WorldWideScience

Sample records for antiangiogenic therapy implications

  1. Recent developments in antiangiogenic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dredge, Keith; Dalgleish, Angus G; Marriott, J Blake

    2002-12-01

    The use of antiangiogenic therapy is gaining momentum as a novel treatment for a number of conditions, ranging from cancer to psoriasis. This has stemmed from research in the early 1970s showing that the formation of new blood vessels by pre-existing endothelial cells is essential in tumour growth and progression. However, although antiangiogenic therapy was hailed as a new avenue of treatment for cancer, initial clinical data have been disappointing. This has led to the reassessment of antiangiogenic therapy for cancer, and new strategies have been proposed to increase the efficacy of these agents in this setting. Angiogenesis has also been implicated in other conditions that are notoriously difficult to treat, such as arteriosclerosis, arthritis, psoriasis and diabetic retinopathy. Increased understanding of the angiogenic process, the diversity of its inducers and mediators, appropriate drug schedules and the use of these agents with other modalities may lead to radically new treatment regimens for many of these conditions. The role of angiogenesis in different pathological settings, and emerging antiangiogenic agents currently in preclinical and clinical studies are discussed in this review. However, while potential benefits are profound, limitations of antiangiogenic therapy have also been identified, suggesting that there is also a need for caution in applying these compounds to the clinical setting. PMID:12517273

  2. Antiangiogenic therapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, D.L.; Andersson, M.; Andersen, Jon Alexander Lykkegaard;

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Angiogenesis is an important component of cancer growth, invasion and metastasis. Therefore, inhibition of angiogenesis is an attractive strategy for treatment of cancer. We describe existing clinical trials of antiangiogenic agents and the challenges facing the clinical development and...... optimal use of these agents for the treatment of breast cancer. Currently, the most promising approach has been the use of bevacizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against the most potent pro-angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Small molecular inhibitors of VEGF...... tyrosine kinase activity, such as sorafenib, appear promising. While, the role of sunitinib and inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in breast cancer has to be defined. Several unanswered questions remain, such as choice of drug(s), optimal duration of therapy and patient selection criteria...

  3. Antiangiogenic therapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, D.L.; Andersson, M.; Andersen, Jon Alexander Lykkegaard;

    2010-01-01

    optimal use of these agents for the treatment of breast cancer. Currently, the most promising approach has been the use of bevacizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against the most potent pro-angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Small molecular inhibitors of VEGF...... tyrosine kinase activity, such as sorafenib, appear promising. While, the role of sunitinib and inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in breast cancer has to be defined. Several unanswered questions remain, such as choice of drug(s), optimal duration of therapy and patient selection criteria......ABSTRACT: Angiogenesis is an important component of cancer growth, invasion and metastasis. Therefore, inhibition of angiogenesis is an attractive strategy for treatment of cancer. We describe existing clinical trials of antiangiogenic agents and the challenges facing the clinical development and...

  4. Antiangiogenic gene therapy of cancer: recent developments

    OpenAIRE

    Libutti Steven K; Blazer Dan G; Tandle Anita

    2004-01-01

    Abstract With the role of angiogenesis in tumor growth and progression firmly established, considerable effort has been directed to antiangiogenic therapy as a new modality to treat human cancers. Antiangiogenic agents have recently received much widespread attention but strategies for their optimal use are still being developed. Gene therapy represents an attractive alternative to recombinant protein administration for several reasons. This review evaluates the potential advantages of gene t...

  5. FAK regulates platelet extravasation and tumor growth after antiangiogenic therapy withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haemmerle, Monika; Bottsford-Miller, Justin; Pradeep, Sunila; Taylor, Morgan L; Choi, Hyun-Jin; Hansen, Jean M; Dalton, Heather J; Stone, Rebecca L; Cho, Min Soon; Nick, Alpa M; Nagaraja, Archana S; Gutschner, Tony; Gharpure, Kshipra M; Mangala, Lingegowda S; Rupaimoole, Rajesha; Han, Hee Dong; Zand, Behrouz; Armaiz-Pena, Guillermo N; Wu, Sherry Y; Pecot, Chad V; Burns, Alan R; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Afshar-Kharghan, Vahid; Sood, Anil K

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies in patients with ovarian cancer suggest that tumor growth may be accelerated following cessation of antiangiogenesis therapy; however, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we aimed to compare the effects of therapy withdrawal to those of continuous treatment with various antiangiogenic agents. Cessation of therapy with pazopanib, bevacizumab, and the human and murine anti-VEGF antibody B20 was associated with substantial tumor growth in mouse models of ovarian cancer. Increased tumor growth was accompanied by tumor hypoxia, increased tumor angiogenesis, and vascular leakage. Moreover, we found hypoxia-induced ADP production and platelet infiltration into tumors after withdrawal of antiangiogenic therapy, and lowering platelet counts markedly inhibited tumor rebound after withdrawal of antiangiogenic therapy. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in platelets regulated their migration into the tumor microenvironment, and FAK-deficient platelets completely prevented the rebound tumor growth. Additionally, combined therapy with a FAK inhibitor and the antiangiogenic agents pazopanib and bevacizumab reduced tumor growth and inhibited negative effects following withdrawal of antiangiogenic therapy. In summary, these results suggest that FAK may be a unique target in situations in which antiangiogenic agents are withdrawn, and dual targeting of FAK and VEGF could have therapeutic implications for ovarian cancer management. PMID:27064283

  6. Antiangiogenic Steroids in Human Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Pietras

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in the early detection of tumors and in the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery for disease management, the worldwide mortality from human cancer remains unacceptably high. The treatment of cancer may benefit from the introduction of novel therapies derived from natural products. Natural products have served to provide a basis for many of the pharmaceutical agents in current use in cancer therapy. Emerging research indicates that progressive growth and spread of many solid tumors depends, in part, on the formation of an adequate blood supply, and this process of tumor-associated angiogenesis is reported to have prognostic significance in several human cancers. This review focuses on the potential application in antitumor therapy of naturally-occurring steroids that target tumor-associated angiogenesis. Squalamine, a 7,24 dihydroxylated 24-sulfated cholestane steroid conjugated to a spermidine at position C-3, is known to have strong antiangiogenic activity in vitro, and it significantly disrupts tumor proliferation and progression in laboratory studies. Work on the interactions of squalamine with vascular endothelial cells indicate that it binds with cell membranes, inhibits the membrane Na+/H+ exchanger and may further function as a calmodulin chaperone. These primary actions appear to promote inhibition of several vital steps in angiogenesis, such as blockade of mitogen-induced actin polymerization, cell–cell adhesion and cell migration, leading to suppression of endothelial cell proliferation. Preclinical studies with squalamine have shown additive benefits in tumor growth delay when squalamine is combined with cisplatin, paclitaxel, cyclophosphamide, genistein or radiation therapy. This compound has also been assessed in early phase clinical trials in cancer; squalamine was found to exhibit little systemic toxicity and was generally well tolerated by treated patients with various solid tumor malignancies

  7. Antiangiogenic Steroids in Human Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietras, Richard J; Weinberg, Olga K

    2005-03-01

    Despite advances in the early detection of tumors and in the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery for disease management, the worldwide mortality from human cancer remains unacceptably high. The treatment of cancer may benefit from the introduction of novel therapies derived from natural products. Natural products have served to provide a basis for many of the pharmaceutical agents in current use in cancer therapy. Emerging research indicates that progressive growth and spread of many solid tumors depends, in part, on the formation of an adequate blood supply, and this process of tumor-associated angiogenesis is reported to have prognostic significance in several human cancers. This review focuses on the potential application in antitumor therapy of naturally-occurring steroids that target tumor-associated angiogenesis. Squalamine, a 7,24 dihydroxylated 24-sulfated cholestane steroid conjugated to a spermidine at position C-3, is known to have strong antiangiogenic activity in vitro, and it significantly disrupts tumor proliferation and progression in laboratory studies. Work on the interactions of squalamine with vascular endothelial cells indicate that it binds with cell membranes, inhibits the membrane Na(+)/H(+) exchanger and may further function as a calmodulin chaperone. These primary actions appear to promote inhibition of several vital steps in angiogenesis, such as blockade of mitogen-induced actin polymerization, cell-cell adhesion and cell migration, leading to suppression of endothelial cell proliferation. Preclinical studies with squalamine have shown additive benefits in tumor growth delay when squalamine is combined with cisplatin, paclitaxel, cyclophosphamide, genistein or radiation therapy. This compound has also been assessed in early phase clinical trials in cancer; squalamine was found to exhibit little systemic toxicity and was generally well tolerated by treated patients with various solid tumor malignancies, including ovarian, non

  8. Clinical trials of antiangiogenic therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taketomi, Akinobu

    2016-04-01

    Angiogenesis is a promising therapeutic target to inhibit tumor growth. This review summarizes data from clinical trials of antiangiogenic agents in hepatocellular carcinoma. A systematic search of PubMed was performed to identify clinical trials of specific antiangiogenic agents in hepatocellular carcinoma treatment, particularly phase III trials involving treatment guidelines for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Sorafenib is the only systemic drug approved for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Two large-scale, randomized phase III trials using sorafenib involving patients with unresectable HCC showed a significant survival benefit compared with placebo control groups. However, subsequent phase III trials of antiangiogenic agents in hepatocellular carcinoma have failed to improve survival compared with standard treatment protocols using sorafenib. The efficacy of antiangiogenic agents in combination with other drugs, transarterial chemoembolization, and surgical resection is currently being investigated. Future research is expected to optimize antiangiogenic therapies in combination with standard treatment with sorafenib. PMID:26899258

  9. Antiangiogenic Steroids in Human Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Pietras, Richard J.; Weinberg, Olga K.

    2005-01-01

    Despite advances in the early detection of tumors and in the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery for disease management, the worldwide mortality from human cancer remains unacceptably high. The treatment of cancer may benefit from the introduction of novel therapies derived from natural products. Natural products have served to provide a basis for many of the pharmaceutical agents in current use in cancer therapy. Emerging research indicates that progressive growth and spread of ...

  10. Potentiation of radiotherapy by a localized antiangiogenic gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: We hypothesized that electrotransfer of a plasmid encoding an antiangiogenic factor, the recombinant disintegrin domain of ADAM-15, (pRDD) could modify the tumor microenvironment and radiosensitize tumor. Materials and methods: pRDD was injected in the TLT tumor or FSaII fibrosarcomas before electroporation. pO2 in tumors and oxygen consumption in vitro were measured by electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry. Tumor perfusion was assessed by laser doppler imaging and patent blue assay. Results: pRDD electrotransfer caused a significant delay in TLT growth and an anti-angiogenic effect. It significantly increased tumor pO2 in TLT and FSaII for at least 4 days. pRDD electrotransfer and radiotherapy were more effective than either treatment alone. Modifications of tumor microenvironment were evaluated: tumor perfusion and interstitial fluid pressure were not modified. Oxygen consumption by the cells was decreased resulting both from a decrease in oxygen consumption rate and from a decrease in cell viability. Conclusion: The combination of localized antiangiogenic gene therapy and radiotherapy applied in the time of maximal oxygenation could be a promising alternative for cancer treatment

  11. Multi-gene targeted antiangiogenic therapies for experimental corneal neovascularization

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Peng; Yin, Hongmei; Wang, Yao; Mi, Jing; He, Wenxiao; Xie, Lixin; Wang, Yiqiang

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effectiveness of multigene-based anti-angiogenic gene therapies for experimental murine corneal neovascularization (corneal NV). Methods Recombinant retroviral vectors encoding murine endostatin (mEndo), murine-soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (msFlk-1), or murine-soluble Tie2 (msTie2) were constructed and packaged in PT67 cells. Viral titers were determined by infection of NIH3T3 cells. Expressions of mEndo, msFlk-1, and msTie2 were confirmed by ...

  12. Gastrointestinal Toxicities With Combined Antiangiogenic and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollom, Erqi L.; Deng, Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Pai, Reetesh K. [Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Brown, J. Martin; Giaccia, Amato; Loo, Billy W.; Shultz, David B.; Le, Quynh Thu; Koong, Albert C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Chang, Daniel T., E-mail: dtchang@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Combining the latest targeted biologic agents with the most advanced radiation technologies has been an exciting development in the treatment of cancer patients. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is an ablative radiation approach that has become established for the treatment of a variety of malignancies, and it has been increasingly used in combination with biologic agents, including those targeting angiogenesis-specific pathways. Multiple reports have emerged describing unanticipated toxicities arising from the combination of SBRT and angiogenesis-targeting agents, particularly of late luminal gastrointestinal toxicities. In this review, we summarize the literature describing these toxicities, explore the biological mechanism of action of toxicity with the combined use of antiangiogenic therapies, and discuss areas of future research, so that this combination of treatment modalities can continue to be used in broader clinical contexts.

  13. Anti-angiogenic therapies for advanced esophago-gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Fontana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neo-vascularization is a vital process for tumor growth and development which involves the interaction between tumor cells and stromal endothelial cells through several growth factors and membranous receptors which ultimately activate pro-angiogenic intracellular signaling pathways. Inhibition of angiogenesis has become a standard treatment option for several tumor types including colorectal cancer, glioblastoma and ovarian cancer. In gastric cancer, the therapeutic role of anti-angiogenic agents is more controversial. Bevacizumab and ramucirumab, two monoclonal antibodies, which target vascular endothelial growth factor-A and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, respectively, have been demonstrated antitumor activity in patients with tumors of the stomach or esophagogastric junction. However, especially for bevacizumab, this antitumor activity has not consistently translated into a survival advantage over standard treatment in randomized trials. In this article, we provide an overview of the role of angiogenesis in gastric cancer and discuss the results of clinical trials that investigated safety and effectiveness of antiangiogenic therapies in this disease. A review of the literature has been done using PubMed, ClinicalTrials.gov website and the ASCO Annual Meeting Library.

  14. Acrolein: unwanted side product or contribution to antiangiogenic properties of metronomic cyclophosphamide therapy?

    OpenAIRE

    Günther, M; Wagner, E.; Ogris, M.

    2008-01-01

    Tumour therapy with cyclophosphamide (CPA), an alkylating chemotherapeutic agent, has been associated with reduced tumour blood supply and antiangiogenic effects when applied in a continuous, low-dose metronomic schedule. Compared to conventional high-dose scheduling, metronomic CPA therapy exhibits antitumoural activity with reduced side effects. We have studied potential antiangiogenic properties of acrolein which is released from CPA after hydroxylation. Acrolein adducts were found in tumo...

  15. Antiangiogenic Gene Therapy of Cancer Utilizing a Recombinant Adenovirus to Elevate Systemic Endostatin Levels in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Feldman, Andrew L.; Restifo, Nicholas P; Alexander, H. Richard; Bartlett, David L.; Hwu, Patrick; Seth, Prem; Libutti, Steven K.

    2000-01-01

    Gene therapy represents a possible alternative to the chronic delivery of recombinant antiangiogenic proteins to cancer patients. Inducing normal host tissues to produce high circulating levels of these proteins may be more effective than targeting antiangiogenic genes to tumor tissue specifically. Previously reported gene therapy approaches in mice have achieved peak circulating endostatin levels of 8–33 ng/ml. Here we report plasma endostatin levels of 1770 ng/ml after administration of a r...

  16. Combined immunotherapy and antiangiogenic therapy of cancer with microencapsulated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirone, Pasquale; Bourgeois, Jacqueline M; Shen, Feng; Chang, Patricia L

    2004-10-01

    An alternative form of gene therapy involves immunoisolation of a nonautologous cell line engineered to secrete a therapeutic product. Encapsulation of these cells in a biocompatible polymer serves to protect these allogeneic cells from host-versus-graft rejection while recombinant products and nutrients are able to pass by diffusion. This strategy was applied to the treatment of cancer with some success by delivering either interleukin 2 or angiostatin. However, as cancer is a complex, multifactorial disease, a multipronged approach is now being developed to attack tumorigenesis via multiple pathways in order to improve treatment efficacy. A combination of immunotherapy with angiostatic therapy was investigated by treating B16-F0/neu melanoma-bearing mice with intraperitoneally implanted, microencapsulated mouse myoblasts (C2C12) genetically modified to deliver angiostatin and an interleukin 2 fusion protein (sFvIL-2). The combination treatment resulted in improved survival, delayed tumor growth, and increased histological indices of antitumor activity (apoptosis and necrosis). In addition to improved efficacy, the combination treatment also ameliorated some of the undesirable side effects from the individual treatments that have led to the previous failure of the single treatments, for example, inflammatory response to IL-2 or vascular mimicry due to angiostatin. In conclusion, the combination of immuno- and antiangiogenic therapies delivered by immunoisolated cells was superior to individual treatments for antitumorigenesis activity, not only because of their known mechanisms of action but also because of unexpected protection against the adverse side effects of the single treatments. Thus, the concept of a "cocktail" strategy, with microencapsulation delivering multiple antitumor recombinant molecules to improve efficacy, is validated. PMID:15585110

  17. Mechanistic Study of Antiangiogenic Agents in Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yin

    2013-01-01

    Tumor growth and metastasis are dependent on angiogenesis that constantly alters the tumor microenvironment. Based on the antiangiogenic principle proposed more than 40 years ago by Dr. Judah Folkman, antiangiogenic drugs (ADs) are successfully developed and are routinely used in combination with chemotherapeutics for treatment of various cancers in human patients. However, nearly 10-year clinical experiences with these drugs have taught us some unexpected outcomes that are mec...

  18. Targeting CD9 produces stimulus-independent antiangiogenic effects predominantly in activated endothelial cells during angiogenesis: A novel antiangiogenic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → CD9 plays stimulus-independent roles in angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. → Targeting CD9 expression is effective in an angiogenic disease model. → Targeting CD9 expression predominantly affects activated endothelial cells. → CD9 is involved in endothelial cell proliferation, but not survival. → CD9 is part of angiogenic machinery in endothelial cells during angiogenesis. -- Abstract: The precise roles of tetraspanin CD9 are unclear. Here we show that CD9 plays a stimulus-independent role in angiogenesis and that inhibiting CD9 expression or function is a potential antiangiogenic therapy. Knocking down CD9 expression significantly inhibited in vitro endothelial cell migration and invasion induced by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) or hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Injecting CD9-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA-CD9) markedly inhibited HGF- or VEGF-induced subconjunctival angiogenesis in vivo. Both results revealed potent and stimulus-independent antiangiogenic effects of targeting CD9. Furthermore, intravitreous injections of siRNA-CD9 or anti-CD9 antibodies were therapeutically effective for laser-induced retinal and choroidal neovascularization in mice, a representative ocular angiogenic disease model. In terms of the mechanism, growth factor receptor and downstream signaling activation were not affected, whereas abnormal localization of integrins and membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase was observed during angiogenesis, by knocking down CD9 expression. Notably, knocking down CD9 expression did not induce death and mildly inhibited proliferation of quiescent endothelial cells under conditions without an angiogenic stimulus. Thus, CD9 does not directly affect growth factor-induced signal transduction, which is required in angiogenesis and normal vasculature, but is part of the angiogenesis machinery in endothelial cells during angiogenesis. In conclusion, targeting CD9 produced stimulus-independent antiangiogenic effects

  19. Antiangiogenic Metargidin Peptide (AMEP) Gene Therapy in Disseminated Melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanggaard, Iben; Gehl, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Gene delivery by electroporation is an efficient method for transfecting genes into various tissues including tumors. Here we present the treatment protocol used in a phase 1 study on gene electrotransfer of plasmid DNA encoding an antiangiogenic peptide into cutaneous melanoma....

  20. Mathematical and numerical analysis of a model for anti-angiogenic therapy in metastatic cancers

    CERN Document Server

    Benzekry, Sebastien

    2010-01-01

    We introduce and analyze a phenomenological model for anti-angiogenic therapy in the treatment of metastatic cancers. It is a structured transport equation with a nonlocal boundary condition describing the evolution of the density of metastasis that we analyze first at the continuous level. We present the numerical analysis of a lagrangian scheme based on the characteristics whose convergence establishes existence of solutions. Then we prove an error estimate and use the model to perform interesting simulations in view of clinical applications.

  1. Non-invasive imaging for studying anti-angiogenic therapy effects

    OpenAIRE

    Ehling, J.; Lammers, T.; Kiessling, F.

    2013-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging plays an emerging role in preclinical and clinical cancer research and has high potential to improve clinical translation of new drugs. This article summarises and discusses tools and methods to image tumour angiogenesis and monitor anti-angiogenic therapy effects. In this context, micro-computed tomography (µCT) is recommended to visualise and quantify the micro-architecture of functional tumour vessels. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MR...

  2. Effects of sustained antiangiogenic therapy in multistage prostate cancer in TRAMP model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isayeva, Tatyana; Chanda, Diptiman; Kallman, Lisa; Eltoum, Isam-Eldin A; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2007-06-15

    Antiangiogenic therapy is a promising alternative for prostate cancer growth and metastasis and holds great promise as an adjuvant therapy. The present study evaluated the potential of stable expression of angiostatin and endostatin before the onset of neoplasia and during the early and late stages of prostate cancer progression in transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice. Groups of 5-, 10-, and 18-week-old male TRAMP mice received recombinant adeno-associated virus-6 encoding mouse endostatin plus angiostatin (E+A) by i.m. injection. The effects of therapy were determined by sacrificing groups of treated mice at defined stages of tumor progression and following cohorts of similarly treated mice for long-term survival. Results indicated remarkable survival after recombinant adeno-associated virus-(E+A) therapy only when the treatment was given at an earlier time, before the onset of high-grade neoplasia, compared with treatment given for invasive cancer. Interestingly, early-stage antiangiogenic therapy arrested the progression of moderately differentiated carcinoma to poorly differentiated state and distant metastasis. Immunohistochemical analysis of the prostate from treated mice indicated significantly lower endothelial cell proliferation and increased tumor cell apoptosis. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-2 expression was significantly down-regulated in tumor endothelium after treatment but not VEGFR-1. Analysis of the neuroendocrine marker synaptophysin expression indicated that antiangiogenic therapy given at an early-stage disease reduced neuroendocrine transition of the epithelial tumors. These studies indicate that stable endostatin and angiostatin gene therapy may be more effective for minimally invasive tumors rather than advanced-stage disease. PMID:17575146

  3. Sigma receptor-mediated targeted delivery of anti-angiogenic multifunctional nanodrugs for combination tumor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanke; Wu, Yuanyuan; Huang, Leaf; Miao, Lei; Zhou, Jianping; Satterlee, Andrew Benson; Yao, Jing

    2016-04-28

    The potential of low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) in anti-angiogenic therapy has been tempered by poor in vivo delivery to the tumor cell and potentially harmful side effects, such as the risk of bleeding due to heparin's anticoagulant activity. In order to overcome these limitations and further improve the therapeutic effect of LMWH, we designed a novel combination nanosystem of LMWH and ursolic acid (UA), which is also an angiogenesis inhibitor for tumor therapy. In this system, an amphiphilic LMWH-UA (LHU) conjugate was synthesized and self-assembled into core/shell nanodrugs with combined anti-angiogenic activity and significantly reduced anticoagulant activity. Furthermore, DSPE-PEG-AA-modified LHU nanodrugs (A-LHU) were developed to facilitate the delivery of nanodrugs to the tumor. The anti-angiogenic activity of A-LHU was investigated both in vitro and in vivo. It was found that A-LHU significantly inhibited the tubular formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) (pnanodrugs are a promising multifunctional antitumor drug delivery system. PMID:26941036

  4. Antiangiogenic therapy of experimental cancer does not induce acquired drug resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Thomas; Folkman, Judah; Browder, Timothy; O'Reilly, Michael S.

    1997-11-01

    Acquired drug resistance is a major problem in the treatment of cancer. Of the more than 500,000 annual deaths from cancer in the United States, many follow the development of resistance to chemotherapy. The emergence of resistance depends in part on the genetic instability, heterogeneity and high mutational rate of tumour cells. In contrast, endothelial cells are genetically stable, homogenous and have a low mutational rate. Therefore, antiangiogenic therapy directed against a tumour's endothelial cells should, in principle, induce little or no drug resistance. Endostatin, a potent angiogenesis inhibitor, was administered to mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma, T241 fibrosarcoma or B16F10 melanoma. Treatment was stopped when tumours had regressed. Tumours were then allowed to re-grow and endostatin therapy was resumed. After 6, 4 or 2 treatment cycles, respectively, no tumours recurred after discontinuation of therapy. These experiments show that drug resistance does not develop in three tumour types treated with a potent angiogenesis inhibitor. An unexpected finding is that repeated cycles of antiangiogenic therapy are followed by prolonged tumour dormancy without further therapy.

  5. Improved survival of mice bearing liver metastases of colon cancer cells treated with a combination of radioimmunotherapy and antiangiogenic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We attempted to determine whether the combined regimen of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) and antiangiogenic therapy would favorably affect the survival of animals bearing liver metastases of colon cancer cells. Daily antiangiogenic therapy with 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME), 75 mg/kg, was initiated at 3 days following intrasplenic cell inoculation of LS180 colon cancer cells. RIT with 7 MBq of 131I-A7, an IgG1 anti-colorectal monoclonal antibody, or 131I-HPMS-1, an irrelevant IgG1, was conducted at 7 days. Production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by LS180 cells was assessed in vitro. All nontreated mice died by 31 days following cell inoculation (n=5). Monotherapy comprising 2-ME treatment resulted in slightly better survival of mice (n=8) (P131I-A7 RIT displayed a marked therapeutic effect (n=8) (P131I-A7 RIT and antiangiogenic therapy demonstrated a superior therapeutic effect in comparison to monotherapy consisting of either RIT or antiangiogenic therapy (n=10) (P131I-HPMS-1 RIT failed to provide an appreciable benefit (n=5). Treatment with 2-ME decreased VEGF production by LS180 cells in a dose-dependent fashion. In conclusion, a combination regimen comprising RIT and antiangiogenic therapy initiated at the early stage of metastasis would be of great benefit in terms of improvement of the therapeutic efficacy with respect to liver metastases. (orig.)

  6. The prospects of treatment for highly malignant brain gliomas. Antiangiogenic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment for malignant brain tumors is an urgent issue of modern oncology. The prognosis of these patients is unfavorable, with median survival of 9-12 months. New treatment methods capable of increasing the relapse-free period and general survival of the patients are searched for. Modern strategy of treatment of the patients with malignant gliomas is based on interdisciplinary approach including surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, symptomatic treatment. Variants of antiangiogenic therapy have been developed recently. The results it its application are equivocal and require further investigation.

  7. Antiangiogenic therapy enhances the efficacy of transcatheter arterial embolization for hepatocellular carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hongchi; Meng, Qinghui; Tan, Hongtao; Pan, Shangha; Sun, Bei; Xu, Ruian; Sun, Xueying

    2007-07-15

    Transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) is a well-established technique for unresectable hepatic malignancies. However, TAE can temporally halt the growth of hepatic tumors by blocking their arterial supply, but often tumors rapidly develop collateral blood vessels via angiogenesis. We have previously demonstrated that intraportal delivery of adeno-associated viral particles expressing angiostatin leads to long-term expression of angiostatin capable of inhibiting angiogenesis and suppressing the outgrowth of tumors in the liver. Thus, we hypothesize that adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated antiangiogenic therapy could enhance the efficacy of TAE to combat liver cancers. To achieve this objective, we engineered a recombinant AAV vector encoding rat angiostatin. Intraportal delivery of this vector led to long term and stable transgenic expression of angiostatin locally in rat hepatocytes and suppressed the growth of CBRH7919 hepatocellular carcinomas established in rat livers by inhibiting formation of neovessels. Although TAE therapy led to necrosis of liver tumors and suppressed their growth, the neovessels of tumors were rapidly reformed 3 weeks after TAE. However, intraportal injection of AAV-angiostatin inhibited the angiogenesis stimulated by TAE, synergized with TAE in suppressing growth of tumors established in livers and prolonged the survival of rats. In conclusion, these encouraging results warrant future investigation of the use of antiangiogenic therapy for enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of TAE to treat unresectable liver cancers. PMID:17330237

  8. Vessel Architectural Imaging Identifies Cancer Patient Responders to Anti-angiogenic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emblem, Kyrre E.; Mouridsen, Kim; Bjornerud, Atle; Farrar, Christian T.; Jennings, Dominique; Borra, Ronald J. H.; Wen, Patrick Y.; Ivy, Percy; Batchelor, Tracy T.; Rosen, Bruce R.; Jain, Rakesh K.; Sorensen, A. Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of vessel caliber by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a valuable technique for in vivo monitoring of hemodynamic status and vascular development, especially in the brain. Here, we introduce a new paradigm in MRI coined as Vessel Architectural Imaging (VAI) that exploits an intriguing and overlooked temporal shift in the MR signal forming the basis for vessel caliber estimation and show how this phenomenon can reveal new information on vessel type and function not assessed by any other non-invasive imaging technique. We also show how this biomarker can provide novel biological insights into the treatment of cancer patients. As an example, we demonstrate using VAI that anti-angiogenic therapy can improve microcirculation and oxygen saturation levels and reduce vessel calibers in patients with recurrent glioblastomas, and more crucially, that patients with these responses have prolonged survival. Thus, VAI has the potential to identify patients who would benefit from therapies. PMID:23955713

  9. Change in Pattern of Relapse After Antiangiogenic Therapy in High-Grade Glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Local recurrence is the dominant pattern of relapse in high-grade glioma (HGG) after conventional therapy. The recent use of antiangiogenic therapy has shown impressive radiologic and clinical responses in adult HGG. The preclinical data suggesting increased invasiveness after angiogenic blockade have necessitated a detailed analysis of the pattern of recurrence after therapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 162 consecutive patients with HGG, either newly diagnosed (n = 58) or with recurrent disease (n = 104) underwent therapy with bevacizumab at 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks and conventional chemotherapy with or without involved field radiotherapy until disease progression. The pattern of recurrence and interval to progression were the primary aims of the present study. Diffuse invasive recurrence (DIR) was defined as the involvement of multiple lobes with or without crossing the midline. Results: At a median follow-up of 7 months (range, 1–37), 105 patients had recurrence, and 79 patients ultimately developed DIR. The interval to progression was similar in the DIR and local recurrence groups (6.5 and 6.3 months, p = .296). The hazard risk of DIR increased exponentially with time and was similar in those with newly diagnosed and recurrent HGG (R2 = 0.957). The duration of bevacizumab therapy increased the interval to recurrence (p < .0001) and improved overall survival (p < .0001). However, the pattern of relapse did not affect overall survival (p = .253). Conclusion: Along with an increase in median progression-free survival, bevacizumab therapy increased the risk of DIR in HGG patients. The risk of increased invasion with prolonged angiogenic blockade should be addressed in future clinical trials.

  10. Response assessment of anti-angiogenic therapy in recurrent high grade gliomas by molecular MR- and Pet- imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevacizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody inhibiting the biological activity of VEGF, is successfully used as an anti-angiogenic agent in recurrent high grade glioma (rHGG) treatment. Anti-angiogenic therapy, however, causes difficulties in distinguishing between anti-vascular and true anti-tumor effects when using standard MRI criteria, a so-called “pseudo-response”. The aim of this PhD thesis was (1) to evaluate functional and molecular neuroimaging response parameters during anti-angiogenic therapy in rHGG patients and (2) to compare two PET tracers to identify the most promising tracer for further neuroimaging of rHGG with respect to future use during anti-angiogenic treatment. In two independent studies, ADC (apparent diffusion coefficient) maps derived from diffusion-weighted MR images as well as FET-PET (18F-fluoro-ethyl-tyrosine) scans were analysed in rHGG patients at onset of anti-angiogenic treatment and at eight weeks follow-up. ADC histograms demonstrated significant changes in skewness in relation to progression-free survival (PFS6) at six months. Patients with increasing skewness following anti-angiogenic therapy had significantly shorter PFS than did patients with decreasing or stable skewness values. In the second study, MR scans according to RANO criteria (Response assessment in neurooncology) and FET-PET scans independently were able to predict PFS6. In four patients FET-PET was able to detect tumor progression earlier than MRI. In a third study we compared FET and FLT-PET (18F-fluoro-deoxy-thymidine) intra-individually and found that the sensitivity for detecting a HGG was higher for FET than for FLT. FET detected biologically active tumor even beyond the borders of contrast enhancement (CE) in T1 and FLT uptake was absent in tumors with no or moderate CE. In rHGG patients undergoing anti-angiogenic treatment, ADC maps and FET-PET, are predictive of treatment response. They contribute important information to response assessment based

  11. The role of semaphorin 4D as a potential biomarker for antiangiogenic therapy in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiaojie; Qiu, Lijuan; Zhang, Lijuan; Xi, Juemin; Li, Duo; Huang, Xinwei; Zhao, Yujiao; Wang, Xiaodang; Sun, Qiangming

    2016-01-01

    Background Semaphorin 4D (Sema4D) belongs to the class IV semaphorins, and accumulating evidence has indicated that its elevated level may be one strategy by which tumors evade current anti-angiogenic therapies. The biological roles of Sema4D in colorectal cancer (CRC), however, remain largely undefined. This study was designed to investigate the effects of Sema4D on tumor angiogenesis and growth in CRC, especially in different vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) backgrounds. Methods The expression of Sema4D in human CRC was evaluated by immunohistochemical analysis of tumors and their matching normal control tissues. The expression level of Sema4D and VEGF was investigated in different CRC cell lines. To evaluate the contributions of Sema4D to tumor-induced angiogenesis, two CRC cell lines with opposite VEGF backgrounds were infected with lentiviruses expressing Sema4D or Sema4D short hairpin RNA, followed by in vitro migration and in vivo tumor angiogenic assays. Results Immunohistochemical analysis of human CRC revealed high levels of Sema4D in a cell surface pattern. In all, 84.85% of CRC samples analyzed exhibited moderate to strong Sema4D expression. The positive ratios of Sema4D staining for well, moderately, and poorly differentiated cancers were 71.43%, 96.67%, and 77.27%, respectively. Sema4D is highly expressed in five different CRC cell lines, while VEGF expression level varies among these cell lines. HCT-116 showed the lowest VEGF level, while Caco-2 showed the maximum VEGF level. In vitro migration results show that regardless of cell type and VEGF background, Sema4D showed an enhanced in vitro proangiogenic effect to induce the migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Finally, in vivo tumor angiogenic assays demonstrated that Sema4D alone can elicit a significant angiogenic response to promote tumor growth independently of VEGF. Conclusion Targeting Sema4D might serve as a parallel option for antiangiogenic therapy for CRC

  12. Imaging Biomarker Dynamics in an Intracranial Murine Glioma Study of Radiation and Antiangiogenic Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Caroline, E-mail: caroline.chung@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Health Network-Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Jalali, Shahrzad [Brain Tumor Research Centre, SickKids Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Foltz, Warren [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Health Network-Princess Margaret Hospital, Ontario (Canada); Burrell, Kelly [Brain Tumor Research Centre, SickKids Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Wildgoose, Petra; Lindsay, Patricia [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Health Network-Princess Margaret Hospital, Ontario (Canada); Graves, Christian; Camphausen, Kevin [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Milosevic, Michael; Jaffray, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Health Network-Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Zadeh, Gelareh [Neurosurgery, University Health Network-Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ménard, Cynthia [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Health Network-Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: There is a growing need for noninvasive biomarkers to guide individualized spatiotemporal delivery of radiation therapy (RT) and antiangiogenic (AA) therapy for brain tumors. This study explored early biomarkers of response to RT and the AA agent sunitinib (SU), in a murine intracranial glioma model, using serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Mice with MRI-visible tumors were stratified by tumor size into 4 therapy arms: control, RT, SU, and SU plus RT (SURT). Single-fraction conformal RT was delivered using MRI and on-line cone beam computed tomography (CT) guidance. Serial MR images (T2-weighted, diffusion, dynamic contrast-enhanced and gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted scans) were acquired biweekly to evaluate tumor volume, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and tumor perfusion and permeability responses (K{sub trans}, K{sub ep}). Results: Mice in all treatment arms survived longer than those in control, with a median survival of 35 days for SURT (P<.0001) and 30 days for RT (P=.009) and SU (P=.01) mice vs 26 days for control mice. At Day 3, ADC rise was greater with RT than without (P=.002). Sunitinib treatment reduced tumor perfusion/permeability values with mean K{sub trans} reduction of 27.6% for SU (P=.04) and 26.3% for SURT (P=.04) mice and mean K{sub ep} reduction of 38.1% for SU (P=.01) and 27.3% for SURT (P=.02) mice. The magnitude of individual mouse ADC responses at Days 3 and 7 correlated with subsequent tumor growth rate R values of −0.878 (P=.002) and −0.80 (P=.01), respectively. Conclusions: Early quantitative changes in diffusion and perfusion MRI measures reflect treatment responses soon after starting therapy and thereby raise the potential for these imaging biomarkers to guide adaptive and potentially individualized therapy approaches in the future.

  13. The carboxyl terminus of VEGF-A is a potential target for anti-angiogenic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, James G; Gammons, Melissa V R; Damodaran, Gopinath; Churchill, Amanda J; Harper, Steven J; Bates, David O

    2015-01-01

    Anti-VEGF-A therapy has become a mainstay of treatment for ocular neovascularisation and in cancer; however, their effectiveness is not universal, in some cases only benefiting a minority of patients. Anti-VEGF-A therapies bind and block both pro-angiogenic VEGF-Axxx and the partial agonist VEGF-Axxxb isoforms, but their anti-angiogenic benefit only comes about from targeting the pro-angiogenic isoforms. Therefore, antibodies that exclusively target the pro-angiogenic isoforms may be more effective. To determine whether C-terminal-targeted antibodies could inhibit angiogenesis, we generated a polyclonal antibody to the last nine amino acids of VEGF-A165 and tested it in vitro and in vivo. The exon8a polyclonal antibody (Exon8apab) did not bind VEGF-A165b even at greater than 100-fold excess concentration, and dose dependently inhibited VEGF-A165 induced endothelial migration in vitro at concentrations similar to the VEGF-A antibody fragment ranibizumab. Exon8apab can inhibit tumour growth of LS174t cells implanted in vivo and blood vessel growth in the eye in models of age-related macular degeneration, with equal efficacy to non-selective anti-VEGF-A antibodies. It also showed that it was the VEGF-Axxx levels specifically that were upregulated in plasma from patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy. These results suggest that VEGF-A165-specific antibodies can be therapeutically useful. PMID:25274272

  14. Modeling tumor-associated edema in gliomas during anti-angiogenic therapy and its impact on imageable tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eHawkins-Daarud

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma, the most aggressive form of primary brain tumor is predominantly assessed with gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted (T1Gd and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Pixel intensity enhancement on the T1Gd image is understood to correspond to the gadolinium contrast agent leaking from the tumor-induced neovasculature, while hyperintensity on the T2/FLAIR images corresponds with edema and infiltrated tumor cells. None of these modalities directly show tumor cells; rather, they capture abnormalities in the microenvironment caused by the presence of tumor cells. Thus, assessing disease response after treatments impacting the microenvironment remains challenging through the obscuring lens of MR imaging. Anti-angiogenic therapies have been used in the treatment of gliomas with spurious results ranging from no apparent response to significant imaging improvement with the potential for extremely diffuse patterns of tumor recurrence on imaging and autopsy. Anti-angiogenic treatment normalizes the vasculature, effectively decreasing vessel permeability and thus reducing tumor-induced edema, drastically altering T2-weighted MRI. We extend a previously developed mathematical model of glioma growth to explicitly incorporate edema formation allowing us to directly characterize and potentially predict the effects of anti-angiogenics on imageable tumor growth. A comparison of simulated glioma growth and imaging enhancement with and without bevacizumab supports the current understanding that anti-angiogenic treatment can serve as a surrogate for steroids and the clinically-driven hypothesis that anti-angiogenic treatment may not have any significant effect on the growth dynamics of the overall tumor-cell populations. However, the simulations do illustrate a potentially large impact on the level of edematous extracellular fluid, and thus on what would be imageable on T2/FLAIR MR for tumors with lower proliferation rates.

  15. Fibrocyte-like cells mediate acquired resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy with bevacizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuhashi, Atsushi; Goto, Hisatsugu; Saijo, Atsuro; Trung, Van The; Aono, Yoshinori; Ogino, Hirokazu; Kuramoto, Takuya; Tabata, Sho; Uehara, Hisanori; Izumi, Keisuke; Yoshida, Mitsuteru; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Hidefusa; Gotoh, Masashi; Kakiuchi, Soji; Hanibuchi, Masaki; Yano, Seiji; Yokomise, Hiroyasu; Sakiyama, Shoji; Nishioka, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Bevacizumab exerts anti-angiogenic effects in cancer patients by inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). However, its use is still limited due to the development of resistance to the treatment. Such resistance can be regulated by various factors, although the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Here we show that bone marrow-derived fibrocyte-like cells, defined as alpha-1 type I collagen-positive and CXCR4-positive cells, contribute to the acquired resistance to bevacizumab. In mouse models of malignant pleural mesothelioma and lung cancer, fibrocyte-like cells mediate the resistance to bevacizumab as the main producer of fibroblast growth factor 2. In clinical specimens of lung cancer, the number of fibrocyte-like cells is significantly increased in bevacizumab-treated tumours, and correlates with the number of treatment cycles, as well as CD31-positive vessels. Our results identify fibrocyte-like cells as a promising cell biomarker and a potential therapeutic target to overcome resistance to anti-VEGF therapy. PMID:26635184

  16. Anti-angiogenic therapy (bevacizumab) in the management of oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Maha M; Afifi, Marwa M

    2016-04-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP), a mucocutaneous chronic inflammatory disease, is conventionally managed using topical corticosteroid therapy. Given the fact that OLP is strongly linked to angiogenesis, anti-angiogenic drugs, such as bevacizumab, might be introduced as an alternative treatment for contraindicated, non-responsive patients. The aim of the present study was to report the short-term effectiveness and safety of intralesional bevacizumab injection in the management of atrophic/erosive OLP. A case series study was conducted in patients with atrophic/erosive OLP in the buccal mucosa, assigned to receive either 2.5 mg of bevacizumab, by intralesional injection (n = 20, test), or topical 0.1% triamcinolone acetonide ointment (n = 20, control). The size, score, and pain intensity of the lesions were assessed pre- and post-treatment. Tissue biopsies were collected for histopathologic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural examination. After 1 wk, the test group had significant reductions both in lesion seize and in pain scores compared with controls. A marked decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and interleukin-8 immunoexpression was noted in tissue biopsies from bevacizumab-treated lesions compared with control lesions. Furthermore, ultrastructural examination of OLP tissue specimens revealed significant healing signs associated with bevacizumab treatment. Short-term data suggest that intralesional bevacizumab injection effectively and safely achieved resolution of atrophic/erosive OLP lesions without disease exacerbations during a 3-month follow-up period. PMID:26892241

  17. Antiangiogenic Therapy in the Treatment of Recurrent Medulloblastoma in the Adult: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Privitera

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is a rare tumor in central nervous system, with an even rarer occurrence in adulthood. The management of a recurrent disease is a medical challenge; chemotherapy has been used as the treatment of choice, while reirradiation has been employed in selected cases. We report the case of a 51-year-old man with recurrent medulloblastoma. He was treated with local reirradiation, chemotherapy, and antiangiogenic drug, with the latter giving the longer progression-free interval. The aim of this report is to show that recurrent medulloblastoma in adults can be approached with a multimodality treatment and that antiangiogenic therapy should have a role in the management of this disease.

  18. The role of semaphorin 4D as a potential biomarker for antiangiogenic therapy in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding X

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Xiaojie Ding,1,2,* Lijuan Qiu,1,2,* Lijuan Zhang,3 Juemin Xi,1,2 Duo Li,1,2 Xinwei Huang,1,2 Yujiao Zhao,1,2 Xiaodang Wang,1,2 Qiangming Sun1,2 1Institute of Medical Biology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 2Molecular Epidemiology Joint Laboratory, Yunnan Key Laboratory of Vaccine Research & Development on Severe Infectious Diseases, 3Department of Pathology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University (Yunnan Provincial Tumor Hospital, Kunming, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Semaphorin 4D (Sema4D belongs to the class IV semaphorins, and accumulating evidence has indicated that its elevated level may be one strategy by which tumors evade current antiangiogenic therapies. The biological roles of Sema4D in colorectal cancer (CRC, however, remain largely undefined. This study was designed to investigate the effects of Sema4D on tumor angiogenesis and growth in CRC, especially in different vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF backgrounds.Methods: The expression of Sema4D in human CRC was evaluated by immunohistochemical analysis of tumors and their matching normal control tissues. The expression level of Sema4D and VEGF was investigated in different CRC cell lines. To evaluate the contributions of Sema4D to tumor-induced angiogenesis, two CRC cell lines with opposite VEGF backgrounds were infected with lentiviruses expressing Sema4D or Sema4D short hairpin RNA, followed by in vitro migration and in vivo tumor angiogenic assays.Results: Immunohistochemical analysis of human CRC revealed high levels of Sema4D in a cell surface pattern. In all, 84.85% of CRC samples analyzed exhibited moderate to strong Sema4D expression. The positive ratios of Sema4D staining for well, moderately, and poorly differentiated cancers were 71.43%, 96.67%, and 77.27%, respectively. Sema4D is highly expressed in five different CRC cell lines, while VEGF

  19. Dynamic contrast-enhanced micro-CT on mice with mammary carcinoma for the assessment of antiangiogenic therapy response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisa, Fabian [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Institute of Medical Physics, Erlangen (Germany); University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies (SAOT), Erlangen (Germany); Brauweiler, Robert; Hupfer, Martin; Nowak, Tristan; Kalender, Willi A. [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Institute of Medical Physics, Erlangen (Germany); Lotz, Laura; Hoffmann, Inge; Dittrich, Ralf; Beckmann, Matthias W. [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, OB/GYN, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Wachter, David [University Hospital Erlangen, Institute of Pathology, Erlangen (Germany); Jost, Gregor; Pietsch, Hubertus [Bayer Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-04-15

    To evaluate the potential of in vivo dynamic contrast-enhanced micro-computed tomography (DCE micro-CT) for the assessment of antiangiogenic drug therapy response of mice with mammary carcinoma. 20 female mice with implanted MCF7 tumours were split into control group and therapy group treated with a known effective antiangiogenic drug. All mice underwent DCE micro-CT for the 3D analysis of functional parameters (relative blood volume [rBV], vascular permeability [K], area under the time-enhancement curve [AUC]) and morphology. All parameters were determined for total, peripheral and central tumour volumes of interest (VOIs). Immunohistochemistry was performed to characterise tumour vascularisation. 3D dose distributions were determined. The mean AUCs were significantly lower in therapy with P values of 0.012, 0.007 and 0.023 for total, peripheral and central tumour VOIs. K and rBV showed significant differences for the peripheral (P{sub per}{sup K} = 0.032, P{sub per}{sup rBV} = 0.029), but not for the total and central tumour VOIs (P{sub total}{sup K} = 0.108, P{sub central}{sup K} = 0.246, P{sub total}{sup rBV} = 0.093, P{sub central}{sup rBV} = 0.136). Mean tumour volume was significantly smaller in therapy (P{sub in} {sub vivo} = 0.001, P{sub ex} {sub vivo} = 0.005). Histology revealed greater vascularisation in the controls and central tumour necrosis. Doses ranged from 150 to 300 mGy. This study indicates the great potential of DCE micro-CT for early in vivo assessment of antiangiogenic drug therapy response. (orig.)

  20. Quantification of serial changes in cerebral blood volume and metabolism in patients with recurrent glioblastoma undergoing antiangiogenic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Antiangiogenic therapy can lead to a decreased in CBV in normal brain tissue. • Responding and pseudoresponding lesions to AAT showed a similar CBV decrease. • Cho and NAA allowed for a distinction of responding and pseudoresponding lesions. • Cr ratios are not suited for evaluation of antiangiogenic therapy response. • Responders to AAT may have an increased risk for remote progression of the GBM. - Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate the usefulness of quantitative advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods for assessment of antiangiogenic therapy (AAT) response in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Methods: Eighteen patients with recurrent GBM received bevacizumab and 18 patients served as control group. Baseline MRI and two follow-up examinations were acquired every 3–5 months using dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast (DSC) perfusion MRI and 1H-MR spectroscopic imaging (1H-MRSI). Maps of absolute cerebral blood volume (aCBV) were coregistered with choline (Cho) and N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) concentrations and compared to usually used relative parameters as well as controls. Results: Perfusion significantly decreased in responding and pseudoresponding GBMs but also in normal appearing brain after AAT onset. Cho and NAA concentrations were superior to Cr-ratios in lesion differentiation and showed a clear gap between responding and pseudoresponding lesions. Responders to AAT exceptionally frequently (6 out of 8 patients) showed remote GBM progression. Conclusions: Quantification of CBV reveals changes in normal brain perfusion due to AAT, which were not described so far. DSC perfusion MRI seems not to be suitable for differentiation between response and pseudoresponse to AAT. However, absolute quantification of brain metabolites may allow for distinction due to a clear gap at 6–9 months after therapy onset

  1. Quantification of serial changes in cerebral blood volume and metabolism in patients with recurrent glioblastoma undergoing antiangiogenic therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadlbauer, Andreas, E-mail: andi@nmr.at [Institute of Medical Radiology, University Clinic of St. Pölten, Propst Führer-Straße 4, A-3100 St. Pölten (Austria); Department of Neurosurgery, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Medical University Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, A-1097 Vienna (Austria); Pichler, Petra [First Department of Internal Medicine, University Clinic of St. Pölten, Propst Führer-Straße 4, A-3100 St. Poelten (Austria); Karl, Marianne [Institute of Medical Radiology, University Clinic of St. Pölten, Propst Führer-Straße 4, A-3100 St. Pölten (Austria); Brandner, Sebastian [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Lerch, Claudia [Institute of Medical Radiology, University Clinic of St. Pölten, Propst Führer-Straße 4, A-3100 St. Pölten (Austria); Renner, Bertold [Institute of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen (Germany); Heinz, Gertraud [Institute of Medical Radiology, University Clinic of St. Pölten, Propst Führer-Straße 4, A-3100 St. Pölten (Austria)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Antiangiogenic therapy can lead to a decreased in CBV in normal brain tissue. • Responding and pseudoresponding lesions to AAT showed a similar CBV decrease. • Cho and NAA allowed for a distinction of responding and pseudoresponding lesions. • Cr ratios are not suited for evaluation of antiangiogenic therapy response. • Responders to AAT may have an increased risk for remote progression of the GBM. - Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate the usefulness of quantitative advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods for assessment of antiangiogenic therapy (AAT) response in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Methods: Eighteen patients with recurrent GBM received bevacizumab and 18 patients served as control group. Baseline MRI and two follow-up examinations were acquired every 3–5 months using dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast (DSC) perfusion MRI and {sup 1}H-MR spectroscopic imaging ({sup 1}H-MRSI). Maps of absolute cerebral blood volume (aCBV) were coregistered with choline (Cho) and N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) concentrations and compared to usually used relative parameters as well as controls. Results: Perfusion significantly decreased in responding and pseudoresponding GBMs but also in normal appearing brain after AAT onset. Cho and NAA concentrations were superior to Cr-ratios in lesion differentiation and showed a clear gap between responding and pseudoresponding lesions. Responders to AAT exceptionally frequently (6 out of 8 patients) showed remote GBM progression. Conclusions: Quantification of CBV reveals changes in normal brain perfusion due to AAT, which were not described so far. DSC perfusion MRI seems not to be suitable for differentiation between response and pseudoresponse to AAT. However, absolute quantification of brain metabolites may allow for distinction due to a clear gap at 6–9 months after therapy onset.

  2. Identification of treatment response predictors and potential molecular targets for chemo preventive and antiangiogenic therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aims of the project were: To evaluate the cellular responses to anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic natural or synthetic compounds (chemo preventives, inhibitors of cell survival and inflammation related signal transduction). To identify bio markers for treatment response through the selection of targets that are common to or specific for anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic activities. To analyze the regulation of the key tumor-promotion pathways Akt, HIF1α, NFκB. We focused our studies on the antiapoptotic role of the AKT survival pathway, which is involved in prostate tumor progression to an androgen-independent phenotype

  3. Early response assessment in patients with multiple myeloma during anti-angiogenic therapy using arterial spin labelling: first clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine if arterial-spin-labelling (ASL) MRI can reliably detect early response to anti-angiogenic therapy in patients with multiple myeloma by comparison with clinical/haematological response. Nineteen consecutive patients (10 men; mean age 63.5 ± 9.1 years) were included in the present study. Inclusion criteria were diagnosis of stage III multiple myeloma and clinical indication for therapeutical administration of bortezomib or lenalidomide. We performed MRI on 3.0T MR in the baseline setting, 3 weeks after onset of therapy and after 8 weeks. Clinical responses were determined on the basis of international uniform response criteria in correlation with haematological parameters and medium-term patient outcome. MRI studies were performed after approval by the local institutional review board. Fifteen patients responded to anti-myeloma therapy; 4/19 patients were non-responders to therapy. Mean tumour perfusion assessed by ASL-MRI in a reference lesion was 220.7 ± 132.5 ml min-1 100 g-1 at baseline, and decreased to 125.7 ± 86.3 (134.5 ± 150.9) ml min-1 100 g-1 3 (8) weeks after onset of therapy (P < 0.02). The mean decrease in paraproteinaemia at week 3 (8) was 52.3 ± 47.7% (58.2 ± 58.7%), whereas β2-microglobulinaemia decreased by 20.3 ± 53.1% (23.3 ± 57.0%). Correlation of ASL perfusion with outcome was significant (P = 0.0037). ASL tumour perfusion measurements are a valuable surrogate parameter for early assessment of response to novel anti-angiogenic therapy. (orig.)

  4. Early response assessment in patients with multiple myeloma during anti-angiogenic therapy using arterial spin labelling: first clinical results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenchel, Michael [Eberhard-Karls University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Eberhard-Karls University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Konaktchieva, Marina [Eberhard-Karls University, Department of Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology, Tuebingen (Germany); Weisel, Katja; Kraus, Sabina [Eberhard-Karls University, Department of Internal Medicine, Hematology, Tuebingen (Germany); Brodoefel, Harald; Claussen, Claus D.; Horger, Marius [Eberhard-Karls University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    To determine if arterial-spin-labelling (ASL) MRI can reliably detect early response to anti-angiogenic therapy in patients with multiple myeloma by comparison with clinical/haematological response. Nineteen consecutive patients (10 men; mean age 63.5 {+-} 9.1 years) were included in the present study. Inclusion criteria were diagnosis of stage III multiple myeloma and clinical indication for therapeutical administration of bortezomib or lenalidomide. We performed MRI on 3.0T MR in the baseline setting, 3 weeks after onset of therapy and after 8 weeks. Clinical responses were determined on the basis of international uniform response criteria in correlation with haematological parameters and medium-term patient outcome. MRI studies were performed after approval by the local institutional review board. Fifteen patients responded to anti-myeloma therapy; 4/19 patients were non-responders to therapy. Mean tumour perfusion assessed by ASL-MRI in a reference lesion was 220.7 {+-} 132.5 ml min{sup -1} 100 g{sup -1} at baseline, and decreased to 125.7 {+-} 86.3 (134.5 {+-} 150.9) ml min{sup -1} 100 g{sup -1} 3 (8) weeks after onset of therapy (P < 0.02). The mean decrease in paraproteinaemia at week 3 (8) was 52.3 {+-} 47.7% (58.2 {+-} 58.7%), whereas {beta}2-microglobulinaemia decreased by 20.3 {+-} 53.1% (23.3 {+-} 57.0%). Correlation of ASL perfusion with outcome was significant (P = 0.0037). ASL tumour perfusion measurements are a valuable surrogate parameter for early assessment of response to novel anti-angiogenic therapy. (orig.)

  5. Imaging Tumor Vascularity and Response to Anti-Angiogenic Therapy Using Gaussia Luciferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantar, Rami S; Lashgari, Ghazal; Tabet, Elie I; Lewandrowski, Grant K; Carvalho, Litia A; Tannous, Bakhos A

    2016-01-01

    We developed a novel approach to assess tumor vascularity using recombinant Gaussia luciferase (rGluc) protein and bioluminescence imaging. Upon intravenous injection of rGluc followed by its substrate coelenterazine, non-invasive visualization of tumor vascularity by bioluminescence imaging was possible. We applied this method for longitudinal monitoring of tumor vascularity in response to the anti-angiogenic drug tivozanib. This simple and sensitive method could be extended to image blood vessels/vasculature in many different fields. PMID:27198044

  6. ADC histograms predict response to anti-angiogenic therapy in patients with recurrent high-grade glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowosielski, Martha; Tinkhauser, Gerd; Stockhammer, Guenther [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Neurology, Innsbruck (Austria); Recheis, Wolfgang; Schocke, Michael; Gotwald, Thaddaeus [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Goebel, Georg [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Health Economics, Innsbruck (Austria); Gueler, Oezguer [Innsbruck Medical University, 4D Visualization Laboratory, University Clinic of Oto-, Rhino- and Laryngology, Innsbruck (Austria); Kostron, Herwig [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Innsbruck (Austria); Hutterer, Markus [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Neurology, Innsbruck (Austria); Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg-Christian Doppler Hospital, Department of Neurology, Salzburg (Austria)

    2011-04-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps to distinguish anti-vascular and anti-tumor effects in the course of anti-angiogenic treatment of recurrent high-grade gliomas (rHGG) as compared to standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This retrospective study analyzed ADC maps from diffusion-weighted MRI in 14 rHGG patients during bevacizumab/irinotecan (B/I) therapy. Applying image segmentation, volumes of contrast-enhanced lesions in T1 sequences and of hyperintense T2 lesions (hT2) were calculated. hT2 were defined as regions of interest (ROI) and registered to corresponding ADC maps (hT2-ADC). Histograms were calculated from hT2-ADC ROIs. Thereafter, histogram asymmetry termed ''skewness'' was calculated and compared to progression-free survival (PFS) as defined by the Response Assessment Neuro-Oncology (RANO) Working Group criteria. At 8-12 weeks follow-up, seven (50%) patients showed a partial response, three (21.4%) patients were stable, and four (28.6%) patients progressed according to RANO criteria. hT2-ADC histograms demonstrated statistically significant changes in skewness in relation to PFS at 6 months. Patients with increasing skewness (n = 11) following B/I therapy had significantly shorter PFS than did patients with decreasing or stable skewness values (n = 3, median percentage change in skewness 54% versus -3%, p = 0.04). In rHGG patients, the change in ADC histogram skewness may be predictive for treatment response early in the course of anti-angiogenic therapy and more sensitive than treatment assessment based solely on RANO criteria. (orig.)

  7. ADC histograms predict response to anti-angiogenic therapy in patients with recurrent high-grade glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps to distinguish anti-vascular and anti-tumor effects in the course of anti-angiogenic treatment of recurrent high-grade gliomas (rHGG) as compared to standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This retrospective study analyzed ADC maps from diffusion-weighted MRI in 14 rHGG patients during bevacizumab/irinotecan (B/I) therapy. Applying image segmentation, volumes of contrast-enhanced lesions in T1 sequences and of hyperintense T2 lesions (hT2) were calculated. hT2 were defined as regions of interest (ROI) and registered to corresponding ADC maps (hT2-ADC). Histograms were calculated from hT2-ADC ROIs. Thereafter, histogram asymmetry termed ''skewness'' was calculated and compared to progression-free survival (PFS) as defined by the Response Assessment Neuro-Oncology (RANO) Working Group criteria. At 8-12 weeks follow-up, seven (50%) patients showed a partial response, three (21.4%) patients were stable, and four (28.6%) patients progressed according to RANO criteria. hT2-ADC histograms demonstrated statistically significant changes in skewness in relation to PFS at 6 months. Patients with increasing skewness (n = 11) following B/I therapy had significantly shorter PFS than did patients with decreasing or stable skewness values (n = 3, median percentage change in skewness 54% versus -3%, p = 0.04). In rHGG patients, the change in ADC histogram skewness may be predictive for treatment response early in the course of anti-angiogenic therapy and more sensitive than treatment assessment based solely on RANO criteria. (orig.)

  8. MO-G-BRF-05: Determining Response to Anti-Angiogenic Therapies with Monte Carlo Tumor Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentinuzzi, D [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Simoncic, U; Jeraj, R [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Titz, B [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Patient response to anti-angiogenic therapies with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor - tyrosine kinase inhibitors (VEGFR TKIs) is heterogeneous. This study investigates key biological characteristics that drive differences in patient response via Monte Carlo computational modeling capable of simulating tumor response to therapy with VEGFR TKI. Methods: VEGFR TKIs potently block receptors, responsible for promoting angiogenesis in tumors. The model incorporates drug pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, as well as patientspecific data of cellular proliferation derived from [18F]FLT-PET data. Sensitivity of tumor response was assessed for multiple parameters, including initial partial oxygen tension (pO{sub 2}), cell cycle time, daily vascular growth fraction, and daily vascular regression fraction. Results were benchmarked to clinical data (patient 2 weeks on VEGFR TKI, followed by 1-week drug holiday). The tumor pO{sub 2} was assumed to be uniform. Results: Among the investigated parameters, the simulated proliferation was most sensitive to the initial tumor pO{sub 2}. Initial change of 5 mmHg can already Result in significantly different levels of proliferation. The model reveals that hypoxic tumors (pO{sub 2} ≥ 20 mmHg) show the highest decrease of proliferation, experiencing mean FLT standardized uptake value (SUVmean) decrease for at least 50% at the end of the clinical trial (day 21). Oxygenated tumors (pO{sub 2} 20 mmHg) show a transient SUV decrease (30–50%) at the end of the treatment with VEGFR TKI (day 14) but experience a rapid SUV rebound close to the pre-treatment SUV levels (70–110%) at the time of a drug holiday (day 14–21) - the phenomenon known as a proliferative flare. Conclusion: Model's high sensitivity to initial pO{sub 2} clearly emphasizes the need for experimental assessment of the pretreatment tumor hypoxia status, as it might be predictive of response to antiangiogenic therapies and the occurrence

  9. MO-G-BRF-05: Determining Response to Anti-Angiogenic Therapies with Monte Carlo Tumor Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Patient response to anti-angiogenic therapies with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor - tyrosine kinase inhibitors (VEGFR TKIs) is heterogeneous. This study investigates key biological characteristics that drive differences in patient response via Monte Carlo computational modeling capable of simulating tumor response to therapy with VEGFR TKI. Methods: VEGFR TKIs potently block receptors, responsible for promoting angiogenesis in tumors. The model incorporates drug pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, as well as patientspecific data of cellular proliferation derived from [18F]FLT-PET data. Sensitivity of tumor response was assessed for multiple parameters, including initial partial oxygen tension (pO2), cell cycle time, daily vascular growth fraction, and daily vascular regression fraction. Results were benchmarked to clinical data (patient 2 weeks on VEGFR TKI, followed by 1-week drug holiday). The tumor pO2 was assumed to be uniform. Results: Among the investigated parameters, the simulated proliferation was most sensitive to the initial tumor pO2. Initial change of 5 mmHg can already Result in significantly different levels of proliferation. The model reveals that hypoxic tumors (pO2 ≥ 20 mmHg) show the highest decrease of proliferation, experiencing mean FLT standardized uptake value (SUVmean) decrease for at least 50% at the end of the clinical trial (day 21). Oxygenated tumors (pO2 20 mmHg) show a transient SUV decrease (30–50%) at the end of the treatment with VEGFR TKI (day 14) but experience a rapid SUV rebound close to the pre-treatment SUV levels (70–110%) at the time of a drug holiday (day 14–21) - the phenomenon known as a proliferative flare. Conclusion: Model's high sensitivity to initial pO2 clearly emphasizes the need for experimental assessment of the pretreatment tumor hypoxia status, as it might be predictive of response to antiangiogenic therapies and the occurrence of proliferative flare. Experimental

  10. Toxicity of radiation therapy and anti-angiogenics combination: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combined administration of anti-angiogenic agents (AA) and radiation is being evaluated. No AA has yet received Marketing Authorization in this indication. However, they are widely used in medical oncology and criteria for stopping their administration in case of irradiation have not been defined.We report the case of a 63-year-old man experiencing grade 2 skin toxicity while on radiation treatment and sorafenib (400 mg twice daily) for a metastatic lesion developing between the vastus medialis muscle and the cortical of the mid-diaphysis of the right femur. Toxicity occurred at 21 Gy, for a total dose of 36 Gy (12 fractions of 3 Gy). Cutaneous symptoms rapidly disappeared after treatment discontinuation. Radiotherapy alone was resumed after a few days and the total dose could be delivered, with good tolerance. At 2-month follow-up, the intramuscular lesion had regressed. Several other cases of patients with poor tolerance to the association of AA and radiotherapy have been reported. Further studies of the effectiveness and tolerance of the combination treatment are needed before indications for AA can be extended to other diseases. (authors)

  11. Adeno-associated virus 2-mediated antiangiogenic cancer gene therapy: long-term efficacy of a vector encoding angiostatin and endostatin over vectors encoding a single factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan; Mahendra, Gandham; Kumar, Sanjay; Shaw, Denise R; Stockard, Cecil R; Grizzle, William E; Meleth, Sreelatha

    2004-03-01

    Angiogenesis is characteristic of solid tumor growth and a surrogate marker for metastasis in many human cancers. Inhibition of tumor angiogenesis using antiangiogenic drugs and gene transfer approaches has suggested the potential of this form of therapy in controlling tumor growth. However, for long-term tumor-free survival by antiangiogenic therapy, the factors controlling tumor neovasculature need to be systemically maintained at stable therapeutic levels. Here we show sustained expression of the antiangiogenic factors angiostatin and endostatin as secretory proteins by recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (rAAV)-mediated gene transfer. Both vectors provided significant protective efficacy in a mouse tumor xenograft model. Stable transgene persistence and systemic levels of both angiostatin and endostatin were confirmed by in situ hybridization of the vector-injected tissues and by serum ELISA measurements, respectively. Whereas treatment with rAAV containing either endostatin or angiostatin alone resulted in moderate to significant protection, the combination of endostatin and angiostatin gene transfer from a single vector resulted in a complete protection. These data suggest that AAV-mediated long-term expression of both endostatin and angiostatin may have clinical utility against recurrence of cancers after primary therapies and may represent rational adjuvant therapies in combination with radiation or chemotherapy. PMID:14996740

  12. Synergistic Effect of Anti-Angiogenic and Radiation Therapy: Quantitative Evaluation with Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MR Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Jung Koo

    Full Text Available We assessed the effects of anti-angiogenic therapy (AAT on radiation therapy (RT, evaluating the tumor growth and perfusion patterns on dynamic contrast enhanced MR (DCE-MR images.Thirteen nude mice with heterotopic xenograft cancer of human lung cancer cell line were used. To observe the interval change of the tumor size and demonstrate the time-signal intensity enhancement curve of the tumor, the mice were subdivided into four groups: control (n = 2, AAT (n = 2, RT (n = 5, and combined therapy (AART, n = 4. DCE-MR images were taken four weeks after treatment. Perfusion parameters were obtained based on the Brix model. To compare the interval size changes in the RT group with those in the AART group, repeated measures ANOVA was used. Perfusion parameters in both the RT and AART groups were compared using a Mann-Whitney U test.Tumor growth was more suppressed in AART group than in the other groups. Control group showed the rapid wash-in and wash-out pattern on DCE-MR images. In contrast to RT group with delayed and prolonged enhancement, both AAT and AART groups showed the rapid wash-in and plateau pattern. The signal intensity in the plateau/time to peak enhancement (P<0.016 and the maximum enhancement ratio (P<0.016 of AART group were higher than those of RT group.AART showed synergistic effects in anticancer treatment. The pattern of the time-intensity curve on the DCE-MR images in each group implies that AAT might help maintain the perfusion in the cancer of AART group.

  13. Antiangiogenic therapy in lung cancer: focus on vascular endothelial growth factor pathway.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Korpanty, Grzegorz

    2010-01-01

    Lung cancer (LC) is a leading cause of death worldwide. Recent advances in chemotherapeutic agents have not yielded any significant improvement in the prognosis of patients with LC. The five-year survival rate for all combined disease stages remains about 15%. For this reason, new therapies such as those that inhibit tumor angiogenesis or block activity of growth factor receptors are of special interest in this group of patients. In this review we will summarize the most recent clinical data on biologic therapies that inhibit tumor angiogenesis in LC, focusing on those that are most clinically relevant.

  14. An inducible hepatocellular carcinoma model for preclinical evaluation of antiangiogenic therapy in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, Anja; Hu, Junhao; Wieland, Matthias; Bergeest, Jan-Philip; Mogler, Carolin; Neumann, André; Géraud, Cyrill; Arnold, Bernd; Rohr, Karl; Komljenovic, Dorde; Schirmacher, Peter; Goerdt, Sergij; Augustin, Hellmut G

    2014-08-01

    The limited availability of experimental tumor models that faithfully mimic the progression of human tumors and their response to therapy remains a major bottleneck to the clinical translation and application of novel therapeutic principles. To address this challenge in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), one of the deadliest and most common cancers in the world, we developed and validated an inducible model of hepatocarcinogenesis in adult mice. Tumorigenesis was triggered by intravenous adenoviral delivery of Cre recombinase in transgenic mice expressing the hepatocyte-specific albumin promoter, a loxP-flanked stop cassette, and the SV40 large T-antigen (iAST). Cre recombinase-mediated excision of the stop cassette led to a transient viral hepatitis and resulted in multinodular tumorigenesis within 5 to 8 weeks. Tumor nodules with histologic characteristics of human HCC established a functional vasculature by cooption, remodeling, and angiogenic expansion of the preexisting sinusoidal liver vasculature with increasing signs of vascular immaturity during tumor progression. Treatment of mice with sorafenib rapidly resulted in the induction of vascular regression, inhibition of tumor growth, and enhanced overall survival. Vascular regression was characterized by loss of endothelial cells leaving behind avascular type IV collagen-positive empty sleeves with remaining pericytes. Sorafenib treatment led to transcriptional changes of Igf1, Id1, and cMet over time, which may reflect the emergence of potential escape mechanisms. Taken together, our results established the iAST model of inducible hepatocarcinogenesis as a robust and versatile preclinical model to study HCC progression and validate novel therapies. PMID:24906623

  15. Phospholipid metabolites in recurrent glioblastoma: in vivo markers detect different tumor phenotypes before and under antiangiogenic therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke Hattingen

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Metabolic changes upon antiangiogenic therapy of recurrent glioblastomas (rGBMs may provide new biomarkers for treatment efficacy. Since in vitro models showed that phospholipid membrane metabolism provides specific information on tumor growth we employed in-vivo MR-spectroscopic imaging (MRSI of human rGBMs before and under bevacizumab (BVZ to measure concentrations of phosphocholine (PCho, phosphoethanolamine (PEth, glycerophosphocholine (GPC, and glyceroethanolamine (GPE. METHODS: (1H and (31P MRSI was prospectively performed in 32 patients with rGBMs before and under BVZ therapy at 8 weeks intervals until tumor progression. Patients were dichotomized into subjects with long overall survival (OS (>median OS and short OS (

  16. Immuno-Expression of Endoglin and Smooth Muscle Actin in the Vessels of Brain Metastases. Is There a Rational for Anti-Angiogenic Therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Barresi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite ongoing clinical trials, the efficacy of anti-angiogenic drugs for the treatment of brain metastases (BM is still questionable. The lower response rate to anti-angiogenic therapy in the presence of BM than in metastatic disease involving other sites suggests that BM may be insensitive to these drugs, although the biological reasons underlining this phenomenon are still to be clarified. With the aim of assessing whether the targets of anti-angiogenic therapies are actually present in BM, in the present study, we analyzed the microvessel density (MVD, a measure of neo-angiogenesis, and the vascular phenotype (mature vs. immature in the tumor tissue of a series of BM derived from different primary tumors. By using immunohistochemistry against endoglin, a specific marker for newly formed vessels, we found that neo-angiogenesis widely varies in BM depending on the site of the primary tumor, as well as on its histotype. According to our results, BM from lung cancer displayed the highest MVD counts, while those from renal carcinoma had the lowest. Then, among BM from lung cancer, those from large cell and adenocarcinoma histotypes had significantly higher MVD counts than those originating from squamous cell carcinoma (p = 0.0043; p = 0.0063. Of note, MVD counts were inversely correlated with the maturation index of the endoglin-stained vessels, reflected by the coverage of smooth muscle actin (SMA positive pericytes (r = −0.693; p < 0.0001. Accordingly, all the endoglin-positive vessels in BM from pulmonary squamous cell carcinoma and renal carcinoma, displayed a mature phenotype, while vessels with an immature phenotype were found in highly vascularized BM from pulmonary large cell and adenocarcinoma. The low MVD and mature phenotype observed in BM from some primary tumors may account for their low sensitivity to anti-angiogenic therapies. Although our findings need to be validated in correlative studies with a clinical response, this should

  17. Antiangiogenic Therapy in the Treatment of Recurrent Medulloblastoma in the Adult: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Giuseppe Privitera; Grazia Acquaviva; Giovanni Carlo Ettorre; Corrado Spatola

    2009-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is a rare tumor in central nervous system, with an even rarer occurrence in adulthood. The management of a recurrent disease is a medical challenge; chemotherapy has been used as the treatment of choice, while reirradiation has been employed in selected cases. We report the case of a 51-year-old man with recurrent medulloblastoma. He was treated with local reirradiation, chemotherapy, and antiangiogenic drug, with the latter giving the longer progression-free interval. The aim...

  18. Mechanisms of Glioma Formation: Iterative Perivascular Glioma Growth and Invasion Leads to Tumor Progression, VEGF-Independent Vascularization, and Resistance to Antiangiogenic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory J. Baker

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available As glioma cells infiltrate the brain they become associated with various microanatomic brain structures such as blood vessels, white matter tracts, and brain parenchyma. How these distinct invasion patterns coordinate tumor growth and influence clinical outcomes remain poorly understood. We have investigated how perivascular growth affects glioma growth patterning and response to antiangiogenic therapy within the highly vascularized brain. Orthotopically implanted rodent and human glioma cells are shown to commonly invade and proliferate within brain perivascular space. This form of brain tumor growth and invasion is also shown to characterize de novo generated endogenous mouse brain tumors, biopsies of primary human glioblastoma (GBM, and peripheral cancer metastasis to the human brain. Perivascularly invading brain tumors become vascularized by normal brain microvessels as individual glioma cells use perivascular space as a conduit for tumor invasion. Agent-based computational modeling recapitulated biological perivascular glioma growth without the need for neoangiogenesis. We tested the requirement for neoangiogenesis in perivascular glioma by treating animals with angiogenesis inhibitors bevacizumab and DC101. These inhibitors induced the expected vessel normalization, yet failed to reduce tumor growth or improve survival of mice bearing orthotopic or endogenous gliomas while exacerbating brain tumor invasion. Our results provide compelling experimental evidence in support of the recently described failure of clinically used antiangiogenics to extend the overall survival of human GBM patients.

  19. Preeclampsia and the Anti-Angiogenic State

    OpenAIRE

    Agarwal, Isha; Karumanchi, S. Ananth

    2011-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a major cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality worldwide, however, its etiology remains unclear. Abnormal placental angiogenesis during pregnancy resulting from high levels of anti-angiogenic factors, soluble Flt1 (sFlt1) and soluble endoglin (sEng), has been implicated in preeclampsia pathogenesis. Accumulating evidence also points to a role for these anti-angiogenic proteins as serum biomarkers for the clinical diagnosis and prediction of preeclampsia. Uncoverin...

  20. Pitfalls in the Neuroimaging of Glioblastoma in the Era of Antiangiogenic and Immuno/Targeted Therapy - Detecting Illusive Disease, Defining Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Yi-Kun Huang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma, the most common malignant primary brain tumor in adults is a devastating diagnosis with an average survival of 14-16 months using the current standard of care treatment. The determination of treatment response and clinical decision making is based on the accuracy of radiographic assessment. Notwithstanding, challenges exist in the neuroimaging evaluation of patients undergoing treatment for malignant glioma.Differentiating treatment response from tumor progression is problematic and currently combines long-term follow-up using standard MRI, with clinical status and corticosteroid-dependency assessments. In the clinical trial setting, treatment with gene therapy, vaccines, immunotherapy, and targeted biologicals similarly produces MRI changes mimicking disease progression. A neuroimaging method to clearly distinguish between pseudoprogression and tumor progression has unfortunately not been found to date. With the incorporation of antiangiogenic therapies, a further pitfall in imaging interpretation is pseudoresponse. The Macdonald Criteria that correlate tumor burden with contrast enhanced imaging proved insufficient and misleading in the context of rapid blood brain barrier normalization following antiangiogenic treatment that is not accompanied by expected survival benefit. Even improved criteria, such as the RANO criteria, that incorporate non-enhancing disease, clinical status, and need for corticosteroid use, fall short of definitively distinguishing tumor progression, pseudoresponse, and pseudoprogression.This review focuses on advanced imaging techniques including perfusion MRI, diffusion MRI, MR spectroscopy, and new PET imaging tracers. The relevant image analysis algorithms and interpretation methods of these promising techniques are discussed in the context of determining response and progression during treatment of glioblastoma both in the standard of care as well as clinical trial context.

  1. DNA methylation biomarkers predict progression-free and overall survival of metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC treated with antiangiogenic therapies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Peters

    Full Text Available VEGF-targeted therapy increases both the progression-free (PFS and overall survival (OS of patients with metastasized renal cell cancer (mRCC. Identification of molecular phenotypes of RCC could improve risk-stratification and the prediction of the clinical disease course. We investigated whether gene-specific DNA hypermethylation can predict PFS and OS among patients undergoing anti-VEGF-based therapy. Primary tumor tissues from 18 patients receiving targeted therapy were examined retrospectively using quantitative methylation-specific PCR analysis of CST6, LAD1, hsa-miR-124-3, and hsa-miR-9-1 CpG islands. PFS and OS were analyzed for first-line and sequential antiangiogenic therapies using the log rank statistics. Sensitivity and specificity were determined for predicting first-line therapy failure. Hypermethylation of CST6 and LAD1 was associated with both a shortened PFS (log rank p = 0.009 and p = 0.004 and OS (p = 0.011 and p = 0.043. The median PFS observed for the high and low methylation groups of CST6 and LAD1 was 2.0 vs.11.4 months. LAD1 methylation had a specificity of 1.0 (95% CI 0.65-1.0 and a sensitivity of 0.73 (95% CI 0.43-0.90 for the prediction of first-line therapy. CST6 and LAD1 methylation are candidate epigenetic biomarkers showing unprecedented association with PFS and OS as well as specificity for the prediction of the response to therapy. DNA methylation markers should be considered for the prospective evaluation of larger patient cohorts in future studies.

  2. Rapamycin/DiR loaded lipid-polyaniline nanoparticles for dual-modal imaging guided enhanced photothermal and antiangiogenic combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinping; Guo, Fang; Yu, Meng; Liu, Li; Tan, Fengping; Yan, Ran; Li, Nan

    2016-09-10

    Imaging-guided photothermal therapy (PTT) has promising application for treating tumors. Nevertheless, so far imaging-guided photothermal drug-delivery systems have been developed with limited success for tumor chemo-photothermal therapy. In this study, as the proof-of-concept, a stimuli-responsive tumor-targeting rapamycin/DiR loaded lipid-polyaniline nanoparticle (RDLPNP) for dual-modal imaging-guided enhanced PTT efficacy is reported for the first time. In this system, polyaniline (PANI) with π-π electronic conjugated system and effective photothermal efficiency is chosen as the appropriate model receptor of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), and loaded cyanine probe (e.g., 1,1-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3-tetramethylindotricarbocyanine iodide, DiR) acts as the donor of near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF). In addition, rapamycin (RAPA), which is used as the antiangiogenesis chemotherapeutic drug, can cutdown the tumor vessels and delay tumor growth obviously. After intravenous treatment of RDLPNPs into Hela tumor bearing mice, fluorescent (from DiR) and enhanced photoacoustic (from DLPNPs) signals were found in tumor site over time, which reached to peak at the 6h time point. After irradiating with an NIR laser, a good anti-tumor effect was observed owing to the enhanced photothermal and antiangiogenic effect of RDLPNPs. These results show that the multifunctional nanoparticle can be used as a promising imaging-guided photothermal drug delivery nanoplatform for cancer therapy. PMID:27388755

  3. Multiparametric Monitoring of Early Response to Antiangiogenic Therapy: A Sequential Perfusion CT and PET/CT Study in a Rabbit VX2 Tumor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Im Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To perform dual analysis of tumor perfusion and glucose metabolism using perfusion CT and FDG-PET/CT for the purpose of monitoring the early response to bevacizumab therapy in rabbit VX2 tumor models and to assess added value of FDG-PET to perfusion CT. Methods. Twenty-four VX2 carcinoma tumors implanted in bilateral back muscles of 12 rabbits were evaluated. Serial concurrent perfusion CT and FDG-PET/CT were performed before and 3, 7, and 14 days after bevacizumab therapy (treatment group or saline infusion (control group. Perfusion CT was analyzed to calculate blood flow (BF, blood volume (BV, and permeability surface area product (PS; FDG-PET was analyzed to calculate SUVmax, SUVmean, total lesion glycolysis (TLG, entropy, and homogeneity. The flow-metabolic ratio (FMR was also calculated and immunohistochemical analysis of microvessel density (MVD was performed. Results. On day 14, BF and BV in the treatment group were significantly lower than in the control group. There were no significant differences in all FDG-PET-derived parameters between both groups. In the treatment group, FMR prominently decreased after therapy and was positively correlated with MVD. Conclusions. In VX2 tumors, FMR could provide further insight into the early antiangiogenic effect reflecting a mismatch in intratumor blood flow and metabolism.

  4. Early biomarkers from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging to predict the response to antiangiogenic therapy in high-grade gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piludu, Francesca; Vidiri, Antonello [Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging Department, Rome (Italy); Marzi, Simona [Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Medical Physics Laboratory, Rome (Italy); Pace, Andrea; Villani, Veronica [Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Neurology Division, Rome (Italy); Fabi, Alessandra [Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Oncology Department, Rome (Italy); Carapella, Carmine Maria [Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Oncologic Surgery Department, Rome (Italy); Terrenato, Irene [Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Biostatistics-Scientific Direction, Rome (Italy); Antenucci, Anna [Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Clinical Pathology, Rome (Italy)

    2015-12-15

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether early changes in tumor volume and perfusion measurements derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) may predict response to antiangiogenic therapy in recurrent high-grade gliomas. Twenty-seven patients who received bevacizumab every 3 weeks were enrolled in the study. For each patient, three MRI scans were performed: at baseline, after the first dose, and after the fourth dose of bevacizumab. The entire tumor volume (V{sub tot}), as well as contrast-enhanced and noncontrast-enhanced tumor subvolumes (V{sub CE-T1} and V{sub NON-CE-T1}, respectively) were outlined using post-contrast T1-weighted images as a guide for the tumor location. Histogram analysis of normalized IAUGC (nIAUGC) and transfer constant K{sup trans} maps were performed. Each patient was classified as a responder patient if he/she had a partial response or a stable disease or as a nonresponder patient if he/she had progressive disease. Responding patients showed a larger reduction in V{sub NON-CE-T1} after a single dose, compared to nonresponding patients. Tumor subvolumes with increased values of nIAUGC and K{sup trans}, after a single dose, significantly differed between responders and nonresponders. The radiological response was found to be significantly associated to the clinical outcome. After a single dose, V{sub tot} was predictive of overall survival (OS), while V{sub CE-T1} showed a tendency of correlation with OS. Tumor subvolumes with increased nIAUGC and K{sup trans} showed the potential for improving the diagnostic accuracy of DCE. Early assessments of the entire tumor volume, including necrotic areas, may provide complementary information of tumor behavior in response to anti-VEGF therapies and is worth further investigation. (orig.)

  5. Combining antiangiogenic therapy with adoptive cell immunotherapy exerts better antitumor effects in non-small cell lung cancer models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shujing Shi

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Cytokine-induced killer cells (CIK cells are a heterogeneous subset of ex-vivo expanded T lymphocytes which are characterized with a MHC-unrestricted tumor-killing activity and a mixed T-NK phenotype. Adoptive CIK cells transfer, one of the adoptive immunotherapy represents a promising nontoxic anticancer therapy. However, in clinical studies, the therapeutic activity of adoptive CIK cells transfer is not as efficient as anticipated. Possible explanations are that abnormal tumor vasculature and hypoxic tumor microenvironment could impede the infiltration and efficacy of lymphocytes. We hypothesized that antiangiogenesis therapy could improve the antitumor activity of CIK cells by normalizing tumor vasculature and modulating hypoxic tumor microenvironment. METHODS: We combined recombinant human endostatin (rh-endostatin and CIK cells in the treatment of lung carcinoma murine models. Intravital microscopy, dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, immunohistochemistry, and flow cytometry were used to investigate the tumor vasculature and hypoxic microenvironment as well as the infiltration of immune cells. RESULTS: Our results indicated that rh-endostatin synergized with adoptive CIK cells transfer to inhibit the growth of lung carcinoma. We found that rh-endostatin normalized tumor vasculature and reduced hypoxic area in the tumor microenvironment. Hypoxia significantly inhibited the proliferation, cytotoxicity and migration of CIK cells in vitro and impeded the homing of CIK cells into tumor parenchyma ex vivo. Furthermore, we found that treatment with rh-endostatin significantly increased the homing of CIK cells and decreased the accumulation of suppressive immune cells in the tumor tissue. In addition, combination therapy produced higher level of tumor-infiltration lymphocytes compared with other treatments. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that rh-endostatin improves the therapeutic effect of adoptive CIK cells

  6. Combining Antiangiogenic Therapy with Adoptive Cell Immunotherapy Exerts Better Antitumor Effects in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shujing; Wang, Rui; Chen, Yitian; Song, Haizhu; Chen, Longbang; Huang, Guichun

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Cytokine-induced killer cells (CIK cells) are a heterogeneous subset of ex-vivo expanded T lymphocytes which are characterized with a MHC-unrestricted tumor-killing activity and a mixed T-NK phenotype. Adoptive CIK cells transfer, one of the adoptive immunotherapy represents a promising nontoxic anticancer therapy. However, in clinical studies, the therapeutic activity of adoptive CIK cells transfer is not as efficient as anticipated. Possible explanations are that abnormal tumor vasculature and hypoxic tumor microenvironment could impede the infiltration and efficacy of lymphocytes. We hypothesized that antiangiogenesis therapy could improve the antitumor activity of CIK cells by normalizing tumor vasculature and modulating hypoxic tumor microenvironment. Methods We combined recombinant human endostatin (rh-endostatin) and CIK cells in the treatment of lung carcinoma murine models. Intravital microscopy, dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, immunohistochemistry, and flow cytometry were used to investigate the tumor vasculature and hypoxic microenvironment as well as the infiltration of immune cells. Results Our results indicated that rh-endostatin synergized with adoptive CIK cells transfer to inhibit the growth of lung carcinoma. We found that rh-endostatin normalized tumor vasculature and reduced hypoxic area in the tumor microenvironment. Hypoxia significantly inhibited the proliferation, cytotoxicity and migration of CIK cells in vitro and impeded the homing of CIK cells into tumor parenchyma ex vivo. Furthermore, we found that treatment with rh-endostatin significantly increased the homing of CIK cells and decreased the accumulation of suppressive immune cells in the tumor tissue. In addition, combination therapy produced higher level of tumor-infiltration lymphocytes compared with other treatments. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that rh-endostatin improves the therapeutic effect of adoptive CIK cells therapy against lung

  7. Residual dormant cancer stem-cell foci are responsible for tumor relapse after antiangiogenic metronomic therapy in hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Padura, Ines; Marighetti, Paola; Agliano, Alice; Colombo, Federico; Larzabal, Leyre; Redrado, Miriam; Bleau, Anne-Marie; Prior, Celia; Bertolini, Francesco; Calvo, Alfonso

    2012-07-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common solid tumor and the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Currently available chemotherapeutic options are not curative due in part to tumor resistance to conventional therapies. We generated orthotopic HCC mouse models in immunodeficient NOD/SCID/IL2rγ null mice by injection of human alpha-feto protein (hAFP)- and/or luciferase-expressing HCC cell lines and primary cells from patients, where tumor growth and spread can be accurately monitored in a non-invasive way. In this model, low-dose metronomic administration of cyclophosphamide (LDM-CTX) caused complete regression of the tumor mass. A significant increase in survival (P<0.0001), reduced aberrant angiogenesis and hyperproliferation, and decrease in the number of circulating tumor cells were found in LDM-CTX-treated animals, in comparison with untreated mice. Co-administration of LDM-CTX with anti-VEGF therapy further improved the therapeutic efficacy. However, the presence of residual circulating hAFP levels suggested that some tumor cells were still present in livers of treated mice. Immunohistochemistry revealed that those cells had a hAFP+/CD13+/PCNA- phenotype, suggesting that they were dormant cancer stem cells (CSC). Indeed, discontinuation of therapy resulted in tumor regrowth. Moreover, in-vitro LDM-CTX treatment reduced hepatosphere formation in both number and size, and the resulting spheres were enriched in CD13+ cells indicating that these cells were particularly resistant to therapy. Co-treatment of the CD13-targeting drug, bestatin, with LDM-CTX leads to slower tumor growth and a decreased tumor volume. Therefore, combining a CD13 inhibitor, which targets the CSC-like population, with LDM-CTX chemotherapy may be used to eradicate minimal residual disease and improve the treatment of liver cancer. PMID:22546866

  8. Therapeutic application of anti-angiogenic nanomaterials in cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sudip; Patra, Chitta Ranjan

    2016-06-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vasculature, plays a vital role in physiological and pathological processes (embryonic development, wound healing, tumor growth and metastasis). The overall balance of angiogenesis inside the human body is maintained by pro- and anti-angiogenic signals. The processes by which drugs inhibit angiogenesis as well as tumor growth are called the anti-angiogenesis technique, a most promising cancer treatment strategy. Over the last couple of decades, scientists have been developing angiogenesis inhibitors for the treatment of cancers. However, conventional anti-angiogenic therapy has several limitations including drug resistance that can create problems for a successful therapeutic strategy. Therefore, a new comprehensive treatment strategy using antiangiogenic agents for the treatment of cancer is urgently needed. Recently researchers have been developing and designing several nanoparticles that show anti-angiogenic properties. These nanomedicines could be useful as an alternative strategy for the treatment of various cancers using anti-angiogenic therapy. In this review article, we critically focus on the potential application of anti-angiogenic nanomaterial and nanoparticle based drug/siRNA/peptide delivery systems in cancer therapeutics. We also discuss the basic and clinical perspectives of anti-angiogenesis therapy, highlighting its importance in tumor angiogenesis, current status and future prospects and challenges.Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vasculature, plays a vital role in physiological and pathological processes (embryonic development, wound healing, tumor growth and metastasis). The overall balance of angiogenesis inside the human body is maintained by pro- and anti-angiogenic signals. The processes by which drugs inhibit angiogenesis as well as tumor growth are called the anti-angiogenesis technique, a most promising cancer treatment strategy. Over the

  9. Longitudinal monitoring of tumor antiangiogenic therapy with near-infrared fluorophore-labeled agents targeted to integrin α{sub v}β{sub 3} and vascular endothelial growth factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xianlei; Ma, Teng; Liu, Hao; Yu, Xinhe; Wu, Yue; Jia, Bing; Wang, Fan; Liu, Zhaofei [Peking University, Medical Isotopes Research Center, Beijing (China); Peking University, Department of Radiation Medicine, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Shi, Jiyun; Zhao, Huiyun [Peking University, Medical Isotopes Research Center, Beijing (China); Peking University, Medical and Healthy Analytical Center, Beijing (China)

    2014-07-15

    Optical imaging is emerging as a powerful tool for the noninvasive imaging of the biological processes in living subjects. This study aimed to investigate whether optical imaging of integrin α{sub v}β{sub 3} and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression can serve as sensitive biomarkers for tumor early response to antiangiogenic therapy. We synthesized two near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging agents, CF680R-3PRGD2 and CF750-BevF(ab'){sub 2}, which were designed to specifically bind to integrin α{sub v}β{sub 3} and VEGF, respectively. The ability of optical imaging using the two imaging agents for early monitoring the antiangiogenic effect of sunitinib was evaluated. CF680R-3PRGD2 and CF750-BevF(ab'){sub 2} specifically bound to their respective targets in vitro and in HT-29 tumor-bearing nude mice. Sunitinib treatment led to significantly decreased tumor uptake of CF680R-3PRGD2 (e.g., 7.47 ± 1.62 % vs. 4.24 ± 0.16 % on day 4; P < 0.05) and CF750-BevF(ab'){sub 2} (e.g., 7.43 ± 2.43 % vs. 4.04 ± 1.39 % on day 2; P < 0.05) in vivo. Immunofluorescence staining and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay confirmed that sunitinib-induced changes in tumor uptake of CF680R-3PRGD2 and CF750-BevF(ab'){sub 2} were correlated with changes in the levels of integrin α{sub v}β{sub 3} and VEGF. Radiobiodistribution of {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD2 and {sup 125}I-BevF(ab'){sub 2}, the radiocounterparts of CF680R-3PRGD2 and CF750-BevF(ab'){sub 2}, respectively, also validated optical imaging results. Longitudinal monitoring of tumor integrin α{sub v}β{sub 3} and VEGF expression could be used as early biomarkers for tumor response to antiangiogenic therapy. This strategy may facilitate the development of new antiangiogenic drugs, and be used for elucidation of the underlying mechanisms of therapies involving the integrin and the VEGF signaling pathway. (orig.)

  10. Exploiting Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR Technology for the Identification of Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 (FGF2 Antagonists Endowed with Antiangiogenic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Presta

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis, the process of new blood vessel formation, is implicated in various physiological/pathological conditions, including embryonic development, inflammation and tumor growth. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2 is a heparin-binding angiogenic growth factor involved in various physiopathological processes, including tumor neovascularization. Accordingly, FGF2 is considered a target for antiangiogenic therapies. Thus, numerous natural/synthetic compounds have been tested for their capacity to bind and sequester FGF2 in the extracellular environment preventing its interaction with cellular receptors. We have exploited surface plasmon resonance (SPR technique in search for antiangiogenic FGF2 binders/antagonists. In this review we will summarize our experience in SPR-based angiogenesis research, with the aim to validate SPR as a first line screening for the identification of antiangiogenic compounds.

  11. Thrombospondin-based Antiangiogenic Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Lawler, Jack

    2007-01-01

    Thrombospondins (TSPs) are a family of extracellular matrix proteins that regulate tissue genesis and remodeling. TSP-1 plays a pivotal role in the regulation of both physiological and pathological angiogenesis. The inhibitory effects of TSP-1 on angiogenesis have been established in numerous experimental models. Among other TSP members, TSP-2 has equivalent domain structure as TSP-1 and shares most functions of TSP-1. The mechanisms by which TSP-1 and -2 inhibit angiogenesis can be broadly c...

  12. Thrombospondin-1-Based Antiangiogenic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Jennifer N; Lawler, Jack

    2015-09-01

    Ocular angiogenesis is one of the underlying causes of blindness and vision impairment and may occur in a spectrum of disorders, including diabetic retinopathy, neovascular age-related macular degeneration, retinal artery or vein occlusion, and retinopathy of prematurity. As such, strategies to inhibit angiogenesis by suppressing vascular endothelial growth factor activity have proven to be effective in the clinic for the treatment of eye diseases. A complementary approach would be to increase the level of naturally occurring inhibitors of angiogenesis, such as thrombospondin (TSP)-1. This article summarizes the development of TSP-1-based inhibitors of angiogenesis. PMID:26352160

  13. Latest Results for Anti-Angiogenic Drugs in Cancer Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Sofie; Kopp, Sascha; Wehland, Markus;

    2016-01-01

    and gastrointestinal cancers. Furthermore, there will be a discussion of unsolved problems, such as lack of biomarkers, drug resistance, and adverse events, for which a solution is necessary in order to improve the benefit of anti-angiogenic drugs in the future. RESULTS: Anti-angiogenic therapy is extensively used...... in the treatment of cancer. There is evidence that drug-induced hypertension serves as a biomarker for a good response to therapy. Currently several possible anti-angiogenic biomarkers are under discussion. Further examples are changes in VEGF or interleukin [IL]-8 polymorphisms, changed plasma levels of VEGF......, or tumor microvessel density. To overcome therapy-associated problems, more research for valid biomarkers is necessary. In addition, a strategy to overcome resistance problems and severe adverse events is desirable. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical trials evaluating targeted therapies with specificity for resistance...

  14. Antiangiogenic agents increase breast cancer stem cells via the generation of tumor hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    Conley, Sarah J.; Gheordunescu, Elizabeth; Kakarala, Pramod; Newman, Bryan; Korkaya, Hasan; Heath, Amber N.; Clouthier, Shawn G.; Wicha, Max S.

    2012-01-01

    Antiangiogenic therapy has been thought to hold significant potential for the treatment of cancer. However, the efficacy of such treatments, especially in breast cancer patients, has been called into question, as recent clinical trials reveal only limited effectiveness of antiangiogenic agents in prolonging patient survival. New research using preclinical models further suggests that antiangiogenic agents actually increase invasive and metastatic properties of breast cancer cells. We demonstr...

  15. Perfusion CT allows prediction of therapy response in non-small cell lung cancer treated with conventional and anti-angiogenic chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tacelli, Nunzia; Santangelo, Teresa; Remy, Jacques [University of Lille Nord de France, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette (EA 2694), Lille (France); University of Lille Nord de France, Faculty of Medicine, Henri Warembourg, Lille (France); Scherpereel, Arnaud; Cortot, Alexis; Wallyn, Frederic [University of Lille Nord de France, Faculty of Medicine, Henri Warembourg, Lille (France); University of Lille Nord de France, Department of Pulmonary and Thoracic Oncology, Lille (France); Duhamel, Alain; Deken, Valerie [University of Lille Nord de France, Faculty of Medicine, Henri Warembourg, Lille (France); University of Lille Nord de France, Department of Medical Statistics, Lille (France); Klotz, Ernst [Siemens Healthcare, Computed Tomography Division, Forchheim (Germany); Lafitte, Jean-Jacques [University of Lille Nord de France, Faculty of Medicine, Henri Warembourg, Lille (France); University of Lille Nord de France, Department of Pulmonary and Thoracic Oncology, Lille (France); Pasteur Institute of Lille, INSERM unit 1019, CIIL, Lille (France); Remy-Jardin, Martine [University of Lille Nord de France, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette (EA 2694), Lille (France); University of Lille Nord de France, Faculty of Medicine, Henri Warembourg, Lille (France); Hospital Calmette, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Lille cedex (France)

    2013-08-15

    To determine whether CT can depict early perfusion changes in lung cancer treated by anti-angiogenic drugs, allowing prediction of response. Patients with non-small cell lung cancer, treated by conventional chemotherapy with (Group 1; n = 17) or without (Group 2; n = 23) anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) drug (bevacizumab) underwent CT perfusion before (TIME 0) and after 1 (TIME 1), 3 (TIME 2) and 6 (TIME 3) cycles of chemotherapy. The CT parameters evaluated included: (1) total tumour vascular volume (TVV) and total tumour extravascular flow (TEF); (2) RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours) measurements. Tumour response was also assessed on the basis of the clinicians' overall evaluation. In Group 1, significant reduction in perfusion was identified between baseline and: (1) TIME 1 (TVV, P = 0.0395; TEF, P = 0.015); (2) TIME 2 (TVV, P = 0.0043; TEF, P < 0.0001); (3) TIME 3 (TVV, P = 0.0034; TEF, P = 0.0005) without any significant change in Group 2. In Group 1: (1) the reduction in TVV at TIME 1 was significantly higher in responders versus non-responders at TIME 2 according to RECIST (P = 0.0128) and overall clinicians' evaluation (P = 0.0079); (2) all responders at TIME 2 had a concurrent decrease in TVV and TEF at TIME 1. Perfusion CT demonstrates early changes in lung cancer vascularity under anti-angiogenic chemotherapy that may help predict therapeutic response. (orig.)

  16. Perfusion CT allows prediction of therapy response in non-small cell lung cancer treated with conventional and anti-angiogenic chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine whether CT can depict early perfusion changes in lung cancer treated by anti-angiogenic drugs, allowing prediction of response. Patients with non-small cell lung cancer, treated by conventional chemotherapy with (Group 1; n = 17) or without (Group 2; n = 23) anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) drug (bevacizumab) underwent CT perfusion before (TIME 0) and after 1 (TIME 1), 3 (TIME 2) and 6 (TIME 3) cycles of chemotherapy. The CT parameters evaluated included: (1) total tumour vascular volume (TVV) and total tumour extravascular flow (TEF); (2) RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours) measurements. Tumour response was also assessed on the basis of the clinicians' overall evaluation. In Group 1, significant reduction in perfusion was identified between baseline and: (1) TIME 1 (TVV, P = 0.0395; TEF, P = 0.015); (2) TIME 2 (TVV, P = 0.0043; TEF, P < 0.0001); (3) TIME 3 (TVV, P = 0.0034; TEF, P = 0.0005) without any significant change in Group 2. In Group 1: (1) the reduction in TVV at TIME 1 was significantly higher in responders versus non-responders at TIME 2 according to RECIST (P = 0.0128) and overall clinicians' evaluation (P = 0.0079); (2) all responders at TIME 2 had a concurrent decrease in TVV and TEF at TIME 1. Perfusion CT demonstrates early changes in lung cancer vascularity under anti-angiogenic chemotherapy that may help predict therapeutic response. (orig.)

  17. VEGFA gene locus (6p12) amplification and colorectal cancer : implications for patients' response to therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Andreozzi, Mariacarla

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study was to assess the presence of VEGFA genomic alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) and clarify how these genomic alterations can modulate CRC patients’ response to BV treatment in addition to first line therapy (5fluorouracil, leucovorin, capecitabine, oxaliplatin, mephedrone). Among our goals we aim to find out predictive biomarkers to improve anti-angiogenic therapy efficacy and possibly to develop new therapeutic approaches by setting out new rational drug combinatio...

  18. Toxicity of radiation therapy and anti-angiogenics combination: a case report; Toxicite de l'association radiotherapie et antiangiogeniques: a propos d'un cas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, O.; Mazeron, R.; Martin, E.; Carrie, C. [Centre Leon-Berard, Service de Radiotherapie, 69 - Lyon (France)

    2009-06-15

    The combined administration of anti-angiogenic agents (AA) and radiation is being evaluated. No AA has yet received Marketing Authorization in this indication. However, they are widely used in medical oncology and criteria for stopping their administration in case of irradiation have not been defined.We report the case of a 63-year-old man experiencing grade 2 skin toxicity while on radiation treatment and sorafenib (400 mg twice daily) for a metastatic lesion developing between the vastus medialis muscle and the cortical of the mid-diaphysis of the right femur. Toxicity occurred at 21 Gy, for a total dose of 36 Gy (12 fractions of 3 Gy). Cutaneous symptoms rapidly disappeared after treatment discontinuation. Radiotherapy alone was resumed after a few days and the total dose could be delivered, with good tolerance. At 2-month follow-up, the intramuscular lesion had regressed. Several other cases of patients with poor tolerance to the association of AA and radiotherapy have been reported. Further studies of the effectiveness and tolerance of the combination treatment are needed before indications for AA can be extended to other diseases. (authors)

  19. Gene therapy and its implications in Periodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Mahale Swapna; Dani Nitin; Ansari Shumaila; Kale Triveni

    2009-01-01

    Gene therapy is a field of Biomedicine. With the advent of gene therapy in dentistry, significant progress has been made in the control of periodontal diseases and reconstruction of dento-alveolar apparatus. Implementation in periodontics include: -As a mode of tissue engineering with three approaches: cell, protein-based and gene delivery approach. -Genetic approach to Biofilm Antibiotic Resistance. Future strategies of gene therapy in preventing periodontal diseases: -Enhances host defense...

  20. Postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy--clinical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, S H; Rosenberg, J; Bostofte, E

    1994-01-01

    The menopause is defined as cessation of menstruation, ending the fertile period. The hormonal changes are a decrease in progesterone level, followed by a marked decrease in estrogen production. Symptoms associated with these hormonal changes may advocate for hormonal replacement therapy. This...... review is based on the English-language literature on the effect of estrogen therapy and estrogen plus progestin therapy on postmenopausal women. The advantages of hormone replacement therapy are regulation of dysfunctional uterine bleeding, relief of hot flushes, and prevention of atrophic changes in...... the urogenital tract. Women at risk of osteoporosis will benefit from hormone replacement therapy. The treatment should start as soon after menopause as possible and it is possible that it should be maintained for life. The treatment may be supplemented with extra calcium intake, vitamin D, and maybe...

  1. Suicide Loss Survivors' Experiences with Therapy: Implications for Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Rebecca; Cerel, Julie; McGann, Vanessa; Maple, Myfanwy

    2016-07-01

    Over two-thirds of suicide loss survivors, those who have lost a loved one to suicide, seek individual therapy following their loss. However, nothing is known about what survivors find helpful about therapy or how therapy impacts their grief. An online survey was conducted June 2012-March 2013 with a convenience sample of 197 survivors primarily from the USA and Australia to develop a better understanding of treatment seeking loss survivors and their experiences in therapy. Questions explored the experience of the suicide death, the therapy received after the loss, and insights about improving therapy for loss survivors. Participants were generally positive about their therapy experiences. However, respondents endorsed symptoms of PTSD, though many did not report a formal diagnosis from a provider, suggesting a discrepancy that could lead to inadequate treatment of symptoms. The findings provide an understanding of treatment seeking loss survivors, along with implications for therapists treating this population. PMID:27074845

  2. GENE THERAPY AND ITS IMPLICATIONS IN SPORTS

    OpenAIRE

    Biljana Vitošević

    2011-01-01

    Thanks to the very successful Human Genome Project and the identification of genes involved in genetic disease, we now have the ability to treat many conditions. However, the identification of the genes which code certain phenotype characteristics has opened the way for abuse in the fields of sport and physical exercise. The principles of gene therapy and the ways in which genes are transferred have completely been copied from gene therapy and are now being used to increase the physical abili...

  3. Development of lentiviral vectors for antiangiogenic gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shichinohe, T; Bochner, B H; Mizutani, K; Nishida, M; Hegerich-Gilliam, S; Naldini, L; Kasahara, N

    2001-11-01

    Growth and metastasis of malignant tumors requires angiogenesis. Inhibition of tumor-induced angiogenesis may represent an effective cytostatic strategy. We have constructed recombinant self-inactivating lentiviral vectors expressing angiostatin and endostatin, and have tested their antiangiogenic activities. As VSV-G-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors showed low relative transduction titers on bovine aortic and human umbilical vein endothelial cells, it was difficult to achieve significant inhibition of endothelial cell growth by lentivirus-mediated antiangiogenic gene transfer directly to endothelial cells without concomitant vector-associated cytotoxicity. However, lentivirus vectors could efficiently and stably transduce T24 human bladder cancer cells that are relatively resistant to adenovirus infection due to loss of coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor expression. Long-term expression and secretion of angiostatin and endostatin from lentivirus-transduced T24 cells resulted in significant inhibition of cellular proliferation on coculture with endothelial cells. This report represents the first use of lentivirus-based vectors to deliver the antiangiogenic factors, angiostatin and endostatin, and suggests the potential utility of antiangiogenic gene therapy with lentiviral vectors for the treatment of cancer. PMID:11773978

  4. Angiogenesis and Anti-Angiogenic Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersin Demirer

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Blood vessels in our body is developed by vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. There have been new advances in molecular pathology and tumor biology areas in recent years. Angiogenesis is modulated by the balance between angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors. Angiogenesis plays a key role in tumor growth. Drugs inhibiting angiogenesis have been in use in various malign or non-malign diseases. Inhibition of angiogenesis in malign diseases is a very attractive subject in medicine and studies are going on about long term affects and toxicities. Inhibition of angiogenesis is not an only treatment choice alone. It is a supplemental treatment option applied with conventional chemotherapy, radiotherapy, surgery, immunotherapy and hormonal therapy. It has been used in colorectal carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, non-small cell lung cancer, glioblastoma, heoatocellular carcinoma, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor, tyroid medullary cancer.

  5. GENE THERAPY AND ITS IMPLICATIONS IN SPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Vitošević

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to the very successful Human Genome Project and the identification of genes involved in genetic disease, we now have the ability to treat many conditions. However, the identification of the genes which code certain phenotype characteristics has opened the way for abuse in the fields of sport and physical exercise. The principles of gene therapy and the ways in which genes are transferred have completely been copied from gene therapy and are now being used to increase the physical abilities of athletes. The genes most frequently used by athletes include: the the ACE gene, the ACTN3 gene, myostatin, the erythropoietin gene, PPAR-delta and the like. The misuse of these genes with the aim of increasing physical abilities has already become part of sport and is extremely difficult to identify, since genes and gene sequences entering the human body are proteins that are already struc-tural and functional parts of the organism. On the other hand, viral vectors as the instruments for gene transfer attack and destroy the human immune system, and the reaction of the human body can be negative, with a danger of insertional mutagenesis and the appearance of oncogenes. Gene ther-apy might actually be much more useful in treating sports injuries, but even these procedures are still far from clinical practice. There is a fine line between gene therapy and gene doping in athletes. A number of growth factors will enhance repair, but it happen that expression of these factors increase the strength of bones and tendons, so that giving an adventage to competitors. First of all, it is neces-sary to acquaint athletes as much as possible with the negative consequences of using gene therapy. However victory and glory may be strong achievements, the health of these young people, and respect for fundamental and ethical principles, humanity, and fair play game have a more lasting value and represent the heavier weight on the scales.

  6. Gene Therapy: Implications for Craniofacial Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Scheller, Erica L.; Villa-Diaz, Luis G.; Krebsbach, Paul H.

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy in the craniofacial region provides a unique tool for delivery of DNA to coordinate protein production in both time and space. The drive to bring this technology to the clinic is derived from the fact that over 85% of the global population may at one time require repair or replacement of a craniofacial structure. This need ranges from mild tooth decay and tooth loss to temporomandibular joint disorders and large-scale reconstructive surgery. Our ability to insert foreign DNA into...

  7. Comparison of effects of anti-angiogenic agents in the zebrafish efficacy–toxicity model for translational anti-angiogenic drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chimote G

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Geetanjali Chimote,1 Jayasree Sreenivasan,1 Nilambari Pawar,1 Jyothi Subramanian,2 Hariharan Sivaramakrishnan,3 Somesh Sharma1,3 1Department of Pharmacology, 2Department of Modeling and Simulation, 3Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Piramal Life Sciences Limited, Mumbai, India Background: Anti-angiogenic therapy in certain cancers has been associated with improved control of tumor growth and metastasis. Development of anti-angiogenic agents has, however, been saddled with higher attrition rate due to suboptimal efficacy, narrow therapeutic windows, or development of organ-specific toxicities. The aim of this study was to evaluate the translational ability of the zebrafish efficacy–toxicity model to stratify anti-angiogenic agents based on efficacy, therapeutic windows, and off-target effects to streamline the compound selection process in anti-angiogenic discovery. Methods: The embryonic model of zebrafish was employed for studying angiogenesis and toxicity. The zebrafish were treated with anti-angiogenic compounds to evaluate their effects on angiogenesis and zebrafish-toxicity parameters. Angiogenesis was measured by scoring the development of subintestinal vessels. Toxicity was evaluated by calculating the median lethal concentration, the lowest observed effect concentration, and gross morphological changes. Results of efficacy and toxicity were used to predict the therapeutic window. Results: In alignment with the clinical outcomes, the zebrafish assays demonstrated that vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR inhibitors are the most potent anti-angiogenic agents, followed by multikinase inhibitors and inhibitors of endothelial cell proliferation. The toxicity assays reported cardiac phenotype in zebrafish treated with VEGFR inhibitors and multikinase inhibitors with VEGFR activity suggestive of cardiotoxic potential of these compounds. Several other pathological features were reported for multikinase inhibitors suggestive of

  8. Broad spectrum antiangiogenic treatment for ocular neovascular diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofra Benny

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Pathological neovascularization is a hallmark of late stage neovascular (wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD and the leading cause of blindness in people over the age of 50 in the western world. The treatments focus on suppression of choroidal neovascularization (CNV, while current approved therapies are limited to inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF exclusively. However, this treatment does not address the underlying cause of AMD, and the loss of VEGF's neuroprotective can be a potential side effect. Therapy which targets the key processes in AMD, the pathological neovascularization, vessel leakage and inflammation could bring a major shift in the approach to disease treatment and prevention. In this study we have demonstrated the efficacy of such broad spectrum antiangiogenic therapy on mouse model of AMD. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Lodamin, a polymeric formulation of TNP-470, is a potent broad-spectrum antiangiogenic drug. Lodamin significantly reduced key processes involved in AMD progression as demonstrated in mice and rats. Its suppressive effects on angiogenesis, vascular leakage and inflammation were studied in a wide array of assays including; a Matrigel, delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH, Miles assay, laser-induced CNV and corneal micropocket assay. Lodamin significantly suppressed the secretion of various pro-inflammatory cytokines in the CNV lesion including monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1/Ccl2. Importantly, Lodamin was found to regress established CNV lesions, unlike soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlk-1. The drug was found to be safe in mice and have little toxicity as demonstrated by electroretinography (ERG assessing retinal and by histology. CONCLUSIONS: Lodamin, a polymer formulation of TNP-470, was identified as a first in its class, broad-spectrum antiangiogenic drug that can be administered orally or locally to treat corneal and retinal neovascularization. Several unique properties

  9. Staff rotation: implications for occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A; Andriuk, M L; Langlois, P; Provost, E

    1995-10-01

    Occupational therapy departments of tertiary care hospitals can provide staff with opportunities to gain diverse clinical experience if they rotate through the various services such as surgery, medicine, geriatrics, plastic surgery and orthopaedics. The system of rotation offers both advantages and disadvantages for the staff and the institution. The Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal, a large university teaching hospital, had traditionally offered staff the opportunity to rotate. Changes in staffing and their needs however, resulted in rotation becoming an important issue within the department. This article presents the pros and the cons of rotation and non-rotation systems as identified by therapists and administrators across Canada. Staff rotation was found to have an effect on job satisfaction and a therapist's career orientation. Given these findings, administrators may want to reconsider the role of the generalist and specialist in their facilities. PMID:10151790

  10. Medicolegal implications of dental implant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Jonathan

    2013-04-01

    Despite the recent economic downturn, the dental implant market continues to grow year on year. Many more dentists are involved in the placement restoration of dental implants and dental implants are being placed in an extended range of clinical scenarios. Dental implant therapy remains a high risk area for the inexperienced interns of civil negligence claims and General Dental Council hearings. Risk can be mitigated by:• Ensuring appropriate indemnity • Complying with the published requirements for training • Maintaining detailed and extensive clinical records • Completing the initial phases of history, examination and investigations robustly • Recording a diagnosis • Providing a bespoke written treatment plan that includes details of the need for treatment, the treatment options (the risks and benefits), the phases of treatment, the costs of treatment,the expected normal sequelae of surgery, the risks and complications of implant therapy and the requirement for future maintenance. The provision of treatment that is different in nature or extent to that agreed can result in a breach of contract as well as a claim for negligence • Engaging sufficiently with the patient to obtain consent • Providing written postoperative instructions detailing emergency arrangements, patients who are anxious or in pain may not retain oral information • Making a frank disclosure of complication or collateral damage • Considering referral at an early stage particularly if reparative surgery is required. The stress of complications or failure may impair a dentist's normally sound judgement; there may be financial pressure, or concerns regarding reputation. In some cases, dentists avoid making a frank disclosure, feel obliged to undertake complicated reparative surgery, fail to make a timely referral, fail to respond appropriately to patient's concerns and in some cases attempt to alter the clinical records.However, in the best of hands and without negligence

  11. Antiangiogenic cancer drug using the zebrafish model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Massimo M

    2014-09-01

    The process of de novo vessel formation, called angiogenesis, is essential for tumor progression and spreading. Targeting of molecular pathways involved in such tumor angiogenetic processes by using specific drugs or inhibitors is important for developing new anticancer therapies. Drug discovery remains to be the main focus for biomedical research and represents the essence of antiangiogenesis cancer research. To pursue these molecular and pharmacological goals, researchers need to use animal models that facilitate the elucidation of tumor angiogenesis mechanisms and the testing of antiangiogenic therapies. The past few years have seen the zebrafish system emerge as a valid model organism to study developmental angiogenesis and, more recently, as an alternative vertebrate model for cancer research. In this review, we will discuss why the zebrafish model system has the advantage of being a vertebrate model equipped with easy and powerful transgenesis as well as imaging tools to investigate not only physiological angiogenesis but also tumor angiogenesis. We will also highlight the potential of zebrafish for identifying antitumor angiogenesis drugs to block tumor development and progression. We foresee the zebrafish model as an important system that can possibly complement well-established mouse models in cancer research to generate novel insights into the molecular mechanism of the tumor angiogenesis. PMID:24903092

  12. Retroviral integration profiles: their determinants and implications for gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-il Lim

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses have often been used for gene therapy because oftheir capacity for the long-term expression of transgenes via stableintegration into the host genome. However, retroviral integrationcan also result in the transformation of normal cells into cancercells, as demonstrated by the incidence of leukemia in a recentretroviral gene therapy trial in Europe. This unfortunate outcomehas led to the rapid initiation of studies examining variousbiological and pathological aspects of retroviral integration. Thisreview summarizes recent findings from these studies, includingthe global integration patterns of various types of retroviruses,viral and cellular determinants of integration, implications ofintegration for gene therapy and retrovirus-mediated infectiousdiseases, and strategies to shift integration to safe host genomicloci. A more comprehensive and mechanistic understanding ofretroviral integration processes will eventually make it possible togenerate safer retroviral vector platforms in the near future. [BMBreports 2012; 45(4: 207-212

  13. Inhibition of SIRT2 Potentiates the Anti-motility Activity of Taxanes: Implications for Antineoplastic Combination Therapies12

    OpenAIRE

    Bonezzi, Katiuscia; Belotti, Dorina; North, Brian J.; Ghilardi, Carmen; Borsotti, Patrizia; Resovi, Andrea; Ubezio, Paolo; Riva, Antonella; Giavazzi, Raffaella; Verdin, Eric; Taraboletti, Giulia

    2012-01-01

    Taxanes are potent inhibitors of cell motility, a property implicated in their antiangiogenic and antimetastatic activity and unrelated to their antiproliferative effect. The molecular mechanism of this anti-motility activity is poorly understood. In this study, we found that paclitaxel induced tubulin acetylation in endothelial and tumor cells, at concentrations that affected cell motility but not proliferation (10-8 to 10-9 M, for 4 hours). Induction of tubulin acetylation correlated with i...

  14. A review on pro- and anti-angiogenic factors as targets of clinical intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouis, D; Kusumanto, Y; Meijer, C; Mulder, NH; Hospers, GAP

    2006-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in physiology and pathology. It is a tightly regulated process, influenced by the microenvironment and modulated by a multitude of pro- and anti-angiogenic factors. A thorough understanding of the angiogenic process may lead to novel therapies to target ischemic

  15. Public health implications of antiretroviral therapy and HIV drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainberg, M A; Friedland, G

    1998-06-24

    Widespread use of antiretroviral agents and increasing occurrence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) strains resistant to these drugs have given rise to a number of important issues. Some of these concerns are distinct from the obvious question of the relationship between drug resistance and treatment failure and have potentially widespread public health implications. The relevant issues include but are not limited to the following: (1) frequency with which drug-resistant virus may be transmitted via sexual, intravenous, or mother-to-child routes; (2) ability of drug-resistant variants to be transmitted, a question that relates, in part, to the relative fitness of such strains; (3) effectiveness of antiviral therapy in diminishing viral burden in both blood and genital secretions, and whether this may be compromised in persons harboring resistant virus; and (4) importance of patient adherence to antiviral therapy and its relationship to sustained reduction in viral load to minimize the appearance in and transmission of drug-resistant virus from both blood and genital secretions. Thus, prevention of both development of HIV drug resistance as well as transmission of drug-resistant variants is a central issue of public health importance. Unless this topic is appropriately addressed, the likelihood is that drug-resistant variants of HIV, if able to successfully replicate, will sustain the epidemic and limit the effectiveness of antiviral therapy. PMID:9643862

  16. Antiangiogenic agents combined with chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shanshan Chen; Shun Lu 

    2015-01-01

    As a targeted therapy, antiangiogenic treatment has been increasingly studied for advanced non-smal cel lung cancer (NSCLC) and has proven ef ective for the treatment of advanced NSCLC. Bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody targeting angiogenesis, is the only antiangiogenic agent approved for use in com-bination with first-line chemotherapy for non-squamous NSCLC. Smal-molecule inhibitors targeting the tyrosine kinase receptor have also shown promise when combined with standard chemotherapeutic agents in patients with advanced NSCLC. However, unlike bevacizumab, not al other antiangiogenic agents show significant benefits when combined with chemotherapy. As for the failures of most other combinations, the combination schedule may be an important reason that has so far been overlooked in clinical trials. This article reviews the combination of angiogenic agents with chemotherapy in the treatment of NSCLC.

  17. The Implications of Cancer Stem Cells for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Jiang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are universally recognized as the most effective anti-cancer therapies. Despite significant advances directed towards elucidating molecular mechanisms and developing clinical trials, cancer still remains a major public health issue. Recent studies have showed that cancer stem cells (CSCs, a small subpopulation of tumor cells, can generate bulk populations of nontumorigenic cancer cell progeny through the self-renewal and differentiation processes. As CSCs are proposed to persist in tumors as a distinct population and cause relapse and metastasis by giving rise to new tumors, development of CSC-targeted therapeutic strategies holds new hope for improving survival and quality of life in patients with cancer. Therapeutic innovations will emerge from a better understanding of the biology and environment of CSCs, which, however, are largely unexplored. This review summarizes the characteristics, evidences and development of CSCs, as well as implications and challenges for cancer treatment.

  18. Adeno-associated virus-mediated delivery of antiangiogenic factors as an antitumor strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, J T; Wu, P; Clouse, M E; Hlatky, L; Terwilliger, E F

    1998-12-15

    Antiangiogenic tumor therapies have recently attracted intense interest for their broad-spectrum action, low toxicity, and, in the case of direct endothelial targeting, an absence of drug resistance. To promote tumor regression and to maintain dormancy, antiangiogenic agents need to be chronically administered. Gene therapy offers a potential way to achieve sustained therapeutic release of potent antiangiogenic substances. As a step toward this goal, we have generated recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors that carry genes coding for angiostatin, endostatin, and an antisense mRNA species against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). These rAAVs efficiently transduced three human tumor cell lines tested. Transduction with an rAAV-encoding antisense VEGF mRNA inhibited the production of endogenous tumor cell VEGF. Conditioned media from cells transduced with this rAAV or with rAAV-expressing endostatin or angiostatin inhibited capillary endothelial cell proliferation in vitro. Antiangiogenic rAAVs may offer a novel gene therapy approach to undermining tumor neovascularization and cancer progression. PMID:9865720

  19. Concerns about anti-angiogenic treatment in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relevance of angiogenesis inhibition in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) should be considered in the unique context of malignant brain tumours. Although patients benefit greatly from reduced cerebral oedema and intracranial pressure, this important clinical improvement on its own may not be considered as an anti-tumour effect. GBM can be roughly separated into an angiogenic component, and an invasive or migratory component. Although this latter component seems inert to anti-angiogenic therapy, it is of major importance for disease progression and survival. We reviewed all relevant literature. Published data support that clinical symptoms are tempered by anti-angiogenic treatment, but that tumour invasion continues. Unfortunately, current imaging modalities are affected by anti-angiogenic treatment too, making it even harder to define tumour margins. To illustrate this we present MRI, biopsy and autopsy specimens from bevacizumab-treated patients. Moreover, while treatment of other tumour types may be improved by combining chemotherapy with anti-angiogenic drugs, inhibiting angiogenesis in GBM may antagonise the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs by normalising the blood-brain barrier function. Although angiogenesis inhibition is of considerable value for symptom reduction in GBM patients, lack of proof of a true anti-tumour effect raises concerns about the place of this type of therapy in the treatment of GBM

  20. Antiangiogenic cancer drug sunitinib exhibits unexpected proangiogenic effects on endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norton KA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Kerri-Ann Norton,1 Zheyi Han,1 Aleksander S Popel,1,2 Niranjan B Pandey11Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2Department of Oncology and the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels, is an essential step for cancer progression, but antiangiogenic therapies have shown limited success. Therefore, a better understanding of the effects of antiangiogenic treatments on endothelial cells is necessary. In this study, we evaluate the changes in cell surface vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR expression on endothelial cells in culture treated with the antiangiogenic tyrosine kinase inhibitor drug sunitinib, using quantitative flow cytometry. We find that proangiogenic VEGFR2 cell surface receptor numbers are increased with sunitinib treatment. This proangiogenic effect might account for the limited effects of sunitinib as a cancer therapy. We also find that this increase is inhibited by brefeldin A, an inhibitor of protein transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus. The complex dynamics of cell surface VEGFRs may be important for successful treatment of cancer with antiangiogenic therapeutics.Keywords: flow cytometry, VEGFRs, sunitinib, angiogenesis, VEGFA

  1. Implications of hedgehog signaling antagonists for cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingwu Xie

    2008-01-01

    The hedgehog(Hh)pathway,initially discovered inDrosophila by two Nobel laureates,Dr.Eric Wieschaus and Dr.Christiane Nusslein-Volhard,is a major regulator for cell differentiation,tissue polarity and cell proliferation.Studies from many laboratories,including ours,reveal activation of this pathway in most basal cell carcinomas and in approximately 30% of extracutaneous human cancers,including medulloblastomas,gastrointestinal,lung,breast and prostate cancers.Thus,it is believed that targeted inhibition of Hh signaling may be effective in treating and preventing many types of human cancers.Even more exciting is the discovery and synthesis of specific signaling antagonists for the Hh pathway,which have significant clinical implications in novel cancer therapeutics.This review discusses the major advances in the current understanding of Hh signaling activation in different types of human cancers,the molecular basis of Hh signaling activation,the major antagonists for Hh signaling inhibition and their potential clinical application in human cancer therapy.

  2. Therapy as Empowerment: Clinical and Political Implications of Empowerment Philosophy in Mental Health Practises of Music Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Randi Rolvsjord

    2006-01-01

    In this article the clinical and political implications of empowerment philosophy are elaborated with music therapy practices in mental health services as the point of departure. The concept and the philosophy of empowerment are discussed through a review of literature from community psychology, sociology and feminist psychology. Empowerment is connected to a resource-oriented perspective on music therapy that implies a focus upon the client's strengths and potentials and emphasizes the impor...

  3. Antiangiogenic drugs and advanced proliferative diabetic retinopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Jefferson Augusto Santana Ribeiro; André Messias; Rodrigo Jorge

    2011-01-01

    Advanced diabetic retinopathy with tractional retinal detachment or persistent vitreous hemorrhage often requires surgical treatment with pars plana vitrectomy. Despite advances in vitrectomy, surgery for complications of diabetic retinopathy can be a challenge and may be impaired by intense fibrovascular proliferation. Antiangiogenic drugs have been used for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy because of their inhibitory action on vascular endothelial growth factor. In this review, we disc...

  4. New antiangiogenics in non-small cell lung cancer treatment: Vargatef™ (BIBF 1120 and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gori B

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Bruno Gori1, Serena Ricciardi1, Alberto Fulvi1, Salvatore Intagliata2, Ester Del Signore1, Filippo de Marinis11Oncological-Pulmonary Unit 1st, San Camillo Hospital, Rome, Italy; 2Department of Medical Oncology, University Campus Bio-Medico, Rome, ItalyAbstract: Lung cancer is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is a particularly aggressive cancer, the optimum management of which is still being determined. In the metastatic disease, the standard therapy is a platinum-based combination chemotherapy; however, in spite of available treatment options for patients who progress beyond first-line therapy, prognosis remains poor. Angiogenesis is a tightly regulated process which comprises a complex, complementary, and overlapping network. Inhibition of tumor-related angiogenesis has become an attractive target for anticancer therapy. Antiangiogenic strategy includes: monoclonal antibodies against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and VEGF receptor (VEGFR, small molecule inhibitors of VEGF tyrosine kinase activity, VEGF Trap, and a new class named “vascular disrupting agents,” tested in ongoing clinical trials which will further define their role in the management of NSCLC. BIBF 1120 is an investigational orally administered receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor that has shown antiangiogenic and antineoplastic activity, inhibiting VEGFR, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, and fibroblast growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases, preventing tumor growth and interfering with the angiogenesis-signaling cascade and overcoming drug resistances.Keywords: NSCLC, angiogenesis, oral antiangiogenic agents, VEGF, PDGF, FGF

  5. Hypothesis: primary antiangiogenic method proposed to treat early stage breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Women with Down syndrome very rarely develop breast cancer even though they now live to an age when it normally occurs. This may be related to the fact that Down syndrome persons have an additional copy of chromosome 21 where the gene that codes for the antiangiogenic protein Endostatin is located. Can this information lead to a primary antiangiogenic therapy for early stage breast cancer that indefinitely prolongs remission? A key question that arises is when is the initial angiogenic switch thrown in micrometastases? We have conjectured that avascular micrometastases are dormant and relatively stable if undisturbed but that for some patients angiogenesis is precipitated by surgery. We also proposed that angiogenesis of micrometastases very rarely occurs before surgical removal of the primary tumor. If that is so, it seems possible that we could suggest a primary antiangiogenic therapy but the problem then arises that starting a therapy before surgery would interfere with wound healing. The therapy must be initiated at least one day prior to surgical removal of the primary tumor and kept at a Down syndrome level perhaps indefinitely. That means the drug must have virtually no toxicity and not interfere meaningfully with wound healing. This specifically excludes drugs that significantly inhibit the VEGF pathway since that is important for wound healing and because these agents have some toxicity. Endostatin is apparently non-toxic and does not significantly interfere with wound healing since Down syndrome patients have no abnormal wound healing problems. We propose a therapy for early stage breast cancer consisting of Endostatin at or above Down syndrome levels starting at least one day before surgery and continuing at that level. This should prevent micrometastatic angiogenesis resulting from surgery or at any time later. Adjuvant chemotherapy or hormone therapy should not be necessary. This can be continued indefinitely since there is no acquired resistance that

  6. CHELATION THERAPY FOR IRON OVERLOAD: NURSING PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Eckes, Ellen J.

    2011-01-01

    Many diseases of the blood are treated with blood transfusion therapy. Chronic transfusions can cause iron overload, and, if untreated, can cause end-organ damage. Chelation therapy provides a way of treating iron overload and minimizing its adverse effects. Nurses need to understand that iron overload is a consequence of chronic blood transfusion, and they need to know what effects it has on end-organs and what treatment options are available.

  7. Implications of CI therapy for Visual Deficit Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward eTaub

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We address here the question of whether the techniques of CI therapy, a family of treatments that has been employed in the rehabilitation of movement and language after brain damage might apply to the rehabilitation of such visual deficits as unilateral spatial neglect and visual field deficits. CI therapy has been used successfully for the upper and lower extremities after chronic stroke, cerebral palsy (CP, multiple sclerosis (MS, other CNS degenerative conditions, resection of motor areas of the brain, focal hand dystonia, and aphasia. Treatments making use of similar methods have proven efficacious for amblyopia.The CI therapy approach consists of four major components: intensive training, training by shaping, a transfer package to facilitate the transfer of gains from the treatment setting to everyday activities, and strong discouragement of compensatory strategies.CI therapy is said to be effective because it overcomes learned nonuse, a learned inhibition of movement that follows injury to the CNS. In addition, CI therapy produces substantial increases in the grey matter of motor areas on both sides of the brain. We propose here that these mechanisms are examples of more general processes: learned nonuse being considered parallel to sensory nonuse following damage to sensory areas of the brain, with both having in common diminished neural connections (DNC in the nervous system as an underlying mechanism. CI therapy would achieve its therapeutic effect by strengthening the diminished neural connections. Use-dependent cortical reorganization is considered to be an example of the more general neuroplastic mechanism of brain structure repurposing (BSR. If the mechanisms involved in these broader categories are involved in each of the deficits being considered, then it may be the principles underlying efficacious treatment in each case may be similar. The lessons learned during CI therapy research might then prove useful for the treatment of

  8. Implications of CI therapy for visual deficit training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Edward; Mark, Victor W; Uswatte, Gitendra

    2014-01-01

    We address here the question of whether the techniques of Constraint Induced (CI) therapy, a family of treatments that has been employed in the rehabilitation of movement and language after brain damage might apply to the rehabilitation of such visual deficits as unilateral spatial neglect and visual field deficits. CI therapy has been used successfully for the upper and lower extremities after chronic stroke, cerebral palsy (CP), multiple sclerosis (MS), other central nervous system (CNS) degenerative conditions, resection of motor areas of the brain, focal hand dystonia, and aphasia. Treatments making use of similar methods have proven efficacious for amblyopia. The CI therapy approach consists of four major components: intensive training, training by shaping, a "transfer package" to facilitate the transfer of gains from the treatment setting to everyday activities, and strong discouragement of compensatory strategies. CI therapy is said to be effective because it overcomes learned nonuse, a learned inhibition of movement that follows injury to the CNS. In addition, CI therapy produces substantial increases in the gray matter of motor areas on both sides of the brain. We propose here that these mechanisms are examples of more general processes: learned nonuse being considered parallel to sensory nonuse following damage to sensory areas of the brain, with both having in common diminished neural connections (DNCs) in the nervous system as an underlying mechanism. CI therapy would achieve its therapeutic effect by strengthening the DNCs. Use-dependent cortical reorganization is considered to be an example of the more general neuroplastic mechanism of brain structure repurposing. If the mechanisms involved in these broader categories are involved in each of the deficits being considered, then it may be the principles underlying efficacious treatment in each case may be similar. The lessons learned during CI therapy research might then prove useful for the treatment

  9. Therapy as Empowerment: Clinical and Political Implications of Empowerment Philosophy in Mental Health Practises of Music Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randi Rolvsjord

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article the clinical and political implications of empowerment philosophy are elaborated with music therapy practices in mental health services as the point of departure. The concept and the philosophy of empowerment are discussed through a review of literature from community psychology, sociology and feminist psychology. Empowerment is connected to a resource-oriented perspective on music therapy that implies a focus upon the client's strengths and potentials and emphasizes the importance of collaboration and equality in the relationship between therapist and client.

  10. Myasthenia gravis - autoantibody characteristics and their implications for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilhus, Nils Erik; Skeie, Geir Olve; Romi, Fredrik; Lazaridis, Konstantinos; Zisimopoulou, Paraskevi; Tzartos, Socrates

    2016-05-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder caused by autoantibodies that target the neuromuscular junction, leading to muscle weakness and fatigability. Currently available treatments for the disease include symptomatic pharmacological treatment, immunomodulatory drugs, plasma exchange, thymectomy and supportive therapies. Different autoantibody patterns and clinical manifestations characterize different subgroups of the disease: early-onset MG, late-onset MG, thymoma MG, muscle-specific kinase MG, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 MG, seronegative MG, and ocular MG. These subtypes differ in terms of clinical characteristics, disease pathogenesis, prognosis and response to therapies. Patients would, therefore, benefit from treatment that is tailored to their disease subgroup, as well as other possible disease biomarkers, such as antibodies against cytoplasmic muscle proteins. Here, we discuss the different MG subtypes, the sensitivity and specificity of the various antibodies involved in MG for distinguishing between these subtypes, and the value of antibody assays in guiding optimal therapy. An understanding of these elements should be useful in determining how to adapt existing therapies to the requirements of each patient. PMID:27103470

  11. Apoptosis and cancer stem cells : Implications for apoptosis targeted therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, Frank A. E.; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating showing that cancer stem cells or tumor-initiating cells are key drivers of tumor formation and progression. Successful therapy must therefore eliminate these cells, which is hampered by their high resistance to commonly used treatment modalities. Thus far, only a limited nu

  12. Tutorial in oral antithrombotic therapy: Biology and dental implications

    OpenAIRE

    Fakhri, Hamid Reza; Janket, Sok Ja; Jackson, Elizabeth A.; Baird, Alison E; Dinnocenzo, Richard; Meurman, Jukka H

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Recent developments of new direct oral anticoagulants that target specific clotting factors necessitate understanding of coagulation biology. The objective of this tutorial is to offer dental professionals a review of coagulation mechanisms and the pharmacodynamics of the conventional and new oral anticoagulants. Also, we summarized the dental implications of the conventional and new anticoagulants. Method: We searched Medline using search terms “antithrombotic”, “antihemostasis” ...

  13. Antiangiogenic Activity and Pharmacogenomics of Medicinal Plants from Traditional Korean Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ean-Jeong Seo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. In the present study, we investigated the antiangiogenic properties of 59 plants used in traditional Korean medicine. Selected phytochemicals were investigated in more detail for their modes of action. Methods. A modified chicken-chorioallantoic-membrane (CAM assay using quail eggs was applied to test for antiangiogenic effects of plant extracts. A molecular docking in silico approached the binding of plant constituents to the vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1 and 2 (VEGFR1, VEGFR2. Microarray-based mRNA expression profiling was employed to correlate the 50% inhibition concentrations (IC50 of a panel of 60 NCI cell lines to these phytochemicals. Results. Extracts from Acer mono leaves, Reynoutria sachalniensis fruits, Cinnamomum japonicum stems, Eurya japonica leaves, Adenophora racemosa whole plant, Caryopteris incana leaves-stems, and Schisandra chinensis stems inhibited angiogenesis more than 50% in quail eggs. Selected phytochemicals from Korean plants were analyzed in more detail using microarray-based mRNA expression profiles and molecular docking to VEGFR1 and VEGFR2. These results indicate multifactorial modes of action of these natural products. Conclusion. The antiangiogenic activity of plants used in traditional Korean medicine implicates their possible application for diseases where inhibition of blood vessel formation is desired, for example, cancer, macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and others.

  14. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori: therapies and clinical implications.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connor, H J

    1992-01-01

    This review presents a critical evaluation of the role of Helicobacter pylori eradication in the management of peptic ulcer disease and non-ulcer dyspepsia. On current evidence, H. pylori eradication therapy seems likely to emerge as the most rational and cost-effective treatment for duodenal ulcer. The role of H. pylori eradication in the treatment of gastric ulcer and non-ulcer dyspepsia is unclear and requires further study. The emerging problem of antibiotic resistance in H. pylori is of ...

  15. NMDA receptors and fear extinction: implications for cognitive behavioral therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Based primarily on studies that employ Pavlovian fear conditioning, extinction of conditioned fear has been found to be mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex. This led to the discovery that an NMDA partial agonist, D-cycloserine, could facilitate fear extinction when given systemically or locally into the amygdala. Because many forms of cognitive behavioral therapy depend on fear extinction, this led to the successful use of D-cycloseri...

  16. Antiangiogenic effects of pazopanib in xenograft hepatocellular carcinoma models: evaluation by quantitative contrast-enhanced ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antiangiogenesis is a promising therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but the effects are difficult to be evaluated. Pazopanib (GW786034B) is a pan-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibitor, the antitumor effects or antiangiogenic effects haven't been investigated in HCC. In vitro direct effects of pazopanib on human HCC cell lines and endothelial cells were evaluated. In vivo antitumor effects were evaluated in three xenograft nude mice models. In the subcutaneous HCCLM3 model, intratumoral blood perfusion was detected by contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS), and serial quantitative parameters were profiled from the time-intensity curves of ultrasonograms. In vitro proliferation of various HCC cell lines were not inhibited by pazopanib. Pazopanib inhibited migration and invasion and induced apoptosis significantly in two HCC cell lines, HCCLM3 and PLC/PRF/5. Proliferation, migration, and tubule formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells were inhibited by pazopanib in a dose-dependent manner. In vivo tumor growth was significantly inhibited by pazopanib in HCCLM3, HepG2, and PLC/PRF/5 xenograft models. Various intratumoral perfusion parameters changed over time, and the signal intensity was significantly impaired in the treated tumors before the treatment efficacy on tumor size could be observed. Mean transit time of the contrast media in hotspot areas of the tumors was reversely correlated with intratumoral microvessel density. Antitumor effects of pazopanib in HCC xenografts may owe to its antiangiogenic effects, and the in vivo antiangiogenic effects could be evaluated by quantitative CEUS

  17. Restoring Wisconsin Art Therapy Association in Art Therapy History: Implications for Professional Definition and Inclusivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potash, Jordan; Burnie, Michele; Pearson, Rosemary; Ramirez, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    The Wisconsin Art Therapy Association (WATA), formally established in 1969, was the first incorporated organization of art therapists in the United States. Under the leadership of Wayne Ramirez, WATA lobbied the national association for an inclusive definition of art therapy that aimed to foster respect for psychiatric, educational, and community…

  18. Neurotransmission and cancer: implications for prevention and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuller, Hildegard M

    2008-08-01

    Published evidence compiled in this review supports the hypothesis that the development, progression, and responsiveness to prevention and therapy of the most common human cancers is strongly influenced, if not entirely orchestrated, by an imbalance in stimulatory and inhibitory neurotransmission. The neurotransmitters acetylcholine, adrenaline, and noradrenaline of the autonomic nervous system act as powerful upstream regulators that orchestrate numerous cell and tissue functions, by releasing growth factors, angiogenesis factors and metastasis factors, arachidonic acid, proinflammatory cytokines, and local neurotransmitters from cancer cells and their microenvironment. In addition, they modulate proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and metastasis of cancer directly by intracellular signaling downstream of neurotransmitter receptors. Nicotine and the tobacco-specific nitrosamines have the documented ability to hyperstimulate neurotransmission by both branches of the autonomic nervous system. The expression and function of these neurotransmitter pathways are cell type specific. Lifestyle, diet, diseases, stress, and pharmacological treatments modulate the expression and responsiveness of neurotransmitter pathways. Current preclinical testing systems fail to incorporate the modulating effects of neurotransmission on the responsiveness to anticancer agents and should be amended accordingly. The neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid has a strong inhibitory function on sympathicus-driven cancers whereas stimulators of cyclic adenosine monophosphate/protein kinase A signaling have strong inhibitory function on parasympathicus-driven cancers. Marker-guided restoration of the physiological balance in stimulatory and inhibitory neurotransmission represents a promising and hitherto neglected strategy for the prevention and therapy of neurotransmitter-responsive cancers. PMID:18594207

  19. The sodium iodide symporter: its implications for imaging and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sodium iodide symporter (NIS) is an intrinsic plasma membrane glycoprotein that mediates the active transport of iodide in the thyroid gland and a number of extrathyroidal tissues, in particular lactating mammary gland. In addition to its key function in thyroid physiology, NIS-mediated iodide accumulation allows diagnostic thyroid scintigraphy as well as therapeutic radioiodine application in benign and malignant thyroid disease. NIS therefore represents one of the oldest targets for molecular imaging and therapy. Based on the effective administration of radioiodine that has been used for over 60 years in the management of follicular cell-derived thyroid cancer, cloning and characterization of the NIS gene has paved the way for the development of a novel cytoreductive gene therapy strategy based on targeted NIS expression in thyroidal and nonthyroidal cancer cells followed by therapeutic application of 131I or alternative radionuclides, including 188Re and 211At. In addition, the possibility of direct and non-invasive imaging of functional NIS expression by 123I- and 99mTc-scintigraphy or 124I-PET-imaging allows the application of NIS as a novel reporter gene. In conclusion, the dual role of NIS as diagnostic and therapeutic gene and the detection of extra-thyroidal endogenous NIS expression in breast cancer open promising perspectives in nuclear medicine and molecular oncology for diagnostic and therapeutic application of NIS outside the thyroid gland. (orig.)

  20. Antiangiogenic Agent Might Upgrade tumor Cell Sensitivity to Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The understanding of the fundamental role of angiogenesis and metastasis in cancer growth has led to tremendous interest in research regarding its regulatory mechanisms and clinical implications in the management of cancer. The present study was conducted to evaluate the influence of the angiogenic regulators modification on the tumor growth and the cell sensitivity to ionizing radiation targeting the improvement of cancer therapeutic protocols. Accordingly, the antiangiogenic activity of apigenin and selenium was tested in vitro via MTT assay. The action of Apigenin and or Selenium was examined in vivo by using a model of solid tumor carcinoma (EAC). The growth rate of solid tumor in all experimental groups was measured by Caliper. The irradiated mice were exposed to 6.5 Gy of gamma rays. Apigenin 50 mg/kg body weight and selenium 5 μg per mice were daily administrated for 14 consecutive days after tumor volume reached 1mm3. The angiogenic activators TNF-α (key cytokine) in spleen, serum MMP 2 and MMP 9, liver and tumor NO, the lipid peroxidation (LPx) and angiogenic inhibitor TIMP-1 in spleen as well as, antioxidant markers (CAT, SOD, GPX) in tumor and liver tissue and DNA fragmentation in splenocytes were estimated to monitor efficacy of Apigenin and selenium in cancer treatment strategy. All parameters were determined as a time course on days 16 and 22 after tumor volume reached 1mm3. The using of MTT assay on EAC cells shows inhibition in EAC cell proliferation after the incubation with apigenin and /or selenium. The administration of apigenin and /or selenium to mice bearing tumor and to irradiated mice bearing tumor reduce significantly the TNF-α expression, MMP 2,9 , NO , LPx level and increased the antioxidant enzymes (GPx , SOD and CAT) activities. The DNA fragmentation and the antiangiogenic factors TIMP-1 were significantly increased when compared with their values in mice bearing tumor or in irradiated mice bearing tumor. From the results obtained

  1. Antiangiogenic agents in the treatment of recurrent or newly diagnosed glioblastoma: Analysis of single-agent and combined modality approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surgical resection followed by radiotherapy and temozolomide in newly diagnosed glioblastoma can prolong survival, but it is not curative. For patients with disease progression after frontline therapy, there is no standard of care, although further surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy may be used. Antiangiogenic therapies may be appropriate for treating glioblastomas because angiogenesis is critical to tumor growth. In a large, noncomparative phase II trial, bevacizumab was evaluated alone and with irinotecan in patients with recurrent glioblastoma; combination treatment was associated with an estimated 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) rate of 50.3%, a median overall survival of 8.9 months, and a response rate of 37.8%. Single-agent bevacizumab also exceeded the predetermined threshold of activity for salvage chemotherapy (6-month PFS rate, 15%), achieving a 6-month PFS rate of 42.6% (p < 0.0001). On the basis of these results and those from another phase II trial, the US Food and Drug Administration granted accelerated approval of single-agent bevacizumab for the treatment of glioblastoma that has progressed following prior therapy. Potential antiangiogenic agents-such as cilengitide and XL184-also show evidence of single-agent activity in recurrent glioblastoma. Moreover, the use of antiangiogenic agents with radiation at disease progression may improve the therapeutic ratio of single-modality approaches. Overall, these agents appear to be well tolerated, with adverse event profiles similar to those reported in studies of other solid tumors. Further research is needed to determine the role of antiangiogenic therapy in frontline treatment and to identify the optimal schedule and partnering agents for use in combination therapy

  2. Genetic basis of type 2 diabetes mellitus: implications for therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolford, Johanna K; de Courten, Barbora

    2004-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus represents a multifactorial, heterogeneous group of disorders, which result from defects in insulin secretion, insulin action, or both. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes has increased dramatically worldwide over the past several decades, a trend that has been heavily...... influenced by the relatively recent changes in diet and physical activity levels. There is also strong evidence supporting a genetic component to type 2 diabetes susceptibility and several genes underlying monogenic forms of diabetes have already been identified. However, common type 2 diabetes is likely to...... result from the contribution of many genes interacting with different environmental factors to produce wide variation in the clinical course of the disease. Not surprisingly, the etiologic complexity underlying type 2 diabetes has made identification of the contributing genes difficult. Current therapies...

  3. Detectability and perceptions of a transsexual: implications for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzini, L R; Magy, M A; Litrownik, A J

    1977-01-01

    Transsexuals are concerned with being accepted in straight society, that is, "passing" successfully. Ninety-one undergraduates were shown a videotaped discussion of interracial dating by five heterosexual biological females and one cross-dressed male transsexual. Experimental subjects, who had been previously informed of the presence of the transsexual, were all able to identify her, significantly more than control subjects who had not been given this set. Ratings were obtained on eight personal attributes of the transsexual and the five biological females prior to the subjects' attempts to identify the transsexual in the group. The results of these ratings indicated that detection of the transsexual was related to perceived femininity and happiness. Based on these findings and subjects' reports of how they correctly identified the transsexual, suggestions were made for a therapy package to assist transsexuals in minimizing the probability of their detection. PMID:864248

  4. IGFBP-4 Anti-Angiogenic and Anti-Tumorigenic Effects Are Associated with Anti-Cathepsin B Activity

    OpenAIRE

    María J. Moreno; Marguerite Ball; Marina Rukhlova; Jacqueline Slinn; Denis L'Abbe; Umar Iqbal; Robert Monette; Martin Hagedorn; Maureen D O'Connor-McCourt; Yves Durocher; Stanimirovic, Danica B

    2013-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 4 (IGFBP-4/IBP-4) has potent IGF-independent anti-angiogenic and antitumorigenic effects. In this study, we demonstrated that these activities are located in the IGFBP-4 C-terminal protein fragment (CIBP-4), a region containing a thyroglobulin type 1 (Tg1) domain. Proteins bearing Tg1 domains have been shown to inhibit cathepsins, lysosomal enzymes involved in basement membrane degradation and implicated in tumor invasion and angiogenesis. In our stu...

  5. IGFBP-4 Anti-Angiogenic and Anti-Tumorigenic Effects Are Associated with Anti-Cathepsin B Activity1

    OpenAIRE

    María J. Moreno; Ball, Marguerite; Rukhlova, Marina; Slinn, Jacqueline; L'Abbe, Denis; Iqbal, Umar; Monette, Robert; Hagedorn, Martin; O'Connor-McCourt, Maureen D.; Durocher, Yves; Stanimirovic, Danica B

    2013-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 4 (IGFBP-4/IBP-4) has potent IGF-independent anti-angiogenic and antitumorigenic effects. In this study, we demonstrated that these activities are located in the IGFBP-4 C-terminal protein fragment (CIBP-4), a region containing a thyroglobulin type 1 (Tg1) domain. Proteins bearing Tg1 domains have been shown to inhibit cathepsins, lysosomal enzymes involved in basement membrane degradation and implicated in tumor invasion and angiogenesis. In our stu...

  6. BRAFV600E: implications for carcinogenesis and molecular therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cantwell-Dorris, Emma R

    2012-02-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)\\/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway is frequently mutated in human cancer. This pathway consists of a small GTP protein of the RAS family that is activated in response to extracellular signaling to recruit a member of the RAF kinase family to the cell membrane. Active RAF signals through MAP\\/ERK kinase to activate ERK and its downstream effectors to regulate a wide range of biological activities including cell differentiation, proliferation, senescence, and survival. Mutations in the v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogenes homolog B1 (BRAF) isoform of the RAF kinase or KRAS isoform of the RAS protein are found as activating mutations in approximately 30% of all human cancers. The BRAF pathway has become a target of interest for molecular therapy, with promising results emerging from clinical trials. Here, the role of the most common BRAF mutation BRAF(V600E) in human carcinogenesis is investigated through a review of the literature, with specific focus on its role in melanoma, colorectal, and thyroid cancers and its potential as a therapeutic target.

  7. Radiation Therapy after Radical Prostatectomy: Implications for Clinicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Fernanda G.; Berthold, Dominik R.

    2016-01-01

    Depending on the pathological findings, up to 60% of prostate cancer patients who undergo radical prostatectomy (RP) will develop biochemical relapse and require further local treatment. Radiotherapy (RT) immediately after RP may potentially eradicate any residual localized microscopic disease in the prostate bed, and it is associated with improved biochemical, clinical progression-free survival, and overall survival in patients with high-risk pathological features according to published randomized trials. Offering immediate adjuvant RT to all men with high-risk pathological factors we are over-treating around 50% of patients who would anyway be cancer-free, exposing them to unnecessary toxicity and adding costs to the health-care system. The current dilemma is, thus, whether to deliver adjuvant immediate RT solely on the basis of high-risk pathology, but in the absence of measurable prostate-specific antigen, or whether early salvage radiotherapy would yield equivalent outcomes. Randomized trials are ongoing to definitely answer this question. Retrospective analyses suggest that there is a dose–response favoring doses >70 Gy to the prostate bed. The evidence regarding the role of androgen deprivation therapy is emerging, and ongoing randomized trials are underway.

  8. Tutorial in oral antithrombotic therapy: Biology and dental implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhri, Hamid R.; Janket, Sok J.; Baird, Alison E.; Dinnocenzo, Richard; Meurman, Jukka H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Recent developments of new direct oral anticoagulants that target specific clotting factors necessitate understanding of coagulation biology. The objective of this tutorial is to offer dental professionals a review of coagulation mechanisms and the pharmacodynamics of the conventional and new oral anticoagulants. Also, we summarized the dental implications of the conventional and new anticoagulants. Method: We searched Medline using search terms “antithrombotic”, “antihemostasis” or “anticoagulation” and combined them with the search results of “dental”, “oral surgery” or “periodontal”. We restricted the results to “human” and “English”. Results: The early coagulation cascade, the new cell-based coagulation model, the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of conventional antithrombotics, and new oral anticoagulants were reviewed. The new direct factor Xa inhibitors and the direct thrombin inhibitor (s), called direct oral anticoagulants (DOAs) have rapid onset of action, fast elimination on cessation, and fewer drug-drug or drug-food interactions than warfarin. However, the lack of antidotes raises concerns that some dental procedures may trigger serious hemorrhagic events. Additionally, careful perioperative withdrawal and resumption protocols for the DOAs are reviewed, because DOAs’ blood levels are dependent on renal function. Also, various reversal strategies in the event of excessive bleedings are summarized. Perioperative management of dental patients taking new DOAs and conventional oral anticoagulants are also discussed. However, the perioperative strategies for DOAs are yet to be validated in randomized trials. Key words:Coagulation cascade, cell-based coagulation model, factor Xa inhibitors, direct thrombin inhibitors, prothrombin complex concentrates. PMID:23524440

  9. Antiangiogenic Effect of Oyster Polypeptide (OPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhua WANG

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Drugs which block tumor angiogenesis will be likely effective towards inhibiting tumor growth for angiogenesis being a prerequisite for tumor growth and metastasis. Therefore, antiangiogenesis has become a promising strategy for the treatment of cancer. Investigation on both antiangiogenic effect and mechanism(s of oyster polypeptide (OPP were performed via experiments of chicken embryos model in vivo and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs in vitro. Methods The methods employed in experiment were chorioallantoic membrane (CAM angiogenesis in chicken embryos in vivo, MTT cell survival assay, flat plate scarification, transwell plates assay, matrigel-induced tube formation assay and transmission electron microscope et al. and the OPP’s effects on angiogenesis was observed. Results Study showed that treatment with OPP resulted in significant inhibition of chorioallantoic membrane (CAM angiogenesis in chicken embryos. MTT cell survival assay showed that treatment with OPP resulted in strong inhibition of HUVECs growth, with an IC50 of 400 μg/mL. Flat plate scarification suggested that OPP (200 μg/mL, 400 μg/mL and 800 μg/mL distinctly inhibited HUVECs’ migration (18.75%, 37.93%, 74.07% respectively, treatment for 12 h. Treatment with OPP of different concentrations (200 μg/mL, 400 μg/mL and 800 μg/mL significantly reduced the density of the migration cells by 15.5%, 37.2% and 67.24% (P<0.05 respectively. Matrigel-induced tube formation assay showed that OPP resulted in striking inhibition of tube formation of 52.43%, 84.47% and 96.12% (P<0.01 at 200 μg/mL, 400 μg/mL and 800 μg/mL (treatment for 10 h respectively. In addition, the apoptotic analysis by transmission electron microscope showed that OPP (400 μg/mL, treatment for 48 h distinctly induced HUVECs’ apoptosis. Conclusion This study strikingly showed that OPP could inhibit angiogenesis through its effects on vascular endothelial cells

  10. Antiangiogenic immunotherapy targeting Flk-1, DNA vaccine and adoptive T cell transfer, inhibits ocular neovascularization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Han [Department of Ophthalmology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-Ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Sonoda, Koh-Hei, E-mail: sonodak@med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Ophthalmology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-Ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Hijioka, Kuniaki; Qiao, Hong; Oshima, Yuji; Ishibashi, Tatsuro [Department of Ophthalmology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-Ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2009-04-17

    Ocular neovascularization (NV) is the primary cause of blindness in a wide range of ocular diseases. The exact mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of ocular NV is not yet well understood, and so there is no satisfactory therapy for ocular NV. Here, we describe a strategy targeting Flk-1, a self-antigen overexpressed on proliferating endothelial cells in ocular NV, by antiangiogenic immunotherapy-DNA vaccine and adoptive T cell therapy. An oral DNA vaccine encoding Flk-1 carried by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium markedly suppressed development of laser-induced choroidal NV. We further demonstrated that adoptive transfer of vaccine-induced CD8{sup +} T cells reduced pathological preretinal NV, with a concomitant facilitation of physiological revascularization after oxygen-induced retinal vessel obliteration. However, physiological retinal vascular development was unaffected in neonatal mice transferred with vaccine-induced CD8{sup +} T cells. These findings suggested that antiangiogenic immunotherapy targeting Flk-1 such as vaccination and adoptive immunotherapy may contribute to future therapies for ocular NV.

  11. Antiangiogenic immunotherapy targeting Flk-1, DNA vaccine and adoptive T cell transfer, inhibits ocular neovascularization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocular neovascularization (NV) is the primary cause of blindness in a wide range of ocular diseases. The exact mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of ocular NV is not yet well understood, and so there is no satisfactory therapy for ocular NV. Here, we describe a strategy targeting Flk-1, a self-antigen overexpressed on proliferating endothelial cells in ocular NV, by antiangiogenic immunotherapy-DNA vaccine and adoptive T cell therapy. An oral DNA vaccine encoding Flk-1 carried by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium markedly suppressed development of laser-induced choroidal NV. We further demonstrated that adoptive transfer of vaccine-induced CD8+ T cells reduced pathological preretinal NV, with a concomitant facilitation of physiological revascularization after oxygen-induced retinal vessel obliteration. However, physiological retinal vascular development was unaffected in neonatal mice transferred with vaccine-induced CD8+ T cells. These findings suggested that antiangiogenic immunotherapy targeting Flk-1 such as vaccination and adoptive immunotherapy may contribute to future therapies for ocular NV.

  12. Radiographic features of oral cholecystograms of 448 symptomatic gallstone patients: Implications for nonsurgical therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Plaisier, P.W.; Brakel, Koen; Hul, René; Bruining, Hajo

    1994-01-01

    textabstractSince radiographic findings on oral cholecystography (OCG) have implications for the eligibility for nonsurgical therapy of elderly patients, we investigated the OCGs of 448 symptomatic gallstone patients (109 male, 339 female; mean age, 49.8 ± 14 (range, 21–88)). Opacification of the gallbladder was found in 323 cases (72.1%). Calcifications of gallstones were found in 85 opacified gallbladders (26.3%). Solitary and multiple stones were calcified in 35.3% and 18.2%, respectively ...

  13. The role of TNF inhibitors in psoriasis therapy: new implications for associated comorbidities

    OpenAIRE

    Yost, John; Gudjonsson, Johann E.

    2009-01-01

    Over the past several years, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists have become first-line agents in the treatment of moderate-to-severe psoriasis. These medications are highly effective in treating both psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis and may also reduce the risk of cardiovascular events in patients with chronic inflammatory disorders. In this article we review the use of anti-TNF therapy in psoriasis and its implications in regards to the co-morbid conditions associated with psoriasis.

  14. Implications of an SSRI generic step therapy pharmacy benefit design: an economic model in anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzer, Pat Ellen; Regan, Timothy S; Chiao, Evelyn; Sarnes, Matthew W

    2005-10-01

    As the antidepressant market continues to expand, it is important for healthcare decision makers to develop clinically and economically sound drug benefit designs. As such, the purpose of this study was to determine the economic implications of a generic step therapy (GST) formulary compared with an open formulary for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in patients with anxiety disorders. A model simulating the SSRI treatment patterns of patients diagnosed with an anxiety disorder in a hypothetical health plan with 1 million members was developed. Treatment options were generic SSRI agents (ie, fluoxetine, paroxetine immediate release, and citalopram) and branded SSRI agents (ie, sertraline, paroxetine controlled release, and escitalopram). After treatment initiation, patients could achieve 180 days or more of continuous therapy with no evidence of therapy change, achieve less than 180 days of therapy with no evidence of therapy change, or have a change in therapy. Consequently, patients incurred differential average annual medical and prescription costs. Model probabilities and costs were estimated from published literature and database analyses. The GST formulary resulted in a greater frequency of therapy change than the open formulary (41.3% vs 36.8%) and a lower frequency of continuous therapy for at least 6 months (25.3% vs 29.8%). Costs of SSRI medication were lower for the GST formulary than for the open formulary (11.6 million US dollars vs 14.8 million US dollars ). Medical costs were considerably greater for the GST formulary than for the open formulary, however (178.7 US dollars million vs 174.9 million US dollars, respectively), with a total cost of 190.3 US dollars million for the GST formulary versus 189.6 US dollars million for the open formulary. The incremental cost of implementing a GST formulary over 1 year was 684 360 US dollars , or 0.06 US dollars per member per month. A sensitivity analysis indicated that the model was most

  15. Vascular phenotype identification and anti-angiogenic treatment recommendation: A pseudo-multiscale mathematical model of angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, L G; Gaffney, E A; Maini, P K; Wagg, J; Phipps, A; Byrne, H M

    2016-06-01

    The development of anti-angiogenic drugs for cancer therapy has yielded some promising candidates, but novel approaches for interventions to angiogenesis have led to disappointing results. In addition, there is a shortage of biomarkers that are predictive of response to anti-angiogenic treatments. Consequently, the complex biochemical and physiological basis for tumour angiogenesis remains incompletely understood. We have adopted a mathematical approach to address these issues, formulating a spatially averaged multiscale model that couples the dynamics of VEGF, Ang1, Ang2 and PDGF, with those of mature and immature endothelial cells and pericyte cells. The model reproduces qualitative experimental results regarding pericyte coverage of vessels after treatment by anti-Ang2, anti-VEGF and combination anti-VEGF/anti-Ang2 antibodies. We used the steady state behaviours of the model to characterise angiogenic and non-angiogenic vascular phenotypes, and used mechanistic perturbations representing hypothetical anti-angiogenic treatments to generate testable hypotheses regarding transitions to non-angiogenic phenotypes that depend on the pre-treatment vascular phenotype. Additionally, we predicted a synergistic effect between anti-VEGF and anti-Ang2 treatments when applied to an immature pre-treatment vascular phenotype, but not when applied to a normalised angiogenic pre-treatment phenotype. Based on these findings, we conclude that changes in vascular phenotype are predicted to be useful as an experimental biomarker of response to treatment. Further, our analysis illustrates the potential value of non-spatial mathematical models for generating tractable predictions regarding the action of anti-angiogenic therapies. PMID:26987523

  16. Gene Therapy of Cancerous Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Valenčáková, A.; Dziaková, A.; Hatalová, E.

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy of cancerous diseases provides new means of curing patients with oncologic illnesses. There are several approaches in treating cancer by gene therapy. Most commonly used methods are: cancer immunogene therapy, suicide gene therapy, application of tumor-suppressor genes, antiangiogenic therapy, mesenchymal stem cells used as vectors, gene directed enzyme/prodrug therapy and bacteria used as anti-cancer agents. Cancer gene immunotherapy uses several immunologic agents for the purp...

  17. SEQUENTIAL TARGETED THERAPY FOR DISSEMINATED KIDNEY CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Matveev

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Targeted therapy is a standard treatment in advanced renal cell carcinoma. Stabilization is an expected response to targeted therapy. The main goal of targeted therapy is to improve progression-free survival. This purpose is served through the sequential use of targeted agents. First-line therapy agents in the good and intermediate MSKCC prognostic groups are antiangiogenic ones such as bevacizumab, sunitinib, sorafenib, pazopanib; in the poor MSKCC prognostic group treatment of choice is an mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus. The antiangiogenic agent axitinib and the mTOR inhibitor everolimus were proved to be effective as second-line therapy. Axitinib administration after anti-VEGF drugs is associated with cumulative toxicity. The efficacy of axitinib in sorafenib-refractory renal cell carcinoma has not been proven. So everolimus remains the agent of choice for second-line targeted therapy. The effect of repeated antiangiogenic therapy may be anticipated after everolimus therapy

  18. Management considerations for childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients and implications on therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Clovis Artur; Aikawa, Nadia Emi; Pereira, Rosa Maria Rodrigues; Campos, Lucia Maria Arruda

    2016-01-01

    Childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE) is a chronic inflammatory and autoimmune disease that may involve various organs and systems. This narrative review focuses on the recent evidence relating to cSLE management. The general management considerations of cSLE patients require the use of validated classification criteria, disease and health-related quality of life tools evaluation, as well as assessments of lupus nephritis biomarkers and cSLE quality indicators. The drug treatment for cSLE patients includes general supportive care and immunosuppressive therapy. Important implications on cSLE therapy are also updated such as infection, vaccination, infertility, pregnancy, contraception, dyslipidemia, physical activity, cancer, bone health, drug pharmacokinetics, adherence, academic outcomes, transition to adult care and cumulative organ damage. PMID:26589476

  19. Sharks: a potential source of antiangiogenic factors and tumor treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jung; Kim, Young

    2002-12-01

    Since angiogenesis is a key feature of tumor growth, inhibiting this process is one way to treat cancer. Cartilage is a natural source of material with strong antiangiogenic activity. This report reviews knowledge of the anticancer properties of shark cartilage and clinical information on drugs such as neovastat and squalamine. Because their entire endoskeleton is composed of cartilage, sharks are thought to be an ideal source of angiogenic and tumor growth inhibitors. Shark cartilage extract has shown antiangiogenic and antitumor activities in animals and humans. The oral administration of cartilage extract was efficacious in reducing angiogenesis. Purified antiangiogenic factors from shark cartilage, such as U-995 and neovastat (AE-941), also showed antiangiogenic and antitumor activity. AE-941 is under phase III clinical investigation. Squalamine, a low molecular weight aminosterol, showed strong antitumor activity when combined with chemotherapeutic materials. The angiogenic tissue inhibitor of metalloprotease 3 (TIMP-3) and tumor suppressor protein (snm23) genes from shark cartilage were cloned and characterized. PMID:14961226

  20. Hypoxia upregulates Bcl-2 expression and suppresses interferon-gamma induced antiangiogenic activity in human tumor derived endothelial cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wang, Jiang Huai

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Hypoxia in solid tumors potentially stimulates angiogenesis by promoting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production and upregulating VEGF receptor expression. However, it is unknown whether hypoxia can modulate the effect of anti-angiogenic treatment on tumor-derived endothelium. METHODS: Human tumor-derived endothelial cells (HTDEC) were freshly isolated from surgically removed human colorectal tumors by collagenase\\/DNase digestion and Percol gradient sedimentation. Cell proliferation was assessed by measuring BrdU incorporation, and capillary tube formation was measured using Matrigel. Cell apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry and ELISA, and Bcl-2 expression was detected by Western blot analysis. RESULTS: Under aerobic culture conditions (5% CO2 plus 21% O2) HTDEC expressed less Bcl-2 and were more susceptible to IFN-gamma-induced apoptosis with significant reductions in both cell proliferation and capillary tube formation, when compared with normal human macrovascular and microvascular EC. Following exposure of HTDEC to hypoxia (5% CO2 plus 2% O2), IFN-gamma-induced cell apoptosis, and antiangiogenic activity (i.e. an inhibition in cell proliferation and capillary tube formation) in HTDEC were markedly attenuated. This finding correlated with hypoxia-induced upregulation of Bcl-2 expression in HTDEC. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that hypoxia can protect HTDEC against IFN-gamma-mediated cell death and antiangiogenic activity, and suggest that improvement of tumor oxygenation may potentiate the efficacy of anti-cancer therapies specifically targeting the inhibition of tumor angiogenesis.

  1. Evaluation of high frequency ultrasound methods and contrast agents for characterising tumor response to anti-angiogenic treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rix, Anne, E-mail: arix@ukaachen.de [Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen, RWTH-Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Lederle, Wiltrud, E-mail: wlederle@ukaachen.de [Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen, RWTH-Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Siepmann, Monica, E-mail: monica.siepmann@rub.de [Department of Medical Engineering, Universitätstraße 150, 44780 Bochum, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Fokong, Stanley, E-mail: sfokong@ukaachen.de [Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen, RWTH-Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Behrendt, Florian F., E-mail: fbehrendt@ukaachen.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen, RWTH-Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Bzyl, Jessica, E-mail: jbzyl@ukaachen.de [Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen, RWTH-Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Grouls, Christoph, E-mail: cgrouls@ukaachen.de [Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen, RWTH-Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Kiessling, Fabian, E-mail: fkiessling@ukaachen.de [Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen, RWTH-Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Palmowski, Moritz, E-mail: mpalmowski@ukaachen.de [Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen, RWTH-Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen, RWTH-Aachen University, Aachen (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To compare non-enhanced and contrast-enhanced high-frequency 3D Doppler ultrasound with contrast-enhanced 2D and 3D B-mode imaging for assessing tumor vascularity during antiangiogenic treatment using soft-shell and hard-shell microbubbles. Materials and methods: Antiangiogenic therapy effects (SU11248) on vascularity of subcutaneous epidermoid-carcinoma xenografts (A431) in female CD1 nude mice were investigated longitudinally using non-enhanced and contrast-enhanced 3D Doppler at 25 MHz. Additionally, contrast-enhanced 2D and 3D B-mode scans were performed by injecting hard-shell (poly-butyl-cyanoacrylate-based) and soft-shell (phospholipid-based) microbubbles. Suitability of both contrast agents for high frequency imaging and the sensitivity of the different ultrasound methods to assess early antiangiogenic therapy effects were investigated. Ultrasound data were validated by immunohistology. Results: Hard-shell microbubbles induced higher signal intensity changes in tumors than soft-shell microbubbles in 2D B-mode measurements (424 ± 7 vs. 169 ± 8 A.U.; p < 0.01). In 3D measurements, signals of soft-shell microbubbles were hardly above the background (5.48 ± 4.57 vs. 3.86 ± 2.92 A.U.), while signals from hard-shell microbubbles were sufficiently high (30.5 ± 8.06 A.U). Using hard-shell microbubbles 2D and 3D B-mode imaging depicted a significant decrease in tumor vascularity during antiangiogenic therapy from day 1 on. Using soft-shell microbubbles significant therapy effects were observed at day 4 after therapy in 2D B-mode imaging but could not be detected in the 3D mode. With non-enhanced and contrast-enhanced Doppler imaging significant differences between treated and untreated tumors were found from day 2 on. Conclusion: Hard-shell microbubble-enhanced 2D and 3D B-mode ultrasound achieved highest sensitivity for assessing therapy effects on tumor vascularisation and were superior to B-mode ultrasound with soft-shell microbubbles and to Doppler

  2. Long-term subcutaneous recombinant interleukin-2 as maintenance therapy: biological effects and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guida, M; Abbate, I; Casamassima, A; Musci, M D; Latorre, A; Lorusso, V; Correale, M; De Lena, M

    1995-01-01

    Several trials have evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of rIL-2 combined with more traditional treatments such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy, but the use of IL-2 as adjuvant therapy for minimal residual disease or to maintain clinical response obtained with other standard treatments has yet to be investigated. The aim of the present trial was to study the biological effects of maintenance long-term treatment (6 months) with subcutaneous low-dose IL-2 in 16 patients with different neoplasms previously treated with chemo-immuno therapeutic regimens or with surgery (7 metastatic renal cancers, 5 locally advanced renal cancers previously subjected to radical nephrectomy, 2 metastatic breast cancers, 1 small cell lung cancer, and 1 metastatic melanoma). Clinical tolerability, feasibility and therapeutic implications are also discussed. The IL-2 schedule was as follows: 4.5 million IU/day, 3 times weekly for 6 months. A total of 14 patients completed therapy without requiring dose modifications and are free of progression after a median duration of 8+ months (range: 7+ to 34+) while two patients progressed during therapy (one inflammatory breast cancer and one renal cancer). Important and persistent hemato-immunostimulating effects in both soluble (IL-2, sIL-2R, IL-6) and cellular (lymphocyte subsets, monocytes, eosinophils) parameters were noted during the entire treatment. The IL-2 related toxicity was quite low. Moreover, this long-term IL-2 therapy could control neoplastic growth and thus prolong clinical response obtained with standard treatments. Prospective randomized studies regarding the clinical efficacy have been initiated. PMID:8547958

  3. An examination of human factors in external beam radiation therapy: Findings and implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To better understand the contributing factors to human error in external beam radiation therapy, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has undertaken a series of human factors evaluations. A team of human factors specialists, assisted by a panel of radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and radiation technologists, conducted visits to 24 radiation oncology departments at community hospitals, university centers, and free-standing clinics. A function and task analysis was initially performed to guide subsequent evaluations in the areas of human-system interfaces, procedures, training and qualifications, and organizational policies and practices. Representative findings and implications for improvement are discussed within the context of a dynamic model which holds that misadministration likely results from the unanticipated interaction of several necessary but singly insufficient conditions

  4. Implications of the Affordable Care Act for occupational therapy practitioners providing services to Medicare recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Gail; Friesema, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    The passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA; Pub. L. 111-148) represents the largest expansion in government funding of health care since Medicare and Medicaid were established in 1965 (Curfman, Abel, & Landers, 2012). Although the health insurance mandate and Medicaid expansion have received the most attention as a result of legal challenges and the July 2012 Supreme Court ruling on the legality of the ACA (Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 2012), other ACA initiatives may have even greater implications for occupational therapy. The ACA includes sections on improving quality and health systems performance for Medicare recipients, with some sections also applying to Medicaid recipients. Insurance companies commonly follow Medicare rules; therefore, the Medicare reforms are likely to spread across all payers, health care settings, and care recipients. PMID:23968787

  5. Current status and implications of microRNAs in ovarian cancer diagnosis and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaman Mohd Saif

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ovarian cancer is the fifth most common cancer among women and causes more deaths than any other type of female reproductive cancer. Currently, treatment of ovarian cancer is based on the combination of surgery and chemotherapy. While recurrent ovarian cancer responds to additional chemotherapy treatments, the progression-free interval becomes shorter after each cycle, as chemo-resistance increases until the disease becomes incurable. There is, therefore, a strong need for prognostic and predictive markers to help optimize and personalize treatment in order to improve the outcome of ovarian cancer. An increasing number of studies indicate an essential role for microRNAs in ovarian cancer progression and chemo-resistance. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small endogenous non-coding RNAs (~22bp which are frequently dysregulated in cancer. Typically, miRNAs are involved in crucial biological processes, including development, differentiation, apoptosis and proliferation. Two families of miRNAs, miR-200 and let-7, are frequently dysregulated in ovarian cancer and have been associated with poor prognosis. Both have been implicated in the regulation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a cellular transition associated with tumor aggressiveness, tumor invasion and chemo-resistance. Moreover, miRNAs also have possible implications for improving cancer diagnosis; for example miR-200 family, let-7 family, miR-21 and miR-214 may be useful in diagnostic tests to help detect ovarian cancer at an early stage. Additionally, the use of multiple target O-modified antagomirs (MTG-AMO to inhibit oncogenic miRNAs and miRNA replacement therapy for tumor suppressor miRNAs are essential tools for miRNA based cancer therapeutics. In this review we describe the current status of the role miRNAs play in ovarian cancer and focus on the possibilities of microRNA-based therapies and the use of microRNAs as diagnostic tools.

  6. Anti-angiogenic effect of high doses of ascorbic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Ichim Thomas E; Mikirova Nina A; Riordan Neil H

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Pharmaceutical doses of ascorbic acid (AA, vitamin C, or its salts) have been reported to exert anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo. One proposed mechanism involves direct cytotoxicity mediated by accumulation of ascorbic acid radicals and hydrogen peroxide in the extracellular environment of tumor cells. However, therapeutic effects have been reported at concentrations insufficient to induce direct tumor cell death. We hypothesized that AA may exert anti-angiogenic effects. To ...

  7. Evaluation of Antioxidant and Antiangiogenic Properties of Caesalpinia Echinata Extracts

    OpenAIRE

    da Silva Gomes, Elisangela Christhianne Barbosa; Jimenez, George Chaves; da Silva, Luis Claudio Nascimento; Sá, Fabrício Bezerra; de Souza, Karen Pena Cavalcanti; Paiva, Gerson S.; de Souza, Ivone Antônia

    2014-01-01

    Natural products contain important combinations of ingredients, which may to some extent help to modulate the effects produced by oxidation substrates in biological systems. It is known that substances capable of modulating the action of these oxidants on tissue may be important allies in the control of neovascularization in pathological processes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant and antiangiogenic properties of an ethanol extract of Caesalpinia echinata. The evaluation ...

  8. Antiangiogenic and anticancer activity of saponins of Momordica cymbalaria

    OpenAIRE

    Raju Koneri; Nagarathna P. K. M.; Mubasheera M. G.; M. Madhu Mohan

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of the current study was to evaluate invitro anticancer activity of saponins of MC on EAC cells by using cytotoxicity (MTT) assay. To evaluate in vivo antiangiogenic potential of saponins of MC on rat air sac angiogenesis, EAC induced peritoneal angiogenesis, CAM angiogenesis. Methods: MTT assay was carried out at different concentrations of saponins of MC in 12 microliter plates containing media with EAC cells. In rat air sac angiogenesis, carrageenin was injected (s.c...

  9. Radiographic features of oral cholecystograms of 448 symptomatic gallstone patients: implications for nonsurgical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaisier, P W; Brakel, K; van der Hul, R L; Bruining, H A

    1994-02-01

    Since radiographic findings on oral cholecystography (OCG) have implications for the eligibility for nonsurgical therapy of elderly patients, we investigated the OCGs of 448 symptomatic gallstone patients (109 male, 339 female; mean age, 49.8 +/- 14 (range, 21-88)). Opacification of the gallbladder was found in 323 cases (72.1%). Calcifications of gallstones were found in 85 opacified gallbladders (26.3%). Solitary and multiple stones were calcified in 35.3% and 18.2%, respectively (P 40 years), there was a significant increase in calcifications (P < 0.02) and a non-significant increase in opacification with increasing age. It is concluded that age is a determinant for calcification of gallstones and not opacification of the gallbladder. Since multiple stones are proportionately observed more in clinical studies than in epidemiologic studies, it is suggested that multiplicity of stones predisposes to biliary complaints. That solitary stones are more likely to be calcified than multiple stones, adds to the hypothesis that solitary and multiple stones have a different pathogenesis. Elderly patients, in whom non-surgical therapy is most likely to be indicated and cost-effective, are less likely to be suitable for this form of treatment, since age is a determinant for stone calcification. PMID:8168584

  10. Listening in the Ambient Mode: Implications for Music Therapy Practice and Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Viega

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This theoretical paper explores the function, structures, and experience of listening to and creating ambient music, and encountering the ambient mode of being (Jaaniste, 2007. In the ambient mode of being, a listener becomes immersed in the raw materials of sonic environments (soundscapes and nomadically shifts awareness across the terrains of these environments- simultaneously experiencing being in a liminal space and grounded in the here-and-now. For music therapists this might mean navigating and attuning to the lo-fidelity soundscapes in various levels of health and helping people achieve hi-fidelity and clarity on individual, community, cultural, and spiritual levels of existence. The ambient mode of being suggests that music therapists can access these levels simultaneously by entering into a creative state of listening in which pervasive ambience becomes salient within the musical relationships built in music therapy. Implications of the ambient mode of being for music therapy practice and theory will b be explored. Clinical outcomes related to encountering the ambient mode of being are discussed including capturing distant or forgotten parts of one’s self and making them salient again.

  11. Thoughts on "Experience of Space in Japan." Implications for Music Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Mairiaux

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available This article presents thoughts on the experience of space, developed from a research study I have been doing during two years immersed in a very singular context where the familiar university environment contrasted with the – for me – completely unknown Japanese culture. The research study explains my motivation as well as my theme of the research: "the experience of space." The influence that my situation of being immersed in Japanese culture had on my hypothesis and research process are also developed. The study introduces some aspects of my experience of space in two different contexts: the context of everyday life experiences in Japan and the context of the butoh dance. Each context helped me to discover aspects of the experience of space, and possible implications for the music therapy context are then developed. In the study I sum up some of the discoveries underlining the negative and positive aspects this research process has led to. Finally, I evoke the learning of "humility," which is the dimension of the process most difficult to share in this article. The research study brought up some interesting subjects to investigate more in the future. One important discovery was the interdependency between perception and language (as a part of culture and the way this implies a special attention in the music therapy context. Another interesting remark concerns the concept of boundary, and I argue that the Japanese concept of "Ma" is precious in relation to the therapeutic challenge of approaching this concept with an open mind.

  12. Anti-angiogenic peptides identified in thrombospondin type I domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thrombospondin 1, the prototypical protein of the thrombospondin protein family, is a potent endogenous inhibitor of angiogenesis. Although the effects of the thrombospondin 1 on neovascularization have been well studied, little is known about the anti-angiogenic potency of other proteins or peptide fragments derived from the proteins in this family. Here we identify a set of 18 novel, anti-angiogenic 17- to 20-amino acid peptides that are derived from proteins containing type I thrombospondin motifs. We have named these peptides adamtsostatin-4, adamtsostatin-16, adamtsostatin-18, cartilostatin-1, cartilostatin-2, fibulostatin-6.2, fibulostatin-6.3, papilostatin-1, papilostatin-2, properdistatin, scospondistatin, semastatin-5A.1, semastatin-5A.2, semastatin-5B, thrombostatin containing-1, thrombostatin contaning-3, thrombostatin contaning-6, and wispostatin-1 to reflect their origin. We further demonstrate that these peptides inhibit the proliferation and migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro. The anti-proliferative and anti-migratory properties of the identified peptides may be important in maintaining angiogenic homeostasis in vivo and make these peptides suitable candidates for use as anti-angiogenic pharmaceutical agents in numerous therapeutic applications

  13. Evaluation of Antiangiogenic Effect of the Leaves of Justicia gendarussa (Burm. f (Acanthaceae by Chrio Allontoic Membrane Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Periyanayagam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Angiogenesis involves the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing blood vessels plays a crucial role in pathological processes such as diabetic retinopathy, arthritis and in the growth of solid tumors. Numerous reports had pointed out to the crucial role of neovascularization in the malignancy of tumors and other angiogenesis dependant diseases. Antiangiogenic therapy which targets activated endothelial cells having several advantages over therapy directed against tumor cells. Determine the antiangiogenic potential of the leaves of Justicia gendarussa by CAM (Chrio Allontoic Membrane assay method. Approach: A chick chrio allontoic membrane assay was carried out. Six eggs were used per experiment to test one extract at a given dose. The upper part of the shell of the eggs were removed like a window, covered with a plastic film and incubated for 72 h. When the CAM is about 1.8-2.6 cm development the pellets containing test solution both aqueous and ethanolic placed on the CAM by means of micropipette. After 24 h antiangiogenic effect was measured by means of a stereomicroscope to observe the avascular zone surrounding the pellet. Results: Below 10 µg both extracts showed no effect. In the dose range of 50 µg mL-1 of ethanolic extract and 100 µg mL-1 of aqueous extract showed inhibition of neovascularization. The effect was in dose dependant manner. Conclusion: These results indicated that both aqueous and ethanolic extracts of the leaves of Justica gendarussa inhibits the angiogenesois in dose dependant fashion and it provides a scientific basis for its traditional use in the treatment of arthtitis which is an angiogenesis dependant disease.

  14. Heterogeneity of tumor vasculature and antiangiogenic intervention: insights from MR angiography and DCE-MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenlian Zhu

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Solid tumor vasculature is highly heterogeneous, which presents challenges to antiangiogenic intervention as well as the evaluation of its therapeutic efficacy. The aim of this study is to evaluate the spatial tumor vascular changes due to bevacizumab/paclitaxel therapy using a combination approach of MR angiography and DCE-MRI method. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Tumor vasculature of MCF-7 breast tumor mouse xenografts was studied by a combination of MR angiography and DCE-MRI with albumin-Gd-DTPA. Tumor macroscopic vasculature was extracted from the early enhanced images. Tumor microvascular parameters were obtained from the pharmacokinetic modeling of the DCE-MRI data. A spatial analysis of the microvascular parameters based on the macroscopic vasculature was used to evaluate the changes of the heterogeneous vasculature induced by a 12 day bevacizumab/paclitaxel treatment in mice bearing MCF-7 breast tumor. RESULTS: Macroscopic vessels that feed the tumors were not affected by the bevacizumab/paclitaxel combination therapy. A higher portion of the tumors was within close proximity of these macroscopic vessels after the treatment, concomitant with tumor growth retardation. There was a significant decrease in microvascular permeability and vascular volume in the tumor regions near these vessels. CONCLUSION: Bevacizumab/paclitaxel combination therapy did not block the blood supply to the MCF-7 breast tumor. Such finding is consistent with the modest survival benefits of adding bevacizumab to current treatment regimens for some types of cancers.

  15. The Significance of Somatosensory Stimulation to the Hand: Implications for Occupational Therapy Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy L. McCormack PhD,OTR/L

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The hands contain numerous nerve endings that are intimately connected to the brain. Mounting evidence supports the concept that willful manipulation of objects contributes to expansion or reorganization of the somatosensory cortex and can produce therapeutic outcomes. In the past decade, research has demonstrated that cortical plasticity can continue throughout adulthood. Brain plasticity is a core principle that demonstrates the ability of the central nervous system to respond to stimuli and modify its structural organization and function as an adaptive response. Occupation-based interventions, which engage the use of the hands, are conceived in this article as a “mindbody” experience because of the vast potential for perceptual learning and neurologic reorganization. Many types of neuroplasticity have been identified, but “activity- dependent neuroplasticity” is an essential concept for occupational therapy practice. In addition, the concept of “cross-modal plasticity” will also be delineated with regard to implications to clinical practice. Guidelines for tactile or somatosensory stimulation will be derived from a systematic review of the neuroscience literature.

  16. Synthesis and Antiangiogenic Activity of N-Alkylated Levamisole Derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders N.; Bendiksen, Christine D.; Sylvest, Lene;

    2012-01-01

    less effective than antibody treatment and are also associated with serious side effects. The discovery of new chemotypes with efficient antiangiogenic activity is therefore of pertinent interest. (S)-Levamisole hydrochloride, an anthelminthic drug approved for human use and with a known clinical...... normal human dermal fibroblasts. Interestingly, the cluster morphology caused by N-methyllevamisole was different than the clusters observed for levamisole, and a third "cord-like" morphology resembling that of the known drug suramin was observed for an aniline-containing derivative. New chemotypes...

  17. Variants at 6q21 implicate PRDM1 in the etiology of therapy-induced second malignancies after Hodgkin lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Best, Timothy; Li, Dalin; Andrew D. Skol; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Jackson, Sarah A; Yasui, Yutaka; Bhatia, Smita; Strong, Louise C.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Huang, R. Stephanie; Mack, Thomas M.; Conti, David V.; Offit, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Survivors of pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) are at significant risk for radiation therapy (RT)-induced second malignant neoplasms (SMNs). We identified two variants at chromosome 6q21 associated with SMNs in HL survivors treated with RT as children but not as adults. The variants comprise a risk locus associated with decreased basal PRDM1 expression and impaired induction of PRDM1 by radiation exposure. These data suggest a novel gene-exposure interaction that may implicate PRDM1 in the etio...

  18. A novel assay to assess the effectiveness of antiangiogenic drugs in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many cytotoxic drugs maintain antiangiogenic properties, but there are no human, tumor-based assays to evaluate their antiangiogenic potential. We used a fibrin-thrombin clot-based angiogenesis model to evaluate the angiogenic response of human breast cancer to various cytotoxic agents commonly used...

  19. Gene electrotransfer of plasmid antiangiogenic metargidin peptide (AMEP) in disseminated melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanggaard, Iben; Snoj, Marko; Cavalcanti, Andrea;

    2013-01-01

    Antiangiogenic metargidin peptide (AMEP) is a novel anticancer agent exerting antiproliferative and antiangiogenic effects by binding to αvβ3 and α5β1 integrins. Electrotransfer designates the use of electric pulses (electroporation) to transfer plasmid DNA into tissues. This first-in-man phase I...

  20. Gene therapy of liver cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hernandez-Alcoceba, R. (Rubén); B. Sangro; Prieto, J.

    2006-01-01

    The application of gene transfer technologies to the treatment of cancer has led to the development of new experimental approaches like gene directed enzyme/pro-drug therapy (GDEPT), inhibition of oncogenes and restoration of tumor-suppressor genes. In addition, gene therapy has a big impact on other fields like cancer immunotherapy, anti-angiogenic therapy and virotherapy. These strategies are being evaluated for the treatment of primary and metastatic liver cancer and some of them have reac...

  1. Antiangiogenic agents in the treatment of recurrent or newly diagnosed glioblastoma: Analysis of single-agent and combined modality approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutin Philip H

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Surgical resection followed by radiotherapy and temozolomide in newly diagnosed glioblastoma can prolong survival, but it is not curative. For patients with disease progression after frontline therapy, there is no standard of care, although further surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy may be used. Antiangiogenic therapies may be appropriate for treating glioblastomas because angiogenesis is critical to tumor growth. In a large, noncomparative phase II trial, bevacizumab was evaluated alone and with irinotecan in patients with recurrent glioblastoma; combination treatment was associated with an estimated 6-month progression-free survival (PFS rate of 50.3%, a median overall survival of 8.9 months, and a response rate of 37.8%. Single-agent bevacizumab also exceeded the predetermined threshold of activity for salvage chemotherapy (6-month PFS rate, 15%, achieving a 6-month PFS rate of 42.6% (p

  2. Antioxidant and antiangiogenic activity of Astronium graveolens Jacq. leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Vanessa; Malafronte, Nicola; Mora, Flor; Pesca, Maria S; Aquino, Rita P; Mencherini, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis is involved in many physiological and pathological conditions. Natural compounds with antioxidant activity have also been reported to possess potent antiangiogenic properties by regulating angiogenesis modulators such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Based on this, we screened the antioxidant and antiangiogenic activities of Astronium graveolens leaf extracts by a DPPH test and a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. MeOH extract expressed a significant free radical-scavenging activity (EC₅₀ = 37.65 μg/mL) and it was able to inhibit the interaction between placental growth factor (PlGF) (placental growth factor), a VEGF family member, and its receptor Flt-1 by more than 50% at 1 mg/mL. 1,2,3,4,6-Penta-O-galloyl-d-glucopyranose, 6 is the most active compound of the extract. It exhibited a high potency in scavenging DPPH (EC₅₀ = 2.16 μg/mL) and reduced by 58% the PlGF/Flt-1 interaction at a concentration of 50 μM. Moreover, the known compounds (1-6) have been isolated for the first time in A. graveolens. PMID:24588321

  3. Mechanism of Action for Nonpharmacological Therapies for Individuals With Dementia: Implications for Practice and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgener, Sandy C; Jao, Ying-Ling; Anderson, Joel G; Bossen, Ann L

    2015-01-01

    The current review addresses the need for increased use of evidence-based, nonpharmacological therapies for individuals with dementia. To facilitate understanding of the potential efficacy of nonpharmacological therapies on cognitive functioning for individuals with dementia, the mechanisms of action for selected therapies are described, including the assessment method used to identify the mechanism. The strength of evidence supporting each therapy was evaluated, with some therapies demonstrating strong support and others only moderate support for their effectiveness and mechanism of action. Therapies with the strongest support include (a) cognitive training/stimulation, (b) physical exercise, and (c) music. Therapies with moderate support include (a) biofield, (b) meditation, (c) engagement with a naturally restorative environment, and (d) social engagement. Although the strength of evidence varies, together these therapies offer treatments designed to improve cognitive functioning, have low risks and adverse effects, and have the potential for widespread accessibility, thereby increasing the potential range of therapies for individuals with dementia. PMID:25975348

  4. Complementary therapy use by patients and parents of children with asthma and the implications for NHS care: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharp Debbie

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients are increasingly using complementary therapies, often for chronic conditions. Asthma is the most common chronic condition in the UK. Previous research indicates that some asthma patients experience gaps in their NHS care. However, little attention has been given to how and why patients and parents of children with asthma use complementary therapies and the implications for NHS care. Methods Qualitative study, comprising 50 semi-structured interviews with a purposeful sample of 22 adults and 28 children with asthma (plus a parent, recruited from a range of NHS and non-NHS settings in Bristol, England. Data analysis was thematic, drawing on the principles of constant comparison. Results A range of complementary therapies were being used for asthma, most commonly Buteyko breathing and homeopathy. Most use took place outside of the NHS, comprising either self-treatment or consultation with private complementary therapists. Complementary therapies were usually used alongside not instead of conventional asthma treatment. A spectrum of complementary therapy users emerged, including "committed", "pragmatic" and "last resort" users. Motivating factors for complementary therapy use included concerns about conventional NHS care ("push factors" and attractive aspects of complementary therapies ("pull factors". While participants were often uncertain whether therapies had directly helped their asthma, breathing techniques such as the Buteyko Method were most notably reported to enhance symptom control and enable reduction in medication. Across the range of therapies, the process of seeking and using complementary therapies seemed to help patients in two broad ways: it empowered them to take greater personal control over their condition rather than feel dependant on medication, and enabled exploration of a broader range of possible causes of their asthma than commonly discussed within NHS settings. Conclusion Complementary therapy

  5. IGFBP-4 Anti-Angiogenic and Anti-Tumorigenic Effects Are Associated with Anti-Cathepsin B Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María J Moreno

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 4 (IGFBP-4/IBP-4 has potent IGF-independent anti-angiogenic and antitumorigenic effects. In this study, we demonstrated that these activities are located in the IGFBP-4 C-terminal protein fragment (CIBP-4, a region containing a thyroglobulin type 1 (Tg1 domain. Proteins bearing Tg1 domains have been shown to inhibit cathepsins, lysosomal enzymes involved in basement membrane degradation and implicated in tumor invasion and angiogenesis. In our studies, CIBP-4 was shown to internalize and co-localize with lysosomal-like structures in both endothelial cells (ECs and glioblastoma U87MG cells. CIBP-4 also inhibited both growth factor-induced EC tubulogenesis in Matrigel and the concomitant increases in intracellular cathepsin B (CatB activity. In vitro assays confirmed CIBP-4 capacity to block recombinant CatB activity. Biodistribution analysis of intravenously injected CIBP-4-Cy5.5 in a glioblastoma tumor xenograft model indicated targeted accumulation of CIBP-4 in tumors. Most importantly, CIBP-4 reduced tumor growth in this animal model by 60%. Pleiotropic anti-angiogenic and anti-tumorigenic activities of CIBP-4 most likely underlie its observed therapeutic potential against glioblastoma.

  6. IGFBP-4 Anti-Angiogenic and Anti-Tumorigenic Effects Are Associated with Anti-Cathepsin B Activity1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, María J; Ball, Marguerite; Rukhlova, Marina; Slinn, Jacqueline; L'Abbe, Denis; Iqbal, Umar; Monette, Robert; Hagedorn, Martin; O'Connor-McCourt, Maureen D; Durocher, Yves; Stanimirovic, Danica B

    2013-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 4 (IGFBP-4/IBP-4) has potent IGF-independent anti-angiogenic and antitumorigenic effects. In this study, we demonstrated that these activities are located in the IGFBP-4 C-terminal protein fragment (CIBP-4), a region containing a thyroglobulin type 1 (Tg1) domain. Proteins bearing Tg1 domains have been shown to inhibit cathepsins, lysosomal enzymes involved in basement membrane degradation and implicated in tumor invasion and angiogenesis. In our studies, CIBP-4 was shown to internalize and co-localize with lysosomal-like structures in both endothelial cells (ECs) and glioblastoma U87MG cells. CIBP-4 also inhibited both growth factor-induced EC tubulogenesis in Matrigel and the concomitant increases in intracellular cathepsin B (CatB) activity. In vitro assays confirmed CIBP-4 capacity to block recombinant CatB activity. Biodistribution analysis of intravenously injected CIBP-4-Cy5.5 in a glioblastoma tumor xenograft model indicated targeted accumulation of CIBP-4 in tumors. Most importantly, CIBP-4 reduced tumor growth in this animal model by 60%. Pleiotropic anti-angiogenic and anti-tumorigenic activities of CIBP-4 most likely underlie its observed therapeutic potential against glioblastoma. PMID:23633927

  7. Cancer gene therapy with iCaspase-9 transcriptionally targeted to tumor endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Wenying; Dong, Zhihong; Jin, Taocong; Mantellini, Maria G.; Núñez, Gabriel; Jacques E Nör

    2008-01-01

    Antiangiogenic therapies have shown varying results partly because each tumor type secretes a distinct panel of angiogenic factors to sustain its own microvascular network. In addition, recent evidence demonstrated that tumors develop resistance to antiangiogenic therapy by turning on alternate angiogenic pathways when one pathway is therapeutically inhibited. Here, we test the hypothesis that expression of a caspase-based artificial death switch in tumor-associated endothelial cells will dis...

  8. Anti-angiogenic agents in metastatic colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major public health concernbeing the third leading cause of cancer mortality inthe United States. The availability of better therapeuticoptions has led to a decline in cancer mortality in thesepatients. Surgical resection should be considered in allstages of the disease. The use of conversion therapyhas made surgery a potentially curative option even inpatients with initially unresectable metastatic disease.In this review we discuss the role of various antiangiogenicagents in patients with metastatic CRC(mCRC). We describe the mechanism of action of theseagents, and the rationale for their use in combinationwith chemotherapy. We also review important clinicalstudies that have evaluated the safety and efficacy ofthese agents in mCRC patients. Despite the discoveryof several promising anti-angiogenic agents, mCRCremains an incurable disease with a median overallsurvival of just over 2 years in patients exposed to allavailable treatment regimens. Further insights intotumor biology and tumor microenvironment may helpimprove outcomes in these patients.

  9. Free HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Enhances Adherence among Individuals on Stable Treatment: Implications for Potential Shortfalls in Free Antiretroviral Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Byakika-Tusiime, Jayne; Polley, Eric C.; Oyugi, Jessica H.; Bangsberg, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the population-level causal effect of source of payment for HIV medication on treatment adherence using Marginal Structural Models. Methods: Data were obtained from an observational cohort of 76 HIV-infected individuals with at least 24 weeks of antiretroviral therapy treatment from 2002 to 2007 in Kampala, Uganda. Adherence was the primary outcome and it was measured using the 30-day visual analogue scale. Marginal structural models (MSM) were used to estimate the effe...

  10. Anti-angiogenic and cytotoxicity studies of some medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kwok-Wen; Salhimi, Salizawati Muhamad; Majid, Amin Malik; Chan, Kit-Lam

    2010-06-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in tumor formation and proliferation. The development of anti-angiogenic agents to block new blood vessel growth will inhibit metastasis and induce apoptosis of the cancer cells. Nine medicinal plants, Strobilanthes crispus, Phyllanthus niruri, Phyllanthus pulcher, Phyllanthus urinaria, Ailanthus malabarica, Irvingia malayana, Smilax myosotiflora, Tinospora crispa and blumea balsamifera were screened for anti-angiogenic properties using the rat aortic ring assay. Of these, the methanol extracts of Phyllanthus species and Irvingia malayana exhibited the highest activity. At 100 microg/mL, P. pulcher, P. niruri, P. urinaria and I. malayana recorded an inhibition of 78.8 %, 59.5 %, 56.7 % and 46.4 %, respectively, against rat aortic vascular growth. Their activities were further investigated by the tube formation assay involving human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) on Matrigel. I. malayana, P. niruri and P. urinaria showed a significant decrease of 45.5, 37.9 and 35.6 %, respectively, whilst P. pulcher showed a much lower decrease of 15.5 % when compared with that of the rat aortic ring assay. All the plant extracts were evaluated for cytotoxicity on a panel of human cancer cell lines using the MTT assay. None of them displayed acute cytotoxicity. The HPLC of P. niruri, P. urinaria and P. pulcher indicated the extracts contained some identical chromatographic peaks of lignans. Further fractionation of I. malayana yielded betulinic acid reported in this plant for the first time and at 100 microg/mL it exhibited a 67.3 % inhibition of vessel outgrowth and 46.5 % inhibition of tube formation. PMID:20112179

  11. Mind-body therapies: evidence and implications in advanced oncology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayden, Kelley D

    2012-11-01

    The idea that thoughts and emotions influence health outcomes is an ancient concept that was initially abandoned by Western medicine researchers. Today, researchers are showing a renewed interest in the interactions of the mind and body and the role these interactions play in disease formation and recovery. Complementary and alternative interventions, such as mind-body therapies, are increasingly being used by cancer survivors for disease prevention, immune system enhancement, and symptom control. Traditional training has not been structured to provide advanced practitioners with an in-depth knowledge of the clinical applications of mind-body therapies. The aim of this article is to acquaint the reader with common mind-body modalities (meditation/mindfulness-based stress reduction, relaxation therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, hypnosis, biofeedback, music therapy, art therapy, support groups, and aromatherapy) and to examine important evidence in support of or against their clinical application. PMID:25031967

  12. Odisolane, a Novel Oxolane Derivative, and Antiangiogenic Constituents from the Fruits of Mulberry (Morus alba L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seoung Rak; Park, Jun Yeon; Yu, Jae Sik; Lee, Sung Ok; Ryu, Ja-Young; Choi, Sang-Zin; Kang, Ki Sung; Yamabe, Noriko; Kim, Ki Hyun

    2016-05-18

    Mulberry, the fruit of Morus alba L., is known as an edible fruit and commonly used in Chinese medicines as a warming agent and as a sedative, tonic, laxative, odontalgic, expectorant, anthelmintic, and emetic. Systemic investigation of the chemical constituents of M. alba fruits led to the identification of a novel oxolane derivative, (R*)-2-((2S*,3R*)-tetrahydro-2-hydroxy-2-methylfuran-3-yl)propanoic acid (1), namely, odisolane, along with five known heterocyclic compounds (2-6). The structure of the new compound was elucidated on the basis of HR-MS, 1D and 2D NMR ((1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC, and NOESY) data analysis. Compound 1 has a novel skeleton that consists of 8 carbon units with an oxolane ring, which until now has never been identified in natural products. The isolated compounds were subjected to several activity tests to verify their biological function. Among them, compounds 1, 3, and 5 significantly inhibited cord formation in HUVECs. The action mechanism of compound 3, which had the strongest antiangiogenic activity, was mediated by decreasing VEGF, p-Akt, and p-ERK protein expression. These results suggest that compounds isolated from M. alba fruits might be beneficial in antiangiogenesis therapy for cancer treatment. PMID:27115720

  13. Comparative evaluation of the antitumor activity of antiangiogenic proteins delivered by gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, C J; Farnebo, F; Yu, E Y; Christofferson, R; Swearingen, R A; Carter, R; von Recum, H A; Yuan, J; Kamihara, J; Flynn, E; D'Amato, R; Folkman, J; Mulligan, R C

    2001-04-10

    Although the systemic administration of a number of different gene products has been shown to result in the inhibition of angiogenesis and tumor growth in different animal tumor models, the relative potency of those gene products has not been studied rigorously. To address this issue, recombinant adenoviruses encoding angiostatin, endostatin, and the ligand-binding ectodomains of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptors Flk1, Flt1, and neuropilin were generated and used to systemically deliver the different gene products in several different preexisting murine tumor models. Single i.v. injections of viruses encoding soluble forms of Flk1 or Flt1 resulted in approximately 80% inhibition of preexisting tumor growth in murine models involving both murine (Lewis lung carcinoma, T241 fibrosarcoma) and human (BxPC3 pancreatic carcinoma) tumors. In contrast, adenoviruses encoding angiostatin, endostatin, or neuropilin were significantly less effective. A strong correlation was observed between the effects of the different viruses on tumor growth and the activity of the viruses in the inhibition of corneal micropocket angiogenesis. These data underscore the need for comparative analyses of different therapeutic approaches that target tumor angiogenesis and provide a rationale for the selection of specific antiangiogenic gene products as lead candidates for use in gene therapy approaches aimed at the treatment of malignant and ocular disorders. PMID:11274374

  14. Occupational Therapy Contributions in Early Intervention: Implications for Personnel Preparation and Interprofessional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhlenhaupt, Mary; Pizur-Barnekow, Kris; Schefkind, Sandra; Chandler, Barbara; Harvison, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Occupational therapy provides a unique contribution in early intervention programs for families and their children from birth to 3 years old who are at risk for, or who have, identified disabilities. This article describes occupational therapy's distinct value and presents the profession's perspective on services to enhance families' caregiving…

  15. Practical Implications for the Development of Applied Metaphor in Adventure Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartford, Gary

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers the definitions, role, and use of metaphor in adventure therapy. It provides an overview of theoretical perspectives on metaphor and the related ways in which metaphor is used in adventure therapy. Research on the use of metaphor in counselling and from neuropsychology and linguistics is applied to a model of metaphor use in…

  16. Cytokines, angiogenic, and antiangiogenic factors and bioactive lipids in preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Undurti N

    2015-09-01

    Preeclampsia is a low-grade systemic inflammatory condition in which oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction occurs. Plasma levels of soluble receptor for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGFR)-1, also known as sFlt1 (soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1), an antiangiogenic factor have been reported to be elevated in preeclampsia. It was reported that pregnant mice deficient in catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) activity show a preeclampsia-like phenotype due to a deficiency or absence of 2-methoxyoestradiol (2-ME), a natural metabolite of estradiol that is elevated during the third trimester of normal human pregnancy. Additionally, autoantibodies (AT1-AAs) that bind and activate the angiotensin II receptor type 1 a (AT1 receptor) also have a role in preeclampsia. None of these abnormalities are consistently seen in all the patients with preeclampsia and some of them are not specific to pregnancy. Preeclampsia could occur due to an imbalance between pro- and antiangiogenic factors. VEGF, an angiogenic factor, is necessary for the transport of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) to endothelial cells. Hence reduced VEGF levels decrease the availability of PUFAs to endothelial cells. This leads to a decrease in the formation of anti-inflammatory and angiogenic factors: lipoxins, resolvins, protectins, and maresins from PUFAs. Lipoxins, resolvins, protectins, maresins, and PUFAs suppress insulin resistance; activation of leukocytes, platelets, and macrophages; production of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α; and oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction; and enhance production of prostacyclin and nitric oxide (NO). Estrogen enhances the formation of lipoxin A4 and NO. PUFAs also augment the production of NO and inhibit the activity of angiotensin-converting enzyme and antagonize the actions of angiotensin II. Thus, PUFAs can prevent activation of angiotensin II receptor type 1 a (AT1 receptor). Patients with preeclampsia have decreased plasma

  17. Maggot Therapy: The Science and Implication for CAM Part I—History and Bacterial Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Norman Arthur Ratcliffe; Stephen Thomas; Alyson Bexfield; Yamni Nigam

    2006-01-01

    It is now a universally acknowledged fact that maggot therapy can be used successfully to treat chronic, long-standing, infected wounds, which have previously failed to respond to conventional treatment. Such wounds are typically characterized by the presence of necrotic tissue, underlying infection and poor healing. Maggot therapy employs the use of freshly emerged, sterile larvae of the common green-bottle fly, Phaenicia (Lucilia) sericata, and is a form of artificially induced myiasis in a...

  18. Maggot Therapy: The Science and Implication for CAM Part II—Maggots Combat Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Norman Arthur Ratcliffe; Stephen Thomas; Alyson Bexfield; Yamni Nigam

    2006-01-01

    Maggot therapy employs the use of freshly emerged, sterile larvae of the common green-bottle fly, Phaenicia (Lucilia) sericata, and is a form of artificially induced myiasis in a controlled clinical situation. Maggot therapy has the following three core beneficial effects on a wound: debridement, disinfection and enhanced healing. In part II of this review article, we discuss clinical infections and the evidence supporting the potent antibacterial action of maggot secretions. Enhancement of w...

  19. Implication of Cord Blood for Cell-Based Therapy in Refractory Childhood Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Young-Ho

    2010-01-01

    Since cord blood (CB) contains hematopoietic stem cells as well as a mixture of multipotent stem cells, CB has the ability to give rise to hematopoietic, epithelial, endothelial and neural tissues. Recently, the application of cell-based therapy using CB has expanded its clinical utility, particularly, by using autologous CB in children with refractory diseases. This review focuses clinical and pre-clinical application of CB cell-based therapy for inherited metabolic diseases as well as tissu...

  20. RNA Interference Inhibits DUX4-induced Muscle Toxicity In Vivo: Implications for a Targeted FSHD Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lindsay M Wallace; Liu, Jian; Domire, Jacqueline S; Garwick-Coppens, Sara E; Susan M Guckes; Mendell, Jerry R.; Flanigan, Kevin M.; Harper, Scott Q.

    2012-01-01

    No treatment exists for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), one of the most common inherited muscle diseases. Although FSHD can be debilitating, little effort has been made to develop targeted therapies. This lack of focus on targeted FSHD therapy perpetuated because the genes and pathways involved in the disorder were not understood. Now, more than 2 decades after efforts to decipher the root cause of FSHD began, this barrier to translation is finally lowering. Specifically, sever...

  1. A therapist’s perspective of a financial planning course: Implications for financial therapy education and trainings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Ann McCoy

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the autoethnography of a doctoral Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT student studying finances in a graduate course. A dataset in the form of field notes was created through recording observations and reflective journaling during the 15 week financial planning course. This data set included observations and insights on various skills and knowledge that would be helpful for conducting financial therapy, the professional and personal growth of a therapist integrating finances into her clinical work, and evaluations regarding how financial courses can be beneficial for therapists and planners who are interested in the interaction between relational and financial issues. Based on the first author’s experiences, reflections and conversations with the second author, four themes were developed. The themes were: (a Seeing the Unnoticed: Challenging Implicit Assumptions, (b Critically Examining My Own Money Scripts, (c What can Therapists Learn From the Financial Discipline, and (d What Financial Planners can Learn from the Clinical Disciplines. Implications for the burgeoning field of financial therapy are discussed, with special attention given to cross-discipline education and training.

  2. Glucocorticoid Induced Cerebellar Toxicity in the Developing Neonate: Implications for Glucocorticoid Therapy during Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin K. Noguchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prematurely born infants commonly suffer respiratory dysfunction due to the immature state of their lungs. As a result, clinicians often administer glucocorticoid (GC therapy to accelerate lung maturation and reduce inflammation. Unfortunately, several studies have found GC therapy can also produce neuromotor/cognitive deficits and selectively stunt the cerebellum. However, despite its continued use, relatively little is known about how exposure to this hormone might produce neurodevelopmental deficits. In this review, we use rodent and human research to provide evidence that GC therapy may disrupt cerebellar development through the rapid induction of apoptosis in the cerebellar external granule layer (EGL. The EGL is a transient proliferative region responsible for the production of over 90% of the neurons in the cerebellum. During normal development, endogenous GC stimulation is thought to selectively signal the elimination of the EGL once production of new neurons is complete. As a result, GC therapy may precociously eliminate the EGL before it can produce enough neurons for normal cerebellar function. It is hoped that this review may provide information for future clinical research in addition to translational guidance for the safer use of GC therapy.

  3. Vitamins and nutrients as primary treatments in experimental brain injury: Clinical implications for nutraceutical therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonder Haar, Cole; Peterson, Todd C; Martens, Kris M; Hoane, Michael R

    2016-06-01

    With the numerous failures of pharmaceuticals to treat traumatic brain injury in humans, more researchers have become interested in combination therapies. This is largely due to the multimodal nature of damage from injury, which causes excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, edema, neuroinflammation and cell death. Polydrug treatments have the potential to target multiple aspects of the secondary injury cascade, while many previous therapies focused on one particular aspect. Of specific note are vitamins, minerals and nutrients that can be utilized to supplement other therapies. Many of these have low toxicity, are already FDA approved and have minimal interactions with other drugs, making them attractive targets for therapeutics. Over the past 20 years, interest in supplementation and supraphysiologic dosing of nutrients for brain injury has increased and indeed many vitamins and nutrients now have a considerable body of the literature backing their use. Here, we review several of the prominent therapies in the category of nutraceutical treatment for brain injury in experimental models, including vitamins (B2, B3, B6, B9, C, D, E), herbs and traditional medicines (ginseng, Gingko biloba), flavonoids, and other nutrients (magnesium, zinc, carnitine, omega-3 fatty acids). While there is still much work to be done, several of these have strong potential for clinical therapies, particularly with regard to polydrug regimens. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:Brain injury and recovery. PMID:26723564

  4. Current view of the immunopathogenesis in inflammatory bowel disease and its implications for therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MI Torres; A Rios

    2008-01-01

    Although the aetiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) remains unknown, the pathogenesis is gradually being unravelled, seeming to be the result of a combination of environmental, genetic, and immunological factors in which an uncontrolled immune response within the intestinal lumen leads to inflammation in genetically predisposed individuals. Multifactorial evidence suggests that a defect of innate immune response to microbial agents is involved in IBD. This editorial outlines the immunopathogenesis of IBD and their current and future therapy. We present IBD as a result of dysregulated mucosal response in the intestinal wall facilitated by defects in epithelial barrier function and the mucosal immune system with excessive production of cytokines growth factors, adhesion molecules, and reactive oxygen metabolites, resulting in tissue injury. Established and evolving therapies are discussed in the second part of this editorial and at the end of this section we review new therapies to modulate the immune system in patients with IBD.

  5. The assessment of personality disorders : Implications for cognitive and behavior therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanVelzen, CJM; Emmelkamp, PMG

    1996-01-01

    This article reviews the comorbidity of personality disorders (PDs) and Axis I disorders and discusses implications for assessment and treatment. Pros and cons of various assessment methods are discussed. The co-occurrence of PDs with Axis I disorders is considerable; roughly half of patients with a

  6. Androgen Induces Adaptation to Oxidative Stress in Prostate Cancer: Implications for Treatment with Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jehonathan H. Pinthus

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is a standard treatment for prostate cancer (PC. The postulated mechanism of action for radiation therapy is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Adjuvant androgen deprivation (AD therapy has been shown to confer a survival advantage over radiation alone in high-risk localized PC. However, the mechanism of this interaction is unclear. We hypothesize that androgens modify the radioresponsiveness of PC through the regulation of cellular oxidative homeostasis. Using androgen receptor (AR+ 22rv1 and AR− PC3 human PC cell lines, we demonstrated that testosterone increased basal reactive oxygen species (bROS levels, resulting in dose-dependent activation of phospho-p38 and pAKT, increased expression of clusterin, catalase, manganese superoxide dismutase. Similar data were obtained in three human PC xenografts; WISH-PC14, WISH-PC23, CWR22, growing in testosterone-supplemented or castrated SCID mice. These effects were reversible through AD or through incubation with a reducing agent. Moreover, testosterone increased the activity of catalase, superoxide dismutases, glutathione reductase. Consequently, AD significantly facilitated the response of AR+ cells to oxidative stress challenge. Thus, testosterone induces a preset cellular adaptation to radiation through the generation of elevated bROS, which is modified by AD. These findings provide a rational for combined hormonal and radiation therapy for localized PC.

  7. Effects of Drawing on Alpha Activity: A Quantitative EEG Study with Implications for Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkofer, Christopher M.; Van Hecke, Amy Vaughan; Konopka, Lukasz M.

    2014-01-01

    Little empirical evidence exists as to how materials used in art therapy affect the brain and its neurobiological functioning. This pre/post within-groups study utilized the quantitative electroencephalogram (qEEG) to measure residual effects in the brain after 20 minutes of drawing. EEG recordings were conducted before and after participants (N =…

  8. Colorectal cancer stem cells : regulation of the phenotype and implications for therapy resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Emmink, B.L.

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis different aspects of cancer stem cells in colorectal cancer are discribed. We focus on the therapy resistance of cancer stem cells and the effect that reactive oxygen species and hypoxia have on the cancer stem cell phenotype. For this purpose a novel culture method to propagate cancer stem cells form resected tumor specimens was used.

  9. Gene therapy of liver cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruben Hernandez-Alcoceba; Bruno Sangro; Jesus Prieto

    2006-01-01

    The application of gene transfer technologies to the treatment of cancer has led to the development of new experimental approaches like gene directed enzyme/prodrug therapy (GDEPT), inhibition of oncogenes and restoration of tumor-suppressor genes. In addition,gene therapy has a big impact on other fields like cancer immunotherapy, anti-angiogenic therapy and virotherapy.These strategies are being evaluated for the treatment of primary and metastatic liver cancer and some of them have reached clinical phases. We present a review on the basis and the actual status of gene therapy approaches applied to liver cancer.

  10. Implications and considerations of thermal effects when applying irreversible electroporation tissue ablation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davalos, Rafael V; Bhonsle, Suyashree; Neal, Robert E

    2015-07-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) describes a cellular response to electric field exposure, resulting in the formation of nanoscale defects that can lead to cell death. While this behavior occurs independently of thermally-induced processes, therapeutic ablation of targeted tissues with IRE uses a series of brief electric pulses, whose parameters result in secondary Joule heating of the tissue. Where contemporary clinical pulse protocols use aggressive energy regimes, additional evidence is supplementing original studies that assert care must be taken in clinical ablation protocols to ensure the cumulative thermal effects do not induce damage that will alter outcomes for therapies using the IRE non-thermal cell death process for tissue ablation. In this letter, we seek to clarify the nomenclature regarding IRE as a non-thermal ablation technique, as well as identify existing literature that uses experimental, clinical, and numerical results to discretely address and evaluate the thermal considerations relevant when applying IRE in clinical scenarios, including several approaches for reducing these effects. Existing evidence in the literature describes cell response to electric fields, suggesting cell death from IRE is a unique process, independent from traditional thermal damage. Numerical simulations, as well as preclinical and clinical findings demonstrate the ability to deliver therapeutic IRE ablation without occurrence of morbidity associated with thermal therapies. Clinical IRE therapy generates thermal effects, which may moderate the non-thermal aspects of IRE ablation. Appropriate protocol development, utilization, and pulse delivery devices may be implemented to restrain these effects and maintain IRE as the vastly predominant tissue death modality, reducing therapy-mitigating thermal damage. Clinical applications of IRE should consider thermal effects and employ protocols to ensure safe and effective therapy delivery. PMID:25809014

  11. Antiangiogenic activity of 2-deoxy-D-glucose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime R Merchan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During tumor angiogenesis, endothelial cells (ECs are engaged in a number of energy consuming biological processes, such as proliferation, migration, and capillary formation. Since glucose uptake and metabolism are increased to meet this energy need, the effects of the glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG on in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis were investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In cell culture, 2-DG inhibited EC growth, induced cytotoxicity, blocked migration, and inhibited actively forming but not established endothelial capillaries. Surprisingly, 2-DG was a better inhibitor of these EC properties than two more efficacious glycolytic inhibitors, 2-fluorodeoxy-D-glucose and oxamate. As an alternative to a glycolytic inhibitory mechanism, we considered 2-DG's ability to interfere with endothelial N-linked glycosylation. 2-DG's effects were reversed by mannose, an N-linked glycosylation precursor, and at relevant concentrations 2-DG also inhibited synthesis of the lipid linked oligosaccharide (LLO N-glycosylation donor in a mannose-reversible manner. Inhibition of LLO synthesis activated the unfolded protein response (UPR, which resulted in induction of GADD153/CHOP and EC apoptosis (TUNEL assay. Thus, 2-DG's effects on ECs appeared primarily due to inhibition of LLOs synthesis, not glycolysis. 2-DG was then evaluated in two mouse models, inhibiting angiogenesis in both the matrigel plug assay and the LH(BETAT(AG transgenic retinoblastoma model. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, 2-DG inhibits endothelial cell angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo, at concentrations below those affecting tumor cells directly, most likely by interfering with N-linked glycosylation rather than glycolysis. Our data underscore the importance of glucose metabolism on neovascularization, and demonstrate a novel approach for anti-angiogenic strategies.

  12. Antioxidant and antiangiogenic activities of the essential oils of Myristica fragrans and Morinda citrifolia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suthagar Pillai Piaru; Roziahanim Mahmud; Amin Malik Shah Abdul Majid; Zeyad Daoud Mahmoud Nassar

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective:Toinvestigate the anti-angiogenic activity and antioxidant properties ofMyristica fragrans (M. fragrans) (nutmeg) andMorinda citrifolia (M. citrifolia)(mengkudu) oils. Methods: The nutmeg and megkudu essential oils were obtained by steam distillation. The antioxidant activities of both essential oils were determined by beta-carotene/linoleic acid bleaching assay and reducing power while the anti-angiogenic activity was investigated using rat aortic ring assay using various concentrations.Results:The results showed that nutmeg oil has higher antioxidant activity than mengkudu oil. The nutmeg oil effectively inhibited the oxidation of linoleic acid with (88.68±0.1)% while the inhibition percentage of oxidation of linoleic acid of the mengkudu oil is (69.44±0.4)%. The nutmeg oil and mengkudu oil showed reducing power with anEC50 value of 181.4 μg/mL and 3 043.0μg/mL, respectively. The antiangiogenic activity of nutmeg oil showed significant antiangiogenic activity withIC50 of77.64μg/mL comparing to mengkudu oil which exhibits IC50 of109.30 μg/mL.Conclusion: Bioactive compound(s) will be isolated from the nutmeg essential oil to be developed as antiangiogenic drugs.

  13. Bone marrow derived myeloid cells orchestrate antiangiogenic resistance in glioblastoma through coordinated molecular networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achyut, B R; Shankar, Adarsh; Iskander, A S M; Ara, Roxan; Angara, Kartik; Zeng, Peng; Knight, Robert A; Scicli, Alfonso G; Arbab, Ali S

    2015-12-28

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a hypervascular and malignant form of brain tumors. Anti-angiogenic therapies (AAT) were used as an adjuvant against VEGF-VEGFR pathway to normalize blood vessels in clinical and preclinical studies, which resulted into marked hypoxia and recruited bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs) to the tumor microenvironment (TME). In vivo animal models to track BMDCs and investigate molecular mechanisms in AAT resistance are rare. We exploited recently established chimeric mouse to develop orthotopic U251 tumor, which uses as low as 5 × 10(6) GFP+ BM cells in athymic nude mice and engrafted >70% GFP+ cells within 14 days. Our unpublished data and published studies have indicated the involvement of immunosuppressive myeloid cells in therapeutic resistance in glioma. Similarly, in the present study, vatalanib significantly increased CD68+ myeloid cells, and CD133+, CD34+ and Tie2+ endothelial cell signatures. Therefore, we tested inhibition of CSF1R+ myeloid cells using GW2580 that reduced tumor growth by decreasing myeloid (Gr1+ CD11b+ and F4/80+) and angiogenic (CD202b+ and VEGFR2+) cell signatures in TME. CSF1R blockade significantly decreased inflammatory, proangiogenic and immunosuppressive molecular signatures compared to vehicle, vatalanib or combination. TCK1 or CXCL7, a potent chemoattractant and activator of neutrophils, was observed as most significantly decreased cytokine in CSF1R blockade. ERK MAPK pathway was involved in cytokine network regulation. In conclusion, present study confirmed the contribution of myeloid cells in GBM development and therapeutic resistance using chimeric mouse model. We identified novel molecular networks including CXCL7 chemokine as a promising target for future studies. Nonetheless, survival studies are required to assess the beneficial effect of CSF1R blockade. PMID:26404753

  14. In vitro and in vivo study of hydralazine, a potential anti-angiogenic agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Quanwei; Lin, Zhexuan; Yin, Xiukai; Tang, Lingzhi; Luo, Hongjun; Li, Hui; Zhang, Yuan; Luo, Wenhong

    2016-05-15

    Hydralazine (HYD), an old routine clinical anti-hypertension drug, is rarely used in clinic nowadays. Since the strategy of repositioning old drugs was put forward, HYD has been reported to possess various biological activities, including antitumor efficacy and reducing intra-tumor microvessel. Here, we investigated that whether HYD had the ability of anti-angiogeneis and its underlying mechanism. Cells proliferation, wound-healing, Transwell migration and invasion, tube formation and rat aortic ring assays in vitro and chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model in vivo were designed to investigated HYD's anti-angiogenic effect. Levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) were assessed by enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA). Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) mice model was used to evaluate HYD's effect on tumor growth and microvessel density. Our results showed that HYD not only inhibited human umbilical vascular endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation, wound-healing, Transwell migration and invasion and tube formation, but also suppressed the microvessel outgrowth of rat aortic ring in vitro and the neovascularzation of CAM in vivo. Furthermore, we demonstrated that HYD attenuated tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth. In the co-culture system of Transwell migration, the secretion of VEGF and bFGF was reduced by HYD respectively. In sum, our data indicate that HYD has the pharmacological effect of ant-angiogenesis by interference with VEGF and bFGF signaling pathways in endothelial cells. These findings suggest that HYD might be a promising angiogenesis inhibitor and a potential effective therapeutic agent for cancer therapy. PMID:26968484

  15. Signaling pathways regulating Homer1a expression: implications for antidepressant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serchov, Tsvetan; Heumann, Rolf; van Calker, Dietrich; Biber, Knut

    2016-03-01

    Homer1a is upregulated by several different antidepressant measures, including non-pharmacological treatments, like sleep deprivation (SD) and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and antidepressant drugs, such as imipramine, fluoxetine and ketamine. Homer1a induction might thus be a crucial joint mechanism for antidepressant therapy in general. However, the upstream signaling pathways that regulate or induce Homer1a expression are still not well understood. The main focus of the present review is to offer an overview of the current knowledge about the potential role of Homer1a in depression and the signaling pathways responsible for Homer1a regulation. It is suggested here that a detailed characterization of the signaling mechanisms leading to Homer1a expression might provide novel therapeutic targets for antidepressant drug development. PMID:26641965

  16. Chronic plantar fasciitis is mediated by local hemodynamics: Implications for emerging therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry E Miller

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Plantar fasciitis (PF is a common, disabling condition affecting millions of patients each year. With early diagnosis and timely application of traditional nonsurgical treatments, symptoms generally resolve over time. However, despite adequate treatment, 20% of patients will experience persistent symptoms. In these patients, minimally invasive therapies that augment local hemodynamics to initiate a regenerative tissue-healing cascade have the greatest potential to resolve long-standing symptoms. We performed a narrative review based on a best evidence evaluation of manuscripts published in Medline-indexed journals to determine the mechanisms involved in soft tissue injury and healing. This evaluation also highlights emerging minimally invasive therapies that exploit these mechanisms in recalcitrant PF.

  17. Implications of silver nanoparticle induced cell apoptosis for in vitro gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impact of manufactured nanomaterials on human health and the environment is a major concern for commercial use of nanotechnology based products. A judicious choice of selective usage, lower nanomaterial concentration and use in combination with conventional therapeutic materials may provide the best solution. For example, silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) are known to be bactericidal and also cytotoxic to mammalian cells. Herein, we investigate the molecular mechanism of Ag NP mediated cytotoxicity in both cancer and non-cancer cells and find that optimum particle concentration leads to programmed cell death in vitro. Also, the benefit of the cytotoxic effects of Ag NPs was tested for therapeutic use in conjunction with conventional gene therapy. The synergistic effect of Ag NPs on the uracil phosphoribosyltransferase expression system sensitized the cells more towards treatment with the drug 5-fluorouracil. Induction of the apoptotic pathway makes Ag NPs a representative of a new chemosensitization strategy for future application in gene therapy

  18. VEGF neutralizing aerosol therapy in primary pulmonary adenocarcinoma with K-ras activating-mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Hervé, Virginie; Rabbe, Nathalie; Guilleminault, Laurent; Paul, Flora; Schlick, Laurène; Azzopardi, Nicolas; Duruisseaux, Michael; Fouquenet, Delphine; Montharu, Jérôme; Redini, Françoise; Paintaud, Gilles; Lemarié, Etienne; Cadranel, Jacques; Wislez, Marie; Heuzé-Vourc’h, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    K-ras mutations promote angiogenesis in lung cancer and contribute to the drug resistance of cancer cells. It is not clear whether K-ras mutated adenocarcinomas are sensitive to anti-angiogenic therapy with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Anti-angiogenic mAbs are usually delivered systemically, but only a small proportion reaches the lung after intravenous injection. We investigated the relevance of a non-invasive pulmonary route for the del...

  19. Convergence of normal stem cell and cancer stem cell developmental stage: Implication for differential therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Shengwen Calvin Li; Lee, Katherine L.; Jane Luo; Jiang F. Zhong; William G Loudon

    2011-01-01

    Increased evidence shows that normal stem cells may contribute to cancer development and progression by acting as cancer-initiating cells through their interactions with abnormal environmental elements. We postulate that normal stem cells and cancer stem cells (CSC) possess similar mechanisms of self-renewal and differentiation. CSC can be the key to the elaboration of anti-cancer-based therapy. In this article, we focus on a controversial new theme relating to CSC. Tumorigenesis may have a c...

  20. Chronic plantar fasciitis is mediated by local hemodynamics: Implications for emerging therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Larry E; Latt, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis (PF) is a common, disabling condition affecting millions of patients each year. With early diagnosis and timely application of traditional nonsurgical treatments, symptoms generally resolve over time. However, despite adequate treatment, 20% of patients will experience persistent symptoms. In these patients, minimally invasive therapies that augment local hemodynamics to initiate a regenerative tissue-healing cascade have the greatest potential to resolve long-standing sympt...

  1. Underlying neural mechanisms of mirror therapy: Implications for motor rehabilitation in stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Kamal Narayan Arya

    2016-01-01

    Mirror therapy (MT) is a valuable method for enhancing motor recovery in poststroke hemiparesis. The technique utilizes the mirror-illusion created by the movement of sound limb that is perceived as the paretic limb. MT is a simple and economical technique than can stimulate the brain noninvasively. The intervention unquestionably has neural foundation. But the underlying neural mechanisms inducing motor recovery are still unclear. In this review, the neural-modulation due to MT has been expl...

  2. Spontaneous remission in canine myasthenia gravis: implications for assessing human MG therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, G D; Lindstrom, J M

    2001-12-11

    The natural course of autoimmune canine MG was determined in 53 dogs with muscular weakness and a positive acetylcholine receptor antibody titer. Dogs were treated with anticholinesterase therapy, without immunosuppression. Spontaneous clinical and immunologic remission occurred in 47 of 53 dogs within an average of 6.4 months. Neoplasia was identified in the six dogs that did not spontaneously remit. This study questions the value of using canine MG in studies designed to assess the effect of immunotherapies. PMID:11739846

  3. Pathologic Assessment of Rectal Carcinoma after Neoadjuvant Radio(chemo)therapy: Prognostic Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Monirath Hav; Louis Libbrecht; Liesbeth Ferdinande; Karen Geboes; Piet Pattyn; Cuvelier, Claude A.

    2015-01-01

    Neoadjuvant radio(chemo)therapy is increasingly used in rectal cancer and induces a number of morphologic changes that affect prognostication after curative surgery, thereby creating new challenges for surgical pathologists, particularly in evaluating morphologic changes and tumour response to preoperative treatment. Surgical pathologists play an important role in determining the many facets of rectal carcinoma patient care after neoadjuvant treatment. These range from proper handling of macr...

  4. Organized proteomic heterogeneity in colorectal liver metastases and implications for therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Turtoi, Andrei; Blomme, Arnaud; Debois, Delphine; Somja, Joan; De Pauw, Edwin; Detry, Olivier; Castronovo, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction : Tumor heterogeneity is a major obstacle for developing effective anti-cancer treatments. Recent studies have pointed at large stochastic genetic heterogeneity within cancer lesions, where no pattern seems to exist that would enable a more structured targeted therapy approach. Aim : Because to date no similar information is available at the protein (phenotype) level, we aimed at characterising the proteomic heterogeneity in human colorectal carcinoma (CRC) liver metastases. ...

  5. Comorbid ADHD: Implications for Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy of Youth with a Specific Phobia

    OpenAIRE

    Halldorsdottir, Thorhildur

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Although findings have been mixed, accumulating evidence suggests that co-occurring attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnoses and symptoms negatively predict cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) outcomes for anxious youth. The current study extends past research by examining the association of not only ADHD but also other features of ADHD with treatment outcomes of youth who received an intensive CBT for a specific phobia. Method: 135 youth (ages 6-15; 52.2% female; 8...

  6. Mind-Body Therapies: Evidence and Implications in Advanced Oncology Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Mayden,, Kelley D.

    2012-01-01

    The idea that thoughts and emotions influence health outcomes is an ancient concept that was initially abandoned by Western medicine researchers. Today, researchers are showing a renewed interest in the interactions of the mind and body and the role these interactions play in disease formation and recovery. Complementary and alternative interventions, such as mind-body therapies, are increasingly being used by cancer survivors for disease prevention, immune system enhancement, and symptom con...

  7. Cancer cell resistance to AURK-directed therapy: implications for anti-cancer strategies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrabáková, Rita; Kollareddy, M.; Mairychová, Kateřina; Halada, Petr; Hajduch, M.; Kovářová, Hana

    Praha: Institute of Animal Physiology and Genetics ASCR, v. v. i, 2011. s. 23-23. [5th Central and Eastern European Proteomics Conference.. 19.09.2011-22.9.2011, Praha] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07017 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : drug resistance * anti-cancer therapy * proteomics * biomarker Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  8. Animal models of Huntington's disease: implications in uncovering pathogenic mechanisms and developing therapies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin-hui WANG; Zheng-hong QIN

    2006-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder, which is caused by an abnormal expansion of Cytosine Adenine Guanine (CAG) trinucleotide repeat in the gene making huntingtin (Htt). Despite intensive research efforts devoted to investigate molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis, effective therapy for this devastating disease is still not available at present. The development of various animal models of HD has offered alternative approaches in the study of HD molecular pathology. Many HD models, including chemical-induced models and genetic models, mimic some aspects of HD symptoms and pathology. To date, however, there is no ideal model which replicates all of the essential features of neuropathology and progressive motor and cognitive impairments of human HD. As a result, our understanding of molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis in HD is still limited. A new model is needed in order to uncover the pathogenesis and to develop novel therapies for HD. In this review we discussed usefulness and limitations of various animal and cellular models of HD in uncovering molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis and developing novel therapies for HD.

  9. New perspectives on the theory of justice: implications for physical therapy ethics and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Ian; Delany, Clare M; Townsend, Anne F; Swisher, Laura Lee

    2011-11-01

    Recent revisions of physical therapy codes of ethics have included a new emphasis concerning health inequities and social injustice. This emphasis reflects the growing evidence regarding the importance of social determinants of health, epidemiological trends for health service delivery, and the enhanced participation of physical therapists in shaping health care reform in a number of international contexts. This perspective article suggests that there is a "disconnect" between the societal obligations and aspirations expressed in the revised codes and the individualist ethical frameworks that predominantly underpin them. Primary health care is an approach to health care arising from an understanding of the nexus between health and social disadvantage that considers the health needs of patients as expressive of the health needs of the communities of which they are members. It is proposed that re-thinking ethical frameworks expressed in codes of ethics can both inform and underpin practical strategies for working in primary health care. This perspective article provides a new focus on the ethical principle of justice: the ethical principle that arguably remains the least consensually understood and developed in the ethics literature of physical therapy. A relatively recent theory of justice known as the "capability approach to justice" is discussed, along with its potential to assist physical therapy practitioners to further develop moral agency in order to address situations of health inequity and social injustice in clinical practice. PMID:21885447

  10. RNA interference inhibits DUX4-induced muscle toxicity in vivo: implications for a targeted FSHD therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Lindsay M; Liu, Jian; Domire, Jacqueline S; Garwick-Coppens, Sara E; Guckes, Susan M; Mendell, Jerry R; Flanigan, Kevin M; Harper, Scott Q

    2012-07-01

    No treatment exists for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), one of the most common inherited muscle diseases. Although FSHD can be debilitating, little effort has been made to develop targeted therapies. This lack of focus on targeted FSHD therapy perpetuated because the genes and pathways involved in the disorder were not understood. Now, more than 2 decades after efforts to decipher the root cause of FSHD began, this barrier to translation is finally lowering. Specifically, several recent studies support an FSHD pathogenesis model involving overexpression of the myopathic DUX4 gene. DUX4 inhibition has therefore emerged as a promising therapeutic strategy for FSHD. In this study, we tested a preclinical RNA interference (RNAi)-based DUX4 gene silencing approach as a prospective treatment for FSHD. We found that adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector-delivered therapeutic microRNAs corrected DUX4-associated myopathy in mouse muscle. These results provide proof-of-principle for RNAi therapy of FSHD through DUX4 inhibition. PMID:22508491

  11. Prostate Cancer and Li-Fraumeni Syndrome: Implications for Screening and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colleen K. Spees

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Li-Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder associated with mutations in the TP53 gene and characterized by a propensity to develop a variety of malignancies resulting in a shortened lifespan. We report a case of prostate cancer in a 50 year old male with LFS. Experimental studies suggest that TP53 mutations in prostate cancer are associated with therapeutic resistance to radiation, chemotherapy, and anti-androgens, implying that LFS men may experience more aggressive cancer biology with implications for therapeutic decisions. The potential of prostate cancer to develop earlier in LFS favors institution of screening at earlier ages.

  12. Music-evoked emotions: principles, brain correlates, and implications for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelsch, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes principles underlying the evocation of emotion with music: evaluation, resonance, memory, expectancy/tension, imagination, understanding, and social functions. Each of these principles includes several subprinciples, and the framework on music-evoked emotions emerging from these principles and subprinciples is supposed to provide a starting point for a systematic, coherent, and comprehensive theory on music-evoked emotions that considers both reception and production of music, as well as the relevance of emotion-evoking principles for music therapy. PMID:25773635

  13. Impact of Metronomic UFT/Cyclophosphamide Chemotherapy and Antiangiogenic Drug Assessed in a New Preclinical Model of Locally Advanced Orthotopic Hepatocellular Carcinoma

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    Terence C. Tang

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is an intrinsically chemotherapy refractory malignancy. Development of effective therapeutic regimens would be facilitated by improved preclinical HCC models. Currently, most models consist of subcutaneous human tumor transplants in immunodeficient mice; however, these do not reproduce the extensive liver disease associated with HCC or metastasize. To address this deficiency, we developed an orthotopic model. Human HCC cells were transfected with the gene encoding secretable β-subunit human choriogonadotropin (β-hCG, which was used as a surrogate marker of tumor burden. The HCC cells were implanted into the left liver lobe of severe combined immunodeficient (SCID mice, after which the efficacy of different therapies was evaluated on established, but liver-confined human Hep3B cell line HCC. Treatments included sorafenib or metronomic chemotherapy using cyclophosphamide (CTX, UFT, an oral 5-fluorouracil prodrug, or doxorubicin either alone or in various combinations, with or without an antiangiogenic agent, DC101, an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 antibody. Sorafenib inhibited tumor growth in a dose-dependent manner but caused severe weight loss in SCID mice, thus necessitating use of DC101 in subsequent experiments. Although less toxicity was observed using either single or doublet metronomic chemotherapy without any added antiangiogenic agent, none, provided survival benefit. In contrast, significantly improved overall survival was observed using various combinations of metronomic chemotherapy regimens such as UFT + CTX with DC101. In conclusion, using this model of liver-confined but advanced HCC suggests that the efficacy of a targeted antiangiogenic drug or metronomic chemotherapy can be mutually enhanced by concurrent combination treatment.

  14. Self-reactive CFTR T cells in humans: implications for gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcedo, Roberto; Griesenbach, Uta; Dorgan, Daniel J; Soussi, Samia; Boyd, A Christopher; Davies, Jane C; Higgins, Tracy E; Hyde, Stephen C; Gill, Deborah R; Innes, J Alastair; Porteous, David J; Alton, Eric W; Wilson, James M; Limberis, Maria P

    2013-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the most common autosomal recessive lethal disorders affecting white populations of northern European ancestry. To date there is no cure for CF. Life-long treatments for CF are being developed and include gene therapy and the use of small-molecule drugs designed to target specific cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations. Irrespective of the type of molecular therapy for CF, which may include gene replacement, exon skipping, nonsense suppression, or molecular correctors, because all of these modulate gene expression there is an inherent risk of activation of T cells against the wild-type version of CFTR. Here we report the validation of the human interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunospot assay and its application for the analysis of CFTR-specific T cell responses in patients with CF and in non-CF subjects. We found non-CF subjects with low levels of self-reactive CFTR-specific T cells in the United States and several patients with CF with low to high levels of self-reactive CFTR-specific T cells in both the United States and the United Kingdom. PMID:23790242

  15. Rectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease: natural history and implications for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: There exists little information concerning the natural history of rectal cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In addition, the tolerance of pelvic irradiation in these patients is unknown. We analyzed the largest series of patients with IBD and rectal cancer in order to determine the natural history of the disease as well as the effect and tolerance of pelvic irradiation. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of 47 patients with IBD and rectal cancer treated over a 34-year period (1960-1994) was performed. Thirty-five patients had ulcerative colitis and 12 patients had Crohn's disease. There were 31 male patients and 16 female patients. The stage (AJC) distribution was as follows: stage 0 in 5 patients, stage I in 13 patients, stage II in 7 patients, stage III in 13 patients, and stage IV in 9 patients. Surgical resection was performed in 44 patients. In two of these patients, preoperative pelvic irradiation was given followed by surgery. Twenty of these patients underwent postoperative adjuvant therapy (12 were treated with chemotherapy and pelvic irradiation and 8 with chemotherapy alone). Three patients were found to have unresectable disease and were treated with chemotherapy alone (2 patients) or chemotherapy and radiation therapy (RT) (1 patient). Radiation complications were graded using the RTOG acute and late effects scoring criteria. Follow-up ranged from 4 to 250 months (median 24 months). Results: The 5-year actuarial results revealed an overall survival (OS) of 42%, a disease-free survival (DFS) of 43%, a pelvic control rate (PC) of 67% and a freedom from distant failure (FFDF) of 47%. DFS decreased with increasing T stage with a 5-year rate of 86% for patients with Tis-T2 disease compared to 10% for patients with T3-T4 disease (p ) were noted in three patients (20%) receiving pelvic irradiation ± chemotherapy and these included two cases of grade 3 skin reactions and one case of grade 4 gastrointestinal

  16. Molecular signatures of maturing dendritic cells: implications for testing the quality of dendritic cell therapies

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    Wang Ena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dendritic cells (DCs are often produced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and interleukin-4 (IL-4 stimulation of monocytes. To improve the effectiveness of DC adoptive immune cancer therapy, many different agents have been used to mature DCs. We analyzed the kinetics of DC maturation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS and interferon-γ (IFN-γ induction in order to characterize the usefulness of mature DCs (mDCs for immune therapy and to identify biomarkers for assessing the quality of mDCs. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected from 6 healthy subjects by apheresis, monocytes were isolated by elutriation, and immature DCs (iDCs were produced by 3 days of culture with GM-CSF and IL-4. The iDCs were sampled after 4, 8 and 24 hours in culture with LPS and IFN-γ and were then assessed by flow cytometry, ELISA, and global gene and microRNA (miRNA expression analysis. Results After 24 hours of LPS and IFN-γ stimulation, DC surface expression of CD80, CD83, CD86, and HLA Class II antigens were up-regulated. Th1 attractant genes such as CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11 and CCL5 were up-regulated during maturation but not Treg attractants such as CCL22 and CXCL12. The expression of classical mDC biomarker genes CD83, CCR7, CCL5, CCL8, SOD2, MT2A, OASL, GBP1 and HES4 were up-regulated throughout maturation while MTIB, MTIE, MTIG, MTIH, GADD45A and LAMP3 were only up-regulated late in maturation. The expression of miR-155 was up-regulated 8-fold in mDCs. Conclusion DCs, matured with LPS and IFN-γ, were characterized by increased levels of Th1 attractants as opposed to Treg attractants and may be particularly effective for adoptive immune cancer therapy.

  17. The Role of Nephrectomy for Kidney Cancer in the Era of Targeted and Immune Therapies.

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    Vaishampayan, Ulka N

    2016-01-01

    Although two phase III trials support the recommendation of nephrectomy followed by interferon alpha in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC), this procedure cannot be applied to every patient with this condition. Systemic therapy has changed from interferon alpha to antiangiogenic-targeted therapy, and the clinical impact of nephrectomy in the era of targeted therapy has not been proven. The SEER database shows that only 35% of patients with advanced RCC undergo nephrectomy as their initial treatment. Retrospective studies showed improved overall survival (OS) outcomes with nephrectomy and interleukin-2 (IL-2) therapy; however, the inherent selection bias of younger and healthier patients receiving IL-2 likely accounts for this finding. Neoadjuvant therapy has demonstrated only modest efficacy in unresectable disease, and if remission is obtained with systemic therapy, it is unclear whether nephrectomy has any incremental benefit. In the absence of proven benefit of nephrectomy in the setting of targeted therapy, it seems advisable for patients with RCC with severely symptomatic disease, competing comorbidities, poor performance status, or unresectable disease to avoid nephrectomy and proceed directly to systemic therapy. The clinical implications of deferred cytoreductive nephrectomy for patients with metastatic RCC are poorly understood, and patient cohorts that do not undergo this procedure are likely to be comprised of patients with unfavorable disease characteristics. Unfortunately, the completed trials of targeted therapy were 90% comprised of patients with prior nephrectomy (the majority of trials incorporate prior nephrectomy as an eligibility requirement) and hence may not reflect the outcomes of the majority of the patients with advanced RCC who have not undergone nephrectomy. Newer therapies such as nivolumab and cabozantinib have also been evaluated for a population in which 90% of the patients underwent nephrectomy. Future clinical trials and registry

  18. Bystander effects and their implications for clinical radiation therapy: Insights from multiscale in silico experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powathil, Gibin G; Munro, Alastair J; Chaplain, Mark A J; Swat, Maciej

    2016-07-21

    Radiotherapy is a commonly used treatment for cancer and is usually given in varying doses. At low radiation doses relatively few cells die as a direct response to radiation but secondary radiation effects, such as DNA mutation or bystander phenomena, may affect many cells. Consequently it is at low radiation levels where an understanding of bystander effects is essential in designing novel therapies with superior clinical outcomes. In this paper, we use a hybrid multiscale mathematical model to study the direct effects of radiation as well as radiation-induced bystander effects on both tumour cells and normal cells. We show that bystander responses play a major role in mediating radiation damage to cells at low-doses of radiotherapy, doing more damage than that due to direct radiation. The survival curves derived from our computational simulations showed an area of hyper-radiosensitivity at low-doses that are not obtained using a traditional radiobiological model. PMID:27084360

  19. Implication of stem cells in the biology and therapy of head and neck cancer [

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    Wollenberg, Barbara

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available [english] The progress which has been made in the therapy of patients with head and neck cancer in recent years mainly concern the HPV associated HNSCC and the quality of life. The overall survival of patients carrying non HPV associated HNSCC during the last thirty years has not experienced any significant improvement and must be referred to as static , . The problem of the illness remains unchanged in the frequent and poorly controllable relapse situation. The locoregionally originating tumours or lymph node metastases show a considerably poorer response towards current therapies. Likewise for a number of patients a formation of distant metastases seems to develop during the course of the illness. Those distant metastases are also therapeutically rather difficult to control. Therefore the mortality of the non HPV induced head and neck cancer remains unchanged. The term “stem cell” describes the entity cell, which acts as a reservoir for new cells in order to replace defective or necrotic cells. A fundamental characteristic of stem cells is the constant ability to multiply into different type of cells, which subsequently do not proliferate. With the insight of new knowledge within the regenerative medicine and the ability of stem cells of self regenerating proliferation and their multipotency in the differentiation, the origin of cancer attains a new distinction. If you look on the tumour as a malignant wound it becomes obvious, that the regeneration or the composition of additional tissue depends on the presence and differentiation of stem cells. The wound healing, which is a regeneration of tissue depends not only on stationary stem cells. In fact stem cells are attracted for “homing” in the defective areas by despatch of various messengers, which then form and replace the vascular tree or other tissue , .Next to those stem cells, which functionally help to form tumour tissue, a small entity of “real cancer stem cells” in solid

  20. Nonlinear Growth Kinetics of Breast Cancer Stem Cells: Implications for Cancer Stem Cell Targeted Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinfeng; Johnson, Sara; Liu, Shou; Kanojia, Deepak; Yue, Wei; Singn, Udai; Wang, Qian; Wang, Qi; Nie, Qing; Chen, Hexin

    2013-08-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in primary breast cancer tissues and cell lines. The CSC population varies widely among cancerous tissues and cell lines, and is often associated with aggressive breast cancers. Despite of intensive research, how the CSC population is regulated within a tumor is still not well understood so far. In this paper, we present a mathematical model to explore the growth kinetics of CSC population both in vitro and in vivo. Our mathematical models and supporting experiments suggest that there exist non-linear growth kinetics of CSCs and negative feedback mechanisms to control the balance between the population of CSCs and that of non-stem cancer cells. The model predictions can help us explain a few long-standing questions in the field of cancer stem cell research, and can be potentially used to predict the efficicacy of anti-cancer therapy.

  1. Modulation of Apoptotic Pathways by Human Papillomaviruses (HPV: Mechanisms and Implications for Therapy

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    Chung-Hsiang Yuan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The ability of the host to trigger apoptosis in infected cells is perhaps the most powerful tool by which viruses can be cleared from the host organism. To avoid elimination by this mechanism, human papillomaviruses (HPV have developed several mechanisms that enable the cells they infect to elude both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis. In this manuscript, we review the current literature regarding how HPV-infected cells avoid apoptosis and the molecular mechanisms involved in these events. In particular, we will discuss the modifications in intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways caused by proteins encoded by HPV early genes. Many of the current efforts regarding anti-cancer drug development are focused on directing tumor cells to undergo apoptosis. However, the ability of HPV-infected cells to resist apoptotic signals renders such therapies ineffective. Possible mechanisms for overcoming the resistance of HPV-infected tumor cells to anticancer drugs will be discussed.

  2. Inflammatory bowel disease. Current concepts of pathogenesis and implications for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocchi, C

    2002-09-01

    . Cytokines, chemokines and other soluble factors dominate immunological studies aimed at understanding how different anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory mediators are improperly regulated and how immune imbalance can be restored. The extent to which T-cells live or die is also a key determinant of chronicity. In addition to classical immune cells, epithelial, endothelial, mesenchymal and nerve cells are slowly gaining more importance in IBD pathogenesis, as they contribute to the ultimate fate of tissue damage. Medical and surgical therapies are vastly better now that they were only a couple of decades ago, but they are still far from satisfactory. Steroid and aminosalicylates are still the most common drugs after 60 years of use, and it is time to renovate our therapeutic approach to a more effective one. The value of biologicals has been highlighted by the recent success of anti-TNF therapy. Timing of therapy must also change. The concept of the step-by-step approach is slowly fading away, and the idea of an ''all-out'' approach with multiple concomitant drugs early in the disease is gaining credibility. New reports on early aggressive therapies, and the demonstration that early and late experimental IBD are caused by different mechanisms are changing the way we think about managing IBD. Both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease will continue to challenge the medical establishment for year to come, but the possibility that IBD can be conquered is more realistic now that never before. PMID:16491045

  3. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells as intruders and targets: clinical implications in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baniyash, Michal

    2016-07-01

    Chronic inflammation, typical of various diseases including cancer, is a "silent bomb within the body," leading to complications that are only evident in most cases upon their appearance, when disease is already deteriorated. Chronic inflammation is associated with accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), which lead to immunosuppression. MDSCs have numerous harmful effects as they support tumor initiation, tumor growth and spreading, which in turn, perpetuate the inflammatory and suppressive conditions, thus preventing anticancer responses. As the concept of the immune system combating many types of tumors was revived in recent years, immunotherapy has dramatically changed the view of cancer treatment, and numerous novel therapies have been developed and approved by the FDA. However, cumulative clinical data point at very limited success rates. It is most likely that the developing chronic inflammation and MDSC-induced immunosuppression interfere with responses to such treatments and hence are major obstacles in achieving higher response rates to immune-based therapies. Moreover, chemotherapies were shown to have adverse immunoregulatory effects, enhancing or decreasing MDSC levels and activity, thus affecting treatment success. Therefore, therapeutic manipulations of chronic inflammation and MDSCs during cancer development are likely to enhance efficacy of immune- and chemo-based treatments, switching chronic pro-cancer inflammatory environments to an anticancerous milieu. Based on the functional relevance of immune networking in tumors, it is critical to merge monitoring immune system biomarkers into the traditional patient's categorization and treatment regimens. This will provide new tools for clinical practice, allowing appropriate management of cancer patients toward a better-personalized medicine. PMID:27225641

  4. Senescence in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Functional Changes and Implications in Stem Cell-Based Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turinetto, Valentina; Vitale, Emanuela; Giachino, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is extensively interested in developing cell therapies using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), with applications to several aging-associated diseases. For successful therapies, a substantial number of cells are needed, requiring extensive ex vivo cell expansion. However, MSC proliferation is limited and it is quite likely that long-term culture evokes continuous changes in MSCs. Therefore, a substantial proportion of cells may undergo senescence. In the present review, we will first present the phenotypic characterization of senescent human MSCs (hMSCs) and their possible consequent functional alterations. The accumulation of oxidative stress and dysregulation of key differentiation regulatory factors determine decreased differentiation potential of senescent hMSCs. Senescent hMSCs also show a marked impairment in their migratory and homing ability. Finally, many factors present in the secretome of senescent hMSCs are able to exacerbate the inflammatory response at a systemic level, decreasing the immune modulation activity of hMSCs and promoting either proliferation or migration of cancer cells. Considering the deleterious effects that these changes could evoke, it would appear of primary importance to monitor the occurrence of senescent phenotype in clinically expanded hMSCs and to evaluate possible ways to prevent in vitro MSC senescence. An updated critical presentation of the possible strategies for in vitro senescence monitoring and prevention constitutes the second part of this review. Understanding the mechanisms that drive toward hMSC growth arrest and evaluating how to counteract these for preserving a functional stem cell pool is of fundamental importance for the development of efficient cell-based therapeutic approaches. PMID:27447618

  5. Long-term antiplatelet therapy following myocardial infarction: implications of PEGASUS-TIMI 54.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, William A E; Storey, Robert F

    2016-05-15

    Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) is standard treatment for patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), typically comprising the use of aspirin with either an irreversible thienopyridine P2Y12 inhibitor, clopidogrel or prasugrel, or reversibly binding ticagrelor. Pivotal studies led to guidelines recommending DAPT for up to 12 months post-ACS. Despite this, there remains a significant burden of coronary artery disease (CAD)-related events up to and after this period. Recent meta-analyses, including both patients with ACS and patients with stable CAD treated with DAPT following percutaneous coronary intervention, have suggested that long-term thienopyridine-based DAPT reduces the risks of myocardial infarction (MI) and stent thrombosis but may paradoxically increase all-cause mortality risk. The PEGASUS-TIMI 54 (Prevention of Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Prior Heart Attack Using Ticagrelor Compared to Placebo on a Background of Aspirin - Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction 54) study examined the effects of long-term DAPT with aspirin and ticagrelor, compared with aspirin alone, on major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) and complications, including bleeding in patients with prior history of MI. It showed that, over a 3-year period, ticagrelor reduced the risk of MACE but increased non-fatal bleeding risk. Overall, the PEGASUS-TIMI 54 results demonstrate that patients with a history of ACS deemed to be at high risk of further ischaemic events, particularly those in whom the risks of ischaemic events and cardiovascular death outweigh the risk of life-threatening bleeding, may benefit from prolonged ticagrelor-based DAPT. Guidelines are emerging which reflect this. The relationship between aspirin and ticagrelor, particularly with regard to aspirin dosing, remains to be fully elucidated and attention has recently been turned to the option of ticagrelor monotherapy. Future studies will explore optimal individualised strategies for long

  6. The Plasticity of Oncogene Addiction: Implications for Targeted Therapies Directed to Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

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    Vinochani Pillay

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available A common mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is an extracellular truncation known as the de2-7 EGFR (or EGFRvIII. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF is the ligand for the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK c-Met, and this signaling axis is often active in GBM. The expression of the HGF/c-Met axis or de2-7 EGFR independently enhances GBMgrowth and invasiveness, particularly through the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/pAkt pathway. Using RTK arrays, we show that expression of de2-7 EGFR in U87MG GBM cells leads to the coactivation of several RTKs, including platelet-derived growth factor receptor β and c-Met. A neutralizing antibody to HGF (AMG102 did not inhibit de2-7 EGFR-mediated activation of c-Met, demonstrating that it is ligand-independent. Therapy for parental U87MG xenografts with AMG 102 resulted in significant inhibition of tumor growth, whereas U87MG.Δ2-7 xenografts were profoundly resistant. Treatment of U87MG.Δ2-7 xenografts with panitumumab, an anti-EGFR antibody, only partially inhibited tumor growth as xenografts rapidly reverted to the HGF/c-Met signaling pathway. Cotreatment with panitumumab and AMG 102 prevented this escape leading to significant tumor inhibition through an apoptotic mechanism, consistent with the induction of oncogenic shock. This observation provides a rationale for using panitumumab and AMG 102 in combination for the treatment of GBM patients. These results illustrate that GBM cells can rapidly change the RTK driving their oncogene addiction if the alternate RTK signals through the same downstream pathway. Consequently, inhibition of a dominant oncogene by targeted therapy can alter the hierarchy of RTKs resulting in rapid therapeutic resistance.

  7. Advancement and prospects of tumor gene therapy

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    Zhang, Chao; Wang, Qing-Tao; Liu, He; Zhang, Zhen-Zhu; Huang, Wen-Lin

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy is one of the most attractive fields in tumor therapy. In past decades, significant progress has been achieved. Various approaches, such as viral and non-viral vectors and physical methods, have been developed to make gene delivery safer and more efficient. Several therapeutic strategies have evolved, including gene-based (tumor suppressor genes, suicide genes, antiangiogenic genes, cytokine and oxidative stress-based genes) and RNA-based (antisense oligonucleotides and RNA inter...

  8. The natural history of local regional breast cancer recurrence: prognosis and implications for systemic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine the natural history and long term outcome of breast cancer patients sustaining local regional failure as their first site of relapse in an effort to design a prospective study evaluating systemic therapy at the time of local regional relapse. Materials and Methods: Between January 1970 and December 1992, over 4000 patients with a diagnosis of breast cancer were treated at our facilities with mastectomy or conservative surgery with radiation therapy (CS+RT). A total of 195 patients sustained a local regional relapse, without evidence of distant metastasis, as the first site of failure and serve as the population base for this study. The 195 patients with local-regional recurrence of disease were distributed as follows: 59 patients relapsed in the ipsilateral breast following CS+RT within 5 years of original diagnosis (EARLYBR); 45 patients relapsed in the ipsilateral breast >5 years from original diagnosis (LATEBR); 52 patients relapsed in the chest wall following mastectomy (CWREC); and 23 patients failed in the regional lymphatics following mastectomy or CS+RT (REGREC). Patients with EARLYBR or LATEBR were generally treated with salvage mastectomy and patients with CWREC or REGREC were treated with definitive irradiation to the chest wall and/or regional nodes. Systemic therapy at the time of locoregional relapse was highly individualized, ranging from observation to tamoxifen to high dose chemotherapy with transplantation. Patient charts were reviewed with all clinical, pathologic, treatment, and outcome parameters entered onto a computerized database. Survival curves were calculated using the life table method with differences between survival curves compared by the Mantle-Haensel statistic. Survival, disease-free survival and distant metastasis rates were calculated from the date of original diagnosis, as well as from the date of local regional relapse. Local regional recurrence-free time was calculated from

  9. Tissue As A Medium For Laser Light Transport-Implications For Photoradiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuss, L. E.; Bolin, F. P.; Cain, B. W.

    1982-12-01

    An important medical laser application is in the emerging field of photoradiation therapy (PRT). PRT is the process in which malignant tissue is destroyed by administration of light to a specific photosensitized site. Filtered arcs, incandescents and dye lasers have been used as sources of activating light. We have carried out light experiments in tissue to study such PRT light distributions. The results of this research have shown that a number of important optical phenomena occurring within illuminated tissue must be accounted for in order to make good predictions of tumor light dosage. Among these are; tissue type, interface effects and anomalies due to composition. These effects substantially influence light levels in PRT and, thus, the therapeutic effect. The uniqueness of tissue as a medium for light transport presents special problems for optics research and instrumentation. Successful solutions necessarily will involve collaboration between the life sciences and optic specialists. Attempts at treatment of human disease using non-ionizing radiation have a history archaeologically traceable to archaic societies (in which the sun's photons were used and often worshipped).1 Western medicine in the past, has used visible light beneficially, albeit empirically, on a few ailments. However, in this century, a significant development in the understanding and in the therapeutic use of this electromagnetic radiation in the UV, visible and IR has occurred, based on scientific study. This utilization of radiation in the visible and ultraviolet can be by two distinct processes. One is through the direct action of the photons which serve as the sole treatment agent. In this case the photon interacts with the cell, or its components, in a single step, to produce a desired effect. An example is the successful use of blue light for treatment of bilirubinemia in newborns. The second process is a biological effect produced through the combination of electromagnetic radiation

  10. Overview of cancer stem cells (CSCs) and mechanisms of their regulation: implications for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Bin; Ahmad, Aamir; Azmi, Asfar S; Ali, Shadan; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2013-06-01

    The identification of small subpopulations of cancer stem cells (CSCs) from blood mononuclear cells in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in 1997 was a landmark observation that recognized the potential role of CSCs in tumor aggressiveness. Two critical properties contribute to the functional role of CSCs in the establishment and recurrence of cancerous tumors: their capacity for self-renewal and their potential to differentiate into unlimited heterogeneous populations of cancer cells. These findings suggest that CSCs may represent novel therapeutic targets for the treatment and/or prevention of tumor progression, since they appear to be involved in cell migration, invasion, metastasis, and treatment resistance-all of which lead to poor clinical outcomes. The identification of CSC-specific markers, the isolation and characterization of CSCs from malignant tissues, and targeting strategies for the destruction of CSCs provide a novel opportunity for cancer research. This overview describes the potential implications of several common CSC markers in the identification of CSC subpopulations that are restricted to common malignant diseases, e.g., leukemia, and breast, prostate, pancreatic, and lung cancers. The role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the regulation of CSC function is also discussed, as are several methods commonly used in CSC research. The potential role of the antidiabetic drug metformin- which has been shown to have effects on CSCs, and is known to function as an antitumor agent-is discussed as an example of this new class of chemotherapeutics. PMID:23744710

  11. Dorsal MPFC circuitry in rodent models of cocaine use: Implications for drug-addiction therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinska, Agnes J.; Chen, Billy T.; Bonci, Antonello; Stein, Elliot A.

    2014-01-01

    While the importance of the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) in cocaine addiction is well established, its precise contribution to cocaine seeking, taking, and relapse remains incompletely understood. In particular, across two different models of cocaine self-administration, pharmacological or optogenetic activation of the dorsal MPFC has been reported to sometimes promote and sometimes inhibit cocaine seeking. We highlight important methodological differences between the two experimental paradigms, and propose a framework to potentially reconcile the apparent discrepancy. We also draw parallels between these preclinical models of cocaine self-administration and human neuroimaging studies in cocaine users, and argue that both lines of evidence point to dynamic interactions between cue-reactivity processes and control processes within the dorsal MPFC circuitry. From a translational perspective, these findings underscore the importance of interventions and therapeutics targeting not just a brain region, but a specific computational process within that brain region, and may have implications for the design and implementation of more effective treatments for human cocaine addiction. PMID:24620898

  12. Emerging role of microRNAs in cancer stem cells:Implications in cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minal; Garg

    2015-01-01

    A small subset of cancer cells that act as tumor initiating cells or cancer stem cells(CSCs) maintain self-renewal and growth promoting capabilities of cancer and are responsible for drug/treatment resistance,tumor recurrence and metastasis. Due to their potential clinical importance,many researchers have put their efforts over decades to unravel the molecular mechanisms that regulate CSCs functions. Micro RNAs(mi RNAs) which are 21-23 nucleotide long,endogenous noncoding RNAs,regulate gene expression through gene silencing at post-transcriptional level by binding to the 3’-untranslated regions or the open reading frames of target genes,thereby result in target mR NA degradation or its translational repression and serve important role in several cellular,physiological and developmental processes. Aberrant mi RNAs expression and their implication in CSCs regulation by controlling asymmetric cell division,drug/treatment resistance and metastasis make mi RNAs a tool of great therapeutic potential against cancer. Recent advancements on the biological complexities of CSCs,modulation in CSCs properties by mi RNA network and development of mi RNA based treatment strategies specifically targeting the CSCs as an attractive therapeutic targets for clinical application are being critically analysed.

  13. Cell membrane integrity in myotonic dystrophy type 1: implications for therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anchel González-Barriga

    Full Text Available Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 (DM1 is a multisystemic disease caused by toxic RNA from a DMPK gene carrying an expanded (CTG•CAGn repeat. Promising strategies for treatment of DM1 patients are currently being tested. These include antisense oligonucleotides and drugs for elimination of expanded RNA or prevention of aberrant binding to RNP proteins. A significant hurdle for preclinical development along these lines is efficient systemic delivery of compounds across endothelial and target cell membranes. It has been reported that DM1 patients show elevated levels of markers of muscle damage or loss of sarcolemmal integrity in their serum and that splicing of dystrophin, an essential protein for muscle membrane structure, is abnormal. Therefore, we studied cell membrane integrity in DM1 mouse models commonly used for preclinical testing. We found that membranes in skeletal muscle, heart and brain were impermeable to Evans Blue Dye. Creatine kinase levels in serum were similar to those in wild type mice and expression of dystrophin protein was unaffected. Also in patient muscle biopsies cell surface expression of dystrophin was normal and calcium-positive fibers, indicating elevated intracellular calcium levels, were only rarely seen. Combined, our findings indicate that cells in DM1 tissues do not display compromised membrane integrity. Hence, the cell membrane is a barrier that must be overcome in future work towards effective drug delivery in DM1 therapy.

  14. Trophic factors as modulators of motor neuron physiology and survival: implications for ALS therapy

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    Luis B Tovar-y-Romo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Motor neuron physiology and development depend on a continuous and tightly regulated trophic support from a variety of cellular sources. Trophic factors guide the generation and positioning of motor neurons during every stage of the developmental process. As well, they are involved in axon guidance and synapse formation. Even in the adult spinal cord an uninterrupted trophic input is required to maintain neuronal functioning and protection from noxious stimuli. Among the trophic factors that have been demonstrated to participate in motor neuron physiology are vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1. Upon binding to membrane receptors expressed in motor neurons or neighboring glia, these trophic factors activate intracellular signaling pathways that promote cell survival and have protective action on motor neurons, in both in vivo and in vitro models of neuronal degeneration. For these reasons these factors have been considered a promising therapeutic method for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases, although their efficacy in human clinical trials have not yet shown the expected protection. In this review we summarize experimental data on the role of these trophic factors in motor neuron function and survival, as well as their mechanisms of action. We also briefly discuss the potential therapeutic use of the trophic factors and why these therapies may have not been yet successful in the clinical use.

  15. Underlying neural mechanisms of mirror therapy: Implications for motor rehabilitation in stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Kamal Narayan

    2016-01-01

    Mirror therapy (MT) is a valuable method for enhancing motor recovery in poststroke hemiparesis. The technique utilizes the mirror-illusion created by the movement of sound limb that is perceived as the paretic limb. MT is a simple and economical technique than can stimulate the brain noninvasively. The intervention unquestionably has neural foundation. But the underlying neural mechanisms inducing motor recovery are still unclear. In this review, the neural-modulation due to MT has been explored. Multiple areas of the brain such as the occipital lobe, dorsal frontal area and corpus callosum are involved during the simple MT regime. Bilateral premotor cortex, primary motor cortex, primary somatosensory cortex, and cerebellum also get reorganized to enhance the function of the damaged brain. The motor areas of the lesioned hemisphere receive visuo-motor processing information through the parieto-occipital lobe. The damaged motor cortex responds variably to the MT and may augment true motor recovery. Mirror neurons may also play a possible role in the cortico-stimulatory mechanisms occurring due to the MT. PMID:26754990

  16. Underlying neural mechanisms of mirror therapy: Implications for motor rehabilitation in stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Narayan Arya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mirror therapy (MT is a valuable method for enhancing motor recovery in poststroke hemiparesis. The technique utilizes the mirror-illusion created by the movement of sound limb that is perceived as the paretic limb. MT is a simple and economical technique than can stimulate the brain noninvasively. The intervention unquestionably has neural foundation. But the underlying neural mechanisms inducing motor recovery are still unclear. In this review, the neural-modulation due to MT has been explored. Multiple areas of the brain such as the occipital lobe, dorsal frontal area and corpus callosum are involved during the simple MT regime. Bilateral premotor cortex, primary motor cortex, primary somatosensory cortex, and cerebellum also get reorganized to enhance the function of the damaged brain. The motor areas of the lesioned hemisphere receive visuo-motor processing information through the parieto-occipital lobe. The damaged motor cortex responds variably to the MT and may augment true motor recovery. Mirror neurons may also play a possible role in the cortico-stimulatory mechanisms occurring due to the MT.

  17. Genetic profiling of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and its clinical implication in targeted therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Diyang; Ren, Zhenggang; Fan, Jia; Gao, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (iCCA) is a treatment-refractory primary liver cancer with an increasing incidence and mortality worldwide in recent years. Lack of a stereotyped genetic signature and limited understanding of genomic landscape make the development of effective targeted therapies challenging. Recent application of advanced technologies such as next-generation sequencing (NGS) has broadened our understanding of genetic heterogeneity in iCCA and many potentially actionable genetic alterations have been identified. This review explores the recent advances in defining genetic alterations in iCCAs, which may present potent therapeutic targets. Chromatin remodeling genes and genes encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase and tyrosine kinase receptors as well as their downstream effectors are among the most frequently altered genes. Clinical trials testing the effect of new targeted agents on iCCA patients, especially those with the above genetic markers are under way. However, the complex interplay of environmental and evolutionary factors contributing to the genetic variability in iCCA calls for a more cautionary use of NGS in tailoring targeted regimen to the patients. Next-generation functional testing may complement NGS to execute precision medicine in future.

  18. Genetic profiling of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and its clinical implication in targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Diyang; Ren, Zhenggang; Fan, Jia; Gao, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (iCCA) is a treatment-refractory primary liver cancer with an increasing incidence and mortality worldwide in recent years. Lack of a stereotyped genetic signature and limited understanding of genomic landscape make the development of effective targeted therapies challenging. Recent application of advanced technologies such as next-generation sequencing (NGS) has broadened our understanding of genetic heterogeneity in iCCA and many potentially actionable genetic alterations have been identified. This review explores the recent advances in defining genetic alterations in iCCAs, which may present potent therapeutic targets. Chromatin remodeling genes and genes encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase and tyrosine kinase receptors as well as their downstream effectors are among the most frequently altered genes. Clinical trials testing the effect of new targeted agents on iCCA patients, especially those with the above genetic markers are under way. However, the complex interplay of environmental and evolutionary factors contributing to the genetic variability in iCCA calls for a more cautionary use of NGS in tailoring targeted regimen to the patients. Next-generation functional testing may complement NGS to execute precision medicine in future. PMID:27152236

  19. Perceptions of Gender and Femininity Based on Language: Implications for Transgender Communication Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Adrienne B; Stutts, Holly Wilder; Bass, Annie

    2015-09-01

    Recent research presents a picture of diminishing gender differences in language. Two experiments examined whether language use can predict perceptions of gender and femininity; one included male and female speakers telling a personal narrative, the other also included male-to-female transgender speakers and analyzed an oral picture description. In each experiment, raters read transcribed samples before judging the gender and rating the femininity of the speaker. Only number of T-units, words per T-unit, dependent clauses per T-unit, and personal pronouns per T-unit emerged as different between gender groups. As none of the variables were strongly correlated with perceptual judgments, regression analysis was used to determine how combinations of linguistic variables predict female/feminine ratings. Results from these two studies demonstrate that gender-related differences in language use for these two contexts are limited, and that any relationship of language to perceptions of gender and femininity is complex and multivariate. This information calls into question the utility of training key language features in transgender communication therapy. PMID:26529899

  20. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Myelodysplastic Syndrome: Implications on Targeted Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Harinder; Leung, Anskar Y H; Kwong, Yok-Lam

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a group of heterogeneous clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by cytopenia, ineffective hematopoiesis, and progression to secondary acute myeloid leukemia in high-risk cases. Conventional prognostication relies on clinicopathological parameters supplemented by cytogenetic information. However, recent studies have shown that genetic aberrations also have critical impacts on treatment outcome. Moreover, these genetic alterations may themselves be a target for treatment. The mutation landscape in MDS is shaped by gene aberrations involved in DNA methylation (TET2, DNMT3A, IDH1/2), histone modification (ASXL1, EZH2), the RNA splicing machinery (SF3B1, SRSF2, ZRSR2, U2AF1/2), transcription (RUNX1, TP53, BCOR, PHF6, NCOR, CEBPA, GATA2), tyrosine kinase receptor signaling (JAK2, MPL, FLT3, GNAS, KIT), RAS pathways (KRAS, NRAS, CBL, NF1, PTPN11), DNA repair (ATM, BRCC3, DLRE1C, FANCL), and cohesion complexes (STAG2, CTCF, SMC1A, RAD21). A detailed understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to transformation is critical for designing single-agent or combinatorial approaches in target therapy of MDS. PMID:27023522

  1. Multijoint arm stiffness during movements following stroke: implications for robot therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovesan, D.; Casadio, M.; Mussa-Ivaldi, F. A.; Morasso, P.G

    2015-01-01

    Impaired arm movements in stroke appear as a set of stereotypical kinematic patterns, characterized by abnormal joint coupling, which have a direct consequence on arm mechanics and can be quantified by the net arm stiffness at the hand. The current available measures of arm stiffness during functional tasks have limited clinical use, since they require several repetitions of the same test movement in many directions. Such procedure is difficult to obtain in stroke survivors who have lower fatigue threshold and increased variability compared to unimpaired individuals. The present study proposes a novel, fast quantitative measure of arm stiffness during movements by means of a Time-Frequency technique and the use of a reassigned spectrogram, applied on a trial-by-trial basis with a single perturbation. We tested the technique feasibility during robot mediated therapy, where a robot helped stroke survivors to regain arm mobility by providing assistive forces during a hitting task to 13 targets covering the entire reachable workspace. The endpoint stiffness of the paretic arm was estimated at the end of each hitting movements by suddenly switching of the assistive forces and observing the ensuing recoil movements. In addition, we considered how assistive forces influence stiffness. This method will provide therapists with improved tools to target the treatment to the individual’s specific impairment and to verify the effects of the proposed exercises. PMID:22275576

  2. Sequence diversity of hepatitis C virus: Implications for immune control and therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joerg Timm; Michael Roggendorf

    2007-01-01

    With approximately 3% of the world's population (170million people) infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV),the WHO has declared HCV a global health problem.Upon acute infection about 50%-80% of subjects develop chronic hepatitis with viral persistence being at risk to develop liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. One characteristic of HCV is its enormous sequence diversity, which represents a significant hurdle to the development of both effective vaccines as well as to novel therapeutic interventions. Due to a polymerase that lacks a proofreading function HCV presents with a high rate of evolution, which enables rapid adaptation to a new environment including an activated immune system upon acute infection. Similarly, novel drugs designed to specifically inhibit viral proteins will face the potential problem of rapid selection of drug resistance mutations. This review focuses on the sequence diversity of HCV, the driving forces of evolution and the impact on immune control and treatment response. An important feature of any therapeutic or prophylactic intervention will be an efficient attack of a structurally or functionally important region in the viral protein. The understanding of the driving forces, but also the limits of viral evolution,will be fundamental for the design of novel therapies.

  3. Role of histone deacetylases in pancreas: Implications for pathogenesis and therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eckhard; Klieser; Stefan; Swierczynski; Christian; Mayr; Johanna; Schmidt; Daniel; Neureiter; Tobias; Kiesslich; Romana; Illig

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, our knowledge of the pathogenesis in acute and chronic pancreatitis(AP/CP) as well as in pancreatic cancerogenesis has significantly diversified. Nevertheless, the medicinal therapeutic options are still limited and therapeutic success and patient outcome are poor. Epigenetic deregulation of gene expression is known to contribute to development and progression of AP and CP as well as of pancreatic cancer. Therefore, the selective inhibition of aberrantly active epigenetic regulators can be an effective option for future thera-pies. Histone deacetylases(HDACs) are enzymes that remove an acetyl group from histone tails, thereby causing chromatin compaction and repression of transcri-ption. In this review we present an overview of the currently available literature addressing the role of HDACs in the pancreas and in pancreatic diseases. In pancreatic cancerogenesis, HDACs play a role in the important process of epithelial-mesenchymal-transition, ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and, hypoxia-inducible-factor-1-angiogenesis. Finally, we focus on HDACs as potential therapeutic targets by summarizing currently available histone deacetylase inhibitors.

  4. Treatment planning for internal emitter therapy: Methods, applications and clinical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sgouros, G. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Treatment planning involves three basic steps: (1) a procedure must be devised that will provide the most relevant information, (2) the procedure must be applied and (3) the resulting information must be translated into a definition of the optimum implementation. There are varying degrees of treatment planning that may be implemented in internal emitter therapy. As in chemotherapy, the information from a Phase 1 study may be used to treat patients based upon body surface area. If treatment planning is included on a patient-specific basis, a pretherapy, trace-labeled, administration of the radiopharmaceutical is generally required. The data collected following the tracer dose may range from time-activity curves of blood and whole-body for use in blood, marrow or total body absorbed dose estimation to patient imaging for three-dimensional internal emitter dosimetry. The most ambitious approach requires a three-dimensional set of images representing radionuclide distribution (SPECT or PET) and a corresponding set of images representing anatomy (CT or MRI). The absorbed dose (or dose-rate) distribution may be obtained by convolution of a point kernel with the radioactivity distribution or by direct Monte Carlo calculation. A critical requirement for both techniques is the development of an overall structure that makes it possible, in a routine manner, to input the images, to identify the structures of interest and to display the results of the dose calculations in a clinically relevant manner. 52 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Rearrangement in Digestive Tract Cancer: Implication for Targeted Therapy in Chinese Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming Ying

    Full Text Available Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK rearrangements define a subgroup of lung cancer which is eligible to targeted kinase inhibition. The aim of this study is to observe the incidence rate of ALK fusion in a large cohort of Chinese digestive tract cancer patients.Tissue microarray (TMA was constructed from 808 digestive tract cancer cases, including 169 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, 182 gastric cancer and 457 colorectal cancer (CRC cases. We tested all cases for ALK expression via a fully automated immunohistochemistry (IHC assay. The IHC-positive cases were subjected to fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, target gene enrichment and sequencing for confirmation of ALK gene rearrangement and discovery of novel fusion partner.Among the tested cases, 2 (0.44% CRC cases showed positive both by IHC and FISH. By qRT-PCR, EML4-ALK fusion was found in one IHC-positive CRC case. In another IHC-positive CRC case, target gene enrichment and sequencing revealed ALK was fused to a novel partner, spectrin beta non-erythrocytic 1 (SPTBN1. One gastric cancer case showed partially positive IHC result, but no fusion was found by FISH and gene sequencing.The incidence rate of ALK gene fusion in Chinese CRC patients was 0.44%,but not detectable in gastric and esophageal cancers. The novel SPTBN1 -ALK fusion, together with other ALK fusion genes, may become a potential target for anti-ALK therapy.

  6. In vitro anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic activities of thalidomide dithiocarbamate analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Aarag, Bishoy Y A; Kasai, Tomonari; Zahran, Magdy A H; Zakhary, Nadia I; Shigehiro, Tsukasa; Sekhar, Sreeja C; Agwa, Hussein S; Mizutani, Akifumi; Murakami, Hiroshi; Kakuta, Hiroki; Seno, Masaharu

    2014-08-01

    Inhibition of angiogenesis is currently perceived as a promising strategy in the treatment of cancer. The anti-angiogenicity of thalidomide has inspired a second wave of research on this teratogenic drug. The present study aimed to investigate the anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic activities of two thalidomide dithiocarbamate analogs by studying their anti-proliferative effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines. Their action on the expression levels of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, VEGF165, and MMP-2 was also assessed. Furthermore, their effect on angiogenesis was evaluated through wound healing, migration, tube formation, and nitric oxide (NO) assays. Results illustrated that the proliferation of HUVECs and MDA-MB-231 cells was not significantly affected by thalidomide at 6.25-100μM. Thalidomide failed to block angiogenesis at similar concentrations. By contrast, thalidomide dithiocarbamate analogs exhibited significant anti-proliferative action on HUVECs and MDA-MB-231 cells without causing cytotoxicity and also showed powerful anti-angiogenicity in wound healing, migration, tube formation, and NO assays. Thalidomide analogs 1 and 2 demonstrated more potent activity to suppress expression levels of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, VEGF165, and MMP-2 than thalidomide. Analog 1 consistently, showed the highest potency and efficacy in all the assays. Taken together, our results support further development and evaluation of novel thalidomide analogs as anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic agents. PMID:24859059

  7. Cinnamon ameliorates experimental allergic encephalomyelitis in mice via regulatory T cells: implications for multiple sclerosis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Susanta; Pahan, Kalipada

    2015-01-01

    Upregulation and/or maintenance of regulatory T cells (Tregs) during an autoimmune insult may have therapeutic efficacy in autoimmune diseases. Although several immunomodulatory drugs and molecules are available, most present significant side effects over long-term use. Cinnamon is a commonly used natural spice and flavoring material used for centuries throughout the world. Here, we have explored a novel use of cinnamon powder in protecting Tregs and treating the disease process of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS. Oral feeding of cinnamon (Cinnamonum verum) powder suppresses clinical symptoms of relapsing-remitting EAE in female PLP-TCR transgenic mice and adoptive transfer mouse model. Cinnamon also inhibited clinical symptoms of chronic EAE in male C57/BL6 mice. Dose-dependent study shows that cinnamon powder at a dose of 50 mg/kg body wt/d or higher significantly suppresses clinical symptoms of EAE in mice. Accordingly, oral administration of cinnamon also inhibited perivascular cuffing, maintained the integrity of blood-brain barrier and blood-spinal cord barrier, suppressed inflammation, normalized the expression of myelin genes, and blocked demyelination in the central nervous system of EAE mice. Interestingly, cinnamon treatment upregulated Tregs via reduction of nitric oxide production. Furthermore, we demonstrate that blocking of Tregs by neutralizing antibodies against CD25 abrogates cinnamon-mediated protection of EAE. Taken together, our results suggest that oral administration of cinnamon powder may be beneficial in MS patients and that no other existing anti-MS therapies could be so economical and trouble-free as this approach. PMID:25569428

  8. Mesenchymal stem cells in drug/gene delivery: implications for cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Steven J; Rameshwar, Pranela

    2012-08-01

    Stem cells have been therapeutically utilized in replacement of hematopoetic cells for decades. This is in contrast to the recent emergence of adult stem cells as, perhaps, safe and beneficial therapeutics for multiple diseases and disorders. In particular, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are currently used in multiple human clinical trials. Although MSCs are ubiquitous, bone marrow, umbilical cord and adipose tissue are the sources where MSCs are isolated for research and clinical application. MSCs were thought to be mesodermal due to the initial reports showing their differentiation into specialized mesodermal cells such as chondrocytes. However, it now appears that MSCs might be neuroectodermal in origin. Thus far, there is no evidence of in vivo transformation of MSCs. However, it is too early to prove or disprove that MSCs can be transformed in vivo in clinical trials. MSCs display immunosuppressive properties when placed in a milieu of inflammatory mediators. This phenotype makes MSCs easily available for therapies as 'off-the-shelf cells. Additionally, MSCs express chemotactic receptors, thereby allowing them to migrate to sites of tissue injury. This latter property has proven useful in the embodiment of MSCs as cellular vehicles to deliver targeted therapeutics to precise regions. The MSCs would typically harbor a prodrug or ectopically express a therapeutic gene to be delivered at a targeted site. This approach has been utilized in a number of different indications requiring precise therapeutic delivery, specifically cancer, cardiovascular disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. Combined with their immune-privileged status, safe clinical profile and low tumorigenicity, MSCs offer vast potential to benefit patients with serious diseases, for which limited treatment options exist. PMID:22946432

  9. Dopamine Replacement Therapy, Learning and Reward Prediction in Parkinson's Disease: Implications for Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrazzoli, Davide; Carter, Adrian; Ustun, Fatma S; Palamara, Grazia; Ortelli, Paola; Maestri, Roberto; Yücel, Murat; Frazzitta, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The principal feature of Parkinson's disease (PD) is the impaired ability to acquire and express habitual-automatic actions due to the loss of dopamine in the dorsolateral striatum, the region of the basal ganglia associated with the control of habitual behavior. Dopamine replacement therapy (DRT) compensates for the lack of dopamine, representing the standard treatment for different motor symptoms of PD (such as rigidity, bradykinesia and resting tremor). On the other hand, rehabilitation treatments, exploiting the use of cognitive strategies, feedbacks and external cues, permit to "learn to bypass" the defective basal ganglia (using the dorsolateral area of the prefrontal cortex) allowing the patients to perform correct movements under executive-volitional control. Therefore, DRT and rehabilitation seem to be two complementary and synergistic approaches. Learning and reward are central in rehabilitation: both of these mechanisms are the basis for the success of any rehabilitative treatment. Anyway, it is known that "learning resources" and reward could be negatively influenced from dopaminergic drugs. Furthermore, DRT causes different well-known complications: among these, dyskinesias, motor fluctuations, and dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS) are intimately linked with the alteration in the learning and reward mechanisms and could impact seriously on the rehabilitative outcomes. These considerations highlight the need for careful titration of DRT to produce the desired improvement in motor symptoms while minimizing the associated detrimental effects. This is important in order to maximize the motor re-learning based on repetition, reward and practice during rehabilitation. In this scenario, we review the knowledge concerning the interactions between DRT, learning and reward, examine the most impactful DRT side effects and provide suggestions for optimizing rehabilitation in PD. PMID:27378872

  10. Local Failure in Resected N1 Lung Cancer: Implications for Adjuvant Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate actuarial rates of local failure in patients with pathologic N1 non–small-cell lung cancer and to identify clinical and pathologic factors associated with an increased risk of local failure after resection. Methods and Materials: All patients who underwent surgery for non–small-cell lung cancer with pathologically confirmed N1 disease at Duke University Medical Center from 1995–2008 were identified. Patients receiving any preoperative therapy or postoperative radiotherapy or with positive surgical margins were excluded. Local failure was defined as disease recurrence within the ipsilateral hilum, mediastinum, or bronchial stump/staple line. Actuarial rates of local failure were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. A Cox multivariate analysis was used to identify factors independently associated with a higher risk of local recurrence. Results: Among 1,559 patients who underwent surgery during the time interval, 198 met the inclusion criteria. Of these patients, 50 (25%) received adjuvant chemotherapy. Actuarial (5-year) rates of local failure, distant failure, and overall survival were 40%, 55%, and 33%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, factors associated with an increased risk of local failure included a video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery approach (hazard ratio [HR], 2.5; p = 0.01), visceral pleural invasion (HR, 2.1; p = 0.04), and increasing number of positive N1 lymph nodes (HR, 1.3 per involved lymph node; p = 0.02). Chemotherapy was associated with a trend toward decreased risk of local failure that was not statistically significant (HR, 0.61; p = 0.2). Conclusions: Actuarial rates of local failure in pN1 disease are high. Further investigation of conformal postoperative radiotherapy may be warranted.

  11. Anti-angiogenic Activity and Mechanism of Sesquiterpene Lactones from Centipeda minima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weihuan; Yu, Xiaobin; Liang, Ning; Ge, Wei; Kwok, Hin Fai; Lau, Clara Bik-San; Li, Yaolan; Chung, Hau Yin

    2016-04-01

    Centipeda minima is a Chinese herbal medicine used in the treatment of various diseases including cancer. An ethanol extract of the herb, its four fractions with different polarities, and two volatile oils prepared by steam distillation (SD) and supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) were investigated for their anti-angiogenic activity in a wild-type zebrafish model using a quantitative endogenous alkaline phosphatase (EAP) assay. The SFE oil displayed potent anti-angiogenic activity. Fifteen sesquiterpene lactones (SLs; compounds 1-15) isolated from the SFE oil were evaluated for their anti-angiogenic effect. Results revealed that pseudoguaianolide type SLs (1-8) inhibited vessel formation in the zebrafish embryos while guaianolide type SLs (9-15) showed little effect. Among the active ones, 6-O-angeloylenolin (1), a major component of SFE oil, possessed the strongest effect by reducing vessel formation in zebrafish embryos to 40% of the control value at 29.7 µM. Further study using the Tg (fli1a:EGFP) y1-type zebrafish model revealed that it blocked both intersegmental blood vessels (ISVs) and subintestinal vessels plexus (SIVs) formation in zebrafish embryos. Real-time polymerase chain reaction assay on the wild-type zebrafish embryos suggested that 6-O-angeloylenolin affected multiple molecular targets related to angiogenesis including VEGF receptor, angiopoietin, and its receptors. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that C. minima possesses anti-angiogenic activity, and 6-O-angeloylenolin is a promising candidate for the development of an anti-angiogenic agent. PMID:27396185

  12. The anti-angiogenic and antibacterial effect ofTinomiscium philippinense Miers. (Menispermaceae) leaf extract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheryl Rena-Aguila; Mario A Tan; Oliver B Villaflores

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To determine the toxicity profile, anti-angiogenic and antibacterial activity of the crude and semi-crude leaf extracts ofTinomiscium philippinense (T. philippinense). Methods:The leaves ofT. philippinense were extracted with methanol and partitioned with solvents of different polarities, namely, hexane, dichloromethane and butanol. The extracts were subjected to duck chorioallantoic membrane assay to establish its anti-angiogenic property. Microwell assay was utilized to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration of the different extracts of the plant. Results:The dichloromethane leaf extract ofT. philippinense at 1 000µg/disc showed the highest anti-angiogenic activity with 37.46% inhibition. All the fractions exhibited a bacteriostatic and bactericidal effect on the three bacterial strains withPseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram negative lactose fermenter exhibiting a higher sensitivity to dichloromethane semi-crude extract among the treatment groups. For the toxicity test, no mortality and no change in behavior were observed in the Sprague-Dawley rats 14 days after the oral administration of the plant extracts. The methanolic leaf extract ofT. philippinense is non-toxic at a maximum dose of 5 000 mg/kg. Conclusions: The dichloromethane leaf extract ofT. philippinense is a potential anti-angiogenic endemic plant species. This plant extract is also a potential antibacterial candidate as determined by microwell assay. The anti-angiogenic and antibacterial activity of the plant may be attributed to the essential oil, steroid, flavonoid, sterol and triterpene content of the plant.

  13. Some Issues on Gender and Renal Replacement Therapy in Kano State, Nigeria: Implications for Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuratu Muhammad

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The study examined some issues on Gender and renal replacement therapy (RRT in Kano state. Stratified sampling technique was used to select 46 males and 26 females from Aminu Kano teaching hospital (AKTH and Abdullah Wase or Nassarawa specialist hospital. Before embarking on data collection, ethical approval was sought and given by the ministry of health Kano state for Abdullah Wase hospital and the management of AKTH hospital. Data was derived primarily from the questionnaire administered to the selected samples, in addition hospital based records of patients were obtained from the dialysis unit of the two hospitals. The results of the study showed that both male and female patients delayed in RRT. However majority of the males and females delayed due to inadequate information(19% and(18% and lack of money(y25% and (18%for the male and female patients resulting from the low socio economic status of most of them as indicated in the tables on education and income of the respondents, Other factors that caused infrequent RRT included the long term nature of treatment (12% and (23%, tried out alternative treatment (19% and (18%males and females respectively. Some of the socio economic and psychological costs of RRT were found to include cut in social spending( 22% males and(15% females, increased expenditure on health (17% and( 19% ,frequent illness (22% and (31%, loss of job (4%males only ,decrease in number of hours put to work (30% and( 31% matrimonial problems ((4% and another ( 4%for the males and females respectively Based on the findings of this research it is recommended that government ad stakeholders need to redefine their priorities and place health matters as a top priority in all state matters as the saying goes a healthy nation is a wealthy nation. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso

  14. Identification of two novel Chlorotoxin derivatives CA4 and CTX-23 with chemotherapeutic and anti-angiogenic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tengfei; Fan, Zheng; Li, Wenxin; Dietel, Barbara; Wu, Yingliang; Beckmann, Matthias W; Wrosch, Jana K; Buchfelder, Michael; Eyupoglu, Ilker Y; Cao, Zhijian; Savaskan, Nicolai E

    2016-01-01

    Brain tumors are fast proliferating and destructive within the brain microenvironment. Effective chemotherapeutic strategies are currently lacking which combat this deadly disease curatively. The glioma-specific chloride ion channel represents a specific target for therapy. Chlorotoxin (CTX), a peptide derived from scorpion venom, has been shown to be specific and efficacious in blocking glioma Cl(-) channel activity. Here, we report on two new derivatives (termed CA4 and CTX-23) designed and generated on the basis of the peptide sequence alignments of CTX and BmKCT. The novel peptides CA4 and CTX-23 are both effective in reducing glioma cell proliferation. In addition, CTX, CA4 and CTX-23 impact on cell migration and spheroid migration. These effects are accompanied by diminished cell extensions and increased nuclear sizes. Furthermore, we found that CA4 and CTX-23 are selective with low toxicity against primary neurons and astrocytes. In the ex vivo VOGiM, which maintain the entire brain tumor microenvironment, both CTX and CA4 display anti-tumor activity and reduce tumor volume. Hence, CTX and CA4 reveal anti-angiogenic properties with endothelial and angiogenic hotspots disrupting activities. These data report on the identification of two novel CTX derivatives with multiple anti-glioma properties including anti-angiogenesis. PMID:26831010

  15. Chimeric Mouse model to track the migration of bone marrow derived cells in glioblastoma following anti-angiogenic treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achyut, B R; Shankar, Adarsh; Iskander, A S M; Ara, Roxan; Knight, Robert A; Scicli, Alfonso G; Arbab, Ali S

    2016-03-01

    Bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs) have been shown to contribute in the tumor development. In vivo animal models to investigate the role of BMDCs in tumor development are poorly explored. We established a novel chimeric mouse model using as low as 5 × 10(6) GFP+ BM cells in athymic nude mice, which resulted in >70% engraftment within 14 d. In addition, chimera was established in NOD-SCID mice, which displayed >70% with in 28 d. Since anti-angiogenic therapies (AAT) were used as an adjuvant against VEGF-VEGFR pathway to normalize blood vessels in glioblastoma (GBM), which resulted into marked hypoxia and recruited BMDCs to the tumor microenvironment (TME). We exploited chimeric mice in athymic nude background to develop orthotopic U251 tumor and tested receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors and CXCR4 antagonist against GBM. We were able to track GFP+ BMDCs in the tumor brain using highly sensitive multispectral optical imaging instrument. Increased tumor growth associated with the infiltration of GFP+ BMDCs acquiring suppressive myeloid and endothelial phenotypes was seen in TME following treatments. Immunofluorescence study showed GFP+ cells accumulated at the site of VEGF, SDF1 and PDGF expression, and at the periphery of the tumors following treatments. In conclusion, we developed a preclinical chimeric model of GBM and phenotypes of tumor infiltrated BMDCs were investigated in context of AATs. Chimeric mouse model could be used to study detailed cellular and molecular mechanisms of interaction of BMDCs and TME in cancer. PMID:26797476

  16. Time until initiation of tumor growth is an effective measure of the anti-angiogenic effect of TNP-470 on human glioblastoma in nude mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, M; Spang-Thomsen, M; Kristjansen, P E

    1999-01-01

    , 11, or 15 days after inoculation. The time from inoculation until initiation of exponential tumor growth was determined along with the post-therapeutic growth delay and the initial tumor doubling time (TD) for each individual tumor (n=103) on the basis of tumor volume growth curves. We found that: i......We examined the effect of the anti-angiogenic compound TNP-470 on early tumor growth characteristics following subcutaneous implantation of 1 mm3 tissue blocks of human glioblastoma U87, in nude mice. The mice received daily injections with TNP-470, 7 mg/kg, from one day before until either 3, 7......) the onset of growth of U87 xenografts was effectively inhibited by concurrent treatment with TNP-470 beyond the first three days after inoculation, ii) this effect was fully reversible upon termination of therapy, and iii) the post-therapeutic growth delay was independent of the accumulated dose...

  17. Is anti-platelet therapy interruption a real clinical issue? Its implications in dentistry and particularly in periodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar A; Kumari M; Arora Nupur; Haritha A

    2009-01-01

    The use of anti-platelet therapy has reduced the mortality and morbidity of cardiovascular disease remarkably. A considerable number of patients presenting before a dentist or periodontist give a history of anti-platelet therapy. A clinical dilemma whether to discontinue the anti-platelet therapy or continue the same always confronts the practitioner. Diverse opinions exist regarding the management of such patients. While one group of researchers advise continuation of anti-platelet therapy r...

  18. Anti-angiogenesis in cancer therapy: Hercules and hydra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellou, S; Pentheroudakis, G; Murphy, C; Fotsis, T

    2013-09-28

    Solid tumours initiate angiogenesis to support their growth by producing growth factors such as VEGF. Depriving the tumour of the excessive vessels that support its growth became the target for developing anti-angiogenic agents that could provide, in combination with chemotherapy, improved anti-cancer treatment. Naturally most agents targeted VEGF and its signalling cascades. Almost 10 years have lapsed since the first anti-angiogenic drug approved by the FDA in 2004 (a humanized antibody inhibiting VEGF-A) and several other agents followed afterwards. There is sufficient accumulated experience to conclude that the clinical results of anti-angiogenic therapy are very modest resulting in moderate improvement in overall survival. Moreover, the clinical outcome is associated with the development of resistance to the anti-angiogenic agent and the increased risk of invasion and metastasis. The initial expectations are, as yet, unfilled, and the entire concept and strategy of the anti-angiogenic intervention in cancer requires re-evaluation. In the present Mini Review we discuss these issues emphasising the underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:23707856

  19. Marine-Derived Angiogenesis Inhibitors for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Qing Wang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis inhibitors have been successfully used for cancer therapy in the clinic. Many marine-derived natural products and their analogues have been reported to show antiangiogenic activities. Compared with the drugs in the clinic, these agents display interesting characteristics, including diverse sources, unique chemical structures, special modes of action, and distinct activity and toxicity profiles. This review will first provide an overview of the current marine-derived angiogenesis inhibitors based on their primary targets and/or mechanisms of action. Then, the marine-derived antiangiogenic protein kinase inhibitors will be focused on. And finally, the clinical trials of the marine-derived antiangiogenic agents will be discussed, with special emphasis on their application potentials, problems and possible coping strategies in their future development as anticancer drugs.

  20. Anti-angiogenic therapy in pediatric brain tumors : An effective strategy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sie, Mariska; den Dunnen, Wilfred F. A.; Hoving, Eelco W.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Brain tumors are still the leading cause of cancer morbidity and mortality among children, despite different therapeutic options including neurosurgery, chemotherapy and radiation. As angiogenesis is highly crucial in brain tumor growth and progression, numerous clinical trials evaluating diverse an

  1. Irradiation-induced angiosarcoma and anti-angiogenic therapy: A therapeutic hope?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angiosarcomas are rare soft-tissue sarcomas of endothelial cell origin. They can be sporadic or caused by therapeutic radiation, hence secondary breast angiosarcomas are an important subgroup of patients. Assessing the molecular biology of angiosarcomas and identify specific targets for treatment is challenging. There is currently great interest in the role of angiogenesis and of angiogenic factors associated with tumor pathogenesis and as targets for treatment of angiosarcomas. A primary cell line derived from a skin fragment of a irradiation-induced angiosarcoma patient was obtained and utilized to evaluate cell biomarkers CD31, CD34, HIF-1alpha and VEGFRs expression by immunocytochemistry and immunofluorescence, drugs cytotoxicity by cell counting and VEGF release by ELISA immunoassay. In addition to previous biomarkers, FVIII and VEGF were also evaluated on tumor specimens by immunohistochemistry to further confirm the diagnosis. We targeted the VEGF–VEGFR-2 axis of tumor angiogenesis with two different class of vascular targeted drugs; caprelsa, the VEGFR-2/EGFR/RET inhibitor and bevacizumab the anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody. We found the same biomarkers expression either in tumor specimens and in the cell line derived from tumor. In vitro experiments demonstrated that angiogenesis plays a pivotal role in the progression of this tumor as cells displayed high level of VEGFR-2, HIF-1 alpha strongly accumulated into the nucleus and the pro-angiogenic factor VEGF was released by cells in culture medium. The evaluation of caprelsa and bevacizumab cytotoxicity demonstrated that both drugs were effective in inhibiting tumor proliferation. Due to these results, we started to treat the patient with pazopanib, which was the unique tyrosine kinase inhibitor available in Italy through a compassionate supply program, obtaining a long lasting partial response. Our data suggest that the study of the primary cell line could help physicians in choosing a therapeutic approach for patient that almost in vitro shows chances of success and that the anti-angiogenetic agents are a reliable therapeutic opportunity for angiosarcomas patients. - Highlights: • Characterization of a new AS cell line for VEGFR-2, HIF-1 alpha and VEGF. • Caprelsa and bevacizumab inhibit AS cells proliferation. • Anti-angiogenetic agents as a reliable therapeutic opportunity for AS patients

  2. Irradiation-induced angiosarcoma and anti-angiogenic therapy: A therapeutic hope?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azzariti, Amalia, E-mail: a.azzariti@oncologico.bari.it [Clinical and Preclinical Pharmacology Laboratory, National Cancer Research Centre, Istituto Tumori Giovanni Paolo II, Viale O. Flacco, 65, 70124 Bari (Italy); Porcelli, Letizia [Clinical and Preclinical Pharmacology Laboratory, National Cancer Research Centre, Istituto Tumori Giovanni Paolo II, Viale O. Flacco, 65, 70124 Bari (Italy); Mangia, Anita; Saponaro, Concetta [Functional Biomorphology Laboratory, National Cancer Research Centre, Istituto Tumori Giovanni Paolo II, Viale O. Flacco, 65, 70124 Bari (Italy); Quatrale, Anna E. [Clinical and Preclinical Pharmacology Laboratory, National Cancer Research Centre, Istituto Tumori Giovanni Paolo II, Viale O. Flacco, 65, 70124 Bari (Italy); Popescu, Ondina S. [Department of Pathology, National Cancer Research Centre, Istituto Tumori Giovanni Paolo II, Viale O. Flacco, 65, 70124 Bari (Italy); Strippoli, Sabino [Medical Oncology Unit, National Cancer Research Centre, Istituto Tumori Giovanni Paolo II, Viale O. Flacco, 65, 70124 Bari (Italy); Simone, Gianni [Department of Pathology, National Cancer Research Centre, Istituto Tumori Giovanni Paolo II, Viale O. Flacco, 65, 70124 Bari (Italy); Paradiso, Angelo [Experimental Medical Oncology, National Cancer Research Centre, Istituto Tumori Giovanni Paolo II, Viale O. Flacco, 65, 70124 Bari (Italy); Guida, Michele [Medical Oncology Unit, National Cancer Research Centre, Istituto Tumori Giovanni Paolo II, Viale O. Flacco, 65, 70124 Bari (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    Angiosarcomas are rare soft-tissue sarcomas of endothelial cell origin. They can be sporadic or caused by therapeutic radiation, hence secondary breast angiosarcomas are an important subgroup of patients. Assessing the molecular biology of angiosarcomas and identify specific targets for treatment is challenging. There is currently great interest in the role of angiogenesis and of angiogenic factors associated with tumor pathogenesis and as targets for treatment of angiosarcomas. A primary cell line derived from a skin fragment of a irradiation-induced angiosarcoma patient was obtained and utilized to evaluate cell biomarkers CD31, CD34, HIF-1alpha and VEGFRs expression by immunocytochemistry and immunofluorescence, drugs cytotoxicity by cell counting and VEGF release by ELISA immunoassay. In addition to previous biomarkers, FVIII and VEGF were also evaluated on tumor specimens by immunohistochemistry to further confirm the diagnosis. We targeted the VEGF–VEGFR-2 axis of tumor angiogenesis with two different class of vascular targeted drugs; caprelsa, the VEGFR-2/EGFR/RET inhibitor and bevacizumab the anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody. We found the same biomarkers expression either in tumor specimens and in the cell line derived from tumor. In vitro experiments demonstrated that angiogenesis plays a pivotal role in the progression of this tumor as cells displayed high level of VEGFR-2, HIF-1 alpha strongly accumulated into the nucleus and the pro-angiogenic factor VEGF was released by cells in culture medium. The evaluation of caprelsa and bevacizumab cytotoxicity demonstrated that both drugs were effective in inhibiting tumor proliferation. Due to these results, we started to treat the patient with pazopanib, which was the unique tyrosine kinase inhibitor available in Italy through a compassionate supply program, obtaining a long lasting partial response. Our data suggest that the study of the primary cell line could help physicians in choosing a therapeutic approach for patient that almost in vitro shows chances of success and that the anti-angiogenetic agents are a reliable therapeutic opportunity for angiosarcomas patients. - Highlights: • Characterization of a new AS cell line for VEGFR-2, HIF-1 alpha and VEGF. • Caprelsa and bevacizumab inhibit AS cells proliferation. • Anti-angiogenetic agents as a reliable therapeutic opportunity for AS patients.

  3. Antiangiogenic Therapy Elicits Malignant Progression of Tumors to Increased Local Invasion and Distant Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Pàez-Ribes, Marta; Allen, Elizabeth; Hudock, James; Takeda, Takaaki; Okuyama, Hiroaki; Viñals, Francesc; Inoue, Masahiro; Bergers, Gabriele; Hanahan, Douglas; Casanovas, Oriol

    2009-01-01

    Multiple angiogenesis inhibitors have been therapeutically validated in preclinical cancer models, and several in clinical trials. Here we report that angiogenesis inhibitors targeting the VEGF pathway demonstrate antitumor effects in mouse models of pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma and glioblastoma but concomitantly elicit tumor adaptation and progression to stages of greater malignancy, with heightened invasiveness and in some cases increased lymphatic and distant metastasis. Increased i...

  4. Evaluation of antiangiogenic and antiproliferative potential of the organic extract of green algae chlorella pyrenoidosa

    OpenAIRE

    Mahender Kyadari; Tasneem Fatma; Rajvardhan Azad; Thirumurthy Velpandian

    2013-01-01

    Objective: algae isolates obtained from fresh and marine resources could be one of the richest sources of novel bioactive secondary metabolites expected to have pharmaceutical significance for new drug development. This study was conducted to evaluate the antiangiogenic and antiproliferative activity of Chlorella pyrenoidosa in experimental models of angiogenesis and by MTT assay. Materials and Methods: lyophilized extract of C. pyrenoidosa was extracted using dichloromethane/methanol (2...

  5. The Antiangiogenic Compound Aeroplysinin-1 Induces Apoptosis in Endothelial Cells by Activating the Mitochondrial Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Beatriz Martínez-Poveda; Salvador Rodríguez-Nieto; Melissa García-Caballero; Miguel-Ángel Medina; Quesada, Ana R.

    2012-01-01

    Aeroplysinin-1 is a brominated metabolite extracted from the marine sponge Aplysina aerophoba that has been previously characterized by our group as a potent antiangiogenic compound in vitro and in vivo. In this work, we provide evidence of a selective induction of apoptosis by aeroplysinin-1 in endothelial cells. Studies on the nuclear morphology of treated cells revealed that aeroplysinin-1 induces chromatin condensation and nuclear fragmentation, and it increases the percentage of cells wi...

  6. Anti-Angiogenic Drugs: Involvement in Cutaneous Side Effects and Wound-Healing Complication

    OpenAIRE

    Bodnar, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Significance: The uses of anti-angiogenic drugs have not only made an impact on the battle to eliminate cancer but are also responsible for a number of medical complications. The long-term use of these drugs has increased the spectrum and incidence of cutaneous side effects and wound-healing complications. It is, therefore, necessary to understand the overall impact that these drugs have on patient care.

  7. Marine sponge as a source of antiangiogenic compounds. The case of aeroplysinin-1

    OpenAIRE

    Quesada, AR; Martínez-Poveda, B.; Rodríguez-Nieto, S; Medina, MA

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority of the natural compounds that have been previously described as inhibitors of angiogenesis have been isolated from plants and terrestrial microorganisms, mainly due to their higher availability and because their therapeutic effects had been previously known in folk traditional medicines. However, increasing attention is being paid to the development of marine-derived antiangiogenic agents, probably fuelled by the increase in the number of marine-derived anticancer drugs whic...

  8. Anti-angiogenic effect of curcumin, curcumin ethylenediamine derivative and curcumin ethylenediamine manganese complex

    OpenAIRE

    SUNTORNSUK, Leena; Koizumi, Keiichi; Saitoh, Yurika; Nakamura, Eliane Shizuka; KAMMASUD, Naparat; VAJARAGUPTA, Opa; Saiki, Ikuo

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the anti-angiogenic effect of curcumin, curcumin ethylenediamine derivative (curcumin ED) and curcumin ethylenediamine manganese complex (curcumin EDMn) through the inhibition of the formation of tube-like structures by human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC). Curcumin, curcumin ED, curcumin EDMn did not show cytotoxicity to HUVEC at concentrations equal and lower than 10 μM. At the concentration of 10 μM,curcumin, curcumin ED and curcumin EDMn inhibited the tube fo...

  9. In Vitro and In Vivo Antiangiogenic Properties of the Serpin Protease Nexin-1

    OpenAIRE

    Selbonne, Sonia; Azibani, Feriel; Iatmanen, Soria; Boulaftali, Yacine; Richard, Benjamin; Jandrot-Perrus, Martine; Bouton, Marie-Christine; Arocas, Véronique

    2012-01-01

    The serpin protease nexin-1 (PN-1) is expressed by vascular cells and secreted by platelets upon activation, and it is known to interact with several modulators of angiogenesis, such as proteases, matrix proteins, and glycosaminoglycans. We therefore investigated the impact of PN-1 on endothelial cell angiogenic responses in vitro and ex vivo and in vivo in PN-1-deficient mice. We found that PN-1 is antiangiogenic in vitro: it inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced endoth...

  10. Platycodin D inhibits tumor growth by antiangiogenic activity via blocking VEGFR2-mediated signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Xin; Gao, Yun-Ge; Guan, Ying-Yun; Xu, Jian-Rong; Lu, Qin; Zhao, Mei; Liu, Ya-Rong; Liu, Hai-Jun; Fang, Chao; Chen, Hong-Zhuan

    2014-09-22

    Platycodin D (PD) is an active component mainly isolated from the root of Platycodon grandiflorum. Recent studies proved that PD exhibited inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration, invasion and xenograft growth of diverse cancer cell lines. However, whether PD is suppressive for angiogenesis, an important hallmark in cancer development, remains unknown. Here, we found that PD could dose-dependently inhibit human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation, motility, migration and tube formation. PD also significantly inhibited angiogenesis in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Moreover, the antiangiogenic activity of PD contributed to its in vivo anticancer potency shown in the decreased microvessel density and delayed growth of HCT-15 xenograft in mice with no overt toxicity. Western blot analysis indicated that PD inhibited the phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and its downstream protein kinase including PLCγ1, JAK2, FAK, Src, and Akt in endothelial cells. Molecular docking simulation showed that PD formed hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions within the ATP binding pocket of VEGFR2 kinase domain. The present study firstly revealed the high antiangiogenic activity and the underlying molecular basis of PD, suggesting that PD may be a potential antiangiogenic agent for angiogenesis-related diseases. PMID:25250884

  11. Endothelial Side Population Cells Contribute to Tumor Angiogenesis and Antiangiogenic Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Hisamichi; Wakabayashi, Taku; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Muramatsu, Fumitaka; Takara, Kazuhiro; Eino, Daisuke; Yamane, Keitaro; Iba, Tomohiro; Takakura, Nobuyuki

    2016-06-01

    Angiogenesis plays a crucial role in tumor growth, with an undisputed contribution of resident endothelial cells (EC) to new blood vessels in the tumor. Here, we report the definition of a small population of vascular-resident stem/progenitor-like EC that contributes predominantly to new blood vessel formation in the tumor. Although the surface markers of this population are similar to other ECs, those from the lung vasculature possess colony-forming ability in vitro and contribute to angiogenesis in vivo These specific ECs actively proliferate in lung tumors, and the percentage of this population significantly increases in the tumor vasculature relative to normal lung tissue. Using genetic recombination and bone marrow transplant models, we show that these cells are phenotypically true ECs and do not originate from hematopoietic cells. After treatment of tumors with antiangiogenic drugs, these specific ECs selectively survived and remained in the tumor. Together, our results established that ECs in the peripheral vasculature are heterogeneous and that stem/progenitor-like ECs play an indispensable role in tumor angiogenesis as EC-supplying cells. The lack of susceptibility of these ECs to antiangiogenic drugs may account for resistance of the tumor to this drug type. Thus, inhibiting these ECs might provide a promising strategy to overcome antiangiogenic drug resistance. Cancer Res; 76(11); 3200-10. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197162

  12. Anti-Angiogenic Activity of Ficus carica Latex Extract on Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mostafaie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels, is a key process in cancer developmentand metastasis. In this study, the anti-angiogenic and anti-proliferative potentials of Ficuscarica latex extract have been investigated using human umbilical vein endothelial cells(HUVECs.Different doses of latex extract were prepared and added to a three-dimensional culture ofHUVEC in a collagen matrix. After 3-5 days of treatment, the anti-angiogenic effects of theextracts were monitored microscopically. For the anti-proliferation assay, different dosesof the extracts were examined on HUVECs.The results clearly indicated that latex extract could inhibit proliferation and capillary tubeformation of HUVECs in a dose-dependent manner at the range of 100-400 μg/ml. In addition,the extract was not cytotoxic up to 450 μg/ml as assessed by trypan blue and lactatedehydrogenase (LDH cytotoxicity assays.It is concluded that latex extracts of F. carica contain strong anti-angiogenic andanti-proliferative activities. Our data indicates that latex extract could be a candidateas a potential agent for the prevention of angiogenesis in cancer and other chronicdisorders.

  13. Anti-angiogenic action of plasma hyaluronan binding protein in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Ji Won; Song, Hyun Seok; Moon, Eun-Joung; Park, Shi-Young; Son, Myung Jin; Jung, Seung Youn; Kim, Ji Tae; Nam, Do-Hyun; Choi-Miura, Nam-Ho; Kim, Kyu-Won; Kim, Yung-Jin

    2006-07-01

    The kringle domain is a triple loop structure present in angiostatin and endostatin. The disulfide bond-linked kringle architectures have been known to be essential for anti-angiogenic activity. Plasma hyaluronan binding protein (PHBP) is a novel serine protease which consists of three epidermal growth factor (EGF) domains, a kringle domain, and a serine protease domain. PHBP can be cleaved autocatalytically to generate activity and is highly expressed in the human blood and liver. To determine the anti-angiogenic activities of PHBP, we purified recombinant mouse PHBP from stable cell line overexpressing PHBP and used protein in vivo and in vitro angiogenesis assays. We found that recombinant PHBP inhibits not only angiogenesis in vivo in chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay but also the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-induced proliferation, invasion and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a dose-dependant manner. Moreover, we found that the kringle domain of PHBP was essential for the anti-angiogenic action of PHBP by the deletion mutants. These findings unravel a new function of PHBP as an inhibitor of the proangiogenic phenotype of vascular endothelial cells and demonstrate that the kringle domain of PHBP might be a potent novel inhibitor of activated endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:16773202

  14. Platycodin D inhibits tumor growth by antiangiogenic activity via blocking VEGFR2-mediated signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luan, Xin; Gao, Yun-Ge; Guan, Ying-Yun; Xu, Jian-Rong; Lu, Qin [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Zhao, Mei [Department of Pharmacy, Shanghai Institute of Health Sciences and Health School Attached to SJTU-SM, 279 Zhouzhu Road, Shanghai 201318 (China); Liu, Ya-Rong; Liu, Hai-Jun [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Fang, Chao, E-mail: fangchao100@hotmail.com [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen, Hong-Zhuan, E-mail: hongzhuan_chen@hotmail.com [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2014-11-15

    Platycodin D (PD) is an active component mainly isolated from the root of Platycodon grandiflorum. Recent studies proved that PD exhibited inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration, invasion and xenograft growth of diverse cancer cell lines. However, whether PD is suppressive for angiogenesis, an important hallmark in cancer development, remains unknown. Here, we found that PD could dose-dependently inhibit human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation, motility, migration and tube formation. PD also significantly inhibited angiogenesis in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Moreover, the antiangiogenic activity of PD contributed to its in vivo anticancer potency shown in the decreased microvessel density and delayed growth of HCT-15 xenograft in mice with no overt toxicity. Western blot analysis indicated that PD inhibited the phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and its downstream protein kinase including PLCγ1, JAK2, FAK, Src, and Akt in endothelial cells. Molecular docking simulation showed that PD formed hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions within the ATP binding pocket of VEGFR2 kinase domain. The present study firstly revealed the high antiangiogenic activity and the underlying molecular basis of PD, suggesting that PD may be a potential antiangiogenic agent for angiogenesis-related diseases. - Highlights: • Platycodin D inhibits HUVEC proliferation, motility, migration and tube formation. • Platycodin D inhibits the angiogenesis in chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane. • Platycodin D suppresses the angiogenesis and growth of HCT-15 xenograft in mice. • Platycodin D inhibits the phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and downstream kinases in HUVEC.

  15. Platycodin D inhibits tumor growth by antiangiogenic activity via blocking VEGFR2-mediated signaling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platycodin D (PD) is an active component mainly isolated from the root of Platycodon grandiflorum. Recent studies proved that PD exhibited inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration, invasion and xenograft growth of diverse cancer cell lines. However, whether PD is suppressive for angiogenesis, an important hallmark in cancer development, remains unknown. Here, we found that PD could dose-dependently inhibit human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation, motility, migration and tube formation. PD also significantly inhibited angiogenesis in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Moreover, the antiangiogenic activity of PD contributed to its in vivo anticancer potency shown in the decreased microvessel density and delayed growth of HCT-15 xenograft in mice with no overt toxicity. Western blot analysis indicated that PD inhibited the phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and its downstream protein kinase including PLCγ1, JAK2, FAK, Src, and Akt in endothelial cells. Molecular docking simulation showed that PD formed hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions within the ATP binding pocket of VEGFR2 kinase domain. The present study firstly revealed the high antiangiogenic activity and the underlying molecular basis of PD, suggesting that PD may be a potential antiangiogenic agent for angiogenesis-related diseases. - Highlights: • Platycodin D inhibits HUVEC proliferation, motility, migration and tube formation. • Platycodin D inhibits the angiogenesis in chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane. • Platycodin D suppresses the angiogenesis and growth of HCT-15 xenograft in mice. • Platycodin D inhibits the phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and downstream kinases in HUVEC

  16. Halting angiogenesis by non-viral somatic gene therapy alleviates psoriasis and murine psoriasiform skin lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibert, John Robert; Wallbrecht, Katrin; Schön, Margarete;

    2011-01-01

    epidermal expression of human TGF-ß1, we have demonstrated that antiangiogenic non-viral somatic gene therapy reduces the cutaneous microvasculature and alleviates chronic inflammatory skin disorders. Transient muscular expression of the recombinant disintegrin domain (RDD) of metargidin (also known as ADAM...... in all models. Thus, non-viral antiangiogenic gene therapy can alleviate psoriasis and may do so in other angiogenesis-related inflammatory skin disorders.......-15) by in vivo electroporation reduced cutaneous angiogenesis and vascularization in all 3 models. As demonstrated using red fluorescent protein-coupled RDD, the treatment resulted in muscular expression of the gene product and its deposition within the cutaneous hyperangiogenic connective tissue...

  17. Regulatory changes in presynaptic cholinergic function assessed in rapid autopsy material from patients with Alzheimer disease: Implications for etiology and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain regions from patients with or without Alzheimer disease (AD) were obtained within 2 hr of death and examined for indices of presynaptic cholinergic function. Consistent with loss of cholinergic projections, cerebral cortical areas involved in AD exhibited decreased choline acetyltransferase activity. However, remaining nerve terminals in these regions displayed marked up-regulation of synaptosomal high affinity [3H]choline uptake, a result indicative of relative cholinergic hyperactivity. As choline uptake is also rate-limiting in acetylcholine biosynthesis, these findings have implications for both therapy and identification of causes contributing to neuronal death in AD

  18. Screening of antiangiogenic potential of twenty two marine invertebrate extracts of phylum Mollusca from South East Coast of India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pankaj Gupta; Muthuvel Arumugam; Raj Vardhan Azad; Rohit Saxena; Supriyo Ghose; Nihar Ranjan Biswas; Thirumurthy Velpandian

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antiangiogenic potential of twenty two marine invertebrate species of Phylum Mollusca from south east coast of India.Methods:Live specimens of molluscan species were collected and their methanolic extracts were evaluated for preliminary antiangiogenic activity using the in ovo chick chorio-allantoic membrane assay. The extracts were further evaluated for in vivo antiangiogenic activity using chemical cautery induced corneal neovascularization assay in rats and oxygen induced retinopathy assay in rat pups.Results:In the chick chorio-allantoic membrane assay, four methanolic extracts of marine molluscan species viz. Meretrix meretrix, Meretrix casta, Telescopium telescopium and Bursacrumena methanolic extracts exhibited noticeable antiangiogenic activity at the tested concentration of 200 µg whereby they significantly inhibited the VEGF induced proliferation of new blood vessels. Among these four extracts, the methanolic extract of Meretrix casta exhibited relatively higher degree of antiangiogenic activity with an inhibitiory percentage (64.63%) of the VEGF induced neovascularization followed by the methanolic extracts of Telescopium telescopium (62.02%), Bursa crumena (60.48%) and Meretrix meretrix (47.01%). These four methanolic extracts were further evaluated for in vivo antiangiogenic activity whereby the methanolic extract of Telescopium telescopium exhibited most noticeable inhibition (42.58%) of the corneal neovascularization in rats in comparison to the sham treated group, and also exhibited most noticeable inhibition (31.31%) of the oxygen induced retinal neovascularization in rat pups in comparison to the hyperoxia group that was observed for considerable retinal neovascularization.Conclusions:The significant antiangiogenic activity evinced by the extract of Telescopium telescopium merits further investigation for ocular neovascular diseases.

  19. Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor Resistance Mutations Associated with First-Line Stavudine-Containing Antiretroviral Therapy: Programmatic Implications for Countries Phasing Out Stavudine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Michele W.; Rhee, Soo-Yon; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Ford, Nathan; Holmes, Susan; Sigaloff, Kim C.; Hamers, Raph L.; de Wit, Tobias F. Rinke; Fleury, Herve J.; Kanki, Phyllis J.; Ruxrungtham, Kiat; Hawkins, Claudia A.; Wallis, Carole L.; Stevens, Wendy; van Zyl, Gert U.; Manosuthi, Weerawat; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Belec, Laurent; Peeters, Martine; Aghokeng, Avelin; Bunupuradah, Torsak; Burda, Sherri; Cane, Patricia; Cappelli, Giulia; Charpentier, Charlotte; Dagnra, Anoumou Y.; Deshpande, Alaka K.; El-Katib, Ziad; Eshleman, Susan H.; Fokam, Joseph; Gody, Jean-Chrysostome; Katzenstein, David; Koyalta, Donato D.; Kumwenda, Johnstone J.; Lallemant, Marc; Lynen, Lutgarde; Marconi, Vincent C.; Margot, Nicolas A.; Moussa, Sandrine; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Nyambi, Phillipe N.; Orrell, Catherine; Schapiro, Jonathan M.; Schuurman, Rob; Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Smith, Davey; Zolfo, Maria; Jordan, Michael R.; Shafer, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization Antiretroviral Treatment Guidelines recommend phasing-out stavudine because of its risk of long-term toxicity. There are two mutational pathways of stavudine resistance with different implications for zidovudine and tenofovir cross-resistance, the primary candidates for replacing stavudine. However, because resistance testing is rarely available in resource-limited settings, it is critical to identify the cross-resistance patterns associated with first-line stavudine failure. Methods We analyzed HIV-1 resistance mutations following first-line stavudine failure from 35 publications comprising 1,825 individuals. We also assessed the influence of concomitant nevirapine vs. efavirenz, therapy duration, and HIV-1 subtype on the proportions of mutations associated with zidovudine vs. tenofovir cross-resistance. Results Mutations with preferential zidovudine activity, K65R or K70E, occurred in 5.3% of individuals. Mutations with preferential tenofovir activity, ≥two thymidine analog mutations (TAMs) or Q151M, occurred in 22% of individuals. Nevirapine increased the risk of TAMs, K65R, and Q151M. Longer therapy increased the risk of TAMs and Q151M but not K65R. Subtype C and CRF01_AE increased the risk of K65R, but only CRF01_AE increased the risk of K65R without Q151M. Conclusions Regardless of concomitant nevirapine vs. efavirenz, therapy duration, or subtype, tenofovir was more likely than zidovudine to retain antiviral activity following first-line d4T therapy. PMID:23687292

  20. Is anti-platelet therapy interruption a real clinical issue? Its implications in dentistry and particularly in periodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of anti-platelet therapy has reduced the mortality and morbidity of cardiovascular disease remarkably. A considerable number of patients presenting before a dentist or periodontist give a history of anti-platelet therapy. A clinical dilemma whether to discontinue the anti-platelet therapy or continue the same always confronts the practitioner. Diverse opinions exist regarding the management of such patients. While one group of researchers advise continuation of anti-platelet therapy rather than invite remote, but possible, thromboembolic events, another group encourages discontinuation for variable periods. This study aims at reviewing the current rationale of anti-platelet therapy and the various options available to a clinician, with regard to the management of a patient under anti-platelet therapy. Current recommendations and consensus favour no discontinuation of anti-platelet therapy. This recommendation, however, comes with a rider to use caution and consider other mitigating factors as well. With a large number of patients giving a history of anti-platelet therapy, the topic is of interest and helps a clinician to arrive at a decision.

  1. Modern imaging techniques during therapy in patients with multiple myeloma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horger, M; Claussen, CD; Lichy, M (Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-Univ. (Germany)), email: marius.horger@med.uni-tuebingen.de; Weisel, K (Dept. of Internal Medicine II, Hematology and Oncology, Eberhard-Karls-Univ. (Germany)); Bares, R (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Eberhard-Karls-Univ. (Germany)); Ernemann, U; Fenchel, M (Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroadiology, Eberhard-Karls-Univ., Tuebingen (Germany))

    2011-10-15

    Imaging modalities used in the diagnosis of multiple myeloma have evolved and most of them are also suitable for either early or mid-term monitoring of response to novel antimyeloma therapy. This pictorial essay focuses on modern imaging techniques for diagnosis and follow-up of patients with multiple myeloma in order to highlight their individual strengths and limitations. Also, the impact of recently established modern pharmaceutical therapy, like anti-angiogenic medication, on the tumor is addressed

  2. The evaluation of anti-angiogenic treatment effects for implanted rabbit VX2 breast tumors using functional multi-slice spiral computed tomography (f-MSCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei Zhen, E-mail: leizhen2004@163.com [Department of Anatomy, Chinese Medical University, No. 92, Beiermalu Road, Heping District, Shenyang, 110001 (China) and Department of Radiology, The First Hospital of Liaoning Medical College, No. 2, Wuduan, Renmin Street, Jinzhou, 121001 (China); Ma Heji, E-mail: maheji9831@sina.com [Department of Radiology, The First Hospital of Liaoning Medical College, No. 2, Wuduan, Renmin Street, Jinzhou, 121001 (China); Xu Na, E-mail: xuna821230@sohu.com [Department of Radiology, The First Hospital of Liaoning Medical College, No. 2, Wuduan, Renmin Street, Jinzhou, 121001 (China); Xi Huanjiu, E-mail: xihuanjiu2004@yahoo.cn [Anthropology Institute, Liaoning Medical College, No. 40, Sanduan, Songpo Rd, Jinzhou, 121001 (China)

    2011-05-15

    Objective: Investigate the benefit of functional multi-slice spiral computed tomography (f-MSCT) perfusion imaging in the non-invasive assessment of targeted anti-angiogenesis therapy on an implanted rabbit VX2 breast tumor model. Method: 69 female pure New Zealand white rabbits were randomly assigned to one of the 4 groups and received treatment accordingly: control (saline), Endostar, neoadjuvant chemotherapy (Cyclophosphamide, Epirubicin and 5-Fluorouracil, CEF), combination therapy (Endostar and CEF). After 2 weeks of treatment, f-MSCT perfusion scannings were performed for all rabbits and information about blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT) and surface permeability (SP) was collected. After perfusion imaging, tumor tissues were sampled for immunohistochemistry and the Western blot test of VEGF protein expression. Results: (1) The VEGF expression level, measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blot, decreased by treatment group (control > Endostar > CEF > combination therapy). The same was true for the mean BF, BV, MTT and PS, which decreased from the control group to the combination therapy group gradually. The mean MTT level increased in reverse order from the control to the combination therapy group. The difference between any 2 groups on these measures was statistically significant (P < 0.05). (2) There was moderate positive correlation between VEGF expression and BE, BV, or PS level (P < 0.05) and a negative correlation between VEGF expression and MTT level for all 4 groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Therefore, f-MSCT can be used as a non-invasive approach to evaluate the effect of anti-angiogenic therapy for implanted rabbit VX2 breast tumors.

  3. The evaluation of anti-angiogenic treatment effects for implanted rabbit VX2 breast tumors using functional multi-slice spiral computed tomography (f-MSCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Investigate the benefit of functional multi-slice spiral computed tomography (f-MSCT) perfusion imaging in the non-invasive assessment of targeted anti-angiogenesis therapy on an implanted rabbit VX2 breast tumor model. Method: 69 female pure New Zealand white rabbits were randomly assigned to one of the 4 groups and received treatment accordingly: control (saline), Endostar, neoadjuvant chemotherapy (Cyclophosphamide, Epirubicin and 5-Fluorouracil, CEF), combination therapy (Endostar and CEF). After 2 weeks of treatment, f-MSCT perfusion scannings were performed for all rabbits and information about blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT) and surface permeability (SP) was collected. After perfusion imaging, tumor tissues were sampled for immunohistochemistry and the Western blot test of VEGF protein expression. Results: (1) The VEGF expression level, measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blot, decreased by treatment group (control > Endostar > CEF > combination therapy). The same was true for the mean BF, BV, MTT and PS, which decreased from the control group to the combination therapy group gradually. The mean MTT level increased in reverse order from the control to the combination therapy group. The difference between any 2 groups on these measures was statistically significant (P < 0.05). (2) There was moderate positive correlation between VEGF expression and BE, BV, or PS level (P < 0.05) and a negative correlation between VEGF expression and MTT level for all 4 groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Therefore, f-MSCT can be used as a non-invasive approach to evaluate the effect of anti-angiogenic therapy for implanted rabbit VX2 breast tumors.

  4. Endostatin improves radioresponse and blocks tumor revascularization after radiation therapy for A431 xenografts in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Clinical trials of antiangiogenic agents used alone for advanced malignancy have been disappointing but preclinical studies suggest that the addition of radiation therapy could improve antitumor efficacy. To test the hypothesis that antiangiogenic therapy combined with radiation therapy can overcome the limitations of antiangiogenic monotherapy, we studied the effects of endostatin combined with radiation on the growth and vascularization of A431 human epidermoid carcinomas growing intramuscularly in the legs of mice. Methods and Materials: Mice with established A431 human epidermoid leg tumors were treated with radiation, endostatin, both radiation and endostatin, or vehicle control. The experiment was repeated and mice from each group were killed at 2, 7, and 10 days after irradiation so that tumor tissue could be obtained to further analyze the kinetics of the antitumor, antivascular, and antiangiogenic response to therapy. Results: Endostatin enhanced the antitumor effects of radiation, and prolonged disease-free survival was observed in the combined treatment group. Endothelial cell proliferation was increased in tumors after irradiation but was blocked by the concurrent administration of endostatin, and the combination of endostatin with radiation enhanced endothelial cell apoptosis within 48 h after irradiation. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, interleukin-8, and matrix metalloproteinase-2 were increased in tumors after irradiation, and this increase was blocked by concurrent administration of endostatin. Conclusion: These data indicate that endostatin can block tumor revascularization after radiation therapy and thereby augment radioresponse

  5. Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme: Implication of Nonenhancing Lesions on Bevacizumab Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Alexandru

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common primary brain tumors, accounting for 15-20% of all intracranial tumors. It is one of the most lethal tumors of the central nervous system with a median survival from diagnosis on the order of 6 to 18 months. Despite aggressive resection and chemoradiation, the tumor always recurs. Magnetic Resonance (MR imaging is an essential component in the diagnosis, treatment planning, and following response. However, the imaging features of recurrent GBM may be challenging, particularly in patients undertaking novel antiangiogenic therapy. We present such a case treated with repeated surgeries, combined chemoradiation, and bevacizumab. The patient benefited from the regimen with a 6-month progression-free survival, evidenced on both stable clinical condition and MR imaging findings. However, despite chemotherapy, a fulminant progression developed with growth multiple tumors in different locations and variable imaging characteristics, ranging from typical enhancing nodules to nonenhancing signal changes. The lesions of different imaging features were biopsy-proved to be recurrent GBM. We discuss the use of MR imaging in the evaluation of GBM treated with bevacizumab and emphasize the implication of signal abnormality on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR images for early evidence of recurrence. [J Interdiscipl Histopathol 2013; 1(4.000: 217-222

  6. The Adoption of New Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Modalities Among Medicare Beneficiaries With Breast Cancer: Clinical Correlates and Cost Implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: New radiation therapy modalities have broadened treatment options for older women with breast cancer, but it is unclear how clinical factors, geographic region, and physician preference affect the choice of radiation therapy modality. Methods and Materials: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database to identify women diagnosed with stage I-III breast cancer from 1998 to 2007 who underwent breast-conserving surgery. We assessed the temporal trends in, and costs of, the adoption of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and brachytherapy. Using hierarchical logistic regression, we evaluated the relationship between the use of these new modalities and patient and regional characteristics. Results: Of 35,060 patients, 69.9% received conventional external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Although overall radiation therapy use remained constant, the use of IMRT increased from 0.0% to 12.6% from 1998 to 2007, and brachytherapy increased from 0.7% to 9.0%. The statistical variation in brachytherapy use attributable to the radiation oncologist and geographic region was 41.4% and 9.5%, respectively (for IMRT: 23.8% and 22.1%, respectively). Women undergoing treatment at a free-standing radiation facility were significantly more likely to receive IMRT than were women treated at a hospital-based facility (odds ratio for IMRT vs EBRT: 3.89 [95% confidence interval, 2.78-5.45]). No such association was seen for brachytherapy. The median radiation therapy cost per treated patient increased from $5389 in 2001 to $8539 in 2007. Conclusions: IMRT and brachytherapy use increased substantially from 1998 to 2007; overall, radiation therapy costs increased by more than 50%. Radiation oncologists played an important role in treatment choice for both types of radiation therapy, whereas geographic region played a bigger role in the use of IMRT than brachytherapy

  7. Oxidative stress contributes to the tamoxifen-induced killing of breast cancer cells: implications for tamoxifen therapy and resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Bekele, Raie T.; Ganesh Venkatraman; Rong-Zong Liu; Xiaoyun Tang; Si Mi; Benesch, Matthew G. K.; Mackey, John R; Roseline Godbout; Curtis, Jonathan M.; McMullen, Todd P. W.; Brindley, David N.

    2016-01-01

    Tamoxifen is the accepted therapy for patients with estrogen receptor-α (ERα)-positive breast cancer. However, clinical resistance to tamoxifen, as demonstrated by recurrence or progression on therapy, is frequent and precedes death from metastases. To improve breast cancer treatment it is vital to understand the mechanisms that result in tamoxifen resistance. This study shows that concentrations of tamoxifen and its metabolites, which accumulate in tumors of patients, killed both ERα-positiv...

  8. Differential Effects of Dopaminergic Therapies on Dorsal and Ventral Striatum in Parkinson's Disease: Implications for Cognitive Function

    OpenAIRE

    MacDonald, Penny A; Oury Monchi

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive abnormalities are a feature of Parkinson's disease (PD). Unlike motor symptoms that are clearly improved by dopaminergic therapy, the effect of dopamine replacement on cognition seems paradoxical. Some cognitive functions are improved whereas others are unaltered or even hindered. Our aim was to understand the effect of dopamine replacement therapy on various aspects of cognition. Whereas dorsal striatum receives dopamine input from the substantia nigra (SN), ventral striatum is in...

  9. Alzheimer’s disease: review of hormone therapy trials and implications for treatment and prevention after menopause

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson, Victor W.

    2013-01-01

    Hormonal changes associated with the menopausal transition and postmenopause have the potential to influence processes linked to Alzheimer’s disease symptoms and pathogenesis, but effects of menopause on Alzheimer risk can be addressed only indirectly. Nine randomized clinical trials of estrogen-containing hormone therapy in Alzheimer’s disease patients were identified by a systematic literature search. Findings suggest that hormone therapy does not improve cognitive symptoms of women with Al...

  10. Evaluation of antiangiogenic and antiproliferative potential of the organic extract of green algae chlorella pyrenoidosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahender Kyadari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: algae isolates obtained from fresh and marine resources could be one of the richest sources of novel bioactive secondary metabolites expected to have pharmaceutical significance for new drug development. This study was conducted to evaluate the antiangiogenic and antiproliferative activity of Chlorella pyrenoidosa in experimental models of angiogenesis and by MTT assay. Materials and Methods: lyophilized extract of C. pyrenoidosa was extracted using dichloromethane/methanol (2:1, concentrated and vacuum evaporated to obtain the dried extract. The crude extract was evaluated in the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-induced angiogenesis in in ovo chick chorioallantoic membrane assay (CAM at various concentrations (n = 8 using thalidomide and normal saline as positive and untreated control groups, respectively. The crude extract was also subjected to the antiangiogenic activity in the silver nitrate/potassium nitrate cautery model of corneal neovascularization (CN in rats where topical bevacizumab was used as a positive control. The vasculature was photographed and blood vessel density was quantified using Aphelion imaging software. The extract was also evaluated for its anti proliferative activity by microculture tetrazolium test (MTT assay using HeLa cancer cell line (ATCC. Results: VEGF increased the blood vessel density by 220% as compared to normal and thalidomide treatment decreased it to 67.2% in in ovo assay. In the in-vivo CN model, the mean neovascular density in the control group, the C. pyrenoidosa extract and bevacizumab group were found to be 100%, 59.02%, and 32.20%, respectively. The Chlorella pyrenoidosa extract negatively affected the viability of HeLa cells. An IC 50 value of the extract was 570 μg/ml, respectively. Conclusion: a significant antiangiogenic activity was observed against VEGF-induced neovascularization and antiproliferative activity by MTT assay. In this study, it could be attributed that the

  11. Anti-angiogenic agents in ovarian cancer: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, B J; Minion, L E; Coleman, R L

    2016-04-01

    Angiogenesis plays a pivotal role in normal ovarian physiology as well as in the progression of ovarian cancer through ascites formation and metastatic spread. Bevacizumab (Avastin(®), Genentech; South San Francisco, CA, USA), a humanized anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) monoclonal antibody, is the most widely studied anti-angiogenesis agent both across tumor types and specifically in epithelial ovarian cancer. In 2005, single-agent bevacizumab at 15 mg/kg (IV) every 3 weeks was first reported to be active in a case of recurrent high-grade serous ovarian cancer after failing 11th line cytotoxic treatment. Since then, many case series, phase II and phase III trials have confirmed these results leading to regulatory approval in most countries including the US Food and Drug Administration in 2014. Guidelines now give clear recommendations as to when and how bevacizumab should be integrated into the ovarian cancer treatment paradigm. Other anti-VEGF agents such as the VEGF receptor (VEGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors have not shown increased activity or reduced toxicity relative to bevacizumab. However, anti-angiogenics other than anti-VEGF/VEGFR agents such as those targeting Angiopoietin-1 and -2 are in development as well as novel combinations with vascular disrupting agents (VDAs), PARP inhibitors and immune checkpoint inhibitors. Clearly, the benefits of anti-angiogenic agents such as bevacizumab must be carefully weighed against the cost and associated toxicities. Although almost all patients with ovarian cancer will receive an anti-angiogenic compound, cures are not increased. Predictive biomarkers are an urgent unmet need. PMID:27141068

  12. Antitumor and anti-angiogenic activity of Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides peptide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi-zhen CAO; Zhi-bin LIN

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the antitumor and anti-angiogenic activity of Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides peptide (GLPP). METHODS: Antitumor effect of GLPP was observed in tumor-bearing mice in vivo. At the same time,the effects of GLPP on proliferation of tumor cells and human umbilical cord vascular endothelial cell (HUVEC)were detected by MTT assay in vitro. Subsequently, spleen lymphocytes proliferation of nude mice was stimulated by LPS or ConA. To investigate the anti-angiogenic effect of GLPP, GLPP 80 μg per disc and GLPP-treated serum 10 μL per disc were added to the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) respectively in vivo. RESULTS: GLPP 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg inhibited growth of Sarcoma 180 in BALB/c mice markedly by 35.2 %, 45.2%, and 61.9%,respectively. GLPP which was directly added to the cultured medium did not inhibit PG cell proliferation in vitro;but GLPP-treated serum 50, 100, 200 mg/kg potently inhibited PG cell proliferation by 22.5%, 26.8%, and 30.3 %,respectively; and reduced the xenograft (human lung carcinoma cell PG) in BALB/c nude mice greatly in vivo by 55.5 %, 46.0 %, and 46.8 %, respectively. Lymphocytes proliferation of nude mice could be stimulated by LPS 5 mg/L but not by ConA 2.5 mg/L, indicating that GLPP could not promote the T lymphocyte proliferation and neutral red phagocytosis of peritoneal macrophages of nude mice. The CAM assay showed that GLPP and GLPP-treated serum had anti-angiogenic effect. GLPP (1, 10, and 100 mg/L) inhibited HUVEC proliferation in vitro with the inhibitory rate of 9.4 %, 15.6%, and 40.4%, respectively. CONCLUSION: GLPP has antitumor and antiangiogenic activity. The anti-angiogenesis of GLPP may be a new mechanism underlying its anti-tumor effects.

  13. A novel antiangiogenic peptide derived from hepatocyte growth factor inhibits neovascularization in vitro and in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yi; Zhao, Hui; Zheng, Ying; Gu, Qing; Ma, Jianxing; Xu, Xun

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To study the antiangiogenic activity of two small peptides (H-RN and H-FT) derived from the hepatocyte growth factor kringle 1 domain (HGF K1) using in vitro and in vivo assays. Methods RF/6A rhesus macaque choroid-retina endothelial cells were used for in vitro studies. The inhibiting effect of two peptides on a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-stimulated cell proliferation, cell migration, and endothelial cell tube formation were investigated. For in vivo assays, the antian...

  14. Natural phenolic metabolites with anti-angiogenic properties - a review from the chemical point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiu; Heilmann, Jörg; König, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    Considering the many secondary natural metabolites available from plants, phenolic compounds play a particularly important role in human health as they occur in significant amounts in many fruits, vegetables and medicinal plants. In this review natural phenolic compounds of plant origin with significant anti-angiogenic properties are discussed. Thirteen representatives from eight different natural or natural-like phenolic subclasses are presented with an emphasis on their synthesis and methods to modify the parent compounds. When available, the consequence of structural variation on the pharmacological activity of the molecules is described. PMID:25815077

  15. Capillary regeneration in scleroderma: stem cell therapy reverses phenotype?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo N Fleming

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Scleroderma is an autoimmune disease with a characteristic vascular pathology. The vasculopathy associated with scleroderma is one of the major contributors to the clinical manifestations of the disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used immunohistochemical and mRNA in situ hybridization techniques to characterize this vasculopathy and showed with morphometry that scleroderma has true capillary rarefaction. We compared skin biopsies from 23 scleroderma patients and 24 normal controls and 7 scleroderma patients who had undergone high dose immunosuppressive therapy followed by autologous hematopoietic cell transplant. Along with the loss of capillaries there was a dramatic change in endothelial phenotype in the residual vessels. The molecules defining this phenotype are: vascular endothelial cadherin, a supposedly universal endothelial marker required for tube formation (lost in the scleroderma tissue, antiangiogenic interferon alpha (overexpressed in the scleroderma dermis and RGS5, a signaling molecule whose expression coincides with the end of branching morphogenesis during development and tumor angiogenesis (also overexpressed in scleroderma skin. Following high dose immunosuppressive therapy, patients experienced clinical improvement and 5 of the 7 patients with scleroderma had increased capillary counts. It was also observed in the same 5 patients, that the interferon alpha and vascular endothelial cadherin had returned to normal as other clinical signs in the skin regressed, and in all 7 patients, RGS5 had returned to normal. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These data provide the first objective evidence for loss of vessels in scleroderma and show that this phenomenon is reversible. Coordinate changes in expression of three molecules already implicated in angiogenesis or anti-angiogenesis suggest that control of expression of these three molecules may be the underlying mechanism for at least the vascular component of this disease

  16. SHORT REPORT Technological dreams: The implications of new technologies for occupational therapy education and evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steward, BARBARA

    2001-01-01

    Computer technologies will change both occupational therapy education and practice. Technological optimists suggest that there will be positive benefits for distance learning and supervision, universal equal access to information and expertise, and positive cross-cultural exchange. However, technologies have inevitable and unexpected costs. In this report I explore the potential for future problems with professional induction, educational reductionism, cultural imperialism and deprofessionalization through a review of the literature. I suggest that early recognition of the costs as well as the benefits of computer-based education will be important to the development of international occupational therapy. PMID:11823879

  17. Low-level laser therapy regulates microglial function through Src-mediated signaling pathways: implications for neurodegenerative diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Song Sheng; Zhou Feifan; Chen Wei R

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Activated microglial cells are an important pathological component in brains of patients with neurodegenerative diseases. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of He-Ne (632.8 nm, 64.6 mW/cm2) low-level laser therapy (LLLT), a non-damaging physical therapy, on activated microglia, and the subsequent signaling events of LLLT-induced neuroprotective effects and phagocytic responses. Methods To model microglial activation, we treated the microglial BV2 cells...

  18. Antiangiogenic treatment in hepatocellular carcinoma: the balance of efficacy and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a severe complication of advanced liver disease with a worldwide incidence of more than 600,000 patients per year. Liver function, clinical performance status, and tumor size are considered in the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) system. While curative treatment options are available for early stages, most patients present with intermediate- or advanced-stage HCC, burdened with a poor prognosis, substantially influenced by the degree of liver-function impairment. Hypervascularization is a major characteristic of HCC, and antiangiogenic treatments are the basis of treatment in noncurative stages, including interventional and pharmacological treatments. Currently, the tyrosine-kinase inhibitor sorafenib is still the only approved drug for HCC. Further improvements in survival in patients with intermediate- and advanced-stage HCC may be anticipated by both multimodal approaches, such as combination of interventional and systemic treatments, and new systemic treatment options. Until now, the Phase III development of other tyrosine-kinase inhibitors in patients with advanced HCC has failed due to minor efficacy and/or increased toxicity compared to sorafenib. However, promising Phase II data have been reported with MET inhibitors in this hard-to-treat population. This review gives a critical overview of antiangiogenic drugs and strategies in intermediate- and advanced-stage HCC, with a special focus on safety

  19. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Clinical Findings following Treatment with Antiangiogenic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Casaroli-Marano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To survey the management of patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nvAMD in Spain. Methods. An observational retrospective multicenter study was conducted. The variables analyzed were sociodemographic characteristics, foveal and macular thickness, visual acuity (VA, type of treatment, number of injections, and the initial administration of a loading dose of an antiangiogenic drug. Results. 208 patients were followed up during 23.4 months in average. During the first and second years, patients received a mean of 4.5±1.8 and 1.6±2.1 injections of antiangiogenic drugs, and 5.4±2.8 and 3.6±2.2 follow-up visits were performed, respectively. The highest improvement in VA was observed at 3 months of follow-up, followed by a decrease in the response that stabilized above baseline values until the end of the study. Patients who received an initial loading dose presented greater VA gains than those without. Conclusions. Our results suggest the need for a more standardized approach in the management and diagnosis of nvAMD receiving VEGF inhibitors. To achieve the visual outcomes reported in pivotal trials, an early diagnosis, proactive approach (more treating than follow-up visits, and a close monitoring might be the key to successfully manage nvAMD.

  20. Apoptotic and anti-angiogenic effects of Salvia triloba extract in prostate cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmaca, Harika; Bozkurt, Emir

    2016-03-01

    Plants, due to their remarkable composition, are considered as natural resources of bioactive compounds with specific biological activities. Salvia genus (Lamiaceae) has been used around the world in complementary medicine since ancient times. We investigated the cytotoxic, apoptotic and anti-angiogenic effects of methanolic Salvia triloba extract (STE) in prostate cancer cells. Cell viability was evaluated by XTT; apoptosis was investigated by DNA fragmentation and caspase 3/7 activity assays. Changes in the angiogenic cytokine levels were investigated by human angiogenesis antibody array. Scratch assay was used to determine the cell motility. STE induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner in both cancer cells; however, it was not cytotoxic to normal cells. Cell motility was reduced in PC-3, DU-145 and HUVEC cells by STE treatment. ANG, ENA-78, bFGF, EGF, IGF-1 and VEGF-D levels were significantly decreased by -2.9, -3.7, -1.7, -1.7, -2.0 and -1.8 fold in STE-treated DU-145 cells, however, ANG, IL-8, LEP, RANTES, TIMP-1, TIMP-2 and VEGF levels were significantly decreased by -5.1, -2.0, -2.4, -3.1, -1.5, -2.0 and -2.5 fold in PC-3 cells. These data suggest that STE might be a promising candidate for anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:26459311

  1. Differential Effects of Dopaminergic Therapies on Dorsal and Ventral Striatum in Parkinson's Disease: Implications for Cognitive Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penny A. MacDonald

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive abnormalities are a feature of Parkinson's disease (PD. Unlike motor symptoms that are clearly improved by dopaminergic therapy, the effect of dopamine replacement on cognition seems paradoxical. Some cognitive functions are improved whereas others are unaltered or even hindered. Our aim was to understand the effect of dopamine replacement therapy on various aspects of cognition. Whereas dorsal striatum receives dopamine input from the substantia nigra (SN, ventral striatum is innervated by dopamine-producing cells in the ventral tegmental area (VTA. In PD, degeneration of SN is substantially greater than cell loss in VTA and hence dopamine-deficiency is significantly greater in dorsal compared to ventral striatum. We suggest that dopamine supplementation improves functions mediated by dorsal striatum and impairs, or heightens to a pathological degree, operations ascribed to ventral striatum. We consider the extant literature in light of this principle. We also survey the effect of dopamine replacement on functional neuroimaging in PD relating the findings to this framework. This paper highlights the fact that currently, titration of therapy in PD is geared to optimizing dorsal striatum-mediated motor symptoms, at the expense of ventral striatum operations. Increased awareness of contrasting effects of dopamine replacement on dorsal versus ventral striatum functions will lead clinicians to survey a broader range of symptoms in determining optimal therapy, taking into account both those aspects of cognition that will be helped versus those that will be hindered by dopaminergic treatment.

  2. Perspectives on Cognitive Therapy Training within Community Mental Health Settings: Implications for Clinician Satisfaction and Skill Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon Wiltsey Stirman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the mounting evidence of the benefits of cognitive therapy for depression and suicidal behaviors over usual care, like other evidence-based psychosocial treatments (EBTs, it has not been widely adopted in clinical practice. Studies have shown that training followed by intensive consultation is needed to prepare providers to an appropriate level of competency in complex, multisession treatment packages such as cognitive therapy. Given the critical role of training in EBT implementation, more information on factors associated with the success and challenges of training programs is needed. To identify potential reasons for variation in training outcomes across ten agencies in a large, urban community mental health system, we explored program evaluation data and examined provider, consultant, and training program administrator perspectives through follow-up interviews. Perceptions of cognitive therapy, contextual factors, and reactions to feedback on audio recordings emerged as broad categories of themes identified from interviews. These factors may interact and impact clinician efforts to learn cognitive therapy and deliver it skillfully in their practice. The findings highlight experiences and stakeholder perspectives that may contribute to more or less successful training outcomes.

  3. System engineering approach to planning anticancer therapies

    CERN Document Server

    Świerniak, Andrzej; Smieja, Jaroslaw; Puszynski, Krzysztof; Psiuk-Maksymowicz, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on the analysis of cancer dynamics and the mathematically based synthesis of anticancer therapy. It summarizes the current state-of-the-art in this field and clarifies common misconceptions about mathematical modeling in cancer. Additionally, it encourages closer cooperation between engineers, physicians and mathematicians by showing the clear benefits of this without stating unrealistic goals. Development of therapy protocols is realized from an engineering point of view, such as the search for a solution to a specific control-optimization problem. Since in the case of cancer patients, consecutive measurements providing information about the current state of the disease are not available, the control laws are derived for an open loop structure. Different forms of therapy are incorporated into the models, from chemotherapy and antiangiogenic therapy to immunotherapy and gene therapy, but the class of models introduced is broad enough to incorporate other forms of therapy as well. The book be...

  4. Dynamic contrast enhanced ultrasound for therapy monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative imaging is a crucial component of the assessment of therapies that target the vasculature of angiogenic or inflamed tissue. Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) using microbubble contrast offers the advantages of being sensitive to perfusion, non-invasive, cost effective and well suited to repeated use at the bedside. Uniquely, it employs an agent that is truly intravascular. This papers reviews the principles and methodology of DCE-US, especially as applied to anti-angiogenic cancer therapies. Reproducibility is an important attribute of such a monitoring method: results are discussed. More recent technical advances in parametric and 3D DCE-US imaging are also summarised and illustrated

  5. Dynamic contrast enhanced ultrasound for therapy monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, John M. [Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Williams, Ross [Imaging Research, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, ON (Canada); Tremblay-Darveau, Charles; Sheeran, Paul S. [Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Milot, Laurent [Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Bjarnason, Georg A. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Toronto, and Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Burns, Peter N., E-mail: burns@sri.utoronto.ca [Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Imaging Research, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    Quantitative imaging is a crucial component of the assessment of therapies that target the vasculature of angiogenic or inflamed tissue. Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) using microbubble contrast offers the advantages of being sensitive to perfusion, non-invasive, cost effective and well suited to repeated use at the bedside. Uniquely, it employs an agent that is truly intravascular. This papers reviews the principles and methodology of DCE-US, especially as applied to anti-angiogenic cancer therapies. Reproducibility is an important attribute of such a monitoring method: results are discussed. More recent technical advances in parametric and 3D DCE-US imaging are also summarised and illustrated.

  6. Cooperation between c-Met and focal adhesion kinase family members in medulloblastoma and implications for therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Guessous, Fadila; Yang, Yanzhi; Johnson, Elizabeth; Marcinkiewicz, Lukasz; Smith, Matthew; Zhang, Ying; Kofman, Alexander; Schiff, David; Christensen, James; Abounader, Roger

    2011-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the involvement of the tyrosine kinase receptor c-Met in medulloblastoma malignancy. The nonreceptor tyrosine kinases FAK and Pyk2, are key players in the progression of different cancers. However, their role in medulloblastoma malignancy is not well understood. In this study, using a protein array approach, we found that c-Met phosphorylates FAK and Pyk2 in medulloblastoma cells. We therefore studied the interactions between c-Met and FAK/Pyk2 and their implication...

  7. Cardiac or Other Implantable Electronic Devices and Sleep-disordered Breathing – Implications for Diagnosis and Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Henrik; Bitter, Thomas; Gutleben, Klaus-Jürgen; Horstkotte, Dieter; Oldenburg, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is of growing interest in cardiology because SDB is a highly prevalent comorbidity in patients with a variety of cardiovascular diseases. The prevalence of SDB is particularly high in patients with cardiac dysrhythmias and/or heart failure. In this setting, many patients now have implantable cardiac devices, such as pacemakers, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators or implanted cardiac resynchronisation therapy devices (CRT). Treatment of SDB using implantab...

  8. Generic and low dose antiretroviral therapy in adults and children: implication for scaling up treatment in resource limited settings

    OpenAIRE

    Ramautarsing Reshmie; Ananworanich Jintanat

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Although access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) for the treatment of HIV has increased during the last decade, many patients are still in need of treatment. With limited funds to provide ART to millions of patients worldwide, there is a need for alternative ways to scale up ART in resource limited settings. This review provides an overview of pharmacokinetic, safety and efficacy studies of generic and reduced dose ART. The production of generic ART has greatly influenced the decline ...

  9. Evidence for self-renewing lung cancer stem cells and their implications in tumor initiation, progression, and targeted therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Sullivan, James P.; Minna, John D.; Shay, Jerry W.

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of rare tumor cells with stem cell features first in leukemia and later in solid tumors has emerged as an important area in cancer research. It has been determined that these stem-like tumor cells, termed cancer stem cells, are the primary cellular component within a tumor that drives disease progression and metastasis. In addition to their stem-like ability to self-renew and differentiate, cancer stem cells are also enriched in cells resistant to conventional radiation therapy ...

  10. Metastasis suppressor function of TRAIL-R in mice- implications for TRAIL-based therapy in humans?

    OpenAIRE

    Grosse-Wilde, Anne; Kemp, Christopher J

    2008-01-01

    TRAIL is a promising candidate for cancer therapy, as it can induce apoptosis specifically in tumor cells but not in normal cells. While earlier mouse tumor studies revealed a strong tissue dependency of TRAIL and its death receptor in suppressing primary tumorigenesis or experimental metastases, we recently found that TRAIL-R inhibits lymph node metastases without affecting primary tumor formation in a mouse model of multistage skin tumorigenesis. This finding uncouples the role of TRAIL in ...

  11. Bone scan findings of chest wall pain syndrome after stereotactic body radiation therapy: implications for the pathophysiology of the syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lloyd, Shane; Decker, Roy H.; Evans, Suzanne B.

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of a 72-year-old woman treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for peripherally located stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). After treatment she developed ipsilateral grade II chest wall pain. A bone scan showed nonspecific and heterogeneous increased radiotracer uptake in the volume of ribs receiving 30% of the prescription dose of radiation (V30). We present a color wash image demonstrating excellent concordance between the V30 and the area of scinti...

  12. Pain, mood, and substance abuse in HIV: Implications for clinic visit utilization, antiretroviral therapy adherence, and virologic failure

    OpenAIRE

    Merlin, JS; Westfall, AO; Raper, JL; Zinski, A; Norton, WE; Willig, JH; R. Gross; Ritchie, CS; Saag, MS; Mugavero, MJ

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cooccurring pain, mood disorders, and substance abuse are common in HIV-infected patients. Our objective was to investigate the relationship between pain, alone and in the context of mood disorders and substance abuse, on clinic utilization, antiretroviral therapy adherence, and virologic suppression. METHODS: Pain, mood disorders, and substance abuse were assessed at the first visit. No-show and urgent visits were measured over a 1-year period. Models were adjusted for age, race,...

  13. Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy and HIV Transmission Risks: Implications for Test-and-Treat Approaches to HIV Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Kalichman, Seth C.; Cherry, Chauncey; Amaral, Christina M.; Swetzes, Connie; Eaton, Lisa; Macy, Rene; Grebler, Tamar; Kalichman, Moira O.

    2010-01-01

    HIV transmission may be prevented by effectively suppressing viral replication with antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, adherence is essential to the success of ART, including for reducing HIV transmission risk behaviors. This study examined the association of nonadherence versus adherence with HIV transmission risks. Men (n = 226) living with HIV/AIDS and receiving ART completed confidential computerized interviews and telephone-based unannounced pill counts for ART adherence monitoring. ...

  14. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Nigeria: an overview of research studies and implications for policy and practice

    OpenAIRE

    Monjok, Emmanuel; Smesny, Andrea; Okokon, Ita B.; Mgbere, Osaro; Essien, E James

    2010-01-01

    Both Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection and AIDS remain major public health crises in Nigeria, a country which harbors more people living with HIV/AIDS than any country in the world, with the exception of South Africa and India. In response to the HIV pandemic, global and international health initiatives have targeted several countries, including Nigeria, for the expansion of antiretroviral therapy (ART) programs for the increasing number of affected patients. The success of these e...

  15. Cognitive behaviour therapy response and dropout rate across purging and nonpurging bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder: DSM-5 implications

    OpenAIRE

    Agüera, Zaida; Riesco, Nadine; Jiménez Murcia, Susana; Islam, Mohammed Anisul; Granero, Roser; Vicente, Enrique; Peñas Lledó, Eva; Arcelus, Jon; Sánchez, Isabel; Menchón Magriñá, José Manuel; Fernández Aranda, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Background: With the imminent publication of the new edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), there has been a growing interest in the study of the boundaries across the three bulimic spectrum syndromes [bulimia nervosa-purging type (BN-P), bulimia nervosa-non purging type (BN-NP) and binge eating disorder (BED)]. Therefore, the aims of this study were to determine differences in treatment response and dropout rates following Cognitive Behavioural Therapy ...

  16. Regulation of Mitochondria-dependent Apoptosis in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Implications for Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Checinska, A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary The work described in this thesis focuses on the characterization of the mechanism(s) underlying the deregulated activation of the intrinsic or mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Apoptosis suppression might contribute to the chemoresistance often observed in NSCLC patients, and elucidation of the molecular causes of this resistance may provide clues for the development of targeted apoptosis-based therapies. In this introduction, lung cancer an...

  17. Palliative nephrectomy until targeted therapy of disseminated kidney cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Klimov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to assess the role of palliative nephrectomy in disseminated kidney cancer patients planned to undergo targeted antiangiogenic treatment.Subjects and methods. The investigation included data on 83 patients with T1-4N0 / +M1 disseminated renal cell carcinoma (RCC who had received at least 2 targeted therapy cycles in 2009 to 2011. In 48 (57.8 % patients, the treatment was preceded by palliative nephrectomy that was not carried out in 35 (42.2 %. Before starting targeted therapy, all the cases were confirmed to be diagnosed with clear cell RCC, with a sarcomatoid component being in 7 (8.4 % patients. The median follow-up of all the patients was 21 (12–36 months.Results. The unremoved affected kidney in disseminated kidney cancer patients receiving targeted antiangiogenic therapy is an independent factor for the poor prognosis of progression-free (odds ratio (OR, 2.4; 95 % confidence interval (CI, 1.2–4.7 and overall (OR, 2.8; 95 % CI, 1.3–6.3 survival. Palliative nephrectomy does not improve the prognosis in patients with a low somatic status, the N+ category, and metastases into the bones and nonregional lymph nodes.Conclusion. Palliative nephrectomy in the selected patients with disseminated kidney cancer on targeted antiangiogenic therapy increases progression-free and overall survival.

  18. Dose reduction of scattered photons from concrete walls lined with lead: Implications for improvement in design of megavoltage radiation therapy facility mazes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Affan, I. A. M., E-mail: info@medphys-environment.co.uk; Hugtenburg, R. P.; Piliero, M. [Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Bari, D. S. [Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP, United Kingdom and University of Zakho, Duhok (Iraq); Al-Saleh, W. M. [Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP, United Kingdom and King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Science, Hofuf (Saudi Arabia); Evans, S. [Department of Medical Physics and Clinical Engineering, Singleton Hospital, Swansea SA2 8QA (United Kingdom); Al-Hasan, M.; Al-Zughul, B. [College of Sciences, Zarqa University, Zarqa (Jordan); Al-Kharouf, S. [The Royal Scientific Society, Amman (Jordan); Ghaith, A. [Association of Arab Universities, Amman (Jordan)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: This study explores the possibility of using lead to cover part of the radiation therapy facility maze walls in order to absorb low energy photons and reduce the total dose at the maze entrance of radiation therapy rooms. Methods: Experiments and Monte Carlo simulations were utilized to establish the possibility of using high-Z materials to cover the concrete walls of the maze in order to reduce the dose of the scattered photons at the maze entrance. The dose of the backscattered photons from a concrete wall was measured for various scattering angles. The dose was also calculated by the FLUKA and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes. The FLUKA code was also used to simulate an existing radiotherapy room to study the effect of multiple scattering when adding lead to cover the concrete walls of the maze. Monoenergetic photons were used to represent the main components of the x ray spectrum up to 10 MV. Results: It was observed that when the concrete wall was covered with just 2 mm of lead, the measured dose rate at all backscattering angles was reduced by 20% for photons of energy comparable to Co-60 emissions and 70% for Cs-137 emissions. The simulations with FLUKA and EGS showed that the reduction in the dose was potentially even higher when lead was added. One explanation for the reduction is the increased absorption of backscattered photons due to the photoelectric interaction in lead. The results also showed that adding 2 mm lead to the concrete walls and floor of the maze reduced the dose at the maze entrance by up to 90%. Conclusions: This novel proposal of covering part or the entire maze walls with a few millimeters of lead would have a direct implication for the design of radiation therapy facilities and would assist in upgrading the design of some mazes, especially those in facilities with limited space where the maze length cannot be extended to sufficiently reduce the dose.

  19. Endogenous angiogenesis inhibitors and their therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Y

    2001-04-01

    A number of endogenous inhibitors targeting the tumor vasculature have recently been identified using in vitro and in vivo antiangiogenesis models. While many of these angiogenesis inhibitors display a broad spectrum of biological actions on several systems in the body, several inhibitors including angiostatin, endostatin, and serpin antithrombin seem to act specifically on the proliferating endothelial cell compartment of the newly formed blood vessels. The discovery of these specific endothelial inhibitors not only increases our understanding of the functions of these molecules in the regulation of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, but may also provide an important therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer and other angiogenesis dependent diseases, including diabetic retinopathy and chronic inflammations. Systemic administration of these angiogenesis inhibitors in animals significantly suppresses the growth of a variety of tumors and their metastases. However, their production as functional recombinant proteins has been proven to be difficult. In addition, high dosages of these inhibitors are required to suppress tumor growth in animal studies. Other disadvantages of the antiangiogenic protein therapy include repeated injections, prolonged treatment, transmission of toxins and infectious particles, and high cost for manufacturing large amounts of protein molecules. Thus, alternative strategies need to be developed in order to improve the clinical settings of antiangiogenic therapy. Developments of these strategies are ongoing and they include identification of more potent inhibitors, antiangiogenic gene therapy, improvement of protein/compound half-lives in the circulation, increase of their concentrations at the disease location, and combinatorial therapies with approaches including chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and immunotherapy. Despite the above-mentioned disadvantages, a few inhibitors have entered into the early stages of clinical trials and

  20. Dosimetric Implications of an Injection of Hyaluronic Acid for Preserving the Rectal Wall in Prostate Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapet, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.chapet@chu-lyon.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Udrescu, Corina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Department of Medical Physics, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Tanguy, Ronan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Ruffion, Alain [Department of Urology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Fenoglietto, Pascal [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Val d' Aurelle, Montpellier (France); Sotton, Marie-Pierre [Department of Medical Physics, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Devonec, Marian [Department of Urology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Colombel, Marc [Department of Urology, Hopital Edouard Herriot, Lyon (France); Jalade, Patrice [Department of Medical Physics, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Azria, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Val d' Aurelle, Montpellier (France)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: This study assessed the contribution of ahyaluronic acid (HA) injection between the rectum and the prostate to reducing the dose to the rectal wall in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: As part of a phase 2 study of hypofractionated radiation therapy (62 Gy in 20 fractions), the patients received a transperineal injection of 10 cc HA between the rectum and the prostate. A dosimetric computed tomographic (CT) scan was systematically performed before (CT1) and after (CT2) the injection. Two 9-beam intensity modulated radiation therapy-SBRT plans were optimized for the first 10 patients on both CTs according to 2 dosage levels: 5 × 6.5 Gy (PlanA) and 5 × 8.5 Gy (PlanB). Rectal wall parameters were compared with a dose–volume histogram, and the prostate–rectum separation was measured at 7 levels of the prostate on the center line of the organ. Results: For both plans, the average volume of the rectal wall receiving the 90% isodose line (V90%) was reduced up to 90% after injection. There was no significant difference (P=.32) between doses received by the rectal wall on CT1 and CT2 at the base of the prostate. This variation became significant from the median plane to the apex of the prostate (P=.002). No significant differences were found between PlanA without HA and PlanB with HA for each level of the prostate (P=.77, at the isocenter of the prostate). Conclusions: HA injection significantly reduced the dose to the rectal wall and allowed a dose escalation from 6.5 Gy to 8.5 Gy without increasing the dose to the rectum. A phase 2 study is under way in our department to assess the rate of acute and late rectal toxicities when SBRT (5 × 8.5 Gy) is combined with an injection of HA.

  1. Dosimetric Implications of an Injection of Hyaluronic Acid for Preserving the Rectal Wall in Prostate Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This study assessed the contribution of ahyaluronic acid (HA) injection between the rectum and the prostate to reducing the dose to the rectal wall in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: As part of a phase 2 study of hypofractionated radiation therapy (62 Gy in 20 fractions), the patients received a transperineal injection of 10 cc HA between the rectum and the prostate. A dosimetric computed tomographic (CT) scan was systematically performed before (CT1) and after (CT2) the injection. Two 9-beam intensity modulated radiation therapy-SBRT plans were optimized for the first 10 patients on both CTs according to 2 dosage levels: 5 × 6.5 Gy (PlanA) and 5 × 8.5 Gy (PlanB). Rectal wall parameters were compared with a dose–volume histogram, and the prostate–rectum separation was measured at 7 levels of the prostate on the center line of the organ. Results: For both plans, the average volume of the rectal wall receiving the 90% isodose line (V90%) was reduced up to 90% after injection. There was no significant difference (P=.32) between doses received by the rectal wall on CT1 and CT2 at the base of the prostate. This variation became significant from the median plane to the apex of the prostate (P=.002). No significant differences were found between PlanA without HA and PlanB with HA for each level of the prostate (P=.77, at the isocenter of the prostate). Conclusions: HA injection significantly reduced the dose to the rectal wall and allowed a dose escalation from 6.5 Gy to 8.5 Gy without increasing the dose to the rectum. A phase 2 study is under way in our department to assess the rate of acute and late rectal toxicities when SBRT (5 × 8.5 Gy) is combined with an injection of HA

  2. Local-regional recurrence after surgery without postoperative irradiation for carcinomas of the major salivary glands: Implications for adjuvant therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine factors predictive of local-regional recurrence (LRR) after surgery alone for carcinomas of the major salivary glands in an attempt to evaluate the potential role of postoperative radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1960 and 2004, 207 patients with carcinomas of the major salivary glands were treated with definitive surgery without postoperative radiation therapy. Histology was: 67 mucoepidermoid (32%), 50 adenoid cystic (24%), 34 acinic cell (16%), 23 malignant mixed (11%), 16 adenocarcinoma (8%), 6 oncocytic (3%), 6 myoepithelial (3%), and 5 other (2%). Distribution of pathologic T-stage was: 54 T1 (26%), 83 T2 (40%), 46 T3 (22%), and 24 T4 (12%). Sixty patients (29%) had microscopically positive margins. Median follow-up was 6.1 years (range, 0.5-18.7 years). Results: The 5-year and 10-year estimates of local-regional control were 86% and 74%, respectively. A Cox proportional hazard model identified pathologic lymph node metastasis (hazard ratio [HR], 4.8; p = 0.001), high histologic grade (HR, 4.2; p = 0.003), positive margins (HR, 2.6; p = 0.03), and T3-4 disease (HR, 2.0; p = 0.04) as independent predictors of LRR. The presence of any one of these factors was associated with 10-year local-regional control rates of 37% to 63%. Conclusion: Lymph node metastasis, high tumor grade, positive margins, and T3-4 stage predict for significant rates of LRR after surgery for carcinomas of the major salivary glands. Postoperative radiation therapy should be considered for patients with these disease characteristics

  3. Clinical implications of the 2013 ESH/ESC hypertension guidelines: targets, choice of therapy, and blood pressure monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeldsen, Sverre E; Aksnes, Tonje A; Ruilope, Luis M

    2014-06-01

    The European Society of Hypertension (ESH)/European Society of Cardiology (ESC) 2013 guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension included simplified blood pressure (BP) targets across patient groups, more balanced discussion on monotherapy vs. combination therapy, as well as reconfirmation of the importance of out-of-office BP measurements. In light of these updates, we wished to review some issues raised and take a fresh look at the role of calcium channel blocker (CCB) therapy; an established antihypertensive class that appears to be a favorable choice in many patients. Relaxed BP targets for high-risk hypertensive patients in the 2013 ESH/ESC guidelines were driven by a lack of commanding evidence for an aggressive approach. However, substantial evidence demonstrates cardiovascular benefits from more intensive BP lowering across patient groups. Individualized treatment of high-risk patients may be prudent until more solid evidence is available. Individual patient profiles and preferences and evidence for preferential therapy benefits should be considered when deciding upon the optimal antihypertensive regimen. CCBs appear to be a positive choice for monotherapy, and in combination with other agent classes, and may provide specific benefits beyond BP lowering. Ambulatory and home BP monitoring have an increasing role in defining the diagnosis and prognosis of hypertension (especially non-sustained); however, their value for comprehensive diagnosis and appropriate treatment selection should be more widely acknowledged. In conclusion, further evidence may be required on BP targets in high-risk patients, and optimal treatment selection based upon individual patient profiles and comprehensive diagnosis using out-of-office BP measurements may improve patient management. PMID:24842751

  4. Epigenetic modulation of cancer-germline antigen gene expression in tumorigenic human mesenchymal stem cells: implications for cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten; Burns, Jorge S; Nielsen, Ole;

    2009-01-01

    Cancer-germline antigens are promising targets for cancer immunotherapy, but whether such therapies will also eliminate the primary tumor stem cell population remains undetermined. We previously showed that long-term cultures of telomerized adult human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can...... modulators, makes them promising targets for immunotherapeutic approaches to cancer treatment....... spontaneously evolve into tumor-initiating, mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC-TERT20), which have characteristics of clinical sarcoma cells. In this study, we used the hMSC-TERT20 tumor stem cell model to investigate the potential of cancer-germline antigens to serve as tumor stem cell targets. We found that...

  5. Expression of paclitaxel-inactivating CYP3A activity in human colorectal cancer: implications for drug therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez, C; García-Martín, E; Pizarro, R M; García-Gamito, F J; Agúndez, J A G

    2002-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 3A is a drug-metabolising enzyme activity due to CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 gene products, that is involved in the inactivation of anticancer drugs. This study analyses the potential of cytochrome P450 3A enzyme in human colorectal cancer to impact anticancer therapy with drugs that are cytochrome P450 3A substrates. Enzyme activity, variability and properties, and the ability to inactivate paclitaxel (taxol) were analysed in human colorectal cancer and healthy colorectal epithelium. C...

  6. Hypermetabolic subcutaneous fat in patients on highly active anti-retroviral therapy treatment: Subtle finding with implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipodystrophy (LD) is a serious complication of highly active anti-retroviral therapy, characterized by peripheral fat wasting, central adiposity and metabolic changes. Since the disfiguration caused by LD is permanent, the focus of management is on early detection to arrest progression. We report a case where ancillary finding of increased fluorine-18 fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) uptake in the sub-cutaneous fat helped early detection of LD and led to early intervention to arrest progression. Though F-18 FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan is not recommended to diagnose LD, conscious reporting of this finding when present can greatly influence patient management

  7. Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of jaw (BRONJ: an anti-angiogenic side-effect?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petcu Eugen B

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bisphosphonates are recommended in the treatment of osteoporosis and some cancers, in which case they prevent the appearance of bone metastasis. The patients taking bisphosphonates are at increased risk of developing bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of jaw (BRONJ which is characterised by the presence of an un-healing wound after dental surgery. BRONJ might represent an anti-angiogenic side effect. However, the real number of patients with BRONJ might be higher than currently recorded. Considering the differential diagnosis which includes various primary and secondary cancers, a correct histopathological diagnosis is very important. The morphological criteria for diagnosis of BRONJ are highlighted in this material. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1813972972323288

  8. Aminopeptidase N inhibition could be involved in the anti-angiogenic effect of dobesilates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farsa Oldřich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium, magnesium and zinc 2,5-dihydroxybenzenesulfonates (dobesilates were synthesized by sulfonation of hydroquinone with sulfuric acid under mild conditions. To form the salts, neutralization with calcium carbonate followed by cation exchange by means of magnesium or zinc sulfates was performed. The dobesilates were characterized by standard spectral methods and by AAS for metal content and then tested for inhibitory activity against aminopeptidase N. Calcium and magnesium 2,5-dihydroxybenzene sulfonates exhibited rather weak inhibitory activity to aminopeptidase N as demonstrated by IC50 values of 978.0 and 832.1 mmol l-1 respectively while zinc 2,5-dihydroxybenzene sulfonate reached the more significant inhibitory activity characterized by IC50 77.4 mmol l-1. The inhibitory activity results suggest that the inhibition of aminopeptidase N could play a role in the anti-angiogenic activity of 2,5-dihydroxybenzenesulfonates.

  9. Structural characterization and effect on anti-angiogenic activity of a fucoidan from Sargassum fusiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Qifei; Chen, Huanjun; Liao, Wenfeng; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Peipei; Qin, Yi; Dong, Qun; Ding, Kan

    2016-01-20

    A fucoidan FP08S2 was isolated from the boiling-water extract of Sargassum fusiforme, purified by CaCl2 precipitation and chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and Sephacryl S-300. FP08S2 contained fucose, xylose, galactose, mannose, glucuronic acid, and 20.8% sulfate. The sulfate groups were attached to diverse positions of fucose, xylose, mannose, and galactose residues. The backbone of FP08S2 consisted of alternate 1,2-linked α-D-Manp and 1,4-linked β-D-GlcpA. Sugar composition analysis and ESI-MS revealed that the oligosaccharides from branches contained fucose, xylose, galactose, glucuronic acid and sulfate. FP08S2 could significantly inhibit tube formation and migration of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) dose-dependently. These results suggested that the fucoidan FP08S2 from brown seaweeds S. fusiforme could be a potent anti-angiogenic agent. PMID:26572427

  10. A biomimetic collagen derived peptide exhibits anti-angiogenic activity in triple negative breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V Rosca

    Full Text Available We investigated the application of a mimetic 20 amino acid peptide derived from type IV collagen for treatment of breast cancer. We showed that the peptide induced a decrease of proliferation, adhesion, and migration of endothelial and tumor cells in vitro. We also observed an inhibition of triple negative MDA-MB-231 xenograft growth by 75% relative to control when administered intraperitoneally for 27 days at 10 mg/kg. We monitored in vivo the changes in vascular properties throughout the treatment using MRI and found that the vascular volume and permeability surface area product decreased significantly. The treatment also resulted in an increase of caspase-3 activity and in a reduction of microvascular density. The multiple mode of action of this peptide, i.e., anti-angiogenic, and anti-tumorigenic, makes it a viable candidate as a therapeutic agent as a monotherapy or in combination with other compounds.

  11. Diterpenoids from the roots of Croton crassifolius and their anti-angiogenic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia-Jian; Chung, Hau Yin; Zhang, Yu-Bo; Li, Guo-Qiang; Li, Yao-Lan; Huang, Wei-Huan; Wang, Guo-Cai

    2016-02-01

    Six diterpenoids [crassifolin J, K, L, M, N and O] along with eleven known ones were isolated from the supercritical fluid extract (SFE) of the roots of Croton crassifolius (Euphorbiaceae). Their structures were elucidated using spectroscopic methods (IR, UV, HRESIMS, 1D and 2D NMR). The structure and stereochemistry of crassifolin J was confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, and the absolute configurations of crassifolin K-M were determined by CD spectra. Twenty-three diterpenoids from this plant were screened for their anti-angiogenic activity using a wild-type zebrafish in vivo model. Four of the known compounds were active, of which penduliflaworosin possessed the best activity relative to the positive control (SU5416). Further study demonstrated that penduliflaworosin could inhibit vessel formation on Tg(fli1a:EGFP)y1-type zebrafish embryos. PMID:26725185

  12. Alters Intratumoral Drug Distribution and Affects Therapeutic Synergy of Antiangiogenic Organoselenium Compound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youcef M. Rustum

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor differentiation enhances morphologic and microvascular heterogeneity fostering hypoxia that retards intratumoral drug delivery, distribution, and compromise therapeutic efficacy. In this study, the influence of tumor biologic heterogeneity on the interaction between cytotoxic chemotherapy and selenium was examined using a panel of human tumor xenografts representing cancers of the head and neck and lung along with tissue microarray analysis of human surgical samples. Tumor differentiation status, microvessel density, interstitial fluid pressure, vascular phenotype, and drug delivery were correlated with the degree of enhancement of chemotherapeutic efficacy by selenium. Marked potentiation of antitumor activity was observed in H69 tumors that exhibited a well-vascularized, poorly differentiated phenotype. In comparison, modulation of chemotherapeutic efficacy by antiangiogenic selenium was generally lower or absent in well-differentiated tumors with multiple avascular hypoxic, differentiated regions. Tumor histomorphologic heterogeneity was found prevalent in the clinical samples studied and represents a primary and critical physiological barrier to chemotherapy.

  13. Antiangiogenic properties of cafestol, a coffee diterpene, in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shuaiyu [Food Biotechnology, University of Science and Technology, 113 Gwahangno, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Food Research Institute, 516 Baekhyun-dong, Bundang-gu, Songnam, Kyungki-do 463-746 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Yeo Cho; Sung, Mi-Jeong; Hur, Haeng-Jeon [Korea Food Research Institute, 516 Baekhyun-dong, Bundang-gu, Songnam, Kyungki-do 463-746 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae-Ho, E-mail: jaehoparkmail@gmail.com [Korea Food Research Institute, 516 Baekhyun-dong, Bundang-gu, Songnam, Kyungki-do 463-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cafestol inhibits tube formation and migration of VEGF-stimulated HUVEC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cafestol inhibits phosphorylation of FAK and Akt. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cafestol decreases NO production. -- Abstract: As angiogenesis plays important roles in tumor growth and metastasis, searching for antiangiogenic compounds is a promising tactic for treating cancers. Cafestol, a diterpene found mainly in unfiltered coffee, provides benefit through varied biological activity, including antitumorigenic, antioxidative, and anti-inflammatory effects. This study aimed to investigate the effects of cafestol on angiogenesis and to uncover the associated mechanism. We show that cafestol inhibits angiogenesis of human umbilical vascular endothelial cells. This inhibition affects the following specific steps of the angiogenic process: proliferation, migration, and tube formation. The inhibitory effects of cafestol are accompanied by decreasing phosphorylation of FAK and Akt and by a decrease in nitric oxide production. Overall, cafestol inhibits angiogenesis by affecting the angiogenic signaling pathway.

  14. Randomized phase II trial of urethral sparing intensity modulated radiation therapy in low-risk prostate cancer: implications for focal therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-risk prostate cancer (PCa) patients have excellent outcomes, with treatment modality often selected by perceived effects on quality of life. Acute urinary symptoms are common during external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), while chronic symptoms have been linked to urethral dose. Since most low-risk PCa occurs in the peripheral zone (PZ), we hypothesized that EBRT using urethral sparing intensity modulated radiation therapy (US-IMRT) could improve urinary health-related quality of life (HRQOL) while maintaining high rates of PCa control. Patients with National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) defined low-risk PCa with no visible lesion within 5 mm of the prostatic urethra on MRI were randomized to US-IMRT or standard (S-) IMRT. Prescription dose was 75.6 Gy in 41 fractions to the PZ + 3–5 mm for US-IMRT and to the prostate + 3 mm for S-IMRT. For US-IMRT, mean proximal and distal urethral doses were limited to 65 Gy and 74 Gy, respectively. HRQOL was assessed using the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index (EPIC) Quality of Life questionnaire. The primary endpoint was change in urinary HRQOL at 3 months. From June 2004 to November 2006, 16 patients were randomized, after which a futility analysis concluded that continued accrual was unlikely to demonstrate a difference in the primary endpoint. Mean change in EPIC urinary HRQOL at 3 months was −0.5 ± 11.2 in the US-IMRT arm and +3.9 ± 15.3 in the S-IMRT arm (p = 0.52). Median PSA nadir was higher in the US-IMRT arm (1.46 vs. 0.78, p = 0.05). At 4.7 years median follow-up, three US-IMRT and no S-IMRT patients experienced PSA failure (p = 0.06; HR 8.8, 95% CI 0.9–86). Two out of 3 patients with PSA failure had biopsy-proven local failure, both located contralateral to the original site of disease. Compared with S-IMRT, US-IMRT failed to improve urinary HRQOL and resulted in higher PSA nadir and inferior biochemical control. The high rate of PSA failure and contralateral local failures in US-IMRT patients, despite

  15. Anti-angiogenic activities of Cnidium officinale Makino and Tabanus bovinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Dong Hoon; Kim, Jin Kyeoung; Kim, Ji Yeoun; Jeong, Heun Young; Keum, Kyung Soo; Han, Sun Hee; Rho, Young Il; Woo, Won Hong; Jung, Kyu Yong; Choi, Bong Kyu; Choo, Young Kug

    2002-08-01

    This study investigated the anti-angiogenic activities of Cnidium officinale Makino and Tabanus bovinus by using cultured glomerular capillary endothelial cells (GECs), chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and rat cornea. Treatment of GECs with several concentrations (5-50 microg/ml) of C. officinale Makino and T. bovinus extracts for 24 h inhibited angiotensin II (10(-8) M)-induced increases of [3H]thymidine uptake and cell numbers in a concentration-dependent manner. The extent of inhibitory rate of [3H]thymidine incorporation by C. officinale Makino and T. bovinus at 50 microg/ml was a similar to that by 10(-5) M of retinoic acid. Herbal extracts also conspicuously inhibited the neovascularization. In contrast to the normal branching of vascular vessels, blood vessel patterns in CAMs treated with extracts (50 microg per egg) of C. officinale Makino and T. bovinus were ran parallel to each other without much branching. Moreover, oral administration of herbal extracts (20 mg/kg per day) for 4 weeks significantly inhibited the rat corneal neovascularization induced by suture, and the length of blood vessels in herbal medicine-treated rat cornea was conspicuously lower than that in control animals. A similar inhibitory effect to these was also observed in the rat cornea treated with thalidomide (200 mg/kg per day). These findings indicate that the anti-angiogenic properties of C. officinale Makino and T. bovinus may be one of the pharmacological mechanisms underlying the anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities of herbal extracts tested in this study. PMID:12127239

  16. Anti-angiogenic activities of CRBGP from buccal glands of lampreys (Lampetra japonica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qi; Liu, Yu; Duan, Dandan; Gou, Meng; Wang, Hao; Wang, Jihong; Li, Qingwei; Xiao, Rong

    2016-04-01

    Cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs), characterized by 16 conserved cysteines, are distributed in a wide range of organisms, such as secernenteas, amphibians, reptiles and mammals. In the previous studies, a novel CRISP family member (cysteine-rich buccal gland protein, CRBGP) was separated from the buccal gland of lampreys (Lampetra japonica, L. japonica). Lamprey CRBGP could not only suppress depolarization-induced contraction of rat tail arterial smooth muscle, but also block voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs). In the present study, the anti-angiogenic activities of lamprey CRBGP were investigated using endothelial cells and chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) models. In vitro assays, lamprey CRBGP is able to induce human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) apoptosis by disturbing the calcium homeostasis and mitochondria functions. In addition, lamprey CRBGP could inhibit proliferation, adhesion, migration, invasion and tube formation of HUVECs by affecting the organization of F-actin and expression level of matrix metallo-proteinase 2 (MMP-2), matrix metallo-proteinase 9 (MMP-9) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) which are related to angiogenesis. In vivo assays, lamprey CRBGP could suppress the blood vessel formation in CAM models. Therefore, lamprey CRBGP is an important protein present in the buccal gland of lampreys and might help lampreys suppress the contraction of blood vessels, nociceptive responses and wound healing of host fishes during their feeding time. In addition, lamprey CRBGP might have the potential to act as an effective anti-angiogenic factor for the treatment of abnormal angiogenesis induced diseases. PMID:26616010

  17. Evaluation, partial characterization and purification of acetylcholine esterase enzyme and antiangiogenic activity from marine sponges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maushmi Shailesh Kumar; Sukanya Gopalkrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To test three marine sponges Halichondria glabrata Keller, 1891; Spirastrellapachyspira (S. pachyspira) Levi, 1958 and Cliona lobata Hancock, 1849 for the presence of the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in both young and developed samples from western coastal area of India. S. pachyspira methanolic extract was selected for anti/pro angiogenic activity. Methods:They were evaluated for AChE activity using Ellman’s assay based on production of yellow colored 5-thio-2-nitrobenzoate. Purification of the enzyme was planned using ammonium sulphate precipitation and characterization by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Chorioallantoic membrane (ChAM) assay model was used for angiogenic/antiangiogenic testing. Results:All the three sponges showed good specific enzyme activity and S. pachyspira contained maximum specific enzyme activity. Sixty percent of ammonium sulphate precipitation of crude protein sample gave single band at 66 kDa corresponding to the true AChE. ChAM assay was performed at 62.5, 125.0 and 250.0 µg/mL. Dosage beyond 250 µg/mL extract showed toxic response with anti angiogenic activity at all the concentrations. Conclusions:AChE activity was detected in all samples. Extract showed good anti-angiogenic response at 62.5 µg/mL. Extract was highly toxic affecting microvasculature of ChAM as well as normal growth and development of the embryo at 500 µg/mL. With further characterization of bioactive compounds from the extract of S. pachyspira, the compounds can be developed for anti tumor activity.

  18. Antitumor effect and antiangiogenic potential of the mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus against malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Makio; Yamada, Tadaaki; Tamura, Masaya; Ishikawa, Daisuke; Hoda, Mir Alireza; Matsumoto, Isao; Klepetko, Walter; Oda, Makoto; Yano, Seiji; Watanabe, Go

    2014-03-01

    The mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus has antitumor and antiangiogenic activity against several carcinomas, yet few reports document the efficacy of temsirolimus against malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Therefore, we evaluated the efficacy of temsirolimus and the antiangiogenic effect of temsirolimus in the treatment of MPM. We examined the efficacy of temsirolimus alone and the efficacy of the combination of temsirolimus and cisplatin or pemetrexed against four MPM cell lines using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The effect of temsirolimus on the production of proangiogenic cytokines by MPM cell lines was examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Expression of mTOR and proangiogenic cytokines in clinical specimens from MPM patients was determined by immunohistochemistry. Temsirolimus inhibited cell viability and suppressed cell proliferation of all MPM cell lines. Combined treatment with temsirolimus and cisplatin inhibited the viability of all MPM cell lines more effectively than temsirolimus alone. Temsirolimus strongly inhibited the phosphorylation of p70s6k, a downstream molecule of mTOR, in all MPM cell lines and led to an increase in the levels of cleaved caspase-3 in the H226 and Y-meso14 cells. Temsirolimus also inhibited the production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and platelet-derived growth factor-AA (PDGF-AA). Phosphorylated mTOR and high expression of VEGF and PDGF were detected in 2 and 3, respectively, out of the 5 MPM specimens. These results suggest that temsirolimus has activity against MPM cells by inhibition of cell proliferation and angiogenesis, and may be beneficial for a subset of MPM patients with high mTOR expression. PMID:24378576

  19. Early detection of antiangiogenic treatment responses in a mouse xenograft tumor model using quantitative perfusion MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angiogenesis plays a major role in tumor growth and metastasis, with tumor perfusion regarded as a marker for angiogenesis. To evaluate antiangiogenic treatment response in vivo, we investigated arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure tumor perfusion quantitatively. Chronic and 24-h acute treatment responses to bevacizumab were assessed by ASL and dynamic-contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI in the A498 xenograft mouse model. After the MRI, tumor vasculature was assessed by CD34 staining. After 39 days of chronic treatment, tumor perfusion decreased to 44.8 ± 16.1 mL/100 g/min (P < 0.05), compared to 92.6 ± 42.9 mL/100 g/min in the control group. In the acute treatment study, tumor perfusion in the treated group decreased from 107.2 ± 32.7 to 73.7 ± 27.8 mL/100 g/min (P < 0.01; two-way analysis of variance), as well as compared with control group post dosing. A significant reduction in vessel density and vessel size was observed after the chronic treatment, while only vessel size was reduced 24 h after acute treatment. The tumor perfusion correlated with vessel size (r = 0.66; P < 0.005) after chronic, but not after acute treatment. The results from DCE-MRI also detected a significant change between treated and control groups in both chronic and acute treatment studies, but not between 0 and 24 h in the acute treatment group. These results indicate that tumor perfusion measured by MRI can detect early vascular responses to antiangiogenic treatment. With its noninvasive and quantitative nature, ASL MRI would be valuable for longitudinal assessment of tumor perfusion and in translation from animal models to human

  20. Evaluation, partial characterization and purification of acetylcholine esterase enzyme and antiangiogenic activity from marine sponges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maushmi Shailesh Kumar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To test three marine sponges Halichondria glabrata Keller, 1891; Spirastrella pachyspira (S. pachyspira Levi, 1958 and Cliona lobata Hancock, 1849 for the presence of the acetylcholinesterase (AChE in both young and developed samples from western coastal area of India. S. pachyspira methanolic extract was selected for anti/pro angiogenic activity. Methods: They were evaluated for AChE activity using Ellman’s assay based on production of yellow colored 5-thio-2-nitrobenzoate. Purification of the enzyme was planned using ammonium sulphate precipitation and characterization by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Chorioallantoic membrane (ChAM assay model was used for angiogenic/ antiangiogenic testing. Results: All the three sponges showed good specific enzyme activity and S. pachyspira contained maximum specific enzyme activity. Sixty percent of ammonium sulphate precipitation of crude protein sample gave single band at 66 kDa corresponding to the true AChE. ChAM assay was performed at 62.5, 125.0 and 250.0 µg/mL. Dosage beyond 250 µg/mL extract showed toxic response with anti angiogenic activity at all the concentrations. Conclusions: AChE activity was detected in all samples. Extract showed good anti-angiogenic response at 62.5 µg/mL. Extract was highly toxic affecting microvasculature of ChAM as well as normal growth and development of the embryo at 500 µg/mL. With further characterization of bioactive compounds from the extract of S. pachyspira, the compounds can be developed for anti tumor activity.

  1. Collagen VII Half-Life at the Dermal-Epidermal Junction Zone: Implications for Mechanisms and Therapy of Genodermatoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühl, Tobias; Mezger, Markus; Hausser, Ingrid; Guey, Lin T; Handgretinger, Rupert; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena; Nyström, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    The tissue half-life of proteins largely determines treatment frequency of non-gene-editing-based therapies targeting the cause of genodermatoses. Surprisingly, such knowledge is missing for a vast number of proteins involved in pathologies. The dermal-epidermal junction zone is believed to be a rather static structure, but to our knowledge no detailed analysis of the stability of proteins within this zone has been performed. Here, we addressed the in vivo half-life of collagen type VII using genetic ablation of its expression and therapeutic introduction of exogenous collagen VII in a preclinical model. A similar in vivo stability of collagen VII was observed in the skin, tongue, and esophagus, with a half-life of about 1 month. Collagen VII expressed by intradermally injected mesenchymal stromal cells also exhibited a similar half-life. Our study provides key information needed for the development of protein replacement or cell-based therapies for dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa caused by genetic deficiency of collagen VII. Moreover, by showing what we define as an intermediate half-life of collagen VII, our study challenges the view of the dermal-epidermal junction zone as a static structure with very slow turnover. PMID:26899947

  2. Advancement and prospects of tumor gene therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Zhang; Qing-Tao Wang; He Liu; Zhen-Zhu Zhang; Wen-Lin Huang

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy is one of the most attractive fields in tumor therapy. In past decades, significant progress has been achieved. Various approaches, such as viral and non-viral vectors and physical methods, have been developed to make gene delivery safer and more efficient. Several therapeutic strategies have evolved, including gene-based (tumor suppressor genes, suicide genes, antiangiogenic genes, cytokine and oxidative stress-based genes) and RNA-based (antisense oligonucieotides and RNA interference) approaches. In addition, immune response-based strategies (dendritic cell- and T cell-based therapy) are also under investigation in tumor gene therapy. This review highlights the progress and recent developments in gene delivery systems, therapeutic strategies, and possible clinical directions for gene therapy.

  3. Genome-wide study reveals an important role of spontaneous autoimmunity, cardiomyocyte differentiation defect and antiangiogenic activities in gender-specific gene expression in Keshan disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Shulan; Tan Wuhong; Wang Sen; Wu Cuiyan; Wang Pan; Wang Bin; Su Xiaohui

    2014-01-01

    Background Keshan disease (KD) is an endemic cardiomyopathy in China.The etiology of KD is still under debate and there is no effective approach to preventing and curing this disease.Young women of child-bearing age are the most frequent victims in rural areas.The aim of this study was to determine the differences between molecular pathogenic mechanisms in male and female KD sufferers.Methods We extracted RNA from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of KD patients (12 women and 4 men) and controls (12 women and 4 men).Then the isolated RNA was amplified,labeled and hybridized to Agilent human 4×44k whole genome microarrays.Gene expression was examined using oligonucleotide microarray analysis.A quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay was also performed to validate our microarray results.Results Among the genes differentially expressed in female KD patients we identified:HLA-DOA,HLA-DRA,and HLA-DQA1 associated with spontaneous autoimmunity; BMP5 and BMP7,involved in cardiomyocyte differentiation defect; and ADAMTS 8,CCL23,and TNFSF15,implicated in anti-angiogenic activities.These genes are involved in the canonical pathways and networks recognized for the female KD sufferers and might be related to the pathogenic mechanism of KD.Conclusion Our results might help to explain the higher susceptibility of women to this disease.

  4. Marine-Derived Angiogenesis Inhibitors for Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Ying-Qing Wang; Ze-Hong Miao

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis inhibitors have been successfully used for cancer therapy in the clinic. Many marine-derived natural products and their analogues have been reported to show antiangiogenic activities. Compared with the drugs in the clinic, these agents display interesting characteristics, including diverse sources, unique chemical structures, special modes of action, and distinct activity and toxicity profiles. This review will first provide an overview of the current marine-derived angiogenesis ...

  5. Need for validation of fagerstrom test for nicotine dependence in Indian context: Implications for nicotine replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Kumar Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Variety of smokeable and chewable tobacco products with diverse nicotine content are used in India. Nicotine quantity in tobacco products has a direct bearing on developing tobacco dependence. The present work used this information to derive scores on the Fagerstrom test for nicotine dependence (FTND. It was used to determine the dosing of nicotine replacement treatment (NRT. Materials and Methods: Nicotine score quantitation was taken from the previous study. This data was applied to FTND to determine the relationship of nicotine content to the potential degree of dependence. Results: Application of nicotine quantitation to FTND in a hypothetical experiment significantly altered the scores from medium to high depending on the brand the used. Conclusion: Application of qunatitation of nicotine content in FTND score has implications for the assessment of tobacco dependence and NRT dose. The study implies validation of FTND using nicotine quantity in the consumed tobacco product as a scorable parameter in the FTND.

  6. Need for validation of Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence in Indian Context: Implications for Nicotine Replacement Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Sharma, Priyamvada

    2016-01-01

    Background: Variety of smokeable and chewable tobacco products with diverse nicotine content are used in India. Nicotine quantity in tobacco products has a direct bearing on developing tobacco dependence. The present work used this information to derive scores on the Fagerstrom test for nicotine dependence (FTND). It was used to determine the dosing of nicotine replacement treatment (NRT). Materials and Methods: Nicotine score quantitation was taken from the previous study. This data was applied to FTND to determine the relationship of nicotine content to the potential degree of dependence. Results: Application of nicotine quantitation to FTND in a hypothetical experiment significantly altered the scores from medium to high depending on the brand the used. Conclusion: Application of qunatitation of nicotine content in FTND score has implications for the assessment of tobacco dependence and NRT dose. The study implies validation of FTND using nicotine quantity in the consumed tobacco product as a scorable parameter in the FTND.

  7. An investigation into frequency and reasons why patients switch antiretroviral therapy and which antiretrovirals are commonly implicated in toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyle A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the study Previous investigation into antiretroviral (ARV therapy switches in our HIV cohort suggested an annual switch rate of 20% in 2006 with 60% of switches being secondary to toxicity [1]. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether this switch rate has changed in recent years, determine reasons why patients change regimens, and identify which ARVs are most likely to be switched for toxicity concerns. Methods The electronic patient database was reviewed to identify all patients within our HIV cohort who switched ARV therapy between 1st December 2009 and 31st May 2011. Details of which ARVs were switched and the reasons why were recorded. Any switches due to toxicity were investigated further to identify the actual or perceived adverse effect. Summary of results Nine hundred and twenty-three regimens were switched over 18 months affecting 12% (n = 722 of patients on treatment during this time. The most common reason for switching medication was due to toxicity, occurring in 452 (49% cases. Other reasons included simplification (15%, clinical trials (8%, virological failure (8% and drug interactions (4%. The remaining 16% switched for various reasons including pregnancy and co-morbidities. Of 452 switches for toxicity (or perceived toxicity, 122 (27% were due to CNS side effects (89 out of a total of 122 were related to efavirenz, 64 (14% gastrointestinal disturbances (38/64 related to protease inhibitors, 54 (12% actual/perceived cardiovascular risk (21/54 related to abacavir and 21/54 related to saquinavir, 54 (12% hepatotoxicity (21/54 related to atazanavir and 14/54 related to efavirenz, 42 (9% metabolic concerns (24/42 related to protease inhibitors and 38 (8% renal toxicity (28/38 related to tenofovir. Other toxicities accounted for 78 (18% switches. An observed toxicity switch rate (OTSR per 1000 patient years (95% CI was calculated for each ARV. Conclusions 12% of patients switched therapy in 18 months, predicting

  8. Incorporating Cancer Stem Cells in Radiation Therapy Treatment Response Modeling and the Implication in Glioblastoma Multiforme Treatment Resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To perform a preliminary exploration with a simplistic mathematical cancer stem cell (CSC) interaction model to determine whether the tumor-intrinsic heterogeneity and dynamic equilibrium between CSCs and differentiated cancer cells (DCCs) can better explain radiation therapy treatment response with a dual-compartment linear-quadratic (DLQ) model. Methods and Materials: The radiosensitivity parameters of CSCs and DCCs for cancer cell lines including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), non–small cell lung cancer, melanoma, osteosarcoma, and prostate, cervical, and breast cancer were determined by performing robust least-square fitting using the DLQ model on published clonogenic survival data. Fitting performance was compared with the single-compartment LQ (SLQ) and universal survival curve models. The fitting results were then used in an ordinary differential equation describing the kinetics of DCCs and CSCs in response to 2- to 14.3-Gy fractionated treatments. The total dose to achieve tumor control and the fraction size that achieved the least normal biological equivalent dose were calculated. Results: Smaller cell survival fitting errors were observed using DLQ, with the exception of melanoma, which had a low α/β = 0.16 in SLQ. Ordinary differential equation simulation indicated lower normal tissue biological equivalent dose to achieve the same tumor control with a hypofractionated approach for 4 cell lines for the DLQ model, in contrast to SLQ, which favored 2 Gy per fraction for all cells except melanoma. The DLQ model indicated greater tumor radioresistance than SLQ, but the radioresistance was overcome by hypofractionation, other than the GBM cells, which responded poorly to all fractionations. Conclusion: The distinct radiosensitivity and dynamics between CSCs and DCCs in radiation therapy response could perhaps be one possible explanation for the heterogeneous intertumor response to hypofractionation and in some cases superior outcome from

  9. Incorporating Cancer Stem Cells in Radiation Therapy Treatment Response Modeling and the Implication in Glioblastoma Multiforme Treatment Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Victoria Y.; Nguyen, Dan; Pajonk, Frank; Kupelian, Patrick; Kaprealian, Tania; Selch, Michael; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke, E-mail: ksheng@mednet.ucla.edu

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To perform a preliminary exploration with a simplistic mathematical cancer stem cell (CSC) interaction model to determine whether the tumor-intrinsic heterogeneity and dynamic equilibrium between CSCs and differentiated cancer cells (DCCs) can better explain radiation therapy treatment response with a dual-compartment linear-quadratic (DLQ) model. Methods and Materials: The radiosensitivity parameters of CSCs and DCCs for cancer cell lines including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), non–small cell lung cancer, melanoma, osteosarcoma, and prostate, cervical, and breast cancer were determined by performing robust least-square fitting using the DLQ model on published clonogenic survival data. Fitting performance was compared with the single-compartment LQ (SLQ) and universal survival curve models. The fitting results were then used in an ordinary differential equation describing the kinetics of DCCs and CSCs in response to 2- to 14.3-Gy fractionated treatments. The total dose to achieve tumor control and the fraction size that achieved the least normal biological equivalent dose were calculated. Results: Smaller cell survival fitting errors were observed using DLQ, with the exception of melanoma, which had a low α/β = 0.16 in SLQ. Ordinary differential equation simulation indicated lower normal tissue biological equivalent dose to achieve the same tumor control with a hypofractionated approach for 4 cell lines for the DLQ model, in contrast to SLQ, which favored 2 Gy per fraction for all cells except melanoma. The DLQ model indicated greater tumor radioresistance than SLQ, but the radioresistance was overcome by hypofractionation, other than the GBM cells, which responded poorly to all fractionations. Conclusion: The distinct radiosensitivity and dynamics between CSCs and DCCs in radiation therapy response could perhaps be one possible explanation for the heterogeneous intertumor response to hypofractionation and in some cases superior outcome from

  10. Gene Therapy of Cancerous Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valenčáková, A.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy of cancerous diseases provides new means of curing patients with oncologic illnesses. There are several approaches in treating cancer by gene therapy. Most commonly used methods are: cancer immunogene therapy, suicide gene therapy, application of tumor-suppressor genes, antiangiogenic therapy, mesenchymal stem cells used as vectors, gene directed enzyme/prodrug therapy and bacteria used as anti-cancer agents. Cancer gene immunotherapy uses several immunologic agents for the purpose of explaining effective anti-tumor immune response. Another method is suicide gene therapy, based on introducing viral or bacterial agents to tumor cells, allowing the conversion of a non-toxic compound to a lethal medication. The application of intact suppressor genes to cancer cells will avert their neoplastic behavior and will induce tumor regression. Inhibition of angiogenesis is also a promising strategy for treating oncologic patients. Mesenchymal stem cells can also be used as vectors in targeted gene therapy. An increasing list of experimental evidence shows, that therapeutically modified mesenchymal stem cells in “gene directed enzyme/prodrug therapy” can attack cancer tissue can kill tumor cells, cancer stem cells included. Bacteria are used as anti-cancer agents independently of in combination with conventional therapeutic methods.

  11. The landscape of gene fusions and somatic mutations in salivary gland neoplasms - Implications for diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Mattias K; Stenman, Göran

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies of the genomic landscape of salivary gland tumors have provided important insights into the molecular pathogenesis of these tumors. The most consistent alterations identified include a translocation-generated gene fusion network involving transcription factors, transcriptional coactivators, tyrosine kinase receptors, and other kinases. In addition, next-generation sequencing studies of a few subtypes of salivary neoplasms have revealed hotspot mutations in individual genes and mutations clustering to specific pathways frequently altered in cancer. Although limited, these studies have opened up new avenues for improved classification and targeted therapies of salivary gland cancers. In this review, we summarize the latest developments in this field, focusing on tumor types for which clinically important molecular data are available. PMID:27101980

  12. Direct and allosteric inhibition of the FGF2/HSPGs/FGFR1 ternary complex formation by an antiangiogenic, thrombospondin-1-mimic small molecule.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katiuscia Pagano

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs are recognized targets for the development of therapies against angiogenesis-driven diseases, including cancer. The formation of a ternary complex with the transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptors (FGFRs, and heparan sulphate proteoglycans (HSPGs is required for FGF2 pro-angiogenic activity. Here by using a combination of techniques including Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Molecular Dynamics, Surface Plasmon Resonance and cell-based binding assays we clarify the molecular mechanism of inhibition of an angiostatic small molecule, sm27, mimicking the endogenous inhibitor of angiogenesis, thrombospondin-1. NMR and MD data demonstrate that sm27 engages the heparin-binding site of FGF2 and induces long-range dynamics perturbations along FGF2/FGFR1 interface regions. The functional consequence of the inhibitor binding is an impaired FGF2 interaction with both its receptors, as demonstrated by SPR and cell-based binding assays. We propose that sm27 antiangiogenic activity is based on a twofold-direct and allosteric-mechanism, inhibiting FGF2 binding to both its receptors.

  13. Dual blockade of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) exhibits potent anti-angiogenic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Xie, Kun; Zhang, Longzhen; Yao, Xuejing; Li, Hongwen; Xu, Qiaoyu; Wang, Xin; Jiang, Jing; Fang, Jianmin

    2016-07-28

    Both vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF or FGF-2) are potent pro-angiogenic factors and play a critical role in cancer development and progression. Clinical anti-VEGF therapy trials had a major challenge due to upregulated expression of other pro-angiogenic factor, like FGF-2. This study developed a novel chimeric decoy receptor VF-Trap fusion protein to simultaneously block activity of both VEGF and FGF pathways in order to achieve an additive or synergistic anti-tumor effect. Our in vitro data showed that VF-Trap potently blocked proliferation and migration of both VEGF- and FGF-2-induced vascular endothelial cells. In animal models, treatment of xenograft tumors with VF-Trap resulted in significant inhibition of tumor growth compared to blockage of the single molecule, like VEGF or FGF blocker. In addition, VF-Trap was also more potent in inhibition of ocular angiogenesis in a mouse oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) model. These data demonstrated the potent anti-angiogenic effects of this novel VF-Trap fusion protein on blockage of VEGF and FGF-2 activity in vitro and in animal models. Further study will assess its effects in clinic as a therapeutic agent for angiogenesis-related disorders, such as cancer and ocular vascular diseases. PMID:27130666

  14. The effect of post-mastectomy radiation therapy on breast implants: Unveiling biomaterial alterations with potential implications on capsular contracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post-mastectomy breast reconstruction with expanders and implants is recognized as an integral part of breast cancer treatment. Its main complication is represented by capsular contracture, which leads to poor expansion, breast deformation, and pain, often requiring additional surgery. In such a scenario, the debate continues as to whether the second stage of breast reconstruction should be performed before or after post-mastectomy radiation therapy, in light of potential alterations induced by irradiation to silicone biomaterial. This work provides a novel, multi-technique approach to unveil the role of radiotherapy in biomaterial alterations, with potential involvement in capsular contracture. Following irradiation, implant shells underwent mechanical, chemical, and microstructural evaluation by means of tensile testing, Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform InfraRed spectroscopy (ATR/FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), high resolution stylus profilometry, and Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Our findings are consistent with radiation-induced modifications of silicone that, although not detectable at the microscale, can be evidenced by more sophisticated nanoscale surface analyses. In light of these results, biomaterial irradiation cannot be ruled out as one of the possible co-factors underlying capsular contracture. - Highlights: • The debate continues whether to perform breast reconstruction before or after PMRT. • Radiation therapy may alter implant material, concurring to capsular contracture. • In this work, irradiated implants were investigated by a multi-technique approach. • Radiation-induced alterations could be evidenced by ATR/FTIR and ToF-SIMS. • Reported alteration might represent a co-factor underlying capsular contracture

  15. The effect of post-mastectomy radiation therapy on breast implants: Unveiling biomaterial alterations with potential implications on capsular contracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribuffo, Diego; Lo Torto, Federico [Department of Plastic Surgery, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00166 Rome (Italy); Giannitelli, Sara M. [Tissue Engineering Unit, Department of Engineering, Università Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, Via Álvaro del Portillo 21, 00128 Rome (Italy); Urbini, Marco; Tortora, Luca [Surface Analysis Laboratory, Department of Mathematics and Physics, University “Roma Tre”, Via della Vasca Navale 84, 00146 Rome (Italy); INFN — National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Section of Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 84, 00146 Rome (Italy); Mozetic, Pamela; Trombetta, Marcella [Tissue Engineering Unit, Department of Engineering, Università Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, Via Álvaro del Portillo 21, 00128 Rome (Italy); Basoli, Francesco; Licoccia, Silvia [Department of Chemical Science and Technologies, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00173 Rome (Italy); Tombolini, Vincenzo [Department of Radiation Oncology, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00166 Rome (Italy); Spencer-Lorillard Foundation, Viale Regina Elena 291, 00161 Rome (Italy); Cassese, Raffaele [Department of Radiation Oncology, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00166 Rome (Italy); Scuderi, Nicolò [Department of Plastic Surgery, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00166 Rome (Italy); and others

    2015-12-01

    Post-mastectomy breast reconstruction with expanders and implants is recognized as an integral part of breast cancer treatment. Its main complication is represented by capsular contracture, which leads to poor expansion, breast deformation, and pain, often requiring additional surgery. In such a scenario, the debate continues as to whether the second stage of breast reconstruction should be performed before or after post-mastectomy radiation therapy, in light of potential alterations induced by irradiation to silicone biomaterial. This work provides a novel, multi-technique approach to unveil the role of radiotherapy in biomaterial alterations, with potential involvement in capsular contracture. Following irradiation, implant shells underwent mechanical, chemical, and microstructural evaluation by means of tensile testing, Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform InfraRed spectroscopy (ATR/FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), high resolution stylus profilometry, and Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Our findings are consistent with radiation-induced modifications of silicone that, although not detectable at the microscale, can be evidenced by more sophisticated nanoscale surface analyses. In light of these results, biomaterial irradiation cannot be ruled out as one of the possible co-factors underlying capsular contracture. - Highlights: • The debate continues whether to perform breast reconstruction before or after PMRT. • Radiation therapy may alter implant material, concurring to capsular contracture. • In this work, irradiated implants were investigated by a multi-technique approach. • Radiation-induced alterations could be evidenced by ATR/FTIR and ToF-SIMS. • Reported alteration might represent a co-factor underlying capsular contracture.

  16. Canine Mesenchymal Stem Cell Potential and the Importance of Dog Breed: Implication for Cell-Based Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolo, Alessandro; Steffen, Frank; Malonzo-Marty, Cherry; Stoyanov, Jivko

    2015-01-01

    The study of canine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has a prominent position in veterinary cell-based applications. Yet the plethora of breeds, their different life spans, and interbreed variations provide unclearness on what can be achieved specifically by such therapies. In this study, we compared a set of morphological, physiological, and genetic markers of MSCs derived from large dog breeds, namely, Border collie, German shepherd, Labrador, Malinois, Golden retriever, and Hovawart. We compared colony-forming units (CFUs) assay, population doubling time (PDT), senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) activity, telomere length, and gene expression of MSCs, as well as the ability of cells to differentiate to osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic phenotypes. The influence of the culture media α-MEM, low-glucose DMEM, and high-glucose DMEM, used in cell isolation and expansion, was investigated in the presence and absence of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Initial cell yield was not affected by culturing medium, but MSCs expanded best in α-MEM supplemented with bFGF. After isolation, the number of MSCs was similar among breeds--as shown by equivalent CFUs--except in the Hovawart samples, which had fivefold less CFU. Telomere lengths were similar among breeds. MSCs divided actively only for 4 weeks in culture (PDT = ∼50 h/division), except Border collie cells divided for a longer time than cells from other groups. The percentage of senescent cells increased linearly in all breeds with time, with a faster rate in German shepherd, Labrador, and Golden retriever. Border collie cells underwent efficient osteogenic differentiation, Hovawart cells performed the best in chondrogenic differentiation, and Labrador cells in both, while German shepherd cells had the lower differentiation potential. MSCs from all breeds preserved the same adipogenic differentiation potential. In conclusion, despite variations, isolated MSCs can be

  17. Dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) circuitry in rodent models of cocaine use: implications for drug addiction therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinska, Agnes J; Chen, Billy T; Bonci, Antonello; Stein, Elliot A

    2015-03-01

    Although the importance of the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) in cocaine addiction is well established, its precise contribution to cocaine seeking, taking and relapse remains incompletely understood. In particular, across two different models of cocaine self-administration, pharmacological or optogenetic activation of the dorsal MPFC has been reported to sometimes promote and sometimes inhibit cocaine seeking. We highlight important methodological differences between the two experimental paradigms and propose a framework to potentially reconcile the apparent discrepancy. We also draw parallels between these pre-clinical models of cocaine self-administration and human neuro-imaging studies in cocaine users, and argue that both lines of evidence point to dynamic interactions between cue-reactivity processes and control processes within the dorsal MPFC circuitry. From a translational perspective, these findings underscore the importance of interventions and therapeutics targeting not just a brain region, but a specific computational process within that brain region, and may have implications for the design and implementation of more effective treatments for human cocaine addiction. PMID:24620898

  18. Evaluation of WHO immunologic criteria for treatment failure: implications for detection of virologic failure, evolution of drug resistance and choice of second-line therapy in India

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    Snigdha Vallabhaneni

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Routine HIV viral load (VL testing is not available in India. We compared test performance characteristics of immunologic failure (IF against the gold standard of virologic failure (VF, examined evolution of drug resistance among those who stayed on a failing regimen because they did not meet criteria for IF and assessed implications for second-line therapy. Methods: Participants on first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in Bangalore, India, were monitored for 24 months at six-month intervals, with CD4 count, VL and genotype, if VL>1000 copies/ml. Standard WHO criteria were used to define IF; VF was defined as having two consecutive VL>1000 copies/ml or one VL>10,000 copies/ml. Resistance was assessed using standard International AIDS Society-USA (IAS-USA recommendations. Results: Of 522 participants (67.6% male, mean age of 37.5; 85.1% on nevirapine-based and 40.4% on d4T-containing regimens, 57 (10.9% had VF, 38 (7.3% had IF and 13 (2.5% had both VF and IF. The sensitivity of immunologic criteria to detect VF was 22.8%, specificity was 94.6% and positive predictive value was 34.2%. Forty-four participants with VF only continued on their failing first-line regimen; by the end of the study period, 90.9% had M184V, 63.6% had thymidine analogue mutations (TAMs, 34.1% had resistance to tenofovir, and 63.6% had resistance to etravirine. Conclusions: WHO IF criteria have low sensitivity for detecting VF, and the presence of IF poorly predicts VF. Relying on CD4 counts leads to unnecessary switches to second-line HAART and continuation of failing regimens, jeopardizing future therapeutic options. Universal access to VL monitoring would avoid costly switches to second-line HAART and preserve future treatment options.

  19. The role of amputation as an outcome measure in cellular therapy for critical limb ischemia: implications for clinical trial design

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    Pearl Gregory J

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells have been ascribed an important therapeutic role in No-Option Critical limb Ischemia (NO-CLI. One primary endpoint for evaluating NO-CLI therapy is major amputation (AMP, which is usually combined with mortality for AMP-free survival (AFS. Only a trial which is double blinded can eliminate physician and patient bias as to the timing and reason for AMP. We examined factors influencing AMP in a prospective double-blinded pilot RCT (2:1 therapy to control of 48 patients treated with site of service obtained bone marrow cells (BMAC as well as a systematic review of the literature. Methods Cells were injected intramuscularly in the CLI limbs as either BMAC or placebo (peripheral blood. Six month AMP rates were compared between the two arms. Both patient and treating team were blinded of the assignment in follow-up examinations. A search of the literature identified 9 NO-CLI trials, the control arms of which were used to determine 6 month AMP rates and the influence of tissue loss. Results Fifteen amputations occurred during the 6 month period, 86.7% of these during the first 4 months. One amputation occurred in a Rutherford 4 patient. The difference in amputation rate between patients with rest pain (5.6% and those with tissue loss (46.7%, irrespective of treatment group, was significant (p = 0.0029. In patients with tissue loss, treatment with BMAC demonstrated a lower amputation rate than placebo (39.1% vs. 71.4%, p = 0.1337. The Kaplan-Meier time to amputation was longer in the BMAC group than in the placebo group (p = 0.067. Projecting these results to a pivotal trial, a bootstrap simulation model showed significant difference in AFS between BMAC and placebo with a power of 95% for a sample size of 210 patients. Meta-analysis of the literature confirmed a difference in amputation rate between patients with tissue loss and rest pain. Conclusions BMAC shows promise in improving AMP

  20. Human Gene Control by Vital Oncogenes: Revisiting a Theoretical Model and Its Implications for Targeted Cancer Therapy

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    Rudolph E. Willis

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available An important assumption of our current understanding of the mechanisms of carcinogenesis has been the belief that clarification of the cancer process would inevitably reveal some of the crucial mechanisms of normal human gene regulation. Since the momentous work of Bishop and Varmus, both the molecular and the biochemical processes underlying the events in the development of cancer have become increasingly clear. The identification of cellular signaling pathways and the role of protein kinases in the events leading to gene activation have been critical to our understanding not only of normal cellular gene control mechanisms, but also have clarified some of the important molecular and biochemical events occurring within a cancer cell. We now know that oncogenes are dysfunctional proto-oncogenes and that dysfunctional tumor suppressor genes contribute to the cancer process. Furthermore, Weinstein and others have hypothesized the phenomenon of oncogene addiction as a distinct characteristic of the malignant cell. It can be assumed that cancer cells, indeed, become dependent on such vital oncogenes. The products of these vital oncogenes, such as c-myc, may well be the Achilles heel by which targeted molecular therapy may lead to truly personalized cancer therapy. The remaining problem is the need to introduce relevant molecular diagnostic tests such as genome microarray analysis and proteomic methods, especially protein kinase identification arrays, for each individual patient. Genome wide association studies on cancers with gene analysis of single nucleotide and other mutations in functional proto-oncogenes will, hopefully, identify dysfunctional proto-oncogenes and allow the development of more specific targeted drugs directed against the protein products of these vital oncogenes. In 1984 Willis proposed a molecular and biochemical model for eukaryotic gene regulation suggesting how proto-oncogenes might function within the normal cell. That model

  1. Low-level laser therapy regulates microglial function through Src-mediated signaling pathways: implications for neurodegenerative diseases

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    Song Sheng

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activated microglial cells are an important pathological component in brains of patients with neurodegenerative diseases. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of He-Ne (632.8 nm, 64.6 mW/cm2 low-level laser therapy (LLLT, a non-damaging physical therapy, on activated microglia, and the subsequent signaling events of LLLT-induced neuroprotective effects and phagocytic responses. Methods To model microglial activation, we treated the microglial BV2 cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS. For the LLLT-induced neuroprotective study, neuronal cells with activated microglial cells in a Transwell™ cell-culture system were used. For the phagocytosis study, fluorescence-labeled microspheres were added into the treated microglial cells to confirm the role of LLLT. Results Our results showed that LLLT (20 J/cm2 could attenuate toll-like receptor (TLR-mediated proinflammatory responses in microglia, characterized by down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokine expression and nitric oxide (NO production. LLLT-triggered TLR signaling inhibition was achieved by activating tyrosine kinases Src and Syk, which led to MyD88 tyrosine phosphorylation, thus impairing MyD88-dependent proinflammatory signaling cascade. In addition, we found that Src activation could enhance Rac1 activity and F-actin accumulation that typify microglial phagocytic activity. We also found that Src/PI3K/Akt inhibitors prevented LLLT-stimulated Akt (Ser473 and Thr308 phosphorylation and blocked Rac1 activity and actin-based microglial phagocytosis, indicating the activation of Src/PI3K/Akt/Rac1 signaling pathway. Conclusions The present study underlines the importance of Src in suppressing inflammation and enhancing microglial phagocytic function in activated microglia during LLLT stimulation. We have identified a new and important neuroprotective signaling pathway that consists of regulation of microglial phagocytosis and inflammation under LLLT

  2. Extension of the biological effective dose to the MIRD schema and possible implications in radionuclide therapy dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In dosimetry-based treatment planning protocols, patients with rapid clearance of the radiopharmaceutical require a larger amount of initial activity than those with slow clearance to match the absorbed dose to the critical organ. As a result, the dose-rate to the critical organ is higher in patients with rapid clearance and may cause unexpected toxicity compared to patients with slow clearance. In order to account for the biological impact of different dose-rates, radiobiological modeling is beginning to be applied to the analysis of radionuclide therapy patient data. To date, the formalism used for these analyses is based on kinetics derived from activity in a single organ, the target. This does not include the influence of other source organs to the dose and dose-rate to the target organ. As a result, only self-dose irradiation in the target organ contributes to the dose-rate. In this work, the biological effective dose (BED) formalism has been extended to include the effect of multiple source organ contributions to the net dose-rate in a target organ. The generalized BED derivation has been based on the Medical Internal Radionuclide Dose Committee (MIRD) schema assuming multiple source organs following exponential effective clearance of the radionuclide. A BED-based approach to determine the largest safe dose to critical organs has also been developed. The extended BED formalism is applied to red marrow dosimetry, as well as kidney dosimetry considering the cortex and the medulla separately, since both those organs are commonly dose limiting in radionuclide therapy. The analysis shows that because the red marrow is an early responding tissue (high α/β), it is less susceptible to unexpected toxicity arising from rapid clearance of high levels of administered activity in the marrow or in the remainder of the body. In kidney dosimetry, the study demonstrates a complex interplay between clearance of activity in the cortex and the medulla, as well as the initial

  3. Patterns of distant brain recurrences after radiosurgery alone for newly diagnosed brain metastases: Implications for salvage therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Single modality radiosurgery (RS) is an established treatment option for patients with brain metastases (BM) with the aim of achieving optimal local control while avoiding toxicity from whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Published studies generally lack detailed data on distant brain recurrence (DBR) rates and characteristics. This study describes the patterns of DBR and consequences for salvage treatment in a group of patients treated with RS alone for 1–3 BM. Materials and methods: Between 2002 and 2012, 443 patients were treated with RS alone in doses ranging 15–24 Gy in 1–3 fractions. Patient selection for RS was performed using triple dose gadolinium-enhanced MRI scans, obtained with slice distance of 2 mm (until 2008), 1.5 mm (2008–2012), and of 1 mm (from 2012). During follow-up, a DBR was observed in 147 patients, but in 20 of these patients (14%) these “new lesions” could retrospectively be seen on the planning MRI scan. These missed metastases had a median size of 2 mm, and in order to study real DBR patterns, these patients were excluded from analysis. Results: Actuarial DBR rates at 6, 12 and 24 months in the remaining 423 patients were 21%, 41% and 54%, respectively, with a median time to DBR of 5.6 months. In 42% of DBR, a single new lesion was seen, in 70% there were ⩽3 new lesions. Median diameter of the DBR was 6 mm; 97% of lesions were ⩽30 mm. Salvage therapy was delivered in 82% of DBR patients, consisting of WBRT (46%), repeated RS (27%), or systemic treatment (9%). A RPA classification system (DBR-RPA), based on WHO performance status and interval between initial RS and diagnosis of DBR, was developed to estimate life expectancy after the development of DBR, which can be used to guide salvage therapy. Conclusions: In this study of patients treated with RS alone, only 25% of treated patients needed salvage treatment for DBR, and ultimately only 18% of all patients underwent WBRT at any time during follow-up. A three

  4. The personal, societal, and economic burden of schizophrenia in the People's Republic of China: implications for antipsychotic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montgomery W

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available William Montgomery,1 Li Liu,2 Michael D Stensland,5 Hai Bo Xue,2 Tamas Treuer,4 Haya Ascher-Svanum31Eli Lilly and Company, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2Lilly Suzhou Pharmaceutical Company, Ltd, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 3Eli Lilly and Company, Global Health Outcomes, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 4Eli Lilly and Company, Budapest, Hungary; 5Agile Outcomes Research, Inc, Rochester, MN, USABackground: This article describes the personal, societal, and economic burden attributable to schizophrenia in the People's Republic of China and highlights the potential for effective outpatient treatment to reduce this burden given recent changes in the Chinese health care system. The importance of effective antipsychotic therapy in reducing the burden of schizophrenia is also examined.Methods: Published research on the burden, disability, management, and economic costs of schizophrenia in the People's Republic of China was examined in the context of the larger body of global research. Research written in English or Chinese and published before June 2012 was identified using PubMed, CNKI, and Wanfang Med database searches. The contribution of effective antipsychotic therapy in reducing the risk for relapse and hospitalization and improving patients' functioning is described.Results: Schizophrenia imposes a substantial burden on Chinese society, with indirect costs accounting for the majority of the total cost. Functional impairment is high, leading to lost wages and work impairment. In the People's Republic of China, schizophrenia is the most common diagnosis among hospitalized psychiatric patients. Ongoing changes in the Chinese health care system may reduce some barriers to effective relapse prevention in schizophrenia and potentially reduce hospitalizations. The use of antipsychotics for acute episodes and maintenance treatment has been shown to decrease symptom severity and reduce the risk for relapse and hospitalization. However, discontinuing

  5. Time-of-flight PET/CT using low-activity protocols: potential implications for cancer therapy monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate quantification of tumour tracer uptake is essential for therapy monitoring by sequential PET imaging. In this study we investigated to what extent a reduction in administered activity, synonymous with an overall reduction in repeated patient exposure, compromised the accuracy of quantitative measures using time-of-flight PET/CT. We evaluated the effect of reducing the emission count statistics, using a 64-channel GEMINI TF PET/CT system. Experiments were performed with the NEMA IEC body phantom at target-to-background ratios of 4:1 and 10:1. Emission data for 10 s, 30 s, 1 min, 2 min, 5 min and 30 min were acquired. Volumes of interest fitted to the CT outline of the spheres were used to calculate recovery coefficients for each target-to-background ratio and for different reconstruction algorithms. Whole-body time-of-flight PET/CT was performed in 20 patients 62±4 min after injection of 350±40 MBq (range 269-411 MBq) 18F-FDG. From the acquired 2 min per bed position list mode data, simulated 1-min, 30-s and 15-s PET acquisitions were created. PET images were reconstructed using the TOF-OSEM algorithm and analysed for differences in SUV measurements resulting from the use of lower administered activity as simulated by reduced count statistics. In the phantom studies, overall we identified no significant quantitation bias over a wide range of acquired counts. With acquisition times as short as 10 s, lesions as small as 1 cm in diameter could still be identified. In the patient studies, visual analysis showed that emission scans as short as 15 s per bed position sufficiently identified tumour lesions for quantification. As the acquisition time per bed position decreased, the differences in SUV quantification of tumour lesions increased relative to the 2-min reference protocol. However, SUVs remained within the limits of reproducibility required for therapy monitoring. Measurements of SUVmean within the region of interest were less prone to noise than SUVmax

  6. Comparison of Mutation Profiles in the Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene among Populations: Implications for Potential Molecular Therapies

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    Luz Berenice López-Hernández

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Novel therapeutic approaches are emerging to restore dystrophin function in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD, a severe neuromuscular disease characterized by progressive muscle wasting and weakness. Some of the molecular therapies, such as exon skipping, stop codon read-through and internal ribosome entry site-mediated translation rely on the type and location of mutations. Hence, their potential applicability worldwide depends on mutation frequencies within populations. In view of this, we compared the mutation profiles of the populations represented in the DMD Leiden Open-source Variation Database with original data from Mexican patients (n = 162 with clinical diagnosis of the disease. Our data confirm that applicability of exon 51 is high in most populations, but also show that differences in theoretical applicability of exon skipping may exist among populations; Mexico has the highest frequency of potential candidates for the skipping of exons 44 and 46, which is different from other populations (p < 0.001. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive comparison of theoretical applicability of exon skipping targets among specific populations.

  7. Expression of eukaryotic initiation factor 5A and hypusine forming enzymes in glioblastoma patient samples: implications for new targeted therapies.

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    Michael Preukschas

    Full Text Available Glioblastomas are highly aggressive brain tumors of adults with poor clinical outcome. Despite a broad range of new and more specific treatment strategies, therapy of glioblastomas remains challenging and tumors relapse in all cases. Recent work demonstrated that the posttranslational hypusine modification of the eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF-5A is a crucial regulator of cell proliferation, differentiation and an important factor in tumor formation, progression and maintenance. Here we report that eIF-5A as well as the hypusine-forming enzymes deoxyhypusine synthase (DHS and deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (DOHH are highly overexpressed in glioblastoma patient samples. Importantly, targeting eIF-5A and its hypusine modification with GC7, a specific DHS-inhibitor, showed a strong antiproliferative effect in glioblastoma cell lines in vitro, while normal human astrocytes were not affected. Furthermore, we identified p53 dependent premature senescence, a permanent cell cycle arrest, as the primary outcome in U87-MG cells after treatment with GC7. Strikingly, combined treatment with clinically relevant alkylating agents and GC7 had an additive antiproliferative effect in glioblastoma cell lines. In addition, stable knockdown of eIF-5A and DHS by short hairpin RNA (shRNA could mimic the antiproliferative effects of GC7. These findings suggest that pharmacological inhibition of eIF-5A may represent a novel concept to treat glioblastomas and may help to substantially improve the clinical course of this tumor entity.

  8. Differential activation of catalase expression and activity by PPAR agonists: Implications for astrocyte protection in anti-glioma therapy

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    Nicholas K.H. Khoo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioma survival is dismal, in part, due to an imbalance in antioxidant expression and activity. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR agonists have antineoplastic properties which present new redox-dependent targets for glioma anticancer therapies. Herein, we demonstrate that treatment of primary cultures of normal rat astrocytes with PPAR agonists increased the expression of catalase mRNA protein, and enzymatic activity. In contrast, these same agonists had no effect on catalase expression and activity in malignant rat glioma cells. The increase in steady-state catalase mRNA observed in normal rat astrocytes was due, in part, to de novo mRNA synthesis as opposed to increased catalase mRNA stability. Moreover, pioglitazone-mediated induction of catalase activity in normal rat astrocytes was completely blocked by transfection with a PPARγ-dominant negative plasmid. These data suggest that defects in PPAR-mediated signaling and gene expression may represent a block to normal catalase expression and induction in malignant glioma. The ability of PPAR agonists to differentially increase catalase expression and activity in normal astrocytes but not glioma cells suggests that these compounds might represent novel adjuvant therapeutic agents for the treatment of gliomas.

  9. The evolving roles of canonical WNT signaling in stem cells and tumorigenesis: implications in targeted cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ke; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Hongmei; Wang, Zhongliang; Nan, Guoxin; Li, Yasha; Zhang, Fugui; Mohammed, Maryam K; Haydon, Rex C; Luu, Hue H; Bi, Yang; He, Tong-Chuan

    2016-02-01

    The canonical WNT/β-catenin signaling pathway governs a myriad of biological processes underlying the development and maintenance of adult tissue homeostasis, including regulation of stem cell self-renewal, cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. WNTs are secreted lipid-modified glycoproteins that act as short-range ligands to activate receptor-mediated signaling pathways. The hallmark of the canonical pathway is the activation of β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activity. Canonical WNTs control the β-catenin dynamics as the cytoplasmic level of β-catenin is tightly regulated via phosphorylation by the 'destruction complex', consisting of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), casein kinase 1α (CK1α), the scaffold protein AXIN, and the tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC). Aberrant regulation of this signaling cascade is associated with varieties of human diseases, especially cancers. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms of canonical WNT signaling. In this review, we focus on the current understanding of WNT signaling at the extracellular, cytoplasmic membrane, and intracellular/nuclear levels, including the emerging knowledge of cross-talk with other pathways. Recent progresses in developing novel WNT pathway-targeted therapies will also be reviewed. Thus, this review is intended to serve as a refresher of the current understanding about the physiologic and pathogenic roles of WNT/β-catenin signaling pathway, and to outline potential therapeutic opportunities by targeting the canonical WNT pathway. PMID:26618721

  10. The implications of oxidative stress and antioxidant therapies in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Clinical aspects and animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Miruna Balmus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, including Crohn′s disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC, is a chronic inflammatory disorder characterized by alternating phases of clinical relapse and remission. The etiology of IBD remains largely unknown, although a combination of patient′s immune response, genetics, microbiome, and environment plays an important role in disturbing intestinal homeostasis, leading to development and perpetuation of the inflammatory cascade in IBD. As chronic intestinal inflammation is associated with the formation of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, oxidative and nitrosative stress has been proposed as one of the major contributing factor in the IBD development. Substantial evidence suggests that IBD is associated with an imbalance between increased ROS and decreased antioxidant activity, which may explain, at least in part, many of the clinical pathophysiological features of both CD and UC patients. Hereby, we review the presently known oxidant and antioxidant mechanisms involved in IBD-specific events, the animal models used to determine these specific features, and also the antioxidant therapies proposed in IBD patients.

  11. Epigenetic modulation of cancer-germline antigen gene expression in tumorigenic human mesenchymal stem cells: implications for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerstorff, Morten; Burns, Jorge S; Nielsen, Ole; Kassem, Moustapha; Ditzel, Henrik

    2009-07-01

    Cancer-germline antigens are promising targets for cancer immunotherapy, but whether such therapies will also eliminate the primary tumor stem cell population remains undetermined. We previously showed that long-term cultures of telomerized adult human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can spontaneously evolve into tumor-initiating, mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC-TERT20), which have characteristics of clinical sarcoma cells. In this study, we used the hMSC-TERT20 tumor stem cell model to investigate the potential of cancer-germline antigens to serve as tumor stem cell targets. We found that tumorigenic transformation of hMSC-TERT20 cells induced the expression of members of several cancer-germline antigen gene families (ie, GAGE, MAGE-A, and XAGE-1), with promoter hypomethylation and histone acetylation of the corresponding genes. Both in vitro cultures and tumor xenografts derived from tumorigenic hMSC-TERT20 single cell subclones exhibited heterogeneous expression of both GAGE and MAGE-A proteins, and similar patterns of expression were observed in clinical sarcomas. Importantly, histone deacetylase and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors were able to induce more ubiquitous expression levels of cancer-germline antigens in hMSC-TERT20 cells, while their expression levels in primary human mesenchymal stem cells remained unaffected. The expression pattern of cancer-germline antigens in tumorigenic mesenchymal stem cells and sarcomas, plus their susceptibility to enhancement by epigenetic modulators, makes them promising targets for immunotherapeutic approaches to cancer treatment. PMID:19498007

  12. Growth and survival of blowfly Lucilia sericata larvae under simulated wound conditions: implications for maggot debridement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čičková, H; Kozánek, M; Takáč, P

    2015-12-01

    Maggot debridement therapy has become a well-established method of wound debridement. Despite its success, little information is available about the optimum duration of the treatment cycle and larval growth in wounds. This study examines the development of Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae) larvae under two containment conditions (bagged and free range) under simulated wound conditions and assesses the impact of transport and further storage of larvae on their survival and growth. There was no significant difference in size between bagged and free-range larvae over the 72-h experimental period. Larvae grew fastest 8-24 h after inoculation and completed their growth at 40-48 h. Mortality rates were similar (0.12-0.23% per hour) in both containment conditions and did not differ significantly (P = 0.3212). Survival of free-range larvae was on average 16% lower than survival of bagged larvae. Refrigeration of larvae upon simulated delivery for > 1 day reduced their survival to refrigeration. PMID:26382290

  13. Progesterone receptors – animal models and cell signalling in breast cancer: Implications for breast cancer of inclusion of progestins in hormone replacement therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Schairer, Catherine

    2002-01-01

    Progestins are included in menopausal hormone replacement therapy to counteract the increased risk for endometrial cancer associated with estrogen replacement therapy. Studies of hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer risk and of changes in mammographic density according to different regimens of hormone replacement therapy suggest that, for the most part, estrogen–progestin replacement therapy has a more adverse effect on breast cancer risk than does estrogen replacement therapy. Many ...

  14. The anti-angiogenic factor PEDF is present in the human heart and is regulated by anoxia in cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Rychli, Kathrin; Kaun, Christoph; Hohensinner, Philipp J.; Dorfner, Adrian J; Pfaffenberger, Stefan; Niessner, Alexander; Bauer, Michael; Dietl, Wolfgang; Podesser, Bruno K.; Maurer, Gerald; Huber, Kurt; Wojta, Johann

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac diseases such as myocardial infarction and heart failure are among the leading causes of death in western societies. Therapeutic angiogenesis has been suggested as a concept to combat these diseases. The biology of angiogenic factors expressed in the heart such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is well studied, whereas data on anti-angiogenic mediators in the heart are scarce. Here we study the expression of the anti-angiogenic factor pigment epithelium-derived fac...

  15. Raman optical activity spectra and conformational elucidation of chiral drugs. The case of the antiangiogenic aeroplysinin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Ortega, Belén; Casado, Juan; Blanch, Ewan W; López Navarrete, Juan T; Quesada, Ana R; Ramírez, Francisco J

    2011-04-01

    We present the determination of the conformational properties of aeroplysinin-1 in aqueous solution by means of a combined experimental and theoretical Raman optical activity (ROA) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) study. Aeroplysinin-1 is an antiangiogenic drug extracted from the sponge Aplysina cavernicola which has been proved to be a valuable candidate for the treatment of cancer and other antiangiogenic diseases. Our study shows that this molecule possesses the 1S,6R absolute configuration in aqueous solution, where only two conformers are present to a significant level. We discuss in detail the relationships between the chiro-optical ROA and VCD features, and the structural properties of various energy accessible conformers are described. The present work is one of the first studies in which both ROA and VCD have been used as complementary tools for the determination of absolute configuration and dominant solution-state conformations of an unknown therapeutically significant molecule. PMID:21401047

  16. Accuracy of ultrasound and oral cholecystography in assessing the number and size of gallstones: implications for non-surgical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brakel, K; Laméris, J S; Nijs, H G; Ginai, A Z; Terpstra, O T

    1992-09-01

    Prior to non-surgical therapy of gallstones it is important to assess their number and size. In order to evaluate the accuracy of ultrasound (US) and oral cholecystography (OCG) in counting and measuring gallstones, a prospective blind study was conducted to compare the results of US (n = 99) and OCG (n = 36), either alone or in combination (n = 34), with the number and size of gallstones retrieved after cholecystectomy. The number of gallstones was accurately estimated by US and OCG in 74% and 69% of the cases, respectively. In assessing the presence of up to three, five or 10 gallstones both US and OCG proved reliable. In measuring the size of gallstones, there was 19% accuracy with US compared with only 3% with OCG. With an accepted measurement error of 3 mm these values increased to 80% for US and 44% for OCG. US proved more reliable than OCG in discriminating gallstones smaller or larger than 10 mm and smaller or larger than 20 mm, but with US, detection of gallstones larger than 30 mm was problematic. Both US and OCG underestimated gallstone size. The combination of both techniques did not significantly improve the assessment of either number or size of gallstones compared with the results obtained with US or OCG alone. It is concluded that (1) both US and OCG have some limitations in assessing the number and size of gallstones, (2) the combination of both examinations does not improve accuracy, and (3) patient selection for non-surgical treatment of gallstones can be started by US alone. PMID:1393414

  17. Determination of the inferior border of the thecal sac using magnetic resonance imaging: implications on radiation therapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine whether the traditional teaching of placing the caudal border of the spinal field at the S2-S3 interspace in children receiving craniospinal irradiation (CSI) is appropriate. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three children had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine with gadolinium prior to craniospinal irradiation at one institution. Thecal sac termination using MRI was determined by drawing a perpendicular line from the point of convergence of dural margins to the corresponding vertebral body. Results: Location of thecal sac termination varied from mid-S1 to low S3 vertebral body, with the most frequent site at the upper S2 vertebral level. Only 2 of 23 (8.7%) children had thecal sac terminations below the S2-S3 interspace. For the nine patients with neuraxis disease, none had thecal sac terminations below the S2-S3 interspace. In seven of the nine patients who had neuraxis seeding at initial presentation, MRI of the spine after CSI was performed and showed that thecal sac termination was lower after radiation therapy in two children, higher in one, and the same in four. Conclusions: In 2 of 23 children (8.7%), placement of the inferior border at the bottom of the S2 vertebral body would have missed the entire thecal sac. Treatment to the entire neuraxis with adequate coverage of distal spinal theca can be achieved by using MRI. Individualized spinal fields using the MRI may help minimize radiation scatter to the gonads while adequately covering the target volume

  18. Community perceptions of malaria and malaria treatment behaviour in a rural district of Ghana: implications for artemisinin combination therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boahen Owusu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artesunate-amodiaquine (AS-AQ was introduced in Ghana as the first line drug for treatment of uncomplicated malaria in 2004. We report the perceptions of malaria and malaria treatment behaviour, the community awareness of and perceptions about AS-AQ two years after the introduction of this ACT treatment for malaria. Methods Two surveys were conducted; a cross-sectional survey of 729 randomly selected household heads (urban-362, rural-367 and 282 women with children Results Majority of respondents ( > 75% in the sampled survey mentioned mosquito bites as the cause of malaria. Other causes mentioned include environmental factors (e.g. dirty surroundings and standing in the sun. Close to 60% of the household heads and 40% of the care-givers interviewed did not know about AS-AQ. The community respondents who knew about and had ever taken AS-AQ perceived it to be a good drug; although they mentioned they had experienced some side effects including headaches and body weakness. Co-blistered AS-AQ was available in all the government health facilities in the study area. Different formulations of ACTs were however found in urban chemical shops but not in rural chemical stores where monotherapy antimalarials were predominant. Conclusion The knowledge of fever as a symptom of malaria is high among the study population. The awareness of AS-AQ therapy and its side-effect was low in the study area. Community education and sensitization, targeting all categories of the population, has to be intensified to ensure an efficient implementation process.

  19. The tumour sink effect on the biodistribution of 68Ga-DOTA-octreotate: implications for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumour sequestration of radiotracer may lead to decreased bioavailability in healthy tissue resulting in lower absorbed radiation dose to critical organs. This study aims to assess the impact of disease burden, body habitus and urinary excretion on the biodistribution of 68Ga-DOTA-octreotate. Ten patients with highly varied burden of somatostatin receptor-positive neuroendocrine tumour on 68Ga-DOTA-octreotate positron emission tomography (PET)/CT were selected. Volumes of interest were drawn to derive the average uptake of renal parenchyma, spleen and body background, as well as to compute the fraction of injected activity sequestered in tumour and excreted in urine. Uptake values were assessed for correlation with tumour sequestration, weight, lean body weight, body surface area and urinary excretion. There was a trend for tumour sequestration, body habitus and urinary excretion to inversely influence all healthy tissue uptake values. In particular, renal uptake, splenic intensity and background soft tissue activity were all significantly correlated to composite factors combining tumour sequestration with body habitus and renal excretion. When combined with body habitus index or a body habitus index and renal excretion, tumour sequestration was strongly and significantly correlated inversely with renal uptake. Our results suggest that tumour sequestration of 68Ga-DOTA-octreotate is a major factor leading to a sink effect that decreases activity concentration in healthy organs such as the kidney. However, body habitus and renal function also influence tissue biodistribution, in a synergistic fashion. Compared with a fixed-dose peptide receptor radionuclide therapy protocol, an adjusted-dose regimen tailored to tumour burden, body habitus and renal function may allow greater radiation dose to individual lesions without substantially adding to toxicity in normal tissues. (orig.)

  20. Survival Following Radiation and Androgen Suppression Therapy for Prostate Cancer in Healthy Older Men: Implications for Screening Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has recommended against screening men over 75 for prostate cancer. We examined whether older healthy men could benefit from aggressive prostate cancer treatment. Methods and Materials: 206 men with intermediate to high risk localized prostate cancer randomized to 70 Gy of radiation (RT) or RT plus 6 months of androgen suppression therapy (RT+AST) constituted the study cohort. Within subgroups stratified by Adult Comorbidity Evaluation-27 comorbidity score and age, Cox multivariable analysis was used to determine whether treatment with RT+AST as compared with RT was associated with a decreased risk of death. Results: Among healthy men (i.e., with mild or no comorbidity), 78 were older than the median age of 72.4 years, and in this subgroup, RT+AST was associated with a significantly lower risk of death on multivariable analysis (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.36 (95% CI=0.13-0.98), p = 0.046, with significantly lower 8-year mortality estimates of 16.5% vs. 41.4% (p = 0.011). Conversely, among men with moderate or severe comorbidity, 24 were older than the median age of 73, and in this subgroup, treatment with RT+AST was associated with a higher risk of death (adjusted hazard ratio = 5.2 (1.3-20.2), p = 0.018). Conclusion: In older men with mild or no comorbidity, treatment with RT+AST was associated with improved survival compared with treatment with RT alone, suggesting that healthy older men may derive the same benefits from prostate cancer treatment as younger men. We therefore suggest that prostate cancer screening recommendations should not be based on strict age cutoffs alone but should also take into account comorbidity.

  1. The tumour sink effect on the biodistribution of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotate: implications for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauregard, Jean-Mathieu [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and University of Melbourne, Centre for Cancer Imaging, Melbourne (Australia); Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec and Laval University, Molecular Imaging Research Group, Medical Imaging Department, Quebec City, QC (Canada); Hofman, Michael S.; Kong, Grace; Hicks, Rodney J. [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and University of Melbourne, Centre for Cancer Imaging, Melbourne (Australia)

    2012-01-15

    Tumour sequestration of radiotracer may lead to decreased bioavailability in healthy tissue resulting in lower absorbed radiation dose to critical organs. This study aims to assess the impact of disease burden, body habitus and urinary excretion on the biodistribution of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotate. Ten patients with highly varied burden of somatostatin receptor-positive neuroendocrine tumour on {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotate positron emission tomography (PET)/CT were selected. Volumes of interest were drawn to derive the average uptake of renal parenchyma, spleen and body background, as well as to compute the fraction of injected activity sequestered in tumour and excreted in urine. Uptake values were assessed for correlation with tumour sequestration, weight, lean body weight, body surface area and urinary excretion. There was a trend for tumour sequestration, body habitus and urinary excretion to inversely influence all healthy tissue uptake values. In particular, renal uptake, splenic intensity and background soft tissue activity were all significantly correlated to composite factors combining tumour sequestration with body habitus and renal excretion. When combined with body habitus index or a body habitus index and renal excretion, tumour sequestration was strongly and significantly correlated inversely with renal uptake. Our results suggest that tumour sequestration of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotate is a major factor leading to a sink effect that decreases activity concentration in healthy organs such as the kidney. However, body habitus and renal function also influence tissue biodistribution, in a synergistic fashion. Compared with a fixed-dose peptide receptor radionuclide therapy protocol, an adjusted-dose regimen tailored to tumour burden, body habitus and renal function may allow greater radiation dose to individual lesions without substantially adding to toxicity in normal tissues. (orig.)

  2. Antitumor and anti-angiogenic potentials of isolated crude saponins and various fractions of Rumex hastatus D. Don.

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Sajjad; Ullah, Farhat; Ayaz, Muhammad; Zeb, Anwar; Ullah, Farman; Sadiq, Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer, being the foremost challenge of the modern era and the focus of world-class investigators, gargantuan research is in progress worldwide to explore novel therapeutic for its management. The exploitation of natural sources has been proven to be an excellent approach to treat or minify the excessive angiogenesis and proliferation of cells. Similarly, based the ethnomedicinal uses and literature survey, the current study is designed to explore the anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic...

  3. Natural phenolic metabolites with anti-angiogenic properties – a review from the chemical point of view

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu Sun; Jörg Heilmann; Burkhard König

    2015-01-01

    Considering the many secondary natural metabolites available from plants, phenolic compounds play a particularly important role in human health as they occur in significant amounts in many fruits, vegetables and medicinal plants. In this review natural phenolic compounds of plant origin with significant anti-angiogenic properties are discussed. Thirteen representatives from eight different natural or natural-like phenolic subclasses are presented with an emphasis on their synthesis and method...

  4. Growth-Inhibitory and Antiangiogenic Activity of the MEK Inhibitor PD0325901 in Malignant Melanoma with or without BRAF Mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Ludovica Ciuffreda; Donatella Del Bufalo; Marianna Desideri; Cristina Di Sanza; Antonella Stoppacciaro; Maria Rosaria Ricciardi; Sabina Chiaretti; Simona Tavolaro; Barbara Benassi; Alfonso Bellacosa; Robin Foà; Agostino Tafuri; Francesco Cognetti; Andrea Anichini; Gabriella Zupi

    2009-01-01

    The Raf/MEK/ERK pathway is an importantmediator of tumor cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Here, weinvestigated the growth-inhibitory and antiangiogenic properties of PD0325901, a novel MEK inhibitor, in human melanoma cells. PD0325901 effects were determined in a panel of melanoma cell lines with different genetic aberrations. PD0325901 markedly inhibited ERK phosphorylation and growth of both BRAF mutant and wild-type melanoma cell lines, with IC50 in the nanomolar range even in the leas...

  5. Anti-angiogenic effect of triptolide in rheumatoid arthritis by targeting angiogenic cascade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangying Kong

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is characterized by a pre-vascular seriously inflammatory phase, followed by a vascular phase with high increase in vessel growth. Since angiogenesis has been considered as an essential event in perpetuating inflammatory and immune responses, as well as supporting pannus growth and development of RA, inhibition of angiogenesis has been proposed as a novel therapeutic strategy for RA. Triptolide, a diterpenoid triepoxide from Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F, has been extensively used in treatment of RA patients. It also acts as a small molecule inhibitor of tumor angiogenesis in several cancer types. However, it is unclear whether triptolide possesses an anti-angiogenic effect in RA. To address this problem, we constructed collagen-induced arthritis (CIA model using DA rats by the injection of bovine type II collagen. Then, CIA rats were treated with triptolide (11-45 µg/kg/day starting on the day 1 after first immunization. The arthritis scores (P<0.05 and the arthritis incidence (P<0.05 of inflamed joints were both significantly decreased in triptolide-treated CIA rats compared to vehicle CIA rats. More interestingly, doses of 11~45 µg/kg triptolide could markedly reduce the capillaries, small, medium and large vessel density in synovial membrane tissues of inflamed joints (all P<0.05. Moreover, triptolide inhibited matrigel-induced cell adhesion of HFLS-RA and HUVEC. It also disrupted tube formation of HUVEC on matrigel and suppressed the VEGF-induced chemotactic migration of HFLS-RA and HUVEC, respectively. Furthermore, triptolide significantly reduced the expression of angiogenic activators including TNF-α, IL-17, VEGF, VEGFR, Ang-1, Ang-2 and Tie2, as well as suppressed the IL1-β-induced phosphorylated of ERK, p38 and JNK at protein levels. In conclusion, our data suggest for the first time that triptolide may possess anti-angiogenic effect in RA both in vivo and in vitro assay systems by downregulating the

  6. Inhibition of tumor angiogenesis by angiostatin: from recombinant protein to gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Eva, Raffaella; Pfeffer, Ulrich; Indraccolo, S; Albini, Adriana; Noonan, Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Tumor growth, local invasion, and metastatic dissemination are dependent on the formation of new microvessels. The process of angiogenesis is regulated by a balance between pro-angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors, and the shift to an angiogenic phenotype (the "angiogenic switch") is a key event in tumor progression. The use of anti-angiogenic agents to restore this balance represents a promising approach to cancer treatment. Known physiological inhibitors include trombospondin, several interleukins, and the proteolytic break-down products of several proteins. Angiostatin, an internal fragment of plasminogen, is one of the more potent of this latter class of angiogenesis inhibitors. Like endostatin, another anti-angiogenic peptide derived from collagen XVIII, angiostatin can induce tumor vasculature regression, leading to a complete cessation of tumor growth. Inhibitors of angiogenesis target normal endothelial cells, therefore the development of resistance to these drugs is unlikely. The efficacy of angiostatin has been demonstrated in animal models for many different types of solid tumors. Anti-angiogenic cancer therapy with angiostatin requires prolonged administration of the peptide. The production of the functional polypeptides is expensive and technical problems related to physical properties and purity are frequently encountered. Gene transfer represents an alternative method to deliver angiostatin. Gene therapy has the potential to produce the therapeutic agent in high concentrations in a local area for a sustained period, thereby avoiding the problems encountered with long-term administration of recombinant proteins, monoclonal antibodies, or anti-angiogenic drugs. In this review we compare the different gene therapy strategies that have been applied to angiostatin, with special regard to their ability to provide sufficient angiostatin at the target site. PMID:12901356

  7. Antiangiogenic activity of xanthomicrol and calycopterin, two polymethoxylated hydroxyflavones in both in vitro and ex vivo models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaszadeh, Hassan; Ebrahimi, Soltan Ahmad; Akhavan, Maziar Mohammad

    2014-11-01

    Our previous studies had shown xanthomicrol and calycopterin, two plant-derived flavonoids, to have selective antiproliferative activity against some malignant cell lines. The present study is focused on the investigation of antiangiogenic potential of these two flavonoids, using in vitro and ex vivo models. Xanthomicrol and calycopterin were found to have potent inhibitory effects on microvessel outgrowth in the rat aortic ring assay. Xanthomicrol was able to completely block microvessel sprouting at 10 µg/mL, and calycopterin suppressed microvessel outgrowth by 89% at 5 µg/mL. Suramin and thalidomide, used at 20 µg/mL as positive controls, inhibited microvessel formation by 23% and 64%, respectively. The flavones also inhibited endothelial cell tube formation and human umbilical vein endothelial cell proliferation at 0.5, 5, and 10 µg/mL. In order to delineate the underlying mechanisms of antiangiogenic activity of these flavones, we investigated the influences of xanthomicrol and calycopterin on expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic-fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF) in endothelial cells. These flavones were able to inhibit VEGF expression at 0.5, 5, and 10 µg/mL, but they had little or no effect on b-FGF expression. These findings suggest that xanthomicrol and calycopterin possess potent antiangiogenic activities, which may be due to their inhibitory influences on VEGF expression. PMID:24895220

  8. A gene transfer comparative study of HSA-conjugated antiangiogenic factors in a transgenic mouse model of metastatic ocular cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frau, E; Magnon, C; Opolon, P; Connault, E; Opolon, D; Beermann, F; Beerman, F; Abitbol, M; Perricaudet, M; Bouquet, C

    2007-03-01

    Different antiangiogenic and antimetastatic recombinant adenoviruses were tested in a transgenic mouse model of metastatic ocular cancer (TRP1/SV40 Tag transgenic mice), which is a highly aggressive tumor, developed from the pigmented epithelium of the retina. These vectors, encoding amino-terminal fragments of urokinase plasminogen activator (ATF), angiostatin Kringles (K1-3), endostatin (ES) and canstatin (Can) coupled to human serum albumin (HSA) were injected to assess their metastatic and antiangiogenic activities in our model. Compared to AdCO1 control group, AdATF-HSA did not significantly reduce metastatic growth. In contrast, mice treated with AdK1-3-HSA, AdES-HSA and AdCan-HSA displayed significantly smaller metastases (1.19+/-1.19, 0.87+/-1.5, 0.43+/-0.56 vs controls 4.04+/-5.12 mm3). Moreover, a stronger inhibition of metastatic growth was obtained with AdCan-HSA than with AdK1-3-HSA (P=0.04). Median survival was improved by 4 weeks. A close correlation was observed between the effects of these viruses on metastatic growth and their capacity to inhibit tumor angiogenesis. Our study indicates that systemic antiangiogenic factors production by recombinant adenoviruses, particularly Can, might represent an effective way of delaying metastatic growth via inhibition of angiogenesis. PMID:17082795

  9. Patterns of failure after complete resection of thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: implications for postoperative radiation therapy volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To analyze intrathoracic or extrathoracic recurrence pattern after surgical resection of thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (TESCC) and its help for further modify and improvement on the target of postoperative radiation therapy. Methods: One hundred and ninety-five patients who had undergone resection of TESCC at the Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences enrolled from April 1999 to July 2007. Sites of failure on different primary location of esophageal cancer were documented. Results: Patients with upper or middle thoracic esophageal cancer had higher proportion of intrathoracic recurrence. Patients with lower thoracic esophageal cancer had more intrathoracic recurrence and abdominal lymph node metastatic recurrence. Histological lymph node status has nothing to do with intrathoracic recurrence, supraclavicular lymph node (SLN) metastasis or distant metastasis (χ2 =1.58, 0.06, 0.04, P =0.134, 0.467, 0.489, respectively), whereas the chance of abdominal lymph node metastases in N positive patients was significantly higher than that in N0 patients (28.7%: 10.6%, χ2 =9.94, P =0.001), and so did in middle thoracic esophageal cancer (20.0%: 5.6%, χ2 =5.67, P =0.015). Anatomic recurrence rate of patients with proximal resection margin no more than 3 cm was significantly higher compared to those more than 3 cm (25.0%: 11.3%, χ2=5.65, P=0.019). Conclusions: Mediastinum is the most common recurrence site.According to recurrence site, the following radiation targets are recommended: when tumor was located at the upper or middle thoracic esophagus with negative N status, the mediastinum, the tumor bed and the supraclavicular region should be included as postoperative RT target; when tumor was located at the middle thoracic esophagus with positive N or located at the lower thoracic esophagus, the abdominal lymph node should be added.If the proximal resection margin was no more than 3 cm, the anastomotic-stoma should be included. (authors)

  10. Gene Therapy Used in Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wirth

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cancer has been, from the beginning, a target of intense research for gene therapy approaches. Currently, more than 60% of all on-going clinical gene therapy trials worldwide are targeting cancer. Indeed, there is a clear unmet medical need for novel therapies. This is further urged by the fact that current conventional cancer therapies are frequently troubled by their toxicities. Different gene therapy strategies have been employed for cancer, such as pro-drug activating suicide gene therapy, anti-angiogenic gene therapy, oncolytic virotherapy, gene therapy-based immune modulation, correction/compensation of gene defects, genetic manipulation of apoptotic and tumor invasion pathways, antisense, and RNAi strategies. Cancer types, which have been targeted with gene therapy, include brain, lung, breast, pancreatic, liver, colorectal, prostate, bladder, head and neck, skin, ovarian, and renal cancer. Currently, two cancer gene therapy products have received market approval, both of which are in China. In addition, the stimulation of the host’s immune system, using gene therapeutic approaches, has gained vast interest. The intention of this review is to point out the most commonly viral and non-viral vectors and methods used in cancer gene therapy, as well as highlight some key results achieved in clinical trials.

  11. Anti-Oxidant, Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Angiogenic Properties of Resveratrol in Ocular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Lançon

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol (3,4′,5 trihydroxy-trans-stilbene is one of the best known phytophenols with pleiotropic properties. It is a phytoalexin produced by vine and it leads to the stimulation of natural plant defenses but also exhibits many beneficial effects in animals and humans by acting on a wide range of organs and tissues. These include the prevention of cardiovascular diseases, anti-cancer potential, neuroprotective effects, homeostasia maintenance, aging delay and a decrease in inflammation. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is one of the main causes of deterioration of vision in adults in developed countries This review deals with resveratrol and ophthalmology by focusing on the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-angiogenic effects of this molecule. The literature reports that resveratrol is able to act on various cell types of the eye by increasing the level of natural antioxidant enzymatic and molecular defenses. Resveratrol anti-inflammatory effects are due to its capacity to limit the expression of pro-inflammatory factors, such as interleukins and prostaglandins, and also to decrease the chemo-attraction and recruitment of immune cells to the inflammatory site. In addition to this, resveratrol was shown to possess anti-VEGF effects and to inhibit the proliferation and migration of vascular endothelial cells. Resveratrol has the potential to be used in a range of human ocular diseases and conditions, based on animal models and in vitro experiments.

  12. The antiangiogenic compound aeroplysinin-1 induces apoptosis in endothelial cells by activating the mitochondrial pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Poveda, Beatriz; Rodríguez-Nieto, Salvador; García-Caballero, Melissa; Medina, Miguel-Ángel; Quesada, Ana R

    2012-09-01

    Aeroplysinin-1 is a brominated metabolite extracted from the marine sponge Aplysina aerophoba that has been previously characterized by our group as a potent antiangiogenic compound in vitro and in vivo. In this work, we provide evidence of a selective induction of apoptosis by aeroplysinin-1 in endothelial cells. Studies on the nuclear morphology of treated cells revealed that aeroplysinin-1 induces chromatin condensation and nuclear fragmentation, and it increases the percentage of cells with sub-diploid DNA content in endothelial, but not in HCT-116, human colon carcinoma and HT-1080 human fibrosarcoma cells. Treatment of endothelial cells with aeroplysinin-1 induces activation of caspases-2, -3, -8 and -9, as well as the cleavage of apoptotic substrates, such as poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and lamin-A in a caspase-dependent mechanism. Our data indicate a relevant role of the mitochondria in the apoptogenic activity of this compound. The observation that aeroplysinin-1 prevents the phosphorylation of Bad relates to the mitochondria-mediated induction of apoptosis by this compound. PMID:23118719

  13. Anti-angiogenic and anti-inflammatory effects of SERPINA3K on corneal injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochen Liu

    Full Text Available SERPINA3K is a member of the serine proteinase inhibitor (SERPIN family. Here we evaluated the therapeutic effects of SERPINA3K on neovascularization and inflammation in a rat cornea alkali burn model that is commonly employed to study corneal wounding. Topical treatment of the injured rat cornea with SERPINA3K (20 µg/eye/day for 7 days significantly decreased the neovascular area, compared with the groups treated with BSA or PBS. The SERPINA3K treatment also ameliorated the corneal inflammation as evaluated by the inflammatory index. Furthermore, SERPINA3K enhanced the recovery of corneal epithelium after the alkali injury. Toward the mechanism of action, SERPINA3K down-regulated the expression of the pro-angiogenic and pro-inflammatory factors, vascular endothelial growth factor and tumor necrosis factor-α and up-regulated the expression of the anti-angiogenic factor, pigment epithelium-derived factor. SERPINA3K specifically inhibited growth of vascular endothelial cells. Meanwhile, SERPINA3K significantly up-regulated the expression of EGFR in the corneal epithelium. These findings suggest that SERPINA3K has therapeutic potential for corneal inflammation and NV.

  14. Controlled delivery of antiangiogenic drug to human eye tissue using a MEMS device

    KAUST Repository

    Pirmoradi, Fatemeh Nazly

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate an implantable MEMS drug delivery device to conduct controlled and on-demand, ex vivo drug transport to human eye tissue. Remotely operated drug delivery to human post-mortem eyes was performed via a MEMS device. The developed curved packaging cover conforms to the eyeball thereby preventing the eye tissue from contacting the actuating membrane. By pulsed operation of the device, using an externally applied magnetic field, the drug released from the device accumulates in a cavity adjacent to the tissue. As such, docetaxel (DTX), an antiangiogenic drug, diffuses through the eye tissue, from sclera and choroid to retina. DTX uptake by sclera and choroid were measured to be 1.93±0.66 and 7.24±0.37 μg/g tissue, respectively, after two hours in pulsed operation mode (10s on/off cycles) at 23°C. During this period, a total amount of 192 ng DTX diffused into the exposed tissue. This MEMS device shows great potential for the treatment of ocular posterior segment diseases such as diabetic retinopathy by introducing a novel way of drug administration to the eye. © 2013 IEEE.

  15. Antiangiogenic treatment delays chondrocyte maturation and bone formation during limb skeletogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Melinda; Gentili, Chiara; Koyama, Eiki; Zasloff, Michael; Pacifici, Maurizio

    2002-01-01

    Hypertrophic chondrocytes have important roles in promoting invasion of cartilage by blood vessels and its replacement with bone. However, it is unclear whether blood vessels exert reciprocal positive influences on chondrocyte maturation and function. Therefore, we implanted beads containing the antiangiogenic molecule squalamine around humeral anlagen in chick embryo wing buds and monitored the effects over time. Fluorescence microscopy showed that the drug diffused from the beads and accumulated in humeral perichondrial tissues, indicating that these tissues were the predominant targets of drug action. Diaphyseal chondrocyte maturation was indeed delayed in squalamine-treated humeri, as indicated by reduced cell hypertrophy and expression of type X collagen, transferrin, and Indian hedgehog (Ihh). Although reduced in amount, Ihh maintained a striking distribution in treated and control humeri, being associated with diaphyseal chondrocytes as well as inner perichondrial layer. These decreases were accompanied by lack of cartilage invasion and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive (TRAP+) cells and a significant longitudinal growth retardation. Recovery occurred at later developmental times, when in fact expression in treated humeri of markers such as matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) appeared to exceed that in controls. Treating primary cultures of hypertrophic chondrocytes and osteoblasts with squalamine revealed no obvious changes in cell phenotype. These data provide evidence that perichondrial tissues and blood vessels in particular influence chondrocyte maturation in a positive manner and may cooperate with hypertrophic chondrocytes in dictating the normal pace and location of the transition from cartilage to bone. PMID:11771670

  16. Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (DCE-US) and anti-angiogenic treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassau, Nathalie; Chami, Linda; Chebil, Mohamed; Benatsou, Baya; Bidault, Sophie; Girard, Elizabeth; Abboud, Ghassen; Roche, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (DCE-US) is a current functional imaging technique enabling a quantitative assessment of tumor perfusion using raw linear data. DCE-US allows calculating several parameters as slope of wash-in or area under the curve representing, respectively, blood flow or blood volume. Decrease of vascularization can easily be detected in responders after 1 or 2 weeks of anti-angiogenic treatment for gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and is correlated with progression-free survival and overall survival in RCC or HCC. DCE-US is supported by the French National Cancer Institute (INCa), which is currently studying the technique in metastatic breast cancer, melanoma, colon cancer, gastrointestinal stromal tumors and renal cell carcinoma, as well as in primary hepatocellular carcinoma, to establish the optimal perfusion parameters and timing for quantitative anticancer efficacy assessments. Currently 479 patients are included in 19 centers and the preliminary results on 400 patients with 1096 DCE-US demonstrated that the area under the curve (AUC) quantified at 1 month could be a robust parameter to predict response at 6 months. PMID:21276407

  17. Viola tricolor Induces Apoptosis in Cancer Cells and Exhibits Antiangiogenic Activity on Chicken Chorioallantoic Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Sadeghnia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the cytotoxic and apoptogenic properties of hydroalcoholic extract and ethyl acetate (EtOAc, n-butanol, and water fractions (0–800 μg/mL of Viola tricolor were investigated in Neuro2a mouse neuroblastoma and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. In addition, antiangiogenic effect of EtOAc fraction was evaluated on chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM. The quality of EtOAc fraction was also characterized using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC fingerprint. Cytotoxicity assay revealed that EtOAc fraction was the most potent among all fractions with maximal effect on MCF-7 and minimal toxicity against normal murine fibroblast L929 cells. Apoptosis induction by EtOAc fraction was confirmed by increased sub-G1 peak of propidium iodide (PI stained cells. This fraction triggered the apoptotic pathway by increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and cleaved caspase-3 level. Moreover, treatment with EtOAc fraction significantly decreased the diameter of vessels on CAM, while the number of newly formed blood vessels was not suppressed significantly. Analysis of quality of EtOAc fraction using HPLC fingerprint showed six major peaks with different retention times. The results of the present study suggest that V. tricolor has potential anticancer property by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting angiogenesis.

  18. Combretastatin A-4 Conjugated Antiangiogenic Micellar Drug Delivery Systems Using Dendron-Polymer Conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumer Bolu, Burcu; Manavoglu Gecici, Ece; Sanyal, Rana

    2016-05-01

    Employment of polymeric nanomaterials in cancer therapeutics is actively pursued since they often enable drug administration with increased efficacy along with reduced toxic side effects. In this study, drug conjugated micellar constructs are fabricated using triblock dendron-linear polymer conjugates where a hydrophilic linear polyethylene glycol (PEG) chain is flanked by well-defined hydrophobic biodegradable polyester dendrons bearing an antiangiogenic drug, combretastatin-A4 (CA4). Variation in dendron generation is utilized to obtain a library of micellar constructs with varying sizes and drug loadings. In particular, a family of drug appended dendron-polymer conjugates based on polyester dendrons of generations ranging from G1 to G3 and 10 kDa linear PEG were obtained using [3 + 2] Huisgen type "click" chemistry. The final constructs benefit from PEG's hydrophilicity and antibiofouling character, as well as biodegradable nature of the hydrophobic polyester dendrons. The hydrophobic-hydrophilic-hydrophobic character of these constructs leads to the formation of flower-like micelles in aqueous media. In addition to generation-dependent subnanomolar range critical micelle concentrations, the resulting micelles possess hydrodynamic diameters suitable for passive tumor targeting through enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect; thereby they are suitable candidates as controlled drug delivery agents. For all constructs, in vitro cytotoxicities were investigated and inhibitory effect of Comb-G3-PEG on tube formation was shown on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). PMID:27019335

  19. The Antiangiogenic Compound Aeroplysinin-1 Induces Apoptosis in Endothelial Cells by Activating the Mitochondrial Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Martínez-Poveda

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aeroplysinin-1 is a brominated metabolite extracted from the marine sponge Aplysina aerophoba that has been previously characterized by our group as a potent antiangiogenic compound in vitro and in vivo. In this work, we provide evidence of a selective induction of apoptosis by aeroplysinin-1 in endothelial cells. Studies on the nuclear morphology of treated cells revealed that aeroplysinin-1 induces chromatin condensation and nuclear fragmentation, and it increases the percentage of cells with sub-diploid DNA content in endothelial, but not in HCT-116, human colon carcinoma and HT-1080 human fibrosarcoma cells. Treatment of endothelial cells with aeroplysinin-1 induces activation of caspases-2, -3, -8 and -9, as well as the cleavage of apoptotic substrates, such as poly (ADP-ribose polymerase and lamin-A in a caspase-dependent mechanism. Our data indicate a relevant role of the mitochondria in the apoptogenic activity of this compound. The observation that aeroplysinin-1 prevents the phosphorylation of Bad relates to the mitochondria-mediated induction of apoptosis by this compound.

  20. Constituent Components of Out-of-Field Scatter Dose for 18-MV Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy: A Comparison With 6-MV and Implications for Carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To characterize and compare the components of out-of-field dose for 18-MV intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and their 6-MV counterparts and consider implications for second cancer induction. Methods and Materials: Comparable plans for each technique/energy were delivered to a water phantom with a sloping wall; under full scatter conditions; with field edge abutting but outside the bath to prevent internal/phantom scatter; and with shielding below the linear accelerator head to attenuate head leakage. Neutron measurements were obtained from published studies. Results: Eighteen-megavolt IMRT produces 1.7 times more out-of-field scatter than 18-MV 3D-CRT. In absolute terms, however, differences are just approximately 0.1% of central axis dose. Eighteen-megavolt IMRT reduces internal/patient scatter by 13%, but collimator scatter (C) is 2.6 times greater than 18-MV 3D-CRT. Head leakage (L) is minimal. Increased out-of-field photon scatter from 18-MV IMRT carries out-of-field second cancer risks of approximately 0.2% over and above the 0.4% from 18-MV 3D-CRT. Greater photoneutron dose from 18-MV IMRT may result in further maximal, absolute increased risk to peripheral tissue of approximately 1.2% over 18-MV 3D-CRT. Out-of-field photon scatter remains comparable for the same modality irrespective of beam energy. Machine scatter (C+L) from 18 versus 6 MV is 1.2 times higher for IMRT and 1.8 times for 3D-CRT. It is 4 times higher for 6-MV IMRT versus 3D-CRT. Reduction in internal scatter with 18 MV versus 6 MV is 27% for 3D-CRT and 29% for IMRT. Compared with 6-MV 3D-CRT, 18-MV IMRT increases out-of-field second cancer risk by 0.2% from photons and adds 0.28-2.2% from neutrons. Conclusions: Out-of-field photon dose seems to be independent of beam energy for both techniques. Eighteen-megavolt IMRT increases out-of-field scatter 1.7-fold over 3D-CRT because of greater collimator scatter despite

  1. Employment of Salmonella in Cancer Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Che-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    One of the primary limitations of cancer gene therapy is lack of selectivity of the therapeutic gene to tumor cells. Current efforts are focused on discovering and developing tumor-targeting vectors that selectively target only cancer cells but spare normal cells to improve the therapeutic index. The use of preferentially tumor-targeting bacteria as vectors is one of the innovative approaches for the treatment of cancer. This is based on the observation that some obligate or facultative-anaerobic bacteria are capable of multiplying selectively in tumors and inhibiting their growth. In this study, we exploited attenuated Salmonella as a tumoricidal agent and a vector to deliver genes for tumor-targeted gene therapy. Attenuated Salmonella, carrying a eukaryotic expression plasmid encoding an anti-angiogenic gene, was used to evaluate its' ability for tumor targeting and gene delivery in murine tumor models. We also investigated the use of a polymer to modify or shield Salmonella from the pre-existing immune response in the host in order to improve gene delivery to the tumor. These results suggest that tumor-targeted gene therapy using Salmonella carrying a therapeutic gene, which exerts tumoricidal and anti-angiogenic activities, represents a promising strategy for the treatment of tumors. PMID:26846804

  2. Factors associated with physical and sexual violence by police among people who inject drugs in Ukraine: implications for retention on opioid agonist therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutsa, Oksana; Marcus, Ruthanne; Bojko, Martha J; Zelenev, Alexei; Mazhnaya, Alyona; Dvoriak, Sergii; Filippovych, Sergii; Altice, Frederick L

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Ukraine's volatile HIV epidemic, one of the largest in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, remains concentrated in people who inject drugs (PWID). HIV prevalence is high (21.3% to 41.8%) among the estimated 310,000 PWID. Opioid agonist therapy (OAT) is the most cost-effective HIV prevention strategy there, yet OAT services are hampered by negative attitudes and frequent harassment of OAT clients and site personnel by law enforcement. This paper examines the various types of police violence that Ukrainian PWID experience and factors associated with the different types of violence, as well as the possible implications of police harassment on OAT retention. Methods In 2014 to 2015, we conducted a cross-sectional survey in five Ukrainian cities with 1613 PWID currently, previously and never on OAT, using a combination of respondent-driven sampling, as well as random sampling. We analysed correlates of police violence by multiple factors, including by gender, and their effects on duration of OAT retention. Self-reported physical and sexual violence by police were the two primary outcomes, while retention on OAT was used as a secondary outcome. Results Overall, 1033 (64.0%) PWID reported being physically assaulted by police, which was positively correlated with currently or previously being on OAT (69.1% vs. 60.2%; pviolence experiences differed by sex, with men experiencing significantly more physical violence, while women experienced more sexual violence (65.9% vs. 42.6%; pviolence is a frequent experience among PWID in Ukraine, particularly for those accessing OAT, an evidence-based primary and secondary HIV prevention strategy. Police violence experiences, however, were different for men and women, and interventions with police that address these sexual differences and focus on non-violent interactions with PWID to improve access and retention on OAT are crucial for improving HIV prevention and treatment goals for Ukraine. PMID:27435717

  3. SU-E-T-375: Passive Scattering to Pencil-Beam-Scanning Comparison for Medulloblastoma Proton Therapy: LET Distributions and Radiobiological Implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giantsoudi, D; MacDonald, S; Paganetti, H [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare the linear energy transfer (LET) distributions between passive scattering and pencil beam scanning proton radiation therapy techniques for medulloblastoma patients and study the potential radiobiological implications. Methods: A group of medulloblastoma patients, previously treated with passive scattering (PS) proton craniospinal irradiation followed by prosterior fossa or involved field boost, were selected from the patient database of our institution. Using the beam geometry and planning computed tomography (CT) image sets of the original treatment plans, pencil beam scanning (PBS) treatment plans were generated for the cranial treatment for each patient, with average beam spot size of 8mm (sigma in air at isocenter). 3-dimensional dose and LET distributions were calculated by Monte Carlo methods (TOPAS) both for the original passive scattering and new pencil beam scanning treatment plans. LET volume histograms were calculated for the target and OARs and compared for the two delivery methods. Variable RBE weighted dose distributions and volume histograms were also calculated using a variable dose and LET-based model. Results: Better dose conformity was achieved with PBS planning compared to PS, leading to increased dose coverage for the boost target area and decreased average dose to the structures adjacent to it and critical structures outside the whole brain treatment field. LET values for the target were lower for PBS plans. Elevated LET values for OARs close to the boosted target areas were noticed, due to end of range of proton beams falling inside these structures, resulting in higher RBE weighted dose for these structures compared to the clinical RBE value of 1.1. Conclusion: Transitioning from passive scattering to pencil beam scanning proton radiation treatment can be dosimetrically beneficial for medulloblastoma patients. LET–guided treatment planning could contribute to better decision making for these cases, especially for

  4. HL-217, a new topical anti-angiogenic agent, inhibits retinal vascular leakage and pathogenic subretinal neovascularization in Vldlr−/− mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • HL-217 is a new synthetic topical anti-angiogenic agent. • HL-217 attenuated subretinal neovascularization in Vldlr−/− mice. • HL-217 blocked the binding of PDGF-BB to PDGFRβ. - Abstract: HL-217 is a new synthetic angiogenesis inhibitor. Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) is a vasoactive factor and has been implicated in proliferative retinopathies. In this study, we examined the mechanism of action and efficacy of topical application of HL-217 on subretinal neovascularization in very low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (Vldlr−/−) mice. In three-week-old male Vldlr−/− mice, HL-217 (1.5 or 3 mg/ml) was administered twice per day for 4 weeks by topical eye drop instillation. Neovascular areas were then measured. We used a protein array to evaluate the expression levels of angiogenic factors. The inhibitory effect of HL-217 on the PDGF-BB/PDGFRβ interaction was evaluated in vitro. The neovascular area in the Vldlr−/− mice was significantly reduced by HL-217. Additionally, HL-217 decreased the expression levels of PDGF-BB protein and VEGF mRNA. Moreover, HL-217 dose-dependently inhibited the PDGF-BB/PDGFRβ interaction (IC50 = 38.9 ± 0.7 μM). These results suggest that HL-217 is a potent inhibitor of PDGF-BB. HL-217, when applied topically, is an effective inhibitor of subretinal neovascularization due to its ability to inhibit the pro-angiogenic effects of PDGF-BB

  5. HL-217, a new topical anti-angiogenic agent, inhibits retinal vascular leakage and pathogenic subretinal neovascularization in Vldlr{sup −/−} mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Junghyun; Kim, Chan-Sik; Jo, Kyuhyung [Korean Medicine Based Herbal Drug Development Group, Herbal Medicine Research Division, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Yun-Seok; Kim, Hyun-Gyu; Lee, Geun-Hyeog [Research and Development Center, Hanlim Pharm. Co. Ltd., 1656-10, Seocho-dong, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun Mi; Sohn, Eunjin [Korean Medicine Based Herbal Drug Development Group, Herbal Medicine Research Division, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Sook, E-mail: jskim@kiom.re.kr [Korean Medicine Based Herbal Drug Development Group, Herbal Medicine Research Division, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • HL-217 is a new synthetic topical anti-angiogenic agent. • HL-217 attenuated subretinal neovascularization in Vldlr{sup −/−} mice. • HL-217 blocked the binding of PDGF-BB to PDGFRβ. - Abstract: HL-217 is a new synthetic angiogenesis inhibitor. Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) is a vasoactive factor and has been implicated in proliferative retinopathies. In this study, we examined the mechanism of action and efficacy of topical application of HL-217 on subretinal neovascularization in very low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (Vldlr{sup −/−}) mice. In three-week-old male Vldlr{sup −/−} mice, HL-217 (1.5 or 3 mg/ml) was administered twice per day for 4 weeks by topical eye drop instillation. Neovascular areas were then measured. We used a protein array to evaluate the expression levels of angiogenic factors. The inhibitory effect of HL-217 on the PDGF-BB/PDGFRβ interaction was evaluated in vitro. The neovascular area in the Vldlr{sup −/−} mice was significantly reduced by HL-217. Additionally, HL-217 decreased the expression levels of PDGF-BB protein and VEGF mRNA. Moreover, HL-217 dose-dependently inhibited the PDGF-BB/PDGFRβ interaction (IC{sub 50} = 38.9 ± 0.7 μM). These results suggest that HL-217 is a potent inhibitor of PDGF-BB. HL-217, when applied topically, is an effective inhibitor of subretinal neovascularization due to its ability to inhibit the pro-angiogenic effects of PDGF-BB.

  6. Schedule-Dependent Antiangiogenic and Cytotoxic Effects of Chemotherapy on Vascular Endothelial and Retinoblastoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Ursula; Mena, Hebe A; Negrotto, Soledad; Arana, Eloisa; Pascual-Pasto, Guillem; Laurent, Viviana; Suñol, Mariona; Chantada, Guillermo L; Carcaboso, Angel M; Schaiquevich, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Current treatment of retinoblastoma involves using the maximum dose of chemotherapy that induces tumor control and is tolerated by patients. The impact of dose and schedule on the cytotoxicity of chemotherapy has not been studied. Our aim was to gain insight into the cytotoxic and antiangiogenic effect of the treatment scheme of chemotherapy used in retinoblastoma by means of different in vitro models and to evaluate potential effects on multi-drug resistance proteins. Two commercial and two patient-derived retinoblastoma cell types and two human vascular endothelial cell types were exposed to increasing concentrations of melphalan or topotecan in a conventional (single exposure) or metronomic (7-day continuous exposure) treatment scheme. The concentration of chemotherapy causing a 50% decrease in cell proliferation (IC50) was determined by MTT and induction of apoptosis was evaluated by flow cytometry. Expression of ABCB1, ABCG2 and ABCC1 after conventional or metronomic treatments was assessed by RT-qPCR. We also evaluated the in vivo response to conventional (0.6 mg/kg once a week for 2 weeks) and metronomic (5 days a week for 2 weeks) topotecan in a retinoblastoma xenograft model. Melphalan and topotecan were cytotoxic to both retinoblastoma and endothelial cells after conventional and metronomic treatments. A significant decrease in the IC50 (median, 13-fold; range: 3-23) was observed following metronomic chemotherapy treatment in retinoblastoma and endothelial cell types compared to conventional treatment (p0.05). In mice, continuous topotecan lead to significantly lower tumor volumes compared to conventional treatment after 14 days of treatment (pretinoblastoma and endothelial cells to both chemotherapy agents with lower IC50 values compared to short-term treatment. These findings were validated in an in vivo model. None of the dosing modalities induced multidrug resistance mechanisms while apoptosis was the mechanism of cell death after both treatment

  7. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI Assessing the Antiangiogenic Effect of Silencing HIF-1α with Targeted Multifunctional ECO/siRNA Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamas, Anthony S; Jin, Erlei; Gujrati, Maneesh; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2016-07-01

    Stabilization of hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), a biomarker of hypoxia, in hypoxic tumors mediates a variety of downstream genes promoting tumor angiogenesis and cancer cell survival as well as invasion, and compromising therapeutic outcome. In this study, dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) with a biodegradable macromolecular MRI contrast agent was used to noninvasively assess the antiangiogenic effect of RGD-targeted multifunctional lipid ECO/siHIF-1α nanoparticles in a mouse HT29 colon cancer model. The RGD-targeted ECO/siHIF-1α nanoparticles resulted in over 50% reduction in tumor size after intravenous injection at a dose of 2.0 mg of siRNA/kg every 3 days for 3 weeks compared to a saline control. DCE-MRI revealed significant decline in vascularity and over a 70% reduction in the tumor blood flow, permeability-surface area product, and plasma volume fraction vascular parameters in the tumor treated with the targeted ECO/siHIF-1α nanoparticles. The treatment with targeted ECO/siRNA nanoparticles resulted in significant silencing of HIF-1α expression at the protein level, which also significantly suppressed the expression of VEGF, Glut-1, HKII, PDK-1, LDHA, and CAIX, which are all important players in tumor angiogenesis, glycolytic metabolism, and pH regulation. By possessing the ability to elicit a multifaceted effect on tumor biology, silencing HIF-1α with RGD-targeted ECO/siHIF-1α nanoparticles has great promise as a single therapy or in combination with traditional chemotherapy or radiation strategies to improve cancer treatment. PMID:27264671

  8. An oncolytic adenovirus enhances antiangiogenic and antitumoral effects of a replication-deficient adenovirus encoding endostatin by rescuing its selective replication in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ran-yi, E-mail: liuranyi@mail.sysu.edu.cn [Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou 510060 (China); Zhou, Ling [Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou 510060 (China); Zhang, Yan-ling [School of Biotechnology, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Huang, Bi-jun; Ke, Miao-la; Chen, Jie-min [Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou 510060 (China); Li, Li-xia [Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou 510060 (China); General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command of PLA, Guangzhou 510010 (China); Fu, Xiang; Wu, Jiang-xue [Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou 510060 (China); Huang, Wenlin, E-mail: hwenl@mail.sysu.edu.cn [Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou 510060 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Tumor-Targeted Drug, Doublle Bioproducts Inc., Guangzhou 510663 (China)

    2013-12-13

    Highlights: •H101 promotes endostatin expression by Ad-Endo via rescuing Ad-Endo replication. •H101 rescued Ad-Endo replication by supplying E1A and E1B19k proteins. •Ad-Endo enhanced the cytotoxicity of H101 in NPC cells. •Ad-Endo and oncolytic Ad H101 have synergistic antitumor effects on NPC. -- Abstract: A replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) encoding secreted human endostatin (Ad-Endo) has been demonstrated to have promising antiangiogenic and antitumoral effects. The E1B55k-deleted Ad H101 can selectively lyse cancer cells. In this study, we explored the antitumor effects and cross-interactions of Ad-Endo and H101 on nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The results showed that H101 dramatically promoted endostatin expression by Ad-Endo via rescuing Ad-Endo replication in NPC cells, and the expressed endostatin proteins significantly inhibited the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. E1A and E1B19k products are required for the rescuing of H101 to Ad-Endo replication in CNE-1 and CNE-2 cells, but not in C666-1 cells. On the other hand, Ad-Endo enhanced the cytotoxicity of H101 by enhancing Ad replication in NPC cells. The combination of H101 and Ad-Endo significantly inhibited CNE-2 xenografts growth through the increased endostatin expression and Ad replication. These findings indicate that the combination of Ad-Endo gene therapy and oncolytic Ad therapeutics could be promising in comprehensive treatment of NPC.

  9. Metabolic Symbiosis Enables Adaptive Resistance to Anti-angiogenic Therapy that Is Dependent on mTOR Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Elizabeth; Miéville, Pascal; Warren, Carmen M; Saghafinia, Sadegh; Li, Leanne; Peng, Mei-Wen; Hanahan, Douglas

    2016-05-10

    Therapeutic targeting of tumor angiogenesis with VEGF inhibitors results in demonstrable, but transitory efficacy in certain human tumors and mouse models of cancer, limited by unconventional forms of adaptive/evasive resistance. In one such mouse model, potent angiogenesis inhibitors elicit compartmental reorganization of cancer cells around remaining blood vessels. The glucose and lactate transporters GLUT1 and MCT4 are induced in distal hypoxic cells in a HIF1α-dependent fashion, indicative of glycolysis. Tumor cells proximal to blood vessels instead express the lactate transporter MCT1, and p-S6, the latter reflecting mTOR signaling. Normoxic cancer cells import and metabolize lactate, resulting in upregulation of mTOR signaling via glutamine metabolism enhanced by lactate catabolism. Thus, metabolic symbiosis is established in the face of angiogenesis inhibition, whereby hypoxic cancer cells import glucose and export lactate, while normoxic cells import and catabolize lactate. mTOR signaling inhibition disrupts this metabolic symbiosis, associated with upregulation of the glucose transporter GLUT2. PMID:27134166

  10. Recruitment of bone marrow derived cells during anti-angiogenic therapy in GBM : Bone marrow derived cell in GBM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Jennifer C.; Walenkamp, Annemiek M. E.; den Dunnen, Wilfred F. A.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a highly vascular tumor characterized by rapid and invasive tumor growth, followed by oxygen depletion, hypoxia and neovascularization, which generate a network of disorganized, tortuous and permeable vessels. Recruitment of bone marrow derived cells (BMDC) is crucial for vascu

  11. Antioxidant and Antiangiogenic Properties, and Gas Chromatographic-Time of Flight Analysis of Sonchus arvensis Leaves Extracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonchus arvensis L. (Asteraceae) is one of the medicinal herbs used in traditional medicines, in which the leaf extract was used as a diuretic, lithotriptic and antiurolithiasis agent. The leaves of S. arvensis reported contain several compounds, including a variety of flavonoids, terpenoids and sterol, even this plant also contain silica and potassium. Flavonoids are secondary metabolite compound which have ability as antioxidant. In this study, the aims are to determine of antioxidants and antiangiogenic properties, and phytoconstituents quantitative of aqueous and methanol extracts of S. arvensis leaves. The antioxidant properties were studied using 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical, xanthine oxidase and beta-carotene-linoleate models system. Furthermore, the antiangiogenic property was evaluated using ex vivo rat aorta ring assay. Quantitative determination of extracts phytoconstituents were carried out by using Gas Chromatographic-Time of Flight (GC-TOF) mass spectrophotometric methods. The results showed that the aqueous and methanol extracts have ability as antioxidant which is antioxidant activities of aqueous extracts on DPPH radical and inhibition of xanthine oxidase activity are higher than that of methanol extracts. Meanwhile antioxidant activity using beta-carotene-linoleate model system of S. arvensis aqueous extract is lower than that of methanol extracts. Nevertheless, the differences of these antioxidant activities are not significant. Antiangiogenic property of aqueous extract is also higher than that of methanol extract which is measured at 100 meu g mL/sup -1/ of extracts. This indicates that there is correlation between antioxidant activity and antiangigenic property, exhibiting that this plant possesses the potential to prevent or cure the diseases that related to angiogenesis such as cancer. (author)

  12. Anti-angiogenic effects of a mutant endostatin: a new prospect for treating retinal and choroidal neovascularization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujing Bai

    Full Text Available Pathological fundus angiogenesis is a major cause of vision loss in retina diseases. Endostatin, a C-terminal fragment of collagen XVIII, is an endogenous anti-angiogenic protein. The present study aimed to investigate the in vitro and in vivo anti-angiogenic properties of two proteins: an N-terminal H1D/H3D mutant endostatin (M-ES and a polyethylene glycol propionaldehyde (PEG covalent M-ES (PEG-M-ES.M-ES and PEG-M-ES properties were characterized in vitro using a zinc ion binding assay and a stability test. Activity assays, including migration, proliferation, and tube formation assays, were performed with human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRMECs and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Mouse oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR and choroidal neovascularization (CNV models were used to evaluate in vivo anti-angiogenic effects. In addition, a rabbit model was used to study the retinal pharmacokinetic profile following an intravitreal injection.The results indicated that the H1D/H3D mutations of endostatin reduced the zinc binding capacity of M-ES and facilitated PEG covalent binding. PEG-M-ES was more stable and persisted longer in the retina compared with M-ES. The in vitro studies demonstrated that M-ES and PEG-M-ES inhibited HRMEC and HUVEC proliferation, migration, and tube formation more efficiently than ES. In vivo, a single intravitreal injection of M-ES and PEG-M-ES significantly decreased neovascularization in both the OIR and CNV animal models.The present study demonstrated for the first time that PEG-M-ES exhibits a long-term inhibitory effect on neovascularization in vitro and in vivo. These data suggest that PEG-M-ES may represent an innovative therapeutic strategy to prevent fundus neovascularization.

  13. Molecular features of interaction between VEGFA and anti-angiogenic drugs used in retinal diseases: a computational approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platania, Chiara B M; Di Paola, Luisa; Leggio, Gian M; Romano, Giovanni L; Drago, Filippo; Salomone, Salvatore; Bucolo, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Anti-angiogenic agents are biological drugs used for treatment of retinal neovascular degenerative diseases. In this study, we aimed at in silico analysis of interaction of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), the main mediator of angiogenesis, with binding domains of anti-angiogenic agents used for treatment of retinal diseases, such as ranibizumab, bevacizumab and aflibercept. The analysis of anti-VEGF/VEGFA complexes was carried out by means of protein-protein docking and molecular dynamics (MD) coupled to molecular mechanics-Poisson Boltzmann Surface Area (MM-PBSA) calculation. Molecular dynamics simulation was further analyzed by protein contact networks. Rough energetic evaluation with protein-protein docking scores revealed that aflibercept/VEGFA complex was characterized by electrostatic stabilization, whereas ranibizumab and bevacizumab complexes were stabilized by Van der Waals (VdW) energy term; these results were confirmed by MM-PBSA. Comparison of MM-PBSA predicted energy terms with experimental binding parameters reported in literature indicated that the high association rate (Kon) of aflibercept to VEGFA was consistent with high stabilizing electrostatic energy. On the other hand, the relatively low experimental dissociation rate (Koff) of ranibizumab may be attributed to lower conformational fluctuations of the ranibizumab/VEGFA complex, higher number of contacts and hydrogen bonds in comparison to bevacizumab and aflibercept. Thus, the anti-angiogenic agents have been found to be considerably different both in terms of molecular interactions and stabilizing energy. Characterization of such features can improve the design of novel biological drugs potentially useful in clinical practice. PMID:26578958

  14. Molecular features of interaction between VEGFA and anti-angiogenic drugs used in retinal diseases: a computational approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Bianca Maria Platania

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Anti-angiogenic agents are biological drugs used for treatment of retinal neovascular degenerative diseases. In this study, we aimed at in-silico analysis of interaction of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA, the main mediator of angiogenesis, with binding domains of anti-angiogenic agents used for treatment of retinal diseases, such as ranibizumab, bevacizumab and aflibercept. The analysis of anti-VEGF/VEGFA complexes was carried out by means of protein-protein docking and molecular dynamics (MD coupled to molecular mechanics-Poisson Boltzmann Surface Area (MM-PBSA calculation. Molecular dynamics simulation was further analyzed by protein contact networks. Rough energetic evaluation with protein-protein docking scores revealed that aflibercept/VEGFA complex was characterized by electrostatic stabilization, whereas ranibizumab and bevacizumab complexes were stabilized by Van der Waals (VdW energy term; these results were confirmed by MM-PBSA. Comparison of MM-PBSA predicted energy terms with experimental binding parameters reported in literature indicated that the high association rate (Kon of aflibercept to VEGFA was consistent with high stabilizing electrostatic energy. On the other hand, the relatively low experimental dissociation rate (Koff of ranibizumab may be attributed to lower conformational fluctuations of the ranibizumab/VEGFA complex, higher number of contacts and hydrogen bonds in comparison to bevacizumab and aflibercept. Thus, the anti-angiogenic agents have been found to be considerably different both in terms of molecular interactions and stabilizing energy. Characterization of such features can improve the design of novel biological drugs potentially useful in clinical practice.

  15. Synthesis and anti-angiogenic effect of conjugates between serum albumin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, B; Struve, C; Friis, T;

    2010-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) inhibit tumor growth and angiogenesis. Covalent linkage of naproxen to human serum albumin (HSA) has been shown to target it efficiently to the liver and this may potentially be exploited for liver-selective inhibition of angiogenesis. With the aim of...... investigating the anti-angiogenic efficiency of NSAID-HSA conjugates in vitro, three NSAIDs, aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen were conjugated to HSA using different concentrations of their N-hydroxysuccinimide esters. Conjugation ratios from 10 to 50 were achieved and the conjugates retained a growth inhibitory...

  16. Natural phenolic metabolites with anti-angiogenic properties – a review from the chemical point of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Sun

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Considering the many secondary natural metabolites available from plants, phenolic compounds play a particularly important role in human health as they occur in significant amounts in many fruits, vegetables and medicinal plants. In this review natural phenolic compounds of plant origin with significant anti-angiogenic properties are discussed. Thirteen representatives from eight different natural or natural-like phenolic subclasses are presented with an emphasis on their synthesis and methods to modify the parent compounds. When available, the consequence of structural variation on the pharmacological activity of the molecules is described.

  17. Factors associated with physical and sexual violence by police among people who inject drugs in Ukraine: implications for retention on opioid agonist therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Kutsa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ukraine's volatile HIV epidemic, one of the largest in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, remains concentrated in people who inject drugs (PWID. HIV prevalence is high (21.3% to 41.8% among the estimated 310,000 PWID. Opioid agonist therapy (OAT is the most cost-effective HIV prevention strategy there, yet OAT services are hampered by negative attitudes and frequent harassment of OAT clients and site personnel by law enforcement. This paper examines the various types of police violence that Ukrainian PWID experience and factors associated with the different types of violence, as well as the possible implications of police harassment on OAT retention. Methods: In 2014 to 2015, we conducted a cross-sectional survey in five Ukrainian cities with 1613 PWID currently, previously and never on OAT, using a combination of respondent-driven sampling, as well as random sampling. We analysed correlates of police violence by multiple factors, including by gender, and their effects on duration of OAT retention. Self-reported physical and sexual violence by police were the two primary outcomes, while retention on OAT was used as a secondary outcome. Results: Overall, 1033 (64.0% PWID reported being physically assaulted by police, which was positively correlated with currently or previously being on OAT (69.1% vs. 60.2%; p<0.01. HIV prevalence rates were higher in those receiving OAT than those not on OAT (47.6% vs. 36.1%; p<0.01. Police violence experiences differed by sex, with men experiencing significantly more physical violence, while women experienced more sexual violence (65.9% vs. 42.6%; p<0.01. For PWID who had successfully accessed OAT, longer OAT retention was significantly correlated both with sexual assault by police and fewer non-fatal overdoses. Conclusions: Police violence is a frequent experience among PWID in Ukraine, particularly for those accessing OAT, an evidence-based primary and secondary HIV prevention strategy. Police

  18. Progress in clinical oncolytic virus-based therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Jebar, AH; Errington-Mais, F; Vile, RG; Selby, PJ; Melcher, AA; S. Griffin(Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8, Canada)

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) carries a dismal prognosis, with advanced disease being resistant to both radiotherapy and conventional cytotoxic drugs, whilst anti-angiogenic drugs are marginally efficacious. Oncolytic viruses (OVs) offer the promise of selective cancer therapy through direct and immune-mediated mechanisms. The premise of OVs lies in their preferential genomic replication, protein expression and productive infection of malignant cells. Numerous OVs are being tested in preclin...

  19. Update on oncolytic viral therapy – targeting angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tysome JR

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available James R Tysome,1–3 Nick R Lemoine,1,3 Yaohe Wang1,31Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom; 2Department of Otolaryngology, Cambridge University Hospitals, Cambridge, United Kingdom; 3Sino-British Research Center for Molecular Oncology, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Oncolytic viruses (OVs have the ability to selectively replicate in and lyse cancer cells. Angiogenesis is an essential requirement for tumor growth. Like OVs, the therapeutic effect of many angiogenesis inhibitors has been limited, leading to the development of more effective approaches to combine antiangiogenic therapy with OVs. Angiogenesis can be targeted either directly by OV infection of vascular endothelial cells, or by arming OVs with antiangiogenic transgenes, which are subsequently expressed locally in the tumor microenvironment. In this review, we describe the development and targeting of OVs, the role of angiogenesis in cancer, and the progress made in arming viruses with antiangiogenic transgenes. Future developments required to optimize this approach are addressed.Keywords: oncolytic virotherapy, cancer

  20. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel 1,5-benzothiazepin-4(5H)-ones as potent antiangiogenic and antioxidant agents

    OpenAIRE

    Channegowda V. Deepu; Goravanahalli M. Raghavendra; Nanjappagowda D. Rekha; K. Mantelingu; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S.; Doddamedur G. Bhadregowda

    2015-01-01

    Novel 1,5-benzothiazepin-4-(5H)-one derivatives (8a-8g) have been synthesized by intramolecular cyclization of 6 using propyl phosphonic anhydride (T3P) as a cyclodehydrating agent. The anti-angiogenic and anti-oxidant properties of the new derivatives were then evaluated. Compounds 8b, 8d, 8e, 8f and 8g exhibited very good inhibition of capillary proliferation, thus proving their anti-angiogenic properties. In addition, the in vitro antioxidant activities of these compounds were evaluated us...

  1. Butyrate-induced proapoptotic and antiangiogenic pathways in EAT cells require activation of CAD and downregulation of VEGF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid produced in the colon, induces cell cycle arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis in transformed cell lines. In this report, we study the effects of butyrate (BuA) on the growth of Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) cells in vivo. BuA, when injected intraperitoneally (i.p) into mice, inhibited proliferation of EAT cells. Further, induction of apoptosis in EAT cells was monitored by nuclear condensation, annexin-V staining, DNA fragmentation, and translocation of caspase-activated DNase into nucleus upon BuA-treatment. Ac-DEVD-CHO, a caspase-3 inhibitor, completely inhibited BuA-induced apoptosis, indicating that activation of caspase-3 mediates the apoptotic pathway in EAT cells. The proapoptotic effect of BuA also reflects on the antiangiogenic pathway in EAT cells. The antiangiogenic effect of BuA in vivo was demonstrated by the downregulation of the secretion of VEGF in EAT cells. CD31 immunohistochemical staining of peritoneum sections clearly indicated a potential angioinhibitory effect of BuA in EAT cells. These results suggest that BuA, besides regulating other fundamental cellular processes, is able to modulate the expression/secretion of the key angiogenic growth factor VEGF in EAT cells

  2. Growth-Inhibitory and Antiangiogenic Activity of the MEK Inhibitor PD0325901 in Malignant Melanoma with or without BRAF Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovica Ciuffreda

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The Raf/MEK/ERK pathway is an importantmediator of tumor cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Here, weinvestigated the growth-inhibitory and antiangiogenic properties of PD0325901, a novel MEK inhibitor, in human melanoma cells. PD0325901 effects were determined in a panel of melanoma cell lines with different genetic aberrations. PD0325901 markedly inhibited ERK phosphorylation and growth of both BRAF mutant and wild-type melanoma cell lines, with IC50 in the nanomolar range even in the least responsive models. Growth inhibition was observed both in vitro and in vivo in xenograft models, regardless of BRAF mutation status, and was due to G1-phase cell cycle arrest and subsequent induction of apoptosis. Cell cycle (cyclin D1, c-Myc, and p27KIP1 and apoptosis (Bcl-2 and survivin regulators were modulated by PD0325901 at the protein level. Gene expression profiling revealed profound modulation of several genes involved in the negative control of MAPK signaling and melanoma cell differentiation, suggesting alternative, potentially relevant mechanisms of action. Finally, PD0325901 inhibited the production of the proangiogenic factors vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin 8 at a transcriptional level. In conclusion, PD0325901 exerts potent growth-inhibitory, proapoptotic, and antiangiogenic activity in melanoma lines, regardless of their BRAF mutation status. Deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms of action of MEK inhibitors will likely translate into more effective treatment strategies for patients experiencing malignant melanoma.

  3. Trends in Malignant Glioma Monoclonal Antibody Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekhonin, Ivan; Gurina, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Although new passive and active immunotherapy methods are emerging, unconjugated monoclonal antibodies remain the only kind of biological preparations approved for high-grade glioma therapy in clinical practice. In this review, we combine clinical and experimental data discussion. As antiangiogenic therapy is the standard of care for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), we analyze major clinical trials and possible therapeutic combinations of bevacizumab, the most common monoclonal antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Another humanized antibody to gain recognition in GBM is epidermal growth factor (EGFR) antagonist nimotuzumab. Other antigens (VEGF receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, hepatocyte growth factor and c-Met system) showed significance in gliomas and were used to create monoclonal antibodies applied in different malignant tumors. We assess the role of genetic markers (isocitrate dehydrogenase, O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransnsferase) in GBM treatment outcome prediction. Besides antibodies studied in clinical trials, we focus on perspective targets and briefly list other means of passive immunotherapy.

  4. Openness to and preference for attributes of biologic therapy prior to initiation among patients with rheumatoid arthritis: patient and rheumatologist perspectives and implications for decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolge, Susan C; Goren, Amir; Brown, Duncan; Ginsberg, Seth; Allen, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Despite American College of Rheumatology recommendations, appropriate and timely initiation of biologic therapies does not always occur. This study examined openness to and preference for attributes of biologic therapies among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), differences in patients’ and rheumatologists’ perceptions, and discussions around biologic therapy initiation. Patients and methods A self-administered online survey was completed by 243 adult patients with RA in the US who were taking disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and had never taken, but had discussed biologic therapy with a rheumatologist. Patients were recruited from a consumer panel (n=142) and patient advocacy organization (n=101). A separate survey was completed by 103 rheumatologists who treated at least 25 patients with RA per month with biologic therapy. Descriptive and bivariate analyses were conducted separately for patients and rheumatologists. Attributes of biologic therapy included route of administration (intravenous infusion or subcutaneous injection), frequency of injections/infusions, and duration of infusion. Results Over half of patients (53.1%) were open to both intravenous infusion and subcutaneous injection, whereas rheumatologists reported 40.7% of patients would be open to both. Only 26.3% of patients strongly preferred subcutaneous injection, whereas rheumatologists reported 35.2%. Discrepancies were even more pronounced among specific patient types (eg, older vs younger patients and Medicare recipients). Among patients, 23% reported initiating discussion about biologics and 54% reported their rheumatologist initiated the discussion. A majority of rheumatologists reported discussing in detail several key aspects of biologics, whereas a minority of patients reported the same. Conclusion Preferences differed among patients with RA from rheumatologists’ perceptions of these preferences for biologic therapy, including greater openness to intravenous

  5. Increased serum levels of anti-angiogenic factors soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase and soluble endoglin in sickle cell disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landburg, P P; Elsenga, H; Schnog, J B; Duits, A J

    2008-01-01

    The anti-angiogenic factors soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase (sFlt)-1 and soluble endoglin (sEng) have been shown to be of importance in angiogenesis by sequestering and inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor, placenta-like growth factor and transforming growth factor-beta(1) signaling. Given

  6. Combination angiostatin and endostatin gene transfer induces synergistic antiangiogenic activity in vitro and antitumor efficacy in leukemia and solid tumors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scappaticci, F A; Smith, R; Pathak, A; Schloss, D; Lum, B; Cao, Y; Johnson, F; Engleman, E G; Nolan, G P

    2001-02-01

    Angiostatin and endostatin are potent endothelial cell growth inhibitors that have been shown to inhibit angiogenesis in vivo and tumor growth in mice. However, tumor shrinkage requires chronic delivery of large doses of these proteins. Here we report synergistic antitumor activity and survival of animals when these factors are delivered in combination to tumors by retroviral gene transfer. We have demonstrated this efficacy in both murine leukemia and melanoma models. Complete loss of tumorigenicity was seen in 40% of the animals receiving tumors transduced by the combination of angiostatin and endostatin in the leukemia model. The synergy was also demonstrated in vitro on human umbilical vein endothelial cell differentiation and this antiangiogenic activity may suggest a mechanism for the antitumor activity in vivo. These findings imply separate pathways by which angiostatin and endostatin mediate their antiangiogenic effects. Together, these data suggest that a combination of antiangiogenic factors delivered by retroviral gene transfer may produce synergistic antitumor effects in both leukemia and solid tumors, thus avoiding long-term administration of recombinant proteins. The data also suggest that novel combinations of antiangiogenic factors delivered into tumors require further investigation as therapeutic modalities. PMID:11237675

  7. Off-label use of targeted therapies in oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levêque, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Off-label use is defined by the prescription of a marketed drug outside the conditions described in the summary of product characteristics. In oncology, off-label prescribing of targeted therapies may occur in patients with other tumor types expressing the same target. Agents associated to phenotypic approaches such as therapies against the tumoral vasculature (anti-angiogenic drugs) and new immunotherapies (checkpoint inhibitors) also carry the potential of alternative indications or combinations. Off-label use of targeted therapies is little documented and appears to be in the same range than that regarding older drugs with wide variations among agents. When compared with older agents, off-label use of targeted therapies is probably more rational through tumoral genotyping but is faced with a limited clinical support, reimbursement challenges related to the very high pricing and the cost of genotyping or molecular profiling, when applicable. PMID:27081648

  8. G6PD Deficiency at Sumba in Eastern Indonesia Is Prevalent, Diverse and Severe: Implications for Primaquine Therapy against Relapsing Vivax Malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Satyagraha, Ari Winasti; Sadhewa, Arkasha; Baramuli, Vanessa; Elvira, Rosalie; Ridenour, Chase; Elyazar, Iqbal; Noviyanti, Rintis; Coutrier, Farah Novita; Harahap, Alida Roswita; Baird, J Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Safe treatment of Plasmodium vivax requires diagnosis of both the infection and status of erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity because hypnozoitocidal therapy against relapse requires primaquine, which causes a mild to severe acute hemolytic anemia in G6PD deficient patients. Many national malaria control programs recommend primaquine therapy without G6PD screening but with monitoring due to a broad lack of G6PD deficiency screening capacity. The degree of risk in do...

  9. An evaluation of the development of clinical reasoning skills in a cohort of occupational therapy students in Hong Kong: implications of curriculum design

    OpenAIRE

    Dasari, Bhoomiah Dharmiah

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate how Hong Kong Occupational Therapy students develop their clinical reasoning abilities and progress through the stages of their undergraduate curriculum. The study examines a range of factors that may affect their development of clinical reasoning. The student cohort was composed of a class of 80 BSc (Honours) occupational therapy students at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University. The study was predominantly quantitative; however, focus group intervie...

  10. Using electronic and digital technologies in music therapy: the implications of gender and age for therapists and the people with whom they work

    OpenAIRE

    Wendy L Magee

    2014-01-01

    This article is going to explore two important themes that have emerged in recent practice, theory and research relating to the use of digital and electronic music technologies in music therapy. Gender and age are of specific importance when introducing technology into both clinical settings involving music therapist and client, and training settings involving music therapy trainees and trainers. This chapter will explore each of these factors and the impact for music therapists and the peopl...

  11. Anti-angiogenic activity of gecko aqueous extracts and its macromolecular components in CAM and HUVE-12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhen; Huang, Shu-Qiong; Liu, Jian-Ting; Jiang, Gui-Xiang; Wang, Chun-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Gecko is a kind of traditional Chinese medicine with remarkable antineoplastic activity. However, undefined mechanisms and ambiguity regarding active ingredients limit new drug development from gecko. This study was conducted to assess anti-angiogenic properties of the aqueous extracts of fresh gecko (AG) or macromolecular components separated from AG (M-AG). An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) approach was applied to detect the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion of the tumor cells treated with AG or M-AG. The effect of AG or M-AG on vascular endothelial cell proliferation and migratory ability was analyzed by tetrazolium dye colorimetric method, transwell and wound-healing assays. Chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays were used to ensure the anti-angiogenic activity of M-AG in vivo. The results showed that AG or M-AG inhibited the VEGF secretion of tumor cells, the relative inhibition rates of AG and M-AG being 27.2% and 53.2% respectively at a concentration of 20 μL/mL. AG and M-AG inhibited the vascular endothelial (VE) cell proliferation with IC50 values of 11.5 ± 0.5 μL/mL and 12.9 ± 0.4 μL/mL respectively. The VE cell migration potential was inhibited significantly (p<0.01) by the AG (≥ 24 μL/mL) or M-AG (≥ 12 μL/ mL) treatment. In vivo, neovascularization of CAM treated with M-AG was inhibited significantly (p<0.05) at a concentration of 0.4 μL/mL. This study provided evidence that anti-angiogenesis is one of the anti-tumor mechanisms of AG and M-AG, with the latter as a promising active component. PMID:25773854

  12. Anti-cancer and anti-angiogenic effects of curcumin and tetrahydrocurcumin on implanted hepatocellular carcinoma in nude mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pornprom Yoysungnoen; Ponthip Wirachwong; Chatchawan Changtam; Apichart Suksamrarn; Suthiluk Patumraj

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effect of tetrahydrocurcumin (THC) on tumor angiogenesis compared with curcumin (CUR) by using both in vitro and in vivo models of human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2).METHODS: The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used for testing the anti-proliferating activities of CUR and THC. In male BALB/c nude mice, 2 x 106 human HepG2 cells were inoculated onto a dorsal skin-fold chamber. One day after HepG2 inoculation, the experimental groups were fed oral daily with CUR or THC (300 mg/kg or 3000 mg/kg). On d 7, 14 and 21, the tumor microvasculature was observed using fluorescence videomicroscopy and capillary vascularity (CV) was measured.RESULTS: Pathological angiogenic features including microvascular dilatation, tortuosity, and hyper-permeability were observed. CUR and THC could attenuate these pathologic features. In HepG2-groups, the CV were significantly increased on d 7 (52.43%), 14 (69.17%), and 21 (74.08%), as compared to controls (33.04%,P < 0.001). Treatment with CUR and THC resulted in significant decrease in the CV (P < 0.005 and P < 0.001, respectively). In particular, the anti-angiogenic effects of CUR and THC were dose-dependent manner. However, the beneficial effect of THC treatment than CUR was observed, in particular, from the 21 d CV (44.96% and 52.86%, P < 0.05).CONCLUSION: THC expressed its anti-angiogenesis without any cytotoxic activities to HepG2 cells even at the highest doses. It is suggested that anti-angiogenic properties of CUR and THC represent a common potential mechanism for their anti-cancer actions.

  13. Monitoring early tumor response to drug therapy with diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flexman, Molly L.; Vlachos, Fotios; Kim, Hyun Keol; Sirsi, Shashank R.; Huang, Jianzhong; Hernandez, Sonia L.; Johung, Tessa B.; Gander, Jeffrey W.; Reichstein, Ari R.; Lampl, Brooke S.; Wang, Antai; Borden, Mark A.; Yamashiro, Darrell J.; Kandel, Jessica J.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2012-01-01

    Although anti-angiogenic agents have shown promise as cancer therapeutics, their efficacy varies between tumor types and individual patients. Providing patient-specific metrics through rapid noninvasive imaging can help tailor drug treatment by optimizing dosages, timing of drug cycles, and duration of therapy--thereby reducing toxicity and cost and improving patient outcome. Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a noninvasive three-dimensional imaging modality that has been shown to capture physiologic changes in tumors through visualization of oxygenated, deoxygenated, and total hemoglobin concentrations, using non-ionizing radiation with near-infrared light. We employed a small animal model to ascertain if tumor response to bevacizumab (BV), an anti-angiogenic agent that targets vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), could be detected at early time points using DOT. We detected a significant decrease in total hemoglobin levels as soon as one day after BV treatment in responder xenograft tumors (SK-NEP-1), but not in SK-NEP-1 control tumors or in non-responder control or BV-treated NGP tumors. These results are confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging T2 relaxometry and lectin perfusion studies. Noninvasive DOT imaging may allow for earlier and more effective control of anti-angiogenic therapy.

  14. New perspectives on targeted therapy in ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coward JIG

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Jermaine IG Coward,1–3 Kathryn Middleton,1 Felicity Murphy1 1Mater Health Services, Raymond Terrace, South Brisbane, QLD, Australia; 2Inflammtion and Cancer Therapeutics Group, Mater Research, University of Queensland, Translational Research Institute, Woolloongabba, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; 3School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia Abstract: Epithelial ovarian cancer remains the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. During the last 15 years, there has been only marginal improvement in 5 year overall survival. These daunting statistics are compounded by the fact that despite all subtypes exhibiting striking heterogeneity, their systemic management remains identical. Although changes to the scheduling and administration of chemotherapy have improved outcomes to a degree, a therapeutic ceiling is being reached with this approach, resulting in a number of trials investigating the efficacy of targeted therapies alongside standard treatment algorithms. Furthermore, there is an urge to develop subtype-specific studies in an attempt to improve outcomes, which currently remain poor. This review summarizes the key studies with antiangiogenic agents, poly(adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose inhibitors, and epidermal growth factor receptor/human epidermal growth factor receptor family targeting, in addition to folate receptor antagonists and insulin growth factor receptor inhibitors. The efficacy of treatment paradigms used in non-ovarian malignancies for type I tumors is also highlighted, in addition to recent advances in appropriate patient stratification for targeted therapies in epithelial ovarian cancer. Keywords: antiangiogenic therapy, high-grade serous, low grade ovarian cancer, PARP inhibition, cancer-related inflammation

  15. Targeting angiogenesis with integrative cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yance, Donald R; Sagar, Stephen M

    2006-03-01

    An integrative approach for managing a patient with cancer should target the multiple biochemical and physiological pathways that support tumor development while minimizing normal tissue toxicity. Angiogenesis is a key process in the promotion of cancer. Many natural health products that inhibit angiogenesis also manifest other anticancer activities. The authors will focus on natural health products (NHPs) that have a high degree of antiangiogenic activity but also describe some of their many other interactions that can inhibit tumor progression and reduce the risk of metastasis. NHPs target various molecular pathways besides angiogenesis, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), the HER-2/neu gene, the cyclooxygenase-2 enzyme, the NF-kB transcription factor, the protein kinases, Bcl-2 protein, and coagulation pathways. The herbalist has access to hundreds of years of observational data on the anticancer activity of many herbs. Laboratory studies are confirming the knowledge that is already documented in traditional texts. The following herbs are traditionally used for anticancer treatment and are antiangiogenic through multiple interdependent processes that include effects on gene expression, signal processing, and enzyme activities: Artemisia annua (Chinese wormwood), Viscum album (European mistletoe), Curcuma longa (turmeric), Scutellaria baicalensis (Chinese skullcap), resveratrol and proanthocyanidin (grape seed extract), Magnolia officinalis (Chinese magnolia tree), Camellia sinensis (green tea), Ginkgo biloba, quercetin, Poria cocos, Zingiber officinale (ginger), Panax ginseng, Rabdosia rubescens (rabdosia), and Chinese destagnation herbs. Quality assurance of appropriate extracts is essential prior to embarking on clinical trials. More data are required on dose response, appropriate combinations, and potential toxicities. Given the multiple effects of these agents, their future use for cancer therapy probably lies in synergistic combinations

  16. Circulating gamma delta T cells are activated and depleted during progression of high-grade gliomas: Implications for gamma delta T cell therapy of GBM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains frustratingly impervious to any existing therapy. We have previously shown that GBM is sensitive to recognition and lysis by ex vivo activated gamma delta T cells, a minor subset of lymphocytes that innately recognize autologous stress-associated target antigens...

  17. ACTIBIND, an actin-binding fungal T2-RNase with antiangiogenic and anticarcinogenic characteristics.

    OpenAIRE

    Roiz, Levava; Smirnoff, Patricia; Bar-Eli, Menashe; Schwartz, Betty; Shoseyov, Oded

    2006-01-01

    KEYWORDS CLASSIFICATION: Agriculture;Angiogenesis Inhibitors;Animals;Anticarcinogenic Agents;Aspergillus niger;blood;Biopsy,Needle;Breast Neoplasms;cytology;Colorectal Neoplasms;dietary modulation of cancer & cancer biomarkers;drug effects;drug therapy;Disease Models,Animal;Endoribonucleases;Female;Food;Humans;Immunohistochemistry;Israel;lifestyle modulation of cancer & cancer biomarkers;Male;Mice;Mice,Nude;Neoplasm Transplantation;Neovascularization,Pathologic;pathology;pharmacology;preventi...

  18. Genomic and Bioinformatics Analysis of HAdV-4, a Human Adenovirus Causing Acute Respiratory Disease: Implications for Gene Therapy and Vaccine Vector Development

    OpenAIRE

    Purkayastha, Anjan; Ditty, Susan E.; Su, Jing; McGraw, John; Hadfield, Ted L.; Tibbetts, Clark; Seto, Donald

    2005-01-01

    Human adenovirus serotype 4 (HAdV-4) is a reemerging viral pathogenic agent implicated in epidemic outbreaks of acute respiratory disease (ARD). This report presents a genomic and bioinformatics analysis of the prototype 35,990-nucleotide genome (GenBank accession no. AY594253). Intriguingly, the genome analysis suggests a closer phylogenetic relationship with the chimpanzee adenoviruses (simian adenoviruses) rather than with other human adenoviruses, suggesting a recent origin of HAdV-4, and...

  19. Alteration of Drug Sensitivity in Human Colon Cancer Cells after Exposure to Heat: Implications for Liver Metastasis Therapy using RFA and Chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Makizumi, Ryouji; Yang, Weng-Lang; Owen, Randall P.; Sharma, Rohit R.; Ravikumar, T S

    2008-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is gaining popularity for treating colorectal liver metastases by inducing image guided tumor hyperthermia. In order to reduce tumor recurrence, adjuvant therapies have been administered post-RFA. We hypothesized that tumor cells escaping RFA cytotoxicity by being in the sublethal zones of tumor might develop differential behavior toward cytotoxic drugs. Here, we used cultured human colorectal cancer cells to evaluate the interaction between heat treatment and ch...

  20. Factors associated with physical and sexual violence by police among people who inject drugs in Ukraine: implications for retention on opioid agonist therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Oksana Kutsa; Ruthanne Marcus; Bojko, Martha J.; Alexei Zelenev; Alyona Mazhnaya; Sergii Dvoriak; Sergii Filippovych; Altice, Frederick L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Ukraine's volatile HIV epidemic, one of the largest in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, remains concentrated in people who inject drugs (PWID). HIV prevalence is high (21.3% to 41.8%) among the estimated 310,000 PWID. Opioid agonist therapy (OAT) is the most cost-effective HIV prevention strategy there, yet OAT services are hampered by negative attitudes and frequent harassment of OAT clients and site personnel by law enforcement. This paper examines the various types of police ...

  1. Reliability of CD4 Quantitation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Children: Implications for Definition of Immunologic Response to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Carey, Vincent J.; Pahwa, Savita; Weinberg, Adriana

    2005-01-01

    Our objective was to develop data-based algorithms for definition of immunologic response to AIDS therapies in pediatric patients, taking account of T-cell subset measurement errors. The study design involved cross-protocol analysis of 2,148 enrollees in six completed Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group trials. We used standard quantitation of T-cell subsets; linear modeling with mean-dependent measurement error variance was used to develop 95% tolerance limits for change in CD4%. For indivi...

  2. Interfractional Variations in the Setup of Pelvic Bony Anatomy and Soft Tissue, and Their Implications on the Delivery of Proton Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To quantify daily variations in the anatomy of patients undergoing radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma, to estimate their effect on dose distribution, and to evaluate the effectiveness of current standard planning and setup approaches employed in proton therapy. Methods: We used series of computed tomography data, which included the pretreatment scan, and between 21 and 43 in-room scans acquired on different treatment days, from 10 patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy at Morristown Memorial Hospital. Variations in femur rotation angles, thickness of subcutaneous adipose tissue, and physical depth to the distal surface of the prostate for lateral beam arrangement were recorded. Proton dose distributions were planned with the standard approach. Daily variations in the location of the prescription isodose were evaluated. Results: In all 10 datasets, substantial variation was observed in the lateral tissue thickness (standard deviation of 1.7-3.6 mm for individual patients, variations of >5 mm from the planning computed tomography observed in all series), and femur rotation angle (standard deviation between 1.3o and 4.8o, with the maximum excursion exceeding 10o in 6 of 10 datasets). Shifts in the position of treated volume (98% isodose) were correlated with the variations in the lateral tissue thickness. Conclusions: Analysis suggests that, combined with image-guided setup verification, the range compensator expansion technique prevents loss of dose to target from femur rotation and soft-tissue deformation, in the majority of cases. Anatomic changes coupled with the uncertainties of particle penetration in tissue restrict possibilities for margin reduction in proton therapy of prostate cancer.

  3. Bone Marrow–Derived Stromal Cell Therapy in Cirrhosis: Clinical Evidence, Cellular Mechanisms, and Implications for the Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current treatment options for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are often limited by the presence of underlying liver disease. In patients with liver cirrhosis, surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy all carry a high risk of hepatic complications, ranging from ascites to fulminant liver failure. For patients receiving radiation therapy, cirrhosis dramatically reduces the already limited radiation tolerance of the liver and represents the most important clinical risk factor for the development of radiation-induced liver disease. Although improvements in conformal radiation delivery techniques have improved our ability to safely irradiate confined areas of the liver to increasingly higher doses with excellent local disease control, patients with moderate-to-severe liver cirrhosis continue to face a shortage of treatment options for HCC. In recent years, evidence has emerged supporting the use of bone marrow–derived stromal cells (BMSCs) as a promising treatment for liver cirrhosis, with several clinical studies demonstrating sustained improvement in clinical parameters of liver function after autologous BMSC infusion. Three predominant populations of BMSCs, namely hematopoietic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and endothelial progenitor cells, seem to have therapeutic potential in liver injury and cirrhosis. Preclinical studies of BMSC transplantation have identified a range of mechanisms through which these cells mediate their therapeutic effects, including hepatocyte transdifferentiation and fusion, paracrine stimulation of hepatocyte proliferation, inhibition of activated hepatic stellate cells, enhancement of fibrolytic matrix metalloproteinase activity, and neovascularization of regenerating liver. By bolstering liver function in patients with underlying Child's B or C cirrhosis, autologous BMSC infusion holds great promise as a therapy to improve the safety, efficacy, and utility of surgery, chemotherapy, and hepatic radiation therapy in the

  4. A systematic review of cognitive remediation therapy for anorexia nervosa - Development, current state and implications for future research and clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To systematically review studies of cognitive remediation therapy (CRT) for anorexia nervosa (AN), and to discuss findings with references to clinical practice and future research. Method: The literature was reviewed using the PubMed, Web of Science and PsycINFO search terms “cognitive remediation therapy” AND “anorexia nervosa”. Papers published online between 2005 and 2013 were selected on the basis of three inclusion criteria: 1) studies of any design focusing on CRT for AN, ...

  5. Presleep thoughts and dysfunctional beliefs in subjects of insomnia with or without depression: Implications for cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia in Indian context

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Presleep thoughts may vary between patients of insomnia with or without depression. They are important for cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia (CBT-I), but they have never been systemically examined in Indian population. Materials and Methods: Patients with insomnia (>1 month) who were willing to undergo CBT-I were included in this study after obtaining informed consent. They were requested to fill a sleep diary and return after 15 days. At the time of intake, diagnosis of dep...

  6. Is “Pedophilia” a Useful or a Confusing Concept? An Empirical Study on Sexual Abuse of Children, Sexual Orientation and Typology: Implications for Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Thore Langfeldt

    2010-01-01

    The concept of pedophilia has traditionally been used as a homogeneous mental disorder by most authors and therapists. The present study, investigating different parameters in men who offend against children, shows that men who sexually offend against boys significantly differ from those who sexually offend against girls only. They are differences with respect to sexual orientation, prevalence, number of victims and being sexually abused during childhood. In the course of therapy, most men wh...

  7. Bone Marrow–Derived Stromal Cell Therapy in Cirrhosis: Clinical Evidence, Cellular Mechanisms, and Implications for the Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vainshtein, Jeffrey M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Kabarriti, Rafi; Mehta, Keyur J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Roy-Chowdhury, Jayanta [Department of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Department of Genetics, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Guha, Chandan, E-mail: cguhamd@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Department of Pathology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Current treatment options for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are often limited by the presence of underlying liver disease. In patients with liver cirrhosis, surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy all carry a high risk of hepatic complications, ranging from ascites to fulminant liver failure. For patients receiving radiation therapy, cirrhosis dramatically reduces the already limited radiation tolerance of the liver and represents the most important clinical risk factor for the development of radiation-induced liver disease. Although improvements in conformal radiation delivery techniques have improved our ability to safely irradiate confined areas of the liver to increasingly higher doses with excellent local disease control, patients with moderate-to-severe liver cirrhosis continue to face a shortage of treatment options for HCC. In recent years, evidence has emerged supporting the use of bone marrow–derived stromal cells (BMSCs) as a promising treatment for liver cirrhosis, with several clinical studies demonstrating sustained improvement in clinical parameters of liver function after autologous BMSC infusion. Three predominant populations of BMSCs, namely hematopoietic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and endothelial progenitor cells, seem to have therapeutic potential in liver injury and cirrhosis. Preclinical studies of BMSC transplantation have identified a range of mechanisms through which these cells mediate their therapeutic effects, including hepatocyte transdifferentiation and fusion, paracrine stimulation of hepatocyte proliferation, inhibition of activated hepatic stellate cells, enhancement of fibrolytic matrix metalloproteinase activity, and neovascularization of regenerating liver. By bolstering liver function in patients with underlying Child's B or C cirrhosis, autologous BMSC infusion holds great promise as a therapy to improve the safety, efficacy, and utility of surgery, chemotherapy, and hepatic radiation therapy in the

  8. RADIATION THERAPY QUALITY IN CCG/POG INTERGROUP 9961: IMPLICATIONS FOR CRANIOSPINAL IRRADIATION AND THE POSTERIOR FOSSA BOOST IN FUTURE MEDULLOBLASTOMA TRIALS

    OpenAIRE

    BernadineDonahue; MaryAnneH.Marymont; SandraKessel; EmikoHolmes; MehmetKocak; RogerJ.Packer

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Associations of radiation therapy (RT) deviations and outcomes in medulloblastoma have not been defined well, particularly in the era of reduced-dose craniospinal irradiation and chemotherapy. The aim of this study is to evaluate the quality of RT on Children’s Cancer Group/Pediatric Oncology Group 9961 and analyze associations of RT deviations with outcome. Materials and Methods: Major volume deviations were assessed based on the distance from specified anatomical region to field ed...

  9. Increased Eligibility for Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis C Infection with Shortened Duration of Therapy: Implications for Access to Care and Elimination Strategies in Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Borgia, Sergio M.; Adenike Rowaiye

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: All oral, highly effective direct-acting antiviral combinations, such as sofosbuvir-ledipasvir, have recently been licensed in Canada but cost as much as $67,000 for a 12-week course of therapy, representing a major economic barrier to predominately single-payer health care systems such as that found in Ontario. In hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 noncirrhotic patients with a baseline viral load of

  10. Predictors of Nonadherence to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy Among HIV-Infected South Indians in Clinical Care: Implications for Developing Adherence Interventions in Resource-Limited Settings

    OpenAIRE

    Venkatesh, Kartik K.; Srikrishnan, A.K.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Kumarasamy, N; Raminani, Sudha; Thamburaj, E.; Prasad, Lakshmi; Triche, Elizabeth W.; Solomon, Suniti; Safren, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    In light of the increasing availability of generic highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in India, further data are needed to examine variables associated with HAART nonadherence among HIV-infected Indians in clinical care. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 198 HIV-infected South Indian men and women between January and April 2008 receiving first-line non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based HAART. Nonadherence was defined as taking less than 95% of HAART d...

  11. Multiple sexual relationships and the stigma associated with anti-retroviral therapy in rural Tanzania : Implications for HIV prevention and treatment interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Mpobela Agnarson, Abela

    2013-01-01

    Background: Risky sexual behavior, HIV-related stigma, and poor access to HIV care and treatment are three interrelated factors in the prevention and treatment of HIV. For every person starting on HIV treatment, there are three who become newly infected, and social stigma hinders enrollment and access to HIV treatment. The scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource-limited settings has been one of the largest public health operations of our time. The current decrease ...

  12. A longitudinal study of non-medical determinants of adherence to R-CHOP therapy for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: implication for survival

    OpenAIRE

    Borel, Cécile; Lamy, Sébastien; Compaci, Gisèle; Récher, Christian; Jeanneau, Pauline; Nogaro, Jean Claude; Bauvin, Eric; Despas, Fabien; Delpierre, Cyrille; LAURENT, GUY

    2015-01-01

    AbstractBackgroundAdherence to therapy has been established for years as a critical parameter for clinical benefit in medical oncology. This study aimed to assess, in the current practice, the influence of the socio-demographical characteristics and the place of treatment on treatment adherence and overall survival among diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients.MethodsWe analysed data from 380 patients enrolled in a French multi-centre regional cohort, with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma receivi...

  13. Implications of the obesity epidemic for lipid-lowering therapy: Non-HDL cholesterol should replace LDL cholesterol as the primary therapeutic target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel R Hoenig

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Michel R HoenigRoyal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital, Herston, Queensland, AustraliaAbstract: Obesity, metabolic syndrome and diabetes are conditions with increasing prevalence around the world. Cardiovascular risk in diabetics is often so high as to overlap with event rates observed in those with established coronary disease and this has lead to diabetes being classified as a coronary risk equivalent. However, despite the elevated risk of cardiovascular events associated with diabetes and the metabolic syndrome, these patients often have normal low density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol despite frequent increases in apolipoprotein B, triglycerides and nonhigh density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol. In contrast to LDL cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol represents cardiovascular risk across all patient populations but is currently only recommended as a secondary target of therapy by the ATP III report for patients with hypertriglyceridemia. This article provides an overview of the studies that shown non-HDL cholesterol to be superior to LDL cholesterol in predicting cardiovascular events and presents the case for non-HDL cholesterol being the more appropriate primary target of therapy in the context of the obesity pandemic. Adopting non-HDL cholesterol as the primary therapeutic target for all patients will conceivably lead to an appropriate intensification of therapy for high risk patients with low LDL cholesterol.Keywords: obesity, coronary artery disease, non-HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, metabolic syndrome, diabetes

  14. Folate Functionalized Boron Nitride Nanotubes and their Selective Uptake by Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells: Implications for their Use as Boron Carriers in Clinical Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is increasingly being used in the treatment of several aggressive cancers, including cerebral glioblastoma multiforme. The main requirement for this therapy is selective targeting of tumor cells by sufficient quantities of10B atoms required for their capture/irradiation with low-energy thermal neutrons. The low content of boron targeting species in glioblastoma multiforme accounts for the difficulty in selective targeting of this very malignant cerebral tumor by this radiation modality. In the present study, we have used for the first time boron nitride nanotubes as carriers of boron atoms to overcome this problem and enhance the selective targeting and ablative efficacy of BNCT for these tumors. Following their dispersion in aqueous solution by noncovalent coating with biocompatible poly-l-lysine solutions, boron nitride nanotubes were functionalized with a fluorescent probe (quantum dots) to enable their tracking and with folic acid as selective tumor targeting ligand. Initial in vitro studies have confirmed substantive and selective uptake of these nanovectors by glioblastoma multiforme cells, an observation which confirms their potential clinical application for BNCT therapy for these malignant cerebral tumors. PMID:20596476

  15. The Association of IFI27 Expression and Fatigue Intensification during Localized Radiation Therapy: Implication of a Para-Inflammatory Bystander Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leorey N. Saligan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms behind fatigue intensification during cancer therapy remain elusive. The interferon alpha-inducible protein 27 (IFI27 was the most up-regulated gene based on our previous microarray data in fatigued men with non-metastatic prostate cancer receiving localized external beam radiation therapy (EBRT. The purpose of this study was to confirm the IFI27 up-regulation and determine its association with fatigue intensification during EBRT. Peripheral blood samples and fatigue scores were collected at three time points—prior to EBRT, at midpoint, and at completion of EBRT. Confirmatory quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA were utilized to verify the microarray results. Subjects were a total of 40 Caucasian men with prostate cancer; 20 scheduled for EBRT (65.6 ± 7.5 years old, and 20 on active surveillance as controls (62.8 ± 6.1 years old. Significant IFI27 expression overtime during EBRT was confirmed by qPCR (p < 0.5, which correlated with fatigue scores during EBRT (R = −0.90, p = 0.006. Alterations in mechanisms associated with immune response and mitochondrial function that explain the up-regulation of IFI27 may provide an understanding of the pathways related to the intensification of fatigue during localized radiation therapy.

  16. Broad targeting of angiogenesis for cancer prevention and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zongwei; Dabrosin, Charlotta; Yin, Xin; Fuster, Mark M; Arreola, Alexandra; Rathmell, W Kimryn; Generali, Daniele; Nagaraju, Ganji P; El-Rayes, Bassel; Ribatti, Domenico; Chen, Yi Charlie; Honoki, Kanya; Fujii, Hiromasa; Georgakilas, Alexandros G; Nowsheen, Somaira; Amedei, Amedeo; Niccolai, Elena; Amin, Amr; Ashraf, S Salman; Helferich, Bill; Yang, Xujuan; Guha, Gunjan; Bhakta, Dipita; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Aquilano, Katia; Chen, Sophie; Halicka, Dorota; Mohammed, Sulma I; Azmi, Asfar S; Bilsland, Alan; Keith, W Nicol; Jensen, Lasse D

    2015-12-01

    Deregulation of angiogenesis--the growth of new blood vessels from an existing vasculature--is a main driving force in many severe human diseases including cancer. As such, tumor angiogenesis is important for delivering oxygen and nutrients to growing tumors, and therefore considered an essential pathologic feature of cancer, while also playing a key role in enabling other aspects of tumor pathology such as metabolic deregulation and tumor dissemination/metastasis. Recently, inhibition of tumor angiogenesis has become a clinical anti-cancer strategy in line with chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery, which underscore the critical importance of the angiogenic switch during early tumor development. Unfortunately the clinically approved anti-angiogenic drugs in use today are only effective in a subset of the patients, and many who initially respond develop resistance over time. Also, some of the anti-angiogenic drugs are toxic and it would be of great importance to identify alternative compounds, which could overcome these drawbacks and limitations of the currently available therapy. Finding "the most important target" may, however, prove a very challenging approach as the tumor environment is highly diverse, consisting of many different cell types, all of which may contribute to tumor angiogenesis. Furthermore, the tumor cells themselves are genetically unstable, leading to a progressive increase in the number of different angiogenic factors produced as the cancer progresses to advanced stages. As an alternative approach to targeted therapy, options to broadly interfere with angiogenic signals by a mixture of non-toxic natural compound with pleiotropic actions were viewed by this team as an opportunity to develop a complementary anti-angiogenesis treatment option. As a part of the "Halifax Project" within the "Getting to know cancer" framework, we have here, based on a thorough review of the literature, identified 10 important aspects of tumor angiogenesis and the

  17. Pirfenidone enhances the efficacy of combined radiation and sunitinib therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is a widely used treatment for many tumors. Combination therapy using anti-angiogenic agents and radiation has shown promise; however, these combined therapies are reported to have many limitations in clinical trials. Here, we show that radiation transformed tumor endothelial cells (ECs) to fibroblasts, resulting in reduced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) response and increased Snail1, Twist1, Type I collagen, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β release. Irradiation of radioresistant Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) tumors greater than 250 mm3 increased collagen levels, particularly in large tumor vessels. Furthermore, concomitant sunitinib therapy did not show a significant difference in tumor inhibition versus radiation alone. Thus, we evaluated multimodal therapy that combined pirfenidone, an inhibitor of TGF-induced collagen production, with radiation and sunitinib treatment. This trimodal therapy significantly reduced tumor growth, as compared to radiation alone. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that radiation-induced collagen deposition and tumor microvessel density were significantly reduced with trimodal therapy, as compared to radiation alone. These data suggest that combined therapy using pirfenidone may modulate the radiation-altered tumor microenvironment, thereby enhancing the efficacy of radiation therapy and concurrent chemotherapy. - Highlights: • Radiation changes tumor endothelial cells to fibroblasts. • Radio-resistant tumors contain collagen deposits, especially in tumor vessels. • Pirfenidone enhances the efficacy of combined radiation and sunitinib therapy. • Pirfenidone reduces radiation-induced collagen deposits in tumors

  18. Pirfenidone enhances the efficacy of combined radiation and sunitinib therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seo-Hyun; Nam, Jae-Kyung; Jang, Junho; Lee, Hae-June, E-mail: hjlee@kcch.re.kr; Lee, Yoon-Jin, E-mail: yjlee8@kcch.re.kr

    2015-06-26

    Radiotherapy is a widely used treatment for many tumors. Combination therapy using anti-angiogenic agents and radiation has shown promise; however, these combined therapies are reported to have many limitations in clinical trials. Here, we show that radiation transformed tumor endothelial cells (ECs) to fibroblasts, resulting in reduced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) response and increased Snail1, Twist1, Type I collagen, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β release. Irradiation of radioresistant Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) tumors greater than 250 mm{sup 3} increased collagen levels, particularly in large tumor vessels. Furthermore, concomitant sunitinib therapy did not show a significant difference in tumor inhibition versus radiation alone. Thus, we evaluated multimodal therapy that combined pirfenidone, an inhibitor of TGF-induced collagen production, with radiation and sunitinib treatment. This trimodal therapy significantly reduced tumor growth, as compared to radiation alone. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that radiation-induced collagen deposition and tumor microvessel density were significantly reduced with trimodal therapy, as compared to radiation alone. These data suggest that combined therapy using pirfenidone may modulate the radiation-altered tumor microenvironment, thereby enhancing the efficacy of radiation therapy and concurrent chemotherapy. - Highlights: • Radiation changes tumor endothelial cells to fibroblasts. • Radio-resistant tumors contain collagen deposits, especially in tumor vessels. • Pirfenidone enhances the efficacy of combined radiation and sunitinib therapy. • Pirfenidone reduces radiation-induced collagen deposits in tumors.

  19. Comprehensive Evaluation of the Anti-Angiogenic and Anti-Neoplastic Effects of Endostar on Liver Cancer through Optical Molecular Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Qian ZHANG; Du, Yang; Xue, Zhenwen; Chi, Chongwei; Jia, Xiaohua; Tian, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging enables non-invasive monitoring of tumor growth, progression, and drug treatment response, and it has become an important tool to promote biological studies in recent years. In this study, we comprehensively evaluated the in vivo anti-angiogenic and anti-neoplastic effects of Endostar on liver cancer based on the optical molecular imaging systems including micro-computer tomography (Micro-CT), bioluminescence molecular imaging (BLI) and fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT...

  20. Novel PI3K/AKT targeting anti-angiogenic activities of 4-vinylphenol, a new therapeutic potential of a well-known styrene metabolite

    OpenAIRE

    Yue, Grace Gar-Lee; Lee, Julia Kin-Ming; Kwok, Hin-Fai; Cheng, Ling; Wong, Eric Chun-Wai; Jiang, Lei; Yu, Hua; Leung, Hoi-Wing; Wong, Yuk-Lau; Leung, Ping-Chung; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Lau, Clara Bik-San

    2015-01-01

    The pneumo- and hepato-toxicity of 4-vinylphenol (4VP), a styrene metabolite, has been previously reported. Nevertheless, the present study reported the novel anti-angiogenic activities of 4VP which was firstly isolated from the aqueous extract of a Chinese medicinal herb Hedyotis diffusa. Our results showed that 4VP at non-toxic dose effectively suppressed migration, tube formation, adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins, as well as protein and mRNA expressions of metalloproteinase-2 of h...

  1. Zinc-chelation contributes to the anti-angiogenic effect of ellagic acid on inhibiting MMP-2 activity, cell migration and tube formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Teng Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ellagic acid (EA, a dietary polyphenolic compound, has been demonstrated to exert anti-angiogenic effect but the detailed mechanism is not yet fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the zinc chelating activity of EA contributed to its anti-angiogenic effect. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The matrix metalloproteinases-2 (MMP-2 activity, a zinc-required reaction, was directly inhibited by EA as examined by gelatin zymography, which was reversed dose-dependently by adding zinc chloride. In addition, EA was demonstrated to inhibit the secretion of MMP-2 from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs as analyzed by Western blot method, which was also reversed by the addition of zinc chloride. Reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs (RECK, known to down-regulate the MMP-2 activity, was induced by EA at both the mRNA and protein levels which was correlated well with the inhibition of MMP-2 activity. Interestingly, zinc chloride could also abolish the increase of EA-induced RECK expression. The anti-angiogenic effect of EA was further confirmed to inhibit matrix-induced tube formation of endothelial cells. The migration of endothelial cells as analyzed by transwell filter assay was suppressed markedly by EA dose-dependently as well. Zinc chloride could reverse these two effects of EA also in a dose-dependent manner. Since magnesium chloride or calcium chloride could not reverse the inhibitory effect of EA, zinc was found to be involved in tube formation and migration of vascular endothelial cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Together these results demonstrated that the zinc chelation of EA is involved in its anti-angiogenic effects by inhibiting MMP-2 activity, tube formation and cell migration of vascular endothelial cells. The role of zinc was confirmed to be important in the process of angiogenesis.

  2. Etablierung und Charakterisierung eines Tumorsurrogat-Angiogenese-Modells und erste pharmakologische Wirksamkeitsnachweise antiangiogener Substanzen mittels kontrastverstärktem Mikro-Ultraschall

    OpenAIRE

    Flechsig, geb. Lerche, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    In this doctoral thesis a tumor surrogate angiogenesis model for in vivo quantitation of antiangiogenic therapeutic effects was established and characterized by using contrast enhanced micro-ultrasound. For this purpose, initially three animal experiments were conducted where angiogenesis of the surrogate model was investigated both with microultrasound and histology. Finally, the surrogate model was used in a therapeutic setting for the first time. The first experiment was conducted by us...

  3. Radiation therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hendee, William R; Hendee, Eric G

    2013-01-01

    The Third Edition of Radiation Therapy Physics addresses in concise fashion the fundamental diagnostic radiologic physics principles as well as their clinical implications. Along with coverage of the concepts and applications for the radiation treatment of cancer patients, the authors have included reviews of the most up-to-date instrumentation and critical historical links. The text includes coverage of imaging in therapy planning and surveillance, calibration protocols, and precision radiation therapy, as well as discussion of relevant regulation and compliance activities. It contains an upd

  4. Radiological evaluation of response to treatment: Application to metastatic renal cancers receiving anti-angiogenic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Targeted therapies have considerably improved the prognosis of patients with metastatic renal cancer (mRCC) but there are no reliable response assessment criteria reflecting the clinical benefits, because there is no regression in size, or it is delayed. Such criteria would help early identification of non-responders, who would then benefit from a change of treatment, and would avoid their being subjected to unnecessary side effects related to the treatment. We will review the imaging techniques currently available for evaluating tumour response in mRCC patients, including the response evaluation criteria in solid tumours (RECIST), the Choi criteria, the modified Choi criteria, and the CT size and attenuation criteria (SACT). We will also discuss functional imaging techniques, which are based on the physiological characteristics of the tumours, such as perfusion CT, magnetic resonance imaging or ultrasound (DCE-CT, DCE-MRI, DCE-US), diffusion MRI, BOLD MRI and new positron emission tomography (PET) tracers. It is not possible at present to propose a unanimously acknowledged criterion for evaluating tumour response to targeted therapy. However, there is a real need for this according to oncologists and the pharmaceutical industry, and radiologists need to be involved in reflecting on the subject. (authors)

  5. Anti-angiogenic effect of Nelumbo nucifera leaf extracts in human umbilical vein endothelial cells with antioxidant potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Suk Lee

    Full Text Available Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn (Nymphaeaceae has long been used as a traditional herb in Chinese, Japanese, Indian, and Korean medicinal practices since prehistoric times and flourishes today as the primary form of medicine. This study reports for the first time the potent ability of N. nucifera leaf extracts to inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-induced angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo, as well as their antioxidant efficacy in various scavenging models and an analysis of their chemical composition. In vivo anti-angiogenic activity was evaluated in a chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM model using fertilized chicken eggs, in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs by using cell viability, cell proliferation and tube formation assays, and by determining intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS in vitro. The antioxidant efficacy of N. nucifera leaf extracts was determined in various scavenging models, including total phenolic and flavonoid content. The chemical composition of N. nucifera leaf extracts was determined by GC-MS analysis, which revealed the presence of different phytochemicals. The IC50 values for the DPPH radical scavenging activities of water and methanol extracts were found to be 1699.47 and 514.36 μg ml(-1, and their total phenolic and flavonoid contents were 85.01 ± 2.32 and 147.63 ± 2.23 mg GAE g dry mass(-1 and 35.38 ± 1.32 and 41.86 ± 1.07 mg QA g dry mass(-1, respectively. N. nucifera leaf extracts (10-100 μg ml(-1 exhibited significant dose-dependent inhibition of VEGF-induced angiogenesis, as well as VEGF-induced proliferation and tube formation in HUVECs. In this study, N. nucifera leaf extracts displayed potent antioxidant and inhibitory effects on VEGF-induced angiogenesis. N. nucifera exerted an inhibitory effect on VEGF-induced proliferation and tube formation, as well as CAM angiogenesis in vivo. Moreover, N. nucifera leaf extracts significantly blocked VEGF-induced ROS production in HUVECs

  6. Long-term effectiveness of initiating non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor- versus ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy: implications for first-line therapy choice in resource-limited settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane D Lima

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In many resource-limited settings, combination antiretroviral therapy (cART failure is diagnosed clinically or immunologically. As such, there is a high likelihood that patients may stay on a virologically failing regimen for a substantial period of time. Here, we compared the long-term impact of initiating non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI- versus boosted protease inhibitor (bPI-based cART in British Columbia (BC, Canada. Methods: We followed prospectively 3925 ART-naïve patients who started NNRTIs (N=1963, 50% or bPIs (N=1962; 50% from 1 January 2000 until 30 June 2013 in BC. At six months, we assessed whether patients virologically failed therapy (a plasma viral load (pVL >50 copies/mL, and we stratified them based on the pVL at the time of failure ≤500 versus >500 copies/mL. We then followed these patients for another six months and calculated their probability of achieving subsequent viral suppression (pVL 500 copies/mL, they had a 20% lower probability of suppressing at 12 months than pVL-matched bPI initiators (0.37 (0.29–0.45 vs. 0.46 (0.38–0.54. In terms of evolving HIV drug resistance, those who failed on NNRTI performed worse than bPI in all scenarios, especially if they failed with a viral load >500 copies/mL. Conclusions: Our results show that patients who virologically failed at six months on NNRTI and continued on the same regimen had a lower probability of subsequently achieving viral suppression and a higher chance of evolving HIV drug resistance. These results suggest that improving access to regular virologic monitoring is critically important, especially if NNRTI-based cART is to remain a preferred choice for first-line therapy in resource-limited settings.

  7. Endostar, a novel recombinant human endostatin, exerts antiangiogenic effect via blocking VEGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of KDR/Flk-1 of endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endostar, a novel recombinant human endostatin expressed and purified in Escherichia coli with an additional nine-amino acid sequence and forming another his-tag structure, was approved by the SFDA in 2005 for the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer. But its mechanism of action has not been illustrated before. In this study, we examined the antiangiogenic activities of endostar in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that endostar suppressed the VEGF-stimulated proliferation, migration, and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro. Endostar blocked microvessel sprouting from rat aortic rings in vitro. Moreover, it could inhibit the formation of new capillaries from pre-existing vessels in the chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay and affect the growth of vessels in tumor. We further found the antiangiogenic effects of endostar were correlated with the VEGF-triggered signaling. Endostar suppressed the VEGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of KDR/Flk-1(VEGFR-2) as well as the overall VEGFR-2 expression and the activation of ERK, p38 MAPK, and AKT in HUVECs. Collectively, these data indicated the relationship between endostar and VEGF signal pathways and provided a molecular basis for the antiangiogenic effects of endostar

  8. ERK1/2 and HIF1α Are Involved in Antiangiogenic Effect of Polyphenols-Enriched Fraction from Chilean Propolis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Cuevas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Propolis has been shown to modulate the angiogenesis in both in vitro and in vivo models. Thus, we aimed to evaluate the antiangiogenic properties of an ethanolic extract of Chilean propolis (EEP and Pinocembrin (Pn. Migration, formation of capillary-like structures of endothelial cells, and sprouting from rat aortic rings were used to assess the antiangiogenic properties of EEP or Pn. In addition, microRNAs and VEGFA mRNA expression were studied by qPCR. ERK1/2 phosphorylation and HIF1α stabilization were assessed by western blot. EEP or Pn attenuated the migration, the capillary-like tube formation, and the sprouting in the in vitro assays. In addition, the activation of HIF1α and ERK1/2 and the VEGFA mRNA expression was significantly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. In summary, these results suggest that HIF1α and ERK1/2 phosphorylation could be involved in the antiangiogenic effect of Chilean propolis, but more studies are needed to corroborate these findings.

  9. An in-depth Monte Carlo study of lateral electron disequilibrium for small fields in ultra-low density lung: implications for modern radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disher, Brandon; Hajdok, George; Gaede, Stewart; Battista, Jerry J.

    2012-03-01

    Modern radiation therapy techniques such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) use tightly conformed megavoltage x-ray fields to irradiate a tumour within lung tissue. For these conditions, lateral electron disequilibrium (LED) may occur, which systematically perturbs the dose distribution within tumour and nearby lung tissues. The goal of this work is to determine the combination of beam and lung density parameters that cause significant LED within and near the tumour. The Monte Carlo code DOSXYZnrc (National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON) was used to simulate four 20 × 20 × 25 cm3 water-lung-water slab phantoms, which contained lung tissue only, or one of three different centrally located small tumours (sizes: 1 × 1 × 1, 3 × 3 × 3, 5 × 5 × 5 cm3). Dose calculations were performed using combinations of six beam energies (Co-60 up to 18 MV), five field sizes (1 × 1 cm2 up to 15 × 15 cm2), and 12 lung densities (0.001 g cm-3 up to 1 g cm-3) for a total of 1440 simulations. We developed the relative depth-dose factor (RDDF), which can be used to characterize the extent of LED (RDDF density of 0.001 g cm-3 (RDDF = 0.2). Dose in up-stream lung and tumour centre were reduced by as much as 80% with respect to the water density calculation. These reductions were worse for smaller tumours irradiated with high energy beams, small field sizes, and low lung density. In conclusion, SBRT trials based on dose calculations in homogeneous tissue are misleading as they do not reflect the actual dosimetric effects due to LED. Future clinical trials should only use dose calculation engines that can account for electron scatter, with special attention given to patients with low lung density (i.e. emphysema). In cases where tissue inhomogeneity corrections are applied, the nature of the correction used may be inadequate in predicting the correct level of LED. In either case, the dose to the tumour is not the

  10. Cationic Liposome-Mediated CXCR4 Gene Delivery into Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells: Implications for Clinical Transplantation and Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Gul-Uludag, Hilal; Xu, Peng; Marquez-Curtis, Leah A.; Xing, James; Janowska-Wieczorek, Anna; Chen, Jie

    2011-01-01

    The chemokine stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1α/CXCL12 and its receptor CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) play a crucial role in the homing/engraftment and retention of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) in the bone marrow. It has been shown using the viral gene transfer technique that CXCR4 overexpression on human CD34+ HSPC significantly improves their engraftment in murine models. However, clinical trials with gene therapy have revealed safety concerns related to the immunogenic...

  11. Is “Pedophilia” a Useful or a Confusing Concept? An Empirical Study on Sexual Abuse of Children, Sexual Orientation and Typology: Implications for Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thore Langfeldt

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The concept of pedophilia has traditionally been used as a homogeneous mental disorder by most authors and therapists. The present study, investigating different parameters in men who offend against children, shows that men who sexually offend against boys significantly differ from those who sexually offend against girls only. They are differences with respect to sexual orientation, prevalence, number of victims and being sexually abused during childhood. In the course of therapy, most men who sexually offend against boys turned out to be homosexual. These findings are discussed in relation to the life situation of young homosexual boys, and with regard to therapeutic work with sex offenders.

  12. Identification of an "Exceptional Responder" Cell Line to MEK1 Inhibition: Clinical Implications for MEK-Targeted Therapy | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The identification of somatic genetic alterations that confer sensitivity to pharmacologic inhibitors has led to new cancer therapies. To identify mutations that confer an exceptional dependency, shRNA-based loss-of-function data were analyzed from a dataset of numerous cell lines to reveal genes that are essential in a small subset of cancer cell lines. Once these cell lines were determined, detailed genomic characterization from these cell lines was utilized to ascertain the genomic aberrations that led to this extreme dependency.

  13. Tissue Regeneration in the Chronically Inflamed Tumor Environment: Implications for Cell Fusion Driven Tumor Progression and Therapy Resistant Tumor Hybrid Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Dittmar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The biological phenomenon of cell fusion in a cancer context is still a matter of controversial debates. Even though a plethora of in vitro and in vivo data have been published in the past decades the ultimate proof that tumor hybrid cells could originate in (human cancers and could contribute to the progression of the disease is still missing, suggesting that the cell fusion hypothesis is rather fiction than fact. However, is the lack of this ultimate proof a valid argument against this hypothesis, particularly if one has to consider that appropriate markers do not (yet exist, thus making it virtually impossible to identify a human tumor cell clearly as a tumor hybrid cell. In the present review, we will summarize the evidence supporting the cell fusion in cancer concept. Moreover, we will refine the cell fusion hypothesis by providing evidence that cell fusion is a potent inducer of aneuploidy, genomic instability and, most likely, even chromothripsis, suggesting that cell fusion, like mutations and aneuploidy, might be an inducer of a mutator phenotype. Finally, we will show that “accidental” tissue repair processes during cancer therapy could lead to the origin of therapy resistant cancer hybrid stem cells.

  14. Pharmaco-thermodynamics of deuterium-induced oedema in living rat brain via 1H2O MRI: implications for boron neutron capture therapy of malignant brain tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Daniel C.; Li, Xin; Springer, Charles S., Jr.

    2005-05-01

    In addition to its common usage as a tracer in metabolic and physiological studies, deuterium possesses anti-tumoural activity and confers protection against γ-irradiation. A more recent interest in deuterium emanates from the search for alternatives capable of improving neutron penetrance whilst reducing healthy tissue radiation dose deposition in boron neutron capture therapy of malignant brain tumours. Despite this potential clinical application, deuterium induces brain oedema, which is detrimental to neutron capture therapy. In this study, five adult male rats were titrated with deuterated drinking water while brain oedema was monitored via water proton magnetic resonance imaging. This report concludes that deuterium, as well as deuterium-induced brain oedema, possesses a uniform brain bio-distribution. At a steady-state blood fluid deuteration value of 16%, when the deuterium isotope fraction in drinking water was 25%, a mean oedematous volume change of 9 ± 2% (p-value effective dose reduction factors using simple linear transport calculations. While body fluid deuteration enhances thermal neutron flux penetrance and reduces dose deposition, oedema has the opposite effect because it increases the volume of interest, e.g., the brain volume. Thermal neutron enhancement and effective dose reduction factors could be reduced by as much as ~10% in the presence of a 9% water volume increase (oedema). All three authors have contributed equally to this work.

  15. The sodium iodide symporter: its implications for imaging and therapy; Der Natrium-Iodid-Symporter (NIS): Bedeutung fuer die Bildgebung und therapeutische Optionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitzweg, C. [Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen, Klinikum Grosshadern, Muenchen (Germany)

    2007-03-15

    The sodium iodide symporter (NIS) is an intrinsic plasma membrane glycoprotein that mediates the active transport of iodide in the thyroid gland and a number of extrathyroidal tissues, in particular lactating mammary gland. In addition to its key function in thyroid physiology, NIS-mediated iodide accumulation allows diagnostic thyroid scintigraphy as well as therapeutic radioiodine application in benign and malignant thyroid disease. NIS therefore represents one of the oldest targets for molecular imaging and therapy. Based on the effective administration of radioiodine that has been used for over 60 years in the management of follicular cell-derived thyroid cancer, cloning and characterization of the NIS gene has paved the way for the development of a novel cytoreductive gene therapy strategy based on targeted NIS expression in thyroidal and nonthyroidal cancer cells followed by therapeutic application of {sup 131}I or alternative radionuclides, including {sup 188}Re and {sup 211}At. In addition, the possibility of direct and non-invasive imaging of functional NIS expression by {sup 123}I- and {sup 99m}Tc-scintigraphy or {sup 124}I-PET-imaging allows the application of NIS as a novel reporter gene. In conclusion, the dual role of NIS as diagnostic and therapeutic gene and the detection of extra-thyroidal endogenous NIS expression in breast cancer open promising perspectives in nuclear medicine and molecular oncology for diagnostic and therapeutic application of NIS outside the thyroid gland. (orig.)

  16. Etiologies of illness among patients meeting integrated management of adolescent and adult illness district clinician manual criteria for severe infections in northern Tanzania: implications for empiric antimicrobial therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubach, Matthew P; Maro, Venance P; Bartlett, John A; Crump, John A

    2015-02-01

    We describe the laboratory-confirmed etiologies of illness among participants in a hospital-based febrile illness cohort study in northern Tanzania who retrospectively met Integrated Management of Adolescent and Adult Illness District Clinician Manual (IMAI) criteria for septic shock, severe respiratory distress without shock, and severe pneumonia, and compare these etiologies against commonly used antimicrobials, including IMAI recommendations for emergency antibacterials (ceftriaxone or ampicillin plus gentamicin) and IMAI first-line recommendations for severe pneumonia (ceftriaxone and a macrolide). Among 423 participants hospitalized with febrile illness, there were 25 septic shock, 37 severe respiratory distress without shock, and 109 severe pneumonia cases. Ceftriaxone had the highest potential utility of all antimicrobials assessed, with responsive etiologies in 12 (48%) septic shock, 5 (14%) severe respiratory distress without shock, and 19 (17%) severe pneumonia illnesses. For each syndrome 17-27% of participants had etiologic diagnoses that would be non-responsive to ceftriaxone, but responsive to other available antimicrobial regimens including amphotericin for cryptococcosis and histoplasmosis; anti-tuberculosis therapy for bacteremic disseminated tuberculosis; or tetracycline therapy for rickettsioses and Q fever. We conclude that although empiric ceftriaxone is appropriate in our setting, etiologies not explicitly addressed in IMAI guidance for these syndromes, such as cryptococcosis, histoplasmosis, and tetracycline-responsive bacterial infections, were common. PMID:25385866

  17. VEGF neutralizing aerosol therapy in primary pulmonary adenocarcinoma with K-ras activating-mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervé, Virginie; Rabbe, Nathalie; Guilleminault, Laurent; Paul, Flora; Schlick, Laurène; Azzopardi, Nicolas; Duruisseaux, Michael; Fouquenet, Delphine; Montharu, Jérôme; Redini, Françoise; Paintaud, Gilles; Lemarié, Etienne; Cadranel, Jacques; Wislez, Marie; Heuzé-Vourc'h, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    K-ras mutations promote angiogenesis in lung cancer and contribute to the drug resistance of cancer cells. It is not clear whether K-ras mutated adenocarcinomas are sensitive to anti-angiogenic therapy with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Anti-angiogenic mAbs are usually delivered systemically, but only a small proportion reaches the lung after intravenous injection. We investigated the relevance of a non-invasive pulmonary route for the delivery of anti-VEGF mAbs in the mouse K-ras(LA1) model. We found that pulmonary delivery of these mAbs significantly reduced the number of tumor lesions and inhibited malignant progression. The antitumor effect involves the VEGFR2-dependent inhibition of blood vessel growth, which impairs tumor proliferation. Pharmacokinetic analysis of aerosolized anti-VEGF showed its low rate of passage into the bloodstream, suggesting that this delivery route is associated with reduced systemic side effects. Our findings highlight the value of the aerosol route for administration of anti-angiogenic mAbs in pulmonary adenocarcinoma with K-ras activating-mutations. PMID:25484066

  18. Monitoring tumor response to antiangiogenic treatment by integrating of dynamic contrast enhanced MRI diffusion weighted imaging and optical imaging in animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the response of the lung tumor xenografts in nude mice to antiangiogenic treatment from perspectives of anatomic, vessel function, cellular and molecular level using the multimodality imaging techniques including optical imaging, dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). Methods: The green fluorescent protein (GFP) was transplanted labeled using GFP-expressing NCI-H460 cells. After the transfection of GFP, NCI-H460 cells were implanted subcutaneously into nude mice. Ten days after implantation, 12 nude mice whose tumor xenografts grew to 0.5-1.0 cm in the maximum diameter were randomly divided into 2 groups, and injected with phosphate-buffered saline and recombinant human endostatin respectively. Then the nude mice in the two groups underwent optical imaging, DCE-MRI and DWI. The volumes, photon counts, the quantitative MR vessel functional parameters including volume transfer constant (Ktrans), rate constant (Kep), volume of extravascular extracellular space (Ve) and maximum area under the enhancement curve (iAUC), and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of the tumors were recorded. Then tumors were collected and observed using the transmission electron microscopy and pathology examination, including HE staining, microvessel density (MVD) and the expressions of vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF). The Kep and VEGF expressions in experimental group and control group were compared with χ2 text, and other values were compared with t test. The Pearson and Spearman test were used for analyzing the correlation of values in the two groups. Results: Seven days after inoculation, the fluorescence signals were detected and grew with the growth of the tumors. On the 7 day after starting therapy, the photon counts of experimental group and control group were (2.51 ± 2.43)× 1010 (photon/sec) and(5.77 ± 3.25)× 1010 (photon/sec), respectively with no significant differences (t=1.964, P >0

  19. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic correlation from mouse to human with pazopanib, a multikinase angiogenesis inhibitor with potent antitumor and antiangiogenic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Knick, Victoria B; Rudolph, Sharon K; Johnson, Jennifer H; Crosby, Renae M; Crouthamel, Ming-Chih; Hopper, Teresa M; Miller, Charles G; Harrington, Laura E; Onori, James A; Mullin, Robert J; Gilmer, Tona M; Truesdale, Anne T; Epperly, Andrea H; Boloor, Amogh; Stafford, Jeffrey A; Luttrell, Deirdre K; Cheung, Mui

    2007-07-01

    With the development of targeted therapeutics, especially for small-molecule inhibitors, it is important to understand whether the observed in vivo efficacy correlates with the modulation of desired/intended target in vivo. We have developed a small-molecule inhibitor of all three vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors (VEGFR), platelet-derived growth factor receptor, and c-Kit tyrosine kinases, pazopanib (GW786034), which selectively inhibits VEGF-induced endothelial cell proliferation. It has good oral exposure and inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth in mice. Because bolus administration of the compound results in large differences in C(max) and C(trough), we investigated the effect of continuous infusion of a VEGFR inhibitor on tumor growth and angiogenesis. GW771806, which has similar enzyme and cellular profiles to GW786034, was used for these studies due to higher solubility requirements for infusion studies. Comparing the pharmacokinetics by two different routes of administration (bolus p.o. dosing and continuous infusion), we showed that the antitumor and antiangiogenic activity of VEGFR inhibitors is dependent on steady-state concentration of the compound above a threshold. The steady-state concentration required for these effects is consistent with the concentration required for the inhibition of VEGF-induced VEGFR2 phosphorylation in mouse lungs. Furthermore, the steady-state concentration of pazopanib determined from preclinical activity showed a strong correlation with the pharmacodynamic effects and antitumor activity in the phase I clinical trial. PMID:17620431

  20. Abrus agglutinin is a potent anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic agent in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutia, Sujit K; Behera, Birendra; Nandini Das, Durgesh; Mukhopadhyay, Subhadip; Sinha, Niharika; Panda, Prashanta Kumar; Naik, Prajna Paramita; Patra, Samir K; Mandal, Mahitosh; Sarkar, Siddik; Menezes, Mitchell E; Talukdar, Sarmistha; Maiti, Tapas K; Das, Swadesh K; Sarkar, Devanand; Fisher, Paul B

    2016-07-15

    Abrus agglutinin (AGG), a plant lectin isolated from the seeds of Abrus precatorius, has documented antitumor and immunostimulatory effects in murine models. To examine possible antitumor activity against breast cancer, we established human breast tumor xenografts in athymic nude mice and intraperitoneally administered AGG. AGG inhibited tumor growth and angiogenesis as confirmed by monitoring the expression of Ki-67 and CD-31, respectively. In addition, TUNEL positive cells increased in breast tumors treated with AGG suggesting that AGG mediates anti-tumorigenic activity through induction of apoptosis and inhibition of angiogenesis. On a molecular level, AGG caused extrinsic apoptosis through ROS generation that was AKT-dependent in breast cancer cells, without affecting primary mammary epithelial cells, suggesting potential cancer specificity of this natural compound. In addition, using HUVECs, AGG inhibited expression of the pro-angiogenic factor IGFBP-2 in an AKT-dependent manner, reducing angiogenic phenotypes both in vitro and in vivo. Overall, the present results establish that AGG promotes both apoptosis and anti-angiogenic activities in human breast tumor cells, which might be exploited for treatment of breast and other cancers. PMID:26914517

  1. Binding assay and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of ACTIBIND, a protein with anticarcinogenic and antiangiogenic activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Native ACTIBIND was successfully crystallized and it was shown that the interaction between ACTIBIND and actin is in a molar ratio of 1:2, with a binding constant of 16.17 × 104 M−1. ACTIBIND is a T2 RNase extracellular glycoprotein produced by the mould Aspergillus niger B1 (CMI CC 324626) that possesses anticarcinogenic and antiangiogenic activities. ACTIBIND was found to be an actin-binding protein that interacts with rabbit muscle actin in a 1:2 molar ratio (ACTIBIND:actin) with a binding constant of 16.17 × 104 M−1. Autoclave-treated ACTIBIND (EI-ACTIBIND) lost its RNase activity, but its actin-binding ability was conserved. ACTIBIND crystals were grown using 20% PEG 3350, 0.2 M ammonium dihydrogen phosphate solution at room temperature (293 K). One to four single crystals appeared in each droplet within a few days and grew to approximate dimensions of 0.5 × 0.5 × 0.5 mm after about two weeks. Diffraction studies of these crystals at low temperature (100 K) indicated that they belong to the P3121 space group, with unit-cell parameters a = 78, b = 78, c = 104 Å

  2. Patterns and Predictors of Early Biochemical Recurrence After Radical Prostatectomy and Adjuvant Radiation Therapy in Men With pT3N0 Prostate Cancer: Implications for Multimodal Therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of our study was to evaluate patterns and predictors of early biochemical recurrence (eBCR) after radical prostatectomy (RP) and adjuvant radiation therapy (aRT) in order to identify which individuals might benefit from additional treatments. Methods and Materials: We evaluated 390 patients with pT3N0 prostate cancer (PCa) receiving RP and aRT at 6 European centers between 1993 and 2006. Patients who were free from BCR at 0.2 ng/mL within 2 or 3 years after aRT. Uni- and multivariable Cox regression analyses predicting overall and eBCR after aRT were fitted. Covariates consisted of preoperative PSA results, surgical margins, pathological stage, Gleason score, and aRT dose. Results: Overall, 5- and 8-year BCR-free survival rates were 77.1% and 70.8%, respectively. At a median follow-up of 86 months after aRT, 33 (8.8%) and 55 (14.6%) men experienced BCR within 2 or 3 years after aRT, respectively. In multivariable analyses, Gleason scores of 8 to 10 represented the only independent predictor of eBCR after aRT (all, P≤.01). The risk of BCR was significantly higher in patients with a Gleason score of 8 to 10 disease than in those with Gleason 2 to 6 within 24 months after treatment, after adjusting for all covariates (all, P≤.04). However, given a 24-month BCR free period, the risk of subsequent BCR for men with poorly differentiated disease was equal to that of men with less aggressive disease (all, P≥.3). Conclusions: High Gleason score represents the only predictor of eBCR after RP and aRT in patients affected by pT3N0 PCa. Given the association between early PSA recurrence, clinical progression, and mortality, these patients might be considered candidates for adjuvant medical therapy and/or prophylactic whole-pelvis radiation therapy in addition to aRT, delivered to the prostatic bed

  3. Elimination of clonogenic tumor cells from HL-60, Daudi, and U-937 cell lines by laser photoradiation therapy: implications for autologous bone marrow purging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulliya, K.S.; Pervaiz, S.

    1989-03-01

    Laser photoradiation therapy was tested in an in vitro model for its efficacy in the elimination of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma cells. Results show that at 31.2 J/cm2 of laser light in the presence of 20 micrograms/mL of merocyanine 540 (MC540) there was greater than 5 log reduction in Burkitt's lymphoma (Daudi) cells. Similar tumor cell kill was obtained for leukemia (HL-60) cells at a laser light dose of 93.6 J/cm2. However, to obtain the same efficiency of killing for histiocytic lymphoma (U-937) cells, a higher dose of MC540 (25 micrograms/mL) was required. Clonogenic tumor stem cell colony formation was reduced by greater than 5 logs after laser photoradiation therapy. Under identical conditions for each cell line the percent survival for granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units (CFU-GM, 45.9%, 40%, 17.5%), granulocyte/erythroid/macrophage/megakaryocyte (GEMM, 40.1%, 20.1%, 11.5%), colony-forming units (CFU-C, 16.2%, 9.1%, 1.8%), and erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E, 33.4%, 17.8%, 3.9%) was significantly higher than the tumor cells. Mixing of gamma ray-irradiated normal marrow cells with tumor cells (1:1 and 10:1 ratio) did not interfere with the elimination of tumor cells. The effect of highly purified recombinant interferon alpha (rIFN) on laser photoradiation therapy of tumor cells was also investigated. In the presence of rIFN (30 to 3,000 U/mL), the viability of leukemic cells was observed to increase from 0% to 1.5% with a concurrent decrease in membrane polarization, suggesting an increase in fluidity of cell membrane in response to rIFN. However, at higher doses of rIFN (6,000 to 12,000 U/mL) this phenomenon was not observed. The viability of lymphoma cells remained unaffected at all doses of rIFN tested.

  4. Molecular monitoring of plasmodium falciparum drug susceptibility at the time of the introduction of artemisinin-based combination therapy in Yaoundé, Cameroon: Implications for the future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menard Sandie

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regular monitoring of the levels of anti-malarial resistance of Plasmodium falciparum is an essential policy to adapt therapy and improve malaria control. This monitoring can be facilitated by using molecular tools, which are easier to implement than the classical determination of the resistance phenotype. In Cameroon, chloroquine (CQ, previously the first-line therapy for uncomplicated malaria was officially withdrawn in 2002 and replaced initially by amodiaquine (AQ monotherapy. Then, artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT, notably artesunate-amodiaquine (AS-AQ or artemether-lumefantrine (AL, was gradually introduced in 2004. This situation raised the question of the evolution of P. falciparum resistance molecular markers in Yaoundé, a highly urbanized Cameroonian city. Methods The genotype of pfcrt 72 and 76 and pfmdr1 86 alleles and pfmdr1 copy number were determined using real-time PCR in 447 P. falciparum samples collected between 2005 and 2009. Results This study showed a high prevalence of parasites with mutant pfcrt 76 (83% and pfmdr1 86 (93% codons. On the contrary, no mutations in the pfcrt 72 codon and no samples with duplication of the pfmdr1 gene were observed. Conclusion The high prevalence of mutant pfcrt 76T and pfmdr1 86Y alleles might be due to the choice of alternative drugs (AQ and AS-AQ known to select such genotypes. Mutant pfcrt 72 codon was not detected despite the prolonged use of AQ either as monotherapy or combined with artesunate. The absence of pfmdr1 multicopies suggests that AL would still remain efficient. The limited use of mefloquine or the predominance of mutant pfmdr1 86Y codon could explain the lack of pfmdr1 amplification. Indeed, this mutant codon is rarely associated with duplication of pfmdr1 gene. In Cameroon, the changes of therapeutic strategies and the simultaneous use of several formulations of ACT or other anti-malarials that are not officially recommended result in a

  5. Elimination of clonogenic tumor cells from HL-60, Daudi, and U-937 cell lines by laser photoradiation therapy: implications for autologous bone marrow purging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser photoradiation therapy was tested in an in vitro model for its efficacy in the elimination of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma cells. Results show that at 31.2 J/cm2 of laser light in the presence of 20 micrograms/mL of merocyanine 540 (MC540) there was greater than 5 log reduction in Burkitt's lymphoma (Daudi) cells. Similar tumor cell kill was obtained for leukemia (HL-60) cells at a laser light dose of 93.6 J/cm2. However, to obtain the same efficiency of killing for histiocytic lymphoma (U-937) cells, a higher dose of MC540 (25 micrograms/mL) was required. Clonogenic tumor stem cell colony formation was reduced by greater than 5 logs after laser photoradiation therapy. Under identical conditions for each cell line the percent survival for granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units (CFU-GM, 45.9%, 40%, 17.5%), granulocyte/erythroid/macrophage/megakaryocyte (GEMM, 40.1%, 20.1%, 11.5%), colony-forming units (CFU-C, 16.2%, 9.1%, 1.8%), and erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E, 33.4%, 17.8%, 3.9%) was significantly higher than the tumor cells. Mixing of gamma ray-irradiated normal marrow cells with tumor cells (1:1 and 10:1 ratio) did not interfere with the elimination of tumor cells. The effect of highly purified recombinant interferon alpha (rIFN) on laser photoradiation therapy of tumor cells was also investigated. In the presence of rIFN (30 to 3,000 U/mL), the viability of leukemic cells was observed to increase from 0% to 1.5% with a concurrent decrease in membrane polarization, suggesting an increase in fluidity of cell membrane in response to rIFN. However, at higher doses of rIFN (6,000 to 12,000 U/mL) this phenomenon was not observed. The viability of lymphoma cells remained unaffected at all doses of rIFN tested

  6. Prognostic implication of thyroglobulin and quantified whole body scan after initial radioiodine therapy on early prediction of ablation and clinical response for the patients with differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to investigate predictors for successful ablation and disease-free status after high-dose radioiodine therapy in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. We enrolled 173 consecutive patients with differentiated thyroid cancer between November 2001 and December 2004 retrospectively (female 145, 46±12 years). All patients underwent total thyroidectomy and I-131 ablative therapy (IAT) (3.7-5.4 GBq). The success or failure of ablation was assessed 6-9 months after the IAT with reference to undetectable thyroglobulin (Tg) and negative I-131 whole body scan (WBS). Afterward, the decision for disease-free status was evaluated using Tg and WBS (follow-up period after 1st IAT 7-81 months, median 43 months, criteria of disease-free: less than 10 ng/ml thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH)-stimulated Tg or less than 2 ng/ml TSH-unstimulated Tg and/or negative WBS). Clinical and tumoral factors such as sex, age, pathologic type, the size of tumor, quantified cervical uptake in WBS1, pattern in WBS1, ablative therapy dose, American Joint Committee on cancer (AJCC) stage, lymph node (LN) stage, Tg just before IAT (Tg1), and ablation status were assessed using logistic regression analyses. There were 93 successful ablations (54%). Significant predictors for the ablation failure were Tg1 (odd raito (OR)=8.42; 95% confidence interval (CI)=2.76-25.69; p<0.0001), LN metastasis (OR=3.05; 95% CI=1.11-8.37; p=0.031), and quantified cervical uptake in WBS1 (OR=4.95; 95% CI=1.07-22.88; p=0.041). One hundred fifty-five patients were determined as disease-free after follow-up. All the eighteen patients with persistent disease were identified as ablation failure after first IAT. Significant predictors for the disease-free status were Tg1 (OR=0.98; 95% CI=0.97-0.99; p=0.028), tumor size (OR=0.53; 95% CI=0.28-0.96; p=0.044), and quantified cervical uptake in WBS1 (OR=0.87; 95% CI=0.76-0.98; p=0.024). The thyroglobulin and quantified cervical uptake in whole

  7. Pseudotyped AAV vector-mediated gene transfer in a human fetal trachea xenograft model: implications for in utero gene therapy for cystic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundeep G Keswani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lung disease including airway infection and inflammation currently causes the majority of morbidities and mortalities associated with cystic fibrosis (CF, making the airway epithelium and the submucosal glands (SMG novel target cells for gene therapy in CF. These target cells are relatively inaccessible to postnatal gene transfer limiting the success of gene therapy. Our previous work in a human-fetal trachea xenograft model suggests the potential benefit for treating CF in utero. In this study, we aim to validate adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2 gene transfer in a human fetal trachea xenograft model and to compare transduction efficiencies of pseudotyping AAV2 vectors in fetal xenografts and postnatal xenograft controls. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human fetal trachea or postnatal bronchus controls were xenografted onto immunocompromised SCID mice for a four-week engraftment period. After injection of AAV2/2, 2/1, 2/5, 2/7 or 2/8 with a LacZ reporter into both types of xenografts, we analyzed for transgene expression in the respiratory epithelium and SMGs. At 1 month, transduction by AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 in respiratory epithelium and SMG cells was significantly greater than that of AAV2/1, 2/5, and 2/7 in xenograft tracheas. Efficiency in SMG transduction was significantly greater in AAV2/8 than AAV2/2. At 3 months, AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 transgene expression was >99% of respiratory epithelium and SMG. At 1 month, transduction efficiency of AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 was significantly less in adult postnatal bronchial xenografts than in fetal tracheal xenografts. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on the effectiveness of AAV vectors in SMG transduction, our findings suggest the potential utility of pseudotyped AAV vectors for treatment of cystic fibrosis. The human fetal trachea xenograft model may serve as an effective tool for further development of fetal gene therapy strategies for the in utero treatment of cystic fibrosis.

  8. Endovascular Therapy for Femoropopliteal Artery Disease and Association of Risk Factors With Primary Patency: The Implication of Critical Limb Ischemia and TASC II C/D Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishibe, Toshiya; Yamamoto, Kiyohito; Seike, Yoshimasa; Ogino, Hitoshi; Nishibe, Masayasu; Koizumi, Jun; Dardik, Alan

    2015-11-01

    The treatment of femoropopliteal artery disease remains controversial, without clear guidelines specifying the indications for endovascular therapy (EVT). Accordingly, we retrospectively examined our experience of using EVT to treat femoropopliteal artery disease. A total of 91 limbs in 82 patients underwent EVT for the treatment of femoropopliteal artery disease. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty alone was performed in 20 limbs, and additional stenting was performed in 71 limbs. The 1-year primary patency, primary-assisted patency, limb salvage, and survival rates were 76%, 88%, 96%, and 92%, respectively. Multivariate Cox analysis of primary patency showed that critical limb ischemia (CLI; hazard ratio [HR], 2.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08-5.33; P EVT for femoropopliteal artery disease. PMID:26574486

  9. Correction for ‘artificial’ electron disequilibrium due to cone-beam CT density errors: implications for on-line adaptive stereotactic body radiation therapy of lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disher, Brandon; Hajdok, George; Wang, An; Craig, Jeff; Gaede, Stewart; Battista, Jerry J.

    2013-06-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has rapidly become a clinically useful imaging modality for image-guided radiation therapy. Unfortunately, CBCT images of the thorax are susceptible to artefacts due to scattered photons, beam hardening, lag in data acquisition, and respiratory motion during a slow scan. These limitations cause dose errors when CBCT image data are used directly in dose computations for on-line, dose adaptive radiation therapy (DART). The purpose of this work is to assess the magnitude of errors in CBCT numbers (HU), and determine the resultant effects on derived tissue density and computed dose accuracy for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of lung cancer. Planning CT (PCT) images of three lung patients were acquired using a Philips multi-slice helical CT simulator, while CBCT images were obtained with a Varian On-Board Imaging system. To account for erroneous CBCT data, three practical correction techniques were tested: (1) conversion of CBCT numbers to electron density using phantoms, (2) replacement of individual CBCT pixel values with bulk CT numbers, averaged from PCT images for tissue regions, and (3) limited replacement of CBCT lung pixels values (LCT) likely to produce artificial lateral electron disequilibrium. For each corrected CBCT data set, lung SBRT dose distributions were computed for a 6 MV volume modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique within the Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system. The reference prescription dose was set such that 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) received at least 54 Gy (i.e. D95). Further, we used the relative depth dose factor as an a priori index to predict the effects of incorrect low tissue density on computed lung dose in regions of severe electron disequilibrium. CT number profiles from co-registered CBCT and PCT patient lung images revealed many reduced lung pixel values in CBCT data, with some pixels corresponding to vacuum (-1000 HU). Similarly, CBCT data in a plastic lung

  10. Correction for 'artificial' electron disequilibrium due to cone-beam CT density errors: implications for on-line adaptive stereotactic body radiation therapy of lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disher, Brandon; Hajdok, George; Wang, An; Craig, Jeff; Gaede, Stewart; Battista, Jerry J

    2013-06-21

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has rapidly become a clinically useful imaging modality for image-guided radiation therapy. Unfortunately, CBCT images of the thorax are susceptible to artefacts due to scattered photons, beam hardening, lag in data acquisition, and respiratory motion during a slow scan. These limitations cause dose errors when CBCT image data are used directly in dose computations for on-line, dose adaptive radiation therapy (DART). The purpose of this work is to assess the magnitude of errors in CBCT numbers (HU), and determine the resultant effects on derived tissue density and computed dose accuracy for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of lung cancer. Planning CT (PCT) images of three lung patients were acquired using a Philips multi-slice helical CT simulator, while CBCT images were obtained with a Varian On-Board Imaging system. To account for erroneous CBCT data, three practical correction techniques were tested: (1) conversion of CBCT numbers to electron density using phantoms, (2) replacement of individual CBCT pixel values with bulk CT numbers, averaged from PCT images for tissue regions, and (3) limited replacement of CBCT lung pixels values (LCT) likely to produce artificial lateral electron disequilibrium. For each corrected CBCT data set, lung SBRT dose distributions were computed for a 6 MV volume modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique within the Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system. The reference prescription dose was set such that 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) received at least 54 Gy (i.e. D95). Further, we used the relative depth dose factor as an a priori index to predict the effects of incorrect low tissue density on computed lung dose in regions of severe electron disequilibrium. CT number profiles from co-registered CBCT and PCT patient lung images revealed many reduced lung pixel values in CBCT data, with some pixels corresponding to vacuum (-1000 HU). Similarly, CBCT data in a plastic lung

  11. Correction for ‘artificial’ electron disequilibrium due to cone-beam CT density errors: implications for on-line adaptive stereotactic body radiation therapy of lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has rapidly become a clinically useful imaging modality for image-guided radiation therapy. Unfortunately, CBCT images of the thorax are susceptible to artefacts due to scattered photons, beam hardening, lag in data acquisition, and respiratory motion during a slow scan. These limitations cause dose errors when CBCT image data are used directly in dose computations for on-line, dose adaptive radiation therapy (DART). The purpose of this work is to assess the magnitude of errors in CBCT numbers (HU), and determine the resultant effects on derived tissue density and computed dose accuracy for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of lung cancer. Planning CT (PCT) images of three lung patients were acquired using a Philips multi-slice helical CT simulator, while CBCT images were obtained with a Varian On-Board Imaging system. To account for erroneous CBCT data, three practical correction techniques were tested: (1) conversion of CBCT numbers to electron density using phantoms, (2) replacement of individual CBCT pixel values with bulk CT numbers, averaged from PCT images for tissue regions, and (3) limited replacement of CBCT lung pixels values (LCT) likely to produce artificial lateral electron disequilibrium. For each corrected CBCT data set, lung SBRT dose distributions were computed for a 6 MV volume modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique within the Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system. The reference prescription dose was set such that 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) received at least 54 Gy (i.e. D95). Further, we used the relative depth dose factor as an a priori index to predict the effects of incorrect low tissue density on computed lung dose in regions of severe electron disequilibrium. CT number profiles from co-registered CBCT and PCT patient lung images revealed many reduced lung pixel values in CBCT data, with some pixels corresponding to vacuum (−1000 HU). Similarly, CBCT data in a plastic lung

  12. Parotid Glands Dose–Effect Relationships Based on Their Actually Delivered Doses: Implications for Adaptive Replanning in Radiation Therapy of Head-and-Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Doses actually delivered to the parotid glands during radiation therapy often exceed planned doses. We hypothesized that the delivered doses correlate better with parotid salivary output than the planned doses, used in all previous studies, and that determining these correlations will help make decisions regarding adaptive radiation therapy (ART) aimed at reducing the delivered doses. Methods and Materials: In this prospective study, oropharyngeal cancer patients treated definitively with chemoirradiation underwent daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) with clinical setup alignment based on the C2 posterior edge. Parotid glands in the CBCTs were aligned by deformable registration to calculate cumulative delivered doses. Stimulated salivary flow rates were measured separately from each parotid gland pretherapy and periodically posttherapy. Results: Thirty-six parotid glands of 18 patients were analyzed. Average mean planned doses was 32 Gy, and differences from planned to delivered mean gland doses were −4.9 to +8.4 Gy, median difference +2.2 Gy in glands in which delivered doses increased relative to planned. Both planned and delivered mean doses were significantly correlated with posttreatment salivary outputs at almost all posttherapy time points, without statistically significant differences in the correlations. Large dispersions (on average, SD 3.6 Gy) characterized the dose–effect relationships for both. The differences between the cumulative delivered doses and planned doses were evident at first fraction (r=.92, P<.0001) because of complex setup deviations (eg, rotations and neck articulations), uncorrected by the translational clinical alignments. Conclusions: After daily translational setup corrections, differences between planned and delivered doses in most glands were small relative to the SDs of the dose–saliva data, suggesting that ART is not likely to gain measurable salivary output improvement in most cases. These differences were

  13. Parotid Glands Dose–Effect Relationships Based on Their Actually Delivered Doses: Implications for Adaptive Replanning in Radiation Therapy of Head-and-Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, Klaudia U. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Fernandes, Laura L. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Vineberg, Karen A.; McShan, Daniel; Antonuk, Alan E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Cornwall, Craig [Department of Hospital Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Feng, Mary [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Schipper, Mathew J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Balter, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Eisbruch, Avraham, E-mail: eisbruch@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Doses actually delivered to the parotid glands during radiation therapy often exceed planned doses. We hypothesized that the delivered doses correlate better with parotid salivary output than the planned doses, used in all previous studies, and that determining these correlations will help make decisions regarding adaptive radiation therapy (ART) aimed at reducing the delivered doses. Methods and Materials: In this prospective study, oropharyngeal cancer patients treated definitively with chemoirradiation underwent daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) with clinical setup alignment based on the C2 posterior edge. Parotid glands in the CBCTs were aligned by deformable registration to calculate cumulative delivered doses. Stimulated salivary flow rates were measured separately from each parotid gland pretherapy and periodically posttherapy. Results: Thirty-six parotid glands of 18 patients were analyzed. Average mean planned doses was 32 Gy, and differences from planned to delivered mean gland doses were −4.9 to +8.4 Gy, median difference +2.2 Gy in glands in which delivered doses increased relative to planned. Both planned and delivered mean doses were significantly correlated with posttreatment salivary outputs at almost all posttherapy time points, without statistically significant differences in the correlations. Large dispersions (on average, SD 3.6 Gy) characterized the dose–effect relationships for both. The differences between the cumulative delivered doses and planned doses were evident at first fraction (r=.92, P<.0001) because of complex setup deviations (eg, rotations and neck articulations), uncorrected by the translational clinical alignments. Conclusions: After daily translational setup corrections, differences between planned and delivered doses in most glands were small relative to the SDs of the dose–saliva data, suggesting that ART is not likely to gain measurable salivary output improvement in most cases. These differences were

  14. Pharmaco-thermodynamics of deuterium-induced oedema in living rat brain via 1H2O MRI: implications for boron neutron capture therapy of malignant brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to its common usage as a tracer in metabolic and physiological studies, deuterium possesses anti-tumoural activity and confers protection against γ-irradiation. A more recent interest in deuterium emanates from the search for alternatives capable of improving neutron penetrance whilst reducing healthy tissue radiation dose deposition in boron neutron capture therapy of malignant brain tumours. Despite this potential clinical application, deuterium induces brain oedema, which is detrimental to neutron capture therapy. In this study, five adult male rats were titrated with deuterated drinking water while brain oedema was monitored via water proton magnetic resonance imaging. This report concludes that deuterium, as well as deuterium-induced brain oedema, possesses a uniform brain bio-distribution. At a steady-state blood fluid deuteration value of 16%, when the deuterium isotope fraction in drinking water was 25%, a mean oedematous volume change of 9 ± 2% (p-value <0.001) was observed in the rat brain-this may account for neurological and behavioural abnormalities found in mammals drinking highly deuterated water. In addition to characterizing the pharmaco-thermodynamics of deuterium-induced oedema, this report also estimates the impact of oedema on thermal neutron enhancement and effective dose reduction factors using simple linear transport calculations. While body fluid deuteration enhances thermal neutron flux penetrance and reduces dose deposition, oedema has the opposite effect because it increases the volume of interest, e.g., the brain volume. Thermal neutron enhancement and effective dose reduction factors could be reduced by as much as ∼10% in the presence of a 9% water volume increase (oedema)

  15. Rhamnazin, a novel inhibitor of VEGFR2 signaling with potent antiangiogenic activity and antitumor efficacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anti-angiogenesis targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) has emerged as an important tool for cancer therapy. The identification of new drugs from natural products has a long and successful history. In this study, we described a novel VEGFR2 inhibitor, rhamnazin, which inhibits tumor angiogenesis and growth. Rhamnazin significantly inhibited proliferation, migration and tube formation of human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro as well as inhibited sprouts formation of rat aorta ring. In addition, it inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and its downstream signaling regulator in HUVECs. Moreover, rhamnazin could directly inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 in vitro and in vivo. Oral administration of rhamnazin at a dose of 200 mg/kg/day could markedly inhibited human tumor xenograft growth and decreased microvessel densities (MVD) in tumor sections. Taken together, these preclinical evaluations suggest that rhamnazin inhibits angiogenesis and may be a promising anticancer drug candidate. - Highlights: • Rhamnazin inhibits the response of HUVECs to VEGF in vitro. • Rhamnazin inhibits VEGFR2 kinase activity and its downstream signaling. • Rhamnazin prevents the growth of MDA-MB-231 tumor and reduces micro-vessel density in vivo

  16. Rhamnazin, a novel inhibitor of VEGFR2 signaling with potent antiangiogenic activity and antitumor efficacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yao [Department of Ophthalmology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Jiangxi Province Clinical Ophthalmology Institute, No.17 Yongwaizheng Street, Donghu District, Nanchang 330006, Jiangxi Province (China); Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, The Third Hospital of Nanchang, Nanchang Key Laboratory of Diabetes, No.1 Qianjing Road, Xihu District, Nanchang 330009, Jiangxi Province (China); Cai, Wei [Department of Medical Genetics, College of Basic Medical Science of Nanchang University, No.461 Bayi Road, Donghu District, Nanchang 330006, Jiangxi Province (China); Pei, Chong-gang, E-mail: profchonggangpei@163.com [Department of Ophthalmology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Jiangxi Province Clinical Ophthalmology Institute, No.17 Yongwaizheng Street, Donghu District, Nanchang 330006, Jiangxi Province (China); Shao, Yi, E-mail: profyishao@163.com [Department of Ophthalmology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Jiangxi Province Clinical Ophthalmology Institute, No.17 Yongwaizheng Street, Donghu District, Nanchang 330006, Jiangxi Province (China)

    2015-