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Sample records for antiarrhythmic drug therapy

  1. Interactions between antiarrhythmic drugs and cardiac memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plotnikov, A. N.; Shvilkin, A.; Xiong, W.; de Groot, J. R.; Rosenshtraukh, L.; Feinmark, S.; Gainullin, R.; Danilo, P.; Rosen, M. R.

    2001-01-01

    Ventricular pacing or arrhythmias can induce cardiac memory (CM). We hypothesized that clinically administered antiarrhythmic drugs alter the expression of CM, and that the repolarization changes characteristic of CM can modulate the effects of antiarrhythmic drugs. We studied conscious,

  2. Progression of atrial fibrillation after catheter ablation procedure and antiarrhythmic drug therapy in patients with paroxysmal AF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. А. Симонян

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim. This prospective randomized study was aimed to assess the progression of atrial fibrillation (AF after ablation procedure and antiarrhythmic drug therapy (AAD in patients with paroxysmal AF by means of implantable cardiac monitors (ICM. Methods. The study enrolled 92 patients with paroxysmal AF, who were eligible either for catheter ablation or AAD. The patients were randomized into two groups: 1 AAD + ICM implantation (group I; n=46, and 2 AF catheter ablation (CA + ICM implantation (group II; n=46, and 2. The primary endpoint was AF progression according to ICM data. The AF progression was defined as AF burden > 30%. A complication rate after ablation procedure and side effects of AAD were determined as the secondary endpoints. The follow up of this study was 24 months. Results. By the end of the follow-up period, AF progression was observed in 27 (58.7% patients in the AAD group and 10 (21.7% patients in the CA group (р=0.0003; HR 0.37, 95% CI [0.17-0.76], р=0.007, Cox regression. 13 (28,3% patients in the AAD group and 2 (4.3% in the CA group (р=0.002 developed persistent AF. The complication rate in the AAD group was 24% (11 patients and 6.5 % (3 patients in the CA group (р=0.02.Conclusion. Radiofrequency ablation of AF leads to a significant decrease in AF progression when compared with antiarrhythmic drug therapy in patients with paroxysmal AF, which was confirmed by implantable cardiac monitors data.Received 12 July 2016. Accepted 22 August 2016.Funding: The study had no sponsorship.Conflict of interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.

  3. Responders and nonresponders after catheter ablation procedure and antiarrhythmic drug therapy in patients with paroxysmal AF: data from implantable cardiac monitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. А. Симонян

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study was to assess the number of responders and nonresponders after catheter ablation procedure and antiarrhythmic drug therapy (AAD in patients with paroxysmal AF through implantable cardiac monitors (ICM. Methods. 92 patients with paroxysmal AF were randomized into two groups: 1 AAD + ICM implantation (group I; n=46, and 2 AF catheter ablation (CA + ICM implantation (group II; n=46, and 2. Patients with an AF% < 0.5% were considered AF-free (responders. Patients with AF% > 0.5% were classified as nonresponders. The follow up of this study was 24 months.Results. At the end of the follow-up period 13 (28.3% patients in AAD group and 29 (63 % patients in CA group were responders (log-rank test; р=0.0009; HR 2,6; 95% CI [1.44-4.69], р=0.001, Cox regression. According to multivariate logistic regression analysis data, AF burden>4.5% during the first two months after treatment (odds ratio [OR]=38,9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 6.2–245; P<0.001, arterial hypertension (OR=12.7; 95% CI, 1.9–85.3; P=0.009 and AF duration more than 5 years (OR=8.5; 95% CI, 1.04–69.6; P=0.044 were independent predictors of AF burden progression Conclusion. According to implantable cardiac monitors data, in patients with paroxysmal AF radiofrequency catheter ablation as compared to antiarrhythmic drug therapy results in higher percentage of responders.Received 10 July 2016. Accepted 22 August 2016.Funding: The study had no sponsorship. Conflict of interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.

  4. Interactions of Rosiglitazone and Anti.Arrhythmic Drugs in Animal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interactions of Rosiglitazone and Anti.Arrhythmic Drugs in Animal Model. YM Mohammed, EI Mohammed, N Mohiuddin, SS Syeda. Abstract. Background: Diabetes increases the risk of vascular problems by two times compared with a healthy individual, with deposition of fats in blood vessel and this includes cardiovascular ...

  5. An Aggressive Strategy for Maintenance of Sinus Rhythm Including a Combination of Catheter Ablation and Antiarrhythmic Drug Therapy Benefits Patients with Chronic Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Haruna, MD

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of restoration and maintenance of sinus rhythm by a combination of catheter ablation and antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs on atrial function in patients with chronic atrial fibrillation (AF remain unknown. In 15 patients with chronic AF (>1 year, we attempted to restore and maintain sinus rhythm by ablation targeting complex fractionated atrial electrocardiograms (CFAEs combined with pulmonary vein isolation with or without AADs. Sinus rhythm was restored in all patients. At 17:7 ± 7:2 months after AF ablation, maintenance of sinus rhythm was achieved in 20% of patients without AADs and in 73.3% of patients with AADs. The left atrial diameter decreased significantly by 9:5 ± 8:1% (P < 0:05 during the 12-month followup. AADs did not have any adverse effects. The aggressive strategy for maintenance of sinus rhythm involving AF ablation and AADs potentially led to recovery of structural changes in the LA in patients with chronic AF.

  6. Antiarrhythmic therapy and risk of death in patients with atrial fibrillation: a nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Søren Skøtt; Hansen, Morten Lock; Gislason, Gunnar H

    2009-01-01

    AIMS: To examine the risk of death associated with antiarrhythmic drug (AAD) therapy in a nationwide unselected cohort of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). METHODS AND RESULTS: All patients admitted with AF in Denmark from 1995 to 2004 and their subsequent use of AADs were identified...... by individual-level linkage of nationwide registries. Multivariable Cox proportional-hazard models with time-dependent covariates were used to analyse the risk of death associated with AAD therapy. A total of 141,500 patients were included in the study; of these 3356 (2.4%) patients received treatment...... increased risk of death associated with any of the AADs. Hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) for flecainide 0.38 (0.32-0.44), propafenone 0.65 (0.58-0.71), sotalol 0.65 (0.63-0.67), and amiodarone 0.94 (0.89-1.00). CONCLUSION: In an unselected cohort of patients with AF, antiarrhythmic treatment...

  7. Efficacy of Antiarrhythmic Drugs in Adults With Congenital Heart Disease and Supraventricular Tachycardias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koyak, Zeliha; Kroon, Bart; de Groot, Joris R.; Wagenaar, Lodewijk J.; van Dijk, Arie P.; Mulder, Bart A.; van Gelder, Isabelle C.; Post, Marco C.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; Bouma, Berto J.

    2013-01-01

    Supraventricular tachycardias (SVTs) are a major cause of morbidity in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). Few data exist on safety and efficacy of antiarrhythmic drugs in this population. Our aim was to determine the efficacy of antiarrhythmic drugs in adults with CHD and first-onset SVT on

  8. Efficacy of antiarrhythmic drugs in adults with congenital heart disease and supraventricular tachycardias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koyak, Z.; Kroon, B.; Groot, J.R. de; Wagenaar, L.J.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Mulder, B.A.; Gelder, I.C.; Post, M.C.; Mulder, B.J.; Bouma, B.J.

    2013-01-01

    Supraventricular tachycardias (SVTs) are a major cause of morbidity in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). Few data exist on safety and efficacy of antiarrhythmic drugs in this population. Our aim was to determine the efficacy of antiarrhythmic drugs in adults with CHD and first-onset SVT on

  9. EO-199, a specific antagonist of antiarrhythmic drugs: Assessment by binding experiments and in vivo studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oppenheimer, E.; Harel, G.; Lipinsky, D.; Sarne, Y. (Tel-Aviv Univ. (Israel))

    1991-01-01

    EO-199, a demethylated analog of the novel class I antiarrhythmic drug EO-122 was found to antagonize the antiarrhythmic activity of EO-122 and that of procainamide (Class I{sub A}). EO-199 did not block significantly the activity of a class I{sub B} antiarrhythmic agent, lidocaine. EO-199 also displaced the specific binding of ({sup 3}H)EO-122 to rate heart membranes similarly to procainamide whereas lidocaine did not. The correlation between binding experiments and pharmacological effects points to a possible subclassification of these drugs; the two chemical analogs EO-199 and EO-122, as well as procainamide (I{sub A}) but not lidocaine (I{sub B}), compete at the same site or the same state of the sodium channel. The availability of a specific antagonist might be useful for studying the mechanism of action of antiarrhythmic drugs as well as an antidote in cases of antiarrhythmics overdose intoxication.

  10. Can antiarrhythmic drugs save lives in patients with congestive heart failure?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brendorp, Bente; Pedersen, Ole Dyg; Elming, Hanne

    2003-01-01

    Although arrhythmic death is a common cause of death in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF), numerous trials involving prophylactic antiarrhythmic drug treatment have yielded few gains. To date, only beta-blockers have shown a distinct mortality-reducing effect and despite the antiarryth...... to obtain sinus rhythm. This paper outlines the results of the large clinical trials dealing with antiarrhythmic drug treatment in CHF patients with or without atrial fibrillation and certain subgroup analysis and future treatment possibilities are discussed....

  11. What a clinician needs to know about the mechanisms of action of antiarrhythmic drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    Vaughan Williams' classifications of antiarrhythmic drugs are briefly discussed, including the fact that these drugs are classified based upon their effects on normal cardiac cells; that more and more subclassifications need to be introduced; that many drugs have actions belonging to different

  12. Comparison of health-related quality of life in patients with atrial fibrillation treated with catheter ablation or antiarrhythmic drug therapy: a systematic review and meta-analysis protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Shaunattonie; Aves, Theresa; Banfield, Laura; Victor, J Charles; Dorian, Paul; Healey, Jeff S; Andrade, Jason; Carroll, Sandra; McGillion, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most prevalent cardiac arrhythmia and causes patients considerable burden; symptoms such as palpitations and dyspnoea are common, leading to frequent emergency room visits. Patients with AF report reduced health-related quality of life (HQOL) compared with the general population; thus, treatments focus on the restoration of sinus rhythm to improve symptoms. Catheter ablation (CA) is a primary treatment strategy to treat AF-related burden in select patient populations; however, repeat procedures are often needed, there is a risk of major complications and the procedure is quite costly in comparison to medical therapy. As the outcomes after CA are mixed, an updated review that synthesises the available literature, on outcomes that matter to patients, is needed so that patients and their healthcare providers can make quality treatment decisions. The purpose of this review protocol is to extend previous findings by systematically analysing randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of CA in patients with AF and using meta-analytic techniques to identify the benefits and risks of CA with respect to HQOL and AF-related symptoms. Methods and analysis We will include all RCTs that compare CA with antiarrhythmic drugs, or radiofrequency CA with cryoballoon CA, in patients with paroxysmal or persistent AF. To locate studies we will perform comprehensive electronic database searches from database inception to 4 April 2017, with no language restrictions. We will conduct a quantitative synthesis of the effect of CA on HQOL as well as AF-related symptoms and the number of CA procedures needed for success, using meta-analytic techniques. Ethics and dissemination No ethical issues are foreseen and ethical approval is not required given that this is a protocol. The findings of the study will be reported at national and international conferences, and in a peer-reviewed journal using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta

  13. Long-term antiarrhythmic therapy with N-acetylprocainamide.

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    Lertora, J J; Atkinson, A J; Kushner, W; Nevin, M J; Lee, W K; Jones, C; Schmid, F R

    1979-03-01

    The effects of long-term NAPA therapy were evaluated in 6 patients with chronic PVCs known to respond to this drug during a previous placebo-controlled, dose-ranging trial. Underlying cardiac status was evaluated every six months by switching each patient from NAPA to placebo. Placebo period PVC frequency after one year of NAPA therapy was reduced, compared to baseline placebo values. Mean PEP/LVET, measured while the patients received placebo, was elevated at the beginning of the study but was normal after one year of NAPA therapy. Comparison of NAPA and placebo period observations indicated a reduction in PEP/LVET when NAPA therapy was begun. This effect, however, could not be demonstrated one year later when mean placebo period PEP/LVET was normal. The apparent dependence of this effect on underlying status of left ventricular function suggests that the initial reduction in PEP/LVET represents an an indirect effect of NAPA rather than a direct inotropic action. NAPA therapy was well tolerated by the 6 patients and ANA titers became abnormal in only one, in marked contrast to reported experience with procainamide.

  14. Dofetilide: a class III anti-arrhythmic drug for the treatment of atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torp-Pedersen, C; Brendorp, B; Køber, L

    2000-01-01

    of dofetilide. After pharmacological or electrical conversion of atrial fibrillation to sinus rhythm in these studies, the probability of remaining in sinus rhythm during the following year was 75%. Dofetilide has a single significant side effect: risk of developing torsade de pointes ventricular tachycardia......Dofetilide is a class III anti-arrhythmic drug that has been approved for the treatment of atrial fibrillation. Two clinical studies, which enrolled 996 patients, demonstrated pharmacological conversion to sinus rhythm to occur in 30% of patients. Following pharmacological or electrical conversion...... and beta-blockers. Other anti-arrhythmic drugs, as well as drugs that interfere with the renal elimination or the metabolism of dofetilide, must be avoided. Dofetilide is an option when persistent atrial fibrillation is a clinical problem. In the setting of severe heart failure and large myocardial...

  15. Effect of antiarrhythmic drugs on small conductance calcium –activated potassium channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simo Vicens, Rafel; Sauter, Daniel Rafael Peter; Grunnet, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common type of arrhythmia. Current pharmacological treatment for AF is moderately effective and/or increases the risk of serious ventricular adverse effects. To avoid ventricular adverse effects, a new target has been considered, the small conductance calcium....... Whether antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs) recommended for treating AF target KCa2.X channels is unknown. To this end, we tested a large number of AADs on the human KCa2.2 and KCa2.3 channels to assess their effect on this new target using automated whole-cell patch clamp. Of the AADs recommended for treatment...... for their antiarrhythmic effect is unlikely, as the calculated IC50 values are very high compared to the effective free therapeutic plasma concentration of the drugs when used for AF treatment, 40,000-fold for dofetilide and 140- fold higher for propafenone....

  16. Antiarrhythmic drug usage and prostate cancer: a population-based cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ting Kao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Even though the relationship between antiarrhythmic drug usage and subsequent prostate cancer (PCa risk has recently been highlighted, relevant findings in the previous literature are still inconsistent. In addition, very few studies have attempted to investigate the association between sodium channel blockers or potassium channel blockers for arrhythmia and the subsequent PCa risk. Therefore, this cohort study aimed to find the relationship between antiarrhythmic drug usage and the subsequent PCa risk using a population-based dataset. The data used in this study were derived from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005, Taiwan, China. We respectively identified 9988 sodium channel blocker users, 3663 potassium channel blocker users, 65 966 beta-blocker users, 23 366 calcium channel blockers users, and 7031 digoxin users as the study cohorts. The matched comparison cohorts (one comparison subject for each antiarrhythmic drug user were selected from the same dataset. Each patient was tracked for a 5-year period to define those who were subsequently diagnosed with PCa. After adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, comorbidities, and age, Cox proportional hazard regressions found that the hazard ratio (HR of subsequent PCa for sodium channel blocker users was 1.12 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.84-1.50, for potassium channel blocker users was 0.89 (95% CI: 0.59-1.34, for beta-blocker users was 1.08 (95% CI: 0.96-1.22, for calcium channel blocker users was 1.14 (95% CI: 0.95-1.36, and for digoxin users was 0.89 (95% CI: 0.67-1.18, compared to their matched nonusers. We concluded that there were no statistical associations between different types of antiarrhythmic drug usage and subsequent PCa risk.

  17. In-hospital cardiac arrest is associated with use of non-antiarrhythmic QTc-prolonging drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, Marie L.; Langendijk, Pim N. J.; Koopmans, Richard P.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Leufkens, Hubert G. M.; Hoes, Arno W.

    2007-01-01

    AIMS: QTc interval-prolonging drugs have been linked to cardiac arrhythmias, cardiac arrest and sudden death. In this study we aimed to quantify the risk of cardiac arrest associated with the use of non-antiarrhythmic QTc-prolonging drugs in an academic hospital setting. METHODS: We performed a

  18. Prevalence, correlates, and temporal trends in antiarrhythmic drug use at discharge after implantable cardioverter defibrillator placement (from the National Cardiovascular Data Registry [NCDR]).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dev, Sandesh; Peterson, Pamela N; Wang, Yongfei; Curtis, Jeptha P; Varosy, Paul D; Masoudi, Frederick A

    2014-01-15

    Patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) can require antiarrhythmic drugs to manage arrhythmias and prevent device shocks. We sought to determine the prevalence, clinical correlates, and institutional variation in the use of antiarrhythmic drugs over time after ICD implantation. From the ICD Registry (2006 to 2011), we analyzed the trends in the use of antiarrhythmic agents prescribed at hospital discharge for patients undergoing first-time ICD placement. The patient, provider, and facility level variables associated with antiarrhythmic use were determined using multivariate logistic regression models. A median odds ratio was calculated to assess the hospital-level variation in the use of antiarrhythmic drugs. Of the cohort (n = 500,995), 15% had received an antiarrhythmic drug at discharge. The use of class III agents increased modestly (13.9% to 14.9%, p <0.01). Amiodarone was the most commonly prescribed drug (82%) followed by sotalol (10%). Among the subgroups, the greatest increase in prescribing was for patients who had received a secondary prevention ICD (26% in 2006% and 30% in 2011, p <0.01) or with a history of ventricular tachycardia (23% to 27%, p <0.01). The median odds ratio for antiarrhythmic prescription was 1.45, indicating that 2 randomly selected hospitals would have had a 45% difference in the odds of treating identical patients with an antiarrhythmic drug. In conclusion, antiarrhythmic drug use, particularly class III antiarrhythmic drugs, is common among ICD recipients at hospital discharge and varies by hospital, suggesting an influence from local treatment patterns. The observed hospital variation suggests a role for augmentation of clinical guidelines regarding the use of antiarrhythmic drugs for patients undergoing implantation of an ICD. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. In-hospital cardiac arrest is associated with use of non-antiarrhythmic QTc-prolonging drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Bruin, Marie L; Langendijk, Pim N J; Koopmans, Richard P

    2007-01-01

    -prolonging drugs (42/140). The risk was more pronounced in patients receiving doses > 1 defined daily dose (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.1, 5.9), patients taking > 1 QTc-prolonging drug simultaneously (OR 4.8, 95% CI 1.6, 14) and patients taking pharmacokinetic interacting drugs concomitantly (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.2, 13......). CONCLUSIONS: Use of non-antiarrhythmic QTc-prolonging drugs in hospitalized patients with several underlying disease is associated with an increased risk of cardiac arrest. The effect is dose related and pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions increase the risk substantially. Physicians caring for inpatients......AIMS: QTc interval-prolonging drugs have been linked to cardiac arrhythmias, cardiac arrest and sudden death. In this study we aimed to quantify the risk of cardiac arrest associated with the use of non-antiarrhythmic QTc-prolonging drugs in an academic hospital setting. METHODS: We performed...

  20. Atrial Heterogeneity Generates Re-entrant Substrate during Atrial Fibrillation and Anti-arrhythmic Drug Action: Mechanistic Insights from Canine Atrial Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Marta; Hancox, Jules C.; Aslanidi, Oleg V.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-arrhythmic drug therapy is a frontline treatment for atrial fibrillation (AF), but its success rates are highly variable. This is due to incomplete understanding of the mechanisms of action of specific drugs on the atrial substrate at different stages of AF progression. We aimed to elucidate the role of cellular, tissue and organ level atrial heterogeneities in the generation of a re-entrant substrate during AF progression, and their modulation by the acute action of selected anti-arrhythmic drugs. To explore the complex cell-to-organ mechanisms, a detailed biophysical models of the entire 3D canine atria was developed. The model incorporated atrial geometry and fibre orientation from high-resolution micro-computed tomography, region-specific atrial cell electrophysiology and the effects of progressive AF-induced remodelling. The actions of multi-channel class III anti-arrhythmic agents vernakalant and amiodarone were introduced in the model by inhibiting appropriate ionic channel currents according to experimentally reported concentration-response relationships. AF was initiated by applied ectopic pacing in the pulmonary veins, which led to the generation of localized sustained re-entrant waves (rotors), followed by progressive wave breakdown and rotor multiplication in both atria. The simulated AF scenarios were in agreement with observations in canine models and patients. The 3D atrial simulations revealed that a re-entrant substrate was typically provided by tissue regions of high heterogeneity of action potential duration (APD). Amiodarone increased atrial APD and reduced APD heterogeneity and was more effective in terminating AF than vernakalant, which increased both APD and APD dispersion. In summary, the initiation and sustenance of rotors in AF is linked to atrial APD heterogeneity and APD reduction due to progressive remodelling. Our results suggest that anti-arrhythmic strategies that increase atrial APD without increasing its dispersion are

  1. Emerging role of Amiodarone and Dronedarone, as antiarrhythmic drugs, in treatment of leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oryan, A; Bemani, E; Bahrami, S

    2018-04-21

    Leishmaniasis is a group of human and animal diseases causing 20,000 to 40,000 annual deaths and its etiological agents belong to the Leishmania genus. The most current treatment against leishmaniasis is chemotherapy. Pentavalent antimonials such as glucantime and pentostam have been administrated as the first-line drugs in treatment of various forms of leishmaniasis. The second-line drugs such as amphotericin B, liposomal amphotericin B, miltefosine, pentamidine, azole drugs and paromomycin are used in resistant cases to pentavalent antimonials. Because of drawbacks of the first-line and second-line drugs including adverse side effects on different organs, increasing resistance, high cost, need to hospitalization and long-term treatment, it is necessary to find an alternative drug for leishmaniasis treatment. Several investigations have reported the effectiveness of amiodarone, the most commonly used antiarrhythmic drug, against fungi, Trypanosomes and Leishmania spp. in vitro, in vivo and clinical conditions. Moreover, the beneficial effects of dronedarone, amiodarone analogues, against Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania mexicana have recently been demonstrated and such treatment regimens resulted in lower side effects. The anti- leishmanial and anti- trypanosomal effectiveness of amiodarone and dronedarone has been attributed to destabilization of intracellular Ca 2+ homeostasis, inhibition of sterol biosynthesis and collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential. Because of relative low cost, excellent pharmacokinetic properties, easy accessibility and beneficial effects of amiodarone and dronedarone on leishmaniasis, they are proper candidates to replace the current drugs used in leishmaniasis treatment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Organising evidence on QT prolongation and occurrence of Torsades de Pointes with non-antiarrhythmic drugs: a call for consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ponti, F; Poluzzi, E; Montanaro, N

    2001-06-01

    The growing list of non-antiarrhythmic drugs associated with QT prolongation and the relevant regulatory interventions have generated concern for two reasons. First, QT prolongation is sometimes viewed as an intrinsic effect of a whole therapeutic class (for example, antihistamines), whereas, in many cases, it is displayed only by some compounds within a given class of non-antiarrhythmic drugs because of an effect on cardiac repolarisation. Second, drug-induced Torsades de Pointes are still considered idiosyncratic, totally unpredictable adverse drug reactions, whereas a number of risk factors for their occurrence is now recognised. In order to increase awareness among prescribing physicians that many non-antiarrhythmic drugs can affect cardiac repolarisation, we would like to propose a comprehensive and updated list of QT-prolonging drugs that should be a starting point to maintain a "consensus list" to be periodically updated. The drug list was generated by performing a Medline search, by using published lists as starting points to retrieve the relevant references quoted in each article and by considering the International Registry for Drug-induced Arrhythmias maintained by the Georgetown University and mainly based on the FDA approved labelling. The drug list presented in this paper: (1) includes virtually all non-antiarrhythmic drugs with QT-prolonging potential, (2) organises the available information on each drug at different levels of clinical relevance and (3) is as up-to-date as possible in order to provide a fast track for the clinical pharmacologist to retrieve the original publications. This list should be considered as a starting point to call for consensus on: (1) the criteria used to generate the list, (2) possible ways to implement the use of this list as a quick reference for clinicians, for instance by providing a "proarrhythmic score" for each drug, and (3) inclusion/exclusion of a given agent into the list on the basis of evidence that may not

  3. Atrial-selective K+ channel blockers: potential antiarrhythmic drugs in atrial fibrillation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravens, Ursula

    2017-11-01

    In the wake of demographic change in Western countries, atrial fibrillation has reached an epidemiological scale, yet current strategies for drug treatment of the arrhythmia lack sufficient efficacy and safety. In search of novel medications, atrial-selective drugs that specifically target atrial over other cardiac functions have been developed. Here, I will address drugs acting on potassium (K + ) channels that are either predominantly expressed in atria or possess electrophysiological properties distinct in atria from ventricles. These channels include the ultra-rapidly activating, delayed outward-rectifying Kv1.5 channel conducting I Kur , the acetylcholine-activated inward-rectifying Kir3.1/Kir3.4 channel conducting I K,ACh , the Ca 2+ -activated K + channels of small conductance (SK) conducting I SK , and the two-pore domain K + (K2P) channels (tandem of P domains, weak inward-rectifying K + channels (TWIK-1), TWIK-related acid-sensitive K + channels (TASK-1 and TASK-3)) that are responsible for voltage-independent background currents I TWIK-1 , I TASK-1 , and I TASK-3 . Direct drug effects on these channels are described and their putative value in treatment of atrial fibrillation is discussed. Although many potential drug targets have emerged in the process of unravelling details of the pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for atrial fibrillation, we do not know whether novel antiarrhythmic drugs will be more successful when modulating many targets or a single specific one. The answer to this riddle can only be solved in a clinical context.

  4. Class III antiarrhythmic drugs amiodarone and dronedarone impair KIR2.1 backward trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yuan; Takanari, Hiroki; Qile, Muge; Nalos, Lukas; Houtman, Marien J C; Romunde, Fee L; Heukers, Raimond; van Bergen En Henegouwen, Paul M P; Vos, Marc A; van der Heyden, Marcel A G

    2017-10-01

    Drug-induced ion channel trafficking disturbance can cause cardiac arrhythmias. The subcellular level at which drugs interfere in trafficking pathways is largely unknown. K IR 2.1 inward rectifier channels, largely responsible for the cardiac inward rectifier current (I K 1 ), are degraded in lysosomes. Amiodarone and dronedarone are class III antiarrhythmics. Chronic use of amiodarone, and to a lesser extent dronedarone, causes serious adverse effects to several organs and tissue types, including the heart. Both drugs have been described to interfere in the late-endosome/lysosome system. Here we defined the potential interference in K IR 2.1 backward trafficking by amiodarone and dronedarone. Both drugs inhibited I K 1 in isolated rabbit ventricular cardiomyocytes at supraclinical doses only. In HK-KWGF cells, both drugs dose- and time-dependently increased K IR 2.1 expression (2.0 ± 0.2-fold with amiodarone: 10 μM, 24 hrs; 2.3 ± 0.3-fold with dronedarone: 5 μM, 24 hrs) and late-endosomal/lysosomal K IR 2.1 accumulation. Increased K IR 2.1 expression level was also observed in the presence of Na v 1.5 co-expression. Augmented K IR 2.1 protein levels and intracellular accumulation were also observed in COS-7, END-2, MES-1 and EPI-7 cells. Both drugs had no effect on K v 11.1 ion channel protein expression levels. Finally, amiodarone (73.3 ± 10.3% P KIR 2.1 upon 24-hrs treatment, whereas dronedarone tended to increase I KIR 2.1 and it did not reach significance (43.8 ± 5.5%, P = 0.26 at -120 mV; 2 μM). We conclude that chronic amiodarone, and potentially also dronedarone, treatment can result in enhanced I K 1 by inhibiting K IR 2.1 degradation. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  5. We have come a long way with device therapy: historical perspectives on antiarrhythmic electrotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüderitz, Berndt

    2002-01-01

    The history of device therapies is long and fascinating. In the beginning, there is not simply the anatomy and physiology of the heart, but also analysis of the pulse, which indicates the activity of the heart. The analysis of the (peripheral) pulse as a mechanical expression of heart activity goes back several millennia. In China, in 280 BC, Wang Shu He wrote 10 books about the pulse. The Greeks called the pulse "sphygmos"; thus, sphygmology deals with a theory of this natural occurrence. In Roman times, Galen interpreted the various types of pulse according to the widespread presumption of the time that each organ in every disease has its own form of pulse. The growing clinical importance of electrical cardiac stimulation was recognized and renewed as Zoll in 1952 described a successful resuscitation in cardiac standstill by external stimulation. Meanwhile, millions of patients with cardiac arrhythmias worldwide have been treated with pacemakers in the last 40 years. The concept of a fully automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator system for recognition and treatment of ventricular tachyarrhythmias was first suggested in 1970. The first implantation of the device in a human being was performed in February 1980. Further developments involved atrial and atrioventricular defibrillators, radiofrequency ablation, laser therapy, and advanced antiarrhythmic surgery. Since 1990, there has been a growing interest in using cardiac pacing as additional treatment in severe cardiac failure. Recent reports have suggested that intervention with left ventricular or biventricular pacing may be helpful for a subgroup of patients with congestive heart failure. Despite encouraging (preliminary) acute and short-term results, pacing strategies for heart failure still are limited and currently regarded as investigational. Advances in the field of therapeutic application of pharmacologic and electrical tools as well as alternative methods will continue as rapidly as before and

  6. Use and Outcomes of Antiarrhythmic Therapy in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation Receiving Oral Anticoagulation: Results from the ROCKET AF Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Benjamin A.; Hellkamp, Anne S.; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Halperin, Jonathan L.; Breithardt, Günter; Passman, Rod; Hankey, Graeme J.; Patel, Manesh R.; Becker, Richard C.; Singer, Daniel E.; Hacke, Werner; Berkowitz, Scott D.; Nessel, Christopher C.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Fox, Keith A.A.; Califf, Robert M.; Piccini, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Antiarrhythmic drugs (AAD) and anticoagulation are mainstays of atrial fibrillation (AF) treatment. Objective We aimed to study the use and outcomes of AAD therapy in anticoagulated AF patients. Methods Patients in the ROCKET AF trial (n=14,264) were grouped by AAD use at baseline: amiodarone, other AAD, or no AAD. Multivariable adjustment was performed to compare stroke, bleeding, and death across groups, as well as across treatment assignment (rivaroxaban or warfarin). Results Of 14,264 patients randomized, 1681 (11.8%) were treated with an AAD (1144 [8%] with amiodarone, 537 [3.8%] with other AADs). Amiodarone-treated patients were less-often female (38% vs. 48%), had more persistent AF (64% vs. 40%), and more concomitant heart failure (71% vs. 41%) than patients receiving other AADs. Patients receiving no AAD more closely-resembled amiodarone-treated patients. Time in therapeutic range was significantly lower in warfarin-treated patients receiving amiodarone versus no AAD (50% vs. 58%, p<0.0001). Compared with no AAD, neither amiodarone (adjusted HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.74–1.31, p=0.9) nor other AADs (adjusted HR 0.66, 95% CI 0.37–1.17, p=0.15) were associated with increased mortality. Similar results were observed for embolic and bleeding outcomes. Rivaroxaban treatment effects in patients not on an AAD were consistent with the overall trial (primary endpoint adjusted HR 0.82, 95% CI 0.68–0.98, pinteraction=0.06; safety endpoint adjusted HR 1.12, 95% CI 0.90–1.24, pinteraction=0.33). Conclusion Treatment with AADs was not associated with increased morbidity or mortality in anticoagulated patients with AF. The influence of amiodarone on outcomes in patients receiving rivaroxaban requires further study. PMID:24833235

  7. Antiarrhythmic Drugs for Nonshockable-Turned-Shockable Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: The ALPS Study (Amiodarone, Lidocaine, or Placebo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudenchuk, Peter J; Leroux, Brian G; Daya, Mohamud; Rea, Thomas; Vaillancourt, Christian; Morrison, Laurie J; Callaway, Clifton W; Christenson, James; Ornato, Joseph P; Dunford, James V; Wittwer, Lynn; Weisfeldt, Myron L; Aufderheide, Tom P; Vilke, Gary M; Idris, Ahamed H; Stiell, Ian G; Colella, M Riccardo; Kayea, Tami; Egan, Debra; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; Gray, Pamela; Gray, Randal; Straight, Ron; Dorian, Paul

    2017-11-28

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) commonly presents with nonshockable rhythms (asystole and pulseless electric activity). It is unknown whether antiarrhythmic drugs are safe and effective when nonshockable rhythms evolve to shockable rhythms (ventricular fibrillation/pulseless ventricular tachycardia [VF/VT]) during resuscitation. Adults with nontraumatic OHCA, vascular access, and VF/VT anytime after ≥1 shock(s) were prospectively randomized, double-blind, to receive amiodarone, lidocaine, or placebo by paramedics. Patients presenting with initial shock-refractory VF/VT were previously reported. The current study was a prespecified analysis in a separate cohort that initially presented with nonshockable OHCA and was randomized on subsequently developing shock-refractory VF/VT. The primary outcome was survival to hospital discharge. Secondary outcomes included discharge functional status and adverse drug-related effects. Of 37 889 patients with OHCA, 3026 with initial VF/VT and 1063 with initial nonshockable-turned-shockable rhythms were treatment-eligible, were randomized, and received their assigned drug. Baseline characteristics among patients with nonshockable-turned-shockable rhythms were balanced across treatment arms, except that recipients of a placebo included fewer men and were less likely to receive bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Active-drug recipients in this cohort required fewer shocks, supplemental doses of their assigned drug, and ancillary antiarrhythmic drugs than recipients of a placebo ( P lidocaine, and 6 (1.9%) placebo-treated patients survived to hospital discharge ( P =0.24). No significant interaction between treatment assignment and discharge survival occurred with the initiating OHCA rhythm (asystole, pulseless electric activity, or VF/VT). Survival in each of these categories was consistently higher with active drugs, although the trends were not statistically significant. Adjusted absolute differences (95% confidence

  8. Acupuncture Antiarrhythmic Effects on Drug Refractory Persistent Atrial Fibrillation: Study Protocol for a Randomized, Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimin Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common form of arrhythmia. Several trials have suggested that acupuncture may prevent AF. However, the efficacy of acupuncture for AF prevention has not been well investigated. Therefore, we designed a prospective, two-parallel-armed, participant and assessor blinded, randomized, sham-controlled clinical trial to investigate acupuncture in persistent AF (ACU-AF. Methods. A total of 80 participants will be randomly assigned to active acupuncture or sham acupuncture groups in a 1 : 1 ratio. Both groups will take the same antiarrhythmic medication during the study period. Patients will receive 10 sessions of acupuncture treatment once a week for 10 weeks. The primary endpoint is AF recurrence rate. Secondary endpoints are left atrium (LA and left atrial appendage (LAA changes in function and volume, and inflammatory biomarker changes. Ethics. This study protocol was approved by the institutional review boards (IRBs of Kyung Hee University Hospital (number 1335-04. This trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov NCT02110537.

  9. Phenotypic variability in LQT3 human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and their response to antiarrhythmic pharmacologic therapy: An in silico approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paci, Michelangelo; Passini, Elisa; Severi, Stefano; Hyttinen, Jari; Rodriguez, Blanca

    2017-11-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs) are in vitro models with the clear advantages of their human origin and suitability for human disease investigations. However, limitations include their incomplete characterization and variability reported in different cell lines and laboratories. The purpose of this study was to investigate in silico ionic mechanisms potentially explaining the phenotypic variability of hiPSC-CMs in long QT syndrome type 3 (LQT3) and their response to antiarrhythmic drugs. Populations of in silico hiPSC-CM models were constructed and calibrated for control (n = 1,463 models) and LQT3 caused by I NaL channelopathy (n = 1,401 models), using experimental recordings for late sodium current (I NaL ) and action potentials (APs). Antiarrhythmic drug therapy was evaluated by simulating mexiletine and ranolazine multichannel effects. As in experiments, LQT3 hiPSC-CMs yield prolonged action potential duration at 90% repolarization (APD 90 ) (+34.3% than controls) and large electrophysiological variability. LQT3 hiPSC-CMs with symptomatic APs showed overexpression of I CaL , I K1 , and I NaL , underexpression of I Kr , and increased sensitivity to both drugs compared to asymptomatic LQT3 models. Simulations showed that both mexiletine and ranolazine corrected APD prolongation in the LQT3 population but also highlighted differences in drug response. Mexiletine stops spontaneous APs in more LQT3 hiPSC-CMs models than ranolazine (784/1,401 vs 53/1,401) due to its stronger action on I Na . In silico simulations demonstrate our ability to recapitulate variability in LQT3 and control hiPSC-CM phenotypes, and the ability of mexiletine and ranolazine to reduce APD prolongation, in agreement with experiments. The in silico models also identify potential ionic mechanisms of phenotypic variability in LQT3 hiPSC-CMs, explaining APD prolongation in symptomatic vs asymptomatic LQT3 hiPSC-CMs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by

  10. Comparative Effectiveness of Acupuncture and Antiarrhythmic Drugs for the Prevention of Cardiac Arrhythmias: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

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    Yanda Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Objectives: This study was designed to systematically evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture treatment for arrhythmia compared to existing drug therapy.Methods: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs were identified through searches of the MEDLINE, CNKI, Embase, and Cochrane databases (1970 through 2016 and hand searches of cross-references from original articles and reviews. Clinical trials that randomized arrhythmia patients to acupuncture therapy vs. conventional drugs, sham acupuncture, or bed rest were included for analysis.Results: A total of 13 trials with 797 patients met the criteria for analysis. The results of the meta-analysis showed no statistically significant difference between acupuncture and conventional treatment for paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT (n = 203; RR, 1.18; 95% CI 0.78–1.79; I2 = 80%; P = 0.44. However, in the ventricular premature beat (VPB group, it showed a significant benefit of acupuncture plus oral administration of anti-arrhythmic drug (AAD on response rates compared with the oral administration of AAD (n = 286; RR, 1.15; 95% CI 1.05–1.27; I2 = 0%; P = 0.002. Finally, when compared with the sinus tachycardia (ST cases without any treatment, acupuncture has benefited these patients (n = 120; MD, 18.80, 95% CI 12.68–24.92; I2 = 81%; P < 0.00001.Conclusions: In summary, our meta-analysis demonstrates that clinical efficacy of acupuncture is not less than AAD for PSVT. Furthermore, in sub-group analysis, acupuncture with or without AAD, shows a clear benefit in treating VPB and ST. However, more definitive RCTs are warranted to guide clinical practice.

  11. Long-term efficacy of catheter ablation as first-line therapy for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Cosedis; Johannessen, Arne; Raatikainen, Pekka

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The Medical ANtiarrhythmic Treatment or Radiofrequency Ablation in Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation (MANTRA-PAF) trial compared radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) with antiarrhythmic drug therapy (AAD) as first-line treatment for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). Endpoint of ablat......OBJECTIVE: The Medical ANtiarrhythmic Treatment or Radiofrequency Ablation in Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation (MANTRA-PAF) trial compared radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) with antiarrhythmic drug therapy (AAD) as first-line treatment for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). Endpoint...

  12. A benefit-risk assessment of class III antiarrhythmic agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brendorp, Bente; Pedersen, Oledyg; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2002-01-01

    disease, and class IV drugs are avoided in heart failure. Unfortunately, arrhythmias are a growing problem due to an increase in the incidence of atrial fibrillation and sudden death. The population is becoming older and more patients survive for a longer time period with congestive heart failure, which....... This class of drugs is developed for treatment of both supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias. Amiodarone, sotalol, dofetilide, and ibutilide are examples of class III drugs that are currently available. Amiodarone and sotalol have other antiarrhythmic properties in addition to pure class III action...... prevention of ventricular arrhythmias and in treatment of atrial fibrillation or flutter. Based on existing evidence there is no routine indication for antiarrhythmic drug therapy other than beta-blockers in patients at high risk of sudden death. Subgroup analyses of trials with amiodarone and dofetilide...

  13. PROPAFENONE, A NEW EFFECTIVE ANTIARRHYTHMIC DRUG. REPORT OF 2 YEARS CLINICAL EXPERIMENT WITH PROPAFENONE (WITH BRIEF REVIEW OF ARTICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IRAJ NAZERY

    1986-05-01

    Full Text Available Propafenone HCI (p, is a relatively new Class IC antiarrhythmic agent. It has been reported to be superior to conventional antiarrhythmics in the control of supraventricular, ventricular and WPW associated tachyarrhythmias. It has been also shown to be well tolerated. In our study protocol, which extends over 2~ years period , we used (p in 87 patients for management of various types of cardiac arrhythmias (most of whom were resistant to conventmonal antiarrhythmics . Intravenously administered, (P was effective in 85% of patients with paroxysmal reentrant supraventricular tachycardia (PRSVT, 75% of those with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF , 50% and 42% of those with refractory premature ventricular contractions (PVC and ventricular tachycardia (V. Tach, respectively. Orally administered, (P was effective in 73% of those with resistant PVCs and nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (NSV Tach, and 75% of those with resistant sustained ventricular tachycardia (RSVT •

  14. Assessment of anti-arrhythmic activity of antipsychotic drugs in an animal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mow, Tomas; Frederiksen, Kristen; Thomsen, Morten B.

    2015-01-01

    limited experimental information exists about the effects of α1-adrenergic receptor activity of antipsychotic drugs in pro-arrhythmic models, we have decided to investigate this. In this study we show that four antipsychotic drugs all have high affinity for α1-adrenergic receptor (sertindole>risperidone>haloperidol>olanzapine......) and all block IKr (sertindole>haloperidol>risperidone>olanzapine). In canine Purkinje fibres, α1-adrenergic stimulation prolonged action potential duration; however, the stimulation does not cause afterdepolarizations, even in the presence of dofetilide-induced delayed repolarization. We showed...

  15. Adenylyl Cyclase Signaling in the Developing Chick Heart: The Deranging Effect of Antiarrhythmic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Hejnova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The adenylyl cyclase (AC signaling system plays a crucial role in the regulation of cardiac contractility. Here we analyzed the key components of myocardial AC signaling in the developing chick embryo and assessed the impact of selected β-blocking agents on this system. Application of metoprolol and carvedilol, two commonly used β-blockers, at embryonic day (ED 8 significantly downregulated (by about 40% expression levels of AC5, the dominant cardiac AC isoform, and the amount of Gsα protein at ED9. Activity of AC stimulated by forskolin was also significantly reduced under these conditions. Interestingly, when administered at ED4, these drugs did not produce such profound changes in the myocardial AC signaling system, except for markedly increased expression of Giα protein. These data indicate that β-blocking agents can strongly derange AC signaling during the first half of embryonic heart development.

  16. Induced KCNQ1 autoimmunity accelerates cardiac repolarization in rabbits: potential significance in arrhythmogenesis and antiarrhythmic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Maguy, Ange; Duverger, James Elber; Vigneault, Patrick; Comtois, Philippe; Shi, Yanfen; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Thomas, Dierk; Nattel, Stanley

    2014-11-01

    Autoantibodies directed against various cardiac receptors have been implicated in cardiomyopathy and heart rhythm disturbances. In a previous study among patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, autoantibodies targeting the cardiac voltage-gated KCNQ1 K(+) channel were associated with shortened corrected QT intervals (QTc). However, the electrophysiologic actions of KCNQ1 autoimmunity have not been assessed experimentally in a direct fashion. The purpose of this study was to investigate the cardiac electrophysiologic effects of KCNQ1 autoantibody production induced by vaccination in a rabbit model. Rabbits were immunized with KCNQ1 channel peptide. ECG recordings were obtained during a 1-month follow-up period. Rabbits then underwent in vivo electrophysiologic study, after which cardiomyocytes were isolated for analysis of slow delayed rectifier current (IKs) and action potential properties via patch-clamp. KCNQ1-immunized rabbits exhibited shortening of QTc compared to sham-immunized controls. Reduced ventricular effective refractory periods and increased susceptibility to ventricular tachyarrhythmia induction were noted in KCNQ1-immunized rabbits upon programmed ventricular stimulation. Action potential durations were shortened in cardiomyocytes isolated from KCNQ1-immunized rabbits compared to the sham group. IKs step and tail current densities were enhanced after KCNQ1 immunization. Functional and structural changes of the heart were not observed. The potential therapeutic significance of KCNQ1 immunization was then explored in a dofetilide-induced long QT rabbit model. KCNQ1 immunization prevented dofetilide-induced QTc prolongation and attenuated long QT-related arrhythmias. Induction of KCNQ1 autoimmunity accelerates cardiac repolarization and increases susceptibility to ventricular tachyarrhythmia induction through IKs enhancement. On the other hand, vaccination against KCNQ1 ameliorates drug-induced QTc prolongation and might be useful therapeutically to

  17. Radiofrequency catheter ablation maintains its efficacy better than antiarrhythmic medication in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raatikainen, M J Pekka; Hakalahti, Antti; Uusimaa, Paavo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Medical ANtiarrhythmic Treatment or Radiofrequency Ablation in Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation (MANTRA-PAF) is a randomized trial comparing radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) to antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs) as first-line treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). In order...

  18. Radiofrequency ablation as initial therapy in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cosedis Nielsen, Jens; Johannessen, Arne; Raatikainen, Pekka

    2012-01-01

    There are limited data comparing radiofrequency catheter ablation with antiarrhythmic drug therapy as first-line treatment in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.......There are limited data comparing radiofrequency catheter ablation with antiarrhythmic drug therapy as first-line treatment in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation....

  19. Effects of a new antiarrhythmic drug SS-68 on electrical activity in working atrial and ventricular myocardium of mouse and their ionic mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saida K. Bogus

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available SS-68 is a derivative of indole, which demonstrated strong antiarrhythmic effects not associated with significant QT prolongation in dog models of atrial fibrillation. Therefore, SS-68 was proposed as a new antiarrhythmic drug and the present study is the first describing its effects on action potentials (APs configuration and elucidating the ionic mechanisms of these effects. Sharp microelectrodes were used to record APs in isolated preparations of mouse atrial and ventricular myocardium. In both types of myocardium 10−6 M SS-68 produced reduction of AP duration, 3 × 10−6 M failed to alter AP waveform and 10−5 – 3 × 10−5 M prolonged APs. Sensitivity of main ionic currents to SS-68 was determined using whole-cell patch clamp. Transient potassium current Ito was slightly inhibited by SS-68 with IC50 = 1.43 × 10−4 M. IKur was more sensitive with IC50 = 1.84 × 10−5 M. Background inward rectifier showed very low sensitivity to SS-68 – only 10−4 M SS-68 caused significant reduction of IK1. ICaL was significantly inhibited by 10−6M – 3 × 10−5 M SS-68. The IC50 value for the ICaL was 1.84 × 10−6 M. Thus, main ionic currents of mouse cardiomyocytes are inhibited by SS-68 in the following order of potency: ICaL > IKur > Ito > IK1. While lower concentration of SS-68 shorten APs via suppression of ICaL, higher concentrations inhibit K+-currents leading to APs prolongation.

  20. A benefit-risk assessment of class III antiarrhythmic agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brendorp, Bente; Pedersen, Oledyg; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2002-01-01

    With beta-blockers as the exception, increasing doubt is emerging on the value of antiarrhythmic drug therapy following a series of trials that have either shown no mortality benefit or even an excess mortality. Vaughan Williams class I drugs are generally avoided in patients with structural heart...... disease, and class IV drugs are avoided in heart failure. Unfortunately, arrhythmias are a growing problem due to an increase in the incidence of atrial fibrillation and sudden death. The population is becoming older and more patients survive for a longer time period with congestive heart failure, which......, which differentiates them from the others. However, all have potential serious adverse events. Proarrhythmia, especially torsade de pointes, is a common problem making the benefit-risk ratio of these drugs a key question. Class III drugs have been evaluated in different settings: primary and secondary...

  1. Drug therapy smartens up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christian

    2015-11-01

    The submission of the first 'smart pill' for market approval, combined with progress in the European nanomedicine landscape, illustrates the positive outlook for drug therapy and health monitoring, explains Christian Martin.

  2. Drug therapy of leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kubanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy (Hansen’s disease is a chronic granulomatous bacterial infection mainly affecting the skin and peripheral nervous system yet also involving other organs and systems as a result of a pathological process. The causative agent of leprosy - Mycobacterium leprae - is an obligate intracellular microorganism. Despite the removal of a threat of a leprosy epidemic, European countries still record outbreaks of the disease mainly among migrants coming from endemic areas. A golden standard of the treatment of leprosy is a WHO-recommended combined drug therapy comprising drugs such as dapsone, clofazimine and rifampicin. The article provides current data on the mechanisms of action, efficacy and safety of these drugs and their combined scheme of treatment obtained as a result of clinical trials. Moreover, it also reviews new regimens of the drug therapy of leprosy including those with the use of drugs from the group of fluoroquinols as well as immunotherapy of the disease.

  3. Design and rationale of a randomized study to compare amiodarone and Class IC anti-arrhythmic drugs in terms of atrial fibrillation treatment efficacy in patients paced for sinus node disease: the PITAGORA trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulizia, Michele; Mangiameli, Salvatore; Chiarandà, Giacomo; Spadola, Vincenzo; Di Giovanni, Nicolò; Colletti, Andrea; Bulla, Vincenzo; Circo, Antonio; Pensabene, Orazio; Vasquez, Ludovico; Vaccaro, Ignazio; Grammatico, Andrea

    2006-04-01

    Many sinus node disease (SND) patients suffer from atrial fibrillation (AF). Anti-arrhythmic drugs (AADs) are the therapeutic mainstay for AF prophylaxis. The PITAGORA trial has a multicentre, prospective, randomized, single blind design to compare amiodarone with Class IC AADs in patients who have an AF history and are paced for SND. Starting from January 2001, 176 patients received a Medtronic AT500 pacemaker. AADs were randomly assigned with a 3 : 2 ratio between Class III and Class IC. Randomization was stratified in order to assign two patients to amiodarone and one patient to sotalol every three Class III AAD patients. After a 5-month observational period, Ramp or Burst+ ATP therapies were enabled in a randomized way, maintained for 4 months, and then crossed over. Total follow-up period is 21 months. The primary long-term objective is to show the non-inferiority of IC AADs compared with amiodarone in terms of time to first occurrence of a composite endpoint (death, atrial cardioversion, hospitalizations due to AF or heart failure, or change of AADs). Data will be analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. The primary short-term objective is to compare Ramp vs. Burst+ efficacy in terminating atrial tachyarrhythmias treated by the device. Secondary endpoints are major clinical events, medication toxicity, symptoms, AF burden, and quality-of-life. Given the high morbidity and healthcare costs associated with AF, new therapeutic strategies are needed. The results of the PITAGORA trial may help in guiding AADs therapy and ATP programming in SND patients suffering from AF.

  4. Inhibition of IK,ACh current may contribute to clinical efficacy of class I and class III antiarrhythmic drugs in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Niels; Rozmaritsa, Nadiia; Trausch, Anne; Zimniak, Thomasz; Christ, Torsten; Wettwer, Erich; Matschke, Klaus; Dobrev, Dobromir; Ravens, Ursula

    2010-03-01

    Inward rectifier potassium currents I(K1) and acetylcholine activated I(K,ACh) are implicated in atrial fibrillation (AF) pathophysiology. In chronic AF (cAF), I(K,ACh) develops a receptor-independent, constitutively active component that together with increased I(K1) is considered to support maintenance of AF. Here, we tested whether class I (propafenone, flecainide) and class III (dofetilide, AVE0118) antiarrhythmic drugs inhibit atrial I(K1) and I(K,ACh) in patients with and without cAF. I(K1) and I(K,ACh) were measured with voltage clamp technique in atrial myocytes from 58 sinus rhythm (SR) and 35 cAF patients. The M-receptor agonist carbachol (CCh; 2 microM) was employed to activate I(K,ACh). In SR, basal current was not affected by either drug indicating no effect of these compounds on I(K1). In contrast, all tested drugs inhibited CCh-activated I(K,ACh) in a concentration-dependent manner. In cAF, basal current was confirmed to be larger than in SR (at -80 mV, -15.2 +/- 1.2 pA/pF, n = 88/35 vs. -6.5 +/- 0.4 pA/pF, n = 194/58 [myocytes/patients]; P ACh) was smaller (-4.1 +/- 0.5 pA/pF vs. -9.5 +/- 0.6 pA/pF; P ACh) contributes to increased basal current, which was reduced by flecainide and AVE0118 only. This may be due to inhibition of constitutively active I(K,ACh) channels. In cAF, all tested drugs reduced CCh-activated I(K,ACh). We conclude that in cAF, flecainide and AVE0118 reduce receptor-independent, constitutively active I(K,ACh), suggesting that they may block I(K,ACh) channels, whereas propafenone and dofetilide likely inhibit M-receptors. The efficacy of flecainide to terminate AF may in part result from blockade of I(K,ACh).

  5. Cost-benefit and cost-savings analyses of antiarrhythmic medication monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Melissa; Carnes, Cynthia; Grover, Janel; Davis, Rich; Kalbfleisch, Steven

    2012-09-15

    The economic impact of pharmacist-managed antiarrhythmic drug therapy monitoring on an academic medical center's electrophysiology (EP) program was investigated. Data were collected for the initial two years of patient visits (n = 816) to a pharmacist-run clinic for antiarrhythmic drug therapy monitoring. A retrospective cost analysis was conducted to assess the direct costs associated with three appointment models: (1) a clinic office visit only, (2) a clinic visit involving electrocardiography and basic laboratory tests, and (3) a clinic visit including pulmonary function testing and chest x-rays in addition to electrocardiography and laboratory testing. A subset of patient cases (n = 18) were included in a crossover analysis comparing pharmacist clinic care and usual care in an EP physician clinic. The primary endpoints were the cost benefits and cost savings associated with pharmacy-clinic care versus usual care. A secondary endpoint was improvement of overall EP program efficiency. The payer mix was 61.6% (n = 498) Medicare, 33.2% (n = 268) managed care, and 5.2% (n = 42) other. Positive contribution margins were demonstrated for all appointment models. The pharmacist-managed clinic also yielded cost savings by reducing overall patient care charges by 21% relative to usual care. By the second year, the pharmacy clinic improved EP program efficiency by scheduling an average of 24 patients per week, in effect freeing up one day per week of EP physician time to spend on other clinical activities. Pharmacist monitoring of antiarrhythmic drug therapy in an out-patient clinic provided cost benefits, cost savings, and improved overall EP program efficiency.

  6. T-wave alternans as a therapeutic marker for antiarrhythmic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrier, Richard L; Nieminen, Tuomo

    2010-06-01

    Over the course of more than a century, visible T-wave alternans (TWA), defined as a beat-to-beat alternation in the morphology and amplitude of the ST segment or T wave, has been observed to occur in close association with life-threatening arrhythmias in patients with acute myocardial ischemia and infarction, heart failure, Prinzmetal's angina, and channelopathies, including Brugada and long QT syndromes. Over 100 studies enrolling a total of more than 12,000 patients support the predictivity of TWA testing for cardiovascular mortality and sudden cardiac death during both exercise and ambulatory electrocardiogram monitoring. To date, the main intended application has been to aid decision-making for cardioverter-defibrillator implantation. The prospect that TWA could be used to guide pharmacologic therapy has not received adequate attention. The literature supporting the utility of TWA as a therapeutic marker of antiarrhythmic effects and proarrhythmia is reviewed for each of the major antiarrhythmic drug classes. Beta-adrenergic and sodium channel blocking agents are the most widely studied drug classes in clinical TWA investigations, which report reductions in TWA magnitude. Patients with Brugada syndrome constitute a significant exception, because sodium channel blockade provokes the diagnostic electrocardiogram changes as well as macroscopic TWA. Calcium channel blockers have undergone extensive research in several animal models, but, surprisingly, no clinical studies on TWA with this class of drugs have been performed. Interestingly, TWA may help to detect the beneficial effects of nonantiarrhythmic agents such as the angiotensin II receptor blocker valsartan, which exert their protective effects through putative indirect actions on myocardial remodeling. There is also suggestive evidence that the proarrhythmic effects associated with cardiovascular and noncardiovascular agents may be disclosed by elevated levels of TWA. Thus, the emerging collective evidence

  7. Algorithms for optimizing drug therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Lene

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug therapy has become increasingly efficient, with more drugs available for treatment of an ever-growing number of conditions. Yet, drug use is reported to be sub optimal in several aspects, such as dosage, patient's adherence and outcome of therapy. The aim of the current study was to investigate the possibility to optimize drug therapy using computer programs, available on the Internet. Methods One hundred and ten officially endorsed text documents, published between 1996 and 2004, containing guidelines for drug therapy in 246 disorders, were analyzed with regard to information about patient-, disease- and drug-related factors and relationships between these factors. This information was used to construct algorithms for identifying optimum treatment in each of the studied disorders. These algorithms were categorized in order to define as few models as possible that still could accommodate the identified factors and the relationships between them. The resulting program prototypes were implemented in HTML (user interface and JavaScript (program logic. Results Three types of algorithms were sufficient for the intended purpose. The simplest type is a list of factors, each of which implies that the particular patient should or should not receive treatment. This is adequate in situations where only one treatment exists. The second type, a more elaborate model, is required when treatment can by provided using drugs from different pharmacological classes and the selection of drug class is dependent on patient characteristics. An easily implemented set of if-then statements was able to manage the identified information in such instances. The third type was needed in the few situations where the selection and dosage of drugs were depending on the degree to which one or more patient-specific factors were present. In these cases the implementation of an established decision model based on fuzzy sets was required. Computer programs

  8. Gastrointestinal Side Effects of Antiarrhythmic Medications: A Review of Current Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amjad, Waseem; Qureshi, Waqas; Farooq, Ali; Sohail, Umair; Khatoon, Salma; Pervaiz, Sarah; Narra, Pratyusha; Hasan, Syeda M; Ali, Farman; Ullah, Aman; Guttmann, Steven

    2017-09-03

    Antiarrhythmic drugs are commonly prescribed cardiac drugs. Due to their receptor mimicry with several of the gastrointestinal tract receptors, they can frequently lead to gastrointestinal side effects. These side effects are the most common reasons for discontinuation of these drugs by the patients. Knowledge of these side effects is important for clinicians that manage antiarrhythmic drugs. This review focuses on the gastrointestinal side effects of these drugs and provides a detailed up-to-date literature review of the side effects of these drugs. The review provides case reports reported in the literature as well as possible mechanisms that lead to gastrointestinal side effects.

  9. ANTIARRHYTHMIC EFFICACY OF PROPAFENONE IN PATIENTS WITH PERSISTENT ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. Kurbanov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess propafenone antiarrhythmic efficacy and optimal timing of the drug administration for relief of persistent atrial fibrillation (PAF. Material and methods. 24 patients (19 men, 5 women, aged 53,8±13,3 with PAF (duration is more than 7 days were included in the study. PAF was confirmed clinically as well as by ECG and daily ECG monitoring. Indications for sinus rhythm recovery by propafenone were defined in according to the ACC/AHA/ESC recommendations (2006. 12-lead ECG was performed before the fist administration and 2, 4, 8, 12, 24 hours and some next days after propafenone therapy start. Echocardiography and thyroid hormone tests were also performed. Propafenone was administered additionally to standard treatment of the underlying disease and oral anticoagulants. The first dose of propafenone was 300 mg, after 4 hours patients received next dose of 300 mg if atrial fibrillation persisted and no side effects were observed, then doses of 300 mg were administered every 6-8 hours (but not more than 900-1200 mg per day during 5 days. Maintenance propafenone dose of 450-600 mg daily was used in case of sinus rhythm recovery. Results. Sinus rhythm was restored in 41,6% of patients taking propafenone, and time of sinus rhythm recovery was 53,1±28,9 hours after therapy start. Propafenone antiarrhythmic efficacy in the loading dose (300 mg was 4,2%. Propafenone efficacy during the first 24 hours (dose of 700±282,8 mg was 12,5%. The maximum rate of sinus rhythm recovery was observed during the first 2-3 days of propafenone receiving (60% of all patients with rhythm recovery. Patients with unrecovered sinus rhythm had longer duration of PAF in comparison with this in effectively treated patients, 105,8±89,0 vs 39,7±38,9 days (p<0,05, respectively, as well as the more prominent basal pulse deficit, 24,6±15,0 vs 13,56±5,7 beats per minute (p<0,05, respectively. Cardiac and transient noncardiac side effects were registered in 8,6 and 4

  10. Targeted drugs in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favaudon, V.; Hennequin, C.; Hennequin, C.

    2004-01-01

    New drugs aiming at the development of targeted therapies have been assayed in combination with ionizing radiation over the past few years. The rationale of this concept comes from the fact that the cytotoxic potential of targeted drugs is limited, thus requiring concomitant association with a cytotoxic agent for the eradication of tumor cells. Conversely a low level of cumulative toxicity is expected from targeted drugs. Most targeted drugs act through inhibition of post-translational modifications of proteins, such as dimerization of growth factor receptors, prenylation reactions, or phosphorylation of tyrosine or serine-threonine residues. Many systems involving the proteasome, neo-angiogenesis promoters, TGF-β, cyclooxygenase or the transcription factor NF-κB, are currently under investigation in hopes they will allow a control of cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle progression, tumor angiogenesis and inflammation. A few drugs have demonstrated an antitumor potential in particular phenotypes. In most instances, however, radiation-drug interactions proved to be strictly additive in terms of cell growth inhibition or induced cell death. Strong potentiation of the response to radiotherapy is expected to require interaction with DNA repair mechanisms. (authors)

  11. [Experimental study of the antiarrhythmic properties of zoniporide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spasov, A A; Gurova; Timofeeva, A S; Sorokin, S M

    2014-01-01

    The antiarrhythmic properties of the Na+/H(+)-exchanger inhibitor zoniporide have been studied in experiments on rats. On the model of 45-min myocardial ischemia followed by 45-min reperfusion, the drug produced a significant (two-fold) decrease in the intensity of post-reperfusion arrhythmias (p zoniporide prevented the development of ventricular fibrillation in 71.43% of cases as compared to control (p < or = 0.05). The drug also increased the threshold of electrical fibrillation by 69.23% and reduced the time to recovery of the heart rhythm by 37.85%.

  12. PITX2 Modulates Atrial Membrane Potential and the Antiarrhythmic Effects of Sodium-Channel Blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syeda, Fahima; Holmes, Andrew P; Yu, Ting Y; Tull, Samantha; Kuhlmann, Stefan Michael; Pavlovic, Davor; Betney, Daniel; Riley, Genna; Kucera, Jan P; Jousset, Florian; de Groot, Joris R; Rohr, Stephan; Brown, Nigel A; Fabritz, Larissa; Kirchhof, Paulus

    2016-10-25

    Antiarrhythmic drugs are widely used to treat patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), but the mechanisms conveying their variable effectiveness are not known. Recent data suggested that paired like homeodomain-2 transcription factor (PITX2) might play an important role in regulating gene expression and electrical function of the adult left atrium (LA). After determining LA PITX2 expression in AF patients requiring rhythm control therapy, the authors assessed the effects of Pitx2c on LA electrophysiology and the effect of antiarrhythmic drugs. LA PITX2 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels were measured in 95 patients undergoing thoracoscopic AF ablation. The effects of flecainide, a sodium (Na + )-channel blocker, and d,l-sotalol, a potassium channel blocker, were studied in littermate mice with normal and reduced Pitx2c mRNA by electrophysiological study, optical mapping, and patch clamp studies. PITX2-dependent mechanisms of antiarrhythmic drug action were studied in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells expressing human Na channels and by modeling human action potentials. Flecainide 1 μmol/l was more effective in suppressing atrial arrhythmias in atria with reduced Pitx2c mRNA levels (Pitx2c +/- ). Resting membrane potential was more depolarized in Pitx2c +/- atria, and TWIK-related acid-sensitive K + channel 2 (TASK-2) gene and protein expression were decreased. This resulted in enhanced post-repolarization refractoriness and more effective Na-channel inhibition. Defined holding potentials eliminated differences in flecainide's effects between wild-type and Pitx2c +/- atrial cardiomyocytes. More positive holding potentials replicated the increased effectiveness of flecainide in blocking human Na v 1.5 channels in HEK293 cells. Computer modeling reproduced an enhanced effectiveness of Na-channel block when resting membrane potential was slightly depolarized. PITX2 mRNA modulates atrial resting membrane potential and thereby alters the effectiveness of Na

  13. Molecular basis for class Ib anti-arrhythmic inhibition of cardiac sodium channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Galpin, Jason D; Frankel, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac sodium channels are established therapeutic targets for the management of inherited and acquired arrhythmias by class I anti-arrhythmic drugs (AADs). These drugs share a common target receptor bearing two highly conserved aromatic side chains, and are subdivided by the Vaughan-Williams...

  14. DRUG INTERACTIONS WITH TUBERCULOSIS THERAPY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kurt

    The most important adverse drug-drug interactions occur with drugs that have seri- ous toxicity and a low therapeutic index, where relatively small changes in drug level can have significant adverse consequences. Additionally, drug-drug interac- tions can be clinically important if the disease being controlled with the drug is.

  15. Synthesis of radiolabeled racemic and enanthiomeric antiarrhythmic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsi, R.S.P.; Stolle, W.T.; Stelzer, L.S.; Hester, J.B.; Perricone, S.C.

    1992-01-01

    Ventricular fibrillation is a leading cause of fatality in patients suffering from cardiovascular disorders. Among approaches to treating cardiac dysrhythmia with medicinal agents is the use of compounds categorized as open-quotes Class IIIclose quotes antiarrhythmic agents to prolong cardiac action potential and increase the refractoriness of cardiac tissues without affecting the sodium current. Investigations into structural requirements necessary for such biological activities led to the synthesis of a series of aniline-propanolamine derivatives. This report describes the preparation of carbon-14 and tritium labeled forms of racemic and enantiomeric forms of these derivatives for conducting drug disposition studies in test animals and human subjects

  16. PITX2 Modulates Atrial Membrane Potential and the Antiarrhythmic Effects of Sodium-Channel Blockers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Syeda, Fahima; Holmes, Andrew P.; Yu, Ting Y.; Tull, Samantha; Kuhlmann, Stefan Michael; Pavlovic, Davor; Betney, Daniel; Riley, Genna; Kucera, Jan P.; Jousset, Florian; de Groot, Joris R.; Rohr, Stephan; Brown, Nigel A.; Fabritz, Larissa; Kirchhof, Paulus

    2016-01-01

    Antiarrhythmic drugs are widely used to treat patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), but the mechanisms conveying their variable effectiveness are not known. Recent data suggested that paired like homeodomain-2 transcription factor (PITX2) might play an important role in regulating gene expression

  17. Control engineering for planning drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, T; Sali, A

    1993-01-01

    An optimal drug input may be defined as producing an ideal therapeutic effect as closely as possible without exceeding predetermined safety limits on any adverse drug effects. The intensity and time patterns of the drug-elicited response are functions of the pharmacodynamic properties of the drug in the patient. Drug input optimisation can be considered as a control problem and the different control engineering techniques may serve to assist in planning/implementing drug dosage regimens. This paper reviews some problems associated with planning optimal drug therapy in different clinical context and illustrates the solution of such problems by clinical examples.

  18. Drug therapy for chronic idiopathic axonal polyneuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrancken, A. F. J. E.; van Schaik, I. N.; Hughes, R. A. C.; Notermans, N. C.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic idiopathic axonal polyneuropathy is an insidiously progressive sensory or sensorimotor polyneuropathy that affects elderly people. Although severe disability or handicap does not occur, it reduces quality of life. OBJECTIVES: To assess whether drug therapy for chronic idiopathic

  19. INTERMITTENT ANTIARYTHMIC THERAPY OF ARIOVENTICULAR NODAL REENTRY TACHYCARDIA IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Djindjic

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Until recent advances in pharmacology and clinical cardiology regarding farmacodynamics of antiarrhythmic drugs and their efficiency in patients with refractory paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia, chronic prophylactic therapy was the only treatment option for patients refusing catheter ablation. Another treatment option, also known by eponym “pill in pocket” have been shown to be equally useful and efficacious.The aim of our study was prospective examination of children with refractory atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia (AVNRT who were withdrawn from chronic antiarrhythmic prophylactic therapy and started with intermittent oral beta blocker treatment (propranolol at dosage 1 mg/kg - max 80 mg.Twelve children (8 boys and 4 girls with AVNRT were included in the study. Four children did not have arrhythmia during first six months after withdrawal and 7 were successfully treated without complication.Intermittent antiarrhythmic therapy in children with AVNRT could be very efficacious and useful treatment option which significantly improves their quality of life.

  20. [Drug interactions in pain therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syhr, K M J; Oertel, B G; Geisslinger, G

    2015-12-01

    Pain is one of the most common reasons for consulting a physician. Chronic pain patients often suffer from a variety of comorbidities, such as depression and anxiety and they are therefore often simultaneously treated with more than one drug. The probability of drug interactions increases with every additional drug. A systematic internet and literature search up to February 2015 was carried out. Systematic lists were included. In addition, the drug prescription information sheets were used and an internet search via Pubmed and google.com was carried out for drugs alone and in combination in order to find substance-specific interactions. A differentiation is made between pharmaceutical, pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic drug interactions. Pharmaceutical interactions are caused by chemical, physical or physicochemical incompatibility of drugs or adjuvants used. These can even occur outside the body and during concomitant administration via the same route. A pharmacodynamic interaction in pain management is for example the additive sedative effect of opioids and benzodiazepines when taken together. Pharmacokinetic interactions occur during the absorption, distribution, metabolism and in the elimination phases. Many drug interactions can be avoided by careful and continuous evaluation of pharmacotherapy and if necessary its adaptation; however, a sound knowledge of the underlying pharmacological mechanisms and the properties of currently used analgesics is necessary.

  1. QTC INTERVAL DURATION CLASS AND DRUG THERAPY OF PATIENCE IN A FIRST YEAR AFTER PACEMAKER IMPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Brynza

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available 49 patients (28 female, 21 male with implanted DDD/DDDR, VVI/VVIR and CRT pacemakers are investigated. Purpose frequency and dose rate of anticoagulants, antiplatelet agents, direct thrombin inhibitors, cardiac glycosides, amiodarone; ivabradine, diuretics, aldosterone antagonists, beta-adrenergic blockers, calcium channel blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs, statins were evaluated before, in acute postoperative period (3–5 days, 6 months and 1 year after pacemaker implantation. Patients were divided into classes 1 (normal QTc (320–440 ms – 24 (49 % patients and 2 (long QTc (> 440 msec – 25 (51 % patients of QTc interval duration. To process the data using standard statistical procedures using Microsoft Excel. It was more often prescriptions of new anticoagulants, beta-adrenergic blockers, ARBs, statins to patients in the first year after pacemaker implantation. QTc interval duration lengthening was associated with a greater purpose frequency and doses of amiodarone, diuretics, beta-adrenergic blockers, ACE inhibitors, ARBs and statins. Patients with implanted pacemaker need individualized drug therapy according to QTc interval duration, in particular, enhancing antiischemic, antihypertensive, antiarrhythmic therapy and therapy of chronic heart failure in patients with QTc interval duration lengthening.

  2. Radiofrequency catheter ablation maintains its efficacy better than antiarrhythmic medication in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: On-treatment analysis of the randomized controlled MANTRA-PAF trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raatikainen, M J Pekka; Hakalahti, Antti; Uusimaa, Paavo; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis; Johannessen, Arne; Hindricks, Gerhard; Walfridsson, Håkan; Pehrson, Steen; Englund, Anders; Hartikainen, Juha; Kongstad, Ole; Mortensen, Leif Spange; Hansen, Peter Steen

    2015-11-01

    The Medical ANtiarrhythmic Treatment or Radiofrequency Ablation in Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation (MANTRA-PAF) is a randomized trial comparing radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) to antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs) as first-line treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). In order to eliminate the clouding effect of crossover we performed an on-treatment analysis of the data. Patients (n=294) were divided into three groups: those receiving only the assigned therapy (RFA and AAD groups) and those receiving both therapies (crossover group). The primary end points were AF burden in 7-day Holter recordings at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months and cumulative AF burden in all recordings. At 24 months, AF burden was significantly lower in the RFA (n=110) than in the AAD (n=92) and the crossover (n=84) groups (90th percentile 1% vs. 10% vs. 16%, P=0.007), and more patients were free from any AF (89% vs. 73% vs. 74%, P=0.006). In the RFA, AAD and the crossover groups 63%, 59% and 21% (PPAF long-term efficacy of RFA was superior to AAD therapy. Thus, it is reasonable to offer RFA as first-line treatment for highly symptomatic patients who accept the risks of the procedure and are aware of frequent need for reablation(s). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Drug delivery system and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Tokushi

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the review of radiation therapy, neutron capture therapy (NCT) and drug delivery system for the latter. In cancer radiation therapy, there are problems of body movement like breathing, needless irradiation of normal tissues, difficulty to decide the correct irradiation position and tumor morphology. NCT has advantages to overcome these, and since boron has a big cross section for thermal neutron, NPT uses the reaction 10 B(n, α) 7 Li in the target cancer which previously incorporated the boron-containing drug. During the period 1966-1996, 246 patients were treated with this in Japan and the treatment has been continued thereafter. The tasks for NCT are developments of drug delivery system efficient to deliver the drug into the tumor and of convenient neutron source like the accelerator. (S.I.)

  4. Behaviour therapy for obesity treatment considering approved drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossmann, Beate; Ulle, Tanja; Kahl, Kai G; Wasem, Jürgen; Aidelsburger, Pamela

    2008-05-29

    Obesity is a worldwide health problem whose prevalence is on the increase. Many obesity-associated diseases require intensive medical treatment and are the cause of a large proportion of health-related expenditures in Germany. Treatment of obesity includes nutritional, exercise and behaviour therapy, usually in combination. The goal of behaviour therapy for obesity is to bring about a long-term alteration in the eating and exercise habits of overweight and obese individuals. Under certain circumstances, drug treatment may be indicated. What is the effectiveness of behaviour therapy for obesity considering approved drugs reduce weight under medical, economic, ethical-social and legal aspects? A systematic review was conducted using relevant electronic literature databases. Publications chosen according to predefined criteria are evaluated by approved methodical standards of the evidence-based medicine systematically and qualitatively. In total 18 studies, included one HTA and one meta-analysis could be identified according to the predefined inclusion criteria. Three studies compare behaviour therapy to other therapy forms (advice or instruction on nutritional changes, physical activity or a combination of the two), six studies evaluate different forms of behaviour therapy, four studies and four studies compare behaviour therapies mediated by Internet or telephone. Three studies could be identified examining the effect of the combination of behaviour and drug therapy. Furthermore one HTA and one meta-analysis could be included in the evaluation. The behaviour therapy in comparison with other therapy forms reveals a higher effectiveness. In comparison of the different therapeutic approaches of the behaviour therapy intensive behaviour therapy forms and group therapy show a higher effectiveness. Studies related to behaviour therapy based on media support demonstrate a weight reduction both through the interventions of media alone as well as through the intervention of

  5. Behaviour therapy for obesity treatment considering approved drug therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasem, Jürgen

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obesity is a worldwide health problem whose prevalence is on the increase. Many obesity-associated diseases require intensive medical treatment and are the cause of a large proportion of health-related expenditures in Germany. Treatment of obesity includes nutritional, exercise and behaviour therapy, usually in combination. The goal of behaviour therapy for obesity is to bring about a long-term alteration in the eating and exercise habits of overweight and obese individuals. Under certain circumstances, drug treatment may be indicated. Objectives: What is the effectiveness of behaviour therapy for obesity considering approved drugs reduce weight under medical, economic, ethical-social and legal aspects? Methods: A systematic review was conducted using relevant electronic literature databases. Publications chosen according to predefined criteria are evaluated by approved methodical standards of the evidence-based medicine systematically and qualitatively. Results: In total 18 studies, included one HTA and one meta-analysis could be identified according to the predefined inclusion criteria. Three studies compare behaviour therapy to other therapy forms (advice or instruction on nutritional changes, physical activity or a combination of the two, six studies evaluate different forms of behaviour therapy, four studies and four studies compare behaviour therapies mediated by Internet or telephone. Three studies could be identified examining the effect of the combination of behaviour and drug therapy. Furthermore one HTA and one meta-analysis could be included in the evaluation. The behaviour therapy in comparison with other therapy forms reveals a higher effectiveness. In comparison of the different therapeutic approaches of the behaviour therapy intensive behaviour therapy forms and group therapy show a higher effectiveness. Studies related to behaviour therapy based on media support demonstrate a weight reduction both through the

  6. [Pharmacogenetics and tailored drug therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, F.C.; Borregaard, N.

    2009-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics traditionally designates the study of genetically determined variation in metabolism of drugs and toxins from the environment. The concept of phamacogenetics has been widened to encompass how essential genetic alterations central to the development of diseases may by used to target...

  7. Valproic acid: Does it have an antiarrhythmic action?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The antiepileptic sodium valproate (valproic acid; VPA is thought to possess an antiarrhythmic action. We aimed to explore whether this medication influences cardiac atrial ectopics or not. Methods: From December 1, 2009 to June 1, 2011, 80 consecutive patients who were newly diagnosed with cryptogenic generalized tonic-clonic seizures were enrolled in this prospective short-term longitudinal observational study, which was conducted at the Sulaimaniya General Teaching Hospital, Iraq. Forty patients were allocated to receive VPA and the rest (n=40 were given placebo. All patients underwent cardiac 24-hour Holter monitoring before and after one week of VPA or placebo administration. The minimum heart rate (MiHR and maximum heart rate (MxHR as well as the total number of atrial ectopics (TNAE were evaluated. Results: VPA significantly reduced the MiHR, MxHR, and the TNAE. In the placebo group, the reduction in the MiHR was statistically significant while the reduction in the MxHR and the TNAE were not. However, the reduction in the target parameters in the VPA-treated group did not demonstrate a dose-dependent effect. When both groups were evaluated head-to-head for the reduction in the MiHR before and after week of therapy, there was no statistically significant difference between them. Conclusion: Sodium valproate therapy appears to be effective against atrial ectopic beats and may be used as an antiarrhythmic medication in patients who co-experience seizures and troublesome atrial ectopics. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(4.000: 592-600

  8. Artificial intelligence in drug combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsigelny, Igor F

    2018-02-09

    Currently, the development of medicines for complex diseases requires the development of combination drug therapies. It is necessary because in many cases, one drug cannot target all necessary points of intervention. For example, in cancer therapy, a physician often meets a patient having a genomic profile including more than five molecular aberrations. Drug combination therapy has been an area of interest for a while, for example the classical work of Loewe devoted to the synergism of drugs was published in 1928-and it is still used in calculations for optimal drug combinations. More recently, over the past several years, there has been an explosion in the available information related to the properties of drugs and the biomedical parameters of patients. For the drugs, hundreds of 2D and 3D molecular descriptors for medicines are now available, while for patients, large data sets related to genetic/proteomic and metabolomics profiles of the patients are now available, as well as the more traditional data relating to the histology, history of treatments, pretreatment state of the organism, etc. Moreover, during disease progression, the genetic profile can change. Thus, the ability to optimize drug combinations for each patient is rapidly moving beyond the comprehension and capabilities of an individual physician. This is the reason, that biomedical informatics methods have been developed and one of the more promising directions in this field is the application of artificial intelligence (AI). In this review, we discuss several AI methods that have been successfully implemented in several instances of combination drug therapy from HIV, hypertension, infectious diseases to cancer. The data clearly show that the combination of rule-based expert systems with machine learning algorithms may be promising direction in this field. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. [Thyroid and treatment with amiodarone diagnosis, therapy and clinical management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikosch, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Amiodarone is a frequently used antiarrhythmic drug with a high antiarrhythmic potency. However, beside its antiarrhythmic effects Amiodarone also reveals a variety of adverse effects and drug-related complications. The affected organs include the eyes, skin, lungs, nervous system, liver, gastrointestinal tract and the thyroid. The thyroid is one of the most frequently affected organs by Amiodarone. An altered hormone equilibrium always occurs and has to be distinguished from Amiodarone induced hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. The differentiation of these states frequently causes problems and may even be a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge in certain cases. The article gives an overview on the interactions between Amiodarone and the thyroid, the diagnostic and therapeutic options and management strategies of patient on Amiodarone therapy in the view of thyroid function.

  10. Drug Therapy in Obese Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinat Salem

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The behavior and dietary treatments are not so successful for extremely obese adolescents. Therefore, using drugs to treat extremely obese children and adolescents are among the modern approaches. This research aims to study the pharmaceutical interventions performed for treatment of obese children. Materials and Methods: The strategy of research was using of key words ‘obesity’, ‘adolescence’, ‘treatment’ and ‘anti-obesity drugs’ were searched in websites of PubMed, Iranian Medical Digital Library, SID, Iran Medex, Magiran. This study reviewed all the available published papers in English and Farsi languages during 2000-2010. The Criteria for exclusion was The papers that had been published on interventions and treatment of eating disorders, type II diabetes or the obesity caused by the secondary syndromes. Results: Twelve papers were found as short-term clinical trials and/or long-term follow-ups. In these studies, the positive effects of ‘sibutramine’ in some studies are shown; although some other side effects are reported as well. A significant weight-loss had been reported on ‘orlistat’ medicine, but digestive complications had been observed as well. None of the studies had followed up patients for more than one year. Apparently, ‘Metformin’ requires further studies.Conclusion: The FDA has only approved ‘sibutramine’ and ‘orlistat’ drugs. But side effects of long-term these drugs have already been unknown. However, it seems that ‘orlistat’ is applied for ≥12-year-old children and ‘sibutramine’ for ≥ 16-year-old children.

  11. Radiofrequency ablation as initial therapy in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walfridsson, H; Walfridsson, U; Nielsen, J Cosedis

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: The Medical ANtiarrhythmic Treatment or Radiofrequency Ablation in Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation (MANTRA-PAF) trial assessed the long-term efficacy of an initial strategy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) vs. antiarrhythmic drug therapy (AAD) as first-line treatment for patients with PAF....... In this substudy, we evaluated the effect of these treatment modalities on the Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) and symptom burden of patients at 12 and 24 months. METHODS AND RESULTS: During the study period, 294 patients were enrolled in the MANTRA-PAF trial and randomized to receive AAD (N = 148) or RFA...

  12. Smart Drug Delivery Systems in Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsoy, Gozde; Gunduz, Ufuk

    2018-02-08

    Smart nanocarriers have been designed for tissue-specific targeted drug delivery, sustained or triggered drug release and co-delivery of synergistic drug combinations to develop safer and more efficient therapeutics. Advances in drug delivery systems provide reduced side effects, longer circulation half-life and improved pharmacokinetics. Smart drug delivery systems have been achieved successfully in the case of cancer. These nanocarriers can serve as an intelligent system by considering the differences of tumor microenvironment from healthy tissue, such as low pH, low oxygen level, or high enzymatic activity of matrix metalloproteinases. The performance of anti-cancer agents used in cancer diagnosis and therapy is improved by enhanced cellular internalization of smart nanocarriers and controlled drug release. Here, we review targeting, cellular internalization; controlled drug release and toxicity of smart drug delivery systems. We are also emphasizing the stimulus responsive controlled drug release from smart nanocarriers. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Collaborative drug therapy management by pharmacists--2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Raymond W; Schwartz, Amy H; Campbell, Marla J; Remington, Tami L; Chuck, Susan; Blair, Melissa M; Vassey, Ann M; Rospond, Raylene M; Herner, Sheryl J; Webb, C Edwin

    2003-09-01

    Since publication of the initial ACCP position statement on CDTM by pharmacists in 1997, the public, government, and much of the health care community at large have come to better appreciate the growing complexity of providing effective and safe drug therapy in today's health care environment. Increased interest in the issues of cost and quality of drug use is evident in the increasing coverage of the issue in the lay press and professional literature. This represents real progress, as well as real opportunity, for pharmacists. It also heightens the potential for a better understanding of the vital role that pharmacists can play in addressing these concerns. The percentage of patients who take several drugs for chronic diseases will continue to increase. Based on current trends, the number of patients who lack adequate access to care, or who receive either suboptimal, inappropriate, or unnecessarily expensive drug therapy for their acute and chronic diseases, will increase. Even as financial and human resources are increasingly strained within the current health care system, costs will continue to rise unless changes are made. Fortunately, qualified pharmacists are prepared, capable, and willing to help address a significant portion of these challenges. The public, many health care providers, some legislators, and a few insurers now recognize that pharmacists, because of their education and training in drug therapy, are well positioned both to accept additional responsibility for patient care and to provide services that make a real difference in health care quality and outcomes. The health care programs administered by the U.S. Public Health Service, the armed forces, and the Veterans Health Administration, as well as 38 states, now support pharmacist participation in CDTM. Pharmacists, working in an interdisciplinary structure with physicians and other health care providers, have demonstrated that they can improve the effectiveness, efficiency, and safety of drug

  14. The role of transporters on drug therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    . Ngatidjan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Pharmacodynamical studies showed that most drugs elicit their effects by acting on 3 kinds of protein molecules known as receptors, enzymes or transporters. Although their detail properties had not been explained for decades the roles of transporters in drug kinetics and dynamics has been well understood, even have been applied in the therapy. Transporters are classified into 2 major classes, the solute carriers (SLC and ATP-binding cassette (ABC families. SLC transporters do not possess ATP binding site property as those of ABC transporters. SLC transporters consist of 3 SLC subfamilies i.e. organic cation transporters (OCTs, organic anion transporters (OATs and organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs. In contrast, ABC transporters require ATP hydrolysis to transport substrate across cell membrane. Human ABC-transporters consist of ABCA1- 13, ABCB1-11, ABCC1-12, ABCD1-4, ABCE1, ABCF1-3 and ABCG1-8 subfamily. Although the originally funtion of transporter is to transport specific physiological substrate such as nutrient, hormone, cytokines, neurotransmitters and other physiological subtances across cell membrane the specificity is not restricted to each substrate. Drugs and other xenobiotics which have structural similarity to the physiological substrates are recognized and transported by the related transporters. The competition of them on transporters therefore may lead to the occurence of drug-drug interactions (DDI or drugphysiological substrate interaction in the drug-kinetics phase. Many transporters located in the liver, intestinal and renal epithelial cell membranes involve in the transport of endogenous substance or xenobiotics including drugs play important roles as protective barrier. Since transporters also serve as the targets of drug action it is understood that transporters play important role in the pathogenesis of diseases as well as in the drug therapy of diseases.

  15. New data on the antiarrhythmic value of parenteral magnesium treatment: magnesium and ventricular arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perticone, F; Ceravolo, R; De Novara, G; Torchia, L; Cloro, C

    1992-12-01

    Antiarrhythmic magnesium (Mg) therapy was evaluated in 20 normomagnesaemic patients affected by ischaemic dilated cardiomyopathy (ID) and severe ventricular arrhythmias, and in 10 patients with torsade de pointes (TdP) occurring in the setting of acquired QT interval prolongation. In the group with IDC, magnesium sulphate was given as slow infusions (50 mg/min over 60 min) twice a day for 7 d. This was antiarrhythmic in all of the patients: ventricular premature contractions and couplets decreased from 13,979 +/- 8964 (mean +/- SD) to 382 +/- 265 (P < 0.001), and from 516 +/- 274 to 9 +/- 6 (P < 0.001), respectively; runs of ventricular tachycardia (41.9 +/- 14.2) disappeared by the fifth day of treatment. The efficacy of antiarrhythmic treatment was evaluated by 24 h Holter monitoring obtained in baseline conditions and after 3, 5 and 10 d from beginning of therapy. In patients with TdP, Mg infusions were instituted at a slow rate (50 mg/min) and continued for 2 h after disappearance of Tdp, which occurred within 20 to 30 min from the start of the Mg infusions. These were followed by prophylactic infusions at rate of 30 mg/min for 90 min twice a day over the next 3 to 4 d. No side effects were observed, and heart rate and QTc remained unchanged from baseline values. In conclusion, Mg infusions may be an effective antiarrhythmic treatment for short and medium-term control of severe ventricular arrhythmias associated with IDC, and may prove useful in the acute treatment of TdP, especially in situations where conventional therapy might prove deleterious or difficult.

  16. Drug therapy for peripheral vestibular vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Antonenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The choice of effective treatments for vestibular vertigo is one of the important problems, by taking into account the high prevalence of peripheral vestibular diseases. Different drugs, such as vestibular suppressants for the relief of acute vertigo attacks and vestibular compensation stimulants for rehabilitation treatment, are used to treat vestibular vertigo. Drug therapy in combination with vestibular exercises is effective in patients with vestibular neuronitis, Meniere's disease, so is that with therapeutic maneuvers in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. The high therapeutic efficacy and safety of betahistines permit their extensive use for the treatment of various vestibular disorders.

  17. Anti-Arrhythmic Potential of Coriandrum sativum Seeds in Salt Induced Arrhythmic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nida Rehman1, Nazish Jahan1*, Khalil-ul-Rahman2, Khalid Mahmood Khan2 and Fatiqa Zafar1

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present research, the anti-arrhythmic potential of Coriandrum sativum (seeds was evaluated in BaCl2 induced tachycardia and KCl induced bradycardia in rats. Heart rate and electrocardiogram (ECG was recorded during the experimental period. The BaCl2 increased the heart rate from 111/min to 157/min while KCL decreased the heart rate from 112/min to 60/min in the rats of positive control groups. ECG patterns also confirmed the tachy- and brady-arrhythmia in the rats of both positive control groups. The changes in biochemical cardiac biomarkers (CK-MB, LDH, AST, and ALT were also the studied parameters. The level of cardiac biomarkers was significantly elevated in the serum of positive control rats as compared to their respective absolute controls. In case of both curative and preventive mode of treatment the elevated levels of enzymes, cardiac biomarkers were significantly reduced. Electrocardiogram (ECG pattern revealed that the studied plant possesses a very good anti-arrhythmic potential in case of curative mode of treatment. The antiarrhythmic potential through preventive mode of treatment was also encouraging, but comparatively less than the curative mode of treatment. Anti-tachycardial potential of C. sativum was comparable with standard drug while, recovery in bradycardia was relatively slow than standard drug. Gross pathology and ECG pattern of base line group confirmed the innoxious nature of C. sativum seeds. Treatment of rats with Coriandrum sativum (100 mgkg-1 BW normalized the heart rate and attenuated the cardiac arrhythmia.

  18. VNS Therapy versus the latest antiepileptic drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Menachem, Elinor; French, Jacqueline A

    2005-09-01

    Pro AED: The central issue in medical decision-making is risk-benefit assessment. Surgery of any type is still considered to be a major undertaking. To warrant these risks, the patient has a right to expect that they have a greater chance of a good outcome with an invasive therapy than with a non-invasive one. The main question is when, if ever, this becomes the case when comparing implantation of a VNS Therapy System versus adding an antiepileptic drug (AED)? After the first drug? The second? After all AEDs have failed? To date, no randomized trial comparing the addition of an AED against vagus nerve stimulation (VNS Therapy) has been undertaken, although several are currently being contemplated. Without this information, it is more difficult to make a case for early implementation of VNS Therapy. Unfortunately, few data are available regarding the potential for patients to become seizure-free after implantation of a VNS Therapy System. Another issue is side effects. It is important to remember that VNS Therapy also produces adverse events, albeit very different in character than those associated with AEDs, to which physicians have become accustomed. These include cough, dyspnea, pharyngitis, voice alteration and sleep apnea. A less frequently discussed, potentially negative consequence of VNS Therapy relates to the ability to obtain imaging of the patient. Patients who have undergone VNS Therapy System implantation are not candidates for imaging of the chest, breast, or abdomen. A second issue is that imaging of the brain can only be performed with MRI scanners that meet certain requirements, and as MRI technology develops, scanners meeting these requirements may become harder to find. However, to summarize, VNS Therapy is an excellent and useful treatment choice. Fortunately, the choice between AEDs and VNS Therapy is not an "either/or" decision. Each has a role in the treatment of patients with epilepsy, and the advantages and disadvantages of each should be

  19. Leishmaniasis in humans: drug or vaccine therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Masoud; Farhoudi, Ramin

    2018-01-01

    Leishmania is an obligate intracellular pathogen that invades phagocytic host cells. Approximately 30 different species of Phlebotomine sand flies can transmit this parasite either anthroponotically or zoonotically through their bites. Leishmaniasis affects poor people living around the Mediterranean Basin, East Africa, the Americas, and Southeast Asia. Affected regions are often remote and unstable, with limited resources for treating this disease. Leishmaniasis has been reported as one of the most dangerous neglected tropical diseases, second only to malaria in parasitic causes of death. People can carry some species of Leishmania for long periods without becoming ill, and symptoms depend on the form of the disease. There are many drugs and candidate vaccines available to treat leishmaniasis. For instance, antiparasitic drugs, such as amphotericin B (AmBisome), are a treatment of choice for leishmaniasis depending on the type of the disease. Despite the availability of different treatment approaches to treat leishmaniasis, therapeutic tools are not adequate to eradicate this infection. In the meantime, drug therapy has been limited because of adverse side effects and unsuccessful vaccine preparation. However, it can immediately make infections inactive. According to other studies, vaccination cannot eradicate leishmaniasis. There is no perfect vaccine or suitable drug to eradicate leishmaniasis completely. So far, no vaccine or drug has been provided to induce long-term protection and ensure effective immunity against leishmaniasis. Therefore, it is necessary that intensive research should be performed in drug and vaccine fields to achieve certain results. PMID:29317800

  20. [Diverticulitis : Domain of conservative or drug therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, S; Kruis, W

    2017-07-01

    Increasing interest in diverticular disease by the scientific community in the last 10-15 years has resulted in an increased number of publications. Among other things, nonevidence-based therapeutic paradigms were tested in randomized, controlled therapy studies. The importance of surgery in the therapy of diverticulitis has diminished in recent years; in particular, it has no role in the treatment of diverticulitis types 1a, 1b, and 2a according to the Classification of Diverticular Disease (CDD) treated successfully by conservative means. Surgery has only a subordinate role in recurrent type 3b diverticulitis according to the CDD. Diverticulitis is therefore increasingly treated using conservative or drug therapy. However, only the classic, established antibiotics are currently available as effective drugs for the treatment of diverticular disease. However, these are also decreasing in significance. Over 90% of patients with type 1a/1b diverticulitis can be safely treated according to current data without the use of antibiotics. It is possible that type 2a diverticulitis will also be successfully treated without antibiotics in the future. Substances such as rifaximin, mesalazine, or probiotics, which were tested above all in patients with chronic recurrent forms (CDD type 3a/3b), have not yet been established.

  1. Optimal drug therapy for children: Canadian initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Canada has a long tradition of undertaking research and training in pediatric clinical pharmacology, and has one of the longest continuous enterprises in this field in the world. Training in pediatric clinical pharmacology in Canada is nationally accredited and rigorous. Canada has the largest number of pediatric clinical pharmacologists per capita of any country on earth, but to date there have been no federally supported initiatives for child-focused drug research. The recent development of a unique national network focused on drug safety - the Genotypic Approaches to Therapy in Children - has provided a framework that it hopes will facilitate networking as well as the development of coordinated national and hopefully international initiatives in pediatric therapeutics.

  2. Leishmaniasis in humans: drug or vaccine therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghorbani M

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Masoud Ghorbani, Ramin Farhoudi Department of Viral Vaccine Production, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Research and Production Complex, Karaj, Iran Abstract: Leishmania is an obligate intracellular pathogen that invades phagocytic host cells. Approximately 30 different species of Phlebotomine sand flies can transmit this parasite either anthroponotically or zoonotically through their bites. Leishmaniasis affects poor people living around the Mediterranean Basin, East Africa, the Americas, and Southeast Asia. Affected regions are often remote and unstable, with limited resources for treating this disease. Leishmaniasis has been reported as one of the most dangerous neglected tropical diseases, second only to malaria in parasitic causes of death. People can carry some species of Leishmania for long periods without becoming ill, and symptoms depend on the form of the disease. There are many drugs and candidate vaccines available to treat leishmaniasis. For instance, antiparasitic drugs, such as amphotericin B (AmBisome, are a treatment of choice for leishmaniasis depending on the type of the disease. Despite the availability of different treatment approaches to treat leishmaniasis, therapeutic tools are not adequate to eradicate this infection. In the meantime, drug therapy has been limited because of adverse side effects and unsuccessful vaccine preparation. However, it can immediately make infections inactive. According to other studies, vaccination cannot eradicate leishmaniasis. There is no perfect vaccine or suitable drug to eradicate leishmaniasis completely. So far, no vaccine or drug has been provided to induce long-term protection and ensure effective immunity against leishmaniasis. Therefore, it is necessary that intensive research should be performed in drug and vaccine fields to achieve certain results. Keywords: leishmania, leishmania treatment, vaccine, recombinant antigens

  3. Drug-Gene Interactions between Genetic Polymorphisms and Antihypertensive Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schelleman, Hedi; Stricker, Bruno H Ch; De Boer, Anthonius; Kroon, Abraham A; Verschuren, Monique W M; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Psaty, Bruce M; Klungel, Olaf H

    2004-01-01

    Genetic factors may influence the response to antihypertensive medication. A number of studies have investigated genetic polymorphisms as determinants of cardiovascular response to antihypertensive drug therapy. In most candidate gene studies, no such drug-gene interactions were found. However,

  4. Drug-drug interactions between anti-retroviral therapies and drugs of abuse in HIV systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Rao, P S S; Earla, Ravindra; Kumar, Anil

    2015-03-01

    Substance abuse is a common problem among HIV-infected individuals. Importantly, addictions as well as moderate use of alcohol, smoking, or other illicit drugs have been identified as major reasons for non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among HIV patients. The literature also suggests a decrease in the response to ART among HIV patients who use these substances, leading to failure to achieve optimal virological response and increased disease progression. This review discusses the challenges with adherence to ART as well as observed drug interactions and known toxicities with major drugs of abuse, such as alcohol, smoking, methamphetamine, cocaine, marijuana, and opioids. The lack of adherence and drug interactions potentially lead to decreased efficacy of ART drugs and increased ART, and drugs of abuse-mediated toxicity. As CYP is the common pathway in metabolizing both ART and drugs of abuse, we discuss the possible involvement of CYP pathways in such drug interactions. We acknowledge that further studies focusing on common metabolic pathways involving CYP and advance research in this area would help to potentially develop novel/alternate interventions and drug dose/regimen adjustments to improve medication outcomes in HIV patients who consume drugs of abuse.

  5. Antiarrhythmic effects of interleukin 1 inhibition after myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesus, Nicole M; Wang, Lianguo; Lai, Johnny; Rigor, Robert R; Francis Stuart, Samantha D; Bers, Donald M; Lindsey, Merry L; Ripplinger, Crystal M

    2017-05-01

    Interleukin 1β (IL-1β) is a key regulator of the inflammatory response after myocardial infarction (MI) by modulating immune cell recruitment, cytokine production, and extracellular matrix turnover. Elevated levels of IL-1β are associated with adverse remodeling, and inhibition of IL-1 signaling after MI results in improved contractile function. The goal of this study was to determine whether IL-1 signaling also contributes to post-MI arrhythmogenesis. MI was created in 2 murine models of elevated inflammation: atherosclerotic on the Western diet or wild-type with a subseptic dose of lipopolysaccharide. The role of IL-1β was assessed with the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra (10 mg/(kg·d), starting 24 hours post-MI). In vivo and ex vivo molecular imaging showed reduced myocardial inflammation after a 4-day course of anakinra treatment, despite no change in infarct size. At day 5 post-MI, high-speed optical mapping of transmembrane potential and intracellular Ca 2+ in isolated hearts revealed that IL-1β inhibition improved conduction velocity, reduced action potential duration dispersion, improved intracellular Ca 2+ handling, decreased transmembrane potential and Ca 2+ alternans magnitude, and reduced spontaneous and inducible ventricular arrhythmias. These functional improvements were linked to increased expression of connexin 43 and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase. This study revealed a novel mechanism for IL-1β in contributing to defective excitation-contraction coupling and arrhythmogenesis in the post-MI heart. Our results suggest that inhibition of IL-1 signaling post-MI may represent a novel antiarrhythmic therapy. Copyright © 2017 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Targeted cancer therapy; nanotechnology approaches for overcoming drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yan; Shen, Jacson K; Milane, Lara; Hornicek, Francis J; Amiji, Mansoor M; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in cancer molecular biology have resulted in parallel and unprecedented progress in the development of targeted cancer therapy. Targeted therapy can provide higher efficacy and lower toxicity than conventional chemotherapy for cancer. However, like traditional chemotherapy, molecularly targeted cancer therapy also faces the challenge of drug resistance. Multiple mechanisms are responsible for chemotherapy resistance in tumors, including over-expression of efflux transporters, somatic alterations of drug targets, deregulation of apoptosis, and numerous pharmacokinetic issues. Nanotechnology based approaches are proving to be efficacious in overcoming drug resistance in cancer. Combination of targeted therapies with nanotechnology approaches is a promising strategy to overcome targeted therapy drug resistance in cancer treatment. This review discusses the mechanisms of targeted drug resistance in cancer and discusses nanotechnology approaches to circumvent this resistance.

  7. The Role of Biologically Active Ingredients from Natural Drug Treatments for Arrhythmias in Different Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Hu, Dan; Song, Xiaoli; Han, Tao; Gao, Yonghong; Xing, Yanwei

    2017-01-01

    Arrhythmia is a disease that is caused by abnormal electrical activity in the heart rate or rhythm. It is the major cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although several antiarrhythmic drugs have been used in clinic for decades, their application is often limited by their adverse effects. As a result, natural drugs, which have fewer side effects, are now being used to treat arrhythmias. We searched for all articles on the role of biologically active ingredients from natural drug treatments for arrhythmias in different mechanisms in PubMed. This study reviews 19 natural drug therapies, with 18 active ingredient therapies, such as alkaloids, flavonoids, saponins, quinones, and terpenes, and two kinds of traditional Chinese medicine compound (Wenxin-Keli and Shensongyangxin), all of which have been studied and reported as having antiarrhythmic effects. The primary focus is the proposed antiarrhythmic mechanism of each natural drug agent. Conclusion . We stress persistent vigilance on the part of the provider in discussing the use of natural drug agents to provide a solid theoretical foundation for further research on antiarrhythmia drugs.

  8. Antiarrhythmic Mechanisms of SK Channel Inhibition in the Rat Atrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsbye, Lasse; Wang, Xiaodong; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard

    2015-01-01

    -clamping and two-electrode voltage-clamp was used to access INa and IK,ACh respectively. RESULTS: The SK channel inhibitor N-(pyridin-2-yl)-4-(pyridin-2-yl)thiazol-2-amine (ICA) exhibited antiarrhythmic effects. ICA prevented electrically induced runs of atrial fibrillation in the isolated right atrium and induced...

  9. POTASSIUM CHANNELS AS DRUGS TARGETS IN THERAPY OF CARDIOVASCULAR DESEASES: 25 YEARS LATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Protić Dragana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Potassium channels are the most variable ion channel group. They participate in numerous cardiovascular functions, for example regulation of vascular tone, maintenance of resting cardiac membrane potential and excitability of cardiac conduction tissue. Both drugs and endogenous ligands could modulate potassium channel function, belonging to the potassium channel blockers or openers. Modulation of potassium channels could be a therapeutic or adverse drug action. Class III antiarrhythmic agents block the potassium channels, thereby prolonging repolarization phase of action potential with resulting prolongation of effective refractory period. Their effectiveness against supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias should be weighted against their proarrhythmogenic potential. In addition, numerous other antiarrhythmic agents could modulate potassium channels as well. Diazoxide, minoxidil and nicorandil (well known arterial vasodilators, as well as numerous newly synthesized substances with still unknown therapeutic potential, belong to the potassium channel activators/ openers. Therapeutic use of such vasodilators may involve treatment of hypertension (diazoxide, minoxidil and stable angina (nicorandil. Their use might be accompanied with side effects, such as vasodilation, edema, hypotension and reflex tachycardia. Potassium channel openers have also an important role in the treatment of peripheral vascular disease and pulmonary hypertension. In the future, drugs with selective effects on the vascular or cardiac potassium channels could be useful therapeutic agents.

  10. Potassium channels as drugs targets in therapy of cardiovascular diseases: 25 years later

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Protić Dragana

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Potassium channels are the most variable ion channel group. They participate in numerous cardiovascular functions, for example regulation of vascular tone, maintenance of resting cardiac membrane potential and excitability of cardiac conduction tissue. Both drugs and endogenous ligands could modulate potassium channel function, belonging to the potassium channel blockers or openers. Modulation of potassium channels could be a therapeutic or adverse drug action. Class III antiarrhythmic agents block the potassium channels, thereby prolonging repolarization phase of action potential with resulting prolongation of effective refractory period. Their effectiveness against supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias should be weighted against their proarrhythmogenic potential. In addition, numerous other antiarrhythmic agents could modulate potassium channels as well. Diazoxide, minoxidil and nicorandil (well known arterial vasodilators, as well as numerous newly synthesized substances with still unknown therapeutic potential, belong to the potassium channel activators/openers. Therapeutic use of such vasodilators may involve treatment of hypertension (diazoxide, minoxidil and stable angina (nicorandil. Their use might be accompanied with side effects, such as vasodilation, edema, hypotension and reflex tachycardia. Potassium channel openers have also an important role in the treatment of peripheral vascular disease and pulmonary hypertension. In the future, drugs with selective effects on the vascular or cardiac potassium channels could be useful therapeutic agents.

  11. In Silico Evaluation of the Potential Antiarrhythmic Effect of Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate on Cardiac Channelopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maroua Boukhabza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ion channels are transmembrane proteins that allow the passage of ions according to the direction of their electrochemical gradients. Mutations in more than 30 genes encoding ion channels have been associated with an increasingly wide range of inherited cardiac arrhythmias. In this line, ion channels become one of the most important molecular targets for several classes of drugs, including antiarrhythmics. Nevertheless, antiarrhythmic drugs are usually accompanied by some serious side effects. Thus, developing new approaches could offer added values to prevent and treat the episodes of arrhythmia. In this sense, green tea catechins seem to be a promising alternative because of the significant effect of Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate (E3G on the electrocardiographic wave forms of guinea pig hearts. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the benefits-risks balance of E3G consumption in the setting of ion channel mutations linked with aberrant cardiac excitability phenotypes. Two gain-of-function mutations, Nav1.5-p.R222Q and Nav1.5-p.I141V, which are linked with cardiac hyperexcitability phenotypes were studied. Computer simulations of action potentials (APs show that 30 μM E3G reduces and suppresses AP abnormalities characteristics of these phenotypes. These results suggest that E3G may have a beneficial effect in the setting of cardiac sodium channelopathies displaying a hyperexcitability phenotype.

  12. Antifungal therapy: drug-drug interactions at your fingertips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lempers, V.J.; Bruggemann, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    The Information Age has revolutionized the ability of healthcare professionals (HCPs) to oversee a substantial body of clinically relevant information literally at one's fingertips. In the field of clinical pharmacology, this may be particularly useful for managing drug-drug interactions (DDIs). A

  13. Nanomaterial-based drug delivery carriers for cancer therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Tao

    2017-01-01

    This brief summarizes different types of organic and inorganic nanomaterials for drug delivery in cancer therapy. It highlights that precisely designed nanomaterials will be the next-generation therapeutic agents for cancer treatment.

  14. Evaluation of the 3-drug combination, Rifater, versus 4-drug therapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of the 3-drug combination, Rifater, versus 4-drug therapy in the ambulatory treatment of tuberculosis in Cape Town. ... The rates of inadequate compliance and of side-effects were siInilar in the two groups. Drug sensitivity testing of bacteria cultured from pre-treatment sputum specimens revealed an overall ...

  15. Drug Therapy Problems in Patients on Antihypertensives and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drug therapy problems (DTPs), with the associated risks inherent in antihypertensive and antidiabetic therapy require utmost attention. This present study was aimed at assessing the DTPs observed in the management of hypertension and diabetes mellitus (DM) in two tertiary health facilities in Niger Delta region. In this ...

  16. Recent advances in targeted drug therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FAN Yongqiang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available More and more clinical trials have proved the efficacy of targeted drugs in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. With the development of science and technology, more and more targeted drugs have appeared. In recent years, targeted drugs such as regorafenib and ramucirumab have shown great potential in related clinical trials. In addition, there are ongoing clinical trials for second-line candidate drugs, such as c-Met inhibitors tivantinib and cabozantinib and a VEGFR-2 inhibitor ramucirumab. This article summarizes the advances in targeted drug therapy for HCC and related trial data, which provides a reference for further clinical trials and treatment.

  17. Bone scintigraphy during therapy with cytostatically acting drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, U.; Pries, H.H.; Joseph, K.; Mahlstedt, J.; Marburg Univ.

    1976-01-01

    Case reports show up, that bone scintigraphy during therapy of metastasing cancer of mamma or prostata with cytostatically acting drugs may reveal 'pseudonormal' results. False negative diagnosis can be excluded only by carefully regarding drug history. Gamma-camera with wholebody scan device for scintigraphy in two projections simplifies safe evaluation significantly. (orig.) [de

  18. In silico drug combination discovery for personalized cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Minji; Kim, Sunkyu; Park, Sungjoon; Lee, Heewon; Kang, Jaewoo

    2018-03-19

    Drug combination therapy, which is considered as an alternative to single drug therapy, can potentially reduce resistance and toxicity, and have synergistic efficacy. As drug combination therapies are widely used in the clinic for hypertension, asthma, and AIDS, they have also been proposed for the treatment of cancer. However, it is difficult to select and experimentally evaluate effective combinations because not only is the number of cancer drug combinations extremely large but also the effectiveness of drug combinations varies depending on the genetic variation of cancer patients. A computational approach that prioritizes the best drug combinations considering the genetic information of a cancer patient is necessary to reduce the search space. We propose an in-silico method for personalized drug combination therapy discovery. We predict the synergy between two drugs and a cell line using genomic information, targets of drugs, and pharmacological information. We calculate and predict the synergy scores of 583 drug combinations for 31 cancer cell lines. For feature dimension reduction, we select the mutations or expression levels of the genes in cancer-related pathways. We also used various machine learning models. Extremely Randomized Trees (ERT), a tree-based ensemble model, achieved the best performance in the synergy score prediction regression task. The correlation coefficient between the synergy scores predicted by ERT and the actual observations is 0.738. To compare with an existing drug combination synergy classification model, we reformulate the problem as a binary classification problem by thresholding the synergy scores. ERT achieved an F1 score of 0.954 when synergy scores of 20 and -20 were used as the threshold, which is 8.7% higher than that obtained by the state-of-the-art baseline model. Moreover, the model correctly predicts the most synergistic combination, from approximately 100 candidate drug combinations, as the top choice for 15 out of the

  19. Microsponges based novel drug delivery system for augmented arthritis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmani, Riyaz Ali M; Aloorkar, Nagesh H; Ingale, Dipti J; Kulkarni, Parthasarathi K; Hani, Umme; Bhosale, Rohit R; Jayachandra Dev, Dandasi

    2015-10-01

    The motive behind present work was to formulate and evaluate gel containing microsponges of diclofenac diethylamine to provide prolonged release for proficient arthritis therapy. Quasi-emulsion solvent diffusion method was implied using Eudragit RS-100 and microsponges with varied drug-polymer ratios were prepared. For the sake of optimization, diverse factors affecting microparticles physical properties were too investigated. Microsponges were characterized by SEM, DSC, FT-IR, XRPD and particle size analysis, and evaluated for morphology, drug loading, in vitro drug release and ex vivo diffusion as well. There were no chemical interactions between drug and polymers used as revealed by compatibility studies outcomes. The drug polymer ratio reflected notable effect on drug content, encapsulation efficiency and particle size. SEM results revealed spherical microsponges with porous surface, and had 7.21 μm mean particle size. The microsponges were then incorporated in gel; which exhibited viscous modulus along with pseudoplastic behavior. In vitro drug release results depicted that microsponges with 1:2 drug-polymer ratio were more efficient to give extended drug release of 75.88% at the end of 8 h; while conventional formulation get exhausted incredibly earlier by releasing 81.11% drug at the end of 4 h only. Thus the formulated microsponge-based gel of diclofenac diethylamine would be a promising alternative to conventional therapy for safer and efficient treatment of arthritis and musculoskeletal disorders.

  20. Drug loaded magnetic nanoparticles for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurgons, R; Seliger, C; Hilpert, A; Trahms, L; Odenbach, S; Alexiou, C

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been investigated for biomedical applications for more than 30 years. In medicine they are used for several approaches such as magnetic cell separation or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The development of biocompatible nanosized drug delivery systems for specific targeting of therapeutics is the focus of medical research, especially for the treatment of cancer and diseases of the vascular system. In an experimental cancer model, we performed targeted drug delivery and used magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, bound to a chemotherapeutic agent, which were attracted to an experimental tumour in rabbits by an external magnetic field (magnetic drug targeting). Complete tumour remission could be achieved. An important advantage of these carriers is the possibility for detecting these nanoparticles after treatment with common imaging techniques (i.e. x-ray-tomography, magnetorelaxometry, magnetic resonance imaging), which can be correlated to histology

  1. Combination therapy: the propitious rationale for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phougat, Neetu; Khatri, Savita; Singh, Anu; Dangi, Mrridula; Kumar, Manish; Dabur, Rajesh; Chhillar, Anil Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic options for many infections are extremely limited and at crisis point. We run the risk of entering a second pre-antibiotic era. There had been no miracle drug for the patients infected by resistant microbial pathogens. Most of the very few new drugs under development have problems with their toxicity, or pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. We are already decades behind in the discovery, characterization and development of new antimicrobials. In that scenario, we could not imagine surviving without newer and effective antimicrobial agents. Bacteria have been the champions of evolution and are still evolving continuously, where they pose serious challenges for humans. Along with the crisis of evolving resistance, the condition is made worst by the meager drug pipeline for new antimicrobials. Despite ongoing efforts only 2 new antibiotics (Telavancin in 2009 and Ceftaroline fosamil in 2010) have been approved since 2009 pipeline status report of Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA). Recent approval of new combination based antiviral drugs such as Stribild (combination of four drugs for HIV treatment) and Menhibrix (combination vaccine to prevent meningococcal disease and Haemophilus influenzae type b in children) proves that combination therapy is still the most promising approach to combat the ever evolving pathogens. Combination therapy involves the drug repurposing and regrouping of the existing antimicrobial agents to provide a synergistic approach for management of infectious diseases. This review article is an effort to highlight the challenges in new drug development and potential of combination drug therapy to deal with them.

  2. Immunoprotective therapy with targeted anticancer drugs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Říhová, Blanka; Strohalm, Jiří; Hoste, K.; Jelínková, Markéta; Hovorka, Ondřej; Kovář, Marek; Plocová, Daniela; Šírová, Milada; Šťastný, Marek; Ulbrich, Karel

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 172, - (2001), s. 21-28 ISSN 1022-1360 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV307/96/K226; GA MZd NC5050 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : doxorubicin * mitomycin * immunoprotective therapy Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 0.634, year: 2001

  3. Monitoring drug therapy in hospitalized patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijtendaal, E.V.

    2014-01-01

    Prevention of adverse drug events that may result from medication errors is challenging. The safety of medication treatment is mostly determined on an average population and medication errors may be prevented when pharmacotherapy is better tailored to the individualized needs of the hospitalized

  4. Effects of Music Therapy on Drug Therapy of Adult Psychiatric Outpatients: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degli Stefani, Mario; Biasutti, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Framed in the patients’ engagement perspective, the current study aims to determine the effects of group music therapy in addition to drug care in comparison with drug care in addition to other non-expressive group activities in the treatment of psychiatric outpatients. Method: Participants (n = 27) with ICD-10 diagnoses of F20 (schizophrenia), F25 (schizoaffective disorders), F31 (bipolar affective disorder), F32 (depressive episode), and F60 (specific personality disorders) were randomized to receive group music therapy plus standard care (48 weekly sessions of 2 h) or standard care only. The clinical measures included dosages of neuroleptics, benzodiazepines, mood stabilizers, and antidepressants. Results: The participants who received group music therapy demonstrated greater improvement in drug dosage with respect to neuroleptics than those who did not receive group music therapy. Antidepressants had an increment for both groups that was significant only for the control group. Benzodiazepines and mood stabilizers did not show any significant change in either group. Conclusion: Group music therapy combined with standard drug care was effective for controlling neuroleptic drug dosages in adult psychiatric outpatients who received group music therapy. We discussed the likely applications of group music therapy in psychiatry and the possible contribution of music therapy in improving the psychopathological condition of adult outpatients. In addition, the implications for the patient-centered perspective were also discussed. PMID:27774073

  5. Effects of Music Therapy on Drug Therapy of Adult Psychiatric Outpatients: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degli Stefani, Mario; Biasutti, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Framed in the patients' engagement perspective, the current study aims to determine the effects of group music therapy in addition to drug care in comparison with drug care in addition to other non-expressive group activities in the treatment of psychiatric outpatients. Method: Participants ( n = 27) with ICD-10 diagnoses of F20 (schizophrenia), F25 (schizoaffective disorders), F31 (bipolar affective disorder), F32 (depressive episode), and F60 (specific personality disorders) were randomized to receive group music therapy plus standard care (48 weekly sessions of 2 h) or standard care only. The clinical measures included dosages of neuroleptics, benzodiazepines, mood stabilizers, and antidepressants. Results: The participants who received group music therapy demonstrated greater improvement in drug dosage with respect to neuroleptics than those who did not receive group music therapy. Antidepressants had an increment for both groups that was significant only for the control group. Benzodiazepines and mood stabilizers did not show any significant change in either group. Conclusion: Group music therapy combined with standard drug care was effective for controlling neuroleptic drug dosages in adult psychiatric outpatients who received group music therapy. We discussed the likely applications of group music therapy in psychiatry and the possible contribution of music therapy in improving the psychopathological condition of adult outpatients. In addition, the implications for the patient-centered perspective were also discussed.

  6. Effects of music therapy on drug therapy of adult psychiatric outpatients: A pilot randomised controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Degli Stefani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Framed in the patients’ engagement perspective, the current study aims to determine the effects of group music therapy in addition to drug care in comparison with drug care in the treatment of psychiatric outpatients. Method: Participants (n = 27 with ICD-10 diagnoses of F20 (schizophrenia, F25 (schizoaffective disorders, F31 (bipolar affective disorder, F32 (depressive episode and F60 (specific personality disorders were randomised to receive group music therapy plus standard care (48 weekly sessions of two hours or standard care only. The clinical measures included dosages of neuroleptics, benzodiazepines, mood stabilisers and antidepressants. Results: The participants who received group music therapy demonstrated greater improvement in drug dosage relative to neuroleptics than those who did not receive group music therapy. Antidepressants had an increment for both groups that was significant only for the control group. Benzodiazepines and mood stabilisers did not show any significant change in either group. Conclusions: Group music therapy combined with standard drug care is effective for controlling neuroleptic drug dosages in adult psychiatric outpatients who received group music therapy. We discuss the likely applications of group music therapy in psychiatry and the possible contribution of music therapy in improving the psychopathological condition of adult outpatients. In addition, the implications for the patient-centred perspective were also discussed.

  7. Impact of renal aging on drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Carlos G; Belloso, Waldo H; Scibona, Paula; Bellizzi, Vincenzo; Macías Núñez, Juan F

    2015-08-01

    Elderly patients (age ≥ 65 years old) use up to 30% of all commonly prescribed medication, and they suffer more their adverse effects than the general population. In order to minimize this risk, physicians should avoid polypharmacy, dangerous pharmacological interactions and take into account pharmacodynamic and senile pharmacokinetic changes before prescribing any medication to the elderly. The present review article originally describes how renal physiology changes secondary to aging such as dysautonomia, glomerular filtration rate reduction, tubular back-filtration, sodium, calcium and magnesium loss, potassium retention, altered dilution-concentration capability, tubular frailty, genetics, internal milieu and body composition are senile changes that when combined predispose elderly people to suffer from pharmacological adverse effects. Knowledge of these physiological modifications associated with aging and their impact on the pharmacology of particular drugs may help to optimize drug use and to avoid complications in this age group.

  8. Spiritual self-schema therapy, drug abuse, and HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcotte, David; Avants, S Kelly; Margolin, Arthur

    2003-01-01

    This case report describes the use of Spiritual Self-Schema (3-S) therapy in the treatment of an HIV-positive inner-city drug user maintained on methadone and referred for additional treatment due to unremitting cocaine use. 3-S therapy is a manual-guided intervention based on cognitive self-schema theory. Its goal is to help the patient create, elaborate, and make accessible a cognitive schema--the "spiritual" self-schema-that is incompatible with drug use and other HIV risk behaviors. 3-S therapy facilitates a cognitive shift from the habitual activation of the "addict" self-schema, with its drug-related cognitions, scripts and action plans, to the "spiritual" self-schema, with its associated repertoire of harm reduction beliefs and behaviors.

  9. Antiarrhythmic effect of acute oxygen-ozone administration to rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Filippo, Clara; Cervone, Carmela; Rossi, Claudia; di Ronza, Cristina; Marfella, Raffaele; Capodanno, Paola; Luongo, Carlo; Rossi, Francesco; D'Amico, Michele

    2010-03-10

    The antiarrhythmic effects of 100; 150; and 300microg/kg i.p. oxygen/ozone mixture were tested on arrhythmias induced by i) ischemia; ii) ischemia/reperfusion; iii) aconitine (15microg/kg/i.v.); potassium chloride (1.5% i.v.) in rats. 25min of cardiac left descending coronary artery ischemia caused severe incidence of ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation and mortality. These were significantly reduced by pre-treatment of rats with oxygen/ozone mixture at doses of 150 and 300microg/kg. In separate experiments using a protocol of 5min ischemia followed by 8min reperfusion this caused arrhythmias starting within 6+/-1s. The incidence of ventricular tachycardia was 100%, while ventricular fibrillation occurred in 75% of the animals and lasted 85+/-14s. The mortality was 62.5%. These figures were significantly (Pozone and a substantial increase observed with 300microg/kg, whilst not affected by the lower dose of 100microg/kg. 150 and 300microg/kg oxygen/ozone prolonged the onset time for the appearance of arrhythmias induced by aconitine (300microg/kg oxygen/ozone, approximately 81% longer). Oxygen/ozone also reduced the ventricular tachycardia duration, ventricular fibrillation incidence, arrhythmia score, and increased the rat's survival rate. As for example, this latter was increased from 25% (aconitine) to 50% (aconitine+oxygen/ozone 150microg/kg). 100microg/kg oxygen/ozone was without effect. None of the oxygen/ozone doses affected the arrhythmias caused by potassium chloride 1.5% i.v. All the oxygen/ozone antiarrhythmic effects were similar to those observed with lidocaine (1.5mg/kg i.v.). In conclusion, oxygen/ozone has antiarrhythmic effects against arrhythmias caused by aconitine, myocardial ischemia and ischemia/reperfusion. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Antiepileptic drug therapy the story so far.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, Martin J

    2010-12-01

    The story began on 11th May 1857 when Charles Locock commented in the Lancet on his use of potassium bromide in 15 cases of "hysterical" epilepsy in young women. The next development was the serendipitous discovery of the anticonvulsant properties of phenobarbital by Alfred Hauptmann in 1912. This predated by more than 20 years the screening of potential therapeutic agents against "electrical seizures" in cats by Houston Merritt and Tracy Putnam. The result was the launching of phenytoin in 1938. Next came primidone, ethosuximide, carbamazepine and valproic acid, all of which can be regarded as first generation antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Shortly after their synthesis, the benzodiazepines were rapidly recognised as having anticonvulsant activity. The modern era focused on the systematic screening of many thousands of compounds against rodent seizure models under the Anticonvulsant Drug Development Program in the US. This resulted in the global licensing, in chronological order, of vigabatrin, zonisamide, oxcarbazepine, lamotrigine, felbamate, gabapentin, topiramate, tiagabine, levetiracetam, pregabalin and lacosamide. Rufinamide is available in the US and Europe for Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and stiripentol has been made available for Dravet syndrome under the European orphan drug scheme. Eslicarbazepine can be prescribed in Europe for partial seizures, but not in the US. Has all this activity improved the lives of people with epilepsy? The short answer is-probably yes, but not by very much! This paper will conclude with a précis of the views of a selected group of paediatric and adult epileptologists on the advances in pharmacological management achieved over the last 20 years. Copyright © 2010 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Drug Carrier for Photodynamic Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilahun Ayane Debele

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a non-invasive combinatorial therapeutic modality using light, photosensitizer (PS, and oxygen used for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. When PSs in cells are exposed to specific wavelengths of light, they are transformed from the singlet ground state (S0 to an excited singlet state (S1–Sn, followed by intersystem crossing to an excited triplet state (T1. The energy transferred from T1 to biological substrates and molecular oxygen, via type I and II reactions, generates reactive oxygen species, (1O2, H2O2, O2*, HO*, which causes cellular damage that leads to tumor cell death through necrosis or apoptosis. The solubility, selectivity, and targeting of photosensitizers are important factors that must be considered in PDT. Nano-formulating PSs with organic and inorganic nanoparticles poses as potential strategy to satisfy the requirements of an ideal PDT system. In this review, we summarize several organic and inorganic PS carriers that have been studied to enhance the efficacy of photodynamic therapy against cancer.

  12. Drug Carrier for Photodynamic Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debele, Tilahun Ayane; Peng, Sydney; Tsai, Hsieh-Chih

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a non-invasive combinatorial therapeutic modality using light, photosensitizer (PS), and oxygen used for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. When PSs in cells are exposed to specific wavelengths of light, they are transformed from the singlet ground state (S0) to an excited singlet state (S1–Sn), followed by intersystem crossing to an excited triplet state (T1). The energy transferred from T1 to biological substrates and molecular oxygen, via type I and II reactions, generates reactive oxygen species, (1O2, H2O2, O2*, HO*), which causes cellular damage that leads to tumor cell death through necrosis or apoptosis. The solubility, selectivity, and targeting of photosensitizers are important factors that must be considered in PDT. Nano-formulating PSs with organic and inorganic nanoparticles poses as potential strategy to satisfy the requirements of an ideal PDT system. In this review, we summarize several organic and inorganic PS carriers that have been studied to enhance the efficacy of photodynamic therapy against cancer. PMID:26389879

  13. [Drug-therapy with sexual offenders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stompe, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Sexual offenders are a heterogeneous group of offenders with different personality structures and different patterns of crime. As a consequence, difficulties arise with the definition of sexually deviant or offending behaviour, which depends on period of time and culture. After presenting the actual definition of sexual offences, their frequency is shown by means of German epidemiological data. The problem of the assumed relationship between paraphilia and sexual offending behaviour is called into question. After the description of the central neurobiological and endocrinological mechanisms, the established pharmacological treatment strategies (Selective Serotonine Reuptake Inhibitors, Antiadrogenes, LHRH (Luteotropic Hormone Releasing Hormone)-Agonists) are presented. Finally, the step-wise algorithm for the therapy of sexual according to Bradford is presented.

  14. Adherence with Drug Therapy in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doreen Matsui

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Available information suggests that nonadherence with medication is a common problem in pregnant women. Not taking prescribed drugs may have potentially negative consequences as patients may not achieve their therapeutic goal. In addition to the many factors that may influence medication-taking behaviour in the general population, unique challenges are encountered in pregnant women as both maternal health and fetal well-being must be considered. On the one hand, pregnant women may be motivated to keep their underlying disease under control, while, on the other hand, fear and anxiety regarding the potential harmful effects of their medication on their unborn child may result in poor adherence with needed medication. Providing evidence-based information, ideally preconceptually, regarding the effects of their medication during pregnancy may be important in avoiding misperceptions that lead to nonadherence.

  15. Effects of Multidimensional Family Therapy (MDFT) on Nonopioid Drug Abuse:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filges, Trine; Andersen, Ditte; Jørgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This review evaluates the evidence of the effects of multidimensional family therapy (MDFT) on drug use reduction in young people for the treatment of nonopioid drug use.  Method: We followed Campbell Collaboration guidelines to conduct a systematic review of randomized and nonrandomized...... trials. Meta-analytic methods were used to quantitatively synthesize study results.  Results: The search yielded five studies that met inclusion criteria. MDFT was found to be more effective than other treatments on drug abuse problem severity and drug use frequency in the short run but not in the long...... run and demonstrated positive effects on treatment retention compared to control conditions.  Discussion: While additional research is needed, the review offers support for MDFT as a treatment to young nonopioid drug abusers. The number of studies included in this review was limited, however...

  16. Evaluation of drug therapy problems among renal patients receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence of drug therapy problems (DTPs), identify the types of DTPs and assess ... numerous reports of incidence, prevalence, and .... G5. 12 (4.18). *Co-morbidity (n=484) n (%). Diabetes. 156 (32.23). Hypertension. 203 (41.94). CHF. 32 (6.61). Dyslipidemia. 43 (8.88). Hypo/Hyper Thyrodism.

  17. Assessment of patients' knowledge of their drug therapy in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients' knowledge of their medications is an important factor in ensuring adherence. Medication adherence is essential for rational drug use and derivation of optimal therapy. This study was conducted to assess knowledge of outpatients regarding their medications. A well structured questionnaire was administered to 200 ...

  18. Bioinformatics in cancer therapy and drug design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horbach, D.Y.; Usanov, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    One of the mechanisms of external signal transduction (ionizing radiation, toxicants, stress) to the target cell is the existence of membrane and intracellular proteins with intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity. No wonder that etiology of malignant growth links to abnormalities in signal transduction through tyrosine kinases. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinases play fundamental roles in development, proliferation and differentiation of tissues of epithelial, mesenchymal and neuronal origin. There are four types of EGFR: EGF receptor (ErbB1/HER1), ErbB2/Neu/HER2, ErbB3/HER3 and ErbB4/HER4. Abnormal expression of EGFR, appearance of receptor mutants with changed ability to protein-protein interactions or increased tyrosine kinase activity have been implicated in the malignancy of different types of human tumors. Bioinformatics is currently using in investigation on design and selection of drugs that can make alterations in structure or competitively bind with receptors and so display antagonistic characteristics. (authors)

  19. Drug Treatment of REM Sleep Behavior Disorder: the Use of Drug Therapies Other Than Clonazepam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kirstie N.; Shneerson, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is characterized by loss of the normal muscle atonia during REM sleep associated with disruptive motor activity related to the acting out of dreams. There is frequently injury to the patient or bed partner, and treatment is usually required. Clonazepam has been the first-line therapy for many years, with 2 large case series reporting efficacy with few side effects in the majority of patients. However, long-acting hypnotics in the elderly or those with cognitive impairment can be associated with adverse events especially unacceptable daytime sedation, confusion, and exacerbation of existing sleep apnea. Methods: We reviewed 39 patients with confirmed RBD who were treated within our regional sleep center, assessing both efficacy and side effects of drug therapies. Results: Adverse effects were reported by 58% of the patients using clonazepam, with 50% either discontinuing the drug or reducing the dose. This prompted us review the side effects of clonazepam in detail and to look for alternative therapies. We report several novel and effective therapies, in particular zopiclone, in a series of patients under long-term follow-up for RBD. Conclusions: There are alternatives to clonazepam therapy for RBD which can be as effective and may be better tolerated. Citation: Anderson KN; Shneerson JM. Drug treatment of REM sleep behavior disorder: the use of drug therapies other than clonazepam. J Clin Sleep Med 2009;5(3):235–239. PMID:19960644

  20. Drug therapy in patients with Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Thomas

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Parkinson`s disease (PD is a progressive, disabling neurodegenerative disorder with onset of motor and non-motor features. Both reduce quality of life of PD patients and cause caregiver burden. This review aims to provide a survey of possible therapeutic options for treatment of motor and non motor symptoms of PD and to discuss their relation to each other. MAO-B-Inhibitors, NMDA antagonists, dopamine agonists and levodopa with its various application modes mainly improve the dopamine associated motor symptoms in PD. This armentarium of PD drugs only partially influences the onset and occurrence of non motor symptoms. These PD features predominantly result from non dopaminergic neurodegeneration. Autonomic features, such as seborrhea, hyperhidrosis, orthostatic syndrome, salivation, bladder dysfunction, gastrointestinal disturbances, and neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as depression, sleep disorders, psychosis, cognitive dysfunction with impaired execution and impulse control may appear. Drug therapy of these non motor symptoms complicates long-term PD drug therapy due to possible occurrence of drug interactions, - side effects, and altered pharmacokinetic behaviour of applied compounds. Dopamine substituting compounds themselves may contribute to onset of these non motor symptoms. This complicates the differentiation from the disease process itself and influences therapeutic options, which are often limited because of additional morbidity with necessary concomitant drug therapy.

  1. Wunderlich syndrome during antiplatelet drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitanini, A; Tavolaro, A; Rosellini, M; Rossi, A

    2009-03-01

    Spontaneous hemorrhage in the kidney, also known as Wunderlich Syndrome, is a rare clinical problem. The most common cause of spontaneous renal hemorrhage is tumor. Other causes are rupture of a renal cyst, vasculitis, hydronephrosis, preeclampsia, and kidney infections. A 67-year-old man was admitted complaining left flank colic pain. A contrast CT scan showed the presence of a subcapsular hematoma of the left kidney extending from the upper to the lower pole. He had no history of trauma and immunological screening tests for vasculitis were normal. His current therapy included acetylsalicylic acid (100 mg/daily) and lisinopril (20 mg/ daily). The patient was hospitalized for 4 days and his circulatory state remained stable. Nine months later an ultrasound examination showed complete resolution of the hematoma. One year later the patient was admitted again because of a spontaneous right calf hematoma and a thoroughly investigation of his coagulation pattern was carried out. Laboratory finding revealed a platelet defect, as the number of adenine nucleotides and other marker related to platelet activation were increased: ADP 1 mcM lack 2 masculine wave, ADP 2 mcM lack 2 masculine wave, Adrenalina 5 mcM lack 2 masculine wave, Adrenalina 10 mcM lack 2 masculine wave. Platelet activation markers: Gp53 in lysosomal membrane 0.48 Dpar (0 - 0.26). Our case describes the recurrence of spontaneous hemorrhages (perirenal and intramuscular hematoma) as a result of an underlying platelet aggregation defect worsened by administration of acetylsalicylic acid. In patients on antiplatelet treatment with a history of excessive bleeding a thorough investigation of coagulation status appears beneficial.

  2. Potential drug interactions in patients given antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Wendel Mombaque Dos; Secoli, Silvia Regina; Padoin, Stela Maris de Mello

    2016-11-21

    to investigate potential drug-drug interactions (PDDI) in patients with HIV infection on antiretroviral therapy. a cross-sectional study was conducted on 161 adults with HIV infection. Clinical, socio demographic, and antiretroviral treatment data were collected. To analyze the potential drug interactions, we used the software Micromedex(r). Statistical analysis was performed by binary logistic regression, with a p-value of ≤0.05 considered statistically significant. of the participants, 52.2% were exposed to potential drug-drug interactions. In total, there were 218 potential drug-drug interactions, of which 79.8% occurred between drugs used for antiretroviral therapy. There was an association between the use of five or more medications and potential drug-drug interactions (p = 0.000) and between the time period of antiretroviral therapy being over six years and potential drug-drug interactions (p sistema nervoso central e cardiovascular, mas também podem interferir em testes utilizados para a detecção da resistência do HIV aos medicamentos antirretrovirais. investigar las posibles interacciones fármaco-fármaco (PDDI en inglés) en pacientes con infección por VIH que reciben terapia antirretroviral. un estudio transversal se llevó a cabo en 161 adultos con infección por VIH. Se recogieron datos clínicos, socio demográficos, y de tratamiento antirretroviral. Para analizar las posibles interacciones entre medicamentos, se utilizó el software Micromedex(r). El análisis estadístico se realizó mediante regresión logística binaria, considerando estadísticamente significativo un valor de p de ≤0.05. de todos los participantes, el 52,2% fueron expuestos a posibles interacciones entre fármacos. En total, aparecieron 218 interacciones entre fármacos potenciales, de las que el 79,8% se produjo entre los fármacos utilizados para el tratamiento antirretroviral. Se observó una asociación entre el uso de cinco o más medicamentos y posibles

  3. [Drug therapy of pulmonary arterial hypertension in 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschermann, Michael; Jansa, Pavel

    2014-04-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a primary pulmonary arteriolar disease, characterized by a progressive increase in pulmonary vascular resistance and pressure in the pulmonary circulation. It progressively leads to hypertrophy of the right ventricle and with no treatment to its failure and patient´s death. Etiology of pulmonary hypertension (PH) has been reclassified repeatedly, most recently during the 4th World Symposium on Pulmonary Hypertension held in 2008 [1]. Currently, the first group contains PAH with either unknown or known cause (systemic connective tissue disease, liver disease, congenital heart disease, HIV infection, abuse of anorexic agents). Current drug therapy of PAH is divided into conventional (anticoagulant therapy, calcium channel blockers, therapy of chronic heart failure) and specific (prostanoids, endothelium receptor antagonists, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors). Patients with positive vasodilator test are indicated for the high doses treatment of calcium channel blockers. Patients with negative vasodilator test are indicated for chronic anticoagulant therapy and specific drug therapy either as mono-therapy, or as combined therapy. Recent years have brought a wide range of new treatments modalities, especially in the field of pharmacotherapy. In addition, other treatment modalities have been tested, for example application of stem cells. Drugs in research include several groups: 1. vasodilators: fasudil, adrenonedullin, activators and stimulators of guanylate cyclase, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP); 2. Anti-inflammatory agents: inhibitor of elastase, antagonist of B cells, immunosuppressive agents, inhibitor of HDAC1; 3. agents affecting metabolism: nitrites, PPAR antagonists, antioxidants, serotonin receptor antagonist and serotonin transporter blockers, statins, inhibitors of Rho-kinase; 4. apoptosis inductors of smooth muscle cells: tyrosine-kinase inhibitors, elastase inhibitors; 5. agents influencing vascular regeneration

  4. Salvage Therapy of Multiple Myeloma: The New Generation Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Romano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During the past decade, overall results of treatment of multiple myeloma (MM have been improved and survival curves are now significantly better with respect to those obtained with historical treatment. These improvements are linked to a deeper knowledge of the biology of disease and to the introduction in clinical practice of drugs with different mechanism of action such as proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs. However, MM remains in most cases an incurable disease. For patients who relapse after treatment with novel agents, the prognosis is dismal and new drugs and therapeutic strategies are required for continued disease control. In this review, we summarize new insights in salvage therapy for relapsed/refractory MM as emerging from recent clinical trials exploring the activity of bendamustine, new generation proteasome inhibitors, novel IMiDs, monoclonal antibodies, and drugs interfering with growth pathways.

  5. Salvage Therapy of Multiple Myeloma: The New Generation Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Alessandra; Conticello, Concetta; Di Raimondo, Cosimo; Schinocca, Elena; La Fauci, Alessia; Parrinello, Nunziatina Laura; Chiarenza, Annalisa

    2014-01-01

    During the past decade, overall results of treatment of multiple myeloma (MM) have been improved and survival curves are now significantly better with respect to those obtained with historical treatment. These improvements are linked to a deeper knowledge of the biology of disease and to the introduction in clinical practice of drugs with different mechanism of action such as proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs). However, MM remains in most cases an incurable disease. For patients who relapse after treatment with novel agents, the prognosis is dismal and new drugs and therapeutic strategies are required for continued disease control. In this review, we summarize new insights in salvage therapy for relapsed/refractory MM as emerging from recent clinical trials exploring the activity of bendamustine, new generation proteasome inhibitors, novel IMiDs, monoclonal antibodies, and drugs interfering with growth pathways. PMID:24967371

  6. Early antiretroviral therapy and potent second-line drugs could decrease HIV incidence of drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Mingwang; Xiao, Yanni; Rong, Libin; Meyers, Lauren Ancel; Bellan, Steven E

    2017-06-28

    Early initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces the risk of drug-sensitive HIV transmission but may increase the transmission of drug-resistant HIV. We used a mathematical model to estimate the long-term population-level benefits of ART and determine the scenarios under which earlier ART (treatment at 1 year post-infection, on average) could decrease simultaneously both total and drug-resistant HIV incidence (new infections). We constructed an infection-age-structured mathematical model that tracked the transmission rates over the course of infection and modelled the patients' life expectancy as a function of ART initiation timing. We fitted this model to the annual AIDS incidence and death data directly, and to resistance data and demographic data indirectly among men who have sex with men (MSM) in San Francisco. Using counterfactual scenarios, we assessed the impact on total and drug-resistant HIV incidence of ART initiation timing, frequency of acquired drug resistance, and second-line drug effectiveness (defined as the combination of resistance monitoring, biomedical drug efficacy and adherence). Earlier ART initiation could decrease the number of both total and drug-resistant HIV incidence when second-line drug effectiveness is sufficiently high (greater than 80%), but increase the proportion of new infections that are drug resistant. Thus, resistance may paradoxically appear to be increasing while actually decreasing. © 2017 The Author(s).

  7. Drug interactions with solid tumour-targeted therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Schoemann, Audrey; Blanchet, Benoit; Bardin, Christophe; Noé, Gaëlle; Boudou-Rouquette, Pascaline; Vidal, Michel; Goldwasser, François

    2014-01-01

    Drug interactions are an on-going concern in the treatment of cancer, especially when targeted therapies, such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) or mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors, are being used. The emergence of elderly patients and/or patients with both cancer and other chronic co-morbidities leads to polypharmacy. Therefore, the risk of drug-drug interactions (DDI) becomes a clinically relevant issue, all the more so as TKIs and mTOR inhibitors are essentially metabolised by cytochrome P450 enzymes. These DDIs can result in variability in anticancer drug exposure, thus favouring the selection of resistant cellular clones or the occurrence of toxicity. This review provides a comprehensive overview of DDIs that involve targeted therapies approved by the FDA for the treatment of solid tumours for more than 3 years (sorafenib, sunitinib, erlotinib, gefitinib, imatinib, lapatinib, everolimus, temsirolimus) and medicinal herb or drugs. This review also provides some guidelines to help oncologists and pharmacists in their clinical practice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Repurposing FDA-approved drugs for anti-aging therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Terry W; Johnston, Rachel K; Srinivasan, Bharath; Zhou, Hongyi; Gao, Mu; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2016-11-01

    There is great interest in drugs that are capable of modulating multiple aging pathways, thereby delaying the onset and progression of aging. Effective strategies for drug development include the repurposing of existing drugs already approved by the FDA for human therapy. FDA approved drugs have known mechanisms of action and have been thoroughly screened for safety. Although there has been extensive scientific activity in repurposing drugs for disease therapy, there has been little testing of these drugs for their effects on aging. The pool of FDA approved drugs therefore represents a large reservoir of drug candidates with substantial potential for anti-aging therapy. In this paper we employ FINDSITE comb , a powerful ligand homology modeling program, to identify binding partners for proteins produced by temperature sensing genes that have been implicated in aging. This list of drugs with potential to modulate aging rates was then tested experimentally for lifespan and healthspan extension using a small invertebrate model. Three protein targets of the rotifer Brachionus manjavacas corresponding to products of the transient receptor potential gene 7, ribosomal protein S6 polypeptide 2 gene, or forkhead box C gene, were screened against a compound library consisting of DrugBank drugs including 1347 FDA approved, non-nutraceutical molecules. Twenty nine drugs ranked in the top 1 % for binding to each target were subsequently included in our experimental analysis. Continuous exposure of rotifers to 1 µM naproxen significantly extended rotifer mean lifespan by 14 %. We used three endpoints to estimate rotifer health: swimming speed (mobility proxy), reproduction (overall vitality), and mitochondria activity (cellular senescence proxy). The natural decline in swimming speed with aging was more gradual when rotifers were exposed to three drugs, so that on day 6, mean swimming speed of females was 1.19 mm/s for naproxen (P = 0.038), 1.20 for fludarabine (P = 0

  9. The role of photodynamic therapy in overcoming cancer drug resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spring, Bryan Q.; Rizvi, Imran; Xu, Nan; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2015-01-01

    Many modalities of cancer therapy induce mechanisms of treatment resistance and escape pathways during chronic treatments, including photodynamic therapy (PDT). It is conceivable that resistance induced by one treatment might be overcome by another treatment. Emerging evidence suggests that the unique mechanisms of tumor cell and microenvironment damage produced by PDT could be utilized to overcome cancer drug resistance, to mitigate the compensatory induction of survival pathways and even to re-sensitize resistant cells to standard therapies. Approaches that capture the unique features of PDT, therefore, offer promising factors for increasing the efficacy of a broad range of therapeutic modalities. Here, we highlight key preclinical findings utilizing PDT to overcome classical drug resistance or escape pathways and thus enhance the efficacy of many pharmaceuticals, possibly explaining the clinical observations of the PDT response to otherwise treatment-resistant diseases. With the development of nanotechnology, it is possible that light activation may be used not only to damage and sensitize tumors but also to enable controlled drug release to inhibit escape pathways that may lead to resistance or cell proliferation. PMID:25856800

  10. Microwave coagulation therapy and drug injection to treat splenic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guoming; Sun, Yuanyuan; Yu, Jie; Dong, Lei; Mu, Nannan; Liu, Xiaohong; Liu, Lanfen; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Xiaofei; Liang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    The present study compares the efficacy of 915- and 2450-MHz contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS)-guided percutaneous microwave coagulation with that of CEUS-guided thrombin injection for the treatment of trauma-induced spleen hemorrhage. In a canine splenic artery hemorrhage model with two levels of arterial diameter (A, microwaves and drug injection. Therapy efficacy was measured by comparing bleeding rate, hemostatic time, bleeding index, bleeding volume, and pathology. The most efficient technique was CEUS-guided 915-MHz percutaneous microwave coagulation therapy in terms of action time and total blood loss. The success rate of the 915-MHz microwave group was higher than that of the 2450-MHz microwave and the drug injection groups (except A level, P microwave group than those in the 2450-MHz microwave and drug injection groups (P microwave group, but pathologic changes of light injury could be seen in the other groups. The present study provides evidence that microwave coagulation therapy is more efficient than thrombin injection for the treatment of splenic hemorrhage. Furthermore, treatment with 915-MHz microwaves stops bleeding more rapidly and generates a wider cauterization zone than does treatment with 2450-MHz microwaves. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A study of the frequency and pattern of non-drug therapies among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    0.93% Allium sativum, 0.56% Cola acuminate. There was a significant difference in the frequency of Non-drug therapies ... There is need for public health education on the benefits or otherwise of non-drug therapies; to enhance treatment outcomes. Keywords: Pattern; Non-drug therapies; lifestyle; hypertension; diabetes; ...

  12. Nanoengineered drug delivery systems for enhancing antibiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalhapure, Rahul S; Suleman, Nadia; Mocktar, Chunderika; Seedat, Nasreen; Govender, Thirumala

    2015-03-01

    Formulation scientists are recognizing nanoengineered drug delivery systems as an effective strategy to overcome limitations associated with antibiotic drug therapy. Antibiotics encapsulated into nanodelivery systems will contribute to improved management of patients with various infectious diseases and to overcoming the serious global burden of antibiotic resistance. An extensive review of several antibiotic-loaded nanocarriers that have been formulated to target drugs to infectious sites, achieve controlled drug release profiles, and address formulation challenges, such as low-drug entrapment efficiencies, poor solubility and stability is presented in this paper. The physicochemical properties and the in vitro/in vivo performances of various antibiotic-loaded delivery systems, such as polymeric nanoparticles, micelles, dendrimers, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles, nanohybirds, nanofibers/scaffolds, nanosheets, nanoplexes, and nanotubes/horn/rods and nanoemulsions, are highlighted and evaluated. Future studies that will be essential to optimize formulation and commercialization of these antibiotic-loaded nanosystems are also identified. The review presented emphasizes the significant formulation progress achieved and potential that novel nanoengineered antibiotic drug delivery systems have for enhancing the treatment of patients with a range of infections. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  13. Protein Nanoparticles as Drug Delivery Carriers for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warangkana Lohcharoenkal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles have increasingly been used for a variety of applications, most notably for the delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. A large number of nanoparticle drug delivery systems have been developed for cancer treatment and various materials have been explored as drug delivery agents to improve the therapeutic efficacy and safety of anticancer drugs. Natural biomolecules such as proteins are an attractive alternative to synthetic polymers which are commonly used in drug formulations because of their safety. In general, protein nanoparticles offer a number of advantages including biocompatibility and biodegradability. They can be prepared under mild conditions without the use of toxic chemicals or organic solvents. Moreover, due to their defined primary structure, protein-based nanoparticles offer various possibilities for surface modifications including covalent attachment of drugs and targeting ligands. In this paper, we review the most significant advancements in protein nanoparticle technology and their use in drug delivery arena. We then examine the various sources of protein materials that have been used successfully for the construction of protein nanoparticles as well as their methods of preparation. Finally, we discuss the applications of protein nanoparticles in cancer therapy.

  14. Protein Nanoparticles as Drug Delivery Carriers for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Wang, Liying; Chen, Yi Charlie

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles have increasingly been used for a variety of applications, most notably for the delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. A large number of nanoparticle drug delivery systems have been developed for cancer treatment and various materials have been explored as drug delivery agents to improve the therapeutic efficacy and safety of anticancer drugs. Natural biomolecules such as proteins are an attractive alternative to synthetic polymers which are commonly used in drug formulations because of their safety. In general, protein nanoparticles offer a number of advantages including biocompatibility and biodegradability. They can be prepared under mild conditions without the use of toxic chemicals or organic solvents. Moreover, due to their defined primary structure, protein-based nanoparticles offer various possibilities for surface modifications including covalent attachment of drugs and targeting ligands. In this paper, we review the most significant advancements in protein nanoparticle technology and their use in drug delivery arena. We then examine the various sources of protein materials that have been used successfully for the construction of protein nanoparticles as well as their methods of preparation. Finally, we discuss the applications of protein nanoparticles in cancer therapy. PMID:24772414

  15. Subcutaneous implants for long-acting drug therapy in laboratory animals may generate unintended drug reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Guarnieri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Long-acting therapy in laboratory animals offers advantages over the current practice of 2-3 daily drug injections. Yet little is known about the disintegration of biodegradable drug implants in rodents. Objective: Compare bioavailability of buprenorphine with the biodegradation of lipid-encapsulated subcutaneous drug pellets. Methods: Pharmacokinetic and histopathology studies were conducted in BALB/c female mice implanted with cholesterol-buprenorphine drug pellets. Results: Drug levels are below the level of detection (0.5 ng/mL plasma within 4-5 days of implant. However, necroscopy revealed that interstitial tissues begin to seal implants within a week. Visual inspection of the implant site revealed no evidence of inflammation or edema associated with the cholesterol-drug residue. Chemical analyses demonstrated that the residues contained 10-13% of the initial opiate dose for at least two weeks post implant. Discussion: The results demonstrate that biodegradable scaffolds can become sequestered in the subcutaneous space. Conclusion: Drug implants can retain significant and unintended reservoirs of drugs.

  16. Amiodarone therapy in chronic heart failure and myocardial infarction: a review of the mortality trials with special attention to STAT-CHF and the GESICA trials. Grupo de Estudio de la Sobrevida en la Insuficiencia Cardiaca en Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, J V; Ramani, K; Neelagaru, S; Kown, M; Gheorghiade, M

    1997-01-01

    Amiodarone appears to reduce sudden death in patients with left ventricular dysfunction resulting from an acute MI or a primary dilated cardiomyopathy, particularly if complex ventricular arrhythmias are present. Amiodarone's beneficial effect on mortality in these patients could be unrelated to its antiarrhythmic effects. Multiple factors could account for the improvement in mortality such as the drug's antiischemic effects, neuromodulating effects, its effect on left ventricular function and on heart rate. Moreover, patients with LV dysfunction who have survived an episode of sudden death would potentially benefit from amiodarone therapy. Future trials are needed to determine the precise subsets(s) of patients who would benefit from the drug and the most efficacious dosing regimen for the drug. Based on available data, amiodarone is the only antiarrhythmic agent which has not been shown to increase mortality in patients with chronic heart failure.

  17. Prescription drug therapies for prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Mary Beth

    2006-07-01

    To characterize the changes in bone mass with age in women and men, explain the physiology and pathophysiology of the bone remodeling process, identify the targets for prescription osteoporosis drugs in this process, and provide details about the uses, efficacy, safety, and economics of prescription drug therapies for osteoporosis prevention and treatment. Preventing accelerated bone loss and decreasing age-related decreases in bone density are the primary goals of prescription drug therapy for osteoporosis. Bisphosphonates are the drugs of choice for preventing and treating postmenopausal osteoporosis. Alternatives for patients who cannot take bisphosphonates include raloxifene and calcitonin salmon. Menopause is accompanied by a rapid loss in bone mass that is followed by annual losses due to aging in women, which are similar to age-related bone mass decreases in men. Most prescription drug therapies for osteoporosis prevention or treatment reduce bone resorption by inhibiting osteoclast activation and activity, with only one medication class able to increase bone formation by stimulating osteoblasts. Denosumab, an investigational monoclonal antibody that inhibits nuclear factor kB ligand, would be a new class of anti-resorptive medications. Bisphosphonates currently are the drugs of choice for preventing and treating osteoporosis, with 7- and 10-year safety data available for risedronate and alendronate, respectively. Weekly and monthly regimens of bisphosphonates improve patient acceptance. Recently, an injectable form of ibandronate received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for once every 3 months administration. Raloxifene and calcitonin salmon are alternatives for patients who cannot take bisphosphonates because of contraindications or adverse effects. Teriparatide, a recombinant parathyroid hormone fragment, not only increases bone mineral density but also increases bone connectivity. Osteoporosis medications are usually safe, especially if used

  18. The Effects of Fall-Risk-Increasing Drugs on Postural Control : A Literature Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Maartje H.; van Campen, Jos P. C. M.; Moek, Marije A.; Tulner, Linda R.; Beijnen, Jos H.; Lamoth, Claudine J. C.

    2013-01-01

    Meta-analyses showed that psychotropic drugs (antidepressants, neuroleptics, benzodiazepines, antiepileptic drugs) and some cardiac drugs (digoxin, type IA anti-arrhythmics, diuretics) are associated with increased fall risk. Because balance and gait disorders are the most consistent predictors of

  19. Vibrio cholerae infection, novel drug targets and phage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazil, Mobashar Hussain Urf Turabe; Singh, Durg V

    2011-10-01

    Vibrio cholerae is the causative agent of the diarrheal disease cholera. Although antibiotic therapy shortens the duration of diarrhea, excessive use has contributed to the emergence of antibiotic resistance in V. cholerae. Mobile genetic elements have been shown to be largely responsible for the shift of drug resistance genes in bacteria, including some V. cholerae strains. Quorum sensing communication systems are used for interaction among bacteria and for sensing environmental signals. Sequence analysis of the ctxB gene of toxigenic V. cholerae strains demonstrated its presence in multiple cholera toxin genotypes. Moreover, bacteriophage that lyse the bacterium have been reported to modulate epidemics by decreasing the required infectious dose of the bacterium. In this article, we will briefly discuss the disease, its clinical manifestation, antimicrobial resistance and the novel approaches to locate drug targets to treat cholera.

  20. Drug Discovery of Therapies for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blat, Yuval; Blat, Shachar

    2015-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic, lethal, muscle disorder caused by the loss of the muscle protein, dystrophin, leading to progressive loss of muscle fibers and muscle weakness. Drug discovery efforts targeting DMD have used two main approaches: (1) the restoration of dystrophin expression or the expression of a compensatory protein, and (2) the mitigation of downstream pathological mechanisms, including dysregulated calcium homeostasis, oxidative stress, inflammation, fibrosis, and muscle ischemia. The aim of this review is to introduce the disease, its pathophysiology, and the available research tools to a drug discovery audience. This review will also detail the most promising therapies that are currently being tested in clinical trials or in advanced preclinical models. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  1. Management of noninfectious posterior uveitis with intravitreal drug therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan HY

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hui Yi Tan,1 Aniruddha Agarwal,2 Cecilia S Lee,3 Jay Chhablani,4 Vishali Gupta,5 Manoj Khatri,6 Jayabalan Nirmal,7 Carlos Pavesio,8 Rupesh Agrawal1,7–9 1Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore; 2Department of Vitreoretina, Stanley M Truhlsen Eye Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 3Department of Ophthalmology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; 4Department of Vitreoretina, L V Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, Telangana, 5Department of Retina and Uvea, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, 6Department of Retina, Rajan Eye Care Hospital, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India; 7School of Material Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore; 8Department of Medical Retina, Moorfields Eye Hospital, NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK; 9Department of Ophthalmology, National Healthcare Group Eye Institute, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore Abstract: Uveitis is an important cause of vision loss worldwide due to its sight-threatening complications, especially cystoid macular edema, as well as choroidal neovascularization, macular ischemia, cataract, and glaucoma. Systemic corticosteroids are the mainstay of therapy for noninfectious posterior uveitis; however, various systemic side effects can occur. Intravitreal medication achieves a therapeutic level in the vitreous while minimizing systemic complications and is thus used as an exciting alternative. Corticosteroids, antivascular endothelial growth factors, immunomodulators such as methotrexate and sirolimus, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are currently available for intravitreal therapy. This article reviews the existing literature for efficacy and safety of these various options for intravitreal drug therapy for the management of noninfectious uveitis (mainly intermediate, posterior, and panuveitis. Keywords: intravitreal therapy, noninfectious uveitis, posterior uveitis

  2. Pattern of drug therapy problems and interventions in ambulatory patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ojeh VB

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We describe the frequency and types of drug therapy problems (DTPs, and interventions carried out to resolve them, among a cohort of HIV- infected patients on ART in Jos, Nigeria. Methods: A prospective pharmacists’ intervention study was conducted between January and August 2012 at the outpatient HIV clinic of the Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH. Pharmacists identified DTPs and made recommendations to resolve them. The main outcome measures were number of DTPs encountered, interventions proposed and acceptance rate of recommendations. Results: A total of 42,416 prescriptions were dispensed to 9339 patients during the eight months study. A total of 420 interventions (Intervention rate of 1 per 100 prescriptions were made to resolve DTPs in 401 (4.3% patients with a mean age of 41 (SD=10 years, and made up of 73% females. DTPs encountered were drug omission (n=89, 21.2%, unnecessary drug (n=55, 13.1% and wrong drug indication (n=55, 13.1%. Recommendations offered included; Addition of another drug to the therapy (n=87, 20.7%, rectification of incomplete prescriptions (n=85, 20.2%, change of drug or dosage (n=67, 16.0%, and discontinuation of the offending drug (n=59, 14.0%. A total of 389 (93% out of 420 of the recommendations were accepted. In all, 50.4% (212 of the problematic prescriptions were changed and dispensed, 22.2% (89 were clarified and dispensed, while wrong identities were corrected in 11.7% (49. However, 7.5% (30 prescriptions were dispensed as prescribed, 5.2% (21 were not dispensed, and 3% (12 were unresolved. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that pharmacists-initiated interventions can ameliorate DTPs in patients receiving ART given the high intervention acceptance rate recorded. The implication of this finding is that pharmacists with requisite training in HIV pharmacotherapy are an excellent resource in detecting and minimizing the effect of antiretroviral drug-related errors.

  3. Use of intravenous antiarrhythmics to identify concealed Brugada syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brugada Ramon

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiology has recently witnessed the production of an overwhelming amount of data through the advances made in genetics and molecular biology research. Understanding of genetics has tremendous potential to aid in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of the majority of diseases. Despite the high level of publicity for research discoveries, clinicians have had difficulty in discriminating between what is still basic research and what can be applied to patients. The fact is that we still lack the technology to perform genetic testing in a time frame that is acceptable to clinicians. Meanwhile, then, the only option is to rely on clinical tests that can help us better stratify the individuals at risk for a disease. For example, Brugada syndrome has benefited tremendously from genetics and molecular biology since its initial description in 1992. Genetics will provide a more definitive diagnosis for the disease in the future. For the time being, though, research has shown that the administration of an intravenous class I antiarrhythmic is very useful in identifying patients with a concealed form of the disease.

  4. Brand-name drug, generic drug, orphan drug. Pharmacological therapy with biosimilar drugs - provision of due diligence in the treatment process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajdel, Justyna; Zajdel, Radosław

    2013-01-01

    Due diligence in the process of provision of healthcare services refers, among other elements, to the application of pharmacological therapy at a time which offers the greatest chance for a successful outcome of treatment, i.e. for achieving the optimum expected effect understood as an improvement in the patient's health, reduction of health risks or elimination of the disease. However, due diligence may also refer to actions aimed at ensuring that neither the patient nor the healthcare payer is required to incur unreasonable costs in the process of treatment. The validity of that statement stems not only from normative acts but also from ethical standards laid down in the Medical Code of Ethics (Article 57 section 2). It often happens that the provision of optimal treatment calls for deviations from the formal provisions included in Summary Product Characteristics (SPCs), and the application of drugs that are bioequivalent to reference drugs, which translates into a significant reduction of costs. The present study addresses the problem of acceptability of a specific form of drug substitution consisting in the replacement of a reference drug with a generic drug. Also explored are legal aspects associated with the possibility of therapy based on "off-label use". The study reviews normative acts existing in the Polish and EU legislation. It also provides a clear definition of orphan drug, which has made it possible to make a distinction and investigate mutual relations between the concepts of brand-name (reference) drug, orphan drug and generic drug.

  5. Safety of available and emerging drug therapies for hyperhidrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosp, Christine; Hamm, Henning

    2017-09-01

    Hyperhidrosis affects 4.8% of the U.S. population and has been underestimated by physicians for long time despite considerable interference with quality of life. Many patients suffer from primary (idiopathic) hyperhidrosis which results from over-activity of sympathetic nerves and is restricted to specific body areas, mostly the axillae, palms, soles, or head. Secondary hyperhidrosis is caused by an underlying disease or the intake of medications and often involves large parts of the body. Numerous effective therapies with topical or systemic drugs and surgical options are available. Areas covered: Efficacy and safety data on aluminum salts, anticholinergic drugs for topical or systemic application, and on intradermal botulinum toxin injections used to treat hyperhidrosis are critically evaluated, including data from clinical trials with focus on possible side effects and long-term complications in dispute. Expert opinion: Hyperhidrosis often responds well to available therapies. Depending on the type of hyperhidrosis treatment should be topical/local or systemic. Most of the side effects are mild, transient and easily manageable. In case of systemic treatment with anticholinergics low dosing and up-titration of medication is necessary to avoid severe adverse effects. Concerns about the promotion of breast cancer and Alzheimer disease by topical aluminum salts are unsolved.

  6. Comparison of effectiveness of acupuncture therapy and conventional drug therapy on psychological profile of migraine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayalakshmi, I; Shankar, N; Saxena, A; Bhatia, M S

    2014-01-01

    Migraine is a painful condition in which patients suffer from recurrent episodes of disabling pain, which could be very severe and can lead to grave psychological disturbances. There is no curative treatment for migraine, but there are various treatment modalities, though, with conflicting reports on their efficacy. This study was conducted to compare the effectiveness of electro acupuncture therapy and the conventional drug therapy on the psychological profile of migraneurs based on the assessment of quality of life and disability parameters. Migraneurs (n = 60) were recruited from the Psychiatry and Neurology OPD, Guru Tegh Bahadur Hospital, Delhi. Following a written consent, migraneurs were randomly allocated into 2 study groups--Group A received 10 sittings of electro acupuncture on selected acupuncture points over a period of 30 days, while for the same duration the Group D received a conventional drug therapy in the form of oral flunarizine 20 mg OD along with paracetamol 500 mg SOS. The patients were assessed twice, before and after completion of the treatment programme (30 days). The quality of life was assessed with WHOQOL BREF (WHO Quality of Life Biomedical Research and Education Foundation) questionnaire and the disability was assessed with MIDAS (Migraine Disability Assessment) questionnaire. Statistical analysis was performed using repeated measure's ANOVA with Tukey's test. Migraneurs were found to have lower quality of life and higher disability scores but following the treatment regimes, the 2 study groups showed a significant improvement in both the parameters studied. It was however observed, that the acupuncture group showed a better response and was thus found to be more effective as compared to the drug group (P = 0.005 to 0.000). We thus conclude that acupuncture is a better treatment option than the conventional drug therapy in not only relieving the pain of migraine but in also improving the psychological profile in migraneurs. Hence its

  7. Adverse drug reactions associated with antiretroviral therapy during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini-Oliveira, Marilia; Grinsztejn, Beatriz

    2014-12-01

    Antiretroviral (ARV) drug use during pregnancy significantly reduces mother-to-child HIV transmission, delays disease progression in the women and reduces the risk of HIV transmission to HIV-serodiscordant partners. Pregnant women are susceptible to the same adverse reactions to ARVs as nonpregnant adults as well as to specific pregnancy-related reactions. In addition, we should consider adverse pregnancy outcomes and adverse reactions in children exposed to ARVs during intrauterine life. However, studies designed to assess the safety of ARV in pregnant women are rare, usually with few participants and short follow-up periods. In this review, we discuss studies reporting adverse reactions to ARV drugs, including maternal toxicity, adverse pregnancy outcomes and the consequences of exposure to ARV in infants. We included results of observational studies, both prospective and retrospective, as well as randomized clinical trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses. The benefits of ARV use during pregnancy outweigh the risks of adverse reactions identified to date. More studies are needed to assess the adverse effects in the medium- and long term in children exposed to ARVs during pregnancy, as well as pregnant women using lifelong antiretroviral therapy and more recently available drugs.

  8. Malaria therapy in HIV: drug interactions between nevirapine and quinine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uriel, A; Lewthwaite, P

    2011-12-01

    We report the case of an HIV-positive Nigerian man on antiretroviral therapy (ART) with an undetectable viral load who presented with rigors, fever and back pain after returning to the UK from a three-week trip to Nigeria. Infection with Plasmodium falciparum malaria was confirmed and treatment with quinine commenced together with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and clarithromycin for possible respiratory infection. At the time of admission the patient could not remember the names of his ART medications. After 24 hours his parasitaemia had increased from 1% to 2.5% and his clinical condition had deteriorated. At this point, his ART was identified as abacavir, lamivudine and nevirapine. The Liverpool HIV-drug interactions website was checked for drug interactions. It recommends caution in the co-administration of both clarithromycin and quinine with nevirapine. Quinine is metabolized by CYP34A and exposure is likely to be decreased by induction of these enzymes in patients taking nevirapine. Given the clinical deterioration the patient was switched to Malarone® (atovoquone/ proguanil) which has no clinically significant interactions with nevirapine. He responded to treatment and was discharged home after 48 hours. This case highlights the importance of knowing the potential drug interactions with ART and the importance of checking for such interactions when prescribing new medications.

  9. [Current research status of drug therapy for apnea of prematurity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao; Shu, Xian-Xiao; Yang, Xiao-Yan; Shi, Jing; Tang, Jun; Mu, De-Zhi

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the current status of studies on drug therapy for apnea of prematurity (AOP) in the past decade in China and abroad, and to describe the research trends in the field. CNKI and MEDLINE were searched with the key words "apnea of prematurity" and "treatment" for articles published in the past decade (January 2006 to December 2015). The articles were screened and the key words were extracted to establish the co-occurrence matrix. Ucinet 6.2 was used to plot the knowledge map. A total of 26 Chinese key words and 20 English key words were included. Those in the center of the co-existent knowledge map of Chinses keywords were "preterm infants", "apnea", "primary apnea", "naloxone" and "aminophylline"; while "apnea", "preterm infants" and "caffeine" located in the central place of the co-existent knowledge map of English keywords. Methylxanthines are still the major drugs for AOP; however, aminophylline is mainly used in China, while caffeine is mainly used in foreign countries. Other drugs such as naltrexone are also used in the clinical treatment of AOP.

  10. Drug-Drug Interactions Among Hospitalized Children Receiving Chronic Antiepileptic Drug Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebowitz, Mollie Blazar; Olson, Karen L; Burns, Michele; Harper, Marvin B; Bourgeois, Florence

    2016-05-01

    Children treated with chronic medications are at risk of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) when hospitalized with an acute illness and prescribed new medications. We aimed to measure the prevalence of potential DDIs (pDDIs) among hospitalized children treated with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and to evaluate the impact of computerized physician order entry (CPOE) on pDDIs. We analyzed a national sample of pediatric hospitalizations from 2005 to 2012 associated with administration of an AED and identified those prescribed a second medication with risk of a DDI. The prevalence of hospitalizations associated with a pDDI was calculated for each AED. We identified the drugs most commonly implicated in pDDIs and factors associated with pDDIs. Rates of pDDIs were measured in pre- and post-CPOE implementation periods. A pDDI was identified in 181 380 (41.7%) hospitalizations associated with the use of an AED, with 117 880 (27.1%) classified as severe pDDIs. AEDs most often implicated with a pDDI were phenobarbital, valproic acid, and phenytoin. Hospitalizations with pDDIs were associated with increased length of stay and a greater number of medications, ICU admissions, and operating room procedures. The implementation of CPOE did not result in a change in the rate of pDDIs (42.7% before versus 40.8% after; P = .48). Children treated with AEDs are at risk of pDDIs while hospitalized. The use of CPOE has not been associated with a significant decrease in the rate of pDDIs. Additional investigation to better define the impact of pDDIs and to advance development of clinical decision support within CPOE systems is warranted. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics

  11. Clarithromycine-Induced Ventricular Tachycardia in a Geriatric Patient Using Multiple Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulsah Karaoren

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Long QT syndrome is a cardiac repolarization disorder, which can be either idiopathic or congenital, and cause sudden cardiac death. The iatrogenic form is generally associated with drugs or electrolyte imbalance. Although prolonged QT interval is frequently seen due to antiarrhythmic agents, it can also be seen with antibiotics or anti-epileptics. Adverse drug interaction can manifest in several clinicopathological forms in elder individuals. In such cases, potential adverse effects of drugs used should be taken into consideration before prescribing additional drugs. Here, we present a case of clarithromycine-induced ventricular arrhythmia accompanied by QT prolongation on the third day of therapy, and the subsequent therapeutic approach, in a 91-year-old man. The patient was taking multiple drugs due to comorbid conditions and was prescribed clarithromycine therapy in the intensive care unit.

  12. Non-drug therapies for lower limb muscle cramps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyton, Fiona; Chuter, Vivienne; Walter, Kate E L; Burns, Joshua

    2012-01-18

    participants who were advised to continue taking quinine. Forty-nine participants were advised to complete lean-to-wall calf muscle stretching held for 10 s three times per day. Forty-eight participants were allocated to a placebo stretching group. After 12 weeks, there was no statistically significant difference in recalled cramp frequency between groups. No "significant" adverse effect was reported. Limitations in the study's design impede interpretation of the results and clinical applicability. There is limited evidence on which to base clinical decisions regarding the use of non-drug therapies for the treatment of lower limb muscle cramp. Serious methodological limitations in the existing evidence hinder clinical application. There is an urgent need to carefully evaluate many of the commonly recommended and emerging non-drug therapies in well designed randomised controlled trials.

  13. Mathematical modeling of multi-drugs therapy: a challenge for determining the optimal combinations of antiviral drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Yoshiki; Iwami, Shingo

    2014-09-25

    In the current era of antiviral drug therapy, combining multiple drugs is a primary approach for improving antiviral effects, reducing the doses of individual drugs, relieving the side effects of strong antiviral drugs, and preventing the emergence of drug-resistant viruses. Although a variety of new drugs have been developed for HIV, HCV and influenza virus, the optimal combinations of multiple drugs are incompletely understood. To optimize the benefits of multi-drugs combinations, we must investigate the interactions between the combined drugs and their target viruses. Mathematical models of viral infection dynamics provide an ideal tool for this purpose. Additionally, whether drug combinations computed by these models are synergistic can be assessed by two prominent drug combination theories, Loewe additivity and Bliss independence. By combining the mathematical modeling of virus dynamics with drug combination theories, we could show the principles by which drug combinations yield a synergistic effect. Here, we describe the theoretical aspects of multi-drugs therapy and discuss their application to antiviral research.

  14. Novel drugs targeting Toll-like receptors for antiviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mira C; Shirey, Kari Ann; Pletneva, Lioubov M; Boukhvalova, Marina S; Garzino-Demo, Alfredo; Vogel, Stefanie N; Blanco, Jorge Cg

    2014-09-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are sentinel receptors of the host innate immune system that recognize conserved 'pathogen-associated molecular patterns' of invading microbes, including viruses. The activation of TLRs establishes antiviral innate immune responses and coordinates the development of long-lasting adaptive immunity in order to control viral pathogenesis. However, microbe-induced damage to host tissues may release 'danger-associated molecular patterns' that also activate TLRs, leading to an overexuberant inflammatory response and, ultimately, to tissue damage. Thus, TLRs have proven to be promising targets as therapeutics for the treatment of viral infections that result in inflammatory damage or as adjuvants in order to enhance the efficacy of vaccines. Here, we explore recent advances in TLR biology with a focus on novel drugs that target TLRs (agonists and antagonists) for antiviral therapy.

  15. [Cognitive-behavioral therapy for alcohol and drug use disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangé, Bernard P; Marlatt, G Alan

    2008-10-01

    Cognitive-behavioral therapies have been successfully used to treat addiction. This article is in part a review on addiction models such as relapse prevention by Marlatt & Gordon, stages of change by Prochaska, DiClemente & Norcross, deriving from motivational interview, developed by Miller & Rollnick, as well as the cognitive models by Beck et al. Based on literature evidence for the development of effective treatment programs, we report on a group treatment model used in a group of alcoholics referred by the Department of Worker's Health Surveillance at Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro to the Alcoholism Rehabilitation and Research Center. Results are presented indicating that this type of treatment could be one alternative to others treatments in use. New research is needed to better validate cognitive-behavioral approach to alcohol and drug problems.

  16. Biologic Drugs: A New Target Therapy in COPD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousuf, Ahmed; Brightling, Christopher E

    2018-04-23

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a heterogeneous disease associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Current diagnostic criteria based on the presence of fixed airflow obstruction and symptoms do not integrate the complex pathological changes occurring within the lung and they do not define different airway inflammatory patterns. The current management of COPD is based on 'one size fits all' approach and does not take the importance of heterogeneity in COPD population into account. The available treatments aim to alleviate symptoms and reduce exacerbation frequency but do not alter the course of the disease. Recent advances in molecular biology have furthered our understanding of inflammatory pathways in pathogenesis of COPD and have led to development of targeted therapies (biologics and small molecules) based on predefined biomarkers. Herein we shall review the trials of biologics in COPD and potential future drug developments in the field.

  17. Comparison of health-related quality of life in patients with atrial fibrillation treated with catheter ablation or antiarrhythmic drug therapy: a systematic review and meta-analysis protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Allan, Katherine S; Henry, Shaunattonie; Aves, Theresa; Banfield, Laura; Victor, J Charles; Dorian, Paul; Healey, Jeff S; Andrade, Jason; Carroll, Sandra; McGillion, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most prevalent cardiac arrhythmia and causes patients considerable burden; symptoms such as palpitations and dyspnoea are common, leading to frequent emergency room visits. Patients with AF report reduced health-related quality of life (HQOL) compared with the general population; thus, treatments focus on the restoration of sinus rhythm to improve symptoms. Catheter ablation (CA) is a primary treatment strategy to treat AF-related burden in select ...

  18. Dofetilide: a new drug to control cardiac arrhythmia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elming, Hanne; Brendorp, Bente; Pedersen, Ole Dyg

    2003-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia. Mortality, and especially morbidity caused by AF, are major and growing health problems in the western world. AF is strongly associated with arterial hypertension, congestive heart failure, valvular heart disease, ischaemic heart...... disease, and with prevalence increasing with age. A variety of drugs have been used to terminate or prevent AF but, as many antiarrhythmic agents have the potential life-threatening pro-arrhythmia, safety problems remain. Dofetilide (Tikosyn, Pfizer), a new Vaughan Williams class III antiarrhythmic agent...... and betablockers, dofetilide is the only antiarrhythmic drug, which is recommended by guidelines for the treatment of AF in a wide range of patients....

  19. Challenges and Future in Vaccines, Drug Development, and Immunomodulatory Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nau, Gerard J.; Ross, Ted M.; Evans, Thomas G.; Chakraborty, Krishnendu; Empey, Kerry M.; Flynn, JoAnne L.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary diseases and infections are among the top contributors to human morbidity and mortality worldwide, and despite the successful history of vaccines and antimicrobial therapeutics, infectious disease still presents a significant threat to human health. Effective vaccines are frequently unavailable in developing countries, and successful vaccines have yet to be developed for major global maladies, such as tuberculosis. Furthermore, antibiotic resistance poses a growing threat to human health. The “Challenges and Future in Vaccines, Drug Development, and Immunomodulatory Therapy” session of the 2013 Pittsburgh International Lung Conference highlighted several recent and current studies related to treatment and prevention of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections, highly pathogenic influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, and tuberculosis. Research presented here focused on novel antimicrobial therapies, new vaccines that are either in development or currently in clinical trials, and the potential for immunomodulatory therapies. These studies are making important contributions to the areas of microbiology, virology, and immunology related to pulmonary diseases and infections and are paving the way for improvements in the efficacy of vaccines and antimicrobials. PMID:25148426

  20. Mitochondrial ROS and cancer drug resistance: Implications for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okon, Imoh S; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2015-10-01

    Under physiological conditions, a well-coordinated and balanced redox system exists to ensure that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are appropriately utilized to accomplish specific functions, such as signaling and protein regulation. The influence of ROS within malignant cells, whether for good or bad may depend on several factors, such as tumor and tissue type, disease stage, treatment strategy, as well as duration, specificity and levels of ROS. What then are the known roles of ROS in cancer? Firstly, ROS significantly impacts cancer phenotypes. Secondly, the oxidative ROS property responsible for killing cancer cells, also impact secondary signaling networks. Thirdly, a strong correlation exist between ROS and genetic instability which may promote mutations. Finally, emerging observations suggest a role for mitochondrial ROS in cancer drug resistance, with implications for therapy. The mitochondria is a key regulator of metabolic-redox (meta-redox) alterations within cancer cells. Like a double-edged sword, mitochondrial ROS perturbations in cancer therapy may be beneficial or detrimental. However, harnessing ROS-specific cancer-targeting benefits remain a major challenge. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Cancer therapy with drug loaded magnetic nanoparticles-magnetic drug targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexiou, Christoph; Tietze, Rainer; Schreiber, Eveline; Jurgons, Roland; Richter, Heike; Trahms, Lutz; Rahn, Helene; Odenbach, Stefan; Lyer, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The aim of magnetic drug targeting (MDT) in cancer therapy is to concentrate chemotherapeutics to a tumor region while simultaneously the overall dose is reduced. This can be achieved with coated superparamagnetic nanoparticles bound to a chemotherapeutic agent. These particles are applied intra arterially close to the tumor region and focused to the tumor by a strong external magnetic field. The interaction of the particles with the field gradient leads to an accumulation in the region of interest (i.e. tumor). The particle enrichment and thereby the drug-load in the tumor during MDT has been proven by several analytical and imaging methods. Moreover, in pilot studies we investigated in an experimental in vivo tumor model the effectiveness of this approach. Complete tumor regressions without any negative side effects could be observed. - Research Highlights: →Iron oxide nanoparticles can be enriched in tumors by external magnetic fields. → Histology evidences the intravasation of particles enter the intracellular space. → Non-invasive imaging techniques can display the spatial arrangement of particles. → HPLC-analysis show outstanding drug enrichment in tumors after MDT.

  2. Nanomedicine of synergistic drug combinations for cancer therapy - Strategies and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui Xue; Wong, Ho Lun; Xue, Hui Yi; Eoh, June Young; Wu, Xiao Yu

    2016-10-28

    Nanomedicine of synergistic drug combinations has shown increasing significance in cancer therapy due to its promise in providing superior therapeutic benefits to the current drug combination therapy used in clinical practice. In this article, we will examine the rationale, principles, and advantages of applying nanocarriers to improve anticancer drug combination therapy, review the use of nanocarriers for delivery of a variety of combinations of different classes of anticancer agents including small molecule drugs and biologics, and discuss the challenges and future perspectives of the nanocarrier-based combination therapy. The goal of this review is to provide better understanding of this increasingly important new paradigm of cancer treatment and key considerations for rational design of nanomedicine of synergistic drug combinations for cancer therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The application of prodrug-based nano-drug delivery strategy in cancer combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yanxiu; Ma, Yakun; Li, Lingbing

    2016-10-01

    Single drug therapy that leads to the multidrug resistance of cancer cells and severe side-effect is a thing of the past. Combination therapies that affect multiple signaling pathways have been the focus of recent active research. Due to the successful development of prodrug-based nano-drug delivery systems (P-N-DDSs), their use has been extended to combination therapy as drug delivery platforms. In this review, we focus specifically on the P-N-DDSs in the field of combination therapy including the combinations of prodrugs with different chemotherapeutic agents, other therapeutic agents, nucleic acid or the combination of different types of therapy (e.g. chemotherapy and phototherapy). The relevant examples of prodrug-based nanoparticulate drug delivery strategy in combination cancer therapy from the recent literature are discussed to demonstrate the feasibilities of relevant technology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. [Morbidity spectrum and drug therapy of homeless persons in Munich].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egen, V

    1998-01-01

    In Germany there are currently approx. 200,000 homeless single people, and the trend is rising. As a result of the situation in which they find themselves, many of these persons are ill and in need of medical treatment. A study was performed in Munich/Germany, focussing on a medical practice providing care for the homeless, to investigate their illnesses and pharmacological therapy. The medical practice was located in a municipal shelter. Each year about 350 different destitute homeless men--about 15 per cent of all single homeless people in Munich--were cared for. The men, whose ages ranged from about 17 to 74 years were single and the majority lived in shelters, bed and breakfast accommodations, or shared apartments. About ten per cent lived on the street. For the study, 171 randomly selected medical records were analysed for the period of July 1994 to June 1995. The homeless men suffered principally from the following illnesses: psychiatric illnesses (36%), infectious and parasitic diseases (31%), skin diseases (30%), injuries (29%), diseases of the skeleton, of the muscles and of the connective tissues (28%), diseases of the respiratory organs (27%), cardiovascular diseases (24%), and diseases of the digestive organs (17%). Seventy-five per cent of the patients received drug treatment. In the case of 37% of the patients, wounds were treated and dressed in the medical practice itself. The most frequently prescribed drugs were: analgesics (12%), antibiotics (10%), antihypertensives (10%), gastrointestinal treatments (9%), treatments for colds (9%), and dermatopharmacological preparations (6%). It was surprising that only 16% of the psychic ill patients were treated with drugs, while over 60% of the other illnesses were mostly treated pharmacologically. The interaction with alcohol was the reason for that. The study showed that the practice did not sufficiently reach women and homeless people living on the street. The homeless situation, the personal and social

  5. [Drug susceptibility test guided therapy and novel empirical quadruple therapy for Helicobacter pylori infection: a network Meta-analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Q Y; Yu, R B; Shi, R H

    2017-05-10

    Objective: To compare the efficacy and the risk of adverse effect of drug susceptibility test guided therapy and novel empirical quadruple therapy for Helicobacter ( H .) pylori infection. Methods: Literature retrieval was conducted by using major databases. Related papers published up to June 2015 were considered eligible if they were randomized control trials comparing different pharmacological formulations for H. pylori infection and used in a network Meta-analysis and a single rate Meta-analysis to evaluate the relative and absolute rates of H. pylori eradication and the risk of adverse effect. The Jadad score was used to evaluate the methodological quality. Funnel plot was constructed to evaluate the risk of publication bias. Begg's rank correlation test or Egger's regression intercept test was done for the asymmetry of funnel plot. Results: Twenty randomized control trials for the treatment of 6 753 initial treated patients with H. pylori infection were included. Drug susceptibility test guided therapy was significantly superior to concomitant therapy, hybrid therapy, sequential therapy and bismuth quadruple therapy. The culture-based therapy had the highest likelihood of improving clinical efficacy, with lowest risk of adverse effect. Concomitant therapy had the highest probability of causing adverse effect despite its effectiveness. Hybrid therapy and bismuth quadruple therapy were associated with lower risk of adverse effect and higher effectiveness. Conclusion: Drug susceptibility test guided therapy showed superiority to other 4 interventions for H. pylori eradication mentioned above. Hybrid therapy and bismuth quadruple therapy might be applied in the settings where the culture-based strategy is not available.

  6. Affordable HIV drug-resistance testing for monitoring of antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inzaule, Seth C.; Ondoa, Pascale; Peter, Trevor; Mugyenyi, Peter N.; Stevens, Wendy S.; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Hamers, Raph L.

    2016-01-01

    Increased provision of antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan Africa has led to a growing number of patients with therapy failure and acquired drug-resistant HIV, driving the demand for more costly further lines of antiretroviral therapy. In conjunction with accelerated access to viral load

  7. Diabetes Insipidus: A Challenging Diagnosis with New Drug Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saifan, Chadi; Nasr, Rabih; Mehta, Suchita; Sharma Acharya, Pranab; Perrera, Isera; Faddoul, Giovanni; Nalluri, Nikhil; Kesavan, Mayurakhan; Azzi, Yorg; El-Sayegh, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes Insipidus (DI) is either due to deficient secretion of arginine vasopressin (central) or to tubular unresponsiveness (nephrogenic). Drug induced DI is a well-known entity with an extensive list of medications. Polyuria is generally defined as urine output exceeding 3 liters per day in adults. It is crucial to identify the cause of diabetes insipidus and to implement therapy as early as possible to prevent the electrolyte disturbances and the associated mortality and morbidity. It is very rare to have an idiosyncratic effect after a short use of a medication, and physicians should be aware of such a complication to avoid volume depletion. The diagnosis of diabetes insipidus is very challenging because it relies on laboratory values, urine output, and the physical examination of the patient. A high clinical suspicion of diabetes insipidus should be enough to initiate treatment. The complications related to DI are mostly related to the electrolyte imbalance that can affect the normal physiology of different organ systems. PMID:24977135

  8. Antiarrhythmic and electrophysiologic effects of flecainide on acutely induced atrial fibrillation in healthy horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Maria Mathilde; Pehrson, S.; Carstensen, Helena

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Only few pharmacologic compounds have been validated for treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) in horses. Studies investigating the utility and safety of flecainide to treat AF in horses have produced conflicting results, and the antiarrhythmic mechanisms of flecainide are not fully...

  9. Persistent human cardiac Na+ currents in stably transfected mammalian cells: Robust expression and distinct open-channel selectivity among Class 1 antiarrhythmics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ging Kuo; Russell, Gabriella; Wang, Sho-Ya

    2013-01-01

    Miniature persistent late Na(+) currents in cardiomyocytes have been linked to arrhythmias and sudden death. The goals of this study are to establish a stable cell line expressing robust persistent cardiac Na(+) currents and to test Class 1 antiarrhythmic drugs for selective action against resting and open states. After transient transfection of an inactivation-deficient human cardiac Na(+) channel clone (hNav1.5-CW with L409C/A410W double mutations), transfected mammalian HEK293 cells were treated with 1 mg/ml G-418. Individual G-418-resistant colonies were isolated using glass cylinders. One colony with high expression of persistent Na(+) currents was subjected to a second colony selection. Cells from this colony remained stable in expressing robust peak Na(+) currents of 996 ± 173 pA/pF at +50 mV (n = 20). Persistent late Na(+) currents in these cells were clearly visible during a 4-second depolarizing pulse albeit decayed slowly. This slow decay is likely due to slow inactivation of Na(+) channels and could be largely eliminated by 5 μM batrachotoxin. Peak cardiac hNav1.5-CW Na(+) currents were blocked by tetrodotoxin with an IC(50) value of 2.27 ± 0.08 μM (n = 6). At clinic relevant concentrations, Class 1 antiarrhythmics are much more selective in blocking persistent late Na(+) currents than their peak counterparts, with a selectivity ratio ranging from 80.6 (flecainide) to 3 (disopyramide). We conclude that (1) Class 1 antiarrhythmics differ widely in their resting- vs. open-channel selectivity, and (2) stably transfected HEK293 cells expressing large persistent hNav1.5-CW Na(+) currents are suitable for studying as well as screening potent open-channel blockers.

  10. REHABILITATION THERAPY VERSUS DRUG THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH LUMBAR DISC DEGENERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BROSCATEAN, Emanuela-Flavia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar disc degeneration is a disorder whose clinical manifestations are represented by episodic pain in the lumbar spine, without lumbar blockage and minor muscle contraction. Because lumbalgia caused by lumbar disc degeneration is not always very high intensity pain, the easiest to apply treatment is drug therapy. The aim of this study was to analyze the potential role of rehabilitation treatment in the recovery of patients and the prevention of complications compared to drug therapy alone. The study included 28 patients (17 women and 11 men aged between 23-60 years, assigned to two groups: 20 patients who received rehabilitation treatment (consisting of massage, kinesiotherapy, hydrokinesiotherapy, electrotherapy and medication and 8 patients who received drug treatment consisting of anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs. The treatment duration was 10 days. For the evaluation of pain, the visual analogue scale was used, for the degree of disability, the Oswestry questionnaire, and for joint mobility and muscle strength, articular and muscular testing. At the end of treatment, the study group compared to the control group had a statistically significant result for pain (p=0.001, as well as for the Oswestry score (p=0.030. The mean age of the patients was 35.51±3.026, which shows an increased incidence among young adults. A possible connection between the development of the disease in women and age less than 45 years was also investigated, but the result was not statistically significant, p=0.22. Our data suggest the fact that rehabilitation treatment plays an important role in the reduction of pain and the improvement of the quality of life of patients with lumbar disc degeneration by decreasing the degree of disability. In the future, it can be proposed to monitor patients with lumbar disc degeneration over a longer time period in order to see the effects of kinetic rehabilitation programs in relation to the delay of chronicization. As

  11. Drug therapy for people with mental disorders in the view of nursing professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Bonfim de Alcântara

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To identify the perception of nursing professionals about drug therapy for people with mental disorders. Methods: An exploratory qualitative research was carried out in four Psychosocial Care Centers of Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil. Data, collected from January to March 2015 using an individual semi-structured interview applied to 56 nursing professionals, were submitted to qualitative data analysis and interpretation as proposed by Creswell. Results: The data were organized into three thematic categories: drug therapy improves the life of the person with a mental disorder; negative and positive consequences related to drug therapy; and drug therapy as one of the resources needed to treat mental health. Conclusion: Nursing staff perceive the importance of medications as a resource to treat people with mental disorders as psychotropic drugs minimize he acute symptoms of disorders and improve living conditions when associated with other therapeutic resources.

  12. Locoregional cancer therapy using polymer-based drug depots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramazani, F.; van Nostrum, C.F.; Storm, Gerrit; Kiessling, F.; Lammers, Twan Gerardus Gertudis Maria; Hennink, W.E.; Kok, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    Locoregional delivery of anticancer drugs is an attractive approach to minimize adverse effects associated with intravenous chemotherapy. Polymer-based drug depots injected or implanted intratumorally or adjacent to the tumor can provide long-term local drug exposure. This review highlights studies

  13. [Comparing the effects of drug therapy, physical therapy, and exercise on pain, disability, and depression in patients with chronic low back pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ja Kyung

    2007-08-01

    This research was conducted to compare the effects of drug therapy, physical therapy, and exercise on pain, disability, and depression in patients with chronic low back pain. The research design of this study was a nonequivalent control group pretest-posttest design. The subjects of this study were 28 patients for the drug therapy & physical therapy, 24 patients for the drug therapy & exercise, and 22 patients for the physical therapy & exercise. Data was collected by MVAS, Oswestry disability questionnaires, and questionnaires of depression. It was analyzed by paired t-test for effectiveness, ANOVA, and Scheffe for comparison of the effects of the 3 experimental treatments, using SPSS/WIN 12.0. There were no effects of drug therapy & physical therapy on pain, disability, and depression. However, there were effects of drug therapy & exercise and the physical therapy & exercise on pain, disability, and depression. The effects of physical therapy & exercise on pain, disability, and depression were the greatest, but there was no statistically significant differences between the drug therapy & exercise and the physical therapy & exercise. Exercise is regarded as a more effective and easily accessible nursing intervention to apply alone than drug therapy or physical therapy simultaneously in reducing pain, disability and depression.

  14. Biomarker-guided repurposing of chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenvang, Jan; Kümler, Iben; Nygård, Sune Boris

    2013-01-01

    are often quite expensive, laden with severe side-effects and unfortunately, to date, have only demonstrated minimal increases in overall survival. Therefore, a strong interest has emerged to identify approved non-cancer drugs that possess anti-cancer activity, thus shortcutting the development process......Cancer is a leading cause of mortality worldwide and matters are only set to worsen as its incidence continues to rise. Traditional approaches to combat cancer include improved prevention, early diagnosis, optimized surgery, development of novel drugs, and honing regimens of existing anti......-cancer drugs. Although discovery and development of novel and effective anti-cancer drugs is a major research area, it is well known that oncology drug development is a lengthy process, extremely costly and with high attrition rates. Furthermore, those drugs that do make it through the drug development mill...

  15. Dofetilide: a new drug to control cardiac arrhythmia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elming, Hanne; Brendorp, Bente; Pedersen, Ole Dyg

    2003-01-01

    , has been developed and approved for the treatment of AF. In contrast to most antiarrhythmic agents, the development programme included two safety studies in high-risk patients. Dofetilide is effective and safe when an elaborate procedure for dosing is implemented. Along with amiodarone...... and betablockers, dofetilide is the only antiarrhythmic drug, which is recommended by guidelines for the treatment of AF in a wide range of patients....... disease, and with prevalence increasing with age. A variety of drugs have been used to terminate or prevent AF but, as many antiarrhythmic agents have the potential life-threatening pro-arrhythmia, safety problems remain. Dofetilide (Tikosyn, Pfizer), a new Vaughan Williams class III antiarrhythmic agent...

  16. What’s in a Name? Student Pharmacists’ Novel Extracurricular Process of Drug Therapy Reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenric B. Ware

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Fostering excitement in pharmacy student learning can be achieved through reinforcing drug therapies in curricular and extracurricular endeavors. This paper described an extracurricular initiative that elevated awareness of drug therapy in its current, future, and past members. This process occurred on an annual basis. Upon invitation, participants were expected to attend meetings with current and graduate organizational members. These settings provided opportunities for recognition and remembrance of organizational history and drug therapies. Checkpoints were inserted to verify progression towards full membership. The primary role of graduate members in this process was the yielding of their professional insights. A student – led, peer – facilitated model of drug therapy exposure along these lines resonates with calls for increased innovative learning strategies.

  17. Polypathology, polypharmacy, medication regimen complexity and drug therapy appropriateness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Aguirre, N; Caudevilla Martínez, A; Bellostas Muñoz, L; Crespo Avellana, M; Velilla Marco, J; Díez-Manglano, J

    Polypathological patients are usually elderly and take numerous drugs. Polypharmacy affects 85% of these individuals and is not associated with greater survival. On the contrary, polypharmacy exposes these individuals to more adverse effects, such as weight loss, falls, functional and cognitive impairment and hospitalisations. The complexity of a drug regimen covers more aspects than the simple number of drugs consumed. The galenic form, the dosage and the method for preparing the drug can impede the understanding of and compliance with prescriptions. Both polypharmacy and therapeutic complexity are associated with poorer adherence by patients. To prevent polypharmacy, reduce complexity and improve adherence, the appropriate use of drugs is needed. Proper prescribing consists of selecting drugs that have clear evidence for their use in the indication, which are appropriate for the patient's circumstances, are well tolerated and cost-effective and whose benefits outweigh the risks. To improve the drug prescription, periodic reviews of the drugs need to be conducted, especially when the patient changes doctor and during healthcare transitions. The Beers and STOPP/START (Screening Tool of Older Person's potentially inappropriate Prescriptions/Screening Tool to Alert doctors to the Right Treatment) criteria are effective tools for this improvement. Deprescription for polymedicated polypathological patients that considers their clinical circumstances, prognosis and preferences can contribute to a more appropriate use of drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  18. Anticancer drug development from traditional cytotoxic to targeted therapies: evidence of shorter drug research and development time, and shorter drug lag in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata-Shoda, E; Masuda, S; Kimura, H

    2012-10-01

    Concern about the drug lag, the delay in marketing approval between one country and another, for anticancer drugs has increased in Japan. Although a number of studies have investigated the drug lag, none has investigated it in relation to the transition of anticancer therapy from traditional cytotoxic drugs to molecularly targeted agents. Our aim was to investigate current trend in oncology drug lag between the US and Japan and identify oncology drugs approved in only one of the two countries. Publicly and commercially available data sources were used to identify drugs approved in the US and Japan as of 31 December 2010 and the data used to calculate the drug lag for individual drugs. Fifty-one drugs were approved in both the US and Japan, whereas 34 and 19 drugs were approved only in the US or Japan, respectively. Of the 19 drugs approved only in Japan, 12 had not been subject to development for a cancer indication in the US, and all were approved before 1996 in Japan. Of the 34 drugs approved only in the US, 20 had not been subject to development in Japan, and none was in the top 25 by annual US anticancer drug-class sales. For drugs approved in both countries, the mean approval lag of the molecularly targeted drugs (MTDs) was significantly shorter than that of the non-molecularly targeted drugs (non-MTDs) (3·3 vs. 5·4 years). Further, mean R&D time of the MTDs was significantly shorter than that of non-MTDs (10·0 vs. 13·7 years). The price of MTDs had increased on average by 6·6% annually in the US, whereas it had decreased on average by 4·3% biyearly in Japan. The emergence of new molecularly targeted agents has contributed to reducing the approval lag, most likely due to improvements in R&D strategy. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Innovative Antiarrhythmic Strategies in the Chronic Atrioventricular Block Dog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossu, Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death represents a major cause of mortality in Western countries and is often caused by ventricular fibrillation. This life-threatening arrhythmia can occur upon maladaptive cardiac remodelling like in heart failure, or can be favoured by drug-induced adverse effects such as Torsade

  20. Family Therapy for Drug Abuse: Review and Updates 2003-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    Just 15 years ago, Liddle and Dakof ("Journal of Marital and Family Therapy," 1995; 21, 511) concluded, based on the available evidence, that family therapy represented a "promising, but not definitive" approach for the treatment of drug problems among adolescents and adults. Seven years later, Rowe and Liddle (2003) review described considerable…

  1. Reasons for Change of Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART) Drugs: Local ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) reduces morbidity and mortality in HIV/AIDS infected patients. HAART is used indefinitely and the regimens are changed over the course of treatment due to resistance, adverse drug reactions or access to drugs. Few studies have been done in resource constrained ...

  2. Functional Family Therapy for Young People in Treatment for Nonopioid Drug Use: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filges, Trine; Andersen, Ditte; Jørgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: This review evaluates the evidence on the effects of functional family therapy (FFT) on drug abuse reduction for young people in treatment for nonopioid drug use. Data and Analysis: We followed Campbell Collaboration guidelines to conduct a systematic review of randomized and nonrandomized trials. Results: The search yielded two…

  3. Cognitive-Behavioural Therapies for Young People in Outpatient Treatment for NonOpioid Drug Use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filges, Trine; Jørgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This review evaluates the evidence on the effects of cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) on drug use reduction for young people in treatment for nonopioid drug use. Method: We followed Campbell Collaboration guidelines to conduct a systematic review of randomized and nonrandomized trials...

  4. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapies for Young People in Outpatient Treatment for Nonopioid Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filges, Trine; Jorgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: This review evaluates the evidence on the effects of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) on drug use reduction for young people in treatment for nonopioid drug use. Method: We followed Campbell Collaboration guidelines to conduct a systematic review of randomized and nonrandomized trials. Meta-analytic methods were used to…

  5. Behavioral couples therapy (BCT) for alcohol and drug use disorders: A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Powers, M.B.; Vedel, E.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.

    2008-01-01

    Narrative reviews conclude that behavioral couples therapy (BCT) produces better outcomes than individual-based treatment for alcoholism and drug abuse problems (e.g., [Epstein, E. E., & McCrady, B. S. (1998). Behavioral couples treatment of alcohol and drug use disorders: Current status and

  6. Brief Strategic Family Therapy for Young People in Treatment for Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrøm, Maia; Filges, Trine; Jørgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This review evaluates the evidence on the effects of brief strategic family therapy (BSFT) on drug use reduction for young people in treatment for nonopioid drug use. Method: We followed Campbell Collaboration guidelines to prepare this review and ultimately located three studies for final analysis and interpretation. Results: The results…

  7. ANTIMALARIAL DRUGS IN THERAPY OF SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS: PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Andreyevna Lisitsyna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The data available in the literature on experience in using antimalarial drugs in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus are summarized. A major emphasis is placed on therapy with hydroxychlorochine (plaquenil versus chlorine. Possible mechanisms of action of the drug and its effect on the course of the disease itself and concomitant abnormalities are described. Data on the toxicity of the drug and its safe use in pregnancy and lactation are also discussed

  8. Episcleritis Related to Drug-Induced Lupus Erythematosus following Infliximab Therapy: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Chatziralli, Irini P.; Kanonidou, Evgenia; Chatzirallis, Alexandros; Dimitriadis, Prodromos; Keryttopoulos, Petros

    2011-01-01

    Drug-induced lupus erythematosus is defined as a lupus-like syndrome temporally related to continuous drug exposure which resolves after discontinuation of the offending drug. Herein, we describe a patient with distinct clinical manifestations of anti-TNF-associated DILE related to infliximab therapy. The patient exhibited clinical and laboratory findings of lupus-like illnesses as well as ocular disorders, such as episcleritis. The main message is that the symptoms of DILE should not be over...

  9. ANTIMALARIAL DRUGS IN THERAPY OF SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS: PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE

    OpenAIRE

    Tatyana Andreyevna Lisitsyna; N M Kosheleva

    2010-01-01

    The data available in the literature on experience in using antimalarial drugs in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus are summarized. A major emphasis is placed on therapy with hydroxychlorochine (plaquenil) versus chlorine. Possible mechanisms of action of the drug and its effect on the course of the disease itself and concomitant abnormalities are described. Data on the toxicity of the drug and its safe use in pregnancy and lactation are also discussed

  10. Boosting immunity by antiviral drug therapy: A simple relationship among timing, efficacy, and success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarova, Natalia L.; Barnes, Eleanor; Klenerman, Paul; Wodarz, Dominik

    2003-02-01

    Drug therapies against persistent human infections such as hepatitis C virus, hepatitis B virus, and HIV fail to consistently eradicate the infection from the host. Hence, recent emphasis has shifted to the study of antiviral therapy aimed at boosting specific immune responses. It was argued that structured therapy interruptions were required to achieve this, because such regimes have shown promising results in early HIV infection. Using mathematical models, we show that, contrary to this notion, a single phase of drug therapy can result in the establishment of sustained immunity. We present a simple relationship between timing of therapy and efficacy of the drugs required for success. In the presence of strong viral suppression, we show that therapy should be stopped relatively early, and that a longer duration of treatment leads to failure. On the other hand, in the presence of weaker viral suppression, stopping treatment too early is detrimental, and therapy has to be continued beyond a time threshold. We discuss our modeling results primarily in the context of HCV therapy during chronic infection. Although the therapy regimes explored here also have implications for HIV, virus-mediated destruction of specific immune cells renders success unlikely during the chronic phase of the infection.

  11. Use of Gestalt Therapy Within a Drug Treatment Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideroff, Stephen I.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a Gestalt therapeutic approach that has shown promise within a drug treatment program. The major issues discussed include the acquisition of self-support, taking responsibility, dealing with anxiety, contact, and the expression of pent-up feelings. (Author)

  12. Impact of clinical pharmacist on cost of drug therapy in the ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljbouri, Tareq M; Alkhawaldeh, Mohammed S; Abu-Rumman, Ala'a Eddeen K; Hasan, Thamer A; Khattar, Hakeem M; Abu-Oliem, Atallah S

    2013-10-01

    To determine whether the presence of Clinical Pharmacist affects the cost of drug therapy for patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) at Al-Hussein hospital at Royal Medical Services in Amman, Jordan. This study compares the consumed quantities of drugs over two periods of time. Each period was ten months long. In the second period there was a Clinical Pharmacist. The decrease in consumption rate of drugs is considered to be an indicator of the success of Clinical Pharmacist in the ICU, as any decrease in consumption rate reflects the correct application of Clinical Pharmacy practices. The cost of this decrease in consumption rate represents the total reduction of drug therapy cost. The total reduction of drug therapy cost after applying Clinical Pharmacy practices in the ICU over a period of ten months was 149946.80 JD (211574.90 USD), which represents an average saving of 35.8% when compared to the first period in this study. The results of this study showed a significant reduction in the consumed quantities of drugs and therefore a reduction in cost of drug therapy. Such findings highlight the importance of the presence of Clinical Pharmacist in all Jordanian hospitals wards and units.

  13. Nanomedicine-based combination anticancer therapy between nucleic acids and small-molecular drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Chen, Liqing; Kang, Lin; Jin, Mingji; Sun, Ping; Xin, Xin; Gao, Zhonggao; Bae, You Han

    2017-06-01

    Anticancer therapy has always been a vital challenge for the development of nanomedicine. Repeated single therapeutic agent may lead to undesirable and severe side effects, unbearable toxicity and multidrug resistance due to complex nature of tumor. Nanomedicine-based combination anticancer therapy can synergistically improve antitumor outcomes through multiple-target therapy, decreasing the dose of each therapeutic agent and reducing side effects. There are versatile combinational anticancer strategies such as chemotherapeutic combination, nucleic acid-based co-delivery, intrinsic sensitive and extrinsic stimulus combinational patterns. Based on these combination strategies, various nanocarriers and drug delivery systems were engineered to carry out the efficient co-delivery of combined therapeutic agents for combination anticancer therapy. This review focused on illustrating nanomedicine-based combination anticancer therapy between nucleic acids and small-molecular drugs for synergistically improving anticancer efficacy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Access to antiepileptic drug therapy in children in Camagüey Province, Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arencibia, Zeina Bárzaga; Leyva, Alberto López; Peña, Yordanka Mejías; Reyes, Alba Rosa González; Nápolez, Maurilys Acosta; Carbonell Perdomo, Demetrio; Manzano, Edita Fernández; Choonara, Imti

    2012-01-01

    Objective To describe access to antiepileptic drug therapy and estimate the prevalence of epilepsy in children in Camagüey Province, Cuba. Methods All the community pharmacies in the province were visited and information collected about the number of children receiving antiepileptic drugs in 2009. Availability and cost of each antiepileptic drug were determined. The prevalence of epilepsy was estimated by determining the number of children receiving antiepileptic drugs. Results There were 923 children who received a total of 977 antiepileptic drugs in Camagüey Province. The estimated prevalence of epilepsy was 5.18 per thousand children which is lower than previously reported rates in other low and lower-middle income countries. Most of the children (871, 94%) received a single antiepileptic drug. Carbamazepine and valproate were the two most frequently prescribed antiepileptic drugs. Antiepileptic drugs were available from the local pharmacy on 76% of occasions. If the antiepileptic drug was not available from the local pharmacy, the parent had to travel to another pharmacy to obtain the medicine. Conclusions The estimated prevalence of epilepsy in children in Cuba is lower than that estimated in other lower-middle income countries. Access to drug therapy in children with epilepsy can be achieved in lower-middle income countries. PMID:23134098

  15. Target Nanoparticles for Therapy - SANS and DLS of Drug Carrier Liposomes and Polymer Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawroth, T.; Johnson, R.; Krebs, L.; Khoshakhlagh, P.; Langguth, P.; Hellmann, N.; Goerigk, G.; Boesecke, P.; Bravin, A.; Le Duc, G.; Szekely, N.; Schweins, R.

    2016-09-01

    T arget Nano-Pharmaceutics shall improve therapy and diagnosis of severe diseases, e.g. cancer, by individual targeting of drug-loaded nano-pharmaceuticals towards cancer cells, and drug uptake receptors in other diseases. Specific ligands, proteins or cofactors, which are recognized by the diseased cells or cells of food and drug uptake, are bound to the nanoparticle surface, and thus capable of directing the drug carriers. The strategy has two branches: a) for parenteral cancer medicine a ligand set (2-5 different, surface-linked) are selected according to the biopsy analysis of the patient tissue e.g. from tumor.; b) in the oral drug delivery part the drug transport is enforced by excipients/ detergents in combination with targeting materials for cellular receptors resulting in an induced drug uptake. Both targeting nanomaterials are characterized by a combination of SANS + DLS and SAXS or ASAXS in a feedback process during development by synthesis, nanoparticle assembly and formulation.

  16. Target Nanoparticles for Therapy - SANS and DLS of Drug Carrier Liposomes and Polymer Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawroth, T; Johnson, R; Krebs, L; Khoshakhlagh, P; Langguth, P; Hellmann, N; Goerigk, G; Boesecke, P; Bravin, A; Duc, G Le; Szekely, N; Schweins, R

    2016-01-01

    T arget Nano-Pharmaceutics shall improve therapy and diagnosis of severe diseases, e.g. cancer, by individual targeting of drug-loaded nano-pharmaceuticals towards cancer cells, and drug uptake receptors in other diseases. Specific ligands, proteins or cofactors, which are recognized by the diseased cells or cells of food and drug uptake, are bound to the nanoparticle surface, and thus capable of directing the drug carriers. The strategy has two branches: a) for parenteral cancer medicine a ligand set (2-5 different, surface-linked) are selected according to the biopsy analysis of the patient tissue e.g. from tumor.; b) in the oral drug delivery part the drug transport is enforced by excipients/ detergents in combination with targeting materials for cellular receptors resulting in an induced drug uptake. Both targeting nanomaterials are characterized by a combination of SANS + DLS and SAXS or ASAXS in a feedback process during development by synthesis, nanoparticle assembly and formulation. (paper)

  17. Nanotechnology-based combinational drug delivery: an emerging approach for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parhi, Priyambada; Mohanty, Chandana; Sahoo, Sanjeeb Kumar

    2012-09-01

    Combination therapy for the treatment of cancer is becoming more popular because it generates synergistic anticancer effects, reduces individual drug-related toxicity and suppresses multi-drug resistance through different mechanisms of action. In recent years, nanotechnology-based combination drug delivery to tumor tissues has emerged as an effective strategy by overcoming many biological, biophysical and biomedical barriers that the body stages against successful delivery of anticancer drugs. The sustained, controlled and targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs in a combination approach enhanced therapeutic anticancer effects with reduced drug-associated side effects. In this article, we have reviewed the scope of various nanotechnology-based combination drug delivery approaches and also summarized the current perspective and challenges facing the successful treatment of cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Localized drugs delivery hydroxyapatite microspheres for osteoporosis therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. H.; Ko, I. H.; Jeon, S.-H.; Chae, J. H.; Lee, E. J.; Chang, J. H.

    2011-10-01

    This study describes the preparation of hydroxyapatite microspheres for local drugs delivery. The formation of the hydroxyapatite microspheres was initiated by enzymatic decomposition of urea and accomplished by emulsification process (water-in-oil). The microspheres obtained were sintered at 500°C. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) indicated that the microspheres have various porous with random size, which maximizes the surface area. Cytotoxicity was not observed after sintering. Osteoporosis drugs, alendronate and BMP-2, were loaded into HAp microspheres and the releases of both molecules showed sustained releasing profiles.

  19. Combination Drug Therapy for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... combination of alpha adrenergic uroselective blocker (Tamsulosin) and 5 alpha iso-enzyme inhibitor (Dutasteride) is a first option of therapy in the management of BPH especially in those cases that are surgical risks with the category of mild to moderate prostate symptom scores. The Annals of African Surgery, Volume 6, ...

  20. Combination Drug Therapy for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    with mild to moderate lower urinary symptoms (LUTs). Apart from symptom resolution, these therapies can fur- ther stop the disease progression to acute retention of urine (AUR) or BPH-related surgeries with the attendant complications (9). Alfuzocin and tamsulosin are uro-selective (acts only on α1a and α1d adrenergic ...

  1. Predicting the Toxicity of Adjuvant Breast Cancer Drug Combination Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    intravenous drug administration, specific binding to intracellular tubulin, intestinal and hepatic metabolism, glomerular filtration and tubular...intracellular tubulin, intestinal and hepatic metabolism, glomerular filtration and tubular reabsorption. For all tissues in both the FVB and KO cohorts...tubulin, intestinal and hepatic metabolism, glomerular filtration and tubular reabsorption. To evaluate the contribution of ABCB1 to the biodistribution

  2. Adverse drug reactions associated with antiretroviral therapy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Africa has one of the highest prevalences of HIV and AIDS in the world. HIV/AIDS patients face countless challenges, one of which is the risk of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). This study aimed to describe the ADRs reported in South Africa with reference to the type of ADRs, antiretrovirals (ARVs) implicated, ...

  3. Methadone maintenance therapy as evidence based drug abuse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This problem is even more worse in poor resource countries, as use of these substances is accompanied with a lot of HIV- risk behaviours, and for cocaine and heroin drug injectors often share injecting equipments hence increasing the chances of contracting and spreading HIV infection. Apart from HIV infection, other ...

  4. Nested Nanotherapeutics for Drug Synergy Enhancement in Breast Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    nanoscale carriers aids in evasion of sequestration by the reticuloendothelial system (RES), with ensuing increased circulation times resulting in...pharmaceutical industry (37). The unique chemistry of cyclodextrins allows for solubilization of numerous water- insoluble drugs, and has been...throughout the course of subsequent in vitro and in vivo evaluation. Sequential release of rapamycin and paclitaxel from nested nanoparticles

  5. Clinically relevant pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions in antiretroviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    For healthcare professionals, the volume of literature available on herb-drug interactions often makes it difficult to separate experimental/potential interactions from those deemed clinically relevant. There is a need for concise and conclusive information to guide pharmacotherapy in HIV/AIDS. In t...

  6. Combination Drug Therapy for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    capsule, prostatic smooth muscle, bladder neck smooth muscle (10-13). The drugs act by reducing muscle tone. At the level of the bladder neck, reduction of muscle tone will improve the outlet obstruction in patients with. BPH (Fig. 2). Towards this .... tatic hypertrophy with alfuzocin: A 12-18 month as- sessment. Br J Urol ...

  7. Drug therapy in pregnancy: | van der Merwe | Obstetrics and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fact that a vulnerable fetus is involved makes the situation all the more challenging. Almost all drugs on the market were not designed with pregnancy in mind and because of the fear of costly litigation, pharmaceutical companies are extremely reluctant to test and later endorse their products for use during pregnancy.

  8. Systematic review: Antihypertensive drug therapy in black patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brewster, Lizzy M.; van Montfrans, Gert A.; Kleijnen, Jos

    2004-01-01

    Background: Hypertension occurs more frequently and is generally more severe in black persons than in white persons, leading to excess morbidity and mortality. Purpose: To systematically review the efficacy of different anti-hypertensive drugs in reducing blood pressure, morbidity, and mortality in

  9. Patient compliance with drug therapy for postmenopausal osteoporosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, A.; Khan, M.Y.

    2007-01-01

    To determine compliance and factors affecting compliance to antiresorptive drugs in osteoporosis, and to compare compliant and non compliant groups in a tertiary care setting. A total of 800 patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis were included in the study. The demographic and reproductive characteristics of all the patients were recorded. Type of antiresorptive drugs prescribed, degree of compliance, time and reasons for discontinuation were studied and analyzed. The mean age of the patients was 64 (+-9) years and their mean duration of follow-up 18 (+-5) months. The prevalence of risk factors for osteoporosis were evenly distributed among treatment groups; 73% patients had a co-morbidity besides osteoporosis while 27% were osteoporotic alone. One or more previous vertebral fractures due to osteoporosis was reported by 14.5% of patients, whereas 35.5% had at least one non-vertebral fracture in their medical history. Out of the total patients 21.5% discontinued the prescribed drug before attending the bone mass re-evaluations, more than half of these within first six months of starting the drugs. The medication that was most frequently discontinued within one year was calcium and vitamin-D (33.7%, p<0.01) while the least discontinued medication was Alendronate (5.9%, p < 0.01) which is taken once a week. In this study the most important determinant of compliance was the type of drug prescribed and its dose frequency, with a definite preference for Alendronate once a week. Treatment compliance was particularly poor for calcium and vitamin-D regimen, thereby emphasizing the need to find new ways of administering supplements, particularly for vitamin-D. (author)

  10. Anaesthesia for electroconvulsive therapy - new tricks for old drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stripp, Tobias Kvist; Jorgensen, Martin Balslev; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review is to investigate existing literature in order to delineate whether the use of anaesthesia and timing of seizure induction in a new and optimised way may improve the efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). METHODS: PubMed/MEDLINE was searched for exist......OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review is to investigate existing literature in order to delineate whether the use of anaesthesia and timing of seizure induction in a new and optimised way may improve the efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). METHODS: PubMed/MEDLINE was searched...... the shortest seizures, etomidate and ketamine the longest. Etomidate and ketamine+propofol 1 : 1 seems to yield the seizures with best quality. Seizure quality is improved when induction of ECT is delayed until the effect of the anaesthetic has waned - possibly monitored with BIS values. Manual...

  11. Superinfection with drug-resistant HIV is rare and does not contribute substantially to therapy failure in a large European cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartha, I.; Assel, M.; Sloot, P.M.A.; Zazzi, M.; Torti, C.; Schülter, E.; De Luca, A.; Sönnerborg, A.; Abecasis, A.B.; Van Laethem, K.; Rosi, A.; Svärd, J.; Paredes, R.; van de Vijver, D.A.M.C.; Vandamme, A.-M.; Müller, V.

    2013-01-01

    Background Superinfection with drug resistant HIV strains could potentially contribute to compromised therapy in patients initially infected with drug-sensitive virus and receiving antiretroviral therapy. To investigate the importance of this potential route to drug resistance, we developed a

  12. Microsponges based novel drug delivery system for augmented arthritis therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Osmani, Riyaz Ali M.; Aloorkar, Nagesh H.; Ingale, Dipti J.; Kulkarni, Parthasarathi K.; Hani, Umme; Bhosale, Rohit R.; Jayachandra Dev, Dandasi

    2015-01-01

    The motive behind present work was to formulate and evaluate gel containing microsponges of diclofenac diethylamine to provide prolonged release for proficient arthritis therapy. Quasi-emulsion solvent diffusion method was implied using Eudragit RS-100 and microsponges with varied drug–polymer ratios were prepared. For the sake of optimization, diverse factors affecting microparticles physical properties were too investigated. Microsponges were characterized by SEM, DSC, FT-IR, XRPD and parti...

  13. Magnetic nanomaterials for hyperthermia-based therapy and controlled drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Challa S S R; Mohammad, Faruq

    2011-08-14

    Previous attempts to review the literature on magnetic nanomaterials for hyperthermia-based therapy focused primarily on magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) using mono metallic/metal oxide nanoparticles. The term "hyperthermia" in the literature was also confined only to include use of heat for therapeutic applications. Recently, there have been a number of publications demonstrating magnetic nanoparticle-based hyperthermia to generate local heat resulting in the release of drugs either bound to the magnetic nanoparticle or encapsulated within polymeric matrices. In this review article, we present a case for broadening the meaning of the term "hyperthermia" by including thermotherapy as well as magnetically modulated controlled drug delivery. We provide a classification for controlled drug delivery using hyperthermia: Hyperthermia-based controlled drug delivery through bond breaking (DBB) and hyperthermia-based controlled drug delivery through enhanced permeability (DEP). The review also covers, for the first time, core-shell type magnetic nanomaterials, especially nanoshells prepared using layer-by-layer self-assembly, for the application of hyperthermia-based therapy and controlled drug delivery. The highlight of the review article is to portray potential opportunities for the combination of hyperthermia-based therapy and controlled drug release paradigms--towards successful application in personalized medicine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Magnetic Nanomaterials for Hyperthermia-based Therapy and Controlled Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Challa S. S. R.; Mohammad, Faruq

    2011-01-01

    Previous attempts to review the literature on magnetic nanomaterials for hyperthermia-based therapy focused primarily on magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) using mono metallic/metal oxide nanoparticles. The term “Hyperthermia” in the literature was also confined only to include use of heat for therapeutic applications. Recently, there have been a number of publications demonstrating magnetic nanoparticle-based hyperthermia to generate local heat resulting in the release of drugs either bound to the magnetic nanoparticle or encapsulated within polymeric matrices. In this review article, we present a case for broadening the meaning of the term “hyperthermia” by including thermotherapy as well as magnetically modulated controlled drug delivery. We provide a classification for controlled drug delivery using hyperthermia: Hyperthermia-based controlled Drug delivery through Bond Breaking (DBB) and Hyperthermia-based controlled Drug delivery through Enhanced Permeability (DEP). The review also covers, for the first time, core-shell type magnetic nanomaterials, especially nanoshells prepared using layer-by-layer self-assembly, for the application of hyperthermia-based therapy and controlled drug delivery. The highlight of the review article is to portray potential opportunities in the combination of hyperthermia-based therapy and controlled drug release paradigms for successful application in personalized medicine. PMID:21447363

  15. Carbon nanotubes as a novel drug delivery system for anticancer therapy: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushwaha, Swatantra Kumar Singh; Ghoshal, SauravI; Rai, Awani Kumar, E-mail: swatantrakushwaha@yahoo.co.in [Pranveer Singh Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India); Singh, Satyawan [Saroj Institute of Technology and Management, Lucknow (India)

    2013-10-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were discovered in 1991 and shown to have certain unique physicochemical properties, attracting considerable interest in their application in various fields including drug delivery. The unique properties of CNTs such as ease of cellular uptake, high drug loading, thermal ablation, among others, render them useful for cancer therapy. Cancer is one of the most challenging diseases of modern times because its therapy involves distinguishing normal healthy cells from affected cells. Here, CNTs play a major role because phenomena such as EPR, allow CNTs to distinguish normal cells from affected ones, the Holy Grail in cancer therapy. Considerable work has been done on CNTs as drug delivery systems over the last two decades. However, concerns over certain issues such as biocompatibility and toxicity have been raised and warrant extensive research in this field. (author)

  16. Carbon nanotubes as a novel drug delivery system for anticancer therapy: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swatantra Kumar Singh Kushwaha

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs were discovered in 1991 and shown to have certain unique physicochemical properties, attracting considerable interest in their application in various fields including drug delivery. The unique properties of CNTs such as ease of cellular uptake, high drug loading, thermal ablation, among others, render them useful for cancer therapy. Cancer is one of the most challenging diseases of modern times because its therapy involves distinguishing normal healthy cells from affected cells. Here, CNTs play a major role because phenomena such as EPR, allow CNTs to distinguish normal cells from affected ones, the Holy Grail in cancer therapy. Considerable work has been done on CNTs as drug delivery systems over the last two decades. However, concerns over certain issues such as biocompatibility and toxicity have been raised and warrant extensive research in this field.

  17. Cognitive-Behavioural Therapies for Young People in Outpatient Treatment for Non-Opioid Drug Use:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filges, Trine; Knudsen, Anne-Sofie Due; Svendsen, Majken

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Youth drug use is a severe problem worldwide. This review focuses on Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT) as a treatment for young people who misuse non-opioid drugs, such as cannabis, amphetamines, ecstasy and cocaine, which are strongly associated with a range of health and social...... problems. CBT is an individualized and multicomponent intervention that combines behavioural and cognitive therapy. While behavioural therapy mainly focuses on external settings and observable behaviour, cognitive therapy is concerned with internal cognitive processes. The primary focus of CBT is to reduce...... literature databases, citations in other reviews and in the included primary studies, hand searches of relevant journals, and Internet searches using Google. We also corresponded with researchers in the CBT field. No language or date restrictions were applied to the searches. SELECTION CRITERIA Studies were...

  18. Dynamics of an HBV Model with Drug Resistance Under Intermittent Antiviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ben-Gong; Tanaka, Gouhei; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Honda, Masao; Kaneko, Shuichi; Chen, Luonan

    2015-06-01

    This paper studies the dynamics of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) model and the therapy regimens of HBV disease. First, we propose a new mathematical model of HBV with drug resistance, and then analyze its qualitative and dynamical properties. Combining the clinical data and theoretical analysis, we demonstrate that our model is biologically plausible and also computationally viable. Second, we demonstrate that the intermittent antiviral therapy regimen is one of the possible strategies to treat this kind of complex disease. There are two main advantages of this regimen, i.e. it not only may delay the development of drug resistance, but also may reduce the duration of on-treatment time compared with the long-term continuous medication. Moreover, such an intermittent antiviral therapy can reduce the adverse side effects. Our theoretical model and computational results provide qualitative insight into the progression of HBV, and also a possible new therapy for HBV disease.

  19. Comparison of Gating Properties and Use-Dependent Block of Nav1.5 and Nav1.7 Channels by Anti-Arrhythmics Mexiletine and Lidocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Mi, Jianxun; Lu, Ka; Lu, Yanxin; Wang, KeWei

    2015-01-01

    Mexiletine and lidocaine are widely used class IB anti-arrhythmic drugs that are considered to act by blocking voltage-gated open sodium currents for treatment of ventricular arrhythmias and relief of pain. To gain mechanistic insights into action of anti-arrhythmics, we characterized biophysical properties of Nav1.5 and Nav1.7 channels stably expressed in HEK293 cells and compared their use-dependent block in response to mexiletine and lidocaine using whole-cell patch clamp recordings. While the voltage-dependent activation of Nav1.5 or Nav1.7 was not affected by mexiletine and lidocaine, the steady-state fast and slow inactivation of Nav1.5 and Nav1.7 were significantly shifted to hyperpolarized direction by either mexiletine or lidocaine in dose-dependent manner. Both mexiletine and lidocaine enhanced the slow component of closed-state inactivation, with mexiletine exerting stronger inhibition on either Nav1.5 or Nav1.7. The recovery from inactivation of Nav1.5 or Nav1.7 was significantly prolonged by mexiletine compared to lidocaine. Furthermore, mexiletine displayed a pronounced and prominent use-dependent inhibition of Nav1.5 than lidocaine, but not Nav1.7 channels. Taken together, our findings demonstrate differential responses to blockade by mexiletine and lidocaine that preferentially affect the gating of Nav1.5, as compared to Nav1.7; and mexiletine exhibits stronger use-dependent block of Nav1.5. The differential gating properties of Nav1.5 and Nav1.7 in response to mexiletine and lidocaine may help explain the drug effectiveness and advance in new designs of safe and specific sodium channel blockers for treatment of cardiac arrhythmia or pain. PMID:26068619

  20. Ocular Toxoplasmosis: Therapy-Related Adverse Drug Reactions and Their Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfenstein, M; Zweifel, S; Barthelmes, D; Meier, F; Fehr, J; Böni, C

    2017-04-01

    Background There are different treatment options for ocular toxoplasmosis (OT). "Classic" therapy consists of pyrimethamine, sulfadiazine and folinic acid combined with systemic steroids and is still widely used. However, potentially severe side effects of this therapy have been reported. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the incidence and types of adverse drug reactions in patients treated for OT. Clinical management of each adverse drug reaction was assessed. Patients and Methods In this retrospective analysis, we reviewed data of patients with OT, who were consecutively examined between December 2011 and December 2015 at the Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Zurich. Results In total, 49 patients had at least one episode of active OT. In 54 (83.0 %) of 65 treated episodes, the classic regimen was used. Of the 37 patients who received classic treatment, 9 (24.3 %) developed at least one adverse drug reaction which led to drug discontinuation, including elevated creatinine (5.4 %), elevated liver enzymes (5.4 %), vomiting (5.4 %), rash (5.4 %) and facial swelling (2.7 %). In 5 patients, treatment was switched to another drug, while in the other 4 patients, therapy was stopped. In these 9 patients, inflammation was well controlled 8 weeks after onset of therapy. No patient suffered from severe side effects, such as potentially life-threatening allergic reactions or pancytopenia. Conclusions In OT patients who were treated with classic therapy, adverse drug reactions are common. Therefore, clinical and laboratory monitoring is mandatory. Adverse drug reactions may require interdisciplinary management. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery treatments and specific targeting therapy for age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Chi Lin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles combined with cells, drugs, and specially designed genes provide improved therapeutic efficacy in studies and clinical setting, demonstrating a new era of treatment strategy, especially in retinal diseases. Nanotechnology-based drugs can provide an essential platform for sustaining, releasing and a specific targeting design to treat retinal diseases. Poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid is the most widely used biocompatible and biodegradable polymer approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Many studies have attempted to develop special devices for delivering small-molecule drugs, proteins, and other macromolecules consistently and slowly. In this article, we first review current progress in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration. Then, we discuss the function of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and the pharmacological effects of anti-VEGF-A antibodies and soluble or modified VEGF receptors. Lastly, we summarize the combination of antiangiogenic therapy and nanomedicines, and review current potential targeting therapy in age-related macular degeneration.

  2. Family Behavior Therapy (FBT) for young people in treatment for non-opioid drug use:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindstrøm, Maia; Saidj, Madina; Kowalski, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    people who misuse non-opioid drugs. FBT is a manual-based family therapy approach. The program is behavior and skill-oriented. It is concerned with identifying psychological and situational stimuli and triggers presumed to be directly related to the youth’s drug use, and skills training to improve self......BACKGROUND Youth drug use is a severe problem worldwide, and the use of cannabis, amphetamine ecstasy and cocaine, referred to as non-opioid drugs, are strongly associated with a range of health and social problems. This review focuses on Family Behavior Therapy (FBT) as a treatment for young...... language nor date restrictions were applied to the searches. SELECTION CRITERIA Studies eligible for inclusion in the review are required to meet several eligibility criteria. Studies must: • have involved a manual-based FBT treatment for young people aged 11-21 years enrolled in outpatient treatment...

  3. Accelerated approval and breakthrough therapy designation: oncology drug development on speed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, James C; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Lee, J Jack; Eckhardt, S Gail

    2013-08-15

    Recent advances in biotechnology have led to discoveries resulting in major improvements in the therapy of refractory malignancies, although most advanced cancers remain incurable. Thus, there is global consensus around the need to streamline the drug approval process for effective agents. Accelerated Approval and Breakthrough Therapy Designation hold the promise of making new treatments available sooner through the use of smaller studies using intermediate endpoints. Here, we consider the inherent limitations of smaller studies and discuss the strategies for hastening oncology drug development while maintaining high-efficacy standards. ©2013 AACR.

  4. Lanthanide-doped upconverting luminescent nanoparticle platforms for optical imaging-guided drug delivery and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie; Zhao, Liang; Han, Gang

    2013-05-01

    Lanthanide-doped upconverting luminescent nanoparticles (UCNPs) are promising materials for optical imaging-guided drug delivery and therapy due to their unique optical and chemical properties. UCNPs absorb low energy near-infrared (NIR) light and emit high-energy shorter wavelength photons. Their special features allow them to overcome various problems associated with conventional imaging probes and to provide versatility for creating nanoplatforms with both imaging and therapeutic modalities. Here, we discuss several approaches to fabricate and utilize UCNPs for traceable drug delivery and therapy. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Elsinochrome A photosensitizers: Alternative drugs for photodynamic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinghui Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT has already been a multifunctional modality for various tumors and nontumorous diseases. However, the development of photosensitizers is relatively delayed, compared with the tremendous progress in laser technology. Elsinochrome A (EA, a perylenequinonoid pigment from China, has all the typical advantages of perylenequinones. Moreover, singlet oxygen quantum yield of EA is superior to other kinds of photosensitizers and EA could be artificially biosynthesized at present, which make it an alternative candidate for PDT. In this review, the photophysics, photochemistry, photobiology and chemical or biological syntheses of EA photosensitizers are briefly presented. Besides, the future prospects of EA photosensitizers are also proposed.

  6. Daratumumab – breakthrough drug in multiple myeloma therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Jurczyszyn

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma (MM remains incurable despite important recent advances in treatment. Over the last 2 years, an anti-CD38 monoclonal antibody daratumumab (DARA has emerged as a breakthrough targeted therapy for patients with MM. Early-stage clinical trials have found DARA to be safe and to have encouraging clinical activity as a single agent and in combination with lenalidomide in heavily pretreated, relapsed patients in whom other novel agents (such as bortezomib, thalidomide and lenalidomide as well as stem cell transplant has already failed. This review discusses the preclinical and clinical development of DARA, its pathophysiological basis, and its prospects for future use in MM.

  7. Current drug therapy and pharmaceutical challenges for Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, José; Davies, Carolina; Simonazzi, Analía; Real, Juan Pablo; Palma, Santiago

    2016-04-01

    One of the most significant health problems in the American continent in terms of human health, and socioeconomic impact is Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Infection was originally transmitted by reduviid insects, congenitally from mother to fetus, and by oral ingestion in sylvatic/rural environments, but blood transfusions, organ transplants, laboratory accidents, and sharing of contaminated syringes also contribute to modern day transmission. Likewise, Chagas disease used to be endemic from Northern Mexico to Argentina, but migrations have earned it global. The parasite has a complex life cycle, infecting different species, and invading a variety of cells - including muscle and nerve cells of the heart and gastrointestinal tract - in the mammalian host. Human infection outcome is a potentially fatal cardiomyopathy, and gastrointestinal tract lesions. In absence of a vaccine, vector control and treatment of patients are the only tools to control the disease. Unfortunately, the only drugs now available for Chagas' disease, Nifurtimox and Benznidazole, are relatively toxic for adult patients, and require prolonged administration. Benznidazole is the first choice for Chagas disease treatment due to its lower side effects than Nifurtimox. However, different strategies are being sought to overcome Benznidazole's toxicity including shorter or intermittent administration schedules-either alone or in combination with other drugs. In addition, a long list of compounds has shown trypanocidal activity, ranging from natural products to specially designed molecules, re-purposing drugs commercialized to treat other maladies, and homeopathy. In the present review, we will briefly summarize the upturns of current treatment of Chagas disease, discuss the increment on research and scientific publications about this topic, and give an overview of the state-of-the-art research aiming to produce an alternative medication to treat T. cruzi infection

  8. Will Drug Resistance against Dolutegravir in Initial Therapy Ever Occur?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark eWainberg

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Dolutegravir (DTG is a second-generation integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI and INSTIs are the latest class of potent anti-HIV drugs. Compared to the first generation INSTIs, raltegravir (RAL and elvitegravir (EVG, DTG shows a limited cross-resistance profile. More interestingly, clinical resistance mutations to DTG in treatment-naive patents have not been observed to this date. This review summarizes recent studies on resistance mutations to DTG and on our understanding of the mechanisms of resistance to DTG as well as future directions for research.

  9. Which drug or drug delivery system can change clinical practice for brain tumor therapy?

    OpenAIRE

    Siegal, Tali

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis and treatment outcome for primary brain tumors have remained unchanged despite advances in anticancer drug discovery and development. In clinical trials, the majority of promising experimental agents for brain tumors have had limited impact on survival or time to recurrence. These disappointing results are partially explained by the inadequacy of effective drug delivery to the CNS. The impediments posed by the various specialized physiological barriers and active efflux mechanis...

  10. Non-drug therapies for dementia: an overview of the current situation with regard to proof of effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräsel, Elmar; Wiltfang, Jens; Kornhuber, Johannes

    2003-01-01

    An overview will be presented of music therapy, art therapy, movement therapy and reminiscence therapy, memory training, reality orientation, validation therapy, self-maintenance therapy, behaviour therapy, milieu therapy and staff training. The overview will examine the aims of each, the principles on which procedures are based and the proof of their effectiveness. The principal aim of non-drug therapies is to influence symptomatic dementia beneficially and to improve the abilities remaining to the patient. The potential benefits are usually deduced from studies made without control groups. At the present time, proof of the effectiveness of these therapies is still lacking as controlled, randomized studies have yet to be conducted, and so a fundamental evaluation of the therapeutic benefits of non-drug therapies in the treatment of dementia cannot yet be made. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  11. Preeclampsia – will Orphan Drug Status facilitate innovative biological therapies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinuhe eHahn

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that development of novel therapies to treat pregnancy-relates disorders, such as preeclampsia, is hampered to the paucity of research funding. Hence, it is with great interest to become aware of at least three novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of this disorder, exploiting either the anticoagulant activity of antithrombin, the free radical scavenging activity of alpha-1-microglobulin, or the regenerative capacity of placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells. As these projects are being carried out by small biotech enterprises, the question arises of how they are able to fund such undertakings. A novel strategy adopted by two of these companies is that they successfully petitioned US and EU agencies in order that preeclampsia be accepted in the register of rare or orphan diseases. This provides a number of benefits including market exclusivity, assistance with clinical trials and dedicated funding schemes. Other strategies to supplement meager research funds, especially to test novel approaches, could be crowdfunding, a venture which relies on intimate interaction with advocacy groups. In other words, preeclampsia meets Facebook. Perhaps similar strategies can be adopted to examine novel therapies targeting either the imbalance in angiogenic growth factors, complement activation, reduced levels of placenta protein 13 or excessive neutrophil activation evident in preeclampsia.

  12. Preeclampsia - will orphan drug status facilitate innovative biological therapies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Sinuhe

    2015-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the development of novel therapies to treat pregnancy-related disorders, such as preeclampsia, is hampered by the paucity of research funding. Hence, it is with great interest to become aware of at least three novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of this disorder: exploiting either the anticoagulant activity of antithrombin, the free radical scavenging activity of alpha-1-microglobulin, or the regenerative capacity of placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells. As these projects are being carried out by small biotech enterprises, the question arises of how they are able to fund such undertakings. A novel strategy adopted by two of these companies is that they successfully petitioned US and EU agencies in order that preeclampsia is accepted in the register of rare or orphan diseases. This provides a number of benefits including market exclusivity, assistance with clinical trials, and dedicated funding schemes. Other strategies to supplement meager research funds, especially to test novel approaches, could be crowdfunding, a venture that relies on intimate interaction with advocacy groups. In other words, preeclampsia meets Facebook. Perhaps similar strategies can be adopted to examine novel therapies targeting either the imbalance in pro- or anti-angiogenic growth factors, complement activation, reduced levels of placenta protein 13, or excessive neutrophil activation evident in preeclampsia.

  13. Preeclampsia – Will Orphan Drug Status Facilitate Innovative Biological Therapies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Sinuhe

    2015-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the development of novel therapies to treat pregnancy-related disorders, such as preeclampsia, is hampered by the paucity of research funding. Hence, it is with great interest to become aware of at least three novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of this disorder: exploiting either the anticoagulant activity of antithrombin, the free radical scavenging activity of alpha-1-microglobulin, or the regenerative capacity of placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells. As these projects are being carried out by small biotech enterprises, the question arises of how they are able to fund such undertakings. A novel strategy adopted by two of these companies is that they successfully petitioned US and EU agencies in order that preeclampsia is accepted in the register of rare or orphan diseases. This provides a number of benefits including market exclusivity, assistance with clinical trials, and dedicated funding schemes. Other strategies to supplement meager research funds, especially to test novel approaches, could be crowdfunding, a venture that relies on intimate interaction with advocacy groups. In other words, preeclampsia meets Facebook. Perhaps similar strategies can be adopted to examine novel therapies targeting either the imbalance in pro- or anti-angiogenic growth factors, complement activation, reduced levels of placenta protein 13, or excessive neutrophil activation evident in preeclampsia. PMID:25767802

  14. Drug therapy for Helicobacter pylori infection: problems and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glupczynski, Y; Burette, A

    1990-12-01

    Antibacterial chemotherapy against Helicobacter pylori is currently being assessed by open or randomized controlled clinical studies for its efficacy in eradicating this bacterium from the stomach of patients with gastritis or gastroduodenal ulcer. Whereas there is presently no "optimal" agent and treatment scheme, the combination of some antibiotics (metronidazole, tinidazole, amoxicillin) with bismuth salts proves definitely superior in vivo to either of these agents administered alone. Several reasons have been proposed, to explain the clinical failure after treatment: insufficient concentration of active drugs in gastric mucus, instability of some agents at an acidic pH, inappropriate formulation of drug, insufficient duration of treatment, and variable compliance of patients. Recently, it has appeared from several clinical trials that H. pylori may rapidly acquire resistance to some antibiotics, and that this event might also account for clinical failure. A critical review of the literature on H. pylori treatment indicates that association of bismuth and antibiotics or of antibiotics alone both may efficiently reduce the risk of emergence of resistance and improve the therapeutic outcome. Guidelines of treatment are suggested in order to avoid the future misuse of antibiotics that would increase selection of antibiotic-resistant H. pylori and negatively affect the ecology of the gastric microflora. Likewise, an accurate definition of a subset of patients with H. pylori who really will require treatment needs to be rapidly established.

  15. Cancer Therapy Using Ultrahigh Hydrophobic Drug-Loaded Graphene Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some, Surajit; Gwon, A-Ryeong; Hwang, Eunhee; Bahn, Ga-hee; Yoon, Yeoheung; Kim, Youngmin; Kim, Seol-Hee; Bak, Sora; Yang, Junghee; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Lee, Hyoyoung

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to demonstrate that curcumin (Cur)-containing graphene composites have high anticancer activity. Specifically, graphene-derivatives were used as nanovectors for the delivery of the hydrophobic anticancer drug Cur based on pH dependence. Different Cur-graphene composites were prepared based on polar interactions between Cur and the number of oxygen-containing functional groups of respective starting materials. The degree of drug-loading was found to be increased by increasing the number of oxygen-containing functional groups in graphene-derivatives. We demonstrated a synergistic effect of Cur-graphene composites on cancer cell death (HCT 116) both in vitro and in vivo. As-prepared graphene quantum dot (GQD)-Cur composites contained the highest amount of Cur nano-particles and exhibited the best anticancer activity compared to the other composites including Cur alone at the same dose. This is the first example of synergistic chemotherapy using GQD-Cur composites simultaneous with superficial bioprobes for tumor imaging. PMID:25204358

  16. Complementary and alternative drug therapy versus science-oriented medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anlauf, Manfred; Hein, Lutz; Hense, Hans-Werner; Köbberling, Johannes; Lasek, Rainer; Leidl, Reiner; Schöne-Seifert, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    This opinion deals critically with the so-called complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapy on the basis of current data. From the authors' perspective, CAM prescriptions and most notably the extensive current endeavours to the "integration" of CAM into conventional patient care is problematic in several respects. Thus, several CAM measures are used, although no specific effects of medicines can be proved in clinical studies. It is extensively explained that the methods used in this regard are those of evidence-based medicine, which is one of the indispensable pillars of science-oriented medicine. This standard of proof of efficacy is fundamentally independent of the requirement of being able to explain efficacy of a therapy in a manner compatible with the insights of the natural sciences, which is also essential for medical progress. Numerous CAM treatments can however never conceivably satisfy this requirement; rather they are justified with pre-scientific or unscientific paradigms. The high attractiveness of CAM measures evidenced in patients and many doctors is based on a combination of positive expectations and experiences, among other things, which are at times unjustified, at times thoroughly justified, from a science-oriented view, but which are non-specific (context effects). With a view to the latter phenomenon, the authors consider the conscious use of CAM as unrevealed therapeutic placebos to be problematic. In addition, they advocate that academic medicine should again systematically endeavour to pay more attention to medical empathy and use context effects in the service of patients to the utmost. The subsequent opinion discusses the following after an introduction to medical history: the definition of CAM; the efficacy of most common CAM procedures; CAM utilisation and costs in Germany; characteristics of science-oriented medicine; awareness of placebo research; pro and contra arguments about the use of CAM, not least of all in terms of

  17. Complementary and alternative drug therapy versus science-oriented medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anlauf, Manfred; Hein, Lutz; Hense, Hans-Werner; Köbberling, Johannes; Lasek, Rainer; Leidl, Reiner; Schöne-Seifert, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    This opinion deals critically with the so-called complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapy on the basis of current data. From the authors’ perspective, CAM prescriptions and most notably the extensive current endeavours to the “integration” of CAM into conventional patient care is problematic in several respects. Thus, several CAM measures are used, although no specific effects of medicines can be proved in clinical studies. It is extensively explained that the methods used in this regard are those of evidence-based medicine, which is one of the indispensable pillars of science-oriented medicine. This standard of proof of efficacy is fundamentally independent of the requirement of being able to explain efficacy of a therapy in a manner compatible with the insights of the natural sciences, which is also essential for medical progress. Numerous CAM treatments can however never conceivably satisfy this requirement; rather they are justified with pre-scientific or unscientific paradigms. The high attractiveness of CAM measures evidenced in patients and many doctors is based on a combination of positive expectations and experiences, among other things, which are at times unjustified, at times thoroughly justified, from a science-oriented view, but which are non-specific (context effects). With a view to the latter phenomenon, the authors consider the conscious use of CAM as unrevealed therapeutic placebos to be problematic. In addition, they advocate that academic medicine should again systematically endeavour to pay more attention to medical empathy and use context effects in the service of patients to the utmost. The subsequent opinion discusses the following after an introduction to medical history: the definition of CAM; the efficacy of most common CAM procedures; CAM utilisation and costs in Germany; characteristics of science-oriented medicine; awareness of placebo research; pro and contra arguments about the use of CAM, not least of all in terms

  18. Gastric emptying rate in the elderly: implications for drug therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, M.A.; Triggs, E.J.; Cheung, M.; Broe, G.A.; Creasey, H.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of the aging process on gastric emptying was studied in 11 elderly subjects (mean age, 77) and in 7 young healthy volunteers (mean age, 26). Gastric emptying rates were assessed by a modified sequential scinti-scanning technique after administration of the nonabsorbable chelated radiopharmaceutical 99mTc-DTPA. The rate of emptying, expressed as half-time (T 1/2e) in minutes, was significantly longer (p less than 0.001) in the elderly subjects (mean apparent T 1/2e . 123.23 min) compared to the young healthy volunteers (mean apparent T 1/2e . 49.69 min). Clinical implications of these findings are discussed, particularly with respect to the rate and extent of drug absorption in elderly persons

  19. Consideration of Drug Therapy in Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Diamantis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH has become a major global health problem both in its frequency by which it determines the complications and the problems of diagnosis and treatment it requires. BPH is a heterogeneous disease. The symptoms attributed to BPH may have other coexisting causes and growth factors both androgen-dependent and independent, which promotes prostate enlargement. It is well known that prostate size correlates poorly with the symptoms so that reducing prostate using 5-alphareductase or alphablocants inhibitors may not always be sufficient. A better understanding of the pathophysiology of BPH and its interactions with other drugs will help the development of new substances with a better efficiency. This present work aims to be a modest contribution related to medical treatment in benign prostatic hyperplasia and the role that the generalist practitioner should play in managing of this urinary disease quite common in elderly men.

  20. Drug therapy in Behçet's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, A A

    2000-06-01

    Behçet's disease is one of the most difficult forms of uveitis to treat. Variety in disease presentation and severity, as well as regional differences in standard of care, demand a tailor-made approach. Anterior segment inflammation generally responds to topical corticosteroids. However, the onset of posterior segment inflammation usually requires the advancement of treatment to periocular injections and/or oral administration of corticosteroids. Cyclosporin, either alone or in combination with corticosteroids, is considered in refractory patients. Other immunosuppressive drugs, such as azathioprine and chlorambucil, may be considered in difficult cases. Finally, preliminary results suggest efficacy with the immunomodulatory agent interferon alfa, although further clinical trials are necessary to evaluate safety and efficacy.

  1. DRUG THERAPY IN ASTHMATIC CHILDREN: SURVEY IN MASHHAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H Karimi

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. For future health planning of our country, the type and amount of drugs used for treatment of chronic diseases should be known. Therefore, in the present study the treatment regimen of asthmatic children in the city of Mashhad was studied. Methods. To study the different types of drugs in the treatment regimen of asthmatic children in the city of Mashhad, we evaluated the treatment regimen of 366 primary school children with asthma disease. Starting, maximum and duration of action of three different bronchodilators (salbutamol inhaler, salbutamol syrup, and theophylline syrup were compared. Findings. The results of the first part of this study showed that only 31.6 percent of asthmatic children had history of treatment and only 10.6 percent had current medication. In addition, most of the treated children (38.8 percent had only bronchodilator (salbutamol syrup in their treatment regimen. The effect of salbutamol inhaler on lung function tests starts in 5 min, salbutamol syrup in 15 min and theophylline syrup at 30 min after administration. The maximum response to salbutamol inhaler, salbutamol syrup, and theophylline syrup occurred 15 min, 4 hr and 3 hr after administration, respectively. The reduction of response to salbutamol inhaler occurs after 3 hr, but there was no any reduction in response to salbutamol and theophylline syrup during study period. Conclusion. The prevalence of asthma among children in the city of Mashhad is relatively high, but most of asthmatic children are not treated. Although the oral bronchodilator in mild asthma is effective, salbutamol inhaler is needed for emergency use.

  2. Antiparasitic peptides from arthropods and their application in drug therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Ferreira Lacerda

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Africa, Asia and Latin America are regions highly affected by endemic diseases, such as Leishmaniasis, Malaria and Chagas’ disease. They are responsible for the death of thousands of patients every year, as there is not yet a cure for them and the drugs used are inefficient against the pathogenic parasites. During the life cycle of some parasitic protozoa, insects become the most important host and disseminator of the diseases triggered by these microorganisms. As infected insects do not develop nocive symptoms, they can carry the parasites for long time inside their body, enabling their multiplication and life cycle completion. Eventually, parasites infect human beings after insects transmission through their saliva and/or feces. Hence, host insects and general arthropods, which developed a way to coexist with such parasites, are a promising source for the prospection of antiparasitic compounds, as alternative methods for the treatment of protozoa-related diseases. Among the molecules already isolated and investigated, there are proteins and peptides with high activity against parasites, able to inhibit parasite activity in different stages of development. Although studies are still taking their first steps, initial results show new perspectives on the treatment of parasitic diseases. Therefore, in this report, we describe about peptides from host insect sources with activity against the three most endemic parasites: Leishmania sp, Plasmodium sp. and Trypanosomes. Moreover, we discuss the future application insect peptides as anti-parasitic drugs and the use of non-hosts insect transcriptomes on the prospection of novel molecules for the treatment of parasitic neglected diseases.

  3. Episcleritis Related to Drug-Induced Lupus Erythematosus following Infliximab Therapy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irini P. Chatziralli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced lupus erythematosus is defined as a lupus-like syndrome temporally related to continuous drug exposure which resolves after discontinuation of the offending drug. Herein, we describe a patient with distinct clinical manifestations of anti-TNF-associated DILE related to infliximab therapy. The patient exhibited clinical and laboratory findings of lupus-like illnesses as well as ocular disorders, such as episcleritis. The main message is that the symptoms of DILE should not be overlooked, although sometimes other systematic conditions may underlie them. As a result, it is very important for the clinicians to evaluate the symptoms of DILE and manage appropriately these cases.

  4. Dual drug loaded superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilnawaz, Fahima; Singh, Abhalaxmi; Mohanty, Chandana; Sahoo, Sanjeeb K

    2010-05-01

    The primary inadequacy of chemotherapeutic drugs is their relative non-specificity and potential side effects to the healthy tissues. To overcome this, drug loaded multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles are conceptualized. We report here an aqueous based formulation of glycerol monooleate coated magnetic nanoparticles (GMO-MNPs) devoid of any surfactant capable of carrying high payload hydrophobic anticancer drugs. The biocompatibility was confirmed by tumor necrosis factor alpha assay, confocal microscopy. High entrapment efficiency approximately 95% and sustained release of encapsulated drugs for more than two weeks under in vitro conditions was achieved for different anticancer drugs (paclitaxel, rapamycin, alone or combination). Drug loaded GMO-MNPs did not affect the magnetization properties of the iron oxide core as confirmed by magnetization study. Additionally the MNPs were functionalized with carboxylic groups by coating with DMSA (Dimercaptosuccinic acid) for the supplementary conjugation of amines. For targeted therapy, HER2 antibody was conjugated to GMO-MNPs and showed enhanced uptake in human breast carcinoma cell line (MCF-7). The IC(50) doses revealed potential antiproliferative effect in MCF-7. Therefore, antibody conjugated GMO-MNPs could be used as potential drug carrier for the active therapeutic aspects in cancer therapy. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Functional Family Therapy for Young People in Treatment for Nonopioid Drug Use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filges, Trine; Andersen, Ditte

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This review evaluates the evidence on the effects of functional family therapy (FFT) on drug abuse reduction for young people in treatment for nonopioid drug use. Data and Analysis: We followed Campbell Collaboration guidelines to conduct a systematic review of randomized...... and nonrandomized trials. Results: The search yielded two studies that met inclusion criteria. Only one study provided numerical results on the effect of FFT on drug use reduction. Conclusions: There is insufficient evidence to allow any conclusion to be drawn on the effect of FFT for young people in treatment...... for nonopioid drug use. There is a need for more research and particularly for more methodologically rigorous studies in the field of treatment for young drug users....

  6. Evaluation of short course drug therapy for tuberculosis in pediatric ward of Imam Khomeini Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daneshjoo Kh

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis appears to be a disease as old as human history. Tuberculosis is of great public health importance in the developing countries. Its clinical profile is different in developing countries in comparison to countries of Europe and North America. The recent epidemic of HIV has slowed down the declining trend in the incidence of tuberculosis. Bacilli are transmitted from one infected person to the others as an aerosol. In some cases contaminated milk may also be responsible. However despite effective regimens and addition of new drugs and improved pharmacokinetic knowledge the chemotherapy of tuberculosis still remains a challenge. Poor drug-compliance by patients being one of the foremost reason for frequent relapses and bacterial resistance. Some important and concrete steps to meet these challenges have been judicious use of two or more bactericidal drugs and introduction of short courses regiment. Multiple drugs therapy may shorten the duration of treatment and prevent emergence of drug resistance.

  7. Pharmacy Characteristics Associated with the Provision of Drug Therapy Services in Nonmetropolitan Community Pharmacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadkari, Abhijit S.; Mott, David A.; Kreling, David H.; Bonnarens, Joseph K.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Higher prevalence of chronic diseases and reduced access to other health professionals in rural areas suggest that rural Medicare enrollees will benefit from pharmacist-provided drug therapy services (DTS). Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe non-metropolitan community pharmacy sites in Wisconsin, the provision of DTS at…

  8. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and... management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). (a) General rule. Each... utilization management program, quality assurance measures and systems, and an MTMP as described in paragraphs...

  9. Estimating prevalence of accumulated HIV-1 drug resistance in a cohort of patients on antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, Wendy P; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Kjær, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    Estimating the prevalence of accumulated HIV drug resistance in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) is difficult due to lack of resistance testing at all occasions of virological failure and in patients with undetectable viral load. A method to estimate this for 6498 EuroSIDA patients...

  10. Replacing hormone therapy-is the decline in prescribing sustained, and are nonhormonal drugs substituted?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vegter, Stefan; Kolling, Pieternel; Toben, Marjolijn; Visser, Sipke T.; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T. W.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: After two cautioning landmark studies in 2002 and 2003, a dramatic decrease in hormonal therapy (HT) prescribing for menopausal symptoms was seen. Our objectives were to (1) determine whether this decline in HT prescribing sustained until 2007 and (2) investigate nonhormonal drug

  11. Effects of aerobic exercise and drug therapy on blood pressure and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Although aerobic exercise has been shown to lower blood pressure (BP) in human beings, its additive BPreducing effect on antihypertensive drug therapy seems to have been investigated in only laboratory animals. Objectives: This study investigated the effects of aerobic dance combined with ...

  12. Liposomes as a drug delivery system in photodynamic therapy for colon cancer treatment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maduray, K

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses a drug termed a photosensitizer (PS), light (laser) of an appropriate wavelength and molecular oxygen (tissue) to elicit cell death of cancer cells. The objective of this study was to evaluate the enhancement of PDT...

  13. Recent insights in nanotechnology-based drugs and formulations designed for effective anti-cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piktel, Ewelina; Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Wątek, Marzena; Wollny, Tomasz; Deptuła, Piotr; Bucki, Robert

    2016-05-26

    The rapid development of nanotechnology provides alternative approaches to overcome several limitations of conventional anti-cancer therapy. Drug targeting using functionalized nanoparticles to advance their transport to the dedicated site, became a new standard in novel anti-cancer methods. In effect, the employment of nanoparticles during design of antineoplastic drugs helps to improve pharmacokinetic properties, with subsequent development of high specific, non-toxic and biocompatible anti-cancer agents. However, the physicochemical and biological diversity of nanomaterials and a broad spectrum of unique features influencing their biological action requires continuous research to assess their activity. Among numerous nanosystems designed to eradicate cancer cells, only a limited number of them entered the clinical trials. It is anticipated that progress in development of nanotechnology-based anti-cancer materials will provide modern, individualized anti-cancer therapies assuring decrease in morbidity and mortality from cancer diseases. In this review we discussed the implication of nanomaterials in design of new drugs for effective antineoplastic therapy and describe a variety of mechanisms and challenges for selective tumor targeting. We emphasized the recent advantages in the field of nanotechnology-based strategies to fight cancer and discussed their part in effective anti-cancer therapy and successful drug delivery.

  14. Effects of aerobic exercise and drug therapy on blood pressure and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    reducing effect on antihypertensive drug therapy seems to have been investigated in only laboratory animals. Objectives: This study investigated the effects of .... pregnant or diabetic or had a history of coronary or valvular heart, renal, cerebral vascular, ... Participants with recent history of smoking and alcohol abuse (<6 ...

  15. A review of drug therapy for sporadic fatal insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabaee Damavandi, Pardis; Dove, Martin T; Pickersgill, Richard W

    2017-09-03

    Sporadic fatal insomnia (sFI) is a rapid progressive neurodegenerative disease characterised by gradual to perpetual insomnia, followed by dysautonomia, coma and death. 1 The cause of sFI was recently mapped to a mutation in a protein, the prion, found in the human brain. It is the unfolding of the prion that leads to the generation of toxic oligomers that destroy brain tissue and function. Recent studies have confirmed that a methionine mutation at codon 129 of the human Prion is characteristic of sFI. Current treatment slows down the progression of the disease, but no cure has been found, yet. We used Molecular Docking and Molecular Dynamics simulation methods, to study the toxic Fatal-Insomnia-prion conformations at local unfolding. The idea was to determine these sites and to stabilise these regions against unfolding and miss-folding, using a small ligand, based on a phenothiazine "moiety". As a result we here discuss current fatal insomnia therapy and present seven novel possible compounds for in vitro and in vivo screening.

  16. Global marketing of cholesterol-lowering drugs as therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elimimian, Jonathan U; Gilmore, James M; Singletary, Tony J

    2006-01-01

    Pharmaceutical marketing services (PMS) are a key component of pharmaceutical companies' marketing strategies in that they create links between the pharmaceutical company and the physician. They are is also a link between physician and patients locally and globally. PMS discussed in this paper provide various services from tangible to intangible products in order to increase the physicians and pharmacists prescribing activities of their treatment modalities. Given the high cost of recruiting, training, and supporting PMS global marketing efforts, it is important for PMS channels to understand the significance of pharmaceutical multinational companies to ascribe to prescription drug services provided in Thailand. This created the unique marketing environment for the pharmaceutical companies. This study examines whether there is a gap in the existing cholesterol-lowering medication prescribed by physicians in Thailand and the newly introduced brand to the U.S. market. The degree of the new product adoption is analyzed through physician prescription frequency and records. Results of the study indicate there is significant improvement in the health conditions of the users of the new cholesterol medication among Thailand patients. Physicians in Thailand were, however, faced with competing brands in the market due to aggressiveness of advertising and promotion by multinational pharmaceutical marketing and manufacturers Associations. Perceived value and benefit to users were significant outcome of the study. More diagnostic and prescriptive research is recommended to cover Southeast Asia and other parts of the developing countries.

  17. Leczyme: A New Candidate Drug for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo Tatsuta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sialic acid-binding lectin (SBL, isolated from oocytes of Rana catesbeiana, is leczyme and has both lectin and ribonuclease (RNase activities. A remarkable antitumor effect of SBL has also been reported. SBL agglutinates various kinds of tumor cells but not normal cells. SBL agglutination activity is not affected by mono- or oligosaccharides. However, SBL-induced agglutination and antitumor effects are inhibited by sialomucin but not asialomucin. In addition, SBL has very little effect on sialidase-treated cells. SBL causes cancer-selective induction of apoptosis by multiple signaling pathways, which target RNA. Synergistic antitumor effects with other molecules, such as tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis ligand (TRAIL and interferon-γ (IFN-γ, have been reported. Thus, SBL may be a novel candidate molecule for anticancer drug development. Sialoglycoconjugates on the tumor cell surface may be associated with lectin activity and antitumor effects of SBL. We review the properties of SBL, particularly its lectin, RNase, and antitumor activities, and comprehensively examine the potential application of SBL for clinical purposes.

  18. Optimized glucocorticoid therapy: teaching old drugs new tricks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strehl, Cindy; Buttgereit, Frank

    2013-11-05

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are commonly used in the treatment of a wide range of rheumatic and other inflammatory diseases. They exert their potent anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects primarily via so called genomic mechanisms, mediated by the cytosolic glucocorticoid receptor (cGR). This mechanism of GC action can be divided into the transactivation and the transrepression processes. However, also rapid effects of GCs exist which are mediated by specific and unspecific non-genomic mechanisms. A clinical relevance of this mode of GC action is assumed for effects mediated by membrane-bound glucocorticoid receptors, but detailed knowledge on the underlying mechanisms is still missing. Great efforts have been made in the past to diminish GC-induced adverse effects, thus improving the benefit/risk ratio of the drugs. Besides approaches to improve the treatment with conventional glucocorticoids currently available to clinicians, new innovative GCs or GC receptor ligands are also being developed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Economic evaluation of antiepileptic drug therapy: a methodologic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Pierre

    2002-05-01

    The increasing number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) fostered the development of economic studies in epilepsy. We reviewed this literature to identify and discuss methodologic issues. We included all studies devoted to cost-based evaluation in epilepsy, published in English from 1989 to 2001, and identified via a Medline search. We identified a series of methodologic problems. First, we reconsidered heterogeneity of concepts and estimating methods, often cited as the most critical problem, as they do not necessarily result from a failure to apply standard methods. One must distinguish "natural" sources of heterogeneity arising from the many unconstrained choices left open in the implementation of economic evaluation on the one hand, and imperfect information and observation-based sources of heterogeneity leading to constrained choices on the other hand. By their very nature, cost-of-illness studies are subject to this variety of choices and were used to illustrate our purpose. Second, cost-minimization studies were reviewed, as they raise additional problems related to study design and choice of an outcome measure. Finally, deficiencies were also identified in cost-effectiveness and cost-utility studies concerning attempts to incorporate patient's point of view in outcome measurement. We agreed with previous reviews on the difficulty of compare results from economic studies in epilepsy due to heterogeneity in methods and concepts used. This is partly due to imperfect information and limits in observation as sources for data collection, as well as to unavailability of refined outcome measures. Therefore, improvements are possible in this field.

  20. Celiac Disease and Drug-Based Therapies: Inquiry into Patients Demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branchi, Federica; Tomba, Carolina; Ferretti, Francesca; Norsa, Lorenzo; Roncoroni, Leda; Bardella, Maria Teresa; Conte, Dario; Elli, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Medical research is looking for alternative drug-based options to the gluten-free diet (GFD) for celiac disease. We aimed at evaluating the need for alternative therapies perceived by celiac patients. During the 2013 meeting of the Lombardy section of the Italian Celiac Patients Association, adult subjects were invited to fill in a questionnaire investigating their clinical profile in relation to compliance to the diet, quality of life (QOL) as well as their opinion on alternative therapies. Three hundred and seventy two patients (76 m, mean age 41.7 ± 13.9 years) completed the questionnaire. Patients reported a significant improvement in health status (HS) and QOL after the diet was started (p < 0.001). The GFD was accepted by 88% patients, but the need for alternative therapies was reported by 65%. Subjects expressing the need for a drug-based therapy showed a lower increase in QOL (p = 0.003) and HS (p = 0.005) on GFD. The preferred option for an alternative therapy was the use of enzymes (145 subjects), followed by a vaccine (111 subjects). The GFD is favorably accepted by most celiac patients. Nevertheless, a proportion of patients pronounce themselves in favor of the development of alternative drugs. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Application of the Pareto principle to identify and address drug-therapy safety issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Fabian; Dormann, Harald; Pfistermeister, Barbara; Sonst, Anja; Patapovas, Andrius; Vogler, Renate; Hartmann, Nina; Plank-Kiegele, Bettina; Kirchner, Melanie; Bürkle, Thomas; Maas, Renke

    2014-06-01

    Adverse drug events (ADE) and medication errors (ME) are common causes of morbidity in patients presenting at emergency departments (ED). Recognition of ADE as being drug related and prevention of ME are key to enhancing pharmacotherapy safety in ED. We assessed the applicability of the Pareto principle (~80 % of effects result from 20 % of causes) to address locally relevant problems of drug therapy. In 752 cases consecutively admitted to the nontraumatic ED of a major regional hospital, ADE, ME, contributing drugs, preventability, and detection rates of ADE by ED staff were investigated. Symptoms, errors, and drugs were sorted by frequency in order to apply the Pareto principle. In total, 242 ADE were observed, and 148 (61.2 %) were assessed as preventable. ADE contributed to 110 inpatient hospitalizations. The ten most frequent symptoms were causally involved in 88 (80.0 %) inpatient hospitalizations. Only 45 (18.6 %) ADE were recognized as drug-related problems until discharge from the ED. A limited set of 33 drugs accounted for 184 (76.0 %) ADE; ME contributed to 57 ADE. Frequency-based listing of ADE, ME, and drugs involved allowed identification of the most relevant problems and development of easily to implement safety measures, such as wall and pocket charts. The Pareto principle provides a method for identifying the locally most relevant ADE, ME, and involved drugs. This permits subsequent development of interventions to increase patient safety in the ED admission process that best suit local needs.

  2. Specific Cell Targeting Therapy Bypasses Drug Resistance Mechanisms in African Trypanosomiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan D Unciti-Broceta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available African trypanosomiasis is a deadly neglected disease caused by the extracellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Current therapies are characterized by high drug toxicity and increasing drug resistance mainly associated with loss-of-function mutations in the transporters involved in drug import. The introduction of new antiparasitic drugs into therapeutic use is a slow and expensive process. In contrast, specific targeting of existing drugs could represent a more rapid and cost-effective approach for neglected disease treatment, impacting through reduced systemic toxicity and circumventing resistance acquired through impaired compound uptake. We have generated nanoparticles of chitosan loaded with the trypanocidal drug pentamidine and coated by a single domain nanobody that specifically targets the surface of African trypanosomes. Once loaded into this nanocarrier, pentamidine enters trypanosomes through endocytosis instead of via classical cell surface transporters. The curative dose of pentamidine-loaded nanobody-chitosan nanoparticles was 100-fold lower than pentamidine alone in a murine model of acute African trypanosomiasis. Crucially, this new formulation displayed undiminished in vitro and in vivo activity against a trypanosome cell line resistant to pentamidine as a result of mutations in the surface transporter aquaglyceroporin 2. We conclude that this new drug delivery system increases drug efficacy and has the ability to overcome resistance to some anti-protozoal drugs.

  3. Peptide-Mediated Liposomal Drug Delivery System Targeting Tumor Blood Vessels in Anticancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Chung Wu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid tumors are known to recruit new blood vessels to support their growth. Therefore, unique molecules expressed on tumor endothelial cells can function as targets for the antiangiogenic therapy of cancer. Current efforts are focusing on developing therapeutic agents capable of specifically targeting cancer cells and tumor-associated microenvironments including tumor blood vessels. These therapies hold the promise of high efficacy and low toxicity. One recognized strategy for improving the therapeutic effectiveness of conventional chemotherapeutics is to encapsulate anticancer drugs into targeting liposomes that bind to the cell surface receptors expressed on tumor-associated endothelial cells. These anti-angiogenic drug delivery systems could be used to target both tumor blood vessels as well as the tumor cells, themselves. This article reviews the mechanisms and advantages of various present and potential methods using peptide-conjugated liposomes to specifically destroy tumor blood vessels in anticancer therapy.

  4. Cognitive relapse after discontinuation of drug therapy in Alzheimer's disease: cholinesterase inhibitors versus nootropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainer, M; Mucke, H A; Krüger-Rainer, C; Kraxberger, E; Haushofer, M; Jellinger, K A

    2001-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study of outpatients diagnosed with dementia of the Alzheimer type who had been treated with a broad variety of drugs supposed to improve cognition or to delay cognitive decline, we have investigated the effects of abruptly discontinuing therapy on cognition. Termination of therapy with any cholinesterase inhibitor was associated with a cognitive decline during the following 6-7 weeks which was significantly more pronounced than that experienced by patients who had received nootropic drugs or calcium channel blockers (3.41 vs. 1.17 points on the ADAS-Cog scale; -1.14 vs. -0.06 points on the MMSE scale). This effect was not modified by gender, apolipoprotein E genotype, or the extent of ventricular enlargement on CT scans. Its magnitude was comparable to the cognitive response observed in published clinical trials when cholinesterase therapy commenced, and also with the data obtained during a 6-week placebo washout phase.

  5. Adenylyl Cyclase Signaling in the Developing Chick Heart: The Deranging Effect of Antiarrhythmic Drugs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hejnová, L.; Hahnová, K.; Kočková, Radka; Svatůňková, Jarmila; Sedmera, David; Novotný, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 2014, č. 2014 (2014), s. 463123 ISSN 2314-6133 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/11/1308 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : embryonic heart * embryotoxicity * adenylyl cyclase * G protein * beta-blocking agents Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 1.579, year: 2014

  6. Dofetilide: a class III anti-arrhythmic drug for the treatment of atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torp-Pedersen, C; Brendorp, B; Køber, L

    2000-01-01

    . Therefore, dosage must be carefully adjusted to the length of QTc interval, calculated creatinine clearance and the presence of heart failure or recent infarction. In addition, treatment must be initiated in hospital with three days of continuous telemetry. Dofetilide can be co-administered with digoxin......, median time to relapse exceeded one year. Two large clinical studies that enrolled 3028 patients have been performed in high-risk patients with severe heart failure and large myocardial infarctions. The outcomes of these studies were neutral with respect to survival and demonstrated the safety...

  7. Heart rate changes mediate the embryotoxic effect of antiarrhythmic drugs in the chick embryo

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kočková, Radka; Svatůňková, Jarmila; Novotný, J.; Hejnová, L.; Ošťádal, Bohuslav; Sedmera, David

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 304, č. 6 (2013), H895-H902 ISSN 0363-6135 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/11/1308; GA ČR(CZ) GA304/08/0615 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : beta-blocking agents * embryonic heart * embryotoxicity * pregnancy * bradycardia Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 4.012, year: 2013

  8. Non-Steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs As Host-Directed Therapy for Tuberculosis : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroesen, Vera M.; Gröschel, Matthias I.; Martinson, Neil; Zumla, Alimuddin; Maeurer, Markus; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Vilaplana, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Lengthy, antimicrobial therapy targeting the pathogen is the mainstay of conventional tuberculosis treatment, complicated by emerging drug resistances. Host-directed therapies, including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), in contrast, target host factors to mitigate disease severity. In

  9. Omega-3 Index and Anti-Arrhythmic Potential of Omega-3 PUFAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribulova, Narcis; Szeiffova Bacova, Barbara; Egan Benova, Tamara; Knezl, Vladimir; Barancik, Miroslav; Slezak, Jan

    2017-10-30

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), namely eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are permanent subjects of interest in relation to the protection of cardiovascular health and the prevention of the incidence of both ventricular and atrial arrhythmias. The purpose of this updated review is to focus on the novel cellular and molecular effects of omega-3 PUFAs, in the context of the mechanisms and factors involved in the development of cardiac arrhythmias; to provide results of the most recent studies on the omega-3 PUFA anti-arrhythmic efficacy and to discuss the lack of the benefit in relation to omega-3 PUFA status. The evidence is in the favor of omega-3 PUFA acute and long-term treatment, perhaps with mitochondria-targeted antioxidants. However, for a more objective evaluation of the anti-arrhythmic potential of omega-3 PUFAs in clinical trials, it is necessary to monitor the basal pre-interventional omega-3 status of individuals, i.e., red blood cell content, omega-3 index and free plasma levels. In the view of evidence-based medicine, it seems to be crucial to aim to establish new approaches in the prevention of cardiac arrhythmias and associated morbidity and mortality that comes with these conditions.

  10. Effects of hospital generic drug substitution on diabetes therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen HY

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hui-Yin Chen,1 Hui-Ru Chang,2 Hui-Chu Lang3 1Department of Auditing, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Department of Social Insurance, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Institute of Hospital and Health Care Administration, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan Objectives: To evaluate the effects on physicians’ prescribing behavior and on the therapeutic outcome of non-insulin-dependent diabetes patients of substituting different generic brands of metformin. Methods: We adopt a retrospective cohort study involving 280 type-2 diabetes patients who regularly used the outpatient services of one medical center and who had changed metformin brands five times between 2003 and 2008. The aim was to examine the effects of switching brands. The generalized estimating equation was used to determine whether drug brand switching affected patient glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c levels, their prescribed daily dose, or their adherence to medication with metformin. Results: HbA1c levels increased from 7.91 to 8.34 throughout the study period, although it was found that brand switching did not adversely affect HbA1c levels after controlling for patient characteristics and the time course of the study. Furthermore, the prescribed daily dose of metformin was stable throughout the study period, and was approximately 0.8 of the defined daily dose. Finally, although adherence was significantly higher with the original metformin than with the four generic brands, patients still maintained high levels of adherence of >0.8. Conclusion: Although switching between different brands of metformin slightly affected the prescribing behavior of the physicians, there was no unfavorable effect on patient HbA1c levels. Thus, the policy of substituting between different generic brands of metformin is a good cost-effective approach that does not adversely affect the quality of diabetes patient care. Keywords: metformin, generic substitution, glycemic

  11. Analysis of combination drug therapy to develop regimens with shortened duration of treatment for tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George L Drusano

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis remains a worldwide problem, particularly with the advent of multi-drug resistance. Shortening therapy duration for Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a major goal, requiring generation of optimal kill rate and resistance-suppression. Combination therapy is required to attain the goal of shorter therapy.Our objective was to identify a method for identifying optimal combination chemotherapy. We developed a mathematical model for attaining this end. This is accomplished by identifying drug effect interaction (synergy, additivity, antagonism for susceptible organisms and subpopulations resistant to each drug in the combination.We studied the combination of linezolid plus rifampin in our hollow fiber infection model. We generated a fully parametric drug effect interaction mathematical model. The results were subjected to Monte Carlo simulation to extend the findings to a population of patients by accounting for between-patient variability in drug pharmacokinetics.All monotherapy allowed emergence of resistance over the first two weeks of the experiment. In combination, the interaction was additive for each population (susceptible and resistant. For a 600 mg/600 mg daily regimen of linezolid plus rifampin, we demonstrated that >50% of simulated subjects had eradicated the susceptible population by day 27 with the remaining organisms resistant to one or the other drug. Only 4% of patients had complete organism eradication by experiment end.These data strongly suggest that in order to achieve the goal of shortening therapy, the original regimen may need to be changed at one month to a regimen of two completely new agents with resistance mechanisms independent of the initial regimen. This hypothesis which arose from the analysis is immediately testable in a clinical trial.

  12. Public versus Private Drug Insurance and Outcomes of Patients Requiring Biologic Therapies for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Rumman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Antitumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF therapy is a highly effective but costly treatment for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Methods. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of IBD patients who were prescribed anti-TNF therapy (2007–2014 in Ontario. We assessed if the insurance type was a predictor of timely access to anti-TNF therapy and nonroutine health utilization (emergency department visits and hospitalizations. Results. There were 268 patients with IBD who were prescribed anti-TNF therapy. Public drug coverage was associated with longer median wait times to first dose than private one (56 versus 35 days, P=0.002. After adjusting for confounders, publicly insured patients were less likely to receive timely access to anti-TNF therapy compared with those privately insured (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.66; 95% CI: 0.45–0.95. After adjustment for demographic and clinical characteristics, publicly funded subjects were more than 2-fold more likely to require hospitalization (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 2.30; 95% CI: 1.19–4.43 and ED visits (IRR 2.42; 95% CI: 1.44–4.08 related to IBD. Conclusions. IBD patients in Ontario with public drug coverage experienced greater delays in access to anti-TNF therapy than privately insured patients and have a higher rate of hospitalizations and ED visits related to IBD.

  13. Public versus Private Drug Insurance and Outcomes of Patients Requiring Biologic Therapies for Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumman, Amir; Candia, Roberto; Sam, Justina J; Croitoru, Kenneth; Silverberg, Mark S; Steinhart, A Hillary; Nguyen, Geoffrey C

    2017-01-01

    Background . Antitumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy is a highly effective but costly treatment for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Methods . We conducted a retrospective cohort study of IBD patients who were prescribed anti-TNF therapy (2007-2014) in Ontario. We assessed if the insurance type was a predictor of timely access to anti-TNF therapy and nonroutine health utilization (emergency department visits and hospitalizations). Results . There were 268 patients with IBD who were prescribed anti-TNF therapy. Public drug coverage was associated with longer median wait times to first dose than private one (56 versus 35 days, P = 0.002). After adjusting for confounders, publicly insured patients were less likely to receive timely access to anti-TNF therapy compared with those privately insured (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.66; 95% CI: 0.45-0.95). After adjustment for demographic and clinical characteristics, publicly funded subjects were more than 2-fold more likely to require hospitalization (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 2.30; 95% CI: 1.19-4.43) and ED visits (IRR 2.42; 95% CI: 1.44-4.08) related to IBD. Conclusions . IBD patients in Ontario with public drug coverage experienced greater delays in access to anti-TNF therapy than privately insured patients and have a higher rate of hospitalizations and ED visits related to IBD.

  14. Drug-Encoded Biomarkers for Monitoring Biological Therapies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desislava Tsoneva

    Full Text Available Blood tests are necessary, easy-to-perform and low-cost alternatives for monitoring of oncolytic virotherapy and other biological therapies in translational research. Here we assessed three candidate proteins with the potential to be used as biomarkers in biological fluids: two glucuronidases from E. coli (GusA and Staphylococcus sp. RLH1 (GusPlus, and the luciferase from Gaussia princeps (GLuc. The three genes encoding these proteins were inserted individually into vaccinia virus GLV-1h68 genome under the control of an identical promoter. The three resulting recombinant viruses were used to infect tumor cells in cultures and human tumor xenografts in nude mice. In contrast to the actively secreted GLuc, the cytoplasmic glucuronidases GusA and GusPlus were released into the supernatants only as a result of virus-mediated oncolysis. GusPlus resulted in the most sensitive detection of enzyme activity under controlled assay conditions in samples containing as little as 1 pg/ml of GusPlus, followed by GusA (25 pg/ml and GLuc (≥375 pg/ml. Unexpectedly, even though GusA had a lower specific activity compared to GusPlus, the substrate conversion in the serum of tumor-bearing mice injected with the GusA-encoding virus strains was substantially higher than that of GusPlus. This was attributed to a 3.2 fold and 16.2 fold longer half-life of GusA in the blood stream compared to GusPlus and GLuc respectively, thus a more sensitive monitor of virus replication than the other two enzymes. Due to the good correlation between enzymatic activity of expressed marker gene and virus titer, we conclude that the amount of the biomarker protein in the body fluid semiquantitatively represents the amount of virus in the infected tumors which was confirmed by low light imaging. We found GusA to be the most reliable biomarker for monitoring oncolytic virotherapy among the three tested markers.

  15. Antiretroviral drug resistance in HIV-1 therapy-naive patients in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Lissette; Kourí, Vivian; Alemán, Yoan; Abrahantes, Yeisel; Correa, Consuelo; Aragonés, Carlos; Martínez, Orlando; Pérez, Jorge; Fonseca, Carlos; Campos, Jorge; Álvarez, Delmis; Schrooten, Yoeri; Dekeersmaeker, Nathalie; Imbrechts, Stijn; Beheydt, Gertjan; Vinken, Lore; Soto, Yudira; Álvarez, Alina; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Van Laethem, Kristel

    2013-06-01

    In Cuba, antiretroviral therapy rollout started in 2001 and antiretroviral therapy coverage has reached almost 40% since then. The objectives of this study were therefore to analyze subtype distribution, and level and patterns of drug resistance in therapy-naive HIV-1 patients. Four hundred and one plasma samples were collected from HIV-1 therapy-naive patients in 2003 and in 2007-2011. HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping was performed in the pol gene and drug resistance was interpreted according to the WHO surveillance drug-resistance mutations list, version 2009. Potential impact on first-line therapy response was estimated using genotypic drug resistance interpretation systems HIVdb version 6.2.0 and Rega version 8.0.2. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using Neighbor-Joining. The majority of patients were male (84.5%), men who have sex with men (78.1%) and from Havana City (73.6%). Subtype B was the most prevalent subtype (39.3%), followed by CRF20-23-24_BG (19.5%), CRF19_cpx (18.0%) and CRF18_cpx (10.3%). Overall, 29 patients (7.2%) had evidence of drug resistance, with 4.0% (CI 1.6%-4.8%) in 2003 versus 12.5% (CI 7.2%-14.5%) in 2007-2011. A significant increase in drug resistance was observed in recently HIV-1 diagnosed patients, i.e. 14.8% (CI 8.0%-17.0%) in 2007-2011 versus 3.8% (CI 0.9%-4.7%) in 2003 (OR 3.9, CI 1.5-17.0, p=0.02). The majority of drug resistance was restricted to a single drug class (75.8%), with 55.2% patients displaying nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI), 10.3% non-NRTI (NNRTI) and 10.3% protease inhibitor (PI) resistance mutations. Respectively, 20.7% and 3.4% patients carried viruses containing drug resistance mutations against NRTI+NNRTI and NRTI+NNRTI+PI. The first cases of resistance towards other drug classes than NRTI were only detected from 2008 onwards. The most frequent resistance mutations were T215Y/rev (44.8%), M41L (31.0%), M184V (17.2%) and K103N (13.8%). The median genotypic susceptibility score for the

  16. NIR-driven Smart Theranostic Nanomedicine for On-demand Drug Release and Synergistic Antitumour Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pengfei; Zheng, Mingbin; Luo, Zhenyu; Gong, Ping; Gao, Guanhui; Sheng, Zonghai; Zheng, Cuifang; Ma, Yifan; Cai, Lintao

    2015-09-24

    Smart nanoparticles (NPs) that respond to external and internal stimulations have been developing to achieve optimal drug release in tumour. However, applying these smart NPs to attain high antitumour performance is hampered by limited drug carriers and inefficient spatiotemporal control. Here we report a noninvasive NIR-driven, temperature-sensitive DI-TSL (DOX/ICG-loaded temperature sensitive liposomes) co-encapsulating doxorubicin (DOX) and indocyanine green (ICG). This theranostic system applies thermo-responsive lipid to controllably release drug, utilizes the fluorescence (FL) of DOX/ICG to real-time trace the distribution of NPs, and employs DOX/ICG to treat cancer by chemo/photothermal therapy. DI-TSL exhibits uniform size distribution, excellent FL/size stability, enhanced response to NIR-laser, and 3 times increased drug release through laser irradiation. After endocytosis by MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells, DI-TSL in cellular endosomes can cause hyperthermia through laser irradiation, then endosomes are disrupted and DI-TSL 'opens' to release DOX simultaneously for increased cytotoxicity. Furthermore, DI-TSL shows laser-controlled release of DOX in tumour, enhanced ICG and DOX retention by 7 times and 4 times compared with free drugs. Thermo-sensitive DI-TSL manifests high efficiency to promote cell apoptosis, and completely eradicate tumour without side-effect. DI-TSL may provide a smart strategy to release drugs on demand for combinatorial cancer therapy.

  17. G2 checkpoint abrogator abates the antagonistic interaction between antimicrotubule drugs and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sui Meihua; Zhang Hongfang; Di Xiaoyun; Chang Jinjia; Shen Youqing; Fan Weimin

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: We previously demonstrated that radiation may arrest tumor cells at G2 phase, which in turn prevents the cytotoxicity of antimicrotubule drugs and results in antagonistic interaction between these two modalities. Herein we tested whether G2 abrogators would attenuate the above antagonistic interaction and improve the therapeutic efficacy of combination therapy between radiation and antimicrotubule drugs. Materials and methods: Breast cancer BCap37 and epidermoid carcinoma KB cell lines were administered with radiation, UCN-01 (a model drug of G2 abrogator), paclitaxel or vincristine, alone or in combinations. The antitumor activities of single and combined treatments were analyzed by a series of cytotoxic, apoptotic, cell cycle, morphological and biochemical assays. Results: UCN-01 significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of radiation, antimitotic drugs, and their combined treatments in vitro. Further investigations demonstrated that UCN-01 attenuated radiation-induced G2 arrest, and subsequently repressed the inhibitory effect of radiation on drug-induced mitotic arrest and apoptosis. Conclusions: This is the first report demonstrating that G2 checkpoint abrogation represses the inhibitory effect of radiation on antimicrotubule drugs, which may be implicated in cancer combination therapy. Considering that G2 abrogators are under extensive evaluation for cancer treatment, our findings provide valuable information for this class of promising compounds.

  18. Process Pharmacology: A Pharmacological Data Science Approach to Drug Development and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lötsch, Jörn; Ultsch, Alfred

    2016-04-01

    A novel functional-genomics based concept of pharmacology that uses artificial intelligence techniques for mining and knowledge discovery in "big data" providing comprehensive information about the drugs' targets and their functional genomics is proposed. In "process pharmacology", drugs are associated with biological processes. This puts the disease, regarded as alterations in the activity in one or several cellular processes, in the focus of drug therapy. In this setting, the molecular drug targets are merely intermediates. The identification of drugs for therapeutic or repurposing is based on similarities in the high-dimensional space of the biological processes that a drug influences. Applying this principle to data associated with lymphoblastic leukemia identified a short list of candidate drugs, including one that was recently proposed as novel rescue medication for lymphocytic leukemia. The pharmacological data science approach provides successful selections of drug candidates within development and repurposing tasks. © 2016 The Authors CPT: Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  19. The Effect of Brief Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Group Intervention on Self Esteem among Drug Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussin Huzilil

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-esteem is related to the individuals understanding and accepting the existing character and attitude to themselves. Failure to understand and accept their own strengths and weaknesses and in the same time do not have the skills to cope with it will caused them to be classified in the group who have low levels of self esteem. The up and down in self esteem will seriously affect the person emotional development and their reasoning process. Thus, reforming self esteem is an important key to help the rehabilition of drug abuser. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of Brief Group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy on self-esteem among drug users. The quasi experimental design with one treatment group and one control group and four measurements (Pre Test, Post 1, Post 2 and Post 3 were employed in this study. The sample of 108 drugs users was chosen using purposive sampling procedure. Data were collected using standardized psychometric instruments, including Internal Control Index (Patricia Duttweiler, 1984 and The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and were analysed using descriptive analysis. The findings shows the intervention of group Brief Cognitive Behavioural Therapy CBT (B are succeed in increasing self-esteem mean score compared to control group in different time interval. As a conclusion, self-esteem among the subjects can be enhanced with an intervention of proper and systematic therapy instead of unplanned therapy sessions

  20. Understanding epigenetics of schizophrenia in the backdrop of its antipsychotic drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swathy, Babu; Banerjee, Moinak

    2017-05-01

    The diatheses of gene and environment interaction in schizophrenia (SCZ) are becoming increasingly evident. Genetic and epigenetic backgrounds are being considered in stratifying and addressing phenotypic variation and drug response in SCZ. But how much of these epigenetic alterations are the primary contributing factor, toward disease pathogenesis and drug response, needs further clarity. Evidence indicates that antipsychotic drugs can also alter the epigenetic homeostasis thereby inducing pharmacoepigenomic effects. We re-examine the context of epigenetics in disease pathogenesis and antipsychotic drug therapy in SCZ to understand how much of these observations act as real indicators of the disease or therapeutic response. We propose that epigenetic viewpoint in SCZ needs to be critically examined under the genetic, epigenetic and pharmacoepigenetic background.

  1. Drug delivery system design and development for boron neutron capture therapy on cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherlock Huang, Lin-Chiang; Hsieh, Wen-Yuan; Chen, Jiun-Yu; Huang, Su-Chin; Chen, Jen-Kun; Hsu, Ming-Hua

    2014-01-01

    We have already synthesized a boron-containing polymeric micellar drug delivery system for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The synthesized diblock copolymer, boron-terminated copolymers (Bpin-PLA-PEOz), consisted of biodegradable poly(D,L-lactide) (PLA) block and water-soluble polyelectrolyte poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) (PEOz) block, and a cap of pinacol boronate ester (Bpin). In this study, we have demonstrated that synthesized Bpin-PLA-PEOz micelle has great potential to be boron drug delivery system with preliminary evaluation of biocompatibility and boron content. - Highlights: • Herein, we have synthesized boron-modified diblock copolymer. • Bpin-PLA-PEOz, which will be served as new boron containing vehicle for transporting the boron drug. • This boron containing Bpin-PLA-PEOz micelle was low toxicity can be applied to drug delivery

  2. A combination therapy of selective intraarterial anti-cancer drug infusion and radiation therapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, Yumiko; Zaitsu, Masayoshi; Mikami, Koji; Takeuchi, Takumi; Matsuda, Izuru; Arahira, Satoko

    2017-01-01

    The gold standard for the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer Without metastasis is radical cystectomy. However, there increase patients very elderly and with serious complications. They are not good candidates for invasive surgical operation. Intraarterial infusion of 70 mg/m 2 of cisplatin and 30 mg/m 2 of pirarubicin into bilateral bladder arteries was conducted for 5 patients diagnosed with muscle invasive bladder cancers without distant metastasis. Right and left distribution of anti-cancer drugs was determined based on the location of bladder tumor(s). External beam radiation therapy was commenced immediately following intraarterial infusion. The patients were followed up with clinical and radiographic investigations and bladderbiopsy was performed as needed. Patients were all males who are smoking or with smoking history ranging from 73 to 85 years of age (median 82). The duration between transurethral resection of bladder tumors (TUR-Bt) and intraarterial infusion of anti-cancer drugs was 47.4 days (range 26-68), the median follow-up period after intraarterial infusion was 21.5 months (range 87-547) without death. Total radiation dose was 59.2 ±3.0 Gy. Complete remission was accomplished in all cases. One patient showed intravesical recurrence of non muscle-invasive tumors 45.8 months following intraarterial infusion and underwent TUR-Bt. Two cases underwent bladder biopsies showing no tumors. All patients but one case with bladder recurrence were free of tumor recurrence with radiographic investigation. For adverse events, acute renal failure was in one case and leukocytopenia was in all 5 cases, Grade 2 for one and Grade 3 for 4 cases. Follow-up periods are not long enough, but early results of a combination therapy of selective intraarterial anti-cancer drug infusion and radiation therapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer were good. (author)

  3. Affordable HIV drug-resistance testing for monitoring of antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inzaule, Seth C; Ondoa, Pascale; Peter, Trevor; Mugyenyi, Peter N; Stevens, Wendy S; de Wit, Tobias F Rinke; Hamers, Raph L

    2016-11-01

    Increased provision of antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan Africa has led to a growing number of patients with therapy failure and acquired drug-resistant HIV, driving the demand for more costly further lines of antiretroviral therapy. In conjunction with accelerated access to viral load monitoring, feasible and affordable technologies to detect drug-resistant HIV could help maximise the durability and rational use of available drug regimens. Potential low-cost technologies include in-house Sanger and next-generation sequencing in centralised laboratories, and point mutation assays and genotype-free systems that predict response to antiretroviral therapy at point-of-care. Strengthening of centralised high-throughput laboratories, including efficient systems for sample referral and results delivery, will increase economies-of-scale while reducing costs. Access barriers can be mitigated by standardisation of in-house assays into commercial kits, use of polyvalent instruments, and adopting price-reducing strategies. A stepwise rollout approach should improve feasibility, prioritising WHO-recommended population-based surveillance and management of complex patient categories, such as patients failing protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy. Implementation research, adaptations of existing WHO guidance, and political commitment, will be key to support the appropriate investments and policy changes. In this Personal View, we discuss the potential role of HIV drug resistance testing for population-based surveillance and individual patient management in sub-Saharan Africa. We review the strengths and challenges of promising low-cost technologies and how they can be implemented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mono- and combination drug therapies in hospitalized patients with bipolar depression. Data from the European drug surveillance program AMSP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haeberle Anne

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For the pharmacological treatment of bipolar depression several guidelines exist. It is largely unknown, to what extent the prescriptions in daily clinical routine correspond to these evidence based recommendations and which combinations of psychotropic drugs are frequently used. Methods The prescriptions of psychotropic drugs were investigated of all in-patients with bipolar depression (n = 2246; time period 1994–2009 from hospitals participating in the drug surveillance program AMSP. For the drug use in 2010, 221 cases were analysed additionally. Results From 1994 to 2009, 85% of all patients received more than one class of psychotropic substances: 74% received antidepressants in combination therapy, 55% antipsychotics, 48% anticonvulsants and 33% lithium. When given in combination, lithium is the most often prescribed substance for bipolar depression (33%, followed by valproic acid (23%, mirtazapine and venlafaxine (16% each, quetiapine (15%, lamotrigine (14% and olanzapine (13%. Both, lithium and valproic acid are often combined with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI, but also with mirtazapine und venlafaxine. Combinations of more than one antidepressant occur quite often, whereby combinations with bupropion, paroxetine, fluoxetine or fluvoxamine are very rare. In 2010, quetiapine (alone and combined was the most frequently prescribed drug (39%; aripiprazole was administered in 10%. Conclusion Combinations of antidepressants (SSRI, mirtazapine, venlafaxine with mood stabilizers (lithium, valproic acid, lamotrigine and / or atypical antipsychotics (quetiapine, olanzapine are common. Of most of those combinations the efficacy has not been studied. The use of aripiprazole and the concomitant use of two or three antidepressants contrast the guidelines.

  5. Drug therapy of apparent treatment-resistant hypertension: focus on mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicklich, Daniel; Frishman, William H

    2015-04-01

    Apparent treatment-resistant hypertension (aTRH) is defined as blood pressure (BP) >140/90 mmHg despite three different antihypertensive drugs including a diuretic. aTRH is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events, including stroke, chronic renal failure, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, aortic aneurysm, atrial fibrillation, and sudden death. Preliminary studies of renal nerve ablation as a therapy to control aTRH were encouraging. However, these results were not confirmed by the Symplicity 3 trial. Therefore, attention has refocused on drug therapy. Secondary forms of hypertension and associated conditions such as obesity, sleep apnea, and primary aldosteronism are common in patients with aTRH. The pivotal role of aldosterone in the pathogenesis of aTRH in many cases is well recognized. For patients with aTRH, the Joint National Committee-8, the European Society of Hypertension, and a recent consensus conference recommend that a diuretic, ACE inhibitor, or angiotensin receptor blocker and calcium channel blocker combination be used to maximally tolerated doses before starting a 'fourth-line' drug such as a mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist. Although the best fourth-line drug for aTRH has not been extensively investigated, a number of studies summarized here show that an MR antagonist is effective in reducing BP when added to the standard multi-drug regimen.

  6. A short history of anti-rheumatic therapy. I. An introduction on traditional and drug treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pasero

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The origins of anti-rheumatic therapy are very old and mainly related to the use of traditional, sometimes extravagant, treatments, as a part of folk medicine. Spa therapy has long been used for the treatment of rheumatic diseases, as well as, in later times, physical treatments, including electrotherapy. Drug treatment has developed beginning from substances of vegetable origin, such as willow and colchicum extracts. Then it has been spread out through the chemical synthesis of compounds with specific action and therefore more effective, owing to the great development of pharmaceutical industry.

  7. Antiarrhythmic medication is superior to catheter ablation in suppressing supraventricular ectopic complexes in patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Christina; Lauridsen, Trine K; Johannessen, Arne

    2017-01-01

    to antiarrhythmic medication (AAD) is unknown. Our aims were to compare the prevalence of SVEC after AAD and CA and to estimate the association between baseline SVEC burden and AF burden during 24months of follow-up. METHODS: Patients with paroxysmal AF (N=260) enrolled in the MANTRA PAF trial were treated with AAD...

  8. ZnO nanoparticles as drug delivery agent for photodynamic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakhar-e-Alam, M; Hammad Aziz, M; Rahim, S; Majid, A; Atif, M; Imran Malick, M; Zaidi, S S Z; Suleman, R

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) limits the success of many tumoricidal drugs. Non-significant accumulation of the drug into the target site is one major problem in photodynamic therapy. Nanoparticles are extensively used as efficient drug carriers in various local infectious and premalignant biological tissues. Due to their unique physical and chemical properties, PEGylated zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) exhibit high drug loading capacities, sustained drug release profiles and long-term anticancer efficacy. (Polyethylene glycol) PEG-zinc oxide nanoparticles were synthesized using the aquis chemical technique. Morphology/structural analysis of the said nanoparticles was confirmed by applying many techniques, e.g. scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and XRD. Average grain size of the nanoparticles, which was ≈100 nm, was calculated by applying the Scherrer formula. The PEGylated ZnO NPs were loaded with protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) to enhance the capability of drug carrying potency. Current work focused on the comparison of the cell killing effect (apoptosis/necrosis) by functionalizing different nanostructures via PEGylated ZnO NPs and bare ZnO NPs using the free-standing drug delivery procedure. ZnO NPs were used as anticancer drug vehicles because of their biocompatibility and bio-safety profile. The apoptotic effect of PEGylated tumoricidal drugs has been studied in human muscle carcinoma (RD cell line) in the dark as well as under laser exposure. It was concluded that PpIX localization was a significant time greater using encapsulation as compared to a conventional drug delivery system. This new technique may find excellent opportunities in the field of nanomedicine, especially in a multidrug delivery system. (letter)

  9. Advances in research and development of new drugs for antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GAO Yanhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is one of the major disease burdens worldwide. At present, the antiviral therapy for hepatitis B includes interferons and nucleos(tide analogues. Current therapeutic regimens based on these drugs cannot significantly increase the proportion of patients with functional cure. With a better understanding of HBV replication cycle and specific virus-host cell interactions, this article summarizes and reviews the advances in the research and development of new drugs for HBV with a focus on different action targets during the above processes.

  10. Cost-effectiveness analysis of antithyroid drug therapy, 131I therapy and subtotal thyroidectomy for Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Fuzuki; Watanabe, Sadahiro; Hayashi, Katsumi; Kita, Tamotsu; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Kosuda, Shigeru; Tanaka, Yuji

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of antithyroid drug (ATD) therapy vs. radioiodine therapy (RIT) vs. subtotal thyroidectomy (STT) by calculating expected lifelong cost and utility based on Graves' disease patients' responses to questionnaires using a decision-tree sensitivity analysis and relevant variables. The decision-tree sensitivity analysis to determine expected lifelong cost and utility in Graves' disease patients was designed on the basis of the 4 competing strategies consisting of: (1) ATD therapy plus RIT strategy, (2) ATD therapy plus STT strategy, (3) low-fixed-dose (185 MBq) RIT alone strategy, and (4) high-fixed-dose (370 MBq) RIT alone strategy. One-way sensitivity analysis was designed in the ATD therapy plus RIT strategy, for replacement with RIT in place of ATD, ranging from a 1% incidence of ATD side effects to 30%. The low-fixed-dose RIT alone strategy was least costly, and the high-fixed-dose RIT alone strategy most costly. The lifelong utility of high-fixed-dose RIT alone strategy with a 5% rate of discounting was highest (lifelong utility for 30 years: 15.2/patient), and the utility of the ATD plus RIT strategy with 1% side effects of the ATD was lowest (14.1/patient). The cost-effectiveness ratio was lowest (yen 5 008/utility) in a low-fixed-dose RIT alone strategy. In conclusion, a low-fixed-dose RIT alone strategy is preferred treatments in view of cost-effectiveness ratio, and RIT should be used more widely in Japan. (author)

  11. New drug therapies for the treatment of overweight and obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahgerefteh, Babak; Vigue, Michael; Freestone, Zachary; Silver, Scott; Nguyen, Quang

    2013-09-01

    Obesity is a serious and costly disease that is growing in epidemic proportions. Obesity-related hospitalizations have nearly tripled from 1996 to 2009. If the current trend in the growth of obesity continues, the total healthcare costs attributable to obesity could reach $861 billion to $957 billion by 2030. The American Medical Association has officially recognized obesity as a disease. Obesity is a public health crisis affecting approximately more than 33% of Americans and costing the healthcare system more than $190 billion annually. To review the 2 new drugs that were recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of obesity, lorcaserin HCl (Belviq) and phentermine/topiramate (Qsymia) and their potential impact on the treatment of obese patients. Lifestyle modification is the first and mainstay treatment for obesity. Antiobesity drugs are indicated as adjuncts to a healthy, low-fat, low-calorie diet and an exercise plan. Currently, 4 drugs are approved by the FDA for the treatment of obesity, 2 of which were approved after June 2012. These 2 drugs, Belviq and Qsymia, have added new tools for the treatment of obesity. In addition to reducing body mass index, these drugs have been shown to reduce hemoglobin A1c levels in patients with diabetes and blood pressure levels in patients with hypertension, as well as to decrease lipid levels in patients with hyperlipidemia. This article reviews the drugs' mechanisms of action, evaluates landmark clinical studies leading to the FDA approval of the 2 drugs, their common side effects, and the benefits these new drugs can provide toward the management of the obesity epidemic that are different from other medications currently available. The weight loss seen in patients who are using the 2 new medications has been shown to further improve other cardiometabolic health parameters, including blood pressure, blood glucose levels, and serum lipid levels. Based on clinical trials evidence, it is

  12. Trends in US hospitalization rates and rhythm control therapies following publication of the AFFIRM and RACE trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Doyle, William; Essebag, Vidal; Zimetbaum, Peter; Reynolds, Matthew R

    2011-05-01

    The impact of trials comparing rate versus rhythm control for AF on subsequent use of rhythm control therapies and hospitalizations at a national level has not been described. We queried the Healthcare Cost & Utilization Project on the frequency of hospital admissions and performance of specific rhythm control procedures from 1998-2006. We analyzed trends in hospitalization for AF as principal diagnosis before and after the publication of key rate versus rhythm trials in 2002. We also reviewed the use of electrical cardioversion and catheter ablation as principal procedures during hospital admissions for any cause and for AF as principal diagnosis. We additionally appraised the overall outpatient utilization of antiarrhythmic drugs during this same time frame using IMS Health's National Prescription Audit.™ Admissions for AF as a principal diagnosis increased at 5%/year from 1998-2002. Following publication of the AFFIRM and RACE trials in 2002, admissions declined by 2%/year from 2002-2004, before rising again from 2004-2006. In-hospital electrical cardioversion followed a similar pattern. National prescription volumes for antiarrhythmic drugs grew at trend reversed by 2005, at which time rapid growth in the use of catheter ablation for AF was observed. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Magnetic chitosan nanoparticles as a drug delivery system for targeting photodynamic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yun; Chen Zhilong; Yang Xiaoxia; Huang Peng; Zhou Xinping; Du Xiaoxia

    2009-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has become an increasingly recognized alternative to cancer treatment in clinic. However, PDT therapy agents, namely photosensitizer (PS), are limited in application as a result of prolonged cutaneous photosensitivity, poor water solubility and inadequate selectivity, which are encountered by numerous chemical therapies. Magnetic chitosan nanoparticles provide excellent biocompatibility, biodegradability, non-toxicity and water solubility without compromising their magnetic targeting. Nevertheless, no previous attempt has been reported to develop an in vivo magnetic drug delivery system with chitosan nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) monitored targeting photodynamic therapy. In this study, magnetic targeting chitosan nanoparticles (MTCNPs) were prepared and tailored as a drug delivery system and imaging agents for PS, designated as PHPP. Results showed that PHPP-MTCNPs could be used in MRI monitored targeting PDT with excellent targeting and imaging ability. Non-toxicity and high photodynamic efficacy on SW480 carcinoma cells both in vitro and in vivo were achieved with this method at the level of 0-100 μM. Notably, localization of nanoparticles in skin and hepatic tissue was significantly less than in tumor tissue, therefore photosensitivity and hepatotoxicity can be attenuated.

  14. A controlled evaluation of family behavior therapy in concurrent child neglect and drug abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, Brad; Azrin, Nathan H; Bradshaw, Kelsey; Van Hasselt, Vincent B; Cross, Chad L; Urgelles, Jessica; Romero, Valerie; Hill, Heather H; Allen, Daniel N

    2014-08-01

    Approximately 50% of child protective service (CPS) referrals abuse drugs; yet, existing treatment studies in this population have been limited to case examinations. Therefore, a family-based behavioral therapy was evaluated in mothers referred from CPS for child neglect and drug abuse utilizing a controlled experimental design. Seventy-two mothers evidencing drug abuse or dependence and child neglect were randomly assigned to family behavior therapy (FBT) or treatment as usual (TAU). Participants were assessed at baseline, 6 months, and 10 months postrandomization. As hypothesized, intent-to-treat repeated measures analyses revealed mothers referred for child neglect not due to their children being exposed to illicit drugs demonstrated better outcomes in child maltreatment potential from baseline to 6- and 10-month postrandomization assessments when assigned to FBT, as compared with TAU mothers and FBT mothers who were referred due to child drug exposure. Similar results occurred for hard drug use from baseline to 6 and 10 months postrandomization. However, TAU mothers referred due to child drug exposure were also found to decrease their hard drug use more than TAU mothers of non-drug-exposed children and FBT mothers of drug-exposed children at 6 and 10 months postrandomization. Although effect sizes for mothers assigned to FBT were slightly larger for marijuana use than TAU (medium vs. large), these differences were not statistically significant. Specific to secondary outcomes, mothers in FBT, relative to TAU, increased time employed from baseline to 6 and 10 months postrandomization. Mothers in FBT, compared to TAU, also decreased HIV risk from baseline to 6 months postrandomization. There were no differences in outcome between FBT and TAU for number of days children were in CPS custody and alcohol intoxication, although FBT mothers demonstrated marginal decreases (p = .058) in incarceration from baseline to 6 months postrandomization relative to TAU mothers

  15. Nanotechnology-Based Drug Delivery Systems for Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovana Maria Fioramonti Calixto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a promising alternative approach for improved cancer treatment. In PDT, a photosensitizer (PS is administered that can be activated by light of a specific wavelength, which causes selective damage to the tumor and its surrounding vasculature. The success of PDT is limited by the difficulty in administering photosensitizers (PSs with low water solubility, which compromises the clinical use of several molecules. Incorporation of PSs in nanostructured drug delivery systems, such as polymeric nanoparticles (PNPs, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs, nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs, hydrogels, liposomes, liquid crystals, dendrimers, and cyclodextrin is a potential strategy to overcome this difficulty. Additionally, nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems may improve the transcytosis of a PS across epithelial and endothelial barriers and afford the simultaneous co-delivery of two or more drugs. Based on this, the application of nanotechnology in medicine may offer numerous exciting possibilities in cancer treatment and improve the efficacy of available therapeutics. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to review nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems for photodynamic therapy of cancer.

  16. Magnetic field activated drug release system based on magnetic PLGA microspheres for chemo-thermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Kun; Song, Lina; Gu, Zhuxiao; Yang, Fang; Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ning

    2015-12-01

    Controlled drug delivery systems have been extensively investigated for cancer therapy in order to obtain better specific targeting and therapeutic efficiency. Herein, we developed doxorubicin-loaded magnetic PLGA microspheres (DOX-MMS), in which DOX was encapsulated in the core and high contents (28.3 wt%) of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles (IOs) were electrostatically assembled on the surface of microsphere to ensure the high sensitivity to response of an external alternating current magnetic field (ACMF). The IOs in PLGA shell can both induce the heat effect and trigger shell permeability enhancement to release drugs when DOX-MMs was activated by ACMF. Results show that the cumulative drug release from DOX-MMs exposed to ACMF for 30 min (21.6%) was significantly higher (approximately 7 times higher) than that not exposed to ACMF (2.8%). The combination of hyperthermia and enhanced DOX release from DOX-MMS is beneficial for in vitro 4T1 breast cancer cell apoptosis as well as effective inhibition of tumor growth in 4T1 tumor xenografts. Therefore, the DOX-MMS can be optimized as powerful delivery system for efficient magnetic responsive drug release and chemo-thermal therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Nanotechnology-Based Drug Delivery Systems for Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calixto, Giovana Maria Fioramonti; Bernegossi, Jéssica; de Freitas, Laura Marise; Fontana, Carla Raquel; Chorilli, Marlus

    2016-03-11

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising alternative approach for improved cancer treatment. In PDT, a photosensitizer (PS) is administered that can be activated by light of a specific wavelength, which causes selective damage to the tumor and its surrounding vasculature. The success of PDT is limited by the difficulty in administering photosensitizers (PSs) with low water solubility, which compromises the clinical use of several molecules. Incorporation of PSs in nanostructured drug delivery systems, such as polymeric nanoparticles (PNPs), solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs), nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs), gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), hydrogels, liposomes, liquid crystals, dendrimers, and cyclodextrin is a potential strategy to overcome this difficulty. Additionally, nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems may improve the transcytosis of a PS across epithelial and endothelial barriers and afford the simultaneous co-delivery of two or more drugs. Based on this, the application of nanotechnology in medicine may offer numerous exciting possibilities in cancer treatment and improve the efficacy of available therapeutics. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to review nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems for photodynamic therapy of cancer.

  18. DNA Nanotechnology for Precise Control over Drug Delivery and Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angell, Chava; Xie, Sibai; Zhang, Liangfang; Chen, Yi

    2016-03-02

    Nanomedicine has been growing exponentially due to its enhanced drug targeting and reduced drug toxicity. It uses the interactions where nanotechnological components and biological systems communicate with each other to facilitate the delivery performance. At this scale, the physiochemical properties of delivery systems strongly affect their capacities. Among current delivery systems, DNA nanotechnology shows many advantages because of its unprecedented engineering abilities. Through molecular recognition, DNA nanotechnology can be used to construct a variety of nanostructures with precisely controllable size, shape, and surface chemistry, which can be appreciated in the delivery process. In this review, different approaches that are currently used for the construction of DNA nanostructures are reported. Further, the utilization of these DNA nanostructures with the well-defined parameters for the precise control in drug delivery and gene therapy is discussed. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Spirituality, religiosity, depression, anxiety, and drug-use consequences during methadone maintenance therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piacentine, Linda B

    2013-07-01

    Substance addiction is damaging to the health of persons, families, and society. Often the person with addiction has decreased spirituality and religiosity and suffers from anxiety, depression, or both, increasing the risk for continued substance use and its concomitant negative consequences. The study purpose was to describe spirituality and religiosity, among persons enrolled in methadone maintenance therapy and to examine associations between spirituality, religiosity, anxiety, depression, and drug-use consequences. Using a descriptive and cross-sectional correlational design, 108 participants completed questionnaires assessing the study variables. Spiritual well-being was similar to other addiction samples and lower than healthy person samples. Most participants described themselves as spiritual or religious though religious participation was lower than in their past. The analysis indicated that spirituality, religiosity, depression, anxiety, and negative drug-use consequences are interrelated in the person with addiction. Higher anxiety was predictive of negative drug-use consequences.

  20. Fighting cancer with nanomedicine---drug-polyester nanoconjugates for targeted cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Qian

    The aim of my Ph. D. research is to develop drug-polyester nanoconjugates (NCs) as a novel translational polymeric drug delivery system that can successfully evade non-specific uptake by reticuloendothelial system (RES) and facilitate targeted cancer diagnosis and therapy. By uniquely integrating well-established chemical reaction-controlled ring opening polymerization (ROP) with nanoprecipitation technique, I successfully developed a polymeric NC system based on poly(lactic acid) and poly(O-carboxyanhydrides) (OCA) that allows for the quantitative loading and controlled release of a variety of anticancer drugs. The developed NC system could be easily modified with parmidronate, one of bisphosphonates commonly used as the treatment for disease characterized by osteolysis, to selectively deliver doxorubicin (Doxo) to the bone tissues and substantially to improve their therapeutic efficiency in inhibiting the growth of osteosarcoma in both murine and canine models. More importantly, the developed NCs could avidly bind to human serum albumin, a ubiquitous protein in the blood, to bypass the endothelium barrier and penetrate into tumor tissues more deeply and efficiently. When compared with PEGylated NCs, these albumin-bound NCs showed significantly reduced accumulation in RES and enhanced tumor accumulation, which consequently contributed to higher their tumor inhibition capabilities. In addition, the developed NC system allows easy incorporation of X-ray computed tomography (CT) contrast agents to largely facilitate personalized therapy by improving diagnosis accuracy and monitoring therapeutic efficacy. Through the synthetic and formulation strategy I developed, a large quantity (grams or larger-scale) of drug-polyester NCs can be easily obtained, which can be used as a model drug delivery system for fundamental studies as well as a real drug delivery system for disease treatment in clinical settings.

  1. Rational drug therapy education in clinical phase carried out by task-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilge, S Sırrı; Akyüz, Bahar; Ağrı, Arzu Erdal; Özlem, Mıdık

    2017-01-01

    Irrational drug use results in drug interactions, treatment noncompliance, and drug resistance. Rational pharmacotherapy education is being implemented in many faculties of medicine. Our aim is to introduce rational pharmacotherapy education by clinicians and to evaluate task-based rational drug therapy education in the clinical context. The Kirkpatrick's evaluation model was used for the evaluation of the program. The participants evaluated the program in terms of constituents of the program, utilization, and contribution to learning. Voluntary participants responded to the evaluation forms after the educational program. Data are evaluated using both quantitative and qualitative tools. SPSS (version 21) used for quantitative data for determining mean and standard deviation values. Descriptive qualitative analysis approach is used for the analysis of open-ended questions. It was revealed that the program and its components have been favorable. A total 95.9% of the students consider the education to be beneficial. Simulated patients practice and personal drug choice/problem-based learning sessions were appreciated by the students in particular. 93.9% of the students stated that all students of medicine should undergo this educational program. Among the five presentations contained in the program, "The Principles of Prescribing" received the highest points (9 ± 1.00) from participating students in general evaluation of the educational program. This study was carried out to improve task-based rational drug therapy education. According to feedback from the students concerning content, method, resource, assessment, and program design; some important changes, especially in number of facilitators and indications, are made in rational pharmacotherapy education in clinical task-based learning program.

  2. Rational drug therapy education in clinical phase carried out by task-based learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilge, S. Sırrı; Akyüz, Bahar; Ağrı, Arzu Erdal; Özlem, Mıdık

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Irrational drug use results in drug interactions, treatment noncompliance, and drug resistance. Rational pharmacotherapy education is being implemented in many faculties of medicine. Our aim is to introduce rational pharmacotherapy education by clinicians and to evaluate task-based rational drug therapy education in the clinical context. Methods: The Kirkpatrick's evaluation model was used for the evaluation of the program. The participants evaluated the program in terms of constituents of the program, utilization, and contribution to learning. Voluntary participants responded to the evaluation forms after the educational program. Data are evaluated using both quantitative and qualitative tools. SPSS (version 21) used for quantitative data for determining mean and standard deviation values. Descriptive qualitative analysis approach is used for the analysis of open-ended questions. Results: It was revealed that the program and its components have been favorable. A total 95.9% of the students consider the education to be beneficial. Simulated patients practice and personal drug choice/problem-based learning sessions were appreciated by the students in particular. 93.9% of the students stated that all students of medicine should undergo this educational program. Among the five presentations contained in the program, “The Principles of Prescribing” received the highest points (9 ± 1.00) from participating students in general evaluation of the educational program. Conclusion: This study was carried out to improve task-based rational drug therapy education. According to feedback from the students concerning content, method, resource, assessment, and program design; some important changes, especially in number of facilitators and indications, are made in rational pharmacotherapy education in clinical task-based learning program. PMID:28458432

  3. Anticholinergic drugs versus non-drug active therapies for non-neurogenic overactive bladder syndrome in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Bhavan Prasad; Cody, June D; Alhasso, Ammar; Stewart, Laurence

    2012-12-12

    Overactive bladder syndrome is defined as urgency with or without urgency incontinence, usually with frequency and nocturia. Pharmacotherapy with anticholinergic drugs is often the first line medical therapy, either alone or as an adjunct to various non-pharmacological therapies after conservative options such as reducing intake of caffeine drinks have been tried. Non-pharmacologic therapies consist of bladder training, pelvic floor muscle training with or without biofeedback, behavioural modification, electrical stimulation and surgical interventions. To compare the effects of anticholinergic drugs with various non-pharmacologic therapies for non-neurogenic overactive bladder syndrome in adults. We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Register (searched 4 September 2012), which includes searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and MEDLINE, and the reference lists of relevant articles. All randomised or quasi-randomised, controlled trials of treatment with anticholinergic drugs for overactive bladder syndrome or urgency urinary incontinence in adults in which at least one management arm involved a non-drug therapy. Trials amongst patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction were excluded. Two authors evaluated the trials for appropriateness for inclusion and risk of bias. Two authors were involved in the data extraction. Data extraction was based on predetermined criteria. Data analysis was based on standard statistical approaches used in Cochrane reviews. Twenty three trials were included with a total of 3685 participants, one was a cross-over trial and the other 22 were parallel group trials. The duration of follow up varied from two to 52 weeks. The trials were generally small and of poor methodological quality. During treatment, symptomatic improvement was more common amongst those participants on anticholinergic drugs compared with bladder training in seven small trials (73/174, 42% versus 98/172, 57% not

  4. Potential drug–drug interactions in HIV-infected children on antiretroviral therapy in Lagos, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oshikoya KA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Kazeem A Oshikoya,1 Ibrahim A Oreagba,2 Saheed Lawal,2 Olufunsho Awodele,2 Olayinka O Ogunleye,1 Idowu O Senbanjo,3 Sunday O Olayemi,2 Veronica C Ezeaka,4,5 Edamisan O Temiye,4,5 Titilope A Adeyemo,4,6 Oluranti Opanuga,4,7 Olufunmilayo A Lesi,4,8 Sulaimon A Akanmu4,6 1Department of Pharmacology, Lagos State University College of Medicine, Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria; 2Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-Araba, Lagos, Nigeria; 3Department of Paediatrics, Lagos State University College of Medicine, Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria; 4APIN Clinic, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria; 5Department of Paediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-Araba, Lagos, Nigeria; 6Department of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-Araba, Lagos, Nigeria; 7Department of Pharmacy, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Idi-Araba Lagos, Nigeria; 8Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-Araba, Lagos, Nigeria Background: Multi-therapy is common in HIV-infected children, and the risk for clinically significant drug interactions (CSDIs is high. We investigated the prevalence of CSDIs between antiretroviral (ARV and co-prescribed drugs for children attending a large HIV clinic in Lagos, Nigeria. Methods: The case files of pediatric patients receiving treatment at the HIV clinic of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH, Idi-Araba, between January 2005 and December 2010 were reviewed. The ARV and co-prescribed drug pairs were evaluated for potential interactions using the Liverpool HIV Pharmacology Group website. The potential interactions were rated as A (no known interaction, B (minor/no action needed, C (moderate/monitor therapy, D (major/therapy modification, and X (contraindicated/avoid combination. Results: Of the 310 cases reviewed, 208 (67.1% patients were at risk of CSDIs. Artemisinin-based combination therapy was prescribed for over one

  5. Modeling antibiotic treatment in hospitals: A systematic approach shows benefits of combination therapy over cycling, mixing, and mono-drug therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepekule, Burcu; Uecker, Hildegard; Derungs, Isabel; Frenoy, Antoine; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian

    2017-09-01

    Multiple treatment strategies are available for empiric antibiotic therapy in hospitals, but neither clinical studies nor theoretical investigations have yielded a clear picture when which strategy is optimal and why. Extending earlier work of others and us, we present a mathematical model capturing treatment strategies using two drugs, i.e the multi-drug therapies referred to as cycling, mixing, and combination therapy, as well as monotherapy with either drug. We randomly sample a large parameter space to determine the conditions determining success or failure of these strategies. We find that combination therapy tends to outperform the other treatment strategies. By using linear discriminant analysis and particle swarm optimization, we find that the most important parameters determining success or failure of combination therapy relative to the other treatment strategies are the de novo rate of emergence of double resistance in patients infected with sensitive bacteria and the fitness costs associated with double resistance. The rate at which double resistance is imported into the hospital via patients admitted from the outside community has little influence, as all treatment strategies are affected equally. The parameter sets for which combination therapy fails tend to fall into areas with low biological plausibility as they are characterised by very high rates of de novo emergence of resistance to both drugs compared to a single drug, and the cost of double resistance is considerably smaller than the sum of the costs of single resistance.

  6. Drug interactions with levothyroxine therapy in patients with hypothyroidism: observational study in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifirò, Gianluca; Parrino, Fabrizio; Sultana, Janet; Giorgianni, Francesco; Ferrajolo, Carmen; Bianchini, Elisa; Medea, Gerardo; Benvenga, Salvatore; Cricelli, Iacopo; Cricelli, Claudio; Lapi, Francesco

    2015-03-01

    Several drugs may interact with levothyroxine and reduce its bioavailability. The aim of this study was to analyse the Italian general practice patients with hypothyroidism from 2002-2011, in terms of variation of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels, number of levothyroxine prescriptions and dose of levothyroxine before and during potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Data were extracted from the Italian general practice Health Search CSD Longitudinal Patient Database (HSD). Analysis was limited to individuals aged 18 years and older with at least one levothyroxine prescription from 2002 to 2011 and at least one year of clinical history recorded in HSD. A quasi-experimental pre-post analysis was carried out using a self-controlled study design, on an intention-to-treat basis. Overall, 5,426 levothyroxine users (7.5 % of population in HSD) were included in the study. The incidence rate ratio comparing the TSH trend before and during the period of exposure to potential DDI showed a significant increase of TSH levels during initial exposure to potential DDI, which decreased over time. The number of prescriptions and dose of levothyroxine decreased before the potential DDI and increased symmetrically during the period of exposure to potential DDI. The co-prescription of levothyroxine and potentially interacting drugs results in an increased use of levothyroxine. Clinicians should carefully consider adjusting levothyroxine therapy in presence of concomitant drugs, such as proton-pump inhibitors, which may reduce levothyroxine bioavailability.

  7. A NIR-controlled cage mimicking system for hydrophobic drug mediated cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaoqun; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Min; Chen, Zhaowei; Lin, Youhui; Li, Wei; Cao, Fangfang; Liu, Zhen; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2017-09-01

    Most chemotherapeutic drugs commonly suffer from several shortcomings, including the lack of aqueous solubility, limited stability and adverse side effects. Although caging strategy has recently been employed as an effective approach to conceal and stabilize these drugs to achieve light-activated cancer therapy, it is plagued by the sophisticated drug modification process and deleterious solvent usage. In addition, using UV or Visible light to remove photocaged group is restricted to its limited tissue penetration ability in and phototoxicity. In this paper, by anchoring photochromic spiropyran on the mesoporous silica coated upconversion nanoparticles (UCNP-SP), we design a NIR-controlled cage mimicking system. Our results indicate that hydrophobic drug can be concealed inside the channels of the nanocarrier with high stability and "uncaged" via NIR irradiation-triggered hydrophobicity-hydrophilicity switch of the spiropyran molecules, finally inducing drug release and recovering their bioactivity. Moreover, under NIR illumination, the UV/Visible emissions from UCNP can also efficaciously initiate the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by Curcumin, further improving the therapeutic efficiency. Both in vitro and in vivo experimental results validate that NIR irradiated nanosystem can produce remarkably enhanced antitumor efficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Open source machine-learning algorithms for the prediction of optimal cancer drug therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cai; Mezencev, Roman; McDonald, John F; Vannberg, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    Precision medicine is a rapidly growing area of modern medical science and open source machine-learning codes promise to be a critical component for the successful development of standardized and automated analysis of patient data. One important goal of precision cancer medicine is the accurate prediction of optimal drug therapies from the genomic profiles of individual patient tumors. We introduce here an open source software platform that employs a highly versatile support vector machine (SVM) algorithm combined with a standard recursive feature elimination (RFE) approach to predict personalized drug responses from gene expression profiles. Drug specific models were built using gene expression and drug response data from the National Cancer Institute panel of 60 human cancer cell lines (NCI-60). The models are highly accurate in predicting the drug responsiveness of a variety of cancer cell lines including those comprising the recent NCI-DREAM Challenge. We demonstrate that predictive accuracy is optimized when the learning dataset utilizes all probe-set expression values from a diversity of cancer cell types without pre-filtering for genes generally considered to be "drivers" of cancer onset/progression. Application of our models to publically available ovarian cancer (OC) patient gene expression datasets generated predictions consistent with observed responses previously reported in the literature. By making our algorithm "open source", we hope to facilitate its testing in a variety of cancer types and contexts leading to community-driven improvements and refinements in subsequent applications.

  9. Open source machine-learning algorithms for the prediction of optimal cancer drug therapies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Huang

    Full Text Available Precision medicine is a rapidly growing area of modern medical science and open source machine-learning codes promise to be a critical component for the successful development of standardized and automated analysis of patient data. One important goal of precision cancer medicine is the accurate prediction of optimal drug therapies from the genomic profiles of individual patient tumors. We introduce here an open source software platform that employs a highly versatile support vector machine (SVM algorithm combined with a standard recursive feature elimination (RFE approach to predict personalized drug responses from gene expression profiles. Drug specific models were built using gene expression and drug response data from the National Cancer Institute panel of 60 human cancer cell lines (NCI-60. The models are highly accurate in predicting the drug responsiveness of a variety of cancer cell lines including those comprising the recent NCI-DREAM Challenge. We demonstrate that predictive accuracy is optimized when the learning dataset utilizes all probe-set expression values from a diversity of cancer cell types without pre-filtering for genes generally considered to be "drivers" of cancer onset/progression. Application of our models to publically available ovarian cancer (OC patient gene expression datasets generated predictions consistent with observed responses previously reported in the literature. By making our algorithm "open source", we hope to facilitate its testing in a variety of cancer types and contexts leading to community-driven improvements and refinements in subsequent applications.

  10. Response biomarkers: re-envisioning the approach to tailoring drug therapy for cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, Shahil; Bathe, Oliver F.

    2016-01-01

    The rapidly expanding arsenal of chemotherapeutic agents approved in the past 5 years represents significant progress in the field. However, this poses a challenge for oncologists to choose which drug or combination of drugs is best for any individual. Because only a fraction of patients respond to any drug, efforts have been made to devise strategies to personalize care. The majority of efforts have involved development of predictive biomarkers. While there are notable successes, there are no predictive biomarkers for most drugs. Moreover, predictive biomarkers enrich the cohort of individuals likely to benefit; they do not guarantee benefit. There is a need to devise alternate strategies to tailor cancer care. One alternative approach is to enhance the current adaptive approach, which involves administration of a drug and cessation of treatment once progression is documented. This currently involves radiographic tests for the most part, which are expensive, inconvenient and imperfect in their ability to categorize patients who are and are not benefiting from treatment. A biomarker approach to categorizing response may have advantages. Herein, we discuss the state of the art on treatment response assessment. While the most mature technologies for response assessment involve radiographic tests such as CT and PET, reports are emerging on biomarkers used to monitor therapeutic efficacy. Potentially, response biomarkers represent a less expensive and more convenient means of monitoring therapy, although an ideal response biomarker has not yet been described. A framework for future response biomarker discovery is described

  11. Novel concept of the smart NIR-light-controlled drug release of black phosphorus nanostructure for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Meng; Wang, Dou; Liang, Weiyuan; Liu, Liping; Zhang, Yin; Chen, Xing; Sang, David Kipkemoi; Xing, Chenyang; Li, Zhongjun; Dong, Biqin; Xing, Feng; Fan, Dianyuan; Bao, Shiyun; Zhang, Han; Cao, Yihai

    2018-01-16

    A biodegradable drug delivery system (DDS) is one the most promising therapeutic strategies for cancer therapy. Here, we propose a unique concept of light activation of black phosphorus (BP) at hydrogel nanostructures for cancer therapy. A photosensitizer converts light into heat that softens and melts drug-loaded hydrogel-based nanostructures. Drug release rates can be accurately controlled by light intensity, exposure duration, BP concentration, and hydrogel composition. Owing to sufficiently deep penetration of near-infrared (NIR) light through tissues, our BP-based system shows high therapeutic efficacy for treatment of s.c. cancers. Importantly, our drug delivery system is completely harmless and degradable in vivo. Together, our work proposes a unique concept for precision cancer therapy by external light excitation to release cancer drugs. If these findings are successfully translated into the clinic, millions of patients with cancer will benefit from our work.

  12. Racial differences in long-term adherence to oral antidiabetic drug therapy: a longitudinal cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meigs James B

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adherence to oral antidiabetic medications is often suboptimal. Adherence differences may contribute to health disparities for black diabetes patients, including higher microvascular event rates, greater complication-related disability, and earlier mortality. Methods In this longitudinal retrospective cohort study, we used 10 years of patient-level claims and electronic medical record data (1/1/1992–12/31/2001 to assess differences in short- and long-term adherence to oral antidiabetic medication among 1906 newly diagnosed adults with diabetes (26% black, 74% white in a managed care setting in which all members have prescription drug coverage. Four main outcome measures included: (1 time from diabetes diagnosis until first prescription of oral antidiabetic medication; (2 primary adherence (time from first prescription to prescription fill; (3 time until discontinuation of oral antidiabetic medication from first prescription; and (4 long-term adherence (amount dispensed versus amount prescribed over a 24-month follow-up from first oral antidiabetic medication prescription. Results Black patients were as likely as whites to initiate oral therapy and fill their first prescription, but experienced higher rates of medication discontinuation (HR: 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2, 2.7 and were less adherent over time. These black-white differences increased over the first six months of therapy but stabilized thereafter for patients who initiated on sulfonylureas. Significant black-white differences in adherence levels were constant throughout follow-up for patients initiated on metformin therapy. Conclusion Racial differences in adherence to oral antidiabetic drug therapy persist even with equal access to medication. Early and continued emphasis on adherence from initiation of therapy may reduce persistent racial differences in medication use and clinical outcomes.

  13. Terpene compound drug as medical expulsive therapy for ureterolithiasis: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Michael Erlano; Park, Jane Hyeon; Castillo, Josefino Cortez; Morales, Marcelino Lopeztan

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the efficacy of terpene compound drug (pinene, camphene, borneol, anethole, fenchone and cineol in olive oil) in facilitating spontaneous passage of ureteral calculi through meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCT). Systematic literature search on MEDLINE, EMBASE, OVID, Science Direct, Proquest, Google scholar, Cochrane Library databases and reference list of related literatures were done without language restriction. RCTs on ureterolithiasis medical expulsive therapy (MET) that compare terpene compound drug versus placebo/control group or alpha-blockers were identified. Articles retrieved were critically appraised by two independent reviewers according to Cochrane Collaboration recommendations. Data from included studies were extracted for calculation of risk ratio (RR) and 95 % confidence interval (CI). Effect estimates were pooled using Mantel-Haenszel method with random effect model. Inter-study heterogeneity and publication bias were assessed. The PRISMA guidelines for meta-analysis reporting were followed. Five RCTs (total of 344 subjects) of adequate methodological quality were included. Pooled effect estimates from homogenous studies showed that compared to placebo/control group, patients treated with terpene compound drug had significantly better ureteral calculi spontaneous expulsion rate (pooled RR: 1.34; 95 % CI 1.12, 1.61). Subgroup analysis of studies that compare terpene compound drug with alpha-blockers showed no significant difference (pooled RR: 0.79; 95 % CI 0.59, 1.06), while significant inter-study heterogeneity was noted. Only minor gastrointestinal adverse effect was reported on terpene compound drug use. The results suggest that terpene compound drug as MET is effective in augmenting spontaneous passage of ureterolithiasis. High quality large-scale RCTs comparing alpha-blockers and terpene compound drug are warranted to make a more definitive conclusion.

  14. [Antiplatelet therapy: resistance to traditional antiaggregation drugs and role of new antiplatelet agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Castillo-Carnevali, Hugo; Barrios Alonso, Vivencio; Zamorano Gómez, José Luis

    2014-09-09

    Platelet aggregation plays a key role in the development of major cardiovascular events (MACE) related to atherothrombosis. Since the appearance of coronary stenting, the importance of measuring and modulating platelet activity has considerably increased in the scientific literature during the last decade. Double antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel administrated to stent carriers has widely demonstrated its efficacy in the prevention of MACE compared with aspirin alone. These benefits are also present when a conservatory approach is chosen for acute coronary syndrome management. However, there are an important number of patients who develop MACE despite optimal dual antiplatelet therapy, most likely related to an incomplete platelet activity inhibition. Many studies suggest an important inter-individual variability in the response to the drugs, maybe related, at least in part, to the use of different assessment techniques of platelet aggregation. Other authors suggest an incomplete platelet inhibition as a possible explanation for the presence of MACE in patients under optimal antiplatelet therapy. Resistance to usual drugs has become a clinically relevant issue that requires an individual approach where new antiplatelet agents, such as prasugrel or ticagrelor, could play an important role as stated in current consensus documents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. Enhancing the Efficacy of Drug-loaded Nanocarriers against Brain Tumors by Targeted Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Brian C.; Kao, Gary D.; Mahmud, Abdullah; Harada, Takamasa; Swift, Joe; Chapman, Christina; Xu, Xiangsheng; Discher, Dennis E.; Dorsey, Jay F.

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a common, usually lethal disease with a median survival of only ~15 months. It has proven resistant in clinical trials to chemotherapeutic agents such as paclitaxel that are highly effective in vitro, presumably because of impaired drug delivery across the tumor's blood-brain barrier (BBB). In an effort to increase paclitaxel delivery across the tumor BBB, we linked the drug to a novel filomicelle nanocarrier made with biodegradable poly(ethylene-glycol)-block-poly(ε-caprolactone-r-D,L-lactide) and used precisely collimated radiation therapy (RT) to disrupt the tumor BBB's permeability in an orthotopic mouse model of GBM. Using a non-invasive bioluminescent imaging technique to assess tumor burden and response to therapy in our model, we demonstrated that the drug-loaded nanocarrier (DLN) alone was ineffective against stereotactically implanted intracranial tumors yet was highly effective against GBM cells in culture and in tumors implanted into the flanks of mice. When targeted cranial RT was used to modulate the tumor BBB, the paclitaxel-loaded nanocarriers became effective against the intracranial tumors. Focused cranial RT improved DLN delivery into the intracranial tumors, significantly improving therapeutic outcomes. Tumor growth was delayed or halted, and survival was extended by >50% (p<0.05) compared to the results obtained with either RT or the DLN alone. Combinations of RT and chemotherapeutic agents linked to nanocarriers would appear to be an area for future investigations that could enhance outcomes in the treatment of human GBM. PMID:23296073

  16. Astrocyte Senescence and Metabolic Changes in Response to HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Cohen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART survival rates among patients infected by HIV have increased. However, even though survival has increased HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND still persist, suggesting that HAART-drugs may play a role in the neurocognitive impairment observed in HIV-infected patients. Given previous data demonstrating that astrocyte senescence plays a role in neurocognitive disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD, we examined the role of HAART on markers of senescence in primary cultures of human astrocytes (HAs. Our results indicate HAART treatment induces cell cycle arrest, senescence-associated beta-galactosidase, and the cell cycle inhibitor p21. Highly active antiretroviral therapy treatment is also associated with the induction of reactive oxygen species and upregulation of mitochondrial oxygen consumption. These changes in mitochondria correlate with increased glycolysis in HAART drug treated astrocytes. Taken together these results indicate that HAART drugs induce the senescence program in HAs, which is associated with oxidative and metabolic changes that could play a role in the development of HAND.

  17. [Assessment of benefits of drug therapies: memantine for Alzheimer's disease as an example].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüther, E; Hellweg, R; Janetzky, W

    2012-12-01

    After the approval of a drug, which represents a first assessment, independent institutions and medical professional associations provide further evaluations. Here, the question is to be asked whether common or diverging evaluation methods exist that can have an impact on the result. In principle, two methods are used: meta-analyses and responder analyses. Meta-analyses and the resulting effect sizes have to be interpreted according to the field of application (for example, the type and severity degree of a disease) with medical expertise. Omitting this can lead to incorrect evaluations and to a discrepancy of evaluation results. In the case of memantine, the merely biometric evaluation of meta-analyses performed by the IQWiG led to a denial of the benefit, while the same data, considering clinical routine, led professional associations to recommend memantine for moderate to severe Alzheimer´s disease. In contrast to meta-analyses, responder analyses directly show the benefit of a therapy option in the presence of significant group differences, as the selected responder criteria are based on the indication. The corresponding results of the responder analyses on memantine were also acknowledged by the IQWiG and led to a positive evaluation of memantine. This discrepancy of evaluation results illustrates the fact that statistical procedures are necessary when evaluating drug and non-drug therapy options but, that the interpretation of the results with medical expertise is essential. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Integrating Antimicrobial Therapy with Host Immunity to Fight Drug-Resistant Infections: Classical vs. Adaptive Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjini, Erida; Brito, Patricia H.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance of infectious agents is a growing problem worldwide. To prevent the continuing selection and spread of drug resistance, rational design of antibiotic treatment is needed, and the question of aggressive vs. moderate therapies is currently heatedly debated. Host immunity is an important, but often-overlooked factor in the clearance of drug-resistant infections. In this work, we compare aggressive and moderate antibiotic treatment, accounting for host immunity effects. We use mathematical modelling of within-host infection dynamics to study the interplay between pathogen-dependent host immune responses and antibiotic treatment. We compare classical (fixed dose and duration) and adaptive (coupled to pathogen load) treatment regimes, exploring systematically infection outcomes such as time to clearance, immunopathology, host immunization, and selection of resistant bacteria. Our analysis and simulations uncover effective treatment strategies that promote synergy between the host immune system and the antimicrobial drug in clearing infection. Both in classical and adaptive treatment, we quantify how treatment timing and the strength of the immune response determine the success of moderate therapies. We explain key parameters and dimensions, where an adaptive regime differs from classical treatment, bringing new insight into the ongoing debate of resistance management. Emphasizing the sensitivity of treatment outcomes to the balance between external antibiotic intervention and endogenous natural defenses, our study calls for more empirical attention to host immunity processes. PMID:27078624

  19. 3-D Bioprinting of Neural Tissue for Applications in Cell Therapy and Drug Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Thomas

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases affect millions of individuals in North America and cost the health-care industry billions of dollars for treatment. Current treatment options for degenerative diseases focus on physical rehabilitation or drug therapies, which temporarily mask the effects of cell damage, but quickly lose their efficacy. Cell therapies for the central nervous system remain an untapped market due to the complexity involved in growing neural tissues, controlling their differentiation, and protecting them from the hostile environment they meet upon implantation. Designing tissue constructs for the discovery of better drug treatments are also limited due to the resolution needed for an accurate cellular representation of the brain, in addition to being expensive and difficult to translate to biocompatible materials. 3-D printing offers a streamlined solution for engineering brain tissue for drug discovery or, in the future, for implantation. New microfluidic and bioplotting devices offer increased resolution, little impact on cell viability and have been tested with several bioink materials including fibrin, collagen, hyaluronic acid, poly(caprolactone, and poly(ethylene glycol. This review details current efforts at bioprinting neural tissue and highlights promising avenues for future work.

  20. Integrating Antimicrobial Therapy with Host Immunity to Fight Drug-Resistant Infections: Classical vs. Adaptive Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjini, Erida; Brito, Patricia H

    2016-04-01

    Antimicrobial resistance of infectious agents is a growing problem worldwide. To prevent the continuing selection and spread of drug resistance, rational design of antibiotic treatment is needed, and the question of aggressive vs. moderate therapies is currently heatedly debated. Host immunity is an important, but often-overlooked factor in the clearance of drug-resistant infections. In this work, we compare aggressive and moderate antibiotic treatment, accounting for host immunity effects. We use mathematical modelling of within-host infection dynamics to study the interplay between pathogen-dependent host immune responses and antibiotic treatment. We compare classical (fixed dose and duration) and adaptive (coupled to pathogen load) treatment regimes, exploring systematically infection outcomes such as time to clearance, immunopathology, host immunization, and selection of resistant bacteria. Our analysis and simulations uncover effective treatment strategies that promote synergy between the host immune system and the antimicrobial drug in clearing infection. Both in classical and adaptive treatment, we quantify how treatment timing and the strength of the immune response determine the success of moderate therapies. We explain key parameters and dimensions, where an adaptive regime differs from classical treatment, bringing new insight into the ongoing debate of resistance management. Emphasizing the sensitivity of treatment outcomes to the balance between external antibiotic intervention and endogenous natural defenses, our study calls for more empirical attention to host immunity processes.

  1. Cancer therapy leading to state of cancer metabolism depression for efficient operation of small dosage cytotoxic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponizovskiy MR

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available “Prolonged medical starvation” as the method of cancer therapy was borrowed from folk healers Omelchenko A and Breuss R. Author was convinced in efficiency of this method of cancer treatment via examination of cured patients and on own experience. The mechanism of this method of cancer therapy operates via Warburg effect targeting that promotes efficient cancer treatment with small cytotoxic drugs. Just it was described the mechanism of Warburg effect as well as mechanism transmutation of mitochondrial function in cancer metabolism which are exhibited in connection with operation of described method cancer therapy. There were described the biochemical and biophysical mechanisms of formations resistance to some cytotoxic drugs and recurrence cancer disease after disease remission which occur sometimes as result of treatment with great dosage of cytotoxic drugs. Also it was described the benefits of use the method “Prolonged medical starvation” with decreased dosage of cytotoxic drugs for cancer treatment. The significance of this work that it was substantiated the mechanism operation of combination “Prolonged medical starvation” with small dosages cytotoxic drugs of cancer treatment, which mechanism leads to prevention recurrence cancer disease and resistance to anticancer drugs in comparison with intensive anticancer chemotherapy with great dosages of cytotoxic drugs in cancer therapy. Also the offered concepts of cancer therapy mechanism gave possibility to explain mechanisms of some results of experiments eliminating the doubts of the authors these experiments.

  2. Non-Steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs As Host-Directed Therapy for Tuberculosis: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera M. Kroesen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lengthy, antimicrobial therapy targeting the pathogen is the mainstay of conventional tuberculosis treatment, complicated by emerging drug resistances. Host-directed therapies, including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, in contrast, target host factors to mitigate disease severity. In the present Systematic Review, we investigate whether NSAIDs display any effects as therapy of TB and discuss possible mechanisms of action of NSAIDs as adjunctive therapy of TB. Ten studies, seven preclinical studies in mice and three clinical trials, were included and systematically reviewed. Our results point toward a beneficial effect of NSAIDs as adjunct to current TB therapy regimens, mediated by decreased lung pathology balancing host-immune reaction. The determination of the best timing for their administration in order to obtain the potential beneficial effects needs further investigation. Even if the preclinical evidence requires clinical evaluation, NSAIDs might represent a potential safe, simple, and cheap improvement in therapy of TB.

  3. Magnetic graphene oxide as a carrier for targeted delivery of chemotherapy drugs in cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Ya-Shu [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Chang Gung University, Kwei-San, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lu, Yu-Jen [Department of Neurosurgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kwei-San, Taoyuan 33305, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Jyh-Ping, E-mail: jpchen@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Chang Gung University, Kwei-San, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Craniofacial Research Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kwei-San, Taoyuan 33305, Taiwan, ROC (China); Graduate Institute of Health Industry and Technology, Research Center for Industry of Human Ecology, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Kwei-San, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Materials Engineering, Ming Chi University of Technology, Tai-Shan, New Taipei City 24301, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2017-04-01

    A magnetic targeted functionalized graphene oxide (GO) complex is constituted as a nanocarrier for targeted delivery and pH-responsive controlled release of chemotherapy drugs to cancer cells. Magnetic graphene oxide (mGO) was prepared by chemical co-precipitation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} magnetic nanoparticles on GO nano-platelets. The mGO was successively modified by chitosan and mPEG-NHS through covalent bindings to synthesize mGOC-PEG. The polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety is expected to prolong the circulation time of mGO by reducing the reticuloendothelial system clearance. Irinotecan (CPT-11) or doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded to mGOC-PEG through π-π stacking interactions for magnetic targeted delivery of the cancer chemotherapy drug. The best values of loading efficiency and loading content of CPT-11 were 54% and 2.7% respectively; whereas for DOX, they were 65% and 393% The pH-dependent drug release profile was further experimented at different pHs, in which ~60% of DOX was released at pH 5.4 and ~10% was released at pH 7.4. In contrast, ~90% CPT-11 was released at pH 5.4 and ~70% at pH 7.4. Based on the drug loading and release characteristics, mGOC-PEG/DOX was further chosen for in vitro cytotoxicity tests against U87 human glioblastoma cell line. The IC50 value of mGOC-PEG/DOX was found to be similar to that of free DOX but was reduced dramatically when subject to magnetic targeting. It is concluded that with the high drug loading and pH-dependent drug release properties, mGOC-PEG will be a promising drug carrier for targeted delivery of chemotherapy drugs in cancer therapy. - Highlights: • mGO was prepared by chemical co-precipitation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} MNP on GO nano-platelets. • mGO was further modified by chitosan and mPEG-NHS to synthesize mGOC-PEG. • mGOC-PEG showed higher drug loading of doxorubicin (DOX) than irinotecan. • mGOC-PEG showed pH-responsive controlled release of chemotherapy drugs. • Magnetic targeting enhanced cytotoxicity of

  4. Magnetic graphene oxide as a carrier for targeted delivery of chemotherapy drugs in cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Ya-Shu; Lu, Yu-Jen; Chen, Jyh-Ping

    2017-01-01

    A magnetic targeted functionalized graphene oxide (GO) complex is constituted as a nanocarrier for targeted delivery and pH-responsive controlled release of chemotherapy drugs to cancer cells. Magnetic graphene oxide (mGO) was prepared by chemical co-precipitation of Fe 3 O 4 magnetic nanoparticles on GO nano-platelets. The mGO was successively modified by chitosan and mPEG-NHS through covalent bindings to synthesize mGOC-PEG. The polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety is expected to prolong the circulation time of mGO by reducing the reticuloendothelial system clearance. Irinotecan (CPT-11) or doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded to mGOC-PEG through π-π stacking interactions for magnetic targeted delivery of the cancer chemotherapy drug. The best values of loading efficiency and loading content of CPT-11 were 54% and 2.7% respectively; whereas for DOX, they were 65% and 393% The pH-dependent drug release profile was further experimented at different pHs, in which ~60% of DOX was released at pH 5.4 and ~10% was released at pH 7.4. In contrast, ~90% CPT-11 was released at pH 5.4 and ~70% at pH 7.4. Based on the drug loading and release characteristics, mGOC-PEG/DOX was further chosen for in vitro cytotoxicity tests against U87 human glioblastoma cell line. The IC50 value of mGOC-PEG/DOX was found to be similar to that of free DOX but was reduced dramatically when subject to magnetic targeting. It is concluded that with the high drug loading and pH-dependent drug release properties, mGOC-PEG will be a promising drug carrier for targeted delivery of chemotherapy drugs in cancer therapy. - Highlights: • mGO was prepared by chemical co-precipitation of Fe 3 O 4 MNP on GO nano-platelets. • mGO was further modified by chitosan and mPEG-NHS to synthesize mGOC-PEG. • mGOC-PEG showed higher drug loading of doxorubicin (DOX) than irinotecan. • mGOC-PEG showed pH-responsive controlled release of chemotherapy drugs. • Magnetic targeting enhanced cytotoxicity of m

  5. Effects of Multidimensional Family Therapy (MDFT) on Nonopioid Drug Abuse: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filges, Trine; Andersen, Ditte; Jørgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: This review evaluates the evidence of the effects of multidimensional family therapy (MDFT) on drug use reduction in young people for the treatment of nonopioid drug use. Method: We followed Campbell Collaboration guidelines to conduct a systematic review of randomized and nonrandomized trials. Meta-analytic methods were used to…

  6. Feasibility of point-of-care creatinine testing in community pharmacy to monitor drug therapy in ambulatory elderly patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerts, A.F.; Koning, F.H. De; Vooght, K.M. De; Egberts, A.C.G.; Smet, P.A.G.M. de; Solinge, W.W. van

    2013-01-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN AND OBJECTIVE: It is often necessary to adjust drug therapy if renal function is impaired in elderly patients taking drugs for diabetes and/or cardiovascular disease that are cleared by the kidneys. Although clinical guidelines recommend regular monitoring of renal function in these

  7. Pharmacological treatment of spondyloarthritis: exploring the effectiveness of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biological therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caso, Francesco; Costa, Luisa; Del Puente, Antonio; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; Lupoli, Gelsy; Scarpa, Raffaele; Peluso, Rosario

    2015-11-01

    Spondyloarthritis represents a heterogeneous group of articular inflammatory diseases that share common genetic, clinical and radiological features. The therapy target of spondyloarthritis relies mainly in improving patients' quality of life, controlling articular inflammation, preventing the structural joints damage and preserving the functional abilities, autonomy and social participation of patients. Among these, traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs have been demonstrated to be effective in the management of peripheral arthritis; moreover, in the last decade, biological therapies have improved the approach to spondyloarthritis. In patients with axial spondyloarthritis, tumor necrosis factor α inhibitors are currently the only effective therapy in patients for whom conventional therapy with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has failed. The aim of this review is to summarize the current experience and evidence about the pharmacological approach in spondyloarthritis patients.

  8. Effectiveness of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in the Improvement of Coping Strategies and Addiction Symptoms in Drug-Dependent Patients

    OpenAIRE

    H BrockieMilan; H Kamarzarrin; H Zare

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study was carried out to determine the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy in improving coping strategies and symptoms of drug addiction patients. Method: In a quasi-experimental study, the number of 90drug-dependent patients referring to clinics to stop taking drugs existing in the city of Urmia were divided into two experimental (n=45) groups and control (n=45) using random sampling. The experimental group received 12 sessions of cognitive-behavioral treatment in C...

  9. Is administered radioiodine activity appropriate? The effects of pre- treatment antithyroid drugs on the therapy outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanayakkara, D.; Udugama, C.; Perera, K.; Herath, S.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Although radioiodine (RAI) therapy has been used in the treatment of thyrotoxicosis, there are both wide variations in current practice and deficiencies in outcome. There is concern as to decide the optimum activity to achieve better therapeutic outcome and uncertainty over the effects of pretreatment antithyroid drugs (ATD) on the post therapy outcome. Use of ATD (carbimazole) to control the severity of the disease prior to RAI therapy is a common accepted practice. The Royal college of Physicians (RCP) guideline on radioiodine therapy for thyrotoxicosis has recommended activity of 400mBq for Graves' disease (GD) and 15mCi for toxic multi nodular disease (TMND) to achieve euthyroidism with an incidence of hypothyroidism around 15-20% at 2 years. However, in the clinical setting, many patients have become hypothyroid very early than the expected time period. This study was carried out to see the fixed dose RAI therapy outcome of both GD and TMND. Another objective is to assess the effects of pre therapy ATD on the RAI therapy for both GD and TMND at 1 year. Post RAI therapy outcome was analyzed in thyrotoxic patients who received RAI at our institute from 2001-2005. Diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis was made on the basis of biochemical thyroid function tests and thyroid uptake scans. Both GD and TMND patients were selected. Patients who were treated with ATD were advised to stop drugs for at least 4 weeks before administration of RAI therapeutic dose. GD patients received 400mBq and TMND received 550mBq of RAI irrespective of the size of the thyroid gland. Both GD and TMND were further categorized into two groups on the basis of whether they have given ATD prior to RAI therapy. Patients with solitary toxic nodular disease were excluded from the study. Post therapy thyroid functions (free thyroxine and thyroid stimulating hormone) were done at 1, 2, 3, 6 and 12 months intervals. Therapy outcome over time was defined on the basis of thyroid function and

  10. Characteristics of hemorrhagic peptic ulcers in patients receiving antithrombotic/nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Akahoshi, Kazuya; Ochiai, Toshiaki; Komori, Keishi; Haraguchi, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Munehiro; Nakamura, Norimoto; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Kakigao, Kana; Ogino, Haruei; Ihara, Eikichi; Akiho, Hirotada; Motomura, Yasuaki; Kabemura, Teppei; Harada, Naohiko; Chijiiwa, Yoshiharu; Ito, Tetsuhide; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

    2012-10-01

    Antithrombotic/nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) therapies increase the incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The features of hemorrhagic peptic ulcer disease in patients receiving antithrombotic/NSAID therapies were investigated. We investigated the medical records of 485 consecutive patients who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy and were diagnosed with hemorrhagic gastroduodenal ulcers. The patients treated with antithrombotic agents/NSAIDs were categorized as the antithrombotic therapy (AT) group (n=213). The patients who were not treated with antithrombotics/NSAIDs were categorized as the control (C) group (n=263). The clinical characteristics were compared between the groups. The patients in the AT group were significantly older than those in the C group (p<0.0001). The hemoglobin levels before/without transfusion were significantly lower in the AT group (8.24±2.41 g/dL) than in the C group (9.44±2.95 g/dL) (p<0.0001). After adjusting for age, the difference in the hemoglobin levels between the two groups remained significant (p=0.0334). The transfusion rates were significantly higher in the AT group than in the C group (p=0.0002). However, the outcome of endoscopic hemostasis was similar in the AT and C groups. Patients with hemorrhagic peptic ulcers receiving antithrombotic/NSAID therapies were exposed to a greater risk of severe bleeding that required transfusion but were still treatable by endoscopy.

  11. Electromotive drug administration for treatment of therapy-refractory overactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gauruder Burmester

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Evaluate the benefits of electromotive drug administration (EMDA as an alternative technique in patients with chronic overactive bladder in terms of improvement of symptoms, quality of life, and sexuality. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 72 patients with therapy-refractory overactive bladder according to the ICS (International Continence Society definition, were treated by EMDA. The regimen consisted of three treatment cycles, each with 3 instillations at 2-week intervals. The solution instilled consisted of 100 mL 4% lidocaine, 100 mL distilled water, 40 mg dexamethasone, and 2 mL epinephrine. Peri-interventionally, a urine test and close circulatory monitoring were performed. All women underwent urodynamic testing and cystoscopy and kept a voiding diary. A comprehensive history was obtained, a quality of life questionnaire administered, and a gynecologic examination performed before initiation of therapy. The women underwent follow-up at 12 months after the end of therapy. RESULTS: The patients had a mean age of 63 (± 11.2 years. Bladder capacity improved significantly by 109 mL (± 55 mL in 51 (71% patients (p = 0.021. The number of micturitions/day decreased significantly to 7 (± 2 (p = 0.013. Quality of life was improved in 54 patients (75%; p = 0.024 and sexuality in 39 (54%; p = 0.020. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that EMDA can improve both quality of life and sexuality in patients with therapy-refractory chronic overactive bladder.

  12. DOMESTIC SPECTRUM OF ANTIVIRAL DRUG — UMIFENOVIR AS ETIOTROPIC THERAPY OF INFLUENZA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Osidak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article are presented the results of comparative observation of the effectiveness of the inclusion in the complex therapy of 203 hospitalized children aged 2 years and older with influenza А(Н1N1pdm09 domestic antiviral drug — Umifenovir  (Arbidol that occurred during the epidemic seasons 2009—2013 and 2015—2016 in terms of observational clinical studies.  It is shown  that this drug, possessing a wide spectrum of antiviral activity, including against Oseltamivir — and Zanamivir-resistant influenza virus strains, antioxidant activity and low toxicity (Code ATX Ј05АХ13, can be successfully used in the treatment of infants with influenza А(Н1N1pdm09.

  13. Drug repurposing identifies a synergistic combination therapy with imatinib mesylate for gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessetto, Ziyan Y; Ma, Yan; Hirst, Jeff J; von Mehren, Margaret; Weir, Scott J; Godwin, Andrew K

    2014-10-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a rare and therefore often neglected disease. Introduction of the kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate radically improved the clinical response of patients with GIST; however, its effects are often short-lived, with GISTs demonstrating a median time-to-progression of approximately two years. Although many investigational drugs, approved first for other cancers, have been subsequently evaluated for the management of GIST, few have greatly affected the overall survival of patients with advanced disease. We employed a novel, focused, drug-repurposing effort for GIST, including imatinib mesylate-resistant GIST, evaluating a large library of FDA-approved drugs regardless of current indication. As a result of the drug-repurposing screen, we identified eight FDA-approved drugs, including fludarabine phosphate (F-AMP), that showed synergy with and/or overcame resistance to imatinib mesylate. F-AMP induces DNA damage, Annexin V, and caspase-3/7 activities as the cytotoxic effects on GIST cells, including imatinib mesylate-resistant GIST cells. F-AMP and imatinib mesylate combination treatment showed greater inhibition of GIST cell proliferation when compared with imatinib mesylate and F-AMP alone. Successful in vivo experiments confirmed the combination of imatinib mesylate with F-AMP enhanced the antitumor effects compared with imatinib mesylate alone. Our results identified F-AMP as a promising, repurposed drug therapy for the treatment of GISTs, with potential to be administered in combination with imatinib mesylate or for treatment of imatinib mesylate-refractory tumors. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Magnetic Nanoparticle Facilitated Drug Delivery for Cancer Therapy with Targeted and Image-Guided Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Li, Yuancheng; Orza, Anamaria; Lu, Qiong; Guo, Peng; Wang, Liya; Yang, Lily; Mao, Hui

    2016-06-14

    With rapid advances in nanomedicine, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have emerged as a promising theranostic tool in biomedical applications, including diagnostic imaging, drug delivery and novel therapeutics. Significant preclinical and clinical research has explored their functionalization, targeted delivery, controllable drug release and image-guided capabilities. To further develop MNPs for theranostic applications and clinical translation in the future, we attempt to provide an overview of the recent advances in the development and application of MNPs for drug delivery, specifically focusing on the topics concerning the importance of biomarker targeting for personalized therapy and the unique magnetic and contrast-enhancing properties of theranostic MNPs that enable image-guided delivery. The common strategies and considerations to produce theranostic MNPs and incorporate payload drugs into MNP carriers are described. The notable examples are presented to demonstrate the advantages of MNPs in specific targeting and delivering under image guidance. Furthermore, current understanding of delivery mechanisms and challenges to achieve efficient therapeutic efficacy or diagnostic capability using MNP-based nanomedicine are discussed.

  15. Doxorubicin-loaded magnetic gold nanoshells for a combination therapy of hyperthermia and drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Faruq; Yusof, Nor Azah

    2014-11-15

    In the present work, nanohybrid of an anticancer drug, doxorubicin (Dox) loaded gold-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs@Au) were prepared for a combination therapy of cancer by means of both hyperthermia and drug delivery. The Dox molecules were conjugated to SPIONs@Au nanoparticles with the help of cysteamine (Cyst) as a non-covalent space linker and the Dox loading efficiency was investigated to be as high as 0.32 mg/mg. Thus synthesized particles were characterized by HRTEM, UV-Vis, FT-IR, SQUID magnetic studies and further tested for heat and drug release at low frequency oscillatory magnetic fields. The hyperthermia studies investigated to be strongly influenced by the applied frequency and the solvents used. The Dox delivery studies indicated that the drug release efficacy is strongly improved by maintaining the acidic pH conditions and the oscillatory magnetic fields, i.e. an enhancement in the Dox release was observed from the oscillation of particles due to the applied frequency, and is not effected by heating of the solution. Finally, the in vitro cell viability and proliferation studies were conducted using two different immortalized cell lines containing a cancerous (MCF-7 breast cancer) and non-cancerous H9c2 cardiac cell type. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Family Mechanisms of Structural Ecosystems Therapy for HIV-Seropositive Women in Drug Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrani, Victoria B.; McCabe, Brian E.; Burns, Myron J.; Feaster, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Examined the effects of Structural Ecosystems Therapy (SET), a family intervention for women living with HIV or AIDS, compared to a psycho-educational health group (HG) intervention, and reciprocal relationships between women and family members. Method Women (n = 126) and their family members (n = 269) were randomized to one of two conditions and assessed every 4 months for 12 months. Family functioning, drug use, and psychological distress was reported by multiple family members. Results Multilevel growth curve modeling showed a different family functioning trajectory between SET and HG, B = −0.05, SE = 0.02, p < .01. There was no intervention effect on the trajectory of family-level drug abstinence or psychological distress, but there was a significant difference in the trajectory of psychological distress after controlling for change in family functioning, B = −0.28, SE = 0.13, p < .05. There was an indirect effect from treatment through change in family functioning to change in psychological distress, B = 0.29, SE = 0.12, p < .05. With respect to reciprocal effects, family drug abstinence significantly predicted women’s abstinence 4 months later, B = 0.22, SE = 0.06, p < .001. Conclusion Findings demonstrated the interdependence of family members and the impact of family in relapse prevention and partially supported SET’s potential for maintaining family functioning and well-being for women living with HIV or AIDS in drug recovery. PMID:22708519

  17. Metabolism of Drugs Used in the Therapy of Seizures: An Analytical Point of View. Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrioli, Roberto; Mercolini, Laura

    2017-10-16

    Seizures are aetiologically and clinically heterogeneous neurological disorders that are currently treated using a wide array of drugs, belonging to equally heterogeneous chemical classes. Some of them are known as "antiepileptic drugs" (AEDs), due to their main field of use, while others (such as benzodiazepines) are frequently used for other conditions as well as for seizures. Due to their different chemical properties and mechanisms of activity, the metabolic characteristics of anti-seizure drugs can vary widely, also producing big differences in terms of safety, efficacy and therapeutic suitability. Scopus and PubMed databases were searched for the most significant papers centered on metabolism and analysis of the following antiepileptics: carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, lamotrigine, phenytoin, ethosuximide, gabapentin, vigabatrin, topiramate, levetiracetam and valproic acid. The most important studies on the metabolic characteristics of several AEDs are reported and briefly discussed in this review; moreover, the analytical methods used to determine biological levels of these drugs during therapy are also described and commented upon, and their main characteristics highlighted. Other AEDs, and notes on polypharmacy, will be included in the second part of this series. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. An alternative therapy for drug-resistant epilepsy: transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Peijing; Liu, Aihua; Zhang, Jianguo; Wang, Yuping; Yang, Anchao; Li, Liang; Ben, Hui; Li, Liping; Liu, Rupeng; He, Wei; Liu, Huanguang; Huang, Feng; Li, Xia; Wu, Peng; Zhu, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is an effective therapy for drug-resistant epilepsy. Acupuncture is also used to treat epilepsy. This study was designed to examine the safety and effectiveness of transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation (ta-VNS) for patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. A total of 50 volunteer patients with drug-resistant epilepsy were selected for a random clinical trial to observe the therapeutic effect of ta-VNS. The seizure frequency, quality of life, and severity were assessed in weeks 8, 16, and 24 of the treatment according to the percentage of seizure frequency reduction. In the pilot study, 47 of the 50 epilepsy patients completed the 24-week treatment; three dropped off. After 8-week treatment, six of the 47 patients (12%) were seizure free and 12 (24%) had a reduction in seizure frequency. In week 16 of the continuous treatment, six of the 47 patients (12%) were seizure free; 17 (34%) had a reduction in seizure frequency. After 24 weeks' treatment, eight patients (16%) were seizure free; 19 (38%) had reduced seizure frequency. Similar to the therapeutic effect of VNS, ta-VNS can suppress epileptic seizures and is a safe, effective, economical, and widely applicable treatment option for drug-resistant epilepsy. (ChiCTR-TRC-10001023).

  19. DRUG THERAPY IN THE PROGRESSED CML PATIENT WITH MULTI-TKI FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim C. Haznedaroglu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to outline pharmacotherapy of the ‘third-line management of CML’ (progressive disease course after sequential TKI drugs. Current management of CML with multi-TKI failure is reviewed. TKI (bosutinib, ponatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib and non-TKI (omacetaxine mepussecinate, IFN or PEG-IFN drugs are available. The literature search was made in PubMed with particular focus on the clinical trials, recommendations, guidelines and expert opinions, as well as international recommendations. Progressing CML disease with multi-TKI failure should be treated with alloSCT based on the availability of the donor and EBMT transplant risk scores. The TKI and non-TKI drugs shall be used to get best promising (hematological, cytogenetic, molecular response. During the CP-CML phase of multi-TKI failure, 2nd generation TKIs (nilotinib or dasatinib are used if they remained. Bosutinib and ponatinib (3rd generation TKIs can be administered in triple-TKI failed (imatinib and nilotinib and dasatinib patients. The presence of T315I mutation at any phase requires ponatinib or omacetaxine mepussecinate therapy before allografting. During the AP/BC-CML phase of multi-TKI failure, the most powerful TKI available (ponatinib or dasatinib if remained together with chemotherapy should be given before alloSCT. Monitoring of CML disease and drug off-target risks (particularly vascular thrombotic events are vital.

  20. Anticancer Drugs Induced Severe Adverse Cutaneous Drug Reactions: An Updated Review on the Risks Associated with Anticancer Targeted Therapy or Immunotherapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chau Yee Ng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous adverse drug reactions are commonly seen in patients with anticancer drug treatment. Anticancer drugs, including chemotherapy, target therapy, and recent immunotherapy causing skin reactions ranging from mild skin rash to life-threatening severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs, such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS and toxic epidermal necrosis (TEN with increase morbidity and mortality while they are receiving cancer treatments, have been proposed to be a result of direct skin toxicity or drug hypersensitivity reactions (these are proposed mechanism, not definite. Differentiating SCARs from other more commonly seen reactions with a better outcome help prevent discontinuation of therapy and inappropriate use of systemic immunosuppressants for presumable allergic reactions, of which will affect the clinical outcome. In this article, we have reviewed published articles from 1950 to August 2017 for SJS/TEN associated with anticancer drugs, including chemotherapy, targeted therapy, and immunotherapy. We aimed to provide an overview of SJS/TEN associated with anticancer drugs to increase clinician recognition and accelerate future studies on the pathomechanism and managements.

  1. Neurogenic contraction induced by the antiarrhythmic compound, AVE 0118, in rat small mesenteric arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kun, Attila; Seprényi, György; Varró, András; Papp, Julius Gy; Pataricza, János

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the vasoactivity of two inhibitors of potassium ion (K(+) ) channels, a potential antiarrhythmic compound, AVE 0118, and 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). Basal and stimulated tones of rat small mesenteric arteries as well as the possible involvement of KV 1.5 ion channel in the mechanism of vascular effect induced by the compounds were analysed. The standard organ bath technique for vascular tone and immunohistochemistry for the localization of ion channels in the arterial tissue were performed. Third- or fourth-order branch of arterial segments was mounted in myographs for recording the isometric tension. AVE 0118 (10(-5) M) and 4-AP (10(-5) M) modulated neither the basal tone nor the contraction induced by noradrenaline but increased the contraction evoked by electrical field stimulation, sensitive to the block of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors. KV 1.5 ion channel-specific immunostaining demonstrated the presence of immunoreactive nerves, and Schwann-cell-specific (S100) immunostaining confirmed the presence of myelin sheath in rat small mesenteric arteries. The study supports an indirect, sympathetic effect of AVE 0118 similar to that of 4-AP, which is mediated, at least in part, by blocking neuronal KV 1.5 type potassium ion channels in the medio-adventitial layer of rat small mesenteric artery. © 2014 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  2. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions with clopidogrel: updated review and risk management in combination therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang ZY

    2015-03-01

    inhibitors on clopidogrel (omeprazole, esomeprazole versus pantoprazole, rabeprazole, the effects of rifampicin on clopidogrel versus ticagrelor and prasugrel, and the effects of calcium channel blockers on clopidogrel (amlodipine versus P-glycoprotein-inhibiting calcium channel blockers. The mechanism of the DDIs with clopidogrel involves modulating CYP enzymes (eg, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C19, and CYP3A4, paraoxonase-1, hepatic carboxylesterase 1, P-glycoprotein, and organic anion transporter family member 1B1.Conclusion: Effective and safe clopidogrel combination therapy can be achieved by increasing the awareness of potential changes in efficacy and toxicity, rationally selecting alternatives, tailoring drug therapy based on genotype, checking the appropriateness of physician orders, and performing therapeutic monitoring. Keywords: clopidogrel, drug–drug interactions, drug metabolism, drug transporter, genotype, pharmacokinetics, polypharmacy, pharmacogenetics, P2Y12 receptor inhibitors, risk management 

  3. Drug Concentration Thresholds Predictive of Therapy Failure and Death in Children With Tuberculosis: Bread Crumb Trails in Random Forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Soumya; Pasipanodya, Jotam G; Ramachandran, Geetha; Hemanth Kumar, A K; Srivastava, Shashikant; Deshpande, Devyani; Nuermberger, Eric; Gumbo, Tawanda

    2016-11-01

     The role of drug concentrations in clinical outcomes in children with tuberculosis is unclear. Target concentrations for dose optimization are unknown.  Plasma drug concentrations measured in Indian children with tuberculosis were modeled using compartmental pharmacokinetic analyses. The children were followed until end of therapy to ascertain therapy failure or death. An ensemble of artificial intelligence algorithms, including random forests, was used to identify predictors of clinical outcome from among 30 clinical, laboratory, and pharmacokinetic variables.  Among the 143 children with known outcomes, there was high between-child variability of isoniazid, rifampin, and pyrazinamide concentrations: 110 (77%) completed therapy, 24 (17%) failed therapy, and 9 (6%) died. The main predictors of therapy failure or death were a pyrazinamide peak concentration children children with tuberculosis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  4. Potential of using boric acid as a boron drug for boron neutron capture therapy for osteosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, C.F.; Lin, S.Y. [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China); Peir, J.J. [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China); Liao, J.W. [Graduate Institute of Veterinary Pathobiology, National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan (China); Lin, Y.C. [Department of Veterinary Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan (China); Chou, F.I., E-mail: fichou@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China)] [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China)

    2011-12-15

    Osteosarcoma is a malignant tumor commonly found in human and animals. The ability of boric acid (BA) to accumulate in osteosarcoma due to the mechanism of the bone formation of cancer cells would make boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) an alternative therapy for osteosarcoma. This study evaluated the feasibility of using BA as the boron drug for BNCT of bone cancer. The cytotoxicity of BA to L929 cells exceeded that of UMR-106 cells. With 25 {mu}g {sup 10}B/mL medium of BA treatment, the boron concentration in UMR-106 cells was higher than that in L929 cells. The biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of BA in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were studied by administrating 25 mg {sup 10}B/kg body weight to SD rats. Blood boron level decreased rapidly within one hour after BA injection. Boron concentration in the long bone was 4-6 time higher than that of blood. Results of this study suggest that BA may be a potential drug for BNCT for osteosarcoma.

  5. Covalent linkage of nanodiamond-paclitaxel for drug delivery and cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Kuang-Kai; Wang, Chi-Ching; Chao, Jui-I [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Zheng, Wen-Wei; Lo, Yu-Shiu; Chen, Chinpiao [Department of Chemistry, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien 97401, Taiwan (China); Chiu, Yu-Chung; Cheng, Chia-Liang, E-mail: clcheng@mail.ndhu.edu.tw, E-mail: chinpiao@mail.ndhu.edu.tw, E-mail: jichao@faculty.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien 97401, Taiwan (China)

    2010-08-06

    A nanoparticle-conjugated cancer drug provides a novel strategy for cancer therapy. In this study, we manipulated nanodiamond (ND), a carbon nanomaterial, to covalently link paclitaxel for cancer drug delivery and therapy. Paclitaxel was bound to the surface of 3-5 nm sized ND through a succession of chemical modifications. The ND-paclitaxel conjugation was measured by atomic force microscope and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and confirmed with infrared spectroscopy by the detection of deuterated paclitaxel. Treatment with 0.1-50 {mu}g ml{sup -1} ND-paclitaxel for 48 h significantly reduced the cell viability in the A549 human lung carcinoma cells. ND-paclitaxel induced both mitotic arrest and apoptosis in A549 cells. However, ND alone or denatured ND-paclitaxel (after treatment with strong alkaline solution, 1 M NaOH) did not induce the damage effects on A549 cells. ND-paclitaxel was taken into lung cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner using flow cytometer analysis. The ND-paclitaxel particles were located in the microtubules and cytoplasm of A549 cells observed by confocal microscopy. Furthermore, ND-paclitaxel markedly blocked the tumor growth and formation of lung cancer cells in xenograft SCID mice. Together, we provide a functional covalent conjugation of ND-paclitaxel, which can be delivered into lung carcinoma cells and preserves the anticancer activities on the induction of mitotic blockage, apoptosis and anti-tumorigenesis.

  6. Monitoring early tumor response to drug therapy with diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flexman, Molly L.; Vlachos, Fotios; Kim, Hyun Keol; Sirsi, Shashank R.; Huang, Jianzhong; Hernandez, Sonia L.; Johung, Tessa B.; Gander, Jeffrey W.; Reichstein, Ari R.; Lampl, Brooke S.; Wang, Antai; Borden, Mark A.; Yamashiro, Darrell J.; Kandel, Jessica J.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2012-01-01

    Although anti-angiogenic agents have shown promise as cancer therapeutics, their efficacy varies between tumor types and individual patients. Providing patient-specific metrics through rapid noninvasive imaging can help tailor drug treatment by optimizing dosages, timing of drug cycles, and duration of therapy--thereby reducing toxicity and cost and improving patient outcome. Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a noninvasive three-dimensional imaging modality that has been shown to capture physiologic changes in tumors through visualization of oxygenated, deoxygenated, and total hemoglobin concentrations, using non-ionizing radiation with near-infrared light. We employed a small animal model to ascertain if tumor response to bevacizumab (BV), an anti-angiogenic agent that targets vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), could be detected at early time points using DOT. We detected a significant decrease in total hemoglobin levels as soon as one day after BV treatment in responder xenograft tumors (SK-NEP-1), but not in SK-NEP-1 control tumors or in non-responder control or BV-treated NGP tumors. These results are confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging T2 relaxometry and lectin perfusion studies. Noninvasive DOT imaging may allow for earlier and more effective control of anti-angiogenic therapy.

  7. Utility of Glioblastoma Patient-Derived Orthotopic Xenografts in Drug Discovery and Personalized Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrizii, Michele; Bartucci, Monica; Pine, Sharon R; Sabaawy, Hatem E

    2018-01-01

    Despite substantial effort and resources dedicated to drug discovery and development, new anticancer agents often fail in clinical trials. Among many reasons, the lack of reliable predictive preclinical cancer models is a fundamental one. For decades, immortalized cancer cell cultures have been used to lay the groundwork for cancer biology and the quest for therapeutic responses. However, cell lines do not usually recapitulate cancer heterogeneity or reveal therapeutic resistance cues. With the rapidly evolving exploration of cancer "omics," the scientific community is increasingly investigating whether the employment of short-term patient-derived tumor cell cultures (two- and three-dimensional) and/or patient-derived xenograft models might provide a more representative delineation of the cancer core and its therapeutic response. Patient-derived cancer models allow the integration of genomic with drug sensitivity data on a personalized basis and currently represent the ultimate approach for preclinical drug development and biomarker discovery. The proper use of these patient-derived cancer models might soon influence clinical outcomes and allow the implementation of tailored personalized therapy. When assessing drug efficacy for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), currently, the most reliable models are generated through direct injection of patient-derived cells or more frequently the isolation of glioblastoma cells endowed with stem-like features and orthotopically injecting these cells into the cerebrum of immunodeficient mice. Herein, we present the key strengths, weaknesses, and potential applications of cell- and animal-based models of GBM, highlighting our experience with the glioblastoma stem-like patient cell-derived xenograft model and its utility in drug discovery.

  8. Enhanced effect of photodynamic therapy in ovarian cancer using a nanoparticle drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhao; Sun, Liping; Lu, Zaijun; Su, Xuantao; Yang, Qifeng; Qu, Xun; Li, Li; Song, Kun; Kong, Beihua

    2015-09-01

    Nanoparticles are promising novel drug delivery carriers that allow tumor targeting and controlled drug release. In the present study, we prepared poly butyl-cyanoacrylate nanoparticles (PBCA-NP) entrapped with hypocrellin B (HB) to improve the effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in ovarian cancer. An ovarian cancer ascites model using Fischer 344 rats and PBCA-NP entrapped with HB (HB-PBCA-NP) were formed successfully. The pharmacodynamic characteristics and biodistribution of the HB-PBCA-NP system were evaluated by comparison with HB dimethyl sulfoxide (HB-DMSO) and testing at various time-points following intraperitoneal drug administration. HB-PBCA-NP-based PDT combined with cytoreductive surgery was then administrated to the tumor-bearing animals. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed to assess the therapeutic effect of the nanoparticle system. The serum HB concentration peaked 4 h after drug administration in the nanoparticle system, and 1 h with HB-DMSO. The peak exposure time of tumor tissues was also extended (4 vs. 2 h), and PBCA-NP remained present for much longer than HB-DMSO. Although PDT combined with surgery prolonged the survival time significantly compared with surgery alone (84 days, PNP- or HB-DMSO-based PDT after cytoreductive surgery (99 vs. 95 days, P=0.293). PBCA-NP exhibited potential advantages in controlled drug release and tumor targeting, which was beneficial for HB-based PDT. PDT combined with surgery prolonged the survival time, suggesting that this might be an alternative treatment option for ovarian cancer.

  9. Therapy against organophosphate poisoning: The importance of anticholinergic drugs with antiglutamatergic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissman, Ben Avi; Raveh, Lily

    2008-01-01

    Potent cholinesterase inhibitors (e.g., soman, sarin), induce a wide range of deleterious effects including convulsions, behavioral impairments and ultimately, death. Due to the likelihood of various scenarios of military or terrorist attacks by these and other chemical weapons, research has to be aimed at finding optimal therapies. Early accumulation of acetylcholine in synaptic clefts was suggested to trigger an array of toxic events including an excessive release of glutamate, culminating in the activation of its receptors. Stimulation of the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) subtype of these receptors was associated with the neuronal injury that initiates organophosphate-induced brain damage. The notion of a stepwise mechanism yielded treatments based on a combination of an immediate administration of enzyme reactivators and anticholinergic drugs. This strategy dramatically increased survival rates but did not abolish convulsions and failed to prevent the ensuing cognitive dysfunction. Efforts to improve this paradigm by adding anticonvulsants or antiglutamatergic drugs with anti-epileptic characteristics produced dubious results. Under these conditions, benactyzine and caramiphen, agents with anticholinergic and antiglutamatergic properties, provided improved protection when introduced as adjunct agents to oximes, reversible cholinesterase inhibitors and/or specific antimuscarinic drugs such as atropine. In contrast, the specific antimuscarinic drug scopolamine failed to block soman-induced changes in glutamatergic and behavioral parameters even when given prophylactically. These findings along with a large number of additional reports led towards the conclusion that the therapeutic advantage of drugs such as benactyzine and caramiphen could derive from their ability to modulate central cholinergic and glutamate neurotransmission

  10. Catanionic drug-derivative nano-objects constructed by chlorambucil and its derivative for efficient leukaemia therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiaoqing; Shi, Chunhuan; Li, Nuannuan; Wang, Kaiming; Li, Zhonghao; Luan, Yuxia

    2015-12-01

    A new carrier-free catanionic drug-derivative nano-object strategy is developed for leukaemia therapy. The as-prepared drug-derivative nano-objects are formed by ionic pairs of hydrophobic anticancer drug chlorambucil (CLB) and its derivative N-(2-Amino-ethyl)-4-{4-[bis-(2-chloro-ethyl)-amino]-phenyl}-butyramide (CLBM). The designed drug delivery system has the advantage of 100% drug content without additional carrier materials. The ionic pairs are formed by proton exchange between CLB and CLBM. Due to the amphiphilicity of the ionic pairs, they can assemble into well-defined drug-derivative (CLB-CLBM) nano-objects. Series of techniques such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and electrical conductivity are used to investigate the property of the solution and aggregation behaviour of as-prepared drug-derivative ionic pairs. In vitro drug release study of the as-prepared nano-objects shows their prolonged drug release behavior. Specifically, in vitro cytotoxicity results of these nano-objects show obviously higher cytotoxicity, which is promising for clinical efficacy. This study may pave the way for the fabrication of carrier-free drug delivery system with efficient cancer therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Hypericin-bearing magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for selective drug delivery in photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unterweger, Harald; Subatzus, Daniel; Tietze, Rainer; Janko, Christina; Poettler, Marina; Stiegelschmitt, Alfons; Schuster, Matthias; Maake, Caroline; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Alexiou, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Combining the concept of magnetic drug targeting and photodynamic therapy is a promising approach for the treatment of cancer. A high selectivity as well as significant fewer side effects can be achieved by this method, since the therapeutic treatment only takes place in the area where accumulation of the particles by an external electromagnet and radiation by a laser system overlap. In this article, a novel hypericin-bearing drug delivery system has been developed by synthesis of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) with a hypericin-linked functionalized dextran coating. For that, sterically stabilized dextran-coated SPIONs were produced by coprecipitation and crosslinking with epichlorohydrin to enhance stability. Carboxymethylation of the dextran shell provided a functionalized platform for linking hypericin via glutaraldehyde. Particle sizes obtained by dynamic light scattering were in a range of 55-85 nm, whereas investigation of single magnetite or maghemite particle diameter was performed by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction and resulted in approximately 4.5-5.0 nm. Surface chemistry of those particles was evaluated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and ζ potential measurements, indicating successful functionalization and dispersal stabilization due to a mixture of steric and electrostatic repulsion. Flow cytometry revealed no toxicity of pure nanoparticles as well as hypericin without exposure to light on Jurkat T-cells, whereas the combination of hypericin, alone or loaded on particles, with light-induced cell death in a concentration and exposure time-dependent manner due to the generation of reactive oxygen species. In conclusion, the combination of SPIONs' targeting abilities with hypericin's phototoxic properties represents a promising approach for merging magnetic drug targeting with photodynamic therapy for the treatment of cancer.

  12. Targeted therapy and personalized medicine in hepatocellular carcinoma: drug resistance, mechanisms, and treatment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galun D

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Danijel Galun,1,2 Tatjana Srdic-Rajic,3 Aleksandar Bogdanovic,1 Zlatibor Loncar,2,4 Marinko Zuvela1,2 1Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Unit, University Clinic for Digestive Surgery, Clinical Center of Serbia, 2Medical School, University of Belgrade, 3Institute for Oncology and Radiology of Serbia/Unit for Experimental Oncology, 4Emergency Center, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia Abstract: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is characterized by a growing number of new cases diagnosed each year that is nearly equal to the number of deaths from this cancer. In a majority of the cases, HCC is associated with the underlying chronic liver disease, and it is diagnosed in advanced stage of disease when curative treatment options are not applicable. Sorafenib is a treatment of choice for patients with performance status 1 or 2 and/or macrovascular invasion or extrahepatic spread, and regorafenib is the only systemic treatment found to provide survival benefit in HCC patients progressing on sorafenib treatment. Other drugs tested in different trials failed to demonstrate any benefit. Disappointing results of numerous trials testing the efficacy of various drugs indicate that HCC has low sensitivity to chemotherapy that is in great part caused by multidrug resistance. Immunotherapy for HCC is a new challenging treatment option and involves immune checkpoint inhibitors/antibody-based therapy and peptide-based vaccines. Another challenging approach is microRNA-based therapy that involves two strategies. The first aims to inhibit oncogenic miRNAs by using miRNA antagonists and the second strategy is miRNA replacement, which involves the reintroduction of a tumor-suppressor miRNA mimetic to restore a loss of function. Keywords: hepatocellular carcinoma, drug resistance, multimodal treatment, chemotherapy 

  13. Leukopenia and lymphopenia during the radiation therapy and their recovery by anti-leukopenia drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makidono, Reiko; Makidono, Atsushi; Matsuura, Keiichi

    1977-01-01

    The immunosuppressive effect of radiation is well understood. Therapeutic radiation can promote an immune depression in patients with malignant tumors by damaging their lymphocytes and macrophages. Definitive results concerning the effect of therapeutic radiation on lymphocytes demand rigidly controlled materials and methods. We studied the peripheral total leukocyte and lymphocyte counts of patients with mammary, esophageal and lung cancer treated by radiation with similar techniques. A significant decrease of lymphocytes was observed in all patients near the end of their radiation therapy courses, confirming the destructive effect of radiation. The relationship between the degree of lymphopenia and impairment of the immunologic capacity of the patient remain to be elucidated. When lymphocytes are reduced by radiation, and the patient's immunologic capacity is impaired, the growth of the primary tumor and metastases increases and secondary infections are frequent. No effective drug has been available to increase the numbers of lymphocytes in lymphopenic patients. We have tested several anti-leukopenia drugs including Cobalt green-pole, Cepharanthin, Glycyron, Inosie, and PVL-yaoi, to assess their ability to increase the numbers of lymphocytes and enhance the recovery of their antibody-producing capacity in man and in mice. Cepharanthin increased the numbers of peripheral lymphocytes, especially T lymphocytes, in some patients, when administered continuously during and after radiation therapy. Cepharanthin, Glycyron and PVL-yaoi increased the numbers of plaque-forming cells against sheep erythrocytes in the spleens of the irradiated mice. These results indicate that some anti-leukopenia drugs are useful in increasing the numbers of lymphocytes and possibly in restoring the immunologic capacities of tumor patients. (auth.)

  14. NIR photoregulated chemo- and photodynamic cancer therapy based on conjugated polyelectrolyte-drug conjugate encapsulated upconversion nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Youyong; Min, Yuanzeng; Hu, Qinglian; Xing, Bengang; Liu, Bin

    2014-09-01

    The design of nanoplatforms with target recognition and near-infrared (NIR) laser photoregulated chemo- and photodynamic therapy is highly desirable but remains challenging. In this work, we have developed such a system by taking advantage of a conjugated polyelectrolyte (CPE)-drug conjugate and upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs). The poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) grafted CPE not only serves as a polymer matrix for UCNP encapsulation, but also as a fluorescent imaging agent, a photosensitizer as well as a carrier for chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin (DOX) through a UV-cleavable ortho-nitrobenzyl (NB) linker. Upon 980 nm laser irradiation, the UCNPs emit UV and visible light. The up-converted UV light is utilized for controlled drug release through the photocleavage of the ortho-nitrobenzyl linker, while the up-converted visible light is used to initiate the polymer photosensitizer to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) for photodynamic therapy. The NIR photo-regulated UCNP@CPE-DOX showed high efficiency of ROS generation and controlled drug release in cancer cells upon single laser irradiation. In addition, the combination therapy showed enhanced inhibition of U87-MG cell growth as compared to sole treatments. As two light sources with different wavelengths are always needed for traditional photodynamic therapy and photoregulated drug release, the adoption of UCNPs as an NIR light switch is highly beneficial to combined chemo- and photodynamic therapy with enhanced therapeutic effects.

  15. HIV drug resistance following a decade of the free antiretroviral therapy programme in India: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karade, Santosh; Chaturbhuj, Devidas N; Sen, Sourav; Joshi, Rajneesh K; Kulkarni, Smita S; Shankar, Subramanian; Gangakhedkar, Raman R

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this review was to assess the burden of HIV drug resistance mutations (DRM) in Indian adults exposed to first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) as per national guidelines. An advanced search of the published literature on HIV drug resistance in India was performed in the PubMed and Scopus databases. Data pertaining to age, sex, CD4 count, viral load, and prevalence of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)/non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) DRM were extracted from each publication. Year-wise Indian HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) sequences were retrieved from the Los Alamos HIV database and mutation analyses were performed. A time trend analysis of the proportion of sequences showing NRTI resistance mutations among individuals exposed to first-line ART was conducted. Overall, 23 studies (1046 unique RT sequences) were identified indicating a prevalence of drug resistance to NRTI and NNRTI. The proportion of RT sequences with any DRM, any NRTI DRM, and any NNRTI DRM was 78.39%, 68.83%, and 73.13%, respectively. The temporal trend analysis of individual DRM from sequences retrieved during 2004-2014 indicated a rising trend in K65R mutations (p=0.013). Although the overall burden of resistance against first-line ART agents remained steady over the study decade, periodic monitoring is essential. There is the need to develop an HIV-1 subtype C-specific resistance database in India. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. How much elderly people of Isfahan are adherent to their drug therapy regimens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazari, Parvaneh; Jafari, Tayebe Arab; Sabzghabaee, Ali Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    The need for a correct follow-up for medical advices of health givers is the cornerstone for avoiding drug-related complications in especial period of elderly people life. There isn't any data about drug therapy regimens adherence of elderly people of Isfahan. In this study, we aimed to cover this deficit. In this cross-sectional study which was carried out in Isfahan (Iran) in 2013 senior citizens (aged 65 or more) who were taking at least one medication and had no record of residency in nursing homes were included. We used Morisky medication adherence scale (after validation and reliability assessment for using this questionnaire in Persian language) to evaluate the level of adherence in the study population. A total of 200 elderly participants were fully studied ( n = 200, 61% females), and 52% of them had poor medication adherence. 77.5% of participants were suffered from at least four medical illnesses, and 18.5% of them were taking more than eight medications per day. We have not found any significant statistical relationship between vision or hearing loss disorders and the medication adherence of the participants). There was a significant positive relationship between the level of education and medication adherence ( P = 0.001), ( χ 2 = 0.29). Low Medication adherence is a common and important drug issue in the elderly in Isfahan. This issue can lead to medical complications and huge cost if it is not addressed appropriately.

  17. Laser Printing of PCL/Progesterone Tablets for Drug Delivery Applications in Hormone Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmoria, G. V.; Klauss, P.; Kanis, L. A.

    2017-09-01

    In this study, polycaprolactone (PCL) and progesterone (PG) tablets were produced by selective laser sintering (SLS) using different particle sizes and laser energy. The sintered PCL/PG tablets presented uniform morphology, coalescence of particles and interconnected pores distributed in the polymeric matrix. The EDS analysis confirmed the presence of progesterone recrystallized on the surface of the porous PCL matrix. The crystallinity values for the PCL/PG tablets were lower than that for the pure PCL, suggesting the interaction of components at the molecular level. The PCL/PG tablets fabricated with small particles and high laser energy presented a higher value for the flexural modulus compared with the other specimens. The glass transition temperature (Tg) was -37 °C for the PCL/PG tablet with a high degree of sintering. The fatigue test showed that the PCL/PG blend tablets have high fatigue strength. The drug release mechanism of all tablets studied followed a zero-order kinetics, and drug release rates were dependent on sintering degree and, consequently, on matrix erosion, showing a potential application to controlled drug delivery in hormone cancer therapy.

  18. Smart tetrazole-based antibacterial nanoparticles as multifunctional drug carriers for cancer combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakerzadeh, Elham; Salehi, Roya; Mahkam, Mehrdad

    2017-12-01

    Due to multidrug resistance of cancer tissues and immune-suppression of cancerous patients during chemotherapy in one hand and the use of tetrazole derivatives in medicine because of its anticancer, antifungal, and antiviral properties, on the other, we were encouraged to design novel smart antibacterial nanocomposites-based polymer of tetrazole as dual anticancer drug delivery systems. The structures of nanocomposites characterized by FTIR, 1 H NMR, FESEM-EDX, and TGA analyzes and antibacterial activity of smart carriers were evaluated by determination of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values against some bacteria and fungi. Then, the pH-responsive manner of both nanocomposites was proved by checking their release profiles at pH of the physiological environment (pH 7.4) and pH of tumor tissues (mildly acidic). Finally, the potential antitumoral activity of these nanocomposite systems against MCF7 cell lines was evaluated by MTT assay and cell cycle studies. The results demonstrated that the novel developed nanocomposites not only meet our expectations about simultaneous release of two anticancer drugs according to the predicted profile but also showed antibacterial and anticancer properties in vitro experimental. Moreover, it was proved that these carriers have tremendous potential in multifunctional drug delivery in cancer therapy.

  19. Impact of opioid substitution therapy on the HIV prevention benefit of antiretroviral therapy for people who inject drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukandavire, Christinah; Low, Andrea; Mburu, Gitau; Trickey, Adam; May, Margaret T; Davies, Charlotte F; French, Clare E; Looker, Katharine J; Rhodes, Tim; Platt, Lucy; Guise, Andy; Hickman, Matthew; Vickerman, Peter

    2017-05-15

    A recent meta-analysis suggested that opioid substitution therapy (OST) increased uptake of antiretroviral treatment (ART) and HIV viral suppression. We modelled whether OST could improve the HIV prevention benefit achieved by ART among people who inject drugs (PWID). We modelled how introducing OST could improve the coverage of ART across a PWID population for different baseline ART coverage levels. Using existing data on how yearly HIV-transmission risk is related to HIV plasma viral load, changes in the level of viral suppression across the population were used to project the relative reduction in yearly HIV-transmission risk achieved by ART, with or without OST, compared with if there was no ART - defined here as the prevention effectiveness of ART. Owing to OST use increasing the chance of being on ART and achieving viral suppression if on ART, the prevention effectiveness of ART for PWID on OST (compared with PWID not on OST) increases by 44, 31, or 20% for a low (20%), moderate (40%), or high (60%) baseline ART coverage, respectively. Improvements in the population-level prevention effectiveness of ART are also achieved across all PWID, compared with if OST was not introduced. For instance, if OST is introduced at 40% coverage, the population-level prevention effectiveness of ART could increase by 27, 20, or 13% for a low (20%), moderate (40%), or high (60%) baseline ART coverage, respectively. OST could improve the HIV prevention benefit of ART; supporting strategies that aim to concurrently scale-up OST with ART.

  20. IGF-1 receptor targeted nanoparticles for image-guided therapy of stroma-rich and drug resistant human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongyu; Qian, Weiping; Uckun, Fatih M; Zhou, Zhiyang; Wang, Liya; Wang, Andrew; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily

    2016-04-17

    Low drug delivery efficiency and drug resistance from highly heterogeneous cancer cells and tumor microenvironment represent major challenges in clinical oncology. Growth factor receptor, IGF-1R, is overexpressed in both human tumor cells and tumor associated stromal cells. The level of IGF-1R expression is further up-regulated in drug resistant tumor cells. We have developed IGF-1R targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) carrying multiple anticancer drugs into human tumors. This IGF-1R targeted theranostic nanoparticle delivery system has an iron core for non-invasive MR imaging, amphiphilic polymer coating to ensure the biocompatibility as well as for drug loading and conjugation of recombinant human IGF-1 as targeting molecules. Chemotherapy drugs, Doxorubicin (Dox), was encapsulated into the polymer coating and/or conjugated to the IONP surface by coupling with the carboxyl groups. The ability of IGF1R targeted theranostic nanoparticles to penetrate tumor stromal barrier and enhance tumor cell killing has been demonstrated in human pancreatic cancer patient tissue derived xenograft (PDX) models. Repeated systemic administrations of those IGF-1R targeted theranostic IONP carrying Dox led to breaking the tumor stromal barrier and improved therapeutic effect. Near infrared (NIR) optical and MR imaging enabled noninvasive monitoring of nanoparticle-drug delivery and therapeutic responses. Our results demonstrated that IGF-1R targeted nanoparticles carrying multiple drugs are promising combination therapy approaches for image-guided therapy of stroma-rich and drug resistant human cancer, such as pancreatic cancer.

  1. Electroconvulsive therapy in drug resistant neuroleptic malignant syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousefi A

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Neuroleptic malignant syndrome is an idiosyncratic and potentially fatal reaction to neuroleptic drugs and is characterized by fever, muscular rigidity, altered mental status, autonomic dysfunction, elevated serum CPK and leucocytosis Neuroleptic malignant syndrome is treated with dantrolene, bromocriptin, amantadin and electroconvulsive therapy."n"nCase: A 22 years old, schizophrenic female was refered to the Emergency ward of Roozbeh hospital in Tehran, Iran in December 2008 with aggression, impulsivity, and reduced sleep. After injection of haloperidol, the patient developed a high grade fever, diaphoresis and muscular stiffness. She was diagnosed as neuroleptic malignant syndrome and the treatment with dantrolen, bromocriptin and amantadin initiated. Although fever subsided, other signs continued, therefore we applied electroconvulsive therapy to this case."n"nConclusion: Due to excellent response of the patient to electroconvulsive therapy and the rare reports of electroconvulsive therapy in neuroleptic malignant syndrome in the Iranian population, this case may lead to develop studies for further investigations of this issue.

  2. The holistic 3M modality of drug delivery nanosystems for cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jin; Luo, Cong; Wang, Yongjun; He, Zhonggui

    2013-01-01

    Cancer has become the leading cause of human death worldwide. There are many challenges in the treatment of cancer and the rapidly developing area of nanotechnology has shown great potential to open a new era in cancer therapy. This article, rather than being exhaustive, focuses on the striking progress in the drug delivery nanosystems (DDNS) for cancer therapy and selects typical examples to point out the emerging mode of action of DDNS from our perspective. Among the outstanding advances in DDNS for cancer therapy is the development of ``multicomponent delivery systems'', ``multifunctional nanocarriers'' and ``multistage delivery systems''. However, these represent only one aspect of DDNS research. In addition, nature is the best teacher and natural evolution pressure has meant that virions conform to the ``multitarget, multistage and multicomponent'' (3M) mode of action. Amazingly, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), used for over 4000 years in China, also displays the same mode of action. Integrating the previous notable progress in nanoparticle technology, learned from the building mode of natural virions and the action concept of TCM, we propose an integrity-based 3M mode DDNS for cancer therapy: multitarget, multistage and multicomponent, which are not fragmented parts but an interconnected integrity. Based on the physiological multitarget and the pharmacokinetic multistage, multicomponent DDNS are rationally designed, where different components with individual specific functions act in a synergistic manner against each target at each disposition stage to maximize the targeted delivery effectiveness. In this article, we introduce each component of 3M DDNS in detail and describe some typical cases to realize the tumor-homing purposes.

  3. Fungal diseases: could nanostructured drug delivery systems be a novel paradigm for therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voltan AR

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aline Raquel Voltan,1 Guillermo Quindós,2 Kaila P Medina Alarcón,3 Ana Marisa Fusco-Almeida,3 Maria José Soares Mendes-Giannini,3 Marlus Chorilli1 1Department of Drugs and Medicines, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Univ. Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, Sao Paulo, Brazil; 2Immunology, Microbiology, and Parasitology Department, Facultad de Medicina y Odontología, Universidad del País Vasco, Bilbao, Spain; 3Department of Clinical Analysis, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Univ. Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, Sao Paulo, Brazil Abstract: Invasive mycoses are a major problem for immunocompromised individuals and patients in intensive care units. Morbidity and mortality rates of these infections are high because of late diagnosis and delayed treatment. Moreover, the number of available antifungal agents is low, and there are problems with toxicity and resistance. Alternatives for treating invasive fungal infections are necessary. Nanostructured systems could be excellent carriers for antifungal drugs, reducing toxicity and targeting their action. The use of nanostructured systems for antifungal therapy began in the 1990s, with the appearance of lipid formulations of amphotericin B. This review encompasses different antifungal drug delivery systems, such as liposomes, carriers based on solid lipids and nanostructure lipids, polymeric nanoparticles, dendrimers, and others. All these delivery systems have advantages and disadvantages. Main advantages are the improvement in the antifungal properties, such as bioavailability, reduction in toxicity, and target tissue, which facilitates innovative therapeutic techniques. Conversely, a major disadvantage is the high cost of production. In the near future, the use of nanosystems for drug delivery strategies can be used for delivering peptides, including mucoadhesive systems for the treatment of oral and vaginal candidiasis. Keywords: fungal diseases, antifungal agents, amphotericin B, azoles

  4. Metal complexes in cancer therapy – an update from drug design perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndagi U

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Umar Ndagi, Ndumiso Mhlongo, Mahmoud E Soliman Molecular Modelling and Drug Design Research Group, School of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Westville, Durban, South Africa Abstract: In the past, metal-based compounds were widely used in the treatment of disease conditions, but the lack of clear distinction between the therapeutic and toxic doses was a major challenge. With the discovery of cisplatin by Barnett Rosenberg in 1960, a milestone in the history of metal-based compounds used in the treatment of cancers was witnessed. This forms the foundation for the modern era of the metal-based anticancer drugs. Platinum drugs, such as cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin, are the mainstay of the metal-based compounds in the treatment of cancer, but the delay in the therapeutic accomplishment of other metal-based compounds hampered the progress of research in this field. Recently, however, there has been an upsurge of activities relying on the structural information, aimed at improving and developing other forms of metal-based compounds and nonclassical platinum complexes whose mechanism of action is distinct from known drugs such as cisplatin. In line with this, many more metal-based compounds have been synthesized by redesigning the existing chemical structure through ligand substitution or building the entire new compound with enhanced safety and cytotoxic profile. However, because of increased emphasis on the clinical relevance of metal-based complexes, a few of these drugs are currently on clinical trial and many more are awaiting ethical approval to join the trial. In this review, we seek to give an overview of previous reviews on the cytotoxic effect of metal-based complexes while focusing more on newly designed metal-based complexes and their cytotoxic effect on the cancer cell lines, as well as on new approach to metal-based drug design and molecular target in cancer therapy. We are optimistic that the concept of selective

  5. Transformable Peptide Nanocarriers for Expeditious Drug Release and Effective Cancer Therapy via Cancer-Associated Fibroblast Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Tianjiao; Zhao, Ying; Ding, Yanping; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Ruifang; Lang, Jiayan; Qin, Hao; Liu, Xiaoman; Shi, Jian; Tao, Ning; Qin, Zhihai; Nie, Guangjun; Zhao, Yuliang

    2016-01-18

    A novel cleavable amphiphilic peptide (CAP) was designed to be specifically responsive to fibroblast activation protein-α (FAP-α), a protease specifically expressed on the surface of cancer-associated fibroblasts. The CAP self-assembled into fiber-like nanostructures in solution, while the presence of hydrophobic chemotherapeutic drugs readily transformed the assemblies into drug-loaded spherical nanoparticles. The disassembly of these nanoparticles (CAP-NPs) upon FAP-α cleavage resulted in rapid and efficient release of the encapsulated drugs specifically at tumor sites. This Transformers-like drug delivery strategy could allow them to disrupt the stromal barrier and enhance local drug accumulation. Therapeutic results suggested that drug-loaded CAP-NPs hold promising tumor specificity and therapeutic efficacy for various solid tumor models, confirming its potential utility and versatility in antitumor therapy. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  6. [Stabilizing the social and health status of drug dependent patients with methadone. Long-term maintainance therapy--Vienna results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loimer, N; Werner, E; Hollerer, E; Pfersmann, V; Schmid-Siegel, B; Presslich, O

    1991-01-01

    On September 25th, 1987 methadone was legalized in Austria for therapeutic use in drug addiction treatment in case of: 1. Long-term drug addiction with intravenous application of the drug, and several unsuccessful withdrawal therapies and/or 2. opiate addiction through intravenous application of the drug along with an existing HIV-1 infection. Since than, 291 patients were treated with methadone at the drug-dependency outpatient clinic of the Psychiatric Clinic of the University of Vienna. In 1990, 96 patients treated for more than one year were investigated using a standardized questionnaire. The image in which crime, prostitution, poverty, ill health all merge was broken by this decriminalization. Methadone treatment offers a first step toward social rehabilitation for drug addicts who have been living as criminals on the fringe of society.

  7. The lay user perspective on the quality of pharmaceuticals, drug therapy and pharmacy services--results of focus group discussions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traulsen, Janine Morgall; Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna; Björnsdóttir, Ingunn

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This article presents the results of a study on quality of pharmacy services and perceived risk of pharmaceuticals. The results presented here are part of a multi-study evaluation of major changes in drug distribution in Iceland. OBJECTIVES: This sub-study addressed the question: what...... is the lay user perspective on pharmaceuticals and pharmacy services, including their perception of risk? METHODS: To answer this question, seven focus group discussions were conducted with pharmacy customers in different locations in Iceland following new drug distribution legislation in 1996. RESULTS......: The lay perspective emphasizes a definite split between lay and expert views on the value and quality of pharmaceuticals, drug therapy and pharmacy services, as well as in their assessment of risk. Participants voiced spontaneous criticism of the roles of both physicians and pharmacists in drug therapy...

  8. Optimization of Drug Delivery Systems for Intraperitoneal Therapy to Extend the Residence Time of the Chemotherapeutic Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. De Smet

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraperitoneal (IP chemotherapy is an effective way of treating peritoneal carcinomatosis of colorectal origin after complete cytoreduction. Although IP therapy has been already performed for many years, no standardized treatment design has been developed in terms of schedule, residence time, drug, or carrier solution. Because of the fast clearance of the conventional intravenous (IV drug delivery systems used for IP therapy, a lot of research is performed to optimize IP drug delivery and extend the residence time of the cytotoxic agent in the peritoneal cavity. This paper reviews the recent advances made in drug delivery systems for IP chemotherapy, discussing the use of microparticles, nanoparticles, liposomes, micelles, implants, and injectable depots for IP delivery.

  9. Testosterone therapy in the new era of Food and Drug Administration oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desroches, Bethany; Kohn, Taylor P; Welliver, Charles; Pastuszak, Alexander W

    2016-04-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) introduced changes in labeling and indications for use to testosterone products in 2015 due to a possible increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) events. This decision was made based on six clinical studies-some that supported an increased CV risk, and some that did not. Since this decision, additional studies have been published examining the interplay between hypogonadism, CV risk, and testosterone, demonstrating that the risk may be lower than originally estimated. Clinicians are placed in a difficult position, as studies support an increased mortality risk in hypogonadal men, but also an increased risk of CV events in men on testosterone therapy. As a result, many clinicians will be more selective in their prescribing of testosterone. In this review, we examine how these new guidelines arose and how they may affect prescribing habits.

  10. Importance of the long-acting partner drug in artemisinin-based combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtzhals, Jørgen Al

    2008-11-01

    The 1st African Health Research Organization International Malaria Symposium on Clinical Pharmacology of Antimalarial Drugs collected approximately 60 health professionals, scientists, policy makers and nongovernmental organization representatives from Africa, Europe and the USA for updates on recent developments in malaria therapy. It was the first African Health Research Organization symposium in Africa aimed at taking an African leadership in the fight against malaria. The intention is to start a tradition of annually recurring symposia that will eventually grow to become a leading international event in malaria research. Apart from scientific presentations, substantial time was dedicated to discussions and brainstorming, with a view to developing tools that can realistically be used to address challenges relating to all aspects of malaria treatment and control. The meeting was funded partly by the Medicines for Malaria Venture and Dafra Pharma International Ltd., Belgium, both of which were represented by some of the speakers.

  11. Adjunctive drug therapies for treatment of respiratory diseases in the newborn: based on evidence or habit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sunil; Tin, Win

    2014-04-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome is a disease of prematurity and is caused by a relative deficiency of endogenous surfactant production. Respiratory distress syndrome is the most common cause of mortality and morbidity in the newborn population and the standard of care is to provide exogenous surfactant therapy. This saves lives and reduces respiratory complications but, despite treatment, a significant proportion of these infants go onto develop chronic lung disease, the severest form of which is bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Once developed, this is a multisystem disease and treatment is mostly supportive by using various therapeutic adjuncts. Some of these have been proven to be safe and effective in large randomized, controlled trials but similar evidence for other drugs is lacking. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview and critically appraise the available scientific evidence for or against their use in routine practice.

  12. Cancer therapy leading to state of cancer metabolism depression for efficient operation of small dosage cytotoxic drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Ponizovskiy MR

    2015-01-01

    “Prolonged medical starvation” as the method of cancer therapy was borrowed from folk healers Omelchenko A and Breuss R. Author was convinced in efficiency of this method of cancer treatment via examination of cured patients and on own experience. The mechanism of this method of cancer therapy operates via Warburg effect targeting that promotes efficient cancer treatment with small cytotoxic drugs. Just it was described the mechanism of Warburg effect as well as mechanism transmutation of mit...

  13. Combination Cancer Therapy Can Confer Benefit via Patient-to-Patient Variability without Drug Additivity or Synergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Adam C; Sorger, Peter K

    2017-12-14

    Combination cancer therapies aim to improve the probability and magnitude of therapeutic responses and reduce the likelihood of acquired resistance in an individual patient. However, drugs are tested in clinical trials on genetically diverse patient populations. We show here that patient-to-patient variability and independent drug action are sufficient to explain the superiority of many FDA-approved drug combinations in the absence of drug synergy or additivity. This is also true for combinations tested in patient-derived tumor xenografts. In a combination exhibiting independent drug action, each patient benefits solely from the drug to which his or her tumor is most sensitive, with no added benefit from other drugs. Even when drug combinations exhibit additivity or synergy in pre-clinical models, patient-to-patient variability and low cross-resistance make independent action the dominant mechanism in clinical populations. This insight represents a different way to interpret trial data and a different way to design combination therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mortality and Macrovascular Risk in Elderly With Hypertension and Diabetes: Effect of Intensive Drug Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashkin, Arseniy P; Kravchenko, Julia; Yashin, Anatoliy I; Sloan, Frank

    2018-01-12

    This study identifies the effect of intensive drug therapy (IDT) in individuals age 65+ with diabetes (type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D)) and hypertension on all-cause death, congestive heart failure (CHF), hospitalization for myocardial infarction (MI), and stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Individuals from the Medicare 5% dataset with hypertension and T2D undergoing IDT for these conditions were propensity score matched to a nonintensive drug-therapy group. Hazard ratios (HRs) were obtained using the Cox proportional hazard model. IDT was associated with increased risk of CHF (HR 2.32; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.32-2.38), MI (HR 4.27; 95% CI 4.05-4.52), and stroke or TIA (HR 1.80; 95% CI 1.70-1.89) but decreased risk of death (HR 0.95; 95% CI 0.93-0.97). Risk for CHF (HR 0.73; 95% CI 0.71-0.73), MI (HR 0.64; 95% CI 0.62-0.67), stroke or TIA (HR 0.82; 95% CI 0.78-0.86), and death (HR 0.29; 95% CI 0.28-0.29) was decreased by adherence to diabetes management guidelines. Use of IDT in a high-risk population delays death but not severe macrovascular outcomes. Protective effects of IDT in high-risk patients likely outweigh polypharmacy-related health concerns. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2017. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  15. The switch drug phenomenon: a phenomenological inquiry into the role of nicotine replacement therapy in smoking cessation behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Sherlock, Roger

    1999-01-01

    This thesis sets out to explore consumers’ health behaviour in an era of increased consumer autonomy with the emergence of a new category o f drugs; those that have ‘switched’ from prescription (Rx) control to over-the-counter (OTC) availability. The switching of drugs presents an opportunity for consumer researchers to explore preventive health behaviour and the move to more self-medication practices by consumers. Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), to help those who wish to stop smoking, ha...

  16. Bladder Pain Syndrome Treated with Triple Therapy with Gabapentin, Amitriptyline, and a Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jea Whan; Han, Dong Youp; Jeong, Hee Jong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Bladder pain syndrome is a chronic disease that manifests as bladder pain, frequency, nocturia, and urgency. Gabapentin, amitriptyline, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are efficacious treatments for bladder pain syndrome. Here, we assessed the effect of triple therapy with these drugs in women with bladder pain syndrome. Methods Between May 2007 and May 2010, we conducted a prospective nonrandomized study on 74 patients with bladder pain syndrome. Of these patients, 38 (11 me...

  17. Self-assembled nanoparticles based on PEGylated conjugated polyelectrolyte and drug molecules for image-guided drug delivery and photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Youyong; Liu, Bin

    2014-09-10

    A drug delivery system based on poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) grafted conjugated polyelectrolyte (CPE) has been developed to serve as a polymeric photosensitizer and drug carrier for combined photodynamic and chemotherapy. The amphiphilic brush copolymer can self-assemble into micellar nanopaticles (NPs) in aqueous media with hydrophobic conjugated polyelectrolyte backbone as the core and hydrophilic PEG as the shell. The NPs have an average diameter of about 100 nm, with the absorption and emission maxima at 502 and 598 nm, respectively, making them suitable for bioimaging applications. Moreover, the CPE itself can serve as a photosensitizer, which makes the NPs not only a carrier for drug but also a photosensitizing unit for photodynamic therapy, resulting in the combination of chemo- and photodynamic therapy for cancer. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value for the combination therapy to U87-MG cells is 12.7 μg mL(-1), which is much lower than that for the solely photodynamic therapy (25.5 μg mL(-1)) or chemotherapy (132.8 μg mL(-1)). To improve the tumor specificity of the system, cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (cRGD) tripeptide as the receptor to integrin αvβ3 overexpressed cancer cells was further incorporated to the surface of the NPs. The delivery system based on PEGylated CPE is easy to fabricate, which integrates the merits of targeted cancer cell image, chemotherapeutic drug delivery, and photodynamic therapy, making it promising for cancer treatment.

  18. Assessment of the expectancy, seriousness and severity of adverse drug reactions reported for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Guenka; Stoimenova, Assena; Dimitrova, Maria; Kamusheva, Maria; Petrova, Daniela; Georgiev, Ognian

    2017-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions can cause increased morbidity and mortality, and therefore information needs to be studied systematically. Little is known about the adverse drug reactions for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease therapy. The goal of this study is to assess the expectedness, seriousness and severity of adverse drug reactions during chronic obstructive pulmonary disease therapy based on their reporting in the national pharmacovigilance system. This was a prospective, observational, 1-year, real-life study about the pharmacotherapy of a sample of 390 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. Prescribed medicines were systematized and national pharmacovigilance databases were searched for reported adverse drug reactions. The expectedness was evaluated through the review of the summary of product characteristics, the seriousness was evaluated by the clinicians based on the life threatening nature of the adverse drug reactions, and the severity was evaluated through Hartwig's Severity Assessment Scale. Descriptive statistics of the reported adverse drug reactions was performed and the relative risk of developing an adverse drug reaction with all international non-proprietary names included in the analysis was calculated. Results confirm that the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a disease with high appearance of adverse drug reactions, and causes many additional costs to the healthcare system. Unexpected and severe adverse drug reactions are frequent. A total of 4.8% of adverse drug reactions were evaluated as life threatening. Majority of adverse drug reactions are classified in Levels 1 (32.6%), 2 (26.4%) and 3 (19%) according to Hartwig's Severity Assessment Scale. Approximately 22% of reported adverse drug reactions affect people's everyday life to a greater extent and require additional therapy which might further increase the risk. The relative risk of developing an adverse drug reaction was highest for novphyllin (relative risk = 0

  19. Side effects due to primary antituberculosis drugs during the initial phase of therapy in 1149 hospitalized patients for tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülbay, Banu Eriş; Gürkan, Ozlem Ural; Yildiz, Oznur Akkoca; Onen, Zeynep Pinar; Erkekol, Ferda Oner; Baççioğlu, Ayşe; Acican, Turan

    2006-10-01

    Side effects of the most commonly used primary antituberculosis (anti-TB) drugs may be mild as well as fatal. The aim of this study was to evaluate the side effects of and the risk factors for developing side effects against anti-TB drugs. Records of 1149 patients with established tuberculosis who initially received anti-TB therapy were evaluated retrospectively. The major side effects, which resulted in a definitive termination from 1 or more drugs related to anti-TB therapy, and the risk factors associated with these side effects, were analyzed. Ninety-five patients (8.3%), constituting 104 cases in total, experienced side effects. Although the frequency of drug reactions were increased from 0.6% at ages side effects. While asymptomatic liver function disturbance was established in 56 of the patients (4.9%) with initiation of anti-TB therapy, the rate of hepatotoxicity was found to be 2.4% in this present study. No age or gender differences were observed among those who had hepatotoxicity and who had not. The major side effects were ototoxicity (1.7%), hepatotoxicity (0.8%), neuropsychiatric manifestations (0.7%), and hyperuricemia (0.6%). It must be remembered that severe side effects associated with anti-TB drugs were encountered with different frequencies especially among patients hospitalized for pulmonary tuberculosis, and these patients should be followed up by closer monitoring for side effects related to anti-TB drugs.

  20. Treatment of Cushing's disease with adrenal blocking drugs and megavoltage therapy to the pituitary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, W.M.; Evered, D.C.; Hunter, P.; Benaim, M.; Cook, D.; Hall, R.

    1979-01-01

    Eighteen patients with Cushing's disease were seen over a 40-month period and considered for treatment by pituitary irradiation and adrenal blocking drugs. Fourteen patients entered the study and each received megavoltage therapy to give a mean dose of 4600 rad to the pituitary over 31 days. Each patient was treated for one (two patients) or two (12 patients) years with one or both of the adrenocortical enzyme inhibitors, metyrapone or aminoglutethimide to suppress cortisol secretion. Doses were adjusted to maintain urinary free cortisol secretion below 300 nmol/24 h. One patient failed to complete the trial. Normal urinary free cortisol excretion and plasma cortisol concentration were maintained after treatment in eight of the remaining 13 patients after therapy. Only one patient required cortisol replacement and normal menstrual function was restored in five of the six women. The remaining five patients relapsed and four were subsequently treated by total adrenalectomy. It was noted that the patients who responded to treatment were substantially younger than the therapeutic failures. It is suggested that this treatment is most useful in the management of younger patients. (author)

  1. Comparative evaluation of antioxidant drug influence on a radio therapy efficiency and oxidative status in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Siprov

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is a comparative analysis of the effect of melatonin (Melaxen and 3-hydroxypyridine (Mexidol on antitumor and antimetastatic influence of chemoradiotherapy and oxidative status at mice with Lewis lung carcinoma. Material — Experiments have been organized on 95 mice of C57Bl/6 line and of 20–22 g in weight. Cyclophosphan has been abdominally administered two times in a dosage of 60 mg/kg within the interval of 120 hours — 20-30 min before radiotherapy. It has been located on the area of initial tumor in a dosage of 2 g at the same time as cyclophosphan injection. Melaxen and Mexidol have been intramuscularly injecting in the dosage of 45 and 50 mg/ kg for 14 days. Antitumor and antimetastatic effect of the applied therapy and changes in the oxidative status of the animals have been estimated. Results — Melaxen and Mexidol do not decrease antitumour and antimetastatic effects of radiotherapy and prevent the activation of free radical processes at animals with tumors. Mexidol was more effective than Melaxen in correction of superoxide dismutase activity in liver. The drugs under the study do not decrease radiotherapy-induced lipid peroxidation in the initial tumor. Conclusion — Melaxen and Mexidol do not decrease the radio therapy efficiency and oxidative status at mice with tumor (on the background of antitumor treatment.

  2. The Knowledge Level of Hypertension Patients for Drug Therapy in the Primary Health Care of Malang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hananditia R. Pramestutie

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a persistent blood pressure in which systolic pressure ≥140 mmHg and diastolic pressure ≥90 mmHg. The knowledge that should be owned by patients with hypertension is the meaning, causes, symptoms and treatment of hypertension. This knowledge is important to support the success of hypertension therapy. The aim of this research was to determine the knowledge level of hypertension patients about their drug therapy in the primary health care of Malang. This research used observational study methods. The selection of the patients and the primary health care was done using non-random sampling technique (purposive sampling. The subject who meet the inclusion criteria were involved. The result of this study revealed that the patients with hypertension who have a sufficient level of knowledge were 69 respondents (72,63%. Patients who have a good criteria were 26 respondents (27,3763%. There is no patient with low level of knowledge in this research. The conclusion from this study is most patients with hypertension in Primary Health Care Malang have enough knowledge about their treatment.

  3. Combining drug and music therapy in patients with moderate Alzheimer's disease: a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovagnoli, Anna Rita; Manfredi, Valentina; Schifano, Letizia; Paterlini, Chiara; Parente, Annalisa; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2018-03-17

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) can impair language, but active music therapy (AMT) and memantine (M) can improve communication. This study aimed to clarify whether adding AMT to M may improve language in comparison with drugs alone in patients with moderate AD on stable therapy with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AchEI). Forty-five AD patients treated with stable dose of AchEI were randomized to receive AMT plus M 20 mg/day or M 20 mg/day for 24 weeks. The Severe Impairment Battery-Language (SIB-l), SIB, Mini Mental State Examination, Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI), Lubben Social Network Scale, Activities of Daily Living, and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living scores at baseline and 12 and 24 weeks assessed language (primary variable) and overall cognitive, psycho-behavior, social, and functional aspects (secondary variables). The SIB-l showed a stabilization of the baseline condition in both groups, in the absence of between-group differences. The NPI depression and appetite scores significantly improved in the M-AMT group. Moreover, significantly less patients in the M-AMT group than those in the M group showed worsening of the NPI total score. Daily activities, social relationships, and overall cognitive performance did not deteriorate. In patients with moderate AD, AMT added to pharmacotherapy has no further benefits for language in comparison with pharmacotherapy alone. However, this integrated treatment can improve the psycho-behavioral profile.

  4. Emerging Glycolysis Targeting and Drug Discovery from Chinese Medicine in Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyu Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular-targeted therapy has been developed for cancer chemoprevention and treatment. Cancer cells have different metabolic properties from normal cells. Normal cells mostly rely upon the process of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation to produce energy whereas cancer cells have developed an altered metabolism that allows them to sustain higher proliferation rates. Cancer cells could predominantly produce energy by glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen. This alternative metabolic characteristic is known as the “Warburg Effect.” Although the exact mechanisms underlying the Warburg effect are unclear, recent progress indicates that glycolytic pathway of cancer cells could be a critical target for drug discovery. With a long history in cancer treatment, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM is recognized as a valuable source for seeking bioactive anticancer compounds. A great progress has been made to identify active compounds from herbal medicine targeting on glycolysis for cancer treatment. Herein, we provide an overall picture of the current understanding of the molecular targets in the cancer glycolytic pathway and reviewed active compounds from Chinese herbal medicine with the potentials to inhibit the metabolic targets for cancer treatment. Combination of TCM with conventional therapies will provide an attractive strategy for improving clinical outcome in cancer treatment.

  5. Cardiac involvement in primary systemic vasculitis and potential drug therapies to reduce cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Durga Prasanna; Shenoy, Sajjan N

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac involvement is common in primary systemic vasculitides and may be due to direct effect of the disease on the heart or due to therapy. We shall review involvement of the heart in the various forms of primary systemic vasculitis. Among anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis (AAV), eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis most commonly involves the heart. Involvement of the heart confers poorer prognosis in AAV, which is also complicated by increased risk of cardiovascular events. Kawasaki's disease (KD) is the most common form of medium-vessel vasculitis to affect the heart, with coronary artery aneurysms being the most common manifestation. These predispose patients with KD to develop premature ischemic heart disease. Takayasu's arteritis is the most common large-vessel vasculitis to involve the heart and can result in aortic incompetence, myocarditis, or coronary heart disease. Involvement of the heart in Behcet's disease is usually in the form of intracardiac mass lesions, thrombosis, or endomyocardial fibrosis. Drugs used in the treatment of systemic vasculitis influence the risk of developing cardiovascular events. Corticosteroid therapy has been shown to increase the risk of myocardial infarction, whereas methotrexate, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, rituximab, and anti-tumor necrosis alpha agents favorably modulate the risk of cardiovascular events, predominantly by dampening systemic inflammation. Awareness of cardiac involvement in vasculitis and accelerated cardiovascular risk in these patients should help clinicians to maximize the modulation of modifiable risk factors for heart disease in these individuals.

  6. Increasing Access to Subsidized Artemisinin-based Combination Therapy through Accredited Drug Dispensing Outlets in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabra Michael

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Tanzania, many people seek malaria treatment from retail drug sellers. The National Malaria Control Program identified the accredited drug dispensing outlet (ADDO program as a private sector mechanism to supplement the distribution of subsidized artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs from public facilities and increase access to the first-line antimalarial in rural and underserved areas. The ADDO program strengthens private sector pharmaceutical services by improving regulatory and supervisory support, dispenser training, and record keeping practices. Methods The government's pilot program made subsidized ACTs available through ADDOs in 10 districts in the Morogoro and Ruvuma regions, covering about 2.9 million people. The program established a supply of subsidized ACTs, created a price system with a cost recovery plan, developed a plan to distribute the subsidized products to the ADDOs, trained dispensers, and strengthened the adverse drug reactions reporting system. As part of the evaluation, 448 ADDO dispensers brought their records to central locations for analysis, representing nearly 70% of ADDOs operating in the two regions. ADDO drug register data were available from July 2007-June 2008 for Morogoro and from July 2007-September 2008 for Ruvuma. This intervention was implemented from 2007-2008. Results During the pilot, over 300,000 people received treatment for malaria at the 448 ADDOs. The percentage of ADDOs that dispensed at least one course of ACT rose from 26.2% during July-September 2007 to 72.6% during April-June 2008. The number of malaria patients treated with ACTs gradually increased after the start of the pilot, while the use of non-ACT antimalarials declined; ACTs went from 3% of all antimalarials sold in July 2007 to 26% in June 2008. District-specific data showed substantial variation among the districts in ACT uptake through ADDOs, ranging from ACTs representing 10% of all antimalarial sales

  7. Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy for injection drug users: adherence, resistance, and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Vlahov

    Full Text Available Injection drug users (IDUs continue to comprise a major risk group for HIV infection throughout the world and represent the focal population for HIV epidemics in Asia and Eastern Europe/Russia. HIV prevention programs have ranged from HIV testing and counseling, education, behavioral and network interventions, drug abuse treatment, bleach disinfection of needles, needle exchange and expanded syringe access, as well as reducing transition to injection and primary substance abuse prevention. With the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in 1996, dramatic clinical improvements have been seen. In addition, the treatment's impact on reducing HIV viral load (and therefore transmission by all routes provides a stronger rationale for an expansion of the focus on prevention to emphasize early identification and treatment of HIV infected individuals. However, treatment of IDUs has many challenges including adherence, resistance and relapse to high risk behaviors, all of which impact issues of access and ultimately effectiveness of potent antiretroviral treatment. A major current challenge in addressing the HIV epidemic revolves around an appropriate approach to HIV treatment for IDUs.

  8. Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy for injection drug users: adherence, resistance, and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlahov David

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Injection drug users (IDUs continue to comprise a major risk group for HIV infection throughout the world and represent the focal population for HIV epidemics in Asia and Eastern Europe/Russia. HIV prevention programs have ranged from HIV testing and counseling, education, behavioral and network interventions, drug abuse treatment, bleach disinfection of needles, needle exchange and expanded syringe access, as well as reducing transition to injection and primary substance abuse prevention. With the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in 1996, dramatic clinical improvements have been seen. In addition, the treatment's impact on reducing HIV viral load (and therefore transmission by all routes provides a stronger rationale for an expansion of the focus on prevention to emphasize early identification and treatment of HIV infected individuals. However, treatment of IDUs has many challenges including adherence, resistance and relapse to high risk behaviors, all of which impact issues of access and ultimately effectiveness of potent antiretroviral treatment. A major current challenge in addressing the HIV epidemic revolves around an appropriate approach to HIV treatment for IDUs.

  9. NIR responsive liposomal system for rapid release of drugs in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Mao; Liu, Yuan-Yuan; Su, Guang-Hao; Song, Fei-Fei; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Qi-Qing

    2017-01-01

    To design a rapid release liposomal system for cancer therapy, a NIR responsive bubble-generating thermosensitive liposome (BTSL) system combined with photothermal agent (Cypate), doxorubicin (DOX), and NH 4 HCO 3 was developed. Cypate/DOX-BTSL exhibited a good aqueous stability, photostability, and photothermal effect. In vitro release suggested that the amounts of DOX released from BTSL were obviously higher than that of (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 liposomes at 42°C. After NIR irradiation, the hyperthermic temperature induced by Cypate led to the decomposition of NH 4 HCO 3 and the generation of a large number of CO 2 bubbles, triggering a rapid release of drugs. Confocal laser scanning microscope and acridine orange staining indicated that Cypate/DOX-BTSL upon irradiation could facilitate to disrupt the lysosomal membranes and realize endolysosomal escape into cytosol, improving the intracellular uptake of DOX clearly. MTT and trypan blue staining implied that the cell damage of Cypate/DOX-BTSL with NIR irradiation was more severe than that in the groups without irradiation. In vivo results indicated that Cypate/DOX-BTSL with irradiation could dramatically increase the accumulation of DOX in tumor, inhibit tumor growth, and reduce systemic side effects of DOX. These data demonstrated that Cypate/DOX-BTSL has the potential to be used as a NIR responsive liposomal system for a rapid release of drugs in thermochemotherapy.

  10. Ultrasound sensitive eLiposomes containing doxorubicin for drug targeting therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chung-Yin; Javadi, Marjan; Belnap, David M; Barrow, Jeffery R; Pitt, William G

    2014-01-01

    This study describes a novel nanocarrier of emulsion liposomes (eLiposomes) composed of a perfluoropentane nanodroplet within the aqueous interior of a DPPC liposome, along with the anticancer drug doxorubicin (Dox). The eLiposome containing Dox (eLipoDox) displayed good release of Dox upon insonation with low intensity ultrasound at 20-kHz, 1.0-MHz and 3.0-MHz. More release occurs in vitro at 20-kHz than at the higher frequencies. Controlled delivery was demonstrated by applying ultrasound (US) to HeLa tumor cells in vitro. The confocal images of Dox release to cells indicate that eLipoDox is an effective carrier of chemotherapeutic agent, and releases Dox to the cell cytosol upon insonation. This novel drug delivery system promises to provide more effective US therapy and tumor treatment and has the potential to reduce the side effects of cardiotoxicity caused by Dox. In this paper, an ultrasound-sensitive doxorubicine-carrying nanoliposome delivery system is reported. Doxorubicin release as a result of ultrasound exposure is clearly demonstrated, paving the way to potential clinical applications with the aim of reducing the systemic toxicity and enhanced local delivery of this compound. © 2013.

  11. Long-term surveillance of SUDEP in drug-resistant epilepsy patients treated with VNS therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryvlin, Philippe; So, Elson L; Gordon, Charles M; Hesdorffer, Dale C; Sperling, Michael R; Devinsky, Orrin; Bunker, Mark T; Olin, Bryan; Friedman, Daniel

    2018-03-01

    Limited data are available regarding the evolution over time of the rate of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy patients (SUDEP) in drug-resistant epilepsy. The objective is to analyze a database of 40 443 patients with epilepsy implanted with vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) therapy in the United States (from 1988 to 2012) and assess whether SUDEP rates decrease during the postimplantation follow-up period. Patient vital status was ascertained using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Death Index (NDI). An expert panel adjudicated classification of cause of deaths as SUDEP based on NDI data and available narrative descriptions of deaths. We tested the hypothesis that SUDEP rates decrease with time using the Mann-Kendall nonparametric trend test and by comparing SUDEP rates of the first 2 years of follow-up (years 1-2) to longer follow-up (years 3-10). Our cohort included 277 661 person-years of follow-up and 3689 deaths, including 632 SUDEP. Primary analysis demonstrated a significant decrease in age-adjusted SUDEP rate during follow-up (S = -27 P = .008), with rates of 2.47/1000 for years 1-2 and 1.68/1000 for years 3-10 (rate ratio 0.68; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.53-0.87; P = .002). Sensitivity analyses confirm these findings. Our data suggest that SUDEP risk significantly decreases during long-term follow-up of patients with refractory epilepsy receiving VNS Therapy. This finding might reflect several factors, including the natural long-term dynamic of SUDEP rate, attrition, and the impact of VNS Therapy. The role of each of these factors cannot be confirmed due to the limitations of the study. © 2018 The Authors. Epilepsia published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International League Against Epilepsy.

  12. Predictors of mortality in patients with extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii pneumonia receiving colistin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ik Sung; Lee, Yu Ji; Wi, Yu Mi; Kwan, Byung Soo; Jung, Kae Hwa; Hong, Woong Pyo; Kim, June Myong

    2016-08-01

    The ratio of the area under the free (unbound) concentration-time curve to minimum inhibitory concentration (fAUC/MIC) was proposed to be the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic index most strongly linked to the antibacterial effect of colistin against Acinetobacter baumannii. A retrospective study of patients who received colistin to treat pneumonia caused by extensively drug-resistant (XDR) A. baumannii over a 4-year period was performed to assess the impact of the colistin MIC on mortality. A total of 227 patients were included in the analysis. The 7-day and 14-day mortality rates of patients with XDR A. baumannii pneumonia receiving colistin therapy were 15.0% and 23.8%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, days from index culture to first dose of colistin, underlying tumour and septic shock at presentation were independent predictors of mortality in patients with XDR A. baumannii pneumonia receiving colistin therapy. In the univariate analysis, the colistin dose based on ideal body weight (IBW) correlated with patient outcome. Therefore, the use of IBW appeared to be more appropriate to calculate the colistin dosage. In addition, these results highlight the clinical significance of colistin MIC in patients with XDR A. baumannii pneumonia receiving colistin therapy. Although MICs were in the 'susceptible' range, patients infected with isolates with high colistin MICs showed a poorer clinical response rate than patients infected with isolates with low colistin MICs. Further clinical studies are needed to evaluate the roles of colistin MIC for predicting mortality in XDR A. baumannii pneumonia with a high colistin MIC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  13. Is there a trigger role of peroxynitrite in the anti-arrhythmic effect of ischaemic preconditioning and peroxynitrite infusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhász, László; Kiss, Attila; Nyeso, Edit; Kovács, Mária; Seprényi, György; Kaszaki, József; Végh, Agnes

    2011-09-30

    This study has examined whether peroxynitrite (PN), generated during the preconditioning (PC) procedure or administered by brief intracoronary infusions, plays a trigger role in the anti-arrhythmic effects of preconditioning and peroxynitrite in anaesthetized dogs. To achieve this we infused the peroxynitrite scavenger uric acid (UA; 0.2 mg/kg/min, i.v.) over a 30 min period, just prior to a 25 min occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery, in preconditioned (UA+PC, n=8), peroxynitrite-treated (UA+PN, n=8) and in control (UAC; n=9) dogs. The effects were compared to those obtained from groups (PC, n=10; PN, n=10; C1, n=14) without uric acid administration. Severities of ischaemia (ST-segment elevation, inhomogeneity of electrical activation) and ventricular arrhythmias (VPBs, VT, VF), plasma nitrate/nitrite levels, as well as myocardial superoxide and nitrotyrosine productions were determined. Both preconditioning and the infusion of peroxynitrite increased nitrotyrosine formation which was abolished by the simultaneous administration of urate. Despite this, the protective effects of preconditioning (i.e. reductions in arrhythmias, superoxide and nitrotyrosine productions, as well as the increase in nitric oxide availability), occurring during the prolonged period of occlusion and reperfusion were still present. In contrast, urate completely abolished the protection resulted from peroxynitrite administration. This effect is most probably due to the fact that urate has already scavenged peroxynitrite during the infusion. Interestingly, urate itself, given prior to ischaemia and reperfusion, was also protective. We conclude that peroxynitrite in nanomolar concentrations can induce an anti-arrhythmic effect but peroxynitrite, generated during the preconditioning stimulus, is not necessary for the preconditioning-induced anti-arrhythmic protection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. High effectiveness of self-help programs after drug addiction therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristensen Øistein

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The self-help groups Alcoholics Anonymous (AA and Narcotics Anonymous (NA are very well established. AA and NA employ a 12-step program and are found in most large cities around the world. Although many have argued that these organizations are valuable, substantial scepticism remains as to whether they are actually effective. Few treatment facilities give clear recommendations to facilitate participation, and the use of these groups has been disputed. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the use of self-help groups after addiction treatment is associated with higher rates of abstinence. Methods One hundred and fourteen patients, 59 with alcohol dependency and 55 with multiple drug dependency, who started in self-help groups after addiction treatment, were examined two years later using a questionnaire. Return rate was 66%. Six (5% of the patients were dead. Results Intention-to-treat-analysis showed that 38% still participated in self-help programs two years after treatment. Among the regular participants, 81% had been abstinent over the previous 6 months, compared with only 26% of the non-participants. Logistic regression analysis showed OR = 12.6, 95% CI (4.1–38.3, p Conclusion The study has several methodological problems; in particular, correlation does not necessarily indicate causality. These problems are discussed and we conclude that the probability of a positive effect is sufficient to recommend participation in self-help groups as a supplement to drug addiction treatment. Previous publication This article is based on a study originally published in Norwegian: Kristensen O, Vederhus JK: Self-help programs in drug addiction therapy. Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen 2005, 125:2798–2801.

  15. 'Forever Young'-Testosterone replacement therapy: a blockbuster drug despite flabby evidence and broken promises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busnelli, Andrea; Somigliana, Edgardo; Vercellini, Paolo

    2017-04-01

    In the last decade, testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) has been increasingly prescribed to treat a controversial condition known as 'late-onset hypogonadism (LOH)'. This syndrome is diagnosed in men who, for no discernible reason other than older age, obesity or ill health have serum testosterone concentrations below the normal range for healthy young men and report one or more of the following symptoms: muscle weakness or wasting, mood, behaviour and cognition-related symptoms and sexual function or libido impairment. However, recent evidence has demonstrated that testosterone drugs do not substantially ameliorate these symptoms and, more worryingly, that their long-term use may be associated with severe adverse effects (i.e. increased risk of prostate cancer, stroke and myocardial infarction, worsening of benign prostatic hyperplasia symptoms and testicular atrophy). Nonetheless, testosterone drugs have exhibited extraordinary commercial success and their pharmaceutical sales are steadily rising. Behind this apparently unjustifiable trend there are deliberate, well designed direct and indirect pharmaceutical marketing initiatives that exploit the conviction rooted in contemporary society that testosterone can reverse the effects of ageing and ensure social accomplishment. Commercial mechanisms have laid the foundation for disease mongering of LOH and also have resulted a considerable expansion of the indications for treatment. This promotion model deserves particular attention since it is applicable to any drug with a purportedly favourable risk-benefit ratio not supported by evidence. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Adjunct therapy of Ayurvedic medicine with anti tubercular drugs on the therapeutic management of pulmonary tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P K Debnath

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB is an age old disease described in Vedic Medicine as ′Yakshma′. Later on, in Ayurveda it earned a prefix and found way into mythology as ′Rajayakshma′. After the discovery of streptomycin, the therapeutic management of PTB received a major breakthrough. The treatment module changed remarkably with the formulation of newer anti-tubercular drugs (ATD with appreciable success. Recent resurgence of PTB in developed countries like United States posed a threat to the medical community due to resistant strains. Consequently, WHO looked toward traditional medicine. Literature reveals that Ayurvedic treatment of PTB was in vogue in India before the introduction of ATD with limited success. Records show that 2766 patients of PTB were treated with Ayurvedic drugs in a tertiary care hospital in Kolkata in the year 1933-1947. Objectives: To evaluate the toxicity reduction and early restoration by adjunct therapy of Ayurvedic drugs by increasing the bio-availability of ATDs. Materials and Methods: In the present study, treatment response of 99 patients treated with ATD as an adjunct with Aswagandha (Withania somnifera and a multi-herbal formulation described in Chikitsa-sthana of Charaka samhita i.e. Chyawanprash were investigated. Hematological profile, sputum bacterial load count, immunoglobulin IgA and IgM, blood sugar, liver function test, serum creatinine were the assessed parameters besides blood isoniazid and pyrazinamide, repeated after 28 days of treatment. Results: The symptoms abated, body weight showed improvement, ESR values were normal, there was appreciable change in IgA and IgM patterns and significantly increased bioavailability of isoniazid and pyrazinamide were recorded. Conclusion: This innovative clinical study coupled with empowered research may turn out to be promising in finding a solution for the treatment of PTB.

  17. Biological in situ Dose Painting for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy Using Drug-Loaded Implantable Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cormack, Robert A.; Sridhar, Srinivas; Suh, W. Warren; D'Amico, Anthony V.; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Implantable devices routinely used for increasing spatial accuracy in modern image-guided radiation treatments (IGRT), such as fiducials or brachytherapy spacers, encompass the potential for in situ release of biologically active drugs, providing an opportunity to enhance the therapeutic ratio. We model this new approach for two types of treatment. Methods and Materials: Radiopaque fiducials used in IGRT, or prostate brachytherapy spacers ('eluters'), were assumed to be loaded with radiosensitizer for in situ drug slow release. An analytic function describing the concentration of radiosensitizer versus distance from eluters, depending on diffusion-elimination properties of the drug in tissue, was developed. Tumor coverage by the drug was modeled for tumors typical of lung stereotactic body radiation therapy treatments for various eluter dimensions and drug properties. Six prostate 125 I brachytherapy cases were analyzed by assuming implantation of drug-loaded spacers. Radiosensitizer-induced subvolume boost was simulated from which biologically effective doses for typical radiosensitizers were calculated in one example. Results: Drug distributions from three-dimensional arrangements of drug eluters versus eluter size and drug properties were tabulated. Four radiosensitizer-loaded fiducials provide adequate radiosensitization for ∼4-cm-diameter lung tumors, thus potentially boosting biologically equivalent doses in centrally located stereotactic body treated lesions. Similarly, multiple drug-loaded spacers provide prostate brachytherapy with flexible shaping of 'biologically equivalent doses' to fit requirements difficult to meet by using radiation alone, e.g., boosting a high-risk region juxtaposed to the urethra while respecting normal tissue tolerance of both the urethra and the rectum. Conclusions: Drug loading of implantable devices routinely used in IGRT provides new opportunities for therapy modulation via biological in situ dose painting.

  18. Adolescent and parent alliances with therapists in Brief Strategic Family Therapy with drug-using Hispanic adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Michael S; Mayorga, Carla C; Mitrani, Victoria B; Szapocznik, José; Turner, Charles W; Alexander, James F

    2008-07-01

    This study examined the relationship between alliance and retention in family therapy. Alliance was examined at the individual (parent, adolescent) and family level (within-family differences) for families that either dropped out or completed family therapy. Participants were 31 Hispanic adolescents and their family members who received brief strategic family therapy for the treatment of adolescent drug use. Videotapes of first sessions were rated to identify parent and adolescent alliances with the therapist. Results demonstrated that Completer cases had significantly higher levels of alliance across all family members than Dropout cases, and Dropout cases had significantly higher unbalanced alliances than Completer cases. Clinical implications are discussed.

  19. Potential drug–drug interactions in Alzheimer patients with behavioral symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasqualetti G

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Pasqualetti, Sara Tognini, Valeria Calsolaro, Antonio Polini, Fabio Monzani Geriatrics Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy Abstract: The use of multi drug regimens among the elderly population has increased tremendously over the last decade although the benefits of medications are always accompanied by potential harm, even when prescribed at recommended doses. The elderly populations are particularly at an increased risk of adverse drug reactions considering comorbidity, poly-therapy, physiological changes affecting the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of many drugs and, in some cases, poor compliance due to cognitive impairment and/or depression. In this setting, drug–drug interaction may represent a serious and even life-threatening clinical condition. Moreover, the inability to distinguish drug-induced symptoms from a definitive medical diagnosis often results in addition of yet another drug to treat the symptoms, which in turn increases drug–drug interactions. Cognitive enhancers, including acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine, are the most widely prescribed agents for Alzheimer’s disease (AD patients. Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, including psychotic symptoms and behavioral disorders, represent noncognitive disturbances frequently observed in AD patients. Antipsychotic drugs are at high risk of adverse events, even at modest doses, and may interfere with the progression of cognitive impairment and interact with several drugs including anti-arrhythmics and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Other medications often used in AD patients are represented by anxiolytic, like benzodiazepine, or antidepressant agents. These agents also might interfere with other concomitant drugs through both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic mechanisms. In this review we focus on the most frequent drug–drug interactions, potentially harmful, in AD patients with

  20. RNA Disruption and Drug Response in Breast Cancer Primary Systemic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritzker, Kenneth; Pritzker, Laura; Generali, Daniele; Bottini, Alberto; Cappelletti, Maria Rosa; Guo, Baoqing; Parissenti, Amadeo; Trudeau, Maureen

    2015-05-01

    As there is now evidence that switching clinical nonresponders early in primary systemic therapy to alternate treatment regimens can enhance survival in some breast cancer patients, the need for a robust intermediate endpoint that can guide treatment response across all tumor subtypes is urgent. Recently, chemotherapy drugs have been shown to induce a decrease in RNA quality in tumor cells from breast cancer biopsies in some patients at midtherapy, and that this has been associated with subsequent achievement of pathological complete response (pCR). The decrease in RNA quality has been shown to be associated with RNA disruption; aberrant RNA bands visualized by RNA electrophoresis have been associated with subsequent tumor cell death. The objectives of these studies are to show that a new assay based on induction of RNA disruption in tumor cells by chemotherapy can stratify at midtherapy, pCR responders from non-pCR responders irrespective of clinical response and to present early evidence that clinically useful RNA disruption can be detected as early as 14 days after initiation of treatment. RNA disruption in tumor cells was quantified by analysis of the RNA electrophoresis banding pattern and expressed as an RNA disruption index (RDI). To develop the RNA disruption assay (RDA), RDI was correlated with clinical outcome (pCR) from the NCIC-CTG MA.22 breast cancer clinical trial (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00066443). RDA Zones were established by stratifying patients using RDI values into Zone 1, Zone 2, and Zone 3. Zone 3 included seven out of eight pCR responders, whereas Zone 1 contained no pCR responders. An intermediate zone (Zone 2) was established which contained one pCR. Subsequently, to determine early drug response, RNA disruption was examined by RDI after 14 days exposure to trastuzumab, zoledronic acid, or letrozole + cyclophosphamide ± sorafenib therapy. In MA.22, RDA stratified 23 of 85 patients in Zone 1 as pCR nonresponders, 24 patients in Zone 2, an

  1. Hepatitis B virus reverse transcriptase - Target of current antiviral therapy and future drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Daniel N; Hu, Jianming

    2015-11-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections rely on the proper functioning of the viral polymerase enzyme, a specialized reverse transcriptase (RT) with multiple activities. All currently approved antiviral drugs for the treatment of chronic HBV infection, except for interferon, target the RT and belong to the same chemical class - they are all nucleoside analogs. Viral DNA synthesis is carried out by the RT enzyme in several different steps, each with distinct RT conformational requirements. In principle, each stage may be targeted by distinct antiviral drugs. In particular, the HBV RT has the unique ability to initiate viral DNA synthesis using itself as a protein primer in a novel protein priming reaction. In order to help identify RT inhibitors and study their mechanisms of action, a number of experimental systems have been developed, each varying in its ability to dissect the protein priming stage and subsequent stages of viral DNA synthesis at the molecular level. Two of the most effective drugs to date, entecavir and tenofovir, can inhibit both the protein priming and the subsequent DNA elongation stages of HBV DNA synthesis. Interestingly, clevudine, a thymidine analog, can inhibit both protein priming and DNA elongation in a non-competitive manner and without being incorporated into the viral DNA. Thus, a nucleoside RT inhibitor (NRTI) can functionally mimic a non-NRTI (NNRTI) in its inhibition of the HBV RT. Therefore, novel NRTIs as well as NNRTIs may be developed to inhibit the DNA synthesis activity of the HBV RT. Furthermore, additional activities of the RT that are also essential to HBV replication, including specific recognition of the viral RNA and its packaging into viral nucleocapsids, may be exploited for antiviral development. To achieve a more potent inhibition of viral replication and ultimately cure chronic HBV infection, the next generation of anti-HBV therapies will likely need to include NRTIs, NNRTIs, and other agents that target the viral RT as

  2. Drug therapies for reducing gastric acidity in people with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Sze May; Moore, Helen S

    2016-08-22

    Malabsorption of fat and protein contributes to poor nutritional status in people with cystic fibrosis. Impaired pancreatic function may also result in increased gastric acidity, leading in turn to heartburn, peptic ulcers and the impairment of oral pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy. The administration of gastric acid-reducing agents has been used as an adjunct to pancreatic enzyme therapy to improve absorption of fat and gastro-intestinal symptoms in people with cystic fibrosis. It is important to establish the evidence regarding potential benefits of drugs that reduce gastric acidity in people with cystic fibrosis. This is an update of a previously published review. To assess the effect of drug therapies for reducing gastric acidity for: nutritional status; symptoms associated with increased gastric acidity; fat absorption; lung function; quality of life and survival; and to determine if any adverse effects are associated with their use. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearches of relevant journals, abstract books and conference proceedings.Most recent search of the Group's Trials Register: 12 May 2016. All randomised and quasi-randomised trials involving agents that reduce gastric acidity compared to placebo or a comparator treatment. Both authors independently selected trials, assessed trial quality and extracted data. The searches identified 39 trials; 17 of these, with 273 participants, were suitable for inclusion, but the number of trials assessing each of the different agents was small. Seven trials were limited to children and four trials enrolled only adults. Meta-analysis was not performed, 14 trials were of a cross-over design and we did not have the appropriate information to conduct comprehensive meta-analyses. All the trials were run in single centres and duration ranged from five days to six months. The

  3. Drug switch because of treatment-related adverse side effects in endocrine adjuvant breast cancer therapy: how often and how often does it work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güth, Uwe; Myrick, Mary Elizabeth; Schötzau, Andreas; Kilic, Nerbil; Schmid, Seraina Margaretha

    2011-10-01

    Therapy-related adverse side effects are a main reason for non-persistence to adjuvant endocrine breast cancer therapy. This study reports frequency of drug-related adverse side effects that were so severe that a modification of the therapy was necessary. We evaluated how many patients discontinued adjuvant endocrine therapy because of these side effects (non-persistence). Last, we analyzed how often a drug switch was undertaken for this reason and how often this measure led to the patient successfully continuing their endocrine therapy. Data concerning all postmenopausal breast cancer patients (≤ 80 years), who initiated endocrine adjuvant therapy between 1998 and 2008 in a Swiss breast center (n = 400), were analyzed. Out of these 400 women, 37 (9.3%) were defined as being non-persistent to the therapy; out of these, 24 (64.9%) because of therapy-related side effects. About 78 patients (19.5%) suffered from severe therapy-related side effects that made a modification of therapy necessary. Out of these 78 cases, 14 patients (17.9%) stopped the therapy without attempting a drug switch (non-persistence). In 64 patients (82.1%; 16% of all women who started endocrine therapy), a drug switch was undertaken. Out of these 64 cases, in 52 cases (81.3%) endocrine therapy was completed after therapy modification. Patients who reported one major adverse effect were more likely to continue the endocrine therapy after a drug switch (P = 0.048) compared with those who suffered from at least two different side effects. In 10 of the 64 cases (15.6%), modification of the therapy was not successful and the patients stopped the treatment prematurely (non-persistence) because of ongoing side effects. In cases when therapy-related side effects occur, a drug switch is a promising step to further improve persistence and, by doing so, the outcome of breast cancer patients.

  4. Colistin combination therapy improves microbiologic cure in critically ill patients with multi-drug resistant gram-negative pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parchem, N L; Bauer, K A; Cook, C H; Mangino, J E; Jones, C D; Porter, K; Murphy, C V

    2016-09-01

    Currently, in vitro synergy with colistin has not translated into improved clinical outcomes. This study aimed to compare colistin combination therapy to colistin monotherapy in critically ill patients with multi-drug resistant gram-negative (MDR-GN) pneumonia. This was a retrospective analysis of critically ill adult patients receiving intravenous colistin for MDR-GN pneumonia comparing colistin combination therapy to colistin monotherapy with a primary endpoint of clinical cure. Combination therapy was defined by administration of another antibiotic to which the MDR-GN pathogen was reported as susceptible or intermediate. Ninety patients were included for evaluation (41 combination therapy and 49 monotherapy). Baseline characteristics were similar between groups. No difference in clinical cure was observed between combination therapy and monotherapy in univariate analysis, nor when adjusted for APACHE II score and time to appropriate antibiotic therapy (57.1 vs. 63.4 %, adjusted OR 1.15, p = 0.78). Microbiological cure was significantly higher for combination therapy (87 vs. 35.5 %, p Colistin combination therapy was associated with a significant improvement in microbiological cure, without improvement in clinical cure. Based on the in vitro synergy and improvement in microbiological clearance, colistin combination therapy should be prescribed for MDR-GN pneumonia. Further research is warranted to determine if in vitro synergy with colistin translates into improved clinical outcomes.

  5. FDM 3D printing of modified drug-delivery systems using hot melt extrusion: a new approach for individualized therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha-Filho, Marcilio; Araújo, Maísa Rp; Gelfuso, Guilherme M; Gratieri, Tais

    2017-11-01

    The production process of 3D-printed drugs offers unique advantages such as the possibility of individualizing the drug therapy and easily associating different drugs and release technologies in the same pharmaceutical unit. Fused deposition modeling, a 3D printing technique, seems especially interesting for pharmaceutical applications, due to its low cost, precise and reproducible control of the printed structures, and versatility for industrial and laboratory scale. This technique combined with another technology already adapted for the pharmaceutical industry, the hot melt extrusion, is able to incorporate various mechanisms of modified drug release. This special report aims to bring together data of the experimental progress achieved using the fused deposition modeling 3D printing combined with hot melt extrusion technique and its potential in drug delivery. [Formula: see text].

  6. HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations Are Present in Six Percent of Persons Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy in Lusaka, Zambia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamers, Raph L.; Siwale, Margaret; Wallis, Carole L.; Labib, Moheb; van Hasselt, Robbert; Stevens, Wendy S.; Schuurman, Rob; Wensing, Annemarie M. J.; van Vugt, Michèle; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the mutational patterns and factors associated with baseline drug-resistant HIV-1 present at initiation of first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) at 3 sites in Lusaka, Zambia, in 2007-2008. Methods: Population sequencing of the HIV-1 pol gene was performed in the PharmAccess

  7. Everolimus treatment for patients with autoimmune hepatitis and poor response to standard therapy and drug alternatives in use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ytting, Henriette; Larsen, Fin Stolze

    2015-01-01

    here report the efficacy of everolimus treatment of patients with AIH. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seven patients (six female, mean age 47 years, range 22-62 years) in whom disease control could not be achieved with standard therapy or the alternative drugs in use were included. RESULTS: Treatment...

  8. HIV-1 drug resistance in antiretroviral-naive individuals with HIV-1-associated tuberculous meningitis initiating antiretroviral therapy in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thao, Vu P.; Le, Thuy; Török, Estee M.; Yen, Nguyen T. B.; Chau, Tran T. H.; Jurriaans, Suzanne; van Doorn, Rogier H.; de Jong, Menno D.; Farrar, Jeremy J.; Dunstan, Sarah J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV-infected individuals in Vietnam is rapidly expanding, but there are limited data on HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) to guide ART strategies. Methods: We retrospectively conducted HIVDR testing in 220 ART-naive individuals recruited to a

  9. Hyperactivity--Drug Therapy/Food Additives/Allergies. A Selective Bibliography. Exceptional Child Bibliography Series No. 602.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Handicapped and Gifted Children, Reston, VA.

    The annotated bibliography on Hyperactivity--Drug Therapy/Food Additives/Allergies contains approximately 65 abstracts and associated indexing information for documents or journal articles published from 1968 to 1975 and selected from the computer files of the Council for Exceptional Children's Information Services and the Education Resources…

  10. The Efficacy of Dog Assisted Therapy in Detained Drug Users: A Pilot Study in an Italian Attenuated Custody Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contalbrigo, Laura; De Santis, Marta; Toson, Marica; Montanaro, Maria; Farina, Luca; Costa, Aldo; Nava, Felice Alfonso

    2017-06-24

    Drug addiction is a major care and safety challenge in prison context. Nowadays, rehabilitation and specific therapeutic programs are suggested to improve health and well-being of inmates during their detention time and to reduce substance abuse relapse after release from prison. Among these programs, several studies reported the benefits for inmates coming from animal assisted interventions. In this pilot controlled study, we investigated the efficacy of a dog assisted therapy program addressed to 22 drug addicted male inmates housed in an attenuated custody institute in Italy. The study lasted six months, the treated group (12 inmates) was involved once a week for one hour in 20 dog assisted therapy sessions, whereas the control group (10 inmates) followed the standard rehabilitation program. One week before the beginning and one week after the end of the sessions, all inmates involved were submitted to symptom checklist-90-revised and Kennedy axis V. Inmates involved in the dog assisted therapy sessions significantly improved their social skills, reducing craving, anxiety and depression symptoms compared to the control group. Despite the limitation due to the small number of inmates enrolled and to the absence of follow up, we found these results encouraging to the use of dog assisted therapy as co-therapy in drug addicted inmates rehabilitation programs, and we claim the need of more extensive study on this subject.

  11. Genome wide analysis of drug-induced torsades de pointes: lack of common variants with large effect sizes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behr, Elijah R.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Kääb, Stefan; Crawford, Dana C.; Nicoletti, Paola; Floratos, Aris; Sinner, Moritz F.; Kannankeril, Prince J.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Bezzina, Connie R.; Schulze-Bahr, Eric; Zumhagen, Sven; Guicheney, Pascale; Bishopric, Nanette H.; Marshall, Vanessa; Shakir, Saad; Dalageorgou, Chrysoula; Bevan, Steve; Jamshidi, Yalda; Bastiaenen, Rachel; Myerburg, Robert J.; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Camm, A. John; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Norris, Kris; Altman, Russ B.; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.; Jeffery, Steve; Kubo, Michiaki; Nakamura, Yusuke; Shen, Yufeng; George, Alfred L.; Roden, Dan M.

    2013-01-01

    Marked prolongation of the QT interval on the electrocardiogram associated with the polymorphic ventricular tachycardia Torsades de Pointes is a serious adverse event during treatment with antiarrhythmic drugs and other culprit medications, and is a common cause for drug relabeling and withdrawal.

  12. Common Variation in the NOS1AP Gene Is Associated With Drug-Induced QT Prolongation and Ventricular Arrhythmia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jamshidi, Yalda; Nolte, Ilja M.; Dalageorgou, Chrysoula; Zheng, Dongling; Johnson, Toby; Bastiaenen, Rachel; Ruddy, Suzanne; Talbott, Daniel; Norris, Kris J.; Snieder, Harold; George, Alfred L.; Marshall, Vanessa; Shakir, Saad; Kannankeril, Prince J.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Camm, A. John; Jeffery, Steve; Roden, Dan M.; Behr, Elijah R.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to determine whether variations in NOS1AP affect drug-induced long QT syndrome (LQTS). Background Use of antiarrhythmic drugs is limited by the high incidence of serious adverse events including QT prolongation and torsades de pointes. NOS1AP gene variants play a role in

  13. HSA-based multi-target combination therapy: regulating drugs' release from HSA and overcoming single drug resistance in a breast cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Yi; Zhang, Zhenlei; Li, Dongyang; Zhao, Lei; Cai, Meiling; Sun, Zhewen; Li, Yongping; Zhang, Yao; Khan, Hamid; Sun, Hongbing; Wang, Tao; Liang, Hong; Yang, Feng

    2018-11-01

    Multi-drug delivery systems, which may be promising solution to overcome obstacles, have limited the clinical success of multi-drug combination therapies to treat cancer. To this end, we used three different anticancer agents, Cu(BpT)Br, NAMI-A, and doxorubicin (DOX), to build human serum albumin (HSA)-based multi-drug delivery systems in a breast cancer model to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of overcoming single drug (DOX) resistance to cancer cells in vivo, and to regulate the drugs' release from HSA. The HSA complex structure revealed that NAMI-A and Cu(BpT)Br bind to the IB and IIA sub-domain of HSA by N-donor residue replacing a leaving group and coordinating to their metal centers, respectively. The MALDI-TOF mass spectra demonstrated that one DOX molecule is conjugated with lysine of HSA by a pH-sensitive linker. Furthermore, the release behavior of three agents form HSA can be regulated at different pH levels. Importantly, in vivo results revealed that the HSA-NAMI-A-Cu(BpT)Br-DOX complex not only increases the targeting ability compared with a combination of the three agents (the NAMI-A/Cu(BpT)Br/DOX mixture), but it also overcomes DOX resistance to drug-resistant breast cancer cell lines.

  14. Low Non-structured Antiretroviral Therapy Interruptions in HIV-Infected Persons Who Inject Drugs Receiving Multidisciplinary Comprehensive HIV Care at an Outpatient Drug Abuse Treatment Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallecillo, Gabriel; Mojal, Sergio; Roquer, Albert; Samos, Pilar; Luque, Sonia; Martinez, Diana; Martires, Paula Karen; Torrens, Marta

    2016-05-01

    Continuous HIV treatment is necessary to ensure successful combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of patient-initiated non-structured treatment interruptions in HIV-infected persons who inject drugs and who received a multidisciplinary comprehensive program, including medical HIV care, drug-dependence treatment and psychosocial support, at a drug outpatient addiction center. Non-structured treatment interruptions were defined as ≥30 consecutive days off cART without medical indication. During a median follow-up of 53.8 months, 37/132 (28 %) patients experienced the first non-structured treatment interruptions. The cumulative probability of cART interruption at 5 years was 31.2 % (95 % CI 22.4-40.0). Current drug use injection ≥1/day (HR 14.77; 95 % CI 5.90-36.96) and cART naive patients (HR 0.35, 95 % CI 0.14-0.93) were predictive factors for non-structured treatment interruptions. HIV care provided at a drug addiction center is a useful strategy to sustain continuous cART, however, drug abstinence is essential for the long-term maintenance of cART.

  15. Drug resistance in HIV patients with virological failure or slow virological response to antiretroviral therapy in Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdissa, Alemseged; Yilma, Daniel; Fonager, Jannik

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The ongoing scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa has prompted the interest in surveillance of transmitted and acquired HIV drug resistance. Resistance data on virological failure and mutations in HIV infected populations initiating treatment in sub......-Saharan Africa is sparse. METHODS: HIV viral load (VL) and resistance mutations pre-ART and after 6 months were determined in a prospective cohort study of ART-naïve HIV patients initiating first-line therapy in Jimma, Ethiopia. VL measurements were done at baseline and after 3 and 6 months. Genotypic HIV drug...... was observed among 14 (5.3%) participants out of 265 patients. Twelve samples were genotyped and six had HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) mutations at baseline. Among virological failures, 9/11 (81.8%) harbored one or more HIVDR mutations at 6 months. The most frequent mutations were K103N and M184VI. CONCLUSIONS...

  16. Drug May Help Prevent Resistance to Toxin-Based Leukemia Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adding the drug 5-AZA to moxetumomab pasudotox, a toxin-based cancer drug, may improve its efficacy in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). As this Cancer Currents blog post explains, in mice, both drugs were more effective than moxetumomab alone.

  17. Tratamento medicamentoso da osteoartrose do joelho Drug therapy in knee osteoarthrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Uchôa de Rezende

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available O tratamento clínico da osteoartrite/artrose (OA está sempre indicado e baseia-se no autocuidado feito pelo paciente e orientado pelo médico. O uso de medicamentos é complementar às medidas de emagrecimento, ganho de força, de propriocepção, de flexibilidade e de amplitude de movimento. Entre os medicamentos disponíveis para o tratamento da OA há os que são essencialmente analgésicos e que não interferem no curso da doença; bem como os anti-inflamatórios, controversos por seus efeitos colaterais e pelo seu papel na OA, porém, com propriedades analgésicas e anti-inflamatórias indiscutíveis; e, por fim, as drogas modificadoras de estrutura, que retardam a evolução da OA. As medicações ainda podem ser de uso tópico, intra-articular, oral e injetável (sistêmico. As várias apresentações de ácido hialurônico (AH mostram o poder analgésico da droga e há indícios de poder modificador de estrutura da cartilagem pela medicação. Há nível de evidência IA, para diacereína e para a glucosamina, de que retardam a evolução da OA. Mais tecnologia para diagnóstico e controle de tratamento da OA, bem como mais estudos multicêntricos são necessários para consolidar o poder do tratamento medicamentoso de outras drogas.Clinical treatment for osteoarthritis (OA is very important and is based on patient's self care and guided by the physician. Drug therapy is additional to losing weight, improving muscular strength, proprioception, flexibility and range of motion. Between the available drugs for osteoarthritis' treatment, some are basically analgesics and do not interfere on disease's progression; some are anti-inflammatory with good analgesic power but with side effects that compromise their prolonged usage; and the structure modifying drugs that slow down the progression of OA. The medications are presented in topic, oral, intra-muscular, intra-venous and intra-articular forms. The hyaluronic acid has various

  18. Drug-induced Brugada syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshino Minoura

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Brugada syndrome (BrS is an inherited cardiac disorder that is associated with an electrocardiogram pattern of ST segment elevation on right precordial leads and a high incidence of sudden death. Diagnosis requires documentation of a coved-type ST segment that occurs spontaneously or in the presence of a class IA or IC antiarrhythmic agent. A wide variety of other drugs, including antianginals, antidepressants, antipsychotics, and antihistamines, have been reported to unmask or induce the electrocardiographic and arrhythmic manifestations of BrS. This review focuses on drug-induced BrS phenotypes, prevalence, and underlying mechanisms.

  19. [Pregnant opioid addicted patients and additional drug intake. Part II: Comorbidity and their therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoell, Imke; Amanzada, Ahmad; Degner, Detlef; Havemann-Reinecke, Ursula

    2011-11-01

    The majority of opioid dependent patients suffer from various psychiatric and somatic comorbid diseases like mood and anxiety disorders, psychotic diseases, personality disorders, HIV infection, Hepatitis B and C. If medical treatment is needed, grouping active substances to FDA Pregnancy Categories (A, B, C, D or X) may be helpful. The majority of substances reported here only fulfill the FDA-categories C or D, which means that they could have teratogenic effects, but with probably different rank order. First of all, referring to mood, personality and anxiety disorders, the focus should be laid on non-pharmacological treatment by offering psychotherapeutic and supporting psychosocial interventions to the patients. However, opioid dependent pregnant patients who suffer from severe diseases such as psychosis, bipolar affective disorder or severe depression, may need psychoactive medication like antipsychotics, antidepressants or mood stabilizers to prevent them from harm caused by psychotic ideas and actions and/or suicidality. However these medications may comprise fetal risks, especially when taken together, and therefore should only be used when benefit and risks are considered together with patients and their relatives. It is important to avoid acute or renewed psychiatric decompensation. We present the current differentiated knowledge for therapy of opioid dependent patients with antipsychotics, antidepressants (e.g. higher fetal risk in case of treatment with fluoxetine and paroxetine) or mood stabilizers. All of them should only be used after considering benefit and risks. During pregnancy, there should not be switched between different antidepressant drugs. Referring mood stabilizers, the intake of valproic acid should be avoided in pregnancy or at least, dosage should be kept as low as possible since severe teratogenetic effects are known. In addition the specific drug treatment of HIV and hepatitis B during pregnancy is described. During childbirth HIV

  20. [High activity antiretroviral therapy change associated to adverse drug reactions in a specialized center in Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subiela, José D; Dapena, Elida

    2016-03-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) represent the first cause of change of the first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimen, therefore, they constitute the main limiting factor in the long-term follow up of HIV patients in treatment. A retrospective study was carried out in a specialized center in Lara State, Venezuela, including 99 patients over 18 years of age who had change of first-line HAART regimen due to ADRs, between 2010 and 2013. The aims of this research were to describe the sociodemographic and clinical variables, frequency of ADRs related to change of HAART, duration of the first-line HAART regimen, to determine the drugs associated with ARVs and to identify the risk factors. The ADRs constituted 47.5% of all causes of change of first-line HAART regimen, the median duration was 1.08±0.28 years. The most frequent ADRs were anemia (34.3%), hypersensitivity reactions (20.2%) and gastrointestinal intolerance (13.1%). The most frequent ARV regimen type was the protease inhibitors-based regimen (59.6%), but zidovudine was the ARV most linked to ADRs (41.4%). The regression analysis showed increased risk of ADRs in singles and students in the univariate analysis and heterosexuals and homosexuals in multivariate analysis; and decreased risk in active workers. The present work shows the high prevalence of ADRs in the studied population and represents the first case-based study that describes the pharmacoepidemiology of a cohort of HIV-positive patients treated in Venezuela.

  1. Cochleo-vestibular clinical findings among drug resistant Tuberculosis Patients on therapy-a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramma Lebogang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstracts Background To investigate the Cochleo-vestibular clinical and audiometric findings in Multi and Extreme Drug Resistance(MDR and XDR tuberculosis(TB patients on treatment and make recommendations. Methods A cross-sectional study of adult MDR and XDR-TB patients was conducted in a general hospital in Cape-Town-South-Africa. Ethical approval was secured and all consenting patients administered with pretested and validated questionnaire under the guidance of International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health(ICF Checklist-version-2.1a. Audiometric evaluation included: Otoscopy, Diagnostic Audiometry and Tympanometry. The data analyses were done with SPSS version 16, Chi-square and StatCalc-7. Results Fifty-three adults, ages 18-60 (mean-33 years comprising 26 males and 27 females participated in the study. Hospital stay duration varied from 1-18 months (mean-6 months and all were on anti-Koch's second line drugs (regimen 2. MDR TB group were 45(85% and XDR 8(15%. Vertigo was the most common vestibular symptoms, 24(45% whereas, tinnitus 23(42% and hearing loss 13(25% were most frequent auditory complaints. Bilateral sensorineural hearing losses of varying degrees were confirmed in 23(47%. There was no association between gender and age with hearing loss [χ2 (P = 0.16, ά = 0.05 and (p = 0.13, ά = 0.05]. Furthermore, MDR and XTR TB groups [20/42 Vs 3/8; Z = 0.46 and P = 0.64], showed no difference in pattern of the hearing losses. Conclusions A multi-disciplinary close surveillance of MDR and XDR TB patients on therapy is imperative. Finally, researches into therapeutic trials on antidotes and potent safer substitutes for aminoglycosides in the management are recommended.

  2. Application of drug delivery system to boron neutron capture therapy for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagië, Hironobu; Ogata, Aya; Sugiyama, Hirotaka; Eriguchi, Masazumi; Takamoto, Shinichi; Takahashi, Hiroyuki

    2008-04-01

    Tumor cell destruction in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is due to the nuclear reaction between (10)B and thermal neutrons ((10)B + (1)n --> (7)Li + (4)He (alpha) + 2.31 MeV (93.7 %)/2.79 MeV (6.3 %)). The resulting lithium ions and alphaparticles are high linear energy transfer (LET) particles which give a high biological effect. Their short range in tissue (5 - 9 mum) restricts radiation damage to those cells in which boron atoms are located at the time of neutron irradiation. BNCT has been applied clinically for the treatment of malignant brain tumors, malignant melanoma, head and neck cancer and hepatoma. Sodium mercaptoundecahydro-dodecaborate (Na(2)(10)B(12)H(11)SH: BSH) and borono-phenylalanine ((10)BPA) are currently being used in clinical treatments. These low molecule compounds are easily cleared from cancer cells and blood, so high accumulation and selective delivery of boron compounds into tumor tissues and cancer cells are most important to achieve effective BNCT and to avoid damage to adjacent healthy cells. In order to achieve the selective delivery of boron atoms to cancer cells, a drug delivery system (DDS) is an attractive intelligent technology for targeting and controlled release of drugs. We performed literature searches related to boron delivery systems in vitro and in vivo. We describe several DDS technologies for boron delivery to cancer tissues and cancer cells from the past to current status. We are convinced that it will be possible to use liposomes, monoclonal antibodies and WOW emulsions as boron delivery systems for BNCT clinically in accordance with the preparation of good commercial product (GCP) grade materials.

  3. Application of drug delivery system for boron neutron capture therapy. Basic research toward clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagie, Hironobu; Takahashi, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    Tumour cell destruction in boron neutron-capture therapy (BNCT) is due to the nuclear reaction between 10 B and thermal neutrons ( 10 B+ 1 n → 7 Li+ 4 He (α) +2.31 MeV (93.7%)/2.79 MeV (6.3%)). The resulting lithium ions and αparticles are high linear energy transfer (LET) particles which give high biological effect. Their short range in tissue (5-9 μm) restricts radiation damage to those cells in which boron atoms are located at the time of neutron irradiation. BNCT has been applied clinically for the treatment of malignant brain tumors, malignant melanoma, head and neck cancer and hepatoma etc, recently. Sodium borocaptate (Na 2 10 B 12 H 11 SH; BSH) and borono-phenylalanine ( 10 BPA) are currently being used in clinical treatments. To achieve the selective delivery of boron atoms to cancer cells, drug delivery system (DDS) becomes an attractive intelligent technology as targeting and controlled release of drugs. We have firstly reported that 10 B atoms delivered by immunoliposomes are cytotoxic to human pancreatic carcinoma cells (AsPC-1) after thermal neutron irradiation in vitro. The intra-tumoural injection of boronated immunoliposomes can increase the retention of 10 B atoms in tumour cells, causing suppression of tumour growth in vivo following thermal neutron irradiation. We prepared polyethylene-glycol binding liposomes (PEG-liposomes) as an effective 10 B carrier to obviate phagocytosis by reticuloendotherial systems. We had prepared 10 BSH entrapped Water-in-Oil-in-Water (WOW) emulsion. The 10 B concentration in VX-2 tumour after intra-arterial injection of 10 BSH entrapped WOW emulsion was superior to the groups of 10 BSH entrapped conventional Lipiodol mix emulsion. 10 Boron entrapped WOW emulsion is one of the most useful for intra-arterial boron delivery carrier on BNCT to hepatocellular carcinoma. (author)

  4. New Drug Candidate Targeting the 4A1 Orphan Nuclear Receptor for Medullary Thyroid Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC is a relatively rare thyroid cancer responsible for a substantial fraction of thyroid cancer mortality. More effective therapeutic drugs with low toxicity for MTC are urgently needed. Orphan nuclear receptor 4A1 (NR4A1 plays a pivotal role in regulating the proliferation and apoptosis of a variety of tumor cells. Based on the NR4A1 protein structure, 2-imino-6-methoxy-2H-chromene-3-carbothioamide (IMCA was identified from the Specs compounds database using the protein structure-guided virtual screening approach. Computationally-based molecular modeling studies suggested that IMCA has a high affinity for the ligand binding pocket of NR4A1. MTT [3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide] and apoptosis assays demonstrated that IMCA resulted in significant thyroid cancer cell death. Immunofluorescence assays showed that IMCA induced NR4A1 translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in thyroid cancer cell lines, which may be involved in the cell apoptotic process. In this study, the quantitative polymerase chain reaction results showed that the IMCA-induced upregulation of sestrin1 and sestrin2 was dose-dependent in thyroid cancer cell lines. Western blot showed that IMCA increased phosphorylation of adenosine 5′-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK and decreased phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K, which is the key enzyme in the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway. The experimental results suggest that IMCA is a drug candidate for MTC therapy and may work by increasing the nuclear export of NR4A1 to the cytoplasm and the tumor protein 53 (p53-sestrins-AMPK-mTOR signaling pathway.

  5. ROLE OF NON-DRUG THERAPIES OF METABOLIC SYNDROME: CHALLENGES AND PROSPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Strelkova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal obesity (and the closely related metabolic syndrome is one of the most common diseases in the world. The urgency of the problem of the progression of abdominal obesity is not only in its high prevalence, but also in the formation of a high risk of developing cardiovascular disease and diabetes type 2. The main reasons for the rapid development of obesity are considered high-calorie food (which includes not only the quantity but also the quality of edible products, sedentary lifestyle and genetic predisposition. Until now there are underway great controversies about the procedures of fast and trouble-free weight loss. There are many studies on the treatment of various components of metabolic syndrome. Despite a number of different pharmaceutical drugs developed for the treatment of abdominal obesity, non-drug therapies come first as well as the organization of the right way of life, which is difficult and sometimes impossible task for the clinician. One of the main reasons is the lack of time in doctor during outpatient consultations. To resolve this issue the role of "School of Health" is considered in order to effectively reduce the body weight of patients with metabolic syndrome and maintaining long-term results. It is expected that the implementation of the "School of Health" in the complex treatment of patients with metabolic syndrome will more broadly inform patients about their disease, improve the motivational and cognitive components of plants, and increase compliance to carry out the doctor's prescription. A review of the prevalence and root causes of abdominal obesity is presented, as well as analysis of the effectiveness of existing “Schools of Health” in the clinical practice for the treatment of various chronic diseases.

  6. Drug utilization and therapy provision patterns by prescriber types among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sooyoung

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) poses a growing challenge for healthcare systems, affecting an increasing number of people in Korea. This study aimed to investigate the prescribing patterns of SLE therapies and to compare common drug regimens prescribed by provider types. Sampled national health insurance claims data in 2015 were used to select eligible SLE patients. Frequency analyses were carried out regarding patient characteristics related to relevant SLE prescriptions. Patient-days were calculated per substance and per drug class and then categorized by provider types. Differences in drug utilization trends among the main types of providers were examined with the chi-square test. A total of 2,074 patients with SLE were selected for study inclusion. Systemic corticosteroid therapy was provided for up to 67.9% of patients, frequently in conjunction with other SLE therapies. About 33.2% and 18.7% of steroid users were treated for more than 150 days and 300 days during the study period, respectively. The provider group that most frequently prescribed systemic corticosteroids was dermatologists. Hydroxychloroquine, an antimalarial considered pivotal to SLE management, was prescribed for only 32.4% of patients, predominantly by rheumatologists. Antimalarial therapy was associated with the longest therapy duration (257.7±120.1 days), followed by immunosuppressant therapy (187.0±153.0 days). Prescription rates of antimalarials and immunosuppressants were substantially lower in primary care doctor group and particularly in dermatologist group, compared to rheumatologist group ( P -value associated with prescription patterns by provider types was therapy for SLE patients compared to other types of providers.

  7. Drug utilization and therapy provision patterns by prescriber types among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin S

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Sooyoung Shin College of Pharmacy and Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology (RIPST, Ajou University, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon, Republic of Korea Background: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE poses a growing challenge for healthcare systems, affecting an increasing number of people in Korea. This study aimed to investigate the prescribing patterns of SLE therapies and to compare common drug regimens prescribed by provider types.Methods: Sampled national health insurance claims data in 2015 were used to select eligible SLE patients. Frequency analyses were carried out regarding patient characteristics related to relevant SLE prescriptions. Patient-days were calculated per substance and per drug class and then categorized by provider types. Differences in drug utilization trends among the main types of providers were examined with the chi-square test.Results: A total of 2,074 patients with SLE were selected for study inclusion. Systemic corticosteroid therapy was provided for up to 67.9% of patients, frequently in conjunction with other SLE therapies. About 33.2% and 18.7% of steroid users were treated for more than 150 days and 300 days during the study period, respectively. The provider group that most frequently prescribed systemic corticosteroids was dermatologists. Hydroxychloroquine, an antimalarial considered pivotal to SLE management, was prescribed for only 32.4% of patients, predominantly by rheumatologists. Antimalarial therapy was associated with the longest therapy duration (257.7±120.1 days, followed by immunosuppressant therapy (187.0±153.0 days. Prescription rates of antimalarials and immunosuppressants were substantially lower in primary care doctor group and particularly in dermatologist group, compared to rheumatologist group (P-value associated with prescription patterns by provider types was <0.001 for both drug classes.Conclusion: The drug utilization patterns among the main provider groups commonly

  8. Retinal toxicities of cancer therapy drugs: biologics, small molecule inhibitors, and chemotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Catherine Y; Francis, Jasmine H; Brodie, Scott E; Marr, Brian; Pulido, Jose S; Marmor, Michael F; Abramson, David H

    2014-07-01

    To review reported retinal side effects from current cancer therapy drugs. Retinal toxicities from ophthalmologic or oncologic case reports, case series, and clinical trials were identified by a systematic literature search using Lexicomp and PubMed. Four biologics, 8 small molecule inhibitors, and 17 traditional chemotherapy agents had reported retinal side effects. For biologics, interferon alpha 2b was associated with retinopathy, denileukin diftitiox with pigmentary retinopathy, ipilimumab with a Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada-like syndrome, and trastuzumab with retinal ischemia. For small molecule inhibitors, v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF) inhibitors were associated with uveitis, mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase inhibitors with pigment epithelium detachments, and tyrosine kinase inhibitors with macular edema. Steroid antagonists were associated with crystalline retinopathy and macular edema. Nitrosoureas, platinum analogs, and cytosine arabinoside were associated with retinal vascular occlusions. Antimicrotubular agents were associated with cystoid macular edema but without fluorescein leakage. Retinoic acid derivatives were associated with impaired night vision, and mitotane was associated with a pigmentary retinopathy and papilledema. Certain agents used in the treatment of systemic cancer are associated with ocular complications. Awareness of these complications will allow early detections and maybe reversal of some of the ocular problems.

  9. Effectiveness of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in the Improvement of Coping Strategies and Addiction Symptoms in Drug-Dependent Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H BrockieMilan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was carried out to determine the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy in improving coping strategies and symptoms of drug addiction patients. Method: In a quasi-experimental study, the number of 90drug-dependent patients referring to clinics to stop taking drugs existing in the city of Urmia were divided into two experimental (n=45 groups and control (n=45 using random sampling. The experimental group received 12 sessions of cognitive-behavioral treatment in Carroll style while the control group received only methadone and the physical pills. All the participants completed coping strategies questionnaire at the beginning, during (after three months, and three months after treatment (follow-up. As well, they were assessed for the rate of improvement in symptoms of addiction and process of addiction treatment using by Madzly’s addiction profile questionnaire. Findings: The results proved the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy and its survival. Conclusion: Cognitive behavioral therapy is very influential in the boost of coping strategies and the improvement of mental and physical health in drug-dependent patients.

  10. Multifuntional Nanotherapeutics for the Combinatorial Drug and Gene Therapy in the Treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourigan, Breanne

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a grade IV glioma, is the most common primary brain tumor, affecting about 3 out of 100,000 persons per year in the United States. GBM accounts for about 80% of primary malignant brain tumors, and is also the most aggressive of malignant brain tumors. With exhaustive treatment, survival only averages between 12 and 15 months, with a 2-year survival rate less than 25%. New therapeutic strategies are necessary to improve the outcomes of this disease. Chemotherapy with temozolomide (TMZ), a DNA alkylating agent, is used as a first-line of treatment for GBM. However, GBM tumors develop resistance to TMZ over time due to increased expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), a gene responsible for DNA repair. We previously developed cationic, amphiphilic copolymer poly(lactide-co-glycolide)-g-polyethylenimine (PgP) and demonstrated its utility for nucleic acid delivery. Here, we examine the ability of PgP polyplexes to overcome TMZ resistance and improve therapeutic efficacy through combination drug and gene therapy for GBM treatment. In this study, we evaluated the ability of PgP to deliver siRNA targeting to MGMT (siMGMT), a gene responsible for drug resistance in GBM. Our results demonstrated that PgP effectively forms stable complex with siRNA and protects siRNAs from heparin competition assay, serum- and ribonuclease-mediated degradation, confirming the potential of the polyplex for in vivo delivery. Results from MTT assays showed that PgP/siRNA polyplexes exhibited minimal cytotoxicity compared to untreated cells when incubated with T98G human GBM cells. We also demonstrated that PgP/siMGMT polyplexes mediate knockdown of MGMT protein as well as a significant ˜56% and ˜68% knockdown of MGMT mRNA in T98G GBM cells compared to cells treated with PgP complexed with non-targeting siRNA (siNT) at a 60:1 and 80:1 nitrogen:phosphate (N:P) ratio, respectively. Further, co-incubation of PgP/siMGMT polyplexes with TMZ

  11. Effectiveness of group cognitive therapy about opium addict complications on attitude of adolescents with drug dependent parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Hojjat

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Statistics show that 30% to 40 % of  opium addicted fathers’ children are prone to substance abuse in the future. The present study aimed at assessing the effectiveness of cognitive therapy approach  to attitude changing of adolescents with substance dependent fathers. Materials and Methods:  In this controlled. field-trail randomized study. .data collection tool was “attitude to addiction questionnaire”. The study population was all male students in the first grade of high school in Maneh - Samalghan city. . Six sessions of group cognitive therapy based on the effectiveness of drug side-effects in drug-addicted fathers’ adolescent children’s attitude were held. The above-mentioned questionnaire was filled out before and after intervention. The obtained data  was fed into SPSS software (V: 16 using. Independent t-test .and paired t-test were used for analysis and P<0.05 was taken as the significant level. Results:  There were no significant differences between the two groups in pre-test regarding their attitude about drug abuse (P=.20%. Mean score variance from pre-test to post-test in the intervention group decreased, but in the control group, it showed a slight increase. This means that the intervention reduced the positive attitude towards drugs, but the changes were not statistically significant (p=0.57. Besides, among ten factors decisive in an individual’s attitude about addiction, only group cognitive therapy  was able  to decrease mean points of an individual’s attitude about drug abuse .. Significantly (P = 0.04. Conclusion: It was found that group cognitive therapy education about opium  addict complicationsdidn`t have a significant effect on the attitude of the students with addicted fathers. Thus, a change of adolescents’ attitude requires more research.

  12. Development of novel drug delivery prototypes devices for targeted delivery drug therapy at the molecular level in aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Roy; Oberhozer, Theunis Gerhardus; Perchyonok, Victoria Tamara

    2011-09-01

    A novel approach in target specific molecular prototype drug delivery system concerns the attempt to employ radical affording substances (RAS) or radical quenching substances (RQS) as prodrugs able to produce irreversible damage on the desired target and therefore to stimulate cellular apoptosis. However, radical species generated can react quickly within the chemical environment prior to reaching its proper site of action. In this short communication, we report our investigations towards developing two alternative novel, simple, flexible and effective drug delivery systems that provide optimal dosage of drugs precisely where and when needed and therefore achieve and sustain a complex delivery profile. We have demonstrated the application of two effective molecular prototype delivery systems able to harness free radical reactivity within the laboratory where biological processes can be studied and controlled, leading to the prevention of disease and the development of new treatments for disease states mediated by free radicals.

  13. Nanoparticle-based drug delivery to improve the efficacy of antiretroviral therapy in the central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Maria João; Neves, José das; Sarmento, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Antiretroviral drug therapy plays a cornerstone role in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients. Despite obvious advances over the past 3 decades, new approaches toward improved management of infected individuals are still required. Drug distribution to the central nervous system (CNS) is required in order to limit and control viral infection, but the presence of natural barrier structures, in particular the blood–brain barrier, strongly limits the perfusion of anti-HIV compounds into this anatomical site. Nanotechnology-based approaches may help providing solutions for antiretroviral drug delivery to the CNS by potentially prolonging systemic drug circulation, increasing the crossing and reducing the efflux of active compounds at the blood–brain barrier, and providing cell/tissue-targeting and intracellular drug delivery. After an initial overview on the basic features of HIV infection of the CNS and barriers to active compound delivery to this anatomical site, this review focuses on recent strategies based on antiretroviral drug-loaded solid nanoparticles and drug nanosuspensions for the potential management of HIV infection of the CNS. PMID:24741312

  14. Targeted Mesoporous Iron Oxide Nanoparticles-Encapsulated Perfluorohexane and a Hydrophobic Drug for Deep Tumor Penetration and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yu-Lin; Fang, Jen-Hung; Liao, Chia-Ying; Lin, Chein-Ting; Li, Yun-Ting; Hu, Shang-Hsiu

    2015-01-01

    A magneto-responsive energy/drug carrier that enhances deep tumor penetration with a porous nano-composite is constructed by using a tumor-targeted lactoferrin (Lf) bio-gate as a cap on mesoporous iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONs). With a large payload of a gas-generated molecule, perfluorohexane (PFH), and a hydrophobic anti-cancer drug, paclitaxel (PTX), Lf-MIONs can simultaneously perform bursting gas generation and on-demand drug release upon high-frequency magnetic field (MF) exposure. Biocompatible PFH was chosen and encapsulated in MIONs due to its favorable phase transition temperature (56 °C) and its hydrophobicity. After a short-duration MF treatment induces heat generation, the local pressure increase via the gasifying of the PFH embedded in MION can substantially rupture the three-dimensional tumor spheroids in vitro as well as enhance drug and carrier penetration. As the MF treatment duration increases, Lf-MIONs entering the tumor spheroids provide an intense heat and burst-like drug release, leading to superior drug delivery and deep tumor thermo-chemo-therapy. With their high efficiency for targeting tumors, Lf-MIONs/PTX-PFH suppressed subcutaneous tumors in 16 days after a single MF exposure. This work presents the first study of using MF-induced PFH gasification as a deep tumor-penetrating agent for drug delivery.

  15. Effects of music therapy on drug avoidance self-efficacy in patients on a detoxification unit: a three-group randomized effectiveness study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Self-efficacy is a component of Bandura's social cognitive theory and can lead to abstinence and a reduction of relapse potential for people who have substance abuse disorders. To date, no music therapy researcher has utilized this theoretical model to address abstinence and reduce the likelihood of relapse in people who have addictions. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of music therapy on drug avoidance self-efficacy in a randomized three-group wait-list control design with patients on a detoxification unit. Participants (N = 131) were cluster randomized to one of three single-session conditions: music therapy, verbal therapy, or wait-list control. Music therapy participants received a group lyric analysis intervention, verbal therapy participants received a group talk therapy session, and wait-list control participants eventually received a group recreational music therapy intervention. Although there was no significant between-group difference in drug avoidance self-efficacy, participants in the music therapy condition tended to have the highest mean drug avoidance self-efficacy scores. Posttest written comments supported the use of both music therapy and verbal therapy sessions. Two music therapy participants specifically noted that their initial skepticism had dissipated after receiving music therapy. Despite a lack of significant differences, the theoretical support of self-efficacy for substance abuse rehabilitation suggests that this may be an area of continued clinical focus and empirical investigation. Clinical anecdotes, limitations of the study, and suggestions for future research are provided.

  16. Drug Stroop: Mechanisms of response to computerized cognitive behavioral therapy for cocaine dependence in a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVito, Elise E; Kiluk, Brian D; Nich, Charla; Mouratidis, Maria; Carroll, Kathleen M

    2018-02-01

    Poor performance on Drug Stroop tasks, which could indicate attentional bias to drug-related cues, craving, poor cognitive control (including poor response inhibition), has been associated with substance use severity, treatment retention and substance use treatment outcomes. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) focuses on training in appraisal and coping strategies, including strategies to minimize the negative impact of triggers and coping with drug-cue-induced craving. One mechanism of action of CBT may be the strengthening of cognitive control processes and reduction of attentional bias to drug-related stimuli. Methadone-maintained individuals with cocaine-use disorders, participating in a randomized controlled trial of treatment as usual (TAU) versus TAU plus access to computer-based CBT (CBT4CBT), completed a computerized Drug Stroop task at pre- and post-treatment. Analyses determined whether attentional bias toward drug-related stimuli changed differentially by treatment group or cocaine use outcomes across the treatment period and whether engagement in components of CBT4CBT or TAU treatment related to changes in attentional bias toward drug-related stimuli at post- versus pre-treatment. Participants achieving a longer duration of cocaine abstinence during treatment (3+ weeks) showed greater reductions in Drug Stroop Effect than those with shorter maximum continuous abstinence. Reductions in Drug Stroop Effect across treatment were associated with greater engagement with CBT4CBT-specific treatment components, but not TAU-specific treatment components. Reduction in attentional bias to drug-related cues and craving and/or improved executive cognitive control and response inhibition may contribute to the mechanism of action of CBT4CBT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Prevalence of transmitted HIV drug resistance among newly diagnosed antiretroviral therapy-naive pregnant women in Lilongwe and Blantyre, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadonda-Kabondo, Nellie; Banda, Richard; Moyo, Kundai; M'bang'ombe, Maurice; Chiwaula, Mabvuto; Porter, Carol; Jordan, Michael R

    2012-05-01

    In 2006, a survey of transmitted human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance (TDR) was conducted in Lilongwe, Malawi. The survey followed the World Health Organization method to classify TDR to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), and protease inhibitors (PIs) among primigravid women aged Blantyre. Findings show that in Lilongwe TDR to NRTIs and PIs was Blantyre, TDR was <5% to all drug classes. Observed moderate TDR in Lilongwe is cause for concern and signals the need for closer monitoring of Malawi's antiretroviral therapy program.

  18. Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for injecting drug users in the WHO European Region 2002-2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donoghoe, Martin C; Bollerup, Annemarie R; Lazarus, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Providing equitable access to highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) to injecting drug users (IDUs) is both feasible and desirable. Given the evidence that IDUs can adhere to HAART as well as non-IDUs and the imperative to provide universal and equitable access to HIV/AIDS treatment for all...... the injecting status of those initiating HAART and the use of opioid substitution therapy among HAART patients, and discuss how HAART might be better delivered to injecting drug users. Our data adds to the evidence that IDUs in Europe have poor and inequitable access to HAART, with only a relatively small...

  19. Health care costs of adults treated for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder who received alternative drug therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Eric Q; Birnbaum, Howard G; Zhang, Huabin F; Ivanova, Jasmina I; Yang, Elaine; Mallet, David

    2007-09-01

    Many therapies exist for treating adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), also referred to as attention-deficit disorder (ADD), but there is no research regarding cost differences associated with initiating alternative ADD/ADHD drug therapies in adults. To compare from the perspective of a large self-insured employer the risk-adjusted direct health care costs associated with 3 alternative drug therapies for ADD in newly treated patients: extended-release methylphenidate (osmotic release oral system-MPH), mixed amphetamine salts extended release (MAS-XR), or atomoxetine. We analyzed data from a US claims database of 5 million beneficiaries from 31 large self-insured employers (1999-2004). Analysis was restricted to adults aged 18 to 64 years with at least 1 diagnosis of ADD/ADHD (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] codes 314.0x--attention deficit disorder; 314.00--attention deficit disorder without hyperactivity; or 314.01--attention-deficit disorder with hyperactivity) and at least 1 pharmacy claim for OROS-MPH, MAS-XR, or atomoxetine identified using National Drug Codes. In preliminary analysis, we calculated the duration of index ADHD drug therapy as time from index therapy initiation to a minimum 60-day gap. Because the median duration of index ADHD drug therapy was found to be approximately 90 days, the primary measures were total direct medical plus drug costs and medical-only costs computed over 6 months following therapy initiation. Adults were required to have continuous eligibility 6 months before and 6 months after their latest drug therapy initiation and no ADHD therapy during the previous 6 months. Cost was measured as the payment amount made by the health plan to the provider rather than billed charges, and it excluded patient copayments and deductibles. Medical costs included costs incurred for all-cause inpatient and outpatient/other services. Costs were adjusted for inflation to

  20. [Drug therapy of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Is combination therapy with 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors and alpha-receptor blockers effective?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horninger, W; Bartsch, G

    2002-09-01

    5 alpha-reductase inhibitors and alpha 1-receptor blockers are the two main drug therapies used in the management of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia. As alpha-reductase inhibitors and alpha 1-receptor blockers act through different mechanisms, a combination of the two agents might be promising. The potential benefits of combination therapy with selective alpha 1-receptor blockers and finasteride, a 5 alpha-reductase inhibitor, are currently being evaluated in several placebo-controlled prospective multicenter studies (VA Study, ALFIN Study, PREDICT Study, and MTOPS Study). The data from these studies available so far demonstrate a statistically significant benefit for the study groups receiving alpha 1-receptor blockers and combination therapy vs placebo and finasteride monotherapy in terms of symptom scores and peak urine flow rates. However, none of the studies yielded a statistically significant advantage of combination therapy over treatment with alpha 1-receptor blockers. These results should be interpreted with reference to the prostatic volume, which in the studies mentioned above was relatively low. From the results of all these studies, it can be concluded that in symptomatic patients with prostate volumes of up to 40-45 ml a combination of 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors with alpha 1-receptor blockers does not appear to provide any benefit. Yet, it can be assumed that in symptomatic patients with prostate volumes of more than 60 ml combination therapy may indeed prove more effective.

  1. Antiarrhythmic effect of the Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (SK) channel inhibitor ICA combined with either amiodarone or dofetilide in an isolated heart model of atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchhoff, Jeppe Egedal; Diness, Jonas Goldin; Abildgaard, Lea

    2016-01-01

    , amiodarone primarily has adverse non-cardiac effects. Pharmacological inhibition of small conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (SK) channels has recently been reported to be antiarrhythmic in a number of animal AF models. In a Langendorff model of acutely induced AF on guinea pig hearts, it was investigated...

  2. Ankylosing spondylitis, late osteoarthritis, vascular calcification, chondrocalcinosis and pseudo gout: toward a possible drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebarek, S; Hamade, E; Thouverey, C; Bandorowicz-Pikula, J; Pikula, S; Magne, D; Buchet, R

    2011-01-01

    In this review we consider diseases associated with pathological mineralization/ossification, namely, ankylosing spondylitis (AS), osteoarthritis (OA), generalized artery calcification of infancy (GACI), vascular calcification as well as chondrocalcinosis (CC) and pseudo gout. Deciphering the key enzymes implicated in the calcification process is an objective of prime importance and the ultimate goal is to synthesize inhibitors of these enzymes in order to provide efficient alternate therapeutic strategies that will slow down the pathologic mineralization and complement the arsenal of anti-inflammatory drugs. One of the difficulties in the definition of diseases associated with pathologic mineralization/ossification lies in the controversial relationship between the type of calcification and the nature of the disease. Here, we propose to clarify this relationship by making a distinction between diseases associated with hydroxyapatite (HA) and calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) deposits. AS, OA, GACI and vascular calcification are usually characterized by mineralization/ossification associated with HA deposits, while CC and pseudo gout are mostly characterized by CPPD deposits. Although both HA and CPPD deposits may occur concomitantly, as in chronic pyrophosphate arthritis or in OA with CPPD, they are formed as a result of two antagonistic processes indicating that treatment of distinct diseases can be only achieved by disease-specific drug therapies. The hydrolysis of PPi, an inhibitor of HA formation, is mostly controlled by tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase TNAP, while PPi production in the extracellular medium is controlled by ANK, a PPi transporter, and/or NPP1 which generates PPi from nucleotide triphosphates. Low PPi concentration may lead to a preferential deposition of HA while high PPi concentration will favor the formation of CPPD deposits. Thus, HA and CCPD deposition cannot occur concomitantly because they are determined by the Pi/PPi ratio

  3. Birth outcome in women with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, and pharmacoepidemiological aspects of anti-inflammatory drug therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Bente Mertz

    2011-01-01

    The clinical epidemiological studies included in this thesis fall into three parts. The first part includes studies on birth outcome in women with ulcerative colitis. The second part includes pharmacoepidemiological studies on birth outcome after anti-inflammatory drug therapy in pregnancy......, including patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. The third part (and the latest publications) includes birth outcome in women with Crohn's disease; and the methods of cohort establishment in these studies are developed and improved due to the knowledge gathered from conducting the earlier...... in children born by women with ulcerative colitis. The pharmacoepidemiological studies on birth outcomes after use of anti-inflammatory drug therapy in pregnancy, including women with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, are based on data from the Hungarian case-control data set, a countywide Danish...

  4. Review of the treatment of psoriatic arthritis with biological agents: choice of drug for initial therapy and switch therapy for non-responders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Angelo S

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Salvatore D’Angelo,1 Giuseppina Tramontano,1 Michele Gilio,1 Pietro Leccese,1 Ignazio Olivieri1,2 1Rheumatology Institute of Lucania (IRel - Rheumatology Department of Lucania, San Carlo Hospital of Potenza and Madonna delle Grazie Hospital of Matera, Potenza and Matera, 2Basilicata Ricerca Biomedica (BRB Foundation, Potenza, Italy Abstract: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA is a heterogeneous chronic inflammatory disease with a broad clinical spectrum and variable course. It can involve musculoskeletal structures as well as skin, nails, eyes, and gut. The management of PsA has changed tremendously in the last decade, thanks to an earlier diagnosis, an advancement in pharmacological therapies, and a wider application of a multidisciplinary approach. The commercialization of tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, etanercept, golimumab, and infliximab as well as interleukin (IL-12/23 (ustekinumab and IL-17 (secukinumab inhibitors is representative of a revolution in the treatment of PsA. No evidence-based strategies are currently available for guiding the rheumatologist to prescribe biological drugs. Several international and national recommendation sets are currently available with the aim to help rheumatologists in everyday clinical practice management of PsA patients treated with biological therapy. Since no specific biological agent has been demonstrated to be more effective than others, the drug choice should be made according to the available safety data, the presence of extra-articular manifestations, the patient’s preferences (e.g., administration route, and the drug price. However, future studies directly comparing different biological drugs and assessing the efficacy of treatment strategies specific for PsA are urgently needed. Keywords: psoriatic arthritis, treatment, biological drugs, TNF inhibitors, ustekinumab, secukinumab

  5. Neospora caninum calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 is an effective drug target for neosporosis therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayode K Ojo

    Full Text Available Despite the enormous economic importance of Neospora caninum related veterinary diseases, the number of effective therapeutic agents is relatively small. Development of new therapeutic strategies to combat the economic impact of neosporosis remains an important scientific endeavor. This study demonstrates molecular, structural and phenotypic evidence that N. caninum calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (NcCDPK1 is a promising molecular target for neosporosis drug development. Recombinant NcCDPK1 was expressed, purified and screened against a select group of bumped kinase inhibitors (BKIs previously shown to have low IC50s against Toxoplasma gondii CDPK1 and T. gondii tachyzoites. NcCDPK1 was inhibited by low concentrations of BKIs. The three-dimensional structure of NcCDPK1 in complex with BKIs was studied crystallographically. The BKI-NcCDPK1 structures demonstrated the structural basis for potency and selectivity. Calcium-dependent conformational changes in solution as characterized by small-angle X-ray scattering are consistent with previous structures in low Calcium-state but different in the Calcium-bound active state than predicted by X-ray crystallography. BKIs effectively inhibited N. caninum tachyzoite proliferation in vitro. Electron microscopic analysis of N. caninum cells revealed ultra-structural changes in the presence of BKI compound 1294. BKI compound 1294 interfered with an early step in Neospora tachyzoite host cell invasion and egress. Prolonged incubation in the presence of 1294 interfered produced observable interference with viability and replication. Oral dosing of BKI compound 1294 at 50 mg/kg for 5 days in established murine neosporosis resulted in a 10-fold reduced cerebral parasite burden compared to untreated control. Further experiments are needed to determine the PK, optimal dosage, and duration for effective treatment in cattle and dogs, but these data demonstrate proof-of-concept for BKIs, and 1294 specifically, for

  6. Neospora caninum calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 is an effective drug target for neosporosis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, Kayode K; Reid, Molly C; Kallur Siddaramaiah, Latha; Müller, Joachim; Winzer, Pablo; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Keyloun, Katelyn R; Vidadala, Rama Subba Rao; Merritt, Ethan A; Hol, Wim G J; Maly, Dustin J; Fan, Erkang; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Hemphill, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Despite the enormous economic importance of Neospora caninum related veterinary diseases, the number of effective therapeutic agents is relatively small. Development of new therapeutic strategies to combat the economic impact of neosporosis remains an important scientific endeavor. This study demonstrates molecular, structural and phenotypic evidence that N. caninum calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (NcCDPK1) is a promising molecular target for neosporosis drug development. Recombinant NcCDPK1 was expressed, purified and screened against a select group of bumped kinase inhibitors (BKIs) previously shown to have low IC50s against Toxoplasma gondii CDPK1 and T. gondii tachyzoites. NcCDPK1 was inhibited by low concentrations of BKIs. The three-dimensional structure of NcCDPK1 in complex with BKIs was studied crystallographically. The BKI-NcCDPK1 structures demonstrated the structural basis for potency and selectivity. Calcium-dependent conformational changes in solution as characterized by small-angle X-ray scattering are consistent with previous structures in low Calcium-state but different in the Calcium-bound active state than predicted by X-ray crystallography. BKIs effectively inhibited N. caninum tachyzoite proliferation in vitro. Electron microscopic analysis of N. caninum cells revealed ultra-structural changes in the presence of BKI compound 1294. BKI compound 1294 interfered with an early step in Neospora tachyzoite host cell invasion and egress. Prolonged incubation in the presence of 1294 interfered produced observable interference with viability and replication. Oral dosing of BKI compound 1294 at 50 mg/kg for 5 days in established murine neosporosis resulted in a 10-fold reduced cerebral parasite burden compared to untreated control. Further experiments are needed to determine the PK, optimal dosage, and duration for effective treatment in cattle and dogs, but these data demonstrate proof-of-concept for BKIs, and 1294 specifically, for therapy of bovine

  7. Enzyme-triggered nanomedicine: Drug release strategies in cancer therapy (Invited Review)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Thomas Lars; Thompson, David H.; Kaasgaard, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Nanomedicine as a field has emerged from the early success of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems, in particular for treatment of cancer, and the advances made in nano- and biotechnology over the past decade. A prerequisite for nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems to be effective...... is that the drug payload is released at the target site. A large number of drug release strategies have been proposed that can be classified into certain areas. The simplest and most successful strategy so far, probably due to relative simplicity, is based on utilizing certain physico-chemical characteristics...... of drugs to obtain a slow drug leakage from the formulations after accumulation in the cancerous site. However, this strategy is only applicable to a relatively small range of drugs and cannot be applied to biologicals. Many advanced drug release strategies have therefore been investigated. Such strategies...

  8. High frequency of antiviral drug resistance and non-b subtypes in HIV-1 patients failing antiviral therapy in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouri, Vivian; Alemán, Yoan; Pérez, Lissette; Pérez, Jorge; Fonseca, Carlos; Correa, Consuelo; Aragonés, Carlos; Campos, Jorge; Alvarez, Delmis; Schrooten, Yoeri; Vinken, Lore; Limia, Celia; Soto, Yudira; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Van Laethem, Kristel

    2014-01-01

    Emergence of HIV-1 drug resistance may limit the sustained benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in settings with limited laboratory monitoring and drug options. The objective is to implement the surveillance of drug resistance and subtypes in HIV-1 patients failing ART in Cuba. This study compiled clinical and genotypic drug resistance data 588 ART-experienced HIV-1 patients attending a clinical center in Havana in 2009-2013. Drug resistance testing was performed as part of routine clinical care. Drug resistance mutations and levels were determined using Rega version 8.0.2. Eighty-three percent received solely ART containing at least three drugs. Patients from 2009 to 2010 were longer treated (median: 4.9 vs 2.7 years) and exposed to more ART regimens (median: 4 vs 2 regimens) compared to patients from 2011-2013. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI), non-nucleoside RTI (NNRTI) and PI mutations were present in 83.5, 77.4 and 52.0%. Full-class resistance (FCR) to NRTI, NNRTI, PI and multidrug resistance (MDR) were detected in 25.0, 33.7, 11.4 and 6.3%. FCR to NRTI, NNRTI, PI and MDR were present in 12.8, 28.7, 0 and 0% after first-line failure (164 patients) and in 23.1, 34.6, 3.8 and 3.1% after second-line failure (130 patients). Subtype B (32.5%), BG recombinants (19.6%) and CRF19_cpx (16.2%) were the most prevalent genetic forms. Subtype distribution did not change significantly between 2009-2010 and 2011-2013, except for BG recombinants that increased from 12.2 to 21.3% (p=0.002). Our study found a high prevalence of drug resistance and supports the need for appropriate laboratory monitoring in clinical practice and access to drug options in case of virological failure.

  9. Modeling of pharmacokinetics of cocaine in human reveals the feasibility for development of enzyme therapies for drugs of abuse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Zheng

    Full Text Available A promising strategy for drug abuse treatment is to accelerate the drug metabolism by administration of a drug-metabolizing enzyme. The question is how effectively an enzyme can actually prevent the drug from entering brain and producing physiological effects. In the present study, we have developed a pharmacokinetic model through a combined use of in vitro kinetic parameters and positron emission tomography data in human to examine the effects of a cocaine-metabolizing enzyme in plasma on the time course of cocaine in plasma and brain of human. Without an exogenous enzyme, cocaine half-lives in both brain and plasma are almost linearly dependent on the initial cocaine concentration in plasma. The threshold concentration of cocaine in brain required to produce physiological effects has been estimated to be 0.22±0.07 µM, and the threshold area under the cocaine concentration versus time curve (AUC value in brain (denoted by AUC2(∞ required to produce physiological effects has been estimated to be 7.9±2.7 µM·min. It has been demonstrated that administration of a cocaine hydrolase/esterase (CocH/CocE can considerably decrease the cocaine half-lives in both brain and plasma, the peak cocaine concentration in brain, and the AUC2(∞. The estimated maximum cocaine plasma concentration which a given concentration of drug-metabolizing enzyme can effectively prevent from entering brain and producing physiological effects can be used to guide future preclinical/clinical studies on cocaine-metabolizing enzymes. Understanding of drug-metabolizing enzymes is key to the science of pharmacokinetics. The general insights into the effects of a drug-metabolizing enzyme on drug kinetics in human should be valuable also in future development of enzyme therapies for other drugs of abuse.

  10. Modeling of pharmacokinetics of cocaine in human reveals the feasibility for development of enzyme therapies for drugs of abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Fang; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2012-01-01

    A promising strategy for drug abuse treatment is to accelerate the drug metabolism by administration of a drug-metabolizing enzyme. The question is how effectively an enzyme can actually prevent the drug from entering brain and producing physiological effects. In the present study, we have developed a pharmacokinetic model through a combined use of in vitro kinetic parameters and positron emission tomography data in human to examine the effects of a cocaine-metabolizing enzyme in plasma on the time course of cocaine in plasma and brain of human. Without an exogenous enzyme, cocaine half-lives in both brain and plasma are almost linearly dependent on the initial cocaine concentration in plasma. The threshold concentration of cocaine in brain required to produce physiological effects has been estimated to be 0.22±0.07 µM, and the threshold area under the cocaine concentration versus time curve (AUC) value in brain (denoted by AUC2(∞)) required to produce physiological effects has been estimated to be 7.9±2.7 µM·min. It has been demonstrated that administration of a cocaine hydrolase/esterase (CocH/CocE) can considerably decrease the cocaine half-lives in both brain and plasma, the peak cocaine concentration in brain, and the AUC2(∞). The estimated maximum cocaine plasma concentration which a given concentration of drug-metabolizing enzyme can effectively prevent from entering brain and producing physiological effects can be used to guide future preclinical/clinical studies on cocaine-metabolizing enzymes. Understanding of drug-metabolizing enzymes is key to the science of pharmacokinetics. The general insights into the effects of a drug-metabolizing enzyme on drug kinetics in human should be valuable also in future development of enzyme therapies for other drugs of abuse.

  11. Functional Family Therapy (FFT) for Young People in Treatment for Non-opioid Drug Use:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filges, Trine; Andersen, Ditte; Jørgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this review is to evaluate the current evidence on the effects of FFT on drug abuse reduction for young people in treatment for non-opioid drug use.......The main aim of this review is to evaluate the current evidence on the effects of FFT on drug abuse reduction for young people in treatment for non-opioid drug use....

  12. Treatment readiness, attitudes toward, and experiences with methadone and buprenorphine maintenance therapy among people who inject drugs in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, Aishwarya; Bazazi, Alexander R; Yee, Ilias; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Altice, Frederick L

    2015-07-01

    Little is known about attitudes toward and experiences with opioid maintenance therapy (OMT) among people who inject drugs in Malaysia, a country where people who inject drugs comprise 1.3% of the adult population. In 2010, 460 people who inject drugs in Greater Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia were surveyed to evaluate attitudes toward and experiences with OMT and treatment readiness. Attitudes towards OMT with both methadone and buprenorphine were assessed using an opinions scale. Multivariable linear regression was used to assess correlates of treatment readiness, measured with the 19-item Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES). All 460 participants used opioids and nearly all (99.1%) met criteria for opioid dependence. Few had had previous experience with methadone (9.3%) or buprenorphine (12.6%) maintenance therapy, yet many had used methadone (55.2%) or buprenorphine (51.7%) outside of treatment settings. Fifteen percent had injected buprenorphine in the past month, and of the few that were currently receiving buprenorphine maintenance therapy, almost all were injecting it. The majority of subjects exhibited a moderate level of treatment readiness and a preference for methadone over buprenorphine. Those with low treatment readiness scores were more likely to have previous experience with compulsory drug detention centers (polder age (ppeople who inject drugs that may be improved by addressing factors that influence patient attitudes. Those individuals with moderate treatment readiness may be targeted by brief motivational and cognitive interventions in primary care, prisons or OMT clinics aimed at improving entry into and retention in treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Host-Directed Therapies for Tackling Multi-Drug Resistant Tuberculosis: Learning From the Pasteur-Bechamp Debates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Maeurer, Markus

    2015-11-01

    Tuberculosis remains a global emergency causing an estimated 1.5 million deaths annually. For several decades the major focus of tuberculosis treatment has been on antibiotic development targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The lengthy tuberculosis treatment duration and poor treatment outcomes associated with multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) are of major concern. The sparse new tuberculosis drug pipeline and widespread emergence of MDR-TB signal an urgent need for more innovative interventions to improve treatment outcomes. Building on the historical Pasteur-Bechamp debates on the role of the "microbe" vs the "host internal milieu" in disease causation, we make the case for parallel investments into host-directed therapies (HDTs). A range of potential HDTs are now available which require evaluation in randomized controlled clinical trials as adjunct therapies for shortening the duration of tuberculosis therapy and improving treatment outcomes for drug-susceptible tuberculosis and MDR-TB. Funder initiatives that may enable further research into HDTs are described. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Commercialization strategy of the herbal composition HemoHIM as a complementary drug for anti-cancer therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Sungkee; Jung, Uhee; Park, Haeran

    2013-01-01

    Ο Purpose - Establishment of strategy for the development of HemoHIM as a complementary drug for cancer therapies including non-clinical data preparation, obtainment of a research project grant, base of manufacturing process and raw material standardization Ο Research Results - Examination and confirmation of the essential requirements to develop the complementary drug for anticancer therapies by consulting with Korea FDA, and clinical CRO, and medical experts (animal efficacy study, toxicological safety test, standard analytical method, raw material standardization) - Obtainment of a governmental research project for 3 years from Ministry of Health and Welfare to develop HemoHIM as an complementary herbal drug for anti-cancer therapies - Acquisition of fundamental data on the manufacturing process and the raw material standardization for the optimal efficacy of HemoHIM Ο Expected benefit - Planning to get the approval of IND from Korea FDA by 2015 after completing the non-clinical study through the on-going project from Ministry of Health and Welfare - Planning to commercialize the product by 2017

  15. Commercialization strategy of the herbal composition HemoHIM as a complementary drug for anti-cancer therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Sungkee; Jung, Uhee; Park, Haeran

    2013-01-15

    Ο Purpose - Establishment of strategy for the development of HemoHIM as a complementary drug for cancer therapies including non-clinical data preparation, obtainment of a research project grant, base of manufacturing process and raw material standardization Ο Research Results - Examination and confirmation of the essential requirements to develop the complementary drug for anticancer therapies by consulting with Korea FDA, and clinical CRO, and medical experts (animal efficacy study, toxicological safety test, standard analytical method, raw material standardization) - Obtainment of a governmental research project for 3 years from Ministry of Health and Welfare to develop HemoHIM as an complementary herbal drug for anti-cancer therapies - Acquisition of fundamental data on the manufacturing process and the raw material standardization for the optimal efficacy of HemoHIM Ο Expected benefit - Planning to get the approval of IND from Korea FDA by 2015 after completing the non-clinical study through the on-going project from Ministry of Health and Welfare - Planning to commercialize the product by 2017.

  16. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Cellular Drug Transporters Are Associated with Intolerance to Antiretroviral Therapy in Brazilian HIV-1 Positive Individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Barcellos Arruda

    Full Text Available Adverse reactions are the main cause of treatment discontinuation among HIV+ individuals. Genes related to drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME influence drug bioavailability and treatment response. We have investigated the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 29 ADME genes and intolerance to therapy in a case-control study including 764 individuals. Results showed that 15 SNPs were associated with intolerance to nucleoside and 11 to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs and NNRTIs, and 8 to protease inhibitors (PIs containing regimens under alpha = 0.05. After Bonferroni adjustment, two associations remained statistically significant. SNP rs2712816, at SLCO2B1 was associated to intolerance to NRTIs (ORGA/AA = 2.37; p = 0.0001, while rs4148396, at ABCC2, conferred risk of intolerance to PIs containing regimens (ORCT/TT = 2.64; p = 0.00009. Accordingly, haplotypes carrying rs2712816A and rs4148396T alleles were also associated to risk of intolerance to NRTIs and PIs, respectively. Our data reinforce the role of drug transporters in response to HIV therapy and may contribute to a future development of personalized therapies.

  17. Small-molecule inhibition of HIV pre-mRNA splicing as a novel antiretroviral therapy to overcome drug resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Bakkour

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of multidrug-resistant viruses compromises antiretroviral therapy efficacy and limits therapeutic options. Therefore, it is an ongoing task to identify new targets for antiretroviral therapy and to develop new drugs. Here, we show that an indole derivative (IDC16 that interferes with exonic splicing enhancer activity of the SR protein splicing factor SF2/ASF suppresses the production of key viral proteins, thereby compromising subsequent synthesis of full-length HIV-1 pre-mRNA and assembly of infectious particles. IDC16 inhibits replication of macrophage- and T cell-tropic laboratory strains, clinical isolates, and strains with high-level resistance to inhibitors of viral protease and reverse transcriptase. Importantly, drug treatment of primary blood cells did not alter splicing profiles of endogenous genes involved in cell cycle transition and apoptosis. Thus, human splicing factors represent novel and promising drug targets for the development of antiretroviral therapies, particularly for the inhibition of multidrug-resistant viruses.

  18. 78 FR 277 - Food and Drug Administration Actions Related to Nicotine Replacement Therapies and Smoking...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-03

    ... Dependence; Public Hearing; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notification of public hearing; Extension of comment period. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 15 [Docket No...

  19. Economic evaluation of anti-epileptic drug therapies with specific focus on teratogenic outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jentink, J.; Boersma, C.; de Jong-van den Berg, L.T.; Postma, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anti-epileptic drugs are known to be teratogenic, yet many women do need to continue the anti-epileptic drug use during pregnancy. Objectives: To perform an economic evaluation of the anti-epileptic drug choice in young women who potentially wish to become pregnant. In particular, to

  20. Multidimensional Family Therapy (MDFT) for Young People in Treatment for Non-opioid Drug Abuse:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filges, Trine; Rasmussen, Pernille; Andersen, Ditte

    2015-01-01

    The main objectives of this review are to evaluate the current evidence on the effects of MDFT on drug abuse reduction for young people (aged 11-21 years) in treatment for non-opioid drug abuse, and if possible to examine moderators of drug abuse reduction effects, specifically analysing whether...

  1. Ischemia-related subcellular redistribution of sodium channels enhances the proarrhythmic effect of class I antiarrhythmic drugs: a simulation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunichika Tsumoto

    Full Text Available Cardiomyocytes located at the ischemic border zone of infarcted ventricle are accompanied by redistribution of gap junctions, which mediate electrical transmission between cardiomyocytes. This ischemic border zone provides an arrhythmogenic substrate. It was also shown that sodium (Na+ channels are redistributed within myocytes located in the ischemic border zone. However, the roles of the subcellular redistribution of Na+ channels in the arrhythmogenicity under ischemia remain unclear.Computer simulations of excitation conduction were performed in a myofiber model incorporating both subcellular Na+ channel redistribution and the electric field mechanism, taking into account the intercellular cleft potentials.We found in the myofiber model that the subcellular redistribution of the Na+ channels under myocardial ischemia, decreasing in Na+ channel expression of the lateral cell membrane of each myocyte, decreased the tissue excitability, resulting in conduction slowing even without any ischemia-related electrophysiological change. The conventional model (i.e., without the electric field mechanism did not reproduce the conduction slowing caused by the subcellular Na+ channel redistribution. Furthermore, Na+ channel blockade with the coexistence of a non-ischemic zone with an ischemic border zone expanded the vulnerable period for reentrant tachyarrhythmias compared to the model without the ischemic border zone. Na+ channel blockade tended to cause unidirectional conduction block at sites near the ischemic border zone. Thus, such a unidirectional conduction block induced by a premature stimulus at sites near the ischemic border zone is associated with the initiation of reentrant tachyarrhythmias.Proarrhythmia of Na+ channel blockade in patients with old myocardial infarction might be partly attributable to the ischemia-related subcellular Na+ channel redistribution.

  2. A programmed release multi-drug implant fabricated by three-dimensional printing technology for bone tuberculosis therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Weigang; Zheng Qixin; Guo Xiaodong; Sun Jianhua; Liu Yudong, E-mail: Zheng-qx@163.co [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China)

    2009-12-15

    In the world, bone tuberculosis is still very difficult to treat and presents a challenge to clinicians. In this study, we utilized 3D printing technology to fabricate a programmed release multi-drug implant for bone tuberculosis therapy. The construction of the drug implant was a multi-layered concentric cylinder divided into four layers from the center to the periphery. Isoniazid and rifampicin were distributed individually into the different layers in a specific sequence of isoniazid-rifampicin-isoniazid-rifampicin. The drug release assays in vitro and in vivo showed that isoniazid and rifampicin were released orderly from the outside to the center to form the multi-drug therapeutic alliance, and the peak concentrations of drugs were detected in sequence at 8 to 12 day intervals. In addition, no negative effect on the proliferation of rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells was detected during the cytocompatibility assay. Due to its ideal pharmacologic action and cytocompatibility, the programmed release multi-drug implant with a complex construction fabricated by 3D printing technology could be of interest in prevention and treatment of bone tuberculosis.

  3. Nanomedicine for therapeutic drug therapy: Approaches to increase the efficacy of drug therapy with nanoemulsion delivery and reduce the toxicity of quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambalapally, Swetha Reddy

    The advancement of nanotechnology has paved the way for novel nanoscale materials for use in a wide range of applications. The use of these nanomaterials in biomedicine facilitates the improvement of existing technologies for disease prevention and treatment through diagnostics, tumor detection, drug delivery, medical imaging and vaccine development. Nanotechnology delivery systems for therapeutic uses includes the formulation of nanoparticles in emulsions. These novel delivery systems can improve drug efficacy by their ability to enhance bioavailability, minimize drug side effects, decrease drug toxicity, provide targeted site delivery and increase circulation of the drug in the blood. Additionally, these delivery systems also improve the drug stability and encapsulation efficiency. In the Introduction, this thesis will describe a novel technique for the preparation of nanoemulsions which was utilized in drug delivery and diagnostic applications. This novel Phase Inversion Temperature (PIT) method is a solvent and polymer-free and low energy requiring emulsification method, typically utilizing oils stabilized by nonionic surfactants to prepare water in oil (W/O) emulsions. The correlation between the particle size, zeta potential and the emulsion stability is described. The use of this nanoemulsion delivery system for pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals by utilizing in vitro systems was investigated. Using the PIT method, a self assembling nanoemulsion (SANE) of gamma Tocotrienols (gammaT3), a component of Vitamin E family has been demonstrated to reduce cholesterol accumulation in HepG-2 cells. The nanoemulsion is stable and the particle size is around 20 nm with a polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.065. The effect of the nano gammaT3 on the metabolism of cholesterol, HMG-CoA activity and Apo-B levels were evaluated in an in vitro system utilizing HepG2 cells. A new class of nanoparticles, Quantum dots (QDs) has shown immense potential as novel nanomaterials used as

  4. Nano-systems for medical applications: biological detection, drug delivery, diagnosis and therapy; Applications medicales des nanoparticules: detection biologique, delivrance de medicaments, diagnostic, therapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riviere, Ch. [Nano-H SAS, 69 - Lyon (France); Roux, S.; Tillement, O. [Lyon-1 Univ. Claude Bernard, Lab. de Physico-Chimie des Materiaux Luminescents, UMR 5620 CNRS, 69 - Villeurbanne (France); Billotey, C. [Lyon-1 Univ. Claude Bernard, Lab. CREATIS-Animage, UMR 5515 CNRS, U630 INSERM, INSA de Lyon, 69 - Villeurbanne (France); Perriat, P. [Groupe d' Etudes de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, UMR 5510 CNRS-INSA de Lyon, 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    2006-05-15

    A review. For a couple of decades, greater and greater connections have been made between nano-technology, biology and medicine. After a rapid description of the particles most often used for biological and medical purposes, the review will detail their potential applications in both domains. In the field of biological detection, a large number of new detection systems is offered by noble metals and semi-conductors, which exhibit very specific nanometer-scale induced properties. In the field of diagnosis and therapeutic applications, particles become more and more sophisticated with an increased possibility of specific targeting, drug delivery triggering and combination of both diagnosis and therapy. (authors)

  5. The Role of Biologically Active Ingredients from Natural Drug Treatments for Arrhythmias in Different Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jie; Hu, Dan; Song, Xiaoli; Han, Tao; Gao, Yonghong; Xing, Yanwei

    2017-01-01

    Arrhythmia is a disease that is caused by abnormal electrical activity in the heart rate or rhythm. It is the major cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although several antiarrhythmic drugs have been used in clinic for decades, their application is often limited by their adverse effects. As a result, natural drugs, which have fewer side effects, are now being used to treat arrhythmias. We searched for all articles on the role of biologically active ingredients from natural drug t...

  6. Update on medical and regulatory issues pertaining to compounded and FDA-approved drugs, including hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkerton, JoAnn V; Pickar, James H

    2016-02-01

    We review the historical regulation of drug compounding, concerns about widespread use of non-Food and Drug Admiistration (FDA)-approved compounded bioidentical hormone therapies (CBHTs), which do not have proper labeling and warnings, and anticipated impact of the 2013 Drug Quality and Security Act (DQSA) on compounding. US government websites were searched for documents concerning drug compounding regulation and oversight from 1938 (passage of Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act [FDCA]) through 2014, including chronologies, Congressional testimony, FDA guidelines and enforcements, and reports. The FDCA and DQSA were reviewed. PubMed and Google were searched for articles on compounded drugs, including CBHT. Congress explicitly granted the FDA limited oversight of compounded drugs in a 1997 amendment to the FDCA, but the FDA has encountered obstacles in exercising that authority. After 64 patient deaths and 750 adversely affected patients from the 2012 meningitis outbreak due to contaminated compounded steroid injections, Congress passed the DQSA, authorizing the FDA to create a voluntary registration for facilities that manufacture and distribute sterile compounded drugs in bulk and reinforcing FDCA regulations for traditional compounding. Given history and current environment, concerns remain about CBHT product regulation and their lack of safety and efficacy data. The DQSA and its reinforcement of §503A of the FDCA solidifies FDA authority to enforce FDCA provisions against compounders of CBHT. The new law may improve compliance and accreditation by the compounding industry; support state and FDA oversight; and prevent the distribution of misbranded, adulterated, or inconsistently compounded medications, and false and misleading claims, thus reducing public health risk.

  7. Polypharmacology in HIV inhibition: can a drug with simultaneous action against two relevant targets be an alternative to combination therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Sonia; Camarasa, María-José

    2018-04-25

    HIV infection still has a serious health and socio-economical impact and is one of the primary causes of morbidity and mortality all over the world. HIV infection and the AIDS pandemic are still matters of great concern, especially in less developed countries where the access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is limited. Patient compliance is another serious drawback. Nowadays, HAART is the treatment of choice although it is not the panacea. Despite the fact that it suppresses viral replication at undetectable viral loads and prevents progression of HIV infection into AIDS HAART has several pitfalls, namely, long-term side-effects, drug resistance development, emergence of drug-resistant viruses, low compliance and the intolerance of some patients to these drugs. Moreover, another serious health concern is the event of co-infection with more than one pathogen at the same time (e.g. HIV and HCV, HBV, herpes viruses, etc). Currently, the multi-target drug approach has become an exciting strategy to address complex diseases and overcome drug resistance development. Such multifunctional molecules combine in their structure pharmacophores that may simultaneously interfere with multiple targets and their use may eventually be more safe and efficacious than that involving a mixture of separate molecules because of avoidance or delay of drug resistance, lower incidence of unwanted drug-drug interactions and improved compliance. In this review we focus on multifunctional molecules with dual activity against different targets of the HIV life cycle or able to block replication, not only of HIV but also of other viruses that are often co-pathogens of HIV. The different approaches are documented by selected examples. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  8. The importance of Pharmacovigilance for the drug safety: Focus on cardiovascular profile of incretin-based therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sportiello, Liberata; Rafaniello, Concetta; Scavone, Cristina; Vitale, Cristiana; Rossi, Francesco; Capuano, Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    With the recent introduction of the new European Pharmacovigilance legislation, all new drugs must be carefully monitored after admission on the European market, in order to assess the long safety profile. Currently, special attention is given to several hypoglycemic agents with recent market approval (agonists of glucagon-like peptide-1 [GLP-1] receptor and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors [DPP-4i]), which act through the potentiation of incretin hormone signaling. Their inclusion in European additional monitoring is also due to safety problems, which seem to characterize their pharmacological class. In fact, these drugs initially showed a good tolerability profile with mainly gastrointestinal adverse events, low risk of hypoglycemia and minor effects on body weight. But, new concerns such as infections, pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer and above all cardiovascular events (especially risk of heart failure requiring hospitalization) are now arising. In this review, we highlighted aspects of the new Pharmacovigilance European dispositions, and then we investigated the tolerability profile of incretin-based therapies, in particular DPP-4 inhibitors. Notably, we focused our attention on new safety concerns, which are emerging mostly in the post-marketing period, as the cardiovascular risk profile. Evidence in literature and opinions of regulatory agencies (e.g., European Medicines Agency and Food and Drug Administration) about risks of incretin-based therapies are yet controversial, and there are many open questions in particular on cancer and cardiovascular effects. Thus, it is important to continue to monitor closely the use of these drugs in clinical practice to improve the knowledge on their long-term safety and their place in diabetes therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Epidemiology, antibiotic therapy and outcomes of bacteremia caused by drug-resistant ESKAPE pathogens in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodro, Marta; Gudiol, Carlota; Garcia-Vidal, Carolina; Tubau, Fe; Contra, Anna; Boix, Lucía; Domingo-Domenech, Eva; Calvo, Mariona; Carratalà, Jordi

    2014-03-01

    Infection due to the six ESKAPE pathogens has recently been identified as a serious emerging problem. However, there is still a lack of information on bacteremia caused by these organisms in cancer patients. We aimed to assess the epidemiology, antibiotic therapy and outcomes of bacteremia due to drug-resistant ESKAPE pathogens (rESKAPE) in patients with cancer. All episodes of bacteremia prospectively documented in hospitalized adults with cancer from 2006 to 2011 were analyzed. Of 1,148 episodes of bacteremia, 392 (34 %) were caused by ESKAPE pathogens. Fifty-four episodes (4.7 %) were due to rESKAPE strains (vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium 0, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) 13, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESLB)-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae 7, carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii 4, carbapenem- and quinolone-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa 18 and derepression chromosomic ß-lactam and ESBL-producing Enterobacter species 12. Risk factors independently associated with rESKAPE bacteremia were comorbidities, prior antibiotic therapy, urinary catheter and urinary tract source. Inappropriate empirical antibiotic therapy was more frequent in patients with rESKAPE bacteremia than in the other cases (55.6 % vs. 21.5 %, p antibiotic therapy and have a urinary tract source. These patients often receive inappropriate empirical antibiotic therapy and have a poor outcome.

  10. [A short history of anti-rheumatic therapy. III. Non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasero, G; Marson, P

    2010-01-01

    The chemical advances of the 20th century led to the synthesis of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), beginning from phenylbutazone and indomethacin and continuing with other new drugs, including ibuprofen, diclofenac, naproxen, piroxicam and, more recently, the highly selective COX-2 inhibitors (coxibs). This progress derived from the discovery of the mechanism of action of these drugs: the inhibition of synthesis of prostaglandins due to the cycloxigenase enzyme system, according to the experimental contributions of John R. Vane.

  11. Features and outcomes of drugs for combination therapy as multi-targets strategy to combat Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Atish Kumar; Dandapat, Jagnehswar; Dash, Umesh Chandra; Kanhar, Satish

    2018-04-06

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), a deleterious neurodegenerative disorder that impairs memory, cognitive functions and may lead to dementia in late stage of life. The pathogenic cause of AD remains incompletely understood and FDA approved drugs are partial inhibitors rather than curative. Most of drugs are synthetic or natural products as galanthamine is an alkaloid obtained from Galanthus spp. Huperzine A, an alkaloid found in Huperzia spp., gingkolides a diterpenoids from Gingko biloba and many ethnobotanicals like Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal., Physostigma venenosum Balf., Bacopa monnieri (L.) Wettst., Centella asiatica (L.) Urb. have been used by traditional Indian, Chinese, and European system of medicines in AD. Clinical significance opioid alkaloid in Papaver somniferum has shown another dimension to this study. Over exploitation of medicinal plants with limited bioactive principles has provided templates to design synthetic drugs in AD e.g. rivastigmine, phenserine, eptastigmine based on chemical structure of physostigmine of Physostigma venenosum Balf. Even ZT-1 a prodrug of Hup A and memogain a prodrug of galantamine has achieved new direction in drug development in AD. All these first-line cholinesterase-inhibitors are used as symptomatic treatments in AD. Single modality of "One-molecule-one-target" strategy for treating AD has failed and so future therapies on "Combination-drugs-multi-targets" strategy (CDMT) will need to address multiple aspects to block the progression of pathogenesis of AD. Besides, cholinergic and amyloid drugs, in this article we summarize proteinopathy-based drugs as AD therapeutics from a variety of biological sources. In this review, an attempt has been made to elucidate the molecular mode of action of various plant products, and synthetic drugs investigated in various preclinical and clinical tests in AD. It also discusses current attempts to formulate a comprehensive CDMT strategy to counter complex pathogenesis in AD. Information

  12. The Pathway From Genes to Gene Therapy in Glaucoma: A Review of Possibilities for Using Genes as Glaucoma Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrás, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of diseases with gene therapy is advancing rapidly. The use of gene therapy has expanded from the original concept of re-placing the mutated gene causing the disease to the use of genes to con-trol nonphysiological levels of expression or to modify pathways known to affect the disease. Genes offer numerous advantages over conventional drugs. They have longer duration of action and are more specific. Genes can be delivered to the target site by naked DNA, cells, nonviral, and viral vectors. The enormous progress of the past decade in molecular bi-ology and delivery systems has provided ways for targeting genes to the intended cell/tissue and safe, long-term vectors. The eye is an ideal organ for gene therapy. It is easily accessible and it is an immune-privileged site. Currently, there are clinical trials for diseases affecting practically every tissue of the eye, including those to restore vision in patients with Leber congenital amaurosis. However, the number of eye trials compared with those for systemic diseases is quite low (1.8%). Nevertheless, judg-ing by the vast amount of ongoing preclinical studies, it is expected that such number will increase considerably in the near future. One area of great need for eye gene therapy is glaucoma, where a long-term gene drug would eliminate daily applications and compliance issues. Here, we review the current state of gene therapy for glaucoma and the possibilities for treating the trabecular meshwork to lower intraocular pressure and the retinal ganglion cells to protect them from neurodegeneration. Copyright© 2017 Asia-Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology.

  13. Rationale for selecting antihistamine drugs for the therapy of chronic urticaria in terms of efficacy and safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Skorokhodkina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Goal of the study. To compare the efficacy of antihistamine drugs for the therapy of chronic urticaria taking into consideration their effect on the patients’ cognitive functions. Materials and methods. The study involved 178 patients with chronic urticaria who were divided into six groups taking second generation antihistamine drugs: Cetirizine (n = 38, Levocetirizine (n = 27, Fexofenadine (n=26, Ebastine (n = 33, Loratadine (n = 26 and Desloratadine (n = 28. The patients recorded dynamic changes in clinical symptoms of the disease (number of urticarial components, skin itching intensity, availability or absence of urticarial derniographism, angioedema signs and signs of the shortness of breath and reduced blood pressure in their individual diaries. Baseline signs of the patients’ cognitive condition and those recorded during the treatment were studied using the Kraepelin’s arithmetic test (modified by Schulte, I.M. Lushchikhina’s verbal and visual thinking assessment method and method for memorizing ten words. The control group comprised 31 subjects without chronic urticaria. Results of the study. Ebastine and Fexofenadine are the most efficient antihistamine drugs for the treatment of chronic urticaria. At the same time, they do not have any negative effect on the patients’ cognitive functions so they can be recommended for long-term treatment of chronic urticaria. In spite of its evident positive therapeutic effect, Cetirizine reduces mental alertness and deteriorates thinking in patients with chronic urticaria. Because of this, the drug must be prescribed with care for long-term administration to those patients whose professional activities demand increased attention concentration. Loratadine has a positive effect on the patients’ attention and thinking. However, taking into consideration its low efficacy, the drug can be prescribed as the basis therapy for the treatment of light forms of chronic urticaria.

  14. Porphyrin-cyclodextrin conjugates as a nanosystem for versatile drug delivery and multimodal cancer therapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Králová, Jarmila; Kejík, Z.; Bříza, T.; Poučková, P.; Kral, A.; Martásek, P.; Král, V.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 1 (2010), s. 128-138 ISSN 0022-2623 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : photodynamic therapy * cancer therapy * porphyrin conjugate Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.207, year: 2010

  15. Recognition of Immune Reconstitution Syndrome Necessary for Better Management of Patients with Severe Drug Eruptions and Those under Immunosuppressive Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuo Shiohara

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The immune reconstitution syndrome (IRS is an increasingly recognized disease concept and is observed with a broad-spectrum of immunosuppressive therapy-related opportunistic infectious diseases and severe drug eruptions complicated by viral reactivations. Clinical illness consistent with IRS includes tuberculosis, herpes zoster, herpes simples, cytomegalovirus infections and sarcoidosis: thus, the manifestations of this syndrome and diverse and depend on the tissue burden of the preexisting infectious agents during the immunosuppressive state, the nature of the immune system being restored, and underlying diseases of the hosts. Although IRS has originally been reported to occur in the setting of HIV infection, it has become clear that the development of IRS can also be in HIV-negative hosts receiving immunosuppressive agents, such as prednisolone and tumor necrosis factor α inhibitors, upon their reduction and withdrawal. Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome, a life-threatening multiorgan system reaction, is another manifestation of the newly observed IRS. Clinical recognition of the IRS is especially important in improving the outcome for diseases with an otherwise life-threatening progenosis. Clinicians should be aware of the implications of IRS and recognize that relieving the symptoms and signs of immune recovery by anti-inflammatory therapies needs to be balanced with anti-microbial therapies aiming at reducing the amplitude and duration of tissue burden of preexisting microbes.

  16. Effectiveness of music therapy in state-trait anxiety rate of addicts in drug-free rehabilitation stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Soleimani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was an attempt to investigate the effect of music therapy on addicts’ state-trait anxiety rate in the stage of drug-free rehabilitation. Method: A quasi-experimental research design, along with pretest-posttest and control group was employed for the conduct of this study. The statistical population of the study included the addicts in the rehabilitation stage who had referred to the clean collaborators rehabilitation camp in Ardebil province in November 2014. From this population, the number of 32 addicts in 16-50-year-old age range was selected as the participants of the study by convenience sampling method. State-Trait Anxiety Inventory was used for data collection. Results: The results of multivariate covariant analysis showed that there is a significant difference between control and experimental groups in state and trait anxiety. In other words, the state and trait anxiety of addicts in the experimental group had been reduced after music therapy. Conclusion: Considering the obtained results, it can be concluded that music therapy alone or along other psychological interventions can be an effective method for reducing addicts’ anxiety in drug-free rehabilitation stage.

  17. Meta-analysis of clinical studies supports the pharmacokinetic variability hypothesis for acquired drug resistance and failure of antituberculosis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasipanodya, Jotam G; Srivastava, Shashikant; Gumbo, Tawanda

    2012-07-01

    Using hollow-fiber tuberculosis studies, we recently demonstrated that nonadherence is not a significant factor for ADR and that therapy failure only occurs after a large proportion of doses are missed. Computer-aided clinical trial simulations have suggested that isoniazid and rifampin pharmacokinetic variability best explained poor outcomes. We were interested in determining whether isoniazid pharmacokinetic variability was associated with either microbiological failure or ADR in the clinic. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines were followed. Prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trials that reported isoniazid acetylation status and microbiological outcomes were selected. The main effects examined were microbiological sputum conversion, ADR, and relapse. Effect size was expressed as pooled risk ratios (RRs) comparing rapid with slow acetylators. Thirteen randomized studies with 1631 rapid acetylators and 1751 slow acetylators met inclusion and exclusion criteria. Rapid acetylators were more likely than slow acetylators to have microbiological failure (RR, 2.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5-2.7), ADR (RR, 2.0; CI, 1.1-3.4), and relapse (RR, 1.3; CI, .9-2.0). Higher failure rates were encountered even in drug regimens comprising >3 antibiotics. No publication bias or small-study effects were observed for the outcomes evaluated. Pharmacokinetic variability to a single drug in the regimen is significantly associated with failure of therapy and ADR in patients. This suggests that individualized dosing for tuberculosis may be more effective than standardized dosing, which is prescribed in directly observed therapy programs.

  18. Biologic therapy response and drug survival for females compared to males with rheumatoid arthritis: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeffrey; Mason, Randal; Martin, Liam; Barnabe, Cheryl

    2014-10-01

    Prior research has identified differences between sexes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease characteristics and treatment response, but not how these differences affect therapeutic decision making to switch therapy. Our objective was to assess for sex differences in RA disease activity during the course of biologic therapy and how these differences impact drug survival and therapeutic switching. Data from the Alberta Biologics Pharmacosurveillance Program, a population-based observational cohort of patients receiving biologic therapy for RA, were used for a sex-stratified analysis of disease activity. Linear mixed-model analysis was applied to compare continuous effectiveness outcomes (DAS28, HAQ scores, visual analogue scales of patient-reported outcomes). Chi-squared tests and log-rank tests were used to determine differences in the frequency of switching and drug survival between females and males. At biologic initiation, females (n = 419) and males (n = 148) had similar disease activity (DAS28 in females 5.83, males 5.72), but females reported worse function (HAQ 1.64 vs 1.51, p = 0.037) and more fatigue (6.7 vs 5.9/10, p = 0.013), but the same global score as males (6.9 vs 6.8/10). During biologic therapy, females reported more fatigue (β = -0.454, 95 % CI -0.852, -0.056, p = 0.0252), worse function (β = -0.183, 95 % CI -0.291, -0.074, p = 0.0010) and higher DAS28 scores (β = -0.401, 95 % CI -0.617, -0.184, p = 0.0003). A new composite disease activity index, the HUPI, eliminated the observed differences in disease activity scores between females and males. Median survival for biologic-naïve patients was similar between sexes (3.7 years males, 3.3 years females, log-rank test p = 0.25). The frequency of switching and survival on subsequent biologics were the same between females and males. Guided by traditional outcome measurement tools, worse disease activity and patient-reported outcomes through the course of therapy did not translate into differences

  19. Interactions between the adducin 2 gene and antihypertensive drug therapies in determining blood pressure in people with hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barkley Ruth

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As part of the NHLBI Family Blood Pressure Program, the Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy (GENOA recruited 575 sibships (n = 1583 individuals from Rochester, MN who had at least two hypertensive siblings diagnosed before age 60. Linkage analysis identified a region on chromosome 2 that was investigated using 70 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs typed in 7 positional candidate genes, including adducin 2 (ADD2. Method To investigate whether blood pressure (BP levels in these hypertensives (n = 1133 were influenced by gene-by-drug interactions, we used cross-validation statistical methods (i.e., estimating a model for predicting BP levels in one subgroup and testing it in a different subgroup. These methods greatly reduced the chance of false positive findings. Results Eight SNPs in ADD2 were significantly associated with systolic BP in untreated hypertensives (p-value Conclusion Our findings suggest that hypertension candidate gene variation may influence BP responses to specific antihypertensive drug therapies and measurement of genetic variation may assist in identifying subgroups of hypertensive patients who will benefit most from particular antihypertensive drug therapies.

  20. Alzheimer's Disease Risk and Progression: The Role of Nutritional Supplements and their Effect on Drug Therapy Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulietti, A; Vignini, A; Nanetti, L; Mazzanti, L; Di Primio, R; Salvolini, E

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease in the elderly population. Despite significant advancements in understanding the genetic and molecular basis of AD, the pathology still lacks treatments that can slow down or reverse the progression of cognitive deterioration. Recently, the relationship between nutrient deficiency and dementia onset has been highlighted. AD is in fact a multifactorial pathology, so that a multi-target approach using combinations of micronutrients and drugs could have beneficial effects on cognitive function in neurodegenerative brain disorders leading to synaptic degeneration. Primarily, this review examines the most recent literature regarding the effects of nutrition on the risk/progression of the disease, focusing attention mostly on antioxidants agents, polyunsaturated fatty acids and metals. Secondly, it aims to figure out if nutritional supplements might have beneficial effects on drug therapy outcome. Even if nutritional supplements showed contrasting evidence of a likely effect of decreasing the risk of AD onset that could be studied more deeply in other clinical trials, no convincing data are present about their usefulness in combination with drug therapies and their effectiveness in slowing down the disease progression.

  1. New therapies versus first-generation biologic drugs in psoriasis: a review of adverse events and their management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrascosa, J M; Del-Alcazar, E

    2018-04-01

    Biologic drugs have revolutionized the treatment of moderate to severe psoriasis in recent years because of their high efficacy and low risk of toxicity. However, even within the group of biologic therapies, there are differences related to the different mechanisms of action. Areas covered: We review the main adverse events associated with the biologic agents currently available for the treatment of psoriasis and the new inhibitors targeting the p19 subunit of interleukin (IL) 23 and the IL-17A receptor. This review covers injection site reactions, infections, cardiovascular events, demyelinating disorders, tumours, class effects secondary adverse events, immunogenicity, safety in pregnancy and vaccines efficacy. Expert commentary: More than a decade after the first approval of biologic drugs for use in psoriasis, the good safety profile of these drugs is one of the main justifications and incentives for their long-term use. The emergence of new pharmacological groups has made it possible to avoid some of the class effects of first-generation biologic agents and the new therapies appear to pose less risk of reactivation of latent infections, such as hepatitis B virus and tuberculosis. However, they are associated with new adverse effects related to their mechanism of action, including candidiasis and the risk of exacerbation or onset of inflammatory bowel disease.

  2. Principal Physicochemical Methods Used to Characterize Dendrimer Molecule Complexes Used as Genetic Therapy Agents, Nanovaccines or Drug Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberto, Rodríguez Fonseca Rolando; Joao, Rodrigues; de Los Angeles, Muñoz-Fernández María; Alberto, Martínez Muñoz; Manuel Jonathan, Fragoso Vázquez; José, Correa Basurto

    2017-08-30

    Nanomedicine is the application of nanotechnology to medicine. This field is related to the study of nanodevices and nanomaterials applied to various medical uses, such as in improving the pharmacological properties of different molecules. Dendrimers are synthetic nanoparticles whose physicochemical properties vary according to their chemical structure. These molecules have been extensively investigated as drug nanocarriers to improve drug solubility and as sustained-release systems. New therapies such as gene therapy and the development of nanovaccines can be improved by the use of dendrimers. The biophysical and physicochemical characterization of nucleic acid/peptide-dendrimer complexes is crucial to identify their functional properties prior to biological evaluation. In that sense, it is necessary to first identify whether the peptide-dendrimer or nucleic aciddendrimer complexes can be formed and whether the complex can dissociate under the appropriate conditions at the target cells. In addition, biophysical and physicochemical characterization is required to determine how long the complexes remain stable, what proportion of peptide or nucleic acid is required to form the complex or saturate the dendrimer, and the size of the complex formed. In this review, we present the latest information on characterization systems for dendrimer-nucleic acid, dendrimer-peptide and dendrimer-drug complexes with several biotechnological and pharmacological applications. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Soluplus Graft Copolymer: Potential Novel Carrier Polymer in Electrospinning of Nanofibrous Drug Delivery Systems for Wound