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  1. Autoimmune Hepatitis Triggered by Anti-TNF- Therapy

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    Satoshi Nakayama

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH is occasionally triggered by drug treatments. Recently, as biological agents are becoming widely used for autoimmune disorders, there have been a growing number of reports of the development of autoimmune processes related to these agents. A 52-year-old Japanese woman with psoriasis developed liver damage two months after initiation of anti-TNFtherapy with adalimumab. Liver histological findings were compatible with AIH, and positive conversions of ANAs were detected. The patient was treated with prednisolone and had a good response. While some cases of AIH triggered by anti-TNFtherapies have been reported, the pathogenesis remains unspecified. When elevation of liver enzymes is observed with high IgG levels and seropositivity of ANA during the course of anti-TNFtherapy, liver biopsy findings may be essential and important to make definitive diagnosis of AIH.

  2. Optimizing anti-TNF therapy in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandse, J.F.

    2015-01-01

    Anti-TNF, zoals infliximab en adalimumab, zijn effectief voor de behandeling van chronische ontstekingsziekten van de darm (IBD): de ziekte van Crohn en colitis ulcerosa. Deze middelen zijn echter kostbaar en niet alle patiënten hebben baat bij de therapie. Dit proefschrift beschrijft hoe de mate va

  3. Optimizing anti-TNF therapy in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandse, J.F.

    2015-01-01

    Anti-TNF, zoals infliximab en adalimumab, zijn effectief voor de behandeling van chronische ontstekingsziekten van de darm (IBD): de ziekte van Crohn en colitis ulcerosa. Deze middelen zijn echter kostbaar en niet alle patiënten hebben baat bij de therapie. Dit proefschrift beschrijft hoe de mate va

  4. Anti-TNF-Alpha Therapy and Systemic Vasculitis

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    Pierre-André Jarrot

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available TNF-α is a pleiotropic cytokine, which plays a major role in the pathogenesis of numerous autoimmune and/or inflammatory systemic diseases. Systemic vasculitis constitutes a group of rare diseases, characterized by inflammation of the arterial or venous vessel wall, causing stenosis and thrombosis. Treatment of the different type of vasculitis mainly relies on steroids and immunosuppressive drugs. In case of refractory or relapsing diseases, however, a second line of treatment may be required. Anti-TNF-α drugs have been used in this setting during the last 15 years with inconsistent results. We reviewed herein the use of anti-TNFtherapy in different kind of vasculitis and concluded that, except for Behcet’s disease, this therapeutic option has not demonstrated significant improvement in the treatment of vasculitis.

  5. Anti-TNF therapy in Jordan: a focus on severe infections and tuberculosis.

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    Alawneh, Khaldoon M; Ayesh, Mahmoud H; Khassawneh, Basheer Y; Saadeh, Salwa Shihadeh; Smadi, Mahmoud; Bashaireh, Khaldoun

    2014-01-01

    A high rate of infection has been reported in patients receiving treatment with anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF). This study describes the rate of and risk factors for serious infections in patients receiving anti-TNF agents in Jordan. This retrospective observational study was conducted at a large tertiary referral center in the north of Jordan. Between January 2006 and January 2012, 199 patients who received an anti-TNF agent (infliximab, adalimumab, or etanercept) were included. Patients received the anti-TNF treatment for rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, inflammatory bowel disease, or other conditions. A serious infection was defined as any bacterial, viral, or fungal infection that required hospitalization, administration of appropriate intravenous antimicrobial therapy, and temporary withholding of anti-TNF treatment. The mean duration of anti-TNF treatment was 26.2 months. Steroids were used in 29.1% of patients, while 54.8% were given additional immunosuppressant therapy (methotrexate or azathioprine). Only one anti-TNF agent was given in 70.4% of patients, while 29.6% received different anti-TNF agents for the duration of treatment. Serious infections were documented in 39 patients (19.6%), including respiratory tract infections (41%), urinary tract infections (30.8%), and skin infections (20.5%), and extrapulmonary tuberculosis in three patients (7.7%). Exposure to more than one anti-TNF agent was the only factor associated with a significant increase in the rate of infection (relative risk 1.9, 95% confidence interval 1.06-4.0, P=0.03). Serious infections, including tuberculosis, were a common problem in patients receiving anti-TNF agents, and exposure to more than one anti-TNF agent increased the risk of serious infection.

  6. Comparison of combination therapies in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: leflunomide-anti-TNF-alpha versus methotrexate-anti-TNF-alpha.

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    De Stefano, Renato; Frati, Elena; Nargi, Fernando; Baldi, Caterina; Menza, Luana; Hammoud, Mohammed; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2010-05-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of leflunomide (LEF)-anti-TNF-alpha combination therapy to methotrexate (MTX)-anti-TNF-alpha combination therapy in a group of patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We have recruited 120 patients with RA with a high disease activity despite being treated with MTX (15 mg/week) or LEF (20 mg/die) for 3 months, without side effects. In each of these patients, therapy with either MTX or LEF was continued and randomly combined with an anti-TNF-alpha drug: etanercept, infliximab, or adalimumab. Patients were assessed at study entry and at 4, 12, and at 24 weeks. The efficacy endpoints included variations in the DAS28-ESR and the ACR20, ACR50, and ACR70 responses. At each visit, any side-effect was recorded. There were no statistically significant differences in the DAS28 variations and in the ACR responses between the two groups or among the six subgroups. The number of discontinuation due to the appearance of serious side effects was higher, but not statistically significant, in the LEF-anti-TNF-alpha group than in the MTX-anti-TNF-alpha group. Other adverse events that did not necessitate the discontinuation of therapy occurred much more frequently in patients treated with MTX than in those treated with LEF. Anti-TNF-alpha drugs can be used in combination not only with MTX, but also with LEF, with the same probability of achieving significant clinical improvement in RA patients and without a significantly greater risk of serious adverse events. In contrast, it seems that combination therapy with LEF-anti-TNF-alpha is more readily tolerated than combination therapy with MTX-anti-TNF-alpha.

  7. Assessment of adenosine deaminase levels in rheumatoid arthritis patients receiving anti-TNF-alpha therapy.

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    Erer, Burak; Yilmaz, Gulsen; Yilmaz, Fatma Meric; Koklu, Seyfettin

    2009-04-01

    Anti-TNF-alpha agents are increasingly used in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treatment and that is known to increase the risk of tuberculosis (TB) reactivation. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) levels are shown to increase to high levels in TB patients. Our aim is to investigate the serum ADA levels in RA patients being treated with anti-TNF-alpha and to compare the results with the patients on DMARD therapy. The study groups comprised of 56 RA patients (45 female, mean age 49) who were treated either with two or three DMARDs, 32 RA patients with anti-TNF-alpha treatment (26 female, mean age 46) and 20 healthy controls (10 female, mean age 48). All patients fulfilled the 1987 ACR criteria for RA. DAS28 score was calculated for all subjects. When compared to healthy controls, ADA levels were measured statistically higher both in patient groups (P = 0.046, 0.002). ADA levels in anti-TNF-alpha group were similar to conventional therapy (11.3 +/- 2.7, 10.9 +/- 4.01; P = 0.76). PPD was positive in 17 RA patients in the anti-TNF-alpha treatment group (%53). The ADA levels were found to be similar in the anti-TNF-alpha group when compared according to the PPD positivity (positive, 12.4 +/- 3.7; negative, 10.5 +/- 2.1; P = 0.02). No correlation was found between the ADA levels and age, disease duration, ESR, CRP, DAS 28 and HAQ score. In this study, we observed that RA patients at remission taking DMARD or anti-TNF-alpha therapy have similar levels of serum ADA. Although serum ADA levels during TB infection increase much higher, in our study, ADA levels of all RA patients were lower than 15 IU/L. Elevated ADA levels may be a clue for diagnosis of TB in patients who were on anti-TNF-alpha therapy.

  8. Optimization of anti-TNF therapy in patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

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    Strik, A S; Bots, S J A; D'Haens, G; Löwenberg, M

    2016-01-01

    After the introduction of anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) agents, the clinical outcome of patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) has improved significantly. However, use of anti-TNF therapy is complicated by loss of response. In order to maintain remission, adequate serum levels are required. Hence, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is important in order to optimize serum drug levels, especially in patients with loss of response to these agents. Optimization of anti-TNF therapy by applying TDM enables clinicians to regain response to TNF blockers in a significant proportion of patients. It is important to use anti-TNF agents in their most optimal way, since these therapeutic agents are expensive and the medical options after failing anti-TNF therapy are limited. Here, we will discuss how to optimize treatment with anti-TNF agents in IBD patients in order to improve treatment efficacy, prevent anti-drug antibody formation, reduce side effects, discontinue unnecessary treatment and manage costs.

  9. Anti-TNF therapy in Jordan: a focus on severe infections and tuberculosis

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    Alawneh KM

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Khaldoon M Alawneh,1 Mahmoud H Ayesh,1 Basheer Y Khassawneh,1 Salwa Shihadeh Saadeh,1 Mahmoud Smadi,2 Khaldoun Bashaireh31Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, King Abdullah University Hospital, 2College of Science, 3Department of Special Surgery, College of Medicine, King Abdullah University Hospital, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, JordanBackground: A high rate of infection has been reported in patients receiving treatment with anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF. This study describes the rate of and risk factors for serious infections in patients receiving anti-TNF agents in Jordan.Methods: This retrospective observational study was conducted at a large tertiary referral center in the north of Jordan. Between January 2006 and January 2012, 199 patients who received an anti-TNF agent (infliximab, adalimumab, or etanercept were included. Patients received the anti-TNF treatment for rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, inflammatory bowel disease, or other conditions. A serious infection was defined as any bacterial, viral, or fungal infection that required hospitalization, administration of appropriate intravenous antimicrobial therapy, and temporary withholding of anti-TNF treatment.Results: The mean duration of anti-TNF treatment was 26.2 months. Steroids were used in 29.1% of patients, while 54.8% were given additional immunosuppressant therapy (methotrexate or azathioprine. Only one anti-TNF agent was given in 70.4% of patients, while 29.6% received different anti-TNF agents for the duration of treatment. Serious infections were documented in 39 patients (19.6%, including respiratory tract infections (41%, urinary tract infections (30.8%, and skin infections (20.5%, and extrapulmonary tuberculosis in three patients (7.7%. Exposure to more than one anti-TNF agent was the only factor associated with a significant increase in the rate of infection (relative risk 1.9, 95% confidence interval 1.06–4.0, P=0

  10. Reactivation of Tuberculosis in Three Cases of Psoriasis after Initiation of Anti-TNF Therapy

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    Samya Abu Shaikha

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available New biological therapies for disabling diseases such as psoriasis may carry both short- and long-term risks. Tuberculosis (TB reactivation is a frequent complication of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF therapy. We present 3 cases of psoriasis that were treated with different types of anti-TNF and developed TB infection (TBI during therapy. One of the cases was diagnosed as active pulmonary TB and the other 2 cases as latent TBI. All cases received appropriate anti-TB treatment, and the anti-TNF therapy was interrupted and then resumed according to various clinical considerations.

  11. New Onset of Dermatomyositis/Polymyositis during Anti-TNFTherapies: A Systematic Literature Review

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    Alexandra Maria Giovanna Brunasso

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed a systematic search of databases from 1990 to 2013 to identify articles concerning the new onset of dermatomyositis/polymyositis (DM/PM in patients treated with anti-TNFtherapy. We retrieved 13 publications describing 20 patients where the new onset of DM/PM after anti-TNFtherapy was recorded. 17 patients were affected by rheumatoid arthritis (RA, one by Crohn’s disease, one by ankylosing spondilytis, and one by seronegative arthritis. In 91% of the cases antinuclear autoantibodies were detected after the introduction of anti-TNFtherapy. In 6 patients antisynthetase antibodies were detected and other clinical findings as interstitial lung disease (ILD were recorded. Improvement of DM/PM after anti-TNF suspension (with the concomitant use of other immunosuppressors was recorded in 94% of cases. The emergence of DM/PM and antisynthetase syndrome seem to be associated with the use of anti-TNF-α agents, especially in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases (mainly RA with positive autoantibodies before therapy initiation. In particular, physicians should pay attention to patients affected by RA with positive antisynthetase antibodies and/or history of ILD. In those cases, the use of the TNF-α blocking agents may trigger the onset of PM/DM or antisynthetase syndrome or may aggravate/trigger the lung disease.

  12. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy complicating anti TNF α therapy for chronic plaque psoriasis.

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    Ahmed, Zahra; Powell, Robert; Llewelyn, Gareth; Anstey, Alex

    2011-12-01

    A 53-year-old woman with chronic plaque psoriasis treated with adalimumab (antitumour necrosis factor (anti TNF) α therapy) for 10 months presented with an 8 week history of hyperesthesia in a 'glove and stocking' distribution and clumsiness on walking. Nerve conduction studies confirmed the clinical diagnosis of a chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). She was admitted and treated with intravenous immunoglobulin and oral steroids and made an excellent recovery. To our knowledge, this is the first published report of CIDP associated with anti TNF α therapy given to treat psoriasis.

  13. [Anti-TNF-alpha therapy in ulcerative colitis].

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    Lakatos, Péter László; Lakatos, László

    2008-05-18

    The most important factors that determine treatment strategy in ulcerative colitis (UC) are disease extent and severity. Orally-topically administered 5-aminosalicylates (5-ASA) remain the treatment of choice in mild-to-moderate UC. In contrast, the treatment of refractory (to steroids, azathioprine or 5-ASA) and fulminant cases is still demanding. New evidence supports a role for infliximab induction and/or maintenance therapy in these subgroup of patients leading to increased remission and decreased colectomy rates. The aim of this paper is to review the rationale for the use of TNF-alpha inhibitors in the treatment of UC.

  14. [Colonic perforation due to invasive amebic colitis during anti-TNF therapy for spondyloarthritis].

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    Restrepo, Juan Pablo; Molina, María del Pilar

    2014-01-01

    TNF blockade has been successful in the treatment of some rheumatic diseases such as spondyloarthritis. Many infectious complications have been reported with anti-TNF therapy, mainly bacterial, mycobacterial, viral and fungal infections. Entamoeba histolytica is an extracellular protozoan parasite that mainly causes colitis and hepatic abscess; bowel perforation is an uncommon complication with high mortality. TNF is considered the principal mediator of cell immunity against amebiasis. Initially, it is chemotactic to E. histolytica, enhancing its adherence to enterocyte via galactose inhibitable lectin, and then activating macrophages to kill ameba though the release of NO, so that TNF blocking could be harmful, increasing amebic virulence. We describe the case of a 46-year-old woman with spondyloarthritis who presented a colonic perforation due to invasive amebic colitis during anti-TNF use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. How do anti-TNF therapies affect gait function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis?

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    Oda, Ryo; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Tokunaga, Daisaku; Nakamura, Satoru; Taniguchi, Daigo; Kawahito, Yutaka; Seno, Takahiro; Matsui, Tomoyuki; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) agents on gait function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Nine subjects with RA who were being treated with anti-TNF agents, participated in this study. A motion capture system was utilized, and data from the force plate and captured three dimensional motions were analyzed.Gait evaluation was performed before and 5.8 ± 2.6 months after introducing the anti-TNF agent. Stride, gait velocity and joint moments were calculated. In addition, an index of balancing weight of the lower extremities was determined. Stride length averaged 45.8 cm at baseline and 53.1 cm at the time of follow-up, and gait velocity averaged 0.9 m/s at baseline and 1.1 m/s at the time of follow-up. At heal contact, the joint moment of hip extension increased from 0.37 to 0.49, while ankle joint dorsiflexion moment increased from 0.08 to 0.13. During mid-stance, knee joint extension moment decreased from 0.16 to 0.06. At toe-off, hip joint flexion moment increased from 0.60 to 0.80, and ankle joint dorsiflexion moment increased from 0.80 to 1.05. The index of balancing weight of the lower extremities increased from 19.6 to 20.9 N. The induction of anti-TNF therapies improved alterations in shock absorption in the early stance phase, balancing weight of the lower extremities in mid-stance, and increased push-off power in the later stance phase. © 2013 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Pityriasis versicolor during anti-TNF-α monoclonal antibody therapy: therapeutic considerations.

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    Balestri, Riccardo; Rech, Giulia; Piraccini, Bianca Maria; Antonucci, Angela; Ismaili, Alma; Patrizi, Annalisa; Bardazzi, Federico

    2012-09-01

    Anecdotal reports have shown that tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibition may cause unchecked superficial infection with the microorganisms responsible for pityriasis versicolor (PV). We observed several cases of PV, which is frequently resistant to topical therapies, in psoriatic patients undergoing anti-TNF-α monoclonal antibody therapy. To evaluate the incidence and the therapeutic management of PV in this group of individuals, between 1 January and 27 December 2010, we examined 153 psoriatic patients for the hypopigmented/hyperpigmented macular and scaling lesions associated with PV. All patients positive for PV were given topical therapy with miconazole nitrate cream twice daily for 28 days, after which they were re-evaluated. In patients non-responsive to topical therapy, we started systemic therapy with fluconazole, 300 mg week(-1) for 3 weeks. We diagnosed seven cases of PV. At the end of topical treatment, complete healing of lesions was observed in only one patient. In the other six patients, systemic treatment led to complete resolution of the infection. Although the onset of PV during anti-TNFtherapy is seldom reported, it is not likely to be rare, but rather under-reported because of its limited pathological significance. In our opinion, the therapeutic management of this condition deserves greater consideration, as the use of topical treatments alone is largely ineffective compared with systemic treatment.

  17. Arterite de Takayasu: tratamento com anti-TNF em uma casuística brasileira Takayasu arteritis: anti-TNF therapy in a Brazilian setting

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    Guilherme Nunes

    2010-06-01

    outpatient clinic of a Brazilian university hospital. Fifteen patients were included, of which 14 (93.3% were females, with a mean age of 29.6 years at diagnosis. Systemic hypertension (60.0% and abolished upper limb pulses (53.3% were the most common clinical features at the diagnosis. Subclavian and carotid arteries were the most commonly affected vessels. Twelve patients (80.0% did not achieve sustained remission on therapy with corticosteroids alone and received immunosuppressive agents including methotrexate, azathioprine and cyclophosphamide. Surgical intervention was necessary and performed in 53.3% of cases. Three cases (20.0% were refractory to corticosteroid plus diverse immunosuppressive therapy and were treated with anti-TNF agents, all of them with disease remission. In conclusion, a significant proportion of TA cases are refractory to traditional therapy. The use of anti-TNF agents may become a possible therapy for these patients.

  18. Risk of post-operative complications associated with anti-TNF therapy in inflammatory bowel disease

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    Tauseef Ali; Laura Yun; David T Rubin

    2012-01-01

    There have been increasing concerns regarding the safety of perioperative antitumour necrosis factor (antiTNF) α agents. We performed a literature review to evaluate the postoperative complications associated with perioperative antiTNF use in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. A comprehensive review was performed with a literature search utilizing Pub Med, Cochrane, OVID and EMBASE databases according to published guidelines. To date, there are only data for infliximab. There are three published studies which have assessed postoperative complications with perioperative infliximab use in patients with Crohn's disease (CD), four studies in ulcerative colitis (UC) patients, and one study on both CD and UC patients. Two out of the three studies in CD patients showed no increased postoperative complications associated with perioperative infliximab. Two out of four studies in UC patients also did not show an increase in postoperative complications, and the combined study with CD and UC patients did not show an increased risk as well. Study differences in study designs, patient population and definition of their endpoints. There appears to be a risk of postoperative complications associated with TNF therapy in some patients. Based on these data, careful patient selection and prospective data collection should be performed.

  19. Large Vessel Vasculitis Occurring in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patient under Anti-TNF Therapy

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    Valentina Cestelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vasculitis is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by the presence of necrotic inflammatory phenomena and destruction of blood vessels. Vasculitis is classified as primary (idiopathic or secondary to infections, connective tissue diseases and drugs but can also be considered as a paraneoplastic phenomenon. Evidence shows that the increasing use of biological agents results in a growing number of reports of autoimmune diseases induced by these therapies. An inflammatory articular chronic disease such as rheumatoid arthritis may be complicated by extra-articular manifestations, such as cutaneous or systemic vasculitis. Herewith, we describe the case of a great vessels arteritis in a patient affected by rheumatoid arthritis in therapy with an anti-TNF agent (etanercept.

  20. Anti-TNFtherapy reduces endothelial cell activation in non-diabetic ankylosing spondylitis patients.

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    Genre, Fernanda; López-Mejías, Raquel; Miranda-Filloy, José A; Ubilla, Begoña; Mijares, Verónica; Carnero-López, Beatriz; Gómez-Acebo, Inés; Dierssen-Sotos, Trinidad; Remuzgo-Martínez, Sara; Blanco, Ricardo; Pina, Trinitario; González-Juanatey, Carlos; Llorca, Javier; González-Gay, Miguel A

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial dysfunction can be detected by the presence of elevated levels of biomarkers of endothelial cell activation. In this study, we aimed to establish whether correlations of these biomarkers with characteristics of patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) exist. We also studied the effect of anti-TNFtherapy on these biomarkers. Serum sE-selectin, MCP-1 and sVCAM-1 levels were measured by ELISA in 30 non-diabetic AS patients undergoing anti-TNFtherapy, immediately before and after an infusion of infliximab. Correlations of these biomarkers with clinical features, systemic inflammation, metabolic syndrome and other serum and plasma biomarkers of cardiovascular risk were studied. Potential changes in the concentration of these biomarkers following an infliximab infusion were also assessed. sE-selectin showed a positive correlation with CRP (p = 0.02) and with other endothelial cell activation biomarkers such as sVCAM-1 (p = 0.019) and apelin (p = 0.008). sVCAM-1 negatively correlated with BMI (p = 0.018), diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.008) and serum glucose (p = 0.04). sVCAM-1 also showed a positive correlation with VAS spinal pain (p = 0.014) and apelin (p < 0.001). MCP-1 had a negative correlation with LDL cholesterol (p = 0.026) and ESR (p = 0.017). Patients with hip involvement and synovitis and/or enthesitis in other peripheral joints showed higher levels of MCP-1 (p = 0.004 and 0.02, respectively). A single infliximab infusion led to a significant reduction in sE-selectin (p = 0.0015) and sVCAM-1 (p = 0.04). Endothelial dysfunction correlates with inflammation and metabolic syndrome features in patients with AS. A beneficial effect of the anti-TNF-α blockade on endothelial dysfunction, manifested by a reduction in levels of biomarkers of endothelial cell activation, was observed.

  1. The relationship between body weight and inflammation: Lesson from anti-TNF-α antibody therapy.

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    Peluso, Ilaria; Palmery, Maura

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with many pathological conditions. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α) is one of the key mediators of inflammation involved in the obesity-related insulin resistance development. We aim to review the human evidence useful to clarify the relationship between inflammation and body weight, with particular reference to TNF-α. Genetic polymorphisms and epigenetic factors, such as diet, could affect TNF-α activity. TNF-α is associated with obesity, but also with anorexia and cachexia. Despite the role of TNF-α in obesity-related diseases, anti-TNF-α antibody therapy is associated with an increase in adiposity. In conclusion the reviewed results suggest that inflammation is more likely a consequence rather than a cause of obesity.

  2. Report of the ECCO pathogenesis workshop on anti-TNF therapy failures in inflammatory bowel diseases: definitions, frequency and pharmacological aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allez, Matthieu; Karmiris, Konstantinos; Louis, Edouard

    2010-01-01

    The first ECCO pathogenesis workshop focused on anti-TNF therapy failures in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). The overall objective was to better understand and explore primary non response and loss of response to anti-TNF agents in IBD. The outcome of this workshop is presented into two parts......, including mechanisms of action of anti-TNF agents, and discuss hypothesis regarding their failures and phenomenon of paradoxical inflammation, including the potential role of TNF independent inflammatory pathways........ This first section addresses definitions, frequency and pharmacological aspects of anti-TNF therapy failure, including pharmacokinetics of anti-TNF monoclonal antibodies and immune and non-immune mediated clearance of anti-TNF mAbs. The second section concerns the biological roles of TNF and TNF antagonists...

  3. Report of the ECCO pathogenesis workshop on anti-TNF therapy failures in inflammatory bowel diseases: definitions, frequency and pharmacological aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allez, Matthieu; Karmiris, Konstantinos; Louis, Edouard;

    2010-01-01

    The first ECCO pathogenesis workshop focused on anti-TNF therapy failures in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). The overall objective was to better understand and explore primary non response and loss of response to anti-TNF agents in IBD. The outcome of this workshop is presented into two parts...

  4. Spondylodiscitis (Andersson lesion in psoriatic spondyloarthritis: a rare event successfully treated with an anti-TNF therapy.

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    Vincenzo Bruzzese

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Spondylodiscitis (Andersson lesion is an infrequent and late complication of advanced ankilosing arthritis. Scanty data on the efficacy of anti-TNF therapy for these lesions are available. To our knowledge, only few cases of spondylodiscitis occurring in patients with psoriatic arthritis were reported in literature. We describe the case of a patient with psoriatic arthritis who early developed Andersson lesions successfully treated with infliximab plus methotrexate therapy.

  5. The Anti-TNFTherapy in the Rheumatoid Arthritis A Terapia Anti-TNF-α na Artrite Reumatóide

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    Lilian Resende Faleiro

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, systemic autoimmune disease of unknown etiology that involves predominantly synovial articulations, which can lead to deformity and destruction. With the progression of the disease, patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis develop inability to perform activities of daily living both as a professional, generating a significant economic impact for the patient and to society. Although the exact cause of rheumatoid arthritis remains unknown, studies conducted over the past two decades has enabled greater understanding of the pathogenesis of this disease. This knowledge has allowed the development of new therapies used to treat severe forms of the disease. The main goal of treatment is to achieve remission, however, when this can not be expected to prevent joint damage and loss of function and even reduce pain. The latest strategies for the treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis involve the early diagnosis and aggressive control of inflammation. The recognition of pro-inflammatory cytokines expressed more as tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α and interleukin (IL 1 and IL6 enabled developing new therapies directed against these cytokines targets. TNF-α is a proinflammatory cytokine that plays a key role in immune response, defense against microorganisms and the inflammatory process. Biological agents that inhibit TNF-α are considered effective in reducing activity and in the retardation of structural joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis, especially in forms refractory to conventional treatments. Currently, they are available in Brazil, three anti-TNF-α: infliximab, etanercept and adalimumab. These drugs are relatively safe for Rheumatoid Arthritis, but may, however, present serious infectious complications such as reactivation of latent tuberculosis.The high cost of these drugs, their use in hospital and the risk to opportunistic infections remain the limiting factors for its widespread use in the treatment of Rheumatoid

  6. Development of psoriasis in IBD patients under TNF-antagonist therapy is associated neither with anti-TNF-antagonist antibodies nor trough levels.

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    Protic, Marijana; Schoepfer, Alain; Yawalkar, Nikhil; Vavricka, Stephan; Seibold, Frank

    2016-12-01

    The cause of anti-TNF-induced psoriasis is still unknown. We aimed to evaluate if the appearance of psoriasis under anti-TNF therapy is associated with anti-TNF antibody levels and TNF-antagonist trough levels. In this case-control study we identified 23 patients (21 with Crohn's disease [CD], two with ulcerative colitis [UC]) who developed psoriasis under infliximab (IFX, n = 20), adalimumab (ADA, n = 2), and certolizumab pegol (CZP, n= 1) and compared them regarding the anti-TNF-antagonist antibody levels with 85 IBD patients (72 with CD, 13 with UC) on anti-TNF therapy without psoriasis. Median disease duration was not different between the two groups (7 years in the group with psoriasis under TNF-antagonists vs. 10 years in the control group, p = 0.072). No patient from the psoriasis group had antibodies against TNF-antagonists compared to 10.6% in the control group (p = 0.103). No difference was found in IFX trough levels in the group of patients with psoriasis compared to the control group (2.6 μg/mL [IQR 0.9-5.5] vs. 3.4 μg/mL [IQR 1.4-8.1], p = 0.573). TNF-antagonist therapy could be continued in 91.3% of patients with TNF-antagonist related psoriasis and most patients responded to topical therapies. Anti-TNF-induced psoriasis seems to be independent of anti-TNF antibodies and trough levels. Interruption of Anti-TNF therapy is rarely necessary.

  7. Mechanism of Action of Anti-TNF Therapy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

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    Levin, Alon D; Wildenberg, Manon E; van den Brink, Gijs R

    2016-08-01

    Several anti-tumour necrosis factor [TNF] blocking strategies have been evaluated in patients with Crohn's disease. Compounds that have been tested included the full monoclonal IgG1 antibodies infliximab and adalimumab, the pegylated anti-TNF F[ab']2 fragment certolizumab, an IgG4 anti-TNF CDP571 with reduced affinity for the Fc receptor, the soluble TNF receptor I onercept, and the TNF receptor II-Fc fusion protein etanercept. The endpoints of these studies suggest that not all methods of blocking TNF are equal. Here we will review the differences in the clinical, biochemical, and endoscopic endpoints of the major clinical studies. Collectively the data suggest that only IgG1 monoclonal antibodies have the ability to induce complete clinical, biochemical, and endoscopic remission. We discuss the potential multiple modes of action that may contribute to the response to full IgG1 anti-TNFs, focusing on the rapid induction of lamina propria T cell apoptosis and Fc receptor-dependent induction of M2-type wound-healing macrophages. We discuss how novel insights into the mechanism of action of anti-TNFs in Crohn's disease may contribute to the development of novel anti-TNFs with improved efficacy.

  8. Incidence, Clinical Characteristics, and Management of Psoriasis Induced by Anti-TNF Therapy in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Nationwide Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Iván; Pérez-Jeldres, Tamara; Iborra, Marisa; Algaba, Alicia; Monfort, David; Calvet, Xavier; Chaparro, María; Mañosa, Miriam; Hinojosa, Esther; Minguez, Miguel; Ortiz de Zarate, Jone; Márquez, Lucía; Prieto, Vanessa; García-Sánchez, Valle; Guardiola, Jordi; Rodriguez, G Esther; Martín-Arranz, María Dolores; García-Tercero, Iván; Sicilia, Beatriz; Masedo, Ángeles; Lorente, Rufo; Rivero, Montserrat; Fernández-Salazar, Luis; Gutiérrez, Ana; Van Domselaar, Manuel; López-SanRomán, Antonio; Ber, Yolanda; García-Sepulcre, Marifé; Ramos, Laura; Bermejo, Fernando; Gisbert, Javier P

    2016-04-01

    Psoriasis induced by anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) therapy has been described as a paradoxical side effect. To determine the incidence, clinical characteristics, and management of psoriasis induced by anti-TNF therapy in a large nationwide cohort of inflammatory bowel disease patients. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease were identified from the Spanish prospectively maintained Estudio Nacional en Enfermedad Inflamatoria Intestinal sobre Determinantes genéticos y Ambientales registry of Grupo Español de Trabajo en Enfermedad de Croh y Colitis Ulcerosa. Patients who developed psoriasis by anti-TNF drugs were the cases, whereas patients treated with anti-TNFs without psoriasis were controls. Cox regression analysis was performed to identify predictive factors. Anti-TNF-induced psoriasis was reported in 125 of 7415 patients treated with anti-TNFs (1.7%; 95% CI, 1.4-2). The incidence rate of psoriasis is 0.5% (95% CI, 0.4-0.6) per patient-year. In the multivariate analysis, the female sex (HR 1.9; 95% CI, 1.3-2.9) and being a smoker/former smoker (HR 2.1; 95% CI, 1.4-3.3) were associated with an increased risk of psoriasis. The age at start of anti-TNF therapy, type of inflammatory bowel disease, Montreal Classification, and first anti-TNF drug used were not associated with the risk of psoriasis. Topical steroids were the most frequent treatment (70%), achieving clinical response in 78% of patients. Patients switching to another anti-TNF agent resulted in 60% presenting recurrence of psoriasis. In 45 patients (37%), the anti-TNF therapy had to be definitely withdrawn. The incidence rate of psoriasis induced by anti-TNF therapy is higher in women and in smokers/former smokers. In most patients, skin lesions were controlled with topical steroids. More than half of patients switching to another anti-TNF agent had recurrence of psoriasis. In most patients, the anti-TNF therapy could be maintained.

  9. Successful Treatment of Primary Cutaneous Mucormycosis Complicating Anti-TNF Therapy with a Combination of Surgical Debridement and Oral Posaconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Jose F; Yakoub, Danny; Cho-Vega, Jeong Hee

    2015-10-01

    Lipid formulations of amphotericin B remain the first-line antifungal therapy for invasive mucormycosis. Posaconazole is an alternative for salvage therapy, but its use as primary therapy is not recommended due to the paucity of clinical data. Here we describe the case of a 57-year-old diabetic woman receiving etanercept and prednisone for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis who developed primary cutaneous mucormycosis after a minor gardening injury. Infection was successfully treated with aggressive surgical debridement followed by a 6-week course of the new delayed-release tablet formulation of posaconazole and temporary withholding of anti-TNF treatment. Primary antifungal therapy with posaconazole can be considered in selected cases of cutaneous mucormycosis.

  10. Anti-TNF-α biotherapies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtzen, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the rationale behind recommending immunopharmacological guidance of long-term therapies with genetically engineered anti-TNF-α immunoglobulin constructs. Arguments why therapeutic decision-making should not rely on clinical outcome alone are presented. Central to this is th......This article discusses the rationale behind recommending immunopharmacological guidance of long-term therapies with genetically engineered anti-TNF-α immunoglobulin constructs. Arguments why therapeutic decision-making should not rely on clinical outcome alone are presented. Central....... Large-scale immunopharmacological knowledge of how patients 'handle' TNF-α biopharmaceuticals would also help industry develop more effective and safer TNF-α inhibitors....

  11. Improvement in symptoms and signs in the forefoot of patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with anti-TNF therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewbury Keith

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inhibition of tumour necrosis factor (TNF is an effective way of reducing synovitis and preventing joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA, yet very little is known about its specific effect on foot pain and disability. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether anti-TNF therapy alters the presence of forefoot pathology and/or reduces foot pain and disability. Methods Consecutive RA patients starting anti-TNF therapy (infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab were assessed for presence of synovial hypertrophy and synovitis in the 2nd and 5th metatarso-phalangeal (MTP joints and plantar forefoot bursal hypertrophy before and 12 weeks after therapy. Tender MTP joints and swollen bursae were established clinically by an experienced podiatrist and ultrasound (US images were acquired and interpreted by a radiologist. Assessment of patient reported disease impact on the foot was performed using the Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Index (MFPDI. Results 31 patients (24 female, 7 male with RA (12 seronegative, 19 seropositive completed the study: mean age 59.6 (SD 10.1 years, disease duration 11.1 (SD 10.5 years, and previous number of Disease Modifying Anti Rheumatic Drugs 3.0 (1.6. Significant differences after therapy were found for Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (t = 4.014, p Presence of MTP joint synovial hypertrophy on US was noted in 67.5% of joints at baseline and 54.8% of joints at twelve weeks. Presence of plantar forefoot bursal hypertrophy on US was noted in 83.3% of feet at baseline and 75% at twelve weeks. Although there was a trend for reduction in observed presence of person specific forefoot pathology, when the frequencies were analysed (McNemar this was not significant. Conclusions Significant improvements were seen in patient reported foot pain and disability 12 weeks after commencing TNF inhibition in RA, but this may not be enough time to detect changes in forefoot pathology.

  12. Systemic and localized infection by Candida species in patients with rheumatic diseases receiving anti-TNF therapy

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    Nadia E. Aikawa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of systemic and localized infection by Candida species and its possible association with demographic, clinical and laboratory manifestations and therapy in patients with rheumatic diseases taking TNF blockers. Methods: Consecutive patients with rheumatic diseases receiving anti-TNF agents were included. The following risk factors up to four weeks prior to the study were analyzed: use of antibiotics, immunosuppressant drugs, hospitalization and invasive procedures. All subjects were evaluated for clinical complaints; specific blood cultures were obtained for fungi and blood samples were collected for Candida spp. detection by polymerase chain reaction. Results: 194 patients [67 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, 47 with ankylosing spondylitis (AS, 36 with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, 28 with psoriatic arthritis and 16 with other conditions] were included. The average age of patients was 42 ± 16 years, with 68 (35% male and mean disease duration of 15 ± 10 years. Sixty-four (33% patients were receiving adalimumab, 59 (30% etanercept and 71 (36% infliximab. Eighty-one percent of patients were concomitantly taking immunosuppressant drugs. At the time of the study, only one (0.5% patient had localized fungal infection (vaginal candidiasis. None of the patients included had systemic candidiasis with positive blood cultures for fungi or PCR positive for Candida spp. in peripheral blood sample. Conclusions: This was the first study to assess the prevalence of invasive and localized fungal disease by Candida in a significant number of patients with rheumatic diseases on anti-TNF therapy, and demonstrated low risk of candidiasis, despite the high prevalence of immunosuppressive drug use.

  13. Impact of 24 months of anti-TNF therapy versus methotrexate on body weight in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfriso, Paolo; Caso, Francesco; Filardo, Giuseppe Sebastiano; Botsios, Costantino; Costa, Luisa; Scarpa, Raffaele; Todesco, Silvano; Spinella, Paolo; Oliviero, Francesca; Punzi, Leonardo

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the impact of anti-TNFtherapy on the body weight of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients following 24 months of treatment. Data were collected on all RA patients included in the Veneto Region's Registry of Biological Therapy from January 2007 to July 2012. Inclusion criteria were: start of monotherapy with adalimumab, etanercept, or methotrexate, no previous use of biologic therapy, and at least 24 months of treatment. At baseline, 12, and 24 months, each patient completed a questionnaire about physical activity, smoking, alcohol, and food habits. One hundred and thirty-one RA patients in monotherapy with etanercept (n = 47), adalimumab (n = 44), and methotrexate (n = 40) were enrolled for this study. After 24 months of therapy, there was an increase of weight only in patients treated with anti-TNF-α. Patients on etanercept and adalimumab therapy showed a risk to gain weight six times greater compared to those on methotrexate therapy. The results of present study show that the use of anti-TNF-α in RA patients can be associated to a significant increase of body weight. This increase is not shown in patients under treatment with methotrexate. A more careful evaluation of weight changes needs to be considered in RA patients under anti-TNF-α treatment.

  14. Healthcare costs of inflammatory bowel disease have shifted from hospitalisation and surgery towards anti-TNF alpha therapy : results from the COIN study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Valk, Mirthe Emilie; Mangen, Marie-Josee J.; Leenders, Max; Dijkstra, Gerard; van Bodegraven, Ad A.; Fidder, Herma H.; de Jong, Dirk J.; Pierik, Marieke; van der Woude, C. Janneke; Romberg-Camps, Marielle J. L.; Clemens, Cees H. M.; Jansen, Jeroen M.; Mahmmod, Nofel; van de Meeberg, Paul C.; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E.; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Bolwerk, Clemens J. M.; Vermeijden, J. Reinoud; Siersema, Peter D.; van Oijen, Martijn G. H.; Oldenburg, Bas

    2014-01-01

    Objective The introduction of anti tumour necrosis factor- (anti-TNF) therapy might impact healthcare expenditures, but there are limited data regarding the costs of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) following the introduction of these drugs. We aimed to assess the healthcare costs and productivity

  15. IGF-1 and ADMA Levels Are Inversely Correlated in Nondiabetic Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients Undergoing Anti-TNF-Alpha Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Genre

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Like rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis (AS is also an inflammatory disease associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and the presence of metabolic syndrome (MeS features. AS patients often display osteoporosis as well as new bone formation. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 is a protein involved in both inflammation and bone metabolism. In the present study we assessed whether disease activity, systemic inflammation, MeS features, adipokines, and biomarkers of endothelial activation were associated with IGF-1 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3 levels in a series of 30 nondiabetic AS patients without CV disease undergoing TNF-α antagonist-infliximab therapy. All determinations were made in the fasting state, immediately before an infliximab infusion. Although no association of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels with angiopoietin-2 or osteopontin was found, an inverse correlation between IGF-1 levels and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA, an endogenous endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor that impairs nitric oxide production and secretion promoting endothelial dysfunction, was found (r=-0.397; P=0.04. However, no significant association was found between IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels and disease activity, systemic inflammation, metabolic syndrome features, or adipokines. In conclusion, in nondiabetic patients with AS undergoing periodic anti-TNFtherapy, IGF-1 and ADMA are inversely correlated.

  16. NIR and MR imaging supported hydrogel based delivery system for anti-TNF alpha probiotic therapy of IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjic, Jelena M.; Berlec, Ales; Bagia, Christina; Liu, Lu S.; Jeric, Irenej; Gach, Michael; Janjic, Bratislav M.; Strukelj, Borut

    2016-03-01

    Current treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is largely symptomatic and consists of anti-inflammatory agents, immune-suppressives or antibiotics, whereby local luminal action is preferred to minimize systemic side-effects. Recently, anti-TNFα therapy has shown considerable success and is now being routinely used. Here we present a novel approach of using perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoemulsion containing hydrogels (nanoemulgels) as imaging supported delivery systems for anti-TNF alpha probiotic delivery in IBD. To further facilitate image-guided therapy a food-grade lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis capable of TNFα-binding was engineered to incorporate infrared fluorescent protein (IRFP). This modified bacteria was then incorporated into novel PFC nanoemulgels. The nanoemulgels presented here are designed to deliver locally anti-TNFα probiotic in the lower colon and rectum and provide dual imaging signature of gel delivery (MRI) across the rectum and lower colon and bacteria release (NIR). NIR imaging data in vitro demonstrates high IRFP expressing and TNFα-binding bacteria loading in the hydrogel and complete release in 3 hours. Stability tests indicate that gels remain stable for at least 14 days showing no significant change in droplet size, zeta potential and pH. Flow cytometry analyses demonstrate the NIRF expressing bacteria L. lactis binds TNFα in vitro upon release from the gels. Magnetic resonance and near-infrared imaging in vitro demonstrates homogeneity of hydrogels and the imaging capacity of the overall formulation.

  17. Variation at FCGR2A and functionally related genes is associated with the response to anti-TNF therapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Avila-Pedretti

    Full Text Available Anti-TNF therapies have been highly efficacious in the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, but 25-30% of patients do not show a significant clinical response. There is increasing evidence that genetic variation at the Fc receptor FCGR2A is associated with the response to anti-TNF therapy. We aimed to validate this genetic association in a patient cohort from the Spanish population, and also to identify new genes functionally related to FCGR2A that are also associated with anti-TNF response.A total of 348 RA patients treated with an anti-TNF therapy were included and genotyped for FCGR2A polymorphism rs1081274. Response to therapy was determined at 12 weeks, and was tested for association globally and independently for each anti-TNF drug (infliximab, etanercept and adalimumab. Using gene expression profiles from macrophages obtained from synovial fluid of RA patients, we searched for genes highly correlated with FCGR2A expression. Tag SNPs were selected from each candidate gene and tested for association with the response to therapy.We found a significant association between FCGR2A and the response to adalimumab (P=0.022. Analyzing the subset of anti-CCP positive RA patients (78%, we also found a significant association between FCGR2A and the response to infliximab (P=0.035. DHX32 and RGS12 were the most consistently correlated genes with FCGR2A expression in RA synovial fluid macrophages (P<0.001. We found a significant association between the genetic variation at DHX32 (rs12356233, corrected P=0.019 and a nominally significant association between RGS12 and the response to adalimumab (rs4690093, uncorrected P=0.040. In the anti-CCP positive group of patients, we also found a nominally significant association between RGS12 and the response to infliximab (rs2857859, uncorrected P=0.042.In the present study we have validated the FCGR2A association in an independent population, and we have identified new genes associated with the response to

  18. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy Following Anti-TNFTherapy With Infliximab for Crohn's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concepcion, Orestes; Schlachterman, Alexander; Glover, Sarah; Forsmark, Christopher Y.

    2016-01-01

    We present a 29-year-old male with Crohn's disease who developed chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) related to infliximab therapy. He developed lower extremity weakness and dysesthesia 3 weeks after a fourth infliximab dose. Laboratory examination revealed an elevated cerebrospinal fluid protein without pleocytosis. The patient initially responded to plasmapheresis therapy with marked symptomatic improvement, but relapsed and was refractory to subsequent treatments with plasmaphereisis, intravenous immunoglobulin, and glucocorticoids. While a causal relationship between infliximab and CIDP cannot be proven, clinicians should monitor Crohn's disease patients who are receiving TNF-α antagonists for neurologic symptoms suggestive of demyelinating disease. PMID:27144200

  19. Endemic fungal infections in inflammatory bowel disease associated with anti-TNF antibody therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordonez, Miguel E; Farraye, Francis A; Di Palma, Jack A

    2013-10-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease are susceptible to complications from pharmacologic treatment of their disease. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors are being used increasingly in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease and can be associated with adverse events, including common infections, and rarely the development of serious life-threatening opportunistic infections. TNF-α inhibitors have the ability to prevent an effective patient granulomatous response, and this may be associated with an increased risk of developing mycobacterial and certain fungal infections, including histoplasmosis, blastomycosis, and coccidioidomycosis, endemic in several parts of the United States. The concern for invasive fungal infection was realized during clinical trials and further demonstrated after the marketing of TNF-α inhibitors. Because of this awareness, the Food and Drug Administration developed an adverse event-reporting system to capture cases of infections associated with the use of TNF-α inhibitors. These opportunistic fungi have a great degree of regional variability, and it has been very difficult to quantify the incidence of infection in patients treated with TNF-α inhibitors. Currently, there are no formal guidelines regarding the use of TNF-α inhibitors and these fungal infections. Considering that gastroenterologists have embraced the use TNF-α inhibitors as a valuable armamentarium in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease, they must be aware of therapy-related infectious complications, including appropriate diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventive strategies. In this article, we explore the association of these fungal entities in relation to the TNF-α inhibitor therapy by considering information provided in the gastroenterology, infectious diseases, rheumatology, and transplant literature. Finally, we provide some recommendations on diagnosis and treatment.

  20. Anti-TNF therapy for juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semeraro F

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Francesco Semeraro,1 Barbara Arcidiacono,2 Giuseppe Nascimbeni,1 Martina Angi,1 Barbara Parolini,2 Ciro Costagliola31Eye Clinic, Department of Neurological Sciences and Vision, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy; 2Department of Ophthalmology, S. Anna Hospital, Brescia, Italy; 3Eye Clinic, Department of Health Sciences, University of Molise, Campobasso, ItalyAbstract: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis is the most common type of uveitis in childhood and one of the main causes of visual impairment in children. The introduction of biological treatment has widened the range of therapeutic options for children with uveitis refractory to standard nonbiologic immunosuppressants. Data from clinical trials suggest that both adalimumab and infliximab have demonstrated effectiveness and safety in open-label studies, although no large, randomized, controlled trials have been reported so far. The role of etanercept in treating juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis is not yet well defined. In our experience, anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy has been shown to be more effective than steroids and/or methotrexate in treating uveitis. Up to now, tumor necrosis factor blocking compounds have been reserved for the treatment of the most severe cases of refractory uveitis, and larger prospective clinical trials are required in order to better assess the safety of these new compounds.Keywords: adalimumab, etanercept, infliximab

  1. The tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 1B polymorphisms predict response to anti-TNF therapy in patients with autoimmune disease: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenjuan; Xu, Hui; Wang, Xiuxiu; Gu, Junying; Xiong, Huizi; Shi, Yuling

    2015-09-01

    Numerous published data on the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 1B (TNFRSF1B) gene polymorphisms are shown to be associated with response or non-response to anti-TNF therapy in autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriasis and Crohn's Disease (CD). The aim of this study is to investigate whether the TNFRSF1B rs1061622 T/G or TNFRSF1A A/G rs767455 polymorphisms can predict the response to anti-TNF-based therapy in patients with autoimmune diseases. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies on the association between TNFRSF1B rs1061622 T/G polymorphism or TNFRSF1A A/G rs767455 polymorphism and non-responsiveness to anti-TNF therapy in autoimmune diseases. A total of 8 studies involving 929 subjects for TNFRSF1B rs1061622 and 564 subjects for TNFRSF1A rs767455 were finally considered. These studies consisted of seven studies on the TNFRSF1B polymorphism and four studies on the TNFRSF1A polymorphism. Meta-analysis showed significant association between the TNFRSF1B rs1061622 allele and non-responders to anti-TNF therapy [T/G odds ratio (OR) 0.72, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.57-0.93, p=0.01]. Stratification by disease type indicated an association between the TNFRSF1B rs1061622 allele and non-responders to TNF antagonist in RA (T/G OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.48-0.99, pautoimmune diseases. The genotyping of this polymorphism could help to optimize the treatment by identifying patients with a likely poor response to biological drugs.

  2. Work disability in non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis patients before and after start of anti-TNF therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallman, Johan K; Jöud, Anna; Olofsson, Tor

    2017-01-01

    Society criteria for axial spondyloarthritis and starting anti-TNF treatment during 2004-11, were retrieved from the observational South Swedish Arthritis Treatment Group study. Patient information was linked to Swedish Social Insurance Agency data on sick leave and disability pension from 1 year before...

  3. Impact of surveillance of hepatitis b and hepatitis c in patients with inflammatory bowel disease under anti-TNF therapies: multicenter prospective observational study (REPENTINA 3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loras, C; Gisbert, J P; Saro, M C; Piqueras, M; Sánchez-Montes, C; Barrio, J; Ordás, I; Montserrat, A; Ferreiro, R; Zabana, Y; Chaparro, M; Fernández-Bañares, F; Esteve, M

    2014-11-01

    Assess IBD patients starting anti-TNF for the impact of preventive measures in HBV and/or HCV, and the predictive response factors to HBV vaccination. Multicenter prospective study including 389 IBD patients. Four interventions were established: I-1) anti-HBs vaccination with double doses at 0-1-2months, and revaccination if titres anti-HBs10-100IU/L and effective vaccination anti-HBs >100IU/L); I-2) anti-HBs >100IU/L (previous effective vaccination): monitoring levels; I-3) anti-HBc and/or HCV+: analysis every two months; I-4) HBsAg+: start anti-virals. I-1 and I-2) For first vaccination, effective vaccination and seroprotection were obtained in 26.4% and 43.5%, and for revaccination 31.3% and 44.4%, respectively. Predictive factors of effective vaccination were age ≤30years (OR=2.2) and being vaccinated simultaneously with anti-TNF (OR=5.2) instead of late vaccination, whereas age ≤30years (OR=2.6) and anti-TNF monotherapy (OR=2.4) were predictive for seroprotection. 80.8% of patients previously vaccinated maintained titres at 29months follow-up. The only factor related to maintaining titres was previous vaccination versus achieving effective vaccination during anti-TNF (HR=2.49); I-3 and I-4) HBV-DNA + without reactivation was detected in 7% of 29 anti-HBc. No reactivation was found in the remaining HCV (n=5) or HBsAg (n=4) patients. 1) Response to vaccination/revaccination is low in patients with anti-TNF. Young patients vaccinated at the beginning of anti-TNF and receiving it as a monotheraphy showed better response. 2) Long-lasting effective vaccination is greatest in patients previously vaccinated. 3) Following-up the established surveillance and/or preventive anti-viral therapy seems to be safe in HBV and HCV patients. Copyright © 2014 European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis and Low Disease Activity because of Anti-TNF-Alpha Therapy Have Higher TRAIL Levels Than Controls: A Potential Compensatory Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Genre

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. TRAIL is a potential biomarker of cardiovascular (CV disease. Ankylosing spondylitis (AS is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with metabolic syndrome (MeS and accelerated atherosclerosis. We assessed whether disease activity, systemic inflammation, and MeS features were associated with circulating TRAIL levels in AS patients undergoing TNF-α antagonist infliximab therapy and if infliximab infusion modified TRAIL levels. Methods. We measured TRAIL serum levels in 30 nondiabetic AS patients without CV disease undergoing anti-TNFtherapy, immediately before and after an infliximab infusion, and in 48 matched controls. Correlations of TRAIL levels with disease activity, systemic inflammation and MeS features, adipokines, and biomarkers of endothelial activation were evaluated. Changes in TRAIL levels following anti-TNF-α infusion were analyzed. Results. TRAIL levels were higher in AS patients than controls. TRAIL levels displayed an inverse correlation with total and LDL cholesterol. We observed an inverse correlation with QUICKI and a marginal association with HOMA-IR. We also found an inverse correlation with resistin and a marginal association with apelin and OPN. Anti-TNF-α infusion did not change TRAIL levels after 120′. Conclusion. Elevated TRAIL levels in AS patients may be the result of a compensatory mechanism to reduce CV risk in these patients.

  5. Diffuse sclerosing osteomyelitis (DSO) of the mandible in SAPHO syndrome: a novel approach with anti-TNF therapy. Systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marí, Antonio; Morla, Arnaud; Melero, Mireia; Schiavone, Rocio; Rodríguez, Jesus

    2014-12-01

    Diffuse sclerosing osteomyelitis of the mandible is now considered a local manifestation of SAPHO syndrome. This rare condition is thought to be of auto-inflammatory origin. The myriad of treatments shown in the literature, are basically empirical and reflect its unknown origin. We present a clinical case of refractory DSO treated with an anti-TNF drug (etanercept) with complete clinical remission. We advise against radical surgery and an interdisciplinary approach is recommended. A systematic literature review was also conducted.

  6. In vitro response pattern of monocytes after tmTNF reverse signaling predicts response to anti-TNF therapy in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Meusch, Undine; Krasselt, Marco; Rossol, Manuela; Baerwald, Christoph; Klingner, Maria; Wagner, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment with TNF inhibitors is very efficient in the majority of the patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but it does not achieve a sufficient treatment response in 40–50% of the cases. Goal of the study was to assess functional ex vivo-tests of RA monocytes as prognostic parameters of the subsequent treatment response. Methods 20 anti-TNF naïve RA patients were enrolled in a prospective, open-label trial, and Etanercept therapy was initiated. Prior to treatment, reverse sign...

  7. Redo Ileal pouch-anal anastomosis combined with anti-TNF-α maintenance therapy for Crohn's disease with pelvic fistula: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Toshimitsu; Okita, Yoshiki; Fujikawa, Hiroyuki; Ohi, Masaki; Tanaka, Koji; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Uchida, Keiichi; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2014-10-01

    Pouch failure has been reported to occur after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for Crohn's disease. We report two cases of patients with Crohn's disease, who underwent redo ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (redo-IPAA) combined with anti-TNF-α maintenance therapy, with good functional results. The first patient, a man with presumed ulcerative colitis, suffered pelvic fistula recurrence and anastomotic dehiscence. He underwent redo-IPAA, at which time longitudinal ulcers were found. Infliximab was started 4 days postoperatively and continued. The second patient, a woman treated for ulcerative colitis, underwent laparoscopic IPAA 8 years later. After the development of a pelvic fistula, twisted mesentery of the ileal pouch was found intraoperatively and Crohn's disease was diagnosed. Adalimumab therapy resulted in fistula closure. Redo-IPAA was performed to normalize the twisted mesentery of the ileal pouch. No complications have been observed in either patient, both of whom have experienced good functional results after closure of the covering stomas.

  8. Influence of Anti-TNF and Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs Therapy on Pulmonary Forced Vital Capacity Associated to Ankylosing Spondylitis: A 2-Year Follow-Up Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Daniel Rocha-Muñoz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the effect of anti-TNF agents plus synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs versus DMARDs alone for ankylosing spondylitis (AS with reduced pulmonary function vital capacity (FVC%. Methods. In an observational study, we included AS who had FVC% <80% at baseline. Twenty patients were taking DMARDs and 16 received anti-TNF + DMARDs. Outcome measures: changes in FVC%, BASDAI, BASFI, 6-minute walk test (6MWT, Borg scale after 6MWT, and St. George’s Respiratory Questionnaire at 24 months. Results. Both DMARDs and anti-TNF + DMARDs groups had similar baseline values in FVC%. Significant improvement was achieved with anti-TNF + DMARDs in FVC%, at 24 months, when compared to DMARDs alone (P=0.04. Similarly, patients in anti-TNF + DMARDs group had greater improvement in BASDAI, BASFI, Borg scale, and 6MWT when compared to DMARDs alone. After 2 years of follow-up, 14/16 (87.5% in the anti-TNF + DMARDs group achieved the primary outcome: FVC% ≥80%, compared with 11/20 (55% in the DMARDs group (P=0.04. Conclusions. Patients with anti-TNF + DMARDs had a greater improvement in FVC% and cardiopulmonary scales at 24 months compared with DMARDs. This preliminary study supports the fact that anti-TNF agents may offer additional benefits compared to DMARDs in patients with AS who have reduced FVC%.

  9. Influence of Anti-TNF and Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs Therapy on Pulmonary Forced Vital Capacity Associated to Ankylosing Spondylitis: A 2-Year Follow-Up Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha-Muñoz, Alberto Daniel; Brambila-Tapia, Aniel Jessica Leticia; Zavala-Cerna, María Guadalupe; Vásquez-Jiménez, José Clemente; De la Cerda-Trujillo, Liliana Faviola; Vázquez-Del Mercado, Mónica; Rodriguez-Jimenez, Norma Alejandra; Díaz-Rizo, Valeria; Díaz-González, Viviana; Cardona-Muñoz, Ernesto German; Dávalos-Rodríguez, Ingrid Patricia; Salazar-Paramo, Mario; Gamez-Nava, Jorge Ivan; Nava-Zavala, Arnulfo Hernan; Gonzalez-Lopez, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effect of anti-TNF agents plus synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) versus DMARDs alone for ankylosing spondylitis (AS) with reduced pulmonary function vital capacity (FVC%). Methods. In an observational study, we included AS who had FVC% <80% at baseline. Twenty patients were taking DMARDs and 16 received anti-TNF + DMARDs. Outcome measures: changes in FVC%, BASDAI, BASFI, 6-minute walk test (6MWT), Borg scale after 6MWT, and St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire at 24 months. Results. Both DMARDs and anti-TNF + DMARDs groups had similar baseline values in FVC%. Significant improvement was achieved with anti-TNF + DMARDs in FVC%, at 24 months, when compared to DMARDs alone (P = 0.04). Similarly, patients in anti-TNF + DMARDs group had greater improvement in BASDAI, BASFI, Borg scale, and 6MWT when compared to DMARDs alone. After 2 years of follow-up, 14/16 (87.5%) in the anti-TNF + DMARDs group achieved the primary outcome: FVC% ≥80%, compared with 11/20 (55%) in the DMARDs group (P = 0.04). Conclusions. Patients with anti-TNF + DMARDs had a greater improvement in FVC% and cardiopulmonary scales at 24 months compared with DMARDs. This preliminary study supports the fact that anti-TNF agents may offer additional benefits compared to DMARDs in patients with AS who have reduced FVC%. PMID:26078986

  10. Predictors of response to anti-TNF therapy according to ACR and EULAR criteria in patients with established RA: results from the South Swedish Arthritis Treatment Group Register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, L E; Kapetanovic, M C; Gülfe, A; Söderlin, M; Saxne, T; Geborek, P

    2008-04-01

    To identify factors predicting response to first TNF blocking treatment course in patients with established RA with a special focus on gender differences. Patients with active RA initiating their first treatment course of TNF-blocking therapy were enrolled. The study period was March 1999 through September 2006. The prospective protocol included information on demographics, clinical characteristics of patients and response measures. Fulfilment of ACR 50-70% improvement and European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) good response or remission [28-joint disease activity score (DAS28) EULAR remission, EULAR good response, ACR50 response and ACR70 response with odds ratios (ORs) 1.97, 2.13, 2.10 and 1.75, respectively. Concurrent treatment with other DMARDs was also significantly associated with EULAR remission, EULAR good response and ACR50 response (OR: 1.96, 2.24 and 1.94, respectively). Likewise, low HAQ at baseline consistently predicted good clinical outcome. Disease activity at baseline was directly associated with favourable response when measured by ACR50 and ACR70 (OR: 1.59 and 1.60, respectively), whereas DAS28 score at baseline was inversely associated with EULAR remission (OR: 0.78). In this observational study of patients with established RA, gender did not predict response to anti-TNF therapy, whereas treatment with concomitant DMARDs, especially MTX and low disability were associated with good response. Choice of outcome measures may influence the predictive value of baseline features.

  11. The use of anti-TNF therapy for ankylosing spondylitis in everyday rheumatology practice and the relationship to disease activity, work disability and diagnostic delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, C; Quinn, K; Harney, S; Ryan, J G

    2014-12-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is characterised by insidious onset lower back pain. Poor symptom recognition results in delays in diagnosis of up to 11 years. Despite the widespread use of anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNFα) therapy, work disability remains a challenging problem in AS. A retrospective review of AS patients attending our physiotherapy service was carried out. Data regarding patient demographics, delay in diagnosis, treatment and disease activity were recorded. Ninety-two patients were identified of which 80 % were male. Just over 60 % of patients were on treatment with a TNF inhibitor and the average delay in diagnosis was 6 years. Clinically relevant changes in disease activity after 3 months of anti-TNFα therapy were demonstrated with a reduction in Bath AS Metrology Index, Bath AS Functional Index and Bath AS Disease Activity Index of 1, 1.99 and 2.39, respectively. In patients under the age of 65 years only 55.4 % of patients were employed. There was no relationship identified between diagnostic delay, employment status and treatment with an anti-TNF agent. Delays in diagnosis of AS remain unacceptably high; however, delays of 6 years compare favourably to reported data. Despite this and the appropriate use of anti-TNFα agents, we continue to see high rates of unemployment in this patient group which can impact both on the person and society and bears further consideration.

  12. Non-systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis outcome after reaching clinical remission with anti-TNFtherapy: a clinical practice observational study of patients who discontinued treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Estíbaliz; Torrente-Segarra, Vicenç; Bou, Rosa; Ricart, Silvia; González, María Isabel; Sánchez, Judith; Calzada, Joan; Antón, Jordi

    2014-08-01

    TNF-alpha-blocking agents (anti-TNF) used in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are well established; however, time to withdraw is unclear. Neither prolonged nor tapering treatment seems to influence risk of relapse. Our aim was to assess relapse percentage after anti-TNF withdrawal of our non-systemic JIA patients after reaching clinical remission. A retrospective review of our non-systemic JIA patients in whom anti-TNF had been withdrawn due to inactive disease was achieved, between December 2000 and November 2011. We analyzed percentages of relapse according to JIA categories and antinuclear antibodies (ANA) positivity. n = 18 patients were included. Eighty-two percentage of patients relapsed after treatment withdrawal, and mean time to relapse was 3.04 months (SD 2.03). The percentage of relapse after anti-TNF discontinuation in the main JIA category was 88 % of negative rheumatoid factor polyarticular JIA and 80 % of persistent oligoarticular JIA. We did not find significant statistical differences according to ANA positivity (9 of 14 were ANA positive), and mean time to relapse (days) was 85.0 (SD 69.4) for ANA-positive versus 102.4 (SD 47.7) for ANA-negative patients (p = NS). Relapse percentage following anti-TNF discontinuation was high (82 %) and occurred within the first 3 months after it. No relationship regarding JIA subtype and ANA positivity was found.

  13. Comparative Efficacy and Acceptability of Anti-TNF-Alpha Therapy in Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Mixed-Treatments Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yehua Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα antagonists, namely, golimumab, adalimumab, infliximab, etanercept and certolizumab have been prescribed to alleviate and treat ankylosing spondylitis (AS. However, the lack of comparative evidence does not enable us to make constructive recommendations particularly for AS patient populations. Methods: Eligible controlled trials regarding the above 5 anti-TNFα therapies were searched electronically through PubMed, Embase and Cochrane until April 1, 2015. Odds ratios (ORs were estimated and compared for efficacy (ASAS20, ASAS40, ASAS5/6 responses and ASAS partial remission and acceptability (serious adverse effects (SAE among the anti-TNFα reagents. Results: Totally, 25 trials with 2989 participants were incorporated in this mixed treatment comparison. All the 5 TNFα blockers achieved better ASAS20, ASAS40, ASAS5/6 and ASAS-PR responses than the placebo. Furthermore, there was no significant distinction existed among inter-drug comparisons, except that unfavorable effects induced by certolizumab seemed to be less severe than those by etanercept (OR = 0.22, 95% CI: 0.05-0.93. Apart from that, etanercept was estimated to arrive at the most favorable ASAS20 response (90.6% and SAE (83.6%, while infliximab seemed to accomplish the best ASAS40 (83.6% and ASAS-PR responses (77.3%. In addition, adalimumab was estimated to rank the highest ASAS5/6 response (75.0%. Conclusions: Etanercept, infliximab and adalimumab might be prioritized among the commonly recognized 5 anti-TNFα therapies specific for AS patients, though existing evidence did not suffice to confirm significant superiority among the above 5 anti-TNFα reagent.

  14. Anti-TNF-Alpha-Adalimumab Therapy Is Associated with Persistent Improvement of Endothelial Function without Progression of Carotid Intima-Media Wall Thickness in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Refractory to Conventional Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Gonzalez-Juanatey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine whether treatment with the anti-TNF-alpha blocker adalimumab yields persistent improvement of endothelial function and prevents from morphological progression of subclinical atherosclerosis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA refractory to conventional therapy, a series of 34 consecutive RA patients, attending hospital outpatient clinics and who were switched from disease modifying antirheumatic drug therapy to anti-TNF-alpha-adalimumab treatment because of severe disease, were assessed by ultrasonography techniques before the onset of adalimumab therapy (at day 0 and then at day 14 and at month 12. Values of flow-mediated endothelium-dependent vasodilatation at day 14 and at month 12 were significantly higher (mean ± standard deviation (SD: 6.1±3.9%; median: 5.7% at day 14, and mean ± SD: 7.4±2.8%; median: 6.9% at month 12 than those obtained at day 0 (mean: 4.5±4.0%; median: 3.6%; P=0.03 and P<0.001, resp.. Endothelium-independent vasodilatation results did not significantly change compared with those obtained at day 0. No significant differences were observed when carotid artery intima-media wall thickness values obtained at month 12 (mean ± SD: 0.69±0.21 mm were compared with those found at day 0 (0.65±0.16 mm (P=0.3. In conclusion, anti-TNF-alpha-adalimumab therapy has beneficial effects on the development of the subclinical atherosclerosis disease in RA.

  15. Coexisting Crohn’s Disease and Takayasu’s Arteritis in Two Patients Treated with Anti-TNFTherapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ratuapli

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Crohn’s disease (CD and Takayasu’s arteritis (TA are inflammatory granulomatous autoimmune disorders. Simultaneous occurrence of CD and TA in the same individual is rare. We report two cases treated with biologic agents. Case 1: A 16-year-old male presented with abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting. CT angiogram showed thickening of the terminal ileum, wall thickening and narrowing of multiple large and medium arteries including aorta and left common carotid. Colonoscopy with biopsy of the stenotic ileocecal valve confirmed CD. Resected carotid artery pathology was consistent with TA. Treatment was initially begun with prednisone, then methotrexate was started followed by infliximab. Due to side effects, methotrexate was switched to azathioprine. He remained asymptomatic. Case 2: A 38-year-old male with well-characterized Crohn’s ileocolitis for 15 years, who had been treated with prednisone, mesalamine, sulfasalazine, and azathioprine presented with chest, upper back and abdominal pain. CT angiogram showed vasculitis of large and medium arteries, with stenosis of the right renal artery, and wall thickening of the sigmoid colon. He was diagnosed with TA. He underwent treatment with infliximab and adalumimab on different occasions, which were later discontinued due to fever, bacteremia and complications from sepsis. He remained on prednisone and azathioprine. In these two patients with both CD and TA the diagnoses were confirmed by imaging and pathologic findings. Both patients developed vascular complications. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitor therapy was effective in one patient but discontinued in the other due to infection. Further research into the association of CD and TA may provide clues to their etiologies and guide effective interventions.

  16. Non-adherence to anti-TNF therapy is associated with illness perceptions and clinical outcomes in outpatients with inflammatory bowel disease : results from a prospective multicentre study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Have, Mike van der; Oldenburg, Bas; Kaptein, Ad A; Jansen, Jeroen M; Scheffer, Robert C H; van Tuyl, Bas A; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; Pierik, Marieke; Siersema, Peter D; van Oijen, Martijn G H; Fidder, Herma H

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Non-adherence to anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a serious problem. In this study, we assessed risk factors for non-adherence and examined the association between adherence to anti-TNF agents and loss of response (LOR)

  17. Non-adherence to Anti-TNF Therapy is Associated with Illness Perceptions and Clinical Outcomes in Outpatients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Results from a Prospective Multicentre Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Have, Mike; Oldenburg, Bas; Kaptein, Ad A; Jansen, Jeroen M; Scheffer, Robert C H; van Tuyl, Bas A; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; Pierik, Marieke; Siersema, Peter D; van Oijen, Martijn G H; Fidder, Herma H

    2016-05-01

    Non-adherence to anti-tumour necrosis factor [TNF] agents in patients with inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] is a serious problem. In this study, we assessed risk factors for non-adherence and examined the association between adherence to anti-TNF agents and loss of response [LOR]. In this multicentre, 12-month observational study, outpatients with IBD were included. Demographic and clinical characteristics were recorded. Adherence was measured with the Modified Morisky Adherence Scale-8 [MMAS-8] and 12-month pharmacy refills [medication possession ratio, MPR]. Risk factors included demographic and clinical characteristics, medication beliefs, and illness perceptions. Cox regression analysis was performed to determine the association between MPR and LOR to anti-TNF, IBD-related surgery or hospitalisation, dose intensification, or discontinuation of anti-TNF. In total, 128 patients were included [67 infliximab, 61 adalimumab], mean age 37 ( ± standard deviation [SD] 14) years, 71 [56%] female. Median disease duration was 8 (interquartile range [IQR] 4-14) years. Clinical disease activity was present in 41/128 [32%] patients, 36/127 [28%] patients had an MMAS-8 illness duration [OR 0.60, 95% CI 0.38-0.96]. Adherence is linearly and negatively [OR 0.14, 95% CI 0.03-0.63] associated with LOR. Non-adherence to anti-TNF agents is strongly associated with LOR to anti-TNF agents, adalimumab use, and illness perceptions. The latter may provide an important target for interventions aimed at improving adherence and health outcomes. Copyright © 2016 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Off-Label Uses of Anti-TNF Therapy in Three Frequent Disorders: Behçet's Disease, Sarcoidosis, and Noninfectious Uveitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Cano, Daniel; Callejas-Rubio, José Luis; Ruiz-Villaverde, Ricardo; Ríos-Fernández, Raquel; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto

    2013-01-01

    Tumoral necrosis factor α plays a central role in both the inflammatory response and that of the immune system. Thus, its blockade with the so-called anti-TNF agents (infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, and golimumab) has turned into the most important tool in the management of a variety of disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthropatties, inflammatory bowel disease, and psoriasis. Nonetheless, theoretically, some other autoimmune disorders may benefit from these agents. Our aim is to review these off-label uses of anti-TNF blockers in three common conditions: Behçet's disease, sarcoidosis, and noninfectious uveitis. Due to the insufficient number of adequate clinical trials and consequently to their lower prevalence compared to other immune disorders, this review is mainly based on case reports and case series. PMID:23983404

  19. Off-Label Uses of Anti-TNF Therapy in Three Frequent Disorders: Behçet’s Disease, Sarcoidosis, and Noninfectious Uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Sánchez-Cano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumoral necrosis factor α plays a central role in both the inflammatory response and that of the immune system. Thus, its blockade with the so-called anti-TNF agents (infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, and golimumab has turned into the most important tool in the management of a variety of disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthropatties, inflammatory bowel disease, and psoriasis. Nonetheless, theoretically, some other autoimmune disorders may benefit from these agents. Our aim is to review these off-label uses of anti-TNF blockers in three common conditions: Behçet’s disease, sarcoidosis, and noninfectious uveitis. Due to the insufficient number of adequate clinical trials and consequently to their lower prevalence compared to other immune disorders, this review is mainly based on case reports and case series.

  20. TNF autovaccination induces self anti-TNF antibodies and inhibits metastasis in a murine melanoma model

    OpenAIRE

    Waterston, AM; Salway, F; Andreakos, E; Butler, DM; FELDMANN M.; Coombes, RC

    2004-01-01

    TNF is a proinflammatory cytokine involved in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases, but also in metastasis in certain types of cancer. In terms of therapy, TNF is targeted by anti-TNF neutralising monoclonal antibodies or soluble TNF receptors. Recently, a novel strategy based on the generation of self anti-TNF antibodies (TNF autovaccination) has been developed. We have previously shown that TNF autovaccination successfully generates high anti-TNF antibody titres, blocks TNF and...

  1. The impact of DMARD and anti-TNF therapy on functional characterization of short-term T-cell activation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis--a follow-up study.

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    Balázs Szalay

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by a systemic dysfunction of T-cells. In this study we tested the impact of DMARD and anti-TNF agents on short-term activation characteristics of T-cells. We enrolled 12 patients with newly diagnosed RA (naïve RA who were treated with methothrexate (MTX and glucocorticsteroid (GCS and 22 patients with established RA non responding to conventional DMARD therapy who were treated with different anti-TNF agents. Nine healthy volunteers served as controls. Blood samples were taken at baseline, then at 4th and 8th week of therapy. The characteristics of several intracellular activation processes during short-term activation of T-cells including cytoplasmic Ca(2+ level, mitochondrial Ca(2+ level, reactive oxygen species (ROS and nitric oxide (NO generation were determined by a novel flow-cytometry technique. At baseline, the tested processes were comparable to controls in naïve RA. During GCS therapy, cytoplasmic Ca(2+ level and ROS generation decreased. After the addition of MTX to GCS cytoplasmic Ca(2+ level became comparable to controls, while ROS generation decreased further. In DMARD non responders, cytoplasmic Ca(2+ level was higher than controls at baseline. The cytoplasmic Ca(2+ level became comparable to controls and ROS generation decreased during each of the three anti-TNF-α agent therapies. Mitochondrial Ca(2+ level and NO generation were unaltered in all of the patient groups. These results indicate that intracellular machinery is affected in T-cells of RA patients. This may alter the behavior of T-cells during activation. Different therapeutic approaches may modulate the abnormal T-cell functions.

  2. Pharmacogenetics of anti-TNF treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenen, M.J.J.; Toonen, E.J.M.; Scheffer, H.; Radstake, T.R.D.J.; Barrera, P.; Franke, B.

    2007-01-01

    TNF-blocking strategies are widely used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Three anti-TNF agents are registered for use in RA: etanercept, infliximab and adalimumab. Although anti-TNF therapy is very effective in controlling disease activity and slowing down radiological damage, prolonge

  3. Anti-TNF treatment in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiler, Janina; Buch, Maya; McDermott, Michael F

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the most common autoimmune disease, is characterized by persistent synovitis and systemic inflammation. Genetic predisposition as well as autoantibodies and environmental factors, such as smoking, are associated with an increased risk of RA. Traditionally RA has been treated with disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) but in the last 15 years or so the introduction of biological response modifiers has revolutionized the treatment of RA. Among these anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents were the first to be successfully used in treating RA. The goal in treating RA is to induce remission or very low disease activity; remission is now accepted as the ultimate therapeutic goal by adoption of a "treat to target" strategy to achieve tight disease control. Therefore early diagnosis, as well as immediate intervention, are of the utmost importance. This review of the role of TNF in RA pathogenesis describes the mechanisms of action of currently used anti-TNF agents and the adverse events and safety of these drugs. Guidance on the use of anti-TNFs during pregnancy and prior to surgical procedures is also discussed. The intense efforts currently being made to identify biomarkers of response to anti-TNF therapy and recent progress in defining genetic predictors of response using genome- wide association studies (GWAS) are covered. However, so far, none of these studies have been translated into clinical application. The development of biosimilars or follow-on biologicals is also discussed and the first reported study of a biosimilar, involving a multicenter study of an etanercept biosimilar, Etanar, is described.

  4. Guidelines for screening, prophylaxis and critical information prior to initiating anti-TNF-alpha treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Inge Nordgaard; Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Belard, Erika

    2012-01-01

    Ag-positive patients at the start of anti-TNF-alpha treatment. Before anti-TNF-alpha therapy, vaccination with 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine is recommended, and HBV vaccination may be considered in seronegative patients. Annual vaccination against seasonal influenza is recommended. Human papilloma virus vaccination...... should be administered in accordance with the guidelines of the National Board of Health of Denmark. In patients without a prior VZV infection, VZV vaccination may be considered. Information for patients: Anti-TNF-alpha treatment results in a generally increased risk of infection and latent tuberculosis......These national clinical guidelines outlining the screening, prophylaxis and critical information required prior to initiating anti-TNF-alpha treatment have been approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology. Anti-TNF-alpha therapy is widely used in gastroenterology (for inflammatory bowel...

  5. EFFECT OF THERAPY WITH ANTI-TNF α DRUGS AND DMARD ON DISEASE ACTIVITY AND HEALTH RELATED QUALITY OF LIFE AMONG WOMEN WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopciuch, Dorota; Paczkowska, Anna; Leszczynsk, Piotr; Michalak, Michal; Nowakowskai, Elzbieta

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the response to 16 and 52 weeks of treatment with adalimumab and etanercept and its effect on disease activity and quality of life in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Patients were selected from 2155 medical cards of patients of Connective Tissue Health Centre (Poznań, Poland) who were refractory to conventional treatment with disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. To assess the disease activity, Disease Activity Score (DAS28) was used and the measurement of quality of life was evaluated with the Polish version of the WHOQoL-Bref questionnaire. To assess the disability, we have used Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI) and to assess the patients' pain caused by RA, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) was used. The results of the study show a significant decrease in inflammatory activity of the disease and, consequently, an improvement in quality of life after anti-TNF α treatment. Results obtained with TNF-blockers after 52 weeks of treatment in RA objectively show the efficacy of these drugs and also the patients' perception of the effect on their quality of life. Study results also indicate changes in disability caused by RA and patients' pain due to disease between 16 and 52 weeks of treatment.

  6. Guidelines for screening, prophylaxis and critical information prior to initiating anti-TNF-alpha treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordgaard-Lassen, Inge; Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Belard, Erika

    2012-01-01

    a history of previous malignancies (cases of malignant disease within 5 years of anti-TNF-alpha treatment should be carefully considered). The physical examination should include lung/heart auscultation and lymph node examination, and the paraclinical investigations should include chest X-rays......These national clinical guidelines outlining the screening, prophylaxis and critical information required prior to initiating anti-TNF-alpha treatment have been approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology. Anti-TNF-alpha therapy is widely used in gastroenterology (for inflammatory bowel...... disease), rheumatology (for rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and spondyloarthropathies) and dermatology (for psoriasis). With this background, the Danish Society for Gastroenterology established a group of experts to assess evidence for actions recommended before treatment with anti-TNF-alpha...

  7. Immunogenicity of Anti-TNF-α Biotherapies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtzen, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Specific inhibition of the cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF), has revolutionized the treatment of patients with several autoimmune diseases, and genetically engineered anti-TNF antibody constructs now constitute a heavy medicinal expenditure in many countries. Unfortunately, up to 30......% of patients do not respond and about 50% of those who do loose response with time. Furthermore, safety may be compromised by immunogenicity with the induction of anti-drug-antibodies (ADA). Assessment of drug pharmacokinetics and ADA is increasingly recognized as a requirement for safe and rational use...... of protein drugs. The use of therapeutic strategies based on anti-TNF drug levels and ADA rather than dose-escalation has also proven to be cost-effective, as this allows individualized patient-tailored strategies rather than the current universal approach to loss of response. The objective of the present...

  8. The effects of anti-TNF treatment on cell proliferation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yli-Karjanmaa, Minna Liisa Kyllikki; Clausen, Bettina Hjelm; Novrup, Hans Gram;

    treated topically with XPro1595, saline or etanercept for 3 consequtive days. Infarct volumetric analysis and behavioral outcome are currently being analysed. Results and conclusion: Preliminary studies showed that Etanercept- and Xpro1595-treated mice displayed altered learning pattern on the Barnes maze....... After two weeks of anti-TNF therapy there was a significant decrease in the number of BrdU+ cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus in the XPro1595-treated group. Ongoing analysis will reveal whether Xpro1595 also decreased infarct volume after experimental stroke....

  9. Anti-TNF-Alpha-Adalimumab Therapy Had Time Lag of Improvement in Synovial Hypertrophy Compared to Rapid Response in Power Doppler Synovial Vascularity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Chou Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The quantification of synovitis is of great significance for follow-up in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. This study aimed to validate the use of power Doppler ultrasonography (PDUS for evaluating synovial vascularity and synovial hypertrophy for synovitis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with adalimumab. Materials and Methods. The synovial disease activity and vascularity of RA on both wrists (radio-carpal joint were assessed using GS and PDUS to derive the composite US scores based on abnormal counts and severity. The relationship between each measure was determined. Results. The 71 patients who received adalimumab therapy had significantly decreased DAS28, ESR, and CRP. After one month, PD score decreased and then remained low for 12 months. Synovial hypertrophy did not change until 3–6 months after, when it started to improve (p=0.017. By multivariate analysis, sex, age, BMI, and DAS28 did not lead to any difference between synovial hypertrophy and PDUS changes (p=0.498. Discussion. Composite US markers of synovial hypertrophy correlate significantly to the DAS28 score and ESR/CRP in adult RA. The time needed for synovial hypertrophy to decrease may be up to 3–6 months after adalimumab therapy. Switching to biological therapy before 3–6 months is inappropriate and ineffective.

  10. Liver Injury Secondary to Anti-TNF-Alpha Therapy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Case Series and Review of the Literature

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    Ravish Parekh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Biologic therapy to inhibit tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α is an effective, safe treatment for patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. All TNF-α inhibitors have been associated with liver toxicity, but many of these cases have been reported in patients receiving therapy for rheumatologic disease. Herein we report the first single-center case series of TNF-α antagonist related liver injury in patients with IBD. Methods. A retrospective case series was performed at the Henry Ford Inflammatory Bowel Diseases Center. IRB approval was obtained. Results. 2 patients were treated with infliximab, whereas the 3rd patient was treated with adalimumab for IBD. All 3 patients had negative viral markers, normal autoimmune serologies, and normal biliary imaging studies. Liver biopsy was performed in all 3 patients, and evidence of portal inflammation was seen. Liver enzymes normalized after discontinuation of therapy in all patients, and no long term effects have been observed. One patient was successfully transitioned from infliximab to adalimumab without relapse of either IBD or liver injury. Conclusion. Liver injury secondary to TNF-α antagonist is an underrecognized, important clinical entity with potentially serious consequences. The mechanism of drug-induced injury is idiosyncratic. Larger cohort studies are needed to establish risk factors and injury patterns related to hepatotoxicity in these patients.

  11. [Effectiveness of anti-TNF alpha antibodies in treatment of fistulizing Crohn's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozpondek, Piotr; Zwolińska-Wcisło, Małgorzata; Przybylska, Magdalena; Mach, Tomasz

    2011-01-01

    About 35% of patients with Crohn's disease develop fistulae. Treatment of those changes is a complicated clinical problem. Anti-TNF alpha antibodies are currently the most effective therapy of fistulizing Crohn's disease. Aim of the study is to evaluate results of anti-TNF alpha treatment in patients with fistulizing Crohn's disease. We evaluated results of anti-TNF alpha treatment (both with adalimumab n=10 and infliximab n=19) in 29 patients with fistulizing Crohn's disease treated in years 2008 - 2011 in Gastroenterology and Hepatology Clinic of University Hospital in Krakow. Closure of over 50% of fistulas was achieved by 78,94% patients after induction therapy with infliximab and 50% with adalimumab. Long term remission, evaluated after 52 weeks of treatment, was observed in 46,15% patients treated with infliximab. Best results were observed in perianal fistulas treatment - remission was achieved in 88.2% of patients. Effectiveness of enterocutaneus fistalas therapy was lower, and their healing was observed in 28.57% of patients. We observed no correlation between duration of Crohn's disease, duration of fistulas history or previously used treatment and results of anti-TNF alpha treatment. Anti-TNF alpha treatment has high effectiveness both short and long term in fistulizing Crohn's disease. Tolerance of treatment is very good. We lack clinical data about treatment other fistulas than perianal, but we suspect that effectiveness of anti-TNF alpha in this cases is lower. It is indicated to treat patients with fistulizing Crohn's disease with anti-TNF alpha, because it gives them chance for long remission and improvement of quality of life.

  12. Individualised therapy is more cost-effective than dose intensification in patients with Crohn's disease who lose response to anti-TNF treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenholdt, Casper; Brynskov, Jørn; Thomsen, Ole Østergaard

    2014-01-01

    for therapeutic failure. DESIGN: Randomised, controlled, single-blind, multicentre study. 69 patients with secondary IFX failure were randomised to IFX dose intensification (5 mg/kg every 4 weeks) (n=36) or interventions based on serum IFX and IFX antibody levels using the proposed algorithm (n=33). Predefined co......OBJECTIVE: Although the reasons for secondary loss of response to infliximab (IFX) maintenance therapy in Crohn's disease vary, dose intensification is usually recommended. This study investigated the cost-effectiveness of interventions defined by an algorithm designed to identify specific reasons......-primary end points at week 12 were proportion of patients responding (Crohn's Disease Activity Index (CDAI) decrease ≥ 70, or ≥ 50% reduction in active fistulas) and accumulated costs related to treatment of Crohn's disease, expressed as mean cost per patient, based on the Danish National Patient Registry...

  13. Preventive and therapeutic anti-TNFtherapy with pentoxifylline decreases arthritis and the associated periodontal co-morbidity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz-Junior, Celso M; Bessoni, Rafaela L C; Costa, Vivian V; Souza, Danielle G; Teixeira, Mauro M; Silva, Tarcília A

    2013-09-17

    The association between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontal disease (PD) has long been studied and some reports suggest that treating RA may improve the associated PD, and vice versa. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of an anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α therapy with pentoxifylline (PTX) in an experimental model of RA-associated PD. Male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to chronic antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) and daily treated with PTX (50mg/kg, i.p.) using preventive (Pre-PTX) or therapeutic (The-PTX) strategies. Fourteen days after the antigen challenge, mice were euthanized and knee joints, maxillae and serum were collected for microscopic and/or immunoenzymatic analysis. AIA triggered significant leukocyte recruitment to the synovial cavity, tissue damage and proteoglycan loss in the knee joint. Pre-PTX and The-PTX regimens decreased these signs of joint inflammation. The increased levels of TNF-α and IL-17 in periarticular tissues of AIA mice were also reduced by both PTX treatments. Serum levels of C-reactive protein, which were augmented after AIA, were reduced by the PTX regimens. Concomitantly to AIA, mice presented alveolar bone loss, and recruitment of osteoclasts and neutrophils to periodontal tissues. Pre-PTX and The-PTX prevented and treated these signs of PD. PTX treatment also decreased TNF-α and increased IL-10 expression in the maxillae of AIA mice, although it did not affect the expression of IFN-γ and IL-17. The current study shows the anti-inflammatory and bone protective effects of preventive and therapeutic PTX treatments, which decreased the joint damage triggered by AIA and the associated periodontal co-morbidity. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ultrasound Doppler measurements predict success of treatment with anti-TNF-α drug in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Karen; Christensen, Robin; Torp-Pedersen, Søren;

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the predictive ability of core outcomes applied in RA trials, including ultrasound (US) Doppler (USD) measurements differentiating patients who remain on anti-TNF-a therapy following 1 year....

  15. Guidelines for screening, prophylaxis and critical information prior to initiating anti-TNF-alpha treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Inge Nordgaard; Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Belard, Erika

    2012-01-01

    These national clinical guidelines outlining the screening, prophylaxis and critical information required prior to initiating anti-TNF-alpha treatment have been approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology. Anti-TNF-alpha therapy is widely used in gastroenterology (for inflammatory bowel...... disease), rheumatology (for rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and spondyloarthropathies) and dermatology (for psoriasis). With this background, the Danish Society for Gastroenterology established a group of experts to assess evidence for actions recommended before treatment with anti...... a history of previous malignancies (cases of malignant disease within 5 years of anti-TNF-alpha treatment should be carefully considered). The physical examination should include lung/heart auscultation and lymph node examination, and the paraclinical investigations should include chest X...

  16. Guidelines for screening, prophylaxis and critical information prior to initiating anti-TNF-alpha treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordgaard-Lassen, Inge; Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Belard, Erika

    2012-01-01

    Ag-positive patients at the start of anti-TNF-alpha treatment. Before anti-TNF-alpha therapy, vaccination with 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine is recommended, and HBV vaccination may be considered in seronegative patients. Annual vaccination against seasonal influenza is recommended. Human papilloma virus vaccination......-TNF-alpha agents. Screening should take place for both active tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis. Screening must evaluate the risk of hepatitis B exposure/infection and that of other viral infections such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and varicella zoster virus (VZV). The assessment should include...

  17. Synovial features of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis in clinical and ultrasound remission differ under anti-TNF therapy: a clue to interpret different chances of relapse after clinical remission?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alivernini, Stefano; Tolusso, Barbara; Petricca, Luca; Bui, Laura; Di Sante, Gabriele; Peluso, Giusy; Benvenuto, Roberta; Fedele, Anna Laura; Federico, Franco; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Gremese, Elisa

    2017-07-01

    To define the synovial characteristics of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in clinical and ultrasound remission achieved by combination therapy with methotrexate (MTX) and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blockers. Patients with RA in remission (n=25) (disease activity score (DAS)<1.6 for at least 6 months), patients with RA in low disease activity (LDA) (n=10) (1.6anti-TNF (adalimumab 40 mg or etanercept 50 mg) with power Doppler (PDUS)-negative synovial hypertrophy underwent synovial tissue biopsy. Patients with RA with high/moderate disease naïve to treatment (n=50) were included as a comparison group. Immunostaining for cluster designation (CD)68, CD21, CD20, CD3, CD31 and collagen was performed. PDUS-negative patients with RA in remission showed lower histological scores for synovial CD68(+), CD20(+), CD3(+) cells and CD31(+) vessels and collagen deposition (p<0.05 for both lining and sublining) compared with PDUS-positive patients with RA with high/moderate disease. In addition, there was no significant difference in terms of lining and sublining CD68(+), CD20(+), CD3(+), CD31(+) cells and collagen comparing PDUS-negative patients with RA in remission and in LDA, respectively. On the contrary, PDUS-negative patients with PsA in remission showed higher histological scores for sublining CD68(+) (p=0.02) and CD3(+) cells (p=0.04) as well as CD31(+) vessels (p<0.001) than PDUS-negative patients with RA in remission. PDUS-negative patients with RA in remission have comparable synovial histological features than PDUS-negative patients with RA in LDA. However, patients with PsA in remission are characterised by a higher degree of residual synovial inflammation than patients with RA in remission, despite PDUS negativity under TNF inhibition. Published by the BMJ

  18. Measurement of anti-TNF agents and anti-drug antibodies serum levels in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Iván; Chaparro, María; Bermejo, Fernando; Gisbert, Javier P

    2014-01-01

    Despite its undoubted benefit in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, anti-TNF therapy has some limitations including the lack of primary response and the loss of response to treatment in some patients. An empirical approach to these problems is frequently used based on clinical outcome. The measurement of anti-TNF drug serum levels and anti-drug antibodies (ADAb) levels has been proposed for improving the management of anti-TNF drugs. Although their role in routine clinical practice has not been clearly defined, current data support their relationship with clinical outcomes and suggest their clinical utility primarily in patients with loss of response to anti-TNF agents. The presence of pre-existing ADAb before starting the anti-TNF therapy has recently been described. Transient ADAb, non-neutralizing ADAb and some cut-offs points have been proposed, extending the knowledge about this topic. A standardized and widely available test with cut-off points for each anti-TNF agent and the definition of the most appropriate actions to be taken given the serum concentration of the drugs and ADAb are needed before recommending their routine use.

  19. Potential Impact of Diet on Treatment Effect from Anti-TNF Drugs in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Hansen, Axel Kornerup; Heitmann, Berit Lilienthal

    2017-03-15

    We wanted to investigate the current knowledge on the impact of diet on anti-TNF response in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), to identify dietary factors that warrant further investigations in relation to anti-TNF treatment response, and, finally, to discuss potential strategies for such investigations. PubMed was searched using specified search terms. One small prospective study on diet and anti-TNF treatment in 56 patients with CD found similar remission rates after 56 weeks among 32 patients with good compliance that received concomitant enteral nutrition and 24 with poor compliance that had no dietary restrictions (78% versus 67%, p = 0.51). A meta-analysis of 295 patients found higher odds of achieving clinical remission and remaining in clinical remission among patients on combination therapy with specialised enteral nutrition and Infliximab (IFX) compared with IFX monotherapy (OR 2.73; 95% CI: 1.73-4.31, p TNF treatment response for clinical use is scarce. Here we propose a mechanism by which Western style diet high in meat and low in fibre may promote colonic inflammation and potentially impact treatment response to anti-TNF drugs. Further studies using hypothesis-driven and data-driven strategies in prospective observational, animal and interventional studies are warranted.

  20. Both anti-TNF and CTLA4 Ig treatments attenuate the disease severity of staphylococcal dermatitis in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Manli; Wang, Wanzhong; Fei, Ying; Josefsson, Elisabet; Ali, Abukar

    2017-01-01

    Background RA patients being treated with biologics are known to have an increased risk of infections. We recently demonstrated that both CTLA4 Ig and anti-TNF treatment aggravate systemic Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) infection in mice, but with distinct clinical manifestations. However, the effects of CTLA4 Ig and anti-TNF treatments on a local S. aureus infection (e.g., skin infection) might differ from their effects on a systemic infection. Aims The aim of this study was to examine the differential effects of anti-TNF versus CTLA4 Ig treatment on S. aureus skin infections in mice. Method Abatacept (CTLA4 Ig), etanercept (anti-TNF treatment) or PBS was given to NMRI mice subcutaneously inoculated with S. aureus strain SH1000. The clinical signs of dermatitis, along with histopathological changes due to skin infection, were compared between the groups. Results Both CTLA4 Ig and anti-TNF treatment resulted in less severe skin infections and smaller post-infectious hyperpigmentation compared with controls. Consistent with the clinical signs of dermatitis, smaller lesion size, more epithelial hyperplasia and more granulation were found in skin biopsies from mice receiving anti-TNF compared with PBS controls. However, both CTLA4 Ig and anti-TNF therapy tended to prolong the healing time, although this finding was not statistically significant. Serum MCP-1 levels were elevated in the anti-TNF group relative to the CTLA4 Ig and PBS groups, whereas IL-6 levels were higher in PBS controls than in the other two groups. Both anti-TNF and CTLA4 Ig treatments tended to down-regulate the necrosis/apoptosis ratio in the locally infected skin tissue. Importantly, no tangible difference was found in the bacterial burden among groups. Conclusion Both CTLA4 Ig and anti-TNF therapies attenuate disease severity but may prolong the healing time required for S. aureus skin infections. Neither treatment has an impact on bacterial clearance in skin tissues. PMID:28264025

  1. Validation study of existing gene expression signatures for anti-TNF treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik J M Toonen

    Full Text Available So far, there are no means of identifying rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients who will fail to respond to tumour necrosis factor blocking agents (anti-TNF, prior to treatment. We set out to validate eight previously reported gene expression signatures predicting therapy outcome. Genome-wide expression profiling using Affymetrix GeneChip Exon 1.0 ST arrays was performed on RNA isolated from whole blood of 42 RA patients starting treatment with infliximab or adalimumab. Clinical response according to EULAR criteria was determined at week 14 of therapy. Genes that have been reported to be associated with anti-TNF treatment were extracted from our dataset. K-means partition clustering was performed to assess the predictive value of the gene-sets. We performed a hypothesis-driven analysis of the dataset using eight existing gene sets predictive of anti-TNF treatment outcome. The set that performed best reached a sensitivity of 71% and a specificity of 61%, for classifying the patients in the current study. We successfully validated one of eight previously reported predictive expression profile. This replicated expression signature is a good starting point for developing a prediction model for anti-TNF treatment outcome that can be used in a daily clinical setting. Our results confirm that gene expression profiling prior to treatment is a useful tool to predict anti-TNF (non response.

  2. Validation study of existing gene expression signatures for anti-TNF treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toonen, Erik J M; Gilissen, Christian; Franke, Barbara; Kievit, Wietske; Eijsbouts, Agnes M; den Broeder, Alfons A; van Reijmersdal, Simon V; Veltman, Joris A; Scheffer, Hans; Radstake, Timothy R D J; van Riel, Piet L C M; Barrera, Pilar; Coenen, Marieke J H

    2012-01-01

    So far, there are no means of identifying rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients who will fail to respond to tumour necrosis factor blocking agents (anti-TNF), prior to treatment. We set out to validate eight previously reported gene expression signatures predicting therapy outcome. Genome-wide expression profiling using Affymetrix GeneChip Exon 1.0 ST arrays was performed on RNA isolated from whole blood of 42 RA patients starting treatment with infliximab or adalimumab. Clinical response according to EULAR criteria was determined at week 14 of therapy. Genes that have been reported to be associated with anti-TNF treatment were extracted from our dataset. K-means partition clustering was performed to assess the predictive value of the gene-sets. We performed a hypothesis-driven analysis of the dataset using eight existing gene sets predictive of anti-TNF treatment outcome. The set that performed best reached a sensitivity of 71% and a specificity of 61%, for classifying the patients in the current study. We successfully validated one of eight previously reported predictive expression profile. This replicated expression signature is a good starting point for developing a prediction model for anti-TNF treatment outcome that can be used in a daily clinical setting. Our results confirm that gene expression profiling prior to treatment is a useful tool to predict anti-TNF (non) response.

  3. Differences in reactivation of tuberculosis induced from anti-TNF treatments are based on bioavailability in granulomatous tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simeone Marino

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb infection is complex. Experimental evidence has revealed that tumor necrosis factor (TNF plays a major role in host defense against Mtb in both active and latent phases of infection. TNF-neutralizing drugs used to treat inflammatory disorders have been reported to increase the risk of tuberculosis (TB, in accordance with animal studies. The present study takes a computational approach toward characterizing the role of TNF in protection against the tubercle bacillus in both active and latent infection. We extend our previous mathematical models to investigate the roles and production of soluble (sTNF and transmembrane TNF (tmTNF. We analyze effects of anti-TNF therapy in virtual clinical trials (VCTs by simulating two of the most commonly used therapies, anti-TNF antibody and TNF receptor fusion, predicting mechanisms that explain observed differences in TB reactivation rates. The major findings from this study are that bioavailability of TNF following anti-TNF therapy is the primary factor for causing reactivation of latent infection and that sTNF--even at very low levels--is essential for control of infection. Using a mathematical model, it is possible to distinguish mechanisms of action of the anti-TNF treatments and gain insights into the role of TNF in TB control and pathology. Our study suggests that a TNF-modulating agent could be developed that could balance the requirement for reduction of inflammation with the necessity to maintain resistance to infection and microbial diseases. Alternatively, the dose and timing of anti-TNF therapy could be modified. Anti-TNF therapy will likely lead to numerous incidents of primary TB if used in areas where exposure is likely.

  4. Alternative for anti-TNF antibodies for arthritis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquet, Joseph; Henrionnet, Christel; Pinzano, Astrid; Vincourt, Jean-Baptiste; Gillet, Pierre; Netter, Patrick; Chary-Valckenaere, Isabelle; Loeuille, Damien; Pourel, Jacques; Grossin, Laurent

    2011-10-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a proinflammatory cytokine, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory diseases, including arthritis. Neutralization of this cytokine by anti-TNF-α antibodies has shown its efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is now widely used. Nevertheless, some patients currently treated with anti-TNF-α remain refractory or become nonresponder to these treatments. In this context, there is a need for new or complementary therapeutic strategies. In this study, we investigated in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory potentialities of an anti-TNF-α triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO), as judged from effects on two rat arthritis models. The inhibitory activity of this TFO on articular cells (synoviocytes and chondrocytes) was verified and compared to that of small interfering RNA (siRNA) in vitro. The use of the anti-TNF-α TFO as a preventive and local treatment in both acute and chronic arthritis models significantly reduced disease development. Furthermore, the TFO efficiently blocked synovitis and cartilage and bone destruction in the joints. The results presented here provide the first evidence that gene targeting by anti-TNF-α TFO modulates arthritis in vivo, thus providing proof-of-concept that it could be used as therapeutic tool for TNF-α-dependent inflammatory disorders.

  5. Drugs for Autoimmune Inflammatory Diseases: From Small Molecule Compounds to Anti-TNF Biologics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Although initially described as an anti-tumor mediator, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF is generally considered as the master pro-inflammatory cytokine. It plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA, inflammatory bowel disease, ankylosing spondylitis (AS, and psoriasis. Consequently, anti-TNF therapy has become mainstay treatment for autoimmune diseases. Historically, anti-inflammatory agents were developed before the identification of TNF. Salicylates, the active components of Willow spp., were identified in the mid-19th century for the alleviation of pain, fever, and inflammatory responses. Study of this naturally occurring compound led to the discovery of aspirin, which was followed by the development of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs due to the chemical advances in the 19th–20th centuries. Initially, the most of NSAIDs were organic acid, but the non-acidic compounds were also identified as NSAIDs. Although effective in the treatment of inflammatory diseases, NSAIDs have some undesirable and adverse effect, such as ulcers, kidney injury, and bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract. In the past two decades, anti-TNF biologics were developed. Drugs belong to this class include soluble TNF receptor 2 fusion protein and anti-TNF antibodies. The introduction of anti-TNF therapeutics has revolutionized the management of autoimmune diseases, such as RA, psoriatic arthritis (PsA, plaque psoriasis (PP, AS, CD and ulcerative colitis (UC. Nevertheless, up to 40% of patients have no response to anti-TNF treatment. Furthermore, this treatment is associated with some adverse effects such as increased risk of infection, and even triggered the de novo development of autoimmune diseases. Such harmful effect of anti-TNF treatment is likely caused by the global inhibition of TNF biological functions. Therefore, specific inhibition of TNF receptor (TNFR1 or TNFR2 may represent a safer and

  6. Improvement of Anti-TNF-α Antibody-Induced Palmoplantar Pustular Psoriasis Using a 308-nm Excimer Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natsuko Iga

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α antibody is utilized in the treatment of a variety of chronic inflammatory conditions, including psoriasis. However, it can induce paradoxical development and/or exacerbation of psoriasis in the course of anti-TNF-α antibody treatment, which is sometimes refractory to conventional treatments. Herein, we report a case of refractory palmoplantar pustular psoriasis induced by anti-TNF-α antibody treatment, which was improved by treatment with a 308-nm excimer light. The 308-nm excimer light has less long-term risks than narrow-band UVB. The 308-nm excimer light may be a good therapeutic option for refractory psoriatic skin lesions induced by anti-TNF-α antibody therapy because of localized side effects without systemic problems, short length of treatment and low cumulative dosages of UV light.

  7. Should axial spondyloarthritis without radiographic changes be treated with anti-TNF agents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keat, Andrew; Bennett, Alexander N; Gaffney, Karl; Marzo-Ortega, Helena; Sengupta, Raj; Everiss, Tamara

    2017-03-01

    A spectrum of disease extends beyond the rigid confines of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) encompasses non-radiographic axSpA (nr-axSpA) in individuals without established radiographic changes but with other clinical/imaging axSpA features and AS in those with definite sacroiliac joint changes on pelvic X-rays. A broad consensus about the management of nr-axSpA is emerging among clinicians, but the evidence base remains open to question. To explore whether nr-axSpA and AS should be treated similarly, we examined the literature on their prevalence, natural history, disease burden, and treatment. There is strong evidence that nr-axSpA and AS are expressions of the same disease. Approximately 10% of patients with nr-axSpA will develop radiographic disease over 2 years; after >20 years, the figure may exceed 80%. Nr-axSpA patients have lower CRP and less spinal inflammation on MRI than AS patients but similar disease activity, pain, and quality-of-life impairment. Most patients with nr-axSpA manage well with conservative treatment, but a minority has severe disabling symptoms. Anti-TNF therapy has demonstrated similar efficacy and safety in nr-axSpA and AS. Current evidence does not clearly indicate that anti-TNF treatment can inhibit or limit bony progression of AS, the basis of conservative and anti-TNF treatment is control of symptoms and function. For some patients with nr-axSpA, the need for powerful treatments is as great as in some with AS; thus, treatment of axSpA should be consistent across the axSpA spectrum with anti-TNF agents being available, irrespective of radiographic change, according to the same criteria as those applied to AS.

  8. Efficacy and safety of combining intra-articular methylprednisolone and anti-TNF agent to achieve prolonged remission in patients with recurrent inflammatory monoarthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haroon, Muhammad

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To control local inflammation, the role of intra-articular corticosteroid is well established; similarly, with time there are more reports on the experience of intra-articular anti-TNF agent for localized joint inflammation. The aim of this study was to assess the safety, local tolerability and clinical response after combining intra-articular administration of corticosteroids and anti-TNF agents for recurrent inflammatory monoarthritis. METHODS: Patients with recurrent monoarthritis of the knee were recruited from our inflammatory arthritis clinics. These patients required intra-articular corticosteroids every 8-12 weeks, with good short-term results. Five such consecutive patients were invited to partake in this study. Patients were maintained on their baseline immunosuppressive therapy. After aspiration of knee joint, the involved joint was injected with 80mg of methylprednisolone mixed with 5ml of lignocaine 1%; this was followed by the injection of an anti-TNF agent. RESULTS: In majority of our patients (three out of five), combining anti-TNF agent and methylprednisolone led to prolonged anti-inflammatory response, and these patients remain in remission to date (mean follow-up of 12 months). These responders were noted to be naive to anti-TNF therapy. Conversely, the remaining two patients were found to be on baseline systemic anti-TNF therapy, and both of them failed to respond either partly or completely. CONCLUSION: Combining intra-articular corticosteroid and anti-TNF agent has proved to be safe in our cohort of patients. We conclude that in particular subset of patients who suffer from recurrent inflammatory monoarthritis or oligoarthritis, combination therapy of intra-articular corticosteroids and anti-TNF agents appears attractive and promising.

  9. Safety of herpes zoster vaccination among inflammatory bowel disease patients being treated with anti-TNF medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, N; Shah, Y; Trivedi, C; Lewis, J D

    2017-10-01

    The risk of herpes zoster (HZ) is elevated in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients treated with anti-TNF medications. While it is optimal to give herpes zoster vaccine prior to initiation of therapy clinical circumstances may not always allow this. To determine the safety of giving herpes zoster vaccine while patients are on anti-TNF therapy. We conducted a retrospective cohort study involving IBD patients who were followed in the Veterans Affairs (VA) healthcare system between 2001 and 2016. Patients who received herpes zoster vaccine while on anti-TNF medication were identified through vaccination codes and confirmed through individual chart review. Our outcome of interest was development of HZ between 0 and 42 days after herpes zoster vaccine administration. Fifty-six thousand four hundred and seventeen patients with IBD were followed in the VA healthcare system. A total of 59 individuals were on anti-TNF medication when they were given herpes zoster vaccine, and amongst them, 12 (20%) were also taking a thiopurine. Median age at the time of herpes zoster vaccine was 64.9 years and 95% of patients had a Charlson Comorbidity Index of ≥2. Median number of encounters within 42 days after receiving herpes zoster vaccine was two. No case of HZ was found within 0-42 days of HZV administration. Our data suggest that co-administering the herpes zoster vaccine to patients who are taking anti-TNF medications is relatively safe. This study significantly expands the evidence supporting the use of herpes zoster vaccine in this population, having included an elderly group of patients with a high Charlson Comorbidity Index who are likely at a much higher risk of developing HZ. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Overview of 99mTc-anti-TNF-α scintigraphy: diagnostic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elboga U

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Umut Elboga,1 Ebuzer Kalender,2 Hulya Yalcin21Department of Nuclear Medicine, Gaziantep University, Gaziantep, Turkey; 2Department of Nuclear Medicine, Mustafa Kemal University, Antioch, TurkeyAbstract: Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α has a role in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s disease, and ulcerative colitis. As TNF-α plays a role in the pathogenesis of different inflammatory diseases, anti-TNF-α agents (monoclonal antibodies [mAbs] such as infliximab, adalimumab, and certolizumab have been developed and investigated for the treatment of these conditions. In recent years, these mAbs also have been used for diagnosis, monitoring, follow-up of disease activity, and therapy decision-making for inflammatory diseases, especially rheumatoid arthritis, after labeling with 99mTc. However, 99mTc-anti-TNF-α imaging might have severe adverse effects and is expensive. In contrast, scintigraphic imaging before therapy with radiolabeled mAbs may be a cost-effective solution for therapy decisions.Keywords: monoclonal antibodies, mAb, nuclear medicine, 99mTc tumor necrosis factor-α imaging

  11. Rate and predictors of mucosal healing in patients with inflammatory bowel disease treated with anti-TNF-alpha antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Beigel

    Full Text Available Mucosal healing (MH is an important treatment goal in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, but factors predicting MH under medical therapy are largely unknown. In this study, we aimed to characterize predictive factors for MH in anti-TNF-alpha antibody-treated IBD patients.We retrospectively analyzed 248 IBD patients (61.3% CD, 38.7% UC treated with anti-TNF-alpha antibodies (infliximab and/or adalimumab for MH, defined as macroscopic absence of inflammatory lesions (Mayo endoscopy score 0 or SES-CD score 0 in colonoscopies which were analyzed before and after initiation of an anti-TNF-alpha antibody treatment.In patients treated with only one anti-TNF-alpha antibody ("TNF1 group", n = 202, 56 patients (27.7% achieved complete MH at follow-up colonoscopy (median overall follow-up time: 63 months. In a second cohort (n = 46, which comprised patients who were consecutively treated with two anti-TNF-alpha antibodies ("TNF2 group", 13 patients (28.3% achieved complete MH (median overall follow-up time: 64.5 months. Compared to patients without MH, CRP values at follow-up colonoscopy were significantly lower in patients with MH (TNF1 group: p = 8.35×10-5; TNF2 group: p = 0.002. Multivariate analyses confirmed CRP at follow-up colonoscopy as predictor for MH in the TNF1 group (p = 0.012. Overall need for surgery was lower in patients with MH (TNF1 group: p = 0.01; TNF2 group: p = 0.03.We identified low serum CRP level at follow-up colonoscopy as predictor for MH, while MH was an excellent negative predictor for the need for surgery.

  12. IgA deficiency evidence after anti-TNF-α treatment in a psoriatic arthritis patient: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Scarpa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the use of anti-TNF-α drugs is related to an increased incidence of infective diseases. This therapy can not be administered to patients having active infections and it has to be considered with caution in case of acquired or congenital immunodeficiency diseases. We report the case of a 28-years-old man affected by psoriatic arthritis; he developed some infections during treatment with TNF-α blockers. The infections were caused by a selective IgA deficiency, that was not evident before the anti-TNF-α blockers administration and disappeared after withdrawing the biological therapy. This case-report draws our attention to the possibility of cases of subclinical immunodeficiency, unknown by the patients, but important in the prognosis and in the therapeutic approach to these diseases. Therefore, it is important to evaluate carefully the immunologic status of patients during the pre-therapeutic screening for TNF-α blocking therapy.

  13. Minimum effective dosages of anti-TNF in rheumatoid arthritis: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, Inmaculada; Valor, Lara; Nieto, Juan Carlos; Montoro, María; Carreño, Luis

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the modified dosages of anti-TNF in controlling disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) measured by DAS28-ESR. Cross-sectional study: RA patients treated with etanercept (ETN), adalimumab (ADA) or infliximab (IFX), at standard or modified doses. dosage, concomitant disease modifying drugs (DMARDs), DAS28-ESR. 195 RA patients included (79% women, mean age 58.1 years): ETN=81, ADA=56, IFX=58. Mean disease duration and time to first biological treatment was higher in IFX group (P=.01). Patients distribution by dosage: standard: ETN (72.8%), ADA (69.6%), IFX (27.6%); escalated: IFX (69%), ADA (5.4%), ETN (0%); reduced: ETN (27.1%), ADA (25%), IFX (3.4%). Concomitant DMARDs use was lower in ETN (58.2%) than ADA (66.07%) and IFX (79.31%). Higher proportion of responders (DAS28 ≤3.2) in ADA (65.3%) and ETN (61.7%) than IFX (48.3%). RA clinical control can be preserved with modified anti-TNF dosages. Controlled prospective studies should be performed to define when therapy can be tailored and for which patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. Anti-TNF-Mediated Modulation of Prohepcidin Improves Iron Availability in Inflammatory Bowel Disease, in an IL-6-Mediated Fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallaro, Flaminia; Duca, Lorena; Pisani, Laura Francesca; Rigolini, Roberta; Spina, Luisa; Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Munizio, Nadia; Costa, Elena; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Vecchi, Maurizio; Pastorelli, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Background. Anaemia is common in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), frequently resulting from a combination of iron deficiency and of anaemia of chronic disease (ACD). ACD is characterized by macrophage iron retention induced by proinflammatory cytokines. Hepcidin is the master inducer of iron accumulation during ACD, and its production is mainly regulated by IL-6 and the novel erythroid hormone erythroferrone (ERFE). This study evaluates whether anti-TNF monoclonal antibodies therapy modurates hepcidin production and the levels of its main regulators, leading to a restoration of iron homeostasis. Methods. Sera were collected from 21 IBD patients, before each anti-TNF administration, for the first 6 weeks of therapy. Prohepcidin, erythropoietin, erythroferrone, C reactive protein, interleukin-6, iron markers, and haemoglobin levels were measured and clinical activity indexes were evaluated. Results. Serum prohepcidin, IL-6, CRP, and ferritin were significantly reduced after 6-week treatment; an increase in serum iron and total transferrin was observed. No changes in the EPO-ERFE axis were found. Remarkably, haemoglobin was significantly increased. Conclusions. Anti-TNF therapy improves iron metabolism and, subsequently, anaemia in IBD. This effect appears to be related to the modulation of the cytokine network and specifically IL-6 leading to a relevant decrease of hepcidin, a master regulator of ACD.

  15. Anti-TNF-Mediated Modulation of Prohepcidin Improves Iron Availability in Inflammatory Bowel Disease, in an IL-6-Mediated Fashion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duca, Lorena; Rigolini, Roberta; Spina, Luisa; Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Munizio, Nadia; Cappellini, Maria Domenica

    2017-01-01

    Background. Anaemia is common in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), frequently resulting from a combination of iron deficiency and of anaemia of chronic disease (ACD). ACD is characterized by macrophage iron retention induced by proinflammatory cytokines. Hepcidin is the master inducer of iron accumulation during ACD, and its production is mainly regulated by IL-6 and the novel erythroid hormone erythroferrone (ERFE). This study evaluates whether anti-TNF monoclonal antibodies therapy modurates hepcidin production and the levels of its main regulators, leading to a restoration of iron homeostasis. Methods. Sera were collected from 21 IBD patients, before each anti-TNF administration, for the first 6 weeks of therapy. Prohepcidin, erythropoietin, erythroferrone, C reactive protein, interleukin-6, iron markers, and haemoglobin levels were measured and clinical activity indexes were evaluated. Results. Serum prohepcidin, IL-6, CRP, and ferritin were significantly reduced after 6-week treatment; an increase in serum iron and total transferrin was observed. No changes in the EPO-ERFE axis were found. Remarkably, haemoglobin was significantly increased. Conclusions. Anti-TNF therapy improves iron metabolism and, subsequently, anaemia in IBD. This effect appears to be related to the modulation of the cytokine network and specifically IL-6 leading to a relevant decrease of hepcidin, a master regulator of ACD. PMID:28191453

  16. Hanseníase virchowiana associada ao uso de inibidor do fator de necrose tumoral α: relato de caso Lepromatous leprosy associated with the use of anti-TNF α therapy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele S Freitas

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A terapia anti-TNFα tem sido amplamente utilizada em diversas artropatias inflamatórias crônicas, em especial artrite reumatoide (AR. No entanto, há preocupações quanto à segurança e ao risco de doenças infecciosas nos pacientes. O objetivo deste artigo é descrever um caso de hanseníase, forma virchowiana, em paciente com AR em uso de terapia anti-TNFα. Dessa forma, a vigilância dos eventos adversos deve ser rigorosa, especialmente no que diz respeito às doenças infecciosas. É recomendada investigação apropriada de lesões cutâneas em paciente recebendo terapia anti-TNFα, visto que o quadro clínico inicial pode ser inespecífico, especialmente em regiões endêmicas como o Brasil.TNF blockers have been used in the treatment of several types of chronic inflammatory arthritis, especially rheumatoid arthritis. However, many doubts regarding the safety and high risk of infectious diseases in these patients remain. The main objective of this report was to present a case of lepromatous leprosy in a rheumatoid arthritis patient using TNF blockers. The development of adverse events should be rigorously observed, especially those related to infectious agents. Thus, appropriate investigation of skin lesions in patients receiving anti-TNFa therapy is recommended, as the initial clinical manifestation may be unusual, particularly in endemic regions in Brazil.

  17. Effect of methotrexate and anti-TNF on Epstein-Barr virus T-cell response and viral load in patients with rheumatoid arthritis or spondylarthropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miceli-Richard, Corinne; Gestermann, Nicolas; Amiel, Corinne; Sellam, Jérémie; Ittah, Marc; Pavy, Stephan; Urrutia, Alejandra; Girauld, Isabelle; Carcelain, Guislaine; Venet, Alain; Mariette, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Introduction There is a suspicion of increased risk of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated lymphoproliferations in patients with inflammatory arthritides receiving immunosuppressive drugs. We investigated the EBV load and EBV-specific T-cell response in patients treated with methotrexate (MTX) or anti-TNF therapy. Methods Data for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (n = 58) or spondylarthropathy (SpA) (n = 28) were analyzed at baseline in comparison with controls (n = 22) and after 3 months of MTX or anti-TNF therapy for EBV load and EBV-specific IFNγ-producing T cells in response to EBV latent-cycle and lytic-cycle peptides. Results The EBV load and the number of IFNγ-producing T-cells after peptide stimulation were not significantly different between groups at baseline (P = 0.61 and P = 0.89, respectively). The EBV load was not significantly modified by treatment, for RA with MTX (P = 0.74) or anti-TNF therapy (P = 0.94) or for SpA with anti-TNF therapy (P = 1.00). The number of EBV-specific T cells was not significantly modified by treatment, for RA with MTX (P = 0.58) or anti-TNF drugs (P = 0.19) or for SpA with anti-TNF therapy (P = 0.39). For all patients, the EBV load and EBV-specific T cells were significantly correlated (P = 0.017; R = 0.21). For most patients, short-term exposure (3 months) to MTX or anti-TNF did not alter the EBV load or EBV-specific T-cell response but two patients had discordant evolution. Conclusions These data are reassuring and suggest there is no short-term defect in EBV-immune surveillance in patients receiving MTX or anti-TNF drugs. However, in these patients, long term follow-up of EBV-specific T-cell response is necessary and the role of non-EBV-related mechanisms of lymphomagenesis is not excluded. PMID:19470150

  18. Anti-TNF Withdrawal in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

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    Joana Torres

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of the anti-tumor necrosis factorα agents (anti-TNFα in clinical practice has greatly advanced the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. The use of these medications results in durable remission in a subset of patients, preventing surgery and hospitalizations. However, there are some concerns about safety and costs associated with their long-term use. Therefore, anti-TNF withdrawal has emerged as an important consideration in clinical practice. Herein our goal was to discuss the available evidence about anti-TNFα discontinuation in IBD that could inform the clinician on the expected rates of relapse, the potential predictors of relapse, as well the response to re-treatment.

  19. Aldehyde modification and alum coadjuvancy enhance anti-TNF-α autovaccination and mitigate arthritis in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavoso, Alfonso; Ostuni, Angela; De Vendel, Jolanda; Bracalello, Angelo; Shcheglova, Tatiana; Makker, Sudesh; Tramontano, Alfonso

    2015-05-01

    Experimental vaccination to induce antibodies (Abs) capable of cytokine antagonism shows promise as a novel immunotherapy for chronic inflammatory disease. We prepared a hybrid antigen consisting of residues 141-235 of rat TNF-α fused to the C-terminus of glutathione-S-transferase (GST), chemically modified to incorporate aldehyde residues, for development of an auto-vaccine eliciting anti-rTNF-α Abs. In rat immunization the soluble aldehyde-modified fusion protein did not generate observable Ab responses. By contrast, vaccination with the aldehyde-modified fusion protein adsorbed on alum induced anti-TNF-α autoAbs with high titer and neutralizing activity. Induction of adjuvant arthritis in rats pre-immunized with unmodified fusion protein or a control protein in alum resulted in severe inflammation and joint damage, whereas the disease induced in rats immunized with the aldehyde-bearing fusion protein in alum was markedly attenuated. Similar results were obtained in a collagen-induced rat arthritis model. Anti-collagen II IgG Ab titers did not deviate significantly in groups pre-immunized with modified fusion protein and control protein, suggesting that anti-TNF vaccination did not skew the immune response related to disease induction. This study demonstrates synergy between particulate alum and protein bound carbonyl residues for enhancement of protein immunogenicity. The antigen-specific co-adjuvant system could prove advantageous for breaking tolerance in emerging auto-vaccination therapies targeting inflammatory cytokines as well as for enhancing a broader category of subunit vaccines. Aldehyde adduction introduces a minimal modification which, together with the established use of alum as a safe adjuvant for human use, could be favorable for further vaccine development.

  20. Successful treatment with anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF)-alpha of proteinuria in a patient with familial mediterranean fever (FMF) resistant to colchicine: anti-TNF drugs and FMF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erten, S; Erten, S F; Altunoglu, A

    2012-04-01

    Familial mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autoinflammatory disease characterized by recurrent attacks of fever, peritonitis, pleuritis, and genetically by autosomal recessive inheritance. The major renal involvement in FMF is the occurrence of amyloidosis that can be prevented by a daily regimen of colchicine. About 5-10% of cases with familial mediterranean fever may be resistant to colchicine. In literature, there is a controversy about the treatment of FMF patients resistant to colchicine. We describe a case with FMF, proteinuria, and bilateral sacroiliitis, which responded to anti-TNF (tumor necrosis factor)-alpha therapy with infliximab and etanercept.

  1. Potential Impact of Diet on Treatment Effect from Anti-TNF Drugs in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Hansen, Axel Kornerup; Heitmann, Berit Lilienthal

    2017-01-01

    We wanted to investigate the current knowledge on the impact of diet on anti-TNF response in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), to identify dietary factors that warrant further investigations in relation to anti-TNF treatment response, and, finally, to discuss potential strategies......% CI: 1.73-4.31, p TNF treatment response for clinical use is scarce. Here we propose a mechanism by which Western style diet high in meat and low in fibre may promote colonic...... inflammation and potentially impact treatment response to anti-TNF drugs. Further studies using hypothesis-driven and data-driven strategies in prospective observational, animal and interventional studies are warranted....

  2. Rituximab Can Induce Remission in a Patient with Ankylosing Spondylitis Who Failed Anti-TNF-α Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlDhaheri, Fahmi; Almteri, Talal; Dwid, Naji; Majdali, Ahd; Janoudi, Nahed; Almoallim, Hani

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 38 Final Diagnosis: Ankylosing spondylitis Symptoms: Back pain • morning stiffness Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Not applicable Specialty: Rheuamatology Objective: Unusual or unexpected effect of treatment Background: Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease that predominantly affects the axial skeleton. The ability of anti-TNF-α agents to reduce disease activity in patients with axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA), including AS, has been demonstrated in multiple randomized trials and several meta-analyses. Reports on the efficacy of rituximab in treatment of AS have described good results. We report on a patient with AS who failed anti-TNFtherapy but showed good clinical improvement with rituximab therapy. Case Report: A 38-year-old male patient was diagnosed with AS and showed poor response to sulfasalazine and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Infliximab was initiated with marked improvement as per the Bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index (BASDAI). Due to disease flare, the patient was switched to etanercept. He subsequently acquired papillary thyroid cancer and etanercept was discontinued. He underwent a total thyroidectomy followed by radioiodine therapy. For his ongoing active disease, NSAIDs and sulfasalazine were resumed with a lack of response (BASDAI=7.1). Rituximab was started and resulted in significant improvement (BASDAI=2.3). Conclusions: Rituximab can be a potential target therapy for patients who start to lose response to TNF-inhibitors or for those who develop solid malignancies. Further placebo-controlled studies are required. PMID:28179619

  3. Paradoxical psoriasis after the use of anti-TNF in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vasconcellos, Jaqueline Barbeito; Pereira, Daniele do Nascimento; Vargas, Thiago Jeunon de Sousa; Levy, Roger Abramino; Pinheiro, Geraldo da Rocha Castelar; Cursi, Ígor Brum

    2016-01-01

    The use of tumor necrosis factor antagonists (anti-TNF) has become a usual practice to treat various inflammatory diseases. Although indicated for the treatment of psoriasis, anti-TNF may paradoxically trigger a psoriasiform condition. We present a case of a female patient who, during the use of infliximab for rheumatoid arthritis, developed psoriasis. In an attempt to switch anti-TNF class, we observed a cumulative worsening of the lesions requiring suspension of the immunobiological agent and the introduction of other drugs for clinical control. The therapeutic challenge of this paradoxical form of psoriasis is the focus of our discussion. The use of another anti-TNF in these patients is a matter of debate among experts.

  4. HTLV-1-associated arthropathy treated with anti-TNF-alpha agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, Laurent; Moura, Bertrand; Marcais, Ambroise; Chapdelaine, Hugo; Hermine, Olivier

    2014-07-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 or HTLV-1 infection is a public health problem in endemic regions like Japan, Central America or Africa. Although the majority of HTLV-1 carriers remain asymptomatic throughout their lives, some patients could develop neurological disorder, inflammatory arthropathy also called HTLV-1-associated arthropathy or T-cell malignancy, the adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma or ATL with a very poor prognosis. Described to be very close to rheumatoid arthritis, HTLV-1-associated arthropathy patients have few or no response to the first line therapy with corticosteroids and disease modifying antirheumatic drugs or DMARDs. The use of anti-TNF-α agents in these patients is an interesting alternative but asks the question of risk of developing an adult T-Cell leukemia/lymphoma. We reported an exceptional case of a smoldering ATL patient with an HTLV-1-associated arthropathy, refractory to corticosteroid, DMARDs and rituximab therapy, treated successfully with etanercept, without progression to aggressive ATL after 5 years.

  5. Genetic Variations in Pattern Recognition Receptor Loci Are Associated with Anti-TNF Response in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Sode

    Full Text Available To determine whether genetic variation within genes related to the Toll-like receptor, inflammasome and interferon-γ pathways contributes to the differences in treatment response to tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (anti-TNF in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA.In a retrospective case-case study, we assessed 23 functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 15 genes. We included 538 anti-TNF naïve Danish RA patients from the nationwide DANBIO database. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to detect associations (p-value<0.05 between genotypes and European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR treatment responses. False Discovery Rate corrections for multiple testing (q-value and stratified analyses were performed to investigate association with individual therapies and IgM-rheumatoid factor (RF status.Six of twenty successfully genotyped polymorphisms were nominally associated with EULAR treatment response. Three of these were in weak to moderate linkage disequilibrium with polymorphisms previously reported associated with anti-TNF treatment response. TLR5(rs5744174 variant allele carriers (odds ratio(OR = 1.7(1.1-2.5,p = 0.010,q = 0.46 and TLR1(rs4833095 homozygous variant carriers (OR = 2.8(1.1-7.4,p = 0.037,q = 0.46 had higher odds for a positive treatment response. NLRP3(rs10754558 variant allele carriers (odds ratio(OR = 0.6(0.4-1.0,p = 0.045,q = 0.46 were more likely to have a negative treatment response. The association in TLR5(rs5744174 remained significant after correction for multiple comparisons among patients negative for RF (OR = 6.2(2.4-16.3,p = 0.0002,q = 0.024. No other association withstood correction for multiple testing. Post hoc analyses showed that change in Patient Global score on a visual analogue scale (VAS and change in pain VAS were the main factors responsible for the association.We reproduced previously reported associations between genetic variation in the TLR10/1/6 gene cluster, TLR5

  6. The ratio Neutrophil/Lymphocyte and Platelet/Lymphocyte in patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis that are Treating with Anti-TNF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İsmail Boyraz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disorder with unknown etiology. RA is characterized by a variable course of remissions and relapses, and subclinical inflammation persists between the disease exacerbations. Anti-TNF therapies have become more often preferred in recent years in the treatment of RA. The aim of the present study was to determine the relationship between N/L and P/L ratios and subclinical inflammation in patients with RA who achieved remission with anti-TNF therapy. METHODS: The present study was a retrospective, controlled and multicenter study. The present study reviewed the medical records of the patients who were on follow-up in the outpatient clinics of the Department of Physical Therapy in Abant İzzet Baysal University and Harran University due to rheumatoid arthritis (RA and who achieved remission with anti-TNF therapy.A total of 80 patients in the inactive phase of RA and 45 healthy subjects in the control group were included in the study. Hemogram results of the people were examined retrospectively. RESULTS: There was significant difference between the patient and the control group in terms of platelet ratio and lymphocyte and neutrophil ratio. There was no significant difference between the group in terms of N/L and P/L ratios.CONCLUSIONS:  In the current study, we found significant differences between the patient and the control group in terms of neutrophil, lymphocyte, and platelet counts; however, there was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of N/L and P/L ratios. These findings suggest that therapies with anti-TNF agents in patients with RA achieved complete control of inflammation. 

  7. Effects of Anti-TNF Alpha Drugs on Disability in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: Long-Term Real-Life Data from the Lorhen Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Filippini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study involving 1033 patients with RA confirms the effectiveness of etanercept, adalimumab, and infliximab in reducing RA-related disability even in patients with a history of highly active and longstanding RA. Moreover, we found that the improvement in disability was biphasic, with a marked improvement during the first year of anti-TNF therapy, followed by slower but significant recovery over the subsequent four years.

  8. Effect of methotrexate and anti-TNF on Epstein-Barr virus T-cell response and viral load in patients with rheumatoid arthritis or spondylarthropathies

    OpenAIRE

    Miceli-Richard, Corinne; Gestermann, Nicolas; Amiel, Corinne; Sellam, Jérémie; Ittah, Marc; Pavy, Stephan; Urrutia, Alejandra; Girauld, Isabelle; Carcelain, Guislaine; Venet, Alain; Mariette, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Introduction There is a suspicion of increased risk of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated lymphoproliferations in patients with inflammatory arthritides receiving immunosuppressive drugs. We investigated the EBV load and EBV-specific T-cell response in patients treated with methotrexate (MTX) or anti-TNF therapy. Methods Data for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (n = 58) or spondylarthropathy (SpA) (n = 28) were analyzed at baseline in comparison with controls (n = 22) and after 3 mon...

  9. Candidate's single-nucleotide polymorphism predictors of treatment nonresponse to the first anti-TNF inhibitor in ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiotis, Ruxandra; Sánchez, Alejandra; Escudero, Alejandro; Bartolomé, Nerea; Szczypiorska, Magdalena; Font, Pilar; Martínez, Antonio; Tejedor, Diego; Artieda, Marta; Mulero, Juan; Buzoianu, Anca; Collantes-Estévez, Eduardo

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study is to identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) predictors of treatment nonresponse to the first anti-TNF-alpha agent in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Patients were classified as "nonresponders" if they failed to achieve improvement ≥50 % of the initial BASDAI. We selected candidate SNPs previously reported, associated with susceptibility or pathogenesis of AS and with other spondylarthropaties (SpAs). The predictors of nonresponse were modeled with multiple logistic regression. The predictive power of the genetic model of nonresponse to treatment was tested with AUC-ROC. One hundred and twenty-one (121) AS patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Of the candidate SNPs tested for association with treatment effectiveness, five independent predictors were identified: rs917997, rs755622, rs1800896, rs3740691, and rs1061622. The genetic model of nonresponse to treatment had a predictive power of 0.77 (95 % CI 0.68-0.86). Our study identified several polymorphisms which could be the useful genetic biomarkers in predicting nonresponse to anti-TNF-alpha therapy.

  10. Systematic review genetic biomarkers associated with anti-TNF treatment response in inflammatory bowel diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Signe Bek; Nielsen, J V; Bo Bojesen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    : To identify polymorphisms and candidate genes from the literature that are associated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) treatment response in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis. METHODS: We performed a PubMed literature search and retrieved...... studies reporting original data on association between polymorphisms and anti-TNF treatment response and conducted a meta-analysis. RESULTS: A functional polymorphism in FCGR3A was significantly associated with anti-TNF treatment response among CD patients using biological response criterion (decrease...... in an explorative analysis. CONCLUSIONS: There are no genetic markers currently available which are adequately predictive of anti-TNF response for use in the clinic. Genetic markers bear the advantage that they do not change over time. Therefore, hypothesis-free approaches, testing a large number of polymorphisms...

  11. Associations between functional polymorphisms in the NFκB signaling pathway and response to anti-TNF treatment in Danish patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bank, S; Andersen, P S; Burisch, J; Pedersen, N; Roug, S; Galsgaard, J; Turino, S Y; Brodersen, J B; Rashid, S; Rasmussen, B K; Avlund, S; Olesen, T B; Hoffmann, H J; Thomsen, M K; Thomsen, V Ø; Frydenberg, M; Nexø, B A; Sode, J; Vogel, U; Andersen, V

    2014-12-01

    Antitumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is used for treatment of severe cases of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). However, one-third of the patients do not respond to the treatment. Genetic markers may predict individual response to anti-TNF therapy. Using a candidate gene approach, 39 mainly functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 26 genes regulating inflammation were assessed in 738 prior anti-TNF-naive Danish patients with IBD. The results were analyzed using logistic regression (crude and adjusted for age, gender and smoking status). Nineteen functional polymorphisms that alter the NFκB-mediated inflammatory response (TLR2 (rs3804099, rs11938228, rs1816702, rs4696480), TLR4 (rs5030728, rs1554973), TLR9 (rs187084, rs352139), LY96 (MD-2) (rs11465996), CD14 (rs2569190), MAP3K14 (NIK) (rs7222094)), TNF-α signaling (TNFA (TNF-α) (rs361525), TNFRSF1A (TNFR1) (rs4149570), TNFAIP3(A20) (rs6927172)) and other cytokines regulated by NFκB (IL1B (rs4848306), IL1RN (rs4251961), IL6 (rs10499563), IL17A (rs2275913), IFNG (rs2430561)) were associated with response to anti-TNF therapy among patients with CD, UC or both CD and UC (P ⩽ 0.05). In conclusion, the results suggest that polymorphisms in genes involved in activating NFκB through the Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathways, genes regulating TNF-α signaling and cytokines regulated by NFκB are important predictors for the response to anti-TNF therapy among patients with IBD. Genetically strong TNF-mediated inflammatory response was associated with beneficial response. In addition, the cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and IFN-γ may be potential targets for treating patients with IBD who do not respond to anti-TNF therapy. These findings should be examined in independent cohorts before these results are applied in a clinical setting.

  12. Drug retention rates and treatment discontinuation among anti-TNF-α agents in psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbroni, Marta; Cantarini, Luca; Caso, Francesco; Costa, Luisa; Pagano, Veronica Anna; Frediani, Bruno; Manganelli, Stefania; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    The study aim was to determine treatment persistence rates and to identify causes of discontinuation in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients in clinical practice. Patients treated with adalimumab (ADA), etanercept (ETA), or infliximab (INF) were retrospectively included. Treatment persistence rates were analyzed by means of a stepwise logistic regression. Differences between therapy duration were assessed by means of an analysis of variance model (ANOVA), while a chi-square test was used to evaluate relationships between therapies and causes of treatment discontinuation and the administration of concomitant disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) among therapies and types of disease considering completed courses of therapy versus courses that were discontinued. 268 patients received a total of 353 anti-TNF treatment courses (97 ADA, 180 ETA, and 76 INF). Comparison among therapies showed significant difference regarding the treatment persistence rates due to the contrast between ETA and INF (P = 0.0062). We observed that 84.7% of patients were still responding after 6 months of follow-up. Comparison among diseases showed that there were significant differences between PsA and AS (P = 0.0073) and PsA and PsA with predominant axial involvement (P = 0.0467) in terms of duration of the therapy, while there were no significant differences with regard to the persistence rate. In this cohort, anti-TNFtherapy was associated with high drug persistence rates. As in rheumatoid arthritis, switching to another anti-TNF-α agent can be an effective option when, during the treatment of AS or PsA, therapy is suspended because of inefficacy or an adverse event. Combination therapy with DMARDs was associated with a better persistence rate.

  13. Is there a benefit from the concomitant use of immunosupression with anti-TNF in Crohn's disease; heads or tails?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Peter Laszlo

    2009-09-01

    Over the last some years the increasing knowledge on the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease led to the development of a number of biological agents targeting specific molecules involved in gut inflammation, first of all TNF-alpha and its receptors. Infliximab, adalimumab and certolizumab have been successful in inducing and maintaining remission in Crohn's disease at both short and long term. This was recently confirmed by a Cochrane meta-analysis and also open label extension follow-up and cohort studies. Emerging new data however indicate that combination therapy with infliximab-azathioprine appears to have added benefit in inducing steroid-free remission and mucosal healing than either infliximab or azathioprine alone in azathioprine-naïve patients with early disease. Similarly the combination of steroids induction and infliximab was efficacious in luminal Crohn's disease. In contrast, there seems to be no synergism between methotrexate and infliximab. It is also less clear whether it is beneficial to use short or long-term infliximab-azathioprine combination in patients who previously failed therapy with azathioprine. In contrast, combination may potentially be associated with increased risk for infection and cancer. In case control-studies, especially the combination of steroids and anti-TNF and older age increased the risk for infectious complications, while scattered case reports point to the potentially increased risk of a rare form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (Hepatosplenic T cell lymphoma) with the use of azathioprine-anti-TNF combination. The aim of this review is to summarize the benefits and risks for the use combination therapy with TNF-alpha inhibitors in the treatment of Crohn's disease.

  14. Circulating levels of sphingosine-1-phosphate are elevated in severe, but not mild psoriasis and are unresponsive to anti-TNF-α treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checa, Antonio; Xu, Ning; Sar, Daniel G.; Haeggström, Jesper Z.; Ståhle, Mona; Wheelock, Craig E.

    2015-07-01

    Sphingolipids are bioactive molecules with a putative role in inflammation. Alterations in sphingolipids, in particular ceramides, have been consistently observed in psoriatic skin. Herein, we quantified the circulating sphingolipid profile in individuals with mild or severe psoriasis as well as healthy controls. In addition, the effects of anti-TNF-α treatment were determined. Levels of sphingoid bases, including sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), increased in severe (P psoriasis relative to healthy controls (n = 32). These alterations were not reversed in severe patients (n = 16) after anti-TNF-α treatment despite significant improvement in psoriasis lesions. Circulating levels of sphingomyelins and ceramides shifted in a fatty acid chain length-dependent manner. These alterations were also observed in psoriasis skin lesions and were associated with changes in mRNA levels of ceramide synthases. The lack of S1P response to treatment may have pathobiological implications due to its close relation to the vascular and immune systems. In particular, increased levels of sphingolipids and especially S1P in severe psoriasis patients requiring biological treatment may potentially be associated with cardiovascular comorbidities. The fact that shifts in S1P levels were not ameliorated by anti-TNF-α treatment, despite improvements in the skin lesions, further supports targeting S1P receptors as therapy for severe psoriasis.

  15. Birth Outcomes in Children Fathered by Men Treated with Anti-TNF-α Agents Before Conception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Michael Due; Friedman, Sonia; Magnussen, Bjarne;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The safety of paternal use of anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) agents immediately prior to conception is practically unknown. On the basis of nationwide data from Danish health registries, we examined the association between paternal use of anti-TNF-α agents within 3 months before...

  16. Potential Impact of Diet on Treatment Effect from Anti-TNF Drugs in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Hansen, Axel Kornerup; Heitmann, Berit Lilienthal

    2017-01-01

    for such investigations. PubMed was searched using specified search terms. One small prospective study on diet and anti-TNF treatment in 56 patients with CD found similar remission rates after 56 weeks among 32 patients with good compliance that received concomitant enteral nutrition and 24 with poor compliance that had...

  17. Synergistic immunosuppressive effect of anti-TNF combined with methotrexate on antibody responses to the 23 valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelinck, L. B. S.; Van der Bijl, A. E.; Visser, L. G.; Huizinga, T. W. J.; Van Hogezand, R. A.; Rijkers, G. T.

    2008-01-01

    introduction: The efficacy of the immune response upon vaccination in patients treated with anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha (anti-TNF) with or without methottexate is the subject of debate. We studied the effect of immuncisuppressive treatment, including anti-TNF and methotrexate, on the response t

  18. Perfil lipídico e uso de anti-TNF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Ferraz Filho

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available O uso do anti-TNF alfa tem sido associado a várias alterações no perfil lipídico, embora o estudo dessas alterações tenha gerado resultados que ainda são conflitantes. O conhecimento desse fato é de grande importância quando se observa a associação entre doenças reumáticas e aterogenêse acelerada. Esta pesquisa foi feita com o intuito de verificar alterações no perfil lipídico de usuários de anti-TNF-α na população do sul do Brasil e sua associação com tempo de uso, indicações, gênero do paciente e tipo de anti-TNF. Para tanto, analisaram-se os perfis de colesterol total (TC, HDL colesterol (HDLc, LDL colesterol (LDLc, índice aterogênico (IAT e triglicerídeos (TGs de 58 pacientes (42 com artrite reumatoide e 16 com espondiloartrites antes e depois do uso desse medicamento por um tempo mediano de 16,0 meses. Não se observaram alterações nos níveis de CT, HDLc, LDLc e IAT (P = NS. Todavia, houve um aumento significativo nos níveis de TGs (P = 0,03. A diferença mediana dos valores de TGs entre primeira e segunda medidas foi de 16 mg/dL, e esse aumento não estava associado ao gênero do paciente, tempo de uso, indicação de uso ou tipo de anti-TNF-α (P = NS. Concluiu-se que o uso de anti TNF-α está associado com aumento nos valores de TGs.

  19. Serum Concentration of Anti-TNF Antibodies, Adverse Effects and Quality of Life in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Remission on Maintenance Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandse, Johannan F; Vos, Laura M C; Jansen, Jeroen; Schakel, Toos; Ponsioen, Cyriel I J; van den Brink, Gijs R; D'Haens, Geert R; Löwenberg, Mark

    2015-11-01

    High serum concentrations of infliximab [IFX] and adalimumab [ADA] may be associated with adverse effects in patients with inflammatory bowel disease [IBD]. We aimed to investigate whether high anti-tumour necrosis factor [TNF] trough levels [TLs] were associated with toxicity and impaired quality of life [QoL]. We conducted a prospective cohort study in IBD patients in clinical and biochemical remission on IFX or ADA maintenance therapy. Trough serum concentrations and antidrug antibodies were measured in addition to biochemical markers of inflammation in serum and stool to confirm quiescent disease. QoL was assessed using the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire and 36-item short form]. Side effects such as fatigue and arthralgia were measured with a visual analogue score [VAS]. Skin toxicity was reported with a European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-derived score. In all, 252 IBD patients on maintenance anti-TNF therapy were screened, of whom 95 [73 with Crohn's disease, 22 with ulcerative colitis; 72 on IFX, 23 on ADA] were in clinical and biochemical remission and were included. Median TLs were 5.5 µg/ml and 6.6 µg/ml for IFX and ADA, respectively. Patients with anti-TNF TLs above median had lower IBDQ scores than patients with lower TLs [IBDQ 176 vs 187, p = 0.02], particularly regarding systemic symptoms and emotional status. A trend towards lower SF-36 and higher fatigue scores was observed in the higher anti-TNF TL group. Skin and arthralgia scores were not significantly different between the groups. IBD patients with higher anti-TNF serum concentrations had significantly lower disease-specific QoL. Fatigue, arthralgia, and skin lesions do not occur more often in these patients. These data are reassuring that high serum concentrations of anti-TNF antibodies are not toxic. Copyright © 2015 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email

  20. Lymphocutaneous Sporotrichosis during Treatment with Anti-TNF-Alpha Monotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Ursini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sporotrichosis is an infectious disease caused by Sporothrix schenckii, a dimorphic fungus isolated for the first time in 1896 by Benjamin Schenck from a 36-year-old male patient presenting lesions on the right hand and arm. The infection generally occurs by traumatic inoculation of soil, plants, and organic matter contaminated with the fungus. Different clinical syndromes are described as a direct consequence of S. schenckii infection, including lymphocutaneous and disseminated forms, although extracutaneous presentations are reported most frequently in AIDS patients. Here we describe the case of a 57-year-old Caucasian male diagnosed in 2004 with ankylosing spondylitis under stable treatment with adalimumab monotherapy (40 mg every other week. During a routine follow-up visit in March 2013, he presented with multiple nodular lesions arranged in a linear fashion along the left hand and forearm. After diagnostic aspiration of the lesions, lymphocutaneous sporotrichosis was diagnosed and appropriate therapy started.

  1. Lymphocutaneous Sporotrichosis during Treatment with Anti-TNF-Alpha Monotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursini, Francesco; Calabria, Marilena; Bruno, Caterina; Tripolino, Cesare; Naty, Saverio; Grembiale, Rosa Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is an infectious disease caused by Sporothrix schenckii, a dimorphic fungus isolated for the first time in 1896 by Benjamin Schenck from a 36-year-old male patient presenting lesions on the right hand and arm. The infection generally occurs by traumatic inoculation of soil, plants, and organic matter contaminated with the fungus. Different clinical syndromes are described as a direct consequence of S. schenckii infection, including lymphocutaneous and disseminated forms, although extracutaneous presentations are reported most frequently in AIDS patients. Here we describe the case of a 57-year-old Caucasian male diagnosed in 2004 with ankylosing spondylitis under stable treatment with adalimumab monotherapy (40 mg every other week). During a routine follow-up visit in March 2013, he presented with multiple nodular lesions arranged in a linear fashion along the left hand and forearm. After diagnostic aspiration of the lesions, lymphocutaneous sporotrichosis was diagnosed and appropriate therapy started. PMID:25755904

  2. Action of anti-TNF-α drugs on the progression of Alzheimer's disease: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Henrique Ferreira Camargo

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe a clinical case of a patient with Alzheimer's disease (AD in use of an anti-TNF-α agent for rheumatoid arthritis (RA. The patient reported is an 81-year-old Caucasian man and retired teacher, diagnosed with RA in 2008 and AD in 2011. Treatment with donepezil was started in 2011 and the use of etanercept introduced in 2012. He was previously treated with adalimumab in 2010 for 18 months. In 2013, the subject was engaged in a clinical trial to assess a complementary non-pharmacological approach for AD, presenting significant cognitive improvement during the follow-up period. We propose the hypothesis of a synergistic effect of anti-TNF-α medication used for the treatment of RA as the cause of the improvement in cognitive response observed. These findings could suggest a possible use of this drug class in the therapeutic management of AD.

  3. Anti-TNF treatment response in rheumatoid arthritis patients is associated with genetic variation in the NLRP3-inflammasome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sode, Jacob; Vogel, Ulla; Bank, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Many patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) benefit from tumor necrosis factor-α blocking treatment (anti-TNF), but about one third do not respond. The objective of this study was to replicate and extend previously found associations between anti-TNF treatment response and genetic...... (relDAS28) were used as secondary outcomes. Subgroup analyses were stratified according to smoking status, type of anti-TNF drug and IgM-Rheumatoid Factor (IgM-RF) status. False discovery rate (FDR) controlling was used to adjust for multiple testing. RESULTS: Statistically significant associations...

  4. Responses to ustekinumab in the anti-TNF agent-naïve vs. anti-TNF agent-exposed patients with psoriasis vulgaris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, A; Spon, M; Skov, L

    2010-01-01

    patients. Ustekinumab binds to the p40 subunit of interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-23 and provides a mechanism of action independent of TNFa. Objective To investigate the efficacy of ustekinumab in a clinical practice setting and to compare treatment responses to ustekinumab in patients previously treated...... in the psoriasis area severity index (PASI75). Kaplan-Meier statistics evaluated the adherence to the treatments expressed as drug survival rate. Results PASI75 was achieved in 80% of the ustekinumab-treated patients after a median time of 112 days. There was no difference in efficacy in anti-TNFa-naïve patients......). Conclusion In clinical practice, the short-term efficacy and patient adherence to ustekinumab are excellent and comparable to the data obtained in clinical trials. Lack of response to previous anti-TNF treatment does not impair clinical response to ustekinumab....

  5. Anti-TNF drives regulatory T cell expansion by paradoxically promoting membrane TNF–TNF-RII binding in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Dao Xuan; Ehrenstein, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Nguyen and Ehrenstein reveal that anti-TNF antibodies paradoxically enhance membrane TNF–TNF-RII interactions to increase Foxp3 expression and confer upon T reg cells the ability to suppress Th17 cells in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

  6. The Anti-TNF-α Antibody Infliximab Inhibits the Expression of Fat-Transporter-Protein FAT/CD36 in a Selective Hepatic-Radiation Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesa Martius

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we reported a radiation-induced inflammation triggering fat-accumulation through fatty-acid-translocase/cluster of differentiation protein 36 (FAT/CD36 in rat liver. Furthermore, inhibition of radiation-induced FAT/CD36-expression by anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (anti-TNF-α (infliximab was shown in vitro. The current study investigates fat-accumulation in a mouse-model of single-dose liver-irradiation (25-Gray and the effect of anti-TNF-α-therapy on FAT/CD36 gene-expression. Mice livers were selectively irradiated in vivo in presence or absence of infliximab. Serum- and hepatic-triglycerides, mRNA, and protein were analyzed by colorimetric assays, RT-PCR, Immunofluorescence and Western-Blot, respectively. Sudan-staining was used demonstrating fat-accumulation in tissue. In mice livers, early (1–3 h induction of TNF-α-expression, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, was observed. It was followed by elevated hepatic-triglyceride level (6–12 h, compared to sham-irradiated controls. In contrast, serum-triglyceride level was decreased at these time points. Similar to triglyceride level in mice livers, Sudan staining of liver cryosections showed a quick (6–12 h increase of fat-droplets after irradiation. Furthermore, expression of fat-transporter-protein FAT/CD36 was increased at protein level caused by radiation or TNF-α. TNF-α-blockage by anti-TNF-α showed an early inhibition of radiation-induced FAT/CD36 expression in mice livers. Immunohistochemistry showed basolateral and cytoplasmic expression of FAT/CD36 in hepatocytes. Moreover, co-localization of FAT/CD36 was detected with α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA+ cells and F4/80+ macrophages. In summary, hepatic-radiation triggers fat-accumulation in mice livers, involving acute-phase-processes. Accordingly, anti-TNF-α-therapy prevented early radiation-induced expression of FAT/CD36 in vivo.

  7. The anti-TNF-α antibody infliximab inhibits the expression of fat-transporter-protein FAT/CD36 in a selective hepatic-radiation mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martius, Gesa; Cameron, Silke; Rave-Fränk, Margret; Hess, Clemens F; Wolff, Hendrik A; Malik, Ihtzaz A

    2015-03-02

    Previously, we reported a radiation-induced inflammation triggering fat-accumulation through fatty-acid-translocase/cluster of differentiation protein 36 (FAT/CD36) in rat liver. Furthermore, inhibition of radiation-induced FAT/CD36-expression by anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (anti-TNF-α) (infliximab) was shown in vitro. The current study investigates fat-accumulation in a mouse-model of single-dose liver-irradiation (25-Gray) and the effect of anti-TNF-α-therapy on FAT/CD36 gene-expression. Mice livers were selectively irradiated in vivo in presence or absence of infliximab. Serum- and hepatic-triglycerides, mRNA, and protein were analyzed by colorimetric assays, RT-PCR, Immunofluorescence and Western-Blot, respectively. Sudan-staining was used demonstrating fat-accumulation in tissue. In mice livers, early (1-3 h) induction of TNF-α-expression, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, was observed. It was followed by elevated hepatic-triglyceride level (6-12 h), compared to sham-irradiated controls. In contrast, serum-triglyceride level was decreased at these time points. Similar to triglyceride level in mice livers, Sudan staining of liver cryosections showed a quick (6-12 h) increase of fat-droplets after irradiation. Furthermore, expression of fat-transporter-protein FAT/CD36 was increased at protein level caused by radiation or TNF-α. TNF-α-blockage by anti-TNF-α showed an early inhibition of radiation-induced FAT/CD36 expression in mice livers. Immunohistochemistry showed basolateral and cytoplasmic expression of FAT/CD36 in hepatocytes. Moreover, co-localization of FAT/CD36 was detected with α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA+) cells and F4/80+ macrophages. In summary, hepatic-radiation triggers fat-accumulation in mice livers, involving acute-phase-processes. Accordingly, anti-TNF-α-therapy prevented early radiation-induced expression of FAT/CD36 in vivo.

  8. Mucosal healing with thalidomide in refractory Crohn's disease patients intolerant of anti-TNF-α drugs: report of 3 cases and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribano, Maria Lia; Cantoro, Laura; Marrollo, Marzia; Cosintino, Rocco; Kohn, Anna

    2014-07-01

    Thalidomide is an oral immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory drug with antitumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) activity. Several case reports and some clinical trials have demonstrated its efficacy in the treatment of refractory Crohn's disease (CD). We report the effect and tolerability of thalidomide in 3 patients with moderate-to-severe CD who were not responsive to anti-TNFtherapies, and review the relevant literature. The first case is of a 28-year-old female affected by Crohn's colitis complicated by a severe fistulizing perianal disease; she was treated with infliximab, adalimumab, and certolizumab pegol, which were stopped because of intolerance. The second case is of a 39-year-old female with fistulizing ileocolitis complicated by severe arthralgias and perianal disease with loss of response to infliximab and intolerance of certolizumab pegol. The third case is of a 39-year-old male with gastric and ileocolonic CD refractory to immunosuppressors and intolerant of infliximab. All the 3 cases achieved complete clinical remission and endoscopic healing of mucosal lesions at a low dose of thalidomide (50 to 150 mg/d). In our CD patients who experienced loss of response or were unable to tolerate anti-TNF-α drugs, thalidomide was an effective and well-tolerated therapy for inducing and maintaining long-term remission.

  9. The PRECiSE 2 trial of certolizumab pegol, a new PEGylated anti-TNF agent, in the treatment of Crohn's disease: An interview with David A Schwartz, 13 June 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, David A

    2008-03-01

    Certolizumab pegol (CDP 870) is a new anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy currently in development for the treatment of Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and psoriasis. Certolizumab pegol is the first PEGylated biologic anti-TNF agent and has a high binding affinity for TNF. Dr. Schwartz was an investigator of the PRECiSE (PEGylated Antibody Fragment Evaluation in Crohn's Disease Safety and Efficacy) 2 trial of certolizumab pegol in patients with Crohn's disease.

  10. Crowdsourced assessment of common genetic contribution to predicting anti-TNF treatment response in rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieberts, Solveig K.; Zhu, Fan; García-García, Javier; Stahl, Eli; Pratap, Abhishek; Pandey, Gaurav; Pappas, Dimitrios; Aguilar, Daniel; Anton, Bernat; Bonet, Jaume; Eksi, Ridvan; Fornés, Oriol; Guney, Emre; Li, Hongdong; Marín, Manuel Alejandro; Panwar, Bharat; Planas-Iglesias, Joan; Poglayen, Daniel; Cui, Jing; Falcao, Andre O.; Suver, Christine; Hoff, Bruce; Balagurusamy, Venkat S. K.; Dillenberger, Donna; Neto, Elias Chaibub; Norman, Thea; Aittokallio, Tero; Ammad-ud-din, Muhammad; Azencott, Chloe-Agathe; Bellón, Víctor; Boeva, Valentina; Bunte, Kerstin; Chheda, Himanshu; Cheng, Lu; Corander, Jukka; Dumontier, Michel; Goldenberg, Anna; Gopalacharyulu, Peddinti; Hajiloo, Mohsen; Hidru, Daniel; Jaiswal, Alok; Kaski, Samuel; Khalfaoui, Beyrem; Khan, Suleiman Ali; Kramer, Eric R.; Marttinen, Pekka; Mezlini, Aziz M.; Molparia, Bhuvan; Pirinen, Matti; Saarela, Janna; Samwald, Matthias; Stoven, Véronique; Tang, Hao; Tang, Jing; Torkamani, Ali; Vert, Jean-Phillipe; Wang, Bo; Wang, Tao; Wennerberg, Krister; Wineinger, Nathan E.; Xiao, Guanghua; Xie, Yang; Yeung, Rae; Zhan, Xiaowei; Zhao, Cheng; Calaza, Manuel; Elmarakeby, Haitham; Heath, Lenwood S.; Long, Quan; Moore, Jonathan D.; Opiyo, Stephen Obol; Savage, Richard S.; Zhu, Jun; Greenberg, Jeff; Kremer, Joel; Michaud, Kaleb; Barton, Anne; Coenen, Marieke; Mariette, Xavier; Miceli, Corinne; Shadick, Nancy; Weinblatt, Michael; de Vries, Niek; Tak, Paul P.; Gerlag, Danielle; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Kurreeman, Fina; Allaart, Cornelia F.; Louis Bridges Jr., S.; Criswell, Lindsey; Moreland, Larry; Klareskog, Lars; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K.; Friend, Stephen; Plenge, Robert; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Oliva, Baldo; Guan, Yuanfang; Mangravite, Lara M.

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) affects millions world-wide. While anti-TNF treatment is widely used to reduce disease progression, treatment fails in ∼one-third of patients. No biomarker currently exists that identifies non-responders before treatment. A rigorous community-based assessment of the utility of SNP data for predicting anti-TNF treatment efficacy in RA patients was performed in the context of a DREAM Challenge (http://www.synapse.org/RA_Challenge). An open challenge framework enabled the comparative evaluation of predictions developed by 73 research groups using the most comprehensive available data and covering a wide range of state-of-the-art modelling methodologies. Despite a significant genetic heritability estimate of treatment non-response trait (h2=0.18, P value=0.02), no significant genetic contribution to prediction accuracy is observed. Results formally confirm the expectations of the rheumatology community that SNP information does not significantly improve predictive performance relative to standard clinical traits, thereby justifying a refocusing of future efforts on collection of other data. PMID:27549343

  11. Pharmacokinetics of anti-TNF monoclonal antibodies in inflammatory bowel disease: Adding value to current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vande Casteele, Niels; Gils, Ann

    2015-03-01

    Since anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibodies were introduced to treat patients with inflammatory bowel diseases, short- and long-term clinical and endoscopic endpoints can be achieved that were unreachable with conventional anti-inflammatory agents. Although a large proportion of patients (70-90%) initially respond to the treatment, remission rates after induction are still low (20-50%) and patients are at risk to lose response to the drug over time. This inter-individual variability in response is likely to be influenced by the observed inter-individual variability in pharmacokinetics. By extensively reviewing the literature, we evaluated the potential role of therapeutic drug monitoring to optimize dosing of anti-TNF drugs. Thereby we emphasize some of the pharmacokinetic cornerstones that can help to understand the observed concentration-effect relationship. After discussing some of the most commonly used assays to measure anti-TNF drug and anti-drug antibody concentrations, we reviewed the application of those tests and their potential clinical value in retrospective and prospective studies.

  12. Anti-cytokine biologic treatment beyond anti-TNF in Behçet's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arida, Aikaterini; Sfikakis, Petros P

    2014-01-01

    Unmet therapeutic needs in Behçet's disease have drawn recent attention to biological agents targeting cytokines other than TNF. The anti-IL-17 antibody secukinumab and the anti-IL-2 receptor antibody daclizumab were not superior to placebo for ocular Behçet's in randomised controlled trials, comprising 118 and 17 patients, respectively. The anti-IL-1 agents anakinra and canakinumab and the anti-IL-6 agent tocilizumab were given to isolated refractory disease patients, who were either anti-TNF naïve (n=9) or experienced (n=18). No new safety signals were reported. Although a potential for bias to report positive effects and underreport negative cases may exist, Anakinra was partially effective, whereas disease remission was noted after canakinumab in some anti-TNF resistant patients. Tocilizumab appeared effective for neuro-Behçet's, but not for mucocutaneous manifestations. Finally, in a pilot study of 7 patients with relapsing posterior uveitis refractory to azathioprine and/or cyclosporine, the anti-IL-1β antibody Gevokizumab was beneficial. Collectively, it seems that IL-1 and IL-6 are promising targets in patients refractory or intolerant to other regimens including anti-TNFs. However, controlled studies are surely needed.

  13. Utility of measuring serum concentrations of anti-TNF agents and anti-drug antibodies in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Iván; Chaparro, María; Bermejo, Fernando; Gisbert, Javier P

    2011-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) is a cytokine with a critical role in the pathogenesis of some chronic inflammatory diseases, such as inflammatory bowel diseases. Anti-TNF agents, which neutralize the biological activity of TNFα, are widely used among the different therapeutic options for the treatment of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. These drugs are very useful in clinical practice, but some patients experience lack and loss of response during the treatment. Drug serum concentration, antibodies against anti-TNF agents, clearance of the drug, formation of immune complexes, a more severe disease and probably other unknown factors can influence the treatment's efficacy. Nowadays, the management of patients with lack or loss of response is empirical. The measurement of drug concentrations and antibodies against anti-TNF agents might be useful for improving the selection of patients that will benefit from the maintenance treatment. In clinical practice, these methods may help us decide which strategy will be used in cases of loss of response: treatment intensification, shortening the infusion interval, increasing the dose, switching to another anti-TNF agent or to a drug with another mechanism of action. The optimal strategy in the future may be comprised of an early detection of loss of response to the treatment by assessing clinical symptoms and finding evidence of activity of the disease on endoscopic or radiological examinations when necessary, as well as a better management of anti-TNF treatment aided by measuring the serum concentration of the drug and antibodies against the drug.

  14. Genetic Variation in the TLR5 Locus Is Associated with Anti-TNF Response Among Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sode, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    linkage data exists) previously found to be associated with RA anti-TNF response in a Dutch cohort (1) and it has been associated with higher PBMC IFN-γ secretion and altered CCL20 production. TLR1 rs4833095 has been associated with high PBMC TLR1 expression. Subgroup associations were found......Background/Purpose: In a recent study (paper in press) of Danish rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients we found single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the NLRP3 and interferon-γ genes to be associated with response to tumor necrosis factor a inhibitors (anti-TNF). The aim of this study...... was to extend and corroborate these associations by analyzing a new set of functional polymorphisms in the NLRP3-inflammasome and interferon-γ pathways in RA patients treated with anti-TNF. Methods: Twenty-three functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 14 genes involved in the inflammasome...

  15. Anti-TNF treatment response in rheumatoid arthritis patients is associated with genetic variation in the NLRP3-inflammasome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sode, Jacob; Vogel, Ulla; Bank, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Many patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) benefit from tumor necrosis factor-α blocking treatment (anti-TNF), but about one third do not respond. The objective of this study was to replicate and extend previously found associations between anti-TNF treatment response and genetic...... logistic regression analyses were performed to test associations between genotypes and treatment response at 3-6 months using the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) response criterion. American College of Rheumatology treatment response (ACR50) and relative change in 28-joint disease activity score...... (relDAS28) were used as secondary outcomes. Subgroup analyses were stratified according to smoking status, type of anti-TNF drug and IgM-Rheumatoid Factor (IgM-RF) status. False discovery rate (FDR) controlling was used to adjust for multiple testing. RESULTS: Statistically significant associations...

  16. Orientation with a Viking sun-compass, a shadow-stick, and two calcite sunstones under various weather conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernáth, Balázs; Blahó, Miklós; Egri, Adám; Barta, András; Kriska, György; Horváth, Gábor

    2013-09-01

    It is widely accepted that Vikings used sun-compasses to derive true directions from the cast shadow of a gnomon. It has been hypothesized that when a cast shadow was not formed, Viking navigators relied on crude skylight polarimetry with the aid of dichroic or birefringent crystals, called "sunstones." We demonstrate here that a simple tool, that we call "shadow-stick," could have allowed orientation by a sun-compass with satisfying accuracy when shadows were not formed, but the sun position could have reliably been estimated. In field tests, we performed orientation trials with a set composed of a sun-compass, two calcite sunstones, and a shadow-stick. We show here that such a set could have been an effective orientation tool for Vikings only when clear, blue patches of the sky were visible.

  17. Amelioration of psoriasis by anti-TNF-alpha RNAi in the xenograft transplantation model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Maria; Stenderup, Karin; Rosada, Cecilia;

    2009-01-01

    RNA as detected in skin biopsies 3 weeks after a single vector injection of lentiviral vectors encoding TNF-alpha shRNA. Our data show efficient lentiviral gene delivery to psoriatic skin and therapeutic applicability of anti-TNF-alpha shRNAs in human skin. These findings validate TNF-alpha mRNA as a target...... molecule for a potential persistent RNA-based treatment of psoriasis and establish the use of small RNA effectors as a novel platform for target validation in psoriasis and other skin disorders.......Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is upregulated in psoriatic skin and represents a prominent target in psoriasis treatment. The level of TNF-alpha-encoding mRNA, however, is not increased in psoriatic skin, and it remains unclear whether intervention strategies based on RNA interference...

  18. Production of anti TNF-α antibodies in eukaryotic cells using different combinations of vectors carrying heavy and light chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balabashin, Dmitriy; Kovalenko, Elena; Toporova, Viktoria; Aliev, Teimur; Panina, Anna; Svirshchevskaya, Elena; Dolgikh, Dmitry; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) plays a key role in rheumatoid arthritis and some other autoimmune diseases. Therapy with anti-TNF-α recombinant antibodies (Ab) appears to be highly effective. Production of new hyper-producing eukaryotic cell lines can decrease the treatment cost, which currently is very high. However, due to the complexity of protein transcription, translation, processing, and secretion in mammalian cells, the stages at which antibody expression is affected are still poorly determined. The aim of this work was to compare the productivity of two cell lines developed in CHO DG44 cells, deficient in dihydrofolate reductase, transfected with vectors carrying either heavy (H) or light (L) chains of chimeric antibody under different combinations of selective elements. Both H and L chains were cloned either in pOptiVEC or pcDNA3.3 vectors and different combinations were used to produce HL and LH cell lines. We have shown that Ab production has been low and comparable between HL and LH cells until selection on methotrexate (MTX) when LH but not HL cells have responded with 3.5 times increased productivity. Flow cytometry analysis has demonstrated that intracellular concentration of full size Abs in LH cells was 5.6 times higher than in HL ones due to higher amount of H chain synthesis. No differences in viability between HL and LH cells have been found. We have concluded that the expression of H chain in the pOptiVEC vector, which is responsible for MTX resistance, has led to the suppression of H chain synthesis and limitation in full Ab assembly.

  19. Genetic Variations in Pattern Recognition Receptor Loci Are Associated with Anti-TNF Response in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sode, Jacob; Vogel, Ulla; Bank, Steffen;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine whether genetic variation within genes related to the Toll-like receptor, inflammasome and interferon-γ pathways contributes to the differences in treatment response to tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (anti-TNF) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS...

  20. Genetic Variation in the TLR5 Locus Is Associated with Anti-TNF Response Among Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sode, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    and interferon-gamma pathways were assessed in 538 anti-TNF naive Danish RA patients. Prospectively collected clinical data including functional status (HAQ), patient global score, smoking status, tender and swollen joint counts, treatments, rheumatoid factor (RF) status and C-reative protein (CRP) were obtained...

  1. Anti-TNF Treatment Response in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Is Associated with Genetic Variation in the NLRP3-Inflammasome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sode, Jacob; Vogel, Ulla; Bank, Steffen; Andersen, Paal Skytt; Thomsen, Marianne Kragh; Hetland, Merete Lund; Locht, Henning; Heegaard, Niels H. H.; Andersen, Vibeke

    2014-01-01

    Objective Many patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) benefit from tumor necrosis factor-α blocking treatment (anti-TNF), but about one third do not respond. The objective of this study was to replicate and extend previously found associations between anti-TNF treatment response and genetic variation in the TNF-, NF-κB- and pattern recognition receptor signalling pathways. Methods Forty-one single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), including 34 functional, in 28 genes involved in inflammatory pathways were assessed in 538 anti-TNF naive Danish RA patients with clinical data. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to test associations between genotypes and treatment response at 3–6 months using the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) response criterion. American College of Rheumatology treatment response (ACR50) and relative change in 28-joint disease activity score (relDAS28) were used as secondary outcomes. Subgroup analyses were stratified according to smoking status, type of anti-TNF drug and IgM-Rheumatoid Factor (IgM-RF) status. False discovery rate (FDR) controlling was used to adjust for multiple testing. Results Statistically significant associations with EULAR response were found for two SNPs in NLRP3(rs4612666) (OR (odds ratio) for good/moderate response = 0.64 (95% confidence interval: 0.44–0.95), p = 0.025, q = 0.95) and INFG(rs2430561) (OR = 0.40 (0.21–0.76), p = 0.005, q = 0.18) and among IgM-RF positive patients for TNFRS1A(rs4149570) (0.59 (0.36–0.98), p = 0.040, q = 0.76). Current smokers who carried the NLRP3(rs4612666) variant allele were less likely to benefit from anti-TNF treatment (OR = 0.24 (0.10–0.56), p = 0.001, q = 0.04). Conclusions In a population of Danish RA patients, we confirm the NLRP3 gene as associated with EULAR anti-TNF response as previously reported. The NLRP3 variant (T) allele is associated with lower treatment response, in particular among

  2. Pre-operative use of anti-TNF-alpha agents and the risk of post-operative complications in patients with Crohn's disease--a nationwide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Bente Mertz; Nielsen, J.; Qvist, N.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A possible negative role of pre-operative use of antitumour necrosis factor-alpha (anti-TNF-alpha) agents on post-operative outcomes in Crohn's disease (CD) patients is still debated. AIM: To examine the impact of pre-operative anti-TNF-alpha agents on post-operative outcomes 30 and 6...

  3. Pre-operative use of anti-TNF-α agents and the risk of post-operative complications in patients with ulcerative colitis - a nationwide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, B M; Nielsen, J; Qvist, N;

    2012-01-01

    It is still controversial whether pre-operative anti-tumour necrosis factor-alpha (anti-TNF-α) agents increase post-operative complications in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC).......It is still controversial whether pre-operative anti-tumour necrosis factor-alpha (anti-TNF-α) agents increase post-operative complications in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC)....

  4. Efeito do anti-TNF-α em implantes endometriais no peritônio de ratas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Kondo

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o efeito da terapia anti-TNF-α no tratamento de implantes endometriais no peritônio de ratas. MÉTODOS: Os implantes endometrióticos foram induzidos cirurgicamente em 120 ratas Wistar-Albino. Os animais foram aleatoriamente distribuídos em 4 grupos. O grupo C (n=36 recebeu uma injeção intraperitoneal de 0,2ml de solução salina. O grupo L (n=41 recebeu uma injeção subcutânea de 1mg/kg de leuprolide. O grupo I5 (n=20 recebeu uma injeção subcutânea de 5mg/kg de anticorpo monoclonal anti-fator de necrose tumoral (TNF a (infliximab. O grupo I10 (n=20 recebeu uma injeção subcutânea de 10mg/kg de infliximab. As ratas foram sacrificadas após 21 dias para se avaliar o tamanho dos implantes e a expressão do TNF-α. RESULTADOS: O tratamento com leuprolide promoveu uma redução absoluta na área de superfície do implante comparado com o grupo C (+14mm vs. 0mm; p=0,013 e com o grupo I10 (+14mm vs. +5mm; p=0,018. Da mesma forma, uma redução percentual da area de superfície do implante foi observada comparando o grupo L com o grupo C (+33,3% vs. 0%; p=0,005 e com o grupo I10 (+33,3% vs. +18,3%; p=0,027. O tratamento com infliximab não foi capaz de diminuir a área de superfície do implante comparado com o grupo C. A expressão de TNF-α reduziu nos grupos L, I5 e I10 comparado com o grupo C (505,6µm² vs. 660,5µm² vs. 317,2µm² vs. 2519,3µm², respectivamente; p<0,001. CONCLUSÃO: A terapia anti-TNF-α reduziu a expressão de TNF-α nos implantes endometrióticos mas não reduziu a área de superfície da lesão.

  5. Adjustment errors of sunstones in the first step of sky-polarimetric Viking navigation: studies with dichroic cordierite/ tourmaline and birefringent calcite crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Száz, Dénes; Farkas, Alexandra; Blahó, Miklós; Barta, András; Egri, Ádám; Kretzer, Balázs; Hegedüs, Tibor; Jäger, Zoltán; Horváth, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    According to an old but still unproven theory, Viking navigators analysed the skylight polarization with dichroic cordierite or tourmaline, or birefringent calcite sunstones in cloudy/foggy weather. Combining these sunstones with their sun-dial, they could determine the position of the occluded sun, from which the geographical northern direction could be guessed. In psychophysical laboratory experiments, we studied the accuracy of the first step of this sky-polarimetric Viking navigation. We measured the adjustment error e of rotatable cordierite, tourmaline and calcite crystals when the task was to determine the direction of polarization of white light as a function of the degree of linear polarization p. From the obtained error functions e(p), the thresholds p* above which the first step can still function (i.e. when the intensity change seen through the rotating analyser can be sensed) were derived. Cordierite is about twice as reliable as tourmaline. Calcite sunstones have smaller adjustment errors if the navigator looks for that orientation of the crystal where the intensity difference between the two spots seen in the crystal is maximal, rather than minimal. For higher p (greater than p crit) of incident light, the adjustment errors of calcite are larger than those of the dichroic cordierite (p crit=20%) and tourmaline (p crit=45%), while for lower p (less than p crit) calcite usually has lower adjustment errors than dichroic sunstones. We showed that real calcite crystals are not as ideal sunstones as it was believed earlier, because they usually contain scratches, impurities and crystal defects which increase considerably their adjustment errors. Thus, cordierite and tourmaline can also be at least as good sunstones as calcite. Using the psychophysical e(p) functions and the patterns of the degree of skylight polarization measured by full-sky imaging polarimetry, we computed how accurately the northern direction can be determined with the use of the Viking

  6. Estratégia de troca entre agentes anti-TNF-alfa não melhora a capacidade funcional em pacientes com artrite reumatoide de longa evolução Switching between anti-TNF-alpha agents does not improve functional capacity in patients with long-standing and active rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Roberta Melo P Soares

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Avaliar a resposta clínica após a estratégia de troca entre agentes antifator de necrose tumoral alfa (anti-TNF-alfa em pacientes com artrite reumatoide (AR. PACIENTES E MÉTODOS: Foram incluídos 99 pacientes com diagnóstico de AR (American College of Rheumatology, 1987, em uso de terapia anti-TNF-alfa, para avaliação da resposta terapêutica após 24 semanas. A estratégia de troca foi feita se, após 12 a 24 semanas, houvesse relato de evento adverso sério (T: toxicidade ou se não ocorresse redução maior que 0,6 do índice de atividade da doença (DAS28 inicial (RI: resposta inadequada. Nesse último caso, o paciente foi considerado como falência primária (FP. Falência secundária (FS foi definida se houvesse perda de resposta após melhora inicial. Remissão (DAS28 0,2 do questionário de avaliação da saúde (HAQ inicial] foram avaliadas por análise de regressão linear. P OBJECTIVES: To assess clinical response after switching between anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha (anti-TNF-alpha agents in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This study included 99 patients diagnosed with RA American College of Rheumatology, 1987, on anti-TNF-alpha therapy, to assess the therapeutic response after 24 weeks. Switching was performed if, after 12 to 24 weeks, a severe adverse event was reported (toxicity: T or if no reduction greater than 0.6 in the initial Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS28 occurred (inadequate response: IR. In case of IR, the patient was considered as primary failure (PF. Secondary failure (SF was defined as loss of response after initial improvement. Remission (DAS28 0.2] were assessed by use of linear regression analysis. The significance level adopted was P < 0.05. RESULTS: Switching was performed in 39 (39.4% patients, especially due to PF (24.3%, SF (35.1% and T (40.5%. The retention rate of the first agent was 60.1%, and the mean time for switching was 14.2 ± 10.9 months. After

  7. Systemically administered anti-TNF therapy ameliorates functional outcomes after focal cerebral ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Bettina Hjelm; Degn, Matilda; Martin, Nellie Anne;

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundThe innate immune system contributes to the outcome after stroke, where neuroinflammation and post-stroke systemic immune depression are central features. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF), which exists in both a transmembrane (tm) and soluble (sol) form, is known to sustain complex inflammat...

  8. TNF receptor 1 genetic risk mirrors outcome of anti-TNF therapy in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregory, Adam P; Dendrou, Calliope A; Attfield, Kathrine E;

    2012-01-01

    substantiate this through functional studies showing that the MS risk allele directs expression of a novel, soluble form of TNFR1 that can block TNF. Importantly, TNF-blocking drugs can promote onset or exacerbation of MS, but they have proven highly efficacious in the treatment of autoimmune diseases......), but not with other autoimmune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis and Crohn’s disease. By analysing MS GWAS data in conjunction with the 1000 Genomes Project data we provide genetic evidence that strongly implicates this SNP, rs1800693, as the causal variant in the TNFRSF1A region. We further...... for which there is no association with rs1800693. This indicates that the clinical experience with these drugs parallels the disease association of rs1800693, and that the MS-associated TNFR1 variant mimics the effect of TNF-blocking drugs. Hence, our study demonstrates that clinical practice can...

  9. Systemically administered anti-TNF therapy ameliorates functional outcomes after focal cerebral ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Bettina Hjelm; Degn, Matilda; Martin, Nellie Anne

    2014-01-01

    after ischemia. Brain inflammation, liver acute phase response (APR), spleen and blood leukocyte profiles, along with plasma microvesicle analysis, were evaluated.ResultsWe found that both XPro1595 and etanercept significantly improved functional outcomes, altered microglial responses, and modified APR......, spleen T cell and microvesicle numbers, but without affecting infarct volumes.ConclusionsOur data suggest that XPro1595 and etanercept improve functional outcome after focal cerebral ischemia by altering the peripheral immune response, changing blood and spleen cell populations and decreasing granulocyte...

  10. [IgA vasculitis associated with anti-TNF-α inhibitors in a patient with Crohn's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Jun; Hosokawa, Ayumu; Akashi, Momoko; Mihara, Hiroshi; Nanjo, Sohachi; Yoshita, Hiroki; Ando, Takayuki; Kajiura, Shinya; Fujinami, Haruka; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2015-10-01

    Anti-TNF-α inhibitors have been widely used in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. Although they have good clinical efficacy and tolerance, they remain a matter of concern because they cause drug-induced autoimmune disorders as side effects. Here, we report a case of a patient with Crohn's disease who developed IgA vasculitis after infliximab and adalimumab treatment. A 17-year-old male with Crohn's disease who had received scheduled infliximab treatment for the preceding 19 months complained of purpura on his lower limbs. He was diagnosed with infliximab-induced IgA vasculitis. Switching infliximab to adalimumab resulted in rapid improvement of the condition. However, 21 months after switching to adalimumab, his purpura recurred. Drug-induced IgA vasculitis is a rare complication caused by infliximab and adalimumab; however, diagnosis in the early phase and appropriate management of patients receiving anti-TNF-α inhibitors is critical to a successful patient outcome.

  11. Therapeutic management of inflammatory bowel disease in real-life practice in the current era of anti-TNF agents: analysis of the French administrative health databases 2009-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchgesner, J; Lemaitre, M; Rudnichi, A; Racine, A; Zureik, M; Carbonnel, F; Dray-Spira, R

    2017-01-01

    Management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has evolved in the last decade. To assess IBD therapeutic management, including treatment withdrawal and early treatment use in the current era of anti-TNF agents (anti-TNFs). All patients affiliated to the French national health insurance diagnosed with IBD were included from 2009 to 2013 and followed up until 31 December 2014. Medication uses, treatment sequences after introduction of thiopurine or anti-TNF monotherapies or both (combination therapy), surgical procedures and hospitalisations were assessed. A total of 210 001 patients were diagnosed with IBD [Crohn's disease (CD), 100 112; ulcerative colitis (UC), 109 889]. Five years after diagnosis, cumulative probabilities of anti-TNF monotherapy and combination therapy exposures were 33.8% and 18.3% in CD patients and 12.9% and 7.4% in UC patients, respectively. Among incident patients who received thiopurines or anti-TNFs, the first treatment was thiopurine in 69.1% of CD and 78.2% of UC patients. Among patients treated with anti-TNFs, 45.2% and 54.5% of CD patients and 38.2% and 39.9% of UC patients started monotherapy and combination therapy within 3 months after diagnosis, respectively; 31.3% of CD and 27.1% of UC incident patients withdrew from thiopurine or anti-TNFs for more than 3 months after their first course of treatment. Five years after diagnosis, the cumulative risks of first intestinal resection in CD patients and colectomy in UC patients were 11.9% and 5.7%, respectively. Step-up approach remains the predominant strategy, while exposure to anti-TNFs is high. Surgery rates are low. Treatment withdrawal in IBD is more common than expected. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Anti-TNF drives regulatory T cell expansion by paradoxically promoting membrane TNF-TNF-RII binding in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, D. X.; Ehrenstein, M R

    2016-01-01

    The interplay between inflammatory and regulatory pathways orchestrates an effective immune response that provides protection from pathogens while limiting injury to host tissue. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a pivotal inflammatory cytokine, but there is conflicting evidence as to whether it boosts or inhibits regulatory T cells (T reg cells). In this study, we show that the therapeutic anti-TNF antibody adalimumab, but not the soluble TNF receptor etanercept, paradoxically promoted the inte...

  13. The PRECiSE 2 trial of certolizumab pegol, a new PEGylated anti-TNF agent, in the treatment of Crohn's disease - An interview with David A Schwartz, 13 June 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Schwartz

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available David A SchwartzVanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USAContext: Certolizumab pegol (CDP 870 is a new anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF therapy currently in development for the treatment of Crohn’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and psoriasis. Certolizumab pegol is the first PEGylated biologic anti-TNF agent and has a high binding affinity for TNF. Dr. Schwartz was an investigator of the PRECiSE (PEGylated Antibody Fragment Evaluation in Crohn’s Disease Safety and Efficacy 2 trial of certolizumab pegol in patients with Crohn’s disease.Keywords: certolizumab pegol, PRECiSE 2 trial, Crohn’s disease

  14. Indirect comparison for Anti-TNF drugs in moderate to severe ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván-Banqueri, M; Vega-Coca, M D; Castillo-Muñoz, M A; Beltrán Calvo, C; Molina López, T

    2015-03-01

    Objetivo: Comparar la eficacia relativa de infliximab, adalimumab y golimumab mediante comparaciones indirectas (CI) ajustadas. Métodos: Se realizó una búsqueda bibliográfica que abarcó hasta Octubre 2013. Las bases de datos consultadas fueron: MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination y the Web of Science. Se incluyeron ensayos clínicos aleatorizados (ECA) que compararan la eficacia de infliximab, adalimumab o golimumab frente a placebo en términos de remisión clínica, respuesta clínica y curación de la mucosa. En el caso de que se incluyera más de un ECA para un mismo fármaco se llevó a cabo un metanálisis utilizado el modelo de efectos fijos. Las CI se realizaron utilizando el método de Butcher et al. Resultados: Se incluyeron 6 ECA publicados en 5 artículos: 2 para infliximab (ACT 1 y ACT 2), 2 para adalimumab (ULTRA 1 y ULTRA 2) y 2 para golimumab (PURSUIT-SC y PURSUIT-M). Los tres agentes biológicos presentaron mayor eficacia que placebo. Los resultados de las CI fueron los siguientes: en relación a la remisión clínica, en el período de inducción y en el período de mantenimiento, no hubo diferencias estadísticamente significativas entre los tres fármacos anti-TNF. En relación a la respuesta clínica y a la curación de la mucosa, en el período de inducción hay diferencias estadísticamente significativas entre infliximab y adalimumab. Conclusiones: En base a los resultados obtenidos (eficacia similar), infliximab, adalimumab y golimumab parecen ser alternativas terapéuticas. Así, otras consideraciones como la seguridad, la tolerancia y el coste-efectividad deben considerarse a la hora de seleccionar el tratamiento más adecuado.

  15. Lack of association of variants previously associated with anti-TNF medication response in rheumatoid arthritis patients: results from a homogeneous Greek population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zervou, Maria I; Myrthianou, Efsevia; Flouri, Irene; Plant, Darren; Chlouverakis, Gregory; Castro-Giner, Francesc; Rapsomaniki, Panayiota; Barton, Anne; Boumpas, Dimitrios T; Sidiropoulos, Prodromos; Goulielmos, George N

    2013-01-01

    Treatment strategies blocking tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) have proven very successful in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), showing beneficial effects in approximately 50-60% of the patients. However, a significant subset of patients does not respond to anti-TNF agents, for reasons that are still unknown. The aim of this study was to validate five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of PTPRC, CD226, AFF3, MyD88 and CHUK gene loci that have previously been reported to predict anti-TNF outcome. In addition, two markers of RA susceptibility, namely TRAF1/C5 and STAT4 were assessed, in a cohort of anti-TNF-treated RA patients, from the homogeneous Greek island of Crete, Greece. The RA patient cohort consisted of 183 patients treated with either of 3 anti-TNF biologic agents (infliximab, adalimumab and etanercept) from the Clinic of Rheumatology of the University Hospital of Crete. The SNPs were genotyped by TaqMan assays or following the Restriction Fragments Length Polymorphisms (RFLPs) approach. Disease activity score in 28 joints (DAS28) at baseline and after 6 months were available for all patients and analysis of good versus poor response at 6 months was performed for each SNP. None of the 7 genetic markers correlated with treatment response. We conclude that the gene polymorphisms under investigation are not strongly predictive of anti-TNF response in RA patients from Greece.

  16. Lack of association of variants previously associated with anti-TNF medication response in rheumatoid arthritis patients: results from a homogeneous Greek population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria I Zervou

    Full Text Available Treatment strategies blocking tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF have proven very successful in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, showing beneficial effects in approximately 50-60% of the patients. However, a significant subset of patients does not respond to anti-TNF agents, for reasons that are still unknown. The aim of this study was to validate five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of PTPRC, CD226, AFF3, MyD88 and CHUK gene loci that have previously been reported to predict anti-TNF outcome. In addition, two markers of RA susceptibility, namely TRAF1/C5 and STAT4 were assessed, in a cohort of anti-TNF-treated RA patients, from the homogeneous Greek island of Crete, Greece. The RA patient cohort consisted of 183 patients treated with either of 3 anti-TNF biologic agents (infliximab, adalimumab and etanercept from the Clinic of Rheumatology of the University Hospital of Crete. The SNPs were genotyped by TaqMan assays or following the Restriction Fragments Length Polymorphisms (RFLPs approach. Disease activity score in 28 joints (DAS28 at baseline and after 6 months were available for all patients and analysis of good versus poor response at 6 months was performed for each SNP. None of the 7 genetic markers correlated with treatment response. We conclude that the gene polymorphisms under investigation are not strongly predictive of anti-TNF response in RA patients from Greece.

  17. Evaluation of dose reduction versus standard dosing for maintenance of remission in patients with spondyloarthritis and clinical remission with anti-TNF (REDES-TNF): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Caridad; Gratacós, Jordi; Torres, Ferran; Avendaño, Cristina; Sanz, Jesús; Vallano, Antoni; Juanola, Xavier; de Miguel, Eugenio; Sanmartí, Raimon; Calvo, Gonzalo

    2015-08-20

    Dose reduction schedules of tumor necrosis factor antagonists (anti-TNF) as maintenance therapy in patients with spondyloarthritis are used empirically in clinical practice, despite the lack of clinical trials providing evidence for this practice. To address this issue the Spanish Society of Rheumatology (SER) and Spanish Society of Clinical Pharmacology (SEFC) designed a 3-year multicenter, randomized, open-label, controlled clinical trial (2 years for inclusion and 1 year of follow-up). The study is expected to include 190 patients with axial spondyloarthritis on stable maintenance treatment (≥4 months) with any anti-TNF agent at doses recommended in the summary of product characteristics. Patients will be randomized to either a dose reduction arm or maintenance of the dosing regimen as per the official labelling recommendations. Randomization will be stratified according to the anti-TNF agent received before study inclusion. Patient follow-up, visit schedule, and examinations will be maintained as per normal clinical practice recommendations according to SER guidelines. The study aims to test the hypothesis of noninferiority of the dose reduction strategy compared with standard treatment. The first patients were recruited in July 2012, and study completion is scheduled for the end of April 2015. The REDES-TNF study is a pragmatic clinical trial that aims to provide evidence to support a medical decision now made empirically. The study results may help inform clinical decisions relevant to both patients and healthcare decision makers. EudraCT 2011-005871-18 (21 December 2011).

  18. Measuring patients’ satisfaction with their anti-TNF treatment in severe Crohn’s disease: scoring and psychometric validation of the Satisfaction for PAtients in Crohn’s diseasE Questionnaire (SPACE-Q©

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilet H

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hélène Gilet,1 Benoit Arnould,1 Fatoumata Fofana,1 Pierre Clerson,2 Jean-Frédéric Colombel,10 Olivier D’Hondt,2 Patrick Faure,4 Hervé Hagège,5 Maria Nachury,3 Stéphane Nahon,6 Gilbert Tucat,7 Luc Vandromme,8 Ines Cazala-Telinge,9 Emmanuel Thibout9 1HEOR and Strategic Market Access, Mapi, Lyon, France; 2Orgamétrie, Roubaix, France; 3Hôpital Claude Huriez, Lille, France; 4Clinique Saint-Jean du Languedoc, Toulouse, France; 5Centre Hospitalier Intercommunal, Créteil, France; 6Centre Hospitalier Intercommunal, Le Raincy Montfermeil, France; 7Gastroenterologist, Private Clinical Practice, Paris, France; 8Gastroenterologist, Private Clinical Practice, Reims, France; 9Abbvie France, Rungis, France; 10Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA Background: Severe Crohn’s disease management includes anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF drugs that differ from early-stage treatments regarding efficacy, safety, and convenience. This study aimed to finalize and psychometrically validate the Satisfaction for PAtients in Crohn’s diseasE Questionnaire (SPACE-Q©, developed to measure satisfaction with anti-TNF treatment in patients with severe Crohn’s disease. Methods: A total of 279 patients with severe Crohn’s disease receiving anti-TNF therapy completed the SPACE-Q 62-item pilot version at inclusion and 12 and 13 weeks after first anti-TNF injection. The final SPACE-Q scoring was defined using multitrait and regression analyses and clinical relevance considerations. Psychometric validation included clinical validity against Harvey–Bradshaw score, concurrent validity against Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication (TSQM, internal consistency reliability, test–retest reliability, and responsiveness against the patient global impression of change (PGIC.Results: Quality of completion was good (55%–67% of patients completed all items. Four items were removed from the questionnaire. Eleven scores were defined

  19. Perfuração do colo por colite amebiana invasiva durante terapia anti-TNF para espondiloartrite♧

    OpenAIRE

    Restrepo,Juan Pablo; Molina,María Del Pilar

    2014-01-01

    O bloqueio do TNF tem tido sucesso no tratamento de algumas doenças reumáticas, como a espondiloartrite. Relatam-se muitas complicações infecciosas com a terapia anti-TNF, principalmente infecções bacterianas, micobacterianas, virais e fúngicas. A Entamoeba histolytica é um protozoário extracelular que causa principalmente colite e abscesso hepático, sendo que a perfuração intestinal é uma complicação rara, com alta mo...

  20. Golimumab: A novel human anti-TNF-α monoclonal antibody for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Kay

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan Kay1, Mahboob U Rahman2,31Division of Rheumatology, UMass Memorial Medical Center, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA; 2Centocor Research and Development, inc., Malvern, PA, USA; 3University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USAIntroduction: The introduction of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α inhibitors represented a significant advance in the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA and other chronic inflammatory diseases. Although three TNF-α inhibitors have been approved for the treatment of RA by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA and the European Medicinal Products Evaluation Agency (EMEA, not all patients achieve a satisfactory clinical improvement with these therapeutic agents. The mode of administration of these medications is inconvenient for some patients.Aims: Golimumab is a novel anti-TNF-α monoclonal antibody that is in clinical development for the treatment of RA, psoriatic arthritis (PsA, and ankylosing spondylitis (AS, either as a first-line biologic therapy or an alternative after other TNF-α inhibitors have been discontinued. This review summarizes the development of, and clinical evidence achieved with, golimumab.Evidence review: Golimumab has demonstrated significant efficacy in randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials when administered subcutaneously once every four weeks. It has been generally well tolerated in clinical trials and demonstrates a safety profile comparable with currently available TNF-α inhibitors.Outcomes summary: Golimumab has been confirmed to be an effective treatment for patients with RA, PsA, and AS in phase III clinical trials as evaluated by traditional measures of disease activity, such as signs and symptoms, as well as measures of physical function, patient reported outcomes, and health economic measures. The efficacy and safety profile of golimumab in RA, PsA, and AS appears to be similar to other anti-TNF agents. However

  1. Tuberculosis chemoprophylaxis in rheumatoid arthritic patients receiving tumor necrosis factor inhibitors or conventional therapy

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    Saad Rabie Samra

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: There was no significant increased risk for tuberculosis among RA patients receiving anti-TNF therapy when screening and chemoprophylaxis was applied, so screening of RA patients before anti-TNF therapy for latent tuberculosis and TB chemoprophylaxis should be done.

  2. Confirmation of an IRAK3 polymorphism as a genetic marker predicting response to anti-TNF treatment in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sode, Jacob; Vogel, U; Bank, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Several genetic variants in Toll-like receptor (TLR) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB signalling pathways have been reported associated with responsiveness to tumour necrosis factor inhibitor (anti-TNF) treatment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The present study was undertaken to replicate these findings...... the IRAK3 rs11541076 variant as associated (odds ratio (OR)=1.33, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.00-1.77, P-value=0.047) with a positive treatment response (EULAR (European League Against Rheumatism) good/moderate vs none response at 4±2 months), and found the NLRP3 rs461266 variant associated (OR=0.......75, 95% CI: 0.60-0.94, P=0.014) with a negative treatment response. Meta-analyses combining data from previous studies suggested smaller effect sizes of associations between variant alleles of CHUK rs11591741, NFKBIB rs3136645 and rs9403 and a negative treatment response. In conclusion, this study...

  3. Role of the protein annexin A1 on the efficacy of anti-TNF treatment in a murine model of acute colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula-Silva, Marina; Barrios, Bibiana Elisabeth; Macció-Maretto, Lisa; Sena, Angela Aparecida; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli; Correa, Silvia Graciela; Oliani, Sonia Maria

    2016-09-01

    TNF-α is involved in the mechanisms that initiate inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). Anti-TNF-α drugs, such as infliximab (IFX), cause non-responsiveness and side effects, indicating the need to investigate alternative therapies for these diseases. The anti-inflammatory protein, annexin A1 (AnxA1), has been associated with the protection of the gastrointestinal mucosa. To further address the role of endogenous AnxA1 on the TNF-α blockade efficacy in a murine model, we assessed colitis induced by Dextran Sulfate Sodium (DSS) in wild-type (WT) and AnxA1(-/-) Balb/c mice treated with IFX. We consistently observed endogenous AnxA1 prevented clinical and physiological manifestations of experimental colitis treated with IFX, additionally the manifestation of the disease was observed earlier in AnxA1(-)(/-) mice. Rectal bleeding, diarrhea, histological score, epithelial damages and collagen degradation caused by DSS were prevented following IFX treatment only in WT mice. IL-6 increased during colitis in WT and AnxA1(-)(/-) mice, decreasing under IFX treatment in WT. The influx of neutrophils and TNF-α secretion were largely elevated in AnxA1(-)(/-) mice when compared to WT mice. In the group WT/DSS+IFX, phagocytes were more susceptible to apoptosis following treatment with IFX. Endogenous expression of AnxA1 increased after DSS and decreased with IFX treatment, demonstrating an attenuated inflammatory response. The data indicate that AnxA1 contributes to the establishment of intestinal homeostasis after blocking of TNF-α was used as a treatment of IBD, constituting a key molecule in the mechanism of action and a potential biomarker of therapeutic efficacy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. to Anti-TNF Treatment Help Us to Clarify the Magnitude of Centrally Related Pain and to Explain the Relief of This Pain upon Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sture Forsgren

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is a neurotrophin with functions related to neuronal survival/proliferation processes and inflammation. BDNF is also an important central pain mediator. The levels of BDNF have been found to be high for RA patients with severe disease and to become lowered in response to anti-TNF treatment. New information says that the levels of BDNF in the blood parallel the BDNF concentrations in the brain and that BDNF can pass the blood-brain barrier. Furthermore, most of the circulating BDNF is produced in the brain. Habitual and regular exercise, in contrast to temporary exercise, does also lead to a lowering of BDNF blood levels. Both anti-TNF treatment and habitual and regular exercise do have pain-relieving effects. It might be that the pain-relieving effect of anti-TNF treatment is related to an affection of central neuronal regions, hereby influencing BDNF production. Measurements of BDNF in the blood help us to clarify the magnitude of centrally related pain for RA patients and help us to explain the relief of this pain in response to anti-TNF treatment.

  5. Multimodal treatment of perianal fistulas in Crohn's disease : seton versus anti-TNF versus advancement plasty (PISA): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groof, E. Joline; Buskens, Christianne J.; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; D'Haens, Geert R. A. M.; Srivastava, Nidhi; van Acker, Gijs J. D.; Jansen, Jeroen M.; Gerhards, Michael F.; Dijkstra, Gerard; Lange, Johan F. M.; Witteman, Ben J. M.; Kruyt, Philip M.; Pronk, Apollo; van Tuyl, Sebastiaan A. C.; Bodelier, Alexander; Crolla, Rogier M. P. H.; West, Rachel L.; Vrijland, Wietske W.; Consten, Esther C. J.; Brink, Menno A.; Tuynman, Jurriaan B.; de Boer, Nanne K. H.; Breukink, Stephanie O.; Pierik, Marieke J.; Oldenburg, Bas; van der Meulen, Andrea E.; Bonsing, Bert A.; Spinelli, Antonino; Danese, Silvio; Sacchi, Matteo; Warusavitarne, Janindra; Hart, Ailsa; Yassin, Nuha A.; Kennelly, Rory P.; Cullen, Garret J.; Winter, Desmond C.; Hawthorne, A. Barney; Torkington, Jared; Bemelman, Willem A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Currently there is no guideline for the treatment of patients with Crohn's disease and high perianal fistulas. Most patients receive anti-TNF medication, but no long-term results of this expensive medication have been described, nor has its efficiency been compared to surgical strategies

  6. Multimodal treatment of perianal fistulas in Crohn's disease : Seton versus anti-TNF versus advancement plasty (PISA): Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groof, E. Joline; Buskens, Christianne J.; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G W; D'Haens, Geert R A M; Srivastava, Nidhi; van Acker, Gijs J D; Jansen, Jeroen M.; Gerhards, Michael F.; Dijkstra, Gerard; Lange, Johan F M; Witteman, Ben J M; Kruyt, Philip M.; Pronk, Apollo; van Tuyl, Sebastiaan A C; Bodelier, Alexander; Crolla, Rogier M P H; West, Rachel L.; Vrijland, Wietske W.; Consten, Esther C J; Brink, Menno A.; Tuynman, Jurriaan B.; de Boer, Nanne K H; Breukink, Stephanie O.; Pierik, Marieke J.; Oldenburg, Bas|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/217176461; van der Meulen, Andrea E.; Bonsing, Bert A.; Spinelli, Antonino; Danese, Silvio; Sacchi, Matteo; Warusavitarne, Janindra; Hart, Ailsa; Yassin, Nuha A.; Kennelly, Rory P.; Cullen, Garret J.; Winter, Desmond C.; Hawthorne, A. Barney; Torkington, Jared; Bemelman, Willem A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Currently there is no guideline for the treatment of patients with Crohn's disease and high perianal fistulas. Most patients receive anti-TNF medication, but no long-term results of this expensive medication have been described, nor has its efficiency been compared to surgical strategies

  7. A plant cell-expressed recombinant anti-TNF fusion protein is biologically active in the gut and alleviates immune-mediated hepatitis and colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilan, Yaron; Gingis-Velitski, Svetlana; Ben Ya'aco, Ami; Shabbat, Yehudit; Zolotarov, Lidya; Almon, Einat; Shaaltiel, Yoseph

    2017-03-01

    The orally administered BY-2 plant cell-expressed recombinant anti-TNF fusion protein (PRX-106) (n=6) consists of the soluble form of the human TNF receptor (TNFR) fused to the Fc component of a human antibody IgG1 domain.

  8. Negative Screening Does Not Rule Out the Risk of Tuberculosis in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Undergoing Anti-TNF Treatment: A Descriptive Study on the GETAID Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abitbol, Yael; Laharie, David; Cosnes, Jacques; Allez, Matthieu; Nancey, Stéphane; Amiot, Aurélien; Aubourg, Alexandre; Fumery, Mathurin; Altwegg, Romain; Michetti, Pierre; Chanteloup, Elise; Seksik, Philippe; Baudry, Clotilde; Flamant, Mathurin; Bouguen, Guillaume; Stefanescu, Carmen; Bourrier, Anne; Bommelaer, Gilles; Dib, Nina; Bigard, Marc André; Viennot, Stephanie; Hébuterne, Xavier; Gornet, Jean-Marc; Marteau, Philippe; Bouhnik, Yoram; Abitbol, Vered; Nahon, Stéphane

    2016-10-01

    to describe the characteristics of incident cases of tuberculosis [TB] despite negative TB screening tests, in patients with inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] undergoing anti-TNF treatment, and to identify the risk factors involved. A retrospective descriptive study was conducted at GETAID centers on all IBD patients undergoing anti-TNF treatment who developed TB even though their initial screening test results were negative. The following data were collected using a standardized anonymous questionnaire: IBD, and TB characteristics and evolution, initial screening methods and results, and time before anti-TNF treatment was restarted. A total of 44 IBD patients [including 23 men; median age 37 years] were identified at 20 French and Swiss centers at which TB screening was performed [before starting anti-TNF treatment] based on Tuberculin Skin Tests [n = 25], Interferon Gamma Release Assays [n = 12], or both [n = 7]. The median interval from the start of anti-TNF treatment to TB diagnosis was 14.5 months (interquartile range [IQR] 25-75: 4.9-43.3). Pulmonary TB involvement was observed in 25 [57%] patients, and 40 [91%] had at least one extrapulmonary location. One TB patient died as the result of cardiac tamponade. Mycobacterium tuberculosis exposure was thought to be a possible cause of TB in 14 cases [32%]: 7 patients [including 6 health care workers] were exposed to occupational risks, and 7 had travelled to endemic countries. Biotherapy was restarted on 27 patients after a median period of 11.2 months [IQR 25-75: 4.4-15.2] after TB diagnosis without any recurrence of the infection. Tuberculosis can occur in IBD patients undergoing anti-TNF treatment, even if their initial screening results were negative. In the present population, TB was mostly extrapulmonary and disseminated. TB screening tests should be repeated on people exposed to occupational risks and/or travelers to endemic countries. Restarting anti-TNF treatment seems to be safe. Copyright © 2016

  9. Optimizing biological therapy in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gecse, Krisztina Barbara; Végh, Zsuzsanna; Lakatos, Péter László

    2016-01-01

    Anti-TNF therapy has revolutionized the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases, including both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. However, a significant proportion of patients does not respond to anti-TNF agents or lose response over time. Recently, therapeutic drug monitoring has gained a major role in identifying the mechanism and management of loss of response. The aim of this review article is to summarize the predictors of efficacy and outcomes, the different mechanisms of anti-TNF/biological failure in Crohn's disease and identify strategies to optimize biological treatment.

  10. Economic evaluation of anti-TNF agents for patients with rheumatoid arthritis in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fragoulakis V

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vasilis Fragoulakis,1 Elli Vitsou,2 Ana Cristina Hernandez,2 Nikolaos Maniadakis11National School of Public Health, 2Pfizer Hellas, Athens, GreeceObjectives: We aimed to estimate the total mean annual treatment cost of different therapy options for patients with moderate-to-severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA in Greece. Methods: A cost-minimization approach was adopted. An economic model was developed to estimate the direct costs of the three widely used treatments within a 1-year time horizon, from a health care payer perspective, either for new or for existing patients. Data on resource use, dose escalation, and frequency of therapy were based on a nationwide field survey of rheumatologists. Other analyses were also undertaken based on evidence from the literature. Total cost comprised the cost of drugs, administration, and hospital day care visits. Unit cost data were obtained from the price bulletin and the government gazettes issued by the Ministry of Health. Due to the short time horizon of the study, the cost was not discounted. Results: The mean annual total cost per new (or per existing responder patient on etanercept was estimated at €9,845 (€9,840, and the total cost on etanercept/methotrexate (MTX was estimated at €9,857 (€9,852. Therapy with etanercept had lower annual cost relative to adalimumab and infliximab. On an annual basis, it was estimated that the difference between etanercept monotherapy and adalimumab monotherapy was €544 (€1,323. Similarly, the difference between etanercept/MTX and infliximab/MTX was €1,871 (€1,490 and €543 (€1,323, respectively, relative to adalimumab/MTX. Results remained constant under other scenario analyses undertaken. Conclusion: In the real-life practice setting in Greece, where dose intensity and frequency differences occur, etanercept alone or in combination with MTX, if prescribed as per label, represents the option with lower annual cost per patient when compared with

  11. Certolizumab, an anti-TNF safe during pregancy? The CRIB Study results: an interview with Professor Xavier Mariette.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariette, Xavier

    2017-09-01

    Professor Xavier Mariette, MD, PhD, has served as the Head of the Rheumatology Department of Bicêtre Hospital, Paris-Sud University since 1999, a role he took following 10 years of practice of clinical immunology. Professor Mariette has initiated a number of clinical research studies on biotherapies in autoimmune diseases. He is the head of the French RATIO (Research Axed on Tolerance of Biotherapy) observatory, collecting specific rare serious adverse events in patients treated with anti-TNF. He initiated the French AIR (Autoimmunity and Rituximab) and ORA (Orencia and Rheumatoid arthritis) registries of patients with autoimmune diseases treated with rituximab and abatacept. He initiated clinical trials in Sjögren's syndrome with infliximab, hydroxychloroquine and belimumab. Professor Mariette is involved in basic research, leading a group working on pathogeny of Sjögren's syndrome, relationships between innate immunity and B-cell activation in autoimmunity and the relationships between autoimmunity and lymphoma. Professor Mariette is also very interested in new ways of teaching. In 2007, he participated with other European Experts in the creation of the EULAR Web Course of Rheumatology in 2007. Professor Mariette has been the President of the Scientific Committee of the EULAR meeting, which took place in Berlin in 2012 and is in 2016 the elect Chair of the EULAR standing committee on investigative rheumatology. Professor Mariette is co-author of more than 430 publications referenced in PubMed with an H-index of 61.

  12. Anti-TNF drives regulatory T cell expansion by paradoxically promoting membrane TNF-TNF-RII binding in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dao Xuan; Ehrenstein, Michael R

    2016-06-27

    The interplay between inflammatory and regulatory pathways orchestrates an effective immune response that provides protection from pathogens while limiting injury to host tissue. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a pivotal inflammatory cytokine, but there is conflicting evidence as to whether it boosts or inhibits regulatory T cells (T reg cells). In this study, we show that the therapeutic anti-TNF antibody adalimumab, but not the soluble TNF receptor etanercept, paradoxically promoted the interaction between monocytes and T reg cells isolated from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Adalimumab bound to monocyte membrane TNF from RA patients and unexpectedly enhanced its expression and its binding to TNF-RII expressed on T reg cells. As a consequence, adalimumab expanded functional Foxp3(+) T reg cells equipped to suppress Th17 cells through an IL-2/STAT5-dependent mechanism. Our data not only highlight the beneficial effect of membrane TNF on T reg cell numbers during chronic inflammation, but in addition reveal how a therapeutic antibody that is thought to act by simply blocking its target can enhance the regulatory properties of this proinflammatory cytokine.

  13. Postoperative Use of Anti-TNF-α Agents in Patients with Crohn's Disease and Risk of Reoperation-A Nationwide Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Jens; Nielsen, Jan; Larsen, Michael Due

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Approximately 80% of patients with Crohn's disease will require surgery. Surgery for Crohn's disease is not curative, and recurrence is typical. In this cohort study, based on nationwide Danish registries, we examined the association between postoperative treatment with anti...... postoperative exposure to anti-TNF-α agents as at least 1 treatment within 6 months after the first operation and the reference cohorts were those not treated. Patients were followed from 6 months after operation and until 5 years. We used Cox proportional-hazards regression to compute adjusted hazard ratios...... is not associated with a reduction in the need for subsequent operation. Uncontrolled confounding might have influenced our results, and, furthermore, future studies are warranted to clarify whether our study population is different from populations most often associated with postoperative anti-TNF-α treatment....

  14. Hidradenitis suppurativa: guidelines of the Italian Society of Dermatology and Venereology (SIDeMaST) for the use of anti-TNF-α agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megna, M; Bettoli, V; Chimenti, S; Chiricozzi, A; Naldi, L; Virgili, A; Girolomoni, G; Monfrecola, G

    2015-12-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by nodules, abscesses and sinus tracts, primarily affecting the intertriginous areas. The occlusion of the upper part of the folliculopilosebaceous unit, leading to rupture of the sebofollicular canal with the consequent development of perifollicular lympho-histiocytic inflammation, is believed to be the initial pathogenic event in HS. Giving the chronic nature of HS, its destructive impact on social, working and daily life of patients, its management is often frustrating both for patients and physicians. The HS treatment choices are influenced by disease severity and its individual subjective impact. In this article, the Board of the Italian Society of Dermatology and Venereology (SIDeMaST) on HS has prepared a document focusing on the role of biologic drugs (anti-TNF-α) in HS management, providing also a flow-chart for HS handling and the inclusion and exclusion criteria for HS treatment with anti-TNF-α.

  15. Multimodal treatment of perianal fistulas in Crohn's disease: seton versus anti-TNF versus advancement plasty (PISA): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    de Groof, E Joline

    2015-08-20

    Currently there is no guideline for the treatment of patients with Crohn\\'s disease and high perianal fistulas. Most patients receive anti-TNF medication, but no long-term results of this expensive medication have been described, nor has its efficiency been compared to surgical strategies. With this study, we hope to provide treatment consensus for daily clinical practice with reduction in costs.

  16. The Effects of Infliximab on Laminin, NFκB, and Anti-TNF Expression through Its Effect on Ischemic Liver Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remzi Adnan Akdogan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the possible protective effects of infliximab on expression of laminin, anti-TNF, and NFκB in the rat hepatic cells after ischemia/reperfusion (I/R. A total of 30 male Wistar albino rats were divided into three groups: Control (C, sham I/R (ISC, and I/R+ infliximab (ISC inf; each group comprised 10 animals. C group animals underwent laparotomy without I/R injury. In ISC groups after undergoing laparotomy, 1 hour of superior mesenteric artery ligation was done, which was followed by 1 hour of reperfusion. In the ISC inf group, 3 days before I/R, infliximab (3 mg/kg was administered intravenously. All animals were killed at the end of reperfusion and hepatic tissue samples were obtained for histopathological and histochemical investigations in all groups. Laminin, anti-TNF, and NFκB immunoreactivity were performed for all groups. ISC caused severe histopathological injury including mucosal erosions, inflammatory cell infiltration, necrosis, hemorrhage, and villous congestion. Infliximab treatment significantly attenuated the severity of intestinal I/R injury and it is shown by laminin, anti-TNF, and NFκB immunoreactivity. Because of its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects, infliximab pretreatment may have protective effects on hepatic cells in the experimental intestinal I/R model of rats.

  17. Targeting cytokines: production and characterization of anti-TNF-α scFvs by phage display technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolalizadeh, Jalal; Nouri, Mohammad; Zolbanin, Jafar Majidi; Barzegari, Abolfazl; Baradaran, Behzad; Barar, Jaleh; Coukos, George; Omidi, Yadollah

    2013-01-01

    The antibody display technology (ADT) such as phage display (PD) has substantially improved the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and Ab fragments through bypassing several limitations associated with the traditional approach of hybridoma technology. In the current study, we capitalized on the PD technology to produce high affinity single chain variable fragment (scFv) against tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF- α), which is a potent pro-inflammatory cytokine and plays important role in various inflammatory diseases and malignancies. To pursue production of scFv antibody fragments against human TNF- α, we performed five rounds of biopanning using stepwise decreased amount of TNF-α (1 to 0.1 μ g), a semi-synthetic phage antibody library (Tomlinson I + J) and TG1 cells. Antibody clones were isolated and selected through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) screening. The selected scFv antibody fragments were further characterized by means of ELISA, PCR, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and Western blot analyses as well as fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Based upon binding affinity to TNF-α , 15 clones were selected out of 50 positive clones enriched from PD in vitro selection. The selected scFvs displayed high specificity and binding affinity with Kd values at nm range to human TNF-α . The immunofluorescence analysis revealed significant binding of the selected scFv antibody fragments to the Raji B lymphoblasts. The effectiveness of the selected scFv fragments was further validated by flow cytometry analysis in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treated mouse fibroblast L929 cells. Based upon these findings, we propose the selected fully human anti-TNF-α scFv antibody fragments as potential immunotherapy agents that may be translated into preclinical/clinical applications.

  18. Lipid profiles alter from pro-atherogenic into less atherogenic and proinflammatory in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients responding to anti TNF-α treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Wei Yeh

    was associated with triglyceride level, atherogenic index and was inversely associated with total cholesterol, HDL-C, and LDL-C levels and can be improved substantially by using anti TNF-α treatment. Such treatment may have a beneficial effect on the cardiovascular risk in patients with JIA.

  19. The clinical importance of the thyroid nodules during anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy in patients with axial spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terlemez, Rana; Akgün, Kenan; Palamar, Deniz; Boz, Sinan; Sarı, Hidayet

    2017-03-30

    The clinical importance of the thyroid nodules in patients with axial spondyloarthritis (ax-SpA) rests with the need to exclude thyroid malignancy. The aim of this study is to assess the risk of thyroid malignancy in ax-SpA patients receiving anti-TNF therapy. From September 2015 until December 2015, 70 patients diagnosed with ax-SpA were included in the research. Forty of the patients had received anti-TNF therapy, and 30 of the patients were anti-TNF naive. All cases were screened for the presence of nodules in the thyroid gland with ultrasound. Of the patients that received anti-TNF therapy, 15 (37.5%); and of the anti-TNF naive patients, 11 (36.7%) had thyroid nodule(s). Four patients from the anti-TNF group underwent fine needle aspiration biopsy of the nodules, and two of them were diagnosed with papillary thyroid carcinoma. None of the nodules in anti-TNF naive patients required biopsy. When compared to the normal population, the standardized incidence ratio (SIR) was found to be increased in both male (SIR 2.03, 95% CI 1.9 to 18) and female (SIR 2.7, 95% CI 2.6 to 24) cases. It is not yet established whether the development of cancer during the treatment process is the effect of the treatment or if it is a part of the natural course of the disease or if it is coincidental. We saw a mild increase in thyroid malignancies in ax-SpA patients who received anti-TNF therapy. Therefore, we believe that the thyroid gland should also be taken into consideration while screening for malignancy before anti-TNF therapy.

  20. Soluble CD163, a specific macrophage activation marker, is decreased by anti-TNF-α antibody treatment in active inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dige, A; Støy, S; Thomsen, K L; Hvas, C L; Agnholt, J; Dahlerup, J F; Møller, H J; Grønbaek, H

    2014-12-01

    Activated macrophages shed the haemoglobin-haptoglobin scavenger receptor CD163 into the circulation as soluble(s)-CD163. We measured sCD163 as an in vivo macrophage activation marker in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC) receiving antitumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α antibody or prednisolone treatment. We also investigated the CD163 expression on circulating monocytes. 58 patients with CD, 40 patients with UC and 90 healthy controls (HC) were included. All patients had active disease at inclusion and were followed for 6 weeks of anti-TNF-α antibody or prednisolone treatment. We measured plasma sCD163 levels at baseline, 1 day, 1 week and 6 weeks after initiating treatment. CD163 expression on circulating CD14(+) monocytes was measured in 21 patients with CD receiving anti-TNF-α antibody treatment. Baseline sCD163 levels were elevated in patients with CD [1.99 (1.80-2.18) mg/l] and in patients with UC [2.07 (1.82-2.32) mg/l] compared with HC [1.51 (1.38-1.63) mg/l] (P CD163 expression on CD14(+) monocytes was increased compared with HC. This study highlights that active CD and UC are associated with increased macrophage activation, as indicated by elevated sCD163 levels and monocytic CD163 expression. Anti-TNF-α antibody treatment induced a rapid decrease in sCD163 levels, suggesting a specific effect on macrophage activation in inflammatory bowel diseases. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Evidencia de la eficacia de los fármacos anti-TNF Alfa en el tratamiento de la espondilitis anquilosante

    OpenAIRE

    Montilla Salas, Juan Manuel

    2011-01-01

    OBJETIVO Establecer la evidencia de los estudios clínicos sobre la eficacia de las terapias anti-TNF alfa para el tratamiento de la espondilitis anquilosante (EA). MÉTODOS Se realizó una búsqueda con los diferentes fármacos anti-NTF alfa actualmente utilizados en terapia de la espondilitis anquilosante (Infiximab, Etanercept y Adalimumab). La revisión bibliográfica se realizó en Medline, Embase y la librería Cochrane para los estudios controlados y randomizados publicados hasta 1-enero-2005. ...

  2. Public versus Private Drug Insurance and Outcomes of Patients Requiring Biologic Therapies for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumman, Amir; Candia, Roberto; Sam, Justina J.; Croitoru, Kenneth; Silverberg, Mark S.; Steinhart, A. Hillary

    2017-01-01

    Background. Antitumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy is a highly effective but costly treatment for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Methods. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of IBD patients who were prescribed anti-TNF therapy (2007–2014) in Ontario. We assessed if the insurance type was a predictor of timely access to anti-TNF therapy and nonroutine health utilization (emergency department visits and hospitalizations). Results. There were 268 patients with IBD who were prescribed anti-TNF therapy. Public drug coverage was associated with longer median wait times to first dose than private one (56 versus 35 days, P = 0.002). After adjusting for confounders, publicly insured patients were less likely to receive timely access to anti-TNF therapy compared with those privately insured (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.66; 95% CI: 0.45–0.95). After adjustment for demographic and clinical characteristics, publicly funded subjects were more than 2-fold more likely to require hospitalization (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 2.30; 95% CI: 1.19–4.43) and ED visits (IRR 2.42; 95% CI: 1.44–4.08) related to IBD. Conclusions. IBD patients in Ontario with public drug coverage experienced greater delays in access to anti-TNF therapy than privately insured patients and have a higher rate of hospitalizations and ED visits related to IBD. PMID:28239601

  3. Public versus Private Drug Insurance and Outcomes of Patients Requiring Biologic Therapies for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Rumman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Antitumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF therapy is a highly effective but costly treatment for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Methods. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of IBD patients who were prescribed anti-TNF therapy (2007–2014 in Ontario. We assessed if the insurance type was a predictor of timely access to anti-TNF therapy and nonroutine health utilization (emergency department visits and hospitalizations. Results. There were 268 patients with IBD who were prescribed anti-TNF therapy. Public drug coverage was associated with longer median wait times to first dose than private one (56 versus 35 days, P=0.002. After adjusting for confounders, publicly insured patients were less likely to receive timely access to anti-TNF therapy compared with those privately insured (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.66; 95% CI: 0.45–0.95. After adjustment for demographic and clinical characteristics, publicly funded subjects were more than 2-fold more likely to require hospitalization (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 2.30; 95% CI: 1.19–4.43 and ED visits (IRR 2.42; 95% CI: 1.44–4.08 related to IBD. Conclusions. IBD patients in Ontario with public drug coverage experienced greater delays in access to anti-TNF therapy than privately insured patients and have a higher rate of hospitalizations and ED visits related to IBD.

  4. Autoimmune diseases induced by TNF-targeted therapies: analysis of 233 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Casals, Manuel; Brito-Zerón, Pilar; Muñoz, Sandra; Soria, Natalia; Galiana, Diana; Bertolaccini, Laura; Cuadrado, Maria-Jose; Khamashta, Munther A

    2007-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-targeted therapies are increasingly used for a rapidly expanding number of rheumatic and autoimmune diseases. With this use and longer follow-up periods of treatment, there are a growing number of reports of the development of autoimmune processes related to anti-TNF agents. We have analyzed the clinical characteristics, outcomes, and patterns of association with the different anti-TNF agents used in all reports of autoimmune diseases developing after TNF-targeted therapy found through a MEDLINE search of articles published between January 1990 and December 2006. We identified 233 cases of autoimmune diseases (vasculitis in 113, lupus in 92, interstitial lung diseases in 24, and other diseases in 4) secondary to TNF-targeted therapies in 226 patients. The anti-TNF agents were administered for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in 187 (83%) patients, Crohn disease in 17, ankylosing spondylitis in 7, psoriatic arthritis in 6, juvenile RA in 5, and other diseases in 3. The anti-TNF agents administered were infliximab in 105 patients, etanercept in 96, adalimumab in 21, and other anti-TNF agents in 3. We found 92 reported cases of lupus following anti-TNF therapy (infliximab in 40 cases, etanercept in 37, and adalimumab in 15). Nearly half the cases fulfilled 4 or more classification criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), which fell to one-third after discarding preexisting lupus-like features. One hundred thirteen patients developed vasculitis after receiving anti-TNF agents (etanercept in 59 cases, infliximab in 47, adalimumab in 5, and other agents in 2). Leukocytoclastic vasculitis was the most frequent type of vasculitis, and purpura was the most frequent cutaneous lesion. A significant finding was that one-quarter of patients with vasculitis related to anti-TNF agents had extracutaneous involvement. Twenty-four cases of interstitial lung disease associated with the use of anti-TNF agents were reported. In these patients, 2 specific

  5. Quando anti-TNF não obtém sucesso, anti-IL-12-23 é opção alternativa na psoríase e na artrite psoriásica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Prado Golmia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pacientes com psoríase e artrite psoriásica respondem à terapia anti-TNF, mas nem todos os pacientes mantêm uma resposta efetiva e alguns não respondem. Nesse artigo, demonstramos o papel de uma nova via patogenética que, até certo ponto, independe de TNF nesses pacientes. Anti-IL-12-23 é um modo terapêutico novo e alternativo para pacientes com resposta recalcitrante à medicação com anti-TNF.

  6. Caracterización de las bases genético-moleculares y ambientales relacionadas con la variabilidad interindividual en la respuesta a ANTI-TNF en pacientes con enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal.

    OpenAIRE

    Lacruz Guzmán, Diana

    2012-01-01

    Objetivo: investigar la relación entre la respuesta a los tratamientos anti-TNF en pacientes con EII y factores genéticos y ambientales. Método: estudio longitudinal de todos los pacientes con EII de un Hospital Universitario, en tratamiento con terapias anti-TNF. La respuesta al tratamiento se determinó mediante el uso del cuestionario CDAI (enfermedad de Crohn), y la determinación de las concentraciones séricas de proteína C reactiva. Los factores genéticos y bioquímicos se estudiaron me...

  7. [Guidelines in RA treatment: concepts on safety and recommendations using anti-TNF-alpha inhibitors. Grupo de Estudio de Nuevas Terapias de Enfermedades reumáticas (GENTE)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Jouanen, Efraín; Abud-Mendoza, Carlos; Garza-Elizondo, Mario Alberto; Medrano-Ramírez, Gabriel; Burgos-Vargas, Rubén; Orozco-Alcalá, José Javier; Pacheco-Tena, César Francisco; Pineda, Carlos; Pozos-Espíndola, Juan Carlos; Ramos-Niembro, Francisco; Robles-San-Román, Manuel; Santana-Sahagún, Jesús Ernesto

    2009-01-01

    Recommendations for the use of Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs (DMARD) with both conventional and biological agents in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) must be based on their safety profile, adverse effects, risks, and advantages. With the purpose of presenting the most updated information about the safety of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) antagonists, in this article we summarize the literature published during the last three years about this sort of biological agents in specific clinical situations, such as risk of developing infections, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and autoimmunity; as well as their administration to patients who will undergo surgical procedures, pregnant and/or breast-feeding women, and patients who need immunizations. Likewise, in this analysis we offer specific recommendations, based on evidence, for the best anti-TNF-alfa management.

  8. Profile of patients with rheumatic diseases undergoing treatment with anti-TNF agents in the Brazilian Public Health System (SUS, Belo Horizonte - MG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haliton Alves de Oliveira Junior

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe the baseline demographic and clinical characteristics as well as the functional status of a prospective cohort of patients with rheumatic diseases assisted by the Brazilian Public Health System (SUS. Data for 302 patients receiving tumor necrosis factor α inhibitors (anti-TNF agents was collected through a standard form. Among patients, 229 (75.8% were female and 155 (51.3% were Caucasian; the mean age was 50.3 ± 12.8 years, and the mean disease duration was 9.9 ± 8.7 years. Among them 214 patients (70.9% received adalimumab, 72 (23.8% etanercept, and 16 (5.3% infliximab. Mean Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI was 1.37 ± 0.67 for all participants. Poor functional response was associated with female gender, married patients and with a score of < 0.6 on the EuroQoL-5 dimensions (EQ-5D. Significant correlation was found between the HAQ-DI values, disease activity and quality of life (QOL. The results obtained in this study contribute to a better understanding of the clinical and demographic characteristics of patients with rheumatic diseases at the beginning of anti-TNF-agent treatment by SUS. Furthermore, our findings are consistent with another Brazilian and foreign cross-sectional investigations. This knowledge can be of great importance for further studies evaluating the effectiveness of biological agents, as well as, to contribute to improve the well-being of the patients with rheumatic diseases.

  9. PDE3A-SLCO1C1 locus is associated with response to anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy in psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julià, Antonio; Rodríguez, Jesús; Fernández-Sueiro, José Luis; Gratacós, Jordi; Queiró, Rubén; Montilla, Carlos; Torre-Alonso, Juan Carlos; Pérez-Venegas, José Javier; Manrique-Arija, Sara; Muñoz-Fernández, Santiago; González, Carlos; Roig, Daniel; Zarco, Pedro; Erra, Alba; Castañeda, Santos; García, Alicia; Salvador, Georgina; Díaz-Torne, César; Blanco, Ricardo; Domínguez, Alfredo Willisch; Mosquera, José Antonio; Vela, Paloma; Tornero, Jesús; Sánchez-Fernández, Simón; Corominas, Héctor; Ramírez, Julio; Avila, Gabriela; Alonso, Arnald; Tortosa, Raül; López-Lasanta, María; Cañete, Juan D; Marsal, Sara

    2014-11-01

    Aim: Variation at PDE3A-SLCO1C1 locus has been recently associated with the response to anti-TNF therapy in rheumatoid arthritis. We undertook the present study to determine whether PDE3A-SLCO1C1 is also associated with the response to anti-TNF therapy in psoriatic arthritis. Patients & methods: Genomic DNA was obtained from 81 psoriatic arthritis patients that had been treated with anti-TNF therapy. PDE3A-SLCO1C1 SNP rs3794271 was genotyped using Taqman realt-time PCR. The clinical response to anti-TNF therapy was measured as the change from baseline in the level of disease activity according to the DAS28 score. Results: A significant association between rs3794271 and anti-TNF response in psoriatic arthritis was found (beta = -0.71; p = 0.0036). Conclusion: PDE3A-SLCO1C1 locus is also associated with response to anti-TNF therapy in psoriatic arthritis. Original submitted 12 May 2014; Revision submitted 18 August 2014.

  10. Ultrasound Doppler measurements predict success of treatment with anti-TNF-α drug in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Karen; Christensen, Robin; Torp-Pedersen, Søren;

    2011-01-01

    was assessed for both USD measurements and other disease measures. Baseline values of disease measures of patients who remained on treatment after 1 year was compared with those who stopped therapy. Results. The study cohort consisted of 109 patients. In this study, the baseline CF was the only measure...

  11. Ultrasound Doppler measurements predict success of treatment with anti-TNF-α drug in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Karen; Christensen, Robin; Torp-Pedersen, Søren

    2011-01-01

    was assessed for both USD measurements and other disease measures. Baseline values of disease measures of patients who remained on treatment after 1 year was compared with those who stopped therapy. Results. The study cohort consisted of 109 patients. In this study, the baseline CF was the only measure...

  12. A BioDesign Approach to Obtain High Yields of Biosimilars by Anti-apoptotic Cell Engineering: a Case Study to Increase the Production Yield of Anti-TNF Alpha Producing Recombinant CHO Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulce Iz, Sultan; Inevi, Muge Anil; Metiner, Pelin Saglam; Tamis, Duygu Ayyildiz; Kisbet, Nazli

    2017-07-06

    Recent developments in medical biotechnology have facilitated to enhance the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and recombinant proteins in mammalian cells. Human mAbs for clinical applications have focused on three areas, particularly cancer, immunological disorders, and infectious diseases. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), which has both proinflammatory and immunoregulatory functions, is an important target in biopharmaceutical industry. In this study, a humanized anti-TNF-α mAb producing stable CHO cell line which produces a biosimilar of Humira (adalimumab) was used. Adalimumab is a fully human anti-TNF mAb among the top-selling mAb products in recent years as a biosimilar. Products from mammalian cell bioprocesses are a derivative of cell viability and metabolism, which is mainly disrupted by cell death in bioreactors. Thus, different strategies are used to increase the product yield. Suppression of apoptosis, also called anti-apoptotic cell engineering, is the most remarkable strategy to enhance lifetime of cells for a longer production period. In fact, using anti-apoptotic cell engineering as a BioDesign approach was inspired by nature; nature gives prolonged life span to some cells like stem cells, tumor cells, and memory B and T cells, and researchers have been using this strategy for different purposes. In this study, as a biomimicry approach, anti-apoptotic cell engineering was used to increase the anti-TNF-α mAb production from the humanized anti-TNF-α mAb producing stable CHO cell line by Bcl-xL anti-apoptotic protein. It was shown that transient transfection of CHO cells by the Bcl-xL anti-apoptotic protein expressing plasmid prolonged the cell survival rate and protected cells from apoptosis. The transient expression of Bcl-xL using CHO cells enhanced the anti-TNF-α production. The production of anti-TNF-α in CHO cells was increased up to 215 mg/L with an increase of 160% after cells were transfected with Bcl-xL expressing plasmid

  13. Recovery of active anti TNF-α ScFv through matrix-assisted refolding of bacterial inclusion bodies using CIM monolithic support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sushma, Krishnan; Bilgimol, Chuvappumkal Joseph; Vijayalakshmi, Mookambeswaran A; Satheeshkumar, Padikara Kutty

    2012-04-01

    Anti TNF-α molecules are important as therapeutic agents for many of the autoimmune diseases in chronic stage. Here we report the expression and purification of a recombinant single chain variable fragment (ScFv) specific to TNF-α from inclusion bodies. In contrast to the conventional on column refolding using the soft gel supports, an efficient methodology using monolithic matrix has been employed. Nickel (II) coupled to convective interaction media (CIM) support was utilized for this purpose with 6M guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl) as the chaotropic agent. The protein purified after solubilization and refolding proved to be biologically active with an IC₅₀ value of 15 μg. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing the application of methacrylate based chromatographic supports for matrix-assisted refolding and purification of Escherichia coli inclusion bodies. The results are promising to elaborate the methodology further to exploit the potential positive features of monoliths in protein refolding science.

  14. Therapeutic potential of combined anti-IL-1β IgY and anti-TNF-α IgY in guinea pigs with allergic rhinitis induced by ovalbumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo-Zhu, Hu; Xi-Ling, Zhu; Zhu, Wen; Li-Hua, Wu; Dan, He; Xiao-Mu, Wu; Wen-Yun, Zhou; Wei-Xu, Hu

    2015-03-01

    We have previously demonstrated that anti-IL-1β immunoglobulin yolk(IgY) inhibits pathological responses in allergic asthma guinea pigs induced by ovalbumin(OVA). This study aims to determine whether the combined blockade of IL-1β and TNF-α can more effectively inhibit allergic inflammation in allergic rhinitis(AR) guinea pigs induced by OVA. Healthy guinea pigs treated with saline were used as the healthy control. The AR guinea pigs induced by OVA were randomly divided into (1) the AR model group containing negative control animals treated with intranasal saline; (2) the 0.1% non-specific IgY treatment group treated with non-specific IgY; (3) the 0.1% anti-TNF-α IgY treatment group treated with 0.1% anti-TNF-α IgY; (4) the 0.1% anti-IL-1β IgY treatment group treated with 0.1% anti-IL-1β IgY; (5) the 0.1% combined anti-IL-1β IgY and anti-TNF-α IgY treatment group treated with 0.1% combined anti-IL-1β IgY and anti-TNF-α IgY; and (6) the fluticasone propionate treatment group treated with fluticasone propionate. Cytokines were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results showed that IL-1β, IL-5, IL-9, IL-13, IL-18, IL-22, IL-33, TNF-α, TGF-β1 and OVA-specific IgE levels in the peripheral blood (PB) and nasal lavage fluid (NLF) significantly decreased at 2h, 4h or 8h in the 0.1% combined anti-IL-1β IgY and anti-TNF-α IgY treatment group compared to the AR model group and the 0.1% non-specific IgY treatment group (P<0.05). The data suggest that blockade of IL-1β and TNF-α by intranasal instillation of combined anti-IL-1β IgY and anti-TNF-α IgY could be a potential alternative strategy for preventing and treating allergic rhinitis.

  15. Combined anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha therapy and DMARD therapy in rheumatoid arthritis patients reduces inflammatory gene expression in whole blood compared to DMARD therapy alone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edwards, C.K., 3rd; Green, J.S.; Volk, H.D.; Schiff, M.; Kotzin, B.L.; Mitsuya, H.; Kawaguchi, T.; Sakata, K.M.; Cheronis, J.; Trollinger, D.; Bankaitis-Davis, D.; Dinarello, C.A.; Norris, D.A.; Bevilacqua, M.P.; Fujita, M.; Burmester, G.R.

    2012-01-01

    Periodic assessment of gene expression for diagnosis and monitoring in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may provide a readily available and useful method to detect subclinical disease progression and follow responses to therapy with disease modifying anti-rheumatic agents (DMARDs) or anti-TNF-alpha therapy

  16. How could the Viking Sun compass be used with sunstones before and after sunset? Twilight board as a new interpretation of the Uunartoq artefact fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernáth, Balázs; Farkas, Alexandra; Száz, Dénes; Blahó, Miklós; Egri, Adám; Barta, András; Akesson, Susanne; Horváth, Gábor

    2014-06-01

    Vikings routinely crossed the North Atlantic without a magnetic compass and left their mark on lands as far away as Greenland, Newfoundland and Baffin Island. Based on an eleventh-century dial fragment artefact, found at Uunartoq in Greenland, it is widely accepted that they sailed along chosen latitudes using primitive Sun compasses. Such instruments were tested on sea and proved to be efficient hand-held navigation tools, but the dimensions and incisions of the Uunartoq find are far from optimal in this role. On the basis of the sagas mentioning sunstones, incompatible hypotheses were formed for Viking solar navigation procedures and primitive skylight polarimetry with dichroic or birefringent crystals. We describe here a previously unconceived method of navigation based on the Uunartoq artefact functioning as a 'twilight board', which is a combination of a horizon board and a Sun compass optimized for use when the Sun is close to the horizon. We deduced an appropriate solar navigation procedure using a twilight board, a shadow-stick and birefringent crystals, which bring together earlier suggested methods in harmony and provide a true skylight compass function. This could have allowed Vikings to navigate around the clock, to use the artefact dial as a Sun compass during long parts of the day and to use skylight polarization patterns in the twilight period. In field tests, we found that true north could be appointed with such a medieval skylight compass with an error of about ±4° when the artificially occluded Sun had elevation angles between +10° and -8° relative to the horizon. Our interpretation allows us to assign exact dates to the gnomonic lines on the artefact and outlines the schedule of the merchant ships that sustained the Viking colony in Greenland a millennium ago.

  17. How could the Viking Sun compass be used with sunstones before and after sunset? Twilight board as a new interpretation of the Uunartoq artefact fragment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernáth, Balázs; Farkas, Alexandra; Száz, Dénes; Blahó, Miklós; Egri, Ádám; Barta, András; Åkesson, Susanne; Horváth, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    Vikings routinely crossed the North Atlantic without a magnetic compass and left their mark on lands as far away as Greenland, Newfoundland and Baffin Island. Based on an eleventh-century dial fragment artefact, found at Uunartoq in Greenland, it is widely accepted that they sailed along chosen latitudes using primitive Sun compasses. Such instruments were tested on sea and proved to be efficient hand-held navigation tools, but the dimensions and incisions of the Uunartoq find are far from optimal in this role. On the basis of the sagas mentioning sunstones, incompatible hypotheses were formed for Viking solar navigation procedures and primitive skylight polarimetry with dichroic or birefringent crystals. We describe here a previously unconceived method of navigation based on the Uunartoq artefact functioning as a ‘twilight board’, which is a combination of a horizon board and a Sun compass optimized for use when the Sun is close to the horizon. We deduced an appropriate solar navigation procedure using a twilight board, a shadow-stick and birefringent crystals, which bring together earlier suggested methods in harmony and provide a true skylight compass function. This could have allowed Vikings to navigate around the clock, to use the artefact dial as a Sun compass during long parts of the day and to use skylight polarization patterns in the twilight period. In field tests, we found that true north could be appointed with such a medieval skylight compass with an error of about ±4° when the artificially occluded Sun had elevation angles between +10° and −8° relative to the horizon. Our interpretation allows us to assign exact dates to the gnomonic lines on the artefact and outlines the schedule of the merchant ships that sustained the Viking colony in Greenland a millennium ago. PMID:24910520

  18. Cancer risk of anti-TNF-α at recommended doses in adult rheumatoid arthritis: a meta-analysis with intention to treat and per protocol analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Moulis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The risk of malignancies on TNF-α antagonists is controversial. The aim of this survey was to assess cancer risk on TNF-α antagonists in adult rheumatoid arthritis patients, including the five marketed drugs (infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab, golimumab and certolizumab used in line with the New Drug Application. Furthermore, the relative interest of modified intention to treat or per protocol analyses to assess such sparse events remains unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Data sources were MEDLINE, CENTRAL, ISI Web of Science, ACR and EULAR meeting abstracts, scientific evaluation of the drugs leading to their marketing approval, and clinicaltrials.gov, until 31 December 2012.We selected double-blind randomized controlled trials in adult rheumatoid arthritis patients, including at least one treatment arm in line with New Drug Application. We performed random effect meta-analysis, with modified intention to treat and per protocol analyses. Thirty-three trials were included. There was no excess risk of malignancies on anti-TNF-α administered in line with New Drug Application in the per protocol model (OR, 0.93 95%CI[0.59-1.44], as well as in the modified intention to treat model (OR, 1.27 95%CI[0.82-1.98]. There was a non-significant tendency for an excess non-melanoma skin cancer risk in both models (respectively, 1.37 [0.71-2.66] and 1.90 [0.98-3.67]. With fixed effect Peto model restricting to trials during at least 52 weeks, the overall cancer risk was respectively 1.60 [0.97-2.64] and 1.22 [0.72-2.08]. Whatever the model, modified intention to treat analysis led to higher estimations than per protocol analysis. The later may underestimate the treatment effect when assessing very sparse events and when many patients dropped out in placebo arms. In metaregression, there was no differential risk among the five drugs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study did not find any evidence for an excess cancer risk on TNF

  19. Efectos del tratamiento con anti-TNF-α, infliximab, sobre la resistencia insulínica, adipocinas (visfatina, leptina, adiponectina, resistina y apelina) y angiopoyetina-2 en pacientes con espondilitis anquilosante

    OpenAIRE

    Miranda Filloy, José Alberto

    2014-01-01

    RESUMEN: La Espondilitis Anquilosante (EA) es una enfermedad inflamatoria crónica que afecta fundamentalmente a la columna vertebral produciendo sacroileítis. Estos pacientes presentan una aterogénesis acelerada y resistencia insulínica, lo que favorece la disfunción endotelial e incrementa el riesgo cardiovascular. Hemos documentado que la infusión del anti-TNF-α infliximab en pacientes no diabéticos con EA mejora la sensibilidad insulínica y disminuye las concentraciones séricas de angio...

  20. Importancia del escrutinio para tuberculosis previo a la administración de agentes anti-TNF-α en uveítis: a propósito de un caso clínico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Leopoldo Zaldívar-Orta

    2014-10-01

    Conclusión: Es indispensable realizar pruebas de escrutinio para tuberculosis latente antes de iniciar tratamiento con agentes biológicos anti-TNF-α, particularmente con infliximab. Las pruebas que miden la producción de interferón gamma (IFN-γ in vitro en respuesta a los antígenos tuberculosos son una alternativa a la prueba cutánea clásica con tuberculina (PPD en la detección de tuberculosis, particularmente en individuos vacunados con el bacilo de Calmette-Guérin (BCG.

  1. Efectos del tratamiento con anti-TNF-α, infliximab, sobre la resistencia insulínica, adipocinas (visfatina, leptina, adiponectina, resistina y apelina) y angiopoyetina-2 en pacientes con espondilitis anquilosante

    OpenAIRE

    Miranda Filloy, José Alberto

    2014-01-01

    RESUMEN: La Espondilitis Anquilosante (EA) es una enfermedad inflamatoria crónica que afecta fundamentalmente a la columna vertebral produciendo sacroileítis. Estos pacientes presentan una aterogénesis acelerada y resistencia insulínica, lo que favorece la disfunción endotelial e incrementa el riesgo cardiovascular. Hemos documentado que la infusión del anti-TNF-α infliximab en pacientes no diabéticos con EA mejora la sensibilidad insulínica y disminuye las concentraciones séricas de angio...

  2. Working life and physical activity in ankylosing spondylitis pre and post anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, David S; McGuigan, Louis E; McGirr, Ellen E

    2014-02-01

    To assess effects of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) on working life and physical activity in Australia; to quantify changes in working life and physical activity that occur after anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) treatment; and to assess efficacy of anti-TNFtherapy for AS in an Australian context. This is a multi-centre observational study of people with AS on anti-TNFtherapy. All participants satisfied the New York Modified Criteria and had active and refractory disease at anti-TNFtherapy commencement. Participation involved a standardized interview, a metrology assessment, assessment of disease remission and medical record review. Interviews and patients' records were used to compare working life (employment, sick leave and productivity) and physical activity (participation rate, hours/week, and physical intensity) between the pre-AS, post-AS and post-anti-TNFtherapy periods. Fifty-two patients took part. Participants were on average 44.8 years old, predominately male (86.5%) and had been on anti-TNFtherapy for 29 months; 39% were in partial remission and 75% had 50% reduction in the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI). Responders to anti-TNFtherapy were 10.5 years younger than non-responders (P = 0.004). Post-anti-TNFtherapy participants gained 6.6 h/week of work (P = 0.02), and productivity improved 31% (P Physical activity participation increased from 71% to 85% (P = 0.039) and activity intensity increased by 33% (P = 0.002) post-treatment. Participants gained 1.8 h/week of sport (P = 0.001) and 2.2 h/week of recreational physical activity (P physical activity severely affected by this disease. Treatment with anti-TNFtherapy results in significant improvement in these parameters. © 2012 The Authors International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases © 2012 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Recurrent Pneumothorax after Etanercept Therapy in a Rheumatoid Arthritis Patient: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Hoon; Seo, Young Ho; Kim, Ji Hyoung; Jeong, Il Woo; Sohn, Sung Birm

    2014-01-01

    The use of anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) agents for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients who are refractory to disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs is gradually increasing. Etanercept is the first anti-TNF agent to be approved for RA treatment and is also the most widely used. However, aggravation of interstitial lung disease after etanercept treatment in RA patients has been reported recently. We report the first case of recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax with progression of interstitial lung disease after initiating etanercept therapy. The withdrawal of etanercept and a change to adalimumab, a different class of TNF inhibitor, achieved clinical stabilization. PMID:25568848

  4. Incidences of serious infections and tuberculosis among patients receiving anti-tumor necrosis factor-α therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, In Kyung; Choung, Rok Seon; Hyun, Jong Jin; Kim, Seung Young; Jung, Sung Woo; Koo, Ja Seol; Lee, Sang Woo; Choi, Jai Hyun; Kim, Ho; Lee, Hong Sik; Keum, Bora; Kim, Eun Sun; Jeen, Yoon Tae

    2014-03-01

    Anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) medications represent a major advancement in the management of chronic inflammatory diseases. However, these agents are associated with increased risks of tuberculosis (TB) and other serious infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidences of such disease among tertiary hospitals in Korea. We retrospectively studied patients who received anti-TNFtherapy; we reviewed serious infections including TB that developed within 6 months after initiation of anti-TNFtherapy. Data concerning patient demographics, types of anti-TNF-α agents, concomitant immunosuppressive drugs use, and infection details were collected. A total 175 patients treated with infliximab (n=72) or adalimumab (n=103) with the following conditions were enrolled: Crohn's disease, 34 (19.4%); ulcerative colitis, 20 (11.4%); ankylosing spondylitis, 82 (46.9%); and rheumatoid arthritis, 39 (22.2%). There were 18 cases (6.0%) of serious infections. The most common site of serious infection was the intra-abdomen (n=6), followed by TB (n=3), skin and soft tissue (n=3), bone and joints (n=2), ocular neurons (n=2), lower respiratory tract (n=1), and urinary tract (n=1). Of the 175 patients, only 3 cases showed development of TB. Furthermore, of all those who developed TB, none had taken anti-TB chemoprophylaxis prior to treatment with an anti-TNF agent due to negative screening results. Serious infections with anti-TNFtherapy were uncommon among tertiary hospitals in Korea; TB was the second most frequent infection. Nevertheless, there were no TB reactivations after anti-TB chemoprophylaxis. Accordingly, physicians should be aware of TB in subjects undergoing anti-TNFtherapy, especially in countries with a high prevalence of TB.

  5. Management of the Pregnant Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patient on Antitumour Necrosis Factor Therapy: State of the Art and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvette PY Leung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antitumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF therapy has been a major advance in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD by improving rates of mucosal healing, steroid-free remission, and decreasing rates of hospitalization and surgery. Because IBD affects women in their reproductive years, clinicians have and will continue to be asked in the future about the safety profile of these agents and their potential impact on pregnancy, the developing fetus and newborn. Immunoglobulin G transfer from the mother to fetus begins in the second trimester, with an elevation starting at 22 weeks of gestation and the largest amount transferred in the third trimester. Although research investigating the long-term outcomes of children exposed to anti-TNF therapy in utero is limited, there is no known adverse effect on either pregnancy or newborn outcomes including infectious complications with this class of drugs. The World Congress of Gastroenterology consensus statement on biological therapy for IBD considered infliximab and adalimumab to be low risk and compatible with use during conception and during pregnancy in at least the first two trimesters. Based on a clinical algorithm used at the University of Calgary Pregnancy and IBD clinic (Calgary, Alberta, recommendations have been provided on the management of pregnant patients on anti-TNF therapy, particularly with regard to third-trimester dosing, taking into account disease characteristics of individual patients. When educated about the safety of anti-TNF therapy during pregnancy, patients often choose to continue on therapy during the third trimester.

  6. Effectiveness of anti-tumour necrosis factor-α therapy in Danish patients with inflammatory bowel diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bank, Steffen; Andersen, Paal Skytt; Burisch, Johan

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcome of anti-tumour necrosis factor-α (anti-TNF) treatment in a large cohort of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) in clinical practice and to establish a cohort...... for future studies of genetic markers associated with treatment response. METHODS: A national, clinically based cohort of previously naïve anti-TNF treated patients from 18 medical departments was established. The patients were screened for tuberculosis prior to treatment initiation. By combining the unique....... RESULTS: Among 492 patients with CD and 267 patients with UC, 74%/13%/14% and 65%/12%/24% were responders, partial responders and non-responders to anti-TNF therapy, respectively. More patients with UC than with CD were non-responders (odds ratio (OR) = 1.96, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.34-2.87, p = 0...

  7. Combined anti-tumor necrosis factor-α therapy and DMARD therapy in rheumatoid arthritis patients reduces inflammatory gene expression in whole blood compared to DMARD therapy alone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl K Edwards

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Periodic assessment of gene expression for diagnosis and monitoring in rheumatoid arthritis (RA may provide a readily available and useful method to detect subclinical disease progression and follow responses to therapy with disease modifying anti-rheumatic agents (DMARDs or anti-TNFtherapy. We used quantitative real-time PCR to compare peripheral blood gene expression profiles in active ("unstable" RA patients on DMARDs, stable RA patients on DMARDs, and stable RA patients treated with a combination of a DMARD and an anti-TNF-α agent (infliximab or etanercept to healthy human controls. The expression of 48 inflammatory genes were compared between healthy controls (N=122, unstable DMARD patients (N=18, stable DMARD patients (N=26, and stable patients on combination therapy (N=20. Expression of 13 genes was very low or undetectable in all study groups. Compared to healthy controls, patients with unstable RA on DMARDs exhibited increased expression of 25 genes, stable DMARD patients exhibited increased expression of 14 genes and decreased expression of five genes, and combined therapy patients exhibited increased expression of six genes and decreased expression of 10 genes. These findings demonstrate that active RA is associated with increased expression of circulating inflammatory markers whereas increases in inflammatory gene expression are diminished in patients with stable disease on either DMARD or anti-TNFtherapy. Furthermore, combination DMARD and anti-TNFtherapy is associated with greater reductions in circulating inflammatory gene expression compared to DMARD therapy alone. These results suggest that assessment of peripheral blood gene expression may prove useful to monitor disease progression and response to therapy.

  8. Periodontal therapy reduces the severity of active rheumatoid arthritis in patients treated with or without tumor necrosis factor inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, P; Bissada, N F; Palomo, L; Han, Y W; Al-Zahrani, M S; Panneerselvam, A; Askari, A

    2009-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontitis are common chronic inflammatory conditions. Recent studies showed a beneficial effect of periodontal treatment on the severity of active RA. This study was undertaken to further examine the effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment on the signs and symptoms of RA in patients treated with or without anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha (anti-TNF-alpha) medications. The effect of anti-TNF-alpha therapy on periodontitis also was assessed. Forty participants diagnosed with moderate/severe RA (under treatment for RA) and severe periodontitis were randomly assigned to receive initial non-surgical periodontal therapy with scaling/root planing and oral hygiene instructions (n = 20) or no periodontal therapy (n = 20). To control RA, all participants had been using disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, and 20 had also been using anti-TNF-alpha before randomization. Probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), bleeding on probing (BOP), gingival index (GI), plaque index (PI), RA disease activity score 28 (DAS28), and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were measured at baseline and 6 weeks later. Linear mixed models were used to identify significant differences between subjects who received periodontal treatment and those who did not. Patients receiving periodontal treatment showed a significant decrease in the mean DAS28, ESR (P periodontal treatment. Anti-TNF-alpha therapy resulted in a significant improvement in CAL, PD, BOP, and GI. Non-surgical periodontal therapy had a beneficial effect on the signs and symptoms of RA, regardless of the medications used to treat this condition. Anti-TNF-alpha therapy without periodontal treatment had no significant effect on the periodontal condition.

  9. The discrepancy between clinical and ultrasonographic remission in rheumatoid arthritis is not related to therapy or autoantibody status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinella, Amelia; Sandri, Gilda; Carpenito, Giacomo; Belletti, Lorenza; Mascia, Maria Teresa

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the clinical remission by means of power Doppler ultrasonographic (PDUS) monitoring in a group of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in clinical remission (DAS28 therapy with DMARDS, anti-TNF, or no therapy in clinical remission according to ACR criteria and DAS 28 therapy with anti-TNF or other therapies showed similar US assessment without significant statistical differences. Among eleven patients that presented swollen and tender joints at the latest physical examination, which preceded US exam, just 5 patients had an US confirmation too. In the other patients, the PDUS did not confirm the presence of inflammation in the corresponding swollen and tender joints or showed a positive ultrasonographic assessment in other locations. The remission state is a great therapy target and not only through the biological therapy. Synovial inflammation could persist independently from type of therapy or autoantibody status.

  10. Tumor necrosis factor-α antagonist therapy for concomitant rheumatoid arthritis and hepatitis C virus infection: a case series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ko-Ming; Cheng, Tien-Tsai; Lin, Jing-Chi; Chen, Chung-Jen

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate treatment response and hepatic safety of anti-tumor necrosis factor-α therapy among patients with concomitant rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We reviewed the charts of 101 consecutive RA patients who were eligible for anti-TNFtherapy in the Chiayi Branch of Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. Group A patients were sero-positive for anti-HCV antibodies and had HCV RNA but were negative for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Group B (the control group) patients were sero-negative for both anti-HCV antibodies and HBsAg. Response to anti-TNF-α treatment was assessed by calculating disease activity score at 28 joints (DAS28) at baseline and 5, 8, and 11 months after the start of TNF-α antagonist therapy. Percentage change in DAS28 from baseline to month 5 was 21.36 ± 8.01 % in group A and 26.98 ± 10.43 % in group B (p = 0.011). However, there was no obvious difference in treatment response between groups at other time points. Anti-TNFtherapy was discontinued within 1 year of starting treatment in two subjects in group A and 4 in group B. Response to anti-TNF-α was better in group B than in group A at 5 months, but there was no substantial difference in response at the 1-year evaluation. Although the study sample was small, our results suggest that the safety of anti-TNFtherapy is similar in RA patients with and without concomitant HCV infection.

  11. Long-Term Safety of Anti-TNF Adalimumab in HBc Antibody-Positive Psoriatic Arthritis Patients: A Retrospective Case Series of 8 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Laurenti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunosuppressive drugs commonly used in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis make patients more susceptible to viral, bacterial, and fungal infections because of their mechanism of action. They not only increase the risk of new infections but also act altering the natural course of preexisting infections. While numerous data regarding the reactivation of tuberculosis infection are available in the literature, poor information about the risk of reactivation or exacerbation of hepatitis viruses B and C infections during treatment with biologics has been reported. Furthermore, reported series with biological therapy included short periods of followup, and therefore, they are not adequate to verify the risk of reactivation in the long-term treatment. Our study evaluated patients with a history of hepatitis B and psoriatic arthritis treated with adalimumab and monitored up to six years. During the observation period, treatment was effective and well tolerated in all patients, and liver function tests and viral load levels remained unchanged.

  12. Pre-existing IgG antibodies cross-reacting with the Fab region of infliximab predict efficacy and safety of infliximab therapy in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenholdt, Casper; Palarasah, Yaseelan; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infliximab (IFX) is a chimeric murine/human anti-TNF antibody (Ab) used for the treatment of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Loss of response is common and associated with development of anti-IFX Abs during ongoing therapy. However, human anti-murine immunoglobulin Abs...

  13. VARIAR Study: Assessment of short-term efficacy and safety of rituximab compared to an tumor necrosis factor alpha antagonists as second-line drug therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis refractory to a first tumor necrosis factor alpha antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrente-Segarra, Vicenç; Acosta Pereira, Asunción; Morla, Rosa; Ruiz, José Miguel; Clavaguera, Teresa; Figuls, Ramon; Corominas, Hector; Geli, Carme; Roselló, Rosa; de Agustín, Juan José; Alegre, Cayetano; Pérez, Carolina; García, Angel; Rodríguez de la Serna, Arturo

    to compare the short-term efficacy and safety of rituximab (RTX) therapy versus anti-TNF in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients after discontinuation of a first anti-TNF agent. prospective observational multicenter study in the clinical practice setting, involving patients with severe RA refractory to a first anti-TNF agent, who received either RTX or a second anti-TNF (2TNF), comparing the efficacy endpoints, EULAR response (Good/Moderate) and safety at 6 months. 103 patients enrolled, 82 completed 6-month follow-up, 73.7% women. Baseline data for RTX and 2TNF groups, respectively: TJC, 8.6 and 6.6; SJC, 8.8 and 7.5; DAS28 score, 5.45 (±1.28) and 5.18 (±1.21) (p=0.048), ESR, 41 and 38.7mmHg; and HAQ, 1.2 and 1.0. Improvement was observed in all parameters, with no significant differences (except for a more marked reduction in ESR with RTX). There were no serious adverse events. RTX use as second-line therapy after anti-TNF failure led to improvements in the efficacy and functional variables at 6 months, with no serious adverse events. These results were comparable to those observed in patients who used a second anti-TNF agent in the same clinical scenario. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  14. Predictors of response to anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy in ulcerative colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Evanthia; Zampeli; Michalis; Gizis; Spyros; I; Siakavellas; Giorgos; Bamias

    2014-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis(UC) is an immune-mediated, chronic inflammatory disease of the large intestine. Its course is characterized by flares of acute inflammation and periods of low-grade chronic inflammatory activity or remission. Monoclonal antibodies against tumor necrosis factor(anti-TNF) are part of the therapeutic armamentarium and are used in cases of moderate to severe UC that is refractory to conventional treatment with corticosteroids and/or immunosuppressants. Therapeutic response to these agents is not uniform and a large percentage of patients either fail to improve(primary non-response) or lose response after a period of improvement(secondary non-response/loss of response). In addition, the use of anti-TNF agents has been related to uncommon but potentially serious adverse effects that preclude their administration or lead to their discontinuation. Finally, use of these medications is associated with a considerable cost for the health system. The identification of parameters thatmay predict response to anti-TNF drugs in UC would help to better select for patients with a high probability to respond and minimize risk and costs for those who will not respond. Analysis of the major clinical trials and the accumulated experience with the use of anti-TNF drugs in UC has resulted to the report of such prognostic factors. Included are clinical and epidemiological characteristics, laboratory markers, endoscopic indicators and molecular(immunological/genetic) signatures. Such predictive parameters of long-term outcomes may either be present at the commencement of treatment or determined during the early period of therapy. Validation of these prognostic markers in large cohorts of patients with variable characteristics will facilitate their introduction into clinical practice and the best selection of UC patients who will benefit from anti-TNF therapy.

  15. Association of rs1568885, rs1813443 and rs4411591 polymorphisms with anti-TNF medication response in Greek patients with Crohn’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Diamantis; Gazouli, Maria; Karantanos, Theodoros; Rigoglou, Stella; Karamanolis, Georgios; Bramis, Konstantinos; Zografos, George; Theodoropoulos, George E

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the correlation between rs1568885, rs1813443 and rs4411591 polymorphisms and response to infliximab in a cohort of Greek patients with Crohn’s disease (CD). METHODS: One hundred and twenty-six patients diagnosed with CD based on standard clinical, endoscopic, radiological, and pathological criteria were enrolled in this study at the Gastroenterology Unit of the 2nd Department of Surgery and at the Colorectal Unit of the 1st Department of Propaedeutic Surgery. Infliximab at a dose of 5 mg/kg was administered intravenously at weeks 0, 2, 6 and then every 8 wk. Clinical and serological responses were assessed using the Harvey-Bradshaw Index and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, respectively, and the endoscopic response was evaluated by ileocolonoscopy performed at baseline and after 12-20 wk of therapy. The changes in endoscopic appearance compared to baseline were classified into four categories, and patients were classified as responders and non-responders. Genomic DNA from whole peripheral blood was extracted and genotyping was performed by allele-specific polymerase chain reactions. χ2 test with Yate’s correction based on the S-Plus was used to compare the genotype frequencies. RESULTS: Eighty patients (63.49%) were classified as complete and 32 (25.39%) as partial responders to infliximab, while 14 (11.11%) were primary non-responders. No correlation was found between response to infliximab and patients’ characteristics such as age, gender and disease duration. There was consistency between Harvey-Bradshaw index scores and serum CRP levels. The TT genotype of the rs1568885 polymorphism was significantly related to partial response (P = 0.024) and resistance to infliximab (P = 0.007) while the AT genotype was more frequent in partial responders (P = 0.035) and in primary non-responders (P = 0.032). Regarding rs1813443, the CC genotype was found to be associated with partial response (P = 0.005) and primary resistance (P = 0.002) to

  16. Diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection before initiation of anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy using both tuberculin skin test and QuantiFERON-TB Gold In Tube assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho-Cheol; Jo, Kyung-Wook; Jung, Young Ju; Yoo, Bin; Lee, Chang-Keun; Kim, Yong-Gil; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Byeon, Jeong-Sik; Kim, Kyung-Jo; Ye, Byong Duk; Shim, Tae Sun

    2014-11-01

    Reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is an important complication in patients treated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) blocking agents. However, the best method for LTBI detection before initiation of anti-TNF therapy remains to be determined. From January 2010 to August 2013, anti-TNF therapy was initiated in 426 patients with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs). Tuberculin skin test (TST) and Quantiferon-TB Gold In Tube (QFT-GIT) assay were performed before starting anti-TNF treatment. LTBI was defined as a positive TST (induration ≥ 10 mm) or as a positive QFT-GIT result. Patients were followed up until December 2013. The positive TST and QFT-GIT rates were 22.3% (95/426) and 16.0% (68/426), respectively, yielding a total of 27.0% (115/426) of positive LTBI results. LTBI treatment was initiated in 25.1% (107/426) and was completed in 100% (107/107) of patients. During a median 294 days of follow-up, active TB occurred in 1.4% (6/426) of the patients with negative TST and QFT-GIT results at baseline. The either test positive strategy, using both TST and QFT-GIT assay, is acceptable for LTBI screening before commencing anti-TNF therapy in patients with IMIDs.

  17. Henoch-Schnlein purpura complicating adalimumab therapy for Crohn’s disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Farooq; Z; Rahman; Gagandeep; K; Takhar; Ovishek; Roy; Anna; Shepherd; Stuart; L; Bloom; Sara; A; McCartney

    2010-01-01

    Anti-tumour necrosis factor-α(TNF) therapy has revolutionised the management of chronic inflammatory conditions.With ever increasing numbers of patients being treated with these agents,uncommon adverse reactions will inevitably occur more frequently.Cutaneous manifestations are associated with many of these chronic conditions and can complicate anti-TNF therapy in about 20% of cases.Vasculitic complications are rarely associated with anti-TNF therapy.Henoch-Schnlein purpura(HSP),a small vessel vasculitis,has been described following infliximab and etanercept therapy but never with adalimumab,a fully humanized TNF antibody.The risk of such immune-mediated reactions is theoretically less with adalimumab compared to infliximab but can still occur.Here we report the f irst case in the literature of HSP that can be attributed to the use of adalimumab in a 19-year-old male with recalcitrant Crohn’s disease.

  18. Immunogenicity of Anti-TNF-α Biotherapies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtzen, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    based on immunopharmacological evidence from individual patients (personalized medicine) is the use of assays for anti-drug antibodies (ADA) that are accurate and relevant in the clinical setting. This paper discusses immunogenicity of genetically engineered immunoglobulins directed against tumor......-necrosis factor-α (TNF). Emphasis will be on commonly used methods for detection of ADA in human serum including issues that question the clinical applicability of these methodologies. The use of dubious assays for ADA in a clinical context may not only contribute to confusion as to the importance of drug...

  19. Varicella zoster meningitis complicating combined anti-tumor necrosis factor and corticosteroid therapy in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Christopher; Walters, Brennan; Fedorak, Richard N

    2013-06-01

    Opportunistic viral infections are a well-recognized complication of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Cases of severe or atypical varicella zoster virus infection, both primary and latent reactivation, have been described in association with immunosuppression of Crohn's disease (CD) patients. However, central nervous system varicella zoster virus infections have been rarely described, and there are no previous reports of varicella zoster virus meningitis associated with anti-TNF therapy among the CD population. Here, we present the case of a 40-year-old male with severe ileocecal-CD who developed a reactivation of dermatomal herpes zoster after treatment with prednisone and adalimumab. The reactivation presented as debilitating varicella zoster virus meningitis, which was not completely resolved despite aggressive antiviral therapy with prolonged intravenous acyclovir and subsequent oral valacyclovir. This is the first reported case of opportunistic central nervous system varicella zoster infection complicating anti-TNF therapy in the CD population. This paper also reviews the literature on varicella zoster virus infections of immunosuppressed IBD patients and the importance of vaccination prior to initiation of anti-TNF therapy.

  20. Molecular probing of TNF: From identification of therapeutic target to guidance of therapy in inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Cong-Qiu

    2016-09-12

    Therapy by blocking tumor necrosis factor (TNF) activity is highly efficacious and profoundly changed the paradigm of several inflammatory diseases. However, a significant proportion of patients with inflammatory diseases do not respond to TNF inhibitors (TNFi). Prediction of therapeutic response is required for TNFi therapy. Isotope labeled anti-TNF antibodies or TNF receptor have been investigated to localize TNF production at inflammatory tissue in animal models and in patients with inflammatory diseases. The in vivo detection of TNF has been associated with treatment response. Recently, fluorophore labeled anti-TNF antibody in combination with confocal laser endomicroscopy in patients with Crohn's disease yielded more accurate and quantitative in vivo detection of TNF in the diseased mucosa. More importantly, this method demonstrated high therapeutic predication value. Fluorophore labeled TNF binding aptamers in combination with modern imaging technology offers additional tools for in vivo TNF probing.

  1. Second-line biologic therapy optimization in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantini, Fabrizio; Niccoli, Laura; Nannini, Carlotta; Cassarà, Emanuele; Kaloudi, Olga; Giulio Favalli, Ennio; Becciolini, Andrea; Benucci, Maurizio; Gobbi, Francesca Li; Guiducci, Serena; Foti, Rosario; Mosca, Marta; Goletti, Delia

    2017-03-22

    The Italian board for the TAilored BIOlogic therapy (ITABIO) reviewed the most consistent literature to indicate the best strategy for the second-line biologic choice in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), spondyloarthritis (SpA), and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Systematic review of the literature to identify English-language articles on efficacy of second-line biologic choice in RA, PsA, and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Data were extracted from available randomized, controlled trials, national biologic registries, national healthcare databases, post-marketing surveys, and open-label observational studies. Some previously stated variables, including the patients׳ preference, the indication for anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) monotherapy in potential childbearing women, and the intravenous route with dose titration in obese subjects resulted valid for all the three rheumatic conditions. In RA, golimumab as second-line biologic has the highest level of evidence in anti-TNF failure. The switching strategy is preferable for responder patients who experience an adverse event, whereas serious or class-specific side effects should be managed by the choice of a differently targeted drug. Secondary inadequate response to etanercept (ETN) should be treated with a biologic agent other than anti-TNF. After two or more anti-TNF failures, the swapping to a different mode of action is recommended. Among non-anti-TNF targeted biologics, to date rituximab (RTX) and tocilizumab (TCZ) have the strongest evidence of efficacy in the treatment of anti-TNF failures. In PsA and AS patients failing the first anti-TNF, the switch strategy to a second is advisable, taking in account the evidence of adalimumab efficacy in patients with uveitis. The severity of psoriasis, of articular involvement, and the predominance of enthesitis and/or dactylitis may drive the choice toward ustekinumab or secukinumab in PsA, and the latter in AS. Taking in account the paucity of controlled trials

  2. Biological therapy of psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivamani Raja

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of psoriasis has undergone a revolution with the advent of biologic therapies, including infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab, efalizumab, and alefacept. These medications are designed to target specific components of the immune system and are a major technological advancement over traditional immunosuppressive medications. These usually being well tolerated are being found useful in a growing number of immune-mediated diseases, psoriasis being just one example. The newest biologic, ustekinumab, is directed against the p40 subunit of the IL-12 and IL-23 cytokines. It has provided a new avenue of therapy for an array of T-cell-mediated diseases. Biologics are generally safe; however, there has been concern over the risk of lymphoma with use of these agents. All anti-TNF-α agents have been associated with a variety of serious and "routine" opportunistic infections.

  3. Effects of Antitumor Necrosis Factor Therapy on Osteoprotegerin, Neopterin, and sRANKL Concentrations in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Kurz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by joint erosions, progressive focal bone loss, and chronic inflammation. Methods. 20 female patients with moderate-to-severe rheumatoid arthritis were treated with anti-TNF-antibody adalimumab in addition to concomitant antirheumatic therapies. Patients were assessed for overall disease activity using the DAS28 score, and neopterin, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, and C-reactive protein (CRP concentrations as well as osteoprotegerin (OPG and soluble receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (sRANKL concentrations were determined before therapy and at week 12. Neopterin as well as OPG and sRANKL were determined by commercial ELISAs. Results. Before anti-TNF therapy patients presented with high disease activity and elevated concentrations of circulating inflammatory markers. OPG concentrations correlated with neopterin (rs=0.494, p=0.027, but not with DAS28. OPG concentrations and disease activity scores declined during anti-TNF-treatment (both p<0.02. Patients who achieved remission (n=7 or showed a good response according to EULAR criteria (n=13 presented with initially higher baseline OPG levels, which subsequently decreased significantly during treatment (p=0.018 for remission, p=0.011 for good response. Conclusions. Adalimumab therapy was effective in modifying disease activity and reducing proinflammatory and bone remodelling cascades.

  4. Genetically determined high activity of IL-12 and IL-18 in ulcerative colitis and TLR5 in Crohns disease were associated with non-response to anti-TNF therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bank, S; Andersen, P S; Burisch, Johan

    2017-01-01

    Anti-tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is used for treatment of severe cases of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). However, one-third of the patients do not respond to the treatment. A recent study indicated that genetically determined hi...

  5. Comparison of non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis and ankylosing spondylitis patients - baseline characteristics, treatment adherence, and development of clinical variables during three years of anti-TNF therapy in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallman, Johan K; Kapetanovic, Meliha C; Petersson, Ingemar F

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The relationship between non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nr-axSpA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is currently debated. Using observational data from the South Swedish Arthritis Treatment Group register, we thus aimed to compare clinical development and treatment adherence...

  6. TNF Blocking Therapies and Immunomonitoring in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altwegg, Romain; Vincent, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Since their appearance in the armamentarium for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) more than a decade ago, antitumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors have demonstrated beneficial activity in induction and maintenance of clinical remission, mucosal healing, improvement in quality of life, and reduction in surgeries and hospitalizations. However, more than one-third of patients present primary resistance, and another one-third become resistant over time. One of the main factors associated with loss of response is the immunogenicity of anti-TNF biologics leading to the production of antidrug antibodies (ADAbs) accelerating their clearance. In this review we present the current state of the literature on the place of TNF and its blockage in the treatment of patients with IBD and discuss the usefulness of serum trough levels and ADAb monitoring in the optimization of anti-TNF therapies. PMID:24757282

  7. TNF Blocking Therapies and Immunomonitoring in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Altwegg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since their appearance in the armamentarium for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD more than a decade ago, antitumor necrosis factor (TNF inhibitors have demonstrated beneficial activity in induction and maintenance of clinical remission, mucosal healing, improvement in quality of life, and reduction in surgeries and hospitalizations. However, more than one-third of patients present primary resistance, and another one-third become resistant over time. One of the main factors associated with loss of response is the immunogenicity of anti-TNF biologics leading to the production of antidrug antibodies (ADAbs accelerating their clearance. In this review we present the current state of the literature on the place of TNF and its blockage in the treatment of patients with IBD and discuss the usefulness of serum trough levels and ADAb monitoring in the optimization of anti-TNF therapies.

  8. Promising biological therapies for ulcerative colitis: A review of the literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hirotada; Akiho; Azusa; Yokoyama; Shuichi; Abe; Yuichi; Nakazono; Masatoshi; Murakami; Yoshihiro; Otsuka; Kyoko; Fukawa; Mitsuru; Esaki; Yusuke; Niina; Haruei; Ogino

    2015-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis(UC) is a chronic lifelong condition characterized by alternating flare-ups and remission. There is no single known unifying cause, and the pathogenesis is multifactorial, with genetics, environmental factors, microbiota, and the immune system all playing roles. Current treatment modalities for UC include 5-aminosalicylates, corticosteroids, immunosuppressants(including purine antimetabolites, cyclosporine, and tacrolimus), and surgery. Therapeutic goals for UC are evolving. Medical treatment aims to induce remission and prevent relapse of disease activity. Infliximab, an anti-tumor necrosis factor(TNF)-α monoclonal antibody, is the first biological agent for the treatment of UC. Over the last decade, infliximab and adalimumab(anti-TNF-α agents) have been used for moderate to severe UC, and have been shown to be effective in inducing and maintaining remission. Recent studies have indicated that golimumab(another anti-TNF-α agent), tofacitinib(a Janus kinase inhibitor), and vedolizumab and etrolizumab(integrin antagonists), achieved good clinical remission and response rates in UC. Recently, golimumab and vedolizumab have been approved for UC by the United States Food and Drug Administration. Vedolizumab may be used as a first-line alternative to anti-TNFtherapy in patients with an inadequate response to corticosteroids and/or immunosuppressants. Here, we provide updated information on various biological agents in the treatment of UC.

  9. How do patients with inflammatory bowel disease want their biological therapy administered?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Hannah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infliximab is usually administered by two monthly intravenous (iv infusions, therefore requiring visits to hospital. Adalimumab is administered by self subcutaneous (sc injections every other week. Both of these anti-TNF drugs appear to be equally efficacious in the treatment of Crohn's Disease and therefore the decision regarding which drug to choose will depend to some extent on patient choice, which may be based on the mode of administration. The aims of this study were to compare preferences in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD patients for two currently available anti-TNF agents and the reasons for their choices. Methods An anonymous questionnaire was distributed to IBD patients who had attended the Gastroenterology service (Ulster Hospital, Dundonald, Belfast, N. Ireland. UK between January 2007 and December 2007. The patients were asked in a hypothetical situation if the following administering methods of anti-TNF drugs (intravenous or subcutaneous were available, which drug route of administration would they choose. Results One hundred and twenty-five patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were issued questionnaires, of these 78 questionnaires were returned (62 percent response. The mean age of respondent was 44 years. Of the total number of respondents, 33 patients (42 percent preferred infliximab and 19 patients (24 percent preferred adalimumab (p = 0.07. Twenty-six patients (33 percent did not indicate a preference for either biological therapy and were not included in the final analysis. The commonest reason cited for those who chose infliximab (iv was: "I do not like the idea of self-injecting," (67 percent. For those patients who preferred adalimumab (sc the commonest reason cited was: "I prefer the convenience of injecting at home," (79 percent. Of those patients who had previously been treated with an anti-TNF therapy (n = 10, all infliximab six patients stated that they would prefer infliximab if given

  10. Nodal Melanoma Metastasis under Infliximab Therapy in a Patient with Nevoid Melanoma First Misdiagnosed as Benign Nevus: A Potentially Dangerous Diagnostic Pitfall in the Era of Biologic Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Safa

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 53-year-old Caucasian woman who developed nodal melanoma metastasis under infliximab therapy 2 years after the removal of a nevoid melanoma, which was initially misdiagnosed as a benign compound nevus. This case illustrates the potential link between tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α inhibition and the reactivation of latent melanoma. Furthermore, this case highlights the need for a complete skin examination before using anti-TNFtherapy to rule out atypical malignant lesions or melanomas that can easily be missed because of presentations such as nevoid melanoma.

  11. Impact of medical therapy on patients with Crohn’s disease requiring surgical resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, YT Nancy; Hong, Thomas; Round, Andrew; Bressler, Brian

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the impact of medical therapy on Crohn’s disease patients undergoing their first surgical resection. METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated all patients with Crohn’s disease undergoing their first surgical resection between years 1995 to 2000 and 2005 to 2010 at a tertiary academic hospital (St. Paul’s Hospital, Vancouver, Canada). Patients were identified from hospital administrative database using the International Classification of Diseases 9 codes. Patients’ hospital and available outpatient clinic records were independently reviewed and pertinent data were extracted. We explored relationships among time from disease diagnosis to surgery, patient phenotypes, medication usage, length of small bowel resected, surgical complications, and duration of hospital stay. RESULTS: Total of 199 patients were included; 85 from years 1995 to 2000 (cohort A) and 114 from years 2005 to 2010 (cohort B). Compared to cohort A, cohort B had more patients on immunomodulators (cohort A vs cohort B: 21.4% vs 56.1%, P < 0.0001) and less patients on 5-aminosalysilic acid (53.6% vs 29.8%, P = 0.001). There was a shift from inflammatory to stricturing and penetrating phenotypes (B1/B2/B3 38.8% vs 12.3%, 31.8% vs 45.6%, 29.4% vs 42.1%, P < 0.0001). Both groups had similar median time to surgery. Within cohort B, 38 patients (33.3%) received anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agent. No patient in cohort A was exposed to anti-TNF agent. Compared to patients not on anti-TNF agent, ones exposed were younger at diagnosis (anti-TNF vs without anti-TNF: A1/A2/A3 39.5% vs 11.8%, 50% vs 73.7%, 10.5% vs 14.5%, P = 0.003) and had longer median time to surgery (90 mo vs 48 mo, P = 0.02). Combination therapy further extended median time to surgery. Using time-dependent multivariate Cox proportional hazard model, patients who were treated with anti-TNF agents had a significantly higher risk to surgery (adjusted hazard ratio 3.57, 95%CI: 1.98-6.44, P < 0.0001) compared to those

  12. The Use of Biologic Therapies in Uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzman, Sergio; Schwartzman, Monica

    2015-12-01

    Therapy for autoimmune ophthalmic disease is currently evolving. The improved understanding of the abnormal immune response in the various forms of uveitis has resulted in targeted therapy. The aberrations of the immune system have been characterized by atypical cell populations, cytokine expression, and cell-cell interactions. Different patterns of cytokine expression have now been delineated in the abnormal uveal tract with exaggerated and/or abnormal expression of TNF, IL-1, IL-2, IL-6, and IL-17. The development of therapies for other conditions in which these cytokines play an important role has resulted in the availability of biological agents that have been adopted for use in the therapy for uveitis. Adalimumab and infliximab have been the best studied anti-TNF agents and indeed have now been recommended by an expert panel as first-line treatment of ocular manifestations of Behçet's disease and second-line treatment for other forms of uveitis (Levy-Clarke et al. (Ophthalmology, 2013). Other anti-TNF agents have been studied as well. Daclizumab, a monoclonal antibody directed against the IL-2 receptor, has also demonstrated utility in treating uveitis as have some of the anti-IL1 agents. Gevokizumab has been granted orphan drug designation for the treatment of resistant forms of uveitis. Therapies affecting IL-6, including tocilizumab are being studied, and available medications that block antigen presenting cell and T cell interaction such as abatacept have been reported to be effective in uveitis. Interferons as well as rituximab have also been evaluated in small studies. Although these biologic therapies have provided a larger armamentarium to treat uveitis, challenges remain. Uveitis is not a single illness; rather, it is a manifestation of many potential systemic diseases that may have very specific individual therapeutic targets. Identifying and characterizing these underlying diseases is not always achieved, and more importantly, the most effective

  13. Etanercept therapy-associated acute uveitis: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F; Wang, N-S

    2009-01-01

    A female patient diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis experienced a new onset acute iritis following the initiation of etanercept therapy and recurrent episodes of iritis continues during the treatment of etanercept. Etanercept-associated iritis was suspected. Anti-TNF therapies can alleviate uveitis in some studies, but in some other anecdotal reports etanercept is considered as the main cause of uveitis. A literature review is presented below. For clinicians, more attention must be paid to the potential association between uveitis or iritis and etanercept, and more careful surveillance of patients under etanercept treatment is necessary.

  14. Reasons for discontinuation of subcutaneous biologic therapy in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: a patient perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolge SC

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Susan C Bolge,1 Amir Goren,2 Neeta Tandon1 1Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, Horsham, PA, USA; 2Health Outcomes Practice, Kantar Health, New York, NY, USA Objective: To examine reasons why rheumatoid arthritis patients discontinued subcutaneous (SQ anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF treatment in the past 12 months, so as to help inform successful, uninterrupted therapy.Methods: Data were collected in March and April 2011 using self-reported, internet-based questionnaires. Study inclusion criteria comprised: rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis; discontinuation of SQ anti-TNF medication (adalimumab, certolizumab, etanercept, or golimumab within the past 12 months; aged ≥18 years; United States residency; and consent to participate. Patients reported primary and other reasons for discontinuation of their most recently discontinued anti-TNF.Results: Questionnaires from 250 patients were analyzed; 72.8% were female, 80.8% were white, and median age was 51 years. Patients had discontinued etanercept (n=109, adalimumab (n=98, certolizumab (n=24, or golimumab (n=19 within the past 12 months. When prompted about their primary reason for discontinuation, lack of effectiveness (40.8% was cited most often, followed by injection experience (18.4%. Combining prompted primary and other reasons for discontinuation, 60.8% of patients reported lack of effectiveness, while 40.8% reported injection experience, which included: pain/burning/discomfort after injection (14.4%; pain/burning/discomfort during injection (13.2%; injection reactions such as redness/swelling after injection (12.4%; dislike of self-injection (11.6%; dislike of frequency of injection (10.4%; and fear of injection/needles (6.8%. Conclusion: From the patient perspective, there are unmet needs with regard to the effectiveness and injection experience associated with SQ anti-TNF medications, which may lead to discontinuation. Treatment options with a

  15. Frequency and clonality of peripheral γδ T cells in psoriasis patients receiving anti-tumour necrosis factor-α therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, J; Dige, A; Christensen, M; D'Amore, F; Iversen, L

    2014-07-01

    Hepatosplenic γδ T cell lymphoma (HSTCL) has been observed in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) who received anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α agents and thiopurines, but only one case was reported in a psoriasis patient worldwide. This difference could be due to differences in either the nature of the inflammatory diseases or in the use of immunomodulators. We investigated the impact of anti-TNF-α agents on the level and repertoire of γδ T cells in peripheral blood from psoriasis patients. Forty-five men and 10 women who were treated with anti-TNF-α agents for psoriasis were monitored for a median 11 months for the level and clonality of γδ T cells via flow cytometry and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of T cell receptor gamma (TCR-γ) gene rearrangements. Seventeen men had a repeated analysis within 48 h of the infliximab infusion to reveal a possible expansion of γδ T cells, as observed previously in CD patients. Ten psoriasis patients who were never exposed to biologicals and 20 healthy individuals served as controls. In the majority of psoriasis patients, the level and clonal pattern of γδ T cells was remarkably stable during infliximab treatment. A single male patient repeatedly experienced a significant increase in the level of γδ T cells after infliximab infusions. A monoclonal γδ T cell repertoire in a polyclonal background tended to be more frequent in anti-TNF-α-treated patients than naive patients, suggesting that anti-TNFtherapy may promote the clonal selection of γδ T cells in psoriasis patients.

  16. Spinal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma mimicking a flare of disease in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis treated with anti-TNF agents: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Sara; Boffini, Nicola; Lucioni, Marco; Paulli, Marco; Montecucco, Carlomaurizio; Caporali, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 52-year-old man with long-standing HLAB27-positive ankylosing spondylitis treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) alpha therapy who was admitted to our rheumatology department complaining of increasing lumbar and buttock pain radiating to the posterior thigh, associated with numbness in the leg, gait disturbance and low-grade fever. The clinical picture was initially interpreted as a flare of disease but was not responsive to treatment. A contrast-enhanced spinal MRI was performed with evidence of a diffuse signal abnormality involving the sacroiliac joints and the spine, with evidence of spondylodiscitis of L5 and with a lesion causing L5-S1 root compression and infiltrating the iliopsoas muscle. These findings confirmed the possibility of a reactivation of disease associated with an infectious process. The most frequent causes of infectious spondylodiscitis were excluded, and a biopsy was then performed. Histological analysis revealed a high-grade B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the spine. This case highlights how a differential diagnosis of low back pain with neurological symptoms can be particularly troublesome in ankylosing spondylitis and that continuous vigilance is warranted in patients treated with long-term immunosuppressive therapies.

  17. How should immunomodulators be optimized when used as combination therapy with anti-tumor necrosis factor agents in the management of inflammatory bowel disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Mark G; Irving, Peter M; Sparrow, Miles P

    2015-10-28

    In the last 15 years the management of inflammatory bowel disease has evolved greatly, largely through the increased use of immunomodulators and, especially, anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) biologic agents. Within this time period, confidence in the use of anti-TNFs has increased, whilst, especially in recent years, the efficacy and safety of thiopurines has been questioned. Yet despite recent concerns regarding the risk: benefit profile of thiopurines, combination therapy with an immunomodulator and an anti-TNF has emerged as the recommended treatment strategy for the majority of patients with moderate-severe disease, especially those who are recently diagnosed. Concurrently, therapeutic drug monitoring has emerged as a means of optimizing the dosage of both immunomodulators and anti-TNFs. However the recommended therapeutic target levels for both drug classes were largely derived from studies of monotherapy with either agent, or studies underpowered to analyze outcomes in combination therapy patients. It has been assumed that these target levels are applicable to patients on combination therapy also, however there are few data to support this. Similarly, the timing and duration of treatment with immunomodulators when used in combination therapy remains unknown. Recent attention, including post hoc analyses of the pivotal registration trials, has focused on the optimization of anti-TNF agents, when used as either monotherapy or combination therapy. This review will instead focus on how best to optimize immunomodulators when used in combination therapy, including an evaluation of recent data addressing unanswered questions regarding the optimal timing, dosage and duration of immunomodulator therapy in combination therapy patients.

  18. Acute coronary syndrome after infliximab therapy in a patient with Crohn's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vasilios Panteris; Anna Perdiou; Vasilios Tsirimpis; Demetrios Georgios Karamanolis

    2006-01-01

    Infliximab is a potent anti-TNF antibody, which is used with great success in Crohn's disease patients. Since its release in clinical practice, several adverse reactions have been observed. The interest in possible consequences of its administration is still high because of the recent introduction of the drug for the long-term maintenance therapy of refractory luminal and fistulizing Crohn's disease. We present a case of acute coronary syndrome (non-STEMI) in a patient with corticoid resistant Crohn's disease after his first dose of infliximab. By reviewing the scant articles that exist in the literature on this topic we made an effort to delineate the possible mechanisms of this phenomenon.

  19. Lewis-Sumner syndrome associated with infliximab therapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Davyd R; Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Baker, Steven K

    2008-10-01

    We report 2 cases of Lewis-Sumner syndrome (LSS) diagnosed in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis undergoing treatment with the antitumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) monoclonal antibody infliximab. While experiencing clinical improvement in their arthritic symptoms, both patients experienced sensory deficits and weakness in multiple nerve distributions. They had electrodiagnostic evidence of motor conduction block and subsequent improvement with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg). We describe the details of the cases and review the literature on immune-mediated neuropathies associated with anti-TNF-alpha therapy.

  20. Episcleritis Related to Drug-Induced Lupus Erythematosus following Infliximab Therapy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irini P. Chatziralli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced lupus erythematosus is defined as a lupus-like syndrome temporally related to continuous drug exposure which resolves after discontinuation of the offending drug. Herein, we describe a patient with distinct clinical manifestations of anti-TNF-associated DILE related to infliximab therapy. The patient exhibited clinical and laboratory findings of lupus-like illnesses as well as ocular disorders, such as episcleritis. The main message is that the symptoms of DILE should not be overlooked, although sometimes other systematic conditions may underlie them. As a result, it is very important for the clinicians to evaluate the symptoms of DILE and manage appropriately these cases.

  1. HEPATITIS AND PNEUMONITIS DURIN ADALIMUMAB THERAPY IN CROHN? DISEASE: mind the histoplasmosis!

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    Bruno do Valle PINHEIRO

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α inhibitor therapy plays a pivotal role in the management of moderate to severe inflammatory bowel disease. Because of the role of TNF-α in the host defenses, anti-TNF therapy has been associated with an increase the risks of granulomatous infections. Objective To report the first case of adalimumab-associated invasive histoplasmosis presenting as an acute hepatitis-like syndrome and febrile pneumonitis in a patient with Crohn’s disease. Method Case report of a patient with progressive histoplasmosis confirmed by percutaneous fine needle aspiration biopsy lung and urine Histoplasma antigen. Results We present the case of a young man with CD who developed pneumonia and acute hepatitis-like features caused by Histoplasma capsulatum infection during adalimumab therapy. To the best of our knowledge, this acute hepatitis-like manifestation has never been reported as a presentation of the histoplasmosis in patients with Crohn’s disease. Conclusions This case underscores the potential risk for serious infection that may arise in this setting and should alert clinicians to the need to consider the histoplasmosis diagnosis in patients presenting with acute hepatitis-like syndrome associated with prolonged febrile illness or pneumonitis during therapy with anti-TNF-α antibodies.

  2. Practical Approaches to "Top-Down" Therapies for Crohn's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amezaga, Aranzazu Jauregui; Van Assche, Gert

    2016-07-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic, progressive, and disabling disease that leads in most cases to the development of bowel damage presenting as a fistula, abscess, or stricture. For years, therapy for Crohn's disease has been based on a "step-up" approach, in which anti-TNF agents are administered after the failure of steroids and immunosuppressants. However, recent studies have suggested that early introduction of anti-TNF agents combined with immunosuppressants can modify the natural history of the disease. Patients who could benefit more of this "top-down" strategy would be those at elevated risk of a complicated or severe inflammatory bowel disease or with factors that can predict an aggressive disease course. Therefore, the management of a patient with CD should be personalized, taking into account the patient's specific characteristics and comorbidities, disease activity, site and behavior of the disease, and predictable factors of poor prognosis. A balance between medication and potential adverse effects should be achieved, trying to avoid under or overtreatment, always discussing the different therapeutic options with the patient. The natural history of ulcerative colitis differs from CD and, to date, there is not much scientific evidence on the use of early combined immunosuppression.

  3. How do patients with inflammatory bowel disease want their biological therapy administered?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Allen, Patrick B

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infliximab is usually administered by two monthly intravenous (iv) infusions, therefore requiring visits to hospital. Adalimumab is administered by self subcutaneous (sc) injections every other week. Both of these anti-TNF drugs appear to be equally efficacious in the treatment of Crohn\\'s Disease and therefore the decision regarding which drug to choose will depend to some extent on patient choice, which may be based on the mode of administration.The aims of this study were to compare preferences in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) patients for two currently available anti-TNF agents and the reasons for their choices. METHODS: An anonymous questionnaire was distributed to IBD patients who had attended the Gastroenterology service (Ulster Hospital, Dundonald, Belfast, N. Ireland. UK) between January 2007 and December 2007. The patients were asked in a hypothetical situation if the following administering methods of anti-TNF drugs (intravenous or subcutaneous) were available, which drug route of administration would they choose. RESULTS: One hundred and twenty-five patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were issued questionnaires, of these 78 questionnaires were returned (62 percent response). The mean age of respondent was 44 years. Of the total number of respondents, 33 patients (42 percent) preferred infliximab and 19 patients (24 percent) preferred adalimumab (p = 0.07). Twenty-six patients (33 percent) did not indicate a preference for either biological therapy and were not included in the final analysis. The commonest reason cited for those who chose infliximab (iv) was: "I do not like the idea of self-injecting," (67 percent). For those patients who preferred adalimumab (sc) the commonest reason cited was: "I prefer the convenience of injecting at home," (79 percent). Of those patients who had previously been treated with an anti-TNF therapy (n = 10, all infliximab) six patients stated that they would prefer infliximab if given the choice

  4. Biologic therapy of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damjanov Nemanja

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA and juvenile idiopathic/rheumatoid arthritis (JIA are chronic, inflammatory, systemic, auto-immune diseases characterized by chronic arthritis leading to progressive joint erosions. The individual functional and social impact of rheumatoid arthritis is of great importance. Disability and joint damage occur rapidly and early in the course of the disease. The remarkably improved outcomes have been achieved initiating biologic therapy with close monitoring of disease progression. Biologic agents are drugs, usually proteins, which can influence chronic immune dysregulation resulting in chronic arthritis. According to the mechanism of action these drugs include: 1 anti-TNF drugs (etanercept, infiximab, adalimumab; 2 IL-1 blocking drugs (anakinra; 3 IL-6 blocking drugs (tocilizumab; 4 agents blocking selective co-stimulation modulation (abatacept; 5 CD 20 blocking drugs (rituximab. Biologics targeting TNF-alpha with methotrexate have revolutionized the treatment of RA, producing significant improvement in clinical, radiographic, and functional outcomes not seen previously. The new concept of rheumatoid arthritis treatment defines early diagnosis, early aggressive therapy with optimal doses of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs and, if no improvement has been achieved during six months, early introduction of biologic drugs. The three-year experience of biologic therapy in Serbia has shown a positive effect on disease outcome.

  5. Genome-wide association study and gene expression analysis identifies CD84 as a predictor of response to etanercept therapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Cui

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF biologic therapy is a widely used treatment for rheumatoid arthritis (RA. It is unknown why some RA patients fail to respond adequately to anti-TNF therapy, which limits the development of clinical biomarkers to predict response or new drugs to target refractory cases. To understand the biological basis of response to anti-TNF therapy, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS meta-analysis of more than 2 million common variants in 2,706 RA patients from 13 different collections. Patients were treated with one of three anti-TNF medications: etanercept (n = 733, infliximab (n = 894, or adalimumab (n = 1,071. We identified a SNP (rs6427528 at the 1q23 locus that was associated with change in disease activity score (ΔDAS in the etanercept subset of patients (P = 8 × 10(-8, but not in the infliximab or adalimumab subsets (P>0.05. The SNP is predicted to disrupt transcription factor binding site motifs in the 3' UTR of an immune-related gene, CD84, and the allele associated with better response to etanercept was associated with higher CD84 gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (P = 1 × 10(-11 in 228 non-RA patients and P = 0.004 in 132 RA patients. Consistent with the genetic findings, higher CD84 gene expression correlated with lower cross-sectional DAS (P = 0.02, n = 210 and showed a non-significant trend for better ΔDAS in a subset of RA patients with gene expression data (n = 31, etanercept-treated. A small, multi-ethnic replication showed a non-significant trend towards an association among etanercept-treated RA patients of Portuguese ancestry (n = 139, P = 0.4, but no association among patients of Japanese ancestry (n = 151, P = 0.8. Our study demonstrates that an allele associated with response to etanercept therapy is also associated with CD84 gene expression, and further that CD84 expression correlates with disease activity. These findings support a model in which CD84

  6. Psoriasis vulgaris flare during efalizumab therapy does not preclude future use: a case series

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    Krueger James G

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe psoriasis vulgaris can be extremely difficult to treat in some patients, even with the newer biological therapies available today. Case presentations We present two patients with severe chronic plaque psoriasis who received numerous systemic anti-psoriatic therapies with varied results. Both responded well to initial treatment with efalizumab (anti-CD11a, but then experienced a flare of their disease after missing a dose. However, after disease stablization, both patients responded well to re-introduction of efalizumab, one patient requiring concurrent treatment with infliximab (anti-TNF-α. Conclusion These cases are presented to characterize this "flare" reaction, and to inform health care providers that efalizumab can still be administered after disease flare, and again may be a successful therapy.

  7. Comparative study of size and charge heterogeneities of anti-TNF-αantibodies by high performance liquid chromatography%TNF-α单抗分子大小变异体与电荷变异体色谱行为的比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭玮; 王文波; 于传飞; 张峰; 王兰; 刘春雨; 李萌; 高凯

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the differences of size and charge heterogeneities between origi-nal humanized anti-TNF-αantibody and four similar biotherapeutic products ( SBP ) .Methods The size exclusion chromatography ( SEC-HPLC ) and weak cation exchange chromatography ( WCX-HPLC ) were used to analyze the size and charge heterogeneities , respectively.Carboxypeptidase B (CpB) treatment was employed to analyze the source of charge heterogeneity of the antibody products .Results Four SBPs showed the same pattern with the originator in SEC-HPLC, and no significant difference with the percentage of mono-mer was observed .The percentages of the aggregates of SBP-3 and SBP-4 were a little higher than those of the originator .The charge distribution of SBPs was significantly different from the originator ′s, especially in the basic region .The results from the samples treated with CpB indicated that the difference of charge distri -bution in the basic region might be caused by the C-terminal lysine variants .Conclusion Four SBPs showed similar size heterogeneity with the originator , but significant differences with charge heterogeneity were observed among them .The study suggested that more attention should be paid to the charge heterogene -ity analysis of the biosimilar products .%目的:分析对比原研TNF-α全人源单克隆抗体(单抗)和4个生物类似药的分子大小和电荷异质性差异。方法采用体积排阻色谱( SEC-HPLC)分析抗体大小异质性,采用弱阳离子交换色谱(WCX-HPLC)分析单抗电荷异质性。结合羧肽酶B(CpB)处理单抗,分析单抗主要电荷异质性来源。结果经体积排阻色谱检测发现,4个生物类似药与原研单抗在单体比例上基本一致,其中两个生物类似药( SBP-3, SBP-4)聚合物比例较原研单抗略高。离子交换色谱检测结果显示,4个生物类似药与原研单抗的电荷分布在碱区以及主峰比例上有明显差异。羧肽

  8. Guillain-Barré syndrome during adalimumab therapy for Crohn´s disease: coincidence or consequence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cançado, Guilherme Grossi Lopes; Vilela, Eduardo Garcia

    2017-04-01

    We report the case of a 64-year-old patient diagnosed with extensive ileal Crohn´s disease who developed Guillain-Barré syndrome after starting biological therapy with adalimumab. Neurologic involvement associated with inflammatory bowel diseases is recognized as an extra-intestinal manifestation. After the breakthrough of antitumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF-α) agents, an increasing number of cases of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies have been reported; however, only one case has been described in a patient with Crohn´s disease. Although a causal relationship between Guillain-Barré syndrome and TNF-α antagonist therapy cannot be proven, this report emphasizes the need to monitor for neurologic signs and symptoms in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases, with or without biological therapy, to avoid severe and irreversible complications associated with demyelinating diseases.

  9. [Lipid profile and cardiovascular risk in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: Effect of the disease and of drug therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansel, B; Bruckert, E

    2010-09-01

    The increased mortality in patients with rheumathoid arthritis (RA) is mainly due to high incidence of cardiovascular (CV) disease. CV morbidity and mortality in RA can be explained by several mechanisms: (1) chronic inflammation, (2) enhanced prevalence of traditional CV risk factors including atherogenic dyslipoproteinemia, (3) a lower use of evidence-based therapy such as statins and (4) chronic treatment for RA such as glucocorticoids. It is difficult to distinguish between the role of pharmacological treatment per se and the severity or duration of the disease since these two parameters are closely interrelated. RA likely influences lipoprotein metabolism leading to quantitative and qualitative alteration of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and of high-density lipoproteins. Glucocorticoids alter carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. However, by reducing the inflammation level, the net effect on lipid parameters and on the CV risk may be favorable. Data from open follow-up studies would suggest that methotrexate use is associated with a beneficial effect on lipid parameters and with a reduction in the incidence of CV disease. Anti-TNF agents increase LDL-cholesterol in some but not all studies; however the use of anti-TNF agents likely reduce CV risk in patients with RA. The influence of recently developed compounds, anti-CD20, CTLA-4 Ig or anti-IL6 is not well documented. Anti-IL6 seem to increase total and LDL-cholesterol; however these changes are associated with an improvement in the TC/HDL-C ratio.

  10. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance in patients with psoriasis: is it really a side effect of biological therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Andrea; Esposito, Ilaria; Lasagni, Claudia; Miglietta, Roberta; Padalino, Claudia; Fabiano, Antonella; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2014-11-01

    Moderate-to-severe psoriasis is treated using biological drugs targeting cytokines involved in the pathogenesis of the disease, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) (adalimumab, infliximab, etanercept) and interleukin 12/23 (IL 12/23) (ustekinumab). There is a slight risk of developing hematological malignancies, such as monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) with anti TNF-α agents. There are no data available on anti-IL12/23 drugs. This retrospective study of data from 191 patients describes the appearance and follow-up of MGUS in three patients with psoriasis receiving long-term biological therapy. Since the appearance of MGUS occurred after about 6 years of anti-TNFα treatment in only three subjects, it was deemed unlikely to be due to the biological treatment. The decision not to suspend biological therapy after the appearance of MGUS was taken after careful assessment of the possible risks and benefits. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Treatment of inflammatory bowel disease: A review of medical therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patricia L Kozuch; Stephen B Hanauer

    2008-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. While a cure remains elusive, both can be treated with medications that induce and maintain remission. With the recent advent of therapies that inhibit tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha the overlap in medical therapies for UC and CD has become greater. Although 5-ASA agents have been a mainstay in the treatment of both CD and UC, the data for their efficacy in patients with CD, particularly as maintenance therapy, are equivocal. Antibiotics may have a limited role in the treatment of colonic CD. Steroids continue to be the first choice to treat active disease not responsive to other more conservative therapy; nonsystemic steroids such as oral and rectal budesonide for ileal and right-sided CD and distal UC respectively are also effective in mild-rnederate disease. 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) and its prodrug azathioprine are steroid-sparing immunomodulators effective in the maintenance of remission of both CD and UC, while methotrexate may be used in both induction and maintenance of CD. Infliximab and adalimumab are anti-TNF agents approved in the US and Europe for the treatment of Crohn's disease, and infliximab is also approved for the treatment of UC.

  12. Blockade of Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha: A Role for Adalimumab in Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration Refractory to Anti-Angiogenesis Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Fernández-Vega

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To report a case of wet age-related macular degeneration (wet-AMD refractory to intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF therapy in a patient who showed visual and anatomical improvement and stabilization after starting a subcutaneous treatment course with adalimumab, an anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α drug, for concomitant Crohn's disease. Methods: Observational case report of a female patient. Ophthalmological evaluation was performed by slit lamp and ophthalmoscopy (posterior pole and anterior segment. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA was determined, and imaging was performed by fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green angiography, and optical coherence tomography (OCT. Intravitreal therapies used and treatment with anti-TNF-α were recorded. Results: A 64-year-old woman with wet-AMD was treated with fourteen intravitreal injections of ranibizumab (0.5 mg for a period of 40 months with intervals of 1-6 months. She initially showed a good visual and anatomical response to periodic anti-VEGF treatment but during check visits, anatomical and functional responses deteriorated. At the 40-month follow-up, the patient had developed Crohn's disease, and her rheumatologist started treatment with adalimumab (40 mg subcutaneously every 2 weeks. During the 25 months of treatment with adalimumab, the patient did not require any additional intravitreal anti-VEGF treatments because her BCVA, clinical, and OCT findings improved and remained stable. Conclusions: We described a case of a patient with wet-AMD refractory to anti-VEGF therapy, which clinically benefited from subcutaneous adalimumab therapy. Treatment with subcutaneous anti-TNF-α in combination with anti-VEGF therapy avoids the high cost and risks related to multiple intravitreal anti-VEGF injections with good functional and anatomic outcomes.

  13. Human rheumatoid arthritis tissue production of IL-17A drives matrix and cartilage degradation: synergy with tumour necrosis factor-alpha, Oncostatin M and response to biologic therapies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, Ellen M

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to examine IL-17A in patients, following anti-TNF-alpha therapy and the effect of IL-17A on matrix turnover and cartilage degradation. METHODS: IL-17A expression was examined by ELISA and immunohistology in the rheumatoid arthritis (RA) joints. RA whole synovial tissue explant (RA ST), primary synovial fibroblasts (RASFC), human cartilage and chondrocyte cultures were stimulated with IL-17A +\\/- TNF-alpha and Oncostatin M (OSM). Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and tissue inhibitor (TIMP-1) were assessed by ELISA and zymography. Cartilage proteoglycan release was assessed histologically by Safranin-O staining. Clinical parameters, IL-17A, MMP\\/TIMP were assessed in patients pre\\/post biologic therapy. RESULTS: IL-17A levels were higher in RA vs osteoarthritis (OA)\\/normal joints (P < 0.05). IL-17A up-regulated MMP-1, -2, -9, and -13 in RA ST, RASFC, cartilage and chondrocyte cultures (P < 0.05). In combination with TNF-alpha and OSM, IL-17A shifted the MMP:TIMP-1 ratio in favor of matrix degradation (all P < 0.05). Cartilage proteoglycan depletion in response to IL-17A was mild; however, in combination with TNF-alpha or OSM showed almost complete proteoglycan depletion. Serum IL-17A was detected in 28% of patients commencing biologic therapy. IL-17A negative patients demonstrated reductions post therapy in serum MMP1\\/TIMP4, MMP3\\/TIMP1 and MMP3\\/TIMP4 ratios and an increase in CS846 (all P < 0.05). No significant changes were observed in IL-17A positive patients. CONCLUSIONS: IL-17A is produced locally in the inflamed RA joint. IL-17A promotes matrix turnover and cartilage destruction, especially in the presence of other cytokines, mimicking the joint environment. IL-17A levels are modulated in vivo, following anti-TNF therapy, and may reflect changes in matrix turnover.

  14. The role of cytokines in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis--Practical and potential application of cytokines as biomarkers and targets of personalized therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzustewicz, Edyta; Bryl, Ewa

    2015-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), as a common chronic disease leading to severe disability, requires early diagnosis and introduction of proper treatment. Deregulation in the cytokine network plays an undoubtedly crucial role in the pathogenesis of RA. The understanding of the role of cytokines in RA can be used for patients' benefit. Technological advances had already allowed introduction of the tailor-made cytokine-targeted therapies (so far anti-TNF, anti-IL-1 and anti-IL-6) into clinical practice. This type of treatment is currently developing very fast. Moreover, cytokines are considered to be potential powerful biomarkers of RA with roles predicted to grow in the future. Detailed understanding of the cytokine balance in RA may assist both the diagnostic process and therapy.

  15. [Drug-induced alveolitis associated with infliximab/azathioprine therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hag, K; Dercken, H-G; Prenzel, R; Hölzle, E

    2008-04-01

    TNF-alpha is known to play a decisive role as a pro-inflammatory cytokine in several autoimmune conditions. Its neutralisation by TNF-alpha antagonists such as infliximab (Remicade), a chimeric monoclonal anti-TNF-alpha antibody, may be beneficial in patients with active disease. These anticytokine drugs have been approved and are being increasingly used in the therapy of rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, inflammatory bowel disease, psoriatic arthropathy and generalised psoriasis after established treatments have failed. Whenever therapy options are few, TNF-alpha antagonists are regarded as an effective, relatively safe and generally well-tolerated alternative, even if there is no detailed knowledge of their safety profile and possible long-term adverse events. In the respiratory tract an increased risk of viral, (myco-)bacterial, fungal and opportunistic infections has been observed. Furthermore, rare cases of severe fibrosing alveolitis in patients with concomitant immunosuppressant therapy or underlying lung disease have been reviewed recently. We present a case of drug-induced alveolitis following infliximab and azathioprine for the treatment of severe, generalised psoriasis and atopic eczema without pre-existing lung disease. Withdrawal of both drugs achieved clinical and functional stabilisation, and the addition of prednisolone resulted in a rapid improvement. As the pathophysiology of the pulmonary insult is unknown and since there are potentially serious adverse effects, we advise caution and close screening before and after initiation of TNF-alpha blockade, especially in patients with an underlying lung disease or with a combination of pneumotoxic agents.

  16. Combination Therapy with Intensive Granulocyte and Monocyte Adsorptive Apheresis plus Adalimumab: Therapeutic Outcomes in 5 Cases with Refractory Crohn’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiji Ozeki

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Adalimumab (ADA is applied to induce remission in patients with Crohn’s disease (CD naïve to chimeric anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (anti-TNF-α, infliximab or patients with loss of response to scheduled maintenance infliximab. Adsorptive granulocyte and monocyte apheresis (GMA depletes elevated/activated myeloid lineage leucocytes as sources of inflammatory cytokines and has been used to treat patients with CD. This study was to investigate the efficacy of intensive GMA in combination with ADA as remission induction therapy in cases of CD refractory to medications including anti-TNFtherapies. Between December 2010 and February 2012, 5 consecutive cases with refractory CD were treated with intensive GMA (2 sessions per week plus ADA to induce remission. CD activity index (CDAI, C-reactive protein (CRP, and endoscopic findings based on the simple endoscopic score for CD (SES-CD at baseline and 10 weeks post 5 ADA injections were applied to determine treatment efficacy outcomes. At week 10 post ADA treatment, clinical remission together with normal CRP levels were achieved in all 5 cases, while SES-CD scores reflected marked improvement in 3 cases and partial improvement in 2 cases who had extensive deep longitudinal CD lesions. The CDAI and CRP values at baseline were 324 ± 118 and 4.9 ± 3.3 mg/dl, respectively. The corresponding values after treatment were 100 ± 28 (p = 0.024 and 0.2 ± 0.2 mg/dl (p = 0.038. In these 5 cases with medication-refractory CD, combination therapy with intensive GMA followed by 5 ADA shots appeared to be an effective and safe intervention for inducing clinical remission.

  17. Biological therapy for dermatological manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zippi, Maddalena; Pica, Roberta; De Nitto, Daniela; Paoluzi, Paolo

    2013-05-16

    Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are the two forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The advent of biological drugs has significantly changed the management of these conditions. Skin manifestations are not uncommon in IBD. Among the reactive lesions (immune-mediated extraintestinal manifestations), erythema nodosum (EN) and pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) are the two major cutaneous ills associated with IBD, while psoriasis is the dermatological comorbidity disease observed more often. In particular, in the last few years, anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α agents have been successfully used to treat psoriasis, especially these kinds of lesions that may occur during the treatment with biological therapies. The entity of the paradoxical manifestations has been relatively under reported as most lesions are limited and a causal relationship with the treatment is often poorly understood. The reason for this apparent side-effect of the therapy still remains unclear. Although side effects may occur, their clinical benefits are undoubted. This article reviews the therapeutic effects of the two most widely used anti-TNF-α molecules, infliximab (a fusion protein dimer of the human TNF-α receptor) and adalimumab (a fully human monoclonal antibody to TNF-α), for the treatment of the major cutaneous manifestations associated with IBD (EN, PG and psoriasis).

  18. Pesquisa de autoanticorpos em pacientes com artrite psoriásica sob terapia anti-TNFα Autoantibodies in patients with psoriatic arthritis on anti-TNFα therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilma S Trindade Viana

    2010-06-01

    induziu positividade ANA em um terço dos pacientes com APs e o uso concomitante de metotrexato não alterou esse achado. Além disso, todos os soros foram sistematicamente negativos para a maioria dos autoanticorpos específicos de doenças reumatológicas testados após a introdução da terapia biológica.INTRODUCTION: Anti-TNFα therapy has been effective in the treatment of patients with refractory psoriatic arthritis (PSA. However, the risk of developing autoantibodies commonly found in rheumatic diseases in PSA patients undergoing this therapy is not clear. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the induction of specific autoantibodies after anti-TNFα therapy in PSA patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Serum samples from 23 PSA patients (women: 61%, age: 45.04 ± 12.68 years, polyarticular: 69.6%, disease duration: 13.3 ± 7.7 years, infliximab: 82.60% obtained immediately before (baseline and approximately one year after the introduction of anti-TNF therapy (last sample (385 ± 131.45 days, were analyzed. The analysis included detection of antinuclear antibodies (ANA and anti-dsDNA antibodies (indirect immunofluorescence on Hep-2 cells and Crithidia luciliae, respectively; anti-RNP and anti-Sm (passive hemagglutination; and anti-Ro/ SS-A and/or anti-La/SS-B, anti-chromatin, anti-histones, anti-citrullinated peptide (CCP, and anti-cardiolipin (ELISA antibodies. RESULTS: At baseline, ANA was positive in 47.8% of patients, with predominance of homogeneous nuclear pattern (81.8%. All baseline serum samples were negative for rheumatoid factor and antibodies to cardiolipin, RNP, Sm, Ro/SS-A, anti-La/SS-B, anti-histone, and anti-dsDNA antibodies, while two patients were positive for anti-chromatin and one for anti-CCP. All ANA-positive samples at baseline, except for one, remained positive after the introduction of anti-TNF therapy; however, de novo ANA reactivity was observed in four originally negative patients (33.3%. Anti-Ro/SS-A, La/SS-B, cardiolipin, histones, dsDNA, and rheumatoid

  19. [Periodontal therapy for rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Zongkai; Li, Chunjie; Lü, Jun; He, Wulin; Gao, Li; Wu, Yafei

    2011-08-01

    To assess the effect and safety of periodontal therapy in relieving the symptoms and clinical signs of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The electronic search was conducted in Medline (OVID, 1950-2010 Sep), EMBASE (1984-2010 Sep), CENTRAL (2010, Issue 3), CBM (1978-2010 Sep) and the Chinese journals on stomatology were hand-searched. Clinical randomized controlled trials as well as clinical controlled trials were selected regarding the targeted issue. Two investigators evaluated the reporting quality and risk of bias of those included trials in accordance with CONSORT statement and Cochrane risk of bias assessment tools, and collected data of included studies in duplicate. Revman 5.0.23 was applied for Meta-analysis. Four trials met the inclusion criteria and a total of 150 patients were enrolled in the trials, one had low risk of bias and others had moderate risk of bias. Meta-analysis showed that pure periodontal therapy could not decrease disease activity score in 28 joints (DAS28) (P=0.06), and there was no statistically significant difference between periodontal therapy with anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) medication and pure anti-TNF-alpha medication (P=0.24). But the subgroup analysis showed that a significantly decreased DAS28 was achieved by periodontal therapy (P=0.03), and the interventions provided a remarkable effect on alleviating clinical signs and erythrocyte sedimentation rate of RA (Pperiodontal therapy may play a positive role in remitting the clinical signs and periodontal status of RA except the relief of the symptoms.

  20. Current therapy of pediatric Crohn’s disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Avishay; Lahad; Batia; Weiss

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases(IBD), including Crohn’s disease(CD) and ulcerative colitis, are chronic relapsing and remitting diseases of the bowel, with an unknown etiology and appear to involve interaction between genetic susceptibility, environmental factors and the immune system. Although our knowledge and understanding of the pathogenesis and causes of IBD have improved significantly, the incidence in the pediatric population is still rising. In the last decade more drugs and treatment option have become available including 5-aminosalicylate,antibiotics, corticosteroids, immunomodulators and biological agents. Before the use of anti-tumor necrosis factor(TNF)-α became available to patients with IBD, the risk for surgery within five years of diagnosis was very high, however, with anti-TNF-α treatment the risk of surgery has decreased significantly. In the pediatric population a remission in disease can be achieved by exclusive enteral nutrition. Exclusive enteral nutrition also has an important role in the improvement of nutritional status and maintained growth. In this review we summarize the current therapeutic treatments in CD. The progress in the treatment options and the development of new drugs has led to optimized tactics for achieving the primary clinical goals of therapy- induction and maintenance of remission while improving the patient’s growth and overall well-being.

  1. Noninfectious interstitial lung disease during infliximab therapy: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccaro, Roberta; Savarino, Edoardo; D'Incà, Renata; Sturniolo, Giacomo Carlo

    2013-08-28

    Pulmonary abnormalities are not frequently encountered in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. However, lung toxicity can be induced by conventional medications used to maintain remission, and similar evidence is also emerging for biologics. We present the case of a young woman affected by colonic Crohn's disease who was treated with oral mesalamine and became steroid-dependent and refractory to azathioprine and adalimumab. She was referred to our clinic with a severe relapse and was treated with infliximab, an anti-tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) antibody, to induce remission. After an initial benefit, with decreases in bowel movements, rectal bleeding and C-reactive protein levels, she experienced shortness of breath after the 5(th) infusion. Noninfectious interstitial lung disease was diagnosed. Both mesalamine and infliximab were discontinued, and steroids were introduced with slow but progressive improvement of symptoms, radiology and functional tests. This represents a rare case of interstitial lung disease associated with infliximab therapy and the effect of drug withdrawal on these lung alterations. Given the increasing use of anti-TNFtherapies and the increasing reports of pulmonary abnormalities in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases, this case underlines the importance of a careful evaluation of respiratory symptoms in patients undergoing infliximab therapy.

  2. Medical Therapies for Stricturing Crohn's Disease: Efficacy and Cross-Sectional Imaging Predictors of Therapeutic Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Cécile; Perrey, Antoine; Lambert, Céline; Pereira, Bruno; Goutte, Marion; Dubois, Anne; Goutorbe, Felix; Dapoigny, Michel; Bommelaer, Gilles; Hordonneau, Constance; Buisson, Anthony

    2017-06-01

    Medical therapy efficacy remains controversial in stricturing Crohn's disease. Cross-sectional imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging, has been suggested as very helpful to guide therapeutic decision making. To assess efficacy and predictors of therapeutic failure in patients receiving medical treatments for stricturing Crohn's disease. In this retrospective study, therapeutic failure was defined as symptomatic stricture leading to surgical or endoscopic therapeutics, hospitalization, treatment discontinuation or additional therapy and short-term clinical response as clinical improvement assessed by two physicians. The 55 cross-sectional imaging examinations (33 magnetic resonance imaging and 22 CT scan) before starting medical therapy were analyzed independently by two radiologists. Results were expressed as hazard ratio (HR) or odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Among 84 patients, therapeutic failure rate within 60 months was 66.6%. In multivariate analysis, Crohn's disease diagnosis after 40 years old (HR 3.9, 95% CI [1.37-11.2], p = 0.011), small stricture luminal diameter (HR 1.34, 95% CI [1.01-1.80], p = 0.046), increased stricture wall thickness (HR 1.23, 95% CI [1.04-1.46], p = 0.013) and fistula with abscess (HR 5.63, 95% CI [1.64-19.35], p = 0.006) were associated with therapeutic failure, while anti-TNF combotherapy (HR 0.17, 95% CI [0.40-0.71], p = 0.015) prevented it. Considering 108 therapeutic sequences, the short-term clinical response rate was 65.7%. In multivariate analysis, male gender (OR 0.15, 95% CI [0.03-0.64], p = 0.011), fistula with abscess (OR 0.09, 95% CI [0.01-0.77], p = 0.028) and comb sign (OR 0.23, 95% CI [0.005-0.97], p = 0.047) were associated with short-term clinical failure. Anti-TNF combotherapy seemed to prevent therapeutic failure, and cross-sectional imaging should be systematically performed to help medical management in stricturing Crohn's disease.

  3. Pentosan polysulfate: a novel therapy for the mucopolysaccharidoses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward H Schuchman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pentosan polysulfate (PPS is an FDA-approved, oral medication with anti-inflammatory and pro-chondrogenic properties. We have previously shown that animal models of the mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS exhibit significant inflammatory disease, contributing to cartilage degeneration. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT only partly reduced inflammation, and anti-TNF-alpha antibody therapy significantly enhanced clinical and pathological outcomes. Here we describe the use of PPS for the treatment of MPS type VI rats. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Treatment began during prenatal development and at 1 and 6 months of age. All animals were treated until they were 9 months old. Significant reductions in the serum and tissue levels of several inflammatory markers (e.g., TNF-alpha, MIP-1alpha and RANTES/CCL5 were observed, as was reduced expression of inflammatory markers in cultured articular chondrocytes. ADAMTS-5/aggrecanase-2 levels also were reduced in chondrocytes, consistent with an elevation of serum tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1. Marked improvements in motility and grooming behavior occurred, along with a reduction in eye and nasal secretions and a lessening of the tracheal deformities. MicroCT and radiographic analyses further revealed that the treated MPS skulls were longer and thinner, and that the teeth malocclusions, misalignments and mineral densities were improved. MicroCT analysis of the femurs and vertebrae revealed improvements in trabecular bone mineral densities, number and spacing in a subset of treated MPS animals. Biomechanical assessments of PPS-treated spines showed partially restored torsional behaviors, suggesting increased spinal stability. No improvements were observed in cortical bone or femur length. The positive changes in the PPS-treated MPS VI rats occurred despite glycosaminoglycan accumulation in their tissues. CONCLUSIONS: Based on these findings we conclude that PPS could be a simple and effective

  4. Current and emerging therapy for celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makharia, Govind K

    2014-01-01

    At present, strict and lifelong gluten-free diet is the only effective treatment for celiac disease. Even small amounts of gluten (50 mg/day) can be immunogenic; therefore all food and food items and drugs that contain gluten and its derivatives must be eliminated completely from the diet. While prescribing gluten-free diet is easy; the key to the success is the dietary counseling by a nutrition specialist and maintenance of adherence to GFD by the patient. In recent times, a number of targets to halt the process of immunological injury have been explored to find out alternative treatment for celiac disease. These targets include exploration of ancient wheat if they are less immunogenic, intra-luminal digestion of gluten using prolylendopeptidases, pretreatment of whole gluten with bacterial-derived peptidase before ingestion; prevention of passage of immunogenic peptides through the tight junctions such as zonulin antagonists, Blocking of HLA-DQ2 to prevent binding of immunogenic peptides, inhibition of transglutaminase 2, immune-modulation, and induction of tolerance to gluten using gluten tolerizing vaccines, use of gluten-sequestering polymers, use of anti-inflammatory drugs (glucocorticoids, budesonides) and anti-cytokines such as anti TNF-α, and anti-interleukin-15. While many of these targets are still in the pre-clinical phase, some of them including zonulin antagonist and endopeptidases have already reached phase II and phase III clinical trials. Furthermore, while these targets appear very exciting; they at best are likely to be used as adjunctive therapy rather than a complete replacement for gluten-free diet.

  5. Current and emerging therapy for celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govind K Makharia

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstractAt present, strict and lifelong gluten free diet is the only effective treatment for celiac disease. Even small amounts of gluten (50mg/day can be immunogenic; therefore all food and food items and drugs that contain gluten and its derivatives must be eliminated completely from the diet. While prescribing gluten free diet is easy; the key to the success is the dietary counseling by a nutrition specialist and maintenance of compliance by the patient. In recent times, a number of targets to halt the process of immunological injury have been explored to find out alternative treatment for celiac disease. These targets include exploration of ancient wheat if they are less immunogenic, intra-luminal digestion of gluten using prolylendopeptidases, pretreatment of whole gluten with bacterial-derived peptidase before ingestion; prevention of passage of immunogenic peptides through the tight junctions such as zonulin antagonists, Blocking of HLA-DQ2 to prevent binding of immunogenic peptides, inhibition of transglutaminase-2, immune-modulation and induction of tolerance to gluten using gluten tolerizing vaccines, use of gluten-sequestering polymers, use of anti-inflammatory drugs (glucocorticoides, budesonides and anti-cytokines such as anti TNF-α, and anti-interleukin-15. While many of these targets are still in the pre-clinical phase, some of them including zonulin antagonist and endopeptidases have already reached phase II and phase III clinical trials. Furthermore, while these targets appears very exciting; they at best are likely to be used as adjunctive therapy rather than a complete replacement for gluten free diet.

  6. Anti-TNF agents for the treatment of active non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Olivieri

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The spondyloarthritis (SpA complex includes ankylosing spondylitis (AS, reactive arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, arthritis related to inflammatory bowel disease and forms that do not meet established criteria for these definite categories which are designated as undifferentiated SpA. In the early 1990s, two sets of classification criteria were suggested with the purpose to cover the whole clinical spectrum of SpA: the Amor criteria and the European Spondylarthropathy Study Group (ESSG criteria...

  7. Transmembrane TNF-α: structure, function and interaction with anti-TNF agents

    OpenAIRE

    Horiuchi, Takahiko; Mitoma, Hiroki; Harashima, Shin-ichi; Tsukamoto, Hiroshi; Shimoda, Terufumi

    2010-01-01

    Transmembrane TNF-α, a precursor of the soluble form of TNF-α, is expressed on activated macrophages and lymphocytes as well as other cell types. After processing by TNF-α-converting enzyme (TACE), the soluble form of TNF-α is cleaved from transmembrane TNF-α and mediates its biological activities through binding to Types 1 and 2 TNF receptors (TNF-R1 and -R2) of remote tissues. Accumulating evidence suggests that not only soluble TNF-α, but also transmembrane TNF-α is involved in the inflamm...

  8. Effects of Hyaluronic Acid Conjugation on Anti-TNF-alpha Inhibition of Inflammation in Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    burn progression, and early mediation may be a key factor in rescuing thermally injured tissue from secondary necrosis in order to improve healing...characterized by increases in pro-inflammatory cytokines, phagocytic macrophages and monocytes in the wound microenvironment, and blood vessel dilation and...in burn wound tissue and wound fluid11 and therefore, is a key player in the destruction of tissue in burn wound progression. TNF-α causes dilation of

  9. Potential role of pharmacogenetics in anti-TNF treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooloos, W.M.; Jong, D.J. de; Huizinga, T.W.J.; Guchelaar, H.J.

    2007-01-01

    Etanercept, infliximab and adalimumab have shown clinical benefit in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases; however, the outcome of treatment with these tumour-necrosis factor inhibitors remains insufficient in approximately 40-60% and approximately 25-40% of individuals with rheumatoid arthritis an

  10. Recommendations for starting anti TNF-α in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Punzi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available La spondilite anchilosante è la malattia più rappresentativa del gruppo delle spondiloartriti. Di esso fanno parte anche l’artrite reattiva, l’artrite psoriasica, l’artrite associata alla colite ulcerosa ed alla malattia di Crohn e forme che non rientrando in nessuna della categorie precedenti sono dette indifferenziate (1. Si tratta di malattie molto frequenti che complessivamente colpiscono l-2% della popolazione (2. La spondilite anchilosante inizia di solito nella seconda e terza decade di vita ed è più frequente nel sesso maschile. In molti casi la malattia è progressiva ed è causa di un grado di disabilità non inferiore a quello provocato dall’artrite reumatoide (3. Gli scopi della terapia della spondilite anchilosante sono: ridurre l’intensità del dolore e della rigidità, migliorare la funzione, contrastare la progressione del danno radiologico e prevenire la disabilità. Sino a poco tempo fa la terapia della spondilite anchilosante consisteva nella somministrazione di farmaci antinfiammatori non-steroidei (FANS e nel programma di riabilitazione. I FANS sono efficaci nel controllo del dolore e della rigidità e consentono anche di ottenere un miglioramento della funzione.

  11. Cerebral tuberculoma in a patient receiving anti-TNF alpha (adalimumab) treatment.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lynch, Karen

    2010-10-01

    We report a case of a cerebral tuberculoma in a 60-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis while receiving the anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha monoclonal antibody, adalimumab (Humira), for active disease. MR brain imaging for dyspraxia revealed a left parietal ring-enhancing lesion, which on resection was shown to be a necrotizing granuloma. There were no associated pulmonary lesions, and the patient was systemically well. Sputum and urine cultures were negative for tuberculosis. The patient was treated with anti-tuberculous medications and made an excellent recovery. We consider this to be the first documented case of tuberculosis involving the central nervous system occurring in the setting of adalimumab treatment.

  12. Anti-TNF treatment blocks the induction of T cell-dependent humoral responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Salinas; L. de Rycke (Leen); B.H. Barendregt (Barbara); J.E. Paramarta (Jacqueline); H. Hreggvidstdottir (Hulda); T. Cantaert (Tineke); M. van der Burg (Mirjam); P.P. Tak (Paul); D. Baeten (Dominique)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractObjective: Experimental and human data suggest that tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blockade may affect B cell responses, in particular the induction of T cell-dependent (TD) humoral immunity. This study aimed to assess this hypothesis directly in patients with arthritis by analysing

  13. The effects of combined spa therapy and rehabilitation on patients with ankylosing spondylitis being treated with TNF inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciprian, Luca; Lo Nigro, Alessandro; Rizzo, Michela; Gava, Alessandra; Ramonda, Roberta; Punzi, Leonardo; Cozzi, Franco

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in pharmacological therapy, physical treatment continues to be important in the management of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects and tolerability of combined spa therapy and rehabilitation in a group of AS patients being treated with TNF inhibitors. Thirty AS patients attending the Rheumatology Unit of the University of Padova being treated with TNF inhibitors for at least 3 months were randomized and assessed by an investigator independent from the spa staff: 15 were prescribed 10 sessions of spa therapy (mud packs and thermal baths) and rehabilitation (exercises in a thermal pool) and the other 15 were considered controls. The patients in both groups had been receiving anti-TNF agents for at least three months. The outcome measures utilized were BASFI, BASDAI, BASMI, VAS for back pain and HAQ. The evaluations were performed in all patients at the entry to the study, at the end of the spa treatment, and after 3 and 6 months. Most of the evaluation indices were significantly improved at the end of the spa treatment, as well as at the 3 and 6 months follow-up assessments. No significant alterations in the evaluation indices were found in the control group. Combined spa therapy and rehabilitation caused a clear, long-term clinical improvement in AS patients being treated with TNF inhibitors. Thermal treatment was found to be well tolerated and none of the patients had disease relapse.

  14. Successful tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blocking therapy suppresses oxidative stress and hypoxia-induced mitochondrial mutagenesis in inflammatory arthritis

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Biniecka, Monika

    2011-07-25

    Abstract Introduction To examine the effects of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blocking therapy on the levels of early mitochondrial genome alterations and oxidative stress. Methods Eighteen inflammatory arthritis patients underwent synovial tissue oxygen (tpO2) measurements and clinical assessment of disease activity (DAS28-CRP) at baseline (T0) and three months (T3) after starting biologic therapy. Synovial tissue lipid peroxidation (4-HNE), T and B cell specific markers and synovial vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were quantified by immunohistochemistry. Synovial levels of random mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations were assessed using Random Mutation Capture (RMC) assay. Results 4-HNE levels pre\\/post anti TNFtherapy were inversely correlated with in vivo tpO2 (P < 0.008; r = -0.60). Biologic therapy responders showed a significantly reduced 4-HNE expression (P < 0.05). High 4-HNE expression correlated with high DAS28-CRP (P = 0.02; r = 0.53), tender joint count for 28 joints (TJC-28) (P = 0.03; r = 0.49), swollen joint count for 28 joints (SJC-28) (P = 0.03; r = 0.50) and visual analogue scale (VAS) (P = 0.04; r = 0.48). Strong positive association was found between the number of 4-HNE positive cells and CD4+ cells (P = 0.04; r = 0.60), CD8+ cells (P = 0.001; r = 0.70), CD20+ cells (P = 0.04; r = 0.68), CD68+ cells (P = 0.04; r = 0.47) and synovial VEGF expression (P = 0.01; r = 063). In patients whose in vivo tpO2 levels improved post treatment, significant reduction in mtDNA mutations and DAS28-CRP was observed (P < 0.05). In contrast in those patients whose tpO2 levels remained the same or reduced at T3, no significant changes for mtDNA mutations and DAS28-CRP were found. Conclusions High levels of synovial oxidative stress and mitochondrial mutation burden are strongly associated with low in vivo oxygen tension and synovial inflammation. Furthermore these significant mitochondrial genome alterations are rescued following successful anti TNF

  15. Anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha therapy and periodontal parameters in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Yaniv; Balbir-Gurman, Alexandra; Machtei, Eli E

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) therapy on the clinical and immunologic parameters of the periodontium. Ten patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who routinely received infusions of infliximab, 200 mg (RA+), 10 patients with RA without anti-TNF-alpha therapy (RA-), and 10 healthy controls (C) were included. Clinical parameters, including the plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), probing depth (PD), clinical attachment loss (AL), and bleeding on probing (BOP), were assessed, and total gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) TNF-alpha level was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Analysis of variance with Scheffe modification and the Pearson correlation test were used for statistical analysis. The ages of the patients ranged from 22 to 76 years (mean, 50.73 +/- 9.1 years). The mean PI was similar among the groups. However, mean inflammatory parameters in the three groups varied significantly; GI was greater in the RA- group compared to RA+ and C groups (P = 0.0042). The RA+ group exhibited less BOP than RA- and C groups (21.1% +/- 3.0%, 45.9% +/- 6.2%, and 39.1% +/- 7.2%, respectively; P = 0.0146). The mean PD in the RA+ group was shallower than in RA- and C groups (3.22 +/- 0.13 mm, 3.85 +/- 0.22 mm, and 3.77 +/- 0.20 mm, respectively; P = 0.055). Clinical AL in the RA+ group was lower than in RA- and C groups (3.68 +/- 0.11 mm, 4.52 +/- 0.26 mm, and 4.35 +/- 0.24 mm, respectively; P = 0.0273). TNF-alpha levels in the GCF of the RA+ group were the lowest compared to RA- and C groups (0.663, 1.23, and 0.949 ng/site, respectively; P = 0.0401). A significant positive correlation was found between TNF-alpha levels in the GCF and clinical AL (r = 0.448; P = 0.0283). Patients with RA receiving anti-TNF-alpha medication had lower periodontal indices and GCF TNF-alpha levels. Thus, suppression of proinflammatory cytokines might prove beneficial in suppressing periodontal diseases.

  16. Modern Therapies for Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies (IIMs): Role of Biologics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadam-Kia, Siamak; Oddis, Chester V; Aggarwal, Rohit

    2017-02-01

    Despite the lack of placebo-controlled trials, glucocorticoids are considered the mainstay of initial treatment for idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (IIMs) and myositis-associated ILD (MA-ILD). Glucocorticoid-sparing agents are often given concomitantly with other immunosuppressive agents, particularly in patients with moderate or severe disease. As treatment of refractory cases of idiopathic inflammatory myopathies has been challenging, there is growing interest in evaluating newer therapies including biologics that target various pathways involved in the pathogenesis of IIMs. In a large clinical trial of rituximab in adult and juvenile myositis, the primary outcome was not met, but the definition of improvement was met by most of this refractory group of myositis patients. Rituximab use was also associated with a significant glucocorticoid-sparing effect. Intravenous immune globulin (IVIg) can be used for refractory IIMs or those with severe dysphagia or concomitant infections. Anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) utility in IIMs is generally limited by previous negative studies along with recent reports suggesting their potential for inducing myositis. Further research is required to assess the role of new therapies such as tocilizumab (anti-IL6), ACTH gel, sifalimumab (anti-IFNα), and abatacept (inhibition of T cell co-stimulation) given their biological plausibility and encouraging small case series results. Other potential novel therapies include alemtuzumab (a humanized monoclonal antibody which binds CD52 on B and T lymphocytes), fingolimod (a sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor modulator that traps T lymphocytes in the lymphoid organs), eculizumab, and basiliximab. The future investigations in IIMs will depend on well-designed controlled clinical trials using validated consensus core set measures and improvements in myositis classification schemes based on serologic and histopathologic features.

  17. Tumour necrosis factor alpha inhibitor therapy and rehabilitation for the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubrano, Ennio; Spadaro, Antonio; Amato, Giorgio; Benucci, Maurizio; Cavazzana, Ilaria; Chimenti, Maria Sole; Ciancio, Giovanni; D Alessandro, Giuseppe; Angelis, Rossella De; Lupoli, Salvatore; Lurati, Alfredo Maria; Naclerio, Caterina; Russo, Romualdo; Semeraro, Angelo; Tomietto, Paola; Zuccaro, Carmelo; De Marco, Gabriele

    2015-04-01

    To systematically review the evidence for a synergistic effect of combining rehabilitation with biological anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) therapy in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Data were analysed to identify the most effective rehabilitation programmes, the best endpoints for effectiveness, and patient subgroups most likely to benefit from combination therapy. Systematic MEDLINE and Embase searches were performed to identify studies evaluating rehabilitation programmes and biological therapy in patients with AS. Evidence was categorised by study type, and efficacy, adverse effects and other outcomes were summarised. Of the 75 studies identified, 13 investigated the combination of a rehabilitation programme with TNF inhibitor therapy, while the remainder studied rehabilitation with standard therapy (often not specified). Data from these few studies suggest that combined rehabilitation plus anti-TNF therapy is more effective in terms of symptom severity, disease activity, disability and quality-of-life indices versus biologic alone or rehabilitation with standard medical therapy, or, in non-comparative studies, compared with baseline. The most effective rehabilitation appears to be supervised or in-patient programmes with an educational component. Available data do not provide guidance on most appropriate endpoints or identify patients most likely to benefit from combination therapy. Combined, TNF inhibitor and rehabilitation therapy appear to have a synergistic effect, possibly due to increased adherence to exercise. Exercise regimes are more effective if supervised and include an education component. Further randomized, controlled trials comparing endpoints and investigating longer-term benefits of combining TNF inhibitors with rehabilitation in different AS subgroups are needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Drug persistence and need for dose intensification to adalimumab therapy; the importance of therapeutic drug monitoring in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonczi, Lorant; Kurti, Zsuzsanna; Rutka, Mariann; Vegh, Zsuzsanna; Farkas, Klaudia; Lovasz, Barbara D; Golovics, Petra A; Gecse, Krisztina B; Szalay, Balazs; Molnar, Tamas; Lakatos, Peter L

    2017-08-08

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) aid therapeutic decision making in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who lose response to anti-TNF therapy. Our aim was to evaluate the frequency and predictive factors of loss of response (LOR) to adalimumab using TDM in IBD patients. One hundred twelve IBD patients (with 214 TDM measurements, CD/UC 84/28, male/female 50/62, mean age CD/UC: 36/35 years) were enrolled in this consecutive cohort from two referral centres in Hungary. Demographic data were comprehensively collected and harmonized monitoring strategy was applied. Previous and current therapy, laboratory data and clinical activity were recorded at the time of TDM. Patients were evaluated either at the time of suspected LOR or during follow-up. TDM measurements were determined by commercial ELISA (LISA TRACKER, Theradiag, France). Among 112 IBD patients, LOR/drug persistence was 25.9%/74.1%. The cumulative ADA positivity (>10 ng/mL) and low TL (intensification was needed in 29.5% of the patients. Female gender and ADA positivity were associated with LOR (female gender: p intensification were frequent during adalimumab therapy and support the selective use of TDM in IBD patients treated with adalimumab. ADA positivity and gender were predictors of LOR.

  19. Economic impact of combination therapy with infliximab plus azathioprine for drug-refractory Crohn's disease: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Shota; Shimizu, Utako; Nan, Zhang; Mandai, Nozomu; Yokoyama, Junji; Terajima, Kenshi; Akazawa, Kouhei

    2013-03-01

    Combination therapy with infliximab (IFX) and azathioprine (AZA) is significantly more effective for treatment of active Crohn's disease (CD) than IFX monotherapy. However, AZA is associated with an increased risk of lymphoma in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of combination therapy with IFX plus AZA for drug-refractory CD. A decision analysis model is constructed to compare, over a time horizon of 1year, the cost-effectiveness of combination therapy with IFX plus AZA and that of IFX monotherapy for CD patients refractory to conventional non-anti-TNFtherapy. The treatment efficacy, adverse effects, quality-of-life scores, and treatment costs are derived from published data. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses are performed to estimate the uncertainty in the results. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of combination therapy with IFX plus AZA is 24,917 GBP/QALY when compared with IFX monotherapy. The sensitivity analyses reveal that the utility score of nonresponding active disease has the strongest influence on the cost-effectiveness, with ICERs ranging from 17,147 to 45,564 GBP/QALY. Assuming that policy makers are willing to pay 30,000 GBP/QALY, the probability that combination therapy with IFX plus AZA is cost-effective is 0.750. Combination therapy with IFX plus AZA appears to be a cost-effective treatment for drug-refractory CD when compared with IFX monotherapy. Furthermore, the additional lymphoma risk of combination therapy has little significance on its cost-effectiveness. Copyright © 2012 European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Disease-modifying Antirheumatic Drugs (DMARD) and Combination Therapy of Conventional DMARD in Patients with Spondyloarthritis and Psoriatic Arthritis with Axial Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simone, Davide; Nowik, Marcin; Gremese, Elisa; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco F

    2015-11-01

    Treatment with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAID) is the recommended first-line therapy in patients with axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA); and for those patients who have persistently active disease, the introduction of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) inhibitors is indicated. Conventional nonbiological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD), although effective and used in clinical practice for peripheral arthritis, are not recommended. Few studies have been conducted with the aim of evaluating the effect of conventional DMARD, either alone or in combination, in axSpA. As for psoriatic arthritis (PsA), DMARD are widely used, but few trials are available about their effects on axial involvement, which is not often assessed as a primary outcome in clinical trials. In rheumatoid arthritis, combination therapy of 2 or more conventional DMARD appears to confer better response than methotrexate monotherapy, and may even be a viable alternative to TNF-α inhibitors. In peripheral PsA, combination therapy can be used after treatment failure with 1 DMARD, but few studies have been conducted. However, available evidence for the combination of conventional DMARD indicates a lack of any significant benefit on axial symptoms; thus this treatment approach does not represent an effective alternative to anti-TNFtherapy.

  1. Cell-type-restricted anti-cytokine therapy: TNF inhibition from one pathogenic source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimov, Grigory A; Kruglov, Andrei A; Khlopchatnikova, Zoya V; Rozov, Fedor N; Mokhonov, Vladislav V; Rose-John, Stefan; Scheller, Jürgen; Gordon, Siamon; Stacey, Martin; Drutskaya, Marina S; Tillib, Sergei V; Nedospasov, Sergei A

    2016-03-15

    Overexpression of TNF contributes to pathogenesis of multiple autoimmune diseases, accounting for a remarkable success of anti-TNF therapy. TNF is produced by a variety of cell types, and it can play either a beneficial or a deleterious role. In particular, in autoimmunity pathogenic TNF may be derived from restricted cellular sources. In this study we evaluated the feasibility of cell-type-restricted TNF inhibition in vivo. To this end, we engineered MYSTI (Myeloid-Specific TNF Inhibitor)--a recombinant bispecific antibody that binds to the F4/80 surface molecule on myeloid cells and to human TNF (hTNF). In macrophage cultures derived from TNF humanized mice MYSTI could capture the secreted hTNF, limiting its bioavailability. Additionally, as evaluated in TNF humanized mice, MYSTI was superior to an otherwise analogous systemic TNF inhibitor in protecting mice from lethal LPS/D-Galactosamine-induced hepatotoxicity. Our results suggest a novel and more specific approach to inhibiting TNF in pathologies primarily driven by macrophage-derived TNF.

  2. The Innate and Adaptive Immune System as Targets for Biologic Therapies in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grainne Holleran

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is an immune-mediated inflammatory condition causing inflammation of gastrointestinal and systemic cells, with an increasing prevalence worldwide. Many factors are known to trigger and maintain inflammation in IBD including the innate and adaptive immune systems, genetics, the gastrointestinal microbiome and several environmental factors. Our knowledge of the involvement of the immune system in the pathophysiology of IBD has advanced rapidly over the last two decades, leading to the development of several immune-targeted treatments with a biological source, known as biologic agents. The initial focus of these agents was directed against the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α leading to dramatic changes in the disease course for a proportion of patients with IBD. However, more recently, it has been shown that a significant proportion of patients do not respond to anti-TNF-α directed therapies, leading a shift to other inflammatory pathways and targets, including those of both the innate and adaptive immune systems, and targets linking both systems including anti-leukocyte trafficking agents-integrins and adhesion molecules. This review briefly describes the molecular basis of immune based gastrointestinal inflammation in IBD, and then describes how several current and future biologic agents work to manipulate these pathways, and their clinical success to date.

  3. Off-label biologic regimens in psoriasis: a systematic review of efficacy and safety of dose escalation, reduction, and interrupted biologic therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Brezinski

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: While off-label dosing of biologic treatments may be necessary in selected psoriasis patients, no systematic review exists to date that synthesizes the efficacy and safety of these off-label dosing regimens. The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate efficacy and safety of off-label dosing regimens (dose escalation, dose reduction, and interrupted treatment with etanercept, adalimumab, infliximab, ustekinumab, and alefacept for psoriasis treatment. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SELECTION: We searched OVID Medline from January 1, 1990 through August 1, 2011 for prospective clinical trials that studied biologic therapy for psoriasis treatment in adults. Individual articles were screened for studies that examined escalated, reduced, or interrupted therapy with etanercept, adalimumab, infliximab, ustekinumab, or alefacept. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 23 articles with 12,617 patients matched the inclusion and exclusion criteria for the systematic review. Data were examined for primary and secondary efficacy outcomes and adverse events including infections, malignancies, cardiovascular events, and anti-drug antibodies. The preponderance of data suggests that continuous treatment with anti-TNF agents and anti-IL12/23 agent was necessary for maintenance of disease control. Among non-responders, dose escalation with etanercept, adalimumab, ustekinumab, and alefacept typically resulted in greater efficacy than standard dosing. Dose reduction with etanercept and alefacept resulted in reduced efficacy. Withdrawal of the examined biologics led to an increase in disease activity; efficacy from retreatment did not result in equivalent initial response rates for most biologics. Safety data on off-label dosing regimens are limited. CONCLUSION: Dose escalation in non-responders generally resulted in increased efficacy in the examined biologics used to treat moderate-to-severe psoriasis. Continuous treatment with anti-TNF agents and anti-IL12/23 agent

  4. Molecular imaging of rheumatoid arthritis by radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies: new imaging strategies to guide molecular therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malviya, G.; Dierckx, R.A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Conti, F. [Rheumatology Unit, I Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy); Chianelli, M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Unit of Nuclear Medicine, Regina apostolorum Hospital, Albano, Rome (Italy); Scopinaro, F. [Nuclear Medicine Department, Sapienza University of Rome, St. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy); Signore, A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Nuclear Medicine Department, Sapienza University of Rome, St. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy)

    2010-02-15

    The closing of the last century opened a wide variety of approaches for inflammation imaging and treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The introduction of biological therapies for the management of RA started a revolution in the therapeutic armamentarium with the development of several novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which can be murine, chimeric, humanised and fully human antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies specifically bind to their target, which could be adhesion molecules, activation markers, antigens or receptors, to interfere with specific inflammation pathways at the molecular level, leading to immune-modulation of the underlying pathogenic process. These new generation of mAbs can also be radiolabelled by using direct or indirect method, with a variety of nuclides, depending upon the specific diagnostic application. For studying rheumatoid arthritis patients, several monoclonal antibodies and their fragments, including anti-TNF-{alpha}, anti-CD20, anti-CD3, anti-CD4 and anti-E-selectin antibody, have been radiolabelled mainly with {sup 99m}Tc or {sup 111}In. Scintigraphy with these radiolabelled antibodies may offer an exciting possibility for the study of RA patients and holds two types of information: (1) it allows better staging of the disease and diagnosis of the state of activity by early detection of inflamed joints that might be difficult to assess; (2) it might provide a possibility to perform 'evidence-based biological therapy' of arthritis with a view to assessing whether an antibody will localise in an inflamed joint before using the same unlabelled antibody therapeutically. This might prove particularly important for the selection of patients to be treated since biological therapies can be associated with severe side-effects and are considerably expensive. This article reviews the use of radiolabelled mAbs in the study of RA with particular emphasis on the use of different radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies for

  5. The sunstone – an intelligent platform for pv led lighting in the urban environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Peter Behrensdorff; Dam-Hansen, Carsten; Harboe, Rene Kirstein

    The need for lighting in the urban environment in the dark hours is fundamental in the modern world. For lamp units for decorative purpose and guide lights the price of the power consumption during the lifetime of the product is nearly negligible compared to the cost of establishment and maintena....... The poster describes a project aimed at developing an intelligent solar powered LED light platform for exploiting the energy from the sun in an urban environmental PV integrated lamp installation in an intelligent, efficient and esthetical way........ - The irradiance is unpredictable due to buildings, vegetation, smog and other shadowing factors. - Very few high quality high-end PV LED products are available for this marked - For applications far from the Equator the amount of dark hours to daylight hours is in a large mismatch especially in the winter...

  6. The sunstone – an intelligent platform for pv led lighting in the urban environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Peter Behrensdorff; Dam-Hansen, Carsten; Harboe, Rene Kirstein

    . - The irradiance is unpredictable due to buildings, vegetation, smog and other shadowing factors. - Very few high quality high-end PV LED products are available for this marked - For applications far from the Equator the amount of dark hours to daylight hours is in a large mismatch especially in the winter....... The poster describes a project aimed at developing an intelligent solar powered LED light platform for exploiting the energy from the sun in an urban environmental PV integrated lamp installation in an intelligent, efficient and esthetical way....

  7. Proinflammatory cytokines induce bronchial hyperplasia and squamous metaplasia in smokers: implications for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herfs, Michael; Hubert, Pascale; Poirrier, Anne-Lise; Vandevenne, Patricia; Renoux, Virginie; Habraken, Yvette; Cataldo, Didier; Boniver, Jacques; Delvenne, Philippe

    2012-07-01

    Tracheobronchial squamous metaplasia is common in smokers, and is associated with both airway obstruction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and increased risk of lung cancer. Although this reversible epithelial replacement is almost always observed in association with chronic inflammation, the role of inflammatory mediators in the pathogenesis of squamous metaplasia remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the implication of cigarette smoke-mediated proinflammatory cytokine up-regulation in the development and treatment of tracheobronchial epithelial hyperplasia and squamous metaplasia. Using immunohistological techniques, we showed a higher epithelial expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6, as well as an activation of NF-κB and activator protein-1/mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways in the respiratory tract of smoking patients, compared with the normal ciliated epithelium of nonsmoking patients. In addition, we demonstrated that these signaling pathways strongly influence the proliferation and differentiation state of in vitro-generated normal human airway epithelial basal cells. Finally, we exposed mice to cigarette smoke for 16 weeks, and demonstrated that anti-TNF-α (etanercept), anti-IL-1β (anakinra), and/or anti-IL-6R (tocilizumab) therapies significantly reduced epithelial hyperplasia and the development of squamous metaplasia. These data highlight the importance of soluble inflammatory mediators in the pathogenesis of tracheobronchial squamous metaplasia. Therefore, the administration of proinflammatory cytokine antagonists may have clinical applications in the management of patients with COPD.

  8. [Safety and efficacy of biologics directed against TNF-alpha and CD20 in the therapy of vasculitis and systemic lupus erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Ulrich A; Hasler, Paul

    2008-05-01

    While the inhibition of TNF-alpha has been shown to improve vasculitis in vitro and in animal models, the clinical evidence for the efficacy of TNF-alpha blockade in most forms of vasculitis is mainly based on case reports and case series. Randomised controlled studies have so far not shown superiority of anti-TNF-alpha agents for Wegener's granulomatosis and giant cell arteritis. Moreover, in the context of Wegener's granulomatosis, a higher frequency and severity of infections are to be expected. In refractory cases of Behçet's disease therapy of uveitis and other organ manifestations is promising. Rituximab has achieved good effects in case reports of vasculitis. Results from controlled trials are not available. Observational studies indicate that in refractory systemic lupus erythematosus, and possibly also in several instances of small vessel vasculitis, rituximab can achieve good responses. The increased frequency of severe infections under TNF-alpha blockade requires a stringent benefit and risk assessment in addition to a multidisciplinary analysis of follow-up parameters. A detailed information of the patient regarding symptoms and signs of a possible infection are a prerequisite. Due to the complexity of the field and the danger of morbidity and mortality as a consequence of vasculitis or systemic lupus erythematosus on the one hand, and of the therapy on the other, biologics should only be used to treat these disorders in institutions fully equipped and staffed for this purpose.

  9. Forebyggelse af infektioner hos patienter, der har kronisk inflammatorisk tarmsygdom og er i behandling med TNF-hæmmere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risager Christensen, Katrine; Steenholdt, Casper

    2014-01-01

    suppression of the immune system. National and international guidelines recommend screening and vaccination for selected infectious agents prior to anti-TNF initiation as well as during ongoing anti-TNF therapy. This review focuses on current available recommendations and discusses physicians’ and patients...

  10. Missed opportunities in the treatment of elderly patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radovits, B.J.; Fransen, J.; Eijsbouts, A.M.M.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Laan, R.F.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether there is a difference in waiting time between indication and start of anti-TNF-alpha therapy in younger and older RA patients. METHODS: The study was carried out in the Nijmegen inception cohort of early RA. All patients meeting indications for anti-TNF-alpha therap

  11. Tailored treatment options for patients with psoriatic arthritis and psoriasis: review of established and new biologic and small molecule therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elyoussfi, Sarah; Thomas, Benjamin J; Ciurtin, Coziana

    2016-05-01

    The diverse clinical picture of PsA suggests the need to identify suitable therapies to address the different combinations of clinical manifestations. This review aimed to classify the available biologic agents and new small molecule inhibitors (licensed and nonlicensed) based on their proven efficacy in treating different clinical manifestations associated with psoriasis and PsA. This review presents the level of evidence of efficacy of different biologic treatments and small molecule inhibitors for certain clinical features of treatment of PsA and psoriasis, which was graded in categories I-IV. The literature searches were performed on the following classes of biologic agents and small molecules: TNF inhibitors (adalimumab, etanercept, infliximab, golimumab, certolizumab), anti-IL12/IL23 (ustekinumab), anti-IL17 (secukinumab, brodalumab, ixekizumab), anti-IL6 (tocilizumab), T cell modulators (alefacept, efalizumab, abatacept, itolizumab), B cell depletion therapy (rituximab), phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor (apremilast) and Janus kinase inhibitor (tofacitinib). A comprehensive table including 17 different biologic agents and small molecule inhibitors previously tested in psoriasis and PsA was generated, including the level of evidence of their efficacy for each of the clinical features included in our review (axial and peripheral arthritis, enthesitis, dactylitis, and nail and skin disease). We also proposed a limited set of recommendations for a sequential biologic treatment algorithm for patients with PsA who failed the first anti-TNF therapy, based on the available literature data. There is good evidence that many of the biologic treatments initially tested in psoriasis are also effective in PsA. Further research into both prognostic biomarkers and patient stratification is required to allow clinicians the possibility to make better use of the various biologic treatment options available. This review showed that there are many potentially new treatments that are

  12. Treatment of ankylosing spondylitis with biologics and targeted physical therapy: positive effect on chest pain, diminished chest mobility, and respiratory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyurcsik, Z; Bodnár, N; Szekanecz, Z; Szántó, S

    2013-12-01

    Biologics are highly effective in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). In this self-controlled study, we assessed the additive value of complex physiotherapy in decreasing chest pain and tenderness and improving respiratory function in AS patients treated with tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) inhibitors. The trial consisted of 2 parts. In study I, clinical data of AS patients with (n=55) or without biological therapy (n=20) were retrospectively analyzed and compared. Anthropometrical data, duration since diagnosis and patient assessment of disease activity, pain intensity, tender points, sacroiliac joint involvement determined by X-ray, functional condition, and physical activity level were recorded. Subjective, functional, and physical tests were performed. In study II, 10 voluntary patients (6 men and 4 women, age 52.4 ± 13.6 years) with definite AS and receiving anti-TNF therapy were recruited. It was a prospective, non-randomized physiotherapeutic trial. BASFI (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index), BASDAI (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index), modified Schober Index, occiput-to-wall distance, and fingertip-to-floor distance were evaluated. Forced vital capacity, forced 1-s expiratory volume, peak expiratory flow, and maximum voluntary ventilation were recorded. Furthermore, typical tender points were recorded. A targeted physiotherapy program was conducted twice a week for 12 weeks and all above parameters were recorded at baseline and after 12 weeks. Differences in patient assessment of disease activity (p=0.019) and pain intensity (p=0.017) were found in study I. Pain and tenderness of the thoracic spine were observed in both groups. Back pain without biologic therapy was slightly higher than other group. In study II, we found that patient assessment of disease activity and pain intensity significantly improved after the physical therapy program (p=0.002 and pexercise program presented here showed an improvement in functional parameters as

  13. The Danish National Registry for Biological Therapy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larsen L

    2016-10-01

    have been selected to monitor the quality of biological treatment. For each indicator, a standard has been defined based on the available evidence. National results will be published in an annual report and local results on a quarterly basis. The indicators will be reported as department-specific proportions with 95% confidence intervals, and the national average will be provided for comparison. An estimated 1,200–1,300 new biological therapies are initiated each year in Danish patients with IBD. Conclusion: The database will be available for research during 2016. Data will be made available by The Danish Clinical Registries (www.rkkp.dk. Keywords: inflammatory bowel disease, biological therapy, anti-TNF-α agents, quality indicators, database

  14. Effectiveness of anti-tumour necrosis factor-α therapy in Danish patients with inflammatory bowel diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bank, Steffen; Andersen, Paal Skytt; Burisch, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcome of anti-tumour necrosis factor-α (anti-TNF) treatment in a large cohort of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) in clinical practice and to establish a cohort...... for future studies of genetic markers associated with treatment response. Methods: A national, clinically based cohort of previously naïve anti-TNF treated patients from 18 medical departments was established. The patients were screened for tuberculosis prior to treatment initiation. By combining the unique.......001). Young age was associated with a beneficial response (p = 0.03), whereas smoking ≥ 10 cigarettes/day was associated with non-response among patients with CD (OR = 2.33, 95% CI: 1.13-4.81, p = 0.03). Conclusion: In this clinically based cohort of Danish patients with IBD treated with anti-TNF, high...

  15. Integration of Known DNA, RNA and Protein Biomarkers Provides Prediction of Anti-TNF Response in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkersen, Lasse; Brynedal, Boel; Marcela Diaz-Gallo, Lina

    2016-01-01

    and replication. Taking advantage of this we surveyed the current state-of-the-art of drug-response stratification in RA, and identified a small set of previously published biomarkers available in peripheral blood which predicts clinical response to TNF blockade in this independent cohort....... to test the claim that the current state-of-the-art precision medicine will benefit RA patients. METHODS: We collected 451 blood samples from 61 healthy individuals and 185 RA patients initiating treatment, before treatment initiation and at a 3 month follow-up time. All samples were subjected to high......-throughput RNA sequencing, DNA genotyping, extensive proteomics and flow cytometry measurements, as well as comprehensive clinical phenotyping. Literature review identified 2 proteins, 52 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 72 gene-expression biomarkers that had previously been proposed as predictors...

  16. A Case of Palmoplantar Pustulosis Induced by Certolizumab Pegol: New Anti-TNF-alpha Demonstrates the Same Class Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelling, Michael L; Vitiello, Magalys; Lanuti, Emma L; Miteva, Maria; Romanelli, Paolo; Kerdel, Francisco A

    2012-08-01

    The development of de novo psoriasis in patients treated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha antagonists is well recognized. The authors hereby report a case of palmplantar pustular psoriasis in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis treated with etanercept. The condition responded to topical steroids but re-occurred upon treating the patient with certolizumab pegol. This strongly suggests that the development of de novo psoriasis is a class effect.

  17. Pathogenic Transdifferentiation of Th17 Cells Contribute to Perpetuation of Rheumatoid Arthritis during Anti-TNF Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Karin M E; Cavallini, Nicola Filluelo; Hu, Dan; Brisslert, Mikael; Cialic, Ron; Valadi, Hadi; Erlandsson, Malin C; Silfverswärd, Sofia; Pullerits, Rille; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Weiner, Howard L; Bokarewa, Maria I

    2015-06-04

    T-helper cells producing interleukin (IL)-17A and IL-17F cytokines (Th17 cells) are considered the source of autoimmunity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this study, we characterized specific pathogenic features of Th17 cells in RA. By using nano-string technology, we analyzed transcription of 419 genes in the peripheral blood CCR6(+)CXCR3(-) CD4(+) cells of 14 RA patients and 6 healthy controls and identified 109 genes discriminating Th17 cells of RA patients from the controls. Th17 cells of RA patients had an aggressive pathogenic profile and in addition to signature cytokines IL-17, IL-23 and IL-21, and transcriptional regulators RAR-related orphan receptor gamma of T cells (RORγt) and Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), they produced high levels of IL-23R, C-C chemokine ligand type 20 (CCL20), granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF ) and transcription factor Tbet required for synovial homing. We showed that Th17 cells are enriched with Helios-producing Foxp3- and IL2RA-deficient cells, indicating altered regulatory profile. The follicular T-helper (Tfh) cells presented a functional profile of adaptor molecules, transcriptional regulator Bcl-6 and B-cell activating cytokines IL-21, IL-31 and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF ). We observed that anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) treatment had a limited effect on the transcription signature of Th17 cells. Patients in remission retained the machinery of receptors (IL-23R and IL-1R1), proinflammatory cytokines (IL-17F, IL-23, IL-21 and TNF ) and adaptor molecules (C-X-C chemokine receptor 5 [CXCR5] and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 [CTLA-4]), essential for efficient transdifferentiation and accumulation of Th17 cells. This study convincingly shows that the peripheral blood CCR6(+)CXCR3(-) CD4(+) cells of RA patients harbor pathogenic subsets of Th17 and Tfh cells, which may transdifferentiate from Tregs and contribute to perpetuation of the disease.

  18. Open-label trial of anti-TNF-alpha in dermato- and polymyositis treated concomitantly with methotrexate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hengstman, G.J.; Bleecker, J.L. De; Feist, E.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: To determine the efficacy of infliximab combined with weekly methotrexate in drug-naive recent-onset dermatomyositis and polymyositis. METHODS: A multicentre open-label controlled trial was conducted. Disease activity was assessed using patient's and physician's disease activity...

  19. Monitoring patients treated with anti-TNF-alpha biopharmaceuticals: assessing serum infliximab and anti-infliximab antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenson, M; Geborek, P; Saxne, T

    2007-01-01

    Infliximab is an anti-tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) mouse-human IgG1/kappa antibody used to treat patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other inflammatory diseases. Unfortunately, response failure and side-effects due to immunogenicity of the drug are not rare. In this study, we...

  20. Genetic variations in pattern recognition receptor loci are associated with anti-TNF response in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sode, Jacob; Vogel, Ulla; Bank, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    .46) and TLR1(rs4833095) homozygous variant carriers (OR = 2.8(1.1-7.4),p = 0.037,q = 0.46) had higher odds for a positive treatment response. NLRP3(rs10754558) variant allele carriers (odds ratio(OR) = 0.6(0.4-1.0),p = 0.045,q = 0.46) were more likely to have a negative treatment response. The association...

  1. Anti-TNF-alpha immunotherapy is associated with increased gingival inflammation without clinical attachment loss in subjects with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pers, Jacques-Olivier; Saraux, Alain; Pierre, Roselyne; Youinou, Pierre

    2008-09-01

    Because periodontitis presents many similarities with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with regard to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-induced bone resorption, the benefits of TNF-alpha blockade in RA prompted us to determine its efficacy in treating coexisting periodontitis. Periodontal status was evaluated in 40 subjects with RA who were divided into two groups: Group I contained 20 subjects who had received infliximab every 6 weeks for > or =22 months at the time of periodontal evaluation. The 20 subjects in group II were evaluated before their first infusion with infliximab. Nine subjects in group II had periodontitis. These subjects were reevaluated after they received nine infusions of infliximab. Infliximab tended to aggravate gingival inflammation as indicated by differences in the modified gingival and papillary bleeding indices between subjects in groups I and II with coexisting periodontitis before and after treatment. Methotrexate had no effect on periodontal status. Although the plaque index revealed that bacterial infection persisted, the probing depth was equal in groups I and II and equivalent before and after treatment in subjects with periodontitis, whereas attachment loss was decreased after infliximab treatment. Inflammation and destruction constitute two interrelated yet separate components of periodontitis in patients with RA. Therefore, TNF-alpha blockade could be beneficial in the treatment of periodontitis.

  2. Effectiveness of anti-tumour necrosis factor-α therapy in Danish patients with inflammatory bowel diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bank, Steffen; Andersen, Paal Skytt; Burisch, Johan;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcome of anti-tumour necrosis factor-α (anti-TNF) treatment in a large cohort of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) in clinical practice and to establish a cohort.......001). Young age was associated with a beneficial response (p = 0.03), whereas smoking ≥ 10 cigarettes/day was associated with non-response among patients with CD (OR = 2.33, 95% CI: 1.13-4.81, p = 0.03). CONCLUSION: In this clinically based cohort of Danish patients with IBD treated with anti-TNF, high...

  3. Intra-articular therapy with infliximab in psoriatic arthritis: efficacy and safety in refractory monoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Minosi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate efficacy and safety of intra-articular therapy (IA with infliximab (IFX, in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA and refractory monoarthritis. Methods: Four male and 1 female aged from 25 to 71 years and disease duration from 1 to 25 years, affected by PsA (CASPAR criteria were observed . All patients were treated with immunomodulators (methotrexate, leflunomide, cyclosporin A, 3/5 with concomitant steroids, 4/5 with NSAID’s. Only 1 patient were treated with IFX 5 mg/kg IV every 6 weeks. Before the IFX injection an amount of synovial fluid was aspired from the inflamed site and the anti-TNF injection was echographic guided. Patients were evaluated at regular intervals through clinical and echographic examination and retreated in case of flare. Results: At follow-up visit after 7 days, in all patients treated with the first injection was detected total regression of the inflammation and no new inflamed synovial fluid was observed; power doppler examination shows reduction of local vascularization. Two patients experienced full remission after 6 months and only one injection, 1 patient (arthritis of the wrist was in remission after 2 injections (3 months of interval. In 2 patients with knee arthritis and important synovial hypertrophy good results obtained after the first injection were not maintained afterwards and second injection was ineffective: these patients were evaluated for surgical intervention. Conclusions: Local injections of IFX were safe and well tolerated in all patients. The efficacy in short term was observed in all cases; our supposition is that presence of synovial hypertrophy is cause of worsening.

  4. TRAF1/C5 but Not PTPRC Variants Are Potential Predictors of Rheumatoid Arthritis Response to Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Canhão

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of our work was to replicate, in a Southern European population, the association reported in Northern populations between PTPRC locus and response to anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF treatment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. We also looked at associations between five RA risk alleles and treatment response. Methods. We evaluated associations between anti-TNF treatment responses assessed by DAS28 change and by EULAR response at six months in 383 Portuguese patients. Univariate and multivariate linear and logistic regression analyses were performed. In a second step to confirm our findings, we pooled our population with 265 Spanish patients. Results. No association was found between PTPRC rs10919563 allele and anti-TNF treatment response, neither in Portuguese modeling for several clinical variables nor in the overall population combining Portuguese and Spanish patients. The minor allele for RA susceptibility, rs3761847 SNP in TRAF1/C5 region, was associated with a poor response in linear and logistic univariate and multivariate regression analyses. No association was observed with the other allellic variants. Results were confirmed in the pooled analysis. Conclusion. This study did not replicate the association between PTPRC and the response to anti-TNF treatment in our Southern European population. We found that TRAF1/C5 risk RA variants potentially influence anti-TNF treatment response.

  5. TRAF1/C5 but Not PTPRC Variants Are Potential Predictors of Rheumatoid Arthritis Response to Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Ana Maria; Santos, Maria José; Bettencourt, Bruno F.; Cui, Jing; Rocha, Fabiana L.; Canas Silva, José; Polido-Pereira, Joaquim; Pereira Silva, José Alberto; Costa, José António; Araujo, Domingos; Silva, Cândida; Santos, Helena; Duarte, Cátia; Cáliz, Rafael; Filipescu, Ileana; Pimentel-Santos, Fernando; Branco, Jaime; Sainz, Juan; Plenge, Robert M.; Solomon, Daniel H.; Bruges-Armas, Jácome; Da Silva, José António P.; Fonseca, João Eurico; Karlson, Elizabeth W.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The aim of our work was to replicate, in a Southern European population, the association reported in Northern populations between PTPRC locus and response to anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) treatment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We also looked at associations between five RA risk alleles and treatment response. Methods. We evaluated associations between anti-TNF treatment responses assessed by DAS28 change and by EULAR response at six months in 383 Portuguese patients. Univariate and multivariate linear and logistic regression analyses were performed. In a second step to confirm our findings, we pooled our population with 265 Spanish patients. Results. No association was found between PTPRC rs10919563 allele and anti-TNF treatment response, neither in Portuguese modeling for several clinical variables nor in the overall population combining Portuguese and Spanish patients. The minor allele for RA susceptibility, rs3761847 SNP in TRAF1/C5 region, was associated with a poor response in linear and logistic univariate and multivariate regression analyses. No association was observed with the other allellic variants. Results were confirmed in the pooled analysis. Conclusion. This study did not replicate the association between PTPRC and the response to anti-TNF treatment in our Southern European population. We found that TRAF1/C5 risk RA variants potentially influence anti-TNF treatment response. PMID:25834819

  6. Autoimmune hepatitis following infliximab therapy for ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozorio, Gerard; McGarity, Bruce; Bak, Haesung; Jordan, Andrew S; Lau, Henry; Marshall, Cathy

    2007-11-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a rare but increasingly recognised serious complication of treatment with the tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) blocking agent, infliximab. This report adds to the small but growing number of articles describing this significant adverse effect. Baseline liver function should be routinely tested in all patients receiving anti-TNF-alpha agents, and periodic monitoring for the development of hepatitis is important.

  7. Interleukin-1beta and TNF-alpha: reliable targets for protective therapies in Parkinson´s Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Celeste Leal

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Neuroinflammation has received increased attention as a target for putative neuroprotective therapies in Parkinson´s Disease (PD. Two prototypic pro-inflammatory cytokines Interleukin-1beta (IL-1 and Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF have been implicated as main effectors of the functional consequences of neuroinflammation on neurodegeneration in PD models. In this review, we describe that the functional interaction between these cytokines in the brain differs from the periphery (e.g. their expression is not induced by each other and present data showing predominantly a toxic effect of these cytokines when expressed at high doses and for a sustained period of time in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SN. In addition, we highlight opposite evidence showing protective effects of these two main cytokines when conditions of duration, amount of expression or state of activation of the target or neighboring cells are changed. Furthermore, we discuss these results in the frame of previous disappointing results from anti-TNF clinical trials against Multiple Sclerosis, another neurodegenerative disease with a clear neuroinflammatory component. In conclusion, we hypothesize that the available evidence suggests that the duration and dose of IL-1 or TNF expression is crucial to predict their functional effect on the SN. Since these parameters are not amenable for measurement in the SN of PD patients, we call for an in-depth analysis to identify downstream mediators that could be common to the toxic (and not the protective effects of these cytokines in the SN. This strategy could spare the possible neuroprotective effect of these cytokines operative in the patient at the time of treatment, increasing the probability of efficacy in a clinical setting. Alternatively, receptor-specific agonists or antagonists could also provide a way to circumvent undesired effects of general anti-inflammatory or specific anti IL-1 or TNF therapies against PD.

  8. Dose tailoring of anti-tumour necrosis factor-alpha therapy delivers useful clinical efficacy in Crohn disease patients experiencing loss of response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaly, S; Costello, S; Beswick, L; Pudipeddi, A; Agarwal, A; Sechi, A; Antoniades, S; Headon, B; Connor, S; Lawrance, I C; Sparrow, M; Walsh, A J; Andrews, J M

    2015-02-01

    'Dose tailoring' of anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) therapy in Crohn disease (CD), by dose escalation, or shortening of dosing intervals, has been suggested to regain clinical response following a flare in a proportion of patients. However, reported outcome data are sparse and none exists from Australia. In an observational multicentre, retrospective study, the impact of anti-TNF-α dose tailoring on corticosteroid use, the need for surgery and physician perception of clinical efficacy was examined in a real-world setting at six Australian adult teaching hospitals. Demographics, disease characteristics, medications, indication for and duration of dose tailoring were documented. Fifty-five CD patients were identified as requiring dose tailoring and secondary loss of response was the indication in 96%. Either adalimumab (64%) or infliximab (36%) was dose escalated for a median of 5 months (range 1-47), with a median of 20 months follow up (range 3-65). At 3 months, dose tailoring reduced the mean number of days on high-dose corticosteroids (45 vs 23, P = 0.01). Most (78%) patients remained resection free, and 73% of physicians reported good clinical efficacy of dose tailoring. Of those who de-escalated therapy due to induction of remission, long-term (>12 months) follow up and complete data on steroid use were available in 15/28, with 12/15 (80%) remaining steroid free at 1 year. Short-term dose tailoring regains disease response in the majority of patients with CD. Of these, most will remain free of corticosteroids at 1 year after de-escalating therapy. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  9. Asymmetric dimethylarginine but not osteoprotegerin correlates with disease severity in patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis undergoing anti-tumor necrosis factor-α therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina, Trinitario; Genre, Fernanda; Lopez-Mejias, Raquel; Armesto, Susana; Ubilla, Begoña; Mijares, Veronica; Dierssen-Sotos, Trinidad; Corrales, Alfonso; Gonzalez-Lopez, Marcos A; Gonzalez-Vela, Maria C; Blanco, Ricardo; Hernández, Jose L; Llorca, Javier; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A

    2016-04-01

    Patients with psoriasis, in particular those with severe disease, have an increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) events compared with the general population. The aim of the present study is to determine whether correlation between asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and osteoprotegerin (OPG), two biomarkers associated with CV disease, and disease severity may exist in patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis. We also aimed to establish if baseline serum levels of these two biomarkers could correlate with the degree of change in the clinical parameters of disease severity following the use of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α therapy in these patients. This was a prospective study on a series of consecutive non-diabetic patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis who completed 6 months of therapy with anti-TNF-α-adalimumab. Patients with kidney disease, hypertension or body mass index of 35 kg/m(2) or more were excluded. Metabolic and clinical evaluation was performed immediately prior to the onset of treatment and at month 6. Twenty-nine patients were assessed. Unlike OPG, a significant positive correlation between ADMA and resistin serum levels was found at the onset of adalimumab and also after 6 months of biologic therapy. We also observed a positive correlation between the percent of body surface area affected (BSA) and ADMA levels obtained before the onset of adalimumab and a negative correlation between baseline ADMA levels and a 6-month BSA change compared with baseline results. In patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis, ADMA levels correlate with clinical markers of disease severity.

  10. Family Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may be credentialed by the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT). Family therapy is often short term. ... challenging situations in a more effective way. References Marriage and family therapists: The friendly mental health professionals. American Association ...

  11. Hormone Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... types of estrogen therapy relieve vaginal dryness. • Systemic estrogen protects against the bone loss that occurs early in menopause and helps prevent hip and spine fractures. • Combined estrogen and progestin therapy may reduce the risk of ...

  12. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the area is stitched shut. Another treatment, called proton-beam radiation therapy , focuses the radiation on the ... after radiation treatment ends. Sore mouth and tooth decay. If you received radiation therapy to the head ...

  13. Electroconvulsive therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007474.htm Electroconvulsive therapy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) uses an electric current to treat depression ...

  14. Proton Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IMRT) Brain Tumor Treatment Brain Tumors Prostate Cancer Lung Cancer Treatment Lung Cancer Head and Neck Cancer Images related to Proton Therapy Videos related to Proton Therapy Sponsored by Please ...

  15. Feminist Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laidlaw, Toni; Malmo, Cheryl

    1991-01-01

    Traces roots of feminist therapy and its independence from traditional and prevalent theories and therapy practices. Asserts that Freudian theory and humanistic assumptions are sexist and contribute to powerlessness of women. In contrast, feminist therapy is seen as dealing directly with client-counselor relationships, trust, advocacy, and…

  16. What Is Music Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login About Music Therapy & AMTA What is Music Therapy? Definition and ... is Music Therapy? Print Email Share What is Music Therapy What is Music Therapy? Music Therapy is ...

  17. Effectiveness of anti-tumour necrosis factor-α therapy in Danish patients with inflammatory bowel diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bank, Steffen; Andersen, Paal Skytt; Burisch, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcome of anti-tumour necrosis factor-α (anti-TNF) treatment in a large cohort of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) in clinical practice and to establish a coho...

  18. Effectiveness of anti-tumour necrosis factor-α therapy in Danish patients with inflammatory bowel diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bank, Steffen; Andersen, Paal Skytt; Burisch, Johan

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcome of anti-tumour necrosis factor-α (anti-TNF) treatment in a large cohort of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) in clinical practice and to establish a coho...

  19. Basic science232. Certolizumab pegol prevents pro-inflammatory alterations in endothelial cell function

    OpenAIRE

    Heathfield, Sarah; Zeef, Leo; Collins, Fraser; Stone, Michael; Wang, Edward; Wright, Helen L; Thomas, Huw B.; Edwards, Steven W; Bullock, Craig; Chapman, Victoria; Walsh, David A.; Mobasheri, Ali; Kendall, David; Kelly, Sara,; Bayley, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular disease is a major comorbidity of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and a leading cause of death. Chronic systemic inflammation involving tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF) could contribute to endothelial activation and atherogenesis. A number of anti-TNF therapies are in current use for the treatment of RA, including certolizumab pegol (CZP), (Cimzia ®; UCB, Belgium). Anti-TNF therapy has been associated with reduced clinical cardiovascular disease risk and ameliorated vas...

  20. Multiparameter phospho-flow analysis of lymphocytes in early rheumatoid arthritis: implications for diagnosis and monitoring drug therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carole L Galligan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The precise mechanisms involved in the initiation and progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA are not known. Early stages of RA often have non-specific symptoms, delaying diagnosis and therapy. Additionally, there are currently no established means to predict clinical responsiveness to therapy. Immune cell activation is a critical component therefore we examined the cellular activation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs in the early stages of RA, in order to develop a novel diagnostic modality. METHODS AND FINDINGS: PBMCs were isolated from individuals diagnosed with early RA (ERA (n = 38, longstanding RA (n = 10, osteoarthritis (OA (n = 19 and from healthy individuals (n = 10. PBMCs were examined for activation of 15 signaling effectors, using phosphorylation status as a measure of activation in immunophenotyped cells, by flow cytometry (phospho-flow. CD3+CD4+, CD3+CD8+ and CD20+ cells isolated from patients with ERA, RA and OA exhibited activation of multiple phospho-epitopes. ERA patient PBMCs showed a bias towards phosphorylation-activation in the CD4+ and CD20+ compartments compared to OA PBMCs, where phospho-activation was primarily observed in CD8+ cells. The ratio of phospho (p-AKT/p-p38 was significantly elevated in patients with ERA and may have diagnostic potential. The mean fluorescent intensity (MFI levels for p-AKT and p-H3 in CD4+, CD8+ and CD20+ T cells correlated directly with physician global assessment scores (MDGA and DAS (disease activity score. Stratification by medications revealed that patients receiving leflunomide, systemic steroids or anti-TNF therapy had significant reductions in phospho-specific activation compared with patients not receiving these therapies. Correlative trends between medication-associated reductions in the levels of phosphorylation of specific signaling effectors and lower disease activity were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Phospho-flow analysis identified phosphorylation

  1. Photodynamic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Oncol . 2004;5:497-508. Hopper C. Photodynamic therapy: a clinical reality in the treatment of cancer. Lancet Oncol . 2000;1:212-219. Huang Z. A review of progress in clinical photodynamic therapy. Technol Cancer Res Treat . 2005;4:283-293. ...

  2. Sweat Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmant, Stephen A.; Merta, Rod J.

    2000-01-01

    A study combined group sweating and group counseling. Four adolescent boys with disruptive behavior disorders participated in 12 sweat therapy sessions. They reported the sessions useful for sharing personal concerns and receiving assistance with problem solving. Three boys showed improvement in self-esteem. Advantages of sweat therapy over other…

  3. Effectiveness and Feasibility Associated with Switching to a Second or Third TNF Inhibitor in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lars Erik; Lie, Elisabeth; Jacobsson, Lennart T H;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Because new modes of action for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are emerging, it is important to understand the use of switching to a second or third antitumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) agent. This study investigated drug survival and treatment response rates of patients...... with PsA undergoing second- and third-line anti-TNF therapy. METHODS: Patients with PsA were monitored in a prospective, observational study. Patients who switched anti-TNF therapy once (first-time switchers, n = 217) or twice (second-time switchers, n = 57) between January 2003 and March 2012 were...... rates were 26% and 10%, respectively. Median drug survival time for patients switching anti-TNF for the first time was 64 months (95% CI 31-97) compared with 14 months (95% CI 5-23) for second-time switchers. Identified baseline predictor of ACR20 response to second-line treatment was the 28-joint...

  4. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment. It uses high doses of radiation to kill cancer cells and stop them from ... half of all cancer patients receive it. The radiation may be external, from special machines, or internal, ...

  5. Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or improve your body's ability to fight disease. Gene therapy holds promise for treating a wide range of diseases, such as cancer, cystic fibrosis, heart disease, diabetes, hemophilia and AIDS. Researchers are still studying how and ...

  6. Proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... TF. Charged particle radiotherapy. In: Gunderson LL, Tepper JE, eds. Gunderson and Tepper: Clinical Radiation Oncology . 4th ... March 22, 2017. Zeman EM, Schreiber EC, Tepper JE. Basics of radiation therapy. In: Niederhuber JE, Armitage ...

  7. Oxygen Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxygen therapy is a treatment that provides you with extra oxygen. Oxygen is a gas that your body needs to function. Normally, your lungs absorb oxygen from the air you breathe. But some conditions ...

  8. Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria Information for Families and Caretakers from The Progeria Research Foundation Written ... accelerated aging in children. Children with Progeria need Physical Therapy (PT) and Occupational Therapy (OT) as often as ...

  9. Adipokines, Biomarkers of Endothelial Activation, and Metabolic Syndrome in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    OpenAIRE

    Fernanda Genre; Raquel López-Mejías; Miranda-Filloy, José A.; Begoña Ubilla; Beatriz Carnero-López; Ricardo Blanco; Trinitario Pina; Carlos González-Juanatey; Javier Llorca; González-Gay, Miguel A.

    2014-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) disease. AS patients also display a high prevalence of features clustered under the name of metabolic syndrome (MeS). Anti-TNF- α therapy was found to be effective to treat AS patients by suppressing inflammation and also improving endothelial function. Previously, it was demonstrated that a short infusion of anti-TNF- α monoclonal antib...

  10. Assessing the likelihood of new-onset inflammatory bowel disease following tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitor therapy for rheumatoid arthritis and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Asha; Stobaugh, Derrick J; Deepak, Parakkal

    2015-04-01

    The association between inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) and the onset of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is unclear. We sought to evaluate this association by analyzing adverse events (AEs) reported to the Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) with a standardized scoring tool for drug-induced AEs. A search of the FAERS for RA or JRA (January 2003-December 2011) reported with adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, etanercept, golimumab, or infliximab was performed. This dataset was then queried for cases indicating IBD. Full-length reports were accessed using the Freedom of Information Act and organized by age, sex, concomitant medications, co-morbidities, type of TNF-α inhibitor used, and diagnosis/treatment details. The Naranjo score was used to determine whether the drug-induced AEs were definite, probable, possible, or doubtful. There were 158 cases of IBD after TNF-α inhibitor exposure in RA or JRA patients. Use of the Naranjo score revealed that, in a majority of the cases (71.5 %), TNF-α inhibitor exposure was considered a 'possible' cause. A majority of the 'probable cases' in JRA were reported with etanercept (40 patients, 90.91 %). There were no 'definite' cases of anti-TNF-induced IBD. After applying the Naranjo scale, a weak association between new-onset IBD and TNF-α inhibitor therapy in RA patients and a moderately strong association especially with etanercept exposure in JRA patients was observed. However, causality cannot be determined due to limitations of the FAERS and the Naranjo score.

  11. Salmonella septicemia in rheumatoid arthritis patients receiving anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy: association with decreased interferon-gamma production and Toll-like receptor 4 expression.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Netea, M.G.; Radstake, T.R.D.J.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Barrera Rico, P.; Kullberg, B.J.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients treated with antibodies to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) have an increased susceptibility to intracellular infections. We describe 2 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who developed Salmonella septicemia during anti-TNF treatment. The aim of this study was to identi

  12. Tuberculosis screening in patients with psoriasis before antitumour necrosis factor therapy : comparison of an interferon-gamma release assay vs. tuberculin skin test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laffitte, E.; Janssens, J. P.; Roux-Lombard, P.; Thielen, A. M.; Barde, C.; Marazza, G.; Panizzon, R. G.; Saurat, J-H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Antitumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF) treatments may reactivate latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). For detecting LTBI, the tuberculin skin test (TST) has low sensitivity and specificity. Interferon-gamma release assays (IGRA) have been shown to be more sensitive and specific than TST.

  13. Maintenance Therapy in IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help Center Home > Resources > Maintenance Therapy Go Back Maintenance Therapy Email Print + Share The term "maintenance therapy" ... are referred to as "maintenance therapies." Why is Maintenance Therapy Needed in IBD? Both Crohn's disease and ...

  14. Maintenance Therapy in IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help Center Home > Resources > Maintenance Therapy Go Back Maintenance Therapy Email Print + Share The term "maintenance therapy" ... are referred to as "maintenance therapies." Why is Maintenance Therapy Needed in IBD? Both Crohn's disease and ...

  15. Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Barb; Takeya, Ryan; Vitelli, Francesca; Swanson, Xin

    2017-03-14

    Gene therapy refers to a rapidly growing field of medicine in which genes are introduced into the body to treat or prevent diseases. Although a variety of methods can be used to deliver the genetic materials into the target cells and tissues, modified viral vectors represent one of the more common delivery routes because of its transduction efficiency for therapeutic genes. Since the introduction of gene therapy concept in the 1970s, the field has advanced considerably with notable clinical successes being demonstrated in many clinical indications in which no standard treatment options are currently available. It is anticipated that the clinical success the field observed in recent years can drive requirements for more scalable, robust, cost effective, and regulatory-compliant manufacturing processes. This review provides a brief overview of the current manufacturing technologies for viral vectors production, drawing attention to the common upstream and downstream production process platform that is applicable across various classes of viral vectors and their unique manufacturing challenges as compared to other biologics. In addition, a case study of an industry-scale cGMP production of an AAV-based gene therapy product performed at 2,000 L-scale is presented. The experience and lessons learned from this largest viral gene therapy vector production run conducted to date as discussed and highlighted in this review should contribute to future development of commercial viable scalable processes for vial gene therapies.

  16. [Testosterone therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diemer, T; Hauptmann, A; Wagenlehner, F M E

    2016-04-01

    Hormone replacement therapy with testosterone has become well-established over the course of time. The initial substantial concerns with respect to complications and potential adverse events, particularly in older patients, were proven to be unfounded over time. Testosterone therapy has therefore gradually become a regular treatment modality in urological practice. It has also been shown to represent a valuable tool as supportive treatment for patients with erectile dysfunction and hypogonadism. A variety of testosterone preparations are available for treatment. Recent pharmaceutical developments have greatly improved the practicability and ease of administration for patients. Several guidelines have been developed that provide clearly formulated standards and instructions for indications, contraindications, application, risk factors and monitoring of testosterone therapy. Adverse events affecting the cardiovascular system and especially diseases of the prostate gland are of great importance, thus making the urologist the primary partner in the treatment of patients with testosterone deficiency.

  17. Art Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Vibeke; Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Based on a Jungian approach, this article will introduce an integrative model to therapeutic change using art therapy methods as practical tools, with the aim of improving quality of life and in the prevention of depression. In a research study involving six participants, painting, clay...... work and drumming were used together with imagination and personal dialogues linked to the artwork. These art therapy processes attempted to combine the participant’s experience of inner and outer reality. The effect of gaining more knowledge about their inner reality using dreams and symbols......, was that participants gained a new understanding about their personal life. In addition, some participants were able to continue to use art therapy experiences as selfdevelopmental tools after the research study terminated. Jung’s description of the interactive relationship between the two living parts of the psyche...

  18. Art Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Vibeke; Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Based on a Jungian approach, this article will introduce an integrative model to therapeutic change using art therapy methods as practical tools, with the aim of improving quality of life and in the prevention of depression. In a research study involving six participants, painting, clay...... work and drumming were used together with imagination and personal dialogues linked to the artwork. These art therapy processes attempted to combine the participant’s experience of inner and outer reality. The effect of gaining more knowledge about their inner reality using dreams and symbols...... model of Art Therapy with this population. This article focuses on the psychological aspect of creativity related to mild depression with an emphasis on the interaction between the conscious and the unconscious part of the psyche....

  19. Music therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    alternate with clear and lucid mental states. These states are important as it is here that it is possible to meet the person’s psychosocial needs. Ketil Normann’s conceps of periods of lucidity are presented and connected to clinical music therapy practice and how it is possible to use music in order...... as a consequence of person-centred care. Umeå University Medical Dissertations. New Series. Ridder, H.M. (2005). Music therapy as a way to enhance lucidity in persons with dementia in advanced stages. In: Esch, A.; Frohne-Hagemann, I.; Laqua, M.; Schirmer, H.; Seitz, E. (Eds.) Jahrbuch Musicktherapie. Forschung...... und Entwicklung Music Therapy Annual. Research and Development. 2005 (1), pp. 25-40. Reichert Verlag Wiesbaden....

  20. Music therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    alternate with clear and lucid mental states. These states are important as it is here that it is possible to meet the person’s psychosocial needs. Ketil Normann’s conceps of periods of lucidity are presented and connected to clinical music therapy practice and how it is possible to use music in order...... as a consequence of person-centred care. Umeå University Medical Dissertations. New Series. Ridder, H.M. (2005). Music therapy as a way to enhance lucidity in persons with dementia in advanced stages. In: Esch, A.; Frohne-Hagemann, I.; Laqua, M.; Schirmer, H.; Seitz, E. (Eds.) Jahrbuch Musicktherapie. Forschung...... und Entwicklung Music Therapy Annual. Research and Development. 2005 (1), pp. 25-40. Reichert Verlag Wiesbaden....

  1. Truth therapy/lie therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langs, R

    In this paper an attempt is made to conceptualize a basic dimension of various psychotherapeutic treatment modalities, especially psychoanalysis and psychoanalytically oriented psychotherapy. The central variable under consideration is the extent to which each endeavors to approach the truth within both patient and therapist as it exists dynamically in terms of their spiraling unconscious communicative interaction. That treatment modality which takes into account every possible dimension of such truths is termed truth therapy. Treatment modalities that make no attempt to arrive at these truths or that deliberately or inadvertently falsify their nature are termed lie or barrier therapies. Extensive consideration is given to truth therapy and the truth system on which it is based. The basis for the need for lie therapies is explored, and lie systems, which may arise from either patient or therapist, or both, are identified. A classification of common types of lie patients and lie therapists (and their main techniques) is offered. The implications of this delineation for our understanding of the dynamic therapies are discussed, and a number of new clinical issues arising from this perspective are addressed.

  2. Adverse events of anti-tumor necrosis factor α therapy in ankylosing spondylitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Tong

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the prevalence of short-term and long-term adverse events associated with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α blocker treatment in Chinese Han patients suffering from ankylosing spondylitis (AS.The study included 402 Chinese Han AS patients treated with TNF-α blockers. Baseline data was collected. All patients were monitored for adverse events 2 hours following administration. Long-term treatment was evaluated at 8, 12, 52 and 104 weeks follow-up for 172 patients treated with TNF-α blockers.Short-term adverse events occurred in 20.15% (81/402, including rash (3.5%; 14/402, pruritus (1.2%; 5/402, nausea (2.2%; 9/402, headache (0.7%; 3/402, skin allergies (4.0%; 16/402, fever (0.5%; 2/402, palpitations (3.0%; 12/402, dyspnea (0.5%; 2/402, chest pain (0.2%; 1/402, [corrected] abdominal pain (1.0%; 4/402, hypertension (2.2%; 9/402, papilledema (0.5%; 2/402, laryngeal edema (0.2%; 1/402 and premature ventricular contraction (0.2%; 1/402. Long-term adverse events occurred in 59 (34.3%; 59/172 patients, including pneumonia (7.6%; 13/172, urinary tract infections (9.9%; 17/172, otitis media (4.7%; 8/172, tuberculosis are (3.5%; 6/172 [corrected], abscess (1.2%; 2/172, oral candidiasis (0.6%; 1/172, elevation of transaminase (1.7%; 3/172, anemia (1.2%; 2/172, hematuresis (0.6%; 1/172, constipation (2.3%; 4/172, weight loss (0.6%; 1/172, exfoliative dermatitis (0.6%; 1/172. CRP, ESR and disease duration were found to be associated with an increased risk of immediate and long-term adverse events (P<0.05. Long-term treatment with Infliximab was associated with more adverse events than rhTNFR-Fc (P<0.01.This study reports on the prevalence of adverse events in short-term and long-term treatment with TNF-α blocker monotherapy in Chinese Han AS patients. Duration of disease, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and c-reactive protein serum levels were found to be associated with increased adverse events with anti-TNFtherapy. Long

  3. Phthalocyanine photodynamic therapy: disparate effects of pharmacologic inhibitors on cutaneous photosensitivity and on tumor regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, C; Hrabovsky, S; McKinley, Y; Tubesing, K; Tang, H P; Dunbar, R; Mukhtar, H; Elmets, C A

    1997-05-01

    The phthalocyanines are promising second-generation photosensitizers that are being evaluated for the photodynamic therapy (PDT) of malignant tumors. In vivo studies with the silicon phthalocyanine Pc 4 have shown that it is highly effective at causing regression of RIF-1 tumors in C3H/HeN mice in PDT protocols. Because cutaneous photosensitivity is the major complication of photosensitizers used for PDT, experiments were performed to evaluate the effect of inhibitors of the inflammatory response (cyproheptadine, dexamethasone, pentoxifylline, and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-alpha] antibodies) on Pc 4-induced cutaneous photosensitivity and tumor regression. The C3H/HeN mice were injected with either Pc 4 or Photofrin and were exposed to 86 J/cm2 of filtered radiation emitted from a solar simulator. Animals were irradiated at 1, 3, 7, 10, 14 and 28 days postinjection. Cutaneous photosensitivity was assessed using the murine ear-swelling response. Cyproheptadine, dexamethasone, pentoxifylline and TNF-alpha antibodies were administered prior to illumination to assess their ability to block Pc 4-induced cutaneous photosensitivity and to evaluate whether such treatment adversely influenced Pc 4 PDT-induced tumor regression. Compared to Photofrin, Pc 4 produced cutaneous photosensitivity that was transient, resolving within 24 h, and that could be elicited for only 10 days after administration. In contrast, Photofrin caused photosensitivity that required 4 days to resolve and could be elicited for at least 1 month after it was administered. The Pc 4-induced cutaneous photosensitivity could be blocked by corticosteroids and an inhibitor of vasoactive amines (cyproheptadine). The TNF-alpha gene transcription was found to increase in keratinocytes following treatment with Pc 4 and light. The anti-TNF-alpha antibodies and pentoxifylline, an inhibitor of cytokine transcription, also prevented cutaneous photosensitivity, implicating TNF-alpha in the pathogenesis of Pc 4

  4. Dance Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, Marcia B.

    1980-01-01

    Dance therapy deals with personal growth via body-mind interaction. A change in movement expression is believed to result in a personality or behavior change. The therapist is trained to become sensitive to movement expression as it relates to the psychological, motor, and cognitive development of the child. (JN)

  5. Pet Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, Kim

    1994-01-01

    This resource guide presents information on a variety of ways that animals can be used as a therapeutic modality with people having disabilities. Aspects addressed include: pet ownership and selection criteria; dogs (including service dogs, hearing/signal dogs, seeing leader dogs, and social/specialty dogs); horseriding for both therapy and fun;…

  6. What Is Music Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login About Music Therapy & AMTA What is Music Therapy? Definition and Quotes ... is Music Therapy? Print Email Share What is Music Therapy What is Music Therapy? Music Therapy is the ...

  7. Anecdotal therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millikan, L E

    1999-01-01

    Traditionally, many advances in medicine have been serendipitous. Are serendipitous and anecdotal synonymous? Many of our materia medica today relate to initial probes and anecdotal reports that matured to full investigation and therapeutic indications. The recent situation regarding Skin Cap is one that highlights the downside of this scenario. Several drugs in the US continue usage largely related to anecdotal indications, and anecdotal extension of legend indications is a standard for American Dermatology. The situation with systemic drugs, such as Trental, zinc preparations, imidazoles for extended indications, lysine and melatonin, all will be discussed. Topical preparations such as skin cap, cantharone, Vioform, all also are included in this category. It is important to place this topic in perspective in regards to geographic variation and therapeutic need. Many diseases lacking specific therapy are important targets for anecdotal therapy, and this will foster continued approaches in this area. The growing standardization of medicine and pharmaceutical regulation, threatens the anecdotal approach, but it provides still an important link to the future for some forms of therapy in diseases that are difficult to treat. Traditionally, the anecdote has been the first step in the therapeutic chain. Withering discovery of the benefits of the common fox glove in dropsy, was followed by many other anecdotes arriving via folk-medicine in the New World. This approach of utilizing folk medicine has now reached new heights, with very active searches by major pharmaceutical companies throughout the third world for remedies that may have potential. Couched with this is the history of anecdotal "snake-oil" remedies, that clearly had no benefit to anyone except the huckster marketing same. The excesses in this area of unproven and false therapies, led to the gradual organization of therapeutic trials and the Food and Drug Administration in the US as we know it today. The

  8. Patterns of 6-mercaptopurine and azathioprine maintenance therapy among a cohort of commercially insured individuals diagnosed with Crohn's disease in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lund JL

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer L Lund,1 Suzanne F Cook,2 Jeffery K Allen,2 Charlotte F Carroll,2 Michael D Kappelman3 1Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark; 2Worldwide Epidemiology, GlaxoSmithKline, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA; 3Department of Pediatrics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA Background and aims: Thiopurines, including 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP and azathioprine (AZA, are the mainstay of maintenance therapy for Crohn's disease (CD. However, studies examining their effectiveness in routine practice among diverse patient populations are lacking. Among a cohort of new users of 6MP/AZA, we described treatment patterns and changes in subsequent therapy. Methods: Using the Truven Health Analytics databases, we identified all individuals diagnosed with CD and initiating 6-MP/AZA monotherapy from 2001–2008 (n=3,657. We estimated the proportion of CD patients remaining on 6-MP/AZA monotherapy, using Kaplan–Meier methods, and identified predictors of treatment noncontinuation, using multivariable Cox regression. Among the “noncontinuers,” we described subsequent patterns of maintenance therapy and summarized the diagnosis and procedure codes and prescription drug claims preceding treatment discontinuation. Results: The 1-year 6-MP/AZA treatment continuation rate was 42%. Children (age ≤18 years and individuals with no prior anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF use were more likely to continue 6-MP/AZA, while those dispensed more (>4 outpatient prescriptions for any drug before initiation of 6-MP/AZA were less likely to continue maintenance treatment. Overall, 1,128 (39% and 105 (4% individuals experienced a clinical event potentially indicating active disease or 6-MP/AZA-intolerance prior to discontinuation, respectively. Most patients discontinued therapy; among the remaining patients who failed to continue 6-MP/AZA, most augmented with an anti-TNF. Conclusion: Most patients initiating 6-MP

  9. Narrative therapy, family therapy and history

    OpenAIRE

    Harper, David J.

    2009-01-01

    This article was inspired by listening to the interesting plenary on the influence of narrative therapy on family therapy at the AFT annual conference in Manchester in September 2008. One of the issues raised concerned the historical connections between narrative therapy and the broader family therapy field. The contributors seemed keen to avoid a split between narrative therapy and the broader family therapy field and, instead, to find connections but this issue seemed difficult to negotiate...

  10. Proton Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelfke, Uwe

    Proton therapy is one of the most rapidly developing new treatment technologies in radiation oncology. This treatment approach has — after roughly 40 years of technical developments — reached a mature state that allows a widespread clinical application. We therefore review the basic physical and radio-biological properties of proton beams. The main physical aspect is the elemental dose distribution arising from an infinitely narrow proton pencil beam. This includes the physics of proton stopping powers and the concept of CSDA range. Furthermore, the process of multiple Coulomb scattering is discussed for the lateral dose distribution. Next, the basic terms for the description of radio-biological properties of proton beams like LET and RBE are briefly introduced. Finally, the main concepts of modern proton dose delivery concepts are introduced before the standard method of inverse treatment planning for hadron therapy is presented.

  11. Particle therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raju, M.R.

    1993-09-01

    Particle therapy has a long history. The experimentation with particles for their therapeutic application got started soon after they were produced in the laboratory. Physicists played a major role in proposing the potential applications in radiotherapy as well as in the development of particle therapy. A brief review of the current status of particle radiotherapy with some historical perspective is presented and specific contributions made by physicists will be pointed out wherever appropriate. The rationale of using particles in cancer treatment is to reduce the treatment volume to the target volume by using precise dose distributions in three dimensions by using particles such as protons and to improve the differential effects on tumors compared to normal tissues by using high-LET radiations such as neutrons. Pions and heavy ions combine the above two characteristics.

  12. Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trondalen, Gro; Bonde, Lars Ole

    2012-01-01

    Music therapy (MT) is most commonly defined as an intervention where “the therapist helps the client to promote health, using music experiences and the relationships developing through them” (Bruscia 1998). Also other definitions of MT agree that a therapeutic relationship is important for a music...... intervention to be considered MT. Other interventions that “use music for health-related goals, but in ways that do not qualify as music therapy” (Gold 2009), may be described as music medicine, or simply as music listening. In this text we elaborate on an overview chapter covering some of the different major...... music therapy orientations/models (Guided Imagery and Music, Nordoff-Robbins, Psychoanalytic, Cognitive-behavioral etc), their theoretical foundations and their practical approaches to health and wellbeing or ‘health musicking’. The relational context – the interplay of (expressive as well as receptive...

  13. Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanfi, Ilan

    2012-01-01

    may cause detrimental long-term effects. Three studies have examined the effect of music therapy procedural support (MTPS) under needle procedures. Consequently, this study aims at examining the effects of MTPS in an RCT. Moreover, the study addresses clinical aspects of the applied MT intervention...... and provides research-based clinical tools. Methods 41 children (1 to 10 years) were enrolled and underwent a single PIVA procedure. The children were randomly assigned to either an MT or a comparable control group receiving PIVA. In addition, the music therapy (MT) group received individualised MTPS (i.......e. music alternate engagement) before, during, and after PIVA. The intervention was performed by a trained music therapist and comprised preferred songs, improvised songs/music, and instrument playing. The study was carried out in accordance with the rules in force regarding research ethics and clinical MT...

  14. Antiproton therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Knudsen, Helge V; Bassler, Niels; Alsner, Jan; Beyer, Gerd-Jürgen; DeMarco, John J; Doser, Michael; Hajdukovic, Dragan; Hartley, Oliver; Iwamoto, Keisuke S; Jäkel, Oliver; Kovacevic, Sandra; Møller, Søren Pape; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen B; Ratib, Osman; Solberg, Timothy D; Vranjes, Sanja; Wouters, Bradly G

    2008-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the most important means we have for the treatment of localised tumours. It is therefore essential to optimize the technique, and a lot of effort goes into this endeavour. Since the proposal by Wilson in 1946 [R.R. Wilson, Radiology use of fast protons, Radiology 47 (1946) 487.] that proton beams might be better than photon beams at inactivating cancer cells, hadron therapy has been developed in parallel with photon therapy and a substantial knowledge has been gained on the effects of pions, protons and heavy ions (mostly carbon ions). Here we discuss the recent measurements by the CERN ACE collaboration of the biological effects of antiprotons, and argue that these particles very likely are the optimal agents for radiotherapy.

  15. Gene therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    2005147 CNHK200-hA-a gene-viral therapeutic system and its antitumor effect on lung cancer. WANG Wei-guo(王伟国),et al. Viral & Gene Ther Center, Eastern Hepatobilli Surg Instit 2nd Milit Univ, Shanghai 200438. Chin J Oncol,2005:27(2):69-72. Objective: To develop a novel vector system, which combines the advantages of the gene therapy,

  16. About Occupational Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if}} {{{tweet}}} About Occupational Therapy What Is Occupational Therapy? Occupational therapy practitioners ask, "What matters to you?" not, " ... about our science-driven and evidence-based profession. Occupational Therapy: Improving Function While Controlling Costs 4 4 The ...

  17. Oxygen Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    LTOT is prescribed for people with chronic lung disease in whom there is a decrease in the ability of the lungs to supply enough oxygen to the body. The heart is obliged to pump faster to meet the body's oxygen requirements. This may place undue stress on the heart, resulting in palpitations, dizziness and fatigue. A low oxygen level in arterial blood is also harmful to the heart, the brain and the pulmonary blood vessels. Oxygen therapy is used to break this cycle. A person with low blood ox...

  18. [Gestalt therapy.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbeil, J; Poupard, D

    1978-01-01

    The authors describe Gestalt Therapy. They retrace its fundamental theoretical axes. These are psychoanalysis, character analysis, the german Gestalt theory of perception, existentialism, and the Orient. Some principal concepts are then elaborated more fully such as the cycle of awareness, desensitization, excitation anxiety and the five defense mechanisms: retroflection, introjection, projection, deflection, and confluence. The nature and goals of the therapeutic process are also described before the presentation of some techniques specific to this approach such as enactment and role playing. Finally, certain basic Gestalt rules, which aim at facilitating and intensifying the communication process among group members, are enunciated.

  19. Nutritional Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Julie

    2016-03-01

    This article provides the reader with steps needed to accurately assess patient nutrition behaviors that contribute to weight gain, inability to lose weight, or inability to sustain weight loss. Evidence-based approaches in nutrition therapy that can create the daily energy deficit needed to produce 1/2 to 2 pounds of weight loss per week, and the strategies to create the energy deficit, are presented. To optimize health, long-term weight loss maintenance is needed. The benefits of using a multidisciplinary team approach in treating obesity are highlighted.

  20. Music Therapy: A Career in Music Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    About Music Therapy & Music Therapy Training M usic therapy is a healthcare profession that uses music to help individuals of all ages improve physical, ... grateful I chose a career as rewarding as music therapy. I love what I do each day!” Where ...

  1. Defining the ultrasound longitudinal natural history of newly diagnosed pediatric small bowel Crohn disease treated with infliximab and infliximab-azathioprine combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillman, Jonathan R; Dehkordy, Soudabeh Fazeli; Smith, Ethan A; DiPietro, Michael A; Sanchez, Ramon; DeMatos-Maillard, Vera; Adler, Jeremy; Zhang, Bin; Trout, Andrew T

    2017-07-01

    Little is known about changes in the imaging appearances of the bowel and mesentery over time in either pediatric or adult patients with newly diagnosed small bowel Crohn disease treated with anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha (anti-TNF-α) therapy. To define how bowel ultrasound findings change over time and correlate with laboratory inflammatory markers in children who have been newly diagnosed with pediatric small bowel Crohn disease and treated with infliximab. We included 28 pediatric patients treated with infliximab for newly diagnosed ileal Crohn disease who underwent bowel sonography prior to medical therapy and at approximately 2 weeks, 1 month, 3 months and 6 months after treatment initiation; these patients also had laboratory testing at baseline, 1 month and 6 months. We used linear mixed models to compare mean results between visits and evaluate whether ultrasound measurements changed over time. We used Spearman rank correlation to assess bivariate relationships. Mean subject age was 15.3±2.2 years; 11 subjects were girls (39%). We observed decreases in mean length of disease involvement (12.0±5.4 vs. 9.1±5.3 cm, P=0.02), maximum bowel wall thickness (5.6±1.8 vs. 4.7±1.7 mm, P=0.02), bowel wall color Doppler signal (1.7±0.9 vs. 1.2±0.8, P=0.002) and mesenteric color Doppler signal (1.1±0.9 vs. 0.6±0.6, P=0.005) at approximately 2 weeks following the initiation of infliximab compared to baseline. All laboratory inflammatory markers decreased at 1 month (P-valuesdisease involvement (P=0.0002) and bowel wall color Doppler signal (PCrohn's disease activity index score. The ultrasound appearance of the bowel changes as early as 2 weeks after the initiation of infliximab therapy. There is strong correlation between bowel wall color Doppler signal and fecal calprotectin.

  2. Camouflage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, V L

    1995-04-01

    Camouflage therapy is a system of cosmetic techniques designed for patients to use to assist themselves in coping constructively with the psychological and physical trauma of their disfigurements. It is described as a "system" because these techniques are interrelated. A camouflage therapist may teach the patient to use one, two, or all of the techniques at the same time in order to normalize their appearance. Four basic techniques have been described in this article. They are as follows: (1) the use of opaque, waterproof cover creams to conceal scarring; (2) the application of pancake makeup for patients with oily or acne-prone skin; (3) color correctors to obliterate discoloration from postoperative trauma; and (4) recreating imperfections on the skin. For more information about the use of cosmetics to normalize the appearance of physical disfigurements, the following books are recommended.

  3. Discovery of Novel Orally Active Tetrahydro-Naphthyl-N-Acylhydrazones with In Vivo Anti-TNF-α Effect and Remarkable Anti-Inflammatory Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, Natália M.; Freitas, Rosana H. C. N.; Fraga, Carlos A. M.

    2016-01-01

    LASSBio-1524 was designed as inhibitor of the IKK-β (kappa β kinase inhibitor) enzyme, which participates in the activation of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) canonical pathway, and its three N-acylhydrazone new analogues, LASSBio-1760, LASSBio-1763 and LASSBio-1764 are now being tested on their anti-inflammatory potential. The activity of these compounds was evaluated with the subcutaneous air pouch induced by carrageenan and by subsequent measurement of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the acute inflammation model, the oral pretreatment with doses from 0.3 to 30 mg/kg of N-acylhydrazone derivatives was able to significantly reduce leukocyte migration to the cavity. Pretreatment with LASSBio-1524 and its analogues also decreased NO, TNF-α and ROS biosynthesis an events closely involved with NF-kB pathway. The tetrahydronaphthyl-N-acylhydrazone derivative LASSBio-1764 was the most promising compound from this series, surpassing even LASSBio-1524. Additionally, none of the compounds demonstrated myelotoxicity or cytotoxicity. Cell viability was assayed and these compounds demonstrated to be safe at different concentrations. Western blot analysis demonstrated that LASSBio-1524 and LASSBio-1760 inhibited NF-κB expression in RAW 264.7 cell lineage. Our data indicate that the tested compounds have anti-inflammatory activity, which may be related to inhibition of leukocyte migration, reducing the production of NO, TNF-α and ROS. LASSBio-1524 and LASSBio-1760, in addition to these features, also reduced p65 nuclear expression assessed by western blot in RAW 264.7 murine cells. PMID:27227468

  4. Associations between functional polymorphisms in the NFκB signaling pathway and response to anti-TNF treatment in Danish patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bank, S; Andersen, P S; Burisch, J

    2014-01-01

    Antitumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is used for treatment of severe cases of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). However, one-third of the patients do not respond to the treatment. Genetic markers may predict individual response to anti-T...

  5. Population pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analysis of BIIB023, an anti-TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (anti-TWEAK) monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galluppi, Gerald R; Wisniacki, Nicolas; Stebbins, Chris

    2016-07-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) is implicated in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis. This study evaluated the pharmacokinetics, using the population approach, and pharmacodynamics of BIIB023, an anti-TWEAK monoclonal antibody, in healthy Chinese, Japanese and Caucasian volunteers. In this single-dose, randomized, double-blind, phase 1 study of BIIB023 in healthy volunteers, BIIB023 was administered by intravenous infusion (3 or 20 mg kg(-1) ) on Day 1; follow-up occurred through Day 71. BIIB023 serum concentration was measured using a validated enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; BIIB023 concentration-time data were subjected to noncompartmental analysis. Population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using data from this study and a prior phase 1 study of BIIB023 in subjects with rheumatoid arthritis. Soluble TWEAK and BIIB023 complex were evaluated. There were no differences in BIIB023 pharmacokinetics requiring dose adjustment among the three ethnic groups or between healthy volunteers and arthritis patients. BIIB023 central compartment volume (3050 ml) and clearance (7.42 ml h(-1) ) were comparable to those observed for other monoclonal antibody drugs. BIIB023 serum exposure increased in a dose-dependent manner in all groups, but not in direct proportion to dose level; at concentrations below ~10 μg ml(-1) , nonlinear clearance was observed. Soluble TWEAK levels decreased to below the level of quantitation after BIIB023 treatment, with concomitant changes in BIIB023 complex levels. No clinically meaningful differences were observed in BIIB023 pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties in healthy Chinese, Japanese and Caucasian volunteers; pharmacodynamic measures suggested target engagement. TWEAK may be an attractive therapeutic target for lupus nephritis treatment. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  6. Golimumab:a Full Humanised Anti-TNF-α Monoclonal Antibody%完全人源化抗TNF-α单克隆抗体Golimumab

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范鸣

    2009-01-01

    @@ 强生Centocor公司和先灵葆雅公司联合开发的完全人源化抗TNF-α单克隆抗体golimumab应用了Medarex公司的HuMAb-MouseTM技术,为一种每月1次皮下注射产品,最近已在其全球首个市场--加拿大以Simponi商品名获准上市,其适应证包括与甲氨蝶呤联用治疗中度至重度类风湿性关节炎、单独或与甲氨蝶呤联用治疗活动性银屑病性关节炎和用于治疗活动性关节强硬性脊椎炎."Golimumab每月1次皮下给药,为风湿病医生及其患者提供了一种重要且方便的新的治疗选择."先灵葆雅公司执行副总裁Thomas Koestler博士声称.

  7. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY EFFECT OF ANTI-TNF-ALPHA siRNA CATIONIC PHOSPHOROUS DENDRIMERS NANOCOMPLEXES ADMINISTERED INTRANASALLY IN A MURINE ACUTE LUNG INJURY MODEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Adam; Tsapis, Nicolas; Andreana, Ilaria

    2017-01-01

    was attributed to their higher pKa value leading to a stronger siRNA complexation and improved protection against enzymatic degradation resulting in a higher cellular uptake. The superior silencing effect of the pyrrolidinium dendriplexes, compared to non-complexed siRNA, was confirmed in vivo in an LPS......-induced murine model of short term acute lung injury upon lung delivery via nasal administration. These data suggest that phosphorous dendriplexes have a strong potential in lung delivery of siRNA for treating inflammatory lung diseases....

  8. The prevalence of clinical remission in RA patients theated with anti-TNF: results from the Dutch Rheumatoid Arthritis Monitoring (DREAM) registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punder, de Yvonne M.R.; Fransen, Jaap; Kievit, Wietske; Houtman, Pieternella M.; Visser, Henk; Laar, van de Mart A.F.J.; Riel, van Piet L.C.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the prevalence of clinical remission and minimal disease activity according to the ACR/European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) remission, DAS-28 <2.6 and minimal disease activity (MDA) criteria, and to compare the extent of residual disease activity with disability in RA p

  9. Occupational Therapy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Occupational Therapy KidsHealth > For Parents > Occupational Therapy Print A A ... for some kids. continue Kids Who Might Need Occupational Therapy According to the AOTA, kids with these medical ...

  10. American Music Therapy Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login Quick Links Facts About Music Therapy Qualifications ... with AMTA Sponsor AMTA Events Social Networking Support Music Therapy When you shop at AmazonSmile, Amazon will ...

  11. Laser therapy for cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000905.htm Laser therapy for cancer To use the sharing features ... Lasers are also used on the skin. How Laser Therapy is Used Laser therapy can be used ...

  12. [Physical therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chohnabayashi, Naohiko

    2008-01-01

    Recently, pulmonary rehabilitation program is widely considered one of the most effective and evidence-based treatment for not only chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but many clinical situations including neuro-muscular disease, post-operative status and weaning period from the ventilator, etc. The essential components of a pulmonary rehabilitation program are team assessment, patient training, psycho-social intervention, exercise, and follow-up. In 2003, Japanese medical societies (J. Thoracic Society, J. Pul. Rehabilitation Society and J. Physiotherapist Society) made a new guideline for pulmonary rehabilitation, especially how to aproach the execise training. As for the duration after surgical operation, airway cleaning is the important technique to prevent post-operative complications including pneumonia. Postural dranage technique is well known for such condition, at the same time, several instruments (flutter vulve, positive expiratory mask, high frequecy oscillation, etc) were also used for the patient to expectrate airway mucus easier. Lung transplantation is a new method of treatment for the critically-ill patients with chronic respiratoy failure. Several techniques of physical therapy are must be needed before and after lung transplantation to prevent both pulmonary infection and osteoporosis.

  13. Interventional anoxia therapy; Interventionelle Therapie des Schlaganfalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, Olav [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein (UKSH), Kiel (Germany). Inst. fuer Neuroradiologie; Brueckmann, Hartmut (eds.) [Univ. Muenchen-Grosshadern Klinikum, Muenchen (Germany). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie

    2011-07-01

    The book on interventional anoxia therapy covers the following issues: (1) Neuroradiologic diagnostics: Closure of the carotid artery; closure of the cerebral arteries, vertebrobasilary closure; dissections, sinus and brain vein thrombosis; (2) therapy of the acute ischemic anoxia: thrombolysis; intra-arterial thrombolysis, mechanical re-channelization materials; stroke-stent; therapy concepts and results; (3) therapy for acute venous obliterations; (4) therapy for extra and intra-cranial artery stenosis: stents, filters, balloons; extra-cranial carotid stenosis; intra-cranial stenosis; sub-clavian Steal syndrome; proximal vertebral artery stenosis; aortic arch stenosis.

  14. Marriage or Family Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Jay

    1984-01-01

    Reviews the differences between family therapy and marriage counseling in terms of professional organization, theory, and practice. Suggests that training in marriage therapy does not appear adequate for family therapy. The goal of the therapy field should be more consensus in theory and a single profession of therapists. (JAC)

  15. Family Play Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel, Shlomo

    This paper examines a case study of family play therapy in Israel. The unique contributions of play therapy are evaluated including the therapy's accessibility to young children, its richness and flexibility, its exposure of covert patterns, its wealth of therapeutic means, and its therapeutic economy. The systematization of the therapy attempts…

  16. Art Therapy Verses Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Giacco, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of my paper is to identify the difference between psychotherapy and art therapy. Then to introduce a technique within the field of art therapy that is relevant to neuro-plasticity Del Giacco Neuro Art Therapy. The paper identifies the importance of the amygdala and the hippocampus within the role of art therapy. Supporting…

  17. Physical Therapy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Physical Therapy KidsHealth > For Parents > Physical Therapy A A A en español Terapia física Physical Therapy Basics Doctors often recommend physical therapy (PT) for ...

  18. Marriage or Family Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Jay

    1984-01-01

    Reviews the differences between family therapy and marriage counseling in terms of professional organization, theory, and practice. Suggests that training in marriage therapy does not appear adequate for family therapy. The goal of the therapy field should be more consensus in theory and a single profession of therapists. (JAC)

  19. Letter: Lichenoid eruption induced by etanercept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos, Nuria; García-Sánchez, Sagrario; Domínguez, José D

    2012-07-15

    Lichenoid drug eruption is an uncommon, but previously reported, side effect of anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy. The majority of these adverse events relate to infliximab. We report a patient who developed a lichenoid eruption on the back of her hands during etanercept therapy. She improved with topical treatment and discontinuation of the drug was not necessary. The physiopathological link between anti-TNF treatment and lichenoid eruptions remains unclear. It is important to realize that a lichenoid reaction pattern may occur during anti-TNF agent treatment.

  20. Music Therapy and Music Therapy Research. Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2002-01-01

    This response to Keynote by Prof. Even Ruud (N)"Music Education and Music Therapy seeks to define these two areas with specific focus on tools and methods for analysis of music as these methods are developed in music therapy. This includes that the music therapist, the music and the client create...

  1. Music Therapy and Music Therapy Research. Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2002-01-01

    This response to Keynote by Prof. Even Ruud (N)"Music Education and Music Therapy seeks to define these two areas with specific focus on tools and methods for analysis of music as these methods are developed in music therapy. This includes that the music therapist, the music and the client create...

  2. Efficacy of adalimumab in patients with crohn's disease and failure to infliximab therapy: a clinical series Eficacia de Adalimumab en pacientes con enfermedad de Crohn y fracaso previo a la terapia con Infliximab: resultados de una serie clínica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Cordero-Ruiz

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: adalimumab, a human anti-TNF, is an effective induction and maintenance therapy for patients with moderate to severe Crohn's disease. It seems to be effective in patients with resistance to infliximab, too, though the experience is more limited. Aim: to evaluate the efficacy of adalimumab, in patients with Crohn's disease (CD and failure to previous treatment with infliximab. B twenty-five patients with CD and failure to previous treatment with infliximab were enrolled; they were treated with 160/80 (24 patients and 80/40 (1 patient induction doses. We analyze clinical response to treatment with adalimumab by the Crohn's disease Activity Index (CDAI and plasma concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP, steroid sparing and complete fistula closure at week 48. Results: eighteen out of twenty-five patients (72% achieved clinical remission (CDAI score Introducción: adalimumab, un anti-TNF humano, ha demostrado ser efectivo en la inducción y tratamiento de mantenimiento de la enfermedad de Crohn moderada-grave. Existe menos experiencia, pero este fármaco parece también eficaz en los pacientes con pérdida de respuesta o intolerancia al infliximab. Objetivo: evaluar la eficacia de adalimumab durante un año, en nuestra serie de pacientes con enfermedad de Crohn (EC y fracaso en el tratamiento previo con infliximab. Métodos: se incluyen 25 pacientes con enfermedad de Crohn y fracaso previo a la terapia con infliximab, que son tratados con adalimumab. Se utilizaron dosis de inducción de 160/80 mg en 24 pacientes y dosis de 80/40 en un paciente. Analizamos la respuesta clínica al tratamiento con adalimumab mediante el Índice de actividad de la enfermedad de Crohn (CDAI y las concentraciones plasmáticas de proteína C reactiva (PCR, el cese de la corticoterapia y el cierre completo de las fistulas en la semana 48. Resultados: dieciocho de veinticinco pacientes (72% alcanzan la remisión clínica (CDAI < 150 en la semana 24 y 15

  3. Adalimumab-induced acute interstitial lung disease in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Meira Dias

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of immunobiological agents for the treatment of autoimmune diseases is increasing in medical practice. Anti-TNF therapies have been increasingly used in refractory autoimmune diseases, especially rheumatoid arthritis, with promising results. However, the use of such therapies has been associated with an increased risk of developing other autoimmune diseases. In addition, the use of anti-TNF agents can cause pulmonary complications, such as reactivation of mycobacterial and fungal infections, as well as sarcoidosis and other interstitial lung diseases (ILDs. There is evidence of an association between ILD and the use of anti-TNF agents, etanercept and infliximab in particular. Adalimumab is the newest drug in this class, and some authors have suggested that its use might induce or exacerbate preexisting ILDs. In this study, we report the first case of acute ILD secondary to the use of adalimumab in Brazil, in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis and without a history of ILD.

  4. Complementary and Integrative Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Art therapy and music therapy • Chiropractic medicine and massage • Guided imagery • Meditation and prayer • Qi gong • Reflexology • Reiki • Yoga Whole medical systems use many types ...

  5. Virtual particle therapy centre

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Particle therapy is an advanced technique of cancer radiation therapy, using protons or other ions to target the cancerous mass. This advanced technique requires a multi-disciplinary team working in a specialised centre. 3D animation: Nymus3D

  6. Genes and Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  7. Gerson Therapy (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... therapy be conducted. Have any side effects or risks been reported from use of the Gerson therapy? Reports of three deaths that may be related to coffee enemas have been published. Taking too many enemas ...

  8. Physical Therapy Diagnosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zimny, Nancy J; Goodman, Catherine C; Orest, Marianne; Delitto, Anthony; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    1995-01-01

    ...: Examples in Orthopedic Physical Therapy" (March 1995). I believe the article raised multiple issues that are important to address to move the discussion of diagnosis within the physical therapy profession forward...

  9. Targeted Cancer Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... changes, hair depigmentation) Problems with blood clotting and wound healing High blood pressure Gastrointestinal perforation (a rare side effect of some targeted therapies) Certain side effects of some targeted therapies have ...

  10. American Occupational Therapy Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Manage Your Practice Evidence-Based Practice & Research Ethics Occupational Therapy Assistants Advocacy & Policy New Evaluation Codes Learn how ... Reimbursement Education & Careers OT is a Top Job Occupational therapy consistently ranks high as one of the top ...

  11. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002375.htm Hyperbaric oxygen therapy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy uses a special pressure chamber to increase ...

  12. Hormone Replacement Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... before and during menopause, the levels of female hormones can go up and down. This can cause ... hot flashes and vaginal dryness. Some women take hormone replacement therapy (HRT), also called menopausal hormone therapy, ...

  13. Photodynamic Therapy for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... References Dolmans DE, Fukumura D, Jain RK. Photodynamic therapy for cancer. Nature Reviews Cancer 2003; 3(5):380–387. [PubMed Abstract] Wilson BC. Photodynamic therapy for cancer: principles. Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology 2002; ...

  14. Home Oxygen Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teenagers Living With Lung Disease Articles written by Respiratory Experts Home Oxygen Therapy More and more people are using oxygen therapy ... April 12, 2012 Revised: © 2017 American Association for Respiratory Care

  15. Photodynamic therapy for cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000906.htm Photodynamic therapy for cancer To use the sharing features on ... type of light to kill cancer cells. How Photodynamic Therapy Works First, the doctors injects a medicine that ...

  16. Complementary Pancreatitis Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medication, and improve quality of life.1,2 Massage Therapy Massage therapy involves touch and different techniques of stroking ... of the body or be a full-body massage. Massage can be performed through one’s clothing or ...

  17. Physical Therapy and Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Valle-Onate, Rafael; Ward, Michael M.; Kerr, Gail S.

    2012-01-01

    Physical therapy and orthopedic surgery are important components in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Supervised physical therapy is more effective that individual or unsupervised exercise in improving symptoms, but controlled trials suggest than combined inpatient and outpatient therapy provides the greatest improvement. Recommendations for exercise are universal, but the best types and sequence of therapies are not known. Total hip replacement is the surgery most commonly perfor...

  18. Musings on Adventure Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Antonio G.; Stauffer, Gary A.

    2001-01-01

    Critiques various definitions of adventure therapy, then suggests that adventure therapy is any intentional, facilitated use of adventure tools and techniques to guide personal change toward desired therapeutic goals. Reflects on the nature of adventure therapy through a discussion of the application of this definition and its implications for…

  19. Venous Thromboembolism Anticoagulation Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘泽霖

    2009-01-01

    @@ VTE of the main treatment for anticoagulant thera-py, anticoagulant therapy drug of choice for low molecu-lar weight heparin (LMWH) for the overwhelming major-ity of clinicians agree that long-term oral anticoagulant therapy is still Vit. K antagonist (mainly warfarin).

  20. Aquatic Therapy for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucher, Greta; Moore, Kelsey; Rodia, Rachel; Moser, Christy Szczech

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic therapy has long been highlighted in the literature as a potentially powerful therapeutic intervention. This review will highlight basic definitions of aquatic therapy, review salient research, and identify specific diagnoses that may benefit from aquatic therapy. Online resources, blogs, and books that occupational therapists may find…

  1. Aquatic Therapy for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucher, Greta; Moore, Kelsey; Rodia, Rachel; Moser, Christy Szczech

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic therapy has long been highlighted in the literature as a potentially powerful therapeutic intervention. This review will highlight basic definitions of aquatic therapy, review salient research, and identify specific diagnoses that may benefit from aquatic therapy. Online resources, blogs, and books that occupational therapists may find…

  2. Evaluation of Inter Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2002-01-01

    This article (revised conference lecture from the 10th World Congress of Music Therapy, Oxford July 2002)) emphasizes the evaluation of the training of Inter Therapy for music therapy students at the MA training at Aalborg University. The students take turns in being client and therapist within...

  3. American Music Therapy Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login Quick Links Facts About Music Therapy Qualifications of ... with AMTA Sponsor AMTA Events Social Networking Support Music Therapy When you shop at AmazonSmile, Amazon will donate ...

  4. Anti-Interleukin-6 Receptor Tocilizumab for Severe Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis-Associated Uveitis Refractory to Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor Therapy: A Multicenter Study of Twenty-Five Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Río, Vanesa; Santos-Gómez, Montserrat; Calvo, Inmaculada; González-Fernández, M Isabel; López-Montesinos, Berta; Mesquida, Marina; Adán, Alfredo; Hernández, María Victoria; Maíz, Olga; Atanes, Antonio; Bravo, Beatriz; Modesto, Consuelo; Díaz-Cordovés, Gisela; Palmou-Fontana, Natalia; Loricera, Javier; González-Vela, M C; Demetrio-Pablo, Rosalía; Hernández, J L; González-Gay, Miguel A; Blanco, Ricardo

    2017-03-01

    To assess the efficacy of tocilizumab (TCZ) for the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis. We conducted a multicenter study of patients with JIA-associated uveitis that was refractory to conventional immunosuppressive drugs and anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) agents. We assessed 25 patients (21 female; 47 affected eyes) with a mean ± SD age of 18.5 ± 8.3 years. Uveitis was bilateral in 22 patients. Cystoid macular edema was present in 9 patients. Ocular sequelae found at initiation of TCZ included cataracts (n = 13), glaucoma (n = 7), synechiae (n = 10), band keratopathy (n = 12), maculopathy (n = 9), and amblyopia (n = 5). Before TCZ, patients had received corticosteroids, conventional immunosuppressive drugs, and biologic agents (median 2 [range 1-5]), including adalimumab (n = 24), etanercept (n = 8), infliximab (n = 7), abatacept (n = 6), rituximab (n = 2), anakinra (n = 1), and golimumab (n = 1). Patients received 8 mg/kg TCZ intravenously every 4 weeks in most cases. TCZ yielded rapid and maintained improvement in all ocular parameters. After 6 months of therapy, 79.2% of patients showed improvement in anterior chamber cell numbers, and 88.2% showed improvement after 1 year. Central macular thickness measured by optical coherence tomography in patients with cystoid macular edema decreased from a mean ± SD of 401.7 ± 86.8 μm to 259.1 ± 39.5 μm after 6 months of TCZ (P = 0.012). The best-corrected visual acuity increased from 0.56 ± 0.35 to 0.64 ± 0.32 (P uveitis was observed in 19 of 25 patients. Significant reduction in the prednisone dosage was also achieved. The main adverse effects were severe autoimmune thrombocytopenia in 1 patient, pneumonia and then autoimmune anemia and thrombocytopenia in 1 patient, and viral conjunctivitis and bullous impetigo in 1 patient. TCZ appears to be a useful therapy for severe refractory JIA

  5. Treatment persistence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Amaral de Ávila Machado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To evaluate treatment persistence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis who started therapies with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD and tumor necrosis factor blockers (anti-TNF drugs. METHODS This retrospective cohort study from July 2008 to September 2013 evaluated therapy persistence, which is defined as the period between the start of treatment until it is discontinued, allowing for an interval of up to 30 days between the prescription end and the start of the next prescription. Odds ratio (OR with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI were calculated by logistic regression models to estimate the patients’ chances of persisting in their therapies after the first and after the two first years of follow-up. RESULTS The study included 11,642 patients with rheumatoid arthritis – 2,241 of these started on anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD and 9,401 patients started on DMARD – and 1,251 patients with ankylosing spondylitis – 976 of them were started on anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD and 275 were started on DMARD. In the first year of follow-up, 63.5% of the patients persisted in their therapies with anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD and 54.1% remained using DMARD in the group with rheumatoid arthritis. In regards to ankylosing spondylitis, 79.0% of the subjects in anti-TNF (+/-DMARD group and 41.1% of the subjects in the DMARD group persisted with their treatments. The OR (95%CI for therapy persistence was 1.50 (1.34-1.67 for the anti-TNF (+/-DMARD group as compared with the DMARD group in the first year for the patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and 2.33 (1.74-3.11 for the patients with ankylosing spondylitis. A similar trend was observed at the end of the second year. CONCLUSIONS A general trend of higher rates of therapy persistence with anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD was observed as compared to DMARD in the study period. We observed higher persistence rates for anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD in patients with ankylosing

  6. Treatment persistence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Marina Amaral de Ávila; de Moura, Cristiano Soares; Ferré, Felipe; Bernatsky, Sasha; Rahme, Elham; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To evaluate treatment persistence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis who started therapies with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) and tumor necrosis factor blockers (anti-TNF drugs). METHODS This retrospective cohort study from July 2008 to September 2013 evaluated therapy persistence, which is defined as the period between the start of treatment until it is discontinued, allowing for an interval of up to 30 days between the prescription end and the start of the next prescription. Odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were calculated by logistic regression models to estimate the patients’ chances of persisting in their therapies after the first and after the two first years of follow-up. RESULTS The study included 11,642 patients with rheumatoid arthritis – 2,241 of these started on anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD) and 9,401 patients started on DMARD – and 1,251 patients with ankylosing spondylitis – 976 of them were started on anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD) and 275 were started on DMARD. In the first year of follow-up, 63.5% of the patients persisted in their therapies with anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD) and 54.1% remained using DMARD in the group with rheumatoid arthritis. In regards to ankylosing spondylitis, 79.0% of the subjects in anti-TNF (+/-DMARD) group and 41.1% of the subjects in the DMARD group persisted with their treatments. The OR (95%CI) for therapy persistence was 1.50 (1.34-1.67) for the anti-TNF (+/-DMARD) group as compared with the DMARD group in the first year for the patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and 2.33 (1.74-3.11) for the patients with ankylosing spondylitis. A similar trend was observed at the end of the second year. CONCLUSIONS A general trend of higher rates of therapy persistence with anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD) was observed as compared to DMARD in the study period. We observed higher persistence rates for anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD) in patients with ankylosing

  7. Anti-TNFα agents in elderly patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a study of a group of 105 over sixty five years old patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Biasini Rebaioli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and the safety of anti-TNF-alfa treatment in elderly patients (≥65 years old with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA, in comparison with younger (17-65 years old. Methods: We considered retrospectively 295 patients, affected by RA and treated with anti-TNF-alfa drugs. They were divided in two groups, according to their age, and followed up for two years: over-65-years old patients (190 and under-65-years old patients (105. Effectiveness of drugs was assessed analyzing RA disease activity (DAS28, DAS44, SDAI, functional status (HAQ and serological parameters (CRP before and after anti-TNF-alfa therapy. Safety was studied considering discontinuation rate of biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, and collateral events rate. Results: At baseline, elderly patients showed higher disease activity’s score (DAS 28, DAS44, SDAI, HAQ with important loss of articular function (worse quality of life, HAQ than younger patients (p0.05. Conclusions: Anti-TNF-alfa treatment was efficacious and safe in both groups of patients. These drugs induced improvement in disease activity, apart from the age. No functional improvement was observed in HAQ, showing the irreversible loss of articular function and the incomplete recovery in elderly patients. Age doesn’t interfere with the possibility to treat elderly patients with anti-TNF-alfa drugs.

  8. Long-term survival of subcutaneous anti-tumor necrosis factor biological drugs administered between 2008 and 2012 in a cohort of rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez Rivas, Noelia; Vazquez Rodriguez, Tomas R; Miranda Filloy, Jose A; Garcia-Porrua, Carlos; Sanchez-Andrade Fernández, Amalia

    2017-05-25

    To compare the survival of subcutaneous anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) drugs used between 2008 and 2012 prescribed in accordance with clinical practice. Retrospective, observational study of the patients in our center diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We included patients who had received a subcutaneous anti-TNF agent for at least 6 months. The data were analyzed using the SPSS V17.0 statistical package. Forty-nine RA patients started subcutaneous biological treatment with an anti-TNF agent (32 with etanercept and 17 with adalimumab). The mean age was 45.94 years (75.5% female). The mean disease duration prior to starting anti-TNF administration was 2.67 years. The mean age at the start of treatment was 51.84 years, and the average Disease Activity Score 28 was 4.93. The median survival of the anti-TNF treatment was 8.40 years; the survival of etanercept was the longer of the two. The main reason for discontinuation was secondary failure (90.9%). In routine clinical practice, the survival of subcutaneous anti-TNF treatment was extensive and was independent of whether or not the patients received concomitant immunosuppressive therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  9. Hendee's radiation therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Pawlicki, Todd; Starkschall, George

    2016-01-01

    The publication of this fourth edition, more than ten years on from the publication of Radiation Therapy Physics third edition, provides a comprehensive and valuable update to the educational offerings in this field. Led by a new team of highly esteemed authors, building on Dr Hendee’s tradition, Hendee’s Radiation Therapy Physics offers a succinctly written, fully modernised update. Radiation physics has undergone many changes in the past ten years: intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has become a routine method of radiation treatment delivery, digital imaging has replaced film-screen imaging for localization and verification, image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is frequently used, in many centers proton therapy has become a viable mode of radiation therapy, new approaches have been introduced to radiation therapy quality assurance and safety that focus more on process analysis rather than specific performance testing, and the explosion in patient-and machine-related data has necessitated an ...

  10. Radiation Therapy: Professions in Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Professions in Radiation Therapy Radiation Oncologist Therapeutic Medical Physicist Radiation Therapist Dosimetrist Radiation Oncology Nurse Social Worker Dietitian Radiation Oncologist Radiation oncologists are physicians who oversee the ...

  11. Art Therapy: What Is Art Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... manage behavior and addictions, develop social skills, improve reality orientation, reduce anxiety, and increase self-esteem. A goal in art therapy is to improve or restore a client’s functioning ...

  12. Radon therapy; Radon in der Therapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spruck, Kaija [Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen, Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz

    2017-04-01

    Radon therapies are used since more than 100 years in human medicine. Today this method is controversially discussed due to the possible increase of ionizing radiation induced tumor risk. Although the exact mode of biological radiation effect on the cell level is still not known new studies show the efficiency of the radon therapy without side effect for instance for rheumatic/inflammatory or respiratory disorders.

  13. Individual medicine in inflammatory bowel disease: monitoring bioavailability, pharmacokinetics and immunogenicity of anti-tumour necrosis factor-alpha antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtzen, Klaus; Ainsworth, Mark; Steenholdt, Casper

    2009-01-01

    are effective in chronic inflammatory bowel disease. These proteins can dramatically lower disease activity and, in some patients, induce remission. Unfortunately, however, not all patients respond favourably to anti-TNF antibodies. For example, patients suffering from Crohn's disease do not benefit from......Antibody constructs targeting tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) have become important in the management of several chronic immunoinflammatory diseases. Four recombinant anti-TNF drugs are currently approved for clinical use in patients with various chronic inflammatory diseases, three of which...... for circulating levels of functional anti-TNF drugs and ADAs is therefore warranted so that treatment can be tailored to the individual patient (individual medicine or personal medicine) in order that effective and economical long-term therapy can be given with minimal risks to the patients....

  14. Erythema Multiforme Major Following Treatment with Infliximab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Dean; Boritz, Eli; Cowen, Edward W.; Brown, Ronald S.

    2012-01-01

    Background The growth in the use of anti-TNF-α agents for treatment of inflammatory conditions has led to increased recognition of the side effects associated with this class of drugs. Case Description We report a case of a patient who developed erythema multiforme (EM) major with characteristic oral and cutaneous lesions following treatment with the anti-TNF-α medication infliximab therapy for Crohn’s Disease (CD). Clinical Implications To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of infliximab-induced EM secondary to the treatment of CD. It is important for dental clinicians evaluating patients using anti-TNF-α agents to be aware of this possible complication. PMID:23036796

  15. [Physical therapy in osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnjidić, Zoja

    2010-01-01

    Physical therapy has an important role in treating rheumatic diseases; its goal is to reduced pain, swelling and to keep joints mobile. The properly manage osteoarthritis is nonpharmacological and pharmacological modalities. Physical therapy applied as a remedy for osteoarthritis is a part of multimodal therapy. The basis for physical therapy management is determined by the recommendation of the physical therapeutic science and evidence-based medicine. When making a decision about application of different methods of treatment in physical therapy, it is important to correctly diagnose a structural transformation and functional problem. Systematic review of the scientific, evidence-based, international concensus recommendations for the management of the osteoarthritis published between 2000 and 2010 were identified high-quality evidence therapy practice that is efficient and effective in increasing movement capability function, and reduce pain, disability, medical intake and improved physical function for patients with osteoarthritis

  16. Unproven (questionable) cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigden, M L

    1995-11-01

    More than half of all cancer patients use some form of alternative treatment during the course of their illness. Alternative therapies are often started early in patients' illness, and their use is frequently not acknowledged to health care professionals. Some alternative therapies are harmful, and their promoters may be fraudulent. Persons who try alternative cancer therapies may not be poorly educated but may ultimately abandon conventional treatment. Recent attention has focused on aspects of questionable therapies that make these treatments attractive to patients and that may be perceived as being deficient in the practice of conventional health care professionals. Physicians with patients with cancer should always make sure that unproven therapies are discussed early in the therapeutic relationship. They should also attempt to be aware of alternative therapies that are in vogue in their particular geographic area.

  17. Drug therapy for diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, L B

    1991-09-01

    Drug therapy with oral hypoglycemic agents and insulin are components of diabetes management regimens that also include diet, exercise/activity, monitoring, and education. Major concerns for practitioners using drug therapy are selection of the appropriate therapy for a particular patient, and drug interactions and side effects. Drug therapy is based on knowledge of the medications' pharmacokinetics; glucose goals, as determined by practitioners and patients; common sense; and strong participatory relationships between practitioners and patients and, if indicated, families. When using insulin, practitioners need to consider the differences between insulin therapy for insulin-dependent and non-insulin-dependent diabetes; how to initiate, adjust, and supplement insulin; situations that require variations in insulin therapy; and injection mechanics.

  18. Nuclear medicine therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Eary, Janet F

    2013-01-01

    One in three of the 30 million Americans who are hospitalized are diagnosed or treated with nuclear medicine techniques. This text provides a succinct overview and detailed set of procedures and considerations for patient therapy with unsealed radioactivity sources.  Serving as a complete literature reference for therapy with radiopharmaceuticals currently utilized in practice, this source covers the role of the physician in radionuclide therapy, and essential procedures and protocols required by health care personnel.

  19. Principles of gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Mammen Biju; Ramakrishnan T; Sudhakar Uma; Vijayalakshmi

    2007-01-01

    Genes are specific sequences of bases that encode instructions to make proteins. When genes are altered so that encoded proteins are unable to carry out their normal functions, genetic disorders can result. Gene therapy is designed to introduce genetic material into cells to compensate for abnormal genes or to make a beneficial protein. This article reviews the fundamentals in gene therapy and its various modes of administration with an insight into the role of gene therapy in Periodontics an...

  20. Advances in Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan BF, Sonveaux P

    2011-01-01

    The book "Advances in Cancer Therapy" is a new addition to the Intech collection of books and aims at providing scientists and clinicians with a comprehensive overview of the state of current knowledge and latest research findings in the area of cancer therapy. For this purpose research articles, clinical investigations and review papers that are thought to improve the readers' understanding of cancer therapy developments and/or to keep them up to date with the most recent advances in this fi...

  1. Placental gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    David, A. L.; Ashcroft, R

    2009-01-01

    Gene therapy uses genetic material as a drug delivery vehicle to express therapeutic proteins. Placental gene therapy may be useful for correction of two important obstetric conditions, foetal growth restriction and pre-eclampsia in which there is a failure of the physiological trophoblast remodelling of the uterine spiral arteries in early pregnancy. The patient in this scenario is the foetus. Placental gene therapy might be justifiable when: there is reasonable certainty that the foetus wil...

  2. Biological therapies for spondyloarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Bruner, Vincenzo; Atteno, Mariangela; Spanò, Angelo; Scarpa, Raffaele; Peluso, Rosario

    2014-01-01

    Biological therapies and new imaging techniques have changed the therapeutic and diagnostic approach to spondyloarthritis. In patients with axial spondyloarthritis, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) inhibitor treatment is currently the only effective therapy in patients for whom conventional therapy with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has failed. TNFα inhibitor treatment is more effective in preventing articular damage in peripheral joints than in axial ones. It is important to tr...

  3. Cochlear Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight recent advances in cochlear gene therapy over the past several years. Cochlear gene therapy has undergone tremendous advances over the past decade. Beginning with some groundbreaking work in 2005 documenting hair cell regeneration using virallymediated delivery of the mouse atonal 1 gene, gene therapy is now being explored as a possible treatment for a variety of causes of hearing loss.

  4. Unproven (questionable) cancer therapies.

    OpenAIRE

    Brigden, M.L.

    1995-01-01

    More than half of all cancer patients use some form of alternative treatment during the course of their illness. Alternative therapies are often started early in patients' illness, and their use is frequently not acknowledged to health care professionals. Some alternative therapies are harmful, and their promoters may be fraudulent. Persons who try alternative cancer therapies may not be poorly educated but may ultimately abandon conventional treatment. Recent attention has focused on aspects...

  5. Evaluation of Inter Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2002-01-01

    This article (revised conference lecture from the 10th World Congress of Music Therapy, Oxford July 2002)) emphasizes the evaluation of the training of Inter Therapy for music therapy students at the MA training at Aalborg University. The students take turns in being client and therapist within...... the same partner constellation. Through this training they learn as a therapeutic method to contain and incorporate experiences from being in the client role into managing the therapist role....

  6. Medical Art Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgul Aydin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Art therapy is a form of expressive therapy that uses art materials. Art therapy combines traditional psychotherapeutic theories and techniques with an understanding of the psychological aspects of the creative process, especially the affective properties of the different art materials. Medical art therapy has been defined as the clinical application of art expression and imagery with individuals who are physically ill, experiencing physical trauma or undergoing invasive or aggressive medical procedures such as surgery or chemotherapy and is considered as a form of complementary or integrative medicine. Several studies have shown that patients with physical illness benefit from medical art therapy in different aspects. Unlike other therapies, art therapy can take the patients away from their illness for a while by means of creative activities during sessions, can make them forget the illness or lost abilities. Art therapy leads to re-experiencing normality and personal power even with short creative activity sessions. In this article definition, influence and necessity of medical art therapy are briefly reviewed.

  7. Physical Therapy and Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle-Onate, Rafael; Ward, Michael M.; Kerr, Gail S.

    2012-01-01

    Physical therapy and orthopedic surgery are important components in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Supervised physical therapy is more effective that individual or unsupervised exercise in improving symptoms, but controlled trials suggest than combined inpatient and outpatient therapy provides the greatest improvement. Recommendations for exercise are universal, but the best types and sequence of therapies are not known. Total hip replacement is the surgery most commonly performed for AS, with good long-term implant survival. Heterotopic ossification may occur no more frequently after hip replacement in patients with AS than in patients with other diseases. Corrective spinal surgery is rarely performed and requires specialized centers and experienced surgeons. PMID:22543536

  8. Neutron Therapy Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Neutron Therapy Facility provides a moderate intensity, broad energy spectrum neutron beam that can be used for short term irradiations for radiobiology (cells)...

  9. Antiplatelet therapy and exodontia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schreuder, Willem H; Peacock, Zachary S

    2015-01-01

    .... The authors reviewed the literature, focusing on the indications and mechanisms of antiplatelet therapy and the perioperative management of patients taking these agents who require exodontia or other...

  10. [Morita therapy over history].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usa, Shinichi

    2003-01-01

    At Sansei Hospital in Kyoto we performed Morita Therapy not only for Japanese clients but also foreign clients from several countries, like Germany, Switzerland, U.S.A., China, Korea, India and Indonesia. We could treat those foreign clients using Morita Therapy with good success although they came from various cultural backgrounds. One of the characteristic Approaches of Morita Therapy was that it avoided the conceptualization of self-consciousness and self image as a subjective fiction established by abstract and logical thinking. Secondary Morita Therapy moves clients to deal with activities in real life. These 2 approaches help clients not to be involved in symptom development or fixation mechanisms and break through self-centeredness. At the first stage of Morita Therapy, namely in the bed rest period clients can experience his psychic state as if he were a just born baby. The founder of Gestalt Therapy, Frederick S. Perls experienced by himself Morita Therapy. During bed rest therapy he behaved as if he were a baby. This behavior came out not from conscious abstract and logical thinking but from spontaneous "pre-conscious" state of mind. Morita called this "Jun-na-kokoro" (Pure mind). Morita knew that neurotic symptoms come out from those abstract and logical thinking which could lead to fixation of symptoms so that therapy principle might be the de-centralization of self and the pure mind experience which is found in our daily life and also in daily life of foreign people from various cultural backgrounds.

  11. [Cognitive behavior therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munezawa, Takeshi

    2009-08-01

    Insomnia is one of the most frequently encountered disorders in general clinical practices. At present, the most commonly used therapy for insomnia is pharmacotherapy. There are some problems in pharmacotherapy such as side effects. Therefore nonpharmacological therapy for insomnia is needed. The cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is a nonpharmacological therapy attracting attention most. CBT-I not only alleviates insomnia symptoms in patients but also enables them to reduce/discontinue the use of hypnotics. I reviewed a study about the effectiveness of CBT-I and commented the future directions of CBT-I.

  12. Writing Music Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Helena Rykov

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available

    Communicating about music therapy is problematic because discursive language fails to convey the nonverbal, embodied essence of experience. I explore the emergence of this problem in the music therapy literature. I discuss the scholarship of phenomenological writing. I provide examples of nondiscursive music therapy writing. I introduce the genre of poetic inquiry.

    Poetry is the most musical form of language. Poetry and music, linked throughout history, share many characteristics. It makes sense that we use poetry to write about music therapy.

    Writing is a crucial skill for music therapy professionals who must produce various notes, proposals, and reports. Writing poetically is a diminished stance compared to discursive prose writing. It is understandable that representing music therapy in experimental, tentative, and creative texts is risky. I invite music therapists to aspire towards poetry when writing music therapy to better address nonverbal, embodied, music therapy essence. I address this invitation to all writers of music therapy: undergraduate and graduate students, clinicians, and researchers.

  13. Music Therapy with Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jukko Tervo

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic community described in this paper was situated at the University of Oulu Central Hospital Department of Psychiatry, Finland, during the years 1979-1989. The ward consisted of eight beds, four for boys and four for girls. The basic emphasis in the treatment was laid on psychoanalytic psychotherapy and music and art therapies suitable for the stage of adolescent development. Adolescent community therapy (psychoanalytic psychotherapy, music therapy, art therapy, special school etc. creates an environment which supports individual growth of the adolescent and youth culture. This, in turn, simultaneously supports psychotherapy.

  14. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Motivational Enhancement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sarah S; Schoenfelder, Erin; Hsiao, Ray Chih-Jui

    2016-10-01

    Although cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is widely recognized as the preferred treatment of psychiatric disorders, less is known about the application of CBT to substance use disorders, particularly in adolescence. This article discusses how CBT conceptualizes substance use and how it is implemented as a treatment of adolescent substance abuse. The article draws on several manuals for CBT that implement it as a standalone treatment or in combination with motivational enhancement therapies. Also reviewed are several studies that examined the efficacy of CBT. Finally, the implications are discussed. Numerous starting resources are provided to help a clinician implement CBT.

  15. Systematic assessment of factors influencing preferences of Crohn's disease patients in selecting an anti-tumor necrosis factor agent (CHOOSE TNF TRIAL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavricka, Stephan R; Bentele, Nicoletta; Scharl, Michael; Rogler, Gerhard; Zeitz, Jonas; Frei, Pascal; Straumann, Alex; Binek, Janek; Schoepfer, Alain M; Fried, Michael

    2012-08-01

    Infliximab (IFX), adalimumab (ADA), and certolizumab pegol (CZP) have similar efficacy in induction and maintenance of clinical remission in Crohn's disease (CD). Given the comparable nature of these drugs, patient preferences may influence the choice of the product. We aimed to identify factors that may contribute to CD patients' decision in selecting one anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agent over the others. A prospective survey was performed among anti-TNF-naïve CD patients. Prior to completion of a questionnaire, patients were provided with a written description of the three anti-TNF agents, focusing on indications, mode of administration, side effects, and scientific evidence of efficacy and safety for each drug. One hundred patients (47 females, mean age 45 ± 16 years, range 19-81) with an ileal, colonic, or ileocolonic (33%, 40%, and 27%, respectively) disease location completed the questionnaire. Based on the information provided, 36% of patients preferred ADA, 28% CZP, and 25% IFX, whereas 11% were undecided. The patients' decision in selecting a specific anti-TNF drug was influenced by the following factors: ease of use (69%), time required for therapy (34%), time interval between application of the drug (31%), scientific evidence for efficacy (19%), and fear of syringes (10%). The majority of patients preferred anti-TNF medications that were administered by subcutaneous injection rather than by intravenous infusion. Ease of use and time required for therapy were two major factors influencing the patients' selection of a specific anti-TNF drug. Patients' individual preferences should be taken into account when prescribing anti-TNF drugs. Copyright © 2011 Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America, Inc.

  16. Narrative Family Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, William M.; Keenan, Robert

    1997-01-01

    States that narrative family therapy is informed by social constructionism and postmodern worldviews, and is a relatively significant departure from mainstream psychotherapy. Discusses the use of narrative family therapy. Uses the story of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden as an example. (MKA)

  17. What Is Wilderness Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Keith C.

    2001-01-01

    Based on the literature and recent research, an integrated, consistent definition of wilderness therapy is presented to differentiate it from other outdoor adventure programs and guide program design and research efforts. Trends in the outdoor industry are explored that suggest that wilderness therapy programs are searching for recognition by…

  18. Antiproton Cancer Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels

    An essential part in cancer radiotherapy, is to direct a sufficiently high dose towards the tumour, without damaging the surrounding tissue. Different techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy and proton therapy have been developed, in order to reduce the dose to the normal tissue...

  19. History of gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Thomas; Parker, Nigel; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2013-08-10

    Two decades after the initial gene therapy trials and more than 1700 approved clinical trials worldwide we not only have gained much new information and knowledge regarding gene therapy in general, but also learned to understand the concern that has persisted in society. Despite the setbacks gene therapy has faced, success stories have increasingly emerged. Examples for these are the positive recommendation for a gene therapy product (Glybera) by the EMA for approval in the European Union and the positive trials for the treatment of ADA deficiency, SCID-X1 and adrenoleukodystrophy. Nevertheless, our knowledge continues to grow and during the course of time more safety data has become available that helps us to develop better gene therapy approaches. Also, with the increased understanding of molecular medicine, we have been able to develop more specific and efficient gene transfer vectors which are now producing clinical results. In this review, we will take a historical view and highlight some of the milestones that had an important impact on the development of gene therapy. We will also discuss briefly the safety and ethical aspects of gene therapy and address some concerns that have been connected with gene therapy as an important therapeutic modality.

  20. Electroconvulsive Therapy and Suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanney, Bryan L.

    1986-01-01

    When the effectiveness and mortality-morbidity of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) are compared with those of drug therapies, it appears that ECT is an effective and preferred treatment strategy. It remains underutilized as a modality of suicide prevention. Addresses controversies that presently limit the use of this treatment. (Author/ABB)

  1. Therapy in Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costonis, Maureen Needham, Ed.

    This book contains a collection of articles on the subject of movement therapy. It can be used as a set of supplementary readings for an academic course in dance therapy or a psychiatric residency program. It includes an exhaustive bibliography on this field for students and practioners in this field. Four principal themes have been selected as a…

  2. [Dance/Movement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on dance, play, and movement therapy for infants and toddlers with disabilities. Individual articles are: "Join My Dance: The Unique Movement Style of Each Infant and Toddler Can Invite Communication, Expression and Intervention" (Suzi Tortora); "Dynamic Play Therapy: An Integrated Expressive Arts Approach to…

  3. Therapy of Lies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Sean

    2012-01-01

    Conversion therapy comes in many forms, ranging from informal chats with counselors to aggressive physical coercion, but all are based on the belief that a gay male or a lesbian can be changed "back" to heterosexual behavior. It is not just alarmed parents who turn to this therapy. Many LGBT individuals seek out such treatment in an effort to…

  4. Art Therapy: A Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Linda, Comp.; Schmal, Marilyn Strauss, Comp.

    The bibliography on art therapy presents 1175 citations (1940-1973) drawn from searches of the medical indexes, computer systems of the National Library of Medicine and the National Institute of Mental Health, other bibliographies, Centre International de Documentation Concernant les Expressions Plastiques, and the American Journal of Art Therapy.…

  5. New Photodynamic Therapy Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, Dan

    1988-09-01

    I am going go over photodynamic therapy first, just an overview for those of you not familiar with it, as it is quite different from most of the normal surgical laser applications. Then I will be talking about the various aspects of the technology, and what we feel the market potentials are in the various aspects of the photodynamic therapy.

  6. Antiproton Cancer Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels

    An essential part in cancer radiotherapy, is to direct a sufficiently high dose towards the tumour, without damaging the surrounding tissue. Different techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy and proton therapy have been developed, in order to reduce the dose to the normal tissue...

  7. Boganmeldelse - Music Therapy Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2006-01-01

    . Alligevel følger her en anbefaling af bogen: for musikterapeuter er det en bog, man ikke kommer uden om. Music Therapy Research, på dansk Musikterapiforskning, er en gennemrevideret, ja faktisk nyudgivelse, af bogen Music Therapy Research: Quantitative and Qualitative Perspectives, som udkom i 1995. Også...

  8. Pediatric Music Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathom-Radocy, Wanda B.

    This book on music therapy includes relevant medical, psychological, and developmental information to help service providers, particularly music therapists, and parents to understand children with disabilities. The first two chapters describe the process of assessment and delineation of goals in music therapy that leads to the design of the music…

  9. Boganmeldelse - Music Therapy Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2006-01-01

    . Alligevel følger her en anbefaling af bogen: for musikterapeuter er det en bog, man ikke kommer uden om. Music Therapy Research, på dansk Musikterapiforskning, er en gennemrevideret, ja faktisk nyudgivelse, af bogen Music Therapy Research: Quantitative and Qualitative Perspectives, som udkom i 1995. Også...

  10. Pediatric Music Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathom-Radocy, Wanda B.

    This book on music therapy includes relevant medical, psychological, and developmental information to help service providers, particularly music therapists, and parents to understand children with disabilities. The first two chapters describe the process of assessment and delineation of goals in music therapy that leads to the design of the music…

  11. Massage Therapy Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Hernandez-Reif, Maria

    2007-01-01

    Massage therapy has been notably effective in preventing prematurity, enhancing growth of infants, increasing attentiveness, decreasing depression and aggression, alleviating motor problems, reducing pain, and enhancing immune function. This review covers massage therapy research from the last decade, as an update to the American Psychologist 1998…

  12. Animal-Assisted Therapy and Occupational Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Gena; Stella, Tiffany; Wilkison, Megan; Szczech Moser, Christy; Hoelzel, Allison; Hendricks, Laura

    2017-01-01

    The use of animals for therapeutic purposes has been documented in the literature for centuries. This review will highlight evidence of the benefits of animal-assisted therapy as well as provide a plethora of resources for therapists interested in learning more about how animals can provide restorative benefits for their clients.

  13. Proton therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Proton Therapy Physics goes beyond current books on proton therapy to provide an in-depth overview of the physics aspects of this radiation therapy modality, eliminating the need to dig through information scattered in the medical physics literature. After tracing the history of proton therapy, the book summarizes the atomic and nuclear physics background necessary for understanding proton interactions with tissue. It describes the physics of proton accelerators, the parameters of clinical proton beams, and the mechanisms to generate a conformal dose distribution in a patient. The text then covers detector systems and measuring techniques for reference dosimetry, outlines basic quality assurance and commissioning guidelines, and gives examples of Monte Carlo simulations in proton therapy. The book moves on to discussions of treatment planning for single- and multiple-field uniform doses, dose calculation concepts and algorithms, and precision and uncertainties for nonmoving and moving targets. It also exami...

  14. Music therapy in dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDermott, Orii; Crellin, Nadia; Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2013-01-01

    Objective Recent reviews on music therapy for people with dementia have been limited to attempting to evaluate whether it is effective, but there is a need for a critical assessment of the literature to provide insight into the possible mechanisms of actions of music therapy. This systematic review......, five studies investigated hormonal and physiological changes, and five studies focused on social and relational aspects of music therapy. The musical interventions in the studies were diverse, but singing featured as an important medium for change. Conclusions Evidence for short-term improvement...... in mood and reduction in behavioural disturbance was consistent, but there were no high-quality longitudinal studies that demonstrated long-term benefits of music therapy. Future music therapy studies need to define a theoretical model, include better-focused outcome measures, and discuss how the findings...

  15. Medical therapy in acromegaly.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sherlock, Mark

    2011-05-01

    Acromegaly is a rare disease characterized by excess secretion of growth hormone (GH) and increased circulating insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) concentrations. The disease is associated with increased morbidity and premature mortality, but these effects can be reduced if GH levels are decreased to <2.5 μg\\/l and IGF-1 levels are normalized. Therapy for acromegaly is targeted at decreasing GH and IGF-1 levels, ameliorating patients\\' symptoms and decreasing any local compressive effects of the pituitary adenoma. The therapeutic options for acromegaly include surgery, radiotherapy and medical therapies, such as dopamine agonists, somatostatin receptor ligands and the GH receptor antagonist pegvisomant. Medical therapy is currently most widely used as secondary treatment for persistent or recurrent acromegaly following noncurative surgery, although it is increasingly used as primary therapy. This Review provides an overview of current and future pharmacological therapies for patients with acromegaly.

  16. Music therapy improvisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira Kuzma

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the technique of music therapy – music therapy improvisation is introduced. In this form of music therapy the improvising partners share meaning through the improvisation: the improvisation is not an end in itself: it portrays meaning that is personal, complex and can be shared with the partner. The therapeutic work, then, is meeting and matching the client's music in order to give the client an experience of "being known", being responded through sounds and being able to express things and communicate meaningfully. Rather than the client playing music, the therapy is about developing the engagement through sustained, joint improvisations. In music therapy, music and emotion share fundamental features: one may represent the other, i.e., we hear the music not as music but as dynamic emotional states. The concept of dynamic structure explains why music makes therapeutic sense.

  17. Accelerators for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Arlene J.

    2000-05-30

    The vast majority of radiation treatments for cancerous tumors are given using electron linacs that provide both electrons and photons at several energies. Design and construction of these linacs are based on mature technology that is rapidly becoming more and more standardized and sophisticated. The use of hadrons such as neutrons, protons, alphas, or carbon, oxygen and neon ions is relatively new. Accelerators for hadron therapy are far from standardized, but the use of hadron therapy as an alternative to conventional radiation has led to significant improvements and refinements in conventional treatment techniques. This paper presents the rationale for radiation therapy, describes the accelerators used in conventional and hadron therapy, and outlines the issues that must still be resolved in the emerging field of hadron therapy.

  18. Music therapy in dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDermott, Orii; Crellin, Nadia; Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2013-01-01

    Objective Recent reviews on music therapy for people with dementia have been limited to attempting to evaluate whether it is effective, but there is a need for a critical assessment of the literature to provide insight into the possible mechanisms of actions of music therapy. This systematic review......, five studies investigated hormonal and physiological changes, and five studies focused on social and relational aspects of music therapy. The musical interventions in the studies were diverse, but singing featured as an important medium for change. Conclusions Evidence for short-term improvement...... in mood and reduction in behavioural disturbance was consistent, but there were no high-quality longitudinal studies that demonstrated long-term benefits of music therapy. Future music therapy studies need to define a theoretical model, include better-focused outcome measures, and discuss how the findings...

  19. Is Swollen to Tender Joint Count Ratio aNew and Useful Clinical Marker for BiologicDrug Response in Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lars Erik; Bliddal, Henning; Christensen, Robin;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the impact of swollen to tender joint count ratio (STR) and other baseline characteristics on treatment response to a first course of anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. METHODS: Patients with RA initiating their first course...

  20. Severe glandular tularemia in a patient treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor for psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruxandra Calin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A case of severe glandular tularemia in a patient receiving anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF therapy is reported here. The patient required prolonged treatment with doxycycline–ciprofloxacin due to early relapse after ciprofloxacin was stopped. Tularemia may have a more severe course in patients receiving anti-TNF. This may thus be an indication for more aggressive treatment.

  1. Treatment of inflammatory bowel disease: medical and surgical aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eshuis, E.J.

    2011-01-01

    De ziekte van Crohn en colitis ulcerosa, ontstekingsziekten van de darm, worden meestal met medicijnen behandeld. Helpt dat niet, dan worden patiënten geopereerd. Emma Eshuis toont aan dat anti-TNF-therapie, een relatief nieuw medicijn, een effectieve en veilige behandeling is voor de ziekte van Cro

  2. Optimizing Treatment with TNF Inhibitors in Inflammatory Bowel Disease by Monitoring Drug Levels and Antidrug Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenholdt, Casper; Bendtzen, Klaus; Brynskov, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Biological tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors have revolutionized the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease and redefined treatment goals to include mucosal healing. Clinicians are faced with challenges such as inadequate responses, treatment failures, side effects, and high dru....... CONCLUSIONS: TDM-guided anti-TNF therapy at treatment failure has been brought from bench to bedside....

  3. Treatment of inflammatory bowel disease: medical and surgical aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eshuis, E.J.

    2011-01-01

    De ziekte van Crohn en colitis ulcerosa, ontstekingsziekten van de darm, worden meestal met medicijnen behandeld. Helpt dat niet, dan worden patiënten geopereerd. Emma Eshuis toont aan dat anti-TNF-therapie, een relatief nieuw medicijn, een effectieve en veilige behandeling is voor de ziekte van Cro

  4. Perspectives for uveitis treatment in rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla Aleksandrovna Godzenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes current approaches to treating uveitis in rheumatic diseases and theoretical backgrounds for using tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α inhibitors. The data available in the literature suggest that anti-TNFtherapy is highly effective in relieving and preventing uveitis attacks.

  5. Evolution of Costs of Inflammatory Bowel Disease over Two Years of Follow-Up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Valk, Mirthe E; Mangen, Marie-Josée J; Severs, Mirjam; van der Have, Mike; Dijkstra, Gerard; van Bodegraven, Ad A; Fidder, Herma H; de Jong, Dirk J; van der Woude, C Janneke; Romberg-Camps, Mariëlle J L; Clemens, Cees H M; Jansen, Jeroen M; van de Meeberg, Paul C; Mahmmod, Nofel; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y; Bolwerk, Clemens; Vermeijden, J Reinoud; Siersema, Peter D; Leenders, Max; Oldenburg, Bas

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With the increasing use of anti-TNF therapy in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a shift of costs has been observed with medication costs replacing hospitalization and surgery as major cost driver. We aimed to explore the evolution of IBD-related costs over two years of follow-up. METHOD

  6. Evolution of costs of inflammatory bowel disease over two years of follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.E. van der Valk (Mirthe); M.J.J. Mangen; M. Severs; M. van der Have (Mike); G. Dijkstra (Gerard); A.A. van Bodegraven (Ad); M. Fidder (Melissa); D.J. De Jong (Dirk J.); C.J. van der Woude (Janneke); M. Romberg-Camps (Mariëlle); P.R. Clemens (Paula ); J.M. Jansen (Jeroen); P.C. van de Meeberg (Paul); N. Mahmmod (Nofel); A.E. van der Meulen-de Jong (Andrea); B.P. Ponsioen (Ben); C.L. Bolwerk (Clemens); J.R. Vermeijden (J. Reinoud); P.D. Siersema (Peter); M. Leenders (Max); B. Oldenburg (Bas)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: With the increasing use of anti-TNF therapy in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a shift of costs has been observed with medication costs replacing hospitalization and surgery as major cost driver. We aimed to explore the evolution of IBD-related costs over two years of follo

  7. Gene therapy for hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortelano, G; Chang, P L

    2000-01-01

    Hemophilia A and B are X-linked genetic disorders caused by deficiency of the coagulation factors VIII and IX, respectively. Because of the health hazards and costs of current product replacement therapy, much effort is devoted to the development of gene therapy for these disorders. Approaches to gene therapy for the hemophilias include: ex vivo gene therapy in which cells from the intended recipients are explanted, genetically modified to secrete Factor VIII or IX, and reimplanted into the donor; in vivo gene therapy in which Factor VIII or IX encoding vectors are directly injected into the recipient; and non-autologous gene therapy in which universal cell lines engineered to secrete Factor VIII or IX are enclosed in immuno-protective devices before implantation into recipients. Research into these approaches is aided by the many murine and canine models available. While problems of achieving high and sustained levels of factor delivery, and issues related to efficacy, safety and cost are still to be resolved, progress in gene therapy for the hemophilias has been encouraging and is likely to reach human clinical trial in the foreseeable future.

  8. Massage therapy research review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany

    2016-08-01

    In this review, massage therapy has been shown to have beneficial effects on varying conditions including prenatal depression, preterm infants, full-term infants, autism, skin conditions, pain syndromes including arthritis and fibromyalgia, hypertension, autoimmune conditions including asthma and multiple sclerosis, immune conditions including HIV and breast cancer and aging problems including Parkinson's and dementia. Although many of the studies have involved comparisons between massage therapy and standard treatment control groups, several have compared different forms of massage (e.g. Swedish versus Thai massage), and different active therapies such as massage versus exercise. Typically, the massage therapy groups have experienced more positive effects than the control or comparison groups. This may relate to the massage therapy providing more stimulation of pressure receptors, in turn enhancing vagal activity and reducing cortisol levels. Some of the researchers have assessed physical, physiological and biochemical effects, although most have relied exclusively on self-report measures. Despite these methodological problems and the dearth of research from the U.S., the massage therapy profession has grown significantly and massage therapy is increasingly practiced in traditional medical settings, highlighting the need for more rigorous research.

  9. Gene Therapy of Cancerous Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Valenčáková, A.; Dziaková, A.; Hatalová, E.

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy of cancerous diseases provides new means of curing patients with oncologic illnesses. There are several approaches in treating cancer by gene therapy. Most commonly used methods are: cancer immunogene therapy, suicide gene therapy, application of tumor-suppressor genes, antiangiogenic therapy, mesenchymal stem cells used as vectors, gene directed enzyme/prodrug therapy and bacteria used as anti-cancer agents. Cancer gene immunotherapy uses several immunologic agents for the purp...

  10. Does photodynamic therapy enhance standard antibacterial therapy in dentistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Fawad; Romanos, Georgios E

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether or not photodynamic therapy enhanced standard antibacterial therapy in dentistry. Photodynamic therapy when used as an adjunct to conventional periodontal therapy kills more bacteria than when conventional periodontal therapy is used alone. To address the focused question, "Does photodynamic therapy enhance killing of oral bacteria?" PubMed/MEDLINE(®) and Google Scholar databases were explored. Original human and experimental studies and studies using photodynamic therapy for killing oral bacteria were included. Letters to the Editor, historic reviews, and unpublished data were excluded. Photodynamic therapy significantly reduces periodontopathogenic bacteria including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Prevotella intermedia, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Photodynamic therapy kills cariogenic bacteria (such as Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguis), bacteria associated with infected root canals, and those associated with periimplantitis. Photodynamic therapy, when used as an adjunct to conventional oral disinfection protocols, enhances standard antibacterial therapy in dentistry.

  11. Collaboration in experiential therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdondini, Lucia; Elliott, Robert; Shearer, Joan

    2012-02-01

    We offer a view of the nature and role of client-therapist collaboration in experiential psychotherapy, focusing on Gestalt and emotion-focused therapy (EFT). We distinguish between the necessary condition of mutual trust (the emotional bond between client and therapist) and effective collaboration (regarding the goals and tasks of therapy). Using a case study of experiential therapy for social anxiety, we illustrate how the development of collaboration can be both complex and pivotal for therapeutic success, and how it can involve client and therapist encountering one another through taking risks by openly and nonjudgementally disclosing difficult experiences in order to enrich and advance the work.

  12. Radiation therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hendee, William R; Hendee, Eric G

    2013-01-01

    The Third Edition of Radiation Therapy Physics addresses in concise fashion the fundamental diagnostic radiologic physics principles as well as their clinical implications. Along with coverage of the concepts and applications for the radiation treatment of cancer patients, the authors have included reviews of the most up-to-date instrumentation and critical historical links. The text includes coverage of imaging in therapy planning and surveillance, calibration protocols, and precision radiation therapy, as well as discussion of relevant regulation and compliance activities. It contains an upd

  13. Feminist music therapy pedagogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahna, Nicole; Swantes, Melody

    2011-01-01

    This study surveyed 188 music therapy educators regarding their views and use of feminist pedagogy and feminist music therapy. The purpose of this study was two-fold: (a) to determine how many music therapy educators used feminist pedagogy and (b) to determine if there was a relationship between......) participatory learning, (b) validation of personal experience/development of confidence, (c) political/social activism, and (d) critical thinking/ open-mindedness. The results revealed that 46% (n = 32) of participants identified as feminist music therapists and 67% (n = 46) of participants identified as using...

  14. Medical Therapy of Acromegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Plöckinger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines the present status of medical therapy of acromegaly. Indications for permanent postoperative treatment, postirradiation treamtent to bridge the interval until remission as well as primary medical therapy are elaborated. Therapeutic efficacy of the different available drugs—somatostatin receptor ligands (SRLs, dopamine agonists, and the GH antagonist Pegvisomant—is discussed, as are the indications for and efficacy of their respective combinations. Information on their mechanism of action, and some pharmakokinetic data are included. Special emphasis is given to the difficulties to define remission criteria of acromegaly due to technical assay problems. An algorithm for medical therapy in acromegaly is provided.

  15. [Possibilities of bacteriophage therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skurnik, Mikael; Kiljunen, Saija

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance of bacterial pathogens has increased, and new therapies are urgently needed. Bacteriophages (phages), viruses infecting and killing bacteria, are the most abundant organisms on earth. In nature there are several specific phages for every bacterium, controlling bacterial numbers and maintaining ecological balance. Phage therapy, i.e., treating bacterial infections with phages, offers an alternative complementary to antibiotics as phages infect and kill also multi-resistant bacteria. Phages possess narrow host specificity, each phage infecting only a few bacterial species or strains. Thereby phages do not harm the normal microbiota as antibiotics do. We aim to begin clinical trials of phage therapy in Finland.

  16. Feminist music therapy pedagogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahna, Nicole; Swantes, Melody

    2011-01-01

    This study surveyed 188 music therapy educators regarding their views and use of feminist pedagogy and feminist music therapy. The purpose of this study was two-fold: (a) to determine how many music therapy educators used feminist pedagogy and (b) to determine if there was a relationship between......) participatory learning, (b) validation of personal experience/development of confidence, (c) political/social activism, and (d) critical thinking/ open-mindedness. The results revealed that 46% (n = 32) of participants identified as feminist music therapists and 67% (n = 46) of participants identified as using...

  17. Treatment of perianal fistula in Crohn's disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis comparing seton drainage and anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groof, E J; Sahami, S; Lucas, C; Ponsioen, C Y; Bemelman, W A; Buskens, C J

    2016-07-01

    The introduction of anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF; infliximab and adalimumab) has changed the management of Crohn's perianal fistula from almost exclusively surgical treatment to one with a much larger emphasis on medical therapy. The aim of this systematic review was to provide an overview of the success rates of setons and anti-TNF for Crohn's perianal fistula. Studies evaluating the effect of setons and anti-TNF on Crohn's perianal fistula were included. Studies assessing perianal fistula in children, rectovaginal and rectourinary fistulae were excluded. The primary end-point was the fistula closure rate. Partial closure and recurrence rates were secondary end-points. Ten studies on seton drainage were included (n = 305). Complete closure varied from 13.6% to 100% and recurrence from 0% to 83.3%. In 34 anti-TNF studies (n = 1449), complete closure varied from 16.7% and 93% (partial closure 8.0-91.2%) and recurrence from 8.0% to 40.9%. Four randomized controlled trials (n = 1028) comparing anti-TNF with placebo showed no significant difference in complete or partial closure in meta-analysis (risk difference 0.12, 95% CI -0.06 to 0.30 and 0.09, 95% CI -0.23 to 0.41, respectively). Subgroup analysis (n = 241) showed a significant advantage for complete fistula closure with anti-TNF in two trials with follow-up > 4 weeks (46% vs 13%, P = 0.003 and 30% vs 13%, P = 0.03). Of four included cohort studies, two revealed a significant difference in response in favour of combined treatment (P = 0.001 and P = 0.014). Closure and recurrence rates after seton drainage as well as anti-TNF vary widely. Despite a large number of studies, no conclusions can be drawn regarding the preferred strategy. However, combination therapy with (temporary) seton drainage, immunomodulators and anti-TNF may be beneficial in achieving perianal fistula closure. Colorectal Disease © 2016 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  18. Radiation therapy -- skin care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000735.htm Radiation therapy - skin care To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. When you have radiation treatment for cancer, you may have some changes ...

  19. Occupational therapy evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristina Tomra; Wæhrens, Eva Ejlersen

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Occupational Therapy Intervention Process Model (OTIPM) serves to guide occupational therapists in their professional reasoning. The OTIPM prescribes evaluation of task performance based on both self-report and observation. Although this approach seems ideal, many clinicians raise...

  20. [Physiotherapy as manual therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torstensen, T A; Nielsen, L L; Jensen, R; Reginiussen, T; Wiesener, T; Kirkesola, G; Mengshoel, A M

    1999-05-30

    Manual therapy includes methods where the therapist's hands are used to stretch, mobilize or manipulate the spinal column, paravertebral structures or extremity joints. The aims of these methods are to relieve pain and improve function. In Norway only specially qualified physiotherapists and chiropractors are authorized to perform manipulation of joints (high velocity thrust techniques). To become a qualified manual therapist in Norway one must have a minimum of two years of clinical practice as physiotherapist followed by two year full time postgraduate training in manual therapy (a total of six years). Historically the Norwegian manual therapy system was developed in the 1950s by physiotherapists and medical doctors in England (James Cyriax and James Mennell) and Norway. As a result doctors allowed physiotherapists to use manipulation as a treatment method of both spinal and peripheral joints. In 1957 the Norwegian health authorities introduced reimbursement for manual therapy performed by physiotherapists.

  1. [Targeted therapies for melanoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, U; Meier, F; Garbe, C

    2014-07-01

    Since the discovery of activating mutations in the BRAF oncogene and also stimulation of immune mediated antitumor response in melanoma, there has been remarkable progress in the development of targeted therapies for unresectable and metastatic melanoma. This article addresses the latest developments of BRAF/MEK/ERK pathway signaling. In addition, the development of drugs to attack alternative mutations in melanoma, such as NRAS and KIT is described. Strategies for the management of BRAF inhibitor resistance, such as with combination therapy, are outlined. Antitumor immune therapies with monoclonal antibodies such as ipilimumab which acts by promoting T-cell activation or antibody blockade of programmed death-1 (PD-1) led to a long term response in metastatic melanoma. Results of latest clinical studies including the toxicity profile are described. Due to selective kinase inhibitors and immune checkpoint blockade, the therapy of unresectable metastatic melanoma has greatly improved and long-term survival of patients with metastatic melanoma seems a real possibility.

  2. Interactional Gestalt Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warehime, Robert G.

    1981-01-01

    Group gestalt therapy in which the leader facilitates the development of helping capacity in group members is described. The general characteristics of this approach are discussed and ground rules concerning leader and member behaviors are suggested. (RC)

  3. Therapy and Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can give you tools to help fight low self-esteem and depression.Therapy can help treat a variety ... trained in psychotherapy include professionals representing psychiatry, clinical psychology, mental health counseling, clinical social work, marriage and ...

  4. Therapy Provider Phase Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Therapy Provider Phase Information dataset is a tool for providers to search by their National Provider Identifier (NPI) number to determine their phase for...

  5. Advances in antiplatelet therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michelson, Alan D

    2011-01-01

    Because of the central role of platelets in cardiovascular atherothrombosis, there is a well-established therapeutic role for antiplatelet therapy that includes aspirin (a cyclooxygenase 1 [COX1] inhibitor), clopidogrel...

  6. Lipid-modifying therapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-03-20

    Mar 20, 2009 ... risk reduction for most patients, while patients with severe ... He runs the Diabetic, Endocrine and Lipid clinics at R K Khan Hospital. Treatment .... retinopathy requiring laser therapy). ... Despite knowledge of the risk factors for.

  7. External Beam Therapy (EBT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Esophageal Cancer Treatment Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Lung Cancer Treatment Prostate Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Why is ... Radiation Oncology) Breast Cancer Treatment Esophageal Cancer Treatment Lung Cancer Treatment Images related to External Beam Therapy (EBT) Sponsored ...

  8. Drug therapy smartens up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christian

    2015-11-01

    The submission of the first 'smart pill' for market approval, combined with progress in the European nanomedicine landscape, illustrates the positive outlook for drug therapy and health monitoring, explains Christian Martin.

  9. Gene therapy in ophthalmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthra, Satagopan; Kumaramanickavel, Govindasamy

    2009-09-01

    It has been more than a year since ophthalmologists and scientists under Dr. Robin Ali's team at the Moorsfield Eye Hospital and the Institute of Ophthalmology, University College London, successfully treated patients with a severely blinding disease, Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA) using gene therapy. This success does not look to be transient, and this achievement in gene replacement therapy clinical trial for LCA has instilled hope in numerous families with patients suffering from this and similar retinal degenerative diseases, for whom restoration of lost vision has remained a distant dream so far. The encouragement that this success has given is expected to also lead to start of clinical trials for other blinding ocular diseases for which gene therapy experiments at the laboratory and animal levels have been successful. This article reviews the various studies that have led to the understanding of gene therapy outcomes in human ocular diseases and attempts to provide a brief sketch of successful clinical trials.

  10. Targeted Thrombolytic Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡豫

    2004-01-01

    @@ Venous and arterial thrombosis are closely related to many severe diseases, especially to cardiovascular and cerebrovasular disorders. Thrombolytic therapy has been proven to be an effective method to treat such disease, which decreased the mortality and morbidity greatly.

  11. Music therapy in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avers, Laura; Mathur, Ambika; Kamat, Deepak

    2007-09-01

    The soothing effects of music have been well described over the centuries and across cultures. In more recent times, studies have shown the beneficial effects of music in alleviating symptoms in a wide variety of clinical and psychologic conditions. Music therapy has been primarily used as an intervention to control emotional states, in pain management, cognitive processing, and stress management. Stress is associated with increased production of the stress hormone cortisol, which is known to suppress immune responses. Several studies in the past few decades have demonstrated a positive effect of music therapy on reducing stress or increasing immune responses, or both. Music therapy should therefore be considered as a valuable addition to standard pharmacologic therapeutic modalities in enhancing the immune response and lowering stress levels in such conditions. This article reviews the role of music as a therapeutic modality and the future for music therapy, particularly in pediatrics.

  12. Nanomedicine and cancer therapies

    CERN Document Server

    Sebastian, Mathew; Elias, Eldho

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Nanotechnological-Based Systems for CancerIn vivo Spectroscopy for Detection and Treatment of GBM with NPt® ImplantationNanobiotechnology for Antibacterial Therapy and DiagnosisChitosan NanoparticlesSynthesis and Biomedical Application of Silver NanoparticlesRecent Advances in Cancer Therapy Using PhytochemicalsMitochondrial Dysfunction and Cancer: Modulation by Palladium-Lipoic Acid ComplexUnity of Mind and Body: The Concept of Life Purpose DominantThuja Occidentalis and Breast Cancer ChemopreventionAntioxidants and Com

  13. Speech therapy with obturator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyammohan, A; Sreenivasulu, D

    2010-12-01

    Rehabilitation of speech is tantamount to closure of defect in cases with velopharyngeal insufficiency. Often the importance of speech therapy is sidelined during the fabrication of obturators. Usually the speech part is taken up only at a later stage and is relegated entirely to a speech therapist without the active involvement of the prosthodontist. The article suggests a protocol for speech therapy in such cases to be done in unison with a prosthodontist.

  14. Concept Analysis: Music Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrock, Carolyn J; Bekhet, Abir K

    2016-01-01

    Down through the ages, music has been universally valued for its therapeutic properties based on the psychological and physiological responses in humans. However, the underlying mechanisms of the psychological and physiological responses to music have been poorly identified and defined. Without clarification, a concept can be misused, thereby diminishing its importance for application to nursing research and practice. The purpose of this article was for the clarification of the concept of music therapy based on Walker and Avant's concept analysis strategy. A review of recent nursing and health-related literature covering the years 2007-2014 was performed on the concepts of music, music therapy, preferred music, and individualized music. As a result of the search, the attributes, antecedents, and consequences of music therapy were identified, defined, and used to develop a conceptual model of music therapy. The conceptual model of music therapy provides direction for developing music interventions for nursing research and practice to be tested in various settings to improve various patient outcomes. Based on Walker and Avant's concept analysis strategy, model and contrary cases are included. Implications for future nursing research and practice to use the psychological and physiological responses to music therapy are discussed.

  15. Antiplatelet therapy and exodontia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreuder, Willem H; Peacock, Zachary S

    2015-11-01

    This is a review of the management considerations regarding exodontia for patients taking antithrombotic medications that affect platelet function or aggregation. The authors reviewed the literature, focusing on the indications and mechanisms of antiplatelet therapy and the perioperative management of patients taking these agents who require exodontia or other dentoalveolar surgery. Dentists making management decisions regarding patients taking antiplatelet therapy should consider the patient's risk of experiencing perioperative hemorrhage against the risk of experiencing complications associated with thromboembolic events. The risk of perioperative bleeding complications is low for patients taking single or dual antiplatelet therapy. Intraoperative and postoperative bleeding can be controlled with local hemostatic measures. For patients taking antiplatelet medication, bleeding risk for exodontia is generally lower than the risk of experiencing thromboembolic events owing to cessation of therapy. Dentists can safely complete exodontia in patients who continue taking antiplatelet therapy. The dentist should consult the patient's prescribing physician before considering altering the patient's antiplatelet therapy regimen. Copyright © 2015 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Psychodynamic Music Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinah Kim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces and explores the basic principles of psychodynamic approaches in music therapy. Music is used as a means to explore both conscious and unconscious issues as well as the internal world of the individuals involved in music therapy. However, the focus of therapy is on therapeutic relationship, especially the dynamics of transference and counter-transference between the client and the music therapist. Musical experiences, such as music listening, songs, and improvisation, can be used to facilitate the therapeutic processes, and to achieve individualized therapeutic goals. When clinically appropriate, verbal processing might play as crucial a role as the musical processing. Practitioners of psychodynamic approaches often strive to gain meaning and in-depth understandings from therapeutic experiences, and the approach is therefore suitable for individuals who are ready to work through their personal issues within a therapeutic relationship. Various approaches and techniques have been developed in psychotherapy as well as in music therapy. Perhaps the only commonality in these approaches is that psychodynamic thinking informs the direction of the therapy and therapeutic processes. Clinical vignettes will be introduced within the article to highlight a triadic dynamic—the client, the music therapist, and the music—in order to illustrate the core aspects of psychodynamic music therapy.

  17. Fertility and cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maguire, L.C.

    1979-05-01

    With increased survival of increasing numbers of cancer patients as a result of therapy, the consequences, early and late, of the therapies must be realized. It is the treating physician's duty to preserve as much reproductive potential as possible for patients, consistent with adequate care. With radiotherapy this means shielding the gonads as much as possible, optimal but not excessive doses and fields, oophoropexy, or sperm collection and storage prior to irradiation. With chemotherapy it means the shortest exposure to drugs consistent with best treatment and prior to therapy the collection and storage of sperm where facilities are available. At present this is still an experimental procedure. Artificial insemination for a couple when the male has received cancer therapy is another alternative. Finally, it is the responsibility of physicians caring for patients with neoplasms to be knowledgeable about these and all other effects of therapy so that patients may be counseled appropriately and understand the implications of therapy for their life.

  18. Cognitive behavioural therapies versus other psychological therapies for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, Rachel; Moore, Theresa Hm; Caldwell, Deborah; Davies, Philippa; Jones, Hannah; Furukawa, Toshi A; Lewis, Glyn; Hunot, Vivien

    2010-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of all CBT approaches compared with all other psychological therapy approaches for acute depressionTo examine the effectiveness and acceptability of different CBT approaches (cognitive therapy, rational emotive behaviour therapy, problem-solving therapy, self-control therapy and Coping with Depression course) compared with all other psychological therapy approaches for acute depression.To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of all CBT approaches compared with different psychological therapy approaches (psychodynamic, behavioural, humanistic, integrative, third wave CBT) for acute depression.

  19. Anti-TNFα-therapy as an evidence-based treatment option for different clinical manifestations of psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhm, Michaela; Burkhardt, Harald; Behrens, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The development programmes of different TNF-blocking agents in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) not only provided substantial evidence for the therapeutic benefits of the specific treatment options, but also enabled new insights into the differential treatment effects on distinct disease manifestations. For the first time, specific robust evidence for distinctive effects on different manifestations of PsA, as a distinct entity separate from rheumatoid arthritis (RA), has been generated in a standardized way. The clearest evidence was shown for an effect on peripheral arthritis (polyarticular) with ACR20 response rates from 45 up to 58% (vs. 9-24% for placebo), and an inhibition of radiographic progression demonstrated for the first time for a treatment principle in PsA. However, as PsA does not remain confined to the peripheral joints, it was necessary to address diverse patterns of PsA-subtypes in the outcome measurements of the anti-TNF trials. Accordingly, the results of the clinical studies on anti-TNF treatment also have demonstrated efficacy on enthesitis, dactylitis and skin psoriasis, either in sub analysis of results from phase III RCTs, or in additional prospective studies.

  20. Biologic Therapy (Immunotherapy) for Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stage for Kidney Cancer Kidney Cancer Treating Kidney Cancer Biologic Therapy (Immunotherapy) for Kidney Cancer The goal of biologic therapy ... Therapy for Kidney Cancer Targeted Therapies for Kidney Cancer Biologic Therapy (Immunotherapy) for Kidney Cancer Chemotherapy for Kidney Cancer Pain ...