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Sample records for antiangiogenic therapy implications

  1. Antiangiogenic and Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Ying; Fleischmann, Dominik; Foygel, Kira; Molvin, Lior; Lutz, Amelie M.; Koong, Albert C.; Jeffrey, R. Brooke; Tian, Lu; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess early treatment effects on computed tomography (CT) perfusion parameters after antiangiogenic and radiation therapy in subcutaneously implanted, human colon cancer xenografts in mice and to correlate in vivo CT perfusion parameters with ex vivo assays of tumor vascularity and hypoxia. Materials and Methods Dynamic contrast-enhanced CT (perfusion CT, 129 mAs, 80 kV, 12 slices × 2.4 mm; 150 μL iodinated contrast agent injected at a rate of 1 mL/min intravenously) was performed in 100 subcutaneous human colon cancer xenografts on baseline day 0. Mice in group 1 (n = 32) received a single dose of the antiangiogenic agent bevacizumab (10 mg/kg body weight), mice in group 2 (n = 32) underwent a single radiation treatment (12 Gy), and mice in group 3 (n = 32) remained untreated. On days 1, 3, 5, and 7 after treatment, 8 mice from each group underwent a second CT perfusion scan, respectively, after which tumors were excised for ex vivo analysis. Four mice were killed after baseline scanning on day 0 for ex vivo analysis. Blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), and flow extraction product were calculated using the left ventricle as an arterial input function. Correlation of in vivo CT perfusion parameters with ex vivo microvessel density and extent of tumor hypoxia were assessed by immunofluorescence. Reproducibility of CT perfusion parameter measurements was calculated in an additional 8 tumor-bearing mice scanned twice within 5 hours with the same CT perfusion imaging protocol. Results The intraclass correlation coefficients for BF, BV, and flow extraction product from repeated CT perfusion scans were 0.93 (95% confidence interval: 0.78, 0.97), 0.88 (0.66, 0.95), and 0.88 (0.56, 0.95), respectively. Changes in perfusion parameters and tumor volumes over time were different between treatments. After bevacizumab treatment, all 3 perfusion parameters significantly decreased from day 1 (P ≤ 0.006) and remained significantly decreased until day 7 (P ≤ 0

  2. Antiangiogenic therapies in ovarian cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Reinthaller, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Summary Angiogenesis plays a pivotal role in normal ovarian physiology as well as in the formation and progression of ovarian cancer. Several well-designed phase II and III trials studied the efficacy of antiangiogenic agents in advanced ovarian cancer. The results of these trials demonstrated significantly prolonged progression-free survival when antiangiogenic agents were used as a maintenance therapy. To date, no effect on overall survival could be ascertained. The most widely studied anti...

  3. Antiangiogenic therapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, D.L.; Andersson, M.; Andersen, Jon Alexander Lykkegaard

    2010-01-01

    and optimal use of these agents for the treatment of breast cancer. Currently, the most promising approach has been the use of bevacizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against the most potent pro-angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Small molecular inhibitors of VEGF...... tyrosine kinase activity, such as sorafenib, appear promising. While, the role of sunitinib and inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in breast cancer has to be defined. Several unanswered questions remain, such as choice of drug(s), optimal duration of therapy and patient selection criteria......ABSTRACT: Angiogenesis is an important component of cancer growth, invasion and metastasis. Therefore, inhibition of angiogenesis is an attractive strategy for treatment of cancer. We describe existing clinical trials of antiangiogenic agents and the challenges facing the clinical development...

  4. Antiangiogenic therapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, D.L.; Andersson, M.; Andersen, Jon Alexander Lykkegaard;

    2010-01-01

    tyrosine kinase activity, such as sorafenib, appear promising. While, the role of sunitinib and inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in breast cancer has to be defined. Several unanswered questions remain, such as choice of drug(s), optimal duration of therapy and patient selection criteria...

  5. Optimal combination of antiangiogenic therapy forhepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    The success of sorafenib in prolonging survival of patientswith hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) makes therapeuticinhibition of angiogenesis a component of treatmentfor HCC. To enhance therapeutic efficacy, overcome drug resistance and reduce toxicity, combination ofantiangiogenic agents with chemotherapy,radiotherapyor other targeted agents were evaluated. Nevertheless,the use of antiangiogenic therapy remains suboptimalregarding dosage, schedule and duration of therapy.The issue is further complicated by combinationantiangiogenesis to other cytotoxic or biologic agents.There is no way to determine which patients are mostlikely respond to a given form of antiangiogenic therapy.Activation of alternative pathways associated with diseaseprogression in patients undergoing antiangiogenictherapy has also been recognized. There is increasingimportance in identifying, validating and standardizingpotential response biomarkers for antiangiogenesistherapy for HCC patients. In this review, biomarkers forantiangiogenesis therapy including systemic, circulating,tissue and imaging ones are summarized. The strengthand deficit of circulating and imaging biomarkerswere further demonstrated by a series of studies inHCC patients receiving radiotherapy with or withoutthalidomide.

  6. Antiangiogenic Steroids in Human Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Pietras

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in the early detection of tumors and in the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery for disease management, the worldwide mortality from human cancer remains unacceptably high. The treatment of cancer may benefit from the introduction of novel therapies derived from natural products. Natural products have served to provide a basis for many of the pharmaceutical agents in current use in cancer therapy. Emerging research indicates that progressive growth and spread of many solid tumors depends, in part, on the formation of an adequate blood supply, and this process of tumor-associated angiogenesis is reported to have prognostic significance in several human cancers. This review focuses on the potential application in antitumor therapy of naturally-occurring steroids that target tumor-associated angiogenesis. Squalamine, a 7,24 dihydroxylated 24-sulfated cholestane steroid conjugated to a spermidine at position C-3, is known to have strong antiangiogenic activity in vitro, and it significantly disrupts tumor proliferation and progression in laboratory studies. Work on the interactions of squalamine with vascular endothelial cells indicate that it binds with cell membranes, inhibits the membrane Na+/H+ exchanger and may further function as a calmodulin chaperone. These primary actions appear to promote inhibition of several vital steps in angiogenesis, such as blockade of mitogen-induced actin polymerization, cell–cell adhesion and cell migration, leading to suppression of endothelial cell proliferation. Preclinical studies with squalamine have shown additive benefits in tumor growth delay when squalamine is combined with cisplatin, paclitaxel, cyclophosphamide, genistein or radiation therapy. This compound has also been assessed in early phase clinical trials in cancer; squalamine was found to exhibit little systemic toxicity and was generally well tolerated by treated patients with various solid tumor malignancies

  7. Antiangiogenic Steroids in Human Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietras, Richard J; Weinberg, Olga K

    2005-03-01

    Despite advances in the early detection of tumors and in the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery for disease management, the worldwide mortality from human cancer remains unacceptably high. The treatment of cancer may benefit from the introduction of novel therapies derived from natural products. Natural products have served to provide a basis for many of the pharmaceutical agents in current use in cancer therapy. Emerging research indicates that progressive growth and spread of many solid tumors depends, in part, on the formation of an adequate blood supply, and this process of tumor-associated angiogenesis is reported to have prognostic significance in several human cancers. This review focuses on the potential application in antitumor therapy of naturally-occurring steroids that target tumor-associated angiogenesis. Squalamine, a 7,24 dihydroxylated 24-sulfated cholestane steroid conjugated to a spermidine at position C-3, is known to have strong antiangiogenic activity in vitro, and it significantly disrupts tumor proliferation and progression in laboratory studies. Work on the interactions of squalamine with vascular endothelial cells indicate that it binds with cell membranes, inhibits the membrane Na(+)/H(+) exchanger and may further function as a calmodulin chaperone. These primary actions appear to promote inhibition of several vital steps in angiogenesis, such as blockade of mitogen-induced actin polymerization, cell-cell adhesion and cell migration, leading to suppression of endothelial cell proliferation. Preclinical studies with squalamine have shown additive benefits in tumor growth delay when squalamine is combined with cisplatin, paclitaxel, cyclophosphamide, genistein or radiation therapy. This compound has also been assessed in early phase clinical trials in cancer; squalamine was found to exhibit little systemic toxicity and was generally well tolerated by treated patients with various solid tumor malignancies, including ovarian, non

  8. Escaping Antiangiogenic Therapy: Strategies Employed by Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio P. Pinto

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Tumor angiogenesis is widely recognized as one of the “hallmarks of cancer”. Consequently, during the last decades the development and testing of commercial angiogenic inhibitors has been a central focus for both basic and clinical cancer research. While antiangiogenic drugs are now incorporated into standard clinical practice, as with all cancer therapies, tumors can eventually become resistant by employing a variety of strategies to receive nutrients and oxygen in the event of therapeutic assault. Herein, we concentrate and review in detail three of the principal mechanisms of antiangiogenic therapy escape: (1 upregulation of compensatory/alternative pathways for angiogenesis; (2 vasculogenic mimicry; and (3 vessel co-option. We suggest that an understanding of how a cancer cell adapts to antiangiogenic therapy may also parallel the mechanisms employed in the bourgeoning tumor and isolated metastatic cells delivering responsible for residual disease. Finally, we speculate on strategies to adapt antiangiogenic therapy for future clinical uses.

  9. Biomarkers of evasive resistance predict disease progression in cancer patients treated with antiangiogenic therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pircher, Andreas; Jöhrer, Karin; Kocher, Florian; Steiner, Normann; Graziadei, Ivo; Heidegger, Isabel; Pichler, Renate; Leonhartsberger, Nicolai; Kremser, Christian; Kern, Johann; Untergasser, Gerold; Gunsilius, Eberhard; Hilbe, Wolfgang

    2016-04-12

    Numerous antiangiogenic agents are approved for the treatment of oncological diseases. However, almost all patients develop evasive resistance mechanisms against antiangiogenic therapies. Currently no predictive biomarker for therapy resistance or response has been established. Therefore, the aim of our study was to identify biomarkers predicting the development of therapy resistance in patients with hepatocellular cancer (n = 11), renal cell cancer (n = 7) and non-small cell lung cancer (n = 2). Thereby we measured levels of angiogenic growth factors, tumor perfusion, circulating endothelial cells (CEC), circulating endothelial progenitor cells (CEP) and tumor endothelial markers (TEM) in patients during the course of therapy with antiangiogenic agents, and correlated them with the time to antiangiogenic progression (aTTP). Importantly, at disease progression, we observed an increase of proangiogenic factors, upregulation of CEC/CEP levels and downregulation of TEMs, such as Robo4 and endothelial cell-specific chemotaxis regulator (ECSCR), reflecting the formation of torturous tumor vessels. Increased TEM expression levels tended to correlate with prolonged aTTP (ECSCR high = 275 days vs. ECSCR low = 92.5 days; p = 0.07 and for Robo4 high = 387 days vs. Robo4 low = 90.0 days; p = 0.08). This indicates that loss of vascular stabilization factors aggravates the development of antiangiogenic resistance. Thus, our observations confirm that CEP/CEC populations, proangiogenic cytokines and TEMs contribute to evasive resistance in antiangiogenic treated patients. Higher TEM expression during disease progression may have clinical and pathophysiological implications, however, validation of our results is warranted for further biomarker development.

  10. Antiangiogenic Steroids in Human Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Despite advances in the early detection of tumors and in the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery for disease management, the worldwide mortality from human cancer remains unacceptably high. The treatment of cancer may benefit from the introduction of novel therapies derived from natural products. Natural products have served to provide a basis for many of the pharmaceutical agents in current use in cancer therapy. Emerging research indicates that progressive growth and spread of ...

  11. Gastrointestinal Toxicities With Combined Antiangiogenic and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollom, Erqi L.; Deng, Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Pai, Reetesh K. [Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Brown, J. Martin; Giaccia, Amato; Loo, Billy W.; Shultz, David B.; Le, Quynh Thu; Koong, Albert C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Chang, Daniel T., E-mail: dtchang@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Combining the latest targeted biologic agents with the most advanced radiation technologies has been an exciting development in the treatment of cancer patients. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is an ablative radiation approach that has become established for the treatment of a variety of malignancies, and it has been increasingly used in combination with biologic agents, including those targeting angiogenesis-specific pathways. Multiple reports have emerged describing unanticipated toxicities arising from the combination of SBRT and angiogenesis-targeting agents, particularly of late luminal gastrointestinal toxicities. In this review, we summarize the literature describing these toxicities, explore the biological mechanism of action of toxicity with the combined use of antiangiogenic therapies, and discuss areas of future research, so that this combination of treatment modalities can continue to be used in broader clinical contexts.

  12. Targeting CD9 produces stimulus-independent antiangiogenic effects predominantly in activated endothelial cells during angiogenesis: A novel antiangiogenic therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamisasanuki, Taro [Department of Gene Therapy and Regenerative Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Department of Ophthalmology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Tokushige, Saori [Department of Gene Therapy and Regenerative Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Terasaki, Hiroto [Department of Gene Therapy and Regenerative Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Department of Ophthalmology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Khai, Ngin Cin; Wang, Yuqing [Department of Gene Therapy and Regenerative Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Sakamoto, Taiji [Department of Ophthalmology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Kosai, Ken-ichiro, E-mail: kosai@m2.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Gene Therapy and Regenerative Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} CD9 plays stimulus-independent roles in angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. {yields} Targeting CD9 expression is effective in an angiogenic disease model. {yields} Targeting CD9 expression predominantly affects activated endothelial cells. {yields} CD9 is involved in endothelial cell proliferation, but not survival. {yields} CD9 is part of angiogenic machinery in endothelial cells during angiogenesis. -- Abstract: The precise roles of tetraspanin CD9 are unclear. Here we show that CD9 plays a stimulus-independent role in angiogenesis and that inhibiting CD9 expression or function is a potential antiangiogenic therapy. Knocking down CD9 expression significantly inhibited in vitro endothelial cell migration and invasion induced by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) or hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Injecting CD9-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA-CD9) markedly inhibited HGF- or VEGF-induced subconjunctival angiogenesis in vivo. Both results revealed potent and stimulus-independent antiangiogenic effects of targeting CD9. Furthermore, intravitreous injections of siRNA-CD9 or anti-CD9 antibodies were therapeutically effective for laser-induced retinal and choroidal neovascularization in mice, a representative ocular angiogenic disease model. In terms of the mechanism, growth factor receptor and downstream signaling activation were not affected, whereas abnormal localization of integrins and membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase was observed during angiogenesis, by knocking down CD9 expression. Notably, knocking down CD9 expression did not induce death and mildly inhibited proliferation of quiescent endothelial cells under conditions without an angiogenic stimulus. Thus, CD9 does not directly affect growth factor-induced signal transduction, which is required in angiogenesis and normal vasculature, but is part of the angiogenesis machinery in endothelial cells during angiogenesis. In conclusion, targeting CD9 produced stimulus

  13. Antiangiogenic Metargidin Peptide (AMEP) Gene Therapy in Disseminated Melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanggaard, Iben; Gehl, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Gene delivery by electroporation is an efficient method for transfecting genes into various tissues including tumors. Here we present the treatment protocol used in a phase 1 study on gene electrotransfer of plasmid DNA encoding an antiangiogenic peptide into cutaneous melanoma.......Gene delivery by electroporation is an efficient method for transfecting genes into various tissues including tumors. Here we present the treatment protocol used in a phase 1 study on gene electrotransfer of plasmid DNA encoding an antiangiogenic peptide into cutaneous melanoma....

  14. Sympathetic Nerves in Breast Cancer: Angiogenesis and Antiangiogenic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    metabolism : a contemporary view with implications for physiology and medicine. Pharmacol Rev. 2004;56:331-49. 7. Madden KS, Felten SY, Felten DL...11. Ugur F, Gulcu N, Boyaci A. Intrathecal infusion therapy with dexmedetomidine-supplemented morphine in cancer pain. Acta Anaesthesiol Scand...Goldstein DS. Catecholamine metabolism : a contemporary view with implications for physiology and medicine. Pharmacol Rev. 2004;56:331-49. 26

  15. [Experimental and morphological study of the effect of antiangiogenic therapy on corneal neovessels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamikonian, V R; Voevodina, T M; Fedorov, A A; Budzinskaia, M V; Balaian, M L

    2013-01-01

    The article presents the results of an experimental and morphological study of combined antiangiogenic effect of photodynamic therapy with Photosens photosensitizer and Avastin (bevacizumab) on neovascularization process in corneal stroma. The combined approach has demonstrated an advantage over separate application of these methods, what, however, has to be proved clinically.

  16. Apelin as a marker for monitoring the tumor vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Takara, Kazuhiro; Yamakawa, Daishi; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Takakura, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Antiangiogenic agents transiently normalize tumor vessel structure and improve vessel function, thereby providing a window of opportunity for enhancing the efficacy of chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Currently, there are no reliable predictors or markers reflecting this vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy. Apelin, the expression of which is regulated by hypoxia, and which has well-described roles in tumor progression, is an easily measured secreted protein. Here, we show that apelin can be used as a marker for the vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy. Mice bearing s.c. tumors resulting from inoculation of the colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT29 were treated with a single injection of bevacizumab, a mAb neutralizing vascular endothelial growth factor. Tumor growth, vessel density, pericyte coverage, tumor hypoxia, and small molecule delivery were determined at four different times after treatment with bevacizumab (days 1, 3, 5, and 8). Tumor growth and vessel density were significantly reduced after bevacizumab treatment, which also significantly increased tumor vessel maturity, and improved tumor hypoxia and small molecule delivery between days 3 and 5. These effects abated by day 8, suggesting that a time window for vessel normalization was opened between days 3 and 5 during bevacizumab treatment in this model. Apelin mRNA expression and plasma apelin levels decreased transiently at day 5 post-treatment, coinciding with vessel normalization. Thus, apelin is a potential indicator of the vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy.

  17. Tumor angiogenesis and anti-angiogenic therapy in malignant gliomas revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Plate, Karl H.; Scholz, Alexander; Dumont, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms of tumor angiogenesis and its prospects for anti-angiogenic cancer therapy are major issues in almost all current concepts of both cancer biology and targeted cancer therapy. Currently, (1) sprouting angiogenesis, (2) vascular co-option, (3) vascular intussusception, (4) vasculogenic mimicry, (5) bone marrow-derived vasculogenesis, (6) cancer stem-like cell-derived vasculogenesis and (7) myeloid cell-driven angiogenesis are all considered to contribute to...

  18. Dual-targeting anti-angiogenic cyclic peptides as potential drug leads for cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lai Yue; Craik, David J.; Daly, Norelle L.

    2016-01-01

    Peptide analogues derived from bioactive hormones such as somatostatin or certain growth factors have great potential as angiogenesis inhibitors for cancer applications. In an attempt to combat emerging drug resistance many FDA-approved anti-angiogenesis therapies are co-administered with cytotoxic drugs as a combination therapy to target multiple signaling pathways of cancers. However, cancer therapies often encounter limiting factors such as high toxicities and side effects. Here, we combined two anti-angiogenic epitopes that act on different pathways of angiogenesis into a single non-toxic cyclic peptide framework, namely MCoTI-II (Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor-II), and subsequently assessed the anti-angiogenic activity of the novel compound. We hypothesized that the combination of these two epitopes would elicit a synergistic effect by targeting different angiogenesis pathways and result in improved potency, compared to that of a single epitope. This novel approach has resulted in the development of a potent, non-toxic, stable and cyclic analogue with nanomolar potency inhibition in in vitro endothelial cell migration and in vivo chorioallantoic membrane angiogenesis assays. This is the first report to use the MCoTI-II framework to develop a 2-in-1 anti-angiogenic peptide, which has the potential to be used as a form of combination therapy for targeting a wide range of cancers. PMID:27734947

  19. Blocking the FGF/FGFR system as a "two-compartment" antiangiogenic/antitumor approach in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomini, Arianna; Chiodelli, Paola; Matarazzo, Sara; Rusnati, Marco; Presta, Marco; Ronca, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are a family of pleiotropic factors produced by stromal and parenchymal tumor cells. Even though FGFs have been firstly characterized as angiogenic factors, they exert autocrine and paracrine functions not only on endothelial cells but also on tumor cells and other stromal components. Thus, the FGF/FGF receptor (FGFR) pathway may represent a key player in tumor growth by regulating the complex cross-talk between stromal and tumor compartments. The ligand dependent or independent activation of the FGF/FGFR system by gene upregulation, oncogenic mutation or amplification occurs in a variety of human tumors and is implicated in various key steps of tumor growth and progression. In addition, FGF/FGFR activation has been described as a mechanism of tumor escape in response to antiangiogenic/anti-VEGF therapies. Experimental and clinical evidences provide a compelling biologic rationale for the development of anti-FGF/FGFR targeting agents in cancer therapy. However, the development of drugs specifically targeting the FGF/FGFR pathway proved to be difficult, also due to the high redundancy and pleiotropic effects of FGF and FGFR family members. On the other hand, the possibility to develop "two-compartment" targeting agents endowed with both antiangiogenic and antitumor activities remains promising. Here we will review the preclinical and clinical approaches and potential therapeutics currently available to block the FGF/FGFR system in human cancer.

  20. Mathematical and numerical analysis of a model for anti-angiogenic therapy in metastatic cancers

    CERN Document Server

    Benzekry, Sebastien

    2010-01-01

    We introduce and analyze a phenomenological model for anti-angiogenic therapy in the treatment of metastatic cancers. It is a structured transport equation with a nonlocal boundary condition describing the evolution of the density of metastasis that we analyze first at the continuous level. We present the numerical analysis of a lagrangian scheme based on the characteristics whose convergence establishes existence of solutions. Then we prove an error estimate and use the model to perform interesting simulations in view of clinical applications.

  1. Effect of Vascular Normalization by Antiangiogenic Therapy on Interstitial Hypertension, Peritumor Edema, and Lymphatic Metastasis: Insights from a Mathematical Model

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Rakesh K.; Tong, Ricky T; Munn, Lance L.

    2007-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical evidence shows that antiangiogenic agents can decrease tumor vessel permeability and interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) in a process of vessel “normalization.” The resulting normalized vasculature has more efficient perfusion, but little is known about how tumor IFP and interstitial fluid velocity (IFV) are affected by changes in transport properties of the vessels and interstitium that are associated with antiangiogenic therapy. By using a mathematical model to simula...

  2. Pharmacogenetics of antiangiogenic and antineovascular therapies of age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, Elisa; Lazzeri, Stefano; Orlandi, Paola; Figus, Michele; Fioravanti, Anna; Di Desidero, Teresa; Sartini, Maria Sole; Nardi, Marco; Danesi, Romano; Bocci, Guido

    2012-07-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common age-related disease causing irreversible visual loss in industrialized countries, is a complex and multifactorial illness. Researchers have found components of the complement alternative pathway inside drusen and Bruch's membrane of AMD patients, underlying a possible important role of complement factor H in the pathogenesis of AMD. The neovascular (wet) AMD is the most destructive form and it is characterized by invasion of new blood vessels into subretinal spaces with subsequent exudation and bleeding, resulting in scarring of the macular region and loss of the central vision. The hallmark of the neovascular form is the choroidal neovascularization, where VEGF-A has an important role in the pathogenesis of the disease. SNPs of these genes have recently been investigated as potential pharmacogenetic markers of the antiangiogenic and antineovascular therapy of AMD, which includes verteporfin photodynamic therapy and anti-VEGF-A drugs, such as pegaptanib, bevacizumab and ranibizumab. The CFH rs1061170 CT and TT genotypes have been associated with an improvement of visual acuity in bevacizumab or ranibizumab treated patients, whereas patients harboring VEGF-A rs699946 G allele responded better to bevacizumab-based therapy if compared with patients carrying the A allele. In conclusion, the discovery of pharmacogenetic markers for the personalization of the antiangiogenic and/or antineovascular therapy could be, in the future, a key issue in ophthalmology to obtain a personalization of the therapy and to avoid unnecessary costs and adverse drug reactions.

  3. Systems Pharmacology Approaches for Optimization of Antiangiogenic Therapies: Challenges and Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish eSharan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Targeted therapies have become an important therapeutic paradigm for multiple malignancies. The rapid development of resistance to these therapies impedes the successful management of advanced cancer. Due to the redundancy in angiogenic signaling, alternative proangiogenic factors are activated upon treatment with anti-VEGF agents. Higher doses of the agents lead to greater stimulation of compensatory proangiogenic pathways that limit the therapeutic efficacy of VEGF-targeted drugs and produce escape mechanisms for tumor. Evidence suggests that dose intensity and schedules affect the dynamics of the development of this resistance. Thus, an optimal dosing regimen is crucial to maximizing the therapeutic benefit of antiangiogenic agents and limiting treatment resistance. A systems pharmacology approach using multiscale computational modeling can facilitate a mechanistic understanding of these dynamics of angiogenic biomarkers and their impacts on tumor reduction and resistance. Herein, we discuss a systems pharmacology approach integrating the biology of VEGF-targeted therapy resistance, including circulating biomarkers, and pharmacodynamics to enable the optimization of antiangiogenic therapy for therapeutic gains.

  4. Gorham-Stout Disease of the Skull Base With Hearing Loss: Dramatic Recovery and Antiangiogenic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa, Akifumi; Ozeki, Michio; Kuze, Bunya; Asano, Takahiko; Matsuoka, Kentaro; Fukao, Toshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    Gorham-Stout disease (GSD) is a rare disorder of unknown etiology. We present a 6-year-old male with GSD involving the skull base who presented with recurrent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea, severe hearing loss, and facial palsy secondary to cerebellar herniation into the internal auditory canal. After 2 months of treatment with pegylated interferon (IFN) α-2b (50 μg/week), his hearing recovered dramatically. Two years later, new bone formation appeared radiologically and IFN was switched to sirolimus. One year after the switch, CSF rhinorrhea disappeared. Antiangiogenic therapy might inhibit proliferation of vascular endothelial cells in osteolytic lesions and lead to new bone formation.

  5. Multimodality multiparametric imaging of early tumor response to a novel antiangiogenic therapy based on anticalins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhard Meier

    Full Text Available Anticalins are a novel class of targeted protein therapeutics. The PEGylated Anticalin Angiocal (PRS-050-PEG40 is directed against VEGF-A. The purpose of our study was to compare the performance of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI, dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI and positron emission tomography with the tracer [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET for monitoring early response to antiangiogenic therapy with PRS-050-PEG40. 31 mice were implanted subcutaneously with A673 rhabdomyosarcoma xenografts and underwent DWI, DCE-MRI and FDG-PET before and 2 days after i.p. injection of PRS-050-PEG40 (n = 13, Avastin (n = 6 or PBS (n = 12. Tumor size was measured manually with a caliper. Imaging results were correlated with histopathology. In the results, the tumor size was not significantly different in the treatment groups when compared to the control group on day 2 after therapy onset (P = 0.09. In contrast the imaging modalities DWI, DCE-MRI and FDG-PET showed significant differences between the therapeutic compared to the control group as early as 2 days after therapy onset (P<0.001. There was a strong correlation of the early changes in DWI, DCE-MRI and FDG-PET at day 2 after therapy onset and the change in tumor size at the end of therapy (r = -0.58, 0.71 and 0.67 respectively. The imaging results were confirmed by histopathology, showing early necrosis and necroptosis in the tumors. Thus multimodality multiparametric imaging was able to predict therapeutic success of PRS-050-PEG40 and Avastin as early as 2 days after onset of therapy and thus promising for monitoring early response of antiangiogenic therapy.

  6. Improved survival of mice bearing liver metastases of colon cancer cells treated with a combination of radioimmunotherapy and antiangiogenic therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinuya, Seigo; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Bai, Jingming; Michigishi, Takatoshi; Tonami, Norihisa [Department of Biotracer Medicine, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Koshida, Kiyoshi [Department of Integrative Cancer Therapy and Urology, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Mori, Hirofumi; Shiba, Kazuhiro [Radioisotope Center, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Watanabe, Naoto [Department of Radiology, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Toyama (Japan); Shuke, Noriyuki [Department of Radiology, Asahikawa Medical College, Asahikawa, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    We attempted to determine whether the combined regimen of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) and antiangiogenic therapy would favorably affect the survival of animals bearing liver metastases of colon cancer cells. Daily antiangiogenic therapy with 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME), 75 mg/kg, was initiated at 3 days following intrasplenic cell inoculation of LS180 colon cancer cells. RIT with 7 MBq of {sup 131}I-A7, an IgG1 anti-colorectal monoclonal antibody, or {sup 131}I-HPMS-1, an irrelevant IgG1, was conducted at 7 days. Production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by LS180 cells was assessed in vitro. All nontreated mice died by 31 days following cell inoculation (n=5). Monotherapy comprising 2-ME treatment resulted in slightly better survival of mice (n=8) (P<0.05). {sup 131}I-A7 RIT displayed a marked therapeutic effect (n=8) (P<0.001); however, all animals eventually died due to metastases by 99 days. The combined regimen of {sup 131}I-A7 RIT and antiangiogenic therapy demonstrated a superior therapeutic effect in comparison to monotherapy consisting of either RIT or antiangiogenic therapy (n=10) (P<0.05); three mice survived the entire 160-day observation period. The combination of antiangiogenic therapy and {sup 131}I-HPMS-1 RIT failed to provide an appreciable benefit (n=5). Treatment with 2-ME decreased VEGF production by LS180 cells in a dose-dependent fashion. In conclusion, a combination regimen comprising RIT and antiangiogenic therapy initiated at the early stage of metastasis would be of great benefit in terms of improvement of the therapeutic efficacy with respect to liver metastases. (orig.)

  7. GLUT3 upregulation promotes metabolic reprogramming associated with antiangiogenic therapy resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Ruby; Jahangiri, Arman; Mascharak, Smita; Nguyen, Alan; Flanigan, Patrick M.; Yagnik, Garima; Wagner, Jeffrey R.; De Lay, Michael; Carrera, Diego; Castro, Brandyn A.; Hayes, Josie; Sidorov, Maxim; Garcia, Jose Luiz Izquierdo; Eriksson, Pia; Ronen, Sabrina; Phillips, Joanna; Koliwad, Suneil; Aghi, Manish K.

    2017-01-01

    Clinical trials revealed limited response duration of glioblastomas to VEGF-neutralizing antibody bevacizumab. Thriving in the devascularized microenvironment occurring after antiangiogenic therapy requires tumor cell adaptation to decreased glucose, with 50% less glucose identified in bevacizumab-treated xenografts. Compared with bevacizumab-responsive xenograft cells, resistant cells exhibited increased glucose uptake, glycolysis, 13C NMR pyruvate to lactate conversion, and survival in low glucose. Glucose transporter 3 (GLUT3) was upregulated in bevacizumab-resistant versus sensitive xenografts and patient specimens in a HIF-1α–dependent manner. Resistant versus sensitive cell mitochondria in oxidative phosphorylation–selective conditions produced less ATP. Despite unchanged mitochondrial numbers, normoxic resistant cells had lower mitochondrial membrane potential than sensitive cells, confirming poorer mitochondrial health, but avoided the mitochondrial dysfunction of hypoxic sensitive cells. Thin-layer chromatography revealed increased triglycerides in bevacizumab-resistant versus sensitive xenografts, a change driven by mitochondrial stress. A glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibitor suppressing GLUT3 transcription caused greater cell death in bevacizumab-resistant than -responsive cells. Overexpressing GLUT3 in tumor cells recapitulated bevacizumab-resistant cell features: survival and proliferation in low glucose, increased glycolysis, impaired oxidative phosphorylation, and rapid in vivo proliferation only slowed by bevacizumab to that of untreated bevacizumab-responsive tumors. Targeting GLUT3 or the increased glycolysis reliance in resistant tumors could unlock the potential of antiangiogenic treatments. PMID:28138554

  8. Antiangiogenic therapy using endostatin increases the number of ALDH+ lung cancer stem cells by generating intratumor hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Wang, Yu-yi; Wang, Yi-qin; Wang, Xia; Liu, Yan-Yang; Wang, Jian-Tao; Du, Chi; Wang, Li; Li, Mei; Luo, Feng; Jiang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Antiangiogenic therapy is becoming a promising option for cancer treatment. However, many investigations have recently indicated that these therapies may have limited efficacy, and the cancers in most patients eventually develop resistance to these therapies. There is considerable recently acquired evidence for an association of such resistance with cancer stem-like cells (CSLCs). Here, we used xenograft tumor murine models to further suggest that antiangiogenic agents actually increase the invasive and metastatic properties of lung cancer cells. In our experiments with murine lung cancer xenografts, we found that the antiangiogenic agent endostatin increased the population of ALDH+ cells, and did so by generating intratumoral hypoxia in the xenografts. We further showed endostatin to cause an increase in the CSLC population by accelerating the generation of tumor hypoxia and by recruiting TAMs, MDSCs and Treg cells, which are inflammatory and immunosuppressive cells and which can secrete cytokines and growth factors such as IL-6, EGF, and TGF-β into the tumor microenvironment. All these factors are related with increased CSLC population in tumors. These results imply that improving the clinical efficacy of antiangiogenic treatments will require the concurrent use of CSLC-targeting agents. PMID:27703219

  9. Change in Pattern of Relapse After Antiangiogenic Therapy in High-Grade Glioma

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    Narayana, Ashwatha, E-mail: ashwatha.narayana@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Department of Neurosurgery, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Kunnakkat, Saroj D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Medabalmi, Praveen [Department of Biostatistics, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Golfinos, John; Parker, Erik [Department of Neurosurgery, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Knopp, Edmond [Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Zagzag, David [Department of Pathology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Eagan, Patricia [Department of Neuro-Oncology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Atlantic Health System, Overlook Hospital, Summit, NJ (United States); Gruber, Deborah [Department of Neuro-Oncology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Gruber, Michael L. [Department of Neurosurgery, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Department of Neuro-Oncology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Atlantic Health System, Overlook Hospital, Summit, NJ (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Local recurrence is the dominant pattern of relapse in high-grade glioma (HGG) after conventional therapy. The recent use of antiangiogenic therapy has shown impressive radiologic and clinical responses in adult HGG. The preclinical data suggesting increased invasiveness after angiogenic blockade have necessitated a detailed analysis of the pattern of recurrence after therapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 162 consecutive patients with HGG, either newly diagnosed (n = 58) or with recurrent disease (n = 104) underwent therapy with bevacizumab at 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks and conventional chemotherapy with or without involved field radiotherapy until disease progression. The pattern of recurrence and interval to progression were the primary aims of the present study. Diffuse invasive recurrence (DIR) was defined as the involvement of multiple lobes with or without crossing the midline. Results: At a median follow-up of 7 months (range, 1-37), 105 patients had recurrence, and 79 patients ultimately developed DIR. The interval to progression was similar in the DIR and local recurrence groups (6.5 and 6.3 months, p = .296). The hazard risk of DIR increased exponentially with time and was similar in those with newly diagnosed and recurrent HGG (R{sup 2} = 0.957). The duration of bevacizumab therapy increased the interval to recurrence (p < .0001) and improved overall survival (p < .0001). However, the pattern of relapse did not affect overall survival (p = .253). Conclusion: Along with an increase in median progression-free survival, bevacizumab therapy increased the risk of DIR in HGG patients. The risk of increased invasion with prolonged angiogenic blockade should be addressed in future clinical trials.

  10. Modeling tumor-associated edema in gliomas during anti-angiogenic therapy and its impact on imageable tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eHawkins-Daarud

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma, the most aggressive form of primary brain tumor is predominantly assessed with gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted (T1Gd and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Pixel intensity enhancement on the T1Gd image is understood to correspond to the gadolinium contrast agent leaking from the tumor-induced neovasculature, while hyperintensity on the T2/FLAIR images corresponds with edema and infiltrated tumor cells. None of these modalities directly show tumor cells; rather, they capture abnormalities in the microenvironment caused by the presence of tumor cells. Thus, assessing disease response after treatments impacting the microenvironment remains challenging through the obscuring lens of MR imaging. Anti-angiogenic therapies have been used in the treatment of gliomas with spurious results ranging from no apparent response to significant imaging improvement with the potential for extremely diffuse patterns of tumor recurrence on imaging and autopsy. Anti-angiogenic treatment normalizes the vasculature, effectively decreasing vessel permeability and thus reducing tumor-induced edema, drastically altering T2-weighted MRI. We extend a previously developed mathematical model of glioma growth to explicitly incorporate edema formation allowing us to directly characterize and potentially predict the effects of anti-angiogenics on imageable tumor growth. A comparison of simulated glioma growth and imaging enhancement with and without bevacizumab supports the current understanding that anti-angiogenic treatment can serve as a surrogate for steroids and the clinically-driven hypothesis that anti-angiogenic treatment may not have any significant effect on the growth dynamics of the overall tumor-cell populations. However, the simulations do illustrate a potentially large impact on the level of edematous extracellular fluid, and thus on what would be imageable on T2/FLAIR MR for tumors with lower proliferation rates.

  11. Anti-Angiogenic Therapy: Strategies to Develop Potent VEGFR-2 Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors and Future Prospect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Leilei; Zhou, Jianfeng; Wu, Jifeng; Shen, Yuemao; Li, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis has always been a major gap for effective cancer therapy. Interruption of aberrant angiogenesis by specific inhibitors targeting receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) has been of great interests to medicinal chemists. Among the factors that are involved in tumor angiogenesis, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) is validated as the most closely related factor which can drive angiogenesis through binding with its natural ligand VEGF. The well-validated VEGF-driven VEGFR-2 signaling pathway can stimulate many endothelial responses, including increasing vessel permeability and enhancing endothelial cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. Consequently, circumventing angiogenesis by VEGFR-2 inhibitors represents a promising strategy for counteracting various VEGFR-2-mediated disorders as well as drug resistance. Over the past decades, a considerable number of novel small molecular VEGFR-2 inhibitors have been exploited with diverse chemical scaffolds. Especially, recent frequently launched inhibitors have declared their research values and therapeutic potentials in oncology. Still, the antiangiogenesis based treatment remains an ongoing challenge. In this review, a comprehensive retrospective of newly emerged VEGFR-2 inhibitors have been summarized, with the emphasis on the structure-activity relationship (SAR) investigation, and also binding patterns of representative inhibitors with biotargets. On the basis of all of this information, varied strategies for developing potent VEGFR-2 inhibitors and the future prospect of the clinical application of antiangiogenic inhibitors are discussed hereby.

  12. Anti-angiogenic therapy (bevacizumab) in the management of oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Maha M; Afifi, Marwa M

    2016-04-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP), a mucocutaneous chronic inflammatory disease, is conventionally managed using topical corticosteroid therapy. Given the fact that OLP is strongly linked to angiogenesis, anti-angiogenic drugs, such as bevacizumab, might be introduced as an alternative treatment for contraindicated, non-responsive patients. The aim of the present study was to report the short-term effectiveness and safety of intralesional bevacizumab injection in the management of atrophic/erosive OLP. A case series study was conducted in patients with atrophic/erosive OLP in the buccal mucosa, assigned to receive either 2.5 mg of bevacizumab, by intralesional injection (n = 20, test), or topical 0.1% triamcinolone acetonide ointment (n = 20, control). The size, score, and pain intensity of the lesions were assessed pre- and post-treatment. Tissue biopsies were collected for histopathologic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural examination. After 1 wk, the test group had significant reductions both in lesion seize and in pain scores compared with controls. A marked decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and interleukin-8 immunoexpression was noted in tissue biopsies from bevacizumab-treated lesions compared with control lesions. Furthermore, ultrastructural examination of OLP tissue specimens revealed significant healing signs associated with bevacizumab treatment. Short-term data suggest that intralesional bevacizumab injection effectively and safely achieved resolution of atrophic/erosive OLP lesions without disease exacerbations during a 3-month follow-up period.

  13. Fibrocyte-like cells mediate acquired resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy with bevacizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuhashi, Atsushi; Goto, Hisatsugu; Saijo, Atsuro; Trung, Van The; Aono, Yoshinori; Ogino, Hirokazu; Kuramoto, Takuya; Tabata, Sho; Uehara, Hisanori; Izumi, Keisuke; Yoshida, Mitsuteru; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Hidefusa; Gotoh, Masashi; Kakiuchi, Soji; Hanibuchi, Masaki; Yano, Seiji; Yokomise, Hiroyasu; Sakiyama, Shoji; Nishioka, Yasuhiko

    2015-12-04

    Bevacizumab exerts anti-angiogenic effects in cancer patients by inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). However, its use is still limited due to the development of resistance to the treatment. Such resistance can be regulated by various factors, although the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Here we show that bone marrow-derived fibrocyte-like cells, defined as alpha-1 type I collagen-positive and CXCR4-positive cells, contribute to the acquired resistance to bevacizumab. In mouse models of malignant pleural mesothelioma and lung cancer, fibrocyte-like cells mediate the resistance to bevacizumab as the main producer of fibroblast growth factor 2. In clinical specimens of lung cancer, the number of fibrocyte-like cells is significantly increased in bevacizumab-treated tumours, and correlates with the number of treatment cycles, as well as CD31-positive vessels. Our results identify fibrocyte-like cells as a promising cell biomarker and a potential therapeutic target to overcome resistance to anti-VEGF therapy.

  14. Antiangiogenic Therapy in the Treatment of Recurrent Medulloblastoma in the Adult: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Privitera

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is a rare tumor in central nervous system, with an even rarer occurrence in adulthood. The management of a recurrent disease is a medical challenge; chemotherapy has been used as the treatment of choice, while reirradiation has been employed in selected cases. We report the case of a 51-year-old man with recurrent medulloblastoma. He was treated with local reirradiation, chemotherapy, and antiangiogenic drug, with the latter giving the longer progression-free interval. The aim of this report is to show that recurrent medulloblastoma in adults can be approached with a multimodality treatment and that antiangiogenic therapy should have a role in the management of this disease.

  15. Recurrence or metastasis of HCC: predictors, early detection and experimental antiangiogenic therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Fu Jiang; Zhi Hua Yang; Jin Qun Hu

    2000-01-01

    AIM To investigate the predictors for recurrence or metastasis of HCC, and to evaluate the effect of antiangiogenic therapy on the growth of transplantable human HCC in nude mice. METHODS RT-PCR was used to measure the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in 56 pairs of nontumorous liver and tumor samples. Sixty blood samples from human HCC were examined by nested RT-PCR to find out AFP mRNA. Recombinant human endostatin and polyclonal antibody against VEGF were administered to treat human HCC transplanted in nude mice. RESULTS Thirty of 56 HCC samples showed stronger expression of MMP-9 in tumorous tissues than in nontumorous tissues. Fifteen of the 26 patients with relative expression level of MMP-9 more than 0.34 developed tumor recurrence or metastasis, whereas only 7 of 30 patients with relative expression level less than 0.34 developed tumor recurrence (P<0.05).There was no significant difference in the relative expression level of VEGF between patients with postoperative recurrence or metastasis and those without recurrence. AFP mRNA was detectable in 53.3% of patients with HCC. The sensitivity and specificity of AFP mRNA as a marker to detect hematogenous dissemination of HCC cells was 81.8% and 84.4%, respectively. Recombinant human endostatin and polyclonal antibody against VEGF inhibited the growth of transplantable HCC in nude mice by 52.2% and 45.7%, respectively.CONCLUSION MMP-9 expression in HCC correlates with the postoperative recurrence or metastasis of HCC. Patients with high level of MMP-9 expression in HCC are susceptible to metastasis. AFP mRNA could serve as an indicator of hematogenous spreading of HCC cells in circulation and a predictor of recurrence or metastasis of HCC. Antiangiogenesis may be an adjuvant therapy for HCC.

  16. The role of semaphorin 4D as a potential biomarker for antiangiogenic therapy in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding X

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Xiaojie Ding,1,2,* Lijuan Qiu,1,2,* Lijuan Zhang,3 Juemin Xi,1,2 Duo Li,1,2 Xinwei Huang,1,2 Yujiao Zhao,1,2 Xiaodang Wang,1,2 Qiangming Sun1,2 1Institute of Medical Biology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 2Molecular Epidemiology Joint Laboratory, Yunnan Key Laboratory of Vaccine Research & Development on Severe Infectious Diseases, 3Department of Pathology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University (Yunnan Provincial Tumor Hospital, Kunming, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Semaphorin 4D (Sema4D belongs to the class IV semaphorins, and accumulating evidence has indicated that its elevated level may be one strategy by which tumors evade current antiangiogenic therapies. The biological roles of Sema4D in colorectal cancer (CRC, however, remain largely undefined. This study was designed to investigate the effects of Sema4D on tumor angiogenesis and growth in CRC, especially in different vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF backgrounds.Methods: The expression of Sema4D in human CRC was evaluated by immunohistochemical analysis of tumors and their matching normal control tissues. The expression level of Sema4D and VEGF was investigated in different CRC cell lines. To evaluate the contributions of Sema4D to tumor-induced angiogenesis, two CRC cell lines with opposite VEGF backgrounds were infected with lentiviruses expressing Sema4D or Sema4D short hairpin RNA, followed by in vitro migration and in vivo tumor angiogenic assays.Results: Immunohistochemical analysis of human CRC revealed high levels of Sema4D in a cell surface pattern. In all, 84.85% of CRC samples analyzed exhibited moderate to strong Sema4D expression. The positive ratios of Sema4D staining for well, moderately, and poorly differentiated cancers were 71.43%, 96.67%, and 77.27%, respectively. Sema4D is highly expressed in five different CRC cell lines, while VEGF

  17. Dynamic contrast-enhanced micro-CT on mice with mammary carcinoma for the assessment of antiangiogenic therapy response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisa, Fabian [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Institute of Medical Physics, Erlangen (Germany); University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies (SAOT), Erlangen (Germany); Brauweiler, Robert; Hupfer, Martin; Nowak, Tristan; Kalender, Willi A. [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Institute of Medical Physics, Erlangen (Germany); Lotz, Laura; Hoffmann, Inge; Dittrich, Ralf; Beckmann, Matthias W. [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, OB/GYN, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Wachter, David [University Hospital Erlangen, Institute of Pathology, Erlangen (Germany); Jost, Gregor; Pietsch, Hubertus [Bayer Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-04-15

    To evaluate the potential of in vivo dynamic contrast-enhanced micro-computed tomography (DCE micro-CT) for the assessment of antiangiogenic drug therapy response of mice with mammary carcinoma. 20 female mice with implanted MCF7 tumours were split into control group and therapy group treated with a known effective antiangiogenic drug. All mice underwent DCE micro-CT for the 3D analysis of functional parameters (relative blood volume [rBV], vascular permeability [K], area under the time-enhancement curve [AUC]) and morphology. All parameters were determined for total, peripheral and central tumour volumes of interest (VOIs). Immunohistochemistry was performed to characterise tumour vascularisation. 3D dose distributions were determined. The mean AUCs were significantly lower in therapy with P values of 0.012, 0.007 and 0.023 for total, peripheral and central tumour VOIs. K and rBV showed significant differences for the peripheral (P{sub per}{sup K} = 0.032, P{sub per}{sup rBV} = 0.029), but not for the total and central tumour VOIs (P{sub total}{sup K} = 0.108, P{sub central}{sup K} = 0.246, P{sub total}{sup rBV} = 0.093, P{sub central}{sup rBV} = 0.136). Mean tumour volume was significantly smaller in therapy (P{sub in} {sub vivo} = 0.001, P{sub ex} {sub vivo} = 0.005). Histology revealed greater vascularisation in the controls and central tumour necrosis. Doses ranged from 150 to 300 mGy. This study indicates the great potential of DCE micro-CT for early in vivo assessment of antiangiogenic drug therapy response. (orig.)

  18. VEGFR2-Targeted Three-Dimensional Ultrasound Imaging Can Predict Responses to Antiangiogenic Therapy in Preclinical Models of Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianhua; Wang, Huaijun; Zhang, Huiping; Lutz, Amelie M; Tian, Lu; Hristov, Dimitre; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2016-07-15

    Three-dimensional (3D) imaging capabilities to assess responses to anticancer therapies are needed to minimize sampling errors common to two-dimensional approaches as a result of spatial heterogeneity in tumors. Recently, the feasibility and reproducibility of 3D ultrasound molecular imaging (3D USMI) using contrast agents, which target molecular markers, have greatly improved, due to the development of clinical 3D matrix array transducers. Here we report preclinical proof-of-concept studies showing that 3D USMI of VEGFR2/KDR expression accurately gauges longitudinal treatment responses to antiangiogenesis therapy in responding versus nonresponding mouse models of colon cancer. Tumors in these models exhibited differential patterns of VEGFR2-targeted 3D USMI signals during the course of antiangiogenic treatment with bevacizumab. In responding tumors, the VEGFR2 signal decreased as soon as 24 hours after therapy was started, whereas in nonresponding tumors there was no change in signal at any time point. The early decrease in VEGFR2 signal was highly predictive of treatment outcome at the end of therapy. Our results offer preclinical proof that 3D USMI can predict responses to antiangiogenic therapy, warranting further investigation of its clinical translatability to predicting treatment outcomes in patients. Cancer Res; 76(14); 4081-9. ©2016 AACR.

  19. Identifying alemtuzumab as an anti-myeloid cell antiangiogenic therapy for the treatment of ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coukos George

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Murine studies suggest that myeloid cells such as vascular leukocytes (VLC and Tie2+ monocytes play a critical role in tumor angiogenesis and vasculogenesis. Myeloid cells are a primary cause of resistance to anti-VEGF therapy. The elimination of these cells from the tumor microenvironment significantly restricts tumor growth in both spontaneous and xenograft murine tumor models. Thus animal studies indicate that myeloid cells are potential therapeutic targets for solid tumor therapy. Abundant VLC and Tie2+ monocytes have been reported in human cancer. Unfortunately, the importance of VLC in human cancer growth remains untested as there are no confirmed therapeutics to target human VLC. Methods We used FACS to analyze VLC in ovarian and non-ovarian tumors, and characterize the relationship of VLC and Tie2-monocytes. We performed qRT-PCR and FACS on human VLC to assess the expression of the CD52 antigen, the target of the immunotherapeutic Alemtuzumab. We assessed Alemtuzumab's ability to induce complement-mediated VLC killing in vitro and in human tumor ascites. Finally we assessed the impact of anti-CD52 immuno-toxin therapy on murine ovarian tumor growth. Results Human VLC are present in ovarian and non-ovarian tumors. The majority of VLC appear to be Tie2+ monocytes. VLC and Tie2+ monocytes express high levels of CD52, the target of the immunotherapeutic Alemtuzumab. Alemtuzumab potently induces complement-mediated lysis of VLC in vitro and ex-vivo in ovarian tumor ascites. Anti-CD52 immunotherapy targeting VLC restricts tumor angiogenesis and growth in murine ovarian cancer. Conclusion These studies confirm VLC/myeloid cells as therapeutic targets in ovarian cancer. Our data provide critical pre-clinical evidence supporting the use of Alemtuzumab in clinical trials to test its efficacy as an anti-myeloid cell antiangiogenic therapeutic in ovarian cancer. The identification of an FDA approved anti-VLC agent with a history

  20. Quantification of serial changes in cerebral blood volume and metabolism in patients with recurrent glioblastoma undergoing antiangiogenic therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadlbauer, Andreas, E-mail: andi@nmr.at [Institute of Medical Radiology, University Clinic of St. Pölten, Propst Führer-Straße 4, A-3100 St. Pölten (Austria); Department of Neurosurgery, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Medical University Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, A-1097 Vienna (Austria); Pichler, Petra [First Department of Internal Medicine, University Clinic of St. Pölten, Propst Führer-Straße 4, A-3100 St. Poelten (Austria); Karl, Marianne [Institute of Medical Radiology, University Clinic of St. Pölten, Propst Führer-Straße 4, A-3100 St. Pölten (Austria); Brandner, Sebastian [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Lerch, Claudia [Institute of Medical Radiology, University Clinic of St. Pölten, Propst Führer-Straße 4, A-3100 St. Pölten (Austria); Renner, Bertold [Institute of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen (Germany); Heinz, Gertraud [Institute of Medical Radiology, University Clinic of St. Pölten, Propst Führer-Straße 4, A-3100 St. Pölten (Austria)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Antiangiogenic therapy can lead to a decreased in CBV in normal brain tissue. • Responding and pseudoresponding lesions to AAT showed a similar CBV decrease. • Cho and NAA allowed for a distinction of responding and pseudoresponding lesions. • Cr ratios are not suited for evaluation of antiangiogenic therapy response. • Responders to AAT may have an increased risk for remote progression of the GBM. - Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate the usefulness of quantitative advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods for assessment of antiangiogenic therapy (AAT) response in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Methods: Eighteen patients with recurrent GBM received bevacizumab and 18 patients served as control group. Baseline MRI and two follow-up examinations were acquired every 3–5 months using dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast (DSC) perfusion MRI and {sup 1}H-MR spectroscopic imaging ({sup 1}H-MRSI). Maps of absolute cerebral blood volume (aCBV) were coregistered with choline (Cho) and N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) concentrations and compared to usually used relative parameters as well as controls. Results: Perfusion significantly decreased in responding and pseudoresponding GBMs but also in normal appearing brain after AAT onset. Cho and NAA concentrations were superior to Cr-ratios in lesion differentiation and showed a clear gap between responding and pseudoresponding lesions. Responders to AAT exceptionally frequently (6 out of 8 patients) showed remote GBM progression. Conclusions: Quantification of CBV reveals changes in normal brain perfusion due to AAT, which were not described so far. DSC perfusion MRI seems not to be suitable for differentiation between response and pseudoresponse to AAT. However, absolute quantification of brain metabolites may allow for distinction due to a clear gap at 6–9 months after therapy onset.

  1. The Role of Antiangiogenic Therapy in the Development of Osteonecrosis of the Jaw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantasia, John E

    2015-11-01

    There is an increasing use of established and newer medications that have antiangiogenic properties. Inhibition of angiogenesis likely has either a primary or secondary role in the development of osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). These medications are being used in the treatment of various cancers and in the treatment of several non-oncologic conditions. Antiangiogenic medications when used in combination with antiresorptive medications, such as nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates or denosumab, seem to increase the likelihood of osteonecrosis of the jaw. This review highlights the role of inhibitors of angiogenesis and their role in the development of osteonecrosis of the jaws.

  2. Early response assessment in patients with multiple myeloma during anti-angiogenic therapy using arterial spin labelling: first clinical results

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    Fenchel, Michael [Eberhard-Karls University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Eberhard-Karls University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Konaktchieva, Marina [Eberhard-Karls University, Department of Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology, Tuebingen (Germany); Weisel, Katja; Kraus, Sabina [Eberhard-Karls University, Department of Internal Medicine, Hematology, Tuebingen (Germany); Brodoefel, Harald; Claussen, Claus D.; Horger, Marius [Eberhard-Karls University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    To determine if arterial-spin-labelling (ASL) MRI can reliably detect early response to anti-angiogenic therapy in patients with multiple myeloma by comparison with clinical/haematological response. Nineteen consecutive patients (10 men; mean age 63.5 {+-} 9.1 years) were included in the present study. Inclusion criteria were diagnosis of stage III multiple myeloma and clinical indication for therapeutical administration of bortezomib or lenalidomide. We performed MRI on 3.0T MR in the baseline setting, 3 weeks after onset of therapy and after 8 weeks. Clinical responses were determined on the basis of international uniform response criteria in correlation with haematological parameters and medium-term patient outcome. MRI studies were performed after approval by the local institutional review board. Fifteen patients responded to anti-myeloma therapy; 4/19 patients were non-responders to therapy. Mean tumour perfusion assessed by ASL-MRI in a reference lesion was 220.7 {+-} 132.5 ml min{sup -1} 100 g{sup -1} at baseline, and decreased to 125.7 {+-} 86.3 (134.5 {+-} 150.9) ml min{sup -1} 100 g{sup -1} 3 (8) weeks after onset of therapy (P < 0.02). The mean decrease in paraproteinaemia at week 3 (8) was 52.3 {+-} 47.7% (58.2 {+-} 58.7%), whereas {beta}2-microglobulinaemia decreased by 20.3 {+-} 53.1% (23.3 {+-} 57.0%). Correlation of ASL perfusion with outcome was significant (P = 0.0037). ASL tumour perfusion measurements are a valuable surrogate parameter for early assessment of response to novel anti-angiogenic therapy. (orig.)

  3. POTENTIAL OF INDUCED METABOLIC BIOLUMINESCENCE IMAGING TO UNCOVER METABOLIC EFFECTS OF ANTI-ANGIOGENIC THERAPY IN TUMORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano eIndraccolo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Tumor heterogeneity at the genetic level has been illustrated by a multitude of studies on the genomics of cancer, but whether tumors can be heterogeneous at the metabolic level is an issue which has been less systematically investigated so far. A burning related question is whether the metabolic features of tumors can change either following natural tumor progression (i.e. in primary tumors versus metastasis or therapeutic interventions. In this regard, recent findings by independent teams indicate that anti-angiogenic drugs cause metabolic perturbations in tumors as well as metabolic adaptations associated with increased malignancy. Induced metabolic bioluminescence imaging (imBI is an imaging technique which enables detection of key metabolites associated with glycolysis, including lactate, glucose, pyruvate and ATP in tumor sections. Signals captured by imBI can be used to visualize the topographic distribution of these metabolites and quantify their absolute amount. ImBI can be very useful for metabolic classification of tumors as well as to track metabolic changes in the glycolytic pathway associated with certain therapies. Imaging of the metabolic changes induced by anti-angiogenic drugs in tumors by imBI or other emerging technologies is a valuable tool to uncover molecular sensors engaged by metabolic stress and offers an opportunity to understand how metabolism-based approaches could improve cancer therapy.

  4. Synergistic Effect of Anti-Angiogenic and Radiation Therapy: Quantitative Evaluation with Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MR Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Jung Koo

    Full Text Available We assessed the effects of anti-angiogenic therapy (AAT on radiation therapy (RT, evaluating the tumor growth and perfusion patterns on dynamic contrast enhanced MR (DCE-MR images.Thirteen nude mice with heterotopic xenograft cancer of human lung cancer cell line were used. To observe the interval change of the tumor size and demonstrate the time-signal intensity enhancement curve of the tumor, the mice were subdivided into four groups: control (n = 2, AAT (n = 2, RT (n = 5, and combined therapy (AART, n = 4. DCE-MR images were taken four weeks after treatment. Perfusion parameters were obtained based on the Brix model. To compare the interval size changes in the RT group with those in the AART group, repeated measures ANOVA was used. Perfusion parameters in both the RT and AART groups were compared using a Mann-Whitney U test.Tumor growth was more suppressed in AART group than in the other groups. Control group showed the rapid wash-in and wash-out pattern on DCE-MR images. In contrast to RT group with delayed and prolonged enhancement, both AAT and AART groups showed the rapid wash-in and plateau pattern. The signal intensity in the plateau/time to peak enhancement (P<0.016 and the maximum enhancement ratio (P<0.016 of AART group were higher than those of RT group.AART showed synergistic effects in anticancer treatment. The pattern of the time-intensity curve on the DCE-MR images in each group implies that AAT might help maintain the perfusion in the cancer of AART group.

  5. Identification of novel targets for antiangiogenic therapy by comparing the gene expressions of tumor and normal endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsubo, Tsuguteru; Hida, Yasuhiro; Ohga, Noritaka; Sato, Hideshi; Kai, Toshihiro; Matsuki, Yasushi; Takasu, Hideo; Akiyama, Kosuke; Maishi, Nako; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Shinohara, Nobuo; Nonomura, Katsuya; Hida, Kyoko

    2014-01-01

    Targeting tumor angiogenesis is an established strategy for cancer therapy. Because angiogenesis is not limited to pathological conditions such as cancer, molecular markers that can distinguish between physiological and pathological angiogenesis are required to develop more effective and safer approaches for cancer treatment. To identify such molecules, we determined the gene expression profiles of murine tumor endothelial cells (mTEC) and murine normal endothelial cells using DNA microarray analysis followed by quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction analysis. We identified 131 genes that were differentially upregulated in mTEC. Functional analysis using siRNA-mediated gene silencing revealed five novel tumor endothelial cell markers that were involved in the proliferation or migration of mTEC. The expression of DEF6 and TMEM176B was upregulated in tumor vessels of human renal cell carcinoma specimens, suggesting that they are potential targets for antiangiogenic intervention for renal cell carcinoma. Comparative gene expression analysis revealed molecular differences between tumor endothelial cells and normal endothelial cells and identified novel tumor endothelial cell markers that may be exploited to target tumor angiogenesis for cancer treatment. PMID:24602018

  6. Antiangiogenic therapy in lung cancer: focus on vascular endothelial growth factor pathway.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Korpanty, Grzegorz

    2010-01-01

    Lung cancer (LC) is a leading cause of death worldwide. Recent advances in chemotherapeutic agents have not yielded any significant improvement in the prognosis of patients with LC. The five-year survival rate for all combined disease stages remains about 15%. For this reason, new therapies such as those that inhibit tumor angiogenesis or block activity of growth factor receptors are of special interest in this group of patients. In this review we will summarize the most recent clinical data on biologic therapies that inhibit tumor angiogenesis in LC, focusing on those that are most clinically relevant.

  7. Mechanisms of Tumor Development and Anti-angiogenic Therapy in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Onishi, Manabu; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Date, Isao

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in surgical and medical therapy, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains a fatal disease. There has been no significant increase in survival for patients with this disease over the last 20 years. Tumor vasculature formation and glioma cell invasion along the white matter tracts both play a pivotal role in glioma development. Angiogenesis and invasion are the major factors believed to be responsible for treatment resistance in tumors, and a better understanding of the glioma inv...

  8. Mechanisms of resistance to chemotherapeutic and anti-angiogenic drugs as novel targets for pancreatic cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburrino, Anna; Piro, Geny; Carbone, Carmine; Tortora, Giampaolo; Melisi, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most lethal and poorly understood human malignancies and will continue to be a major unsolved health problem in the 21st century. Despite efforts over the past three decades to improve diagnosis and treatment, the prognosis for patients with pancreatic cancer is extremely poor with or without treatment, and incidence rates are virtually identical to mortality rates. Although advances have been made through the identification of relevant molecular pathways in pancreatic cancer, there is still a critical, unmet need for the translation of these findings into effective therapeutic strategies that could reduce the intrinsic drug resistance of this disease and for the integration of these molecularly targeted agents into established combination chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimens in order to improve patients’ survival. Tumors are heterogeneous cellular entities whose growth and progression depend on reciprocal interactions between genetically altered neoplastic cells and a non-neoplastic microenvironment. To date, most of the mechanisms of resistance studied have been related to tumor cell-autonomous signaling pathways. However, recent data suggest a putative important role of tumor microenvironment in the development and maintenance of resistance to classic chemotherapeutic and targeted therapies. This present review is meant to describe and discuss some of the most important advances in the comprehension of the tumor cell-autonomous and tumor microenvironment-related molecular mechanisms responsible for the resistance of pancreatic cancer to the proapoptotic activity of the classic chemotherapeutic agents and to the most novel anti-angiogenic drugs. We present some of the emerging therapeutic targets for the modulation of this resistant phenotype. PMID:23641216

  9. Endometrial adult/progenitor stem cells: pathogenetic theory and new antiangiogenic approach for endometriosis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittatore, G; Moggio, A; Benedetto, C; Bussolati, B; Revelli, A

    2014-03-01

    The cyclical arrival of endometrial cells into the abdominal cavity through retrograde flux at menstruation represents the etiopathogenetic basis of endometriosis. The endometrium has peculiar regenerative properties linked to the presence of adult stem cells similar to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Once in the abdominal cavity, these MSCs could proliferate, invade, and differentiate into endometrial cells, finally generating ectopic implants. As only differentiated endometrial cells, and not endometrial MSCs, possess steroid hormone receptors, MSCs could be responsible for the high rate of persistence/recurrence of the disease after hypoestrogenism-inducing therapies. Even angiogenesis promoted by MSCs could play an important role, as survival and proliferation of endometriotic tissue depend on the formation of new blood vessels. Inhibition of angiogenesis represents, in fact, a new, promising therapeutic approach for the disease. Further, medications directly targeting endometriosis MSCs could be effective, alone or in association with hormonal treatments, in increasing the success of medical treatment.

  10. 抑制血管生成治疗肿瘤的策略和展望%Current Strategies and Future Directions of Antiangiogenic Tumor Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张紫莱; 王晋慧; 刘新垣

    2003-01-01

    新生血管生成是绝大多数肿瘤得以生长和转移的必要前提. 所以, 通过抑制肿瘤血管生成来抑制肿瘤是非常有前途的一种方法, 有望发展成为一种新型的癌症疗法. 主要可以分为两大类: 一是通过抑制促血管生成信号或扩大抑制血管生成因子的作用来干扰肿瘤新生血管的形成过程, 这领域的广泛研究已经发现了一系列促血管生成因子及其抑制剂和血管生成抑制因子; 二是利用肿瘤血管与正常血管的差别来携带杀伤性药物直接特异性破坏已形成的肿瘤血管; 另外, 内皮细胞及其前体细胞制成疫苗也可起到直接杀伤作用. 到目前为止, 虽然很多抑制肿瘤血管的药物已经被用于临床试验, 但结果往往不尽如人意, 从长远来看, 需要更有效的治疗方法. 包括抗血管基因治疗策略, 靶向药物导入系统的研究, 以及抗血管生成药物和免疫疗法、化疗和放射治疗的联合应用都在探讨中. 随着肿瘤模型评估系统的发展, 抗血管治疗肿瘤的方法在不久的将来一定会广泛进入临床应用.%Neovascularization is a prerequisite for progressive growth of most tumors and their metastases. Therefore, inhibition of angiogenesis could be one of the most promising strategies that might lead to the development of novel anticancer therapy. New blood vessels forming in tumors can be avoided by interfering the process of angiogenesis through suppressing the proangiogenic signal or augmenting the antiangiogenic factors. Concentrated efforts in this area have lead to the discovery of many proangiogenic factors as well as their inhibitors, and antiangiogenic factors. For the established tumor vasculature, tumor vasculature-targeted delivery of antiangiogenic substances and endothelial cell vaccines has been explored. Although some antiangiogenic drugs are currently in clinical development, for future reason, more efficient therapeutic methods

  11. Benefits of combined radioimmunotherapy and anti-angiogenic therapy in a liver metastasis model of human colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiao-Feng; Kinuya, Seigo; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Michigishi, Takatoshi; Tonami, Norihisa [Department of Biotracer Medicine, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 13-1 Takaramachi, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-8640 (Japan); Koshida, Kiyoshi [Department of Integrative Cancer Therapy and Urology, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kanazawa (Japan); Mori, Hirofumi; Shiba, Kazuhiro [Radioiosotope Center, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa (Japan); Watanabe, Naoto [Department of Radiology, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Toyama (Japan); Shuke, Noriyuki [Department of Radiology, Asahikawa Medical College, Asahikawa (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    The combined use of anti-angiogenic therapy (AT) and radioimmunotherapy (RIT) may improve the therapeutic outcome in patients with cancer lesions. This hypothesis is based on the ability of AT to suppress tumour endothelial compartments and the direct action of RIT against tumour cells. We previously confirmed this hypothesis in an established subcutaneous xenograft model of colon cancer. The purpose of the current investigation was to determine the benefit of this combination within a liver metastasis model, which mimics treatment of minimal disease in an adjuvant setting. Liver metastases were established in nude mice by intrasplenic inoculation of LS180 colon cancer cells; following such inoculation, metastases of <1 mm in diameter can be observed at 1 week and these lesions can attain a size of several millimetres at 2 weeks. Daily AT with 2-methoxyoestradiol (2-ME), 75 mg/kg, was initiated at 1 week. RIT with 7 MBq of {sup 131}I-A7, an IgG1 anti-colorectal monoclonal antibody, was conducted at 2 weeks. RIT employing an irrelevant IgG1, {sup 131}I-HPMS-1, was implemented for comparison. The weight of liver metastases was measured 4 weeks after cell inoculation. The effect of AT on {sup 131}I-A7 accumulation in metastases was also observed. Toxicity of treatment was monitored by blood cell counts. Monotherapy with 2-ME AT or {sup 131}I-A7 RIT significantly suppressed metastasis growth (P<0.0001): metastasis weight was 5.96{+-}0.87 g in non-treated controls, 2.67{+-}1.89 g in cases receiving AT and 0.85{+-}0.68 g in those receiving {sup 131}I-A7 RIT. Combination of AT and {sup 131}I-A7 RIT more effectively suppressed the growth to 0.28{+-}0.32 g (P<0.05 vs RIT alone). The effect of {sup 131}I-HPMS-1 RIT, which suppressed metastasis growth to 2.25{+-}0.88 g, was significant in comparison with the control (P<0.0001); however, the combination of AT and {sup 131}I-HPMS-1 RIT (which suppressed growth to 1.41{+-}0.68 g) was far less effective than the combination of AT

  12. Immuno-Expression of Endoglin and Smooth Muscle Actin in the Vessels of Brain Metastases. Is There a Rational for Anti-Angiogenic Therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Barresi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite ongoing clinical trials, the efficacy of anti-angiogenic drugs for the treatment of brain metastases (BM is still questionable. The lower response rate to anti-angiogenic therapy in the presence of BM than in metastatic disease involving other sites suggests that BM may be insensitive to these drugs, although the biological reasons underlining this phenomenon are still to be clarified. With the aim of assessing whether the targets of anti-angiogenic therapies are actually present in BM, in the present study, we analyzed the microvessel density (MVD, a measure of neo-angiogenesis, and the vascular phenotype (mature vs. immature in the tumor tissue of a series of BM derived from different primary tumors. By using immunohistochemistry against endoglin, a specific marker for newly formed vessels, we found that neo-angiogenesis widely varies in BM depending on the site of the primary tumor, as well as on its histotype. According to our results, BM from lung cancer displayed the highest MVD counts, while those from renal carcinoma had the lowest. Then, among BM from lung cancer, those from large cell and adenocarcinoma histotypes had significantly higher MVD counts than those originating from squamous cell carcinoma (p = 0.0043; p = 0.0063. Of note, MVD counts were inversely correlated with the maturation index of the endoglin-stained vessels, reflected by the coverage of smooth muscle actin (SMA positive pericytes (r = −0.693; p < 0.0001. Accordingly, all the endoglin-positive vessels in BM from pulmonary squamous cell carcinoma and renal carcinoma, displayed a mature phenotype, while vessels with an immature phenotype were found in highly vascularized BM from pulmonary large cell and adenocarcinoma. The low MVD and mature phenotype observed in BM from some primary tumors may account for their low sensitivity to anti-angiogenic therapies. Although our findings need to be validated in correlative studies with a clinical response, this should

  13. Cellular Adaptation to VEGF-Targeted Antiangiogenic Therapy Induces Evasive Resistance by Overproduction of Alternative Endothelial Cell Growth Factors in Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyung Seok; Raven, Peter A; Frees, Sebastian; Gust, Kilian; Fazli, Ladan; Ettinger, Susan; Hong, Sung Joon; Kollmannsberger, Cristian; Gleave, Martin E; So, Alan I

    2015-11-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-targeted antiangiogenic therapy significantly inhibits the growth of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Eventually, therapy resistance develops in even the most responsive cases, but the mechanisms of resistance remain unclear. Herein, we developed two tumor models derived from an RCC cell line by conditioning the parental cells to two different stresses caused by VEGF-targeted therapy (sunitinib exposure and hypoxia) to investigate the mechanism of resistance to such therapy in RCC. Sunitinib-conditioned Caki-1 cells in vitro did not show resistance to sunitinib compared with parental cells, but when tested in vivo, these cells appeared to be highly resistant to sunitinib treatment. Hypoxia-conditioned Caki-1 cells are more resistant to hypoxia and have increased vascularity due to the upregulation of VEGF production; however, they did not develop sunitinib resistance either in vitro or in vivo. Human endothelial cells were more proliferative and showed increased tube formation in conditioned media from sunitinib-conditioned Caki-1 cells compared with parental cells. Gene expression profiling using RNA microarrays revealed that several genes related to tissue development and remodeling, including the development and migration of endothelial cells, were upregulated in sunitinib-conditioned Caki-1 cells compared with parental and hypoxia-conditioned cells. These findings suggest that evasive resistance to VEGF-targeted therapy is acquired by activation of VEGF-independent angiogenesis pathways induced through interactions with VEGF-targeted drugs, but not by hypoxia. These results emphasize that increased inhibition of tumor angiogenesis is required to delay the development of resistance to antiangiogenic therapy and maintain the therapeutic response in RCC.

  14. Current protein-based anti-angiogenic therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Sanjukta; Barrow, Colin J; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Ramana, Venkata; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a multistep process for the formation of new blood vessels. Interactions between several cellular factors including growth factors, cytokines and hematopoietic factors lead to activation of various cellular pathways finally resulting in the extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation, endothelial cell proliferation, survival and migration. Normally, angiogenesis is an essential requirement for vascular development in growing embryos as well as in adult tissues where this process depends on the intricate balance between the activities of the pro- and anti-angiogenic factors. Abnormal angiogenesis results in aberrant vasculature leading to various pathological conditions. The most important factor implicated in angiogenic processes is vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its family of ligands and receptors. Several anti-angiogenic drugs have been developed and many more are currently in different phases of clinical trials, which target various angiogenesis-inducing agents including VEGF, VEGF receptors, angiopoietins and ECM components such as integrins. Anti-angiogenic therapy can be divided into gene-based therapy and protein-based therapy. Gene-based therapies include the use of antisense oligonucleotides, siRNA, aptamers, catalytic oligonucleotides including ribozymes and DNAzymes and transcription decoys. Protein-based therapeutics includes monoclonal antibodies, peptidomimetics, fusion proteins and decoy receptors. The later class of therapeutics has several advantages over gene-based and small molecule drugs, including specificity and complexity in functions, better tolerability, less interference with normal biological processes and lesser adverse effects due to decreased immune response by virtue of being mostly body's natural proteins. This review provides a comprehensive overview of angiogenesis and on the current protein-based anti-angiogenic therapeutics under research and in the clinic.

  15. Mechanisms of Glioma Formation: Iterative Perivascular Glioma Growth and Invasion Leads to Tumor Progression, VEGF-Independent Vascularization, and Resistance to Antiangiogenic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory J. Baker

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available As glioma cells infiltrate the brain they become associated with various microanatomic brain structures such as blood vessels, white matter tracts, and brain parenchyma. How these distinct invasion patterns coordinate tumor growth and influence clinical outcomes remain poorly understood. We have investigated how perivascular growth affects glioma growth patterning and response to antiangiogenic therapy within the highly vascularized brain. Orthotopically implanted rodent and human glioma cells are shown to commonly invade and proliferate within brain perivascular space. This form of brain tumor growth and invasion is also shown to characterize de novo generated endogenous mouse brain tumors, biopsies of primary human glioblastoma (GBM, and peripheral cancer metastasis to the human brain. Perivascularly invading brain tumors become vascularized by normal brain microvessels as individual glioma cells use perivascular space as a conduit for tumor invasion. Agent-based computational modeling recapitulated biological perivascular glioma growth without the need for neoangiogenesis. We tested the requirement for neoangiogenesis in perivascular glioma by treating animals with angiogenesis inhibitors bevacizumab and DC101. These inhibitors induced the expected vessel normalization, yet failed to reduce tumor growth or improve survival of mice bearing orthotopic or endogenous gliomas while exacerbating brain tumor invasion. Our results provide compelling experimental evidence in support of the recently described failure of clinically used antiangiogenics to extend the overall survival of human GBM patients.

  16. Pitfalls in the Neuroimaging of Glioblastoma in the Era of Antiangiogenic and Immuno/Targeted Therapy - Detecting Illusive Disease, Defining Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Yi-Kun Huang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma, the most common malignant primary brain tumor in adults is a devastating diagnosis with an average survival of 14-16 months using the current standard of care treatment. The determination of treatment response and clinical decision making is based on the accuracy of radiographic assessment. Notwithstanding, challenges exist in the neuroimaging evaluation of patients undergoing treatment for malignant glioma.Differentiating treatment response from tumor progression is problematic and currently combines long-term follow-up using standard MRI, with clinical status and corticosteroid-dependency assessments. In the clinical trial setting, treatment with gene therapy, vaccines, immunotherapy, and targeted biologicals similarly produces MRI changes mimicking disease progression. A neuroimaging method to clearly distinguish between pseudoprogression and tumor progression has unfortunately not been found to date. With the incorporation of antiangiogenic therapies, a further pitfall in imaging interpretation is pseudoresponse. The Macdonald Criteria that correlate tumor burden with contrast enhanced imaging proved insufficient and misleading in the context of rapid blood brain barrier normalization following antiangiogenic treatment that is not accompanied by expected survival benefit. Even improved criteria, such as the RANO criteria, that incorporate non-enhancing disease, clinical status, and need for corticosteroid use, fall short of definitively distinguishing tumor progression, pseudoresponse, and pseudoprogression.This review focuses on advanced imaging techniques including perfusion MRI, diffusion MRI, MR spectroscopy, and new PET imaging tracers. The relevant image analysis algorithms and interpretation methods of these promising techniques are discussed in the context of determining response and progression during treatment of glioblastoma both in the standard of care as well as clinical trial context.

  17. Anti-angiogenic therapeutic strategies in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela S. Ardelean

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT is an autosomal dominant vascular dysplastic disorder, characterized by recurrent nosebleeds (epistaxis, multiple telangiectases and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs in major organs. Mutations in Endoglin (ENG or CD105 and Activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ACVRL1 or ALK1 genes of the TGF-β superfamily receptors are responsible for HHT1 and HHT2 respectively and account for the majority of HHT cases. Haploinsufficiency in ENG and ALK1 is recognized at the underlying cause of HHT. However, the mechanisms responsible for the predisposition to and generation of AVMs, the hallmark of this disease, are poorly understood. Recent data suggest that dysregulated angiogenesis contributes to the pathogenesis of HHT and that the vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF, may be implicated in this disease, by modulating the angiogenic balance in the affected tissues. Hence, anti-angiogenic therapies that target the abnormal vessels and restore the angiogenic balance are candidates for treatment of HHT. Here we review the experimental evidence for dysregulated angiogenesis in HHT, the anti-angiogenic therapeutic strategies used in animal models and some patients with HHT and the potential benefit of the anti-angiogenic treatment for ameliorating this severe, progressive vascular disease.

  18. Multiparametric Monitoring of Early Response to Antiangiogenic Therapy: A Sequential Perfusion CT and PET/CT Study in a Rabbit VX2 Tumor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Im Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To perform dual analysis of tumor perfusion and glucose metabolism using perfusion CT and FDG-PET/CT for the purpose of monitoring the early response to bevacizumab therapy in rabbit VX2 tumor models and to assess added value of FDG-PET to perfusion CT. Methods. Twenty-four VX2 carcinoma tumors implanted in bilateral back muscles of 12 rabbits were evaluated. Serial concurrent perfusion CT and FDG-PET/CT were performed before and 3, 7, and 14 days after bevacizumab therapy (treatment group or saline infusion (control group. Perfusion CT was analyzed to calculate blood flow (BF, blood volume (BV, and permeability surface area product (PS; FDG-PET was analyzed to calculate SUVmax, SUVmean, total lesion glycolysis (TLG, entropy, and homogeneity. The flow-metabolic ratio (FMR was also calculated and immunohistochemical analysis of microvessel density (MVD was performed. Results. On day 14, BF and BV in the treatment group were significantly lower than in the control group. There were no significant differences in all FDG-PET-derived parameters between both groups. In the treatment group, FMR prominently decreased after therapy and was positively correlated with MVD. Conclusions. In VX2 tumors, FMR could provide further insight into the early antiangiogenic effect reflecting a mismatch in intratumor blood flow and metabolism.

  19. Rapamycin/DiR loaded lipid-polyaniline nanoparticles for dual-modal imaging guided enhanced photothermal and antiangiogenic combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinping; Guo, Fang; Yu, Meng; Liu, Li; Tan, Fengping; Yan, Ran; Li, Nan

    2016-09-10

    Imaging-guided photothermal therapy (PTT) has promising application for treating tumors. Nevertheless, so far imaging-guided photothermal drug-delivery systems have been developed with limited success for tumor chemo-photothermal therapy. In this study, as the proof-of-concept, a stimuli-responsive tumor-targeting rapamycin/DiR loaded lipid-polyaniline nanoparticle (RDLPNP) for dual-modal imaging-guided enhanced PTT efficacy is reported for the first time. In this system, polyaniline (PANI) with π-π electronic conjugated system and effective photothermal efficiency is chosen as the appropriate model receptor of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), and loaded cyanine probe (e.g., 1,1-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3-tetramethylindotricarbocyanine iodide, DiR) acts as the donor of near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF). In addition, rapamycin (RAPA), which is used as the antiangiogenesis chemotherapeutic drug, can cutdown the tumor vessels and delay tumor growth obviously. After intravenous treatment of RDLPNPs into Hela tumor bearing mice, fluorescent (from DiR) and enhanced photoacoustic (from DLPNPs) signals were found in tumor site over time, which reached to peak at the 6h time point. After irradiating with an NIR laser, a good anti-tumor effect was observed owing to the enhanced photothermal and antiangiogenic effect of RDLPNPs. These results show that the multifunctional nanoparticle can be used as a promising imaging-guided photothermal drug delivery nanoplatform for cancer therapy.

  20. Monitoring Response to Antiangiogenic Therapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Using Imaging Markers Derived from PET and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Langen, Adrianus J.; van den Boogaart, Vivian; Lubberink, Mark; Backes, Walter H.; Marcus, Johannes T.; van Tinteren, Harm; Pruim, Jan; Brans, Boudewijn; Leffers, Pieter; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C.; Smit, Egbert F.; Groen, Harry J. M.; Hoekstra, Otto S.

    2011-01-01

    With antiangiogenic agents, tumor shrinkage may be absent, despite survival benefit. The present study assessed the predictive value of molecular imaging for the identification of survival benefit during antiangiogenic treatment with bevacizumab and erlotinib in patients with advanced non-small cell

  1. Angiogenic molecular signature in colorectal cancer: Pharmacogenomic implications for the use of antiangiogenic therapies

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    In the framework of personalized medicine in antiangiogenesis, we took a translational research approach to explore the angiogenic molecular signature of advanced CRC patients. As derived from our findings in vitro, the tumour microenvironment of CRC metastases would be different to that of primary tumours. The mCRC more aggressive molecular phenotype provides some intrinsic resistance to the hypoxic induction of VEGF expression. The distinct metastatic "secretome" emerge as potential pro...

  2. Phenylboronic acid-sugar grafted polymer architecture as a dual stimuli-responsive gene carrier for targeted anti-angiogenic tumor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinhwan; Lee, Yeong Mi; Kim, Hyunwoo; Park, Dongsik; Kim, Jihoon; Kim, Won Jong

    2016-01-01

    We present a cationic polymer architecture composed of phenylboronic acid (PBA), sugar-installed polyethylenimine (PEI), and polyethylene glycol (PEG). The chemical bonding of PBA with the diol in the sugar enabled the crosslinking of low-molecular-weight (MW) PEI to form high-MW PEI, resulting in strong interaction with anionic DNA for gene delivery. Inside the cell, the binding of PBA and sugar was disrupted by either acidic endosomal pH or intracellular ATP, so gene payloads were released effectively. This dual stimuli-responsive gene release drove the polymer to deliver DNA for high transfection efficiency with low cytotoxicity. In addition, PBA moiety with PEGylation facilitated the binding of polymer/DNA polyplexes to sialylated glycoprotein which is overexpressed on the tumor cell membrane, and thus provided high tumor targeting ability. Therapeutic application of our polymer was demonstrated as an anti-angiogenic gene delivery agent for tumor growth inhibition. Our judicious designed polymer structure based on PBA provides enormous potential as a gene delivery agent for effective gene therapy by stimuli-responsiveness and tumor targeting.

  3. TU-G-BRA-07: Characterization of Tumor Proliferation During Successive Cycles of Anti-Angiogenic Therapy Using [F-18]FLT PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarpelli, M; Perlman, S; Harmon, S; Perk, T; Scully, P; Bruce, J; Liu, G; Jeraj, R [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Studies have shown cessation of anti-angiogenic treatment during the first cycle of therapy resulted in rebound of tumor proliferation (flare). This study characterized proliferation dynamics during the first and third cycle of anti-angiogenic treatment using [F-18]FLT PET. Methods: Thirteen patients with various solid cancers were treated with Axitinib (Pfizer, Inc) at a dose of 5mg orally, twice daily, on contiguous three-week cycles with intermittent dosing (two-weeks-on/one-week-off). All patients received three FLT PET/CT scans during cycle 1 (C1): at baseline (C1D0), peak Axitinib concentration (C1D14), and the end of washout (C1D21). Ten patients received up to an additional three scans at corresponding time points during cycle 3 (C3). Lesions were identified by a nuclear medicine physician and manually contoured. Tumor burden was quantified using standard SUV metrics. Correlations between imaging metrics across C1 and C3 were calculated using the Spearman correlation. Results: At C1 peak drug concentration 11/13 patients had decreases in SUVtotal, with median decrease of 50% (change from C1D0 to C1D14). At C3 peak drug concentration 7/7 patients had decreases in SUVtotal, with median decrease of 20% (C3D0 to C3D14). Proliferative flare during C1 washout (>20% increase from C1D14 to C1D21) occurred in 9/13 patients, with median SUVtotal increase of 190%. Flare was also seen in C3 for 5/5 patients, with median SUVtotal increase of 70% (change from C3D14 to C3D21). Correlations were found between changes in imaging metrics across C1 and C3, notably the change in SUVtotal from C1D0 to C1D21 and the change in SUVtotal from C1D0 to C3D0 (ρ = 0.80). Conclusion: Measurements of SUVtotal showed that both patient response to treatment and flare were evident in both cycles of treatment. Correlation between changes in SUVtotal across C1 and C3 suggest early time points could be used to characterize patient response in later cycles. Research funded in part by

  4. Antiangiogenic strategies in medulloblastoma: reality or mystery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grizzi, Fabio; Weber, Christina; Di Ieva, Antonio

    2008-05-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood. Surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy successfully cure many patients, but survivors can suffer long-term toxicities affecting their neurocognitive and growth potential; furthermore, there is no curative therapy in up to 30% of cases, mainly because of our incomplete understanding of many of the underlying molecular and cellular processes. Angiogenesis is a hallmark of the progression of medulloblastoma and, over the last years, investigators have sought to develop effective and less toxic antiangiogenic strategies, including the inhibition or destruction of abnormal blood vessels using either antiangiogenic or vascular disrupting agents. However, the results are conflicting principally because of the complex biology of tumor vasculature and the irregular geometry of the vascular system in real space. In addition, current targets of antiangiogenic therapy, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), are thought to be critical for both physiologic and pathologic angiogenesis, and clinical side effects of anti-VEGF therapy are beginning to emerge. We here review the state-of-the-art concerning antiangiogenic targets for medulloblastoma treatment, and discuss the complexity of the vascular system that intrinsically limits the efficacy of current strategies.

  5. Early biomarkers from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging to predict the response to antiangiogenic therapy in high-grade gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piludu, Francesca; Vidiri, Antonello [Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging Department, Rome (Italy); Marzi, Simona [Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Medical Physics Laboratory, Rome (Italy); Pace, Andrea; Villani, Veronica [Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Neurology Division, Rome (Italy); Fabi, Alessandra [Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Oncology Department, Rome (Italy); Carapella, Carmine Maria [Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Oncologic Surgery Department, Rome (Italy); Terrenato, Irene [Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Biostatistics-Scientific Direction, Rome (Italy); Antenucci, Anna [Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Clinical Pathology, Rome (Italy)

    2015-12-15

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether early changes in tumor volume and perfusion measurements derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) may predict response to antiangiogenic therapy in recurrent high-grade gliomas. Twenty-seven patients who received bevacizumab every 3 weeks were enrolled in the study. For each patient, three MRI scans were performed: at baseline, after the first dose, and after the fourth dose of bevacizumab. The entire tumor volume (V{sub tot}), as well as contrast-enhanced and noncontrast-enhanced tumor subvolumes (V{sub CE-T1} and V{sub NON-CE-T1}, respectively) were outlined using post-contrast T1-weighted images as a guide for the tumor location. Histogram analysis of normalized IAUGC (nIAUGC) and transfer constant K{sup trans} maps were performed. Each patient was classified as a responder patient if he/she had a partial response or a stable disease or as a nonresponder patient if he/she had progressive disease. Responding patients showed a larger reduction in V{sub NON-CE-T1} after a single dose, compared to nonresponding patients. Tumor subvolumes with increased values of nIAUGC and K{sup trans}, after a single dose, significantly differed between responders and nonresponders. The radiological response was found to be significantly associated to the clinical outcome. After a single dose, V{sub tot} was predictive of overall survival (OS), while V{sub CE-T1} showed a tendency of correlation with OS. Tumor subvolumes with increased nIAUGC and K{sup trans} showed the potential for improving the diagnostic accuracy of DCE. Early assessments of the entire tumor volume, including necrotic areas, may provide complementary information of tumor behavior in response to anti-VEGF therapies and is worth further investigation. (orig.)

  6. Therapeutic application of anti-angiogenic nanomaterials in cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sudip; Patra, Chitta Ranjan

    2016-06-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vasculature, plays a vital role in physiological and pathological processes (embryonic development, wound healing, tumor growth and metastasis). The overall balance of angiogenesis inside the human body is maintained by pro- and anti-angiogenic signals. The processes by which drugs inhibit angiogenesis as well as tumor growth are called the anti-angiogenesis technique, a most promising cancer treatment strategy. Over the last couple of decades, scientists have been developing angiogenesis inhibitors for the treatment of cancers. However, conventional anti-angiogenic therapy has several limitations including drug resistance that can create problems for a successful therapeutic strategy. Therefore, a new comprehensive treatment strategy using antiangiogenic agents for the treatment of cancer is urgently needed. Recently researchers have been developing and designing several nanoparticles that show anti-angiogenic properties. These nanomedicines could be useful as an alternative strategy for the treatment of various cancers using anti-angiogenic therapy. In this review article, we critically focus on the potential application of anti-angiogenic nanomaterial and nanoparticle based drug/siRNA/peptide delivery systems in cancer therapeutics. We also discuss the basic and clinical perspectives of anti-angiogenesis therapy, highlighting its importance in tumor angiogenesis, current status and future prospects and challenges.Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vasculature, plays a vital role in physiological and pathological processes (embryonic development, wound healing, tumor growth and metastasis). The overall balance of angiogenesis inside the human body is maintained by pro- and anti-angiogenic signals. The processes by which drugs inhibit angiogenesis as well as tumor growth are called the anti-angiogenesis technique, a most promising cancer treatment strategy. Over the

  7. Combined anti-angiogenic therapy targeting PDGF and VEGF receptors lowers the interstitial fluid pressure in a murine experimental carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Kłosowska-Wardega

    Full Text Available Elevation of the interstitial fluid pressure (IFP of carcinoma is an obstacle in treatment of tumors by chemotherapy and correlates with poor drug uptake. Previous studies have shown that treatment with inhibitors of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF signaling lowers the IFP of tumors and improve chemotherapy. In this study, we investigated whether the combination of PDGFR and VEGFR inhibitors could further reduce the IFP of KAT-4 human carcinoma tumors. The tumor IFP was measured using the wick-in-needle technique. The combination of STI571 and PTK/ZK gave an additive effect on the lowering of the IFP of KAT-4 tumors, but the timing of the treatment was crucial. The lowering of IFP following combination therapy was accompanied by vascular remodeling and decreased vascular leakiness. The effects of the inhibitors on the therapeutic efficiency of Taxol were investigated. Whereas the anti-PDGF and anti-VEGF treatment did not significantly inhibit tumor growth, the inhibitors enhanced the effect of chemotherapy. Despite having an additive effect in decreasing tumor IFP, the combination therapy did not further enhance the effect of chemotherapy. Simultaneous targeting of VEGFR and PDGFR kinase activity may be a useful strategy to decrease tumor IFP, but the timing of the inhibitors should be carefully determined.

  8. Exploiting Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR Technology for the Identification of Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 (FGF2 Antagonists Endowed with Antiangiogenic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Presta

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis, the process of new blood vessel formation, is implicated in various physiological/pathological conditions, including embryonic development, inflammation and tumor growth. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2 is a heparin-binding angiogenic growth factor involved in various physiopathological processes, including tumor neovascularization. Accordingly, FGF2 is considered a target for antiangiogenic therapies. Thus, numerous natural/synthetic compounds have been tested for their capacity to bind and sequester FGF2 in the extracellular environment preventing its interaction with cellular receptors. We have exploited surface plasmon resonance (SPR technique in search for antiangiogenic FGF2 binders/antagonists. In this review we will summarize our experience in SPR-based angiogenesis research, with the aim to validate SPR as a first line screening for the identification of antiangiogenic compounds.

  9. Antiangiogenic cancer treatment: The great discovery and greater complexity (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Ewa; Papiernik, Diana; Wietrzyk, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of tumor angiogenesis opened a new path in fighting cancer. The approval of different antiangiogenic agents, most targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling, has either increased the effectiveness of standard chemotherapy or even replaced it by offering better patient outcomes. However, an increasing number of preclinical and clinical observations have shown that the process of angiogenesis is far from clearly understood. Apart from targeting the VEGF pathway, novel strategies aim to influence other molecular factors that are involved in tumor angiogenesis. In addition, naturally occurring compounds seem to offer additional agents for influencing angiogenesis. The first concept of antiangiogenic therapy aimed to destroy tumor vessels, while it turned out that, paradoxically, antiangiogenic drugs normalized vasculature and as a result offered an improvement in chemotherapeutic delivery. In order to design an effective treatment schedule, methods for detecting the time window of normalization and biomarkers predicting patient response are needed. The initial idea that antiangiogenic therapy would be resistance-free failed to materialize and currently we still face the obstacle of resistance to antiangiogenic therapy.

  10. Perfusion CT allows prediction of therapy response in non-small cell lung cancer treated with conventional and anti-angiogenic chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tacelli, Nunzia; Santangelo, Teresa; Remy, Jacques [University of Lille Nord de France, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette (EA 2694), Lille (France); University of Lille Nord de France, Faculty of Medicine, Henri Warembourg, Lille (France); Scherpereel, Arnaud; Cortot, Alexis; Wallyn, Frederic [University of Lille Nord de France, Faculty of Medicine, Henri Warembourg, Lille (France); University of Lille Nord de France, Department of Pulmonary and Thoracic Oncology, Lille (France); Duhamel, Alain; Deken, Valerie [University of Lille Nord de France, Faculty of Medicine, Henri Warembourg, Lille (France); University of Lille Nord de France, Department of Medical Statistics, Lille (France); Klotz, Ernst [Siemens Healthcare, Computed Tomography Division, Forchheim (Germany); Lafitte, Jean-Jacques [University of Lille Nord de France, Faculty of Medicine, Henri Warembourg, Lille (France); University of Lille Nord de France, Department of Pulmonary and Thoracic Oncology, Lille (France); Pasteur Institute of Lille, INSERM unit 1019, CIIL, Lille (France); Remy-Jardin, Martine [University of Lille Nord de France, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette (EA 2694), Lille (France); University of Lille Nord de France, Faculty of Medicine, Henri Warembourg, Lille (France); Hospital Calmette, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Lille cedex (France)

    2013-08-15

    To determine whether CT can depict early perfusion changes in lung cancer treated by anti-angiogenic drugs, allowing prediction of response. Patients with non-small cell lung cancer, treated by conventional chemotherapy with (Group 1; n = 17) or without (Group 2; n = 23) anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) drug (bevacizumab) underwent CT perfusion before (TIME 0) and after 1 (TIME 1), 3 (TIME 2) and 6 (TIME 3) cycles of chemotherapy. The CT parameters evaluated included: (1) total tumour vascular volume (TVV) and total tumour extravascular flow (TEF); (2) RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours) measurements. Tumour response was also assessed on the basis of the clinicians' overall evaluation. In Group 1, significant reduction in perfusion was identified between baseline and: (1) TIME 1 (TVV, P = 0.0395; TEF, P = 0.015); (2) TIME 2 (TVV, P = 0.0043; TEF, P < 0.0001); (3) TIME 3 (TVV, P = 0.0034; TEF, P = 0.0005) without any significant change in Group 2. In Group 1: (1) the reduction in TVV at TIME 1 was significantly higher in responders versus non-responders at TIME 2 according to RECIST (P = 0.0128) and overall clinicians' evaluation (P = 0.0079); (2) all responders at TIME 2 had a concurrent decrease in TVV and TEF at TIME 1. Perfusion CT demonstrates early changes in lung cancer vascularity under anti-angiogenic chemotherapy that may help predict therapeutic response. (orig.)

  11. 68Ga-TRAP-(RGD)3 Hybrid Imaging for the In Vivo Monitoring of αvß3-Integrin Expression as Biomarker of Anti-Angiogenic Therapy Effects in Experimental Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmierczak, Philipp M.; Todica, Andrei; Gildehaus, Franz-Josef; Hirner-Eppeneder, Heidrun; Brendel, Matthias; Eschbach, Ralf S.; Hellmann, Magdalena; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Kropf, Saskia; Rominger, Axel; Cyran, Clemens C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate 68Ga-TRAP-(RGD)3 hybrid imaging for the in vivo monitoring of αvß3-integrin expression as biomarker of anti-angiogenic therapy effects in experimental breast cancer. Materials and Methods Human breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) xenografts were implanted orthotopically into the mammary fat pads of n = 25 SCID mice. Transmission/emission scans (53 min to 90 min after i.v. injection of 20 MBq 68Ga-TRAP-(RGD)3) were performed on a dedicated small animal PET before (day 0, baseline) and after (day 7, follow-up) a 1-week therapy with the VEGF antibody bevacizumab or placebo (imaging cohort n = 13; therapy n = 7, control n = 6). The target-to-background ratio (TBR, VOImaxtumor/VOImeanmuscle) served as semiquantitative measure of tumor radiotracer uptake. Unenhanced CT data sets were subsequently acquired for anatomic coregistration and morphology-based tumor response assessments (CT volumetry). The imaging results were validated by multiparametric ex vivo immunohistochemistry (αvß3-integrin, microvascular density–CD31, proliferation–Ki-67, apoptosis–TUNEL) conducted in a dedicated immunohistochemistry cohort (n = 12). Results 68Ga-TRAP-(RGD)3 binding was significantly reduced under VEGF inhibition and decreased in all bevacizumab-treated animals (ΔTBRfollow-up/baseline: therapy -1.07±0.83, control +0.32±1.01, p = 0.022). No intergroup difference in tumor volume development between day 0 and day 7 was observed (Δvolumetherapy 134±77 μL, Δvolumecontrol 132±56 μL, p = 1.000). Immunohistochemistry revealed a significant reduction of αvß3-integrin expression (308±135 vs. 635±325, p = 0.03), microvascular density (CD31, 168±108 vs. 432±70, p = 0.002), proliferation (Ki-67, 5,195±1,002 vs. 7,574±418, p = 0.004) and significantly higher apoptosis (TUNEL, 14,432±1,974 vs. 3,776±1,378, p = 0.002) in the therapy compared to the control group. Conclusions 68Ga-TRAP-(RGD)3 hybrid imaging allows for the in vivo assessment of αvß3

  12. Implications of laboratory diagnosis on brucellosis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Dahouk, Sascha; Nöckler, Karsten

    2011-07-01

    Brucellosis is a worldwide zoonosis with a huge economic impact on animal husbandry and public health. The diagnosis of human brucellosis can be protracted because the disease primarily presents as fever of unknown origin with unspecific clinical signs and symptoms. The isolation rate of the fastidious etiologic agent from blood cultures is low, and therefore laboratory diagnosis is mainly based on serologic and molecular testing. However, seronegative brucellosis patients have been described, and antibody titers of diagnostic significance are difficult to define. Whether the molecular detection of Brucella DNA in clinical samples should be followed by long-term antibiotic treatment or not is also a matter of debate. The aim of this article is to review and discuss the implications of laboratory test results in the diagnosis of human brucellosis on disease therapy.

  13. Computational systems biology approaches to anti-angiogenic cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Stacey D; Chu, Liang-Hui; Popel, Aleksander S

    2015-02-01

    Angiogenesis is an exquisitely regulated process that is required for physiological processes and is also important in numerous diseases. Tumors utilize angiogenesis to generate the vascular network needed to supply the cancer cells with nutrients and oxygen, and many cancer drugs aim to inhibit tumor angiogenesis. Anti-angiogenic therapy involves inhibiting multiple cell types, molecular targets, and intracellular signaling pathways. Computational tools are useful in guiding treatment strategies, predicting the response to treatment, and identifying new targets of interest. Here, we describe progress that has been made in applying mathematical modeling and bioinformatics approaches to study anti-angiogenic therapeutics in cancer.

  14. Latest Results for Anti-Angiogenic Drugs in Cancer Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Sofie; Kopp, Sascha; Wehland, Markus;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Angiogenesis is a mechanism, which tumors use to recruit oxygen and nutrients in order to maintain growth. The vascular endothelial growth factor family is the primary mediator of this process. For the last couple of decades, inhibition of angiogenesis has been the subject of extensiv...... mechanisms are necessary. Moreover, biomarker studies in future clinical investigations are important for the development of the next generation of anti-angiogenic drugs....... research, but so far anti-angiogenic drugs have only shown a modest effect. METHODS: This paper reviews four relevant anti-angiogenic drugs: bevacizumab, ramucirumab, nintedanib and sunitinib. The primary focus will be recent trials investigating the effects of the drugs in lung, breast...... and gastrointestinal cancers. Furthermore, there will be a discussion of unsolved problems, such as lack of biomarkers, drug resistance, and adverse events, for which a solution is necessary in order to improve the benefit of anti-angiogenic drugs in the future. RESULTS: Anti-angiogenic therapy is extensively used...

  15. Antiangiogenic VEGF-Ax: A New Participant in Tumor Angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eswarappa, Sandeepa M; Fox, Paul L

    2015-07-15

    The transcript of the angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) is subject to a multitude of stimulus-dependent, posttranscriptional regulatory events, consistent with its unusually long 3' untranslated region. We have recently reported translational readthrough of VEGFA mRNA whereby translating ribosomes traverse the canonical stop codon to a conserved, downstream stop codon, generating VEGF-Ax ("x" for extended), a novel, extended isoform with an additional 22 amino acids appended at the C-terminus. This event is the first vertebrate example of protein-regulated, programmed translational readthrough that generates a protein with a known function. Remarkably, VEGF-Ax exhibits potent antiangiogenic activity, both in vitro and in vivo, thus raising profound clinical implications, particularly with respect to cancer treatment. In this review, we discuss the potential of VEGF-Ax as a therapeutic agent and drug target, as well as its possible role in the failure of, or resistance to, conventional anti-VEGF therapies in many types of cancers.

  16. Angiogenesis and Anti-Angiogenic Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersin Demirer

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Blood vessels in our body is developed by vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. There have been new advances in molecular pathology and tumor biology areas in recent years. Angiogenesis is modulated by the balance between angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors. Angiogenesis plays a key role in tumor growth. Drugs inhibiting angiogenesis have been in use in various malign or non-malign diseases. Inhibition of angiogenesis in malign diseases is a very attractive subject in medicine and studies are going on about long term affects and toxicities. Inhibition of angiogenesis is not an only treatment choice alone. It is a supplemental treatment option applied with conventional chemotherapy, radiotherapy, surgery, immunotherapy and hormonal therapy. It has been used in colorectal carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, non-small cell lung cancer, glioblastoma, heoatocellular carcinoma, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor, tyroid medullary cancer.

  17. Comparison of anti-angiogenic properties of pristine carbon nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Sawosz, Ewa; Grodzik, Marta;

    2013-01-01

    nanoparticles decreased the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor. These results provide new insights into the biological activity of carbon nanomaterials and emphasise the potential use of multi-wall nanotubes and diamond nanoparticles in anti-angiogenic tumour therapy.......Angiogenesis is vital for tumour formation, development and metastasis. Recent reports show that carbon nanomaterials inhibit various angiogenic signalling pathways and, therefore, can be potentially used in anti-angiogenic therapy. In the present study, we compared the effect of different carbon...... nanomaterials on blood vessel development. Diamond nanoparticles, graphite nanoparticles, graphene nanosheets, multi-wall nanotubes and C60 fullerenes were evaluated for their angiogenic activities using the in ovo chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane model. Diamond nanoparticles and multi-wall nanotubes...

  18. Postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy--clinical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, S H; Rosenberg, J; Bostofte, E

    1994-01-01

    in the urogenital tract. Women at risk of osteoporosis will benefit from hormone replacement therapy. The treatment should start as soon after menopause as possible and it is possible that it should be maintained for life. The treatment may be supplemented with extra calcium intake, vitamin D, and maybe calcitonin....... Physical activity should be promoted, and cigarette smoking reduced if possible. Women at risk of cardiovascular disease will also benefit from hormone replacement therapy. There is overwhelming evidence that hormone therapy will protect against both coronary heart disease and stroke...... suggest that every woman showing any signs of hormone deprivation should be treated with hormone replacement therapy. This includes women with subjective or objective vaso-motor symptoms, genito-urinary symptoms, women at risk of osteoporosis (fast bone losers), and women at risk of cardiovascular...

  19. Broad spectrum antiangiogenic treatment for ocular neovascular diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofra Benny

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Pathological neovascularization is a hallmark of late stage neovascular (wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD and the leading cause of blindness in people over the age of 50 in the western world. The treatments focus on suppression of choroidal neovascularization (CNV, while current approved therapies are limited to inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF exclusively. However, this treatment does not address the underlying cause of AMD, and the loss of VEGF's neuroprotective can be a potential side effect. Therapy which targets the key processes in AMD, the pathological neovascularization, vessel leakage and inflammation could bring a major shift in the approach to disease treatment and prevention. In this study we have demonstrated the efficacy of such broad spectrum antiangiogenic therapy on mouse model of AMD. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Lodamin, a polymeric formulation of TNP-470, is a potent broad-spectrum antiangiogenic drug. Lodamin significantly reduced key processes involved in AMD progression as demonstrated in mice and rats. Its suppressive effects on angiogenesis, vascular leakage and inflammation were studied in a wide array of assays including; a Matrigel, delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH, Miles assay, laser-induced CNV and corneal micropocket assay. Lodamin significantly suppressed the secretion of various pro-inflammatory cytokines in the CNV lesion including monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1/Ccl2. Importantly, Lodamin was found to regress established CNV lesions, unlike soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlk-1. The drug was found to be safe in mice and have little toxicity as demonstrated by electroretinography (ERG assessing retinal and by histology. CONCLUSIONS: Lodamin, a polymer formulation of TNP-470, was identified as a first in its class, broad-spectrum antiangiogenic drug that can be administered orally or locally to treat corneal and retinal neovascularization. Several unique properties

  20. Gene therapy: implications for craniofacial regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, Erica L; Villa-Diaz, Luis G; Krebsbach, Paul H

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy in the craniofacial region provides a unique tool for delivery of DNA to coordinate protein production in both time and space. The drive to bring this technology to the clinic is derived from the fact that more than 85% of the global population may at one time require repair or replacement of a craniofacial structure. This need ranges from mild tooth decay and tooth loss to temporomandibular joint disorders and large-scale reconstructive surgery. Our ability to insert foreign DNA into a host cell has been developing since the early uses of gene therapy to alter bacterial properties for waste cleanup in the 1980s followed by successful human clinical trials in the 1990s to treat severe combined immunodeficiency. In the past 20 years, the emerging field of craniofacial tissue engineering has adopted these techniques to enhance regeneration of mineralized tissues, salivary gland, and periodontium and to reduce tumor burden of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Studies are currently pursuing research on both biomaterial-mediated gene delivery and more clinically efficacious, although potentially more hazardous, viral methods. Although hundreds of gene therapy clinical trials have taken place in the past 20 years, we must still work to ensure an ideal safety profile for each gene and delivery method combination. With adequate genotoxicity testing, we can expect gene therapy to augment protein delivery strategies and potentially allow for tissue-specific targeting, delivery of multiple signals, and increased spatial and temporal control with the goal of natural tissue replacement in the craniofacial complex.

  1. [Antiangiogenic agents in ARMD treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coroi, Mihaela-Cristiana; Demea, Sorina; Todor, Meda; Apopei, Emmanuela

    2012-01-01

    The aim of antiangiogenic agents in the treatment of age related senile macular degeneration is to destroy coroidian neoformation vessels by minimally affecting the central vision. We present a case of important central vision recovery after 3 intravitreal injections of Avastin. The therapeutic decision and patient monitoring have been made using imaging studies, such as OCT and AFG. A modern therapeutic approach of neovascular forms of age related macular degeneration, backed up by AFG and OCT is a modern treatment method of this disabling illness which brings patients optimal functional and structural improvement.

  2. Retroviral integration profiles: their determinants and implications for gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-il Lim

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses have often been used for gene therapy because oftheir capacity for the long-term expression of transgenes via stableintegration into the host genome. However, retroviral integrationcan also result in the transformation of normal cells into cancercells, as demonstrated by the incidence of leukemia in a recentretroviral gene therapy trial in Europe. This unfortunate outcomehas led to the rapid initiation of studies examining variousbiological and pathological aspects of retroviral integration. Thisreview summarizes recent findings from these studies, includingthe global integration patterns of various types of retroviruses,viral and cellular determinants of integration, implications ofintegration for gene therapy and retrovirus-mediated infectiousdiseases, and strategies to shift integration to safe host genomicloci. A more comprehensive and mechanistic understanding ofretroviral integration processes will eventually make it possible togenerate safer retroviral vector platforms in the near future. [BMBreports 2012; 45(4: 207-212

  3. Angiogenesis and antiangiogenic agents in cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomao F

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Federica Tomao,1 Anselmo Papa,2 Luigi Rossi,2 Eleonora Zaccarelli,2 Davide Caruso,2 Federica Zoratto,2 Pierluigi Benedetti Panici,1 Silverio Tomao2 1Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Sapienza University of Rome, Policlinico Umberto I, Rome, 2Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, Sapienza University of Rome, Oncology Unit, ICOT, Latina, Italy Abstract: Standard treatment of cervical cancer (CC consists of surgery in the early stages and of chemoradiation in locally advanced disease. Metastatic CC has a poor prognosis and is usually treated with palliative platinum-based chemotherapy. Current chemotherapeutic regimens are associated with significant adverse effects and only limited activity, making identification of active and tolerable novel targeted agents a high priority. Angiogenesis is a complex process that plays a crucial role in the development of many types of cancer. The dominant role of angiogenesis in CC seems to be directly related to human papillomavirus-related inhibition of p53 and stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α. Both of these mechanisms are able to increase expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. Activation of VEGF promotes endothelial cell proliferation and migration, favoring formation of new blood vessels and increasing permeability of existing blood vessels. Since bevacizumab, a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody binding to all isoforms of VEGF, has been demonstrated to significantly improve survival in gynecologic cancer, some recent clinical research has explored the possibility of using novel therapies directed toward inhibition of angiogenesis in CC too. Here we review the main results from studies concerning the use of antiangiogenic drugs that are being investigated for the treatment of CC. Keywords: cervical cancer, angiogenesis, human papillomavirus, bevacizumab, target therapies

  4. A review on pro- and anti-angiogenic factors as targets of clinical intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouis, D; Kusumanto, Y; Meijer, C; Mulder, NH; Hospers, GAP

    2006-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in physiology and pathology. It is a tightly regulated process, influenced by the microenvironment and modulated by a multitude of pro- and anti-angiogenic factors. A thorough understanding of the angiogenic process may lead to novel therapies to target ischemic

  5. Antiangiogenic agents combined with chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shanshan Chen; Shun Lu 

    2015-01-01

    As a targeted therapy, antiangiogenic treatment has been increasingly studied for advanced non-smal cel lung cancer (NSCLC) and has proven ef ective for the treatment of advanced NSCLC. Bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody targeting angiogenesis, is the only antiangiogenic agent approved for use in com-bination with first-line chemotherapy for non-squamous NSCLC. Smal-molecule inhibitors targeting the tyrosine kinase receptor have also shown promise when combined with standard chemotherapeutic agents in patients with advanced NSCLC. However, unlike bevacizumab, not al other antiangiogenic agents show significant benefits when combined with chemotherapy. As for the failures of most other combinations, the combination schedule may be an important reason that has so far been overlooked in clinical trials. This article reviews the combination of angiogenic agents with chemotherapy in the treatment of NSCLC.

  6. Inhibition of SIRT2 Potentiates the Anti-motility Activity of Taxanes: Implications for Antineoplastic Combination Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katiuscia Bonezzi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Taxanes are potent inhibitors of cell motility, a property implicated in their antiangiogenic and antimetastatic activity and unrelated to their antiproliferative effect. The molecular mechanism of this anti-motility activity is poorly understood. In this study, we found that paclitaxel induced tubulin acetylation in endothelial and tumor cells, at concentrations that affected cell motility but not proliferation (10-8 to 10-9 M, for 4 hours. Induction of tubulin acetylation correlated with inhibition of motility but not proliferation based on a comparison of highly and poorly cytotoxic taxanes (paclitaxel and IDN5390 and tumor cell lines sensitive and resistant to paclitaxel (1A9 and 1A9 PTX22. Consistent with the hypothesis that tubulin deacetylase activity might affect cell response to the anti-motility activity of taxanes, we found that overexpression of the tubulin deacetylase SIRT2 increased cell motility and reduced cell response to the anti-motility activity of paclitaxel. Conversely, the SIRT2 inhibitor splitomicin reduced cell motility and potentiated the anti-motility activity of paclitaxel. The inhibitory effect was further potentiated by the addition of the HDAC6 inhibitor trichostatin A. Paclitaxel and splitomicin promoted translocation into the nucleus—and hence activation—of FOXO3a, a negative regulator of cell motility. This study indicates a role for SIRT2 in the regulation of cell motility and suggests that therapies combining sirtuin inhibitors and taxanes could be used to treat cell motility-based pathologic processes such as tumor angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis.

  7. The Implications of Cancer Stem Cells for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Jiang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are universally recognized as the most effective anti-cancer therapies. Despite significant advances directed towards elucidating molecular mechanisms and developing clinical trials, cancer still remains a major public health issue. Recent studies have showed that cancer stem cells (CSCs, a small subpopulation of tumor cells, can generate bulk populations of nontumorigenic cancer cell progeny through the self-renewal and differentiation processes. As CSCs are proposed to persist in tumors as a distinct population and cause relapse and metastasis by giving rise to new tumors, development of CSC-targeted therapeutic strategies holds new hope for improving survival and quality of life in patients with cancer. Therapeutic innovations will emerge from a better understanding of the biology and environment of CSCs, which, however, are largely unexplored. This review summarizes the characteristics, evidences and development of CSCs, as well as implications and challenges for cancer treatment.

  8. Implications of Renal Denervation Therapy in Patients with Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Jaén-Águila

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA syndrome is a prevalent condition characterized by repeated episodes of obstruction of the upper airway, leading to intermittent hypoxemia and important endothelial and anatomical dysfunctions that cause cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. The finding of the relationship between OSA and hypertension, especially resistant hypertension (RHT, has increased the interest in therapeutic strategies that affect renal sympathetic activity in these patients. The observational studies published until now demonstrated that renal denervation therapy can reduce the severity of OSA syndrome. Renal sympathetic denervation (RDN could be a future therapeutic possibility for conditions other than RHT, such as atrial fibrillation, heart failure, obesity, and OSA syndrome, where renal sympathetic system plays an important physiological role. The aim of this review was to elucidate the implications of renal sympathetic activity in OSA syndrome.

  9. Working memory and older adults: implications for occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andiel, C; Liu, L

    1995-01-01

    Atkinson and Shiffrin's (1968) modal model of memory is still commonly used by rehabilitation professionals to evaluate memory impairment in older adults. However, research to date has been unable to indicate that short-term memory declines with age. These findings have led some rehabilitation professionals to mistakenly conclude that short-term memory is not affected by the aging process. This article reviews both the traditional concept of short-term memory, as outlined by Atkinson and Shiffrin, and the more recent conceptualization of short-term memory in terms of Baddeley and Hitch's (1974) model of working memory. The implications of the concept of working memory has implications for occupational therapy interventions for older adults. For example, clients with dementia may experience difficulties in performing tasks that require drawing inferences. Similarly, language that contains vague references may present problems for these clients. In addition, changes in working memory in older adults suggest that they may experience difficulties with medication management and what Rule, Milke, and Dobbs (1992) called wayfinding. Therefore, evaluations of working memory would provide a better indication of older adults' memory performance than the modal model.

  10. Glial implications in transplantation therapy of spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Shi-wen; XIE Yu-feng

    2009-01-01

    Spinal cord injuries are damages that result in complete or partial loss of sensation and/or mobility and affect the life qualities of many patients. Their pathophysiology in-cludes primary and secondary processes, which are related with the activation of astrocytes and microgliacytes and the degeneration of oligodendrocytes. Although transplan-tation of embryonic stem cells or neural progenitor cells is an attractive strategy for repair of the injured central ner-vous system (CNS), transplantation of these cells alone for acute spinal cord injuries has not resulted in robust axon regeneration beyond the injury sites. This may be due to the progenitor cells differentiating to the cell types that sup-port axon growth poorly and/or their inability to modify the inhibitory environment of adult CNS after injury. Recent studies indicate that transplantation of glial progenitor cells has exhibited beneficial effects on the recovery and promis-ing future for the therapy strategy of spinal cord injury. In this review, we summarized the data from recent literature regarding glial implications in transplantation therapy of spinal cord injury.

  11. Rhabdomyosarcoma: Current Challenges and Their Implications for Developing Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettmer, Simone; Li, Zhizhong; Billin, Andrew N.; Barr, Frederic G.; Cornelison, D.D.W.; Ehrlich, Alan R.; Guttridge, Denis C.; Hayes-Jordan, Andrea; Helman, Lee J.; Houghton, Peter J.; Khan, Javed; Langenau, David M.; Linardic, Corinne M.; Pal, Ranadip; Partridge, Terence A.; Pavlath, Grace K.; Rota, Rossella; Schäfer, Beat W.; Shipley, Janet; Stillman, Bruce; Wexler, Leonard H.; Wagers, Amy J.; Keller, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) represents a rare, heterogeneous group of mesodermal malignancies with skeletal muscle differentiation. One major subgroup of RMS tumors (so-called “fusion-positive” tumors) carries exclusive chromosomal translocations that join the DNA-binding domain of the PAX3 or PAX7 gene to the transactivation domain of the FOXO1 (previously known as FKHR) gene. Fusion-negative RMS represents a heterogeneous spectrum of tumors with frequent RAS pathway activation. Overtly metastatic disease at diagnosis is more frequently found in individuals with fusion-positive than in those with fusion-negative tumors. RMS is the most common pediatric soft-tissue sarcoma, and approximately 60% of all children and adolescents diagnosed with RMS are cured by currently available multimodal therapies. However, a curative outcome is achieved in <30% of high-risk individuals with RMS, including all those diagnosed as adults, those diagnosed with fusion-positive tumors during childhood (including metastatic and nonmetastatic tumors), and those diagnosed with metastatic disease during childhood (including fusion-positive and fusion-negative tumors). This white paper outlines current challenges in RMS research and their implications for developing more effective therapies. Urgent clinical problems include local control, systemic disease, need for improved risk stratification, and characterization of differences in disease course in children and adults. Biological challenges include definition of the cellular functions of PAX-FOXO1 fusion proteins, clarification of disease heterogeneity, elucidation of the cellular origins of RMS, delineation of the tumor microenvironment, and identification of means for rational selection and testing of new combination therapies. To streamline future therapeutic developments, it will be critical to improve access to fresh tumor tissue for research purposes, consider alternative trial designs to optimize early clinical testing of candidate

  12. Inulin based micelles loaded with curcumin or celecoxib with effective anti-angiogenic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandracchia, Delia; Tripodo, Giuseppe; Trapani, Adriana; Ruggieri, Simona; Annese, Tiziana; Chlapanidas, Theodora; Trapani, Giuseppe; Ribatti, Domenico

    2016-10-10

    Curcumin (CUR) and celecoxib (CLX) are two highly hydrophobic drugs which show bioavailability problems due to their poor aqueous solubility. The aim of this study was to encapsulate each of these drugs in micelles based on biodegradable and amphiphilic polymers to investigate their anti-angiogenesis activity. Here we use an amphiphilic polymer, based on two natural substances from renewable resources (Inulin and Vitamin E, INVITE), as a self-assembling system for the drug delivery of CUR and CLX. By the in vivo assay of chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) it was assessed that both INVITE-CUR and INVITE-CLX micelles possess remarkable anti-angiogenic activity, while the INVITE micelles alone resulted intrinsically pro-angiogenic. Furthermore, it has been shown that encapsulation of CUR and CLX in INVITE micelles enhances of several magnitudes the water-solubility of CUR and CLX (14·10(5) and 3·10(2) times for CUR and CLX, respectively). These results may have interesting implications not only in anticancer or diabetic maculopathy therapy based on the anti-angiogenesis strategy but also for regenerative medicine where over-production of new vessels is required.

  13. Therapeutic Implications for Overcoming Radiation Resistance in Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byeong Mo Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation (IR, such as X-rays and gamma (γ-rays, mediates various forms of cancer cell death such as apoptosis, necrosis, autophagy, mitotic catastrophe, and senescence. Among them, apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe are the main mechanisms of IR action. DNA damage and genomic instability contribute to IR-induced cancer cell death. Although IR therapy may be curative in a number of cancer types, the resistance of cancer cells to radiation remains a major therapeutic problem. In this review, we describe the morphological and molecular aspects of various IR-induced types of cell death. We also discuss cytogenetic variations representative of IR-induced DNA damage and genomic instability. Most importantly, we focus on several pathways and their associated marker proteins responsible for cancer resistance and its therapeutic implications in terms of cancer cell death of various types and characteristics. Finally, we propose radiation-sensitization strategies, such as the modification of fractionation, inflammation, and hypoxia and the combined treatment, that can counteract the resistance of tumors to IR.

  14. DNA repair and gene therapy: implications for translational uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limp-Foster, M; Kelley, M R

    2000-01-01

    Gene therapy has been proposed to have implications in the treatment of cancer. By genetically manipulating the hematopoietic stem cell compartment with genes that confer resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, the dose escalation that is necessary to effectively treat the cancers could potentially be achieved. DNA repair genes are some of the potential candidates to confer increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. Although initial focus in this area has been on the direct reversal protein (MGMT), its protective ability is limited to those agents that produce O(6)-methylGuanine cross-links-agents that are not extensively used clinically (e.g., nitrosoureas). Furthermore, most alkylating agents attack more sites in DNA other than O(6)-methylGuanine, such that the protections afforded by MGMT may prevent the initial cytotoxicity, but at a price of increased mutational burden and potential secondary leukemias. Therefore, some of the genes that are being tested as candidates for gene transfer are base excision repair (BER) genes. We and others have found that overexpression of selective BER genes confers resistance to chemotherapeutic agents such as thiotepa, ionizing radiation, bleomycin, and other agents. As these "proof of concept" analyses mature, many more clinically relevant chemotherapeutic agents can be tested for BER protective ability.

  15. Implications of hedgehog signaling antagonists for cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingwu Xie

    2008-01-01

    The hedgehog(Hh)pathway,initially discovered inDrosophila by two Nobel laureates,Dr.Eric Wieschaus and Dr.Christiane Nusslein-Volhard,is a major regulator for cell differentiation,tissue polarity and cell proliferation.Studies from many laboratories,including ours,reveal activation of this pathway in most basal cell carcinomas and in approximately 30% of extracutaneous human cancers,including medulloblastomas,gastrointestinal,lung,breast and prostate cancers.Thus,it is believed that targeted inhibition of Hh signaling may be effective in treating and preventing many types of human cancers.Even more exciting is the discovery and synthesis of specific signaling antagonists for the Hh pathway,which have significant clinical implications in novel cancer therapeutics.This review discusses the major advances in the current understanding of Hh signaling activation in different types of human cancers,the molecular basis of Hh signaling activation,the major antagonists for Hh signaling inhibition and their potential clinical application in human cancer therapy.

  16. Therapeutic Implications for Overcoming Radiation Resistance in Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byeong Mo; Hong, Yunkyung; Lee, Seunghoon; Liu, Pengda; Lim, Ji Hong; Lee, Yong Heon; Lee, Tae Ho; Chang, Kyu Tae; Hong, Yonggeun

    2015-11-10

    Ionizing radiation (IR), such as X-rays and gamma (γ)-rays, mediates various forms of cancer cell death such as apoptosis, necrosis, autophagy, mitotic catastrophe, and senescence. Among them, apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe are the main mechanisms of IR action. DNA damage and genomic instability contribute to IR-induced cancer cell death. Although IR therapy may be curative in a number of cancer types, the resistance of cancer cells to radiation remains a major therapeutic problem. In this review, we describe the morphological and molecular aspects of various IR-induced types of cell death. We also discuss cytogenetic variations representative of IR-induced DNA damage and genomic instability. Most importantly, we focus on several pathways and their associated marker proteins responsible for cancer resistance and its therapeutic implications in terms of cancer cell death of various types and characteristics. Finally, we propose radiation-sensitization strategies, such as the modification of fractionation, inflammation, and hypoxia and the combined treatment, that can counteract the resistance of tumors to IR.

  17. Thermotolerance of human myometrium: implications for minimally invasive uterine therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Aaron C.; Grisez, Brian T.; McMillan, Kathleen; Chill, Nicholas; Harclerode, Tyler P.; Radabaugh, Rebecca; Jones, Ryan M.; Coad, James E.

    2013-02-01

    Endometrial ablation has gained significant clinical acceptance over the last decade as a minimally invasive treatment for abnormal uterine bleeding. To improve upon current thermal injury modeling, it is important to better characterize the myometrium's thermotolerance. The extent of myometrial thermal injury was determined across a spectrum of thermal histories/doses (time-temperature combinations). Fresh extirpated human myometrium was obtained from 13 subjects who underwent a previous scheduled benign hysterectomy. Within two hours of hysterectomy, the unfixed myometrium was treated in a stabilized saline bath with temperatures ranging from 45-70 °C and time intervals from 30- 150 seconds. The time-temperature combinations were selected to simulate treatment times under 2.5 minutes. A total of six such thermal matrices, each comprised of 45 time-temperature combinations, were prepared for evaluation. The treated myometrium was cryosectioned for nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) staining to assess for thermal respiratory enzyme inactivation. Image analysis was subsequently used to quantitatively assess the stained myometrium's capacity to metabolize the tetrazolium at each time-temperature combination. This colorimetric data was then used as marker of cellular viability and determine survival parameters with implications for developing minimally invasive uterine therapies.

  18. Radiotherapy and antiangiogenic TM in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohamed K; Miller, Meredith W; Taylor, Jeremy; Gill, Navkiranjit K; Dick, Robert D; Van Golen, Kenneth; Brewer, George J; Merajver, Sofia D

    2002-01-01

    Tetrathiomolybdate (TM) is a potent nontoxic orally delivered copper complexing agent under development for the last several years for the treatment of Wilson's disease. It has been shown to block angiogenesis in primary and metastatic tumors. Therefore, the combination of cytotoxic radiotherapy (RT) and antiangiogenic TM could target both the existing tumor and the tumor microvasculature in a comprehensive strategy. Using a Lewis lung high metastatic (LLHM) carcinoma mouse tumor model, we demonstrate that the combination of TM and RT is more effective than either used as monotherapy. We also show that their therapeutic effects are additive, with no additional toxicity. We show that TM has no significant cytotoxicity in vitro against LLHM tumor cells, further supporting the antiangiogenic mechanism for its action.

  19. Radiotherapy and Antiangiogenic TM in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed K. Khan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetrathiomolybdate (TM is a potent nontoxic orally delivered copper complexing agent under development for the last several years for the treatment of Wilson's disease. It has been shown to block angiogenesis in primary and metastatic tumors. Therefore, the combination of cytotoxic radiotherapy (RT and antiangiogenic TM could target both the existing tumor and the tumor microvasculature in a comprehensive strategy. Using a Lewis lung high metastatic (LLHM carcinoma mouse tumor model, we demonstrate that the combination of TM and RT is more effective than either used as monotherapy. We also show that their therapeutic effects are additive, with no additional toxicity. We show that TM has no significant cytotoxicity in vitro against LLHM tumor cells, further supporting the antiangiogenic mechanism for its action.

  20. Antiangiogenic VEGF Isoform in Inflammatory Myopathies

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    Nila Volpi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF antiangiogenic isoform A-165b on human muscle in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM and to compare distribution of angiogenic/antiangiogenic VEGFs, as isoforms shifts are described in other autoimmune disorders. Subjects and Methods. We analyzed VEGF-A165b and VEGF-A by western blot and immunohistochemistry on skeletal muscle biopsies from 21 patients affected with IIM (polymyositis, dermatomyositis, and inclusion body myositis and 6 control muscle samples. TGF-β, a prominent VEGF inductor, was analogously evaluated. Intergroup differences of western blot bands density were statistically examined. Endomysial vascularization, inflammatory score, and muscle regeneration, as pathological parameters of IIM, were quantitatively determined and their levels were confronted with VEGF expression. Results. VEGF-A165b was significantly upregulated in IIM, as well as TGF-β. VEGF-A was diffusely expressed on unaffected myofibers, whereas regenerating/atrophic myofibres strongly reacted for both VEGF-A isoforms. Most inflammatory cells and endomysial vessels expressed both isoforms. VEGF-A165b levels were in positive correlation to inflammatory score, endomysial vascularization, and TGF-β. Conclusions. Our findings indicate skeletal muscle expression of antiangiogenic VEGF-A165b and preferential upregulation in IIM, suggesting that modulation of VEGF-A isoforms may occur in myositides.

  1. A novel imaging-based high-throughput screening approach to anti-angiogenic drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evensen, Lasse; Micklem, David R; Link, Wolfgang; Lorens, James B

    2010-01-01

    -throughput screening using the EC-vSMC co-culture assay establishes a new platform to screen for novel anti-angiogenic compounds for cancer therapy.

  2. New antiangiogenics in non-small cell lung cancer treatment: Vargatef™ (BIBF 1120 and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gori B

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Bruno Gori1, Serena Ricciardi1, Alberto Fulvi1, Salvatore Intagliata2, Ester Del Signore1, Filippo de Marinis11Oncological-Pulmonary Unit 1st, San Camillo Hospital, Rome, Italy; 2Department of Medical Oncology, University Campus Bio-Medico, Rome, ItalyAbstract: Lung cancer is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is a particularly aggressive cancer, the optimum management of which is still being determined. In the metastatic disease, the standard therapy is a platinum-based combination chemotherapy; however, in spite of available treatment options for patients who progress beyond first-line therapy, prognosis remains poor. Angiogenesis is a tightly regulated process which comprises a complex, complementary, and overlapping network. Inhibition of tumor-related angiogenesis has become an attractive target for anticancer therapy. Antiangiogenic strategy includes: monoclonal antibodies against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and VEGF receptor (VEGFR, small molecule inhibitors of VEGF tyrosine kinase activity, VEGF Trap, and a new class named “vascular disrupting agents,” tested in ongoing clinical trials which will further define their role in the management of NSCLC. BIBF 1120 is an investigational orally administered receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor that has shown antiangiogenic and antineoplastic activity, inhibiting VEGFR, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, and fibroblast growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases, preventing tumor growth and interfering with the angiogenesis-signaling cascade and overcoming drug resistances.Keywords: NSCLC, angiogenesis, oral antiangiogenic agents, VEGF, PDGF, FGF

  3. Penduliflaworosin, a Diterpenoid from Croton crassifolius, Exerts Anti-Angiogenic Effect via VEGF Receptor-2 Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeyin Liang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-angiogenesis targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2 has been considered as an important strategy for cancer therapy. Penduliflaworosin is a diterpenoid isolated from the plant Croton crassifolius. Our previous study showed that this diterpenoid possesses strong anti-angiogenic activity by inhibiting vessel formation in zebrafish. This study was conducted to further investigate the anti-angiogenic activity and mechanism of penduliflaworosin. Results revealed that penduliflaworosin significantly inhibited VEGF-induced angiogenesis processes including proliferation, invasion, migration, and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Moreover, it notably inhibited VEGF-induced sprout formation of aortic rings and blocked VEGF-induced vessel formation in mice. Western blotting studies showed that penduliflaworosin inhibited phosphorylation of the VEGF receptor-2 and its downstream signaling mediators in HUVECs, suggesting that the anti-angiogenic activity was due to an interference with the VEGF/VEGF receptor-2 pathway. In addition, molecular docking simulation indicated that penduliflaworosin could form hydrogen bonds within the ATP-binding region of the VEGF receptor-2 kinase unit. Finally, cytotoxicity assay showed that penduliflaworosin possessed little toxicity toward both cancer and normal cells. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that penduliflaworosin exerts its anti-angiogenic effect via the VEGF receptor-2 signaling pathway. The anti-angiogenic property and low cytotoxicity of penduliflaworosin suggest that it may be useful in cancer treatments.

  4. Angiogenesis and vascular malformations: Antiangiogenic drugs for treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with angiodysplasias and Osler's disease (hereditary hemorrhagic teleangiectasia) is clinically challenging.Frequently, vascular malformations occur as multiple disseminated lesions, making local treatment an unfavorable choice or impossible. After local therapy,lesions often recur at other sites of the intestine.However, as there are few therapeutic alternatives,repeated endoscopic coagulations or surgical resections are still performed to prevent recurrent bleeding.Hormonal therapy has been employed for more than 50 years but has recently been shown to be ineffective.Therefore, new therapeutic strategies are required.Understanding of the pathophysiology of angiogenesis and vascular malformations has recently substantially increased. Currently, multiple inhibitors of angiogenesis are under development for treatment of malignant diseases. Experimental and clinical data suggest that antiangiogenic substances, which were originally developed for treatment of malignant diseases, may also represent long-awaited specific drugs for the treatment of vascular malformations. However, antiangiogenics display significantly different actions and side-effects.Although antiangiogenics like thalidomide seem to inhibit gastrointestinal bleeding, other substances like bevacizumab can cause mucosal bleeding. Therefore differential and cautious evaluation of this therapeutic strategy is necessary.

  5. Role of the antiangiogenic agent bevacizumab in the treatment of elderly patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bartolomeo, Maria; Pietrantonio, Filippo; Martinetti, Antonia; Buzzoni, Roberto; Gevorgyan, Arpine; Bajetta, Emilio

    2011-02-01

    Although major progress has been achieved in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer with the employment of biological antiangiogenic agents, several questions remain open for discussion regarding the use of this therapy in elderly patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. In Western countries, the total number of elderly patients with colorectal cancer is expected to increase in the future. As adverse physical or socioeconomic conditions are more common in the elderly, an assessment of the patient's suitability for this therapy should be performed before a treatment decision is made. Most patients in clinical trials of the antiangiogenic drug bevacizumab were aged <65 years and thus the efficacy and tolerability of this agent in older patients has been less well explored. However, this article shows that older and younger patients with metastatic colorectal cancer appeared to derive similar survival benefit from bevacizumab treatment. Elderly patients were also found to have significant prolongation of median progression-free survival with the addition of bevacizumab to their treatment, with a similar magnitude of improvement in this outcome being observed in younger and older patients. It should be emphasized that the patients included in the studies discussed in this article were eligible for clinical trials and therefore may not be representative of a more general elderly population. Careful selection of patients and monitoring of treatment effects are required to optimize use of the antiangiogenic agent bevacizumab in older patients.

  6. PLANT PRODUCTS POTENTIAL AS ANTI-ANGIOGENIC AND IN CANCER MANAGEMENT

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    Patil Kalpana S.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a disease that knows no geographic boundaries. Cancer is abnormal malignant growth of body tissue or cell. A cancerous growth is called a malignant tumor or malignancy. A non cancerous growth is called benign tumor. The process of cancer metastasis is consisting of series of sequential interrelated steps, each of which is rate limiting. Plants are loaded with chemical with chemo preventive activities of some of them are undergoing clinical trial. Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels important during fatal life and growth of adult blood. It is essential step in tumor growth, as tumors cant grow approximately to 2mm3 without developing new blood supply. The complex interplay of positive and negative regulators of angiogenic process determines the degree of new blood vessels formation in and around a tumor. Inhibition of angiogenesis is a potentially novel method of cancer therapy. The anti-angiogenic agents in current use are unable to destroy the tumor vasculature completely. Extensive screening of plants for anti-cancer profile has shown some good results. Some plants are already in use. Isolation of active principle of these plants may provide the basic nucleus upon which synthetic drug can be produced. The selected and careful use of this plant products may definitely help in anti-angiogenic therapy and thus, in cancer management. Hence it is possible that herbal remedies definitely hold hope for the discovery of potent anti-angiogenic and drugs on metastasis.

  7. Metastasis in renal cell carcinoma: Biology and implications for therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Gong

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Although multiple advances have been made in systemic therapy for renal cell carcinoma (RCC, metastatic RCC remains incurable. In the current review, we focus on the underlying biology of RCC and plausible mechanisms of metastasis. We further outline evolving strategies to combat metastasis through adjuvant therapy. Finally, we discuss clinical patterns of metastasis in RCC and how distinct systemic therapy approaches may be considered based on the anatomic location of metastasis.

  8. Antiangiogenic Activity and Pharmacogenomics of Medicinal Plants from Traditional Korean Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ean-Jeong Seo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. In the present study, we investigated the antiangiogenic properties of 59 plants used in traditional Korean medicine. Selected phytochemicals were investigated in more detail for their modes of action. Methods. A modified chicken-chorioallantoic-membrane (CAM assay using quail eggs was applied to test for antiangiogenic effects of plant extracts. A molecular docking in silico approached the binding of plant constituents to the vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1 and 2 (VEGFR1, VEGFR2. Microarray-based mRNA expression profiling was employed to correlate the 50% inhibition concentrations (IC50 of a panel of 60 NCI cell lines to these phytochemicals. Results. Extracts from Acer mono leaves, Reynoutria sachalniensis fruits, Cinnamomum japonicum stems, Eurya japonica leaves, Adenophora racemosa whole plant, Caryopteris incana leaves-stems, and Schisandra chinensis stems inhibited angiogenesis more than 50% in quail eggs. Selected phytochemicals from Korean plants were analyzed in more detail using microarray-based mRNA expression profiles and molecular docking to VEGFR1 and VEGFR2. These results indicate multifactorial modes of action of these natural products. Conclusion. The antiangiogenic activity of plants used in traditional Korean medicine implicates their possible application for diseases where inhibition of blood vessel formation is desired, for example, cancer, macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and others.

  9. Cancer stem cells: therapeutic implications and perspectives in cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Han

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC theory is gaining increasing attention from researchers and has become an important focus of cancer research. According to the theory, a minority population of cancer cells is capable of self-renewal and generation of differentiated progeny, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs. Understanding the properties and characteristics of CSCs is key to future study on cancer research, such as the isolation and identification of CSCs, the cancer diagnosis, and the cancer therapy. Standard oncology treatments, such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgical resection, can only shrink the bulk tumor and the tumor tends to relapse. Thus, therapeutic strategies that focus on targeting CSCs and their microenvironmental niche address the ineffectiveness of traditional cancer therapies to eradicate the CSCs that otherwise result in therapy resistance. The combined use of traditional therapies with targeted CSC-specific agents may target the whole cancer and offer a promising strategy for lasting treatment and even cure.

  10. Clinical implications of antithrombotic therapy in dentistry: a literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Seguro, Joel David Martinho

    2016-01-01

    Tese de mestrado, Medicina Dentária, Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Medicina Dentária, 2016 Introduction: The therapeutical approach of patients under chronic antithrombotic therapy needing dental procedures causes great controversy. The increased hemorrhage risk associated with these procedures when the patient is undergoing this therapy must be taken into account relatively to the increased thrombotic risk caused by its interruption. The aim of this study was to review the current ...

  11. Antiangiogenic mechanisms of PJ-8, a novel inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shiu-Wen; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Huang, Tur-Fu

    2012-05-01

    Angiogenesis occurs not only during tissue growth and development but also during wound healing and tumor progression. Angiogenesis is a balanced process controlled by proangiogenic and antiangiogenic molecules. As a critical factor in the induction of angiogenesis, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has become an attractive target for antiangiogenic and cancer therapeutic agents. In an effort to develop novel inhibitors to block VEGF signaling, we selected Pj-8, a benzimidazole derivative, and investigated its inhibitory mechanisms in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). Pj-8 concentration-dependently inhibited VEGF-induced proliferation, migration and tube formation of HUVECs. Pj-8 also suppressed VEGF-induced microvessel sprouting from aortic rings ex vivo and suppressed neovascularization of implanted matrigel plugs in vivo. Pj-8 inhibited VEGF-induced phosphorylation of VEGF receptor (VEGFR) 2 and the downstream protein kinases, including Akt, focal adhesion kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinases and Src. Results from in vitro kinase assay further demonstrated that Pj-8 suppressed the kinase activity of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1). Using xenograft tumor angiogenesis model, Pj-8 markedly eliminated tumor-associated angiogenesis. Taken together, our findings suggest that Pj-8 inhibits VEGF and tumor cells MDA-MB-231-induced angiogenesis, and it may be a potential drug candidate in anticancer therapy. Downregulation of VEGFR2-mediated signaling may contribute to its antiangiogenic actions.

  12. Implications of CI therapy for Visual Deficit Training

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    Edward eTaub

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We address here the question of whether the techniques of CI therapy, a family of treatments that has been employed in the rehabilitation of movement and language after brain damage might apply to the rehabilitation of such visual deficits as unilateral spatial neglect and visual field deficits. CI therapy has been used successfully for the upper and lower extremities after chronic stroke, cerebral palsy (CP, multiple sclerosis (MS, other CNS degenerative conditions, resection of motor areas of the brain, focal hand dystonia, and aphasia. Treatments making use of similar methods have proven efficacious for amblyopia.The CI therapy approach consists of four major components: intensive training, training by shaping, a transfer package to facilitate the transfer of gains from the treatment setting to everyday activities, and strong discouragement of compensatory strategies.CI therapy is said to be effective because it overcomes learned nonuse, a learned inhibition of movement that follows injury to the CNS. In addition, CI therapy produces substantial increases in the grey matter of motor areas on both sides of the brain. We propose here that these mechanisms are examples of more general processes: learned nonuse being considered parallel to sensory nonuse following damage to sensory areas of the brain, with both having in common diminished neural connections (DNC in the nervous system as an underlying mechanism. CI therapy would achieve its therapeutic effect by strengthening the diminished neural connections. Use-dependent cortical reorganization is considered to be an example of the more general neuroplastic mechanism of brain structure repurposing (BSR. If the mechanisms involved in these broader categories are involved in each of the deficits being considered, then it may be the principles underlying efficacious treatment in each case may be similar. The lessons learned during CI therapy research might then prove useful for the treatment of

  13. In vitro and in vivo anti-angiogenic activities of Panduratin A.

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    Siew-Li Lai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Targeting angiogenesis has emerged as an attractive and promising strategy in anti-cancer therapeutic development. The present study investigates the anti-angiogenic potential of Panduratin A (PA, a natural chalcone isolated from Boesenbergia rotunda by using both in vitro and in vivo assays. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: PA exerted selective cytotoxicity on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs with IC(50 value of 6.91 ± 0.85 µM when compared to human normal fibroblast and normal liver epithelial cells. Assessment of the growth kinetics by cell impedance-based Real-Time Cell Analyzer showed that PA induced both cytotoxic and cytostatic effects on HUVECs, depending on the concentration used. Results also showed that PA suppressed VEGF-induced survival and proliferation of HUVECs. Furthermore, endothelial cell migration, invasion, and morphogenesis or tube formation demonstrated significant time- and dose-dependent inhibition by PA. PA also suppressed matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 secretion and attenuated its activation to intermediate and active MMP-2. In addition, PA suppressed F-actin stress fiber formation to prevent migration of the endothelial cells. More importantly, anti-angiogenic potential of PA was also evidenced in two in vivo models. PA inhibited neo-vessels formation in murine Matrigel plugs, and angiogenesis in zebrafish embryos. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our study demonstrated the distinctive anti-angiogenic properties of PA, both in vitro and in vivo. This report thus reveals another biological activity of PA in addition to its reported anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activities, suggestive of PA's potential for development as an anti-angiogenic agent for cancer therapy.

  14. Antiproliferative and Antiangiogenic Effects of Punica granatum Juice (PGJ) in Multiple Myeloma (MM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibullo, Daniele; Caporarello, Nunzia; Giallongo, Cesarina; Anfuso, Carmelina Daniela; Genovese, Claudia; Arlotta, Carmen; Puglisi, Fabrizio; Parrinello, Nunziatina L; Bramanti, Vincenzo; Romano, Alessandra; Lupo, Gabriella; Toscano, Valeria; Avola, Roberto; Brundo, Maria Violetta; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Raccuia, Salvatore Antonio

    2016-10-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a clonal B-cell malignancy characterized by an accumulation of clonal plasma cells (PC) in the bone marrow (BM) leading to bone destruction and BM failure. Despite recent advances in pharmacological therapy, MM remains a largely incurable pathology. Therefore, novel effective and less toxic agents are urgently necessary. In the last few years, pomegranate has been studied for its potential therapeutic properties including treatment and prevention of cancer. Pomegranate juice (PGJ) contains a number of potential active compounds including organic acids, vitamins, sugars, and phenolic components that are all responsible of the pro-apoptotic effects observed in tumor cell line. The aim of present investigation is to assess the antiproliferative and antiangiogenic potential of the PGJ in human multiple myeloma cell lines. Our data demonstrate the anti-proliferative potential of PGJ in MM cells; its ability to induce G0/G1 cell cycle block and its anti-angiogenic effects. Interestingly, sequential combination of bortezomib/PGJ improved the cytotoxic effect of the proteosome inhibitor. We investigated the effect of PGJ on angiogenesis and cell migration/invasion. Interestingly, we observed an inhibitory effect on the tube formation, microvessel outgrowth aorting ring and decreased cell migration and invasion as showed by wound-healing and transwell assays, respectively. Analysis of angiogenic genes expression in endothelial cells confirmed the anti-angiogenic properties of pomegranate. Therefore, PGJ administration could represent a good tool in order to identify novel therapeutic strategies for MM treatment, exploiting its anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic effects. Finally, the present research supports the evidence that PGJ could play a key role of a future therapeutic approach for treatment of MM in order to optimize the pharmacological effect of bortezomib, especially as adjuvant after treatment.

  15. Antiproliferative and Antiangiogenic Effects of Punica granatum Juice (PGJ in Multiple Myeloma (MM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Tibullo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma (MM is a clonal B-cell malignancy characterized by an accumulation of clonal plasma cells (PC in the bone marrow (BM leading to bone destruction and BM failure. Despite recent advances in pharmacological therapy, MM remains a largely incurable pathology. Therefore, novel effective and less toxic agents are urgently necessary. In the last few years, pomegranate has been studied for its potential therapeutic properties including treatment and prevention of cancer. Pomegranate juice (PGJ contains a number of potential active compounds including organic acids, vitamins, sugars, and phenolic components that are all responsible of the pro-apoptotic effects observed in tumor cell line. The aim of present investigation is to assess the antiproliferative and antiangiogenic potential of the PGJ in human multiple myeloma cell lines. Our data demonstrate the anti-proliferative potential of PGJ in MM cells; its ability to induce G0/G1 cell cycle block and its anti-angiogenic effects. Interestingly, sequential combination of bortezomib/PGJ improved the cytotoxic effect of the proteosome inhibitor. We investigated the effect of PGJ on angiogenesis and cell migration/invasion. Interestingly, we observed an inhibitory effect on the tube formation, microvessel outgrowth aorting ring and decreased cell migration and invasion as showed by wound-healing and transwell assays, respectively. Analysis of angiogenic genes expression in endothelial cells confirmed the anti-angiogenic properties of pomegranate. Therefore, PGJ administration could represent a good tool in order to identify novel therapeutic strategies for MM treatment, exploiting its anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic effects. Finally, the present research supports the evidence that PGJ could play a key role of a future therapeutic approach for treatment of MM in order to optimize the pharmacological effect of bortezomib, especially as adjuvant after treatment.

  16. Constructivist Developmental Theory and Therapy: Implications for Counseling Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, Tony D.; Generali, Margaret M.

    1995-01-01

    Contends that child and adolescent clinicians should consider the contributions of a constructivist developmental framework. Reviews a constructivist developmental model for counseling adolescents. Highlights developmental theory and therapy within the context of the mental health needs of adolescents experiencing aberrant behaviors and/or…

  17. Tutorial in oral antithrombotic therapy: Biology and dental implications

    OpenAIRE

    Fakhri, Hamid Reza; Janket, Sok Ja; Jackson, Elizabeth A.; Alison E Baird; Dinnocenzo, Richard; Meurman, Jukka H

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Recent developments of new direct oral anticoagulants that target specific clotting factors necessitate understanding of coagulation biology. The objective of this tutorial is to offer dental professionals a review of coagulation mechanisms and the pharmacodynamics of the conventional and new oral anticoagulants. Also, we summarized the dental implications of the conventional and new anticoagulants. Method: We searched Medline using search terms “antithrombotic”, “antihemostasis” ...

  18. Sharks: a potential source of antiangiogenic factors and tumor treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jung; Kim, Young

    2002-12-01

    Since angiogenesis is a key feature of tumor growth, inhibiting this process is one way to treat cancer. Cartilage is a natural source of material with strong antiangiogenic activity. This report reviews knowledge of the anticancer properties of shark cartilage and clinical information on drugs such as neovastat and squalamine. Because their entire endoskeleton is composed of cartilage, sharks are thought to be an ideal source of angiogenic and tumor growth inhibitors. Shark cartilage extract has shown antiangiogenic and antitumor activities in animals and humans. The oral administration of cartilage extract was efficacious in reducing angiogenesis. Purified antiangiogenic factors from shark cartilage, such as U-995 and neovastat (AE-941), also showed antiangiogenic and antitumor activity. AE-941 is under phase III clinical investigation. Squalamine, a low molecular weight aminosterol, showed strong antitumor activity when combined with chemotherapeutic materials. The angiogenic tissue inhibitor of metalloprotease 3 (TIMP-3) and tumor suppressor protein (snm23) genes from shark cartilage were cloned and characterized.

  19. Schema Therapy for Emotional Dysregulation: Theoretical Implication and Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadomo, Harold; Grecucci, Alessandro; Giardini, Irene; Ugolini, Erika; Carmelita, Alessandro; Panzeri, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The term emotional dysregulation refers to an impaired ability to regulate unwanted emotional states. Scientific evidence supports the idea that emotional dysregulation underlies several psychological disorders as, for example: personality disorders, bipolar disorder type II, interpersonal trauma, anxiety disorders, mood disorders and post-traumatic stress disorder. Emotional dysregulation may derive from early interpersonal traumas in childhood. These early traumatic events create a persistent sensitization of the central nervous system in relation to early life stressing events. For this reason, some authors suggest a common endophenotypical origin across psychopathologies. In the last 20 years, cognitive behavioral therapy has increasingly adopted an interactive-ontogenetic view to explain the development of disorders associated to emotional dysregulation. Unfortunately, standard Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) methods are not useful in treating emotional dysregulation. A CBT-derived new approach called Schema Therapy (ST), that integrates theory and techniques from psychodynamic and emotion focused therapy, holds the promise to fill this gap in cognitive literature. In this model, psychopathology is viewed as the interaction between the innate temperament of the child and the early experiences of deprivation or frustration of the subject's basic needs. This deprivation may lead to develop early maladaptive schemas (EMS), and maladaptive Modes. In the present paper we point out that EMSs and Modes are associated with either dysregulated emotions or with dysregulatory strategies that produce and maintain problematic emotional responses. Thanks to a special focus on the therapeutic relationship and emotion focused-experiential techniques, this approach successfully treats severe emotional dysregulation. In this paper, we make several comparisons between the main ideas of ST and the science of emotion regulation, and we present how to conceptualize pathological

  20. Phytochemicals for breast cancer therapy: current status and future implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Jawed Akhtar; Singh, Aru; Chagtoo, Megha; Singh, Nidhi; Godbole, Madan Madhav; Chakravarti, Bandana

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies among women, representing nearly 30% of newly diagnosed cancers every year. Till date, various therapeutic interventions, including surgery, chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, and radiotherapy are available and are known to cause a significant decline in the overall mortality rate. However, therapeutic resistance, recurrence and lack of treatment in metastasis are the major challenges that need to be addressed. Increasing evidence suggests the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in heterogeneous population of breast tumors capable of selfrenewal and differentiation and is considered to be responsible for drug resistance and recurrence. Therefore, compound that can target both differentiated cancer cells, as well as CSCs, may provide a better treatment strategy. Due to safe nature of dietary agents and health products, investigators are introducing them into clinical trials in place of chemotherapeutic agents.This current review focuses on phytochemicals, mainly flavonoids that are in use for breast cancer therapy in preclinical phase. As phytochemicals have several advantages in breast cancer and cancer stem cells, new synthetic series for breast cancer therapy from analogues of most potent natural molecule can be developed via rational drug design approach.

  1. The FIRO model of family therapy: implications of factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, R J; Ross, M W

    1989-11-01

    Schutz's FIRO model contains three main elements: inclusion, control, and affection. It is used widely in mental health research and practice, but has received little empirical validation. The present study is based on factor analysis of the resources to FIRO questionnaire of 120 normal couples and 191 couples who were attending a clinic for marital/psychiatric problems. Results confirmed the validity of the FIRO model for women only. The differences between the sexes reflected a considerable degree of sex-role stereotyping, the clinical implications of which are discussed.

  2. Restoring Wisconsin Art Therapy Association in Art Therapy History: Implications for Professional Definition and Inclusivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potash, Jordan; Burnie, Michele; Pearson, Rosemary; Ramirez, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    The Wisconsin Art Therapy Association (WATA), formally established in 1969, was the first incorporated organization of art therapists in the United States. Under the leadership of Wayne Ramirez, WATA lobbied the national association for an inclusive definition of art therapy that aimed to foster respect for psychiatric, educational, and community…

  3. Sunitinib: the antiangiogenic effects and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Z

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Zhonglin Hao, Ibrahim Sadek Department of Medicine, Section of Hematology and Oncology, Georgia Cancer Center, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta University, Augusta, GA, USA Abstract: As a multitargeted kinase inhibitor, sunitinib has carved its way into demonstrating itself as a most effective tyrosine kinase inhibitor in the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Mechanistically, sunitinib inhibits multiple receptor tyrosine kinases, especially those involved in angiogenesis, that is, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, and proto-oncogene cKIT. Sunitinib has also been implicated in enhancing cancer invasiveness and metastasis. Mechanisms of resistance are poorly understood, but both intrinsic and acquired mechanisms are thought to be involved. While the side effects are manageable, sunitinib, like many other tyrosine kinase inhibitors, can be associated with serious toxicities that require careful management including frequent dose reductions. Although still in the early stage, emerging evidence points to an immunomodulatory role for sunitinib. It is also likely to contribute to the overall outcomes, especially those seen in metastatic renal cell carcinoma, and such effects are thought to be mediated by the proto-oncogene cKIT receptor. Combination with other modalities such as stereotactic body radiation therapy, therapeutic vaccines, and checkpoint inhibitors is being pursued for improved efficacy. Keywords: sunitinib, angiogenesis, MDSC, cancer

  4. Drug therapy during pregnancy: implications for dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouanounou, A; Haas, D A

    2016-04-22

    Pregnancy is accompanied by various physiological and physical changes, including those found in the cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, renal and haematological systems. These alterations in the pregnant patient may potentially affect drug pharmacokinetics. Also, pharmacotherapy presents a unique matter due to the potential teratogenic effects of certain drugs. Although medications prescribed by dentists are generally safe during pregnancy, some modifications may be needed. In this article we will discuss the changes in the physiology during pregnancy and its impact on drug therapy. Specific emphasis will be given to the drugs commonly given by dentists, namely, local anaesthetics, analgesics, antibiotics and sedatives.

  5. Agammaglobulinemia: causative mutations and their implications for novel therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglöf, Anna; Turunen, Janne J; Gissberg, Olof; Bestas, Burcu; Blomberg, K Emelie M; Smith, C I Edvard

    2013-12-01

    Agammaglobulinemias are primary (inherited) immunodeficiencies characterized by the lack of functional B-cells and antibodies, and are caused by mutations in genes encoding components of the pre-B-cell or B-cell receptor, or their signaling pathways. The known genetic defects do not account for all agammaglobulinemic patients, suggesting that novel mutations underlying the disease remain to be found. While efficient, the current life-maintaining therapy with immunoglobulins and antibiotics is non-curative, prompting research into alternative treatment strategies that aim at rescuing the expression of the affected protein, thus giving rise to functional B-cells. These include gene therapy, which could be used to correct the defective gene or replace it with a functional copy. For a number of genetic defects, another alternative is to modulate the splicing of the affected transcripts. While these technologies are not yet ready for clinical trials in agammaglobulinemia, advances in genomic targeting are likely to make this option viable in the near future.

  6. Different types of fungal sinusitis occurring concurrently: implications for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupa, V; Thomas, Meera

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the clinical and histopathological features, management and outcome of a series of patients with simultaneous occurrence of invasive and non-invasive fungal sinusitis (mixed fungal sinusitis). The histopathological records of patients with fungal sinusitis seen over the last 6 years were reviewed. The clinical, histopathological, treatment and follow up details of all cases with mixed fungal sinusitis were noted. Six cases of mixed fungal sinusitis with concurrent occurrence of chronic granulomatous fungal sinusitis and allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) were seen during the study period. Most (83.3 %) had bilateral disease. All patients had undergone prior endoscopic sinus surgery at least once within the previous 2 years. Histopathological features showed predominance of invasive disease in half the patients. Except for one patient who did not report for follow up, all patients with predominant chronic granulomatous fungal sinusitis received systemic antifungal therapy and inhaled steroids. Those with predominant features of AFS received oral and inhaled steroids. Five patients with mixed fungal sinusitis who had follow up ranging from 6 months to 5 years were disease free following treatment. Mixed fungal sinusitis should be recognized by the surgeon and pathologist as a separate category of fungal sinusitis whose treatment depends on accurate histological diagnosis. A good outcome may be expected with appropriate therapy.

  7. The relationship between ADHD and obesity: implications for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, Samuele; Castellanos, F Xavier

    2014-05-01

    Increasing attention is being paid to the relationship between attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and obesity. While most available research focused on determining the extent of the association between ADHD and obesity, a few studies have examined the clinical implications of diagnosing/treating ADHD in individuals with obesity. Here, we provide a narrative review of studies addressing the impact of ADHD, or its treatment, in individuals with obesity. Reviewed studies suggest that ADHD impedes the successful treatment of obesity in individuals with comorbid ADHD and obesity. Preliminary evidence also suggests that ADHD treatment might significantly increase the effectiveness of weight management strategies. We discuss the limitations of the reviewed studies and provide suggestions for future research in the field.

  8. African trypanosomiasis and antibodies: implications for vaccination, therapy and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magez, Stefan; Radwanska, Magdalena

    2009-10-01

    African trypanosomiasis causes devastating effects on human populations and livestock herds in large parts of sub-Saharan Africa. Control of the disease is hampered by the lack of any efficient vaccination results in a field setting, and the severe side effects of current drug therapies. In addition, with the exception of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense infections, the diagnosis of trypanosomiasis has to rely on microscopic analysis of blood samples, as other specific tools are nonexistent. However, new developments in biotechnology, which include loop-mediated isothermal amplification as an adaptation to conventional PCR, as well as the antibody engineering that has allowed the development of Nanobody technology, offer new perspectives in both the detection and treatment of trypanosomiasis. In addition, recent data on parasite-induced B-cell memory destruction offer new insights into mechanisms of vaccine failure, and should lead us towards new strategies to overcome trypanosome defenses operating against the host immune system.

  9. Pathophysiology of septic shock and implications for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, R L

    1993-11-01

    Current knowledge about the pathophysiology of septic shock is reviewed, and biotechnology-based therapies under development are discussed. Patients with septic shock begin their clinical course with leukocytosis, fever, tachycardia, tachypnea, and organ hypoperfusion; shock ensues as immunologic and vasoactive mediators produce hypotension. There are many metabolic and cardiovascular responses, and single- or multiple-organ failure is common. Patients may experience adult respiratory distress syndrome. A multitude of endogenous and exogenous factors have been linked to the pathophysiology of sepsis and septic shock, including (1) endotoxin from gram-negative bacteria, (2) peptidoglycan and exotoxins from gram-negative bacteria, (3) endotoxin-binding proteins and receptors, (4) bactericidal proteases, (5) exotoxins from gram-positive bacteria, (6) acute-phase proteins and proteases, (7) cytokines, (8) arachidonic acid metabolites, (9) complement, (10) beta-endorphin, (11) histamine, (12) stimulation of intrinsic and extrinsic coagulation pathways and proteases, and (13) endothelium-derived factors and adhesion molecules. Molecular entities and strategies under development to combat septic shock include monoclonal antibodies to endotoxin, active immunization with lipid-A analogues, bactericidal permeability-increasing protein, interleukin inhibitors, and inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Successful treatment of septic shock will probably require a combination of agents, including antimicrobials. An ideal goal for biotechnology in the area of septic shock is to prevent invading pathogens from overstimulating the host's immune system and to systematically eliminate those pathogens. Biotechnology is opening new avenues to the treatment of septic shock.

  10. BRAFV600E: implications for carcinogenesis and molecular therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cantwell-Dorris, Emma R

    2012-02-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)\\/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway is frequently mutated in human cancer. This pathway consists of a small GTP protein of the RAS family that is activated in response to extracellular signaling to recruit a member of the RAF kinase family to the cell membrane. Active RAF signals through MAP\\/ERK kinase to activate ERK and its downstream effectors to regulate a wide range of biological activities including cell differentiation, proliferation, senescence, and survival. Mutations in the v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogenes homolog B1 (BRAF) isoform of the RAF kinase or KRAS isoform of the RAS protein are found as activating mutations in approximately 30% of all human cancers. The BRAF pathway has become a target of interest for molecular therapy, with promising results emerging from clinical trials. Here, the role of the most common BRAF mutation BRAF(V600E) in human carcinogenesis is investigated through a review of the literature, with specific focus on its role in melanoma, colorectal, and thyroid cancers and its potential as a therapeutic target.

  11. Radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy: Implications for clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda G Herrera

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Depending on the pathological findings, up to 60% of prostate cancer patients who undergo radical prostatectomy (RP will develop biochemical relapse and require further local treatment. Radiotherapy (RT immediately after RP may potentially eradicate any residual localized microscopic disease in the prostate bed, and it is associated with improved biochemical, clinical progression free survival, and overall survival in patients with high-risk pathological features according to published randomized trials. Offering immediate adjuvant RT to all men with high-risk pathological factors we are over-treating around 50% of patients who would anyway be cancer-free, exposing them to unnecessary toxicity and adding costs to the health care system. The current dilemma is, thus, whether to deliver adjuvant immediate RT solely on the basis of high-risk pathology, but in the absence of measurable prostate-specific antigen, or whether early salvage radiotherapy would yield equivalent outcomes. Randomized trials are ongoing to definitely answer this question. Retrospective analyses suggest that there is a dose–response favoring doses >70 Gy to the prostate bed. The evidence regarding the role of androgen deprivation therapy is emerging, and ongoing randomized trials are underway.

  12. Cognitive behavior therapy with Internet addicts: treatment outcomes and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Kimberly S

    2007-10-01

    Research over the last decade has identified Internet addiction as a new and often unrecognized clinical disorder that impact a user's ability to control online use to the extent that it can cause relational, occupational, and social problems. While much of the literature explores the psychological and social factors underlying Internet addiction, little if any empirical evidence exists that examines specific treatment outcomes to deal with this new client population. Researchers have suggested using cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) as the treatment of choice for Internet addiction, and addiction recovery in general has utilized CBT as part of treatment planning. To investigate the efficacy of using CBT with Internet addicts, this study investigated 114 clients who suffered from Internet addiction and received CBT at the Center for Online Addiction. This study employed a survey research design, and outcome variables such as client motivation, online time management, improved social relationships, improved sexual functioning, engagement in offline activities, and ability to abstain from problematic applications were evaluated on the 3rd, 8th, and 12th sessions and over a 6-month follow-up. Results suggested that Caucasian, middle-aged males with at least a 4-year degree were most likely to suffer from some form of Internet addiction. Preliminary analyses indicated that most clients were able to manage their presenting complaints by the eighth session, and symptom management was sustained upon a 6-month follow-up. As the field of Internet addiction continues to grow, such outcome data will be useful in treatment planning with evidenced-based protocols unique to this emergent client population.

  13. Tumour biology: Herceptin acts as an anti-angiogenic cocktail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Yotaro; Xu, Lei; di Tomaso, Emmanuelle; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2002-03-01

    Malignant tumours secrete factors that enable them to commandeer their own blood supply (angiogenesis), and blocking the action of these factors can inhibit tumour growth. But because tumours may become resistant to treatments that target individual angiogenic factors by switching over to other angiogenic molecules, a cocktail of multiple anti-angiogenic agents should be more effective. Here we show that herceptin, a monoclonal antibody against the cell-surface receptor HER2 (for human epidermal growth factor receptor-2; ref. 4), induces normalization and regression of the vasculature in an experimental human breast tumour that overexpresses HER2 in mice, and that it works by modulating the effects of different pro- and anti-angiogenic factors. As a single agent that acts against multiple targets, herceptin, or drugs like it, may offer a simple alternative to combination anti-angiogenic treatments.

  14. Anti-Angiogenic Gene Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-04-01

    in immunocompetent animals (47). 16. Kisker, 0., Becker, C. M., Prox, D., Fannon, M., D’Amato. R., Flynn, E.. Fogler , Persistence and stable expression...Pluda, J., Fogler , W., Schiller, J. H., and Wilding, rAAV is the poor transduction efficiency in primary tumors as well as G. Phase I phannacokinetic

  15. Combination Antiangiogenic and Immunomodulatory Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-01

    Classification and causes of jaundice. In: UpToDate in Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Rose, BD (Ed), UpToDate , Wellesley, MA, 2000. 3. Sauter BV...Roy Chowdhury N, Roy Chowdhury J. Bilirubin metabolism. In: UpToDate in Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Rose, BD (Ed), UpToDate , Wellesley, MA...2000. 4. Sauter BV. Roy Chowdhury N, Roy Chowdhury J. Diagnostic approach to the patient with jaundice. In: UpToDate in Gastroenterology and

  16. Combination Antiangiogenic and Inmmunomodulatory Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-06-01

    Gastroenterology , Lawrence J. Brandt (ed.), Current Medicine, 1998. 2. Five chapters in UpToDate : B. Sauter, N. Roy Chowdhury, and J. Roy Chowdhury...InUpToDate, Burton D. Rose (ed.), UpToDate , Inc.; submitted. 1. Bilirubin Metabolism 2. Jaundice: Causes, Classifications and Approach to Diagnosis 3...Conjugated Bilirubin): Dubin Johnson Syndrome, Rotor Syndrome N.B.: UpToDate is a CD ROM book aimed at the "intelllectually oriented subspecialist

  17. Potentiation of Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy Using Antiangiogenic and Antitumor Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    University of Rochester Rochester, NY 14642 REPORT DATE: October 2007 TYPE OF REPORT: Final PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army Medical...Research and given once daily by gavage in a volume of 0.13 mL. Control animals received 0.5% carboxymethylcellulose drug carrier. Irradiations were

  18. Antiangiogenic Effects of VH02, a Novel Urea Derivative: In Vitro and in Vivo Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwadee Phowichit

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2 is a vital target for therapeutic intervention in cancer. We have recently described a computer-based drug design for a small molecule VEGFR2 inhibitor named VH02 (1-((1-(1H-indazol-6-yl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-4-ylmethyl-3-(3-chloromethylphenylurea. This study aimed to further explore the anti-angiogenic activity of VH02 both in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro assays include cell viability, capillary-like tube formation, MMP activity, and western blot analyses of signaling through VEGFR2 while the in vivo anti-angiogenic response were performed to evaluate the effect on vascularization in Matrigel plug applied in C57BL/6L mice. VH02 reduced angiogenesis behavior of EA.hy926 including cell viability, migration, adhesion, capillary-like tube formation, and MMP-2 activity induced by VEGF. Furthermore, VH02 regulated angiogenesis by directly inhibiting VEGFR2 on Tyr1175 signaling pathway leading to the inhibition of Akt-mediated cell survival and migration. Disruption of phosphorylation at VEGFR2-Tyr1175 by VH02 abolished FAK-Tyr397 signaling but not phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. This suggests that blockade of FAK by VH02 apparently associated with reduction of endothelial cell motility. Actin cytoskeleton rearrangement was diminished by VH02 in human endothelial cells. The anti-angiogenic effect of VH02 was confirmed in the in vivo model, revealing the reduction of vascular density in Matrigel plug after VH02 treatment. Additionally, the pericyte-like cells surrounding blood vessels in the plugs were significantly reduced as well as vascular density and p-Akt intensity. Our findings indicate that VH02 successfully inhibits VEGF-induced angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo models. The compound could be further developed as an antiangiogenesis agent for cancer therapy.

  19. Antiangiogenic effects of pazopanib in xenograft hepatocellular carcinoma models: evaluation by quantitative contrast-enhanced ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Wei-Zhong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antiangiogenesis is a promising therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, but the effects are difficult to be evaluated. Pazopanib (GW786034B is a pan-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibitor, the antitumor effects or antiangiogenic effects haven't been investigated in HCC. Methods In vitro direct effects of pazopanib on human HCC cell lines and endothelial cells were evaluated. In vivo antitumor effects were evaluated in three xenograft nude mice models. In the subcutaneous HCCLM3 model, intratumoral blood perfusion was detected by contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS, and serial quantitative parameters were profiled from the time-intensity curves of ultrasonograms. Results In vitro proliferation of various HCC cell lines were not inhibited by pazopanib. Pazopanib inhibited migration and invasion and induced apoptosis significantly in two HCC cell lines, HCCLM3 and PLC/PRF/5. Proliferation, migration, and tubule formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells were inhibited by pazopanib in a dose-dependent manner. In vivo tumor growth was significantly inhibited by pazopanib in HCCLM3, HepG2, and PLC/PRF/5 xenograft models. Various intratumoral perfusion parameters changed over time, and the signal intensity was significantly impaired in the treated tumors before the treatment efficacy on tumor size could be observed. Mean transit time of the contrast media in hotspot areas of the tumors was reversely correlated with intratumoral microvessel density. Conclusions Antitumor effects of pazopanib in HCC xenografts may owe to its antiangiogenic effects, and the in vivo antiangiogenic effects could be evaluated by quantitative CEUS.

  20. Gene Therapy of Cancerous Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Valenčáková, A.; Dziaková, A.; Hatalová, E.

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy of cancerous diseases provides new means of curing patients with oncologic illnesses. There are several approaches in treating cancer by gene therapy. Most commonly used methods are: cancer immunogene therapy, suicide gene therapy, application of tumor-suppressor genes, antiangiogenic therapy, mesenchymal stem cells used as vectors, gene directed enzyme/prodrug therapy and bacteria used as anti-cancer agents. Cancer gene immunotherapy uses several immunologic agents for the purp...

  1. Hypoxia upregulates Bcl-2 expression and suppresses interferon-gamma induced antiangiogenic activity in human tumor derived endothelial cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wang, Jiang Huai

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Hypoxia in solid tumors potentially stimulates angiogenesis by promoting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production and upregulating VEGF receptor expression. However, it is unknown whether hypoxia can modulate the effect of anti-angiogenic treatment on tumor-derived endothelium. METHODS: Human tumor-derived endothelial cells (HTDEC) were freshly isolated from surgically removed human colorectal tumors by collagenase\\/DNase digestion and Percol gradient sedimentation. Cell proliferation was assessed by measuring BrdU incorporation, and capillary tube formation was measured using Matrigel. Cell apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry and ELISA, and Bcl-2 expression was detected by Western blot analysis. RESULTS: Under aerobic culture conditions (5% CO2 plus 21% O2) HTDEC expressed less Bcl-2 and were more susceptible to IFN-gamma-induced apoptosis with significant reductions in both cell proliferation and capillary tube formation, when compared with normal human macrovascular and microvascular EC. Following exposure of HTDEC to hypoxia (5% CO2 plus 2% O2), IFN-gamma-induced cell apoptosis, and antiangiogenic activity (i.e. an inhibition in cell proliferation and capillary tube formation) in HTDEC were markedly attenuated. This finding correlated with hypoxia-induced upregulation of Bcl-2 expression in HTDEC. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that hypoxia can protect HTDEC against IFN-gamma-mediated cell death and antiangiogenic activity, and suggest that improvement of tumor oxygenation may potentiate the efficacy of anti-cancer therapies specifically targeting the inhibition of tumor angiogenesis.

  2. Femoral Head Growth Plate Dysplasia and Fracture in Juvenile Rabbits Induced by Off-target Antiangiogenic Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, A Peter; Mitchard, T; Rolf, M G; Stewart, J; Duffy, P

    2016-08-01

    Epiphyseal growth plate dysplasia (chondrodysplasia) might be considered as the pathognomonic feature of antiangiogenic treatment in preclinical species as it is reliably and dose-responsively induced in rodents and monkeys with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) inhibitors, fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor inhibitors, matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors, and vascular targeting agents. Here we report epiphyseal growth plate dysplasia in juvenile rabbits treated with an oral spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor induced by off-target antiangiogenic inhibition of VEGF and FGF family kinase receptors. Epiphyseal growth plate dysplasia resulted in weakening and fracturing of the femoral head physis in 6 of 10 male and 1 of 10 female animals as well as microfracturing and dysplasia of the distal femoral articular cartilage in 1 male animal. Fracture lines ran through the zone of hypertrophic cartilage (as well as adjacent zones), were orientated parallel to the physeal plane, and often involved displacement of the femoral head. We would suggest that the high prevalence of growth plate fracture in the rabbit may represent a potential additional adverse risk to those already established for children treated with antiangiogenic therapy.

  3. Is copper chelation an effective anti-angiogenic strategy for cancer treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniades, V; Sioga, A; Dietrich, E M; Meditskou, S; Ekonomou, L; Antoniades, K

    2013-12-01

    Angiogenesis and the acquisition of an angiogenic phenotype is important for cancer cell proliferation. Copper in an essential trace element that participates in many enzymatic complexes like the cytochrome c, superoxide dismutase and lysyl oxidase and it is involved in processes, like embryogenesis, growth, angiogenesis and carcinogenesis. In particular, its involvement in carcinogenesis was described for the first time in oral submucous fibrosis, where fibroblasts produce large amounts of collagen in the presence of copper. Copper's action in carcinogenesis is two-fold: (1) it participates in reactions with an increased redox potential that result in the production of oxidative products and oxidative stress. Through this mechanism, copper may cause DNA mutations in the nucleus and mitochondria or alterations to membrane phospholipids, (2) it participates in angiogenesis even in the absence of angiogenic molecules, as it was reported for the first time in rabbit cornea models with copolymer pellets charged with PGE1. Copper chelation regimens like penicillamine and tetrathiomolybdate are being described in the literature as having anti-angiogenic, anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory actions. Animal models of brain cancer that evaluated the anti-angiogenic properties of copper, have proven evidence of the reduction of tumor's microvascular supply, tumor volume and vascular permeability after plasma copper levels reduction. Interestingly, plasma copper levels reduction was shown to suppress micrometastases generation in mice models of breast cancer. We hypothesize that copper chelation therapy: increases oxidative stress in cancer cells to a level that does not allow survival because of the reduction of anti-oxidative enzymes production. It may also result in inhibition of angiogenesis and of the initiation of the angiogenic switch, because copper normally enhances endothelial cell migration and proliferation, improves binding of growth factors to endothelial cells

  4. a Simple Evolutionary Model for Cancer Cell Population and its Implications on Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Peng; Wen, Shutang; Li, Baoshun; Li, Yuxiao

    We established a simple evolutionary model based on the cancer stem cell hypothesis. By taking cellular interactions into consideration, we introduced the evolutionary games theory into the quasispecies model. The fitness values are determined by both genotypes and cellular interactions. In the evolutionary model, a cancer cell population can evolve in different patterns. For single peak intrinsic fitness landscape, the evolution pattern can transit with increasing differentiation probability from malignant cells to benign cells in four different modes. For a large enough value of differentiation probability, the evolution is always the case that the malignant cells extinct ultimately, which might give some implications on cancer therapy.

  5. Molecular Basis of Triple Negative Breast Cancer and Implications for Therapy

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    Parvin F. Peddi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Triple negative breast cancer is an aggressive form of breast cancer with limited treatment options and is without proven targeted therapy. Understanding the molecular basis of triple negative breast cancer is crucial for effective new drug development. Recent genomewide gene expression and DNA sequencing studies indicate that this cancer type is composed of a molecularly heterogeneous group of diseases that carry multiple somatic mutations and genomic structural changes. These findings have implications for therapeutic target identification and the design of future clinical trials for this aggressive group of breast cancer.

  6. Management considerations for childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients and implications on therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Clovis Artur; Aikawa, Nadia Emi; Pereira, Rosa Maria Rodrigues; Campos, Lucia Maria Arruda

    2016-01-01

    Childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE) is a chronic inflammatory and autoimmune disease that may involve various organs and systems. This narrative review focuses on the recent evidence relating to cSLE management. The general management considerations of cSLE patients require the use of validated classification criteria, disease and health-related quality of life tools evaluation, as well as assessments of lupus nephritis biomarkers and cSLE quality indicators. The drug treatment for cSLE patients includes general supportive care and immunosuppressive therapy. Important implications on cSLE therapy are also updated such as infection, vaccination, infertility, pregnancy, contraception, dyslipidemia, physical activity, cancer, bone health, drug pharmacokinetics, adherence, academic outcomes, transition to adult care and cumulative organ damage.

  7. Dawn of ocular gene therapy: implications for molecular diagnosis in retinal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, ZANEVELD; Feng, WANG; Xia, WANG; Rui, CHEN

    2013-01-01

    Personalized medicine aims to utilize genomic information about patients to tailor treatment. Gene replacement therapy for rare genetic disorders is perhaps the most extreme form of personalized medicine, in that the patients’ genome wholly determines their treatment regimen. Gene therapy for retinal disorders is poised to become a clinical reality. The eye is an optimal site for gene therapy due to the relative ease of precise vector delivery, immune system isolation, and availability for monitoring of any potential damage or side effects. Due to these advantages, clinical trials for gene therapy of retinal diseases are currently underway. A necessary precursor to such gene therapies is accurate molecular diagnosis of the mutation(s) underlying disease. In this review, we discuss the application of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) to obtain such a diagnosis and identify disease causing genes, using retinal disorders as a case study. After reviewing ocular gene therapy, we discuss the application of NGS to the identification of novel Mendelian disease genes. We then compare current, array based mutation detection methods against next NGS-based methods in three retinal diseases: Leber’s Congenital Amaurosis, Retinitis Pigmentosa, and Stargardt’s disease. We conclude that next-generation sequencing based diagnosis offers several advantages over array based methods, including a higher rate of successful diagnosis and the ability to more deeply and efficiently assay a broad spectrum of mutations. However, the relative difficulty of interpreting sequence results and the development of standardized, reliable bioinformatic tools remain outstanding concerns. In this review, recent advances NGS based molecular diagnoses are discussed, as well as their implications for the development of personalized medicine. PMID:23393028

  8. A systems analysis of psychobiology and behavior therapy. Implications for behavioral medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, G E

    1981-01-01

    This article examines some basic principles of systems theory and applies them to the integration of psychobiology and behavior therapy in the evolution of behavioral medicine. Using the concepts of whole/part relationships, level and emergent property, and self-regulation and disregulation, it is proposed that all behavioral therapies involve psychobiological processes, and therefore, indirectly impinge on physical health. It is argued that the distinction between behavior and biology is one of level, and, therefore, behavioral therapies are ultimately biobehavioral therapies having biobehavioral consequences. It is proposed that contrary to traditional reductionistic logic, modern advances in biology are providing strong justification for the importance of including psychological methods in treating diseases manifested at the biological level. Various clinical examples are used to demonstrate how systems theory can be applied to differential diagnosis and treatment, computing cost/benefit ratios of different treatments, and conducting comprehensive clinical research and evaluation. Assessing the interaction of biological, psychological, and social treatment modalities becomes the hallmark of responsible patient care. Implications of the systems conception of behavioral medicine for collaboration among health care providers, the training of future clinicians in different disciplines, and policy decisions regarding the larger social consequences of health care are considered.

  9. Targeting Tumor Mitochondrial Metabolism Overcomes Resistance to Antiangiogenics

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    Paloma Navarro

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial malignancies are effectively treated by antiangiogenics; however, acquired resistance is a major problem in cancer therapeutics. Epithelial tumors commonly have mutations in the MAPK/Pi3K-AKT pathways, which leads to high-rate aerobic glycolysis. Here, we show how multikinase inhibitor antiangiogenics (TKIs induce hypoxia correction in spontaneous breast and lung tumor models. When this happens, the tumors downregulate glycolysis and switch to long-term reliance on mitochondrial respiration. A transcriptomic, metabolomic, and phosphoproteomic study revealed that this metabolic switch is mediated by downregulation of HIF1α and AKT and upregulation of AMPK, allowing uptake and degradation of fatty acids and ketone bodies. The switch renders mitochondrial respiration necessary for tumor survival. Agents like phenformin or ME344 induce synergistic tumor control when combined with TKIs, leading to metabolic synthetic lethality. Our study uncovers mechanistic insights in the process of tumor resistance to TKIs and may have clinical applicability.

  10. In vitro and ex vivo antiangiogenic activity of Salvia officinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarz, Maryam; Mostafaie, Ali; Mansouri, Kamran; Bidmeshkipour, Ali; Motlagh, Hamid Reza Mohammadi; Parvaneh, Shahram

    2010-10-01

    Angiogenesis is a key process in the promotion of cancer and its metastasis. Herein, the antiangiogenic activity of Salvia officinalis extract and its fractions was investigated. S. officinalis aerial parts were extracted with ethanol and its successive hexane, ethyl acetate, n-butanol and aqueous fractions were evaluated for their antiangiogenic activities using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) capillary tube formation and rat aorta models in a three-dimensional collagen matrix. Furthermore, antimigrative effects of the fractions were assessed using a wound healing model. The ethanol extract of S. officinalis (ESO) potently inhibited capillary tube formation in HUVEC and rat aorta models of angiogenesis, and its hexane fraction (HSO) exerted the highest inhibitory effect. In addition, the ethanol extract of S. officinalis and its hexane fraction showed a dose-dependent inhibitory activity on the migration of the endothelial cells in the wound healing model. Furthermore, ESO inhibited endothelial cell proliferation at 50-200 μg/mL in a dose-dependent manner. These findings indicated some new pharmacological activities of S. officinalis such as antiangiogenic in vitro and ex vivo, and antimigrative activity in vitro. Therefore, S. officinalis could be a candidate as a useful herb with therapeutic or preventive activity against angiogenesis related disorders.

  11. Screening the antiangiogenic activity of medicinal plants grown and sold in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zihlif, Malek; Afifi, Fatma; Muhtaseb, Ruba; Al-Khatib, Sondos; Abaza, Ismail; Naffa, Randa

    2012-02-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for the growth, invasion, and metastasis of most solid tumors and has become a valuable pharmacological target for cancer prevention and treatment. This study was performed to assess the antiangiogenic activity of 31 medicinal plants grown and sold in Jordan. The antiangiogenic activity was assessed using the rat aortic ring assay. Out of 31 extracts, 15 extracts showed more than 50 % inhibition of the blood vessels outgrowth from the primary tissue explants (p = 0.000). Three of these 15 extracts showed a potential cytotoxic effect on normal fibroblast cells. Four extracts shared antiangiogenic and antiproliferative activity towards MCF7 breast cancer cell lines. Eight extracts demonstrated selective antiangiogenic activity. This is the first report demonstrating the potential antiangiogenic activity of Artemisia judaica, Aloysia citriodora, Salvia egyptiaca, and Calendula arvensis. Some extracts with antiangiogenic activity exhibited selectivity against the endothelial cells proliferation, demonstrating a direct inhibitory activity against the key step in tumor angiogenesis.

  12. Corneal neovascularization and contemporary antiangiogenic therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chih-Chien; Chang, Hua-Ming; Lin, Tai-Chi; Hung, Kuo-Hsuan; Chien, Ke-Hung; Chen, Szu-Yu; Chen, San-Ni; Chen, Yan-Ting

    2015-06-01

    Corneal neovascularization (NV), the excessive ingrowth of blood vessels from conjunctiva into the cornea, is a common sequela of disease insult that can lead to visual impairment. Clinically, topical steroid, argon laser photocoagulation, and subconjunctival injection of bevacizumab have been used to treat corneal NV. Sometimes, the therapies are ineffective, especially when the vessels are large. Large vessels are difficult to occlude and easily recanalized. Scientists and physicians are now dedicated to overcoming this problem. In this article, we briefly introduce the pathogenesis of corneal NV, and then highlight the existing animal models used in corneal NV research-the alkali-induced model and the suture-induced model. Most of all, we review the potential therapeutic targets (i.e., vascular endothelial growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor) and their corresponding inhibitors, as well as the immunosuppressants that have been discovered in recent years by corneal NV studies.

  13. VEGFR2 heterogeneity and response to anti-angiogenic low dose metronomic cyclophosphamide treatment

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    Skowronski Karolina

    2010-12-01

    stabilization of colorectal microvessels, but no such change in melanoma vessels. Conclusions Overall, our study suggests that while heterogeneous expression of VEGFR2 is a feature of human tumors, it may not affect response to low dose metronomic cyclophosphamide treatment and possibly other anti-angiogenic approaches. It remains to be seen whether this heterogeneity is partly responsible for the variable clinical success seen to date with targeted anti-VEGFR2 therapy.

  14. Complement activation and choriocapillaris loss in early AMD: implications for pathophysiology and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, S Scott; Sohn, Elliott H; Chirco, Kathleen R; Drack, Arlene V; Stone, Edwin M; Tucker, Budd A; Mullins, Robert F

    2015-03-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common and devastating disease that can result in severe visual dysfunction. Over the last decade, great progress has been made in identifying genetic variants that contribute to AMD, many of which lie in genes involved in the complement cascade. In this review we discuss the significance of complement activation in AMD, particularly with respect to the formation of the membrane attack complex in the aging choriocapillaris. We review the clinical, histological and biochemical data that indicate that vascular loss in the choroid occurs very early in the pathogenesis of AMD, and discuss the potential impact of vascular dropout on the retinal pigment epithelium, Bruch's membrane and the photoreceptor cells. Finally, we present a hypothesis for the pathogenesis of early AMD and consider the implications of this model on the development of new therapies.

  15. Vagus nerve stimulation therapy (VNST) in epilepsy - implications for dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisowska, P; Daly, B

    2012-01-27

    Epilepsy is a chronic condition which affects about 1% of the population. It is important that the dental team is aware of the management of epileptic seizures and epileptic syndromes including recent advances in seizure management. As people with epilepsy often get a warning aura before seizures begin, the management of the condition has increasingly involved measures to prevent the seizure, once the aura has begun. Vagus nerve stimulation therapy (VNST) in epilepsy involves the use of an implantable electronic device and is being increasingly used in the UK to control severe treatment resistant epilepsy. As a result, more patients will be presented to clinicians in the primary healthcare setting and hospital services with these devices in place. Members of the dental team need to understand the principles of epilepsy control, how VNST is used in the management of intractable epilepsy, how the VNST system operates and the implications of VNST use for dental practice including medical devices, interactions and safety features.

  16. Evolving trends in Streptococcus pneumoniae resistance: implications for therapy of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ronald N; Jacobs, Michael R; Sader, Helio S

    2010-09-01

    Pneumonia is a major infectious disease associated with significant morbidity, mortality and utilisation of healthcare resources. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the predominant pathogen in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), accounting for 20-60% of bacterial cases. Emergence of multidrug-resistant S. pneumoniae has become a significant problem in the management of CAP. Although pneumococcal conjugate vaccine usage in children has led to significant decreases in morbidity and mortality due to S. pneumoniae in all age groups, disease management has been further complicated by the unexpected increase in resistant serotypes, such as 19A, in some regions. Until rapid and accurate diagnostic tests become available, initial treatment of CAP will remain empirical. Thus, selection of appropriate antimicrobial therapy for CAP must be based on prediction of the most likely pathogens and their local antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. This article reviews information on antimicrobial resistance patterns amongst S. pneumoniae and implications for managing CAP.

  17. Antenatal corticosteroids impact the inflammatory rather than the antiangiogenic profile of women with preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayeri, Unzila A; Buhimschi, Irina A; Laky, Christine A; Cross, Sarah N; Duzyj, Christina M; Ramma, Wenda; Sibai, Baha M; Funai, Edmund F; Ahmed, Asif; Buhimschi, Catalin S

    2014-06-01

    Circulating antiangiogenic factors and proinflammatory cytokines are implicated in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. This study was performed to test the hypothesis that steroids modify the balance of inflammatory and proangiogenic and antiangiogenic factors that potentially contribute to the patient's evolving clinical state. Seventy singleton women, admitted for antenatal corticosteroid treatment, were enrolled prospectively. The study group consisted of 45 hypertensive women: chronic hypertension (n=6), severe preeclampsia (n=32), and superimposed preeclampsia (n=7). Normotensive women with shortened cervix (preeclampsia cases were obtained before steroids and then serially up until delivery. A clinical severity score was designed to clinically monitor disease progression. Serum levels of angiogenic factors (soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 [sFlt-1], placental growth factor [PlGF], soluble endoglin [sEng]), endothelin-1 (ET-1), and proinflammatory markers (IL-6, C-reactive protein [CRP]) were assessed before and after steroids. Soluble IL-2 receptor (sIL-2R) and total immunoglobulins (IgG) were measured as markers of T- and B-cell activation, respectively. Steroid treatment coincided with a transient improvement in clinical manifestations of preeclampsia. A significant decrease in IL-6 and CRP was observed although levels of sIL-2R and IgG remained unchanged. Antenatal corticosteroids did not influence the levels of angiogenic factors but ET-1 levels registered a short-lived increase poststeroids. Although a reduction in specific inflammatory mediators in response to antenatal steroids may account for the transient improvement in clinical signs of preeclampsia, inflammation is unlikely to be the major contributor to severe preeclampsia or useful for therapeutic targeting.

  18. Clinical implications of miRNAs in the pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Macha, Muzafar A; Heimann, Nicholas; Seshacharyulu, Parthasarathy; Haridas, Dhanya; Chugh, Seema; Batra, Surinder K

    2015-01-01

    Despite considerable progress being made in understanding pancreatic cancer (PC) pathogenesis, it still remains the 10th most often diagnosed malignancy in the world and 4th leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States with a five year survival rate of only 6%. The aggressive nature, lack of early diagnostic and prognostic markers, late clinical presentation, and limited efficacy of existing treatment regimens make PC a lethal cancer with high mortality and poor prognosis. Therefore, novel reliable biomarkers and molecular targets are urgently needed to combat this deadly disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short (19-24 nucleotides) non-coding RNA molecules implicated in the regulation of gene expression at post-transcriptional level and play significant roles in various physiological and pathological conditions. Aberrant expression of miRNAs has been reported in several cancers including PC and is implicated in PC pathogenesis and progression, suggesting their utility in diagnosis, prognosis and therapy. In this review, we summarize the role of several miRNAs that regulate various oncogenes (KRAS) and tumor suppressor genes (p53, p16, SMAD4, etc.) involved in PC development, their prospective roles as diagnostic and prognostic markers and as a therapeutic targets.

  19. Influence of shoulder pain on muscle function: implications for the assessment and therapy of shoulder disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struyf, Filip; Lluch, Enrique; Falla, Deborah; Meeus, Mira; Noten, Suzie; Nijs, Jo

    2015-02-01

    Shoulder pain is often a challenging clinical phenomenon because of the potential mismatch between pathology and the perception of pain. Current evidence clearly emphasizes an incomplete understanding of the nature of shoulder pain. Indeed, the effective diagnosis and treatment of shoulder pain should not only rely upon a detailed knowledge of the peripheral pathologies that may be present in the shoulder, but also on current knowledge of pain neurophysiology. To assess and treat shoulder pain, a comprehensive understanding of the way in which pain is processed is essential. This review reflects modern pain neurophysiology to the shoulder and aims to answer the following questions: why does my shoulder hurt? What is the impact of shoulder pain on muscle function? What are the implications for the clinical examination of the shoulder? And finally, what are the clinical implications for therapy? Despite the increasing amount of research in this area, an in-depth understanding of the bidirectional nociception-motor interaction is still far from being achieved. Many questions remain, especially related to the treatment of nociception-motor interactions.

  20. Thoughts on "Experience of Space in Japan." Implications for Music Therapy

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    Isabelle Mairiaux

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available This article presents thoughts on the experience of space, developed from a research study I have been doing during two years immersed in a very singular context where the familiar university environment contrasted with the – for me – completely unknown Japanese culture. The research study explains my motivation as well as my theme of the research: "the experience of space." The influence that my situation of being immersed in Japanese culture had on my hypothesis and research process are also developed. The study introduces some aspects of my experience of space in two different contexts: the context of everyday life experiences in Japan and the context of the butoh dance. Each context helped me to discover aspects of the experience of space, and possible implications for the music therapy context are then developed. In the study I sum up some of the discoveries underlining the negative and positive aspects this research process has led to. Finally, I evoke the learning of "humility," which is the dimension of the process most difficult to share in this article. The research study brought up some interesting subjects to investigate more in the future. One important discovery was the interdependency between perception and language (as a part of culture and the way this implies a special attention in the music therapy context. Another interesting remark concerns the concept of boundary, and I argue that the Japanese concept of "Ma" is precious in relation to the therapeutic challenge of approaching this concept with an open mind.

  1. Anti-angiogenic and anti-inflammatory properties of kahweol, a coffee diterpene.

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    Casimiro Cárdenas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies have shown that unfiltered coffee consumption is associated with a low incidence of cancer. This study aims to identify the effects of kahweol, an antioxidant diterpene contained in unfiltered coffee, on angiogenesis and key inflammatory molecules. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The experimental procedures included in vivo angiogenesis assays (both the chicken and quail choriallantoic membrane assay and the angiogenesis assay with fluorescent zebrafish, the ex vivo mouse aortic ring assay and the in vitro analysis of the effects of treatment of human endothelial cells with kahweol in cell growth, cell viability, cell migration and zymographic assays, as well as the tube formation assay on Matrigel. Additionally, two inflammation markers were determined, namely, the expression levels of cyclooxygenase 2 and the levels of secreted monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. We show for the first time that kahweol is an anti-angiogenic compound with inhibitory effects in two in vivo and one ex vivo angiogenesis models, with effects on specific steps of the angiogenic process: endothelial cell proliferation, migration, invasion and tube formation on Matrigel. We also demonstrate the inhibitory effect of kahweol on the endothelial cell potential to remodel extracellular matrix by targeting two key molecules involved in the process, MMP-2 and uPA. Finally, the anti-inflammatory potential of this compound is demonstrated by its inhibition of both COX-2 expression and MCP-1 secretion in endothelial cells. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our data indicate that, indeed, kahweol behaves as an anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic compound with potential use in antitumoral therapies. These data may contribute to the explanation of the reported antitumoral effects of kahweol, including the recent epidemiological meta-analysis showing that drinking coffee could decrease the risk of certain cancers.

  2. Anti-Angiogenic and Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Kahweol, a Coffee Diterpene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, Casimiro; Quesada, Ana R.; Medina, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies have shown that unfiltered coffee consumption is associated with a low incidence of cancer. This study aims to identify the effects of kahweol, an antioxidant diterpene contained in unfiltered coffee, on angiogenesis and key inflammatory molecules. Methodology/Principal Findings The experimental procedures included in vivo angiogenesis assays (both the chicken and quail choriallantoic membrane assay and the angiogenesis assay with fluorescent zebrafish), the ex vivo mouse aortic ring assay and the in vitro analysis of the effects of treatment of human endothelial cells with kahweol in cell growth, cell viability, cell migration and zymographic assays, as well as the tube formation assay on Matrigel. Additionally, two inflammation markers were determined, namely, the expression levels of cyclooxygenase 2 and the levels of secreted monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. We show for the first time that kahweol is an anti-angiogenic compound with inhibitory effects in two in vivo and one ex vivo angiogenesis models, with effects on specific steps of the angiogenic process: endothelial cell proliferation, migration, invasion and tube formation on Matrigel. We also demonstrate the inhibitory effect of kahweol on the endothelial cell potential to remodel extracellular matrix by targeting two key molecules involved in the process, MMP-2 and uPA. Finally, the anti-inflammatory potential of this compound is demonstrated by its inhibition of both COX-2 expression and MCP-1 secretion in endothelial cells. Conclusion/Significance Taken together, our data indicate that, indeed, kahweol behaves as an anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic compound with potential use in antitumoral therapies. These data may contribute to the explanation of the reported antitumoral effects of kahweol, including the recent epidemiological meta-analysis showing that drinking coffee could decrease the risk of certain cancers. PMID:21858104

  3. Heterogeneity of tumor vasculature and antiangiogenic intervention: insights from MR angiography and DCE-MRI.

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    Wenlian Zhu

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Solid tumor vasculature is highly heterogeneous, which presents challenges to antiangiogenic intervention as well as the evaluation of its therapeutic efficacy. The aim of this study is to evaluate the spatial tumor vascular changes due to bevacizumab/paclitaxel therapy using a combination approach of MR angiography and DCE-MRI method. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Tumor vasculature of MCF-7 breast tumor mouse xenografts was studied by a combination of MR angiography and DCE-MRI with albumin-Gd-DTPA. Tumor macroscopic vasculature was extracted from the early enhanced images. Tumor microvascular parameters were obtained from the pharmacokinetic modeling of the DCE-MRI data. A spatial analysis of the microvascular parameters based on the macroscopic vasculature was used to evaluate the changes of the heterogeneous vasculature induced by a 12 day bevacizumab/paclitaxel treatment in mice bearing MCF-7 breast tumor. RESULTS: Macroscopic vessels that feed the tumors were not affected by the bevacizumab/paclitaxel combination therapy. A higher portion of the tumors was within close proximity of these macroscopic vessels after the treatment, concomitant with tumor growth retardation. There was a significant decrease in microvascular permeability and vascular volume in the tumor regions near these vessels. CONCLUSION: Bevacizumab/paclitaxel combination therapy did not block the blood supply to the MCF-7 breast tumor. Such finding is consistent with the modest survival benefits of adding bevacizumab to current treatment regimens for some types of cancers.

  4. The Role of PPARs in the Endothelium: Implications for Cancer Therapy

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    Karen E. Swales

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The growth and metastasis of cancers intimately involve the vasculature and in particular the endothelial cell layer. Tumours require new blood vessel formation via angiogenesis to support growth. In addition, inflammation, coagulation, and platelet activation are common signals in the growth and metastasis of tumour cells. The endothelium plays a central role in the homeostatic control of inflammatory cell recruitment, regulating platelet activation and coagulation pathways. PPARα, -β/δ, and -γ are all expressed in endothelial cells. This review will discuss the roles of PPARs in endothelial cells in relation to angiogenesis, inflammation, coagulation, and platelet control pathways. In particular, we will discuss the recent evidence that supports the hypothesis that PPARα and PPARγ are antiangiogenic receptors, while PPARβ/δ is proangiogenic.

  5. Anti-angiogenesis therapy for lung cancer:the shore and the other shore

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuang Zhang; Jingjing Liu; Hui Li; Ying Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is known to be an important event in tumor growth. In preclinical and clinical researches, anti-angiogenesis therapy has made great progress, but there are stil many problems for future anti-an-giogenesis therapy. Here, we review recently completed clinical trials of emerging antiangiogenic agents in patients with non-smal cel lung cancer (NSCLC) and discuss the chal enges of anti-angiogenic therapy.

  6. A novel delivery vector for targeted delivery of the antiangiogenic drug paclitaxel to angiogenic blood vessels: TLTYTWS-conjugated PEG-PLA nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Fei; Mo, Xiao-hui; Zhao, Jian; Liang, Hui; Chen, Zhong-jian; Wang, Xiu-li

    2017-02-01

    Antiangiogenesis has been widely accepted as an attractive strategy to combat tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. An actively targeting nanoparticle-based drug delivery system (nano-DDS) would provide an alternative method to achieve antiangiogenic antitumor therapy. In the present study, our group fabricated novel nano-DDS, TLTYTWS (TS) peptide-modified poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic acid) (PEG-PLA) nanoparticles (TS-NPs) encapsulating a drug with antiangiogenic potential, paclitaxel (Ptx) (TS-Ptx-NPs). The nanoparticles were uniformly spherical and had a unimodal particle size distribution and slightly negative zeta potential. TS-NPs accumulated significantly in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) via energy-dependent and caveolae- and lipid raft-mediated endocytosis and improved the antiproliferative, antimigratory, and antitube-forming abilities of paclitaxel in vitro. Following intravenous administration, TS-Ptx-NPs presented favorable pharmacokinetic profiles. Melanoma distribution assays confirmed that TS-NPs achieved higher accumulation and penetration at melanoma sites. These results collectively indicated that TLTYTWS-decorated nanoparticles can be considered to be a promising nano-DDS for chemotherapies targeting tumor angiogenesis and have great potential to improve the efficacy of antiangiogenic therapy in melanoma tumor-bearing nude mice.

  7. Vertebrate embryos as tools for anti-angiogenic drug screening and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beedie, Shaunna L; Diamond, Alexandra J; Fraga, Lucas Rosa; Figg, William D; Vargesson, Neil

    2016-11-22

    The development of new angiogenic inhibitors highlights a need for robust screening assays that adequately capture the complexity of vessel formation, and allow for the quantitative evaluation of the teratogenicity of new anti-angiogenic agents. This review discusses the use of screening assays in vertebrate embryos, specifically focusing upon chicken and zebrafish embryos, for the detection of anti-angiogenic agents.

  8. Synthesis and Antiangiogenic Activity of N-Alkylated Levamisole Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvest, Lene; Friis, Tina; Staerk, Dan; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen; Olsen, Christian A.; Houen, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    Inhibition of angiogenesis is a promising addition to current cancer treatment strategies. Neutralization of vascular endothelial growth factor by monoclonal antibodies is clinically effective but may cause side effects due to thrombosis. Low molecular weight angiogenesis inhibitors are currently less effective than antibody treatment and are also associated with serious side effects. The discovery of new chemotypes with efficient antiangiogenic activity is therefore of pertinent interest. (S)-Levamisole hydrochloride, an anthelminthic drug approved for human use and with a known clinical profile, was recently shown to be an inhibitor of angiogenesis in vitro and exhibited tumor growth inhibition in mice. Here we describe the synthesis and in vitro evaluation of a series of N-alkylated analogues of levamisole with the aim of characterizing structure–activity relationships with regard to inhibition of angiogenesis. N-Methyllevamisole and p-bromolevamisole proved more effective than the parent compound, (S)-levamisole hydrochloride, with respect to inhibition of angiogenesis and induction of undifferentiated cluster morphology in human umbilical vein endothelial cells grown in co-culture with normal human dermal fibroblasts. Interestingly, the cluster morphology caused by N-methyllevamisole was different than the clusters observed for levamisole, and a third “cord-like” morphology resembling that of the known drug suramin was observed for an aniline-containing derivative. New chemotypes exhibiting antiangiogenic effects in vitro are thus described, and further investigation of their underlying mechanism of action is warranted. PMID:23024819

  9. Synthesis and antiangiogenic activity of N-alkylated levamisole derivatives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders N Hansen

    Full Text Available Inhibition of angiogenesis is a promising addition to current cancer treatment strategies. Neutralization of vascular endothelial growth factor by monoclonal antibodies is clinically effective but may cause side effects due to thrombosis. Low molecular weight angiogenesis inhibitors are currently less effective than antibody treatment and are also associated with serious side effects. The discovery of new chemotypes with efficient antiangiogenic activity is therefore of pertinent interest. (S-levamisole hydrochloride, an anthelminthic drug approved for human use and with a known clinical profile, was recently shown to be an inhibitor of angiogenesis in vitro and exhibited tumor growth inhibition in mice. Here we describe the synthesis and in vitro evaluation of a series of N-alkylated analogues of levamisole with the aim of characterizing structure-activity relationships with regard to inhibition of angiogenesis. N-methyllevamisole and p-bromolevamisole proved more effective than the parent compound, (S-levamisole hydrochloride, with respect to inhibition of angiogenesis and induction of undifferentiated cluster morphology in human umbilical vein endothelial cells grown in co-culture with normal human dermal fibroblasts. Interestingly, the cluster morphology caused by N-methyllevamisole was different than the clusters observed for levamisole, and a third "cord-like" morphology resembling that of the known drug suramin was observed for an aniline-containing derivative. New chemotypes exhibiting antiangiogenic effects in vitro are thus described, and further investigation of their underlying mechanism of action is warranted.

  10. Multigenic lentiviral vectors for combined and tissue-specific expression of miRNA- and protein-based antiangiogenic factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Askou, Anne Louise; Aagaard, Lars; Kostic, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Lentivirus-based gene delivery vectors carrying multiple gene cassettes are powerful tools in gene transfer studies and gene therapy, allowing coexpression of multiple therapeutic factors and, if desired, fluorescent reporters. Current strategies to express transgenes and microRNA (miRNA) clusters......-to-back RNApolII-driven expression cassettes. This configuration allows effective production of intron-embedded miRNAs that are released upon transduction of target cells. Exploiting such multigenic lentiviral vectors, we demonstrate robust miRNA-directed downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor...... by the VMD2 promoter, verifying that multigenic lentiviral vectors can be produced with high titers sufficient for in vivo applications. Altogether, our results suggest the potential applicability of combined miRNA- and protein-encoding lentiviral vectors in antiangiogenic gene therapy, including new...

  11. IGFBP-4 Anti-Angiogenic and Anti-Tumorigenic Effects Are Associated with Anti-Cathepsin B Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María J Moreno

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 4 (IGFBP-4/IBP-4 has potent IGF-independent anti-angiogenic and antitumorigenic effects. In this study, we demonstrated that these activities are located in the IGFBP-4 C-terminal protein fragment (CIBP-4, a region containing a thyroglobulin type 1 (Tg1 domain. Proteins bearing Tg1 domains have been shown to inhibit cathepsins, lysosomal enzymes involved in basement membrane degradation and implicated in tumor invasion and angiogenesis. In our studies, CIBP-4 was shown to internalize and co-localize with lysosomal-like structures in both endothelial cells (ECs and glioblastoma U87MG cells. CIBP-4 also inhibited both growth factor-induced EC tubulogenesis in Matrigel and the concomitant increases in intracellular cathepsin B (CatB activity. In vitro assays confirmed CIBP-4 capacity to block recombinant CatB activity. Biodistribution analysis of intravenously injected CIBP-4-Cy5.5 in a glioblastoma tumor xenograft model indicated targeted accumulation of CIBP-4 in tumors. Most importantly, CIBP-4 reduced tumor growth in this animal model by 60%. Pleiotropic anti-angiogenic and anti-tumorigenic activities of CIBP-4 most likely underlie its observed therapeutic potential against glioblastoma.

  12. Phage as a modulator of immune responses: practical implications for phage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górski, Andrzej; Międzybrodzki, Ryszard; Borysowski, Jan; Dąbrowska, Krystyna; Wierzbicki, Piotr; Ohams, Monika; Korczak-Kowalska, Grażyna; Olszowska-Zaremba, Natasza; Łusiak-Szelachowska, Marzena; Kłak, Marlena; Jończyk, Ewa; Kaniuga, Ewelina; Gołaś, Aneta; Purchla, Sylwia; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Letkiewicz, Sławomir; Fortuna, Wojciech; Szufnarowski, Krzysztof; Pawełczyk, Zdzisław; Rogóż, Paweł; Kłosowska, Danuta

    2012-01-01

    Although the natural hosts for bacteriophages are bacteria, a growing body of data shows that phages can also interact with some populations of mammalian cells, especially with cells of the immune system. In general, these interactions include two main aspects. The first is the phage immunogenicity, that is, the capacity of phages to induce specific immune responses, in particular the generation of specific antibodies against phage antigens. The other aspect includes the immunomodulatory activity of phages, that is, the nonspecific effects of phages on different functions of major populations of immune cells involved in both innate and adaptive immune responses. These functions include, among others, phagocytosis and the respiratory burst of phagocytic cells, the production of cytokines, and the generation of antibodies against nonphage antigens. The aim of this chapter is to discuss the interactions between phages and cells of the immune system, along with their implications for phage therapy. These topics are presented based on the results of experimental studies and unique data on immunomodulatory effects found in patients with bacterial infections treated with phage preparations.

  13. The Fanconi anemia pathway and ICL repair: implications for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lily C; Gautier, Jean

    2010-10-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited disease caused by mutations in at least 13 genes and characterized by genomic instability. In addition to displaying strikingly heterogenous clinical phenotypes, FA patients are exquisitely sensitive to treatments with crosslinking agents that create interstrand crosslinks (ICL). In contrast to bacteria and yeast, in which ICLs are repaired through replication-dependent and -independent mechanisms, it is thought that ICLs are repaired primarily during DNA replication in vertebrates. However, recent data indicate that replication-independent ICL repair also operates in vertebrates. While the precise role of the FA pathway in ICL repair remains elusive, increasing evidence suggests that FA proteins function at different steps in the sensing, recognition and processing of ICLs, as well as in signaling from these very toxic lesions, which can be generated by a wide variety of cancer chemotherapeutic drugs. Here, we discuss some of the recent findings that have shed light on the role of the FA pathway in ICL repair, with special emphasis on the implications of these findings for cancer therapy since disruption of FA genes have been associated with cancer predisposition.

  14. Prognostic and Therapeutic Implications of Statin and Aspirin Therapy in Individuals With Nonobstructive Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Benjamin J.W.; Small, Gary; Yam, Yeung; Chen, Li; McPherson, Ruth; Achenbach, Stephan; Al-Mallah, Mouaz; Berman, Daniel S.; Budoff, Matthew J.; Cademartiri, Filippo; Callister, Tracy Q.; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Cheng, Victor Y.; Chinnaiyan, Kavitha; Cury, Ricardo; Delago, Augustin; Dunning, Allison; Feuchtner, Gundrun; Hadamitzky, Martin; Hausleiter, Jörg; Karlsberg, Ronald P.; Kaufmann, Philipp A.; Kim, Yong-Jin; Leipsic, Jonathon; LaBounty, Troy; Lin, Fay; Maffei, Erica; Raff, Gilbert L.; Shaw, Leslee J.; Villines, Todd C.; Min, James K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We sought to examine the risk of mortality associated with nonobstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) and to determine the impact of baseline statin and aspirin use on mortality. Approach and Results Coronary computed tomographic angiography permits direct visualization of nonobstructive CAD. To date, the prognostic implications of nonobstructive CAD and the potential benefit of directing therapy based on nonobstructive CAD have not been carefully examined. A total of 27 125 consecutive patients who underwent computed tomographic angiography (12 enrolling centers and 6 countries) were prospectively entered into the COronary CT Angiography EvaluatioN For Clinical Outcomes: An InteRnational Multicenter (CONFIRM) registry. Patients, without history of previous CAD or obstructive CAD, for whom baseline statin and aspirin use was available were analyzed. Each coronary segment was classified as normal or nonobstructive CAD (1%–49% stenosis). Patients were followed up for a median of 27.2 months for all-cause mortality. The study comprised 10 418 patients (5712 normal and 4706 with nonobstructive CAD). In multivariable analyses, patients with nonobstructive CAD had a 6% (95% confidence interval, 1%–12%) higher risk of mortality for each additional segment with nonobstructive plaque (P=0.021). Baseline statin use was associated with a reduced risk of mortality (hazard ratio, 0.44; 95% confidence interval, 0.28–0.68; P=0.0003), a benefit that was present for individuals with nonobstructive CAD (hazard ratio, 0.32; 95% confidence interval, 0.19–0.55; P<0.001) but not for those without plaque (hazard ratio, 0.66; 95% confidence interval, 0.30–1.43; P=0.287). When stratified by National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment Program III, no mortality benefit was observed in individuals without plaque. Aspirin use was not associated with mortality benefit, irrespective of the status of plaque. Conclusions The presence and extent of nonobstructive

  15. Mechanism of Action for Nonpharmacological Therapies for Individuals With Dementia: Implications for Practice and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgener, Sandy C; Jao, Ying-Ling; Anderson, Joel G; Bossen, Ann L

    2015-01-01

    The current review addresses the need for increased use of evidence-based, nonpharmacological therapies for individuals with dementia. To facilitate understanding of the potential efficacy of nonpharmacological therapies on cognitive functioning for individuals with dementia, the mechanisms of action for selected therapies are described, including the assessment method used to identify the mechanism. The strength of evidence supporting each therapy was evaluated, with some therapies demonstrating strong support and others only moderate support for their effectiveness and mechanism of action. Therapies with the strongest support include (a) cognitive training/stimulation, (b) physical exercise, and (c) music. Therapies with moderate support include (a) biofield, (b) meditation, (c) engagement with a naturally restorative environment, and (d) social engagement. Although the strength of evidence varies, together these therapies offer treatments designed to improve cognitive functioning, have low risks and adverse effects, and have the potential for widespread accessibility, thereby increasing the potential range of therapies for individuals with dementia.

  16. Anti-angiogenic agents in metastatic colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major public health concernbeing the third leading cause of cancer mortality inthe United States. The availability of better therapeuticoptions has led to a decline in cancer mortality in thesepatients. Surgical resection should be considered in allstages of the disease. The use of conversion therapyhas made surgery a potentially curative option even inpatients with initially unresectable metastatic disease.In this review we discuss the role of various antiangiogenicagents in patients with metastatic CRC(mCRC). We describe the mechanism of action of theseagents, and the rationale for their use in combinationwith chemotherapy. We also review important clinicalstudies that have evaluated the safety and efficacy ofthese agents in mCRC patients. Despite the discoveryof several promising anti-angiogenic agents, mCRCremains an incurable disease with a median overallsurvival of just over 2 years in patients exposed to allavailable treatment regimens. Further insights intotumor biology and tumor microenvironment may helpimprove outcomes in these patients.

  17. Emerging Roles of Propolis: Antioxidant, Cardioprotective, and Antiangiogenic Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daleprane, Julio Beltrame; Abdalla, Dulcinéia Saes

    2013-01-01

    Propolis has attracted attention in recent years due to its beneficial effects, which make it a potential preventive and therapeutic agent as well as a useful additive in food and cosmetics. The aim of this review is to discuss the growing evidence that propolis may, via a diverse array of biological actions, assist in the prevention of some inflammation-mediated pathologies including cardiovascular disease. The active components of propolis that have been identified so far include polyphenols and flavonoids. These compounds have cardioprotective, vasoprotective, antioxidant, antiatherosclerotic, anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic actions. Many studies have been undertaken to elucidate the mechanism(s) by which propolis acts, which involve cellular signaling targets and interactions at the genomic level. This review will highlight the effects of propolis that may assist in the prevention of chronic degenerative diseases, such as cardiovascular disease. PMID:23662115

  18. Emerging Roles of Propolis: Antioxidant, Cardioprotective, and Antiangiogenic Actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Beltrame Daleprane

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Propolis has attracted attention in recent years due to its beneficial effects, which make it a potential preventive and therapeutic agent as well as a useful additive in food and cosmetics. The aim of this review is to discuss the growing evidence that propolis may, via a diverse array of biological actions, assist in the prevention of some inflammation-mediated pathologies including cardiovascular disease. The active components of propolis that have been identified so far include polyphenols and flavonoids. These compounds have cardioprotective, vasoprotective, antioxidant, antiatherosclerotic, anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic actions. Many studies have been undertaken to elucidate the mechanism(s by which propolis acts, which involve cellular signaling targets and interactions at the genomic level. This review will highlight the effects of propolis that may assist in the prevention of chronic degenerative diseases, such as cardiovascular disease.

  19. Complementary therapy use by patients and parents of children with asthma and the implications for NHS care: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharp Debbie

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients are increasingly using complementary therapies, often for chronic conditions. Asthma is the most common chronic condition in the UK. Previous research indicates that some asthma patients experience gaps in their NHS care. However, little attention has been given to how and why patients and parents of children with asthma use complementary therapies and the implications for NHS care. Methods Qualitative study, comprising 50 semi-structured interviews with a purposeful sample of 22 adults and 28 children with asthma (plus a parent, recruited from a range of NHS and non-NHS settings in Bristol, England. Data analysis was thematic, drawing on the principles of constant comparison. Results A range of complementary therapies were being used for asthma, most commonly Buteyko breathing and homeopathy. Most use took place outside of the NHS, comprising either self-treatment or consultation with private complementary therapists. Complementary therapies were usually used alongside not instead of conventional asthma treatment. A spectrum of complementary therapy users emerged, including "committed", "pragmatic" and "last resort" users. Motivating factors for complementary therapy use included concerns about conventional NHS care ("push factors" and attractive aspects of complementary therapies ("pull factors". While participants were often uncertain whether therapies had directly helped their asthma, breathing techniques such as the Buteyko Method were most notably reported to enhance symptom control and enable reduction in medication. Across the range of therapies, the process of seeking and using complementary therapies seemed to help patients in two broad ways: it empowered them to take greater personal control over their condition rather than feel dependant on medication, and enabled exploration of a broader range of possible causes of their asthma than commonly discussed within NHS settings. Conclusion Complementary therapy

  20. Anti-angiogenic and cytotoxicity studies of some medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kwok-Wen; Salhimi, Salizawati Muhamad; Majid, Amin Malik; Chan, Kit-Lam

    2010-06-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in tumor formation and proliferation. The development of anti-angiogenic agents to block new blood vessel growth will inhibit metastasis and induce apoptosis of the cancer cells. Nine medicinal plants, Strobilanthes crispus, Phyllanthus niruri, Phyllanthus pulcher, Phyllanthus urinaria, Ailanthus malabarica, Irvingia malayana, Smilax myosotiflora, Tinospora crispa and blumea balsamifera were screened for anti-angiogenic properties using the rat aortic ring assay. Of these, the methanol extracts of Phyllanthus species and Irvingia malayana exhibited the highest activity. At 100 microg/mL, P. pulcher, P. niruri, P. urinaria and I. malayana recorded an inhibition of 78.8 %, 59.5 %, 56.7 % and 46.4 %, respectively, against rat aortic vascular growth. Their activities were further investigated by the tube formation assay involving human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) on Matrigel. I. malayana, P. niruri and P. urinaria showed a significant decrease of 45.5, 37.9 and 35.6 %, respectively, whilst P. pulcher showed a much lower decrease of 15.5 % when compared with that of the rat aortic ring assay. All the plant extracts were evaluated for cytotoxicity on a panel of human cancer cell lines using the MTT assay. None of them displayed acute cytotoxicity. The HPLC of P. niruri, P. urinaria and P. pulcher indicated the extracts contained some identical chromatographic peaks of lignans. Further fractionation of I. malayana yielded betulinic acid reported in this plant for the first time and at 100 microg/mL it exhibited a 67.3 % inhibition of vessel outgrowth and 46.5 % inhibition of tube formation.

  1. Raman spectral study of anti-angiogenic drugs on the role of chick vascular

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruixiang; Chen, Rong; Chen, Qisong; Lin, Juqiang; Pan, Jianji; Lin, Shaojun; Li, Chao; Li, Yongzeng; Feng, Shangyuan

    2009-08-01

    Inhibit angiogenesis is one of the important tumor therapy. If the mechanism of vascular changes can be detected at molecular level, it will have therapeutic significance. Raman spectroscopy, which can be applied to the structural analysis of solid, liquid or solution of biological molecules, is a non-destructive spectral technology holding very rich information. Basing on Confocal Raman Microscope, a unique system is developed for obtaining the different Raman spectra of the chick embryo vascular with the anti-angiogenic drugs - thalidomide and without. In the study, the location and shape of the average Raman spectra of vessels in drug 5h were very similar to the ones without medicine, and the intensity of some characteristic peaks changed, such as 1441cm-1,1527cm-1 and 1657cm-1 showing markedly increasing, while the 971cm-1 and 1081cm-1 decreasing. This change was due to anti- angiogenic drugs that caused the nucleic acid, protein, phospholipids, and other important biological molecules of the vessels on the structure or content tovary. PCA was used to distinguish between the two kinds of vascular with the result that they were accurately partitioned.The study indicated that Raman spectroscopy could be an effective tool for detection of the mechanism of vascular changes.

  2. Odisolane, a Novel Oxolane Derivative, and Antiangiogenic Constituents from the Fruits of Mulberry (Morus alba L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seoung Rak; Park, Jun Yeon; Yu, Jae Sik; Lee, Sung Ok; Ryu, Ja-Young; Choi, Sang-Zin; Kang, Ki Sung; Yamabe, Noriko; Kim, Ki Hyun

    2016-05-18

    Mulberry, the fruit of Morus alba L., is known as an edible fruit and commonly used in Chinese medicines as a warming agent and as a sedative, tonic, laxative, odontalgic, expectorant, anthelmintic, and emetic. Systemic investigation of the chemical constituents of M. alba fruits led to the identification of a novel oxolane derivative, (R*)-2-((2S*,3R*)-tetrahydro-2-hydroxy-2-methylfuran-3-yl)propanoic acid (1), namely, odisolane, along with five known heterocyclic compounds (2-6). The structure of the new compound was elucidated on the basis of HR-MS, 1D and 2D NMR ((1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC, and NOESY) data analysis. Compound 1 has a novel skeleton that consists of 8 carbon units with an oxolane ring, which until now has never been identified in natural products. The isolated compounds were subjected to several activity tests to verify their biological function. Among them, compounds 1, 3, and 5 significantly inhibited cord formation in HUVECs. The action mechanism of compound 3, which had the strongest antiangiogenic activity, was mediated by decreasing VEGF, p-Akt, and p-ERK protein expression. These results suggest that compounds isolated from M. alba fruits might be beneficial in antiangiogenesis therapy for cancer treatment.

  3. Glioma cell VEGFR-2 confers resistance to chemotherapeutic and antiangiogenic treatments in PTEN-deficient glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Tobias; Sahm, Felix; Blaes, Jonas; Osswald, Matthias; Rübmann, Petra; Milford, David; Urban, Severino; Jestaedt, Leonie; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Hertenstein, Anne; Pfenning, Philipp-Niclas; Ruiz de Almodóvar, Carmen; Wick, Antje; Winkler, Frank; von Deimling, Andreas; Platten, Michael; Wick, Wolfgang; Weiler, Markus

    2015-10-13

    Loss of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a prerequisite for tumor cell-specific expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-2 in glioblastoma defining a subgroup prone to develop evasive resistance towards antiangiogenic treatments. Immunohistochemical analysis of human tumor tissues showed VEGFR-2 expression in glioma cells in 19% of specimens examined, mainly in the infiltration zone. Glioma cell VEGFR-2 positivity was restricted to PTEN-deficient tumor specimens. PTEN overexpression reduced VEGFR-2 expression in vitro, as well as knock-down of raptor or rictor. Genetic interference with VEGFR-2 revealed proproliferative, antiinvasive and chemoprotective functions for VEGFR-2 in glioma cells. VEGFR-2-dependent cellular effects were concomitant with activation of 'kappa-light-chain-enhancer' of activated B-cells, protein kinase B, and N-myc downstream regulated gene 1. Two-photon in vivo microscopy revealed that expression of VEGFR-2 in glioma cells hampers antiangiogenesis. Bevacizumab induces a proinvasive response in VEGFR-2-positive glioma cells. Patients with PTEN-negative glioblastomas had a shorter survival after initiation of bevacizumab therapy compared with PTEN-positive glioblastomas. Conclusively, expression of VEGFR-2 in glioma cells indicates an aggressive glioblastoma subgroup developing early resistance to temozolomide or bevacizumab. Loss of PTEN may serve as a biomarker identifying those tumors upfront by routine neuropathological methods.

  4. The Role of Descending Modulation in Manual Therapy and Its Analgesic Implications: A Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigotsky, Andrew D; Bruhns, Ryan P

    2015-01-01

    Manual therapy has long been a component of physical rehabilitation programs, especially to treat those in pain. The mechanisms of manual therapy, however, are not fully understood, and it has been suggested that its pain modulatory effects are of neurophysiological origin and may be mediated by the descending modulatory circuit. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to examine the neurophysiological response to different types of manual therapy, in order to better understand the neurophysiological mechanisms behind each therapy's analgesic effects. It is concluded that different forms of manual therapy elicit analgesic effects via different mechanisms, and nearly all therapies appear to be at least partially mediated by descending modulation. Additionally, future avenues of mechanistic research pertaining to manual therapy are discussed.

  5. The Role of Descending Modulation in Manual Therapy and Its Analgesic Implications: A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D. Vigotsky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Manual therapy has long been a component of physical rehabilitation programs, especially to treat those in pain. The mechanisms of manual therapy, however, are not fully understood, and it has been suggested that its pain modulatory effects are of neurophysiological origin and may be mediated by the descending modulatory circuit. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to examine the neurophysiological response to different types of manual therapy, in order to better understand the neurophysiological mechanisms behind each therapy’s analgesic effects. It is concluded that different forms of manual therapy elicit analgesic effects via different mechanisms, and nearly all therapies appear to be at least partially mediated by descending modulation. Additionally, future avenues of mechanistic research pertaining to manual therapy are discussed.

  6. Mind-body therapies: evidence and implications in advanced oncology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayden, Kelley D

    2012-11-01

    The idea that thoughts and emotions influence health outcomes is an ancient concept that was initially abandoned by Western medicine researchers. Today, researchers are showing a renewed interest in the interactions of the mind and body and the role these interactions play in disease formation and recovery. Complementary and alternative interventions, such as mind-body therapies, are increasingly being used by cancer survivors for disease prevention, immune system enhancement, and symptom control. Traditional training has not been structured to provide advanced practitioners with an in-depth knowledge of the clinical applications of mind-body therapies. The aim of this article is to acquaint the reader with common mind-body modalities (meditation/mindfulness-based stress reduction, relaxation therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, hypnosis, biofeedback, music therapy, art therapy, support groups, and aromatherapy) and to examine important evidence in support of or against their clinical application.

  7. Cytokines, angiogenic, and antiangiogenic factors and bioactive lipids in preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Undurti N

    2015-09-01

    Preeclampsia is a low-grade systemic inflammatory condition in which oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction occurs. Plasma levels of soluble receptor for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGFR)-1, also known as sFlt1 (soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1), an antiangiogenic factor have been reported to be elevated in preeclampsia. It was reported that pregnant mice deficient in catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) activity show a preeclampsia-like phenotype due to a deficiency or absence of 2-methoxyoestradiol (2-ME), a natural metabolite of estradiol that is elevated during the third trimester of normal human pregnancy. Additionally, autoantibodies (AT1-AAs) that bind and activate the angiotensin II receptor type 1 a (AT1 receptor) also have a role in preeclampsia. None of these abnormalities are consistently seen in all the patients with preeclampsia and some of them are not specific to pregnancy. Preeclampsia could occur due to an imbalance between pro- and antiangiogenic factors. VEGF, an angiogenic factor, is necessary for the transport of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) to endothelial cells. Hence reduced VEGF levels decrease the availability of PUFAs to endothelial cells. This leads to a decrease in the formation of anti-inflammatory and angiogenic factors: lipoxins, resolvins, protectins, and maresins from PUFAs. Lipoxins, resolvins, protectins, maresins, and PUFAs suppress insulin resistance; activation of leukocytes, platelets, and macrophages; production of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α; and oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction; and enhance production of prostacyclin and nitric oxide (NO). Estrogen enhances the formation of lipoxin A4 and NO. PUFAs also augment the production of NO and inhibit the activity of angiotensin-converting enzyme and antagonize the actions of angiotensin II. Thus, PUFAs can prevent activation of angiotensin II receptor type 1 a (AT1 receptor). Patients with preeclampsia have decreased plasma

  8. 3D modeling of effects of increased oxygenation and activity concentration in tumors treated with radionuclides and antiangiogenic drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagerloef, Jakob H.; Kindblom, Jon; Bernhardt, Peter [Department of Radiation Physics, Goeteborg University, Goeteborg 41345 (Sweden); Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Goeteborg 41345 (Sweden); Department of Radiation Physics, Goeteborg University, Goeteborg, Sweden and Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Goeteborg 41345 (Sweden)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: Formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) in response to hypoxia is a fundamental event in the process of tumor growth and metastatic dissemination. However, abnormalities in tumor neovasculature often induce increased interstitial pressure (IP) and further reduce oxygenation (pO{sub 2}) of tumor cells. In radiotherapy, well-oxygenated tumors favor treatment. Antiangiogenic drugs may lower IP in the tumor, improving perfusion, pO{sub 2} and drug uptake, by reducing the number of malfunctioning vessels in the tissue. This study aims to create a model for quantifying the effects of altered pO{sub 2}-distribution due to antiangiogenic treatment in combination with radionuclide therapy. Methods: Based on experimental data, describing the effects of antiangiogenic agents on oxygenation of GlioblastomaMultiforme (GBM), a single cell based 3D model, including 10{sup 10} tumor cells, was developed, showing how radionuclide therapy response improves as tumor oxygenation approaches normal tissue levels. The nuclides studied were {sup 90}Y, {sup 131}I, {sup 177}Lu, and {sup 211}At. The absorbed dose levels required for a tumor control probability (TCP) of 0.990 are compared for three different log-normal pO{sub 2}-distributions: {mu}{sub 1} = 2.483, {sigma}{sub 1} = 0.711; {mu}{sub 2} = 2.946, {sigma}{sub 2} = 0.689; {mu}{sub 3} = 3.689, and {sigma}{sub 3} = 0.330. The normal tissue absorbed doses will, in turn, depend on this. These distributions were chosen to represent the expected oxygen levels in an untreated hypoxic tumor, a hypoxic tumor treated with an anti-VEGF agent, and in normal, fully-oxygenated tissue, respectively. The former two are fitted to experimental data. The geometric oxygen distributions are simulated using two different patterns: one Monte Carlo based and one radially increasing, while keeping the log-normal volumetric distributions intact. Oxygen and activity are distributed, according to the same pattern. Results: As tumor pO{sub 2

  9. Occupational Therapy Contributions in Early Intervention: Implications for Personnel Preparation and Interprofessional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhlenhaupt, Mary; Pizur-Barnekow, Kris; Schefkind, Sandra; Chandler, Barbara; Harvison, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Occupational therapy provides a unique contribution in early intervention programs for families and their children from birth to 3 years old who are at risk for, or who have, identified disabilities. This article describes occupational therapy's distinct value and presents the profession's perspective on services to enhance families' caregiving…

  10. Practical Implications for the Development of Applied Metaphor in Adventure Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartford, Gary

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers the definitions, role, and use of metaphor in adventure therapy. It provides an overview of theoretical perspectives on metaphor and the related ways in which metaphor is used in adventure therapy. Research on the use of metaphor in counselling and from neuropsychology and linguistics is applied to a model of metaphor use in…

  11. Assessment and Therapeutic Application of the Expressive Therapies Continuum: Implications for Brain Structures and Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusebrink, Vija B.

    2010-01-01

    The Expressive Therapies Continuum (ETC) provides a theoretical model for art-based assessments and applications of media in art therapy. The three levels of the ETC (Kinesthetic/Sensory, Perceptual/Affective, and Cognitive/Symbolic) appear to reflect different functions and structures in the brain that process visual and affective information.…

  12. Concurrent sex therapy and psychoanalytic psychotherapy by separate therapists: effectiveness and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levay, A; Weissberg, J; Blaustein, A

    1976-11-01

    Since the publication of Masters and Johnson's Human Sexual Inadequacy in 1970, sex therapy has become an established, though controversial, new approach to the treatment of sexual disorders. Masters and Johnson adopted the position that any other form of psychotherapy should be avoided or suspended during the two- or three-week period of sex therapy. Helen Kaplan, in considering sex therapy to be a type of psychotherapy, has stressed that the skillful trained psychotherapist uses his awareness of the psychodynamics and unconscious conflicts of the couple in modifying and tailoring the sex therapy program to their individual needs. In the present study, sex therapy, utilizing a second therapist, was introduced into an ongoing psychoanalytic psychotherapy.

  13. Incorporating anti-IgE (omalizumab) therapy into pulmonary medicine practice: practice management implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Philip

    2006-02-01

    Despite aggressive therapy, many asthma patients cannot achieve optimal control, and it is recognized that a small number of patients, generally those with severe persistent asthma, are the most difficult to control and are responsible for a large segment of the costs of asthma. These patients demonstrate a need for additional therapeutic options to achieve enhanced asthma control. Omalizumab should be considered a second-line therapy for patients with moderate-to-severe persistent allergic asthma not fully controlled on standard therapy. This article should not be considered a complete guide to incorporating this therapy into practice but serve as an introduction and a basic review of the practice management aspects of therapy for physicians practicing in the United States.

  14. Spectrum of pediatric gliomas: implications for the development of future therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytel, Peter

    2007-12-01

    The therapy of gliomas is still challenging. This is especially true for pediatric gliomas because response to conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy agents and radiation therapy is currently often poor and because therapy-related morbidity is a significant problem in children. Stratification of tumors according to biologic characteristics and new more targeted therapies therefore hold the promise of better tumor control as well as reduced side effects. Significant progress has been made in recent years in understanding the biology of gliomas. These new insights into the molecular mechanism driving tumor growth uncover new potential molecular targets for future therapies. In addition, they start to uncover biologically defined tumor subtypes that may have to be considered independently in the search for optimal treatment regimens.

  15. Antiangiogenic factors and maternal hemodynamics during intensive hemodialysis in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelis, Tom; Spaanderman, Marc; Beerenhout, Charles; Perschel, Frank H; Verlohren, Stefan; Schalkwijk, Casper G; van der Sande, Frank M; Kooman, Jeroen P; Hladunewich, Michelle

    2013-10-01

    We report on a 21-year-old pregnant patient with IgA nephropathy who was initiated on intensive hemodialysis (8 hours of hemodialysis 3 times a week) at a gestational age of 26 weeks on the basis of worsening kidney function resulting in rapidly progressive fatigue and difficulties in metabolic control. Throughout the pregnancy, and while on intensive hemodialysis, 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure control was within the target, and results of weekly 24-hour measurement of central hemodynamics and pulse wave velocity, and of serial levels of circulating (anti-)angiogenic factors were comparable to normal pregnancies. Estimated fetal growth evolved along the 50th percentile, and no polyhydramnios was detected. After induction for a sudden, unexplained increase in blood pressure, she delivered a healthy boy of 2480 g at a gestational age of 36 weeks. This case adds to the expanding literature that supports the use of intensive hemodialysis in pregnant patients with end-stage renal disease and illustrates, for the first time, the potential use of serial (anti-) angiogenic factors and 24-hour measurements of blood pressure and hemodynamic indices in order to facilitate monitoring of these complicated patients.

  16. Antiangiogenic and antitumor activities of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masferrer, J L; Leahy, K M; Koki, A T; Zweifel, B S; Settle, S L; Woerner, B M; Edwards, D A; Flickinger, A G; Moore, R J; Seibert, K

    2000-03-01

    We provide evidence that cyclooxygenase (COX)-2-derived prostaglandins contribute to tumor growth by inducing newly formed blood vessels (neoangiogenesis) that sustain tumor cell viability and growth. COX-2 is expressed within human tumor neovasculature as well as in neoplastic cells present in human colon, breast, prostate, and lung cancer biopsy tissue. COX-1 is broadly distributed in normal, as well as in neoplastic, tissues. The contribution of COX-2 to human tumor growth was indicated by the ability of celecoxib, an agent that inhibits the COX-2 enzyme, to suppress growth of lung and colon tumors implanted into recipient mice. Mechanistically, celecoxib demonstrated a potent antiangiogenic activity. In a rat model of angiogenesis, we observe that corneal blood vessel formation is suppressed by celecoxib, but not by a COX-1 inhibitor. These and other data indicate that COX-2 and COX-2-derived prostaglandins may play a major role in development of cancer through numerous biochemical mechanisms, including stimulation of tumor cell growth and neovascularization. The ability of celecoxib to block angiogenesis and suppress tumor growth suggests a novel application of this anti-inflammatory drug in the treatment of human cancer.

  17. Programmed translational readthrough generates antiangiogenic VEGF-Ax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eswarappa, Sandeepa M; Potdar, Alka A; Koch, William J; Fan, Yi; Vasu, Kommireddy; Lindner, Daniel; Willard, Belinda; Graham, Linda M; DiCorleto, Paul E; Fox, Paul L

    2014-06-19

    Translational readthrough, observed primarily in less complex organisms from viruses to Drosophila, expands the proteome by translating select transcripts beyond the canonical stop codon. Here, we show that vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) mRNA in mammalian endothelial cells undergoes programmed translational readthrough (PTR) generating VEGF-Ax, an isoform containing a unique 22-amino-acid C terminus extension. A cis-acting element in the VEGFA 3' UTR serves a dual function, not only encoding the appended peptide but also directing the PTR by decoding the UGA stop codon as serine. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A2/B1 binds this element and promotes readthrough. Remarkably, VEGF-Ax exhibits antiangiogenic activity in contrast to the proangiogenic activity of VEGF-A. Pathophysiological significance of VEGF-Ax is indicated by robust expression in multiple human tissues but depletion in colon adenocarcinoma. Furthermore, genome-wide analysis revealed AGO1 and MTCH2 as authentic readthrough targets. Overall, our studies reveal a novel protein-regulated PTR event in a vertebrate system.

  18. Tumour growth inhibition and anti-angiogenic effects using curcumin correspond to combined PDE2 and PDE4 inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abusnina, Abdurazzag; Keravis, Thérèse; Zhou, Qingwei; Justiniano, Hélène; Lobstein, Annelise; Lugnier, Claire

    2015-02-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a major role in angiogenesis by stimulating endothelial cells. Increase in cyclic AMP (cAMP) level inhibits VEGF-induced endothelial cell proliferation and migration. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs), which specifically hydrolyse cyclic nucleotides, are critical in the regulation of this signal transduction. We have previously reported that PDE2 and PDE4 up-regulations in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) are implicated in VEGF-induced angiogenesis and that inhibition of PDE2 and PDE4 activities prevents the development of the in vitro angiogenesis by increasing cAMP level, as well as the in vivo chicken embryo angiogenesis. We have also shown that polyphenols are able to inhibit PDEs. The curcumin having anti-cancer properties, the present study investigated whether PDE2 and PDE4 inhibitors and curcumin could have similar in vivo anti-tumour properties and whether the anti-angiogenic effects of curcumin are mediated by PDEs. Both PDE2/PDE4 inhibitor association and curcumin significantly inhibited in vivo tumour growth in C57BL/6N mice. In vitro, curcumin inhibited basal and VEGF-stimulated HUVEC proliferation and migration and delayed cell cycle progression at G0/G1, similarly to the combination of selective PDE2 and PDE4 inhibitors. cAMP levels in HUVECs were significantly increased by curcumin, similarly to rolipram (PDE4 inhibitor) and BAY-60-550 (PDE2 inhibitor) association, indicating cAMP-PDE inhibitions. Moreover, curcumin was able to inhibit VEGF-induced cAMP-PDE activity without acting on cGMP-PDE activity and to modulate PDE2 and PDE4 expressions in HUVECs. The present results suggest that curcumin exerts its in vitro anti-angiogenic and in vivo anti-tumour properties through combined PDE2 and PDE4 inhibition.

  19. Cardiovascular risk factors in high-need psoriasis patients and its implications for biological therapies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, R.J.B.; Boezeman, J.B.M.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Jong, E.M.G.J. de

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The associations between psoriasis and cardiovascular risk factors are reported to be stronger as psoriasis severity increases. This makes studying cardiovascular risk factors in high-need psoriasis patients, eligible for biological therapy, interesting. OBJECTIVE: To survey the prevalen

  20. Viral Response to Specifically Targeted Antiviral Therapy for Hepatitis C and the Implications for Treatment Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis L Cooper

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, hepatitis C virus (HCV antiviral therapy is characterized by long duration, a multitude of side effects, difficult administration and suboptimal success; clearly, alternatives are needed. Collectively, specifically targeted antiviral therapy for HCV (STAT-C molecules achieve rapid viral suppression and very high rapid virological response rates, and improve sustained virological response rates. The attrition rate of agents within this class has been high due to various toxicities. Regardless, several STAT-C molecules are poised to become the standard of care for HCV treatment in the foreseeable future. Optimism must be tempered with concerns related to the rapid development of drug resistance with resulting HCV rebound. Strategies including induction dosing with interferon and ribavirin, use of combination high-potency STAT-C molecules and an intensive emphasis on adherence to HCV antiviral therapy will be critical to the success of this promising advance in HCV therapy.

  1. Acute, regional inflammatory response after traumatic brain injury: Implications for cellular therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Harting, Matthew T.; jimenez, fernando; Adams, Sasha D.; Mercer, David W.; Cox, Charles S.

    2008-01-01

    While cellular therapy has shown promise in the management of traumatic brain injury (TBI), microenvironment interactions between the intracerebral milieu and therapeutic stem cells are poorly understood. We sought to characterize the acute, regional inflammatory response after TBI.

  2. Antioxidant and antiangiogenic activities of the essential oils of Myristica fragrans and Morinda citrifolia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suthagar Pillai Piaru; Roziahanim Mahmud; Amin Malik Shah Abdul Majid; Zeyad Daoud Mahmoud Nassar

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective:Toinvestigate the anti-angiogenic activity and antioxidant properties ofMyristica fragrans (M. fragrans) (nutmeg) andMorinda citrifolia (M. citrifolia)(mengkudu) oils. Methods: The nutmeg and megkudu essential oils were obtained by steam distillation. The antioxidant activities of both essential oils were determined by beta-carotene/linoleic acid bleaching assay and reducing power while the anti-angiogenic activity was investigated using rat aortic ring assay using various concentrations.Results:The results showed that nutmeg oil has higher antioxidant activity than mengkudu oil. The nutmeg oil effectively inhibited the oxidation of linoleic acid with (88.68±0.1)% while the inhibition percentage of oxidation of linoleic acid of the mengkudu oil is (69.44±0.4)%. The nutmeg oil and mengkudu oil showed reducing power with anEC50 value of 181.4 μg/mL and 3 043.0μg/mL, respectively. The antiangiogenic activity of nutmeg oil showed significant antiangiogenic activity withIC50 of77.64μg/mL comparing to mengkudu oil which exhibits IC50 of109.30 μg/mL.Conclusion: Bioactive compound(s) will be isolated from the nutmeg essential oil to be developed as antiangiogenic drugs.

  3. Dopamine is a safe antiangiogenic drug which can also prevent 5-fluorouracil induced neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Chandrani; Chakroborty, Debanjan; Dasgupta, Partha Sarathi; Basu, Sujit

    2015-08-01

    The role of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) in tumor angiogenesis is well established and accordingly, molecules targeting VEGFA or its receptors are being presently used in the clinics for treatment of several types of cancer. However, these antiangiogenic agents are expensive and have serious side effects. Thus identification of newer drugs with manageable systemic side effects or toxicities is of immense clinical importance. Since we have reported earlier that dopamine (DA) inhibits VEGFA induced angiogenesis in experimental tumor models, we therefore sought to investigate whether DA treatment results in similar toxicities like other antiangiogenic agents. Our results indicated that unlike sunitinib, another commonly used antiangiogenic agent in the clinics which targets VEGF receptors, DA [50 mg/kg/days × 7days intraperitoneally (i.p.)] not only could inhibit tumor angiogenesis and growth of HT29 human colon cancer and LLC (Lewis lung carcinoma) in mice, it also did not cause hypertension, hematological, renal and hepatic toxicities in normal, HT29 and LLC tumor bearing animals. Furthermore and interestingly, in contrast to the currently used antiangiogenic agents, DA also prevented 5-fluorouracil (5FU) induced neutropenia in HT29 colon cancer bearing mice. This action of DA was through inhibition of 5FU mediated suppression of colony forming unit-granulocyte macrophage colony forming units in the bone marrow. Thus our results indicate that DA may be safely used as an antiangiogenic drug for the treatment of malignant tumors.

  4. Antiangiogenic drugs used with chemotherapy for patients with recurrent ovarian cancer: a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, SuYi; Zeng, LongJia; Kuang, Yan; Cao, ZhiJuan; Zheng, ChengJun; Zhang, Yue; Liao, Meng; Yang, Lu

    2017-01-01

    Objective The value of antiangiogenic inhibitors for patients with recurrent ovarian cancer has not been completely affirmed. Therefore, we aimed to assess the effectiveness and toxicities of various antiangiogenic drugs for the treatment of recurrent ovarian cancer. Methods In this meta-analysis, we searched PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases for complete randomized controlled trials. The searches were extended to May 15, 2016. The risk of bias of the included studies was evaluated via a Cochrane systematic evaluation, and the statistical analyses were performed using RevMan 5.2 software. Results In total, we included 8 randomized controlled trials involving 3,211 patients and divided them into 3 groups, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibitors (VEGFRIs), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors (bevacizumab), and angiopoietin inhibitors (trebananib). The progression-free survival improved significantly in all the groups being given antiangiogenic drugs (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.55, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.45–0.67, I2=0%, Phypokalemia. Conclusion This meta-analysis showed that antiangiogenic drugs improved the progression-free survival. The VEGFRI, bevacizumab, and trebananib groups showed increased overall survival. Adding antiangiogenic drugs to chemotherapy treatment resulted in a higher incidence of grade 3/4 side effects, but these were manageable. PMID:28255243

  5. Independent anti-angiogenic capacities of coagulation factors X and Xa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Soledad; Gonzalez, Ibeth; Pinto, Mauricio P; Arce, Maximiliano; Valenzuela, Rodrigo; Aranda, Evelyn; Elliot, Matias; Alvarez, Marjorie; Henriquez, Soledad; Velasquez, Ethel V; Orge, Felipe; Oliva, Barbara; Gonzalez, Pamela; Villalon, Manuel; Cautivo, Kelly M; Kalergis, Alexis M; Pereira, Karla; Mendoza, Camila; Saez, Claudia; Kato, Sumie; Cuello, Mauricio A; Parborell, Fernanda; Irusta, Griselda; Palma, Veronica; Allende, Miguel L; Owen, Gareth I

    2014-11-01

    Knockout models have shown that the coagulation system has a role in vascular development and angiogenesis. Herein, we report for the first time that zymogen FX and its active form (FXa) possess anti-angiogenic properties. Both the recombinant FX and FXa inhibit angiogenesis in vitro using endothelial EA.hy926 and human umbilical cord vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC). This effect is dependent on the Gla domain of FX. We demonstrate that FX and FXa use different mechanisms: the use of Rivaroxaban (RX) a specific inhibitor of FXa attenuated its anti-angiogenic properties but did not modify the anti-angiogenic effect of FX. Furthermore, only the anti-angiogenic activity of FXa is PAR-1dependent. Using in vivo models, we show that FX and FXa are anti-angiogenic in the zebrafish intersegmental vasculature (ISV) formation and in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays. Our results provide further evidence for the non-hemostatic functions of FX and FXa and demonstrate for the first time a biological role for the zymogen FX.

  6. The anti-angiogenic and antibacterial effect of Tinomiscium philippinense Miers. (Menispermaceae leaf extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheryl Rena-Aguila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the toxicity profile, anti-angiogenic and antibacterial activity of the crude and semi-crude leaf extracts of Tinomiscium philippinense (T. philippinense. Methods: The leaves of T. philippinense were extracted with methanol and partitioned with solvents of different polarities, namely, hexane, dichloromethane and butanol. The extracts were subjected to duck chorioallantoic membrane assay to establish its anti-angiogenic property. Microwell assay was utilized to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration of the different extracts of the plant. Results: The dichloromethane leaf extract of T. philippinense at 1 000 µg/disc showed the highest anti-angiogenic activity with 37.46% inhibition. All the fractions exhibited a bacteriostatic and bactericidal effect on the three bacterial strains with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram negative lactose fermenter exhibiting a higher sensitivity to dichloromethane semi-crude extract among the treatment groups. For the toxicity test, no mortality and no change in behavior were observed in the Sprague-Dawley rats 14 days after the oral administration of the plant extracts. The methanolic leaf extract of T. philippinense is non-toxic at a maximum dose of 5000 mg/kg. Conclusions: The dichloromethane leaf extract of T. philippinense is a potential antiangiogenic endemic plant species. This plant extract is also a potential antibacterial candidate as determined by microwell assay. The anti-angiogenic and antibacterial activity of the plant may be attributed to the essential oil, steroid, flavonoid, sterol and triterpene content of the plant.

  7. A therapist’s perspective of a financial planning course: Implications for financial therapy education and trainings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Ann McCoy

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the autoethnography of a doctoral Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT student studying finances in a graduate course. A dataset in the form of field notes was created through recording observations and reflective journaling during the 15 week financial planning course. This data set included observations and insights on various skills and knowledge that would be helpful for conducting financial therapy, the professional and personal growth of a therapist integrating finances into her clinical work, and evaluations regarding how financial courses can be beneficial for therapists and planners who are interested in the interaction between relational and financial issues. Based on the first author’s experiences, reflections and conversations with the second author, four themes were developed. The themes were: (a Seeing the Unnoticed: Challenging Implicit Assumptions, (b Critically Examining My Own Money Scripts, (c What can Therapists Learn From the Financial Discipline, and (d What Financial Planners can Learn from the Clinical Disciplines. Implications for the burgeoning field of financial therapy are discussed, with special attention given to cross-discipline education and training.

  8. Antiangiogenic activity of 2-deoxy-D-glucose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime R Merchan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During tumor angiogenesis, endothelial cells (ECs are engaged in a number of energy consuming biological processes, such as proliferation, migration, and capillary formation. Since glucose uptake and metabolism are increased to meet this energy need, the effects of the glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG on in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis were investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In cell culture, 2-DG inhibited EC growth, induced cytotoxicity, blocked migration, and inhibited actively forming but not established endothelial capillaries. Surprisingly, 2-DG was a better inhibitor of these EC properties than two more efficacious glycolytic inhibitors, 2-fluorodeoxy-D-glucose and oxamate. As an alternative to a glycolytic inhibitory mechanism, we considered 2-DG's ability to interfere with endothelial N-linked glycosylation. 2-DG's effects were reversed by mannose, an N-linked glycosylation precursor, and at relevant concentrations 2-DG also inhibited synthesis of the lipid linked oligosaccharide (LLO N-glycosylation donor in a mannose-reversible manner. Inhibition of LLO synthesis activated the unfolded protein response (UPR, which resulted in induction of GADD153/CHOP and EC apoptosis (TUNEL assay. Thus, 2-DG's effects on ECs appeared primarily due to inhibition of LLOs synthesis, not glycolysis. 2-DG was then evaluated in two mouse models, inhibiting angiogenesis in both the matrigel plug assay and the LH(BETAT(AG transgenic retinoblastoma model. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, 2-DG inhibits endothelial cell angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo, at concentrations below those affecting tumor cells directly, most likely by interfering with N-linked glycosylation rather than glycolysis. Our data underscore the importance of glucose metabolism on neovascularization, and demonstrate a novel approach for anti-angiogenic strategies.

  9. Anti-angiogenic activity of inositol hexaphosphate (IP6).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vucenik, Ivana; Passaniti, Antonino; Vitolo, Michele I; Tantivejkul, Kwanchanit; Eggleton, Paul; Shamsuddin, Abulkalam M

    2004-11-01

    A significant anticancer activity of the naturally occurring carbohydrate inositol hexaphosphate (IP(6)) has been reported against numerous cancer models. Since tumors require angiogenesis for growth and metastasis, we hypothesize that IP(6) reduces tumor growth by inhibiting angiogenesis. Because angiogenesis depends on the interaction between endothelial and tumor cells, we investigated the effect of IP(6) on both. IP(6) inhibited the proliferation and induced the differentiation of endothelial cells in vitro; the growth of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs) evaluated by MTT proliferation assay was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner (IC(50) = 0.74 mM). The combination of IP(6) and vasostatin, a calreticulin fragment with anti-angiogenic activity, was synergistically superior in growth inhibition than either compound. IP(6) inhibited human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) tube formation (in vitro capillary differentiation) on a reconstituted extracellular matrix, Matrigel, and disrupted pre-formed tubes. IP(6) significantly reduced basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-induced vessel formation (P < 0.01) in vivo in Matrigel plug assay. Exposure of HepG2, a human hepatoma cell line, to IP(6) for 8 h, resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in the mRNA levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), as assessed by RT-PCR. IP(6) treatment of HepG2 cells for 24 h also significantly reduced the VEGF protein levels in conditioned medium, in a concentration-dependent manner (P = 0.012). Thus, IP(6) has an inhibitory effect on induced angiogenesis.

  10. Glucocorticoid Induced Cerebellar Toxicity in the Developing Neonate: Implications for Glucocorticoid Therapy during Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin K. Noguchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prematurely born infants commonly suffer respiratory dysfunction due to the immature state of their lungs. As a result, clinicians often administer glucocorticoid (GC therapy to accelerate lung maturation and reduce inflammation. Unfortunately, several studies have found GC therapy can also produce neuromotor/cognitive deficits and selectively stunt the cerebellum. However, despite its continued use, relatively little is known about how exposure to this hormone might produce neurodevelopmental deficits. In this review, we use rodent and human research to provide evidence that GC therapy may disrupt cerebellar development through the rapid induction of apoptosis in the cerebellar external granule layer (EGL. The EGL is a transient proliferative region responsible for the production of over 90% of the neurons in the cerebellum. During normal development, endogenous GC stimulation is thought to selectively signal the elimination of the EGL once production of new neurons is complete. As a result, GC therapy may precociously eliminate the EGL before it can produce enough neurons for normal cerebellar function. It is hoped that this review may provide information for future clinical research in addition to translational guidance for the safer use of GC therapy.

  11. Deep sequencing reveals microRNAs predictive of antiangiogenic drug response

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Donas, Jesús; Beuselinck, Benoit; Inglada-Pérez, Lucía; Graña, Osvaldo; Schöffski, Patrick; Wozniak, Agnieszka; Bechter, Oliver; Apellániz-Ruiz, Maria; Leandro-García, Luis Javier; Esteban, Emilio; Castellano, Daniel E.; González del Alba, Aranzazu; Climent, Miguel Angel; Hernando, Susana; Arranz, José Angel; Morente, Manuel; Pisano, David G.; Robledo, Mercedes

    2016-01-01

    The majority of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients are treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) in first-line treatment; however, a fraction are refractory to these antiangiogenic drugs. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are regulatory molecules proven to be accurate biomarkers in cancer. Here, we identified miRNAs predictive of progressive disease under TKI treatment through deep sequencing of 74 metastatic clear cell RCC cases uniformly treated with these drugs. Twenty-nine miRNAs were differentially expressed in the tumors of patients who progressed under TKI therapy (P values from 6 × 10–9 to 3 × 10–3). Among 6 miRNAs selected for validation in an independent series, the most relevant associations corresponded to miR–1307-3p, miR–155-5p, and miR–221-3p (P = 4.6 × 10–3, 6.5 × 10–3, and 3.4 × 10–2, respectively). Furthermore, a 2 miRNA–based classifier discriminated individuals with progressive disease upon TKI treatment (AUC = 0.75, 95% CI, 0.64–0.85; P = 1.3 × 10–4) with better predictive value than clinicopathological risk factors commonly used. We also identified miRNAs significantly associated with progression-free survival and overall survival (P = 6.8 × 10–8 and 7.8 × 10–7 for top hits, respectively), and 7 overlapped with early progressive disease. In conclusion, this is the first miRNome comprehensive study, to our knowledge, that demonstrates a predictive value of miRNAs for TKI response and provides a new set of relevant markers that can help rationalize metastatic RCC treatment. PMID:27699216

  12. Current view of the immunopathogenesis in inflammatory bowel disease and its implications for therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MI Torres; A Rios

    2008-01-01

    Although the aetiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) remains unknown, the pathogenesis is gradually being unravelled, seeming to be the result of a combination of environmental, genetic, and immunological factors in which an uncontrolled immune response within the intestinal lumen leads to inflammation in genetically predisposed individuals. Multifactorial evidence suggests that a defect of innate immune response to microbial agents is involved in IBD. This editorial outlines the immunopathogenesis of IBD and their current and future therapy. We present IBD as a result of dysregulated mucosal response in the intestinal wall facilitated by defects in epithelial barrier function and the mucosal immune system with excessive production of cytokines growth factors, adhesion molecules, and reactive oxygen metabolites, resulting in tissue injury. Established and evolving therapies are discussed in the second part of this editorial and at the end of this section we review new therapies to modulate the immune system in patients with IBD.

  13. Gene therapy of liver cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruben Hernandez-Alcoceba; Bruno Sangro; Jesus Prieto

    2006-01-01

    The application of gene transfer technologies to the treatment of cancer has led to the development of new experimental approaches like gene directed enzyme/prodrug therapy (GDEPT), inhibition of oncogenes and restoration of tumor-suppressor genes. In addition,gene therapy has a big impact on other fields like cancer immunotherapy, anti-angiogenic therapy and virotherapy.These strategies are being evaluated for the treatment of primary and metastatic liver cancer and some of them have reached clinical phases. We present a review on the basis and the actual status of gene therapy approaches applied to liver cancer.

  14. Implications of Intercellular Signaling for Radiation Therapy: A Theoretical Dose-Planning Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, Stephen J., E-mail: stephen.mcmahon@qub.ac.uk [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); McGarry, Conor K. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Radiotherapy Physics, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Butterworth, Karl T. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); O' Sullivan, Joe M. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Clinical Oncology, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Hounsell, Alan R. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Radiotherapy Physics, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Prise, Kevin M. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Recent in vitro results have shown significant contributions to cell killing from signaling effects at doses that are typically used in radiation therapy. This study investigates whether these in vitro observations can be reconciled with in vivo knowledge and how signaling may have an impact on future developments in radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Prostate cancer treatment plans were generated for a series of 10 patients using 3-dimensional conformal therapy, intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and volumetric modulated arc therapy techniques. These plans were evaluated using mathematical models of survival following modulated radiation exposures that were developed from in vitro observations and incorporate the effects of intercellular signaling. The impact on dose–volume histograms and mean doses were evaluated by converting these survival levels into “signaling-adjusted doses” for comparison. Results: Inclusion of intercellular communication leads to significant differences between the signalling-adjusted and physical doses across a large volume. Organs in low-dose regions near target volumes see the largest increases, with mean signaling-adjusted bladder doses increasing from 23 to 33 Gy in IMRT plans. By contrast, in high-dose regions, there is a small decrease in signaling-adjusted dose due to reduced contributions from neighboring cells, with planning target volume mean doses falling from 74 to 71 Gy in IMRT. Overall, however, the dose distributions remain broadly similar, and comparisons between the treatment modalities are largely unchanged whether physical or signaling-adjusted dose is compared. Conclusions: Although incorporating cellular signaling significantly affects cell killing in low-dose regions and suggests a different interpretation for many phenomena, their effect in high-dose regions for typical planning techniques is comparatively small. This indicates that the significant signaling effects observed in vitro

  15. Microglia and Macrophages in Malignant Gliomas: Recent Discoveries and Implications for Promising Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Carolina Carvalho da Fonseca

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors. Their deadliest manifestation, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, accounts for 15% of all primary brain tumors and is associated with a median survival of only 15 months even after multimodal therapy. There is substantial presence of microglia and macrophages within and surrounding brain tumors. These immune cells acquire an alternatively activated phenotype with potent tumor-tropic functions that contribute to glioma growth and invasion. In this review, we briefly summarize recent data that has been reported on the interaction of microglia/macrophages with brain tumors and discuss potential application of these findings to the development of future antiglioma therapies.

  16. Implications of dietary therapy into the 21st century: conclusion to special issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Elizabeth A

    2013-08-01

    The concept of dietary therapy for epilepsy has played an important role in the approach to the treatment of seizures for centuries--particularly with the development and utilization of the classic ketogenic diet over the past 90 years. Recently, there has been developing interest in the utilization of diet in other medical disorders, including autism spectrum disorders, traumatic brain injury, degenerative neurologic disorders, and cancer. As the utilization of dietary therapy expands, there are several issues that need to be addressed and better characterized to better understand the role of diet in the treatment of epilepsy and other disease.

  17. Colorectal cancer stem cells : regulation of the phenotype and implications for therapy resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmink, B.L.

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis different aspects of cancer stem cells in colorectal cancer are discribed. We focus on the therapy resistance of cancer stem cells and the effect that reactive oxygen species and hypoxia have on the cancer stem cell phenotype. For this purpose a novel culture method to propagate cance

  18. Effects of Drawing on Alpha Activity: A Quantitative EEG Study with Implications for Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkofer, Christopher M.; Van Hecke, Amy Vaughan; Konopka, Lukasz M.

    2014-01-01

    Little empirical evidence exists as to how materials used in art therapy affect the brain and its neurobiological functioning. This pre/post within-groups study utilized the quantitative electroencephalogram (qEEG) to measure residual effects in the brain after 20 minutes of drawing. EEG recordings were conducted before and after participants (N =…

  19. Cognitive Behaviour Therapies and Their Implications for Applied Educational Psychology Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rait, Shami; Monsen, Jeremy J.; Squires, Garry

    2010-01-01

    This paper critically considers the growing interest in the use of Cognitive Behaviour Therapies to support children and young people presenting with a wide range of social-emotional difficulties. This focus has emerged since the prevalence of such difficulties in children and young people has increased over the past four decades, and the…

  20. Understanding positional cues in salamander limb regeneration: implications for optimizing cell-based regenerative therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCusker, Catherine D; Gardiner, David M

    2014-06-01

    Regenerative medicine has reached the point where we are performing clinical trials with stem-cell-derived cell populations in an effort to treat numerous human pathologies. However, many of these efforts have been challenged by the inability of the engrafted populations to properly integrate into the host environment to make a functional biological unit. It is apparent that we must understand the basic biology of tissue integration in order to apply these principles to the development of regenerative therapies in humans. Studying tissue integration in model organisms, where the process of integration between the newly regenerated tissues and the 'old' existing structures can be observed and manipulated, can provide valuable insights. Embryonic and adult cells have a memory of their original position, and this positional information can modify surrounding tissues and drive the formation of new structures. In this Review, we discuss the positional interactions that control the ability of grafted cells to integrate into existing tissues during the process of salamander limb regeneration, and discuss how these insights could explain the integration defects observed in current cell-based regenerative therapies. Additionally, we describe potential molecular tools that can be used to manipulate the positional information in grafted cell populations, and to promote the communication of positional cues in the host environment to facilitate the integration of engrafted cells. Lastly, we explain how studying positional information in current cell-based therapies and in regenerating limbs could provide key insights to improve the integration of cell-based regenerative therapies in the future.

  1. Implications for clinical treatment from the micrometer site dosimetric calculations in boron neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, Trent L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37901 (United States)], E-mail: tnichol2@utk.edu; Kabalka, George W. [Department of Chemistry, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37901 (United States); Miller, Laurence F. [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37901 (United States); McCormack, Michael T. [Department of Medicine, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, Knoxville, TN 37920 (United States); Johnson, Andrew [Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)

    2009-07-15

    Boron neutron capture therapy has now been used for several malignancies. Most clinical trials have addressed its use for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme. A few trials have focused on the treatment of malignant melanoma with brain metastases. Trial results for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme have been encouraging, but have not achieved the success anticipated. Results of trials for the treatment of malignant melanoma have been very promising, though with too few patients for conclusions to be drawn. Subsequent to these trials, regimens for undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma, hepatic metastases from adenocarcinoma of the colon, and head and neck malignancies have been developed. These tumors have also responded well to boron neutron capture therapy. Glioblastoma is an infiltrative tumor with distant individual tumor cells that might create a mechanism for therapeutic failure though recurrences are often local. The microdosimetry of boron neutron capture therapy can provide an explanation for this observation. Codes written to examine the micrometer scale energy deposition in boron neutron capture therapy have been used to explore the effects of near neighbor cells. Near neighbor cells can contribute a significantly increased dose depending on the geometric relationships. Different geometries demonstrate that tumors which grow by direct extension have a greater near neighbor effect, whereas infiltrative tumors lose this near neighbor dose which can be a significant decrease in dose to the cells that do not achieve optimal boron loading. This understanding helps to explain prior trial results and implies that tumors with small, closely packed cells that grow by direct extension will be the most amenable to boron neutron capture therapy.

  2. Implications of silver nanoparticle induced cell apoptosis for in vitro gene therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopinath, P; Ghosh, Siddhartha Sankar [Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India); Gogoi, Sonit Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Arun [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India)], E-mail: arun@iitg.ernet.in, E-mail: sghosh@iitg.ernet.in

    2008-02-20

    The impact of manufactured nanomaterials on human health and the environment is a major concern for commercial use of nanotechnology based products. A judicious choice of selective usage, lower nanomaterial concentration and use in combination with conventional therapeutic materials may provide the best solution. For example, silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) are known to be bactericidal and also cytotoxic to mammalian cells. Herein, we investigate the molecular mechanism of Ag NP mediated cytotoxicity in both cancer and non-cancer cells and find that optimum particle concentration leads to programmed cell death in vitro. Also, the benefit of the cytotoxic effects of Ag NPs was tested for therapeutic use in conjunction with conventional gene therapy. The synergistic effect of Ag NPs on the uracil phosphoribosyltransferase expression system sensitized the cells more towards treatment with the drug 5-fluorouracil. Induction of the apoptotic pathway makes Ag NPs a representative of a new chemosensitization strategy for future application in gene therapy.

  3. General systems theory: implications for theory and action in occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielhofner, G

    1978-11-01

    This paper presents a description of the transformation of science under General Systems Theory, and the relationship of this transformation to the field of occupational therapy. Changes in scientific methods of proof and in scientific laws that underlie theory are discussed. The paper presents a scale for recognizing complexity in phenomena and for analyzing the appropriateness of theories designed to explain the phenomena. It also presents the theory of open systems as an alternative to mechanistic explanations of human behavior.

  4. Music-evoked emotions: principles, brain correlates, and implications for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelsch, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes principles underlying the evocation of emotion with music: evaluation, resonance, memory, expectancy/tension, imagination, understanding, and social functions. Each of these principles includes several subprinciples, and the framework on music-evoked emotions emerging from these principles and subprinciples is supposed to provide a starting point for a systematic, coherent, and comprehensive theory on music-evoked emotions that considers both reception and production of music, as well as the relevance of emotion-evoking principles for music therapy.

  5. Identifying good responders to glucose lowering therapy in type 2 diabetes: implications for stratified medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angus G Jones

    Full Text Available Defining responders to glucose lowering therapy can be important for both clinical care and for the development of a stratified approach to diabetes management. Response is commonly defined by either HbA1c change after treatment or whether a target HbA1c is achieved. We aimed to determine the extent to which the individuals identified as responders and non-responders to glucose lowering therapy, and their characteristics, depend on the response definition chosen.We prospectively studied 230 participants commencing GLP-1 agonist therapy. We assessed participant characteristics at baseline and repeated HbA1c after 3 months treatment. We defined responders (best quartile of response based on HbA1c change or HbA1c achieved. We assessed the extent to which these methods identified the same individuals and how this affected the baseline characteristics associated with treatment response.Different definitions of response identified different participants. Only 39% of responders by one definition were also good responders by the other. Characteristics associated with good response depend on the response definition chosen: good response by HbA1c achieved was associated with low baseline HbA1c (p<0.001, high C-peptide (p<0.001 and shorter diabetes duration (p = 0.01 whereas response defined by HbA1c change was associated with high HbA1c (p<0.001 only. We describe a simple novel method of defining treatment response based on a combination of HbA1c change and HbA1c achieved that defines response groups with similar baseline glycaemia.The outcome of studies aiming to identify predictors of treatment response to glucose lowering therapy may depend on how response is defined. Alternative definitions of response should be considered which minimise influence of baseline glycaemia.

  6. Understanding positional cues in salamander limb regeneration: implications for optimizing cell-based regenerative therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine D. McCusker

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative medicine has reached the point where we are performing clinical trials with stem-cell-derived cell populations in an effort to treat numerous human pathologies. However, many of these efforts have been challenged by the inability of the engrafted populations to properly integrate into the host environment to make a functional biological unit. It is apparent that we must understand the basic biology of tissue integration in order to apply these principles to the development of regenerative therapies in humans. Studying tissue integration in model organisms, where the process of integration between the newly regenerated tissues and the ‘old’ existing structures can be observed and manipulated, can provide valuable insights. Embryonic and adult cells have a memory of their original position, and this positional information can modify surrounding tissues and drive the formation of new structures. In this Review, we discuss the positional interactions that control the ability of grafted cells to integrate into existing tissues during the process of salamander limb regeneration, and discuss how these insights could explain the integration defects observed in current cell-based regenerative therapies. Additionally, we describe potential molecular tools that can be used to manipulate the positional information in grafted cell populations, and to promote the communication of positional cues in the host environment to facilitate the integration of engrafted cells. Lastly, we explain how studying positional information in current cell-based therapies and in regenerating limbs could provide key insights to improve the integration of cell-based regenerative therapies in the future.

  7. New perspectives on the theory of justice: implications for physical therapy ethics and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Ian; Delany, Clare M; Townsend, Anne F; Swisher, Laura Lee

    2011-11-01

    Recent revisions of physical therapy codes of ethics have included a new emphasis concerning health inequities and social injustice. This emphasis reflects the growing evidence regarding the importance of social determinants of health, epidemiological trends for health service delivery, and the enhanced participation of physical therapists in shaping health care reform in a number of international contexts. This perspective article suggests that there is a "disconnect" between the societal obligations and aspirations expressed in the revised codes and the individualist ethical frameworks that predominantly underpin them. Primary health care is an approach to health care arising from an understanding of the nexus between health and social disadvantage that considers the health needs of patients as expressive of the health needs of the communities of which they are members. It is proposed that re-thinking ethical frameworks expressed in codes of ethics can both inform and underpin practical strategies for working in primary health care. This perspective article provides a new focus on the ethical principle of justice: the ethical principle that arguably remains the least consensually understood and developed in the ethics literature of physical therapy. A relatively recent theory of justice known as the "capability approach to justice" is discussed, along with its potential to assist physical therapy practitioners to further develop moral agency in order to address situations of health inequity and social injustice in clinical practice.

  8. Animal models of Huntington's disease: implications in uncovering pathogenic mechanisms and developing therapies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin-hui WANG; Zheng-hong QIN

    2006-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder, which is caused by an abnormal expansion of Cytosine Adenine Guanine (CAG) trinucleotide repeat in the gene making huntingtin (Htt). Despite intensive research efforts devoted to investigate molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis, effective therapy for this devastating disease is still not available at present. The development of various animal models of HD has offered alternative approaches in the study of HD molecular pathology. Many HD models, including chemical-induced models and genetic models, mimic some aspects of HD symptoms and pathology. To date, however, there is no ideal model which replicates all of the essential features of neuropathology and progressive motor and cognitive impairments of human HD. As a result, our understanding of molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis in HD is still limited. A new model is needed in order to uncover the pathogenesis and to develop novel therapies for HD. In this review we discussed usefulness and limitations of various animal and cellular models of HD in uncovering molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis and developing novel therapies for HD.

  9. Antiplatelet Therapy Considerations in Ischemic Cardiogenic Shock: Implications of Metabolic Bioactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Phillip A; Sieg, Adam; Paruthi, Christina; Rajapreyar, Indranee

    2015-07-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and a P2Y12 receptor antagonist remains a mainstay in the prevention of ischemic events following coronary stent placement. Significant controversy exists regarding the optimal management of high platelet reactivity despite antiplatelet therapy; however this finding has been consistently associated with poor clinical outcomes including greater risk of stent thrombosis and myocardial infarction. Variability in antiplatelet effects of clopidogrel and prasugrel has been linked to genetic polymorphisms and potential drug-drug interactions. Both of these factors have significant influence on the cytochrome P-450 enzyme system activity of the liver responsible for their biotransformation to the active form of both drugs. Very little has been publicized regarding differences in antiplatelet effects which may be associated with conditions in which the functional capacity of the liver may be temporarily compromised. Patients who present with cardiogenic shock due to acute coronary syndromes have evidence of multiorgan dysfunction including liver dysfunction that may affect the activity of these drugs. This review aims to explore existing evidence and propose additional considerations to the selection of antiplatelet therapy in patients with cardiogenic shock who receive catheter-based revascularization and stent placement.

  10. ATP and sulfonylurea sensitivity of mutant ATP-sensitive K+ channels in neonatal diabetes: implications for pharmacogenomic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Joseph C; Remedi, Maria S; Dao, Crystal; Nichols, Colin G

    2005-09-01

    The prediction that overactivity of the pancreatic ATP-sensitive K(+) channel (K(ATP) channel) underlies reduced insulin secretion and causes a diabetic phenotype in humans has recently been borne out by genetic studies implicating "activating" mutations in the Kir6.2 subunit of K(ATP) as causal in both permanent and transient neonatal diabetes. Here we characterize the channel properties of Kir6.2 mutations that underlie transient neonatal diabetes (I182V) or more severe forms of permanent neonatal diabetes (V59M, Q52R, and I296L). In all cases, the mutations result in a significant decrease in sensitivity to inhibitory ATP, which correlates with channel "overactivity" in intact cells. Mutations can be separated into those that directly affect ATP affinity (I182V) and those that stabilize the open conformation of the channel and indirectly reduce ATP sensitivity (V59M, Q52R, and I296L). With respect to the latter group, alterations in channel gating are also reflected in a functional "uncoupling" of sulfonylurea (SU) block: SU sensitivity of I182V is similar to that of wild-type mutants, but the SU sensitivity of all gating mutants is reduced, with the I296L mutant being resistant to block by tolbutamide (implications for the use of insulinotropic SU drugs as an alternative therapy to insulin injections.

  11. Pathogenesis of metastatic disease: implications for current therapy and for the development of new therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poste, G

    1986-01-01

    Different tumor cell subpopulations coexisting within the same tumor exhibit varied susceptibilities to antineoplastic agents. Tumor cell heterogeneity is now recognized as the principal cause of treatment failure in cancer, and is a formidable obstacle to effective therapy and to the development of drug delivery systems for selective targeting of antineoplastic agents to tumor cells. Recent insights into the genesis of tumor cell heterogeneity during progressive tumor growth reveal new complexities that raise challenging questions about the adequacy of certain approaches to the current therapy of metastatic disease and impose challenging criteria for the development of improved therapeutic strategies. Many of the experimental approaches used in the search for new antineoplastic agents and targeted drug delivery systems ignore the pathogenesis of metastasis and the problem of tumor cell heterogeneity. The adoption of more relevant assay systems is an urgent priority. These include the greater use of metastatic tumor models and the increased use of human tumor cells to replace rodent cell systems which have been of limited predictive value in identifying effective anticancer agents. In contrast to current strategies for the development of new antineoplastic drugs which seek to identify agents with activity against a broad range of histologically diverse tumors, greater success may be achieved by seeking agents active only against specific cell lineages. Many established human tumor cell lines may not be suitable for this purpose because of extensive phenotypic change produced by prolonged passage ex vivo. Development of histiotype-specific human tumor cell screens will require an extensive research effort to identify target cells that display demonstrable phenotypic relatedness to tumor cells in neoplastic lesions. Major advances in the therapy of metastatic disease are considered unlikely in the next few years, and progress will stem from improved use of existing

  12. Cognitive effects of cancer systemic therapy: implications for the care of older patients and survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelblatt, Jeanne S; Jacobsen, Paul B; Ahles, Tim

    2014-08-20

    The number of patients with cancer who are age 65 years or older (hereinafter "older") is increasing dramatically. One obvious aspect of cancer care for this group is that they are experiencing age-related changes in multiple organ systems, including the brain, which complicates decisions about systemic therapy and assessments of survivorship outcomes. There is a consistent body of evidence from studies that use neuropsychological testing and neuroimaging that supports the existence of impairment following systemic therapy in selected cognitive domains among some older patients with cancer. Impairment in one or more cognitive domains could have important effects in the daily lives of older patients. However, an imperfect understanding of the precise biologic mechanisms underlying cognitive impairment after systemic treatment precludes development of validated methods for predicting which older patients are at risk. From what is known, risks may include lifestyle factors such as smoking, genetic predisposition, and specific comorbidities such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Risk also interacts with physiologic and cognitive reserve, because even at the same chronological age and with the same number of illnesses, older patients vary from having high reserve (ie, biologically younger than their age) to being frail (biologically older than their age). Surveillance for the presence of cognitive impairment is also an important component of long-term survivorship care with older patients. Increasing the workforce of cancer care providers who have geriatrics training or who are working within multidisciplinary teams that have this type of expertise would be one avenue toward integrating assessment of the cognitive effects of cancer systemic therapy into routine clinical practice.

  13. Catatonia and autism: a historical review, with implications for electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhossche, Dirk M; Reti, Irving M; Wachtel, Lee E

    2009-03-01

    Current autism research is historically separated from catatonia and other childhood psychotic disorders, although catatonia and autism share several common symptoms (mutism, echolalia, stereotypic speech and repetitive behaviors, posturing, grimacing, rigidity, mannerisms, and purposeless agitation). Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) effectively treats catatonia and catatonia-related conditions of intractable compulsions, tics, and self-injury in people with autism. We assess the incidence of catatonic symptoms in autism, examine emerging ECT indications in people with autism and related developmental disorders, and encourage ethical debate and legal-administrative action to assure equal access to ECT for people with autism.

  14. Chronopharmacology of L-DOPA: implications for orthochronal therapy in the prevention of circadian dyschronism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehret, C.F.; Meinert, J.C.; Groh, K.R.

    1978-01-01

    Two experimental results showed a significant influence of the circadian phase time-of-administration of L-DOPA upon the circadian rhythm of the rat, as judged by measures of core temperature. It is concluded that, in order to minimize the deleterious side effects and maximize the beneficial effects of a drug such as L-DOPA, orthochronal therapy is indicated. How orthochronal is to be defined when extrapolated to organisms apparently deficient in either tyrosine hydroxylase or in L-DOPA itself (as in the case of Parkinson's disease) will require experimental trial with appropriate subjects.

  15. Genetic and epigenetic heterogeneity of epithelial ovarian cancer and the clinical implications for molecular targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Huimin; Cao, Dongyan; Yang, Jiaxin; Li, Menghui; Zhang, Zhenyu; Shen, Keng

    2016-04-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most lethal gynaecological malignancy, and tumoural heterogeneity (TH) has been blamed for treatment failure. The genomic and epigenomic atlas of EOC varies significantly with tumour histotype, grade, stage, sensitivity to chemotherapy and prognosis. Rapidly accumulating knowledge about the genetic and epigenetic events that control TH in EOC has facilitated the development of molecular-targeted therapy. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, designed to target homologous recombination, are poised to change how breast cancer susceptibility gene (BRCA)-related ovarian cancer is treated. Epigenetic treatment regimens being tested in clinical or preclinical studies could provide promising novel treatment approaches and hope for improving patient survival.

  16. The Antiangiogenic Effects of a Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Decoy Receptor Can Be Monitored in Vivo Using Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flemming Forsberg

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of antiangiogenic therapies has stimulated interest in noninvasive imaging methods to monitor response. We investigated whether the effects of a vascular endothelial growth factor decoy receptor (VEGF Trap, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Tarrytown, NY could be monitored in vivo using contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS. Twenty nude mice (in two groups were implanted with a human melanoma cell line (DB-1. The active group received VEGF Trap (4 × 25 mg/kg over 2 weeks, whereas the control group received an inactive protein. An ultrasound contrast agent was injected followed by power Doppler imaging (PDI and pulse inversion harmonic imaging (PIHI; regular and intermittent. Specimens were sectioned in the same planes as the images and stained for endothelial cells (CD31, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, VEGF, and hypoxia (Glut1. Measures of tumor vascularity obtained with the different imaging modes were compared to immunohistochemical markers of angiogenesis. Mean tumor volume was smaller in the active group than in the control group (656 ± 225 vs 1,160 ± 605 mm3. Overall, PDI and VEGF correlated (r = .34; p = .037. Vascularity decreased from control to treated mice with intermittent PIHI, as did the expression of CD31 and COX-2 (p # .02, whereas VEGF increased (p = .05. CEUS appears to allow in vivo monitoring of the antiangiogenic effects of VEGF Trap in the DB-1 human melanoma xenograft model.

  17. Anti-Metastatic and Anti-Angiogenic Activities of Core-Shell SiO2@LDH Loaded with Etoposide in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanjing; Zhu, Rongrong; Wang, Mei; Wu, Bin; He, Xiaolie; Qian, Yechang; Wang, Shilong

    2016-11-01

    Currently, nanoparticles have gained a great attention in the anti-tumor research area. However, to date, studies on the anti-metastasis action of core-shell SiO2@LDH (LDH: layered double hydroxide) nanoparticles remain untouched. Two emerging aspects considered are establishing research on the controlling delivery effect of SiO2@LDH combined with anti-cancer medicine from a new perspective. The fine properties synthetic SiO2@LDH-VP16 (VP16: etoposide) are practiced to exhibit the nanoparticle's suppression on migration and invasion of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Both in vitro and in vivo inspection shows that SiO2@LDH can help VP16 better function as an anti-metastasis agent. On the other hand, anti-angiogenic efficiency, co-localization, as well as western blot are investigated to explain the possible mechanism. A clear mergence of SiO2@LDH-VP16 and cytomembrane/microtubule may be observed from co-location images. Results offer evidence that SiO2@LDH-VP16 plays positions on cytomembrane and microtubules. It efficiently inhibits metastasis on NSCLC by reducing vascularization, and eliciting depression of the PI3K-AKT and FAK-Paxillin signaling pathways. SiO2@LDH-VP16, the overall particle morphology, and function on anti-metastasis and anti-angiogenic may be tuned to give new opportunities for novel strategies for cancer therapy.

  18. Effects of 5HPP-33,an antiangiogenic thalidomide analog, in mouse whole embryo culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalidomide is a well-known example of a teratogen which has been shown to have an inhibitory effect on angiogenesis. As a result of its targeted effect on immature blood vessels, anti-angiogenic specific chemical analogs were developed to maximize this mechanism of thalidomide e...

  19. In vitro anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic activities of thalidomide dithiocarbamate analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Aarag, Bishoy Y A; Kasai, Tomonari; Zahran, Magdy A H; Zakhary, Nadia I; Shigehiro, Tsukasa; Sekhar, Sreeja C; Agwa, Hussein S; Mizutani, Akifumi; Murakami, Hiroshi; Kakuta, Hiroki; Seno, Masaharu

    2014-08-01

    Inhibition of angiogenesis is currently perceived as a promising strategy in the treatment of cancer. The anti-angiogenicity of thalidomide has inspired a second wave of research on this teratogenic drug. The present study aimed to investigate the anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic activities of two thalidomide dithiocarbamate analogs by studying their anti-proliferative effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines. Their action on the expression levels of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, VEGF165, and MMP-2 was also assessed. Furthermore, their effect on angiogenesis was evaluated through wound healing, migration, tube formation, and nitric oxide (NO) assays. Results illustrated that the proliferation of HUVECs and MDA-MB-231 cells was not significantly affected by thalidomide at 6.25-100μM. Thalidomide failed to block angiogenesis at similar concentrations. By contrast, thalidomide dithiocarbamate analogs exhibited significant anti-proliferative action on HUVECs and MDA-MB-231 cells without causing cytotoxicity and also showed powerful anti-angiogenicity in wound healing, migration, tube formation, and NO assays. Thalidomide analogs 1 and 2 demonstrated more potent activity to suppress expression levels of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, VEGF165, and MMP-2 than thalidomide. Analog 1 consistently, showed the highest potency and efficacy in all the assays. Taken together, our results support further development and evaluation of novel thalidomide analogs as anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic agents.

  20. Biological evaluation of tubulysin A: A potential anticancer and antiangiogenic natural product

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaur, Gurmeet; Hollingshead, Melinda; Holbeck, Susan; Schauer-Vukašinović, Vesna; Camalier, Richard F.; Dömling, Alexander; Agarwal, Seema

    2006-01-01

    Tubulysin A (tubA) is a natural product isolated from a strain of myxobacteria that has been shown to depolymerize microtubules and induce mitotic arrest. The potential of tubA as an anticancer and antiangiogenic agent is explored in the present study. tubA shows potent antiproliferative activity in

  1. Anti-angiogenic activity of Morinda citrifolia extracts and its chemical constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beh, Hooi-Kheng; Seow, Lay-Jing; Asmawi, Mohd Zaini; Abdul Majid, Amin Malik Shah; Murugaiyah, Vikneswaran; Ismail, Norhayati; Ismail, Zhari

    2012-01-01

    Morinda citrifolia L. has been used for the treatment of a wide variety of diseases, including cancer. This study was undertaken to evaluate the anti-angiogenic effect of M. citrifolia fruits and leaves. Anti-angiogenic activity was evaluated in vivo using the chick chorioallantoic membrane assay. Bioactivity-guided fractionation and isolation were performed to identify the active constituent, and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis was then used to quantify the amount of this active constituent in the active extracts and fraction. The methanol extracts of fruits and leaves of M. citrifolia and the subsequent chloroform fraction of the fruit methanolic extract were found to have potential anti-angiogenic activity and were more potent compared to suramin. Scopoletin was identified as one of the chemical constituents that may be partly responsible for the anti-angiogenic activity of M. citrifolia fruits. The present findings further support the use of M. citrifolia in cancer or other pathological conditions related to angiogenesis.

  2. Structural Determinant and Its Underlying Molecular Mechanism of STPC2 Related to Anti-Angiogenic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Min; Cui, Ning; Bo, Zhixiang; Xiang, Feixiang

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to use different strategies to further uncover the anti-angiogenic molecular mechanism of a fucoidan-like polysaccharide STPC2, isolated from brown alga Sargassum thunbergii. A desulfated derivative, STPC2-DeS, was successfully prepared and identified. The native polysaccharide and desulfated product were subjected to evaluate their anti-angiogenic effects. In the tube formation assay, STPC2 showed dose-dependent inhibition. In addition, STPC2 could distinctly inhibit the permeation of HUVEC cells into the lower chamber. Moreover, a significant reduction of microvessel density was observed in chick chorioallantoic membrane assay treated with STPC2. Meanwhile, STPC2 was found to repress the VEGF-induced neovessel formation in the matrigel plug assay in vivo. However, STPC2-DeS failed to suppress the anti-angiogenic activity via these in vitro and in vivo strategies. In addition, we demonstrated that STPC2 could significantly downregulate the phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and its related downstream Src family kinase, focal adhesion kinase, and AKT kinase. Furthermore, surface plasmon resonance assay revealed that STPC2 bound strongly to VEGF to interfere with VEGF–VEGFR2 interaction. Taken together, these results evidently demonstrated that STPC2 exhibited a potent anti-angiogenic activity through binding to VEGF via sulfated groups to impede VEGF–VEGFR2 interaction, thus affected the downstream signaling molecules. PMID:28230794

  3. The AIDS dementia complex: clinical and basic neuroscience with implications for novel molecular therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navia, B A; Rostasy, K

    2005-10-01

    The AIDS dementia complex (ADC, also referred to as HIV-associated cognitive impairment) is a common disorder among HIV-infected patients associated with both inflammatory and neurodegenerative processes. This review describes recent advances in the clinical and basic neurosciences of HIV infection and discusses the multivariable nature of what has become a chronic disorder in the context of highly active antiretroviral therapies (HAART). Since its initial description twenty years ago, advances in cell and molecular biology along with those in neuroimaging have furthered our understanding of the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. The clinical and neuropsychological profile of ADC is generally consistent with a "frontal-subcortical" pattern of injury. Neuropathogenesis is largely driven by indirect mechanisms mediated by infected, or more commonly, immune activated macrophages, which secrete viral and host-derived factors. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides a robust in vivo method to measure the inflammatory and neurotoxic events triggered by these factors and their associated signals. Although the use of combined or highly active antiretroviral therapies (HAART) has significantly improved survival rates, cerebral injury and cognitive impairment remain common events. Factors such as aging and chronic infection will likely impact the course of this disease, its pathogenesis, and treatment. The combined observations presented in this review suggest a number of critical areas for future inquiry.

  4. Mammalian-derived respiratory allergens - implications for diagnosis and therapy of individuals allergic to furry animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Ola B; van Hage, Marianne; Grönlund, Hans

    2014-03-01

    Furry animals cause respiratory allergies in a significant proportion of the population. A majority of all mammalian allergens are spread as airborne particles, and several have been detected in environments where furry animals are not normally kept. The repertoire of allergens from each source belongs to a restricted number of allergen families. Classification of allergen families is particularly important for the characterization of allergenicity and cross-reactivity of allergens. In fact, major mammalian allergens are taken from only three protein families, i.e. the secretoglobin, lipocalin and kallikrein families. In particular, the lipocalin superfamily harbours major allergens in all important mammalian allergen sources, and cross-reactivity between lipocalin allergens may explain cross-species sensitization between mammals. The identification of single allergen components is of importance to improve diagnosis and therapy of allergic patients using component-resolved diagnostics and allergen-specific immunotherapy (ASIT) respectively. Major disadvantages with crude allergen extracts for these applications emphasize the benefits of careful characterization of individual allergens. Furthermore, detailed knowledge of the characteristics of an allergen is crucial to formulate attenuated allergy vaccines, e.g. hypoallergens. The diverse repertoires of individual allergens from different mammalian species influence the diagnostic potential and clinical efficacy of ASIT to furry animals. As such, detailed knowledge of individual allergens is essential for adequate clinical evaluation. This review compiles current knowledge of the allergen families of mammalian species, and discusses how this information may be used for improved diagnosis and therapy of individuals allergic to mammals.

  5. Cytokines, macrophage lipid metabolism and foam cells: implications for cardiovascular disease therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, James E; Michael, Daryn R; Ashlin, Tim G; Ramji, Dipak P

    2011-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the biggest killer globally and the principal contributing factor to the pathology is atherosclerosis; a chronic, inflammatory disorder characterized by lipid and cholesterol accumulation and the development of fibrotic plaques within the walls of large and medium arteries. Macrophages are fundamental to the immune response directed to the site of inflammation and their normal, protective function is harnessed, detrimentally, in atherosclerosis. Macrophages contribute to plaque development by internalizing native and modified lipoproteins to convert them into cholesterol-rich foam cells. Foam cells not only help to bridge the innate and adaptive immune response to atherosclerosis but also accumulate to create fatty streaks, which help shape the architecture of advanced plaques. Foam cell formation involves the disruption of normal macrophage cholesterol metabolism, which is governed by a homeostatic mechanism that controls the uptake, intracellular metabolism, and efflux of cholesterol. It has emerged over the last 20 years that an array of cytokines, including interferon-γ, transforming growth factor-β1, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-10, are able to manipulate these processes. Foam cell targeting, anti-inflammatory therapies, such as agonists of nuclear receptors and statins, are known to regulate the actions of pro- and anti-atherogenic cytokines indirectly of their primary pharmacological function. A clear understanding of macrophage foam cell biology will hopefully enable novel foam cell targeting therapies to be developed for use in the clinical intervention of atherosclerosis.

  6. Bioelectrical impedance analysis in clinical practice: implications for hepatitis C therapy BIA and hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahraman Alisan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Body composition analysis using phase angle (PA, determined by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA, reflects tissue electrical properties and has prognostic value in liver cirrhosis. Objective of this prospective study was to investigate clinical use and prognostic value of BIA-derived phase angle and alterations in body composition for hepatitis C infection (HCV following antiviral therapy. Methods 37 consecutive patients with HCV infection were enrolled, BIA was performed, and PA was calculated from each pair of measurements. 22 HCV genotype 3 patients treated for 24 weeks and 15 genotype 1 patients treated for 48 weeks, were examined before and after antiviral treatment and compared to 10 untreated HCV patients at 0, 24, and 48 weeks. Basic laboratory data were correlated to body composition alterations. Results Significant reduction in body fat (BF: 24.2 ± 6.7 kg vs. 19.9 ± 6.6 kg, genotype1; 15.4 ± 10.9 kg vs. 13.2 ± 12.1 kg, genotype 3 and body cell mass (BCM: 27.3 ± 6.8 kg vs. 24.3 ± 7.2 kg, genotype1; 27.7 ± 8.8 kg vs. 24.6 ± 7.6 kg, genotype 3 was found following treatment. PA in genotype 3 patients was significantly lowered after antiviral treatment compared to initial measurements (5.9 ± 0.7° vs. 5.4 ± 0.8°. Total body water (TBW was significantly decreased in treated patients with genotype 1 (41.4 ± 7.9 l vs. 40.8 ± 9.5 l. PA reduction was accompanied by flu-like syndromes, whereas TBW decline was more frequently associated with fatigue and cephalgia. Discussion BIA offers a sophisticated analysis of body composition including BF, BCM, and TBW for HCV patients following antiviral regimens. PA reduction was associated with increased adverse effects of the antiviral therapy allowing a more dynamic therapy application.

  7. Molecular signatures of maturing dendritic cells: implications for testing the quality of dendritic cell therapies

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    Wang Ena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dendritic cells (DCs are often produced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and interleukin-4 (IL-4 stimulation of monocytes. To improve the effectiveness of DC adoptive immune cancer therapy, many different agents have been used to mature DCs. We analyzed the kinetics of DC maturation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS and interferon-γ (IFN-γ induction in order to characterize the usefulness of mature DCs (mDCs for immune therapy and to identify biomarkers for assessing the quality of mDCs. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected from 6 healthy subjects by apheresis, monocytes were isolated by elutriation, and immature DCs (iDCs were produced by 3 days of culture with GM-CSF and IL-4. The iDCs were sampled after 4, 8 and 24 hours in culture with LPS and IFN-γ and were then assessed by flow cytometry, ELISA, and global gene and microRNA (miRNA expression analysis. Results After 24 hours of LPS and IFN-γ stimulation, DC surface expression of CD80, CD83, CD86, and HLA Class II antigens were up-regulated. Th1 attractant genes such as CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11 and CCL5 were up-regulated during maturation but not Treg attractants such as CCL22 and CXCL12. The expression of classical mDC biomarker genes CD83, CCR7, CCL5, CCL8, SOD2, MT2A, OASL, GBP1 and HES4 were up-regulated throughout maturation while MTIB, MTIE, MTIG, MTIH, GADD45A and LAMP3 were only up-regulated late in maturation. The expression of miR-155 was up-regulated 8-fold in mDCs. Conclusion DCs, matured with LPS and IFN-γ, were characterized by increased levels of Th1 attractants as opposed to Treg attractants and may be particularly effective for adoptive immune cancer therapy.

  8. The inhibition of MAPK potentiates the anti-angiogenic efficacy of mTOR inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dormond-Meuwly, Anne; Roulin, Didier; Dufour, Marc; Benoit, Michael; Demartines, Nicolas [Department of Visceral Surgery, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois and University of Lausanne, Pavillon 3, Av. de Beaumont, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland); Dormond, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.dormond@chuv.ch [Department of Visceral Surgery, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois and University of Lausanne, Pavillon 3, Av. de Beaumont, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} Targeting mTOR in endothelial cell activates MAPK. {yields} Blocking MAPK enhances the anti-angiogenic effects of mTOR inhibitors. {yields} The anti-angiogenic efficacy of ATP-competitive inhibitors of mTOR is superior to that of rapamycin. -- Abstract: The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) which is part of two functionally distinct complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, plays an important role in vascular endothelial cells. Indeed, the inhibition of mTOR with an allosteric inhibitor such as rapamycin reduces the growth of endothelial cell in vitro and inhibits angiogenesis in vivo. Recent studies have shown that blocking mTOR results in the activation of other prosurvival signals such as Akt or MAPK which counteract the growth inhibitory properties of mTOR inhibitors. However, little is known about the interactions between mTOR and MAPK in endothelial cells and their relevance to angiogenesis. Here we found that blocking mTOR with ATP-competitive inhibitors of mTOR or with rapamycin induced the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in endothelial cells. Downregulation of mTORC1 but not mTORC2 had similar effects showing that the inhibition of mTORC1 is responsible for the activation of MAPK. Treatment of endothelial cells with mTOR inhibitors in combination with MAPK inhibitors reduced endothelial cell survival, proliferation, migration and tube formation more significantly than either inhibition alone. Similarly, in a tumor xenograft model, the anti-angiogenic efficacy of mTOR inhibitors was enhanced by the pharmacological blockade of MAPK. Taken together these results show that blocking mTORC1 in endothelial cells activates MAPK and that a combined inhibition of MAPK and mTOR has additive anti-angiogenic effects. They also provide a rationale to target both mTOR and MAPK simultaneously in anti-angiogenic treatment.

  9. The anti-angiogenic and antibacterial effect ofTinomiscium philippinense Miers. (Menispermaceae) leaf extract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheryl Rena-Aguila; Mario A Tan; Oliver B Villaflores

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To determine the toxicity profile, anti-angiogenic and antibacterial activity of the crude and semi-crude leaf extracts ofTinomiscium philippinense (T. philippinense). Methods:The leaves ofT. philippinense were extracted with methanol and partitioned with solvents of different polarities, namely, hexane, dichloromethane and butanol. The extracts were subjected to duck chorioallantoic membrane assay to establish its anti-angiogenic property. Microwell assay was utilized to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration of the different extracts of the plant. Results:The dichloromethane leaf extract ofT. philippinense at 1 000µg/disc showed the highest anti-angiogenic activity with 37.46% inhibition. All the fractions exhibited a bacteriostatic and bactericidal effect on the three bacterial strains withPseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram negative lactose fermenter exhibiting a higher sensitivity to dichloromethane semi-crude extract among the treatment groups. For the toxicity test, no mortality and no change in behavior were observed in the Sprague-Dawley rats 14 days after the oral administration of the plant extracts. The methanolic leaf extract ofT. philippinense is non-toxic at a maximum dose of 5 000 mg/kg. Conclusions: The dichloromethane leaf extract ofT. philippinense is a potential anti-angiogenic endemic plant species. This plant extract is also a potential antibacterial candidate as determined by microwell assay. The anti-angiogenic and antibacterial activity of the plant may be attributed to the essential oil, steroid, flavonoid, sterol and triterpene content of the plant.

  10. Excessive sodium ions delivered into cells by nanodiamonds: implications for tumor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Li, Wenxin; Zhang, Yu; Li, Jing; Liang, Le; Zhang, Xiangzhi; Chen, Nan; Sun, Yanhong; Chen, Wen; Tai, Renzhong; Fan, Chunhai; Huang, Qing

    2012-06-11

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) possess many excellent physical and chemical properties that make them attractive materials for applications in biomedicine. In this paper, the adsorption and delivery of a large amount of sodium ions into the cell interior by NDs in serum-free medium is demonstrated. The excess sodium ions inside the cells induce osmotic stresses followed by cell swelling and an increase in the intracellular levels of calcium and reactive oxygen species (ROS), which leads to severe cellular damage. In complete culture medium, however, serum proteins wrapped around the NDs effectively prevent the sodium ions from adsorbing onto the NDs, and thus the NDs show no cytotoxicity. This work is the first to elaborate on the correlation between the sodium ions adsorbed on the nanomaterials and their bio-effects. Excessive ions delivered into cells by NDs might have potential applications in tumor therapy.

  11. KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, and PTEN mutations: implications for targeted therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Roock, Wendy; De Vriendt, Veerle; Normanno, Nicola; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Tejpar, Sabine

    2011-06-01

    The discovery of mutant KRAS as a predictor of resistance to epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibodies brought a major change in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. This seminal finding also highlighted our sparse knowledge about key signalling pathways in colorectal tumours. Drugs that inhibit oncogenic alterations such as phospho-MAP2K (also called MEK), phospho-AKT, and mutant B-RAF seem promising as single treatment or when given with EGFR inhibitors. However, our understanding of the precise role these potential drug targets have in colorectal tumours, and the oncogenic dependence that tumours might have on these components, has not progressed at the same rate. As a result, patient selection and prediction of treatment effects remain problematic. We review the role of mutations in genes other than KRAS on the efficacy of anti-EGFR therapy, and discuss strategies to target these oncogenic alterations alone or in combination with receptor tyrosine-kinase inhibition.

  12. Sexual contact between psychologists and their former therapy patients: psychoanalytic perspectives and professional implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavit, Natalie; Bucky, Steven

    2004-09-01

    Data was analyzed from the semi-structured interviews of 6 heterosexual male psychoanalytic psychotherapists who by self-report had not engaged in a post-termination sexual involvement. The focus of each interview was to elicit the participants' views about sexual contact between psychotherapists and their former therapy patients, as well as their related attitudes towards Standard 4.07 of the APA Ethics Code (1992). The results suggested great disparity of opinion regarding what might constitute acceptable, ethical behavior in this domain. Nonetheless, all the clinicians agreed that the potential for harm resulting from post-termination sexual involvements was great, They all shared the beliefs that transference did not resolve with termination, that professional responsibilities continued after treatment ended, and that power differentials between therapist and patient lingered, perhaps in perpetuity. However, it was determined to be premature to replace the current Standard 4.07 with an absolute prohibition against sexual involvements between therapists and their former patients.

  13. Interaction of tumor cells with the immune system: implications for dendritic cell therapy and cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhof, Marianne; Karas, Irene; Gomez, Ivan; Eger, Andreas; Imhof, Martin

    2013-01-01

    There is a continuous demand for preclinical modeling of the interaction of dendritic cells with the immune system and cancer cells. Recent progress in gene expression profiling with nucleic acid microarrays, in silico modeling and in vivo cell and animal approaches for non-clinical proof of safety and efficacy of these immunotherapies is summarized. Immunoinformatic approaches look promising to unfold this potential, although still unstable and difficult to interpret. Animal models have progressed a great deal in recent years, finally narrowing the gap from bench to bedside. However, translation to the clinic should be done with precaution. The most significant results concerning clinical benefit might come from detailed immunologic investigations made during well designed clinical trials of dendritic-cell-based therapies, which in general prove safe.

  14. The Plasticity of Oncogene Addiction: Implications for Targeted Therapies Directed to Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinochani Pillay

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available A common mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is an extracellular truncation known as the de2-7 EGFR (or EGFRvIII. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF is the ligand for the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK c-Met, and this signaling axis is often active in GBM. The expression of the HGF/c-Met axis or de2-7 EGFR independently enhances GBMgrowth and invasiveness, particularly through the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/pAkt pathway. Using RTK arrays, we show that expression of de2-7 EGFR in U87MG GBM cells leads to the coactivation of several RTKs, including platelet-derived growth factor receptor β and c-Met. A neutralizing antibody to HGF (AMG102 did not inhibit de2-7 EGFR-mediated activation of c-Met, demonstrating that it is ligand-independent. Therapy for parental U87MG xenografts with AMG 102 resulted in significant inhibition of tumor growth, whereas U87MG.Δ2-7 xenografts were profoundly resistant. Treatment of U87MG.Δ2-7 xenografts with panitumumab, an anti-EGFR antibody, only partially inhibited tumor growth as xenografts rapidly reverted to the HGF/c-Met signaling pathway. Cotreatment with panitumumab and AMG 102 prevented this escape leading to significant tumor inhibition through an apoptotic mechanism, consistent with the induction of oncogenic shock. This observation provides a rationale for using panitumumab and AMG 102 in combination for the treatment of GBM patients. These results illustrate that GBM cells can rapidly change the RTK driving their oncogene addiction if the alternate RTK signals through the same downstream pathway. Consequently, inhibition of a dominant oncogene by targeted therapy can alter the hierarchy of RTKs resulting in rapid therapeutic resistance.

  15. Exercise and the liver: implications for therapy in fatty liver disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nathan A; Keating, Shelley E; George, Jacob

    2012-02-01

    The increasing recognition that fatty liver plays a direct role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and metabolic disease has resulted in significant research enquiry into the efficacy of lifestyle therapy in modulating liver fat. Recently, this has extended to the specific investigation of a possible independent benefit of physical activity/exercise in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). In this article we review the effect of acute and regular exercise (training) on metabolism, including liver glucose and lipid metabolism, and the available human trials that have compared the benefit of regular exercise versus a nonexercise control on liver fat. The limited human research suggests that exercise can reduce liver fat and that this benefit may be mediated, in part, by a reduction in hepatic lipogenesis. The relative importance of extrahepatic adaptations and acute versus regular exercise in explaining this benefit are discussed. From a clinical perspective, the revelation of a benefit of exercise per se offers a novel approach for liver fat reduction, and highlights the importance of incorporating fitness assessment and prescription in the management of patients with fatty liver disorders. Implementation of exercise therapy in a clinical setting is arguably the biggest challenge because evidence shows that mere provision of information about the benefits of exercise and/or exercise prescription to the patient does not translate to positive outcomes. Rather, the focus should be on implementing strategies to promote behavior change including regular contact and assessment with a health care professional, self-monitoring, and personalization of goals that focus on changing physical activity behavior.

  16. The Role of TAM Family Receptors in Immune Cell Function: Implications for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolino, Magdalena; Penninger, Josef M.

    2016-01-01

    The TAM receptor protein tyrosine kinases—Tyro3, Axl, and Mer—are essential regulators of immune homeostasis. Guided by their cognate ligands Growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6) and Protein S (Pros1), these receptors ensure the resolution of inflammation by dampening the activation of innate cells as well as by restoring tissue function through promotion of tissue repair and clearance of apoptotic cells. Their central role as negative immune regulators is highlighted by the fact that deregulation of TAM signaling has been linked to the pathogenesis of autoimmune, inflammatory, and infectious diseases. Importantly, TAM receptors have also been associated with cancer development and progression. In a cancer setting, TAM receptors have a dual regulatory role, controlling the initiation and progression of tumor development and, at the same time, the associated anti-tumor responses of diverse immune cells. Thus, modulation of TAM receptors has emerged as a potential novel strategy for cancer treatment. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how TAM receptors control immunity, with a particular focus on the regulation of anti-tumor responses and its implications for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27775650

  17. Emerging role of microRNAs in cancer stem cells:Implications in cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minal; Garg

    2015-01-01

    A small subset of cancer cells that act as tumor initiating cells or cancer stem cells(CSCs) maintain self-renewal and growth promoting capabilities of cancer and are responsible for drug/treatment resistance,tumor recurrence and metastasis. Due to their potential clinical importance,many researchers have put their efforts over decades to unravel the molecular mechanisms that regulate CSCs functions. Micro RNAs(mi RNAs) which are 21-23 nucleotide long,endogenous noncoding RNAs,regulate gene expression through gene silencing at post-transcriptional level by binding to the 3’-untranslated regions or the open reading frames of target genes,thereby result in target mR NA degradation or its translational repression and serve important role in several cellular,physiological and developmental processes. Aberrant mi RNAs expression and their implication in CSCs regulation by controlling asymmetric cell division,drug/treatment resistance and metastasis make mi RNAs a tool of great therapeutic potential against cancer. Recent advancements on the biological complexities of CSCs,modulation in CSCs properties by mi RNA network and development of mi RNA based treatment strategies specifically targeting the CSCs as an attractive therapeutic targets for clinical application are being critically analysed.

  18. Blood-brain barrier pathology in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease: implications for drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Brinda S; Monahan, Angela J; Carvey, Paul M; Hendey, Bill

    2007-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a tightly regulated barrier in the central nervous system. Though the BBB is thought to be intact during neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), recent evidence argues otherwise. Dysfunction of the BBB may be involved in disease progression, eliciting of peripheral immune response, and, most importantly, altered drug efficacy. In this review, we will give a brief overview of the BBB, its components, and their functions. We will critically evaluate the current literature in AD and PD BBB pathology resulting from insult, neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration. Specifically, we will discuss alterations in tight junction, transport and endothelial cell surface proteins, and vascular density changes, all of which result in altered permeability. Finally, we will discuss the implications of BBB dysfunction in current and future therapeutics. Developing a better appreciation of BBB dysfunction in AD and PD may not only provide novel strategies in treatment, but will prove an interesting milestone in understanding neurodegenerative disease etiology and progression.

  19. Tissue As A Medium For Laser Light Transport-Implications For Photoradiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuss, L. E.; Bolin, F. P.; Cain, B. W.

    1982-12-01

    An important medical laser application is in the emerging field of photoradiation therapy (PRT). PRT is the process in which malignant tissue is destroyed by administration of light to a specific photosensitized site. Filtered arcs, incandescents and dye lasers have been used as sources of activating light. We have carried out light experiments in tissue to study such PRT light distributions. The results of this research have shown that a number of important optical phenomena occurring within illuminated tissue must be accounted for in order to make good predictions of tumor light dosage. Among these are; tissue type, interface effects and anomalies due to composition. These effects substantially influence light levels in PRT and, thus, the therapeutic effect. The uniqueness of tissue as a medium for light transport presents special problems for optics research and instrumentation. Successful solutions necessarily will involve collaboration between the life sciences and optic specialists. Attempts at treatment of human disease using non-ionizing radiation have a history archaeologically traceable to archaic societies (in which the sun's photons were used and often worshipped).1 Western medicine in the past, has used visible light beneficially, albeit empirically, on a few ailments. However, in this century, a significant development in the understanding and in the therapeutic use of this electromagnetic radiation in the UV, visible and IR has occurred, based on scientific study. This utilization of radiation in the visible and ultraviolet can be by two distinct processes. One is through the direct action of the photons which serve as the sole treatment agent. In this case the photon interacts with the cell, or its components, in a single step, to produce a desired effect. An example is the successful use of blue light for treatment of bilirubinemia in newborns. The second process is a biological effect produced through the combination of electromagnetic radiation

  20. Accelerated cell aging in female APOE-ε4 carriers: implications for hormone therapy use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily G Jacobs

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein-ε4 (APOE-ε4 is a major genetic risk factor for cognitive decline, Alzheimer's disease (AD and early mortality. An accelerated rate of biological aging could contribute to this increased risk. Here, we determined whether APOE-ε4 status impacts leukocyte telomere length (TL and the rate of cellular senescence in healthy mid-life women and, further, whether hormone replacement therapy (HT modifies this association. Post-menopausal women (N = 63, Mean age = 57.7, all HT users for at least one year, were enrolled in a randomized longitudinal study. Half of the participants (N = 32 remained on their HT regimen and half (N = 31 went off HT for approximately two years (Mean  = 1.93 years. Participants included 24 APOE-ε4 carriers and 39 non-carrier controls. Leukocyte TL was measured at baseline and the end of year 2 using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Logistic regression analysis indicated that the odds of an APOE-ε4 carrier exhibiting telomere shortening (versus maintenance/growth over the 2-year study were more than 6 (OR  = 6.26, 95% CI  = 1.02, 38.49 times higher than a non-carrier, adjusting for established risk factors and potential confounds. Despite the high-functioning, healthy mid-life status of study participants, APOE-ε4 carriers had marked telomere attrition during the 2-year study window, the equivalent of approximately one decade of additional aging compared to non-carriers. Further analyses revealed a modulatory effect of hormone therapy on the association between APOE status and telomere attrition. APOE-ε4 carriers who went off their HT regimen exhibited TL shortening, as predicted for the at-risk population. APOE-ε4 carriers who remained on HT, however, did not exhibit comparable signs of cell aging. The opposite pattern was found in non-carriers. The results suggest that hormone use might buffer against accelerated cell aging in mid-life women at risk for dementia

  1. Proton therapy of prostate cancer by anterior-oblique beams: implications of setup and anatomy variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moteabbed, M.; Trofimov, A.; Sharp, G. C.; Wang, Y.; Zietman, A. L.; Efstathiou, J. A.; Lu, H.-M.

    2017-03-01

    Proton therapy of prostate by anterior beams could offer an attractive option for treating patients with hip prosthesis and limiting the high-dose exposure to the rectum. We investigated the impact of setup and anatomy variations on the anterior-oblique (AO) proton plan dose, and strategies to manage these effects via range verification and adaptive delivery. Ten patients treated by bilateral (BL) passive-scattering proton therapy (79.2 Gy in 44 fractions) who underwent weekly verification CT scans were selected. Plans with AO beams were additionally created. To isolate the effect of daily variations, initial AO plans did not include range uncertainty margins. The use of fixed planning margins and adaptive range adjustments to manage these effects was investigated. For each case, the planned dose was recalculated on weekly CTs, and accumulated on the simulation CT using deformable registration to approximate the delivered dose. Planned and accumulated doses were compared for each scenario to quantify dose deviations induced by variations. The possibility of estimating the necessary range adjustments before each treatment was explored by simulating the procedure of a diode-based in vivo range verification technique, which would potentially be used clinically. The average planned rectum, penile bulb and femoral heads mean doses were smaller for initial AO compared to BL plans (by 8.3, 16.1 and 25.9 Gy, respectively). After considering interfractional variations in AO plans, the target coverage was substantially reduced. The maximum reduction of V 79.2/D 95/D mean/EUD for AO (without distal margins) (25.3%/10.7/1.6/4.9 Gy, respectively) was considerably larger than BL plans. The loss of coverage was mainly related to changes in water equivalent path length of the prostate after fiducial-based setup, caused by discrepancies in patient anterior surface and bony-anatomy alignment. Target coverage was recovered partially when using fixed planning margins, and fully when

  2. Emerging principles for the development of resistance to antihormonal therapy: Implications for the clinical utility of fulvestrant*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariazi, Eric A.; Lewis-Wambi, Joan S.; Gill, Shaun D.; Pyle, Jennifer R.; Ariazi, Jennifer L.; Kim, Helen R.; Sharma, Catherine G.N.; Cordera, Fernando; Shupp, Heather A.; Li, Tianyu; Jordan, V. Craig

    2007-01-01

    We seek to evaluate the clinical consequences of resistance to antihormonal therapy by studying analogous animal xenograft models. Two approaches were taken. 1) MCF-7 tumors were serially transplanted into selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) -treated immunocompromised mice to mimic five years of SERM treatment. The studies in vivo were designed to replicate the development of acquired resistance to SERMs over years of clinical exposure. 2) MCF-7 cells were cultured long-term under SERM-treated or estrogen withdrawn conditions (to mimic aromatase inhibitors), and then injected into mice to generate endocrine-resistant xenografts. These tumor models have allowed us to define Phase I and Phase II antihormonal resistance according to their responses to E2 and fulvestrant. Phase I SERM-resistant tumors were growth stimulated in response to estradiol (E2), but paradoxically, Phase II SERM and estrogen withdrawn-resistant tumors were growth inhibited by E2. Fulvestrant did not support growth of Phase I and II SERM-resistant tumors, but did allow growth of Phase II estrogen withdrawn-resistant tumors. Importantly, fulvestrant plus E2 in Phase II antihormone-resistant tumors reversed the E2-induced inhibition and instead resulted in growth stimulation. These data have important clinical implications. Based on these and prior laboratory findings, we propose a clinical strategy for optimal third-line therapy: patients who have responded to and then failed at least two antihormonal treatments may respond favorably to short-term low-dose estrogen due to E2-induced apoptosis, followed by treatment with fulvestrant plus an aromatase inhibitor to maintain low tumor burden and avoid a negative interaction between physiologic E2 and fulvestrant. PMID:17085047

  3. Emerging principles for the development of resistance to antihormonal therapy: implications for the clinical utility of fulvestrant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariazi, Eric A; Lewis-Wambi, Joan S; Gill, Shaun D; Pyle, Jennifer R; Ariazi, Jennifer L; Kim, Helen R; Sharma, Catherine G N; Cordera, Fernando; Shupp, Heather A; Li, Tianyu; Jordan, V Craig

    2006-12-01

    We seek to evaluate the clinical consequences of resistance to antihormonal therapy by studying analogous animal xenograft models. Two approaches were taken: (1) MCF-7 tumors were serially transplanted into selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM)-treated immunocompromised mice to mimic 5 years of SERM treatment. The studies in vivo were designed to replicate the development of acquired resistance to SERMs over years of clinical exposure. (2) MCF-7 cells were cultured long-term under SERM-treated or estrogen withdrawn conditions (to mimic aromatase inhibitors), and then injected into mice to generate endocrine-resistant xenografts. These tumor models have allowed us to define Phase I and Phase II antihormonal resistance according to their responses to E(2) and fulvestrant. Phase I SERM-resistant tumors were growth stimulated in response to estradiol (E(2)), but paradoxically, Phase II SERM and estrogen withdrawn-resistant tumors were growth inhibited by E(2). Fulvestrant did not support growth of Phases I and II SERM-resistant tumors, but did allow growth of Phase II estrogen withdrawn-resistant tumors. Importantly, fulvestrant plus E(2) in Phase II antihormone-resistant tumors reversed the E(2)-induced inhibition and instead resulted in growth stimulation. These data have important clinical implications. Based on these and prior laboratory findings, we propose a clinical strategy for optimal third-line therapy: patients who have responded to and then failed at least two antihormonal treatments may respond favorably to short-term low-dose estrogen due to E(2)-induced apoptosis, followed by treatment with fulvestrant plus an aromatase inhibitor to maintain low tumor burden and avoid a negative interaction between physiologic E(2) and fulvestrant.

  4. Interconnections between apoptotic, autophagic and necrotic pathways: implications for cancer therapy development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Mayur V; Paczulla, Anna M; Klonisch, Thomas; Dimgba, Florence N; Rao, Sahana B; Roberg, Karin; Schweizer, Frank; Lengerke, Claudia; Davoodpour, Padideh; Palicharla, Vivek R; Maddika, Subbareddy; Łos, Marek

    2013-01-01

    The rapid accumulation of knowledge on apoptosis regulation in the 1990s was followed by the development of several experimental anticancer- and anti-ischaemia (stroke or myocardial infarction) drugs. Activation of apoptotic pathways or the removal of cellular apoptotic inhibitors has been suggested to aid cancer therapy and the inhibition of apoptosis was thought to limit ischaemia-induced damage. However, initial clinical studies on apoptosis-modulating drugs led to unexpected results in different clinical conditions and this may have been due to co-effects on non-apoptotic interconnected cell death mechanisms and the 'yin-yang' role of autophagy in survival versus cell death. In this review, we extend the analysis of cell death beyond apoptosis. Upon introduction of molecular pathways governing autophagy and necrosis (also called necroptosis or programmed necrosis), we focus on the interconnected character of cell death signals and on the shared cell death processes involving mitochondria (e.g. mitophagy and mitoptosis) and molecular signals playing prominent roles in multiple pathways (e.g. Bcl2-family members and p53). We also briefly highlight stress-induced cell senescence that plays a role not only in organismal ageing but also offers the development of novel anticancer strategies. Finally, we briefly illustrate the interconnected character of cell death forms in clinical settings while discussing irradiation-induced mitotic catastrophe. The signalling pathways are discussed in their relation to cancer biology and treatment approaches.

  5. Underlying neural mechanisms of mirror therapy: Implications for motor rehabilitation in stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Narayan Arya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mirror therapy (MT is a valuable method for enhancing motor recovery in poststroke hemiparesis. The technique utilizes the mirror-illusion created by the movement of sound limb that is perceived as the paretic limb. MT is a simple and economical technique than can stimulate the brain noninvasively. The intervention unquestionably has neural foundation. But the underlying neural mechanisms inducing motor recovery are still unclear. In this review, the neural-modulation due to MT has been explored. Multiple areas of the brain such as the occipital lobe, dorsal frontal area and corpus callosum are involved during the simple MT regime. Bilateral premotor cortex, primary motor cortex, primary somatosensory cortex, and cerebellum also get reorganized to enhance the function of the damaged brain. The motor areas of the lesioned hemisphere receive visuo-motor processing information through the parieto-occipital lobe. The damaged motor cortex responds variably to the MT and may augment true motor recovery. Mirror neurons may also play a possible role in the cortico-stimulatory mechanisms occurring due to the MT.

  6. Perceptions of Gender and Femininity Based on Language: Implications for Transgender Communication Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Adrienne B; Stutts, Holly Wilder; Bass, Annie

    2015-09-01

    Recent research presents a picture of diminishing gender differences in language. Two experiments examined whether language use can predict perceptions of gender and femininity; one included male and female speakers telling a personal narrative, the other also included male-to-female transgender speakers and analyzed an oral picture description. In each experiment, raters read transcribed samples before judging the gender and rating the femininity of the speaker. Only number of T-units, words per T-unit, dependent clauses per T-unit, and personal pronouns per T-unit emerged as different between gender groups. As none of the variables were strongly correlated with perceptual judgments, regression analysis was used to determine how combinations of linguistic variables predict female/feminine ratings. Results from these two studies demonstrate that gender-related differences in language use for these two contexts are limited, and that any relationship of language to perceptions of gender and femininity is complex and multivariate. This information calls into question the utility of training key language features in transgender communication therapy.

  7. Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii: resistance mechanisms and implications for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavascki, Alexandre P; Carvalhaes, Cecília G; Picão, Renata C; Gales, Ana C

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii are major nosocomial pathogens worldwide. Both are intrinsically resistant to many drugs and are able to become resistant to virtually any antimicrobial agent. An increasing prevalence of infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) isolates has been reported in many countries. The resistance mechanisms of P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii include the production of beta-lactamases, efflux pumps, and target-site or outer membrane modifications. Resistance to multiple drugs is usually the result of the combination of different mechanisms in a single isolate or the action of a single potent resistance mechanism. There are many challenges in the treatment of MDR P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii, especially considering the absence of new antimicrobials in the drug-development pipeline. In this review, we present the major resistance mechanisms of P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii, and discuss how they can affect antimicrobial therapy, considering recent clinical, microbiological, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic findings of the main drugs used to treat MDR isolates.

  8. Role of inflammation and its miRNA based regulation in epilepsy: Implications for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Arpna; Dixit, Aparna Banerjee; Banerjee, Jyotirmoy; Tripathi, Manjari; Sarat Chandra, P

    2016-01-15

    There is a need to develop innovative therapeutic strategies to counteract epilepsy, a common disabling neurological disorder. Despite the recent advent of additional antiepileptic drugs and respective surgery, the treatment of epilepsy remains a major challenge. The available therapies are largely based on symptoms, and these approaches do not affect the underlying disease processes and are also associated frequently with severe side effects. This is mainly because of the lack of well-defined targets in epilepsy. The discovery that inflammatory mediators significantly contribute to the onset and recurrence of seizures in experimental seizure models, as well as the presence of inflammatory molecules in human epileptogenic tissue, highlights the possibility of targeting specific inflammation related pathways to control seizures that are otherwise resistant to the available AEDs. Emerging studies suggest that miRNAs have a significant role in regulating inflammatory pathways shown to be involved in epilepsy. These miRNAs can possibly be used as novel therapeutic targets in the treatment of epilepsy as well as serve as diagnostic biomarkers of epileptogenesis. This review highlights the immunological features underlying the pathogenesis of epileptic seizures and the possible miRNA mediated approaches for drug resistant epilepsies that modulate the immune-mediated pathogenesis.

  9. Trophic factors as modulators of motor neuron physiology and survival: implications for ALS therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis B Tovar-y-Romo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Motor neuron physiology and development depend on a continuous and tightly regulated trophic support from a variety of cellular sources. Trophic factors guide the generation and positioning of motor neurons during every stage of the developmental process. As well, they are involved in axon guidance and synapse formation. Even in the adult spinal cord an uninterrupted trophic input is required to maintain neuronal functioning and protection from noxious stimuli. Among the trophic factors that have been demonstrated to participate in motor neuron physiology are vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1. Upon binding to membrane receptors expressed in motor neurons or neighboring glia, these trophic factors activate intracellular signaling pathways that promote cell survival and have protective action on motor neurons, in both in vivo and in vitro models of neuronal degeneration. For these reasons these factors have been considered a promising therapeutic method for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases, although their efficacy in human clinical trials have not yet shown the expected protection. In this review we summarize experimental data on the role of these trophic factors in motor neuron function and survival, as well as their mechanisms of action. We also briefly discuss the potential therapeutic use of the trophic factors and why these therapies may have not been yet successful in the clinical use.

  10. Tumor Microenvironment Modulation via Gold Nanoparticles Targeting Malicious Exosomes: Implications for Cancer Diagnostics and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Roma-Rodrigues

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are nanovesicles formed in the endosomal pathway with an important role in paracrine and autocrine cell communication. Exosomes secreted by cancer cells, malicious exosomes, have important roles in tumor microenvironment maturation and cancer progression. The knowledge of the role of exosomes in tumorigenesis prompted a new era in cancer diagnostics and therapy, taking advantage of the use of circulating exosomes as tumor biomarkers due to their stability in body fluids and targeting malignant exosomes’ release and/or uptake to inhibit or delay tumor development. In recent years, nanotechnology has paved the way for the development of a plethora of new diagnostic and therapeutic platforms, fostering theranostics. The unique physical and chemical properties of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs make them suitable vehicles to pursuit this goal. AuNPs’ properties such as ease of synthesis with the desired shape and size, high surface:volume ratio, and the possibility of engineering their surface as desired, potentiate AuNPs’ role in nanotheranostics, allowing the use of the same formulation for exosome detection and restraining the effect of malicious exosomes in cancer progression.

  11. Denonvilliers' space expansion by transperineal injection of hydrogel: implications for focal therapy of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro Abreu, Andre Luis; Ma, Yanling; Shoji, Sunao; Marien, Arnaud; Leslie, Scott; Gill, Inderbir; Ukimura, Osamu

    2014-04-01

    We developed and assessed a technique of: (i) expanding Denonvilliers' space by hydrogel (polyethylene glycol) during focal cryoabation; and (ii) temperature mapping to ensure protection of the rectal wall. In a fresh cadaver, 20 cc of hydrogel was injected transperineally into Denonvilliers' space under transrectal ultrasound guidance. Successful expansion of Denonvilliers' space was achieved with a range of 9-11 mm thickness covering the entire posterior prostate surface. Two freeze-thaw cycles were used to expand the iceball reaching the rectal wall as an end-point. Intraoperative transrectal ultrasound monitoring and temperature mapping in Denonvilliers' space by multiple thermocouples documented real-time iceball expansion up to 10 mm beyond the prostate, and safety in protecting the rectal wall from thermal injury. The lowest temperatures of the thermocouples with a distance of 0 mm, 5 mm and 10 mm from the prostate were: -35°C, -18°C and 0°C (P focal therapy of prostate cancer.

  12. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Myelodysplastic Syndrome: Implications on Targeted Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harinder Gill

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS is a group of heterogeneous clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by cytopenia, ineffective hematopoiesis, and progression to secondary acute myeloid leukemia in high-risk cases. Conventional prognostication relies on clinicopathological parameters supplemented by cytogenetic information. However, recent studies have shown that genetic aberrations also have critical impacts on treatment outcome. Moreover, these genetic alterations may themselves be a target for treatment. The mutation landscape in MDS is shaped by gene aberrations involved in DNA methylation (TET2, DNMT3A, IDH1/2, histone modification (ASXL1, EZH2, the RNA splicing machinery (SF3B1, SRSF2, ZRSR2, U2AF1/2, transcription (RUNX1, TP53, BCOR, PHF6, NCOR, CEBPA, GATA2, tyrosine kinase receptor signaling (JAK2, MPL, FLT3, GNAS, KIT, RAS pathways (KRAS, NRAS, CBL, NF1, PTPN11, DNA repair (ATM, BRCC3, DLRE1C, FANCL, and cohesion complexes (STAG2, CTCF, SMC1A, RAD21. A detailed understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to transformation is critical for designing single-agent or combinatorial approaches in target therapy of MDS.

  13. Cardiac Arrhythmias in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: Implications of Renal Failure for Antiarrhythmic Drug Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potpara, Tatjana S; Jokic, Vera; Dagres, Nikolaos; Marin, Francisco; Prostran, Milica S; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2016-01-01

    The kidney has numerous complex interactions with the heart, including shared risk factors (e.g., hypertension, dyslipidemia, etc.) and mutual amplification of morbidity and mortality. Both cardiovascular diseases and chronic kidney disease (CKD) may cause various alterations in cardiovascular system, metabolic homeostasis and autonomic nervous system that may facilitate the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias. Also, pre-existent or incident cardiac arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation (AF) may accelerate the progression of CKD. Patients with CKD may experience various cardiac rhythm disturbances including sudden cardiac death. Contemporary management of cardiac arrhythmias includes the use of antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs), catheter ablation and cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs). Importantly, AADs are not used only as the principal treatment strategy, but also as an adjunct therapy in combination with CIEDs, to facilitate their effects or to minimize inappropriate device activation in selected patients. Along with their principal antiarrhythmic effect, AADs may also induce cardiac arrhythmias and the risk for such proarrhythmic effect(s) is particularly increased in patients with reduced left ventricular systolic function or in the setting of electrolyte imbalance. Moreover, CKD itself can induce profound alterations in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of many drugs including AADs, thus facilitating the drug accumulation and increased exposure. Hence, the use of AADs in patients with CKD may be challenging. In this review article, we provide an overview of the characteristics of arrhythmogenesis in patients with CKD with special emphasis on the complexity of pharmacokinetics and risk for proarrhythmias when using AADs in patients with cardiac arrhythmias and CKD.

  14. Tumor Microenvironment Modulation via Gold Nanoparticles Targeting Malicious Exosomes: Implications for Cancer Diagnostics and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roma-Rodrigues, Catarina; Raposo, Luís R.; Cabral, Rita; Paradinha, Fabiana; Baptista, Pedro V.; Fernandes, Alexandra R.

    2017-01-01

    Exosomes are nanovesicles formed in the endosomal pathway with an important role in paracrine and autocrine cell communication. Exosomes secreted by cancer cells, malicious exosomes, have important roles in tumor microenvironment maturation and cancer progression. The knowledge of the role of exosomes in tumorigenesis prompted a new era in cancer diagnostics and therapy, taking advantage of the use of circulating exosomes as tumor biomarkers due to their stability in body fluids and targeting malignant exosomes’ release and/or uptake to inhibit or delay tumor development. In recent years, nanotechnology has paved the way for the development of a plethora of new diagnostic and therapeutic platforms, fostering theranostics. The unique physical and chemical properties of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) make them suitable vehicles to pursuit this goal. AuNPs’ properties such as ease of synthesis with the desired shape and size, high surface:volume ratio, and the possibility of engineering their surface as desired, potentiate AuNPs’ role in nanotheranostics, allowing the use of the same formulation for exosome detection and restraining the effect of malicious exosomes in cancer progression. PMID:28098821

  15. Micro-minicircle Gene Therapy: Implications of Size on Fermentation, Complexation, Shearing Resistance, and Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenler, Sofia; Wiklander, Oscar PB; Badal-Tejedor, Maria; Turunen, Janne; Nordin, Joel Z; Hallengärd, David; Wahren, Britta; Andaloussi, Samir EL; Rutland, Mark W; Smith, CI Edvard; Lundin, Karin E; Blomberg, Pontus

    2014-01-01

    The minicircle (MC), composed of eukaryotic sequences only, is an interesting approach to increase the safety and efficiency of plasmid-based vectors for gene therapy. In this paper, we investigate micro-MC (miMC) vectors encoding small regulatory RNA. We use a construct encoding a splice-correcting U7 small nuclear RNA, which results in a vector of 650 base pairs (bp), as compared to a conventional 3600 bp plasmid carrying the same expression cassette. Furthermore, we construct miMCs of varying sizes carrying different number of these cassettes. This allows us to evaluate how size influences production, super-coiling, stability and efficiency of the vector. We characterize coiling morphology by atomic force microscopy and measure the resistance to shearing forces caused by an injector device, the Biojector. We compare the behavior of miMCs and plasmids in vitro using lipofection and electroporation, as well as in vivo in mice. We here show that when the size of the miMC is reduced, the formation of dimers and trimers increases. There seems to be a lower size limit for efficient expression. We demonstrate that miMCs are more robust than plasmids when exposed to shearing forces, and that they show extended expression in vivo. PMID:24399204

  16. Treatment planning for internal emitter therapy: Methods, applications and clinical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sgouros, G. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Treatment planning involves three basic steps: (1) a procedure must be devised that will provide the most relevant information, (2) the procedure must be applied and (3) the resulting information must be translated into a definition of the optimum implementation. There are varying degrees of treatment planning that may be implemented in internal emitter therapy. As in chemotherapy, the information from a Phase 1 study may be used to treat patients based upon body surface area. If treatment planning is included on a patient-specific basis, a pretherapy, trace-labeled, administration of the radiopharmaceutical is generally required. The data collected following the tracer dose may range from time-activity curves of blood and whole-body for use in blood, marrow or total body absorbed dose estimation to patient imaging for three-dimensional internal emitter dosimetry. The most ambitious approach requires a three-dimensional set of images representing radionuclide distribution (SPECT or PET) and a corresponding set of images representing anatomy (CT or MRI). The absorbed dose (or dose-rate) distribution may be obtained by convolution of a point kernel with the radioactivity distribution or by direct Monte Carlo calculation. A critical requirement for both techniques is the development of an overall structure that makes it possible, in a routine manner, to input the images, to identify the structures of interest and to display the results of the dose calculations in a clinically relevant manner. 52 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Sequence diversity of hepatitis C virus: Implications for immune control and therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joerg Timm; Michael Roggendorf

    2007-01-01

    With approximately 3% of the world's population (170million people) infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV),the WHO has declared HCV a global health problem.Upon acute infection about 50%-80% of subjects develop chronic hepatitis with viral persistence being at risk to develop liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. One characteristic of HCV is its enormous sequence diversity, which represents a significant hurdle to the development of both effective vaccines as well as to novel therapeutic interventions. Due to a polymerase that lacks a proofreading function HCV presents with a high rate of evolution, which enables rapid adaptation to a new environment including an activated immune system upon acute infection. Similarly, novel drugs designed to specifically inhibit viral proteins will face the potential problem of rapid selection of drug resistance mutations. This review focuses on the sequence diversity of HCV, the driving forces of evolution and the impact on immune control and treatment response. An important feature of any therapeutic or prophylactic intervention will be an efficient attack of a structurally or functionally important region in the viral protein. The understanding of the driving forces, but also the limits of viral evolution,will be fundamental for the design of novel therapies.

  18. Role of histone deacetylases in pancreas: Implications for pathogenesis and therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eckhard; Klieser; Stefan; Swierczynski; Christian; Mayr; Johanna; Schmidt; Daniel; Neureiter; Tobias; Kiesslich; Romana; Illig

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, our knowledge of the pathogenesis in acute and chronic pancreatitis(AP/CP) as well as in pancreatic cancerogenesis has significantly diversified. Nevertheless, the medicinal therapeutic options are still limited and therapeutic success and patient outcome are poor. Epigenetic deregulation of gene expression is known to contribute to development and progression of AP and CP as well as of pancreatic cancer. Therefore, the selective inhibition of aberrantly active epigenetic regulators can be an effective option for future thera-pies. Histone deacetylases(HDACs) are enzymes that remove an acetyl group from histone tails, thereby causing chromatin compaction and repression of transcri-ption. In this review we present an overview of the currently available literature addressing the role of HDACs in the pancreas and in pancreatic diseases. In pancreatic cancerogenesis, HDACs play a role in the important process of epithelial-mesenchymal-transition, ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and, hypoxia-inducible-factor-1-angiogenesis. Finally, we focus on HDACs as potential therapeutic targets by summarizing currently available histone deacetylase inhibitors.

  19. Insertional oncogenesis by non-acute retroviruses: implications for gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hung; Johnson, Chassidy

    2011-04-01

    Retroviruses cause cancers in a variety of animals and humans. Research on retroviruses has provided important insights into mechanisms of oncogenesis in humans, including the discovery of viral oncogenes and cellular proto-oncogenes. The subject of this review is the mechanisms by which retroviruses that do not carry oncogenes (non-acute retroviruses) cause cancers. The common theme is that these tumors result from insertional activation of cellular proto-oncogenes by integration of viral DNA. Early research on insertional activation of proto-oncogenes in virus-induced tumors is reviewed. Research on non-acute retroviruses has led to the discovery of new proto-oncogenes through searches for common insertion sites (CISs) in virus-induced tumors. Cooperation between different proto-oncogenes in development of tumors has been elucidated through the study of retrovirus-induced tumors, and retroviral infection of genetically susceptible mice (retroviral tagging) has been used to identify cellular proto-oncogenes active in specific oncogenic pathways. The pace of proto-oncogene discovery has been accelerated by technical advances including PCR cloning of viral integration sites, the availability of the mouse genome sequence, and high throughput DNA sequencing. Insertional activation has proven to be a significant risk in gene therapy trials to correct genetic defects with retroviral vectors. Studies on non-acute retroviral oncogenesis provide insight into the potential risks, and the mechanisms of oncogenesis.

  20. Oleanolic Acid Alters Multiple Cell Signaling Pathways: Implication in Cancer Prevention and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žiberna, Lovro; Šamec, Dunja; Mocan, Andrei; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Bishayee, Anupam; Farooqi, Ammad Ahmad; Sureda, Antoni; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, much attention has been paid to diet and dietary supplements as a cost-effective therapeutic strategy for prevention and treatment of a myriad of chronic and degenerative diseases. Rapidly accumulating scientific evidence achieved through high-throughput technologies has greatly expanded the understanding about the multifaceted nature of cancer. Increasingly, it is being realized that deregulation of spatio-temporally controlled intracellular signaling cascades plays a contributory role in the onset and progression of cancer. Therefore, targeting regulators of oncogenic signaling cascades is essential to prevent and treat cancer. A plethora of preclinical and epidemiological evidences showed promising role of phytochemicals against several types of cancer. Oleanolic acid, a common pentacyclic triterpenoid, is mainly found in olive oil, as well as several plant species. It is a potent inhibitor of cellular inflammatory process and a well-known inducer of phase 2 xenobiotic biotransformation enzymes. Main molecular mechanisms underlying anticancer effects of oleanolic acid are mediated by caspases, 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2, matrix metalloproteinases, pro-apoptotic Bax and bid, phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase/Akt1/mechanistic target of rapamycin, reactive oxygen species/apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, nuclear factor-κB, cluster of differentiation 1, CKD4, s6k, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, as well as aforementioned signaling pathways . In this work, we critically review the scientific literature on the molecular targets of oleanolic acid implicated in the prevention and treatment of several types of cancer. We also discuss chemical aspects, natural sources, bioavailability, and safety of this bioactive phytochemical. PMID:28300756

  1. Macro-management of microRNAs in cell cycle progression of tumor cells and its implications in anti-cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin-hui LIANG; Xiang-huo HE

    2011-01-01

    The cell cycle,which is precisely controlled by a number of regulators,including cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs),is crucial for the life cycle of mammals.Cell cycle dysregulation is implicated in many diseases,including cancer.Recently,compelling evidence has been found that microRNAs play important roles in the regulation of cell cycle progression by modulating the expression of cyclins,CDKs and other cell cycle regulators.Herein,the recent findings on the regulation of the cell cycle by microRNAs are summarized,and the potential implications of miRNAs in anti-cancer therapies are discussed.

  2. Replicative Homeostasis III: implications for antiviral therapy and mechanisms of response and non-response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sallie Richard

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract While improved drug regimens have greatly enhanced outcomes for patients with chronic viral infection, antiviral therapy is still not ideal due to drug toxicities, treatment costs, primary drug failure and emergent resistance. New antiviral agents, alternative treatment strategies and a better understanding of viral pathobiology, host responses and drug action are desperately needed. Interferon (IFN and ribavirin, are effective drugs used to treat hepatitis C (HCV, but the mechanism(s of their action are uncertain. Error catastrophe (EC, or precipitous loss of replicative fitness caused by genomic mutation, is postulated to mediate ribavirin action, but is a deeply flawed hypothesis lacking empirical confirmation. Paradoxically ribavirin, a proven RNA mutagen, has no impact on HCV viraemia long term, suggesting real viruses, replicating in-vitro, as opposed to mathematical models, replicating in-silico, are likely to resist EC by highly selective replication of fit (~consensus sequence genomes mediated, in part, by replicative homeostasis (RH, an epicyclic mechanism that dynamically links RNApol fidelity and processivity and other viral protein functions. Replicative homeostasis provides a rational explanation for the various responses seen during treatment of HCV, including genotype-specific and viral load-dependent differential response rates, as well as otherwise unexplained phenomena like the transient inhibition and rebound of HCV viraemia seen during ribavirin monotherapy. Replicative homeostasis also suggests a primarily non-immunological mechanism that mediates increased immune responsiveness during treatment with ribavirin (and other nucleos(tide analogues, explicating the enhanced second-phase clearance of HCV ribavirin promotes and, thus, the apparent immunomodulatory action of ribavirin. More importantly, RH suggests specific new antiviral therapeutic strategies.

  3. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT): implications of neutron beam and boron compound characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, F J; Nigg, D W; Capala, J; Watkins, P R; Vroegindeweij, C; Auterinen, I; Seppälä, T; Bleuel, D

    1999-07-01

    The potential efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant glioma is a significant function of epithermal-neutron beam biophysical characteristics as well as boron compound biodistribution characteristics. Monte Carlo analyses were performed to evaluate the relative significance of these factors on theoretical tumor control using a standard model. The existing, well-characterized epithermal-neutron sources at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), the Petten High Flux Reactor (HFR), and the Finnish Research Reactor (FiR-1) were compared. Results for a realistic accelerator design by the E. O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL) are also compared. Also the characteristics of the compound p-Boronophenylaline Fructose (BPA-F) and a hypothetical next-generation compound were used in a comparison of the BMRR and a hypothetical improved reactor. All components of dose induced by an external epithermal-neutron beam fall off quite rapidly with depth in tissue. Delivery of dose to greater depths is limited by the healthy-tissue tolerance and a reduction in the hydrogen-recoil and incident gamma dose allow for longer irradiation and greater dose at a depth. Dose at depth can also be increased with a beam that has higher neutron energy (without too high a recoil dose) and a more forward peaked angular distribution. Of the existing facilities, the FiR-1 beam has the better quality (lower hydrogen-recoil and incident gamma dose) and a penetrating neutron spectrum and was found to deliver a higher value of Tumor Control Probability (TCP) than other existing beams at shallow depth. The greater forwardness and penetration of the HFR the FiR-1 at greater depths. The hypothetical reactor and accelerator beams outperform at both shallow and greater depths. In all cases, the hypothetical compound provides a significant improvement in efficacy but it is shown that the full benefit of improved compound is not realized until the neutron beam is fully

  4. Competition between Li+ and Mg2+ in metalloproteins. Implications for lithium therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudev, Todor; Lim, Carmay

    2011-06-22

    Lithium is used (in the form of soluble salts) to treat bipolar disorder and has been considered as a possible drug in treating chronic neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases. One of the proposed mechanisms of Li(+) action involves a competition between the alien Li(+) and native Mg(2+) for metal-binding sites and subsequent inhibition of key enzymes involved in specific neurotransmission pathways, but not vital Mg(2+) proteins in the cell. This raises the following intriguing questions: Why does Li(+) replace Mg(2+) only in enzymes involved in bipolar disorder, but not in Mg(2+) proteins essential to cells? In general, what factors allow monovalent Li(+) to displace divalent Mg(2+) in proteins? Specifically, how do the composition, overall charge, and solvent exposure of the metal-binding site as well as a metal-bound phosphate affect the selectivity of Li(+) over Mg(2+)? Among the many possible factors, we show that the competition between Mg(2+) and Li(+) depends on the net charge of the metal complex, which is determined by the numbers of metal cations and negatively charged ligands, as well as the relative solvent exposure of the metal cavity. The protein itself is found to select Mg(2+) over the monovalent Li(+) by providing a solvent-inaccessible Mg(2+)-binding site lined by negatively charged Asp/Glu, whereas the cell machinery was found to select Mg(2+) among other competing divalent cations in the cellular fluids such as Ca(2+) and Zn(2+) by maintaining a high concentration ratio of Mg(2+) to its biogenic competitor in various biological compartments. The calculations reveal why Li(+) replaces Mg(2+) only in enzymes that are known targets of Li(+) therapy, but not in Mg(2+) enzymes essential to cells, and also reveal features common to the former that differ from those in the latter proteins.

  5. Cinnamon ameliorates experimental allergic encephalomyelitis in mice via regulatory T cells: implications for multiple sclerosis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Susanta; Pahan, Kalipada

    2015-01-01

    Upregulation and/or maintenance of regulatory T cells (Tregs) during an autoimmune insult may have therapeutic efficacy in autoimmune diseases. Although several immunomodulatory drugs and molecules are available, most present significant side effects over long-term use. Cinnamon is a commonly used natural spice and flavoring material used for centuries throughout the world. Here, we have explored a novel use of cinnamon powder in protecting Tregs and treating the disease process of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS. Oral feeding of cinnamon (Cinnamonum verum) powder suppresses clinical symptoms of relapsing-remitting EAE in female PLP-TCR transgenic mice and adoptive transfer mouse model. Cinnamon also inhibited clinical symptoms of chronic EAE in male C57/BL6 mice. Dose-dependent study shows that cinnamon powder at a dose of 50 mg/kg body wt/d or higher significantly suppresses clinical symptoms of EAE in mice. Accordingly, oral administration of cinnamon also inhibited perivascular cuffing, maintained the integrity of blood-brain barrier and blood-spinal cord barrier, suppressed inflammation, normalized the expression of myelin genes, and blocked demyelination in the central nervous system of EAE mice. Interestingly, cinnamon treatment upregulated Tregs via reduction of nitric oxide production. Furthermore, we demonstrate that blocking of Tregs by neutralizing antibodies against CD25 abrogates cinnamon-mediated protection of EAE. Taken together, our results suggest that oral administration of cinnamon powder may be beneficial in MS patients and that no other existing anti-MS therapies could be so economical and trouble-free as this approach.

  6. Nrf2 is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer: implications for cell proliferation and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neoptolemos John P

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nrf2 is a key transcriptional regulator of a battery of genes that facilitate phase II/III drug metabolism and defence against oxidative stress. Nrf2 is largely regulated by Keap1, which directs Nrf2 for proteasomal degradation. The Nrf2/Keap1 system is dysregulated in lung, head and neck, and breast cancers and this affects cellular proliferation and response to therapy. Here, we have investigated the integrity of the Nrf2/Keap1 system in pancreatic cancer. Results Keap1, Nrf2 and the Nrf2 target genes AKR1c1 and GCLC were detected in a panel of five pancreatic cancer cell lines. Mutation analysis of NRF2 exon 2 and KEAP1 exons 2-6 in these cell lines identified no mutations in NRF2 and only synonomous mutations in KEAP1. RNAi depletion of Nrf2 caused a decrease in the proliferation of Suit-2, MiaPaca-2 and FAMPAC cells and enhanced sensitivity to gemcitabine (Suit-2, 5-flurouracil (FAMPAC, cisplatin (Suit-2 and FAMPAC and gamma radiation (Suit-2. The expression of Nrf2 and Keap1 was also analysed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (n = 66 and 57, respectively and matching normal benign epithelium (n = 21 cases. Whilst no significant correlation was seen between the expression levels of Keap1 and Nrf2 in the tumors, interestingly, Nrf2 staining was significantly greater in the cytoplasm of tumors compared to benign ducts (P Conclusions Expression of Nrf2 is up-regulated in pancreatic cancer cell lines and ductal adenocarcinomas. This may reflect a greater intrinsic capacity of these cells to respond to stress signals and resist chemotherapeutic interventions. Nrf2 also appears to support proliferation in certain pancreatic adenocarinomas. Therefore, strategies to pharmacologically manipulate the levels and/or activity of Nrf2 may have the potential to reduce pancreatic tumor growth, and increase sensitivity to therapeutics.

  7. Growth hormone improves growth retardation induced by rapamycin without blocking its antiproliferative and antiangiogenic effects on rat growth plate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Óscar Álvarez-García

    Full Text Available Rapamycin, an immunosuppressant agent used in renal transplantation with antitumoral properties, has been reported to impair longitudinal growth in young individuals. As growth hormone (GH can be used to treat growth retardation in transplanted children, we aimed this study to find out the effect of GH therapy in a model of young rat with growth retardation induced by rapamycin administration. Three groups of 4-week-old rats treated with vehicle (C, daily injections of rapamycin alone (RAPA or in combination with GH (RGH at pharmacological doses for 1 week were compared. GH treatment caused a 20% increase in both growth velocity and body length in RGH animals when compared with RAPA group. GH treatment did not increase circulating levels of insulin-like growth factor I, a systemic mediator of GH actions. Instead, GH promoted the maturation and hypertrophy of growth plate chondrocytes, an effect likely related to AKT and ERK1/2 mediated inactivation of GSK3β, increase of glycogen deposits and stabilization of β-catenin. Interestingly, GH did not interfere with the antiproliferative and antiangiogenic activities of rapamycin in the growth plate and did not cause changes in chondrocyte autophagy markers. In summary, these findings indicate that GH administration improves longitudinal growth in rapamycin-treated rats by specifically acting on the process of growth plate chondrocyte hypertrophy but not by counteracting the effects of rapamycin on proliferation and angiogenesis.

  8. Anti-angiogenic activity and antitumor efficacy of amphiphilic twin drug from ursolic acid and low molecular weight heparin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wenming; Zohra Dahmani, Fatima; Zhang, Juan; Xiong, Hui; Wu, Yuanyuan; Yin, Lifang; Zhou, Jianping; Yao, Jing

    2017-02-01

    Heparin, a potential blood anti-coagulant, is also known for its binding ability to several angiogenic factors through electrostatic interactions due to its polyanionic character. However, the clinical application of heparin for cancer treatment is limited by several drawbacks, such as unsatisfactory therapeutic effects and severe anticoagulant activity that could induce hemorrhaging. Herein, low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) was conjugated to ursolic acid (UA), which is also an angiogenesis inhibitor, by binding the amine group of aminoethyl-UA (UA-NH2) with the carboxylic groups of LMWH. The resulting LMWH-UA conjugate as an amphiphilic twin drug showed reduced anticoagulant activity and could also self-assemble into nanomicelles with a mean particle size ranging from 200-250 nm. An in vitro endothelial tubular formation assay and an in vivo Matrigel plug assay were performed to verify the anti-angiogenic potential of LMWH-UA. Meanwhile, the in vivo antitumor effect of LMWH-UA was also evaluated using a B16F10 mouse melanoma model. LMWH-UA nanomicelles were shown to inhibit angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the i.v. administration of LMWH-UA to the B16F10 tumor-bearing mice resulted in a significant inhibition of tumor growth as compared to the free drug solutions. These findings demonstrate the therapeutic potential of LMWH-UA as a new therapeutic remedy for cancer therapy.

  9. Proinflammatory cytokines induce bronchial hyperplasia and squamous metaplasia in smokers: implications for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herfs, Michael; Hubert, Pascale; Poirrier, Anne-Lise; Vandevenne, Patricia; Renoux, Virginie; Habraken, Yvette; Cataldo, Didier; Boniver, Jacques; Delvenne, Philippe

    2012-07-01

    Tracheobronchial squamous metaplasia is common in smokers, and is associated with both airway obstruction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and increased risk of lung cancer. Although this reversible epithelial replacement is almost always observed in association with chronic inflammation, the role of inflammatory mediators in the pathogenesis of squamous metaplasia remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the implication of cigarette smoke-mediated proinflammatory cytokine up-regulation in the development and treatment of tracheobronchial epithelial hyperplasia and squamous metaplasia. Using immunohistological techniques, we showed a higher epithelial expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6, as well as an activation of NF-κB and activator protein-1/mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways in the respiratory tract of smoking patients, compared with the normal ciliated epithelium of nonsmoking patients. In addition, we demonstrated that these signaling pathways strongly influence the proliferation and differentiation state of in vitro-generated normal human airway epithelial basal cells. Finally, we exposed mice to cigarette smoke for 16 weeks, and demonstrated that anti-TNF-α (etanercept), anti-IL-1β (anakinra), and/or anti-IL-6R (tocilizumab) therapies significantly reduced epithelial hyperplasia and the development of squamous metaplasia. These data highlight the importance of soluble inflammatory mediators in the pathogenesis of tracheobronchial squamous metaplasia. Therefore, the administration of proinflammatory cytokine antagonists may have clinical applications in the management of patients with COPD.

  10. PROCTITIS ONE WEEK AFTER STEREOTACTIC BODY RADIATION THERAPY FOR PROSTATE CANCER: IMPLICATIONS FOR CLINICAL TRIAL DESIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ima Paydar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Proctitis following prostate cancer radiation therapy is a primary determinant of quality of life (QOL. While previous studies have assessed acute rectal morbidity at 1 month after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT, little data exist on the prevalence and severity of rectal morbidity within the first week following treatment. This study reports the acute bowel morbidity one week following prostate SBRT. Materials and methods: Between May 2013 and August 2014, 103 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with 35 to 36.25 Gy in five fractions using robotic SBRT delivered on a prospective clinical trial. Bowel toxicity was graded using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 (CTCAEv.4. Bowel QOL was assessed using EPIC-26 questionnaire bowel domain at baseline, one week, one month, and three months. Time-dependent changes in bowel symptoms were statistically compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Clinically significant change was assessed by the minimally important difference (MID in EPIC score. This was defined as a change of one-half standard deviation (SD from the baseline score. Results: One hundred and three patients with a minimum of three months of follow-up were analyzed. The cumulative incidence of acute grade 2 GI toxicity was 23%. There were no acute ≥ grade 3 bowel toxicities. EPIC bowel summary scores maximally declined at 1 week after SBRT (-13.9, p<0.0001 before returning to baseline at three months after SBRT (+0.03, p=0.94. Prior to treatment, 4.9% of men reported that their bowel bother was a moderate to big problem. This increased to 28.4% (p<0.0001 one week after SBRT and returned to baseline at three months after SBRT (0.0%, p=0.66. Only the bowel summary and bowel bother score declines at 1 week met the MID threshold for clinically significant change. Conclusion: The rate and severity of acute proctitis following prostate SBRT peaked at one week after

  11. Some Issues on Gender and Renal Replacement Therapy in Kano State, Nigeria: Implications for Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuratu Muhammad

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The study examined some issues on Gender and renal replacement therapy (RRT in Kano state. Stratified sampling technique was used to select 46 males and 26 females from Aminu Kano teaching hospital (AKTH and Abdullah Wase or Nassarawa specialist hospital. Before embarking on data collection, ethical approval was sought and given by the ministry of health Kano state for Abdullah Wase hospital and the management of AKTH hospital. Data was derived primarily from the questionnaire administered to the selected samples, in addition hospital based records of patients were obtained from the dialysis unit of the two hospitals. The results of the study showed that both male and female patients delayed in RRT. However majority of the males and females delayed due to inadequate information(19% and(18% and lack of money(y25% and (18%for the male and female patients resulting from the low socio economic status of most of them as indicated in the tables on education and income of the respondents, Other factors that caused infrequent RRT included the long term nature of treatment (12% and (23%, tried out alternative treatment (19% and (18%males and females respectively. Some of the socio economic and psychological costs of RRT were found to include cut in social spending( 22% males and(15% females, increased expenditure on health (17% and( 19% ,frequent illness (22% and (31%, loss of job (4%males only ,decrease in number of hours put to work (30% and( 31% matrimonial problems ((4% and another ( 4%for the males and females respectively Based on the findings of this research it is recommended that government ad stakeholders need to redefine their priorities and place health matters as a top priority in all state matters as the saying goes a healthy nation is a wealthy nation. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso

  12. Extracorporeal blood oxygenation and ozonation: clinical and biological implications of ozone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paolo, N; Gaggiotti, E; Galli, F

    2005-01-01

    Some lines of evidence have suggested that the challenge to antioxidants and biomolecules provoked by pro-oxidants such as ozone may be used to generate a controlled stress response of possible therapeutic relevance in some immune dysfunctions and chronic, degenerative conditions. Immune and endothelial cells have been proposed to be elective targets of the positive molecular effects of ozone and its derived species formed during blood ozonation. On the bases of these underlying principles and against often prejudicial scepticism and concerns about its toxicity, ozone has been used in autohemotherapy (AHT) for four decades with encouraging results. However, clinical application and validation of AHT have been so far largely insufficient. Latterly, a new and more effective therapeutic approach to ozone therapy has been established, namely extracorporeal blood oxygenation and ozonation (EBOO). This technique, first tested in vitro and then in vivo in sheep and humans (more than 1200 treatments performed in 82 patients), is performed with a high-efficiency apparatus that makes it possible to treat with a mixture of oxygen-ozone (0.5-1 microg/ml oxygen) in 1 h of extracorporeal circulation up to 4800 ml of heparinized blood without technical or clinical problems, whereas only 250 ml of blood can be treated with ozone by AHT. The EBOO technique can be easily adapted for use in hemodialysis also. The standard therapeutic cycle lasts for 7 weeks in which 14 treatment sessions of 1 h are performed. After a session of EBOO, the interaction of ozone with blood components results in 4-5-fold increased levels of thiobarbituric acid reactants and a proportional decrease in plasma protein thiols without any appreciable erythrocyte haemolysis. On the basis of preliminary in vitro evidence, these simple laboratory parameters may represent a useful complement in the routine monitoring of biological compliance to the treatment. The clinical experience gained so far confirms the

  13. Treatment with Antiangiogenic Drugs in Multiple Lines in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.-D. Hofheinz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC, continuing antiangiogenic drugs beyond progression might provide clinical benefit. We synthesized the available evidence in a meta-analysis. Patients and Methods. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies investigating the use of antiangiogenic drugs beyond progression. Eligible studies were randomized phase II/III trials. Primary endpoints were overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS. Secondary endpoints were the impact of continuing antiangiogenic drugs (i in subgroups, (ii in different types of compounds targeting the VEGF-axis (monoclonal antibodies versus tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and (iii on remission rates and prevention of progression. Results. Eight studies (3,668 patients were included. Continuing antiangiogenic treatment beyond progression significantly improved PFS (HR 0.64; 95%-CI, 0.55–0.75 and OS (HR 0.83; 95%-CI, 0.76–0.89. PFS was significantly improved in all subgroups with comparable HR. OS was improved in all subgroups stratified by age, gender, and ECOG status. The rate of patients achieving at least stable disease was improved with an OR of 2.25 (95%-CI, 1.41–3.58. Conclusions. This analysis shows a significant PFS and OS benefit as well as a benefit regarding disease stabilization when using antiangiogenic drugs beyond progression in mCRC. Future studies should focus on the optimal sequence of administering antiangiogenic drugs.

  14. Treatment with Antiangiogenic Drugs in Multiple Lines in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubicka, S.; Falcone, A.; Burkholder, I.; Hacker, U. T.

    2016-01-01

    Background. In metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), continuing antiangiogenic drugs beyond progression might provide clinical benefit. We synthesized the available evidence in a meta-analysis. Patients and Methods. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies investigating the use of antiangiogenic drugs beyond progression. Eligible studies were randomized phase II/III trials. Primary endpoints were overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary endpoints were the impact of continuing antiangiogenic drugs (i) in subgroups, (ii) in different types of compounds targeting the VEGF-axis (monoclonal antibodies versus tyrosine kinase inhibitors), and (iii) on remission rates and prevention of progression. Results. Eight studies (3,668 patients) were included. Continuing antiangiogenic treatment beyond progression significantly improved PFS (HR 0.64; 95%-CI, 0.55–0.75) and OS (HR 0.83; 95%-CI, 0.76–0.89). PFS was significantly improved in all subgroups with comparable HR. OS was improved in all subgroups stratified by age, gender, and ECOG status. The rate of patients achieving at least stable disease was improved with an OR of 2.25 (95%-CI, 1.41–3.58). Conclusions. This analysis shows a significant PFS and OS benefit as well as a benefit regarding disease stabilization when using antiangiogenic drugs beyond progression in mCRC. Future studies should focus on the optimal sequence of administering antiangiogenic drugs. PMID:27656206

  15. Gene electrotransfer of plasmid antiangiogenic metargidin peptide (AMEP) in disseminated melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanggaard, Iben; Snoj, Marko; Cavalcanti, Andrea;

    2013-01-01

    Antiangiogenic metargidin peptide (AMEP) is a novel anticancer agent exerting antiproliferative and antiangiogenic effects by binding to αvβ3 and α5β1 integrins. Electrotransfer designates the use of electric pulses (electroporation) to transfer plasmid DNA into tissues. This first-in-man phase I...... study investigated safety and tolerability of intratumoral plasmid AMEP electrotransfer into cutaneous metastatic melanoma. Secondary objectives were efficacy and pharmacokinetics. Five patients with disseminated melanoma without further treatment options were treated at two dose levels (1 and 2 mg DNA...... lesions increased more than 20%. No response occurred in distant lesions. This first-in-man study on electrotransfer of plasmid AMEP into cutaneous melanoma shows that the procedure and drug are safe and that local transfection was obtained....

  16. Antiangiogenic activity of mononuclear copper(II) polypyridyl complexes for the treatment of cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagababu, Penumaka; Barui, Ayan Kumar; Thulasiram, Bathini; Devi, C Shobha; Satyanarayana, S; Patra, Chitta Ranjan; Sreedhar, Bojja

    2015-07-09

    A series of four new mononuclear copper(II) polypyridyl complexes (1-4) have been designed, developed, and thoroughly characterized by several physicochemical techniques. The CT-DNA binding properties of 1-4 have been investigated by absorption, emission spectroscopy, and viscosity measurements. All the complexes especially 1 and 4 exhibit cytotoxicity toward several cancer cell lines, suggesting their anticancer properties as observed by several in vitro assays. Additionally, the complexes show inhibition of endothelial cell (HUVECs) proliferation, indicating their antiangiogenic nature. In vivo chick embryo angiogenesis assay again confirms the antiangiogenic properties of 1 and 4. The formation of excessive intracellular ROS (H2O2 and O2(•-)) and upregulation of BAX induced by copper(II) complexes may be the plausible mechanisms behind their anticancer activities. The present study may offer a basis for the development of new transition metal complexes through suitable choice of ligands for cancer therapeutics by controlling tumor angiogenesis.

  17. Synthesis and biological evaluations of cytotoxic and antiangiogenic triterpenoids-jacaranone conjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Hua; Yue, Partick Y. K.; Wang, Shao Rong;

    2016-01-01

    , and structurally related triterpenoids with a cytotoxic semibenzoquinone, jacaranone. The cytotoxic, antiproliferative and antiangiogenic activities of segments and conjugates were determined. The possible targets of conjugates 6a-6h were predicted using Similarity Ensemble Approach (SEA). Results: The results...... with cytotoxic agents. The conjugation or hybridization of bifunctional molecules is one of the alternative rational design strategies for co-administration of anticancer drugs. Objective and Methods: The goal of this work is to prepare the conjugates of an antiangiogenic triterpene, 3-oxo oleanolic acid...... antiangiogenesis related targets could involve glycogen phosphorylase, neuraminidase, interferon gamma, and tubulin beta chain. Conclusion: The bifunctional conjugates could be useful as dual acting antitumor/antigiogenic agents....

  18. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Clinical Findings following Treatment with Antiangiogenic Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo Casaroli-Marano; Roberto Gallego-Pinazo; Clemencia Torrón Fernández-Blanco; Figueroa, Marta S.; Begoña Pina Marín; Gustavo Fernández-Baca Vaca; Antonio Piñero-Bustamante; Juan Donate López; José García-Arumí; Jordi Farrés Martí

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To survey the management of patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nvAMD) in Spain. Methods. An observational retrospective multicenter study was conducted. The variables analyzed were sociodemographic characteristics, foveal and macular thickness, visual acuity (VA), type of treatment, number of injections, and the initial administration of a loading dose of an antiangiogenic drug. Results. 208 patients were followed up during 23.4 months in average. During the ...

  19. Human RNASET2 derivatives as potential anti-angiogenic agents: actin binding sequence identification and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesiel-Nuttman, Liron; Doron, Shani; Schwartz, Betty; Shoseyov, Oded

    2015-01-01

    Human RNASET2 (hRNASET2) has been demonstrated to exert antiangiogenic and antitumorigenic effects independent of its ribonuclease capacity. We suggested that RNASET2 exerts its antiangiogenic and antitumorigenic activities via binding to actin and consequently inhibits cell motility. We focused herein on the identification of the actin binding site of hRNASET2 using defined sequences encountered within the whole hRNASET2 protein. For that purpose we designed 29 different hRNASET2-derived peptides. The 29 peptides were examined for their ability to bind immobilized actin. Two selected peptides-A103-Q159 consisting of 57 amino acids and peptide K108-K133 consisting of 26 amino acids were demonstrated to have the highest actin binding ability and concomitantly the most potent anti-angiogenic activity. Further analyses on the putative mechanisms associated with angiogenesis inhibition exerted by peptide K108-K133 involved its location during treatment within the HUVE cells. Peptide K108-K133 readily penetrates the cell membrane within 10 min of incubation. In addition, supplementation with angiogenin delays the entrance of peptide K108-K133 to the cell suggesting competition on the same cell internalization route. The peptide was demonstrated to co-localize with angiogenin, suggesting that both molecules bind analogous cellular epitopes, similar to our previously reported data for ACTIBIND and trT2-50. PMID:25815360

  20. Platycodin D inhibits tumor growth by antiangiogenic activity via blocking VEGFR2-mediated signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luan, Xin; Gao, Yun-Ge; Guan, Ying-Yun; Xu, Jian-Rong; Lu, Qin [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Zhao, Mei [Department of Pharmacy, Shanghai Institute of Health Sciences and Health School Attached to SJTU-SM, 279 Zhouzhu Road, Shanghai 201318 (China); Liu, Ya-Rong; Liu, Hai-Jun [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Fang, Chao, E-mail: fangchao100@hotmail.com [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen, Hong-Zhuan, E-mail: hongzhuan_chen@hotmail.com [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2014-11-15

    Platycodin D (PD) is an active component mainly isolated from the root of Platycodon grandiflorum. Recent studies proved that PD exhibited inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration, invasion and xenograft growth of diverse cancer cell lines. However, whether PD is suppressive for angiogenesis, an important hallmark in cancer development, remains unknown. Here, we found that PD could dose-dependently inhibit human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation, motility, migration and tube formation. PD also significantly inhibited angiogenesis in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Moreover, the antiangiogenic activity of PD contributed to its in vivo anticancer potency shown in the decreased microvessel density and delayed growth of HCT-15 xenograft in mice with no overt toxicity. Western blot analysis indicated that PD inhibited the phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and its downstream protein kinase including PLCγ1, JAK2, FAK, Src, and Akt in endothelial cells. Molecular docking simulation showed that PD formed hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions within the ATP binding pocket of VEGFR2 kinase domain. The present study firstly revealed the high antiangiogenic activity and the underlying molecular basis of PD, suggesting that PD may be a potential antiangiogenic agent for angiogenesis-related diseases. - Highlights: • Platycodin D inhibits HUVEC proliferation, motility, migration and tube formation. • Platycodin D inhibits the angiogenesis in chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane. • Platycodin D suppresses the angiogenesis and growth of HCT-15 xenograft in mice. • Platycodin D inhibits the phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and downstream kinases in HUVEC.

  1. Doxycycline down-regulates DNA-PK and radiosensitizes tumor initiating cells: Implications for more effective radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Rebecca; Fiorillo, Marco; Chadwick, Amy; Ozsvari, Bela; Reeves, Kimberly J; Smith, Duncan L; Clarke, Robert B; Howell, Sacha J; Cappello, Anna Rita; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Peiris-Pagès, Maria; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2015-06-10

    pharmacokinetics, with nearly 100% oral absorption and a long serum half-life (18-22 hours), at a standard dose of 200-mg per day. In further support of this idea, we show that doxycycline effectively inhibits the mammosphere-forming activity of primary breast cancer samples, derived from metastatic disease sites (pleural effusions or ascites fluid). Our results also have possible implications for the radio-therapy of brain tumors and/or brain metastases, as doxycycline is known to effectively cross the blood-brain barrier. Further studies will be needed to determine if other tetracycline family members also confer radio-sensitivity.

  2. Anti-angiogenic therapy in pediatric brain tumors : An effective strategy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sie, Mariska; den Dunnen, Wilfred F. A.; Hoving, Eelco W.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Brain tumors are still the leading cause of cancer morbidity and mortality among children, despite different therapeutic options including neurosurgery, chemotherapy and radiation. As angiogenesis is highly crucial in brain tumor growth and progression, numerous clinical trials evaluating diverse an

  3. Microvascular endothelial cell heterogeneity : general concepts and pharmacological consequences for anti-angiogenic therapy of cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langenkamp, Elise; Molema, Grietje

    2009-01-01

    Microvascular endothelial cells display a large degree of heterogeneity in function depending on their location in the vascular tree. The existence of organ-specific, microvascular-bed-specific, and even intravascular variations in endothelial cell gene expression emphasizes their high cell-to-cell

  4. Vessel co-option mediates resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy in liver metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frentzas, Sophia; Simoneau, Eve; Bridgeman, Victoria L; Vermeulen, Peter B; Foo, Shane; Kostaras, Eleftherios; Nathan, Mark R; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Gao, Zu-Hua; Shi, Yu; Van den Eynden, Gert; Daley, Frances; Peckitt, Clare; Tan, Xianming; Salman, Ayat; Lazaris, Anthoula; Gazinska, Patrycja; Berg, Tracy J; Eltahir, Zak; Ritsma, Laila; van Rheenen, Jacco; Khashper, Alla; Brown, Gina; Nyström, Hanna; Sund, Malin; Van Laere, Steven; Loyer, Evelyne; Dirix, Luc; Cunningham, David; Metrakos, Peter; Reynolds, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of angiogenesis inhibitors in cancer is limited by resistance mechanisms that are poorly understood. Notably, instead of through the induction of angiogenesis, tumor vascularization can occur through the nonangiogenic mechanism of vessel co-option. Here we show that vessel co-option is

  5. Irradiation-induced angiosarcoma and anti-angiogenic therapy: A therapeutic hope?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azzariti, Amalia, E-mail: a.azzariti@oncologico.bari.it [Clinical and Preclinical Pharmacology Laboratory, National Cancer Research Centre, Istituto Tumori Giovanni Paolo II, Viale O. Flacco, 65, 70124 Bari (Italy); Porcelli, Letizia [Clinical and Preclinical Pharmacology Laboratory, National Cancer Research Centre, Istituto Tumori Giovanni Paolo II, Viale O. Flacco, 65, 70124 Bari (Italy); Mangia, Anita; Saponaro, Concetta [Functional Biomorphology Laboratory, National Cancer Research Centre, Istituto Tumori Giovanni Paolo II, Viale O. Flacco, 65, 70124 Bari (Italy); Quatrale, Anna E. [Clinical and Preclinical Pharmacology Laboratory, National Cancer Research Centre, Istituto Tumori Giovanni Paolo II, Viale O. Flacco, 65, 70124 Bari (Italy); Popescu, Ondina S. [Department of Pathology, National Cancer Research Centre, Istituto Tumori Giovanni Paolo II, Viale O. Flacco, 65, 70124 Bari (Italy); Strippoli, Sabino [Medical Oncology Unit, National Cancer Research Centre, Istituto Tumori Giovanni Paolo II, Viale O. Flacco, 65, 70124 Bari (Italy); Simone, Gianni [Department of Pathology, National Cancer Research Centre, Istituto Tumori Giovanni Paolo II, Viale O. Flacco, 65, 70124 Bari (Italy); Paradiso, Angelo [Experimental Medical Oncology, National Cancer Research Centre, Istituto Tumori Giovanni Paolo II, Viale O. Flacco, 65, 70124 Bari (Italy); Guida, Michele [Medical Oncology Unit, National Cancer Research Centre, Istituto Tumori Giovanni Paolo II, Viale O. Flacco, 65, 70124 Bari (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    Angiosarcomas are rare soft-tissue sarcomas of endothelial cell origin. They can be sporadic or caused by therapeutic radiation, hence secondary breast angiosarcomas are an important subgroup of patients. Assessing the molecular biology of angiosarcomas and identify specific targets for treatment is challenging. There is currently great interest in the role of angiogenesis and of angiogenic factors associated with tumor pathogenesis and as targets for treatment of angiosarcomas. A primary cell line derived from a skin fragment of a irradiation-induced angiosarcoma patient was obtained and utilized to evaluate cell biomarkers CD31, CD34, HIF-1alpha and VEGFRs expression by immunocytochemistry and immunofluorescence, drugs cytotoxicity by cell counting and VEGF release by ELISA immunoassay. In addition to previous biomarkers, FVIII and VEGF were also evaluated on tumor specimens by immunohistochemistry to further confirm the diagnosis. We targeted the VEGF–VEGFR-2 axis of tumor angiogenesis with two different class of vascular targeted drugs; caprelsa, the VEGFR-2/EGFR/RET inhibitor and bevacizumab the anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody. We found the same biomarkers expression either in tumor specimens and in the cell line derived from tumor. In vitro experiments demonstrated that angiogenesis plays a pivotal role in the progression of this tumor as cells displayed high level of VEGFR-2, HIF-1 alpha strongly accumulated into the nucleus and the pro-angiogenic factor VEGF was released by cells in culture medium. The evaluation of caprelsa and bevacizumab cytotoxicity demonstrated that both drugs were effective in inhibiting tumor proliferation. Due to these results, we started to treat the patient with pazopanib, which was the unique tyrosine kinase inhibitor available in Italy through a compassionate supply program, obtaining a long lasting partial response. Our data suggest that the study of the primary cell line could help physicians in choosing a therapeutic approach for patient that almost in vitro shows chances of success and that the anti-angiogenetic agents are a reliable therapeutic opportunity for angiosarcomas patients. - Highlights: • Characterization of a new AS cell line for VEGFR-2, HIF-1 alpha and VEGF. • Caprelsa and bevacizumab inhibit AS cells proliferation. • Anti-angiogenetic agents as a reliable therapeutic opportunity for AS patients.

  6. Integrating Molecular Imaging Approaches to Monitor Prostate Targeted Suicide and Anti-angiogenic Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-02-01

    clinical trials. The ad- vantages of using adenovirus are severalfold: (1) ease of ge- netic manipulation ( Chartier et al., 1996; Kanerva et al...located upstream of an immediate early gene of human cytomegalovirus. Cell 41, 521–530. CHARTIER , C., DEGRYSE, E., GANTZER, M., DIETERLE, A., PAVIRANI, A...Hemminki, A., Belousova, N., Zinn, K.R., Liu, B., Wang, M., Chaudhuri, T.R., Rogers , B.E., Buchsbaum, D.J., Siegal, G.P., Barnes, M.N., Go- mez-Navarro

  7. Halting angiogenesis by non-viral somatic gene therapy alleviates psoriasis and murine psoriasiform skin lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibert, John Robert; Wallbrecht, Katrin; Schön, Margarete

    2011-01-01

    with epidermal expression of human TGF-ß1, we have demonstrated that antiangiogenic non-viral somatic gene therapy reduces the cutaneous microvasculature and alleviates chronic inflammatory skin disorders. Transient muscular expression of the recombinant disintegrin domain (RDD) of metargidin (also known as ADAM...... in all models. Thus, non-viral antiangiogenic gene therapy can alleviate psoriasis and may do so in other angiogenesis-related inflammatory skin disorders.......-15) by in vivo electroporation reduced cutaneous angiogenesis and vascularization in all 3 models. As demonstrated using red fluorescent protein-coupled RDD, the treatment resulted in muscular expression of the gene product and its deposition within the cutaneous hyperangiogenic connective tissue...

  8. Screening of antiangiogenic potential of twenty two marine invertebrate extracts of phylum Mollusca from South East Coast of India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pankaj Gupta; Muthuvel Arumugam; Raj Vardhan Azad; Rohit Saxena; Supriyo Ghose; Nihar Ranjan Biswas; Thirumurthy Velpandian

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antiangiogenic potential of twenty two marine invertebrate species of Phylum Mollusca from south east coast of India.Methods:Live specimens of molluscan species were collected and their methanolic extracts were evaluated for preliminary antiangiogenic activity using the in ovo chick chorio-allantoic membrane assay. The extracts were further evaluated for in vivo antiangiogenic activity using chemical cautery induced corneal neovascularization assay in rats and oxygen induced retinopathy assay in rat pups.Results:In the chick chorio-allantoic membrane assay, four methanolic extracts of marine molluscan species viz. Meretrix meretrix, Meretrix casta, Telescopium telescopium and Bursacrumena methanolic extracts exhibited noticeable antiangiogenic activity at the tested concentration of 200 µg whereby they significantly inhibited the VEGF induced proliferation of new blood vessels. Among these four extracts, the methanolic extract of Meretrix casta exhibited relatively higher degree of antiangiogenic activity with an inhibitiory percentage (64.63%) of the VEGF induced neovascularization followed by the methanolic extracts of Telescopium telescopium (62.02%), Bursa crumena (60.48%) and Meretrix meretrix (47.01%). These four methanolic extracts were further evaluated for in vivo antiangiogenic activity whereby the methanolic extract of Telescopium telescopium exhibited most noticeable inhibition (42.58%) of the corneal neovascularization in rats in comparison to the sham treated group, and also exhibited most noticeable inhibition (31.31%) of the oxygen induced retinal neovascularization in rat pups in comparison to the hyperoxia group that was observed for considerable retinal neovascularization.Conclusions:The significant antiangiogenic activity evinced by the extract of Telescopium telescopium merits further investigation for ocular neovascular diseases.

  9. Axitinib Has Antiangiogenic and Antitumorigenic Activity in Myxoid Liposarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoghue, Jacqueline F.; Wilding, Alexander L.

    2016-01-01

    Myxoid liposarcoma is a rare form of soft-tissue sarcoma. Although most patients initially respond well to treatment, approximately 21% relapse, highlighting the need for alternative treatments. To identify novel treatment regimens and gain a better understanding of myxoid liposarcoma tumor biology, we screened various candidate and approved targeted therapeutics and chemotherapeutics against myxoid liposarcoma cell lines. Therapeutics that target angiogenesis showed antitumor activity. The small molecule inhibitor axitinib, which targets angiogenesis by inhibiting the VEGFR and PDGFR families and c-Kit, inhibited cell cycle progression and induced apoptosis in vitro, as well as having significant antitumor activity against MLS 1765 myxoid liposarcoma xenografts in mice. Axitinib also displayed synergistic antitumor activity in vitro when combined with the potassium channel ionophore salinomycin or the BH3 mimetic ABT-737. Another angiogenesis-targeting therapeutic, 4EGI-1, which targets the oncoprotein eIF4E, significantly decreased angiogenic ligand expression by myxoid liposarcoma cells and reduced tumor cell growth. To verify this oncogenic addiction to angiogenic pathways, we utilized VEGFR-derived ligand traps and found that autocrine VEGFR signaling was crucial to myxoid liposarcoma cell survival. Overall, these findings suggest that autocrine angiogenic signaling through the VEGFR family is critical to myxoid liposarcoma cell survival and that further study of axitinib as a potential anticancer therapy is warranted. PMID:27822137

  10. Axitinib Has Antiangiogenic and Antitumorigenic Activity in Myxoid Liposarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren T. Kerr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Myxoid liposarcoma is a rare form of soft-tissue sarcoma. Although most patients initially respond well to treatment, approximately 21% relapse, highlighting the need for alternative treatments. To identify novel treatment regimens and gain a better understanding of myxoid liposarcoma tumor biology, we screened various candidate and approved targeted therapeutics and chemotherapeutics against myxoid liposarcoma cell lines. Therapeutics that target angiogenesis showed antitumor activity. The small molecule inhibitor axitinib, which targets angiogenesis by inhibiting the VEGFR and PDGFR families and c-Kit, inhibited cell cycle progression and induced apoptosis in vitro, as well as having significant antitumor activity against MLS 1765 myxoid liposarcoma xenografts in mice. Axitinib also displayed synergistic antitumor activity in vitro when combined with the potassium channel ionophore salinomycin or the BH3 mimetic ABT-737. Another angiogenesis-targeting therapeutic, 4EGI-1, which targets the oncoprotein eIF4E, significantly decreased angiogenic ligand expression by myxoid liposarcoma cells and reduced tumor cell growth. To verify this oncogenic addiction to angiogenic pathways, we utilized VEGFR-derived ligand traps and found that autocrine VEGFR signaling was crucial to myxoid liposarcoma cell survival. Overall, these findings suggest that autocrine angiogenic signaling through the VEGFR family is critical to myxoid liposarcoma cell survival and that further study of axitinib as a potential anticancer therapy is warranted.

  11. Anti-angiogenic Factors and Preeclampsia%抗血管生成因子与子痫前期

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王盼盼

    2011-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a major cause of maternal and fetal morbidity in the world.Although the etiology of preeclampsia is still unclear, the clinical phenotypes of preeclampsia have been demonstrated to be related to high circulating levels of anti-angiogenic proteins secreted by the placenta such as soluble Fms-like tyrosine kinase 1( sFlt1 )and soluble endoglin( sEng ).Alterations in circulating sFlt1 and sEng precede the onset of clinical disease, thereby provide new strategies for screening, early detection, diagnosis and future therapy of preeclampsia.%子痫前期是导致全球孕产妇和围生儿发病和死亡的主要原因之一.子痫前期的病因至今尚未明确,但是其临床表现已证实与血循环中高水平的抗血管生成因子有关,这些抗血管生成因子是由胎盘产生的,包括可溶性血管内皮生长因子受体1(sFlt1)、可溶性Endoglin(sEng)等.血循环中sFlt1、sEng等抗血管生成因子的水平在临床症状出现前即已改变,为子痫前期的筛选、预测、诊断、治疗提供了新的思路.

  12. The evaluation of anti-angiogenic treatment effects for implanted rabbit VX2 breast tumors using functional multi-slice spiral computed tomography (f-MSCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei Zhen, E-mail: leizhen2004@163.com [Department of Anatomy, Chinese Medical University, No. 92, Beiermalu Road, Heping District, Shenyang, 110001 (China) and Department of Radiology, The First Hospital of Liaoning Medical College, No. 2, Wuduan, Renmin Street, Jinzhou, 121001 (China); Ma Heji, E-mail: maheji9831@sina.com [Department of Radiology, The First Hospital of Liaoning Medical College, No. 2, Wuduan, Renmin Street, Jinzhou, 121001 (China); Xu Na, E-mail: xuna821230@sohu.com [Department of Radiology, The First Hospital of Liaoning Medical College, No. 2, Wuduan, Renmin Street, Jinzhou, 121001 (China); Xi Huanjiu, E-mail: xihuanjiu2004@yahoo.cn [Anthropology Institute, Liaoning Medical College, No. 40, Sanduan, Songpo Rd, Jinzhou, 121001 (China)

    2011-05-15

    Objective: Investigate the benefit of functional multi-slice spiral computed tomography (f-MSCT) perfusion imaging in the non-invasive assessment of targeted anti-angiogenesis therapy on an implanted rabbit VX2 breast tumor model. Method: 69 female pure New Zealand white rabbits were randomly assigned to one of the 4 groups and received treatment accordingly: control (saline), Endostar, neoadjuvant chemotherapy (Cyclophosphamide, Epirubicin and 5-Fluorouracil, CEF), combination therapy (Endostar and CEF). After 2 weeks of treatment, f-MSCT perfusion scannings were performed for all rabbits and information about blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT) and surface permeability (SP) was collected. After perfusion imaging, tumor tissues were sampled for immunohistochemistry and the Western blot test of VEGF protein expression. Results: (1) The VEGF expression level, measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blot, decreased by treatment group (control > Endostar > CEF > combination therapy). The same was true for the mean BF, BV, MTT and PS, which decreased from the control group to the combination therapy group gradually. The mean MTT level increased in reverse order from the control to the combination therapy group. The difference between any 2 groups on these measures was statistically significant (P < 0.05). (2) There was moderate positive correlation between VEGF expression and BE, BV, or PS level (P < 0.05) and a negative correlation between VEGF expression and MTT level for all 4 groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Therefore, f-MSCT can be used as a non-invasive approach to evaluate the effect of anti-angiogenic therapy for implanted rabbit VX2 breast tumors.

  13. High antiangiogenic and low anticoagulant efficacy of orally active low molecular weight heparin derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Woo; Jeon, Ok Cheol; Kim, Sang Kyoon; Al-Hilal, Taslim Ahmed; Jin, Shun Ji; Moon, Hyun Tae; Yang, Victor C; Kim, Sang Yoon; Byun, Youngro

    2010-12-20

    Heparin, an anticoagulant that is widely used clinically, is also known to bind to several kinds of proteins through electrostatic interactions because of its polyanionic character. These interactions are mediated by the physicochemical properties of heparin such as sequence composition, sulfation patterns, charge distribution, overall charge density, and molecular size. Although this electrostatic character mediates its binding to many proteins related with tumor progression, thereby providing its antiangiogenic property, the administration of heparin for treating cancer is limited in clinical applications due to several drawbacks, such as its low oral absorption, unsatisfactory therapeutic effects, and strong anticoagulant activity which induces hemorrhaging. Here, we evaluated novel, orally active, low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) derivatives (LHD) conjugated with deoxycholic acid (DOCA) that show reduced anticoagulant activity and enhanced antiangiogenic activity. The chemical conjugate of LMWH and DOCA was synthesized by conjugating the amine group of N-deoxycholylethylamine (EtDOCA) with the carboxylic groups of heparin at various DOCA conjugation ratios. The LMWH-DOCA conjugate series (LHD1, LHD1.5, LHD2, and LHD4) were further formulated with poloxamer 407 as a solubilizer for oral administration. An in vitro endothelial tubular formation and in vivo Matrigel plug assay were performed to verify the antiangiogenic potential of LHD. Finally, we evaluated tumor growth inhibition of oral LHD administration in a SCC7 model as well as in A549 human cancer cell lines in a mouse xenograft model. Increasing DOCA conjugation ratios showed decreased anticoagulant activity, eventually to zero. LHD could block angiogenesis in the tubular formation assay and the Matrigel plug assay. In particular, oral administration of LHD4, which has 4 molecules of DOCA per mole of LMWH, inhibited tumor growth in SCC7 mice model as well as A549 mice xenograft model. LHD4 was orally

  14. Evaluation of antiangiogenic and antiproliferative potential of the organic extract of green algae chlorella pyrenoidosa

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    Mahender Kyadari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: algae isolates obtained from fresh and marine resources could be one of the richest sources of novel bioactive secondary metabolites expected to have pharmaceutical significance for new drug development. This study was conducted to evaluate the antiangiogenic and antiproliferative activity of Chlorella pyrenoidosa in experimental models of angiogenesis and by MTT assay. Materials and Methods: lyophilized extract of C. pyrenoidosa was extracted using dichloromethane/methanol (2:1, concentrated and vacuum evaporated to obtain the dried extract. The crude extract was evaluated in the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-induced angiogenesis in in ovo chick chorioallantoic membrane assay (CAM at various concentrations (n = 8 using thalidomide and normal saline as positive and untreated control groups, respectively. The crude extract was also subjected to the antiangiogenic activity in the silver nitrate/potassium nitrate cautery model of corneal neovascularization (CN in rats where topical bevacizumab was used as a positive control. The vasculature was photographed and blood vessel density was quantified using Aphelion imaging software. The extract was also evaluated for its anti proliferative activity by microculture tetrazolium test (MTT assay using HeLa cancer cell line (ATCC. Results: VEGF increased the blood vessel density by 220% as compared to normal and thalidomide treatment decreased it to 67.2% in in ovo assay. In the in-vivo CN model, the mean neovascular density in the control group, the C. pyrenoidosa extract and bevacizumab group were found to be 100%, 59.02%, and 32.20%, respectively. The Chlorella pyrenoidosa extract negatively affected the viability of HeLa cells. An IC 50 value of the extract was 570 μg/ml, respectively. Conclusion: a significant antiangiogenic activity was observed against VEGF-induced neovascularization and antiproliferative activity by MTT assay. In this study, it could be attributed that the

  15. Toward an integrative understanding of narrative and emotion processes in Emotion-focused therapy of depression: implications for theory, research and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Lynne

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the fundamental contributions of client narrative disclosure in psychotherapy and its importance for the elaboration of new emotional meanings and self understanding in the context of Emotion-focused therapy (EFT) of depression. An overview of the multi-methodological steps undertaken to empirically investigate the contributions of client story telling, emotional differentiation and meaning-making processes (Narrative Processes Coding System; Angus et al., 1999) in EFT treatments of depression is provided, followed by a summary of key research findings that informed the development of a narrative-informed approach to Emotion-focused therapy of depression (Angus & Greenberg, 2011). Finally, the clinical practice and training implications of adopting a research-informed approach to working with narrative and emotion processes in EFT are described, and future research directions discussed.

  16. Resveratrol and related stilbenes: their anti-aging and anti-angiogenic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasiotis, Konstantinos M; Pratsinis, Harris; Kletsas, Dimitris; Haroutounian, Serkos A

    2013-11-01

    Dietary stilbenes comprise a class of natural compounds that display significant biological activities of medicinal interest. Among them, their antioxidant, anti-aging and anti-angiogenesic properties are well established and subjects of numerous research endeavors. This mini-review aspires to account and present the literature reports published on research concerning various natural and synthetic stilbenes, such as trans-resveratrol. Special focus was given to most recent research findings, while the mechanisms underlying their anti-aging and anti-angiogenic effects as well as the respective signaling pathways involved were also presented and discussed.

  17. Roles of main pro-and anti-angiogenic factors in tumor angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi Huang; Shi-Deng Bao

    2004-01-01

    Tumor growth without size restriction depends on vascular supply. The ability of tumor to induce new blood-vessel formation has been a major focus of cancer research over the past decade. It is now known that members of the vascular endothelial growth factor and angiopoietin families,mainly secreted by tumor cells, induce tumor angiogenesis,whereas other endogenous angiogenic inhibitors, including thrombospondin-1 and angiostatin, keep tumor in dormancy.Experimental and clinical evidence has suggested that the process of tumor metastasis depends on angiogenesis or lymphangiogenesis. This article summarizes the recent research progress for some basic pro- or anti-angiogenic factors in tumor angiogenesis.

  18. Antitumor and anti-angiogenic activity of Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides peptide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi-zhen CAO; Zhi-bin LIN

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the antitumor and anti-angiogenic activity of Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides peptide (GLPP). METHODS: Antitumor effect of GLPP was observed in tumor-bearing mice in vivo. At the same time,the effects of GLPP on proliferation of tumor cells and human umbilical cord vascular endothelial cell (HUVEC)were detected by MTT assay in vitro. Subsequently, spleen lymphocytes proliferation of nude mice was stimulated by LPS or ConA. To investigate the anti-angiogenic effect of GLPP, GLPP 80 μg per disc and GLPP-treated serum 10 μL per disc were added to the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) respectively in vivo. RESULTS: GLPP 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg inhibited growth of Sarcoma 180 in BALB/c mice markedly by 35.2 %, 45.2%, and 61.9%,respectively. GLPP which was directly added to the cultured medium did not inhibit PG cell proliferation in vitro;but GLPP-treated serum 50, 100, 200 mg/kg potently inhibited PG cell proliferation by 22.5%, 26.8%, and 30.3 %,respectively; and reduced the xenograft (human lung carcinoma cell PG) in BALB/c nude mice greatly in vivo by 55.5 %, 46.0 %, and 46.8 %, respectively. Lymphocytes proliferation of nude mice could be stimulated by LPS 5 mg/L but not by ConA 2.5 mg/L, indicating that GLPP could not promote the T lymphocyte proliferation and neutral red phagocytosis of peritoneal macrophages of nude mice. The CAM assay showed that GLPP and GLPP-treated serum had anti-angiogenic effect. GLPP (1, 10, and 100 mg/L) inhibited HUVEC proliferation in vitro with the inhibitory rate of 9.4 %, 15.6%, and 40.4%, respectively. CONCLUSION: GLPP has antitumor and antiangiogenic activity. The anti-angiogenesis of GLPP may be a new mechanism underlying its anti-tumor effects.

  19. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel indolocarbazoles with anti-angiogenic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acero, Nuria; Braña, Miguel F; Añorbe, Loreto; Domínguez, Gema; Muñoz-Mingarro, Dolores; Mitjans, Francesc; Piulats, Jaume

    2012-02-01

    A novel series of indolocarbazoles were synthesized and their antiproliferative activity against HUVEC, LoVo, DLD-1 and ST-486 cell lines, was investigated. Those staurosporine analogs in which a substituted dimethylaminoalkoxy chain was attached to the indolic nitrogen showed interesting activity and selectivity with respect to HUVEC proliferation. The effect on capillary tube formation in 3-dimensional matrigel matrix was studied using the most active compounds. Evaluation of their in vivo anti-angiogenic activity in a murine Lewis lung cancer model was also analyzed.

  20. Is anti-platelet therapy interruption a real clinical issue? Its implications in dentistry and particularly in periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, A Jaya; Kumari, M Meena; Arora, Nupur; Haritha, A

    2009-09-01

    The use of anti-platelet therapy has reduced the mortality and morbidity of cardiovascular disease remarkably. A considerable number of patients presenting before a dentist or periodontist give a history of anti-platelet therapy. A clinical dilemma whether to discontinue the anti-platelet therapy or continue the same always confronts the practitioner. Diverse opinions exist regarding the management of such patients. While one group of researchers advise continuation of anti-platelet therapy rather than invite remote, but possible, thromboembolic events, another group encourages discontinuation for variable periods. This study aims at reviewing the current rationale of anti-platelet therapy and the various options available to a clinician, with regard to the management of a patient under anti-platelet therapy. Current recommendations and consensus favour no discontinuation of anti-platelet therapy. This recommendation, however, comes with a rider to use caution and consider other mitigating factors as well. With a large number of patients giving a history of anti-platelet therapy, the topic is of interest and helps a clinician to arrive at a decision.

  1. Is anti-platelet therapy interruption a real clinical issue? Its implications in dentistry and particularly in periodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of anti-platelet therapy has reduced the mortality and morbidity of cardiovascular disease remarkably. A considerable number of patients presenting before a dentist or periodontist give a history of anti-platelet therapy. A clinical dilemma whether to discontinue the anti-platelet therapy or continue the same always confronts the practitioner. Diverse opinions exist regarding the management of such patients. While one group of researchers advise continuation of anti-platelet therapy rather than invite remote, but possible, thromboembolic events, another group encourages discontinuation for variable periods. This study aims at reviewing the current rationale of anti-platelet therapy and the various options available to a clinician, with regard to the management of a patient under anti-platelet therapy. Current recommendations and consensus favour no discontinuation of anti-platelet therapy. This recommendation, however, comes with a rider to use caution and consider other mitigating factors as well. With a large number of patients giving a history of anti-platelet therapy, the topic is of interest and helps a clinician to arrive at a decision.

  2. Ellagic Acid, the Active Compound of Phyllanthus urinaria, Exerts In Vivo Anti-Angiogenic Effect and Inhibits MMP-2 Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Teng Huang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess the potential anti-angiogenic mechanism of Phyllanthus urinaria (P. urinaria and characterize the major compound in P. urinaria that exerts anti-angiogenic effect. The water extract of P. urinaria and Ellagic Acid were used to evaluate the anti-angiogenic effect in chorioallantoic membrane (CAM in chicken embryo and human vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs. The matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 activity was determined by gelatin zymography. The mRNA expressions of MMP-2, MMP-14 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2 were analyzed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Level of MMP-2 proteins in conditioned medium or cytosol was determined by western blot analysis. We confirmed that P. urinaria's in vivo anti-angiogenic effect was associated with a reduction in MMP-2 activity. Ellagic acid, one of the major polyphenolic components as identified in P. urinaria by high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS, exhibited the same anti-angiogenic effect in vivo. Both P. urinaria and Ellagic Acid inhibited MMP-2 activity in HUVECs with unchanged mRNA level. The mRNA expression levels of MMP-14 and TIMP-2 were not altered either. Results from comparing the change of MMP-2 protein levels in conditioned medium and cytosol of HUVECs after the P. urinaria or Ellagic Acid treatment revealed an inhibitory effect on the secretion of MMP-2 protein. This study concluded that Ellagic Acid is the active compound in P. urinaria to exhibit anti-angiogenic activity and to inhibit the secretion of MMP-2 protein from HUVECs.

  3. Treatment for recurrent medulloblastoma with intrathecal liposomal cytarabine and systemic metronomic combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygaard, Randi; Kivivuori, Sanna-Maria

    2012-03-01

    The prognosis of recurrent medulloblastoma is dismal, with a median survival of less than 1 year. Our patient was initially diagnosed with high-risk medulloblastoma when he was 14 years old. He had a recurrence 18 months after the end of therapy. Recurrence treatment consisted of 13 intrathecal applications of liposomal cytarabine over an 18-month period, and oral metronomic antiangiogenic therapy with thalidomide, celecoxib, and etoposide. Side effects from the intrathecal treatment were most likely related to arachnoiditis despite prolonged prophylaxis with steroids. He also developed partial hearing loss. Neutropenia was the main side effect of the metronomic therapy. He remains alive, with a good quality of life and without evidence of disease 34 months from the start of recurrence therapy. This combination of local antineoplastic and systemic antiangiogenic therapy seems to be promising for recurrent medulloblastoma. However, more patients and standardized protocols are needed to verify the benefit of this combination therapy and to define the correct duration of treatment.

  4. Relaxation training as complementary therapy for mild hypertension control and the implications of evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, P; French, P; Leung, B

    2001-05-01

    Relaxation therapy for the treatment of hypertension presented a number of challenges, in terms of conducting and using research as well as gaining the wider acceptance of this complementary therapy in common practice in Hong Kong. Two issues were central to the current implementation of complementary therapies: the evidence-based practice movement and the management of risk during the implementation of new therapies. A major concern was how to maximize the chance of inclusion of research on complementary therapies in evidence-based practice systematic reviews. This was thought to be achievable by making the data amenable to meta-analysis when small samples may be unavoidable. The empirical work examined the effects of three relaxation therapies for the reduction of high blood pressure in nine Chinese subjects. Subjects were randomly assigned to three groups: (a) progressive muscle relaxation, (b) stretch release relaxation and (c) cognitive imagery relaxation. Systolic, diastolic blood pressure and heart rate were assessed in a baseline session, the 8th post-treatment session, and a 30-days follow-up session. Datawere analyzed using ANOVA and Paired sample t-test. One-Sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov Tests for the normal distribution were performed among the three groups. The results verified that the normality assumption for the data had not been violated. Results revealed that in the context of the study all relaxation therapies can reduce blood pressure in Chinese subjects, but stretch release relaxation and progressive muscle relaxation therapies appeared to be more effective in lowering blood pressure compared to cognitive imagery relaxation. These data are in a form available for meta-analysis at a later date. The study also shows a degree of clinical significance and validation with respect to a Hong Kong population. It demonstrates ways in which the inclusion of research on complementary therapies in systematic reviews can be maximized.

  5. Severe acute respiratory syndrome, a pathological immune response to the new coronavirus--implications for understanding of pathogenesis, therapy, design of vaccines, and epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo, Jesus F; Muñoz-Fernandez, M Angeles

    2004-01-01

    Findings coming from autopsies and serum of SARS patients suggest an important immune-inflammatory implication in the evolution to respiratory distress. Conditions such as HIV infection or treatment with immunosuppressors (in cancer or autoimmune diseases) are not among the bad prognosis factors for development of distress. To date, there have been no reported case fatalities in children, probably due to their more immature immune system. Our conclusions follow: (1) The milder form of SARS in children and the apparent protective factor that immunosupression represent rules out a significant viral cytopathic effect (they would be the most affected). (2) The evidence for immune implication in distress strongly supports immunomodulators for therapy: phosphodiesterase inhibitors (due to their down-modulating activity on proinflammatory cytokines); inhaled corticoids (aimed at producing a local immunomodulation); teophylline or nedocromil sodium (which prevents inflammatory cell recruitment into the airway wall). (3) An early immunomodulatory therapy, based on the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and clinical parameters to evaluate the respiratory function such as arterial oxygen saturation, could prevent the occurrence of distress. (4) Vaccine design should consider the immune origin of distress. (5) Physicians should be aware of mildly symptomatic patients (children, immuno-compromised hosts) to avoid transmission to immunocompetent adults.

  6. Apoptotic and anti-angiogenic effects of Salvia triloba extract in prostate cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmaca, Harika; Bozkurt, Emir

    2016-03-01

    Plants, due to their remarkable composition, are considered as natural resources of bioactive compounds with specific biological activities. Salvia genus (Lamiaceae) has been used around the world in complementary medicine since ancient times. We investigated the cytotoxic, apoptotic and anti-angiogenic effects of methanolic Salvia triloba extract (STE) in prostate cancer cells. Cell viability was evaluated by XTT; apoptosis was investigated by DNA fragmentation and caspase 3/7 activity assays. Changes in the angiogenic cytokine levels were investigated by human angiogenesis antibody array. Scratch assay was used to determine the cell motility. STE induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner in both cancer cells; however, it was not cytotoxic to normal cells. Cell motility was reduced in PC-3, DU-145 and HUVEC cells by STE treatment. ANG, ENA-78, bFGF, EGF, IGF-1 and VEGF-D levels were significantly decreased by -2.9, -3.7, -1.7, -1.7, -2.0 and -1.8 fold in STE-treated DU-145 cells, however, ANG, IL-8, LEP, RANTES, TIMP-1, TIMP-2 and VEGF levels were significantly decreased by -5.1, -2.0, -2.4, -3.1, -1.5, -2.0 and -2.5 fold in PC-3 cells. These data suggest that STE might be a promising candidate for anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic treatment of prostate cancer.

  7. Antitumor and antiangiogenic activity of Schisandra chinensis polysaccharide in a renal cell carcinoma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Hai-Ming; Liu, Shi-Jian; Zhang, Chun-Ying

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the antitumor and antiangiogenic effects of the Schisandra chinensis polysaccharides (SCP) in selected renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells and evaluate its potential mechanism of action. In vitro, endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion by Caki-1 was blockaded in response to SCP treatment for 48h. In vivo, a significant tumor growth inhibition effect was observed after SCP administration for 4 weeks. Moreover, SCP treatment decreased the level of VEGF, CD31 and CD34 in RCC tumor tissues. Further analysis of the tumor inhibition mechanism indicated that the number of apoptotic tumor cells increased significantly; the expression of Bax and p53 increased; and the expression of Bcl-2 decreased dramatically in transplanted tumor tissues following SCP administration. These results indicated that the potential mechanisms involved by which SCP exerted its antitumor and antiangiogenic activity might be associated with the up-regulation of Bax and p53, downregulation of Bcl-2, as well as the reduction of VEGF, CD31 and CD34 in xenografted tumors. These findings demonstrated that the SCP is a potential antitumor agent for RCC treatment.

  8. Synthesis, Anti-Tumor and Anti-Angiogenic Activity Evaluations of Asiatic Acid Amino Acid Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Jing

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Fifteen semi-synthetic derivatives of asiatic acid (AA have been synthesized and evaluated for their biological activities. The successful modification of these compounds at the C-2, C-3, C-23 and C-28 positions was confirmed using NMR, MS and IR spectra. Further, their anti-tumor effects were evaluated in vitro using different cancer cell lines (HeLa, HepG2, B16F10, SGC7901, A549, MCF7 and PC3, while their anti-angiogenic activities were evaluated in vivo using a larval zebrafish model. Among the derivatives, compounds 4–10 showed more potent cytotoxic and anti-angiogenic effects than AA, while compounds 11–17 had significantly less effects. The new derivative 10 was also included in finished formulations to evaluate its stability using HPLC due to its potential topical use. The derivative 10 had markedly better anti-tumor activities than both AA and other derivatives, with similar stability as its parent compound AA.

  9. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Clinical Findings following Treatment with Antiangiogenic Drugs

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    Ricardo Casaroli-Marano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To survey the management of patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nvAMD in Spain. Methods. An observational retrospective multicenter study was conducted. The variables analyzed were sociodemographic characteristics, foveal and macular thickness, visual acuity (VA, type of treatment, number of injections, and the initial administration of a loading dose of an antiangiogenic drug. Results. 208 patients were followed up during 23.4 months in average. During the first and second years, patients received a mean of 4.5±1.8 and 1.6±2.1 injections of antiangiogenic drugs, and 5.4±2.8 and 3.6±2.2 follow-up visits were performed, respectively. The highest improvement in VA was observed at 3 months of follow-up, followed by a decrease in the response that stabilized above baseline values until the end of the study. Patients who received an initial loading dose presented greater VA gains than those without. Conclusions. Our results suggest the need for a more standardized approach in the management and diagnosis of nvAMD receiving VEGF inhibitors. To achieve the visual outcomes reported in pivotal trials, an early diagnosis, proactive approach (more treating than follow-up visits, and a close monitoring might be the key to successfully manage nvAMD.

  10. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Clinical Findings following Treatment with Antiangiogenic Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casaroli-Marano, Ricardo; Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto; Fernández-Blanco, Clemencia Torrón; Figueroa, Marta S; Pina Marín, Begoña; Fernández-Baca Vaca, Gustavo; Piñero-Bustamante, Antonio; Donate López, Juan; García-Arumí, José; Farrés Martí, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To survey the management of patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nvAMD) in Spain. Methods. An observational retrospective multicenter study was conducted. The variables analyzed were sociodemographic characteristics, foveal and macular thickness, visual acuity (VA), type of treatment, number of injections, and the initial administration of a loading dose of an antiangiogenic drug. Results. 208 patients were followed up during 23.4 months in average. During the first and second years, patients received a mean of 4.5 ± 1.8 and 1.6 ± 2.1 injections of antiangiogenic drugs, and 5.4 ± 2.8 and 3.6 ± 2.2 follow-up visits were performed, respectively. The highest improvement in VA was observed at 3 months of follow-up, followed by a decrease in the response that stabilized above baseline values until the end of the study. Patients who received an initial loading dose presented greater VA gains than those without. Conclusions. Our results suggest the need for a more standardized approach in the management and diagnosis of nvAMD receiving VEGF inhibitors. To achieve the visual outcomes reported in pivotal trials, an early diagnosis, proactive approach (more treating than follow-up visits), and a close monitoring might be the key to successfully manage nvAMD.

  11. Capillary regeneration in scleroderma: stem cell therapy reverses phenotype?

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    Jo N Fleming

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Scleroderma is an autoimmune disease with a characteristic vascular pathology. The vasculopathy associated with scleroderma is one of the major contributors to the clinical manifestations of the disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used immunohistochemical and mRNA in situ hybridization techniques to characterize this vasculopathy and showed with morphometry that scleroderma has true capillary rarefaction. We compared skin biopsies from 23 scleroderma patients and 24 normal controls and 7 scleroderma patients who had undergone high dose immunosuppressive therapy followed by autologous hematopoietic cell transplant. Along with the loss of capillaries there was a dramatic change in endothelial phenotype in the residual vessels. The molecules defining this phenotype are: vascular endothelial cadherin, a supposedly universal endothelial marker required for tube formation (lost in the scleroderma tissue, antiangiogenic interferon alpha (overexpressed in the scleroderma dermis and RGS5, a signaling molecule whose expression coincides with the end of branching morphogenesis during development and tumor angiogenesis (also overexpressed in scleroderma skin. Following high dose immunosuppressive therapy, patients experienced clinical improvement and 5 of the 7 patients with scleroderma had increased capillary counts. It was also observed in the same 5 patients, that the interferon alpha and vascular endothelial cadherin had returned to normal as other clinical signs in the skin regressed, and in all 7 patients, RGS5 had returned to normal. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These data provide the first objective evidence for loss of vessels in scleroderma and show that this phenomenon is reversible. Coordinate changes in expression of three molecules already implicated in angiogenesis or anti-angiogenesis suggest that control of expression of these three molecules may be the underlying mechanism for at least the vascular component of this disease

  12. VEGF Spliced Variants: Possible Role of Anti-Angiogenesis Therapy

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    Caroline Hilmi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis has been targeted in retinopathies, psoriasis, and a variety of cancers (colon, breast, lung, and kidney. Among these tumour types, clear cell renal cell carcinomas (RCCs are the most vascularized tumours due to mutations of the von Hippel Lindau gene resulting in HIF-1 alpha stabilisation and overexpression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF. Surgical nephrectomy remains the most efficient curative treatment for patients with noninvasive disease, while VEGF targeting has resulted in varying degrees of success for treating metastatic disease. VEGF pre-mRNA undergoes alternative splicing generating pro-angiogenic isoforms. However, the recent identification of novel splice variants of VEGF with anti-angiogenic properties has provided some insight for the lack of current treatment efficacy. Here we discuss an explanation for the relapse to anti-angiogenesis treatment as being due to either an initial or acquired resistance to the therapy. We also discuss targeting angiogenesis via SR (serine/arginine-rich proteins implicated in VEGF splicing.

  13. The Adoption of New Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Modalities Among Medicare Beneficiaries With Breast Cancer: Clinical Correlates and Cost Implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Kenneth B. [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center and Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Soulos, Pamela R. [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center and Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Herrin, Jeph [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center and Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Health Research and Educational Trust, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Yu, James B. [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center and Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Long, Jessica B. [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center and Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Dostaler, Edward [Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); and others

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: New radiation therapy modalities have broadened treatment options for older women with breast cancer, but it is unclear how clinical factors, geographic region, and physician preference affect the choice of radiation therapy modality. Methods and Materials: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database to identify women diagnosed with stage I-III breast cancer from 1998 to 2007 who underwent breast-conserving surgery. We assessed the temporal trends in, and costs of, the adoption of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and brachytherapy. Using hierarchical logistic regression, we evaluated the relationship between the use of these new modalities and patient and regional characteristics. Results: Of 35,060 patients, 69.9% received conventional external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Although overall radiation therapy use remained constant, the use of IMRT increased from 0.0% to 12.6% from 1998 to 2007, and brachytherapy increased from 0.7% to 9.0%. The statistical variation in brachytherapy use attributable to the radiation oncologist and geographic region was 41.4% and 9.5%, respectively (for IMRT: 23.8% and 22.1%, respectively). Women undergoing treatment at a free-standing radiation facility were significantly more likely to receive IMRT than were women treated at a hospital-based facility (odds ratio for IMRT vs EBRT: 3.89 [95% confidence interval, 2.78-5.45]). No such association was seen for brachytherapy. The median radiation therapy cost per treated patient increased from $5389 in 2001 to $8539 in 2007. Conclusions: IMRT and brachytherapy use increased substantially from 1998 to 2007; overall, radiation therapy costs increased by more than 50%. Radiation oncologists played an important role in treatment choice for both types of radiation therapy, whereas geographic region played a bigger role in the use of IMRT than brachytherapy.

  14. The revival of Phage Therapy to fight Antimicrobial Resistance – Part I: What are the legal implications?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minssen, Timo

    2014-01-01

    Last week I blogged about recent publications concerning the global battle against anti-microbial resistance (AMR). I did not mention a recent paper published in the June 2014 issue of Nature, which describes how European and U.S. researchers and authorities are increasingly considering clinical ...... therapies, also addressed in the paper, lies in the reluctance of pharmaceutical companies to invest into the field. The potential obstacles for more private involvement in phage therapy are many and range from considerable risks of failure, reputational damage, and unforeseeable side...... provide a good basis for further considerations. Part II of this contribution will elaborate a little further on the IP situation in phage therapy and discuss alternatives to IP protection....

  15. Client-centred therapy, post-traumatic stress disorder and post-traumatic growth: theoretical perspectives and practical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Stephen

    2004-03-01

    In practice it is not unusual for client-centred therapists to work with people who have experienced traumatic events. However, client-centred therapy is not usually considered within texts on traumatic stress and questions have been raised over the appropriateness of client-centred therapy with trauma survivors. The present study shows how, although he was writing well before the introduction of the term 'post-traumatic stress disorder', Carl Rogers provided a theory of therapy and personality that contains an account of threat-related psychological processes largely consistent with contemporary trauma theory. Rogers' theory provides the conceptual underpinnings to the client-centred and experiential ways of working with traumatized people. Furthermore, Rogers' theory provides an understanding of post-traumatic growth processes, and encourages therapists to adopt a more positive psychological perspective to their understanding of how people adjust to traumatic events.

  16. Dynamic contrast enhanced ultrasound for therapy monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, John M. [Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Williams, Ross [Imaging Research, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, ON (Canada); Tremblay-Darveau, Charles; Sheeran, Paul S. [Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Milot, Laurent [Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Bjarnason, Georg A. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Toronto, and Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Burns, Peter N., E-mail: burns@sri.utoronto.ca [Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Imaging Research, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    Quantitative imaging is a crucial component of the assessment of therapies that target the vasculature of angiogenic or inflamed tissue. Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) using microbubble contrast offers the advantages of being sensitive to perfusion, non-invasive, cost effective and well suited to repeated use at the bedside. Uniquely, it employs an agent that is truly intravascular. This papers reviews the principles and methodology of DCE-US, especially as applied to anti-angiogenic cancer therapies. Reproducibility is an important attribute of such a monitoring method: results are discussed. More recent technical advances in parametric and 3D DCE-US imaging are also summarised and illustrated.

  17. System engineering approach to planning anticancer therapies

    CERN Document Server

    Świerniak, Andrzej; Smieja, Jaroslaw; Puszynski, Krzysztof; Psiuk-Maksymowicz, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on the analysis of cancer dynamics and the mathematically based synthesis of anticancer therapy. It summarizes the current state-of-the-art in this field and clarifies common misconceptions about mathematical modeling in cancer. Additionally, it encourages closer cooperation between engineers, physicians and mathematicians by showing the clear benefits of this without stating unrealistic goals. Development of therapy protocols is realized from an engineering point of view, such as the search for a solution to a specific control-optimization problem. Since in the case of cancer patients, consecutive measurements providing information about the current state of the disease are not available, the control laws are derived for an open loop structure. Different forms of therapy are incorporated into the models, from chemotherapy and antiangiogenic therapy to immunotherapy and gene therapy, but the class of models introduced is broad enough to incorporate other forms of therapy as well. The book be...

  18. Anticancer and antiangiogenic effects of methanol extracts of Lonicera caprifolium L. on C6 rat glioma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nergiz Hacer Turgut

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Gliomas are brain tumors with high morbidity and mortality. For the treatment of gliomas, it is important to develop new and powerful treatments that could complement existing clinical treatment. Lonicera caprifolium L. (L. caprifolium has various uses in herbal traditional medicine. This study was conducted to determine the phenolic acid levels and DNA damage protection potential of L. caprifolium extract, and to explore the antitumor effect of the extract by investigating its toxicity on C6 rat glioma cell lines and normal L929 mouse fibroblast cell lines. We also aimed to investigate the antiangiogenic potential of the extract. Method: Phenolic acid content was determined by HPLC analysis. DNA damage protection potential was evaluated on pBR322 plasmid DNA. The effect of extracts on the proliferation of cancer cells was evaluated by XTT assay. Antiangiogenic effect was determined with Chorioallantoic membrane model. Results: The extract was found rich in vanillic acid (273.003 µg/g; while the amount of chlorogenic acid was almost at negligible level (0.028 µg/g. 0.005-0.05 mg / ml extract protected against the hazardous effects of UV and H2O2 in all DNA bands. The presence of the extract significantly reduced C6 cell proliferation compared to control (p<0.05. The extract had antiproliferative effect with a half maximum inhibition of concentration (IC50 value of 0.45 mg/ml. L. caprifolium extract in 10-6, 10-5 and 10-4 M concentrations caused antiangiogenic effect. Antiangiogenic scores of L. caprifolium were 0.6, 0.73 and 1.6, respectively. Conclusions: These results show that L. caprifolium has potential cytotoxic and antiangiogenic effect on C6 rat glioma cells and that the phenolic acid content of the plant may partially influence these activities.

  19. Nosocomial extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteremia in hemodialysis patients and the implications for antibiotic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chao Yang

    2014-11-01

    Conclusions: In accordance with our previous study, our results have demonstrated the inferiority of flomoxef to carbapenems in the treatment of HD access-related ESBL-Kp bacteremia and provide an insight into the possibility of using ertapenem rather than flomoxef as an initial or de-escalating therapy for infections caused by ESBL-producing bacteria.

  20. Possible role of interleukin-1β in type 2 diabetes onset and implications for anti-inflammatory therapy strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Zhao

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence of a role of chronic inflammation in type 2 diabetes progression has led to the development of therapies targeting the immune system. We develop a model of interleukin-1β dynamics in order to explain principles of disease onset. The parameters in the model are derived from in vitro experiments and patient data. In the framework of this model, an IL-1β switch is sufficient and necessary to account for type 2 diabetes onset. The model suggests that treatments targeting glucose bear the potential of stopping progression from pre-diabetes to overt type 2 diabetes. However, once in overt type 2 diabetes, these treatments have to be complemented by adjuvant anti-inflammatory therapies in order to stop or decelerate disease progression. Moreover, the model suggests that while glucose-lowering therapy needs to be continued all the way, dose and duration of the anti-inflammatory therapy needs to be specifically controlled. The model proposes a framework for the discussion of clinical trial outcomes.

  1. Possible Role of Interleukin-1β in Type 2 Diabetes Onset and Implications for Anti-inflammatory Therapy Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gang; Dharmadhikari, Gitanjali; Maedler, Kathrin; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence of a role of chronic inflammation in type 2 diabetes progression has led to the development of therapies targeting the immune system. We develop a model of interleukin-1β dynamics in order to explain principles of disease onset. The parameters in the model are derived from in vitro experiments and patient data. In the framework of this model, an IL-1β switch is sufficient and necessary to account for type 2 diabetes onset. The model suggests that treatments targeting glucose bear the potential of stopping progression from pre-diabetes to overt type 2 diabetes. However, once in overt type 2 diabetes, these treatments have to be complemented by adjuvant anti-inflammatory therapies in order to stop or decelerate disease progression. Moreover, the model suggests that while glucose-lowering therapy needs to be continued all the way, dose and duration of the anti-inflammatory therapy needs to be specifically controlled. The model proposes a framework for the discussion of clinical trial outcomes. PMID:25167060

  2. Perspectives on Cognitive Therapy Training within Community Mental Health Settings: Implications for Clinician Satisfaction and Skill Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon Wiltsey Stirman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the mounting evidence of the benefits of cognitive therapy for depression and suicidal behaviors over usual care, like other evidence-based psychosocial treatments (EBTs, it has not been widely adopted in clinical practice. Studies have shown that training followed by intensive consultation is needed to prepare providers to an appropriate level of competency in complex, multisession treatment packages such as cognitive therapy. Given the critical role of training in EBT implementation, more information on factors associated with the success and challenges of training programs is needed. To identify potential reasons for variation in training outcomes across ten agencies in a large, urban community mental health system, we explored program evaluation data and examined provider, consultant, and training program administrator perspectives through follow-up interviews. Perceptions of cognitive therapy, contextual factors, and reactions to feedback on audio recordings emerged as broad categories of themes identified from interviews. These factors may interact and impact clinician efforts to learn cognitive therapy and deliver it skillfully in their practice. The findings highlight experiences and stakeholder perspectives that may contribute to more or less successful training outcomes.

  3. Measuring Homework Compliance in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Depression. Review, Preliminary Findings, and Implications for Theory and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaynor, Scott T.; Lawrence, P. Scott; Nelson-Gray, Rosemery O.

    2006-01-01

    Despite the importance placed on completion of extra-session homework in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), a review of the available literature suggests there is much about the nature of homework compliance that remains to be empirically evaluated. This is especially true among youth receiving CBT. The present study begins to address how best to…

  4. Musically Planned Creativity and Flexibility--Elementary Classroom: Implications for Orff-Schulwerk, the Kodaly Method and Music Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochheimer, Laura

    1976-01-01

    The goals and activities of the Orff-Schulwerk Approach and the Kodaly Method of music therapy are described; and the usefulness of each approach to develop creativity, social development, and cognitive ability in normal, gifted, and handicapped elementary level students is discussed. (SBH)

  5. Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of jaw (BRONJ: an anti-angiogenic side-effect?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petcu Eugen B

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bisphosphonates are recommended in the treatment of osteoporosis and some cancers, in which case they prevent the appearance of bone metastasis. The patients taking bisphosphonates are at increased risk of developing bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of jaw (BRONJ which is characterised by the presence of an un-healing wound after dental surgery. BRONJ might represent an anti-angiogenic side effect. However, the real number of patients with BRONJ might be higher than currently recorded. Considering the differential diagnosis which includes various primary and secondary cancers, a correct histopathological diagnosis is very important. The morphological criteria for diagnosis of BRONJ are highlighted in this material. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1813972972323288

  6. Diterpenoids from the roots of Croton crassifolius and their anti-angiogenic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia-Jian; Chung, Hau Yin; Zhang, Yu-Bo; Li, Guo-Qiang; Li, Yao-Lan; Huang, Wei-Huan; Wang, Guo-Cai

    2016-02-01

    Six diterpenoids [crassifolin J, K, L, M, N and O] along with eleven known ones were isolated from the supercritical fluid extract (SFE) of the roots of Croton crassifolius (Euphorbiaceae). Their structures were elucidated using spectroscopic methods (IR, UV, HRESIMS, 1D and 2D NMR). The structure and stereochemistry of crassifolin J was confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, and the absolute configurations of crassifolin K-M were determined by CD spectra. Twenty-three diterpenoids from this plant were screened for their anti-angiogenic activity using a wild-type zebrafish in vivo model. Four of the known compounds were active, of which penduliflaworosin possessed the best activity relative to the positive control (SU5416). Further study demonstrated that penduliflaworosin could inhibit vessel formation on Tg(fli1a:EGFP)y1-type zebrafish embryos.

  7. Alters Intratumoral Drug Distribution and Affects Therapeutic Synergy of Antiangiogenic Organoselenium Compound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youcef M. Rustum

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor differentiation enhances morphologic and microvascular heterogeneity fostering hypoxia that retards intratumoral drug delivery, distribution, and compromise therapeutic efficacy. In this study, the influence of tumor biologic heterogeneity on the interaction between cytotoxic chemotherapy and selenium was examined using a panel of human tumor xenografts representing cancers of the head and neck and lung along with tissue microarray analysis of human surgical samples. Tumor differentiation status, microvessel density, interstitial fluid pressure, vascular phenotype, and drug delivery were correlated with the degree of enhancement of chemotherapeutic efficacy by selenium. Marked potentiation of antitumor activity was observed in H69 tumors that exhibited a well-vascularized, poorly differentiated phenotype. In comparison, modulation of chemotherapeutic efficacy by antiangiogenic selenium was generally lower or absent in well-differentiated tumors with multiple avascular hypoxic, differentiated regions. Tumor histomorphologic heterogeneity was found prevalent in the clinical samples studied and represents a primary and critical physiological barrier to chemotherapy.

  8. A biomimetic collagen derived peptide exhibits anti-angiogenic activity in triple negative breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V Rosca

    Full Text Available We investigated the application of a mimetic 20 amino acid peptide derived from type IV collagen for treatment of breast cancer. We showed that the peptide induced a decrease of proliferation, adhesion, and migration of endothelial and tumor cells in vitro. We also observed an inhibition of triple negative MDA-MB-231 xenograft growth by 75% relative to control when administered intraperitoneally for 27 days at 10 mg/kg. We monitored in vivo the changes in vascular properties throughout the treatment using MRI and found that the vascular volume and permeability surface area product decreased significantly. The treatment also resulted in an increase of caspase-3 activity and in a reduction of microvascular density. The multiple mode of action of this peptide, i.e., anti-angiogenic, and anti-tumorigenic, makes it a viable candidate as a therapeutic agent as a monotherapy or in combination with other compounds.

  9. Aminopeptidase N inhibition could be involved in the anti-angiogenic effect of dobesilates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farsa Oldřich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium, magnesium and zinc 2,5-dihydroxybenzenesulfonates (dobesilates were synthesized by sulfonation of hydroquinone with sulfuric acid under mild conditions. To form the salts, neutralization with calcium carbonate followed by cation exchange by means of magnesium or zinc sulfates was performed. The dobesilates were characterized by standard spectral methods and by AAS for metal content and then tested for inhibitory activity against aminopeptidase N. Calcium and magnesium 2,5-dihydroxybenzene sulfonates exhibited rather weak inhibitory activity to aminopeptidase N as demonstrated by IC50 values of 978.0 and 832.1 mmol l-1 respectively while zinc 2,5-dihydroxybenzene sulfonate reached the more significant inhibitory activity characterized by IC50 77.4 mmol l-1. The inhibitory activity results suggest that the inhibition of aminopeptidase N could play a role in the anti-angiogenic activity of 2,5-dihydroxybenzenesulfonates.

  10. Antiangiogenic properties of cafestol, a coffee diterpene, in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shuaiyu [Food Biotechnology, University of Science and Technology, 113 Gwahangno, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Food Research Institute, 516 Baekhyun-dong, Bundang-gu, Songnam, Kyungki-do 463-746 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Yeo Cho; Sung, Mi-Jeong; Hur, Haeng-Jeon [Korea Food Research Institute, 516 Baekhyun-dong, Bundang-gu, Songnam, Kyungki-do 463-746 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae-Ho, E-mail: jaehoparkmail@gmail.com [Korea Food Research Institute, 516 Baekhyun-dong, Bundang-gu, Songnam, Kyungki-do 463-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cafestol inhibits tube formation and migration of VEGF-stimulated HUVEC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cafestol inhibits phosphorylation of FAK and Akt. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cafestol decreases NO production. -- Abstract: As angiogenesis plays important roles in tumor growth and metastasis, searching for antiangiogenic compounds is a promising tactic for treating cancers. Cafestol, a diterpene found mainly in unfiltered coffee, provides benefit through varied biological activity, including antitumorigenic, antioxidative, and anti-inflammatory effects. This study aimed to investigate the effects of cafestol on angiogenesis and to uncover the associated mechanism. We show that cafestol inhibits angiogenesis of human umbilical vascular endothelial cells. This inhibition affects the following specific steps of the angiogenic process: proliferation, migration, and tube formation. The inhibitory effects of cafestol are accompanied by decreasing phosphorylation of FAK and Akt and by a decrease in nitric oxide production. Overall, cafestol inhibits angiogenesis by affecting the angiogenic signaling pathway.

  11. Evaluation, partial characterization and purification of acetylcholine esterase enzyme and antiangiogenic activity from marine sponges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maushmi Shailesh Kumar; Sukanya Gopalkrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To test three marine sponges Halichondria glabrata Keller, 1891; Spirastrellapachyspira (S. pachyspira) Levi, 1958 and Cliona lobata Hancock, 1849 for the presence of the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in both young and developed samples from western coastal area of India. S. pachyspira methanolic extract was selected for anti/pro angiogenic activity. Methods:They were evaluated for AChE activity using Ellman’s assay based on production of yellow colored 5-thio-2-nitrobenzoate. Purification of the enzyme was planned using ammonium sulphate precipitation and characterization by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Chorioallantoic membrane (ChAM) assay model was used for angiogenic/antiangiogenic testing. Results:All the three sponges showed good specific enzyme activity and S. pachyspira contained maximum specific enzyme activity. Sixty percent of ammonium sulphate precipitation of crude protein sample gave single band at 66 kDa corresponding to the true AChE. ChAM assay was performed at 62.5, 125.0 and 250.0 µg/mL. Dosage beyond 250 µg/mL extract showed toxic response with anti angiogenic activity at all the concentrations. Conclusions:AChE activity was detected in all samples. Extract showed good anti-angiogenic response at 62.5 µg/mL. Extract was highly toxic affecting microvasculature of ChAM as well as normal growth and development of the embryo at 500 µg/mL. With further characterization of bioactive compounds from the extract of S. pachyspira, the compounds can be developed for anti tumor activity.

  12. Evaluation, partial characterization and purification of acetylcholine esterase enzyme and antiangiogenic activity from marine sponges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maushmi Shailesh Kumar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To test three marine sponges Halichondria glabrata Keller, 1891; Spirastrella pachyspira (S. pachyspira Levi, 1958 and Cliona lobata Hancock, 1849 for the presence of the acetylcholinesterase (AChE in both young and developed samples from western coastal area of India. S. pachyspira methanolic extract was selected for anti/pro angiogenic activity. Methods: They were evaluated for AChE activity using Ellman’s assay based on production of yellow colored 5-thio-2-nitrobenzoate. Purification of the enzyme was planned using ammonium sulphate precipitation and characterization by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Chorioallantoic membrane (ChAM assay model was used for angiogenic/ antiangiogenic testing. Results: All the three sponges showed good specific enzyme activity and S. pachyspira contained maximum specific enzyme activity. Sixty percent of ammonium sulphate precipitation of crude protein sample gave single band at 66 kDa corresponding to the true AChE. ChAM assay was performed at 62.5, 125.0 and 250.0 µg/mL. Dosage beyond 250 µg/mL extract showed toxic response with anti angiogenic activity at all the concentrations. Conclusions: AChE activity was detected in all samples. Extract showed good anti-angiogenic response at 62.5 µg/mL. Extract was highly toxic affecting microvasculature of ChAM as well as normal growth and development of the embryo at 500 µg/mL. With further characterization of bioactive compounds from the extract of S. pachyspira, the compounds can be developed for anti tumor activity.

  13. Systematic Review of Inhaled Bronchodilator and Corticosteroid Therapies in Infants with Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia: Implications and Future Directions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J Clouse

    Full Text Available There is much debate surrounding the use of inhaled bronchodilators and corticosteroids for infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD.The objective of this systematic review was to identify strengths and knowledge gaps in the literature regarding inhaled therapies in BPD and guide future research to improve long-termoutcomes.The databases of Academic Search Complete, CINAHL, PUBMED/MEDLINE, and Scopus were searched for studies that evaluated both acute and long-term clinical outcomes related to the delivery and therapeutic efficacy of inhaled beta-agonists, anticholinergics and corticosteroids in infants with developing and/or established BPD.Of 181 articles, 22 met inclusion criteria for review. Five evaluated beta-agonist therapies (n = 84, weighted gestational age (GA of 27.1(26-30 weeks, weighted birth weight (BW of 974(843-1310 grams, weighted post menstrual age (PMA of 34.8(28-39 weeks, and weighted age of 53(15-86 days old at the time of evaluation. Fourteen evaluated inhaled corticosteroids (n = 2383, GA 26.2(26-29 weeks, weighted BW of 853(760-1114 grams, weighted PMA of 27.0(26-31 weeks, and weighted age of 6(0-45 days old at time of evaluation. Three evaluated combination therapies (n = 198, weighted GA of 27.8(27-29 weeks, weighted BW of 1057(898-1247 grams, weighted PMA of 30.7(29-45 weeks, and age 20(10-111 days old at time of evaluation.Whether inhaled bronchodilators and inhaled corticosteroids improve long-term outcomes in BPD remains unclear. Literature regarding these therapies mostly addresses evolving BPD. There appears to be heterogeneity in treatment responses, and may be related to varying modes of administration. Further research is needed to evaluate inhaled therapies in infants with severe BPD. Such investigations should focus on appropriate definitions of disease and subject selection, timing of therapies, and new drugs, devices and delivery methods as compared to traditional methods across all modalities of

  14. Genome-wide study reveals an important role of spontaneous autoimmunity, cardiomyocyte differentiation defect and antiangiogenic activities in gender-specific gene expression in Keshan disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Shulan; Tan Wuhong; Wang Sen; Wu Cuiyan; Wang Pan; Wang Bin; Su Xiaohui

    2014-01-01

    Background Keshan disease (KD) is an endemic cardiomyopathy in China.The etiology of KD is still under debate and there is no effective approach to preventing and curing this disease.Young women of child-bearing age are the most frequent victims in rural areas.The aim of this study was to determine the differences between molecular pathogenic mechanisms in male and female KD sufferers.Methods We extracted RNA from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of KD patients (12 women and 4 men) and controls (12 women and 4 men).Then the isolated RNA was amplified,labeled and hybridized to Agilent human 4×44k whole genome microarrays.Gene expression was examined using oligonucleotide microarray analysis.A quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay was also performed to validate our microarray results.Results Among the genes differentially expressed in female KD patients we identified:HLA-DOA,HLA-DRA,and HLA-DQA1 associated with spontaneous autoimmunity; BMP5 and BMP7,involved in cardiomyocyte differentiation defect; and ADAMTS 8,CCL23,and TNFSF15,implicated in anti-angiogenic activities.These genes are involved in the canonical pathways and networks recognized for the female KD sufferers and might be related to the pathogenic mechanism of KD.Conclusion Our results might help to explain the higher susceptibility of women to this disease.

  15. Pain management mini-series. Part II. Chronic opioid drug therapy: implications for perioperative anesthesia and pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Robert B; Johnson, Quinn L; Reeves-Viets, Joseph L

    2013-01-01

    In the U.S., there is a growing percentage of chronic pain patients requiring surgery. Chronic pain patients require careful evaluation and planning to achieve appropriate acute pain management. Peri-surgical pain management often requires continuation of previously prescribed chronic pain modalities and careful selection of multimodal acute pain interventions. This article will provide a broad overview of chronic pain, definitions, and current recommendations for the treatment of perioperative pain in patients maintained on opioid therapy.

  16. Evaluation of Immune Responses Mediated by Listeria-Stimulated Human Dendritic Cells: Implications for Cancer Vaccine Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    biospecimens followed protocols approved by the Institutional Review Board of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC). Leukocyte concentrates...Antitumor Immunity and Checkpoint Immunotherapy. Cancer immunology research 2, 926-936 (2014). 17. Wherry, E.J. T cell exhaustion. Nat Immunol 12, 492... Cancer Vaccine Therapy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: David J. Chung, MD, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research New

  17. Pharmacy Adherence Measures to Assess Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy: Review of the Literature and Implications for Treatment Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, Kenneth H.; McMahon, James H.; Jordan, Michael R.; Kelley, Karen; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Hong, Steven Y.; Wanke, Christine A.; Sharon R Lewin; Elliott, Julian H.

    2011-01-01

    Prescription or pill-based methods for estimating adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), pharmacy adherence measures (PAMs), are objective estimates calculated from routinely collected pharmacy data. We conducted a literature review to evaluate PAMs, including their association with virological and other clinical outcomes, their efficacy compared with other adherence measures, and factors to consider when selecting a PAM to monitor adherence. PAMs were classified into 3 categories: medica...

  18. Emerging principles for the development of resistance to antihormonal therapy: Implications for the clinical utility of fulvestrant*

    OpenAIRE

    Ariazi, Eric A.; Lewis-Wambi, Joan S.; Gill, Shaun D.; Pyle, Jennifer R; Ariazi, Jennifer L.; Kim, Helen R.; Sharma, Catherine G.N.; Cordera, Fernando; Shupp, Heather A.; Li, Tianyu; Jordan, V Craig

    2006-01-01

    We seek to evaluate the clinical consequences of resistance to antihormonal therapy by studying analogous animal xenograft models. Two approaches were taken. 1) MCF-7 tumors were serially transplanted into selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) -treated immunocompromised mice to mimic five years of SERM treatment. The studies in vivo were designed to replicate the development of acquired resistance to SERMs over years of clinical exposure. 2) MCF-7 cells were cultured long-term under SE...

  19. Induction of abscopal anti-tumor immunity and immunogenic tumor cell death by ionizing irradiation - implications for cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, B; Rubner, Y; Wunderlich, R; Weiss, E-M; Pockley, A G; Fietkau, R; Gaipl, U S

    2012-01-01

    Although cancer progression is primarily driven by the expansion of tumor cells, the tumor microenvironment and anti-tumor immunity also play important roles. Herein, we consider how tumors can become established by escaping immune surveillance and also how cancer cells can be rendered visible to the immune system by standard therapies such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy, either alone or in combination with additional immune stimulators. Although local radiotherapy results in DNA damage (targeted effects), it is also capable of inducing immunogenic forms of tumor cell death which are associated with a release of immune activating danger signals (non-targeted effects), such as necrosis. Necrotic tumor cells may result from continued exposure to death stimuli and/or an impaired phosphatidylserine (PS) dependent clearance of the dying tumor cells. In such circumstances, mature dendritic cells take up tumor antigen and mediate the induction of adaptive and innate anti-tumor immunity. Locally-triggered, systemic immune activation can also lead to a spontaneous regression of tumors or metastases that are outside the radiation field - an effect which is termed abscopal. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that combining radiotherapy with immune stimulation can induce anti-tumor immunity. Given that it takes time for immunity to develop following exposure to immunogenic tumor cells, we propose practical combination therapies that should be considered as a basis for future research and clinical practice. It is essential that radiation oncologists become more aware of the importance of the immune system to the success of cancer therapy.

  20. A critique of the representation of human suffering in the cognitive behavioural therapy literature with implications for mental health nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, A

    2011-02-01

    This paper is informed by interpretivist understandings and practices, and the author's own conversion to interpretivist writing practice. The aim of the paper is to critique the ways in which suffering people are represented in the mainstream cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) literature with a view to identifying some implications for mental health nursing practice. It will begin by identifying key assumptions governing the textual portrayal of human experience, and will argue that the language used to describe human suffering is a potential site for struggles over meaning and more adequate representation. However, reductionist portrayals of individuals and their problems have largely gone unchallenged in much of the CBT literature since its early development in the 1970s. This is arguably because of the socialization of new members of the CBT community into established cultural and textual practices. A comparison of reductionist CBT writing with more fleshed out, more fully human possibilities will further clarify that forms of representation are never neutral, given the danger of reductionist representations facilitating reductionist interventions. The paper will end with the following emerging implications for mental health nursing practice: the therapeutic power of self-narratives, narrative research and the recovery movement, and the promising possibilities for autoethnographic research for mental health nurses and for day to day interactions between nurses and service users.

  1. Multiparameter phospho-flow analysis of lymphocytes in early rheumatoid arthritis: implications for diagnosis and monitoring drug therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carole L Galligan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The precise mechanisms involved in the initiation and progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA are not known. Early stages of RA often have non-specific symptoms, delaying diagnosis and therapy. Additionally, there are currently no established means to predict clinical responsiveness to therapy. Immune cell activation is a critical component therefore we examined the cellular activation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs in the early stages of RA, in order to develop a novel diagnostic modality. METHODS AND FINDINGS: PBMCs were isolated from individuals diagnosed with early RA (ERA (n = 38, longstanding RA (n = 10, osteoarthritis (OA (n = 19 and from healthy individuals (n = 10. PBMCs were examined for activation of 15 signaling effectors, using phosphorylation status as a measure of activation in immunophenotyped cells, by flow cytometry (phospho-flow. CD3+CD4+, CD3+CD8+ and CD20+ cells isolated from patients with ERA, RA and OA exhibited activation of multiple phospho-epitopes. ERA patient PBMCs showed a bias towards phosphorylation-activation in the CD4+ and CD20+ compartments compared to OA PBMCs, where phospho-activation was primarily observed in CD8+ cells. The ratio of phospho (p-AKT/p-p38 was significantly elevated in patients with ERA and may have diagnostic potential. The mean fluorescent intensity (MFI levels for p-AKT and p-H3 in CD4+, CD8+ and CD20+ T cells correlated directly with physician global assessment scores (MDGA and DAS (disease activity score. Stratification by medications revealed that patients receiving leflunomide, systemic steroids or anti-TNF therapy had significant reductions in phospho-specific activation compared with patients not receiving these therapies. Correlative trends between medication-associated reductions in the levels of phosphorylation of specific signaling effectors and lower disease activity were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Phospho-flow analysis identified phosphorylation

  2. Contextual factors of the ICF as a tool for analysis of the implications of physical disability for a group of patients under Occupational Therapy care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosé Colom Toldrá

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the implications of the acquisition of physical disability on everyday life situations of persons under occupational therapy care using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health – ICF, with emphasis on contextual factors. The study included 11 adults and elderly with physical impairments resulting from neurological disorders who were under Occupational Therapy care at the Center for Teaching and Research at the University of Sao Paulo from 2009 to 2010. It’s an exploratory qualitative research conducted through documentary study and semi-structured interview for the administration of the ICF components. Changes in body functions are diverse, both mental and related to movement, and when coupled with contextual factors may result in different levels and types of disabilities, preventing participation in life situations. The analysis of contextual factors helps to identify and relate personal and environmental aspects and their dynamic interaction reflects processes that may cause disability, establishing the ICF as a valuable guide for research and development of rehabilitation practices that consider the different aspects of the reality of a person’s life.

  3. Direct and allosteric inhibition of the FGF2/HSPGs/FGFR1 ternary complex formation by an antiangiogenic, thrombospondin-1-mimic small molecule.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katiuscia Pagano

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs are recognized targets for the development of therapies against angiogenesis-driven diseases, including cancer. The formation of a ternary complex with the transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptors (FGFRs, and heparan sulphate proteoglycans (HSPGs is required for FGF2 pro-angiogenic activity. Here by using a combination of techniques including Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Molecular Dynamics, Surface Plasmon Resonance and cell-based binding assays we clarify the molecular mechanism of inhibition of an angiostatic small molecule, sm27, mimicking the endogenous inhibitor of angiogenesis, thrombospondin-1. NMR and MD data demonstrate that sm27 engages the heparin-binding site of FGF2 and induces long-range dynamics perturbations along FGF2/FGFR1 interface regions. The functional consequence of the inhibitor binding is an impaired FGF2 interaction with both its receptors, as demonstrated by SPR and cell-based binding assays. We propose that sm27 antiangiogenic activity is based on a twofold-direct and allosteric-mechanism, inhibiting FGF2 binding to both its receptors.

  4. Dual blockade of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) exhibits potent anti-angiogenic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Xie, Kun; Zhang, Longzhen; Yao, Xuejing; Li, Hongwen; Xu, Qiaoyu; Wang, Xin; Jiang, Jing; Fang, Jianmin

    2016-07-28

    Both vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF or FGF-2) are potent pro-angiogenic factors and play a critical role in cancer development and progression. Clinical anti-VEGF therapy trials had a major challenge due to upregulated expression of other pro-angiogenic factor, like FGF-2. This study developed a novel chimeric decoy receptor VF-Trap fusion protein to simultaneously block activity of both VEGF and FGF pathways in order to achieve an additive or synergistic anti-tumor effect. Our in vitro data showed that VF-Trap potently blocked proliferation and migration of both VEGF- and FGF-2-induced vascular endothelial cells. In animal models, treatment of xenograft tumors with VF-Trap resulted in significant inhibition of tumor growth compared to blockage of the single molecule, like VEGF or FGF blocker. In addition, VF-Trap was also more potent in inhibition of ocular angiogenesis in a mouse oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) model. These data demonstrated the potent anti-angiogenic effects of this novel VF-Trap fusion protein on blockage of VEGF and FGF-2 activity in vitro and in animal models. Further study will assess its effects in clinic as a therapeutic agent for angiogenesis-related disorders, such as cancer and ocular vascular diseases.

  5. Dose reduction of scattered photons from concrete walls lined with lead: Implications for improvement in design of megavoltage radiation therapy facility mazes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Affan, I. A. M., E-mail: info@medphys-environment.co.uk; Hugtenburg, R. P.; Piliero, M. [Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Bari, D. S. [Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP, United Kingdom and University of Zakho, Duhok (Iraq); Al-Saleh, W. M. [Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP, United Kingdom and King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Science, Hofuf (Saudi Arabia); Evans, S. [Department of Medical Physics and Clinical Engineering, Singleton Hospital, Swansea SA2 8QA (United Kingdom); Al-Hasan, M.; Al-Zughul, B. [College of Sciences, Zarqa University, Zarqa (Jordan); Al-Kharouf, S. [The Royal Scientific Society, Amman (Jordan); Ghaith, A. [Association of Arab Universities, Amman (Jordan)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: This study explores the possibility of using lead to cover part of the radiation therapy facility maze walls in order to absorb low energy photons and reduce the total dose at the maze entrance of radiation therapy rooms. Methods: Experiments and Monte Carlo simulations were utilized to establish the possibility of using high-Z materials to cover the concrete walls of the maze in order to reduce the dose of the scattered photons at the maze entrance. The dose of the backscattered photons from a concrete wall was measured for various scattering angles. The dose was also calculated by the FLUKA and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes. The FLUKA code was also used to simulate an existing radiotherapy room to study the effect of multiple scattering when adding lead to cover the concrete walls of the maze. Monoenergetic photons were used to represent the main components of the x ray spectrum up to 10 MV. Results: It was observed that when the concrete wall was covered with just 2 mm of lead, the measured dose rate at all backscattering angles was reduced by 20% for photons of energy comparable to Co-60 emissions and 70% for Cs-137 emissions. The simulations with FLUKA and EGS showed that the reduction in the dose was potentially even higher when lead was added. One explanation for the reduction is the increased absorption of backscattered photons due to the photoelectric interaction in lead. The results also showed that adding 2 mm lead to the concrete walls and floor of the maze reduced the dose at the maze entrance by up to 90%. Conclusions: This novel proposal of covering part or the entire maze walls with a few millimeters of lead would have a direct implication for the design of radiation therapy facilities and would assist in upgrading the design of some mazes, especially those in facilities with limited space where the maze length cannot be extended to sufficiently reduce the dose.

  6. Advancement and prospects of tumor gene therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Zhang; Qing-Tao Wang; He Liu; Zhen-Zhu Zhang; Wen-Lin Huang

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy is one of the most attractive fields in tumor therapy. In past decades, significant progress has been achieved. Various approaches, such as viral and non-viral vectors and physical methods, have been developed to make gene delivery safer and more efficient. Several therapeutic strategies have evolved, including gene-based (tumor suppressor genes, suicide genes, antiangiogenic genes, cytokine and oxidative stress-based genes) and RNA-based (antisense oligonucieotides and RNA interference) approaches. In addition, immune response-based strategies (dendritic cell- and T cell-based therapy) are also under investigation in tumor gene therapy. This review highlights the progress and recent developments in gene delivery systems, therapeutic strategies, and possible clinical directions for gene therapy.

  7. Dosimetric Implications of an Injection of Hyaluronic Acid for Preserving the Rectal Wall in Prostate Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapet, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.chapet@chu-lyon.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Udrescu, Corina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Department of Medical Physics, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Tanguy, Ronan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Ruffion, Alain [Department of Urology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Fenoglietto, Pascal [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Val d' Aurelle, Montpellier (France); Sotton, Marie-Pierre [Department of Medical Physics, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Devonec, Marian [Department of Urology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Colombel, Marc [Department of Urology, Hopital Edouard Herriot, Lyon (France); Jalade, Patrice [Department of Medical Physics, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Azria, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Val d' Aurelle, Montpellier (France)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: This study assessed the contribution of ahyaluronic acid (HA) injection between the rectum and the prostate to reducing the dose to the rectal wall in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: As part of a phase 2 study of hypofractionated radiation therapy (62 Gy in 20 fractions), the patients received a transperineal injection of 10 cc HA between the rectum and the prostate. A dosimetric computed tomographic (CT) scan was systematically performed before (CT1) and after (CT2) the injection. Two 9-beam intensity modulated radiation therapy-SBRT plans were optimized for the first 10 patients on both CTs according to 2 dosage levels: 5 × 6.5 Gy (PlanA) and 5 × 8.5 Gy (PlanB). Rectal wall parameters were compared with a dose–volume histogram, and the prostate–rectum separation was measured at 7 levels of the prostate on the center line of the organ. Results: For both plans, the average volume of the rectal wall receiving the 90% isodose line (V90%) was reduced up to 90% after injection. There was no significant difference (P=.32) between doses received by the rectal wall on CT1 and CT2 at the base of the prostate. This variation became significant from the median plane to the apex of the prostate (P=.002). No significant differences were found between PlanA without HA and PlanB with HA for each level of the prostate (P=.77, at the isocenter of the prostate). Conclusions: HA injection significantly reduced the dose to the rectal wall and allowed a dose escalation from 6.5 Gy to 8.5 Gy without increasing the dose to the rectum. A phase 2 study is under way in our department to assess the rate of acute and late rectal toxicities when SBRT (5 × 8.5 Gy) is combined with an injection of HA.

  8. AAV Vector-Mediated Gene Delivery to Substantia Nigra Dopamine Neurons: Implications for Gene Therapy and Disease Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina Albert

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Gene delivery using adeno-associated virus (AAV vectors is a widely used method to transduce neurons in the brain, especially due to its safety, efficacy, and long-lasting expression. In addition, by varying AAV serotype, promotor, and titer, it is possible to affect the cell specificity of expression or the expression levels of the protein of interest. Dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra projecting to the striatum, comprising the nigrostriatal pathway, are involved in movement control and degenerate in Parkinson′s disease. AAV-based gene targeting to the projection area of these neurons in the striatum has been studied extensively to induce the production of neurotrophic factors for disease-modifying therapies for Parkinson′s disease. Much less emphasis has been put on AAV-based gene therapy targeting dopamine neurons in substantia nigra. We will review the literature related to targeting striatum and/or substantia nigra dopamine neurons using AAVs in order to express neuroprotective and neurorestorative molecules, as well as produce animal disease models of Parkinson′s disease. We discuss difficulties in targeting substantia nigra dopamine neurons and their vulnerability to stress in general. Therefore, choosing a proper control for experimental work is not trivial. Since the axons along the nigrostriatal tract are the first to degenerate in Parkinson′s disease, the location to deliver the therapy must be carefully considered. We also review studies using AAV-a-synuclein (a-syn to target substantia nigra dopamine neurons to produce an α-syn overexpression disease model in rats. Though these studies are able to produce mild dopamine system degeneration in the striatum and substantia nigra and some behavioural effects, there are studies pointing to the toxicity of AAV-carrying green fluorescent protein (GFP, which is often used as a control. Therefore, we discuss the potential difficulties in overexpressing proteins in general in

  9. Clinical implications of the 2013 ESH/ESC hypertension guidelines: targets, choice of therapy, and blood pressure monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeldsen, Sverre E; Aksnes, Tonje A; Ruilope, Luis M

    2014-06-01

    The European Society of Hypertension (ESH)/European Society of Cardiology (ESC) 2013 guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension included simplified blood pressure (BP) targets across patient groups, more balanced discussion on monotherapy vs. combination therapy, as well as reconfirmation of the importance of out-of-office BP measurements. In light of these updates, we wished to review some issues raised and take a fresh look at the role of calcium channel blocker (CCB) therapy; an established antihypertensive class that appears to be a favorable choice in many patients. Relaxed BP targets for high-risk hypertensive patients in the 2013 ESH/ESC guidelines were driven by a lack of commanding evidence for an aggressive approach. However, substantial evidence demonstrates cardiovascular benefits from more intensive BP lowering across patient groups. Individualized treatment of high-risk patients may be prudent until more solid evidence is available. Individual patient profiles and preferences and evidence for preferential therapy benefits should be considered when deciding upon the optimal antihypertensive regimen. CCBs appear to be a positive choice for monotherapy, and in combination with other agent classes, and may provide specific benefits beyond BP lowering. Ambulatory and home BP monitoring have an increasing role in defining the diagnosis and prognosis of hypertension (especially non-sustained); however, their value for comprehensive diagnosis and appropriate treatment selection should be more widely acknowledged. In conclusion, further evidence may be required on BP targets in high-risk patients, and optimal treatment selection based upon individual patient profiles and comprehensive diagnosis using out-of-office BP measurements may improve patient management.

  10. Possible Role of Interleukin-1β in Type 2 Diabetes Onset and Implications for Anti-inflammatory Therapy Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Gang Zhao; Gitanjali Dharmadhikari; Kathrin Maedler; Michael Meyer-Hermann

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence of a role of chronic inflammation in type 2 diabetes progression has led to the development of therapies targeting the immune system. We develop a model of interleukin-1β dynamics in order to explain principles of disease onset. The parameters in the model are derived from in vitro experiments and patient data. In the framework of this model, an IL-1β switch is sufficient and necessary to account for type 2 diabetes onset. The model suggests that treatments targeting gluco...

  11. Randomized phase II trial of urethral sparing intensity modulated radiation therapy in low-risk prostate cancer: implications for focal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vainshtein Jeffrey

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low-risk prostate cancer (PCa patients have excellent outcomes, with treatment modality often selected by perceived effects on quality of life. Acute urinary symptoms are common during external beam radiotherapy (EBRT, while chronic symptoms have been linked to urethral dose. Since most low-risk PCa occurs in the peripheral zone (PZ, we hypothesized that EBRT using urethral sparing intensity modulated radiation therapy (US-IMRT could improve urinary health-related quality of life (HRQOL while maintaining high rates of PCa control. Methods Patients with National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN defined low-risk PCa with no visible lesion within 5 mm of the prostatic urethra on MRI were randomized to US-IMRT or standard (S- IMRT. Prescription dose was 75.6 Gy in 41 fractions to the PZ + 3–5 mm for US-IMRT and to the prostate + 3 mm for S-IMRT. For US-IMRT, mean proximal and distal urethral doses were limited to 65 Gy and 74 Gy, respectively. HRQOL was assessed using the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index (EPIC Quality of Life questionnaire. The primary endpoint was change in urinary HRQOL at 3 months. Results From June 2004 to November 2006, 16 patients were randomized, after which a futility analysis concluded that continued accrual was unlikely to demonstrate a difference in the primary endpoint. Mean change in EPIC urinary HRQOL at 3 months was −0.5 ± 11.2 in the US-IMRT arm and +3.9 ± 15.3 in the S-IMRT arm (p = 0.52. Median PSA nadir was higher in the US-IMRT arm (1.46 vs. 0.78, p = 0.05. At 4.7 years median follow-up, three US-IMRT and no S-IMRT patients experienced PSA failure (p = 0.06; HR 8.8, 95% CI 0.9–86. Two out of 3 patients with PSA failure had biopsy-proven local failure, both located contralateral to the original site of disease. Conclusions Compared with S-IMRT, US-IMRT failed to improve urinary HRQOL and resulted in higher PSA nadir and inferior biochemical

  12. Reduction of PSA values by combination pharmacological therapy in patients with chronic prostatitis: implications for prostate cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magri, Vittorio; Trinchieri, Alberto; Montanari, Emanuele; Del Nero, Alberto; Mangiarotti, Barbara; Zirpoli, Pasquale; de Eguileor, Magda; Marras, Emanuela; Ceriani, Isabella; Vral, Anne; Perletti, Gianpaolo

    2007-06-01

    We identified from our clinical database a total of 471 patients affected by cat. II chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP), cat. III (IIIa and IIIb) chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), or cat. IV asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis (AIP), according to NIH criteria. 132 intent-to-treat patients, showing levels of PSA > or =4 ng/mL, were subjected to a 6-week course of combination pharmacological therapy with 500 mg/day ciprofloxacin, 500 mg/day azithromycin (3 days/week), 10 mg/day alfuzosin and 320 mg b.i.d. Serenoa repens extract. At the end of treatment, 111 per-protocol patients belonging to all categories of prostatitis showed a total 32.5% reduction of PSA levels. In the same group, 66 patients (59.4%) showed "normalization" of PSA values under the 4 ng/mL limit. Patients affected by cat. IIIb CP/CPPS showed the highest PSA reduction and normalization rates (40% and 68.4%, respectively). Follow-up data show that, after a marked, significant reduction at completion of therapy, PSA levels, urine peak flow rates and NIH-CPSI symptom scores remained constant or decreased throughout a period of 18 months in patients showing normalization of PSA values. Prostatic biopsy was proposed to 45 patients showing persistently high PSA values (> or = 4 ng/mL) at the end of treatment. Fourteen patients rejected biopsy; of the remaining 31, 10 were diagnosed with prostate cancer. Four months after a first biopsy, a second biopsy was proposed to the 21 patients with a negative first diagnosis and persistently elevated PSA levels. Three patients rejected the procedure; of the remaining 18, four were diagnosed with prostatic carcinoma. In summary, combination pharmacological therapy decreased the number of patients undergoing prostatic biopsy from 111 to 45. Normalization of PSA values in 59.4% of patients--not subjected to biopsy--increased the prostate cancer detection rate from 12.6% (14/111) to 31.1% (14/45). The reduction of PSA after a 6-week course of therapy was

  13. Anti-angiogenic drugs for second-line treatment of NSCLC patients: just new pawns on the chessboard?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronte, Giuseppe; Passiglia, Francesco; Galvano, Antonio; Russo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is one of the main pathways targeted to treat cancer. Bevacizumab added survival benefit when combined with platinum-based chemotherapy in NSCLC. Recently, Phase III trials showed survival benefit when anti-angiogenic drugs are added to docetaxel as second-line treatment for NSCLC. These anti-angiogenic agents include nintedanib and ramucirumab, a tyrosine-kinase inhibitor and a monoclonal antibody, respectively, which target receptors involved in angiogenesis. These studies have some similarities and differences. We propose a new algorithm for treatment sequences in performance status 0-1 patients with non-oncogene-addicted NSCLC type adenocarcinoma. Indeed clearer scientific evidences are available for this subgroup of patients.

  14. Incorporating Cancer Stem Cells in Radiation Therapy Treatment Response Modeling and the Implication in Glioblastoma Multiforme Treatment Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Victoria Y.; Nguyen, Dan; Pajonk, Frank; Kupelian, Patrick; Kaprealian, Tania; Selch, Michael; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke, E-mail: ksheng@mednet.ucla.edu

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To perform a preliminary exploration with a simplistic mathematical cancer stem cell (CSC) interaction model to determine whether the tumor-intrinsic heterogeneity and dynamic equilibrium between CSCs and differentiated cancer cells (DCCs) can better explain radiation therapy treatment response with a dual-compartment linear-quadratic (DLQ) model. Methods and Materials: The radiosensitivity parameters of CSCs and DCCs for cancer cell lines including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), non–small cell lung cancer, melanoma, osteosarcoma, and prostate, cervical, and breast cancer were determined by performing robust least-square fitting using the DLQ model on published clonogenic survival data. Fitting performance was compared with the single-compartment LQ (SLQ) and universal survival curve models. The fitting results were then used in an ordinary differential equation describing the kinetics of DCCs and CSCs in response to 2- to 14.3-Gy fractionated treatments. The total dose to achieve tumor control and the fraction size that achieved the least normal biological equivalent dose were calculated. Results: Smaller cell survival fitting errors were observed using DLQ, with the exception of melanoma, which had a low α/β = 0.16 in SLQ. Ordinary differential equation simulation indicated lower normal tissue biological equivalent dose to achieve the same tumor control with a hypofractionated approach for 4 cell lines for the DLQ model, in contrast to SLQ, which favored 2 Gy per fraction for all cells except melanoma. The DLQ model indicated greater tumor radioresistance than SLQ, but the radioresistance was overcome by hypofractionation, other than the GBM cells, which responded poorly to all fractionations. Conclusion: The distinct radiosensitivity and dynamics between CSCs and DCCs in radiation therapy response could perhaps be one possible explanation for the heterogeneous intertumor response to hypofractionation and in some cases superior outcome from

  15. An investigation into frequency and reasons why patients switch antiretroviral therapy and which antiretrovirals are commonly implicated in toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyle A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the study Previous investigation into antiretroviral (ARV therapy switches in our HIV cohort suggested an annual switch rate of 20% in 2006 with 60% of switches being secondary to toxicity [1]. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether this switch rate has changed in recent years, determine reasons why patients change regimens, and identify which ARVs are most likely to be switched for toxicity concerns. Methods The electronic patient database was reviewed to identify all patients within our HIV cohort who switched ARV therapy between 1st December 2009 and 31st May 2011. Details of which ARVs were switched and the reasons why were recorded. Any switches due to toxicity were investigated further to identify the actual or perceived adverse effect. Summary of results Nine hundred and twenty-three regimens were switched over 18 months affecting 12% (n = 722 of patients on treatment during this time. The most common reason for switching medication was due to toxicity, occurring in 452 (49% cases. Other reasons included simplification (15%, clinical trials (8%, virological failure (8% and drug interactions (4%. The remaining 16% switched for various reasons including pregnancy and co-morbidities. Of 452 switches for toxicity (or perceived toxicity, 122 (27% were due to CNS side effects (89 out of a total of 122 were related to efavirenz, 64 (14% gastrointestinal disturbances (38/64 related to protease inhibitors, 54 (12% actual/perceived cardiovascular risk (21/54 related to abacavir and 21/54 related to saquinavir, 54 (12% hepatotoxicity (21/54 related to atazanavir and 14/54 related to efavirenz, 42 (9% metabolic concerns (24/42 related to protease inhibitors and 38 (8% renal toxicity (28/38 related to tenofovir. Other toxicities accounted for 78 (18% switches. An observed toxicity switch rate (OTSR per 1000 patient years (95% CI was calculated for each ARV. Conclusions 12% of patients switched therapy in 18 months, predicting

  16. Pharmacy adherence measures to assess adherence to antiretroviral therapy: review of the literature and implications for treatment monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, James H; Jordan, Michael R; Kelley, Karen; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Hong, Steven Y; Wanke, Christine A; Lewin, Sharon R; Elliott, Julian H

    2011-02-15

    Prescription or pill-based methods for estimating adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), pharmacy adherence measures (PAMs), are objective estimates calculated from routinely collected pharmacy data. We conducted a literature review to evaluate PAMs, including their association with virological and other clinical outcomes, their efficacy compared with other adherence measures, and factors to consider when selecting a PAM to monitor adherence. PAMs were classified into 3 categories: medication possession ratio (MPR), pill count (PC), and pill pick-up (PPU). Data exist to recommend PAMs over self-reported adherence. PAMs consistently predicted patient outcomes, but additional studies are needed to determine the most predictive PAM parameters. Current evidence suggests that shorter duration of adherence assessment (≤ 6 months) and use of PAMs to predict future outcomes may be less accurate. PAMs which incorporate the number of days for which ART was prescribed without the counting of remnant pills, are reasonable minimum-resource methods to assess adherence to ART.

  17. Epigenetic modulation of cancer-germline antigen gene expression in tumorigenic human mesenchymal stem cells: implications for cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten; Burns, Jorge S; Nielsen, Ole;

    2009-01-01

    Cancer-germline antigens are promising targets for cancer immunotherapy, but whether such therapies will also eliminate the primary tumor stem cell population remains undetermined. We previously showed that long-term cultures of telomerized adult human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can...... spontaneously evolve into tumor-initiating, mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC-TERT20), which have characteristics of clinical sarcoma cells. In this study, we used the hMSC-TERT20 tumor stem cell model to investigate the potential of cancer-germline antigens to serve as tumor stem cell targets. We found...... that tumorigenic transformation of hMSC-TERT20 cells induced the expression of members of several cancer-germline antigen gene families (ie, GAGE, MAGE-A, and XAGE-1), with promoter hypomethylation and histone acetylation of the corresponding genes. Both in vitro cultures and tumor xenografts derived from...

  18. The effect of post-mastectomy radiation therapy on breast implants: Unveiling biomaterial alterations with potential implications on capsular contracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribuffo, Diego; Lo Torto, Federico [Department of Plastic Surgery, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00166 Rome (Italy); Giannitelli, Sara M. [Tissue Engineering Unit, Department of Engineering, Università Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, Via Álvaro del Portillo 21, 00128 Rome (Italy); Urbini, Marco; Tortora, Luca [Surface Analysis Laboratory, Department of Mathematics and Physics, University “Roma Tre”, Via della Vasca Navale 84, 00146 Rome (Italy); INFN — National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Section of Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 84, 00146 Rome (Italy); Mozetic, Pamela; Trombetta, Marcella [Tissue Engineering Unit, Department of Engineering, Università Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, Via Álvaro del Portillo 21, 00128 Rome (Italy); Basoli, Francesco; Licoccia, Silvia [Department of Chemical Science and Technologies, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00173 Rome (Italy); Tombolini, Vincenzo [Department of Radiation Oncology, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00166 Rome (Italy); Spencer-Lorillard Foundation, Viale Regina Elena 291, 00161 Rome (Italy); Cassese, Raffaele [Department of Radiation Oncology, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00166 Rome (Italy); Scuderi, Nicolò [Department of Plastic Surgery, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00166 Rome (Italy); and others

    2015-12-01

    Post-mastectomy breast reconstruction with expanders and implants is recognized as an integral part of breast cancer treatment. Its main complication is represented by capsular contracture, which leads to poor expansion, breast deformation, and pain, often requiring additional surgery. In such a scenario, the debate continues as to whether the second stage of breast reconstruction should be performed before or after post-mastectomy radiation therapy, in light of potential alterations induced by irradiation to silicone biomaterial. This work provides a novel, multi-technique approach to unveil the role of radiotherapy in biomaterial alterations, with potential involvement in capsular contracture. Following irradiation, implant shells underwent mechanical, chemical, and microstructural evaluation by means of tensile testing, Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform InfraRed spectroscopy (ATR/FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), high resolution stylus profilometry, and Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Our findings are consistent with radiation-induced modifications of silicone that, although not detectable at the microscale, can be evidenced by more sophisticated nanoscale surface analyses. In light of these results, biomaterial irradiation cannot be ruled out as one of the possible co-factors underlying capsular contracture. - Highlights: • The debate continues whether to perform breast reconstruction before or after PMRT. • Radiation therapy may alter implant material, concurring to capsular contracture. • In this work, irradiated implants were investigated by a multi-technique approach. • Radiation-induced alterations could be evidenced by ATR/FTIR and ToF-SIMS. • Reported alteration might represent a co-factor underlying capsular contracture.

  19. Human gene control by vital oncogenes: revisiting a theoretical model and its implications for targeted cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Rudolph E

    2012-01-01

    An important assumption of our current understanding of the mechanisms of carcinogenesis has been the belief that clarification of the cancer process would inevitably reveal some of the crucial mechanisms of normal human gene regulation. Since the momentous work of Bishop and Varmus, both the molecular and the biochemical processes underlying the events in the development of cancer have become increasingly clear. The identification of cellular signaling pathways and the role of protein kinases in the events leading to gene activation have been critical to our understanding not only of normal cellular gene control mechanisms, but also have clarified some of the important molecular and biochemical events occurring within a cancer cell. We now know that oncogenes are dysfunctional proto-oncogenes and that dysfunctional tumor suppressor genes contribute to the cancer process. Furthermore, Weinstein and others have hypothesized the phenomenon of oncogene addiction as a distinct characteristic of the malignant cell. It can be assumed that cancer cells, indeed, become dependent on such vital oncogenes. The products of these vital oncogenes, such as c-myc, may well be the Achilles heel by which targeted molecular therapy may lead to truly personalized cancer therapy. The remaining problem is the need to introduce relevant molecular diagnostic tests such as genome microarray analysis and proteomic methods, especially protein kinase identification arrays, for each individual patient. Genome wide association studies on cancers with gene analysis of single nucleotide and other mutations in functional proto-oncogenes will, hopefully, identify dysfunctional proto-oncogenes and allow the development of more specific targeted drugs directed against the protein products of these vital oncogenes. In 1984 Willis proposed a molecular and biochemical model for eukaryotic gene regulation suggesting how proto-oncogenes might function within the normal cell. That model predicted the

  20. Anti-angiogenic effect of triptolide in rheumatoid arthritis by targeting angiogenic cascade.

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    Xiangying Kong

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is characterized by a pre-vascular seriously inflammatory phase, followed by a vascular phase with high increase in vessel growth. Since angiogenesis has been considered as an essential event in perpetuating inflammatory and immune responses, as well as supporting pannus growth and development of RA, inhibition of angiogenesis has been proposed as a novel therapeutic strategy for RA. Triptolide, a diterpenoid triepoxide from Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F, has been extensively used in treatment of RA patients. It also acts as a small molecule inhibitor of tumor angiogenesis in several cancer types. However, it is unclear whether triptolide possesses an anti-angiogenic effect in RA. To address this problem, we constructed collagen-induced arthritis (CIA model using DA rats by the injection of bovine type II collagen. Then, CIA rats were treated with triptolide (11-45 µg/kg/day starting on the day 1 after first immunization. The arthritis scores (P<0.05 and the arthritis incidence (P<0.05 of inflamed joints were both significantly decreased in triptolide-treated CIA rats compared to vehicle CIA rats. More interestingly, doses of 11~45 µg/kg triptolide could markedly reduce the capillaries, small, medium and large vessel density in synovial membrane tissues of inflamed joints (all P<0.05. Moreover, triptolide inhibited matrigel-induced cell adhesion of HFLS-RA and HUVEC. It also disrupted tube formation of HUVEC on matrigel and suppressed the VEGF-induced chemotactic migration of HFLS-RA and HUVEC, respectively. Furthermore, triptolide significantly reduced the expression of angiogenic activators including TNF-α, IL-17, VEGF, VEGFR, Ang-1, Ang-2 and Tie2, as well as suppressed the IL1-β-induced phosphorylated of ERK, p38 and JNK at protein levels. In conclusion, our data suggest for the first time that triptolide may possess anti-angiogenic effect in RA both in vivo and in vitro assay systems by downregulating the

  1. Targeted concurrent and sequential delivery of chemotherapeutic and antiangiogenic agents to the brain by using drug-loaded nanofibrous membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Yuan-Yun; Yang, Tao-Chieh; Wang, Yi-Chuan; Lee, Wei-Hwa; Chang, Tzu-Min; Kau, Yi-Chuan; Liu, Shih-Jung

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most frequent and devastating primary brain tumor. Surgery followed by radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant chemotherapy is the standard of care for patients with glioblastoma. Chemotherapy is ineffective, because of the low therapeutic levels of pharmaceuticals in tumor tissues and the well-known tumor-cell resistance to chemotherapy. Therefore, we developed bilayered poly(d,l)-lactide-co-glycolide nanofibrous membranes that enabled the sequential and sustained release of chemotherapeutic and antiangiogenic agents by employing an electrospinning technique. The release characteristics of embedded drugs were determined by employing an in vitro elution technique and high-performance liquid chromatography. The experimental results showed that the fabricated nanofibers showed a sequential drug-eluting behavior, with the release of high drug levels of chemotherapeutic carmustine, irinotecan, and cisplatin from day 3, followed by the release of high concentrations of the antiangiogenic combretastatin from day 21. Biodegradable multidrug-eluting nanofibrous membranes were then dispersed into the cerebral cavity of rats by craniectomy, and the in vivo release characteristics of the pharmaceuticals from the membranes were investigated. The results suggested that the nanofibrous membranes released high concentrations of pharmaceuticals for more than 8 weeks in the cerebral parenchyma of rats. The result of histological analysis demonstrated developmental atrophy of brains with no inflammation. Biodegradable nanofibrous membranes can be manufactured for long-term sequential transport of different chemotherapeutic and anti-angiogenic agents in the brain, which can potentially improve the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme and prevent toxic effects due to systemic administration.

  2. Early Assessment of Colorectal Cancer Patients with Liver Metastases Treated with Antiangiogenic Drugs: The Role of Intravoxel Incoherent Motion in Diffusion-Weighted Imaging.

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    Vincenza Granata

    Full Text Available To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of quantitative intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM of Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI in the assessment of liver metastases treated with targeted chemotherapy agents.12 patients with unresectable liver metastases from colorectal cancer were enrolled and received neoadjuvant FOLFIRI (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan plus bevacizumab therapy. DWI was performed for 36 metastases at baseline and after 14 days from starting the treatment. In addition to the basic IVIM metrics, the product between pseudo-diffusivity and perfusion fraction was considered as a descriptor roughly analogous to the flow. Median diffusion parameters of Region of Interest (ROI were used as representative values for each lesion. Normalized parameters in comparison with the median value of spleen were also collected. The percentual change of the diffusion parameters was calculated. The response to chemotherapy was evaluated according the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST as calculated on whole-body CT scan obtained three months after treatment. Mann Whitney test and Receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis were performed.24 lesions were categorized as responding and 12 as not responding. There was no statistically significant difference among absolute and normalized diffusion parameters between the pretreatment and the post-treatment findings. Instead, the perfusion fraction (fp values showed a statistical difference between responder and non-responder lesions: sensitivity and specificity of fp variation was 62% and 93%, respectively.IVIM parameters represent a valuable tool in the evaluation of the anti-angiogenic therapy in patients with liver metastases from colorectal cancer. A percentage change of fp represents the most effective DWI marker in the assessment of tumor response.

  3. ERK2, but not ERK1, mediates acquired and "de novo" resistance to imatinib mesylate: implication for CML therapy.

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    Clara I Aceves-Luquero

    Full Text Available Resistance to Imatinib Mesylate (IM is a major problem in Chronic Myelogenous Leukaemia management. Most of the studies about resistance have focused on point mutations on BCR/ABL. However, other types of resistance that do not imply mutations in BCR/ABL have been also described. In the present report we aim to study the role of several MAPK in IM resistance not associate to BCR/ABL mutations. Therefore we used an experimental system of resistant cell lines generated by co-culturing with IM (K562, Lama 84 as well as primary material from resistant and responder patient without BCR/ABL mutations. Here we demonstrate that Erk5 and p38MAPK signaling pathways are not implicated in the acquired resistance phenotype. However, Erk2, but not Erk1, is critical for the acquired resistance to IM. In fact, Bcr/Abl activates preferentially Erk2 in transient transfection in a dose dependent fashion through the c-Abl part of the chimeric protein. Finally, we present evidences demonstrating how constitutive activation of Erk2 is a de novo mechanism of resistance to IM. In summary our data support the use of therapeutic approaches based on Erk2 inhibition, which could be added to the therapeutic armamentarium to fight CML, especially when IM resistance develops secondary to Erk2 activation.

  4. Clinical features of brain metastases in breast cancer: an implication for hippocampal-sparing whole-brain radiation therapy

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    Wu S

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available San-Gang Wu,1,* Jia-Yuan Sun,2,* Qin Tong,3 Feng-Yan Li,2 Zhen-Yu He2 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Xiamen Cancer Hospital, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen, 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, 3Department of Radiation Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of University of South China, Hengyang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: The objectives of this study were to describe the distribution of brain metastases (BM in breast cancer patients and investigate the risk factors for perihippocampal metastases (PHM. Patients and methods: Retrospective analysis of the clinicopathological characteristics and patterns of BM was performed. Associations between clinicopathological characteristics and PHM (the hippocampus plus 5 mm margin were evaluated using logistic regression analyses. Results: A total of 1,356 brain metastatic lesions were identified in 192 patients. Patients with 1–3 BM, 4–9 BM, and ≥10 BM accounted for 63.0%, 18.8%, and 18.2%, respectively. There were only 7 (3.6% patients with hippocampal metastases (HM and 14 (7.3% patients with PHM. On logistic regression, the number of BM was an independent risk factor for PHM. Patients with ≥10 BM had a significantly higher risk of PHM compared with those with <10 BM. Breast cancer subtype (BCS was not associated with PHM. The number of BM was significantly correlated with various BCSs. Patients with hormone receptor (HR+/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2+, HR-/HER2+, and HR-/HER2- subtypes had a higher probability of ≥10 BM, relative to patients with an HR+/HER2- subtype. Conclusion: Our study suggests that a low incidence of PHM may be acceptable to perform hippocampal-sparing whole-brain radiation therapy for breast cancer patients

  5. Extension of the biological effective dose to the MIRD schema and possible implications in radionuclide therapy dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baechler, Sébastien; Hobbs, Robert F; Prideaux, Andrew R; Wahl, Richard L; Sgouros, George

    2008-03-01

    In dosimetry-based treatment planning protocols, patients with rapid clearance of the radiopharmaceutical require a larger amount of initial activity than those with slow clearance to match the absorbed dose to the critical organ. As a result, the dose-rate to the critical organ is higher in patients with rapid clearance and may cause unexpected toxicity compared to patients with slow clearance. In order to account for the biological impact of different dose-rates, radiobiological modeling is beginning to be applied to the analysis of radionuclide therapy patient data. To date, the formalism used for these analyses is based on kinetics derived from activity in a single organ, the target. This does not include the influence of other source organs to the dose and dose-rate to the target organ. As a result, only self-dose irradiation in the target organ contributes to the dose-rate. In this work, the biological effective dose (BED) formalism has been extended to include the effect of multiple source organ contributions to the net dose-rate in a target organ. The generalized BED derivation has been based on the Medical Internal Radionuclide Dose Committee (MIRD) schema assuming multiple source organs following exponential effective clearance of the radionuclide. A BED-based approach to determine the largest safe dose to critical organs has also been developed. The extended BED formalism is applied to red marrow dosimetry, as well as kidney dosimetry considering the cortex and the medulla separately, since both those organs are commonly dose limiting in radionuclide therapy. The analysis shows that because the red marrow is an early responding tissue (high alpha/beta), it is less susceptible to unexpected toxicity arising from rapid clearance of high levels of administered activity in the marrow or in the remainder of the body. In kidney dosimetry, the study demonstrates a complex interplay between clearance of activity in the cortex and the medulla, as well as the

  6. The personal, societal, and economic burden of schizophrenia in the People's Republic of China: implications for antipsychotic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montgomery W

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available William Montgomery,1 Li Liu,2 Michael D Stensland,5 Hai Bo Xue,2 Tamas Treuer,4 Haya Ascher-Svanum31Eli Lilly and Company, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2Lilly Suzhou Pharmaceutical Company, Ltd, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 3Eli Lilly and Company, Global Health Outcomes, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 4Eli Lilly and Company, Budapest, Hungary; 5Agile Outcomes Research, Inc, Rochester, MN, USABackground: This article describes the personal, societal, and economic burden attributable to schizophrenia in the People's Republic of China and highlights the potential for effective outpatient treatment to reduce this burden given recent changes in the Chinese health care system. The importance of effective antipsychotic therapy in reducing the burden of schizophrenia is also examined.Methods: Published research on the burden, disability, management, and economic costs of schizophrenia in the People's Republic of China was examined in the context of the larger body of global research. Research written in English or Chinese and published before June 2012 was identified using PubMed, CNKI, and Wanfang Med database searches. The contribution of effective antipsychotic therapy in reducing the risk for relapse and hospitalization and improving patients' functioning is described.Results: Schizophrenia imposes a substantial burden on Chinese society, with indirect costs accounting for the majority of the total cost. Functional impairment is high, leading to lost wages and work impairment. In the People's Republic of China, schizophrenia is the most common diagnosis among hospitalized psychiatric patients. Ongoing changes in the Chinese health care system may reduce some barriers to effective relapse prevention in schizophrenia and potentially reduce hospitalizations. The use of antipsychotics for acute episodes and maintenance treatment has been shown to decrease symptom severity and reduce the risk for relapse and hospitalization. However, discontinuing

  7. The role of amputation as an outcome measure in cellular therapy for critical limb ischemia: implications for clinical trial design

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    Pearl Gregory J

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells have been ascribed an important therapeutic role in No-Option Critical limb Ischemia (NO-CLI. One primary endpoint for evaluating NO-CLI therapy is major amputation (AMP, which is usually combined with mortality for AMP-free survival (AFS. Only a trial which is double blinded can eliminate physician and patient bias as to the timing and reason for AMP. We examined factors influencing AMP in a prospective double-blinded pilot RCT (2:1 therapy to control of 48 patients treated with site of service obtained bone marrow cells (BMAC as well as a systematic review of the literature. Methods Cells were injected intramuscularly in the CLI limbs as either BMAC or placebo (peripheral blood. Six month AMP rates were compared between the two arms. Both patient and treating team were blinded of the assignment in follow-up examinations. A search of the literature identified 9 NO-CLI trials, the control arms of which were used to determine 6 month AMP rates and the influence of tissue loss. Results Fifteen amputations occurred during the 6 month period, 86.7% of these during the first 4 months. One amputation occurred in a Rutherford 4 patient. The difference in amputation rate between patients with rest pain (5.6% and those with tissue loss (46.7%, irrespective of treatment group, was significant (p = 0.0029. In patients with tissue loss, treatment with BMAC demonstrated a lower amputation rate than placebo (39.1% vs. 71.4%, p = 0.1337. The Kaplan-Meier time to amputation was longer in the BMAC group than in the placebo group (p = 0.067. Projecting these results to a pivotal trial, a bootstrap simulation model showed significant difference in AFS between BMAC and placebo with a power of 95% for a sample size of 210 patients. Meta-analysis of the literature confirmed a difference in amputation rate between patients with tissue loss and rest pain. Conclusions BMAC shows promise in improving AMP

  8. Energy deposition of H and He ion beams in hydroxyapatite films: A study with implications for ion-beam cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limandri, Silvina; de Vera, Pablo; Fadanelli, Raul C.; Nagamine, Luiz C. C. M.; Mello, Alexandre; Garcia-Molina, Rafael; Behar, Moni; Abril, Isabel

    2014-02-01

    Ion-beam cancer therapy is a promising technique to treat deep-seated tumors; however, for an accurate treatment planning, the energy deposition by the ions must be well known both in soft and hard human tissues. Although the energy loss of ions in water and other organic and biological materials is fairly well known, scarce information is available for the hard tissues (i.e., bone), for which the current stopping power information relies on the application of simple additivity rules to atomic data. Especially, more knowledge is needed for the main constituent of human bone, calcium hydroxyapatite (HAp), which constitutes 58% of its mass composition. In this work the energy loss of H and He ion beams in HAp films has been obtained experimentally. The experiments have been performed using the Rutherford backscattering technique in an energy range of 450-2000 keV for H and 400-5000 keV for He ions. These measurements are used as a benchmark for theoretical calculations (stopping power and mean excitation energy) based on the dielectric formalism together with the MELF-GOS (Mermin energy loss function-generalized oscillator strength) method to describe the electronic excitation spectrum of HAp. The stopping power calculations are in good agreement with the experiments. Even though these experimental data are obtained for low projectile energies compared with the ones used in hadron therapy, they validate the mean excitation energy obtained theoretically, which is the fundamental quantity to accurately assess energy deposition and depth-dose curves of ion beams at clinically relevant high energies. The effect of the mean excitation energy choice on the depth-dose profile is discussed on the basis of detailed simulations. Finally, implications of the present work on the energy loss of charged particles in human cortical bone are remarked.

  9. New Insights into p53 Signaling and Cancer Cell Response to DNA Damage: Implications for Cancer Therapy

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    Razmik Mirzayans

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the p53 signaling pathway by DNA-damaging agents was originally proposed to result either in cell cycle checkpoint activation to promote survival or in apoptotic cell death. This model provided the impetus for numerous studies focusing on the development of p53-based cancer therapies. According to recent evidence, however, most p53 wild-type human cell types respond to ionizing radiation by undergoing stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS and not apoptosis. SIPS is a sustained growth-arrested state in which cells remain viable and secrete factors that may promote cancer growth and progression. The p21WAF1 (hereafter p21 protein has emerged as a key player in the p53 pathway. In addition to its well-studied role in cell cycle checkpoints, p21 regulates p53 and its upstream kinase (ATM, controls gene expression, suppresses apoptosis, and induces SIPS. Herein, we review these and related findings with human solid tumor-derived cell lines, report new data demonstrating dynamic behaviors of p53 and p21 in the DNA damage response, and examine the gain-of-function properties of cancer-associated p53 mutations. We point out obstacles in cancer-therapeutic strategies that are aimed at reactivating the wild-type p53 function and highlight some alternative approaches that target the apoptotic threshold in cancer cells with differing p53 status.

  10. Mitochondrial dysfunction in psychiatric and neurological diseases: cause(s), consequence(s), and implications of antioxidant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasote, Deepak M; Hegde, Mahabaleshwar V; Katyare, Surendra S

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is at the base of development and progression of several psychiatric and neurologic diseases with different etiologies. MtDNA/nDNA mutational damage, failure of endogenous antioxidant defenses, hormonal malfunction, altered membrane permeability, metabolic dysregulation, disruption of calcium buffering capacity and ageing have been found to be the root causes of mitochondrial dysfunction in psychatric and neurodegenerative diseases. However, the overall consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction are only limited to increase in oxidative/nitrosative stress and cellular energy crises. Thus far, extensive efforts have been made to improve mitochondrial function through specific cause-dependent antioxidant therapy. However, owing to complex genetic and interlinked causes of mitochondrial dysfunction, it has not been possible to achieve any common, unique supportive antioxidant therapeutic strategy for the treatment of psychiatric and neurologic diseases. Hence, we propose an antioxidant therapeutic strategy for management of consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction in psychiatric and neurologic diseases. It is expected that this will not only reduces oxidative stress, but also promote anaerobic energy production.

  11. Hepatitis C RNA assay differences in results: Potential implications for shortened therapy and determination of Sustained Virologic Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloherty, Gavin; Chevaliez, Stephane; Sarrazin, Christoph; Herman, Christine; Holzmayer, Vera; Dawson, George; Maasoumy, Benjamin; Vermehren, Johannes; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Feld, Jordan J.; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    Approval of Ledipasvir/Sofosbuvir for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C (HCV) includes the truncation of therapy from 12 to 8 weeks in treatment naïve, non-cirrhotic patients with baseline HCV RNA levels <6 million IU/mL (6.8 log10 IU/mL). The aim of this study was to evaluate this clinical cutoff with a different widely used commercially available HCV RNA test. Results from samples tested prospectively with Roche High Pure TaqMan HCV 2.0 test (HPS) were compared to those tested retrospectively with the Abbott RealTime HCV RNA test (ART). Using 6 million IU/mL as the cut-off, pre-treatment results were concordant in 70.4% of cases. When results with the same test measured at screening and baseline, clinical decisions could be impacted in 14.4% and 6.2% of cases for HPS and ART respectively. Using only HCV RNA cutoff of 6 million IU/mL, 29.55% of subjects would receive a different and potentially incorrect treatment duration based solely on HCV RNA test method used. A further 6–14% of subjects would have treatment decision change based on the day the sample was taken. PMID:27762283

  12. Shockwave therapy differentially stimulates endothelial cells: implications on the control of inflammation via toll-Like receptor 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holfeld, Johannes; Tepeköylü, Can; Kozaryn, Radoslaw; Urbschat, Anja; Zacharowski, Kai; Grimm, Michael; Paulus, Patrick

    2014-02-01

    Shock wave therapy (SWT) reportedly improves ventricular function in ischemic heart failure. Angiogenesis and inflammation modulatory effects were described. However, the mechanism remains largely unknown. We hypothesized that SWT modulates inflammation via toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) through the release of cytosolic RNA. SWT was applied to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with 250 impulses, 0.08 mJ/mm(2) and 3 Hz. Gene expression of TLR3, inflammatory genes and signalling molecules was analysed at different time points by real-time polymerase chain reaction. SWT showed activation of HUVECs: enhanced expression of TLR3 and of the transporter protein for nucleic acids cyclophilin B, of pro-inflammatory cytokines cyclophilin A and interleukin-6 and of anti-inflammatory interleukin-10. No changes were found in the expression of vascular endothelial cell adhesion molecule. SWT modulates inflammation via the TLR3 pathway. The interaction between interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10 in TLR3 stimulation can be schematically seen as a three-phase regulation over time.

  13. The implications of oxidative stress and antioxidant therapies in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Clinical aspects and animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Miruna Balmus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, including Crohn′s disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC, is a chronic inflammatory disorder characterized by alternating phases of clinical relapse and remission. The etiology of IBD remains largely unknown, although a combination of patient′s immune response, genetics, microbiome, and environment plays an important role in disturbing intestinal homeostasis, leading to development and perpetuation of the inflammatory cascade in IBD. As chronic intestinal inflammation is associated with the formation of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, oxidative and nitrosative stress has been proposed as one of the major contributing factor in the IBD development. Substantial evidence suggests that IBD is associated with an imbalance between increased ROS and decreased antioxidant activity, which may explain, at least in part, many of the clinical pathophysiological features of both CD and UC patients. Hereby, we review the presently known oxidant and antioxidant mechanisms involved in IBD-specific events, the animal models used to determine these specific features, and also the antioxidant therapies proposed in IBD patients.

  14. Comparison of mutation profiles in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene among populations: implications for potential molecular therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Hernández, Luz Berenice; Gómez-Díaz, Benjamín; Luna-Angulo, Alexandra Berenice; Anaya-Segura, Mónica; Bunyan, David John; Zúñiga-Guzman, Carolina; Escobar-Cedillo, Rosa Elena; Roque-Ramírez, Bladimir; Ruano-Calderón, Luis Angel; Rangel-Villalobos, Héctor; López-Hernández, Julia Angélica; Estrada-Mena, Francisco Javier; García, Silvia; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón Mauricio

    2015-03-09

    Novel therapeutic approaches are emerging to restore dystrophin function in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), a severe neuromuscular disease characterized by progressive muscle wasting and weakness. Some of the molecular therapies, such as exon skipping, stop codon read-through and internal ribosome entry site-mediated translation rely on the type and location of mutations. Hence, their potential applicability worldwide depends on mutation frequencies within populations. In view of this, we compared the mutation profiles of the populations represented in the DMD Leiden Open-source Variation Database with original data from Mexican patients (n = 162) with clinical diagnosis of the disease. Our data confirm that applicability of exon 51 is high in most populations, but also show that differences in theoretical applicability of exon skipping may exist among populations; Mexico has the highest frequency of potential candidates for the skipping of exons 44 and 46, which is different from other populations (p < 0.001). To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive comparison of theoretical applicability of exon skipping targets among specific populations.

  15. Comparison of Mutation Profiles in the Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene among Populations: Implications for Potential Molecular Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Berenice López-Hernández

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Novel therapeutic approaches are emerging to restore dystrophin function in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD, a severe neuromuscular disease characterized by progressive muscle wasting and weakness. Some of the molecular therapies, such as exon skipping, stop codon read-through and internal ribosome entry site-mediated translation rely on the type and location of mutations. Hence, their potential applicability worldwide depends on mutation frequencies within populations. In view of this, we compared the mutation profiles of the populations represented in the DMD Leiden Open-source Variation Database with original data from Mexican patients (n = 162 with clinical diagnosis of the disease. Our data confirm that applicability of exon 51 is high in most populations, but also show that differences in theoretical applicability of exon skipping may exist among populations; Mexico has the highest frequency of potential candidates for the skipping of exons 44 and 46, which is different from other populations (p < 0.001. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive comparison of theoretical applicability of exon skipping targets among specific populations.

  16. Viola tricolor Induces Apoptosis in Cancer Cells and Exhibits Antiangiogenic Activity on Chicken Chorioallantoic Membrane

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    Hamid Reza Sadeghnia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the cytotoxic and apoptogenic properties of hydroalcoholic extract and ethyl acetate (EtOAc, n-butanol, and water fractions (0–800 μg/mL of Viola tricolor were investigated in Neuro2a mouse neuroblastoma and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. In addition, antiangiogenic effect of EtOAc fraction was evaluated on chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM. The quality of EtOAc fraction was also characterized using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC fingerprint. Cytotoxicity assay revealed that EtOAc fraction was the most potent among all fractions with maximal effect on MCF-7 and minimal toxicity against normal murine fibroblast L929 cells. Apoptosis induction by EtOAc fraction was confirmed by increased sub-G1 peak of propidium iodide (PI stained cells. This fraction triggered the apoptotic pathway by increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and cleaved caspase-3 level. Moreover, treatment with EtOAc fraction significantly decreased the diameter of vessels on CAM, while the number of newly formed blood vessels was not suppressed significantly. Analysis of quality of EtOAc fraction using HPLC fingerprint showed six major peaks with different retention times. The results of the present study suggest that V. tricolor has potential anticancer property by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting angiogenesis.

  17. Controlled delivery of antiangiogenic drug to human eye tissue using a MEMS device

    KAUST Repository

    Pirmoradi, Fatemeh Nazly

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate an implantable MEMS drug delivery device to conduct controlled and on-demand, ex vivo drug transport to human eye tissue. Remotely operated drug delivery to human post-mortem eyes was performed via a MEMS device. The developed curved packaging cover conforms to the eyeball thereby preventing the eye tissue from contacting the actuating membrane. By pulsed operation of the device, using an externally applied magnetic field, the drug released from the device accumulates in a cavity adjacent to the tissue. As such, docetaxel (DTX), an antiangiogenic drug, diffuses through the eye tissue, from sclera and choroid to retina. DTX uptake by sclera and choroid were measured to be 1.93±0.66 and 7.24±0.37 μg/g tissue, respectively, after two hours in pulsed operation mode (10s on/off cycles) at 23°C. During this period, a total amount of 192 ng DTX diffused into the exposed tissue. This MEMS device shows great potential for the treatment of ocular posterior segment diseases such as diabetic retinopathy by introducing a novel way of drug administration to the eye. © 2013 IEEE.

  18. Anti-Oxidant, Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Angiogenic Properties of Resveratrol in Ocular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lançon, Allan; Frazzi, Raffaele; Latruffe, Norbert

    2016-03-02

    Resveratrol (3,4',5 trihydroxy-trans-stilbene) is one of the best known phytophenols with pleiotropic properties. It is a phytoalexin produced by vine and it leads to the stimulation of natural plant defenses but also exhibits many beneficial effects in animals and humans by acting on a wide range of organs and tissues. These include the prevention of cardiovascular diseases, anti-cancer potential, neuroprotective effects, homeostasia maintenance, aging delay and a decrease in inflammation. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the main causes of deterioration of vision in adults in developed countries This review deals with resveratrol and ophthalmology by focusing on the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-angiogenic effects of this molecule. The literature reports that resveratrol is able to act on various cell types of the eye by increasing the level of natural antioxidant enzymatic and molecular defenses. Resveratrol anti-inflammatory effects are due to its capacity to limit the expression of pro-inflammatory factors, such as interleukins and prostaglandins, and also to decrease the chemo-attraction and recruitment of immune cells to the inflammatory site. In addition to this, resveratrol was shown to possess anti-VEGF effects and to inhibit the proliferation and migration of vascular endothelial cells. Resveratrol has the potential to be used in a range of human ocular diseases and conditions, based on animal models and in vitro experiments.

  19. Phenolic Compounds as Antiangiogenic CMG2 Inhibitors from Costa Rican Endophytic Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shugeng; Cryan, Lorna; Habeshian, Kaiane A.; Murillo, Catalina; Tamayo-Castillo, Giselle; Rogers, Michael S.; Clardy, Jon

    2013-01-01

    Targeting and inhibiting CMG2 (Capillary Morphogenesis Gene protein 2) represents a new strategy for therapeutic agents for cancer and retinal diseases due to CMG2’s role in blood vessel growth (angiogenesis). A high throughput FRET (Förster Resonance Energy Transfer) assay was developed for the identification of CMG2 inhibitors as anti-angiogenetic agents. Bioassay-guided separation led to the isolation and identification of two new compounds (1 and 2) from CR252M, an endophytic fungus Coccomyces proteae collected from a Costa Rican rainforest, and one known compound (3) from CR1207B (Aurapex penicillata). Secondary in vitro assays indicated anti-angiogenic activity. Compound 3 inhibited the endothelial cell migration at 52 µM, but did not show any endothelial cell antiproliferative effect at 156 µM. The structure of the two new compounds, A (1) and B (2), were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis, including 1D and 2D NMR experiments. PMID:22910038

  20. Antiangiogenic treatment delays chondrocyte maturation and bone formation during limb skeletogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Melinda; Gentili, Chiara; Koyama, Eiki; Zasloff, Michael; Pacifici, Maurizio

    2002-01-01

    Hypertrophic chondrocytes have important roles in promoting invasion of cartilage by blood vessels and its replacement with bone. However, it is unclear whether blood vessels exert reciprocal positive influences on chondrocyte maturation and function. Therefore, we implanted beads containing the antiangiogenic molecule squalamine around humeral anlagen in chick embryo wing buds and monitored the effects over time. Fluorescence microscopy showed that the drug diffused from the beads and accumulated in humeral perichondrial tissues, indicating that these tissues were the predominant targets of drug action. Diaphyseal chondrocyte maturation was indeed delayed in squalamine-treated humeri, as indicated by reduced cell hypertrophy and expression of type X collagen, transferrin, and Indian hedgehog (Ihh). Although reduced in amount, Ihh maintained a striking distribution in treated and control humeri, being associated with diaphyseal chondrocytes as well as inner perichondrial layer. These decreases were accompanied by lack of cartilage invasion and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive (TRAP+) cells and a significant longitudinal growth retardation. Recovery occurred at later developmental times, when in fact expression in treated humeri of markers such as matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) appeared to exceed that in controls. Treating primary cultures of hypertrophic chondrocytes and osteoblasts with squalamine revealed no obvious changes in cell phenotype. These data provide evidence that perichondrial tissues and blood vessels in particular influence chondrocyte maturation in a positive manner and may cooperate with hypertrophic chondrocytes in dictating the normal pace and location of the transition from cartilage to bone.

  1. Anti-Oxidant, Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Angiogenic Properties of Resveratrol in Ocular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Lançon

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol (3,4′,5 trihydroxy-trans-stilbene is one of the best known phytophenols with pleiotropic properties. It is a phytoalexin produced by vine and it leads to the stimulation of natural plant defenses but also exhibits many beneficial effects in animals and humans by acting on a wide range of organs and tissues. These include the prevention of cardiovascular diseases, anti-cancer potential, neuroprotective effects, homeostasia maintenance, aging delay and a decrease in inflammation. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is one of the main causes of deterioration of vision in adults in developed countries This review deals with resveratrol and ophthalmology by focusing on the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-angiogenic effects of this molecule. The literature reports that resveratrol is able to act on various cell types of the eye by increasing the level of natural antioxidant enzymatic and molecular defenses. Resveratrol anti-inflammatory effects are due to its capacity to limit the expression of pro-inflammatory factors, such as interleukins and prostaglandins, and also to decrease the chemo-attraction and recruitment of immune cells to the inflammatory site. In addition to this, resveratrol was shown to possess anti-VEGF effects and to inhibit the proliferation and migration of vascular endothelial cells. Resveratrol has the potential to be used in a range of human ocular diseases and conditions, based on animal models and in vitro experiments.

  2. Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome: an anti-angiogenic state?

    Science.gov (United States)

    KUSANOVIC, Juan Pedro; ROMERO, Roberto; ESPINOZA, Jimmy; NIEN, Jyh Kae; KIM, Chong Jai; MITTAL, Pooja; EDWIN, Sam; EREZ, Offer; GOTSCH, Francesca; MAZAKI-TOVI, Shali; THAN, Nandor G.; SOTO, Eleazar; CAMACHO, Natalia; GOMEZ, Ricardo; QUINTERO, Ruben; HASSAN, Sonia S.

    2008-01-01

    Objective An imbalanced chronic blood flow between the donor and recipient twin through placental vascular anastomoses is the accepted pathophysiology of twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS). Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (VEGFR-1) mRNA is overexpressed only in the syncytiotrophoblast of the donor twin in some cases of TTTS. This study was conducted to determine maternal plasma concentrations of placental growth factor (PlGF), soluble VEGFR-1, and soluble endoglin (s-Eng) in monochorionic-diamniotic pregnancies with and without TTTS. Study design This case-control study included monochorionic-diamniotic pregnancies between 16–26 weeks with and without TTTS. Maternal plasma concentrations of PlGF, sVEGFR-1 and s-Eng were determined with ELISA. A p-value <.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Patients with TTTS had higher median plasma concentrations of s-Eng [14.8 ng/ml vs. 7.8 ng/ml; p<0.001] and sVEGFR-1 [6383.1 pg/ml vs. 3220.1 pg/ml; p<0.001]; and lower median plasma concentrations of PlGF [115.5 pg/ml vs. 359.3 pg/ml; p=0.002] than those without TTTS. Conclusions We propose that an anti-angiogenic state may be present in some cases of TTTS. PMID:18395032

  3. Antioxidant and antiangiogenic properties of phenolic extract from Pleurotus tuber-regium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shaoling; Lai, Tsz ching; Chen, Lei; Kwok, Hin fai; Lau, Clara Bik-san; Cheung, Peter C K

    2014-10-01

    Pleurotus tuber-regium (Fries) Singer (PTR), both an edible and a medicinal mushroom also known as tiger milk mushroom, has experienced growing popularity and economic importance due to its flavor, nutritive value, and medicinal effects. In this study, the antioxidant and antiangiogenic activities of a 60% ethanol extract (EE) obtained from the sclerotium of PTR were investigated. Typical phenolic compounds including protocatechuic, chlorogenic, syringic, ferulic, and folic acid were identified and quantified in EE by the HPLC-UV-ESI/MS analyses. EE possessed strong antioxidant activity and could dose-dependently inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) migration and tube formation. qPCR results showed that VEGF-induced FGF, ANG-Tie, and MMP gene expression as well as VEGFR were down-regulated at the mRNA level after treated with EE, suggesting that multiple molecular targets related to angiogenesis was involved. Furthermore, EE also inhibited the formation of subintestinal vessel plexus (SIVs) in zebrafish embryos in vivo. All of these suggested that EE of PTR could be the source of potential inhibitors to target angiogenesis.

  4. Molecular level interaction of the human acidic fibroblast growth factor with the antiangiogenic agent, inositol hexaphosphate .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sriramoju M; Wang, Han-Min; Mohan, Sepuru K; Chou, Ruey-Hwang; Yu, Chin

    2010-12-21

    Acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF1) regulates a wide array of important biological phenomena such as angiogenesis, cell differentiation, tumor growth, and neurogenesis. Generally, FGFs are known for their strong affinity for the glycosaminoglycan heparin, as a prerequisite for recognition of a specific tyrosine kinase on the cell surface and are responsible for the cell signal transduction cascade. Inositol hexaphosphate (IP6) is a natural antioxidant and is known for its antiangiogenic role, in addition to its ability to control tumor growth. In the present study, we investigated the interaction of IP6 with the acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF1) using various biophysical techniques including isothermal calorimetry, circular dichroism, and multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. Herein, we have reported the three-dimensional solution structure of the FGF1-IP6 complex. These data show that IP6 binds FGF1 and enhances its thermal stability. In addition, we also demonstrate that IP6 acts as an antagonist to acidic fibroblast growth factor by inhibiting its receptor binding and subsequently decreasing the mitogenic activity. The inhibition likely results in the ability of IP6 to antagonize the angiogenic and mitogenic activity of FGF1.

  5. Musings on Adventure Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Antonio G.; Stauffer, Gary A.

    2001-01-01

    Critiques various definitions of adventure therapy, then suggests that adventure therapy is any intentional, facilitated use of adventure tools and techniques to guide personal change toward desired therapeutic goals. Reflects on the nature of adventure therapy through a discussion of the application of this definition and its implications for…

  6. Role of neuregulin-1/ErbB signaling in cardiovascular physiology and disease: implications for therapy of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmens, Katrien; Doggen, Kris; De Keulenaer, Gilles W

    2007-08-21

    Since the discovery that neuregulin-1 (NRG-1)/ErbB signaling is indispensable in cardiac development, evidence has shown that this system also plays a crucial role in the adult heart. In patients, an inhibitory ErbB2 antibody, trastuzumab, used in the treatment of mammary carcinomas, increases the risk for the development of cardiotoxic cardiomyopathy. Postnatal disruption of NRG-1/ErbB signaling by gene targeting in mice leads to dilated cardiomyopathy. Initially, the search for the mechanisms behind these observations focused mainly on the effects of NRG-1 on cardiomyocyte growth and survival and revealed that NRG-1 has Akt-dependent antiapoptotic effects in cultured cardiomyocytes. In vivo studies, however, did not uniformly reinforce a role for apoptosis in the development of cardiomyopathy induced by impaired NRG-1/ErbB signaling. More recent studies have revealed that NRG-1 is involved in the regulation of cardiac sympathovagal balances by counterbalancing adrenergic stimulation of the adult myocardium and through an obligatory interaction with the muscarinic cholinergic system. NRG-1 is synthesized and released by the endocardial and cardiac microvascular endothelium, dynamically controlled by neurohormonal and biomechanical stimuli. The physiology of the cardiac NRG-1/ErbB system has implications for the treatment of both cancer and heart failure. Clinical studies in breast cancer with novel ErbB inhibitors are currently underway. Novel oncological indications for ErbB inhibition are emerging; cardiovascular side effects need to be carefully monitored. On the other hand, pharmacological activation of ErbB signaling is likely an unrecognized and beneficial effect of currently used drugs in heart failure and a promising therapeutic approach to prevent or reverse myocardial dysfunction.

  7. Community perceptions of malaria and malaria treatment behaviour in a rural district of Ghana: implications for artemisinin combination therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boahen Owusu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artesunate-amodiaquine (AS-AQ was introduced in Ghana as the first line drug for treatment of uncomplicated malaria in 2004. We report the perceptions of malaria and malaria treatment behaviour, the community awareness of and perceptions about AS-AQ two years after the introduction of this ACT treatment for malaria. Methods Two surveys were conducted; a cross-sectional survey of 729 randomly selected household heads (urban-362, rural-367 and 282 women with children Results Majority of respondents ( > 75% in the sampled survey mentioned mosquito bites as the cause of malaria. Other causes mentioned include environmental factors (e.g. dirty surroundings and standing in the sun. Close to 60% of the household heads and 40% of the care-givers interviewed did not know about AS-AQ. The community respondents who knew about and had ever taken AS-AQ perceived it to be a good drug; although they mentioned they had experienced some side effects including headaches and body weakness. Co-blistered AS-AQ was available in all the government health facilities in the study area. Different formulations of ACTs were however found in urban chemical shops but not in rural chemical stores where monotherapy antimalarials were predominant. Conclusion The knowledge of fever as a symptom of malaria is high among the study population. The awareness of AS-AQ therapy and its side-effect was low in the study area. Community education and sensitization, targeting all categories of the population, has to be intensified to ensure an efficient implementation process.

  8. Perceptions of HIV, AIDS and tuberculosis among patients on antiretroviral therapy in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe: implications for the provision of HIV and TB care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödlach, Alexander; Dlodlo, Riitta A; Hwalima, Zanele E

    2012-06-01

    The objectives of the research were to explore perceptions of HIV, AIDS and tuberculosis (TB) among individuals enrolled in antiretroviral therapy (ART) at two municipal clinics in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, and to assess the implications of these perceptions on the provision of HIV and TB care services. Data were collected using the freelist technique to elicit the elements of a cultural domain as well as open-ended interviews with ART clients, conducted during June and July 2009. Participants were recruited through non-probability convenience sampling. The freelist data were analysed using multidimensional scaling and hierarchical clustering, and the interview data were analysed using the grounded theory method. The results suggest that: 1) the participants had substantial knowledge about HIV, AIDS and TB; 2) the participants' perceptions of HIV, AIDS and TB constituted three distinct, though overlapping, cultural domains; 3) because of the availability of ART and TB treatment, a diagnosis of HIV infection or TB alone was generally perceived with hope that one would be able to live a normal life, while AIDS illness or TB/HIV coinfection were associated with notions of death and despair; and, 4) such perceptions may negatively impact the uptake of testing for HIV and TB, and thereby contribute to delayed start of the respective treatment. Health messages should build on these meanings which have the potential to either enhance or compromise available health programmes and their use by people living with HIV or TB.

  9. Continuous administration of endostatin by intraperitoneally implanted osmotic pump improves the efficacy and potency of therapy in a mouse xenograft tumor model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kisker, O; Becker, CM; Prox, D; Fannon, M; D'Amato, R; Flynn, E; Fogler, WE; Sim, BKL; Allred, EN; Pirie-Shepherd, [No Value; Folkman, J

    2001-01-01

    In the first Phase I clinical trials of endostatin as an antiangiogenic therapy for cancer, the protein was administered as an i.v. bolus for similar to 20-30 min each day. This protocol was based on experimental studies in which animals were treated by s.c. bolus once a day. However, it was not cle

  10. Definitive radiation therapy for treatment of laryngeal carcinoma. Impact of local relapse on outcome and implications for treatment strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoebers, F.; Rios, E.; Troost, E.; Ende, P. van den; Jong, J. de [Maastricht Univ. Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO Clinic); Kross, K.; Lacko, M.; Kremer, B. [Maastricht Univ. Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands). Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery; Lalisang, R. [Maastricht Univ. Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands). Div. of Medical Oncology

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to evaluate outcome after radiotherapy (RT) for laryngeal carcinoma and investigate effects of local relapse on ultimate disease control, including surgical salvage procedures. Methods and materials: In all, 435 patients with laryngeal carcinoma (cT1-cT4a) treated with primary RT were retrospectively analyzed. Uni- and multivariate analyses were performed to identify prognostic factors for local relapse-free survival and overall survival. Results: Median follow-up was 38 months (range 1-144 months). The cumulative frequency of local recurrence was dependent on T stage: cT1 tumors 10 %, cT2 18 %, cT3 23 %, and cT4 36 % (p < 0.001). Salvage surgery for local persistent/recurrent disease was performed in 59 of 78 patients (76 %). The ultimate local control rates at 5 years (including salvage therapy) were 98, 98, 87, and 68 % for cT1, cT2, cT3, and cT4 tumors (p < 0.001), respectively. For the patients who developed local recurrence, the 5-year ultimate local control rates were 80, 88, 55, and 26 % (p < 0.001), respectively. Overall survival at 5 years was 68 % for patients without local relapse and 50 % for patients experiencing local failure (p < 0.001). In univariate analysis, cT stage, cN stage, and tumor volume were statistically significant associated with local relapse-free survival. In multivariate analysis for the cT3-4 tumors, only tumor volume remained statistically significant (HR 1.017, p = 0.001) for local relapse-free survival. Conclusion: Local control rates for cT1-2 laryngeal carcinomas are favorable and in concordance with previous reports and most recurrences are salvaged. For cT3-4 tumors treated with RT alone, initial local control rates are moderate, and in 60 % of recurring cases salvage surgery is attempted, with ultimate local control being achieved in only a subset. For voluminous, locally advanced laryngeal tumors, more aggressive treatment modalities should be considered, including upfront laryngectomy

  11. Implication of spot position error on plan quality and patient safety in pencil-beam-scanning proton therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Juan; Beltran, Chris J., E-mail: beltran.chris@mayo.edu; Herman, Michael G. [Division of Medical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively and systematically assess dosimetric effects induced by spot positioning error as a function of spot spacing (SS) on intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plan quality and to facilitate evaluation of safety tolerance limits on spot position. Methods: Spot position errors (PE) ranging from 1 to 2 mm were simulated. Simple plans were created on a water phantom, and IMPT plans were calculated on two pediatric patients with a brain tumor of 28 and 3 cc, respectively, using a commercial planning system. For the phantom, a uniform dose was delivered to targets located at different depths from 10 to 20 cm with various field sizes from 2{sup 2} to 15{sup 2} cm{sup 2}. Two nominal spot sizes, 4.0 and 6.6 mm of 1 σ in water at isocenter, were used for treatment planning. The SS ranged from 0.5 σ to 1.5 σ, which is 2–6 mm for the small spot size and 3.3–9.9 mm for the large spot size. Various perturbation scenarios of a single spot error and systematic and random multiple spot errors were studied. To quantify the dosimetric effects, percent dose error (PDE) depth profiles and the value of percent dose error at the maximum dose difference (PDE [ΔDmax]) were used for evaluation. Results: A pair of hot and cold spots was created per spot shift. PDE[ΔDmax] is found to be a complex function of PE, SS, spot size, depth, and global spot distribution that can be well defined in simple models. For volumetric targets, the PDE [ΔDmax] is not noticeably affected by the change of field size or target volume within the studied ranges. In general, reducing SS decreased the dose error. For the facility studied, given a single spot error with a PE of 1.2 mm and for both spot sizes, a SS of 1σ resulted in a 2% maximum dose error; a SS larger than 1.25 σ substantially increased the dose error and its sensitivity to PE. A similar trend was observed in multiple spot errors (both systematic and random errors). Systematic PE can lead to noticeable hot

  12. Employment of Salmonella in Cancer Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Che-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    One of the primary limitations of cancer gene therapy is lack of selectivity of the therapeutic gene to tumor cells. Current efforts are focused on discovering and developing tumor-targeting vectors that selectively target only cancer cells but spare normal cells to improve the therapeutic index. The use of preferentially tumor-targeting bacteria as vectors is one of the innovative approaches for the treatment of cancer. This is based on the observation that some obligate or facultative-anaerobic bacteria are capable of multiplying selectively in tumors and inhibiting their growth. In this study, we exploited attenuated Salmonella as a tumoricidal agent and a vector to deliver genes for tumor-targeted gene therapy. Attenuated Salmonella, carrying a eukaryotic expression plasmid encoding an anti-angiogenic gene, was used to evaluate its' ability for tumor targeting and gene delivery in murine tumor models. We also investigated the use of a polymer to modify or shield Salmonella from the pre-existing immune response in the host in order to improve gene delivery to the tumor. These results suggest that tumor-targeted gene therapy using Salmonella carrying a therapeutic gene, which exerts tumoricidal and anti-angiogenic activities, represents a promising strategy for the treatment of tumors.

  13. HL-217, a new topical anti-angiogenic agent, inhibits retinal vascular leakage and pathogenic subretinal neovascularization in Vldlr{sup −/−} mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Junghyun; Kim, Chan-Sik; Jo, Kyuhyung [Korean Medicine Based Herbal Drug Development Group, Herbal Medicine Research Division, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Yun-Seok; Kim, Hyun-Gyu; Lee, Geun-Hyeog [Research and Development Center, Hanlim Pharm. Co. Ltd., 1656-10, Seocho-dong, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun Mi; Sohn, Eunjin [Korean Medicine Based Herbal Drug Development Group, Herbal Medicine Research Division, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Sook, E-mail: jskim@kiom.re.kr [Korean Medicine Based Herbal Drug Development Group, Herbal Medicine Research Division, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • HL-217 is a new synthetic topical anti-angiogenic agent. • HL-217 attenuated subretinal neovascularization in Vldlr{sup −/−} mice. • HL-217 blocked the binding of PDGF-BB to PDGFRβ. - Abstract: HL-217 is a new synthetic angiogenesis inhibitor. Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) is a vasoactive factor and has been implicated in proliferative retinopathies. In this study, we examined the mechanism of action and efficacy of topical application of HL-217 on subretinal neovascularization in very low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (Vldlr{sup −/−}) mice. In three-week-old male Vldlr{sup −/−} mice, HL-217 (1.5 or 3 mg/ml) was administered twice per day for 4 weeks by topical eye drop instillation. Neovascular areas were then measured. We used a protein array to evaluate the expression levels of angiogenic factors. The inhibitory effect of HL-217 on the PDGF-BB/PDGFRβ interaction was evaluated in vitro. The neovascular area in the Vldlr{sup −/−} mice was significantly reduced by HL-217. Additionally, HL-217 decreased the expression levels of PDGF-BB protein and VEGF mRNA. Moreover, HL-217 dose-dependently inhibited the PDGF-BB/PDGFRβ interaction (IC{sub 50} = 38.9 ± 0.7 μM). These results suggest that HL-217 is a potent inhibitor of PDGF-BB. HL-217, when applied topically, is an effective inhibitor of subretinal neovascularization due to its ability to inhibit the pro-angiogenic effects of PDGF-BB.

  14. ENMD-2076 is an orally active kinase inhibitor with antiangiogenic and antiproliferative mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Graham C; Brokx, Richard D; Denny, Trisha A; Hembrough, Todd A; Plum, Stacy M; Fogler, William E; Sidor, Carolyn F; Bray, Mark R

    2011-01-01

    ENMD-2076 is a novel orally active, small molecule kinase inhibitor with a mechanism of action involving several pathways key to tumor growth and survival: angiogenesis, proliferation, and the cell cycle. ENMD-2076 has selective activity against the mitotic kinase Aurora A, as well as kinases involved in angiogenesis (VEGFRs, FGFRs). ENMD-2076 inhibited the growth in vitro of a wide range of human solid tumor and hematopoietic cancer cell lines with IC(50) values ranging from 0.025 to 0.7 μmol/L. ENMD-2076 was also shown to induce regression or complete inhibition of tumor growth in vivo at well-tolerated doses in tumor xenograft models derived from breast, colon, melanoma, leukemia, and multiple myeloma cell lines. Pharmacodynamic experiments in vivo showed that in addition to inhibiting Aurora A, single doses of ENMD-2076 had sustained inhibitory effects on the activation of Flt3 as well as the angiogenic tyrosine kinases, VEGFR2/KDR and FGFR1 and 2. ENMD-2076 was shown to prevent the formation of new blood vessels and regress formed vessels in vivo at doses equivalent to those that gave substantial activity in tumor xenograft models. These results indicate that ENMD-2076 is a well-tolerated, orally active multitarget kinase inhibitor with a unique antiangiogenic/antiproliferative profile and provides strong preclinical support for use as a therapeutic for human cancers. Several phase 1 studies involving ENMD-2076 have been recently completed, and the compound is currently being evaluated in a phase 2 clinical trial in patients with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer.

  15. Vascular CXCR4 expression - a novel antiangiogenic target in gastric cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Ingold

    antiangiogenic target for the treatment of gastric carcinomas.

  16. Enhanced antitumor efficacy of a vascular disrupting agent combined with an antiangiogenic in a rat liver tumor model evaluated by multiparametric MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Chen

    Full Text Available A key problem in solid tumor therapy is tumor regrowth from a residual viable rim after treatment with a vascular disrupting agent (VDA. As a potential solution, we studied a combined treatment of a VDA and antiangiogenic. This study was approved by the institutional ethical committee for the use and care of laboratory animals. Rats with implanted liver tumors were randomized into four treatment groups: 1 Zd6126 (Zd; 2 Thalidomide (Tha; 3 Zd in combination with Tha (ZdTha; and 4 controls. Multiparametric MRIs were performed and quantified before and after treatment. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs and plasma stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α were monitored. Tumor apoptosis, necrosis, and microvessels were verified by histopathology. A single use of Zd or Tha did not significantly delay tumor growth. The combined ZdTha showed enhanced antitumor efficacy due to synergistic effects; it induced a cumulative tumor apoptosis or necrosis, which resulted in significant delay in tumor growth and reduction in the viable tumor rim; it also reduced tumor vessel permeability; and it improved tumor hemodynamic indexes, most likely via a transient normalization of tumor vasculature induced by Tha. A stepwise linear regression analysis showed that the apparent diffusion coefficient was an independent predictor of tumor growth. We found no significant increases in Zd-induced circulating EPCs or plasma SDF-1α. ZdTha showed improved therapeutic efficacy in solid tumors compared to either agent alone. The therapeutic effects were successfully tracked in vivo with multiparametric MRI.

  17. [Genetic basis of head and neck cancers and gene therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özel, Halil Erdem; Özkırış, Mahmut; Gencer, Zeliha Kapusuz; Saydam, Levent

    2013-01-01

    Surgery and combinations of traditional treatments are not successful enough particularly for advanced stage head and neck cancer. The major disadvantages of chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the lack of specificity for the target tissue and toxicity to the patient. As a result, gene therapy may offer a more specific approach. The aim of gene therapy is to present therapeutic genes into cancer cells which selectively eliminate malignant cells with no systemic toxicity to the patient. This article reviews the genetic basis of head and neck cancers and important concepts in cancer gene therapy: (i) inhibition of oncogenes; (ii) tumor suppressor gene replacement; (iii) regulation of immune response against malignant cells; (iv) genetic prodrug activation; and (v) antiangiogenic gene therapy. Currently, gene therapy is not sufficient to replace the traditional treatments of head and neck cancers, however there is no doubt that it will have an important role in the near future.

  18. Molecular features of interaction between VEGFA and anti-angiogenic drugs used in retinal diseases: a computational approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Bianca Maria Platania

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Anti-angiogenic agents are biological drugs used for treatment of retinal neovascular degenerative diseases. In this study, we aimed at in-silico analysis of interaction of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA, the main mediator of angiogenesis, with binding domains of anti-angiogenic agents used for treatment of retinal diseases, such as ranibizumab, bevacizumab and aflibercept. The analysis of anti-VEGF/VEGFA complexes was carried out by means of protein-protein docking and molecular dynamics (MD coupled to molecular mechanics-Poisson Boltzmann Surface Area (MM-PBSA calculation. Molecular dynamics simulation was further analyzed by protein contact networks. Rough energetic evaluation with protein-protein docking scores revealed that aflibercept/VEGFA complex was characterized by electrostatic stabilization, whereas ranibizumab and bevacizumab complexes were stabilized by Van der Waals (VdW energy term; these results were confirmed by MM-PBSA. Comparison of MM-PBSA predicted energy terms with experimental binding parameters reported in literature indicated that the high association rate (Kon of aflibercept to VEGFA was consistent with high stabilizing electrostatic energy. On the other hand, the relatively low experimental dissociation rate (Koff of ranibizumab may be attributed to lower conformational fluctuations of the ranibizumab/VEGFA complex, higher number of contacts and hydrogen bonds in comparison to bevacizumab and aflibercept. Thus, the anti-angiogenic agents have been found to be considerably different both in terms of molecular interactions and stabilizing energy. Characterization of such features can improve the design of novel biological drugs potentially useful in clinical practice.

  19. Anti-angiogenic effects of a mutant endostatin: a new prospect for treating retinal and choroidal neovascularization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujing Bai

    Full Text Available Pathological fundus angiogenesis is a major cause of vision loss in retina diseases. Endostatin, a C-terminal fragment of collagen XVIII, is an endogenous anti-angiogenic protein. The present study aimed to investigate the in vitro and in vivo anti-angiogenic properties of two proteins: an N-terminal H1D/H3D mutant endostatin (M-ES and a polyethylene glycol propionaldehyde (PEG covalent M-ES (PEG-M-ES.M-ES and PEG-M-ES properties were characterized in vitro using a zinc ion binding assay and a stability test. Activity assays, including migration, proliferation, and tube formation assays, were performed with human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRMECs and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Mouse oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR and choroidal neovascularization (CNV models were used to evaluate in vivo anti-angiogenic effects. In addition, a rabbit model was used to study the retinal pharmacokinetic profile following an intravitreal injection.The results indicated that the H1D/H3D mutations of endostatin reduced the zinc binding capacity of M-ES and facilitated PEG covalent binding. PEG-M-ES was more stable and persisted longer in the retina compared with M-ES. The in vitro studies demonstrated that M-ES and PEG-M-ES inhibited HRMEC and HUVEC proliferation, migration, and tube formation more efficiently than ES. In vivo, a single intravitreal injection of M-ES and PEG-M-ES significantly decreased neovascularization in both the OIR and CNV animal models.The present study demonstrated for the first time that PEG-M-ES exhibits a long-term inhibitory effect on neovascularization in vitro and in vivo. These data suggest that PEG-M-ES may represent an innovative therapeutic strategy to prevent fundus neovascularization.

  20. Activation of the NF-kappaB pathway by adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors and its implications in immune response and gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayandharan, Giridhara R; Aslanidi, George; Martino, Ashley T; Jahn, Stephan C; Perrin, George Q; Herzog, Roland W; Srivastava, Arun

    2011-03-01

    Because our in silico analysis with a human transcription factor database demonstrated the presence of several binding sites for NF-κB, a central regulator of cellular immune and inflammatory responses, in the adeno-associated virus (AAV) genome, we investigated whether AAV uses NF-κB during its life cycle. We used small molecule modulators of NF-κB in HeLa cells transduced with recombinant AAV vectors. VP16, an NF-κB activator, augmented AAV vector-mediated transgene expression up to 25-fold. Of the two NF-κB inhibitors, Bay11, which blocks both the canonical and the alternative NF-κB pathways, totally ablated transgene expression, whereas pyrrolidone dithiocarbamate, which interferes with the classical NF-κB pathway, had no effect. Western blot analyses confirmed the abundance of the nuclear p52 protein component of the alternative NF-κB pathway in the presence of VP16, which was ablated by Bay11, suggesting that AAV transduction activates the alternative NF-κB pathway. In vivo, hepatic AAV gene transfer activated the canonical NF-κB pathway within 2 h, resulting in expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines (likely reflecting the sensing of viral particles by antigen-presenting cells), whereas the alternative pathway was activated by 9 h. Bay11 effectively blocked activation of both pathways without interfering with long-term transgene expression while eliminating proinflammatory cytokine expression. These studies suggest that transient immunosuppression with NF-κB inhibitors before transduction with AAV vectors should lead to a dampened immune response, which has significant implications in the optimal use of AAV vectors in human gene therapy.

  1. Dynamic impacts of the inhibition of the molecular chaperone Hsp90 on the T-cell proteome have implications for anti-cancer therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Fierro-Monti

    Full Text Available The molecular chaperone Hsp90-dependent proteome represents a complex protein network of critical biological and medical relevance. Known to associate with proteins with a broad variety of functions termed clients, Hsp90 maintains key essential and oncogenic signalling pathways. Consequently, Hsp90 inhibitors are being tested as anti-cancer drugs. Using an integrated systematic approach to analyse the effects of Hsp90 inhibition in T-cells, we quantified differential changes in the Hsp90-dependent proteome, Hsp90 interactome, and a selection of the transcriptome. Kinetic behaviours in the Hsp90-dependent proteome were assessed using a novel pulse-chase strategy (Fierro-Monti et al., accompanying article, detecting effects on both protein stability and synthesis. Global and specific dynamic impacts, including proteostatic responses, are due to direct inhibition of Hsp90 as well as indirect effects. As a result, a decrease was detected in most proteins that changed their levels, including known Hsp90 clients. Most likely, consequences of the role of Hsp90 in gene expression determined a global reduction in net de novo protein synthesis. This decrease appeared to be greater in magnitude than a concomitantly observed global increase in protein decay rates. Several novel putative Hsp90 clients were validated, and interestingly, protein families with critical functions, particularly the Hsp90 family and cofactors themselves as well as protein kinases, displayed strongly increased decay rates due to Hsp90 inhibitor treatment. Remarkably, an upsurge in survival pathways, involving molecular chaperones and several oncoproteins, and decreased levels of some tumour suppressors, have implications for anti-cancer therapy with Hsp90 inhibitors. The diversity of global effects may represent a paradigm of mechanisms that are operating to shield cells from proteotoxic stress, by promoting pro-survival and anti-proliferative functions. Data are available via

  2. Improved Perfusion MR Imaging Assessment of Intracerebral Tumor Blood Volume and Antiangiogenic Therapy Efficacy in a Rat Model with Ferumoxytol

    OpenAIRE

    Gahramanov, Seymur; Muldoon, Leslie L; Li, Xin; Neuwelt, Edward A.

    2011-01-01

    Our findings suggest that, at perfusion MR imaging, more consistent estimations of relative cerebral blood volume are provided with ferumoxytol than with gadolinium-based contrast agents regardless of the permeability of the tumor vasculature.

  3. Recruitment of bone marrow derived cells during anti-angiogenic therapy in GBM : Bone marrow derived cell in GBM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Jennifer C.; Walenkamp, Annemiek M. E.; den Dunnen, Wilfred F. A.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a highly vascular tumor characterized by rapid and invasive tumor growth, followed by oxygen depletion, hypoxia and neovascularization, which generate a network of disorganized, tortuous and permeable vessels. Recruitment of bone marrow derived cells (BMDC) is crucial for vascu

  4. Aponecrotic, antiangiogenic and antiproliferative effects of a novel dextran derivative on breast cancer growth in vitro and in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Benedetto, Mélanie Di; Starzec, Anna; Colombo, Bruno M; Briane, Dominique; Perret, Gérard Y; Kraemer, Michel; Crépin, Michel

    2002-01-01

    1 Since the sodium phenylacetate (NaPa) was reported to enhance the inhibitory effect of carboxymethyl benzylamide dextran (CMDB) on the breast cancer growth, we performed the esterification of CMDB with NaPa to obtain a new drug carrying the characteristics of these two components. A new molecule, phenylacetate carboxymethyl benzylamide dextran, was named NaPaC.We investigated in vitro and in vivo the effects of NaPaC on MCF-7ras cell growth as well as its apoptotic and antiangiogenic effect...

  5. Natural phenolic metabolites with anti-angiogenic properties – a review from the chemical point of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Sun

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Considering the many secondary natural metabolites available from plants, phenolic compounds play a particularly important role in human health as they occur in significant amounts in many fruits, vegetables and medicinal plants. In this review natural phenolic compounds of plant origin with significant anti-angiogenic properties are discussed. Thirteen representatives from eight different natural or natural-like phenolic subclasses are presented with an emphasis on their synthesis and methods to modify the parent compounds. When available, the consequence of structural variation on the pharmacological activity of the molecules is described.

  6. Disease modifying and antiangiogenic activity of 2-Methoxyestradiol in a murine model of rheumatoid arthritis

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    Moore Elizabeth G

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A critical component of disease progression in rheumatoid arthritis (RA involves neovascularization associated with pannus formation. 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2 is a naturally occurring molecule with no known physiologic function, although at pharmacologic concentrations it has antiproliferative and antiangiogenic activities. We investigated the impact of orally administered 2ME2 on the initiation and development of proliferative synovitis using the anti-collagen monoclonal antibodies (CAIA model. Methods Severe polyarticular arthritis was induced in Balb/c female mice by administration of 2 mg of a monoclonal antibody cocktail intravenously into the tail vein of mice. Twenty-four hours following monoclonal antibody administration, mice were injected with 25 μg of LPS (E. coli strain 0111:B4 via the intraperitoneal route. Treatment with 2ME2 (100, 75, 50, 25, 10, 1 mg/kg, p.o., daily, or vehicle control began 24 hrs following LPS challenge and continued to day 21. Hind limbs were harvested, sectioned and evaluated for DMARD activity and general histopathology by histomorphometric analysis and immunohistochemistry (vWF staining. In a separate study, different dosing regimens of 2ME2 (100 mg/kg; q.d. vs q.w. vs q.w. × 2 were evaluated. The effect of treatment with 2ME2 on gene expression of inflammatory cytokines and angiogenic growth factors in the joint space was evaluated 5 and 14 days after the induction of arthritis. Results Mice treated with 2ME2 beginning 24 hours post anti-collagen monoclonal antibody injection, showed a dose-dependent inhibition in mean arthritic scores. At study termination (day 21, blinded histomorphometric assessments of sectioned hind limbs demonstrated decreases in synovial inflammation, articular cartilage degradation, pannus formation, osteoclast activity and bone resorption. At the maximal efficacious dosing regimen (100 mg/kg/day, administration of 2ME2 resulted in total inhibition of the

  7. Diminished oligomerization in the synthesis of new anti-angiogenic cyclic peptide using solution instead of solid-phase cyclization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Sandra; Clarhaut, Jonathan; Péraudeau, Elodie; Vincenzi, Marian; Soum, Claire; Rossi, Filomena; Guillon, Jean; Papot, Sébastien; Ronga, Luisa

    2016-05-01

    The design and synthesis of novel peptides that inhibit angiogenesis is an important area for anti-angiogenic drug development. Cyclic and small peptides present several advantages for therapeutic application, including stability, solubility, increased bio-availability and lack of immune response in the host cell. We describe here the synthesis and biological evaluations of a new cyclic peptide analog of CBO-P11: cyclo(RIKPHE), designated herein as CBO-P23M, a hexamer peptide encompassing residues 82 to 86 of VEGF which are involved in the interaction with VEGF receptor-2. CBO-P23M was prepared using in solution cyclization, therefore reducing the peptide cyclodimerization occurred during solid-phase cyclization. The cyclic dimer of CBO-P23M, which was obtained as the main side product during synthesis of the corresponding monomer, was also isolated and investigated. Both peptides markedly reduce VEGF-A-induced phosphorylation of VEGFR-2 and Erk1/2. Moreover, they exhibit anti-angiogenic activity in an in vitro morphogenesis study. Therefore CBO-P23M and CBO-P23M dimer appear as attractive candidates for the development of novel angiogenesis inhibitors for the treatment of cancer and other angiogenesis-related diseases. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 368-375, 2016.

  8. Growth-Inhibitory and Antiangiogenic Activity of the MEK Inhibitor PD0325901 in Malignant Melanoma with or without BRAF Mutations

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    Ludovica Ciuffreda

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The Raf/MEK/ERK pathway is an importantmediator of tumor cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Here, weinvestigated the growth-inhibitory and antiangiogenic properties of PD0325901, a novel MEK inhibitor, in human melanoma cells. PD0325901 effects were determined in a panel of melanoma cell lines with different genetic aberrations. PD0325901 markedly inhibited ERK phosphorylation and growth of both BRAF mutant and wild-type melanoma cell lines, with IC50 in the nanomolar range even in the least responsive models. Growth inhibition was observed both in vitro and in vivo in xenograft models, regardless of BRAF mutation status, and was due to G1-phase cell cycle arrest and subsequent induction of apoptosis. Cell cycle (cyclin D1, c-Myc, and p27KIP1 and apoptosis (Bcl-2 and survivin regulators were modulated by PD0325901 at the protein level. Gene expression profiling revealed profound modulation of several genes involved in the negative control of MAPK signaling and melanoma cell differentiation, suggesting alternative, potentially relevant mechanisms of action. Finally, PD0325901 inhibited the production of the proangiogenic factors vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin 8 at a transcriptional level. In conclusion, PD0325901 exerts potent growth-inhibitory, proapoptotic, and antiangiogenic activity in melanoma lines, regardless of their BRAF mutation status. Deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms of action of MEK inhibitors will likely translate into more effective treatment strategies for patients experiencing malignant melanoma.

  9. Homoleptic phosphino copper(I) complexes with in vitro and in vivo dual cytotoxic and anti-angiogenic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandin, V; Trenti, A; Porchia, M; Tisato, F; Giorgetti, M; Zanusso, I; Trevisi, L; Marzano, C

    2015-11-01

    Homoleptic, tetrahedral Cu(i) complexes of the type [Cu(P)4]BF4 (1-3), where P are the phosphine ligands, 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane (PTA), 3,7-diacetyl-1,3,7-triaza-5-phosphabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane (DAPTA) and 2-thia-1,3,5-triaza-phosphoaadamantane-2,2-dioxide (PTA-SO2), have been prepared. Novel complexes [Cu(DAPTA)4]BF42 and [Cu(PTA-SO2)4]BF43 have been fully characterized by means of spectroscopic methods, corroborated by XAS-EXAFS analysis of 2. In vitro cell culture experiments revealed a significant antiproliferative activity for Cu(i) compounds against several human cancer cell lines derived from solid tumors with preferential cell growth inhibition towards tumour compared to non-malignant cells. In vitro monitoring of migration and capillary-like tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) showed an anti-angiogenic effect of copper(i) complexes at sub-cytotoxic concentrations. In vivo studies on the antitumor efficacy and ability to inhibit angiogenesis confirmed the dual cytotoxic and anti-angiogenic properties of Cu(i) derivatives.

  10. Therapy of Multiple Myeloma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.Goldschmidt; F.W.Cremer; 等

    2002-01-01

    Multiple Myeloma(MM)is characterised by the accumulation of malignanat plasma cells in the bone marrow producing a monocolonal immungoglobulin.The standard conventiona therapy in the combination of melphalan and prednisone resulting in a response rate of 40%-60% and in a median survival time of approximately 3 years.In order to improve the therapeutic efficacy va rious combination regimens have been tested.Most randomized trials have frailed to show a significant improvement in survival time when combination chemotherapy is used instead of melphalan with or without prednisone.The benefit of maintenance therapy with interferon-alpha has been demonstrated.The toxicity of interferon-alpha,which may reduce the quality of life,should be considered.Recently,myeloma-treatment has been modified.High-dose chemotherapy accompaniced by hematopoietic stem-cell support via autologous transplant is recommended up to the age of 65-70 years.First results from a French study comparing single versus double autologous transplantaiton have shown a benefit in terms of event-free survival for the sequential approach.Vaccinations as an adoptive immuntherapy to treat minimal residual dsease are umder way.The mortality rate of allogeneic transplantation of hemaatopoietic stem cells has been reduced in the last 5 years.The use of reduced conditioning regimens or the partial depletion of T cells in peripheral blood stem cell transplants in an effort to decrease transplant related mortality are promising approaches.Thalidomide and its derivates are a new class of agents with independent anti-tumour activity in MM.Encouraging results with this antiangiogenic therapy in phase Ⅱ trials have been reported.Supportive therapies,such as the treatment of anaemia with erythropoietin,the management of renal failure and the use of bisphosphonates,improve the life quality of MM patients.

  11. Factors associated with physical and sexual violence by police among people who inject drugs in Ukraine: implications for retention on opioid agonist therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Kutsa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ukraine's volatile HIV epidemic, one of the largest in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, remains concentrated in people who inject drugs (PWID. HIV prevalence is high (21.3% to 41.8% among the estimated 310,000 PWID. Opioid agonist therapy (OAT is the most cost-effective HIV prevention strategy there, yet OAT services are hampered by negative attitudes and frequent harassment of OAT clients and site personnel by law enforcement. This paper examines the various types of police violence that Ukrainian PWID experience and factors associated with the different types of violence, as well as the possible implications of police harassment on OAT retention. Methods: In 2014 to 2015, we conducted a cross-sectional survey in five Ukrainian cities with 1613 PWID currently, previously and never on OAT, using a combination of respondent-driven sampling, as well as random sampling. We analysed correlates of police violence by multiple factors, including by gender, and their effects on duration of OAT retention. Self-reported physical and sexual violence by police were the two primary outcomes, while retention on OAT was used as a secondary outcome. Results: Overall, 1033 (64.0% PWID reported being physically assaulted by police, which was positively correlated with currently or previously being on OAT (69.1% vs. 60.2%; p<0.01. HIV prevalence rates were higher in those receiving OAT than those not on OAT (47.6% vs. 36.1%; p<0.01. Police violence experiences differed by sex, with men experiencing significantly more physical violence, while women experienced more sexual violence (65.9% vs. 42.6%; p<0.01. For PWID who had successfully accessed OAT, longer OAT retention was significantly correlated both with sexual assault by police and fewer non-fatal overdoses. Conclusions: Police violence is a frequent experience among PWID in Ukraine, particularly for those accessing OAT, an evidence-based primary and secondary HIV prevention strategy. Police

  12. Economic implications of using bendamustine, alemtuzumab, or chlorambucil as a first-line therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia in the US: a cost-effectiveness analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kongnakorn T

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Thitima Kongnakorn,1 James A Sterchele,2 Christopher G Salvador,3 Denis Getsios,4 Mkaya Mwamburi51Evidera, Bangkok, Thailand; 2formerly of Teva Branded Pharmaceutical Products R&D, Inc, Frazer, PA, 3Oncology Market Research, Teva Branded Pharmaceutical Products R&D, Inc, Frazer, PA, 4Evidera, Lexington, MA, 5Tufts University School of Medicine, Public Health and Community Medicine, Boston, MA, USABackground: The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of using bendamustine versus alemtuzumab or bendamustine versus chlorambucil as a first-line therapy in patients with Binet stage B or C chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL in the US.Methods: A discrete event simulation of the disease course of CLL was developed to evaluate the economic implications of single-agent treatment with bendamustine, alemtuzumab, or chlorambucil, which are indicated for a treatment-naïve patient population with Binet stage B or C CLL. Data from clinical trials were used to create a simulated patient population, risk equations for progression-free survival and survival post disease progression, response rates, and rates of adverse events. Costs from a US health care payer perspective in 2012 US dollars, survival (life years, and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs were estimated over a patient's lifetime; all were discounted at 3% per year.Results: Compared with alemtuzumab, bendamustine was considered to be a dominant treatment providing greater benefit (6.10 versus 5.37 life years and 4.02 versus 3.45 QALYs at lower cost ($78,776 versus $121,441. Compared with chlorambucil, bendamustine was associated with higher costs ($78,776 versus $42,337 but with improved health outcomes (6.10 versus 5.21 life years and 4.02 versus 3.30 QALYs, resulting in incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of $40,971 per life year gained and $50,619 per QALY gained.Conclusion: Bendamustine is expected to provide cost savings and greater health benefit than alemtuzumab in

  13. Increased serum levels of anti-angiogenic factors soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase and soluble endoglin in sickle cell disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landburg, P.P.; Elsenga, H.; Schnog, J.B.; Duits, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    The anti-angiogenic factors soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase (sFlt)-1 and soluble endoglin (sEng) have been shown to be of importance in angiogenesis by sequestering and inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor, placenta-like growth factor and transforming growth factor-beta(1) signaling. Given

  14. Polychlorinated biphenyls target Notch/Dll and VEGF R2 in the mouse placenta and human trophoblast cell lines for their anti-angiogenic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkunte, Satyan; Huang, Zheping; Lippe, Eliana; Kumar, Sunil; Robertson, Larry W.; Sharma, Surendra

    2017-01-01

    The intrauterine environment is particularly vulnerable to environmental exposures. We previously established a mouse model that provided evidence for pregnancy complications and placental anti-angiogenesis in response to Aroclor 1254 (A-1254), a mixture of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Importantly, these effects were observed in IL-10−/−, but not wild type, mice, suggesting that IL-10 deficiency predisposes to pregnancy disruptive effects of environmental toxicants. However, the mechanisms by which PCBs cause anti-angiogenic effects are unclear. Here, we evaluated PCB-mediated anti-angiogenic effects by diverse but complementary approaches, including HUVEC-mediated trophoblast invasion in nude mice, in vitro three-dimensional capillary tube formation involving HUVEC and/or HTR8 trophoblasts, and aortic ring endothelial cell outgrowth/sprouting. Taken together, our data suggest that PCBs act as potent anti-angiogenic agents. Importantly, we show that treatment of pregnant IL-10−/− mice with A-1254 resulted in placental activation of the Notch/Delta-like ligand (Dll) pathway, a master regulator of cell-cell interaction and vascular patterning. Similar results were obtained with HUVEC and HTR8 trophoblasts. Rescue of A-1254-induced disruption of HUVEC-based tube formation by γ-secretase inhibitor L1790 confirmed the critical role of the Notch/Dll pathway. Our data suggest that PCBs impart pregnancy disruptive functions by activating the Notch/Dll pathway and by inducing anti-angiogenic effects at the maternal-fetal interface. PMID:28071720

  15. 89Zr-bevacizumab PET visualizes heterogeneous tracer accumulation in tumor lesions of renal cell carcinoma patients and differential effects of antiangiogenic treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosting, Sjoukje F; Brouwers, Adrienne H; van Es, Suzanne C; Nagengast, Wouter B; Oude Munnink, Thijs H; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N; Hollema, Harry; de Jong, Johan R; de Jong, Igle J; de Haas, Sanne; Scherer, Stefan J; Sluiter, Wim J; Dierckx, Rudi A; Bongaerts, Alfons H H; Gietema, Jourik A; de Vries, Elisabeth G E

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: No validated predictive biomarkers for antiangiogenic treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) exist. Tumor vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) level may be useful. We determined tumor uptake of (89)Zr-bevacizumab, a VEGF-A-binding PET tracer, in mRCC patients before

  16. Truth therapy/lie therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langs, R

    In this paper an attempt is made to conceptualize a basic dimension of various psychotherapeutic treatment modalities, especially psychoanalysis and psychoanalytically oriented psychotherapy. The central variable under consideration is the extent to which each endeavors to approach the truth within both patient and therapist as it exists dynamically in terms of their spiraling unconscious communicative interaction. That treatment modality which takes into account every possible dimension of such truths is termed truth therapy. Treatment modalities that make no attempt to arrive at these truths or that deliberately or inadvertently falsify their nature are termed lie or barrier therapies. Extensive consideration is given to truth therapy and the truth system on which it is based. The basis for the need for lie therapies is explored, and lie systems, which may arise from either patient or therapist, or both, are identified. A classification of common types of lie patients and lie therapists (and their main techniques) is offered. The implications of this delineation for our understanding of the dynamic therapies are discussed, and a number of new clinical issues arising from this perspective are addressed.

  17. Delayed Diagnosis of Osteonecrosis of the Jaw (ONJ Associated with Bevacizumab Therapy in Colorectal Cancer Patients: Report of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Erovigni

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Medication-induced Osteonecrosis of the Jaw (MRONJ has been reported not only after use of antiresorptive agents (bisphosphonates and denosumab, but also in cancer patients receiving antiangiogenic agents, alone or combined with antiresorptive drugs. We report two cases of MRONJ observed in colorectal cancer patients after bevacizumab therapy only. MRONJ was diagnosed, respectively, two and seven months after a tooth extraction; both the patients had received two courses of bevacizumab infusions (for a total of 29 and 10 administrations, respectively. We discuss if tooth extraction during or after antiangiogenic therapy could be a potential trigger of MRONJ, but also if an underlying bone disease not evident before oral surgery might be a possible cause. A careful drug history has to be registered by dental specialists in cancer patients before oral surgery and adequate imaging might be obtained to avoid a delayed diagnosis.

  18. Synthesis, biological evaluation, and docking studies of new 2-furylbenzimidazoles as anti-angiogenic agents: part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temirak, Ahmed; Shaker, Yasser M; Ragab, Fatma A F; Ali, Mamdouh M; Soliman, Salwa M; Mortier, Jeremie; Wolber, Gerhard; Ali, Hamed I; El Diwani, Hoda I

    2014-04-01

    The 2-(5-methyl-2-furyl)-1H-benzimidazole moiety has shown promising activity against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced angiogenesis. In part I of this study, we have synthesized new analogs and tested their anti-angiogenic potentials. Here, we continue our previous study with different new analogs. Some compounds show promising cytotoxic activity against the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7, with IC50 in the range of 7.80-13.90 µg/mL, and exhibited remarkable in vitro inhibition against VEGF in the MCF-7 cancer cell line, with 95-98% of inhibition in comparison to tamoxifen as reference (IC50: 8.00 µg/mL, % of inhibition = 98%). Additionally, a molecular docking study was carried out to gain insight into plausible binding modes and to understand the structure-activity relationships of the synthesized compounds.

  19. Anti-Angiogenic Treatment (Sunitinib for Disseminated Malignant Haemangiopericytoma: A Case Study and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Delgado

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A meningeal haemangiopericytoma (HP is a mesenchymal tumour that makes up less than 1% of all CNS tumours. HPs arise from pericytes and present high rates of recurrence and distant metastasis. The primary treatment option is surgery. When the disease is disseminated, chemotherapy produces a weak and short-lived response; therefore, new drugs are needed. Case Presentation: We describe the case of a 65-year-old woman with a 13-year history of recurrent HP. After local treatment with radiotherapy, she developed metastases that required systemic treatment, and treatment with sunitinib, an oral inhibitor of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and the platelet-derived growth factor receptor, was initiated. As a result, radiological stabilisation of the systemic disease was maintained for over 12 months. Conclusions: Anti-angiogenic agents can be useful for treating disseminated HP, but further studies are needed to confirm their possible role in controlling metastatic disease.

  20. Anti-cancer and anti-angiogenic effects of curcumin and tetrahydrocurcumin on implanted hepatocellular carcinoma in nude mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pornprom Yoysungnoen; Ponthip Wirachwong; Chatchawan Changtam; Apichart Suksamrarn; Suthiluk Patumraj

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effect of tetrahydrocurcumin (THC) on tumor angiogenesis compared with curcumin (CUR) by using both in vitro and in vivo models of human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2).METHODS: The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used for testing the anti-proliferating activities of CUR and THC. In male BALB/c nude mice, 2 x 106 human HepG2 cells were inoculated onto a dorsal skin-fold chamber. One day after HepG2 inoculation, the experimental groups were fed oral daily with CUR or THC (300 mg/kg or 3000 mg/kg). On d 7, 14 and 21, the tumor microvasculature was observed using fluorescence videomicroscopy and capillary vascularity (CV) was measured.RESULTS: Pathological angiogenic features including microvascular dilatation, tortuosity, and hyper-permeability were observed. CUR and THC could attenuate these pathologic features. In HepG2-groups, the CV were significantly increased on d 7 (52.43%), 14 (69.17%), and 21 (74.08%), as compared to controls (33.04%,P < 0.001). Treatment with CUR and THC resulted in significant decrease in the CV (P < 0.005 and P < 0.001, respectively). In particular, the anti-angiogenic effects of CUR and THC were dose-dependent manner. However, the beneficial effect of THC treatment than CUR was observed, in particular, from the 21 d CV (44.96% and 52.86%, P < 0.05).CONCLUSION: THC expressed its anti-angiogenesis without any cytotoxic activities to HepG2 cells even at the highest doses. It is suggested that anti-angiogenic properties of CUR and THC represent a common potential mechanism for their anti-cancer actions.

  1. Association of Maternal Antiangiogenic Profile at Birth With Early Postnatal Loss of Microvascular Density in Offspring of Hypertensive Pregnancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Grace Z.; Aye, Christina Y.L.; Lewandowski, Adam J.; Davis, Esther F.; Khoo, Cheen P.; Newton, Laura; Yang, Cheng T.; Al Haj Zen, Ayman; Simpson, Lisa J.; O’Brien, Kathryn; Cook, David A.; Granne, Ingrid; Kyriakou, Theodosios; Channon, Keith M.; Watt, Suzanne M.

    2016-01-01

    Offspring of hypertensive pregnancies are more likely to have microvascular rarefaction and increased blood pressure in later life. We tested the hypothesis that maternal angiogenic profile during a hypertensive pregnancy is associated with fetal vasculogenic capacity and abnormal postnatal microvascular remodeling. Infants (n=255) born after either hypertensive or normotensive pregnancies were recruited for quantification of postnatal dermal microvascular structure at birth and 3 months of age. Vasculogenic cell potential was assessed in umbilical vein endothelial cells from 55 offspring based on in vitro microvessel tube formation and proliferation assays. Maternal angiogenic profile (soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1, soluble endoglin, vascular endothelial growth factor, and placental growth factor) was measured from postpartum plasma samples to characterize severity of pregnancy disorder. At birth, offspring born after hypertensive pregnancy had similar microvessel density to those born after a normotensive pregnancy, but during the first 3 postnatal months, they had an almost 2-fold greater reduction in total vessel density (−17.7±16.4% versus −9.9±18.7%; P=0.002). This postnatal loss varied according to the vasculogenic capacity of the endothelial cells of the infant at birth (r=0.49; P=0.02). The degree of reduction in both in vitro and postnatal in vivo vascular development was proportional to levels of antiangiogenic factors in the maternal circulation. In conclusion, our data indicate that offspring born to hypertensive pregnancies have reduced vasculogenic capacity at birth that predicts microvessel density loss over the first 3 postnatal months. Degree of postnatal microvessel reduction is proportional to levels of antiangiogenic factors in the maternal circulation at birth. PMID:27456522

  2. Future Therapies of Wet Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Ishikawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly population, and the prevalence of the disease increases exponentially with every decade after the age of 50 years. While VEGF inhibitors are promising drugs for treating patients with ocular neovascularization, there are limitations to their potential for improving vision in AMD patients. Thus, future therapies are required to have the potential to improve visual outcomes. This paper will summarize the future strategies and therapeutic targets that are aimed at enhancing the efficacy and duration of effect of antiangiogenic strategies.

  3. Monitoring early tumor response to drug therapy with diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flexman, Molly L.; Vlachos, Fotios; Kim, Hyun Keol; Sirsi, Shashank R.; Huang, Jianzhong; Hernandez, Sonia L.; Johung, Tessa B.; Gander, Jeffrey W.; Reichstein, Ari R.; Lampl, Brooke S.; Wang, Antai; Borden, Mark A.; Yamashiro, Darrell J.; Kandel, Jessica J.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2012-01-01

    Although anti-angiogenic agents have shown promise as cancer therapeutics, their efficacy varies between tumor types and individual patients. Providing patient-specific metrics through rapid noninvasive imaging can help tailor drug treatment by optimizing dosages, timing of drug cycles, and duration of therapy--thereby reducing toxicity and cost and improving patient outcome. Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a noninvasive three-dimensional imaging modality that has been shown to capture physiologic changes in tumors through visualization of oxygenated, deoxygenated, and total hemoglobin concentrations, using non-ionizing radiation with near-infrared light. We employed a small animal model to ascertain if tumor response to bevacizumab (BV), an anti-angiogenic agent that targets vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), could be detected at early time points using DOT. We detected a significant decrease in total hemoglobin levels as soon as one day after BV treatment in responder xenograft tumors (SK-NEP-1), but not in SK-NEP-1 control tumors or in non-responder control or BV-treated NGP tumors. These results are confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging T2 relaxometry and lectin perfusion studies. Noninvasive DOT imaging may allow for earlier and more effective control of anti-angiogenic therapy.

  4. Proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proton beam therapy; Cancer - proton therapy; Radiation therapy - proton therapy; Prostate cancer - proton therapy ... that use x-rays to destroy cancer cells, proton therapy uses a beam of special particles called ...

  5. A longitudinal study of angiogenic (placental growth factor) and anti-angiogenic (soluble endoglin and soluble VEGF receptor-1) factors in normal pregnancy and patients destined to develop preeclampsia and deliver a small-for-gestational-age neonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Roberto; Nien, Jyh Kae; Espinoza, Jimmy; Todem, David; Fu, Wenjiang; Chung, Hwan; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Gotsch, Francesca; Erez, Offer; Mazaki-tovi, Shali; Gomez, Ricardo; Edwin, Sam; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Levine, Richard J.; Karumanchi, Ananth

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Accumulating evidence suggests that an imbalance between pro-angiogenic [i.e. vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and placental growth factor (PlGF)] and anti-angiogenic factors [i.e. soluble VEGF receptor-1 (sVEGFR-1, also referred to as sFlt1) is involved in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia (PE). Endoglin is a protein that regulates the pro-angiogenic effects of transforming growth factor β, and its soluble form has been recently implicated in the pathophysiology of PE. The objective of this study was to determine if changes in maternal plasma concentration of these angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors differ prior to development of disease among patients with normal pregnancies, and those destined to develop PE (preterm and term) or to deliver an SGA neonate. Methods This longitudinal nested case-control study included 144 singleton pregnancies in the following groups: 1) patients with uncomplicated pregnancies who delivered appropriate for gestational age (AGA) neonates (n=46); 2) patients who delivered an SGA neonate but did not develop PE (n=56); and 3) patients who developed PE (n=42). Longitudinal samples were collected at each prenatal visit, which was scheduled at four-week intervals from the first or early second trimester until delivery. Plasma concentrations of soluble endoglin (s-Eng), sVEGFR-1 and PlGF were determined by specific and sensitive ELISA. Results 1) Patients destined to deliver an SGA neonate had higher plasma concentrations of s-Eng throughout gestation than those with normal pregnancies; 2) patients destined to develop preterm PE and term PE had significantly higher concentrations of s-Eng than those with normal pregnancies at 23 and 30 weeks, respectively (for preterm PE: p<0.036 and for term PE: 0=0.002); 3) patients destined to develop PE (term or preterm) and those who delivered an SGA neonate had lower plasma concentrations of PlGF than those with normal pregnancy throughout gestation, and the maternal

  6. New perspectives on targeted therapy in ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coward JIG

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Jermaine IG Coward,1–3 Kathryn Middleton,1 Felicity Murphy1 1Mater Health Services, Raymond Terrace, South Brisbane, QLD, Australia; 2Inflammtion and Cancer Therapeutics Group, Mater Research, University of Queensland, Translational Research Institute, Woolloongabba, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; 3School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia Abstract: Epithelial ovarian cancer remains the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. During the last 15 years, there has been only marginal improvement in 5 year overall survival. These daunting statistics are compounded by the fact that despite all subtypes exhibiting striking heterogeneity, their systemic management remains identical. Although changes to the scheduling and administration of chemotherapy have improved outcomes to a degree, a therapeutic ceiling is being reached with this approach, resulting in a number of trials investigating the efficacy of targeted therapies alongside standard treatment algorithms. Furthermore, there is an urge to develop subtype-specific studies in an attempt to improve outcomes, which currently remain poor. This review summarizes the key studies with antiangiogenic agents, poly(adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose inhibitors, and epidermal growth factor receptor/human epidermal growth factor receptor family targeting, in addition to folate receptor antagonists and insulin growth factor receptor inhibitors. The efficacy of treatment paradigms used in non-ovarian malignancies for type I tumors is also highlighted, in addition to recent advances in appropriate patient stratification for targeted therapies in epithelial ovarian cancer. Keywords: antiangiogenic therapy, high-grade serous, low grade ovarian cancer, PARP inhibition, cancer-related inflammation

  7. Gene Therapy with Endogenous Inhibitors of Angiogenesis for Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Beyond Anti-VEGF Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selwyn M. Prea

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of substantial and irreversible vision loss amongst elderly populations in industrialized countries. The advanced neovascular (or “wet” form of the disease is responsible for severe and aggressive loss of central vision. Current treatments aim to seal off leaky blood vessels via laser therapy or to suppress vessel leakage and neovascular growth through intraocular injections of antibodies that target vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. However, the long-term success of anti-VEGF therapy can be hampered by limitations such as low or variable efficacy, high frequency of administration (usually monthly, potentially serious side effects, and, most importantly, loss of efficacy with prolonged treatment. Gene transfer of endogenous antiangiogenic proteins is an alternative approach that has the potential to provide long-term suppression of neovascularization and/or excessive vascular leakage in the eye. Preclinical studies of gene transfer in a large animal model have provided impressive preliminary results with a number of transgenes. In addition, a clinical trial in patients suffering from advanced neovascular AMD has provided proof-of-concept for successful gene transfer. In this mini review, we summarize current theories pertaining to the application of gene therapy for neovascular AMD and the potential benefits when used in conjunction with endogenous antiangiogenic proteins.

  8. ACTIBIND, an actin-binding fungal T2-RNase with antiangiogenic and anticarcinogenic characteristics.

    OpenAIRE

    Roiz, Levava; Smirnoff, Patricia; Bar-Eli, Menashe; Schwartz, Betty; Shoseyov, Oded

    2006-01-01

    KEYWORDS CLASSIFICATION: Agriculture;Angiogenesis Inhibitors;Animals;Anticarcinogenic Agents;Aspergillus niger;blood;Biopsy,Needle;Breast Neoplasms;cytology;Colorectal Neoplasms;dietary modulation of cancer & cancer biomarkers;drug effects;drug therapy;Disease Models,Animal;Endoribonucleases;Female;Food;Humans;Immunohistochemistry;Israel;lifestyle modulation of cancer & cancer biomarkers;Male;Mice;Mice,Nude;Neoplasm Transplantation;Neovascularization,Pathologic;pathology;pharmacology;preventi...

  9. Effect of prolonged discontinuation of successful antiretroviral therapy on CD4+ T cell decline in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: implications for intermittent therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebas, Pablo; Henry, Keith; Mondy, Kristin; Deeks, Steven; Valdez, Herman; Cohen, Cal; Powderly, William G

    2002-09-15

    This study evaluates the change in CD4(+) T cell counts among patients who achieved complete viral suppression and subsequently discontinued highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). We included 72 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1-infected patients with plasma HIV RNA loads of <500 copies/mL for at least 3 months who then discontinued therapy for at least 12 weeks. The median CD4(+) T decay while off HAART was 16 cells/mm(3)/month (interquartile range, -6 to -34 cells/month). The mean follow-up after therapy ended was 45 weeks. The slope of the CD4(+) T cell decay was inversely correlated with the increase of CD4(+) T cells while receiving HAART, baseline virus load, CD4(+) T cell count at the time therapy was discontinued, age, and duration HIV RNA levels were undetectable. In a multiple regression analysis model, the increase of CD4(+) T cells while receiving therapy and age were independently associated with the rate of CD4(+) T cell loss.

  10. Increased Eligibility for Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis C Infection with Shortened Duration of Therapy: Implications for Access to Care and Elimination Strategies in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio M Borgia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: All oral, highly effective direct-acting antiviral combinations, such as sofosbuvir-ledipasvir, have recently been licensed in Canada but cost as much as $67,000 for a 12-week course of therapy, representing a major economic barrier to predominately single-payer health care systems such as that found in Ontario. In hepatitis C virus (HCV genotype 1 noncirrhotic patients with a baseline viral load of <6×106 IU/mL, treatment with sofosbuvir-ledipasvir can be shortened to eight weeks without compromising ≥95% efficacy. The number of HCV-infected patients in Ontario eligible for shortened therapy, and the associated cost savings, are unknown. The authors propose that treating every patient with shortened therapy, regardless of baseline viral load, would lead to significant public cost savings and collateral efficiencies, enabling increased HCV treatment capacity and cure.

  11. Zinc-chelation contributes to the anti-angiogenic effect of ellagic acid on inhibiting MMP-2 activity, cell migration and tube formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Teng Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ellagic acid (EA, a dietary polyphenolic compound, has been demonstrated to exert anti-angiogenic effect but the detailed mechanism is not yet fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the zinc chelating activity of EA contributed to its anti-angiogenic effect. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The matrix metalloproteinases-2 (MMP-2 activity, a zinc-required reaction, was directly inhibited by EA as examined by gelatin zymography, which was reversed dose-dependently by adding zinc chloride. In addition, EA was demonstrated to inhibit the secretion of MMP-2 from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs as analyzed by Western blot method, which was also reversed by the addition of zinc chloride. Reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs (RECK, known to down-regulate the MMP-2 activity, was induced by EA at both the mRNA and protein levels which was correlated well with the inhibition of MMP-2 activity. Interestingly, zinc chloride could also abolish the increase of EA-induced RECK expression. The anti-angiogenic effect of EA was further confirmed to inhibit matrix-induced tube formation of endothelial cells. The migration of endothelial cells as analyzed by transwell filter assay was suppressed markedly by EA dose-dependently as well. Zinc chloride could reverse these two effects of EA also in a dose-dependent manner. Since magnesium chloride or calcium chloride could not reverse the inhibitory effect of EA, zinc was found to be involved in tube formation and migration of vascular endothelial cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Together these results demonstrated that the zinc chelation of EA is involved in its anti-angiogenic effects by inhibiting MMP-2 activity, tube formation and cell migration of vascular endothelial cells. The role of zinc was confirmed to be important in the process of angiogenesis.

  12. Placental-Specific sFLT-1 e15a Protein Is Increased in Preeclampsia, Antagonizes Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Signaling, and Has Antiangiogenic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Kirsten R; Kaitu'u-Lino, Tu'uhevaha J; Hastie, Roxanne; Hannan, Natalie J; Ye, Louie; Binder, Natalie; Cannon, Ping; Tuohey, Laura; Johns, Terrance G; Shub, Alexis; Tong, Stephen

    2015-12-01

    In preeclampsia, the antiangiogenic factor soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFLT-1) is released from placenta into the maternal circulation, causing endothelial dysfunction and organ injury. A recently described splice variant, sFLT-1 e15a, is primate specific and the most abundant placentally derived sFLT-1. Therefore, it may be the major sFLT-1 isoform contributing to the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. sFLT-1 e15a protein remains poorly characterized: its bioactivity has not been comprehensively examined, and serum levels in normal and preeclamptic pregnancy have not been reported. We generated and validated an sFLT-1 e15a-specific ELISA to further characterize serum levels during pregnancy, and in the presence of preeclampsia. Furthermore, we performed assays to examine the bioactivity and antiangiogenic properties of sFLT-1 e15a protein. sFLT-1 e15a was expressed in the syncytiotrophoblast, and serum levels rose across pregnancy. Strikingly, serum levels were increased 10-fold in preterm preeclampsia compared with normotensive controls. We confirmed sFLT-1 e15a is bioactive and is able to inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor signaling of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and block downstream Akt phosphorylation. Furthermore, sFLT-1 e15a has antiangiogenic properties. sFLT-1 e15a decreased endothelial cell migration, invasion, and inhibited endothelial cell tube formation. Administering sFLT-1 e15a blocked vascular endothelial growth factor induced sprouts from mouse aortic rings ex vivo. We have demonstrated that sFLT-1 e15a is increased in preeclampsia, antagonizes vascular endothelial growth factor signaling, and has antiangiogenic activity. Future development of diagnostics and therapeutics for preeclampsia should consider targeting placentally derived sFLT-1 e15a.

  13. Oral 5-Aminosalicylate, Mesalamine Suppository, and Mesalamine Enema as Initial Therapy for Ulcerative Proctitis in Clinical Practice with Quality of Care Implications

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    James M. Richter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ulcerative proctitis (UP is typically treated initially with oral 5-aminosalicylate (“5-ASA”, mesalamine suppository, or mesalamine enema (“UP Rx”. Little is known about their effectiveness in practice. Methods. Using a US health insurance database, we identified new-onset UP patients between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2007, based on the following: (1 initiation of UP Rx; (2 endoscopy in prior 30 days resulting in diagnosis of UP; and (3 no prior encounters for ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease. We examined the incidence of therapy escalation and total costs in relation to initial UP Rx. Results. We identified 548 patients: 327 received mesalamine suppository, 138 received oral 5-ASA, and 83 received mesalamine enema, as initial UP Rx. One-third receiving oral 5-ASA experienced therapy escalation over 12 months, 21% for both mesalamine suppository and enema. Mean cumulative total cost of UP Rx over 12 months was $1552, $996, and $986 for patients beginning therapy with oral 5-ASA, mesalamine enema, and mesalamine suppository, respectively. Contrary to expert recommendations the treatments were often not continued prophylactically. Conclusions. Treatment escalation was common, and total costs of therapy were higher, in patients who initiated treatment with oral 5-ASA. Further study is necessary to assess the significance of these observations.

  14. Broad targeting of angiogenesis for cancer prevention and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zongwei; Dabrosin, Charlotta; Yin, Xin; Fuster, Mark M; Arreola, Alexandra; Rathmell, W Kimryn; Generali, Daniele; Nagaraju, Ganji P; El-Rayes, Bassel; Ribatti, Domenico; Chen, Yi Charlie; Honoki, Kanya; Fujii, Hiromasa; Georgakilas, Alexandros G; Nowsheen, Somaira; Amedei, Amedeo; Niccolai, Elena; Amin, Amr; Ashraf, S Salman; Helferich, Bill; Yang, Xujuan; Guha, Gunjan; Bhakta, Dipita; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Aquilano, Katia; Chen, Sophie; Halicka, Dorota; Mohammed, Sulma I; Azmi, Asfar S; Bilsland, Alan; Keith, W Nicol; Jensen, Lasse D

    2015-12-01

    Deregulation of angiogenesis--the growth of new blood vessels from an existing vasculature--is a main driving force in many severe human diseases including cancer. As such, tumor angiogenesis is important for delivering oxygen and nutrients to growing tumors, and therefore considered an essential pathologic feature of cancer, while also playing a key role in enabling other aspects of tumor pathology such as metabolic deregulation and tumor dissemination/metastasis. Recently, inhibition of tumor angiogenesis has become a clinical anti-cancer strategy in line with chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery, which underscore the critical importance of the angiogenic switch during early tumor development. Unfortunately the clinically approved anti-angiogenic drugs in use today are only effective in a subset of the patients, and many who initially respond develop resistance over time. Also, some of the anti-angiogenic drugs are toxic and it would be of great importance to identify alternative compounds, which could overcome these drawbacks and limitations of the currently available therapy. Finding "the most important target" may, however, prove a very challenging approach as the tumor environment is highly diverse, consisting of many different cell types, all of which may contribute to tumor angiogenesis. Furthermore, the tumor cells themselves are genetically unstable, leading to a progressive increase in the number of different angiogenic factors produced as the cancer progresses to advanced stages. As an alternative approach to targeted therapy, options to broadly interfere with angiogenic signals by a mixture of non-toxic natural compound with pleiotropic actions were viewed by this team as an opportunity to develop a complementary anti-angiogenesis treatment option. As a part of the "Halifax Project" within the "Getting to know cancer" framework, we have here, based on a thorough review of the literature, identified 10 important aspects of tumor angiogenesis and the

  15. Anti-angiogenic effect of Nelumbo nucifera leaf extracts in human umbilical vein endothelial cells with antioxidant potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Suk; Shukla, Shruti; Kim, Jung-Ae; Kim, Myunghee

    2015-01-01

    Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn (Nymphaeaceae) has long been used as a traditional herb in Chinese, Japanese, Indian, and Korean medicinal practices since prehistoric times and flourishes today as the primary form of medicine. This study reports for the first time the potent ability of N. nucifera leaf extracts to inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo, as well as their antioxidant efficacy in various scavenging models and an analysis of their chemical composition. In vivo anti-angiogenic activity was evaluated in a chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model using fertilized chicken eggs, in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by using cell viability, cell proliferation and tube formation assays, and by determining intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vitro. The antioxidant efficacy of N. nucifera leaf extracts was determined in various scavenging models, including total phenolic and flavonoid content. The chemical composition of N. nucifera leaf extracts was determined by GC-MS analysis, which revealed the presence of different phytochemicals. The IC50 values for the DPPH radical scavenging activities of water and methanol extracts were found to be 1699.47 and 514.36 μg ml(-1), and their total phenolic and flavonoid contents were 85.01 ± 2.32 and 147.63 ± 2.23 mg GAE g dry mass(-1) and 35.38 ± 1.32 and 41.86 ± 1.07 mg QA g dry mass(-1), respectively. N. nucifera leaf extracts (10-100 μg ml(-1)) exhibited significant dose-dependent inhibition of VEGF-induced angiogenesis, as well as VEGF-induced proliferation and tube formation in HUVECs. In this study, N. nucifera leaf extracts displayed potent antioxidant and inhibitory effects on VEGF-induced angiogenesis. N. nucifera exerted an inhibitory effect on VEGF-induced proliferation and tube formation, as well as CAM angiogenesis in vivo. Moreover, N. nucifera leaf extracts significantly blocked VEGF-induced ROS production in HUVECs, confirming

  16. Anti-angiogenic effect of Nelumbo nucifera leaf extracts in human umbilical vein endothelial cells with antioxidant potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Suk Lee

    Full Text Available Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn (Nymphaeaceae has long been used as a traditional herb in Chinese, Japanese, Indian, and Korean medicinal practices since prehistoric times and flourishes today as the primary form of medicine. This study reports for the first time the potent ability of N. nucifera leaf extracts to inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-induced angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo, as well as their antioxidant efficacy in various scavenging models and an analysis of their chemical composition. In vivo anti-angiogenic activity was evaluated in a chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM model using fertilized chicken eggs, in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs by using cell viability, cell proliferation and tube formation assays, and by determining intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS in vitro. The antioxidant efficacy of N. nucifera leaf extracts was determined in various scavenging models, including total phenolic and flavonoid content. The chemical composition of N. nucifera leaf extracts was determined by GC-MS analysis, which revealed the presence of different phytochemicals. The IC50 values for the DPPH radical scavenging activities of water and methanol extracts were found to be 1699.47 and 514.36 μg ml(-1, and their total phenolic and flavonoid contents were 85.01 ± 2.32 and 147.63 ± 2.23 mg GAE g dry mass(-1 and 35.38 ± 1.32 and 41.86 ± 1.07 mg QA g dry mass(-1, respectively. N. nucifera leaf extracts (10-100 μg ml(-1 exhibited significant dose-dependent inhibition of VEGF-induced angiogenesis, as well as VEGF-induced proliferation and tube formation in HUVECs. In this study, N. nucifera leaf extracts displayed potent antioxidant and inhibitory effects on VEGF-induced angiogenesis. N. nucifera exerted an inhibitory effect on VEGF-induced proliferation and tube formation, as well as CAM angiogenesis in vivo. Moreover, N. nucifera leaf extracts significantly blocked VEGF-induced ROS production in HUVECs

  17. Aponecrotic, antiangiogenic and antiproliferative effects of a novel dextran derivative on breast cancer growth in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Benedetto, Mélanie; Starzec, Anna; Colombo, Bruno M; Briane, Dominique; Perret, Gérard Y; Kraemer, Michel; Crépin, Michel

    2002-04-01

    1. Since the sodium phenylacetate (NaPa) was reported to enhance the inhibitory effect of carboxymethyl benzylamide dextran (CMDB) on the breast cancer growth, we performed the esterification of CMDB with NaPa to obtain a new drug carrying the characteristics of these two components. A new molecule, phenylacetate carboxymethyl benzylamide dextran, was named NaPaC. 2. We investigated in vitro and in vivo the effects of NaPaC on MCF-7ras cell growth as well as its apoptotic and antiangiogenic effects in comparison to NaPa and CMDB. In addition, we assessed in vitro the antiproliferative effects of these drugs on other breast cancer cells, including MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-435 and MCF-7. 3. In vitro, NaPaC inhibited MCF-7ras cell proliferation by 40% at concentration lower than that of CMDB and NaPa (12 microM vs 73 microM and 10 mM). IC(50)s were 6 and 28 microM for NaPaC and CMDB, respectively. The similar results were obtained for three other breast cancer cell lines. NaPaC reduced the DNA replication and induced cell recruitment in G(0)/G(1) phase more efficiently than its components. Moreover, it induced a cell death at concentration 1000-fold lower than NaPa. 4. In vivo, CMDB (150 mg kg(-1)) and NaPa (40 mg kg(-1)) inhibited the MCF-7ras tumour growth by 37 and 57%, respectively, whereas NaPaC (15 mg kg(-1)) decreased tumour growth by 66% without toxicity. 5. NaPa or CMDB reduced the microvessel number in tumour by 50% after 7 weeks of treatment. NaPaC had the same effect after only 2 weeks. After 7 weeks, it generated a large necrosis area without detectable microvessels. In vitro, NaPaC inhibited human endothelial cell proliferation more efficiently than CMDB or NaPa. NaPaC interacts with vascular endothelial growth factor as observed by affinity electrophoresis. 6. NaPaC acts like NaPa and CMDB but in more potent manner than components used separately. Its antiproliferative, aponecrotic and anti-angiogenic actions make it a good candidate for a new anti

  18. Embolization biomaterial reinforced with nanotechnology for an in-situ release of anti-angiogenic agent in the treatment of hyper-vascularized tumors and arteriovenous malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubeli, E; Yagoubi, N; Pascale, F; Bédouet, L; Slimani, K; Labarre, D; Saint-Maurice, J P; Laurent, A; Moine, L

    2015-10-01

    A polymer based material was developed to act as an embolic agent and drug reservoir for the treatment of arteriovenous malformations (AVM) and hyper vascularized solid tumors. The aim was to combine the blocking of blood supply to the target region and the inhibition of the embolization-stimulated angiogenesis. The material is composed of an ethanolic solution of a linear acrylate based copolymer and acrylate calibrated microparticles containing nanospheres loaded with sunitinib, an anti-angiogenic agent. The precipitation of the linear copolymer in aqueous environment after injection through microcatheter results in the formation of an in-situ embolization gel whereas the microparticles serve to increase the cohesive properties of the embolization agent and to form a reservoir from which the sunitinib-loaded nanospheres are released post-embolization. The swollen state of the microparticles in contact with aqueous medium results in the release of the nanospheres out of microparticles macromolecular structure. After the synthesis, the formulation and the characterization of the different components of the material, anti-angiogenic activity was evaluated in vitro using endothelial cells and in vivo using corneal neovascularization model in rabbit. The efficiency of the arterial embolization was tested in vivo in a sheep model. Results proved the feasibility of this new system for vascular embolization in association with an in situ delivery of anti-angiogenic drug. This combination is a promising strategy for the management of arteriovenous malformations and solid tumors.

  19. ERK1/2 and HIF1α Are Involved in Antiangiogenic Effect of Polyphenols-Enriched Fraction from Chilean Propolis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Alejandro; Saavedra, Nicolás; Rudnicki, Martina; Abdalla, Dulcineia S. P.; Salazar, Luis A.

    2015-01-01

    Propolis has been shown to modulate the angiogenesis in both in vitro and in vivo models. Thus, we aimed to evaluate the antiangiogenic properties of an ethanolic extract of Chilean propolis (EEP) and Pinocembrin (Pn). Migration, formation of capillary-like structures of endothelial cells, and sprouting from rat aortic rings were used to assess the antiangiogenic properties of EEP or Pn. In addition, microRNAs and VEGFA mRNA expression were studied by qPCR. ERK1/2 phosphorylation and HIF1α stabilization were assessed by western blot. EEP or Pn attenuated the migration, the capillary-like tube formation, and the sprouting in the in vitro assays. In addition, the activation of HIF1α and ERK1/2 and the VEGFA mRNA expression was significantly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. In summary, these results suggest that HIF1α and ERK1/2 phosphorylation could be involved in the antiangiogenic effect of Chilean propolis, but more studies are needed to corroborate these findings. PMID:26347785

  20. Corosolic Acid Exhibits Anti-angiogenic and Anti-lymphangiogenic Effects on In Vitro Endothelial Cells and on an In Vivo CT-26 Colon Carcinoma Animal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Ki Hyun; Park, Jong-Hwa; Lee, Dae Young; Hwang-Bo, Jeon; Baek, Nam In; Chung, In Sik

    2015-05-01

    We describe the anti-angiogenic and anti-lymphangiogenic effects of corosolic acid, a pentacyclic triterpenoid isolated from Cornus kousa Burg. A mouse colon carcinoma CT-26 animal model was employed to determine the in vivo anti-angiogenic and anti-lymphangiogenic effects of corosolic acid. Corosolic acid induced apoptosis in CT-26 cells, mediated by the activation of caspase-3. In addition, it reduced the final tumor volume and the blood and lymphatic vessel densities of tumors, indicating that it suppresses in vivo angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. Corosolic acid inhibited the proliferation and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human dermal lymphatic microvascular endothelial cells. In addition, corosolic acid decreased the proliferation and migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells stimulated by angiopoietin-1. Pretreatment with corosolic acid decreased the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and ERK1/2, suggesting that corosolic acid contains anti-angiogenic activity that can suppress FAK signaling induced by angiopoietin-1.

  1. ERK1/2 and HIF1α Are Involved in Antiangiogenic Effect of Polyphenols-Enriched Fraction from Chilean Propolis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Cuevas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Propolis has been shown to modulate the angiogenesis in both in vitro and in vivo models. Thus, we aimed to evaluate the antiangiogenic properties of an ethanolic extract of Chilean propolis (EEP and Pinocembrin (Pn. Migration, formation of capillary-like structures of endothelial cells, and sprouting from rat aortic rings were used to assess the antiangiogenic properties of EEP or Pn. In addition, microRNAs and VEGFA mRNA expression were studied by qPCR. ERK1/2 phosphorylation and HIF1α stabilization were assessed by western blot. EEP or Pn attenuated the migration, the capillary-like tube formation, and the sprouting in the in vitro assays. In addition, the activation of HIF1α and ERK1/2 and the VEGFA mRNA expression was significantly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. In summary, these results suggest that HIF1α and ERK1/2 phosphorylation could be involved in the antiangiogenic effect of Chilean propolis, but more studies are needed to corroborate these findings.

  2. Psoriasis : implications of biologics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lecluse, L.L.A.

    2010-01-01

    Since the end of 2004 several specific immunomodulating therapies: ‘biologic response modifiers’ or ‘biologics’ have been registered for moderate to severe psoriasis in Europe. This thesis is considering the implications of the introduction of the biologics for psoriasis patients, focusing on safety

  3. INTERACTION BETWEEN ANTI-HYPERTENSIVE AND NON-STEROIDAL ANTI INFLAMMATORY DRUGS: IMPLICATIONS IN MANAGEMENT OF OSTEOARTHRITIS AND OPINION ON A COMPROMISE THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Adeolu O. Ajala

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The premise for this article is that a significant proportion of patients presenting in the clinic with osteoarthritis have hypertension as co-morbidity. A common drug of choice in managing symptoms of osteoarthritis including those affecting the knee joint is the Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDS groups. It has been reported however that NSAIDs diminish the effects of anti-hypertensive drugs and may lead to an ineffective hypertension therapy. In order to avoid complications in the health of the patient with concomitant hypertension and osteoarthritis and who are on both antihypertensive and NSAIDs, it becomes imperative to consider using non-pharmacologic approaches such as physiotherapy in managing the symptoms of osteoarthritis in this group of patients and thereby maximizing the effects of their antihypertensive therapy. This is more so that information exists on efficacy of physiotherapy in form of therapeutic exercises and electrotherapeutic modalities in management of clinical features of osteoarthritis.

  4. Effects of music and music therapy on medical patients: a meta-analysis of the research and implications for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dileo, Cheryl

    2006-01-01

    Although the literature examining the effects of music medicine or music therapy interventions in medical settings is both large and growing, this literature is difficult to summarize because of of its diversity. The current article reports the results of a recent meta-analysis of 183 studies across 11 medical specialty areas with 40 categories of outcome variables. Emphasized are results for patients with cancer, those who are terminally ill, and patients with human immunodeficiency virus. Meta-analysis results revealed significantly greater effect sizes for outcomes of music therapy versus music medicine interventions, and significant and homogeneous size effects for several outcome variables, including pain, well-being, mood, and nausea/vomiting. Suggestions for future research are provided.

  5. Increased Lung Expression of Anti-Angiogenic Factors in Down Syndrome: Potential Role in Abnormal Lung Vascular Growth and the Risk for Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galambos, Csaba; Minic, Angela D.; Bush, Douglas; Nguyen, Dominique; Dodson, Blair; Seedorf, Gregory; Abman, Steven H.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Infants with Down syndrome (DS) or Trisomy 21, are at high risk for developing pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), but mechanisms that increase susceptibility are poorly understood. Laboratory studies have shown that early disruption of angiogenesis during development impairs vascular and alveolar growth and causes PAH. Human chromosome 21 encodes known anti-angiogenic factors, including collagen18a1 (endostatin, ES), ß-amyloid peptide (BAP) and Down Syndrome Critical Region 1 (DSCR-1). Therefore, we hypothesized that fetal lungs from subjects with DS are characterized by early over-expression of anti-angiogenic factors and have abnormal lung vascular growth in utero. Methods Human fetal lung tissue from DS and non-DS subjects were obtained from a biorepository. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) was performed to assay 84 angiogenesis-associated genes and individual qRT-PCR was performed for ES, amyloid protein precursor (APP) and DSCR1. Western blot analysis (WBA) was used to assay lung ES, APP and DSCR-1 protein contents. Lung vessel density and wall thickness were determined by morphometric analysis. Results The angiogenesis array identified up-regulation of three anti-angiogenic genes: COL18A1 (ES), COL4A3 (tumstatin) and TIMP3 (tissue inhibitor of metallopeptidase 3) in DS lungs. Single qRT-PCR and WBA showed striking elevations of ES and APP mRNA (p = 0.022 and p = 0.001) and protein (p = 0.040 and p = 0.002; respectively). Vessel density was reduced (p = 0.041) and vessel wall thickness was increased in DS lung tissue (p = 0.033) when compared to non-DS subjects. Conclusions We conclude that lung anti-angiogenic factors, including COL18A1 (ES), COL4A3, TIMP3 and APP are over-expressed and fetal lung vessel growth is decreased in subjects with DS. We speculate that increased fetal lung anti-angiogenic factor expression due to trisomy 21 impairs lung vascular growth and signaling, which impairs alveolarization and

  6. Presleep thoughts and dysfunctional beliefs in subjects of insomnia with or without depression: Implications for cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia in Indian context

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Presleep thoughts may vary between patients of insomnia with or without depression. They are important for cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia (CBT-I), but they have never been systemically examined in Indian population. Materials and Methods: Patients with insomnia (>1 month) who were willing to undergo CBT-I were included in this study after obtaining informed consent. They were requested to fill a sleep diary and return after 15 days. At the time of intake, diagnosis of dep...

  7. G6PD deficiency at Sumba in Eastern Indonesia is prevalent, diverse and severe: implications for primaquine therapy against relapsing Vivax malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Winasti Satyagraha

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Safe treatment of Plasmodium vivax requires diagnosis of both the infection and status of erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD activity because hypnozoitocidal therapy against relapse requires primaquine, which causes a mild to severe acute hemolytic anemia in G6PD deficient patients. Many national malaria control programs recommend primaquine therapy without G6PD screening but with monitoring due to a broad lack of G6PD deficiency screening capacity. The degree of risk in doing so hinges upon the level of residual G6PD activity among the variants present in any given area. We conducted studies on Sumba Island in eastern Indonesia in order to assess the potential threat posed by primaquine therapy without G6PD screening. We sampled 2,033 residents of three separate districts in western Sumba for quantitative G6PD activity and 104 (5.1% were phenotypically deficient (<4.6U/gHb; median normal 10U/gHb. The villages were in two distinct ecosystems, coastal and inland. A positive correlation occurred between the prevalence of malaria and G6PD deficiency: 5.9% coastal versus inland 0.2% for malaria (P<0.001, and 6.7% and 3.1% for G6PD deficiency (P<0.001 at coastal and inland sites, respectively. The dominant genotypes of G6PD deficiency were Vanua Lava, Viangchan, and Chatham, accounting for 98.5% of the 70 samples genotyped. Subjects expressing the dominant genotypes all had less than 10% of normal enzyme activities and were thus considered severe variants. Blind administration of anti-relapse primaquine therapy at Sumba would likely impose risk of serious harm.

  8. Bone Marrow–Derived Stromal Cell Therapy in Cirrhosis: Clinical Evidence, Cellular Mechanisms, and Implications for the Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vainshtein, Jeffrey M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Kabarriti, Rafi; Mehta, Keyur J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Roy-Chowdhury, Jayanta [Department of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Department of Genetics, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Guha, Chandan, E-mail: cguhamd@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Department of Pathology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Current treatment options for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are often limited by the presence of underlying liver disease. In patients with liver cirrhosis, surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy all carry a high risk of hepatic complications, ranging from ascites to fulminant liver failure. For patients receiving radiation therapy, cirrhosis dramatically reduces the already limited radiation tolerance of the liver and represents the most important clinical risk factor for the development of radiation-induced liver disease. Although improvements in conformal radiation delivery techniques have improved our ability to safely irradiate confined areas of the liver to increasingly higher doses with excellent local disease control, patients with moderate-to-severe liver cirrhosis continue to face a shortage of treatment options for HCC. In recent years, evidence has emerged supporting the use of bone marrow–derived stromal cells (BMSCs) as a promising treatment for liver cirrhosis, with several clinical studies demonstrating sustained improvement in clinical parameters of liver function after autologous BMSC infusion. Three predominant populations of BMSCs, namely hematopoietic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and endothelial progenitor cells, seem to have therapeutic potential in liver injury and cirrhosis. Preclinical studies of BMSC transplantation have identified a range of mechanisms through which these cells mediate their therapeutic effects, including hepatocyte transdifferentiation and fusion, paracrine stimulation of hepatocyte proliferation, inhibition of activated hepatic stellate cells, enhancement of fibrolytic matrix metalloproteinase activity, and neovascularization of regenerating liver. By bolstering liver function in patients with underlying Child's B or C cirrhosis, autologous BMSC infusion holds great promise as a therapy to improve the safety, efficacy, and utility of surgery, chemotherapy, and hepatic radiation therapy in the

  9. Pirfenidone enhances the efficacy of combined radiation and sunitinib therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seo-Hyun; Nam, Jae-Kyung; Jang, Junho; Lee, Hae-June, E-mail: hjlee@kcch.re.kr; Lee, Yoon-Jin, E-mail: yjlee8@kcch.re.kr

    2015-06-26

    Radiotherapy is a widely used treatment for many tumors. Combination therapy using anti-angiogenic agents and radiation has shown promise; however, these combined therapies are reported to have many limitations in clinical trials. Here, we show that radiation transformed tumor endothelial cells (ECs) to fibroblasts, resulting in reduced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) response and increased Snail1, Twist1, Type I collagen, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β release. Irradiation of radioresistant Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) tumors greater than 250 mm{sup 3} increased collagen levels, particularly in large tumor vessels. Furthermore, concomitant sunitinib therapy did not show a significant difference in tumor inhibition versus radiation alone. Thus, we evaluated multimodal therapy that combined pirfenidone, an inhibitor of TGF-induced collagen production, with radiation and sunitinib treatment. This trimodal therapy significantly reduced tumor growth, as compared to radiation alone. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that radiation-induced collagen deposition and tumor microvessel density were significantly reduced with trimodal therapy, as compared to radiation alone. These data suggest that combined therapy using pirfenidone may modulate the radiation-altered tumor microenvironment, thereby enhancing the efficacy of radiation therapy and concurrent chemotherapy. - Highlights: • Radiation changes tumor endothelial cells to fibroblasts. • Radio-resistant tumors contain collagen deposits, especially in tumor vessels. • Pirfenidone enhances the efficacy of combined radiation and sunitinib therapy. • Pirfenidone reduces radiation-induced collagen deposits in tumors.