semisynthetic antifungal agents against chemotherapy-resistant pathogens having the highest therapeutic indices. Recent results of research on the mechanisms of action of polyenes are outlined.

  4. Antifungal activity of different extracts of Ageratum conyzoides for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antifungal activity of different extracts of Ageratum conyzoides for the management of Fusarium solani. Sidra Javed, Uzma Bashir. Abstract. Ageratum conyzoides L. is potential allelopathic weed very useful for its antifungal and antimicrobial activity. Being environmentally safe and friendly, it has the potential to substitute ...

  5. Nosocomial Candidiasis: Antifungal Stewardship and the Importance of Rapid Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaller, Michael A; Castanheira, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    Candidemia and other forms of candidiasis are associated with considerable excess mortality and costs. Despite the addition of several new antifungal agents with improved spectrum and potency, the frequency of Candida infection and associated mortality have not decreased in the past two decades. The lack of rapid and sensitive diagnostic tests has led to considerable overuse of antifungal agents resulting in increased costs, selection pressure for resistance, unnecessary drug toxicity, and adverse drug interactions. Both the lack of timely diagnostic tests and emergence of antifungal resistance pose considerable problems for antifungal stewardship. Whereas antifungal stewardship with a focus on nosocomial candidiasis should be able to improve the administration of antifungal therapy in terms of drug selection, proper dose and duration, source control and de-escalation therapy, an important parameter, timeliness of antifungal therapy, remains a victim of slow and insensitive diagnostic tests. Fortunately, new proteomic and molecular diagnostic tools are improving the time to species identification and detection. In this review we will describe the potential impact that rapid diagnostic testing and antifungal stewardship can have on the management of nosocomial candidiasis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Cuticular antifungals in spiders: density- and condition dependence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel González-Tokman

    Full Text Available Animals living in groups face a high risk of disease contagion. In many arthropod species, cuticular antimicrobials constitute the first protective barrier that prevents infections. Here we report that group-living spiders produce cuticular chemicals which inhibit fungal growth. Given that cuticular antifungals may be costly to produce, we explored whether they can be modulated according to the risk of contagion (i.e. under high densities. For this purpose, we quantified cuticular antifungal activity in the subsocial crab spider Diaea ergandros in both natural nests and experimentally manipulated nests of varying density. We quantified the body-condition of spiders to test whether antifungal activity is condition dependent, as well as the effect of spider density on body-condition. We predicted cuticular antifungal activity to increase and body-condition to decrease with high spider densities, and that antifungal activity would be inversely related to body-condition. Contrary to our predictions, antifungal activity was neither density- nor condition-dependent. However, body-condition decreased with density in natural nests, but increased in experimental nests. We suggest that pathogen pressure is so important in nature that it maintains high levels of cuticular antifungal activity in spiders, impacting negatively on individual energetic condition. Future studies should identify the chemical structure of the isolated antifungal compounds in order to understand the physiological basis of a trade-off between disease prevention and energetic condition caused by group living, and its consequences in the evolution of sociality in spiders.

  7. In vitro antifungal activity of Dorstenia mannii leaf extracts (Moraceae)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owner

    The active ingredients of this plant could be an addition to the antifungal arsenal to opportunistic fungal yeast pathogens. Key words: Antifungal activity, Dorstenia mannii, yeasts, opportunistic candidiasis. INTRODUCTION. Nowadays, fungal diseases have emerged and are being increasingly recognized as important public ...

  8. Antifungal cyclic peptides from the marine sponge Microscleroderma herdmani

    Science.gov (United States)

    Screening natural product extracts from National Cancer Institute Open Repository for antifungal discovery afforded hits for bioassay-guided fractionation. Upon LC-MS analysis of column fractions with antifungal activities to generate information on chemical structure, two new cyclic hexapeptides, m...

  9. In vitro control of Alternaria citri using antifungal potentials of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In vitro control of Alternaria citri using antifungal potentials of Trichoderma species. Asma Murtaza, Shazia Shafique, Tehmina Anjum, Sobiya Shafique. Abstract. The antifungal potential of five species of Trichoderma viz., Trichoderma viride, Trichoderma aureoviride, Trichoderma reesei, Trichoderma koningii and ...

  10. [Derivatives of 4-nitroso-aminopyrazole as antifungal agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giori, P; Mazzotta, D; Vertuani, G; Guarneri, M; Pancaldi, D; Brunelli, A

    1981-12-01

    The synthesis of 4-nitroso-5-amminopyrazoles and of 4-nitroso-5-pyrazolylurethans and -ureas is described. The chemicals were tested for antifungal activity against Erysiphe graminis, Erysiphe cichoracearum, Puccinia recondita, Septoria apii and Rhizoctonia solani. A number of the described compounds showed some antifungal activity.

  11. The role of the multidisciplinary team in antifungal stewardship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agrawal, S.; Barnes, R.; Bruggemann, R.J.; Rautemaa-Richardson, R.; Warris, A.

    2016-01-01

    There are a variety of challenges faced in the management of invasive fungal diseases (IFD), including high case-fatality rates, high cost of antifungal drugs and development of antifungal resistance. The diagnostic challenges and poor outcomes associated with IFD have resulted in excessive

  12. Antifungal Activity of Endemic Salvia tigrina in Turkey | Dulger ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ketoconazole was used as a positive reference standard to determine the sensitivity of the strains. Results: The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ranged from 3.12 to 25 mg/mL. All the extracts exhibited a strong antifungal effect against the fungal cultures. The extracts exhibited greater antifungal effect against C.

  13. IIn vitro antifungal evaluation of various plant extracts against early ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antifungal activities of 27 plant extracts were tested against Alternaria solani (E. & M.) Jones and Grout using radial growth technique. While all tested plant extracts produced some antifungal activities, the results revealed that Circium arvense, Humulus lupulus, Lauris nobilis and Salvia officinalis showed significant ...

  14. Identification and antifungal activity of Streptomyces sp. S72 isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The test of antifungal activity for several pathogens fungi causing invasive aspergillosis and systemic candidiasis revealed that the Streptomyces sp. S72 was a good moderate antifungal compound producer against Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans, and had no activity against Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus ...

  15. Spectrophotometric reading of EUCAST antifungal susceptibility testing of Aspergillus fumigatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meletiadis, J.; Mortensen, K.L.; Verweij, P.E.; Mouton, J.W.; Arendrup, M.C.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Given the increasing number of antifungal drugs and the emergence of resistant Aspergillus isolates, objective, automated and high-throughput antifungal susceptibility testing is important. The EUCAST E.Def 9.3 reference method for MIC determination of Aspergillus species relies on

  16. Antifungal activity of crude extracts of Gladiolus dalenii van Geel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bulb extracts of Gladiolus dalenii reportedly used in the treatment of fungal infections in HIV/AIDS patients in the Lake Victoria region were tested for antifungal activity using the disc diffusion assay technique. Commercially used antifungal drugs, Ketaconazole and Griseofulvin (Cosmos Pharmaceuticals) were used as ...

  17. In vitro Antifungal, Antioxidant and Cytotoxic Activities of a Partially ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the in vitro antifungal and antioxidant activities of the aqueous extract and protein fraction of Atlantia monophylla Linn (Rutaceae) leaf. Methods: Ammonium sulphate (0 – 80 %) precipitation method was used to extract protein from the leaves of A. monophylla Linn (Rutaceae). In vitro antifungal ...

  18. Antiplatelet and anticoagulation for patients with prosthetic heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massel, David R; Little, Stephen H

    2013-07-09

    Patients with prosthetic heart valves are at increased risk for valve thrombosis and arterial thromboembolism. Oral anticoagulation alone, or the addition of antiplatelet drugs, has been used to minimise this risk. An important issue is the effectiveness and safety of the latter strategy. This is an update of our previous review; the goal was to create a valid synthesis of all available, methodologically sound data to further assess the safety and efficacy of combined oral anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy versus oral anticoagulant monotherapy in patients with prosthetic heart valves. We updated the previous searches from 2003 and 2010 on 16 January 2013 and searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) on The Cochrane Library (2012, Issue 12), MEDLINE (OVID, 1946 to January Week 1 2013), and EMBASE (OVID, 1980 to 2013 Week 02). We have also looked at reference lists of individual reports, review articles, meta-analyses, and consensus statements. We included reports published in any language or in abstract form. All reports of randomised controlled trials comparing standard-dose oral anticoagulation to standard-dose oral anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy in patients with one or more prosthetic heart valves. Two review authors independently performed the search strategy, assessed trials for inclusion and study quality, and extracted data. We collected adverse effects information from the trials. One new study has been identified and included in this update. In total, 13 studies involving 4122 participants were included in this review update. Years of publication ranged from 1971 to 2011. Compared with anticoagulation alone, the addition of an antiplatelet agent reduced the risk of thromboembolic events (odds ratio (OR) 0.43, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.32 to 0.59; P heart valves. The risk of major bleeding is increased with antiplatelet therapy. These results apply to patients with mechanical prosthetic valves or those with

  19. DYSREGULATION OF ION HOMEOSTASIS BY ANTIFUNGAL AGENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqiang eZhang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Ion signaling and transduction networks are central to fungal development and virulence because they regulate gene expression, filamentation, host association and invasion, pathogen stress response and survival. Dysregulation of ion homeostasis rapidly mediates cell death, forming the mechanistic basis by which a growing number of amphipathic but structurally unrelated compounds elicit antifungal activity. Included in this group is carvacrol, a terpenoid phenol that is a prominent component of oregano and other plant essential oils. Carvacrol triggers an early dose dependent Ca2+ burst and long lasting pH changes in the model yeast S. cerevisiae. The distinct phases of ionic transients and a robust transcriptional response that overlaps with Ca2+ stress and nutrient starvation point to specific signaling events elicited by plant terpenoid phenols, rather than a non-specific lesion of the membrane as was previously considered. We discuss the potential use of plant essential oils and other agents that disrupt ion signaling pathways as chemosensitizers to augment conventional antifungal therapy, and to convert fungistatic drugs with strong safety profiles into fungicides.

  20. Oxylipin studies expose aspirin as antifungal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, Johan L F; Sebolai, Olihile M; Pohl, Carolina H; van Wyk, Pieter W J; Lodolo, Elizabeth J

    2007-12-01

    The presence of aspirin-sensitive 3-hydroxy fatty acids (i.e. 3-OH oxylipins) in yeasts was first reported in the early 1990s. Since then, these oxidized fatty acids have been found to be widely distributed in yeasts. 3-OH oxylipins may: (1) have potent biological activity in mammalian cells; (2) act as antifungals; and (3) assist during forced spore release from enclosed sexual cells (asci). A link between 3-OH oxylipin production, mitochondria and aspirin sensitivity exists. Research suggests that: (1) 3-OH oxylipins in some yeasts are probably also produced by mitochondria through incomplete beta-oxidation; (2) aspirin inhibits mitochondrial beta-oxidation and 3-OH oxylipin production; (3) yeast sexual stages, which are probably more dependent on mitochondrial activity, are also characterized by higher 3-OH oxylipin levels as compared to asexual stages; (4) yeast sexual developmental stages as well as cell adherence/flocculation are more sensitive to aspirin than corresponding asexual growth stages; and (5) mitochondrion-dependent asexual yeast cells with a strict aerobic metabolism are more sensitive to aspirin than those that can also produce energy through an alternative anaerobic glycolytic fermentative pathway in which mitochondria are not involved. This review interprets a wide network of studies that reveal aspirin to be a novel antifungal.

  1. Antifungal Quinoline Alkaloids from Waltheria indica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretton, Sylvian; Dorsaz, Stéphane; Azzollini, Antonio; Favre-Godal, Quentin; Marcourt, Laurence; Ebrahimi, Samad Nejad; Voinesco, Francine; Michellod, Emilie; Sanglard, Dominique; Gindro, Katia; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Cuendet, Muriel; Christen, Philippe

    2016-02-26

    Chemical investigation of a dichloromethane extract of the aerial parts of Waltheria indica led to the isolation and characterization of five polyhydroxymethoxyflavonoids, namely, oxyanin A (1), vitexicarpin (3), chrysosplenol E (4), flindulatin (5), 5-hydroxy-3,7,4'-trimethoxyflavone (6), and six quinolone alkaloids, waltheriones M-Q (2, 7, 8, 10, 11) and 5(R)-vanessine (9). Among these, compounds 2, 7, 8, 10, and 11 have not yet been described in the literature. Their chemical structures were established by means of spectroscopic data interpretation including (1)H and (13)C, HSQC, HMBC, COSY, and NOESY NMR experiments and UV, IR, and HRESIMS. The absolute configurations of the compounds were established by ECD. The isolated constituents and 10 additional quinoline alkaloids previously isolated from the roots of the plant were evaluated for their in vitro antifungal activity against the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, and 10 compounds (7, 9, 11-16, 18, 21) showed growth inhibitory activity on both planktonic cells and biofilms (MIC ≤ 32 μg/mL). Their spectrum of activity against other pathogenic Candida species and their cytotoxicity against human HeLa cells were also determined. In addition, the cytological effect of the antifungal isolated compounds on the ultrastructure of C. albicans was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy.

  2. Microbial biotransformation to obtain new antifungals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando Bianchini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Antifungal drugs belong to few chemical groups and such low diversity limits the therapeutic choices. The urgent need of innovative options has pushed researchers to search new bioactive molecules. Literature regarding the last 15 years reveals that different research groups have used different approaches to achieve such goal. However, the discovery of molecules with different mechanisms of action still demands considerable time and efforts. This review was conceived to present how Pharmaceutical Biotechnology might contribute to the discovery of molecules with antifungal properties by microbial biotransformation procedures. Authors present some aspects of (1 microbial biotransformation of herbal medicines and food; (2 possibility of major and minor molecular amendments in existing molecules by biocatalysis; (3 methodological improvements in processes involving whole cells and immobilized enzymes; (4 potential of endophytic fungi to produce antimicrobials by bioconversions; and (5 in silico research driving to the improvement of molecules. All these issues belong to a new conception of transformation procedures, so-called green chemistry, which aims the highest possible efficiency with reduced production of waste and the smallest environmental impact.

  3. Microbial Biotransformation to Obtain New Antifungals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, Luiz F.; Arruda, Maria F. C.; Vieira, Sergio R.; Campelo, Patrícia M. S.; Grégio, Ana M. T.; Rosa, Edvaldo A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Antifungal drugs belong to few chemical groups and such low diversity limits the therapeutic choices. The urgent need of innovative options has pushed researchers to search new bioactive molecules. Literature regarding the last 15 years reveals that different research groups have used different approaches to achieve such goal. However, the discovery of molecules with different mechanisms of action still demands considerable time and efforts. This review was conceived to present how Pharmaceutical Biotechnology might contribute to the discovery of molecules with antifungal properties by microbial biotransformation procedures. Authors present some aspects of (1) microbial biotransformation of herbal medicines and food; (2) possibility of major and minor molecular amendments in existing molecules by biocatalysis; (3) methodological improvements in processes involving whole cells and immobilized enzymes; (4) potential of endophytic fungi to produce antimicrobials by bioconversions; and (5) in silico research driving to the improvement of molecules. All these issues belong to a new conception of transformation procedures, so-called “green chemistry,” which aims the highest possible efficiency with reduced production of waste and the smallest environmental impact. PMID:26733974

  4. Antifungal agents in non-neonatologic pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elio Castagnola

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of action of antifungal agents helps driving the choice of the treatment, basing on the activity against the fungus of interest. Pharmacokinetics should also be taken into account, considering the time-dependent and the concentration-dependent drugs. Triazoles belong to the first group, while amphotericin B and echinocandins belong to the second one. The effectiveness of time-dependent drugs hangs on the time spent above the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC, whereas that of concentration-dependent drugs is related to the peak of concentration achieved. Thetissue penetration is another important factor that should be taken into account while prescribing an antifungal agent. Interactions with other drugs, above all with those used to treat underlying pathologies, should also be considered. Fungicidal drugs are generally preferred to fungistatic agents, therefore echinocandins and amphotericin B are more prescribed than azoles. Combination therapies are not recommended.http://dx.doi.org/10.7175/rhc.v4i1S.860

  5. Oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senoo, Keitaro; Lane, Deirdre A; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2014-09-01

    The availability of 4 non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs), that is, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban, has changed the landscape of stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. This review article provides an overview of the 4 phase III studies that have compared these NOACs, examining major outcomes of efficacy and safety. A range of practical questions relating to the NOACs have emerged, including topics such as patient selection, treating patients with renal impairment, treating elderly patients, and combining anticoagulant therapy with antiplatelet drugs. We also address the interaction of various patient characteristics with the treatments and suggest the features can assist the physician in the choice of a particular NOAC for a particular patient(s). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Recent developments in the use of oral anticoagulants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Michael R

    2009-01-01

    For many years, vitamin K antagonists, unfractionated heparins, low-molecular-weight heparins and a pentasaccharide were the only anticoagulant drugs available for the prevention of venous thromboembolism after surgery. However, their benefits were associated with disadvantages, such as their sub......For many years, vitamin K antagonists, unfractionated heparins, low-molecular-weight heparins and a pentasaccharide were the only anticoagulant drugs available for the prevention of venous thromboembolism after surgery. However, their benefits were associated with disadvantages......, such as their subcutaneous route of administration or the need for coagulation monitoring. Research was challenged to develop new drugs that would simplify thromboprophylaxis while showing equivalent or better efficacy. Rivaroxaban and dabigatran are now available in some countries for the prevention of venous...

  7. Direct Oral Anticoagulants: An Overview for the Interventional Radiologist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Pradesh, E-mail: pradeshkumar@doctors.org.uk; Ravi, Rajeev, E-mail: rajeev.ravi@aintree.nhs.uk; Sundar, Gaurav, E-mail: gaurav.sundar@aintree.nhs.uk [Aintree University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Radiology Department (United Kingdom); Shiach, Caroline, E-mail: caroline.shiach@aintree.nhs.uk [Aintree University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Haematology Department (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-15

    The direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have emerged as a good alternative for the treatment of thromboembolic diseases, and their use in clinical practice is increasing rapidly. The DOACs act by blocking the activity of one single step in the coagulation cascade. These drugs act downstream in the common pathway of the coagulation cascade by directly antagonising the action of thrombin or factor Xa. The development of DOACs represents a paradigm shift from the oral vitamin K antagonists such as warfarin. This article aims to describe the properties of the currently available DOACs including pharmacology and dosing. We also address the strategies for periprocedural management and reversal of anticoagulation of patients treated with these agents.

  8. Anticoagulant activity of Moon jellyfish (Aurelia aurita) tentacle extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Akriti; Biswas, Sumit; Sarkar, Angshuman; Chakrabarty, Dibakar

    2012-10-01

    Moon jellyfish (Aurelia aurita) tentacle extract was studied for its anticoagulant activity in vitro. The Jellyfish Tentacle Extract (JFTE) showed very strong fibrinogenolytic activity by cleaving Aα and Bβ chain of fibrinogen molecule. The fibrinogenolytic activity was found to be stronger than some snake venom derived anticoagulants. JFTE also completely liquefied fibrin clots in 24 h. JFTE was found to contain both high and low molecular weight proteins/peptides. The fibrinogenolysis appears to be caused by high molecular weight fractions of the extract. It has been also noted that PMSF significantly reduced fibrinogenolytic activity and heating totally abolished it. Autolytic degradation of the high molecular weight protein was also noted. Autolysis slowed down, but did not abolish the fibrinogenolytic activity of the extract. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Self-management of oral anticoagulant therapy in two centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Hanna; Grove, E; Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard

    Self-management of oral anticoagulant therapy in two centers: 11.000 patient-years of follow-up H Nilsson1,2,3, EL Grove2, TB Larsen3, M Maegaard1, TD Christensen1 1Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery & Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus; 2Department...... of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus; 3Department of Cardiology, Aalborg Hospital & Department of Health Science and Technology, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark haana_86@hotmail.com Objectives: Patient-self-management (PSM) of oral anticoagulant therapy with vitamin K antagonists have...... clinical practice. Materials and methods: A case-series study including all patients who had passed an exam in PSM in the period 1995-2012 at Aarhus University Hospital or Aalborg University Hospital, including 2200 patients and 11000 patient-years in total. The effectiveness was measured using...

  10. Net clinical benefit of combination anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy versus anticoagulation alone in atrial fibrillation patients: Results from the amadeus trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lane, Deirdre; Kamphuisen, Pieter; Minini, Pascal; De Peuter, Olaf R.; Buller, Harry R.; Lip, Gregory Y. H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: To compare the effect of combination anticoagulant and antiplatelet (AP) therapy with anticoagulation alone on stroke and bleeding risk in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients and examine predictors of clinically relevant bleeding. Methods: Post-hoc analysis of 4576 AF patients [mean (SD)

  11. Conservatively managed pineal apoplexy in an anticoagulated patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werder, Gabriel M.; Razdan, Rahul S.; Gagliardi, Joseph A.; Chaddha, Shashi K.B.

    2008-01-01

    We present a case of pineal apoplexy in an anticoagulated and hypertensive 56-year-old Hispanic male. At presentation, the patient's international normalized ratio (INR) was 10.51 and his blood pressure was 200/130 mmHg. His presenting symptoms included acute onset of headache, chest pain, nausea, vomiting, vertigo, and visual disturbance. Neuroimaging demonstrated hemorrhage into a morphologically normal pineal gland. Under conservative management, the patient experienced gradual resolution of all symptoms excluding the disturbance of upward gaze

  12. Patients' preferences in anticoagulant therapy: discrete choice experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafzadeh, Mehdi; Gagne, Joshua J; Choudhry, Niteesh K; Polinski, Jennifer M; Avorn, Jerry; Schneeweiss, Sebastian S

    2014-11-01

    With proliferating treatment options for anticoagulant therapy, physicians and patients must choose among them based on their benefits and risks. Using a Discrete Choice Experiment, we elicited patients' relative preferences for specific benefits and risks of anticoagulant therapy. We selected a sample of US patients with cardiovascular disease from an online panel and elicited their preferences for benefits and risks of anticoagulant therapy: nonfatal stroke, nonfatal myocardial infarction, cardiovascular death, minor bleeding, major bleeding, bleeding death, and need for monitoring. These attributes were used to design scenarios describing hypothetical treatments that were labeled as new drug, old drug, or no drug. Latent class analysis was used to identify groups of patients with similar preferences. A total of 341 patients completed all Discrete Choice Experiment questions. On average, patients valued a 1% increased risk of a fatal bleeding event the same as a 2% increase in nonfatal myocardial infarction, a 3% increase in nonfatal stroke, a 3% increase in cardiovascular death, a 6% increase in major bleeding, and a 16% increase in minor bleeding. The odds of choosing no drug or old drug versus new drug were 0.72 (95% confidence interval, 0.61-0.84) and 0.86 (95% confidence interval, 0.81-0.93), respectively. Previous stroke or myocardial infarction was associated with membership in the class with larger negative preferences for these outcomes. Patients' preferences for various outcomes of anticoagulant therapy vary and depend on their previous experiences with myocardial infarction or stroke. Incorporating these preferences into benefit risk calculation and treatment decisions can enhance patient-centered care. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. In-vitro anticoagulant activity of fucoidan derivatives from brown seaweed Laminaria japonica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Quanbin; Zhang, Zhongshan; Hou, Yun; Zhang, Hong

    2011-05-01

    Fucoidan, a group of sulfated heteropolysaccharides, was extracted from Laminaria japonica, an important economic alga species in China. The anticoagulant activity of fucoidan and its derivatives (including sulfated, phosphorylated, and aminated fucoidan) was examined using in-vitro anticoagulant systems. The correlation between chemical variations within the fucoidan group and anticoagulant activity was determined. The in-vitro anticoagulant properties of fucoidan and its derivatives were determined by measuring activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT), and thrombin time (TT). The results indicate anticoagulant activity in all samples using APTT and TT assays; however, only the fucoidan derivatives affected the PT assay. Thus, the fucoidan derivatives were able to inhibit both intrinsic and extrinsic blood coagulants. Fucoidan (FPS) and its derivatives presented better anticoagulant activity than low molecular weight fucoidan (DFPS) and its derivatives, suggesting that molecular weight and proper conformation are contributing factors for anticoagulant activity of polysaccharides. Amino groups have a positive charge and can thus change the charge density of fucoidan. Accordingly, among the tested samples, aminated fucoidan (NF) was the most active reflecting the importance of charge density for anticoagulant activity. Available data obtained using in-vitro models suggest that the sulfate content, sulfate/total-sugar ratio, molecular weight, and the substituted group of fucoidan are important factors for anticoagulant activity but that the influence of sulfate, phosphate and amino groups on anticoagulant activity was different.

  14. New Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOAC and Their Use Today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Schwarb

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The ideal anticoagulant is oral, has a wide therapeutic range, predictable pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, a rapid onset of action, an available antidote, minimal side effects and minimal interactions with other drugs or food. With the development of the novel direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC, we now have an alternative to the traditional vitamin K antagonists (VKA for the prevention and treatment of thrombosis. DOACs have limited monitoring requirements and very predictable pharmacokinetic profiles. They were shown to be non-inferior or superior to VKA in the prophylaxis or treatment of thromboembolic events. Particularly in terms of safety they were associated with less major bleeding, including intracranial bleeding, thus providing a superior benefit for the prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. Despite these advantages, there are remaining limitations with DOACs: their dependence on renal and hepatic function for clearance and the lack of an approved reversal agent, whereas such antidotes are successively being made available. DOACs do not need regular monitoring to assess the treatment effect but, on the other hand, they interact with other drugs and interfere with functional coagulation assays. From a practical point of view, the properties of oral administration, simple dosing without monitoring, a short half-life allowing for the possibility of uncomplicated switching or bridging, and proven safety overwhelm the disadvantages, making them an attractive option for short- or long-term anticoagulation.

  15. Spontaneous pharyngo-laryngeal hematoma and anticoagulation. A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleny CASASOLA-GIRÓN

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Objective: Spontaneous pharyngeal-laryngeal hematoma shows the importance of a complete ENT examination in the face of symptoms of banal appearance and a correct history that, in the case reported, unveiled the therapeutic use of anticoagulants. Case description: A 55 year old woman comes to emergency because of unexplained dysphagia. The inspection shows the presence of a hematoma in the pharyngeal-laryngeal region that, after the anticoagulant therapy was reversed, evolved favorably with conservative treatment. Discussion: In this case, apart from medical management performed by the hematology department, we focus our therapeutic approach in the protection of the airway and the prevention of a possible massive bleeding. Determining which patients require endotracheal intubation or tracheostomy and hemostatic surgery is the key to treatment. Conclusions: The anticoagulant therapy involves several complications that ENT specialists must consider in the face of clinical symptoms of dysphagia, dysphonia, dyspnea or signs of bleeding and they must know the possibilities of performance depending on the severity of each case.

  16. [Oral anticoagulants and medicinal plants. An emerging interaction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argento, A; Tiraferri, E; Marzaloni, M

    2000-01-01

    The consumption of herbal medicines is increasing steadily throughout the world, although to our knowledge there are neither studies on their effectiveness nor controls over the quality and safety of these preparations. Considered "food integrators", these preparations are marketed without restriction. It is a common notion that natural therapy has neither side nor toxic effects: allergic reactions, direct toxic effects or those due to contamination, carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, and heavy metal toxicity have been reported as adverse events caused by herbs. Rather than replacing traditional therapy, most herbal medical treatment is used in conjunction with it. Also, the attending physician is generally not informed that the patient is using herbs. Because Passionflower, hydroalcoholic extracts, Juniper and Verbena officinalis supply variable quantities of vitamin K, they can lessen the effect of oral anticoagulant therapy. Ganoderma Japonicum, Papaw, Salvia miltiorrhiza, Ginseng, Devil's claw, Garlic, Quinine, Ginkgo, Ginger, Red Clover and Horse-Chestnut reinforce warfarin action by heterogeneous mechanisms. They should thus not be used in patients on oral anticoagulant and/or antiplatelet therapy. The scientific community must take into account the adverse events caused by interaction between herbal medicine and conventional therapy, and patients must be informed of the dangers of these preparations. If a bleeding event occurs or the quality of anticoagulant therapy is poor, the clinician should consider the possibility of interaction between conventional therapy and herbal medicine that the patient has neglected to mention he is taking.

  17. Exploring potential anticoagulant drug formulations using thrombin generation test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Zavyalova

    2016-03-01

    The thrombin generation test was used to assess the whole coagulation cascade in normal and factor-deficient human blood plasma. Potential therapeutic windows were estimated for coagulation factors, ranking them as targets for anticoagulant drugs. Thrombin and factor Xa have been revealed as the most promising targets, which fully agrees with the current drug development strategy. Inhibitors of factors Va and VIIa are expected to have narrow therapeutic windows. Inhibitors of factors VIIIa and IXa are expected to have a moderate anticoagulant effect. Factors XI and XII are poor targets for anticoagulant drugs. Compared with plasma that is deficient in factor II, the thrombin inhibitors bivalirudin and aptamer HD1 had increased activity. Both inhibitors were tested in deficient plasma providing a model of potential drug combination. The most promising combinations were anti-thrombin with anti-V/Va and also anti-thrombin with anti-IX/IXa. Each combination had an incremental dose-effect dependence that is promising from the standpoint of the therapeutic window.

  18. Electroconvulsive therapy and anticoagulation after pulmonary embolism: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cesar Lazaro

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is considered the most effective treatment for catatonia regardless its underlying condition. The rigid fixed posture and immobility observed in catatonia may lead to several clinical complications, of which, pulmonary embolism (PE is one of the most severe. The rapid improvement of the psychiatric condition in catatonia-related PE is essential, since immobility favors the occurrence of new thromboembolic events and further complications. In that scenario, ECT should be considered, based on a risk-benefit analysis, aiming at the faster resolution of the catatonia. Methods Case report and literature review. Results A 66-years-old woman admitted to the psychiatric ward with catatonia due to a depressive episode presented bilateral PE. Clinically stable, but still severely depressed after a trial of antidepressants, she was treated with ECT in the course of full anticoagulation with enoxaparin. After five ECT sessions, her mood was significantly better and she was walking and eating spontaneously. She did not present complications related either to PE or to anticoagulation. After the eighth ECT session, she evolved with hypomania, which was managed with oral medication adjustments. The patient was completely euthymic at discharge. Conclusion The case we presented provides further evidence to the anecdotal case reports on the safety of ECT in the course of concomitant full anticoagulant therapy after PE, and illustrates how, with the proper precautions, the benefits of ECT in such condition might outweigh its risks.

  19. Personalized prophylactic anticoagulation decision analysis in patients with membranous nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taewoo; Biddle, Andrea K.; Lionaki, Sofia; Derebail, Vimal K.; Barbour, Sean J.; Tannous, Sameer; Hladunewich, Michelle A.; Hu, Yichun; Poulton, Caroline J.; Mahoney, Shannon L.; Jennette, J. Charles; Hogan, Susan L.; Falk, Ronald J.; Cattran, Daniel C.; Reich, Heather N.; Nachman, Patrick H.

    2014-01-01

    Primary membranous nephropathy is associated with increased risk of venous thromboembolic events, which are inversely correlated with serum albumin levels. To evaluate the potential benefit of prophylactic anticoagulation (venous thromboembolic events prevented) relative to the risk (major bleeds), we constructed a Markov decision model. The venous thromboembolic event risk according to serum albumin was obtained from an inception cohort of 898 patients with primary membranous nephropathy. Risk estimates of hemorrhage were obtained from a systematic literature review. Benefit-to-risk ratios were predicted according to bleeding risk and serum albumin. This ratio increased with worsening hypoalbuminemia from 4.5:1 for an albumin under 3 g/dl to 13.1:1 for an albumin under 2 g/dl in patients at low bleeding risk. Patients at intermediate bleeding risk with an albumin under 2 g/dl have a moderately favorable benefit-to-risk ratio (under 5:1). Patients at high bleeding risk are unlikely to benefit from prophylactic anticoagulation regardless of albuminemia. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis, to account for uncertainty in risk estimates, confirmed these trends. From these data, we constructed a tool to estimate the likelihood of benefit based on an individual’s bleeding risk profile, serum albumin level, and acceptable benefit-to-risk ratio (http://www.gntools.com). This tool provides an approach to the decision of prophylactic anticoagulation personalized to the individual’s needs and adaptable to dynamic changes in health status and risk profile. PMID:24336031

  20. Selection of an aptamer antidote to the anticoagulant drug bivalirudin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Martin

    Full Text Available Adverse drug reactions, including severe patient bleeding, may occur following the administration of anticoagulant drugs. Bivalirudin is a synthetic anticoagulant drug sometimes employed as a substitute for heparin, a commonly used anticoagulant that can cause a condition called heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT. Although bivalrudin has the advantage of not causing HIT, a major concern is lack of an antidote for this drug. In contrast, medical professionals can quickly reverse the effects of heparin using protamine. This report details the selection of an aptamer to bivalirudin that functions as an antidote in buffer. This was accomplished by immobilizing the drug on a monolithic column to partition binding sequences from nonbinding sequences using a low-pressure chromatography system and salt gradient elution. The elution profile of binding sequences was compared to that of a blank column (no drug, and fractions with a chromatographic difference were analyzed via real-time PCR (polymerase chain reaction and used for further selection. Sequences were identified by 454 sequencing and demonstrated low micromolar dissociation constants through fluorescence anisotropy after only two rounds of selection. One aptamer, JPB5, displayed a dose-dependent reduction of the clotting time in buffer, with a 20 µM aptamer achieving a nearly complete antidote effect. This work is expected to result in a superior safety profile for bivalirudin, resulting in enhanced patient care.

  1. Optimal Anticoagulation for Pregnant Women with Mechanical Heart Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Rohan; Silversides, Candice K; McLintock, Claire

    2016-10-01

    The prothrombotic state of pregnancy increases the risk of thromboembolic complications and death in women with mechanical heart valves (MHVs). Although it is accepted that these women must be on therapeutic anticoagulation throughout pregnancy, competing maternal and fetal risks, as well as the lack of high-quality data from prospective studies, make the choice of the optimal method of anticoagulation challenging. Vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) are associated with fewer maternal complications, but conversely also the lowest live birth rates as well as warfarin-related embryopathy and fetopathy. Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) does not cross the placenta and is associated with fewer fetal risks but more maternal complications. Sequential treatment involving VKAs in the second and third trimesters and either low-molecular-weight or unfractionated heparin in the first trimester, although appealing is still associated with maternal complications, especially around the time of bridging. As absolute equipoise of maternal versus fetal wellbeing is unlikely, patient preferences should be considered in decision making. A multidisciplinary team including hematologists, cardiologists, obstetric physicians, and high-risk obstetricians with expertise in the management of pregnant women with cardiac disease is required to optimize outcomes. Prospective studies are needed to determine the anticoagulant regimen for women with MHVs that provides optimal and acceptable maternal and fetal outcomes. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  2. synthesis, physical characterization, antibacterial activity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KEY WORDS: Cobalt (III) Schiff base complex, Thermodynamic parameters, Amines, Antibacterial activity. INTRODUCTION. For a long time tetradentate Schiff base complexes of transition metal ions have attracted many researchers interest in the field of coordination chemistry [1-4]. Though a large number of papers have ...

  3. Antibacterial activity of Ficus capensis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-16

    May 16, 2008 ... cholesterol levels and to boost immune system; it lowers high blood pressure and its oil has been seen to have antibacterial properties (Juurlink, 2001). .... extracts can sometimes change after fractionation and a pure component eventually obtained may lack the activity of the original extract. REFERENCES.

  4. Underuse of Anticoagulation in Older Patients with Atrial Fibrillation and CHADS2 Score ≥ 2: Are We Doing Better Since the Marketing of Direct Oral Anticoagulants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrard, Séverine; Vandenabeele, Caroline; Marien, Sophie; Boland, Benoit; Dalleur, Olivia

    2017-11-01

    Our objectives were to (1) describe the evolution of the underuse of anticoagulants in older people with atrial fibrillation (AF) and a CHADS 2 score ≥ 2 since direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) were introduced to the market and (2) describe factors associated with this underuse. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study including geriatric patients admitted during the pre-DOAC (2008-2011) and post-DOAC (2013-2015) periods in an academic hospital in Belgium. Five inclusion criteria were met: age ≥ 75 years, diagnosis of AF, indication for anticoagulation (CHADS 2 score ≥ 2), risk of functional decline (Identification of Seniors At Risk [ISAR] score ≥ 2), and comprehensive geriatric assessment. The use of anticoagulants and antiplatelets at home before admission was recorded. Risks of stroke and bleeding were calculated using CHADS 2 and HEMORR 2 HAGES scores, respectively. Three different logistic regression models were performed to describe the evolution of and factors associated with the underuse of anticoagulants after DOAC marketing. Anticoagulant underuse, present in 209 of 614 (34%) geriatric patients with AF, was lower in patients with a history of stroke (28.5%) or congestive heart failure (26.9%) but higher in those receiving antiplatelets (56.2%) and in older individuals. Anticoagulant underuse decreased significantly from the pre-DOAC (37.3%) to the post-DOAC (29.7%) era, as shown by two analyses using propensity scores. In older patients with AF, anticoagulant underuse was mainly associated with antiplatelet use. Anticoagulant underuse and antiplatelet use have both decreased since DOAC marketing. Underuse of anticoagulants was still a concern for three in ten geriatric patients with AF at high risk of stroke (CHADS 2 score ≥ 2).

  5. Antibacterial Property and Cytotoxicity of a Poly(lactic acid/Nanosilver-Doped Multiwall Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Hui Tsou

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel method was used to synthesize a nanosilver-doped multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT-Ag, and subsequently, the novel poly(lactic acid (PLA- and MWCNT-Ag-based biocompatible and antimicrobial nanocomposites were prepared by melt blending. Based on energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry images, an MWCNT-Ag was successfully synthesized. The effect of the MWCNT-Ag on the PLA bionanocomposites was investigated by evaluating their thermal and mechanical properties, antifungal activity, and cytotoxicity. The nanocomposites exhibited a high degree of biocompatibility with the MWCNT-Ag content, which was less than 0.3 phr. Furthermore, tensile strength testing, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and antibacterial evaluation revealed that the tensile strength, thermostability, glass transition temperature, and antibacterial properties were enhanced by increasing the MWCNT-Ag content. Finally, hydrolysis analysis indicated that the low MWCNT-Ag content could increase the packing density of PLA.

  6. Tioconazole, a new imidazole-antifungal agent for the treatment of dermatomycoses. Antifungal and pharmacologic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, M S; Baird, J R; Brammer, K W; Faulkner, J K; Halliwell, G; Jevons, S; Tarbit, M H

    1983-01-01

    Tioconazole is a new imidazole antifungal agent with broad-spectrum activity. Its in vitro activity against common dermal pathogens is generally better than miconazole by a factor of 2-8. This activity is paralleled by good topical efficacy in a guinea pig dermatomycosis model. Pharmacokinetic studies in animals have demonstrated minimal systemic exposure following dermal application. Acute general pharmacology studies have shown that the compound is well tolerated in animals and unlikely to produce side-effects in man.

  7. Isolation of antibacterial compounds from Quercus dilatata L. through bioassay guided fractionation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamil Maryam

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Four medicinal plants (Chrozophora hierosolymitana Spreng, Chrysanthemum leucanthemum L., Ephedra gerardiana Wall. ex Stapf, and Quercus dilatata L. used by indigenous healers to treat various infectious diseases were selected for the present study. The major objective of the present study was isolation and characterization of antimicrobial components from the crude plant extracts using bioassay guided fractionation. Methods Seven methanolic extracts of the four plants were screened to identify any antimicrobial agents present in them. The active crude plant extract was fractionated first by solvent partitioning and then by HPLC. Characterization of the active fractions was done by using spectrophotometer. Results All the seven methanolic extracts showed low antifungal activity, however, when these extracts were tested for antibacterial activity, significant activity was exhibited by two extracts. The extract of aerial parts of Q. dilatata was most active and therefore, was selected for further analysis. Initially fractionation was done by solvent-solvent partitioning and out of six partitioned fractions, ethanol fraction was selected on the basis of results of antibacterial activity and phytochemical analysis. Further, fractionation was carried out by RP- HPLC and purified active subfractions were characterized by comparing their absorption spectra with that of the known natural products isolated from the plants of Quercus genus. Discussion and conclusion The results suggest that this is the first report of the isolated antibacterial compounds from this genus.

  8. Smart tetrazole-based antibacterial nanoparticles as multifunctional drug carriers for cancer combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakerzadeh, Elham; Salehi, Roya; Mahkam, Mehrdad

    2017-12-01

    Due to multidrug resistance of cancer tissues and immune-suppression of cancerous patients during chemotherapy in one hand and the use of tetrazole derivatives in medicine because of its anticancer, antifungal, and antiviral properties, on the other, we were encouraged to design novel smart antibacterial nanocomposites-based polymer of tetrazole as dual anticancer drug delivery systems. The structures of nanocomposites characterized by FTIR, 1 H NMR, FESEM-EDX, and TGA analyzes and antibacterial activity of smart carriers were evaluated by determination of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values against some bacteria and fungi. Then, the pH-responsive manner of both nanocomposites was proved by checking their release profiles at pH of the physiological environment (pH 7.4) and pH of tumor tissues (mildly acidic). Finally, the potential antitumoral activity of these nanocomposite systems against MCF7 cell lines was evaluated by MTT assay and cell cycle studies. The results demonstrated that the novel developed nanocomposites not only meet our expectations about simultaneous release of two anticancer drugs according to the predicted profile but also showed antibacterial and anticancer properties in vitro experimental. Moreover, it was proved that these carriers have tremendous potential in multifunctional drug delivery in cancer therapy.

  9. Polyhydroxybutyrate and phenolic compounds microalgae electrospun nanofibers: A novel nanomaterial with antibacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntzler, Suelen Goettems; Almeida, Ana Claudia Araujo de; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira; Morais, Michele Greque de

    2018-03-02

    Polymer nanofibers produced by electrospinning are promising for use in food packaging because of their nanometric diameter, which provides a barrier to external conditions above the possible incorporation of the active compounds. The microalga Spirulina sp. LEB 18 synthesizes bioproducts, such as polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), which is biodegradable and has similar mechanical and thermal properties to polymers of petrochemical origin. Moreover, phenolic compounds of microalgae have antibacterial, antifungal, and antioxidant activities, which is a differential for the development of packaging. The objective of the study was to develop a nanomaterial with antibacterial action from bioproducts of microalgal origin. PHB nanofibers containing phenolic compounds presented average diameter of 810±85nm exhibited hydrophobicity, which gave protection to the food relative to the moisture outside the package. These nanofibers showed inhibition of the growth of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 with a zone of 7.5±0.4mm. Thermal and mechanical properties have confirmed the potential applicability of this material as food packaging. This new nanomaterial combines a packaging function to protect products and to be biodegradable with the antibacterial activity that prevents the proliferation of microorganisms and ensures the quality and preservation of food. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Treatment Changes among Users of Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants in Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellfritzsch, Maja; Husted, Steen Elkjaer; Grove, Erik Lerkevang

    2016-01-01

    Patients with atrial fibrillation discontinuing anticoagulant therapy are left unprotected against ischaemic stroke. Further, switching between oral anticoagulants may be associated with a transiently increased risk of bleeding or thromboembolism. However, there is a paucity of real-life data...... on pattern of switching and discontinuation of oral anticoagulants. To address this, we conducted a nationwide drug utilization study including all registered Danish atrial fibrillation patients initiating a non-VKA oral anticoagulant (NOAC) between August 2011 and February 2016. We assessed changes...... in anticoagulant treatment, including switching between oral anticoagulants and discontinuation of NOACs, and explored patient characteristics predicting these changes. We identified 50,632 patients with atrial fibrillation initiating NOAC therapy within the study period. The majority initiated dabigatran (49...

  11. In vitro Antifungal Activity of Limonene against Trichophyton rubrum

    OpenAIRE

    Chee, Hee Youn; Kim, Hoon; Lee, Min Hee

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the antifungal activities of limonene against Trichophyton rubrum were evaluated via broth microdilution and vapor contact assays. In both assays, limonene was shown to exert a potent antifungal effect against T. rubrum. The volatile vapor of limonene at concentrations above 1 ?l/800 ml air space strongly inhibited the growth of T. rubrum. The MIC value was 0.5% v/v in the broth microdilution assay. The antifungal activity of limonene against T. rubrum was characterized as a fu...

  12. Design, synthesis, and in vitro evaluation of novel antifungal triazoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fei; Ni, Tingjunhong; Zhao, Jing; Pang, Lei; Li, Ran; Cai, Zhan; Ding, Zichao; Wang, Ting; Yu, Shichong; Jin, Yongsheng; Zhang, Dazhi; Jiang, Yuanying

    2017-05-15

    Twenty-nine novel triazole analogues of ravuconazole and isavuconazole were designed and synthesized. Most of the compounds exhibited potent in vitro antifungal activities against 8 fungal isolates. Especially, compounds a10, a13, and a14 exhibited superior or comparable antifungal activity to ravuconazole against all the tested fungi. Structure-activity relationship study indicated that replacing 4-cyanophenylthioazole moiety of ravuconazole with fluorophenylisoxazole resulted in novel antifungal triazoles with more effectiveness and a broader-spectrum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Anti-fungal activity of irradiated chitosan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham ThiLe Ha; Tran Thi Thuy; Nguyen Quoc Hien [Nuclear Research Inst., No.1 Nguyen Tu Luc, Dalat (Viet Nam); Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Kume, Tamikazu [Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Gunma (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    Anti-fungal activity of chitosan induced by irradiation has been investigated. Commercial chitosan samples of 8B (80% deacetylation) and l0B (99% deacetylation) were irradiated by {gamma}-ray in dry condition. Highly deacethylated chitosan (10B) at low dose irradiation (75 kGy) was effective for inhibition of fungal growth. The sensitivities of Exobasidium vexans, Septoria chrysanthemum and Gibberella fujikuroi for the irradiated chitosan were different and the necessary concentrations of chitosan were 550, 350 and 250 {mu}g/ml, respectively. For the plant growth, low deacethylation (chitosan 8B) and high dose (500 kGy) was effective and the growth of chrysanthemum was promoted by spraying the irradiated chitosan. (author)

  14. Antifungal potential of Indian medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabur, Rajesh; Singh, H; Chhillar, A K; Ali, M; Sharma, G L

    2004-06-01

    Fourteen Indian plants, selected based on their use in respiratory and other disorders in traditional systems of medicine, were analyzed for their potential activity against fungi. The antifungal activity was investigated by disc diffusion, microbroth dilution and percent spore germination inhibition tests against pathogenic Aspergilli. Methanolic extracts of Solanum xanthocarpum and Datura metel inhibited the growth of Aspergillus fumigatus, A. flavus and A. niger and their in vitro MICs were found to be 1.25-2.50 mg/ml by both microbroth dilution and percent spore germination assays. In disc diffusion assay, a concentration of 0.062 mg/disc of methanol extract of D. metel showed significant activity against Aspergilli. S. xanthocarpum exhibited similar activity at 0.125 mg/disc. Copyright 2004 Elsevier B.V.

  15. Naturally occurring antifungal aromatic esters and amides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, M.S.; Shahnaz; Tabassum, S.; Ogunwande, I.A.; Pervez, M.K.

    2010-01-01

    During the search of antifungal natural products from terrestrial plants, a new long chained aromatic ester named grandiflorate along with spatazoate from Portulaca grandiflora and N-[2-methoxy-2-(4-methoxyphenyl) ethyl]-trans-cinnamide and aegeline from Solanum erianthum of Nigeria were isolated and tested against six fungal species. The known constituents have not been reported so far from mentioned investigated plants. Structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated with the aid of spectroscopic techniques including two dimensional NMR experiments. Among the compounds, the esters found more potent than amides against Candida albicans and Aspergillus flavus. The new compound grandiflorate gave response against all tested fungal species while aegeline was found to give lowest inhibition during this study. (author)

  16. New anticoagulants: how to deal with treatment failure and bleeding complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmi, Rashid S; Lwaleed, Bashir A

    2011-10-01

    Conventional anticoagulants have proven efficacy in the management of thromboembolism. Their adverse effects and a narrow therapeutic window, necessitating regular need for monitoring, however, have long been an incentive for the development of safer anticoagulants without compromising efficacy. Over the last decade or so several new parenteral and oral anticoagulants have been launched with efficacy comparable with conventional agents. From fondaparinux to its long acting derivative idraparinux, and the factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban to the direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran, the advent of new anticoagulants is radically changing anticoagulation. For conventional anticoagulants, despite their shortcomings, effective methods of reversing their anticoagulant effects exist. Moreover, strategies to deal with the occurrence of fresh thrombotic events in the face of therapeutic anticoagulation with the conventional agents have also been addressed. Nevertheless, for the new anticoagulants, the optimal management of these complications remains unknown. This review explores these issues in the light of current evidence. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  17. Abnormal uterine bleeding in women receiving direct oral anticoagulants for the treatment of venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Richard; Marcoux, Violaine; Tagalakis, Vicky

    2017-08-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is a common complication of anticoagulant therapy in premenopausal women affected with acute venous thromboembolism. AUB impacts quality of life, and can lead to premature cessation of anticoagulation. There is increasing data to suggest that the direct oral anticoagulants when used for the treatment of venous thromboembolism differ in their menstrual bleeding profile. This article aims to review the existing literature regarding the association between AUB and the direct oral anticoagulants and make practical recommendations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Major cerebral events in Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis: is anticoagulant therapy safe?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus V; Snygg-Martin, Ulrika; Olaison, Lars

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the impact of anticoagulation on major cerebral events in patients with left-sided Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis (IE). METHODS: A prospective cohort study; the use of anticoagulation and the relation to major cerebral events was evaluated separately at onset......-19%), and cerebral haemorrhage in 5 patients (3%; 95% CI: 0.5-6%). Patients receiving anticoagulation were less likely to have experienced a major cerebral event at the time of admission (15%) compared with those without anticoagulation (37%, p = 0.009; adjusted OR: 0.27; 95% CI: 0.075-0.96; p = 0.04). In...

  19. Postoperative anticoagulation in patients with mechanical heart valves following surgical treatment of subdural hematomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Anubhav G; Ng, Julie; Hsu, Wesley; Pradilla, Gustavo; Raza, Shaan; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Lim, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Thromboembolic events and anticoagulation-associated bleeding events represent frequent complications following cardiac mechanical valve replacement. Management guidelines regarding the timing for resuming anticoagulation therapy following a surgically treated subdural hematoma (SDH) in patients with mechanical valves remains to be determined. To determine optimal anticoagulation management in patients with mechanical heart valves following treatment of SDH. Outcomes were retrospectively reviewed for 12 patients on anticoagulation therapy for thromboembolic prophylaxis for mechanical cardiac valves who underwent surgical intervention for a SDH at the Johns Hopkins Hospital between 1995 and 2010. The mean age at admission was 71 years. All patients had St. Jude's mechanical heart valves and were receiving anticoagulation therapy. All patients had their anticoagulation reversed with vitamin K and fresh frozen plasma and underwent surgical evacuation. Anticoagulation was withheld for a mean of 14 days upon admission and a mean of 9 days postoperatively. The average length of stay was 19 days. No deaths or thromboembolic events occurred during the hospitalization. Average follow-up time was 50 months, during which two patients had a recurrent SDH. No other associated morbidities occurred during follow-up. Interruptions in anticoagulation therapy for up to 3 weeks pose minimal thromboembolic risk in patients with mechanical heart valves. Close follow-up after discharge is highly recommended, as recurrent hemorrhages can occur several weeks after the resumption of anticoagulation.

  20. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel 3-substituted amino-4-hydroxylcoumarin derivatives as chitin synthase inhibitors and antifungal agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhiqiang; Ji, Qinggang; Chen, Chunyan; Liao, Qin; Wu, Hualong; Liu, Xiaofei; Huang, Yanrong; Yuan, Lvjiang; Liao, Fei

    2016-01-01

    A series of novel 3-substituted amino-4-hydroxycoumarin derivatives have been designed and synthesized as chitin synthase (CHS) inhibitors. All the synthesized compounds have been screened for their CHS inhibition activity and antimicrobial activity in vitro. The enzymatic assay indicated that most of the compounds have good inhibitory activity against CHS, in which compound 6o with IC50 of 0.10 mmol/L had stronger activity than that of polyoxins B, which acts as control drug with IC50 of 0.18 mmol/L. As far as the antifungal activity is concerned, most of the compounds possessed moderate to excellent activity against some representative pathogenic fungi. Especially, compound 6b was found to be the most potent agent against Cryptococcus neoformans with minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 4 μg/mL. Moreover, the results of antibacterial screening showed that these compounds have negligible actions to some tested bacteria. Therefore, these compounds would be promising to develop selective antifungal agents.

  1. Isolation of flavonoids from Anemopaegma arvense (Vell Stellf. ex de Souza and their antifungal activity against Trichophyton rubrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Di Giovane Costanzo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Anemopaegma arvense (Vell Stellf. ex de Souza belongs to the family Bignoniaceae, and is popularly known as catuaba. To evaluate the cytotoxic and antimicrobial activity of A. arvense, fraction F3 and flavonoids 1 (quercetin 3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→6-β-D-glucopyranoside (rutin and flavonoid 2 (quercetin 3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→6-β-D-galactopyranoside were isolated from the leaves of this plant. Fraction F3 and flavonoids 1 and 2 exhibited no antibacterial activity. Furthermore, no cytotoxic activity of fraction 3 or flavonoids 1 and 2 was observed against the tumor cells tested. However, analysis of the antifungal activity of flavonoids 1 and 2 revealed minimum inhibitory concentrations of 0.5 and 0.25 mg/mL, respectively, against the Trichophyton rubrum strains tested (wild type and mutant. This study demonstrates for the first time the antifungal activity of isolated flavonoids, validating the same activity for A. arvense.

  2. Cryptic antifungal compounds active by synergism with polyene antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Mariko; Ihara, Fumio; Nihira, Takuya

    2016-04-01

    The majority of antifungal compounds reported so far target the cell wall or cell membrane of fungi, suggesting that other types of antibiotics cannot exert their activity because they cannot penetrate into the cells. Therefore, if the permeability of the cell membrane could be enhanced, many antibiotics might be found to have antifungal activity. We here used the polyene antibiotic nystatin, which binds to ergosterol and forms pores at the cell membrane, to enhance the cellular permeability. In the presence of nystatin, many culture extracts from entomopathogenic fungi displayed antifungal activity. Among all the active extracts, two active components were purified and identified as helvolic acid and terramide A. Because the minimum inhibitory concentration of either compound was reduced four-fold in the presence of nystatin, it can be concluded that this screening method is useful for detecting novel antifungal activity. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Antifungal activity of extracts and phenolic compounds from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antifungal activity of extracts and phenolic compounds from Barringtonia racemosa L. (Lecythidaceae). NM Hussin, R Muse, S Ahmad, J Ramli, M Mahmood, MR Sulaiman, MYA Shukor, MFA Rahman, KNK Aziz ...

  4. A Lysozyme with Antifungal Activity from Pithecellobium dulce Seeds

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    Ploypat Niyomploy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A protein of an apparent molecular mass of 14.4 kDa with antifungal activity was isolated from the seeds of Pithecellobium dulce using extraction with 100 mM Tris-HCl buffer (pH=8.0, precipitation with 80 % ammonium sulfate, and bioassay purification via Resource Q anion exchange chromatography and Superdex 200 gel filtration chromatography. The purified protein was putatively identified by tandem mass spectrometry with Mascot database searching, with the partial amino acid sequences showing a high degree of similarity to chicken egg white lysozyme. This putative plant lysozyme expressed antifungal activity with a rather high thermal stability of up to 80 °C for 15 min (at pH=8.0. It exerted an antifungal action towards Macrophomina phaseolina but displayed no antifungal activity against two other isolates, Phymatotrichopsis omnivora and Fusarium avenaceum.

  5. In vitro antifungal and cytotoxicity activities of selected Tanzanian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the antifungal and cytotoxic activities of four medicinal plants from Tanzania, namely, Mystroxylon aethiopicum, Lonchocarpus capassa, Albizia anthelmentica and Myrica salicifolia. Methods: The plant materials were subjected to extraction using dichloromethane, ethyl acetate and distilled water.

  6. Antifungal activity of naphthoquinoidal compounds in vitro against fluconazole-resistant strains of different Candida species: a special emphasis on mechanisms of action on Candida tropicalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João B A Neto

    Full Text Available In recent decades, the incidence of candidemia in tertiary hospitals worldwide has substantially increased. These infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality; in addition, they prolong hospital stays and raise the costs associated with treatment. Studies have reported a significant increase in infections by non-albicans Candida species, especially C. tropicalis. The number of antifungal drugs on the market is small in comparison to the number of antibacterial agents available. The limited number of treatment options, coupled with the increasing frequency of cross-resistance, makes it necessary to develop new therapeutic strategies. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the antifungal activities of three semisynthetic naphthofuranquinone molecules against fluconazole-resistant Candida spp. strains. These results allowed to us to evaluate the antifungal effects of three naphthofuranquinones on fluconazole-resistant C. tropicalis. The toxicity of these compounds was manifested as increased intracellular ROS, which resulted in membrane damage and changes in cell size/granularity, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and DNA damage (including oxidation and strand breakage. In conclusion, the tested naphthofuranquinones (compounds 1-3 exhibited in vitro cytotoxicity against fluconazole-resistant Candida spp. strains.

  7. Design, Synthesis, DFT Study and Antifungal Activity of Pyrazolecarboxamide Derivatives

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    Jin-Xia Mu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of novel pyrazole amide derivatives were designed and synthesized by multi-step reactions from phenylhydrazine and ethyl 3-oxobutanoate as starting materials, and their structures were characterized by NMR, MS and elemental analysis. The antifungal activity of the title compounds was determined. The results indicated that some of title compounds exhibited moderate antifungal activity. Furthermore, DFT calculations were used to study the structure-activity relationships (SAR.

  8. [Amides of amino acids and peptides as antifungal agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giori, P; Vertuani, G; Mazzotta, D; Guarneri, M; Pancaldi, D; Brunelli, A

    1982-07-01

    The synthesis of pyrazolyl-amides of aminoacids and peptides is described. The chemicals were tested for antifungal activity against wheat powdery mildew (Erysiphe graminis DC.), cucumber powdery mildew (Erysiphe cichoracearum DC.), wheat brown rust (Puccinia recondita Rob. ex Desm. f. sp. tritici Erikss et Henn.), celery leaf spot (Septoria Apii Briosi ed Cav. Chest.) and collar rot (Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn). Some of these compounds showed antifungal activity.

  9. Patients' knowledge on oral anticoagulant treatment in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Reka; Fekete, Helga; Csoka, Ildiko

    2017-12-01

    Background A key element for an effective and safe oral anticoagulant treatment (OAT) is to have the relevant information delivered to patients in an easy-to-understand way and thus have them apply this knowledge in their own therapy. Objective To assess knowledge about OAT, reveal knowledge gaps and identify at-risk patients in terms of limited knowledge about their anticoagulant therapy. Setting Community pharmacies in Hungary. Methods This descriptive cross-sectional study used a structured, validated, self-developed questionnaire to assess patients' knowledge about OAT. Scores were calculated on each domain and the association between knowledge and patients' or treatment characteristics were analysed. Responses in all domains were assessed to identify at-risk patients and knowledge gaps. Main outcome measures Knowledge and knowledge gaps on OAT, and risk factors for limited knowledge. Results The questionnaire developed based on four validated questionnaires passed the field test and had a good internal consistency (Cronbach α = 0.795). Our full patient population (N = 427) had a mean percentage score of 59.39 (29.7% good, 41.2% average, 29.0% poor knowledge on OAT). Poor knowledge level was found to significantly correlate with advanced age (> 75 years), lower education, diagnosis of atrial fibrillation, and unawareness of the indication of OAT. The lowest frequency of correct answers regarded the questions on drug interactions (10.2%) and diet (11.4%). Pharmacists were infrequently indicated as the healthcare professionals to share information with regarding OAT (12.7%). Conclusion Findings of our study offer a valuable insight into the required directions of developing new strategies for patient education to improve knowledge on the treatment with oral anticoagulants.

  10. Management of anticoagulation in hip fractures: A pragmatic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassa, Rafik; Khalfaoui, Mahdi Yacine; Hujazi, Ihab; Sevenoaks, Hannah; Dunkow, Paul

    2017-09-01

    Hip fractures are common and increasing with an ageing population. In the United Kingdom, the national guidelines recommend operative intervention within 36 hours of diagnosis. However, long-term anticoagulant treatment is frequently encountered in these patients which can delay surgical intervention. Despite this, there are no set national standards for management of drug-induced coagulopathy pre-operatively in the context of hip fractures.The aim of this study was to evaluate the management protocols available in the current literature for the commonly encountered coagulopathy-inducing agents.We reviewed the current literature, identified the reversal agents used in coagulopathy management and assessed the evidence to determine the optimal timing, doses and routes of administration.Warfarin and other vitamin K antagonists (VKA) can be reversed effectively using vitamin K with a dose in the range of 2 mg to 10 mg intravenously to correct coagulopathy.The role of fresh frozen plasma is not clear from the current evidence while prothrombin complex remains a reliable and safe method for immediate reversal of VKA-induced coagulopathy in hip fracture surgery or failed vitamin K treatment reversal.The literature suggests that surgery should not be delayed in patients on classical antiplatelet medications (aspirin or clopidogrel), but spinal or regional anaesthetic methods should be avoided for the latter. However, evidence regarding the use of more novel antiplatelet medications (e.g. ticagrelor) and direct oral anticoagulants remains a largely unexplored area in the context of hip fracture surgery. We suggest treatment protocols based on best available evidence and guidance from allied specialties.Hip fracture surgery presents a common management dilemma where semi-urgent surgery is required. In this article, we advocate an evidence-based algorithm as a guide for managing these anticoagulated patients. Cite this article: EFORT Open Rev 2017;2:394-402. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.2.160083.

  11. Anticoagulation in heart failure: current status and future direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghiade, Mihai; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Fonarow, Gregg C; Greene, Stephen J; Greenberg, Barry H; Liu, Peter P; Massie, Barry M; Mehra, Mandeep R; Metra, Marco; Zannad, Faiez; Cleland, John G F; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Shah, Ami N; Butler, Javed

    2013-11-01

    Despite therapeutic advances, patients with worsening heart failure (HF) requiring hospitalization have unacceptably high post-discharge mortality and re-admission rates soon after discharge. Evidence suggests a hypercoagulable state is present in patients with HF. Although thromboembolism as a direct consequence of HF is not frequently clinically recognized, it may contribute to mortality and morbidity. Additionally, many patients with HF have concomitant disorders conferring additional thrombotic risk, including atrial fibrillation (AF) and coronary artery disease (CAD). Acute coronary syndrome (ACS), a known consequence of coronary thrombosis, is a common precipitating factor for worsening HF. Coronary thrombosis may also cause sudden death in patients with HF and CAD. Because data are largely derived from observational studies or trials of modest size, guideline recommendations on anticoagulation for HF vary between organizations. The recently presented Warfarin versus Aspirin in Reduced Cardiac Ejection Fraction trial of HF patients in sinus rhythm suggested anticoagulation reduces the risk of stroke, although rates of the combined primary endpoint (death, ischemic stroke, or intracerebral hemorrhage) were similar for acetylsalicylic acid and warfarin. Newer oral anticoagulants dabigatran, apixaban, and rivaroxaban have successfully completed trials for the prevention of stroke in patients with AF and have shown benefits in the subpopulation of patients with concomitant HF. Positive results of the Anti-Xa Therapy to Lower Cardiovascular Events in Addition to Standard Therapy in Subjects with Acute Coronary Syndrome-Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction 51 (ATLAS ACS 2-TIMI 51) trial of rivaroxaban in ACS are also encouraging. These data suggest there is a need to assess the potential role for these newer agents in the management of patients hospitalized for HF who continue to have a high post-discharge event rate despite available therapies.

  12. Anticoagulant Effect of Sugammadex: Just an In Vitro Artifact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirkmann, Daniel; Britten, Martin W; Pauling, Henning; Weidle, Juliane; Volbracht, Lothar; Görlinger, Klaus; Peters, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    Sugammadex prolongs activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and prothrombin time (PT) suggestive of anticoagulant effects. To pinpoint its presumed anticoagulant site of action, the authors assessed Sugammadex's impact on a panel of coagulation assays. Sugammadex, Rocuronium, Sugammadex and Rocuronium combined, or saline were added to blood samples from healthy volunteers and analyzed using plasmatic (i.e., aPTT, thrombin time, and fibrinogen concentration) (n = 8 each), PT (quick), activities of plasmatic coagulation factors, and whole blood (extrinsically and intrinsically activated thromboelastometry) assays (n = 18 each). Furthermore, dose-dependent effects of Sugammadex were also assessed (n = 18 each) in diluted Russel viper venom time (DRVVT) assays with low (DRVVT1) and high (DRVVT2) phospholipid concentrations and in a highly phospholipid-sensitive aPTT assay. Sugammadex increased PT (+9.1%; P IX, XI, and XII decreased (-7%, P = 0.009; -7.8%, P < 0.0001; -6.9%, P < 0.0001; and -4.3%, P = 0.011, respectively). Sugammadex dose-dependently prolonged both DRVVT1 and the highly phospholipid-sensitive aPTT assays, but additional phospholipids in the DRVVT2 assay almost abolished these prolongations. Thrombin time, a thromboelastometric thrombin generation assay, clot firmness, clot lysis, fibrinogen concentration, and activities of other coagulation factors were unaltered. Rocuronium, Sugammadex and Rocuronium combined, and saline exerted no effects. Sugammadex significantly affects various coagulation assays, but this is explainable by an apparent phospholipid-binding effect, suggesting that Sugammadex`s anticoagulant effects are likely an in vitro artifact.

  13. Increased use of oral anticoagulants in patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gadsbøll, Kasper; Staerk, Laila; Fosbøl, Emil Loldrup

    2017-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study is to examine temporal trends in the use oral anticoagulants (OAC) as stroke prophylaxis in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and to examine factors associated with OAC initiation. Methods and results From Danish nationwide registries, we identified patients diagnosed...... initiation rates increased (P age > 75 years and high risk of stroke). The increased OAC...... initiation was accompanied by introduction and increased uptake of the NOACs. By the end of the study, NOACs accounted for 72.5% of all OACs prescribed in newly diagnosed AF patients. OAC initiation was associated with male gender, age 65-74 years, few comorbidities and increased risk of stroke. Conclusion...

  14. Direct Oral Anticoagulant Drugs in Dental Clinical Practice

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    Stasko J.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The direct oral anticoagulant drugs (DOAC are generally safe and effective in several clinical settings including acute venous thromboembolic disease, prophylaxis in the postoperative setting, prevention of thromboembolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation, and in the management of acute coronary syndrome. The relatively short half-life, rapid onset of action, and predictable pharmacokinetics should simplify periprocedural use of the DOAC. The aim of this work is to propose and summarize periprocedural management of patients treated with the DOAC in dental practice and to inform about the principal specifications of this treatment.

  15. Novel oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Dobreanu, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) survey was to assess clinical practice in relation to stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF), particularly into the use of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) for stroke prevention, among members of the EHRA electrophysiology (EP......) research network. In this EP Wire survey, we have provided some insights into current practice in Europe for the use of NOACs for stroke prevention in AF. There were clear practice differences evident, and also the need for greater adherence to the guidelines, especially since guideline adherent management...

  16. Anticoagulants Influence the Performance of In Vitro Assays Intended for Characterization of Nanotechnology-Based Formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedrone, Edward; Neun, Barry W; Rodriguez, Jamie; Vermilya, Alison; Clogston, Jeffrey D; McNeil, Scott E; Barenholz, Yechezkel; Szebeni, Janos; Dobrovolskaia, Marina A

    2017-12-21

    The preclinical safety assessment of novel nanotechnology-based drug products frequently relies on in vitro assays, especially during the early stages of product development, due to the limited quantities of nanomaterials available for such studies. The majority of immunological tests require donor blood. To enable such tests one has to prevent the blood from coagulating, which is usually achieved by the addition of an anticoagulant into blood collection tubes. Heparin, ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), and citrate are the most commonly used anticoagulants. Novel anticoagulants such as hirudin are also available but are not broadly used. Despite the notion that certain anticoagulants may influence assay performance, a systematic comparison between traditional and novel anticoagulants in the in vitro assays intended for immunological characterization of nanotechnology-based formulations is currently not available. We compared hirudin-anticoagulated blood with its traditional counterparts in the standardized immunological assay cascade, and found that the type of anticoagulant did not influence the performance of the hemolysis assay. However, hirudin was more optimal for the complement activation and leukocyte proliferation assays, while traditional anticoagulants citrate and heparin were more appropriate for the coagulation and cytokine secretion assays. The results also suggest that traditional immunological controls such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS ) are not reliable for understanding the role of anticoagulant in the assay performance. We observed differences in the test results between hirudin and traditional anticoagulant-prepared blood for nanomaterials at the time when no such effects were seen with traditional controls. It is, therefore, important to recognize the advantages and limitations of each anticoagulant and consider individual nanoparticles on a case-by-case basis.

  17. Anticoagulation Quality and Complications of using Vitamin K Antagonists in the Cardiac Surgery Outpatient Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Augusto Cray da Costa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: In patients with mechanical prosthetic heart valves or atrial fibrillation requiring anticoagulation to prevent thromboembolic events, several factors influence adherence and anticoagulation complications. Objective: To evaluate the factors that interfere with the quality and complications of anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists. Methods: A retrospective cohort study of 100 patients, in the period from 2011 to 2014, was performed. Anticoagulation conditions in the last year, regarding the presence of complications (embolisms/bleeding and inadequate treatment were assessed: achievement of less than 8 annual prothrombin times and International Normalized Ratio outside therapeutic target in more than 40% of prothrombin times. Results: There were 31 complications (22 minor bleeding without hospitalization and 9 major complications: 7 bleeding with hospitalization and two emboli; 70 were with International Normalized Ratio outside the target in more than 40% of the tests and 36 with insufficient number of prothrombin times. Socioeconomic factors, anticoagulant type and anticoagulation reason had no relationship with complications or with inadequate treatment. There were more complications in patients with longer duration of anticoagulation (P=0.001. Women had more International Normalized Ratio outside the target range (OR 2.61, CI:1.0-6.5; P=0.04. Patients with lower number of annual prothrombin times had longer times of anticoagulation (P=0.03, less annual consultations (P=0.02 and less dose adjustments (P=0.003. Patients with longer duration of anticoagulation have more complications (P=0.001. Conclusion: There was a high rate of major complications and International Normalized Ratio was outside the goal. Less annual prothrombin times was related to longer duration of anticoagulation, less annual consultations and less dose adjustments. More major complications occurred in patients with longer duration of

  18. Anticoagulants Influence the Performance of In Vitro Assays Intended for Characterization of Nanotechnology-Based Formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Cedrone

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The preclinical safety assessment of novel nanotechnology-based drug products frequently relies on in vitro assays, especially during the early stages of product development, due to the limited quantities of nanomaterials available for such studies. The majority of immunological tests require donor blood. To enable such tests one has to prevent the blood from coagulating, which is usually achieved by the addition of an anticoagulant into blood collection tubes. Heparin, ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA, and citrate are the most commonly used anticoagulants. Novel anticoagulants such as hirudin are also available but are not broadly used. Despite the notion that certain anticoagulants may influence assay performance, a systematic comparison between traditional and novel anticoagulants in the in vitro assays intended for immunological characterization of nanotechnology-based formulations is currently not available. We compared hirudin-anticoagulated blood with its traditional counterparts in the standardized immunological assay cascade, and found that the type of anticoagulant did not influence the performance of the hemolysis assay. However, hirudin was more optimal for the complement activation and leukocyte proliferation assays, while traditional anticoagulants citrate and heparin were more appropriate for the coagulation and cytokine secretion assays. The results also suggest that traditional immunological controls such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS are not reliable for understanding the role of anticoagulant in the assay performance. We observed differences in the test results between hirudin and traditional anticoagulant-prepared blood for nanomaterials at the time when no such effects were seen with traditional controls. It is, therefore, important to recognize the advantages and limitations of each anticoagulant and consider individual nanoparticles on a case-by-case basis.

  19. Modified Silica Nanofibers with Antibacterial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Veverková

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is focused on development of functionalized inorganic-organic nanofibrous material with antibacterial activity for wound dressing applications. The nanofibers combining poly(vinyl alcohol and silica were produced by electrospinning from the sol and thermally stabilized. The PVA/silica nanofibers surface was functionalized by silver and copper nanoparticles to ensure antibacterial activity. It was proven that quantity of adsorbed silver and copper nanoparticles depends on process time of adsorption. According to antibacterial tests results, this novel nanofibrous material shows a big potential for wound dressing applications due to its significant antibacterial efficiency.

  20. BETLE LEAF ESSENTIAL OIL FOR HEMOPHILIAC PATIENTS AND ITS ANTIBACTERIAL EFFECTS ON MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS

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    Teguh Hari Sucipto

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Betle leaf (Piper betle L. is a medicinal plant. It contains essential oil and shows various biological activities, such as antibacterial, anticoagulant, etc. It is further reported to have low anticoagulant activities; thus, it is highly potential as a candidate for coagulant drug. Coagulant is used to prevent bleeding for patients with blood clotting disorders like hemophilia. In Indonesia, 1,236 people were reported with hemophilia. The standard parameters of anticoagulant activity are the freezing period and the compound concentrations. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of betle leaf’s essential oil on blood coagulation in patients with factor VIII and IX of blood plasma disorders. The isolation of essential oil is conducted through steam distillation method with two kinds of solvents, namely distilled water and n-hexane. The obtained n-hexane extract is then separated from the liquid-liquid extraction and rotary evaporator. Essential oil is diluted with citrate plasma solution. The test results of blood clots increase as the concentration of essential oils increase. The results are recorded as such: essential oils ½ times dilution of 99.67 seconds; ¼ times dilution of 127 seconds; 1/8 times dilution of 179 seconds; and 1/16 times dilution of 242.67 seconds. The test above proves that the piper betle extract possesses a coagulant activity. The ethanol extract contained in the piper betle could stimulate clotting in the blood cells. It is caused by the increase of blood plasma concentration which further escalate the plasma fluid into the blood cells. Based on this study, the activity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis can be obstructed by betle leaf in ½ times dilution. The extract significantly reduces acid which accelerates bacteria development.

  1. INR targets and site-level anticoagulation control: results from the Veterans AffaiRs Study to Improve Anticoagulation (VARIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, A J; Berlowitz, D R; Miller, D R; Hylek, E M; Ozonoff, A; Zhao, S; Reisman, J I; Ash, A S

    2012-04-01

    Not all clinicians target the same International Normalized Ratio (INR) for patients with a guideline-recommended target range of 2-3. A patient's mean INR value suggests the INR that was actually targeted. We hypothesized that sites would vary by mean INR, and that sites of care with mean values nearest to 2.5 would achieve better anticoagulation control, as measured by per cent time in therapeutic range (TTR). To examine variations among sites in mean INR and the relationship with anticoagulation control in an integrated system of care. We studied 103,897 patients receiving oral anticoagulation with an expected INR target between 2 and 3 at 100 Veterans Health Administration (VA) sites from 1 October 2006 to 30 September 2008. Key site-level variables were: proportion near 2.5 (that is, percentage of patients with mean INR between 2.3 and 2.7) and mean risk-adjusted TTR. Site mean INR ranged from 2.22 to 2.89; proportion near 2.5, from 30 to 64%. Sites' proportions of patients near 2.5, below 2.3 and above 2.7 were consistent from year to year. A 10 percentage point increase in the proportion near 2.5 predicted a 3.8 percentage point increase in risk-adjusted TTR (P < 0.001). Proportion of patients with mean INR near 2.5 is a site-level 'signature' of care and an implicit measure of targeted INR. This proportion varies by site and is strongly associated with site-level TTR. Our study suggests that sites wishing to improve TTR, and thereby improve patient outcomes, should avoid the explicit or implicit pursuit of non-standard INR targets. © 2012 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  2. Warfarin anticoagulation in hemodialysis patients with atrial fibrillation: comparison of nephrologist-led and anticoagulation clinic-led management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahbahani, Hamad; AlTurki, Ahmed; Dawas, Ahmed; Lipman, Mark L

    2018-01-08

    There is conflicting evidence of benefit versus harm for warfarin anticoagulation in hemodialysis patients with atrial fibrillation. This equipoise may be explained by suboptimal Time in Therapeutic Range (TTR), which correlates well with thromboembolic and bleeding complications. This study aimed to compare nephrologist-led management of warfarin therapy versus that led by specialized anticoagulation clinic. In a retrospective cohort of chronic hemodialysis patients from two institutions (Institution A: Nephrologist-led warfarin management, Institution B: Anticoagulation clinic-led warfarin management), we identified patients with atrial fibrillation who were receiving warfarin for thromboembolic prophylaxis. Mean TTRs, proportion of patients achieving TTR ≥ 60%, and frequency of INR testing were compared using a logistic regression model. In Institution A, 16.7% of hemodialysis patients had atrial fibrillation, of whom 36.8% were on warfarin. In Institution B, 18% of hemodialysis patients had atrial fibrillation, and 55.5% were on warfarin. The mean TTR was 61.8% (SD 14.5) in Institution A, and 60.5% (SD 15.8) in Institution B (p-value 0.95). However, the proportion of patients achieving TTR ≥ 60% was 65% versus 43.3% (Adjusted OR 2.22, CI 0.65-7.63) and mean frequency of INR testing was every 6 days versus every 13.9 days in Institutions A and B respectively. There was no statistical difference in mean TTR between nephrologist-led management of warfarin and that of clinic-led management. However, the former achieved a trend toward a higher proportion of patients with optimal TTR. This improved therapeutic results was associated with more frequent INR monitoring.

  3. Nationwide Study of Candidemia, Antifungal Use, and Antifungal Drug Resistance in Iceland, 2000 to 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmundsdottir, Lena Ros; Erlendsdottir, Helga

    2013-01-01

    Candidemia is often a life-threatening infection, with highly variable incidence among countries. We conducted a nationwide study of candidemia in Iceland from 2000 to 2011, in order to determine recent trends in incidence rates, fungal species distribution, antifungal susceptibility patterns, and concurrent antifungal consumption. A total of 208 infection episodes in 199 patients were identified. The average incidence during the 12 years was 5.7 cases/100,000 population/year, which was significantly higher than that from 1990 to 1999 (4.3/100,000/year; P = 0.02). A significant reduction in the use of blood cultures was noted in the last 3 years of the study, coinciding with the economic crisis in the country (P 60 years, and varied by gender. Age-specific incidence among males >80 years old was 28.6/100,000/year, and it was 8.3/100,000/year for females in this age group (P = 0.028). The 30-day survival rate among adult patients remained unchanged compared to that from 1990 to 1999 (70.4% versus 69.5%, P = 0.97). Candida albicans was the predominant species (56%), followed by C. glabrata (16%) and C. tropicalis (13%). The species distribution remained stable compared to that from previous decades. Fluconazole use increased 2.4-fold from 2000 to 2011, with no increase in resistance. In summary, the incidence of candidemia in Iceland has continued to increase but may have reached a steady state, and no increase in antifungal drug resistance has been noted. Decreased use of blood cultures toward the end of the study may have influenced detection rates. PMID:23269738

  4. Does novel oral anticoagulant improve anticoagulation for non-valvular atrial fibrillation associated stroke: An inpatient registration study in Shanghai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Di Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstracts: Objective: To summarize the use rate, safety, efficacy of antithrombotics in stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA prevention, and reasons for not using dabigatran etexilate (DE in Shanghai, China. Methods: Non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF-associated stroke patients were prospectively registered as an electronic database. Use rate of antithrombotics and reasons for not using DE were extracted during follow-up. Patients' baseline characteristics, recurrent ischemic stroke/TIA events and bleeding complications were analyzed. Patients: From April 2012 to August 2014, 110 inpatients with NVAF-associated stroke were studied in our hospital. NVAF was diagnosed by 12-lead electrocardiogram, 24 h Holter and echocardiography. Results: Before introduction of DE (April 2013, use rates of warfarin and antiplatelets were 28.9% (11/38 and 60.5% (23/38 respectively; after that, use rates of warfarin, DE, and antiplatelets were 20.8% (15/72, 12.5% (9/72, and 43.1% (31/72. The DE did not improve use of anticoagulants (P = 0.639. There were 19 (17.3% recurrent ischemic stroke events up to October 2015; two (9.5% in the non-user group, 10 (18.5% in the antiplatelet group, and seven (20.0% in the anticoagulants group (P = 0.570. Furthermore, recurrence rates were similar between the DE group (20.0% and the Warfarin group (20.0%, P = 1.000. The most common reason for not using DE was financial concerns (61.0%, followed by inconvenience to purchase (14.0% and hemorrhage concerns (11.0%. Two patients using warfarin found fecal occult blood so they stopped warfarin and began to use antiplatelet drugs. No bleeding event occurred in the other groups. Only one patient had side effects (dyspepsia and gastroesophageal reflux from DE. Conclusion: The use rate of either DE or warfarin in Shanghai was low; DE had not improved anticoagulation therapy for NVAF patients in Shanghai mainly because DE had not been covered by health insurance. Keywords

  5. Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation. Is there a gap in care for ambulatory patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Wayne; Nicol, Kelly; Anderson, David; Brownell, Brenda; Chiasson, Meredith; Burge, Frederick I.; Flowerdew, Gordon; Cox, Jafna

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Atrial fibrillation (AF) substantially increases risk of stroke. Evidence suggests that anticoagulation to reduce risk is underused (a "care gap"). Our objectives were to clarify measures of this gap in care by including data from family physicians and to determine why eligible patients were not receiving anticoagulation therapy. DESIGN: Telephone survey of family physicians regarding specific patients in their practices. SETTING: Nova Scotia. PARTICIPANTS: Ambulatory AF patients not taking warfarin who had risk factors that made anticoagulation appropriate. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportion of patients removed from the care gap; reasons given for not giving the remainder anticoagulants. RESULTS: Half the patients thought to be in the care gap had previously unknown contraindications to anticoagulation, lacked a clear indication for anticoagulation, or were taking warfarin. Patients' refusal and anticipated problems with compliance and monitoring were among the reasons for not giving patients anticoagulants. CONCLUSION: Adding data from primary care physicians significantly narrowed the care gap. Attention should focus on the remaining reasons for not giving eligible patients anticoagulants. PMID:15508374

  6. Safety and efficacy of anticoagulation for secondary stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation patients: The AMADEUS trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lane, D.A.; Kamphuisen, P.W.; Minini, P.; Buller, H.R.; Lip, G.Y.H.

    2010-01-01

    ackground: Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and previous ischemic stroke are at high risk of recurrent stroke, but are also perceived to be at increased bleeding risk while treated with anticoagulants. Methods: Post-hoc analyses examined the efficacy and safety of anticoagulation of 4576 AF

  7. Conservative approach to dental extractions in patients on anticoagulant therapy: A clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somma, Francesco; Grande, Nicola Maria; Plotino, GianLuca; Cameli, Giorgio; Pameijer, Cornelis H

    2010-01-01

    This clinical study reviewed dental surgical extractions that were performed on 532 patients diagnosed at risk of thromboembolism without interrupting their anticoagulant therapy. The results confirmed that anticoagulant therapy can be modified successfully and does not need to be interrupted, which can carry significant risks.

  8. Comparing Direct Oral Anticoagulants and Warfarin for Atrial Fibrillation, Venous Thromboembolism, and Mechanical Heart Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcy, Todd R; Truong, Teresa; Rai, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    To summarize available data for use of direct oral anticoagulants in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, venous thromboembolism, and mechanical heart valves including dose-response consistency to offer considerations for pharmacotherapeutic decision-making for oral anticoagulants. A Medline search of English-language studies published between 2000 and March 2015 was conducted to identify pertinent papers using combinations of the following words: apixaban, atrial fibrillation, dabigatran, direct oral anticoagulant, edoxaban, factor IIa inhibitors, factor Xa inhibitors, mechanical heart valves, novel oral anticoagulant, rivaroxaban, venous thromboembolism, and warfarin. Original studies, guidelines, and approved prescribing information were evaluated and included if contributing new or complementary data toward the objective. References for all identified studies were reviewed and entries included if contributory. Randomized controlled trials have established the safety and efficacy of direct oral anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism for most patient groups. Direct oral anticoagulants should not be used in patients with mechanical heart valves until proven safe and effective. There are groups for which questions remain regarding inter-patient dose-response consistency for direct oral anticoagulants. There are postmarketing data suggesting poorer real-world performance of dabigatran relative to clinical trial data. Direct oral anticoagulants offer several advantages over warfarin, and large clinical trial data establish the appropriateness of their use in broad populations. There remain groups for whom the relative benefit and risk of these agents relative to warfarin are uncertain. A patient-specific approach in pharmacotherapeutic decision-making is appropriate.

  9. The use of prophylactic anticoagulation during induction and consolidation chemotherapy in adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Rachael F; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Stevenson, Kristen E; Neuberg, Donna; Sallan, Stephen E; Mourad, Yasser R Abou; Bergeron, Julie; Seftel, Matthew D; Kokulis, Caroline; Connors, Jean M

    2018-02-01

    Treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in adults confers a high risk of venous thromboembolic (VTE) complications. We describe the implementation and results of prophylactic anticoagulation guidelines in adults (18-50 years) treated on a Dana-Farber Cancer Institute ALL pediatric inspired consortium protocol from 2007 to 2013. A high rate of asparaginase related toxicity events, including thrombosis, resulted in a protocol amendment adding guidelines for prophylactic anticoagulation and a modified asparaginase dose and schedule. After excluding patients with Philadelphia positive ALL, a cohort of 36 patients were treated after the protocol amendment with prophylactic anticoagulation and compared to 49 patients who received no prophylactic anticoagulation. Bleeding complications were not significantly different in those treated with prophylactic anticoagulation compared with those enrolled prior to the amendment (p = 0.26). No patients on prophylactic anticoagulation had grade ≥ 3 bleeding. Prior to the amendment, the 2 year cumulative incidence of VTE post-induction was 41% compared to 28% while on prophylactic anticoagulation (p = 0.32). The 2 year cumulative incidence pulmonary embolus pre-amendment was 16% compared with 8% post-amendment (p = 0.34). Prophylactic anticoagulation can be safely administered to adults with ALL without increasing the number or severity of bleeding events and, in addition to modifications in the asparaginase regimen, resulted in a reduction in the cumulative incidence of VTE.

  10. Anticoagulant effects of an antidiabetic drug on monocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksson, C E; Hellum, M; Haug, K B F; Aass, H C; Joø, G B; Øvstebø, R; Trøseid, A M; Klingenberg, O; Kierulf, P

    2011-11-01

    Monocyte- and microparticle (MP)-associated tissue factor (TF) is upregulated in diabetes. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces expression of TF and alternatively spliced TF (asTF) and increases MP release from monocytes. Using LPS-stimulated TF-bearing human monocytes, we examined whether glibenclamide, a sulfonylurea used to treat diabetes type 2, might possess anticoagulant properties. We studied the effects of glibenclamide on cell- and supernatant-associated procoagulant activity (Factor Xa-generating assay and clot formation assay), on expression of TF and asTF (flow cytometry, RT-qPCR, western blot) and on cell viability and MP release (flow cytometry). Glibenclamide dose-dependently decreased procoagulant activity of cells and supernatants. The reduction in cellular procoagulant activity coincided with reduced expression of TF and asTF in cells, whereas cell viability remained almost unchanged. The glibenclamide-induced reduction in procoagulant activity of supernatants appeared to be associated with a decreased number of released MPs. Reduction of monocyte- and supernatant-associated procoagulant activity by glibenclamide is associated with decreased expression of TF and asTF and possibly with a reduced MP number. Our data indicate that glibenclamide reduces the prothrombotic state in LPS-stimulated monocytes in vitro. Glibenclamide might therefore also have an anticoagulant effect in vivo, but this needs to be further evaluated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Stabilization of the E* Form Turns Thrombin into an Anticoagulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bah, Alaji; Carrell, Christopher J.; Chen, Zhiwei; Gandhi, Prafull S.; Di Cera, Enrico; (WU-MED)

    2009-07-31

    Previous studies have shown that deletion of nine residues in the autolysis loop of thrombin produces a mutant with an anticoagulant propensity of potential clinical relevance, but the molecular origin of the effect has remained unresolved. The x-ray crystal structure of this mutant solved in the free form at 1.55 {angstrom} resolution reveals an inactive conformation that is practically identical (root mean square deviation of 0.154 {angstrom}) to the recently identified E* form. The side chain of Trp215 collapses into the active site by shifting >10 {angstrom} from its position in the active E form, and the oxyanion hole is disrupted by a flip of the Glu192-Gly193 peptide bond. This finding confirms the existence of the inactive form E* in essentially the same incarnation as first identified in the structure of the thrombin mutant D102N. In addition, it demonstrates that the anticoagulant profile often caused by a mutation of the thrombin scaffold finds its likely molecular origin in the stabilization of the inactive E* form that is selectively shifted to the active E form upon thrombomodulin and protein C binding.

  12. In Vitro Antifungal Activity against Oral Candida Species Using a Denture Base Coated with Silver Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Kamikawa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although oral Candida easily adheres to denture base materials, many denture detergents are effective only against bacteria but not against Candida. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs, which are known to have potent antibacterial and antifungal activity, have been used in the prevention of oral candidiasis (OC. We evaluated the adherence of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata on a heat-cured Acron resin piece supported by AgNPs by low-vacuum scanning electron microscopy (SEM and measuring colony-forming units. C. albicans and C. glabrata increasingly adhered to the resin surface of the control piece over time, but the adhesion AgNP of both Candida species to the AgNP-coated surface was significantly inhibited (P<0.001. Low-vacuum SEM revealed that C. albicans and C. glabrata on the resin surface of control pieces appeared as oval colonies, with a major axis of 3-4 μm and a smooth cell wall, but those on the AgNP-coated resin surface were less abundant than the control and showed swollen yeast features, with a major axis of more than 5 μm and a corrugated cell wall. Our results suggest a way to prevent denture-associated OC by using denture base materials processed by AgNPs.

  13. Self-monitoring and self-management of oral anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heneghan, Carl J; Garcia-Alamino, Josep M; Spencer, Elizabeth A; Ward, Alison M; Perera, Rafael; Bankhead, Clare; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Fitzmaurice, David; Mahtani, Kamal R; Onakpoya, Igho J

    2016-07-05

    The introduction of point-of-care devices for the management of patients on oral anticoagulation allows self-testing by the patient at home. Patients who self-test can either adjust their medication according to a pre-determined dose-INR (international normalized ratio) schedule (self-management), or they can call a clinic to be told the appropriate dose adjustment (self-monitoring). Increasing evidence suggests self-testing of oral anticoagulant therapy is equal to or better than standard monitoring. This is an updated version of the original review published in 2010. To evaluate the effects on thrombotic events, major haemorrhages, and all-cause mortality of self-monitoring or self-management of oral anticoagulant therapy compared to standard monitoring. For this review update, we re-ran the searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), 2015, Issue 6, the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (Ovid, 1946 to June week 4 2015), Embase (Ovid, 1980 to 2015 week 27) on 1 July 2015. We checked bibliographies and contacted manufacturers and authors of relevant studies. We did not apply any language restrictions . Outcomes analysed were thromboembolic events, mortality, major haemorrhage, minor haemorrhage, tests in therapeutic range, frequency of testing, and feasibility of self-monitoring and self-management. Review authors independently extracted data and we used a fixed-effect model with the Mantzel-Haenzel method to calculate the pooled risk ratio (RR) and Peto's method to verify the results for uncommon outcomes. We examined heterogeneity amongst studies with the Chi(2) and I(2) statistics and used GRADE methodology to assess the quality of evidence. We identified 28 randomised trials including 8950 participants (newly incorporated in this update: 10 trials including 4227 participants). The overall quality of the evidence was generally low to moderate. Pooled estimates showed a reduction in thromboembolic events (RR 0.58, 95% CI 0.45 to 0

  14. Probiotics as Antifungals in Mucosal Candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Victor H; Bandara, H M H N; Mayer, Marcia P A; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

    2016-05-01

    Candidais an opportunistic pathogen that causes mucosal and deep systemic candidiasis. The emergence of drug resistance and the side effects of currently available antifungals have restricted their use as long-term prophylactic agents for candidal infections. Given this scenario, probiotics have been suggested as a useful alternative for the management of candidiasis. We analyzed the available data on the efficacy of probiotics in candidal colonization of host surfaces. A number of well-controlled studies indicate that probiotics, particularly lactobacilli, suppressCandidagrowth and biofilm development in vitro.A few clinical trials have also shown the beneficial effects of probiotics in reducing oral, vaginal, and enteric colonization byCandida; alleviation of clinical signs and symptoms; and, in some cases, reducing the incidence of invasive fungal infection in critically ill patients. Probiotics may serve in the future as a worthy ally in the battle against chronic mucosal candidal infections. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. When and in which patients can anticoagulation be resumed after intracerebral haemorrhage?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Marietta

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Whether to resume the anticoagulant or the antiaggregant therapy after an episode of major haemorrhage is a difficult dilemma for the physician. The physician has to take into consideration two major questions: whether the benefits of restarting anticoagulation outweigh the risk, and if so, when and how should anticoagulation be restarted. Although some case reports suggest that anticoagulation can be withheld safely for short periods after ICH, even in patients with mechanical heart valves, it is still not clear if long-term anticoagulation can be safely reinstituted after haemorrhage, for example in patients with atrial fibrillation. In fact, no large and well-conducted randomised clinical trials are available, and there is lack of strong evidence on which guidelines recommendations can be based. The article summarise the available literature findings. Finally, a protocol is suggested which may represent a useful tool for assessing treatment options.

  16. Clinico-mycological study of dermatophytic infections and their sensitivity to antifungal drugs in a tertiary care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soniya Mahajan

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Inadequate and irregular use of antifungal drugs has led to the emergence of resistant strains, which cause poor treatment outcomes. Thus, it is very important to test for antifungal sensitivity to check for resistance to antifungals.

  17. [Brown Seaweeds as a Source of New Pharmaceutical Substances with Antibacterial Action].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besednova, N N; Kuznetsova, T A; Zaporozhets, T S; Zvyagintseva, T N

    2015-01-01

    At present the increase of antibiotic resistance in infection agents to antimicrobial drugs requires discovery of new antimicrobial substances with improved pharmacological properties and novel mechanisms of action, to which microorganisms do not develop resistance. Three areas are of interest for the search: recovery of new compounds from natural objects, including aquatic organisms, chemical modification of the known antibiotic molecules, discovery of compounds with antimicrobial activity among some new chemical structures which have no analogues in nature. The review is mainly concerned with discussion of antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal activity of sulfated polysaccharides (fucoidans) and extracts of brown, red and green algae, as well as of antioxidant, antiinflammatory, immunomodulatory and antiendotoxin properties that contribute to their antiinfective action. Such an activity makes fucoidans promising as a basis for developing new drugs for therapy of infectious diseases.

  18. Design and synthesis of novel complexes containing N-phenyl-1H-pyrazole moiety: Ni complex as potential antifungal and antiproliferative compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gamel, Nadia E. A.; Farghaly, Thoraya A.

    2013-11-01

    Cu(II) (1), Ni(II) (2), Cr(III) (3) and Fe(III) (4) complexes with 3-acetyl-4-benzoyl-1-phenyl-1H-pyrazole (L1) were prepared and structurally characterized. Usual coordination of L1 was achieved through nitrogen of pyrazole moiety and carbonyl acetyl group. Electronic spectra of the complexes indicate that the geometry of the metal center was six coordinate octahedral. In vitro antimicrobial activity of the ligand and complex compounds was screened in terms of antibacterial effect on Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive), Escherichia coli (Gram-negative) and antifungal effect on the fungi Aspergillus flavus and candida albicans using the modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) methods. Ni(II) complex (2) exhibited remarkable antifungal inhibition against Candida albicans equal to the standard antifungal agent. To continue our study some structural modifications are formed by adding 4-fluoro-benzoyl moiety to L1 in different forms to produce different ligands, 3-acetyl-4-(4-flourobenzoyl)-1-phenyl-1H-pyrazole (L2) and 3-[(3-acetyl-1-phenyl-1H-4-pyrazolyl)carbonyl]-1-phenyl-4-(4-flourobenzoyl)-1H-pyrazole (L3), Ni complexes (5 and 6) are prepared and comparable in vitro antimicrobial study is evaluated. In vitro cytotoxicity of the Ni(II) complex (2) is studied using MTT assay. The analysis of the cell test showed that (2) displayed quite small cytotoxic response at the higher concentration level which indeed would further enable us for more opportunities in therapeutic and biomedical challenges. Both of the capability as a potent in vitro antifungal agent and the cell test analysis show Ni(II) complex (2) as a promising material in the translation of observed in vitro biological phenomenon into clinical therapies settings.

  19. Optical sensing of anticoagulation status: Towards point-of-care coagulation testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane M Tshikudi

    Full Text Available Anticoagulant overdose is associated with major bleeding complications. Rapid coagulation sensing may ensure safe and accurate anticoagulant dosing and reduce bleeding risk. Here, we report the novel use of Laser Speckle Rheology (LSR for measuring anticoagulation and haemodilution status in whole blood. In the LSR approach, blood from 12 patients and 4 swine was placed in disposable cartridges and time-varying intensity fluctuations of laser speckle patterns were measured to quantify the viscoelastic modulus during clotting. Coagulation parameters, mainly clotting time, clot progression rate (α-angle and maximum clot stiffness (MA were derived from the clot viscoelasticity trace and compared with standard Thromboelastography (TEG. To demonstrate the capability for anticoagulation sensing in patients, blood samples from 12 patients treated with warfarin anticoagulant were analyzed. LSR clotting time correlated with prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin time (r = 0.57-0.77, p<0.04 and all LSR parameters demonstrated good correlation with TEG (r = 0.61-0.87, p<0.04. To further evaluate the dose-dependent sensitivity of LSR parameters, swine blood was spiked with varying concentrations of heparin, argatroban and rivaroxaban or serially diluted with saline. We observed that anticoagulant treatments prolonged LSR clotting time in a dose-dependent manner that correlated closely with TEG (r = 0.99, p<0.01. LSR angle was unaltered by anticoagulation whereas TEG angle presented dose-dependent diminution likely linked to the mechanical manipulation of the clot. In both LSR and TEG, MA was largely unaffected by anticoagulation, and LSR presented a higher sensitivity to increased haemodilution in comparison to TEG (p<0.01. Our results establish that LSR rapidly and accurately measures the response of various anticoagulants, opening the opportunity for routine anticoagulation monitoring at the point-of-care or for patient self-testing.

  20. Antibacterial evaluation of Anacardium occidentale (Linn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aghomotsegin

    inhibitory concentration (MIC) revealed that both parts of the plant have antibacterial activity, but the .... flavonols, xanthones, chalcones, auron, flavononois, ... Table 2. Antibacterial activity of ethanol extract of stem peels and leaves of Anacardium occidentale L. Plant part. Concentrations of the extracts in % (mg/ml).

  1. Antibacterial effects and toxigenesis of Penicillium aurantiogriseum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The toxigenesis of one Penicillium aurantiogriseum and one Penicillium viridicatum isolates was investigated. Sterile culture filtrates of both fungi had a clear antibacterial effect only against Bacillus subtilis. The effect on B. subtilis varied with amount of filtrate used and temperature. The antibacterial activity of chloroform ...

  2. Anticancer and antibacterial secondary metabolites from the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The emergence of multiple-drug resistance bacteria has become a major threat and thus calls for an urgent need to search for new effective and safe anti-bacterial agents. Objectives: This study aims to evaluate the anticancer and antibacterial activities of secondary metabolites from Penicillium sp., ...

  3. Antibacterial activity of some powdered herbal preparations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibacterial activity of some powdered herbal preparations marketed in Kaduna metropolis. D Abba, H.I Inabo, S.E Yakubu, OS Olonitola. Abstract. The aim of the study was to investigate the phytochemical components and the antibacterial activities of some powdered herbal medicinal preparations sourced from identified ...

  4. Antibacterial activity from Siamese crocodile ( Crocodylus siamensis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibacterial agents were purified from Siamese crocodile serum by anion exchange, gel filtration and reversed phase HPLC. Six antibacterial agents designed as Hp14, Hp15, Hp17, Hp31, Hp36 and Hp51 were purified and proved to carry activity against Salmonella typhi, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, ...

  5. Antibacterial Effect of Surface Pretreatment Techniques against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-23

    Feb 23, 2018 ... Self-etching adhesive systems with acidic primers demonstrates only limited antibacterial activities because of the buffering effect of dentin tubular fluid and the existence of aciduric bacteria.[42]. Moreover, dentin bonding systems possessing antibacterial activity even after being cured are beneficial for ...

  6. ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF SALACIA PYRIFORMIS | Poh ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An in-vitro antibacterial action of the plant material was evaluated, using the disc diffusion method. The extracts exhibited marked inhibitory action on the growth of Proteus mirabilis and Escherichia coli at the concentration of 100mg/ml. Key Words: Salacia pyrriformis, Celastraceae, root chemical constituents, antibacterial ...

  7. What makes a natural clay antibacterial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lynda B.; Metge, David W.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Turner, Amanda G.; Prapaipong, Panjai; Port-Peterson, Amisha T.

    2011-01-01

    Natural clays have been used in ancient and modern medicine, but the mechanism(s) that make certain clays lethal against bacterial pathogens has not been identified. We have compared the depositional environments, mineralogies, and chemistries of clays that exhibit antibacterial effects on a broad spectrum of human pathogens including antibiotic resistant strains. Natural antibacterial clays contain nanoscale (2+ solubility.

  8. Methanolic Extract of Plumbago Zeylanica - A Remarkable Antibacterial Agent Against Many Human and Agricultural Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Kumar Singh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The current investigation was carried out to determine the cytotoxic and the antimicrobial activities of methanolic extracts of Plumbago zeylanica. Methods: The stems, leaves, and whole plants were air dried and extracted with methanol by using a Soxhlet extractor for 72 hours at 55 - 60°C. The antimicrobial activities were determined from the zones of inhibition, which were measured by using the agar well diffusion method, and the cytotoxicity assays were performed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay method. Results: The methanolic extracts of the stem and the leaves of Plumbago zeylanica were tested against six bacterial species and nine fungal species, and both extracts showed antimicrobial activity in a dose-dependent manner. The leaf extract of Plumbago zeylanica showed maximum antimicrobial activity against both Staphylococcus aureus sub sp aureus and Fusarium oxysporum. The stem extract was found to be more antimicrobial against the Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the Penicillium expansum species. MTT assays were used to test the cytotoxicity of the whole plant extract in the HCT-116 and the K-562 cell lines, and that extract was shown to have weak cytotoxicity in both cell lines. Conclusion: In the present study, the methanolic stem extracts of Plumbago zeylanica were found to possess remarkable antibacterial activities against many human and agricultural pathogens. The extracts were also found to possess significant antifungal activities, but the antifungal activities were less than the antibacterial activities. Finally, the extracts were found to have weak cytotoxicities in the HCT-116 and the K-562 cell lines.

  9. Antibacterial activity of baking soda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, D

    1997-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) was assessed using three different experimental approaches. Standard minimum inhibitory concentration analyses revealed substantial inhibitory activity against Streptococcus mutans that was not due to ionic strength or high osmolarity. Short-term exposure assays showed significant killing of bacterial suspensions when baking soda was combined with the detergent sodium dodecylsulfate. Multiple, brief exposures of sucrose-colonized S mutans to baking soda and sodium dodecylsulfate caused statistically significant decreases in numbers of viable cells. Use of oral health care products with high concentrations of baking soda could conceivably result in decreased levels of cariogenic S mutans in saliva and plaque.

  10. Antibacterial graphene oxide coatings on polymer substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiming; Wen, Jing; Gao, Yang; Li, Tianyang; Wang, Huifang; Yan, Hong; Niu, Baolong; Guo, Ruijie

    2018-04-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) was thought to be a promising antibacterial material. In this work, graphene oxide coatings on polymer substrate were prepared and the antibacterial activity against E. coli and S. aureus was investigated. It was demonstrated that the coatings exhibited stronger antibacterial activity against E. coli with thin membrane than S. aureus with thick membrane. Take into consideration the fact that the coatings presented smooth, sharp edges-free morphology and bonded parallelly to substrate, which was in mark contrast with their precursor GO nanosheets, oxidative stress mechanism was considered the main factor of antibacterial activity. The coatings, which are easy to recycle and have no inhalation risk, provide an alternative for application in antibacterial medical instruments.

  11. Antibacterial activity of selected Myanmar medicinal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nwe Yee Win; Nyunt Wynn; Mar Mar Nyein; Win Myint; Saw Hla Myint; Myint Khine

    2001-01-01

    Thirteen plants which are traditionally used for the treatment of dysentery and diarrhoea in Myanmar were selected and tested for antibacterial activity by using agar disc diffusion technique. Polar and nonpolar solvents were employed for extraction of plants. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the extracts with the most significant predominant activity were evaluated by plate dilution method. The plants Eugenia jambolana, Quisqualis indica, Leucaena glauca and Euphorbia splendens var. 1 were found to show significant antibacterial activity. It was also observed that extracts using nonpolar solvents did not show any antibacterial activity and extracts using polar solvents showed antibacterial activity on tested bacteria, indicating that the active chemical compound responsible for the antibacterial action must be a polar soluble compound. (author)

  12. DNA Topoisomerases as Targets for Antibacterial Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiasa, Hiroshi

    2018-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases are proven therapeutic targets of antibacterial agents. Quinolones, especially fluoroquinolones, are the most successful topoisomerase-targeting antibacterial drugs. These drugs target type IIA topoisomerases in bacteria. Recent structural and biochemical studies on fluoroquinolones have provided the molecular basis for both their mechanism of action, as well as the molecular basis of bacterial resistance. Due to the development of drug resistance, including fluoroquinolone resistance, among bacterial pathogens, there is an urgent need to discover novel antibacterial agents. Recent advances in topoisomerase inhibitors may lead to the development of novel antibacterial drugs that are effective against fluoroquinolone-resistant pathogens. They include type IIA topoisomerase inhibitors that either interact with the GyrB/ParE subunit or form nick-containing ternary complexes. In addition, several topoisomerase I inhibitors have recently been identified. Thus, DNA topoisomerases remain important targets of antibacterial agents.

  13. Characterization of Antifungal Activity and Nail Penetration of ME1111, a New Antifungal Agent for Topical Treatment of Onychomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabata, Yuji; Takei-Masuda, Naomi; Kubota, Natsuki; Takahata, Sho; Ohyama, Makoto; Kaneda, Kaori; Iida, Maiko; Maebashi, Kazunori

    2016-02-01

    Fungal nail infection (onychomycosis) is a prevalent disease in many areas of the world, with a high incidence approaching 23%. Available antifungals to treat the disease suffer from a number of disadvantages, necessitating the discovery of new efficacious and safe antifungals. Here, we evaluate the in vitro antifungal activity and nail penetration ability of ME1111, a novel antifungal agent, along with comparator drugs, including ciclopirox, amorolfine, terbinafine, and itraconazole. ME1111 showed potent antifungal activity against Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes (the major etiologic agents of onychomycosis) strains isolated in Japan and reference fungal strains with an MIC range of 0.12 to 0.5 mg/liter and an MIC50 and MIC90 of 0.5 mg/liter for both. Importantly, none of the tested isolates showed an elevated ME1111 MIC. Moreover, the antifungal activity of ME1111 was minimally affected by 5% wool keratin powder in comparison to the other antifungals tested. The ME1111 solution was able to penetrate human nails and inhibit fungal growth in a dose-dependent manner according to the TurChub assay. In contrast, 8% ciclopirox and 5% amorolfine nail lacquers showed no activity under the same conditions. ME1111 demonstrated approximately 60-fold-greater selectivity in inhibition of Trichophyton spp. than of human cell lines. Our findings demonstrate that ME1111 possesses potent antidermatophyte activity, maintains this activity in the presence of keratin, and possesses excellent human nail permeability. These results suggest that ME1111 is a promising topical medication for the treatment of onychomycosis and therefore warrants further clinical evaluation. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Characterization of Antifungal Activity and Nail Penetration of ME1111, a New Antifungal Agent for Topical Treatment of Onychomycosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei-Masuda, Naomi; Kubota, Natsuki; Takahata, Sho; Ohyama, Makoto; Kaneda, Kaori; Iida, Maiko; Maebashi, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    Fungal nail infection (onychomycosis) is a prevalent disease in many areas of the world, with a high incidence approaching 23%. Available antifungals to treat the disease suffer from a number of disadvantages, necessitating the discovery of new efficacious and safe antifungals. Here, we evaluate the in vitro antifungal activity and nail penetration ability of ME1111, a novel antifungal agent, along with comparator drugs, including ciclopirox, amorolfine, terbinafine, and itraconazole. ME1111 showed potent antifungal activity against Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes (the major etiologic agents of onychomycosis) strains isolated in Japan and reference fungal strains with an MIC range of 0.12 to 0.5 mg/liter and an MIC50 and MIC90 of 0.5 mg/liter for both. Importantly, none of the tested isolates showed an elevated ME1111 MIC. Moreover, the antifungal activity of ME1111 was minimally affected by 5% wool keratin powder in comparison to the other antifungals tested. The ME1111 solution was able to penetrate human nails and inhibit fungal growth in a dose-dependent manner according to the TurChub assay. In contrast, 8% ciclopirox and 5% amorolfine nail lacquers showed no activity under the same conditions. ME1111 demonstrated approximately 60-fold-greater selectivity in inhibition of Trichophyton spp. than of human cell lines. Our findings demonstrate that ME1111 possesses potent antidermatophyte activity, maintains this activity in the presence of keratin, and possesses excellent human nail permeability. These results suggest that ME1111 is a promising topical medication for the treatment of onychomycosis and therefore warrants further clinical evaluation. PMID:26643333

  15. Mapping and Identification of Antifungal Peptides in the Putative Antifungal Protein AfpB from the Filamentous Fungus Penicillium digitatum.

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    Garrigues, Sandra; Gandía, Mónica; Borics, Attila; Marx, Florentine; Manzanares, Paloma; Marcos, Jose F

    2017-01-01

    Antifungal proteins (AFPs) from Ascomycetes are small cysteine-rich proteins that are abundantly secreted and show antifungal activity against non-producer fungi. A gene coding for a class B AFP (AfpB) was previously identified in the genome of the plant pathogen Penicillium digitatum . However, previous attempts to detect the AfpB protein were not successful despite the high expression of the corresponding afpB gene. In this work, the structure of the putative AfpB was modeled. Based on this model, four synthetic cysteine-containing peptides, PAF109, PAF112, PAF118, and PAF119, were designed and their antimicrobial activity was tested and characterized. PAF109 that corresponds to the γ-core motif present in defensin-like antimicrobial proteins did not show antimicrobial activity. On the contrary, PAF112 and PAF118, which are cationic peptides derived from two surface-exposed loops in AfpB, showed moderate antifungal activity against P. digitatum and other filamentous fungi. It was also confirmed that cyclization through a disulfide bridge prevented peptide degradation. PAF116, which is a peptide analogous to PAF112 but derived from the Penicillium chrysogenum antifungal protein PAF, showed activity against P. digitatum similar to PAF112, but was less active than the native PAF protein. The two AfpB-derived antifungal peptides PAF112 and PAF118 showed positive synergistic interaction when combined against P. digitatum . Furthermore, the synthetic hexapeptide PAF26 previously described in our laboratory also exhibited synergistic interaction with the peptides PAF112, PAF118, and PAF116, as well as with the PAF protein. This study is an important contribution to the mapping of antifungal motifs within the AfpB and other AFPs, and opens up new strategies for the rational design and application of antifungal peptides and proteins.

  16. Dynamics of Mixed- Candida Species Biofilms in Response to Antifungals.

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    Vipulanandan, G; Herrera, M; Wiederhold, N P; Li, X; Mintz, J; Wickes, B L; Kadosh, D

    2018-01-01

    Oral infections caused by Candida species, the most commonly isolated human fungal pathogen, are frequently associated with biofilms. Although Candida albicans is the predominant organism found in patients with oral thrush, a biofilm infection, there is an increasing incidence of oral colonization and infections caused by non- albicans Candida species, including C. glabrata, C. dubliniensis, and C. tropicalis, which are frequently more resistant to antifungal treatment. While single-species Candida biofilms have been well studied, considerably less is known about the dynamics of mixed- Candida species biofilms and how these dynamics are altered by antifungal treatment. To address these questions, we developed a quantitative polymerase chain reaction-based approach to determine the precise species composition of mixed- Candida species biofilms formed by clinical isolates and laboratory strains in the presence and absence of clinically relevant concentrations of 3 commonly used antifungals: fluconazole, caspofungin, and amphotericin B. In monospecies biofilms, fluconazole exposure favored growth of C. glabrata and C. tropicalis, while caspofungin generally favored significant growth of all species to a varying degree. Fluconazole was not effective against preformed mixed- Candida species biofilms while amphotericin B was potent. As a general trend, in mixed- Candida species biofilms, C. albicans lost dominance in the presence of antifungals. Interestingly, presence in mixed versus monospecies biofilms reduced susceptibility to amphotericin B for C. tropicalis and C. glabrata. Overall, our data suggest that antifungal treatment favors the growth of specific non- albicans Candida species in mixed- Candida species biofilms.

  17. Antifungal activity of essential oils against selected terverticillate penicillia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felšöciová, Soňa; Kačániová, Miroslava; Horská, Elena; Vukovič, Nenad; Hleba, Lukáš; Petrová, Jana; Rovná, Katarina; Stričík, Michal; Hajduová, Zuzana

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to screen 15 essential oils of selected plant species, viz. Lavandula angustifolia, Carum carvi, Pinus mungo var. pulmilio, Mentha piperita, Chamomilla recutita L., Pinus sylvestris, Satureia hortensis L., Origanum vulgare L., Pimpinella anisum, Rosmarinus officinalis L., Salvia officinalis L., Abietis albia etheroleum, Chamomilla recutita L. Rausch, Thymus vulgaris L., Origanum vulgare L. for antifungal activity against five Penicillium species: Penicillium brevicompactum, Penicillium citrinum, Penicillium crustosum, Penicillium expansum and Penicillium griseofulvum. The method used for screening included the disc diffusion method. The study points out the wide spectrum of antifungal activity of essential oils against Penicillium fungi. There were five essential oils of the 15 mentioned above which showed a hopeful antifungal activity: Pimpinella anisum, Chamomilla recutita L., Thymus vulgaris, Origanum vulgare L. The most hopeful antifungal activity and killing effect against all tested penicillia was found to be Origanum vulgare L. and Pimpinella anisum. The lowest level of antifungal activity was demonstrated by the oils Pinus mungo var. pulmilio, Salvia officinalis L., Abietis albia etheroleum, Chamomilla recutita L. Rausch, Rosmarinus officinalis.

  18. Antifungal activity of essential oils against selected terverticillate penicillia

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    Soňa Felšöciová

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to screen 15 essential oils of selected plant species, viz. Lavandula angustifolia, Carum carvi, Pinus mungo var. pulmilio, Mentha piperita, Chamomilla recutita L., Pinus sylvestris, Satureia hortensis L., Origanum vulgare L., Pimpinella anisum, Rosmarinus officinalis L., Salvia officinalis L., Abietis albia etheroleum, Chamomilla recutita, L. Rausch, Thymus vulgaris L., Origanum vulgare L. for antifungal activity against five Penicillium species: Penicillium brevicompactum, Penicillium citrinum, Penicillium crustosum, Penicillium expansum and Penicillium griseofulvum. The method used for screening included the disc diffusion method. The study points out the wide spectrum of antifungal activity of essential oils against Penicillium fungi. There were five essential oils of the 15 mentioned above which showed a hopeful antifungal activity: Pimpinella anisum, Chamomilla recutita L., Thymus vulgaris, Origanum vulgare L. The most hopeful antifungal activity and killing effect against all tested penicillia was found to be Origanum vulgare L. and Pimpinella anisum. The lowest level of antifungal activity was demonstrated by the oils Pinus mungo var. pulmilio, Salvia officinalis L., Abietis albia etheroleum, Chamomilla recutita L. Rausch, Rosmarinus officinalis.

  19. Chloroquine sensitizes biofilms of Candida albicans to antifungal azoles

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    Ravikumar Bapurao Shinde

    Full Text Available Biofilms formed by Candida albicans, a human pathogen, are known to be resistant to different antifungal agents. Novel strategies to combat the biofilm associated Candida infections like multiple drug therapy are being explored. In this study, potential of chloroquine to be a partner drug in combination with four antifungal agents, namely fluconazole, voriconazole, amphotericin B, and caspofungin, was explored against biofilms of C. albicans. Activity of various concentrations of chloroquine in combination with a particular antifungal drug was analyzed in a checkerboard format. Growth of biofilm in presence of drugs was analyzed by XTT-assay, in terms of relative metabolic activity compared to that of drug free control. Results obtained by XTT-metabolic assay were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The interactions between chloroquine and four antifungal drugs were determined by calculating fractional inhibitory concentration indices. Azole resistance in biofilms was reverted significantly (p < 0.05 in presence of 250 µg/mL of chloroquine, which resulted in inhibition of biofilms at very low concentrations of antifungal drugs. No significant alteration in the sensitivity of biofilms to caspofungin and amphotericin B was evident in combination with chloroquine. This study for the first time indicates that chloroquine potentiates anti-biofilm activity of fluconazole and voriconazole.

  20. Potential antifungal activity of Cladonia aff. rappii A. Evans

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    Claudia M. Plaza

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Context: Lichen is a self-supporting symbiotic organism composed of a fungus and an algal partner. They have manifold biological activities like antiviral, antibiotic, antioxidant, antitumor, allergenic and inhibition of plant growth. Species of Cladonia, have been studied by its antifungal activity. Aims: To evaluate the antifungal activity determination of Cladonia aff. rappii against five yeasts, four of genus Candida and one Cryptococcus, using water, ethanol and dichloromethane extracts. Methods: The evaluation of the antifungal activity was developed by three diffusion methods such as spot-on-a-lawn, disc diffusion and well diffusion. Additionally, the values of minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC and the minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC were determined. Results: Based on the experimental results obtained, the best antifungal activity was using ethanol extract at 20 mg/mL against Candida albicans, applying the three diffusion methods above mentioned. With ethanol extract, the lower MIC was against Candida glabrata and the lower MFC were with Candida glabrata, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis. The dichloromethane extract presented the lowest MIC and MFC against C. neoformans. Not activity was observed with aqueous extract. Conclusions: The present study revealed antifungal and fungicidal activity in the extract of lichen Cladonia aff. rappii.