WorldWideScience

Sample records for anti-stokes raman scattering

  1. Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Heterodyne Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bredfeldt, J S; Vinegoni, C; Hambir, S; Boppart, S A

    2003-01-01

    A new interferometric technique is demonstrated for measuring Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) signals. Two forward-directed CARS signals are generated, one in each arm of an interferometer. The deterministic nature of the CARS process allows for these two signals, when spatially and temporally overlapped, to interfere with one another. Heterodyne detection can therefore be employed to increase the sensitivity in CARS signal detection. In addition, nonlinear CARS interferometry will facilitate the use of this spectroscopic technique for molecular contrast in Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT).

  2. Imaging properties of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Jing-He; Xiao Fan-Rong; Wang Gui-Ying; Xu Zhi-Zhan

    2005-01-01

    The coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscope with the combination of confocal and CARS techniques is a remarkable alternative for imaging chemical or biological specimens that neither fluoresce nor tolerate labelling. CARS is a nonlinear optical process, the imaging properties of CARS microscopy will be very different from the conventional confocal microscope. In this paper, the intensity distribution and the polarization property of the optical field near the focus was calculated. By using the Green function, the precise analytic solution to the wave equation of a Hertzian dipole source was obtained. We found that the intensity distributions vary considerably with the different experimental configurations and the different specimen shapes. So the conventional description of microscope (e.g. the point spread function) will fail to describe the imaging properties of the CARS microscope.

  3. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy of single nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Iestyn; Payne, Lukas; Zoriniants, George; Thomas, Evan; Williams, Oliver; Watson, Peter; Langbein, Wolfgang; Borri, Paola

    2014-11-01

    Nanoparticles have attracted enormous attention for biomedical applications as optical labels, drug-delivery vehicles and contrast agents in vivo. In the quest for superior photostability and biocompatibility, nanodiamonds are considered one of the best choices due to their unique structural, chemical, mechanical and optical properties. So far, mainly fluorescent nanodiamonds have been utilized for cell imaging. However, their use is limited by the efficiency and costs in reliably producing fluorescent defect centres with stable optical properties. Here, we show that single non-fluorescing nanodiamonds exhibit strong coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) at the sp(3) vibrational resonance of diamond. Using correlative light and electron microscopy, the relationship between CARS signal strength and nanodiamond size is quantified. The calibrated CARS signal in turn enables the analysis of the number and size of nanodiamonds internalized in living cells in situ, which opens the exciting prospect of following complex cellular trafficking pathways quantitatively.

  4. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy of single nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Iestyn; Payne, Lukas; Zoriniants, George; Thomas, Evan; Williams, Oliver; Watson, Peter; Langbein, Wolfgang; Borri, Paola

    2014-11-01

    Nanoparticles have attracted enormous attention for biomedical applications as optical labels, drug-delivery vehicles and contrast agents in vivo. In the quest for superior photostability and biocompatibility, nanodiamonds are considered one of the best choices due to their unique structural, chemical, mechanical and optical properties. So far, mainly fluorescent nanodiamonds have been utilized for cell imaging. However, their use is limited by the efficiency and costs in reliably producing fluorescent defect centres with stable optical properties. Here, we show that single non-fluorescing nanodiamonds exhibit strong coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) at the sp3 vibrational resonance of diamond. Using correlative light and electron microscopy, the relationship between CARS signal strength and nanodiamond size is quantified. The calibrated CARS signal in turn enables the analysis of the number and size of nanodiamonds internalized in living cells in situ, which opens the exciting prospect of following complex cellular trafficking pathways quantitatively.

  5. Quantitative coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, James P R; Domke, Katrin F; Rago, Gianluca; Kano, Hideaki; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o; Vartiainen, Erik M; Bonn, Mischa

    2011-06-23

    The ability to observe samples qualitatively at the microscopic scale has greatly enhanced our understanding of the physical and biological world throughout the 400 year history of microscopic imaging, but there are relatively few techniques that can truly claim the ability to quantify the local concentration and composition of a sample. We review coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) as a quantitative, chemically specific, and label-free microscopy. We discuss the complicating influence of the nonresonant response on the CARS signal and the various experimental and mathematical approaches that can be adopted to extract quantitative information from CARS. We also review the uses to which CARS has been employed as a quantitative microscopy to solve challenges in material and biological science.

  6. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering under electric field stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitaine, Erwan; Ould Moussa, Nawel; Louot, Christophe; Lefort, Claire; Pagnoux, Dominique; Duclère, Jean-René; Kaneyasu, Junya F.; Kano, Hideaki; Duponchel, Ludovic; Couderc, Vincent; Leproux, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    We introduce an experiment using electro-CARS, an electro-optical method based on the combination of ultrabroadband multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (M-CARS) spectroscopy and electric field stimulation. We demonstrate that this method can effectively discriminate the resonant CARS signal from the nonresonant background owing to a phenomenon of molecular orientation in the sample medium. Such molecular orientation is intrinsically related to the induction of an electric dipole moment by the applied static electric field. Evidence of the electro-CARS effect is obtained with a solution of n -alkanes (CnH2 n +2 , 15 ≤n ≤40 ), for which an enhancement of the CARS signal-to-noise ratio is achieved in the case of CH2 and CH3 symmetric/asymmetric stretching vibrations. Additionally, an electric-field-induced second-harmonic generation experiment is performed in order to corroborate the orientational organization of molecules due to the electric field excitation. Finally, we use a simple mathematical approach to compare the vibrational information extracted from electro-CARS measurements with spontaneous Raman data and to highlight the impact of electric stimulation on the vibrational signal.

  7. Raman and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microspectroscopy for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafft, Christoph; Dietzek, Benjamin; Schmitt, Michael; Popp, Jürgen

    2012-04-01

    A tutorial article is presented for the use of linear and nonlinear Raman microspectroscopies in biomedical diagnostics. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is the most frequently applied nonlinear variant of Raman spectroscopy. The basic concepts of Raman and CARS are introduced first, and subsequent biomedical applications of Raman and CARS are described. Raman microspectroscopy is applied to both in-vivo and in-vitro tissue diagnostics, and the characterization and identification of individual mammalian cells. These applications benefit from the fact that Raman spectra provide specific information on the chemical composition and molecular structure in a label-free and nondestructive manner. Combining the chemical specificity of Raman spectroscopy with the spatial resolution of an optical microscope allows recording hyperspectral images with molecular contrast. We also elaborate on interfacing Raman spectroscopic tools with other technologies such as optical tweezing, microfluidics and fiber optic probes. Thereby, we aim at presenting a guide into one exciting branch of modern biophotonics research.

  8. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy with a photonic crystal fiber based light source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, H.N.; Hilligsøe, Karen Marie; Thøgersen, J.;

    2003-01-01

    A coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscope based on a Ti:sapphire femtosecond oscillator and a photonic crystal fiber is demonstrated. The nonlinear response of the fiber is used to generate the additional wavelength needed in the Raman process. The applicability of the setup...

  9. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy for pharmaceutics: a shift in the right direction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fussell, Andrew Luke

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation demonstrates coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy as a tool in pharmaceutical solid state development. CARS microscopy is a nonlinear optical imaging technique that uses inelastic scattering of light to provide chemically specific imaging. CARS microscopy is suit

  10. Broadband multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy employing photonic-crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Esben Ravn; Paulsen, Henrik Nørgaard; Birkedal, Victoria;

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate spectral multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy and microscopy based on a single Ti:sapphire oscillator and a nonlinear photonic-crystal fiber (PCF). The Stokes pulse is generated by spectral conversion of the laser pulse in a PCF. The pump pulse...

  11. Combustion Diagnostics by Pure Rotational Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leipertz, Alfred; Seeger, Thomas

    Since its first use in Richard Chang's laboratory in 1982 in a comparative study with vibrational coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (VCARS) in a flame, pure rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (RCARS) has gained tremendous importance for gas temperature and relative species concentration measurements in combustion diagnostics. The field of application covers basic studies on diagnostics development and on flame research as well as its use in technical combustion systems, e.g., for the determination of the gas-phase temperature in the vaporizing spray of a gasoline direct injection (GDI) injector or for the simultaneous measurement of gas temperature and exhaust-gas-recirculation rate (EGR rate) in a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine. An overview is given on the fundamentals of the technique and on its most important technical applications.

  12. Design of supercontinuum source for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hui; CHANG Sheng-jiang; ZHANG Yan-xin; ZHAO Xiang-ting

    2008-01-01

    A new method to obtain supemontinuum(SC)source for multiplex coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering(CARS)micros-copy is proposed.The nonlinear propagation in photonic-crystal fibers(PCF)of femtosecond pulse laser with central wavelength at 800.9 nm is studied with scalar wave theory.Based on the incident laser power and dispersion of PCF,super broadband source for multiplex CARS microscopy is designed.

  13. Polarized multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering using a picosecond laser and a fiber supercontinuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Sébastien; Courjaud, Antoine; Mottay, Eric; Finot, Christophe; Dudley, John; Rigneault, Hervé

    2011-02-01

    We perform multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) micro-spectroscopy with a picosecond pulsed laser and a broadband supercontinuum (SC) generated in photonic crystal fiber. CARS signal stability is achieved using an active fiber coupler that avoids thermal and mechanical drifts. We obtain multiplex CARS spectra for test liquids in the 600-2000 cm(-1) spectral range. In addition we investigate the polarization dependence of the CARS spectra when rotating the pump beam linear polarization state relative to the linearly polarized broad stokes SC. From these polarization measurements we deduce the Raman depolarization ratio, the resonant versus nonresonant contribution, the Raman resonance frequency, and the linewidth.

  14. A versatile setup using femtosecond adaptive spectroscopic techniques for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yujie, E-mail: styojm@physics.tamu.edu [Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Voronine, Dmitri V.; Sokolov, Alexei V. [Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Baylor University, Waco, Texas 76798 (United States); Scully, Marlan O. [Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Baylor University, Waco, Texas 76798 (United States); Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    We report a versatile setup based on the femtosecond adaptive spectroscopic techniques for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering. The setup uses a femtosecond Ti:Sapphire oscillator source and a folded 4f pulse shaper, in which the pulse shaping is carried out through conventional optical elements and does not require a spatial light modulator. Our setup is simple in alignment, and can be easily switched between the collinear single-beam and the noncollinear two-beam configurations. We demonstrate the capability for investigating both transparent and highly scattering samples by detecting transmitted and reflected signals, respectively.

  15. Experimental Investigation on Selective Excitation of Two-Pulse Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xia; ZHANG Hui; ZHANG Xiang-Yun; ZHANG Shi-An; WANG Zu-Geng; SUN Zhen-Rong

    2008-01-01

    Selective excitation of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering from the benzene solution is achieved by adaptive pulse shaping based on genetic algorithm, and second harmonic generation frequency-resolved optical gating (SHG-FROG) technique is adopted to characterize the original and optimal laser pulses. The mechanism for two-pulse coherent mode-selective excitation of Raman scattering is experimentally investigated by modulating the pump pulse in the frequency domain, and it is indicated that two-pulse coherent mode-selective excitation of Raman scattering mainly depends on the effective frequency components of the pump pulse related to specific vibrational mode. The experimental results suggest that two-pulse CARS has good signal-to-background ratio and high sensitivity, and it has attractive potential applications in the complicated molecular system.

  16. Effect of Scatterering on Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) signals

    CERN Document Server

    Ranasinghesagara, Janaka C; Piazza, Vincenzo; Potma, Eric O; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2016-01-01

    We develop a computational framework to examine the factors responsible for scattering-induced distortions of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) signals in turbid samples. We use the Huygens-Fresnel Wave-based Electric Field Superposition (HF-WEFS) method combined with the radiating dipole approximation to compute the effects of scattering-induced distortions of focal excitation fields on the far-field CARS signal. We analyze the effect of spherical scatterers, placed in the vicinity of the focal volume, on the CARS signal emitted by different objects (2{\\mu}m diameter solid sphere, 2{\\mu}m diameter myelin cylinder and 2{\\mu}m diameter myelin tube). We find that distortions in the CARS signals arise not only from attenuation of the focal field but also from scattering-induced changes in the spatial phase that modifies the angular distribution of the CARS emission. Our simulations further show that CARS signal attenuation can be minimized by using a high numerical aperture condenser. Moreover, unlike...

  17. Supercontinuum generation for coherent anti- Stokes Raman scattering microscopy with photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille Klarskov; Isomäki, Antti; Hansen, Kim P.

    2011-01-01

    Photonic crystal fiber (PCF) designs with two zero-dispersion wavelengths (ZDWs) are experimentally investigated in order to suggest a novel PCF for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. From our investigation, we select the optimum PCF design and demonstrate a tailored spectrum...... with power concentrated around the relevant wavelengths for lipid imaging (648 nm and 1027 nm). This new PCF is characterized by varying the fiber length, the average power, and the pulse width of the fs pump pulses. It was found that the selected PCF design gave a significantly improved spectral...

  18. Spectral model of time-domain coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Marrocco, Michele

    2014-01-01

    We show that the increasingly popular nonlinear optical technique of time-domain coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), which is usually understood in terms of the semiclassical time-dependent third-order polarization, can be equally explained in terms of the time-delayed version of the Yuratich equation so popular in traditional frequency-domain CARS. The method brings out the strong dependence of CARS time traces and time-delayed CARS lineshapes on the spectral envelope of the probe laser electric field. Examples are analytically shown for experimental results that are otherwise treated by means of numerical methods only.

  19. Revealing silent vibration modes of nanomaterials by detecting anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering with femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jianhua; Chen, Lei; Dai, Qiaofeng; Lan, Sheng; Tie, Shaolong

    2016-01-01

    We proposed a scheme in which normal Raman scattering is coupled with hyper-Raman scattering for generating a strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering in nanomaterials by using femtosecond laser pulses. The proposal was experimentally demonstrated by using a single-layer MoS2 on a SiO2/Si substrate, a 17 nm-thick MoS2 on an Au/SiO2 substrate and a 9 nm-thick MoS2 on a SiO2-SnO2/Ag/SiO2 substrate which were confirmed to be highly efficient for second harmonic generation. A strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering was also observed in other nanomaterials possessing large second-order susceptibilities, such as silicon quantum dots self-assembled into ``coffee'' rings and tubular Cu-doped ZnO nanorods. In all the cases, many Raman inactive vibration modes were clearly revealed in the anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering. Apart from the strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering, Stokes hyper-Raman scattering with small Raman shifts was detected during the ablation process of thick MoS2 layers. It was also observed by slightly defocusing the excitation light. The detection of anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering may serve as a new technique for studying the Raman inactive vibration modes in nanomaterials.We proposed a scheme in which normal Raman scattering is coupled with hyper-Raman scattering for generating a strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering in nanomaterials by using femtosecond laser pulses. The proposal was experimentally demonstrated by using a single-layer MoS2 on a SiO2/Si substrate, a 17 nm-thick MoS2 on an Au/SiO2 substrate and a 9 nm-thick MoS2 on a SiO2-SnO2/Ag/SiO2 substrate which were confirmed to be highly efficient for second harmonic generation. A strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering was also observed in other nanomaterials possessing large second-order susceptibilities, such as silicon quantum dots self-assembled into ``coffee'' rings and tubular Cu-doped ZnO nanorods. In all the cases, many Raman inactive vibration modes were clearly

  20. Quantitative, Comparable Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) Spectroscopy: Correcting Errors in Phase Retrieval

    CERN Document Server

    Camp, Charles H; Cicerone, Marcus T

    2015-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microspectroscopy has demonstrated significant potential for biological and materials imaging. To date, however, the primary mechanism of disseminating CARS spectroscopic information is through pseudocolor imagery, which explicitly neglects a vast majority of the hyperspectral data. Furthermore, current paradigms in CARS spectral processing do not lend themselves to quantitative sample-to-sample comparability. The primary limitation stems from the need to accurately measure the so-called nonresonant background (NRB) that is used to extract the chemically-sensitive Raman information from the raw spectra. Measurement of the NRB on a pixel-by-pixel basis is a nontrivial task; thus, reference NRB from glass or water are typically utilized, resulting in error between the actual and estimated amplitude and phase. In this manuscript, we present a new methodology for extracting the Raman spectral features that significantly suppresses these errors through phase detrending ...

  1. Stimulated-emission pumping enabling sub-diffraction-limited spatial resolution in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleff, C.; Gross, P.; Fallnich, C.; Offerhaus, H.L.; Herek, J.L.; Kruse, K.; Beeker, W.P.; Lee, C.J.; Boller, K-J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of stimulated emission pumping to achieve sub-diffraction-limited spatial resolution in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. A pair of control light fields is used to prepopulate the Raman state involved in the CARS process prior to the CARS

  2. Broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering light generation in BBO crystal by using two crossing femtosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Zhang, Jun; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2008-07-01

    As broad as 12000 cm(-1) coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) light from ultraviolet to infrared was generated in a BBO crystal by using two crossing femtosecond laser pulses with 30% conversion efficiency. More than fifteenth-order anti-Stokes and second-order Stokes Raman sidebands were observed with nice Gaussian spatial mode. The effect of the crossing angle between two input beams on the spectrum and emitting angle of the Raman sidebands was studied in detail. Calculation shows that the phase-matching condition determines the frequencies and angles of the sidebands.

  3. Automated identification of subcellular organelles by coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mashtoly, Samir F; Niedieker, Daniel; Petersen, Dennis; Krauss, Sascha D; Freier, Erik; Maghnouj, Abdelouahid; Mosig, Axel; Hahn, Stephan; Kötting, Carsten; Gerwert, Klaus

    2014-05-06

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is an emerging tool for label-free characterization of living cells. Here, unsupervised multivariate analysis of CARS datasets was used to visualize the subcellular compartments. In addition, a supervised learning algorithm based on the "random forest" ensemble learning method as a classifier, was trained with CARS spectra using immunofluorescence images as a reference. The supervised classifier was then used, to our knowledge for the first time, to automatically identify lipid droplets, nucleus, nucleoli, and endoplasmic reticulum in datasets that are not used for training. These four subcellular components were simultaneously and label-free monitored instead of using several fluorescent labels. These results open new avenues for label-free time-resolved investigation of subcellular components in different cells, especially cancer cells.

  4. Delivery of picosecond lasers in multimode fibers for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiyong; Yang, Yaliang; Luo, Pengfei; Gao, Liang; Wong, Kelvin K; Wong, Stephen T C

    2010-06-07

    We investigated the possibility of using standard commercial multimode fibers (MMF), Corning SMF28 fibers, to deliver picosecond excitation lasers for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging. We theoretically and/or experimentally analyzed issues associated with the fiber delivery, such as dispersion length, walk-off length, nonlinear length, average threshold power for self-phase modulations, and four-wave mixing (FWM). These analyses can also be applied to other types of fibers. We found that FWM signals are generated in MMF, but they can be filtered out using a long-pass filter for CARS imaging. Finally, we demonstrated that MMF can be used for delivery of picosecond excitation lasers in the CARS imaging system without any degradation of image quality.

  5. Molecular Orientation in Dry and Hydrated Cellulose Fibers: A Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy Study

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmerley, Maxwell; Younger, Rebecca; Valenton, Tiffany; Oertel, David C.; Ward, Jimmie L.; Potma, Eric O.

    2010-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy is combined with spontaneous Raman scattering microspectroscopy and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy to interrogate the molecular alignment in dry and hydrated cellulose fibers. Two types of cellulose were investigated: natural cellulose I in cotton fibers and regenerated cellulose II in rayon fibers. On the basis of the orientation of the methylene symmetric stretching vibration, the molecular alignment of cellulose microfibr...

  6. Fast spectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy with high-speed tunable picosecond laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahyadi, Harsono; Iwatsuka, Junichi; Minamikawa, Takeo; Niioka, Hirohiko; Araki, Tsutomu; Hashimoto, Mamoru

    2013-09-01

    We develop a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy system equipped with a tunable picosecond laser for high-speed wavelength scanning. An acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) is integrated in the laser cavity to enable wavelength scanning by varying the radio frequency waves applied to the AOTF crystal. An end mirror attached on a piezoelectric actuator and a pair of parallel plates driven by galvanometer motors are also introduced into the cavity to compensate for changes in the cavity length during wavelength scanning to allow synchronization with another picosecond laser. We demonstrate fast spectral imaging of 3T3-L1 adipocytes every 5  cm-1 in the Raman spectral region around 2850  cm-1 with an image acquisition time of 120 ms. We also demonstrate fast switching of Raman shifts between 2100 and 2850  cm-1, corresponding to CD2 symmetric stretching and CH2 symmetric stretching vibrations, respectively. The fast-switching CARS images reveal different locations of recrystallized deuterated and nondeuterated stearic acid.

  7. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy of human smooth muscle cells in bioengineered tissue scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackmann, Christian; Esguerra, Maricris; Olausson, Daniel; Delbro, Dick; Krettek, Alexandra; Gatenholm, Paul; Enejder, Annika

    2011-02-01

    The integration of living, human smooth muscle cells in biosynthesized cellulose scaffolds was monitored by nonlinear microscopy toward contractile artificial blood vessels. Combined coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy was applied for studies of the cell interaction with the biopolymer network. CARS microscopy probing CH2-groups at 2845 cm-1 permitted three-dimensional imaging of the cells with high contrast for lipid-rich intracellular structures. SHG microscopy visualized the fibers of the cellulose scaffold, together with a small signal obtained from the cytoplasmic myosin of the muscle cells. From the overlay images we conclude a close interaction between cells and cellulose fibers. We followed the cell migration into the three-dimensional structure, illustrating that while the cells submerge into the scaffold they extrude filopodia on top of the surface. A comparison between compact and porous scaffolds reveals a migration depth of <10 μm for the former, whereas the porous type shows cells further submerged into the cellulose. Thus, the scaffold architecture determines the degree of cell integration. We conclude that the unique ability of nonlinear microscopy to visualize the three-dimensional composition of living, soft matter makes it an ideal instrument within tissue engineering.

  8. Label-free imaging of human breast tissues using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yaliang; Gao, Liang; Wang, Zhiyong; Thrall, Michael J.; Luo, Pengfei; Wong, Kelvin K.; Wong, Stephen T.

    2011-03-01

    Breast cancer is a common disease in women. Current imaging and diagnostic methods for breast cancer confront several limitations, like time-consuming, invasive and with a high cost. Alternative strategies are in high demand to alleviate patients' trauma and lower medical expenses. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging technique offers many advantages, including label-free, sub-wavelength spatial resolution and video-rate imaging speed. Therefore, it has been demonstrated as a powerful tool for various biomedical applications. In this study, we present a label-free fast imaging method to identify breast cancer and its subtypes using CARS microscopy. Human breast tissues, including normal, benign and invasive carcinomas, were imaged ex vivo using a custom-built CARS microscope. Compared with results from corresponding hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stains, the CARS technique has demonstrated its capability in identifying morphological features in a similar way as in H&E stain. These features can be used to distinguish breast cancer from normal and benign tissues, and further separate cancer subtypes from each other. Our pilot study suggests that CARS microscopy could be used as a routine examination tool to characterize breast cancer ex vivo. Moreover, its label-free and fast imaging properties render this technique as a promising approach for in vivo and real-time imaging and diagnosis of breast cancer.

  9. Femtosecond Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Gas Phase Thermometry at 5 kHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineman, Claresta; Lucht, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the thermal instabilities occurring in turbulent combustion, such as in modern gas turbine combustors, is critical for more reliable and fuel-efficient operation. Non-intrusive laser based spectroscopy methods have been documented as the techniques of choice for turbulent combustion diagnostics. Specifically, femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (fs-CARS) thermometry has been established for temporal resolution of turbulent fluctuations in flame structure and provides accurate measurements across a wide range of temperatures. Experiments performed to date include 5 kHz pure vibrational N2 chirped probe-pulse fs-CARS thermometry on non-premixed hydrogen jet diffusion flames, methane jet diffusion flames, and the DLR gas turbine model combustor (GTMC). The fs-CARS signal generation process requires precise spatial and temporal overlap of tightly focused pulsed laser beams of less than 100 fs pulse duration. Here, signal loss due to beam steering, pressure fluctuations, or shear layer density gradients can become a problem. The effect of such interferences has been investigated using high velocity flow of compressed nitrogen gas from a converging-diverging nozzle. Resulting changes in fs-CARS spectra have been studied. Funding for this work was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences.

  10. Investigation of lipid homeostasis in living Drosophila by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Cheng-Hao; Chen, Wei-Wen; Wu, June-Tai; Chang, Ta-Chau

    2012-12-01

    To improve our understanding of lipid metabolism, Drosophila is used as a model animal, and its lipid homeostasis is monitored by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy. We are able to achieve in vivo imaging of larval fat body (analogous to adipose tissue in mammals) and oenocytes (analogous to hepatocytes) in Drosophila larvae at subcellular level without any labeling. By overexpressing two lipid regulatory proteins-Brummer lipase (Bmm) and lipid storage droplet-2 (Lsd-2)-we found different phenotypes and responses under fed and starved conditions. Comparing with the control larva, we observed more lipid droplet accumulation by ˜twofold in oenocytes of fat-body-Bmm-overexpressing (FB-Bmm-overexpressing) mutant under fed condition, and less lipid by ˜fourfold in oenocytes of fat-body-Lsd-2-overexpressing (FB-Lsd-2-overexpressing) mutant under starved condition. Moreover, together with reduced size of lipid droplets, the lipid content in the fat body of FB-Bmm-overexpressing mutant decreases much faster than that of the control and FB-Lsd-2-overexpressing mutant during starvation. From long-term starvation assay, we found FB-Bmm-overexpressing mutant has a shorter lifespan, which can be attributed to faster consumption of lipid in its fat body. Our results demonstrate in vivo observations of direct influences of Bmm and Lsd-2 on lipid homeostasis in Drosophila larvae.

  11. Diagnosing lung cancer using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liang; Yang, Yaliang; Xing, Jiong; Thrall, Michael J.; Wang, Zhiyong; Li, Fuhai; Luo, Pengfei; Wong, Kelvin K.; Zhao, Hong; Wong, Stephen T. C.

    2011-03-01

    Lung carcinoma is the most prevalent type of cancer in the world, and it is responsible for more deaths than other types of cancer. During diagnosis, a pathologist primarily aims to differentiate small cell carcinoma from non-small cell carcinoma on biopsy and cytology specimens, which is time consuming due to the time required for tissue processing and staining. To speed up the diagnostic process, we investigated the feasibility of using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy as a label-free strategy to image lung lesions and differentiate subtypes of lung cancers. Different mouse lung cancer models were developed by injecting human lung cancer cell lines, including adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and small cell carcinoma, into lungs of the nude mice. CARS images were acquired from normal lung tissues and different subtypes of cancer lesions ex vivo using intrinsic contrasts from symmetric CH2 bonds. These images showed good correlation with the hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained sections from the same tissue samples with regard to cell size, density, and cell-cell distance. These features are routinely used in diagnosing lung lesions. Our results showed that the CARS technique is capable of providing a visualizable platform to differentiate different kinds of lung cancers using the same pathological features without histological staining and thus has the potential to serve as a more efficient examination tool for diagnostic pathology. In addition, incorporating with suitable fiber-optic probes would render the CARS technique as a promising approach for in vivo diagnosis of lung cancer.

  12. Compact fibre-based coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy and interferometric coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering from a single femtosecond fibre-laser oscillator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vikas Kumar; Alessio Gambetta; Cristian Manzoni; Roberta Ramponi; Giulio Cerullo; Marco Marangoni

    2010-12-01

    We demonstrate a new approach to CARS spectroscopy by efficiently synthesizing synchronized narrow-bandwidth (less than 10 cm-1) pump and Stokes pulses (frequency difference continuously tunable upto ∼ 3000 cm-1) based on spectral compression together with second harmonic generation (in periodically-poled nonlinear crystals) of femtosecond pulses emitted by a single compact Er-fibre oscillator. For a far better signal to non-resonant background contrast, interferometric CARS (I-CARS) is demonstrated and CARS signal enhancement upto three orders of magnitude is achieved by constructive interference with an auxiliary local oscillator at anti-Stokes field, also synthesized by spectral compression of pulses emitted from the same fibre oscillator.

  13. Detection of chemical interfaces in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy: Dk-CARS. I. Axial interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gachet, David; Rigneault, Hervé

    2011-12-01

    We develop a full vectorial theoretical investigation of the chemical interface detection in conventional coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. In Part I, we focus on the detection of axial interfaces (i.e., parallel to the optical axis) following a recent experimental demonstration of the concept [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 213905 (2010)]. By revisiting the Young's double slit experiment, we show that background-free microscopy and spectroscopy is achievable through the angular analysis of the CARS far-field radiation pattern. This differential CARS in k space (Dk-CARS) technique is interesting for fast detection of interfaces between molecularly different media. It may be adapted to other coherent and resonant scattering processes.

  14. Collinear and noncollinear emission of anti-stokes and second order stokes Raman radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aussenegg, F. R.; Lippitsch, M. E.; Brandmüller, J.; Nitsch, W.

    1981-04-01

    Generating higher order stimulated Raman scattering in benzene, apart from phase-matched anti-Stokes radiation a collinear anti-Stokes emission is observed, which is explained by parametric four-photon processes under mismatch condition.

  15. Longitudinal in vivo coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging of demyelination and remyelination in injured spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yunzhou; Zhang, Delong; Huff, Terry B.; Wang, Xiaofei; Shi, Riyi; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2011-10-01

    In vivo imaging of white matter is important for the mechanistic understanding of demyelination and evaluation of remyelination therapies. Although white matter can be visualized by a strong coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) signal from axonal myelin, in vivo repetitive CARS imaging of the spinal cord remains a challenge due to complexities induced by the laminectomy surgery. We present a careful experimental design that enabled longitudinal CARS imaging of de- and remyelination at single axon level in live rats. In vivo CARS imaging of secretory phospholipase A2 induced myelin vesiculation, macrophage uptake of myelin debris, and spontaneous remyelination by Schwann cells are sequentially monitored over a 3 week period. Longitudinal visualization of de- and remyelination at a single axon level provides a novel platform for rational design of therapies aimed at promoting myelin plasticity and repair.

  16. Selective excitation of molecular mode in a mixture by femtosecond resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Ping; Li Si-Ning; Fan Rong-Wei; Li Xiao-Hui; Xia Yuan-Qin; Yu Xin; Chen De-Ying

    2012-01-01

    Femtosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy is used to investigate gaseous molecular dynamics.Due to the spectrally broad laser pulses,usually poorly resolved spectra result from this broad spectroscopy.However,it can be demonstrated that by the electronic resonance enhancement optimization control a selective excitation of specific vibrational mode is possible.Using an electronically resonance-enhanced effect,iodine molecule specific CARS spectroscopy can be obtained from a mixture of iodine-air at room temperature and a pressure of 1 atm (corresponding to a saturation iodine vapour as low as about 35 Pa).The dynamics on either the electronically excited state or the ground state of iodine molecules obtained is consistent with previous studies (vacuum,heated and pure iodine) in the femtosecond time resolved CARS spectroscopy,showing that an effective method of suppressing the non-resonant CARS background and other interferences is demonstrated.

  17. Investigation of protein distribution in solid lipid particles and its impact on protein release using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Philip C.; Birch, Ditlev; Saarinen, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gain new insights into protein distribution in solid lipid microparticles (SLMs) and subsequent release mechanisms using a novel label-free chemical imaging method, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. Lysozyme-loaded SLMs were prepared using diffe...

  18. Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Spectroscopy of Single Molecules in Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunney Xie, Wei Min, Chris Freudiger, Sijia Lu

    2012-01-18

    During this funding period, we have developed two breakthrough techniques. The first is stimulated Raman scattering microscopy, providing label-free chemical contrast for chemical and biomedical imaging based on vibrational spectroscopy. Spontaneous Raman microscopy provides specific vibrational signatures of chemical bonds, but is often hindered by low sensitivity. We developed a three-dimensional multiphoton vibrational imaging technique based on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). The sensitivity of SRS imaging is significantly greater than that of spontaneous Raman microscopy, which is achieved by implementing high-frequency (megahertz) phase-sensitive detection. SRS microscopy has a major advantage over previous coherent Raman techniques in that it offers background-free and readily interpretable chemical contrast. We demonstrated a variety of biomedical applications, such as differentiating distributions of omega-3 fatty acids and saturated lipids in living cells, imaging of brain and skin tissues based on intrinsic lipid contrast, and monitoring drug delivery through the epidermis. This technology offers exciting prospect for medical imaging. The second technology we developed is stimulated emission microscopy. Many chromophores, such as haemoglobin and cytochromes, absorb but have undetectable fluorescence because the spontaneous emission is dominated by their fast non-radiative decay. Yet the detection of their absorption is difficult under a microscope. We use stimulated emission, which competes effectively with the nonradiative decay, to make the chromophores detectable, as a new contrast mechanism for optical microscopy. We demonstrate a variety of applications of stimulated emission microscopy, such as visualizing chromoproteins, non-fluorescent variants of the green fluorescent protein, monitoring lacZ gene expression with a chromogenic reporter, mapping transdermal drug distribu- tions without histological sectioning, and label-free microvascular

  19. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy: Understanding the essentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariunbold, Gombojav O.; Altangerel, Narangerel

    2016-12-01

    This paper is a brief overview to coherent anti- Stokes Raman spectroscopic technique and introduces the strengths and barriers to its use all based on the interpretation of simple theoretical formulae. The use of the Gaussian ultrashort pulses is highlighted as a practical elucidatory reconstruction tool of coherent Raman spectra. The paper presents the integral formulae for coherent anti-Stokes and Stokes Raman scattering, and discusses the closed-form solutions, its complex error function, and the delay time formula for enhancement of the inferred pure coherent Raman spectra. As an example, the timeresolved coherent Stokes Raman scattering experimental observations are quantitatively elucidated.Understanding the essentials of coherent Raman spectroscopy, therefore, promotes the importance of a number of experiments including the ones utilizing a broadband excitation with a narrowband delayed probing for successful background suppression.

  20. Dual/differential coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering module for multiphoton microscopes with a femtosecond Ti:sapphire oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bei; Borri, Paola; Langbein, Wolfgang

    2013-06-01

    In the last decade, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy has emerged as a powerful multiphoton imaging technique offering label-free chemical sensitivity and high three-dimensional resolution. However, its widespread application in the life sciences has been hampered by the use of costly pulsed lasers, the existence of a nonresonant background requiring involved technical solutions for its efficient suppression, and the limited acquisition speed of multiplex techniques addressing several vibrational resonances, if improved chemical specificity is needed. We have recently reported a differential CARS technique (D-CARS), which simultaneously measures two vibrational frequencies, enhancing the chemical selectivity and sensitivity without introducing costly hardware, while maintaining fast acquisition. In this study, we demonstrate a compact, fully automated, cost-effective module, which integrates on hardware and software level with a commercial multiphoton microscope based on a single 100 fs Ti:Sapphire oscillator and enables D-CARS microscopy in a user-friendly format for applications in the life sciences.

  1. Anti-Stokes resonant x-ray Raman scattering for atom specific and excited state selective dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunnus, Kristjan; Josefsson, Ida; Rajkovic, Ivan; Schreck, Simon; Quevedo, Wilson; Beye, Martin; Grübel, Sebastian; Scholz, Mirko; Nordlund, Dennis; Zhang, Wenkai; Hartsock, Robert W.; Gaffney, Kelly J.; Schlotter, William F.; Turner, Joshua J.; Kennedy, Brian; Hennies, Franz; Techert, Simone; Wernet, Philippe; Odelius, Michael; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Ultrafast electronic and structural dynamics of matter govern rate and selectivity of chemical reactions, as well as phase transitions and efficient switching in functional materials. Since x-rays determine electronic and structural properties with elemental, chemical, orbital and magnetic selectivity, short pulse x-ray sources have become central enablers of ultrafast science. Despite of these strengths, ultrafast x-rays have been poor at picking up excited state moieties from the unexcited ones. With time-resolved anti-Stokes resonant x-ray Raman scattering (AS-RXRS) performed at the LCLS, and ab initio theory we establish background free excited state selectivity in addition to the elemental, chemical, orbital and magnetic selectivity of x-rays. This unparalleled selectivity extracts low concentration excited state species along the pathway of photo induced ligand exchange of Fe(CO)5 in ethanol. Conceptually a full theoretical treatment of all accessible insights to excited state dynamics with AS-RXRS with transform-limited x-ray pulses is given—which will be covered experimentally by upcoming transform-limited x-ray sources.

  2. Assessment of liver steatosis and fibrosis in rats using integrated coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and multiphoton imaging technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian; Lu, Fake; Zheng, Wei; Xu, Shuoyu; Tai, Dean; Yu, Hanry; Huang, Zhiwei

    2011-11-01

    We report the implementation of a unique integrated coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), second-harmonic generation (SHG), and two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy imaging technique developed for label-free monitoring of the progression of liver steatosis and fibrosis generated in a bile duct ligation (BDL) rat model. Among the 21 adult rats used in this study, 18 rats were performed with BDL surgery and sacrificed each week from weeks 1 to 6 (n = 3 per week), respectively; whereas 3 rats as control were sacrificed at week 0. Colocalized imaging of the aggregated hepatic fats, collagen fibrils, and hepatocyte morphologies in liver tissue is realized by using the integrated CARS, SHG, and TPEF technique. The results show that there are significant accumulations of hepatic lipid droplets and collagen fibrils associated with severe hepatocyte necrosis in BDL rat liver as compared to a normal liver tissue. The volume of normal hepatocytes keeps decreasing and the fiber collagen content in BDL rat liver follows a growing trend until week 6; whereas the hepatic fat content reaches a maximum in week 4 and then appears to stop growing in week 6, indicating that liver steatosis and fibrosis induced in a BDL rat liver model may develop at different rates. This work demonstrates that the integrated CARS and multiphoton microscopy imaging technique has the potential to provide an effective means for early diagnosis and detection of liver steatosis and fibrosis without labeling.

  3. Detecting polymeric nanoparticles with coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering microscopy in tissues exhibiting fixative-induced autofluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, N. L.; Godfrey, L.; Lalatsa, A.; Serrano, D. R.; Uchegbu, I. F.; Schatzlein, A.; Moger, J.

    2015-03-01

    Recent advances in pharmaceutical nanotechnology have enabled the development of nano-particulate medicines with enhanced drug performance. Although the fate of these nano-particles can be macroscopically tracked in the body (e.g. using radio-labeling techniques), there is little information about the sub-cellular scale mechanistic processes underlying the particle-tissue interactions, or how these interactions may correlate with pharmaceutical efficacy. To rationally engineer these nano-particles and thus optimize their performance, these mechanistic interactions must be fully understood. Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy provides a label-free means for visualizing biological samples, but can suffer from a strong non-resonant background in samples that are prepared using aldehyde-based fixatives. We demonstrate how formalin fixative affects the detection of polymeric nanoparticles within kidneys following oral administration using CARS microscopy, compared with samples that were snap-frozen. These findings have implications for clinical applications of CARS for probing nanoparticle distribution in tissue biopsies.

  4. Detection of Lipid-Rich Prostate Circulating Tumour Cells with Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Ranjana

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Circulating tumour cells (CTC are an important indicator of metastasis and associated with a poor prognosis. Detection sensitivity and specificity of CTC in the peripheral blood of metastatic cancer patient remain a technical challenge. Methods Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS microscopy was employed to examine the lipid content of CTC isolated from the peripheral blood of metastatic prostate cancer patients. CARS microscopy was also employed to evaluate lipid uptake and mobilization kinetics of a metastatic human prostate cancer cell line. Results One hundred CTC from eight metastatic prostate cancer patients exhibited strong CARS signal which arose from intracellular lipid. In contrast, leukocytes exhibited weak CARS signal which arose mostly from cellular membrane. On average, CARS signal intensity of prostate CTC was 7-fold higher than that of leukocytes (P Conclusions Intracellular lipid could serve as a biomarker for prostate CTC which could be sensitively detected with CARS microscopy in a label-free manner. Strong affinity for lipid by metastatic prostate cancer cells could be used to improve detection sensitivity and therapeutic targeting of prostate CTC.

  5. Polyglutamine aggregate structure in vitro and in vivo; new avenues for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas M Perney

    Full Text Available Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS microscopy is applied for the first time for the evaluation of the protein secondary structure of polyglutamine (polyQ aggregates in vivo. Our approach demonstrates the potential for translating information about protein structure that has been obtained in vitro by X-ray diffraction into a microscopy technique that allows the same protein structure to be detected in vivo. For these studies, fibres of polyQ containing peptides (D(2Q(15K(2 were assembled in vitro and examined by electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction methods; the fibril structure was shown to be cross β-sheet. The same polyQ fibres were evaluated by Raman spectroscopy and this further confirmed the β-sheet structure, but indicated that the structure is highly rigid, as indicated by the strong Amide I signal at 1659 cm(-1. CARS spectra were simulated using the Raman spectrum taking into account potential non-resonant contributions, providing evidence that the Amide I signal remains strong, but slightly shifted to lower wavenumbers. Combined CARS (1657 cm(-1 and multi-photon fluorescence microscopy of chimeric fusions of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP with polyQ (Q40 expressed in the body wall muscle cells of Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes (1 day old adult hermaphrodites revealed diffuse and foci patterns of Q40-YFP that were both fluorescent and exhibited stronger CARS (1657 cm(-1 signals than in surrounding tissues at the resonance for the cross β-sheet polyQ in vitro.

  6. Experimental demonstration of mode-selective phonon excitation of 6H-SiC by a mid-infrared laser with anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Kyohei; Hachiya, Kan; Okumura, Kensuke; Mishima, Kenta; Inukai, Motoharu; Torgasin, Konstantin; Omer, Mohamed [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Yoshida-honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Sonobe, Taro [Kyoto University Research Administration Office, Kyoto University, Yoshida-honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Zen, Heishun; Negm, Hani; Kii, Toshiteru; Masuda, Kai; Ohgaki, Hideaki [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasyo, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2013-10-28

    Mode-selective phonon excitation by a mid-infrared laser (MIR-FEL) is demonstrated via anti-Stokes Raman scattering measurements of 6H-silicon carbide (SiC). Irradiation of SiC with MIR-FEL and a Nd-YAG laser at 14 K produced a peak where the Raman shift corresponds to a photon energy of 119 meV (10.4 μm). This phenomenon is induced by mode-selective phonon excitation through the irradiation of MIR-FEL, whose photon energy corresponds to the photon-absorption of a particular phonon mode.

  7. Three-pulse multiplex coherent anti-Stokes/Stokes Raman scattering (CARS/CSRS) microspectroscopy using a white-light laser source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bito, Kotatsu; Okuno, Masanari; Kano, Hideaki; Leproux, Philippe; Couderc, Vincent; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o.

    2013-06-01

    We have developed a three-pulse non-degenerate multiplex coherent Raman microspectroscopic system using a white-light laser source. The fundamental output (1064 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser is used for the pump radiation with the white-light laser output (1100-1700 nm) for the Stokes radiation to achieve broadband multiplex excitations of vibrational coherences. The second harmonic (532 nm) of the same Nd:YAG laser is used for the probe radiation. Thanks to the large wavelength difference between the pump and probe radiations, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and coherent Stokes Raman scattering (CSRS) can be detected simultaneously. Simultaneous detection of CARS and CSRS enables us to obtain information on the electronic resonance effect that affects differently the CARS and CSRS signals. Simultaneous analysis of the CARS and CSRS signals provides us the imaginary part of χ(3) without introducing any arbitrary parameter in the maximum entropy method (MEM).

  8. Ab initio study of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) of the 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane (RDX) explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Abdelsalam; Ågren, Hans; Thorvaldsen, Andreas J.; Ruud, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) of the 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane (RDX) C 3H 6N 6O 6 molecule is studied by ab initio methods. The results are compared to available experimental observations and against calculations and experimental observations of the conventional non-resonant Raman spectrum for RDX. It is found that all intense bands in the observed CARS spectrum and all Raman differential cross sections are well reproduced by the calculations. The features of the resonant CARS signal vary strongly from the corresponding Raman signal, and are obtained with a considerably larger cross section, a fact that could further facilitate the use of CARS spectroscopy in applications of stand-off detection of gaseous samples at ultra-low concentrations.

  9. The manipulation of massive ro-vibronic superpositions using time-frequency-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (TFRCARS) from quantum control to quantum computing

    CERN Document Server

    Zadoyan, R; Lidar, D A; Apkarian, V A

    2001-01-01

    Molecular ro-vibronic coherences, joint energy-time distributions of quantum amplitudes, are selectively prepared, manipulated, and imaged in Time-Frequency-Resolved Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (TFRCARS) measurements using femtosecond laser pulses. The studies are implemented in iodine vapor, with its thermally occupied statistical ro-vibrational density serving as initial state. The evolution of the massive ro-vibronic superpositions, consisting of 1000 eigenstates, is followed through two-dimensional images. The first- and second-order coherences are captured using time-integrated frequency-resolved CARS, while the third-order coherence is captured using time-gated frequency-resolved CARS. The Fourier filtering provided by time integrated detection projects out single ro-vibronic transitions, while time-gated detection allows the projection of arbitrary ro-vibronic superpositions from the coherent third-order polarization. Beside the control and imaging of chemistry, the controlled manipulation of...

  10. Hyperspectral imaging and characterization of live cells by broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy with singular value decomposition (SVD) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmaladze, Alexander; Jasensky, Joshua; Price, Erika; Zhang, Chi; Boughton, Andrew; Han, Xiaofeng; Seeley, Emily; Liu, Xinran; Banaszak Holl, Mark M; Chen, Zhan

    2014-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy can be used as a powerful imaging technique to identify chemical compositions of complex samples in biology, biophysics, medicine, and materials science. In this work we developed a CARS microscopic system capable of hyperspectral imaging. By employing an ultrafast laser source, a photonic crystal fiber, and a scanning laser microscope together with spectral detection by a highly sensitive back-illuminated cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, we were able to rapidly acquire and process hyperspectral images of live cells with chemical selectivity. We discuss various aspects of hyperspectral CARS image analysis and demonstrate the use of singular value decomposition methods to characterize the cellular lipid content.

  11. In planta imaging of Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid in Cannabis sativa L. with hyperspectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbacik, Erik T; Korai, Roza P; Frater, Eric H; Korterik, Jeroen P; Otto, Cees; Offerhaus, Herman L

    2013-04-01

    Nature has developed many pathways to produce medicinal products of extraordinary potency and specificity with significantly higher efficiencies than current synthetic methods can achieve. Identification of these mechanisms and their precise locations within plants could substantially increase the yield of a number of natural pharmaceutics. We report label-free imaging of Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCa) in Cannabis sativa L. using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy. In line with previous observations we find high concentrations of THCa in pistillate flowering bodies and relatively low amounts within flowering bracts. Surprisingly, we find differences in the local morphologies of the THCa-containing bodies: organelles within bracts are large, diffuse, and spheroidal, whereas in pistillate flowers they are generally compact, dense, and have heterogeneous structures. We have also identified two distinct vibrational signatures associated with THCa, both in pure crystalline form and within Cannabis plants; at present the exact natures of these spectra remain an open question.

  12. In planta imaging of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid in Cannabis sativa L. with hyperspectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbacik, Erik T.; Korai, Roza P.; Frater, Eric H.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Otto, Cees; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2013-04-01

    Nature has developed many pathways to produce medicinal products of extraordinary potency and specificity with significantly higher efficiencies than current synthetic methods can achieve. Identification of these mechanisms and their precise locations within plants could substantially increase the yield of a number of natural pharmaceutics. We report label-free imaging of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCa) in Cannabis sativa L. using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy. In line with previous observations we find high concentrations of THCa in pistillate flowering bodies and relatively low amounts within flowering bracts. Surprisingly, we find differences in the local morphologies of the THCa-containing bodies: organelles within bracts are large, diffuse, and spheroidal, whereas in pistillate flowers they are generally compact, dense, and have heterogeneous structures. We have also identified two distinct vibrational signatures associated with THCa, both in pure crystalline form and within Cannabis plants; at present the exact natures of these spectra remain an open question.

  13. Lipid droplet pattern and nondroplet-like structure in two fat mutants of Caenorhabditis elegans revealed by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Yung-Hsiang; Chien, Cheng-Hao; Chen, Wei-Wen; Ma, Tian-Hsiang; Liu, Kuan-Yu; Chang, Yu-Sun; Chang, Ta-Chau; Lo, Szecheng J.

    2014-01-01

    Lipid is an important energy source and essential component for plasma and organelle membranes in all kinds of cells. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy is a label-free and nonlinear optical technique that can be used to monitor the lipid distribution in live organisms. Here, we utilize CARS microscopy to investigate the pattern of lipid droplets in two live Caenorhabditis elegans mutants (fat-2 and fat-3). The CARS images showed a striking decrease in the size, number, and content of lipid droplets in the fat-2 mutant but a slight difference in the fat-3 mutant as compared with the wild-type worm. Moreover, a nondroplet-like structure with enhanced CARS signal was detected for the first time in the uterus of fat-2 and fat-3 mutants. In addition, transgenic fat-2 mutant expressing a GFP fusion protein of vitellogenin-2 (a yolk lipoprotein) revealed that the enhanced CARS signal colocalized with the GFP signal, which suggests that the nondroplet-like structure is primarily due to the accumulation of yolk lipoproteins. Together, this study implies that CARS microscopy is a potential tool to study the distribution of yolk lipoproteins, in addition to lipid droplets, in live animals.

  14. Measurement of vibrationally excited N2(v) in an atmospheric-pressure air pulsed corona discharge using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramoto, Yoshiyuki; Ono, Ryo

    2014-08-01

    Vibrationally excited N2(v = 1, 2) in an atmospheric-pressure air pulsed corona discharge was measured using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS). In a dry air discharge, the vibrational temperature determined from the ratio N2(v = 2)/N2(v = 0), Tv2, was approximately 500 K higher than that determined from N2(v = 1)/N2(v = 0), Tv1, immediately after the discharge pulse. Both vibrational temperatures reached equilibrium within 100 μs after the discharge pulse by the vibration-to-vibration (V-V) process of N2-N2. The translational temperature was also measured using CARS. The rise in the translational temperature due to vibration-to-translation (V-T) energy transfer was not observed for a postdischarge time of 5 μs-1 ms in the dry-air discharge. However, when the air was humidified, a significant V-T energy transfer was observed. It was due to an extremely rapid V-T process of H2O-H2O following the V-V process of N2-H2O. Measurements showed that the humidification of the ambient air accelerated the decrease in the N2 vibrational temperature and increased the translational temperature. N2(v) was generated mostly in the secondary streamer, not in the primary one, according to estimation from the measured N2(v) density.

  15. Multimodal coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy reveals microglia-associated myelin and axonal dysfunction in multiple sclerosis-like lesions in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imitola, Jaime; Côté, Daniel; Rasmussen, Stine; Xie, X. Sunney; Liu, Yingru; Chitnis, Tanuja; Sidman, Richard L.; Lin, Charles. P.; Khoury, Samia J.

    2011-02-01

    Myelin loss and axonal degeneration predominate in many neurological disorders; however, methods to visualize them simultaneously in live tissue are unavailable. We describe a new imaging strategy combining video rate reflectance and fluorescence confocal imaging with coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy tuned to CH2 vibration of myelin lipids, applied in live tissue of animals with chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Our method allows monitoring over time of demyelination and neurodegeneration in brain slices with high spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. Local areas of severe loss of lipid signal indicative of demyelination and loss of the reflectance signal from axons were seen in the corpus callosum and spinal cord of EAE animals. Even in myelinated areas of EAE mice, the intensity of myelin lipid signals is significantly reduced. Using heterozygous knock-in mice in which green fluorescent protein replaces the CX3CR1 coding sequence that labels central nervous system microglia, we find areas of activated microglia colocalized with areas of altered reflectance and CARS signals reflecting axonal injury and demyelination. Our data demonstrate the use of multimodal CARS microscopy for characterization of demyelinating and neurodegenerative pathology in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis, and further confirm the critical role of microglia in chronic inflammatory neurodegeneration.

  16. Longitudinal, 3D in vivo imaging of sebaceous glands by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy –normal function and response to cryotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yookyung; Tam, Joshua; Jalian, H. Ray; Anderson, R. Rox; Evans, Conor L.

    2014-01-01

    Sebaceous glands perform complex functions, and are centrally involved in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris. Current techniques for studying sebaceous glands are mostly static in nature, whereas the gland’s main function – excretion of sebum via the holocrine mechanism – can only be evaluated over time. We present a longitudinal, real-time alternative – the in vivo, label-free imaging of sebaceous glands using Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) microscopy, which is used to selectively visualize lipids. In mouse ears, CARS microscopy revealed dynamic changes in sebaceous glands during the holocrine secretion process, as well as in response to damage to the glands caused by cooling. Detailed gland structure, plus the active migration of individual sebocytes and cohorts of sebocytes were measured. Cooling produced characteristic changes in sebocyte structure and migration. This study demonstrates that CARS microscopy is a promising tool for studying the sebaceous gland and its associated disorders in three-dimensions in vivo. PMID:25026458

  17. Label-free assessment of adipose-derived stem cell differentiation using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouras, Rabah; Bagnaninchi, Pierre O.; Downes, Andrew R.; Elfick, Alistair P. D.

    2012-11-01

    Adult stem cells (SCs) hold great potential as likely candidates for disease therapy but also as sources of differentiated human cells in vitro models of disease. In both cases, the label-free assessment of SC differentiation state is highly desirable, either as a quality-control technology ensuring cells to be used clinically are of the desired lineage or to facilitate in vitro time-course studies of cell differentiation. We investigate the potential of nonlinear optical microscopy as a minimally invasive technology to monitor the differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) into adipocytes and osteoblasts. The induction of ADSCs toward these two different cell lineages was monitored simultaneously using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, two photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF), and second harmonic generation at different time points. Changes in the cell's morphology, together with the appearance of biochemical markers of cell maturity were observed, such as lipid droplet accumulation for adipo-induced cells and the formation of extra-cellular matrix for osteo-induced cells. In addition, TPEF of flavoproteins was identified as a proxy for changes in cell metabolism that occurred throughout ADSC differentiation toward both osteoblasts and adipocytes. These results indicate that multimodal microscopy has significant potential as an enabling technology for the label-free investigation of SC differentiation.

  18. Protein expression guided chemical profiling of living cells by the simultaneous observation of Raman scattering and anti-Stokes fluorescence emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Liang-da; Ichimura, Taro; Sekiya, Takumasa; Machiyama, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Tomonobu; Fujita, Hideaki; Ozawa, Takeaki; Fujita, Katsumasa

    2017-01-01

    Our current understanding of molecular biology provides a clear picture of how the genome, transcriptome and proteome regulate each other, but how the chemical environment of the cell plays a role in cellular regulation remains much to be studied. Here we show an imaging method using hybrid fluorescence-Raman microscopy that measures the chemical micro-environment associated with protein expression patterns in a living cell. Simultaneous detection of fluorescence and Raman signals, realised by spectrally separating the two modes through the single photon anti-Stokes fluorescence emission of fluorescent proteins, enables the accurate correlation of the chemical fingerprint of a specimen to its physiological state. Subsequent experiments revealed the slight chemical differences that enabled the chemical profiling of mouse embryonic stem cells with and without Oct4 expression. Furthermore, using the fluorescent probe as localisation guide, we successfully analysed the detailed chemical content of cell nucleus and Golgi body. The technique can be further applied to a wide range of biomedical studies for the better understanding of chemical events during biological processes. PMID:28272392

  19. Quantitative interpretation of time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy with all Gaussian pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Ariunbold, Gombojav O

    2016-01-01

    Coherent Raman scattering spectroscopy is studied purposely, with the Gaussian ultrashort pulses as a hands-on elucidatory extraction tool of the clean coherent Raman resonant spectra from the overall measured data contaminated with the non-resonant four wave mixing background. The integral formulae for both the coherent anti-Stokes and Stokes Raman scattering are given in the semiclassical picture, and the closed-form solutions in terms of a complex error function are obtained. An analytic form of maximum enhancement of pure coherent Raman spectra at threshold time delay depending on bandwidth of probe pulse is also obtained. The observed experimental data for pyridine in liquid-phase are quantitatively elucidated and the inferred time-resolved coherent Raman resonant results are reconstructed with a new insight.

  20. Shaping femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectra using optimal control theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezeshki, Soroosh; Schreiber, Michael; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich

    2008-04-21

    Optimal control theory is used to tailor laser pulses which enhance a femtosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (fs-CARS) spectrum in a certain frequency range. For this aim the optimal control theory has to be applied to a target state distributed in time. Explicit control mechanisms are given for shaping either the Stokes or the probe pulse in the four-wave mixing process. A simple molecule for which highly accurate potential energy surfaces are available, namely molecular iodine, is used to test the procedure. This approach of controlling vibrational motion and delivering higher intensities to certain frequency ranges might also be important for the improvement of CARS microscopy.

  1. Three-pulse multiplex coherent anti-Stokes/Stokes Raman scattering (CARS/CSRS) microspectroscopy using a white-light laser source

    OpenAIRE

    Bito, Kotatsu; Okuno, Masanari; Kano, Hideaki; LEPROUX, Philippe; Couderc, Vincent; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a three-pulse non-degenerate multiplex coherent Raman microspectroscopic system using a white-light laser source. The fundamental output (1064 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser is used for the pump radiation with the white-light laser output (1100–1700 nm) for the Stokes radiation to achieve broadband multiplex excitations of vibrational coherences. The second harmonic (532 nm) of the same Nd:YAG laser is used for the probe radiation. Thanks to the large wavelength difference between th...

  2. Single-pulse coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy via fiber Bragg grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seung Ryeol; Park, Joo Hyun; Kwon, Won Sik; Kim, Jin Hwan; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Lee, Jae Yong; Kim, Soohyun

    2016-03-01

    Fiber Bragg grating is used in a variety of applications. In this study, we suggest compact, cost-effective coherent anti- Stokes Raman spectroscopy which is based on the pulse shaping methods via commercialized fiber Bragg grating. The experiment is performed incorporating a commercialized femtosecond pulse laser system (MICRA, Coherent) with a 100 mm length of 780-HP fiber which is inscribed 50 mm of Bragg grating. The pump laser for coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy has a bandwidth of 90 nm and central wavelength of 815 nm with a notch shaped at 785 nm. The positive chirped pulse is compensated by chirped mirror set. We compensate almost 14000 fs2 of positive group delay dispersion for the transform-limited pulse at the sample position. The pulse duration was 15 fs with average power of 50 mW, and showed an adequate notch shape. Finally, coherent anti-Stokes Raman signals are observed using a spectrometer (Jobin Yvon Triax320 and TE-cooled Andor Newton EMCCD). We obtained coherent anti-Stokes Raman signal of acetone sample which have Raman peak at the spectral finger-print region. In conclusion, the proposed method is more simple and cost-effective than the methods of previous research which use grating pairs and resonant photonic crystal slab. Furthermore, the proposed method can be used as endoscope application.

  3. Stokes and anti-stokes stimulated Mie scattering on nanoparticle suspensions of latex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhanov, I. S.; Krivokhizha, S. V.; Chaikov, L. L.

    2016-12-01

    Stokes and anti-Stokes shifts of stimulated concentration light scattering (SCLS, stimulated Mie scattering) in suspensions of various-sized latex nanoparticles in water were measured by the light guide scheme, under conditions of backscattering in the presence of convection.

  4. Low-concentration chemical sensing using surface-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Xia; Sinyukov, Alexander; Traverso, Andrew; Veronine, Dmitri; Wang, Kai; Xia, Hui; Yang, Wenlong; Yuan, Luqi; Sokolov, Alexei; Scully, Marlan

    2010-10-01

    Measurements of surface enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectra (CARS) of cyclohexane are carried out. Random aggregates of gold nanoparticles for field enhancement were deposited on a glass substrate and were characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Surface enhancement of the CARS signal by gold nanoparticles is observed. This technique can be used to detect low amounts of chemicals with a higher sensitivity compared to the conventional surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The lowest detected concentration of cyclohexane in a thin film of methanol was 1%. However, it was not possible to detect any signal from the same sample of cyclohexane without gold nanoparticles using conventional CARS technique. Therefore, surface enhancement is necessary to achieve higher spectroscopy sensitivity. Further studies of nanostructure-enhanced electrical fields are required to quantitatively understand the observed effects and will be performed in the future.

  5. Clinical cancer diagnosis using optical fiber-delivered coherent anti-stokes ramon scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liang

    This thesis describes the development of a combined label-free imaging and analytical strategy for intraoperative characterization of cancer lesions using the coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging (CARS) technique. A cell morphology-based analytical platform is developed to characterize CARS images and, hence, provide diagnostic information using disease-related pathology features. This strategy is validated for three different applications, including margin detection for radical prostatectomy, differential diagnosis of lung cancer, as well as detection and differentiation of breast cancer subtypes for in situ analysis of margin status during lumpectomy. As the major contribution of this thesis, the developed analytical strategy shows high accuracy and specificity for all three diseases and thus has introduced the CARS imaging technique into the field of human cancer diagnosis, which holds substantial potential for clinical translations. In addition, I have contributed a project aimed at miniaturizing the CARS imaging device into a microendoscope setup through a fiber-delivery strategy. A four-wave-mixing (FWM) background signal, which is caused by simultaneous delivery of the two CARS-generating excitation laser beams, is initially identified. A polarization-based strategy is then introduced and tested for suppression of this FWM noise. The approach shows effective suppression of the FWM signal, both on microscopic and prototype endoscopic setups, indicating the potential of developing a novel microendoscope with a compatible size for clinical use. These positive results show promise for the development of an all-fiber-based, label-free imaging and analytical platform for minimally invasive detection and diagnosis of cancers during surgery or surgical-biopsy, thus improving surgical outcomes and reducing patients' suffering.

  6. Picosecond anti-Stokes generation in a photonic-crystal fiber for interferometric CARS microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Esben Ravn; Keiding, Søren Rud; Potma, Eric Olaf

    2006-08-07

    We generate tunable picosecond anti-Stokes pulses by four-wave mixing of two picosecond pump and Stokes pulse trains in a photonic-crystal fiber. The visible, spectrally narrow anti-Stokes pulses with shifts over 150 nm are generated without generating other spectral features. As a demonstration, we employ the generated anti-Stokes pulses as reference pulses in an interferometric coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging experiment showing that interpulse coherence among the pump, Stokes and anti-Stokes beams is retained.

  7. Investigation of porous media combustion by coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weikl, M. C.; Tedder, S. A.; Seeger, T.; Leipertz, A.

    2010-10-01

    High efficiency, marginal pollutant emissions and low fuel consumption are desirable standards for modern combustion devices. The porous burner technology is a modern type of energy conversion with a strong potential to achieve these standards. However, due to the solid ceramic framework investigation of the thermodynamic properties of combustion, for example temperature, is difficult. The combustion process inside the ceramic structure of a porous burner was experimentally investigated by coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). In this work, we present measurements using dual-pump dual-broadband CARS (DP-DBB-CARS) of temperature and species concentrations inside the reaction and flue gas zone of a porous media burner. Improvements to the setup and data evaluation procedure in contrast to previous measurements are discussed in detail. The results at varied thermal power and stoichiometry are presented. In addition, measurements at a range of radial positions inside a pore are conducted and correlated with the solid structure of the porous foam, which was determined by X-ray computer tomography.

  8. High-order Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman generation in monoisotopic CVD {sup 12}C-diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminskii, Alexander A. [Institute of Crystallography, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lux, Oliver; Rhee, Hanjo; Eichler, Hans J. [Institute of Optics and Atomic Physics, Technische Universitaet Berlin (Germany); Ralchenko, Victor G.; Bolshakov, Andrey P. [General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Shirakawa, Akira; Yoneda, Hitoki [Institute for Laser Science, University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    We determined, for the first time, the room temperature phonon energy related to the F{sub 2g} vibration mode (ω{sub SRS(12C)} ∝ 1333.2 cm{sup -1}) in a mono-crystalline single-isotope CVD {sup 12}C-diamond crystal by means of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) spectroscopy. Picosecond one-micron excitation using a Nd{sup 3+}:Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}-laser generates a nearly two-octave spanning SRS frequency comb (∝12000 cm{sup -1}) consisting of higher-order Stokes and anti-Stokes components. The spacing of the spectral lines was found to differ by Δω{sub SRS} ∝ 0.9 cm{sup -1} from the comb spacing (ω{sub SRS(natC)} ∝ 1332.3 cm{sup -1}) when pumping a conventional CVD diamond crystal with a natural composition of the two stable carbon isotopes {sup 12}C (98.93%) and {sup 13}C (1.07%). (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. In vivo lipid saturation study of C. elegans using quantitative broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littleton, Bradley; Kavanagh, Thomas; Nie, Yu; Abbate, Vincenzo; Hylands, Peter; Sturzenbaum, Stephen; Richards, David

    2016-03-01

    In vivo lipid saturation maps of microscopic nematodes (Caenorhabditis elegans) have been produced using our novel Spectral Interferometric Polarisation Coherent anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (SIP-CARS) imaging technique. This technique employs simple passive polarisation optics and a balanced homodyne detection scheme to exploit symmetries in the CARS polarisation response resulting in the complete cancellation of the non-resonant background (NRB) and real component of the CARS signal (with no prior or post assumptions as regards to their form). The remaining imaginary component of the CARS response is linear with analyte concentration and directly relatable to the spontaneous Raman spectrum [1]. Furthermore, the resonant CARS signal is interferometrically amplified by the non-resonant response, a necessity for rapid imaging at biologically relevant powers [2]. This technique permits acquisition of a broad NRB-free spectrum, in excess of 1800cm-1, in a single exposure at each pixel. This allows simultaneous determination of lipid droplet saturation, from the fingerprint region, and lipid order, from the C-H stretch region from which maps can be readily constructed. Additionally exploiting the dispersive nature of our signal collection two-photon autofluorescence can be isolated and images subsequently produced. We have successfully applied this technique to identify differences in lipid saturation distributions in selective C. elegans mutants and demonstrated that the technique is sufficiently sensitive to detect the effects of lipid metabolism altering drugs on wild type C. elegans. [1] Littleton et al, Phys Rev Lett, 111, 103902 (2013) [2] Parekh et al, Biophys J, 99, 2695-2704 (2010)

  10. The application of Raman and anti-stokes Raman spectroscopy for in situ monitoring of structural changes in laser irradiated titanium dioxide materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigby, Stephanie J. [Centre for Research in Energy and Environment, School of Engineering, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen AB10 1FR (United Kingdom); Al-Obaidi, Ala H.R. [Smart Light Devices, Unit 13, Tyseal Base, Craigshaw Crescent Aberdeen, West Tullos Industrial Estate, Aberdeen AB12 3AW (United Kingdom); Lee, Soo-Keun [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, POSTECH, San 31 Hyoja Dong Nam-Gu, Pohang, Kyungpook 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); McStay, Daniel [Discovery Technologies Ltd., Redshank House, Alness Point Business Park, Alness IV17 0IJ (United Kingdom); Robertson, Peter K.J. [Centre for Research in Energy and Environment, School of Engineering, The Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen AB10 1FR (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: peter.robertson@rgu.ac.uk

    2006-09-15

    The use of Raman and anti-stokes Raman spectroscopy to investigate the effect of exposure to high power laser radiation on the crystalline phases of TiO{sub 2} has been investigated. Measurement of the changes, over several time integrals, in the Raman and anti-stokes Raman of TiO{sub 2} spectra with exposure to laser radiation is reported. Raman and anti-stokes Raman provide detail on both the structure and the kinetic process of changes in crystalline phases in the titania material. The effect of laser exposure resulted in the generation of increasing amounts of the rutile crystalline phase from the anatase crystalline phase during exposure. The Raman spectra displayed bands at 144 cm{sup -1} (A1g), 197 cm{sup -1} (Eg), 398 cm{sup -1} (B1g), 515 cm{sup -1} (A1g), and 640 cm{sup -1} (Eg) assigned to anatase which were replaced by bands at 143 cm{sup -1} (B1g), 235 cm{sup -1} (2 phonon process), 448 cm{sup -1} (Eg) and 612 cm{sup -1} (A1g) which were assigned to rutile. This indicated that laser irradiation of TiO{sub 2} changes the crystalline phase from anatase to rutile. Raman and anti-stokes Raman are highly sensitive to the crystalline forms of TiO{sub 2} and allow characterisation of the effect of laser irradiation upon TiO{sub 2}. This technique would also be applicable as an in situ method for monitoring changes during the laser irradiation process.

  11. Investigation of fiber Bragg grating as a spectral notch shaper for single-pulse coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seung Ryeol; Park, Joo Hyun; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Lee, Eun Seong; Lee, Jae Yong; Kim, Soohyun

    2017-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate compact and efficient single-pulse coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) via spectral notch shaping implemented with a fiber Bragg grating. We show that a fiber Bragg grating can serve as a narrowband notch filtering component on a 90 nm broadband femtosecond pulsed laser without spectral distortion. Finally, we obtain CARS spectra of various samples in the fingerprint region of molecular vibrations. This scheme has potential for compact implementations of all-fiber single-pulse multiplex CARS due to its compatibility with fiber optics.

  12. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy of single nanodiamonds

    OpenAIRE

    Pope, Iestyn; Payne, Lukas; Zoriniants, George; Thomas, Evan L. H.; Williams, Oliver Aneurin; Watson, Peter Duncan; Langbein, Wolfgang Werner; Borri, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles have attracted enormous attention for biomedical applications as optical labels, drug-delivery vehicles and contrast agents in vivo. In the quest for superior photostability and biocompatibility, nanodiamonds are considered one of the best choices due to their unique structural, chemical, mechanical and optical properties. So far, mainly fluorescent nanodiamonds have been utilized for cell imaging. However, their use is limited by the efficiency and costs in reliably producing f...

  13. Background-free coherent anti-stokes Raman spectroscopy and microscopy by dual-soliton pulse generation

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Kun; Wei, Haoyun; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    We propose an all-fiber-generated dual-soliton pulses based scheme for the background-free detection of coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy under the spectral focusing mechanism. Due to the strong birefringence and high nonlinearity of a polarization-maintaining photonic crystal fiber (PM-PCF), two redshifted soliton pulses can be simultaneously generated relying on high-order dispersion and nonlinear effects along two eigenpolarization axes in the anomalous dispersion regime, while allowing feasible tunability of the frequency distance and temporal interval between them. This proposed scheme, termed as DS-CARS, exploits a unique combination of slight frequency-shift and advisable temporal walk-off of this two soliton pulses to achieve robust and efficient suppression of nonresonant background with compact all-fiber coherent excitation source. Capability of the DS-CARS is experimentally demonstrated by the background-free CARS spectroscopy and unambiguous CARS microscopy of polymer beads in the fingerprin...

  14. Stimulated Raman Scattering in Nanorod Silicon Carbide Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    When the film is excited by a very low excitation energy, the spontaneous Raman scattering emerges. The intensity of Raman scattering is proportional to the excitation power below the threshold excitation. When the excited power reaches the excitation threshold, the intensity of Stokes light strongly increases. Meanwhile an anti-Stokes light at 495nm and multiple order but small Stokes peaks occur. The intensity of Stokes light is much larger than that of anti-Stokes. The full width of half maximum (FWHM) of Stokes peak is reduced from 0.4nm to less than 0.2nm, the scattering angle between both Stokes and incident lights becomes less than 1°, and the angle between the Stokes and anti-Stokes lights is about 3°. When the exciting power is in excess of the threshold, anti-Stokes and multiple Raman scattering peaks reappear. These experiments can be unlimitedly repeated. From this experiment, we can exclude the possibility of spontaneous Raman scattering. It is suggested that the nanorods are a quantum line dimension having a large surface. There will be Raman differential scattering section so long as the nanorod films become very strong scattering media; the surface-enhanced Raman scattering will be produced, the nanorod films of SiC will form a strong multiple scattering resonance cavities so as to form the stimulated Raman scattering oscillation.

  15. Simultaneous temperature and exhaust-gas recirculation-measurements in a homogeneous charge-compression ignition engine by use of pure rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weikl, Markus C.; Beyrau, Frank; Leipertz, Alfred

    2006-05-01

    Pure rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy was used for the simultaneous determination of temperature and exhaust-gas recirculation in a homogeneous charge-compression ignition engine. Measurements were performed in a production-line four-cylinder gasoline engine operated with standard gasoline fuel through small optical line-of-sight accesses. The homogenization process of fresh intake air with recirculated exhaust gas was observed during the compression stroke, and the effect of charge temperature on combustion timing is shown. Single-pulse coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy spectra could not only be taken in the compression stroke but also during the gas-exchange cycle and after combustion. Consequently, the used method has been shown to be suitable for the investigation of two of the key parameters for self-ignition, namely temperature and charge composition.

  16. Anti-Stokes Resonance Raman of Ir Illuminated Dendrimer Iron (III)-Porphyrins%红外辐照下树枝状铁(iii)卟啉的反斯托克斯共振拉曼

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MO Yu-jun; D.L.Jiang; M.Uymura; T.Aida; T.Kitagawa

    2005-01-01

    The benzene dendrimers of Fe(Ⅲ) tetraphenyl porphyrin chloride[LnFe(Ⅲ)TPPCl] with n = 3, 4, and 5 (n: number of layers) have been synthesized and the IR illumination effects at benzene bands were examined with anti- Stokes resonance Raman speetroseopy for their dioxane solutions.Boltzman temperatures were determined from the Stokes to anti - Stokes intensity ratio for the speetra excited at 413.1 nm in the presence and absence of IR illumination.

  17. Observation of anomalous Stokes versus anti-Stokes ratio in MoTe2 atomic layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Thomas; Chen, Shao-Yu; Xiao, Di; Ramasubramaniam, Ashwin; Yan, Jun

    We grow hexagonal molybdenum ditelluride (MoTe2), a prototypical transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) semiconductor, with chemical vapor transport methods and investigate its atomic layers with Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman scattering. We report observation of all six types of zone center optical phonons. Quite remarkably, the anti-Stokes Raman intensity of the low energy layer-breathing mode becomes more intense than the Stokes peak under certain experimental conditions, creating an illusion of 'negative temperature'. This effect is tunable, and can be switched from anti-Stokes enhancement to suppression by varying the excitation wavelength. We interpret this observation to be a result of resonance effects arising from the C excitons in the vicinity of the Brillouin zone center, which are robust even for multiple layers of MoTe2. The intense anti-Stokes Raman scattering provides a cooling channel for the crystal and opens up opportunities for laser cooling of atomically thin TMDC semiconductor devices. Supported by the University of Massachusetts Amherst, the National Science Foundation Center for Hierarchical Manufacturing (CMMI-1025020) and Office of Emerging Frontiers in Research and Innovation (EFRI-1433496).

  18. What are the intensities and line-shapes of the twenty four polarization terms in coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Kai [School of Science, Tianjin University of Technology and Education, Tianjin, 300222 (China); Lee, Soo-Y., E-mail: sooying@ntu.edu.sg [Division of Physics & Applied Physics, and Division of Chemistry & Biological Chemistry, School of Physical & Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371 (Singapore)

    2015-12-15

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is conventionally described by just one diagram/term where the three electric field interactions act on the ket side in a Feynman dual time-line diagram in a specific time order of pump, Stokes and probe pulses. In theory, however, any third-order nonlinear spectroscopy with three different electric fields interacting with a molecule can be described by forty eight diagrams/terms. They reduce to just 24 diagrams/terms if we treat the time ordering of the electric field interactions on the ket independently of those on the bra, i.e. the ket and bra wave packets evolve independently. The twenty four polarization terms can be calculated in the multidimensional, separable harmonic oscillator model to obtain the intensities and line-shapes. It is shown that in fs/ps CARS, for the two cases of off-resonance CARS in toluene and resonance CARS in rhodamine 6G, where we use a fs pump pulse, a fs Stokes pulse and a ps probe pulse, we obtain sharp vibrational lines in four of the polarization terms where the pump and Stokes pulses can create a vibrational coherence on the ground electronic state, while the spectral line-shapes of the other twenty terms are broad and featureless. The conventional CARS term with sharp vibrational lines is the dominant term, with intensity at least one order of magnitude larger than the other terms.

  19. What are the intensities and line-shapes of the twenty four polarization terms in coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Niu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS is conventionally described by just one diagram/term where the three electric field interactions act on the ket side in a Feynman dual time-line diagram in a specific time order of pump, Stokes and probe pulses. In theory, however, any third-order nonlinear spectroscopy with three different electric fields interacting with a molecule can be described by forty eight diagrams/terms. They reduce to just 24 diagrams/terms if we treat the time ordering of the electric field interactions on the ket independently of those on the bra, i.e. the ket and bra wave packets evolve independently. The twenty four polarization terms can be calculated in the multidimensional, separable harmonic oscillator model to obtain the intensities and line-shapes. It is shown that in fs/ps CARS, for the two cases of off-resonance CARS in toluene and resonance CARS in rhodamine 6G, where we use a fs pump pulse, a fs Stokes pulse and a ps probe pulse, we obtain sharp vibrational lines in four of the polarization terms where the pump and Stokes pulses can create a vibrational coherence on the ground electronic state, while the spectral line-shapes of the other twenty terms are broad and featureless. The conventional CARS term with sharp vibrational lines is the dominant term, with intensity at least one order of magnitude larger than the other terms.

  20. Three-phonon stimulated Raman scattering in an orthorhombic LuAlO3 crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminskii, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    High-order stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) has been revealed in a LuAlO3 crystal upon stationary picosecond laser excitation. All recorded Stokes and anti-Stokes χ(3)-nonlinear laser components are attributed to three SRS-promoting A g vibrational modes of its octahedral anionic units (AlO3)-3.

  1. Application of Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering to Combustion Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-01

    partition function and gI is the nuclear -spin degeneracy. When Maxwell’s equations which describe the propagation of electromagnetic waves are solved...Scanning Spectrometer) shown in Fig. 5. The DARSS unit consists of a linear (one- dimensional) diode array ( reticon ) detector element in conjunction with...electronics scheme it offers. 77 The major problem encountered with the DARSS unit was the single dimensionality of the reticon detector. Previously the

  2. In situ dissolution analysis using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and hyperspectral CARS microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fussell, Andrew; Garbacik, Erik; Offerhaus, Herman; Kleinebudde, Peter; Strachan, Clare

    2013-01-01

    The solid-state form of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) in an oral dosage form plays an important role in determining the dissolution rate of the API. As the solid-state form can change during dissolution, there is a need to monitor the oral dosage form during dissolution testing. Coherent

  3. Ionization penalty in nonlinear Raman neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronin, Aleksandr A; Fedotov, Ilya V; Doronina-Amitonova, Lyubov V; Ivashkina, Olga I; Zots, Marina A; Fedotov, Andrei B; Anokhin, Konstantin V; Zheltikov, Aleksei M

    2011-02-15

    Light-assisted ionization accompanying coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) of ultrashort laser pulses in brain tissue is shown to manifest itself in a detectable blueshift of the anti-Stokes signal. This blueshift can serve as an indicator of ionization processes in CARS-based neuroimaging.

  4. Raman scattering in crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, D.F.

    1988-09-30

    A tutorial presentation is given of Raman scattering in crystals. The physical concepts are emphasized rather than the detailed mathematical formalism. Starting with an introduction to the concepts of phonons and conservation laws, the effects of photon-phonon interactions are presented. This interaction concept is shown for a simple cubic crystal and is extended to a uniaxial crystal. The correlation table method is used for determining the number and symmetry of the Raman active modes. Finally, examples are given to illustrate the relative ease of using this group theoretical method and the predictions are compared with measured Raman spectra. 37 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Optical parametric oscillator-based light source for coherent Raman scattering microscopy: practical overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brustlein, Sophie; Ferrand, Patrick; Walther, Nico; Brasselet, Sophie; Billaudeau, Cyrille; Marguet, Didier; Rigneault, Hervé

    2011-02-01

    We present the assets and constraints of using optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) to perform point scanning nonlinear microscopy and spectroscopy with special emphasis on coherent Raman spectroscopy. The difterent possible configurations starting with one OPO and two OPOs are described in detail and with comments that are intended to be practically useful for the user. Explicit examples on test samples such as nonlinear organic crystal, polystyrene beads, and fresh mouse tissues are given. Special emphasis is given to background-free coherent Raman anti-Stokes scattering (CARS) imaging, including CARS hyperspectral imaging in a fully automated mode with commercial OPOs.

  6. Surface enhanced Raman scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Furtak, Thomas

    1982-01-01

    In the course of the development of surface science, advances have been identified with the introduction of new diagnostic probes for analytical characterization of the adsorbates and microscopic structure of surfaces and interfaces. Among the most recently de­ veloped techniques, and one around which a storm of controversy has developed, is what has now been earmarked as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Within this phenomenon, molecules adsorbed onto metal surfaces under certain conditions exhibit an anomalously large interaction cross section for the Raman effect. This makes it possible to observe the detailed vibrational signature of the adsorbate in the ambient phase with an energy resolution much higher than that which is presently available in electron energy loss spectroscopy and when the surface is in contact with a much larger amount of material than that which can be tolerated in infrared absorption experiments. The ability to perform vibrational spectroscopy under these conditions would l...

  7. Raman scattering mediated by neighboring molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mathew D; Bradshaw, David S; Andrews, David L

    2016-05-01

    Raman scattering is most commonly associated with a change in vibrational state within individual molecules, the corresponding frequency shift in the scattered light affording a key way of identifying material structures. In theories where both matter and light are treated quantum mechanically, the fundamental scattering process is represented as the concurrent annihilation of a photon from one radiation mode and creation of another in a different mode. Developing this quantum electrodynamical formulation, the focus of the present work is on the spectroscopic consequences of electrodynamic coupling between neighboring molecules or other kinds of optical center. To encompass these nanoscale interactions, through which the molecular states evolve under the dual influence of the input light and local fields, this work identifies and determines two major mechanisms for each of which different selection rules apply. The constituent optical centers are considered to be chemically different and held in a fixed orientation with respect to each other, either as two components of a larger molecule or a molecular assembly that can undergo free rotation in a fluid medium or as parts of a larger, solid material. The two centers are considered to be separated beyond wavefunction overlap but close enough together to fall within an optical near-field limit, which leads to high inverse power dependences on their local separation. In this investigation, individual centers undergo a Stokes transition, whilst each neighbor of a different species remains in its original electronic and vibrational state. Analogous principles are applicable for the anti-Stokes case. The analysis concludes by considering the experimental consequences of applying this spectroscopic interpretation to fluid media; explicitly, the selection rules and the impact of pressure on the radiant intensity of this process.

  8. Generation and delayed retrieval of spatially multimode Raman scattering in warm rubidium vapors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrapkiewicz, Radosław; Wasilewski, Wojciech

    2012-12-31

    We apply collective Raman scattering to create, store and retrieve spatially multimode light in warm rubidium-87 vapors. The light is created in a spontaneous Stokes scattering process. This is accompanied by the creation of counterpart collective excitations in the atomic ensemble - the spin waves. After a certain storage time we coherently convert the spin waves into the light in deterministic anti-Stokes scattering. The whole process can be regarded as a delayed four-wave mixing which produces pairs of correlated, delayed random images. Storage of higher order spatial modes up to microseconds is possible owing to usage of a buffer gas. We study the performance of the Raman scattering, storage and retrieval of collective excitations focusing on spatial effects and the influence of decoherence caused by diffusion of rubidium atoms in different buffer gases. We quantify the number of modes created and retrieved by analyzing statistical correlations of intensity fluctuations between portions of the light scattered in the far field.

  9. [The measurement of temperature with Raman scattering spectra of polycrystal (SrNO3)2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, F; Gong, G; Zeng, Z; Liu, G

    2000-04-01

    We have developed a new method for the determination of temperature with Raman scattering spectra. The strontium nitrate was chosen as an experiment substance. It has two bands of Raman scattering, and their wavenumbers are 738 and 1,057 cm-1 in 600-1,700 cm-1. We have obtained the intensities of their Stokes and Anti-Stokes scattering, then we have got two temperatures of strontium nitrate according to the formula. The result from the 738 cm-1 scattering band has larger error than that from the 1,057 cm-1. This may account for the noise of the photocounter. This no touch method is fit to measure the temperature of the molecular.

  10. Generation and delayed retrieval of spatially multimode Raman scattering in warm rubidium vapors

    CERN Document Server

    Chrapkiewicz, Radoslaw

    2014-01-01

    We apply collective Raman scattering to create, store and retrieve spatially multimode light in warm rubidium-87 vapors. The light is created in a spontaneous Stokes scattering process. This is accompanied by the creation of counterpart collective excitations in the atomic ensemble -- the spin waves. After a certain storage time we coherently convert the spin waves into the light in deterministic anti-Stokes scattering. The whole process can be regarded as a delayed four-wave mixing which produces pairs of correlated, delayed random images. Storage of higher order spatial modes up to microseconds is possible owing to usage of a buffer gas. We study the performance of the Raman scattering, storage and retrieval of collective excitations focusing on spatial effects and the influence of decoherence caused by diffusion of rubidium atoms in different buffer gases. We quantify the number of modes created and retrieved by analyzing statistical correlations of intensity fluctuations between portions of the light scat...

  11. Investigation of Optical Fibers for Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) Spectroscopy in Reacting Flows (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not...OF ABSTRACT: SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 22 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON (Monitor) a. REPORT Unclassified b. ABSTRACT Unclassified c...Seeger of the University of Erlangen- Nuremberg , Prof. Margaret M. Murnane of the University of Colorado/JILA, and Dr. Hans Stauffer and Ms. Amy Lynch

  12. In situ dissolution analysis of pharmaceutical dosage forms using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fussell, A. L.; Garbacik, E. T.; Löbmann, K.; Offerhaus, H. L.; Kleinebudde, P.; Strachan, C. J.

    2014-02-01

    A custom-built intrinsic flow-through dissolution setup was developed and incorporated into a home-built CARS microscope consisting of a synchronously pumped optical parametric oscillator (OPO) and an inverted microscope with a 20X/0.5NA objective. CARS dissolution images (512×512 pixels) were collected every 1.12s for the duration of the dissolution experiment. Hyperspectral CARS images were obtained pre- and postdissolution by rapidly imaging while sweeping the wavelength of the OPO in discrete steps so that each frame in the data stack corresponds to a vibrational frequency. An image-processing routine projects this hyperspectral data into a single image wherein each compound appears with a unique color. Dissolution was conducted using theophylline and cimetidine-naproxen co-amorphous mixture. After 15 minutes of theophylline dissolution, hyperspectral imaging showed a conversion of theophylline anhydrate to the monohydrate, confirmed by a peak shift in the CARS spectra. CARS dissolution images showed that monohydrate crystal growth began immediately and reached a maximum with complete surface coverage at about 300s. This result correlated with the UV dissolution data where surface crystal growth on theophylline compacts resulted in a rapidly reducing dissolution rate during the first 300s. Co-amorphous cimetidinenaproxen didn't appear to crystallize during dissolution. We observed solid-state conversions on the compact's surface in situ during dissolution. Hyperspectral CARS imaging allowed visual discrimination between the solid-state forms on the compact's surface. In the case of theophylline we were able to correlate the solid-state change with a change in dissolution rate.

  13. Chemical Imaging of Oral Solid Dosage Forms and Changes upon Dissolution Using Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windbergs, Maike; Jurna, Martin; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Herek, Jennifer L.; Kleinebudde, Peter; Strachan, Clare J.

    2009-01-01

    Dissolution testing is a crucial part of pharmaceutical dosage form investigations and is generally performed by analyzing the concentration of the released drug in a defined volume of flowing dissolution medium. As solid-state properties of the components affect dissolution behavior to a large and

  14. Phase-shift effect of amplitude spread function on spectrum and image formation in coherent Raman scattering microspectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukutake, Naoki

    2016-03-01

    Coherent Raman scattering microspectroscopy, which includes coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microspectroscopy, permits label-free hyperspectral imaging. We report the theoretical study of the phase-shift effect of the impulse response function on the spectral and image-forming properties of coherent Raman scattering microspectroscopy. We show that the spectrum and image are influenced by not only the NA of objective for excitation (NA(ex)) but also that for signal collection (NA(col)), in association with the phase-shift effect. We discuss that, under the condition NA(ex)≠NA(col), both the spectrum and the image become deformed by the phase-shift effect, which can be applied to the direct measurement of the imaginary part of the nonlinear susceptibility in CARS spectroscopy. We point out that, even in SRS microscopy, the nonresonant background can contribute to the image formation and cause the artifact in the image.

  15. Second order resonant Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Cristobal, A.; Catarero, A. [Valencia Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Aplicada; Trallero-Giner, C. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico City (Mexico). Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados

    1996-03-01

    A theoretical model for resonant Raman scattering by two optical phonons in zincblende-type semiconductors is presented. The effect of Coulomb interaction between electrons and holes is taken into account by introducing discrete and continuous excitonic intermediate states. The model can be applied for laser frequencies below and above the band gap. We consider deformation potential and Froehlich interaction for the electron-one-phonon coupling. The absolute value of the scattering efficiency is evaluated for the L-O-phonons, TO-plus LO-phonon and two-TO-photons Raman processes, around the E{sub o} absorption edge of II-VI compound semiconductors. Comparison with the electron-hole uncorrelated theory and experimental data emphasizes the role if the excitonic effects. (author). 10 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Electronic Raman Scattering in Graphene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Hong-Yan; WANG Qiang-Hua

    2008-01-01

    Linear dispersion near the Dirac points in the band structure of graphenes can give rise to novel physical properties.We calculate the electronic contribution to the Raman spectra in graphenes, which also shows novel features.In the clean limit, the Raman spectrum in the undoped graphene is linear (with a universal slope against impurity scattering) at low energy due to the linear dispersion near the Dirac points, and it peaks at a position corresponding to the van Hove singularity in the band structure. In a doped graphene, the electronic Raman absorption is forbidden up to a vertical inter-band particle-hole gap. Beyond the gap the spectrum follows the undoped case. In the presence of impurities, absorption within the gap (in the otherwise clean case) is induced, which is identified as the intra-band contribution. The Drude-like intra-band contribution is seen to be comparable to the higher energy inter-band Raman peak. The results are discussed in connection to experiments.

  17. Femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering for polyatomics with harmonic potentials: Application to rhodamine 6G

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Kai; Cong, Shulin; Lee, Soo-Y.

    2009-08-01

    The perturbation theory of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), with Raman pump on minus pump off and heterodyne detection along the probe direction, is reviewed. It has four third-order polarization terms, labeled as SRS or inverse Raman scattering (IRS): SRS(I), SRS(II), IRS(I), and IRS(II). These four polarizations have a wave packet interpretation. The polarizations, with homogenous and inhomogeneous broadening included, can be written as integrals over four-time correlation functions, and analytic formulas are derived for the latter for multidimensional harmonic potential surfaces with Franck-Condon displacements in the modes which facilitates the calculation of the SRS cross sections. The theory is applied to understand recent experimental results on the femtosecond SRS (FSRS) of a fluorescent dye, rhodamine 6G (R6G), where the Raman pump pulse is about 1 ps long, and the probe pulse is about 10 fs. The calculations compared very well with the R6G experimental results for off-resonance and resonance FSRS spectra spanning both Stokes and anti-Stokes bands, and for negative and positive pump-probe delay times on resonance.

  18. CARS and Raman spectroscopy of function-related conformational changes of chymotrypsin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandt, N.N.; Chikishev, A.Yu.; Greve, J.; Koroteev, N.I.; Otto, C.; Sakodynskaya, I.K.

    2000-01-01

    We report on the comparative analysis of the conformation-sensitive bands of free enzyme (chymotrypsin), liganded enzyme (chymotrypsin anthranilate) and enzyme complex with 18-crown-6. The studies were carried out by Raman scattering spectroscopy and polarization-sensitive coherent anti-Stokes Raman

  19. Raman Scattering of Inorganic Fibers

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    We have examined evolution of Raman spectra of carbon fibers and SiC fibers through structural transformations caused by heat treatment. Raman spectra of the SiC fibers indicate that the fibers consist of amorphous or microcrystalline SiC and graphitic microcrystals. We discuss the correlation between the tensile strength of the fibers and their microscopic structure deduced from the Raman data.

  20. Enhanced Raman Scattering by Molecular Nanoaggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L. Akins

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The formation of a molecular aggregate in a confined, nanodimensioned region of space leads to what might be termed a ‘molecular nanoaggregate’. The present review deals with a theoretical formulation termed ‘aggregation-enhanced Raman scattering’ (AERS, and its use in discussion of relative Raman band intensities and selection rules for nanoaggregates. AERs represents a concept for discussion of nanoaggregates that is different from those provided by resonance Raman scattering, surface-enhanced Raman scattering and Mie scattering, all of which ignore the impact of aggregation of molecules on Raman scattering. Beyond the theoretical formulation behind the AERS phenomenon, also outlined in this review are representative samples of the publications of other authors and researchers using AERS to provide explanations for experimental findings. In addition to clarifying issues regarding the use of nanocomposites involving aggregated molecules, it is found that increasing use of AERS concepts is being made to rationalize Raman spectral observations in a range of other disciplines that fall in both the physical sciences and the medical fields.

  1. Double-clad hollow core photonic crystal fiber for coherent Raman endoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brustlein, Sophie; Berto, Pascal; Hostein, Richard; Ferrand, Patrick; Billaudeau, Cyrille; Marguet, Didier; Muir, Alistair; Knight, Jonathan; Rigneault, Hervé

    2011-06-20

    Performing label free coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in endoscope imaging is a challenge, with huge potential clinical benefit. To date, this goal has remained inaccessible because of the inherent coherent Raman noise that is generated in the fiber itself. By developing double-clad hollow core photonic crystal fiber, we demonstrate coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and stimulated Raman scattering in an 'endoscope-like' scheme. Both the excitation beams and the collected CARS and SRS signals travel through the same fiber. No CARS and SRS signals are generated within the hollow core fiber even for temporally overlapping pump and Stokes beams, leading to excellent image quality. The CARS and SRS signals generated in the sample are coupled back into a high numerical aperture multimode cladding surrounding the central photonic crystal cladding. We demonstrate this scheme by imaging molecular vibrational bonds of organic crystal deposited on a glass surface.

  2. Transverse stimulated Raman scattering in KDP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, C.E.; Sacks, R.A.; Wonterghem, B.M. Van; Caird, J.A.; Murray, J.R.; Campbell, J.H.; Kyle, K.; Ehrlich, R.E.; Nielsen, N.D.

    1995-09-12

    Optical components of large-aperture, high irradiance and high fluence lasers can experience significant levels of stimulated scattering along their transverse dimensions. The authors have observed transverse stimulated Raman scattering in large aperture KDP crystals, and have measured the stimulated gain coefficient. With sufficiently high gain, transverse stimulated scattering can lead to energy loss from the main beam and, more importantly, optical damage in the components in which this scattering occurs. Thus transverse stimulated,scattering is of concern in large aperture fusion lasers such as Nova and Beamlet, which is a single-aperture, full-scale scientific prototype of the laser driver for the proposed National Ignition Facility.

  3. Ice thickness measurements by Raman scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Pershin, Sergey M; Klinkov, Vladimir K; Yulmetov, Renat N; Bunkin, Alexey F

    2014-01-01

    A compact Raman LIDAR system with a spectrograph was used for express ice thickness measurements. The difference between the Raman spectra of ice and liquid water is employed to locate the ice-water interface while elastic scattering was used for air-ice surface detection. This approach yields an error of only 2 mm for an 80-mm-thick ice sample, indicating that it is promising express noncontact thickness measurements technique in field experiments.

  4. Single-pulse stimulated Raman scattering spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Frostig, Hadas; Natan, Adi; Silberberg, Yaron

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the acquisition of stimulated Raman scattering spectra with the use of a single femtosecond pulse. High resolution vibrational spectra are obtained by shifting the phase of a narrow band of frequencies in the broadband input pulse spectrum, using spectral shaping. The vibrational spectrum is resolved by examining the amplitude features formed in the spectrum after interaction with the sample. Using this technique, low frequency Raman lines (<100cm^-1) are resolved in a straightforward manner.

  5. CARS (Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering) Spectroscopy of the Reaction Zone of Methane-Nitrous Oxide and RDX Propellant Flames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    initio calculations ( Fendell et al., ref 29) and constants (Dabrowski, et al., ref 30) derived from the BEu <--X’ Eg+ and C flu <-- X Eg+ band of H2 (Haw...Harris, Combustion and Flame, vol 53, 1983, p I3. 5. K. Aron, L. H. Harris, and J. Fendell , Applied Optics, vol 22, 1983, p 36U4. h. K. Aron and L. E...vol 92, 1982, p 246. 29. J. FendelL , L. E. Harris, and K. Aron, "Theoretical Calculation of H2 CARS Spectra for Propellant Flames," Technical Report

  6. Enabling Technologies for Point and Remote Sensing of Chemical and Biological Agents Using Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    The lower frequency scattering is called Stokes scattering, and the higher frequency scattering is called anti-Stokes scattering. In figure 2b, the...15. Aroca, R. F.; Alvarez- Puebla , R. A.; Pieczonka, N.; Sanchez-Cortez, S.; Garcia-Ramos, J. V. Advances in Colloid and Interface Science 2005, 116

  7. Scanning angle Raman spectroscopy: Investigation of Raman scatter enhancement techniques for chemical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Matthew W. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This thesis outlines advancements in Raman scatter enhancement techniques by applying evanescent fields, standing-waves (waveguides) and surface enhancements to increase the generated mean square electric field, which is directly related to the intensity of Raman scattering. These techniques are accomplished by employing scanning angle Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. A 1064 nm multichannel Raman spectrometer is discussed for chemical analysis of lignin. Extending dispersive multichannel Raman spectroscopy to 1064 nm reduces the fluorescence interference that can mask the weaker Raman scattering. Overall, these techniques help address the major obstacles in Raman spectroscopy for chemical analysis, which include the inherently weak Raman cross section and susceptibility to fluorescence interference.

  8. Simple technique for scattering experiments of submillimeter droplets

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    A simple technique is presented of allowing the generation of submillimeter-sized single droplets for scattering experiments. Multiorder Raman spectra (including Stokes, anti-Stokes, and combination emission) from a liquid CCl4 spherical droplet formed by a hollow glass fiber is also obtained by this technique, with a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG pulsed pumping (532 nm).

  9. Raman properties of GaSb nanoparticles embedded in SiO2 films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Fa-Min; Wang Tian-Min; Zhang Li-De

    2004-01-01

    The Raman shifts of nanocrystalline GaSb excited by an Ar+ ion laser at wavelengths 514.5, 496.5, 488.0, 476.5,and 457.9nm are studied by an SPEX-1403 laser Raman spectrometer respectively, and they are explained by phonon confinement, tensile stress, resonant Raman scattering and quantum size effects. The Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman spectra of GaSb nanocrystals strongly support the Raman feature of GaSb nanocrystals. The calculated optical spectra compare well with experimental data on Raman scattering GaSb nanocrystals.

  10. Raman scattering in the atmospheres of the major planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, W. D.; Trafton, L. M.

    1978-01-01

    A technique is developed to calculate the detailed effects of Raman scattering in an inhomogeneous anisotropically scattering atmosphere. The technique is applied to evaluations of Raman scattering by H2 in the atmosphere of the major planets. It is noted that Raman scattering produces an insufficient decrease in the blue and ultraviolet regions to explain the albedos of all planets investigated. For all major planets, the filling-in of solar line cores and the generation of the Raman-shifted ghosts of the Fraunhofer spectrum are observed. With regard to Uranus and Neptune, Raman scattering is seen to exert a major influence on the formation and profile of strong red and near infrared CH4 bands, and Raman scattering by H2 explains the residual intensity in the cores of these bands. Raman scattering by H2 must also be taken into account in the scattering of photons into the cores of saturated absorption bands.

  11. On cavity modification of stimulated Raman scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Matsko, A B; Letargat, R J; Ilchenko, V S; Maleki, L

    2003-01-01

    We study theoretically stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in a nonlinear dielectric microcavity and compare SRS thresholds for the cavity and the bulk material it is made of. We show that cavity SRS enhancement results solely from the intensity build up in the cavity and from the differences of the SRS dynamics in free and confined space. There is no significant modification of the Raman gain due to cavity QED effects. We show that the SRS threshold depends significantly on the nature of the dominating cavity decay as well as on the coupling technique with the cavity used for SRS measurements.

  12. Image formation using stimulated raman scattering gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bespalov, V. G.; Makarov, E. A.; Stasel'ko, D. I.

    2016-07-01

    Theoretical analysis of the spatial, noise, and energy characteristics of an amplifier has been performed in the mode of spectral and time selection using subnanosecond stimulated Raman Scattering gain of weak echo signals in crystalline active media that are known for high (up to 10-1 cm/MW) gain coefficients. The possibility to reach high gain values has been demonstrated for weak signals from objects at acceptable angular sizes of the field of vision of an amplifier. To provide a signal-to-noise ratio that exceeds unity over the entire field of vision, the number of photons at the input to an amplifier that is required has to exceed the number of its resolution elements. Accurate determination of the possibilities of recording of weak echo signals and quality of images of targets that are obtained using amplifiers under stimulated Raman Scattering requires additional special experiments.

  13. Raman Scattering in Coherently Prepared Atomic System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Fu-Cheng(林福成); Yongjoo Rhee; Jonghoon Yi; Hyunmin Park

    2001-01-01

    Atoms in the coherent superposition state prepared by a pulse pair are used as a novel optical memory material where a single interrogation pulse will produce a new pulse pair preserving the relative amplitudes and phases of the preparing pulse pair. Such a coherent superposition state can also be specially tailored along the propagation path to generate Raman scattering in a relatively short distance with very high efficiency.

  14. High-Speed Coherent Raman Fingerprint Imaging of Biological Tissues

    CERN Document Server

    Camp, Charles H; Heddleston, John M; Hartshorn, Christopher M; Walker, Angela R Hight; Rich, Jeremy N; Lathia, Justin D; Cicerone, Marcus T

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a coherent Raman imaging platform using broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (BCARS) that provides an unprecedented combination of speed, sensitivity, and spectral breadth. The system utilizes a unique configuration of laser sources that probes the Raman spectrum over 3,000 cm$^{-1}$ and generates an especially strong response in the typically weak Raman "fingerprint" region through heterodyne amplification of the anti-Stokes photons with a large nonresonant background (NRB) while maintaining high spectral resolution of $<$ 13 cm$^{-1}$. For histology and pathology, this system shows promise in highlighting major tissue components in a non-destructive, label-free manner. We demonstrate high-speed chemical imaging in two- and three-dimensional views of healthy murine liver and pancreas tissues and interfaces between xenograft brain tumors and the surrounding healthy brain matter.

  15. 在Na2(A1∑_u+)与H2碰撞中的相干反斯托克斯拉曼谱研究%Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy Study in the Na2(A1∑_u~+)-H2 Collision

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡勤; 张利平; 栾楠楠; 程玉锋; 戴康; 沈异凡

    2011-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) has been used to analyze the internal state distribution of H2 after energy transfer with Na2 (A1 S,f ). The scanned CARS reveals that during energy transfer processes H2 molecules are produced at the V=l, 2 and 3 vibrational levels. Two possible populations ratios (w,/ra2) are obtained from scanned CARS peaks. The actual population ratio Hi/n2 is determined to be 1. 82 through shape simulations of the time resolved CARS profiles under a kinetic model. The n,/n2 ratio indicates that the H2 molecules produced by the energy transfer process are 0.53 populated at the V=l level, 0.30 at V=2 and 0.17 at V=3. The relative fraction (, ) of average energy disposal is derived as 0.51, 0.46, 0.03, which has a major energy releases in vibrational and translational. This consequence supports the col linear collision geometry in ratio Na2-H2 energy transfer.%利用相干反斯托克斯拉曼谱(CARS)分析了H:在与Na2(A1∑_u~+)碰撞后的振转态布居数分布.扫描CARS表明了在能量转移过程中H:在V=1,2,3振动能级上得到布居.由扫描CARS的峰值得到2个可能的布居数比值,通过解速率方程组及时间分辨CARS轮廓模拟,确定实际的布居数比n1//n2为1.82,得到了在能量转移中H2在V=1,2,3振动能级上的布居数之比为0.53:0.30:0.17.平均转移能量分配的相对值,,分别为0.51,0.46,0.03,能量主要配置在振动和平动上,支持Na2-H2的直线式碰撞传能机制.

  16. Diffusion Raman et luminescence dans des aerogels de silice purs ou dopes Dy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerri, F.; Fabre, F.; Zwick, A.; Bournett, D.

    1994-02-01

    Light scattering studies of pure and Dy doped aerogels are presented. Careful examination of Stokes and anti-Stokes spectra allow the discrimination between Raman and luminescence processes. It is shown that in pure aerogels, scattered intensity is due to Raman processes only, and the density of vibrational states does not exhibit any singularity. The fractal properties of the structure imply modifications not only in the spectral distribution of the low frequency modes (usually labelled phonons and fractons) but alsoin the high frequency one, at least up to 600 cm-1. In Dy-doped dense silica, coupling between electronic and vibronic excitations is evidenced by the presence of anti-Stokes luminescence. In Dy-doped aerogels, the enlarged Dy3+ electronic levels, strongly coupled with vibrational states give rise to emission processes traducing the response of the sample as a whole, rather than resonant Raman scattering or luminescence processes.

  17. Raman Scattering by Molecular Hydrogen and Nitrogen in Exoplanetary Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Oklopčić, Antonija; Heng, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    An important source of opacity in the atmospheres of exoplanets at short visible and near-UV wavelengths is Rayleigh scattering of light on molecules. It is accompanied by a related, albeit weaker process -- Raman scattering. In this paper, we analyze the signatures of Raman scattering imprinted in the reflected light and the geometric albedo of exoplanets, which could provide valuable information about planetary atmospheres. Raman scattering affects the geometric albedo spectra of planets in two main ways. Firstly, it causes filling-in of strong absorption lines in the incident radiation, thus producing sharp peaks in the albedo. Secondly, it shifts the wavelengths of spectral features in the reflected light causing the so-called Raman ghost lines. Observing the Raman peaks in the albedo could be used to measure the column density of the scattering molecule, thus providing constrains on the presence of clouds and hazes in the atmosphere. Observing the Raman ghost lines could be used to spectroscopically iden...

  18. Surface Raman scattering from effervescent magnetic peroxyborates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walrafen, G. E.; Krishnan, P. N.; Hokmabadi, M.; Griscom, D. L.; Munro, R. G.

    1982-10-01

    Surface Raman scattering using a spinning technique was investigated for solid NaBO3ṡ4H2O and NaBO3ṡH2O, as well as for electron bombarded peroxyborates, for peroxyborates heated for various times and at temperatures for 110-180 °C, and for solid Na2O2 and BaO2. The Raman spectra indicate that the breakdown of peroxy groups is accompanied by the formation of trapped molecular O2. Quantitative Raman intensity data were also obtained as functions of heating time at 115 °C for the 1556 cm-1 line from O2 and for the 890 and 705 cm-1 lines whose intensities scale with the peroxy concentration. These intensity data were treated by logistics theory, and they were found to be consistent with a second-order autocatalyzed forward reaction dependent on the product of the peroxy and O2 concentrations, plus a first-order reverse reaction dependent only on the O2 concentration.

  19. Enhanced Raman scattering of biological molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Joseph R.

    The results presented in this thesis, originate from the aspiration to develop an identification algorithm for Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis (S. enterica), Escherichia coli (E. coli), Bacillus globigii ( B. globigii), and Bacillus megaterium ( B. megaterium) using "enhanced" Raman scattering. We realized our goal, with a method utilizing an immunoassay process in a spectroscopic technique, and the direct use of the enhanced spectral response due to bacterial surface elements. The enhanced Raman signal originates from Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) and/or Morphological Dependent Resonances (MDR's). We utilized a modified Lee-Meisel colloidal production method to produce a SERS active substrate, which was applied to a SERS application for the amino acid Glycine. The comparison indicates that the SERS/FRACTAL/MDR process can produce an increase of 107 times more signal than the bulk Raman signal from Glycine. In the extension of the Glycine results, we studied the use of SERS related to S. enterica, where we have shown that the aromatic amino acid contribution from Phenylalanine, Tyrosine, and Tryptophan produces a SERS response that can be used to identify the associated SERS vibrational modes of a S. enterica one or two antibody complexes. The "fingerprint" associated with the spectral signature in conjunction with an enhanced Raman signal allows conclusions to be made: (1) about the orientation of the secondary structure on the metal; (2) whether bound/unbound antibody can be neglected; (3) whether we can lower the detection limit. We have lowered the detection limit of S. enterica to 106 bacteria/ml. We also show a profound difference between S. enterica and E. coli SERS spectra even when there exists non-specific binding on E. coli indicating a protein conformation change induced by the addition of the antigen S. enterica. We confirm TEM imagery data, indicating that the source of the aromatic amino acid SERS response is originating from

  20. Additional Raman Scattering Mechanism due to Transverse Polar Modes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Ze

    2001-01-01

    Longitudinal polar modes generate a macroscopic electric field in piezoelectric crystals and cause an additional mechanism of Raman scattering. The classical theory holds that transverse polar modes cannot produce such an additional mechanism. Our quantum theory shows that there is an additional Raman scattering mechanism arising from the electro-optic effect of transverse polar modes.``

  1. Chemical state speciation by resonant Raman scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Karydas, A G; Zarkadas, C; Paradelis, T; Kallithrakas-Kontos, N

    2002-01-01

    In the resonant Raman scattering (RRS) process the emitted photon exhibits a continuous energy distribution with a high energy cutoff limit. This cutoff energy depends on the chemical state of the element under examination. In the present work, the possibility of identifying the chemical state of V atoms by employing RRS spectroscopy with a semiconductor Si(Li) detector is investigated. A proton induced Cr K alpha x-ray beam was used as the incident radiation, having a fixed energy lower than the V K-absorption edge. The net RRS distributions extracted from the energy dispersive spectra of metallic V and its compound targets were simulated by an appropriate theoretical model. The results showed the possibility of employing RRS spectroscopy with a semiconductor detector for chemical speciation studies.

  2. Vectorial stimulated Raman scattering resolution on the semi-line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginovart, Frédéric, E-mail: Frederic.Ginovart@enssat.fr [UEB, Université Européenne de Bretagne, Université de Rennes I (France); CNRS, UMR 6082 FOTON, Enssat, 6 rue de Kerampont, BP 80518, 22305 Lannion cédex (France)

    2012-07-09

    Stimulated Raman scattering between a laser pump pulse and a Stokes pulse is considered in a two-level medium with vectorial optical fields. The model on the semi-line is proved to be solvable by inverse scattering transform scheme. Among solutions, soliton generation is discussed. Then, it is shown how rotation of the Stokes wave leads to a spike of pump radiation in the time domain. -- Highlights: ► Vectorial stimulated Raman scattering is shown to be solvable on the semi-line by the inverse scattering transform scheme. ► Solitons can be created by pairs like in the scalar stimulated Raman scattering. ► Raman spike and multi-spike can occur in the time domain when considering rotating Stokes polarization.

  3. Ultraviolet Raman scattering from persistent chemical warfare agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullander, Fredrik; Wästerby, Pär.; Landström, Lars

    2016-05-01

    Laser induced Raman scattering at excitation wavelengths in the middle ultraviolet was examined using a pulsed tunable laser based spectrometer system. Droplets of chemical warfare agents, with a volume of 2 μl, were placed on a silicon surface and irradiated with sequences of laser pulses. The Raman scattering from V-series nerve agents, Tabun (GA) and Mustard gas (HD) was studied with the aim of finding the optimum parameters and the requirements for a detection system. A particular emphasis was put on V-agents that have been previously shown to yield relatively weak Raman scattering in this excitation band.

  4. Enhanced Raman scattering from nano-SnO2 grains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ding Shuo; Liu Jin-Quan; Liu Yu-Long

    2004-01-01

    We present the Raman spectra of nano-SnO2 grains with sizes from 4nm to 80nm excited by 532nm and 1.06μm lines. The enhanced Raman scattering of the nanograins is observed for both exciting lines when the grain size is less than 8nm. The less the grain size is, the more intensely the Raman scattering is enhanced. According to our results,the enhancements of the Raman intensity are a few tenfolds and different for different exciting lines when the grain size is 4nm. It can be attributed to enhanced Raman scattering by electron-hole pair excitations in the nanograins that originate from sub-microscopic (10nm) size and other defect- and surface-related features. A critical size that divides respective predominance of bulk properties and the defect-, surface-, and size-related features can be determined to be about 8nm.

  5. Cascade correlation-enhanced Raman scattering in atomic vapors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hong-Mei; Chen, Li-Qing; Yuan, Chun-Hua

    2016-12-01

    A new Raman process can be used to realize efficient Raman frequency conversion by coherent feedback at low light intensity [Chen B, Zhang K, Bian C L, Qiu C, Yuan C H, Chen L Q, Ou Z Y, and Zhang W P 2013 Opt. Express 21, 10490]. We present a theoretical model to describe this enhanced Raman process, termed as cascade correlation-enhanced Raman scattering, which is a Raman process injected by a seeded light field. It is correlated with the initially prepared atomic spin excitation and driven by the quasi-standing-wave pump fields, and the processes are repeated until the Stokes intensities are saturated. Such an enhanced Raman scattering may find applications in quantum information, nonlinear optics, and optical metrology due to its simplicity. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11474095, 11274118, and 91536114).

  6. Nanostructured surface enhanced Raman scattering substrates for explosives detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Michael Stenbaek; Olsen, Jesper Kenneth; Boisen, Anja;

    2010-01-01

    Here we present a method for trace detection of explosives in the gas phase using novel surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy substrates. Novel substrates that produce an exceptionally large enhancement of the Raman effect were used to amplify the Raman signal of explosives molecu...... process compared to existing commercial substrates. Therefore it is believed that these novel substrates will be able to make SERS more applicable in mobile explosives detection systems to be deployed in for example landmine clearance actions....

  7. Effect of nonstoichiometry on Raman scattering of VO2 films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Hong-Tao; Feng Ke-Cheng; Wang Xue-Jin; Li Chao; He Chen-Juan; Nie Yu-Xin

    2004-01-01

    @@ We report on Raman scattering of VO2 films prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering under different conditions. Our investigations revealed that the dominated Raman peaks shift towards high frequency for both V-rich and O-rich VO2 films, compared with the stoichiometry VO2 films. The experimental evidence is presented and the cause for nonstoichiometry dependence of Raman spectra of VO2 films is discussed.

  8. Picosecond anti-Stokes generation in a photonic-crystal fiber for interferometric CARS microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Esben Ravn

    2006-01-01

    We generate tunable picosecond anti-Stokes pulses by four-wave mixing of two picosecond pump and Stokes pulse trains in a photonic-crystal fiber. The visible, spectrally narrow anti-Stokes pulses with shifts over 150 nm are generated without generating other spectral features. As a demonstration...

  9. Vibrational imaging based on stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandakumar, P; Kovalev, A; Volkmer, A [3. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70550 Stuttgart (Germany)], E-mail: a.volkmer@physik.uni-stuttgart.de

    2009-03-15

    A stimulated Raman scattering microscope with near-infrared picosecond laser pulses at high repetition rates (76 MHz) and radio-frequency lock-in detection is accomplished. Based on stimulated Raman loss detection, we demonstrate noninvasive point-by-point vibrational mapping of chemical and biological samples with high sensitivity and without the requirement for labeling of the sample with natural or artificial fluorophores. We experimentally demonstrate a major benefit of this technique, which is the capability to respond exclusively to the linear Raman-resonance properties of the sample, thus allowing a direct quantitative interpretation of image contrast in terms of the number density of Raman-active modes.

  10. Vibrational imaging based on stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandakumar, P.; Kovalev, A.; Volkmer, A.

    2009-03-01

    A stimulated Raman scattering microscope with near-infrared picosecond laser pulses at high repetition rates (76 MHz) and radio-frequency lock-in detection is accomplished. Based on stimulated Raman loss detection, we demonstrate noninvasive point-by-point vibrational mapping of chemical and biological samples with high sensitivity and without the requirement for labeling of the sample with natural or artificial fluorophores. We experimentally demonstrate a major benefit of this technique, which is the capability to respond exclusively to the linear Raman-resonance properties of the sample, thus allowing a direct quantitative interpretation of image contrast in terms of the number density of Raman-active modes.

  11. Raman and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) studies of the thrombin-binding aptamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsai-Chin; Vasudev, Milana; Dutta, Mitra; Stroscio, Michael A

    2013-06-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering is used to study the Raman spectra and peak shifts the thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA) on substrates having two different geometries; one with a single stranded sequence and one with double stranded sequence. The Raman signals of the deoxyribonucleic acids on both substrates are enhanced and specific peaks of bases are identified. These results are highly reproducible and have promising applications in low cost nucleic acid detection.

  12. Revisiting the Young's double slit experiment for background-free nonlinear Raman spectroscopy and microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gachet, David; Brustlein, Sophie; Rigneault, Hervé

    2010-05-28

    In the Young's double slit experiment, the spatial shift of the interference pattern projected onto a screen is directly related to the phase difference between the fields diffracted by the two slits. We apply this property to fields emitted by nonlinear processes and thus demonstrate background-free coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy near an axial interface between a resonant and a nonresonant medium. This method is relevant to remove the nonresonant background in other coherent resonant processes.

  13. On surface Raman scattering and luminescence radiation in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, H; Filipov, V; Schwarz, U; Armbrüster, M; Leithe-Jasper, A; Tanaka, T; Shalamberidze, S O

    2010-02-01

    The discrepancy between Raman spectra of boron carbide obtained by Fourier transform Raman and conventional Raman spectrometry is systematically investigated. While at photon energies below the exciton energy (1.560 eV), Raman scattering of bulk phonons of boron carbide occurs, photon energies exceeding the fundamental absorption edge (2.09 eV) evoke additional patterns, which may essentially be attributed to luminescence or to the excitation of Raman-active processes in the surface region. The reason for this is the very high fundamental absorption in boron carbide inducing a very small penetration depth of the exciting laser radiation. Raman excitations essentially restricted to the boron carbide surface region yield spectra which considerably differ from bulk phonon ones, thus indicating structural modifications.

  14. Radiation-reaction-force-induced nonlinear mixing of Raman sidebands of an ultraintense laser pulse in a plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Naveen; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z; Keitel, Christoph H

    2013-09-06

    Stimulated Raman scattering of an ultraintense laser pulse in plasmas is studied by perturbatively including the leading order term of the Landau-Lifshitz radiation reaction force in the equation of motion for plasma electrons. In this approximation, the radiation reaction force causes a phase shift in nonlinear current densities that drive the two Raman sidebands (anti-Stokes and Stokes waves), manifesting itself into the nonlinear mixing of two sidebands. This mixing results in a strong enhancement in the growth of the forward Raman scattering instability.

  15. High pressure Raman scattering of silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khachadorian, Sevak; Scheel, Harald; Thomsen, Christian [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Papagelis, Konstantinos [Materials Science Department, University of Patras, 26504 Patras (Greece); Colli, Alan [Nokia Research Centre, 21 J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Ferrari, Andrea C, E-mail: khachadorian@physik.tu-berlin.de [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-13

    We study the high pressure response, up to 8 GPa, of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) with {approx} 15 nm diameter, by Raman spectroscopy. The first order Raman peak shows a superlinear trend, more pronounced compared to bulk Si. Combining transmission electron microscopy and Raman measurements we estimate the SiNWs' bulk modulus and the Grueneisen parameters. We detect an increase of Raman linewidth at {approx} 4 GPa, and assign it to pressure induced activation of a decay process into LO and TA phonons. This pressure is smaller compared to the {approx} 7 GPa reported for bulk Si. We do not observe evidence of phase transitions, such as discontinuities or change in the pressure slopes, in the investigated pressure range.

  16. Time—dependent Theory of Raman Scattering with Pulses—Application to Continuum Raman Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soo-Y.Lee

    1995-01-01

    A theory of real-time dependence of Raman scattering for a pulse-mode laser is developed within second-order perturbation theory and using the wavepacket terminology.We apply the theory to continuum Raman scattering for short and long pulses and varying pulse carrier frequency,For an initial ground virational state,it is shown that the rate of Raman emission as a funcition of time and pulse carrier frequency is structureless for all pulses,and for pulses that are longer than the dissociation time the rate also decays with the pulses.This is contrary to recently reported resonance fluorescence type structures at long times (M.Shapiro,J.Chem.Phys.99,2453(1993),We explain why such structures are unphysical for continuum Raman scattering.

  17. Raman Scattering at Plasmonic Junctions Shorted by Conductive Molecular Bridges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hu, Dehong; Apkarian, V. Ara; Hess, Wayne P.

    2013-04-10

    Intensity spikes in Raman scattering, accompanied by switching between line spectra and band spectra, can be assigned to shorting the junction plasmon through molecular conductive bridges. This is demonstrated through Raman trajectories recorded at a plasmonic junction formed by a gold AFM tip in contact with a silver surface coated either with biphenyl-4,4’-dithiol or biphenyl-4-thiol. The fluctuations are absent in the monothiol. In effect, the making and breaking of chemical bonds is tracked.

  18. Integrated Raman and angular scattering of single biological cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Zachary J.

    2009-12-01

    Raman, or inelastic, scattering and angle-resolved elastic scattering are two optical processes that have found wide use in the study of biological systems. Raman scattering quantitatively reports on the chemical composition of a sample by probing molecular vibrations, while elastic scattering reports on the morphology of a sample by detecting structure-induced coherent interference between incident and scattered light. We present the construction of a multimodal microscope platform capable of gathering both elastically and inelastically scattered light from a 38 mum2 region in both epi- and trans-illumination geometries. Simultaneous monitoring of elastic and inelastic scattering from a microscopic region allows noninvasive characterization of a living sample without the need for exogenous dyes or labels. A sample is illuminated either from above or below with a focused 785 nm TEM00 mode laser beam, with elastic and inelastic scattering collected by two separate measurement arms. The measurements may be made either simultaneously, if identical illumination geometries are used, or sequentially, if the two modalities utilize opposing illumination paths. In the inelastic arm, Stokes-shifted light is dispersed by a spectrograph onto a CCD array. In the elastic scattering collection arm, a relay system images the microscope's back aperture onto a CCD detector array to yield an angle-resolved elastic scattering pattern. Post-processing of the inelastic scattering to remove fluorescence signals yields high quality Raman spectra that report on the sample's chemical makeup. Comparison of the elastically scattered pupil images to generalized Lorenz-Mie theory yields estimated size distributions of scatterers within the sample. In this thesis we will present validations of the IRAM instrument through measurements performed on single beads of a few microns in size, as well as on ensembles of sub-micron particles of known size distributions. The benefits and drawbacks of the

  19. Simulations of Stimulated Raman Scattering in Low-Density Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Lihua; CHANG Tieqiang; LIU Zhanjun; ZHENG Chunyang

    2007-01-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering(SRS)in a low-density plasma slab is investigated by particle-in-cell(PIC)simulations.The backward stimulated Raman scattering(B-SRS)dominates initially and erodes the head of the pump wave,while the forward stimulated Raman scattering (F-SRS)subsequently develops and is located at the rear part of the slab.Two-stage electron acceleration may be more efficient due to the coexistence of these two instabilities.The B-SRS plasma wave with low phase velocities can accelerate the background electrons which may be further boosted to higher energies by the F-SRS plasma wave with high phase velocities.The simulations show that the peaks of the main components in both the frequency and wave number spectra occur at the positions estimated from the phase-matching conditions.

  20. Competition between two types of anti-Stokes emission in Ho(3+)-activated ZBLAN glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepke, Cz; Wisniewski, K; Piatkowski, D; Malinowski, M

    2009-01-21

    A competition between two anti-Stokes emissions has been observed and interpreted in ZBLAN glass activated by Ho(3+) ions. The first anti-Stokes emission intensity was seen to increase with temperature, whereas another, upconverted emission, was seen to decrease under the same conditions. Both observed tendencies are believed to be caused by the same effect: the multiphonon anti-Stokes excitation of the state responsible for the first emission. Analysis of the kinetics and fits of the theoretical model to experimental data are presented.

  1. Competition between two types of anti-Stokes emission in Ho3+-activated ZBLAN glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepke, Cz; Wisniewski, K.; Piatkowski, D.; Malinowski, M.

    2009-01-01

    A competition between two anti-Stokes emissions has been observed and interpreted in ZBLAN glass activated by Ho3+ ions. The first anti-Stokes emission intensity was seen to increase with temperature, whereas another, upconverted emission, was seen to decrease under the same conditions. Both observed tendencies are believed to be caused by the same effect: the multiphonon anti-Stokes excitation of the state responsible for the first emission. Analysis of the kinetics and fits of the theoretical model to experimental data are presented.

  2. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Physics and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kneipp, Katrin; Kneipp, Harald

    2006-01-01

    Almost 30 years after the first reports on surface-enhanced Raman signals, the phenomenon of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is now well established. Yet, explaining the enhancement of a spectroscopic signal by fouteen orders of magnitude continues to attract the attention of physicists and chemists alike. And, at the same time and rapidly growing, SERS is becoming a very useful spectroscopic tool with exciting applications in many fields. SERS gained particular interest after single-molecule Raman spectroscopy had been demonstrated. This bookl summarizes and discusses present theoretical approaches that explain the phenomenon of SERS and reports on new and exciting experiments and applications of the fascinating spectroscopic effect.

  3. Femtosecond coherent Raman spectroscopy and its application to porphyrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, M; Heid, M; Schlücker, S; Kiefer, W

    2002-01-01

    The results on femtosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) experiments for the analysis and control of ground state vibrational dynamics of porphyrin systems are briefly reviewed. By detecting the spectrum of the transient CARS signal, a detailed mapping of the dynamics initiated by the stimulated Raman pump process is achieved. The method yields the dephasing behavior and spectral information of the investigated system at the same time. The different contributions to the ground state vibrational dynamics are selected by changing the direction of the CARS signal analyzer in the polarization arrangement used.

  4. Resonant Raman Scattering from Silicon Nanoparticles Enhanced by Magnetic Response

    CERN Document Server

    Dmitriev, Pavel A; Milichko, Valentin A; Makarov, Sergey V; Mukhin, Ivan S; Samusev, Anton K; Krasnok, Alexander E; Belov, Pavel A; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2016-01-01

    Enhancement of optical response with high-index dielectric nanoparticles is attributed to the excitation of their Mie-type magnetic and electric resonances. Here we study Raman scattering from crystalline silicon nanoparticles and reveal that magnetic dipole modes have much stronger effect on the scattering than electric modes of the same order. We demonstrate experimentally a 140-fold enhancement of Raman signal from individual silicon spherical nanoparticles at the magnetic dipole resonance. Our results confirm the importance of the optically-induced magnetic response of subwavelength dielectric nanoparticles for enhancing light-matter interactions.

  5. Resonance electronic Raman scattering in rare earth crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, G.M.

    1988-11-10

    The intensities of Raman scattering transitions between electronic energy levels of trivalent rare earth ions doped into transparent crystals were measured and compared to theory. A particle emphasis was placed on the examination of the effect of intermediate state resonances on the Raman scattering intensities. Two specific systems were studied: Ce/sup 3 +/(4f/sup 1/) in single crystals of LuPO/sub 4/ and Er/sup 3 +/(4f/sup 11/) in single crystals of ErPO/sub 4/. 134 refs., 92 figs., 33 tabs.

  6. Raman Cooling of Solids through Photonic Density of States Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yin-Chung

    2015-01-01

    The laser cooling of vibrational states of solids has been achieved through photoluminescence in rare-earth elements, optical forces in optomechanics, and the Brillouin scattering light-sound interaction. The net cooling of solids through spontaneous Raman scattering, and laser refrigeration of indirect band gap semiconductors, both remain unsolved challenges. Here, we analytically show that photonic density of states (DoS) engineering can address the two fundamental requirements for achieving spontaneous Raman cooling: suppressing the dominance of Stokes (heating) transitions, and the enhancement of anti-Stokes (cooling) efficiency beyond the natural optical absorption of the material. We develop a general model for the DoS modification to spontaneous Raman scattering probabilities, and elucidate the necessary and minimum condition required for achieving net Raman cooling. With a suitably engineered DoS, we establish the enticing possibility of refrigeration of intrinsic silicon by annihilating phonons from ...

  7. Label-free in vivo analysis of intracellular lipid droplets in the oleaginous microalga Monoraphidium neglectum by coherent Raman scattering microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Daniel; Pilger, Christian; Hachmeister, Henning; Oberländer, Elina; Wördenweber, Robin; Wichmann, Julian; Mussgnug, Jan H; Huser, Thomas; Kruse, Olaf

    2016-10-21

    Oleaginous photosynthetic microalgae hold great promise as non-food feedstocks for the sustainable production of bio-commodities. The algal lipid quality can be analysed by Raman micro-spectroscopy, and the lipid content can be imaged in vivo in a label-free and non-destructive manner by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. In this study, both techniques were applied to the oleaginous microalga Monoraphidium neglectum, a biotechnologically promising microalga resistant to commonly applied lipid staining techniques. The lipid-specific CARS signal was successfully separated from the interfering two-photon excited fluorescence of chlorophyll and for the first time, lipid droplet formation during nitrogen starvation could directly be analysed. We found that the neutral lipid content deduced from CARS image analysis strongly correlated with the neutral lipid content measured gravimetrically and furthermore, that the relative degree of unsaturation of fatty acids stored in lipid droplets remained similar. Interestingly, the lipid profile during cellular adaption to nitrogen starvation showed a two-phase characteristic with initially fatty acid recycling and subsequent de novo lipid synthesis. This works demonstrates the potential of quantitative CARS microscopy as a label-free lipid analysis technique for any microalgal species, which is highly relevant for future biotechnological applications and to elucidate the process of microalgal lipid accumulation.

  8. Generation of Anti-Stokes Line in Fundamental Mode of Photonic Crystal Fibre

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; HOU Lan-Tian; LIU Zhao-Lun; ZHOU Gui-Yao

    2008-01-01

    A photonic crystal fibre (PCF) with zero-dispersion wavelength around 800 nm is designed and fabricated. Simulated results show that the zero-dispersion wavelength of fundamental mode for this PCF is at 826 nm, and phase-matched four-wave mixing can be achieved in fundamental mode. Using 20Ofs Ti:sapphire laser with central wavelength at 810nm as pump, the anti-Stokes line around 610nm is generated efficiently. The output signal has a Gaussian-like profile, which indicates that the anti-Stokes signal is in the fundamental mode of the PCF. The energy of anti-Stokes signal is higher than that of residual pump laser and the maximum ratio of the anti-Stokes signal to the pump component in the output spectrum is estimated to be 1.2.

  9. Temperature dependence of surface enhanced Raman scattering on C70

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Ying; Zhang Zhenlong; DU Yinxiao; DONG Hua; MO Yujun

    2005-01-01

    The temperature dependence of surface enhanced Raman scattering of the C70 molecule is reported.The Raman scattering of C70 molecules adsorbed on the surface of a silver mirror was measured at different temperatures. The experimental results indicate that the relative intensities of the Raman features vary with the temperature of the sample. When the temperature decreases from room temperature to 0℃, the relative intensities of certain Raman bands decrease abruptly. If we take the strongest band 1565cm-1 as a standard value 100, the greatest decrease approaches to 43%. However, with the further decrease in the temperature these relative intensities increase and resume the value at room temperature. And such a temperature dependence is reversible. Our results show that the adsorption state of the C70 molecules on the silver surface around 0℃changes greatly with the temperature, resulting in a decrease in relative intensities for some main Raman features of C70molecule. When the temperature is lower than 0℃, the adsorption state changes continually and more slowly. Synchronously, eight new Raman featu res, which have not ever been reported in literature, are observed in our experiment and this enriches the basic information of the vibrational modes for C70 molecule.

  10. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, Tiziana C; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James; Liu, Gang Logan

    2015-11-03

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  11. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James C.; Liu, Gang Logan

    2014-07-22

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  12. Multiphonon Resonance Raman Scattering in InGaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ager III, J.W.; Walukiewicz, W.; Shan, W.; Yu, K.M.; Li, S.X.; Haller, E.E.; Lu, H.; Schaff, W.J.

    2005-06-28

    In In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N epitaxial films with 0.37 < x < 1 and free electron concentrations in the 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} range, strong resonant Raman scattering of A{sub 1}(LO) phonon is observed for laser excitation in Raman scattering when excited above the direct band gaps. Examination of films with direct band gaps between 0.7 and 1.9 eV using laser energies from 1.9 to 2.7 eV shows that the resonance is broad, extending to up to 2 eV above the direct gap. Multiphonon Raman scattering with up to 5 LO phonons is also observed for excitation close to resonance in alloy samples; this is the highest number of phonon overtones ever observed for multiphonon scattering in a III-V compound under ambient conditions. Coupling of the electron plasmon to the LO phonon to form a longitudinal plasmon coupled mode of the type which is observed in the Raman spectra of n-GaN, appears not to occur in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N for x > 0.37.

  13. The Discovery of Raman Scattering in HII Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Dopita, Michael A; Sutherland, Ralph S; Kewley, Lisa J; Groves, Brent A

    2016-01-01

    We report here on the discovery of faint extended wings of H\\alpha\\ observed out to an apparent velocity of ~ 7600 km/s in the Orion Nebula (M42) and in five HII regions in the Large and the Small Magellanic Clouds. We show that, these wings are caused by Raman scattering of both the O I and Si II resonance lines and stellar continuum UV photons with H I followed by radiative decay to the H I n=2 level. The broad wings also seen in H\\beta\\ and in H\\gamma\\ result from Raman scattering of the UV continuum in the H I n=4 and n=5 levels respectively.The Raman scattering fluorescence is correlated with the intensity of the narrow permitted lines of O I and Si II. In the case of Si II, this is explained by radiative pumping of the same 1023.7\\AA\\ resonance line involved in the Raman scattering by the Ly\\beta\\ radiation field. The subsequent radiative cascade produces enhanced Si II 5978.9, 6347.1$ and 6371.4\\AA\\ permitted transitions. Finally we show that in O I, radiative pumping of the 1025.76\\AA\\ resonance line ...

  14. Correlation steering in the angularly multimode Raman atomic memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazelanik, Mateusz; Dąbrowski, Michał; Wasilewski, Wojciech

    2016-09-19

    We present the possibility of steering the direction of correlations between the off-resonant Raman scattered photons from the angularly multimode atomic memory based on warm rubidium vapors. Using acousto-optic deflectors (AOD) driven by different modulation frequencies, we experimentally change the angle of incidence of the laser beams on the atomic ensemble. By performing correlation measurements for various deflection angles, we verify that we can choose the anti-Stokes light propagation direction independently of the correlated Stokes scattered light in a continuous way. As a result we can select the spatial mode of photons retrieved from the memory, which may be important for future development of quantum information processing.

  15. Generation of a VUV-to-visible Raman frequency comb in hydrogen-filled kagom\\'e photonic crystal fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Mridha, M K; Bauerschmidt, S T; Abdolvand, A; Russell, P St J

    2016-01-01

    We report the generation of a purely vibrational Raman comb, extending from the vacuum ultraviolet (184 nm) to the visible (478 nm), in hydrogen-filled kagom\\'e-style photonic crystal fiber pumped at 266 nm. Stimulated Raman scattering and molecular modulation processes are enhanced by higher Raman gain in the ultraviolet. Owing to the pressure-tunable normal dispersion landscape of the fiber-gas system in the ultraviolet, higher-order anti-Stokes bands are generated preferentially in higher-order fiber modes. The results pave the way towards tunable fiber-based sources of deep- and vacuum ultraviolet light for applications in, e.g., spectroscopy and biomedicine.

  16. Signal enhancement of surface enhanced Raman scattering and surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering using in situ colloidal synthesis in microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rab; Bowden, Stephen A; Parnell, John; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2010-03-01

    We demonstrate the enhanced analytical sensitivity of both surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) responses, resulting from the in situ synthesis of silver colloid in a microfluidic flow structure, where both mixing and optical interrogation were integrated on-chip. The chip-based sensor was characterized with a model Raman active label, rhodamine-6G (R6G), and had a limit of detection (LOD) of ca. 50 fM (equivalent to single molecule detection). The device was also used for the determination of the natural pigment, scytonemin, from cyanobacteria (as an analogue for extraterrestrial life existing in extreme environments). The observed LOD of approximately 10 pM (ca. microfluidic system than those measured using the same experimental parameters, with colloid synthesized off-chip, under quiescent conditions.

  17. Surface enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopic waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascola, Robert J; McWhorter, Christopher S; Murph, Simona H

    2015-04-14

    A waveguide for use with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy is provided that includes a base structure with an inner surface that defines a cavity and that has an axis. Multiple molecules of an analyte are capable of being located within the cavity at the same time. A base layer is located on the inner surface of the base structure. The base layer extends in an axial direction along an axial length of an excitation section. Nanoparticles are carried by the base layer and may be uniformly distributed along the entire axial length of the excitation section. A flow cell for introducing analyte and excitation light into the waveguide and a method of applying nanoparticles may also be provided.

  18. Raman scattering study of glass crystallization kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkanski, M.; Haro, E.; Espinosa, G. P.; Phillips, J. C.

    1984-08-01

    Laser induced glass-crystalline transition is studied by light scattering. Three significant effects are observed depending on the incident laser energy density: (i) Spectral band narrowing indicating cluster enlargement constitutes a precursor effect, (ii) an intensity increase effect indicates a rapid rise of the density of clusters attaining microcrystalline size and (iii) a dynamical reversal effect indicative of glass-crystalline instability. Cluster volume and crystallization appear as separate but related threshold phenomena.

  19. Mapping Chemical and Structural Composition of Pharmaceutical and Biological Samples by Raman, Surface-Enhanced Raman and Fluorescence Spectral Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chourpa, Igor; Cohen-Jonathan, Simone; Dubois, Pierre

    Raman spectroscopy is an analytical technique recognised for its structural and conformational specificity. The efficient discrimination of molecular species by Raman is particularly potent for multidimensional microscopic imaging of complex biological environment, as demonstrated in the present book. The commonly admitted problem of Raman, low sensitivity, can often be circumvented due to high output instruments and via approaches like RRS (resonance Raman scattering), SERS (surface-enhanced Raman scattering), TERS (tip-enhanced Raman scattering) or CARS (coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering). In contrast to the latter, RRS and SERS are realizable with less sophisticated set-up based on common Raman systems. Although more invasive than RRS, SERS provides better sensitivity and quenching of fluorescence. SERRS (surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering) spectroscopy can be used in coupling with fluorescence and competes in selectivity and sensitivity with spectrofluorimetry. In the chapter below, we use recent applications made in our group to illustrate the use of Raman and SERRS spectral imaging for characterization of biological samples (animal subcutaneous tissue, human cancer cells) and pharmaceutical samples (microparticles for drug delivery, fibres for wound dressing). After a brief description of experimental details on spectral imaging, the chapter will focus on results concerning (i) biocompatible pharmaceutical materials made of alginates and (ii) anticancer drugs in pharmaceutical forms and in biological systems.

  20. Raman crystal lasers in the visible and near-infrared

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EICHLERH.J.; GADG.M.A.; KAMINSKIIA.A.; RHEEH.

    2003-01-01

    Raman lasers based on potassium gadolinium tungstate and lead tungstate crystals pumped by a≈120 ps Nd: YAG laser at 1.064/μm were developed. High reflection mirrors for the Stokes wavelength have been used to generate near-infrared and eye safe spectral region of 1.15 - 1.32/μm. Second harmonic generation of the generated Raman lasers was observed. Eifficient multiple Stokes and anti-Stokes picosecond generation in 64 crystals have been shown to exhibit stimulated Raman scattering on about 700 lines covering the whole visible and near-infrared spectrum. All stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) wavelengths in the visible and near-infrared spectrum are identified and attributed to the SRS-active vibration modes of these crystals.

  1. Raman crystal lasers in the visible and near-infrared

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Raman lasers based on potassium gadolinium tungstate and lead tungstate crystals pumped by a≈120 ps Nd: YAG laser at 1.064 μm were developed. High reflection mirrors for the Stokes wavelength have been used to generate near-infrared and eye safe spectral region of 1.15-1.32 μm. Second harmonic generation of the generated Raman lasers was observed. Eifficient multiple Stokes and anti-Stokes picosecond generation in 64 crystals have been shown to exhibit stimulated Raman scattering on about 700 lines covering the whole visible and near-infrared spectrum. All stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) wavelengths in the visible and near-infrared spectrum are identified and attributed to the SRS-active vibration modes of these crystals.

  2. Low-frequency Raman scattering in alkali tellurite glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Angelos G Kalampounias

    2008-10-01

    Raman scattering has been employed to study the alkali-cation size dependence and the polarization characteristics of the low-frequency modes for the glass-forming tellurite mixtures, 0.1M2O–0.9TeO2 (M = Na, K, Rb and Cs). The analysis has shown that the Raman coupling coefficient alters by varying the type of the alkali cation. The addition of alkali modifier in the tellurite network leads to the conversion of the TeO4 units to TeO3 units with a varying number of non-bridging oxygen atoms. Emphasis has also been given to the lowfrequency modes and particular points related to the low-frequency Raman phenomenology are discussed in view of the experimental findings.

  3. Transient Effects And Pump Depletion In Stimulated Raman Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsten, J. L.; Wenzel, R. G...; Druhl, K.

    1983-11-01

    Stimulated rotational Raman scattering in a 300-K multipass cell filled with para-H2 with a single-mode CO2-pumped laser is studied using a frequency-narrowed optical parametric oscillator (OPO) as a probe laser at the Stokes frequency for the So(0) transition. Amplification and pump depletion are examined as a function of incident pump energy. The pump depletion shows clear evidence of transient behavior. A theoretical treatment of transient stimulated Raman scattering, including effects of both pump depletion and medium saturation is presented. In a first approximation, diffraction effects are neglected, and only plane-wave interactions are considered. The theoretical results are compared to the experimental pulse shapes.

  4. Electron-phonon coupling in perovskites studied by Raman Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathe, V. G.; Tyagi, S.; Sharma, G.

    2016-10-01

    Raman scattering is an unique technique for characterization and quantification of electron-phonon, spin-phonon and spin-lattice coupling in many of the currently prominent compounds like multiferroics and manganites. In manganites, it is understood now that a phase separated landscape with coexisting metallic and insulating regions exist in most of the compounds and application of small external perturbation causes an alteration in this landscape. In such scenario, local metallic regions grow suddenly at the expense of insulating regions below the magnetic ordering temperature. Such regions can be characterized effectively using Raman scattering measurements where delocalized electrons couple with the adjacent phonon peaks giving a Fano resonance in the form of asymmetric line shape.

  5. Selection of stimulated Raman scattering signal by entangled photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munkhbaatar, Purevdorj; Myung-Whun, Kim

    2017-01-01

    We propose an excitation-probe measurement method utilizing entangled photon pulses. The excitation-probe signal is dominated by stimulated Raman scattering as well as two-photon absorption when the time delay between the excitation pulse and the probe pulse is shorter than the pulse duration. We demonstrate that the two-photon-absorption signal can be suppressed when the photons of the pulses are entangled. The stimulated Raman scattering signal can be composed of many peaks distributed over broad photon energies owing to the transitions between numerous quantum states in complex materials. We show that the desired peaks among the many peaks can be selected by controlling the thickness of the nonlinear crystal, the pump pulse center frequency, and the polarization of the excitation pulse and probe pulse.

  6. Raman scattering with strongly coupled vibron-polaritons

    CERN Document Server

    Strashko, Artem

    2016-01-01

    Strong coupling between cavity photons and molecular vibrations can lead to the formation of vibron-polaritons. In a recent experiment with PVAc molecules in a metal-metal microcavity [A.Shalabney et al., Ang.Chem.Int.Ed. 54 7971 (2015)], such a coupling was observed to enhance the Raman scattering probability by several orders of magnitude. Inspired by this, we theoretically analyze the effect of strong photon-vibron coupling on the Raman scattering amplitude of organic molecules. This problem has recently been addressed in [J.del Pino, J.Feist and F.J.Garcia-Vidal; J.Phys.Chem.C 119 29132 (2015)] using exact numerics for a small number of molecules. In this paper we derive compact analytic results for any number of molecules, also including the ultra-strong coupling regime. Our calculations predict a division of the Raman signal into upper and lower polariton modes,with some enhancement to the lower polariton Raman amplitude due to the mode softening under strong coupling.

  7. Raman scattering with strongly coupled vibron-polaritons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strashko, Artem; Keeling, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    Strong coupling between cavity photons and molecular vibrations can lead to the formation of vibron-polaritons. In a recent experiment with PVAc molecules in a metal-metal microcavity [Shalabney et al., Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 54, 7971 (2015), 10.1002/anie.201502979], such a coupling was observed to enhance the Raman scattering probability by several orders of magnitude. Inspired by this, we theoretically analyze the effect of strong photon-vibron coupling on the Raman scattering amplitude of organic molecules. This problem has recently been addressed by del Pino, Feist, and Garcia-Vidal [J. Phys. Chem. C 119, 29132 (2015), 10.1021/acs.jpcc.5b11654] using exact numerics for a small number of molecules. In this paper we derive compact analytic results for any number of molecules, also including the ultrastrong-coupling regime. Our calculations predict a division of the Raman signal into upper and lower polariton modes, with some enhancement to the lower polariton Raman amplitude due to the mode softening under strong coupling.

  8. High directivity optical antenna substrates for surface enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongxing; Zhu, Wenqi; Chu, Yizhuo; Crozier, Kenneth B

    2012-08-22

    A two-dimensional array of gold optical antennas integrated with a one-dimensional array of gold strips and mirrors is introduced and fabricated. The experimental results show that this design achieves average surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement factors as high as 1.2 × 10(10) , which is more than two orders of magnitude larger than optical antennas without the gold strips and gold mirror.

  9. Direct observation of the cyclic dimer in liquid acetic acid by probing the C=O vibration with ultrafast coherent Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lütgens, Matthias; Friedriszik, Frank; Lochbrunner, Stefan

    2014-09-01

    We present a comparison of spontaneous Raman and ultrafast coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectra of the C=O vibration of liquid acetic acid. The former technique cannot clearly reveal the number of contributions in the spectrum. However, the additional time and spectrally resolved CARS experiment supports strictly the existence of four modes, which proves the coexistence of more than one H-bonded configuration in liquid acetic acid. A comparably slowly dephasing mode which is obscured by a broad band in the linear Raman spectrum is assigned to the cyclic dimer and can be observed freed from all other contributions by ultrafast CARS.

  10. Theoretical and experimental research on high-order stimulated Raman scattering in KGd(WO4)2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaobin; Kang, Wenyun; Song, Xiaoquan; Xie, Ping; Zong, Nan; Tu, Wei

    2017-02-01

    Eight wavelengths (465, 485, 508, 532, 559, 588, 621, and 658 nm) were synchronously generated by a single-pass potassium gadolinium tungstate (KGW) crystal Raman arrangement, which was pumped by a 532 nm, picosecond Nd: YAG laser with high peak power. To the best of our knowledge, this single-pass arrangement synchronously generated the highest-order Stokes and anti-Stokes among all known KGW Raman lasers. The first- to seventh-order Stokes conversion efficiency was calculated using Raman coupled equations. Further, the numerical results of third-order Stokes (621 nm) conversion efficiency were in good agreement with the experimental ones. We also analyze and discuss the factors because of which higher-order Stokes were not generated.

  11. Characteristics of 1.9-μm laser emission from hydrogen-filled hollow-core fiber by vibrational stimulated Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Bo; Chen, Yubin; Wang, Zefeng

    2016-12-01

    We report here the characteristics of 1.9-μm laser emission from a gas-filled hollow-core fiber by stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). A 6.5-m hydrogen-filled ice-cream negative curvature hollow-core fiber is pumped with a high peak-power, narrow linewidth, linearly polarized subnanosecond pulsed 1064-nm microchip laser, generating a pulsed vibrational Stokes wave at 1908.5 nm. The maximum quantum efficiency of about 48% is obtained, which is mainly limited by the mode mismatch between the pump laser beam and the Stokes wave in the hollow-core fiber. The linewidths of the pump laser and the first-order vibrational Stokes wave are measured to be about 1 and 2 GHz, respectively, by a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer. The pressure selection phenomenon of the vibrational anti-Stokes waves is also investigated. The pulse duration of the vibrational Stokes wave is recorded to be narrower than that of the pump laser. The polarization properties of the hollow-core fiber and the polarization dependence of the vibrational and the rotational SRS are also studied. The beam profile of the vibrational Stokes wave shows good quality.

  12. Hamiltonian design in readout from room-temperature Raman atomic memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowski, Michał; Chrapkiewicz, Radosław; Wasilewski, Wojciech

    2014-10-20

    We present an experimental demonstration of the Hamiltonian manipulation in light-atom interface in Raman-type warm rubidium-87 vapor atomic memory. By adjusting the detuning of the driving beam we varied the relative contributions of the Stokes and anti-Stokes scattering to the process of four-wave mixing which reads out a spatially multimode state of atomic memory. We measured the temporal evolution of the readout fields and the spatial intensity correlations between write-in and readout as a function of detuning with the use of an intensified camera. The correlation maps enabled us to resolve between the anti-Stokes and the Stokes scattering and to quantify their contributions. Our experimental results agree quantitatively with a simple, plane-wave theoretical model we provide. They allow for a simple interpretation of the coaction of the anti-Stokes and the Stokes scattering at the readout stage. The Stokes contribution yields additional, adjustable gain at the readout stage, albeit with inevitable extra noise. Here we provide a simple and useful framework to trace it and the results can be utilized in the existing atomic memories setups. Furthermore, the shown Hamiltonian manipulation offers a broad range of atom-light interfaces readily applicable in current and future quantum protocols with atomic ensembles.

  13. Breast cancer study in rats by using Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez E, J. C. [IPN, Unidad Profesional Interdisciplinaria de Ingenieria, Campus Guanajuato, Av. Mineral de Valenciana 200, Col. Fracc. Industrial Puerto Interior, 36275 Silao, Guanajuato (Mexico); Cordova F, T.; Roca Ch, J. M.; Hernandez R, A., E-mail: jcmartineze@ipn.mx [Universidad de Guanajuato, Division de Ciencias e Ingenierias, Departamento de Ingenieria Fisica, Loma del Bosque 103, Col. Lomas del Campestre, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: The use of Raman scattering to differentiate the biochemistry and hence distinguish between normal and abnormal samples of breast cancer with induced stress was investigated. Twelve different rat serum samples (5 control samples and 7 breast cancer samples) were measured. 25 spectra per sample were acquired in a region of 50 X 50 microns. Three hundred spectra were recorded and the spectral diagnostic models were constructed by using multivariate statistical analysis on the spectral matrix to carry out the discrimination between the control samples and cancers samples with induced stress. The spectral recording was performed with Raman microscopy system Thermo Scientific XRD in the range from 200 to 2000 cm{sup -1} with a laser source of 780 nm, 24 m W of power and 50 s and exposure time were used for each spectrum. It is shown that the serum samples from rats with breast cancer and the control group can be discriminate when the multivariate analysis methods are applied to their Raman data set. The ratios were significant and correspond to proteins and phospholipids. The preliminary results suggest that the Raman spectroscopy could be an alternative technique to study the breast cancer in humans in a near future. (Author)

  14. Raman scattering or fluorescence emission? Raman spectroscopy study on lime-based building and conservation materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaszowska, Zofia; Malek, Kamilla; Staniszewska-Slezak, Emilia; Niedzielska, Karina

    2016-12-05

    This work presents an in-depth study on Raman spectra excited with 1064 and 532nm lasers of lime binders employed in the past as building materials and revealed today as valuable conservation materials. We focus our interest on the bands of strong intensity, which are present in the spectra of all binders acquired with laser excitation at 1064nm, but absent in the corresponding spectra acquired with laser excitation at 532nm. We suggest, that the first group of spectra represents fluorescence phenomena of unknown origin and the second true Raman scattering. In our studies, we also include two other phases of lime cycle, i.e. calcium carbonate (a few samples of calcite of various origins) and calcium oxide (quicklime) to assess how structural and chemical transformations of lime phases affect the NIR-Raman spectral profile. Furthermore, we analyse a set of carbonated limewashes and lime binders derived from old plasters to give an insight into their spectral characteristics after excitation with the 1064nm laser line. NIR-Raman micro-mapping results are also presented to reveal the spatial distribution of building materials and fluorescent species in the cross-section of plaster samples taken from a 15th century chapel. Our study shows that the Raman analysis can help identify lime-based building and conservation materials, however, a caution is advised in the interpretation of the spectra acquired using 1064nm excitation.

  15. Portable fiber sensors based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xuan; Tanaka, Zuki; Newhouse, Rebecca; Xu, Qiao; Chen, Bin; Chen, Shaowei; Zhang, Jin Z; Gu, Claire

    2010-12-01

    Two portable molecular sensing systems based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) have been experimentally demonstrated using either a tip-coated multimode fiber (TCMMF) or a liquid core photonic crystal fiber (LCPCF) as the SERS probe. With Rhodamine 6G as a test molecule, the TCMMF-portable SERS system achieved 2-3 times better sensitivity than direct sampling (focusing the laser light directly into the sample without the fiber probe), and a highly sensitive LCPCF-portable SERS system reached a sensitivity up to 59 times that of direct sampling, comparable to the sensitivity enhancement achieved using fiber probes in the bulky Renishaw system. These fiber SERS probes integrated with a portable Raman spectrometer provide a promising scheme for a compact and flexible molecular sensing system with high sensitivity and portability.

  16. Dental caries imaging using hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi; Zheng, Wei; Jian, Lin; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-03-01

    We report the development of a polarization-resolved hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) imaging technique based on a picosecond (ps) laser-pumped optical parametric oscillator system for label-free imaging of dental caries. In our imaging system, hyperspectral SRS images (512×512 pixels) in both fingerprint region (800-1800 cm-1) and high-wavenumber region (2800-3600 cm-1) are acquired in minutes by scanning the wavelength of OPO output, which is a thousand times faster than conventional confocal micro Raman imaging. SRS spectra variations from normal enamel to caries obtained from the hyperspectral SRS images show the loss of phosphate and carbonate in the carious region. While polarization-resolved SRS images at 959 cm-1 demonstrate that the caries has higher depolarization ratio. Our results demonstrate that the polarization resolved-hyperspectral SRS imaging technique developed allows for rapid identification of the biochemical and structural changes of dental caries.

  17. Smart surface-enhanced Raman scattering traceable drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Tang, Yonghong; Dai, Sheng; Kleitz, Freddy; Qiao, Shi Zhang

    2016-07-07

    A novel smart nanoparticle-based system has been developed for tracking intracellular drug delivery through surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This new drug delivery system (DDS) shows targeted cytotoxicity towards cancer cells via pH-cleavable covalent carboxylic hydrazone links and the SERS tracing capability based on gold@silica nanocarriers. Doxorubicin, as a model anticancer drug, was employed to compare SERS with conventional fluorescence tracing approaches. It is evident that SERS demonstrates higher sensitivity and resolution, revealing intracellular details, as the strengths of the original Raman signals can be amplified by SERS. Importantly, non-destructive SERS will provide the designed DDS with great autonomy and potential to study the dynamic procedures of non-fluorescent drug delivery into living cells.

  18. Vibronic Raman Scattering at the Quantum Limit of Plasmons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2014-07-09

    We record sequences of Raman spectra at a plasmonic junction formed by a gold AFM tip in contact with a silver surface coated with 4,4’-dimercaptostilbene (DMS). A 2D correlation analysis of the recorded trajectories reveals that the observable vibrational states can be divided into sub-sets. The first set comprises the totally symmetric vibrations of DMS (ag) that are neither correlated with each other nor to the fluctuating background, which is assigned to the signature of charge transfer plasmons tunneling through DMS. The second set consists of bu vibrations, which are correlated both with each other and with the continuum. Our findings are rationalized on the basis of the charge-transfer theory of Raman scattering, and illustrate how the tunneling plasmons modulate the vibronic coupling term from which the intensities of the bu states are derived.

  19. On the calibration of polarimetric Thomson scattering by Raman polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giudicotti, L.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2015-12-01

    Polarimetric Thomson scattering (TS) is an alternative method for the analysis of Thomson scattering spectra in which the plasma temperature T e is determined from the depolarization of the TS radiation. This is a relativistic effect and therefore the technique is suitable only for very hot plasmas (T e  >  10 keV) such as those of ITER. The practical implementation of polarimetric TS requires a method to calibrate the polarimetric response of the collection optics carrying the TS light to the detection system, and in particular to measure the additional depolarization of the TS radiation introduced by the plasma-exposed first mirror. Rotational Raman scattering of laser light from diatomic gases such as H2, D2, N2 and O2 can provide a radiation source of predictable intensity and polarization state from a well-defined volume inside the vacuum vessel and is therefore suitable for these calibrations. In this paper we discuss Raman polarimetry as a technique for the calibration of a hypothetical polarimetric TS system operating in the same conditions of the ITER core TS system and suggest two calibration methods for the measurement of the additional depolarization introduced by the plasma-exposed first mirror, and in general for calibrating the polarimetric response of the detection system.

  20. Smart surface-enhanced Raman scattering traceable drug delivery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Tang, Yonghong; Dai, Sheng; Kleitz, Freddy; Qiao, Shi Zhang

    2016-06-01

    A novel smart nanoparticle-based system has been developed for tracking intracellular drug delivery through surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This new drug delivery system (DDS) shows targeted cytotoxicity towards cancer cells via pH-cleavable covalent carboxylic hydrazone links and the SERS tracing capability based on gold@silica nanocarriers. Doxorubicin, as a model anticancer drug, was employed to compare SERS with conventional fluorescence tracing approaches. It is evident that SERS demonstrates higher sensitivity and resolution, revealing intracellular details, as the strengths of the original Raman signals can be amplified by SERS. Importantly, non-destructive SERS will provide the designed DDS with great autonomy and potential to study the dynamic procedures of non-fluorescent drug delivery into living cells.A novel smart nanoparticle-based system has been developed for tracking intracellular drug delivery through surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This new drug delivery system (DDS) shows targeted cytotoxicity towards cancer cells via pH-cleavable covalent carboxylic hydrazone links and the SERS tracing capability based on gold@silica nanocarriers. Doxorubicin, as a model anticancer drug, was employed to compare SERS with conventional fluorescence tracing approaches. It is evident that SERS demonstrates higher sensitivity and resolution, revealing intracellular details, as the strengths of the original Raman signals can be amplified by SERS. Importantly, non-destructive SERS will provide the designed DDS with great autonomy and potential to study the dynamic procedures of non-fluorescent drug delivery into living cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03869g

  1. Live-cell stimulated Raman scattering imaging of alkyne-tagged biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Senlian; Chen, Tao; Zhu, Yuntao; Li, Ang; Huang, Yanyi; Chen, Xing

    2014-06-02

    Alkynes can be metabolically incorporated into biomolecules including nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and glycans. In addition to the clickable chemical reactivity, alkynes possess a unique Raman scattering within the Raman-silent region of a cell. Coupling this spectroscopic signature with Raman microscopy yields a new imaging modality beyond fluorescence and label-free microscopies. The bioorthogonal Raman imaging of various biomolecules tagged with an alkyne by a state-of-the-art Raman imaging technique, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, is reported. This imaging method affords non-invasiveness, high sensitivity, and molecular specificity and therefore should find broad applications in live-cell imaging.

  2. Coherent Raman spectro-imaging with laser frequency combs

    CERN Document Server

    Ideguchi, Takuro; Bernhardt, Birgitta; Guelachvili, Guy; Picqué, Nathalie; Hänsch, Theodor W

    2013-01-01

    Optical spectroscopy and imaging of microscopic samples have opened up a wide range of applications throughout the physical, chemical, and biological sciences. High chemical specificity may be achieved by directly interrogating the fundamental or low-lying vibrational energy levels of the compound molecules. Amongst the available prevailing label-free techniques, coherent Raman scattering has the distinguishing features of high spatial resolution down to 200 nm and three-dimensional sectioning. However, combining fast imaging speed and identification of multiple - and possibly unexpected- compounds remains challenging: existing high spectral resolution schemes require long measurement times to achieve broad spectral spans. Here we overcome this difficulty and introduce a novel concept of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectro-imaging with two laser frequency combs. We illustrate the power of our technique with high resolution (4 cm-1) Raman spectra spanning more than 1200 cm-1 recorded within le...

  3. {alpha}-Glycine under high pressures: a Raman scattering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murli, Chitra; Sharma, S.M.Surinder M.; Karmakar, S.; Sikka, S.K

    2003-11-01

    High-pressure behaviour of {alpha}-glycine has been investigated up to {approx}23 GPa using Raman scattering technique. The experimental results show slope change in the CO{sub 2} bending, NH{sub 3} torsional and NH{sub 3} rocking modes around 3 GPa and are interpreted in terms of change in the nature of an N-H...O-C intra-layer hydrogen bond at this pressure. Several other spectral features seem to arise from pressure-induced variations in the inter-molecular coupling.

  4. Electromagnetic field in matter. Surface enhanced Raman scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Apostol

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The polarization and magnetization degrees of freedom are included in the general treatment of the electromagnetic field in matter, and their governing equations are given. Particular cases of solutions are discussed for polarizable, non-magnetic matter, including quasi-static fields, surface plasmons, propagation, zero-point fluctuations of the eigenmodes, especially for a semi-infinite homogeneous body (half-space. The van der Waals London-Casimir force acting between a neutral nano-particle and a half-space is computed and the response of this electromagnetically coupled system to an external field is given, with relevance for the surface enhanced Raman scattering.

  5. Raman scattering in layer indium selenide under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdi, K.; Babaev, S.; Ellialtioǧlu, Ş.; Ismailov, A.

    1993-08-01

    Experimental results of Raman scattering spectra of ɛ-InSe crystals are presented at 300 K and pressures up to 10.2 kbar. Values of the mode-Grüneisen parameters were calculated using frequency-pressure dependences for five observed phonons. Changes of the shear force constants under pressure were analysed using linear-chain model both for ɛ-InSe and ɛ-GaSe crystals. The decrease of the shear force constants between metallic planes with increasing pressure are explained qualitatively by charge transfer from intralayer to interlayer space.

  6. Guiding Brain Tumor Resection Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Nanoparticles and a Hand-Held Raman Scanner

    OpenAIRE

    Karabeber, Hazem; Huang, Ruimin; Iacono, Pasquale; Samii, Jason M.; Pitter, Ken; Holland, Eric C.; Kircher, Moritz F.

    2014-01-01

    The current difficulty in visualizing the true extent of malignant brain tumors during surgical resection represents one of the major reasons for the poor prognosis of brain tumor patients. Here, we evaluated the ability of a hand-held Raman scanner, guided by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles, to identify the microscopic tumor extent in a genetically engineered RCAS/tv-a glioblastoma mouse model. In a simulated intraoperative scenario, we tested both a static Raman imagi...

  7. Applications of Raman and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering to the Analysis of Eukaryotic Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Franziska; Joseph, Virginia; Panne, Ulrich; Kneipp, Janina

    In this chapter, we discuss Raman scattering and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for the analysis of cellular samples of plant and animal origin which are several tens to hundreds of microns in size. As was shown in the past several years, the favorable properties of noble metal nanostructures can be used to generate SERS signals in very complex biological samples such as cells, and result in an improved sensitivity and spatial resolution. Pollen grains, the physiological containers that produce the male gametes of seed plants, consist of a few vegetative cells and one generative cell, surrounded by a biopolymer shell. Their chemical composition has been a subject of research of plant physiologists, biochemists [1, 2], and lately even materials scientists [3, 4] for various reasons. In spite of a multitude of applied analytical approaches it could not be elucidated in its entirety yet. Animal cells from cell cultures have been a subject of intense studies due to their application in virtually all fields of biomedical research, ranging from studies of basic biological mechanisms to models for pharmaceutical and diagnostic research. Many aspects of all kinds of cellular processes including signalling, transport, and gene regulation have been elucidated, but many more facts about cell biology will need to be understood in order to efficiently address issues such as cancer, viral infection or genetic disorder. Using the information from spectroscopic methods, in particular combining normal Raman spectroscopy and SERS may open up new perspectives on cellular biochemistry. New sensitive Raman-based tools are being developed for the biochemical analysis of cellular processes [5-8].

  8. Romantic Story or Raman Scattering? Rose Petals as Ecofriendly, Low-Cost Substrates for Ultrasensitive Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Sin-Yi; Yu, Chen-Chieh; Yen, Yu-Ting; Lin, Keng-Te; Chen, Hsuen-Li; Su, Wei-Fang

    2015-06-16

    In this Article, we present a facile approach for the preparation of ecofriendly substrates, based on common rose petals, for ultrasensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The hydrophobic concentrating effect of the rose petals allows us to concentrate metal nanoparticle (NP) aggregates and analytes onto their surfaces. From a systematic investigation of the SERS performance when using upper and lower epidermises as substrates, we find that the lower epidermis, with its quasi-three-dimensional (quasi-3D) nanofold structure, is the superior biotemplate for SERS applications. The metal NPs and analytes are both closely packed in the quasi-3D structure of the lower epidermis, thereby enhancing the Raman signals dramatically within the depth of focus (DOF) of the Raman optical system. We have also found the effect of the pigment of the petals on the SERS performance. With the novel petal-based substrate, the SERS measurements reveal a detection limit for rhodamine 6G below the femtomolar regime (10(-15) M), with high reproducibility. Moreover, when we employ an upside-down drying process, the unique effect of the Wenzal state of the hydrophobic petal surface further concentrate the analytes and enhanced the SERS signals. Rose petals are green, natural materials that appear to have great potential for use in biosensors and biophotonics.

  9. Hyper Raman spectra calculated in a time-dependent Hartree-Fock method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Abdelsalam; Ågren, Hans; Ringholm, Magnus; Thorvaldsen, Andreas J.; Ruud, Kenneth

    2012-10-01

    Hyper Raman scattering (HRS) of the benzonitrile (BN) and 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane (RDX) molecules is studied by means of ab initio calculations. The computational procedure employs a recently developed methodology for the analytic calculations of frequency-dependent polarizability gradients of arbitrary order, including perturbation dependent basis sets. The result are compared to normal Raman scattering (NRS) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) that previously have been studied using the same technology. It is found that some suppressed or silent modes in CARS and NRS spectra are clearly seen in HRS, and that although under general excitation conditions the HRS intensities are much lower than for CARS and NRS, HRS provides complementary information useful for target identification.

  10. Raman scattering of nanocrystalline silicon embedded in SiO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马智训; 廖显伯; 孔光临; 褚君浩

    2000-01-01

    Raman scattering of nanocrystalline silicon embedded in SiO2 matrix is systematically in-vestigated. it is found that the Raman spectra can be well fitted by 5 Lorentzian lines in the Raman shift range of 100-600 cm-1. The two-phonon scattering is also observed in the range of 600-1100 cM-1 The experimental results indicate that the silicon crystallites in the films consist of nanocrystalline phase and amorphous phase; both can contribute to the Raman scattering. Besides the red-shift of the first order optical phonon modes with the decreasing size of silicon nanocrystallites, we have also found an enhancement effect on the second order Raman scattering, and the size effect on their Raman shift.

  11. Raman scattering of nanocrystalline silicon embedded in SiO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Raman scattering of nanocrystalline silicon embedded in SiO2 matrix is systematically investigated. It is found that the Raman spectra can be well fitted by 5 Lorentzian lines in the Raman shift range of 100-600 cm-1. The two-phonon scattering is also observed in the range of 600-1100 cm-1. The experimental results indicate that the silicon crystallites in the films consist of nanocrystalline phase and amorphous phase; both can contribute to the Raman scattering. Besides the red-shift of the first order optical phonon modes with the decreasing size of silicon nanocrystallites, we have also found an enhancement effect on the second order Raman scattering, and the size effect on their Raman shift.

  12. Origin of the frequency shift of Raman scattering in chalcogenide glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, X.C.; Tao, H.Z.; Gong, L.J.;

    2014-01-01

    Raman scattering is a sensitive method for probing the structural evolution in glasses, especially in covalent ones. Usually the main Raman scattering frequency shifts with composition for Gesingle bondSe chalcogenide glasses. However, it has not been well established whether and how the dependen...

  13. Effects of Raman scattering in quantum state-preserving frequency conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Søren Michael Mørk; Andersen, Lasse Mejling; Castaneda, Mario A. Usuga;

    2014-01-01

    We analyse frequency conversion by Bragg scattering numerically including Raman scattering. The frequency configuration that performs the best under influence of Raman noise results in 95% conversion over a 3.25 THz bandwidth with a 2.5-dB noise figure....

  14. Enhanced Raman Scattering from Aromatic Dithiols Electrosprayed into Plasmonic Nanojunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Johnson, Grant E.; Novikova, Irina V.; Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G.; Evans, James E.; Zamkov, Mikhail; Laskin, Julia; Hess, Wayne P.

    2015-12-01

    We describe surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) experiments in which molecular coverage is systematically varied from 3.8 x 105 to 3.8 x 102 to 0.38 molecules/μm2 using electrospray deposition of ethanolic 4,4’-dimercaptostilbene (DMS) solutions. The plasmonic SERS substrate used herein consists of a well-characterized 2-dimensional (2D) array of silver nanospheres [see El-Khoury et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2014, 141, 214308], previously shown to feature uniform topography and plasmonic response, as well as intense SERS activity. When compared to their ensemble averaged analogues, the spatially and temporally averaged spectra of a single molecule exhibit several unique features including: (i) distinct relative intensities of the observable Raman-active vibrational states, (ii) more pronounced SERS backgrounds, and (iii) broader Raman lines indicative of faster vibrational dephasing. The first observation may be understood on the basis of an intuitive physical picture in which removal of averaging over multiple molecules exposes the tensorial nature of Raman scattering. When an oriented single molecule gives rise to the recorded SERS spectra, the relative orientation of the molecule with respect to vector components of the local electric field determines the relative intensities of the observable vibrational states. Using a single molecule SERS framework described herein, we derive a unique molecular orientation in which a single DMS molecule is isolated at a nanojunction formed between two silver nanospheres in the 2D array. The DMS molecule is found lying nearly flat with respect to the metal surface. The derived orientation of a single molecule at a plasmonic nanojunction is consistent with observations (ii) and (iii). In particular, a careful inspection of the temporal spectral variations along the recorded single molecule SERS time sequences reveals that the time-averaged SERS backgrounds arise from individual molecular events, marked by broadened SERS

  15. Spin-flip Raman scattering in low-dimensional semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debus, Joerg

    2012-07-01

    The challenges for achieving novel spin effects or improving existent spin phenomena are based on interaction, namely interactions between carriers themselves as well as a carrier and a second system, such as the nuclear spin or phonon system leading to a scattering process and thus to spin decoherence. By means of the resonant spin-flip Raman scattering technique fundamental spin interactions of carriers confined in low-dimensional semiconductors, their dependence on the local structure symmetry as well as the type and excitation state of the carrier complex are characterized. It is shown that the scattering processes of the electron, hole, and exciton spins depend on the symmetry of the crystal lattice, quantum confinement potential, and magnetic field confinement. The studies outline problems of the semiconductor spintronics, but also ways to identify and monitor them, and present a novel quantum dot structure providing a long exciton lifetime and temperature-robust longitudinal spin relaxation time thus making a step toward the realization of spin-based applications.

  16. Analysis of polymer surfaces and thin-film coatings with Raman and surface enhanced Raman scattering

    CERN Document Server

    McAnally, G D

    2001-01-01

    This thesis investigates the potential of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for the analysis and characterisation of polymer surfaces. The Raman and SERS spectra from a PET film are presented. The SERS spectra from the related polyester PBT and from the monomer DMT are identical to PET, showing that only the aromatic signals are enhanced. Evidence from other compounds is presented to show that loss of the carbonyl stretch (1725 cm sup - sup 1) from the spectra is due to a chemical interaction between the silver and surface carbonyl groups. The interaction of other polymer functional groups with silver is discussed. A comparison of Raman and SERS spectra collected from three faces of a single crystal shows the SERS spectra are depolarised. AFM images of the silver films used to obtain SERS are presented. They consist of regular islands of silver, fused together to form a complete film. The stability and reproducibility and of these surfaces is assessed. Band assignments for the SERS spectrum of PET are ...

  17. Laser-induced synthesis of metal-carbon materials for implementing surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucherik, A.; Arakelian, S.; Vartanyan, T.; Kutrovskaya, S.; Osipov, A.; Povolotskaya, A.; Povolotskii, A.; Man'shina, A.

    2016-08-01

    Metal-carbon materials exhibiting surface-enhanced Raman scattering have been synthesized by laser irradiation of colloidal systems consisting of carbon and noble metal nanoparticles. The dependence of the Raman scattering intensity on the material composition and laser irradiation conditions has been investigated. The possibility of recording the Raman spectrum of organic dye rhodamine 6G, deposited in amount of 10-6 M on the substrate obtained from a colloidal solution is demonstrated.

  18. Competition between two types of anti-Stokes emission in Ho{sup 3+}-activated ZBLAN glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koepke, Cz; Wisniewski, K; Piatkowski, D [Institute of Physics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Malinowski, M [Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics, Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland)], E-mail: koepke@fizyka.umk.pl

    2009-01-21

    A competition between two anti-Stokes emissions has been observed and interpreted in ZBLAN glass activated by Ho{sup 3+} ions. The first anti-Stokes emission intensity was seen to increase with temperature, whereas another, upconverted emission, was seen to decrease under the same conditions. Both observed tendencies are believed to be caused by the same effect: the multiphonon anti-Stokes excitation of the state responsible for the first emission. Analysis of the kinetics and fits of the theoretical model to experimental data are presented.

  19. Method and system to measure temperature of gases using coherent anti-stokes doppler spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Mark

    2013-12-17

    A method of measuring a temperature of a noble gas in a chamber includes providing the noble gas in the chamber. The noble gas is characterized by a pressure and a temperature. The method also includes directing a first laser beam into the chamber and directing a second laser beam into the chamber. The first laser beam is characterized by a first frequency and the second laser beam is characterized by a second frequency. The method further includes converting at least a portion of the first laser beam and the second laser beam into a coherent anti-Stokes beam, measuring a Doppler broadening of the coherent anti-Stokes beam, and computing the temperature using the Doppler broadening.

  20. Fiber sensors for molecular detection using Raman and surface enhanced raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xuan

    In this dissertation, highly sensitive optical fiber sensors based on Raman spectroscopy (RS) and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) are studied with focus on applications in various chemical and biological detections. In particular, two main categories of optical fibers have been used as the sensing platforms: one is the conventional multimode optical fiber and the other is the hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF). For the conventional multimode optical fiber, we've developed two types of probes using SERS techniques: the first is based on a double substrate "sandwich" structure with colloidal metal nanoparticles, and the second is based on interference lithography-defined nanopillar array structure on the fiber facet with the metal film deposition. For the HCPCF, the photonic bandgap guiding mechanism provides an ideal sensing platform because the confinement of both light and sample inside the fiber enables direct interaction between the propagating wave and the analyte. We demonstrate that by filling up the air channel(s) of the fiber with gas or liquid samples, it can significantly increase the sensitivity of the sensors in either regular Raman or SERS applications. For RS applications, these fiber sensors were tested with ambient gases, organic vapors, and biomedically important glucose molecule. For SERS application, these fiber sensors were evaluated with Rhodamine 6G, trans-1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)-ethylene, toluene vapor, 2,4-dinitrotoluene vapor, proteins and bacteria. We also demonstrate that these fiber sensors can be integrated with the portable Raman spectrometer in order to make it practical for out-of-laboratory applications. The techniques developed in this study are expected to have significant impact in chemical, biological, environmental, national security, and other applications.

  1. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering in art and archaeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leona, Marco

    2005-11-01

    The identification of natural dyes found in archaeological objects and in works of art as textile dyes and lake pigments is a demanding analytical task. To address the problems raised by the very low dye content of dyed fibers and lake pigments, and by the requirement to remove only microscopic samples, surface enhanced Raman scattering techniques were investigated for application to museum objects. SERS gives excellent results with the majority of natural dyes, including: alizarin, purpurin, laccaic acid, carminic acid, kermesic acid, shikonin, juglone, lawsone, brazilin and brazilein, haematoxylin and haematein, fisetin, quercitrin, quercetin, rutin, and morin. In this study, limits of detection were determined for representative dyes and different SERS supports such as citrate reduced Ag colloid and silver nanoisland films. SERS was successfully used to identify natural madder in a microscopic fragment from a severely degraded 11th Century Byzantine textile recently excavated in Amorium, Turkey.

  2. Isotopic gas analysis through Purcell cavity enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrak, B.; Cooper, J.; Konthasinghe, K.; Peiris, M.; Djeu, N.; Hopkins, A. J.; Muller, A.

    2016-02-01

    Purcell enhanced Raman scattering (PERS) by means of a doubly resonant Fabry-Perot microcavity (mode volume ≈ 100 μm3 and finesse ≈ 30 000) has been investigated as a technique for isotopic ratio gas analysis. At the pump frequency, the resonant cavity supports a buildup of circulating power while simultaneously enabling Purcell spontaneous emission rate enhancement at the resonant Stokes frequency. The three most common isotopologues of CO2 gas were quantified, and a signal was obtained from 13C16O2 down to a partial pressure of 2 Torr. Due to its small size and low pump power needed (˜10 mW) PERS lends itself to miniaturization. Furthermore, since the cavity is resonant with the emission frequency, future improvements could allow it to serve as its own spectral analyzer and no separate spectroscopic device would be needed.

  3. Counter-Intuitive Vacuum-Stimulated Raman Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Hennrich, M; Kuhn, A; Rempe, G; Hennrich, Markus; Legero, Thomas; Kuhn, Axel; Rempe, Gerhard

    2002-01-01

    Vacuum-stimulated Raman scattering in strongly coupled atom-cavity systems allows one to generate free-running single photon pulses on demand. Most properties of the emitted photons are well defined, provided spontaneous emission processes do not contribute. Therefore, electronic excitation of the atom must not occur, which is assured for a system adiabatically following a dark state during the photon-generation process. We experimentally investigate the conditions that must be met for adiabatic following in a time-of-flight driven system, with atoms passing through a cavity and a pump beam oriented transverse to the cavity axis. From our results, we infer the optimal intensity and relative pump-beam position with respect to the cavity axis.

  4. Q-branch Raman scattering and modern kinetic thoery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monchick, L. [The Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The program is an extension of previous APL work whose general aim was to calculate line shapes of nearly resonant isolated line transitions with solutions of a popular quantum kinetic equation-the Waldmann-Snider equation-using well known advanced solution techniques developed for the classical Boltzmann equation. The advanced techniques explored have been a BGK type approximation, which is termed the Generalized Hess Method (GHM), and conversion of the collision operator to a block diagonal matrix of symmetric collision kernels which then can be approximated by discrete ordinate methods. The latter method, which is termed the Collision Kernel method (CC), is capable of the highest accuracy and has been used quite successfully for Q-branch Raman scattering. The GHM method, not quite as accurate, is applicable over a wider range of pressures and has proven quite useful.

  5. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering on gold nanotrenches and nanoholes

    KAUST Repository

    Yue, Weisheng

    2012-04-01

    Dependent effects on edge-to-edge distance and incidence polarization in surface-enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) were studied in detection of 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MPy) molecules absorbed on gold nanotrenches and nanoholes. The gold nanostructures with controllable size and period were fabricated using electron-beam lithography. Large SERS enhancement in detection of 4-MPy molecules on both nanostructred substrates was observed. The SERS enhancement increased exponentially with decrease of edge to-edge distance for both the nanotrenches and nanoholes while keeping the sizes of the nanotrenches and nanoholes unchanged. Investigation of polarization dependence showed that the SERS enhancement of nanotrenches was much more sensitive to the incidence polarizations than that of nanoholes. © 2012 American Scientific Publishers.

  6. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) fabrics for trace analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jun [National Engineering Laboratory for Advanced Yarn and Fabric Formation and Clean Production, Wuhan Textile University, Wuhan 430073 (China); Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials & Key Laboratory for the Synthesis and Application of Organic Functional Molecules, Ministry of Education & College of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Zhou, Ji [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials & Key Laboratory for the Synthesis and Application of Organic Functional Molecules, Ministry of Education & College of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Tang, Bin, E-mail: bin.tang@deakin.edu.au [National Engineering Laboratory for Advanced Yarn and Fabric Formation and Clean Production, Wuhan Textile University, Wuhan 430073 (China); Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria 3216 (Australia); Zeng, Tian; Li, Yaling [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials & Key Laboratory for the Synthesis and Application of Organic Functional Molecules, Ministry of Education & College of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Li, Jingliang [Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria 3216 (Australia); Ye, Yong, E-mail: yeyong@hubu.edu.cn [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials & Key Laboratory for the Synthesis and Application of Organic Functional Molecules, Ministry of Education & College of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Wang, Xungai [National Engineering Laboratory for Advanced Yarn and Fabric Formation and Clean Production, Wuhan Textile University, Wuhan 430073 (China); Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria 3216 (Australia)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Gold nanoparticles are in-situ synthesized on silk fabrics by heating. • Flexible silk fabrics with gold nanoparticles are used for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). • SERS activities of silk fabrics with different gold contents are investigated. - Abstract: Flexible SERS active substrates were prepared by modification of silk fabrics with gold nanoparticles. Gold nanoparticles were in-situ synthesized after heating the silk fabrics immersed in gold ion solution. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) properties of the treated silk fabrics varied as the concentration of gold ions changed, in relation to the morphologies of gold nanoparticles on silk. In addition, X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to observe the structure of the gold nanoparticle treated silk fabrics. The SERS enhancement effect of the silk fabrics treated with gold nanoparticles was evaluated by collecting Raman signals of different concentrations of p-aminothiophenol (PATP), 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MPy) and crystal violet (CV) solutions. The results demonstrate that the silk fabrics corresponding to 0.3 and 0.4 mM of gold ions possess high SERS activity compared to the other treated fabrics. It is suggested that both the gold content and morphologies of gold nanoparticles dominate the SERS effect of the treated silk fabrics.

  7. Fingerprinting CBRNE materials using surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertone, Jane F.; Spencer, Kevin M.; Sylvia, James M.

    2008-04-01

    One approach to CBRNE detection is analytical monitoring with portable spectroscopy systems. Such a technique needs to work in adverse environments, be amenable to use by field operators, and, given the sensitive nature of the target materials, should have an extremely rapid response time with no false negatives. This research demonstrates that surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is capable of detecting ppb levels of CBRNE materials with high sensitivity and no false positives. We present reproducible and selective detection using novel SERS structures that exhibit an inherently uniform surface morphology, leading to rapid, reproducible manufacturing. Our work includes receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curves for the detection of both conventional and improvised nitro explosives at low signal-to-noise ratios. We also present the detection of added CBRNE materials including chemical and biological agents as well as nuclear enriching materials. Our expertise extends to instrumentation of portable, robust Raman spectrographs that can be packaged with our sensors for a versatile security tool with applications extending from points of entry to points of production, from people to objects and freight.

  8. Assessing Telomere Length Using Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Shenfei; Wang, Zhuyuan; Chen, Hui; Cui, Yiping

    2014-11-01

    Telomere length can provide valuable insight into telomeres and telomerase related diseases, including cancer. Here, we present a brand-new optical telomere length measurement protocol using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). In this protocol, two single strand DNA are used as SERS probes. They are labeled with two different Raman molecules and can specifically hybridize with telomeres and centromere, respectively. First, genome DNA is extracted from cells. Then the telomere and centromere SERS probes are added into the genome DNA. After hybridization with genome DNA, excess SERS probes are removed by magnetic capturing nanoparticles. Finally, the genome DNA with SERS probes attached is dropped onto a SERS substrate and subjected to SERS measurement. Longer telomeres result in more attached telomere probes, thus a stronger SERS signal. Consequently, SERS signal can be used as an indicator of telomere length. Centromere is used as the inner control. By calibrating the SERS intensity of telomere probe with that of the centromere probe, SERS based telomere measurement is realized. This protocol does not require polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or electrophoresis procedures, which greatly simplifies the detection process. We anticipate that this easy-operation and cost-effective protocol is a fine alternative for the assessment of telomere length.

  9. Characteristics of intermediate state related to anti-Stokes luminescence of ZnO single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Katsushi; Goto, Takenari; Yao, Takafumi

    2014-06-01

    Anti-Stokes luminescence from ZnO is supposed to be a two-step two-photon absorption process with an intermediate state. The intermediate state is assumed to be a localized state with two different excited and relaxed states. One of the localized states is believed to be the well-known 2.4 eV green luminescence; the other is difficult to observe experimentally. We found an interesting 2.25 eV deep luminescence from ZnO, which has been shown to relate to anti-Stokes luminescence. The 2.25 eV yellow luminescence was observable only below the band gap excitation and through a time-resolved observation after the excitation light was turned off. The intermediate states were found to be a photo-excited donor-acceptor pair and its lattice relaxation state. The characteristics and the role of the intermediate state of ZnO related to the anti-Stokes luminescence are discussed.

  10. Multimode Raman light-atom interface in warm atomic ensemble as multiple three-mode quantum operations

    CERN Document Server

    Parniak, Michał; Wasilewski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the properties of a Raman quantum light-atom interface in long atomic ensemble and its applications as a quantum memory or two-mode squeezed state generator. We include both Stokes and anti-Stokes scattering and the effects of Doppler broadening in buffer gas assuming frequent velocity-averaging collisions. We find the Green functions describing multimode transformation from input to output fields of photons and atomic excitations. Proper mode basis is found via singular value decomposition. It reveals that triples of modes are coupled by a transformation equivalent to a combination of two beamsplitters and a two-mode squeezing operation. We analyze the possible transformations on an example of warm rubidium-87 vapor. We find that the fidelity of the mapping of a single excitation between the memory and light is strictly limited by the fractional contribution of the Stokes scattering in predominantly anti-Stokes process. The model we present bridges the gap between the Stokes only and anti-Stokes o...

  11. ``Bloch wave'' modification of stimulated Raman by stimulated Brillouin scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, E. S.; Vu, H. X.; DuBois, D. F.; Bezzerides, B.

    2013-03-01

    Using the reduced-description particle-in-cell (RPIC) method, we study the coupling of backward stimulated Raman scattering (BSRS) and backward stimulated Brillouin scattering (BSBS) in regimes where the reflectivity involves the nonlinear behavior of particles trapped in the daughter plasma waves. The temporal envelope of a Langmuir wave (LW) obeys a Schrödinger equation where the potential is the periodic electron density fluctuation resulting from an ion-acoustic wave (IAW). The BSRS-driven LWs in this case have a Bloch wave structure and a modified dispersion due to the BSBS-driven spatially periodic IAW, which includes frequency band gaps at kLW˜kIAW/2˜k0 (kLW, kIAW, and k0 are the wave number of the LW, IAW, and incident pump electromagnetic wave, respectively). This band structure and the associated Bloch wave harmonic components are distinctly observed in RPIC calculations of the electron density fluctuation spectra and this structure may be observable in Thomson scatter. Bloch wave components grow up in the LW spectrum, and are not the result of isolated BSRS. Self-Thomson scattered light from these Bloch wave components can have forward scattering components. The distortion of the LW dispersion curve implies that the usual relationship connecting the frequency shift of the BSRS-scattered light and the density of origin of this light may become inaccurate. The modified LW frequency results in a time-dependent frequency shift that increases as the IAW grows, detunes the BSRS frequency matching condition, and reduces BSRS growth. A dependence of the BSRS reflectivity on the IAW Landau damping results because this damping determines the levels of IAWs. The time-dependent reflectivity in our simulations is characterized by bursts of sub-picosecond pulses of BSRS alternating with multi-ps pulses of BSBS, and BSRS is observed to decline precipitously as soon as SBS begins to grow from low levels. In strong BSBS regimes, the Bloch wave effects in BSRS are

  12. Amplification Effect on Rayleigh Scattering and SBS in 25 km Distributed Fiber Raman Amplifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-Ping Gong; Zai-Xuan Zhang

    2008-01-01

    The amplification effect on stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and Rayleigh scattering in the backward pumped G652 fibers Raman amplifier have been researched. The signal source is a tunable narrow spectral bandwidth (<10 MHz) ECL laser and is pumped by the tunable power 1427.2 nm fiber Raman laser. The Rayleigh scattering lines are amplified by fiber Raman amplifier, and Stokes stimulated Brillouin scattering lines are amplified by fiber Raman amplifier and fiber BriUouin amplifier. The SBS lines total gain is a production of the gain of Raman and the gain of Brillouin amplifier. In experiment, the gain of SBS is about 42 dB and the saturation gain of 25 km G652 backward FRA is about 25 dB, so the gain of fiber Brillouin amplifier is about 17 dB.

  13. Resonance Raman Scattering Studies of Gallium - - Aluminum-Arsenide Superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gant, Thomas Andrew

    We have made resonance Raman scattering studies of folded LA phonons and quantized LO phonons in several GaAs-AlAs superlattices. The motivation for this work was to study the electronic structure and the electron -phonon interaction in these structures. The samples were not intentionally doped. The Raman spectra of optic phonons were usually taken at a temperature of 10 K or less. The folded acoustic phonon work was taken at temperatures ranging from 200-300 K in order to enhance the scattering by the thermal factor. Two samples in particular have received very close attention: sample 2292 (50 A GaAs- 20 A AlAs) and sample 3250 (20 A GaAs- 50 A AlAs). In sample 2292 we have made resonance studies of the folded LA phonons and the GaAs -like confined LO_2 mode near the second heavy hole exciton. The results on the folded acoustic phonons show a very strong resonance enhancement for the second order folded phonons, but very little for the first order. An interference between two different scattering channels (the n = 1 light hole and the n = 2 heavy hole subbands) seems to be responsible for this effect. The resonance profile for the LO_2 confined optic phonon in sample 2292 shows 4 peaks in the region from 1.8 eV to 2.05 eV. We have studied the dependence of this resonance profile on the power density. A higher power density was achieved by using the same laser power with a tighter focus. At the higher power density the peak at 1.93 eV (formerly the strongest peak present) vanished. This "bleaching" effect is related to screening due to the higher carrier density. In sample 3250 we have studied the polarization dependence of the resonance profiles of four peaks (LO _2, LO_4, LO_6, and an interface mode) near the lowest direct gap. The A_1 symmetry confined LO modes are seen in both polarized and depolarized geometries, in violation of the usual selection rule (polarized). A mechanism is proposed to explain this result, which has been previously observed by other

  14. Single-Molecule Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Spectrum of Non-Resonant Aromatic Amine Showing Raman Forbidden Bands

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, Yuko S; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Zhang, Zhenglong; Kozu, Tomomi; Itoh, Tamitake; Nakanishi, Shunsuke

    2016-01-01

    We present the experimentally obtained single-molecule (SM) surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectrum of 4-aminibenzenethiol (4-ABT), also known as para-aminothiophenol (PATP). Measured at a 4-ABT concentration of 8 * 10^-10 M, the spectra show Raman forbidden modes. The SM-SERS spectrum of 4-ABT obtained using a non-resonant visible laser is different from the previously reported SERS spectra of 4-ABT, and could not be reconstructed using quantum mechanical calculations. Careful classical assignments (not based on quantum-mechanical calculations) are reported, and indicate that differences in the reported spectra of 4-ABT are mainly due to the appearance of Raman forbidden bands. The presence of Raman forbidden bands can be explained by the charge-transfer (CT) effect of 4-ABT adsorbed on the silver nanostructures, indicating a breakdown of Raman selection rules at the SERS hotspot.

  15. A fiber-laser-based stimulated Raman scattering spectral microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nose, Keisuke; Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Kishi, Tatsuya; Sumimura, Kazuhiko; Kanematsu, Yasuo; Itoh, Kazuyoshi

    2013-02-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) spectral microscopy is a powerful technique for label-free biological imaging because it allows us to distinguish chemical species with overlapping Raman bands. Here we present an SRS spectral microscope based only on fiber lasers (FL's), which offer the possibilities of downsizing and simplification of the system. A femtosecond figure-8 Er-FL at a repetition rate of 54.4 MHz is used to generate pump pulses. After amplified by an Er doped fiber amplifier, Er-FL pulses are spectrally compressed to 2-ps second harmonic pulses. For generating Stokes pulses, a femtosecond Yb-FL pulses at a repetition rate of 27.2 MHz is used. Then these lasers are synchronized by a phase locked loop, which consists of a two-photon absorption photodetector, a loop filter, a phase modulator in the Er- FL cavity, and a piezo electric transducer in the Yb-FL cavity. The intensity noise of pump pulses is reduced by the collinear balanced detection (CBD) technique based on delay-and-add fiber lines. Experimentally, we confirmed that the intensity noise level of probe pulses was close to the shot noise limit. The Stokes pulses are introduced to a wavelength tunable band pass filter (BPF), which consists of a galvanomirror scanner, a 4-f optical system, a reflection grating, and a collimator. This system is able to scan the wavenumber from 2850 cm-1 to 3100 cm-1 by tuning the BPF. We succeeded in the spectral imaging of a mixture of polystyrene beads and poly(methyl methacrylate) beads.

  16. Efficient generation of broad Raman sidebands in an index-guided photonic crystal fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Hou, Jing; Jiang, Zongfu; Leng, Jinyong

    2013-04-01

    The efficient generation of broad Raman sidebands is experimentally demonstrated in a short piece of index-guided photonic crystal fiber, which is pumped by a high-peak-power pulse near the zero-dispersion wavelength and seeded by a continuous-wave Stokes signal centered at 1117 nm. The Raman sidebands generated via stimulated Raman scattering and cascaded four-wave mixing contain five Stokes and six anti-Stokes peaks and span from 827 to 1398 nm, and the 3 dB linewidth for each peak is smaller than 1 nm. However, the pure Raman sidebands are largely dependent on the pulse pump power as well as the fiber length.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Raman scattering cross sections for H2 (Oklopcic+,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklopcic, A.; Hirata, C. M.; Heng, K.

    2017-02-01

    An important source of opacity in exoplanet atmospheres at short visible and near-UV wavelengths is Rayleigh scattering of light on molecules. It is accompanied by a related, albeit weaker process-Raman scattering. We analyze the signatures of Raman scattering imprinted in the reflected light and the geometric albedo of exoplanets, which could provide information about atmospheric properties. Raman scattering affects the geometric albedo spectra of planets in the following ways. First, it causes filling-in of strong absorption lines in the incident radiation, thus producing sharp peaks in the albedo. Second, it shifts the wavelengths of spectral features in the reflected light causing the so-called Raman ghost lines. Raman scattering can also cause a broadband reduction of the albedo due to wavelength shifting of a stellar spectrum with red spectral index. Observing the Raman peaks in the albedo could be used to measure the column density of gas, thus providing constraints on the presence of clouds in the atmosphere. Observing the Raman ghost lines could be used to spectroscopically identify the main scatterer in the atmosphere, even molecules like H2 or N2, which do not have prominent spectral signatures in the optical wavelength range. If detected, ghost lines could also provide information about the temperature of the atmosphere. In this paper, we investigate the effects of Raman scattering in hydrogen- and nitrogen-dominated atmospheres. We analyze the feasibility of detecting the signatures of Raman scattering with the existing and future observational facilities, and of using these signatures as probes of exoplanetary atmospheres. (1 data file).

  18. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy in the presence of strong resonant signal from background molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Bitter, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Optical spectroscopy with broadband femtosecond laser pulses often involves simultaneous excitation of multiple molecular species with close resonance frequencies. Interpreting the collective optical response from molecular mixtures typically requires Fourier analysis of the detected time-resolved signal. We propose an alternative method of separating coherent optical responses from two molecular species with neighboring excitation resonances (here, vibrational modes of oxygen and carbon dioxide). We utilize ro-vibrational coupling as a mechanism of suppressing the strong vibrational response from the dominating molecular species (O$_{2}$). Coherent ro-vibrational dynamics lead to long "silence windows" of zero signal from oxygen molecules. In these silence windows, the detected signal stems solely from the minority species (CO$_{2}$) enabling background-free detection and characterization of the O$_2$/CO$_2$ mixing ratio. In comparison to a Fourier analysis, our technique does not require femtosecond time re...

  19. Silicon nanohybrid-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Houyu; Jiang, Xiangxu; Lee, Shuit-Tong; He, Yao

    2014-11-01

    Nanomaterial-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensors are highly promising analytical tools, capable of ultrasensitive, multiplex, and nondestructive detection of chemical and biological species. Extensive efforts have been made to design various silicon nanohybrid-based SERS substrates such as gold/silver nanoparticle (NP)-decorated silicon nanowires, Au/Ag NP-decorated silicon wafers (AuNP@Si), and so forth. In comparison to free AuNP- and AgNP-based SERS sensors, the silicon nanohybrid-based SERS sensors feature higher enhancement factors (EFs) and excellent reproducibility, since SERS hot spots are efficiently coupled and stabilized through interconnection to the semiconducting silicon substrates. Consequently, in the past decade, giant advancements in the development of silicon nanohybrid-based SERS sensors have been witnessed for myriad sensing applications. In this review, the representative achievements related to the design of high-performance silicon nanohybrid-based SERS sensors and their use for chemical and biological analysis are reviewed in a detailed way. Furthermore, the major opportunities and challenges in this field are discussed from a broad perspective and possible future directions.

  20. Graphene thickness-controlled photocatalysis and surface enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Cheng-Chi; Chen, Chun-Hu

    2014-11-01

    Exceptional photocatalytic enhancement of graphene-semiconductor composites has been widely reported, but our understanding of the role that graphene plays in this enhancement remains limited, which arises from the difficulty of precisely controlling graphene hybridization. Here we present a general platform of a graphene-semiconductor hybrid panel (GHP) system wherein a precise number of layers of graphene are hybridized with photoactive semiconductors (e.g. TiO2, ZnO) to study systematically how graphene affects the photocatalysis. The results show that the graphene enhancement of the photocatalysis depends on the number of graphene layers, with the maximum performance observed at 3 layers. Photodeposited indicators of gold particles further reveal that graphene thickness governs the density of photocatalytic sites and charge transfer efficiency at the graphene-semiconductor interfaces. We suggest that quantized energy levels caused by different numbers of stacked graphene sheets along the vector normal to the graphene basal plane affect the charge transfer routes and lead to the graphene thickness-controlled photocatalysis. GHP substrates deposited with gold particles are promising, uniform substrates for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) applications with the enhancement factor as high as ∼10(8) on 3-layer graphene.

  1. Raman Scattering from Atmospheric Nitrogen in the Stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, M. J.; Kent, G. S.

    1973-01-01

    The Mark II laser radar system at Kingston, Jamaica, has been used to make observations on the Raman shifted line from atmospheric nitrogen at 828.5 nm. The size of the system makes it possible to detect signals from heights of up to 40 kilometres. The effects of aerosol scattering observed using a single wavelength are almost eliminated, and a profile of nitrogen density may be obtained. Assuming a constant mixing ratio, this may be interpreted as a profile of atmospheric density whose accuracy is comparable to that obtained from routine meteorological soundings. In order to obtain an accurate profile several interfering effects have had to be examined and, where necessary, eliminated. These include: 1) Fluorescence in optical components 2) Leakage of signal at 694.3 nm. 3) Overload effects and non-linearities in the receiving and counting electronics. Most of these effects have been carefully examined and comparisons are being made between the observed atmospheric density profiles and local meteorological radio-sonde measurements. Good agreement has been obtained over the region of overlap (15 - 30 KID), discrepancies being of the same order as the experimental accuracy (1-10%), depending on height and length of period of observation.

  2. Computer simulation of surface-enhanced Raman scattering in nanostructured metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyarintsev, S. O.; Sarychev, A. K.

    2011-12-01

    The simulation of local field fluctuations and surface-enhanced Raman scattering in percolation systems at the percolation threshold is described. An approximate real-space renormalization group method was used in the simulation. It allows one to radically reduce the computation time compared to an exact calculation and to obtain detailed information about the electromagnetic field. The local fields in real macroscopic systems can be calculated by using this approximation. A computer simulation of the local fields in metal island (percolation) films has been performed by the developed method. The calculation has confirmed the existence of giant local field fluctuations. In turn, the local electric field excites Raman scattering. The local fields of surface-enhanced Raman scattering have been calculated for the first time. The dependence of the Raman scattering enhancement factor on the reference frequency and Stokes shift has been derived. An experimental observation of this dependence could be considered as a confirmation of the electromagnetic nature of the enhancement.

  3. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering on aluminum using near infrared and visible excitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Gühlke, Marina; Kneipp, Janina;

    2014-01-01

    We observed strong surface-enhanced Raman scattering on discontinuous nanostructured aluminum films using 785 nm excitation even though dielectric constants of this metal suggest plasmon supported spectroscopy in the ultraviolet range. The excitation of SERS correlates with plasmon resonances...

  4. Accounting for Transverse Inhomogeneity of Radiation Beams in Laser Raman Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apanasevich, P. A.; Dashkevich, V. I.; Timofeeva, G. I.

    2016-05-01

    A simple method of accounting for transverse inhomogeneity of the pump and Stokes radiation beams in the description of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) using intensity-transfer equations for interacting beams is proposed. Features of the method are illustrated using the calculated dependences of the Raman laser efficiency on the output mirror reflectivity and the pump pulse energy as examples.

  5. Strongly enhanced Raman scattering of Cu-phthalocyanine sandwiched between graphene and Au(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wan-Ing; Gholami, Mohammad Fardin; Beyer, Paul; Severin, Nikolai; Shao, Feng; Zenobi, Renato; Rabe, Jürgen P

    2017-01-05

    Graphene and flat gold have both been argued to enhance Raman scattering of molecular adsorbates through a chemical mechanism. Here we show that these two effects can add to each other. For Cu-phthalocyanine in between graphene and Au(111) on mica a Raman enhancement up to 68-fold has been observed.

  6. Detection of nerve gases using surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates with high droplet adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hakonen, Aron; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk;

    2016-01-01

    we demonstrate that surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) can be used for sensitive detection of femtomol quantities of two nerve gases, VX and Tabun, using a handheld Raman device and SERS substrates consisting of flexible gold-covered Si nanopillars. The substrate surface exhibits high droplet...

  7. Measurement of Concentration Distribution of Hydrogen Gas Flow by Measuring the Intensity of Raman Scattering Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asahi, Ippei; Ninomiya, Hideki

    An experimental study to visualize and measure the concentration distribution of hydrogen gas flow using the Raman scattering was performed. A Nd:YAG laser of wavelength at 355 nm was used, and the beam pattern was transformed into a rectangle and a sheet beam was formed. The Raman scattered light was observed at a right angle with respect to the laser beam axis using a gated ICCD camera and an interference filter. Shadowgraph images were obtained at the same condition. The Raman scattering light image from atmospheric nitrogen was first acquired and the function of Raman scattering light acquisition and the background light suppression was confirmed. Next, images of the Raman scattering light image and shadowgraph of hydrogen gas discharged from a nozzle into the atmosphere were acquired. The two obtained Raman images were compared and the spatial concentration distribution of the flow of the hydrogen gas at different flow rates was calculated. This method is effective for visualizing the gas flow and measuring the concentration distribution of the Raman active molecules, such as hydrogen gas.

  8. Charged defects in chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors studied with combined Raman scattering and PALS methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kavetskyy, T.; Vakiv, M. [Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine); Shpotyuk, O. [Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine)], E-mail: shpotyuk@novas.lviv.ua

    2007-04-15

    A combination of Raman scattering and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) techniques to study charged defects in chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors (ChVSs) was applied for the first time in this study. In the case of Ge{sub 15.8}As{sub 21}S{sub 63.2} glass, it is found that the main radiation-induced switching of heteropolar Ge-S bonds into heteropolar As-S ones, previously detected by IR fast Fourier transform spectroscopy, can also be identified by Raman spectroscopy in the depolarized configuration. Results obtained by Raman scattering are in good agreement with PALS data for the investigated glass composition.

  9. Generation of Pseudoscalar Bosons by Stimulated Raman Scattering of Light in Dielectric Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorelik V.S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The conditions of pseudoscalar excitations of liquids and crystals vibration states in spontaneous and stimulated Raman spectra revealing are reported. The selection rules for pseudoscalar modes of molecules and crystals observation have been obtained. The experiments on observation of spontaneous and stimulated Raman scattering on pseudoscalar modes of molecules and crystals have been fulfilled. The excitation of stimulated Raman scattering was with using of solid state laser YAG:Nd3+, generating intense (up to 1 TW/cm2 ultrashort (60 ps laser pulses with energy 10 mJ and frequency repetition 10 Hz. The relationship between pseudoscalar bosons of dielectric media and axion of vacuum is analyzed.

  10. Photon-phonon anti-stokes upconversion of a photonically, electronically, and thermally isolated opal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem, Michelle R.

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of the present research was to investigate an intense violet shift displayed by a non-toxic, natural silicate material with a highly ordered nanostructure. The material displayed an unexpected, nonlinear 2:3 photon-phonon anti-Stokes upconversion while photonically, electronically, and thermally isolated. Conducted aphotonically and at ambient temperatures, the specimen upconverted a low-power, 650 nm constant wave red laser to an internally highly dispersed 433 nm violet wavelength. The strong dispersion was largely due to nearly total internal reflection of the laser. The upconversion had an efficiency of about 78 %, based on specimen volume, with no detectable thermal variance. The 2:3 anti-Stokes upconversion displayed by this material is likely the result of a previously unknown photon-phonon evanescence response that amplified the energy of a portion of the incident laser photons. Thus, a portion of the incident laser photons were upconverted, and the material converted another portion into an amplified energy that caused the upconversion. Internal micro-lasing appeared to be a means of photon-phonon evanescent energy redistribution, enabling dispersed photonic upconversion. Additional analyses also found an unexpectedly rhythmic photonic structure in spectrophotometric scans, polariscopic color changing, and previously undocumented ultraviolet responses.

  11. Coupled wave equations theory of surface-enhanced femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAnally, Michael O.; McMahon, Jeffrey M.; Van Duyne, Richard P.; Schatz, George C.

    2016-09-01

    We present a coupled wave semiclassical theory to describe plasmonic enhancement effects in surface-enhanced femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering (SE-FSRS). A key result is that the plasmon enhanced fields which drive the vibrational equation of motion for each normal mode results in dispersive lineshapes in the SE-FSRS spectrum. This result, which reproduces experimental lineshapes, demonstrates that plasmon-enhanced stimulated Raman methods provide unique sensitivity to a plasmonic response. Our derived SE-FSRS theory shows a plasmonic enhancement of |gp u|2I m {" separators="χR(ω ) gst 2 }/I m {" separators="χR(ω ) }, where |gpu|2 is the absolute square of the plasmonic enhancement from the Raman pump, χR(ω) is the Raman susceptibility, and gst is the plasmonic enhancement of the Stokes field in SE-FSRS. We conclude with a discussion on potential future experimental and theoretical directions for the field of plasmonically enhanced coherent Raman scattering.

  12. Resonant enhancement of Raman scattering in metamaterials with hybrid electromagnetic and plasmonic resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Guddala, Sriram; Ramakrishna, S Anantha

    2016-01-01

    A tri-layer metamaterial perfect absorber of light, consisting of (Al/ZnS/Al) films with the top aluminium layer patterned as an array of circular disk nanoantennas, is investigated for resonantly enhancing Raman scattering from C-60 fullerene molecules deposited on the metamaterial. The metamaterial is designed to have resonant bands due to plasmonic and electromagnetic resonances at the Raman pump frequency (725 nm) as well as Stokes emission bands. The Raman scattering from C60 on the metamaterial with resonantly matched bands is measured to be enhanced by an order of magnitude more than from C60 on metamaterials with off-resonant absorption bands peaked at 1090 nm. The Raman pump is significantly enhanced due to the resonance with a propagating surface plasmon band, while the highly impedance matched electromagnetic resonance is expected to couple out the Raman emission efficiently. The nature and hybridization of the plasmonic and electromagnetic resonances to form compound resonances are investigated by...

  13. The Nanofabrication and Application of Substrates for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS was discovered in 1974 and impacted Raman spectroscopy and surface science. Although SERS has not been developed to be an applicable detection tool so far, nanotechnology has promoted its development in recent decades. The traditional SERS substrates, such as silver electrode, metal island film, and silver colloid, cannot be applied because of their enhancement factor or stability, but newly developed substrates, such as electrochemical deposition surface, Ag porous film, and surface-confined colloids, have better sensitivity and stability. Surface enhanced Raman scattering is applied in other fields such as detection of chemical pollutant, biomolecules, DNA, bacteria, and so forth. In this paper, the development of nanofabrication and application of surface-enhanced Ramans scattering substrate are discussed.

  14. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering: a new optical probe in molecular biophysics and biomedicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, J.; Wittig, B.; Bohr, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Sensitive and detailed molecular structural information plays an increasing role in molecular biophysics and molecular medicine. Therefore, vibrational spectroscopic techniques, such as Raman scattering, which provide high structural information content are of growing interest in biophysical...... of the free electrons in the metal. This effect of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) allows us to push vibrational spectroscopy to new limits in detection sensitivity, lateral resolution, and molecular structural selectivity. This opens up exciting perspectives also in molecular biospectroscopy...... and biomedical research. Raman spectroscopy can be revolutionized when the inelastic scattering process takes place in the very close vicinity of metal nanostructures. Under these conditions, strongly increased Raman signals can be obtained due to resonances between optical fields and the collective oscillations...

  15. Nonlinear Evolutions of Stimulated Raman and Brillouin Scattering Processes in Partially Stripped-Ion Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡业民; 胡希伟

    2001-01-01

    Numerical analyses for the nonlinear evolutions of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) processes are given. Various effects of the second- and third-order nonlinear susceptibilities on the SRS and SBS processes are studied. The nonlinear evolutions of SRS and SBS processes are atfected more efficiently than their linear growth rates by the nonlinear susceptibility.

  16. Stimulated low frequency Raman scattering in cupric oxide nanoparticles water suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averyushkin, A. S.; Baranov, A. N.; Bulychev, N. A.; Kazaryan, M. A.; Kudryavtseva, A. D.; Strokov, M. A.; Tcherniega, N. V.; Zemskov, K. I.

    2017-04-01

    Cupric oxide nanoparticles with average size of 213.2 nm, were synthesized in acoustoplasma discharge for investigating their vibrational properties. The low-frequency acoustic mode in cupric oxide (CuO) nanoparticles has been studied by stimulated low-frequency Raman scattering (SLFRS). SLFRS conversion efficiency, threshold and frequency shift of the scattered light are measured.

  17. Simulation of Stimulated Brillouin Scattering and Stimulated Raman Scattering In Shock Ignition

    CERN Document Server

    Hao, L; Liu, W D; Yan, R; Ren, C

    2016-01-01

    We study stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in shock ignition by comparing fluid and PIC simulations. Under typical parameters for the OMEGA experiments [Theobald \\emph{et al}., Phys. Plasmas \\textbf{19}, 102706 (2012)], a series of 1D fluid simulations with laser intensities ranging between 2$\\times$10$^{15}$ and 2$\\times$10$^{16}$ W/cm$^2$ finds that SBS is the dominant instability, which increases significantly with the incident intensity. Strong pump depletion caused by SBS and SRS limits the transmitted intensity at the 0.17n$_c$ to be less than 3.5$\\times$10$^{15}$ W/cm$^2$. The PIC simulations show similar physics but with higher saturation levels for SBS and SRS convective modes and stronger pump depletion due to higher seed levels for the electromagnetic fields in PIC codes. Plasma flow profiles are found to be important in proper modeling of SBS and limiting its reflectivity in both the fluid and PIC simulations.

  18. Guiding brain tumor resection using surface-enhanced Raman scattering nanoparticles and a hand-held Raman scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabeber, Hazem; Huang, Ruimin; Iacono, Pasquale; Samii, Jason M; Pitter, Ken; Holland, Eric C; Kircher, Moritz F

    2014-10-28

    The current difficulty in visualizing the true extent of malignant brain tumors during surgical resection represents one of the major reasons for the poor prognosis of brain tumor patients. Here, we evaluated the ability of a hand-held Raman scanner, guided by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles, to identify the microscopic tumor extent in a genetically engineered RCAS/tv-a glioblastoma mouse model. In a simulated intraoperative scenario, we tested both a static Raman imaging device and a mobile, hand-held Raman scanner. We show that SERS image-guided resection is more accurate than resection using white light visualization alone. Both methods complemented each other, and correlation with histology showed that SERS nanoparticles accurately outlined the extent of the tumors. Importantly, the hand-held Raman probe not only allowed near real-time scanning, but also detected additional microscopic foci of cancer in the resection bed that were not seen on static SERS images and would otherwise have been missed. This technology has a strong potential for clinical translation because it uses inert gold-silica SERS nanoparticles and a hand-held Raman scanner that can guide brain tumor resection in the operating room.

  19. Anomalous lattice vibrations of monolayer MoS 2 probed by ultraviolet Raman scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Hsiang Lin

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive Raman scattering study of monolayer MoS2 with increasing laser excitation energies ranging from the near-infrared to the deep-ultraviolet. The Raman scattering intensities from the second-order phonon modes are revealed to be enhanced anomalously by only the ultraviolet excitation wavelength 354 nm. We demonstrate theoretically that such resonant behavior arises from a strong optical absorption that forms near the Γ point and of the band structure and an inter-valley resonant electronic scattering by the M-point phonons. These results advance our understanding of the double resonance Raman scattering process in low-dimensional semiconducting nanomaterials and provide a foundation for the technological development of monolayer MoS2 in the ultraviolet frequency range. © the Owner Societies 2015.

  20. Enhanced Raman scattering of graphene on Ag nanoislands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Wei; HUANG ZhiYi; ZHOU YingHui; CAI WeiWei; KANG JunYong

    2014-01-01

    The effect of Ag nanoislands on the Raman of graphene was investigated in this work.Compared with that on the bare silicon wafer,Raman enhancement was observed in the graphene film that covered on Ag/Si surface with nanoscale Ag islands,which would be induced by the localized plasmon resonance in Ag nanostructures.The interaction between the graphene sheet and Ag/Si substrate was further studied.The peak shift and line shape of Raman spectroscopy indicated a nonuniform strain distribution in the Ag/Si supported graphene film.

  1. Time-gated optical imaging through turbid media using stimulated Raman scattering: Studies on image contrast

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Divakar Rao; H S Patel; B Jain; P K Gupta

    2005-02-01

    In this paper, we report the development of experimental set-up for timegated optical imaging through turbid media using stimulated Raman scattering. Our studies on the contrast of time-gated images show that for a given optical thickness, the image contrast is better for sample with lower scattering coefficient and higher physical thickness, and that the contrast improves with decreasing value of anisotropy parameters of the scatterers. These results are consistent with time-resolved Monte Carlo simulations.

  2. Raman scattering studies on manganese ion-implanted GaN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Da-Qing; Zhang Yi-Men; Zhang Yu-Ming; Li Pei-Xian; Wang Chao

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports that the Raman spectra have been recorded on the metal-organic chemical vapour deposition epitaxially grown GaN before and after the Mn ions implanted.Several Raman defect modes have emerged from the implanted samples.The structures around 182 cm-1 modes are attributed to the disorder-activated Raman scattering,whereas the 361 cm-1 and 660 cm-1 peaks are assigned to nitrogen vacancy-related defect scattering.One additional peak at 280 cm-1 is attributed to the vibrational mode of gallium vacancy-related defects and/or to disorder activated Raman scattering.A Raman-scattering study of lattice recovery is also presented by rapid thermal annealing at different temperatures between 700℃ and 1050℃ on Mn implanted GaN epilayers.The behaviour of peak-shape change and full width at half maximum(FWHM)of the A1(LO)(733 cm-1)and EH2(566 cm-1)Raman modes are explained on the basis of implantation-induced lattice damage in GaN epilayers.

  3. Eliminating Rayleigh and Raman Scattering in Three-Dimensional Fluorescence Spectroscopy by Kriging Interpolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sh.; Xiao, X.; Xu, G.

    2016-11-01

    In order to effectively eliminate Rayleigh and Raman scattering, a method based on Kriging interpolation is proposed, in which both the distance and the correlation between the scattering region and the nonscattering region are considered. The experimental results show that an unbiased estimation of the scattering region is achieved by this Kriging interpolation. Compared with other interpolation methods that use only the neighboring points, the performance of this method for eliminating the scattering region is much less sensitive to the scattering range that we set.

  4. Laser induced broad band anti-Stokes white emission from LiYbF4 nanocrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L. Marciniak; R. Tomala; M. Stefanski; D. Hreniak; W. Strek

    2016-01-01

    Spectroscopic properties of tetragonal LiYbF4 nanocrystals under high dense NIR excitation at vacuum condition were in-vestigated. White, broad band emission covering whole visible part of the spectrum from LiYbF4 nanocrystals was observed. Its in-tensity strongly depended on the excitation power, excitation wavelength and ambient pressure. Temperature of the nanocrystals un-der 975 nm excitation was determined as a function of excitation power. Strong photo-induced current was observed from LiYbF4 pallet. The emission kinetic was analyzed. The mechanism of the anti-Stokes white emission was discussed in terms of the la-ser-induced charge transfer emission from Yb2+ states.

  5. Limiting the intensity of femtosecond pulses with anti-stokes excitation of organic dye solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetlichnyi, V. A.; Meshalkin, Yu. P.; Kirpichnikov, A. V.; Pestryakov, E. V.

    2010-08-01

    Results of experimental investigations into the nonlinear absorption of the symmetric polymethine 1-butyl -3,3-dimethyl-2-[5-(1-butyl-3,3-dimethyl-3H-benz[e]indoline-2-uledene)-1,3-pentadienyl]-3H-benz[e]indolium perchlorate dye solution excited by radiation of a femtosecond titanium-sapphire laser (20 fs, 800 nm, 75 MHz, and 300 mW) by the open aperture z-scan method are presented. Record limitation of the femtosecond laser radiation intensity (by 300 times at a 93% linear transmission of the medium) was achieved. The nonlinear absorption mechanisms in organic dyes with anti-Stokes excitation by wideband high-power pulsed radiation to the absorption band edge and the prospects for organic dye application for limitation of the femtosecond laser radiation intensity are discussed.

  6. High-efficiency broadband anti-Stokes emission from Yb3+-doped bulk crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Siqi; Wang, Chunhao; Li, Zhen; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Yichuan; Yin, Hao; Wu, Lidan; Chen, Zhenqiang; Zhang, Ge

    2016-05-15

    We investigate the broadband anti-Stokes emission (BASE) from Yb3+-doped crystals with a laser diode (LD) pumping at 940 nm. Our experiment reveals that Yb3+-doped crystals with random cracks are able to generate bright BASE at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. By examining the various characteristics of the crystals and the emitted light, we supply a theory for interpreting the underlying physics for this variety of BASE. In particular, we take into consideration the effects of energy migration, avalanche process, and charge-transfer luminescence. This represents the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that BASE was obtained from Yb3+-doped bulk crystals with a high optical-optical efficiency.

  7. Raman Scattering at Resonant or Near-Resonant Conditions: A Generalized Short-Time Approximation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdelsalam Mohammed; Yu-Ping Sun; Quan Miao; Hans (A)gren; Faris Gel'mukhanov

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of resonant Raman scattering in the course of the frequency detuning.The dephasing in the time domain makes the scattering fast when the photon energy is tuned from the absorption resonance.This makes frequency detuning to act as a camera shutter with a regulated scattering duration and provides a practical tool of controlling the scattering time in ordinary stationary measurements.The theory is applied to resonant Raman spectra of a couple of few-mode model systems and to trans-1,3,5-hexatriene and guanine-cytosine (G-C) Watson-Crick base pairs (DNA) molecules.Besides some particular physical effects,the regime of fast scattering leads to a simplification of the spectrum as well as to the scattering theory itself.Strong overtones appear in the Raman spectra when the photon frequency is tuned in the resonant region,while in the mode of fast scattering,the overtones are gradually quenched when the photon frequency is tuned more than one vibrational quantum below the first absorption resonance.The detuning from the resonant region thus leads to a strong purification of the Raman spectrum from the contamination by higher overtones and soft modes and purifies the spectrum also in terms of avoidance of dissociation and interfering fluorescence decay of the resonant state.This makes frequency detuning a very useful practical tool in the analysis of the resonant Raman spectra of complex systems and considerably improves the prospects for using the Raman effect for detection of foreign substances at ultra-low concentrations.

  8. Raman scattering from a superconductivity-induced bound state in MgB2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeyher, R

    2003-03-14

    It is shown that the sharp peak in the E(2g) Raman spectrum of superconducting MgB2 is due to a bound state caused by the electron-phonon coupling. Our theory explains why this peak appears only in the spectra with E(2g) symmetry and only in the sigma but not the pi bands. The properties of the bound state and the Raman spectrum are investigated, also in the presence of impurity scattering.

  9. The Role of Fermi Resonance in Formation of Valence Band of Water Raman Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey A. Burikov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of Fermi resonance in formation of valence band of water Raman scattering was investigated. Simultaneous measurement of characteristics of bending and valence bands of water in D2O solutions, KBr, and KCl and using genetic algorithms in conjunction with variation methods allowed increasing accuracy of estimation of Fermi resonance coupling constant and of Fermi resonance contribution into formation of water Raman valence band.

  10. Next-generation Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) Substrates for Hazard Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Izake, E.L., " Forensic and homeland security applications of modern portable Raman spectroscopy," Forensic Science International, 1-8 (2010). [19...Yazici, M.M., Kahraman, M., Sahin, F., Gulluce, M., "Characterization of Thermophilic Bacteria Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering," Applied...pathogenic bacteria ," Proceedings of the SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, 73130K (73110 pp.) (2009). [69] Hankus, M.E

  11. Electroless Gold-Modified Diatoms as Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannico, Marianna; Rea, Ilaria; Chandrasekaran, Soundarrajan; Musto, Pellegrino; Voelcker, Nicolas H.; De Stefano, Luca

    2016-06-01

    Porous biosilica from diatom frustules is well known for its peculiar optical and mechanical properties. In this work, gold-coated diatom frustules are used as low-cost, ready available, functional support for surface-enhanced Raman scattering. Due to the morphology of the nanostructured surface and the smoothness of gold deposition via an electroless process, an enhancement factor for the p-mercaptoaniline Raman signal of the order of 105 is obtained.

  12. A study of surface enhanced Raman scattering for furfural adsorbed on silver surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ting-jian; Li, Peng-wei; Shang, Zhi-guo; Zhang, Ling; He, Ting-chao; Mo, Yu-jun

    2008-02-01

    The normal Raman spectrum (NRS) and the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectrum of furfural in silver colloid were recorded and analyzed in this paper. The assignment of these bands to furfural molecules was performed by density functional theory (DFT) calculation. The data of the SERS by comparing with the one of NRS show that furfural molecules are adsorbed on the silver surface via the nonbonding electrons of the carbonyl oxygen.

  13. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering from AgNP-graphene-AgNP sandwiched nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian; Xu, Yijun; Xu, Pengyu; Pan, Zhenghui; Chen, Sheng; Shen, Qishen; Zhan, Li; Zhang, Yuegang; Ni, Weihai

    2015-10-01

    We developed a facile approach toward hybrid AgNP-graphene-AgNP sandwiched structures using self-organized monolayered AgNPs from wet chemical synthesis for the optimized enhancement of the Raman response of monolayer graphene. We demonstrate that the Raman scattering of graphene can be enhanced 530 fold in the hybrid structure. The Raman enhancement is sensitively dependent on the hybrid structure, incident angle, and excitation wavelength. A systematic simulation is performed, which well explains the enhancement mechanism. Our study indicates that the enhancement resulted from the plasmonic coupling between the AgNPs on the opposite sides of graphene. Our approach towards ideal substrates offers great potential to produce a ``hot surface'' for enhancing the Raman response of two-dimensional materials.We developed a facile approach toward hybrid AgNP-graphene-AgNP sandwiched structures using self-organized monolayered AgNPs from wet chemical synthesis for the optimized enhancement of the Raman response of monolayer graphene. We demonstrate that the Raman scattering of graphene can be enhanced 530 fold in the hybrid structure. The Raman enhancement is sensitively dependent on the hybrid structure, incident angle, and excitation wavelength. A systematic simulation is performed, which well explains the enhancement mechanism. Our study indicates that the enhancement resulted from the plasmonic coupling between the AgNPs on the opposite sides of graphene. Our approach towards ideal substrates offers great potential to produce a ``hot surface'' for enhancing the Raman response of two-dimensional materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional SEM images, electric field enhancement profiles, Raman scattering spectra, and structure-dependent peak ratios. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04500b

  14. Shape-dependent surface-enhanced Raman scattering in gold-Raman probe-silica sandwiched nanoparticles for biocompatible applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Cushing, Scott K; Zhang, Jianming; Lankford, Jessica; Aguilar, Zoraida P; Ma, Dongling; Wu, Nianqiang

    2012-03-23

    To meet the requirement of Raman probes (labels) for biocompatible applications, a synthetic approach has been developed to sandwich the Raman-probe (malachite green isothiocyanate, MGITC) molecules between the gold core and the silica shell in gold-SiO₂ composite nanoparticles. The gold-MGITC-SiO₂ sandwiched structure not only prevents the Raman probe from leaking out but also improves the solubility of the nanoparticles in organic solvents and in aqueous solutions even with high ionic strength. To amplify the Raman signal, three types of core, gold nanospheres, nanorods and nanostars, have been chosen as the substrates of the Raman probe. The effect of the core shape on the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been investigated. The colloidal nanostars showed the highest SERS enhancement factor while the nanospheres possessed the lowest SERS activity under excitation with 532 and 785 nm lasers. Three-dimensional finite-difference time domain (FDTD) simulation showed significant differences in the local electromagnetic field distributions surrounding the nanospheres, nanorods, and nanostars, which were induced by the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). The electromagnetic field was enhanced remarkably around the two ends of the nanorods and around the sharp tips of the nanostars. This local electromagnetic enhancement made the dominant contribution to the SERS enhancement. Both the experiments and the simulation revealed the order nanostars > nanorods > nanospheres in terms of the enhancement factor. Finally, the biological application of the nanostar-MGITC-SiO₂ nanoparticles has been demonstrated in the monitoring of DNA hybridization. In short, the gold–MGITC-SiO₂ sandwiched nanoparticles can be used as a Raman probe that features high sensitivity, good water solubility and stability, low-background fluorescence, and the absence of photobleaching for future biological applications.

  15. Biophotonics of skin: method for correction of deep Raman spectra distorted by elastic scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig, Blandine; Koenig, Anne; Perraut, François; Piot, Olivier; Gobinet, Cyril; Manfait, Michel; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2015-03-01

    Confocal Raman microspectroscopy allows in-depth molecular and conformational characterization of biological tissues non-invasively. Unfortunately, spectral distortions occur due to elastic scattering. Our objective is to correct the attenuation of in-depth Raman peaks intensity by considering this phenomenon, enabling thus quantitative diagnosis. In this purpose, we developed PDMS phantoms mimicking skin optical properties used as tools for instrument calibration and data processing method validation. An optical system based on a fibers bundle has been previously developed for in vivo skin characterization with Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (DRS). Used on our phantoms, this technique allows checking their optical properties: the targeted ones were retrieved. Raman microspectroscopy was performed using a commercial confocal microscope. Depth profiles were constructed from integrated intensity of some specific PDMS Raman vibrations. Acquired on monolayer phantoms, they display a decline which is increasing with the scattering coefficient. Furthermore, when acquiring Raman spectra on multilayered phantoms, the signal attenuation through each single layer is directly dependent on its own scattering property. Therefore, determining the optical properties of any biological sample, obtained with DRS for example, is crucial to correct properly Raman depth profiles. A model, inspired from S.L. Jacques's expression for Confocal Reflectance Microscopy and modified at some points, is proposed and tested to fit the depth profiles obtained on the phantoms as function of the reduced scattering coefficient. Consequently, once the optical properties of a biological sample are known, the intensity of deep Raman spectra distorted by elastic scattering can be corrected with our reliable model, permitting thus to consider quantitative studies for purposes of characterization or diagnosis.

  16. Multi-wavelength Raman scattering of nanostructured Al-doped zinc oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, V.; Ghidelli, M.; Gondoni, P. [Dipartimento di Energia and NEMAS, Center for Nanoengineered Materials and Surfaces, Politecnico di Milano, via Ponzio 34/3, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Casari, C. S.; Li Bassi, A. [Dipartimento di Energia and NEMAS, Center for Nanoengineered Materials and Surfaces, Politecnico di Milano, via Ponzio 34/3, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Center for Nano Science and Technology PoliMI, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Pascoli 70/3, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2014-02-21

    In this work we present a detailed Raman scattering investigation of zinc oxide and aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) films characterized by a variety of nanoscale structures and morphologies and synthesized by pulsed laser deposition under different oxygen pressure conditions. The comparison of Raman spectra for pure ZnO and AZO films with similar morphology at the nano/mesoscale allows to investigate the relation between Raman features (peak or band positions, width, relative intensity) and material properties such as local structural order, stoichiometry, and doping. Moreover Raman measurements with three different excitation lines (532, 457, and 325 nm) point out a strong correlation between vibrational and electronic properties. This observation confirms the relevance of a multi-wavelength Raman investigation to obtain a complete structural characterization of advanced doped oxide materials.

  17. Amplification effect on SBS and Rayleigh scattering in the backward pumped distributed fiber Raman amplifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zaixuan Zhang; Huaping Gong

    2009-01-01

    The amplification effect on stimulated Brillouin scattering(SBS)and Rayleigh scattering in the backward pumped G652 fiber Raman amplifier(FRA)is studied.The pump source is a 1427.2-nm fiber Raman laser whose power is tunable between 0-1200 mW,and the signal source is a tunable narrow spectral bandwidth(<10 MHz)external cavity laser(ECL).The Rayleigh scattering lines are amplified by the FRA and Stokes SBS lines are amplified by the FRA and the fiber Brillouin amplifier.The total gain of SBS lines is the production of the gain of Raman amplifier and that of Brillouin amplifier.In experiment,the SBS gain is about 42 dB and the saturation gain of 25-km G652 backward FRA is about 25 dB,so the gain of fiber Brillouin amplifier is about 17 dB.

  18. Directional Raman scattering from single molecules in the feed gaps of optical antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongxing; Zhu, Wenqi; Best, Michael D; Camden, Jon P; Crozier, Kenneth B

    2013-05-08

    Controlling light from single emitters is an overarching theme of nano-optics. Antennas are routinely used to modify the angular emission patterns of radio wave sources. "Optical antennas" translate these principles to visible and infrared wavelengths and have been recently used to modify fluorescence from single quantum dots and single molecules. Understanding the properties of single molecules, however, would be advanced were one able to observe their vibrational spectra through Raman scattering in a very reproducible manner but it is a hugely challenging task, as Raman scattering cross sections are very weak. Here we measure for the first time the highly directional emission patterns of Raman scattering from single molecules in the feed gaps of optical antennas fabricated on a chip. More than a thousand single molecule events are observed, revealing that an unprecedented near-unity fraction of optical antennas have single molecule sensitivity.

  19. NONLINEAR OPTICS: Stimulated resonant hyper-Raman scattering of light by polaritons in alkali metal vapors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaĭchuk, Yu A.; Yashkir, Yu N.

    1989-12-01

    A theory is developed for the calculation of the gain g due to stimulated resonant hyper-Raman scattering of light by polaritons in gaseous media. It is shown that throughout the tuning range of the pump frequency (including one- and two-photon resonances) a maximum of g corresponds to a dispersion curve of polaritons plotted ignoring attenuation. Theoretical results are used to analyze characteristics of hyper-Raman scattering in sodium vapor. It is shown that under normal experimental conditions the splitting of polariton branches is considerable (amounting to tens of reciprocal centimeters on the frequency scale and several angular degrees). The value of g is estimated for two-photon resonances in the case when the pump frequency is tunable in a wide range. The optimal conditions for stimulated hyper-Raman scattering are identified.

  20. Utilization of IR laser pumped anti-Stokes emission of Er-Yb doped systems for identification of securities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmin, A.N.; Ryabtsev, G.I.; Ketko, G.A. [Institute of Physics, Belarussian Academy of Sciences, Minsk (Belarus); Gorelenko, A.Yu.; Demidovich, A.A. [Science Center `Gosznak` of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus); Strek, W.; Maruszewicz, K.; Deren, P. [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Wroclaw (Poland)

    1996-12-31

    In this paper we present a utilization of anti-Stokes luminescence of Er-Yb systems for identification of securities. A simple method of detection of an up-conversion phenomenon in such system by means of IR laser operating in the region 960-1010 nm is proposed. (author) 3 refs, 3 figs

  1. High-sensitivity pesticide detection using particle-enhanced resonant Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Bikas; Saito, Yuika; Verma, Prabhat

    2016-03-01

    The use of pesticides in agriculture has raised concerns, as even a small residual of pesticide on food can be harmful. It is therefore of great importance to develop a robust technique to detect tiny amounts of pesticides. Although Raman spectroscopy is frequently used for chemical identification, it is not suitable for extremely low molecular concentrations. We propose a technique called particle-enhanced resonant Raman spectroscopy to detect extremely low concentrations of pesticides, where gold nanoparticles of desired plasmonic resonance are synthesized to match the resonance in Raman scattering. We successfully demonstrated the detection of extremely low amounts of pesticides on oranges.

  2. Frabrication of Au Nanoparticles in Various Shapes and Their Application in Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen-yang XUE; Hui-juan WANG; Yong-feng LIANG; Rong CHEN; Jun LIU

    2010-01-01

    Anisotropic metallic Nanoparticles (NPs) have unique optical properties, such as Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS)spectroscopy. In this paper, star-shaped and sphere gold NPs were prepared by seed-mediated growth and Frence methods respectively. The reaction process and the effect of reagent in seed-mediated growth of gold nanostar particles were systematically described. After fabricating NPs the authors test their Raman enhancement using Crystal Violet (CV) molecules apart. The experimental results indicated that star-shaped Au NPs had stronger Raman enhancement spectrum than that of sphere Au NPs.

  3. Stimulated Raman scattering in soft glass fluoride fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Christian; Dupont, Sune Vestergaard Lund; Agger, Christian;

    2011-01-01

    We have measured the absolute Raman gain spectrum in short fluoride soft glass fibers with a pump wavelength of 1650 nm. We found a peak gain of gR=4.0±2×10−14 m W−1.......We have measured the absolute Raman gain spectrum in short fluoride soft glass fibers with a pump wavelength of 1650 nm. We found a peak gain of gR=4.0±2×10−14 m W−1....

  4. Stimulated Raman scattering in soft glass fluoride fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Christian; Dupont, Sune; Agger, Christian;

    2011-01-01

    We have measured the absolute Raman gain spectrum in short fluoride soft glass fibers with a pump wavelength of 1650nm. We found a peak gain of gR ¼ 4:0 2 × 10−14mW−1.......We have measured the absolute Raman gain spectrum in short fluoride soft glass fibers with a pump wavelength of 1650nm. We found a peak gain of gR ¼ 4:0 2 × 10−14mW−1....

  5. Accurate and Approximate Calculations of Raman Scattering in the Atmosphere of Neptune

    CERN Document Server

    Sromovsky, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Raman scattering by H$_2$ in Neptune's atmosphere has significant effects on its reflectivity for $\\lambda <$ 0.5 $\\mu$m, producing baseline decreases of $\\sim$ 20% in a clear atmosphere and $\\sim$ 10% in a hazy atmosphere. Here we present the first radiation transfer algorithm that includes both polarization and Raman scattering and facilitates computation of spatially resolved spectra. New calculations show that Cochran and Trafton's (1978, Astrophys. J. 219, 756-762) suggestion that light reflected in the deep CH$_4$ bands is mainly Raman scattered is not valid for current estimates of the CH$_4$vertical distribution, which implies only a 4% Raman contribution. Comparisons with IUE, HST, and groundbased observations confirm that high altitude haze absorption is reducing Neptune's geometric albedo by $\\sim$6% in the 0.22-0.26 $\\mu$m range and by $\\sim$13% in the 0.35-0.45 $\\mu$m range. We used accurate calculations to evaluate several approximations of Raman scattering. The Karkoschka (1994, Icarus 111, ...

  6. Theory of Two-Magnon Raman Scattering in Iron Pnictides and Chalcogenides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C. C.

    2011-08-15

    Although the parent iron-based pnictides and chalcogenides are itinerant antiferromagnets, the use of local moment picture to understand their magnetic properties is still widespread. We study magnetic Raman scattering from a local moment perspective for various quantum spin models proposed for this new class of superconductors. These models vary greatly in the level of magnetic frustration and show a vastly different two-magnon Raman response. Light scattering by two-magnon excitations thus provides a robust and independent measure of the underlying spin interactions. In accord with other recent experiments, our results indicate that the amount of magnetic frustration in these systems may be small.

  7. Enhancement of photoluminescence and raman scattering in one-dimensional photonic crystals based on porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonchar, K. A., E-mail: k.a.gonchar@gmail.com [Moscow State University, Physics Faculty (Russian Federation); Musabek, G. K.; Taurbayev, T. I. [Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Physics Department (Kazakhstan); Timoshenko, V. Yu. [Moscow State University, Physics Faculty (Russian Federation)

    2011-05-15

    In porous-silicon-based multilayered structures that exhibit the properties of one-dimensional photonic crystals, an increase in the photoluminescence and Raman scattering intensities is observed upon optical excitation at the wavelength 1.064 {mu}m. When the excitation wavelength falls within the edge of the photonic band gap of the structures, a multiple increase (by a factor larger than 400) in the efficiency of Raman scattering is detected. The effect is attributed to partial localization of excitation light and, correspondingly, to the much longer time of interaction of light with the material in the structures.

  8. One phonon resonant Raman scattering in semiconductor quantum wires: Magnetic field effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betancourt-Riera, Re., E-mail: rbriera@posgrado.cifus.uson.mx [Instituto Tecnologico de Hermosillo, Avenida Tecnologico S/N, Colonia Sahuaro, C.P. 83170, Hermosillo, Sonor, (Mexico); Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, Apartado Postal 5-088, C.P. 83190, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Betancourt-Riera, Ri. [Instituto Tecnologico de Hermosillo, Avenida Tecnologico S/N, Colonia Sahuaro, C.P. 83170, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Nieto Jalil, J.M. [Tecnologico de Monterrey-Campus Sonora Norte, Bulevar Enrique Mazon Lopez No. 965, C.P. 83000, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Riera, R. [Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, Apartado Postal 5-088, C.P. 83190, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2013-02-01

    We have developed a theory of one phonon resonant Raman scattering in a semiconductor quantum wire of cylindrical geometry in the presence of an external magnetic field distribution, parallel to the cylinder axis. The effect of the magnetic field in the electron and hole states, and in the Raman scattering efficiency, is determinate. We consider the electron-phonon interaction using a Froehlich-type Hamiltonian, deduced for the case of complete confinement phonon modes by Comas and his collaborators. We also assume T=0 K, a single parabolic conduction and valence bands. The spectra are discussed for different magnetic field values and the selection rules for the processes are also studied.

  9. Raman Scattering of Nanocrystalline δ-TiNx Synthesized by Mechanical Milling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Zhan-hui; YAO Bin; MA Hong-an; JIA Xiao-peng; QIU Li-xia; SU Wen-hui

    2005-01-01

    @@ Introduction Raman scattering is a powerful nondestructive technique that gives vibrational information about organic and inorganic materials. Raman scattering features, such as intensity, frequency and width, are strongly dependent on compositions, defects, short-range orders, crystal structures, and internal stresses of materials. Therefore, it has been widely used to obtain detailed information about the structural properties of semiconductors, high-Tc superconductors, ceramics, catalysts, carbon based materials, and Ⅲ-Ⅴ valent metallic nitride materials, including lattice perfection, strain, crystalline, interface, and compositional uniformity[1].

  10. A time-resolved resonance Raman study of chlorine dioxide photochemistry in water and acetonitrile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, S.C.; Philpott, M.P.; Mayer, S.G.; Reid, P.J. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1999-07-15

    The photochemistry of chlorine dioxide (OClO) has attracted much interest due to its participation in the atmospheric chlorine reservoir as well as its potential role in stratospheric ozone depletion. Since the environmental impact of OClO arises from its ability to produce atomic chlorine, understanding this phase-dependent reactivity is essential if models capable of predicting the environmental impact of OClO in both homogeneous and heterogeneous settings are to be obtained. The photochemistry of chlorine dioxide (OClO) in water and acetonitrile is investigated using time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy. Stokes and anti-Stokes spectra are measured as a function of time following photoexcitation using degenerate pump and probe wavelengths of 390 nm. For aqueous OClO, the time-dependent Stokes intensities are found to be consistent with the re-formation of ground-state OClO by subpicosecond geminate recombination of the primary ClO and O photofragments. This represents the first unequivocal demonstration of primary-photoproduct geminate recombination in the condensed-phase photochemistry of OClO. Anti-Stokes intensity corresponding to the OClO symmetric stretch is observed demonstrating that, following geminate recombination, excess vibrational energy is deposited along this coordinate. Analysis of the anti-Stokes decay kinetics demonstrates that, in water, intermolecular vibrational relaxation occurs with a time constant of {approximately}9 ps. For OClO dissolved in acetonitrile, the Stokes scattering intensities are consistent with a significant reduction in the geminate-recombination quantum yield relative to water. Comparison of the OClO anti-Stokes decay kinetics in acetonitrile and water demonstrates that the rate of intermolecular vibrational relaxation is {approximately}4 times smaller in acetonitrile. Finally, in both solvents the appearance of symmetric-stretch anti-Stokes intensity is significantly delayed relative to geminate recombination. This

  11. Implementation of Rotational Raman Channel in Multiwavelength Aerosol Lidar to Improve Measurements of Particle Extinction and Backscattering at 532 NM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veselovskii Igor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a practical implementation of rotational Raman (RR measurements in an existing Mie-Raman lidar to obtain measurements of aerosol extinction and backscattering at 532 nm. A 2.3 nm width interference filter was used to select a spectral range characterized by low temperature sensitivity within the anti-Stokes branch of the RR spectrum. Simulations demonstrate that the temperature dependence of the scattering cross section does not exceed 1.0% in the 230-300K range making accurate correction for this dependence quite easy. With this upgrade, the NASA/GSFC multiwavelength Raman lidar has demonstrated useful α532 measurements and was used for regular observations. Examples of lidar measurements and inversion of optical data to the particle microphysics will be given in presentation.

  12. Dramatic Raman Gain Suppression in the Vicinity of the Zero Dispersion Point in Gas-Filled Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Bauerschmidt, Sebastian T; Russell, Philip St J

    2015-01-01

    In 1964 Bloembergen and Shen predicted that Raman gain could be suppressed if the rates of phonon creation and annihilation (by inelastic scattering) exactly balance. This is only possible if the momentum required for each process is identical, i.e., phonon coherence waves created by pump-to-Stokes scattering are identical to those annihilated in pump-to-anti-Stokes scattering. In bulk gas cells, this can only be achieved over limited interaction lengths at an oblique angle to the pump axis. Here we report a simple system that provides dramatic Raman gain suppression over long collinear path-lengths in hydrogen. It consists of a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber whose zero dispersion point is pressure-adjusted to lie close to the pump laser wavelength. At a certain precise pressure, generation of Stokes light in the fundamental mode is completely suppressed, allowing other much weaker nonlinear processes to be explored.

  13. Resonant Raman scattering theory for Kitaev models and their Majorana fermion boundary modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreault, Brent; Knolle, Johannes; Perkins, Natalia B.; Burnell, F. J.

    2016-09-01

    We study the inelastic light scattering response in two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) Kitaev spin-liquid models with Majorana spinon band structures in the symmetry classes BDI and D leading to protected gapless surface modes. We present a detailed calculation of the resonant Raman/Brillouin scattering vertex relevant to iridate and ruthenate compounds whose low-energy physics is believed to be proximate to these spin-liquid phases. In the symmetry class BDI, we find that while the resonant scattering on thin films can detect the gapless boundary modes of spin liquids, the nonresonant processes do not couple to them. For the symmetry class D, however, we find that the coupling between both types of light-scattering processes and the low-energy surface states is strongly suppressed. Additionally, we describe the effect of weak time-reversal symmetry breaking perturbations on the bulk Raman response of these systems.

  14. Raman scattering of the synchrotron self-absorbed radiation in accretion discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishan, V.

    1988-01-15

    The quasar non-thermal continuum in the radio region can undergo Raman scattering in the accretion disc plasma around the central black hole provided that the frequency and the wave vector matching and the threshold conditions are satisfied. The scattered radiation has a frequency ..omega..sub(o)/2 approx. ..omega..sub(p) where ..omega..sub(o) is the frequency of the incident radiation and ..omega..sub(p) is the electron plasma frequency. The spectral shape of the scattered radiation is significantly different from that of the incident radiation. It is proposed that the observed spectral shape of the radio radiation may be accounted for by including the effects of Raman scattering.

  15. Sub-nanosecond strong pulse generated by backward Raman scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenhuan Ye(叶震寰); Qihong Lou(楼祺洪); Jingxing Dong(董景星); Yunrong Wei(魏运荣); Lei Ling(凌磊)

    2003-01-01

    Hundreds picosecond strong short-wavelength pulses have been generated by a backward Raman oscillatoramplifier pumped with a 10-J KrF laser from Heaven-1 MOPA system. Not only high power but also highenergy laser pulses have been obtained with an energy conversion efficiency up to 17%. 640-picosecondpulse duration was observed in our experiments by a 1.5-GHz-bandwidth oscilloscope corresponding to 34times of pulse compression rate.

  16. Onset of stimulated Raman scattering of a laser in a plasma in the presence of hot drifting electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, D. N.; Yadav, Pinki; Jang, D. G.; Hur, M. S.; Suk, H.; Avinash, K.

    2015-05-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering of a laser in plasmas with energetic drifting electrons was investigated by analyzing the growth of interacting waves during the Raman scattering process. The Langmuir wave and scattered electromagnetic sideband wave grow initially and are dampened after attaining a maximum level that indicates a periodic exchange of energy between the pump wave and the daughter waves. The presence of energetic drifting electrons in the laser-produced plasma influences the stimulated Raman scattering process. The plasma wave generated by Raman scattering may be influenced by the energetic electrons, which enhance the growth rate of the instability. Our results show that the presence of energetic (hot) drifting electrons in a plasma has an important effect on the evolution of the interacting waves. This phenomenon is modeled via two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of the propagation and interaction of the laser under Raman instability.

  17. Raman scattering evidence of hydrohalite formation on frozen yeast cells

    CERN Document Server

    Okotrub, K A

    2012-01-01

    We studied yeast cells in physiological solution during freezing by Raman microspectroscopy technique. The purpose was to find out the origin of a sharp peak near ~3430 cm^-1 in Raman spectrum of frozen mammalian cells, observed earlier (J. Dong et al, Biophys. J., 99 (2010) 2453), which presumably could be used as an indicator of intracellar ice appearance. We have shown that this line (actually doublet of 3408 and 3425 cm^-1) corresponds to Raman spectrum of hydrohalite (NaCl-2H2O), which is formed as the result of the eutectic crystallization of the liquid solution around the cells. We also show that the spatial distribution of hydrohalite in the sample significantly depends on the cooling rate. At lower cooling rate (1{\\deg}C/min), products of eutectic crystallization form layer on the cell surface which thickness varies for different cells and can reach ~1 {\\mu}m in thickness. At higher cooling rate (20{\\deg}C/min), the hydrohalite distribution appears more homogeneous, in the sample, and the eutectic cr...

  18. Using Raman Spectroscopy and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering to Identify Colorants in Art: An Experiment for an Upper-Division Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, Hannah E.; Frano, Kristen A.; Svoboda, Shelley A.; Wustholz, Kristin L.

    2015-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) studies of art represent an attractive way to introduce undergraduate students to concepts in nanoscience, vibrational spectroscopy, and instrumental analysis. Here, we present an undergraduate analytical or physical chemistry laboratory wherein a combination of normal Raman and SERS spectroscopy is used to…

  19. Surface enhanced raman scattering on tardigrada - Towards monitoring and imaging molecular structures in live cryptobiotic organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, Harald; Møbjerg, Nadja; Jørgensen, Aslak

    2013-01-01

    Tardigrades are microscopic metazoans which are able to survive extreme physical and chemical conditions by entering a stress tolerant state called cryptobiosis. At present, the molecular mechanisms behind cryptobiosis are still poorly understood. We show that surface enhanced Raman scattering su....... This opens new avenues for exploring cryptobiosis by studying molecular changes in live cryptobiotic organisms....

  20. Anisotropic collision-induced Raman scattering by the Kr:Xe gas mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixneuf, S; Chrysos, M; Rachet, F

    2009-08-21

    We report anisotropic collision-induced Raman scattering intensities by the Kr-Xe atomic pair recorded in a gas mixture of Kr and Xe at room temperature. We compare them to quantum-mechanical calculations on the basis of modern incremental polarizability models of either ab initio post-Hartree-Fock or density functional theory methods.

  1. Dynamic Thomson Scattering from Nonlinear Electron Plasma Waves in a Raman Plasma Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, A.; Katz, J.; Bucht, S.; Haberberger, D.; Bromage, J.; Zuegel, J. D.; Froula, D. H.; Trines, R.; Bingham, R.; Sadler, J.; Norreys, P. A.

    2016-10-01

    Electron plasma waves (EPW's) can be used to transfer significant energy from a long-pulse laser to a short-pulse seed laser through the Raman scattering instability. Successful implementation of Raman amplification could open an avenue to producing high-intensity pulses beyond the capabilities of current laser technology ( 1022 W / cm 2). This three-wave interaction takes advantage of the plasma's ability to sustain large-amplitude plasma waves. Having complete knowledge of the EPW amplitude is essential to establishing optimal parameters for high-efficiency Raman amplification. A dynamic Thomson-scattering diagnostic is being developed to spatially and temporally resolve the amplitude of the driven and thermal EPW's. By imaging the scattered probe light onto a novel pulse-front tilt compensated streaked optical spectrometer, the diffraction efficiency of this plasma wave can be measured as a function of space and time. These data will be used in conjunction with particle-in-cell simulations to determine the EPW's spatial and temporal profile. This will allow the effect of the EPW profile on Raman scattering to be experimentally determined. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  2. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering biosensor for DNA detection on nanoparticle island substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Scott Wu; Ho, Ho Pui; Lee, Rebecca K.Y.

    2009-01-01

    We present a study on the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) properties of Ag nanoparticle island substrates (NIS) and their applications for target oligonucleotide (OND) detection. It has been found that the surface nanostructure of NIS samples can be controlled with a good degree of repro...

  3. A comparison study on Raman scattering properties of alpha- and beta-MnO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Tao; Fjellväg, Helmer; Norby, Poul

    2009-01-01

    In this comment to a recent paper [Anal. Chim. Acta 585 (2007) 241–245], we report a comparison study on Mn oxide-related compounds with different crystallographic forms, which distinguish between β-MnO2 and α-MnO2 type materials via Raman scattering (RS) spectroscopy. The tetragonal rutile-type β...

  4. Raman scattering and quantum confinement in heavily electron-irradiated alkali halides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shtyrkov, E.I.; Klimovitskii, A.; Hartog, H.W. den; Vainshtein, D.I.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we will study the properties of several unusual Raman scattering peaks in heavily irradiated NaCl with vast amounts of colloidal sodium and chlorine precipitates. It appears that the laser excitation light interacts with both the electronic and vibration systems of the Na colloids, whi

  5. Communication: Significant contributions of Albrecht's $A$ term to non-resonant Raman scattering processes

    CERN Document Server

    Duan, Sai; Luo, Yi

    2015-01-01

    The Raman intensity can be well described by the famous Albrecht equation that consists of $A$ and $B$ terms. It has become a textbook knowledge that the contribution from Albrecht's $A$ term can be neglected without loss of accuracy for non-resonant Raman scattering processes. However, as demonstrated in this study, we have found that this widely accepted long-standing assumption fails drastically for totally symmetric vibration modes of molecules. Perturbed first principles calculations for water molecule show that strong constructive interference between the $A$ and $B$ terms occurs for the Raman intensity of the symmetric O-H stretching mode, which can account for about 40% of the total intensity. Meanwhile, a minor destructive interference is found for the angle bending mode. The state to state mapping between the Albrecht's theory and the perturbation theory allows us to verify the accuracy of the widely employed perturbation method for the dynamic/resonant Raman intensities. The model calculations show...

  6. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering from AgNP-graphene-AgNP sandwiched nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian; Xu, Yijun; Xu, Pengyu; Pan, Zhenghui; Chen, Sheng; Shen, Qishen; Zhan, Li; Zhang, Yuegang; Ni, Weihai

    2015-11-07

    We developed a facile approach toward hybrid AgNP-graphene-AgNP sandwiched structures using self-organized monolayered AgNPs from wet chemical synthesis for the optimized enhancement of the Raman response of monolayer graphene. We demonstrate that the Raman scattering of graphene can be enhanced 530 fold in the hybrid structure. The Raman enhancement is sensitively dependent on the hybrid structure, incident angle, and excitation wavelength. A systematic simulation is performed, which well explains the enhancement mechanism. Our study indicates that the enhancement resulted from the plasmonic coupling between the AgNPs on the opposite sides of graphene. Our approach towards ideal substrates offers great potential to produce a "hot surface" for enhancing the Raman response of two-dimensional materials.

  7. Simulations and analysis of the Raman scattering and differential Raman scattering/Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of amino acids, peptides and proteins in aqueous solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalkanen, Karl J.; Nieminen, R. M.; Bohr, Jakob

    2000-01-01

    The Raman and Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of amino acids and small peptides in aqueous solution have been simulated by density functional theory and restricted Hartree/Fock methods. The treatment of the aqueous environment in treated in two ways. The water molecules in the first hydration...... shell which strongly interact with the molecule are treated explicitly while the waters in the bulk are treated by a continuum model. The structures are optimized and the harmonic force elds are calculated. The derivatives needed to simulate the Raman and ROA intensities are calculated from first...... principles. The simulated Raman and ROA spectra have been compared to recently meassured spectra on amino acids and peptides. The simulations and understanding from them are used to interpret the Raman and ROA spectra of proteins. A comparison to vibrational absorption (VA) and vibrational circular dichroism...

  8. Time-resolved spatially offset Raman spectroscopy for depth analysis of diffusely scattering layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iping Petterson, Ingeborg E; Dvořák, Patrick; Buijs, Joost B; Gooijer, Cees; Ariese, Freek

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study is to use time-resolved (TR) Raman spectroscopy, spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS), and a combination of these approaches to obtain high quality Raman spectra from materials hidden underneath an opaque layer. Both TR Raman and SORS are advanced techniques that allow for an increased relative selectivity of photons from deeper layers within a sample. Time-resolved detection reduces fluorescence background, and the selectivity for the second layer is improved. By combining this with spatially offset excitation we additionally increased selectivity for deeper layers. Test samples were opaque white polymer blocks of several mm thicknesses. Excitation was carried out with a frequency-doubled Ti:sapphire laser at 460 nm, 3 ps pulse width and 76 MHz repetition rate. Detection was either with a continuous-wave CCD camera or in time-resolved mode using an intensified CCD camera with a 250 ps gate width. The Raman photons were collected in backscatter mode, with or without lateral offset. By measuring the delay of the Raman signal from the second layer (polyethylene terephthalate/PET/Arnite), the net photon migration speeds through Teflon, polythene, Delrin and Nylon were determined. Raman spectra could be obtained from a second layer of PET through Teflon layers up to 7 mm of thickness. The ability to obtain chemical information through layers of diffusely scattering materials has powerful potential for biomedical applications.

  9. Raman facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Raman scattering is a powerful light scattering technique used to diagnose the internal structure of molecules and crystals. In a light scattering experiment, light...

  10. Single-Beam Coherent Raman Spectroscopy and Microscopy via Spectral Notch Shaping

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Ori; Grinvald, Eran; Silberberg, Yaron

    2010-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is one of the key techniques in the study of vibrational modes and molecular structures. In Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) spectroscopy, a molecular vibrational spectrum is resolved via the third-order nonlinear interaction of pump, Stokes and probe photons, typically using a complex experimental setup with multiple beams and laser sources. Although CARS has become a widespread technique for label-free chemical imaging and detection of contaminants, its multi-source, multi-beam experimental implementation is challenging. In this work we present a simple and easily implementable scheme for performing single-beam CARS spectroscopy and microscopy using a single femtosecond pulse, shaped by a tunable narrowband notch filter. As a substitute for multiple sources, the single broadband pulse simultaneously provides the pump, Stokes and probe photons, exciting a broad band of vibrational levels. High spectroscopic resolution is obtained by utilizing a tunable spectral notch, shaped wi...

  11. Excitation energy-dependent nature of Raman scattering spectrum in GaInNAs/GaAs quantum well structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, Ayse; Akalin, Elif; Sarcan, Fahrettin; Donmez, Omer; Akyuz, Sevim; Arikan, Cetin M; Puustinen, Janne; Guina, Mircea

    2012-11-28

    The excitation energy-dependent nature of Raman scattering spectrum, vibration, electronic or both, has been studied using different excitation sources on as-grown and annealed n- and p-type modulation-doped Ga1 - xInxNyAs1 - y/GaAs quantum well structures. The samples were grown by molecular beam technique with different N concentrations (y = 0%, 0.9%, 1.2%, 1.7%) at the same In concentration of 32%. Micro-Raman measurements have been carried out using 532 and 758 nm lines of diode lasers, and the 1064 nm line of the Nd-YAG laser has been used for Fourier transform-Raman scattering measurements. Raman scattering measurements with different excitation sources have revealed that the excitation energy is the decisive mechanism on the nature of the Raman scattering spectrum. When the excitation energy is close to the electronic band gap energy of any constituent semiconductor materials in the sample, electronic transition dominates the spectrum, leading to a very broad peak. In the condition that the excitation energy is much higher than the band gap energy, only vibrational modes contribute to the Raman scattering spectrum of the samples. Line shapes of the Raman scattering spectrum with the 785 and 1064 nm lines of lasers have been observed to be very broad peaks, whose absolute peak energy values are in good agreement with the ones obtained from photoluminescence measurements. On the other hand, Raman scattering spectrum with the 532 nm line has exhibited only vibrational modes. As a complementary tool of Raman scattering measurements with the excitation source of 532 nm, which shows weak vibrational transitions, attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy has been also carried out. The results exhibited that the nature of the Raman scattering spectrum is strongly excitation energy-dependent, and with suitable excitation energy, electronic and/or vibrational transitions can be investigated.

  12. Raman scattering in silicon disordered by gold ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavrentiev, Vasily; Vacik, Jiri; Vosecek, Vaclav [NS Lab, Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR, Rez-130, Husinec 250 68 (Czech Republic); Vorlicek, Vladimir [Institute of Physics AS CR, Na Slovance 2, Prague 182 21 (Czech Republic)

    2010-08-15

    Si (111) covered by a 250-nm thick SiO{sub 2} surface layer has been disordered through implantation of 3.035 MeV gold ions within broad range of fluences from 1 x 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2} to 1 x 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. Raman spectroscopy (514.5 nm laser) was applied for characterization of the silicon disordering. Variation of the Raman spectra of silicon after low-fluence implantation (fluences lower than 5 x 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}) in the vicinity of the transverse optical phonon (1TO) peak reflects the coexistence of bulk Si crystals (c-Si) and Si nanocrystals (nc-Si) in the implanted layer. Implantation with higher fluences yields only the stable 470 cm{sup -1} 1TO peak, corresponding to formation of amorphous phase (a-Si), in this region of the spectra. Detailed analysis of the silicon disorder was performed through calculation of the transverse acoustical phonon (1TA) peak area. The fluence dependence of the peak area reveals qualitative correlation with the depth profile of structural defects in the modified Si layer evaluated from RBS (Rutherford backscattering) experiment and from SRIM (stopping and range of ions in matter) code simulation. This correlation suggests a decrease of the structural disorder in the modified layer region enriched by vacancies. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  13. Raman Scattering from Pt Island-Decorated Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Awnish; Gutierrez, Humberto; Eklund, Peter

    2009-03-01

    We performed microRaman studies of decorated n-Graphene Layers (nGLs). Nano-islands (NI; dia˜5-10 nm) of Pt were created by deposition on the nGL with gaps between the NI in the range of few nm. When the NI were present, we observed D and D' Raman bands as well as splitting of the G-band into G^+ and G^- (most pronounced for 1GL). The observations may be related to graphene ``confined'' in the interstitial spaces between NIs. The D and D' bands show the following properties: (1) Intensity of D and D' relative to G band decreases with increasing number of layers n in the nGL. (2) Peak frequencies, φD decreases linearly with 1/n while φD'remains constant. (3) Linewidth γD decreases linearly with 1/n , while γD' increases linearly with 1/n. Our results will be discussed in terms of results theoretically predicted by zone folding (Jishi et al).

  14. Electron Raman scattering in semiconductor quantum well wire of cylindrical ring geometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Re. Betancourt-Riera; Ri. Betancourt-Riera; J. M. Nieto Jalil; R. Riera

    2015-01-01

    We study the electron states and the differential cross section for an electron Raman scattering process in a semi-conductor quantum well wire of cylindrical ring geometry. The electron Raman scattering developed here can be used to provide direct information about the electron band structures of these confinement systems. We assume that the system grows in a GaAs/Al0.35Ga0.65As matrix. The system is modeled by considering T =0 K and also a single parabolic con-duction band, which is split into a sub-band system due to the confinement. The emission spectra are discussed for different scattering configurations, and the selection rules for the processes are also studied. Singularities in the spectra are found and interpreted.

  15. Nonadiabaticity in a Jahn-Teller system probed by absorption and resonance Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pae, K; Hizhnyakov, V

    2013-03-14

    A theory of absorption and resonance Raman scattering of impurity centers in crystals with E⊗e-type Jahn-Teller effect in the excited state is presented. The vibronic interaction with non-totally symmetric local or pseudolocal modes and with a continuum of bath modes (phonons) is considered. A number of specific quantum effects, such as the nonadiabaticity-induced enhancement of the Raman scattering at high-energy excitation, the size effect of the final state, the interference of different channels of scattering, the Fermi resonances in the conical intersection, and others, were shown to become apparent in the calculated spectra. The vibronic interaction with phonons essentially determines the structure of the spectra.

  16. Anti-Stokes Frequency Shift and Evolution in Polarization-Maintaining Photonic Crystal Fiber with Two-Zero Dispersion Wavelengths

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG He-Lin; LENG Yu-Xin; XU Zhi-Zhan; QI Yi-Hong; HU Ming-Lie; WANG Ching-Yue

    2009-01-01

    Using the tunable pump pulses with about 100 fs pulse duration and 1064 nm central wavelength; the polarization-,wavelength- and power-dependent anti-Stokes lines are generated and modulated simultaneously in a polarizationmaintaining photonic crystal fiber (PM-PCF) with two zero-dispersion wavelengths.By accurately controlling the polarization directions,the wavelength and the power of the pump pulse in the fiber anomalous region close to the second zero-dispersion wavelength of the PM-PCF,the output anti-Stokes pulse spectra can be tuned between 563nm and 603 nm,which is in good agreement with the theoretical simulation.The color conversion of the mode image from yellow to orange is also observed with the different polarization pump pulses.These results can be attributed to the combined interaction between the fiber birefringence (including linear- and nonlinearbirefringence) and dispersion,and are attributed to phase-matching parametric four-wave mixing.

  17. Resonant enhancement of Raman scattering in metamaterials with hybrid electromagnetic and plasmonic resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guddala, Sriram; Narayana Rao, D.; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha

    2016-06-01

    A tri-layer metamaterial perfect absorber of light, consisting of (Al/ZnS/Al) films with the top aluminum layer patterned as an array of circular disk nanoantennas, is investigated for resonantly enhancing Raman scattering from C60 fullerene molecules deposited on the metamaterial. The metamaterial is designed to have resonant bands due to plasmonic and electromagnetic resonances at the Raman pump frequency (725 nm) as well as Stokes emission bands. The Raman scattering from C60 on the metamaterial with resonantly matched bands is measured to be enhanced by an order of magnitude more than C60 on metamaterials with off-resonant absorption bands peaking at 1090 nm. The Raman pump is significantly enhanced due to the resonance with a propagating surface plasmon band, while the highly impedance-matched electromagnetic resonance is expected to couple out the Raman emission efficiently. The nature and hybridization of the plasmonic and electromagnetic resonances to form compound resonances are investigated by numerical simulations.

  18. Measurements of Raman scattering in the middle ultraviolet band from persistent chemical warfare agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullander, Fredrik; Landström, Lars; Lundén, Hampus; Mohammed, Abdesalam; Olofsson, Göran; Wästerby, Pär.

    2014-05-01

    The very low Raman scattering cross section and the fluorescence background limit the measuring range of Raman based instruments operating in the visible or infrared band. We are exploring if laser excitation in the middle ultraviolet (UV) band between 200 and 300 nm is useful and advantageous for detection of persistent chemical warfare agents (CWA) on various kinds of surfaces. The UV Raman scattering from tabun, mustard gas, VX and relevant simulants in the form of liquid surface contaminations has been measured using a laboratory experimental setup with a short standoff distance around 1 meter. Droplets having a volume of 1 μl were irradiated with a tunable pulsed laser swept within the middle UV band. A general trend is that the signal strength moves through an optimum when the laser excitation wavelength is swept between 240 and 300 nm. The signal from tabun reaches a maximum around 265 nm, the signal from mustard gas around 275 nm. The Raman signal from VX is comparably weak. Raman imaging by the use of a narrow bandpass UV filter is also demonstrated.

  19. Green and red Anti-Stokes emission of U3+: LaCl3produced by infrared laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Anti-Stokes green and red emission from U3+: LaCl3 can be produced by infrared laser excitation at 975.3 nm, 977.7 nm and 979.4 nm at 8K. The upconversion luminescence intensity dependence upon the excitation laser power was measured and analyzed. The results show that depending on the excitation wavelength, the mechanisms responsible for the upconversion process are two-photon absorption and excited-state absorption.

  20. Resonance Raman scattering and excitonic spectra in TlInS{sub 2} crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalamai, V.V. [Institute of Applied Physics, Academy of Sciences of Moldova, 5 Academy Street, 2028 Chisinau, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Stamov, I.G. [T.G. Shevchenko State University of Pridnestrovie, 25 Oktyabrya Street 107, 3300 Tiraspol, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Syrbu, N.N., E-mail: sirbunn@yahoo.com [Technical University of Moldova, 168 Stefan cel Mare Avenue, 2004 Chisinau, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Ursaki, V.V. [Institute of Applied Physics, Academy of Sciences of Moldova, 5 Academy Street, 2028 Chisinau, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Dorogan, V. [Technical University of Moldova, 168 Stefan cel Mare Avenue, 2004 Chisinau, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    The excitons ground and excited states for E∥a and E∥b polarizations in absorption and reflection spectra of TlInS{sub 2} crystals were detected. The fundamental parameters of excitons and bands were determined at k=0. The resonance Raman spectra were investigated in the region of excitons transitions. The resonance Raman scattering spectra with participation of optical phonons that are active at the center of Brillouin zone were identified. The Raman scattering in Y(YX)Z and Y(ZX)Z geometries at 10 K with excitation by He–Ne laser was researched. Energies of phonons with A{sub g} and B{sub g} symmetries were determined. It was shown that the number of modes at 10 K was two times lower than expected according to theoretical calculations. - Highlights: • The resonance Raman scattering in geometry Y(YX)Z and Y(ZX)Z at 10 K was investigated. • Energies of phonons with A{sub g} and B{sub g} symmetries were determined. • The experimental and theoretical calculations completely conform if crystals are described by symmetry group D{sub 4h}{sup 15}. • The main parameters of excitons and bands were determined. • The model of electron transitions in k=0 was suggested.

  1. Temporal Quantum Correlations in Inelastic Light Scattering from Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasperczyk, Mark; de Aguiar Júnior, Filomeno S.; Rabelo, Cassiano; Saraiva, Andre; Santos, Marcelo F.; Novotny, Lukas; Jorio, Ado

    2016-12-01

    Water is one of the most prevalent chemicals on our planet, an integral part of both our environment and our existence as a species. Yet it is also rich in anomalous behaviors. Here we reveal that water is a novel—yet ubiquitous—source for quantum correlated photon pairs at ambient conditions. The photon pairs are produced through Raman scattering, and the correlations arise from the shared quantum of a vibrational mode between the Stokes and anti-Stokes scattering events. We confirm the nonclassical nature of the produced photon pairs by showing that the cross-correlation and autocorrelations of the signals violate a Cauchy-Schwarz inequality by over 5 orders of magnitude. The unprecedented degree of violating the inequality in pure water, as well as the well-defined polarization properties of the photon pairs, points to its usefulness in quantum information.

  2. Ultra thin films of nanocrystalline Ge studied by AFM and interference enhanced Raman scattering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Balaji; S Mohan; D V S Muthu; A K Sood

    2003-10-01

    Initial growth stages of the ultra thin films of germanium (Ge) prepared by ion beam sputter deposition have been studied using atomic force microscope (AFM) and interference enhanced Raman scattering. The growth of the films follows Volmer-Weber growth mechanism. Analysis of the AFM images shows that Ostwald ripening of the grains occurs as the thickness of the film increases. Raman spectra of the Ge films reveal phonon confinement along the growth direction and show that the misfit strain is relieved for film thickness greater than 4 nm.

  3. Surface enhanced Raman scattering study of the antioxidant alkaloid boldine using prismatic silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, M. A.; Jara, G. P.; Villarroel, R.; Aliaga, A. E.; Gómez-Jeria, J. S.; Clavijo, E.; Garrido, C.; Aguayo, T.; Campos Vallette, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Prismatic silver nanoparticles (PNps) were used in the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) study of the antioxidant alkaloid boldine (5,6,6a,7-tetrahydro-1,10-dimethoxy-6-methyl-4H-dibenzo[de,g]quinoline-2,9-diol). Prismatic and quasi-spherical (QsNps) silver nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized by UV-Vis spectra, topographic profile (AFM) and zeta potential measurements. Raman and infrared (IR) spectra of the boldine were registered. Theoretical model calculations of the boldine onto the Ag surface predict a nearly coplanar orientation of the benzo[de]quinoline moiety and non-bonded interactions (electrostatic).

  4. Rapid detection of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium by surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Lan; Zhang, Ping; Zheng, Da-wei; Wang, Yang-jun-qi; Zhong, Ru-gang

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is used as an analytical tool for the detection and identification of pathogenic bacteria of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium). Compared with normal Raman signal, the intensity of SERS signal is greatly enhanced. After processing all SERS data, the obvious differences between the SERS spectra of two species are determined. And applying the chemometric tools of principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis (PCA-HCA), the SERS spectra of two species are distinguished more accurately. The results indicate that SERS analysis can provide a rapid and sensitive method for the detection of pathogenic bacteria.

  5. Raman Scattering from 1,3-Propanedithiol at a Hot Spot: Theory Meets Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2013-08-21

    We compute the Raman spectra of 1,3-propanedithiol (PDT) in the gas phase, in methanol, linked either to the face or vertex of a finite tetrahedral Ag20 cluster, and linking two Ag20 clusters using tools of density functional theory. The calculated normal mode-dependent molecular polarizability derivative tensors are employed to simulate single molecule surface-enhanced Raman (SERS) spectra. This is achieved by rotating the polarizability tensors of an individual molecule with respect to explicitly defined vector components of the incident and scattered radiation. Our results provide a basis for understanding commonly observed phenomena in single molecule SERS spectroscopy.

  6. Optical antenna arrays on a fiber facet for in situ surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smythe, Elizabeth J; Dickey, Michael D; Bao, Jiming; Whitesides, George M; Capasso, Federico

    2009-03-01

    This paper reports a bidirectional fiber optic probe for the detection of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). One facet of the probe features an array of gold optical antennas designed to enhance Raman signals, while the other facet of the fiber is used for the input and collection of light. Simultaneous detection of benzenethiol and 2-[(E)-2-pyridin-4-ylethenyl]pyridine is demonstrated through a 35 cm long fiber. The array of nanoscale optical antennas was first defined by electron-beam lithography on a silicon wafer. The array was subsequently stripped from the wafer and then transferred to the facet of a fiber. Lithographic definition of the antennas provides a method for producing two-dimensional arrays with well-defined geometry, which allows (i) the optical response of the probe to be tuned and (ii) the density of "hot spots" generating the enhanced Raman signal to be controlled. It is difficult to determine the Raman signal enhancement factor (EF) of most fiber optic Raman sensors featuring hot spots because the geometry of the Raman enhancing nanostructures is poorly defined. The ability to control the size and spacing of the antennas enables the EF of the transferred array to be estimated. EF values estimated after focusing a laser directly onto the transferred array ranged from 2.6 x 10(5) to 5.1 x 10(5).

  7. Implementation of an Analytical Raman Scattering Correction for Satellite Ocean-Color Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinna, Lachlan I. W.; Werdell, P. Jeremy; Proctor, Christopher W.

    2016-01-01

    Raman scattering of photons by seawater molecules is an inelastic scattering process. This effect can contribute significantly to the water-leaving radiance signal observed by space-borne ocean-color spectroradiometers. If not accounted for during ocean-color processing, Raman scattering can cause biases in derived inherent optical properties (IOPs). Here we describe a Raman scattering correction (RSC) algorithm that has been integrated within NASA's standard ocean-color processing software. We tested the RSC with NASA's Generalized Inherent Optical Properties algorithm (GIOP). A comparison between derived IOPs and in situ data revealed that the magnitude of the derived backscattering coefficient and the phytoplankton absorption coefficient were reduced when the RSC was applied, whilst the absorption coefficient of colored dissolved and detrital matter remained unchanged. Importantly, our results show that the RSC did not degrade the retrieval skill of the GIOP. In addition, a timeseries study of oligotrophic waters near Bermuda showed that the RSC did not introduce unwanted temporal trends or artifacts into derived IOPs.

  8. Implementation of an analytical Raman scattering correction for satellite ocean-color processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinna, Lachlan I W; Werdell, P Jeremy; Proctor, Christopher W

    2016-07-11

    Raman scattering of photons by seawater molecules is an inelastic scattering process. This effect can contribute significantly to the water-leaving radiance signal observed by space-borne ocean-color spectroradiometers. If not accounted for during ocean-color processing, Raman scattering can cause biases in derived inherent optical properties (IOPs). Here we describe a Raman scattering correction (RSC) algorithm that has been integrated within NASA's standard ocean-color processing software. We tested the RSC with NASA's Generalized Inherent Optical Properties algorithm (GIOP). A comparison between derived IOPs and in situ data revealed that the magnitude of the derived backscattering coefficient and the phytoplankton absorption coefficient were reduced when the RSC was applied, whilst the absorption coefficient of colored dissolved and detrital matter remained unchanged. Importantly, our results show that the RSC did not degrade the retrieval skill of the GIOP. In addition, a time-series study of oligotrophic waters near Bermuda showed that the RSC did not introduce unwanted temporal trends or artifacts into derived IOPs.

  9. Electron Raman scattering in a double quantum well tuned by an external nonresonant intense laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiutiunnyk, A.; Mora-Ramos, M. E.; Morales, A. L.; Duque, C. M.; Restrepo, R. L.; Ungan, F.; Martínez-Orozco, J. C.; Kasapoglu, E.; Duque, C. A.

    2017-02-01

    In this work we shall present a study of inelastic light scattering involving inter-subband electron transitions in coupled GaAs-(Ga,Al)As quantum wells. Calculations include the electron related Raman differential cross section and Raman gain. The effects of an external nonresonant intense laser field are used in order to tune these output properties. The confined electron states will be described by means of a diagonalization procedure within the effective mass and parabolic band approximations. It is shown that the application of the intense laser field can produce values of the intersubband electron Raman gain above 400 cm-1. The system proposed here is an alternative choice for the development of AlxGa1-xAs semiconductor laser diodes that can be tuned via an external nonresonant intense laser field.

  10. Porous silicon nanowire arrays decorated by Ag nanoparticles for surface enhanced Raman scattering study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, L.; Xu, H. J.; Chan, Y. F.; Sun, X. M.

    2012-02-01

    A large scale and highly ordered Ag nanoparticle-decorated porous silicon nanowire array was fabricated for a uniform and reproducible surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate. The overall process for the proposed structure is simple and reliable with the use of only chemical etching and metal reduction processes. The SERS sensitivity of the novel substrate as low as 10-16 M for rhodamine 6G (R6G) and the Raman enhancement factor as high as 10^14 were obtained. The excellent SERS performances were mainly attributed to the strong local electromagnetic effect which is associated with the formation of large-quantity Ag nanoparticles on porous silicon nanowire array and the existence of semiconductor silicon nanowires. Significantly, the quadratic relation between the logarithmic concentrations and the logarithmic integrated Raman peak intensities provided quantitative detection of R6G. Our results open new possibilities for applying SERS to trace detection of low-concentration biomolecules.

  11. Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS Studies of Gold and Silver Nanoparticles Prepared by Laser Ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel P. Hernandez-Rivera

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Gold and silver nanoparticles (NPs were prepared in water, acetonitrile and isopropanol by laser ablation methodologies. The average characteristic (longer size of the NPs obtained ranged from 3 to 70 nm. 4-Aminobenzebethiol (4-ABT was chosen as the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS probe molecule to determine the optimum irradiation time and the pH of aqueous synthesis of the laser ablation-based synthesis of metallic NPs. The synthesized NPs were used to evaluate their capacity as substrates for developing more analytical applications based on SERS measurements. A highly energetic material, TNT, was used as the target compound in the SERS experiments. The Raman spectra were measured with a Raman microspectrometer. The results demonstrate that gold and silver NP substrates fabricated by the methods developed show promising results for SERS-based studies and could lead to the development of micro sensors.

  12. Metal-coated magnetic nanoparticles for surface enhanced Raman scattering studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G V Pavan Kumar; N Rangarajan; B Sonia; P Deepika; Nashiour Rohman; Chandrabhas Narayana

    2011-04-01

    We report the optimization and usage of surfactantless, water dispersible Ag and Au-coated –Fe2O3 nanoparticles for applications in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). These nanoparticles, with plasmonic as well as super paramagnetic properties exhibit Raman enhancement factors of the order of 106 (105) for Ag (Au) coating, which are on par with the conventional Ag and Au nanoparticles. Raman markers like 2-naphthalenethiol, rhodamine-B and rhodamine-6G have been adsorbed to these nanoparticles and tested for nonresonant SERS at low concentrations. Further, to confirm the robustness of Ag-coated nanoparticles, we have performed temperaturedependent SERS in the temperature range of 77–473 K. The adsorbed molecules exhibit stable SERS spectra except at temperatures >323 K, where the thermal desorption of test molecule (naphthalenethiol) were evident. The magnetic properties of these nanoparticles combined with SERS provide a wide range of applications.

  13. Raman scattering enhancement in photon-plasmon resonance mediated metal-dielectric microcavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guddala, Sriram; Dwivedi, Vindesh K.; Vijaya Prakash, G.; Narayana Rao, D.

    2013-12-01

    Here, we report the photon-plasmon interaction scheme and enhanced field strengths resulted into the amplification of phonon in a novel microcavity. A metal-dielectric microcavity, with unified cavity photonic mode and localized surface plasmon resonances, is visualized by impregnating the gold nanoparticles into the deep see-through nano-sized pores of porous silicon microcavity. The intense optical field strengths resulting from the photon-plasmon interactions are probed by both resonant and non-resonant Raman scattering experiments. Due to photon-plasmon-phonon interaction mechanism, several orders of enhancement in the intensity of scattered Raman Stokes photon (at 500 cm-1) are observed. Our metal nanoparticle-microcavity hybrid system shows the potential to improve the sensing figure of merit as well as the applications of plasmonics for optoelectronics, photovoltaics, and related technologies.

  14. Raman scattering enhancement in photon-plasmon resonance mediated metal-dielectric microcavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guddala, Sriram; Narayana Rao, D., E-mail: dnr.laserlab@gmail.com, E-mail: dnrsp@uohyd.ernet.in [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500 046 (India); Dwivedi, Vindesh K.; Vijaya Prakash, G. [Nanophotonics Laboratory, Department of Physics, IIT Delhi, New Delhi 110 016 (India)

    2013-12-14

    Here, we report the photon-plasmon interaction scheme and enhanced field strengths resulted into the amplification of phonon in a novel microcavity. A metal-dielectric microcavity, with unified cavity photonic mode and localized surface plasmon resonances, is visualized by impregnating the gold nanoparticles into the deep see-through nano-sized pores of porous silicon microcavity. The intense optical field strengths resulting from the photon-plasmon interactions are probed by both resonant and non-resonant Raman scattering experiments. Due to photon-plasmon-phonon interaction mechanism, several orders of enhancement in the intensity of scattered Raman Stokes photon (at 500 cm{sup −1}) are observed. Our metal nanoparticle-microcavity hybrid system shows the potential to improve the sensing figure of merit as well as the applications of plasmonics for optoelectronics, photovoltaics, and related technologies.

  15. Stimulated Raman Scattering and Nonlinear Focusing of High-Power Laser Beams Propagating in Water

    CERN Document Server

    Hafizi, B; Penano, J R; Gordon, D F; Jones, T G; Helle, M H; Kaganovich, D

    2015-01-01

    The physical processes associated with propagation of a high-power (power > critical power for self-focusing) laser beam in water include nonlinear focusing, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), optical breakdown and plasma formation. The interplay between nonlinear focusing and SRS is analyzed for cases where a significant portion of the pump power is channeled into the Stokes wave. Propagation simulations and an analytical model demonstrate that the Stokes wave can re-focus the pump wave after the power in the latter falls below the critical power. It is shown that this novel focusing mechanism is distinct from cross-phase focusing. While discussed here in the context of propagation in water, the gain-focusing phenomenon is general to any medium supporting nonlinear focusing and stimulated forward Raman scattering.

  16. Feasibility of Single Molecule DNA Sequencing using Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talley, C E; Reboredo, F; Chan, J; Lane, S M

    2006-02-03

    We have used a combined theoretical and experimental approach in order to assess the feasibility of using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for DNA sequencing at the single molecule level. We have developed a numerical tool capable of calculating the E-field and resulting SERS enhancement factors for metallic structures of arbitrary size and shape. Measurements of the additional SERS enhancement by combining SERS with coherent antistokes Raman scattering (CARS) show that only modest increases in the signal are achievable due to thermal damage at higher laser powers. Finally, measurements of the SERS enhancement from nanoparticles coated with an insulating layer show that the SERS enhancement is decreased by as much as two orders of magnitude when the molecule is not in contact with the metal surface.

  17. Monitoring lipid accumulation in the green microalga Botryococcus braunii with frequency-modulated stimulated Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Chin; Chandrappa, Dayananda; Smirnoff, Nicholas; Moger, Julian

    2015-03-01

    The potential of microalgae as a source of renewable energy has received considerable interest because they can produce lipids (fatty acids and isoprenoids) that can be readily converted into biofuels. However, significant research in this area is required to increase yields to make this a viable renewable source of energy. An analytical tool that could provide quantitative in situ spectroscopic analysis of lipids synthesis in individual microalgae would significantly enhance our capability to understand the synthesis process at the cellular level and lead to the development of strategies for increasing yield. Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy has great potential in this area however, the pump-probe signal from two-color two-photon absorption of pigments (chlorophyll and carotenoids) overwhelm the SRS signal and prevent its application. Clearly, the development of a background suppression technique is of significant value for this important research area. To overcome the limitation of SRS in pigmented specimens, we establish a frequency-modulated stimulated Raman scattering (FM-SRS) microscopy that eliminates the non-Raman background by rapidly toggling on-and-off the targeted Raman resonance. Moreover, we perform the background-free imaging and analysis of intracellular lipid droplets and extracellular hydrocarbons in a green microalga with FM-SRS microscopy. We believe that FM-SRS microscopy demonstrates the potential for many applications in pigmented cells and provides the opportunity for improved selective visualization of the chemical composition of algae and plants

  18. Numerical modeling of the intracavity stimulated Raman scattering as a source of subnanosecond optical pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashkir, Yuri M.; Yashkir, Yuriy Y.

    2004-09-01

    We present a computer numerical model (virtual sub-nanosecond laser) utilizing intracavity stimulated Raman scattering. The goal of this work is to shorten laser output pulses (for which the highly nonlinear frequency conversion process stimulated Raman scattering is used) and to obtain high efficiency (which is enhanced by placing a Raman-active crystal inside the cavity where the fundamental laser frequency intensity is maximal). The following laser components were modeled: a diodepumped solidstate laser active medium (a crystal of the Nd3+:YLF type), a closed cavity for a wave on its fundamental frequency with a Q-switching element and an internal subcavity with a Ramanactive crystal with controlled output coupler transmission at the Raman frequency. The model components are: a numerical integrator of a set of three rate equations (for an inverse population of the laser medium and for the number of fundamental and Stokes frequency photons), random number sources for radiation seeding, and an interactive data input interface and graphic output. A wide range of parameters was investigated and output pulses as short as 0.8 ns were found. The optimal conditions for the maximal peak power of Stokes pulses were determined and the conditions for generating pulse trains for burst laser machining were identified.

  19. Strongly polarized scattering in surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy of randomly distributed molecules on gold nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Fazio

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We study the polarized Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering from randomly oriented molecules adsorbed on near-field coupled gold nanowires. We show that the scattering is polarized always along the wire-to-wire nanocavities. We find the exact angular dependence for the polarized, unpolarized, parallel- and cross-polarized SERS intensity. Finally we develop a model that fits the experimental data and allows to measure the field enhancement and the re-radiation enhancement factors, independently, and retrieve the depolarization ratio of the probe molecules.

  20. Absolute determination of cross sections for resonant Raman scattering on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Matthias; Beckhoff, Burkhard; Ulm, Gerhard; Kanngießer, Birgit

    2006-07-01

    We studied the resonant Raman scattering of x rays in the vicinity of the K absorption edge of silicon. The investigation was carried out at the plane grating monochromator beamline for undulator radiation of the PTB laboratory at BESSY II in Berlin. Cross sections were determined absolutely for a wide energy range of incident photons with small relative uncertainties employing calibrated instrumentation avoiding any reference samples. The experimentally determined values differ clearly from the theoretical ones found in the literature.

  1. Eigenmode description of Raman scattering in atomic vapors in the presence of decoherence

    OpenAIRE

    Kolodynski, Jan; Chwedenczuk, Jan; Wasilewski, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    A theoretical model describing the Raman scattering process in atomic vapors is constructed. The treatment investigates the low-excitation regime suitable for modern experimental applications. Despite the incorporated decoherence effects (possibly mode dependent) it allows for a direct separation of the time evolution from the spatial degrees of freedom. The impact of noise on the temporal properties of the process is examined. The model is applied in two experimentally relevant situations of...

  2. Morphology, structure and Raman scattering of carbon nanotubes produced by using mesoporous materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解思深; 李文治; 王超英; 徐丽雯; 张昊; 张云; 钱露茜

    1997-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes were prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of hydrocarbon gas on various substrates.The effect of substrates on the growth,morphology and structure of carbon nanotubes were investigated.Aligned carbon nanotubes with high density and purity were achieved by CVD on mesoporous silica substrate.The Raman scattering of aligned carbon nanotubes was carried out,and the dependence of the phonon properties on the mi-crostructure of the nanotubes has been discussed.

  3. Entangled valence electron-hole dynamics revealed by stimulated attosecond x-ray Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Healion, Daniel; Zhang, Yu; Biggs, Jason D.; Govind, Niranjan; Mukamel, Shaul

    2012-09-06

    We show that broadband x-ray pulses can create wavepackets of valence electrons and holes localized in the vicinity of a selected atom (nitrogen, oxygen or sulfur in cysteine) by resonant stimulated Raman scattering. The subsequent dynamics reveals highly correlated motions of entangled electrons and hole quasiparticles. This information goes beyond the time-dependent total charge density derived from x-ray diffraction.

  4. Raman Back-scattering study of Damaged and Strain Subsurface Layers in GaAs Wafers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The damaged and strain subsurface layers of semi-insulating(SI) GaAs substrate were characterized non-destructively by Raman back-scattering.The study shows that the thicknesses of the damaged and strain layers are less than 3μm.The damaged and strain layer can be removed after being etched in H2SO4·H2O2·H2O for 1.5 min.

  5. Growth and Raman scattering characterization of Cu2ZnSnS4 thin films

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, P. A.; Salomé, P M P; Cunha, A. F. da

    2009-01-01

    In the present work we report the results of the growth, morphological and structural characterization of Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films prepared by sulfurization of DC magnetron sputtered Cu/Zn/Sn precursor layers. The adjustment of the thicknesses and the properties of the precursors were used to control the final composition of the films. Its properties were studied by SEM/EDS, XRD and Raman scattering. The influence of the sulfurization temperature on the morphology, composition ...

  6. Characterization of Model Polyimide/Silver Interphases Using Surface- Enhanced Raman Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    investigated SERS from bilayers of polystyrene (PS), diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A ( DGEBA ), poly (4-vinyl pyridine) (PVP), and poly (styrene sulfonate...PSS). Samples were prepared by spin-coating films of PS, DGEBA , or PVP were spun onto silver island films from dilute solutions and then overcoating...solution. Otherwise, SERS was only observed from the first layer (PS, DGEBA , or PVP) even though the PSS films were strong Raman scatters. These results

  7. Raman-scattering probe of anharmonic effects in GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Prabhat; Abbi, S. C.; Jain, K. P.

    1995-06-01

    A comparative study of anharmonic effects in various structural forms of GaAs, namely crystalline, disordered and ion-implanted, and pulse laser annealed (PLA), using temperature-dependent Raman scattering, is reported for various phonon modes over the temperature range 10-300 K. The disordered and PLA samples are found to have greater anharmonicity than crystalline GaAs. The localized vibrational mode in PLA GaAs shows shorter relaxation time than the LO-phonon mode.

  8. Solution-based characterization of surface-enhanced Raman response of single scattering centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurence, T A; Talley, C; Schwartzberg, A; Braun, G; Moskovits, M; Reich, N; Huser, T

    2008-03-06

    We demonstrate the rapid optical characterization of large numbers of individual metal nanoparticles freely diffusing in colloidal solution by confocal laser spectroscopy. We find that hollow gold nanospheres and solid silver nanoparticles linked with a bifunctional ligand, both designed nanostructures, exhibit significantly higher monodispersity in their Rayleigh and Raman scattering response than randomly aggregated gold and silver nanoparticles. We show that measurements of rotational diffusion timescales allow sizing of particles significantly more reliably than can be obtained using translational diffusion timescales.

  9. Vibrational fingerprinting of bacterial pathogens by surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premasiri, W. Ranjith; Moir, D. T.; Ziegler, Lawrence D.

    2005-05-01

    The surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of vegetative whole-cell bacteria were obtained using in-situ grown gold nanoparticle cluster-covered silicon dioxide substrates excited at 785 nm. SERS spectra of Gram-negative bacteria; E. coli and S. typhimurium, and Gram-positive bacteria; B. subtilis, B. cereus, B. thuringeinsis and B. anthracis Sterne, have been observed. Raman enhancement factors of ~104-105 per cell are found for both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria on this novel SERS substrate. The bacterial SERS spectra are species specific and exhibit greater species differentiation and reduced spectral congestion than their corresponding non-SERS (bulk) Raman spectra. Fluorescence observed in the 785 nm excited bulk Raman emission of Bacillus species is not apparent in the corresponding SERS spectra. The surface enhancement effect allows the observation of Raman spectra at the single cell level excited by low incident laser powers (blood serum, has an observable effect on the bacterial SERS spectra. However, reproducible, species specific SERS vibrational fingerprints are still obtained. The potential of SERS for detection and identification of bacteria with species specificity on these gold nanoparticle coated substrates is demonstrated by these results.

  10. Silver nanoparticles decorated nanoporous gold for surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min; Zhang, Ling; Chen, Bin; Wang, Zheng; Chen, Chao; Zeng, Heping

    2017-02-01

    Raman spectra are considered as signatures of matter and have been widely used to identify several classes of materials. The development of mobile spectrometers further extends applications of Raman spectroscopy, and both indoor/outdoor and in vivo/in vitro measurements have been evaluated on site. However, the finite detection level restricts its application in high density matters. Here we report a facile silver nanoparticle decorated nanoporous gold (NanoAg@NPG) substrate, which can provide high enhancement of the Raman signal from nearby molecules by 785 nm photoexcitation. This enhancement is attributed to the abundant Raman-active nanogaps constructed by adjacent nanoparticles and also by the NPG ligaments and adhered nanoparticles. This NanoAg@NPG substrate shows great potential as a reproducible and quantifiable near infrared surface-enhanced Raman scattering probe for various targets, since it performs well in the so-called biological window which can avoid autofluorescence and absorption either from targets or surroundings in the visible optical region.

  11. Investigation of pre-pulse pumping laser for preserving temporal waveform of stimulated Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junchi; Su, Hongpeng; Peng, Yujie; Guo, Xiaoyang; Wang, Zhanshan; Leng, Yuxin

    2017-01-01

    A modified polarized beam combination technique is proposed for preserving the temporal waveforms of stimulated Raman scattering. 1064 nm pre-pulse pumping lasers prior to the main pumping laser with a delay time are generated and injected into a Ba(NO3)2 Raman medium to excite the crystal firstly. The influences of pre-pulse lasers with various energy levels on the temporal shapes of Raman lasers are investigated, and it is demonstrated that the temporal waveforms of the Raman laser are distorted once the energies of the pre-pulse are below and above the required energy for preserving the temporal shapes of Stokes radiation. It is also discovered that the temporal shape of the 1197 nm Raman laser cannot be perfectly preserved if the energy of the 1064 nm main laser is too low or the relative delay time is too large. Moreover, the optical conversion efficiency and Stokes laser energy obtained under pumping lasers with single and double intensity peaks are compared.

  12. Two-dimensional molybdenum tungsten diselenide alloys: photoluminescence, Raman scattering, and electrical transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mei; Wu, Juanxia; Zhu, Yiming; Dumcenco, Dumitru O; Hong, Jinhua; Mao, Nannan; Deng, Shibin; Chen, Yanfeng; Yang, Yanlian; Jin, Chuanhong; Chaki, Sunil H; Huang, Ying-Sheng; Zhang, Jin; Xie, Liming

    2014-07-22

    Two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenide alloys have attracted intense attention due to their tunable band gaps. In the present work, photoluminescence, Raman scattering, and electrical transport properties of monolayer and few-layer molybdenum tungsten diselenide alloys (Mo1-xWxSe2, 0 ≤ x ≤ 1) are systematically investigated. The strong photoluminescence emissions from Mo1-xWxSe2 monolayers indicate composition-tunable direct band gaps (from 1.56 to 1.65 eV), while weak and broad emissions from the bilayers indicate indirect band gaps. The first-order Raman modes are assigned by polarized Raman spectroscopy. Second-order Raman modes are assigned according to its frequencies. As composition changes in Mo1-xWxSe2 monolayers and few layers, the out-of-plane A1g mode showed one-mode behavior, while B2g(1) (only observed in few layers), in-plane E2g(1), and all observed second-order Raman modes showed two-mode behaviors. Electrical transport measurement revealed n-type semiconducting transport behavior with a high on/off ratio (>10(5)) for Mo1-xWxSe2 monolayers.

  13. Suppression of resonance Raman scattering via ground state depletion towards sub-diffraction-limited label-free microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rieger, S.; Fischedick, M.; Boller, K-J.; Fallnich, C.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the first experimental demonstration of the suppression of spontaneous Raman scattering via ground state depletion. The concept of Raman suppression can be used to achieve sub-diffraction-limited resolution in label-free microscopy by exploiting spatially selective signal suppression wh

  14. Lock-in-detection-free line-scan stimulated Raman scattering microscopy for near video-rate Raman imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-09-01

    We report on the development of a unique lock-in-detection-free line-scan stimulated Raman scattering microscopy technique based on a linear detector with a large full well capacity controlled by a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) for near video-rate Raman imaging. With the use of parallel excitation and detection scheme, the line-scan SRS imaging at 20 frames per second can be acquired with a ∼5-fold lower excitation power density, compared to conventional point-scan SRS imaging. The rapid data communication between the FPGA and the linear detector allows a high line-scanning rate to boost the SRS imaging speed without the need for lock-in detection. We demonstrate this lock-in-detection-free line-scan SRS imaging technique using the 0.5 μm polystyrene and 1.0 μm poly(methyl methacrylate) beads mixed in water, as well as living gastric cancer cells.

  15. Monitoring intra-cellular lipid metabolism in macrophages by Raman- and CARS-microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthäus, Christian; Bergner, Gero; Krafft, Christoph; Dietzek, Benjamin; Lorkowski, Stefan; Popp, Jürgen

    2010-04-01

    Monocyte-derived macrophages play a key role in lipid metabolism in vessel wall tissues. Macrophages can take up lipids by various mechanisms. As phagocytes, macrophages are important for the decomposition of lipid plaques within arterial walls that contribute to arteriosclerosis. Of special interest are uptake dynamics and intra-cellular fate of different individual types of lipids as, for example, fatty acids, triglycerides or free and esterified cholesterol. Here we utilize Raman microscopy to image the metabolism of such lipids and follow subsequent storage or degradation patterns. The combination of optical microscopy with Raman spectroscopy allows visualization at the diffraction limit of the employed laser light and biochemical characterization through the associated spectral information. Relatively long measuring times, due to the weakness of Raman scattering can be overcome by non-linear effects such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS). With this contribution we introduce first results to monitor the incorporation of lipid components into individual cells employing Raman and CARS microscopy.

  16. Universality of Coherent Raman Gain Suppression in Gas-Filled Broadband-Guiding Photonic Crystal Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, P.; Mridha, M. K.; Novoa, D.; Abdolvand, A.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2017-03-01

    As shown in the early 1960s, the gain in stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) is drastically suppressed when the rate of creation of phonons (via a pump-to-Stokes conversion) is exactly balanced by the rate of phonon annihilation (via a pump-to-anti-Stokes conversion). This occurs when the phonon coherence waves—synchronized vibrations of a large population of molecules—have identical propagation constants for both processes; i.e., they are phase-velocity matched. As recently demonstrated, hydrogen-filled photonic crystal fiber pumped in the vicinity of its zero-dispersion wavelength provides an ideal system for observing this effect. Here we report that Raman gain suppression is actually a universal feature of SRS in gas-filled hollow-core fibers and that it can strongly impair SRS even when the phase mismatch is high, particularly at high pump powers when it is normally assumed that nonlinear processes become more (not less) efficient. This counterintuitive result means that intermodal stimulated Raman scattering (for example, between LP01 and LP11 core modes) begins to dominate at high power levels. The results reported have important implications for fiber-based Raman shifters, amplifiers, or frequency combs, especially for operation in the ultraviolet, where the Raman gain is much higher.

  17. Development of fiber lasers and devices for coherent Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Erin Stranford

    As ultrafast laser technology has found expanding application in machining, spectroscopy, microscopy, surgery, and numerous other areas, the desire for inexpensive and robust laser sources has grown. Until recently, nonlinear effects in fiber systems due to the tight confinement of the light in the core have limited their performance. However, with advances in managing nonlinearity through pulse propagation physics and the use of large core fibers, the performance of fiber lasers can compete with that of their solid-state counterparts. As specific applications, such as coherent Raman scattering microscopy, emerge that stand to benefit from fiber technology, new performance challenges in areas such as laser noise are anticipated. This thesis studies nonlinear pulse propagation in fiber lasers and fiber parametric devices. Applications of dissipative solitons and self-similar pulse propagation to low-repetition rate oscillators that have the potential to simplify short-pulse amplification schemes will be examined. The rest of this thesis focuses on topics relevant to fiber laser development for coherent Raman scattering microscopy sources. Coherent pulse division and recombination inside the laser cavity will be introduced as an energy-scaling mechanism and demonstrated for a fiber soliton laser. The relative intensity noise properties of mode-locked fiber lasers, with a particular emphasis on normal dispersion lasers, will be explored in simulation and experiment. A fiber optical parametric oscillator will be studied in detail for low noise frequency conversion of picosecond pulses, and its utility for coherent Raman imaging will be demonstrated. Spectral compression of femtosecond pulses is used to generate picosecond pulses to pump this device, and this technique provides a route to future noise reduction in the system. Furthermore, this device forms a multimodal source capable of providing the picosecond pulses for coherent Raman scattering microscopy and the

  18. Raman-scattering-assistant broadband noise-like pulse generation in all-normal-dispersion fiber lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Daojing; Li, Lei; Chen, Hao; Tang, Dingyuan; Zhao, Luming

    2015-01-01

    We report on the observation of both stable dissipative solitons and noise-like pulses with the presence of strong Raman scattering in a relatively short all-normal-dispersion Yb-doped fiber laser. We show that Raman scattering can be filtered out by intracavity filter. Furthermore, by appropriate intracavity polarization control, the Raman effect can be utilized to generate broadband noise-like pulses (NLPs) with bandwidth up to 61.4 nm. To the best of our knowledge, this is the broadest NLP achieved in all-normal-dispersion fiber lasers

  19. Polarized Raman scattering study of PSN single crystals and epitaxial thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorný, J.; Rafalovskyi, I.; Gregora, I.; Borodavka, F.; Savinov, M.; Drahokoupil, J.; Tyunina, M.; Kocourek, T.; Jelinek, M.; Bing, Y.; Ye, Z.-G.; Hlinka, J.

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a detailed analysis of the dependence of Raman scattering intensity on the polarization of the incident and inelastically scattered light in PbSc0.5Nb0.5O3 (PSN) single crystals and epitaxially compressed thin films grown on (100)-oriented MgO substrates. It is found that there are significant differences between the properties of the crystals and films, and that these differences can be attributed to the anticipated structural differences between these two forms of the same material. In particular, the scattering characteristics of the oxygen octahedra breathing mode near 810 cm-1 indicate a ferroelectric state for the crystals and a relaxor state for the films, which is consistent with the dielectric behaviors of these materials.

  20. High precision stress measurements in semiconductor structures by Raman microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlig, Benjamin

    2009-07-01

    Stress in silicon structures plays an essential role in modern semiconductor technology. This stress has to be measured and due to the ongoing miniaturization in today's semiconductor industry, the measuring method has to meet certain requirements. The present thesis deals with the question how Raman spectroscopy can be used to measure the state of stress in semiconductor structures. In the first chapter the relation between Raman peakshift and stress in the material is explained. It is shown that detailed stress maps with a spatial resolution close to the diffraction limit can be obtained in structured semiconductor samples. Furthermore a novel procedure, the so called Stokes-AntiStokes-Difference method is introduced. With this method, topography, tool or drift effects can be distinguished from stress related influences in the sample. In the next chapter Tip-enhanced Raman Scattering (TERS) and its application for an improvement in lateral resolution is discussed. For this, a study is presented, which shows the influence of metal particles on the intensity and localization of the Raman signal. A method to attach metal particles to scannable tips is successfully applied. First TERS scans are shown and their impact on and challenges for high resolution stress measurements on semiconductor structures is explained. (orig.)

  1. Raman Spectroscopy and Microscopy of Individual Cells andCellular Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, J; Fore, S; Wachsmann-Hogiu, S; Huser, T

    2008-05-15

    Raman spectroscopy provides the unique opportunity to non-destructively analyze chemical concentrations on the submicron length scale in individual cells without the need for optical labels. This enables the rapid assessment of cellular biochemistry inside living cells, and it allows for their continuous analysis to determine cellular response to external events. Here, we review recent developments in the analysis of single cells, subcellular compartments, and chemical imaging based on Raman spectroscopic techniques. Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy provides for the full spectral assessment of cellular biochemistry, while coherent Raman techniques, such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering is primarily used as an imaging tool comparable to confocal fluorescence microscopy. These techniques are complemented by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, which provides higher sensitivity and local specificity, and also extends the techniques to chemical indicators, i.e. pH sensing. We review the strengths and weaknesses of each technique, demonstrate some of their applications and discuss their potential for future research in cell biology and biomedicine.

  2. Dimensional scale effects on surface enhanced Raman scattering efficiency of self-assembled silver nanoparticle clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fasolato, C. [Dip. Fisica, Università Sapienza, P.le Aldo Moro, 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Center for Life Nanoscience@Sapienza, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, V.le Regina Elena, 291, 00185 Rome (Italy); Domenici, F., E-mail: fabiodomenici@gmail.com, E-mail: paolo.postorino@roma1.infn.it; De Angelis, L.; Luongo, F.; Postorino, P., E-mail: fabiodomenici@gmail.com, E-mail: paolo.postorino@roma1.infn.it [Dip. Fisica, Università Sapienza, P.le Aldo Moro, 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Sennato, S. [Dip. Fisica, Università Sapienza, P.le Aldo Moro, 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); CNR-IPCS UOS Roma, Dip. Fisica, Università Sapienza, P.le Aldo Moro, 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Mura, F. [Dip. Scienze di Base Applicate all' Ingegneria, Università Sapienza, Via A. Scarpa, 16, 00185 Rome (Italy); Costantini, F. [Dip. Ingegneria Astronautica Elettrica ed Energetica, Università Sapienza, Via Eudossiana, 18, 00184 Rome (Italy); Bordi, F. [Dip. Fisica, Università Sapienza, P.le Aldo Moro, 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Center for Life Nanoscience@Sapienza, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, V.le Regina Elena, 291, 00185 Rome (Italy); CNR-IPCS UOS Roma, Dip. Fisica, Università Sapienza, P.le Aldo Moro, 5, 00185 Rome (Italy)

    2014-08-18

    A study of the Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) from micrometric metallic nanoparticle aggregates is presented. The sample is obtained from the self-assembly on glass slides of micro-clusters of silver nanoparticles (60 and 100 nm diameter), functionalized with the organic molecule 4-aminothiophenol in water solution. For nanoparticle clusters at the micron scale, a maximum enhancement factor of 10{sup 9} is estimated from the SERS over the Raman intensity ratio normalized to the single molecule contribution. Atomic force microscopy, correlated to spatially resolved Raman measurements, allows highlighting the connection between morphology and efficiency of the plasmonic system. The correlation between geometric features and SERS response of the metallic structures reveals a linear trend of the cluster maximum scattered intensity as a function of the surface area of the aggregate. On given clusters, the intensity turns out to be also influenced by the number of stacking planes of the aggregate, thus suggesting a plasmonic waveguide effect. The linear dependence results weakened for the largest area clusters, suggesting 30 μm{sup 2} as the upper limit for exploiting the coherence over large scale of the plasmonic response.

  3. Plasmon Coupling Enhanced Raman Scattering Nanobeacon for Single-Step, Ultrasensitive Detection of Cholera Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chong-Hua; Liu, Ling-Wei; Liang, Ping; Tang, Li-Juan; Yu, Ru-Qin; Jiang, Jian-Hui

    2016-08-02

    We report the development of a novel plasmon coupling enhanced Raman scattering (PCERS) method, PCERS nanobeacon, for ultrasensitive, single-step, homogeneous detection of cholera toxin (CT). This method relies on our design of the plasmonic nanoparticles, which have a bilayer phospholipid coating with embedded Raman indicators and CT-binding ligands of monosialoganglioside (GM1). This design allows a facile synthesis of the plasmonic nanoparticle via two-step self-assembly without any specific modification or chemical immobilization. The realization of tethering GM1 on the surface imparts the plasmonic nanoparticles with high affinity, excellent specificity, and multivalence for interaction with CT. The unique lipid-based bilayer coated structure also affords excellent biocompatibility and stability for the plasmonic nanoparticles. The plasmonic nanoparticles are able to show substantial enhancement of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals in a single-step interaction with CT, because of their assembly into aggregates in response to the CT-sandwiched interactions. The results reveal that the developed nanobeacon provides a simple but ultrasensitive sensor for rapid detection of CT with a large signal-to-background ratio and excellent reproducibility in a wide dynamic range, implying its potential for point-of-care applications in preventive and diagnostic monitoring of cholera.

  4. Temperature dependence of first- and second-order Raman scattering in silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khachadorian, S.; Scheel, H.; Vierck, A.; Thomsen, C. [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Colli, A. [Nokia Research Centre, Broers Building, 21 J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    The first- and second-order Raman scattering of the silicon nanowires grown without any metal catalyst is studied in the temperature range from 77 to 873 K. The first- and second-order Raman peaks were found to shift and broaden differently with increasing temperature. We show that this is due to the confinement related enhanced anharmonic effects in silicon nanowires. Our measurements also show that both the second- to first-order Raman peak intensity ratio [I(2TA){sub int.}/I(1TO){sub int.} and I(2TO){sub int.}/I(1TO){sub int.}] and the Raman relative intensities [I(2TA){sub int.}/I(2TO){sub int.}] increase with increasing temperature. TEM image of SiNWs. The SiNW are 15 nm in diameter and up to a few microns long. (Copyright copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Efficient stimulated Raman scattering in hybrid liquid-silica fibers for wavelength conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrun, Sylvie; Phan Huy, Minh-Châu.; Delaye, Philippe; Pauliat, Gilles

    2016-10-01

    Wavelength Raman converters have been developed for years to provide an elegant solution to easily shift the wavelength of existing lasers. In the pulse regime, due to relatively low Raman gains, these converters are usually limited to high-energy pulses, typically a few J or a few mJ in the nanosecond or picosecond regime. In order to build efficient Raman converters with lower energy pulses, we have developed a new class of fiber wavelength shifters based on Stimulated Raman Scattering in the liquid filling the hollow core of photonic bandgap fibers or Kagome fibers. The liquid choice, the design of the photonic crystal microstructure, the fiber length and its diameter give us enough degrees of freedom to realize efficient and versatile shifters, each being optimized for a specific wavelength shift. Connecting such a fiber device to a fixed wavelength laser allows delivering a new wavelength. With the same laser, another wavelength can be obtained by connecting another shifter. Using microlasers delivering 532 nm sub-nanosecond pulses of about 1 μJ, we already built a full series of shifters to reach any wavelength among: 556 nm; 561 nm; 582 nm; 595 nm; 612 nm; 630 nm; 650 nm; 667 nm; 772 nm. Hereafter, we detail how we design and optimize these new devices.

  6. Probing IrTe2 crystal symmetry by polarized Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarević, N.; Bozin, E. S.; Šćepanović, M.; Opačić, M.; Lei, Hechang; Petrovic, C.; Popović, Z. V.

    2014-06-01

    Polarized Raman scattering measurements on IrTe2 single crystals carried out over the 15-640 K temperature range, and across the structural phase transition, reveal different insights regarding the crystal symmetry. In the high temperature regime three Raman active modes are observed at all of the studied temperatures above the structural phase transition, rather than two as predicted by the factor group analysis for the assumed P3¯m1 symmetry. This indicates that the actual symmetry of the high temperature phase is lower than previously thought. The observation of an additional Eg mode at high temperature can be explained by doubling of the original trigonal unit cell along the c axis and within the P3¯c1 symmetry. In the low temperature regime (below 245 K) the other Raman modes appear as a consequence of the symmetry lowering phase transition and the corresponding increase of the primitive cell. All of the modes observed below the phase transition temperature can be assigned within the monoclinic crystal symmetry. The temperature dependence of the Raman active phonons in both phases is mainly driven by anharmonicity effects. The results call for reconsideration of the crystallographic phases of IrTe2.

  7. Raman scattering by phonons of Ga1-xAlxSb mixed crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdekas, D.

    2013-06-01

    We present calculations of the Raman scattering spectra by the long-wavelength vibrations of Ga1-xAlxSb mixed crystals for three different cation concentrations. Each mixed crystal is approached using a primitive cell 64 times larger than the primitive cell of the bulk constituents GaSb and AlSb. The phonon modes are calculated on the basis of an 11 parameter Rigid Ion Model and the Raman spectra are calculated using the Bond Polarizability Model (BPM), away from resonance conditions. The parameters of this model (BPM) are not arbitrarily approximated but we have obtained them on the basis of certain relations, involving directly measurable quantities, such as dielectric and elastooptic constants of the bulk crystal. It is shown that for small concentrations the Al ions are not randomly distributed over the whole crystal but almost all tend to concentrate in neighboring lattice planes. Further, we have reproduced the Raman spectra close to resonance conditions, assuming that the value of the first order polarizability of AlSb is increased by an amount of 50% close to resonance conditions. Finally it is shown that disorder produces asymmetric Raman lines spectra with the intensities of the two strongest peaks in the optic frequency ranges of the bulk constituents being concentration dependent.

  8. Structure-property relations in crystalline L-leucine obtained from calorimetry, X-rays, neutron and Raman scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Facanha Filho, Pedro F.; Jiao, Xueshe; Freire, Paulo T. C.;

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the amino acid L-leucine (LEU) using inelastic neutron scattering, X-rays and neutron diffraction, calorimetry and Raman scattering as a function of temperature, focusing on the relationship between the local dynamics of the NH(3), CH(3), CH(2) and CO(2) moieties and the molecular...

  9. The Inclusion of Raman Scattering Effects in the Combined Ocean-Atmosphere Radiative Transfer Model MOMO to Estimate the Influence of Raman Scattering in Case 1 Waters on Satellite Ocean Remote Sensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bismarck, J.; Fischer, J.

    2011-12-01

    Raman scattering of the solar lightfield, due to energy absorption by vibrational modes of water molecules, may contribute significantly to the signals observed by remote sensing satellites over water. The inelastic fraction of the water-leaving radiance for clear water reaches values of 30% in the red part of the visible spectrum, and still reaches values of several percent in moderately turbid waters. Furthermore, inelastic scattering due to chlorophyll and yellow substance fluorescence adds to this fraction. For these reasons the inclusion of inelastic scattering sources into radiative-transfer models, used in ocean remote sensing applications or atmosphere remote sensing over the ocean, can be important. MOMO is a computer code based on the matrix-operator method designed to calculate the lightfield in the stratified atmosphere-ocean system. It has been developed at the Institute for Space Sciences of the Freie Universität Berlin and provides the full polarization state (in the newest version) and an air-sea interface accounting for radiative effects of the wind roughened water surface. The inclusion of Raman scattering effects is done by a processing module, that starts a primary MOMO program run with a high spectral resolution, to calculate the radiative energy available for inelastic scattering at each model layer boundary. The processing module then calculates the first order Raman source-terms for every observation wavelength at every layer boundary, accounting for the non-isotropicity (including the azimuthal dependence) of the Raman phase-function, the spectral redistribution, and the spectral dependence of the Raman scattering coefficient. These elementary source-terms then serve as input for the second program run, which then calculates the source-terms of all model layers, using the doubling-adding method, and the resulting radiance field. Higher orders of the Raman contribution can be computed with additional program runs. Apart from the Raman

  10. Fabrication and Robotization of Ultrasensitive Plasmonic Nanosensors for Molecule Detection with Raman Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaobin; Kim, Kwanoh; Liu, Chao; Fan, Donglei

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we introduce the history and mechanisms of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), discuss various techniques for fabrication of state-of-the-art SERS substrates, and review recent work on robotizing plasmonic nanoparticles, especially, the efforts we made on fabrication, characterization, and robotization of Raman nanosensors by design. Our nanosensors, consisting of tri-layer nanocapsule structures, are ultrasensitive, well reproducible, and can be robotized by either electric or magnetic tweezers. Three applications using such SERS nanosensors were demonstrated, including location predictable detection, single-cell bioanalysis, and tunable molecule release and monitoring. The integration of SERS and nanoelectromechanical system (NEMS) devices is innovative in both device concept and fabrication, and could potentially inspire a new device scheme for various bio-relevant applications. PMID:25946633

  11. Raman scattering investigation of the quasi-one-dimensional superconductor Ta₄Pd₃Te₁₆.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, D; Richard, P; Song, Z-D; Zhang, W-L; Wu, S-F; Jiao, W H; Fang, Z; Cao, G-H; Ding, H

    2015-12-16

    We have performed polarized Raman scattering measurements on the newly discovered superconductor Ta4Pd3Te16 (T(c) = 4.6 K). We observe 28 out of 33 Raman active modes, with frequencies in good accordance with first-principles calculations. Although most of the phonons observed vary only slightly with temperature and do not exhibit any asymmetric profile that would suggest strong electron-phonon coupling, the linewidth of the A(g) phonon mode at 89.9 cm(-1) shows an unconventional increase with temperature decreasing, which is possibly due to a charge-density-wave transition or the emergence of charge-density-wave fluctuations below a temperature estimated to fall in the 140-200 K range.

  12. Probing the pairing symmetry of the iron pnictides with electronic Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, G.R.

    2010-04-29

    An important issue in the study of the iron-arsenic based superconductors is the symmetry of the superconducting gap, a problem complicated by multiple gaps on different Fermi surface sheets. Electronic Raman scattering is a flexible bulk probe which allows one in principle to determine gap magnitudes and test for gap nodes in different regions of the Brillouin zone by employing different photon polarization states. Here we calculate the clean Raman intensity for A{sub 1g}, B{sub 1g} and B{sub 2g} polarizations, and discuss the peak structures and low-energy power laws which might be expected for several popular models of the superconducting gap in these systems.

  13. Formation Regularities of Plasmonic Silver Nanostructures on Porous Silicon for Effective Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandarenka, Hanna V; Girel, Kseniya V; Bondarenko, Vitaly P; Khodasevich, Inna A; Panarin, Andrei Yu; Terekhov, Sergei N

    2016-12-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures demonstrating an activity in the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy have been fabricated by an immersion deposition of silver nanoparticles from silver salt solution on mesoporous silicon (meso-PS). The SERS signal intensity has been found to follow the periodical repacking of the silver nanoparticles, which grow according to the Volmer-Weber mechanism. The ratio of silver salt concentration and immersion time substantially manages the SERS intensity. It has been established that optimal conditions of nanostructured silver layers formation for a maximal Raman enhancement can be chosen taking into account a special parameter called effective time: a product of the silver salt concentration on the immersion deposition time. The detection limit for porphyrin molecules CuTMPyP4 adsorbed on the silvered PS has been evaluated as 10(-11) M.

  14. Nanotag-enabled photonic crystal fiber as quantitative surface-enhanced Raman scattering optofluidic platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkhasova, Polina; Chen, Hui; Du, Henry, E-mail: hdu@stevens.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, New Jersey 07030 (United States); Kanka, Jiri [Institute of Photonics and Electronics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Chaberska 57, 182 31 Prague (Czech Republic); Mergo, Pawel [Department of Optical Fibres Technology, Maria Curie-Sklodovska University, PI. M. Currie-Sklodowskiej 5, 20-031 Lublin (Poland)

    2015-02-16

    Core-shell nanotags that are active in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and entrapped with thiocyanate (SCN) label molecules were immobilized in the air channels of suspended-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF) to impart quantitative capacity to SERS-based PCF optofluidic sensing platform. The Raman intensity of Rhodamine 6G increases with concentration, whereas the intensity of SCN remains constant when measured using this platform. The signal from the SCN label can be used as an internal reference to establish calibration for quantitative measurements of analytes of unknown concentrations. The long optical path-length PCF optofluidic platform integrated with SERS-active core-shell nanotags holds significant promise for sensitive quantitative chem/bio measurements with the added benefit of small sampling volume. The dependence of SERS intensity on the nanotag coverage density and PCF length was interpreted based on numerical-analytical simulations.

  15. A Raman scattering study of H{sub 2} trapped near O in Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiller, M. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)], E-mail: martin.hiller@phy.tu-dresden.de; Lavrov, E.V.; Weber, J. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    Single-crystal silicon wafers exposed to a hydrogen plasma are studied by Raman scattering. Three Raman signals at 3727(1), 3733(1), and 3740(1)cm{sup -1}(T{yields}0 K) are assigned to ro-vibrational modes of H{sub 2} bound to interstitial oxygen (O-H{sub 2}). By monitoring the trapping kinetics of interstitial H{sub 2} at oxygen it is found that ortho- and para-H{sub 2} have similar diffusivities. At 77 K, an ortho-to-para conversion of H{sub 2} within the O-H{sub 2} complex is observed. This conversion occurs with similar kinetics as has been previously observed for isolated interstitial H{sub 2} in Si, and is suggested to be caused by interaction of H{sub 2} with the nuclear magnetic moment of {sup 29}Si.

  16. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering activity of niobium surface after irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Victor G.; Vlakhov, Emil S.; Stan, George E.; Zamfirescu, Marian; Albu, Catalina; Mihailescu, Natalia; Negut, Irina; Luculescu, Catalin; Socol, Marcela; Ristoscu, Carmen; Mihailescu, Ion N.

    2015-11-01

    The chemical modification of the niobium (Nb) surface after irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses was investigated by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The physical-chemical analyses indicated that the laser treatment results in oxidation of the Nb surface, as well as in the formation of Nb hydrides. Remarkably, after the samples' washing in ethanol, a strong Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) signal originating from the toluene residual traces was evidenced. Further, it was observed that the laser irradiated Nb surface is able to provide a SERS enhancement of ˜1.3 × 103 times for rhodamine 6G solutions. Thus, for the first time it was shown that Nb/Nb oxide surfaces could exhibit SERS functionality, and so one can expect applications in biological/biochemical screening or for sensing of dangerous environmental substances.

  17. In Situ and In Vivo Molecular Analysis by Coherent Raman Scattering Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chien-Sheng; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2016-06-01

    Coherent Raman scattering (CRS) microscopy is a high-speed vibrational imaging platform with the ability to visualize the chemical content of a living specimen by using molecular vibrational fingerprints. We review technical advances and biological applications of CRS microscopy. The basic theory of CRS and the state-of-the-art instrumentation of a CRS microscope are presented. We further summarize and compare the algorithms that are used to separate the Raman signal from the nonresonant background, to denoise a CRS image, and to decompose a hyperspectral CRS image into concentration maps of principal components. Important applications of single-frequency and hyperspectral CRS microscopy are highlighted. Potential directions of CRS microscopy are discussed.

  18. Luminescence, optical and laser Raman scattering studies on γ -irradiated terbium-doped potassium iodide crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangaru, S.

    2011-02-01

    This paper reports the thermoluminescence (TL), optical absorption and other laser Raman scattering studies performed on terbium-doped KI crystals γ-irradiated at room temperature. Photoluminescence studies confirm the presence of terbium ions in the KI matrix in their trivalent form. Formation of V3- and Z1-centres on F-bleaching of γ-irradiated crystals was observed. The characteristic emission due to Tb3+ ions in the spectral distribution under optically stimulated emission and TL emission confirms the participation of the Tb3+ ions in the recombination process. The Raman bands were identified as the totally symmetric vibration modes of f.c.c. species KI:Tb3+.

  19. Immunoassay utilizing biochemistry reaction product via surface-enhanced Raman scattering in near field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO; Haiying; NI; Yi; JIANG; Wei; LUO; Peiqing; HUANG; Mei

    2005-01-01

    We propose here a kind of applications of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) to immunology. It is a new enzyme immunoassay based on SERS. In the proposed system, antibody immobilized on a solid substrate reacts with antigen, which binds with another antibody labeled with peroxidase. If this immunocomplex is subjected to reaction with o-phenylenediamine and hydrogenperoxide, azoaniline is generated. This azo compound is adsorbed on a silver colloid and only the azo compound gives a strong surface-enhanced resonance Raman (SERRS) spectrum. A linear relationship was observed between the peak intensity of the N=N stretching band and the concentration of antigen, revealing that one can determine the concentration of antigen by the SERRS measurement of the reaction product. The detection limit of this SERS enzyme immunoassay method was found to be about 10-15 mol/L.

  20. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering spectroscopy of single R6G molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Zeng-Hui; Liu Li; Wang Gui-Ying; Xu Zhi-Zhan

    2006-01-01

    Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) adsorbed on colloidal silver clusters has been studied. Based on the great enhancement of the Raman signal and the quench of the fluorescence, the SERRS spectra of R6G were recorded for the samples of dye colloidal solution with different concentrations. Spectral inhomogeneity behaviours from single molecules in the dried sample films were observed with complementary evidences, such as spectral polarization, spectral diffusion, intensity fluctuation of vibrational lines and even "breathing" of the molecules. Sequential spectra observed from a liquid sample with an average of 0.3 dye molecules in the probed volume exhibited the expected Poisson distribution for actually measuring 0, 1 or 2 molecules. Difference between the SERRS spectra of R6G excited by linearly and circularly polarized light were experimentally measured.

  1. Carbon nanotubes doped with trivalent elements by using back - scattering Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Babanejad

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available  In this paper by using DC arc discharge method and acetylene gas, as the carbon source, and nitrogen, as the carrier gas, canrbon nanotubes, CNTs, doped with trivalent element boron, B, have been produced. The deposited CNTs on the cathod electrod, which have structural doped properties to boron element, have been collected and after purification have been investigated by back-scattering Raman spectroscopy. The results reveal that the high frequency G mode component in CNTs doped with electron acceptor element, B, shift to higher wavenumbers. The low frequency G mode component which can appear at approximately 1540–1570 cm-1 wavenumber region, called BWF mode, is a sign of metallic CNT. In the synthesized doped CNTs due to the presence of boron dopant, D mode has sharp peaks and has relatively high intensity in the Raman spectra .

  2. Tip-enhanced Raman scattering microscopy: Recent advance in tip production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Yasuhiko; Walke, Peter; De Feyter, Steven; Uji-i, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) microscopy is a technique that combines the chemical sensitivity of Raman spectroscopy with the resolving power of scanning probe microscopy. The key component of any TERS setup is a plasmonically-active noble metal tip, which serves to couple far-field incident radiation with the near-field. Thus, the design and implementation of reproducible probes are crucial for the continued development of TERS as a tool for nanoscopic analysis. Here we discuss conventional methods for the fabrication of TERS-ready tips, highlighting the problems therein, as well as detailing more recent developments to improve reducibility. In addition, the idea of remote excitation-TERS is enlightened upon, whereby TERS sensitivity is further improved by using propagating surface plasmons to separate the incident radiation from the tip apex, as well as how this can be incorporated into the fabrication process.

  3. In vitro colocalization of plasmonic nano-biolabels and biomolecules using plasmonic and Raman scattering microspectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Kamalesh; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2015-04-01

    An insight into the intracellular fate of theranostics is important for improving their potential in biological applications. In vivo efficacy of plasmonic theranostics depends on our ability to monitor temporal changes in their size, shape, and state of aggregation, and the identification of molecules adsorbed on their surfaces. We develop a technique which combines plasmonic and Raman scattering microspectroscopy to colocalize plasmonic scattering from metallic nanoparticles with the Raman signatures of biomolecules adsorbed on the surface of the former. Using this technique, we have colocalized biomolecules with the plasmonic scattering from silver nanoparticles in the vicinity of Escherichia coli bacteria. To prove the applicability of this setup for the measurements on mammalian cells, imaging of HEK293 cells treated with gold nanoparticles was performed. We discuss the importance of such correlated measurements over individual techniques, although the latter may lead to misinterpretation of results. Finally, with the above-mentioned examples, we have given criteria to improve the specificity of theranostics. We believe that this methodology will be considered as a prime development in the assessment of theranostics.

  4. Glass transition dynamics of anti-inflammatory ketoprofen studied by Raman scattering and terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Tomohiko; Igawa, Hikaru; Kim, Tae Hyun; Mori, Tatsuya; Kojima, Seiji

    2014-03-01

    A liquid-glass transition and a crystalline state of pharmaceutical racemic ketoprofen were studied by Raman scattering and the broadband terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) in the frequency range from 9 to 260 cm-1. The low-frequency Raman scattering spectra clearly shows the remarkable change related to a liquid-glass transition at about Tg = 267 K. After melt-quenching at liquid nitrogen temperature, a boson peak appears at about 16.5 cm-1 near and below Tg and the intensity of quasi-elastic scattering related to structural relaxation increases markedly on heating. The crystalline racemic ketoprofen of "conformer A" shows the noncoincidence effect of mode frequencies below 200 cm-1 between Raman scattering spectra and dielectric spectra observed by THz-TDS.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of surface-enhanced Raman-scattered gold nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalmodia S

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Sushma Kalmodia,1,2 Jaidev Harjwani,3 Raguraman Rajeswari,1 Wenrong Yang,2 Colin J Barrow,2 Sundara Ramaprabhu,3 Subramanian Krishnakumar,1,* Sailaja V Elchuri1,* 1Department of Nanobiotechnology, Sankara Nethralaya, Chennai, India; 2Centre for Chemistry and Biotechnology, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia; 3Alternative Energy and Nanotechnology Lab, Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, India *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: In this paper, we report a simple, rapid, and robust method to synthesize surface-enhanced Raman-scattered gold nanoparticles (GNPs based on green chemistry. Vitis vinifera L. extract was used to synthesize noncytotoxic Raman-active GNPs. These GNPs were characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, dynamic light-scattering, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and Raman spectroscopy. The characteristic surface plasmon-resonance band at ~528 nm is indicative of spherical particles, and this was confirmed by TEM. The N–H and C–O stretches in FTIR spectroscopy indicated the presence of protein molecules. The predominant XRD plane at (111 and (200 indicated the crystalline nature and purity of GNPs. GNPs were stable in the buffers used for biological studies, and exhibited no cytotoxicity in noncancerous MIO-M1 (Müller glial and MDA-MB-453 (breast cancer cell lines. The GNPs exhibited Raman spectral peaks at 570, 788, and 1,102 cm-1. These new GNPs have potential applications in cancer diagnosis, therapy, and ultrasensitive biomarker detection. Keywords: GNPs, SERS, SPR, Vitis vinifera L., stability

  6. Ultrasensitive molecular sensor using N-doped graphene through enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Simin; Dos Santos, Maria Cristina; Carvalho, Bruno R; Lv, Ruitao; Li, Qing; Fujisawa, Kazunori; Elías, Ana Laura; Lei, Yu; Perea-López, Nestor; Endo, Morinobu; Pan, Minghu; Pimenta, Marcos A; Terrones, Mauricio

    2016-07-01

    As a novel and efficient surface analysis technique, graphene-enhanced Raman scattering (GERS) has attracted increasing research attention in recent years. In particular, chemically doped graphene exhibits improved GERS effects when compared with pristine graphene for certain dyes, and it can be used to efficiently detect trace amounts of molecules. However, the GERS mechanism remains an open question. We present a comprehensive study on the GERS effect of pristine graphene and nitrogen-doped graphene. By controlling nitrogen doping, the Fermi level (E F) of graphene shifts, and if this shift aligns with the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of a molecule, charge transfer is enhanced, thus significantly amplifying the molecule's vibrational Raman modes. We confirmed these findings using different organic fluorescent molecules: rhodamine B, crystal violet, and methylene blue. The Raman signals from these dye molecules can be detected even for concentrations as low as 10(-11) M, thus providing outstanding molecular sensing capabilities. To explain our results, these nitrogen-doped graphene-molecule systems were modeled using dispersion-corrected density functional theory. Furthermore, we demonstrated that it is possible to determine the gaps between the highest occupied and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (HOMO-LUMO) of different molecules when different laser excitations are used. Our simulated Raman spectra of the molecules also suggest that the measured Raman shifts come from the dyes that have an extra electron. This work demonstrates that nitrogen-doped graphene has enormous potential as a substrate when detecting low concentrations of molecules and could also allow for an effective identification of their HOMO-LUMO gaps.

  7. Chip-Scale Bioassays Based on Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering: Fundamentals and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hye-Young Park

    2005-12-17

    This work explores the development and application of chip-scale bioassays based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for high throughput and high sensitivity analysis of biomolecules. The size effect of gold nanoparticles on the intensity of SERS is first presented. A sandwich immunoassay was performed using Raman-labeled immunogold nanoparticles with various sizes. The SERS responses were correlated to particle densities, which were obtained by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The response of individual particles was also investigated using Raman-microscope and an array of gold islands on a silicon substrate. The location and the size of individual particles were mapped using AFM. The next study describes a low-level detection of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 and simulants of biological warfare agents in a sandwich immunoassay format using SERS labels, which have been termed Extrinsic Raman labels (ERLs). A new ERL scheme based on a mixed monolayer is also introduced. The mixed monolayer ERLs were created by covering the gold nanoparticles with a mixture of two thiolates, one thiolate for covalently binding antibody to the particle and the other thiolate for producing a strong Raman signal. An assay platform based on mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold is then presented. The mixed SAMs were prepared from dithiobis(succinimidyl undecanoate) (DSU) to covalently bind antibodies on gold substrate and oligo(ethylene glycol)-terminated thiol to prevent nonspecific adsorption of antibodies. After the mixed SAMs surfaces, formed from various mole fraction of DSU were incubated with antibodies, AFM was used to image individual antibodies on the surface. The final study presents a collaborative work on the single molecule adsorption of YOYO-I labeled {lambda}-DNA at compositionally patterned SAMs using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. The role of solution pH, {lambda}-DNA concentration, and domain size was investigated. This work also revealed

  8. Chip-Scale Bioassays Based on Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering: Fundamentals and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hye-Young [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This work explores the development and application of chip-scale bioassays based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for high throughput and high sensitivity analysis of biomolecules. The size effect of gold nanoparticles on the intensity of SERS is first presented. A sandwich immunoassay was performed using Raman-labeled immunogold nanoparticles with various sizes. The SERS responses were correlated to particle densities, which were obtained by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The response of individual particles was also investigated using Raman-microscope and an array of gold islands on a silicon substrate. The location and the size of individual particles were mapped using AFM. The next study describes a low-level detection of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 and simulants of biological warfare agents in a sandwich immunoassay format using SERS labels, which have been termed Extrinsic Raman labels (ERLs). A new ERL scheme based on a mixed monolayer is also introduced. The mixed monolayer ERLs were created by covering the gold nanoparticles with a mixture of two thiolates, one thiolate for covalently binding antibody to the particle and the other thiolate for producing a strong Raman signal. An assay platform based on mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold is then presented. The mixed SAMs were prepared from dithiobis(succinimidyl undecanoate) (DSU) to covalently bind antibodies on gold substrate and oligo(ethylene glycol)-terminated thiol to prevent nonspecific adsorption of antibodies. After the mixed SAMs surfaces, formed from various mole fraction of DSU were incubated with antibodies, AFM was used to image individual antibodies on the surface. The final study presents a collaborative work on the single molecule adsorption of YOYO-I labeled {lambda}-DNA at compositionally patterned SAMs using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. The role of solution pH, {lambda}-DNA concentration, and domain size was investigated. This work also revealed

  9. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection of DNA derived from the West Nile virus genome using magnetic capture of Raman-active gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    A model paramagnetic nanoparticle (MNP) assay is demonstrated for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection of DNA oligonucleotides derived from the West Nile virus (WNV) genome. Detection is based on the capture of WNV target sequences by hybridization with complementary oligonucleotide pr...

  10. Effect of annealing on Raman scattering spectra of monolayer graphene samples gradually disordered by ion irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Zion, E.; BUTENKO A.; Kaganovskii, Yu.; Richter, V.; Wolfson, L; Sharoni, A.; Kogan, E.; Kaveh, M.; Shlimak, I.

    2016-01-01

    The Raman scattering spectra (RS) of two series of monolayer graphene samples irradiated with various doses of C$^{+}$ and Xe$^{+}$ ions were measured after annealing in high vacuum, and in forming gas (95\\%Ar+5\\%H$_{2}$). It was found that these methods of annealing have dramatically different influence on the RS lines. Annealing in vacuum below 500$^{\\circ}$C leads to significant decrease of both D-line, associated with defects, and 2D-line, associated with the intact lattice structure, whi...

  11. Phonons and magnons in stripe-ordered nickelates. A Raman scattering study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnezdilov, V.; Kurnosov, V.; Yeremenko, A.; Pashkevich, Yu.; Lemmens, P.; Tranquada, J.; Choi, K.-Y.; Güntherodt, G.; Nakajima, K.

    2005-02-01

    Electronic correlation effects in La2-xSrxNiO4 (x=1/3 and 0.225) lead to spontaneous phase separation into microscopic spin/charge stripes with commensurate and incommensurate order, respectively. Raman scattering experiments on such single-crystalline materials show a rich phenomenology of phonon and magnon anomalies due to the new, self-organized periodicities. These effects are observable as function of temperature but can also be induced by cooling in seemingly small magnetic fields leading to a reorganization of stripe structure.

  12. Polarized micro Raman scattering spectroscopy for curved edges of epitaxial graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Md. Sherajul, E-mail: sheraj-ruet@yahoo.com; Makino, T.; Hashimoto, A. [Graduate School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Fukui, 3-9-1 Bunkyo, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan); Bhuiyan, A. G. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Khulna University of Engineering and Technology, Khulna 9203 (Bangladesh); Tanaka, S. [Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    This letter performed polarized microscopic laser Raman scattering spectroscopy on the curved edges of transferred epitaxial graphene on SiO{sub 2}/Si. The intensity ratio between the parallel and perpendicular polarized D band is evolved, providing a spectroscopy-based technique to probe the atomic-scale edge structures in graphene. A detailed analysis procedure for non-ideal disordered curved edges of graphene is developed combining the atomic-scale zigzag and armchair edge structures along with some point defects. These results could provide valuable information of the realistic edges of graphene at the atomic-scale that can strongly influence the performance of graphene-based nanodevices.

  13. Adsorption study of antibiotics on silver nanoparticle surfaces by surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filgueiras, Aline Luciano; Paschoal, Diego; Dos Santos, Hélio F.; Sant'Ana, Antonio C.

    2015-02-01

    In this work the adsorption of the antibiotics levofloxacin (LV), tetracycline (TC) and benzylpenicillin (BP) on the surface of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) have been investigated through both surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and UV-VIS-NIR spectroscopies. The SERS spectra were obtained using 1064 nm exciting radiation. Theoretical models for the antibiotic molecules were obtained from DFT calculations, and used in the vibrational assignment. The adsorption geometries were proposed based on the changes in the spectral patterns. The LV compound adsorbs through carboxylate group, TC compound interacts with silver atoms through carbonyl from intermediate ring, and BP compound adsorbs by carbonyl moieties from carboxylate and acyclic amide.

  14. Stimulated Raman Scattering in Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seka, W.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Theobald, W.; Myatt, J. F.; Maximov, A. V.; Short, R. W.; Regan, S. P.; Michel, P.; Goyon, C. S.; Moody, J. D.

    2016-10-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) is clearly visible in all planar and spherical direct-drive National Ignition Facility experiments. They are also visible in high-intensity OMEGA experiments with comparable ILn products (I and L are the intensity and density scale length near the quarter-critical surface). The two experimental platforms are complementary and provide information regarding single-beam and multibeam SRS. Experimental evidence and rough estimates of the levels of SRS will be shown and discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  15. Stimulated Raman scattering modes in highly elliptical-core optical fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兆民; 顾春明; 林景全; 郑学彦

    1996-01-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) transmission modes in highly elliptical-core optical fiber of three different structures are experimentally researched.The measuring setup,SRS spectrum and photographs of Stokes modes are given.The observed phenomena are completely different from those on circular-core graded-index optical fiber.The beam sizes of SRS remain constant and SRS light transmits with the characteristics of higher-order.mode.In addition,the experimental results are theoretically explained with fiber-optical dispersion theory and SRS phase matching conditions.Experimental results and theoretical analyses are in good agreement.

  16. Electronic Raman scattering and the Fano resonance in metallic carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasdeo, Eddwi H.; Nugraha, Ahmad R. T.; Sato, Kentaro; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Saito, Riichiro

    2013-09-01

    The Fano resonance spectra for the G band in metallic carbon nanotubes are calculated as a function of laser excitation energy, in which the origin of the resonance is given by an interference between the continuous electronic Raman spectra and the discrete phonon spectra. We found that the second-order scattering process of the q≠0 electron-electron interaction is more relevant to the continuous spectra rather than the q=0 first-order process because the q=0 direct Coulomb interaction vanishes due to the symmetry of the two sublattices of a carbon nanotube.

  17. Plasmonic Enhancement of Raman Scattering for Metal-Analyte Sandwich Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulakovich, O. S.; Shabunya-Klyachkovskaya, E. V.; Matsukovich, A. S.; Trotsiuk, L. L.; Gaponenko, S. V.

    2016-11-01

    The effect of the mutual positions of plasmonic gold fi lms and a layer of analyte (malachite green and mitoxantrone molecules) on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was investigated. When the excitation emission in the plasmon resonance region (531 nm and 632.8 nm) was used the SERS intensity of the analyte in a sandwich configuration was up to five times higher compared with the "analyte under gold film" arrangement and up to 60 times higher than for the "analyte on gold fi lm" case.

  18. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering in femtosecond laser-nanostructured Ag substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai Ye; He Min; Yan Xiaona; Ma Guohong [Department of Physics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Lu Bo, E-mail: yedai@shu.edu.cn [Instrumental Analysis and Research Center, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)

    2011-02-01

    We demonstrate that a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate could be directly fabricated on the surface of Ag film by femtosecond laser micromachining. According to the morphology observation by SEM, an amount of nanoparticles, nanoprotrusions, and nanospikes were found to form in the ablation region and the density and size distribution of these Ag nanoparticles depended possibly on the incident laser intensity. Additionally, a large area of nanostructured region was produced by fast line scanning, and an enhancement factor of {approx}10{sup 5} was obtained in this region after the sample was soaked in the rhodamine 6G solution for 30 min.

  19. Intensity dependent waiting time for strong electron trapping events in speckle stimulated raman scatter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, Harvey [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Daughton, W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yin, L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The onset of Stimulated Raman scatter from an intense laser speckle is the simplest experimentally realizable laser-plasma-interaction environment. Despite this data and recent 3D particle simulations, the controlling mechanism at the onset of backscatter in the kinetic regime when strong electron trapping in the daughter Langmuir wave is a dominant nonlinearity is not understood. This paper explores the consequences of assuming that onset is controlled by large thermal fluctuations. A super exponential dependence of mean reflectivity on speckle intensity in the onset regime is predicted.

  20. Raman scattering on H{sub 2} in platelets in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavrov, E.V., E-mail: edward.lavrov@physik.tu-dresden.d [Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Hiller, M.; Weber, J. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    A Raman scattering study of H{sub 2} trapped within left brace111right brace oriented platelets in Si has been performed. The rotational transitions S{sub 0}(J) for J=0,1,2, and 3 are identified at 353, 587, 815, and 1034cm{sup -1}, respectively. At low temperatures, ortho-to-para conversion of H{sub 2} trapped within platelets is observed and suggested to be caused by interaction of nearby H{sub 2} molecules. The contributions of ortho- and para-H{sub 2} to the vibrational Q{sub 1}(J) broad band at 4150cm{sup -1} are identified.

  1. In situ monitoring of biomolecular processes in living systems using surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunbek, Mine; Kelestemur, Seda; Culha, Mustafa

    2015-12-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) continues to strive to gather molecular level information from dynamic biological systems. It is our ongoing effort to utilize the technique for understanding of the biomolecular processes in living systems such as eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. In this study, the technique is investigated to identify cell death mechanisms in 2D and 3D in vitro cell culture models, which is a very important process in tissue engineering and pharmaceutical applications. Second, in situ biofilm formation monitoring is investigated to understand how microorganisms respond to the environmental stimuli, which inferred information can be used to interfere with biofilm formation and fight against their pathogenic activity.

  2. Nanoporous gold as a highly active substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucheyev, S O; Hayes, J R; Biener, J; Hamza, A V

    2006-03-28

    Colloidal solutions of metal nanoparticles are currently among most studied substrates for sensors based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). However, such substrates often suffer from not being cost-effective, reusable, or stable. Here, we develop nanoporous Au as a highly active, tunable, a.ordable, stable, bio-compatible, and reusable SERS substrate. Nanoporous Au is prepared by a facile process of free corrosion of AgAu alloys followed by annealing. Results show that nanofoams with average pore sizes of {approx} 250 nm exhibit the largest SERS signal for 632.8 nm excitation. This is attributed to the electromagnetic SERS enhancement mechanism with additional field localization within pores.

  3. Raman scattering enhanced by plasmonic clusters and its application to single-molecule imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuike, Tomokazu [The Open University of Japan, Wakaba 2-11, Mihama-ku, Chiba 261-8586 (Japan); ESICB, Kyoto University, Kyoto daigaku-Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8530 (Japan); Nobusada, Katsuyuki [Institute for Molecular Science and SOKENDAI, Nishigonaka 38, Okazaki, 444-8585 (Japan); ESICB, Kyoto University, Kyoto daigaku-Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8530 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    The optical response of the linear Au{sub 8} cluster is investigated by the linear response theory based on the density functional theory. It is revealed that the observed many peaks in the visible region originate from the interaction of the ideal plasmonic excitation along the molecular axis with the background d-electron excitations, i.e., the Landau damping. In spite of the existence of the damping, the Raman scattering is shown to be enhanced remarkably by the incident light resonant to the visible excitations. The novel imaging experiment with the atomic resolution is proposed by utilizing a plasmonic cluster as the probing tip.

  4. Nonlinear kinetic modeling and simulations of Raman scattering in a two-dimensional geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bénisti Didier

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present our nonlinear kinetic modeling of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS by the means of envelope equations, whose coefficients have been derived using a mixture of perturbative and adiabatic calculations. First examples of the numerical resolution of these envelope equations in a two-dimensional homogeneous plasma are given, and the results are compared against those of particle-in-cell (PIC simulations. These preliminary comparisons are encouraging since our envelope code provides threshold intensities consistent with those of PIC simulations while requiring computational resources reduced by 4 to 5 orders of magnitude compared to full-kinetic codes.

  5. Optical properties of individual nano-sized gold particle pairs. Mie-scattering, fluorescence, and Raman-scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olk, Phillip

    2008-07-01

    This thesis examines and exploits the optical properties of pairs of MNPs. Pairs of MNPs offer two further parameters not existent at single MNPs, which both affect the local optical fields in their vicinity: the distance between them, and their relative orientation with respect to the polarisation of the excitation light. These properties are subject of three chapters: One section examines the distance-dependent and orientation-sensitive scattering cross section (SCS) of two equally sized MNPs. Both near- and far-field interactions affect the spectral position and spectral width of the SCS. Far-field coupling affects the SCS even in such a way that a two-particle system may show both a blue- and redshifted SCS, depending only on the distance between the two MNPs. The maximum distance for this effect is the coherence length of the illumination source - a fact of importance for SCS-based experiments using laser sources. Another part of this thesis examines the near-field between two MNPs and the dependence of the locally enhanced field on the relative particle orientation with respect to the polarisation of the excitation light. To attain a figure of merit, the intensity of fluorescence light from dye molecules in the surrounding medium was measured at various directions of polarisation. The field enhancement was turned into fluorescence enhancement, even providing a means for sensing the presence of very small MNPs of 12 nm in diameter. In order to quantify the near-field experimentally, a different technique is devised in a third section of this thesis - scanning particle-enhanced Raman microscopy (SPRM). This device comprises a scanning probe carrying an MNP which in turn is coated with a molecule of known Raman signature. By manoeuvring this outfit MNP into the vicinity of an illuminated second MNP and by measuring the Raman signal intensity, a spatial mapping of the field enhancement was possible. (orig.)

  6. Evaluation of surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection using a handheld and a bench-top Raman spectrometer: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jinkai; Pang, Shintaro; Labuza, Theodore P; He, Lili

    2014-11-01

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection using a handheld Raman spectrometer and a bench-top Raman spectrometer was systemically evaluated and compared in this study. Silver dendrites were used as the SERS substrate, and two pesticides, maneb and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate-ammonium salt (PDCA) were used as the analytes. Capacity and performance were evaluated based on spectral resolution, signal variation, quantitative capacity, sensitivity, flexibility and intelligence for SERS detection. The results showed that the handheld Raman spectrometer had better data consistency, more accurate quantification capacity, as well as the capacity of on-site and intelligence for qualitative and semi-quantitative analysis. On the other hand, the bench-top Raman spectrometer showed about 10 times higher sensitivity, as well as flexibility for optimization of the SERS measurements under different parameters such as laser power output, collective time, and objective magnification. The study on the optimization of SERS measurements on a bench-top spectrometer provides a useful guide for designing a handheld Raman spectrometer, specifically for SERS detection. This evaluation can advance the application of a handheld Raman spectrometer for the on-site measurement of trace amounts of pesticides or other chemicals.

  7. Collision-induced Raman scattering and the peculiar case of neon: Anisotropic spectrum, anisotropy, and the inverse scattering problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixneuf, Sophie [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH IEK-8: Troposphere, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Rachet, Florent; Chrysos, Michael, E-mail: michel.chrysos@univ-angers.fr [LUNAM Université, Université d’Angers, CNRS UMR 6200, Laboratoire MOLTECH-Anjou, 2 Bd Lavoisier, 49045 Angers (France)

    2015-02-28

    Owing in part to the p orbitals of its filled L shell, neon has repeatedly come on stage for its peculiar properties. In the context of collision-induced Raman spectroscopy, in particular, we have shown, in a brief report published a few years ago [M. Chrysos et al., Phys. Rev. A 80, 054701 (2009)], that the room-temperature anisotropic Raman lineshape of Ne–Ne exhibits, in the far wing of the spectrum, a peculiar structure with an aspect other than a smooth wing (on a logarithmic plot) which contrasts with any of the existing studies, and whose explanation lies in the distinct way in which overlap and exchange interactions interfere with the classical electrostatic ones in making the polarizability anisotropy, α{sub ∥} − α{sub ⊥}. Here, we delve deeper into that study by reporting data for that spectrum up to 450 cm{sup −1} and for even- and odd-order spectral moments up to M{sub 6}, as well as quantum lineshapes, generated from SCF, CCSD, and CCSD(T) models for α{sub ∥} − α{sub ⊥}, which are critically compared with the experiment. On account of the knowledge of the spectrum over the augmented frequency domain, we show how the inverse scattering problem can be tackled both effectively and economically, and we report an analytic function for the anisotropy whose quantum lineshape faithfully reproduces our observations.

  8. Collision-induced Raman scattering and the peculiar case of neon: anisotropic spectrum, anisotropy, and the inverse scattering problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixneuf, Sophie; Rachet, Florent; Chrysos, Michael

    2015-02-28

    Owing in part to the p orbitals of its filled L shell, neon has repeatedly come on stage for its peculiar properties. In the context of collision-induced Raman spectroscopy, in particular, we have shown, in a brief report published a few years ago [M. Chrysos et al., Phys. Rev. A 80, 054701 (2009)], that the room-temperature anisotropic Raman lineshape of Ne-Ne exhibits, in the far wing of the spectrum, a peculiar structure with an aspect other than a smooth wing (on a logarithmic plot) which contrasts with any of the existing studies, and whose explanation lies in the distinct way in which overlap and exchange interactions interfere with the classical electrostatic ones in making the polarizability anisotropy, α∥ - α⊥. Here, we delve deeper into that study by reporting data for that spectrum up to 450 cm(-1) and for even- and odd-order spectral moments up to M6, as well as quantum lineshapes, generated from SCF, CCSD, and CCSD(T) models for α∥ - α⊥, which are critically compared with the experiment. On account of the knowledge of the spectrum over the augmented frequency domain, we show how the inverse scattering problem can be tackled both effectively and economically, and we report an analytic function for the anisotropy whose quantum lineshape faithfully reproduces our observations.

  9. Generation of femtosecond anti-stokes pulses through phase-matched parametric four-wave mixing in a photonic crystal fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konorov, S O; Serebryannikov, E E; Zheltikov, A M; Zhou, Ping; Tarasevitch, A P; von der Linde, D

    2004-07-01

    Phase-matched parametric four-wave mixing in higher-order guided modes of a photonic crystal fiber is shown to result in an efficient decay of 40-fs 800-nm Ti:sapphire laser pump pulses into an anti-Stokes signal with a central wavelength around 590-600 nm and a Stokes signal centered at 1.25 microm. The photonic crystal fiber is designed in such a way as to minimize the group-velocity dispersion at the pump wavelength, phase match the parametric four-wave-mixing process, and reduce the group delay between the pump and the anti-Stokes pulses. The duration of the anti-Stokes pulse under these conditions, as shown by cross-correlation frequency-resolved optical gating measurements, is less than 200 fs.

  10. Measurements of density field in a swirling flame by 2D spontaneous Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharaborin, D. K.; Dulin, V. M.; Lobasov, A. S.; Markovich, D. M.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of the density distribution in swirling turbulent premixed flames. The measurement principle is based on registration of spontaneous Raman scattering, when the reacting gas flow is illuminated by a laser sheet. Evaluation of 1D and 2D distributions of density and temperature were performed in a laminar Bunsen flame as a test case for validation of experimental technique. Time-averaged 2D images of the scattering during rovibronic transitions of nitrogen molecules were captured in turbulent premixed low-swirl and high-swirl (Re = 5000) propane-air flames in a wide range of equivalence ratio. The obtained density fields are useful for better understanding of heat and mass transfer in swirl-stabilized turbulent flames and for validation of CFD results.

  11. Generalized Kramers-Heisenberg expressions for stimulated Raman scattering and two-photon absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roslyak, Oleksiy; Marx, Christoph A.; Mukamel, Shaul

    2010-01-01

    The frequency-domain pump-probe signal of a material system interacting with two quantum modes of the radiation field is recast in terms of products of scattering amplitudes (T matrix elements) rather than the third-order susceptibility Im χ(3). The resulting expression offers a more intuitive physical picture for the optical process compared with the semiclassical approach which treats the radiation field as classical. It can be derived and interpreted using closed-time-path-loop diagrams which represent the joint state of the matter and the field for each contribution to the signal. The signal has two components representing stimulated Raman scattering ω1 − ω2 and two-photon absorption ω1 + ω2 two-photon resonances. Both are expressed as nonequi-librium steady-state photon and matter fluxes, as is common in the description of dissipative processes in open quantum systems. PMID:20613889

  12. Anomalously Hot Electrons due to Rescatter of Stimulated Raman Scattering in the Kinetic Regime

    CERN Document Server

    Winjum, B J; Tsung, F S; Mori, W B

    2012-01-01

    Using particle-in-cell simulations, we examine hot electron generation from electron plasma waves excited by stimulated Raman scattering and rescattering in the kinetic regime where the wavenumber times the Debye length (k\\lambda_D) is greater than 0.3 for backscatter. We find that for laser and plasma conditions of possible relevance to experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), anomalously energetic electrons can be produced through the interaction of a discrete spectrum of plasma waves generated from SRS (back and forward scatter), rescatter, and the Langmuir decay of the rescatter-generated plasma waves. Electrons are bootstrapped in energy as they propagate into plasma waves with progressively higher phase velocities.

  13. Observation of the reduction of methylviologen at Ag and. beta. -ZnP/sub 2/ electrodes by raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blatter-Moerke, I.; von Kaenal, H.; Wachter, P.

    1987-01-29

    The reduction of MV/sup 2 +/ to MV/sup +/ at Ag electrodes in aqueous solutions of 1 mM MV/sup 2 +/ + 0.1 M KCl was monitored by resonant Raman Scattering. Apart from dissolved MV/sup +/ a second, adsorbed species was found both by cyclic voltammetry and by Raman scattering. Roughening of the Ag electrode electrochemically enabled the detection of surface-enhanced Raman spectra from the oxidized component MV/sup 2 +/. On p-type ..beta..-ZnP/sub 2/ the incident laser beam produces a photocurrent which sets in at approx. -0.2 V/sub SCE/ and reduces the MV/sup 2 +/ ions present in the electrolyte. This reduction is monitored as function of applied voltage. The Raman intensities are found to proportional to the photocurrent.

  14. Laser-MBE of nickel nanowires using AAO template: a new active substrate of surface enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lisheng; Fang, Yan; Zhang, Pengxiang

    2008-01-01

    The highly ordered anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template was fabricated using aluminum anodizing in electrolytes with two-step method, which apertures were about 50-80nm. The nickel nanowires with about 40-70nm in diameter was prepared on the AAO template by laser-MBE (molecular beam epitaxy). And high quality Raman spectra of SudanII were obtained on the glass covered with the nickel nanowires. On the nickel nanowires there are both surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and tip enhanced Raman scattering (TERS). The new observations not only enlarge the range of SERS applications, but also imply a possible new enhancement mechanism. Otherwise the Raman and SERS frequencies of SudanII molecule were calculated using, respectively, DFT and B3PW91.

  15. Combined laser ultrasonics, laser heating, and Raman scattering in diamond anvil cell system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinin, Pavel V; Prakapenka, Vitali B; Burgess, Katherine; Odake, Shoko; Chigarev, Nikolay; Sharma, Shiv K

    2016-12-01

    We developed a multi-functional in situ measurement system under high pressure equipped with a laser ultrasonics (LU) system, Raman device, and laser heating system (LU-LH) in a diamond anvil cell (DAC). The system consists of four components: (1) a LU-DAC system (probe and pump lasers, photodetector, and oscilloscope) and DAC; (2) a fiber laser, which is designed to allow precise control of the total power in the range from 2 to 100 W by changing the diode current, for heating samples; (3) a spectrometer for measuring the temperature of the sample (using black body radiation), fluorescence spectrum (spectrum of the ruby for pressure measurement), and Raman scattering measurements inside a DAC under high pressure and high temperature (HPHT) conditions; and (4) an optical system to focus laser beams on the sample and image it in the DAC. The system is unique and allows us to do the following: (a) measure the shear and longitudinal velocities of non-transparent materials under HPHT; (b) measure temperature in a DAC under HPHT conditions using Planck's law; (c) measure pressure in a DAC using a Raman signal; and (d) measure acoustical properties of small flat specimens removed from the DAC after HPHT treatment. In this report, we demonstrate that the LU-LH-DAC system allows measurements of velocities of the skimming waves in iron at 2580 K and 22 GPa.

  16. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering for 2-D WSesub>2sub> hybridized with functionalized gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun Young; Kim, Jeongyong; Joo, Jinsoo

    2016-11-28

    Two-dimensional (2-D) transition metal dichalcogenides, such as MoSsub>2sub>, WSesub>2sub>, and WSsub>2sub>, are promising materials for application in field effect transistors, optoelectronics, and sensing devices. In this study, 2-D WSesub>2sub> samples with various numbers of layers were hybridized with functionalized gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) to achieve surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The nanoscale Raman and photoluminescence spectra of the WSesub>2sub> layers and WSesub>2sub>/Au-NP hybrids were measured using a high-resolution laser confocal microscope. The WSesub>2sub> exhibited distinct optical characteristics depending on the number of WSesub>2sub> layers. The intensities of the Raman characteristic modes of the WSesub>2sub> layers were significantly enhanced after hybridization with functionalized Au-NPs, indicating the SERS effect. The SERS effect weakened with increasing the number of WSesub>2sub> layers. The SERS effect was more pronounced for mono- and bi-layer WSesub>2sub> systems compared with the multi-layer WSesub>2sub> systems.

  17. Nonlinear kinetic modeling of stimulated Raman scattering in a multidimensional geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benisti, D.; Morice, O.; Gremillet, L.; Friou, A.; Lefebvre, E. [CEA, DAM, DIF F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2012-05-15

    In this paper, we derive coupled envelope equations modeling the growth of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in a multi-dimensional geometry and accounting for nonlinear kinetic effects. In particular, our envelope equations allow for the nonlinear reduction of the Landau damping rate, whose decrease with the plasma wave amplitude depends on the rate of side-loss. Account is also made of the variations in the extent of the plasma wave packet entailed by the collisionless dissipation due to trapping. The dephasing between the electron plasma wave (EPW) and the laser drive, as well as the self-focussing of the plasma wave, both induced by the EPW nonlinear frequency shift, are also included in our envelope equations. These equations are solved in a multi-dimensional geometry using our code dubbed BRAMA, whose predictions regarding the evolution of Raman reflectivity as a function of the laser intensity are compared against previously published particle in cell results, thus illustrating the ability of BRAMA simulations to provide the correct laser threshold intensity for SRS as well as the right order of magnitude of Raman reflectivity above threshold.

  18. Raman scattering probe of ion-implanted and pulse laser annealed GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Prabhat; Jain, K. P.; Abbi, S. C.

    1996-04-01

    We report Raman scattering studies of phosphorus-ion-implanted and subsequently pulse laser annealed (PLA) GaAs. The threshold value of implantation fluence for the disappearance of one-phonon modes in the Raman spectrum of ion-implanted GaAs sample is found to be greater than that for the two-phonon modes by an order of magnitude. The phonon correlation length decreases with increasing disorder. The lattice reconstruction process during PLA creates microcrystallites for incomplete annealing, whose sizes can be given by the phonon correlation lengths, and are found to increase with the annealing power density. The intensity ratio of the Raman spectra corresponding to the allowed longitudinal-optical (LO)-phonon mode to the forbidden transverse-optical (TO)-phonon mode, ILO/ITO, is used as a quantitative measure of crystallinity in the implantation and PLA processes. The threshold annealing power density is estimated to be 20 MW/cm2 for 70 keV phosphorus-ion-implanted GaAs at a fluence of 5×1015 ions/cm2. The localized vibrational mode of phosphorus is observed in PLA samples for fluences above 1×1015 ions/cm2.

  19. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering of Silicon Nanocrystals in a Silica Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, Sergei; Khriachtchev, Leonid

    2016-06-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is an intriguing effect, efficiency of which depends on many factors and whose applicability to a given system is not obvious before the experiment. The motivation of the present work is to demonstrate the SERS effect on silicon nanocrystals (Si-nc) embedded in silica, the material of high technological importance. Using the Ag overlayer method, we have found the SERS effect for this material. The best result is obtained for Ag layers of a weight thickness of 12 nm, whose surface plasmons are in a resonance with the laser wavelength (488 nm). The enhancement obtained for the Raman signal from 3-4-nm Si-nc in a 40-nm SiOx film is above 100. The SERS effect is about twice stronger for ultra-small Si-nc (~1 nm) and/or disordered silicon compared to Si-nc with sizes of 3-4 nm. The SERS measurements with an Ag overlayer allow detecting silicon crystallization for ultra-thin SiOx films and/or for very low Si excess and suppress the Raman signal from the substrate and the photoluminescence of the film.

  20. Raman scattering studies on the collapsed phase of CaCo2As2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianting, Ji; Anmin, Zhang; Run, Yang; Yong, Tian; Feng, Jin; Xianggang, Qiu; Qingming, Zhang

    2016-06-01

    In this work, Raman scattering measurements have been performed on the collapsed phase CaCo2As2 crystals. At least 8 Raman modes were observed at room temperature though CaCo2As2 is structurally similar to other 122 compounds like BaFe2As2. Two Raman modes are assigned to the intrinsic A1g and B1g of this material system respectively. The other ones are considered to originate from the local vibrations relevant to cobalt vacancies. Careful polarized measurements allow us to clearly resolve the four-fold symmetry of the B1g mode, which put strong constraints on possible point group symmetries of the system with Co vacancies. The temperature-dependent measurements demonstrate that the anomalies in both frequency and width of the B1g mode occur around Neel temperature T N. The anomalies are considered to be related to the gap opening near the magnetic transition. The study may shed light on the structural and magnetic changes and their correlations with superconductivity in 122 systems. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921701), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11474357), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, and the Research Funds of Renmin University of China.

  1. Tapered Optical Fiber Probe Assembled with Plasmonic Nanostructures for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhulin; Lei, Xing; Liu, Ye; Wang, Zhiwei; Wang, Xiujuan; Wang, Zhaoming; Mao, Qinghe; Meng, Guowen

    2015-08-12

    Optical fiber-Raman devices integrated with plasmonic nanostructures have promising potentials for in situ probing remote liquid samples and biological samples. In this system, the fiber probe is required to simultaneously demonstrate stable surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals and high sensitivity toward the target species. Here we demonstrate a generic approach to integrate presynthesized plasmonic nanostructures with tapered fiber probes that are prepared by a dipping-etching method, through reversed electrostatic attraction between the silane couple agent modified silica fiber probe and the nanostructures. Using this approach, both negatively and positively charged plasmonic nanostructures with various morphologies (such as Au nanosphere, Ag nanocube, Au nanorod, Au@Ag core-shell nanorod) can be stably assembled on the tapered silica fiber probes. Attributed to the electrostatic force between the plasmonic units and the fiber surface, the nanostructures do not disperse in liquid samples easily, making the relative standard deviation of SERS signals as low as 2% in analyte solution. Importantly, the detection sensitivity of the system can be optimized by adjusting the cone angle (from 3.6° to 22°) and the morphology of nanostructures assembled on the fiber. Thus, the nanostructures-sensitized optical fiber-Raman probes show great potentials in the applications of SERS-based environmental detection of liquid samples.

  2. Study of cluster formation and its effects on Rayleigh and Raman scattering measurements in a Mach 6 wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirinzadeh, B.; Hillard, M. E.; Blair, A. B.; Exton, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    Using a frequency-doubled Nd-YAG pulsed laser and a single-intensified CCD camera, Rayleigh scattering measurements have been performed to study the cluster formation in a Mach 6 wind tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. These studies were conducted both in the free stream and in a model flow field for various flow conditions to gain an understanding of the dependence of the Rayleigh scattering (by clusters) on the local pressures and temperatures in the facility. Using the same laser system, simultaneous measurements of the local temperature have also been performed using the rotational Raman scattering of molecular nitrogen and determined the densities of molecular oxygen and nitrogen by using the vibrational Raman scattering from these species. Quantitative results are presented in detail with emphasis on the applicability of the Rayleigh scattering for obtaining quantitative measurements of molecular densities both in the free stream and in the model flow field.

  3. Raman Spectroscopy and Related Techniques in Biomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair Elfick

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this review we describe label-free optical spectroscopy techniques which are able to non-invasively measure the (biochemistry in biological systems. Raman spectroscopy uses visible or near-infrared light to measure a spectrum of vibrational bonds in seconds. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman (CARS microscopy and stimulated Raman loss (SRL microscopy are orders of magnitude more efficient than Raman spectroscopy, and are able to acquire high quality chemically-specific images in seconds. We discuss the benefits and limitations of all techniques, with particular emphasis on applications in biomedicine—both in vivo (using fiber endoscopes and in vitro (in optical microscopes.

  4. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering-active gold nanoparticles modified with a monolayer of silver film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun-Chao; Yang, Kuang-Hsuan; Liu, Yu-Chuan; Yu, Chung-Chin; Wu, Yi-Hao

    2012-11-07

    As shown in the literature, electrochemical underpotential deposition (UPD) offers the ability to deposit up to a monolayer of one metal onto a more noble metal with a flat surface. In this work, we develop an electrochemical pathway to prepare more surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-active substrates with Ag UPD-modified Au nanoparticles (NPs) by using sonoelectrochemical deposition-dissolution cycles (SEDDCs). Encouragingly, the SERS of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) adsorbed on these Ag UPD-modified Au NPs exhibits a higher intensity by ca. 12-fold magnitude, as compared with that of R6G adsorbed on unmodified Au NPs. The prepared SERS-active substrate demonstrates a large Raman scattering enhancement for R6G with a detection limit of 2 × 10(-14) M and an enhancement factor of 5.0 × 10(8). Also, the strategy proposed in this work to improve the SERS effects by using UPD Ag based on SEDDCs has an effect on the smaller probe molecules of 2,2'-bipyridine (BPy).

  5. Raman scattering under structural and magnetic phase transitions in terbium ferroborate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peschanskii, A. V.; Yeremenko, A. V.; Fomin, V. I.; Bezmaternykh, L. N.; Gudim, I. A.

    2014-02-01

    The Raman scattering spectrum of single crystal TbFe3(BO3)4 was studied in the frequency range 3-500 cm-1 at temperatures from 2 to 300 K. It was found that in high- and low-temperature phases there exist additional phonon lines which were not known before. In the high-temperature phase, these lines originate from LO-TO splitting of polar phonons. Appearance of the additional lines in the low temperature phase is due to both a reduction of the crystal symmetry under the phase transition and an increase of the primitive cell volume. It was established that the frequencies of some phonon lines in the magneto-ordered phase are shifted towards the high-energy region upon applying an external magnetic field along the third-order axis. The spectrum of two-magnon Raman scattering was investigated. It was shown that at low temperatures the two-magnon band has a complex shape that reflects specific features in the density of state of the magnon branches. The magnon energy at the Brillouin zone boundary was determined.

  6. Inflammation-related alterations of lipids after spinal cord injury revealed by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamosaityte, Sandra; Galli, Roberta; Uckermann, Ortrud; Sitoci-Ficici, Kerim H.; Koch, Maria; Later, Robert; Schackert, Gabriele; Koch, Edmund; Steiner, Gerald; Kirsch, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) triggers several lipid alterations in nervous tissue. It is characterized by extensive demyelination and the inflammatory response leads to accumulation of activated microglia/macrophages, which often transform into foam cells by accumulation of lipid droplets after engulfment of the damaged myelin sheaths. Using an experimental rat model, Raman microspectroscopy was applied to retrieve the modifications of the lipid distribution following SCI. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and endogenous two-photon fluorescence (TPEF) microscopies were used for the detection of lipid-laden inflammatory cells. The Raman mapping of CH2 deformation mode intensity at 1440 cm-1 retrieved the lipid-depleted injury core. Preserved white matter and inflammatory regions with myelin fragmentation and foam cells were localized by specifically addressing the distribution of esterified lipids, i.e., by mapping the intensity of the carbonyl Raman band at 1743 cm-1, and were in agreement with CARS/TPEF microscopy. Principal component analysis revealed that the inflammatory regions are notably rich in saturated fatty acids. Therefore, Raman spectroscopy enabled to specifically detect inflammation after SCI and myelin degradation products.

  7. Experimental Observation of Near-Field Deterioration Induced by Stimulated Rotational Raman Scattering in Long Air Paths

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jing; ZHANG Xiao-Min; HAN Wei; LI Fu-Quan; ZHOU Li-Dan; FENG Bin; XIANG Yong

    2011-01-01

    @@ We report the experimental investigation of a stimulated rotational Raman scattering effect in long air paths on SG-IQ TIL, with a 1053nm, 20-cm-diameter, linearly polarized, ins flat-topped laser pulse.An intense speckle pattern of near field with thickly dotted hot spots is observed at the end of propagation with an intensity-length product above 17TW/cm.The Stokes developing from the scattering of the laser beam by quantum fluctuations is characterized by a combination of high spatial frequency components.The observed speckle pattern with smalldiameter hot spots results from the combination of the nonlinear Raman amplification and the linear diffraction propagation effect of the Stokes with a noise pattern arising from the spontaneous Raman scattering.A new promising suppression concept based on the special characteristic of the Stokes, called active and selective filtering of Stokes, is proposed.

  8. Role of orbital filling on nonlinear ionic Raman scattering in perovskite titanates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Mingqiang; Rondinelli, James M.

    2017-01-01

    The linear and nonlinear phononic interactions between an optically excited infrared (IR) or hyper-Raman mode and a driven Raman mode are computed for the d0 (CaTiO3) and d1 (LaTiO3) titanates within a first-principles density functional framework. We calculate the potential energy surface expanded in terms of the Ag or B1 g mode amplitudes coupled to the Au or the B3 u mode and determine the coupling coefficients for these multimode interactions. We find that the linear-quadratic coupling dominates the anharmonicities over the quadratic-quadratic interaction in the perovskite titanates. The IR and Raman modes both modify the electronic structure with the former being more significant but occurring on a different time scale; furthermore, the coupled-mode interactions lead to sizable perturbations to the valence bandwidth (˜100 meV ) and band gap (˜50 meV). By comparing the coupling coefficients of undoped CaTiO3 and LaTiO3 to those for electron-doped (CaTiO3) and hole-doped (LaTiO3) titanates, we isolate the role of orbital filling in the nonlinear coupling process. We find that with increasing occupancy of the d manifold, the linear-quadratic interaction decreases by approximately 30% with minor changes induced by the cation chemistry (that mainly affect the phonon mode frequencies) or by electron correlation. We identify the importance of the Ti-O bond stiffness, which depends on the orbital filling, in governing the lattice anharmonicitiy. This microscopic understanding can be used to increase the nonlinear coupling coefficient to facilitate more facile access of nonequilibrium structures and properties through ionic Raman scattering processes.

  9. Gold Nanoparticle-based Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering Fe(III) Ion Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ly, Nguyen Hoang; Joo, Sang-Woo [Soongsil University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kwang Hwi [School of Systems Biomedical Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    We performed density functional theory (DFT) calculations of 4-aminobenzo-15-crown-5 (4AB15C5) in conjugation with 4-mercaptobenzoic acid (4MCB) with the polarizable continuum model (PCM) while considering the aqueous media. After specific binding of the ferric ion onto the 4MCB.4AB15C5 compound, the Raman frequencies and intensities were estimated by DFT calculations with the PCM. It was predicted that the Raman intensities became significantly increased upon binding of the ferric ion. 4MCB.4AB15C5 could be assembled on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) via the cleavage of the thiol bond. Colorimetric and UV.Vis absorption spectroscopy indicated that AuNPs became significantly aggregated in the presence of 1.10 mM of the ferric ion. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of 4MCB.4AB15C5 was used to identify the dissimilar spectral behaviors that yield a difference in intensity in the presence of the ferric ion. These changes were not observed in the other biological ions Zn{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 2+}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, NH{sup 4+}, and Co{sup 2+}. This study indicated that 4AB15C5 could be used to detect ferric ions in aqueous AuNP solutions by a combined method of colorimetric, UV.Vis absorption, and Raman spectroscopy. AuNPs.[4MCB. 4AB15C5] can thus be utilized as a selective turn-on sensor to Fe3{sup +} in aqueous solutions above 1 mM.

  10. Polarised Raman spectroscopy on a single class of single-wall nanotubes by nano surface-enhanced scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoulay, J.; Débarre, A.; Richard, A.; Tchénio, P.; Bandow, S.; Iijima, S.

    2000-12-01

    We report on the opportunity of performing polarised Raman spectroscopy on nanotubes by using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) mechanisms at the scale of a single hot site. In conjunction with the opportunity of selecting a single class of single wall nanotubes (SWNTs), it opens the way to fine spectroscopic studies of carbon nanotubes. Results obtained on a single class of nanotubes demonstrate first that polarised Raman spectroscopy is possible when a single hot site of a SERS substrate is selected and second that in this situation, unambiguous assignment of the modes is possible.

  11. Nonlinear microscopy, infrared, and Raman microspectroscopy for brain tumor analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Tobias; Bergner, Norbert; Bielecki, Christiane; Krafft, Christoph; Akimov, Denis; Romeike, Bernd F. M.; Reichart, Rupert; Kalff, Rolf; Dietzek, Benjamin; Popp, Jürgen

    2011-02-01

    Contemporary brain tumor research focuses on two challenges: First, tumor typing and grading by analyzing excised tissue is of utmost importance for choosing a therapy. Second, for prognostication the tumor has to be removed as completely as possible. Nowadays, histopathology of excised tissue using haematoxylin-eosine staining is the gold standard for the definitive diagnosis of surgical pathology specimens. However, it is neither applicable in vivo, nor does it allow for precise tumor typing in those cases when only nonrepresentative specimens are procured. Infrared and Raman spectroscopy allow for very precise cancer analysis due to their molecular specificity, while nonlinear microscopy is a suitable tool for rapid imaging of large tissue sections. Here, unstained samples from the brain of a domestic pig have been investigated by a multimodal nonlinear imaging approach combining coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, second harmonic generation, and two photon excited fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, a brain tumor specimen was additionally analyzed by linear Raman and Fourier transform infrared imaging for a detailed assessment of the tissue types that is required for classification and to validate the multimodal imaging approach. Hence label-free vibrational microspectroscopic imaging is a promising tool for fast and precise in vivo diagnostics of brain tumors.

  12. Temperature performance of Raman scattering in data fiber and its application in distributed temperature fiber-optic sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deming LIU; Shuang LIU; Hairong LIU

    2009-01-01

    A wavelength division multiplexer (WDM) was used to extract the Raman scattering signal from a data fiber. The temperature performance of Raman scattering spectrum was studied theoretically and experimentally. On the base of this study, a distributed fiber-optic temperature sensor (DFTS) system was developed. The sensing distance was 4 km. The temperature accuracy and the distance resolution reached to ±1℃ and ±1 m, respec-tively. The system is stable and adequate for commercial usage, such as the power industry, the underground tunnel, the subway, and the pipe laying, and also for the mission applications, such as the warship and the airplane.

  13. Raman scattering study on the hidden order and antiferromagnetic phases in URu2-xFexSi2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Hsiang-Hsi; Ran, Sheng; Kanchanavatee, Noravee; Lee, Alexander; Krapivin, Viktor; Haule, Kristjan; Maple, M. Brian; Blumberg, Girsh

    The heavy fermion compound URu2Si2 possesses an unusual ground state known as the ``hidden order'' (HO) phase below T = 17 . 5 K, which evolves into an large moment antiferromagnetic (LMAFM) phase under pressure. A recent Raman scattering study shows that an A2 g symmetry (D4 h) in-gap mode emerges in the HO phase, characterizing the excitation from a chirality density wave. Here, we report Raman scattering results for single crystal URu2-xFexSi2 with x MBM, SR and NK acknowledge DOE BES Award DE-FG02-04ER46105 and NSF Award DMR 1206553.

  14. Laser Cooling Using Anti-Stokes Fluorescencein Yb3+-Doped Fluorozirconate Glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The fluorozirconate glasses ZBLANP( ZrF4-BaF2-LaF3-AlF3-NaF-PbF2) doped with different Yb3+ concentration were prepared. The Raman spectra and absorption spectra are measured to substantiate the existence of phonon-assisted emission. After analyzing the normalized absorption spectra of samples with different Yb3+-doped concentration, we calculated the maximum cooling effect in the 3 wt% Yb3+-doped sample pumped at 1 012.5 nm. The corresponding cooling capability is about -4.09 ℃/W and the cooling efficiency reaches 1.76%.

  15. Study on forward stimulated Brillouin scattering in a backward pumped fiber Raman amplifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zaixuan Zhang(张在宣); Dawei Fang(方达伟); Songlin Zhuang(庄松林); Laixiao Li(李来晓); Dan Geng(耿丹); Bizhi Dai(戴碧智); Yongxing Jin(金永兴); Honglin Liu(刘红林); Insoo S.Kim; Jianfeng Wang(王剑锋); Xiaobiao Wu(吴孝彪)

    2004-01-01

    Strong multi-order forward stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) has been observed in the backward pumped S-band distributed fiber Raman amplifier (FRA) with tunable narrow signal source (less than 100 MHz) when the pump power of FRA reached the SBS threshold. This does not obey the theory that only weak backward SBS lines exist according to the conservation of energy and momentum and the wave vector selected rule. This is because the sound waveguide characteristic weakens the wave vector rule, and the forward transmitted sound waveguide Brillouin scattering lines are generated and amplified in FRA.When the pump power is further increased, 11 orders of SBS lines and comb-like profile are observed. For the excited line, the frequency is 197.2296 THz and the power is 0 dBm. The even order SBS lines are stronger than odd order SBS lines, the power of the 2nd and 4th order SBS lines is 1.75 dBm, which is 16 dB higher than that of the 1st and 3rd order SBS lines. The odd order SBS lines are named BrillouinRayleigh scattering lines.

  16. Raman Scattering Study of Sr 14-xCaxCu 24O 41

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogita, Norio; Fujita, Yoshinori; Sakaguchi, Yoshifumi; Fujino, Yuichi; Nagata, Takashi; Akimitsu, Jun; Udagawa, Masayuki

    2000-08-01

    Polarized Raman scattering spectra of Sr14-xCaxCu24O41 have been measured for x=0 and 11.5 at ambient pressure. In the spectra, the intra-molecular vibrations due to the unit structure of (Sr/Ca)2Cu2O3 and CuO2 have been clearly observed below 700 cm-1. A comparison of the number of the observed peaks with the results of a factor group analysis indicates that the crystallographic symmetry of the ladder is F222 for x=0 and 11.5, instead of centro-symmetric Fmmm, while that of the chain is Amma for both compositions. However the symmetry of the chain for x=11.5 is close to F222 or Fmmm. That is, the structure of the chains changes from an incomplete staggered structure to almost complete staggered one with increasing x. In the (c,c) and (a,a) spectra, the broad two-magnon peaks have been observed at around 3000 cm-1. From the analysis of the recent theory of the magnetic scattering in the 2-leg spin ladder system done by Natsume et al., the following magnetic parameters for x=0 are obtained: J leg=151 meV, J rung=91 meV, and Δ ladder=44 meV. The values agree with those reported by neutron scattering.

  17. Polarized Raman scattering in single crystals of Nd0.7Sr0.3MnO3

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Pattabiraman; G Rangarajan; Kwang-Yong Choi; P Lemmens; G Guentherodt; G Balakrishnan; D McK Paul; M R Less

    2002-05-01

    We report polarized Raman scattering in single crystals of Nd0.7Sr0.3MnO3. The temperature dependence of the MnO6 octahedral bending and stretching modes observed in the XX spectra points to the existence of local lattice distortions, possibly polarons. The XY spectra have been analyzed using a collision-dominated model, which allows the extraction of the carrier scattering rate.

  18. Templated green synthesis of plasmonic silver nanoparticles in onion epidermal cells suitable for surface-enhanced Raman and hyper-Raman scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palanco, Marta Espina; Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Guehlke, Marina;

    2016-01-01

    We report fast and simple green synthesis of plasmonic silver nanoparticles in the epidermal cells of onions after incubation with AgNO3 solution. The biological environment supports the generation of silver nanostructures in two ways. The plant tissue delivers reducing chemicals for the initial...... images of extracellular spaces in dark field microscopy of onion layers a few hours after AgNO3 exposure due to the formation of silver nanoparticles. Silver nanostructures generated in the extracellular space of onion layers and within the epidermal cell walls can serve as enhancing plasmonic structures...... for one-and two-photon-excited spectroscopy such as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and surface enhanced hyper-Raman scattering (SEHRS). Our studies demonstrate a templated green preparation of enhancing plasmonic nanoparticles and suggest a new route to deliver silver nanoparticles as basic...

  19. Cascaded forward Brillouin scattering to all Stokes orders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, C.; Stiller, B.; Eggleton, B. J.; Steel, M. J.; Poulton, C. G.

    2017-02-01

    Inelastic scattering processes such as Brillouin scattering can often function in cascaded regimes and this is likely to occur in certain integrated opto-acoustic devices. We develop a Hamiltonian formalism for cascaded Brillouin scattering valid for both quantum and classical regimes. By regarding Brillouin scattering as the interaction of a single acoustic envelope and a single optical envelope that covers all Stokes and anti-Stokes orders, we obtain a compact model that is well suited for numerical implementation, extension to include other optical nonlinearities or short pulses, and application in the quantum-optics domain. We then theoretically analyze intra-mode forward Brillouin scattering (FBS) for arbitrary waveguides with and without optical dispersion. In the absence of optical dispersion, we find an exact analytical solution. With a perturbative approach, we furthermore solve the case of weak optical dispersion. Our work leads to several key results on intra-mode FBS. For negligible dispersion, we show that cascaded intra-mode FBS results in a pure phase modulation and discuss how this necessitates specific experimental methods for the observation of fiber-based and integrated FBS. Further, we discuss how the descriptions that have been established in these two classes of waveguides connect to each other and to the broader context of cavity opto-mechanics and Raman scattering. Finally, we draw an unexpected striking similarity between FBS and discrete diffraction phenomena in waveguide arrays, which makes FBS an interesting candidate for future research in quantum-optics.

  20. Stimulated Raman scattering holography for time-resolved imaging of methane gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Eynas; Gren, Per; Edenharder, Stefan; Sjödahl, Mikael

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, pulsed digital holographic detection is coupled to the stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) process for imaging gases. A Q-switched Nd-YAG laser (532 nm) has been used to pump methane gas (CH4) at pressures up to 12 bars. The frequency-tripled (355 nm) beam from the same laser was used to pump an optical parametric oscillator (OPO). The Stokes beam (from the OPO) has been tuned to 629.93 nm so that the frequency difference between the pump (532 nm) and the Stokes beams fits a Raman active vibrational mode of the methane molecule (2922  cm-1). The pump beam has been spatially modulated with fringes produced in a Michelson interferometer. The pump and the Stokes beams were overlapped in time, space, and polarization on the gas molecules, resulting in a stimulated Raman gain of the Stokes beam and a corresponding loss of the pump beam through the SRS process. The resulting gain of the Stokes beam has been detected using pulsed digital holography by blending it with a reference beam on the detector. Two holograms of the Stokes beam, without and with the pump beam fringes present, were recorded. Intensity maps calculated from the recorded digital holograms showed amplification of the Stokes beam at the position of overlap with the pump beam fringes and the gas molecules. The gain of the Stokes beam has been separated from the background in the Fourier domain. A gain of about 4.5% at a pump beam average intensity of 4  MW/cm2 and a Stokes beam intensity of 0.16  MW/cm2 have been recorded at a gas pressure of 12 bars. The gain decreased linearly with decreasing gas pressure. The results show that SRS holography is a promising technique to pinpoint a specific species and record its spatial and temporal distribution.

  1. Identification of metalloporphyrins with high sensitivity using graphene-enhanced resonance Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bo-Hyun; Kim, Daechul; Song, Sungho; Park, DongHyuk; Kang, Il-Suk; Jeong, Dae Hong; Jeon, Seokwoo

    2014-03-18

    Graphene-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (GERRS) was performed for the detection of three different metallo-octaethylporphyrins (M-OEPs; M = 2H, FeCl, and Pt) homogeneously thermal vapor deposited on a graphene surface. GERRS of M-OEPs were measured using three different excitation wavelengths, λ(ex) = 405, 532, and 633 nm, and characterized detail vibrational bands for the identification of M-OEPs. The GERRS spectra of Pt-OEP at λ(ex) = 532 nm showed ~29 and ~162 times signal enhancement ratio on graphene and on graphene with Ag nanoclusters, respectively, compared to the spectra from bare SiO2 substrate. This enhancement ratio, however, was varied with M-OEPs and excitation wavelengths. The characteristic peaks and band shapes of GERRS for each M-OEP were measured with high sensitivity (100 pmol of thermal vapor deposited Pt-OEP), and these facilitate the selectively recognition of molecules. Also, the peaks shift and broadening provide the evidence of the interaction between graphene and M-OEPs through the charge transfer and π-orbital interaction. The increase of graphene layer induced the decrease of signal intensity and GERRS effect was almost not observed on the thick graphite flakes. Further experiments with various substrates demonstrated that the interaction of single layer of graphene with molecule is the origin of the Raman signal enhancement of M-OEPs. In this experiment, we proved the graphene is a good alternative substrate of Raman spectroscopy for the selective detection of various metalloporphyrins with high sensitivity.

  2. Stimulated Raman scattering in the relativistic regime in near-critical plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Moreau, J G; Nuter, R; Tikhonchuk, V T

    2016-01-01

    Interaction of a high intensity short laser pulse with near-critical plasmas allows to achieve extremely high coupling efficiency and transfer laser energy to energetic ions. One dimensional Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations are considered to detail the processes involved in the energy transfer. A confrontation of the numerical results with the theory highlights a key role played by the process of stimulated Raman scattering in the relativistic regime. The interaction of a 1 ps laser pulse (I $\\sim$ 6.10$^{18}$ W.cm$^2$) with an under-critical (0.5 $n_c$) homogeneous plasma leads to a very high plasma absorption reaching 68 % of the laser pulse energy. This permits a homogeneous electron heating all along the plasma and an efficient ion acceleration at the plasma edges and in cavities.

  3. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering and Plasmon effect for enzymatic bionanocomplexes characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojnarowska-Nowak Renata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol oxidase (ChOX enzyme is one of the most important analytical enzyme, used for cholesterol assay in clinical diagnostics as well as food production, and the developing of innovative solutions for improving the selectivity and accuracy of the analysis including bio-nanotechnological approaches is still ongoing. The Surface Plazmon Resonance (SPR and the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS as specific for nanocurriers effects were observed what enable us to research the oscillation spectra of the ChOX enzyme. The vibrational lines are attributed to chemical functional groups existing in enzyme, for example, amino acids, amide groups as well as for cofactor. For the improving the SERS effect the gold nanoparticles – ChOX bionanocomplexes were analyzed in combination with gold-coating gratings as a promising plazmonic material.

  4. Silver nanoplates: controlled preparation, self-assembly, and applications in surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zao; Xu, Xibin; Wu, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Chaohua; Li, Xibo; Luo, Bingchi; Luo, Jiangshan; Jiang, Xiaodong; Wu, Weidong; Yi, Yougen; Tang, Yongjian

    2013-02-01

    Silver nanoplates were prepared in a dual reduction system with NaBH4 and sodium citrate both as reducing agents. And then the as-prepared nanoplates could be growing up through multistage growth methodology. The average edge length of Ag nanoplates can be tailored from 40 nm to 260 nm without changing their shape, crystallinity, and the average thickness. Furthermore, the effectiveness of these silver nanoplates as substrates prepared by the silanization self-assembly method toward surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection was evaluated by using 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) and rhodamine 6G (R6G) as probe molecules. It was found that the enhancement ability of the silver nanoplates film is remarkable lower than that of the spherical silver nanoparticle film. The reason is attributed to the electromagnetic mechanism and chemical mechanism. This work will be of great significance in understanding the SERS enhancement mechanism and in the fabrication of nanoparticle films for biosensing.

  5. Label-free biomedical imaging of lipids by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Prasanna V; Mutlu, Ayse Sena; Wang, Meng C

    2015-01-05

    Advances in modern optical microscopy have provided unparalleled tools to study intracellular structure and function, yet visualizing lipid molecules within a cell remains challenging. Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) microscopy is a recently developed imaging modality that addresses this challenge. By selectively imaging the vibration of chemical moieties enriched in lipids, this technique allows for rapid imaging of lipid molecules in vivo without the need for perturbative extrinsic labels. SRS microscopy has been effectively employed in the study of fat metabolism, helping uncover novel regulators of lipid storage. This unit provides a brief introduction to the principle of SRS microscopy, and describes methods for its use in imaging lipids in cells, tissues, and whole organisms.

  6. Raman scattering in transition metal compounds: Titanium and compounds of titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, J.; Ederer, D.L.; Shu, T. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The transition metal compounds form a very interesting and important set of materials. The diversity arises from the many states of ionization the transition elements may take when forming compounds. This variety provides ample opportunity for a large class of materials to have a vast range of electronic and magnetic properties. The x-ray spectroscopy of the transition elements is especially interesting because they have unfilled d bands that are at the bottom of the conduction band with atomic like structure. This group embarked on the systematic study of transition metal sulfides and oxides. As an example of the type of spectra observed in some of these compounds they have chosen to showcase the L{sub II, III} emission and Raman scattering in some titanium compounds obtained by photon excitation.

  7. Rational Design of a Bisphenol A Aptamer Selective Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Nanoprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) optical nanoprobes offer a number of advantages for ultrasensitive analyte detection. These functionalized colloidal nanoparticles are a multifunctional assay component. providing a platform for conjugation to spectral tags, stabilizing polymers, and biorecognition elements such as aptamers or antibodies. We demonstrate the design and characterization of a SERS-active nanoprobe and investigate the nanoparticles’ biorecognition capabilities for use in a competitive binding assay. Specifically, the nanoprobe is designed for the quantification of bisphenol A (BPA) levels in the blood after human exposure to the toxin in food and beverage plastic packaging. The nanoprobes demonstrated specific affinity to a BPA aptamer with a dissociation constant Kd of 54 nM, and provided a dose-dependent SERS spectra with a limit of detection of 3 nM. Our conjugation approach shows the versatility of colloidal nanoparticles in assay development, acting as detectable spectral tagging elements and biologically active ligands concurrently. PMID:25329684

  8. Polarization Dependence of Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering on a Single Dielectric Nanowire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Qi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Our measurements of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS on Ga2O3 dielectric nanowires (NWs core/silver composites indicate that the SERS enhancement is highly dependent on the polarization direction of the incident laser light. The polarization dependence of the SERS signal with respect to the direction of a single NW was studied by changing the incident light angle. Further investigations demonstrate that the SERS intensity is not only dependent on the direction and wavelength of the incident light, but also on the species of the SERS active molecule. The largest signals were observed on an NW when the incident 514.5 nm light was polarized perpendicular to the length of the NW, while the opposite phenomenon was observed at the wavelength of 785 nm. Our theoretical simulations of the polarization dependence at 514.5 nm and 785 nm are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  9. Nanopatterning and tuning of optical taper antenna apex for tip-enhanced Raman scattering performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharintsev, S. S.; Rogov, A. M.; Kazarian, S. G.

    2013-09-01

    This paper focuses on finding optimal electrochemical conditions from linear sweep voltammetry analysis for preparing highly reproducible tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) conical gold tips with dc-pulsed voltage etching. Special attention is given to the reproducibility of tip apex shapes with different etchant mixtures. We show that the fractional Brownian motion model enables a mathematical description of the decaying current kinetics during the whole etching process up to the cutoff event. Further progress in preparation of highly reproducible smooth and sharp tip apexes is related to the effect of an additive, such as isopropanol, to aqueous acids. A finite-difference time-domain method based near-field analysis provides evidence that TERS performance depends critically on tip orientation relative to a highly focused laser beam. A TERS based criterion for recognizing gold tips able to couple/decouple optical near- and far-fields is proposed.

  10. Nanopatterning and tuning of optical taper antenna apex for tip-enhanced Raman scattering performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharintsev, S S; Rogov, A M; Kazarian, S G

    2013-09-01

    This paper focuses on finding optimal electrochemical conditions from linear sweep voltammetry analysis for preparing highly reproducible tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) conical gold tips with dc-pulsed voltage etching. Special attention is given to the reproducibility of tip apex shapes with different etchant mixtures. We show that the fractional Brownian motion model enables a mathematical description of the decaying current kinetics during the whole etching process up to the cutoff event. Further progress in preparation of highly reproducible smooth and sharp tip apexes is related to the effect of an additive, such as isopropanol, to aqueous acids. A finite-difference time-domain method based near-field analysis provides evidence that TERS performance depends critically on tip orientation relative to a highly focused laser beam. A TERS based criterion for recognizing gold tips able to couple/decouple optical near- and far-fields is proposed.

  11. Nanopatterning and tuning of optical taper antenna apex for tip-enhanced Raman scattering performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharintsev, S. S.; Rogov, A. M. [Department of Optics and Nanophotonics, Institute of Physics, Kazan Federal University, Kremlevskaya 16, Kazan 420008 (Russian Federation); Kazarian, S. G. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-15

    This paper focuses on finding optimal electrochemical conditions from linear sweep voltammetry analysis for preparing highly reproducible tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) conical gold tips with dc-pulsed voltage etching. Special attention is given to the reproducibility of tip apex shapes with different etchant mixtures. We show that the fractional Brownian motion model enables a mathematical description of the decaying current kinetics during the whole etching process up to the cutoff event. Further progress in preparation of highly reproducible smooth and sharp tip apexes is related to the effect of an additive, such as isopropanol, to aqueous acids. A finite-difference time-domain method based near-field analysis provides evidence that TERS performance depends critically on tip orientation relative to a highly focused laser beam. A TERS based criterion for recognizing gold tips able to couple/decouple optical near- and far-fields is proposed.

  12. Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering for Quantification of p-Coumaric Acid Produced by Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morelli, Lidia; Zor, Kinga; Jendresen, Christian Bille

    2017-01-01

    engineered E. coli strains was successfully evaluated using SERS and confirmed with high-performance liquid chromatography. As this novel approach has potential to be automated and parallelized, it can be considered for high-throughput screening in metabolic engineering.......The number of newly developed genetic variants of microbial cell factories for production of biochemicals has been rapidly growing in recent years, leading to an increased need for new screening techniques. We developed a method based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) coupled with liquid-liquid......-wafer signal variation of only 11.7%. LLE using dichloromethane as organic phase was combined with the detection in order to increase selectivity and sensitivity by decreasing the effect of interfering compounds from the analytes of interest. The difference in pHCA production yield between three genetically...

  13. Stimulated low-frequency Raman scattering in tobacco mosaic virus suspension

    CERN Document Server

    Karpova, O V; Lednev, V N; Mironova, T V; Oshurko, V B; Pershin, S M; Petrova, E K; Tcherniega, N V; Zemskov, K I

    2016-01-01

    Laser pulses interaction with tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in Tris-HCl pH7.5 buffer and in water has been investigated. 20 ns ruby laser pulses have been used for excitation. Spectrum of the light passing through the sample was registered with the help of Fabri-Perot interferometer. In the case of TMV in water we observed in the spectrum only one line of the exciting laser light, for TMV in Tris-HCl pH7.5 buffer second line appeared, corresponding to the stimulated low-frequency Raman scattering (SLFRS) on the breathing radial mode of TMV. SLFRS frequency shift by 2 cm-1, (60 GHz), conversion efficiency and threshold are measured for the first time to the best of our knowledge.

  14. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy characterization and identification of foodborne bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongliang; Chen, Yud-Ren; Nou, Xiangwu; Chao, Kaunglin

    2007-09-01

    Rapid and routine identification of foodborne bacteria are considerably important, because of bio- / agro- terrorism threats, public health concerns, and economic loss. Conventional, PCR, and immunoassay methods for the detection of bacteria are generally time-consuming, chemical reagent necessary and multi-step procedures. Fast microbial detection requires minimal sample preparation, permits the routine analysis of large numbers of samples with negligible reagent costs, and is easy to operate. Therefore, we have developed silver colloidal nanoparticle based surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy as a potential tool for the rapid and routine detection of E. coli and L. monocytogenes. This study presents the further results of our examination on S. typhimonium, one of the most commonly outbreak bacteria, for the characteristic bands and subsequent identification.

  15. Silicon nanowire arrays coated with electroless Ag for increased surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Bai

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The ordered Ag nanorod (AgNR arrays are fabricated through a simple electroless deposition technique using the isolated Si nanowire (SiNW arrays as the Ag-grown scaffold. The AgNR arrays have the single-crystallized structure and the plasmonic crystal feature. It is found that the formation of the AgNR arrays is strongly dependent on the filling ratio of SiNWs. A mechanism is proposed based on the selective nucleation and the synergistic growth of Ag nanoparticles on the top of the SiNWs. Moreover, the special AgNR arrays grown on the substrate of SiNWs exhibit a detection sensitivity of 10−15M for rhodamine 6G molecules, which have the potential application to the highly sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering sensors.

  16. Arsenic interception by cell wall of bacteria observed with surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Haixia; Zhuang, Guoqiang; Ma, Anzhou; Jing, Chuanyong

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the interactions between arsenic (As) resistant bacteria and As, using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. According to our 16S rDNA results, eight bacteria isolated from the environment can be identified to four genera (Arthrobacter, Pseudomonas, Sphingomonas, and Acinetobacter). The bacteria were separated into cell wall and protoplast in the study to assess the As(V) attack. The As(V) stress on bacteria could be identified with SERS, but not with FTIR. The bacteria in our study primarily resist As(V) through sequestration of As(V) by the cell wall. The change in SERS peaks and their relationships with cell wall suggested that As(V) mainly interacts with functional groups on the cell wall including polysaccharides and flavin derivates.

  17. Surface enhanced Raman scattering detection of single R6G molecules on nanoporous gold films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongwen; Zhang, L.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Iwasaki, H.; Inouye, Y.; Xue, Q. K.; Chen, M. W.

    2011-03-01

    Detecting single molecules with high sensitivity and molecular specificity is of great practical interest in many fields such as chemistry, biology, medicine, and pharmacology. For this purpose, cheap and highly active substrates are of crucial importance. Recently, nanoporous metals (NPMs), with a three-dimensional continuous network structure and pore channels usually much smaller than the wavelength of visible light, revealed outstanding optical properties in surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). In this work, we further modify the nanoporous gold films by growing a high density of gold nano-tips on the surface. Extremely focused electromagnetic fields can be produced at the apex of the nano-tips, resulting in so-called hot spots. With this NPM-based and affordable substrate, single molecule-detection is achievable with ultrahigh enhancement in SERS.

  18. Improved surface-enhanced Raman scattering on arrays of gold quasi-3D nanoholes

    KAUST Repository

    Yue, Weisheng

    2012-10-04

    Arrays of gold quasi-3D nanoholes were proposed and fabricated as substrates for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). By detecting rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules, the gold quasi-3D nanoholes demonstrated an SERS intensity that was 25-62 times higher than that of two-dimensional nanoholes with the same geometrical shapes and periodicities. The larger SERS enhancement of the quasi-3D nanoholes is attributed to the enhanced electromagnetic field on the top-layer nanohole, the bottom nanodiscs and the field coupling between the two layers. In addition, the investigation of the shape dependence of the SERS on the quasi-3D nanoholes demonstrated that the quadratic, circular, triangular and rhombic holes exhibited different SERS properties. Numerical simulations of the electromagnetic properties on the nanostructures were performed with CST Microwave Studio, and the results agree with the experimental observations. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  19. Stimulated low-frequency Raman scattering in a suspension of tobacco mosaic virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpova, O. V.; Kudryavtseva, A. D.; Lednev, V. N.; Mironova, T. V.; Oshurko, V. B.; Pershin, S. M.; Petrova, E. K.; Tcherniega, N. V.; Zemskov, K. I.

    2016-08-01

    The interaction of laser pulses with tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in Tris-HCl pH7.5 buffer and in water has been investigated. Ruby laser pulses of 20 ns duration have been used for excitation. The spectrum of the light passing through the sample was registered with the help of a Fabry-Perot interferometer. In the case of TMV in water we observed in the spectrum only one line of the exciting laser light, but for TMV in Tris-HCl pH7.5 buffer a second line appeared, corresponding to stimulated low-frequency Raman scattering (SLFRS) on the breathing radial mode of TMV. The frequency shift of the SLFRS by 2 cm-1 (60 GHz), the conversion efficiency and the threshold are measured for the first time to the best of our knowledge.

  20. Highly reproducible surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrate for detection of phenolic pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhiqiang; Tang, Dan; Liu, Liwei; Wang, Yin; Zhou, Qingwei; Su, Shaoqiang; Hu, Die; Han, Bing; Jin, Mingliang; Ao, Xianyu; Zhan, Runze; Gao, Xingsen; Lu, Xubing; Zhou, Guofu; Senz, Stephan; Zhang, Zhang; Liu, Junming

    2016-11-01

    The ordering degree of nanostructures is the key to determining the uniformity of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). However, fabrication of large-area ordered nanostructures remains a challenge, especially with the ultrahigh-density (>1010 cm-2). Here, we report a fabrication of large-area ultrahigh-density ordered Ag@Al2O3/Ag core-shell nanosphere (NS) arrays with tunable nanostructures. The ultrahigh-density (2.8 × 1010 cm-2) ordered NS arrays over a large-area capability (diameter >4.0 cm) enable the uniform SERS signals with the relative standard deviation of less than 5%. The as-fabricated highly reproducible SERS substrate can be applied to detect trace phenolic pollutants in water. This work does not only provide a new route for synthesizing the ultrahigh-density ordered nanostructures, but also create a new class of SERS substrates with high sensitivity and excellent reproducibility.

  1. Monitoring peripheral nerve degeneration in ALS by label-free stimulated Raman scattering imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Feng; Yang, Wenlong; Mordes, Daniel A.; Wang, Jin-Yuan; Salameh, Johnny S.; Mok, Joanie; Chew, Jeannie; Sharma, Aarti; Leno-Duran, Ester; Suzuki-Uematsu, Satomi; Suzuki, Naoki; Han, Steve S.; Lu, Fa-Ke; Ji, Minbiao; Zhang, Rosanna; Liu, Yue; Strominger, Jack; Shneider, Neil A.; Petrucelli, Leonard; Xie, X. Sunney; Eggan, Kevin

    2016-10-01

    The study of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and potential interventions would be facilitated if motor axon degeneration could be more readily visualized. Here we demonstrate that stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy could be used to sensitively monitor peripheral nerve degeneration in ALS mouse models and ALS autopsy materials. Three-dimensional imaging of pre-symptomatic SOD1 mouse models and data processing by a correlation-based algorithm revealed that significant degeneration of peripheral nerves could be detected coincidentally with the earliest detectable signs of muscle denervation and preceded physiologically measurable motor function decline. We also found that peripheral degeneration was an early event in FUS as well as C9ORF72 repeat expansion models of ALS, and that serial imaging allowed long-term observation of disease progression and drug effects in living animals. Our study demonstrates that SRS imaging is a sensitive and quantitative means of measuring disease progression, greatly facilitating future studies of disease mechanisms and candidate therapeutics.

  2. Comparison of Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering Spectra of Two Kinds of Silver Nanoplate Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Jin-long; TANG Bin; XU Shu-ping; PAN Ling-yun; XU Wei-qing

    2012-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering(SERS) spectra of different silver nanoplate self-assembled films at different excitation wavelengths were fairly compared.Shape conversion from silver nanoprisms to nanodisks on slides was in situ carried out.The SERS spectra of 4-mercaptopyridine(4-MPY) on these anisotropic silver nanoparticle self-assembled films present that strong enhancement appeared when the excitation line and the surface plasmon resonance(SPR) band of silver substrate overlapped.In this model,the influence of the crystal planes of silver nanoplates on SERS enhancement could be ignored because the basal planes were nearly unchanged in two kinds of silver nanoplate self-assembled films.

  3. Perforated nanocap array: Facile fabrication process and efficient surface enhanced Raman scattering with fluorescence suppression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jun; Huang Li-Qing; Tong Hui-Min; Zhai Li-Peng; Yuan Lin; Zhao Li-Hua; Zhang Wei-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Recently,individual reduced-symmetry metal nanostructures and their plasmonic properties have been studied extensively.However,little attention has been paid to the approach to fabricating ordered reduced-symmetry metal nanostructure arrays.In this paper,a novel perforated silver nanocap array with high surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity and fluorescence suppression is reported.The array is fabricated by electron beam evaporating Ag onto the perforated barrier layer side of a hard anodization (HA) anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template.The morphology and optical property of the perforated silver nanocap array are characterized by an atomic force microscope (AFM),a scanning electron microscope (SEM),and absorption spectra.The results of SERS measurements reveal that the perforated silver nanocap array offers high SERS activity and fluorescence suppression compared with an imperforated silver nanocap array.

  4. 3D Ag/ZnO hybrids for sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chenyue; Xu, Chunxiang; Lu, Junfeng; Li, Zhaohui; Tian, Zhengshan

    2016-03-01

    To combine the surface plasma resonance of metal and local field enhancement in metal/semiconductor interface, Ag nanoparticles (NPs) were assembled on a ZnO nanorod array which was grown by hydrothermally on carbon fibers. The construction of dimensional (3D) Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) substrate is used for the sensitive detection of organic pollutants with the advantages such as facile synthesis, short detection time and low cost. The hybrid substrate was manifested a high sensitivity to phenol red at a lower concentration of 1 × 10-9 M and a higher enhancement factor of 3.18 × 109. Moreover, the ZnO nanostructures decorated with Ag NPs were demonstrated self-cleaning function under UV irradiation via photocatalytic degradation of the analytic molecules. The fabrication process of the materials and sensors, optimization of the SERS behaviors for different sized Ag NPs, the mechanism of SERS and recovery were presented with a detailed discussion.

  5. Longitudinal acoustic waves in layered media: Comparative study of Raman scattering and reflection delay time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Boudouti, E H; Zelmat, R; Bailich, R [LDOM, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Mohamed I, 60000 Oujda (Morocco); Hassouani, Y El [Universite de Bordeaux, Laboratoire de Mecanique Physique, Talence F-33405 (France); Djafari-Rouhani, B, E-mail: elboudouti@yahoo.f [Institut d' Electronique, de Microelectronique et de Nanotechnologie, UMR CNRS 8520, UFR de Physique, Universite de Lille 1, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)

    2010-03-01

    Using a Green's function method, we present a theoretical analysis of the propagation of acoustic waves in multilayer structures. The structure studied consists of a finite superlattice (SL) made of a periodic repetition of N unit cells deposited on a substrate. Such a structure exhibits extended modes constituting the allowed bands separated by forbidden bands where localized modes associated to free surfaces, defect layers, ... may exist. These modes can be observed either by Raman scattering when an incident light is launched from vacuum towards the multilayer, or by the reflection delay time when an incident acoustic wave is launched from the substrate. Specific applications of our results are given for some available experiments in the literature (e.g., Si/Ge{sub x}Si{sub 1-x}, GaSb-AlSb) and a good agreement has been obtained between our theoretical results and the experimental data.

  6. Raman scattering from confined phonons in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bairamov, B. H.; Aydinli, A.; Tanatar, B.; Güven, K.; Gurevich, S.; Mel'tser, B. Ya.; Ivanov, S. V.; Kop'ev, P. S.; Smirnitskii, V. B.; Timofeev, F. N.

    1998-10-01

    We report on photoluminescence and Raman scattering performed at low temperature (T = 10 K) on GaAs/Al0.3Ga0.7As quantum-well wires with effective wire widths ofL = 100.0 and 10.9 nm prepared by molecular beam epitaxial growth followed by holographic patterning, reactive ion etching, and anodic thinning. We find evidence for the existence of longitudinal optical phonon modes confined to the GaAs quantum wire. The observed frequency at οL10 = 285.6 cm-1forL = 11.0 nm is in good agreement with that calculated on the basis of the dispersive dielectric continuum theory of Enderleinas applied to the GaAs/Al0.3Ga0.7As system. Our results indicate the high crystalline quality of the quantum-well wires fabricated using these techniques.

  7. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering and Plasmon effect for enzymatic bionanocomplexes characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnarowska-Nowak, Renata; Polit, Jacek; Broda, Daniel; Bobitski, Yaroslaw; Starowicz, Zbigniew; Gonchar, Mykhailo; Sheregii, E. M.

    2016-12-01

    Cholesterol oxidase (ChOX) enzyme is one of the most important analytical enzyme, used for cholesterol assay in clinical diagnostics as well as food production, and the developing of innovative solutions for improving the selectivity and accuracy of the analysis including bio-nanotechnological approaches is still ongoing. The Surface Plazmon Resonance (SPR) and the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) as specific for nanocurriers effects were observed what enable us to research the oscillation spectra of the ChOX enzyme. The vibrational lines are attributed to chemical functional groups existing in enzyme, for example, amino acids, amide groups as well as for cofactor. For the improving the SERS effect the gold nanoparticles - ChOX bionanocomplexes were analyzed in combination with gold-coating gratings as a promising plazmonic material.

  8. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering of coumarin 343 on silver colloidal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Shafqat; Pang, Yoonsoo

    2016-09-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of coumarin 343 (C343) adsorbed on silver colloidal nanoparticles reduced by sodium citrate was investigated and the surface adsorption geometry of C343 on Ag was sought by optimizing C343-Ag complexes for neutral and deprotonated C343 molecules in the DFT simulations. The SERS of C343 showed a number of spectral changes upon solution pH change. We found that deprotonated C343 adsorbs on the Ag nanoparticles through the carboxylate group keeping a perpendicular geometry to the surface. When protonated, the adsorption geometry of C343 is changed into more or less flat to the surface as the cyclic ester group becomes a preferred surface adsorption site.

  9. Influence of Temperature on Stimulated Raman Scattering in Single-Mode Silica Fibre

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MEN Zhi-Wei; FANG Wen-Hui; SUN Xiu-Ping; LI Zuo-Wei; YI Han-Wei; WANG Zhao-Min; GAO Shu-Qin; LU Guo-Hui

    2008-01-01

    One piece of single-mode silica fibre is used to study of temperature characteristics of stimulated Raman scattering(SRS), additional peaks (double-humped) are observed at both sides of pump light and 1st-order Stokes light in the experiment. The frequency shift of the double-humped is calculated by stimulated Four-Photon mixing (SFPM)phase matching theory, the result is consistent with the frequency shift of this experiment. Simultaneously, the experimental conditions accord with the theoretical calculation of effective coherence length. We indicate that the double-humped phenomenon is caused by SFPM. The intensity of double-humped is first increased, then decreased and finally disappeared as the temperature increases. This phenomenon has been explained theoretically.

  10. Hybrid Structures for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering: DNA Origami/Gold Nanoparticle Dimer/Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, Julia; Matković, Aleksandar; Pešić, Jelena; Gajić, Radoš; Bald, Ilko

    2016-10-01

    A combination of three innovative materials within one hybrid structure to explore the synergistic interaction of their individual properties is presented. The unique electronic, mechanical, and thermal properties of graphene are combined with the plasmonic properties of gold nanoparticle (AuNP) dimers, which are assembled using DNA origami nanostructures. This novel hybrid structure is characterized by means of correlated atomic force microscopy and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). It is demonstrated that strong interactions between graphene and AuNPs result in superior SERS performance of the hybrid structure compared to their individual components. This is particularly evident in efficient fluorescence quenching, reduced background, and a decrease of the photobleaching rate up to one order of magnitude. The versatility of DNA origami structures to serve as interface for complex and precise arrangements of nanoparticles and other functional entities provides the basis to further exploit the potential of the here presented DNA origami-AuNP dimer-graphene hybrid structures.

  11. Darkfield microspectroscopy of nanostructures on silver tip-enhanced Raman scattering probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Tamitake, E-mail: tamitake-itou@aist.go.jp [Nano-Bioanalysis Team, Health Technology Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Takamatsu, Kagawa 761-0395 (Japan); Yamamoto, Yuko S., E-mail: yamayulab@gmail.com [Research Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-8472 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, School of Science and Technology, Kagawa University, Takamatsu, Kagawa 761-0396 (Japan); Suzuki, Toshiaki [UNISOKU Co. Ltd., 2-4-3 Kasugano, Hirakata, Osaka 573-0131 (Japan); Kitahama, Yasutaka; Ozaki, Yukihiro [Department of Chemistry, School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan)

    2016-01-11

    We report an evaluation method employing darkfield microspectroscopy for silver probes used in tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS). By adjusting the darkfield illumination, the diffracted light from the probe outlines disappears and the diffracted light from the surface nanostructures and tips of the probes appears as colorful spots. Scanning electron microscopy reveals that the spectral variations in these spots reflect the shapes of the surface nanostructures. The tip curvatures correlate to the spectral maxima of their spots. Temporal color changes in the spots indicate the deterioration due to the oxidation of the silver surfaces. These results show that the proposed method is useful for in situ evaluation of plasmonic properties of TERS probes.

  12. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering on gold nanorod pairs with interconnection bars of different widths

    KAUST Repository

    Yue, Weisheng

    2012-08-01

    We demonstrate that surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement could be tuned by adjusting the width of a connection bar at the bottom of a gold nanorod pair. Arrays of gold nanorod pairs with interconnection bars of different widths at the bottom of the interspace were fabricated by electron-beam lithography and used for the SERS study. Rhodamine 6G (R6G) was used as the probe molecule for the SERS. In addition to the large SERS enhancement observed in the nanostructured substrates, the SERS enhancement increases as the width of the connection bar increases. This result provides an important method for tuning SERS enhancement. Numerical simulations of electromagnetic properties on the nanostructures were performed with CST Microwave Studio, and the results correspond well with the experimental observations. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Electron-beam lithography of gold nanostructures for surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Yue, Weisheng

    2012-10-26

    The fabrication of nanostructured substrates with precisely controlled geometries and arrangements plays an important role in studies of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Here, we present two processes based on electron-beam lithography to fabricate gold nanostructures for SERS. One process involves making use of metal lift-off and the other involves the use of the plasma etching. These two processes allow the successful fabrication of gold nanostructures with various kinds of geometrical shapes and different periodic arrangements. 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MPy) and Rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules are used to probe SERS signals on the nanostructures. The SERS investigations on the nanostructured substrates demonstrate that the gold nanostructured substrates have resulted in large SERS enhancement, which is highly dependent on the geometrical shapes and arrangements of the gold nanostructures. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  14. Eigenmode description of Raman scattering in atomic vapors in the presence of decoherence

    CERN Document Server

    Chwedenczuk, Jan; Wasilewski, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    A theoretical model describing the Raman scattering process in atomic vapors is constructed. Despite the incorporated decoherence effects, it allows for a direct separation of system's time evolution from its spatial degrees of freedom. The impact of noise on the temporal properties of the system is investigated. In particular, it is shown that even in the presence of decoherence, the estimation of the number of spin waves created in the process can reach sensitivity below the projection noise limit. The model is then applied in two experimentally relevant situations of ultra-cold and room-temperature atoms. In both cases, the spatial eigenmodes of the Stokes photon and atomic excitation fields and their coupling parameters are computed.

  15. Detection of amino acid neurotransmitters by surface enhanced Raman scattering and hollow core photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Vidhu S.; Khetani, Altaf; Monfared, Ali Momenpour T.; Smith, Brett; Anis, Hanan; Trudeau, Vance L.

    2012-03-01

    The present work explores the feasibility of using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for detecting the neurotransmitters such as glutamate (GLU) and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA). These amino acid neurotransmitters that respectively mediate fast excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain, are important for neuroendocrine control, and upsets in their synthesis are also linked to epilepsy. Our SERS-based detection scheme enabled the detection of low amounts of GLU (10-7 M) and GABA (10-4 M). It may complement existing techniques for characterizing such kinds of neurotransmitters that include high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or mass spectrography (MS). This is mainly because SERS has other advantages such as ease of sample preparation, molecular specificity and sensitivity, thus making it potentially applicable to characterization of experimental brain extracts or clinical diagnostic samples of cerebrospinal fluid and saliva. Using hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) further enhanced the Raman signal relative to that in a standard cuvette providing sensitive detection of GLU and GABA in micro-litre volume of aqueous solutions.

  16. Surface enhanced Raman scattering for detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrift, Will; Bhattacharjee, Arunima; Darvishzadeh-Varcheie, Mahsa; Lu, Ying; Hochbaum, Allon; Capolino, Filippo; Whiteson, Katrine; Ragan, Regina

    2015-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA), a biofilm forming bacterium, commonly affects cystic fibrosis, burn victims, and immunocompromised patients. PA produces pyocyanin, an aromatic, redox active, secondary metabolite as part of its quorum sensing signaling system activated during biofilm formation. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensors composed of Au nanospheres chemically assembled into clusters on diblock copolymer templates were fabricated and the ability to detect pyocyanin to monitor biofilm formation was investigated. Electromagnetic full wave simulations of clusters observed in scanning electron microcopy images show that the localized surface plasmon resonance wavelength is 696 nm for a dimer with a gap spacing of 1 nm in an average dielectric environment of the polymer and analyte; the local electric field enhancement is on the order of 400 at resonance, relative to free space. SERS data acquired at 785 nm excitation from a monolayer of benzenethiol on fabricated samples was compared with Raman data of pure benzenethiol and enhancement factors as large as 8×109 were calculated that are consistent with simulated field enhancements. Using this system, the limit of detection of pyocyanin in pure gradients was determined to be 10 parts per billion. In SERS data of the supernatant from the time dependent growth of PA shaking cultures, pyocyanin vibrational modes were clearly observable during the logarithmic growth phase corresponding to activation of genes related to biofilm formation. These results pave the way for the use of SERS sensors for the early detection of biofilm formation, leading to reduced healthcare costs and better patient outcomes.

  17. Ground-state charge transfer as a mechanism for surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippitsch, Max E.

    1984-03-01

    A model is presented for the contribution of ground-state charge transfer between a metal and adsorbate to surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). It is shown that this contribution can be understood using the vibronic theory for calculating Raman intensities. The enhancement is due to vibronic coupling of the molecular ground state to the metal states, the coupling mechanism being a modulation of the ground-state charge-transfer energy by the molecular vibrations. An analysis of the coupling operator gives the selection rules for this process, which turn out to be dependent on the overall symmetry of the adsorbate-metal system, even if the charge transfer is small enough for the symmetry of the adsorbate to remain the same as that of the free molecule. It is shown that the model can yield predictions on the properties of SERS, e.g., specificity to adsorption geometry, appearance of forbidden bands, dependence on the applied potential, and dependence on the excitation wavelength. The predictions are in good agreement with experimental results. It is also deduced from this model that in many cases atomic-scale roughness is a prerequisite for the observation of SERS. A result on the magnitude of the enhancement can only be given in a crude approximation. Although in most cases an additional electromagnetic enhancement seems to be necessary to give an observable signal, this charge-transfer mechanism should be important in many SERS systems.

  18. Bromide-Assisted Anisotropic Growth of Gold Nanoparticles as Substrates for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A. Kerr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report herein a one-step synthesis of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs of various shapes such as triangles, hexagons, and semispheres, using 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA as the reducing agent in the presence of potassium bromide (KBr. Anisotropic Au NPs have received ever-increasing attention in various areas of research due to their unique physical and chemical properties. Numerous synthetic methods involving either top-down or bottom-up approaches have been developed to synthesize Au NPs with deliberately varied shapes, sizes, and configurations; however, the production of templateless, seedless, and surfactant-free singular-shaped anisotropic Au NPs remains a significant challenge. The concentrations of hydrogen tetrachloroaurate (HAuCl4, 5-HIAA, and KBr, as well as the reaction temperature, were found to influence the resulting product morphology. A detailed characterization of the resulting Au NPs was performed using ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and Raman spectroscopy. The as-prepared Au NPs exhibited excellent surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS properties, which make them very attractive for the development of SERS-based chemical and biological sensors.

  19. Nanoparticle surface-enhanced Raman scattering of bacteriorhodopsin stabilized by amphipol A8-35.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polovinkin, V; Balandin, T; Volkov, O; Round, E; Borshchevskiy, V; Utrobin, P; von Stetten, D; Royant, A; Willbold, D; Arzumanyan, G; Chupin, V; Popot, J-L; Gordeliy, V

    2014-10-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has developed dramatically since its discovery in the 1970s, because of its power as an analytical tool for selective sensing of molecules adsorbed onto noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) and nanostructures, including at the single-molecule (SM) level. Despite the high importance of membrane proteins (MPs), SERS application to MPs has not really been studied, due to the great handling difficulties resulting from the amphiphilic nature of MPs. The ability of amphipols (APols) to trap MPs and keep them soluble, stable, and functional opens up onto highly interesting applications for SERS studies, possibly at the SM level. This seems to be feasible since single APol-trapped MPs can fit into gaps between noble metal NPs, or in other gap-containing SERS substrates, whereby the enhancement of Raman scattering signal may be sufficient for SM sensitivity. The goal of the present study is to give a proof of concept of SERS with APol-stabilized MPs, using bacteriorhodopsin (BR) as a model. BR trapped by APol A8-35 remains functional even after partial drying at a low humidity. A dried mixture of silver Lee-Meisel colloid NPs and BR/A8-35 complexes give rise to SERS with an average enhancement factor in excess of 10(2). SERS spectra resemble non-SERS spectra of a dried sample of BR/APol complexes.

  20. Raman scattering in LiCoO{sub 2} single crystals and thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, J.D.; Fu, M.L.; Trickett, D.M.; McGraw, J.M.; Ciszek, T.F.; Parilla, P.A.; Rogers, C.T.; Ginley, D.S.

    1998-07-01

    While LiCoO{sub 2} is one of the most promising cathode materials for rechargeable Li-ion batteries, many questions persist regarding the interrelationship of the electronic, structural and battery properties. The authors report Raman scattering measurements for uniaxially textured and randomly oriented polycrystalline LiCoO{sub 2} thin films as well as for LiCoO{sub 2} and LiCo{sub 0.4}Al{sub 0.6}O{sub 2} single crystals. For both the crystalline LiCoO{sub 2} thin film samples and the single crystal LiCoO{sub 2} samples, well defined phonon modes are observed at Raman shifts of 486 cm{sup {minus}1} and 596 cm{sup {minus}1} corresponding to the expected E{sub g} and A{sub 1g} modes of the layered LiCoO{sub 2} crystal structure with R{bar 3}m symmetry. Upon Al substitution for Co in LiCoO{sub 2}, the two phonon modes appear to shift to higher energy, but further work is needed to clarify this point.

  1. Preparation of silver material used for detection of biocomplexes by surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, M.; Binczyk, M.; Skrobanska, M.; Marciniak, L.; Runka, T.; Jastrzab, R.

    2016-08-01

    Silver dendrites were obtained on Cu plate by a classic galvanic displacement process. The process of preparing Ag particles was performed at different immersion times in AgNO3 solution, and the best process parameters were selected according to the enhancement effect of the Raman spectra of Rhodamine 6G. Ag-Cu substrates were chosen for a Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) study of biocomplexes because their preparation is cost effective and simple, and the relative homogeneous signal enhancement on the prepared silver SERS-active substrate was obtained. The rapid process of surface preparation was applied to identify the mode of coordination. Biocomplexes of Co and Ni ions with adenosine triphosphate form in neutral pH were immersed on the Ag dendrites, and SERS spectra of these compounds were collected. This research work was carried out in order to determine different types of coordination in the same pH conditions and relatively low concentration using SERS which is an emerging and promising technique for the determination of coordination types in biocomplexes.

  2. Magnetic field effects on the electron Raman scattering in coaxial cylindrical quantum well wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezaei, G., E-mail: grezaei2001@gmail.com [Department of Physics, College of Sciences, Yasouj University, Yasouj 75914-353 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimi, M.J.; Pakarzadeh, H. [Department of Physics, College of Sciences, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz 71555-313 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    Based on the effective mass and parabolic one band approximations, the influence of an external magnetic field on the differential cross-section for the intersubband electron Raman scattering process in coaxial cylindrical quantum well wires is investigated. The dependence of differential cross-section on magnetic field strength and structural parameters of the coaxial cylindrical quantum well wire is studied. It is found that the magnetic field strength and the geometrical size of the system have a great influence on the position of the singularities in the emission spectra. Moreover, one can control the frequency shift in the Raman spectrum by varying the magnetic field strength and the size of the coaxial cylindrical quantum well wire. -- Highlights: • Magnetic field effects on ERS in CCQWWs are investigated. • Light polarization vectors and geometrical size effects on the ERS are also studied. • Number, position and magnitude of the peaks depend on the magnetic field strength. • The light polarization vectors have a great influence on the magnitude of the peaks. • An increase in the size leads to the considerable changes in the emission spectra.

  3. Sub-100 nm gold nanohole-enhanced Raman scattering on flexible PDMS sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seunghyun; Ongko, Andry; Kim, Ho Young; Yim, Sang-Gu; Jeon, Geumhye; Jeong, Hee Jin; Lee, Seungwoo; Kwak, Minseok; Yang, Seung Yun

    2016-08-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a highly sensitive vibrational spectroscopy technique enabling detection of multiple analytes at the molecular level in a nondestructive and rapid manner. In this work, we introduce a new approach to fabricate deep subwavelength-scaled (sub-100 nm) metallic nanohole arrays (quasi-3D metallic nanoholes) on flexible and highly efficient SERS substrates. Target structures have been fabricated using a two-step process consisting of (i) direct pattern transfer of spin-coated polymer films onto polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates by plasma etching with transferred anodic aluminum oxide masks, and (ii) producing SERS-active substrates by functionalization of the etched polymeric films followed by Au deposition. Such an all-dry, top-down lithographic approach enables on-demand patterning of SERS-active metallic nanoholes with high structural fidelity even onto flexible and stretchable substrates, thus making possible multiple sensing modes in a versatile fashion. For example, metallic nanoholes on flexible PDMS substrates are highly amenable to their integration with curved glass sticks, which can be used in optical fiber-integrated SERS systems. Au surfaces immobilized by probe DNA molecules show a selective enhancement of Raman scattering with Cy5-labeled complementary DNA (as compared to flat Au surfaces), demonstrating the potential of using the quasi-3D Au nanohole arrays for bio-sensing applications.

  4. Rapid, label-free detection of brain tumors with stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Minbiao; Orringer, Daniel A.; Freudiger, Christian W.; Ramkissoon, Shakti; Liu, Xiaohui; Lau, Darryl; Golby, Alexandra J.; Norton, Isaiah; Hayashi, Marika; Agar, Nathalie Y.R.; Young, Geoffrey S.; Spino, Cathie; Santagata, Sandro; Camelo-Piragua, Sandra; Ligon, Keith L.; Sagher, Oren; Xie, X. Sunney

    2013-01-01

    Surgery is an essential component in the treatment of brain tumors. However, delineating tumor from normal brain remains a major challenge. Here we describe the use of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy for differentiating healthy human and mouse brain tissue from tumor-infiltrated brain based on histoarchitectural and biochemical differences. Unlike traditional histopathology, SRS is a label-free technique that can be rapidly performed in situ. SRS microscopy was able to differentiate tumor from non-neoplastic tissue in an infiltrative human glioblastoma xenograft mouse model based on their different Raman spectra. We further demonstrated a correlation between SRS and H&E microscopy for detection of glioma infiltration (κ=0.98). Finally, we applied SRS microscopy in vivo in mice during surgery to reveal tumor margins that were undetectable under standard operative conditions. By providing rapid intraoperative assessment of brain tissue, SRS microscopy may ultimately improve the safety and accuracy of surgeries where tumor boundaries are visually indistinct. PMID:24005159

  5. Stimulated Raman scattering in hydrogen by ultrashort laser pulse in the keV regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachau, H.; Dondera, M.

    2016-04-01

    This letter addresses the problem of stimulated Raman excitation of a hydrogen atom submitted to an ultrashort and intense laser pulse in the keV regime. The pulse central frequency ω of 55 a.u. (about 1.5 keV) is in the weakly relativistic regime, ω ≤ c/a0 (c is the speed of light in vacuum and a 0 the Bohr radius) and the pulse duration is τ ≈ 18.85 a.u. (about 456 attoseconds). We solve the corresponding time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) using a spectral approach, retardation (or nondipole) effects are included up to O(1/c) , breaking the conservation of the magnetic quantum number m and forcing the resolution of the TDSE in a three-dimensional space. Due to the laser bandwidth, which is of the order of the ionization potential of hydrogen, stimulated Raman scattering populates nlm excited states (n and l are the principal and azimuthal quantum numbers, respectively). The populations of these excited states are calculated and analyzed in terms of l and m quantum numbers, this showing the contributions of the retardation effects and their relative importance.

  6. Environmentally Responsive Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Substrates for High Sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Hongdeok; Jung, Chan Woo; Jalani, Ghulam; Lim, Dong Woo [Hanyang Univ., Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    We first report the synthesis and characterization of a new class of thermoresponsive SERS substrates composed of branched GNPs (bGNPs) with sharp features and poly(NIPAM-co-allylamonium chloride) (p(NIPAM-co-AA)) chemically conjugated with 1,10-decanedithiol of the self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of the gold-patterned microarray chip (Figure 1). As organic-inorganic composites, these SERS substrates were formed by strong ionic interaction between negatively charged bGNPs and positively charged p(NIPAM-co-AA) tethered on the gold pattern. When rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RBITC) was introduced to bGNPs as Raman dye, thermally-triggered collapse and aggregation of p(NIPAM-co-AA) chains in aqueous solution above the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) produced a SERS signal higher than that seen below LCST, potentially due to the decreased distance between bGNPs or between bGNPs and the gold pattern. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been of growing interest as a powerful tool to study vibrational information of molecules adsorbed on metallic nanoparticles (MNPs)

  7. Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering Based in Situ Hybridization Strategy for Telomere Length Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Shenfei; Chen, Chen; Wang, Zhuyuan; Zhang, Yizhi; Cui, Yiping

    2016-02-23

    Assessing telomere length is of vital importance since telomere length is closely related with several fatal diseases such as atherosclerosis and cancer. Here, we present a strategy to assess/measure telomere length, that is, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) based in situ hybridization (SISH). The SISH method uses two kinds of SERS nanoprobes to hybridize in situ with telomeres and centromeres, respectively. The telomere specific SERS nanoprobe is called the Telo-probe, while the centromere specific SERS nanoprobe is called the Centro-probe. They are composed of metal nanoparticles (NPs), Raman reporter molecules and specially designed DNA strands. With longer telomeres, more Telo-probes will hybridize with them, resulting in a stronger SERS signal. To exclude possible influence of the SERS intensity by external factors (such as the nanoprobe concentration, the cell number or different batches of nanoprobes), centromeres are used as the inner control, which can be recognized by Centro-probes. Telomere length is evaluated using a redefined telomere-to-centromere ratio (T/C ratio). The calculation method for T/C ratio in SISH method is more reliable than that in fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). In addition, unlike FISH method, the SISH method is insensitive to autofluorescence. Moreover, SISH method can be used to analyze single telomeres. These features make SISH an excellent alternative strategy for telomere length measurement.

  8. TECHNIQUE OF ESTIMATE OF ABSORPTION COEFFICIENT LASER RADIATION IN BORON DOPED DIAMONDS BY INTENSITY OF RAMAN SCATTERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. N. Poklonskaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of measurements of Raman scattering at the room temperature in air in boron doped synthetic diamonds (five with boron concentrations 2·1017; 6·1017; 2·1018; 1,7·1019; 1·1020 cm–3 and one intentionally undoped are presented. The laser with wavelength 532 nm was used for Raman scattering excitation. Dependences of integral intensity and halfwidth of diamond Raman line with respect to the doping level are presented. In the geometrical optics approximation an expression for doped to undoped integral intensity ratio is obtained. Qualitative estimates of conductivity of the studied samples are conducted. The obtained results can be applied for mapping of near-surface laser radiation absorption coefficient of synthetic single crystal diamonds and for their quality control.

  9. Silver nanoparticles deposited on anodic aluminum oxide template using magnetron sputtering for surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong-ek, Krongkamol [Nanoscience and Technology Program, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Eiamchai, Pitak; Horprathum, Mati; Patthanasettakul, Viyapol [National Electronics and Computer Technology Center, 112 Thailand Science Park, Phahonyothin Rd., Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Limnonthakul, Puenisara [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand); Chindaudom, Pongpan [National Electronics and Computer Technology Center, 112 Thailand Science Park, Phahonyothin Rd., Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Nuntawong, Noppadon, E-mail: noppadon.nuntawong@nectec.or.t [National Electronics and Computer Technology Center, 112 Thailand Science Park, Phahonyothin Rd., Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand)

    2010-09-30

    Low-cost and highly sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates have been fabricated by a simple anodizing process and a magnetron sputtering deposition. The substrates, which consist of silver nanoparticles embedded on anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates, are investigated by a scanning electron microscope and a confocal Raman spectroscopy. The SERS activities are demonstrated by Raman scattering from adsorbed solutions of methylene blue and pyridine on the SERS substrate surface. The most optimized SERS substrate contains the silver nanoparticles, with a size distribution of 10-30 nm, deposited on the AAO template. From a calculation, the SERS enhancement factor is as high as 8.5 x 10{sup 7}, which suggests strong potentials for direct applications in the chemical detection and analyses.

  10. In situ resonant Raman scattering and reversible photoinduced structural change in YBa2Cu3O6+x

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osada, M.; Käll, M.; Bäckström, J.;

    2005-01-01

    or absence of a specific Raman scattering resonance. A comparison of the spectral efficiencies for this photoswitching with analogous data for the persistent photoconductivity and photoconductivity quenching effects suggests that the two phenomena have the same microscopic origin. We argue that the effects...

  11. Surface-Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering and Visible Extinction Spectroscopy of Copper Chlorophyllin: An Upper Level Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzer, Cheryl S.; Reim, Candace Lawson; Sirois, John J.; House, Paul G.

    2010-01-01

    Advanced chemistry students are introduced to surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) by studying how sodium copper chlorophyllin (CuChl) adsorbs onto silver colloids (CuChl/Ag) as a function of pH. Using both SERRS and visible extinction spectroscopy, the extent of CuChl adsorption and colloidal aggregation are monitored. Initially at…

  12. Dispersion-based stimulated Raman scattering spectroscopy, holography, and optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Francisco E.; Fischer, Martin C.; Warren, Warren S.

    2016-03-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) enables fast, high resolution imaging of chemical constituents important to biological structures and functional processes. While this technology has shown remarkable potential, it is currently limited to point scanning and can only probe a few Raman bands at a time. In this work we take a fundamentally different approach to detecting the small nonlinear signals based on dispersion effects that accompany the loss/gain processes in SRS. We use a modified pump-probe system (pulses with duration of ~0.5 ps and 75 fs, respectively) with interferometric detection in the Fourier-domain to demonstrate that the dispersive measurements are more robust to noise (e.g., laser noise) compared to conventional amplitude measurements, which in turn permits facile spectral and spatial multiplexing. Results show that it is possible to assess a broadband dispersion spectrum (currently limited to ~400 cm-1) with a single laser shot or spectrometer acquisition (20-50 µs). For molecular imaging with broadband spectral information, we achieve spatial pixel rates of 2.5 kHz, and will discuss how this can be further improved to 20-50 kHz. We also combine SRS with optical coherence tomography (OCT) (molecular and structural information are rendered from the same data), which enables axial multiplexing by coherence gating and paves the way for volumetric biochemical imaging. The approach is tested on a thin water-and-oil phantom, a thick scattering polystyrene bead phantom, and thick freshly excised human adipose tissue. Finally, we will outline other opportunities for spatial multiplexing using wide-field holography and spectroscopic-OCT, which would massively parallelize the spatial and spectral information. The combination of dispersion-based SRS and phase imaging has the potential to enable faster wide-area and volumetric molecular imaging. Such methods would be valuable in a clinical setting for many applications.

  13. Study of far-infrared reflection and Raman scattering spectra in reactive ion, etched ZnTe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴森; 沈文忠; 小川博司; 郭其新

    2003-01-01

    Far-infrared reflection and Raman scattering measurements have been carried out on reactive ion,etched p-ZnTe samples.The averaged thickness of the surface damaged layer is found to be in the range of 1.0-1.5μm,and the,etch-induced defect density is in the order of 1018cm-3.The Raman intensity ratio between the second-order Raman peaks and the first-order longitudinal optical phonons reveals an increase trend with the radio frequency(rf)power.With the aid of related theories,we discuss the effects of the rf plasma power and the concentration of CH4/H2 on the damage,disorder,and the second-order Raman structures in p-ZnTe samples.

  14. Pulsed laser deposited Ag nanoparticles on nickel hydroxide nanosheet arrays for highly sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, Yuting; Wang, Huanwen; Chen, Xiao [Department of Chemistry, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Wang, Xuefeng, E-mail: xfwang@tongji.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Wei, Huige [Integrated Composites Laboratory (ICL), Dan F. Smith Department of Chemical Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, Texas 77710 (United States); Guo, Zhanhu, E-mail: zhanhu.guo@lamar.edu [Integrated Composites Laboratory (ICL), Dan F. Smith Department of Chemical Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, Texas 77710 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Silver nanoparticles (NPs) were deposited on nickel hydroxide nanosheet (NS) arrays by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy. • The Ag/Ni(OH){sub 2} composite film exhibits very high Raman scattering enhancement ability, possessing an enhancement factor as high as 5 × 10{sup 6}. • The enhancement ability of the substrate was strongly dependent on the size and interparticle gap of Ag NPs. • The 3D structure of Ni(OH){sub 2} NS arrays and the charge transfer of Ag NPs may be responsible for this high sensitivity Raman phenomenon. - Abstract: In the present work, silver nanoparticles (NPs) were deposited on nickel hydroxide nanosheet (NS) arrays by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy. The effective high specific surface area with silver NPs decorated on the NS arrays was revealed by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The microstructure and optical property of this three-dimensional (3D) substrate were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and UV–vis spectra, respectively. Using rhodamine 6G (R6G) as probe molecules with the concentration down to 10{sup −5} M, the Ag/Ni(OH){sub 2} composite film exhibits very high Raman scattering enhancement ability, possessing an enhancement factor as high as 5 × 10{sup 6}. It has been found that the enhancement ability of the substrate was strongly dependent on the size and interparticle gap of Ag NPs rather than the testing position on the film surface. In addition, the 3D structure of Ni(OH){sub 2} NS arrays and the charge transfer of Ag NPs may be responsible for this high sensitivity Raman phenomenon.

  15. Nonlinear optical imaging and Raman microspectrometry of the cell nucleus throughout the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliss, Artem; Kuzmin, Andrey N; Kachynski, Aliaksandr V; Prasad, Paras N

    2010-11-17

    Fundamental understanding of cellular processes at molecular level is of considerable importance in cell biology as well as in biomedical disciplines for early diagnosis of infection and cancer diseases, and for developing new molecular medicine-based therapies. Modern biophotonics offers exclusive capabilities to obtain information on molecular composition, organization, and dynamics in a cell by utilizing a combination of optical spectroscopy and optical imaging. We introduce here a combination of Raman microspectrometry, together with coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) nonlinear optical microscopy, to study macromolecular organization of the nucleus throughout the cell cycle. Site-specific concentrations of proteins, DNA, RNA, and lipids were determined in nucleoli, nucleoplasmic transcription sites, nuclear speckles, constitutive heterochromatin domains, mitotic chromosomes, and extrachromosomal regions of mitotic cells by quantitative confocal Raman microspectrometry. A surprising finding, obtained in our study, is that the local concentration of proteins does not increase during DNA compaction. We also demonstrate that postmitotic DNA decondensation is a gradual process, continuing for several hours. The quantitative Raman spectroscopic analysis was corroborated with CARS/TPEF multimodal imaging to visualize the distribution of protein, DNA, RNA, and lipid macromolecules throughout the cell cycle.

  16. A hybrid atomistic electrodynamics-quantum mechanical approach for simulating surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton, John L; Morton, Seth M; Moore, Justin E; Jensen, Lasse

    2014-01-21

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a technique that has broad implications for biological and chemical sensing applications by providing the ability to simultaneously detect and identify a single molecule. The Raman scattering of molecules adsorbed on metal nanoparticles can be enhanced by many orders of magnitude. These enhancements stem from a twofold mechanism: an electromagnetic mechanism (EM), which is due to the enhanced local field near the metal surface, and a chemical mechanism (CM), which is due to the adsorbate specific interactions between the metal surface and the molecules. The local field near the metal surface can be significantly enhanced due to the plasmon excitation, and therefore chemists generally accept that the EM provides the majority of the enhancements. While classical electrodynamics simulations can accurately simulate the local electric field around metal nanoparticles, they offer few insights into the spectral changes that occur in SERS. First-principles simulations can directly predict the Raman spectrum but are limited to small metal clusters and therefore are often used for understanding the CM. Thus, there is a need for developing new methods that bridge the electrodynamics simulations of the metal nanoparticle and the first-principles simulations of the molecule to facilitate direct simulations of SERS spectra. In this Account, we discuss our recent work on developing a hybrid atomistic electrodynamics-quantum mechanical approach to simulate SERS. This hybrid method is called the discrete interaction model/quantum mechanics (DIM/QM) method and consists of an atomistic electrodynamics model of the metal nanoparticle and a time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) description of the molecule. In contrast to most previous work, the DIM/QM method enables us to retain a detailed atomistic structure of the nanoparticle and provides a natural bridge between the electronic structure methods and the macroscopic

  17. Stimulated Raman scattering of an ultrashort XUV radiation pulse by a hydrogen atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondera, Mihai; Florescu, Viorica; Bachau, Henri

    2017-02-01

    We consider the hydrogen atom H (1 s ) exposed to an ultrashort laser pulse with a central frequency ω0 ranging from several hundreds of eV to 1.5 keV (≈55 a.u.) and a peak intensity of 3.51 ×1016W /cm2 . We study the excitation of the atom by stimulated Raman scattering, a process involving pairs of frequencies (ω1,ω2 ). These frequencies are non-negligible components of the pulse Fourier transform and they satisfy the condition Eg+ℏ ω1=Eb+ℏ ω2,Eg and Eb≡En being the ground-state and the excited-state energy, respectively. The numerical results obtained by integrating the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) are compared with calculations in lowest order perturbation theory (LOPT). In LOPT we consider, in the second order of PT, the contribution of the term A .P in the dipole approximation and, in first order of PT, the expression of A2 taken for first-order retardation effects. (A denotes the vector potential of the field and P is the momentum operator.) We focus on the Raman excitation of bound states with principal quantum numbers n up to n =13 . The evaluation in perturbation theory of the A .P contribution to 1 s -n s and 1 s -n d transition probabilities uses analytic expressions of the corresponding Kramers-Heisenberg matrix elements. At fixed pulse duration τ =6 π a.u. (≈0.48 fs), we find that the retardation effects play an important role at high frequencies: they progressively diminish as the frequency decreases until the contribution of A .P dominates over the A2 contribution for ω0 values of a few a.u. We also study the dependence of the Raman process on the pulse duration for several values of ω0. In the case ω0=13 a .u .(≈354 eV ) where dipole and nondipole contributions are of the same order of magnitude, we present the Raman excitation probability as a function of the pulse duration for excited n s ,n p , and n d states.

  18. A large-solid-angle X-ray Raman scattering spectrometer at ID20 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huotari, S; Sahle, Ch J; Henriquet, Ch; Al-Zein, A; Martel, K; Simonelli, L; Verbeni, R; Gonzalez, H; Lagier, M C; Ponchut, C; Moretti Sala, M; Krisch, M; Monaco, G

    2017-03-01

    An end-station for X-ray Raman scattering spectroscopy at beamline ID20 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility is described. This end-station is dedicated to the study of shallow core electronic excitations using non-resonant inelastic X-ray scattering. The spectrometer has 72 spherically bent analyzer crystals arranged in six modular groups of 12 analyzer crystals each for a combined maximum flexibility and large solid angle of detection. Each of the six analyzer modules houses one pixelated area detector allowing for X-ray Raman scattering based imaging and efficient separation of the desired signal from the sample and spurious scattering from the often used complicated sample environments. This new end-station provides an unprecedented instrument for X-ray Raman scattering, which is a spectroscopic tool of great interest for the study of low-energy X-ray absorption spectra in materials under in situ conditions, such as in operando batteries and fuel cells, in situ catalytic reactions, and extreme pressure and temperature conditions.

  19. Discrete-ordinate radiative transfer in a stratified medium with first-order rotational Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spurr, Robert [RT Solutions Inc., 9 Channing Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)], E-mail: rtsolutions@verizon.net; Haan, Johan de; Oss, Roeland van [KNMI, de Bilt (Netherlands); Vasilkov, Alexander [SSAI, Lanham, MD (United States)

    2008-02-15

    Rotational Raman scattering (RRS) by air molecules in the Earth's atmosphere is predominantly responsible for the Ring effect: Fraunhofer and absorption-feature filling-in observed in UV/visible backscatter spectra. Accurate determination of RRS effects requires detailed radiative transfer (RT) treatment. In this paper, we demonstrate that the discrete-ordinate RT equations may be solved analytically in a multi-layer multiple scattering atmosphere in the presence of RRS treated as a first-order perturbation. Based on this solution, we develop a generic pseudo-spherical RT model LIDORT-RRS for the determination of backscatter radiances with RRS included; the model will generate output at arbitrary viewing geometry and optical thickness. Model comparisons with measured RRS filling-in effects from OMI observations show very good agreement. We examine telluric RRS filling-in effects for satellite-view backscatter radiances in a spectral range covering the ozone Huggins absorption bands. The model is also used to investigate calcium H and K Fraunhofer filling-in through cloud layers in the atmosphere.

  20. Laser radar studies: A study of the feasibility of remote measurement of atmospheric density and turbidity by means of rotational Raman scattering of laser light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, N.; Schotland, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    A remote sensing technique is described which utilizes elastic scattering and rotational Raman scattering of laser light in the atmosphere to obtain soundings of turbidity, transmissivity and density. A scheme is devised whereby, through selective weighting of the rotational Raman lines, the effect of atmospheric temperature structure may be eliminated. The close spectral proximity of the elastic and Raman-scattered signals, combined with the fact that the Raman scattering is quite weak, produces special requirements for the spectroscopic and light-gathering components of a rotational Raman laser radar system. These requirements are investigated. A computation of typical signal-to-noise ratios is made. It is shown that daytime signal-to-noise ratios greater than 10 db are to be expected for observation heights of 5 km and below. For nighttime work, 10 db signal-to-noise ratios are achievable to altitudes as high as 15 km.

  1. Inelastic electron and Raman scattering from the collective excitations in quantum wires: Zero magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwaha, Manvir S.

    2013-04-01

    The nanofabrication technology has taught us that an m-dimensional confining potential imposed upon an n-dimensional electron gas paves the way to a quasi-(n-m)-dimensional electron gas, with m ⩽ n and 1 ⩽ n, m ⩽ 3. This is the road to the (semiconducting) quasi-n dimensional electron gas systems we have been happily traversing on now for almost two decades. Achieving quasi-one dimensional electron gas (Q-1DEG) [or quantum wire(s) for more practical purposes] led us to some mixed moments in this journey: while the reduced phase space for the scattering led us believe in the route to the faster electron devices, the proximity to the 1D systems left us in the dilemma of describing it as a Fermi liquid or as a Luttinger liquid. No one had ever suspected the potential of the former, but it took quite a while for some to convince the others on the latter. A realistic Q-1DEG system at the low temperatures is best describable as a Fermi liquid rather than as a Luttinger liquid. In the language of condensed matter physics, a critical scrutiny of Q-1DEG systems has provided us with a host of exotic (electronic, optical, and transport) phenomena unseen in their higher- or lower-dimensional counterparts. This has motivated us to undertake a systematic investigation of the inelastic electron scattering (IES) and the inelastic light scattering (ILS) from the elementary electronic excitations in quantum wires. We begin with the Kubo's correlation functions to derive the generalized dielectric function, the inverse dielectric function, and the Dyson equation for the dynamic screened potential in the framework of Bohm-Pines' random-phase approximation. These fundamental tools then lead us to develop methodically the theory of IES and ILS for the Q-1DEG systems. As an application of the general formal results, which know no bounds regarding the subband occupancy, we compute the density of states, the Fermi energy, the full excitation spectrum [comprised of intrasubband and

  2. Inelastic electron and Raman scattering from the collective excitations in quantum wires: Zero magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manvir S. Kushwaha

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The nanofabrication technology has taught us that an m-dimensional confining potential imposed upon an n-dimensional electron gas paves the way to a quasi-(n-m-dimensional electron gas, with m ⩽ n and 1 ⩽ n, m ⩽ 3. This is the road to the (semiconducting quasi-n dimensional electron gas systems we have been happily traversing on now for almost two decades. Achieving quasi-one dimensional electron gas (Q-1DEG [or quantum wire(s for more practical purposes] led us to some mixed moments in this journey: while the reduced phase space for the scattering led us believe in the route to the faster electron devices, the proximity to the 1D systems left us in the dilemma of describing it as a Fermi liquid or as a Luttinger liquid. No one had ever suspected the potential of the former, but it took quite a while for some to convince the others on the latter. A realistic Q-1DEG system at the low temperatures is best describable as a Fermi liquid rather than as a Luttinger liquid. In the language of condensed matter physics, a critical scrutiny of Q-1DEG systems has provided us with a host of exotic (electronic, optical, and transport phenomena unseen in their higher- or lower-dimensional counterparts. This has motivated us to undertake a systematic investigation of the inelastic electron scattering (IES and the inelastic light scattering (ILS from the elementary electronic excitations in quantum wires. We begin with the Kubo's correlation functions to derive the generalized dielectric function, the inverse dielectric function, and the Dyson equation for the dynamic screened potential in the framework of Bohm-Pines’ random-phase approximation. These fundamental tools then lead us to develop methodically the theory of IES and ILS for the Q-1DEG systems. As an application of the general formal results, which know no bounds regarding the subband occupancy, we compute the density of states, the Fermi energy, the full excitation spectrum [comprised of

  3. Improved molecular fingerprint analysis employing multi-branched gold nanoparticles in conjunction with surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Jencilin; Taylor, Erik N; Gilbert, Richard J; Webster, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy is a powerful analytical tool that assesses molecular properties based on spectroscopic signatures. In this study, the effect of gold nanoparticle morphology (spherical vs multi-branched) was assessed for the characterization of a Raman signal (ie, molecular fingerprint) that may be helpful for numerous medical applications. Multi-branched gold nanoparticles (MBAuNPs) were fabricated using a green chemistry method which employed the reduction of gold ion solute by 2-[4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazyl] ethane sulfonic acid. Two types of reporter dyes, indocyanine (IR820 and IR792) and carbocyanine (DTTC [3,3'-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide] and DTDC [3,3'-diethylthiadicarbocyanine iodide]), were functionalized to the surface of the MBAuNPs and stabilized with denatured bovine serum albumin, thus forming the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy tag. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated anti-epidermal growth factor receptor to the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy tags and the properties of the resulting conjugates were assessed through determination of the Raman signal. Using the MBAuNP Raman probes synthesized in this manner, we demonstrated that MBAuNP provided significantly more surface-enhanced Raman scattering signal when compared with the associated spherical gold nanoparticle of similar size and concentration. MBAuNP enhancements were retained in the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy tags complexed to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor, providing evidence that this could be a useful biological probe for enhanced Raman molecular fingerprinting. Furthermore, while utilizing IR820 as a novel reporter dye linked with MBAuNP, superior Raman signal fingerprint results were obtained. Such results provide significant promise for the use of MBAuNP in the detection of numerous diseases for which biologically specific surface markers exist.

  4. Design of the sample cell in near-field surface-enhanced Raman scattering by finite difference time domain method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaqin Li; Guoshu Jian; Shifa Wu

    2006-01-01

    The rational design of the sample cell may improve the sensitivity of surface-enhanced Raman scattering(SERS) detection in a high degree. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations of the configurationof Ag film-Ag particles illuminated by plane wave and evanescent wave are performed to provide physicalinsight for design of the sample cell. Numerical solutions indicate that the sample cell can provide more"hot spots" and the massive field intensity enhancement occurs in these "hot spots". More information onthe nanometer character of the sample can be got because of gradient-field Raman (GFR) of evanescentwave.

  5. Surface enhanced Raman scattering on Tardigrada--towards monitoring and imaging molecular structures in live cryptobiotic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneipp, Harald; Møbjerg, Nadja; Jørgensen, Aslak; Bohr, Henrik G; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus; Kneipp, Janina; Kneipp, Katrin

    2013-10-01

    Tardigrades are microscopic metazoans which are able to survive extreme physical and chemical conditions by entering a stress tolerant state called cryptobiosis. At present, the molecular mechanisms behind cryptobiosis are still poorly understood. We show that surface enhanced Raman scattering supported by plasmonic gold nanoparticles can measure molecular constituents and their local distribution in live tardigrades. Surface enhanced Raman signatures allow to differentiate between two species and indicate molecular structural differences between tardigrades in water and in a dry state. This opens new avenues for exploring cryptobiosis by studying molecular changes in live cryptobiotic organisms.

  6. The Raman coupling function in disordered solids: a light and neutron scattering study on glasses of different fragility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontana, A [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trento, I-38050 Povo Trento (Italy); Rossi, F [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trento, I-38050 Povo Trento (Italy); Viliani, G [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trento, I-38050 Povo Trento (Italy); Caponi, S [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trento, I-38050 Povo Trento (Italy); Fabiani, E [Universite Joseph Fourier c/o Institut de Biologie Structurale and CRG-IN13 at Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL), BP 156, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Baldi, G [CRS SOFT CNR-INFM, c/o Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , I-00185, Rome (Italy); Ruocco, G [CRS SOFT CNR-INFM, c/o Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , I-00185, Rome (Italy); Dal Maschio, R [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e delle Tecnologie Industriali, Universita di Trento, I-38050 Mesiano Trento (Italy)

    2007-05-23

    We report new inelastic Raman and neutron scattering spectra for glasses with different degrees of fragility, v-SiO{sub 2}, v-GeO{sub 2} (AgI){sub 0.5}(Ag{sub 2}O-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub 0.5} (AgI){sub x}(AgPO{sub 3}){sub 1-x}. The data are compared for each sample to obtain the Raman coupling function C({omega}). The study indicates a general linear behaviour of C({omega}) near the boson peak maximum, and evidences a correlation between vibrational and relaxational properties, confirming the results of recent publications.

  7. Probing the adsorption mechanism in thiamazole bound to the silver surface with Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering and DFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Nandita; Thomas, Susy; Sarkar, Anjana; Mukherjee, Tulsi; Kapoor, Sudhir

    2009-09-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of thiamazole have been investigated in aqueous solution. Thiamazole is an important anti-thyroid drug that is used in the treatment of hyperthyroidism (over activity of the thyroid gland). Due to its medicinal importance, the surface adsorption properties of thiamazole have been studied. The experimental Raman and SERS data are supported with DFT calculations using B3LYP functional with LANL2DZ basis set. From the SERS spectra as well as theoretical calculations, it has been inferred that thiamazole is chemisorbed to the silver surface directly through the sulphur atom and the ring N atom, with a tilted orientation.

  8. Raman scattering study of ro-vibrational modes of interstitial H{sub 2} in crystalline Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Sandro; Lavrov, Edward; Weber, Joerg [Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Raman scattering studies of Si samples hydrogenated in a rf plasma have been performed. Ro-vibrational Q(J) transitions for rotational quantum number J=0,1,2, and 3 have been investigated in the temperature range from 90 to 388 K. We demonstrate that the Q(2) transition appears in the Raman spectra above 200 K as suggested by Hiller et al. Additionally, the Q(3) transition is detected at 388 K. From the temperature dependence of the phonon spectrum of the Si host, we can show that the coupling between rotational states of H{sub 2} depends on the temperature.

  9. Morphology modification of gold nanoparticles from nanoshell to C-shape: Improved surface enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Ting-Yang; Zhu, Jian; Li, Jian-Jun; Zhao, Jun-Wu

    2016-06-01

    Morphology modification of nanostructures is of great interest, because it can be used to fabricate nanostructures which are hard to be done using other methods. Different from traditional lithographic technique which is slow and expensive, morphology modification is easy, cheap, and reproducible. In this paper, modification of the optical and morphological properties of a hollow gold nanoshell (HGNS) is achieved by using H2O2 as an oxidizer. The reshaping of these nanostructures has been demonstrated as a consequence of an oxidation process in which HGNSs are dissolved by H2O2 under the acidic conditions provided by HCl. We investigate the oxidation process by a transmission electron microscope and propose a reshaping model involving four different shapes (HGNS, HGNS with hole, gold nanoring, and C-shaped gold nanoparticle) which are corresponding to the oxidation products of HGNSs at different pH values. Besides, the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity of each oxidation product has been evaluated by using rhodamine 6G as the Raman active probe. It has been observed that the C-shaped gold nanoparticles which are corresponding to the oxidation products at the minimum pH value have the highest SERS activity and this result can also be interpreted by discrete-dipole approximation simulations. We demonstrate that the morphology modification of HGNSs becomes possible in a controlled manner using wet chemistry and can be used in preparation of gold nanoparticles such as HGNS with hole, gold nanoring, and C-shaped gold nanoparticle with large SERS activity. These nanostructures must have potential use in many plasmonic areas, including sensing, catalysis, and biomedicine.

  10. An examination of errors in computed water-leaving radiances due to a simplified treatment of water Raman scattering effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bismarck, Jonas von; Fischer, Jürgen

    2013-05-01

    Studies in the past have shown that solar shortwave radiation that has been Raman scattered in the ocean, and therefore undergone a wavelength shift, can contribute significantly to the signals observed by remote sensing satellites. While radiative transfer models that qualitatively approximate the effect of water Raman scattering on the water leaving irradiance have been available for a while, we have developed a new version of the radiative transfer code MOMO, which enables the accurate and fully angle resolved inclusion of inelastic scattering sources, and therefore allows detailed quantitative analyses of the effect on the light field in the ocean-atmosphere system. This article focuses on a study performed with this new model on the impact of azimuthally averaging the Raman scattering phase function, which is done in some RT models and significantly decreases computation time, on the water-leaving radiance. At the request of the authors and Proceedings Editors the above article has been updated to include a number of post-publication amendments. Changes made to the previously published article are detailed in the pages attached to the end of the updated article PDF file. The updated article was re-published on 15 August 2013.

  11. Suppression of a parasitic pump side-scattering in backward Raman amplifiers of laser pulses in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solodov, Andrei; Malkin, Vladimir; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2003-10-01

    In backward Raman amplifiers (BRA), the pump laser pulse can be prematurely depleted through Raman scattering, seeded by the plasma noise, as the pump encounters plasma before reaching the counter-propagating seed pulse. It was shown previously that detuning of the Raman resonance, either by a plasma density gradient or a pump frequency chirp, can prevent the premature pump backscattering, even while the desired amplification of the seed pulse persists with a high efficiency. However, parasitic pump side-scattering is not automatically suppressed together with the parasitic backscattering, and might be even more dangerous for BRA. What we show here is that by combining the above two detuning mechanisms one can suppress parasitic pump side-scattering as well. Apart from the simplest counterpropagating geometry, we examine BRA for arbitrary angles between the directions of pump and seed propagation. We show that, by selecting an appropriate direction of the plasma density gradient, one can favorably minimize the detuning in the direction of the seed pulse propagation, while strongly suppressing the parasitic pump side-scattering in all the other directions. This work was supported in part by DOE and DARPA.

  12. Single-molecule surface-enhanced Raman scattering of R6G in aqueous environment under non-resonance conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Enzhong Tan; Penggang Yin; Lidong Li; Lin Guo

    2011-01-01

    The single-molecule surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) in an aqueous environment under non-resonance conditions are studied. Series of spectra are recorded in time-mapping mode, and intensity fluctuations of SERS signals and spectral diffusion are observed. The correlations between the presence frequency of SERS spectra and number of hot spots as well as the quantity of molecules in scattering volume are examined thoroughly. The results indicate that only molecules located at hot spots produce good signal-to-noise ratio Raman spectra and the origin of fluctuating SERS signals are mainly ascribed to the movement of hot spots.%@@ The single-molecule surface-enhanced Raman scattering(SERS) spectra of Rhodamine 6G(R6G) in anaqueous environment under non-resonance conditions are studied.Series of spectra are recorded in timemapping mode,and intensity fluctuations of SERS signals and spectral diffusion are observed.The correlations between the presence frequency of SERS spectra and number of hot spots as well as the quantity of molecules in scattering volume are examined thoroughly.

  13. Raman and surface enhanced Raman scattering study of the orientation of cruciform 9,10-anthracene thiophene and furan derivatives deposited on a gold colloidal surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Pérez, J.; Leyton, P.; Paipa, C.; Soto, J. P.; Brunet, J.; Gómez-Jeria, J. S.; Campos-Vallette, M. M.

    2016-10-01

    The 9,10-di(thiophen-2-yl)anthracene (TAT), 9,10-di(furan-2-yl)anthracene (FAF) and 2-[(10-(thiophen-2-yl)anthracen-9-yl)]furan (TAF) cruciform molecular systems were synthesized using one-step coupling reactions and structurally characterized via Raman, infrared, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and mass spectroscopies. The orientation of the analytes on a gold colloidal surface was inferred from a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) study. The metal surface interaction was driven by the S and O atoms of the thiophene and furan α-substituents, and the plane of the anthracene fragment remained parallel to the surface. Theoretical calculations based on a simplified molecular model for the analyte-surface interaction provide a good representation of the experimental data.

  14. Anti-Stokes emissions and determination of Stark sub-level diagram of Er{sup 3+} ions in KY{sub 3}F{sub 10}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulma, E [Laboratoire d' Energetique et d' Optique, UTAP, Universite de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, BP 1039, Reims Cedex 51 687 (France); Diaf, M [Departement de Physique, Universite Badji Mokhtar Annaba, BP12, 23000 Annaba, Algerie (Germany); Jouart, J P [Laboratoire d' Energetique et d' Optique, UTAP, Universite de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, BP 1039, Reims Cedex 51 687 (France); Bouffard, M [Laboratoire d' Energetique et d' Optique, UTAP, Universite de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, BP 1039, Reims Cedex 51 687 (France); Doualan, J L [Centre Interdisciplinaire de Recherches Ions Lasers (CIRIL), UMR 6637 CNRS-CEA-ISMRA, ENSI de Caen, 6 Boulevard Marechal Juin, 14050 Caen Cedex (France); Moncorge, R [Centre Interdisciplinaire de Recherches Ions Lasers (CIRIL), UMR 6637 CNRS-CEA-ISMRA, ENSI de Caen, 6 Boulevard Marechal Juin, 14050 Caen Cedex (France)

    2006-07-26

    We are interested, in this work, in determining the Stark sub-level of Er{sup 3+} ions doping a KY{sub 3}F{sub 10} single crystal with a molar concentration of 1%. We have used a new method of measurement of energies of the ground level and emitting levels from excitation and anti-Stokes emission spectra recorded at liquid nitrogen temperature. This technique is based on a spectral analysis of the anti-Stokes emissions recorded after selective excitation with a red dye tunable laser. Thus, we could determine the Stark sub-levels of the ground and the principal emitting levels in the infrared, visible and near-UV ranges with a very good precision.

  15. Stimulated Raman Scattering in a Weakly Polar Ⅲ-Ⅴ Semiconductor: Effect of dc Magnetic Field and Free Carrier Concentration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Singh; P. Aghamkar; P. K. Sen

    2007-01-01

    @@ Using the hydrodynamic model of semiconductor plasmas, we perform an analytical investigation of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) of an electromagnetic pump wave in a transversely magnetized weakly polar semiconductor arising from electron-density perturbations and molecular vibrations of the medium both produced at the longitudinal optical phonon frequency. Assuming that the origin of SRS lies in the third-order susceptibility of the medium, we investigate the growth rate of Stokes mode. The dependence of stimulated Raman gain on the external dc magnetic field strength and free carrier concentration is reported. The possibility of the occurrence of optical phase conjugation via SRS is also studied. The steady-state Raman gain is found to be greatly enhanced by the presence of the strong external dc magnetic field.

  16. Compositional dependence of Raman scattering and photoluminescence emission in Cu-Ga-Se films grown by MOCVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossberg, M., E-mail: mgross@staff.ttu.e [Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia); Krustok, J. [Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia); Siebentritt, S. [Universite du Luxembourg, 162a avenue de la Faiencerie, L-1511 Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Albert, J. [Helmholtz Centre Berlin, Glienicker Strasse 100, 14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents Raman scattering and photoluminescence (PL) analysis of polycrystalline Cu-Ga-Se films grown epitaxially on the GaAs substrate. In the compositional dependence of the Raman spectra of the CuGaSe{sub 2} films, the appearance of the ordered vacancy compounds (OVCs) CuGa{sub 3}Se{sub 5} and CuGa{sub 5}Se{sub 8} was observed. The dominating A{sub 1} Raman modes were detected at 185, 166 and 159 cm{sup -1}, respectively. The PL bands of CuGaSe{sub 2}, CuGa{sub 3}Se{sub 5} and CuGa{sub 5}Se{sub 8} at T=10 K were detected at 1.615, 1.72 and 1.76 eV, respectively. The dominating PL emission channel is the band-to-tail (BT) type recombination.

  17. Structural and Raman scattering study of Ni-doped CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Ashwini, E-mail: vdinesh33@rediffmail.com; Dar, Mashkoor A., E-mail: vdinesh33@rediffmail.com; Sharma, Poorva, E-mail: vdinesh33@rediffmail.com; Varshney, Dinesh, E-mail: vdinesh33@rediffmail.com [School of Physics, Vigyan Bhawan, Devi Ahilya University, Khandwa Road Campus, Indore-452001 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Raman scattering measurements were made on polycrystalline CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and Co{sub 0.5}Ni{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrites as prepared by solid-state reaction route. Rietveld refined X-ray diffraction pattern confirmed the formation of single-phase and both of the samples perfectly indexed in cubic spinel structure with Fd3m space group. Slight reduction in the lattice parameter of Co{sub 0.5}Ni{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} has been observed as compared to CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. From Raman scattering spectra, a shoulder like feature has been observed in both of the compounds reveals that octahedral site is occupied by Co, Ni and Fe ions and tetrahedral site is occupied by only Fe ion.

  18. Rapid Detection of Polychlorinated Biphenyls at Trace Levels in Real Environmental Samples by Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengjun Zhang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Detection of trace levels of persistent pollutants in the environment is difficult but significant. Organic pollutant homologues, due to their similar physical and chemical properties, are even more difficult to distinguish, especially in trace amounts. We report here a simple method to detect polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs in soil and distilled spirit samples by the surface-enhanced Raman scattering technique using Ag nanorod arrays as substrates. By this method, polychlorinated biphenyls can be detected to a concentration of 5 μg/g in dry soil samples within 1 minute. Furthermore, based on simulation and understanding of the Raman characteristics of PCBs, we recognized homologues of tetrachlorobiphenyl by using the surface-enhance Raman scattering method even in trace amounts in acetone solutions, and their characteristic Raman peaks still can be distinguished at a concentration of 10-6 mol/L. This study provides a fast, simple and sensitive method for the detection and recognition of organic pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls.

  19. Raman Studies of Carbon Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorio, Ado; Souza Filho, Antonio G.

    2016-07-01

    This article reviews recent advances on the use of Raman spectroscopy to study and characterize carbon nanostructures. It starts with a brief survey of Raman spectroscopy of graphene and carbon nanotubes, followed by recent developments in the field. Various novel topics, including Stokes-anti-Stokes correlation, tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy in two dimensions, phonon coherence, and high-pressure and shielding effects, are presented. Some consequences for other fields—quantum optics, near-field electromagnetism, archeology, materials and soil sciences—are discussed. The review ends with a discussion of new perspectives on Raman spectroscopy of carbon nanostructures, including how this technique can contribute to the development of biotechnological applications and nanotoxicology.

  20. Toward development of a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based cancer diagnostic immunoassay panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Jennifer H; Granger, Michael C; Firpo, Matthew A; Mulvihill, Sean J; Porter, Marc D

    2013-01-21

    Proteomic analyses of readily obtained human fluids (e.g., serum, urine, and saliva) indicate that the diagnosis of complex diseases will be enhanced by the simultaneous measurement of multiple biomarkers from such samples. This paper describes the development of a nanoparticle-based multiplexed platform that has the potential for simultaneous read-out of large numbers of biomolecules. For this purpose, we have chosen pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PA) as a test bed for diagnosis and prognosis. PA is a devastating form of cancer in which an estimated 86% of diagnoses resulted in death in the United States in 2010. The high mortality rate is due, in part, to the asymptomatic development of the disease and the dearth of sensitive diagnostics available for early detection. One promising route lies in the development of a serum biomarker panel that can generate a signature unique to early stage PA. We describe the design and development of a proof-of-concept PA biomarker immunoassay array coupled with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) as a sensitive readout method.