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Sample records for antiarrhythmic drug therapy

  1. Therapy with conventional antiarrhythmic drugs for ventricular arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestico, P F; DePace, N L; Morganroth, J

    1984-09-01

    Conventional antiarrhythmic drugs are an important tool for the clinical cardiologist for the treatment of ventricular arrhythmias. Knowledge of the different properties of these drugs will help decrease the incidence of adverse effects and increase the frequency of successful therapy.

  2. [Modern drug therapy of atrial fibrillation: selection of treatment strategy, antiarrhythmic preparations, and schemes of treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanorskiĭ, S G

    2012-01-01

    This review presents novel literature data on drug treatment of atrial fibrillation. We discuss here choice of strategy of therapy, antiarrhythmic drugs, and algorithms of preventive measures aimed at prevention of recurrences of this arrhythmia.

  3. Cardiac Arrhythmias in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: Implications of Renal Failure for Antiarrhythmic Drug Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potpara, Tatjana S; Jokic, Vera; Dagres, Nikolaos; Marin, Francisco; Prostran, Milica S; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2016-01-01

    The kidney has numerous complex interactions with the heart, including shared risk factors (e.g., hypertension, dyslipidemia, etc.) and mutual amplification of morbidity and mortality. Both cardiovascular diseases and chronic kidney disease (CKD) may cause various alterations in cardiovascular system, metabolic homeostasis and autonomic nervous system that may facilitate the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias. Also, pre-existent or incident cardiac arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation (AF) may accelerate the progression of CKD. Patients with CKD may experience various cardiac rhythm disturbances including sudden cardiac death. Contemporary management of cardiac arrhythmias includes the use of antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs), catheter ablation and cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs). Importantly, AADs are not used only as the principal treatment strategy, but also as an adjunct therapy in combination with CIEDs, to facilitate their effects or to minimize inappropriate device activation in selected patients. Along with their principal antiarrhythmic effect, AADs may also induce cardiac arrhythmias and the risk for such proarrhythmic effect(s) is particularly increased in patients with reduced left ventricular systolic function or in the setting of electrolyte imbalance. Moreover, CKD itself can induce profound alterations in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of many drugs including AADs, thus facilitating the drug accumulation and increased exposure. Hence, the use of AADs in patients with CKD may be challenging. In this review article, we provide an overview of the characteristics of arrhythmogenesis in patients with CKD with special emphasis on the complexity of pharmacokinetics and risk for proarrhythmias when using AADs in patients with cardiac arrhythmias and CKD.

  4. Review of contemporary antiarrhythmic drug therapy for maintenance of sinus rhythm in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Sandeep; Karam, Pascal; Deshmukh, Abhishek J; Mehta, Jawahar; Paydak, Hakan

    2012-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common rhythm disturbance seen in clinical practice, and its prevalence and incidence are rising rapidly as the population ages with its attendant complications. Management of AF involves anticoagulation, and fortunately new drugs for long-term anticoagulation are now available. Maintenance of sinus rhythm, though intuitively better than rate control strategy, has not been shown to offer mortality benefit. Still, maintenance of sinus rhythm is considered an appropriate therapeutic strategy when symptoms are not adequately controlled with rate control. Though significant advances have been made in ablation techniques for AF, pharmacological therapy is still the first line of treatment for rate control and maintenance of sinus rhythm, given ease of use, noninvasive nature, and limited experience with catheter-based ablation techniques. Class IC and III agents (Vaughan Williams classification) form the backbone for pharmacological maintenance of sinus rhythm. Dronedarone, a recently approved class III agent, provides a significant advance because of its relatively safe side effect profile. Currently drugs with selective atrial channels blocking properties, like Vernakalant, are being tested in trials and may provide an opportunity to maintain sinus rhythm with limited toxicity. Large trials are also being conducted to better define the efficacy of catheter-based ablation strategy as first-line treatment. Here, we review the current status of commonly used antiarrhythmic medications for the maintenance of sinus rhythm in AF.

  5. Antiarrhythmics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Receptor Blockers Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitors Anticoagulants Antiplatelet Therapy Aspirin Beta-Blockers Blood Thinners Calcium Channel Blockers Digitalis Medicines Diuretics Inotropic Agents Nitrates Statins, Cholesterol-Lowering Medicines Antiarrhythmics Disclaimer The ...

  6. Use of antiarrhythmic drugs in elderly patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hon-Chi Lee; Kristin TL Huang; Win-Kuang Shen

    2011-01-01

    Human aging is a global issue with important implications for current and future incidence and prevalence of health conditions and disability.Cardiac arrhythmias,including atrial fibrillation,sudden cardiac death,and bradycardia requiring pacemaker placement,all increase exponentially after the age of 60.It is important to distinguish between the normal,physiological consequences of aging on cardiacelectrophysiology and the abnormal,pathological alterations.The age-related cardiac changes include ventricular hypertrophy,senileamyloidosis,cardiac valvular degenerative changes and annular calcification,fibrous infiltration of the conduction system,and loss of naturalpacemaker cells and these changes could have a profound effect on the development of arrhythmias.The age-related cardiac electrophysiological changes include up- and down-regulation of specific ion channel expression and intracellular Ca2+ overload which promote the development of cardiac an-hythmias.As ion channels are the substrates of antiarrhythmic drugs,it follows that the pharmacoldnetics and pharmacodynamics of these drugs will also change with age.Aging alters the absorption,distribution,metabolism,and elimination of antiarrhythmic drugs,so liver and kidney function must be monitored to avoid potential adverse drug effects,and antiarrhythmic dosing may need to be adjusted for age.Elderly patients are also more susceptible to the side effects of many antiarrhythmics,including bradycardia,orthostatic hypotension,urinary retention,and falls.Moreover,the choice of antiarrhythmic drugs in the elderly patient is frequently complicated by the presence of co-morbid conditions and by polyphanmacy,and the astute physician must pay careful attention to potential drug-drug interactions.Finally,it is important to remember that the use of antiarrhythmic drugs in elderly patients must be individualized and tailored to each patient's physiology,disease processes,and medication regimen.

  7. Targeting ryanodine receptors for anti-arrhythmic therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mark D McCAULEY; Xander H T WEHRENS

    2011-01-01

    Antiarrhythmic drugs are a group of pharmaceuticals that suppress or prevent abnormal heart rhythms, which are often associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Current antiarrhythmic drugs that typically target plasma membrane ion channels have limited clinical success and in some cases have been described as being pro-arrhythmic. However, recent studies suggest that pathological release of calcium (Ca2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum via cardiac ryanodine receptors (RyR2) could represent a promising target for antiarrhythmic therapy. Diastolic SR Ca2+ release has been linked to arrhythmogenesis in both the inherited arrhythmia synSeveral classes of pharmaceuticals have been shown to reduce abnormal RyR2 activity and may confer protection against triggered arrhythmias through reduction of SR Ca2+ leak. In this review, we will evaluate the current pharmacological methods for stabilizing RyR2 and suggest treatment modalities based on current evidence of molecular mechanisms.

  8. [Vaughan Williams class IV antiarrhythmic drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horie, M; Washizuka, T; Ikeguchi, S; Sasayama, S

    1996-08-01

    Vaughan Williams class IV antiarrhythmic drugs have Ca-channel blocking actions. Since L-type Ca-channels play key roles in regulating pulse conduction in atrioventricular node as well as in pathologically-depolarized myocardium, Ca-channel blockers known to modulate this type of Ca-channel (ICa,L) are used as antiarrhythmic agents. ICa,L channels have relatively high threshold potential (-40 mV) to activate and long-opening properties, and are enhanced by beta-adrenergic stimulation. Among three major ICa,L blockers, dihydropyridines such as nifedipine were found to bind to the channel from extracellular side. In contrast, verapamil and diltiazem interact with the channel from the cytoplasmic side, thereby causing rate-dependent block of ICa,L channels. This sideness of pharmacological action of the Ca-channel blockers determines an important therapeutic modality and their indication for tachyarrhythmias.

  9. Gap junctions enhancer combined with Vaughan Williams class III antiarrhythmic drugs, a promising antiarrhythmic method?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lian-dong; Zhang, Cun-tai; Ruan, Lei; Ni, Ming-ke; Quan, Xiao-qing

    2011-01-01

    Arrhythmias is one of the leading causes of death in the world. Current antiarrhythmic drugs are limited by unsatisfactory efficacy and adverse effects such as proarrhythmias. Reentry mechanism plays an important role in persistence of arrhythmias. Reentry can only continue when reentry path-length is longer than cardiac wavelength which is equal to the product of conduction velocity (CV) and effective refractory period (ERP). Gap junctions uncoupling is associated with proarrhythmic CV slowing and transmural dispersion of repolarization (TDR) increasing in many cardiac diseases. Vaughan Williams class III antiarrhythmic drugs prolong ERP with an augmented TDR which is the main mechanism of the proarrhythmic effects. Gap junctions enhancer can augment CV and diminish TDR. As a result, gap junctions enhancer combined with class III drugs may be a promising antiarrhythmic method.

  10. NEW ANTIARRHYTHMIC DRUG FOR THE TREATMENT OF ATRIAL FIBRILLATION. STUDY DATA, CLINICAL GUIDELINES, REGULATORY AGENCY RECOMMENDATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Martsevich

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objectives and strategies for treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF, one of the most common cardiac arrhythmia, are seen. A combination of strategies for heart rate control in patients with atrial fibrillation receiving rhythm-controling therapy is preferred at present, according to current guidelines. Amiodarone, one of the most effective anti-arrhythmic drugs with an extensive evidence base, remains the drug of reserve because of serious side effects. A new drug, dronedarone, has electrophysiological properties attributable to all four classes of antiarrhythmic drugs. According to meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials dronedarone is inferior to amiodarone in prevention of AF recurrences, but it is superior to amiodaron in safety. However , in 2011 dronedarone was included in the Food and Drug Administration (FDA list of drugs that require further analysis in connection with appearance of the new information about its safety.

  11. Antiarrhythmic therapy and risk of death in patients with atrial fibrillation: a nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Søren Skøtt; Hansen, Morten Lock; Gislason, Gunnar H;

    2009-01-01

    by individual-level linkage of nationwide registries. Multivariable Cox proportional-hazard models with time-dependent covariates were used to analyse the risk of death associated with AAD therapy. A total of 141,500 patients were included in the study; of these 3356 (2.4%) patients received treatment......AIMS: To examine the risk of death associated with antiarrhythmic drug (AAD) therapy in a nationwide unselected cohort of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). METHODS AND RESULTS: All patients admitted with AF in Denmark from 1995 to 2004 and their subsequent use of AADs were identified...... increased risk of death associated with any of the AADs. Hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) for flecainide 0.38 (0.32-0.44), propafenone 0.65 (0.58-0.71), sotalol 0.65 (0.63-0.67), and amiodarone 0.94 (0.89-1.00). CONCLUSION: In an unselected cohort of patients with AF, antiarrhythmic treatment...

  12. Efficacy of Antiarrhythmic Drugs in Adults With Congenital Heart Disease and Supraventricular Tachycardias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koyak, Zeliha; Kroon, Bart; de Groot, Joris R.; Wagenaar, Lodewijk J.; van Dijk, Arie P.; Mulder, Bart A.; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.; Post, Marco C.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; Bouma, Berto J.

    2013-01-01

    Supraventricular tachycardias (SVTs) are a major cause of morbidity in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). Few data exist on safety and efficacy of antiarrhythmic drugs in this population. Our aim was to determine the efficacy of antiarrhythmic drugs in adults with CHD and first-onset SVT on

  13. EO-199, a specific antagonist of antiarrhythmic drugs: Assessment by binding experiments and in vivo studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oppenheimer, E.; Harel, G.; Lipinsky, D.; Sarne, Y. (Tel-Aviv Univ. (Israel))

    1991-01-01

    EO-199, a demethylated analog of the novel class I antiarrhythmic drug EO-122 was found to antagonize the antiarrhythmic activity of EO-122 and that of procainamide (Class I{sub A}). EO-199 did not block significantly the activity of a class I{sub B} antiarrhythmic agent, lidocaine. EO-199 also displaced the specific binding of ({sup 3}H)EO-122 to rate heart membranes similarly to procainamide whereas lidocaine did not. The correlation between binding experiments and pharmacological effects points to a possible subclassification of these drugs; the two chemical analogs EO-199 and EO-122, as well as procainamide (I{sub A}) but not lidocaine (I{sub B}), compete at the same site or the same state of the sodium channel. The availability of a specific antagonist might be useful for studying the mechanism of action of antiarrhythmic drugs as well as an antidote in cases of antiarrhythmics overdose intoxication.

  14. Antiarrhythmic drugs use in elderly patients. Vaughan Williams class I and II drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Ushkalova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of class I antiarrhythmic drugs in the elderly is limited by their adverse drug reactions (ADRs, proarrhythmic effect (I A и I C and high risk of drug interactions. Disopyramide use should be avoided due to its strong anticholinergic properties associated with the risk of cognitive and physical disorders and falls in the “very elderly” patients. Available data suggest that elderly patients do not have significant limitations for beta-blockers use. However to determine beta-blockers with the best benefit/risk ratio in elderly patients with co-morbidity further clinical trials are needed.

  15. Dofetilide: a class III anti-arrhythmic drug for the treatment of atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torp-Pedersen, C; Brendorp, B; Køber, L

    2000-01-01

    Dofetilide is a class III anti-arrhythmic drug that has been approved for the treatment of atrial fibrillation. Two clinical studies, which enrolled 996 patients, demonstrated pharmacological conversion to sinus rhythm to occur in 30% of patients. Following pharmacological or electrical conversion...

  16. A classification of antiarrhythmic actions reassessed after a decade of new drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan Williams, E M

    1984-04-01

    The past decade has seen the introduction of many new class 1 drugs, restricting fast inward current. Confirmative evidence has been obtained that the antiarrthymic action of lidocaine and diphenylhydantoin is indeed due to their effect as class 1 agents depressing conduction. The original class 3 drug, amiodarone, is increasingly in use as an antiarrhythmic of first choice for WPW and for arrhythmias associated with hypertrophic myopathy, and as a reserve drug in resistant arrhythmias of other types. Other compounds delaying repolarization have proved to be clinically effective as antiarrhythmics. In addition to their class 2 antiarrhythymic action exhibited acutely, on long-term treatment beta blockers have a class 3 action, which might be, at least in part, responsible for the protection of postinfarction patients against sudden death. Recent research suggests that inhibition of slow inward current may lead, as a secondary consequence of lowered [Ca]i, to improved cell-to-cell conduction. Finally, all but one of the new antiarrhythmic drugs, none of which existed in 1972, have turned out to possess one or more of the four classes of action originally described. This can hardly be a coincidence. The single exception, alinidine, a selective bradycardic agent, may restrict anionic currents, which would constitute a fifth class of action, but this is far from proved.

  17. In-hospital cardiac arrest is associated with use of non-antiarrhythmic QTc-prolonging drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Bruin, Marie L; Langendijk, Pim N J; Koopmans, Richard P;

    2007-01-01

    a case-control study in which patients, for whom intervention of the advanced life support resuscitation team was requested for cardiac arrest between 1995 and 2003 in the Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, were compared with controls regarding current use of non-antiarrhythmic QTc-prolonging drugs...... should be made aware of the fact that these non-antiarrhythmic drugs may be hazardous, so that potential risks can be weighed against treatment benefits and additional cardiac surveillance can be requested, if necessary....

  18. Beat Rate Variability in Murine Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes: Effect of Antiarrhythmic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius Niehoff

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Heart rate variability (HRV refers to the fluctuation of the time interval between consecutive heartbeats in humans. It has recently been discovered that cardiomyocytes derived from human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells show beat rate variability (BRV that is similar to the HRV in humans. In the present study, clinical aspects of HRV were transferred to an in vitro model. The aims of the study were to explore the BRV in murine embryonic stem cell (mESC-derived cardiomyocytes and to demonstrate the influence of antiarrhythmic drugs on BRV as has been shown in clinical trials previously. Methods: The Microelectrode Array (MEA technique was used to perform short-term recordings of extracellular field potentials (FPs of spontaneously beating cardiomyocytes derived from mESCs (D3 cell line, αPig-44. Offline analysis was focused on time domain and nonlinear methods. Results: The Poincaré-Plot analysis of measurements without pharmacological intervention revealed that three different shapes of scatter plots occurred most frequently. Comparable shapes have been described in clinical studies before. The antiarrhythmic drugs Ivabradine, Verapamil and Sotalol augmented BRV, whereas Flecainide decreased BRV parameters at low concentrations (SDSD 79.0 ± 8.7% of control at 10-9 M, p -5 M, p Conclusions: Spontaneously beating cardiomyocytes derived from mESCs showed BRV that appears to be similar to the HRV known from humans. Antiarrhythmic drugs affected BRV parameters similar to clinical observations. Therefore, our study demonstrates that this in vitro model can contribute to a better understanding of electrophysiological properties of mESC-derived cardiomyocytes and might serve as a valuable tool for drug safety screening.

  19. Relevance of cellular to clinical electrophysiology in interpreting antiarrhythmic drug action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan Williams, E M

    1989-12-01

    The usefulness of cellular electrophysiologic techniques in elucidating the fundamental actions of antiarrhythmic drugs is contrasted with their apparent lack of relevance to the selection of drugs for the treatment of particular arrhythmias. Clinical electrophysiologists employ different techniques, but their results may be explained in terms of cellular drug actions. The varying clinical effects of class IA, IB and IC agents are due to differences in the speed of their attachment to, and detachment from, sodium channels. The role of sympathetic activity in arrhythmogenesis is complex, but again readily explicable in terms of the electrophysiologic cellular actions of stimulation of the individual types of adrenoceptors (alpha 1, alpha 2, beta 1 and beta 2) and the distribution of these receptors, and of the longterm effects of sympathetic deprivation, either by antisympathetic drugs (class II) or by sympathetic denervation. Delayed repolarization (e.g., by class III drugs or prolonged beta blockade) is antiarrhythmic because it is homogeneous, despite the incidental prolongation of QT. If, however, QT is prolonged by heterogeneity of conduction or repolarization, or by partial sympathetic denervation (long QT syndrome or post myocardial infarction), this indicates increased risk of arrhythmia. Finally, the efficacy of calcium antagonists (class IV) in supraventricular arrhythmias is attributable to the cellular electrophysiologic characteristics of sinoatrial and atrioventricular nodal and transitional elements.

  20. Drug: D00648 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 885.225 D00648.gif Cardiac depressant [anti-arrhythmic] ATC code: C01BD05 voltage-gated potassium channel (...KCNH2) blocker [HSA:3757] [KO:K04905] map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs map07232 Potassium channel blocking and ... CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM C01 CARDIAC THERAPY C01B ANTIARRHYTHMICS, CLASS I AND III C01BD Antiarrhythmics, clas

  1. The importance of class-I antiarrhythmic drug test in the evaluation of patients with syncope: unmasking Brugada syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, M.; Sarkozy, A.; Brodbeck, J.; Henkens, S.; Chierchia, G.B.; Asmundis, C. de; Capulzini, L.; Muller-Burri, S.A.; Yakazi, Y.; Brugada, P.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The Brugada syndrome (BrS) can first present with syncope. Class-I antiarrhythmic drug (AAD) test is used to unmask the diagnostic coved-type ECG pattern in case it is not spontaneously present. The aim of the study was to analyze patients with BrS presenting with syncope as first mani

  2. A benefit-risk assessment of class III antiarrhythmic agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elming, Hanne; Brendorp, Bente; Pehrson, Steen;

    2004-01-01

    relief. Since many patients experience a decrease in physical performance as well as a diminished quality of life during arrhythmia there is still a need for antiarrhythmic drug therapy. The development of new antiarrhythmic agents has changed the focus from class I to class III agents since it became...... evident that with class I drug therapy the prevalence of mortality is considerably higher. This review focuses on the benefits and risks of known and newer class III antiarrhythmic agents. The benefits discussed include the ability to maintain sinus rhythm in persistent atrial fibrillation patients......, and reducing the need for implantable cardioverter defibrillator shock/antitachycardia therapy, since no class III antiarrhythmic agents have proven survival benefit. The risks discussed mainly focus on pro-arrhythmia as torsade de pointes ventricular tachycardia....

  3. Classifying antiarrhythmic actions: by facts or speculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan Williams, E M

    1992-11-01

    Classification of antiarrhythmic actions is reviewed in the context of the results of the Cardiac Arrhythmia Suppression Trials, CAST 1 and 2. Six criticisms of the classification recently published (The Sicilian Gambit) are discussed in detail. The alternative classification, when stripped of speculative elements, is shown to be similar to the original classification. Claims that the classification failed to predict the efficacy of antiarrhythmic drugs for the selection of appropriate therapy have been tested by an example. The antiarrhythmic actions of cibenzoline were classified in 1980. A detailed review of confirmatory experiments and clinical trials during the past decade shows that predictions made at the time agree with subsequent results. Classification of the effects drugs actually have on functioning cardiac tissues provides a rational basis for finding the preferred treatment for a particular arrhythmia in accordance with the diagnosis.

  4. Late sodium current inhibition: the most promising antiarrhythmic principle in the near future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frommeyer, G; Milberg, P; Maier, L S; Eckardt, L

    2014-01-01

    Ranolazine has primarily been developed and so far approved as an antianginal drug. However, it also has potentially interesting and relevant antiarrhythmic properties. Its antiarrhythmic effects are mainly based on the blockade of sodium currents, in particular of the late sodium current. Experimental and clinical studies have revealed an antiarrhythmic effect of ranolazine in atrial fibrillation as chronic or "pill in the pocket" therapy. Of note, this effect was preserved in the setting of chronic heart failure. Furthermore, an antiarrhythmic effect has also been shown in experimental models of ventricular tachyarrhythmias. In addition, prevention of ventricular tachyarrhythmias has been demonstrated in patients with structural heart disease. A few late sodium current inhibitors are evaluated for antiarrhythmic properties in experimental studies. However, randomized clinical data is not yet available for these recently developed agents and larger controlled trials are necessary before recommending ranozaline as a novel antiarrhythmic drug.

  5. Enhanced Late Na and Ca Currents as Effective Antiarrhythmic Drug Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagueuzian, Hrayr S.; Pezhouman, Arash; Angelini, Marina; Olcese, Riccardo

    2017-01-01

    While recent advances clarified the molecular and cellular modes of action of antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs), their link to suppression of dynamical arrhythmia mechanisms remains only partially understood. The current classifications of AADs (Classes I, III, and IV) rely on blocking peak Na, K and L-type calcium currents (ICa,L), with Class II with dominant beta receptor blocking activity and Class V including drugs with diverse classes of actions. The discovery that the calcium and redox sensor, cardiac Ca/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) enhances both the late Na (INa-L) and the late ICa,L in patients at high risk of VT/VF provided a new and a rational AAD target. Pathological rise of either or both of INa-L and late ICa,L are demonstrated to promote cellular early afterdepolarizations (EADs) and EAD-mediated triggered activity that can initiate VT/VF in remodeled hearts. Selective inhibition of the INa-L without affecting their peak transients with the highly specific prototype drug, GS-967 suppresses these EAD-mediated VT/VFs. As in the case of INa-L, selective inhibition of the late ICa,L without affecting its peak with the prototype drug, roscovitine suppressed oxidative EAD-mediated VT/VF. These findings indicate that specific blockers of the late inward currents without affecting their peaks (gating modifiers), offer a new and effective AAD class action i.e., “Class VI.” The development of safe drugs with selective Class VI actions provides a rational and effective approach to treat VT/VF particularly in cardiac conditions associated with enhanced CaMKII activity such as heart failure. PMID:28220073

  6. Drug: D08215 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D08215 Drug Mexiletine (INN) C11H17NO 179.131 179.2588 D08215.gif Antiarrhythmic Sa...me as: C07220 ATC code: C01BB02 Class I antiarrhythmic agent (Ib) voltage-gated sodium channel (SCN1A) block...CYP3A4 [HSA:1576] CYP inhibition: CYP1A2 [HSA:1544] map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs map07231 Sodium channel bl...ARDIAC THERAPY C01B ANTIARRHYTHMICS, CLASS I AND III C01BB Antiarrhythmics, class... Ib C01BB02 Mexiletine D08215 Mexiletine (INN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Cardiovascular Agents Antiarrhythmic

  7. Drug: D00640 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 758 377.9049 D00640.gif Cardiac depressant [anti-arrhythmic] Therapeutic category: 2129 ATC code: C01BC03 Class I antiarrhythmic...5] Transporter inhibition: ABCB1 [HSA:5243] map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs map07231 Sodium channel blocking d...RDIAC THERAPY C01B ANTIARRHYTHMICS, CLASS I AND III C01BC Antiarrhythmics, class Ic C01BC03 Propafenone D006...40 Propafenone hydrochloride (JP16/USP) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Cardiovascular Agents Antiarrhythmic...rugs Therapeutic category of drugs in Japan [BR:br08301] 2 Agents affecting individual organs 21 Cardiovascular agents 212 Antiarrhyt

  8. Use and Outcomes of Antiarrhythmic Therapy in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation Receiving Oral Anticoagulation: Results from the ROCKET AF Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Benjamin A.; Hellkamp, Anne S.; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Halperin, Jonathan L.; Breithardt, Günter; Passman, Rod; Hankey, Graeme J.; Patel, Manesh R.; Becker, Richard C.; Singer, Daniel E.; Hacke, Werner; Berkowitz, Scott D.; Nessel, Christopher C.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Fox, Keith A.A.; Califf, Robert M.; Piccini, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Antiarrhythmic drugs (AAD) and anticoagulation are mainstays of atrial fibrillation (AF) treatment. Objective We aimed to study the use and outcomes of AAD therapy in anticoagulated AF patients. Methods Patients in the ROCKET AF trial (n=14,264) were grouped by AAD use at baseline: amiodarone, other AAD, or no AAD. Multivariable adjustment was performed to compare stroke, bleeding, and death across groups, as well as across treatment assignment (rivaroxaban or warfarin). Results Of 14,264 patients randomized, 1681 (11.8%) were treated with an AAD (1144 [8%] with amiodarone, 537 [3.8%] with other AADs). Amiodarone-treated patients were less-often female (38% vs. 48%), had more persistent AF (64% vs. 40%), and more concomitant heart failure (71% vs. 41%) than patients receiving other AADs. Patients receiving no AAD more closely-resembled amiodarone-treated patients. Time in therapeutic range was significantly lower in warfarin-treated patients receiving amiodarone versus no AAD (50% vs. 58%, p<0.0001). Compared with no AAD, neither amiodarone (adjusted HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.74–1.31, p=0.9) nor other AADs (adjusted HR 0.66, 95% CI 0.37–1.17, p=0.15) were associated with increased mortality. Similar results were observed for embolic and bleeding outcomes. Rivaroxaban treatment effects in patients not on an AAD were consistent with the overall trial (primary endpoint adjusted HR 0.82, 95% CI 0.68–0.98, pinteraction=0.06; safety endpoint adjusted HR 1.12, 95% CI 0.90–1.24, pinteraction=0.33). Conclusion Treatment with AADs was not associated with increased morbidity or mortality in anticoagulated patients with AF. The influence of amiodarone on outcomes in patients receiving rivaroxaban requires further study. PMID:24833235

  9. LMI1195 PET imaging in evaluation of regional cardiac sympathetic denervation and its potential role in antiarrhythmic drug treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Ming; Bozek, Jody; Lamoy, Melanie; Kagan, Mikhail; Benites, Pedro; Onthank, David; Robinson, Simon P. [Lantheus Medical Imaging, Discovery Research, N. Billerica, MA (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Regional cardiac sympathetic denervation (RCSD) associated with reduced noradrenaline transporter (NAT) function has been linked to cardiac arrhythmia. This study examined the association of LMI1195, an {sup 18}F-labeled NAT substrate developed for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, with NAT in vitro, and its imaging to detect RCSD and guide antiarrhythmic drug treatment in vivo. LMI1195 association with NAT was assessed in comparison with other substrates, noradrenaline (NA) and {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), in NAT-expressing cells. LMI1195 cardiac imaging was performed for evaluation of RCSD in a rabbit model surgically developed by regional phenol application on the left ventricular (LV) wall. The normal LV areas in images were quantified as regions with radioactivity {>=}50 % maximum. Potential impact of RCSD on dofetilide, an antiarrhythmic drug, induced ECG changes was assessed. NAT blockade with desipramine reduced LMI1195 cell uptake by 90 {+-} 3 %, similar to NA and MIBG. NA, MIBG, or self inhibited LMI1195 cell uptake concentration-dependently with comparable IC{sub 50} values (1.09, 0.21, and 0.90 {mu}M). LMI1195 cardiac imaging differentiated innervated and denervated areas in RCSD rabbits. The surgery resulted in a large denervated LV area at 2 weeks which was partially recovered at 12 weeks. Myocardial perfusion imaging with flurpiridaz F 18 showed normal perfusion in RCSD areas. Dofetilide induced more prominent QTc prolongation in RCSD than control animals. However, changes in heart rate were comparable. LMI1195 exhibits high association with NAT and can be used for imaging RCSD. The detected RCSD increases cardiac risks to the antiarrhythmic drug, dofetilide, by inducing more QTc prolongation. (orig.)

  10. Drug Therapy in Atrial Fibrillation Management: Where Do We Stand in 2010?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Montazeri

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is a commonly encountered arrhythmia in our daily practice. Every year a huge bulk of data is published about different management strategies, new antiarrhythmic drugs, anticoagulation protocols and ablation procedures in these patients. In this review article, we discuss different management strategies and new antiarrhythmic drugs as well as those commonly used. We will also have a brief look at anticoagulation in AF.We try to introduce the most recent publications in this field and we think that this review article may not only give information about the current state of antiarrhythmic therapy of AF, it may also show some progresses that we may anticipate in the near future. New drugs are promising in the management of AF because of better safety profile and also acceptable efficacy. A comparison between the catheter ablation procedure and antiarrhythmic therapy is beyond the scope of this article.

  11. Drug: D08020 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D08020 Drug Lorcainide (INN) C22H27ClN2O 370.1812 370.9156 D08020.gif Cardiac depressant [anti-arrhythmic...] ATC code: C01BC07 Class 1C antiarrhythmic drug Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC)... classification [BR:br08303] C CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM C01 CARDIAC THERAPY C01B ANTIARRHYTHMICS, CLASS I AND III C01BC Antiarrhythmic

  12. Interactions between antiarrhythmic drugs and food Interacciones entre fármacos antiarrítmicos y alimentos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Jáuregui-Garrido

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: A drug interaction is defined as any alteration, pharmacokinetics and/or pharmacodynamics, produced by different substances, other drug treatments, dietary factors and habits such as drinking and smoking. These interactions can affect the antiarrhythmic drugs, altering their therapeutic efficacy and adverse effects. The aim of this study was to conduct a review of available data about interactions between antiarrhythmic drugs and food. Methods: The purpose of this review was to report an update of the existing literature data on the main findings with respect to food and antiarrhythmic drugs interactions by means of a search conducted in PubMed, which yielded a total of 250 articles initially. Results: After excluding different articles which were not focusing on the specific objective, the main results refer to interactions among antiarrhythmic drugs and food in general, grapefruit juice, and others like fibre or medicinal plants. Discussion: Food may affect the bioavailability of antiarrhythmic drugs and in some specific cases (dairy products, rich-in-protein diets, grapefruit juice, this should be carefully considered. The best recommendation seems to advise patients to remove the grapefruit juice from their diet when treatment with these drugs. Fibre should be separated from taking these drugs and regarding medicinal plants and given their increased use, the anamnesis must include information about its use, the reason for that use and what types of plants are used, all in order to give the corresponding recommendations.Objetivo: La interacción de medicamentos se define como cualquier alteración, farmacocinética y/o farmacodinámica, producida por diferentes sustancias, otros tratamientos, factores dietéticos y hábitos como beber y fumar. Estas interacciones pueden afectar a los fármacos antiarrítmicos, alterando su eficacia terapéutica y sus efectos adversos. El objetivo de este estudio fue realizar una revisión de los

  13. Drug: D08458 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available inchona calisaya [TAX:153742], Cinchona succirubra, Cinchona calisaya Antiarrhythmic; Antiprotozoal, Antimal...arial Same as: C06527 ATC code: C01BA01 Class I antiarrhythmic agent (Ia) voltage-gated sodium channel (SCN1...5244], SCL47A2 [HSA:146802], ABCB1 [HSA:5243] map07025 Quinolines map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs map07231 Sod...br08303] C CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM C01 CARDIAC THERAPY C01B ANTIARRHYTHMICS, CLASS I AND III C01BA Antiarrhythmic...BR:br08302] Cardiovascular Agents Antiarrhythmics Quinidine D08458 Quinidine (BAN) Target-based classificati

  14. Drug: D08435 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D08435 Drug Propafenone (INN); Propafenon hexal (TN) C21H27NO3 341.1991 341.444 D08435.gif Antiarrhythmic... Same as: C07381 ATC code: C01BC03 Class I antiarrhythmic agent (Ic) voltage-gated sod...P1A2 [HSA:1544], CYP2D6 [HSA:1565] Transporter inhibition: ABCB1 [HSA:5243] map07037 Antiarrhythmic...fication [BR:br08303] C CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM C01 CARDIAC THERAPY C01B ANTIARRHYTHMICS, CLASS I AND III C01BC Antiarrhythmic...] Cardiovascular Agents Antiarrhythmics Propafenone D08435 Propafenone (INN) Targ

  15. Drug: D07962 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D07962 Drug Flecainide (INN) C17H20F6N2O3 414.1378 414.3427 D07962.gif Antiarrhythmic... Same as: C07001 ATC code: C01BC04 Class I antiarrhythmic agent voltage-gated sodium channel (SCN1A) block...cker [HSA:3752] [KO:K04893] Enzyme: CYP2D6 [HSA:1565], CYP3A4 [HSA:1576] map07037 Antiarrhythmic...ation [BR:br08303] C CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM C01 CARDIAC THERAPY C01B ANTIARRHYTHMICS, CLASS I AND III C01BC Antiarrhythmic

  16. Drug: D06652 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D06652 Drug Tedisamil (USAN) C19H32N2 288.2565 288.4708 D06652.gif Antiarrhythmic a...08303] C CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM C01 CARDIAC THERAPY C01B ANTIARRHYTHMICS, CLASS I AND III C01BD Antiarrhyth...mics, class III C01BD06 Tedisamil D06652 Tedisamil (USAN) Target-based classificati

  17. Drug: D00645 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 7BrN. C7H7O3S 413.066 414.3571 D00645.gif Anti-adrenergic; Cardiac depressant [anti-arrhythmic] ATC code: C0...1BD02 voltage-gated potassium channel blocker map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs map07232 Potassium channel block...08303] C CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM C01 CARDIAC THERAPY C01B ANTIARRHYTHMICS, CLASS I AND III C01BD Antiarrhythmic

  18. Drug: D02088 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 8.7185 D02088.gif Cardiac depressant [anti-arrhythmic] ATC code: C01BB03 voltage-gated sodium channel (SCN1A...el (SCN9A) blocker [HSA:6335] [KO:K04841] map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs map07231 ...ULAR SYSTEM C01 CARDIAC THERAPY C01B ANTIARRHYTHMICS, CLASS I AND III C01BB Antiarrhythmics, class Ib C01BB0

  19. A computational model to predict the effects of class I anti-arrhythmic drugs on ventricular rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Jonathan D; Zhu, Z Iris; Yang, Pei-Chi; Bankston, John R; Jeng, Mao-Tsuen; Kang, Chaoyi; Wang, Lianguo; Bayer, Jason D; Christini, David J; Trayanova, Natalia A; Ripplinger, Crystal M; Kass, Robert S; Clancy, Colleen E

    2011-08-31

    A long-sought, and thus far elusive, goal has been to develop drugs to manage diseases of excitability. One such disease that affects millions each year is cardiac arrhythmia, which occurs when electrical impulses in the heart become disordered, sometimes causing sudden death. Pharmacological management of cardiac arrhythmia has failed because it is not possible to predict how drugs that target cardiac ion channels, and have intrinsically complex dynamic interactions with ion channels, will alter the emergent electrical behavior generated in the heart. Here, we applied a computational model, which was informed and validated by experimental data, that defined key measurable parameters necessary to simulate the interaction kinetics of the anti-arrhythmic drugs flecainide and lidocaine with cardiac sodium channels. We then used the model to predict the effects of these drugs on normal human ventricular cellular and tissue electrical activity in the setting of a common arrhythmia trigger, spontaneous ventricular ectopy. The model forecasts the clinically relevant concentrations at which flecainide and lidocaine exacerbate, rather than ameliorate, arrhythmia. Experiments in rabbit hearts and simulations in human ventricles based on magnetic resonance images validated the model predictions. This computational framework initiates the first steps toward development of a virtual drug-screening system that models drug-channel interactions and predicts the effects of drugs on emergent electrical activity in the heart.

  20. Drug: D02969 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D02969 Drug Aprindine (USAN/INN) C22H30N2 322.2409 322.487 D02969.gif Cardiac depressant [anti-arrhythmic...] ATC code: C01BB04 Class I antiarrhythmic agent (Ib) voltage-gated sodium channel (SC...NH2) blocker [HSA:3757] [KO:K04905] Enzyme: CYP2D6 [HSA:1565] map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs map07231 Sodium ...STEM C01 CARDIAC THERAPY C01B ANTIARRHYTHMICS, CLASS I AND III C01BB Antiarrhythmic

  1. Acupuncture Antiarrhythmic Effects on Drug Refractory Persistent Atrial Fibrillation: Study Protocol for a Randomized, Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimin Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common form of arrhythmia. Several trials have suggested that acupuncture may prevent AF. However, the efficacy of acupuncture for AF prevention has not been well investigated. Therefore, we designed a prospective, two-parallel-armed, participant and assessor blinded, randomized, sham-controlled clinical trial to investigate acupuncture in persistent AF (ACU-AF. Methods. A total of 80 participants will be randomly assigned to active acupuncture or sham acupuncture groups in a 1 : 1 ratio. Both groups will take the same antiarrhythmic medication during the study period. Patients will receive 10 sessions of acupuncture treatment once a week for 10 weeks. The primary endpoint is AF recurrence rate. Secondary endpoints are left atrium (LA and left atrial appendage (LAA changes in function and volume, and inflammatory biomarker changes. Ethics. This study protocol was approved by the institutional review boards (IRBs of Kyung Hee University Hospital (number 1335-04. This trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov NCT02110537.

  2. Improved Anticancer Photothermal Therapy Using the Bystander Effect Enhanced by Antiarrhythmic Peptide Conjugated Dopamine-Modified Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiantao; Lin, Yu-Hsin; Yang, Lingyan; Huang, Chih-Ching; Chen, Liliang; Wang, Wen-Cheng; Chen, Guan-Wen; Yan, Junyan; Sawettanun, Saranta; Lin, Chia-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Despite tremendous efforts toward developing novel near-infrared (NIR)-absorbing nanomaterials, improvement in therapeutic efficiency remains a formidable challenge in photothermal cancer therapy. This study aims to synthesize a specific peptide conjugated polydopamine-modified reduced graphene oxide (pDA/rGO) nanocomposite that promotes the bystander effect to facilitate cancer treatment using NIR-activated photothermal therapy. To prepare a nanoplatform capable of promoting the bystander effect in cancer cells, we immobilized antiarrhythmic peptide 10 (AAP10) on the surface of dopamine-modified rGO (AAP10-pDA/rGO). Our AAP10-pDA/rGO could promote the bystander effect by increasing the expression of connexin 43 protein in MCF-7 breast-cancer cells. Because of its tremendous ability to absorb NIR absorption, AAP10-pDA/rGO offers a high photothermal effect under NIR irradiation. This leads to a massive death of MCF-7 cells via the bystander effect. Using tumor-bearing mice as the model, it is found that NIR radiation effectively ablates breast tumor in the presence of AAP10-pDA/rGO and inhibits tumor growth by ≈100%. Therefore, this research integrates the bystander and photothermal effects into a single nanoplatform in order to facilitate an efficient photothermal therapy. Furthermore, our AAP10-pDA/rGO, which exhibits both hyperthermia and the bystander effect, can prevent breast-cancer recurrence and, therefore, has great potential for future clinical and research applications.

  3. Drug: D08127 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 288.1605 288.8135 D08127.gif Antiarrhythmic; Local anesthetic Therapeutic category: 1214 ATC code: C01BB01 ...C05AD01 D04AB01 N01BB02 R02AD02 S01HA07 S02DA01 Class I antiarrhythmic agent (Ib) voltage-gated sodium chann...sporter: SLC22A3 [HSA:6581] map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs map07231 Sodium channel...CULAR SYSTEM C01 CARDIAC THERAPY C01B ANTIARRHYTHMICS, CLASS I AND III C01BB Antiarrhythmic

  4. Drug: D08459 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e; Natisedine (TN) C20H24N2O2. C12H12N2O3 556.2686 556.652 D08459.gif Antiarrhythmic; Antiprotozoal, antimal...:55244], SCL47A2 [HSA:146802], ABCB1 [HSA:5243] map07025 Quinolines map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs map07231 S...LAR SYSTEM C01 CARDIAC THERAPY C01B ANTIARRHYTHMICS, CLASS I AND III C01BA Antiarrhythmics, class Ia C01BA01...08302] Cardiovascular Agents Antiarrhythmics Quinidine D08459 Quinidine phenylethylbarbiturate Target-based

  5. Drug: D02086 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 214 2129 ATC code: C01BB01 C05AD01 D04AB01 N01BB02 R02AD02 S01HA07 S02DA01 Class I antiarrhythmic agent volt...CYP2D6 [HSA:1565] Transporter: SLC22A3 [HSA:6581] map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs m... organs 21 Cardiovascular agents 212 Antiarrhythmic agents 2129 Others D02086 Lid...ion [BR:br08303] C CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM C01 CARDIAC THERAPY C01B ANTIARRHYTHMICS, CLASS I AND III C01BB Antiarrhythmic

  6. Determination of five antiarrhythmic drugs in human plasma by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouyban, Abolghasem; Sorouraddin, Mohammad Hossein; Farajzadeh, Mir Ali; Somi, Mohammad Hossein; Fazeli-Bakhtiyari, Rana

    2015-03-01

    A fast and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method with ultraviolet (UV) detection was developed and validated for the simultaneous quantitation of five antiarrhythmic drugs (metoprolol, propranolol, carvedilol, diltiazem, and verapamil) in human plasma samples. It involves dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) of the desired drugs from 660 µL plasma and separation using isocratic elution with UV detection at 200 nm. The complete separation of all analytes was achieved within 7 min. Acetonitrile (as disperser solvent) resulting from the protein precipitation procedure was mixed with 100 µL dichloromethane (as an extraction solvent) and rapidly injected into 5 mL aqueous solution (pH 11.5) containing 1% (w/v), NaCl. After centrifugation, the sedimented phase containing enriched analytes was collected and evaporated to dryness. The residue was re-dissolved in 50 µL de-ionized water (acidified to pH 3) and injected into the HPLC system for analysis. Under the optimal conditions, the enrichment factors and extraction recoveries ranged between 4.4-10.8 and 33-82%, respectively. The suggested method was linear (r(2) ≥0.997) over a dynamic range of 0.02-0.80 µg mL(-1) in plasma. The intra- and inter-days relative standard deviation (RSD%) and relative error (RE%) values of the method were below 20%, which shows good precision and accuracy. Finally, this method was applied to the analysis of real plasma samples obtained from the patients treated with these drugs.

  7. Drug: D00638 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 589 474.3947 D00638.gif Cardiac depressant [anti-arrhythmic] Therapeutic category: 2129 ATC code: C01BC04 Class I antiarrhythmic...SA:3752] [KO:K04893] Enzyme: CYP2D6 [HSA:1565], CYP3A4 [HSA:1576] map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs map07231 Sod... organs 21 Cardiovascular agents 212 Antiarrhythmic agents 2129 Others D00638 Flecainide acetate (JP16/USP) ...R SYSTEM C01 CARDIAC THERAPY C01B ANTIARRHYTHMICS, CLASS I AND III C01BC Antiarrhythmics, class Ic C01BC04 F...lecainide D00638 Flecainide acetate (JP16/USP) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Cardiovascular Agents Antiarrhythmic

  8. Drug: D06172 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D06172 Drug Tocainide (USAN/INN) C11H16N2O 192.1263 192.2575 D06172.gif Cardiac depressant [anti-arrhythmic...ocker [HSA:6335] [KO:K04841] map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs map07231 Sodium channe...01 CARDIAC THERAPY C01B ANTIARRHYTHMICS, CLASS I AND III C01BB Antiarrhythmics, class Ib C01BB03 Tocainide D

  9. PROPAFENONE, A NEW EFFECTIVE ANTIARRHYTHMIC DRUG. REPORT OF 2 YEARS CLINICAL EXPERIMENT WITH PROPAFENONE (WITH BRIEF REVIEW OF ARTICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IRAJ NAZERY

    1986-05-01

    Full Text Available Propafenone HCI (p, is a relatively new Class IC antiarrhythmic agent. It has been reported to be superior to conventional antiarrhythmics in the control of supraventricular, ventricular and WPW associated tachyarrhythmias. It has been also shown to be well tolerated. In our study protocol, which extends over 2~ years period , we used (p in 87 patients for management of various types of cardiac arrhythmias (most of whom were resistant to conventmonal antiarrhythmics . Intravenously administered, (P was effective in 85% of patients with paroxysmal reentrant supraventricular tachycardia (PRSVT, 75% of those with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF , 50% and 42% of those with refractory premature ventricular contractions (PVC and ventricular tachycardia (V. Tach, respectively. Orally administered, (P was effective in 73% of those with resistant PVCs and nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (NSV Tach, and 75% of those with resistant sustained ventricular tachycardia (RSVT •

  10. Assessment of anti-arrhythmic activity of antipsychotic drugs in an animal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mow, Tomas; Frederiksen, Kristen; Thomsen, Morten B.

    2015-01-01

    limited experimental information exists about the effects of α1-adrenergic receptor activity of antipsychotic drugs in pro-arrhythmic models, we have decided to investigate this. In this study we show that four antipsychotic drugs all have high affinity for α1-adrenergic receptor (sertindole>risperidone......>haloperidol>olanzapine) and all block IKr (sertindole>haloperidol>risperidone>olanzapine). In canine Purkinje fibres, α1-adrenergic stimulation prolonged action potential duration; however, the stimulation does not cause afterdepolarizations, even in the presence of dofetilide-induced delayed repolarization. We showed...

  11. Prospects for Creation of Cardioprotective and Antiarrhythmic Drugs Based on Opioid Receptor Agonists

    OpenAIRE

    Maslov, Leonid N; Khaliulin, Igor; Oeltgen, Peter R; Naryzhnaya, Natalia V.; Pei, Jian‐Ming; Brown, Stephen A; Lishmanov, Yury B.; Downey, James M

    2016-01-01

    Abstract It has now been demonstrated that the μ, δ1, δ2, and κ1 opioid receptor (OR) agonists represent the most promising group of opioids for the creation of drugs enhancing cardiac tolerance to the detrimental effects of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Opioids are able to prevent necrosis and apoptosis of cardiomyocytes during I/R and improve cardiac contractility in the reperfusion period. The OR agonists exert an infarct‐reducing effect with prophylactic administration and prevent reperfusi...

  12. Test of a model of antiarrhythmic drug action. Effects of quinidine and lidocaine on myocardial conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hondeghem, L; Katzung, B G

    1980-06-01

    The effects of quinidine and lidocaine on the maximum upstroke velocity (Vmax) of the ventricular myocardial action potential were compared with the effects predicted by a model over a wide range of driving rates, rhythm disturbances and holding potentials. These rate-, rhythm- and voltage-dependent effects were accurately predicted by the proposed model. The model was also able to predict several previously undocumented properties of the drugs: 1) If lidocaine decreases Vmax of a pulse train, the steady state is reached within a few action potentials. 2) The poststimulation recovery of Vmax in the presence of lidocaine or quinidine can occur in a multiexponential fashion, if the membrane potential is kept at the potential where both the fast (operating mainly at more negative membrane potentials) and the slow (operating at more positive potentials) recovery processes are operative. 3) Hyperpolarization markedly attenuates the rate-dependent drug effects. 4) Combinations of lidocaine and quinidine have a superadditive effect on the Vmax of early extrasystoles.

  13. Adenylyl Cyclase Signaling in the Developing Chick Heart: The Deranging Effect of Antiarrhythmic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Hejnova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The adenylyl cyclase (AC signaling system plays a crucial role in the regulation of cardiac contractility. Here we analyzed the key components of myocardial AC signaling in the developing chick embryo and assessed the impact of selected β-blocking agents on this system. Application of metoprolol and carvedilol, two commonly used β-blockers, at embryonic day (ED 8 significantly downregulated (by about 40% expression levels of AC5, the dominant cardiac AC isoform, and the amount of Gsα protein at ED9. Activity of AC stimulated by forskolin was also significantly reduced under these conditions. Interestingly, when administered at ED4, these drugs did not produce such profound changes in the myocardial AC signaling system, except for markedly increased expression of Giα protein. These data indicate that β-blocking agents can strongly derange AC signaling during the first half of embryonic heart development.

  14. Evaluation of cardiac vulnerability and antifibrillatory properties of anti-arrhythmic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smailys, A; Gasiunas, V; Gasiuniene, G

    1989-10-01

    A method of evaluating the antifibrillatory properties of drugs by their effect on the acceleration of the cardiac rhythm by electric pulses was developed. It permitted measurement of fibrillation thresholds and the maximal driving frequency of stimulation. The heart was accelerated in closed chest dogs, and this increased the fibrillation thresholds after the application of lidocaine (1 mg/kg), quinidine (5 mg/kg), and novocainamide (15 mg/kg body wt.). The development of an original programmed stimulator increased the accuracy of the method by means of establishing the initial and terminal stimulation rates and observing the constant steps of change of pulse intervals. Four methods of causing fibrillation were compared: (1) a single pulse during the vulnerable phase of the cardiac cycle; (2) a train of pulses overlapping the vulnerable phase; (3) sequential R on T pacing; (4) simple acceleration of the cardiac rhythm. In addition to the other methods, the method of accelerating the heart rate differs in that only a small amplitude of stimulating pulses is needed. The present method may be used in the case of an unstable initial cardiac rhythm.

  15. International Conference on Harmonisation; guidance on E14 Clinical Evaluation of QT/QTc Interval Prolongation and Proarrhythmic Potential for Non-Antiarrhythmic Drugs; availability. Notice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-20

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a guidance entitled "E14 Clinical Evaluation of QT/QTc Interval Prolongation and Proarrhythmic Potential for Non-Antiarrhythmic Drugs." The guidance was prepared under the auspices of the International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH). The guidance provides recommendations to sponsors concerning clinical studies to assess the potential of a new drug to cause cardiac arrhythmias, focusing on the assessment of changes in the QT/QTc interval on the electrocardiogram as a predictor of risk. The guidance is intended to encourage the assessment of drug effects on the QT/QTc interval as a standard part of drug development and to encourage the early discussion of this assessment with FDA.

  16. Drug: D02910 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ic, ventricular] [DS:H00293] Same as: C06823 ATC code: C01BD01 Class III antiarrhythmic...A4 [HSA:1576], CYP1A2 [HSA:1544] Transporter inhibition: ABCB1 [HSA:5243] map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs map0...C THERAPY C01B ANTIARRHYTHMICS, CLASS I AND III C01BD Antiarrhythmics, class III C01BD01 Amiodarone D02910 A...miodarone (USAN/INN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Cardiovascular Agents Antiarrhythmics Amiodarone D...D02910 Drug Amiodarone (USAN/INN) C25H29I2NO3 645.0237 645.3116 D02910.gif Cardiac depressant [anti-arrhythm

  17. Radiofrequency ablation as initial therapy in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cosedis Nielsen, Jens; Johannessen, Arne; Raatikainen, Pekka;

    2012-01-01

    There are limited data comparing radiofrequency catheter ablation with antiarrhythmic drug therapy as first-line treatment in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.......There are limited data comparing radiofrequency catheter ablation with antiarrhythmic drug therapy as first-line treatment in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation....

  18. Drug: D00647 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D00647.gif Cardiac depressant [anti-arrhythmic] Same as: C07751 ATC code: C01BD04 voltage-gated potassium ch...annel (KCNH2) blocker [HSA:3757] [KO:K04905] map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs map07232 Potassium channel blocki...8303] C CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM C01 CARDIAC THERAPY C01B ANTIARRHYTHMICS, CLASS I AND III C01BD Antiarrhythmic...thmics Dofetilide D00647 Dofetilide (JAN/USAN/INN) Targe...s, class III C01BD04 Dofetilide D00647 Dofetilide (JAN/USAN/INN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Cardiovascular Agents Antiarrhy

  19. Dronedarone: a new antiarrhythmic agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyetayo, Ola O; Rogers, Carrie E; Hofmann, Prudence O

    2010-09-01

    Dronedarone is an antiarrhythmic agent recently approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for the reduction of cardiovascular-related hospitalizations in patients with paroxysmal or persistent atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter. The drug is a derivative of amiodarone and has been modified to reduce the organ toxicities frequently encountered with amiodarone. Dronedarone exerts its antiarrhythmic effects through multichannel blockade of the sodium, potassium, and calcium channels and also possesses antiadrenergic activity, thereby exhibiting pharmacologic effects of all four Vaughan Williams classes of antiarrhythmics. The efficacy of dronedarone for the maintenance of sinus rhythm, ventricular rate control, and reduction in cardiovascular-related hospitalizations has been demonstrated in several randomized, placebo-controlled trials. Although a high rate of gastrointestinal events (e.g., nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea) has been associated with dronedarone, more serious adverse events such as thyroid, liver, or pulmonary toxicities have not been observed. Because of a possible increase in mortality, dronedarone should be avoided in patients with New York Heart Association class IV or II-III heart failure with a recent decompensation. Given the efficacy and safety data currently available, dronedarone represents a reasonable alternative for maintenance of sinus rhythm in appropriately selected patients.

  20. Radiofrequency catheter ablation maintains its efficacy better than antiarrhythmic medication in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raatikainen, M J Pekka; Hakalahti, Antti; Uusimaa, Paavo;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Medical ANtiarrhythmic Treatment or Radiofrequency Ablation in Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation (MANTRA-PAF) is a randomized trial comparing radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) to antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs) as first-line treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). In order...

  1. Drug therapy smartens up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christian

    2015-11-01

    The submission of the first 'smart pill' for market approval, combined with progress in the European nanomedicine landscape, illustrates the positive outlook for drug therapy and health monitoring, explains Christian Martin.

  2. Effect of K201, a novel antiarrhythmic drug on calcium handling and arrhythmogenic activity of pulmonary vein cardiomyocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y-J; Chen, Y-C; Wongcharoen, W; Lin, C-I; Chen, S-A

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Pulmonary veins are the most important focus for the generation of atrial fibrillation. Abnormal calcium homeostasis with ryanodine receptor dysfunction may underlie the arrhythmogenic activity in pulmonary veins. The preferential ryanodine receptor stabilizer (K201) possesses antiarrhythmic effects through calcium regulation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of K201 on the arrhythmogenic activity and calcium regulation of pulmonary vein cardiomyocytes. Experimental approach: The ionic currents and intracellular calcium were studied in isolated single cardiomyocytes from rabbit pulmonary vein before and after the administration of K201, by the whole-cell patch clamp and indo-1 fluorimetric ratio techniques. Key results: K201 (0.1, 0.3, 1 μM) reduced the firing rates in pulmonary vein cardiomyocytes, decreased the amplitudes of the delayed afterdepolarizations and prolonged the action potential duration. K201 decreased the L-type calcium currents, Na+/Ca2+ exchanger currents, transient inward currents and calcium transients. K201 (1 μM, but not 0.1 μM or 0.3 μM) also reduced the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium content. Moreover, both the pretreatment and administration of K201 (0.3 μM) decreased the isoprenaline (10 nM)-induced arrhythmogenesis in pulmonary veins. Conclusions and implications: K201 reduced the arrhythmogenic activity of pulmonary vein cardiomyocytes and attenuated the arrhythmogenicity induced by isoprenaline. These findings may reveal the anti-arrhythmic potential of K201. PMID:17994112

  3. Drug: D02272 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ) (C20H24N2O2)2. H2SO4. 2H2O 782.3561 782.9426 D02272.gif Cardiac depressant [anti-arrhythmic] Therapeutic c...ategory: 2122 ATC code: C01BA01 Class I antiarrhythmic agent (Ia) voltage-gated sodium channel (SCN1A) block...CL47A2 [HSA:146802], ABCB1 [HSA:5243] map07025 Quinolines map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs map07231 Sodium chan...21 Cardiovascular agents 212 Antiarrhythmic agents 2122 Quinidines D02272 Quinidine sulfate hydrate (JP16); ...br08303] C CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM C01 CARDIAC THERAPY C01B ANTIARRHYTHMICS, CLASS I AND III C01BA Antiarrhythmic

  4. Effects of a new antiarrhythmic drug SS-68 on electrical activity in working atrial and ventricular myocardium of mouse and their ionic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogus, Saida K; Abramochkin, Denis V; Galenko-Yaroshevsky, Pavel A; Suzdalev, Konstantin F

    2015-08-01

    SS-68 is a derivative of indole, which demonstrated strong antiarrhythmic effects not associated with significant QT prolongation in dog models of atrial fibrillation. Therefore, SS-68 was proposed as a new antiarrhythmic drug and the present study is the first describing its effects on action potentials (APs) configuration and elucidating the ionic mechanisms of these effects. Sharp microelectrodes were used to record APs in isolated preparations of mouse atrial and ventricular myocardium. In both types of myocardium 10(-6) M SS-68 produced reduction of AP duration, 3 × 10(-6) M failed to alter AP waveform and 10(-5) - 3 × 10(-5) M prolonged APs. Sensitivity of main ionic currents to SS-68 was determined using whole-cell patch clamp. Transient potassium current Ito was slightly inhibited by SS-68 with IC50 = 1.43 × 10(-4) M. IKur was more sensitive with IC50 = 1.84 × 10(-5) M. Background inward rectifier showed very low sensitivity to SS-68 - only 10(-4) M SS-68 caused significant reduction of IK1. ICaL was significantly inhibited by 10(-6)M - 3 × 10(-5) M SS-68. The IC50 value for the ICaL was 1.84 × 10(-6) M. Thus, main ionic currents of mouse cardiomyocytes are inhibited by SS-68 in the following order of potency: ICaL > IKur > Ito > IK1. While lower concentration of SS-68 shorten APs via suppression of ICaL, higher concentrations inhibit K(+)-currents leading to APs prolongation.

  5. [Drug therapy for cough].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskela, Heikki; Naaranlahti, Toivo

    2016-01-01

    An efficient therapy for cough usually requires identification and treatment of the underlying disease, like asthma. However an underlying disease in cough is not found in all cases and conventional treatment of the underlying disease is ineffective against cough. Drug therapy options are available also for these situations. Honey or menthol can be tried for cough associated with respitatory infections, antihistamines for cough associated with allergic rhinitis, blockers of the leukotriene receptor or muscarinic receptor for asthma-associated cough and morphine for cough associated with a malignant disease. Menthol, blockers of the muscarinic receptor, or dextrometorphan can be tried for prolonged idiopathic cough. Codeine is not necessary in the treatment of cough. Refraining from drug treatment should always be considered.

  6. Drug: D00636 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 29I2NO3. HCl 681.0004 681.7725 D00636.gif Antiarrhythmic [DS:H00293] Therapeutic category: 2129 ATC code: C01BD01 Class III antiarrhy...], CYP2D6 [HSA:1565], CYP3A4 [HSA:1576], CYP1A2 [HSA:1544] Transporter inhibition: ABCB1 [HSA:5243] map07037 Antiarrhythmic... [BR:br08301] 2 Agents affecting individual organs 21 Cardiovascular agents 212 Antiarrhythmic agents 2129 O... drug classification [BR:br08302] Cardiovascular Agents Antiarrhythmics Amiodarone D00636 Amiodarone hydroch...r08303] C CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM C01 CARDIAC THERAPY C01B ANTIARRHYTHMICS, CLASS I AND III C01BD Antiarrhyt

  7. Mechanisms of termination and prevention of atrial fibrillation by drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, A J; Smith, G L; Rankin, A C

    2011-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a disorder of the rhythm of electrical activation of the cardiac atria. It is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, has multiple aetiologies, and increases the risk of death from stroke. Pharmacological therapy is the mainstay of treatment for AF, but currently available anti-arrhythmic drugs have limited efficacy and safety. An improved understanding of how anti-arrhythmic drugs affect the electrophysiological mechanisms of AF initiation and maintenance, in the setting of the different cardiac diseases that predispose to AF, is therefore required. A variety of animal models of AF has been developed, to represent and control the pathophysiological causes and risk factors of AF, and to permit the measurement of detailed and invasive parameters relating to the associated electrophysiological mechanisms of AF. The purpose of this review is to examine, consolidate and compare available relevant data on in-vivo electrophysiological mechanisms of AF suppression by currently approved and investigational anti-arrhythmic drugs in such models. These include the Vaughan Williams class I-IV drugs, namely Na(+) channel blockers, β-adrenoceptor antagonists, action potential prolonging drugs, and Ca(2+) channel blockers; the "upstream therapies", e.g., angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, statins and fish oils; and a variety of investigational drugs such as "atrial-selective" multiple ion channel blockers, gap junction-enhancers, and intracellular Ca(2+)-handling modulators. It is hoped that this will help to clarify the main electrophysiological mechanisms of action of different and related drug types in different disease settings, and the likely clinical significance and potential future exploitation of such mechanisms.

  8. The Medical ANtiarrhythmic Treatment or Radiofrequency Ablation in Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation (MANTRA-PAF) trial: clinical rationale, study design, and implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jons, Christian; Hansen, Peter Steen; Johannessen, Arne;

    2009-01-01

    AIMS: No large randomized multicentre trial has evaluated the efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) vs. anti-arrhythmic drug (AAD) therapy as a first-line treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). METHODS AND RESULTS: The Medical ANtiarrhythmic Treatment or Radiofrequency Ablation....... The primary endpoint is cumulative AF burden on repeated 7 days Holter monitoring. Secondary endpoints are: thromboembolic events, hospitalization due to arrhythmia, pro-arrhythmic events, procedure/treatment-related side effects, health economics, quality of life, and change in left ventricular function. Ten...

  9. Intoxicaciones medicamentosas (I: Psicofármacos y antiarrítmicos Acute pharmacologic poisoning (I: Psychotropic and antiarrhythmic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Osés

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available En la valoración de la Intoxicación Medicamentosa Aguda (IMA en pacientes graves con dosis potencialmente no tóxicas del teórico fármaco responsable es importante insistir en la anamnesis en la coingesta de otros fármacos o tóxicos. Inicialmente se prestará atención a las medidas de soporte vital, oxigenando, protegiendo la vía aérea y expandiendo la volemia. El ECG es una herramienta diagnóstica de primer orden en las IMA, sobre todo por antidepresivos tricíclicos (ADT y medicación cardiovascular. Su monitorización continua durante las primeras 12-24 horas suele ser necesaria en la mayoría de los casos. Las benzodiacepinas no suelen producir intoxicaciones graves. El uso del flumazenilo se reservará a los casos de depresión respiratoria, coma profundo o de causa no filiada. Pueden dar lugar a convulsiones, sobre todo en caso de intoxicación mixta con antidepresivos, y síndrome de abstinencia. Los ADT poseen una potencial gravedad enorme, pudiendo originar arritmias mortales. El rango terapéutico del litio es muy estrecho, pudiendo producirse signos de toxicidad fundamentalmente digestiva y neurológica. En caso de intoxicación por digoxina, se considerará el uso de anticuerpos antidigital en caso de bradiarritmias graves, bloqueos AV o PCR. El glucagón es el antídoto para la intoxicación grave por ß-bloqueantes y para la hipotensión refractaria en caso de calcioantagonistas.In the evaluation of Acute Drug Poisoning (ADP in patients seriously ill with a potentially non-toxic dose of the drug that is theoretically responsible, it is important to insist on anamnesis in the coingestion of other drugs or toxics. Initially attention is given to life support measures, oxygenation, protection of the airway and expanding the volemia. The ECG is a diagnostic tool of the first order in ADPs, above all for tricyclic antidepressants (TAD and cardio-vascular drugs. In the majority of cases continuous monitoring is usually

  10. Drug: D02239 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D02239 Drug Sparteine sulfate (JAN/USAN); Sparteine sulfate pentahydrate C15H26N2. ...01 CARDIAC THERAPY C01B ANTIARRHYTHMICS, CLASS I AND III C01BA Antiarrhythmics, class Ia C01BA04 Sparte...ine D02239 Sparteine sulfate (JAN/USAN) CAS: 6160-12-9 PubChem: 7849298 LigandBox: D02

  11. ATRIAL-FLUTTER CAN BE TERMINATED BY A CLASS-III ANTIARRHYTHMIC DRUG BUT NOT BY A CLASS-IC DRUG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CRIJNS, HJGM; VANGELDER, IC; KINGMA, JH; DUNSELMAN, PHJM; GOSSELINK, ATM; LIE, KI

    1994-01-01

    In atrial flutter, chemical conversion with class I drugs is often unsuccessful, whereas class III drugs seem more promising. The different electrophysiological effects of these drugs may explain this discrepancy. To date, only experimental data show the differential effects of these drugs on conver

  12. Optimizing HIV drug therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Calmy, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    The spectrum of drugs used in HIV-infected patients has dramatically changed since triple antiretroviral combinations were introduced, albeit at the expense of some severe adverse events, in 1996. Long term complications of antiretroviral drug exposure, such as HIV lipodystrophy, as well as organ-specific disease of heart and bone are, therefore, a critical issue when designing antiretroviral regimens. Because it is difficult to predict the occurrence of lipodystrophy, and because there is no...

  13. Drug: D00642 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 520.572 D00642.gif Cardiac depressant [anti-arrhythmic] ATC code: C01BA01 Class I antiarrhythmic agent volt...A:55244], SCL47A2 [HSA:146802], ABCB1 [HSA:5243] map07025 Quinolines map07037 Antiarrhythmic...n [BR:br08303] C CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM C01 CARDIAC THERAPY C01B ANTIARRHYTHMICS, CLASS I AND III C01BA Antiarrhythmic... Cardiovascular Agents Antiarrhythmics Quinidine D00642 Quinidine gluconate (USP)

  14. [Drug therapy for acromegaly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góth, Miklós

    2013-09-29

    Prolonged overproduction of growth hormone, like insulin-like growth factor-1 hypersecretion leads to acromegaly in adults. This is associated with several co-morbidities and increased mortality. Despite typical clinical features and modern diagnostic tools, it often takes years to diagnose from the onset of the disease. The aims of the treatment are to reduce or control tumour growth, inhibit growth hormone hypersecretion, normalize insulin-like growth factor-1 levels, treat co-morbidities and, therefore, reduce mortality. There are three approaches for therapy: surgery, medical management (dopamine agonists, somatostatin analogues and growth hormone receptor antagonist), and radiotherapy. Efficient therapy of the disease is based on the appropriate multidisciplinary team management. The review provides a summary of medical treatment for acromegaly.

  15. [Drug therapy of acne].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochsendorf, F R; Degitz, K

    2008-07-01

    Acne is treated according to the clinical picture and the pathophysiologically relevant mechanisms, such as seborrhea, follicular hyperkeratosis, P. acnes colonisation,and inflammation. In mild forms of acne, topical therapy is most appropriate. Comedonal acne can be treated with topical retinoids; papulopustular acne with a combination of retinoids and topical antimicrobial substances (benzoyl peroxide, antibiotics, or azelaic acid). Moderate forms or those with extrafacial involvement can be treated with oral antibiotics combined with topical retinoids or benzoyl peroxide. Acne conglobata and other severe manifestations are treated with oral isotretinoin. Women are also treated with oral contraceptives containing anti-androgenic progestins. If inflammation is prominent, initial short term treatment with oral glucocorticoids is helpful. Second-line agents include oral zinc or dapsone. Following successful treatment, topical retinoids are suitable for maintenance therapy.

  16. Algorithms for optimizing drug therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Lene

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug therapy has become increasingly efficient, with more drugs available for treatment of an ever-growing number of conditions. Yet, drug use is reported to be sub optimal in several aspects, such as dosage, patient's adherence and outcome of therapy. The aim of the current study was to investigate the possibility to optimize drug therapy using computer programs, available on the Internet. Methods One hundred and ten officially endorsed text documents, published between 1996 and 2004, containing guidelines for drug therapy in 246 disorders, were analyzed with regard to information about patient-, disease- and drug-related factors and relationships between these factors. This information was used to construct algorithms for identifying optimum treatment in each of the studied disorders. These algorithms were categorized in order to define as few models as possible that still could accommodate the identified factors and the relationships between them. The resulting program prototypes were implemented in HTML (user interface and JavaScript (program logic. Results Three types of algorithms were sufficient for the intended purpose. The simplest type is a list of factors, each of which implies that the particular patient should or should not receive treatment. This is adequate in situations where only one treatment exists. The second type, a more elaborate model, is required when treatment can by provided using drugs from different pharmacological classes and the selection of drug class is dependent on patient characteristics. An easily implemented set of if-then statements was able to manage the identified information in such instances. The third type was needed in the few situations where the selection and dosage of drugs were depending on the degree to which one or more patient-specific factors were present. In these cases the implementation of an established decision model based on fuzzy sets was required. Computer programs

  17. Drug therapy during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebyl, J R

    1992-02-01

    A randomized prospective trial has shown that folic acid started before conception and continued for the first trimester reduces the risk of recurrence of neural tube defects by 72% in women with a previously affected child. Carbamazepine exposure in utero is associated with a 1% risk of spina bifida. Long-term follow-up of antenatal exposure to phenobarbital and carbamazepine in two groups of infants shows no neurologic differences between the two groups. Magnesium sulfate is more effective in prevention of recurrent eclamptic seizures than phenytoin. During pregnancy, the need for thyroxine increases in many women. Vitamin B6 and ginger are both effective for nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy. Low-dose aspirin does not change the course of preeclampsia when it is started after the diagnosis is made. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors cause significant disturbances of fetal and neonatal renal function. Prophylactic beta-adrenergic agents fail to prevent prematurity in twins. Oral tocolysis with magnesium chloride or ritodrine is no more effective than observation alone. The risk of primary pulmonary hypertension in the newborn after indomethacin tocolysis is increased with prolonged therapy. Lithium causes polyhydramnios from fetal diabetes insipidus in utero. Treatment of Ureaplasma urealyticum infection with erythromycin during pregnancy does not eliminate the organism from the lower genital tract and does not improve perinatal outcome.

  18. Drug: D02537 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D02537 Drug Dronedarone (INN) C31H44N2O5S 556.2971 556.7565 D02537.gif Antiarrhythmic...[HSA:1576 1577 1551] Transporter inhibition: ABCB1 [HSA:5243] map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs map07231 Sodium ...1B ANTIARRHYTHMICS, CLASS I AND III C01BD Antiarrhythmics, class III C01BD07 Dronedarone D02537 Dronedarone ...(INN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Cardiovascular Agents Antiarrhythmics

  19. Wide complex tachycardia in the presence of class I antiarrhythmic agents: a diagnostic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Bhaskar; Lazzara, Ralph; Stavrakis, Stavros

    2014-05-01

    We present two patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation on class 1C antiarrhythmic drugs without concomitant atrioventricular (AV) nodal blocking agents who developed atrial flutter with 1:1 AV conduction. Their electrocardiogram revealed wide complex tachycardia with rates >200/minute. Atrial flutter with 1:1 conduction in the presence of class IC antiarrhythmic drugs may present a diagnostic challenge. These cases illustrate the importance of coadministering an AV nodal blocking agent with class IC antiarrhythmic agents in patients with atrial fibrillation. The differential diagnosis of wide complex tachycardia in patients taking class IC agents should include atrial flutter with 1:1 AV conduction.

  20. A benefit-risk assessment of class III antiarrhythmic agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brendorp, Bente; Pedersen, Oledyg; Torp-Pedersen, Christian;

    2002-01-01

    again increases the frequency of both supraventricular as well as ventricular arrhythmias. Class III antiarrhythmic drugs act by blocking repolarising currents and thereby prolong the effective refractory period of the myocardium. This is believed to facilitate termination of re-entry tachyarrhythmias....... This class of drugs is developed for treatment of both supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias. Amiodarone, sotalol, dofetilide, and ibutilide are examples of class III drugs that are currently available. Amiodarone and sotalol have other antiarrhythmic properties in addition to pure class III action......, which differentiates them from the others. However, all have potential serious adverse events. Proarrhythmia, especially torsade de pointes, is a common problem making the benefit-risk ratio of these drugs a key question. Class III drugs have been evaluated in different settings: primary and secondary...

  1. Public understanding of drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herxheimer, Andrew

    2012-06-01

    Knowing some basic principles about medicines would help patients to understand drug therapy and to help and encourage them to use it well. These principles relate to the categories and names of drugs, their different uses, how they reach the site of action (absorption, distribution, fate), how they produce their effects, both beneficial and harmful, the time courses of drug actions, how the pattern and intensity of the effects of a drug depend on dose and timing, drug interactions, how drug effects are demonstrated and investigated and sources of information and their trustworthiness. These basic principles are an essential part of health literacy and understanding them would enable individuals to comprehend better the information that they are likely to receive about medicines that they will take. Different populations need different types of education. For schoolchildren, the principles could fit into biology and domestic science teaching, starting in the later years of primary school or early in secondary school. A teaching package would also be needed for their teachers. For adults, web-based learning seems the most practical option. Web-based programmes could be supported by the NHS and professional bodies and through public libraries and local community health services. Specific groups for targeting could include young mothers and carers of chronically ill people. For retired people, one could envisage special programmes, perhaps in collaboration with the University of the Third Age. Conversations between patients and professionals would then become more effective and help shared decision making.

  2. Drug: D01455 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available category: 2129 ATC code: C01BG07 Class I antiarrhythmic agent (Ia) voltage-gated sodium channel (SCN1A) bloc...g individual organs 21 Cardiovascular agents 212 Antiarrhythmic agents 2129 Other...sification [BR:br08303] C CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM C01 CARDIAC THERAPY C01B ANTIARRHYTHMICS, CLASS I AND III C01BG Other antiarrhythmic

  3. Drug: D00199 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Rauvolfia serpentina [TAX:4060] Antiarrhythmic Same as: C06542 ATC code: C01BA05 Class I antiarrhythmic agen...ication [BR:br08303] C CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM C01 CARDIAC THERAPY C01B ANTIARRHYTHMICS, CLASS I AND III C01BA Antiarrhythmic

  4. Drug: D03492 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available f Cardiac depressant [anti-arrhythmic] ATC code: C01BG07 Class I antiarrhythmic agent (Ia) voltage-gated sod...ication [BR:br08303] C CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM C01 CARDIAC THERAPY C01B ANTIARRHYTHMICS, CLASS I AND III C01BG Other antiarrhythmic

  5. Tedisamil and lidocaine enhance each other's antiarrhythmic activity against ischaemia-induced arrhythmias in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Sarraf, Guilda; Barrett, Terrance D; Walker, Michael J A

    2003-01-01

    Combinations of the action potential-widening drug tedisamil (Class III antiarrhythmic activity), and the inactivated state sodium channel blocker lidocaine (Class Ib antiarrhythmic activity) were assessed for antiarrhythmic actions in a rat model of ischaemia-induced arrhythmias and for electrophysiological actions in normal rat myocardial tissue.Both tedisamil and lidocaine dose-dependently suppressed ischaemia-induced arrhythmias. The ED50 values were 3.0±1.3 and 4.9±0.6 μmol kg−1 min−1, r...

  6. Alternative Drugs in Pain Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlker Kelle

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Various treatment modalities of acute and chronic pain have been an area of interest of medicine and investigators for centuries. There are two major classes of drugs that are used to control pain: opioid and non-opioid analgesics. They could be used in the case of monotherapy or combination therapy in pain management. However, these agents are not accepted as ideal drugs in clinical approaches against pain because of their serious side effects such as development of tolerance and addiction, renal failure and gastrointestinal bleeding. As a consequent, developing new forms of pain relievers that are more safe and effective without any other side effects has became the main goal of researchers. In recent studies, it has been shown that conotoxin therapies are not addictive, and have tolerable indexes unlike opioids. In addition, conotoxins side effects are much milder and easier to manage than those of opioids. In this regard, it has been emphasized that biotoxins such as conotoxins obtained from marine creatures can be better choices in pain management for future prospects.

  7. ANTIARRHYTHMIC EFFICACY OF PROPAFENONE IN PATIENTS WITH PERSISTENT ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. Kurbanov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess propafenone antiarrhythmic efficacy and optimal timing of the drug administration for relief of persistent atrial fibrillation (PAF. Material and methods. 24 patients (19 men, 5 women, aged 53,8±13,3 with PAF (duration is more than 7 days were included in the study. PAF was confirmed clinically as well as by ECG and daily ECG monitoring. Indications for sinus rhythm recovery by propafenone were defined in according to the ACC/AHA/ESC recommendations (2006. 12-lead ECG was performed before the fist administration and 2, 4, 8, 12, 24 hours and some next days after propafenone therapy start. Echocardiography and thyroid hormone tests were also performed. Propafenone was administered additionally to standard treatment of the underlying disease and oral anticoagulants. The first dose of propafenone was 300 mg, after 4 hours patients received next dose of 300 mg if atrial fibrillation persisted and no side effects were observed, then doses of 300 mg were administered every 6-8 hours (but not more than 900-1200 mg per day during 5 days. Maintenance propafenone dose of 450-600 mg daily was used in case of sinus rhythm recovery. Results. Sinus rhythm was restored in 41,6% of patients taking propafenone, and time of sinus rhythm recovery was 53,1±28,9 hours after therapy start. Propafenone antiarrhythmic efficacy in the loading dose (300 mg was 4,2%. Propafenone efficacy during the first 24 hours (dose of 700±282,8 mg was 12,5%. The maximum rate of sinus rhythm recovery was observed during the first 2-3 days of propafenone receiving (60% of all patients with rhythm recovery. Patients with unrecovered sinus rhythm had longer duration of PAF in comparison with this in effectively treated patients, 105,8±89,0 vs 39,7±38,9 days (p<0,05, respectively, as well as the more prominent basal pulse deficit, 24,6±15,0 vs 13,56±5,7 beats per minute (p<0,05, respectively. Cardiac and transient noncardiac side effects were registered in 8,6 and 4

  8. Drug: D07520 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D07520 Drug Bepridil (INN); Bepadin (TN) C24H34N2O 366.2671 366.5396 D07520.gif Antiarrhythmic...; Calcium antagonist; Coronary vasodilator Same as: C06847 ATC code: C08EA02 Class IV antiarrhythmic...36 Calcium channel blocking drugs map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs map07231 Sodium channel blocking drugs Anato

  9. Acupuncture therapy for drug addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motlagh, Farid Esmaeili; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Rashid, Rusdi Abd; Seghatoleslam, Tahereh; Habil, Hussain

    2016-01-01

    Acupuncture therapy has been used to treat substance abuse. This study aims to review experimental studies examining the effects of acupuncture on addiction. Research and review articles on acupuncture treatment of substance abuse published between January 2000 and September 2014 were searched using the databases ISI Web of Science Core Collection and EBSCO's MEDLINE Complete. Clinical trial studies on the efficacy of acupuncture therapy for substance abuse were classified according to substance (cocaine, opioid, nicotine, and alcohol), and their treatment protocols, assessments, and findings were examined. A total of 119 studies were identified, of which 85 research articles addressed the efficacy of acupuncture for treating addiction. There were substantial variations in study protocols, particularly regarding treatment duration, frequency of electroacupuncture, duration of stimulation, and choice of acupoints. Contradictory results, intergroup differences, variation in sample sizes, and acupuncture placebo effects made it difficult to evaluate acupuncture effectiveness in drug addiction treatment. This review also identified a lack of rigorous study design, such as control of confounding variables by incorporating sham controls, sufficient sample sizes, reliable assessments, and adequately replicated experiments.

  10. Classification of the antiarrhythmic action of moricizine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan Williams, E M

    1991-03-01

    The subdivisiion of class 1 antiarrhythmic agents into groups a, b, and c was originally based on clinical electrophysiologic findings. Class 1b compounds did not alter QRS or HV interval in sinus rhythm, but the compounds did lengthen ERP in spite of shortening JT. Class 1c agents widened QRS and prolonged HV at low concentrations in sinus rhythm, but had little effect on ERP or JT. Cellular electrophysiologic studies provided an explanation for these clinical effects by frequency-dependent onset/offset kinetics. Class 1b drugs became rapidly attached to sodium channels after depolarization, which rendered them nonconducting, but the drugs also dissociated rapidly after repolarization so that by the end of a normal diastole nearly all channels were back to their conducting state. In contrast, class 1c drugs became more slowly attached, and more slowly detached, so that a proportion of sodium channels was permanently eliminated as long as the drug was present. This caused slow conduction in the His-Purkinje system and ventricle. Both clinical and cellular electrophysiologic studies show that moricizine HCl is a class 1c agent.

  11. Cardiovascular pharmacogenomics and individualized drug therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Naveen L.; Weinshilboum, Richard M.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of individualized drug therapy requires physicians to be able to accurately predict an individual’s response to a drug. Both genetic and environmental factors are known to influence drug response. ‘Pharmacogenetics’ is the study of the role of inheritance in variation in drug response phenotypes. Pharmacogenetics is now moving genome-wide to become ‘pharmacogenomics’, resulting in the recognition of novel biomarkers for individual variation in drug response. This article reviews the ...

  12. Drug therapy for ulcerative colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-Tai Xu; Shu-Yong Meng; Bo-Rong Pan

    2004-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an inflammatory destructive disease of the large intestine occurred usually in the rectum and lower part of the colon as well as the entire colon. Drug therapy is not the only choice for UC treatment and medical management should be as a comprehensive whole.Azulfidine, Asacol, Pentasa, Dipentum, and Rowasa all contain 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), which is the topical anti-inflammatory ingredient. Pentasa is more commonly used in treating Crohn's ileitis because Pentasa capsules release more 5-ASA into the small intestine than Asacol tablets. Pentasa can also be used for treating mild to moderate UC. Rowasa enemas are safe and effective in treating ulcerative proctitis and proctosigmoiditis. The sulfafree 5-ASA agents (Asacol, Pentasa, Dipentum and Rowasa) have fewer side effects than sulfa-containing Azulfidine. In UC patients with moderate to severe disease and in patients who failed to respond to 5-ASA compounds,systemic (oral) corticosteroids should be used. Systemic corticosteroids (prednisone, prednisolone, cortisone, etc.)are potent and fast-acting drugs for treating UC, Crohn's ileitis and ileocolitis. Systemic corticosteroids are not effective in maintaining remission in patients with UC.Serious side effects can result from prolonged corticosteroid treatment. To minimize side effects, corticosteroids should be gradually reduced as soon as the disease remission is achieved. In patients with corticosteroid-dependent or unresponsive to corticosteroid treatment, surgery or immunomodulator is considered. Immunomodulators used for treating severe UC include azathioprine/6-MP,methotrexate, and cyclosporine. Integrated traditional Chinese and Western medicine is safe and effective in maintaining remission in patients with UC.

  13. Drug: D08377 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D08377 Drug Pilsicainide (INN) C17H24N2O 272.1889 272.3853 D08377.gif Antiarrhythmic Class I antiarrhythmic...nhibition: SLC22A2 [HSA:6582] map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs map07231 Sodium channel blocking drugs Target-ba

  14. Molecular basis for class Ib anti-arrhythmic inhibition of cardiac sodium channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Galpin, Jason D; Frankel, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac sodium channels are established therapeutic targets for the management of inherited and acquired arrhythmias by class I anti-arrhythmic drugs (AADs). These drugs share a common target receptor bearing two highly conserved aromatic side chains, and are subdivided by the Vaughan...... the inhibition of cardiac sodium channels by clinically relevant drugs and provide information for the directed design of AADs....

  15. Delayed ventricular repolarization as an anti-arrhythmic principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan Williams, E M

    1985-11-01

    Depolarization of cardiac muscle is achieved by 'fast inward current' through channels which are inactivated within about 1 ms. When the cells are repolarized the process of inactivation of fast channels is rapidly reversed. The class 1 anti-arrhythmic drugs delay the disappearance of inactivation until long after repolarization is complete. In theory, it should be possible to produce a similar extension of refractory period by delaying the repolarization itself. Quinidine and disopyramide caused minor delays of repolarization, but both were primarily class 1 agents, and in addition had undesirable anticholinergic activity. Amiodarone, already in use for many years as an antianginal drug, prolonged action potential duration (APD) and was shown to have an anti-arrhythmic action in rabbits, dogs and man. Although prolongation of APD lengthens QT, a long QT may be caused by phenomena other than prolonged APD, such as heterogeneity of sympathetic drive. Association of long QT with arrhythmia does not, therefore, invalidate the principle that homogeneously prolonged APD should be anti-arrhythmic. In practice, amiodarone, bretylium, sotalol, thyroidectomy, and long-term beta-blockade prolong APD, and are associated with low incidence of arrhythmia. Many mechanisms controlling cardiac repolarization have been proposed, but how repolarization is delayed by individual agents is not fully elucidated.

  16. [Antiarrhythmic effect of TJ0711].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Qiu, Jun; Li, Gao

    2014-03-01

    To study the antiarrhythmic effect of the newly developed alpha/beta-blocker TJ0711, a variety of animal models of arrhythmia were induced by CaCl2, ouabain and ischemia/reperfusion. Glass microelectrode technique was used to observe action potentials of right ventricular papillary muscle of guinea pig. The onset time of arrhythmia induced by CaCl2 was significantly prolonged by TJ0711 at 0.75, 1.5 and 3 mg x kg(-1) doses. TJ0711 (1.5 and 3 mg x kg(-1)) can significantly shorten the ventricular tachycardia (VT) and ventricular fibrillation (VF) duration, the incidence of VF and mortality were significantly reduced. On ischemia-reperfusion-induced arrhythmic model, TJ0711 (0.25, 0.5, 1 and 2 mg x kg(-1)) can significantly reduce the ventricular premature contraction (PVC), VT, VF incidence, mortality, arrhythmia score with a dose-dependent manner. At the same time, rats serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) activities decreased significantly by TJ0711 (1 and 2 mg x kg(-1)). Ouabain could cause arrhythmia in guinea pigs, when TJ0711 (0.375, 0.75, 1.5 and 3 mg x kg(-1)) was given, the doses of ouabain inducing a variety of arrhythmia PVC, VT, VF, cardiac arrest (CA) were significantly increased with a dose-dependent manner. In the TJ0711 0.1-30 micromol x L(-1) concentration range, guinea pig right ventricular papillary muscle action potential RP (rest potential), APA (action potential amplitude) and V(max) (maximum velocity of depolarization) were not significantly affected. APD20, APD50 and APD90 had a shortening trend but no statistical difference with the increase of TJ0711 concentration. TJ0711 has antiarrhythmic effect on the sympathetic nerve excitement and myocardial cell high calcium animal arrhythmia model. Myocardial action potential zero phase conduction velocity and resting membrane potential were not inhibited by TJ0711. APD20, APD50 and APD90 were shortened by TJ0711 at high concentration. Its antiarrhythmic action mechanism may be

  17. Drug: D03914 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 593.2174 D03914.gif Antiarrhythmic ATC code: C01BD07 calcium channel L type blocker [HSA:775 776 778 779] [...ransporter inhibition: ABCB1 [HSA:5243] map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs map07231 Sodium channel blocking drugs...ASS I AND III C01BD Antiarrhythmics, class III C01BD07 Dronedarone D03914 Dronedarone hydrochloride (USAN) U...SP drug classification [BR:br08302] Cardiovascular Agents Antiarrhythmics Droneda

  18. Drug: D00637 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 437.4696 D00637.gif Cardiac depressant [anti-arrhythmic] [DS:H00292] Same as: C07740 Therapeutic category: ...2129 ATC code: C01BA03 Class I antiarrhythmic agent voltage-gated sodium channel (SCN1A) blocker [HSA:6323] ...ansporter inhibition: SLC22A1 [HSA:6580] map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs map07231 Sodium channel blocking drug...al organs 21 Cardiovascular agents 212 Antiarrhythmic agents 2129 Others D00637 Disopyramide phosphate (JAN/...HERAPY C01B ANTIARRHYTHMICS, CLASS I AND III C01BA Antiarrhythmics, class Ia C01BA03 Disopyramide D00637 Dis

  19. PAROXYSMAL ATRIAL FIBRILLATION: CHOICE OF CARDIOVERSION THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Tatarskii

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics and classification of different patterns of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation are presented. Main indications to restoration of sinus rhythm are discussed. The features of main medications used to terminate of atrial fibrillation are given. The choice of antiarrhythmic drug is considerate. Necessity of individual approach to therapy tactics is proved.

  20. Drug: D00235 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 0(153) Salivary secretion Enzyme: CYP2D6 [HSA:1565] map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs map07048 Antimigraines map...ents affecting individual organs 21 Cardiovascular agents 212 Antiarrhythmic agen

  1. Drug: D01856 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -rectifying channel (KCNJ12) [HSA:3768] [KO:K05005] map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs... Agents affecting individual organs 21 Cardiovascular agents 212 Antiarrhythmic agents 2129 Others D01856 Ni

  2. Drug: D00513 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YP2D6 [HSA:1565] Transporter: SLC22A2 [HSA:6582] map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs ma...gents affecting individual organs 21 Cardiovascular agents 212 Antiarrhythmic agents 2123 Beta blockers D005

  3. Drug: D03547 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 7.gif Cardiac depressant [anti-arrhythmic] voltage-gated potassium channel (KCNA5) blocker [HSA:3741] [KO:K0...el (KCND3) blocker [HSA:3752] [KO:K04893] map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs map07232

  4. Pharmacogenetics of cardiovascular drug therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, Bas J.M.; Olaf H Klungel; de Boer, Anthonius; Ch Stricker, Bruno H; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke-Hilse

    2009-01-01

    In developed countries cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of death. Cardiovascular drugs such as platelet aggregation inhibitors, oral anticoagulants, antihypertensives and cholesterol lowering drugs are abundantly prescribed to reduce risk of cardiovascular disease. Notable interindividual variation exists in the response to these pharmacotherapeutic interventions, which can be partially explained by factors such as gender, age, diet, concomitant drug use and environmental f...

  5. Drug: D07894 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D07894 Drug Encainide (INN) C22H28N2O2 352.2151 352.4699 D07894.gif Antiarrhythmic ...1] Enzyme: CYP2D6 [HSA:1565] map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs Anatomical Therapeutic..., CLASS I AND III C01BC Antiarrhythmics, class Ic C01BC08 Encainide D07894 Encainide (INN) Target-based clas

  6. Drug: D01026 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available C code: C07AA07 Class III antiarrhythmic agent voltage-gated potassium channel (KCNH2) blocker [HSA:3757] [K...4) Neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction hsa04261(153+154) Adrenergic signaling in cardiomyocytes map07037 Antiarrhythmic...peutic category of drugs in Japan [BR:br08301] 2 Agents affecting individual organs 21 Cardiovascular agents 212 Antiarrhythmic...chloride (JAN/USP) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Cardiovascular Agents Antiarrhythmics Sotalol D01026

  7. Efficacy and safety in pharmacological cardioversion of recent-onset atrial fibrillation: a propensity score matching to compare amiodarone vs class IC antiarrhythmic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonora, Antonio; Turcato, Gianni; Franchi, Elena; Taioli, Gabriele; Dilda, Alice; Zerman, Germana; Maccagnani, Antonio; Pistorelli, Claudio; Olivieri, Oliviero

    2016-07-06

    The acute management of recent-onset (IC antidysrhythmic agents vs amiodarone in a propensity score matched series of patients acutely treated for AF in the emergency department. During a 3-year period, we retrospectively evaluated all episodes of recent-onset (IC group in terms of efficacy and safety that is conversion to sinus rhythm rates within 12 and 48 h after starting treatment, time to conversion, and adverse drug effects. An overall number of 817 episodes of recent-onset AF were collected (amiodarone group = 406, class IC group = 411). After matching, we obtained 358 episodes equally divided (amiodarone group = 179 and class IC group = 179). Conversion rates within 12 h were 139 (53.1 %) in amiodarone group and 95 (72.6 %) in class IC group (p IC group (p IC agents, when compared with amiodarone, proved to be more rapid and effective, and equally safe in the acute management of recent-onset AF.

  8. Drug resistance mechanisms and novel drug targets for tuberculosis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Mahmudul; Hameed, H M Adnan; Mugweru, Julius; Chhotaray, Chiranjibi; Wang, Changwei; Tan, Yaoju; Liu, Jianxiong; Li, Xinjie; Tan, Shouyong; Ojima, Iwao; Yew, Wing Wai; Nuermberger, Eric; Lamichhane, Gyanu; Zhang, Tianyu

    2017-01-20

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) poses a significant challenge to the successful treatment and control of TB worldwide. Resistance to anti-TB drugs has existed since the beginning of the chemotherapy era. New insights into the resistant mechanisms of anti-TB drugs have been provided. Better understanding of drug resistance mechanisms helps in the development of new tools for the rapid diagnosis of drug-resistant TB. There is also a pressing need in the development of new drugs with novel targets to improve the current treatment of TB and to prevent the emergence of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This review summarizes the anti-TB drug resistance mechanisms, furnishes some possible novel drug targets in the development of new agents for TB therapy and discusses the usefulness using known targets to develop new anti-TB drugs. Whole genome sequencing is currently an advanced technology to uncover drug resistance mechanisms in M. tuberculosis. However, further research is required to unravel the significance of some newly discovered gene mutations in their contribution to drug resistance.

  9. Drug: D00643 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D00643 Drug Quinidine polygalacturonate; Cardioquin (TN) C20H24N2O2. (C6H10O7)mon D00643.gif Antiarrhythmic...1B ANTIARRHYTHMICS, CLASS I AND III C01BA Antiarrhythmics, class Ia C01BA01 Quinidine D00643 Quinidine polyg...alacturonate USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Cardiovascular Agents Antiarrhythmics Quinidine D00643 Qui...nolines map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs map07231 Sodium channel blocking drugs Anat...2A2 [HSA:6582], SLC22A1 [HSA:6580], SLC47A1 [HSA:55244], SCL47A2 [HSA:146802], ABCB1 [HSA:5243] map07025 Qui

  10. New drug therapies for COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Clare L; Hansel, Trevor T

    2014-03-01

    Clinical trials with new drugs for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have been performed. Viruses exacerbate COPD and bacteria may play a part in severe COPD; therefore, antibiotic and antiviral approaches have a sound rationale. Antiinflammatory approaches have been studied. Advances in understanding the molecular basis of other processes have resulted in novel drugs to target reactive oxidant species, mucus, proteases, fibrosis, cachexia, and muscle wasting, and accelerated aging. Studies with monoclonal antibodies have been disappointing, highlighting the tendency for infections and malignancies during treatment. Promising future directions are lung regeneration with retinoids and stem cells.

  11. [Pharmacogenetics and tailored drug therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, F.C.; Borregaard, N.

    2009-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics traditionally designates the study of genetically determined variation in metabolism of drugs and toxins from the environment. The concept of phamacogenetics has been widened to encompass how essential genetic alterations central to the development of diseases may by used to target...

  12. Drug: D04778 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 78.gif Cardiac depressant [anti-arrhythmic] ATC code: C01BC07 Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classifi...cation [BR:br08303] C CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM C01 CARDIAC THERAPY C01B ANTIARRHYTHMICS, CLASS I AND III C01BC Antiarrhythmic

  13. Drug Therapy in Obese Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinat Salem

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The behavior and dietary treatments are not so successful for extremely obese adolescents. Therefore, using drugs to treat extremely obese children and adolescents are among the modern approaches. This research aims to study the pharmaceutical interventions performed for treatment of obese children. Materials and Methods: The strategy of research was using of key words ‘obesity’, ‘adolescence’, ‘treatment’ and ‘anti-obesity drugs’ were searched in websites of PubMed, Iranian Medical Digital Library, SID, Iran Medex, Magiran. This study reviewed all the available published papers in English and Farsi languages during 2000-2010. The Criteria for exclusion was The papers that had been published on interventions and treatment of eating disorders, type II diabetes or the obesity caused by the secondary syndromes. Results: Twelve papers were found as short-term clinical trials and/or long-term follow-ups. In these studies, the positive effects of ‘sibutramine’ in some studies are shown; although some other side effects are reported as well. A significant weight-loss had been reported on ‘orlistat’ medicine, but digestive complications had been observed as well. None of the studies had followed up patients for more than one year. Apparently, ‘Metformin’ requires further studies.Conclusion: The FDA has only approved ‘sibutramine’ and ‘orlistat’ drugs. But side effects of long-term these drugs have already been unknown. However, it seems that ‘orlistat’ is applied for ≥12-year-old children and ‘sibutramine’ for ≥ 16-year-old children.

  14. Drug: D00639 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 7 215.7197 D00639.gif Cardiac depressant [anti-arrhythmic] Therapeutic category: 1900 2129 ATC code: C01BB02 Class I antiarrhythmic...n: CYP1A2 [HSA:1544] map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs map07231 Sodium channel blocking drugs Therapeutic catego...ride (JP16/USP) 2 Agents affecting individual organs 21 Cardiovascular agents 212 Antiarrhythmic agents 2129...drug classification [BR:br08302] Cardiovascular Agents Antiarrhythmics Mexiletine...thmics, class Ib C01BB02 Mexiletine D00639 Mexiletine hydrochloride (JP16/USP) USP

  15. Drug: D01326 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 6 358.9479 D01326.gif Cardiac depressant [anti-arrhythmic] Therapeutic category: 2129 ATC code: C01BB04 Class I antiarrhythmic...P3A4 [HSA:1576] map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs map07231 Sodium channel blocking drugs Therapeutic category of...HMICS, CLASS I AND III C01BB Antiarrhythmics, class Ib C01BB04 Aprindine D01326 Aprindine hydrochloride (JP1... drugs in Japan [BR:br08301] 2 Agents affecting individual organs 21 Cardiovascular agents 212 Antiarrhyth...mic agents 2129 Others D01326 Aprindine hydrochloride (JP16/USAN) Anatomical Therap

  16. Drug: D08421 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D08421 Drug Procainamide (INN) C13H21N3O 235.1685 235.3253 D08421.gif Antiarrhythmic... Same as: C07401 ATC code: C01BA02 Class I antiarrhythmic agent voltage-gated sodium channel (SCN1A) blocke...581] Transporter inhibition: SLC47A1 [HSA:55244] map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs map07213 Dopamine receptor ag... CLASS I AND III C01BA Antiarrhythmics, class Ia C01BA02 Procainamide D08421 Procainamide (INN) USP drug cla...ssification [BR:br08302] Cardiovascular Agents Antiarrhythmics Procainamide D08421 Procainamide (INN) Target

  17. Drug therapy for hereditary cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imyanitov Evgeny N

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumors arising in patients with hereditary cancer syndromes may have distinct drug sensitivity as compared to their sporadic counterparts. Breast and ovarian neoplasms from BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers are characterized by deficient homologous recombination (HR of DNA, that makes them particularly sensitive to platinum compounds or inhibitors of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. Outstandingly durable complete responses to high dose chemotherapy have been observed in several cases of BRCA-related metastatic breast cancer (BC. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that women with BRCA1-related BC may derive less benefit from taxane-based treatment than other categories of BC patients. There is virtually no reports directly assessing drug response in hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC patients; studies involving non-selected (i.e., both sporadic and hereditary CRC with high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-H suggest therapeutic advantage of irinotecan. Celecoxib has been approved for the treatment of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP. Hereditary medullary thyroid cancers (MTC have been shown to be highly responsive to a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor vandetanib, which exerts specific activity towards mutated RET receptor. Given the rapidly improving accessibility of DNA analysis, it is foreseen that the potential predictive value of cancer-associated germ-line mutations will be increasingly considered in the future studies.

  18. Drug: D08394 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D08394 Drug Pirmenol (INN) C22H30N2O 338.2358 338.4864 D08394.gif Antiarrhythmic Class I antiarrhythmic... (SCN8A) blocker [HSA:6334] [KO:K04840]; voltage-gated sodium channel (SCN9A) blocker [HSA:6335] [KO:K04841] map07037 Antiarrhythmic

  19. Drug: D08060 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D08060 Drug Ibutilide (INN) C20H36N2O3S 384.2447 384.5764 D08060.gif Antiarrhythmic... Same as: C07753 ATC code: C01BD05 voltage-gated potassium channel (KCNH2) blocker [HSA:3757] [KO:K04905] map07037 Antiarrhythmic...PY C01B ANTIARRHYTHMICS, CLASS I AND III C01BD Antiarrhythmics, class III C01BD05 Ibutilide D08060 Ibutilide

  20. Anti-inflammatory drug therapy in asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rottier, Bart L.; Duiverman, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    Asthma is a disease with chronic inflammation of the airways and and-inflammatory treatment is a logical treatment. Inhaled corticosteroids [ICS] remain the cornerstone of anti-inflammatory therapy in recent international guidelines. Asthma cannot be cured by any medication: if the drug is discontin

  1. Drug therapy for the pregnant dental patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendia, Jonathan; Cuddy, Michael A; Moore, Paul A

    2012-09-01

    Providing needed dental treatment, managing oral infection, and controlling pain are essential functions of dentists for helping patients maintain overall health during pregnancy. Medications commonly required for dental care consist of local anesthetics and associated vasoconstrictors, centrally and peripherally acting analgesics, sedative and anxiolytic agents, and antibiotics. Therapeutic drugs routinely used in dental practice are selected because of their known safety and effectiveness. However, for a pregnant patient requiring dental care, the agents routinely prescribed should be reevaluated for potential risks to the mother and/or fetus. The decision to administer a specific drug requires that the benefits outweigh the potential risks of the drug therapy. This article reviews and updates the recommendations for using dental therapeutic agents, thereby enabling general practitioners to select the safest drugs when treating pregnant dental patients.

  2. Drug: D00477 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pronestyl (TN) C13H21N3O. HCl 271.1451 271.7863 D00477.gif Cardiac depressant [anti-arrhythmic] Therapeutic ...category: 2121 ATC code: C01BA02 Class I antiarrhythmic agent (Ia) voltage-gated sodium channel (SCN1A) bloc...:6581] Transporter inhibition: SLC47A1 [HSA:55244] map07028 Antipsychotics map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs map...TIARRHYTHMICS, CLASS I AND III C01BA Antiarrhythmics, class Ia C01BA02 Procainami...de D00477 Procainamide hydrochloride (JP16/USP) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Cardiovascular Agents Antiarrhythmic

  3. Progress in Drug Therapy for Multiple Myeloma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shun'e Yang; Bing Zhao

    2008-01-01

    Multiple myeloma remains incurable with conventional treatments. However, new active drugs, including the immunomodulatory agents, thalidomide and lenalidomide,and the proteasome inhibitors bortezomib and NPI-0052, and other targeted therapies, have shown promising anti-myeloma activity. These agents represent a new generation of treatments for multiple myeloma that affect both specific intracellular signaling pathways and the tumor microenvironment. This review therefore focuses on the extensive clinical data available from studies of these drugs in the treatment of newly diagnosed, refractory and relapsed multiple myeloma.

  4. Radiofrequency ablation as initial therapy in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walfridsson, H; Walfridsson, U; Nielsen, J Cosedis

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: The Medical ANtiarrhythmic Treatment or Radiofrequency Ablation in Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation (MANTRA-PAF) trial assessed the long-term efficacy of an initial strategy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) vs. antiarrhythmic drug therapy (AAD) as first-line treatment for patients with PAF. I......L and symptom burden in patients with PAF. Patients randomized to RFA showed greater improvement in physical scales (SF-36) and the EQ-visual analogue scale. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00133211....

  5. Carbon materials for drug delivery & cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang Liu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes and graphene are both low-dimensional sp2 carbon nanomaterials exhibiting many unique physical and chemical properties that are interesting in a wide range of areas including nanomedicine. Since 2004, carbon nanotubes have been extensively explored as drug delivery carriers for the intracellular transport of chemotherapy drugs, proteins, and genes. In vivo cancer treatment with carbon nanotubes has been demonstrated in animal experiments by several different groups. Recently, graphene, another allotrope of carbon, has also shown promise in various biomedical applications. In this article, we will highlight recent research on these two categories of closely related carbon nanomaterials for applications in drug delivery and cancer therapy, and discuss the opportunities and challenges in this rapidly growing field.

  6. A New Anti-arrhythmic Agent Developed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ In cooperation with colleagues from the China Pharmaceutical University over the past 15 years, researchers from the Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica (SIMM), a pharmaceutical research arm of CAS, have developed a new injection of acehytisine hydrochloride as a natural medication against heart rhythm disorders. The drug was officially approved on August 22, 2005 by China's State Food & Drug Administration (SFDA) as a new and marketable pharmaceutical for clinical therapy.

  7. Drug: D01554 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available UN 1165 (TN); Sunrythm (TN) (C17H24N2O. HCl)2. H2O 634.3416 635.7077 D01554.gif Therapeutic category: 2129 Class I antiarrhythmic...bition: SLC22A2 [HSA:6582] map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs map07231 Sodium channel blocking drugs Therapeutic ...category of drugs in Japan [BR:br08301] 2 Agents affecting individual organs 21 Cardiovascular agents 212 Antiarrhythmic

  8. Valproic acid: Does it have an antiarrhythmic action?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The antiepileptic sodium valproate (valproic acid; VPA is thought to possess an antiarrhythmic action. We aimed to explore whether this medication influences cardiac atrial ectopics or not. Methods: From December 1, 2009 to June 1, 2011, 80 consecutive patients who were newly diagnosed with cryptogenic generalized tonic-clonic seizures were enrolled in this prospective short-term longitudinal observational study, which was conducted at the Sulaimaniya General Teaching Hospital, Iraq. Forty patients were allocated to receive VPA and the rest (n=40 were given placebo. All patients underwent cardiac 24-hour Holter monitoring before and after one week of VPA or placebo administration. The minimum heart rate (MiHR and maximum heart rate (MxHR as well as the total number of atrial ectopics (TNAE were evaluated. Results: VPA significantly reduced the MiHR, MxHR, and the TNAE. In the placebo group, the reduction in the MiHR was statistically significant while the reduction in the MxHR and the TNAE were not. However, the reduction in the target parameters in the VPA-treated group did not demonstrate a dose-dependent effect. When both groups were evaluated head-to-head for the reduction in the MiHR before and after week of therapy, there was no statistically significant difference between them. Conclusion: Sodium valproate therapy appears to be effective against atrial ectopic beats and may be used as an antiarrhythmic medication in patients who co-experience seizures and troublesome atrial ectopics. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(4.000: 592-600

  9. A novel antiarrhythmic target-M3-R/IKM3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao-fengYANG

    2004-01-01

    The total efficient rate of antiarrhythmic agents is only 30%to 60%, and the compounding problem is the lack of an effective therapy for some serious arrhythmias. Muscarinic receptors have been cloned and subdivided into the five subtypes M1, M2, M3,M4 and M5. And M2 receptors have long been believed to be the only functional subtype of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) in the heart, although recent studies have provided

  10. Tedisamil and lidocaine enhance each other's antiarrhythmic activity against ischaemia-induced arrhythmias in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarraf, Guilda; Barrett, Terrance D; Walker, Michael J A

    2003-08-01

    1. Combinations of the action potential-widening drug tedisamil (Class III antiarrhythmic activity), and the inactivated state sodium channel blocker lidocaine (Class Ib antiarrhythmic activity) were assessed for antiarrhythmic actions in a rat model of ischaemia-induced arrhythmias and for electrophysiological actions in normal rat myocardial tissue. 2. Both tedisamil and lidocaine dose-dependently suppressed ischaemia-induced arrhythmias. The ED(50) values were 3.0+/-1.3 and 4.9+/-0.6 micro mol kg(-1) min(-1), respectively. 3. Combinations of the two drugs acted synergistically such that the ED(50) for tedisamil was reduced to 0.8+/-0.2 micro mol kg(-1) min(-1) in the presence of 2 micro mol kg(-1) min(-1) lidocaine. Similarly, the ED(50) for lidocaine was reduced to 0.7+/-0.2 micro mol kg(-1) min(-1) in the presence of 2 micro mol kg(-1) min(-1) tedisamil (both Plidocaine produced a leftward shift in the dose-response curve for tedisamil's effect on effective refractory period (Plidocaine had no effect on its own. These data indicate that the synergistic actions of combinations of tedisamil and lidocaine were mediated, at least in part, by extension of effective refractory period in normal myocardial tissue. 5. In contrast to the strategy of developing drugs that are selective for a single electrophysiological mechanism, the results of the present study suggest that effective antiarrhythmic drugs might be developed by optimising the combination of two complimentary electrophysiological mechanisms (i.e., action potential-prolonging activity and inactivated state sodium channel blockade).

  11. Drug: D08525 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available beta-Adrenergic blocking [DS:H00293] Same as: C07309 ATC code: C07AA07 Class III antiarrhythmic agent volta...153+154) Adrenergic signaling in cardiomyocytes map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs map07232 Potassium channel blo...ts, non-selective C07AA07 Sotalol D08525 Sotalol (INN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Cardiovascular Agents Antiarrhythmic

  12. Impact of pharmaceutical care interventions on the occurrence and resolution of drug therapy problems in antiretroviral drug therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nwaozuzu, E.E.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Pharmaceutical care (PC has been shown to improve the outcome of drug therapy in many disease conditions.HIV/AIDS is one of the disease conditions that are fraught with many problems that can benefit from this new emphasis of pharmacy practice also known as ‘pharmacists care’. This study is designed to determine the number and types of drug therapy problems occurring in the drug therapy of HIV patients receiving treatment at a tertiary hospital in southeast Nigeria and to evaluate the impact of pharmaceutical care activities on the occurrence of these drug therapy problems (DTPs. The components of the American society of health-system pharmacists (ASHP guidelines on ‘standardized method for pharmaceutical care’ was used as a data collection instrument to evaluate, document and intervene in the antiretroviral therapy of about one thousand four hundred and seventy three (1,473 patients. The study showed significant reduction in the incidence of drug therapy problems following the Pharmacist’s intervention activities. The study found out that eighty-nine percent (89% of the prescriptions had potential drug therapy problems before the interventions which were reduced by 12% to seventy-seven percent (77% after the intervention. The study also identified seventeen (17 different potential drug therapy problems prior to the interventions. A re - evaluation of these potential drug therapy problems after the interventions showed the very significant percentage reductions in the occurrence of each DTP. The study showed that pharmacists’ interventions in antiretroviral drug therapy through Pharmaceutical care can significantly reduce the occurrence of drug therapy problems associated with antiretroviral drug therapy.

  13. Antiarrhythmic and electrophysiologic effects of flecainide on acutely induced atrial fibrillation in healthy horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Maria Mathilde; Pehrson, S.; Carstensen, Helena;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Only few pharmacologic compounds have been validated for treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) in horses. Studies investigating the utility and safety of flecainide to treat AF in horses have produced conflicting results, and the antiarrhythmic mechanisms of flecainide are not fully...... length, and ventricular depolarization and repolarization. ANIMALS: Nine Standardbred horses. Eight received flecainide, 3 were used as time-matched controls, 2 of which also received flecainide. METHODS: Prospective study. The antiarrhythmic and electrophysiologic effects of flecainide were based on 5...... parameters: ability to terminate acute pacing-induced AF (≥ 15 minutes), and drug-induced changes in atrial effective refractory period, AF duration, AF vulnerability, and ventricular depolarization and repolarization times. Parameters were assessed at baseline and after flecainide by programmed electrical...

  14. Anti-Arrhythmic Potential of Coriandrum sativum Seeds in Salt Induced Arrhythmic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nida Rehman1, Nazish Jahan1*, Khalil-ul-Rahman2, Khalid Mahmood Khan2 and Fatiqa Zafar1

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present research, the anti-arrhythmic potential of Coriandrum sativum (seeds was evaluated in BaCl2 induced tachycardia and KCl induced bradycardia in rats. Heart rate and electrocardiogram (ECG was recorded during the experimental period. The BaCl2 increased the heart rate from 111/min to 157/min while KCL decreased the heart rate from 112/min to 60/min in the rats of positive control groups. ECG patterns also confirmed the tachy- and brady-arrhythmia in the rats of both positive control groups. The changes in biochemical cardiac biomarkers (CK-MB, LDH, AST, and ALT were also the studied parameters. The level of cardiac biomarkers was significantly elevated in the serum of positive control rats as compared to their respective absolute controls. In case of both curative and preventive mode of treatment the elevated levels of enzymes, cardiac biomarkers were significantly reduced. Electrocardiogram (ECG pattern revealed that the studied plant possesses a very good anti-arrhythmic potential in case of curative mode of treatment. The antiarrhythmic potential through preventive mode of treatment was also encouraging, but comparatively less than the curative mode of treatment. Anti-tachycardial potential of C. sativum was comparable with standard drug while, recovery in bradycardia was relatively slow than standard drug. Gross pathology and ECG pattern of base line group confirmed the innoxious nature of C. sativum seeds. Treatment of rats with Coriandrum sativum (100 mgkg-1 BW normalized the heart rate and attenuated the cardiac arrhythmia.

  15. [New drug therapy for retinal degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohguro, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is an inherited retinal degeneration characterized by nyctalopia, ring scotoma, and bone-spicule pigmentation of the retina. So far, no effective therapy has been found for RP. As a possible molecular etiology of RP, retina-specific gene deficits are most likely involved, but little has been identified in terms of intracellular mechanisms leading to retinal photoreceptor cell death at post-translational levels. In order to find an effective therapy for RP, we must look for underlying common mechanisms that are responsible for the development of RP, instead of designing a specific therapy for each of the RP types with different causes. Therefore, in the present study, several animal models with different causes of RP were studied, including (1)Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats with a deficit of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) function caused by rhodopsin mutation; (2) P23H rats, (3) S334ter rats, (4) photo stress rats, (5) retinal degeneration (rd) mice with a deficit of phosphodiesterase(PDE) function; and (6) cancer-associated retinopathy (CAR) model rats with a deficit of recoverin-dependent photoreceptor adaptation function. In each of these models, the following assessments were made in order to elucidate common pathological mechanisms among the models: (1) retinal function assessed by electroretinogram (ERG), (2) retinal morphology, (3) retinoid analysis, (4) rhodopsin regeneration, (5) rhodopsin phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, and (6) cytosolic cGMP levels. We found that unregulated photoreceptor adaptation processes caused by an imbalance of rhodopsin phosphorylation and dephosphorylation caused retinal dysfunction leading to photoreceptor cell death. As possible candidate drugs for normalizing these retinal dysfunctions and stopping further retinal degeneration, nilvadipine, a Ca channel blocker, retinoid derivatives, and anthocyanine were chosen and tested to determine their effect on the above animal models with

  16. Potential drug interactions in patients given antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendel Mombaque dos Santos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to investigate potential drug-drug interactions (PDDI in patients with HIV infection on antiretroviral therapy. Methods: a cross-sectional study was conducted on 161 adults with HIV infection. Clinical, socio demographic, and antiretroviral treatment data were collected. To analyze the potential drug interactions, we used the software Micromedex(r. Statistical analysis was performed by binary logistic regression, with a p-value of ≤0.05 considered statistically significant. Results: of the participants, 52.2% were exposed to potential drug-drug interactions. In total, there were 218 potential drug-drug interactions, of which 79.8% occurred between drugs used for antiretroviral therapy. There was an association between the use of five or more medications and potential drug-drug interactions (p = 0.000 and between the time period of antiretroviral therapy being over six years and potential drug-drug interactions (p < 0.00. The clinical impact was prevalent sedation and cardiotoxicity. Conclusions: the PDDI identified in this study of moderate and higher severity are events that not only affect the therapeutic response leading to toxicity in the central nervous and cardiovascular systems, but also can interfere in tests used for detection of HIV resistance to antiretroviral drugs.

  17. Drug: D01833 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D01833 Drug Benziodarone (JAN/INN); Amplivix (TN) C17H12I2O3 517.8876 518.0843 D01833.gif Antiarrhythmic... ATC code: C01DX04 map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC)

  18. Drug: D04955 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 55.gif Cardiac depressant [anti-arrhythmic] voltage-gated potassium channel (KCNH2) blocker [HSA:3757] [KO:K04905] map07037 Antiarrhy...thmic drugs map07232 Potassium channel blocking and opening drugs Target-based clas

  19. Drug: D03732 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 32.gif Cardiac depressant [anti-arrhythmic] voltage-gated potassium channel (KCNH2) blocker [HSA:3757] [KO:K04905] map07037 Antiarrhy...thmic drugs map07232 Potassium channel blocking and opening drugs Target-based clas

  20. Drug: D00358 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available C05AD01 D04AB01 N01BB02 R02AD02 S01HA07 S02DA01 Class I antiarrhythmic agent (Ib) voltage-gated sodium chann...sporter: SLC22A3 [HSA:6581] map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs map07231 Sodium channel...MICS, CLASS I AND III C01BB Antiarrhythmics, class Ib C01BB01 Lidocaine D00358 Lidocaine (JP16/USP/INN) C05

  1. Nanomaterial-based drug delivery carriers for cancer therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Tao

    2017-01-01

    This brief summarizes different types of organic and inorganic nanomaterials for drug delivery in cancer therapy. It highlights that precisely designed nanomaterials will be the next-generation therapeutic agents for cancer treatment.

  2. Drug addiction therapy. A dance to the music of time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodison, L; Schafer, H

    1999-10-21

    Dance therapy can play a useful role in the treatment and rehabilitation of women with drug addiction. It works by raising self-esteem through an improved relationship with the body, giving women the strength to help combat their habit. The benefits of dance therapy for women at the detox unit of Holloway Prison have been confirmed by prison staff.

  3. Biopolymers as transdermal drug delivery systems in dermatology therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basavaraj, K H; Johnsy, George; Navya, M A; Rashmi, R; Siddaramaiah

    2010-01-01

    The skin is considered a complex organ for drug delivery because of its structure. Drug delivery systems are designed for the controlled release of drugs through the skin into the systemic circulation, maintaining consistent efficacy and reducing the dose of the drugs and their related side effects. Transdermal drug delivery represents one of the most rapidly advancing areas of novel drug delivery. The excellent impervious nature of the skin is the greatest challenge that must be overcome for successful drug delivery. Today, polymers have been proven to be successful for long-term drug delivery applications as no single polymer can satisfy all of the requirements. Biopolymers in the field of dermal application are rare and the mechanisms that affect skin absorption are almost unknown. Biopolymers are widely used as drug delivery systems, but as such the use of biopolymers as drug delivery systems in dermatologic therapy is still in progress. Commonly used biopolymers include hydrocolloids, alginates, hydrogels, polyurethane, collagen, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), chitosan, proteins and peptides, pectin, siRNAs, and hyaluronic acid. These new and exciting methods for drug delivery are already increasing the number and quality of dermal and transdermal therapies. This article reviews current research on biopolymers and focuses on their potential as drug carriers, particularly in relation to the dermatologic aspects of their use.

  4. [Special features of biological drug therapy in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalto, Kristiina; Leinonen, Sanna; Kolho, Kaija-Leena; Lahdenne, Pekka

    2016-01-01

    Several new biological drugs, of which TNFα blockers are being used most extensively, have in recent years been adopted for the treatment of pediatric inflammatory diseases such as juvenile arthritis and associated chronic iritis, and inflammatory bowel diseases. In special situations the children will be prescribed off-label also other drugs affecting cytokines, e.g. IL-1 and IL-6 blockers. Tailoring of the treatment is possible today with the help of drug level measurements and anti-drug antibody determinations. Severe safety hazards associated with biological drug therapy in children are very rare.

  5. Drug: D00619 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available (TN); Verelan (TN) C27H38N2O4. HCl 490.2598 491.0626 D00619.gif Anti-anginal; Cardiac depressant [anti-arrhythmic...] Therapeutic category: 2129 2171 ATC code: C08DA01 Class IV antiarrhythmic agent calcium channel L ty...on: ABCB1 [HSA:5243], ABCB4 [HSA:5244], SLC22A3 [HSA:6581] map07036 Calcium channel blocking drugs map07037 Antiarrhythmic...n [BR:br08301] 2 Agents affecting individual organs 21 Cardiovascular agents 212 Antiarrhythmic agents 2129

  6. Drug: D00483 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 6H21NO2. HCl 295.1339 295.8044 D00483.gif Anti-adrenergic [beta-receptor]; Cardiac depressant [anti-arrhythmic...] Therapeutic category: 2123 2149 ATC code: C07AA05 Class II antiarrhythmic agent beta1-adrenergic recepto...enomic biomarker: CYP2D6 [HSA:1565] CYP inhibition: CYP1A2 [HSA:1544] map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs map07048... Cardiovascular agents 212 Antiarrhythmic agents 2123 Beta blockers D00483 Propranolol hydrochloride (JP16/U

  7. Drug targeting systems for cancer therapy: nanotechnological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tigli Aydin, R Seda

    2015-01-01

    Progress in cancer treatment remains challenging because of the great nature of tumor cells to be drug resistant. However, advances in the field of nanotechnology have enabled the delivery of drugs for cancer treatment by passively and actively targeting to tumor cells with nanoparticles. Dramatic improvements in nanotherapeutics, as applied to cancer, have rapidly accelerated clinical investigations. In this review, drug-targeting systems using nanotechnology and approved and clinically investigated nanoparticles for cancer therapy are discussed. In addition, the rationale for a nanotechnological approach to cancer therapy is emphasized because of its promising advances in the treatment of cancer patients.

  8. Azimilide dihydrochloride: a new class III anti-arrhythmic agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrol, R; Page, R L

    2000-11-01

    Azimilide dihydrochloride (Stedicor) is a new class III anti-arrhythmic agent that is being developed by Proctor & Gamble to treat supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias. Development of this agent is being undertaken due to the high prevalence of atrial fibrillation and the lack of satisfactory therapy for this arrhythmia, along with the desire to develop therapy to reduce the risk of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias in patients following myocardial infarction. The mechanism of action of azimilide is to block both the slowly conducting (I(Ks)) and rapidly conducting (I(Kr)) rectifier potassium currents in cardiac cells. This differs from other class III agents that block I(Kr) exclusively or in combination with sodium, calcium, or transient outward (I(to)) potassium current channels. Azimilide is distinguished by a relative lack of reverse use-dependence, excellent oral absorption, no need for dose titration, an option for out-patient initiation, no need for adjustment associated with renal or liver failure and a lack of interaction with warfarin or digoxin. It carries some risk of torsade de pointes and rarely, neutropoenia. Azimilide has shown dose-related efficacy in prolonging the time to recurrence of atrial fibrillation. A large trial examining the impact of azimilide on mortality in high-risk patients following myocardial infarction has completed enrolment and should yield data in the next couple of years and further studies are planned. Even if this trial fails to show a survival benefit, a neutral effect on mortality will make the agent attractive for atrial arrhythmias.

  9. Combination therapy: the propitious rationale for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phougat, Neetu; Khatri, Savita; Singh, Anu; Dangi, Mrridula; Kumar, Manish; Dabur, Rajesh; Chhillar, Anil Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic options for many infections are extremely limited and at crisis point. We run the risk of entering a second pre-antibiotic era. There had been no miracle drug for the patients infected by resistant microbial pathogens. Most of the very few new drugs under development have problems with their toxicity, or pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. We are already decades behind in the discovery, characterization and development of new antimicrobials. In that scenario, we could not imagine surviving without newer and effective antimicrobial agents. Bacteria have been the champions of evolution and are still evolving continuously, where they pose serious challenges for humans. Along with the crisis of evolving resistance, the condition is made worst by the meager drug pipeline for new antimicrobials. Despite ongoing efforts only 2 new antibiotics (Telavancin in 2009 and Ceftaroline fosamil in 2010) have been approved since 2009 pipeline status report of Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA). Recent approval of new combination based antiviral drugs such as Stribild (combination of four drugs for HIV treatment) and Menhibrix (combination vaccine to prevent meningococcal disease and Haemophilus influenzae type b in children) proves that combination therapy is still the most promising approach to combat the ever evolving pathogens. Combination therapy involves the drug repurposing and regrouping of the existing antimicrobial agents to provide a synergistic approach for management of infectious diseases. This review article is an effort to highlight the challenges in new drug development and potential of combination drug therapy to deal with them.

  10. Effects of Music Therapy on Drug Therapy of Adult Psychiatric Outpatients: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degli Stefani, Mario; Biasutti, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Framed in the patients' engagement perspective, the current study aims to determine the effects of group music therapy in addition to drug care in comparison with drug care in addition to other non-expressive group activities in the treatment of psychiatric outpatients. Method: Participants (n = 27) with ICD-10 diagnoses of F20 (schizophrenia), F25 (schizoaffective disorders), F31 (bipolar affective disorder), F32 (depressive episode), and F60 (specific personality disorders) were randomized to receive group music therapy plus standard care (48 weekly sessions of 2 h) or standard care only. The clinical measures included dosages of neuroleptics, benzodiazepines, mood stabilizers, and antidepressants. Results: The participants who received group music therapy demonstrated greater improvement in drug dosage with respect to neuroleptics than those who did not receive group music therapy. Antidepressants had an increment for both groups that was significant only for the control group. Benzodiazepines and mood stabilizers did not show any significant change in either group. Conclusion: Group music therapy combined with standard drug care was effective for controlling neuroleptic drug dosages in adult psychiatric outpatients who received group music therapy. We discussed the likely applications of group music therapy in psychiatry and the possible contribution of music therapy in improving the psychopathological condition of adult outpatients. In addition, the implications for the patient-centered perspective were also discussed.

  11. Effects of music therapy on drug therapy of adult psychiatric outpatients: A pilot randomised controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Degli Stefani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Framed in the patients’ engagement perspective, the current study aims to determine the effects of group music therapy in addition to drug care in comparison with drug care in the treatment of psychiatric outpatients. Method: Participants (n = 27 with ICD-10 diagnoses of F20 (schizophrenia, F25 (schizoaffective disorders, F31 (bipolar affective disorder, F32 (depressive episode and F60 (specific personality disorders were randomised to receive group music therapy plus standard care (48 weekly sessions of two hours or standard care only. The clinical measures included dosages of neuroleptics, benzodiazepines, mood stabilisers and antidepressants. Results: The participants who received group music therapy demonstrated greater improvement in drug dosage relative to neuroleptics than those who did not receive group music therapy. Antidepressants had an increment for both groups that was significant only for the control group. Benzodiazepines and mood stabilisers did not show any significant change in either group. Conclusions: Group music therapy combined with standard drug care is effective for controlling neuroleptic drug dosages in adult psychiatric outpatients who received group music therapy. We discuss the likely applications of group music therapy in psychiatry and the possible contribution of music therapy in improving the psychopathological condition of adult outpatients. In addition, the implications for the patient-centred perspective were also discussed.

  12. Effects of Music Therapy on Drug Therapy of Adult Psychiatric Outpatients: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degli Stefani, Mario; Biasutti, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Framed in the patients’ engagement perspective, the current study aims to determine the effects of group music therapy in addition to drug care in comparison with drug care in addition to other non-expressive group activities in the treatment of psychiatric outpatients. Method: Participants (n = 27) with ICD-10 diagnoses of F20 (schizophrenia), F25 (schizoaffective disorders), F31 (bipolar affective disorder), F32 (depressive episode), and F60 (specific personality disorders) were randomized to receive group music therapy plus standard care (48 weekly sessions of 2 h) or standard care only. The clinical measures included dosages of neuroleptics, benzodiazepines, mood stabilizers, and antidepressants. Results: The participants who received group music therapy demonstrated greater improvement in drug dosage with respect to neuroleptics than those who did not receive group music therapy. Antidepressants had an increment for both groups that was significant only for the control group. Benzodiazepines and mood stabilizers did not show any significant change in either group. Conclusion: Group music therapy combined with standard drug care was effective for controlling neuroleptic drug dosages in adult psychiatric outpatients who received group music therapy. We discussed the likely applications of group music therapy in psychiatry and the possible contribution of music therapy in improving the psychopathological condition of adult outpatients. In addition, the implications for the patient-centered perspective were also discussed. PMID:27774073

  13. Drug therapy during pregnancy: implications for dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouanounou, A; Haas, D A

    2016-04-22

    Pregnancy is accompanied by various physiological and physical changes, including those found in the cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, renal and haematological systems. These alterations in the pregnant patient may potentially affect drug pharmacokinetics. Also, pharmacotherapy presents a unique matter due to the potential teratogenic effects of certain drugs. Although medications prescribed by dentists are generally safe during pregnancy, some modifications may be needed. In this article we will discuss the changes in the physiology during pregnancy and its impact on drug therapy. Specific emphasis will be given to the drugs commonly given by dentists, namely, local anaesthetics, analgesics, antibiotics and sedatives.

  14. Drug: D08443 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available gif beta-Adrenergic blocking Same as: C07407 ATC code: C07AA05 Class II antiarrhythmic agent beta1-adrenergi...A:1551] Genomic biomarker: CYP2D6 [HSA:1565] CYP inhibition: CYP1A2 [HSA:1544] map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs

  15. Monitoring drug therapy in hospitalized patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijtendaal, E.V.

    2014-01-01

    Prevention of adverse drug events that may result from medication errors is challenging. The safety of medication treatment is mostly determined on an average population and medication errors may be prevented when pharmacotherapy is better tailored to the individualized needs of the hospitalized pat

  16. Spiritual self-schema therapy, drug abuse, and HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcotte, David; Avants, S Kelly; Margolin, Arthur

    2003-01-01

    This case report describes the use of Spiritual Self-Schema (3-S) therapy in the treatment of an HIV-positive inner-city drug user maintained on methadone and referred for additional treatment due to unremitting cocaine use. 3-S therapy is a manual-guided intervention based on cognitive self-schema theory. Its goal is to help the patient create, elaborate, and make accessible a cognitive schema--the "spiritual" self-schema-that is incompatible with drug use and other HIV risk behaviors. 3-S therapy facilitates a cognitive shift from the habitual activation of the "addict" self-schema, with its drug-related cognitions, scripts and action plans, to the "spiritual" self-schema, with its associated repertoire of harm reduction beliefs and behaviors.

  17. Multifaceted Applications of Chitosan in Cancer Drug Delivery and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anish Babu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan is a versatile polysaccharide of biological origin. Due to the biocompatible and biodegradable nature of chitosan, it is intensively utilized in biomedical applications in scaffold engineering as an absorption enhancer, and for bioactive and controlled drug release. In cancer therapy, chitosan has multifaceted applications, such as assisting in gene delivery and chemotherapeutic delivery, and as an immunoadjuvant for vaccines. The present review highlights the recent applications of chitosan and chitosan derivatives in cancer therapy.

  18. Drug Carrier for Photodynamic Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilahun Ayane Debele

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a non-invasive combinatorial therapeutic modality using light, photosensitizer (PS, and oxygen used for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. When PSs in cells are exposed to specific wavelengths of light, they are transformed from the singlet ground state (S0 to an excited singlet state (S1–Sn, followed by intersystem crossing to an excited triplet state (T1. The energy transferred from T1 to biological substrates and molecular oxygen, via type I and II reactions, generates reactive oxygen species, (1O2, H2O2, O2*, HO*, which causes cellular damage that leads to tumor cell death through necrosis or apoptosis. The solubility, selectivity, and targeting of photosensitizers are important factors that must be considered in PDT. Nano-formulating PSs with organic and inorganic nanoparticles poses as potential strategy to satisfy the requirements of an ideal PDT system. In this review, we summarize several organic and inorganic PS carriers that have been studied to enhance the efficacy of photodynamic therapy against cancer.

  19. [The treatment of atherosclerosis--drug therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, H; Takahashi, Y

    1993-08-01

    Drug treatment against atherosclerosis has been evaluated recently in many epidemiological studies. Lipid Research Clinics Group convincingly reported in a large scale design that anion exchange resin effectively reduced blood cholesterol level and concomitantly decreased the events of coronary heart disease. Subsequently, anion exchange resin with or without combined administration of niacin or statin was found to inhibit the progression of coronary atherosclerotic lesions in FATS, SCOR, CLAS and STARS. Fenofibrate also successfully reduced the coronary artery narrowings. Based on these intervention studies, several hypocholesterolemic agents are definitely effective in the treatment of coronary atherosclerosis.

  20. Selection of drug therapy in stable angina pectoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savonitto, S; Ardissino, D

    1998-05-01

    Drug therapy in stable angina has two aims: the prevention of major cardiac events (such as unstable angina, myocardial infarction, or death) and the control of chest pain and transient myocardial ischemia. Given the low incidence of major cardiac events in patients with stable angina, primary preventive studies are scarce because they require a large sample size and long-term follow-up. Thus far, only aspirin and some lipid-lowering agents have been shown to be effective for this purpose. Antiischemic drugs reduce the imbalance between myocardial oxygen demand and supply, either by reducing oxygen consumption or by increasing coronary blood flow. The ideal approach would be to target drug therapy against the ischemia-inducing factor in each patient. The characteristics of anginal symptoms do not seem to help in selecting medical therapy, whereas a standard exercise test and a provocative test of coronary vasoconstriction may provide useful information in order to select patients who will preferentially respond to either a beta-blocker or a calcium antagonist. The combination of two or more anti-ischemic drugs does not seem to be any more effective than an adequately titrated monotherapy in reducing the occurrence of myocardial ischemia in individual patients. Combination therapy in stable coronary artery disease should include an individually selected and optimally titrated anti-ischemic agent and aspirin, with the addition of a lipid-lowering agent in patients with even mild hypercholesterolemia.

  1. Drug therapy of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: Current trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash De Sousa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is a developmental disorder with an age onset prior to 7 years. Children with ADHD have significantly lower ability to focus and sustain attention and also score higher on impulsivity and hyperactivity. Stimulants, such as methylphenidate, have remained the mainstay of ADHD treatment for decades with evidence supporting their use. However, recent years have seen emergence of newer drugs and drug delivery systems, like osmotic release oral systems and transdermal patches, to mention a few. The use of nonstimulant drugs like atomoxetine and various other drugs, such as a-agonists, and a few antidepressants, being used in an off-label manner, have added to the pharmacotherapy of ADHD. This review discusses current trends in drug therapy of ADHD and highlights the promise pharmacogenomics may hold in the future.

  2. Acute migraine therapy: the newer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenen, J

    1997-06-01

    In 1996, our knowledge of acute antimigraine therapy expanded in three major areas. First, large surveys have confirmed the remarkable efficacy profile of sumatriptan in clinical practice. No satisfying clinical, pharmacokinetic or genetic explanations were found for its major shortcomings: nonresponders, headache recurrence and noncardiac chest symptoms. Second, the novel 5-HT1B/D agonists zolmitriptan (311C90), rizatriptan (MK-462), eletriptan (UK-116,044), avitriptan (BMS-180048) and alniditan (R091274) were all proved superior to placebo for attack treatment, but their advantages over sumatriptan are yet to be analysed in more detail. A higher lipophilicity explains (except for alniditan) their greater oral bioavailability and better central nervous system penetration. A central action now proved experimentally in animals and in humans for 5-HT1B/D agonists such as zolmitriptan may be advantageous for the antimigraine efficacy, but it could also increase sedation. Third, an endothelin (Ro470203, bosentan) and a neurokinin 1 (RPR100893) receptor antagonist were found to be ineffective in migraine. Both compounds are potent inhibitors of neurogenic plasma extravasation in rat dura mater, which might suggest that this pharmacological property does not necessarily predict efficacy in aborting migraine attacks.

  3. Drug therapy in patients with Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Thomas

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Parkinson`s disease (PD is a progressive, disabling neurodegenerative disorder with onset of motor and non-motor features. Both reduce quality of life of PD patients and cause caregiver burden. This review aims to provide a survey of possible therapeutic options for treatment of motor and non motor symptoms of PD and to discuss their relation to each other. MAO-B-Inhibitors, NMDA antagonists, dopamine agonists and levodopa with its various application modes mainly improve the dopamine associated motor symptoms in PD. This armentarium of PD drugs only partially influences the onset and occurrence of non motor symptoms. These PD features predominantly result from non dopaminergic neurodegeneration. Autonomic features, such as seborrhea, hyperhidrosis, orthostatic syndrome, salivation, bladder dysfunction, gastrointestinal disturbances, and neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as depression, sleep disorders, psychosis, cognitive dysfunction with impaired execution and impulse control may appear. Drug therapy of these non motor symptoms complicates long-term PD drug therapy due to possible occurrence of drug interactions, - side effects, and altered pharmacokinetic behaviour of applied compounds. Dopamine substituting compounds themselves may contribute to onset of these non motor symptoms. This complicates the differentiation from the disease process itself and influences therapeutic options, which are often limited because of additional morbidity with necessary concomitant drug therapy.

  4. Management of noninfectious posterior uveitis with intravitreal drug therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hui Yi; Agarwal, Aniruddha; Lee, Cecilia S; Chhablani, Jay; Gupta, Vishali; Khatri, Manoj; Nirmal, Jayabalan; Pavesio, Carlos; Agrawal, Rupesh

    2016-01-01

    Uveitis is an important cause of vision loss worldwide due to its sight-threatening complications, especially cystoid macular edema, as well as choroidal neovascularization, macular ischemia, cataract, and glaucoma. Systemic corticosteroids are the mainstay of therapy for noninfectious posterior uveitis; however, various systemic side effects can occur. Intravitreal medication achieves a therapeutic level in the vitreous while minimizing systemic complications and is thus used as an exciting alternative. Corticosteroids, antivascular endothelial growth factors, immunomodulators such as methotrexate and sirolimus, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are currently available for intravitreal therapy. This article reviews the existing literature for efficacy and safety of these various options for intravitreal drug therapy for the management of noninfectious uveitis (mainly intermediate, posterior, and panuveitis).

  5. Quantifying the pharmacology of antimalarial drug combination therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Ian M.; Hodel, Eva Maria; Kay, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Most current antimalarial drugs are combinations of an artemisinin plus a ‘partner’ drug from another class, and are known as artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs). They are the frontline drugs in treating human malaria infections. They also have a public-health role as an essential component of recent, comprehensive scale-ups of malaria interventions and containment efforts conceived as part of longer term malaria elimination efforts. Recent reports that resistance has arisen to artemisinins has caused considerable concern. We investigate the likely impact of artemisinin resistance by quantifying the contribution artemisinins make to the overall therapeutic capacity of ACTs. We achieve this using a simple, easily understood, algebraic approach and by more sophisticated pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analyses of drug action; the two approaches gave consistent results. Surprisingly, the artemisinin component typically makes a negligible contribution (≪0.0001%) to the therapeutic capacity of the most widely used ACTs and only starts to make a significant contribution to therapeutic outcome once resistance has started to evolve to the partner drugs. The main threat to antimalarial drug effectiveness and control comes from resistance evolving to the partner drugs. We therefore argue that public health policies be re-focussed to maximise the likely long-term effectiveness of the partner drugs. PMID:27604175

  6. Echinocandins: A ray of hope in antifungal drug therapy

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    Grover Neeta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infections are on the rise. Amphotericin B and azole antifungals have been the mainstay of antifungal therapy so far. The high incidence of infusion related toxicity and nephrotoxicity with amphotericin B and the emergence of fluconazole resistant strains of Candida glabrata egged on the search for alternatives. Echinocandins are a new class of antifungal drugs that act by inhibition of β (1, 3-D- glucan synthase, a key enzyme necessary for integrity of the fungal cell wall. Caspofungin was the first drug in this class to be approved. It is indicated for esophageal candidiasis, candidemia, invasive candidiasis, empirical therapy in febrile neutropenia and invasive aspergillosis. Response rates are comparable to those of amphotericin B and fluconazole. Micafungin is presently approved for esophageal candidiasis, for prophylaxis of candida infections in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT and in disseminated candidiasis and candidemia. The currently approved indications for anidulafungin are esophageal candidiasis, candidemia and invasive candidiasis. The incidence of infusion related adverse effects and nephrotoxicity is much lower than with amphotericin B. The main adverse effect is hepatotoxicity and derangement of serum transaminases. Liver function may need to be monitored. They are, however, safer in renal impairment. Even though a better pharmacoeconomical choice than amphotericin B, the higher cost of these drugs in comparison to azole antifungals is likely to limit their use to azole resistant cases of candidial infections and as salvage therapy in invasive aspergillosis rather than as first line drugs.

  7. [Drug therapy of pain: reason overwhelmed by emotion?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiler, R; Dudler, J

    2013-10-09

    Successful pain management represents a daily medical challenge for in- and outpatients. The analysis of Swiss drug unit sales data between year 2000 and 2010 of an array of selected analgesic drugs (non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), paracetamol, metamizole, and opioids) identified current trends. While the overall number of treatment-days with analgesics has markedly and steadily increased and opioid usage may be considered as consistent with recently widened indications to non-tumor pain, the use of NSAIDs (whether COX-2-selective or not) entered stagnation and usage of the least well documented substances (paracetamol and metamizole) has more than decupled. These observations are put into perspective with the findings of a brief literature review aimed at summarizing the latest research developments in the field of analgesic drug therapy.

  8. Salvage Therapy of Multiple Myeloma: The New Generation Drugs

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    Alessandra Romano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During the past decade, overall results of treatment of multiple myeloma (MM have been improved and survival curves are now significantly better with respect to those obtained with historical treatment. These improvements are linked to a deeper knowledge of the biology of disease and to the introduction in clinical practice of drugs with different mechanism of action such as proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs. However, MM remains in most cases an incurable disease. For patients who relapse after treatment with novel agents, the prognosis is dismal and new drugs and therapeutic strategies are required for continued disease control. In this review, we summarize new insights in salvage therapy for relapsed/refractory MM as emerging from recent clinical trials exploring the activity of bendamustine, new generation proteasome inhibitors, novel IMiDs, monoclonal antibodies, and drugs interfering with growth pathways.

  9. Pulmonary fibrosis associated with psychotropic drug therapy: a case report

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    Thornton Clare

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Sertraline and Risperidone are commonly used psychotropic drugs. Sertraline has previously been associated with eosinopilic pneumonia. Neither drug is recognised as a cause of diffuse fibrotic lung disease. Our report represents the first such case. Case Presentation We describe the case of a 33 year old Asian male with chronic schizophrenia who had been treated for three years with sertraline and risperidone. He presented to hospital in respiratory failure following a six month history of progressive breathlessness. High resolution CT scan demonstrated diffuse pulmonary fibrosis admixed with patchy areas of consolidation. Because the aetiology of this man's diffuse parenchymal lung disease remained unclear a surgical lung biopsy was undertaken. Histological assessment disclosed widespread fibrosis with marked eosinophillic infiltration and associated organising pneumonia - features all highly suggestive of drug induced lung disease. Following withdrawal of both sertraline and risperidone and initiation of corticosteroid therapy the patient's respiratory failure resolved and three years later he remains well albeit limited by breathlessness on heavy exertion. Conclusion Drug induced lung disease can be rapidly progressive and if drug exposure continues may result in respiratory failure and death. Prompt recognition is critical as drug withdrawal may result in marked resolution of disease. This case highlights sertraline and risperidone as drugs that may, in susceptible individuals, cause diffuse pulmonary fibrosis.

  10. Repurposing FDA-approved drugs for anti-aging therapies.

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    Snell, Terry W; Johnston, Rachel K; Srinivasan, Bharath; Zhou, Hongyi; Gao, Mu; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2016-11-01

    There is great interest in drugs that are capable of modulating multiple aging pathways, thereby delaying the onset and progression of aging. Effective strategies for drug development include the repurposing of existing drugs already approved by the FDA for human therapy. FDA approved drugs have known mechanisms of action and have been thoroughly screened for safety. Although there has been extensive scientific activity in repurposing drugs for disease therapy, there has been little testing of these drugs for their effects on aging. The pool of FDA approved drugs therefore represents a large reservoir of drug candidates with substantial potential for anti-aging therapy. In this paper we employ FINDSITE(comb), a powerful ligand homology modeling program, to identify binding partners for proteins produced by temperature sensing genes that have been implicated in aging. This list of drugs with potential to modulate aging rates was then tested experimentally for lifespan and healthspan extension using a small invertebrate model. Three protein targets of the rotifer Brachionus manjavacas corresponding to products of the transient receptor potential gene 7, ribosomal protein S6 polypeptide 2 gene, or forkhead box C gene, were screened against a compound library consisting of DrugBank drugs including 1347 FDA approved, non-nutraceutical molecules. Twenty nine drugs ranked in the top 1 % for binding to each target were subsequently included in our experimental analysis. Continuous exposure of rotifers to 1 µM naproxen significantly extended rotifer mean lifespan by 14 %. We used three endpoints to estimate rotifer health: swimming speed (mobility proxy), reproduction (overall vitality), and mitochondria activity (cellular senescence proxy). The natural decline in swimming speed with aging was more gradual when rotifers were exposed to three drugs, so that on day 6, mean swimming speed of females was 1.19 mm/s for naproxen (P = 0.038), 1.20 for fludarabine (P = 0

  11. Biomarker-guided repurposing of chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer therapy: a novel strategy in drug development

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    Jan eStenvang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a leading cause of mortality worldwide and matters are only set to worsen as its incidence continues to rise. Traditional approaches to combat cancer include improved prevention, early diagnosis, optimized surgery, development of novel drugs and honing regimens of existing anti-cancer drugs. Although discovery and development of novel and effective anti-cancer drugs is a major research area, it is well known that oncology drug development is a lengthy process, extremely costly and with high attrition rates. Furthermore, those drugs that do make it through the drug development mill are often quite expensive, laden with severe side-effects and, unfortunately, to date, have only demonstrated minimal increases in overall survival. Therefore, a strong interest has emerged to identify approved non-cancer drugs that possess anti-cancer activity, thus shortcutting the development process. This research strategy is commonly known as drug repurposing or drug repositioning and provides a faster path to the clinics. We have developed and implemented a modification of the standard drug repurposing strategy that we review here; rather than investigating target-promiscuous non-cancer drugs for possible anti-cancer activity, we focus on the discovery of novel cancer indications for already approved chemotherapeutic anti-cancer drugs. Clinical implementation of this strategy is normally commenced at clinical phase II trials and includes pre-treated patients. As the response rates to any non-standard chemotherapeutic drug will be relatively low in such a patient cohort it is a pre-requisite that such testing is based on predictive biomarkers. This review describes our strategy of biomarker-guided repurposing of chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer therapy, taking the repurposing of topoisomerase I inhibitors and topoisomerase I as a potential predictive biomarker as case in point.

  12. Drug: D00631 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available on: CYP2D6 [HSA:1565] map07036 Calcium channel blocking drugs map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs map07231 Sodium ...ans 21 Cardiovascular agents 212 Antiarrhythmic agents 2129 Others D00631 Bepridi...C08EA02 Class IV antiarrhythmic agent calcium channel L type blocker [HSA:775 776 778 779] [KO:K04850 K04851...scor (TN) C24H34N2O. HCl. H2O 420.2544 421.0158 D00631.gif Vasodilator Therapeutic category: 2129 ATC code:

  13. [Multimorbidity and multi-target-therapy with herbal drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saller, R; Rostock, M

    2012-12-12

    The active components of herbal drugs and substances are pleiotropic multi-ingredient compounds with multitarget properties including antiinflammatory effects. A pleiotropic inhibition of inflammation could play an important role in mutlimorbide patients as an attempt of prevention or retardation of metastasis. A large number of experimental data for European and non-European herbal drugs as well as various herbal drug combinations suggest such a possibility. Despite the so far small number of clinical studies, such an experimental herbal treatment could appear to be reasonable and acceptable, provided that there are data available on quality and safety of these herbal drugs by treatments of patients with various diseases. Besides, herbal drugs and substances play a growing role the treatment of patients with multimorbidity. Many of these herbal drugs have antiinflammatory effects beside their proved symptomatic efficacy in a lot of other diseases. The specific selection of herbal drugs that are efficacious in specific indications and additionally showed antiinflammatory effects offers the possibility of simultaneous antiinflammatory and specific efficacy. St. John's Wort and milk thistle belong to the oldest and to the best experimentally and clinically examined herbal remedies. The spectrum of internal and external uses of Hypercum perforatum as a multicompound herbal drug includes functional gastro-intestinal complaint and illness, skin disease, mucosal lesion, superficial injury, depressive upset and depression, somatoform disorders, restlessness, nervosity, convalescence, exhaustion and sleep disturbances respectively. The plurivalent character of the multicompound even enables a broad spectrum of activity. This might justify to prefer St. John's Wort to other drugs in a wide range of treatments: In multimorbide patients with depression or in depressive patients with coronary heart disease the anti-inflammatory effects could mean an additional advantage

  14. Therapeutic Management of Familial Hypercholesterolemia: Current and Emerging Drug Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Roshni S; Scopelliti, Emily M; Savelloni, Julie

    2015-12-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a genetic disorder characterized by significantly elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) concentrations that result from mutations of the LDL receptor, apolipoprotein B (apo B-100), and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9). Early and aggressive treatment can prevent premature atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in these high-risk patients. Given that the cardiovascular consequences of FH are similar to typical hypercholesterolemia, traditional therapies are utilized to decrease LDL-C levels. Patients with FH should receive statins as first-line treatment; high-potency statins at high doses are often required. Despite the use of statins, additional treatments are often necessary to achieve appropriate LDL-C lowering in this patient population. Novel drug therapies that target the pathophysiologic defects of the condition are continuously emerging. Contemporary therapies including mipomersen (Kynamro, Genzyme), an oligonucleotide inhibitor of apo B-100 synthesis; lomitapide (Juxtapid, Aegerion), a microsomal triglyceride transfer protein inhibitor; and alirocumab (Praluent, Sanofi-Aventis/Regeneron) and evolocumab (Repatha, Amgen), PCSK9 inhibitors, are currently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in FH. This review highlights traditional as well as emerging contemporary therapies with supporting clinical data to evaluate current recommendations and discuss the future direction of FH management.

  15. Repositioning FDA-Approved Drugs in Combination with Epigenetic Drugs to Reprogram Colon Cancer Epigenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynal, Noël J-M; Da Costa, Elodie M; Lee, Justin T; Gharibyan, Vazganush; Ahmed, Saira; Zhang, Hanghang; Sato, Takahiro; Malouf, Gabriel G; Issa, Jean-Pierre J

    2017-02-01

    Epigenetic drugs, such as DNA methylation inhibitors (DNMTi) or histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), are approved in monotherapy for cancer treatment. These drugs reprogram gene expression profiles, reactivate tumor suppressor genes (TSG) producing cancer cell differentiation and apoptosis. Epigenetic drugs have been shown to synergize with other epigenetic drugs or various anticancer drugs. To discover new molecular entities that enhance epigenetic therapy, we performed a high-throughput screening using FDA-approved libraries in combination with DNMTi or HDACi. As a screening model, we used YB5 system, a human colon cancer cell line, which contains an epigenetically silenced CMV-GFP locus, mimicking TSG silencing in cancer. CMV-GFP reactivation is triggered by DNMTi or HDACi and responds synergistically to DNMTi/HDACi combination, which phenocopies TSG reactivation upon epigenetic therapy. GFP fluorescence was used as a quantitative readout for epigenetic activity. We discovered that 45 FDA-approved drugs (4% of all drugs tested) in our FDA-approved libraries enhanced DNMTi and HDACi activity, mainly belonging to anticancer and antiarrhythmic drug classes. Transcriptome analysis revealed that combination of decitabine (DNMTi) with the antiarrhythmic proscillaridin A produced profound gene expression reprogramming, which was associated with downregulation of 153 epigenetic regulators, including two known oncogenes in colon cancer (SYMD3 and KDM8). Also, we identified about 85 FDA-approved drugs that antagonized DNMTi and HDACi activity through cytotoxic mechanisms, suggesting detrimental drug interactions for patients undergoing epigenetic therapy. Overall, our drug screening identified new combinations of epigenetic and FDA-approved drugs, which can be rapidly implemented into clinical trials. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(2); 397-407. ©2016 AACR.

  16. A new triterpene and an antiarrhythmic liriodendrin from Pittosporum brevicalyx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chun; Li, Bo-Gang; Gao, Xiao-Ping; Qi, Hua-Yi; Zhang, Guo-Lin

    2010-12-01

    A new triterpene, 21-O-senecioyl-R(1)-barrigenol (1) and 13 known compounds were isolated from the ethanol extracts of the leaves and bark of Pittosporum brevicalyx (Oliv.) Gagnep. Their structures were elucidated based on spectral data. The antiarrhythmic action of one furofuran lignan, liriodendrin (2), was tested on a model of CaCl(2)-induced arrhythmia and compared with the effect of verapamil. The prophylactic administration of liriodendrin (2) was effective in prolonging latency of arrhythmia and reducing the occurrence of ventricular fibrillation from 75% to 25%. The overall mortality rate was significantly reduced by the prophylactic administration of liriodendrin from 87.5% to 25%. The antiarrhythmic effect of liriodendrin (5.0 mg/kg) was similar to that of verapamil (1.05 mg/kg). Thus, liriodendrin may be a potent suppressor of CaCl(2)-induced arrhythmias.

  17. Nanoengineered drug delivery systems for enhancing antibiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalhapure, Rahul S; Suleman, Nadia; Mocktar, Chunderika; Seedat, Nasreen; Govender, Thirumala

    2015-03-01

    Formulation scientists are recognizing nanoengineered drug delivery systems as an effective strategy to overcome limitations associated with antibiotic drug therapy. Antibiotics encapsulated into nanodelivery systems will contribute to improved management of patients with various infectious diseases and to overcoming the serious global burden of antibiotic resistance. An extensive review of several antibiotic-loaded nanocarriers that have been formulated to target drugs to infectious sites, achieve controlled drug release profiles, and address formulation challenges, such as low-drug entrapment efficiencies, poor solubility and stability is presented in this paper. The physicochemical properties and the in vitro/in vivo performances of various antibiotic-loaded delivery systems, such as polymeric nanoparticles, micelles, dendrimers, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles, nanohybirds, nanofibers/scaffolds, nanosheets, nanoplexes, and nanotubes/horn/rods and nanoemulsions, are highlighted and evaluated. Future studies that will be essential to optimize formulation and commercialization of these antibiotic-loaded nanosystems are also identified. The review presented emphasizes the significant formulation progress achieved and potential that novel nanoengineered antibiotic drug delivery systems have for enhancing the treatment of patients with a range of infections.

  18. Protein nanoparticles as drug delivery carriers for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Wang, Liying; Chen, Yi Charlie; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles have increasingly been used for a variety of applications, most notably for the delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. A large number of nanoparticle drug delivery systems have been developed for cancer treatment and various materials have been explored as drug delivery agents to improve the therapeutic efficacy and safety of anticancer drugs. Natural biomolecules such as proteins are an attractive alternative to synthetic polymers which are commonly used in drug formulations because of their safety. In general, protein nanoparticles offer a number of advantages including biocompatibility and biodegradability. They can be prepared under mild conditions without the use of toxic chemicals or organic solvents. Moreover, due to their defined primary structure, protein-based nanoparticles offer various possibilities for surface modifications including covalent attachment of drugs and targeting ligands. In this paper, we review the most significant advancements in protein nanoparticle technology and their use in drug delivery arena. We then examine the various sources of protein materials that have been used successfully for the construction of protein nanoparticles as well as their methods of preparation. Finally, we discuss the applications of protein nanoparticles in cancer therapy.

  19. Chitosan in Mucoadhesive Drug Delivery: Focus on Local Vaginal Therapy

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    Toril Andersen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucoadhesive drug therapy destined for localized drug treatment is gaining increasing importance in today’s drug development. Chitosan, due to its known biodegradability, bioadhesiveness and excellent safety profile offers means to improve mucosal drug therapy. We have used chitosan as mucoadhesive polymer to develop liposomes able to ensure prolonged residence time at vaginal site. Two types of mucoadhesive liposomes, namely the chitosan-coated liposomes and chitosan-containing liposomes, where chitosan is both embedded and surface-available, were made of soy phosphatidylcholine with entrapped fluorescence markers of two molecular weights, FITC-dextran 4000 and 20,000, respectively. Both liposomal types were characterized for their size distribution, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency and the in vitro release profile, and compared to plain liposomes. The proof of chitosan being both surface-available as well as embedded into the liposomes in the chitosan-containing liposomes was found. The capability of the surface-available chitosan to interact with the model porcine mucin was confirmed for both chitosan-containing and chitosan-coated liposomes implying potential mucoadhesive behavior. Chitosan-containing liposomes were shown to be superior in respect to the simplicity of preparation, FITC-dextran load, mucoadhesiveness and in vitro release and are expected to ensure prolonged residence time on the vaginal mucosa providing localized sustained release of entrapped model substances.

  20. Drug therapy in autism: a present and future perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Baldeep; Prakash, Ajay; Sewal, Rakesh K; Medhi, Bikash; Modi, Manish

    2012-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder, with a multifactorial etiology, characterized by severe abnormalities in communications, social awareness and skills, and the presence of restrictive and stereotyped patterns of behaviors. It is traditionally considered a "static" encephalopathic disorder without any specific cure and few effective biomedical interventions. There are various factors which are involved in the etiopathogenesis of autism or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) such as impaired immune responses, neuroinflammation, abnormal neurotransmission, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, environmental toxins and stressors. The autism is often associated with a number of genetic disorders such as fragile X syndrome, tuberous sclerosis, epilepsy and Down syndrome. The recent approaches to autism treatment included various non-pharmacological and pharmacological therapy such as food supplementation, detoxification, treatment of neuroinflammation, immunologic treatments and psychotropic medications, which are found to be effective in treating various behavioral symptoms of autism. In current practice, there is no curative treatment for autism but the recommended treatment for autism involves educational therapies: speech therapy, sensory integration therapy, auditory therapy. There are classes of different pharmacological agents which are found to be effective in improving behavioral symptoms of ASD such as neurotransmitter reuptake inhibitors (fluoxetine), tricyclic antidepressants (imipramine), anticonvulsants (lamotrigine), atypical antipsychotics (clozapine), acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (rivastigmine), etc. New classes of drugs with novel mechanisms of action should be there so that this disorder will become less prevalent in the future.

  1. Subcutaneous implants for long-acting drug therapy in laboratory animals may generate unintended drug reservoirs

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    Michael Guarnieri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Long-acting therapy in laboratory animals offers advantages over the current practice of 2-3 daily drug injections. Yet little is known about the disintegration of biodegradable drug implants in rodents. Objective: Compare bioavailability of buprenorphine with the biodegradation of lipid-encapsulated subcutaneous drug pellets. Methods: Pharmacokinetic and histopathology studies were conducted in BALB/c female mice implanted with cholesterol-buprenorphine drug pellets. Results: Drug levels are below the level of detection (0.5 ng/mL plasma within 4-5 days of implant. However, necroscopy revealed that interstitial tissues begin to seal implants within a week. Visual inspection of the implant site revealed no evidence of inflammation or edema associated with the cholesterol-drug residue. Chemical analyses demonstrated that the residues contained 10-13% of the initial opiate dose for at least two weeks post implant. Discussion: The results demonstrate that biodegradable scaffolds can become sequestered in the subcutaneous space. Conclusion: Drug implants can retain significant and unintended reservoirs of drugs.

  2. Update on the Genetic Polymorphisms of Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes in Antiepileptic Drug Therapy

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    Junji Saruwatari

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Genetic polymorphisms in the genes that encode drug-metabolizing enzymes are implicated in the inter-individual variability in the pharmacokinetics and pharmaco-dynamics of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs. However, the clinical impact of these polymorphisms on AED therapy still remains controversial. The defective alleles of cytochrome P450 (CYP 2C9 and/or CYP2C19 could affect not only the pharmacokinetics, but also the pharmacodynamics of phenytoin therapy. CYP2C19 deficient genotypes were associated with the higher serum concentration of an active metabolite of clobazam, N-desmethylclobazam, and with the higher clinical efficacy of clobazam therapy than the other CYP2C19 genotypes. The defective alleles of CYP2C9 and/or CYP2C19 were also found to have clinically significant effects on the inter-individual variabilities in the population pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital, valproic acid and zonisamide. EPHX1 polymorphisms may be associated with the pharmacokinetics of carbamazepine and the risk of phenytoin-induced congenital malformations. Similarly, the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 2B7 genotype may affect the pharmacokinetics of lamotrigine. Gluthatione S-transferase null genotypes are implicated in an increased risk of hepatotoxicity caused by carbamazepine and valproic acid. This article summarizes the state of research on the effects of mutations of drug-metabolizing enzymes on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of AED therapies. Future directions for the dose-adjustment of AED are discussed.

  3. Pharmacogenetics of multiple sclerosis: personalized therapy with immunomodulatory drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsareva, Ekaterina; Kulakova, Olga; Boyko, Alexey; Favorova, Olga

    2016-03-01

    Pharmacogenetic (PG) studies aim to discover the individual genetic background that underlies the heterogeneity of treatment response, and thus find biomarkers for identification of individual patients who will benefit the most from the therapy administered or urgently require the alternate drug. Over the last decade, PG studies have made progress in terms of multiple sclerosis (MS), which is one of the most severe neurodegenerative diseases of the central nervous system. With the understanding of the role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of MS, a number of immunomodulatory drugs were developed for MS treatment management. However, clinical response to these disease-modifying therapies varies in individual patients. Interferon-β and glatiramer acetate showed the most reliable long-term safety and remain among the first-line disease-modifying therapies for MS worldwide. Here, we will review the results of interferon-β and glatiramer acetate PG studies with a detailed analysis of study design and approaches, their advantages and limitations, and future perspectives.

  4. Significance of classifying antiarrhythmic actions since the cardiac arrhythmia suppression trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan Williams, E M

    1991-02-01

    The Cardiac Antiarrhythmic Suppression Trial (CAST) showed flecainide and encainide induced excess mortality compared with placebo. Labeling drugs as Class 1C is based on clinical observations, comprising measurements of the electrocardiographic parameters QRS. H-V and J-T intervals and of effective refractory period (ERP) as follows: 1--(QRS) wide, 2--(HV) long, 3--(ERP) unchanged, 4--(JT) unchanged. In vitro electrophysiology helped to explain the clinical findings. Flecainide and encainide rendered Na channels as nonconducting, but F and E were only slowly released from the channels after repolarization. At any given drug concentration, a proportion of total channels were eliminated, and the steady-state proportion increased at rising heart rate. It is not proven that the properties that lead to classification of a drug as 1C were those that caused excess deaths in the CAST. The proarrhythmic tendency of 1C drugs can be reduced by beta-blockade, and the mechanisms of adrenergic arrhythmogenicity are discussed. Propafenone is both a 1C drug and a beta-blocker, and its pharmacologic profile is reviewed to illustrate how it resembles and differs from flecainide and encainide. Some features of the CAST are assessed with particular reference to the extent to which conclusions drawn from the results may be justifiably extrapolated to other drugs classified as 1C.

  5. Pattern of drug therapy problems and interventions in ambulatory patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in Nigeria

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    Ojeh VB

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We describe the frequency and types of drug therapy problems (DTPs, and interventions carried out to resolve them, among a cohort of HIV- infected patients on ART in Jos, Nigeria. Methods: A prospective pharmacists’ intervention study was conducted between January and August 2012 at the outpatient HIV clinic of the Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH. Pharmacists identified DTPs and made recommendations to resolve them. The main outcome measures were number of DTPs encountered, interventions proposed and acceptance rate of recommendations. Results: A total of 42,416 prescriptions were dispensed to 9339 patients during the eight months study. A total of 420 interventions (Intervention rate of 1 per 100 prescriptions were made to resolve DTPs in 401 (4.3% patients with a mean age of 41 (SD=10 years, and made up of 73% females. DTPs encountered were drug omission (n=89, 21.2%, unnecessary drug (n=55, 13.1% and wrong drug indication (n=55, 13.1%. Recommendations offered included; Addition of another drug to the therapy (n=87, 20.7%, rectification of incomplete prescriptions (n=85, 20.2%, change of drug or dosage (n=67, 16.0%, and discontinuation of the offending drug (n=59, 14.0%. A total of 389 (93% out of 420 of the recommendations were accepted. In all, 50.4% (212 of the problematic prescriptions were changed and dispensed, 22.2% (89 were clarified and dispensed, while wrong identities were corrected in 11.7% (49. However, 7.5% (30 prescriptions were dispensed as prescribed, 5.2% (21 were not dispensed, and 3% (12 were unresolved. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that pharmacists-initiated interventions can ameliorate DTPs in patients receiving ART given the high intervention acceptance rate recorded. The implication of this finding is that pharmacists with requisite training in HIV pharmacotherapy are an excellent resource in detecting and minimizing the effect of antiretroviral drug-related errors.

  6. An emerging antiarrhythmic target: late sodium current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banyasz, T; Szentandrássy, N; Magyar, J; Szabo, Z; Nánási, P P; Chen-Izu, Y; Izu, L T

    2015-01-01

    The cardiac late sodium current (INa,L) has been in the focus of research in the recent decade. The first reports on the sustained component of voltage activated sodium current date back to the seventies, but early studies interpreted this tiny current as a product of a few channels that fail to inactivate, having neither physiologic nor pathologic implications. Recently, the cardiac INa,L has emerged as a potentially major arrhythmogenic mechanism in various heart diseases, attracting the attention of clinicians and researchers. Research activity on INa,L has exponentially increased since Ranolazine, an FDA-approved antianginal drug was shown to successfully suppress cardiac arrhythmias by inhibiting INa,L. This review aims to summarize and discuss a series of papers focusing on the cardiac late sodium current and its regulation under physiological and pathological conditions. We will discuss critical evidences implicating INa,L as a potential target for treating myocardial dysfunction and cardiac arrhythmias.

  7. Management of noninfectious posterior uveitis with intravitreal drug therapy

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    Tan HY

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hui Yi Tan,1 Aniruddha Agarwal,2 Cecilia S Lee,3 Jay Chhablani,4 Vishali Gupta,5 Manoj Khatri,6 Jayabalan Nirmal,7 Carlos Pavesio,8 Rupesh Agrawal1,7–9 1Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore; 2Department of Vitreoretina, Stanley M Truhlsen Eye Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 3Department of Ophthalmology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; 4Department of Vitreoretina, L V Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, Telangana, 5Department of Retina and Uvea, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, 6Department of Retina, Rajan Eye Care Hospital, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India; 7School of Material Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore; 8Department of Medical Retina, Moorfields Eye Hospital, NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK; 9Department of Ophthalmology, National Healthcare Group Eye Institute, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore Abstract: Uveitis is an important cause of vision loss worldwide due to its sight-threatening complications, especially cystoid macular edema, as well as choroidal neovascularization, macular ischemia, cataract, and glaucoma. Systemic corticosteroids are the mainstay of therapy for noninfectious posterior uveitis; however, various systemic side effects can occur. Intravitreal medication achieves a therapeutic level in the vitreous while minimizing systemic complications and is thus used as an exciting alternative. Corticosteroids, antivascular endothelial growth factors, immunomodulators such as methotrexate and sirolimus, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are currently available for intravitreal therapy. This article reviews the existing literature for efficacy and safety of these various options for intravitreal drug therapy for the management of noninfectious uveitis (mainly intermediate, posterior, and panuveitis. Keywords: intravitreal therapy, noninfectious uveitis, posterior uveitis

  8. RNA Editing and Drug Discovery for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Hsuan Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA editing is vital to provide the RNA and protein complexity to regulate the gene expression. Correct RNA editing maintains the cell function and organism development. Imbalance of the RNA editing machinery may lead to diseases and cancers. Recently, RNA editing has been recognized as a target for drug discovery although few studies targeting RNA editing for disease and cancer therapy were reported in the field of natural products. Therefore, RNA editing may be a potential target for therapeutic natural products. In this review, we provide a literature overview of the biological functions of RNA editing on gene expression, diseases, cancers, and drugs. The bioinformatics resources of RNA editing were also summarized.

  9. Generalized lichenoid drug eruption associated with imatinib mesylate therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudip Kumar Ghosh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Imatinib mesylate (IM, an anticancer drug, has been widely used to treat chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST, and dermato-fibrosarcoma protuberans. Cutaneous reactions to IM have been reported to occur in varying number of patients in different case series. Non-lichenoid cutaneous reactions secondary to IM have been well-documented in the literature and are the commonest non-hematologic adverse reactions associated with its use. Lichenoid drug eruption (LDE associated with IM therapy has rarely been reported in the literature. A case of a generalized LDE associated with IM therapy has been described here for its rarity and interesting clinical presentation. As the clinical usage of IM is increasing, one might expect an increasing number of similar patients in the future. It is thus important to realize the potential of IM to produce LDE and to differentiate this entity from idiopathic lichen planus. In the present article, the reports of IM-associated LDE, described in the PubMed and Medline database (in English language literature, have also been reviewed.

  10. Generalized lichenoid drug eruption associated with imatinib mesylate therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sudip Kumar

    2013-09-01

    Imatinib mesylate (IM), an anticancer drug, has been widely used to treat chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), and dermato-fibrosarcoma protuberans. Cutaneous reactions to IM have been reported to occur in varying number of patients in different case series. Non-lichenoid cutaneous reactions secondary to IM have been well-documented in the literature and are the commonest non-hematologic adverse reactions associated with its use. Lichenoid drug eruption (LDE) associated with IM therapy has rarely been reported in the literature. A case of a generalized LDE associated with IM therapy has been described here for its rarity and interesting clinical presentation. As the clinical usage of IM is increasing, one might expect an increasing number of similar patients in the future. It is thus important to realize the potential of IM to produce LDE and to differentiate this entity from idiopathic lichen planus. In the present article, the reports of IM-associated LDE, described in the PubMed and Medline database (in English language literature), have also been reviewed.

  11. Progress in psoriasis therapy via novel drug delivery systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitha Vincent

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a lifelong condition which is caused by the negative signals produced by immune system, which leads to hyper proliferation and other inflammatory reactions on the skin. In this case, keratinocytes which are the outermost layer of skin possess shortened life cycle and results in the alteration of desquamation process where the cytokines will come out through lesions of affected patients and as a result, scaling marks appears on the skin. These conditions may negatively affect the patient’s quality of life and lead to psychosocial stress. Psoriasis can be categorized as mild, moderate and severe conditions. Mild psoriasis leads to the formation of rashes, and when it becomes moderate, the skin turns into scaly. In severe conditions, red patches may be present on skin surface and becomes itchy. Topical therapy continues to be one of the pillars for psoriasis management. Drug molecules with target effect on the skin tissues and other inflammations should be selected for the treatment of psoriasis. Most of the existing drugs lead to systemic intoxication and dryness when applied in higher dose. Different scientific approaches for topical delivery are being explored by researches including emollient, modified gelling system, transdermal delivery, spray, nanogels, hydrogels, micro/nano emulsion, liposomes, nano capsules etc. These topical dosage forms are evaluated for various physico chemical properties such as drug content, viscosity, pH, extrudability, spreadability, toxicity, irritancy, permeability and drug release mechanism. This review paper focus attention to the impact of these formulation approaches on various anti-psoriasis drugs for their successful treatment.

  12. Amiodarone therapy in chronic heart failure and myocardial infarction: a review of the mortality trials with special attention to STAT-CHF and the GESICA trials. Grupo de Estudio de la Sobrevida en la Insuficiencia Cardiaca en Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, J V; Ramani, K; Neelagaru, S; Kown, M; Gheorghiade, M

    1997-01-01

    Amiodarone appears to reduce sudden death in patients with left ventricular dysfunction resulting from an acute MI or a primary dilated cardiomyopathy, particularly if complex ventricular arrhythmias are present. Amiodarone's beneficial effect on mortality in these patients could be unrelated to its antiarrhythmic effects. Multiple factors could account for the improvement in mortality such as the drug's antiischemic effects, neuromodulating effects, its effect on left ventricular function and on heart rate. Moreover, patients with LV dysfunction who have survived an episode of sudden death would potentially benefit from amiodarone therapy. Future trials are needed to determine the precise subsets(s) of patients who would benefit from the drug and the most efficacious dosing regimen for the drug. Based on available data, amiodarone is the only antiarrhythmic agent which has not been shown to increase mortality in patients with chronic heart failure.

  13. Development of drug delivery systems for radionuclide therapy using a combination therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, On Hee; Choi, Sun Ju [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    For the development of new controlled drug delivery systems, the application of combination therapy using angiogenesis inhibitor and tumor static agents has drawn great attention. This approach would be very beneficial for cancer treatment especially when a new drug deliver system utilizing biodegradable polymers is developed. Therefore, the present study for the combination therapy of angiogenesis inhibitor and chemotherapeutic agents was to carry out prior to the development of the novel drug delivery. In present study, the ability of inhibition on cell growth was investigated with treatment of anti-angiogenetic agent and anticancer agent. Thalidomide was used as an antivasculatory agents and Doxorubicine was treated as a chemotherapeutic agent. To demonstrate apoptotic process in in-vitro study, TUNEL assay was carried out. Also, the alteration of p53 level was examined by using western blotting. For the cell lines, NIH:OVCAR3, MKN45, SNU719, C6, L929, T98G, Hep3B and Calu6 were applied. Results showed that Thalidomide inhibited cell growth in tumor cell lines in a dose-dependent manner and Doxorubicin as well. A significant synergistic effect on the apoptotic was noticed in the combination treatment of Thalidomide and Doxorubicin compared to a single treatment of either drug. Therefore, it can be concluded that the mechanism of cytotoxicity was due to the enhancement of apoptosis in early cell death with combination treatment in tumor cell lines.

  14. Challenges and future in vaccines, drug development, and immunomodulatory therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Heather M; Nau, Gerard J; Ross, Ted M; Evans, Thomas G; Chakraborty, Krishnendu; Empey, Kerry M; Flynn, JoAnne L

    2014-08-01

    Pulmonary diseases and infections are among the top contributors to human morbidity and mortality worldwide, and despite the successful history of vaccines and antimicrobial therapeutics, infectious disease still presents a significant threat to human health. Effective vaccines are frequently unavailable in developing countries, and successful vaccines have yet to be developed for major global maladies, such as tuberculosis. Furthermore, antibiotic resistance poses a growing threat to human health. The "Challenges and Future in Vaccines, Drug Development, and Immunomodulatory Therapy" session of the 2013 Pittsburgh International Lung Conference highlighted several recent and current studies related to treatment and prevention of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections, highly pathogenic influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, and tuberculosis. Research presented here focused on novel antimicrobial therapies, new vaccines that are either in development or currently in clinical trials, and the potential for immunomodulatory therapies. These studies are making important contributions to the areas of microbiology, virology, and immunology related to pulmonary diseases and infections and are paving the way for improvements in the efficacy of vaccines and antimicrobials.

  15. DRUG THERAPY OF PAROXYSMAL ATRIAL FIBRILLATION IN THE ELDERLY OVER 75 YEARS OLD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effectiveness and safety of various agents on paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in the elderly over 75 years old.Methods Totally 264 in-patients (75-91 years old, 185 males and 79 females) with atrial fibrillation history of less than 7 days were enrolled in this study. A total of 611 atrial fibrillation episodes were recorded, but 130 episodes (22. 3% ) of atrial fibrillation were auto-converted to sinus rhythm. The rest 481 episodes of atrial fibrillation were divided into six groups based on the drug used. Results The cardioversion ratio of atrial fibrillation were 9. 5%, 46.9%, 71.7%, 55.9%, 32.7%, and73.6%in control, cedilanid, amiodarone, propafenone, verapamil, and quinidine groups, respectively. Ventricular rate control were 5.4%, 83.6%, 84. 9%, 77.9%, 78.8%, and 11.3% in those groups, respectively. The total effective rates of amiodarone and cedilanid groups were the highest. When the ventricular rate was controlled to below 90 bpm, the patients would almost complain of no discomfort. No severe side-effect was observed in each group. Conclusion Amiodarone and cedilanid may be the proper drugs for the treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in the elderly. The above antiarrhythmics in each therapeutic group were relatively safe and effective.

  16. [Intravesical therapy with mitomycin through electromotive drug administration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verri, Cristian; Liberati, Emanuele; Celestino, Francesco; De Carlo, Francesco; Torelli, Fiammetta; Di Stasi, Savino M

    2013-01-01

    In the management of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), high-level evidence supports the widespread practice of intravesical therapy with mitomycin-C (MMC). Randomized trials showed a significant reduction in short-term recurrence compared with transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) alone, but little effect on long-term and no impact at all in preventing progression. Electromotive drug administration (EMDA®) offers a means of controlling and enhancing the tissue transport of certain drugs, in order to increase their efficacy. In both laboratory and clinical studies, intravesical electromotive drug administration (EMDA) increases MMC bladder uptake, resulting in an improved clinical efficacy in NMIBC without systemic side effects. New frameworks for treatment of NMIBC - e.g., sequential intravesical BCG and EMDA/MMC, as well as intravesical EMDA/MMC immediately before TURBT - have provided promising preliminary results with higher remission rates and longer remission times, and they are a priority to minimise the costs of disease management. These findings suggest EMDA-enhanced MMC efficacy against urothelial cancer could be a major therapeutic breakthrough in the treatment of NMIBC.

  17. Extended drug delivery by contact lenses for glaucoma therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cheng-Chun; Burke, Michael T; Carbia, Blanca E; Plummer, Caryn; Chauhan, Anuj

    2012-08-20

    We combine laboratory-based timolol release studies and in vivo pharmacodynamics studies in beagle dogs to evaluate the efficacy of glaucoma therapy through extended wear contact lenses. Commercial contact lenses cannot provide extended delivery of ophthalmic drugs and so the studies here focused on increasing the release duration of timolol from ACUVUE TruEye contact lenses by incorporating vitamin E diffusion barriers. The efficacy of timolol delivered via extended wear contact lenses was then compared to eye drops in beagle dogs that suffer from spontaneous glaucoma. The lenses were either replaced every 24h or continuously worn for 4 days, and the pharmacodynamics effect of changes in the intraocular pressure (IOP) of timolol from the ACUVUE TruEye contact lenses can be significantly increased by incorporation of vitamin E. The in vivo studies showed that IOP reduction from baseline by pure contact lens on daily basis was comparable with that by eye drops but with only 20% of drug dose, which suggested higher drug bioavailability for contact lenses. In addition, by inclusion of vitamin E into the lenses, the IOP was reduced significantly during the 4-day treatment with continuous wear of lens.

  18. Brand-name drug, generic drug, orphan drug. Pharmacological therapy with biosimilar drugs - provision of due diligence in the treatment process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajdel, Justyna; Zajdel, Radosław

    2013-01-01

    Due diligence in the process of provision of healthcare services refers, among other elements, to the application of pharmacological therapy at a time which offers the greatest chance for a successful outcome of treatment, i.e. for achieving the optimum expected effect understood as an improvement in the patient's health, reduction of health risks or elimination of the disease. However, due diligence may also refer to actions aimed at ensuring that neither the patient nor the healthcare payer is required to incur unreasonable costs in the process of treatment. The validity of that statement stems not only from normative acts but also from ethical standards laid down in the Medical Code of Ethics (Article 57 section 2). It often happens that the provision of optimal treatment calls for deviations from the formal provisions included in Summary Product Characteristics (SPCs), and the application of drugs that are bioequivalent to reference drugs, which translates into a significant reduction of costs. The present study addresses the problem of acceptability of a specific form of drug substitution consisting in the replacement of a reference drug with a generic drug. Also explored are legal aspects associated with the possibility of therapy based on "off-label use". The study reviews normative acts existing in the Polish and EU legislation. It also provides a clear definition of orphan drug, which has made it possible to make a distinction and investigate mutual relations between the concepts of brand-name (reference) drug, orphan drug and generic drug.

  19. A New Era for Cancer Target Therapies: Applying Systems Biology and Computer-Aided Drug Design to Cancer Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yung-Hao; Chiu, Chia-Chiun; Lin, Chih-Lung; Chen, Ting-Shou; Jheng, Bo-Ren; Lee, Yu-Ching; Chen, Jeremy; Chen, Bor-Sen

    In recent years, many systems biology approaches have been used with various cancers. The materials described here can be used to build bases to discover novel cancer therapy targets in connection with computer-aided drug design (CADD). A deeper understanding of the mechanisms of cancer will provide more choices and correct strategies in the development of multiple target drug therapies, which is quite different from the traditional cancer single target therapy. Targeted therapy is one of the most powerful strategies against cancer and can also be applied to other diseases. Due to the large amount of progress in computer hardware and the theories of computational chemistry and physics, CADD has been the main strategy for developing novel drugs for cancer therapy. In contrast to traditional single target therapies, in this review we will emphasize the future direction of the field, i.e., multiple target therapies. Structure-based and ligand-based drug designs are the two main topics of CADD. The former needs both 3D protein structures and ligand structures, while the latter only needs ligand structures. Ordinarily it is estimated to take more than 14 years and 800 million dollars to develop a new drug. Many new CADD software programs and techniques have been developed in recent decades. We conclude with an example where we combined and applied systems biology and CADD to the core networks of four cancers and successfully developed a novel cocktail for drug therapy that treats multiple targets.

  20. ABC transporters in anticancer drug transport – Less ons for Therapy, Drug Development and Delivery Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh P.K

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The structural aspects as well as the classification of the ABC superfamily (the largest group of transmembrane proteins has been highlighted. Over-expression of one or more of these transporters, barring exceptions, can correlate with an increased drug resistance (the multidrug resistance phenotype. Hence, studying these proteins, using experimental and in silico approaches, has tremendous benefit for patient selection as well as stratification into “good” and “poor” drug responders. Further, the need to obtain a better insight into “intrinsic” and “extrinsic” mechanisms of resistance were reiterated upon, based on the relative recruitment of the different signal transduction molecules. The concept of the reversal of the MDR phenotype, has been discussed and extended in the context of combination therapy. This form of therapy involves the use of a cocktail of synthetic and biopharmaceutical drugs as well as nanotechnology-based approaches, for improvements in their pharmacokinetic (PK and pharmacodynamic (PD profile. Such strategies have targeted the heterogeneous cancer and cancer stem cells, signaling molecules, marker enzymes as well as the microenvironment for improved efficacy and safety as well as to minimize the chance of relapse

  1. 抗心律失常天然活性成分的研究进展%Research progress of antiarrhythmic natural active ingredients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方永煌; 岑柏宏; 陈瑞晗; 曹静桦; 黄国杰; 梁燕玲; 董艳芬

    2015-01-01

    Arrhythmias are common in the field of cardiovascular disease. In March 2013, World Health Organization reported that, in 2008 the population who died of cardiovascular disease has been as high as 17.3 million, and by 2030 will increase to 23.3 million. Sudden cardiac death accounts for about 40%-50%, while the majority of sudden cardiac death caused by arrhythmia, so the development of new drugs antiarrhythmic is urgent. In recent years, the development of chemical antiarrhythmic drugs getting into the bottleneck, the value of natural antiarrhythmic drug has gotten the world's attention again. At present, the active ingredient of natural antiarrhythmic drugs mainly are alkaloids, flavonoids, saponins. By a comprehensive analysis of the reported literature, the article generalizes the research progress which is about the active ingredient of natural antiarrhythmic drug in nearly a decade, in order to provide certain basis for further study on the active ingredient of natural drugs.%心律失常是心血管领域的常见病、多发病。2013年3月世界卫生组织报道,2008年死于心脑血管疾病者高达1730万,而到2030年将增至2330万。其中心脏性猝死占40%~50%,而大多数心脏性猝死由心律失常所引发,故抗心律失常新药的研发刻不容缓。近几年化学抗心律药物的研发渐入瓶颈,天然药物抗心律失常的价值重新得到世界的关注。目前天然药物抗心律失常活性成分多为生物碱类、黄酮类、皂苷类。本研究通过综合分析已报道的相关文献,概括近几年抗心律失常的天然药物活性成分研究进展,为天然药物活性成分的进一步研究提供依据。

  2. [Drug therapy of acute and chronic abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streitberger, Konrad; Stüber, Frank; Kipfer Buchli, Irène; Stamer, Ulrike M

    2011-08-01

    For drug therapy a differentiation of acute and chronic pain is essential. In emergency situations of acute abdominal pain a fast diagnosis is mandatory. Analgesia should be provided as soon as possible. The different groups of analgesics should be used according to their known effects, side effects and contraindications. Postoperative pain after abdominal surgery has to be considered as a special condition of acute abdominal pain. Main treatment options are non opioid analgesics and opioids. Opioids can be administered intravenously via patient controlled analgesia (PCA) devices. In major abdominal surgery neuroaxial analgesia, preferentially administered via an epidural catheter provides excellent pain relief with positive impact on gastrointestinal motility and patients' recovery. Because of difficulties to allocate chronic abdominal pain to a specific organ, causal treatment often turns out to be difficult. Peripheral and central sensitization, as well as an alteration of the endogenous pain modulation comes to the fore in these chronic pain conditions. Co-analgesics like anticonvulsants and antidepressants are utilized to reduce sensitization and improve the endogenous pain modulating system. Non drug approaches and alternative treatment options might be useful. In contrast, orally or transcutaneously administered opioids are the principal corner stone for the treatment of cancer pain.

  3. The relevance of cellular to clinical electrophysiology in classifying antiarrhythmic actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan Williams, E M

    1992-01-01

    The division of class I antiarrhythmic agents (sodium-channel blockers) into Ia, Ib, and Ic subgroups was based on clinical observations. Lidocaine, mexiletine, and tocainide (Ib) did not alter the QRS or H-V interval in sinus rhythm, but prolonged effective refractory period (ERP) in spite of some shortening of the J-T interval. Encainide, flecainide, and lorcainide (Ic) widened the QRS and prolonged H-V in sinus rhythm and at low concentration, but had little effect on the ERP or J-T. These clinical findings could be explained by fast onset/offset kinetics of Ib drugs, that when used in high concentrations, blocked most sodium channels during the action potential plateau; therefore, at the beginning of diastole, insufficient drug-free channels were available to support conduction, and the ERP was prolonged. Rapid dissociation of the drugs after repolarization insured that by the end of diastole most channels were again drug free, so that the QRS and H-V were normal. The Ic compounds were more potent, but of slow onset, so that a steady-state block of Na channels was not achieved until after many beats. Offset was also slow, so that a proportion of channels was persistently unavailable, Na current was reduced, and conduction slowed, causing widening of the QRS and lengthening of H-V. Because the remaining drug-free channels were normal, they recovered rapidly from inactivation, and the ERP was not prolonged. By clinical criteria, moricizine also must be classed as Ic, and its offset/onset kinetics are much slower than those of Ib drugs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Antiarrhythmic Effect Of Antioxidants In Patients With Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabchabov PhD, Rustam; Rg PhD, Khabchabov; Er PhD, Makhmudova

    2016-01-01

    Resume In accordance with modern concepts, one of the leading roles in the development of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and flutter, belongs - the restructuring of the myocardium, in second place - sick sinus syndrome and in third place - the presence of accessory pathways and hormonal disorders. The development of atrial fibrillation and flutter in the structural pathology, primarily begins with of drugs if it does not work, we have to carry out ablation. Providing proper, effective and important combination therapy - is the main challenge in cardiology.

  5. Clarithromycine-Induced Ventricular Tachycardia in a Geriatric Patient Using Multiple Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulsah Karaoren

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Long QT syndrome is a cardiac repolarization disorder, which can be either idiopathic or congenital, and cause sudden cardiac death. The iatrogenic form is generally associated with drugs or electrolyte imbalance. Although prolonged QT interval is frequently seen due to antiarrhythmic agents, it can also be seen with antibiotics or anti-epileptics. Adverse drug interaction can manifest in several clinicopathological forms in elder individuals. In such cases, potential adverse effects of drugs used should be taken into consideration before prescribing additional drugs. Here, we present a case of clarithromycine-induced ventricular arrhythmia accompanied by QT prolongation on the third day of therapy, and the subsequent therapeutic approach, in a 91-year-old man. The patient was taking multiple drugs due to comorbid conditions and was prescribed clarithromycine therapy in the intensive care unit.

  6. Block by a putative antiarrhythmic agent of a calcium-dependent potassium channel in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLarnon, J G

    1990-05-04

    The actions of a new, putative antiarrhythmic drug, KC-8851 on single channel currents in hippocampal CA1 neurons have been studied. A calcium-dependent potassium current IK(Ca) was activated in the cultured neurons when a solution containing 140 mM K+ and 0.2 mM Ca2+ was applied to inside-out patches. Addition of the compound KC-8851, at concentrations between 1-50 microM, resulted in significant, dose-dependent, decreases in the mean open times of the K channel. The onward (blocking) rate constant was determined from a simple channel blockade scheme and was 5 x 10(7) M-1s-1; this rate constant was not dependent on voltage. Addition of KC-8851 to the solution bath with outside-out patches also caused significant decreases in the mean open times of the IK(Ca) channel consistent with channel blockade by the drug.

  7. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... minimum standards for pharmacy practice as established by the States. (2) Concurrent drug utilization... dosage or duration of drug therapy. (vi) Drug-allergy contraindications. (vii) Clinical abuse/misuse. (3... by CMS. (5) Considerations in pharmacy fees. An applicant to become a Part D sponsor must—...

  8. REHABILITATION THERAPY VERSUS DRUG THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH LUMBAR DISC DEGENERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BROSCATEAN, Emanuela-Flavia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar disc degeneration is a disorder whose clinical manifestations are represented by episodic pain in the lumbar spine, without lumbar blockage and minor muscle contraction. Because lumbalgia caused by lumbar disc degeneration is not always very high intensity pain, the easiest to apply treatment is drug therapy. The aim of this study was to analyze the potential role of rehabilitation treatment in the recovery of patients and the prevention of complications compared to drug therapy alone. The study included 28 patients (17 women and 11 men aged between 23-60 years, assigned to two groups: 20 patients who received rehabilitation treatment (consisting of massage, kinesiotherapy, hydrokinesiotherapy, electrotherapy and medication and 8 patients who received drug treatment consisting of anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs. The treatment duration was 10 days. For the evaluation of pain, the visual analogue scale was used, for the degree of disability, the Oswestry questionnaire, and for joint mobility and muscle strength, articular and muscular testing. At the end of treatment, the study group compared to the control group had a statistically significant result for pain (p=0.001, as well as for the Oswestry score (p=0.030. The mean age of the patients was 35.51±3.026, which shows an increased incidence among young adults. A possible connection between the development of the disease in women and age less than 45 years was also investigated, but the result was not statistically significant, p=0.22. Our data suggest the fact that rehabilitation treatment plays an important role in the reduction of pain and the improvement of the quality of life of patients with lumbar disc degeneration by decreasing the degree of disability. In the future, it can be proposed to monitor patients with lumbar disc degeneration over a longer time period in order to see the effects of kinetic rehabilitation programs in relation to the delay of chronicization. As

  9. Drug-induced diarrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassany, O; Michaux, A; Bergmann, J F

    2000-01-01

    Diarrhoea is a relatively frequent adverse event, accounting for about 7% of all drug adverse effects. More than 700 drugs have been implicated in causing diarrhoea; those most frequently involved are antimicrobials, laxatives, magnesium-containing antacids, lactose- or sorbitol-containing products, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, prostaglandins, colchicine, antineoplastics, antiarrhythmic drugs and cholinergic agents. Certain new drugs are likely to induce diarrhoea because of their pharmacodynamic properties; examples include anthraquinone-related agents, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, lipase inhibitors and cholinesterase inhibitors. Antimicrobials are responsible for 25% of drug-induced diarrhoea. The disease spectrum of antimicrobial-associated diarrhoea ranges from benign diarrhoea to pseudomembranous colitis. Several pathophysiological mechanisms are involved in drug-induced diarrhoea: osmotic diarrhoea, secretory diarrhoea, shortened transit time, exudative diarrhoea and protein-losing enteropathy, and malabsorption or maldigestion of fat and carbohydrates. Often 2 or more mechanisms are present simultaneously. In clinical practice, 2 major types of diarrhoea are seen: acute diarrhoea, which usually appears during the first few days of treatment, and chronic diarrhoea, lasting more than 3 or 4 weeks and which can appear a long time after the start of drug therapy. Both can be severe and poorly tolerated. In a patient presenting with diarrhoea, the medical history is very important, especially the drug history, as it can suggest a diagnosis of drug-induced diarrhoea and thereby avoid multiple diagnostic tests. The clinical examination should cover severity criteria such as fever, rectal emission of blood and mucus, dehydration and bodyweight loss. Establishing a relationship between drug consumption and diarrhoea or colitis can be difficult when the time elapsed between the start of the drug and the onset of symptoms is long, sometimes up to several

  10. Access to antiepileptic drug therapy in children in Camagüey Province, Cuba

    OpenAIRE

    Bárzaga Arencibia, Zeina; López Leyva, Alberto; Mejías Peña, Yordanka; González Reyes, Alba Rosa; Acosta Nápolez, Maurilys; Carbonell Perdomo, Demetrio; Fernández Manzano, Edita; Choonara, Imti

    2012-01-01

    bjective  To describe access to antiepileptic drug therapy and estimate the prevalence of epilepsy in children in Camagüey Province, Cuba. Methods  All the community pharmacies in the province were visited and information collected about the number of children receiving antiepileptic drugs in 2009. Availability and cost of each antiepileptic drug were determined. The prevalence of epilepsy was estimated by determining the number of children receiving antiepileptic drugs. Results  Ther...

  11. Locoregional cancer therapy using polymer-based drug depots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramazani, Farshad; van Nostrum, Cornelis F.; Storm, G; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan; Hennink, Wim E.; Kok, Robbert J.

    2016-01-01

    Locoregional delivery of anticancer drugs is an attractive approach to minimize adverse effects associated with intravenous chemotherapy. Polymer-based drug depots injected or implanted intratumorally or adjacent to the tumor can provide long-term local drug exposure. This review highlights studies

  12. Understanding renal replacement therapy and dosing of drugs in pediatric patients with kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuppa, Athena F

    2012-01-01

    Multifaceted factors need to be considered when prescribing renal replacement therapy (RRT) and dosing of drugs in pediatric patients with kidney disease. RRTs in pediatrics such as intermittent hemodialysis, continuous venovenous hemofiltration, continuous venovenous hemodialysis, and continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration affect solute and drug clearance. Drug properties such as molecular weight, molecular charge, volume of distribution, and protein binding affect drug clearance. RRT prescription parameters such as blood flow rate, ultrafiltration rate, membrane size, and pore size can also influence drug clearance. Furthermore, the pediatric patient presents additional concerns because of developmental factors in children that affect both pharmacokinetics of drugs.

  13. Managing potential drug-drug interactions between gastric acid-reducing agents and antiretroviral therapy: experience from a large HIV-positive cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J M; Stott, K E; Monnery, D; Seden, K; Beeching, N J; Chaponda, M; Khoo, S; Beadsworth, M B J

    2016-02-01

    Drug-drug interactions between antiretroviral therapy and other drugs are well described. Gastric acid-reducing agents are one such class. However, few data exist regarding the frequency of and indications for prescription, nor risk assessment in the setting of an HIV cohort receiving antiretroviral therapy. To assess prevalence of prescription of gastric acid-reducing agents and drug-drug interaction within a UK HIV cohort, we reviewed patient records for the whole cohort, assessing demographic data, frequency and reason for prescription of gastric acid-reducing therapy. Furthermore, we noted potential drug-drug interaction and whether risk had been documented and mitigated. Of 701 patients on antiretroviral therapy, 67 (9.6%) were prescribed gastric acid-reducing therapy. Of these, the majority (59/67 [88.1%]) were prescribed proton pump inhibitors. We identified four potential drug-drug interactions, which were appropriately managed by temporally separating the administration of gastric acid-reducing agent and antiretroviral therapy, and all four of these patients remained virally suppressed. Gastric acid-reducing therapy, in particular proton pump inhibitor therapy, appears common in patients prescribed antiretroviral therapy. Whilst there remains a paucity of published data, our findings are comparable to those in other European cohorts. Pharmacovigilance of drug-drug interactions in HIV-positive patients is vital. Education of patients and staff, and accurate data-gathering tools, will enhance patient safety.

  14. Biomarker-guided repurposing of chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenvang, Jan; Kümler, Iben; Nygård, Sune Boris;

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of mortality worldwide and matters are only set to worsen as its incidence continues to rise. Traditional approaches to combat cancer include improved prevention, early diagnosis, optimized surgery, development of novel drugs, and honing regimens of existing anti......-cancer drugs. Although discovery and development of novel and effective anti-cancer drugs is a major research area, it is well known that oncology drug development is a lengthy process, extremely costly and with high attrition rates. Furthermore, those drugs that do make it through the drug development mill...... are often quite expensive, laden with severe side-effects and unfortunately, to date, have only demonstrated minimal increases in overall survival. Therefore, a strong interest has emerged to identify approved non-cancer drugs that possess anti-cancer activity, thus shortcutting the development process...

  15. Scandinavian clinical practice guideline on fluid and drug therapy in adults with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claesson, J; Freundlich, M; Gunnarsson, I

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The objective of the Scandinavian Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (SSAI) task force on fluid and drug therapy in adults with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was to provide clinically relevant, evidence-based treatment recommendations according...

  16. Applications of nanosystems to anticancer drug therapy (Part I. Nanogels, nanospheres, nanocapsules).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talevi, Alan; Gantner, Melisa E; Ruiz, María E

    2014-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in cancer drug therapy is to maximize the effectiveness of the active agent while reducing its systemic adverse effects. To add more, many widely-used chemoterapeutic agents present unfavorable physicochemical properties (e.g. low solubility, lack of chemical or biological stability) that hamper or limit their therapeutic applications. All these issues may be overcome by designing adequate drug delivery systems; nanocarriers are particularly suitable for this purpose. Nanosystems can be used for targeted-drug release, treatment, diagnostic imaging and therapy monitoring. They allow the formulation of drug delivery systems with user-defined characteristics regarding solubility, biodegradability, particle size, release kinetics and active targeting, among others. This review (Part I) focuses on recent patents published between 2008 and the present day, related to nanospheres, nanocapsules and nanogels applied to anticancer drug therapy. Other nanosystems is covered in a second article (Part II).

  17. [The mechanism of antiarrhythmic action of a new ammonium derivative of lidocaine (LKhT-12-02)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinov, D S; Balashov, V P; Sernov, L N; Kazachenko, V N; Blinova, E V; Belova, L A; Astashev, M E

    2006-01-01

    The results of electrophysiological investigation of the effects of LKhT-12-02 (a quaternary ammonium derivative of lidocaine) on the intact cat heart and the isolated ion channels of Lymnaea stagnalis snail showed that this compound belongs to class 1B antiarrhythmic agents (Vaughan - Williams classification). The drug does not suppress the automatic nonmonotonic rhythm driver, does not influence the conductance in ventricles, auricles, and atrioventricular node in the sinus rhythm, and does not elongate the effective refractory period of the auricles and atrioventricular node. LKhT-12-02 decreases the rate of fast depolarization of the action potential, while not reducing its duration. The compound does not influence the conduction of sodium ion channels.

  18. Evaluation of a Reality Therapy Stratification System in a Residential Drug Rehabilitation Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Richard

    1978-01-01

    A stratification system was designed and implemented based on the principles of reality therapy for use in a male adolescent drug rehabilitation center. The program involved four levels in an ascending order of responsibility and privileges. Problems are discussed as well as requirements for successfully implementing reality therapy in…

  19. Family Therapy for Drug Abuse: Review and Updates 2003-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    Just 15 years ago, Liddle and Dakof ("Journal of Marital and Family Therapy," 1995; 21, 511) concluded, based on the available evidence, that family therapy represented a "promising, but not definitive" approach for the treatment of drug problems among adolescents and adults. Seven years later, Rowe and Liddle (2003) review described considerable…

  20. 抗心律失常药物基因组学与女性心血管健康%Antiarrhythmic Pharmacogenomics and Cardiovascular Health in Women

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李翠兰; 胡大一

    2012-01-01

    The article reviews the latest progress related to antiarrhythmic pharmacogenomics and cardiovascular diseases and health for women. It includes: (1) basic concepts; (2) cytochrome P450 polymorphisms and antiarrhythmic drugs; (3 ) polymorphisms coding ion channels and arrhythmias; (4) gender differences of expression for ion channel and transfer subunits; (5) gender differences of ventricular repolarization; (6) gender differences of inherrited and drug-induced long QT syndrome and treatment strategy; (7) selective estrogen receptor modulator raloxifene and QT interval; (8) the additive effects of naringenin and antiarrhythmic drug.%本文将从与女性心血管健康相关的角度,综述与心律失常相关的药物基因组学进展.主要内容包括:(1)药物基因组学的概念与研究范围;(2)细胞色素P450遗传多态对抗心律失常药物疗效的影响;(3)编码离子通道的基因多态与心律失常的关系;(4)离子通道及转运亚单位心脏表达的性别差异;(5)心室复极的性别差异及其成因;(6)先天性和药物引起的长QT综合征的性别差异及围产期长QT综合征患者的治疗策略;(7)女性雌激素治疗对QT间期的作用;(8)柚皮素与抗心律失常药物的叠加作用等.

  1. Optical properties of the chemotherapy drugs used in the central nervous system lymphoma therapy: monitoring drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myllylä, T.; Popov, A.; Surazyński, L.; Oinas, J.; Bibikova, O.; Bykov, A.; Wróbel, M. S.; Gnyba, M.; Jedrzejewska-Szczerska, M.; Meglinski, I.; Kuittinen, O.

    2015-07-01

    Our aim is to optically monitor the delivery of the chemotherapy drugs for brain tumours, particularly used in the central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma therapy. In vivo monitoring would help to optimize the treatment and avoiding unnecessary medications. Moreover, it would be beneficial to be able to measure which of the multi-regimen drugs actually do penetrate and how well into the brain tissue. There exist several potential optical measurement techniques to be utilised for the purpose. The most desired method would allow the detection of the drugs without using optical biomarkers as a contrast agent. In this case, for non-invasive sensing of the drug in the brain cortex, the drug should have a reasonably strong optical absorption band somewhere in the range between 600 nm and 1700 nm, and not directly coincident with the strong bands of haemoglobin or water. Alternatively, mid-infrared (MIR) range has the potential for invasive drug monitoring techniques. In this paper, we report the optical properties of several chemotherapy drugs used in CNS lymphoma therapy, such as rituximabi, cyclophosphamide and etoposide. We measured their transmittance and reflectance spectra in near-infrared (NIR) range, particularly 900 nm - 2500 nm, to be considered when choosing the in vivo monitoring method to be developed. The absorption and scattering coefficients were retrieved from the measurements and applying Beer's law. For the measurement of the sum of total transmission and reflection in NIR range we used integrating sphere with spektralo to enable calculation of the scattering coefficient.

  2. Cognitive-Behavioural Therapies for Young People in Outpatient Treatment for NonOpioid Drug Use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filges, Trine; Jørgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This review evaluates the evidence on the effects of cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) on drug use reduction for young people in treatment for nonopioid drug use. Method: We followed Campbell Collaboration guidelines to conduct a systematic review of randomized and nonrandomized trials...

  3. Behavioral couples therapy (BCT) for alcohol and drug use disorders: A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Powers, M.B.; Vedel, E.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.

    2008-01-01

    Narrative reviews conclude that behavioral couples therapy (BCT) produces better outcomes than individual-based treatment for alcoholism and drug abuse problems (e.g., [Epstein, E. E., & McCrady, B. S. (1998). Behavioral couples treatment of alcohol and drug use disorders: Current status and innovat

  4. A perspective on molecular genetic studies of tardive dyskinesia: one clue for individualized antipsychotic drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmori, Osamu; Shinkai, Takahiro; Hori, Hiroko; Matsumoto, Chima; Nakamura, Jun

    2003-06-01

    Interindividual genetic profile differences related to antipsychotic drug therapy may be determined based on molecular genetic studies of the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and studies of antipsychotic drug responses (therapeutic as well as adverse responses). In the present article, we review molecular genetic studies of tardive dyskinesia (TD), which is a representative adverse response to antipsychotic drugs. Such studies have been performed to explore the gene-associated pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic processes of antipsychotic drugs. Positive associations between several genes and TD have been reported. The accumulation of results from such studies will hopefully lead to individualized antipsychotic drug therapies that involve the application of new genomic techniques, including DNA microarrays. Subsequently, antipsychotic drugs may in the future be prescribed for smaller subgroups of patients who have been classified as having a particular genetic profile.

  5. Drug-Related Adverse Events of Osteoporosis Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Moin; Cheung, Angela M; Khan, Aliya A

    2017-03-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis is associated with microarchitectural deterioration and increased risk of fracture. Osteoporosis therapy effectively reduces the risk of vertebral, nonvertebral, and hip fracture and has been associated with increased survival. Currently approved treatments for osteoporosis include bisphosphonates, denosumab, selective estrogen receptor modulators, and teriparatide. This article reviews the adverse events of therapy associated with these medical interventions. Hormone replacement therapy is not included, because it is no longer indicated for the treatment of osteoporosis in all countries. Calcitonin and strontium ranelate are also not included, because their indication for osteoporosis has recently been limited or withdrawn.

  6. Epigenetic polypharmacology: from combination therapy to multitargeted drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lera, Angel R; Ganesan, A

    The modern drug discovery process has largely focused its attention in the so-called magic bullets, single chemical entities that exhibit high selectivity and potency for a particular target. This approach was based on the assumption that the deregulation of a protein was causally linked to a disease state, and the pharmacological intervention through inhibition of the deregulated target was able to restore normal cell function. However, the use of cocktails or multicomponent drugs to address several targets simultaneously is also popular to treat multifactorial diseases such as cancer and neurological disorders. We review the state of the art with such combinations that have an epigenetic target as one of their mechanisms of action. Epigenetic drug discovery is a rapidly advancing field, and drugs targeting epigenetic enzymes are in the clinic for the treatment of hematological cancers. Approved and experimental epigenetic drugs are undergoing clinical trials in combination with other therapeutic agents via fused or linked pharmacophores in order to benefit from synergistic effects of polypharmacology. In addition, ligands are being discovered which, as single chemical entities, are able to modulate multiple epigenetic targets simultaneously (multitarget epigenetic drugs). These multiple ligands should in principle have a lower risk of drug-drug interactions and drug resistance compared to cocktails or multicomponent drugs. This new generation may rival the so-called magic bullets in the treatment of diseases that arise as a consequence of the deregulation of multiple signaling pathways provided the challenge of optimization of the activities shown by the pharmacophores with the different targets is addressed.

  7. ANTIMALARIAL DRUGS IN THERAPY OF SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS: PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Andreyevna Lisitsyna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The data available in the literature on experience in using antimalarial drugs in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus are summarized. A major emphasis is placed on therapy with hydroxychlorochine (plaquenil versus chlorine. Possible mechanisms of action of the drug and its effect on the course of the disease itself and concomitant abnormalities are described. Data on the toxicity of the drug and its safe use in pregnancy and lactation are also discussed

  8. Electrophysiological mechanisms of sophocarpine as a potential antiarrhythmic agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-fang YANG; Ci-zhen LI; Wei WANG; Ying-min CHEN; Ying ZHANG; Yuan-mou LIU; Hong-wei WANG

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To examine the electrophysiological effects of sophocarpine on action potentials (AP) and ionic currents of cardiac myocytes and to compare some of these effects with those of amiodarone.Methods: Langendorff perfusion set-up was used in isolated guinea pig heart, and responses to sophocarpine were monitored using electrocardiograph. Conventional microelectrode, voltage clamp technique and perforated patch were employed to record fast response AP (fAP), slow response AP (sAP) and ionic currents in guinea pig papillary muscle or rabbit sinus node cells.Results: Tachyarrhythmia produced by isoprenaline (15 μmol/L) could be reversed by sophocarpine (300 μmol/L). Sophocarpine (10 μmol/L) decreased the amplitude by 4.0%, maximal depolarization velocity (Vmax) of the fAP by 24.4%, and Na+ current (INa) by 18.0%,while it prolonged the effective refractory period (ERP) by 21.1%. The same concentration of sophocarpine could also decrease the amplitude and Vmax of the sAP, by 26.8% and 25.7%, respectively, and attenuated the Ca2+ current (ICaL) and the K+ tail current substantially. Comparison of sophocarpine with amiodarone demonstrated that both prolonged the duration and the ERP of fAP and sAP, both decreased the amplitude and Vmax of the fAP and sAP, and both slowed the automatic heart rate.Conclusion: Sophocarpine could reverse isoprenaline-induced arrhythmia and inhibit INa, IcaL, and Ikr currents. The electrophysiological effects of sophocarpine are similar to those of amiodarone, which might be regarded as a prospective antiarrhythmic agent.

  9. Use of Gestalt Therapy Within a Drug Treatment Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideroff, Stephen I.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a Gestalt therapeutic approach that has shown promise within a drug treatment program. The major issues discussed include the acquisition of self-support, taking responsibility, dealing with anxiety, contact, and the expression of pent-up feelings. (Author)

  10. Nested Nanotherapeutics for Drug Synergy Enhancement in Breast Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    a drug-containing polymeric core, composed of poly(lactic-co- glycolic) acid (PLGA), surrounded by an outer shell composed of drug complexed to...oligosaccharides in the form of truncated cones, and were chosen as the shell forming material because of their ability to form inclusion complexes with...facilitated by their positive surface charge, which has been previously shown to enhance traversal through negatively- charged membranes via

  11. Dual drug delivery from vitamin E loaded contact lenses for glaucoma therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Kuan-Hui; Carbia, Blanca E; Plummer, Caryn; Chauhan, Anuj

    2015-08-01

    Glaucoma patients frequently instill eye drops multiple times each day, which is a cause for reduced compliance. Additionally, eye drops suffer from other limitations including low bioavailability, which can lead to side effects. We propose to develop drug-eluting contact lenses for managing glaucoma with increased bioavailability and improved compliance. Contact lenses are developed for extended simultaneous release of timolol and dorzolamide, both of which are commonly prescribed hydrophilic drugs. The extended release is achieved by loading lenses with vitamin E barriers. In vitro release studies are performed with control and vitamin E loaded lenses for both drugs loaded separately and then together in the same lens. The safety and efficacy of combination therapy by contacts are demonstrated in a Beagle model of glaucoma. Simultaneous loading of timolol and dorzolamide increases the release duration of both drugs. Also vitamin E incorporation is highly effective in increasing the release durations of both drugs to about 2-days. The lenses loaded with both drugs exhibited superior IOP reduction compared to eye drops with about 6-fold lower drug loading. More importantly, combination therapy by continuous wear of vitamin E loaded contact for 2-days, followed by a new set of contacts for another two days, reduced IOP during the 4days of wear time and for another 8days after removal of the contacts. Vitamin E loading is very effective for providing combination therapy by contact lenses due to the increase in release durations of several drugs. The contact lens based therapy reduces IOP with lower drug dose compared to eye drops and may significantly improve the compliance as the effect of the therapy lasts significantly longer than the wear-duration.

  12. Neoadjuvant therapy in muscle-invasive bladder cancer: a model for rational accelerated drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balar, Arjun V; Milowsky, Matthew I

    2015-05-01

    Since the advent of cisplatin-based combination therapy in the management of muscle-invasive and advanced bladder cancer, there has been little progress in improving outcomes for patients. Novel therapies beyond cytotoxic chemotherapy are needed. The neoadjuvant paradigm lends to acquiring ample pretreatment and posttreatment tumor tissue as a standard of care, which enables comprehensive biomarker analyses to better understand mechanisms of both response and resistance, which will aid drug development. This article discusses the evolution of neoadjuvant therapy as standard treatment and the role it may serve toward the development of novel therapies.

  13. Effects of new antiarrhythmic agent SS-68 on excitation conduction, electrical activity in Purkinje fibers and pulmonary veins: Assessment of safety and side effects risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogus, Saida K; Kuzmin, Vladislav S; Abramochkin, Denis V; Suzdalev, Konstantin F; Galenko-Yaroshevsky, Pavel A

    2017-03-02

    The compound SS-68 has been selected among numerous new derivatives of indole and demonstrated antiarrhythmic effects in animal models. The present study concerns several aspects of SS-68 safety and efficacy as a potential antiarrhythmic drug. The first estimation of atrioventricular conduction in mammalian heart under SS-68 has been carried out; effects of SS-68 in Purkinje fibers and myocardium of pulmonary veins have been investigated. The drug weakly affects cardiac atrioventricular conduction: only high concentrations of SS-68 (≥10 μmol/L) significantly decrease this parameter. Also, the drug weakly affects Purkinje fibers automaticity, but effectively alters action potential waveform in Purkinje fibers in a concentration-dependent manner. SS-68 (0.1-100 μmol/L) failed to induce any early or delayed afterdepolarizations in Purkinje fibers both in basal conditions and under provocation of proarrhythmic activity by norepinephrine (NE). Moreover, 10 μmol/L SS-68 suppressed NE-induced extra-beats and rapid firing in Purkinje fibers. In pulmonary veins only high concentrations of SS-68 significantly increased action potential duration, while lower concentrations (0.1-1 μmol/L) were ineffective. Also, 0.1-100 μmol/L SS-68 was unable to elicit arrhythmogenic alternations of action potential waveform in pulmonary veins. In conclusion, SS-68 has no proarrhythmic effects, such as afterdepolarizations or abnormal automaticity in used experimental models.

  14. [Drug therapy for osteoporosis associated with rheumatoid arthritis (calcitonin)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, M; Suzuki, Y

    2001-05-01

    Calcitonin (CT) inhibits osteoclastic bone resorption and also exhibits long-lasting analgestic action, probably mediating through intrinsic serotonin and opioid peptides. The injection form of eel and salmon CT is only available in Japan. There are a few RCT data regarding the effect of CT on osteoporosis associated with RA, the previous studies have shown its effectiveness in terms of maintaining or increasing bone mineral density in RA patients with or without corticosteroid therapy. RA patients with high turnover osteoporosis and back pain might be a good indication of CT therapy.

  15. The emergence of drug resistant HIV variants and novel anti-retroviral therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Koosha Paydary; Parisa Khaghani; Sahra Emamzadeh-Fard; SeyedAhmad SeyedAlinaghi; Kazem Baesi

    2013-01-01

    After its identification in 1980s, HIV has infected more than 30 million people worldwide. In the era of highly active anti-retroviral therapy, anti-retroviral drug resistance results from insufficient anti-retroviral pressure, which may lead to treatment failure. Preliminary studies support the idea that anti-retroviral drug resistance has evolved largely as a result of low-adherence of patients to therapy and extensive use of anti-retroviral drugs in the developed world;however, a highly heterogeneous horde of viral quasi-species are currently circulating in developing nations. Thus, the prioritizing of strategies adopted in such two worlds should be quite different considering the varying anti-retroviral drug resistance prevalence. In this article, we explore differences in anti-retroviral drug resistance patterns between developed and developing countries, as they represent two distinct ecological niches of HIV from an evolutionary standpoint.

  16. Access to antiepileptic drug therapy in children in Camagüey Province, Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arencibia, Zeina Bárzaga; Leyva, Alberto López; Peña, Yordanka Mejías; Reyes, Alba Rosa González; Nápolez, Maurilys Acosta; Carbonell Perdomo, Demetrio; Manzano, Edita Fernández; Choonara, Imti

    2012-01-01

    Objective To describe access to antiepileptic drug therapy and estimate the prevalence of epilepsy in children in Camagüey Province, Cuba. Methods All the community pharmacies in the province were visited and information collected about the number of children receiving antiepileptic drugs in 2009. Availability and cost of each antiepileptic drug were determined. The prevalence of epilepsy was estimated by determining the number of children receiving antiepileptic drugs. Results There were 923 children who received a total of 977 antiepileptic drugs in Camagüey Province. The estimated prevalence of epilepsy was 5.18 per thousand children which is lower than previously reported rates in other low and lower-middle income countries. Most of the children (871, 94%) received a single antiepileptic drug. Carbamazepine and valproate were the two most frequently prescribed antiepileptic drugs. Antiepileptic drugs were available from the local pharmacy on 76% of occasions. If the antiepileptic drug was not available from the local pharmacy, the parent had to travel to another pharmacy to obtain the medicine. Conclusions The estimated prevalence of epilepsy in children in Cuba is lower than that estimated in other lower-middle income countries. Access to drug therapy in children with epilepsy can be achieved in lower-middle income countries. PMID:23134098

  17. Target Nanoparticles for Therapy - SANS and DLS of Drug Carrier Liposomes and Polymer Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawroth, T.; Johnson, R.; Krebs, L.; Khoshakhlagh, P.; Langguth, P.; Hellmann, N.; Goerigk, G.; Boesecke, P.; Bravin, A.; Le Duc, G.; Szekely, N.; Schweins, R.

    2016-09-01

    T arget Nano-Pharmaceutics shall improve therapy and diagnosis of severe diseases, e.g. cancer, by individual targeting of drug-loaded nano-pharmaceuticals towards cancer cells, and drug uptake receptors in other diseases. Specific ligands, proteins or cofactors, which are recognized by the diseased cells or cells of food and drug uptake, are bound to the nanoparticle surface, and thus capable of directing the drug carriers. The strategy has two branches: a) for parenteral cancer medicine a ligand set (2-5 different, surface-linked) are selected according to the biopsy analysis of the patient tissue e.g. from tumor.; b) in the oral drug delivery part the drug transport is enforced by excipients/ detergents in combination with targeting materials for cellular receptors resulting in an induced drug uptake. Both targeting nanomaterials are characterized by a combination of SANS + DLS and SAXS or ASAXS in a feedback process during development by synthesis, nanoparticle assembly and formulation.

  18. Process Pharmacology: A Pharmacological Data Science Approach to Drug Development and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ultsch, Alfred

    2016-01-01

    A novel functional‐genomics based concept of pharmacology that uses artificial intelligence techniques for mining and knowledge discovery in “big data” providing comprehensive information about the drugs’ targets and their functional genomics is proposed. In “process pharmacology”, drugs are associated with biological processes. This puts the disease, regarded as alterations in the activity in one or several cellular processes, in the focus of drug therapy. In this setting, the molecular drug targets are merely intermediates. The identification of drugs for therapeutic or repurposing is based on similarities in the high‐dimensional space of the biological processes that a drug influences. Applying this principle to data associated with lymphoblastic leukemia identified a short list of candidate drugs, including one that was recently proposed as novel rescue medication for lymphocytic leukemia. The pharmacological data science approach provides successful selections of drug candidates within development and repurposing tasks. PMID:27069773

  19. Drug Information Services Today: Current Role and Future Perspectives in Rational Drug Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundstuen Reppe, Linda; Spigset, Olav; Schjøtt, Jan

    2016-02-01

    Polypharmacy and complex drug treatment regimens are becoming increasingly common, which may lead to adverse drug reactions, drug interactions, medication nonadherence, and increasing costs and thus challenge the rational use of drugs. At the same time, the accessibility of drug information increases, and health care professionals may have limited opportunities and capabilities to search and critically evaluate drug information. Clinicians have reported difficulties in searching the best evidence and translating study findings into clinically meaningful information applicable to specific patients. Consequently, it remains a challenge to ensure the rational use of drugs in the years to come. Drug information centers (DICs) have been established to promote the rational use of drugs. One of the most important tasks of DICs is the question and answer services for health care professionals posing drug-related questions. DICs staffed by pharmacists and clinical pharmacologists hold expertise in searching for drug information and critical evaluation of the literature. The uniqueness in this service lies not only in the identification and interpretation of the scientific literature but also in the adaptation of the findings into specific clinical situations and the discussion of possible solutions with the enquirer. Thus, DICs could provide valuable decision support to the clinic. Taking into account the increasing number of possible drug-related questions that will arise today and in the future, the DICs will remain highly relevant in the years to come. However, the DICs must follow the developments in health information technology to disseminate relevant, unbiased drug information to old and new users of the service. Moreover, the DICs are important tools to counterbalance the drug information published by the pharmaceutical industry.

  20. Drug-induced arrhythmias, quantifying the problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, M.L. de

    2004-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias as an adverse reaction to the use of non-antiarrhythmic drugs have attracted much attention during recent years. It has become the single most common reason for regulatory action regarding the marketing of drugs. Although drug-induced arrhythmias are very rare (approximately 1 pe

  1. International Conference on Pathophysiology and Drug Therapy of Cardiovascular Disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@2001 Jan 22-26 Patiala, INDIA Info: Dr Manjeet Singh Professor of Cardiovascular Pharmacology Head, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Drug Research Punjabi University Patiala-147002 Punjab (INDIA) Phn: 91-175-282461/63, ext 6184. Fax: 91-175-283073/282881 E-mail: rnanjeet@pbi. emet. in

  2. Effects of antiarrhythmic peptide 10 on acute ventricular arrhythmia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing Sun; Jin-Fa Jiang; Cui-Mei Zhao; Chao-Hui Hu

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To observe the effects antiarrhythmic peptide 10 (AAP10) aon acute ventricular arrhythmia and the phosphorylation state of ischemic myocardium connexin.Methods:Acute total ischemia and partial ischemia models were established by ceasing perfusion and ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery in SD rats. The effects of AAP10 (1 mg/L) on the incidence rate of ischemia-induced ventricular arrhythmia were observed. The ischemic myocardium was sampled to detect total-Cx43 and NP-Cx43 by immunofluorescent staining and western blotting. the total-Cx43 expression was detected through image analysis system by semi-quantitative analysis.Results: AAP10 could significantly decrease the incidence of ischemia-induced ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. During ischemic stage, total ischemia (TI) and AAP10 total ischemia (ATI) groups were compared with partial ischemia (PI) and AAP10 partial ischemia (API) groups. The rates of incidence for arrhythmia in the ATI and API groups (10% and 0%) were lower than those in the TI and PI groups (60% and 45%). The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P=0.019, P=0.020). The semi-quantitative analysis results of the ischemic myocardium showed that the total-Cx43 protein expression distribution areas for TI, ATI, PI and API groups were significantly decreased compared with the control group. On the other hand, the NP-Cx43 distribution areas of TI, ATI, PI and API groups were significantly increased compared with the control group (P>0.05). AAP10 could increase the total-Cx43 expression in the ischemic area and decrease the NP-Cx43 expression. Western blot results were consistent with the results of immunofluorescence staining.Conclusions:AAP10 can significantly decrease the rate of incidence of acute ischemia-induced ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. Acute ischemic ventricular arrhythmias may have a relationship with the decreased phosphorylation of Cx43

  3. Xanthohumol Modulates Calcium Signaling in Rat Ventricular Myocytes: Possible Antiarrhythmic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaiz-Cot, Juan Jose; Cleemann, Lars; Morad, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmia is a major cause of mortality in cardiovascular pathologies. A host of drugs targeted to sarcolemmal Na(+), Ca(2+), and K(+) channels has had limited success clinically. Recently, Ca(2+) signaling has been target of pharmacotherapy based on finding that leaky ryanodine receptors elevate local Ca(2+) concentrations causing membrane depolarizations that trigger arrhythmias. In this study, we report that xanthohumol, an antioxidant extracted from hops showing therapeutic effects in other pathologies, suppresses aberrant ryanodine receptor Ca(2+) release. The effects of xanthohumol (5-1000 nM) on Ca(2+) signaling pathways were probed in isolated rat ventricular myocytes incubated with Fluo-4 AM using the perforated patch-clamp technique. We found that 5-50 nM xanthohumol reduced the frequency of spontaneously occurring Ca(2+) sparks (>threefold) and Ca(2+) waves in control myocytes and in cells subjected to Ca(2+) overload caused by the following: 1) exposure to low K(+) solutions, 2) periods of high frequency electrical stimulation, 3) exposures to isoproterenol, or 4) caffeine. At room temperatures, 50-100 nM xanthohumol reduced the rate of relaxation of electrically- or caffeine-triggered Ca(2+)transients, without suppressing ICa, but this effect was small and reversed by isoproterenol at physiologic temperatures. Xanthohumol also suppressed the Ca(2+) content of the SR and its rate of recirculation. The stabilizing effects of xanthohumol on the frequency of spontaneously triggered Ca(2+) sparks and waves combined with its antioxidant properties, and lack of significant effects on Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels, may provide this compound with clinically desirable antiarrhythmic properties.

  4. Nanoparticle-mediated combination chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy overcomes tumor drug resistance in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khdair, Ayman; Handa, Hitesh; Mao, Guangzhao; Panyam, Jayanth

    2009-02-01

    Drug resistance limits the success of many anticancer drugs. Reduced accumulation of the drug at its intracellular site of action because of overexpression of efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a major mechanism of drug resistance. In this study, we investigated whether photodynamic therapy (PDT) using methylene blue, also a P-gp inhibitor, can be used to enhance doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity in drug-resistant tumor cells. Aerosol OT (AOT)-alginate nanoparticles were used as a carrier for the simultaneous cellular delivery of doxorubicin and methylene blue. Methylene blue was photoactivated using light of 665 nm wavelength. Induction of apoptosis and necrosis following treatment with combination chemotherapy and PDT was investigated in drug-resistant NCI/ADR-RES cells using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Effect of encapsulation in nanoparticles on the intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin and methylene blue was investigated qualitatively using fluorescence microscopy and was quantitated using HPLC. Encapsulation in AOT-alginate nanoparticles significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of combination therapy in resistant tumor cells. Nanoparticle-mediated combination therapy resulted in a significant induction of both apoptosis and necrosis. Improvement in cytotoxicity could be correlated with enhanced intracellular and nuclear delivery of the two drugs. Further, nanoparticle-mediated combination therapy resulted in significantly elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production compared to single drug treatment. In conclusion, nanoparticle-mediated combination chemotherapy and PDT using doxorubicin and methylene blue was able to overcome resistance mechanisms and resulted in improved cytotoxicity in drug-resistant tumor cells.

  5. Carbon nanotubes as a novel drug delivery system for anticancer therapy: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swatantra Kumar Singh Kushwaha

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs were discovered in 1991 and shown to have certain unique physicochemical properties, attracting considerable interest in their application in various fields including drug delivery. The unique properties of CNTs such as ease of cellular uptake, high drug loading, thermal ablation, among others, render them useful for cancer therapy. Cancer is one of the most challenging diseases of modern times because its therapy involves distinguishing normal healthy cells from affected cells. Here, CNTs play a major role because phenomena such as EPR, allow CNTs to distinguish normal cells from affected ones, the Holy Grail in cancer therapy. Considerable work has been done on CNTs as drug delivery systems over the last two decades. However, concerns over certain issues such as biocompatibility and toxicity have been raised and warrant extensive research in this field.

  6. Carbon nanotubes as a novel drug delivery system for anticancer therapy: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushwaha, Swatantra Kumar Singh; Ghoshal, SauravI; Rai, Awani Kumar, E-mail: swatantrakushwaha@yahoo.co.in [Pranveer Singh Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India); Singh, Satyawan [Saroj Institute of Technology and Management, Lucknow (India)

    2013-10-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were discovered in 1991 and shown to have certain unique physicochemical properties, attracting considerable interest in their application in various fields including drug delivery. The unique properties of CNTs such as ease of cellular uptake, high drug loading, thermal ablation, among others, render them useful for cancer therapy. Cancer is one of the most challenging diseases of modern times because its therapy involves distinguishing normal healthy cells from affected cells. Here, CNTs play a major role because phenomena such as EPR, allow CNTs to distinguish normal cells from affected ones, the Holy Grail in cancer therapy. Considerable work has been done on CNTs as drug delivery systems over the last two decades. However, concerns over certain issues such as biocompatibility and toxicity have been raised and warrant extensive research in this field. (author)

  7. Molecularly targeted therapy for advanced hepatocellularcarcinoma - a drug development crisis?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the fastest growing causeof cancer related death globally. Sorafenib, a multitargetedkinase inhibitor, is the only drug proven toimprove outcomes in patients with advanced diseaseoffering modest survival benefit. Although comprehensivegenomic mapping has improved understanding of thegenetic aberrations in hepatocellular cancer (HCC), thisknowledge has not yet impacted clinical care. The lastfew years have seen the failure of several first and secondline phase Ⅲ clinical trials of novel molecularly targetedtherapies, warranting a change in the way new therapiesare investigated in HCC. Potential reasons for thesefailures include clinical and molecular heterogeneity, trialdesign and a lack of biomarkers. This review discussesthe current crisis in HCC drug development and how weshould learn from recent trial failures to develop a moreeffective personalised treatment paradigm for patientswith HCC.

  8. Hypoxia Responsive Drug Delivery Systems in Tumor Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimoradi, Houman; Matikonda, Siddharth S; Gamble, Allan B; Giles, Gregory I; Greish, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is a common characteristic of solid tumors. It is mainly determined by low levels of oxygen resulting from imperfect vascular networks supplying most tumors. In an attempt to improve the present chemotherapeutic treatment and reduce associated side effects, several prodrug strategies have been introduced to achieve hypoxia-specific delivery of cytotoxic anticancer agents. With the advances in nanotechnology, novel delivery systems activated by the consequent outcomes of hypoxia have been developed. However, developing hypoxia responsive drug delivery systems (which only depend on low oxygen levels) is currently naïve. This review discusses four main hypoxia responsive delivery systems: polymeric based drug delivery systems, oxygen delivery systems combined with radiotherapy and chemotherapy, anaerobic bacteria which are used for delivery of genes to express anticancer proteins such as tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-α) and hypoxia-inducible transcription factors 1 alpha (HIF1α) responsive gene delivery systems.

  9. Acute Migraine Therapy: New Drugs and New Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Monteith, Teshamae S.; Goadsby, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    Opinion Statement The conceptual shift of our understanding of migraine from a vascular disorder to a brain disorder has dramatically altered the approach to the development of new medicines in the field. Current pharmacologic treatments of acute migraine consist of nonspecific and relatively specific agents. Migraine-specific drugs comprise two classes, the ergot alkaloid derivatives and the triptans, serotonin 5-HT1B/1D receptor agonists. The ergots, consisting of ergotamine and dihydroergo...

  10. A Drug Discovery Partnership for Personalized Breast Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    reverse chemotherapy drug resistance, (2) Design and synthesis of small molecule inhibitors of HER2 tyrosine kinase to suppress tumorigenesis, and (3...Acetylcholinesterase inhibitor used in the treatment of myasthenia gravis or reversal of nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents Task 5- Hire research...concentrations of each inhibitor in the presence of   44   10µM ATP to establish an inhibition curve for each. The data were fit to a logistic sigmoid

  11. Exosomes as drug delivery vehicles for Parkinson's disease therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Matthew J; Klyachko, Natalia L; Zhao, Yuling; Gupta, Richa; Plotnikova, Evgeniya G; He, Zhijian; Patel, Tejash; Piroyan, Aleksandr; Sokolsky, Marina; Kabanov, Alexander V; Batrakova, Elena V

    2015-06-10

    Exosomes are naturally occurring nanosized vesicles that have attracted considerable attention as drug delivery vehicles in the past few years. Exosomes are comprised of natural lipid bilayers with the abundance of adhesive proteins that readily interact with cellular membranes. We posit that exosomes secreted by monocytes and macrophages can provide an unprecedented opportunity to avoid entrapment in mononuclear phagocytes (as a part of the host immune system), and at the same time enhance delivery of incorporated drugs to target cells ultimately increasing drug therapeutic efficacy. In light of this, we developed a new exosomal-based delivery system for a potent antioxidant, catalase, to treat Parkinson's disease (PD). Catalase was loaded into exosomes ex vivo using different methods: the incubation at room temperature, permeabilization with saponin, freeze-thaw cycles, sonication, or extrusion. The size of the obtained catalase-loaded exosomes (exoCAT) was in the range of 100-200nm. A reformation of exosomes upon sonication and extrusion, or permeabilization with saponin resulted in high loading efficiency, sustained release, and catalase preservation against proteases degradation. Exosomes were readily taken up by neuronal cells in vitro. A considerable amount of exosomes was detected in PD mouse brain following intranasal administration. ExoCAT provided significant neuroprotective effects in in vitro and in vivo models of PD. Overall, exosome-based catalase formulations have a potential to be a versatile strategy to treat inflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders.

  12. Transdermal iontophoresis of ranitidine: an opportunity in paediatric drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djabri, Asma; Guy, Richard H; Delgado-Charro, M Begoña

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the use of transdermal iontophoresis for the delivery of ranitidine hydrochloride in children. Constant, direct current, anodal iontophoresis of ranitidine was performed in vitro across dermatomed pig skin. The effect of donor vehicle, current intensity, and drug concentration were first examined using aqueous solutions. It was found that drug delivery was higher at pH 7 (donor: 5mM Tris) than pH 5.6 (donor: water). In the presence of low levels of competing background electrolyte, ranitidine delivery increased linearly with applied current but was independent of the donor drug concentration. The second part of the study evaluated two Pluronic(®) F-127 gels as potential vehicles for ranitidine delivery. The formulations were characterised in terms of apparent viscosity, conductivity and passive permeation measurements. Iontophoretic delivery of ranitidine was only slightly affected when delivered from the gels relative to aqueous solutions. Overall the results demonstrated that therapeutic paediatric doses of ranitidine (neonates: 0.09-0.17 μmol/kg h; 1 month to 12 years: 0.36-0.71 μmol/kg h) could be easily achieved by transdermal iontophoresis with simple gel patches of practical surface area (0.2-1.5 cm(2)/kg).

  13. non-drug therapy of traditional Chinese medicine treatment of knee osteoarthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Mei Li; Pin-Jie Gu; Lei Yin

    2016-01-01

    To review combining manipulation in recent years and the progress of moxibustion treatment of knee osteoarthritis, to evaluate the research progress of Chinese medicine external treatment knee osteoarthritis. Collect and analyze non-drug therapy of traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis of data in recent years. Chinese medicine external treatment can significantly improve the stability of the knee joint, patients walking ability, and quality of life of patients. Chinese medicine non-drug therapy can be used as ideal scheme for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis.

  14. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery treatments and specific targeting therapy for age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tai-Chi; Hung, Kuo-Hsuan; Peng, Chi-Hsien; Liu, Jorn-Hon; Woung, Lin-Chung; Tsai, Ching-Yao; Chen, Shih-Jen; Chen, Yan-Ting; Hsu, Chih-Chien

    2015-11-01

    Nanoparticles combined with cells, drugs, and specially designed genes provide improved therapeutic efficacy in studies and clinical setting, demonstrating a new era of treatment strategy, especially in retinal diseases. Nanotechnology-based drugs can provide an essential platform for sustaining, releasing and a specific targeting design to treat retinal diseases. Poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid is the most widely used biocompatible and biodegradable polymer approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Many studies have attempted to develop special devices for delivering small-molecule drugs, proteins, and other macromolecules consistently and slowly. In this article, we first review current progress in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration. Then, we discuss the function of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the pharmacological effects of anti-VEGF-A antibodies and soluble or modified VEGF receptors. Lastly, we summarize the combination of antiangiogenic therapy and nanomedicines, and review current potential targeting therapy in age-related macular degeneration.

  15. Family Behavior Therapy (FBT) for young people in treatment for non-opioid drug use:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindstrøm, Maia; Saidj, Madina; Kowalski, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    people who misuse non-opioid drugs. FBT is a manual-based family therapy approach. The program is behavior and skill-oriented. It is concerned with identifying psychological and situational stimuli and triggers presumed to be directly related to the youth’s drug use, and skills training to improve self......BACKGROUND Youth drug use is a severe problem worldwide, and the use of cannabis, amphetamine ecstasy and cocaine, referred to as non-opioid drugs, are strongly associated with a range of health and social problems. This review focuses on Family Behavior Therapy (FBT) as a treatment for young...... language nor date restrictions were applied to the searches. SELECTION CRITERIA Studies eligible for inclusion in the review are required to meet several eligibility criteria. Studies must: • have involved a manual-based FBT treatment for young people aged 11-21 years enrolled in outpatient treatment...

  16. Concomitant therapy in people with epilepsy: potential drug-drug interactions and patient awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyal, Sara; Rasaby, Sivan; Ekstein, Dana

    2014-02-01

    People with epilepsy (PWE) may use prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) drugs for the treatment of concomitant diseases. Combinations of these drugs, as well as dietary supplements, with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) may lead to reduced control of seizures and of coexisting medical conditions and increased risk of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The aims of this study were to obtain comprehensive lists of medications, dietary supplements, botanicals, and specific food components used by adult PWE and to evaluate the potential for interactions involving AEDs and patients' awareness of such potential interactions. We conducted a prospective, questionnaire-based study of PWE attending the Hadassah-Hebrew University Epilepsy Clinic over a period of 7months. The questionnaire interview included the listing of medications, medicinal herbs, dietary supplements, and specific food components consumed and the knowledge of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs), and it was conducted by a pharmacist. Drug-drug interactions were analyzed via the Micromedex online database. Out of 179 patients who attended the clinic over the study period, we interviewed 73 PWE, of which 71 were included in our final analysis. The mean number of AEDs consumed per subject was 1.7 (SD: 0.8, range: 1-4). Forty (56%) subjects were also treated with other prescription and/or OTC medications, and thirty-four (48%) took dietary supplements. Drug families most prone to DDIs involving AEDs included antipsychotic agents, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and statins. Two-thirds of study participants (67%) knew that DDIs may lead to ADRs, but only half (56%) were aware of the potential for reduced seizure control. Only 44% always reported treatment with AEDs to medical professionals. This study provides for the first time a comprehensive picture of prescription and OTC drugs and food supplements used by PWE. Despite a considerable potential for DDIs involving AEDs, patient awareness is limited

  17. The Miracle Drug : Hormone Replacement Therapy and Labor Market Behavior of Middle-Aged Women

    OpenAIRE

    Meltem Daysal, N.; Orsini, C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: In an aging society, determining which factors contribute to the employment of older individuals is increasingly important. This paper sheds light on the impact of medical innovation in the form of Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) on employment of middle-aged women. HRT are drugs taken by middle-aged women to soften symptoms related to menopause. Before 2002, HRT products were among the most popular prescription drugs in America. We use the timing of the release of information of t...

  18. Drug therapy and cognitive stimulation in patients with poststroke cognitive impairments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.R. Khasanova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to compare a multimodal drug approach to treating poststroke cognitive impairments (CI.Patients and methods. Eighty patients with postroke CI in the early recovery period were examined. They were allocated to 4 groups:1 secondary stroke prevention only (a comparison nontreatment group; 2 actovegin infusions; 3 cerebrolysin infusions; 4 drug therapy in combination with non-drug cognitive training using the standard procedure. Follow-ups and neuropsychological assessments were made at the inclusion in the study and 3 and 6 months after stroke. The state of cognitive functions 6 months after stroke was considered to be an endpoint of the study.Results and discussion. At the inclusion in the study, the mini-mental state examination and the frontal lobe dysfunction scale showed no statistical differences in cognitive functions in different patient groups. At a 3-month follow-up, the cognitive status in the neuronal plasticity stimulation groups was significantly better than in the comparison group (p≤0.05. At a 6-month follow-up, there was a significant cognitive improvement in the combined stimulation group versus the drug-therapy and comparison groups (p≤0.05. Day-to-day activities and independent functioning also improved significantly more promptly in the patients receiving drug or combined therapies. More complex instrumental activities of daily living recovered significantly better during combined cognitive function stimulation than during pharmacological stimulation only. There was evidence that the drugs with proven stimulating effects on neuronal plasticity and nondrug cognitive training were effective in treating CI in the early recovery period of stroke. The combined drug and nondrug poststroke CI treatments reflecting the multimodal approach versus drug therapy were found to be most effective in these patients.

  19. Preeclampsia – Will Orphan Drug Status Facilitate Innovative Biological Therapies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Sinuhe

    2015-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the development of novel therapies to treat pregnancy-related disorders, such as preeclampsia, is hampered by the paucity of research funding. Hence, it is with great interest to become aware of at least three novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of this disorder: exploiting either the anticoagulant activity of antithrombin, the free radical scavenging activity of alpha-1-microglobulin, or the regenerative capacity of placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells. As these projects are being carried out by small biotech enterprises, the question arises of how they are able to fund such undertakings. A novel strategy adopted by two of these companies is that they successfully petitioned US and EU agencies in order that preeclampsia is accepted in the register of rare or orphan diseases. This provides a number of benefits including market exclusivity, assistance with clinical trials, and dedicated funding schemes. Other strategies to supplement meager research funds, especially to test novel approaches, could be crowdfunding, a venture that relies on intimate interaction with advocacy groups. In other words, preeclampsia meets Facebook. Perhaps similar strategies can be adopted to examine novel therapies targeting either the imbalance in pro- or anti-angiogenic growth factors, complement activation, reduced levels of placenta protein 13, or excessive neutrophil activation evident in preeclampsia. PMID:25767802

  20. Preeclampsia - will orphan drug status facilitate innovative biological therapies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Sinuhe

    2015-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the development of novel therapies to treat pregnancy-related disorders, such as preeclampsia, is hampered by the paucity of research funding. Hence, it is with great interest to become aware of at least three novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of this disorder: exploiting either the anticoagulant activity of antithrombin, the free radical scavenging activity of alpha-1-microglobulin, or the regenerative capacity of placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells. As these projects are being carried out by small biotech enterprises, the question arises of how they are able to fund such undertakings. A novel strategy adopted by two of these companies is that they successfully petitioned US and EU agencies in order that preeclampsia is accepted in the register of rare or orphan diseases. This provides a number of benefits including market exclusivity, assistance with clinical trials, and dedicated funding schemes. Other strategies to supplement meager research funds, especially to test novel approaches, could be crowdfunding, a venture that relies on intimate interaction with advocacy groups. In other words, preeclampsia meets Facebook. Perhaps similar strategies can be adopted to examine novel therapies targeting either the imbalance in pro- or anti-angiogenic growth factors, complement activation, reduced levels of placenta protein 13, or excessive neutrophil activation evident in preeclampsia.

  1. Preeclampsia – will Orphan Drug Status facilitate innovative biological therapies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinuhe eHahn

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that development of novel therapies to treat pregnancy-relates disorders, such as preeclampsia, is hampered to the paucity of research funding. Hence, it is with great interest to become aware of at least three novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of this disorder, exploiting either the anticoagulant activity of antithrombin, the free radical scavenging activity of alpha-1-microglobulin, or the regenerative capacity of placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells. As these projects are being carried out by small biotech enterprises, the question arises of how they are able to fund such undertakings. A novel strategy adopted by two of these companies is that they successfully petitioned US and EU agencies in order that preeclampsia be accepted in the register of rare or orphan diseases. This provides a number of benefits including market exclusivity, assistance with clinical trials and dedicated funding schemes. Other strategies to supplement meager research funds, especially to test novel approaches, could be crowdfunding, a venture which relies on intimate interaction with advocacy groups. In other words, preeclampsia meets Facebook. Perhaps similar strategies can be adopted to examine novel therapies targeting either the imbalance in angiogenic growth factors, complement activation, reduced levels of placenta protein 13 or excessive neutrophil activation evident in preeclampsia.

  2. Drug therapy of hypercholesterolaemia in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braamskamp, Marjet J A M; Wijburg, Frits A; Wiegman, Albert

    2012-04-16

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of death and morbidity in the world. The origins of atherosclerosis and subsequent CVD begin in childhood. In order to prevent CVD, children and adolescents at high risk for premature atherosclerosis should be identified and treated as early as possible. Hypercholesterolaemia is a major risk factor for atherosclerosis. Childhood hypercholesterolaemia can be either primary, due to hereditary disorders such as familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) and familial combined hyperlipidaemia (FCHL), or secondary due to obesity, diabetes mellitus or nephrotic syndrome. Current guidelines suggest screening for hypercholesterolaemia between the ages of 2 and 10 years. Treatment strategies include lifestyle interventions involving dietary changes and increased physical activity. If these interventions are insufficient in lowering serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels, pharmacological therapy should be considered from the age of 8 years. Currently, statins are the preferred initial pharmacological therapy and have proven to be both efficient and well tolerated. However, long-term data on safety, and regular monitoring of those patients treated with statins, are still required, because in children with primary hypercholesterolaemia, treatment should be continued for life.

  3. Molecularly targeted therapy for advanced hepatocellularcarcinoma - a drug development crisis?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes the current status of neoadjuvantradiation approaches in the treatment of pancreatic cancer,including a description of modern radiation techniques,and an overview on the literature regarding neoadjuvantradio- or radiochemotherapeutic strategies both forresectable and irresectable pancreatic cancer. Neoadjuvantchemoradiation for locally-advanced, primarily non- orborderline resectable pancreas cancer results in secondaryresectability in a substantial proportion of patients withconsecutively markedly improved overall prognosisand should be considered as possible alternative inpretreatment multidisciplinary evaluations. In resectablepancreatic cancer, outstanding results in terms ofresponse, local control and overall survival have beenobserved with neoadjuvant radio- or radiochemotherapy inseveral phase Ⅰ/Ⅱ trials, which justify further evaluationof this strategy. Further investigation of neoadjuvantchemoradiation strategies should be performed preferentiallyin randomized trials in order to improvecomparability of the current results with other treatmentmodalities. This should include the evaluation of optimalsequencing with newer and more potent systemicinduction therapy approaches. Advances in patientselection based on new molecular markers might be ofcrucial interest in this context. Finally modern externalbeam radiation techniques (intensity-modulated radiationtherapy, image-guided radiation therapy and stereotacticbody radiation therapy), new radiation qualities (protons,heavy ions) or combinations with alternative boostingtechniques widen the therapeutic window and contributeto the reduction of toxicity.

  4. Functional hydrogel contact lens for drug delivery in the application of oculopathy therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaohong; Tan, Huaping; Hao, Lingyun

    2016-12-01

    Although hydrogel contact lens has attracted increasingly concerns as delivery carriers in the field of oculopathy therapy, traditional hydrogel does not show excellent drug encapsulated and controlled properties due to simple hydrophilic polymer chain lacking extra interaction with drug molecule. Herein, functional hydrogels were synthesized in this research to delivery ophthalmic drug for oculopathy therapy. Functional monomer of mono-GMA-β-CD and functional crosslinker of MA-β-CD were incorporated into hydrogel by copolymerization. For hydrogels, equilibrium swelling ratio and contact angle was influenced by mono-GMA-β-CD ratio and MA-β-CD ratio, respectively. All hydrogels exhibited similar water loss behavior and good transparency. Hydrogels had rheological characteristic of typical elastomer. Viscoelasticity and surface morphology of hydrogel were also affected by mono-GMA-β-CD ratio and MA-β-CD ratio. In the aspect of properties, functional hydrogel containing β-CD domain exhibited better protein resistance capacity and significantly higher equilibrium encapsulated drug amount than traditional hydrogel. Besides the performance, drug release behavior of drug encapsulated hydrogel was adjusted by both mono-GMA-β-CD ratio and MA-β-CD ratio. Preliminary in vivo evaluation revealed that functional hydrogel contact lens had better effect and efficacy on lowering intraocular tension than commercial eye drop. It is inferred from all results that functional contact lens has a bright prospect in the application of oculopathy therapy.

  5. Will Drug Resistance against Dolutegravir in Initial Therapy Ever Occur?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark eWainberg

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Dolutegravir (DTG is a second-generation integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI and INSTIs are the latest class of potent anti-HIV drugs. Compared to the first generation INSTIs, raltegravir (RAL and elvitegravir (EVG, DTG shows a limited cross-resistance profile. More interestingly, clinical resistance mutations to DTG in treatment-naive patents have not been observed to this date. This review summarizes recent studies on resistance mutations to DTG and on our understanding of the mechanisms of resistance to DTG as well as future directions for research.

  6. Antiarrhythmic effects of n-3 fatty acids: evidence from human studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geelen, A.; Brouwer, I.A.; Zock, P.L.; Katan, M.B.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose of review N-3 fatty acids from fish reduce cardiovascular mortality including sudden cardiac death. In this paper, the authors discuss the results of human studies with regard to the hypothesis that n-3 fatty acids reduce the risk of fatal coronary heart disease through antiarrhythmic effect

  7. Antiarrhythmic and electrophysiologic effects of flecainide on acutely induced atrial fibrillation in healthy horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, M M; Pehrson, S; Carstensen, H;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Only few pharmacologic compounds have been validated for treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) in horses. Studies investigating the utility and safety of flecainide to treat AF in horses have produced conflicting results, and the antiarrhythmic mechanisms of flecainide are not fully u...

  8. Antiarrhythmic activity of n-tyrosol during acute myocardial ischemia and reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyshova, G A; Plotnikov, M B; Smol'yakova, V I; Golubeva, I V; Aliev, O I; Tolstikova, T G; Krysin, A P; Sorokina, I V

    2007-06-01

    Antiarrhythmic activity of n-tyrosol was demonstrated on the model of early occlusion and reperfusion arrhythmia. The preparation reduces the incidence of ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation, increases the percent of animals without ventricular arrhythmia, and moderates the severity of developing ventricular arrhythmias.

  9. Cardiovascular pharmacogenetics: on the way toward individually tailored drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siffert, Winfried

    2003-05-01

    G proteins are important mediators of hormone action in all cells of the human body. Therefore, functional polymorphisms in genes encoding G protein subunits are expected to have a marked influence upon cell activation and cardiovascular responses to hormones and drugs. The 825T allele of a common C825T polymorphism in the gene, GNB3, encoding the G beta 3 subunit, was found to be associated with increased intracellular signal transduction via G protein-coupled receptors. Originally defined as a candidate gene associated with an increased risk for essential hypertension, the 825T allele turns out to be an interesting marker in cardiovascular pharmacogenetics. Carriers of the 825T allele show an increased vasoconstriction in the skin microcirculation in response to noradrenaline, angiotensin II, and endothelin I. Coronary vasoconstriction is enhanced in 825T allele carriers in response to azepexol. On the other hand, some drugs like hydrochlorothiazide, clonidine, and endothelin receptor antagonist evoke increased effects in 825T allele carriers. It appears that the GNB3 C825T polymorphism could be an attractive marker to discriminate responders and nonresponders and might, therefore, represent an excellent candidate gene in cardiovascular pharmacogenetics.

  10. Drug therapy for Helicobacter pylori infection: problems and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glupczynski, Y; Burette, A

    1990-12-01

    Antibacterial chemotherapy against Helicobacter pylori is currently being assessed by open or randomized controlled clinical studies for its efficacy in eradicating this bacterium from the stomach of patients with gastritis or gastroduodenal ulcer. Whereas there is presently no "optimal" agent and treatment scheme, the combination of some antibiotics (metronidazole, tinidazole, amoxicillin) with bismuth salts proves definitely superior in vivo to either of these agents administered alone. Several reasons have been proposed, to explain the clinical failure after treatment: insufficient concentration of active drugs in gastric mucus, instability of some agents at an acidic pH, inappropriate formulation of drug, insufficient duration of treatment, and variable compliance of patients. Recently, it has appeared from several clinical trials that H. pylori may rapidly acquire resistance to some antibiotics, and that this event might also account for clinical failure. A critical review of the literature on H. pylori treatment indicates that association of bismuth and antibiotics or of antibiotics alone both may efficiently reduce the risk of emergence of resistance and improve the therapeutic outcome. Guidelines of treatment are suggested in order to avoid the future misuse of antibiotics that would increase selection of antibiotic-resistant H. pylori and negatively affect the ecology of the gastric microflora. Likewise, an accurate definition of a subset of patients with H. pylori who really will require treatment needs to be rapidly established.

  11. Treatment of Hepatitis C in Patients Undergoing Immunosuppressive Drug Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooka, Kohtaro; Lim, Joseph K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract With 185 million people chronically infected globally, hepatitis C is a leading bloodborne infection. All-oral regimens of direct acting agents have superior efficacy compared to the historical interferon-based regimens and are significantly more tolerable. However, trials of both types of regimens have often excluded patients on immunosuppressive medications for reasons other than organ transplantation. Yet, these patients—most often suffering from malignancy or autoimmune diseases—could stand to benefit from these treatments. In this study, we systematically review the literature on the treatment of hepatitis C in these neglected populations. Research on patients with organ transplants is more robust and this literature is reviewed here non-systematically. Our systematic review produced 2273 unique works, of which 56 met our inclusion criteria and were used in our review. The quality of data was low; only 3 of the 56 studies were randomized controlled trials. Sustained virologic response was reported sporadically. Interferon-containing regimens achieved this end-point at rates comparable to that in immunocompetent individuals. Severe adverse effects and death were rare. Data on all-oral regimens were sparse, but in the most robust study, rates of sustained virologic response were again comparable to immunocompetent individuals (40/41). Efficacy and safety of interferon-containing regimens and all-oral regimens were similar to rates in immunocompetent individuals; however, there were few interventional trials. The large number of case reports and case series makes conclusions vulnerable to publication bias. While firm conclusions are challenging, given the dearth of high-quality studies, our results demonstrate that antiviral therapy can be safe and effective. The advent of all-oral regimens offers patients and clinicians greatly increased chances of cure and fewer side effects. Preliminary data reveal that these regimens may confer such benefits in

  12. Complementary and alternative drug therapy versus science-oriented medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anlauf, Manfred

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This opinion deals critically with the so-called complementary and alternative medical (CAM therapy on the basis of current data. From the authors’ perspective, CAM prescriptions and most notably the extensive current endeavours to the “integration” of CAM into conventional patient care is problematic in several respects.Thus, several CAM measures are used, although no specific effects of medicines can be proved in clinical studies. It is extensively explained that the methods used in this regard are those of evidence-based medicine, which is one of the indispensable pillars of science-oriented medicine. This standard of proof of efficacy is fundamentally independent of the requirement of being able to explain efficacy of a therapy in a manner compatible with the insights of the natural sciences, which is also essential for medical progress. Numerous CAM treatments can however never conceivably satisfy this requirement; rather they are justified with pre-scientific or unscientific paradigms. The high attractiveness of CAM measures evidenced in patients and many doctors is based on a combination of positive expectations and experiences, among other things, which are at times unjustified, at times thoroughly justified, from a science-oriented view, but which are non-specific (context effects. With a view to the latter phenomenon, the authors consider the conscious use of CAM as unrevealed therapeutic placebos to be problematic. In addition, they advocate that academic medicine should again systematically endeavour to pay more attention to medical empathy and use context effects in the service of patients to the utmost.The subsequent opinion discusses the following after an introduction to medical history: the definition of CAM; the efficacy of most common CAM procedures; CAM utilisation and costs in Germany; characteristics of science-oriented medicine; awareness of placebo research; pro and contra arguments about the use of CAM, not least

  13. Episcleritis Related to Drug-Induced Lupus Erythematosus following Infliximab Therapy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irini P. Chatziralli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced lupus erythematosus is defined as a lupus-like syndrome temporally related to continuous drug exposure which resolves after discontinuation of the offending drug. Herein, we describe a patient with distinct clinical manifestations of anti-TNF-associated DILE related to infliximab therapy. The patient exhibited clinical and laboratory findings of lupus-like illnesses as well as ocular disorders, such as episcleritis. The main message is that the symptoms of DILE should not be overlooked, although sometimes other systematic conditions may underlie them. As a result, it is very important for the clinicians to evaluate the symptoms of DILE and manage appropriately these cases.

  14. Anti dermatophytic therapy--prospects for the discovery of new drugs from natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Luciana Arantes; de Cássia Orlandi Sardi, Janaína; Gullo, Fernanda Patrícia; de Souza Pitangui, Nayla; Scorzoni, Liliana; Leite, Fernanda Sangalli; Giannini, Maria José Soares Mendes; Almeida, Ana Marisa Fusco

    2013-12-01

    Millions of people and animals suffer from superficial infections caused by a group of highly specialized filamentous fungi, the dermatophytes, which only infect keratinized structures. With the appearance of AIDS, the incidence of dermatophytosis has increased. Current drug therapy used for these infections is often toxic, long-term, and expensive and has limited effectiveness; therefore, the discovery of new anti dermatophytic compounds is a necessity. Natural products have been the most productive source for new drug development. This paper provides a brief review of the current literature regarding the presence of dermatophytes in immunocompromised patients, drug resistance to conventional treatments and new anti dermatophytic treatments.

  15. Anti dermatophytic therapy: prospects for the discovery of new drugs from natural products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Arantes Soares

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Millions of people and animals suffer from superficial infections caused by a group of highly specialized filamentous fungi, the dermatophytes, which only infect keratinized structures. With the appearance of AIDS, the incidence of dermatophytosis has increased. Current drug therapy used for these infections is often toxic, long-term, and expensive and has limited effectiveness; therefore, the discovery of new anti dermatophytic compounds is a necessity. Natural products have been the most productive source for new drug development. This paper provides a brief review of the current literature regarding the presence of dermatophytes in immunocompromised patients, drug resistance to conventional treatments and new anti dermatophytic treatments.

  16. Current Therapy of Drugs in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haiyan; Le, Wei Dong; Xie, Ya-Ying; Wang, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), commonly termed as motor neuron disease (MND) in UK, is a chronically lethal disorder among the neurodegenerative diseases, meanwhile. ALS is basically irreversible and progressive deterioration of upper and lower motor neurons in the motor cortex, brain stem and medulla spinalis. Riluzole, used for the treatment of ALS, was demonstrated to slightly delay the initiation of respiratory dysfunction and extend the median survival of patients by a few months. In this study, the key biochemical defects were discussed, such as: mutant Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, mitochondrial protectants, and anti-excitotoxic/ anti-oxidative / antiinflammatory/ anti-apoptotic agents, so the related drug candidates that have been studied in ALS models would possibly be further used in ALS patients.

  17. Consideration of Drug Therapy in Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Diamantis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH has become a major global health problem both in its frequency by which it determines the complications and the problems of diagnosis and treatment it requires. BPH is a heterogeneous disease. The symptoms attributed to BPH may have other coexisting causes and growth factors both androgen-dependent and independent, which promotes prostate enlargement. It is well known that prostate size correlates poorly with the symptoms so that reducing prostate using 5-alphareductase or alphablocants inhibitors may not always be sufficient. A better understanding of the pathophysiology of BPH and its interactions with other drugs will help the development of new substances with a better efficiency. This present work aims to be a modest contribution related to medical treatment in benign prostatic hyperplasia and the role that the generalist practitioner should play in managing of this urinary disease quite common in elderly men.

  18. Antiparasitic peptides from arthropods and their application in drug therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Ferreira Lacerda

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Africa, Asia and Latin America are regions highly affected by endemic diseases, such as Leishmaniasis, Malaria and Chagas’ disease. They are responsible for the death of thousands of patients every year, as there is not yet a cure for them and the drugs used are inefficient against the pathogenic parasites. During the life cycle of some parasitic protozoa, insects become the most important host and disseminator of the diseases triggered by these microorganisms. As infected insects do not develop nocive symptoms, they can carry the parasites for long time inside their body, enabling their multiplication and life cycle completion. Eventually, parasites infect human beings after insects transmission through their saliva and/or feces. Hence, host insects and general arthropods, which developed a way to coexist with such parasites, are a promising source for the prospection of antiparasitic compounds, as alternative methods for the treatment of protozoa-related diseases. Among the molecules already isolated and investigated, there are proteins and peptides with high activity against parasites, able to inhibit parasite activity in different stages of development. Although studies are still taking their first steps, initial results show new perspectives on the treatment of parasitic diseases. Therefore, in this report, we describe about peptides from host insect sources with activity against the three most endemic parasites: Leishmania sp, Plasmodium sp. and Trypanosomes. Moreover, we discuss the future application insect peptides as anti-parasitic drugs and the use of non-hosts insect transcriptomes on the prospection of novel molecules for the treatment of parasitic neglected diseases.

  19. DRUG THERAPY IN ASTHMATIC CHILDREN: SURVEY IN MASHHAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H Karimi

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. For future health planning of our country, the type and amount of drugs used for treatment of chronic diseases should be known. Therefore, in the present study the treatment regimen of asthmatic children in the city of Mashhad was studied. Methods. To study the different types of drugs in the treatment regimen of asthmatic children in the city of Mashhad, we evaluated the treatment regimen of 366 primary school children with asthma disease. Starting, maximum and duration of action of three different bronchodilators (salbutamol inhaler, salbutamol syrup, and theophylline syrup were compared. Findings. The results of the first part of this study showed that only 31.6 percent of asthmatic children had history of treatment and only 10.6 percent had current medication. In addition, most of the treated children (38.8 percent had only bronchodilator (salbutamol syrup in their treatment regimen. The effect of salbutamol inhaler on lung function tests starts in 5 min, salbutamol syrup in 15 min and theophylline syrup at 30 min after administration. The maximum response to salbutamol inhaler, salbutamol syrup, and theophylline syrup occurred 15 min, 4 hr and 3 hr after administration, respectively. The reduction of response to salbutamol inhaler occurs after 3 hr, but there was no any reduction in response to salbutamol and theophylline syrup during study period. Conclusion. The prevalence of asthma among children in the city of Mashhad is relatively high, but most of asthmatic children are not treated. Although the oral bronchodilator in mild asthma is effective, salbutamol inhaler is needed for emergency use.

  20. Dual drug loaded superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilnawaz, Fahima; Singh, Abhalaxmi; Mohanty, Chandana; Sahoo, Sanjeeb K

    2010-05-01

    The primary inadequacy of chemotherapeutic drugs is their relative non-specificity and potential side effects to the healthy tissues. To overcome this, drug loaded multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles are conceptualized. We report here an aqueous based formulation of glycerol monooleate coated magnetic nanoparticles (GMO-MNPs) devoid of any surfactant capable of carrying high payload hydrophobic anticancer drugs. The biocompatibility was confirmed by tumor necrosis factor alpha assay, confocal microscopy. High entrapment efficiency approximately 95% and sustained release of encapsulated drugs for more than two weeks under in vitro conditions was achieved for different anticancer drugs (paclitaxel, rapamycin, alone or combination). Drug loaded GMO-MNPs did not affect the magnetization properties of the iron oxide core as confirmed by magnetization study. Additionally the MNPs were functionalized with carboxylic groups by coating with DMSA (Dimercaptosuccinic acid) for the supplementary conjugation of amines. For targeted therapy, HER2 antibody was conjugated to GMO-MNPs and showed enhanced uptake in human breast carcinoma cell line (MCF-7). The IC(50) doses revealed potential antiproliferative effect in MCF-7. Therefore, antibody conjugated GMO-MNPs could be used as potential drug carrier for the active therapeutic aspects in cancer therapy.

  1. Recent insights in nanotechnology-based drugs and formulations designed for effective anti-cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piktel, Ewelina; Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Wątek, Marzena; Wollny, Tomasz; Deptuła, Piotr; Bucki, Robert

    2016-05-26

    The rapid development of nanotechnology provides alternative approaches to overcome several limitations of conventional anti-cancer therapy. Drug targeting using functionalized nanoparticles to advance their transport to the dedicated site, became a new standard in novel anti-cancer methods. In effect, the employment of nanoparticles during design of antineoplastic drugs helps to improve pharmacokinetic properties, with subsequent development of high specific, non-toxic and biocompatible anti-cancer agents. However, the physicochemical and biological diversity of nanomaterials and a broad spectrum of unique features influencing their biological action requires continuous research to assess their activity. Among numerous nanosystems designed to eradicate cancer cells, only a limited number of them entered the clinical trials. It is anticipated that progress in development of nanotechnology-based anti-cancer materials will provide modern, individualized anti-cancer therapies assuring decrease in morbidity and mortality from cancer diseases. In this review we discussed the implication of nanomaterials in design of new drugs for effective antineoplastic therapy and describe a variety of mechanisms and challenges for selective tumor targeting. We emphasized the recent advantages in the field of nanotechnology-based strategies to fight cancer and discussed their part in effective anti-cancer therapy and successful drug delivery.

  2. The Miracle Drug : Hormone Replacement Therapy and Labor Market Behavior of Middle-Aged Women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meltem Daysal, N.; Orsini, C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: In an aging society, determining which factors contribute to the employment of older individuals is increasingly important. This paper sheds light on the impact of medical innovation in the form of Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) on employment of middle-aged women. HRT are drugs taken by

  3. Replacing hormone therapy-is the decline in prescribing sustained, and are nonhormonal drugs substituted?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vegter, Stefan; Kolling, Pieternel; Toben, Marjolijn; Visser, Sipke T.; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T. W.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: After two cautioning landmark studies in 2002 and 2003, a dramatic decrease in hormonal therapy (HT) prescribing for menopausal symptoms was seen. Our objectives were to (1) determine whether this decline in HT prescribing sustained until 2007 and (2) investigate nonhormonal drug prescri

  4. Nature and frequency of drug therapy alerts generated by clinical decision support in community pharmacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heringa, Mette; Floor-Schreudering, Annemieke; Tromp, P. Chris; de Smet, Peter A G M; Bouvy, Marcel L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the nature, frequency, and determinants of drug therapy alerts generated by a clinical decision support system (CDSS) in community pharmacy in order to propose CDSS improvement strategies. Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of dispensed dru

  5. Estimating prevalence of accumulated HIV-1 drug resistance in a cohort of patients on antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, Wendy P; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Kjær, Jesper;

    2011-01-01

    Estimating the prevalence of accumulated HIV drug resistance in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) is difficult due to lack of resistance testing at all occasions of virological failure and in patients with undetectable viral load. A method to estimate this for 6498 EuroSIDA patients...

  6. Pharmacy Characteristics Associated with the Provision of Drug Therapy Services in Nonmetropolitan Community Pharmacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadkari, Abhijit S.; Mott, David A.; Kreling, David H.; Bonnarens, Joseph K.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Higher prevalence of chronic diseases and reduced access to other health professionals in rural areas suggest that rural Medicare enrollees will benefit from pharmacist-provided drug therapy services (DTS). Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe non-metropolitan community pharmacy sites in Wisconsin, the provision of DTS at…

  7. New development and application of ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction in gene therapy and drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-Yi; Yang, Feng; Lin, Yan; Zhang, Jin-Shan; Qiu, Ri-Xiang; Jiang, Lan; Zhou, Xing-Xing; Yu, Jiang-Xiu

    2013-08-01

    Ultrasound is a common used technique for clinical imaging. In recent years, with the advances in preparation technology of microbubbles and the innovations in ultrasound imaging, ultrasound is no longer confined to detection of tissue perfusion, but extends to specific ultrasound molecular imaging and target therapy gradually. With the development of research, ultrasound molecular imaging and target therapy have made great progresses. Targeted microbubbles for molecular imaging are achieved by binding target molecules, specific antibody or ligand to the surface of microbubbles to obtain specific imaging by attaching to target tissues. Meanwhile, it can also achieve targeting gene therapy or drug delivery by ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) mediating genes or drugs to specific target sites. UTMD has a number of advantages, such as target-specific, highly effective, non-invasivity, relatively low-cost and no radiation, and has broad application prospects, which is regarded as one hot spot in medical studies. We reviewed the new development and application of UTMD in gene therapy and drug delivery in this paper. With further development of technology and research, the gene or drug delivery system and related methods will be widely used in application and researches.

  8. A patient-centric goal in time to blood pressure control from drug therapy initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Song Hee; Wang, Junling; Tak, Sunghee

    2013-02-01

    A time frame in which newly diagnosed hypertensive patients attain blood pressure (BP) goal would guide patients through uncertainty associated with initiating drug therapy for hypertension control. This study estimates time to BP goal resulting from drug therapy initiation among real-world hypertensive patients and identifies factors associated with variations in time to BP goal. The study uses a historical cohort design. Hypertensive patients who had initiated antihypertensive drug therapy between July 1, 2002, and December 31, 2003, were followed up to 12 months until the end of 2004. Electronic medical records from a medical group were linked with pharmacy claims, as well as with medical claims. Survival analyses were used to compare lengths of time needed to reach BP goals. A total of 223 patients from a real world practice setting had initiated antihypertensive drug therapy. The patients took 3.25 months (95% CI: 2.49-4.82) to reach BP goal. The patient-centric time to BP goal was 7.1 weeks longer than those reported in controlled experimental settings. This finding highlights the gap between results of controlled clinical trials and their application to clinical practice, and informs healthcare practitioners of the importance of setting a patient-centric goal in pharmacological treatment of hypertension.

  9. Drug: D00303 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D00303 Drug Disopyramide (JP16/USAN/INN); Rythmodan P (TN) C21H29N3O 339.2311 339.4745 D00303...r08301] 2 Agents affecting individual organs 21 Cardiovascular agents 212 Antiarrhythmic agents 2129 Others D00303... Disopyramide (JP16/USAN/INN) Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification [BR:br08303] C CARD...[BR:br08302] Cardiovascular Agents Antiarrhythmics Disopyramide D00303 Disopyramide (JP16/USAN/INN) Target-b... NaV1.x voltage-gated sodium channel (SCN1A) [HSA:6323] [KO:K04833] Disopyramide [ATC:C01BA03] D00303

  10. Functional Family Therapy for Young People in Treatment for Nonopioid Drug Use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filges, Trine; Andersen, Ditte

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This review evaluates the evidence on the effects of functional family therapy (FFT) on drug abuse reduction for young people in treatment for nonopioid drug use. Data and Analysis: We followed Campbell Collaboration guidelines to conduct a systematic review of randomized...... and nonrandomized trials. Results: The search yielded two studies that met inclusion criteria. Only one study provided numerical results on the effect of FFT on drug use reduction. Conclusions: There is insufficient evidence to allow any conclusion to be drawn on the effect of FFT for young people in treatment...... for nonopioid drug use. There is a need for more research and particularly for more methodologically rigorous studies in the field of treatment for young drug users....

  11. Evaluation of short course drug therapy for tuberculosis in pediatric ward of Imam Khomeini Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daneshjoo Kh

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis appears to be a disease as old as human history. Tuberculosis is of great public health importance in the developing countries. Its clinical profile is different in developing countries in comparison to countries of Europe and North America. The recent epidemic of HIV has slowed down the declining trend in the incidence of tuberculosis. Bacilli are transmitted from one infected person to the others as an aerosol. In some cases contaminated milk may also be responsible. However despite effective regimens and addition of new drugs and improved pharmacokinetic knowledge the chemotherapy of tuberculosis still remains a challenge. Poor drug-compliance by patients being one of the foremost reason for frequent relapses and bacterial resistance. Some important and concrete steps to meet these challenges have been judicious use of two or more bactericidal drugs and introduction of short courses regiment. Multiple drugs therapy may shorten the duration of treatment and prevent emergence of drug resistance.

  12. Correlates of non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy in a cohort of HIV-positive drug users receiving antiretroviral therapy in Hanoi, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, M R; Obeng-Aduasare, Y; Sheehan, H; Hong, S Y; Terrin, N; Duong, D V; Trung, N V; Wanke, C; Kinh, N V; Tang, A M

    2014-08-01

    The HIV epidemic in Vietnam is concentrated, with high prevalence estimates among injection drug users and commercial sex workers. Socio-demographics, substance use and clinical correlates of antiretroviral therapy non-adherence were studied in 100 HIV-1 infected drug users receiving antiretroviral therapy for at least 6 months in Hanoi, Vietnam. All study participants were men with a mean age of 29.9 ± 4.9 years. The median duration on antiretroviral therapy was 16.2 ± 12.7 months; 83% reported 'very good' or 'perfect' adherence in the past 30 days on a subjective one-item Likert scale at time of study enrollment; 48% of participants reported drug use within the previous 6 months, with 22% reporting current drug use. Injection drug use with or without non-injection drug use in the past 6 months (95% C.I. 2.19, 1.30-3.69) and years on antiretroviral therapy (95% C.I. 1.43, 1.14-1.78) were correlated with suboptimal adherence. These findings support Vietnam's ongoing scale-up of harm reduction programmes for injection drug users and their integration with antiretroviral therapy delivery. Moreover, results highlight the need to identify and implement new ways to support high levels of antiretroviral therapy adherence as duration on antiretroviral therapy increases.

  13. Spatiotemporally synchronized cancer combination therapy using photo-activated nanoparticle drug delivery systems (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    This talk will introduce a new nanotechnology platform for cancer combination therapy that utilizes near infrared light activation not only for photodynamic damage but also as an extrinsic mechanism to initiate release of complimentary drugs to suppress dynamic bursts in molecular signaling networks that promote tumor cell survival and treatment escape. The goal is to achieve co-delivery with concomitant activity of photodynamic, molecular inhibitor and chemotherapeutic agents, selectively within the tumor. This approach overcomes challenges in achieving synergistic interactions using sequential drug delivery. Conventional drug delivery is compromised by the differential pharmacokinetics of individual agents and potentially antagonistic effects—such as vascular shutdown by one agent that limits delivery of the second. Here, photodynamic damage—which efficiently kills drug-resistant cells via damage of common proteins involved in drug-resistance (such as anti-apoptosis factors and drug-efflux transporters)—is synchronized spatially and temporally with the photo-initiated release of complimentary agents—to enable full interaction amongst the individual therapies. This spatiotemporal synchronization offers new prospects for exploiting time-sensitive synergistic interactions. Specific implementations of these concepts will be presented in preclinical models of cancer. Strategies to enable molecular-targeting of cancer cells via site-specific attachment of targeting moieties to the outer lipid shell of these nanovehicles will also be discussed. If successful in humans, this new paradigm for synchronized, tumor-focused combination therapy will ultimately supersede the present use of chronic drug injection by increasing efficacy per cycle whilst reducing systemic exposure to toxic drugs.

  14. [Drug therapy of sleep disorders in shift workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastre-y-Hernández, M; Vass, K; Fichte, K; Paschelke, G

    1982-04-09

    The hypnotic action of a soporific may be of limited use in populations who live in contradiction to their "internal biological clock". In order to test the assumption 60 nurses who had a disturbance in their sleep-waking rhythm due to shift work participated in an one-week double blind study. Nurses were randomly assigned to receive either lormetazepam 1 mg (Noctamid) or placebo (n = 30 per group). In the nurses with disturbance of falling asleep, a normalization of the duration of falling asleep occurred in 15 of 17 cases under lormetazepam as compared to ten of 17 under placebo. In the nurses who slept too little the length of the sleeping time normalized in 15 of 16 cases under lormetazepam as compared to the nine of 16 under placebo. With simultaneous consideration of the duration of falling asleep, total duration of sleep and depth of sleep, a distinction was made between "normalization in all three parameters", "normalization in one or two parameters, but no deterioration in any parameter" and "no normalization" for evaluation of the therapy comparison. The action of lormetazepam was shown in higher improvement rates (p less than 0,05). Neurophysiological and social medical implications are being discussed.

  15. Specific Cell Targeting Therapy Bypasses Drug Resistance Mechanisms in African Trypanosomiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unciti-Broceta, Juan D.; Arias, José L.; Maceira, José; Soriano, Miguel; Ortiz-González, Matilde; Hernández-Quero, José; Muñóz-Torres, Manuel; de Koning, Harry P.; Magez, Stefan; Garcia-Salcedo, José A.

    2015-01-01

    African trypanosomiasis is a deadly neglected disease caused by the extracellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Current therapies are characterized by high drug toxicity and increasing drug resistance mainly associated with loss-of-function mutations in the transporters involved in drug import. The introduction of new antiparasitic drugs into therapeutic use is a slow and expensive process. In contrast, specific targeting of existing drugs could represent a more rapid and cost-effective approach for neglected disease treatment, impacting through reduced systemic toxicity and circumventing resistance acquired through impaired compound uptake. We have generated nanoparticles of chitosan loaded with the trypanocidal drug pentamidine and coated by a single domain nanobody that specifically targets the surface of African trypanosomes. Once loaded into this nanocarrier, pentamidine enters trypanosomes through endocytosis instead of via classical cell surface transporters. The curative dose of pentamidine-loaded nanobody-chitosan nanoparticles was 100-fold lower than pentamidine alone in a murine model of acute African trypanosomiasis. Crucially, this new formulation displayed undiminished in vitro and in vivo activity against a trypanosome cell line resistant to pentamidine as a result of mutations in the surface transporter aquaglyceroporin 2. We conclude that this new drug delivery system increases drug efficacy and has the ability to overcome resistance to some anti-protozoal drugs. PMID:26110623

  16. Specific Cell Targeting Therapy Bypasses Drug Resistance Mechanisms in African Trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unciti-Broceta, Juan D; Arias, José L; Maceira, José; Soriano, Miguel; Ortiz-González, Matilde; Hernández-Quero, José; Muñóz-Torres, Manuel; de Koning, Harry P; Magez, Stefan; Garcia-Salcedo, José A

    2015-06-01

    African trypanosomiasis is a deadly neglected disease caused by the extracellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Current therapies are characterized by high drug toxicity and increasing drug resistance mainly associated with loss-of-function mutations in the transporters involved in drug import. The introduction of new antiparasitic drugs into therapeutic use is a slow and expensive process. In contrast, specific targeting of existing drugs could represent a more rapid and cost-effective approach for neglected disease treatment, impacting through reduced systemic toxicity and circumventing resistance acquired through impaired compound uptake. We have generated nanoparticles of chitosan loaded with the trypanocidal drug pentamidine and coated by a single domain nanobody that specifically targets the surface of African trypanosomes. Once loaded into this nanocarrier, pentamidine enters trypanosomes through endocytosis instead of via classical cell surface transporters. The curative dose of pentamidine-loaded nanobody-chitosan nanoparticles was 100-fold lower than pentamidine alone in a murine model of acute African trypanosomiasis. Crucially, this new formulation displayed undiminished in vitro and in vivo activity against a trypanosome cell line resistant to pentamidine as a result of mutations in the surface transporter aquaglyceroporin 2. We conclude that this new drug delivery system increases drug efficacy and has the ability to overcome resistance to some anti-protozoal drugs.

  17. Specific Cell Targeting Therapy Bypasses Drug Resistance Mechanisms in African Trypanosomiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan D Unciti-Broceta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available African trypanosomiasis is a deadly neglected disease caused by the extracellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Current therapies are characterized by high drug toxicity and increasing drug resistance mainly associated with loss-of-function mutations in the transporters involved in drug import. The introduction of new antiparasitic drugs into therapeutic use is a slow and expensive process. In contrast, specific targeting of existing drugs could represent a more rapid and cost-effective approach for neglected disease treatment, impacting through reduced systemic toxicity and circumventing resistance acquired through impaired compound uptake. We have generated nanoparticles of chitosan loaded with the trypanocidal drug pentamidine and coated by a single domain nanobody that specifically targets the surface of African trypanosomes. Once loaded into this nanocarrier, pentamidine enters trypanosomes through endocytosis instead of via classical cell surface transporters. The curative dose of pentamidine-loaded nanobody-chitosan nanoparticles was 100-fold lower than pentamidine alone in a murine model of acute African trypanosomiasis. Crucially, this new formulation displayed undiminished in vitro and in vivo activity against a trypanosome cell line resistant to pentamidine as a result of mutations in the surface transporter aquaglyceroporin 2. We conclude that this new drug delivery system increases drug efficacy and has the ability to overcome resistance to some anti-protozoal drugs.

  18. Drug resistant neuroleptic malignant syndrome and the role of electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Husnain; Zeb-un-Nisa; Alrukn, Suhail Abdulla Mohammad; Al Madani, Abubaker Abdul Rahman Shaffi

    2014-04-01

    Neuroleptic malignant syndrome is considered as a rare but potentially fatal complication of neuroleptic medications e.g.,antipsychotics, sedatives and anti emetics. It is characterized by hyperthermia, muscle rigidity, an elevated creatine kinase level and autonomic instability. The syndrome often develops after the start of antipsychotic or a sudden increase in dosage of the neuroleptic medication or in states of dehydration. Treatment is mainly supportive and includes withdrawal of the neuroleptic medication and, possibly, administration of drugs such as dantrolene and bromocriptine. In rare cases where drugs treatment remains ineffective a trial of electroconvulsive therapy is being given. The case presented is a drug resistant case of Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome where finally electroconvulsive therapy was effective.

  19. Adverse effects of drug therapies on male and female sexual function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Th; Bader, M; Uckert, S; Staehler, M; Becker, A; Stief, C G

    2006-12-01

    Sexual dysfunctions (SD) are adverse effects of common drug therapies that have rarely been considered in investigations so far. Possibly it is barely known that many widespread and frequently prescribed medications and drug therapies can have significant impact on vascular and nerval processes as well as on endocrinologic and psychoneuroendocrinologic systems and therefore can influence sexual functions. Impotence and disorders of the erectile function can mainly be caused by antidopaminergic mechanisms, whereas ejaculatory disorders and anorgasmia often can be explained by antiserotoninergic effects. Anticholinergic and adrenoloytic agents can also cause a particular impairment of erectile functions. The following considerations will show that the detection and treatment of SD (also in women!) should be given much more attention since drug-induced SDs occur predominantly in indications where a SD itself can be a symptom of the disease.

  20. [Drug therapy for prevention of falls and fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringe, Johann D

    2006-06-01

    The primary goal in the practical management of osteoporosis is to prevent first or subsequent fractures and thereby to avoid acute or chronic pain and progressive skeletal deformity. Therapeutic strategies should always take the complex pathogenetic mechanisms of fractures into account, especially the fact that mechanical impacts and falls play an important role in the majority of fracture events. Accordingly, recommendations to patients and the selection of drugs should aim at both, falls and fractures. In this context there is an increasing interest in the dual effects of vitamin D on bone and muscle. Controlled studies proved that adequate vitamin D supplementation is able to improve muscle strength, coordination and body sway and thereby reduce the risk of falls and fractures. Alendronate has been studied extensively by large trials of high quality and its efficacy to reduce the risk of vertebral and nonvertebral fractures is in line with the criteria of evidence-based medicine. The innovative combination of 70 mg alendronate with 2,800 IU vitamin D in a once-weekly tablet guarantees a basic supply with this important prohormone for bone and muscle. Due to a regular combined intake an improved compliance can be anticipated which will be followed by better therapeutic results in osteoporosis patients with increased fracture risk.

  1. [Drug treatment and interventional pain therapy in back pain patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprott, Haiko; Klauke, Wolfgang

    2013-09-01

    The treatment of chronic, non-malignant low-back pain is based on the patients' history and the clinical examination. It can be assumed that half of the cases present with a neuropathic pain component which needs to be treated with antidepressive and antiepileptic drugs instead of "pure" analgesics. Opioids should be considered with extreme caution because of their toxicity. Chronic non-malignant back pain is the prototype for interdisciplinary treatment approaches and multi-modal interdisciplinary settings, including pain programmes. However, a personalised strategy has to be preferred in most cases. A quick relief of pain is important in order to improve function as well as to re-integrate the patient into professional life. Spinal infiltrations can be of both diagnostic as well as therapeutic benefits. Their indication must be considered carefully, especially if the invasive diagnostic intervention has no therapeutic consequences. The interventional procedures should only be used as part of a multimodal approach in patients without any psychological problem. The sole use of interventions supports the purely somatic orientation of many patients and thus leads us in the wrong direction.

  2. Global marketing of cholesterol-lowering drugs as therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elimimian, Jonathan U; Gilmore, James M; Singletary, Tony J

    2006-01-01

    Pharmaceutical marketing services (PMS) are a key component of pharmaceutical companies' marketing strategies in that they create links between the pharmaceutical company and the physician. They are is also a link between physician and patients locally and globally. PMS discussed in this paper provide various services from tangible to intangible products in order to increase the physicians and pharmacists prescribing activities of their treatment modalities. Given the high cost of recruiting, training, and supporting PMS global marketing efforts, it is important for PMS channels to understand the significance of pharmaceutical multinational companies to ascribe to prescription drug services provided in Thailand. This created the unique marketing environment for the pharmaceutical companies. This study examines whether there is a gap in the existing cholesterol-lowering medication prescribed by physicians in Thailand and the newly introduced brand to the U.S. market. The degree of the new product adoption is analyzed through physician prescription frequency and records. Results of the study indicate there is significant improvement in the health conditions of the users of the new cholesterol medication among Thailand patients. Physicians in Thailand were, however, faced with competing brands in the market due to aggressiveness of advertising and promotion by multinational pharmaceutical marketing and manufacturers Associations. Perceived value and benefit to users were significant outcome of the study. More diagnostic and prescriptive research is recommended to cover Southeast Asia and other parts of the developing countries.

  3. Bile acid signaling in metabolic disease and drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tiangang; Chiang, John Y L

    2014-10-01

    Bile acids are the end products of cholesterol catabolism. Hepatic bile acid synthesis accounts for a major fraction of daily cholesterol turnover in humans. Biliary secretion of bile acids generates bile flow and facilitates hepatobiliary secretion of lipids, lipophilic metabolites, and xenobiotics. In the intestine, bile acids are essential for the absorption, transport, and metabolism of dietary fats and lipid-soluble vitamins. Extensive research in the last 2 decades has unveiled new functions of bile acids as signaling molecules and metabolic integrators. The bile acid-activated nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, vitamin D receptor, and G protein-coupled bile acid receptor play critical roles in the regulation of lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, inflammation, and drug metabolism and detoxification. Bile acid synthesis exhibits a strong diurnal rhythm, which is entrained by fasting and refeeding as well as nutrient status and plays an important role for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Recent research revealed an interaction of liver bile acids and gut microbiota in the regulation of liver metabolism. Circadian disturbance and altered gut microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of liver diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, and obesity. Bile acids and their derivatives are potential therapeutic agents for treating metabolic diseases of the liver.

  4. Pandemism of swine flu and its prospective drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, R K; Tripathi, P; Rawat, G

    2012-12-01

    Swine flu is a respiratory disease caused by influenza A H1N1 virus. The current pandemic of swine flu is most probably due to a mutation-more specifically, a re-assortment of four known strains of influenza A virus subtype H1N1. Antigenic variation of influenza viruses while circulating in the population is an important factor leading to difficulties in controlling influenza by vaccination. Due to the global effect of swine flu and its effect on humans, extensive investigations are being undertaken. In this context, Tamiflu is the only available drug used in the prophylaxis of this disease and is made from the compound shikimic acid. Due to the sudden increase in the demand of shikimic acid, its price has increased greatly. Thus, it is necessary to find an alternative approach for the treatment of swine flu. This review presents the overall information of swine flu, beginning from its emergence to the prevention and treatment of the disease, with a major emphasis on the alternative approach (bacterial fermentation process) for the treatment of swine flu. The alternative approach for the treatment of swine flu includes the production of shikimic acid from a fermentation process and it can be produced in large quantities without any time limitations.

  5. Public versus Private Drug Insurance and Outcomes of Patients Requiring Biologic Therapies for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Rumman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Antitumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF therapy is a highly effective but costly treatment for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Methods. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of IBD patients who were prescribed anti-TNF therapy (2007–2014 in Ontario. We assessed if the insurance type was a predictor of timely access to anti-TNF therapy and nonroutine health utilization (emergency department visits and hospitalizations. Results. There were 268 patients with IBD who were prescribed anti-TNF therapy. Public drug coverage was associated with longer median wait times to first dose than private one (56 versus 35 days, P=0.002. After adjusting for confounders, publicly insured patients were less likely to receive timely access to anti-TNF therapy compared with those privately insured (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.66; 95% CI: 0.45–0.95. After adjustment for demographic and clinical characteristics, publicly funded subjects were more than 2-fold more likely to require hospitalization (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 2.30; 95% CI: 1.19–4.43 and ED visits (IRR 2.42; 95% CI: 1.44–4.08 related to IBD. Conclusions. IBD patients in Ontario with public drug coverage experienced greater delays in access to anti-TNF therapy than privately insured patients and have a higher rate of hospitalizations and ED visits related to IBD.

  6. Public versus Private Drug Insurance and Outcomes of Patients Requiring Biologic Therapies for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumman, Amir; Candia, Roberto; Sam, Justina J.; Croitoru, Kenneth; Silverberg, Mark S.; Steinhart, A. Hillary

    2017-01-01

    Background. Antitumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy is a highly effective but costly treatment for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Methods. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of IBD patients who were prescribed anti-TNF therapy (2007–2014) in Ontario. We assessed if the insurance type was a predictor of timely access to anti-TNF therapy and nonroutine health utilization (emergency department visits and hospitalizations). Results. There were 268 patients with IBD who were prescribed anti-TNF therapy. Public drug coverage was associated with longer median wait times to first dose than private one (56 versus 35 days, P = 0.002). After adjusting for confounders, publicly insured patients were less likely to receive timely access to anti-TNF therapy compared with those privately insured (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.66; 95% CI: 0.45–0.95). After adjustment for demographic and clinical characteristics, publicly funded subjects were more than 2-fold more likely to require hospitalization (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 2.30; 95% CI: 1.19–4.43) and ED visits (IRR 2.42; 95% CI: 1.44–4.08) related to IBD. Conclusions. IBD patients in Ontario with public drug coverage experienced greater delays in access to anti-TNF therapy than privately insured patients and have a higher rate of hospitalizations and ED visits related to IBD. PMID:28239601

  7. Drug: D03369 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D03369 Drug Capobenic acid (USAN/INN) C16H23NO6 325.1525 325.3569 D03369.gif Cardiac depressant [anti-arrhyt...hmic] CAS: 21434-91-3 PubChem: 17397518 LigandBox: D03369 NIKKAJI: J10.782D ATOM 23

  8. Drug: D06203 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D06203 Drug Transcainide (USAN/INN) C22H35N3O2 373.2729 373.5322 D06203.gif Cardiac depressant [anti-arrhyth...mic] CAS: 88296-62-2 PubChem: 47207861 LigandBox: D06203 NIKKAJI: J263.287J ATOM 27

  9. Drug: D01182 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 54) Adrenergic signaling in cardiomyocytes hsa04970(153+154+155) Salivary secretion Enzyme: CYP2D6 [HSA:1565] map07037 Antiarrhythmic...thmic agents 2123 Beta blockers D01182 Alprenolol hydrochloride (JP16/USAN) Anatomi...nists Therapeutic category of drugs in Japan [BR:br08301] 2 Agents affecting individual organs 21 Cardiovascular agents 212 Antiarrhy

  10. Drug: D03367 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available diac depressant [anti-arrhythmic] CAS: 27276-25-1 PubChem: 17397516 LigandBox: D03367 NIKKAJI: J21.180J ATOM...D03367 Drug Capobenate sodium (USAN) C16H22NO6. Na 347.1345 347.3387 D03367.gif Car

  11. Diagnosis-Therapy Integrative Systems Based on Magnetic RNA Nanoflowers for Co-drug Delivery and Targeted Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yingshu; Li, Shuang; Wang, Yujie; Zhang, Shusheng

    2017-02-21

    This study was to develop a codrug delivery system for targeting cancer therapy based on magnetic RNA nanoflowers (RNA NF). Compared with traditional nucleic acid structure, convenient separation can be achieved by introducing magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) into RNA NF. Folic acid (FA) modified MNP/RNA NF (FA/MNP/RNA NF) was used as a targeting nanocarrier with excellent biocompatibility to overcome the nonselectivity of MNP/RNA NF. And then, anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) and photosensitizer 5, 10, 15, 20-tetrakis (1-methylpyridinium-4-yl) porphyrin (TMPyP4) binding with RNA NF were used as codrug cargo models. RNA NF was first used for codrug delivery. So, imaging fluorescent tags, target recognition element, and drug molecules were all assembled together on the surface of MNP/RNA NF. The experimental results suggested that the treatment efficacy of codrug delivery platform (FA/MNP/RNA NF/D/T) was better than single-drug delivery platform (FA/MNP/RNA NF/D). Besides, the FA/MNP/RNA NF was used as a probe for cancer cell detection. The limit of detection was 50 HeLa cells. In conclusion, the codrug delivery platform based on FA/MNP/RNA NF was a promising approach for the intracellular quantification of other biomolecules, as well as a diagnosis-therapy integrative system.

  12. Update on medical and regulatory issues pertaining to compounded and FDA-approved drugs, including hormone therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Pinkerton, JoAnn V; Pickar, James H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: We review the historical regulation of drug compounding, concerns about widespread use of non-Food and Drug Admiistration (FDA)-approved compounded bioidentical hormone therapies (CBHTs), which do not have proper labeling and warnings, and anticipated impact of the 2013 Drug Quality and Security Act (DQSA) on compounding. Methods: US government websites were searched for documents concerning drug compounding regulation and oversight from 1938 (passage of Federal Food, Drug...

  13. Antiretroviral drug resistance in HIV-1 therapy-naive patients in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Lissette; Kourí, Vivian; Alemán, Yoan; Abrahantes, Yeisel; Correa, Consuelo; Aragonés, Carlos; Martínez, Orlando; Pérez, Jorge; Fonseca, Carlos; Campos, Jorge; Álvarez, Delmis; Schrooten, Yoeri; Dekeersmaeker, Nathalie; Imbrechts, Stijn; Beheydt, Gertjan; Vinken, Lore; Soto, Yudira; Álvarez, Alina; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Van Laethem, Kristel

    2013-06-01

    In Cuba, antiretroviral therapy rollout started in 2001 and antiretroviral therapy coverage has reached almost 40% since then. The objectives of this study were therefore to analyze subtype distribution, and level and patterns of drug resistance in therapy-naive HIV-1 patients. Four hundred and one plasma samples were collected from HIV-1 therapy-naive patients in 2003 and in 2007-2011. HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping was performed in the pol gene and drug resistance was interpreted according to the WHO surveillance drug-resistance mutations list, version 2009. Potential impact on first-line therapy response was estimated using genotypic drug resistance interpretation systems HIVdb version 6.2.0 and Rega version 8.0.2. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using Neighbor-Joining. The majority of patients were male (84.5%), men who have sex with men (78.1%) and from Havana City (73.6%). Subtype B was the most prevalent subtype (39.3%), followed by CRF20-23-24_BG (19.5%), CRF19_cpx (18.0%) and CRF18_cpx (10.3%). Overall, 29 patients (7.2%) had evidence of drug resistance, with 4.0% (CI 1.6%-4.8%) in 2003 versus 12.5% (CI 7.2%-14.5%) in 2007-2011. A significant increase in drug resistance was observed in recently HIV-1 diagnosed patients, i.e. 14.8% (CI 8.0%-17.0%) in 2007-2011 versus 3.8% (CI 0.9%-4.7%) in 2003 (OR 3.9, CI 1.5-17.0, p=0.02). The majority of drug resistance was restricted to a single drug class (75.8%), with 55.2% patients displaying nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI), 10.3% non-NRTI (NNRTI) and 10.3% protease inhibitor (PI) resistance mutations. Respectively, 20.7% and 3.4% patients carried viruses containing drug resistance mutations against NRTI+NNRTI and NRTI+NNRTI+PI. The first cases of resistance towards other drug classes than NRTI were only detected from 2008 onwards. The most frequent resistance mutations were T215Y/rev (44.8%), M41L (31.0%), M184V (17.2%) and K103N (13.8%). The median genotypic susceptibility score for the

  14. Inhibition by a novel anti-arrhythmic agent, NIP-142, of cloned human cardiac K+ channel Kv1.5 current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, T; Masumiya, H; Tanaka, N; Yamashita, T; Tsuruzoe, N; Tanaka, Y; Tanaka, H; Shigenoba, K

    2001-03-16

    NIP-142 was shown to prolong atrial effective refractory period and to terminate atrial fibrillation and flutter in in vivo canine models. To obtain information on its antiarrhythmic action, we examined the effect of NIP-142 on cloned human cardiac K+ channel Kv1.5 (hKv1.5) currents stably expressed in a human cell line using whole-cell voltage clamp methods. NIP-142 inhibited the hKv1.5 current in a concentration-dependent and voltage-independent manner. The inhibition was larger at the end of depolarizing pulse than at the outward current peak. The IC50 for inhibition of the steady-state phase was 4.75 microM. A cross-over phenomenon was observed when current traces in the absence and presence of NIP-142 were superimposed. Inhibition of hKv1.5 current by NIP-142 was frequency-independent; changing the depolarizing pulse frequencies (0.1, 0.2, 1 Hz) and little effect on the degree of inhibition. NIP-142 decreased the maximal peak amplitude of kHv1.5 current at the first command pulse after 3 min rest in the presence of the drug. These results suggest that NIP-142 has inhibitory effects on the hKv 1.5 current through interaction with both open and closed states of the channel, which may underlie its antiarrhythmic activity in the atria.

  15. Mitochondrial basis of the anti-arrhythmic action of lidocaine and modulation by the n-6 to n-3 PUFA ratio of cardiac phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaison, Luc; Moreau, Daniel; Clauw, Fabienne; Vergely, Catherine; Rochette, Luc

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the involvement of mitochondria in the mechanism of the anti-arrhythmic lidocaine. Rats were fed with a diet containing either n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, SSO group) or an equimolecular mixture of n-3 and n-6 PUFAs (FO group) for 8 weeks. The hearts were perfused according to the working mode using a medium with or without lidocaine 5 μm. They were then subjected to local ischemia (20 min) and reperfusion (30 min). Dietary n-3 PUFAs triggered the expected decrease in the n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio of cardiac phospholipids. Reperfusing the ischemic area favored the incidence of severe arrhythmias. Lidocaine treatment abolished almost completely reperfusion arrhythmias in the FO group, but did not display anti-arrhythmic properties in the SSO group. As it was indicated by measurements of the mitochondrial function, lidocaine seemed to favor mitochondrial calcium retention in the FO group, which might prevent cytosolic calcium spikes and reperfusion arrhythmias. In the SSO group, the resistance to lidocaine was associated with an aggravation of cellular damages. The mitochondrial calcium retention capacities were saturated, and lidocaine was unable to increase them, making the drug inefficient in preventing reperfusion arrhythmias.

  16. Epidemiological control of drug resistance and compensatory mutation under resistance testing and second-line therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddler, Clare A; Wu, Yue; Valckenborgh, Frank; Tanaka, Mark M

    2013-12-01

    The fitness cost of antibiotic resistance in the absence of treatment raises the possibility that prudent use of drugs may slow or reverse the rise of resistance. Unfortunately, compensatory mutations that lower this cost may lead to entrenched resistance. Here, we develop a mathematical model of resistance evolution and compensatory mutation to determine whether reversion to sensitivity can occur, and how disease control might be facilitated by a second-line therapy. When only a single antibiotic is available, sensitive bacteria reach fixation only under treatment rates so low that hardly any cases are treated. We model a scenario in which drug sensitivity can be accurately tested so that a second-line therapy is administered to resistant cases. Before the rise of resistance to the second drug, disease eradication is possible if resistance testing and second-line treatment are conducted at a high enough rate. However, if double drug resistance arises, the possibility of disease eradication is greatly reduced and compensated resistance prevails in most of the parameter space. The boundary separating eradication from fixation of compensated resistance is strongly influenced by the underlying basic reproductive number of the pathogen and drug efficacy in sensitive cases, but depends less on the resistance cost and compensation. When double resistance is possible, the boundary is affected by the relative strengths of resistance against the two drugs in the double-resistant-compensated strain.

  17. NIR-driven Smart Theranostic Nanomedicine for On-demand Drug Release and Synergistic Antitumour Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pengfei; Zheng, Mingbin; Luo, Zhenyu; Gong, Ping; Gao, Guanhui; Sheng, Zonghai; Zheng, Cuifang; Ma, Yifan; Cai, Lintao

    2015-09-01

    Smart nanoparticles (NPs) that respond to external and internal stimulations have been developing to achieve optimal drug release in tumour. However, applying these smart NPs to attain high antitumour performance is hampered by limited drug carriers and inefficient spatiotemporal control. Here we report a noninvasive NIR-driven, temperature-sensitive DI-TSL (DOX/ICG-loaded temperature sensitive liposomes) co-encapsulating doxorubicin (DOX) and indocyanine green (ICG). This theranostic system applies thermo-responsive lipid to controllably release drug, utilizes the fluorescence (FL) of DOX/ICG to real-time trace the distribution of NPs, and employs DOX/ICG to treat cancer by chemo/photothermal therapy. DI-TSL exhibits uniform size distribution, excellent FL/size stability, enhanced response to NIR-laser, and 3 times increased drug release through laser irradiation. After endocytosis by MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells, DI-TSL in cellular endosomes can cause hyperthermia through laser irradiation, then endosomes are disrupted and DI-TSL ‘opens’ to release DOX simultaneously for increased cytotoxicity. Furthermore, DI-TSL shows laser-controlled release of DOX in tumour, enhanced ICG and DOX retention by 7 times and 4 times compared with free drugs. Thermo-sensitive DI-TSL manifests high efficiency to promote cell apoptosis, and completely eradicate tumour without side-effect. DI-TSL may provide a smart strategy to release drugs on demand for combinatorial cancer therapy.

  18. Clinical characteristics of left posterior fascicular type wide QRS tachycardia and drug therapy analysis%左后分支型宽 QRS 波心动过速临床特征及药物治疗分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴庆; 白剑; 李晓宏; 张必利

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨左后分支型宽 QRS 波心动过速的临床特征及对药物治疗的反应。方法收集14例体表心电图呈左后分支型宽 QRS 波心动过速患者的临床资料,包括病史、心电图特征、电生理检查结果及其对抗心律失常药物治疗的反应。结果14例发作时胸导联 QRS 均呈右束支阻滞图形,电轴均左偏或指向无人区。其中13例经电生理检查或心电图确诊为室速,1例不能确定为室速或室上速;12例曾接受维拉帕米治疗,均能成功终止发作。结论急诊终止左后分支型宽 QRS 波心动过速发作可首选维拉帕米治疗。%Objective To investigate clinical characteristics of left posterior fascicular type wide QRS complex tachycardia and the response of the patients to drug therapy. Methods The clinical data of 14 cases with left posterior fascicular type wide QRS complex tachycardia were collected and analyzed,including case history,surface ECG features,electrophysiological findings and responses to antiarrhythmic drug. Results 14 patients showed episodes of right bundle branch block QRS pattern in chest leads of ECG with axis pointing to left side or to no man′s land,out of them,13 patients were finally diagnosed to have ventricular tachycardia by electrophysiological examination or ECG and 1 case was failed in confirming to have whether ventricular or supraventricular tachycardia;verapamil therapy was performed on 12 patients and the attacks were successfully terminated. Conclusions Verapamil therapy is the first-choice for the emergent termination of left posterior fascicular type wide QRS complex tachycardia.

  19. PREPARATION AND DRUG RELEASE CHARACTERISTICS OF PINGYANGMYCIN GELATIN MICROSPHERES FOR EMBOLIZATION THERAPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴红; 张镇西; 吴道澄; 于开涛; 李晓晔

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To prepare Pingyangmycin gelatin microspheres (PYM-GMS) for carotid artery embolization therapy and to study the release characteristics in vivo and in vitro. Methods: PYM-GMS was prepared by optical double-phase emulsified condensation polymerization. Through UV-spectrophotometer drug content and encapsulation rate were measured. The characteristics of drug release in vitro which could simulate the actual state in vivo were tested by HPLC. Three ways of vein drop, artery perfusion and artery embolization were contrasted. Under the supervision of X-ray, PYM-GMS were perfused into the external carotid artery of rabbits by superselective artery embolization. Blood samples were tested at different time and analyzed statistically. Results: The roundness of PYM-GMS was 1.02±0.005. The mean diameter was 85.6 (m, 78% of them ranging from 50(200 (m, which fitted the use of embolization. PYM content and encapsulation rate were 6.8% and 91.3% respectively. 70% of the drug was released in 3 h in the simulated environment in vivo and total drug was released after more than 6 h. After artery embolization with small dosage of PYM-GMS, the local drug concentration was 8 times higher than the blood drug concentration and the high level of local drug concentration was kept for more than 120 min. Conclusion: External carotid artery embolization with PYM-GMS, which significantly reduced the circulating drug level and employment dosage, could prolong the duration higher drug concentration and suit the purpose of targeted tumor therapy.

  20. Achieving a Spiritual Therapy Standard for Drug Dependency in Malaysia, from an Islamic Perspective: Brief Review Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghatoleslam, Tahereh; Habil, Hussain; Hatim, Ahmad; Rashid, Rusdi; Ardakan, Abolfazl; Esmaeili Motlaq, Farid

    2015-01-01

    Religion is one of the protective factors that facilities positive outcomes by preventing individuals from engaging in addictive substance. A recent study has confirmed that religion inhibits drug addiction. The concept of psychospiritual therapy was to introduce drug addiction. Therefore, of the various methods of psychotherapy, the usage of Taqwa (piety) emerged as an applicable method of Islamic spiritual therapy. This study was conducted in Malaysia as a Muslim country and focuses on Islamic recommendations and its relation to spiritual therapy.

  1. A green approach to dual-drug nanoformulations with targeting and synergistic effects for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shichao; Yang, Xiangrui; Lu, Yue; Fan, Zhongxiong; Li, Yang; Jiang, Yuan; Hou, Zhenqing

    2017-11-01

    Exploration of efficient dual-drug nanohybrids, particularly those with high drug loading, specific targeting property, and long-termed stability, is of highly importance in cancer therapy. A pH-driven coprecipitation was performed in the aqueous phase to obtain a dual-drug nanoformulation, composed of 10-hydroxycamptothecine (HCPT) nanoneedles integrated with an exterior thin layer of the methotrexate (MTX)-chitosan conjugate. The high stability of nanohybrids in water and the targeting property provided by the MTX ingredient function synergistically to the prolonged and sustained drug release property in tumor tissues and the increased cellular uptake. The cytotoxicity test illustrates that dual-drug nanoneedles possess the remarkable killing ability to HeLa cells with the combination index at 0.33 ± 0.07. After cellular internalization, the release of both drug ingredients results in an excellent anticancer activity in vivo with the minimized adverse side effects. Design of a green approach to the carrier-free, dual-drug nanoformulations enables to develop emerging drug delivery systems for cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  2. Molecular fundamentals of drug interactions in the therapy of colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Regulska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Rapid advances in the field of chemotherapy have resulted in the introduction of numerous antineoplastic drugs into clinical practice, which increased the efficiency of patient management. Also the prevalent use of combination treatment based on drug action synergy contributed to the improved clinical effect associated with cytotoxic drug administration. It seems, however, obvious that the multidirectional pharmacotherapy in oncology requires a thorough knowledge of drugs’ pharmaceutical behavior in order to maximize their collective action and prevent the occurrence of unintended drug interactions that could potentially impair treatment effectiveness. In fact, drug interactions constitute a serious problem for current oncology primarily resulting from a narrow therapeutic index specific for the majority of anticancer drugs. This, in turn, indicates that even slight deviations of their pharmacokinetics could cause significant clinical consequences, manifested by alteration of the toxicological profile or reduction of therapeutic efficiency. Hence, the investigation of molecular aspects underlying the mechanisms of various drug interactions seems to be essential for proper and safe patient management. The present article is devoted to the extensive subject of drug interactions occurring in the therapy of colorectal cancer. It presents the available literature data on both positive and negative effects of interactions and it discusses their mechanisms complying with their classification into pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic ones.

  3. Potential drug-drug interactions in Alzheimer patients with behavioral symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualetti, Giuseppe; Tognini, Sara; Calsolaro, Valeria; Polini, Antonio; Monzani, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The use of multi drug regimens among the elderly population has increased tremendously over the last decade although the benefits of medications are always accompanied by potential harm, even when prescribed at recommended doses. The elderly populations are particularly at an increased risk of adverse drug reactions considering comorbidity, poly-therapy, physiological changes affecting the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of many drugs and, in some cases, poor compliance due to cognitive impairment and/or depression. In this setting, drug-drug interaction may represent a serious and even life-threatening clinical condition. Moreover, the inability to distinguish drug-induced symptoms from a definitive medical diagnosis often results in addition of yet another drug to treat the symptoms, which in turn increases drug-drug interactions. Cognitive enhancers, including acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine, are the most widely prescribed agents for Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, including psychotic symptoms and behavioral disorders, represent noncognitive disturbances frequently observed in AD patients. Antipsychotic drugs are at high risk of adverse events, even at modest doses, and may interfere with the progression of cognitive impairment and interact with several drugs including anti-arrhythmics and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Other medications often used in AD patients are represented by anxiolytic, like benzodiazepine, or antidepressant agents. These agents also might interfere with other concomitant drugs through both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic mechanisms. In this review we focus on the most frequent drug-drug interactions, potentially harmful, in AD patients with behavioral symptoms considering both physiological and pathological changes in AD patients, and potential pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic drug interaction mechanisms.

  4. Regional Lymphotropic Therapy in Combination with Low Level Laser Therapy for Treating Multi-Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Dogorova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available With the growing incidence of Multi-Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB in newly identified patients, novel multimodality treatment methods are needed, aimed at reducing the time to sputum conversion and cavity healing, which would be applicable in MDR cases. Our experimental treatment consisted of the following: 1 chemotherapy based on the drug sensitivity profile, 2 local laser irradiation therapy for 25 days, and lymphotropic administration of isoniazid (to subcutaneous tissue in alternating locations: underarm area; fifth intercostal space along the sterna border; subclavian area where the first rib meets the sternum in a daily dose of 10mg/kg 5 times a week. This treatment was significantly more effective in newly detected destructive MDR-TB versus the standard Category IV regimen for MDR-TB in terms of reduced time for sputum culture conversion and cavity healing, estimated to be 6 months after initiation of treatment.

  5. Pharmaceutical care interventions, their outcomes and patients’ satisfaction in antiretroviral drug therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nwaozuzu, E.E.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacist’s interventions (also known as pharmaceutical care plans are means of solving the drug therapy problems identified in pharmaceutical care. Outcomes are the results of pharmacists’ intervention activities. Patients’ satisfaction refers to patients’ feeling of fulfillment, pleasure or happiness with the services they have received. This study was designed to determine the types of pharmacist interventions applied in the pharmaceutical care of HIV patients receiving treatment at a tertiary hospital in southeast Nigeria, the types of outcomes of such interventions and level of patients’ satisfaction with their drug therapy. The components of the American society of health-system pharmacists (ASHP guidelines on ‘standardized method for pharmaceutical care was used as a data collection instrument to evaluate, document and intervene in the antiretroviral therapy of about one thousand four hundred and seventy three (1,473 patients. The results showed significant reductions in the frequency of the various interventions and parameters measured after the interventions. The study concluded that pharmaceutical interventions influences patients’ adherence, optimizes their drug therapy and improves rational prescribing and care resulting in significant improvements in the outcomes of their treatment and levels of satisfaction.

  6. Brief strategic family therapy for young people in treatment for drug use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindstrøm, Maia; Filges, Trine; Jørgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    2015-01-01

    This review evaluates the evidence on the effects of brief strategic family therapy (BSFT) on drug use reduction for young people in treatment for nonopioid drug use. Method: We followed Campbell Collaboration guidelines to prepare this review and ultimately located three studies for final analysis...... and interpretation. Results: The results are mixed: BSFT does not seem to have better or worse effects on drug use frequency and family functioning than other treatments but has positive effects on treatment retention compared to control conditions. Longer retention in treatment has been identified as a consistent...... predictor of a favorable outcome from drug use treatment. Discussion: Although it is possible that the length of follow-up in the included studies was insufficient to detect significant changes, it should be noted that the evidence we found was limited, in terms of both the number of studies...

  7. The Optimal Drug Therapy National Symposium 2001: a call for action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, S

    2001-01-01

    There is widespread concern internationally and within Canada about the rapid escalation in pharmaceutical costs. Although there is reason to believe that the quality of prescribing has improved in recent years, with heightened emphasis on evidence-based therapeutic decision-making, there is enormous pressure to prescribe in almost every clinical situation. Busy clinicians need improved tools to aid therapeutic decision-making. Access to timely information about drug efficacy and safety is essential. Most importantly, there is a need for a new partnership model that may blend the interests of patients, professionals, payors and manufacturers to better define disease state management approaches that will lead to an optimal return on the investment in pharmaceutical care. The new model will depend on high standards of research to show what does and does not work to secure the most effective pharmacotherapy. It will also require renewed efforts in education for patients and caregivers, and progress on that front will, in turn, rely on the most effective use of expanded capacity in information technology. One early impact will be seen in the reduction of medication errors. The framework for therapeutic decision-making must evolve in keeping with the revolution in human biology. With improved understanding of human genomics and proteomics, prescribers are better able to consider highly individualized and targeted drug therapies while actively concentrating on risk minimization. The Optimal Drug Therapy National Symposium 2001 has created a consensus among stakeholders and pointed the way to improvements in drug therapy that may be achieved through enhanced research, educa- tion, public involvement and professional support. Unequivocal commitment to the laudable goal of optimal drug therapy is now required from all sides.

  8. Drug therapy of colorectal cancer%大肠癌的药物治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖冰; 王媛媛

    2011-01-01

    大肠癌作为消化道常见的恶性肿瘤,严重威胁着人类的健康.随着医学的不断进步,目前针对大肠癌治疗也逐渐向多元化发展.除手术治疗外的多种药物治疗在大肠癌的治疗中发挥重要的作用.本文将对大肠癌的化疗、免疫治疗、生物治疗、基因治疗、靶向治疗、中医中药治疗及对症支持治疗的研究逐一论述.%Colorectal cancer as the common malignant tumor in digestive tract is seriously threatening the health of human beings.With the development of medicine, current treatment for colorectal cancer has gradually diversified.In addition to surgical treatment, the multi-type drug therapy playsan important role in the treatment of colorectal cancer.This article reviews the effect of multi-type drug therapy for colorectal cancer, including chemotherapy, immunotherapy,biological therapy, gene therapy, targeted therapy, Chinese medicine treatment and supporting treatment.

  9. A short history of anti-rheumatic therapy. I. An introduction on traditional and drug treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pasero

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The origins of anti-rheumatic therapy are very old and mainly related to the use of traditional, sometimes extravagant, treatments, as a part of folk medicine. Spa therapy has long been used for the treatment of rheumatic diseases, as well as, in later times, physical treatments, including electrotherapy. Drug treatment has developed beginning from substances of vegetable origin, such as willow and colchicum extracts. Then it has been spread out through the chemical synthesis of compounds with specific action and therefore more effective, owing to the great development of pharmaceutical industry.

  10. Drug therapy of apparent treatment-resistant hypertension: focus on mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicklich, Daniel; Frishman, William H

    2015-04-01

    Apparent treatment-resistant hypertension (aTRH) is defined as blood pressure (BP) >140/90 mmHg despite three different antihypertensive drugs including a diuretic. aTRH is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events, including stroke, chronic renal failure, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, aortic aneurysm, atrial fibrillation, and sudden death. Preliminary studies of renal nerve ablation as a therapy to control aTRH were encouraging. However, these results were not confirmed by the Symplicity 3 trial. Therefore, attention has refocused on drug therapy. Secondary forms of hypertension and associated conditions such as obesity, sleep apnea, and primary aldosteronism are common in patients with aTRH. The pivotal role of aldosterone in the pathogenesis of aTRH in many cases is well recognized. For patients with aTRH, the Joint National Committee-8, the European Society of Hypertension, and a recent consensus conference recommend that a diuretic, ACE inhibitor, or angiotensin receptor blocker and calcium channel blocker combination be used to maximally tolerated doses before starting a 'fourth-line' drug such as a mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist. Although the best fourth-line drug for aTRH has not been extensively investigated, a number of studies summarized here show that an MR antagonist is effective in reducing BP when added to the standard multi-drug regimen.

  11. Does the appearance of drug resistance during therapy alter bacterial susceptibility to opsonophagocytosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmell, C G

    1996-01-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are common causes of infection in patients undergoing chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). Their ability to survive intracellularly within peritoneal macrophages and to persist within the peritoneum during antibiotic therapy has led to the development of drug resistance during treatment. Strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis (SE) and Staphytococcus haemolyticus (SH) have been isolated from patients with CAPD during treatment with ciprofloxacin. The respective MIC values pre-and post-therapy were SE-0.25 and 128 mg/L and SH-0.50 and 64 mg/L. The susceptibility of each isolate to opsonophagocytosis was measured in vitro using isolated polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) derived from fresh human blood donations. The bacteria were radiolabelled during growth, opsonised in either 1 or 10% serum and their uptake measured No differences were seen between the pre- and post therapy isolates when using 10% serum as opsonic source (18 vs. 21%); with 1% serum the corresponding values were lower (5 and 8% respectively). Similarly their ability to generate a respiratory burst as measured by chemiluminescence (CL) in the phagocytic cells was not diminished in the strains which had developed resistance to ciprofloxacin. The mean CL response to the strains isolated at outset of therapy ranged from 0.35-0.45 cpsc, and to the resistant strains following therapy from 0.36-0.50 cpsc. It is clear from the present investigation that although the bacterial strain became at least 10 times more resistant to ciprofloxacin during therapy, no change in their susceptibility to phagocytosis occurred refuting the idea that the emergence of drug resistant strains during therapy results in "super-bugs" of greater virulence.

  12. The anti-arrhythmic effects of prednisone in patients with sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsen, Amr

    2011-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) affects 2.3 million people in the United States and is currently the most common cardiac arrhythmia. Its overall prevalence is only increasing as the population ages. The classical risk factors for developing AF include hypertension, valvular disease, ischemic cardiomyopathy, and thyroid disease. In some patients with AF, an underlying cardiovascular pathology is not identified and the etiology remains unknown. Treatment modalities for AF typically include rate control medications, antiarrhythmics and radio frequency ablation (RFA), each of which is accompanied by its own risk of complications. We report a case of symptomatic AF that was refractory to multiple antiarrhythmics and an RFA procedure which resolved with prednisone. In this case, AF was associated with cardiac sarcoidosis, a disorder that is thought to be due to granulomatous involvement of the myocardium and increased systemic inflammation.

  13. The application of carbon nanotubes in target drug delivery systems for cancer therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Zhenzhong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Among all cancer treatment options, chemotherapy continues to play a major role in killing free cancer cells and removing undetectable tumor micro-focuses. Although chemotherapies are successful in some cases, systemic toxicity may develop at the same time due to lack of selectivity of the drugs for cancer tissues and cells, which often leads to the failure of chemotherapies. Obviously, the therapeutic effects will be revolutionarily improved if human can deliver the anticancer drugs with high selectivity to cancer cells or cancer tissues. This selective delivery of the drugs has been called target treatment. To realize target treatment, the first step of the strategies is to build up effective target drug delivery systems. Generally speaking, such a system is often made up of the carriers and drugs, of which the carriers play the roles of target delivery. An ideal carrier for target drug delivery systems should have three pre-requisites for their functions: (1 they themselves have target effects; (2 they have sufficiently strong adsorptive effects for anticancer drugs to ensure they can transport the drugs to the effect-relevant sites; and (3 they can release the drugs from them in the effect-relevant sites, and only in this way can the treatment effects develop. The transporting capabilities of carbon nanotubes combined with appropriate surface modifications and their unique physicochemical properties show great promise to meet the three pre-requisites. Here, we review the progress in the study on the application of carbon nanotubes as target carriers in drug delivery systems for cancer therapies.

  14. ZnO nanoparticles as drug delivery agent for photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhar-e-Alam, M.; Rahim, S.; Atif, M.; Hammad Aziz, M.; Imran Malick, M.; Zaidi, S. S. Z.; Suleman, R.; Majid, A.

    2014-02-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) limits the success of many tumoricidal drugs. Non-significant accumulation of the drug into the target site is one major problem in photodynamic therapy. Nanoparticles are extensively used as efficient drug carriers in various local infectious and premalignant biological tissues. Due to their unique physical and chemical properties, PEGylated zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) exhibit high drug loading capacities, sustained drug release profiles and long-term anticancer efficacy. (Polyethylene glycol) PEG-zinc oxide nanoparticles were synthesized using the aquis chemical technique. Morphology/structural analysis of the said nanoparticles was confirmed by applying many techniques, e.g. scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and XRD. Average grain size of the nanoparticles, which was ≈100 nm, was calculated by applying the Scherrer formula. The PEGylated ZnO NPs were loaded with protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) to enhance the capability of drug carrying potency. Current work focused on the comparison of the cell killing effect (apoptosis/necrosis) by functionalizing different nanostructures via PEGylated ZnO NPs and bare ZnO NPs using the free-standing drug delivery procedure. ZnO NPs were used as anticancer drug vehicles because of their biocompatibility and bio-safety profile. The apoptotic effect of PEGylated tumoricidal drugs has been studied in human muscle carcinoma (RD cell line) in the dark as well as under laser exposure. It was concluded that PpIX localization was a significant time greater using encapsulation as compared to a conventional drug delivery system. This new technique may find excellent opportunities in the field of nanomedicine, especially in a multidrug delivery system.

  15. Efficacy of triple therapy and sequential therapy in the eradication of Helicobacter pylor in patients receiving long-term non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs treatnent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄鑫薪

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the efficacy of triple therapy and sequential therapy in the eradication of Helicobacter pylori(Hp) in patients receiving long-term non-steroidal antiinflammatorv drugs(NSAID) treatment. Methods Patients receiving long-term NSAID treatment were enrolled

  16. Tuberculosis--advances in development of new drugs, treatment regimens, host-directed therapies, and biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Robert S; Maeurer, Markus; Mwaba, Peter; Chakaya, Jeremiah; Rustomjee, Roxana; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Marais, Ben; Schito, Marco; Churchyard, Gavin; Swaminathan, Soumya; Hoelscher, Michael; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2016-04-01

    Tuberculosis is the leading infectious cause of death worldwide, with 9·6 million cases and 1·5 million deaths reported in 2014. WHO estimates 480,000 cases of these were multidrug resistant (MDR). Less than half of patients who entered into treatment for MDR tuberculosis successfully completed that treatment, mainly due to high mortality and loss to follow-up. These in turn illustrate weaknesses in current treatment regimens and national tuberculosis programmes, coupled with operational treatment challenges. In this Review we provide an update on recent developments in the tuberculosis drug-development pipeline (including new and repurposed antimicrobials and host-directed drugs) as they are applied to new regimens to shorten and improve outcomes of tuberculosis treatment. Several new or repurposed antimicrobial drugs are in advanced trial stages for MDR tuberculosis, and two new antimicrobial drug candidates are in early-stage trials. Several trials to reduce the duration of therapy in MDR and drug-susceptible tuberculosis are ongoing. A wide range of candidate host-directed therapies are being developed to accelerate eradication of infection, prevent new drug resistance, and prevent permanent lung injury. As these drugs have been approved for other clinical indications, they are now ready for repurposing for tuberculosis in phase 2 clinical trials. We assess risks associated with evaluation of new treatment regimens, and highlight opportunities to advance tuberculosis research generally through regulatory innovation in MDR tuberculosis. Progress in tuberculosis-specific biomarkers (including culture conversion, PET and CT imaging, and gene expression profiles) can support this innovation. Several global initiatives now provide unique opportunities to tackle the tuberculosis epidemic through collaborative partnerships between high-income countries and middle-income and low-income countries for clinical trials training and research, allowing funders to

  17. The lag time in initiating clinical testing of new drugs in combination with radiation therapy, a significant barrier to progress?

    OpenAIRE

    Blumenfeld, P; Pfeffer, R M; Symon, Z; Den, R B; Dicker, A.P.; Raben, D.; Lawrence, Y R

    2014-01-01

    Background: The clinical development of new drugs with radiation appears to be limited. We hypothesised that phase I clinical trials with radiation therapy (RT) are initiated too late into a new drug's lifetime, impeding the ability to complete RT–drug development programmes before patent expiration. Methods: We identified novel drug–radiation phase I combination trials performed between 1980 and 2012 within the PubMed and ClinicalTrials.gov databases. Data gathered for each drug included: da...

  18. 帕金森病的药物治疗%Drug therapy for Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨任民

    2011-01-01

    帕金森病(PD)的多种治疗药物是针对运动症状的治疗,而PD非运动症状可降低患者生活质量,甚至可加重PD患者的运动症状和功能残疾,其治疗也不容忽视.本文综述PD运动症状的药物治疗原则,以及各类药物的临床使用及其疗效评价,同时汇总多种非运动症状的药物治疗研究.%Several drugs have been used to treat the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). Non-motor symptoms may reduce quality of life, cause more motor symptoms and functional disability in PD patients. The therapy for non-motor symptoms should not be ignored. This review describes the principle and application of drug therapy for motor symptoms of PD, and summarizes drug therapy for a variety of non-motor symptoms.

  19. Nanoparticle-Based Drug Delivery for Therapy of Lung Cancer: Progress and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anish Babu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The last decade has witnessed enormous advances in the development and application of nanotechnology in cancer detection, diagnosis, and therapy culminating in the development of the nascent field of “cancer nanomedicine.” A nanoparticle as per the National Institutes of Health (NIH guidelines is any material that is used in the formulation of a drug resulting in a final product smaller than 1 micron in size. Nanoparticle-based therapeutic systems have gained immense popularity due to their ability to overcome biological barriers, effectively deliver hydrophobic therapies, and preferentially target disease sites. Currently, many formulations of nanocarriers are utilized including lipid-based, polymeric and branched polymeric, metal-based, magnetic, and mesoporous silica. Innovative strategies have been employed to exploit the multicomponent, three-dimensional constructs imparting multifunctional capabilities. Engineering such designs allows simultaneous drug delivery of chemotherapeutics and anticancer gene therapies to site-specific targets. In lung cancer, nanoparticle-based therapeutics is paving the way in the diagnosis, imaging, screening, and treatment of primary and metastatic tumors. However, translating such advances from the bench to the bedside has been severely hampered by challenges encountered in the areas of pharmacology, toxicology, immunology, large-scale manufacturing, and regulatory issues. This review summarizes current progress and challenges in nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems, citing recent examples targeted at lung cancer treatment.

  20. Renal denervation, adjusted drugs, or combined therapy for resistant hypertension: A meta-regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiao-Yu; Cheng, Bin; Li, Ying-Li; Wang, Yue-Feng

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study is to systematically evaluate the efficacy of renal denervation (RD), adjusted drugs, or combined therapy for resistant hypertension (RH) through a systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled studies.Publications were comprehensively searched. Studies that investigated the effects of RD and/or adjusted drugs in lowering blood pressure (BP) were included. After quality assessment and data extraction, subgroup analyzes were first performed according to blinding method. Meta-regression and inverted funnel plots were also conducted.A total of 13 studies containing 1604 RH patients were included. Compared with control, the meta-analysis showed that RD significantly reduced office-based BP and ambulatory BP in 6 months in the unblinded studies, while no significant difference was found in the blinded studies. Meta-regression demonstrated the significant influence of blinding method on BP reduction, and further analysis revealed a significant BP reduction compared with baseline even in the control arm of blinded studies. RD had similar effects compared with adjusted drugs, and combined therapy seemed to further reduce the level of BP.The efficacy of RD was different between blinded and unblinded studies, and our data revealed a significant BP-lowering effect in the control arm of blinded studies, which was helpful to explain this finding. Furthermore, RD seemed to be equivalent to adjusted drugs, and also we suggested a potential advantage of combined therapy of RD and adjusted drugs compared with monotherapy for RH. However, more studies are warranted to better address the issue.

  1. Transdermal hormone therapy in postmenopausal women: A review of metabolic effects and drug delivery technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan W Kopper

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Nathan W Kopper, Jennifer Gudeman, Daniel J ThompsonKV Pharmaceutical, St. Louis, MO, USAAbstract: Vasomotor symptoms (VMS associated with menopause can cause significant discomfort and decrease the quality of life for women in the peri-menopausal and post-menopausal stages of life. Hormone therapy (HT is the mainstay of treatment for menopausal symptoms and is currently the only therapy proven effective for VMS. Numerous HT options are available to treat VMS, including estrogen-only and estrogen-progestogen combination products to meet the needs of both hysterectomized and nonhysterectomized women. In addition to selecting an appropriate estrogen or estrogen-progestogen combination, consideration should be given to the route of administration to best suit the needs of the patient. Delivery systems for hormone therapy include oral tablets, transdermal patches, transdermal topical (nonpatch products, and intravaginal preparations. Oral is currently the most commonly utilized route of administration in the United States. However, evidence suggests that oral delivery may lead to some undesirable physiologic effects caused by significant gut and hepatic metabolism. Transdermal drug delivery may mitigate some of these effects by avoiding gut and hepatic first-pass metabolism. Advantages of transdermal delivery include the ability to administer unmetabolized estradiol directly to the blood stream, administration of lower doses compared to oral products, and minimal stimulation of hepatic protein production. Several estradiol transdermal delivery technologies are available, including various types of patches, topical gels, and a transdermal spray.Keywords: estradiol, hormone therapy, menopause, transdermal drug delivery, vasomotor symptoms

  2. Dual-targeting anti-angiogenic cyclic peptides as potential drug leads for cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lai Yue; Craik, David J.; Daly, Norelle L.

    2016-01-01

    Peptide analogues derived from bioactive hormones such as somatostatin or certain growth factors have great potential as angiogenesis inhibitors for cancer applications. In an attempt to combat emerging drug resistance many FDA-approved anti-angiogenesis therapies are co-administered with cytotoxic drugs as a combination therapy to target multiple signaling pathways of cancers. However, cancer therapies often encounter limiting factors such as high toxicities and side effects. Here, we combined two anti-angiogenic epitopes that act on different pathways of angiogenesis into a single non-toxic cyclic peptide framework, namely MCoTI-II (Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor-II), and subsequently assessed the anti-angiogenic activity of the novel compound. We hypothesized that the combination of these two epitopes would elicit a synergistic effect by targeting different angiogenesis pathways and result in improved potency, compared to that of a single epitope. This novel approach has resulted in the development of a potent, non-toxic, stable and cyclic analogue with nanomolar potency inhibition in in vitro endothelial cell migration and in vivo chorioallantoic membrane angiogenesis assays. This is the first report to use the MCoTI-II framework to develop a 2-in-1 anti-angiogenic peptide, which has the potential to be used as a form of combination therapy for targeting a wide range of cancers. PMID:27734947

  3. Antiarrhythmic Effect Of Antioxidants In Patients With Atrial Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Khabchabov PhD, Rustam; RG PhD, Khabchabov; ER PhD, Makhmudova

    2016-01-01

    Resume In accordance with modern concepts, one of the leading roles in the development of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and flutter, belongs - the restructuring of the myocardium, in second place - sick sinus syndrome and in third place - the presence of accessory pathways and hormonal disorders. The development of atrial fibrillation and flutter in the structural pathology, primarily begins with of drugs if it does not work, we have to carry out ablation. Providing proper, effective and imp...

  4. Impact of pharmaceutical care interventions on the occurrence and resolution of side/adverse drug effects associated with antiretroviral drug therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nwaozuzu, E.E.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pharmaceutical care (PC has been shown to improve the outcome of drug therapy in many disease conditions. HIV/AIDS is one of the disease conditions that are fraught with many problems that can benefit from this new emphasis of pharmacy practice also known as ‘pharmacists care’. Adverse drug reactions or effects are unintended and undesirable effects of drugs other than their known and expected actions which can be unpleasant and sometimes fatal. This study is designed to evaluate the impact of pharmaceutical care activities on the occurrence of side/adverse drug reactions in HIV/AIDS patients receiving antiretroviral drugs. The components of the American society of health-system pharmacists (ASHP guidelines on ‘standardized method for pharmaceutical care’ was used as a data collection instrument to evaluate, document and intervene in the antiretroviral therapy of about one thousand four hundred and seventy three (1,473 patients. The study identified about sixty (60 different types of side/adverse effects occurring among these patients through observation and patient complaints. The study also showed significant reduction in the incidence of side/adverse drug effects following the Pharmacist’s intervention activities, p ≥ 0.5. The study showed that pharmacists’ interventions in antiretroviral drug therapy through Pharmaceutical care can significantly reduce the incidence of side/adverse drug effects in HIV/AIDS patients receiving antiretroviral drugs.

  5. Knee osteoarthritis a pathological basis for use of newer drug therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukundraj S. Keny

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Knee osteoarthritis (OA is a disease of the whole knee joint occurring due to an interaction between inflammatory, hypoxic, and mechanical pathways. Initial management includes monotherapy with analgesics or anti and #8209;inflammatory agents, eventually switching over to combination therapy with steroids and/or newer drugs. Cardiovascular risks associated with non and #8209;steroidal anti and #8209;inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs limit their long term use. Hence, novel target receptors or pathways, which remain unaffected by conventional therapy and modify disease are being increasingly looked for. Newer drugs such as glucosamine, chondroitin, methylsulfonylmethane, diacerein along with vitamins/minerals are commonly used as adjuncts to NSAIDs or as monotherapy. Because of their novel mechanisms of action and better safety profile they seem to be promising as disease modifying agents in the treatment of OA. Google, PubMed, Cochrane databases and Science Direct search was performed, and relevant articles were identified. This review focuses on the pathological targets which these drugs modify in order to bring about a symptom modifying effect. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(3.000: 424-430

  6. Magnetic field activated drug release system based on magnetic PLGA microspheres for chemo-thermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Kun; Song, Lina; Gu, Zhuxiao; Yang, Fang; Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ning

    2015-12-01

    Controlled drug delivery systems have been extensively investigated for cancer therapy in order to obtain better specific targeting and therapeutic efficiency. Herein, we developed doxorubicin-loaded magnetic PLGA microspheres (DOX-MMS), in which DOX was encapsulated in the core and high contents (28.3 wt%) of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles (IOs) were electrostatically assembled on the surface of microsphere to ensure the high sensitivity to response of an external alternating current magnetic field (ACMF). The IOs in PLGA shell can both induce the heat effect and trigger shell permeability enhancement to release drugs when DOX-MMs was activated by ACMF. Results show that the cumulative drug release from DOX-MMs exposed to ACMF for 30 min (21.6%) was significantly higher (approximately 7 times higher) than that not exposed to ACMF (2.8%). The combination of hyperthermia and enhanced DOX release from DOX-MMS is beneficial for in vitro 4T1 breast cancer cell apoptosis as well as effective inhibition of tumor growth in 4T1 tumor xenografts. Therefore, the DOX-MMS can be optimized as powerful delivery system for efficient magnetic responsive drug release and chemo-thermal therapy.

  7. A comprehensive overview of exosomes as drug delivery vehicles - endogenous nanocarriers for targeted cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Kasper Bendix; Gudbergsson, Johann Mar; Skov, Martin Najbjerg; Pilgaard, Linda; Moos, Torben; Duroux, Meg

    2014-08-01

    Exosomes denote a class of secreted nanoparticles defined by size, surface protein and lipid composition, and the ability to carry RNA and proteins. They are important mediators of intercellular communication and regulators of the cellular niche, and their altered characteristics in many diseases, such as cancer, suggest them to be important both for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, prompting the idea of using exosomes as drug delivery vehicles, especially for gene therapy. This review covers the current status of evidence presented in the field of exosome-based drug delivery systems. Components for successful exosome-based drug delivery, such as choice of donor cell, therapeutic cargo, use of targeting peptide, loading method and administration route are highlighted and discussed with a general focus pertaining to the results obtained in models of different cancer types. In addition, completed and on-going clinical trials are described, evaluating exosome-based therapies for the treatment of different cancer types. Due to their endogenous origin, exosome-based drug delivery systems may have advantages in the treatment of cancer, but their design needs further refinement to justify their usage on the clinical scale.

  8. Nanotechnology-Based Drug Delivery Systems for Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calixto, Giovana Maria Fioramonti; Bernegossi, Jéssica; de Freitas, Laura Marise; Fontana, Carla Raquel; Chorilli, Marlus

    2016-03-11

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising alternative approach for improved cancer treatment. In PDT, a photosensitizer (PS) is administered that can be activated by light of a specific wavelength, which causes selective damage to the tumor and its surrounding vasculature. The success of PDT is limited by the difficulty in administering photosensitizers (PSs) with low water solubility, which compromises the clinical use of several molecules. Incorporation of PSs in nanostructured drug delivery systems, such as polymeric nanoparticles (PNPs), solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs), nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs), gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), hydrogels, liposomes, liquid crystals, dendrimers, and cyclodextrin is a potential strategy to overcome this difficulty. Additionally, nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems may improve the transcytosis of a PS across epithelial and endothelial barriers and afford the simultaneous co-delivery of two or more drugs. Based on this, the application of nanotechnology in medicine may offer numerous exciting possibilities in cancer treatment and improve the efficacy of available therapeutics. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to review nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems for photodynamic therapy of cancer.

  9. Hepatitis B Virus Reactivation in the Setting of Cancer Chemotherapy and Other Immunosuppressive Drug Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Stevan A; Perrillo, Robert P

    2016-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus reactivation (HBVr) is an important complication of immunosuppressive drug therapy (ISDT). It can occur with active or resolved hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection with a clinical spectrum that ranges from mild elevations in liver tests to fulminant hepatic failure. The risk of it occurring is determined by the interplay between HBV serological status, level of viremia, and the immunosuppressive potency of the drug(s) used. Reactivation is most common during treatment of hematologic malignancies but also occurs with chemotherapy for breast cancer and numerous other solid organ malignancies, organ transplant, and immune suppression for nonmalignant conditions. The expansion of new biologic treatments for malignant and nonmalignant disorders has enlarged the population at risk. Increased awareness of HBVr among healthcare providers who prescribe ISDT, adoption of routine HBV screening, and linking the results of screening to antiviral prophylaxis are needed to reduce the incidence of this potentially fatal but preventable disorder.

  10. Drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus associated with nab-paclitaxel therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamond, N W D; Younis, T; Purdy, K; Dorreen, M S

    2013-10-01

    Drug-induced lupus erythematosus (dile) syndromes are documented complications of chemotherapeutic agents, including paclitaxel. Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (scle) is a distinct dile syndrome presenting with characteristic annular or papulosquamous skin lesions in a photosensitive distribution with associated high anti-ssa titres. Previously, dile syndromes complicating paclitaxel therapy have been attributed to polyethoxylated castor oil (Kolliphor EL: BASF, Ludwigshafen, Germany), the biologic solvent included in the drug's original formulation (Taxol: Bristol-Myers Squibb, Montreal, QC), rather than the parent chemotherapy molecule. Here, we report a characteristic case of drug-induced scle complicating treatment with nanoparticle albumin bound (nab)-paclitaxel (Abraxane: Celgene, Summit, NJ, U.S.A.), a solvent-free taxane formulation. The pertinent English-language literature is also discussed. This case report is the first to link solvent-free paclitaxel with scle, and it suggests that the parent molecule is responsible for the reaction.

  11. DNA Nanotechnology for Precise Control over Drug Delivery and Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angell, Chava; Xie, Sibai; Zhang, Liangfang; Chen, Yi

    2016-03-02

    Nanomedicine has been growing exponentially due to its enhanced drug targeting and reduced drug toxicity. It uses the interactions where nanotechnological components and biological systems communicate with each other to facilitate the delivery performance. At this scale, the physiochemical properties of delivery systems strongly affect their capacities. Among current delivery systems, DNA nanotechnology shows many advantages because of its unprecedented engineering abilities. Through molecular recognition, DNA nanotechnology can be used to construct a variety of nanostructures with precisely controllable size, shape, and surface chemistry, which can be appreciated in the delivery process. In this review, different approaches that are currently used for the construction of DNA nanostructures are reported. Further, the utilization of these DNA nanostructures with the well-defined parameters for the precise control in drug delivery and gene therapy is discussed.

  12. The use of levomepromazine in Hyperemesis Gravidarum resistant to drug therapy--a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heazell, Alexander E P; Langford, Nigel; Judge, Jatinder K; Heazell, Martin A; Downey, Gabrielle P

    2005-01-01

    Hyperemesis Gravidarum (HG) is a potentially serious complication of early pregnancy, which may rarely be severe enough to warrant termination of pregnancy. HG requires prompt treatment with intravenous fluids, thiamine supplementation and appropriate anti-emetic therapy. Anti-histamines such as promethazine are favoured as first-line agents, with prochlorperazine being used as a second-line drug. However, there is no clear data as to the most appropriate drug if these are ineffective. A case series of six women who presented with HG resistant to drug treatment is described. In these cases, levomepromazine 6.25mg tds was used to control HG. Five pregnancies progressed leading to live born infants with no evidence of congenital anomaly. One pregnancy resulted in an intra-uterine death with no external or ultrasound evidence of congenital anomaly. The role of phenothiazines in the pharmacological management of HG is discussed.

  13. Fighting cancer with nanomedicine---drug-polyester nanoconjugates for targeted cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Qian

    The aim of my Ph. D. research is to develop drug-polyester nanoconjugates (NCs) as a novel translational polymeric drug delivery system that can successfully evade non-specific uptake by reticuloendothelial system (RES) and facilitate targeted cancer diagnosis and therapy. By uniquely integrating well-established chemical reaction-controlled ring opening polymerization (ROP) with nanoprecipitation technique, I successfully developed a polymeric NC system based on poly(lactic acid) and poly(O-carboxyanhydrides) (OCA) that allows for the quantitative loading and controlled release of a variety of anticancer drugs. The developed NC system could be easily modified with parmidronate, one of bisphosphonates commonly used as the treatment for disease characterized by osteolysis, to selectively deliver doxorubicin (Doxo) to the bone tissues and substantially to improve their therapeutic efficiency in inhibiting the growth of osteosarcoma in both murine and canine models. More importantly, the developed NCs could avidly bind to human serum albumin, a ubiquitous protein in the blood, to bypass the endothelium barrier and penetrate into tumor tissues more deeply and efficiently. When compared with PEGylated NCs, these albumin-bound NCs showed significantly reduced accumulation in RES and enhanced tumor accumulation, which consequently contributed to higher their tumor inhibition capabilities. In addition, the developed NC system allows easy incorporation of X-ray computed tomography (CT) contrast agents to largely facilitate personalized therapy by improving diagnosis accuracy and monitoring therapeutic efficacy. Through the synthetic and formulation strategy I developed, a large quantity (grams or larger-scale) of drug-polyester NCs can be easily obtained, which can be used as a model drug delivery system for fundamental studies as well as a real drug delivery system for disease treatment in clinical settings.

  14. Study of HIV-1 Drug Resistance in Patients Receiving Free Antiretroviral Therapy in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-ping LI; Hai-wei ZHOU; Jiang-hong HUANG; Hong PENG; Peng-fei MA; Yi-ming SHAO; Hui XING; Zhe WANG; Xue-feng SI; Lian-en WANG; Hua CHENG; Wei-guo CUI; Shu-lin JIANG; Ling-jie LIAO

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of drug-resistance mutations, resistance to antiretroviral drugs, and the subsequent virological response to therapy in treatment-naive and antiretroviral-treated patients infected with HIV/AIDS in Henan, China, a total of 431 plasma samples were collected in Queshan county between 2003 and 2004, from patients undergoing the antiretroviral regimen Zidovudine + Didanosine + Nevirapine (Azt+Ddi+Nvp). Personal information was collected by face to face interview. Viral load and genotypic drug resistance were tested. Drug resistance mutation data were obtained by analyzing patient-derived sequences through the HIVdb Program (http://hivdb.stanford.edu). Overall, 38.5% of treatment-naive patients had undetectable plasma viral load (VL), the rate significantly increased to 61.9% in 0 to 6 months treatment patients (mean 3 months) (P<0.005) but again significantly decrease to 38.6% in 6 to 12 months treatment patients (mean 9 months) (P<0.001) and 40.0% in patients receiving more than 12 months treatment (mean 16 months) (P<0.005). The prevalence of drug resistance in patients who had a detectable VL and available sequences were 7.0%, 48.6%, 70.8%, 72.3% in treatment-na(1)ve, 0 to 6 months treatment, 6 to 12 months treatment, and treatment for greater than 12 months patients, respectively. No mutation associated with resistance to Protease inhibitor (PI) was detected in this study. Nucleoside RT inhibitor (NRTI) mutations always emerged after non-nucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI) mutations, and were only found in patients treated for more than 6 months, with a frequency less than 5%, with the exception of mutation T215Y (12.8%, 6/47) which occurred in patients treated for more than 12 months. NNRTI mutations emerged quickly after therapy begun, and increased significantly in patients treated for more than 6 months (P<0.005), and the most frequent mutations were K103N, V106A, Y181C, G190A. There had been optimal viral suppression in

  15. Magnetic graphene oxide as a carrier for targeted delivery of chemotherapy drugs in cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ya-Shu; Lu, Yu-Jen; Chen, Jyh-Ping

    2017-04-01

    A magnetic targeted functionalized graphene oxide (GO) complex is constituted as a nanocarrier for targeted delivery and pH-responsive controlled release of chemotherapy drugs to cancer cells. Magnetic graphene oxide (mGO) was prepared by chemical co-precipitation of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles on GO nano-platelets. The mGO was successively modified by chitosan and mPEG-NHS through covalent bindings to synthesize mGOC-PEG. The polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety is expected to prolong the circulation time of mGO by reducing the reticuloendothelial system clearance. Irinotecan (CPT-11) or doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded to mGOC-PEG through π-π stacking interactions for magnetic targeted delivery of the cancer chemotherapy drug. The best values of loading efficiency and loading content of CPT-11 were 54% and 2.7% respectively; whereas for DOX, they were 65% and 393% The pH-dependent drug release profile was further experimented at different pHs, in which 60% of DOX was released at pH 5.4 and 10% was released at pH 7.4. In contrast, 90% CPT-11 was released at pH 5.4 and 70% at pH 7.4. Based on the drug loading and release characteristics, mGOC-PEG/DOX was further chosen for in vitro cytotoxicity tests against U87 human glioblastoma cell line. The IC50 value of mGOC-PEG/DOX was found to be similar to that of free DOX but was reduced dramatically when subject to magnetic targeting. It is concluded that with the high drug loading and pH-dependent drug release properties, mGOC-PEG will be a promising drug carrier for targeted delivery of chemotherapy drugs in cancer therapy.

  16. Longitudinal Detection and Persistence of Minority Drug-Resistant Populations and Their Effect on Salvage Therapy.

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    Masako Nishizawa

    Full Text Available Drug-resistant HIV are more prevalent and persist longer than previously demonstrated by bulk sequencing due to the ability to detect low-frequency variants. To clarify a clinical benefit to monitoring minority-level drug resistance populations as a guide to select active drugs for salvage therapy, we retrospectively analyzed the dynamics of low-frequency drug-resistant population in antiretroviral (ARV-exposed drug resistant individuals.Six HIV-infected individuals treated with ARV for more than five years were analyzed. These individuals had difficulty in controlling viremia, and treatment regimens were switched multiple times guided by standard drug resistance testing using bulk sequencing. To detect minority variant populations with drug resistance, we used a highly sensitive allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR with detection thresholds of 0.3-2%. According to ARV used in these individuals, we focused on the following seven reverse transcriptase inhibitor-resistant mutations: M41L, K65R, K70R, K103N, Y181C, M184V, and T215F/Y. Results of AS-PCR were compared with bulk sequencing data for concordance and presence of additional mutations. To clarify the genetic relationship between low-frequency and high-frequency populations, AS-PCR amplicon sequences were compared with bulk sequences in phylogenetic analysis.The use of AS-PCR enabled detection of the drug-resistant mutations, M41L, K103N, Y181C, M184V and T215Y, present as low-frequency populations in five of the six individuals. These drug resistant variants persisted for several years without ARV pressure. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that pre-existing K103N and T215I variants had close genetic relationships with high-frequency K103N and T215I observed during treatment.Our results demonstrate the long-term persistence of drug-resistant viruses in the absence of drug pressure. The rapid virologic failures with pre-existing mutant viruses detectable by AS-PCR highlight the clinical importance of

  17. PL 03-3 THE FUTURE DEVELOPMENT OF DRUG THERAPY FOR HYPERTENSION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeldsen, Sverre

    2016-09-01

    There is a whole armament of good drugs for treatment of hypertension including diuretics, calcium antagonist, angiotensin receptor antagonists and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors. Secondary drugs mostly used for special indications include beta-blockers, alpha-blockers, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (aldosterone antagonists), renin-inhibitors, centrally acting drugs, direct vasodilators and others.A variety of new drugs targeting different pressor mechanism exist and have partly been studies experimentally but will unlikely make it to clinical use in human hypertension. The reason for this is mainly the fact that all existing drugs are generic and inexpensive. The clinical development of new drugs has thus halted because industry does not get paid back for their investments. A recent example is the angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor which has success in the treatment of heart failure at least partly because of powerful blood pressure lowering properties. However, one may also wonder whether potential harmful effects from long term treatment such as deposition of beta-amyloid in the brain may influence the risk of Alzheimer and prohibit development for use in hypertension.Against the solid documentation of today's first line drugs on preventing the cardiovascular complications of hypertension potential new drugs on the market would need to be tested in mega-trials before likely to be successful. Even if proven effective the cost issue would remain as a major barrier.Thus, the future development of drug therapy for hypertension would be improving the clinical aspects including overcoming clinical inertia and adherence to the drugs. In other words education of physicians and patients to make the right choices and follow-up on treatment that has been initiated. Targets are always the same - patients with well controlled blood pressure and without side effects. Adherence may be facilitated with drug monitoring in blood and urine, and

  18. Racial differences in long-term adherence to oral antidiabetic drug therapy: a longitudinal cohort study

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    Meigs James B

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adherence to oral antidiabetic medications is often suboptimal. Adherence differences may contribute to health disparities for black diabetes patients, including higher microvascular event rates, greater complication-related disability, and earlier mortality. Methods In this longitudinal retrospective cohort study, we used 10 years of patient-level claims and electronic medical record data (1/1/1992–12/31/2001 to assess differences in short- and long-term adherence to oral antidiabetic medication among 1906 newly diagnosed adults with diabetes (26% black, 74% white in a managed care setting in which all members have prescription drug coverage. Four main outcome measures included: (1 time from diabetes diagnosis until first prescription of oral antidiabetic medication; (2 primary adherence (time from first prescription to prescription fill; (3 time until discontinuation of oral antidiabetic medication from first prescription; and (4 long-term adherence (amount dispensed versus amount prescribed over a 24-month follow-up from first oral antidiabetic medication prescription. Results Black patients were as likely as whites to initiate oral therapy and fill their first prescription, but experienced higher rates of medication discontinuation (HR: 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2, 2.7 and were less adherent over time. These black-white differences increased over the first six months of therapy but stabilized thereafter for patients who initiated on sulfonylureas. Significant black-white differences in adherence levels were constant throughout follow-up for patients initiated on metformin therapy. Conclusion Racial differences in adherence to oral antidiabetic drug therapy persist even with equal access to medication. Early and continued emphasis on adherence from initiation of therapy may reduce persistent racial differences in medication use and clinical outcomes.

  19. Comparison of Gating Properties and Use-Dependent Block of Nav1.5 and Nav1.7 Channels by Anti-Arrhythmics Mexiletine and Lidocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Mi, Jianxun; Lu, Ka; Lu, Yanxin; Wang, KeWei

    2015-01-01

    Mexiletine and lidocaine are widely used class IB anti-arrhythmic drugs that are considered to act by blocking voltage-gated open sodium currents for treatment of ventricular arrhythmias and relief of pain. To gain mechanistic insights into action of anti-arrhythmics, we characterized biophysical properties of Nav1.5 and Nav1.7 channels stably expressed in HEK293 cells and compared their use-dependent block in response to mexiletine and lidocaine using whole-cell patch clamp recordings. While the voltage-dependent activation of Nav1.5 or Nav1.7 was not affected by mexiletine and lidocaine, the steady-state fast and slow inactivation of Nav1.5 and Nav1.7 were significantly shifted to hyperpolarized direction by either mexiletine or lidocaine in dose-dependent manner. Both mexiletine and lidocaine enhanced the slow component of closed-state inactivation, with mexiletine exerting stronger inhibition on either Nav1.5 or Nav1.7. The recovery from inactivation of Nav1.5 or Nav1.7 was significantly prolonged by mexiletine compared to lidocaine. Furthermore, mexiletine displayed a pronounced and prominent use-dependent inhibition of Nav1.5 than lidocaine, but not Nav1.7 channels. Taken together, our findings demonstrate differential responses to blockade by mexiletine and lidocaine that preferentially affect the gating of Nav1.5, as compared to Nav1.7; and mexiletine exhibits stronger use-dependent block of Nav1.5. The differential gating properties of Nav1.5 and Nav1.7 in response to mexiletine and lidocaine may help explain the drug effectiveness and advance in new designs of safe and specific sodium channel blockers for treatment of cardiac arrhythmia or pain.

  20. Comparison of Gating Properties and Use-Dependent Block of Nav1.5 and Nav1.7 Channels by Anti-Arrhythmics Mexiletine and Lidocaine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wang

    Full Text Available Mexiletine and lidocaine are widely used class IB anti-arrhythmic drugs that are considered to act by blocking voltage-gated open sodium currents for treatment of ventricular arrhythmias and relief of pain. To gain mechanistic insights into action of anti-arrhythmics, we characterized biophysical properties of Nav1.5 and Nav1.7 channels stably expressed in HEK293 cells and compared their use-dependent block in response to mexiletine and lidocaine using whole-cell patch clamp recordings. While the voltage-dependent activation of Nav1.5 or Nav1.7 was not affected by mexiletine and lidocaine, the steady-state fast and slow inactivation of Nav1.5 and Nav1.7 were significantly shifted to hyperpolarized direction by either mexiletine or lidocaine in dose-dependent manner. Both mexiletine and lidocaine enhanced the slow component of closed-state inactivation, with mexiletine exerting stronger inhibition on either Nav1.5 or Nav1.7. The recovery from inactivation of Nav1.5 or Nav1.7 was significantly prolonged by mexiletine compared to lidocaine. Furthermore, mexiletine displayed a pronounced and prominent use-dependent inhibition of Nav1.5 than lidocaine, but not Nav1.7 channels. Taken together, our findings demonstrate differential responses to blockade by mexiletine and lidocaine that preferentially affect the gating of Nav1.5, as compared to Nav1.7; and mexiletine exhibits stronger use-dependent block of Nav1.5. The differential gating properties of Nav1.5 and Nav1.7 in response to mexiletine and lidocaine may help explain the drug effectiveness and advance in new designs of safe and specific sodium channel blockers for treatment of cardiac arrhythmia or pain.

  1. Drug-induced proarrhythmia: risk factors and electrophysiological mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frommeyer, Gerrit; Eckardt, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced ventricular tachyarrhythmias can be caused by cardiovascular drugs, noncardiovascular drugs, and even nonprescription agents. They can result in arrhythmic emergencies and sudden cardiac death. If a new arrhythmia or aggravation of an existing arrhythmia develops during therapy with a drug at a concentration usually considered not to be toxic, the situation can be defined as proarrhythmia. Various cardiovascular and noncardiovascular drugs can increase the occurrence of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia of the 'torsade de pointes' type. Antiarrhythmic drugs, antimicrobial agents, and antipsychotic and antidepressant drugs are the most important groups. Age, female sex, and structural heart disease are important risk factors for the occurrence of torsade de pointes. Genetic predisposition and individual pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic sensitivity also have important roles in the generation of arrhythmias. An increase in spatial or temporal dispersion of repolarization and a triangular action-potential configuration have been identified as crucial predictors of proarrhythmia in experimental models. These studies emphasized that sole consideration of the QT interval is not sufficient to assess the proarrhythmic risk. In this Review, we focus on important triggers of proarrhythmia and the underlying electrophysiological mechanisms that can enhance or prevent the development of torsade de pointes.

  2. Is Yangxue Qingnao Granule Combined with Antihypertensive Drugs, a New Integrative Medicine Therapy, More Effective Than Antihypertensive Therapy Alone in Treating Essential Hypertension?

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    Jie Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Yangxue Qingnao granule (YQG combined with antihypertensive drugs, a new integrative medicine therapy, has been widely used for essential hypertension (EH in China. This study aims to assess the current clinical evidence of YQG combined with antihypertensive drugs for EH. Methods. Randomized controlled trials(RCTs published between 1996 and 2012 on YQG combined with antihypertensive drugs versus antihypertensive drugs in treating EH were retrieved from six major electronic databases, including The Cochrane Library, PubMed, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese Scientific Journal Database, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, and Wanfang Data. Meta-analysis was performed on the overall effects on blood pressure. Results. Twelve randomized trials were included. Methodological quality of the trials was evaluated as generally low. Meta-analysis showed that YQG combined with antihypertensive drugs demonstrated potential effect for lowing either SBP (MD: −7.31 [−11.75, −2.87]; P=0.001 or DBP (MD: −5.21 [−8.19, −2.24]; P=0.0006 compared to antihypertensive drugs alone. Conclusions. It indicated that YQG combined with antihypertensive drugs is more effective than antihypertensive drugs alone in treating EH. However, more RCTs of larger scale, multicentre/country, longer follow-up periods, and higher quality are required to verify the efficacy of integrative medicine therapy over all antihypertensive therapies.

  3. Kidney failure during HIV disease treated with tenofovir, multiple concurrent diseases and drug therapies

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    Roberto Manfredi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A significant case report of a HIV infected patient in his fifties who experienced an excellent virological and immunological response to antiretroviral therapy (which has been modified just to prevent or avoid some adverse events, but developed a severe, sudden acute kidney failure while under a polypharmacy due to some underlying and overwhelming disorders (i.e. arterial hypertension, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, a recent acute heart infarction with remarkable remnants, and finally an anecdotal muscle-joint pain with self-prescription of non-steroideal anti-inflammatory drugs, represents the key point for a debate around the increasing frequency of “polypharmacy” in the field of HIV infection, even when HIV resistance to antiretroviral is not a concern. The continuing increase of mean age of HIV-infected population, plus the existing, sometimes unmodifiable risk factors for cardiovascular, dysmetabolic, and renal disorders, plus the adjunct of anecdotal illnesses prompting the resort to different drugs and medications, either prescribed for HIV infection itself, or taken for concurrent or subsequent diseases, or self-prescribed occasionally due to an intercurrent, trivial disorders per se, may prompt a complicated scenario culminating with a life-threatening acute renal failure of tubular origin. Our report gives us the opportunity to revise and discuss the expected interactions between antiretroviral therapy and the even growing exposure to multiple different drug and drug classes, which may be responsible for relevant drug interactions and direct or adjunctive end-organ impairment, up to life-threatening conditions, which may be avoided or prevented by considering carefully all comorbidites and co-treatments potentially administered to HIV infected patients, thirty years after the discovery of AIDS.

  4. Antiepileptic, behavioral, and antidepressant effects of adjuvant lamotrigine therapy in drug-resistant epilepsy

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    Martinović Žarko J.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the behavioral effects of lamotrigine as add-on therapy in treatment-resistant epilepsy. Methods. An open, prospective, long-term study of lamotrigine as adjuvant therapy was performed in 56 patients with drug-resistant epilepsy (female/male ratio 35/21, age range 16-51 years. All the patients kept seizure diaries, and electroencephalograms were recorded at baseline and during 24 months of the treatment. Quality of life questionnaire, Hamilton depression scale (HMD, Beck depression scale (BDI, and Hamilton anxiety scale (HMA were used before and during lamotrigine therapy. Comparative assessments were made in an age- and sex-matched control group treated with other antiepileptic drugs. Results. Overall, seizure control was improved in 55.3% of the patients, remained unchanged in 39.3%, and deteriorated in 5.4%. Improvement in some quality of life measures occurred in 50% of the patients. The HMD subscales and BDI scale showed significant improvement in lamotrigine treated patients compared to the control group (ANOVA, p < 0.01. Negative behavioral effects occurred in 10.7% of the patients. Conclusion. Lamotrigine demonstrated significant antiepileptic long-term efficacy, and its positive effects on the mood and quality of life, which surpassed the negative behavioral effects, and contributed highly to the favorable treatment outcome.

  5. Cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analysis of drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, T D

    1985-04-01

    A model for cost-benefit analysis and cost-effectiveness analysis (CBA-CEA) of pharmaceutical intervention is presented, and CBA-CEA research methods reported in the literature are reviewed. The cost versus benefit and the cost effectiveness of drug therapy can be analyzed in societal as well as private terms. Since CBA measures costs and outcomes in monetary terms, it can be used to compare net benefits of all types of interventions. CEA, however, can be used only in comparing alternative interventions that can produce a similar health outcome. Research activities needed for identification of treatment protocols, alternative therapies and their respective outcomes, and resource use are described. Quantification of benefits and costs is discussed and inherent strengths and weaknesses of CBA-CEA are summarized. For the wide variety of research activities involved in CBA-CEA, the expertise of economists, physicians, clinical pharmacists and pharmacologists, epidemiologists, sociologists, and psychologists is needed. Inherent in CBA-CEA for drug therapy are judgments, either by analysts or by policy decision makers, about how to value life, pain, anxiety, and happiness and how to distribute health-care resources. When results of CBA-CEA are presented and interpreted with care, this analysis can be an important tool for policy decision makers.

  6. Cancer therapy leading to state of cancer metabolism depression for efficient operation of small dosage cytotoxic drugs

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    Ponizovskiy MR

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available “Prolonged medical starvation” as the method of cancer therapy was borrowed from folk healers Omelchenko A and Breuss R. Author was convinced in efficiency of this method of cancer treatment via examination of cured patients and on own experience. The mechanism of this method of cancer therapy operates via Warburg effect targeting that promotes efficient cancer treatment with small cytotoxic drugs. Just it was described the mechanism of Warburg effect as well as mechanism transmutation of mitochondrial function in cancer metabolism which are exhibited in connection with operation of described method cancer therapy. There were described the biochemical and biophysical mechanisms of formations resistance to some cytotoxic drugs and recurrence cancer disease after disease remission which occur sometimes as result of treatment with great dosage of cytotoxic drugs. Also it was described the benefits of use the method “Prolonged medical starvation” with decreased dosage of cytotoxic drugs for cancer treatment. The significance of this work that it was substantiated the mechanism operation of combination “Prolonged medical starvation” with small dosages cytotoxic drugs of cancer treatment, which mechanism leads to prevention recurrence cancer disease and resistance to anticancer drugs in comparison with intensive anticancer chemotherapy with great dosages of cytotoxic drugs in cancer therapy. Also the offered concepts of cancer therapy mechanism gave possibility to explain mechanisms of some results of experiments eliminating the doubts of the authors these experiments.

  7. Clinical curative effect observation of therapy of Chinese drug iontophoresis in treatment of degenerative osteoarthropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xiao-Lin; Lu, Tan; Yang, Li-Bin; Zhou, Qin-Lan; Qin, Hua; Liang, Qiudong

    2015-07-01

    Degenerative osteoarthropathy is a kind of arthrosis induced by various factors, with main pathological feature of articular cartilage and syndesmophyte formation. In recent years, its morbidity increases year by year and tend to appear more among young people. Its curative effect has yet to be improved. This paper mainly discussed the clinical curative effect of therapy of Chinese drug iontophoresis in degenerative osteoarthropathy. A total of 296 cases of degenerative osteoarthropathy was randomly divided into two groups (with no consideration on gender): Chinese drug iontophoresis group: joint was treated by therapy of Chinese drug iontophoresis and MTZ-F experiment; frequency electrotherapy group: joint was only treated by medium frequency electrotherapy. Two groups were both treated for 30 min for one time, 1 time for a day, total for 4 weeks. Result of the study found that, total effective rate of medium frequency electrotherapy group was 74.3%, Chinese medicine iontophoresis group was 93.2%; curative effect of Chinese medicine iontophoresis group was superior to electrotherapy group. It indicates that, Chinese medicine iontophoresis has good clinical effect in the treatment of osteoarthropathy and deserves to be popularized and applied.

  8. Chemical modifications and bioconjugate reactions of nanomaterials for sensing, imaging, drug delivery and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biju, Vasudevanpillai

    2014-02-07

    As prepared nanomaterials of metals, semiconductors, polymers and carbon often need surface modifications such as ligand exchange, and chemical and bioconjugate reactions for various biosensor, bioanalytical, bioimaging, drug delivery and therapeutic applications. Such surface modifications help us to control the physico-chemical, toxicological and pharmacological properties of nanomaterials. Furthermore, introduction of various reactive functional groups on the surface of nanomaterials allows us to conjugate a spectrum of contrast agents, antibodies, peptides, ligands, drugs and genes, and construct multifunctional and hybrid nanomaterials for the targeted imaging and treatment of cancers. This tutorial review is intended to provide an introduction to newcomers about how chemical and bioconjugate reactions transform the surface of nanomaterials such as silica nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles, gold quantum clusters, semiconductor quantum dots, carbon nanotubes, fullerene and graphene, and accordingly formulate them for applications such as biosensing, bioimaging, drug and gene delivery, chemotherapy, photodynamic therapy and photothermal therapy. Nonetheless, controversial reports and our growing concerns about toxicity and pharmacokinetics of nanomaterials suggest the need for not only rigorous in vivo experiments in animal models but also novel nanomaterials for practical applications in the clinical settings. Further reading of original and review articles cited herein is necessary to buildup in-depth knowledge about the chemistry, bioconjugate chemistry and biological applications of individual nanomaterials.

  9. Drug interaction as cause of spontaneously resolving epidural spinal hematoma on warfarin therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitabh Sagar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 42-year-old male, an old case of deep vein thrombosis on warfarin and other drugs like quetiapine, aspirin, diclofenac sodium, fenofibrate, atorvastatin, propanolol and citalopram for concurrent illnesses, who presented with widespread mucocutaneous bleeding and epidural spinal hematoma. The epidural bleed presented clinically as a nontraumatic, rapidly improving myeloradiculopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the spine revealed an epidural hematoma at D12-L1 level. The case was managed conservatively due lack of neurosurgical facilities. The patient gained full neurological recovery on conservative management alone. This case highlights the problem of drug interaction on warfarin therapy and also an unusual spontaneous recovery of spinal hematoma. Our case was anticoagulated in the recommended therapeutic INR range of 2.2 to 2.4. Most of the similar cases reported in literature were also anticoagulated in the therapeutic range. Thus intraspinal hemorrhage is a rare but dangerous complication of anticoagulant therapy. It must be suspected in any patient on anticoagulant agents who complains of local or referred spinal pain associated with neurological deficits. Drug interactions with warfarin are common. High suspicion and immediate intervention are essential to prevent complications from intraspinal hemorrhage.

  10. [Sildenafil and alprostadil in the combined drug therapy of erectile dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazo, E B; Dmitriev, D G; Gamidov, S I; Ovchinnikov, R I

    2002-01-01

    Forty-four patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) aged 21-72 years aged 21-72 years (mean age 61 years) were examined and treated with sildenafil and alprostadil monotherapy or combined therapy. ED was psychogenic in 9(20.5%), arterial in 12(27.2%), vein occlusive in 9(20.5%) and neurogenic in 14(31.8%) patients. Monotherapy was most effective in psychogenic ED (alprostadil--100%, sildenafil--88.9%), least effective in vein occlusive ED (alprostadil--33.3%, sildenafil--22.2%). Alprostadil was more effective in arterial and neurogenic ED (83.3 vs 66.7 and 78.6 vs 57.1%, respectively). Combination of the two drugs produced much high response: 100, 85.7 and 55.5% in arterial, neurogenic and vein occlusive ED, respectively. Thus, combined treatment with sildenafil and alprostadil is a method of choice in the treatment of ED in failure of monotherapy with these drugs or in vein occlusive ED. In the combined treatment dose of the drugs, number of side effects and cost of therapy are lower.

  11. Combined therapy for multi-drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infection--is there evidence outside the laboratory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuon, Felipe F; Rocha, Jaime L; Merlini, Alexandre B

    2015-09-01

    Acinetobacter are among the most common bacteria isolated in hospital infections, especially in developing countries. Multi-drug, extended-drug or pan-drug resistance makes treatment a real medical challenge. In the present review, the authors describe clinical and experimental data in order to present different current and potential future strategies to treat infections caused by multi-drug-resistant Acinetobacter. The therapeutic options for carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter are scarce, and the current options have poor pharmacokinetic aspects and several side effects. Combined therapy has been an alternative for multi-drug-resistant Acinetobacter. However, this issue is always controversial. In some studies combined therapy has shown superiority for some strains of Acinetobacter in animal models and in vitro studies. However, studies with humans are scarce and too poor quality to suggest the best approach for the treatment of infections caused by multi-drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

  12. Early rehabilitation and neuroprotective drug therapy outcomes in elderly patients with acute stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue Chen; Lufang Chen; Yiqing Tao; Feixue Zhou; Chunlan Cui; Shichao Liu

    2011-01-01

    Sixty elderly patients, who suffered from acute stroke and were admitted within a 1-year period to the Department of Geriatrics in the First Affiliated Hospital of School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, China, underwent early rehabilitation in combination with neuroprotective drug therapy. Limb movement, cognitive functions and daily life self-care ability in elderly patients upon admission and discharge were assessed using the Hunt-Hess scale, functional independence measures and mini-mental state examination. The mean duration of hospital stay among the 60 patients was 35 days. Upon discharge, 42 (75%) of the patients exhibited cognitive impairment to varying degrees, and 25 (45%) of the 56 stroke patients who underwent rehabilitation evaluation attained independence in daily living activities, 11 (20%) required intermittent supervision, and 20 (36%) required 24-hour constant supervision during performance of these activities. Results demonstrated that early rehabilitation treatment in combination with neuroprotective therapy for acute stroke was effective.

  13. Endoscopic laryngeal patterns in vagus nerve stimulation therapy for drug-resistant epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felisati, Giovanni; Gardella, Elena; Schiavo, Paolo; Saibene, Alberto Maria; Pipolo, Carlotta; Bertazzoli, Manuela; Chiesa, Valentina; Maccari, Alberto; Franzini, Angelo; Canevini, Maria Paola

    2014-01-01

    In 30% of patients with epilepsy seizure control cannot be achieved with medications. When medical therapy is not effective, and epilepsy surgery cannot be performed, vagus nerve stimulator (VNS) implantation is a therapeutic option. Laryngeal patterns in vagus nerve stimulation have not been extensively studied yet. The objective was to evaluate laryngeal patterns in a cohort of patients affected by drug-resistant epilepsy after implantation and activation of a vagus nerve stimulation therapy device. 14 consecutive patients underwent a systematic otolaryngologic examination between 6 months and 5 years after implantation and activation of a vagus nerve stimulation therapy device. All patients underwent fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation, which was recorded on a portable device allowing a convenient slow-motion analysis of laryngeal patterns. All recordings were blindly evaluated by two of the authors. We observed three different laryngeal patterns. Four patients showed left vocal cord palsy at the baseline and during vagus nerve stimulation; seven showed left vocal cord palsy at the baseline and left vocal cord adduction during vagus nerve stimulation; and three patients showed a symmetric pattern at the baseline and constant left vocal cord adduction during vagus nerve stimulation. These laryngeal findings are here described for the first time in the literature and can be only partially explained by existing knowledge of laryngeal muscles and vagus nerve physiology. This might represent a new starting point for studies concerning laryngeal physiology and phonation, while the vagus nerve stimulation therapy could act as a new and ethical experimental model for human laryngeal physiology.

  14. Modeling hepatitis C virus therapies combining drugs and lectin affinity plasmapheresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tullis, Richard H; Duffin, R Paul; Ichim, Thomas E; Joyce, James A; Levin, Nathan W

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can be cured by standard pegylated interferon (IFN) + ribavirin drug therapy in 30-50% of treatment-naïve genotype 1 HCV patients. Cure rate is defined as a sustained viral response measured 6 months after the end of treatment. Recently, Fujiwara et al. [Hepatol Res 2007;37:701-710], using a double-filtration plasmapheresis (DFPP) technique, showed that simple physical reduction in circulating HCV using a 1-week pretreatment increased the cure rate for treatment-naïve type 1 HCV patients from 50 (controls) to 78% (treated). For previous nonresponders, the cure rate increased from 30 to 71%. This effect occurs even though the DFPP per treatment HCV viral load reduction averaged 26%. In clinical studies discussed here, a lectin affinity plasmapheresis (LAP) device caused an estimated 41% decrease in viral load as previously reported. A more detailed analysis using normalized data to correct for any variations in initial viral load gave an average 29% per treatment viral load reduction in 5 HCV-positive dialysis patients. The latter data indicate that continuous application of LAP could bring HCV viral load to undetectable levels in 4.1 days. Compared to DFPP, the LAP approach has the advantage that no plasma losses are incurred. In addition hemopurification can be carried out for extended periods of time analogous to continuous renal replacement therapy for the treatment of acute kidney failure, making the process much more effective. Calculations based on these data predict that continuous hemopurification would substantially increase the rate of viral load reduction (approx. 14-fold) and therefore increase the cure rate for HCV standard-of-care drug therapies without adding additional drugs and their associated side effects.

  15. Achieving a Spiritual Therapy Standard for Drug Dependency in Malaysia, from an Islamic Perspective: Brief Review Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    SEGHATOLESLAM, Tahereh; HABIL, Hussain; HATIM, Ahmad; RASHID, Rusdi; ARDAKAN, Abolfazl; ESMAEILI MOTLAQ, Farid

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Religion is one of the protective factors that facilities positive outcomes by preventing individuals from engaging in addictive substance. A recent study has confirmed that religion inhibits drug addiction. The concept of psychospiritual therapy was to introduce drug addiction. Therefore, of the various methods of psychotherapy, the usage of Taqwa (piety) emerged as an applicable method of Islamic spiritual therapy. This study was conducted in Malaysia as a Muslim country and focuses on Islamic recommendations and its relation to spiritual therapy. PMID:26060772

  16. Achieving a Spiritual Therapy Standard for Drug Dependency in Malaysia, from an Islamic Perspective: Brief Review Article.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Seghatoleslam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Religion is one of the protective factors that facilities positive outcomes by preventing individuals from engaging in addictive substance. A recent study has confirmed that religion inhibits drug addiction. The concept of psychospiritual therapy was to introduce drug addiction. Therefore, of the various methods of psychotherapy, the usage of Taqwa (piety emerged as an applicable method of Islamic spiritual therapy. This study was conducted in Malaysia as a Muslim country and focuses on Islamic recommendations and its relation to spiritual therapy.

  17. Pharmacological treatment of spondyloarthritis: exploring the effectiveness of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biological therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caso, Francesco; Costa, Luisa; Del Puente, Antonio; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; Lupoli, Gelsy; Scarpa, Raffaele; Peluso, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Spondyloarthritis represents a heterogeneous group of articular inflammatory diseases that share common genetic, clinical and radiological features. The therapy target of spondyloarthritis relies mainly in improving patients’ quality of life, controlling articular inflammation, preventing the structural joints damage and preserving the functional abilities, autonomy and social participation of patients. Among these, traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs have been demonstrated to be effective in the management of peripheral arthritis; moreover, in the last decade, biological therapies have improved the approach to spondyloarthritis. In patients with axial spondyloarthritis, tumor necrosis factor α inhibitors are currently the only effective therapy in patients for whom conventional therapy with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has failed. The aim of this review is to summarize the current experience and evidence about the pharmacological approach in spondyloarthritis patients. PMID:26568809

  18. 131I therapy for 345 patients with refractory severe hyperthyroidism: Without antithyroid drug pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yong; Xing, Jialiu; Fang, Yi; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Youren; Long, Yahong

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the safety and long-term results of (131)I therapy alone for patients with refractory severe hyperthyroidism without antithyroid drug pretreatment. From January 2002 to December 2012, 408 patients with refractory severe hyperthyroidism were treated with (131)I alone. Among them, 345 were followed up for 1 to 10 years for physical examination, thyroid function, and thyroid ultrasound. Complete Blood Count (CBC) liver function, electrocardiogram, echocardiogram, and Emission Computed Tomography (ECT) thyroid imaging were performed as indicated. The 345 patients had concomitant conditions including thyrotoxic heart disease, severe liver dysfunction, enlarged thyroid weighing 80 to 400 g, severe cytopenia, and vasculitis. One to two weeks prior to (131)I therapy, all patients were given low-iodine diet. The dose of (131)I therapy was 2.59 to 6.66 MBq (70 to180 µCi) per gram of thyroid with an average of 3.83 ± 0.6 MBq (103.6 ± 16.4 µCi); and the total (131)I activity administrated for the individuals was 111 to 3507.6 MBq (3.0 to 94.8 mCi, mean 444 ± 336.7 MBq (12.0 ± 9.1 mCi)). Out of the 408 patients, 283 were cured, 15 with complete remission, and 47 with incomplete remission. No treatment failure or significant clinical worsening was noted in these patients. Our data indicated that (131)I therapy alone for patients with refractory severe hyperthyroidism without antithyroid drug pretreatment is safe and effective.

  19. Applications of Acoustics and Cavitation to Noninvasive Therapy and Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coussios, Constantin C.; Roy, Ronald A.

    2008-01-01

    Biomedical acoustics is rapidly evolving from a diagnostic modality into a therapeutic tool, and acoustic cavitation is often the common denominator in a wide range of new therapeutic applications. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) waves generated outside the body can be used to deposit heat deep within the body. Through a quantitative analysis of heat deposition by ultrasound, it is shown that inertial cavitation can help address some of the major challenges of HIFU therapy by providing a means of enhancing and monitoring treatment noninvasively. In the context of drug delivery, both inertial and stable cavitation play roles in enhancing drug activity and uptake. In particular, shape oscillations arising during stable cavitation provide an effective micropumping mechanism for enhanced mass transport across inaccessible interfaces.

  20. A Novel Epi-drug Therapy Based on the Suppression of BET Family Epigenetic Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong-Guk; Bayarsaihan, Dashzeveg

    2017-01-01

    Recent progress in epigenetic research has made a profound influence on pharmacoepigenomics, one of the fastest growing disciplines promising to provide new epi-drugs for the treatment of a broad range of diseases. Histone acetylation is among the most essential chromatin modifications underlying the dynamics of transcriptional activation. The acetylated genomic regions recruit the BET (bromodomain and extra-terminal) family of bromodomains (BRDs), thereby serving as a molecular scaffold in establishing RNA polymerase II specificity. Over the past several years, the BET epigenetic readers have become the main targets for drug therapy. The discovery of selective small-molecule compounds with capacity to inhibit BET proteins has paved a path for developing novel strategies against cancer, cardiovascular, skeletal, and inflammatory diseases. Therefore, further research into small chemicals impeding the regulatory activity of BRDs could offer therapeutic benefits for many health problems including tumor growth, heart disease, oral, and bone disorders. PMID:28356894

  1. Adjacent central venous catheters can result in immediate aspiration of infused drugs during renal replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, K Y R; Mari, J M; Wigmore, T J

    2012-02-01

    Dual-lumen haemodiafiltration catheters enable continuous renal replacement therapy in the critically ill and are often co-located with central venous catheters used to infuse drugs. The extent to which infusions are immediately aspirated by an adjacent haemodiafiltration catheter remains unknown. A bench model was constructed to evaluate this effect. A central venous catheter and a haemodiafiltration catheter were inserted into a simulated central vein and flow generated using centrifugal pumps within the simulated vein and haemodiafiltration circuit. Ink was used as a visual tracer and creatinine solution as a quantifiable tracer. Tracers were completely aspirated by the haemodiafiltration catheter unless the infusion was at least 1 cm downstream to the arterial port. No tracer was aspirated from catheters infusing at least 2 cm downstream. Orientation of side ports did not affect tracer elimination. Co-location of central venous and haemodiafiltration catheters may lead to complete aspiration of infusions into the haemodiafilter with resultant drug under-dosing.

  2. Drug-resistant tuberculosis among HIV-infected patients starting antiretroviral therapy in Durban, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey K Hom

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB and describe the resistance patterns in patients commencing antiretroviral therapy (ART in an HIV clinic in Durban, South Africa. DESIGN: Cross-sectional cohort study. METHODS: Consecutive HIV-infected adults (≥ 18y/o initiating HIV care were enrolled from May 2007-May 2008, regardless of signs or symptoms of active TB. Prior TB history and current TB treatment status were self-reported. Subjects expectorated sputum for culture (MGIT liquid and 7H11 solid medium. Positive cultures were tested for susceptibility to first- and second-line anti-tuberculous drugs. The prevalence of drug-resistant TB, stratified by prior TB history and current TB treatment status, was assessed. RESULTS: 1,035 subjects had complete culture results. Median CD4 count was 92/µl (IQR 42-150/µl. 267 subjects (26% reported a prior history of TB and 210 (20% were receiving TB treatment at enrollment; 191 (18% subjects had positive sputum cultures, among whom the estimated prevalence of resistance to any antituberculous drug was 7.4% (95% CI 4.0-12.4. Among those with prior TB, the prevalence of resistance was 15.4% (95% CI 5.9-30.5 compared to 5.2% (95% CI 2.1-8.9 among those with no prior TB. 5.1% (95% CI 2.4-9.5 had rifampin or rifampin plus INH resistance. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of TB resistance to at least one drug was 7.4% among adults with positive TB cultures initiating ART in Durban, South Africa, with 5.1% having rifampin or rifampin plus INH resistance. Improved tools for diagnosing TB and drug resistance are urgently needed in areas of high HIV/TB prevalence.

  3. Network-based approaches for drug response prediction and targeted therapy development in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorel, Mathurin; Barillot, Emmanuel; Zinovyev, Andrei; Kuperstein, Inna

    2015-08-21

    Signaling pathways implicated in cancer create a complex network with numerous regulatory loops and redundant pathways. This complexity explains frequent failure of one-drug-one-target paradigm of treatment, resulting in drug resistance in patients. To overcome the robustness of cell signaling network, cancer treatment should be extended to a combination therapy approach. Integrating and analyzing patient high-throughput data together with the information about biological signaling machinery may help deciphering molecular patterns specific to each patient and finding the best combinations of candidates for therapeutic targeting. We review state of the art in the field of targeted cancer medicine from the computational systems biology perspective. We summarize major signaling network resources and describe their characteristics with respect to applicability for drug response prediction and intervention targets suggestion. Thus discuss methods for prediction of drug sensitivity and intervention combinations using signaling networks together with high-throughput data. Gradual integration of these approaches into clinical routine will improve prediction of response to standard treatments and adjustment of intervention schemes.

  4. Bypassing P-Glycoprotein Drug Efflux Mechanisms: Possible Applications in Pharmacoresistant Schizophrenia Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Famida G. Hoosain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficient noninvasive treatment of neurodegenerative disorders is often constrained by reduced permeation of therapeutic agents into the central nervous system (CNS. A vast majority of bioactive agents do not readily permeate into the brain tissue due to the existence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB and the associated P-glycoprotein efflux transporter. The overexpression of the MDR1 P-glycoprotein has been related to the occurrence of multidrug resistance in CNS diseases. Various research outputs have focused on overcoming the P-glycoprotein drug efflux transporter, which mainly involve its inhibition or bypassing mechanisms. Studies into neurodegenerative disorders have shown that the P-glycoprotein efflux transporter plays a vital role in the progression of schizophrenia, with a noted increase in P-glycoprotein function among schizophrenic patients, thereby reducing therapeutic outcomes. In this review, we address the hypothesis that methods employed in overcoming P-glycoprotein in cancer and other disease states at the level of the BBB and intestine may be applied to schizophrenia drug delivery system design to improve clinical efficiency of drug therapies. In addition, the current review explores polymers and drug delivery systems capable of P-gp inhibition and modulation.

  5. Effects of concurrent drug therapy on technetium /sup 99m/Tc gluceptate biodistribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinkle, G.H.; Basmadjian, G.P.; Peek, C.; Barker, K.K.; Ice, R.D.

    1982-11-01

    Drug interactions with /sup 99m/Tc gluceptate resulting in altered biodistribution were studied using chart review and animal tests. Charts of nine patients who had abnormal gallbladder uptake of technetium /sup 99m/Tc gluceptate during a two-year period were reviewed to obtain data such as concurrent drug therapy, primary diagnosis, and laboratory values. Adult New Zealand white rabbits were then used for testing the biodistribution of technetium /sup 99m/Tc gluceptate when administered concurrently with possibly interacting drugs identified in the chart review--penicillamine, penicillin G potassium, penicillin V potassium, acetaminophen, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Chart review revealed no conclusive patterns of altered biodistribution associated with other factors. The data did suggest the possibility that the five drugs listed above might cause increased hepatobiliary clearance of the radiopharmaceutical. Animal tests showed that i.v. penicillamine caused substantial distribution of radioactivity into the gallbladder and small bowel. Minimally increased gallbladder radioactivity occurred when oral acetaminophen and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole were administered concurrently. Oral and i.v. penicillins did not increase gallbladder activity. Penicillamine may cause substantial alteration of the biodistribution of technetium /sup 99m/Tc gluceptate.

  6. DRUG THERAPY IN THE PROGRESSED CML PATIENT WITH MULTI-TKI FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim C. Haznedaroglu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to outline pharmacotherapy of the ‘third-line management of CML’ (progressive disease course after sequential TKI drugs. Current management of CML with multi-TKI failure is reviewed. TKI (bosutinib, ponatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib and non-TKI (omacetaxine mepussecinate, IFN or PEG-IFN drugs are available. The literature search was made in PubMed with particular focus on the clinical trials, recommendations, guidelines and expert opinions, as well as international recommendations. Progressing CML disease with multi-TKI failure should be treated with alloSCT based on the availability of the donor and EBMT transplant risk scores. The TKI and non-TKI drugs shall be used to get best promising (hematological, cytogenetic, molecular response. During the CP-CML phase of multi-TKI failure, 2nd generation TKIs (nilotinib or dasatinib are used if they remained. Bosutinib and ponatinib (3rd generation TKIs can be administered in triple-TKI failed (imatinib and nilotinib and dasatinib patients. The presence of T315I mutation at any phase requires ponatinib or omacetaxine mepussecinate therapy before allografting. During the AP/BC-CML phase of multi-TKI failure, the most powerful TKI available (ponatinib or dasatinib if remained together with chemotherapy should be given before alloSCT. Monitoring of CML disease and drug off-target risks (particularly vascular thrombotic events are vital.

  7. Diacyllipid micelle-based nanocarrier for magnetically guided delivery of drugs in photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinteza, Ludmila O; Ohulchanskyy, Tymish Y; Sahoo, Yudhisthira; Bergey, Earl J; Pandey, Ravindra K; Prasad, Paras N

    2006-01-01

    We report the design, synthesis using nanochemistry, and characterization of a novel multifunctional polymeric micelle-based nanocarrier system, which demonstrates combined function of magnetophoretically guided drug delivery together with light-activated photodynamic therapy. Specifically, the nanocarrier consists of polymeric micelles of diacylphospholipid-poly(ethylene glycol) (PE-PEG) coloaded with the photosensitizer drug 2-[1-hexyloxyethyl]-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH), and magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The nanocarrier shows excellent stability and activity over several weeks. The physicochemical characterizations have been carried out by transmission electron micrography and optical spectroscopy. An efficient cellular uptake has been confirmed with confocal laser scanning microscopy. The loading efficiency of HPPH is practically unaffected upon coloading with the magnetic nanoparticles, and its phototoxicity is retained. The magnetic response of the nanocarriers was demonstrated by their magnetically directed delivery to tumor cells in vitro. The magnetophoretic control on the cellular uptake provides enhanced imaging and phototoxicity. These multifunctional nanocarriers demonstrate the exciting prospect offered by nanochemistry for targeting photodynamic therapy.

  8. Covalent linkage of nanodiamond-paclitaxel for drug delivery and cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Kuang-Kai; Wang, Chi-Ching; Chao, Jui-I [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Zheng, Wen-Wei; Lo, Yu-Shiu; Chen, Chinpiao [Department of Chemistry, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien 97401, Taiwan (China); Chiu, Yu-Chung; Cheng, Chia-Liang, E-mail: clcheng@mail.ndhu.edu.tw, E-mail: chinpiao@mail.ndhu.edu.tw, E-mail: jichao@faculty.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien 97401, Taiwan (China)

    2010-08-06

    A nanoparticle-conjugated cancer drug provides a novel strategy for cancer therapy. In this study, we manipulated nanodiamond (ND), a carbon nanomaterial, to covalently link paclitaxel for cancer drug delivery and therapy. Paclitaxel was bound to the surface of 3-5 nm sized ND through a succession of chemical modifications. The ND-paclitaxel conjugation was measured by atomic force microscope and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and confirmed with infrared spectroscopy by the detection of deuterated paclitaxel. Treatment with 0.1-50 {mu}g ml{sup -1} ND-paclitaxel for 48 h significantly reduced the cell viability in the A549 human lung carcinoma cells. ND-paclitaxel induced both mitotic arrest and apoptosis in A549 cells. However, ND alone or denatured ND-paclitaxel (after treatment with strong alkaline solution, 1 M NaOH) did not induce the damage effects on A549 cells. ND-paclitaxel was taken into lung cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner using flow cytometer analysis. The ND-paclitaxel particles were located in the microtubules and cytoplasm of A549 cells observed by confocal microscopy. Furthermore, ND-paclitaxel markedly blocked the tumor growth and formation of lung cancer cells in xenograft SCID mice. Together, we provide a functional covalent conjugation of ND-paclitaxel, which can be delivered into lung carcinoma cells and preserves the anticancer activities on the induction of mitotic blockage, apoptosis and anti-tumorigenesis.

  9. Potential of using boric acid as a boron drug for boron neutron capture therapy for osteosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, C.F.; Lin, S.Y. [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China); Peir, J.J. [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China); Liao, J.W. [Graduate Institute of Veterinary Pathobiology, National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan (China); Lin, Y.C. [Department of Veterinary Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan (China); Chou, F.I., E-mail: fichou@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China)] [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China)

    2011-12-15

    Osteosarcoma is a malignant tumor commonly found in human and animals. The ability of boric acid (BA) to accumulate in osteosarcoma due to the mechanism of the bone formation of cancer cells would make boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) an alternative therapy for osteosarcoma. This study evaluated the feasibility of using BA as the boron drug for BNCT of bone cancer. The cytotoxicity of BA to L929 cells exceeded that of UMR-106 cells. With 25 {mu}g {sup 10}B/mL medium of BA treatment, the boron concentration in UMR-106 cells was higher than that in L929 cells. The biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of BA in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were studied by administrating 25 mg {sup 10}B/kg body weight to SD rats. Blood boron level decreased rapidly within one hour after BA injection. Boron concentration in the long bone was 4-6 time higher than that of blood. Results of this study suggest that BA may be a potential drug for BNCT for osteosarcoma.

  10. Polymeric nanohybrids and functionalized carbon nanotubes as drug delivery carriers for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Satya; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Shao, Wei; Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Abbasi, Sana

    2011-11-01

    The scope of nanotechnology to develop target specific carriers to achieve higher therapeutic efficacy is gaining importance in the pharmaceutical and other industries. Specifically, the emergence of nanohybrid materials is posed to edge over chemotherapy and radiation therapy as cancer therapeutics. This is primarily because nanohybrid materials engage controlled production parameters in the making of engineered particles with specific size, shape, and other essential properties. It is widely expressed that these materials will significantly contribute to the next generation of medical care technology and pharmaceuticals in areas of disease diagnosis, disease prevention and many other treatment procedures. This review focuses on the currently used nanohybrid materials, polymeric nanoparticles and nanotubes, which show great potential as effective drug delivery systems for cancer therapy, as they can be grafted with cell-specific receptors and intracellular targeting molecules for the targeted delivery of therapeutics. Specifically, this article focuses on the current status, recent advancements, potentials and limitations of polymeric nanohybrids and functionalized carbon nanotubes as drug delivery carriers.

  11. Monitoring early tumor response to drug therapy with diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flexman, Molly L.; Vlachos, Fotios; Kim, Hyun Keol; Sirsi, Shashank R.; Huang, Jianzhong; Hernandez, Sonia L.; Johung, Tessa B.; Gander, Jeffrey W.; Reichstein, Ari R.; Lampl, Brooke S.; Wang, Antai; Borden, Mark A.; Yamashiro, Darrell J.; Kandel, Jessica J.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2012-01-01

    Although anti-angiogenic agents have shown promise as cancer therapeutics, their efficacy varies between tumor types and individual patients. Providing patient-specific metrics through rapid noninvasive imaging can help tailor drug treatment by optimizing dosages, timing of drug cycles, and duration of therapy--thereby reducing toxicity and cost and improving patient outcome. Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a noninvasive three-dimensional imaging modality that has been shown to capture physiologic changes in tumors through visualization of oxygenated, deoxygenated, and total hemoglobin concentrations, using non-ionizing radiation with near-infrared light. We employed a small animal model to ascertain if tumor response to bevacizumab (BV), an anti-angiogenic agent that targets vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), could be detected at early time points using DOT. We detected a significant decrease in total hemoglobin levels as soon as one day after BV treatment in responder xenograft tumors (SK-NEP-1), but not in SK-NEP-1 control tumors or in non-responder control or BV-treated NGP tumors. These results are confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging T2 relaxometry and lectin perfusion studies. Noninvasive DOT imaging may allow for earlier and more effective control of anti-angiogenic therapy.

  12. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions with clopidogrel: updated review and risk management in combination therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang ZY

    2015-03-01

    inhibitors on clopidogrel (omeprazole, esomeprazole versus pantoprazole, rabeprazole, the effects of rifampicin on clopidogrel versus ticagrelor and prasugrel, and the effects of calcium channel blockers on clopidogrel (amlodipine versus P-glycoprotein-inhibiting calcium channel blockers. The mechanism of the DDIs with clopidogrel involves modulating CYP enzymes (eg, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C19, and CYP3A4, paraoxonase-1, hepatic carboxylesterase 1, P-glycoprotein, and organic anion transporter family member 1B1.Conclusion: Effective and safe clopidogrel combination therapy can be achieved by increasing the awareness of potential changes in efficacy and toxicity, rationally selecting alternatives, tailoring drug therapy based on genotype, checking the appropriateness of physician orders, and performing therapeutic monitoring. Keywords: clopidogrel, drug–drug interactions, drug metabolism, drug transporter, genotype, pharmacokinetics, polypharmacy, pharmacogenetics, P2Y12 receptor inhibitors, risk management 

  13. Behavioral couples therapy (BCT) for alcohol and drug use disorders: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Mark B; Vedel, Ellen; Emmelkamp, Paul M G

    2008-07-01

    Narrative reviews conclude that behavioral couples therapy (BCT) produces better outcomes than individual-based treatment for alcoholism and drug abuse problems (e.g., [Epstein, E. E., & McCrady, B. S. (1998). Behavioral couples treatment of alcohol and drug use disorders: Current status and innovations. Clinical Psychology Review, 18(6), 689-711; O'Farrell, T. J., & Fals-Stewart, W. (2003). Alcohol abuse. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 29(1), 121-146]). However, the strength and consistency of this effect favoring BCT has not been examined because a meta-analysis of BCT studies has not been reported. This meta-analysis combines multiple well controlled studies to help clarify the overall impact of BCT in the treatment of substance use disorders. A comprehensive literature search produced 12 randomized controlled trials (n=754) that were included in the final analyses. There was a clear overall advantage of including BCT compared to individual-based treatments (Cohen's d=0.54). This was true across outcome domains (frequency of use d=0.36, consequences of use d=0.52, and relationship satisfaction d=0.57). However the pattern of results varied as a function of time. BCT was superior to control conditions only in relationship satisfaction at posttreatment (d=0.64). However, at follow-up BCT was superior on all three outcome domains (frequency of use d=0.45, consequences of use d=0.50, and relationship satisfaction d=0.51). In addition to other control conditions, BCT also outperformed individual cognitive behavioral therapy without couples therapy (d=0.42). Larger sample sizes were associated with higher effect sizes (p=0.02). However, treatment dose and publication year were not related to effect size. Overall, BCT shows better outcomes than more typical individual-based treatment for married or cohabiting individuals who seek help for alcohol dependence or drug dependence problems. The benefit for BCT with low severity problem drinkers has received little

  14. Characterization of antiarrhythmic drugs by alternating current induced arrhythmias in isolated heart tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchard, U; Bösken, R; Greeff, K

    1982-04-01

    A new method for inducing arrhythmias or asystolia by the application of a 50 HZ alternating current (ac) to electrically driven heart preparations has been developed and applied to isolated left atria and right ventricular papillary muscles of the guinea-pig. An increase in driving frequency from 1 to 3 HZ effects a significant reduction of the threshold of ac-arrhythmia in guinea-pig papillary muscles but no change in atria. A decrease in temperature from 31 degrees C to 25 degrees C and an increase in [Ca2+]0 from 1.25 to 5 mmol/l elevates threshold for ac-arrhythmia and -asystolia. The fast sodium channel inhibitors quinidine, carticaine and benzylamino-5,6-dihydro-8,9-dimethoxy-imidazo-5,1-a-isoquinoline hydrochloride (HE-36) increase threshold of ac-arrhythmia in left atria and papillary muscles, whereas the slow channel inhibitor verapamil is ineffective in concentrations up to 6 mumol/l. Threshold of ac-arrhythmia is elevated by quinidine predominantly in papillary muscles. Carticaine and HE-36 are effective in left atria and papillary muscles to almost the same extent. Threshold of ac-asystolia is increased mainly in papillary muscles by quinidine and HE-36; carticaine produces a similar increase in left atria and papillary muscles. Verapamil even leads to a decrease in threshold predominantly in papillary muscles. It is concluded that model arrhythmias induced by alternating current are brought about mainly by an increase in Na+-conductance of cardiac cell membranes. The negative chronotropic potency in right atria occurs in the sequence verapamil greater than quinidine greater than carticane approximately HE-36. The negative inotropic potency in papillary muscle occurs in the same sequence but HE-36 increases force of contraction.

  15. Central nervous system HIV infection in "less-drug regimen" antiretroviral therapy simplification strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, Francesca; Gianotti, Nicola; Lazzarin, Adriano; Cinque, Paola

    2014-02-01

    Less-drug regimens (LDR) refer to combinations of either two antiretroviral drugs or ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor (PI) monotherapy. They may represent a simplification strategy in patients with persistently suppressed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viremia, with the main benefits of reducing drug-related toxicities and costs. Systemic virological efficacy of LDR is slightly lower as compared with combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), but patients with failure do not usually develop drug resistance and resuppress HIV replication after reintensification. A major concern of LDR is the lower efficacy in the virus reservoirs, especially in the central nervous system (CNS), where viral compartmentalization and independent evolution of infection may lead to CNS viral escape, often associated with neurologic symptoms. The authors reviewed studies of virological and functional CNS efficacy of LDR, particularly of boosted PI monotherapy regimens, for which more information is available. Symptomatic viral CSF escape was observed mainly in PI/r monotherapy patients with plasma failure and low nadir CD4+ cell counts, and resolved upon reintroduction of triple drug cART, whereas asymptomatic viral failure in CSF was not significantly more frequent in patients on PI/r monotherapy compared with patients on standard cART. In addition, there was no difference in functional outcomes between PI monotherapy and cART patients, irrespective of CSF viral escape. More data are needed on the CNS effect of dual ART regimens and, in general, on long-term efficacy of LDR. Simplification with LDR may be an attractive option in patients with suppressed viral load, if they are well selected and monitored for potential CNS complications.

  16. Therapy against organophosphate poisoning: the importance of anticholinergic drugs with antiglutamatergic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, Ben Avi; Raveh, Lily

    2008-10-15

    Potent cholinesterase inhibitors (e.g., soman, sarin), induce a wide range of deleterious effects including convulsions, behavioral impairments and ultimately, death. Due to the likelihood of various scenarios of military or terrorist attacks by these and other chemical weapons, research has to be aimed at finding optimal therapies. Early accumulation of acetylcholine in synaptic clefts was suggested to trigger an array of toxic events including an excessive release of glutamate, culminating in the activation of its receptors. Stimulation of the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) subtype of these receptors was associated with the neuronal injury that initiates organophosphate-induced brain damage. The notion of a stepwise mechanism yielded treatments based on a combination of an immediate administration of enzyme reactivators and anticholinergic drugs. This strategy dramatically increased survival rates but did not abolish convulsions and failed to prevent the ensuing cognitive dysfunction. Efforts to improve this paradigm by adding anticonvulsants or antiglutamatergic drugs with anti-epileptic characteristics produced dubious results. Under these conditions, benactyzine and caramiphen, agents with anticholinergic and antiglutamatergic properties, provided improved protection when introduced as adjunct agents to oximes, reversible cholinesterase inhibitors and/or specific antimuscarinic drugs such as atropine. In contrast, the specific antimuscarinic drug scopolamine failed to block soman-induced changes in glutamatergic and behavioral parameters even when given prophylactically. These findings along with a large number of additional reports led towards the conclusion that the therapeutic advantage of drugs such as benactyzine and caramiphen could derive from their ability to modulate central cholinergic and glutamate neurotransmission.

  17. Hypericin-bearing magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for selective drug delivery in photodynamic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unterweger H

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Harald Unterweger,1 Daniel Subatzus,1 Rainer Tietze,1 Christina Janko,1 Marina Poettler,1 Alfons Stiegelschmitt,2 Matthias Schuster,3 Caroline Maake,4 Aldo R Boccaccini,5 Christoph Alexiou11ENT Department, Section of Experimental Oncology and Nanomedicine (SEON, Else Kröner-Fresenius-Stiftung Professorship, University Hospital Erlangen; 2Institute of Glass and Ceramics, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University Erlangen-Nuremberg, 3Materials for Electronics and Energy Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany; 4Institute of Anatomy, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstr, Zurich, Switzerland; 5Institute of Biomaterials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany Abstract: Combining the concept of magnetic drug targeting and photodynamic therapy is a promising approach for the treatment of cancer. A high selectivity as well as significant fewer side effects can be achieved by this method, since the therapeutic treatment only takes place in the area where accumulation of the particles by an external electromagnet and radiation by a laser system overlap. In this article, a novel hypericin-bearing drug delivery system has been developed by synthesis of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs with a hypericin-linked functionalized dextran coating. For that, sterically stabilized dextran-coated SPIONs were produced by coprecipitation and crosslinking with epichlorohydrin to enhance stability. Carboxymethylation of the dextran shell provided a functionalized platform for linking hypericin via glutaraldehyde. Particle sizes obtained by dynamic light scattering were in a range of 55–85 nm, whereas investigation of single magnetite or maghemite particle diameter was performed by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction and resulted in approximately 4.5–5.0 nm. Surface chemistry of those

  18. Drug: D03830 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D03830 Drug Diltiazem malate (USAN); Tiamate (TN) C22H26N2O4S. C4H6O5 548.1829 548.6053 D03830...036 Calcium channel blocking drugs map07037 Antiarrhythmic drugs Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification [BR:br0830...LOCKERS WITH DIRECT CARDIAC EFFECTS C08DB Benzothiazepine derivatives C08DB01 Diltiazem D03830... Diltiazem malate (USAN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Cardiovascular Agents Calcium Cha...nnel Blocking Agents Diltiazem D03830 Diltiazem malate (USAN) Target-based classification of drugs [BR:br083

  19. Strategy for the Prediction of Steady-State Exposure of Digoxin to Determine Drug-Drug Interaction Potential of Digoxin With Other Drugs in Digitalization Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2016-01-20

    Digoxin, a narrow therapeutic index drug, is widely used in congestive heart failure. However, the digitalization therapy involves dose titration and can exhibit drug-drug interaction. Ctrough versus area under the plasma concentration versus time curve in a dosing interval of 24 hours (AUC0-24h) and Cmax versus AUC0-24h for digoxin were established by linear regression. The predictions of digoxin AUC0-24h values were performed using published Ctrough or Cmax with appropriate regression lines. The fold difference, defined as the quotient of the observed/predicted AUC0-24h values, was evaluated. The mean square error and root mean square error, correlation coefficient (r), and goodness of the fold prediction were used to evaluate the models. Both Ctrough versus AUC0-24h (r = 0.9215) and Cmax versus AUC0-24h models for digoxin (r = 0.7781) showed strong correlations. Approximately 93.8% of the predicted digoxin AUC0-24h values were within 0.76-fold to 1.25-fold difference for Ctrough model. In sharp contrast, the Cmax model showed larger variability with only 51.6% of AUC0-24h predictions within 0.76-1.25-fold difference. The r value for observed versus predicted AUC0-24h for Ctrough (r = 0.9551; n = 177; P < 0.001) was superior to the Cmax (r = 0.6134; n = 275; P < 0.001) model. The mean square error and root mean square error (%) for the Ctrough model were 11.95% and 16.2% as compared to 67.17% and 42.3% obtained for the Cmax model. Simple linear regression models for Ctrough/Cmax versus AUC0-24h were derived for digoxin. On the basis of statistical evaluation, Ctrough was superior to Cmax model for the prediction of digoxin AUC0-24h and can be potentially used in a prospective setting for predicting drug-drug interaction or lack of it.

  20. Polydopamine-based surface modification of mesoporous silica nanoparticles as pH-sensitive drug delivery vehicles for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Danfeng; Gao, Yongfeng; Wang, Lijun; Liu, Gan; Chen, Yuhan; Wang, Teng; Tao, Wei; Mei, Lin; Huang, Laiqiang; Zeng, Xiaowei

    2016-02-01

    A novel pH-sensitive drug delivery system of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) which were modified by polydopamine (PDA) for controlled release of cationic amphiphilic drug desipramine (DES) was prepared. MSNs-DES-PDA were characterized in terms of size, size distribution, surface morphology, BET surface area, mesoporous size and pore volume, drug loading content and in vitro drug release profile. MSNs-DES-PDA had high drug loading content and pH sensitivity. The DES release profiles of MSNs-DES and MSNs-DES-PDA were totally different, and the drug release of MSNs-DES-PDA accelerated with increasing acidity. MSNs-DES-PDA can be internalized into cells. In vitro experiments demonstrated that MSNs-DES-PDA had higher cytotoxicity and inhibitory effects on acid sphingomyelinase than those of free DES. This drug delivery system was beneficial for controlled release and cancer therapy.

  1. Drug design with Cdc7 kinase: a potential novel cancer therapy target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Sawa

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Masaaki Sawa1, Hisao Masai21Carna Biosciences, Inc., Kobe, Japan; 2Genome Dynamics Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Identification of novel molecular targets is critical in development of new and efficient cancer therapies. Kinases are one of the most common drug targets with a potential for cancer therapy. Cell cycle progression is regulated by a number of kinases, some of which are being developed to treat cancer. Cdc7 is a serine-threonine kinase originally discovered in budding yeast, which has been shown to be necessary to initiate the S phase. Inhibition of Cdc7 in cancer cells retards the progression of the S phase, accumulates DNA damage, and induces p53-independent cell death, but the same treatment in normal cells does not significantly affect viability. Low-molecular-weight compounds that inhibit Cdc7 kinase with an IC50 of less than 10 nM have been identified, and shown to be effective in the inhibition of tumor growth in animal models. Thus Cdc7 kinase can be recognized as a novel molecular target for cancer therapy.Keywords: Cdc7 kinase, cell cycle, replication fork, genome stability, DNA damages, ATP-binding pocket, kinase inhibitor

  2. Drug: D06517 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.9473 D06517.gif Cardiac depressant [anti-arrhythmic] Class I antiarrhythmic agent (Ia) voltage-gated sodiu...ted sodium channel (SCN9A) blocker [HSA:6335] [KO:K04841] map07037 Antiarrhythmic

  3. Hypericin-bearing magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for selective drug delivery in photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unterweger, Harald; Subatzus, Daniel; Tietze, Rainer; Janko, Christina; Poettler, Marina; Stiegelschmitt, Alfons; Schuster, Matthias; Maake, Caroline; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Alexiou, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Combining the concept of magnetic drug targeting and photodynamic therapy is a promising approach for the treatment of cancer. A high selectivity as well as significant fewer side effects can be achieved by this method, since the therapeutic treatment only takes place in the area where accumulation of the particles by an external electromagnet and radiation by a laser system overlap. In this article, a novel hypericin-bearing drug delivery system has been developed by synthesis of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) with a hypericin-linked functionalized dextran coating. For that, sterically stabilized dextran-coated SPIONs were produced by coprecipitation and crosslinking with epichlorohydrin to enhance stability. Carboxymethylation of the dextran shell provided a functionalized platform for linking hypericin via glutaraldehyde. Particle sizes obtained by dynamic light scattering were in a range of 55-85 nm, whereas investigation of single magnetite or maghemite particle diameter was performed by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction and resulted in approximately 4.5-5.0 nm. Surface chemistry of those particles was evaluated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and ζ potential measurements, indicating successful functionalization and dispersal stabilization due to a mixture of steric and electrostatic repulsion. Flow cytometry revealed no toxicity of pure nanoparticles as well as hypericin without exposure to light on Jurkat T-cells, whereas the combination of hypericin, alone or loaded on particles, with light-induced cell death in a concentration and exposure time-dependent manner due to the generation of reactive oxygen species. In conclusion, the combination of SPIONs' targeting abilities with hypericin's phototoxic properties represents a promising approach for merging magnetic drug targeting with photodynamic therapy for the treatment of cancer.

  4. Structural characterization of functionalized gold nanoparticles for drug delivery in cancer therapy: a NMR based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Sílvia C; Rangel, Maria; Pereira, Maria C; Coelho, Manuel A N; Ivanova, Galya

    2015-07-15

    In the present paper, we report results from a study of the structure and physicochemical properties of gold nanoparticles modified with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) designed for the drug delivery of the proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib (BTZ) in cancer therapy. A number of advanced analytical techniques were used to define important physicochemical characteristics such as composition, structure, surface properties, particle size and morphology. A new approach based on detailed NMR studies was employed to define specific intermolecular interactions and mechanisms of drug immobilization and location into surface modified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Particularly important information was gained from analysis of NMR spectroscopic parameters such as the spectral line shape, translation diffusion, the nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) and spin-lattice relaxation (T1). The results confirmed the coexistence of two different types of BTZ inclusion into polyethylene glycol coated gold nanoparticles: (i) association with the polymer chains by weak H-bonds and/or dipole-charge interactions and (ii) adsorption on the surface of the gold nanoparticles. The results allowed for determination of the overall structure of Bortezomib loaded PEG coated AuNPs, which is related to the therapeutic drug efficacy and activity in the treatment of cancer.

  5. Use of Nanotechnology to Develop Multi-Drug Inhibitors For Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Raghavendra; Jones, Nathan R; Banerjee, Shubhadeep; Robertson, Gavin P

    2013-12-01

    Therapeutic agents that inhibit a single target often cannot combat a multifactorial disease such as cancer. Thus, multi-target inhibitors (MTIs) are needed to circumvent complications such as the development of resistance. There are two predominant types of MTIs, (a) single drug inhibitor (SDIs) that affect multiple pathways simultaneously, and (b) combinatorial agents or multi-drug inhibitors (MDIs) that inhibit multiple pathways. Single agent multi-target kinase inhibitors are amongst the most prominent class of compounds belonging to the former, whereas the latter includes many different classes of combinatorial agents that have been used to achieve synergistic efficacy against cancer. Safe delivery and accumulation at the tumor site is of paramount importance for MTIs because inhibition of multiple key signaling pathways has the potential to lead to systemic toxicity. For this reason, the development of drug delivery mechanisms using nanotechnology is preferable in order to ensure that the MDIs accumulate in the tumor vasculature, thereby increasing efficacy and minimizing off-target and systemic side effects. This review will discuss how nanotechnology can be used for the development of MTIs for cancer therapy and also it concludes with a discussion of the future of nanoparticle-based MTIs as well as the continuing obstacles being faced during the development of these unique agents.'

  6. An alternative therapy for drug-resistant epilepsy: transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong Peijing; Liu Aihua; Zhang Jianguo; Wang Yuping; Yang Anchao; Li Liang; Ben Hui

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies demonstrated that vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is an effective therapy for drugresistant epilepsy.Acupuncture is also used to treat epilepsy.This study was designed to examine the safety and effectiveness of transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation (ta-VNS) for patients with drug-resistant epilepsy.Methods A total of 50 volunteer patients with drug-resistant epilepsy were selected for a random clinical trial to observe the therapeutic effect of ta-VNS.The seizure frequency,quality of life,and severity were assessed in weeks 8,16,and 24 of the treatment according to the percentage of seizure frequency reduction.Results In the pilot study,47 of the 50 epilepsy patients completed the 24-week treatment; three dropped off.After 8-week treatment,six of the 47 patients (12%) were seizure free and 12 (24%) had a reduction in seizure frequency.In week 16 of the continuous treatment,six of the 47 patients (12%)were seizure free; 17 (34%) had a reduction in seizure frequency.After 24 weeks' treatment,eight patients (16%) were seizure free; 19 (38%) had reduced seizure frequency.Conclusion Similar to the therapeutic effect of VNS,ta-VNS can suppress epileptic seizures and is a safe,effective,economical,and widely applicable treatment option for drug-resistant epilepsy.(ChiCTR-TRC-10001023)

  7. Fungal diseases: could nanostructured drug delivery systems be a novel paradigm for therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voltan, Aline Raquel; Quindós, Guillermo; Alarcón, Kaila P Medina; Fusco-Almeida, Ana Marisa; Mendes-Giannini, Maria José Soares; Chorilli, Marlus

    2016-01-01

    Invasive mycoses are a major problem for immunocompromised individuals and patients in intensive care units. Morbidity and mortality rates of these infections are high because of late diagnosis and delayed treatment. Moreover, the number of available antifungal agents is low, and there are problems with toxicity and resistance. Alternatives for treating invasive fungal infections are necessary. Nanostructured systems could be excellent carriers for antifungal drugs, reducing toxicity and targeting their action. The use of nanostructured systems for antifungal therapy began in the 1990s, with the appearance of lipid formulations of amphotericin B. This review encompasses different antifungal drug delivery systems, such as liposomes, carriers based on solid lipids and nanostructure lipids, polymeric nanoparticles, dendrimers, and others. All these delivery systems have advantages and disadvantages. Main advantages are the improvement in the antifungal properties, such as bioavailability, reduction in toxicity, and target tissue, which facilitates innovative therapeutic techniques. Conversely, a major disadvantage is the high cost of production. In the near future, the use of nanosystems for drug delivery strategies can be used for delivering peptides, including mucoadhesive systems for the treatment of oral and vaginal candidiasis. PMID:27540288

  8. Drug and light dose responses to focal photodynamic therapy of single blood vessels in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Mamta; Moriyama, Eduardo H.; Mariampillai, Adrian; Samkoe, Kimberley; Cramb, David; Wilson, Brian C.

    2009-11-01

    As part of an ongoing program to develop two-photon (2-γ) photodynamic therapy (PDT) for treatment of wet-form age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and other vascular pathologies, we have evaluated the reciprocity of drug-light doses in focal-PDT. We targeted individual arteries in a murine window chamber model, using primarily the clinical photosensitizer Visudyne/liposomal-verteporfin. Shortly after administration of the photosensitizer, a small region including an arteriole was selected and irradiated with varying light doses. Targeted and nearby vessels were observed for a maximum of 17 to 25 h to assess vascular shutdown, tapering, and dye leakage/occlusion. For a given end-point metric, there was reciprocity between the drug and light doses, i.e., the response correlated with the drug-light product (DLP). These results provide the first quantification of photosensitizer and light dose relationships for localized irradiation of a single blood vessel and are compared to the DLP required for vessel closure between 1-γ and 2-γ activation, between focal and broad-beam irradiation, and between verteporfin and a porphyrin dimer with high 2-γ cross section. Demonstration of reciprocity over a wide range of DLP is important for further development of focal PDT treatments, such as the targeting of feeder vessels in 2-γ PDT of AMD.

  9. The Effects of Fall-Risk-Increasing Drugs on Postural Control : A Literature Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Maartje H.; van Campen, Jos P. C. M.; Moek, Marije A.; Tulner, Linda R.; Beijnen, Jos H.; Lamoth, Claudine J. C.

    2013-01-01

    Meta-analyses showed that psychotropic drugs (antidepressants, neuroleptics, benzodiazepines, antiepileptic drugs) and some cardiac drugs (digoxin, type IA anti-arrhythmics, diuretics) are associated with increased fall risk. Because balance and gait disorders are the most consistent predictors of f

  10. Electroconvulsive therapy in drug resistant neuroleptic malignant syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousefi A

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Neuroleptic malignant syndrome is an idiosyncratic and potentially fatal reaction to neuroleptic drugs and is characterized by fever, muscular rigidity, altered mental status, autonomic dysfunction, elevated serum CPK and leucocytosis Neuroleptic malignant syndrome is treated with dantrolene, bromocriptin, amantadin and electroconvulsive therapy."n"nCase: A 22 years old, schizophrenic female was refered to the Emergency ward of Roozbeh hospital in Tehran, Iran in December 2008 with aggression, impulsivity, and reduced sleep. After injection of haloperidol, the patient developed a high grade fever, diaphoresis and muscular stiffness. She was diagnosed as neuroleptic malignant syndrome and the treatment with dantrolen, bromocriptin and amantadin initiated. Although fever subsided, other signs continued, therefore we applied electroconvulsive therapy to this case."n"nConclusion: Due to excellent response of the patient to electroconvulsive therapy and the rare reports of electroconvulsive therapy in neuroleptic malignant syndrome in the Iranian population, this case may lead to develop studies for further investigations of this issue.

  11. IGF-1 receptor targeted nanoparticles for image-guided therapy of stroma-rich and drug resistant human cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongyu; Qian, Weiping; Uckun, Fatih M.; Zhou, Zhiyang; Wang, Liya; Wang, Andrew; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily

    2016-05-01

    Low drug delivery efficiency and drug resistance from highly heterogeneous cancer cells and tumor microenvironment represent major challenges in clinical oncology. Growth factor receptor, IGF-1R, is overexpressed in both human tumor cells and tumor associated stromal cells. The level of IGF-1R expression is further up-regulated in drug resistant tumor cells. We have developed IGF-1R targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) carrying multiple anticancer drugs into human tumors. This IGF-1R targeted theranostic nanoparticle delivery system has an iron core for non-invasive MR imaging, amphiphilic polymer coating to ensure the biocompatibility as well as for drug loading and conjugation of recombinant human IGF-1 as targeting molecules. Chemotherapy drugs, Doxorubicin (Dox), was encapsulated into the polymer coating and/or conjugated to the IONP surface by coupling with the carboxyl groups. The ability of IGF1R targeted theranostic nanoparticles to penetrate tumor stromal barrier and enhance tumor cell killing has been demonstrated in human pancreatic cancer patient tissue derived xenograft (PDX) models. Repeated systemic administrations of those IGF-1R targeted theranostic IONP carrying Dox led to breaking the tumor stromal barrier and improved therapeutic effect. Near infrared (NIR) optical and MR imaging enabled noninvasive monitoring of nanoparticle-drug delivery and therapeutic responses. Our results demonstrated that IGF-1R targeted nanoparticles carrying multiple drugs are promising combination therapy approaches for image-guided therapy of stroma-rich and drug resistant human cancer, such as pancreatic cancer.

  12. NEBULIZATION THERAPY - A NOVEL APPROACH TO DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM IN AYURVEDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajaria Divya Kumari

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Several route of administration of drug have not only been described in Ayurvedic texts but also practiced for several millennia. Depending upon physical property of the drug it can be rubbed on the skin like lotion or it can be instilled in the form of drops like nasal (nasya/ ear (karnapurana drop etc. It can be swallowed in the form of tablets and also it can be injected directly into the bloodstream. Similarly the medicines can also be administered through nasal route using nebulization technique or through meter dose inhalation.The process of Nebulization involves a suspension of fine vaporized liquid droplets--otherwise known as aerosol--to administer fluids, oxygen and liquid medication directly to the respiratory system. Nebulizers are commonly used for treatment of cystic fibrosis, asthma, COPD and other respiratory diseases. Breakthroughs in the treatment of Asthma came in light with the introduction of Inhalation therapy (Nebulization / Aerosol mode of drug administration in the conventional medicine. There are several plus points for through-the-lung delivery of medication. The lungs have a large surface area, so that absorption is fast and ample. Lungs are quite tolerant to foreign substances like powders of tobacco, smoke, and fragrances of a hundred types by common men. Lungs are much more permeable than skin, nasal mucosa or the gastro-intestinal tract. This mode of administration proves to be highly beneficial in saving life in acute life threatening condition such as “Status Asthmatics”. But wide range of toxic side effects of modern medicine confines its use as permanent remedy. Administration of drug through nasal route is highly prevalent also in Ayurveda. Since ancient time Acharays very well knew the importance and effectiveness of this route as they had said that“Nasa hi Shirsodvaram”. There are numerous variety of drugs mentioned in Ayurvedic text which can be administered through Nasal route, namely Nasya and

  13. Fungal diseases: could nanostructured drug delivery systems be a novel paradigm for therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voltan AR

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aline Raquel Voltan,1 Guillermo Quindós,2 Kaila P Medina Alarcón,3 Ana Marisa Fusco-Almeida,3 Maria José Soares Mendes-Giannini,3 Marlus Chorilli1 1Department of Drugs and Medicines, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Univ. Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, Sao Paulo, Brazil; 2Immunology, Microbiology, and Parasitology Department, Facultad de Medicina y Odontología, Universidad del País Vasco, Bilbao, Spain; 3Department of Clinical Analysis, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Univ. Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, Sao Paulo, Brazil Abstract: Invasive mycoses are a major problem for immunocompromised individuals and patients in intensive care units. Morbidity and mortality rates of these infections are high because of late diagnosis and delayed treatment. Moreover, the number of available antifungal agents is low, and there are problems with toxicity and resistance. Alternatives for treating invasive fungal infections are necessary. Nanostructured systems could be excellent carriers for antifungal drugs, reducing toxicity and targeting their action. The use of nanostructured systems for antifungal therapy began in the 1990s, with the appearance of lipid formulations of amphotericin B. This review encompasses different antifungal drug delivery systems, such as liposomes, carriers based on solid lipids and nanostructure lipids, polymeric nanoparticles, dendrimers, and others. All these delivery systems have advantages and disadvantages. Main advantages are the improvement in the antifungal properties, such as bioavailability, reduction in toxicity, and target tissue, which facilitates innovative therapeutic techniques. Conversely, a major disadvantage is the high cost of production. In the near future, the use of nanosystems for drug delivery strategies can be used for delivering peptides, including mucoadhesive systems for the treatment of oral and vaginal candidiasis. Keywords: fungal diseases, antifungal agents, amphotericin B, azoles

  14. Smart multifunctional drug delivery towards anticancer therapy harmonized in mesoporous nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Seonmi; Singh, Rajendra K.; Khanal, Dipesh; Patel, Kapil D.; Lee, Eun-Jung; Leong, Kam W.; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Kim, Hae-Won

    2015-08-01

    Nanomedicine seeks to apply nanoscale materials for the therapy and diagnosis of diseased and damaged tissues. Recent advances in nanotechnology have made a major contribution to the development of multifunctional nanomaterials, which represents a paradigm shift from single purpose to multipurpose materials. Multifunctional nanomaterials have been proposed to enable simultaneous target imaging and on-demand delivery of therapeutic agents only to the specific site. Most advanced systems are also responsive to internal or external stimuli. This approach is particularly important for highly potent drugs (e.g. chemotherapeutics), which should be delivered in a discreet manner and interact with cells/tissues only locally. Both advances in imaging and precisely controlled and localized delivery are critically important in cancer treatment, and the use of such systems - theranostics - holds great promise to minimise side effects and boost therapeutic effectiveness of the treatment. Among others, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) are considered one of the most promising nanomaterials for drug delivery. Due to their unique intrinsic features, including tunable porosity and size, large surface area, structural diversity, easily modifiable chemistry and suitability for functionalization, and biocompatibility, MSNPs have been extensively utilized as multifunctional nanocarrier systems. The combination or hybridization with biomolecules, drugs, and other nanoparticles potentiated the ability of MSNPs towards multifunctionality, and even smart actions stimulated by specified signals, including pH, optical signal, redox reaction, electricity and magnetism. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the state-of-the-art of multifunctional, smart drug delivery systems centered on advanced MSNPs, with special emphasis on cancer related applications.

  15. Drug-Drug Interactions Based on Pharmacogenetic Profile between Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy and Antiblastic Chemotherapy in Cancer Patients with HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berretta, Massimiliano; Caraglia, Michele; Martellotta, Ferdinando; Zappavigna, Silvia; Lombardi, Angela; Fierro, Carla; Atripaldi, Luigi; Muto, Tommaso; Valente, Daniela; De Paoli, Paolo; Tirelli, Umberto; Di Francia, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) into clinical practice has dramatically changed the natural approach of HIV-related cancers. Several studies have shown that intensive antiblastic chemotherapy (AC) is feasible in HIV-infected patients with cancer, and that the outcome is similar to that of HIV-negative patients receiving the same AC regimens. However, the concomitant use of HAART and AC can result in drug accumulation or possible toxicity with consequent decreased efficacy of one or both classes of drugs. In fact, many AC agents are preferentially metabolized by CYP450 and drug-drug interactions (DDIs) with HAART are common. Therefore, it is important that HIV patients with cancer in HAART receiving AC treatment at the same time receive an individualized cancer management plan based on their liver and renal functions, their level of bone marrow suppression, their mitochondrial dysfunction, and their genotype profile. The rationale of this review is to summarize the existing data on the impact of HAART on the clinical management of cancer patients with HIV/AIDS and DDIs between antiretrovirals and AC. In addition, in order to maximize the efficacy of antiblastic therapy and minimize the risk of drug-drug interaction, a useful list of pharmacogenomic markers is provided.

  16. Metal complexes in cancer therapy – an update from drug design perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndagi U

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Umar Ndagi, Ndumiso Mhlongo, Mahmoud E Soliman Molecular Modelling and Drug Design Research Group, School of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Westville, Durban, South Africa Abstract: In the past, metal-based compounds were widely used in the treatment of disease conditions, but the lack of clear distinction between the therapeutic and toxic doses was a major challenge. With the discovery of cisplatin by Barnett Rosenberg in 1960, a milestone in the history of metal-based compounds used in the treatment of cancers was witnessed. This forms the foundation for the modern era of the metal-based anticancer drugs. Platinum drugs, such as cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin, are the mainstay of the metal-based compounds in the treatment of cancer, but the delay in the therapeutic accomplishment of other metal-based compounds hampered the progress of research in this field. Recently, however, there has been an upsurge of activities relying on the structural information, aimed at improving and developing other forms of metal-based compounds and nonclassical platinum complexes whose mechanism of action is distinct from known drugs such as cisplatin. In line with this, many more metal-based compounds have been synthesized by redesigning the existing chemical structure through ligand substitution or building the entire new compound with enhanced safety and cytotoxic profile. However, because of increased emphasis on the clinical relevance of metal-based complexes, a few of these drugs are currently on clinical trial and many more are awaiting ethical approval to join the trial. In this review, we seek to give an overview of previous reviews on the cytotoxic effect of metal-based complexes while focusing more on newly designed metal-based complexes and their cytotoxic effect on the cancer cell lines, as well as on new approach to metal-based drug design and molecular target in cancer therapy. We are optimistic that the concept of selective

  17. [Stabilizing the social and health status of drug dependent patients with methadone. Long-term maintainance therapy--Vienna results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loimer, N; Werner, E; Hollerer, E; Pfersmann, V; Schmid-Siegel, B; Presslich, O

    1991-01-01

    On September 25th, 1987 methadone was legalized in Austria for therapeutic use in drug addiction treatment in case of: 1. Long-term drug addiction with intravenous application of the drug, and several unsuccessful withdrawal therapies and/or 2. opiate addiction through intravenous application of the drug along with an existing HIV-1 infection. Since than, 291 patients were treated with methadone at the drug-dependency outpatient clinic of the Psychiatric Clinic of the University of Vienna. In 1990, 96 patients treated for more than one year were investigated using a standardized questionnaire. The image in which crime, prostitution, poverty, ill health all merge was broken by this decriminalization. Methadone treatment offers a first step toward social rehabilitation for drug addicts who have been living as criminals on the fringe of society.

  18. Imaging-guided photoacoustic drug release and synergistic chemo-photoacoustic therapy with paclitaxel-containing nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Junping; Yang, Sihua; Wen, Liewei; Xing, Da

    2016-03-28

    Here, a novel triggered drug release modality was developed for oncotherapy. Paclitaxel (PTX), perfluorohexane (PFH) and gold nanorods (AuNRs) loaded nanoparticles (PTX-PAnP) were synthesized. Folic acid (FA) conjugated PTX-PAnP (PTX-PAnP-FA) could be selectively taken into folate receptor-overexpressed tumor cells. Upon pulsed laser irradiation, the PTX-PAnP-FA could be rapidly destructed because of the PFH vaporization, resulting in fast drug release, which induced apoptosis of cancer cells efficiently. Stimulated fragmentation of the PTX-PAnP-FA nanoparticles can facilitate multiple mechanisms such as bubble implosion, shockwave generation, and sonoporation that further enhance the therapeutic efficiency. The in vivo therapy study further confirmed this new approach resulted in efficient tumor suppression. The results demonstrate a unique drug release mechanism based on photoacoustic effect. It provides an all-in-one platform for photoacoustic image-guided drug release and synergistic chemo-photoacoustic therapy.

  19. The lay user perspective on the quality of pharmaceuticals, drug therapy and pharmacy services--results of focus group discussions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traulsen, Janine Morgall; Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna; Björnsdóttir, Ingunn

    2002-01-01

    : The lay perspective emphasizes a definite split between lay and expert views on the value and quality of pharmaceuticals, drug therapy and pharmacy services, as well as in their assessment of risk. Participants voiced spontaneous criticism of the roles of both physicians and pharmacists in drug therapy......BACKGROUND: This article presents the results of a study on quality of pharmacy services and perceived risk of pharmaceuticals. The results presented here are part of a multi-study evaluation of major changes in drug distribution in Iceland. OBJECTIVES: This sub-study addressed the question: what...... is the lay user perspective on pharmaceuticals and pharmacy services, including their perception of risk? METHODS: To answer this question, seven focus group discussions were conducted with pharmacy customers in different locations in Iceland following new drug distribution legislation in 1996. RESULTS...

  20. Something new every day: defining innovation and innovativeness in drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Jeffrey K

    2008-01-01

    The word "innovation" comes from the Latin noun innovatio, derived from the verb innovare, to introduce [something] new. It can refer either to the act of introducing something new or to the thing itself that is introduced. In terms of commerce, it is defined in the Oxford English Dictionary as "the action of introducing a new product into the market; a product newly brought on to the market," a definition that illustrates both aspects of the word's meaning. "Innovativeness" is the property of being an innovation. Here I identify several different types of innovativeness in drug therapy, including structural, pharmacological or pharmacodynamic, pharmaceutical, and pharmacokinetic innovativeness, and I stress the over-riding importance of clinical innovativeness, which should result in a better benefit to harm balance at an affordable cost.

  1. Drug therapy for depression insomnia%抑郁性失眠的药物治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈发展; 陆峥

    2011-01-01

    Insomnia is the most common symptom of depression with a heavy burden. The treatment for depression insomnia, which is used as evaluation index of antidepressant treatment, is the key to the treatment of depressive disorder.This review describes the progress of the drug therapy for depression insomnia.%失眠是抑郁障碍患者最常见的症状,可导致较重的疾病负担.针对抑郁性失眠的治疗是抑郁障碍治疗的关键,通常作为抗抑郁治疗的疗效评估指标.本文综述抑郁性失眠的药物治疗进展.

  2. A graphene oxide based smart drug delivery system for tumor mitochondria-targeting photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yanchun; Zhou, Feifan; Zhang, Da; Chen, Qun; Xing, Da

    2016-02-01

    Subcellular organelles play critical roles in cell survival. In this work, a novel photodynamic therapy (PDT) drug delivery and phototoxicity on/off nano-system based on graphene oxide (NGO) as the carrier is developed to implement subcellular targeting and attacking. To construct the nanodrug (PPa-NGO-mAb), NGO is modified with the integrin αvβ3 monoclonal antibody (mAb) for tumor targeting. Pyropheophorbide-a (PPa) conjugated with polyethylene-glycol is used to cover the surface of the NGO to induce phototoxicity. Polyethylene-glycol phospholipid is loaded to enhance water solubility. The results show that the phototoxicity of PPa on NGO can be switched on and off in organic and aqueous environments, respectively. The PPa-NGO-mAb assembly is able to effectively target the αvβ3-positive tumor cells with surface ligand and receptor recognition; once endocytosized by the cells, they are observed escaping from lysosomes and subsequently transferring to the mitochondria. In the mitochondria, the `on' state PPa-NGO-mAb performs its effective phototoxicity to kill cells. The biological and physical dual selections and on/off control of PPa-NGO-mAb significantly enhance mitochondria-mediated apoptosis of PDT. This smart system offers a potential alternative to drug delivery systems for cancer therapy.Subcellular organelles play critical roles in cell survival. In this work, a novel photodynamic therapy (PDT) drug delivery and phototoxicity on/off nano-system based on graphene oxide (NGO) as the carrier is developed to implement subcellular targeting and attacking. To construct the nanodrug (PPa-NGO-mAb), NGO is modified with the integrin αvβ3 monoclonal antibody (mAb) for tumor targeting. Pyropheophorbide-a (PPa) conjugated with polyethylene-glycol is used to cover the surface of the NGO to induce phototoxicity. Polyethylene-glycol phospholipid is loaded to enhance water solubility. The results show that the phototoxicity of PPa on NGO can be switched on and off in

  3. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs prior to chronic renal replacement therapy initiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Emil L; Kamper, Anne-Lise; Køber, Lars;

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may be associated with severe renal complications, including acute renal failure, reduced glomerular filtration rate and interstitial nephritis. Caution against NSAIDs is therefore recommended in advanced chronic kidney disease. In this study......, we examined NSAID use, aetiology and comorbidity among a national cohort of patients before the initiation of chronic renal replacement therapy (RRT). METHODS: Patients initiated on chronic RRT in the period 1997-2006 were identified in the Danish National Registry on Regular Dialysis...... and Transplantation, including etiological diagnosis. The use of NSAID before the start of RRT was studied by linkage to the National Prescription Register and comorbidity by linkage to the National Patient Registry. RESULTS: A total of 6663 patients were included in the study, and 2407 patients (36.1%) were...

  4. [Efficacy of oral drug Thrombovasim® in therapy of lower extremity deep vein thromboses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishenina, S V; Madonov, P G; Kinsht, D N; Émedova, T A; Zotov, S P; Ufimtsev, M S; Leont'ev, S G

    Within the framework of the multicenter randomized placebo-controlled double-blind clinical trial "VETTER-1" the authors carried out assessment of therapeutic efficacy and safety of oral drug Thrombovasim® possessing a thrombolytic effect in comprehensive treatment of lower-extremity deep vein thrombosis (LEDVT). The clinical study comprised a total of 154 patients. All patients received standard therapy accepted in LEDVT. The patients were subdivided into 4 groups. Patients from the three study groups received Thrombovasim® at a daily dose of 1,600, 3,200, and 4,800 IU. The control group patients were given placebo. Efficacy was assessed by the results of ultrasound duplex scanning first performed before treatment commenced and then after it terminated. The relative frequency of positive dynamics according to the findings of instrumental methods of study in patients taking Thrombovasim® amounted to 0.728 and in the group of patients receiving placebo to 0.585, p=0.0031. Comparing the degree of blood flow normalization in the zone of the compromised blood flow revealed a pronounced dose-dependent effect: in patients taking the drug at a daily dose of 1,600 IU, the relative frequency of positive dynamics amounted to 0.707 corresponding to an increase in therapeutic efficacy by 21%, for a dose of 3,200 IU these parameters amounted to 0.0257 and 24% and for 4,800 IU - 0.747 and 28%, respectively. In patients taking Thrombovasim® there were no cases of negative dynamics observed. Of the patients taking Thrombovasim®, none developed undesirable or severe adverse events. Inclusion of Thrombovasim® into the composition of comprehensive therapy for LEDVT increases efficacy of treatment at the expense of a spontaneous thrombolytic effect. The most effective dose amounted to 4,800 IU daily. Thrombovasim® turned out to be an efficient and safe agent in treatment of venous thromboses.

  5. Assessment of the expectancy, seriousness and severity of adverse drug reactions reported for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Guenka; Stoimenova, Assena; Dimitrova, Maria; Kamusheva, Maria; Petrova, Daniela; Georgiev, Ognian

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Adverse drug reactions can cause increased morbidity and mortality, and therefore information needs to be studied systematically. Little is known about the adverse drug reactions for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease therapy. The goal of this study is to assess the expectedness, seriousness and severity of adverse drug reactions during chronic obstructive pulmonary disease therapy based on their reporting in the national pharmacovigilance system. Methods: This was a prospective, observational, 1-year, real-life study about the pharmacotherapy of a sample of 390 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. Prescribed medicines were systematized and national pharmacovigilance databases were searched for reported adverse drug reactions. The expectedness was evaluated through the review of the summary of product characteristics, the seriousness was evaluated by the clinicians based on the life threatening nature of the adverse drug reactions, and the severity was evaluated through Hartwig’s Severity Assessment Scale. Descriptive statistics of the reported adverse drug reactions was performed and the relative risk of developing an adverse drug reaction with all international non-proprietary names included in the analysis was calculated. Results: Results confirm that the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a disease with high appearance of adverse drug reactions, and causes many additional costs to the healthcare system. Unexpected and severe adverse drug reactions are frequent. A total of 4.8% of adverse drug reactions were evaluated as life threatening. Majority of adverse drug reactions are classified in Levels 1 (32.6%), 2 (26.4%) and 3 (19%) according to Hartwig’s Severity Assessment Scale. Approximately 22% of reported adverse drug reactions affect people’s everyday life to a greater extent and require additional therapy which might further increase the risk. The relative risk of developing an adverse drug reaction was highest for

  6. Emerging Glycolysis Targeting and Drug Discovery from Chinese Medicine in Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyu Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular-targeted therapy has been developed for cancer chemoprevention and treatment. Cancer cells have different metabolic properties from normal cells. Normal cells mostly rely upon the process of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation to produce energy whereas cancer cells have developed an altered metabolism that allows them to sustain higher proliferation rates. Cancer cells could predominantly produce energy by glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen. This alternative metabolic characteristic is known as the “Warburg Effect.” Although the exact mechanisms underlying the Warburg effect are unclear, recent progress indicates that glycolytic pathway of cancer cells could be a critical target for drug discovery. With a long history in cancer treatment, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM is recognized as a valuable source for seeking bioactive anticancer compounds. A great progress has been made to identify active compounds from herbal medicine targeting on glycolysis for cancer treatment. Herein, we provide an overall picture of the current understanding of the molecular targets in the cancer glycolytic pathway and reviewed active compounds from Chinese herbal medicine with the potentials to inhibit the metabolic targets for cancer treatment. Combination of TCM with conventional therapies will provide an attractive strategy for improving clinical outcome in cancer treatment.

  7. Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Associated with Antiepileptic Drugs and Cranial Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shereen Elazzazy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Case reports on the development of toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN associated with concurrent administration of phenytoin with cranial radiation therapy (Ahmed (2004, Criton et al. (1997, and Rzany et al. (1996, but reports about erythema multiforme, which can develop in patients treated with levetiracetam and cranial irradiation, are very limited. This paper presents evidence that TEN may be induced by concurrent use of radiation with both phenytoin and levetiracetam. Our case is a 42-year-old male patient, a case of gliosarcoma who developed purpuric dermatitis associated with phenytoin when combined with cranial radiation therapy; although phenytoin was discontinued and switched to levetiracetam, the patient had more severe symptoms of toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN on levetiracetam; the patient improved with aggressive symptom management, discontinuation of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs, and holding radiotherapy. Although TEN is a rare toxicity, physicians should pay a special attention to the monitoring of brain tumor patients on antiepileptic prophylaxis during cranial irradiation; furthermore, patients should be counselled to notify their physicians if they develop any new or unusual symptoms.

  8. Comparative evaluation of antioxidant drug influence on a radio therapy efficiency and oxidative status in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Siprov

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is a comparative analysis of the effect of melatonin (Melaxen and 3-hydroxypyridine (Mexidol on antitumor and antimetastatic influence of chemoradiotherapy and oxidative status at mice with Lewis lung carcinoma. Material — Experiments have been organized on 95 mice of C57Bl/6 line and of 20–22 g in weight. Cyclophosphan has been abdominally administered two times in a dosage of 60 mg/kg within the interval of 120 hours — 20-30 min before radiotherapy. It has been located on the area of initial tumor in a dosage of 2 g at the same time as cyclophosphan injection. Melaxen and Mexidol have been intramuscularly injecting in the dosage of 45 and 50 mg/ kg for 14 days. Antitumor and antimetastatic effect of the applied therapy and changes in the oxidative status of the animals have been estimated. Results — Melaxen and Mexidol do not decrease antitumour and antimetastatic effects of radiotherapy and prevent the activation of free radical processes at animals with tumors. Mexidol was more effective than Melaxen in correction of superoxide dismutase activity in liver. The drugs under the study do not decrease radiotherapy-induced lipid peroxidation in the initial tumor. Conclusion — Melaxen and Mexidol do not decrease the radio therapy efficiency and oxidative status at mice with tumor (on the background of antitumor treatment.

  9. The Knowledge Level of Hypertension Patients for Drug Therapy in the Primary Health Care of Malang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hananditia R. Pramestutie

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a persistent blood pressure in which systolic pressure ≥140 mmHg and diastolic pressure ≥90 mmHg. The knowledge that should be owned by patients with hypertension is the meaning, causes, symptoms and treatment of hypertension. This knowledge is important to support the success of hypertension therapy. The aim of this research was to determine the knowledge level of hypertension patients about their drug therapy in the primary health care of Malang. This research used observational study methods. The selection of the patients and the primary health care was done using non-random sampling technique (purposive sampling. The subject who meet the inclusion criteria were involved. The result of this study revealed that the patients with hypertension who have a sufficient level of knowledge were 69 respondents (72,63%. Patients who have a good criteria were 26 respondents (27,3763%. There is no patient with low level of knowledge in this research. The conclusion from this study is most patients with hypertension in Primary Health Care Malang have enough knowledge about their treatment.

  10. Predictors of mortality in patients with extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii pneumonia receiving colistin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ik Sung; Lee, Yu Ji; Wi, Yu Mi; Kwan, Byung Soo; Jung, Kae Hwa; Hong, Woong Pyo; Kim, June Myong

    2016-08-01

    The ratio of the area under the free (unbound) concentration-time curve to minimum inhibitory concentration (fAUC/MIC) was proposed to be the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic index most strongly linked to the antibacterial effect of colistin against Acinetobacter baumannii. A retrospective study of patients who received colistin to treat pneumonia caused by extensively drug-resistant (XDR) A. baumannii over a 4-year period was performed to assess the impact of the colistin MIC on mortality. A total of 227 patients were included in the analysis. The 7-day and 14-day mortality rates of patients with XDR A. baumannii pneumonia receiving colistin therapy were 15.0% and 23.8%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, days from index culture to first dose of colistin, underlying tumour and septic shock at presentation were independent predictors of mortality in patients with XDR A. baumannii pneumonia receiving colistin therapy. In the univariate analysis, the colistin dose based on ideal body weight (IBW) correlated with patient outcome. Therefore, the use of IBW appeared to be more appropriate to calculate the colistin dosage. In addition, these results highlight the clinical significance of colistin MIC in patients with XDR A. baumannii pneumonia receiving colistin therapy. Although MICs were in the 'susceptible' range, patients infected with isolates with high colistin MICs showed a poorer clinical response rate than patients infected with isolates with low colistin MICs. Further clinical studies are needed to evaluate the roles of colistin MIC for predicting mortality in XDR A. baumannii pneumonia with a high colistin MIC.

  11. Pathogenesis of Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Gastropathy: Clues to Preventative Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim MA Bastaki

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric ulceration and bleeding are major impediments to the chronic use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs. The development of effective therapies for prevention of these adverse effects requires better understanding of their pathogenesis. Several features of NSAIDs contribute to the development of damage in the stomach, including the topical irritant effects of these drugs on the epithelium, impairment of the barrier properties of the mucosa, suppression of gastric prostaglandin synthesis, reduction of gastric mucosal blood flow and interference with the repair of superficial injury. The presence of acid in the lumen of the stomach also contributes to the pathogenesis of NSAID-induced ulcers and bleeding in a number of ways. Acid impairs the restitution process, interferes with hemostasis and can inactivate several growth factors that are important in mucosal integrity and repair. Profound suppression of gastric acid secretion has been shown to be effective in preventing NSAID-induced ulceration. There is a strong possibility that new NSAIDs entering the market will have greatly reduced toxicity in the gastrointestinal tract.

  12. Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy for injection drug users: adherence, resistance, and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Vlahov

    Full Text Available Injection drug users (IDUs continue to comprise a major risk group for HIV infection throughout the world and represent the focal population for HIV epidemics in Asia and Eastern Europe/Russia. HIV prevention programs have ranged from HIV testing and counseling, education, behavioral and network interventions, drug abuse treatment, bleach disinfection of needles, needle exchange and expanded syringe access, as well as reducing transition to injection and primary substance abuse prevention. With the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in 1996, dramatic clinical improvements have been seen. In addition, the treatment's impact on reducing HIV viral load (and therefore transmission by all routes provides a stronger rationale for an expansion of the focus on prevention to emphasize early identification and treatment of HIV infected individuals. However, treatment of IDUs has many challenges including adherence, resistance and relapse to high risk behaviors, all of which impact issues of access and ultimately effectiveness of potent antiretroviral treatment. A major current challenge in addressing the HIV epidemic revolves around an appropriate approach to HIV treatment for IDUs.

  13. Biological drugs targeting the immune response in the therapy of psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saveria Pastore

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Saveria Pastore1, Emanuela Gubinelli2, Luca Leoni2, Desanka Raskovic2, Liudmila Korkina11Laboratory of Tissue Engineering and Cutaneous Physiopathology; 2Second Dermatology Unit, Istituto Dermopatico dell’Immacolata, IRCCS, Roma, ItalyAbstract: Chronic plaque psoriasis affects more than 2% of world population, has a chronic recurrent behavior, gives a heavy burden to the patients’ quality of life, and hence remains a huge medical and social problem. The clinical results of conventional therapies of psoriasis are not satisfactory. According to the current knowledge of the molecular and cellular basis of psoriasis, it is defined as an immune-mediated chronic inflammatory and hyperproliferative skin disease. A new generation of biological drugs, targeting molecules and cells involved into perturbed pro-inflammatory immune response in the psoriatic skin and joints, has been recently designed and applied clinically. These biological agents are bioengineered proteins such as chimeric and humanized antibodies and fusion proteins. In particular, they comprise the antitumor necrosis factor-α agents etanercept, infliximab, and adalimumab, with clinical efficacy in both moderate-severe psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, and the anti-CD11a efalizumab with selective therapeutic action exclusively in the skin. Here, we overview recent findings on the molecular pathways relevant to the inflammatory response in psoriasis and present our clinical experience with the drugs currently employed in the dermatologic manifestations, namely etanercept, infliximab, and efalizumab. The growing body of clinical data on the efficacy and safety of antipsoriasis biological drugs is reviewed as well. Particular focus is given to long-term safety concerns and feasibility of combined therapeutic protocols to ameliorate clinical results.Keywords: psoriasis, immune-mediated inflammation, etanercept, infliximab, efalizumab

  14. High effectiveness of self-help programs after drug addiction therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristensen Øistein

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The self-help groups Alcoholics Anonymous (AA and Narcotics Anonymous (NA are very well established. AA and NA employ a 12-step program and are found in most large cities around the world. Although many have argued that these organizations are valuable, substantial scepticism remains as to whether they are actually effective. Few treatment facilities give clear recommendations to facilitate participation, and the use of these groups has been disputed. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the use of self-help groups after addiction treatment is associated with higher rates of abstinence. Methods One hundred and fourteen patients, 59 with alcohol dependency and 55 with multiple drug dependency, who started in self-help groups after addiction treatment, were examined two years later using a questionnaire. Return rate was 66%. Six (5% of the patients were dead. Results Intention-to-treat-analysis showed that 38% still participated in self-help programs two years after treatment. Among the regular participants, 81% had been abstinent over the previous 6 months, compared with only 26% of the non-participants. Logistic regression analysis showed OR = 12.6, 95% CI (4.1–38.3, p Conclusion The study has several methodological problems; in particular, correlation does not necessarily indicate causality. These problems are discussed and we conclude that the probability of a positive effect is sufficient to recommend participation in self-help groups as a supplement to drug addiction treatment. Previous publication This article is based on a study originally published in Norwegian: Kristensen O, Vederhus JK: Self-help programs in drug addiction therapy. Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen 2005, 125:2798–2801.

  15. Characterization of inward-rectifier K+ channel inhibition by antiarrhythmic piperazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanping; Lu, Zhe

    2004-12-14

    Strong inward-rectifier K(+) (Kir) channels play a significant role in shaping the cardiac action potential: they help produce its long plateau and accelerate its rate of repolarization. Consequently, genetic deletion of the gene encoding the strongly rectifying K(+) channel IRK1 (Kir2.1) prolongs the cardiac action potential in mice. In principle, broadening the action potential lengthens the refractory period, which may in turn be antiarrhythmogenic. Interestingly, previous studies showed that piperazine, an inexpensive and safe anthelmintic, both inhibits IRK1 channels and is antiarrhythmic in some animal preparations. This potential pharmacological benefit motivated us to further characterize the energetic, kinetic, and molecular properties of IRK1 inhibition by piperazine. We show how its blocking characteristics, in particular, its shallow voltage dependence, allow piperazine to be effective even in the presence of high-affinity polyamine blockers. We also examine the channel selectivity of piperazine and its molecular determinants.

  16. Bacillus-shape design of polymer based drug delivery systems with janus-faced function for synergistic targeted drug delivery and more effective cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Fei; Lin, Jinyan; Li, Yang; Li, Yanxiu; Wu, Hongjie; Yu, Fei; Jia, Mengmeng; Yang, Xiangrui; Wu, Shichao; Xie, Liya; Ye, Shefang; Luo, Fanghong; Hou, Zhenqing

    2015-04-01

    The particle shape of the drug delivery systems had a strong impact on their in vitro and in vivo performance, but there was limited availability of techniques to produce the specific shaped drug carriers. In this article, the novel methotrexate (MTX) decorated MPEG-PLA nanobacillus (MPEG-PLA-MTX NB) was prepared by the self-assembly technique followed by the extrusion through SPG membrane with high N2 pressure for targeted drug delivery, in which Janus-like MTX was not only used as a specific anticancer drug but could also be served as a tumor-targeting ligand. The MPEG-PLA-MTX NBs demonstrated much higher in vitro and in vivo targeting efficiency compared to the MPEG-PLA-MTX nanospheres (MPEG-PLA-MTX NSs) and MPEG-PLA nanospheres (MPEG-PLA NSs). In addition, the MPEG-PLA-MTX NBs also displayed much more excellent in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity than the MPEG-PLA-MTX NSs and free MTX injection. To our knowledge, this work provided the first example of the integration of the shape design (which mediated an early phase tumor accumulation and a late-phase cell internalization) and Janus-faced function (which mediated an early phase active targeting effect and a late-phase anticancer effect) on the basis of nanoscaled drug delivery systems. The highly convergent and cooperative drug delivery strategy opens the door to more drug delivery systems with new shapes and functions for cancer therapy.

  17. Disulfide cross-linked polyurethane micelles as a reduction-triggered drug delivery system for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shuangjiang; Ding, Jianxun; He, Chaoliang; Cao, Yue; Xu, Weiguo; Chen, Xuesi

    2014-05-01

    Nanoscale carriers that stably load drugs in blood circulation and release the payloads in desirable sites in response to a specific trigger are of great interest for smart drug delivery systems. For this purpose, a novel type of disulfide core cross-linked micelles, which are facilely fabricated by cross-linking of poly(ethylene glycol)/polyurethane block copolymers containing cyclic disulfide moieties via a thiol-disulfide exchange reaction, are developed. A broad-spectrum anti-cancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX), is loaded into the micelles as a model drug. The drug release from the core cross-linked polyurethane micelles (CCL-PUMs) loaded with DOX is suppressed in normal phosphate buffer saline (PBS), whereas it is markedly accelerated with addition of an intracellular reducing agent, glutathione (GSH). Notably, although DOX-loaded CCL-PUMs display lower cytotoxicity in vitro compared to either free DOX or DOX-loaded uncross-linked polyurethane micelles, the drug-loaded CCL-PUMs show the highest anti-tumor efficacy with reduced toxicity in vivo. Since enhanced anti-tumor efficacy and reduced toxic side effects are key aspects of efficient cancer therapy, the novel reduction-responsive CCL-PUMs may hold great potential as a bio-triggered drug delivery system for cancer therapy.

  18. An update on risk factors for drug-induced arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachos, Konstantinos; Georgopoulos, Stamatis; Efremidis, Michael; Sideris, Antonios; Letsas, Konstantinos P

    2016-01-01

    A variety of drugs, either anti-arrhythmics or non-antiarrhythmics, have been associated with drug-induced arrhythmias. Drug-induced arrhythmias are usually observed in the presence of long QT interval or Brugada electrocardiographic pattern. Clinical risk factors, such as female gender, structural heart disease, metabolic and electrolyte abnormalities, bradycardia and conduction disease, increased drug bioavailability, and silent channelopathies act as ''effect amplifiers'' which can make an otherwise relatively safe drug dangerous with regard to risk for polymorphic ventricular tachycardia in the setting of QT interval prolongation. A drug-induced type 1 electrocardiographic pattern of Brugada syndrome is considered highly proarrhythmic. Specific electrocardiographic markers including the corrected QT interval, QRS duration, Tpeak-Tend/QT ratio, and others may predict the risk of arrhythmias in both situations. The present review highlights on the current clinical and electrocardiographic risk factors for prediction of drug-induced arrhythmias.

  19. Antihypertensive drug therapy and the risk of lower extremity amputations in pharmacologically treated type 2 diabetes patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkens, JA; Klungel, OH; Stolk, RP; Spoelstra, JA; Grobbee, DE; Leufkens, HGM

    2004-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to determine the association between different antihypertensive drug therapies and lower extremity amputations (LEAs) in type 2 diabetes patients. Methods Data were obtained from the PHARMO Record Linkage System comprising pharmacy records and data on hospital

  20. Fifty Cases of Child Restless Syndrome Treated with the Integrated Method of Chinese Herbal Drugs and Auricular-Plaster Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Fifty cases of child restless syndrome were treated with oral administration of Chinese traditional herbal drugs plus auricular-plaster therapy from December 1998 to November 2001, and another 47 cases were treated with oral administration of methylphenidate as controls. The result is reported as follows.

  1. The efficacy of leflunomide monotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis : towards the goals of disease modifying antirheumatic drug therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolen, J.S.; Emery, P.; Kalden, J.R.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Dougados, M.; Strand, C.V.; Breedveld, F.C.

    2004-01-01

    This expert review of results from the leflunomide phase II and III clinical trials database demonstrates that leflunomide meets all 3 goals desired of disease modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) therapy: reducing the signs and symptoms of the disease; inhibiting structural damage; and improving ph

  2. Hyperactivity--Drug Therapy/Food Additives/Allergies. A Selective Bibliography. Exceptional Child Bibliography Series No. 602.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Handicapped and Gifted Children, Reston, VA.

    The annotated bibliography on Hyperactivity--Drug Therapy/Food Additives/Allergies contains approximately 65 abstracts and associated indexing information for documents or journal articles published from 1968 to 1975 and selected from the computer files of the Council for Exceptional Children's Information Services and the Education Resources…

  3. Everolimus treatment for patients with autoimmune hepatitis and poor response to standard therapy and drug alternatives in use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ytting, Henriette; Larsen, Fin Stolze

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Not all patients with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) respond to standard medical therapy with corticosteroids and azathioprine. Such patients may develop end-stage liver disease with poor prognosis unless transplantation is considered. Alternatively, the introduction of new therapeutic...... here report the efficacy of everolimus treatment of patients with AIH. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seven patients (six female, mean age 47 years, range 22-62 years) in whom disease control could not be achieved with standard therapy or the alternative drugs in use were included. RESULTS: Treatment...... strategies could potentially ameliorate deterioration of liver function. Patients in our tertiary center were selected for everolimus therapy when exhibiting nonresponse or intolerance to combinations of the standard and empirical drugs in use (e.g., mycophenolate mofetil, calcineurin inhibitors [CNIs]). We...

  4. 阿尔茨海默病药物治疗进展%Advance of drug therapy for Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵烨; 徐美华; 董文心

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenesy of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is complex and unclear. The drug therapy for AD currently is principally to improve the symptoms. This review describes the common and new drugs for AD to provide some references for AD drug therapy in clinic.%阿尔茨海默病(AD)发病机制复杂,现有药物大多以缓解病情为主要治疗目的,尚未有能彻底治愈的有效药物.本文综述目前常用的AD治疗药物和具有前景的新型治疗药物,以期能够对AD的药物治疗提供参考.

  5. Drug resistance in HIV patients with virological failure or slow virological response to antiretroviral therapy in Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdissa, Alemseged; Yilma, Daniel; Fonager, Jannik;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The ongoing scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa has prompted the interest in surveillance of transmitted and acquired HIV drug resistance. Resistance data on virological failure and mutations in HIV infected populations initiating treatment in sub......-Saharan Africa is sparse. METHODS: HIV viral load (VL) and resistance mutations pre-ART and after 6 months were determined in a prospective cohort study of ART-naïve HIV patients initiating first-line therapy in Jimma, Ethiopia. VL measurements were done at baseline and after 3 and 6 months. Genotypic HIV drug...... was observed among 14 (5.3%) participants out of 265 patients. Twelve samples were genotyped and six had HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) mutations at baseline. Among virological failures, 9/11 (81.8%) harbored one or more HIVDR mutations at 6 months. The most frequent mutations were K103N and M184VI. CONCLUSIONS...

  6. Transactivator of transcription (TAT) peptide- chitosan functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a potential drug delivery vehicle for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xia; Liu, Lanxia; Zhu, Dunwan; Zhang, Hailing; Leng, Xigang

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)-based drug delivery vehicles might find great potential in cancer therapy via the combination of chemotherapy with photothermal therapy due to the strong optical absorbance of CNTs in the near-infrared region. However, the application of CNTs in cancer therapy was considerably constrained by their lack of solubility in aqueous medium, as well as the cytotoxicity caused by their hydrophobic surface. Intracellular delivery efficiency is another factor determining the application potential of CNTs in cancer therapy. In the present study, low-molecular-weight chitosan conjugated with transactivator of transcription (TAT) peptide was used for noncovalent functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), aiming at providing a more efficient drug delivery vehicle for cancer therapy. The TAT-chitosan-conjugated MWCNTs (MWCNTs-TC) were further investigated for their water solubility, cytotoxicity, cell-penetrating capability, and accumulation in tumor. It was found that MWCNTs-TC were essentially nontoxic with satisfying water solubility, and they were more efficient in terms of cancer-targeted intracellular transport both in vitro and in vivo as compared with chitosan-modified MWCNTs (MWCNTs-CS), suggesting the great application potential of MWCNTs-TC in cancer therapy.

  7. Drug Concentration Thresholds Predictive of Therapy Failure and Death in Children With Tuberculosis: Bread Crumb Trails in Random Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Soumya; Pasipanodya, Jotam G.; Ramachandran, Geetha; Hemanth Kumar, A. K.; Srivastava, Shashikant; Deshpande, Devyani; Nuermberger, Eric; Gumbo, Tawanda

    2016-01-01

    Background. The role of drug concentrations in clinical outcomes in children with tuberculosis is unclear. Target concentrations for dose optimization are unknown. Methods. Plasma drug concentrations measured in Indian children with tuberculosis were modeled using compartmental pharmacokinetic analyses. The children were followed until end of therapy to ascertain therapy failure or death. An ensemble of artificial intelligence algorithms, including random forests, was used to identify predictors of clinical outcome from among 30 clinical, laboratory, and pharmacokinetic variables. Results. Among the 143 children with known outcomes, there was high between-child variability of isoniazid, rifampin, and pyrazinamide concentrations: 110 (77%) completed therapy, 24 (17%) failed therapy, and 9 (6%) died. The main predictors of therapy failure or death were a pyrazinamide peak concentration <38.10 mg/L and rifampin peak concentration <3.01 mg/L. The relative risk of these poor outcomes below these peak concentration thresholds was 3.64 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.28–5.83). Isoniazid had concentration-dependent antagonism with rifampin and pyrazinamide, with an adjusted odds ratio for therapy failure of 3.00 (95% CI, 2.08–4.33) in antagonism concentration range. In regard to death alone as an outcome, the same drug concentrations, plus z scores (indicators of malnutrition), and age <3 years, were highly ranked predictors. In children <3 years old, isoniazid 0- to 24-hour area under the concentration-time curve <11.95 mg/L × hour and/or rifampin peak <3.10 mg/L were the best predictors of therapy failure, with relative risk of 3.43 (95% CI, .99–11.82). Conclusions. We have identified new antibiotic target concentrations, which are potential biomarkers associated with treatment failure and death in children with tuberculosis. PMID:27742636

  8. Tratamento medicamentoso da osteoartrose do joelho Drug therapy in knee osteoarthrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Uchôa de Rezende

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available O tratamento clínico da osteoartrite/artrose (OA está sempre indicado e baseia-se no autocuidado feito pelo paciente e orientado pelo médico. O uso de medicamentos é complementar às medidas de emagrecimento, ganho de força, de propriocepção, de flexibilidade e de amplitude de movimento. Entre os medicamentos disponíveis para o tratamento da OA há os que são essencialmente analgésicos e que não interferem no curso da doença; bem como os anti-inflamatórios, controversos por seus efeitos colaterais e pelo seu papel na OA, porém, com propriedades analgésicas e anti-inflamatórias indiscutíveis; e, por fim, as drogas modificadoras de estrutura, que retardam a evolução da OA. As medicações ainda podem ser de uso tópico, intra-articular, oral e injetável (sistêmico. As várias apresentações de ácido hialurônico (AH mostram o poder analgésico da droga e há indícios de poder modificador de estrutura da cartilagem pela medicação. Há nível de evidência IA, para diacereína e para a glucosamina, de que retardam a evolução da OA. Mais tecnologia para diagnóstico e controle de tratamento da OA, bem como mais estudos multicêntricos são necessários para consolidar o poder do tratamento medicamentoso de outras drogas.Clinical treatment for osteoarthritis (OA is very important and is based on patient's self care and guided by the physician. Drug therapy is additional to losing weight, improving muscular strength, proprioception, flexibility and range of motion. Between the available drugs for osteoarthritis' treatment, some are basically analgesics and do not interfere on disease's progression; some are anti-inflammatory with good analgesic power but with side effects that compromise their prolonged usage; and the structure modifying drugs that slow down the progression of OA. The medications are presented in topic, oral, intra-muscular, intra-venous and intra-articular forms. The hyaluronic acid has various

  9. Enzymatic prenylation and oxime ligation for the synthesis of stable and homogeneous protein-drug conjugates for targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joong-Jae; Choi, Hyo-Jung; Yun, Misun; Kang, YingJin; Jung, Ji-Eun; Ryu, Yiseul; Kim, Tae Yoon; Cha, Young-Je; Cho, Hyun-Soo; Min, Jung-Joon; Chung, Chul-Woong; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2015-10-05

    Targeted therapy based on protein-drug conjugates has attracted significant attention owing to its high efficacy and low side effects. However, efficient and stable drug conjugation to a protein binder remains a challenge. Herein, a chemoenzymatic method to generate highly stable and homogenous drug conjugates with high efficiency is presented. The approach comprises the insertion of the CaaX sequence at the C-terminal end of the protein binder, prenylation using farnesyltransferase, and drug conjugation through an oxime ligation reaction. MMAF and an EGFR-specific repebody are used as the antitumor agent and protein binder, respectively. The method enables the precisely controlled synthesis of repebody-drug conjugates with high yield and homogeneity. The utility of this approach is illustrated by the notable stability of the repebody-drug conjugates in human plasma, negligible off-target effects, and a remarkable antitumor activity in vivo. The present method can be widely used for generating highly homogeneous and stable PDCs for targeted therapy.

  10. ROLE OF NON-DRUG THERAPIES OF METABOLIC SYNDROME: CHALLENGES AND PROSPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Strelkova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal obesity (and the closely related metabolic syndrome is one of the most common diseases in the world. The urgency of the problem of the progression of abdominal obesity is not only in its high prevalence, but also in the formation of a high risk of developing cardiovascular disease and diabetes type 2. The main reasons for the rapid development of obesity are considered high-calorie food (which includes not only the quantity but also the quality of edible products, sedentary lifestyle and genetic predisposition. Until now there are underway great controversies about the procedures of fast and trouble-free weight loss. There are many studies on the treatment of various components of metabolic syndrome. Despite a number of different pharmaceutical drugs developed for the treatment of abdominal obesity, non-drug therapies come first as well as the organization of the right way of life, which is difficult and sometimes impossible task for the clinician. One of the main reasons is the lack of time in doctor during outpatient consultations. To resolve this issue the role of "School of Health" is considered in order to effectively reduce the body weight of patients with metabolic syndrome and maintaining long-term results. It is expected that the implementation of the "School of Health" in the complex treatment of patients with metabolic syndrome will more broadly inform patients about their disease, improve the motivational and cognitive components of plants, and increase compliance to carry out the doctor's prescription. A review of the prevalence and root causes of abdominal obesity is presented, as well as analysis of the effectiveness of existing “Schools of Health” in the clinical practice for the treatment of various chronic diseases.

  11. Clinically significant drug interactions among HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So-Ngern, Apichot; Montakantikul, Preecha; Manosuthi, Weerawat

    2014-09-01

    We conducted a cross sectional study of the outpatient medical records of 1000 HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in 2011 to determine the incidence of clinically significant drug interactions (CSDI). The severities of the CSDI were graded following the Micromedex" 2.0 database and the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) 2012 HIV treatment guidelines. Three hundred thirty-five patients (34%) had 554 episodes of CSDI. Of which 337 episodes (61%), 163 episodes (29%) and 54 episodes (10%) had grades 2, 3 and 4 severity CSDI, respectively. The CSDI were caused by protease inhibitor (PI)-based drug regimens in 79%, by efavirenz-based regimens in 34% and by nevirapine-based regimens in 10% (p5 items prescribed at a time (OR 1.80; 95% CI: 1.23-2.63), seeing a doctor >4 times a year (OR 1.72; 95% CI: 1.20-2.46), having hypertension (OR 0.60; 95% CI: 0.37-0.98), having a duration of receiving ART of >5 years (OR 0.46; 95% CI: 0.28-0.77) and having a CD4 count of >200 cells/mm3 (OR 0.46; 95%CI: 0.26-0.84). CSDI were common among HIV-infected patients receiving ARV in our outpatient clinic. Patients having a low CD, count, having dyslipidemia, receiving PI-based ART, having a frequent number of visits per year and having a large number of items prescribed at each visit had a greater chance of a CSDI.

  12. [High activity antiretroviral therapy change associated to adverse drug reactions in a specialized center in Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subiela, José D; Dapena, Elida

    2016-03-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) represent the first cause of change of the first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimen, therefore, they constitute the main limiting factor in the long-term follow up of HIV patients in treatment. A retrospective study was carried out in a specialized center in Lara State, Venezuela, including 99 patients over 18 years of age who had change of first-line HAART regimen due to ADRs, between 2010 and 2013. The aims of this research were to describe the sociodemographic and clinical variables, frequency of ADRs related to change of HAART, duration of the first-line HAART regimen, to determine the drugs associated with ARVs and to identify the risk factors. The ADRs constituted 47.5% of all causes of change of first-line HAART regimen, the median duration was 1.08±0.28 years. The most frequent ADRs were anemia (34.3%), hypersensitivity reactions (20.2%) and gastrointestinal intolerance (13.1%). The most frequent ARV regimen type was the protease inhibitors-based regimen (59.6%), but zidovudine was the ARV most linked to ADRs (41.4%). The regression analysis showed increased risk of ADRs in singles and students in the univariate analysis and heterosexuals and homosexuals in multivariate analysis; and decreased risk in active workers. The present work shows the high prevalence of ADRs in the studied population and represents the first case-based study that describes the pharmacoepidemiology of a cohort of HIV-positive patients treated in Venezuela.

  13. Absence of antiretroviral therapy and other risk factors for morbidity and mortality in Malaysian compulsory drug detention and rehabilitation centers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannia J Fu

    Full Text Available Throughout Asia, people who use drugs are confined in facilities referred to as compulsory drug detention and rehabilitation centers. The limited transparency and accessibility of these centers has posed a significant challenge to evaluating detainees and detention conditions directly. Despite HIV being highly prevalent in this type of confined setting, direct evaluation of detainees with HIV and their access to medical care has yet to be reported in the literature.We evaluated the health status of 100 adult male detainees with HIV and their access to medical care in the two largest Malaysian compulsory drug detention and rehabilitation centers holding HIV-infected individuals.Approximately 80% of all detainees with HIV were surveyed in each detention center. Most participants reported multiple untreated medical conditions. None reported being able to access antiretroviral therapy during detention and only 9% reported receiving any HIV-related clinical assessment or care. Nearly a quarter screened positive for symptoms indicative of active tuberculosis, yet none reported having been evaluated for tuberculosis. Although 95% of participants met criteria for opioid dependence prior to detention, none reported being able to access opioid substitution therapy during detention, with 86% reporting current cravings for opioids and 87% anticipating relapsing to drug use after release. Fourteen percent of participants reported suicidal ideation over the previous two weeks.We identified a lack of access to antiretroviral therapy in two of the six compulsory drug detention and rehabilitation centers in Malaysia designated to hold HIV-infected individuals and found significant, unmet health needs among detainees with HIV. Individuals confined under such conditions are placed at considerably high risk for morbidity and mortality. Our findings underscore the urgent need for evidence-based drug policies that respect the rights of people who use drugs and seek

  14. DIACEREIN AS THE DRUG OF CHOICE IN THE THERAPY OF KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS WITH SECONDARY RECURRENT SYNOVITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Udovika

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of diacerein in the therapy of primary knee osteoarthritis (OA with secondary recurrent synovitis.Subjects and methods. The 3-month open-label randomized controlled trial enrolled 133 patients with OA. Group 1 consisted of 68 subjects (42 women and 26 men; mean age 54.22±4.29 years who took diacerein 100 mg/day for 3 months. Group 2 (a control group included 65 subjects (45 women and 20 men; mean age 53.50±3.27 years who received chondroitin sulfate 1000 mg/day + glucosamine sulfate 1000 mg/day and meloxicam 7.5 mg/day for 3 months too.Results and discussion. After a therapy cycle, Group 1 patients displayed a statistically significant decrease in the Lequesne index from 13.92±2.16 to 5.95±0.92 (p=0.00005; in Group 2, this index significantly reduced from 16.72±1.78 to 10.76±1.54 (p=0.001. Pain intensity on the visual analogue scale decreased significantly from 70.88±7.06 to 22.05±6.36 mm (p<0.00001 in Group 1 and from 72.46±7.02 to 39.84±6.67 mm (p<0.0004 in Group 2. A persistent analgesic effect was achieved at weeks 6 and 7 in Groups 1 and 2, respectively. The therapeutic effect was estimated as very good and good by 48 and 52% of the patients, respectively, in Group 1 and as good and moderate by 43 and 57% in Group 2. Three months after a therapy cycle effusion in the affected knee substantially increased (from 21.70±6.29 to 29.16±3.63 ml; p<0.001 in Group 2 and slightly increased (from 5.86±3.10 to 6.12±1.09 ml; p>0.05 in Group 1, which confirms the steady-state effect of diacerein. The results of the performed open-label randomized clinical trial showed marked analgesic and anti-inflammatory effect of diacerein and allow to recommend it as the drug of choice to treat knee OA with secondary recurrent synovitis.

  15. Efficacy of sofosbuvir-based therapies in HIV/HCV infected patients and persons who inject drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puoti, Massimo; Panzeri, Claudia; Rossotti, Roberto; Baiguera, Chiara

    2014-12-15

    In the era of Directly Acting anti HCV Antivirals treatment of hepatitis C is successful in the majority of persons treated. However, treatment of persons with HIV or who inject drugs remains challenging because of special issues: drug-drug interactions with antiretroviral, psychiatric and drug substitution therapies, treatment adherence, impact of treatment on HIV disease course or on risk of bacterial infections. Sofosbuvir induced sustained virologic response in 91% of 23 HIV/HCV coinfected persons treated in combination with ribavirin and pegylated interferon, in 83% of 497 treated in combination with ribavirin and in all 50 patients infected with HCV GT1 treated in combination with ledipasvir and ribavirin. The rates of efficacy in HCV-HIV coinfected were almost the same as those observed in HCV monoinfected suggesting that the efficacy of sofosbuvir is not reduced by HIV coinfection. There are no data on the efficacy of sofosbuvir in injection drugs users. The pangenotypic activity, the high barrier to resistance, the modest potential for drug-drug interactions makes sofosbuvir a reference drug for the treatment of these two special populations.

  16. Hsp60, a novel target for antitumor therapy: structure-function features and prospective drugs design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Andrea; Barone, Giampaolo; Lauria, Antonino; Martorana, Annamaria; Piccionello, Antonio Palumbo; Pierro, Paola; Terenzi, Alessio; Almerico, Anna Maria; Buscemi, Silvestre; Campanella, Claudia; Angileri, Francesca; Carini, Francesco; Zummo, Giovanni; de Macario, Everly Conway; Cappello, Francesco; Macario, Alberto J L

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock protein 60 kDa (Hsp60) is a chaperone classically believed to be involved in assisting the correct folding of other mitochondrial proteins. Hsp60 also plays a role in cytoprotection against cell stressors, displaying for example, antiapoptotic potential. Despite the plethora of studies devoted to the mechanism of Hsp60's function, especially in prokaryotes, fundamental issues still remain unexplored, including the definition of its role in cancer. Key questions still unanswered pertain to the differences in structure-function features that might exist between the well-studied prokaryotic GroEL and the largely unexplored eukaryotic Hsp60 proteins. In this article we discuss these differences in sequence, structure, and roles of Hsp60, focusing on the human ortholog with the view of devising compounds to block its ability to favour tumor-cell growth and survival. Compounds currently known to directly or indirectly affect Hsp60 functions, such as protein folding, HIF-1α accumulation, or Hsp60-induced cell proliferation, are discussed along with strategies that might prove effective for developing Hsp60-targeting drugs for anticancer therapy.

  17. Can bone loss be reversed by antithyroid drug therapy in premenopausal women with Graves' disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belsing Tina Z

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Context Hyperthyroidism can lead to reduced bone mineral density (BMD and increased fracture risk particularly in postmenopausal women, but the mechanism behind is still unclear. Objective Prospective examination of the influence of thyroid hormones and/or thyroid autoantibodies on BMD in premenopause. Design We have examined 32 premenopausal women with untreated active Graves' disease from time of diagnosis, during 18 months of antithyroid drug therapy (ATD and additionally 18 months after discontinuing ATD. Variables of thyroid metabolism, calcium homeostasis and body composition were measured every 3 months. BMD of lumbar spine and femoral neck were measured at baseline, 18 ± 3 and 36 ± 3 months. Data were compared to base line, a sex- and age matched control group and a group of patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis treated with non-suppressive doses of levothyroxine. Results The study showed significantly (p Conclusion The results indicated a clinically relevant impact of thyroid function on bone modulation also in premenopausal women with Graves' disease, and further indicated the possibility for a direct action of TRAb on bones.

  18. ATOX1 gene silencing increases susceptibility to anticancer therapy based on copper ionophores or chelating drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barresi, Vincenza; Spampinato, Giorgia; Musso, Nicolò; Trovato Salinaro, Angela; Rizzarelli, Enrico; Condorelli, Daniele Filippo

    2016-03-01

    Copper is a catalytic cofactor required for the normal function of many enzymes involved in fundamental biological processes but highly cytotoxic when in excess. Therefore its homeostasis and distribution is strictly regulated by a network of transporters and intracellular chaperones. ATOX1 (antioxidant protein 1) is a copper chaperone that plays a role in copper homeostasis by binding and transporting cytosolic copper to ATPase proteins in the trans-Golgi network. In the present study the Caco-2 cell line, a colon carcinoma cell line, was used as an in vitro model to evaluate if ATOX1 deficiency could affect sensitivity to experimentally induced copper dyshomeostasis. Silencing of ATOX1 increased toxicity of a short treatment with a high concentration of Cu(2+). Copper ionophores, such as 5-chloro-8-hydroxyquinoline, induced a copper-dependent cell toxicity which was significantly potentiated after ATOX1 silencing. The copper chelator TPEN (N,N,N',N'-tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine) produced a form of cell toxicity that was reversed by the addition of Cu(2+). ATOX1 silencing increased Caco-2 cell sensitivity to TPEN toxicity. Our results suggest the possibility of a therapy with copper-chelating or ionophore drugs in subtypes of tumors showing specific alterations in ATOX1 expression.

  19. Drug therapy of renal cell carcinoma%肾癌的药物治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康马飞

    2008-01-01

    肾癌的药物治疗目前仍以免疫化学治疗为主,单纯化疗也有效,吉西他滨联合顺铂是目前的标准化疗方案.靶向治疗药物的出现使肾癌的治疗发生了改变,多靶点受体酪氨酸激酶抑制剂(如舒尼替尼和索拉非尼)、哺乳动物雷帕霉素靶蛋白抑制剂(temsirolimus)和抗肿瘤单克隆抗体(如贝伐单抗)等已成为肾癌的一线治疗选择.%Immunochemotherapy is still the primary drug therapy of renal cell carcinoma(RCC), and chemotherapy is effective too. The combination of gemcitabine and cisplatin is the standard regimen now. How-ever, emerge of targeted therapeutic agents has altered the treatment of RCC. Multitargeted tyrosine kinase in-hibitor, such as sunitinib and sorafenib, and mammalian target of rapamycin (roTOR) inhibitors( temsiroll-mus), and anti-tumor monoclonal antibody, such as bevacizumab, have already become the first line election.

  20. Use of new antiretroviral drugs and classes in Bahia, Brazil: a real life experience on salvage therapy of AIDS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brites, Carlos; Nóbrega, Isabella; Martins Netto, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has significantly evolved in the last decade, with an increasing number of new drugs and classes. Currently, even heavily experienced patients can be successfully treated with new regimens. In Brazil, the recent incorporation of some new antiretroviral drugs made it possible to suppress HIV plasma viremia in most treated patients, with significant benefits in terms of quality of life and survival. However, little has been published on outcomes of patients under new drugs-based regimens. We reviewed the safety and efficacy of antiretroviral regimens using recently introduced drugs in Bahia. Our results confirm that patients using darunavir, raltegravir, enfuvirtide, or etravirine presented with a high rate of virological suppression without significant adverse events, after one year of follow-up.

  1. Common drugs for stabilization of renal function in the progression of diabetic nephropathy and their relations with hypertension therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuxuan; Wang, Chengcheng; Zhang, Xiuli; Gu, Harvest F; Wu, Liang

    2017-02-14

    Diabetic nephropathy is characterized by hypertension, progressive albuminuria, glomerulosclerosis and declines in glomerular filtration rate leading to end stage renal disease. Although the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy is not fully understood, current treatment of the patients with diabetic nephropathy is mainly based upon the control of hyperglycaemia and management of blood pressures. Several drugs, which are originally developed for hypertension therapy, have been adopted for stabilization of renal function in diabetic nephropathy. In this review, we first discuss the relationships between diabetic nephropathy and hypertension particularly in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. We then summarize chemical structures, pharmacological characteristics and clinical studies of the common drugs used for treatment of diabetic nephropathy, while these drugs have effects against hypertension. This review may provide the constructive information for further drug development in diabetic nephropathy.

  2. Successful treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis with combination therapy using linezolid and rifampicin under therapeutic drug monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashizawa, Nobuyuki; Tsuji, Yasuhiro; Kawago, Koyomi; Higashi, Yoshitsugu; Tashiro, Masato; Nogami, Makiko; Gejo, Ryuichi; Narukawa, Munetoshi; Kimura, Tomoatsu; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro

    2016-05-01

    Linezolid is an effective antibiotic against most gram-positive bacteria including drug-resistant strains such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Although linezolid therapy is known to result in thrombocytopenia, dosage adjustment or therapeutic drug monitoring of linezolid is not generally necessary. In this report, however, we describe the case of a 79-year-old woman with recurrent methicillin-resistant S. aureus osteomyelitis that was successfully treated via surgery and combination therapy using linezolid and rifampicin under therapeutic drug monitoring for maintaining an appropriate serum linezolid concentration. The patient underwent surgery for the removal of the artificial left knee joint and placement of vancomycin-impregnated bone cement beads against methicillin-resistant S. aureus after total left knee implant arthroplasty for osteoarthritis. We also initiated linezolid administration at a conventional dose of 600 mg/h at 12-h intervals, but reduced it to 300 mg/h at 12-h intervals on day 9 because of a decrease in platelet count and an increase in serum linezolid trough concentration. However, when the infection exacerbated, we again increased the linezolid dose to 600 mg/h at 12-h intervals and performed combination therapy with rifampicin, considering their synergistic effects and the control of serum linezolid trough concentration via drug interaction. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus infection improved without reducing the dose of or discontinuing linezolid. The findings in the present case suggest that therapeutic drug monitoring could be useful for ensuring the therapeutic efficacy and safety of combination therapy even in patients with osteomyelitis who require long-term antibiotic administration.

  3. Potential drug–drug interactions in Alzheimer patients with behavioral symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasqualetti G

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Pasqualetti, Sara Tognini, Valeria Calsolaro, Antonio Polini, Fabio Monzani Geriatrics Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy Abstract: The use of multi drug regimens among the elderly population has increased tremendously over the last decade although the benefits of medications are always accompanied by potential harm, even when prescribed at recommended doses. The elderly populations are particularly at an increased risk of adverse drug reactions considering comorbidity, poly-therapy, physiological changes affecting the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of many drugs and, in some cases, poor compliance due to cognitive impairment and/or depression. In this setting, drug–drug interaction may represent a serious and even life-threatening clinical condition. Moreover, the inability to distinguish drug-induced symptoms from a definitive medical diagnosis often results in addition of yet another drug to treat the symptoms, which in turn increases drug–drug interactions. Cognitive enhancers, including acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine, are the most widely prescribed agents for Alzheimer’s disease (AD patients. Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, including psychotic symptoms and behavioral disorders, represent noncognitive disturbances frequently observed in AD patients. Antipsychotic drugs are at high risk of adverse events, even at modest doses, and may interfere with the progression of cognitive impairment and interact with several drugs including anti-arrhythmics and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Other medications often used in AD patients are represented by anxiolytic, like benzodiazepine, or antidepressant agents. These agents also might interfere with other concomitant drugs through both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic mechanisms. In this review we focus on the most frequent drug–drug interactions, potentially harmful, in AD patients with

  4. Effects of music therapy on drug avoidance self-efficacy in patients on a detoxification unit: a three-group randomized effectiveness study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Self-efficacy is a component of Bandura's social cognitive theory and can lead to abstinence and a reduction of relapse potential for people who have substance abuse disorders. To date, no music therapy researcher has utilized this theoretical model to address abstinence and reduce the likelihood of relapse in people who have addictions. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of music therapy on drug avoidance self-efficacy in a randomized three-group wait-list control design with patients on a detoxification unit. Participants (N = 131) were cluster randomized to one of three single-session conditions: music therapy, verbal therapy, or wait-list control. Music therapy participants received a group lyric analysis intervention, verbal therapy participants received a group talk therapy session, and wait-list control participants eventually received a group recreational music therapy intervention. Although there was no significant between-group difference in drug avoidance self-efficacy, participants in the music therapy condition tended to have the highest mean drug avoidance self-efficacy scores. Posttest written comments supported the use of both music therapy and verbal therapy sessions. Two music therapy participants specifically noted that their initial skepticism had dissipated after receiving music therapy. Despite a lack of significant differences, the theoretical support of self-efficacy for substance abuse rehabilitation suggests that this may be an area of continued clinical focus and empirical investigation. Clinical anecdotes, limitations of the study, and suggestions for future research are provided.

  5. Drug: D01785 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 392.2231 392.9626 D01785.gif Antiarrhythmic Therapeutic category: 2129 Class I antiarrhythmic agent voltage-... voltage-gated sodium channel (SCN9A) blocker [HSA:6335] [KO:K04841] map07037 Antiarrhythmic... 2 Agents affecting individual organs 21 Cardiovascular agents 212 Antiarrhythmic agents 2129 Others D01785

  6. [Drug therapy of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Is combination therapy with 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors and alpha-receptor blockers effective?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horninger, W; Bartsch, G

    2002-09-01

    5 alpha-reductase inhibitors and alpha 1-receptor blockers are the two main drug therapies used in the management of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia. As alpha-reductase inhibitors and alpha 1-receptor blockers act through different mechanisms, a combination of the two agents might be promising. The potential benefits of combination therapy with selective alpha 1-receptor blockers and finasteride, a 5 alpha-reductase inhibitor, are currently being evaluated in several placebo-controlled prospective multicenter studies (VA Study, ALFIN Study, PREDICT Study, and MTOPS Study). The data from these studies available so far demonstrate a statistically significant benefit for the study groups receiving alpha 1-receptor blockers and combination therapy vs placebo and finasteride monotherapy in terms of symptom scores and peak urine flow rates. However, none of the studies yielded a statistically significant advantage of combination therapy over treatment with alpha 1-receptor blockers. These results should be interpreted with reference to the prostatic volume, which in the studies mentioned above was relatively low. From the results of all these studies, it can be concluded that in symptomatic patients with prostate volumes of up to 40-45 ml a combination of 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors with alpha 1-receptor blockers does not appear to provide any benefit. Yet, it can be assumed that in symptomatic patients with prostate volumes of more than 60 ml combination therapy may indeed prove more effective.

  7. 3D-printed hierarchical scaffold for localized isoniazid/rifampin drug delivery and osteoarticular tuberculosis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Min; Li, Kun; Zhu, Yufang; Zhang, Jianhua; Ye, Xiaojian

    2015-04-01

    After surgical treatment of osteoarticular tuberculosis (TB), it is necessary to fill the surgical defect with an implant, which combines the merits of osseous regeneration and local multi-drug therapy so as to avoid drug resistance and side effects. In this study, a 3D-printed macro/meso-porous composite scaffold is fabricated. High dosages of isoniazid (INH)/rifampin (RFP) anti-TB drugs are loaded into chemically modified mesoporous bioactive ceramics in advance, which are then bound with poly (3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHBHHx) through a 3D printing procedure. The composite scaffolds show greatly prolonged drug release time compared to commercial calcium phosphate scaffolds either in vitro or in vivo. In addition, the drug concentrations on the periphery tissues of defect are maintained above INH/RFP minimal inhibitory concentrations even up to 12 weeks post-surgery, while they are extremely low in blood. Examinations of certain serum enzymes suggest no harm to hepatic or renal functions. Micro-CT evaluations and histology results also indicate partly degradation of the composite scaffolds and new bone growth in the cavity. These results suggest promising applications of our hierarchical composite scaffold in bone regeneration and local anti-TB therapy after osteoarticular TB debridement surgery.

  8. Effects of the Combined Therapy of Acupuncture with Herbal Drugs on Male Immune Infertility-- A Clinical Report of 50 Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Bing; Lun Xin; Gong Yuzhuo; Wang Xinzhong

    2005-01-01

    To study the clinical effects of the combined therapy of acupuncture with herbal drugs on male immune infertility and on antisperm antibody (AsAb), 100 male cases of infertility with positive AsAb were divided randomly into two groups, each consisting of 50 cases. The acupuncture-drug group was treated with acupuncture on Ganshu (BL 18), Shenshu (BL 23), Taichong (LR 3), Taixi (KI 3), Xinshu (BL 15),Geshu (BL 17), Shenmen (HT 7), and Xuehai (SP 10), combined with oral medication of Liuwei treated with oral prednisone. The clinical therapeutic effects and the impact on AsAb were observed in the two groups. The results showed that the total effective rate in the acupuncture-drug group was 90%;while that of the control group was 64%, the comparison showing a statistically significant difference (P<0.05). The positive rate of blood serum and/or AsAb in both the two groups decreased in varying degrees, but the negative-turning rate of AsAb in the acupuncture-drug group was more obvious, the comparison showing also a significant difference (P<0.05). Conclusion: The combined therapy of acupuncture with herbal drugs has definite therapeutic effects on male immune infertility, which can regulate AsAb and raise the immunity of the patients.

  9. Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for injecting drug users in the WHO European Region 2002-2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donoghoe, Martin C; Bollerup, Annemarie R; Lazarus, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Providing equitable access to highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) to injecting drug users (IDUs) is both feasible and desirable. Given the evidence that IDUs can adhere to HAART as well as non-IDUs and the imperative to provide universal and equitable access to HIV/AIDS treatment for all...... the injecting status of those initiating HAART and the use of opioid substitution therapy among HAART patients, and discuss how HAART might be better delivered to injecting drug users. Our data adds to the evidence that IDUs in Europe have poor and inequitable access to HAART, with only a relatively small...

  10. Potential of vesicular stomatitis virus as an oncolytic therapy for recurrent and drug-resistant ovarian cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joshua F. Heiber; Xiang-Xi Xu; Glen N. Barber

    2011-01-01

    In the last decade,we have gained significant understanding of the mechanism by which vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) specifically kills cancer cells.Dysregulation of translation and defective innate immunity are beth thought to contribute to VSV oncolysis.Safety and efficacy are important objectives to consider in evaluating VSV as a therapy for malignant disease.Ongoing efforts may enable VSV virotherapy to be considered in the near future to treat drug-resistant ovarian cancer when other options have been exhausted.In this article,we review the development of VSV as a potential therapeutic approach for recurrent or drug-resistant ovarian cancer.

  11. Concurrent anti-vascular therapy and chemotherapy in solid tumors using drug-loaded acoustic nanodroplet vaporization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yi-Ju; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2017-02-01

    Drug-loaded nanodroplets (NDs) can be converted into gas bubbles through ultrasound (US) stimulation, termed acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV), which provides a potential strategy to simultaneously induce vascular disruption and release drugs for combined physical anti-vascular therapy and chemotherapy. Doxorubicin-loaded NDs (DOX-NDs) with a mean size of 214nm containing 2.48mg DOX/mL were used in this study. High-speed images displayed bubble formation and cell debris, demonstrating the reduction in cell viability after ADV. Intravital imaging provided direct visualization of disrupted tumor vessels (vessel size chemotherapy with DOX-NDs vaporization promotes uniform treatment to improve therapeutic efficacy.

  12. Dronedarone: an emerging therapy for atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosei, Enrico Agabiti; Salvetti, Massimo

    2010-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia, with a prevalence ranging from 0.1% to 9.0% at different ages, and is associated with increased cardiovascular events and mortality. A significant increase in the prevalence of the disease is expected to occur in the coming years as a consequence of the aging of the population and advances in the management of coronary artery disease and heart failure. Effective rhythm control may be difficult to obtain in a significant proportion of patients with AF. The limited efficacy and the possible adverse effects of antiarrhythmic drugs has led researchers to focus their attention on new molecules, in a search of compounds with antiarrhythmic efficacy and a more favourable safety profile. Among several new drugs developed for the management of AF, dronedarone, a benzofuran derivative that shares many of the antiarrhythmic properties of amiodarone, but with a more favourable safety profile, seems particularly promising. The drug is noniodinated, has less lipophilicity, reaches therapeutic concentrations over a shorter period of time and has lower tissue accumulation. Dronedarone, similarly to amiodarone, exhibits electrophysiologic characteristics of all 4 Vaughan Williams classes. Clinical studies have shown that dronedarone effectively reduces ventricular rate, may prevent or delay the recurrence of AF, and may reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with AF or atrial flutter. The drug has an overall good safety profile, in particular with low pulmonary and thyroid toxicity. An important exception is represented by patients with unstable haemodynamic conditions, in which the use of dronedarone has been found to be associated with an increase in mortality. Dronedarone has been recently approved for clinical use by the Food and Drug Administration and by the European Medicines Agency. Further results from trials and clinical use will better define the efficacy and safety profile of dronedarone in AF compared

  13. Review of the treatment of psoriatic arthritis with biological agents: choice of drug for initial therapy and switch therapy for non-responders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Angelo S

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Salvatore D’Angelo,1 Giuseppina Tramontano,1 Michele Gilio,1 Pietro Leccese,1 Ignazio Olivieri1,2 1Rheumatology Institute of Lucania (IRel - Rheumatology Department of Lucania, San Carlo Hospital of Potenza and Madonna delle Grazie Hospital of Matera, Potenza and Matera, 2Basilicata Ricerca Biomedica (BRB Foundation, Potenza, Italy Abstract: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA is a heterogeneous chronic inflammatory disease with a broad clinical spectrum and variable course. It can involve musculoskeletal structures as well as skin, nails, eyes, and gut. The management of PsA has changed tremendously in the last decade, thanks to an earlier diagnosis, an advancement in pharmacological therapies, and a wider application of a multidisciplinary approach. The commercialization of tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, etanercept, golimumab, and infliximab as well as interleukin (IL-12/23 (ustekinumab and IL-17 (secukinumab inhibitors is representative of a revolution in the treatment of PsA. No evidence-based strategies are currently available for guiding the rheumatologist to prescribe biological drugs. Several international and national recommendation sets are currently available with the aim to help rheumatologists in everyday clinical practice management of PsA patients treated with biological therapy. Since no specific biological agent has been demonstrated to be more effective than others, the drug choice should be made according to the available safety data, the presence of extra-articular manifestations, the patient’s preferences (e.g., administration route, and the drug price. However, future studies directly comparing different biological drugs and assessing the efficacy of treatment strategies specific for PsA are urgently needed. Keywords: psoriatic arthritis, treatment, biological drugs, TNF inhibitors, ustekinumab, secukinumab

  14. 失眠症的非药物治疗进展①%Advance in Non-drug Therapy of Insomnia (review)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    At present, insomnia treatments mainly contain drug therapy and non-drug therapy. The non-drug therapy included sleep hy-giene instruction, cognitive behavioral therapy, psychological therapy, physical therapy, relaxation therapy, and music therapy, etc. The non-drug therapy is a safe and effective treatment, and it plays a good effect whether using with drug or alone.%  目前关于失眠症的治疗方法主要有药物治疗和非药物治疗。非药物治疗有睡眠卫生指导、认知行为治疗、心理疗法、物理疗法、松弛疗法、音乐疗法等。非药物治疗具有安全有效的优势,无论是与药物联合还是单独运用均起到较好的效果。

  15. Targeting of small molecule anticancer drugs to the tumour and its vasculature using cationic liposomes: lessons from gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choong Peter FM

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cationic (positively charged liposomes have been tested in various gene therapy clinical trials for neoplastic and other diseases. They have demonstrated selectivity for tumour vascular endothelial cells raising hopes for both antiangiogenic and antivascular therapies. They are also capable of being selectively delivered to the lungs and liver when administered intravenously. These vesicles are being targeted to the tumour in various parts of the body by using advanced liposomal systems such as ligand-receptor and antibody-antigen combinations. At present, the transferrin receptor is commonly used for cancer-targeted drug delivery systems including cationic liposomes. This review looks at the growing utility of these vesicles for delivery of small molecule anticancer drugs.

  16. Antithyroid drugs as a factor influencing the outcome of radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease and toxic nodular goitre?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koerber, C.; Schneider, P.; Koerber-Hafner, N.; Haenscheid, H.; Reiners, C. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2001-09-01

    There is controversy over the factors that may influence the outcome of radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid diseases. Antithyroid medication has been claimed to negatively influence the effectiveness of radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease. In a longitudinal study, we assessed the influence of sex, age, antithyroid drugs, target radiation dose, target mass, applied activity, delivered dose, interval between last meal and application, and TSH, FT{sub 3} and FT{sub 4} levels on the outcome of radioiodine therapy. One hundred and forty-four patients (111 female, 33 male) suffering from Graves' disease (GD) and 563 patients (434 female, 129 male) with toxic nodular goitre (TNG) were entered in the study and followed up until 8 months after therapy. Treatment was defined as successful when the TSH level was found to be normal or elevated. Ninety-eight GD patients and 418 TNG patients were successfully treated. Forward stepwise multiple regression analysis models retained only the target mass in GD and the applied activity in TNG as significantly associated with the outcome of therapy. The predictive value of all variables involved was extremely low in both disease groups. Whereas concomitant antithyroid medication had no influence in GD, it adversely influenced radioiodine therapy of TNG. This effect may be attributed to a radioiodine ''steal phenomenon'' induced by TSH-stimulated normal thyroid tissue, which causes overestimation of the uptake in toxic nodules. (orig.)

  17. Contribution of Diagnostic Tests and Drug Therapy in Screening of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) in Western Algerian Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelkrim Berroukche; Abderahmane Labani; Mohamed Terras

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is known through the American and European continents whereas it remains much to make to know the epidemiologic profile of this pathology in Algeria. This study aims to show a contribution of diagnostic tests and drug therapy in screening of BPH in Western Algerian hospital. Our study was carried out on 385 men recruited in the Urology department of Saida hospital during the period 2010-2013, consulting for urologic problems whose 120 patien...

  18. Clinical observation on the effect of deep brain stimulation combined with drug therapy in the treatment of idiopathic Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li MENG

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study the efficacy and safety of deep brain stimulation (DBS combined with drug therapy in the treatment of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD. Methods From August 2013 to August 2015, 60 patients with idiopathic PD were enrolled. They were divided into DBS group (N = 30 and control group (N = 30 based on different treatment methods. The control group was given routine drug therapy, while DBS group was given DBS combined with drug therapy. Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS and Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Scale (PDQUALIF were used to evaluate the severity of disease and quality of life. Results In comparison with control group, UPDRS suggested lower mind, behavior and mood score (P = 0.023, lower activities of daily living score (P = 0.005, lower motor function score (P = 0.025, lower motor complications score (P = 0.008 and lower PDQUALIF score (P = 0.016 in DBS group. In comparison with scores in DBS group before treatment, UPDRS suggested lower mind, behavior and mood score (P = 0.003, lower activities of daily living score (P = 0.016, lower motor function score (P = 0.001, lower motor complications score (P = 0.016 and lower PDQUALIF score (P = 0.000 after treatment. Total effective rate was found higher in DBS group [96.67% (29/30; χ 2 = 5.109, P = 0.000] than that in control group [76.67% (23/30]. Conclusions DBS combined with drug therapy can effectively improve clinical symptoms and quality of life in patients with idiopathic PD. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.02.007

  19. The impact of drug reimbursement policy on rates of testosterone replacement therapy among older men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Piszczek

    Full Text Available Despite a lack of data describing the long-term efficacy and safety of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT, prescribing of testosterone to older men has increased with the availability of topical formulations. The magnitude of this increase and the impact of formulary restrictions on testosterone prescribing are poorly characterized.We conducted a time series analysis using the linked health administrative records of men aged 66 years or older in Ontario, Canada between January 1, 1997 and March 31, 2012. We used interventional autoregressive integrated moving average models to examine the impact of a restrictive drug reimbursement policy on testosterone prescribing and examined the demographic profile of men initiating testosterone in the final 2 years of the study period.A total of 28,477 men were dispensed testosterone over the study period. Overall testosterone prescribing declined 27.9% in the 6 months following the implementation of the restriction policy (9.5 to 6.9 men per 1000 eligible; p<0.01. However, the overall decrease was temporary and testosterone use exceeded pre-policy levels by the end of the study period (11.0 men per 1000 eligible, largely driven by prescriptions for topical testosterone (4.8 men per 1000 eligible. Only 6.3% of men who initiated testosterone had a documented diagnosis of hypogonadism, the main criteria for TRT reimbursement according to the new policy.Government-imposed restrictions did not influence long-term prescribing of testosterone to older men. By 2012, approximately 1 in every 90 men aged 66 or older was being treated with TRT, most with topical formulations.

  20. Neospora caninum calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 is an effective drug target for neosporosis therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayode K Ojo

    Full Text Available Despite the enormous economic importance of Neospora caninum related veterinary diseases, the number of effective therapeutic agents is relatively small. Development of new therapeutic strategies to combat the economic impact of neosporosis remains an important scientific endeavor. This study demonstrates molecular, structural and phenotypic evidence that N. caninum calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (NcCDPK1 is a promising molecular target for neosporosis drug development. Recombinant NcCDPK1 was expressed, purified and screened against a select group of bumped kinase inhibitors (BKIs previously shown to have low IC50s against Toxoplasma gondii CDPK1 and T. gondii tachyzoites. NcCDPK1 was inhibited by low concentrations of BKIs. The three-dimensional structure of NcCDPK1 in complex with BKIs was studied crystallographically. The BKI-NcCDPK1 structures demonstrated the structural basis for potency and selectivity. Calcium-dependent conformational changes in solution as characterized by small-angle X-ray scattering are consistent with previous structures in low Calcium-state but different in the Calcium-bound active state than predicted by X-ray crystallography. BKIs effectively inhibited N. caninum tachyzoite proliferation in vitro. Electron microscopic analysis of N. caninum cells revealed ultra-structural changes in the presence of BKI compound 1294. BKI compound 1294 interfered with an early step in Neospora tachyzoite host cell invasion and egress. Prolonged incubation in the presence of 1294 interfered produced observable interference with viability and replication. Oral dosing of BKI compound 1294 at 50 mg/kg for 5 days in established murine neosporosis resulted in a 10-fold reduced cerebral parasite burden compared to untreated control. Further experiments are needed to determine the PK, optimal dosage, and duration for effective treatment in cattle and dogs, but these data demonstrate proof-of-concept for BKIs, and 1294 specifically, for

  1. Non-Drug Therapy and Prevention of Diabetes Mellitus by Dalk (Massage)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayat, Davood; Vakilinia, Seyed Reza; Asghari, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Background: According to WHO estimation, the number of diabetic patients would reach about 591.9 million people in 2035. The tendency towards other kinds of treatment is increasing because of the high therapeutic expenditures and current medical complications. Positive results of massage in recent articles and the prominent role of dalk in Iranian traditional medicine led us to the present study review. Methods: Studying Iranian traditional medicine textbooks, such as Canon of Ibn Sina, Kholasat Al Hekma of Aghili, Zakhireh-ye Khwarazm shahi of Jorjani, Alhavi of Razes and Kamel-al-sanaat of Ibn Abas were done on the topic of dalk discussion. Additionally, a search on “massage and diabetes mellitus” articles was done in motor search engines of PubMed, Google Scholars and the site of “Farhangestane Oloume Pezeshki”. The data were eventually compared and evaluated. Results: In Iranian traditional medicine, dalk means kneading or massage of the body. Depending on the quality and quantity of the performance, it was divided into different kinds. The mechanism of dalk is to increase the blood supply in organs and subsequently increasing organ’s warmness and metabolism that lead to increased residues expulsion. Therefore, it could be advised to healthcare system as a means of treatment. On the other hand, for different diseases such as asthma, arthritis, insomnia, paralysis, DM, and constipation the effect of massage was evaluated and its positive results were confirmed. For example, in DM, its effects in decreasing FBS and HBA1C are shown. Conclusion: According to Iranian traditional medicine and latest articles, dalk as a non-drug therapy and prevention manner is recommended. PMID:27840511

  2. Commercialization strategy of the herbal composition HemoHIM as a complementary drug for anti-cancer therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Sungkee; Jung, Uhee; Park, Haeran

    2013-01-15

    Ο Purpose - Establishment of strategy for the development of HemoHIM as a complementary drug for cancer therapies including non-clinical data preparation, obtainment of a research project grant, base of manufacturing process and raw material standardization Ο Research Results - Examination and confirmation of the essential requirements to develop the complementary drug for anticancer therapies by consulting with Korea FDA, and clinical CRO, and medical experts (animal efficacy study, toxicological safety test, standard analytical method, raw material standardization) - Obtainment of a governmental research project for 3 years from Ministry of Health and Welfare to develop HemoHIM as an complementary herbal drug for anti-cancer therapies - Acquisition of fundamental data on the manufacturing process and the raw material standardization for the optimal efficacy of HemoHIM Ο Expected benefit - Planning to get the approval of IND from Korea FDA by 2015 after completing the non-clinical study through the on-going project from Ministry of Health and Welfare - Planning to commercialize the product by 2017.

  3. Response to pulmonary arterial hypertension drug therapies in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension and cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalampopoulos, Athanasios; Howard, Luke S; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Gin-Sing, Wendy; Grapsa, Julia; Wilkins, Martin R; Davies, Rachel J; Nihoyannopoulos, Petros; Connolly, Susan B; Gibbs, J Simon R

    2014-12-01

    The age at diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and the prevalence of cardiovascular (CV) risk factors are increasing. We sought to determine whether the response to drug therapy was influenced by CV risk factors in PAH patients. We studied consecutive incident PAH patients (n = 146) between January 1, 2008, and July 15, 2011. Patients were divided into two groups: the PAH-No CV group included patients with no CV risk factors (obesity, systemic hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, permanent atrial fibrillation, mitral and/or aortic valve disease, and coronary artery disease), and the PAH-CV group included patients with at least one. The response to PAH treatment was analyzed in all the patients who received PAH drug therapy. The PAH-No CV group included 43 patients, and the PAH-CV group included 69 patients. Patients in the PAH-No CV group were younger than those in the PAH-CV group (P < 0.0001). In the PAH-No CV group, 16 patients (37%) improved on treatment and 27 (63%) did not improve, compared with 11 (16%) and 58 (84%) in the PAH-CV group, respectively (P = 0.027 after adjustment for age). There was no difference in survival at 30 months (P = 0.218). In conclusion, in addition to older age, CV risk factors may predict a reduced response to PAH drug therapy in patients with PAH.

  4. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Cellular Drug Transporters Are Associated with Intolerance to Antiretroviral Therapy in Brazilian HIV-1 Positive Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, Mônica Barcellos; Campagnari, Francine; de Almeida, Tailah Bernardo; Couto-Fernandez, José Carlos; Tanuri, Amilcar; Cardoso, Cynthia Chester

    2016-01-01

    Adverse reactions are the main cause of treatment discontinuation among HIV+ individuals. Genes related to drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) influence drug bioavailability and treatment response. We have investigated the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 29 ADME genes and intolerance to therapy in a case-control study including 764 individuals. Results showed that 15 SNPs were associated with intolerance to nucleoside and 11 to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs and NNRTIs), and 8 to protease inhibitors (PIs) containing regimens under alpha = 0.05. After Bonferroni adjustment, two associations remained statistically significant. SNP rs2712816, at SLCO2B1 was associated to intolerance to NRTIs (ORGA/AA = 2.37; p = 0.0001), while rs4148396, at ABCC2, conferred risk of intolerance to PIs containing regimens (ORCT/TT = 2.64; p = 0.00009). Accordingly, haplotypes carrying rs2712816A and rs4148396T alleles were also associated to risk of intolerance to NRTIs and PIs, respectively. Our data reinforce the role of drug transporters in response to HIV therapy and may contribute to a future development of personalized therapies. PMID:27648838

  5. Small-molecule inhibition of HIV pre-mRNA splicing as a novel antiretroviral therapy to overcome drug resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Bakkour

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of multidrug-resistant viruses compromises antiretroviral therapy efficacy and limits therapeutic options. Therefore, it is an ongoing task to identify new targets for antiretroviral therapy and to develop new drugs. Here, we show that an indole derivative (IDC16 that interferes with exonic splicing enhancer activity of the SR protein splicing factor SF2/ASF suppresses the production of key viral proteins, thereby compromising subsequent synthesis of full-length HIV-1 pre-mRNA and assembly of infectious particles. IDC16 inhibits replication of macrophage- and T cell-tropic laboratory strains, clinical isolates, and strains with high-level resistance to inhibitors of viral protease and reverse transcriptase. Importantly, drug treatment of primary blood cells did not alter splicing profiles of endogenous genes involved in cell cycle transition and apoptosis. Thus, human splicing factors represent novel and promising drug targets for the development of antiretroviral therapies, particularly for the inhibition of multidrug-resistant viruses.

  6. Osteoclastogenesis is influenced by modulation of gap junctional communication with antiarrhythmic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kylmäoja, Elina; Kokkonen, Hanna; Kauppinen, Kyösti; Hussar, Piret; Sato, Tetsuji; Haugan, Ketil; Larsen, Bjarne Due; Tuukkanen, Juha

    2013-03-01

    Osteoclasts are formed by the fusion of mononuclear precursor cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage. Among several putative mechanisms, gap-junctional intercellular communication (GJC) has been proposed to have a role in osteoclast fusion and bone resorption. We examined the role of GJC in osteoclastogenesis and in vitro bone resorption with mouse bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells and RAW 264.7 cells. Blocking of gap junctions with 18-α-glycyrrhetinic acid (18GA) led to inhibition of osteoclastogenesis and in vitro bone resorption. Similarly, the GJC inhibitor GAP27 inhibited osteoclast formation. GJC modulation with the antiarrhythmic peptides (AAPs) led to increased amounts of multinuclear RAW 264.7 osteoclasts as well as increased number of nuclei per multinuclear cell. In the culture of bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells in the presence of bone marrow stromal cells AAP reduced the number of osteoclasts, and coculture of MC3T3-E1 preosteoblasts with RAW 264.7 macrophages prevented the action of AAPs to promote osteoclastogenesis. The present data indicate that AAPs modulate the fusion of the pure culture of cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage. However, the fusion is influenced by GJC in cells of the osteoblast lineage.

  7. Neurogenic contraction induced by the antiarrhythmic compound, AVE 0118, in rat small mesenteric arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kun, Attila; Seprényi, György; Varró, András; Papp, Julius Gy; Pataricza, János

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the vasoactivity of two inhibitors of potassium ion (K(+) ) channels, a potential antiarrhythmic compound, AVE 0118, and 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). Basal and stimulated tones of rat small mesenteric arteries as well as the possible involvement of KV 1.5 ion channel in the mechanism of vascular effect induced by the compounds were analysed. The standard organ bath technique for vascular tone and immunohistochemistry for the localization of ion channels in the arterial tissue were performed. Third- or fourth-order branch of arterial segments was mounted in myographs for recording the isometric tension. AVE 0118 (10(-5) M) and 4-AP (10(-5) M) modulated neither the basal tone nor the contraction induced by noradrenaline but increased the contraction evoked by electrical field stimulation, sensitive to the block of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors. KV 1.5 ion channel-specific immunostaining demonstrated the presence of immunoreactive nerves, and Schwann-cell-specific (S100) immunostaining confirmed the presence of myelin sheath in rat small mesenteric arteries. The study supports an indirect, sympathetic effect of AVE 0118 similar to that of 4-AP, which is mediated, at least in part, by blocking neuronal KV 1.5 type potassium ion channels in the medio-adventitial layer of rat small mesenteric artery.

  8. Modeling of pharmacokinetics of cocaine in human reveals the feasibility for development of enzyme therapies for drugs of abuse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Zheng

    Full Text Available A promising strategy for drug abuse treatment is to accelerate the drug metabolism by administration of a drug-metabolizing enzyme. The question is how effectively an enzyme can actually prevent the drug from entering brain and producing physiological effects. In the present study, we have developed a pharmacokinetic model through a combined use of in vitro kinetic parameters and positron emission tomography data in human to examine the effects of a cocaine-metabolizing enzyme in plasma on the time course of cocaine in plasma and brain of human. Without an exogenous enzyme, cocaine half-lives in both brain and plasma are almost linearly dependent on the initial cocaine concentration in plasma. The threshold concentration of cocaine in brain required to produce physiological effects has been estimated to be 0.22±0.07 µM, and the threshold area under the cocaine concentration versus time curve (AUC value in brain (denoted by AUC2(∞ required to produce physiological effects has been estimated to be 7.9±2.7 µM·min. It has been demonstrated that administration of a cocaine hydrolase/esterase (CocH/CocE can considerably decrease the cocaine half-lives in both brain and plasma, the peak cocaine concentration in brain, and the AUC2(∞. The estimated maximum cocaine plasma concentration which a given concentration of drug-metabolizing enzyme can effectively prevent from entering brain and producing physiological effects can be used to guide future preclinical/clinical studies on cocaine-metabolizing enzymes. Understanding of drug-metabolizing enzymes is key to the science of pharmacokinetics. The general insights into the effects of a drug-metabolizing enzyme on drug kinetics in human should be valuable also in future development of enzyme therapies for other drugs of abuse.

  9. Antiretroviral salvage therapy for multiclass drug-resistant HIV-1-infected patients: from clinical trials to daily clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaz, Arkaitz; Falcó, Vicenç; Ribera, Esteban

    2011-01-01

    Drug resistance is one of the key problems in the management of long-term HIV-1-infected patients. Due to cross-resistance patterns within classes, broad resistance to the three original antiretroviral classes can develop in some patients, mainly those with extensive antiretroviral treatment experience and multiple treatment failures. Triple-class-resistant HIV-1 infection has been associated with a higher risk of clinical progression and death. Additionally, it increases the probability of transmission of multidrug-resistant HIV-1 strains. Over the last years, the availability of new antiretroviral agents against novel targets (integrase inhibitors and CCR5 antagonists), and new drugs within old classes (nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors) has opened a range of new therapeutic options for patients with multiclass drug-resistant HIV-1 infection and scarce therapeutic options with previous drugs. In randomized clinical trials, each of these new drugs has shown exceptional efficacy results, especially in patients who received other fully active drugs in the regimen. Indeed, in nonrandomized trials and observational studies, unprecedented rates of virologic suppression similar to those obtained in naive patients have been achieved when three of the currently available new drugs were combined, even in heavily experienced patients who had no viable salvage options with the previous classes. Thus, the goal of suppression and maintenance (plasma HIV-1 RNA infection. Treatment failure can still occur, however, and the management of patients with multidrug-resistant HIV-1 infection remains a challenge. Clinicians are encouraged to optimize use of the new drugs to obtain better control of HIV infection while avoiding emergence of new resistance-associated mutations. The aim of this article is to summarize current knowledge on the management of salvage therapy for patients with multidrug-resistant HIV-1 infection by analyzing the evidence

  10. Functional Family Therapy (FFT) for Young People in Treatment for Non-opioid Drug Use:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filges, Trine; Andersen, Ditte; Jørgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this review is to evaluate the current evidence on the effects of FFT on drug abuse reduction for young people in treatment for non-opioid drug use.......The main aim of this review is to evaluate the current evidence on the effects of FFT on drug abuse reduction for young people in treatment for non-opioid drug use....

  11. A Partnership Training Program: Studying Targeted Drug Delivery Using Nanoparticles in Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Drugs 2013, 18, 97– 107. 67. Cui, M.; Naczynski, D. J.; Zevon, M.; Griffith, C. K.; Sheihet, L.; Poventud-Fuentes, I.; Chen, S.; Roth , C. M.; Moghe, P...in vivo. Adv Drug Deliv Rev 2013:65:71-9. 42. Waite CL, Roth CM. Nanoscale drug delivery systems for enhanced drug penetration into solid tumors...instrument and a laser lamp (Edinburgh Instruments, Scotland ). Transmission electronmicroscopy (TEM) imaging was performed using an FEI Tecnai F20 U-TWIN

  12. A programmed release multi-drug implant fabricated by three-dimensional printing technology for bone tuberculosis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weigang; Zheng, Qixin; Guo, Xiaodong; Sun, Jianhua; Liu, Yudong

    2009-12-01

    In the world, bone tuberculosis is still very difficult to treat and presents a challenge to clinicians. In this study, we utilized 3D printing technology to fabricate a programmed release multi-drug implant for bone tuberculosis therapy. The construction of the drug implant was a multi-layered concentric cylinder divided into four layers from the center to the periphery. Isoniazid and rifampicin were distributed individually into the different layers in a specific sequence of isoniazid-rifampicin-isoniazid-rifampicin. The drug release assays in vitro and in vivo showed that isoniazid and rifampicin were released orderly from the outside to the center to form the multi-drug therapeutic alliance, and the peak concentrations of drugs were detected in sequence at 8 to 12 day intervals. In addition, no negative effect on the proliferation of rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells was detected during the cytocompatibility assay. Due to its ideal pharmacologic action and cytocompatibility, the programmed release multi-drug implant with a complex construction fabricated by 3D printing technology could be of interest in prevention and treatment of bone tuberculosis.

  13. A programmed release multi-drug implant fabricated by three-dimensional printing technology for bone tuberculosis therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Weigang; Zheng Qixin; Guo Xiaodong; Sun Jianhua; Liu Yudong, E-mail: Zheng-qx@163.co [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China)

    2009-12-15

    In the world, bone tuberculosis is still very difficult to treat and presents a challenge to clinicians. In this study, we utilized 3D printing technology to fabricate a programmed release multi-drug implant for bone tuberculosis therapy. The construction of the drug implant was a multi-layered concentric cylinder divided into four layers from the center to the periphery. Isoniazid and rifampicin were distributed individually into the different layers in a specific sequence of isoniazid-rifampicin-isoniazid-rifampicin. The drug release assays in vitro and in vivo showed that isoniazid and rifampicin were released orderly from the outside to the center to form the multi-drug therapeutic alliance, and the peak concentrations of drugs were detected in sequence at 8 to 12 day intervals. In addition, no negative effect on the proliferation of rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells was detected during the cytocompatibility assay. Due to its ideal pharmacologic action and cytocompatibility, the programmed release multi-drug implant with a complex construction fabricated by 3D printing technology could be of interest in prevention and treatment of bone tuberculosis.

  14. Multidimensional Family Therapy (MDFT) for Young People in Treatment for Non-opioid Drug Abuse:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filges, Trine; Rasmussen, Pernille; Andersen, Ditte

    2015-01-01

    The main objectives of this review are to evaluate the current evidence on the effects of MDFT on drug abuse reduction for young people (aged 11-21 years) in treatment for non-opioid drug abuse, and if possible to examine moderators of drug abuse reduction effects, specifically analysing whether...

  15. Standard treatment option in stage III non-small-cell lung cancer: case against trimodal therapy and consolidation drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremić, Branislav

    2015-03-01

    Prospective randomized trials and meta-analyses established concurrent radiochemotherapy (RT-CHT) as standard treatment approach in patients with inoperable, locally advanced (stage IIIA and B) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In patients with either clinically (c) or pathologically (p) staged disease (stage IIIA), including those with pN2 disease, trimodal therapy was also frequently practiced in the past and is currently still advocated by large cooperative groups and organizations. Similarly, consolidation CHT provided after concurrent RT-CHT was suggested to be feasible and effective in inoperable stage III NSCLC. Contrasting these practices and suggestions, there is no evidence that trimodal therapy in stage IIIA (clinically or pathologically staged) or consolidation CHT in inoperable stage III NSCLC plays any role in its treatment. In both cases, evidence clearly demonstrates that concurrent RT-CHT is of similar efficacy and less toxic, and it should be considered a standard treatment option for all patients with stage III NSCLC.

  16. Common Variation in the NOS1AP Gene Is Associated With Drug-Induced QT Prolongation and Ventricular Arrhythmia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jamshidi, Yalda; Nolte, Ilja M.; Dalageorgou, Chrysoula; Zheng, Dongling; Johnson, Toby; Bastiaenen, Rachel; Ruddy, Suzanne; Talbott, Daniel; Norris, Kris J.; Snieder, Harold; George, Alfred L.; Marshall, Vanessa; Shakir, Saad; Kannankeril, Prince J.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Camm, A. John; Jeffery, Steve; Roden, Dan M.; Behr, Elijah R.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to determine whether variations in NOS1AP affect drug-induced long QT syndrome (LQTS). Background Use of antiarrhythmic drugs is limited by the high incidence of serious adverse events including QT prolongation and torsades de pointes. NOS1AP gene variants play a role in

  17. Nanomedicine for therapeutic drug therapy: Approaches to increase the efficacy of drug therapy with nanoemulsion delivery and reduce the toxicity of quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambalapally, Swetha Reddy

    The advancement of nanotechnology has paved the way for novel nanoscale materials for use in a wide range of applications. The use of these nanomaterials in biomedicine facilitates the improvement of existing technologies for disease prevention and treatment through diagnostics, tumor detection, drug delivery, medical imaging and vaccine development. Nanotechnology delivery systems for therapeutic uses includes the formulation of nanoparticles in emulsions. These novel delivery systems can improve drug efficacy by their ability to enhance bioavailability, minimize drug side effects, decrease drug toxicity, provide targeted site delivery and increase circulation of the drug in the blood. Additionally, these delivery systems also improve the drug stability and encapsulation efficiency. In the Introduction, this thesis will describe a novel technique for the preparation of nanoemulsions which was utilized in drug delivery and diagnostic applications. This novel Phase Inversion Temperature (PIT) method is a solvent and polymer-free and low energy requiring emulsification method, typically utilizing oils stabilized by nonionic surfactants to prepare water in oil (W/O) emulsions. The correlation between the particle size, zeta potential and the emulsion stability is described. The use of this nanoemulsion delivery system for pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals by utilizing in vitro systems was investigated. Using the PIT method, a self assembling nanoemulsion (SANE) of gamma Tocotrienols (gammaT3), a component of Vitamin E family has been demonstrated to reduce cholesterol accumulation in HepG-2 cells. The nanoemulsion is stable and the particle size is around 20 nm with a polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.065. The effect of the nano gammaT3 on the metabolism of cholesterol, HMG-CoA activity and Apo-B levels were evaluated in an in vitro system utilizing HepG2 cells. A new class of nanoparticles, Quantum dots (QDs) has shown immense potential as novel nanomaterials used as

  18. Drug: D02389 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D02389 Drug Primidolol (USAN/INN) C17H23N3O4 333.1689 333.3822 D02389.gif Antihyper...tensive; Anti-anginal; Cardiac depressant [anti-arrhythmic] Same as: C11774 beta1-adrenergic receptor antago...nist [HSA:153] [KO:K04141]; beta2-adrenergic receptor antagonist [HSA:154] [KO:K04142]; beta3-adrenergic rec...thway hsa04080(153+154+155) Neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction hsa04261(153+154) Adrenergic signaling i...n cardiomyocytes hsa04970(153+154+155) Salivary secretion Target-based classification of drugs [BR:br08310

  19. Drug: D00432 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D00432 Drug Nadolol (JP16/USP/INN); Corgard (TN) C17H27NO4 309.194 309.4006 D00432....lar agents 212 Antiarrhythmic agents 2123 Beta blockers D00432 Nadolol (JP16/USP/INN) Anatomical Therapeutic...ING AGENTS C07AA Beta blocking agents, non-selective C07AA12 Nadolol D00432 Nadol...ol (JP16/USP/INN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Cardiovascular Agents Beta-adrenergic Blocking Agents Nadolol D00432...eceptors Rhodopsin family Adrenaline beta1-adrenergic receptor [HSA:153] [KO:K04141] Nadolol [ATC:C07AA12] D00432

  20. Nanoparticle-based drug delivery to improve the efficacy of antiretroviral therapy in the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomes MJ

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Maria João Gomes,1 José das Neves,1,2 Bruno Sarmento1,2 1Instituto de Engenharia Biomédica (INEB, Porto, Portugal; 2Instituto de Investigação e Formação Avançada em Ciências e Tecnologias da Saúde (IINFACTS, Instituto Superior de Ciências da Saúde-Norte, CESPU, Gandra, Portugal Abstract: Antiretroviral drug therapy plays a cornerstone role in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients. Despite obvious advances over the past 3 decades, new approaches toward improved management of infected individuals are still required. Drug distribution to the central nervous system (CNS is required in order to limit and control viral infection, but the presence of natural barrier structures, in particular the blood–brain barrier, strongly limits the perfusion of anti-HIV compounds into this anatomical site. Nanotechnology-based approaches may help providing solutions for antiretroviral drug delivery to the CNS by potentially prolonging systemic drug circulation, increasing the crossing and reducing the efflux of active compounds at the blood–brain barrier, and providing cell/tissue-targeting and intracellular drug delivery. After an initial overview on the basic features of HIV infection of the CNS and barriers to active compound delivery to this anatomical site, this review focuses on recent strategies based on antiretroviral drug-loaded solid nanoparticles and drug nanosuspensions for the potential management of HIV infection of the CNS. Keywords: HIV/AIDS, blood–brain barrier, protease inhibitors, efflux transporters, drug targeting