WorldWideScience

Sample records for anti-proliferative substance taurolidine

  1. Microbiocidal effects of various taurolidine containing catheter lock solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olthof, E.D.; Nijland, R van; Gulich, A.F.; Wanten, G.J.A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: We have recently shown that a catheter lock solution containing taurolidine dramatically decreases catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) in patients on home parenteral nutrition (HPN) when compared to heparin. Since several taurolidine formulations are commercially avail

  2. Anti-proliferative effect of Ficus pumila Linn. on human leukemic cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Larbie

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: These findings suggest that crude extracts of FPS and FPL have anti-proliferative effect on the leukemia cells. The antioxidant properties of the plant including phenolics may be partly responsible for the anti-proliferative activity. Further studies are required to isolate chemical components of the plant and establish their anti-proliferative activities and mechanism of action. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2015; 4(2.000: 330-336

  3. The evolving role of taurolidine in cancer therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Neary, Peter M

    2010-04-01

    BACKGROUND AND DESIGN: Taurolidine consists of two taurinamide rings derived from the naturally occurring amino acid taurine. It has been utilized to prevent adhesions, as an antimicrobial, and as an anti-inflammatory agent. More recently, it has been found to exert antineoplastic activity. We reviewed the literature regarding taurolidine and its role in cancer treatment. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Taurolidine induces cancer cell death through a variety of mechanisms. Even now, all the antineoplastic pathways it employs are not completely elucidated. It has been shown to enhance apoptosis, inhibit angiogenesis, reduce tumor adherence, downregulate proinflammatory cytokine release, and stimulate anticancer immune regulation following surgical trauma. Apoptosis is activated through both a mitochondrial cytochrome-c-dependent mechanism and an extrinsic direct pathway. A lot of in vitro and animal data support taurolidine\\'s tumoricidal action. Taurolidine has been used as an antimicrobial agent in the clinical setting since the 1970s and thus far appears nontoxic. The nontoxic nature of taurolidine makes it a favorable option compared with current chemotherapeutic regimens. Few published clinical studies exist evaluating the role of taurolidine as a chemotherapeutic agent. The literature lacks a gold-standard level 1 randomized clinical trial to evaluate taurolidine\\'s potential antineoplastic benefits. However, these trials are currently underway. Such randomized control studies are vital to clarify the role of taurolidine in modern cancer treatment.

  4. Polyphenols with Anti-Proliferative Activities from Penthorum Chinense Pursh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doudou Huang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Two new polyphenols, penthorumin C (1 and 2,6-dihydroxyacetophenone-4-O- [4ꞌ,6ꞌ-(S-hexahydroxydiphenoyl]-β-D-glucose (2, along with four known polyphenolic acids, pinocembrin-7-O-[4ꞌꞌ,6ꞌꞌ-hexahydroxydiphenoyl]-β-D-glucose(3, pinocembrin-7-O-[3ꞌꞌ-O- galloyl- 4ꞌꞌ,6ꞌꞌ-hexahydroxydiphenoyl]-β-D-glucose (4, thonningianin A (5, and thonningianin B (6 were isolated from Penthourm chinense. All compounds were evaluated for their anti-proliferative activity in HSC-T6 cells, and 2 and 5 showed significant activity, with IC50 values of 12.7 and 19.2 μM, respectively.

  5. Anti proliferative activity of hydnophytum formicarium (sanola) extracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The whole plant of Hydnophytum formicarium Jack (Rubiaceae) locally known as sarang semut, was first extracted successively by petroleum-ether, followed by methanol (MeOH), chloroform, n-buthanol and distilled water and were tested for anti proliferative activity using a panel of human cancer cell lines. MeOH, n-buthanol and aqueous extracts showed anti proliferative effect towards KB-IV (EC50 methanol extract: 17.58 μg/ml; EC50 n-buthanol extract: 9.12 μg/ml and EC50 aqueous extract: 8.71 μg/ml) and only methanol extract showed positive activity towards Caov-3 (EC50: 14.79 μg/ml). No activity was observed in case of other extracts (i.e. petroleum ether and chloroform with EC50 >99 μg/ml). The methanolic extract was tested for its mechanism of action via apoptosis on Caov-3 by employing the TUNEL assay. In the present study, augmented levels of apoptosis were observed in Caov-3 cells treated with 15 μg/ml with apoptotic index of 43.3% and 78.8% in higher concentration (20 μg/ml), a significant different compared with control, which had apoptotic index of 2% only. In conclusion, there is a high possibility that the bioactive component in the methanol extract had selective anti proliferation effects on Caov-3 through apoptotic pathway. This finding may provide a new strategy and a promising approach to the discovery an effective anticancer drug. (Author)

  6. Anti-proliferative activity of Monensin and its tertiary amide derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huczyński, Adam; Klejborowska, Greta; Antoszczak, Michał; Maj, Ewa; Wietrzyk, Joanna

    2015-10-15

    New tertiary amide derivatives of polyether ionophore Monensin A (MON) were synthesised and their anti-proliferative activity against cancer cell lines was studied. Very high activity (IC50=0.09 μM) and selectivity (SI=232) of MON against human biphenotypic myelomonocytic leukemia cell line (MV4-11) was demonstrated. The MON derivatives obtained exhibit interesting anti-proliferative activity, high selectivity index and also are able to break the drug-resistance of cancer cell line.

  7. Evaluation of the anti-proliferative and cytostatic effect of Citrus sinensis (orange) fruit juice

    OpenAIRE

    Chinedu, Enegide; Arome, David; Ameh, Solomon F; Ameh, Gift E

    2014-01-01

    Aim: This work has been designed to evaluate the anti-proliferative and cytostatic effects of Citrus sinensis (orange) fruit juice on rapidly proliferating cells. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out on the seeds of Sorghum bicolor for 72 h. The mean radicle length (mm) of the seeds was taken at 48 and 72 h. Result: The result showed that when compared with the control, methotrexate, the standard drug showed a significant (P < 0.001) anti-proliferative effect throughout the experi...

  8. Tristetraprolin mediates the anti-proliferative effects of metformin in breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pandiri, Indira; Chen, Yingqing; Joe, Yeonsoo; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Park, Jeongmin; Chung, Hun Taeg; Park, Jeong Woo

    2016-01-01

    Metformin, which is a drug commonly prescribed to treat type 2 diabetes, has anti-proliferative effects in cancer cells; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect remain largely unknown. The aim is to investigate the role of tristetraprolin (TTP), an AU-rich element-binding protein, in anti-proliferative effects of metformin in cancer cells. p53 wild-type and p53 mutant breast cancer cells were treated with metformin, and expression of TTP and c-Myc was analyzed by semi-quantit...

  9. The nontoxic natural compound Curcumin exerts anti-proliferative, anti-migratory, and anti-invasive properties against malignant gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New drugs are constantly sought after to improve the survival of patients with malignant gliomas. The ideal substance would selectively target tumor cells without eliciting toxic side effects. Here, we report on the anti-proliferative, anti-migratory, and anti-invasive properties of the natural, nontoxic compound Curcumin observed in five human glioblastoma (GBM) cell lines in vitro. We used monolayer wound healing assays, modified Boyden chamber trans-well assays, and cell growth assays to quantify cell migration, invasion, and proliferation in the absence or presence of Curcumin at various concentrations. Levels of the transcription factor phospho-STAT3, a potential target of Curcumin, were determined by sandwich-ELISA. Subsequent effects on transcription of genes regulating the cell cycle were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. Effects on apoptosis were determined by caspase assays. Curcumin potently inhibited GBM cell proliferation as well as migration and invasion in all cell lines contingent on dose. Simultaneously, levels of the biologically active phospho-STAT3 were decreased and correlated with reduced transcription of the cell cycle regulating gene c-Myc and proliferation marking Ki-67, pointing to a potential mechanism by which Curcumin slows tumor growth. Curcumin is part of the diet of millions of people every day and is without known toxic side effects. Our data show that Curcumin bears anti-proliferative, anti-migratory, and anti-invasive properties against GBM cells in vitro. These results warrant further in vivo analyses and indicate a potential role of Curcumin in the treatment of malignant gliomas

  10. Taurolidine: cytotoxic and mechanistic evaluation of a novel antineoplastic agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabresi, P; Goulette, F A; Darnowski, J W

    2001-09-15

    Bis-(1,1-dioxoperhydro-1,2,4-thiadiazinyl-4)methane (taurolidine) is a synthetic broad-spectrum antibiotic that reacts with bacterial cell membrane components to prevent adhesion to epithelial cell surfaces. Reflecting the key role of adhesion in the growth and development of human solid tumors, studies were initiated to assess the antiproliferative activity of this agent in selected human and murine tumor cell lines. A 3-day exposure to Taurolidine inhibited the growth of all of the cell lines evaluated with IC(50)s ranging from 9.6-34.2 microM. Studies to identify the mechanism responsible for this effect were conducted in NIH-3T3 murine fibroblasts and the PA-1 and SKOV-3 human ovarian tumor cells. These studies revealed that a 48-h exposure to taurolidine had little effect on cell cycle distribution in PA-1 and SKOV-3 cells but significantly increased the appearance of DNA debris in the sub-G(0)/G(1) region, an effect consistent with an induction of apoptosis. In contrast, in NIH-3T3 cells, taurolidine exposure did not increase DNA debris in the sub-G(0)/G(1) region. Additional studies assessed phosphotidylserine externalization after a 24-h exposure to taurolidine using annexin-V binding as a cell surface marker. These studies revealed that taurolidine increased the percentage of annexin-V-positive cells by 4-fold and 3-fold in PA-1 and SKOV-3 cells, respectively. In NIH-3T3 cells, taurolidine exposure slightly increased ( approximately 5%) annexin-V binding. Parallel studies revealed that exposure to taurolidine also resulted in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage in both ovarian tumor cell lines but not in NIH-3T3 cells. Finally, murine-based studies were conducted to assess the antineoplastic activity of three consecutive daily i.p. bolus injections of taurolidine at doses ranging from 5-mg injection/mouse to 30-mg injection/mouse. The 20-mg injection dose produced approximately 10% mortality and was identified as the maximally tolerated dose in this model

  11. Synthesis and anti-proliferative activity of fluoro-substituted chalcones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmaoglu, Serdar; Algul, Oztekin; Anıl, Derya Aktas; Gobek, Arzu; Duran, Gulay Gulbol; Ersan, Ronak Haj; Duran, Nizami

    2016-07-01

    A series of novel fluoro-substituted chalcone derivatives have been synthesized. All synthesized compounds were characterized by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), (13)C NMR, and elemental analysis. Their anti-proliferative activities were evaluated against five cancer cells lines, namely, A549, A498, HeLa, A375, and HepG2 using the MTT method. Most of the compounds showed moderate to high activity with IC50 values in the range of 0.029-0.729μM. Of all the synthesized compounds, 10 and 19 exhibited the most potent anti-proliferative activities against cancer cells, and 10 was identified as the most promising compound. PMID:27217001

  12. Metformin Enhances Anti-proliferative Effect of Cisplatin in Cervical Cancer Cell Line

    OpenAIRE

    Ratih D. Yudhani; Riza N. Pesik; Dono Indarto

    2016-01-01

    Cervival cancer is one of the top rank of gynecological malignancy in the world, leading to high morbidity and mortality rates. Cisplatin is a chemotherapeutic agent that is generally used to treat cervical cancer but the use of this drug is limited because of serious side effects. Metformin, a diabetic drug, decreases not only blood glucose levels but also cell viability of some cancer cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-proliferative effect of combination metformin and ...

  13. Quinazolinones-Phenylquinoxaline hybrids with unsaturation/saturation linkers as novel anti-proliferative agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palem, Jyothsna Devi; Alugubelli, Gopi Reddy; Bantu, Rajashaker; Nagarapu, Lingaiah; Polepalli, Sowjanya; Jain, S Nishanth; Bathini, Raju; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2016-07-01

    A new series of novel quinazolinones with allylphenyl quinoxaline hybrids 9a-n were efficiently synthesized in good yields by the reaction of 3-allyl-2-methylquinazolin-4(3H)-one (5a-n) with bromophenyl)quinoxaline (8) utilizing Pd catalyzed Heck-cross coupling and evaluated for anti-proliferative activity against four cancer cell lines such as HeLa (cervical), MIAPACA (pancreatic), MDA-MB-231 (breast) and IMR32 (neuroblastoma). Compounds 9a, 9e, 9g and 9h exhibited promising anti-proliferative activity with GI50 values ranging from 0.06 to 0.2μM against four cell lines, while compounds 9e and 9k showed significant activity against HeLa and MIAPACA cell lines and compounds 9b, 9d, 9h and 9j showed selective potency against IMR32 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines. This is the first report on the synthesis and in vitro anti-proliferative evaluation of E-2-(4-substituted)-3-(3-(4-(quinoxalin-2-yl)phenyl)allyl)quinazolin-4(3H)-ones (9a-n). Docking results indicate a sign of good correlation between experimental activity and calculated binding affinity (dock score), suggesting that these compounds could act as promising DNA intercalates. PMID:27209232

  14. Comparative antitumor and anti-proliferative activities ofHippophae rhamnoidesL. leaves extracts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Javid Ali; Bashir Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the antitumor and anti-proliferative activities of methanol, aqueous, acetone, ethyl acetate, ethanol, chloroform andn-hexane extracts ofHippophae rhamnoides leaves. Methods: Antitumor activities were evaluated by using the antitumor potato disc assay by using inoculums (Agrobacterium tumefaciens) with three different concentrations of test samples (10, 100 and 1 000 mg/L). Anti-proliferative activity was evaluated by the given method of methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay. The concentrations of the extract ranging from 0.039 to 10 mg/mL were tested against HeLa cells. Results: Highest tumors inhibition activity (60.9% and 55.8%) was shown by methanol and ethanol extracts, with EC50 values of 424.41 and 434.61 mg/L respectively. At 10 mg/mL, The highest cell inhibition 75.61% was observed in methanol extract and the lowest 36.59% were calculated inn-hexane extract. The difference in tumor and cell inhibition (%) may be due to the different concentration of active compounds responsible for antitumor and anti-proliferative activities. All extracts have considerable level of tumor and cell inhibitiory effect in a dose dependent manner. Conclusions:Our finding showed thatHippophae rhamnoidesleaves are a potent natural source of antitumor and antiproliferative agent.

  15. Tristetraprolin mediates the anti-proliferative effects of metformin in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandiri, Indira; Chen, Yingqing; Joe, Yeonsoo; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Park, Jeongmin; Chung, Hun Taeg; Park, Jeong Woo

    2016-02-01

    Metformin, which is a drug commonly prescribed to treat type 2 diabetes, has anti-proliferative effects in cancer cells; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect remain largely unknown. The aim is to investigate the role of tristetraprolin (TTP), an AU-rich element-binding protein, in anti-proliferative effects of metformin in cancer cells. p53 wild-type and p53 mutant breast cancer cells were treated with metformin, and expression of TTP and c-Myc was analyzed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR, Western blots, and promoter activity assay. Breast cancer cells were transfected with siRNA against TTP to inhibit TTP expression or c-Myc and, after metformin treatment, analyzed for cell proliferation by MTS assay. Metformin induces the expression of tristetraprolin (TTP) in breast cancer cells in a p53-independent manner. Importantly, inhibition of TTP abrogated the anti-proliferation effect of metformin. We observed that metformin decreased c-Myc levels, and ectopic expression of c-Myc blocked the effect of metformin on TTP expression and cell proliferation. Our data indicate that metformin induces TTP expression by reducing the expression of c-Myc, suggesting a new model whereby TTP acts as a mediator of metformin's anti-proliferative activity in cancer cells. PMID:26956973

  16. Quinazolinones-Phenylquinoxaline hybrids with unsaturation/saturation linkers as novel anti-proliferative agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palem, Jyothsna Devi; Alugubelli, Gopi Reddy; Bantu, Rajashaker; Nagarapu, Lingaiah; Polepalli, Sowjanya; Jain, S Nishanth; Bathini, Raju; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2016-07-01

    A new series of novel quinazolinones with allylphenyl quinoxaline hybrids 9a-n were efficiently synthesized in good yields by the reaction of 3-allyl-2-methylquinazolin-4(3H)-one (5a-n) with bromophenyl)quinoxaline (8) utilizing Pd catalyzed Heck-cross coupling and evaluated for anti-proliferative activity against four cancer cell lines such as HeLa (cervical), MIAPACA (pancreatic), MDA-MB-231 (breast) and IMR32 (neuroblastoma). Compounds 9a, 9e, 9g and 9h exhibited promising anti-proliferative activity with GI50 values ranging from 0.06 to 0.2μM against four cell lines, while compounds 9e and 9k showed significant activity against HeLa and MIAPACA cell lines and compounds 9b, 9d, 9h and 9j showed selective potency against IMR32 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines. This is the first report on the synthesis and in vitro anti-proliferative evaluation of E-2-(4-substituted)-3-(3-(4-(quinoxalin-2-yl)phenyl)allyl)quinazolin-4(3H)-ones (9a-n). Docking results indicate a sign of good correlation between experimental activity and calculated binding affinity (dock score), suggesting that these compounds could act as promising DNA intercalates.

  17. Comparative antitumor and anti-proliferative activities of Hippophae rhamnoides L. leaves extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javid Ali

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the antitumor and anti-proliferative activities of methanol, aqueous, acetone, ethyl acetate, ethanol, chloroform and n-hexane extracts of Hippophae rhamnoides leaves. Methods: Antitumor activities were evaluated by using the antitumor potato disc assay by using inoculums (Agrobacterium tumefaciens with three different concentrations of test samples (10, 100 and 1 000 mg/L. Anti-proliferative activity was evaluated by the given method of methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay. The concentrations of the extract ranging from 0.039 to 10 mg/mL were tested against HeLa cells. Results: Highest tumors inhibition activity (60.9% and 55.8% was shown by methanol and ethanol extracts, with EC50 values of 424.41 and 434.61 mg/L respectively. At 10 mg/mL, The highest cell inhibition 75.61% was observed in methanol extract and the lowest 36.59% were calculated in n-hexane extract. The difference in tumor and cell inhibition (% may be due to the different concentration of active compounds responsible for antitumor and anti-proliferative activities. All extracts have considerable level of tumor and cell inhibitiory effect in a dose dependent manner. Conclusions: Our finding showed that Hippophae rhamnoides leaves are a potent natural source of antitumor and antiproliferative agent.

  18. In vitro anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic activities of thalidomide dithiocarbamate analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Aarag, Bishoy Y A; Kasai, Tomonari; Zahran, Magdy A H; Zakhary, Nadia I; Shigehiro, Tsukasa; Sekhar, Sreeja C; Agwa, Hussein S; Mizutani, Akifumi; Murakami, Hiroshi; Kakuta, Hiroki; Seno, Masaharu

    2014-08-01

    Inhibition of angiogenesis is currently perceived as a promising strategy in the treatment of cancer. The anti-angiogenicity of thalidomide has inspired a second wave of research on this teratogenic drug. The present study aimed to investigate the anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic activities of two thalidomide dithiocarbamate analogs by studying their anti-proliferative effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines. Their action on the expression levels of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, VEGF165, and MMP-2 was also assessed. Furthermore, their effect on angiogenesis was evaluated through wound healing, migration, tube formation, and nitric oxide (NO) assays. Results illustrated that the proliferation of HUVECs and MDA-MB-231 cells was not significantly affected by thalidomide at 6.25-100μM. Thalidomide failed to block angiogenesis at similar concentrations. By contrast, thalidomide dithiocarbamate analogs exhibited significant anti-proliferative action on HUVECs and MDA-MB-231 cells without causing cytotoxicity and also showed powerful anti-angiogenicity in wound healing, migration, tube formation, and NO assays. Thalidomide analogs 1 and 2 demonstrated more potent activity to suppress expression levels of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, VEGF165, and MMP-2 than thalidomide. Analog 1 consistently, showed the highest potency and efficacy in all the assays. Taken together, our results support further development and evaluation of novel thalidomide analogs as anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic agents.

  19. Absence of microbial adaptation to taurolidine in patients on home parenteral nutrition who develop catheter related bloodstream infections and use taurolidine locks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olthof, E.D.; Rentenaar, R.J.; Rijs, A.J.M.M.; Wanten, G.J.A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Some home parenteral nutrition (HPN) patients develop catheter related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) despite using an anti-microbial catheter lock solution taurolidine. The aim of this study was to assess whether long-term use of taurolidine leads to selective growth of microorga

  20. Evidence of Anti-Proliferative Activities in Blue Mussel (Mytilus edulis By-Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Elise Carbonneau

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Shellfish waste components contain significant levels of high quality protein and are therefore a potential source for biofunctional high-value peptides. The feasibility of applying a pilot scale enzymatic hydrolysis process to whole Mytilus edulis and, by fractionation, recover hydrolysates presenting a biological activity of interest, was evaluated. Fractions were tested on four immortalized cancerous cell lines: A549, BT549, HCT15 and PC3. The 50 kDa fraction, enriched in peptides, presented anti-proliferative activity with all cell lines and results suggest a bioactive molecule synergy within the fraction. At a protein concentration of 44 µg/mL, the 50 kDa fraction induced a mortality of 90% for PC3, 89% for A549, 85% for HCT15 and of 81% for BT549 cell lines. At the low protein concentration of only 11 µg/mL the 50 kDa fraction still entails a cell mortality of 76% for A549 and 87% for PC3 cell lines. The 50 kDa fraction contains 56% of proteins, 3% of lipids and 6% of minerals on a dry weight basis and the lowest levels detected of taurine and methionine and highest levels of threonine, proline and glycine amino acids. The enzymatic hydrolysis process suggests that Mytilus edulis by-products should be viewed as high-valued products with strong potential as anti-proliferative agent and promising active ingredients in functional foods.

  1. Arctigenin in combination with quercetin synergistically enhances the anti-proliferative effect in prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Piwen; Phan, Tien; Gordon, David; Chung, Seyung; Henning, Susanne M.; Vadgama, Jaydutt V.

    2014-01-01

    Scope We investigated whether a combination of two promising chemopreventive agents arctigenin and quercetin increases the anti-carcinogenic potency at lower concentrations than necessary when used individually in prostate cancer. Methods and results Androgen-dependent LAPC-4 and LNCaP prostate cancer cells were treated with low doses of arctigenin and quercetin alone or in combination for 48h. The anti-proliferative activity of arctigenin was 10-20 fold stronger than quercetin in both cell lines. Their combination synergistically enhanced the anti-proliferative effect, with a stronger effect in androgen receptor (AR) wild-type LAPC-4 cells than in AR mutated LNCaP cells. Arctigenin demonstrated a strong ability to inhibit AR protein expression in LAPC-4 cells. The combination treatment significantly inhibited both AR and PI3K/Akt pathways compared to control. A protein array analysis revealed that the mixture targets multiple pathways particularly in LAPC-4 cells including Stat3 pathway. The mixture significantly inhibited the expression of several oncogenic microRNAs including miR-21, miR-19b, and miR-148a compared to control. The mixture also enhanced the inhibition of cell migration in both cell lines compared to individual compounds tested. Conclusion The combination of arctigenin and quercetin, that target similar pathways, at low physiological doses, provides a novel regimen with enhanced chemoprevention in prostate cancer. PMID:25380086

  2. [Synthesis and anti-proliferative activity of fluoroquinolone (rhodanine unsaturated ketone) amide derivatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liu-zhou; Xie, Yu-suo; Yan, Qiang; Wu, Shu-min; Ni, Li-li; Zhao, Hui; Huang, Wen-long; Hu, Guo-qiang

    2015-08-01

    To discover novel antitumor rhodanine unsaturated ketones, a series of fluoroquinolone (rhodanine α, β-unsaturated ketone) amine derivatives (5a-5r) were designed and synthesized with fluoroquinolone amide scaffold as a carrier. The structures of eighteen title compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, 1H NMR and MS. The in vitro anti-proliferative activity against Hep-3B, Capan-1 and HL60 cells was evaluated by MTT assay. The results showed that the title compounds not only had more significant anti-proliferative activity against three tested cancer cell lines than that of the parent ciprofloxacin 1, but also exhibited the highest activity against Capan-1 cells. The SAR revealed that some compounds carrying aromatic heterocyclic rings or phenyl attached to an electron-withdrawing carboxyl or sulfonamide substituent were comparable to or better than comparison doxorubicin against Capan-1 cells. As such, it suggests that fluoroquinolone (rhodanine α, β-unsaturated ketone) amines are promising leads for the development of novel antitumor fluoroquinolones or rhodanine analogues. PMID:26669001

  3. Synthesis and anti-proliferative activity of novel azazerumbone conjugates with chalcones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Vuong Van; Nam, Tran Duy; Hung, Truong Ngoc; Nga, Nguyen Thi; Quan, Pham Minh; Chinh, Luu Van; Jung, Sang-Hun

    2015-11-15

    The conjugation of azazerumbone ((3E,7E,11E)-5,5,8,12-tetramethylazacyclododeca-3,7,11-trien-2-one (7)) and 2,4-dihydroxychalcones was carried out for the preparation of novel target compounds 9a-g with 1-ethylene-4-methylene-1,2,3-triazole linker and 10a-f with propylene linker between amide nitrogen of azazerumbone and 4-hydroxy group of chalcone. The anti-proliferative activity of these compounds against the LU-1, Hep-G2, MCF-7 and SW480 human cancer cell lines were significantly improved compared to those of azazerumbone or zerumbone. The anti-proliferative activities of (3E,7E,11E)-1-((1-(2-(3-hydroxy-4-((E)-3-(3-methoxyphenyl)acryloyl)phenoxy)ethyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl)methyl)-5,5,8,12-tetramethyl azacyclododeca-3,7,11-trien-2-one (9b) and (3E,7E,11E)-1-(3-(4-((E)-3-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)acryloyl)phenoxy)propyl)-5,5,8,12-tetramethylazacyclododeca-3,7,11-trien-2-one (10d) are nearly comparable to those of ellipticine. PMID:26459207

  4. Anti-proliferative activity of Fumaria vaillantii extracts on different cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Haji Abbas Tabrizi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant-derived natural products are known to have cancer chemo-preventive and chemo-therapeutic properties. Plant extracts or their active constituents are used as folk medicine in traditional therapies by 80% of the world population. The aim of the present study was to determine the anti-proliferative potential of Fumaria vaillantii extracts on three different cancer cell lines including malignant melanoma SKMEL-3, human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 and human myelogenous leukemia K562 as well as human gingival fibroblast (HGF as normal cell line. Anti-proliferative activity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT, flowcytometry and annexin methods. Total phenolics and flavonoids were determined by Folin-Ciocalteu and aluminum chloride methods. Chloroform fraction had the lowest IC 50 value at 72 h (0.1 μg/ml in MCF-7 cells. Flowcytometry and annexin-V analysis indicated that the chloroform fraction induced necrosis in MCF-7 cells. In addition, the colorimetric methods showed that the methanolic fraction possessed the highest amount of total phenolics (33.03 ± 0.75 mg/g of dry powder and flavonoids (10.5 ± 2.0 mg/g of dry powder.The collective data demonstrated that F. vaillantii chloroform fraction may contain effective compounds with chemo-therapeutic potential act through an apoptotic independent pathway.

  5. New ursane triterpenoids from Salvia urmiensis Bunge: Absolute configuration and anti-proliferative activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farimani, Mahdi Moridi; Bahadori, Mir Babak; Koulaei, Sheyda Ahmadi; Salehi, Peyman; Ebrahimi, Samad Nejad; Khavasi, Hamid Reza; Hamburger, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    Two new triterpenoids, urmiensolide B (1) and urmiensic acid (2), with rare carbon skeletons together with three known compounds were isolated from the aerial parts of Salvia urmiensis Bunge, an endemic species of Iran. The structures were established by a combination of 1D and 2D NMR, and HRESIMS, and in the case of 2 and 3, their structures were confirmed by single-crystal X-ray analysis. The absolute configuration of 2 was established by electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectra. The new compounds were evaluated for their anti-proliferative activities against A549 and MCF-7 human cancer cell lines. Compounds 1 and 2 showed IC50 values of 2.8 and 1.6 μM against MCF-7 cells, respectively. PMID:26254275

  6. Buformin exhibits anti-proliferative and anti-invasive effects in endometrial cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgore, Joshua; Jackson, Amanda L; Clark, Leslie H; Guo, Hui; Zhang, Lu; Jones, Hannah M; Gilliam, Timothy P; Gehrig, Paola A; Zhou, Chunxiao; Bae-Jump, Victoria L

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Biguanides are anti-diabetic drugs that are thought to have anti-tumorigenic effects. Most pre-clinical studies have focused on metformin for cancer treatment and prevention; however, buformin may be potentially more potent than metformin. Given this, our goal was to evaluate the effects of buformin on cell growth, adhesion and invasion in endometrial cancer cell lines. Methods: The ECC-1 and Ishikawa endometrial cancer cell lines were used. Cell proliferation was assessed by MTT assay. Apoptosis and cell cycle analysis was performed by FITC Annexin V assay and propidium iodide staining, respectively. Adhesion was analyzed using the laminin adhesion assay. Invasion was assessed using the transwell invasion assay. The effects of buformin on the AMPK/mTOR pathway were determined by Western immunoblotting. Results: Buformin and metformin inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner in both endometrial cancer cell lines. IC50s were 1.4-1.6 mM for metformin and 8-150 μM for buformin. Buformin induced cell cycle G1 phase arrest in the ECC-1 cells and G2 phase arrest in the Ishikawa cells. For both ECC-1 and Ishikawa cells, treatment with buformin resulted in induction of apoptosis, reduction in adhesion and invasion, activation of AMPK and inhibition of phosphorylated-S6. Buformin potentiated the anti-proliferative effects of paclitaxel in both cell lines. Conclusion: Buformin has significant anti-proliferative and anti-metastatic effects in endometrial cancer cells through modulation of the AMPK/mTOR pathway. IC50 values were lower for buformin than metformin, suggesting that buformin may be more potent for endometrial cancer treatment and worthy of further investigation. PMID:27398153

  7. Effects of taurolidine on radiosensitivity of murine melanoma cells and its mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To observe the effects of taurolidine on radiosensitivity of B16-F10 cells of murine melanoma via the enhancement of Bax and Bad proteins and induction of Bcl-2 protein. Methods: The apoptosis of B16-F10 cells was assessed after treated with 0, 10, 25, 50, 100 and 150 μmol·L-1 taurolidine, clone survival assay was used to detect the radiosensitivity of B16-F10 cells, and protein expressions were determined by Western blotting. Results: The apoptosis of 5% cells was induced in a dose-and time-dependent manner after B16-F10 cells were treated with 50 μmol·L-1 taurolidine. The survival rate decreased after treated with tautolidine in combination with 2 Gy X-irradiation with the increase of taurolidine concentration and doses of irradiation (P0 and SER Dq) also increased with the increase of its concentration, there was significant difference between 50 μmol·L-1 taurolidine group and 10 μmol·L-1 taurolidine group (P<0.05); meantime, the level of proapototic protein Bax and Bad increased and the level of antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 reduced. Conclusion: Taurolidine in combination with irradiation can enhance the radiosensitivity by the mediation of Bcl-2 family protein. (authors)

  8. Anti-Proliferative Effect of Rosmarinus officinalis L. Extract on Human Melanoma A375 Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Cattaneo

    Full Text Available Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L. has been used since ancient times in traditional medicine, while nowadays various rosemary formulations are increasingly exploited by alternative medicine to cure or prevent a wide range of health disorders. Rosemary's bioproperties have prompted scientific investigation, which allowed us to ascertain antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, cytostatic, and cytotoxic activities of crude extracts or of pure components. Although there is a growing body of experimental work, information about rosemary's anticancer properties, such as chemoprotective or anti-proliferative effects on cancer cells, is very poor, especially concerning the mechanism of action. Melanoma is a skin tumor whose diffusion is rapidly increasing in the world and whose malignancy is reinforced by its high resistance to cytotoxic agents; hence the availability of new cytotoxic drugs would be very helpful to improve melanoma prognosis. Here we report on the effect of a rosemary hydroalcoholic extract on the viability of the human melanoma A375 cell line. Main components of rosemary extract were identified by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS and the effect of the crude extract or of pure components on the proliferation of cancer cells was tested by MTT and Trypan blue assays. The effect on cell cycle was investigated by using flow cytometry, and the alteration of the cellular redox state was evaluated by intracellular ROS levels and protein carbonylation analysis. Furthermore, in order to get information about the molecular mechanisms of cytotoxicity, a comparative proteomic investigation was performed.

  9. Anti-Proliferative Effect of Rosmarinus officinalis L. Extract on Human Melanoma A375 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Lucia; Cicconi, Rosella; Mignogna, Giuseppina; Giorgi, Alessandra; Mattei, Maurizio; Graziani, Giulia; Ferracane, Rosalia; Grosso, Alessandro; Aducci, Patrizia; Schininà, M Eugenia; Marra, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) has been used since ancient times in traditional medicine, while nowadays various rosemary formulations are increasingly exploited by alternative medicine to cure or prevent a wide range of health disorders. Rosemary's bioproperties have prompted scientific investigation, which allowed us to ascertain antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, cytostatic, and cytotoxic activities of crude extracts or of pure components. Although there is a growing body of experimental work, information about rosemary's anticancer properties, such as chemoprotective or anti-proliferative effects on cancer cells, is very poor, especially concerning the mechanism of action. Melanoma is a skin tumor whose diffusion is rapidly increasing in the world and whose malignancy is reinforced by its high resistance to cytotoxic agents; hence the availability of new cytotoxic drugs would be very helpful to improve melanoma prognosis. Here we report on the effect of a rosemary hydroalcoholic extract on the viability of the human melanoma A375 cell line. Main components of rosemary extract were identified by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS) and the effect of the crude extract or of pure components on the proliferation of cancer cells was tested by MTT and Trypan blue assays. The effect on cell cycle was investigated by using flow cytometry, and the alteration of the cellular redox state was evaluated by intracellular ROS levels and protein carbonylation analysis. Furthermore, in order to get information about the molecular mechanisms of cytotoxicity, a comparative proteomic investigation was performed. PMID:26176704

  10. Anti-proliferative effects of Bifidobacterium adolescentis SPM0212 extract on human colon cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are beneficial probiotic organisms that contribute to improved nutrition, microbial balance, and immuno-enhancement of the intestinal tract, as well as anti-tumor activity. The aim of the present work was to study the growth inhibition of tumor cells by butanol extract of Bifidobacterium adolescentis isolated from healthy young Koreans. The anti-proliferative activity of B. adolescentis isolates was assessed by XTT assays on three human colon cancer cell lines (Caco-2, HT-29, and SW480). The effects of B. adolescentis SPM0212 butanol extract on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and nitric oxide (NO) production were tested using the murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cell line. The butanol extract of B. adolescentis SPM0212 dose-dependently inhibited the growth of Caco-2, HT-29, and SW480 cells by 70%, 30%, and 40%, respectively, at 200 μg/mL. Additionally, the butanol extract of B. adolescentis SPM0212 induced macrophage activation and significantly increased the production of TNF-α and NO, which regulate immune modulation and are cytotoxic to tumor cells. The butanol extract of B. adolescentis SPM0212 increased activity of the host immune system and may improve human health by helping to prevent colon cancer as a biological response modifier

  11. Two new diterpene derivatives from Euphorbia lunulata Bge and their anti-proliferative activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Liao, Zhi-xin; Liu, Shi-jun; Qu, Yan-bo; Wang, Heng-shan

    2014-07-01

    A new ent-abietane-type diterpene lactone (1) and a new jatrophane-type diterpenoid (2), together with twelve known compounds including three diterpenes (3-5), five triterpenes (6-10) and four sterides (11-14) were isolated from the ethanol extract of the whole plant of Euphorbia lunulata Bge. The structure of compounds 1 and 2 was elucidated on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR spectra and the HR-ESI-MS data. The structure of compound 2 was further analyzed by an X-ray crystallographic study. The in vitro anti-proliferative activities against MCF-7 and NCI-H460 cell lines for compounds 1-5 (diterpene) were evaluated. The results showed marked activity for compound 1 against the two cell lines with the IC50 values 19.5 (NCI-H460) and 18.6 (MCF-7) μM, while for cis-platinum (a positive cytotoxic control agent) 29.7 (NCI-H460) and 27.7 (MCF-7) μM. Compounds 2-5 exhibited moderate cytotoxic activities for the two cell lines with the IC50 values ranging from 32.1 to 58.2 μM.

  12. Biocatalytically Oligomerized Epicatechin with Potent and Specific Anti-proliferative Activity for Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramaswamy Nagarajan

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Catechins, naturally occurring flavonoids derived from wine and green tea, are known to exhibit multiple health benefits. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG is one of the most widely investigated catechins, but its efficacy in cancer therapy is still inconsistent and limited. The poor stability of EGCG has contributed to the disparity in the reported anti-cancer activity and other beneficial properties. Here we report an innovative enzymatic strategy for the oligomerization of catechins (specifically epicatechin that yields stable, water-soluble oligomerized epicatechins with enhanced and highly specific anti-proliferative activity for human breast cancer cells. This one-pot oxidative oligomerization is carried out in ambient conditions using Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP as a catalyst yielding water-soluble oligo(epicatechins. The oligomerized epicatechins obtained exhibit excellent growth inhibitory effects against human breast cancer cells with greater specificity towards growth-inhibiting cancer cells as opposed to normal cells, achieving a high therapeutic differential. Our studies indicate that water-soluble oligomeric epicatechins surpass EGCG in stability, selectivity and efficacy at lower doses.

  13. Evaluation of the Anti-proliferative Effects of Ophiocoma erinaceus Methanol Extract Against Human Cervical Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Baharara, Javad; Amini, Elaheh; Namvar, Farideh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Marine organisms provide appreciable source of novel bioactive compounds with pharmacological potential. There is little information in correlation with anti-cancer activities of brittle star. In the present study, anti-neoplastic efficacy of Ophiocoma erinaceus methanol extract against human cervical cancer cells was investigated. Methods: The HeLa cells were cultured and exposed to brittle star methanol extract for 24 and 48 hr. The anti-proliferative properties were examined by...

  14. One-Pot Ugi/Aza-Michael Synthesis of Highly Substituted 2,5-Diketopiperazines with Anti-Proliferative Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Ulrike Holzgrabe; Gessner, Viktoria H.; Florian Seufert; Carsten Berges; Andreas Hartung

    2012-01-01

    The well-known Ugi reaction of aldehydes with amines, carboxylic acids and isocyanides leads to the formation of acyclic α-acylaminocarboxamides. Replacement of the carboxylic acid derivatives with β-acyl substituted acrylic acids gives access to highly substituted 2,5-diketopiperazines in one single reaction-step without additives or complex reaction procedures. The obtained diketopiperazines show anti-proliferative effects on activated T cells and represent therefore poten...

  15. Insulin-sensitizing and Anti-proliferative Effects of Argania spinosa Seed Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Samane

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Argania spinosa is an evergreen tree endemic of southwestern Morocco. Many preparations have been used in traditional Moroccan medicine for centuries to treat several illnesses including diabetes. However, scientific evidence supporting these actions is lacking. Therefore, we prepared various extracts of the argan fruit, namely keel, cake and argan oil extracts, which we tested in the HTC hepatoma cell line for their potential to affect cellular insulin responses. Cell viability was measured by Trypan Blue exclusion and the response to insulin evaluated by the activation of the extracellular regulated kinase (ERK1/2, ERK kinase (MEK1/2 and protein kinase B (PKB/Akt signaling components. None of the extracts demonstrated significant cytotoxic activity. Certain extracts demonstrated a bi-phasic effect on ERK1/2 activation; low doses of the extract slightly increased ERK1/2 activation in response to insulin, whereas higher doses completely abolished the response. In contrast, none of the extracts had any significant effect on MEK whereas only a cake saponin subfraction enhanced insulin-induced PKB/Akt activation. The specific action of argan oil extracts on ERK1/2 activation made us consider an anti-proliferative action. We have thus tested other transformed cell lines (HT-1080 and MSV-MDCK-INV cells and found similar results. Inhibition of ERK1/2 activation was also associated with decreased DNA synthesis as evidenced by [3H]thymidine incorporation experiments. These results suggest that the products of Argania spinosa may provide a new therapeutic avenue against proliferative diseases.

  16. Insulin-sensitizing and anti-proliferative effects of Argania spinosa seed extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samane, Samira; Noël, Josette; Charrouf, Zoubida; Amarouch, Hamid; Haddad, Pierre Selim

    2006-09-01

    Argania spinosa is an evergreen tree endemic of southwestern Morocco. Many preparations have been used in traditional Moroccan medicine for centuries to treat several illnesses including diabetes. However, scientific evidence supporting these actions is lacking. Therefore, we prepared various extracts of the argan fruit, namely keel, cake and argan oil extracts, which we tested in the HTC hepatoma cell line for their potential to affect cellular insulin responses. Cell viability was measured by Trypan Blue exclusion and the response to insulin evaluated by the activation of the extracellular regulated kinase (ERK1/2), ERK kinase (MEK1/2) and protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) signaling components. None of the extracts demonstrated significant cytotoxic activity. Certain extracts demonstrated a bi-phasic effect on ERK1/2 activation; low doses of the extract slightly increased ERK1/2 activation in response to insulin, whereas higher doses completely abolished the response. In contrast, none of the extracts had any significant effect on MEK whereas only a cake saponin subfraction enhanced insulin-induced PKB/Akt activation. The specific action of argan oil extracts on ERK1/2 activation made us consider an anti-proliferative action. We have thus tested other transformed cell lines (HT-1080 and MSV-MDCK-INV cells) and found similar results. Inhibition of ERK1/2 activation was also associated with decreased DNA synthesis as evidenced by [(3)H]thymidine incorporation experiments. These results suggest that the products of Argania spinosa may provide a new therapeutic avenue against proliferative diseases.

  17. Binding, Antioxidant and Anti-proliferative Properties of Bioactive Compounds of Sweet Paprika (Capsicum annuum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong-Gi; Bae, Jong-Hyang; Jastrzebski, Zenon; Cherkas, Andriy; Heo, Buk-Gu; Gorinstein, Shela; Ku, Yang-Gyu

    2016-06-01

    The scope of this research was to determine the bioactive composition, antioxidant, binding, and anti-proliferative properties of red sweet paprika growing under artificial light. The amounts of carotenoids, chlorophyll, polyphenols, tannins, and flavonoids in red paprika (RP), cultivated in Korea, before and after light treatments under high pressure sodium (HPS) and lighting emitting plasma (LEP) lamps (RPControl, RPHPS, RPLEP), were analyzed in water (W) and ethanolic extracts (Et). Spectroscopic, radical scavenging assays, fluorescence and cytotoxicity measurements were applied. The results of this study showed that total chlorophyll and carotenes were the highest in RPHPS (10.50 ± 1.02 and 33.90 ± 3.26 μg/g dry weight (DW)). The strongest antioxidant capacity (μM TE/g DW) in a 2, 2'-azino-bis (3-ethyl-benzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS(•+)) assay was in RPControlEt (24.34 ± 2.36), in a ferric-reducing/antioxidant power (FRAP) assay in RPHPSW (27.08 ± 2.4) and in a cupric reducing antioxidant (CUPRAC) in RPLEPW (70.99 ± 7.11). The paprika ethanolic extracts showed lower values in their bioactivity than the water ones. The binding and cytotoxicity abilities of extracted polyphenols correlated with their amounts. LEP treatment is better for plant growth characteristics than other conventional treatments. The investigated paprika samples can be used as a source of antioxidants. PMID:27184000

  18. Azithromycin Synergistically Enhances Anti-Proliferative Activity of Vincristine in Cervical and Gastric Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Xuezhang; Zhang, Yuyan; Li, Yong; Hao, Xiujing; Liu, Xiaoming, E-mail: erc1080@gmail.com; Wang, Yujiong, E-mail: erc1080@gmail.com [Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education for the Conservation and Utilization of Special Biological Resources of Western China, Yinchuan 750021, Ningxia (China); College of Life Science, Ningxia University, Yinchuan 750021, Ningxia (China)

    2012-12-04

    In this study, the anti-proliferative and anticancer activity of azithromycin (AZM) was examined. In the presence of AZM, cell growth was inhibited more effectively in Hela and SGC-7901 cancer cells, relative to transformed BHK-21 cells. The respective 50% inhibition of cell growth (IC{sub 50}) values for Hela, SGC-7901 and BHK-21 were 15.66, 26.05 and 91.00 µg/mL at 72 h post incubation, indicative of a selective cytotoxicity against cancer cells. Cell apoptosis analysis using Hoechst nuclear staining and annexin V-FITC binding assay further demonstrated that AZM was capable of inducing apoptosis in both cancer cells and transformed cells. The apoptosis induced by AZM was partly through a caspase-dependent mechanism with an up-regulation of apoptotic protein cleavage PARP and caspase-3 products, as well as a down-regulation of anti-apoptotic proteins, Mcl-1, bcl-2 and bcl-X1. More importantly, a combination of AZM and a low dose of the common anti-cancer chemotherapeutic agent vincristine (VCR), produced a selectively synergistic effect on apoptosis of Hela and SGC-7901 cells, but not BHK-21 cells. In the presence of 12.50 μg/mL of VCR, the respective IC{sub 50} values of Hela, SGC-7901 and BHK-21 cells to AZM were reduced to 9.47 µg/mL, 8.43 µg/mL and 40.15 µg/mL at 72 h after the incubation, suggesting that the cytotoxicity of AZM had a selective anti-cancer effect on cancer over transformed cells in vitro. These results imply that AZM may be a potential anticancer agent for use in chemotherapy regimens, and it may minimize side effects via reduction of dosage and enhancing the effectiveness common chemotherapeutic drugs.

  19. Insulin-sensitizing and anti-proliferative effects of Argania spinosa seed extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samane, Samira; Noël, Josette; Charrouf, Zoubida; Amarouch, Hamid; Haddad, Pierre Selim

    2006-09-01

    Argania spinosa is an evergreen tree endemic of southwestern Morocco. Many preparations have been used in traditional Moroccan medicine for centuries to treat several illnesses including diabetes. However, scientific evidence supporting these actions is lacking. Therefore, we prepared various extracts of the argan fruit, namely keel, cake and argan oil extracts, which we tested in the HTC hepatoma cell line for their potential to affect cellular insulin responses. Cell viability was measured by Trypan Blue exclusion and the response to insulin evaluated by the activation of the extracellular regulated kinase (ERK1/2), ERK kinase (MEK1/2) and protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) signaling components. None of the extracts demonstrated significant cytotoxic activity. Certain extracts demonstrated a bi-phasic effect on ERK1/2 activation; low doses of the extract slightly increased ERK1/2 activation in response to insulin, whereas higher doses completely abolished the response. In contrast, none of the extracts had any significant effect on MEK whereas only a cake saponin subfraction enhanced insulin-induced PKB/Akt activation. The specific action of argan oil extracts on ERK1/2 activation made us consider an anti-proliferative action. We have thus tested other transformed cell lines (HT-1080 and MSV-MDCK-INV cells) and found similar results. Inhibition of ERK1/2 activation was also associated with decreased DNA synthesis as evidenced by [(3)H]thymidine incorporation experiments. These results suggest that the products of Argania spinosa may provide a new therapeutic avenue against proliferative diseases. PMID:16951716

  20. Redox-directed cancer therapeutics: Taurolidine and Piperlongumine as broadly effective antineoplastic agents (Review)

    OpenAIRE

    MÖHLER, HANS; PFIRMAN, ROLF W.; Frei, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Targeting the oxygen stress response pathway is considered a promising strategy to exert antineoplastic activity in a broad spectrum of tumor types. Supporting this view, we summarize the mechanism of action of Taurolidine and Piperlongumine, two antineoplastic agents with strikingly broad tumor selectivity. Taurolidine enhances the oxidative stress (ROS) selectively in tumor cells. Its cytotoxicity for various tumor cells in vitro and in vivo, which includes tumor stem cells, is based on the...

  1. The effects of taurolidine alone and in combination with doxorubicin or carboplatin in canine osteosarcoma in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marley Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteosarcoma (OS affects over 8000 dogs/year in the United States. The disease usually arises in the appendicular skeleton and metastasizes to the lung. Dogs with localized appendicular disease benefit from limb amputation and chemotherapy but most die within 6–12 months despite these treatments. Taurolidine, a derivative of taurine, has anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic effects against a variety of cancers. The following in vitro studies tested taurolidine as a candidate for adjuvant therapy for canine OS. Tests for p53 protein status and caspase activity were used to elucidate mechanisms of taurolidine-induced cell death. Results Taurolidine was cytotoxic to osteosarcoma cells and increased the toxicity of doxorubicin and carboplatin in vitro. Apoptosis was greatly induced in cells exposed to 125 μM taurolidine and less so in cells exposed to 250 μM taurolidine. Taurolidine cytotoxicity appeared caspase-dependent in one cell line; with apparent mutant p53 protein. This cell line was the most sensitive to single agent taurolidine treatment and had a taurolidine-dependent reduction in accumulated p53 protein suggesting taurolidine’s effects may depend on the functional status of p53 in canine OS. Conclusion Taurolidine’s cytotoxic effect appears dependent on cell specific factors which may be explained, in part, by the functional status of p53. Taurolidine initiates apoptosis in canine OS cells and this occurs to a greater extent at lower concentrations. Mechanisms of cell death induced by higher concentrations were not elucidated here. Taurolidine combined with doxorubicin or carboplatin can increase the toxicity of these chemotherapy drugs and warrants further investigation in dogs with osteosarcoma.

  2. GTP depletion synergizes the anti-proliferative activity of chemotherapeutic agents in a cell type-dependent manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Tao; Meng, Lingjun [Center for Cancer and Stem Cell Biology, Institute of Biosciences and Technology, Texas A and M Health Science Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Tsai, Robert Y.L., E-mail: rtsai@ibt.tamhsc.edu [Center for Cancer and Stem Cell Biology, Institute of Biosciences and Technology, Texas A and M Health Science Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} Strong synergy between mycophenolic acid (MPA) and 5-FU in MDA-MB-231 cells. {yields} Cell type-dependent synergy between MPA and anti-proliferative agents. {yields} The synergy of MPA on 5-FU is recapitulated by RNA polymerase-I inhibition. {yields} The synergy of MPA on 5-FU requires the expression of nucleostemin. -- Abstract: Mycophenolic acid (MPA) depletes intracellular GTP by blocking de novo guanine nucleotide synthesis. GTP is used ubiquitously for DNA/RNA synthesis and as a signaling molecule. Here, we made a surprising discovery that the anti-proliferative activity of MPA acts synergistically with specific chemotherapeutic agents in a cell type-dependent manner. In MDA-MB-231 cells, MPA shows an extremely potent synergy with 5-FU but not with doxorubicin or etoposide. The synergy between 5-FU and MPA works most effectively against the highly tumorigenic mammary tumor cells compared to the less tumorigenic ones, and does not work in the non-breast cancer cell types that we tested, with the exception of PC3 cells. On the contrary, MPA shows the highest synergy with paclitaxel but not with 5-FU in SCC-25 cells, derived from oral squamous cell carcinomas. Mechanistically, the synergistic effect of MPA on 5-FU in MDA-MB-231 cells can be recapitulated by inhibiting the RNA polymerase-I activity and requires the expression of nucleostemin. This work reveals that the synergy between MPA and anti-proliferative agents is determined by cell type-dependent factors.

  3. One-Pot Ugi/Aza-Michael Synthesis of Highly Substituted 2,5-Diketopiperazines with Anti-Proliferative Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Holzgrabe

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The well-known Ugi reaction of aldehydes with amines, carboxylic acids and isocyanides leads to the formation of acyclic α-acylaminocarboxamides. Replacement of the carboxylic acid derivatives with β-acyl substituted acrylic acids gives access to highly substituted 2,5-diketopiperazines in one single reaction-step without additives or complex reaction procedures. The obtained diketopiperazines show anti-proliferative effects on activated T cells and represent therefore potential candidates for targeting unwanted T cell-mediated immune responses.

  4. In vitro antioxidant activities and anti-proliferative properties of the functional herb Abrus cantoniensis and its main alkaloid abrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mei; Al Zaharna, Mazen; Chen, Yu-Shan; Li, Li; Cheung, Hon-Yeung

    2014-09-01

    Abrus cantoniensis is a common and popular vegetative food consumed as beverage, soup and folk medicine in the tropical and subtropical areas of Asia. It has been claimed valuable for cleansing toxicants in the liver. However, the functional effects of A. cantoniensis have not yet been scientifically explored. This study comprehensively evaluated the in vitro antioxidant and anti-proliferative capacities of the herbal extract and the main alkaloid abrine. Abrine was qualitatively and quantitatively determined in methanol extract (ME) using HPLC-DAD and LC-MS/MS. The results showed that ME, ethyl acetate fraction (EF) and abrine exhibited comparable ABTS radical cation scavenging activities and reducing power to two commercial antioxidants (BHT and Trolox). The EF exerted strong cellular antioxidant activity and selective cytotoxicity against three cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. Biological assays revealed that the EF induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M and apoptosis in MCF-7 and Hep3B cells after 48 h of treatment. Thus, A. cantoniensis exerted potent cellular antioxidant and anti-proliferative properties, highlighting why it has been traditionally used as a functional food. PMID:25059572

  5. Furanodiene presents synergistic anti-proliferative activity with paclitaxel via altering cell cycle and integrin signaling in 95-D lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wen-Shan; Dang, Yuan-Ye; Chen, Xiu-Ping; Lu, Jin-Jian; Wang, Yi-Tao

    2014-02-01

    Furanodiene (FUR) is a natural terpenoid isolated from Rhizoma Curcumae, a well-known Chinese medicinal herb that presents anti-proliferative activities in several cancer cell lines. Recently, we found that the combined treatment of FUR with paclitaxel (TAX) showed synergetic anti-proliferative activities in 95-D lung cancer cells. Herein, we showed that FUR reduced the cell numbers distributed in mitosis phase induced by TAX while increased those in G1 phase. The protein levels of cyclin D1, cyclin B1, CDK6 and c-Myc were all down-regulated in the group of combined treatment. The dramatically down-regulated expression of integrin β4, focal adhesion kinase and paxillin might partially contribute to the synergic effect. Though FUR alone obviously induced endoplasmic reticulum stress, this signaling pathway may not contribute to the synergetic anti-proliferative effect as the protein expression of CHOP and BIP was similar in FUR alone and combined treatment group.

  6. Chemical Composition, Antioxidant, Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Proliferative Activities of Essential Oils of Plants from Burkina Faso

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayala, Bagora; Bassole, Imaël Henri Nestor; Gnoula, Charlemagne; Nebie, Roger; Yonli, Albert; Morel, Laurent; Figueredo, Gilles; Nikiema, Jean-Baptiste; Lobaccaro, Jean-Marc A.; Simpore, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    This research highlights the chemical composition, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative activities of essential oils from leaves of Ocimum basilicum, Ocimum americanum, Hyptis spicigera, Lippia multiflora, Ageratum conyzoides, Eucalyptus camaldulensis and Zingiber officinale. Essential oils were analyzed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry and gas chromatography–flame ionization detector. Major constituents were α-terpineol (59.78%) and β-caryophyllene (10.54%) for Ocimum basilicum; 1, 8-cineol (31.22%), camphor (12.730%), α-pinene (6.87%) and trans α-bergamotene (5.32%) for Ocimum americanum; β-caryophyllene (21%), α-pinene (20.11%), sabinene (10.26%), β-pinene (9.22%) and α-phellandrene (7.03%) for Hyptis spicigera; p-cymene (25.27%), β-caryophyllene (12.70%), thymol (11.88), γ-terpinene (9.17%) and thymyle acetate (7.64%) for Lippia multiflora; precocene (82.10%)for Ageratum conyzoides; eucalyptol (59.55%), α-pinene (9.17%) and limonene (8.76%) for Eucalyptus camaldulensis; arcurcumene (16.67%), camphene (12.70%), zingiberene (8.40%), β-bisabolene (7.83%) and β-sesquiphellandrène (5.34%) for Zingiber officinale. Antioxidant activities were examined using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2′-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) methods. O. basilicum and L. multiflora exhibited the highest antioxidant activity in DPPH and ABTS tests, respectively. Anti-inflammatory properties were evaluated by measuring the inhibition of lipoxygenase activity and essential oil of Z. officinale was the most active. Anti-proliferative effect was assayed by the measurement of MTT on LNCaP and PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines, and SF-763 and SF-767 glioblastoma cell lines. Essential oils from A. conyzoides and L. multiflora were the most active on LNCaP and PC-3 cell lines, respectively. The SF-767 glioblastoma cell line was the most sensitive to O. basilicum and L. multiflora EOs while essential oil of A. conyzoides

  7. Chemical composition, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative activities of essential oils of plants from Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayala, Bagora; Bassole, Imaël Henri Nestor; Gnoula, Charlemagne; Nebie, Roger; Yonli, Albert; Morel, Laurent; Figueredo, Gilles; Nikiema, Jean-Baptiste; Lobaccaro, Jean-Marc A; Simpore, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    This research highlights the chemical composition, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative activities of essential oils from leaves of Ocimum basilicum, Ocimum americanum, Hyptis spicigera, Lippia multiflora, Ageratum conyzoides, Eucalyptus camaldulensis and Zingiber officinale. Essential oils were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-flame ionization detector. Major constituents were α-terpineol (59.78%) and β-caryophyllene (10.54%) for Ocimum basilicum; 1, 8-cineol (31.22%), camphor (12.730%), α-pinene (6.87%) and trans α-bergamotene (5.32%) for Ocimum americanum; β-caryophyllene (21%), α-pinene (20.11%), sabinene (10.26%), β-pinene (9.22%) and α-phellandrene (7.03%) for Hyptis spicigera; p-cymene (25.27%), β-caryophyllene (12.70%), thymol (11.88), γ-terpinene (9.17%) and thymyle acetate (7.64%) for Lippia multiflora; precocene (82.10%)for Ageratum conyzoides; eucalyptol (59.55%), α-pinene (9.17%) and limonene (8.76%) for Eucalyptus camaldulensis; arcurcumene (16.67%), camphene (12.70%), zingiberene (8.40%), β-bisabolene (7.83%) and β-sesquiphellandrène (5.34%) for Zingiber officinale. Antioxidant activities were examined using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) methods. O. basilicum and L. multiflora exhibited the highest antioxidant activity in DPPH and ABTS tests, respectively. Anti-inflammatory properties were evaluated by measuring the inhibition of lipoxygenase activity and essential oil of Z. officinale was the most active. Anti-proliferative effect was assayed by the measurement of MTT on LNCaP and PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines, and SF-763 and SF-767 glioblastoma cell lines. Essential oils from A. conyzoides and L. multiflora were the most active on LNCaP and PC-3 cell lines, respectively. The SF-767 glioblastoma cell line was the most sensitive to O. basilicum and L. multiflora EOs while essential oil of A. conyzoides

  8. Chemical composition, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative activities of essential oils of plants from Burkina Faso.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagora Bayala

    Full Text Available This research highlights the chemical composition, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative activities of essential oils from leaves of Ocimum basilicum, Ocimum americanum, Hyptis spicigera, Lippia multiflora, Ageratum conyzoides, Eucalyptus camaldulensis and Zingiber officinale. Essential oils were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-flame ionization detector. Major constituents were α-terpineol (59.78% and β-caryophyllene (10.54% for Ocimum basilicum; 1, 8-cineol (31.22%, camphor (12.730%, α-pinene (6.87% and trans α-bergamotene (5.32% for Ocimum americanum; β-caryophyllene (21%, α-pinene (20.11%, sabinene (10.26%, β-pinene (9.22% and α-phellandrene (7.03% for Hyptis spicigera; p-cymene (25.27%, β-caryophyllene (12.70%, thymol (11.88, γ-terpinene (9.17% and thymyle acetate (7.64% for Lippia multiflora; precocene (82.10%for Ageratum conyzoides; eucalyptol (59.55%, α-pinene (9.17% and limonene (8.76% for Eucalyptus camaldulensis; arcurcumene (16.67%, camphene (12.70%, zingiberene (8.40%, β-bisabolene (7.83% and β-sesquiphellandrène (5.34% for Zingiber officinale. Antioxidant activities were examined using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH and 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS methods. O. basilicum and L. multiflora exhibited the highest antioxidant activity in DPPH and ABTS tests, respectively. Anti-inflammatory properties were evaluated by measuring the inhibition of lipoxygenase activity and essential oil of Z. officinale was the most active. Anti-proliferative effect was assayed by the measurement of MTT on LNCaP and PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines, and SF-763 and SF-767 glioblastoma cell lines. Essential oils from A. conyzoides and L. multiflora were the most active on LNCaP and PC-3 cell lines, respectively. The SF-767 glioblastoma cell line was the most sensitive to O. basilicum and L. multiflora EOs while essential oil of A. conyzoides showed the

  9. Platycodin D from Platycodonis Radix enhances the anti-proliferative effects of doxorubicin on breast cancer MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Zheng-Hai; Li, Ting; Gao, Hong-wei; Sun, Wen; Chen, Xiu-Ping; Wang, Yi-Tao; Lu, Jin-jian

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been demonstrated that platycodin D (PD) exhibits anti-cancer activities. This study aims to investigate the anti-proliferative effects of the combination of PD and doxorubicin (DOX) on human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells). Methods The anti-proliferative effects of different dosages of PD, DOX, and PD + DOX on MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells were determined by the MTT assay. The 10 μM PD, 5 μM DOX, and 10 μM PD + 5 μM DOX induced-protein expression of apoptosis-...

  10. Taurolidine antiadhesive properties on interaction with E. coli; its transformation in biological environment and interaction with bacteria cell wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Francesco; Darnowski, James W; Opazo, Cristian; Goldberg, Alexander; Kishore, Nina; Agoston, Elin S; Rossi, Miriam

    2010-01-28

    The taurine amino-acid derivative, taurolidine, bis-(1,1-dioxoperhydro-1,2,4-thiabiazinyl-4)methane, shows broad antibacterial action against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, mycobacteria and some clinically relevant fungi. It inhibits, in vitro, the adherence of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus to human epithelial and fibroblast cells. Taurolidine is unstable in aqueous solution and breaks down into derivatives which are thought to be responsible for the biological activity. To understand the taurolidine antibacterial mechanism of action, we provide the experimental single crystal X-ray diffraction results together with theoretical methods to characterize the hydrolysis/decomposition reactions of taurolidine. The crystal structure features two independent molecules linked through intermolecular H-bonds with one of them somewhat positively charged. Taurolidine in a biological environment exists in equilibrium with taurultam derivatives and this is described theoretically as a 2-step process without an energy barrier: formation of cationic taurolidine followed by a nucleophilic attack of O(hydroxyl) on the exocyclic C(methylene). A concerted mechanism describes the further hydrolysis of the taurolidine derivative methylol-taurultam. The interaction of methylol-taurultam with the diaminopimelic NH(2) group in the E. coli bacteria cell wall (peptidoglycan) has a negative DeltaG value (-38.2 kcal/mol) but a high energy barrier (45.8 kcal/mol) suggesting no reactivity. On the contrary, taurolidine docking into E. coli fimbriae protein, responsible for bacteria adhesion to the bladder epithelium, shows it has higher affinity than mannose (the natural substrate), whereas methylol-taurultam and taurultam are less tightly bound. Since taurolidine is readily available because it is administered in high doses after peritonitis surgery, it may successfully compete with mannose explaining its effectiveness against bacterial infections at laparoscopic lesions.

  11. Taurolidine antiadhesive properties on interaction with E. coli; its transformation in biological environment and interaction with bacteria cell wall.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Caruso

    Full Text Available The taurine amino-acid derivative, taurolidine, bis-(1,1-dioxoperhydro-1,2,4-thiabiazinyl-4methane, shows broad antibacterial action against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, mycobacteria and some clinically relevant fungi. It inhibits, in vitro, the adherence of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus to human epithelial and fibroblast cells. Taurolidine is unstable in aqueous solution and breaks down into derivatives which are thought to be responsible for the biological activity. To understand the taurolidine antibacterial mechanism of action, we provide the experimental single crystal X-ray diffraction results together with theoretical methods to characterize the hydrolysis/decomposition reactions of taurolidine. The crystal structure features two independent molecules linked through intermolecular H-bonds with one of them somewhat positively charged. Taurolidine in a biological environment exists in equilibrium with taurultam derivatives and this is described theoretically as a 2-step process without an energy barrier: formation of cationic taurolidine followed by a nucleophilic attack of O(hydroxyl on the exocyclic C(methylene. A concerted mechanism describes the further hydrolysis of the taurolidine derivative methylol-taurultam. The interaction of methylol-taurultam with the diaminopimelic NH(2 group in the E. coli bacteria cell wall (peptidoglycan has a negative DeltaG value (-38.2 kcal/mol but a high energy barrier (45.8 kcal/mol suggesting no reactivity. On the contrary, taurolidine docking into E. coli fimbriae protein, responsible for bacteria adhesion to the bladder epithelium, shows it has higher affinity than mannose (the natural substrate, whereas methylol-taurultam and taurultam are less tightly bound. Since taurolidine is readily available because it is administered in high doses after peritonitis surgery, it may successfully compete with mannose explaining its effectiveness against bacterial infections at

  12. Probing the GnRH receptor agonist binding site identifies methylated triptorelin as a new anti-proliferative agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P Millar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available D-amino acid substitutions at Glycine postion-6 in GnRH-I decapeptide can possess super-agonist activity and enhanced in vivo pharmacokinetics. Agonists elicit growth-inhibition in tumorigenic cells expressing the GnRH receptor above threshold levels. However, new agonists with modified properties are required to improve the anti-proliferative range. Effects of residue substitutions and methylations on tumourigenic HEK293[SCL60] and WPE-1-NB26-3 prostate cells expressing the rat GnRH receptor were compared. Peptides were ranked according to receptor binding affinity, induction of inositol phosphate production and cell growth-inhibition. Analogues possessing D-Trp6 (including Triptorelin, D-Leu6 (including Leuprolide, D-Ala6, D-Lys6, or D-Arg6 exhibited agonist and anti-proliferative activity. Residues His5 or His5,Trp7,Tyr8, corresponding to residues found in GnRH-II , were tolerated, with retention of sub-nanomolar/low nanomolar binding affinities and EC50s for receptor activation and IC50s for cell growth-inhibition. His5D-Arg6-GnRH-I exhibited reduced binding affinity and potency, effective in the mid-nanomolar range. However, all GnRH-II-like analogues were less potent than Triptorelin. By comparison, three methylated-Trp6 Triptorelin variants showed differential binding, receptor activation and anti-proliferation potency. Significantly, 5-Methyl-DL-Trp6-Triptorelin was equipotent to triptorelin. Subsequent studies should determine whether pharmacologically enhanced derivatives of Triptorelin can be developed by further alkylations, without substitutions or cleavable cytotoxic adducts, to improve the extent of growth-inhibition of tumour cells expressing the GnRH receptor.

  13. The antiendotoxin agent taurolidine potentially reduces ischemia/reperfusion injury through its metabolite taurine.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Doddakula, Kishore K

    2010-09-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass results in ischemia\\/reperfusion (I\\/R)-induced endotoxemia. We conducted a prospective randomized trial to investigate the effect of taurolidine, an antiendotoxin agent with antioxidant and membrane-stabilizing properties, on patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG).

  14. Co-immunotherapy with interleukin-2 and taurolidine for progressive metastatic melanoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, G C

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Recombinant interleukin-2(rIL-2) therapy in metastatic melanoma is limited by toxicities, particularly vascular leak syndrome(VLS). Taurolidine potentiates the anti-neoplastic effects of IL-2 while reducing its associated endothelial cell dysfunction in experimental settings. We hypothesized that co-administration of rIL-2 with taurolidine could enhance tolerability without weakening effectiveness. METHODS: Eleven patients with progressive metastatic melanoma received high-dose rIL-2 with co-infusion of taurolidine. Patients were monitored for the development of toxicities and evidence of response. RESULTS: Ten patients tolerated twenty-nine courses of high-dose rIL-2 without dose-reduction. Most toxicities were low-grade. No patient developed VLS. Seven patients died from disease progression. Two had complete clinical and radiological responses to treatment. Two patients remain alive despite evidence of disease progression a mean of 17.5 months after diagnosing metastatic disease. CONCLUSION: Co-administration of taurolidine with high-dose rIL-2 in stage IV melanoma patients appears to greatly enhance the tolerability of this regime without diminishing its therapeutic value.

  15. Redox-directed cancer therapeutics: Taurolidine and Piperlongumine as broadly effective antineoplastic agents (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möhler, Hanns; Pfirrmann, Rolf W; Frei, Karl

    2014-10-01

    Targeting the oxygen stress response pathway is considered a promising strategy to exert antineoplastic activity in a broad spectrum of tumor types. Supporting this view, we summarize the mechanism of action of Taurolidine and Piperlongumine, two antineoplastic agents with strikingly broad tumor selectivity. Taurolidine enhances the oxidative stress (ROS) selectively in tumor cells. Its cytotoxicity for various tumor cells in vitro and in vivo, which includes tumor stem cells, is based on the induction of programmed cell death, largely via apoptosis but also necroptosis and autophagy. The redox-directed mechanism of action of Taurolidine is apparent from the finding that reducing agents e.g., N-acetylcysteine or glutathione impair its cytotoxicity, while its effectiveness is enhanced by agents which inhibit the cellular anti‑oxidant capacity. A similar redox-directed antineoplastic action is shown by Piperlongumine, a recently described experimental drug of plant origin. Taurolidine is particularly advantageous in surgical oncology as this taurine-derivative can be applied perioperatively or systemically with good tolerability as shown in initial clinical applications. PMID:25175943

  16. Taurolidine Antiadhesive Properties on Interaction with E. coli; Its Transformation in Biological Environment and Interaction with Bacteria Cell Wall

    OpenAIRE

    Caruso, Francesco; James W Darnowski; Opazo, Cristian; Goldberg, Alexander; Kishore, Nina; Agoston, Elin S.; Rossi, Miriam

    2010-01-01

    The taurine amino-acid derivative, taurolidine, bis-(1,1-dioxoperhydro-1,2,4-thiabiazinyl–4)methane, shows broad antibacterial action against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, mycobacteria and some clinically relevant fungi. It inhibits, in vitro, the adherence of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus to human epithelial and fibroblast cells. Taurolidine is unstable in aqueous solution and breaks down into derivatives which are thought to be responsible for the biological activit...

  17. Taurolidine lock is superior to heparin lock in the prevention of catheter related bloodstream infections and occlusions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn D Olthof

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Patients on home parenteral nutrition (HPN are at risk for catheter-related complications; mainly infections and occlusions. We have previously shown in HPN patients presenting with catheter sepsis that catheter locking with taurolidine dramatically reduced re-infections when compared with heparin. Our HPN population therefore switched from heparin to taurolidine in 2008. The aim of the present study was to compare long-term effects of this catheter lock strategy on the occurrence of catheter-related bloodstream infections and occlusions in HPN patients. METHODS: Data of catheter-related complications were retrospectively collected from 212 patients who received HPN between January 2000 and November 2011, comprising 545 and 200 catheters during catheter lock therapy with heparin and taurolidine, respectively. We evaluated catheter-related bloodstream infection and occlusion incidence rates using Poisson-normal regression analysis. Incidence rate ratios were calculated by dividing incidence rates of heparin by those of taurolidine, adjusting for underlying disease, use of anticoagulants or immune suppressives, frequency of HPN/fluid administration, composition of infusion fluids, and duration of HPN/fluid use before catheter creation. RESULTS: Bloodstream infection incidence rates were 1.1/year for heparin and 0.2/year for taurolidine locked catheters. Occlusion incidence rates were 0.2/year for heparin and 0.1/year for taurolidine locked catheters. Adjusted incidence ratios of heparin compared to taurolidine were 5.9 (95% confidence interval, 3.9-8.7 for bloodstream infections and 1.9 (95% confidence interval, 1.1-3.1 for occlusions. CONCLUSIONS: Given that no other procedural changes than the catheter lock strategy were implemented during the observation period, these data strongly suggest that taurolidine decreases catheter-related bloodstream infections and occlusions in HPN patients compared with heparin.

  18. Taurolidine Antiadhesive Properties on Interaction with E. coli; Its Transformation in Biological Environment and Interaction with Bacteria Cell Wall

    OpenAIRE

    Francesco Caruso; Darnowski, James W.; Cristian Opazo; Alexander Goldberg; Nina Kishore; Agoston, Elin S.; Miriam Rossi

    2010-01-01

    The taurine amino-acid derivative, taurolidine, bis-(1,1-dioxoperhydro-1,2,4-thiabiazinyl-4)methane, shows broad antibacterial action against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, mycobacteria and some clinically relevant fungi. It inhibits, in vitro, the adherence of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus to human epithelial and fibroblast cells. Taurolidine is unstable in aqueous solution and breaks down into derivatives which are thought to be responsible for the biological activit...

  19. Phytochemical profile of Rosmarinus officinalis and Salvia officinalis extracts and correlation to their antioxidant and anti-proliferative activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontogianni, Vassiliki G; Tomic, Goran; Nikolic, Ivana; Nerantzaki, Alexandra A; Sayyad, Nisar; Stosic-Grujicic, Stanislava; Stojanovic, Ivana; Gerothanassis, Ioannis P; Tzakos, Andreas G

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to monitor the anti-proliferative activity of Rosmarinus officinalis and Salvia officinalis extracts against cancer cells and to correlate this activity with their phytochemical profiles using liquid chromatography/diode array detection/electrospray ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (LC/DAD/ESI-MS(n)). For the quantitative estimation of triterpenic acids in the crude extracts an NMR based methodology was used and compared with the HPLC measurements, both applied for the first time, for the case of betulinic acid. Both extracts exerted cytotoxic activity through dose-dependent impairment of viability and mitochondrial activity of rat insulinoma m5F (RINm5F) cells. Decrease of RINm5F viability was mediated by nitric oxide (NO)-induced apoptosis. Importantly, these extracts potentiated NO and TNF-α release from macrophages therefore enhancing their cytocidal action. The rosemary extract developed more pronounced antioxidant, cytotoxic and immunomodifying activities, probably due to the presence of betulinic acid and a higher concentration of carnosic acid in its phytochemical profile.

  20. Anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects of S1, a tetrandrine derivative, in human gastric cancer BGC-823 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Rong-Rong; Hu, Hai-Feng; Bai, Fan; Liu, Ying; Wu, Chun-Zhen; Huang, Xiao-Xing; Xie, Li-Ping; Hu, You-Jia

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the anti-proliferation and apoptosis-inducing effects of S1, a novel tetrandrine derivative, in human gastric cancer BGC-823 cells and explore the possible mechanism of action. The anti-proliferative activity was determined by MTT assay; the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were detected by flow cytometry. Quantitative real time RT-PCR and Western blotting were used to evaluate the mRNA and protein expression levels in mitochondrial pathway. S1 significantly reduced cell viability and induced a G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis in dose- and time-dependent manner. Further studies showed that S1 increased mRNA and protein expression of Bax and the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Moreover, S1 decreased the protein expression of procaspase-9 and procaspase-3, suggesting that the induction of apoptosis may be related to the alteration of the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 and the activation of caspases. These findings suggested that S1 merits further investigation as a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of human gastric cancer.

  1. Biological Characterization of Cynara cardunculus L. Methanolic Extracts: Antioxidant, Anti-proliferative, Anti-migratory and Anti-angiogenic Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Duarte

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cynara cardunculus (Cc is a multipurpose species; beyond its use in southwestern European cuisine, it is also used for the production of solid biofuel, seed oil, biodiesel, paper pulp and cheese, as well as animal feed. In addition, Cc has a long tradition of use in folk medicine as a diuretic and liver protector. The value of this species as a source of bioactive compounds is known; however, pharmacological use would further increase its cultivation. The main goal of the current work was to evaluate the potential of Cc as source of anti-carcinogenic phytochemicals. Different methanolic extracts obtained from wild and cultivated plants were tested for antioxidant activity and effect on breast tumor cell viability. The most effective extract, both as antioxidant and inhibition of tumor cell viability, was tested for effects on angiogenesis and tumor cell migration capacity. All the extracts tested had high antioxidant activity; however, only green leaves and dry head extracts exhibit anti-proliferative activity. Green cultivated leaves (GCL were the most effective extract both as antioxidant and inhibiting the proliferation of tumor cells; it is equally active inhibiting tumor cell migration and in vivo angiogenesis. GCL extract is an effective inhibitor of several key points in tumor development and thus a promising source of anti-carcinogenic phytochemicals.

  2. Biosynthesis of Anti-Proliferative Gold Nanoparticles Using Endophytic Fusarium oxysporum Strain Isolated from Neem (A. indica) Leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Ejaz Ahmad; Ahmad, Absar; Julius, Anju; Syed, Asad; Khan, Shadab; Kharat, Mahesh; Pai, Kalpana; Kadoo, Narendra; Gupta, Vidya

    2016-01-01

    Here we report a simple, rapid, environment friendly approach for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles using neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss.) fungal endophyte, which based upon morphological and cultural characteristics was eventually identified as Fusarium oxysporum. The aqueous precursor (HAuCl4) solution when reacted with endophytic fungus resulted in the biosynthesis of abundant amounts of well dispersed gold nanoparticles of 10-40 nm with an average size of 22nm. These biosynthesized gold nanoparticles were then characterized by standard analytical techniques such as UV-Visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Transmission Electron Microscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. Cytotoxic activity of these nanoparticles was checked against three different cell types including breast cancer (ZR-75-1), Daudi (Human Burkitt's lymphoma cancer) and normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), where it was found that our gold nanoparticles are anti-proliferative against cancer cells but completely safe toward normal cells. In addition to this, assessment of toxicity toward human RBC revealed less than 0.1 % hemolysis as compared to Triton X-100 suggesting safe nature of our biosynthesized gold nanoparticles on human cells. Also, our nanoparticles exhibited no anti-fungal (against Aspergillus niger) or anti-bacterial [against Gram positive (Bacillus subtilis & Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram negative (Escherichia coli & Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacteria] activity thus suggesting their non-toxic, biocompatible nature. The present investigation opens up avenues for ecofriendly, biocompatible nanomaterials to be used in a wide variety of application such as drug delivery, therapeutics, theranostics and so on.

  3. A novel microtubule inhibitor 4SC-207 with anti-proliferative activity in taxane-resistant cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Bausch

    Full Text Available Microtubule inhibitors are invaluable tools in cancer chemotherapy: taxanes and vinca alkaloids have been successfully used in the clinic over the past thirty years against a broad range of tumors. However, two factors have limited the effectiveness of microtubule inhibitors: toxicity and resistance. In particular, the latter is highly unpredictable, variable from patient to patient and is believed to be the cause of treatment failure in most cases of metastatic cancers. For these reasons, there is an increasing demand for new microtubule inhibitors that can overcome resistance mechanisms and that, at the same time, have reduced side effects. Here we present a novel microtubule inhibitor, 4SC-207, which shows strong anti-proliferative activity in a large panel of tumor cell lines with an average GI50 of 11 nM. In particular, 4SC-207 is active in multi-drug resistant cell lines, such as HCT-15 and ACHN, suggesting that it is a poor substrate for drug efflux pumps. 4SC-207 inhibits microtubule growth in vitro and in vivo and promotes, in a dose dependent manner, a mitotic delay/arrest, followed by apoptosis or aberrant divisions due to chromosome alignment defects and formation of multi-polar spindles. Furthermore, preliminary data from preclinical studies suggest low propensity towards bone marrow toxicities at concentrations that inhibit tumor growth in paclitaxel-resistant xenograft models. In summary, our results suggest that 4SC-207 may be a potential anti-cancer agent.

  4. Anti-proliferative effect of leaf extracts of Eucalyptus citriodora against human cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, Madhulika; Sharma, Vikas; Saxena, Ajit Kumar

    2012-12-01

    Six different extracts from Eucalyptus citriodora leaves were investigated for their anticancer effect. Extracts were prepared using a range of polar and non-polar solvents to leach out maximum active components. Phytochemical analysis of the extracts revealed the presence of anthraquinones, cardiac glycosides, flavonoids, saponins and tannins. Cytotoxic activity of different extracts was tested in vitro against seven human cancer cell lines from seven different tissues, such as SW-620 (colon), HOP-62 (lung), PC-3 (prostate), OVCAR-5 (ovary), HeLa (cervix), IMR-32 (neuroblastoma) and HEP-2 (liver). The ethyl acetate, chloroform and 50% methanolic extract displayed highest anti-proliferative effect in a dose-dependent manner. In vivo anti-tumor activity was evaluated against murine tumor (solid) model of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma and Sarcoma 180. The results showed that ethyl acetate and aqueous extracts suppressed the growth of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (29.79% and 18.48%, respectively), but showed little growth inhibition in case of Sarcoma 180 (13. 86% and 8.57%, respectively). The activity might be due to the flavonoids, tannins and saponins that are present in all the extracts of the plant. Further investigation is required for the isolation of active principle(s) from the ethyl acetate extract, which has shown significant in vitro and in vivo anticancer potential. PMID:23350280

  5. Conformational study reveals amino acid residues essential for hemagglutinating and anti-proliferative activities of Clematis montana lectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bangmin; Zhang, Bin; Qi, Wei; Zhu, Yanan; Zhao, Yan; Zhou, Nan; Sun, Rong; Bao, Jinku; Wu, Chuanfang

    2014-11-01

    Clematis montana lectin (CML), a novel mannose-binding lectin purified from C. montana Buch.-Ham stem (Ranunculaceae), has been proved to have hemagglutinating activity in rabbit erythrocytes and apoptosis-inducing activity in tumor cells. However, the biochemical properties of CML have not revealed and its structural information still needs to be elucidated. In this study, it was found that CML possessed quite good thermostability and alkaline resistance, and its hemagglutinating activity was bivalent metal cation dependent. In addition, hemagglutination test and fluorescence spectroscopy proved that GuHCl, urea, and sodium dodecyl sulfate could change the conformation of CML and further caused the loss of hemagglutination activity. Moreover, the changes of fluorescence spectrum indicated that the tryptophan (Trp) microenvironment conversion might be related to the conformation and bioactivities of CML. In addition, it was also found that Trp residues, arginine (Arg) residues, and sulfhydryl were important for the hemagglutinating activity of CML, but only Trp was proved to be crucial for the CML conformation. Furthermore, the Trp, Arg, and sulfhydryl-modified CML exhibited 97.17%, 76.99%, and 49.64% loss of its anti-proliferative activity, respectively, which was consistent with the alterations of its hemagglutinating activity. Given these findings, Trp residues on the surface of CML are essential for the active center to form substrate-accessible conformation and suitable environment for carbohydrate binding. PMID:25239139

  6. The anti-proliferative effect of L-carnosine correlates with a decreased expression of hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovine, Barbara; Oliviero, Giorgia; Garofalo, Mariangela; Orefice, Maria; Nocella, Francesca; Borbone, Nicola; Piccialli, Vincenzo; Centore, Roberto; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Piccialli, Gennaro; Bevilacqua, Maria Assunta

    2014-01-01

    In recent years considerable attention has been given to the use of natural substances as anticancer drugs. The natural antioxidant dipeptide L-carnosine belongs to this class of molecules because it has been proved to have a significant anticancer activity both in vitro and in vivo. Previous studies have shown that L-carnosine inhibits the proliferation of human colorectal carcinoma cells by affecting the ATP and Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) production. In the present study we identified the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α (HIF-1α) as a possible target of L-carnosine in HCT-116 cell line. HIF-1α protein is over-expressed in multiple types of human cancer and is the major cause of resistance to drugs and radiation in solid tumours. Of particular interest are experimental data supporting the concept that generation of ROS provides a redox signal for HIF-1α induction, and it is known that some antioxidants are able to suppress tumorigenesis by inhibiting HIF-1α. In the current study we found that L-carnosine reduces the HIF-1α protein level affecting its stability and decreases the HIF-1 transcriptional activity. In addition, we demonstrated that L-carnosine is involved in ubiquitin-proteasome system promoting HIF-1α degradation. Finally, we compared the antioxidant activity of L-carnosine with that of two synthetic anti-oxidant bis-diaminotriazoles (namely 1 and 2, respectively). Despite these three compounds have the same ability in reducing intracellular ROS, 1 and 2 are more potent scavengers and have no effect on HIF-1α expression and cancer cell proliferation. These findings suggest that an analysis of L-carnosine antioxidant pathway will clarify the mechanism underlying the anti-proliferative effects of this dipeptide on colon cancer cells. However, although the molecular mechanism by which L-carnosine down regulates or inhibits the HIF-1α activity has not been yet elucidated, this ability may be promising in treating hypoxia-related diseases. PMID

  7. The anti-proliferative effect of L-carnosine correlates with a decreased expression of hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha in human colon cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Iovine

    Full Text Available In recent years considerable attention has been given to the use of natural substances as anticancer drugs. The natural antioxidant dipeptide L-carnosine belongs to this class of molecules because it has been proved to have a significant anticancer activity both in vitro and in vivo. Previous studies have shown that L-carnosine inhibits the proliferation of human colorectal carcinoma cells by affecting the ATP and Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS production. In the present study we identified the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α (HIF-1α as a possible target of L-carnosine in HCT-116 cell line. HIF-1α protein is over-expressed in multiple types of human cancer and is the major cause of resistance to drugs and radiation in solid tumours. Of particular interest are experimental data supporting the concept that generation of ROS provides a redox signal for HIF-1α induction, and it is known that some antioxidants are able to suppress tumorigenesis by inhibiting HIF-1α. In the current study we found that L-carnosine reduces the HIF-1α protein level affecting its stability and decreases the HIF-1 transcriptional activity. In addition, we demonstrated that L-carnosine is involved in ubiquitin-proteasome system promoting HIF-1α degradation. Finally, we compared the antioxidant activity of L-carnosine with that of two synthetic anti-oxidant bis-diaminotriazoles (namely 1 and 2, respectively. Despite these three compounds have the same ability in reducing intracellular ROS, 1 and 2 are more potent scavengers and have no effect on HIF-1α expression and cancer cell proliferation. These findings suggest that an analysis of L-carnosine antioxidant pathway will clarify the mechanism underlying the anti-proliferative effects of this dipeptide on colon cancer cells. However, although the molecular mechanism by which L-carnosine down regulates or inhibits the HIF-1α activity has not been yet elucidated, this ability may be promising in treating hypoxia

  8. Anti-proliferative properties of commercial Pelargonium sidoides tincture, with cell-cycle G0/G1 arrest and apoptosis in Jurkat leukaemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Andreia; Bester, Megan; Soundy, Puffy; Apostolides, Zeno

    2016-09-01

    Context Pelargonium sidoides DC (Geraniaceae) is an important medicinal plant indigenous to South Africa and Lesotho. Previous studies have shown that root extracts are rich in polyphenolic compounds with antibacterial, antiviral and immunomodulatory activities. Little is known regarding the anticancer properties of Pelargonium sidoides extracts. Objective This study evaluates the anti-proliferative effects of a Pelargonium sidoides radix mother tincture (PST). Materials and methods The PST was characterized by LC-MS/MS. Anti-proliferative activity was evaluated in the pre-screen panel of the National Cancer Institute (NCI-H460, MCF-7 and SF-268) and the Jurkat leukaemia cell line at concentrations of 0-150 μg/mL. The effect on cell growth was determined with sulphorhodamine B and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assays after 72 h. The effect on cell cycle and apoptosis induction in Jurkat cells was determined by flow cytometry with propidium iodide and Annexin V: fluorescein isothiocyanate staining. Results Dihydroxycoumarin sulphates, gallic acid as well as gallocatechin dimers and trimers were characterized in PST by mass spectrometry. Moderate anti-proliferative effects with GI50 values between 40 and 80 μg/mL were observed in the NCI-pre-screen panel. Strong activity observed with Jurkat cells with a GI50 value of 6.2 μg/mL, significantly better than positive control 5-fluorouracil (GI50 value of 9.7 μg/mL). The PST arrested Jurkat cells at the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle and increased the apoptotic cells from 9% to 21%, while the dead cells increased from 4% to 17%. Conclusion We present evidence that P. sidoides has cancer cell type-specific anti-proliferative effects and may be a source of novel anticancer molecules. PMID:26794080

  9. Role of VDR in anti-proliferative effects of calcitriol in tumor-derived endothelial cells and tumor angiogenesis in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Ivy; Han, Guangzhou; Seshadri, Mukund; Gillard, Bryan M.; Yu, Wei-Dong; Barbara A Foster; Trump, Donald L.; Johnson, Candace S.

    2009-01-01

    Calcitriol (1, 25-dihydroxycholecalciferol), the major active form of vitamin D, is anti-proliferative in tumor cells and tumor-derived endothelial cells (TDEC). These actions of calcitriol are mediated at least in part by vitamin D receptor (VDR), which is expressed in many tissues including endothelial cells. To investigate the role of VDR in calcitriol effects on tumor vasculature, we established TRAMP-2 tumors subcutaneously into either VDR wild type (WT) or knockout (KO) mice. Within 30 ...

  10. Experimental and theoretical study of possible correlation between the electrochemistry of canthin-6-one and the anti-proliferative activity against human cancer stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebrián-Torrejón, G.; Doménech-Carbó, A.; Scotti, M. T.; Fournet, A.; Figadère, B.; Poupon, E.

    2015-12-01

    This work presents an approach to study the performance of novel targets able to overcome cancer stem cell chemoresistance, based on the voltammetric data for microparticulate films of natural or synthetic alkaloids from the canthin-6-one series. A comparison of this voltammetric technique with conventional solution phase electrochemistry suggests the differences in the anti-proliferative activity of canthin-6-ones could be tentatively correlated to their different capacity to generate semiquinone radical anions. These data also match theoretical calculations.

  11. Anti-proliferative effects of raw and steamed extracts of Panax notoginseng and its ginsenoside constituents on human liver cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neo Soek-Ying

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Panax notoginseng is a potential source of anticancer compounds. This study aims to investigate the effects of steaming on the chemical profile of P. notoginseng and the anti-proliferative effects of P. notoginseng on liver cancer cells. Methods Samples of powdered raw P. notoginseng roots were steamed for various durations. Extracts of the raw and steamed samples were subjected to ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS analysis for chemical profiling. The anti-proliferative effects on three human liver cancer cells, namely SNU449, SNU182 and HepG2, were evaluated using colorimetric WST-1 assay. Results Steaming changed chromatographic and pharmacological profiles of P. notoginseng, causing differences in activities such as inhibition of cancer growth. Steamed P. notoginseng exhibited greater anti-proliferative effects against liver cancer cells (SNU449, SNU182 and HepG2 than its raw form; steaming up to 24 hours increased bioactivities. Steaming increased the concentrations of ginsenoside Rh2, Rk1, Rk3 and 20S-Rg3 and enhanced growth inhibition of liver cancer cells. Conclusion Steaming changes the chemical profile as well as anti-cancer biological activities of P. notoginseng. Steamed P. notoginseng contains potential compounds for the treatment of liver cancer.

  12. Biocatalytic polymer thin films: optimization of the multilayered architecture towards in situ synthesis of anti-proliferative drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Sidsel Ø.; Fejerskov, Betina; Zelikin, Alexander N.

    2014-03-01

    We report on the assembly of multi-layered polyelectrolyte thin films containing an immobilized enzyme to perform conversion of externally administered prodrugs and achieve delivery of the resulting therapeutics to adhering cells. Towards this goal, multi-layered coatings were assembled using poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride). Activity of the incorporated enzyme was quantified as a function of the assembly conditions, position of the enzyme within the multi-layered architecture, concentration of the enzyme in the adsorption solution, and concentration of the administered prodrug. Biocatalytic coatings exhibited sustained levels of enzymatic activity over at least one week of incubation in physiological buffers without signs of loss of activity of the enzyme. Developed enzyme-containing polymer films afforded zero-order release of the in situ synthesized cargo with kinetics of synthesis (nM per hour) covering at least 3 orders of magnitude. Internalization of the synthesized product by adhering cells was visualized using a fluorogenic enzyme substrate. Therapeutic utility of biocatalytic coatings was demonstrated using a myoblast cell line and a prodrug for the anti-proliferative agent, 5-fluorouridine. Taken together, this work presents a novel approach to delivery of small molecule drugs using multi-layered polymer thin films with utility in surface-mediated drug delivery, assembly of therapeutic implantable devices, and tissue engineering.We report on the assembly of multi-layered polyelectrolyte thin films containing an immobilized enzyme to perform conversion of externally administered prodrugs and achieve delivery of the resulting therapeutics to adhering cells. Towards this goal, multi-layered coatings were assembled using poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride). Activity of the incorporated enzyme was quantified as a function of the assembly conditions, position of the enzyme within the multi

  13. Imatinib mesylate exerts anti-proliferative effects on osteosarcoma cells and inhibits the tumour growth in immunocompetent murine models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bérengère Gobin

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignant bone tumour characterized by osteoid production and/or osteolytic lesions of bone. A lack of response to chemotherapeutic treatments shows the importance of exploring new therapeutic methods. Imatinib mesylate (Gleevec, Novartis Pharma, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was originally developed for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia. Several studies revealed that imatinib mesylate inhibits osteoclast differentiation through the M-CSFR pathway and activates osteoblast differentiation through PDGFR pathway, two key cells involved in the vicious cycle controlling the tumour development. The present study investigated the in vitro effects of imatinib mesylate on the proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle, and migration ability of five osteosarcoma cell lines (human: MG-63, HOS; rat: OSRGA; mice: MOS-J, POS-1. Imatinib mesylate was also assessed as a curative and preventive treatment in two syngenic osteosarcoma models: MOS-J (mixed osteoblastic/osteolytic osteosarcoma and POS-1 (undifferentiated osteosarcoma. Imatinib mesylate exhibited a dose-dependent anti-proliferative effect in all cell lines studied. The drug induced a G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in most cell lines, except for POS-1 and HOS cells that were blocked in the S phase. In addition, imatinib mesylate induced cell death and strongly inhibited osteosarcoma cell migration. In the MOS-J osteosarcoma model, oral administration of imatinib mesylate significantly inhibited the tumour development in both preventive and curative approaches. A phospho-receptor tyrosine kinase array kit revealed that PDGFRα, among 7 other receptors (PDFGFRβ, Axl, RYK, EGFR, EphA2 and 10, IGF1R, appears as one of the main molecular targets for imatinib mesylate. In the light of the present study and the literature, it would be particularly interesting to revisit therapeutic evaluation of imatinib mesylate in osteosarcoma according to the tyrosine-kinase receptor

  14. MicroRNA mir-16 is anti-proliferative in enterocytes and exhibits diurnal rhythmicity in intestinal crypts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakrishnan, Anita, E-mail: anita.balakrishnan@doctors.org.uk [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); School of Clinical Sciences, Division of Gastroenterology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GE (United Kingdom); Stearns, Adam T. [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 2JD (United Kingdom); Park, Peter J. [Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Harvard Medical School, Center for Biomedical Informatics, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Dreyfuss, Jonathan M. [Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Ashley, Stanley W. [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Rhoads, David B. [Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Pediatric Endocrine Unit, MassGeneral Hospital for Children, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Tavakkolizadeh, Ali, E-mail: atavakkoli@partners.org [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2010-12-10

    Background and aims: The intestine exhibits profound diurnal rhythms in function and morphology, in part due to changes in enterocyte proliferation. The regulatory mechanisms behind these rhythms remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that microRNAs are involved in mediating these rhythms, and studied the role of microRNAs specifically in modulating intestinal proliferation. Methods: Diurnal rhythmicity of microRNAs in rat jejunum was analyzed by microarrays and validated by qPCR. Temporal expression of diurnally rhythmic mir-16 was further quantified in intestinal crypts, villi, and smooth muscle using laser capture microdissection and qPCR. Morphological changes in rat jejunum were assessed by histology and proliferation by immunostaining for bromodeoxyuridine. In IEC-6 cells stably overexpressing mir-16, proliferation was assessed by cell counting and MTS assay, cell cycle progression and apoptosis by flow cytometry, and cell cycle gene expression by qPCR and immunoblotting. Results: mir-16 peaked 6 hours after light onset (HALO 6) with diurnal changes restricted to crypts. Crypt depth and villus height peaked at HALO 13-14 in antiphase to mir-16. Overexpression of mir-16 in IEC-6 cells suppressed specific G1/S regulators (cyclins D1-3, cyclin E1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 6) and produced G1 arrest. Protein expression of these genes exhibited diurnal rhythmicity in rat jejunum, peaking between HALO 11 and 17 in antiphase to mir-16. Conclusions: This is the first report of circadian rhythmicity of specific microRNAs in rat jejunum. Our data provide a link between anti-proliferative mir-16 and the intestinal proliferation rhythm and point to mir-16 as an important regulator of proliferation in jejunal crypts. This function may be essential to match proliferation and absorptive capacity with nutrient availability.

  15. Biofilm formation in long-term central venous catheters in children with cancer: a randomized controlled open-labelled trial of taurolidine versus heparin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handrup, Mette Møller; Fuursted, Kurt; Funch, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    Taurolidine has demonstrated inhibition of biofilm formation in vitro. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of catheter locking with taurolidine vs heparin in biofilm formation in central venous catheters. Forty-eight children with cancer were randomized to catheter locking by heparin (n...... = 22) or taurolidine (n = 26), respectively. After removal, catheters were examined by standardized scanning electron microscopy to assess quantitative biofilm formation. Biofilm was present if morphologically typical structures and bacterial cells were identified. Quantitative and semi......-quantitative cultures were also performed. Biofilm was identified in 23 of 26 catheters from the taurolidine group and 21 of 22 catheters from the heparin group. A positive culture was made of six of the catheters locked with taurolidine and heparin, respectively (p = 0.78). The rate of catheter-related bloodstream...

  16. Medium Renewal Blocks Anti-Proliferative Effects of Metformin in Cultured MDA-MB-231 Breast Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maruša Rajh

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies indicate that metformin, a widely used type 2 diabetes drug, might reduce breast cancer risk and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes. Metformin might protect against breast cancer indirectly by ameliorating systemic glucose homeostasis. Alternatively, it might target breast cancer cells directly. However, experiments using MDA-MB-231 cells, a standard in vitro breast cancer model, produced inconsistent results regarding effectiveness of metformin as a direct anti-cancer agent. Metformin treatments in cultured MDA-MB-231 cells are usually performed for 48-96 hours, but protocols describing renewal of cell culture medium during these prolonged treatments are rarely reported. We determined whether medium renewal protocol might alter sensitivity of MDA-MB-231 cells treated with metformin. Using the MTS assay, BrdU incorporation and Hoechst staining we found that treatment with metformin for 48-72 hours failed to suppress viability and proliferation of MDA-MB-231 cells if low-glucose (1 g/L medium was renewed every 24 hours. Conversely, metformin suppressed their viability and proliferation if medium was not renewed. Without renewal glucose concentration in the medium was reduced to 0.1 g/L in 72 hours, which likely explains increased sensitivity to metformin under these conditions. We also examined whether 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG reduces resistance to metformin. In the presence of 2-DG metformin reduced viability and proliferation of MDA-MB-231 cells with or without medium renewal, thus demonstrating that 2-DG reduces their resistance to metformin. In sum, we show that medium renewal blocks anti-proliferative effects of metformin during prolonged treatments in low-glucose medium. Differences in medium renewal protocols during prolonged treatments might therefore lead to apparently inconsistent results as regards effectiveness of metformin as a direct anti-cancer agent. Finally, our results indicate that co-therapy with

  17. Medium Renewal Blocks Anti-Proliferative Effects of Metformin in Cultured MDA-MB-231 Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajh, Maruša; Dolinar, Klemen; Miš, Katarina; Pavlin, Mojca; Pirkmajer, Sergej

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that metformin, a widely used type 2 diabetes drug, might reduce breast cancer risk and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes. Metformin might protect against breast cancer indirectly by ameliorating systemic glucose homeostasis. Alternatively, it might target breast cancer cells directly. However, experiments using MDA-MB-231 cells, a standard in vitro breast cancer model, produced inconsistent results regarding effectiveness of metformin as a direct anti-cancer agent. Metformin treatments in cultured MDA-MB-231 cells are usually performed for 48-96 hours, but protocols describing renewal of cell culture medium during these prolonged treatments are rarely reported. We determined whether medium renewal protocol might alter sensitivity of MDA-MB-231 cells treated with metformin. Using the MTS assay, BrdU incorporation and Hoechst staining we found that treatment with metformin for 48-72 hours failed to suppress viability and proliferation of MDA-MB-231 cells if low-glucose (1 g/L) medium was renewed every 24 hours. Conversely, metformin suppressed their viability and proliferation if medium was not renewed. Without renewal glucose concentration in the medium was reduced to 0.1 g/L in 72 hours, which likely explains increased sensitivity to metformin under these conditions. We also examined whether 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) reduces resistance to metformin. In the presence of 2-DG metformin reduced viability and proliferation of MDA-MB-231 cells with or without medium renewal, thus demonstrating that 2-DG reduces their resistance to metformin. In sum, we show that medium renewal blocks anti-proliferative effects of metformin during prolonged treatments in low-glucose medium. Differences in medium renewal protocols during prolonged treatments might therefore lead to apparently inconsistent results as regards effectiveness of metformin as a direct anti-cancer agent. Finally, our results indicate that co-therapy with 2-DG and

  18. In vitro anti-proliferative, anti-bacterial potential and induction of DNA strand break of partially purified Cuscuta reflexa Roxb.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhulika Bhagat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cuscuta reflexa is an important medicinal plant, mentioned in Ayurveda, an ancient Indian system of medicine. The plant is selected to evaluate the possibility for novel pharmaceuticals for anticancer and antibiotics drugs. Since most of these drugs had developed resisitance against currently used chemotherapeutics. This study describes the in vitro anti-proliferative, anti-bacterial and single stand DNA break of the holoprasitic plant Cuscuta reflexa. Bioassay-guided fractionation and partial purification of the plant were done and evaluated for antiproliferative activity against human cancer cell lines by SRB assay and single strand DNA break by comet assay. Further antibacterial activity was also performed by agar well diffusion assay. The alcoholic extract, chloroform fraction and partially purified ethylacetate-methanol (1:1 sub-fraction of C. reflexa showed anti-proliferative potential against IMR-32 and 502713 human cancer cell lines. Alcoholic extract exhibited anti-proliferative activity of 74% and 72%, chloroform fraction demonstrated 91% and 95% against neuroblastoma (IMR-32 and colon (502713 cancer cell lines at 100 μg/ml. Single strand DNA break of the chloroform fraction was also demonstrated using comet assay, indicating that possible mode of cell death may be apoptosis. Anti-microbial properties were evaluated against eight species of pathogenic and non-pathogenic microorganisms and maximum zone of inhibition for anti-bacterial activity was found against Staphylococcus aureus (22 mm by alcoholic extract, 21 mm by chloroform fraction and 12 mm by ethylacetate-methanol (1:1 sub-fraction. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of the chloroform fraction was 1500 μg/ml for S. aureus. The plant was found to be equally effective against gram-positive and negative bacteria. Studies are well underway to isolate and identify active compounds from chloroform fraction and ethyl acetate:methanol (1:1 sub-fraction, which can be used as

  19. Lactobacillus casei Exerts Anti-Proliferative Effects Accompanied by Apoptotic Cell Death and Up-Regulation of TRAIL in Colon Carcinoma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeliki Tiptiri-Kourpeti

    Full Text Available Probiotic microorganisms such as lactic acid bacteria (LAB exert a number of strain-specific health-promoting activities attributed to their immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic properties. Despite recent attention, our understanding of the biological processes involved in the beneficial effects of LAB strains is still limited. To this end, the present study investigated the growth-inhibitory effects of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 against experimental colon cancer. Administration of live Lactobacillus casei (as well as bacterial components thereof on murine (CT26 and human (HT29 colon carcinoma cell lines raised a significant concentration- and time-dependent anti-proliferative effect, determined by cell viability assays. Specifically, a dramatic decrease in viability of colon cancer cells co-incubated with 10(9 CFU/mL L. casei for 24 hours was detected (78% for HT29 and 52% for CT26 cells. In addition, live L. casei induced apoptotic cell death in both cell lines as revealed by annexin V and propidium iodide staining. The significance of the in vitro anti-proliferative effects was further confirmed in an experimental tumor model. Oral daily administration of 10(9 CFU live L. casei for 13 days significantly inhibited in vivo growth of colon carcinoma cells, resulting in approximately 80% reduction in tumor volume of treated mice. Tumor growth inhibition was accompanied by L. casei-driven up-regulation of the TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand TRAIL and down-regulation of Survivin. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for beneficial tumor-inhibitory, anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects driven by this probiotic LAB strain.

  20. Lactobacillus casei Exerts Anti-Proliferative Effects Accompanied by Apoptotic Cell Death and Up-Regulation of TRAIL in Colon Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiptiri-Kourpeti, Angeliki; Spyridopoulou, Katerina; Santarmaki, Valentina; Aindelis, Georgios; Tompoulidou, Evgenia; Lamprianidou, Eleftheria E; Saxami, Georgia; Ypsilantis, Petros; Lampri, Evangeli S; Simopoulos, Constantinos; Kotsianidis, Ioannis; Galanis, Alex; Kourkoutas, Yiannis; Dimitrellou, Dimitra; Chlichlia, Katerina

    2016-01-01

    Probiotic microorganisms such as lactic acid bacteria (LAB) exert a number of strain-specific health-promoting activities attributed to their immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic properties. Despite recent attention, our understanding of the biological processes involved in the beneficial effects of LAB strains is still limited. To this end, the present study investigated the growth-inhibitory effects of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 against experimental colon cancer. Administration of live Lactobacillus casei (as well as bacterial components thereof) on murine (CT26) and human (HT29) colon carcinoma cell lines raised a significant concentration- and time-dependent anti-proliferative effect, determined by cell viability assays. Specifically, a dramatic decrease in viability of colon cancer cells co-incubated with 10(9) CFU/mL L. casei for 24 hours was detected (78% for HT29 and 52% for CT26 cells). In addition, live L. casei induced apoptotic cell death in both cell lines as revealed by annexin V and propidium iodide staining. The significance of the in vitro anti-proliferative effects was further confirmed in an experimental tumor model. Oral daily administration of 10(9) CFU live L. casei for 13 days significantly inhibited in vivo growth of colon carcinoma cells, resulting in approximately 80% reduction in tumor volume of treated mice. Tumor growth inhibition was accompanied by L. casei-driven up-regulation of the TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand TRAIL and down-regulation of Survivin. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for beneficial tumor-inhibitory, anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects driven by this probiotic LAB strain. PMID:26849051

  1. Searching in mother nature for anti-cancer activity: anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effect elicited by green barley on leukemia/lymphoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Robles-Escajeda

    Full Text Available Green barley extract (GB was investigated for possible anti-cancer activity by examining its anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic properties on human leukemia/lymphoma cell lines. Our results indicate that GB exhibits selective anti-proliferative activity on a panel of leukemia/lymphoma cells in comparison to non-cancerous cells. Specifically, GB disrupted the cell-cycle progression within BJAB cells, as manifested by G2/M phase arrest and DNA fragmentation, and induced apoptosis, as evidenced by phosphatidylserine (PS translocation to the outer cytoplasmic membrane in two B-lineage leukemia/lymphoma cell lines. The pro-apoptotic effect of GB was found to be independent of mitochondrial depolarization, thus implicating extrinsic cell death pathways to exert its cytotoxicity. Indeed, GB elicited an increase of TNF-α production, caspase-8 and caspase-3 activation, and PARP-1 cleavage within pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia Nalm-6 cells. Moreover, caspase-8 and caspase-3 activation and PARP-1 cleavage were strongly inhibited/blocked by the addition of the specific caspase inhibitors Z-VAD-FMK and Ac-DEVD-CHO. Furthermore, intracellular signaling analyses determined that GB treatment enhanced constitutive activation of Lck and Src tyrosine kinases in Nalm-6 cells. Taken together, these findings indicate that GB induced preferential anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic signals within B-lineage leukemia/lymphoma cells, as determined by the following biochemical hallmarks of apoptosis: PS externalization, enhanced release of TNF-α, caspase-8 and caspase-3 activation, PARP-1 cleavage and DNA fragmentation Our observations reveal that GB has potential as an anti-leukemia/lymphoma agent alone or in combination with standard cancer therapies and thus warrants further evaluation in vivo to support these findings.

  2. Aplysinopsin Analogs: Synthesis and Anti-proliferative Activity of Substituted (Z)-5-(N-benzylindol-3-ylmethylene)imidazolidine-2,4-diones

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, Y. Thirupathi; Reddy, P. Narsimha; Koduru, Srinivas; Damodaran, Chendil; Crooks, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    A series of substituted (Z)-5-(N-benzylindol-3-ylmethylene)imidazolidine-2,4-dione (3) analogs structurally related to aplysinopsin, and that incorporate a variety of substituents in both the indole and N-benzyl moieties have been synthesized under microwave irradiation and conventional heating methods These analogs were evaluated for their anti-proliferative activity against MCF-7 and MDA-231 breast cancer cell lines, and A549 and H460 lung cancer cell lines. Two analogs, 3f and 3j had IC50 ...

  3. Korean Ginseng Berry Fermented by Mycotoxin Non-producing Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae: Ginsenoside Analyses and Anti-proliferative Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhipeng; Ahn, Hyung Jin; Kim, Nam Yeon; Lee, Yu Na; Ji, Geun Eog

    2016-01-01

    To transform ginsenosides, Korean ginseng berry (KGB) was fermented by mycotoxin non-producing Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae. Changes of ginsenoside profile and anti-proliferative activities were observed. Results showed that A. niger tended to efficiently transform protopanaxadiol (PPD) type ginsenosides such as Rb1, Rb2, Rd to compound K while A. oryzae tended to efficiently transform protopanaxatriol (PPT) type ginsenoside Re to Rh1 via Rg1. Butanol extracts of fermented KGB showed high cytotoxicity on human adenocarcinoma HT-29 cell line and hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cell line while that of unfermented KGB showed little. The minimum effective concentration of niger-fermented KGB was less than 2.5 µg/mL while that of oryzae-fermented KGB was about 5 µg/mL. As A. niger is more inclined to transform PPD type ginsenosides, niger-fermented KGB showed stronger anti-proliferative activity than oryzae-fermented KGB. PMID:27582326

  4. Taurolidine lock is superior to heparin lock in the prevention of catheter related bloodstream infections and occlusions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olthof, E.D.; Versleijen, M.W.J.; Huisman-de Waal, G.J.; Feuth, T.; Kievit, W.; Wanten, G.J.A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Patients on home parenteral nutrition (HPN) are at risk for catheter-related complications; mainly infections and occlusions. We have previously shown in HPN patients presenting with catheter sepsis that catheter locking with taurolidine dramatically reduced re-infections when c

  5. The Budding Yeast “Saccharomyces cerevisiae” as a Drug Discovery Tool to Identify Plant-Derived Natural Products with Anti-Proliferative Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouchra Qaddouri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a valuable system to study cell-cycle regulation, which is defective in cancer cells. Due to the highly conserved nature of the cell-cycle machinery between yeast and humans, yeast studies are directly relevant to anticancer-drug discovery. The budding yeast is also an excellent model system for identifying and studying antifungal compounds because of the functional conservation of fungal genes. Moreover, yeast studies have also contributed greatly to our understanding of the biological targets and modes of action of bioactive compounds. Understanding the mechanism of action of clinically relevant compounds is essential for the design of improved second-generation molecules. Here we describe our methodology for screening a library of plant-derived natural products in yeast in order to identify and characterize new compounds with anti-proliferative properties.

  6. Anti Proliferative and Pro Apoptotic Effects of Flavonoid Quercetin Are Mediated by CB1 Receptor in Human Colon Cancer Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refolo, Maria Grazia; D'Alessandro, Rosalba; Malerba, Natascia; Laezza, Chiara; Bifulco, Maurizio; Messa, Caterina; Caruso, Maria Gabriella; Notarnicola, Maria; Tutino, Valeria

    2015-12-01

    Quercetin, the major constituent of flavonoid and widely present in fruits and vegetables, is an attractive compound for cancer prevention due to its beneficial anti proliferative effects, showing a crucial role in the regulation of apoptosis and cell cycle signaling. In vitro studies have demonstrated that quercetin specifically influences colon cancer cell proliferation. Our experiments, using human colon adenocarcinoma cells, confirmed the anti proliferative effect of quercetin and gave intriguing new insight in to the knowledge of the mechanisms involved. We observed a significant increase in the expression of the endocannabinoids receptor (CB1-R) after quercetin treatment. CB1-R can be considered an estrogen responsive receptor and quercetin, having a structure similar to that of the estrogens, can interact with CB1-R leading to the regulation of cell growth. In order to clarify the contribution of the CB1-R to the quercetin action, we investigated some of the principal molecular pathways that are inhibited or activated by this natural compound. In particular we detected the inhibition of the major survival signals like the PI3K/Akt/mTOR and an induction of the pro apoptotic JNK/JUN pathways. Interestingly, the metabolism of β-catenin was modified by flavonoid both directly and through activated CB1-R. In all the experiments done, the quercetin action has proven to be reinforced by anandamide (Met-F-AEA), a CB1-R agonist, and partially counteracted by SR141716, a CB1-R antagonist. These findings open new perspectives for anticancer therapeutic strategies.

  7. Anti-Proliferative and Pro-Apoptotic Activities of 4-Methyl-2,6-bis(1-phenylethyl)phenol in Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Nak Yoon; Kim, Seung Cheol; Kim, Yun Hwan; Kim, Gihyeon; Lee, Yunmi; Sung, Gi-Ho; Kim, Ji Hye; Yang, Woo Seok; Kim, Mi Seon; Baek, Kwang-Soo; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2016-07-01

    It has been found that 4-isopropyl-2,6-bis(1-phenylethyl)phenol (KTH-13), a novel compound isolated from Cordyceps bassiana, is able to suppress tumor cell proliferation by inducing apoptosis. To mass-produce this compound, we established a total synthesis method. Using those conditions, we further synthesized various analogs with structural similarity to KTH-13. In this study, we aimed to test their anti-cancer activity by measuring anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities. Of 8 compounds tested, 4-methyl-2,6-bis(1-phenylethyl)phenol (KTH-13-Me) exhibited the strongest anti-proliferative activity toward MDA-MB 231 cells. KTH-13-Me also similarly suppressed the survival of various cancer cell lines, including C6 glioma, HCT-15, and LoVo cells. Treatment of KTH-13-Me induced several apoptotic signs in C6 glioma cells, such as morphological changes, induction of apoptotic bodies, and nuclear fragmentation and chromatin condensation. Concordantly, early-apoptotic cells were also identified by staining with FITC-Annexin V/PI. Moreover, KTH-13-Me highly enhanced the activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9, and decreased the protein level of Bcl-2. In addition, the phosphorylation levels of Src and STAT3 were diminished in KTH-13-Me-treated C6 cells. Therefore, these results suggest that KTH-13-Me can be developed as a novel anti-cancer drug capable of blocking proliferation, inducing apoptosis, and blocking cell survival signaling in cancer cells. PMID:27068261

  8. Anti-Proliferative and Pro-Apoptotic Activities of 4-Methyl-2,6-bis(1-phenylethyl)phenol in Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Nak Yoon; Kim, Seung Cheol; Kim, Yun Hwan; Kim, Gihyeon; Lee, Yunmi; Sung, Gi-Ho; Kim, Ji Hye; Yang, Woo Seok; Kim, Mi Seon; Baek, Kwang-Soo; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2016-01-01

    It has been found that 4-isopropyl-2,6-bis(1-phenylethyl)phenol (KTH-13), a novel compound isolated from Cordyceps bassiana, is able to suppress tumor cell proliferation by inducing apoptosis. To mass-produce this compound, we established a total synthesis method. Using those conditions, we further synthesized various analogs with structural similarity to KTH-13. In this study, we aimed to test their anti-cancer activity by measuring anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities. Of 8 compounds tested, 4-methyl-2,6-bis(1-phenylethyl)phenol (KTH-13-Me) exhibited the strongest anti-proliferative activity toward MDA-MB 231 cells. KTH-13-Me also similarly suppressed the survival of various cancer cell lines, including C6 glioma, HCT-15, and LoVo cells. Treatment of KTH-13-Me induced several apoptotic signs in C6 glioma cells, such as morphological changes, induction of apoptotic bodies, and nuclear fragmentation and chromatin condensation. Concordantly, early-apoptotic cells were also identified by staining with FITC-Annexin V/PI. Moreover, KTH-13-Me highly enhanced the activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9, and decreased the protein level of Bcl-2. In addition, the phosphorylation levels of Src and STAT3 were diminished in KTH-13-Me-treated C6 cells. Therefore, these results suggest that KTH-13-Me can be developed as a novel anti-cancer drug capable of blocking proliferation, inducing apoptosis, and blocking cell survival signaling in cancer cells. PMID:27068261

  9. Role of VDR in anti-proliferative effects of calcitriol in tumor-derived endothelial cells and tumor angiogenesis in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ivy; Han, Guangzhou; Seshadri, Mukund; Gillard, Bryan M.; Yu, Wei-dong; Foster, Barbara A.; Trump, Donald L.; Johnson, Candace S.

    2008-01-01

    Calcitriol (1, 25-dihydroxycholecalciferol), the major active form of vitamin D, is anti-proliferative in tumor cells and tumor-derived endothelial cells (TDEC). These actions of calcitriol are mediated at least in part by vitamin D receptor (VDR), which is expressed in many tissues including endothelial cells. To investigate the role of VDR in calcitriol effects on tumor vasculature, we established TRAMP-2 tumors subcutaneously into either VDR wild type (WT) or knockout (KO) mice. Within 30 days post inoculation, tumors in KO mice were larger than those in WT (P<0.001). TDEC from WT expressed VDR and were able to transactivate a reporter gene whereas TDEC from KO mice were not. Treatment with calcitriol resulted in growth inhibition in TDEC expressing VDR. However, TDEC from KO mice were relatively resistant, suggesting that calcitriol-mediated growth inhibition on TDEC is VDR-dependent. Further analysis of the TRAMP-C2 tumor sections revealed that the vessels in KO mice were enlarged and had less pericyte coverage compared to WT (P<0.001). Contrast-enhanced MRI demonstrated an increase in vascular volume of TRAMP tumors grown in VDR KO mice compared to WT mice (P<0.001) and FITC-dextran permeability assay suggested a higher extent of vascular leakage in tumors from KO mice. Using ELISA and Western blot analysis, there was an increase of HIF-1 alpha, VEGF, Ang1 and PDGF-BB levels observed in tumors from KO mice. These results indicate that calcitriol-mediated anti-proliferative effects on TDEC are VDR dependent and loss of VDR can lead to abnormal tumor angiogenesis. PMID:19141646

  10. Dual Anti-Metastatic and Anti-Proliferative Activity Assessment of Two Probiotics on HeLa and HT-29 Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouri Zahra

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective Lactobacilli are a group of probiotics with beneficial effects on prevention of cancer. However, there is scant data in relation with the impacts of probiotics in late-stage cancer progration, especially metastasis. The present original work was aimed to evaluate the anti-metastatic and anti-proliferative activity of lactobacillus rhamnosus supernatant (LRS and lactobacillus crispatus supernatant (LCS on the human cervical and colon adenocarcinoma cell lines (HeLa and HT-29, respectively. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, the anti-proliferative activities of LRS and LCS were determined through MTT assay. MRC-5 was used as a normal cell line. Expression analysis of CASP3, MMP2, MMP9, TIMP1 and TIMP2 genes was performed by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, following the cell synchronization. Results Supernatants of these two lactobacilli had cytotoxic effect on HeLa, however LRS treatment was only effective on HT-29 cell line. In addition, LRS had no side-effect on normal cells. It was shown that CASP3 gene expression has been reduced after treatment with supernatants of two studied lactobacilli. According to our study, LRS and LCS are efficacious in the prevention of metastasis potency in HeLa cells with decreased expression of MMP2, MMP9 and increased expression of their inhibitors. In the case of HT-29 cells, only LRS showed this effect. Conclusion Herein, we have demonstrated two probiotics which have anti-metastatic effects on malignant cells and they can be administrated to postpone late-stage of cancer disease. LRS and LCS are effective on HeLa cell lines while only the effect of LRS is significant on HT-29, through cytotoxic and anti-metastatic mechanisms. Further assessments are required to evaluate our results on the other cancer cell lines, in advance to use these probiotics in other extensive trial studies.

  11. Quantitative analysis of the anti-proliferative activity of combinations of selected iron-chelating agents and clinically used anti-neoplastic drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliska Potuckova

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated that several chelators possess marked potential as potent anti-neoplastic drugs and as agents that can ameliorate some of the adverse effects associated with standard chemotherapy. Anti-cancer treatment employs combinations of several drugs that have different mechanisms of action. However, data regarding the potential interactions between iron chelators and established chemotherapeutics are lacking. Using estrogen receptor-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells, we explored the combined anti-proliferative potential of four iron chelators, namely: desferrioxamine (DFO, salicylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (SIH, (E-N'-[1-(2-hydroxy-5-nitrophenylethyliden] isonicotinoyl hydrazone (NHAPI, and di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Dp44mT, plus six selected anti-neoplastic drugs. These six agents are used for breast cancer treatment and include: paclitaxel, 5-fluorouracil, doxorubicin, methotrexate, tamoxifen and 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide (an active metabolite of cyclophosphamide. Our quantitative chelator-drug analyses were designed according to the Chou-Talalay method for drug combination assessment. All combinations of these agents yielded concentration-dependent, anti-proliferative effects. The hydrophilic siderophore, DFO, imposed antagonism when used in combination with all six anti-tumor agents and this antagonistic effect increased with increasing dose. Conversely, synergistic interactions were observed with combinations of the lipophilic chelators, NHAPI or Dp44mT, with doxorubicin and also the combinations of SIH, NHAPI or Dp44mT with tamoxifen. The combination of Dp44mT with anti-neoplastic agents was further enhanced following formation of its redox-active iron and especially copper complexes. The most potent combinations of Dp44mT and NHAPI with tamoxifen were confirmed as synergistic using another estrogen receptor-expressing breast cancer cell line, T47D, but not estrogen receptor

  12. Quantitative analysis of the anti-proliferative activity of combinations of selected iron-chelating agents and clinically used anti-neoplastic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potuckova, Eliska; Jansova, Hana; Machacek, Miloslav; Vavrova, Anna; Haskova, Pavlina; Tichotova, Lucie; Richardson, Vera; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Richardson, Des R; Simunek, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that several chelators possess marked potential as potent anti-neoplastic drugs and as agents that can ameliorate some of the adverse effects associated with standard chemotherapy. Anti-cancer treatment employs combinations of several drugs that have different mechanisms of action. However, data regarding the potential interactions between iron chelators and established chemotherapeutics are lacking. Using estrogen receptor-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells, we explored the combined anti-proliferative potential of four iron chelators, namely: desferrioxamine (DFO), salicylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (SIH), (E)-N'-[1-(2-hydroxy-5-nitrophenyl)ethyliden] isonicotinoyl hydrazone (NHAPI), and di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Dp44mT), plus six selected anti-neoplastic drugs. These six agents are used for breast cancer treatment and include: paclitaxel, 5-fluorouracil, doxorubicin, methotrexate, tamoxifen and 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide (an active metabolite of cyclophosphamide). Our quantitative chelator-drug analyses were designed according to the Chou-Talalay method for drug combination assessment. All combinations of these agents yielded concentration-dependent, anti-proliferative effects. The hydrophilic siderophore, DFO, imposed antagonism when used in combination with all six anti-tumor agents and this antagonistic effect increased with increasing dose. Conversely, synergistic interactions were observed with combinations of the lipophilic chelators, NHAPI or Dp44mT, with doxorubicin and also the combinations of SIH, NHAPI or Dp44mT with tamoxifen. The combination of Dp44mT with anti-neoplastic agents was further enhanced following formation of its redox-active iron and especially copper complexes. The most potent combinations of Dp44mT and NHAPI with tamoxifen were confirmed as synergistic using another estrogen receptor-expressing breast cancer cell line, T47D, but not estrogen receptor-negative MDA

  13. Green synthesis of bacterial mediated anti-proliferative gold nanoparticles: inducing mitotic arrest (G2/M phase) and apoptosis (intrinsic pathway)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh Kumar, C.; Poornachandra, Y.; Chandrasekhar, Cheemalamarri

    2015-11-01

    The physiochemical and biological properties of microbial derived gold nanoparticles have potential applications in various biomedical domains as well as in cancer therapy. We have fabricated anti-proliferative bacterial mediated gold nanoparticles (b-Au NPs) using a culture supernatant of Streptomyces clavuligerus and later characterized them by UV-visible, TEM, DLS, XRD and FT-IR spectroscopic techniques. The capping agent responsible for the nanoparticle formation was characterized based on SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF-MS analyses. They were tested for anticancer activity in A549, HeLa and DU145 cell lines. The biocompatibility and non-toxic nature of the nanoparticles were tested on normal human lung cell line (MRC-5). The b-Au NPs induced the cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase and also inhibited the microtubule assembly in DU145 cells. Mechanistic studies, such as ROS, MMP, Cyt-c, GSH, caspases 9, 8 and 3 activation and the Annexin V-FITC staining, along with the above parameters tested provided sufficient evidence that the b-Au NPs induced apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway. The results supported the use of b-Au NPs for future therapeutic application in cancer therapy and other biomedical applications.The physiochemical and biological properties of microbial derived gold nanoparticles have potential applications in various biomedical domains as well as in cancer therapy. We have fabricated anti-proliferative bacterial mediated gold nanoparticles (b-Au NPs) using a culture supernatant of Streptomyces clavuligerus and later characterized them by UV-visible, TEM, DLS, XRD and FT-IR spectroscopic techniques. The capping agent responsible for the nanoparticle formation was characterized based on SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF-MS analyses. They were tested for anticancer activity in A549, HeLa and DU145 cell lines. The biocompatibility and non-toxic nature of the nanoparticles were tested on normal human lung cell line (MRC-5). The b-Au NPs induced the cell cycle arrest in G2

  14. Lasiodiplodan, an exocellular (1→6)-β-D: -glucan from Lasiodiplodia theobromae MMPI: production on glucose, fermentation kinetics, rheology and anti-proliferative activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves da Cunha, Mário A; Turmina, Janaína A; Ivanov, Raphael C; Barroso, Roney R; Marques, Patrícia T; Fonseca, Eveline A I; Fortes, Zuleica B; Dekker, Robert F H; Khaper, Neelam; Barbosa, Aneli M

    2012-08-01

    Lasiodiplodan, an exopolysaccharide of the (1→6)-β-D: -glucan type, is produced by Lasiodiplodia theobromae MMPI when grown under submerged culture on glucose. The objective of this study was to evaluate lasiodiplodan production by examining the effects of carbon (glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose) and nitrogen sources (KNO(3), (NH(4))(2)SO(4), urea, yeast extract, peptone), its production in shake flasks compared to a stirred-tank bioreactor, and to study the rheology of lasiodiplodan, and lasiodiplodan's anti-proliferative effect on breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Although glucose (2.05 ± 0.05 g L(-1)), maltose (2.08 ± 0.04 g L(-1)) and yeast extract (2.46 ± 0.06 g L(-1)) produced the highest amounts of lasiodiplodan, urea as N source resulted in more lasiodiplodan per unit biomass than yeast extract (0.74 ± 0.006 vs. 0.22 ± 0.008 g g(-1)). A comparison of the fermentative parameters of L. theobromae MMPI in shake flasks and a stirred-tank bioreactor at 120 h on glucose as carbon source showed maximum lasiodiplodan production in agitated flasks (7.01 ± 0.07 g L(-1)) with a specific yield of 0.25 ± 0.57 g g(-1) and a volumetric productivity of 0.06 ± 0.001 g L(-1) h(-1). A factorial 2(2) statistical design developed to evaluate the effect of glucose concentration (20-60 g L(-1)) and impeller speed (100-200 rpm) on lasiodiplodan production in the bioreactor showed the highest production (6.32 g L(-1)) at 72 h. Lasiodiplodan presented pseudoplastic behaviour, and the apparent viscosity increased at 60°C in the presence of CaCl(2). Anti-proliferative activity of lasiodiplodan was demonstrated in MCF-7 cells, which was time- and dose-dependent with an IC(50) of 100 μg lasiodiplodan mL(-1). PMID:22399240

  15. In vitro antioxidant and anti-proliferative activities of seed extracts of Nymphaea mexicana in different solvents and GC-MS analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umar Shah

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A first attempt was made for the GC-MS profiling, anti-oxidant analysis cum DNA protective properties and anti-proliferative activities of a wild aquatic plant, Nymphaea mexicana found in Himalayan region and consumed for its peculiar taste and aroma. Three different solvents were used viz; methanol, ethanol and water. Extracts showed a dose dependent relationship with highest antioxidant potential in ethanol, however highest TPC was found in methanol (0.110 ± 0.05 GAE/g as compared to ethanol (0.095 ± 0.05 GAE/g and water (0.073 ± 0.05 GAE/g. Plant extracts showed efficient DNA damage protection (at concentrations > 30 μg/mL and maximum efficiency against DNA damage was seen in ethanolic solvent. The antiproliferative activities of the plant were noteworthy at a concentration of 20 mg/ mL but were significantly lower than standard (5-flourouracil. The plant is known for its specific taste and aroma hence GC-MS profiling were carried out and relative percentage of important compounds found was determined. GC-MS analysis confirmed some major aroma rendering compounds along with some major anti-oxidants.

  16. Foodomics study on the effects of extracellular production of hydrogen peroxide by rosemary polyphenols on the anti-proliferative activity of rosemary polyphenols against HT-29 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés, Alberto; García-Cañas, Virginia; Koçak, Engin; Simó, Carolina; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2016-07-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated a strong association between the antioxidant properties of rosemary polyphenols and their chemoprotective activity. However, the prooxidant effects of rosemary polyphenols have been rarely reported. In this work, a foodomics study is performed to investigate the in vitro autooxidation of carnosic acid (CA), carnosol (CS) and a polyphenol-enriched rosemary extract (SC-RE) in cell culture conditions. The results revealed that rosemary polyphenols autooxidation in culture medium generated H2 O2 at different rates. Generated H2 O2 levels by SC-RE and CA, but not CS, were correlated with intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in HT-29 cells, and were partially involved in their anti-proliferative effect in this cell line. These compounds also induced different effects on glutathione metabolism. Results also indicated that high extracellular H2 O2 concentrations, resulting of using high (45 μg/mL) SC-RE concentration in culture media, exerted some artifactual effects related with cell cycle, but they did not influence the expression of relevant molecular biomarkers of stress. PMID:26842614

  17. Anti-proliferative and ADMET screening of novel 3-(1H-indol-3-yl-1, 3-diphenylpropan-1-one derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjunatha K. Siddappa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer tends to be one of the major diseases in the present century affecting global population, and proliferation of cancerous cells needs to be eliminated as the cell growth is uncontrolled. In this present study, a series of facile, high yielding 3-(1H-indol-3-yl-1, 3-diphenylpropan-1-ones 3(a–j was designed, synthesized and evaluated for anti-proliferative activity against different human cancer cell lines; MCF-7 (breast cancer, K562 (leukemic cancer, HeLa (cervical cancer, Colo205 (colorectal adreno carcinoma, HepG2 (Hepato cellular carcinoma cell lines. The compounds 3a, 3c, 3d, 3e, 3f, 3g and 3j exhibited an average inhibition of 35% against Hepatocellular Carcinoma (Hepg2 cell lines whereas, compounds 3a, 3c, 3d and 3e exhibited 33, 31, 35 and 33% inhibition, respectively, against HeLa cells at 10 μm concentrations. Doxorubicin was employed as a positive control. The ADME-TOX data was obtained by subjecting the molecules in silico to quantitatively predict the physicochemical properties. The structure of the title compounds were established by IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and Mass analysis.

  18. A new class of hybrid anticancer agents inspired by the synergistic effects of curcumin and genistein: Design, synthesis, and anti-proliferative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiao-Hong; Yu, Kevin; Zhang, Xiaojie; Chen, Guanglin; Hoover, Andrew; Leon, Francisco; Wang, Rubing; Subrahmanyam, Nithya; Addo Mekuria, Ermias; Harinantenaina Rakotondraibe, Liva

    2015-10-15

    Inspired by the synergistic effects of dietary natural products with different scaffolds on the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, incorporation of central (1E,4E)-1,4-penta-dien-3-one linker (an optimal substitute for the central metabolically unstable diketone linker of curcumin), 1-alkyl-1H-imidazol-2-yl (a promising bioisostere of terminal aryl group in curcumin), and chromone (the common pharmacophore in genistein and quercetin) into one chemical entity resulted in ten new hybrid molecules, 3-((1E,4E)-5-(1-alkyl-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-3-oxopenta-1,4-dien-1-yl)-4H-chromen-4-ones. They were synthesized through a three-step transformation using acid-catalyzed aldol condensation as key step. The WST-1 cell proliferation assay showed that they have greater anti-proliferative potency than curcumin, quercetin, and genistein on both androgen-dependent and androgen-independent human prostate cancer cells. PMID:26341135

  19. Taurolidine and congeners activate hTRPA1 but not hTRPV1 channels and stimulate CGRP release from mouse tracheal sensory nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kichko, Tatjana I; Pfirrmann, Rolf W; Reeh, Peter W

    2016-02-01

    Taurolidine has long been in clinical use as an antimicrobial irrigation that does not impede wound healing. It can even be administered intravenously (30 g/day) to treat sepsis or to exert newly recognized antineoplastic actions. Only one irritant effect is reported, that is, to temporarily induce burning pain of unknown origin when applied to body cavities or peripheral veins. The structure of the molecule suggested the chemoreceptor channel TRPA1 as a potential target, which was verified measuring stimulated CGRP release from sensory nerves of the isolated mouse trachea and calcium influx in hTRPA1-transfected HEK293 cells. With both methods, the concentration-response relationship of taurolidine exceeded the threshold value below 500 μmol/L and 100 μmol/L, respectively, and reached saturation at 1 mmol/L. The clinical 2% taurolidine solution did not evoke greater or longer lasting responses. The reversible tracheal response was abolished in TRPA1(-/-) but retained in TRPV1(-/-) mice. Consistently, hTRPV1-HEK showed no calcium influx as a response, likewise native HEK293 cells and hTRPA1-HEK deprived of extracellular calcium did not respond to taurolidine 1 mmol/L. The metabolite taurultam and its oxathiazine derivative, expected to cause less burning pain, showed weak tracheal irritancy only at 10 mmol/L, acting also through hTRPA1 but not hTRPV1. In conclusion, taurolidine, its metabolite, and a novel derivative showed no unspecific cellular effects but selectively, concentration-dependently and reversibly activated the irritant receptor TRPA1 in CGRP-expressing, thus nociceptive, neurons. The clinical solution of 2% taurolidine (~70 mmol/L) can, thus, rightly be expected to cause transient burning pain and neurogenic inflammation. PMID:26977296

  20. Synthesis, characterization, DNA interactions, DNA cleavage, radical scavenging activity, antibacterial, anti-proliferative and docking studies of new transition metal complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chennam, Kishan Prasad; Ravi, Mudavath; Ushaiah, B; Srinu, V; Eslavath, Ravi Kumar; Devi, Ch Sarala

    2016-01-01

    The compound N-(2-hydroxybenzylidene)-1-ethyl-1, 4-dihydro-7-methyl-4-oxo-1, 8 naphthyridine-3-carbohydrazide (LH) and its Cu (II), Co (II) and Zn (II) complexes were synthesized and characterized. The absorption spectral titrations and competitive DNA binding studies depicted those complexes of title compound bind to CT-DNA through intercalation. Interestingly [Cu (II)-(L2)] showed relatively high binding constant value (6.61 x 10(5) M(-1)) compared to [Co (II)-(L2)] (4.378× 10(5) M(-1)) and [Zn (II)-(L2)] (3.1x10(5) M(-1)). Ligand and its complexes were also examined for DNA nuclease activity against pBR-322 plasmid DNA, which showed that [Cu (II)-(L2)] had the best hydrolytic cleavage property displaying prominent double-strand DNA cleavage. In addition, antioxidant activities of the ligand and its metal complexes investigated through scavenging effects for DPPH radical in- vitro, indicated their potentiality as good antioxidants. The in vitro anti-bacterial study inferred the better anti-bacterial activity of [Cu (II)-(L2)] and this was also correlated theoretically by employing docking studies wherein [Cu (II)-(L2)] displayed good Gold score and Chem score. Finally the in vitro anti- proliferative activity of studied compounds was tested against HeLa and MCF-7 cell lines. Interestingly [Cu (II)-(L2)] displayed lower IC50 value and lower percentage of viability in both HeLa and MCF-7 cell lines.

  1. A novel dual-functioning ruthenium(II)-arene complex of an anti-microbial ciprofloxacin derivative - Anti-proliferative and anti-microbial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ude, Ziga; Romero-Canelón, Isolda; Twamley, Brendan; Fitzgerald Hughes, Deirdre; Sadler, Peter J; Marmion, Celine J

    2016-07-01

    7-(4-(Decanoyl)piperazin-1-yl)-ciprofloxacin, CipA, (1) which is an analogue of the antibiotic ciprofloxacin, and its ruthenium(II) complex [Ru(η(6)-p-cymene)(CipA-H)Cl], (2) have been synthesised and the x-ray crystal structures of 1·1.3H2O·0.6CH3OH and 2·CH3OH·0.5H2O determined. The complex adopts a typical pseudo-octahedral 'piano-stool' geometry, with Ru(II) π-bonded to the p-cymene ring and σ-bonded to a chloride and two oxygen atoms of the chelated fluoroquinolone ligand. The complex is highly cytotoxic in the low μM range and is as potent as the clinical drug cisplatin against the human cancer cell lines A2780, A549, HCT116, and PC3. It is also highly cytotoxic against cisplatin- and oxaliplatin-resistant cell lines suggesting a different mechanism of action. The complex also retained low μM cytotoxicity against the human colon cancer cell line HCT116p53 in which the tumour suppressor p53 had been knocked out, suggesting that the potent anti-proliferative properties associated with this complex are independent of the status of p53 (in contrast to cisplatin). The complex also retained moderate anti-bacterial activity in two Escherichia coli, a laboratory strain and a clinical isolate resistant to first, second and third generation β-lactam antibiotics.

  2. Umbelliprenin is cytotoxic against QU-DB large cell lung cancer cell line but anti-proliferative against A549 adenocarcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaghanzadeh Narges

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Umbelliprenin is a natural compound, belonging to the class of sesquiterpene coumarins. Recently, umbelliprenin has attracted the researchers' attention for its antitumor activities against skin tumors. Its effect on lung cancer is largely unknown. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of this natural compound, which is expected to have low adverse effects, on lung cancer. Methods The QU-DB large cell and A549 adenocarcinoma lung cancer cell lines were treated with umbelliprenin. IC50 values were estimated using methyl thiazolely diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay, in which a decrease in MTT reduction can occur as a result of cell death or cell proliferation inhibition. To quantify the rate of cell death at IC50 values, flow cytometry using Annexin V-FITC (for apoptotic cells, and propidium iodide (for necrotic cells dyes were employed. Results Data from three independent MTT experiments in triplicate revealed that IC50 values for QU-DB and A549 were 47 ± 5.3 μM and 52 ± 1.97 μM, respectively. Annexin V/PI staining demonstrated that umbelliprenin treatment at IC50 induced 50% cell death in QU-DB cells, but produced no significant death in A549 cells until increasing the umbelliprenin concentration to IC80. The pattern of cell death was predominantly apoptosis in both cell lines. When peripheral blood mononuclear cells were treated with 50 μM and less concentrations of umbelliprenin, no suppressive effect was observed. Conclusions We found cytotoxic/anti-proliferative effects of umbelliprenin against two different types of lung cancer cell lines.

  3. Umbelliprenin is Cytotoxic against QU-DB Large Cell Lung Cancer Cell Line but Anti-Proliferative against A549 Adenocarcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Ghaderi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background:Umbelliprenin is a natural compound, belonging to the class of sesquiterpene coumarins.Recently, umbelliprenin has attracted the researchers' attention for its antitumor activitiesagainst skin tumors. Its effect on lung cancer is largely unknown. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of this natural compound, which is expected to have low adverse effects, on lung cancer.Methods:The QU-DB large cell and A549 adenocarcinoma lung cancer cell lines were treated with umbelliprenin. IC50 values were estimated using methyl thiazolely diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay, in which a decrease in MTT reduction can occur as a result of cell death or cell proliferation inhibition. To quantify the rate of cell death at IC50 values, flow cytometry using Annexin V-FITC (for apoptotic cells, and propidium iodide (for necrotic cells dyes were employed.Results:Data from three independent MTT experiments in triplicate revealed that IC50 values for QUDB and A549 were 47 ± 5.3 μM and 52 ± 1.97 μM, respectively. Annexin V/PI staining demonstrated that umbelliprenin treatment at IC50 induced 50% cell death in QU-DB cells,but produced no significant death in A549 cells until increasing the umbelliprenin concentration to IC80. The pattern of cell death was predominantly apoptosis in both cell lines. When peripheral blood mononuclear cells were treated with 50 μM and lessconcentrations of umbelliprenin, no suppressive effect was observed.Conclusions:We found cytotoxic/anti-proliferative effects of umbelliprenin against two different types of lung cancer cell lines.

  4. A novel dual-functioning ruthenium(II)-arene complex of an anti-microbial ciprofloxacin derivative - Anti-proliferative and anti-microbial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ude, Ziga; Romero-Canelón, Isolda; Twamley, Brendan; Fitzgerald Hughes, Deirdre; Sadler, Peter J; Marmion, Celine J

    2016-07-01

    7-(4-(Decanoyl)piperazin-1-yl)-ciprofloxacin, CipA, (1) which is an analogue of the antibiotic ciprofloxacin, and its ruthenium(II) complex [Ru(η(6)-p-cymene)(CipA-H)Cl], (2) have been synthesised and the x-ray crystal structures of 1·1.3H2O·0.6CH3OH and 2·CH3OH·0.5H2O determined. The complex adopts a typical pseudo-octahedral 'piano-stool' geometry, with Ru(II) π-bonded to the p-cymene ring and σ-bonded to a chloride and two oxygen atoms of the chelated fluoroquinolone ligand. The complex is highly cytotoxic in the low μM range and is as potent as the clinical drug cisplatin against the human cancer cell lines A2780, A549, HCT116, and PC3. It is also highly cytotoxic against cisplatin- and oxaliplatin-resistant cell lines suggesting a different mechanism of action. The complex also retained low μM cytotoxicity against the human colon cancer cell line HCT116p53 in which the tumour suppressor p53 had been knocked out, suggesting that the potent anti-proliferative properties associated with this complex are independent of the status of p53 (in contrast to cisplatin). The complex also retained moderate anti-bacterial activity in two Escherichia coli, a laboratory strain and a clinical isolate resistant to first, second and third generation β-lactam antibiotics. PMID:26993079

  5. BPR1K653, a novel Aurora kinase inhibitor, exhibits potent anti-proliferative activity in MDR1 (P-gp170-mediated multidrug-resistant cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Hei Antonio Cheung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Over-expression of Aurora kinases promotes the tumorigenesis of cells. The aim of this study was to determine the preclinical profile of a novel pan-Aurora kinase inhibitor, BPR1K653, as a candidate for anti-cancer therapy. Since expression of the drug efflux pump, MDR1, reduces the effectiveness of various chemotherapeutic compounds in human cancers, this study also aimed to determine whether the potency of BPR1K653 could be affected by the expression of MDR1 in cancer cells. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: BPR1K653 specifically inhibited the activity of Aurora-A and Aurora-B kinase at low nano-molar concentrations in vitro. Anti-proliferative activity of BPR1K653 was evaluated in various human cancer cell lines. Results of the clonogenic assay showed that BPR1K653 was potent in targeting a variety of cancer cell lines regardless of the tissue origin, p53 status, or expression of MDR1. At the cellular level, BPR1K653 induced endo-replication and subsequent apoptosis in both MDR1-negative and MDR1-positive cancer cells. Importantly, it showed potent activity against the growth of xenograft tumors of the human cervical carcinoma KB and KB-derived MDR1-positive KB-VIN10 cells in nude mice. Finally, BPR1K653 also exhibited favorable pharmacokinetic properties in rats. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: BPR1K653 is a novel potent anti-cancer compound, and its potency is not affected by the expression of the multiple drug resistant protein, MDR1, in cancer cells. Therefore, BPR1K653 is a promising anti-cancer compound that has potential for the management of various malignancies, particularly for patients with MDR1-related drug resistance after prolonged chemotherapeutic treatments.

  6. Taurolidine-citrate lock solution (TauroLock significantly reduces CVAD-associated grampositive infections in pediatric cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleischhack Gudrun

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taurolidin/Citrate (TauroLock™, a lock solution with broad spectrum antimicrobial activity, may prevent bloodstream infection (BSI due to coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS or 'MRSE' in case of methicillin-resistant isolates in pediatric cancer patients with a long term central venous access device (CVAD, Port- or/Broviac-/Hickman-catheter type. Methods In a single center prospective 48-months cohort study we compared all patients receiving anticancer chemotherapy from April 2003 to March 2005 (group 1, heparin lock with 200 IU/ml sterile normal saline 0.9%; Canusal® Wockhardt UK Ltd, Wrexham, Wales and all patients from April 2005 to March 2007 (group 2; taurolidine 1.35%/Sodium Citrate 4%; TauroLock™, Tauropharm, Waldbüttelbrunn, Germany. Results In group 1 (heparin, 90 patients had 98 CVAD in use during the surveillance period. 14 of 30 (47% BSI were 'primary Gram positive BSI due to CoNS (n = 4 or MRSE (n = 10' [incidence density (ID; 2.30 per 1000 inpatient CVAD-utilization days]. In group 2 (TauroLock™, 89 patients had 95 CVAD in use during the surveillance period. 3 of 25 (12% BSI were caused by CoNS. (ID, 0.45. The difference in the ID between the two groups was statistically significant (P = 0.004. Conclusion The use of Taurolidin/Citrate (TauroLock™ significantly reduced the number and incidence density of primary catheter-associated BSI due to CoNS and MRSE in pediatric cancer patients.

  7. Impact of ABCB1 1236C > T-2677G > T-3435C > T polymorphisms on the anti-proliferative activity of imatinib, nilotinib, dasatinib and ponatinib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessilly, Géraldine; Panin, Nadtha; Elens, Laure; Haufroid, Vincent; Demoulin, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of ABCB1 (also called P-glycoprotein) confers resistance to multiple anticancer drugs, including tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Several ABCB1 single nucleotide polymorphisms affect the transporter activity. The most common ABCB1 variants are 1236C > T, 2677G > T, 3435C > T and have been associated with clinical response to imatinib in chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) in some studies. We evaluated the impact of these polymorphisms on the anti-proliferative effect and the intracellular accumulation of TKIs (imatinib, nilotinib, dasatinib and ponatinib) in transfected HEK293 and K562 cells. ABCB1 overexpression increased the resistance of cells to doxorubicin, vinblastine and TKIs. Imatinib anti-proliferative effect and accumulation were decreased to a larger extent in cells expressing the ABCB1 wild-type protein compared with the 1236T-2677T-3435T variant relatively to control cells. By contrast, ABCB1 polymorphisms influenced the activity of nilotinib, dasatinib and ponatinib to a much lesser extent. In conclusion, our data suggest that wild-type ABCB1 exports imatinib more efficiently than the 1236T-2677T-3435T variant protein, providing a molecular basis for the reported association between ABCB1 polymorphisms and the response to imatinib in CML. Our results also point to a weaker impact of ABCB1 polymorphisms on the activity of nilotinib, dasatinib and ponatinib. PMID:27405085

  8. Efeito anti-proliferativo das infusões de Achyrocline satureioides DC (Asteraceae sobre o ciclo celular de Allium cepa Anti-proliferative effect of infusions of Achyrocline satureioides on the Allium cepa cell cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana M. Fachinetto

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Achyrocline satureioides (marcela é utilizada na medicina popular brasileira, na forma de chá, como tratamento de patologias digestivas e inflamatórias. O efeito anti-proliferativo de infusões de marcela sobre o ciclo celular da cebola foi avaliado, utilizando-se inflorescências de marcela recém coletadas (2005 e após armazenamento por 30 meses (2003. Preparou-se as infusões em duas concentrações: 5,0 mg/mL (concentração usual como chá e 20 mg/mL. Utilizaram-se 3 grupos de 6 bulbos de cebola para cada população de marcela. Retirou-se um grupo de bulbos controle de cada população. Todos os bulbos enraizados em água destilada foram transferidos para os extratos de marcela e permaneceram por 24 horas, (os bulbos controle permaneceram em água. As radículas foram coletadas, fixadas em etanol-ácido acético (3:1 por 24 h e estocadas em álcool 70%. Foram analisadas 6000 células por grupo de bulbos, e os índices mitóticos calculados submetidos a análise estatística pelo teste chi2 a 5%. Conclui-se que as infusões de marcela possuem ação antiproliferativa sobre o ciclo celular da cebola e que essa ação inibitória da divisão celular aumenta conforme aumento da concentração, bem como após o armazenamento.Achyrocline saturoides (marcela is used in Brazilian folk medicine as a tea in the treatment of digestive and inflammatory diseases. The anti-proliferative effect of infusions of marcela on onion cell cycle was evaluated by using the inflorescences of recently collected marcela and after the storage for 30 months. Marcela inflorescences were collected for the infusion preparations in 2003 and in 2005 (used still fresh. We prepared the infusions at two concentrations 5.0 mg/mL (concentration used as tea and 20 mg/mL. We used two groups of six onion bulbs for each population of marcela, and one group of bulbs of each population was withdrawn as a control group. All bulbs rooted in distilled water and after they were

  9. Differentiation-inducing and anti-proliferative activities of isoliquiritigenin and all-trans-retinoic acid on B16F0 melanoma cells: Mechanisms profiling by RNA-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoyu; Yang, Ming; Hao, Wenjin; Han, Jichun; Ma, Jun; Wang, Caixia; Sun, Shiguo; Zheng, Qiusheng

    2016-10-30

    Melanoma is a cancer that arises from melanocytes, specialized pigmented cells that are found predominantly in the skin. The incidence of malignant melanoma has significantly increased over the last decade. With the development of therapy, the survival rate of some kind of cancer has been improved greatly. But the treatment of melanoma remains unsatisfactory. Much of melanoma's resistance to traditional chemotherapy is believed to arise intrinsically, by virtue of potent growth and cell survival-promoting genetic alteration. Therefore, significant attention has recently been focused on differentiation therapy, as well as differentiation inducer compounds. In previous study, we found isoliquiritigenin (ISL), a natural product extracted from licorice, could induce B16F0 melanoma cell differentiation. Here we investigated the transcriptional response of melanoma differentiation process induced by ISL and all-trans-retinoic acid (RA). Results showed that 390 genes involves in 201 biochemical pathways were differentially expressed in ISL treatment and 304 genes in 193 pathways in RA treatment. Differential expressed genes (DGEs, fold-change (FC)≥10) with the function of anti-proliferative and differentiation inducing indicated a loss of grade malignancy characteristic. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis indicated glutathione metabolism, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and pentose phosphate pathway were the top three relative pathway perturbed by ISL, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway was the most important pathway in RA treatment. In the analysis of hierarchical clustering of DEGs, we discovered 72 DEGs involved in the process of drug action. We thought Cited1, Tgm2, Xaf1, Cd59a, Fbxo2, Adh7 may have critical role in the differentiation of melanoma. The evidence displayed herein confirms the critical role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in melanoma pathobiology and provides evidence for future targets in the

  10. New steroidal 17β-carboxy derivatives present anti-5α-reductase activity and anti-proliferative effects in a human androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Cristina; Varela, Carla; Correia-da-Silva, Georgina; Tavares da Silva, Elisiário; Carvalho, Rui A; Costa, Saul C P; Cunha, Sara C; Fernandes, José O; Teixeira, Natércia; Roleira, Fernanda M F

    2013-11-01

    The androgens testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), besides playing an important role in prostate development and growth, are also responsible for the development and progression of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer. Therefore, the actions of these hormones can be antagonized by preventing the irreversible conversion of T into DHT by inhibiting 5α-reductase (5α-R). This has been a useful therapeutic approach for the referred diseases and can be achieved by using 5α-reductase inhibitors (RIs). Steroidal RIs, finasteride and dutasteride, are used in clinic for BPH treatment and were also proposed for chemoprevention of prostate cancer. Nevertheless, due to the increase in bone and muscle loss, impotency and occurrence of high-grade prostate tumours, it is important to seek for other potent and specific molecules with lower side effects. In the present work, we designed and synthesized steroids with the 3-keto-Δ(4) moiety in the A-ring, as in the 5α-R substrate T, and with carboxamide, carboxyester or carboxylic acid functions at the C-17β position. The inhibitory 5α-R activity, in human prostate microsomes, as well as the anti-proliferative effects of the most potent compounds, in a human androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell line (LNCaP cells), were investigated. Our results showed that steroids 3, 4 and 5 are good RIs, which suggest that C-17β lipophylic amides favour 5α-R inhibition. Moreover, these steroids induce a decrease in cell viability of stimulated LNCaP cells, in a 5α-R dependent-manner, similarly to finasteride. PMID:23933094

  11. A novel, non-apoptotic role for Scythe/BAT3: a functional switch between the pro- and anti-proliferative roles of p21 during the cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila T Yong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Scythe/BAT3 is a member of the BAG protein family whose role in apoptosis has been extensively studied. However, since the developmental defects observed in Bat3-null mouse embryos cannot be explained solely by defects in apoptosis, we investigated whether BAT3 is also involved in cell-cycle progression. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a stable-inducible Bat3-knockdown cellular system, we demonstrated that reduced BAT3 protein level causes a delay in both G1/S transition and G2/M progression. Concurrent with these changes in cell-cycle progression, we observed a reduction in the turnover and phosphorylation of the CDK inhibitor p21, which is best known as an inhibitor of DNA replication; however, phosphorylated p21 has also been shown to promote G2/M progression. Our findings indicate that in Bat3-knockdown cells, p21 continues to be synthesized during cell-cycle phases that do not normally require p21, resulting in p21 protein accumulation and a subsequent delay in cell-cycle progression. Finally, we showed that BAT3 co-localizes with p21 during the cell cycle and is required for the translocation of p21 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus during the G1/S transition and G2/M progression. CONCLUSION: Our study reveals a novel, non-apoptotic role for BAT3 in cell-cycle regulation. By maintaining a low p21 protein level during the G1/S transition, BAT3 counteracts the inhibitory effect of p21 on DNA replication and thus enables the cells to progress from G1 to S phase. Conversely, during G2/M progression, BAT3 facilitates p21 phosphorylation by cyclin A/Cdk2, an event required for G2/M progression. BAT3 modulates these pro- and anti-proliferative roles of p21 at least in part by regulating cyclin A abundance, as well as p21 translocation between the cytoplasm and the nucleus to ensure that it functions in the appropriate intracellular compartment during each phase of the cell cycle.

  12. 美洛昔康抑制人结肠癌细胞增殖与Wnt/β-catenin信号的关系研究%Anti-proliferative effect of meloxicam and Wnt/β-catenin signal in colon cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周密; 何百成; 秧茂盛

    2015-01-01

    Aim To investigate the inhibitory effect of meloxicam ( Mel ) on human colon cancer LoVo cells and its mechanism. Methods Crystal violet staining assay and flow cytometry assay were performed to de-termine the anti-proliferative effect of Mel. Flow cy-tometry assay and H&E assay were used to evaluate the apoptotic effect of Mel. Luciferase reporter plasmid ISRE-Luc was employed to measure the effect of Mel on the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling transduc-tion. Western blot assay was used to detect effect of Mel on the expression level of β-catenin protein. Re-sults Compared with the control group, the inhibitory rate of cell proliferation at 72 h and 100 μmol · L-1 Mel was ( 57. 635 ± 3. 86 )% ( t = 10. 044 , P =0. 001);the cell apoptotic rate at 24 h and 60 μmol· L-1 Mel was ( 33. 6 ± 1. 7 )% ( t = 30. 166 , P =0. 001 );the transcriptional activities of TCF/LEF and Myc/Max at 24 h and 60 μmol · L-1 were ( 40. 05 ± 2. 79 )% ( t = 14. 864 , P = 0. 001 ) and ( 35. 9 ± 2. 38 )% ( t =16. 904 , P =0. 001 ) respectively; the levels of intracellular β-catenin protein at 24 h or 48 h and 40 μmol·L-1 were (71 ± 3. 78)%(t=7. 353,P=0. 003 ) or ( 52. 66 ± 3. 57 )% ( t = 11. 724 , P =0. 001 ) respectively. Conclusion Mel may inhibit proliferation and promote apoptosis of LoVo cells by in-hibiting Wnt/β-catenin pathway signaling transduction and decreasing intracellular β-catenin protein level.%目的:研究美洛昔康( meloxicam,Mel)对人结肠癌细胞LoVo增殖抑制作用及其机制。方法以人结肠癌细胞株LoVo为研究对象,体外药物敏感试验(结晶紫染色)和流式细胞术( FCM)分析Mel对细胞的增殖抑制作用;流式细胞术和HE染色检测Mel对细胞凋亡的影响;萤光素酶报告质粒检测Mel 对 Wnt/β-catenin 通路信号转导的影响;Western blot检测Mel对细胞内β-catenin蛋白水平的影响。结果与对照组相比,Mel能抑制LoVo细胞增殖,72 h、100μmol· L-1 Mel

  13. Substance use - prescription drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Substance use disorder - prescription drugs; Substance abuse - prescription drugs; Drug abuse - prescription drugs; Drug use - prescription drugs; Narcotics - substance use; Opioid - substance use; Sedative - substance use; Hypnotic - substance ...

  14. Suppressive Effect of Chitosan-taurolidine Nanogel on Invasiveness of HeLa Cells Treated with CO2 Pneumoperitoneum Pressure%壳聚糖-滔罗定纳米凝胶对CO2气腹后HeLa细胞侵袭性的抑制作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨琰; 黄颢; 严兆华; 吕炎; 张凤兰

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the suppressive effect of the chitosan-taurolidine nanogel on the invasiveness of HeLa cells treated with CO2 pneumoperitoneum pressure. Methods Chitosan (0. 02% ) ,as a nano carrier ,was used to synthesize the taurolidine nanogel. The morphology of the fresh-prepared nanogel was observed by the scanning electron microscopy. The invasive ability of HeLa cells was detected by the Transwell migration assay before and after chitosan-taurolidine nanogel treatment. Results Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the chitosan-taurolidine nanogel presented a homogenous structure with a large quantity of fiber interwoven to form a network. The interspace of the network was 50-300 μm in diameter. After treatment with CO2 pneumoperitoneum pressure ,the number of invading and migrating HeLa cells was (69. 2±1. 5 ) and (90. 5 ±4. 1 ) and it was decreased to (20. 8±2. 5 ) and (61. 3±2. 8 ) after chitosan-taurolidine nanogel treatment with the difference being statistically significant ( P<0. 05 ). Conclusion The chitosan-taurolidine nanogel could restrain the invasion and migration of HeLa cells treated with CO2 pneumoperitoneum pressure ,which suggested that it may become a potential treatment alternative that can reduce tumor metastasis after laparoscopic CO2 pneumoperitoneum pressure treatment.%目的 探讨纳米载体壳聚糖(chitosan,CS)包裹新型抑癌剂滔罗定(taurolidine,TRO)所合成的纳米凝胶对CO2气腹后HeLa细胞侵袭性的抑制作用.方法以0.02%的壳聚糖为纳米载体,制备滔罗定凝胶,采用扫描电镜观察新鲜制备的纳米凝胶形态.以终浓度为0.2 mg/mL的壳聚糖-滔罗定凝胶处理HeLa细胞24 h后,Transwell小室法检测细胞处理前后侵袭及迁徙能力的改变.结果 所制备的壳聚糖-滔罗定凝胶为匀质、透明的胶样液体,电镜下凝胶为大量纤维交织形成支架的匀质结构,支架间空隙直径为50~300 μm.CO2气腹后HeLa细胞

  15. Recent Advances in Researches on Physiologically Active Substances in Holothurians

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hirata Takashi; Zaima Nobuhiro; Yamashita Kyoko; Noguchi Ryoko; XUE Changhu; Sugawara Tatsuya

    2005-01-01

    In this report, we reviewed recent literature on physiologically active substances from sea cucumbers (SCs) and their activities together with results obtained from our study. Preventive properties against lipid metabolism were reported in rats using a whole SC preparation with no particular constituent specified. Administration of the preparation lowered serum and hepatic cholesterol levels and improved the HDL/LDL ratio. These functions may be attributed to the stimulatory effect of the extract on the secretion of cholesterol in feces. Novel fucosylated chondroitin sulfates (FCSs) from Ludwigothurea grisea significantly induced fibroblast growth factor 2-dependent angiogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The proangiogenetic activity seemed attributable to the action of the sulfated fucose branches on the polysaccharide.SCs contain mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) that are capable of absorbing UV. A biogenetic precursor of MAAs was first reported in SCs. The anti-proliferative effects of a branched chain fatty acid from a sea cucumber on prostate cancer cells was reported with the activity of 5-lipoxygenase. Glycosphingolipid constituents in SCs have been systematically analyzed over the past ten years. The results showed that the gangliosides in several SCs differed from those of mammals in that a sialic acid of SC gangliosides directly binded to glucose of cerebroside. Neuritogenic activity of the glycosphingolipids was demonstrated in vitro experiments and may lead to the development of therapeutic products for neurological disorders. Our study also showed that sphingoid bases, the hydrolyzed products of glycosphingolipids from SCs, induced significant apoptosis in several tumor cell lines.

  16. Substance use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Substance abuse; Illicit drug abuse; Narcotic abuse; Hallucinogen abuse ... Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. Weiss RD. Drugs of abuse. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  17. Bioactive substances

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Wahidullah, S.

    Chemistry related to certain bioactive molecules, from Indian Ocean Region, developed into drugs or which served as models for the synthesis of more effective bioactive substances or in use in fundamental studies of physiological and biochemical...

  18. Isolation,Identification and Cancer Cell Anti-proliferative Activity of Fomitopsis officinalis Fruit Body Constituents%药用拟层孔菌子实体的化学成分及其对肿瘤细胞增殖抑制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    池梦怡; 贾力耕; 包海鹰

    2014-01-01

    Eight compounds,isolated and purified from Fomitopsis officinalis fruit bodies by silica gel column chromatography,Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography and recrystallization,were identified by NMR and mass spectrometry as 4,6,8 (14),22 (23)-tetraen-3-one-ergos-tane,ergosta-7,22,dien-3β-ol,3-keto-dehydrosulfurenic acid,dehydroeburicoic acid,dehydroeburiconic acid,and fomefficinic acids A,B and C. 4,6,8 (14),22 (23)-tetraen-3-one-ergostane has been isolated from F.officinalis fruit bodies for the first time.Fomefficinic acids A and C,3-keto-dehydrosulfurenic acid and dehydroeburicoic acid were obtained in high yield and tested for anti-proliferative activity against two human cancer cell lines.Fomefficinic acids A and C,and 3-keto-dehydrosulfurenic acid,inhibited the growth of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells,while fomefficinic acids A and C inhibited the growth of SMMC-7721 human liver cancer cells.%通过硅胶柱层析法、Sephadex LH-20凝胶柱层析法和重结晶法,分离纯化药用拟层孔菌(Fomitopsis officinalis)子实体中的化学成分,依据化合物的物理性质,运用核磁共振谱(nuclear magnetic resonance, NMR)、质谱(mass spectrometry,MS)等波谱法分析鉴定化合物结构,并选用得率较高的4种化合物进行体外抗肿瘤实验。共分离出8个化合物,为4,6,8(14),22(23)-四烯-3-酮-麦角甾烷、麦角甾-7,22-二稀-3β-醇、3-酮基-去氢硫色多孔菌酸、去氢齿孔酸、阿里红酸A、去氢齿孔酮酸、阿里红酸 C、阿里红酸 B。其中化合物4,6,8(14),22(23)-四烯-3-酮-麦角甾烷为首次从药用拟层孔菌子实体中分离得到。阿里红酸A、阿里红酸 C、3-酮基-去氢硫色多孔菌酸抑制人乳腺癌细胞MCF-7活性较好,阿里红酸A、阿里红酸 C 抑制人肝癌细胞 SMMC-7721活性较好。

  19. Synthesis of novel furozan-based nitric oxide-releasing derivatives of 1-oxo-oridonin with anti-proliferative activity%NO供体型呋咱类1-位氧代冬凌草甲素衍生物的合成及抗增殖活性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李达翃; 王磊; 蔡浩; 蒋博文; 张奕华; 孙益军; 徐进宜

    2012-01-01

    目的:为寻找新型一氧化氮(NO)供体型抗肿瘤候选药物,设计合成了一系列新型呋咱类1-位氧代冬凌草甲素衍生物.方法:首先合成不同呋咱类NO供体中间体(9a-i),再将它们与1-位氧代冬凌草甲素(2)的14-位羟基进行缩合,得到一系列NO供体型呋咱类1-位氧代冬凌草甲素衍生物;用Griess实验测试硝酸盐/亚硝酸盐的含量,从而间接测试了NO释放量;同时采用MTT法测定了目标化合物对4种人肿瘤细胞株增殖的抑制活性.结果:所有呋咱类NO供体衍生物在体外60 min时间点上都能释放大于19 μmol·L-1的NO.活性最好的目标化合物10h对Bel-7402细胞的增殖抑制活性IC50值达到0.74 μmol.L-1,优于阳性对照药紫杉醇;获得了初步构效关系信息.结论:利用NO供体和活性天然产物形成孪药分子有望成为发现新型抗肿瘤药物的途径之一.%AIM:To search for novel nitric oxide (NO) releasing anti-tumor agents,a series of furoxan-based nitric oxide-releasing derivatives of 1-oxo-oridonin were designed and synthesized.METHOD:Different furozan-based NO donors (ga-i) were synthesized and conjugated with the 14-hydroxyl of 1-oxo-oridonin (2).The level of nitrate/nitrite in the cell lysates was tested by Griess assay and the anti-proliferative activity of these derivatives against four human cancer cell lines was also determined.RESULTS:These furoxan-based NO-releasing derivatives could produce more than 19 μmol·L-1 of NO in vitro at the time point of 60 min.The most promising compound 10 h exhibited stronger activity than the positive control Taxol against the Bel-7402 cell line with an IC50 value 0.74 μmol.L-1.The structure-activity relationships were concluded based on the derived experimental data.CONCLUSION:These results suggested that NO-donor/natural product hybrids may provide a promising approach for the discovery of novel anti-tumor agents.

  20. Salinomycin对乳腺癌阿霉素耐药细胞株MCF-7/DOX的增殖抑制作用及机制%Anti-proliferative effect of salinomycin on doxorubicin-resistant human breast cancer MCF-7/DOX cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘浩; 卢敏莹; 贺智敏

    2015-01-01

    Aim To investigate the anti-proliferative effect of salinomycin on doxorubicin-resistant human breast cancer MCF-7 /DOX cells.Methods MCF-7 and MCF-7 /DOX cells were treated or untreated with salinomycin.Cell viability was detected by MTS assay. Cell apoptosis was detected by Annexin V-FITC /PI as-say.Reactive oxygen species (ROS)was measured by DCFH-DA staining.Mitochondrial membrane potential was measured by JC-1 assay.The expression of apopto-sis related proteins BAX, BCL-2, caspase-3, and caspase-9 were evaluated by Western blot analysis. Results The cell viability was significantly reduced by salinomycin treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The flow cytometry results showed that salinomycin in-duced MCF-7 /DOX cell apoptosis,increased ROS pro-duction,and decreased mitochondrial membrane poten-tial.Furthermore,salinomycin decreased the expres-sion of BCL-2,and increased the expression of BAX, cleaved caspase-3,and cleaved caspase-9.Moreover, the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC ) markedly blocked the above effects.Conclusions Our results suggest that salinomycin-induced apoptosis in MCF-7 /DOX is associated with induction of ROS production, and activation of mitochondria apoptosis pathway, which may become a potential chemotherapeutic agent for the therapy of doxorubicin resistant breast cancer.%目的:本研究旨在探讨 Salinomycin 对乳腺癌阿霉素耐药细胞株 MCF-7/DOX 增殖和凋亡的影响及可能作用机制。方法MTS 实验检测 Salinomycin 对 MCF-7/DOX 细胞增殖的影响;Annexin V-FITC /PI 染色检测 Salinomycin 对MCF-7/DOX 耐药细胞凋亡的影响;DCFH-DA 染色检测 Sali-nomycin 对 MCF-7/DOX 耐药细胞活性氧(reactive oxygen species,ROS)产生的影响;JC-1法测定细胞线粒体膜电位;Western blot 法检测细胞凋亡相关蛋白 BAX、BCL-2、caspase-3和 caspase-9的表达变化。结果Salinomycin 能明显抑制MCF-7/DOX 耐药细胞增殖,且具有浓度

  1. Shared Substance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerlufsen, Tony; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted; Eagan, James;

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a novel middleware for developing flexible interactive multi-surface applications. Using a scenario-based approach, we identify the requirements for this type of applications. We then introduce Substance, a data- oriented framework that decouples functionality from data, and S...

  2. Recent advances in researches on physiologically active substances in holothurians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashi, Hirata; Nobuhiro, Zaima; Kyoko, Yamashita; Ryoko, Noguchi; Xue, Changhu; Tatsuya, Sugawara

    2005-07-01

    In this report, we reviewed recent literature on physiologically active substances from sea cucumbers (SCs) and their activities together with results obtained from our study. Preventive properties against lipid metabolism were reported in rats using a whole SC preparation with no particular constituent specified. Administration of the preparation lowered serum and hepatic cholesterol levels and improved the HDL/LDL ratio. These functions may be attributed to the stimulatory effect of the extract on the secretion of cholesterol in feces. Novel fucosylated chondroitin sulfates (FCSs) from Ludwigothurea grisea significantly induced fibroblast growth factor 2-dependent angiogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HU-VECs). The proangiogenetic activity seemed attributable to the action of the sulfated fucose branches on the polysaccharide. SCs contain mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) that are capable of absorbing UV. A biogenetic precursor of MAAs was first reported in SCs. The anti-proliferative effects of a branched chain fatty acid from a sea cucumber on prostate cancer cells was reported with the activity of 5-lipoxygenase. Glycosphingolipid constituents in SCs have been systematically analyzed over the past ten years. The results showed that the gangliosides in several SCs differed from those of mammals in that a sialic acid of SC gangliosides directly binded to glucose of cerebroside. Neuritogenic activity of the glycosphingolipids was demonstrated in vitro experiments and may lead to the development of therapeutic products for neurological disorders. Our study also showed that sphingoid bases, the hydrolyzed products of glycosphingolipids from SCs, induced significant apoptosis in several tumor cell lines.

  3. Substance Identification Information from EPA's Substance Registry

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Substance Registry Services (SRS) is the authoritative resource for basic information about substances of interest to the U.S. EPA and its state and tribal...

  4. Substance use and multiculturalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, M

    1996-01-01

    This paper reviews intercultural variability of substance use behaviors, including availability of international statistics on consumption of alcohol and other drugs, as well as the use of drugs available locally only. Within a conceptual framework of intercultural relations, it considers the history of transcultural spread of substance use behaviors and possible reactions to the introduction of new drugs within a culture or jurisdiction, including illustrations of the "law of alien poisons." Although intercultural views of substance use have generally concentrated on majority groups' views of substance use in minority groups, minority and non-Western views of substance use need to be considered in the context of increasing international and intercultural communications that increase the rate at which substance use behaviors spread. Both Western and non-Western experiences with substance use and misuse must be taken into account so that better interventions can be developed to deal with addictions and other substance-related problems. PMID:8908704

  5. Substance Abuse and Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Shannon; Suárez, Liza

    2016-10-01

    There is a strong, bidirectional link between substance abuse and traumatic experiences. Teens with cooccurring substance use disorders (SUDs) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have significant functional and psychosocial impairment. Common neurobiological foundations point to the reinforcing cycle of trauma symptoms, substance withdrawal, and substance use. Treatment of teens with these issues should include a systemic and integrated approach to both the SUD and the PTSD. PMID:27613348

  6. Substance, Reality, and Distinctness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Hennig

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Descartes claims that God is a substance, and that mind and body are two different and separable substances. This paper provides some background that renders these claims intelligible. For Descartes, that something is real means it can exist in separation, and something is a substance if it does not depend on other substances for its existence. Further, separable objects are correlates of distinct ideas, for an idea is distinct (in an objective sense if its object may be easily and clearly separated from everything that is not its object. It follows that if our idea of God is our most distinct idea, as Descartes claims, then God must be a substance in the Cartesian sense of the term. Also, if we can have an idea of a thinking subject which does not in any sense refer to bodily things, and if bodily things are substances, then mind and body must be two different substances.

  7. Substance use disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Didden, H.C.M.; Nagel, J.E.L. van der; Duijvenbode, N. van

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing body of research on substance use and substance use disorders among individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities who have been identified as a group at risk. Use of alcohol, tobacco and/or illicit drugs is prevalent, especially among those with mild to borderline i

  8. Special Issue: Substance Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrmann, Barbara S., Ed.; Washington, Craig S., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Presents ten articles about substance abuse: its effects, consequences, and strategies for intervention. Describes specific group therapy techniques and presents both a court service designed for assisting juveniles with drug/alcohol offenses, and a school-based substance abuse prevention program. Looks at strategies for counseling special…

  9. Drug and Substance Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are common in later life. The Most Common Types of Drug and Substance Abuse Prescription and Over-the-Counter Medications Abuse Among ... older population than in younger people. But, other types of substance abuse, such as inappropriate use of prescription and over- ...

  10. Pricing hazardous substance emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staring, Knut; Vennemo, Haakon

    1997-12-31

    This report discusses pricing of emissions to air of several harmful substances. It combines ranking indices for environmentally harmful substances with economic valuation data to yield price estimates. The ranking methods are discussed and a relative index established. Given the relative ranking of the substances, they all become valued by assigning a value to one of them, the `anchor` substance, for which lead is selected. Valuations are provided for 19 hazardous substances that are often subject to environmental regulations. They include dioxins, TBT, etc. The study concludes with a discussion of other categories of substances as well as uncertainties and possible refinements. When the valuations are related to CO, NOx, SOx and PM 10, the index system undervalues these pollutants as compared to other studies. The scope is limited to the outdoor environment and does not include global warming and eutrophication. The indices are based on toxicity and so do not apply to CO{sub 2} or other substances that are biologically harmless. The index values are not necessarily valid for all countries and should be considered as preliminary. 18 refs., 6 tabs.

  11. Anti-Proliferative Effect of an Aqueous Extract of Prunella vulgaris in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Mi Hwang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The abnormal proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs in arterial walls is an important pathogenic factor of vascular disorders such as diabetic atherosclerosis. We have reported the anti-inflammatory effect of an aqueous extract from Prunella vulgaris (APV in vascular endothelial cell. In the present study, APV exhibited inhibitory effects on high glucose-stimulated VSMC proliferation, migration, and invasion activities, inducing G1 cell cycle arrest with downregulation of cyclins and CDKs and upregulation of the CKIs, p21waf1/cip1 and p27kip1. Furthermore, APV dose dependently suppressed the high glucose-induced matrix metalloproteinase activity. High glucose-induced phosphorylation of ERK, p38 MAPK, was decreased by the pretreatment of APV. NF-κB activation by high glucose was attenuated by APV, as an antioxidant. APV attenuated the high glucose-induced decrease of nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2 translocation and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 expression. Intracellular cGMP level was also increased by APV treatment. These results demonstrate that APV may inhibit VSMC proliferation via downregulating ROS/NF-κB /ERK/p38 MAPK pathways. In addition, APV has a beneficial effect by the interaction of Nrf2-mediated NO/cGMP with HO-1, suggesting that Prunella vulgaris may be useful in preventing diabetic atherosclerosis.

  12. Apocynaceae species with anti proliferative and/or antiplasmodial properties:a review of ten genera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eric Wei Chiang Chan; Siu Kuin Wong; Hung Tuck Chan

    2016-01-01

    Apocynaceae is a large family of tropical trees, shrubs and vines with most species producing white latex. Major metabolites of species are triterpenoids, iridoids, alkaloids and cardenolides, which are known for a wide range of biological and pharmacological activities such as cardioprotective, hepatoprotective, neuroprotective, anti-infl ammatory, anticancer and antimalarial properties. Prompted by their anticancer and antimalarial properties, the current knowledge on ten genera (Allamanda,Alstonia,Calotropis, Catharanthus,Cerbera,Dyera,Kopsia,Nerium,Plumeria andVallaris) is updated. Major classes of metabolites are described using some species as examples. Species with antiproliferative (APF) and/or antiplasmodial (APM) properties have been identifi ed. With the exception of the genusDyera, nine genera of 22 species possess APF activity. Seven genera (Alstonia,Calotropis,Catharanthus,Dyera, Kopsia,PlumeriaandVallaris) of 13 species have APM properties. Among these species,Alstonia angustiloba,Alstonia macrophylla,Calotropis gigantea,Calotropis procera,Catharanthus roseus, Plumeria alba andValaris glabra displayed both APF and APM properties. The chemical constituents of these seven species are compiled for assessment and further research.

  13. Anti-Proliferative Effect of Copper Oxide Nanorods Against Human Cervical Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandurangan, Muthuraman; Nagajyothi, P C; Shim, Jaesool; Kim, Doo Hwan

    2016-09-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles have been widely investigated for its use in the pharmacological field. The present study was aimed to investigate the cytotoxicity of copper oxide nanorods in human cervical carcinoma cells. The effect of copper oxide nanorods on cell viability was determined by sulforhodamine-B (SRB) assay. The fluorescence and confocal microscopy analyzes showed the cell rounding and nuclear fragmentation following exposure of copper oxide nanorods. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) was increased and could initiate membrane lipid peroxidation, which in turn regulate cytokinetic movements of cells. The messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of p53 and caspase 3 was increased, which further confirms the occurrence of apoptosis at the transcriptional level. Furthermore, caspase-3 enzyme activity was increased, which also confirms the occurrence of apoptosis in tumor cells at the translational level. Taking all our experimental results together, it may suggest that the copper oxide nanorods could be a potential anti-tumor agent to inhibit cancer cell proliferation. PMID:26811107

  14. Synergistic anti-proliferative effects of gambogic acid with docetaxel in gastrointestinal cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Zhengyun

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary Background Gambogic acid has a marked anti-tumor effect for gastric and colorectal cancers in vitro and in vivo. However, recent investigations on gambogic acid have focused mainly on mono-drug therapy, and its potential role in cancer therapy has not been comprehensively illustrated. This study aimed to assess the interaction between gambogic acid and docetaxel on human gastrointestinal cancer cells and to investigate the mechanism of gambogic acid plus docetaxel treatment-induced apoptotic cell death. Methods MTT assay was used to determine IC50 values in BGC-823, MKN-28, LOVO and SW-116 cells after gambogic acid and docetaxel administration. Median effect analysis was applied for determination of synergism and antagonism. Synergistic interaction between gambogic acid and docetaxel was evaluated using the combination index (CI method. Furthermore, cellular apoptosis was analyzed by Annexin-V and propidium iodide (PI double staining. Additionally, mRNA expression of drug-associated genes, i.e., β-tublin III and tau, and the apoptosis-related gene survivin, were measured by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. Results Gambogic acid provided a synergistic effect on the cytotoxicity induced by docetaxel in all four cell lines. The combined application of gambogic acid and docetaxel enhanced apoptosis in gastrointestinal cancer cells. Moreover, gambogic acid markedly decreased the mRNA expression of docetaxel-related genes, including β-tubulin III, tau and survivin, in BGC-823 cells. Conclusions Gambogic acid plus docetaxel produced a synergistic anti-tumor effect in gastrointestinal cancer cells, suggesting that the drug combination may offer a novel treatment option for patients with gastric and colorectal cancers.

  15. Anti-proliferative and computational studies of two new pregnane glycosides from Desmidorchis flava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raees, Muhammad Adil; Hussain, Hidayat; Al-Rawahi, Ahmed; Csuk, René; Muhammad, Syed Aun; Khan, Husain Yar; Rehman, Najeeb Ur; Abbas, Ghulam; Al-Broumi, Mohammed Abdullah; Green, Ivan R; Elyassi, Ali; Mahmood, Talat; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed

    2016-08-01

    Two new pregnane glycosides named desmiflavasides C (1) and D (2) were isolated from the sap of Desmidorchis flava (N.E.Br.) Meve & Liede and have had their structures confirmed from 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic techniques and mass spectrometry (ESIMS). Further, the effects of desmiflavasides C (1) and D (2) on the proliferation of breast and ovarian cancer cells as well as normal breast epithelial cells in culture were examined. Interestingly, desmiflavasides C (1) and D (2) were able to cause a substantial decline in the viability of cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, treatment of normal cells with compound 2 resulted in no significant growth inhibition, indicating that its cytotoxicity was selective towards cancer cells. Furthermore, the activity of compound 2 against cancer as well as normal epithelial cells was found to be similar to that of a previously reported pregnane glycoside, nizwaside (3). Molecular docking studies of desmiflavasides C (1) and D (2) and nizwaside (3) were carried out to ascertain if it was possible to predict any important binding orientations required of small molecule drug candidates with suggested protein target molecules for the purposes of being able to predict the affinity and activity to an acceptable degree by such compounds. Desmiflavaside D (2) showed a relatively good binding affinity (-22.4449kcal/mol) as compared to the other two compounds viz., nizwaside (3) (-20.0319kcal/mol), and desmiflavaside C (1) (-19.4042kcal/mol). Docking results of the three pregnane glycosides viz., 1-3 revealed that these ligand molecules can accurately interact with the target protein. PMID:27299811

  16. In-vitro release of anti-proliferative paclitaxel from novel balloon-expandable polycaprolactone stents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report investigated the in-vitro release characteristics of paclitaxel from novel balloon-expandable polycaprolactone stents. Polycaprolactone stents were first manufactured by a lab-made micro-injection molding machine. Paclitaxel and polylactide-polyglycolide (PLGA) copolymer were dissolved in acetonitrile and were coated onto the surface of the stents by a spray coating device, which was designed and built especially for this study. An elution method was utilized to characterize the in-vitro release characteristics of paclitaxel. The high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that biodegradable stents could provide sustained release of paclitaxel for more than 70 days. Various process parameters that controlled the release rate of paclitaxel were studied. The experimental results suggested that the total period of drug release could be prolonged by adopting 75:25 PLGA copolymers, employing multi-layer coatings, and increasing the drug loading. In addition, the effectiveness of eluted paclitaxel on cell behavior was examined. The results showed that the eluted drug could effectively inhibit the proliferation of smooth muscle cells. - Research Highlights: → We investigate the in-vitro release characteristics of paclitaxel from polycaprolactone stents. → Biodegradable stents provide sustained release of paclitaxel for more than 70 days. → The eluted drug effectively inhibits the proliferation of smooth muscle cells.

  17. Anti-Proliferative Effects of Siegesbeckia orientalis Ethanol Extract on Human Endometrial RL-95 Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Chang Chang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial cancer is a common malignancy of the female genital tract. This study demonstrates that Siegesbeckia orientalis ethanol extract (SOE significantly inhibited the proliferation of RL95-2 human endometrial cancer cells. Treating RL95-2 cells with SOE caused cell arrest in the G2/M phase and induced apoptosis of RL95-2 cells by up-regulating Bad, Bak and Bax protein expression and down-regulation of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL protein expression. Treatment with SOE increased protein expression of caspase-3, -8 and -9 dose-dependently, indicating that apoptosis was through the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways. Moreover, SOE was also effective against A549 (lung cancer, Hep G2 (hepatoma, FaDu (pharynx squamous cancer, MDA-MB-231 (breast cancer, and especially on LNCaP (prostate cancer cell lines. In total, 10 constituents of SOE were identified by Gas chromatography-mass analysis. Caryophyllene oxide and caryophyllene are largely responsible for most cytotoxic activity of SOE against RL95-2 cells. Overall, this study suggests that SOE is a promising anticancer agent for treating endometrial cancer.

  18. Insulin-sensitizing and Anti-proliferative Effects of Argania spinosa Seed Extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Samira Samane; Josette Noël; Zoubida Charrouf; Hamid Amarouch; Pierre Selim Haddad

    2006-01-01

    Argania spinosa is an evergreen tree endemic of southwestern Morocco. Many preparations have been used in traditional Moroccan medicine for centuries to treat several illnesses including diabetes. However, scientific evidence supporting these actions is lacking. Therefore, we prepared various extracts of the argan fruit, namely keel, cake and argan oil extracts, which we tested in the HTC hepatoma cell line for their potential to affect cellular insulin responses. Cell viability was measu...

  19. Anti-proliferative activity of hop-derived prenylflavonoids against human cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Christian; Noor, Seema; Leischner, Christian; Burkard, Markus; Lauer, Ulrich M; Venturelli, Sascha

    2015-06-01

    Flavonoids form a substantial group of secondary plant metabolites that display several health-promoting effects. Therefore, prenylflavonoids, a subclass of flavonoids, have attracted increasing attention. Here, we investigated the possible anti-cancer potential of 6-prenylnaringenin (6-PN) and 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN), two prenylflavonoids present in hops and beer and demonstrate an unexpectedly pronounced, dose-dependent reduction of cellular proliferation of human PC-3 prostate cancer and UO.31 renal carcinoma cells upon treatment. Based on these findings 6-PN and 8-PN are currently further clinically evaluated in detail. PMID:25925225

  20. Anti-proliferative action of silibinin on human colon adenomatous cancer HT-29 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Reyhan; Ali, Mohd; Mahmood, Safrunnisa; Sanyal, Sankar Nath

    2014-02-01

    Antecedentes: Silibinina un flavonoide a partir de la leche de cardo mariano (Silybum marianum) exhiben una variedad de acciones farmacológicas, incluyendo actividades anti-proliferativos y apoptóticos contra varios tipos de cánceres en animales intactos y líneas celulares de cáncer. En el presente estudio, se estudió el efecto de silibinina en células humanas de cáncer de colon HT-29. Método: Las incubaciones de las células con diferentes concentraciones silibinin (0,783-1.600 ug/ml) para 24, 48 o 72 horas mostró un descenso progresivo de la viabilidad celular. Resultados: La pérdida de la viabilidad celular fue de tiempo de inhibición dependiente y óptima de crecimiento de las células (78%) se observó a las 72 horas. Bajo microscopio invertido, las células muertas fueron vistos como los agregados de células. IC50 (concentración de silibinina matar a las células 50%) los valores fueron 180, 110 y 40 ug/ml a las 24, 48 y 72 horas, respectivamente. Conclusión: Estos resultados volver a hacer cumplir la potenciales contra el cáncer de silibinina, como se informó anteriormente para varias otras líneas celulares de cáncer (Ramasamy y Agarwal (2008), Cancer Letters, 269: 352-62).

  1. In-vitro release of anti-proliferative paclitaxel from novel balloon-expandable polycaprolactone stents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shih-Jung, E-mail: shihjung@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Hsiao, Chao-Ying [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Chen, Jan-Kan [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Liu, Kuo-Sheng [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Lee, Cheng-Hung [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Second Section of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China)

    2011-07-20

    This report investigated the in-vitro release characteristics of paclitaxel from novel balloon-expandable polycaprolactone stents. Polycaprolactone stents were first manufactured by a lab-made micro-injection molding machine. Paclitaxel and polylactide-polyglycolide (PLGA) copolymer were dissolved in acetonitrile and were coated onto the surface of the stents by a spray coating device, which was designed and built especially for this study. An elution method was utilized to characterize the in-vitro release characteristics of paclitaxel. The high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that biodegradable stents could provide sustained release of paclitaxel for more than 70 days. Various process parameters that controlled the release rate of paclitaxel were studied. The experimental results suggested that the total period of drug release could be prolonged by adopting 75:25 PLGA copolymers, employing multi-layer coatings, and increasing the drug loading. In addition, the effectiveness of eluted paclitaxel on cell behavior was examined. The results showed that the eluted drug could effectively inhibit the proliferation of smooth muscle cells. - Research Highlights: {yields} We investigate the in-vitro release characteristics of paclitaxel from polycaprolactone stents. {yields} Biodegradable stents provide sustained release of paclitaxel for more than 70 days. {yields} The eluted drug effectively inhibits the proliferation of smooth muscle cells.

  2. Hybrid surfactants decorated with copper ions: aggregation behavior, antimicrobial activity and anti-proliferative effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Kumar, Sandeep; Dilbaghi, Neeraj; Bhanjana, Gaurav; Guru, Santosh Kumar; Bhushan, Shashi; Jaglan, Sundeep; Hassan, P A; Aswal, V K

    2016-09-14

    In the present study, the emphasis is laid on the self aggregation behavior of copper based inorganic-organic hybrids in aqueous media. The two complexes, cationic hexadecyl pyridinium trichloro cuprate (1 : 1), [Cp](+)[CuCl3](-), and bishexadecylpyridinium tetrachloro cuprate (2 : 1), [Cp2](2+)[CuCl4](2-), were synthesized using the ligand insertion method. The complexes were characterized using elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and thermogravimetric analysis. The copper complexes were found to be thermally stable, and in the solid state, they possessed the perovskite arrangement with [Cp2](2+)[CuCl4](2-) exhibiting superior stability and crystallinity. The self aggregation behavior of the prepared complexes was analyzed in solution phase (in aqueous medium) using surface tension, conductivity, XRD and small angle neutron scattering (SANS). The results show that the presence of copper as a co-ion in both the stoichiometries results in lower critical micellization concentrations than their precursor. Micellization was thermodynamically spontaneous and micelles formed were ellipsoidal in shape and underwent a prolate ellipsoidal growth with an increase in the concentration of metallosurfactant, as estimated from the SANS. Furthermore, these metallosurfactants were investigated for biocompatibility (using hemolytic assay), antimicrobial activity (fungus and bacteria) and cytotoxicity using human cancerous cells. The hemolysis activity was found to depend on the aggregated state of the metallosurfactants, displaying the highest activity in the monomeric state, and the minimum for post micellar concentrations. The surfactants were found to enhance the antibacterial activity by twofold or more, with the addition of metal in both the stoichiometries. On the contrary, for anticancer and antifungal activities, barely any regular trend or generalization could be obtained. Nevertheless, the copper complexes exhibited high IC50 values for fR2 (healthy cells) signifying their higher safety in comparison to the cancerous cells. PMID:27523253

  3. Hybrid surfactants decorated with copper ions: aggregation behavior, antimicrobial activity and anti-proliferative effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Kumar, Sandeep; Dilbaghi, Neeraj; Bhanjana, Gaurav; Guru, Santosh Kumar; Bhushan, Shashi; Jaglan, Sundeep; Hassan, P A; Aswal, V K

    2016-09-14

    In the present study, the emphasis is laid on the self aggregation behavior of copper based inorganic-organic hybrids in aqueous media. The two complexes, cationic hexadecyl pyridinium trichloro cuprate (1 : 1), [Cp](+)[CuCl3](-), and bishexadecylpyridinium tetrachloro cuprate (2 : 1), [Cp2](2+)[CuCl4](2-), were synthesized using the ligand insertion method. The complexes were characterized using elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and thermogravimetric analysis. The copper complexes were found to be thermally stable, and in the solid state, they possessed the perovskite arrangement with [Cp2](2+)[CuCl4](2-) exhibiting superior stability and crystallinity. The self aggregation behavior of the prepared complexes was analyzed in solution phase (in aqueous medium) using surface tension, conductivity, XRD and small angle neutron scattering (SANS). The results show that the presence of copper as a co-ion in both the stoichiometries results in lower critical micellization concentrations than their precursor. Micellization was thermodynamically spontaneous and micelles formed were ellipsoidal in shape and underwent a prolate ellipsoidal growth with an increase in the concentration of metallosurfactant, as estimated from the SANS. Furthermore, these metallosurfactants were investigated for biocompatibility (using hemolytic assay), antimicrobial activity (fungus and bacteria) and cytotoxicity using human cancerous cells. The hemolysis activity was found to depend on the aggregated state of the metallosurfactants, displaying the highest activity in the monomeric state, and the minimum for post micellar concentrations. The surfactants were found to enhance the antibacterial activity by twofold or more, with the addition of metal in both the stoichiometries. On the contrary, for anticancer and antifungal activities, barely any regular trend or generalization could be obtained. Nevertheless, the copper complexes exhibited high IC50 values for fR2 (healthy cells) signifying their higher safety in comparison to the cancerous cells.

  4. A possible anti-proliferative and anti-metastatic effect of irradiated riboflavin in solid tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Souza Queiroz, Karla Cristiana; Zambuzzi, Willian Fernando; de Souza, Ana Carolina Santos; da Silva, Rodrigo Augusto; Machado, Daisy; Justo, Giselle Zenker; Carvalho, Hernandes F.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Ferreira, Carmen Verissima

    2007-01-01

    Riboflavin is a potent photosensitizer as well as part of the vitamin B complex. Recently we demonstrated that the products generated by irradiation of riboflavin have potential as anti-leukaemic therapy. The possible action, however, of the riboflavin photoproducts in solid cancers has not been add

  5. Xanthones from Garcinia paucinervis with in vitro anti-proliferative activity against HL-60 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Da-Hong; Li, Chen-Xi; Jia, Cui-Cui; Sun, Ya-Ting; Xue, Chun-Mei; Bai, Jiao; Hua, Hui-Ming; Liu, Xiao-Qiu; Li, Zhan-Lin

    2016-02-01

    Three new xanthones, paucinervins H-J (1-3), as well as eleven known compounds (4-14), were isolated from the leaves of Garcinia paucinervis. The structures of the new compounds (1-3) were elucidated by 1D, 2D NMR spectra and HR ESIMS. In vitro antiproliferative activity against human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells was tested, among which, compounds 2, 5, 6 and 7 exhibited strong growth inhibitory effects with GI50 values ranging from 1.30 to 9.08 μM, respectively. Preliminary SARs were also discussed. PMID:26659874

  6. Anti-proliferative actions of T-type calcium channel inhibition in Thy1 nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cove-Smith, Andrea; Mulgrew, Christopher J; Rudyk, Olena; Dutt, Neelanjana; McLatchie, Linda M; Shattock, Michael J; Hendry, Bruce M

    2013-08-01

    Aberrant proliferation of mesangial cells (MCs) is a key finding in progressive glomerular disease. TH1177 is a small molecule that has been shown to inhibit low-voltage activated T-type Ca(2+) channels (TCCs). The current study investigates the effect of TH1177 on MC proliferation in vitro and in vivo. The effect of Ca(2+) channel inhibition on primary rat MC proliferation in vitro was studied using the microculture tetrazolium assay and by measuring bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. In vivo, rats with Thy1 nephritis were treated with TH1177 or vehicle. Glomerular injury and average glomerular cell number were determined in a blinded fashion. Immunostaining for Ki-67 and phosphorylated ERK were also performed. The expression of TCC isoforms in healthy and diseased tissue was investigated using quantitative real-time PCR. TCC blockade caused a significant reduction in rat MC proliferation in vitro, whereas L-type inhibition had no effect. Treatment of Thy1 nephritis with TH1177 significantly reduced glomerular injury (P < 0.005) and caused a 49% reduction in glomerular cell number (P < 0.005) compared to the placebo. TH1177 also reduced Ki-67-positive and pERK-positive cells per glomerulus by 52% (P < 0.01 and P < 0.005, respectively). These results demonstrate that TH1177 inhibits MC proliferation in vitro and in vivo, supporting the hypothesis that TCC inhibition may be a useful strategy for studying and modifying MC proliferative responses to injury. PMID:23746655

  7. Substance use - LSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Substance abuse - LSD; Drug abuse - LSD; Drug use - LSD; Lysergic acid diethylamide; Hallucinogen - LSD ... less inhibition, similar to being drunk from alcohol use. As if your thinking is extremely clear and ...

  8. Supervision: Substance and Style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellerman, Saul W.

    1976-01-01

    Argues that managerial style and substance are inextricably intertwined, illustrating the discussion with excerpts from an extensive study and job analysis of first-line supervisors in a food packaging plant. (JG)

  9. Substance use during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forray, Ariadna

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal substance use is a critical public health concern that is linked with several harmful maternal and fetal consequences. The most frequently used substance in pregnancy is tobacco, followed by alcohol, cannabis and other illicit substances. Unfortunately, polysubstance use in pregnancy is common, as well as psychiatric comorbidity, environmental stressors, and limited and disrupted parental care, all of which can compound deleterious maternal and fetal outcomes. There are few existing treatments for prenatal substance use and these mainly comprise behavioral and psychosocial interventions. Contingency management has been shown to be the most efficacious of these. The purpose of this review is to examine the recent literature on the prenatal use of tobacco, alcohol, cannabis, stimulants, and opioids, including the effects of these on maternal and fetal health and the current therapeutic options. PMID:27239283

  10. Toxic Substances Portal- Arsenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Favorites Del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Bookmarks Yahoo MyWeb Page last reviewed: February 12, 2013 Page ... Favorites Del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Bookmarks Yahoo MyWeb Contact Us: Agency for Toxic Substances and ...

  11. Substance use - inhalants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Substance abuse - inhalants; Drug abuse - inhalants; Drug use - inhalants; Glue - inhalants ... consumered.org/learn/inhalant-abuse National Institute on Drug Abuse -- www.teens.drugabuse.gov/drug-facts/inhalants SMART ...

  12. SUBSTANCE ABUSE IN INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bano Rubeena

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The epidemic of substance abuse in young generation has assumed alarming dimensions in India. Changing cultural values, increasing economic stress and dwindling supportive bonds are leading to initiation into substance use. Cannabis, heroin, and Indian-produced pharmaceutical drugs are the most frequently abused drugs in India. Drug use, misuse or abuse is also primarily due to the nature of the drug abused, the personality of the individual and the addict’s immediate environment. The processes of industrialization, urbanization and migration have led to loosening of the traditional methods of social control rendering an individual vulnerable to the stresses and strains of modern life.

  13. Attaching substances to microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buist, Girbe; Leenhouts Cornelis, J.; Venema, Gerard; Kok, Jan

    2005-01-01

    The invention relates to surface display of proteins on microorganisms via the targeting and anchoring of heterologous proteins to the outer surface of cells such as yeast, fungi, mammalian, plant cells, and bacteria. The invention provides a proteinaceous substance comprising a reactive group and a

  14. Yellow substance (gelbstoff)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The different values of the mean slope (S) of the absorption coefficient a(λ) of gelbstoff (yellow substance) for each region under the same hydrological conditions and the correlation between the quantity of absorption (CA) of gelbstoff and sea water parameter is discussed. 12 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  15. Risks and Chemical Substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumberg, Avrom A.

    1994-01-01

    Examines exposure to chemicals within the home and three important ways in which hazardous substances can be identified and evaluated. Suggests a rational picture of human health risks and contains an introductory discussion of reasons for exposure, epidemiology, cancer causes and patterns, animal testing, toxins, and risk. (LZ)

  16. Adolescent Substance Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Craig R.; DeBlassie, Richard R.

    1985-01-01

    Cummings (1979), citing evidence from the National Institute of Drug Abuse, reports that one of every eleven adult Americans suffers from a severe addictive problem. Drug addiction is epidemic among teenagers; one of every six teenagers suffers from a severe addictive problem. This paper focuses on adolescent drug/substance abuse. (Author)

  17. Substance Abuse in the Military

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DrugFacts » Substance Abuse in the Military DrugFacts: Substance Abuse in the Military Email Facebook Twitter Revised March ... alcohol and tobacco use, and especially prescription drug abuse, are much more prevalent and are on the ...

  18. Substance abuse in later life.

    OpenAIRE

    D'Archangelo, E.

    1993-01-01

    Substance abuse affects an appreciable portion of the elderly population. Elderly people have characteristics that could hinder identification, diagnosis, intervention, and treatment of substance abuse. If physicians use strategies specific to the elderly, management is often successful.

  19. Toxic Substances Control Act

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Toxic Substances Control Act and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  20. Substance abuse and criminal behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, J M; Greenberg, D M; Motayne, G G

    1992-09-01

    As forensic psychiatry develops as a clinical subspecialty, clinical skill in understanding, treating, and predicting violent behavior will become more important. This article addresses the importance of understanding the relationship between substance abuse and violent behavior. This article also discusses morbidity and mortality in substance abuse, the demographics of substance abuse and criminality, and the clinical aspects of the forensic psychiatric evaluation.

  1. Parental substance use impairment, parenting and substance use disorder risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arria, Amelia M; Mericle, Amy A; Meyers, Kathleen; Winters, Ken C

    2012-07-01

    Using data from a nationally representative sample, this study investigated substance use disorder (SUD) among respondents with ages 15-54 years as a function of their parents' substance-related impairment and parents' treatment history. In addition, associations among maternal and paternal substance-related impairment, specific parenting behaviors, and risk for SUD in the proband were examined. As expected, parental substance-related impairment was associated with SUD. Paternal treatment history was associated with a decreased risk for SUD in the proband but did not appear to be associated with positive parenting practices. Results of post hoc analyses suggested that parenting behaviors might operate differently to influence SUD risk in children where parents are affected by substance use problems compared with nonaffected families. Future research is warranted to better understand the complex relationships among parental substance use, treatment, parenting behaviors, and SUD risk in offspring. Opportunities might exist within treatment settings to improve parenting skills.

  2. SUBSTANCE USE AND SEXUAL DYSFUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Substance use disorders form a major part of global disease burden. With increasing trend of use of psychoactive substance, the deleterious effects associated with it also increases. These effects may be biological, social or legal. Among the biological consequences of substance use, little is known of its effect on sexual functioning. In common parlance it is said that many substances increase the sexual desire and hence act as an aphrodisiac. To what extent this is true remains a question of debate. The purpose of thi s article is to review and summarize the available literature on the impact of psychoactive substances like alcohol, tobacco, cannabis and others on sexual functioning. Almost all of them are associated with one or other form of sexual dysfunction. The mec hanism by which they exert such deleterious effect also varies. Further, the sexual dysfunction resulting from substance use can itself have bearing on treatment aspects of substance use. The relationship between sexual dysfunction and substance is attribu ted not only to pharmacological effects, but also to psychological and social factors stemming from substance use. This information of sexual consequence of substance will be of interest and may serve as a powerful tool to healthcare providers

  3. Substance abuse and child maltreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Kathryn

    2009-04-01

    Pediatricians and other medical providers caring for children need to be aware of the dynamics in the significant relationship between substance abuse and child maltreatment. A caregiver's use and abuse of alcohol, marijuana, heroin, cocaine, methamphetamine, and other drugs place the child at risk in multiple ways. Members of the medical community need to understand these risks because the medical community plays a unique and important role in identifying and caring for these children. Substance abuse includes the abuse of legal drugs as well as the use of illegal drugs. The abuse of legal substances may be just as detrimental to parental functioning as abuse of illicit substances. Many substance abusers are also polysubstance users and the compounded effect of the abuse of multiple substances may be difficult to measure. Often other interrelated social features, such as untreated mental illness, trauma history, and domestic violence, affect these families.

  4. Substance Use and Facial Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Debra A.

    2010-01-01

    Substance use is a major contributing factor to the interpersonal violence that accounts for a significant proportion of facial injuries among adults and adolescents; thus, violence is the main “pathway” through which substance use and injuries are linked. Beyond causality, substance use continues to influence recovery from the injury through its impact on the healing process (e.g., patient non-compliance, suppression of T-cell counts, susceptibility to bacterial colonization, and protein pro...

  5. Radioactive substances decontamination exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In common with all hospitals prepared to accept casualties contaminated with radioactive substances, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary has a contingency plan for dealing with them. Such plans are prepared by each hospital after discussion between the hospital's radiation protection adviser and its accident and emergency staff. As in virtually all hospitals with such plans those in this hospital have never had to be used. As part of an ongoing evaluation of all contingency arrangements an exercise was held to see how well the arrangements for dealing with radioactive contamination worked in practice. We report the results of the exercise since the practical problems we experienced must be common to all similar plans and might be of use to other hospitals. (author)

  6. Isolation of haloorganic groundwater humic substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krog, M.; Grøn, C.

    1995-01-01

    Humic substances were isolated from groundwater according to a revised method designed to avoid organohalogen artefacts. The prepared humic substances exhibited lower halogen contents than humic substances isolated according to the conventionally used method. Excessive oxidation or hydrolysis...

  7. Infant of a substance using mother

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Maternal substance use; Maternal drug use; Narcotic exposure - infant; Substance use disorder - infant ... ARE THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS SEEN IN AN INFANT OF A SUBSTANCE-ABUSING MOTHER? Babies born to ...

  8. Substance Abuse Treatment Facilities Locator

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) provides on-line resource for locating drug and alcohol abuse treatment programs. The...

  9. Ozone-depleting Substances (ODS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This site includes all of the ozone-depleting substances (ODS) recognized by the Montreal Protocol. The data include ozone depletion potentials (ODP), global...

  10. Substance Abuse and Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... More Drugs and Alcohol Tobacco Learn More Substance Abuse and Mental Health Drugs and Alcohol Did you ... related topics from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) Free Resources for parents and ...

  11. Music, Substance Use, and Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meng-Jinn; Miller, Brenda A.; Grube, Joel W.; Waiters, Elizabeth D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study investigated whether young people’s substance use and aggressive behaviors are related to their listening to music containing messages of substance use and violence. Method Data were collected using self-administered questionnaires and from a sample of community college students aged 15-25 (N = 1056; 43% male). A structural equation modeling method was used to simultaneously assess the associations between listening to various genres of music, alcohol use, illicit drug use, and aggressive behaviors, taking into account respondents’ age, gender, race/ethnicity, and level of sensation seeking. Results Listening to rap music was significantly and positively associated with alcohol use, problematic alcohol use, illicit drug use, and aggressive behaviors when all other variables were controlled. Additionally, alcohol and illicit drug use were positively associated with listening to musical genres of techno and reggae. Control variables such as sensation seeking, age, gender and race/ethnicity were significantly related to substance use and aggressive behaviors. Conclusion The findings suggest that young people’s substance use and aggressive behaviors may be related to their frequent exposure to music containing references to substance use and violence. Conversely, music listening preference may reflect some personal predispositions or lifestyle preferences. Alternatively, substance use, aggression and music preference are independent constructs, but share common “third factors.” PMID:16608146

  12. Anti-proliferative effect of extremely low frequency electromagnetic field on preneoplastic lesions formation in the rat liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villa-Treviño Saúl

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF have been studied with great interest due to their possible effects on human health. In this study, we evaluated the effect of 4.5 mT - 120 Hz ELF-EMF on the development of preneoplastic lesions in experimental hepatocarcinogenesis. Methods Male Fischer-344 rats were subjected to the modified resistant hepatocyte model and were exposed to 4.5 mT - 120 Hz ELF-EMF. The effects of the ELF-EMF on hepatocarcinogenesis, apoptosis, proliferation and cell cycle progression were evaluated by histochemical, TUNEL assay, caspase 3 levels, immunohistochemical and western blot analyses. Results The application of the ELF-EMF resulted in a decrease of more than 50% of the number and the area of γ-glutamyl transpeptidase-positive preneoplastic lesions (P = 0.01 and P = 0.03, respectively and glutathione S-transferase placental expression (P = 0.01. The number of TUNEL-positive cells and the cleaved caspase 3 levels were unaffected; however, the proliferating cell nuclear antigen, Ki-67, and cyclin D1 expression decreased significantly (P ≤ 0.03, as compared to the sham-exposure group. Conclusion The application of 4.5 mT - 120 Hz ELF-EMF inhibits preneoplastic lesions chemically induced in the rat liver through the reduction of cell proliferation, without altering the apoptosis process.

  13. Mechanisms underlying the anti-proliferative effects of berry components in in vitro models of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Emma M; Gill, Chris I R; McDougall, Gordon J; Stewart, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Consumption of fruit and vegetables is associated with a decreased risk of several cancers, particularly colorectal cancer, possibly linked to their phytochemical content, which is of interest due to several proposed health benefits, including potential anticancer activity. Epidemiological data suggests that cancers of the digestive tract are most susceptible to dietary modification, possibly due to being in direct contact with bioactive food constituents and therefore investigating the effects of these bioactive compounds on the prevalent colorectal cancer is feasible. Berries are a common element of Western diets, with members of the Rubus, Fragria, Sorbus, Ribes and Vaccinum genus featuring in desserts, preserves, yoghurts and juices. These soft fruit are rich in bioactive phytochemicals including several classes of phenolic compounds such as flavonoids (anthocyanins, flavonols and flavanols) and phenolic acids (hydroxybenzoic and hydroxycinnamic acids). Whilst there is little data linking berry consumption to reduced risk of colorectal cancer, in vitro evidence from models representing colorectal cancer suggests that berry polyphenols may modulate cellular processes essential for cancer cell survival, such as proliferation and apoptosis. The exact mechanisms and berry constituents responsible for these potential anticancer activities remain unknown, but use of in vitro models provides a means to elucidate these matters.

  14. Anti-proliferative effect of a compound isolated from Cassia auriculata against human colon cancer cell line HCT 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esakkirajan, M; Prabhu, N M; Arulvasu, C; Beulaja, M; Manikandan, R; Thiagarajan, R; Govindaraju, K; Prabhu, D; Dinesh, D; Babu, G; Dhanasekaran, G

    2014-01-01

    The compound was isolated from leaves of Cassia auriculata and its structure was characterized using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS), UV-vis spectroscopy (UV-vis), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, cytotoxicity, nuclear morphology and lactate dehydrogenase assay of isolated compound was tested against human colon cancer cell line HCT 15. The isolated compound, 4-(4-chlorobenzyl)-2,3,4,5,6,7-hexahydro-7-(2-ethoxyphenyl)benzo[h][1,4,7]triazecin-8(1H)-one at 25μg/ml concentration and by 48h showed 50% inhibition of human colon cancer cells (HCT 15). The results suggest that isolated compound from C. auriculata has potential to prevent colon cancer cell line.

  15. Apoptosis mediated anti-proliferative effect of compound isolated from Cassia auriculata leaves against human colon cancer cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esakkirajan, M.; Prabhu, N. M.; Manikandan, R.; Beulaja, M.; Prabhu, D.; Govindaraju, K.; Thiagarajan, R.; Arulvasu, C.; Dhanasekaran, G.; Dinesh, D.; Babu, G.

    2014-06-01

    A compound was isolated from Cassia auriculata leaves and characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS), UV-vis spectroscopy (UV-vis), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). The in vitro anticancer effect of the compound isolated from C. auriculata was evaluated in human colon cancer cells HCT 15 by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, cytotoxicity, nuclear morphology analysis and measurement of lactate dehydrogenase. The isolated compound 4-(2,5 dichlorobenzyl)-2,3,4,5,6,7 hexahydro7(4 methoxyphenyl)benzo[h][1,4,7] triazecin8(1H)-one showed 50% inhibition of HCT 15 cells when tested at 20 μg/ml after 24 h incubation. Cytotoxicity, nuclear morphology and lactate dehydrogenase assays clearly show potent anticancer activity of the isolated compound against colon cancer. Thus, the in vitro findings suggest that the compound isolated from C. auriculata leaves have potent anti-cancer properties with possible clinical applications.

  16. Anti-proliferative effect of rhein, an anthraquinone isolated from Cassia species, on Caco-2 human adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviello, Gabriella; Rowland, Ian; Gill, Christopher I; Acquaviva, Angela Maria; Capasso, Francesco; McCann, Mark; Capasso, Raffaele; Izzo, Angelo A; Borrelli, Francesca

    2010-07-01

    In recent years, the use of anthraquinone laxatives, in particular senna, has been associated with damage to the intestinal epithelial layer and an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. In this study, we evaluated the cytotoxicity of rhein, the active metabolite of senna, on human colon adenocarcinoma cells (Caco-2) and its effect on cell proliferation. Cytotoxicity studies were performed using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), neutral red (NR) and trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) assays whereas (3)H-thymidine incorporation and Western blot analysis were used to evaluate the effect of rhein on cell proliferation. Moreover, for genoprotection studies Comet assay and oxidative biomarkers measurement (malondialdehyde and reactive oxygen species) were used. Rhein (0.1-10 microg/ml) had no significant cytotoxic effect on proliferating and differentiated Caco-2 cells. Rhein (0.1 and 1 microg/ml) significantly reduced cell proliferation as well as mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation; by contrast, at high concentration (10 microg/ml) rhein significantly increased cell proliferation and extracellular-signal-related kinase (ERK) phosphorylation. Moreover, rhein (0.1-10 microg/ml): (i) did not adversely affect the integrity of tight junctions and hence epithelial barrier function; (ii) did not induce DNA damage, rather it was able to reduce H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage and (iii) significantly inhibited the increase in malondialdehyde and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels induced by H(2)O(2)/Fe(2+). Rhein was devoid of cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in colon adenocarcinoma cells. Moreover, at concentrations present in the colon after a human therapeutic dosage of senna, rhein inhibited cell proliferation via a mechanism that seems to involve directly the MAP kinase pathway. Finally, rhein prevents the DNA damage probably via an anti-oxidant mechanism.

  17. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Treatment Induces Anti-Proliferative Effects in Prostate Cancer Cells by Redox and Apoptotic Signaling Pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Weiss

    Full Text Available One of the promising possibilities of the clinical application of cold plasma, so-called cold atmospheric plasma (CAP, is its application on malignant cells and cancer tissue using its anti-neoplastic effects, primarily through the delivery of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS, RNS. In this study, we investigated the impact of CAP on cellular proliferation and consecutive molecular response mechanisms in established prostate cancer (PC cell lines. PC cells showed a significantly reduced cell growth following CAP treatment as a result of both an immediate increase of intracellular peroxide levels and through the induction of apoptosis indicated by annexin V assay, TUNEL assay, and the evaluation of changes in nuclear morphology. Notably, co-administration of N-acetylcysteine (NAC completely neutralized CAP effects by NAC uptake and rapid conversion to glutathione (GSH. Vitamin C could not counteract the CAP induced effects on cell growth. In summary, relatively short treatments with CAP of 10 seconds were sufficient to induce a significant inhibition of cancer proliferation, as observed for the first time in urogenital cancer. Therefore, it is important to understand the mode of CAP related cell death and clarify and optimize CAP as cancer therapy. Increased levels of peroxides can alter redox-regulated signaling pathways and can lead to growth arrest and apoptosis. We assume that the general intracellular redox homeostasis, especially the levels of cellular GSH and peroxidases such as peroxiredoxins affect the outcome of the CAP treatment.

  18. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Treatment Induces Anti-Proliferative Effects in Prostate Cancer Cells by Redox and Apoptotic Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Martin; Gümbel, Denis; Hanschmann, Eva-Maria; Mandelkow, Robert; Gelbrich, Nadine; Zimmermann, Uwe; Walther, Reinhard; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Sckell, Axel; Kramer, Axel; Burchardt, Martin; Lillig, Christopher H; Stope, Matthias B

    2015-01-01

    One of the promising possibilities of the clinical application of cold plasma, so-called cold atmospheric plasma (CAP), is its application on malignant cells and cancer tissue using its anti-neoplastic effects, primarily through the delivery of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS, RNS). In this study, we investigated the impact of CAP on cellular proliferation and consecutive molecular response mechanisms in established prostate cancer (PC) cell lines. PC cells showed a significantly reduced cell growth following CAP treatment as a result of both an immediate increase of intracellular peroxide levels and through the induction of apoptosis indicated by annexin V assay, TUNEL assay, and the evaluation of changes in nuclear morphology. Notably, co-administration of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) completely neutralized CAP effects by NAC uptake and rapid conversion to glutathione (GSH). Vitamin C could not counteract the CAP induced effects on cell growth. In summary, relatively short treatments with CAP of 10 seconds were sufficient to induce a significant inhibition of cancer proliferation, as observed for the first time in urogenital cancer. Therefore, it is important to understand the mode of CAP related cell death and clarify and optimize CAP as cancer therapy. Increased levels of peroxides can alter redox-regulated signaling pathways and can lead to growth arrest and apoptosis. We assume that the general intracellular redox homeostasis, especially the levels of cellular GSH and peroxidases such as peroxiredoxins affect the outcome of the CAP treatment.

  19. Anti-proliferative and angio-suppressive effect of Stoechospermum marginatum (C. Agardh) Kutzing extract using various experimental models.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vinayak, R.C.; Puttananjaiah, S.; Chatterji, A.; Salimath, B.

    , particularly in the regions surrounded by China, the Korean peninsula and Japan. By and large, plants possessing an extensive array of pharma- cological activities including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, cardioprotective, and anticancer/antiangiogenic have..., triterpenes are more inclined to possess angiosuppressive activity. A number of studies have indicated that marine seaweeds from India exhibit potent antioxidant properties [12-15, 23-25]; however, they have not been systematically explored...

  20. Two New Oleanane-Type Saponins with Anti-Proliferative Activity from Camellia oleifera Abel. Seed Cake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Jian-Fa; Peng, Yun-Ru; Bao, Guan-Hu; Hou, Ru-Yan; Wan, Xiao-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Two new oleanane-type saponins, named oleiferasaponins C₄ (1) and C₅ (2), were isolated from Camellia oleifera Abel. seed cake residue. Their respective structures were identified as 16α-hydroxy-22α-O-angeloyl-23α-aldehyde-28-dihydroxymethylene-olean-12-ene-3β-O-[β-d-galacto-pyranosyl-(1→2)]-[β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-galactopyranosy-(1→3)]-β-d-glucopyranosid-uronic acid methyl ester (1) and 16α-hydroxy-22α-O-angeloyl-23α-aldehyde-28-dihydroxy-methylene-olean-12-ene-3β-O-[β-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→2)]-[β-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→3)]-β-d-glucopyranosiduronic acid methyl ester (2) through 1D- and 2D-NMR, HR-ESI-MS, and GC-MS spectroscopic methods. The two compounds exhibited potent cytotoxic activities against five human tumor cell lines (BEL-7402, BGC-823, MCF-7, HL-60 and KB).

  1. Anti-proliferative effect of biogenic gold nanoparticles against breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231 & MCF-7)

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. S., Uma Suganya; Govindaraju, K.; Ganesh Kumar, V.; Prabhu, D.; Arulvasu, C.; Stalin Dhas, T.; Karthick, V.; Changmai, Niranjan

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer is a major complication in women and numerous approaches are being developed to overcome this problem. In conventional treatments such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy the post side effects cause an unsuitable effect in treatment of cancer. Hence, it is essential to develop a novel strategy for the treatment of this disease. In the present investigation, a possible route for green synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using leaf extract of Mimosa pudica and its anticancer efficacy in the treatment of breast cancer cell lines is studied. The synthesized nanoparticles were found to be effective in killing cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 & MCF-7) which were studied using various anticancer assays (MTT assay, cell morphology determination, cell cycle analysis, comet assay, Annexin V-FITC/PI staining and DAPI staining). Cell morphological analysis showed the changes occurred in cancer cells during the treatment with AuNPs. Cell cycle analysis revealed apoptosis in G0/G1 to S phase. Similarly in Comet assay, there was an increase in tail length in treated cells in comparison with the control. Annexin V-FITC/PI staining assay showed prompt fluorescence in treated cells indicating the translocation of phosphatidylserine from the inner membrane. PI and DAPI staining showed the DNA damage in treated cells.

  2. Anti-Proliferative Activity of Meroditerpenoids Isolated from the Brown Alga Stypopodium flabelliforme against Several Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Valentao

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The sea constitutes one of the most promising sources of novel compounds with potential application in human therapeutics. In particular, algae have proved to be an interesting source of new bioactive compounds. In this work, six meroditerpenoids (epitaondiol, epitaondiol diacetate, epitaondiol monoacetate, stypotriol triacetate, 14-ketostypodiol diacetate and stypodiol isolated from the brown alga Stypopodium flabelliforme were tested for their cell proliferation inhibitory activity in five cell lines. Cell lines tested included human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2, human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y, rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3, murine macrophages (RAW.267 and Chinese hamster fibroblasts (V79. Antimicrobial activity of the compounds was also evaluated against Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium, Proteus mirabilis, Bacillus cereus, Enterococcus faecalis and Micrococcus luteus. Overall, the compounds showed good activity against all cell lines, with SH-SY5Y and RAW.267 being the most susceptible. Antimicrobial capacity was observed for epitaondiol monoacetate, stypotriol triacetate and stypodiol, with the first being the most active. The results suggest that these molecules deserve further studies in order to evaluate their potential as therapeutic agents.

  3. Anti-proliferative lichen compounds with inhibitory activity on 12(S)-HETE production in human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucar, F; Schneider, I; Ogmundsdóttir, H; Ingólfsdóttir, K

    2004-11-01

    Several lichen compounds, i.e. lobaric acid (1), a beta-orcinol depsidone from Stereocaulon alpinum L., (+)-protolichesterinic acid (2), an aliphatic alpha-methylene-gamma-lactone from Cetraria islandica Laur. (Parmeliaceae), (+)-usnic acid (3), a dibenzofuran from Cladonia arbuscula (Wallr.) Rabenh. (Cladoniaceae), parietin (4), an anthraquinone from Xanthoria elegans (Link) Th. Fr. (Calaplacaceae) and baeomycesic acid (5), a beta-orcinol depside isolated from Thamnolia vermicularis (Sw.) Schaer. var. subuliformis (Ehrh.) Schaer. were tested for inhibitory activity on platelet-type 12(S)-lipoxygenase using a cell-based in vitro system in human platelets. Lobaric acid (1) and (+)-protolichesterinic acid (2) proved to be pronounced inhibitors of platelet-type 12(S)-lipoxygenase, whereas baeomycesic acid (5) showed only weak activity (inhibitory activity at a concentration of 100 microg/ml: (1) 93.4+/-6.62%, (2) 98,5+/-1.19%, 5 14.7+/-2.76%). Usnic acid (3) and parietin (4) were not active at this concentration. 1 and 2 showed a clear dose-response relationship in the range of 3.33-100 microg/ml. According to the calculated IC50 values the highest inhibitory activity was observed for the depsidone 1 (IC50 = 28.5 microM) followed by 2 (IC50 = 77.0 microM). The activity of 1 was comparable to that of the flavone baicalein, which is known as a selective 12(S)-lipoxygenase inhibitor (IC50 = 24.6 microM).

  4. Medium Renewal Blocks Anti-Proliferative Effects of Metformin in Cultured MDA-MB-231 Breast Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Maruša Rajh; Klemen Dolinar; Katarina Miš; Mojca Pavlin; Sergej Pirkmajer

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that metformin, a widely used type 2 diabetes drug, might reduce breast cancer risk and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes. Metformin might protect against breast cancer indirectly by ameliorating systemic glucose homeostasis. Alternatively, it might target breast cancer cells directly. However, experiments using MDA-MB-231 cells, a standard in vitro breast cancer model, produced inconsistent results regarding effectiveness of metformin as a direct ant...

  5. Anti-proliferative and proapoptotic effects of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate on human melanoma: possible implications for the chemoprevention of melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nihal, Minakshi; Ahmad, Nihal; Mukhtar, Hasan; Wood, Gary S

    2005-04-20

    Melanoma accounts for only about 4% of all skin cancer cases but most of skin cancer-related deaths. Standard systemic therapies such as interferon (IFN) have not been adequately effective in the management of melanoma. Therefore, novel approaches are needed for prevention and treatment of this disease. Chemoprevention by naturally occurring agents present in food and beverages has shown benefits in certain cancers including nonmelanoma skin cancers. Here, employing 2 human melanoma cell lines (A-375 amelanotic malignant melanoma and Hs-294T metastatic melanoma) and normal human epidermal melanocytes (NHEM), we studied the antiproliferative effects of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the major polyphenolic antioxidant present in green tea. EGCG treatment was found to result in a dose-dependent decrease in the viability and growth of both melanoma cell lines. Interestingly, at similar EGCG concentrations, the normal melanocytes were not affected. EGCG treatment of the melanoma cell lines resulted in decreased cell proliferation (as assessed by Ki-67 and PCNA protein levels) and induction of apoptosis (as assessed cleavage of PARP, TUNEL assay and JC-1 assay). EGCG also significantly inhibited the colony formation ability of the melanoma cells studied. EGCG treatment of melanoma cells resulted in a downmodulation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2, upregulation of proapoptotic Bax and activation of caspases -3, -7 and -9. Furthermore, our data demonstrated that EGCG treatment resulted in a significant, dose-dependent decrease in cyclin D1 and cdk2 protein levels and induction of cyclin kinase inhibitors (ckis) p16INK4a, p21WAF1/CIP1 and p27KIP1. Our data suggest that EGCG causes significant induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of melanoma cells that is mediated via modulations in the cki-cyclin-cdk network and Bcl2 family proteins. Thus, EGCG, alone or in conjunction with current therapies, could be useful for the management of melanoma.

  6. New naphthalene derivatives and isoquinoline alkaloids from Ancistrocladus cochinchinensis with their anti-proliferative activity on human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Le Quynh; Linh, Tran My; Giang, Vu Huong; Mai, Nguyen Chi; Nhiem, Nguyen Xuan; Tai, Bui Huu; Cuc, Nguyen Thi; Anh, Hoang Le Tuan; Ban, Ninh Khac; Minh, Chau Van; Kiem, Phan Van

    2016-08-15

    Five new compounds, named ancistronaphtosides A and B (1 and 2), anciscochine (3), anciscochine 6-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (4), and 4'-methoxy-5-epi-ancistecrorine A1 (5), together with tortoside A (6) and 4-hydroxy-2-methoxyphenyl-6-O-syringoyl-β-d-glucopyranoside (7) were isolated from the methanolic extract of Ancistrocladus cochinchinensis. Their chemical structures were established using HR-ESI-MS, NMR spectroscopic, and chiroptical methods. Compound 5 significantly exhibited anti-proliferation against HL-60, LU-1, and SK-MEL-2 cells with IC50 values of 5.0±1.2, 6.5±1.6, and 6.8±2.0μg/mL, respectively. PMID:27423477

  7. Abrus agglutinin is a potent anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic agent in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutia, Sujit K; Behera, Birendra; Nandini Das, Durgesh; Mukhopadhyay, Subhadip; Sinha, Niharika; Panda, Prashanta Kumar; Naik, Prajna Paramita; Patra, Samir K; Mandal, Mahitosh; Sarkar, Siddik; Menezes, Mitchell E; Talukdar, Sarmistha; Maiti, Tapas K; Das, Swadesh K; Sarkar, Devanand; Fisher, Paul B

    2016-07-15

    Abrus agglutinin (AGG), a plant lectin isolated from the seeds of Abrus precatorius, has documented antitumor and immunostimulatory effects in murine models. To examine possible antitumor activity against breast cancer, we established human breast tumor xenografts in athymic nude mice and intraperitoneally administered AGG. AGG inhibited tumor growth and angiogenesis as confirmed by monitoring the expression of Ki-67 and CD-31, respectively. In addition, TUNEL positive cells increased in breast tumors treated with AGG suggesting that AGG mediates anti-tumorigenic activity through induction of apoptosis and inhibition of angiogenesis. On a molecular level, AGG caused extrinsic apoptosis through ROS generation that was AKT-dependent in breast cancer cells, without affecting primary mammary epithelial cells, suggesting potential cancer specificity of this natural compound. In addition, using HUVECs, AGG inhibited expression of the pro-angiogenic factor IGFBP-2 in an AKT-dependent manner, reducing angiogenic phenotypes both in vitro and in vivo. Overall, the present results establish that AGG promotes both apoptosis and anti-angiogenic activities in human breast tumor cells, which might be exploited for treatment of breast and other cancers. PMID:26914517

  8. Cytotoxic Compounds from Juglans sinensis Dode Display Anti-Proliferative Activity by Inducing Apoptosis in Human Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoo Jin; Cui, Jun; Lee, Jun; Han, Ah-Reum; Lee, Eun Byul; Jang, Ho Hee; Seo, Eun Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    Phytochemical investigation of the bark of Juglans sinensis Dode (Juglandaceae) led to the isolation of two active compounds, 8-hydroxy-2-methoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (1) and 5-hydroxy-2-methoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (2), together with 15 known compounds 3-17. All compounds were isolated from this plant for the first time. The structures of 1 and 2 were elucidated by spectroscopic data analysis, including 1D and 2D NMR experiments. Compounds 1-17 were tested for their cytotoxicity against the A549 human lung cancer cell line; compounds 1 and 2 exhibited significant cytotoxicity and additionally had potent cytotoxicity against six human cancer cell lines, MCF7 (breast cancer), SNU423 (liver cancer), SH-SY5Y (neuroblastoma), HeLa (cervical cancer), HCT116 (colorectal cancer), and A549 (lung cancer). In particular, breast, colon, and lung cancer cells were more sensitive to the treatment using compound 1. In addition, compounds 1 and 2 showed strong cytotoxic activity towards human breast cancer cells MCF7, HS578T, and T47D, but not towards MCF10A normal-like breast cells. They also inhibited the colony formation of MCF7, A549, and HCT116 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that the percentage of apoptotic cells significantly increased in MCF7 cells upon the treatment with compounds 1 and 2. The mechanism of cell death caused by compounds 1 and 2 may be attributed to the upregulation of Bax and downregulation of Bcl2. These findings suggest that compounds 1 and 2 may be regarded as potential therapeutic agents against cancer.

  9. Efavirenz Has the Highest Anti-Proliferative Effect of Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors against Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Hecht

    Full Text Available Cancer prevention and therapy in HIV-1-infected patients will play an important role in future. The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI Efavirenz and Nevirapine are cytotoxic against cancer cells in vitro. As other NNRTIs have not been studied so far, all clinically used NNRTIs were tested and the in vitro toxic concentrations were compared to drug levels in patients to predict possible anti-cancer effects in vivo.Cytotoxicity was studied by Annexin-V-APC/7AAD staining and flow cytometry in the pancreatic cancer cell lines BxPC-3 and Panc-1 and confirmed by colony formation assays. The 50% effective cytotoxic concentrations (EC50 were calculated and compared to the blood levels in our patients and published data.The in vitro EC50 of the different drugs in the BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer cells were: Efavirenz 31.5 μmol/l (= 9944 ng/ml, Nevirapine 239 μmol/l (= 63,786 ng/ml, Etravirine 89.0 μmol/l (= 38,740 ng/ml, Lersivirine 543 μmol/l (= 168,523 ng/ml, Delavirdine 171 μmol/l (= 78,072 ng/ml, Rilpivirine 24.4 μmol/l (= 8941 ng/ml. As Efavirenz and Rilpivirine had the highest cytotoxic potential and Nevirapine is frequently used in HIV-1 positive patients, the results of these three drugs were further studied in Panc-1 pancreatic cancer cells and confirmed with colony formation assays. 205 patient blood levels of Efavirenz, 127 of Rilpivirine and 31 of Nevirapine were analyzed. The mean blood level of Efavirenz was 3587 ng/ml (range 162-15,363 ng/ml, of Rilpivirine 144 ng/ml (range 0-572 ng/ml and of Nevirapine 4955 ng/ml (range 1856-8697 ng/ml. Blood levels from our patients and from published data had comparable Efavirenz levels to the in vitro toxic EC50 in about 1 to 5% of all patients.All studied NNRTIs were toxic against cancer cells. A low percentage of patients taking Efavirenz reached in vitro cytotoxic blood levels. It can be speculated that in HIV-1 positive patients having high Efavirenz blood levels pancreatic cancer incidence might be reduced. Efavirenz might be a new option in the treatment of cancer.

  10. High cytotoxicity and anti-proliferative activity of algae extracts on an in vitro model of human hepatocellular carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, Celso; Pinteus, Susete; Horta, André; Pedrosa, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cancer represents a serious threat for human health with high social and economic impacts worldwide. Therefore, the development of new anticancer drugs is of most importance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antitumor potential of twelve algae from Portugal coast on an in vitro model of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG-2 cells).Results: Both extracts of Asparagopsis armata (1000 µg/ml; 24 h) presented high cytotoxicity with 11.22 ± 2.98 and 1.51 ± 0.38 % of Hep...

  11. New Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Proliferative Constituents from Fermented Red Mold Rice Monascus purpureus NTU 568

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Haur Kuo

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Six azaphilonoid derivatives, including two new blue fluorescent monapurfluores A (1 and B (2, two known pyridine-containing molecules, monascopyridines C (3 and D (4, and two known monasfluores A (5 and B (6, were isolated and characterized from red mold rice fermented by Monascus purpureus NTU 568. Structural elucidation of new isolates was based on nuclear magnetic resonance (1H- NMR, 13C-NMR, COSY, HMQC, and HMBC and other spectroscopic analyses. Bioactivity evaluation indicated that 1-6 possessed anti-inflammatory activities with dose-dependent relationships for lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced nitric oxide production. Furthermore, 1-4 also showed moderate antiproliferative effects against human laryngeal carcinoma (HEp-2 (IC50 = 14.81~20.06 μg/mL and human colon adenocarcinoma (WiDr (IC50 = 12.89~21.14 μg/mL.

  12. Anti-proliferative actions of 2-decylamino-5,8-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung-Jin [Department of Pharmacology, Chungnam National University College of Pharmacy, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Drug Research and Development, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Zhang, Wei-Yun; Yi, Hyoseok; Kim, Yohan; Kim, In-Su [Department of Pharmacology, Chungnam National University College of Pharmacy, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Shen, Gui-Nan; Song, Gyu-Yong [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Chungnam National University College of Pharmacy, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Myung, Chang-Seon, E-mail: cm8r@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacology, Chungnam National University College of Pharmacy, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Drug Research and Development, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} 2-Decylamino-DMNQ inhibited PDGF-BB-induced VSMC proliferation in a dose-dependent manner with no apparent cytotoxicity. {yields} 2-Decylamino-DMNQ inhibited PDGF-BB-induced phosphorylation of Erk1/2 and PLC{gamma}1. {yields} 2-Decylamino-DMNQ arrested a G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle progression in association with pRb phosphorylation and PCNA expression. {yields} Both U0126, an Erk inhibitor, and U73122, a PLC{gamma} inhibitor, arrested a G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase of the cell cycle. -- Abstract: Naphthoquinone derivatives have been reported to possess various pharmacological activities, such as antiplatelet, anticancer, antifungal, and antiviral properties. In this study, we investigated the effects of a newly-synthesized naphthoquinone derivative, 2-decylamino-5,8-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (2-decylamino-DMNQ), on VSMC proliferation and examined the molecular basis of the underlying mechanism. In a dose-dependent manner, 2-decylamino-DMNQ inhibited PDGF-stimulated VSMC proliferation with no apparent cytotoxic effect. While 2-decylamino-DMNQ did not affect PDGF-R{beta} or Akt, it did inhibit the phosphorylation of Erk1/2 and PLC{gamma}1 induced by PDGF. Moreover, 2-decylamino-DMNQ suppressed DNA synthesis through the arrest of cell cycle progression at the G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase, including the suppression of pRb phosphorylation and a decrease in PCNA expression, which was related to the downregulation of cell cycle regulatory factors, such as cyclin D1/E and CDK 2/4. It was demonstrated that both U0126, an Erk1/2 inhibitor, and U73122, a PLC{gamma} inhibitor, increased the proportion of cells in the G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase of the cell cycle. Thus, these results suggest that 2-decylamino DMNQ has an inhibitory effect on PDGF-induced VSMC proliferation and the mechanism of this action is through cell cycle arrest at the G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase. This may be a useful tool for studying interventions for vascular restenosis in coronary revascularization procedures and stent implantation.

  13. Two New Oleanane-Type Saponins with Anti-Proliferative Activity from Camellia oleifera Abel. Seed Cake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Fa Zong

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Two new oleanane-type saponins, named oleiferasaponins C4 (1 and C5 (2, were isolated from Camellia oleifera Abel. seed cake residue. Their respective structures were identified as 16α-hydroxy-22α-O-angeloyl-23α-aldehyde-28-dihydroxymethylene-olean-12-ene-3β-O-[β-d-galacto-pyranosyl-(1→2]-[β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2-β-d-galactopyranosy-(1→3]-β-d-glucopyranosid-uronic acid methyl ester (1 and 16α-hydroxy-22α-O-angeloyl-23α-aldehyde-28-dihydroxy-methylene-olean-12-ene-3β-O-[β-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→2]-[β-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→3]-β-d-glucopyranosiduronic acid methyl ester (2 through 1D- and 2D-NMR, HR-ESI-MS, and GC-MS spectroscopic methods. The two compounds exhibited potent cytotoxic activities against five human tumor cell lines (BEL-7402, BGC-823, MCF-7, HL-60 and KB.

  14. Three new anti-proliferative Annonaceous acetogenins with mono-tetrahydrofuran ring from graviola fruit (Annona muricata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shi; Liu, Jingchun; Kadouh, Hoda; Sun, Xiuxiu; Zhou, Kequan

    2014-06-15

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of the fruit powder of graviola (Annona muricata) yielded three novel compounds: muricins J, K, and L. The compounds are all C35 Annonaceous acetogenins with a mono-tetrahydrofuran ring and four hydroxyls. Their structures were elucidated by spectral methods and chemical modification after isolation via chromatographic techniques and HPLC purification. These three acetogenins demonstrated an antiproliferative against human prostate cancer PC-3 cells.

  15. Discovery at the interface: Toward novel anti-proliferative agents targeting human estrogen receptor/S100 interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, David H; Asare, Bethany K; Rajnarayanan, Rajendram V

    2016-10-17

    Estrogen Receptor Alpha (ER) is expressed in about 70% of breast cancer and mediates various cellular signaling events including cell cycle. The antiestrogen tamoxifen is currently administered to patients in order to induce regression of the tumor growth of estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer. However, upon continued administration, patients develop resistance to tamoxifen. In addition, calcium binding proteins (EF-hand proteins) such as, Calmodulin and S100, are significantly overexpressed in breast cancer cells, can activate transcription of target genes by directly binding to ER in lieu of estrogen. Calmodulin antagonists (w7 and melatonin) have been shown to significantly inhibit ER mediated activities including cell proliferation and transcriptional activity. Furthermore, S100P is shown to mediate tamoxifen resistance and cell migration capacity in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Molecules targeting specific ER-EF hand protein interfaces could potentially provide an alternative therapeutic strategy to combat these scenarios. Using theoretical 3D models of ER-S100 protein we identified ER conformation-sensing regions of the interacting EF hand proteins and evaluated their ability to bind to ER in silico and to inhibit breast cancer cell proliferation and viability in vitro. The recognition motif of the binding interface was sensitive to small changes in partner orientation as evidenced by significant anti cell proliferative activity of the short peptide derived from S100P residues 74-78, when compared with a longer peptide with altered orientation of the recognition motif derived from S100P 74-81. Structural clues and pharmacophores from peptide-ER interactions can be used to design novel anti-cancer agents. PMID:27580430

  16. 31 CFR 20.610 - Controlled substance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Controlled substance. 20.610 Section 20.610 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 20.610 Controlled substance. Controlled substance means a controlled substance...

  17. Women and substance use disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Hesse

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Substance use disorders belong to the class of externalizing behaviours that are generally more common among men than women. Those women who do have substance disorders therefore deviate more from the norms of society compared with men, tend to live in an environment characterized by high risk of violence and other forms of abuse, and tend to be survivors of childhood trauma. In terms of seeking treatment, women often have difficulty acknowledging their problems with substance use disorders, and professionals are reluctant to ask women about drug or alcohol use. Even when they do seek treatment, women in many countries face practical and financial barriers to access treatment. For women who do enter treatment, outcomes are generally comparable to outcomes for men, suggesting that facilitating entry into treatment can yield substantial benefits for women with addictions.

  18. Substance Use Among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidmore, Chloe R; Kaufman, Erin A; Crowell, Sheila E

    2016-10-01

    Emerging adulthood has heightened risk for substance use. College students experience unique challenges, making them prone to use of alcohol, marijuana, and nonmedical use of prescription drugs. This article reviews rates of college students' substance use, risk factors, and populations at elevated risk. Consequences include legal, academic, and mental health problems; engagement in other risky behaviors; increased rates of injury; and death. Researchers, clinicians, and university administrators must identify those at greatest risk and provide prevention and intervention programs. Despite broad evidence supporting such programs, many students fail to access appropriate treatment. Future research should elucidate treatment barriers. PMID:27613349

  19. Adolescent pregnancy and substance use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, P; Kokotailo, P

    1999-03-01

    The question of just what is the relationship of early pregnancy and childbearing and substance use among adolescents remains unanswered. From a public health perspective, both behaviors are unwanted, and populations that are at risk are often at high risk for both. Perhaps prevention of one behavior may be expected to prevent the other. This, however, may be too simplistic a notion, grounded in misconception of the role of early pregnancy and specific cultural context. Furthermore, several studies have documented a decline of drug use during pregnancy and just after delivery among adolescent mothers. Does this trend continue through the parenting years? If so, for whom? What are the individual maternal, child, and family environmental characteristics that predict a decline in use or continued abstinence after early childbearing? Within the context of poverty, lower educational attainment, minority status, and high prevalence of alcohol and drug use, pregnancy may play a positive role. With a change in role, young women may be less likely than nonparenting peers and less likely than prior to their own pregnancy to become deeply involved in the negative behaviors, such as smoking, drinking, and substance use. Perhaps this is a potential opportunity to intervene. To summarize, the health risk behaviors of substance use and adolescent pregnancy and childbearing appear to be linked. Youths who become pregnant before they complete high school represent a particular group of young women who may be at higher risk than the general population for substance use, at least cigarettes, alcohol, and marijuana. Yet, most pregnant teenagers are not substance users. Among those who are, frequency and amounts of use in most samples were low compared with adult samples of pregnant women. Furthermore, there is evidence that teenagers perceive substance use as a risk to their pregnancies and their unborn children. Among users, there is a decrease in use and increase in quit rates

  20. Diet and substance abuse recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may be helpful during recovery (this may include B-complex, zinc, and vitamins A and C) A person with substance use is more likely to relapse when they have poor eating habits. This is why regular meals are important. Drug and alcohol addiction causes a person to forget what it ...

  1. Substances and Heart Rhythm Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... wine and eating too much can bring about symptoms in others. These rhythm problems are rarely serious. Substance Abuse: Drugs and Inhalants Abusing legal or illegal drugs can lead to dangerous arrhythmias . Alcohol Small amounts (no more than one drink a ...

  2. Youth employment and substance use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaestner, Robert; Sasso, Anthony Lo; Callison, Kevin; Yarnoff, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    A significant portion of teens work while in school and the consequences of that work are of potential concern to society. While there is widespread support for combining work and school, and some evidence that employment has positive effects on youth development, previous research has revealed some potentially harmful consequences of employment among teens. In this paper, we investigate the relationship between teen employment and substance use. We extended this literature by studying two different cohorts of youth, and by exploiting arguably exogenous variation in youth employment and earnings caused by changes in minimum wages and the business cycle (unemployment). Estimates suggest that hours of work are positively associated with alcohol and cigarette use. However, if selection on unobserved variables were equal to selection on observed variables, these associations would be close to zero. With respect to the association between earnings and substance use, the evidence is less clear.

  3. The Many Victims of Substance Abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Mauro, Tara

    2007-01-01

    Substance abuse is a complicated disorder and has far reaching consequences. The victims of substance abuse extend beyond the unfortunate ones suffering from this disorder and often include family and friends. Treatment options for substance abuse are many; however, positive outcomes are not always guaranteed. Many factors play into the potential for successful treatment. Some of these include the adherence and motivation of the substance abusing patients as well as patients' surrounding envi...

  4. Update on Banned Substances 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Barnes, Kenneth P.; Rainbow, Catherine R.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Doping has been pervasive throughout the history of athletic competitions and has only recently been regulated by organizations such as the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), US Anti-Doping Agency (USADA), and the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). These regulatory bodies were created to preserve fair play and maintain the safety of the participants. Their updated 2013 lists of banned substances and practices include a variety of drugs and practices that could cause harm ...

  5. Why adolescents use substances of abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhigg, Daniel

    2013-08-01

    In summary, adolescent substance use is associated with a variety of risks. Using a nonjudgmental and collaborative approach to treating adolescent substance users can yield positive results. Motivational interviewing and the adolescent community reinforcement approach are evidence-based, nonpharmacologic treatments for teens with substance use disorders.

  6. Family Characteristics and Adolescent Substance Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Andy L.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Study used self-report questionnaire data from high school students to determine the relation between adolescents' perception of family characteristics and adolescent substance use patterns. Results indicate adolescents' perception of maternal substance use, family hardiness, and age of the adolescent were significant predictors of substance use.…

  7. Substance misuse and substance use disorders in sex offenders: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.L. Kraanen; P.M.G. Emmelkamp

    2011-01-01

    Substance abuse has often been associated with committing sex offenses. In this article, the following will be reviewed: 1) studies that assessed substance abuse in sex offenders; 2) differences in substance abuse among different types of sex offenders; 3) differences in substance abuse between sex

  8. Update on Substance Use in Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Simone C; Fogger, Susanne A; McGuinness, Teena M

    2016-08-01

    With alarming frequency, an individual's first substance use occurs in childhood or adolescence. However, the use of many types of substances among individuals younger than 18 has been gradually declining over the past 6 years, and our understanding of risk factors for youth substance use has improved. Risk factors identified as possibly contributing to a young individual's first encounter with cigarettes or alcohol include parents' own substance use or mental health problems. Mental disorders of children have been implicated in substance use as well. Screening and interventions are available to reduce the frequency and intensity of adolescent substance use and are suggested in the current article. Nurses are in a position to identify adolescents who are at risk for substance use disorders and link the family system to effective intervention. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 54(8), 24-27.]. PMID:27479476

  9. Substance use during pregnancy and postnatal outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irner, Tina Birk; Teasdale, Thomas William; Tine, Nielsen;

    2012-01-01

    of substances. More than 50% of the mothers ceased using any substances (with the exception of tobacco) by birth, indicating that the treatment program did have an interventional effect on the mothers. The mothers' ability to either cease or decrease the use of substances during pregnancy appears to have direct...... pregnancy, as well as their background, and to examine the effect substance use has on gestational age, birth weight, and the development of neonatal abstinence syndrome at birth. A sample of 161 pregnant women and their 163 newborn children were included. The results indicate that the children whose...... mothers continued to use substances throughout their pregnancies were born at a lower gestational age (Chi-Square = 15.1(2), P children exposed to poly-substances in utero were more affected than those exposed to only alcohol and those with no substance exposure. The same children were more...

  10. Method for determining immunochemical substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drawing a method for detecting and measuring a predetermined specifically-bindable immunochemical substance in a liquid sample in a cuvette, comprising the steps of: (A) providing, in an immunoassay technique for the liquid sample in said cuvette, a component comprising a suspension of particles which may be agglutinated or insolubilized in relationship to the presence and concentration of the immunochemical substance in the sample; and (B) determining the presence and concentration of the immunochemical substance by measuring the electromagnetic radiation transmission properties of the sample using a calibrated radiation-measuring apparatus, said apparatus comprising: (1) a suitable electromagnetic radiation source capable of providing radiation at wavelengths equal to or less than the mean diameter of said particles; (2) means for concentrating and collimating radiation from the electromagnetic radiation source to form a beam; (3) means for filtering the beam to (I) eliminate radiation having wavelengths greater than the means diameter of the particles and (II) transmit radiation, which radiation has a range, whereby the upper wavelength is equal to or below the mean diameter of the particles, and the range is of at least about 100nm; (4) means for (I) positioning a sample-containing cuvette and for (II) allowing the filtered beam incident on the cuvette to be transmitted through the cuvette and sample, and for (III) receiving a portion of the filtered beam transmitted through the sample at two or more predetermined angles with respect to the beam; and (5) means for detecting and measuring the portion of the beam transmitted at a predetermined angle

  11. Substance abuse precedes internet addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Young Sik; Han, Doug Hyun; Kim, Sun Mi; Renshaw, Perry F.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate possible overlapping substance abuse and internet addiction in a large, uniformly sampled population, ranging in age from 13 to 18 years. Participants (N=73,238) in the current study were drawn from the 6th Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey (KYRBWS-V) for students from 400 middle schools and 400 high schools in 16 cities within South Korea. Of adolescent internet users, 85.2% were general users (GU), 11.9% were users with potential ris...

  12. Storage of hazardous substances in bonded warehouses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A variety of special regulations exist in Costa Rica for registration and transport of hazardous substances; these set the requirements for entry into the country and the security of transport units. However, the regulations mentioned no specific rules for storing hazardous substances. Tax deposits have been the initial place where are stored the substances that enter the country.The creation of basic rules that would be regulating the storage of hazardous substances has taken place through the analysis of regulations and national and international laws governing hazardous substances. The regulatory domain that currently exists will be established with a field research in fiscal deposits in the metropolitan area. The storage and security measures that have been used by the personnel handling the substances will be identified to be putting the reality with that the hazardous substances have been handled in tax deposits. A rule base for the storage of hazardous substances in tax deposits can be made, protecting the safety of the environment in which are manipulated and avoiding a possible accident causing a mess around. The rule will have the characteristics of the storage warehouses hazardous substances, such as safety standards, labeling standards, infrastructure features, common storage and transitional measures that must possess and meet all bonded warehouses to store hazardous substances. (author)

  13. [Substance abuse in older adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitar, Raoul; Dürsteler, Kenneth M; Rösner, Susanne; Grosshans, Martin; Herdener, Marcus; Mutschler, Jochen

    2014-09-01

    In respect of demographic change, the number of older patients with substance abuse and addiction is on the raise. In this review we present important clinical and therapeutic aspects of substance abuse and addiction in the elderly and focus on alcohol, benzodiazepines and opioids. Daily and risky alcohol consumption is common among older people. They also have an increased risk getting alcohol-related complications. For early detection, laboratory parameters and questionnaires such as the AUDIT-C are suitable. Therapeutically brief interventions have been proved successful. Also, abuse of benzodiazepines, especially low-dose addiction, is widespread among older persons, although often overlooked, and patients often do not recognize their addiction. The physician has to know the correct indication, adequate dosage and pharmacological interactions. A slow-dose reduction is recommended in case of addiction. Thanks to opioid substitution therapy, patients with an opioidaddiction can reach a higher age. Age influences the effects of the substitute, which may require an adjustment of the dosage. Treatment of elderly patients should be based on their needs and resources and is usually very effective.

  14. Dietary supplements containing prohibited substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Bijl, P; Tutelyan, V A

    2013-01-01

    Dietary supplement use among athletes to enhance performance is proliferating as more individuals strive for obtaining that chemical competitive edge. As a result the concomitant use of dietary supplements containing performance-enhancing substances of those falling in the categories outlined in the current review, can also be expected to rise. This despite ever-increasing sophisticated analytical methodology techniques being used to assay dietary supplement and urine samples in doping laboratories. The reasons for this include that a variety of these chemical entities, many of them on the prohibited drug list of the WADA, are being produced on commercial scales in factories around the world (ephedrine and pseudoephedrine, sibutramine, methylhexaneamine, prohormones, 'classic' anabolic steroids, clenbuterol, peptide hormones etc.), aggressive marketing strategies are being employed by companies and these supplements can be easily ordered via e.g. the internet. It can also be anticipated that there will be an increase in the number of supplements containing 'designer' steroids and other 'newer' molecules. Chromatographic techniques combined with mass spectrometry leading to identification of molecular fragments and productions will assist in determining these substances. To prevent accidental doping, information regarding dietary supplements must be provided to athletes, coaches and sports doctors at all levels of competition. The risks of accidental doping via dietary supplement ingestion can be minimized by using 'safe' products listed on databases, e.g. such as those available in The Netherlands and Germany. PMID:24741950

  15. School Substance Use Norms and Racial Composition Moderate Parental and Peer Influences on Adolescent Substance Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jinni; Supple, Andrew J

    2016-06-01

    Parental and peer influences on adolescent substance use have been well demonstrated. However, limited research has examined how parental and peer influences vary across school contexts. This study used a multilevel approach to examine the effects of school substance use norms and school racial composition in predicting adolescent substance use (a composite measure of alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use) and in moderating parental and peer influences on adolescent substance use. A total of 14,346 adolescents from 34 schools in a mid-western county completed surveys electronically at school. Analyses were conducted using hierarchical linear modeling. Results indicated that school-level disapproval against substance use and percentage of minority students at school were negatively associated with adolescent substance use. School-level disapproval moderated the association between peer substance use and adolescent substance use, with the association being stronger when school-level disapproval was lower. School racial composition moderated the influence of parental disapproval and peer substance use on adolescent substance use. Specifically, both the association between parental disapproval and adolescent substance use and the association between peer substance use and adolescent substance use were weaker for adolescents who attended schools with higher percentages of minority students. Findings highlighted the importance of considering the role of school contexts, in conjunction with parental and peer influences, in understanding adolescent substance use. PMID:27215854

  16. Impulsivity, Peer Influence, and Adolescent Substance Use

    OpenAIRE

    Stautz, Kaidy

    2013-01-01

    Individuals in Western societies commonly begin to experiment with alcohol and/or cannabis during their adolescent years. Many experience negative consequences from the use of these substances and a minority develop pathological problems such as abuse and dependence. Previous research has identified myriad individual and environmental variables that precede and predict problematic substance use. Two such risk factors are the personality trait impulsivity and the influence of substance-using p...

  17. Natural sweet substances - alternative of sugar

    OpenAIRE

    Kratochvílová, Kateřina

    2014-01-01

    Natural sweet substances – alternative of sugar Summary Sugar (sucrose) is undoubtedly the most commonly used sweetening agent of natural origin, but certainly not the only one. Large amount of sweet substances with different structure has been isolated from the plants. These non-carbohydrate sweetening agents have several advantages over sucrose. They are low-energy substances, which have much higher sweetening effect than sucrose, and therefore become a suitable alternative sugar. U...

  18. Molecular aggregation of humic substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wershaw, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    Humic substances (HS) form molecular aggregates in solution and on mineral surfaces. Elucidation of the mechanism of formation of these aggregates is important for an understanding of the interactions of HS in soils arid natural waters. The HS are formed mainly by enzymatic depolymerization and oxidation of plant biopolymers. These reactions transform the aromatic and lipid plant components into amphiphilic molecules, that is, molecules that consist of separate hydrophobic (nonpolar) and hydrophilic (polar) parts. The nonpolar parts of the molecules are composed of relatively unaltered segments of plant polymers and the polar parts of carboxylic acid groups. These amphiphiles form membrane-like aggregates on mineral surfaces and micelle-like aggregates in solution. The exterior surfaces of these aggregates are hydrophilic, and the interiors constitute separate hydrophobic liquid-like phases.

  19. Unification of Force and Substance

    CERN Document Server

    Wilczek, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Maxwell's mature presentation of his equations emphasized the unity of electromagnetism and mechanics, subsuming both as "dynamical systems". That intuition of unity has proved both fruitful, as a source of pregnant concepts, and broadly inspiring. A deep aspect of Maxwell's work is its use of redundant potentials, and the associated requirement of gauge symmetry. Those concepts have become central to our present understanding of fundamental physics, but they can appear to be rather formal and esoteric. Here I discuss two things: The physical significance of gauge invariance, in broad terms; and some tantalizing prospects for further unification, building on that concept, that are visible on the horizon today. If those prospects are realized, Maxwell's vision of the unity of field and substance will be brought to a new level.

  20. Decisions to regulate genotoxic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decisions to regulate genotoxic substances involve trade-offs between various incomparable factors such as risks to human health and other environmental risks, public perceptions, costs and uncertainties. Two different approaches towards these trade-offs are discussed. In one approach, all relevant factors are defined and trade-offs are considered using a general and very elaborate analysis. Cost-benefit analysis is an exponent of this approach. An illustration is given for the regulation of transboundary releases of radioactive materials. The other approach considers what is politically feasible for the time being and seeks a decision with much room for later corrections. Incrementalism is a philosophy in this vein. It is illustrated by reference to the regulation of transboundary air pollution. Weaknesses and strengths of the two approaches are discussed. (author)

  1. Unification of force and substance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczek, Frank

    2016-08-28

    Maxwell's mature presentation of his equations emphasized the unity of electromagnetism and mechanics, subsuming both as 'dynamical systems'. That intuition of unity has proved both fruitful, as a source of pregnant concepts, and broadly inspiring. A deep aspect of Maxwell's work is its use of redundant potentials, and the associated requirement of gauge symmetry. Those concepts have become central to our present understanding of fundamental physics, but they can appear to be rather formal and esoteric. Here I discuss two things: the physical significance of gauge invariance, in broad terms; and some tantalizing prospects for further unification, building on that concept, that are visible on the horizon today. If those prospects are realized, Maxwell's vision of the unity of field and substance will be brought to a new level.This article is part of the themed issue 'Unifying physics and technology in light of Maxwell's equations'. PMID:27458259

  2. Substance abuse precedes Internet addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Sik; Han, Doug Hyun; Kim, Sun Mi; Renshaw, Perry F

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate possible overlapping substance abuse and internet addiction in a large, uniformly sampled population, ranging in age from 13 to 18 years. Participants (N=73,238) in the current study were drawn from the 6th Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey (KYRBWS-V) for students from 400 middle schools and 400 high schools in 16 cities within South Korea. Of adolescent internet users, 85.2% were general users (GU), 11.9% were users with potential risk for internet addiction (PR), and 3.0% were users with high risk for internet addiction (HR). There was a difference in the number of students with alcohol drinking among the GU, PR, and HR groups (20.8% vs 23.1% vs 27.4%). There was a difference in the number of students who smoked among the GS, PR, and HR groups (11.7% vs 13.5% vs 20.4%). There was a difference in the number of students with drug use among the GU, PR, and HR groups (1.7% vs 2.0% vs 6.5%). After adjusting for sex, age, stress, depressed mood, and suicidal ideation, smoking may predict a high risk for internet addiction (OR=1.203, p=0.004). In addition, drug use may predict a high risk for internet addiction (OR=2.591, pinternet addiction have vulnerability for addictive behaviors, co-morbid substance abuse should be evaluated and, if found, treated in adolescents with internet addiction.

  3. Family discord is associated with increased substance use for pregnant substance users

    OpenAIRE

    Denton, Wayne H.; Adinoff, Bryon H.; Lewis, Daniel; Walker, Robrina; Winhusen, Theresa

    2013-01-01

    Childhood abuse and partner violence are associated with prenatal substance abuse but the potential impact of current family discord, which reflects broader family relationships and encompasses problems less severe than violence, has had little evaluation in pregnant substance users. Using data from 196 pregnant substance users participating in a NIDA Clinical Trials Network randomized clinical trial, we examined the relationship of baseline family discord to substance use a...

  4. Peer Substance Use and Homelessness Predicting Substance Abuse from Adolescence Through Early Adulthood

    OpenAIRE

    Tompsett, Carolyn J.; Domoff, Sarah E.; Toro, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Adolescents who experience homelessness are at higher risk for abusing substances, and for being exposed to substance-using peers. The current study used a longitudinal design to track substance abuse, affiliation with substance-using peers, and episodes of homelessness among a sample of 223 adolescents who were homeless at thebaseline data collection and 148 adolescents who were housed at baseline. Participants were interviewed at six waves over 6.5 years, covering an age rang...

  5. Parental Substance Use, Family Support and Outcome Following Treatment for Adolescent Psychoactive Substance Use Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Stephen D.; Kelly, John F.; Myers, Mark G.; Brown, Sandra A.

    2002-01-01

    Examines family variables that may influence adolescent substance use during the 6 months following inpatient treatment: parental substance use, family aftercare attendance, and adolescent ratings of family helpfulness. Results revealed no relationship between either parental substance use and family aftercare attendance or reports of family…

  6. Contextual Factors in Adolescent Substance Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochhauser, Mark; And Others

    Research on adolescent substance use has focused on prevalence and incidence; however, contextual factors have been largely ignored. A survey of 155 adolescents from a Minneapolis suburb was conducted to assess contextual factors affecting adolescent substance use. Subjects reported their use of alcohol, cigarettes, and marihuana with respect to…

  7. Substance Abuse and Violence: Cause and Consequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Elaine M.; Belfer, Myron L.

    1995-01-01

    Describes two ways in which substance abuse is related to violence: trade in drugs and being under the influence of drugs. The paper argues that reducing the demand for drugs by eliminating the market for them will bring about a reciprocal reduction in substance abuse-related violence. (GR)

  8. Substance Use in Popular Movies and Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Donald F.; Henriksen, Lisa; Christenson, Peter G.

    This study examines the frequency and nature of substance use in the most popular movie rentals and songs of 1996 and 1997. The intent was to determine the accuracy of public perceptions about extensive substance use in media popular among youth. Because teenagers are major consumers of movies and music, there is concern about the potential for…

  9. National Toxic Substance Incidents Program (NTSIP)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-02-03

    This podcast gives an overview of the three components of the National Toxic Substance Incidents Program: state surveillance, national database, and response teams.  Created: 2/3/2011 by Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry.   Date Released: 2/3/2011.

  10. Accessing Substance Abuse Prevention Programs for Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Jennifer L.; Johnson, Gail E.

    2009-01-01

    Current estimates indicate that over 6 million children live with at least one parent who is a substance abuser or is substance dependent. Children who are exposed to drug and alcohol abuse are at a greater risk of experiencing academic and behavior difficulties. Additionally, several studies have shown that students with emotional and behavioral…

  11. Moving On: Young People and Substance Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Kathryn; Chamberlain, Chris

    2009-01-01

    To help explain why some young people move from recreational drug use to substance abuse, twelve in-depth interviews were conducted with young people who had experienced problematic substance use. The data were supplemented by statistical data on 111 young people. The researchers found a variety of "structural" factors that help explain young…

  12. Harm Reduction in MSW Substance Abuse Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eversman, Michael H.

    2012-01-01

    Professional social work largely has endorsed the empirically supported paradigm of harm reduction in relation to substance abuse issues. Despite literature detailing similarities between social work and harm reduction, little is known about its presence in MSW substance abuse coursework. A purposive sample of 133 social work faculty from…

  13. Preventing and Treating Substance Abuse among Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Steve

    2011-01-01

    Substance misuse is one of the most prevalent causes of adolescent injury and death. Additionally, 5-8% of adolescents in the U.S. qualify for a diagnosis of substance abuse disorder. This article discusses formal prevention and treatment program models, focusing on a continuum of care which extends from prevention to treatment alternatives.…

  14. 76 FR 50236 - Center for Substance Abuse Prevention; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    ...: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, Drug... HUMAN SERVICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Center for Substance Abuse... the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's (SAMHSA) Center for Substance......

  15. Best practice in workplace hazardous substances management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winder, C

    1995-09-01

    Chemical-induced injury and disease remains a significant problem in workers in industry. As a result of this problem, a number of national and international initiatives have recommended the development of conventions, regulations, and codes of practice to attempt to deal with the problems of hazardous substances at work. Within Australia, workplace hazardous substances regulations are in development which will impose legal obligations and responsibilities on the suppliers of hazardous substances and on the employers who use them. At the same time, internationally consistent ISO standards are in use, or are being developed, for quality systems, environmental management, and occupational health and safety. These standards outline a model for the management of quality, environment, or safety, and the processes involved are applicable to the management of hazardous substances. This process includes: obtaining commitment from senior management; instituting consultative mechanisms; developing a hazardous substances policy; identifying components of the hazardous substances management program; resourcing, implementing, and reviewing the program; and integrating the program into the organisation's strategic plan. Only by blending in a specific management program for hazardous substances into the overall planning of an organization will they be managed effectively and efficiently.

  16. Temperament Style and Substance Abuse Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Melinda J.; Galen, Luke W.; DeLuca, John W.

    1998-06-01

    The relationship of temperament to different patterns and types of alcohol abuse has received much attention over the last decade in order to provide clues to matching patients optimally to treatment strategies. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of temperament with a number of relevant substance abuse characteristics in a substance abusing population. One hundred forty-five male veterans were interviewed on their lifetime use of substances and on their psychiatric symptoms, problems associated with use, context, and family history of substance abuse. Subjects filled out the TPQ and the MPQ, which were subjected to factor analysis and revealed four factors: (1) Negative Affectivity/Impulsivity, (2) Positive Affectivity/Sociability, (3) Persistence/Achievement, and (4) Constraint. There was partial support for the hypotheses. Impulsivity was negatively correlated with age of onset and positively correlated with substance-related problems and a family history of substance abuse. Subjects with a history of depression scored significantly lower on the Positive Affectivity/Sociability factor than those who had not experienced a significant depression. Individuals who used alone scored lower on this factor than those who used in social contexts. The temperament factors of Persistence/Achievement and Constraint were, for the most part, unrelated to substance abuse.

  17. Former substance users working as counselors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hecksher, Dorte

    2007-01-01

    All helping professionals risk participation in "dual relationships". But in the case of former substance users working as counselors, specific dilemmas and problems are accentuated. A qualitative analysis highlights some of the ethical and personal dilemmas faced by these counselors. The data is...... derived from an interview study initiated in 2000 in Denmark on former substance users with 4 -8 years of abstinence. Through an analysis of interview data from a larger group of former substance users, it became evident that those working as counselors experienced specific dilemmas and problems. The...

  18. Neurobiology of Adolescent Substance Use Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Aditi; Morrow, Jonathan D

    2016-07-01

    There are many facets of the neurobiology of substance use that are distinct in adolescence as compared with adulthood. The adolescent brain is subject to intense subcortical reward processes, but is left with an immature prefrontal control system that is often unable to resist the pull of potentially exciting activities like substance use, even when fully aware of the dangers involved. Peer influences serve only to magnify these effects and foster more sensation-seeking, risky behavior. The unique aspects of neurobiology should be taken into consideration when designing prevention programs and clinical interventions for adolescent substance use disorders. PMID:27338961

  19. Advances on functional neuroimaging in substance misuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past decade, functional neuroimaging has contributed greatly to our knowledge about the neuropharmacology of substance misuse in man. In this review, discussed the application and the progress of the positron emission tomography, single photon emission computed tomography and functional magnetic resonance imaging in the substance misuse. After reading some papers, found that the dopamine transporter was significantly decreased in the brain of subjects with heroin abuse. Also observed a significant decrease of regional cerebral blood flow in bilateral cerebral frontal lobes, temporal lobes, the insula and the ipsilateral basal nuclei in substance misuse subjects. Taken together, functional images will lead the direction in future research formedication development of addiction treatment. (authors)

  20. Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback in Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Thurstone, Chris; Lajoie, Travis

    2013-01-01

    Strategies are needed to improve adolescent substance abuse treatment outcomes. For example, during outpatient substance abuse treatment, up to 80% of adolescents continue to use. 1 , 2 Following residential substance abuse treatment, 88% of adolescents relapse within 6 months. 3

  1. Substance abuse and rehabilitation: responding to the global burden of diseases attributable to substance abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Tzy Wu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Li-Tzy Wu*Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University School of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA *Li-Tzy Wu is the Editor-in-Chief of Substance Abuse and RehabilitationAbstract: Alcohol, tobacco, and illegal drug use are pervasive throughout the world. Substance use problems are among the major contributors to the global disease burden, which includes disability and mortality. The benefits of treatment far outweigh the economic costs. Despite the availability of treatment services, however, the vast majority of people with substance use disorders do not seek or use treatment. Barriers to and unmet need for evidence-based treatment are widespread even in the United States. Women, adolescents, and young adults are especially vulnerable to adverse effects from substance abuse, but they face additional barriers to getting evidence-based treatment or other social/medical services. Substance use behaviors and the diseases attributable to substance use problems are preventable and modifiable. Yet the ever-changing patterns of substance use and associated problems require combined research and policy-making efforts from all parts of the world to establish a viable knowledge base to inform for prevention, risk-reduction intervention, effective use of evidence-based treatment, and rehabilitation for long-term recovery. The new international, open-access, peer-reviewed Substance Abuse and Rehabilitation (SAR journal strives to provide an effective platform for sharing ideas for solutions and disseminating research findings globally. Substance use behaviors and problems have no boundaries. The journal welcomes papers from all regions of the world that address any aspect of substance use, abuse/dependence, intervention, treatment, and policy. The “open-access” journal makes cutting edge knowledge freely available to practitioners and researchers worldwide, and this is particularly important for addressing

  2. Microcomputer for controlled substance record keeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, R L; Motta, L J; Yee, A D

    1984-01-01

    The use of a microcomputer to maintain controlled substance inventory and record keeping is described. The system maintains perpetual inventories of the central narcotic vault and proof-of-use controlled drug records outstanding at nursing stations. The computerized system has eliminated (1) the delay previously encountered in the posting of transactions from the numeric log to perpetual inventory logs and (2) the potential addition and subtraction errors inherent in a manual system. Computerizing the controlled drug record-keeping system has saved approximately 166 minutes of labor per day, a cost savings of approximately $26. The new system also helps prevent diversion of controlled substances. The computer may also be used for other tasks while not running the controlled substance program. A microcomputer is well suited to the task of controlled-substance record-keeping functions, and the cost of the system (less than $4000) can be quickly recouped in labor savings. PMID:6695929

  3. Decriminalizing Possession of All Controlled Substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzman, Marc G.

    1978-01-01

    Excerpts from the Minnesota Bar Association's Blue Ribbon Committee report of findings and recommendations, with regard to dealing with possession of heroin and other controlled substances, are presented here. (Author/DS)

  4. Dual Diagnosis: Substance Abuse and Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorder becoming more severe when that person abuses heroin during periods of mania. Either substance abuse or mental illness can develop first. A person experiencing a mental health condition may turn to drugs and alcohol as ...

  5. Substance Use in the Perinatal Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forray, Ariadna; Foster, Dawn

    2015-11-01

    Perinatal substance use remains a major public health problem and is associated with a number of deleterious maternal and fetal effects. Polysubstance use in pregnancy is common and can potentiate adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Tobacco is the most commonly used substance in pregnancy, followed by alcohol and illicit substances. The treatments for perinatal substance use are limited and consist mostly of behavioral and psychosocial interventions. Of these, contingency management has shown the most efficacy. More recently, novel interventions such as progesterone for postpartum cocaine use have shown promise. The purpose of this review is to examine the recent literature on the use of tobacco, alcohol, cannabis, stimulants, and opioids in the perinatal period, their effects on maternal and fetal health, and current treatments. PMID:26386836

  6. Toxicities of selected substances to freshwater biota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohreiter, D.W.

    1980-05-01

    The amount of data available concerning the toxicity of various substances to freshwater biota is so large that it is difficult to use in a practical situation, such as environmental impact assessment. In this document, summary tables are presented showing acute and/or chronic toxicity of selected substances for various groups of aquatic biota. Each entry is referenced to its original source so that details concerning experimental conditions may be consulted. In addition, general information concerning factors modifying toxicity, synergisms, evidence of bioaccumulation, and water quality standards and criteria for the selected substances is given. The final table is a general toxicity table designed to provide an easily accessible and general indication of toxicity of selected substances in aquatic systems.

  7. [Oil and Hazardous Substance Spill Response Emergencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A major oil or hazardous substance spill may constitute an emergency situation requiring prompt actions by the Service to protect threatened natural resources. This...

  8. Brief Intervention Helps Adolescents Curb Substance Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... triggers for drug use (e.g., peer pressure, boredom). Teens whose parents attended a session in the ... can influence relationships, neurological development, educational attainment, and interpersonal functioning. Typically, adolescents who abuse substances but do ...

  9. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Response, and Recovery Health Care and Health Systems Integration Health Disparities Health Financing Health Information Technology HIV, AIDS, and Viral Hepatitis Homelessness and Housing Laws, Regulations, and Guidelines Mental and Substance Use Disorders Prescription Drug Misuse and ...

  10. Novel psychoactive substances of interest for psychiatry

    OpenAIRE

    Schifano, Fabrizio; Orsolini, Laura; Duccio Papanti, G; Corkery, John M

    2015-01-01

    Novel psychoactive substances include synthetic cannabinoids, cathinone derivatives, psychedelic phenethylamines, novel stimulants, synthetic opioids, tryptamine derivatives, phencyclidine-like dissociatives, piperazines, GABA-A/B receptor agonists, a range of prescribed medications, psychoactive plants/herbs, and a large series of performance and image enhancing drugs. Users are typically attracted by these substances due to their intense psychoactive effects and likely lack of detection in ...

  11. Emotional Cutoff In Women Who Abuse Substances

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Frances Lynn

    2000-01-01

    Emotional Cutoff in Women who Abuse Substances Frances L. Bell ABSTRACT This exploratory study was based upon Bowen Family Systems theory and investigated emotional cutoff in women (n = 168) who entered a substance abuse treatment program. Three questions were explored: First, the degree of emotional cutoff in this sample was compared to a non-clinical sample of women. Secondly, the relationship was explored between the variable of emotional cutoff and the following variables: su...

  12. Performance contracting for substance abuse treatment.

    OpenAIRE

    Commons, M; McGuire, T G; Riordan, M.H.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe an innovation in performance contracting for substance abuse services in the State of Maine and examine data on measured performance by providers before and after the innovation. DATA SOURCES AND COLLECTION: From the Maine Addiction Treatment System (MATS), an admission and discharge data set collected by the Maine Office of Substance Abuse (OSA). The MATS data for this study include information on clients of programs receiving public funding from October 1, 1989 throug...

  13. Substance abuse on the college campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimsza, Mary Ellen; Moses, Karen S

    2005-02-01

    Substance abuse is a major health and behavioral concern in college students. Alcohol and marijuana are the most commonly abused drugs on college campuses. Others include tobacco, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, gamma-hydroxybutyrate, flunitrazepam (Rohypnol), lysergic acid, ketamine, methamphetamine, phencyclidine, cocaine, and psilocybin mushrooms. This article reviews the use of these drugs by college students. Substance use is a major contributing factor in poor academic performance and failure to successfully complete a college education.

  14. Psychiatric Consultation and Substance Use Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specker, Sheila; Meller, William H.; Thurber, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Background A substantial number of patients in general hospitals will evince substance abuse problems but a majority is unlikely to be adequately identified in the referral-consultation process. This failure may preclude patients from receiving effective interventions for substance use disorders. Objectives 1. To evaluate all referred patients for possible substance use disorders. 2. To ascertain the degree of convergence between patients referred for chemical problems and the corresponding DSM diagnosis. 3. To compare demographic data for substance abusing patients and referrals not so classified. 4. To evaluate conditions concomitant with substance use disorders. Method Consecutive one-year referrals (524) to consultation-liaison psychiatric services were scrutinized for chemically-related problems by psychiatric consultants. Results Of the referrals, 176 met criteria for substance use disorders (SUD) (57% alcohol; 25% other drugs; 18% both alcohol and other drugs). Persons diagnosed with SUD tended to be younger, male, non-Caucasian, unmarried, and unemployed. They were more likely to be depressed, have liver and other gastrointestinal problems, and to have experienced traumatic events; they also tended to have current financial difficulties. Most were referred for SUD evaluation by personnel in general medicine and family practice. Following psychiatric consultation, SUD designated patients were referred mainly to substance abuse treatment programs. The only variable related to recommended inpatient versus outpatient services for individuals with SUD was the Global Assessment of Functioning Axis (GAF) with persons having lower estimated functioning more likely to be referred for inpatient interventions. Conclusions These data are similar to the results of past studies in this area. Unlike previous investigations in the domain of consultative-liaison psychiatry, financial stressors and specific consultant recommendations were included in data gathering. Although

  15. Psychiatric Consultation and Substance Use Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Specker

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: A substantial number of patients in general hospitals will evince substance abuse problems but a majority is unlikely to be adequately identified in the referral-consultation process. This failure may preclude patients from receiving effective interventions for substance use disorders. Objectives: 1. To evaluate all referred patients for possible substance use disorders. 2. To ascertain the degree of convergence between patients referred for chemical problems and the corresponding DSM diagnosis. 3. To compare demographic data for substance abusing patients and referrals not so classified. 4. To evaluate conditions concomitant with substance use disorders. Method: Consecutive one-year referrals (524 to consultation-liaison psychiatric services were scrutinized for chemically-related problems by psychiatric consultants. Results: Of the referrals, 176 met criteria for substance use disorders (SUD (57% alcohol; 25% other drugs; 18% both alcohol and other drugs. Persons diagnosed with SUD tended to be younger, male, non-Caucasian, unmarried, and unemployed. They were more likely to be depressed, have liver and other gastrointestinal problems, and to have experienced traumatic events; they also tended to have current financial difficulties. Most were referred for SUD evaluation by personnel in general medicine and family practice. Following psychiatric consultation, SUD designated patients were referred mainly to substance abuse treatment programs. The only variable related to recommended inpatient versus outpatient services for individuals with SUD was the Global Assessment of Functioning Axis (GAF with persons having lower estimated functioning more likely to be referred for inpatient interventions. Conclusions: These data are similar to the results of past studies in this area. Unlike previous investigations in the domain of consultative-liaison psychiatry, financial stressors and specific consultant recommendations were included in

  16. The Relationship Between Controlled Substances and Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinty, Emma E; Choksy, Seema; Wintemute, Garen J

    2016-01-01

    A causal relationship between controlled substances and firearm violence has been widely assumed in the United States, and federal law prohibits individuals who are "unlawful users of or addicted to any controlled substance" from purchasing or possessing firearms (68 FR 3750. 2003. Codified at 27 CFR §478.11). However, the law does a poor job of defining "unlawful users," resulting in recent calls for a revised, actionable definition. Such a definition should be informed by research evidence, but to date the epidemiologic research on the relationship between controlled substances and violence has not been comprehensively reviewed. The initial goal of this review was to summarize the best available evidence on the relationship between controlled substances and firearm violence, but only 1 study specific to firearm violence was identified. We therefore reviewed studies of this relationship using broader measures of interpersonal violence and suicide, all of which included but were not limited to firearm violence, and measures of illicit firearm carrying. Prospective longitudinal studies (n = 22) from 1990 to 2014 were identified by using searches of online databases and citation tracking. Information was extracted from each study by using a standardized protocol. Quality of evidence was independently assessed by 2 reviewers. Aggregate measures of controlled substance use were associated with increased interpersonal violence and suicide, but evidence regarding the relationship between specific substances and violence was mixed. Involvement in illegal drug sales was consistently associated with interpersonal violence. To effectively revise extant federal law and delineate appropriate prohibiting criteria, more research is needed to understand the relationship between controlled substances and firearm violence. PMID:26905893

  17. 16 CFR 1500.4 - Human experience with hazardous substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Human experience with hazardous substances... SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.4 Human experience with hazardous substances. (a) Reliable data on human experience with...

  18. Adolescent substance use disorders in the school setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, Amy M; Prince, Jefferson B

    2012-01-01

    Adolescent substance use is a major public health problem that concerns parents, schools, clinicians, and policy makers. The authors review school-based prevention programs, school drug policies, clinical signs and symptoms of substance impairment, recommendations for referral and engaging adolescents who are using substances, and treatment interventions for adolescent substance use disorders.

  19. Client perceptions of incest and substance abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janikowski, T P; Bordieri, J E; Glover, N M

    1997-01-01

    Clients receiving substance abuse treatment from 35 treatment facilities throughout the United States were surveyed using the Substance Abuse and Incest Survey-Revised (SAIS-R). A total of 732 participants responded to the survey; 518 (71%) were males, 204 (28%) were females, and 10 (1%) did not indicate gender. Participants had a mean age of 33.8 years, were predominately Caucasian (61.6%), never married (45.2%), were currently unemployed (69.4%), and had completed an average of 11.7 years of education. Of the entire sample, 266 (36.3%) reported having been victims of incest; 151 were males and 113 were females (2 did not indicate gender). The group reporting incest histories had a significantly greater percentage of females that did the group not reporting incest histories (chi 2 = 48.1, p incest histories were asked about their perceptions regarding incest, substance abuse, and counseling. Item responses were examined using descriptive statistics and factor analysis. The factor analysis on SAIS-R perception items identified five factors that accounted for 68.9% of the variance; these factors were Stigma and Resistance to Counseling; Substance Abuse and Incest; Ambivalence; Fear and Anticipation; and Receptivity to Counseling. Results are presented and the implications for substance abuse treatment and counseling are discussed.

  20. Removal of humic substances by biosorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    VUKOVI(C) Marija; DOMANOVAC Tomislav; BRI(S)KI Felicita

    2008-01-01

    Fungal pellets of Aspergillus niger 405, Aspergillus ustus 326, and Stachybotrys sp. 1103 were used for the removal of humic substances from aqueous solutions. Batchwise biosorption, carried out at pH 6 and 25℃, was monitored spectrophotometrically and the process described with Freundlich's model. Calculated sorption coefficients K/and n showed that A. niger exhibited the highest efficiency. A good match between the model and experimental data and a high correlation coefficient (R2) pointed out to judicious choice of the mechanism for removal of humic substances from the reaction medium. The sorption rate constants (k) for A. ustus and Stachybotrys sp. were almost equal, however higher than that for A. niger. Comparison of test results with the simulated ones demonstrated the applicability of the designed kinetic model for removal of humic substances from natural water by biosorption with fungal pellets. Different morphological structure of the examined fungal pellets showed that faster sorption does not imply the most efficient removal of humic substances. Desorption of humic substances from fungal pellets was complete, rapid, and yielded uniform results.

  1. Families Affected by Parental Substance Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Vincent C; Wilson, Celeste R

    2016-08-01

    Children whose parents or caregivers use drugs or alcohol are at increased risk of short- and long-term sequelae ranging from medical problems to psychosocial and behavioral challenges. In the course of providing health care services to children, pediatricians are likely to encounter families affected by parental substance use and are in a unique position to intervene. Therefore, pediatricians need to know how to assess a child's risk in the context of a parent's substance use. The purposes of this clinical report are to review some of the short-term effects of maternal substance use during pregnancy and long-term implications of fetal exposure; describe typical medical, psychiatric, and behavioral symptoms of children and adolescents in families affected by substance use; and suggest proficiencies for pediatricians involved in the care of children and adolescents of families affected by substance use, including screening families, mandated reporting requirements, and directing families to community, regional, and state resources that can address needs and problems. PMID:27432847

  2. Sensory processing disorders among substance dependents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batya Engel-Yeger

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: (1 To compare sensory processing patterns as expressed in daily life between substance dependents and typical controls; (2 profile the prevalence of sensory processing disorders (SPD among substance dependents; and (3 examine gender effect on SPD within and between groups. Methods: Two hundred ninety people aged 19-64 participated in this study. The study group included 145 individuals who lived in the community or took part in an outpatient program because of addiction to drugs/alcohol and had been clean for over three months. The control group included 145 individuals who were not exposed to drugs or alcohol on a regular basis and did not suffer from addictive behavior. All participants filled a demographic questionnaire. Those who met the inclusion criteria completed the Adolescent/Adult Sensory Profile (AASP so that their sensory processing patterns could be assessed. Results: When comparing both groups, the study group showed greater sensory sensitivity and significantly higher prevalence of SPD. Significant group/gender interaction was found in regard to sensation seeking. Discussion: SPD among substance dependents may be expressed in daily life by either hypersensitivity or hyposensitivity. The behavioral outcomes reflected by the AASP support neurophysiological manifestations about SPD of substance dependents. The evaluation process of substance dependents should refer to their sensory processing abilities. In case SPD is diagnosed, Occupational Therapy and specific sensory–based interventions should be considered in order to fit the specific needs of individuals and enhance their performance, meaningful participation, and quality of life.

  3. Trends in Adolescent Substance Use and Perception of Risk from Substance Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Quality, National Surveys on Drug Use and Health (NSDUHs), 2002 to 2011 (revised March 2012). 3 THE NSDUH REPORT: Trends in Adolescent Substance Use and Perception of Risk from Substance Use January 3, 2013 Changes in Cocaine, LSD, and Heroin Use and Risk Perception With roughly 78 percent ...

  4. Relationships between substance initiation sequence and further substance use: A French nationwide retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attaiaa, Lalla-Asma; Beck, Francois; Richard, Jean-Baptiste; Marimoutou, Catherine; Mayet, Aurélie

    2016-06-01

    The Gateway theory (GT) proposes that tobacco or alcohol use lead to cannabis use, which can itself be followed by other illicit drugs (OID) onset. Aim of this study was to evaluate if the order of initiation sequence could influence further substance use. Data from a 2010 population-based survey were used (22,774 subjects aged 15-64). Using reported ages at initiations, 7 sequences were identified: initiation of tobacco only (T), cannabis or OID only, tobacco followed by cannabis (T-C), cannabis followed by tobacco (C-T), alternative 2-substance sequences, gateway sequence (T-C-OID) and 3-substance alternative sequences. Logistics regressions were performed to study the impact of sequence on further use (tobacco, alcohol, cannabis and OID), and substance use disorders (SUD) (tobacco, alcohol and cannabis). The most observed sequences were T (45.5%), T-C (20.5%), C-T (5.1%) and T-C-OID (3.5%). Further use and SUD likelihoods, whatever the substance considered, increased with the number of substances previously initiated. However, for a same number of substances initiated, current use and SUD likelihoods did not significantly vary according to sequence. Polysubstance initiation appears as a better predictor of further use and SUD than the initiation sequence, questioning the GT and being more in line with a common liability to substance use. PMID:26826476

  5. Playing video games while using or feeling the effects of substances: associations with substance use problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ream, Geoffrey L; Elliott, Luther C; Dunlap, Eloise

    2011-10-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that playing video games while using or feeling the effects of a substance--referred to herein as "concurrent use"-is related to substance use problems after controlling for substance use frequency, video gaming as an enthusiastic hobby, and demographic factors. Data were drawn from a nationally representative online survey of adult video gamers conducted by Knowledge Networks, valid n = 2,885. Problem video game playing behavior was operationalized using Tejeiro Salguero and Bersabé Morán's 2002 problem video game play (PVP) measure, and measures for substance use problems were taken from the National Survey of Drug Use and Health (NSDUH). Separate structural equation modeling analyses were conducted for users of caffeine, tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana. In all four models, concurrent use was directly associated with substance use problems, but not with PVP. Video gaming as an enthusiastic hobby was associated with substance use problems via two indirect paths: through PVP for all substances, and through concurrent use for caffeine, tobacco, and alcohol only. Results illustrate the potential for "drug interaction" between self-reinforcing behaviors and addictive substances, with implications for the development of problem use.

  6. The Role of Substance Use Initiation in Adolescent Development of Subsequent Substance-Related Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magid, Viktoriya; Moreland, Angela D.

    2014-01-01

    A systematic review was conducted on the role of substance use initiation in subsequent use and substance-related problems among adolescents. Specifically, we examine previous studies to identify whether age of onset predicts subsequent levels of misuse; we also posit reasons for this association that have been suggested within the literature. In…

  7. Substance Abuse Training and Perceived Knowledge: Predictors of Perceived Preparedness to Work in Substance Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bina, Rena; Yum, Joohee; Hall, Diane M. Harnek; Sowbel, Lynda; Mollette, Angela; Jani, Jayshree; Smith-Osborne, Alexa

    2008-01-01

    As frontline mental health care providers, social workers need to be prepared to confront and properly manage substance abuse issues in practice. This study examined predictors of recent master of social work (MSW) graduates' perceptions of preparedness to practice in the area of substance abuse. A cross-sectional design was used, and 232 recent…

  8. Playing video games while using or feeling the effects of substances: associations with substance use problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ream, Geoffrey L; Elliott, Luther C; Dunlap, Eloise

    2011-10-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that playing video games while using or feeling the effects of a substance--referred to herein as "concurrent use"-is related to substance use problems after controlling for substance use frequency, video gaming as an enthusiastic hobby, and demographic factors. Data were drawn from a nationally representative online survey of adult video gamers conducted by Knowledge Networks, valid n = 2,885. Problem video game playing behavior was operationalized using Tejeiro Salguero and Bersabé Morán's 2002 problem video game play (PVP) measure, and measures for substance use problems were taken from the National Survey of Drug Use and Health (NSDUH). Separate structural equation modeling analyses were conducted for users of caffeine, tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana. In all four models, concurrent use was directly associated with substance use problems, but not with PVP. Video gaming as an enthusiastic hobby was associated with substance use problems via two indirect paths: through PVP for all substances, and through concurrent use for caffeine, tobacco, and alcohol only. Results illustrate the potential for "drug interaction" between self-reinforcing behaviors and addictive substances, with implications for the development of problem use. PMID:22073023

  9. Occupational turnover intentions among substance abuse counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothrauff, Tanja C; Abraham, Amanda J; Bride, Brian E; Roman, Paul M

    2011-01-01

    This study examined predictor, moderator, and mediator variables of occupational turnover intention (OcTI) among substance abuse counselors. Data were obtained via questionnaires from 929 counselors working in 225 private substance abuse treatment (SAT) programs across the United States. Hierarchical multiple regression models were conducted to assess predictor, moderator, and mediator variables of OcTI. OcTI scores were relatively low on a 7-point scale, indicating that very few counselors definitely intended to leave the SAT field. Age, certification, positive perceptions of procedural and distributive justice, and hospital-based status negatively predicted OcTI. Counselors' substance use disorder-impacted history moderated the association between organizational commitment and OcTI. Organizational turnover intention partially mediated the link between organizational commitment and OcTI. Workforce stability might be achieved by promoting perceptions of advantages to working in a particular treatment program, having organizational commitment, showing appreciation for counselors' work, and valuing employees from diverse backgrounds.

  10. Adolescents' Exposure to Disasters and Substance Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, Miriam; Fang, Lin

    2016-06-01

    This paper reviews the impact of exposure to man-made or natural disasters on adolescent substance use. It covers empirical studies published from 2005 to 2015 concerning (a) the scope of the problem, (b) vulnerable groups and risk and protective factors, and (c) evidence-based interventions. The review suggests a strong link between adolescent substance use and exposure to either man-made or natural disaster. Vulnerable groups include adolescents with previous exposure to traumatic events, living in areas that are continually exposed to disasters, and ethnic minorities. Risk and protective factors at the individual, familial, community, and societal levels are described based on the bioecological model of mass trauma. Given that mass trauma is unfortunately a global problem, it is important to establish international interdisciplinary working teams to set gold standards for comparative studies on the etiology for adolescent substance use in the context of disasters. PMID:27087347

  11. Sociocultural perspective of substance use in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, H K

    1996-01-01

    The present communication focuses on a sociocultural perspective of substance use in a pluralistic and diverse culture. India has a history of use of plant products, viz., cannabis, opium, and home-brewed alcoholic beverages, within a defined sociocultural framework over five millennium. Cross sectional epidemiological studies in the field of substance use in different parts of India show that certain social groups are more "vulnerable" to substance use. Caste, religion, and local customs and traditions play a significant role in the choice of drugs, their consumption, and their control in rural/semiurban populations. The intercultural barriers are diminishing in urban populations, and even alien drugs like heroin have been introduced. The social and cultural implications of the traditional vis-a-vis the altering drug use scene are discussed at length. PMID:8908712

  12. Biologically active substances of stone crop fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Makarkina

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Stone fruit crops are successfully cultivated in many regions of Russia. Their fruits contain a great diversity of biologically active and mineral substances. The stone fruit varietal collection of the All Russia Research Institute of Fruit Crop Breeding has been estimated on the content of biologically active substances (ascorbic acid and phenolic compounds in fruits: 80 sour cherry varieties, 28 sweet cherry varieties, 29 plum varieties and 24 apricot varieties. High cultivar variability of the content of ascorbic acid and P-active sub-stances in fruits has been determined in each crop. The best genotypes have been singled out according to each biochemical component and a complex of characters.

  13. Problems of substance abuse: exploitation and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, L

    1985-01-01

    The notion of substance abuse is highly problematic. There is considerable disagreement amongst 'experts' as to the relative hazards and addictive properties of both legally and illegally available substances. There are also widely divergent sub-cultural attitudes to the harmfulness or benefit of drug use. One can assume no social consensus as to the nature of the contemporary 'drug problem', nor about the most appropriate means of dealing with it. There is, however, considerable evidence that criminalization of drug use, and harsh penalties against users and suppliers, are ineffective and counter-productive. Other models of control need to be considered, and in particular the merits and de-merits of the medicalization of drug abuse require examination. However, this is only one aspect of the problem. On the other side are the national and international corporations and syndicates, both legitimate and criminal, that earn vast profits from trade in toxic substances. Tobacco is legally available in every country in the world, and the industry is rarely subject to strict control. Thus the issue of substance abuse and control should be seen in a global context, in which account is taken of both legitimate and underworld operations. In attempts to control international trade in toxic substances, the limited success and the problems of already existing legal controls should be acknowledged. Local awareness and regulation of trade in substances is essential, but not sufficient. Amongst other avenues to be explored is the possibility of diverting presently illicitly grown narcotics into indigenous pharmaceutical industries in the Third World. Some problems with this strategy are noted.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Substance misuse prevention as corporate social responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radacsi, Gergely; Hardi, Peter

    2014-03-01

    All sectors of society should be involved in reducing substance misuse, including businesses. However, the business sector is typically involved only to the extent that their products compel them to be (e.g., alcohol producers promoting responsible alcohol consumption). This article examines why business participation has been limited and how embedding prevention within a framework of health promotion could increase participation. It reviews both Hungarian and international cases, concluding that although corporate social responsibility (CSR) offers a framework to approach substance misuse reduction, a different perception of the role of the business sector is necessary to make it viable. PMID:24093521

  15. A uniform system for evaluation of substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zandt, P.T.J. van der [Directorate-General for Environmental Protection, The Hague (Netherlands); Vermeire, T.J. [National Inst. for Public Health and Environmental Protection, Bilthoven (Netherlands); Roelfzeme, H. [Directorate-General for Public Health, Rijswijk (Netherlands)

    1994-12-31

    One of the action points that have been formulated in the Netherlands` first Environmental Policy Plan was the development, in co-operation with industry, of a system for the rapid screening of potential risks of chemicals. In the ``Uniform System for Evaluation of Substances`` (USES 1.0) project different methods for assessment of risks to man and environment that had been developed for new and existing substances and pesticides have been integrated and harmonized. USES 1.0 provides a decision-supporting tool that may be applied by governments and industries in both nation and international (OECD, EU) risk management processes.

  16. Substance misuse prevention as corporate social responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radacsi, Gergely; Hardi, Peter

    2014-03-01

    All sectors of society should be involved in reducing substance misuse, including businesses. However, the business sector is typically involved only to the extent that their products compel them to be (e.g., alcohol producers promoting responsible alcohol consumption). This article examines why business participation has been limited and how embedding prevention within a framework of health promotion could increase participation. It reviews both Hungarian and international cases, concluding that although corporate social responsibility (CSR) offers a framework to approach substance misuse reduction, a different perception of the role of the business sector is necessary to make it viable.

  17. Waste water shows traces of radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sludge at sewage treatment plants has been found to contain radioactive substances originating in hospitals, nuclear weapon tests, the Chernobyl accident, the Finnish nuclear power plants and natural sources. Radioactive substances also enter sewers together with excretions after patients have left the hospital. Hospitals used to let the excretions of patients receiving the iodine 131 treatment into the sewer system only after the activity of the excretions had decreased. Today, excretions can be led into the sewer directly. Calculations have shown that hospital staff receive higher radiation doses when the waste is collected than sewage treatment plant staff receive when the radioactive iodine is led directly into the sewer

  18. A Substance Flow Model for Global Phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccari, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    A system-based substance flow model (SFM) for phosphorus is developed based on the global phosphorus substance flow analysis (SFA) of Cordell et al (2009). The model is based strictly on mass balance considerations. It predicts the sensitivity of phosphorus consumption to various interventions intended to conserve reserves, as well as interactions among these efforts, allowing a comparison of their impacts on phosphorus demand. The interventions include control of phosphorus losses from soil erosion, food production and food waste, or phosphorus recycling such as from animal manure or human waste.

  19. Analysis of standard substance human hair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human hair samples as standard substances were analyzed by the neutron activation analysis (NAA) on the miniature neutron source reactor. 19 elements, i.e. Al, As, Ba, Br, Ca, Cl, Cr, Co, Cu, Fe, Hg, I, Mg, Mn, Na, S, Se, V and Zn, were measured. The average content, standard deviation, relative standard deviation and the detection limit under the present research conditions were given for each element, and the results showed that the measured values of the samples were in agreement with the recommended values, which indicated that NAA can be used to analyze standard substance human hair with a relatively high accuracy. (authors)

  20. 76 FR 36557 - Center for Substance Abuse Prevention; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-22

    ... Abuse and Mental Health Services, Administration's Center for Substance Abuse Prevention Drug Testing... HUMAN SERVICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Center for Substance Abuse... Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's (SAMHSA) Center for Substance Abuse......

  1. 78 FR 15961 - Center for Substance Abuse Treatment National Advisory Council; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Center for Substance Abuse... meeting of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's (SAMHSA) Center for Substance... below). Committee Name: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Center for...

  2. Playing Video Games While Using or Feeling the Effects of Substances: Associations with Substance Use Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey L. Ream

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study tested the hypothesis that playing video games while using or feeling the effects of a substance—referred to herein as “concurrent use”—is related to substance use problems after controlling for substance use frequency, video gaming as an enthusiastic hobby, and demographic factors. Data were drawn from a nationally representative online survey of adult video gamers conducted by Knowledge Networks, valid n = 2,885. Problem video game playing behavior was operationalized using Tejeiro Salguero and Bersabé Morán’s 2002 problem video game play (PVP measure, and measures for substance use problems were taken from the National Survey of Drug Use and Health (NSDUH. Separate structural equation modeling analyses were conducted for users of caffeine, tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana. In all four models, concurrent use was directly associated with substance use problems, but not with PVP. Video gaming as an enthusiastic hobby was associated with substance use problems via two indirect paths: through PVP for all substances, and through concurrent use for caffeine, tobacco, and alcohol only. Results illustrate the potential for “drug interaction” between self-reinforcing behaviors and addictive substances, with implications for the development of problem use.

  3. Ecotoxicological Hazard Assessment of Genotoxic Substances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roex EWM; Traas TP; Slooff W; CSR

    2001-01-01

    The current knowledge about the ecological relevance of mutagenic substances is described. Mutations can be divided in somatic and germ-line mutations. Current screening methods in genotoxicology are focussed on the protection of man, and therefore somatic mutations are the most crucial. In the fiel

  4. Binding of cationic surfactants to humic substances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishiguro, M.; Tan, W.; Koopal, L.K.

    2007-01-01

    Commercial surfactants are introduced into the environment either through waste products or site-specific contamination. The amphiphilic nature of both surfactants and humic substances (HS) leads to their mutual attraction especially when surfactant and HS are oppositely charged. Binding of the cati

  5. Substance P in human cerebrospinal fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a combined method of reversed-phase, high-pressure liquid chromatography and RIA, the author was able to isolate the neuropephide substance P from human cerebrospinal fluid and to make a quantitative measurement. The rp-HPLC-RIA method was found to be superior to other methods. (MBC)

  6. Substance Use in Women and Men Infographic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hernandez-Avila CA, Rounsaville BJ, Kranzler HR. Opioid-, cannabis- and alcohol-dependent women show more rapid progression to substance ... H. A community survey of adverse effects of cannabis use. Drug Alcohol Depend. 1996;42(3):201-207. Center for ...

  7. Interagency Intervention with Perinatal Substance Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durfee, Michael; Tilton-Durfee, Deanne

    1990-01-01

    The lack of agreement on the nature and extent of the problem of prenatal exposure to substances is discussed. Comprehensive coordination of services is called for. The 14 programs in the Los Angeles County Interagency Council on Child Abuse and Neglect (ICAN) are discussed. (GH)

  8. Neuronal signal substances as biomarkers of migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, Lars

    2006-01-01

    Of the sensory nervous system associated signal substances it is only calcitonin generelated peptide (CGRP) that is reliably associated with the degree of pain in the acute attacks of primary headaches. The treatment with triptans alleviates both the pain and the associated CGRP release, putative...

  9. Attaching substances to micro-organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buist, Girbe; Leenhouts, Cornelis Johannes; Venema, Gerard; Kok, Jan

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates to surface display of proteins on micro-organisms via the targeting and anchoring of heterologous proteins to the outer surface of cells such as yeast, fungi, mammalian and plant cells, and bacteria. The invention provides a proteinaceous substance comprising a reactive group a

  10. Addressing Trauma in Substance Abuse Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Amanda L.; Prosek, Elizabeth A.; Stamman, Julia; Callahan, Molly M.; Loseu, Sahar; Bevly, Cynthia M.; Cross, Kaitlin; Woehler, Elliott S.; Calzada, Richard-Michael R.; Chadwell, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Trauma is prevalent among clients with substance abuse issues, yet addictions counselors' training in trauma approaches is limited. The purpose of the current article is to provide pertinent information regarding trauma treatment including the use of assessments, empirically supported clinical approaches, self-help groups and the risk of vicarious…

  11. Study of humic substances by fluorescence spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sona Konecna

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine main fluorophores of soil humic substances using 2D and 3D synchronous fluorescencespectroscopy (SFS. The measured synchronous spectra werecompared with standards IHSS. Differences between humic andfulvic acids as well as our and IHSS samples are discussed.

  12. 21 CFR 1310.02 - Substances covered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 8519 (2) Acetone 6532 (3) Benzyl chloride 8570 (4) Ethyl ether 6584 (5) Potassium permanganate 6579 (6..., potassium hypophosphite, manganese hypophosphite, magnesium hypophosphite and sodium hypophosphite) 6797 (28... Permanganate 6588 (c) The Administrator may add or delete a substance as a listed chemical by publishing...

  13. Social Desirability Scales: More Substance than Style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrae, Robert R.; Costa, Paul T., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Compared self-reports from 215 adults to the external criterion of spouse ratings of personality traits to separate substance from style in social desirability (SD) scales. Results showed that correcting self-reports for SD failed to improve correspondence with an external, objective criterion and in several cases lowered agreement. (LLL)

  14. Research Group for Persistent Toxic Substances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ The research group for persistent toxic substances (PTS), based at the Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences (RCEES), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), received the Science Fund for Creative Research Groups from the Chinese Academy of Sciences from 2004 to 2008.The group consists of six scientists at RCEES and ten international scientists.

  15. The potential of the essential fatty acid-deficient hairless rat as a psoriasis screening model for topical anti-proliferative drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, M.; Groth, L.; Fullerton, A.;

    2002-01-01

    , histology of the epidermis and fatty acid analysis of serum and skin. Immediately after the EFAD condition had been established, the animals were treated with dithranol ointment or different concentrations of calcipotriol solution. A reduction in epidermal thickness of 15-20% was seen after the treatment...... with calcipotriol. Dithranol and its coal tar-containing vehicle also showed a reductive effect on epidermal thickness. EFAD hairless rats possess various histological changes resembling psoriasis. These histological changes normalise during treatment with anti-psoriatic drugs as calcipotriol, dithranol and coal...

  16. Nuclease and anti-proliferative activities of copper(II) complexes of N3O tripodal ligands involving a sterically hindered phenolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthet, Nathalie; Martel-Frachet, Véronique; Michel, Fabien; Philouze, Christian; Hamman, Sylvain; Ronot, Xavier; Thomas, Fabrice

    2013-06-21

    Copper(II) complexes 1(2+)-6 of a series of tripodal ligands involving a N3O donor set, namely 2-[(bis-pyridin-2-ylmethyl-amino)-methyl]-4-methoxy-phenol (1L), 2-tert-butyl-4-methoxy-6-[bis-pyridin-2-ylmethyl-amino)-methyl]-phenol (2L), 2-tert-butyl-4-methoxy-6-{[(2-pyridin-2-yl-ethyl)-pyridin-2-ylmethyl-amino]-methyl}-phenol (3L), 2-tert-butyl-4-methoxy-6-{[(6-methyl-pyridin-2-ylmethyl)-pyridin-2-ylmethyl-amino]-methyl}-phenol (4L), 2-tert-butyl-4-fluoro-6-{[(6-methyl-pyridin-2-ylmethyl)-pyridin-2-ylmethyl-amino]-methyl}-phenol (5L) and 2-tert-butyl-4-methoxy-6-{bis[(6-methyl-pyridin-2-ylmethyl)-amino]-methyl}-phenol (6L), respectively, were synthesized. Complexes 1(2+), 3(+) and 4(+) were structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction. The structure of 1(2+) is dimeric, with an essentially trigonal bipyramidal geometry around the copper(II) ions and two bridging deprotonated phenolate moieties. The mononuclear complexes 3(+) and 4(+) contain a square pyramidal copper ion, coordinated in axial position by the phenol moiety. In the water-DMF (90 : 10) mixture at pH 7.3 all the copper(II) complexes are mononuclear, mainly under their phenolate neutral form (except 3(+)), with a coordinated solvent molecule. The DNA cleavage activity of the complexes was tested towards the ϕX174 DNA plasmid. In the absence of an exogenous agent 1(2+) does not show any cleavage activity, 2(+) and 3(+) are moderately active, while 4(+), 5(+) and 6(+) exhibit a high nuclease activity. Experiments in the presence of various scavengers reveal that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are not involved in the strand scission mechanism. The cytotoxicity of the complexes was evaluated on bladder cancer cell lines sensitive or resistant to cisplatin. The IC50 values of the complexes 2(+), 4(+), 5(+) and 6(+) are lower than that of cisplatin (range from 6.3 to 3.1 μM against 9.1 μM for cisplatin). Furthermore, complexes 2(+), 4(+), 5(+) and 6(+) are able to circumvent cisplatin cellular resistance. PMID:23624882

  17. Tumor suppressor ASXL1 is essential for the activation of INK4B expression in response to oncogene activity and anti-proliferative signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Xudong; Bekker-Jensen, Ida Holst; Christensen, Jesper;

    2015-01-01

    ASXL1 mutations are frequently found in hematological tumors, and loss of Asxl1 promotes myeloid transformation in mice. Here we present data supporting a role for an ASXL1-BAP1 complex in the deubiquitylation of mono-ubiquitylated lysine 119 on Histone H2A (H2AK119ub1) in vivo. The Polycomb group...

  18. Anti-proliferative and Apoptotic Effects of Basella rubra (L.) Against 1, 2-Dimethyl Hydrazine-induced Colon Carcinogenesis in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilari, Bhanu Priya; Kotakadi, Venkata Subbaiah; Penchalaneni, Josthna

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a very prevalent diagnosed cancer. The current study was performed in order to examine the role of BRAE (Basella rubra aqueous extract) in regulating aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation, cell proliferation and inhibition of apoptosis in a colon carcinogenesis model in male Wistar rats. Rats were randomly allocated into six groups. Group I served as control, and group II acted as a drug control administered BRAE (250mg/kg b.w.) orally for 30 weeks. Rats in group III-VI were given subcutaneous injections of DMH (25mg/kg b.w. weekly) for 15 weeks to initiate colon carcinogenesis. Those in group IV and VI were administered BRAE along with DMH injections. Rats in group V were administered with BRAE after cessation of DMH injection. After 30 weeks of experimental period colons were obtained from experimental groups and analyzed for ACF incidence, argyrophilic nucleolar organizing region- associated proteins (AgNOR) count, histopathological and immunohistochemical changes. Only in DMH exposed groups were ACF and AgNOR numbers increased. Administration of BRAE appreciably decreased the numbers of ACF and AgNOR in BRAE treated groups. Histopathological findings revealed a high level of dysplastic changes with decreased number of goblet cells found only in only DMH injected rats. Administration of BRAE in treated group rats reversed these changes. Expression markers for cell proliferation (PCNA and Ki67) were elevated in DMH treated rats, but reduced with BRAE treatement. This expression was reversed with apoptosis markers (p53 and Caspase-3). Thus the results results of the present study were found to be significant and confirmed the potential efficacy of BRAE against colon carcinogenesis. PMID:26838257

  19. Anti-proliferative and apoptosis-triggering potential of disulfiram and disulfiram-loaded polysorbate 80-stabilized PLGA nanoparticles on hepatocellular carcinoma Hep3B cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoda, Muddasarul; Pajaniradje, Sankar; Shakya, Garima; Mohankumar, Kumaravel; Rajagopalan, Rukkumani

    2016-08-01

    There is an emerging trend to restudy known drugs for their anti-cancer potential. One such anti-alcoholic drug, disulfiram, with significant anti-cancer potential was studied for its efficacy against Hep3B cell lines, an in vitro model of hepatocellular carcinoma. Simultaneously, we intended to study the effect of polysorbate 80-stabilized PLGA nanoparticles and its DSF-loaded counterpart. Cell and nuclear staining, comet assay, flow cytometry and Western blots were performed. Results suggest that cell proliferation was inhibited by DSF and its PLGA nanoparticles through cell cycle arrest, triggering activation of apoptotic pathways that culminates with cell death. DSF loaded nanoparticles when compared with free DSF, showed significantly lesser effect due to its sustained drug-releasing property, while empty nanoparticles showed negligible influence on Hep3B cells. Our results suggest that DSF alone contributes to cell death, while polysorbate 80-stabilized PLGA nanoparticles show sustained drug release patterns that would potentially lower dosage regimens. PMID:27013133

  20. Chmp 1A is a mediator of the anti-proliferative effects of All-trans Retinoic Acid in human pancreatic cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Hanh

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We recently have shown that Charged multivesicular protein/Chromatin modifying protein1A (Chmp1A functions as a tumor suppressor in human pancreatic tumor cells. Pancreatic cancer has the worst prognosis of all cancers with a dismal 5-year survival rate. Preclinical studies using ATRA for treating human pancreatic cancer suggest this compound might be useful for treatment of pancreatic cancer patients. However, the molecular mechanism by which ATRA inhibits growth of pancreatic cancer cells is not clear. The objective of our study was to investigate whether Chmp1A is involved in ATRA-mediated growth inhibition of human pancreatic tumor cells. Results We performed microarray studies using HEK 293T cells and discovered that Chmp1A positively regulated Cellular retinol-binding protein 1 (CRBP-1. CRBP-1 is a key regulator of All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA through ATRA metabolism and nuclear localization. Since our microarray data indicates a potential involvement of Chmp1A in ATRA signaling, we tested this hypothesis by treating pancreatic tumor cells with ATRA in vitro. In the ATRA-responsive cell lines, ATRA significantly increased the protein expression of Chmp1A, CRBP-1, P53 and phospho-P53 at serine 15 and 37 position. We found that knockdown of Chmp1A via shRNA abolished the ATRA-mediated growth inhibition of PanC-1 cells. Also, Chmp1A silencing diminished the increase of Chmp1A, P53 and phospho-P53 protein expression induced by ATRA. In the ATRA non-responsive cells, ATRA did not have any effect on the protein level of Chmp1A and P53. Chmp1A over-expression, however, induced growth inhibition of ATRA non-responsive cells, which was accompanied by an increase of Chmp1A, P53 and phospho-P53. Interestingly, in ATRA responsive cells Chmp1A is localized to the nucleus, which became robust upon ATRA treatment. In the ATRA-non-responsive cells, Chmp1A was mainly translocated to the plasma membrane upon ATRA treatment. Conclusion Collectively our data provides evidence that Chmp1A mediates the growth inhibitory activity of ATRA in human pancreatic cancer cells via regulation of CRBP-1. Our results also suggest that nuclear localization of Chmp1A is important in mediating ATRA signaling.

  1. Reduced selenium-binding protein 1 in breast cancer correlates with poor survival and resistance to the anti-proliferative effects of selenium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Zhang

    Full Text Available Supplemental dietary selenium is associated with reduced incidence of many cancers. The antitumor function of selenium is thought to be mediated through selenium-binding protein 1 (SELENBP1. However, the significance of SELENBP1 expression in breast cancer is still largely unknown. A total of 95 normal and tumor tissues assay and 12 breast cancer cell lines were used in this study. We found that SELENBP1 expression in breast cancer tissues is reduced compared to normal control. Low SELENBP1 expression in ER(+ breast cancer patients was significantly associated with poor survival (p<0.01, and SELENBP1 levels progressively decreased with advancing clinical stages of breast cancer. 17-β estradiol (E2 treatment of high SELENBP1-expressing ER(+ cell lines led to a down-regulation of SELENBP1, a result that did not occur in ER(- cell lines. However, after ectopic expression of ER in an originally ER(- cell line, down-regulation of SELENBP1 upon E2 treatment was observed. In addition, selenium treatment resulted in reduced cell proliferation in endogenous SELENBP1 high cells; however, after knocking-down SELENBP1, we observed no significant reduction in cell proliferation. Similarly, selenium has no effect on inhibition of cell proliferation in low endogenous SELENBP1 cells, but the inhibitory effect is regained following ectopic SELENBP1 expression. Furthermore, E2 treatment of an ER silenced high endogenous SELENBP1 expressing cell line showed no abolishment of cell proliferation inhibition upon selenium treatment. These data indicate that SELENBP1 expression is regulated via estrogen and that the cell proliferation inhibition effect of selenium treatment is dependent on the high level of SELENBP1 expression. Therefore, the expression level of SELENBP1 could be an important marker for predicting survival and effectiveness of selenium supplementation in breast cancer. This is the first study to reveal the importance of monitoring SELENBP1 expression as a potential biomarker in contributing to breast cancer prevention and treatment.

  2. Anti-proliferative effect of methanolic extract of Gracilaria tenuistipitata on oral cancer cells involves apoptosis, DNA damage, and oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeh Chi-Chen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methanolic extracts of Gracilaria tenuistipitata (MEGT were obtained from the edible red algae. Previously, we found that water extract of G. tenuistipitata was able to modulate oxidative stress-induced DNA damage and its related cellular responses. Methods In this study, the methanol extraction product MEGT was used to evaluate the cell growth inhibition in oral cancer cells and its possible mechanism was investigated. Results The cell viability of MEGT treated Ca9-22 oral cancer cell line was significantly decreased in a dose–response manner (p p p p p 2(3 intensity for mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP of MEGT-treated Ca9-22 cancer cells was significantly decreased in a dose–response manner (p  Conclusions These results indicated that MEGT had apoptosis-based cytotoxicity against oral cancer cells through the DNA damage, ROS induction, and mitochondrial depolarization. Therefore, MEGT derived from the edible algae may have potential therapeutic effects against oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC.

  3. Calcium signaling and the novel anti-proliferative effect of the UTP-sensitive P2Y11 receptor in rat cardiac myofibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Certal, Mariana; Vinhas, Adriana; Pinheiro, Ana Rita; Ferreirinha, Fátima; Barros-Barbosa, Aurora Raquel; Silva, Isabel; Costa, Maria Adelina; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo

    2015-11-01

    During myocardial ischemia and reperfusion both purines and pyrimidines are released into the extracellular milieu, thus creating a signaling wave that propagates to neighboring cells via membrane-bound P2 purinoceptors activation. Cardiac fibroblasts (CF) are important players in heart remodeling, electrophysiological changes and hemodynamic alterations following myocardial infarction. Here, we investigated the role UTP on calcium signaling and proliferation of CF cultured from ventricles of adult rats. Co-expression of discoidin domain receptor 2 and α-smooth muscle actin indicate that cultured CF are activated myofibroblasts. Intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) signals were monitored in cells loaded with Fluo-4 NW. CF proliferation was evaluated by the MTT assay. UTP and the selective P2Y4 agonist, MRS4062, caused a fast desensitizing [Ca(2+)]i rise originated from thapsigargin-sensitive internal stores, which partially declined to a plateau providing the existence of Ca(2+) in the extracellular fluid. The biphasic [Ca(2+)]i response to UTP was attenuated respectively by P2Y4 blockers, like reactive blue-2 and suramin, and by the P2Y11 antagonist, NF340. UTP and the P2Y2 receptor agonist MRS2768 increased, whereas the selective P2Y11 agonist NF546 decreased, CF growth; MRS4062 was ineffective. Blockage of the P2Y11 receptor or its coupling to adenylate cyclase boosted UTP-induced CF proliferation. Confocal microscopy and Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of P2Y2, P2Y4 and P2Y11 receptors. Data indicate that besides P2Y4 and P2Y2 receptors which are responsible for UTP-induced [Ca(2+)]i transients and growth of CF, respectively, synchronous activation of the previously unrecognized P2Y11 receptor may represent an important target for anti-fibrotic intervention in cardiac remodeling.

  4. Highly potent anti-proliferative effects of a gallium(III) complex with 7-chloroquinoline thiosemicarbazone as a ligand: synthesis, cytotoxic and antimalarial evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kewal; Schniper, Sarah; González-Sarrías, Antonio; Holder, Alvin A; Sanders, Natalie; Sullivan, David; Jarrett, William L; Davis, Krystyn; Bai, Fengwei; Seeram, Navindra P; Kumar, Vipan

    2014-10-30

    A gallium(III) complex with 7-chloroquinoline thiosemicarbazone was synthesized and characterized. The complex proved to be thirty-one times more potent on colon cancer cell line, HCT-116, with considerably less cytotoxicity on non-cancerous colon fibroblast, CCD-18Co, when compared to etoposide. Its anti-malarial potential on 3D7 isolate of Plasmodium falciparum was better than lumefantrine. PMID:25147149

  5. Anti-proliferative effect of fungal taxol extracted from Cladosporium oxysporum against human pathogenic bacteria and human colon cancer cell line HCT 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokul Raj, K.; Manikandan, R.; Arulvasu, C.; Pandi, M.

    2015-03-01

    Cladosporium oxysporum a new taxol producing endophytic fungus was identified and production of taxol were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), infrared (IR) nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR (13C and 1H)) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The taxol biosynthetic gene (dbat) was evaluated for new taxol producing fungus. Antibacterial activity against six different human pathogenic bacteria was done by agar well diffusion method. The anticancer efficacy of isolated fungal taxol were also evaluated in human colon cancer cell HCT 15 by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), cytotoxicity and nuclear morphology analysis. The isolated fungal taxol showed positive towards biosynthetic gene (dbat) and effective against both Gram positive as well as Gram negative. The fungal taxol suppress growth of cancer cell line HCT 15 with an IC50 value of 3.5 μM concentration by 24 h treatment. Thus, the result reveals that C. oxysporum could be a potential alternative source for production of taxol and have antibacterial as well as anticancer properties with possible clinical applications.

  6. Novel combination of sorafenib and celecoxib provides synergistic anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects in human liver cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melchiorre Cervello

    Full Text Available Molecular targeted therapy has shown promise as a treatment for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Sorafenib, a multikinase inhibitor, recently received FDA approval for the treatment of advanced HCC. However, although sorafenib is well tolerated, concern for its safety has been expressed. Celecoxib (Celebrex® is a selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 inhibitor which exhibits antitumor effects in human HCC cells. The present study examined the interaction between celecoxib and sorafenib in two human liver tumor cell lines HepG2 and Huh7. Our data showed that each inhibitor alone reduced cell growth and the combination of celecoxib with sorafenib synergistically inhibited cell growth and increased apoptosis. To better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the synergistic antitumor activity of the combination, we investigated the expression profile of the combination-treated liver cancer cell lines using microarray analysis. Combination treatment significantly altered expression levels of 1,986 and 2,483 transcripts in HepG2 and Huh7 cells, respectively. Genes functionally involved in cell death, signal transduction and regulation of transcription were predominantly up-regulated, while genes implicated in metabolism, cell-cycle control and DNA replication and repair were mainly down-regulated upon treatment. However, combination-treated HCC cell lines displayed specificity in the expression and activity of crucial factors involved in hepatocarcinogenesis. The altered expression of some of these genes was confirmed by semi-quantitative and quantitative RT-PCR and by Western blotting. Many novel genes emerged from our transcriptomic analyses, and further functional analyses may determine whether these genes can serve as potential molecular targets for more effective anti-HCC strategies.

  7. Silver Nanoparticles Exhibit the Dose-Dependent Anti-Proliferative Effect against Human Squamous Carcinoma Cells Attenuated in the Presence of Berberine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkadiusz Dziedzic

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The biological activity of nanosize silver particles towards oral epithelium-derived carcinoma seems to be still underinvestigated. We evaluated the influence of low doses of nanosize scale silver particles on the proliferation and viability of malignant oral epithelial keratinocytes in vitro, alone and in conjunction with the plant alkaloid berberine. Cells of human tongue squamous carcinoma SCC-25 (ATCC CRL-1628, cultivated with the mixture of Dulbecco's modified Eagle’s medium, were exposed to silver nanoparticles alone (AgNPs, concentrations from 0.31 to 10 μg/mL and to a combination of AgNPs with berberine chloride (BER, 1/2 IC50 concentration during 24 h and 48 h. The cytotoxic activity of AgNPs with diameters of 10 nm ± 4 nm was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazyl-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Cell cycle analysis was performed by treating cells with propidium iodide followed by flow-activated cell sorting. RT-QPCR reaction was used to assess expression of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and pro-apoptotic protein Bcl-2-associated X protein Bax genes expression. Monodisperse silver nanoparticles at a concentration of 10 μg/mL arrested SCC-25 cells cycle after 48 h at the G0/G1 phase in a dose- and time-dependent manner through disruption G0/G1 checkpoint, with increase of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio gene expression. AgNPs exhibit cytotoxic effects on SCC-25 malignant oral epithelial keratinocytes, which is diminished when combined with BER. The AgNPs concentration required to inhibit the growth of carcinoma cells by 50% (IC50 after 48 h was estimated at 5.19 μg/mL. AgNPs combined with BER increased the expression of Bcl-2 while decreasing the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 in SCC-25 cells. Silver particles at low doses therefore reduce the proliferation and viability of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. SCC-25 cells are susceptible to damage from AgNPs-induced stress, which can be regulated by the natural alkaloid berberine, suggesting that nanoparticles may be potentially used in a chemoprevention/chemotherapy by augmentation of action of standard anti-cancer drugs.

  8. Quantitative Analysis of the Anti-Proliferative Activity of Combinations of Selected Iron-Chelating Agents and Clinically Used Anti-Neoplastic Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Eliska Potuckova; Hana Jansova; Miloslav Machacek; Anna Vavrova; Pavlina Haskova; Lucie Tichotova; Vera Richardson; Kalinowski, Danuta S.; Richardson, Des R.; Tomas Simunek

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that several chelators possess marked potential as potent anti-neoplastic drugs and as agents that can ameliorate some of the adverse effects associated with standard chemotherapy. Anti-cancer treatment employs combinations of several drugs that have different mechanisms of action. However, data regarding the potential interactions between iron chelators and established chemotherapeutics are lacking. Using estrogen receptor-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells, ...

  9. Anti-proliferative effects of polyphenols from pomegranate rind (Punica granatum L.) on EJ bladder cancer cells via regulation of p53/miR-34a axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Benhong; Yi, Huilan; Tan, Jun; Wu, Yue; Liu, Gang; Qiu, Zhenpeng

    2015-03-01

    miRNAs and their validated miRNA targets appear as novel effectors in biological activities of plant polyphenols; however, limited information is available on miR-34a mediated cytotoxicity of pomegranate rind polyphenols in cancer cell lines. For this purpose, cell viability assay, Realtime quantitative PCR for mRNA quantification, western blot for essential protein expression, p53 silencing by shRNA and miR-34a knockdown were performed in the present study. EJ cell treatment with 100 µg (GAE)/mL PRE for 48 h evoked poor cell viability and caspase-dependent pro-apoptosis appearance. PRE also elevated p53 protein and triggered miR-34a expression. The c-Myc and CD44 were confirmed as direct targets of miR-34a in EJ cell apoptosis induced by PRE. Our results provide sufficient evidence that polyphenols in PRE can be potential molecular clusters to suppress bladder cancer cell EJ proliferation via p53/miR-34a axis. PMID:25572695

  10. New geranylated flavanones from the fruits of Paulownia catalpifolia Gong Tong with their anti-proliferative activity on lung cancer cells A549.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tian-yang; Jin, Xing; Tang, Wen-zhao; Wang, Xiao-jing; Zhao, Yun-xue

    2015-09-01

    Three new geranylated flavanones, named as paucatalinone A (1), B (2), and isopaucatalinone B (3), were isolated from the fruits of Paulownia catalpifolia Gong Tong (Scrophulariaceae). Their structures were well determined by means of IR, MS, 1D and 2D NMR, and CD techniques. Paucatalinone A (1) is the first sample as a dimeric geranylated flavanone derivative isolated from natural products. Paucatalinone A (1) displayed good antiproliferative effects on human lung cancer cells A549 and resulted in a clear increase of the percentage of cells in G1 phase and a decrease in the percentage of cells in S and G2/M phases in comparison with control cells. PMID:26115572

  11. The potential of the essential fatty acid-deficient hairless rat as a psoriasis screening model for topical anti-proliferative drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mette; Groth, L.; Holmer, G.;

    2002-01-01

    with calcipotriol. Dithranol and its coal tar-containing vehicle also showed a reductive effect on epidermal thickness. EFAD hairless rats possess various histological changes resembling psoriasis. These histological changes normalise during treatment with anti-psoriatic drugs as calcipotriol, dithranol and coal......The objective of this study was to establish essential fatty acid deficiency (EFAD) in hairless rats and investigate the potential of this model as a psoriasis screening model by testing the effects of calcipotriol and dithranol on differentiation and proliferation in the epidermis. Hairless rats...... were fed with a fat-free diet lacking linoleic acid. The EFAD condition was established within 8 weeks. In order to ensure that this condition had been established, several parameters were measured and observed, i.e. animal weight, water consumption, transepidermal water loss, clinical skin symptoms...

  12. Synthesis, characterization and anti proliferative effect of [Au(en) 2]Cl 3 and [Au(N- propyl-en) 2]Cl 3 on human cancer cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isab, Anvarhusein A.; Shaikh, M. Nasiruzzaman; Monim-ul-Mehboob, M.; Al-Maythalony, Bassem A.; Wazeer, Mohammed I. M.; Altuwaijri, Saleh

    2011-09-01

    Two Au(III) complexes of the type [Au(en) 2]Cl 3 ( 2a) and [Au(N-pr-en) 2]Cl 3 ( 3a) were synthesized by reacting Auric acid (HAuCl 4·3H 2O) with 2 equiv. ethylenediamine (en) or N-alkyl substituted ethylenediamine ligands. This metallodrug was characterized by various analytical and spectroscopic techniques such as elemental analysis, UV-Vis, Far-IR, 1H NMR and solution 13C as well as solid 13C and 15N NMR. Potentiality of [Au(en) 2]Cl 3 and [Au(N-pr-en) 2]Cl 3 as an anti-cancer agent were investigated by measuring some relevant physicochemical and biochemical properties such as stability of Au-N bonds by vibrational stretching from Far IR as well as cytotoxicity and stomach cancer cell inhibiting effect, respectively. The solid-state 15N NMR chemical shift shows that the ligand is strongly bound to gold(III) centre via N atoms. The computational study of 2a shows that the gold coordination sphere adopts distorted square planar geometry with bidentate ethylenediamine ligands acting as a tetradentate chelate. While stable in the solution state, the in vitro biological studies performed with these compounds 2a in solution showed higher activity towards the inhibitory effects of the human cancer cell lines such as prostate cancer (PC-3) and gastric carcinoma (SGC-7901) than that of the N-substituted gold(III) complex ( 3a). Cytotoxicity of the new compounds has also been estimated in PC-3 and SGC-7901 cells.

  13. Synthesis, characterization and anti-proliferative activity of Cd(II) complexes with NNN type pyrazole-based ligand and pseudohalide ligands as coligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopa, Cigdem; Yildirim, Hatice; Kara, Hulya; Kurtaran, Raif; Alkan, Mahir

    2014-03-01

    Cd(II) complexes of tridentate nitrogen donor ligand, 2,6-bis(3,4,5-trimethylpyrazolyl)pyridine (btmpp), Cd(btmpp)X2 (X:Cl, ONO or N(CN)2) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental and spectral (FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, UV-Vis) analyses, differential thermal analysis and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. The molecular structure of reported complex 1, revealed distorted square-pyramidal geometry around Cadmium. Complexes 1-3 and corresponding ligand were tested for cytotoxic activity against the human carcinoma cell lines HEP3B (hepatocellular carcinoma), PC3 (prostate adenocarcinoma), MCF7 (breast adenocarcinoma) and Saos2 (osteosarcoma). The results show that, complexes are more cytotoxic than the free ligand and complex 2 is the most cytotoxic complex for PC3.

  14. Anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative and anti-atherosclerotic effects of quercetin in human in vitro and in vivo models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleemann, R.; Verschuren, L.; Morrison, M.; Zadelaar, A.S.M.; Erk, M.J. van; Wielinga, P.Y.; Kooistra, T.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Polyphenols such as quercetin may exert several beneficial effects, including those resulting from anti-inflammatory activities, but their impact on cardiovascular health is debated. We investigated the effect of quercetin on cardiovascular risk markers including human C-reactive protein

  15. Incest and substance abuse: implications for treatment professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janikowski, T P; Glover, N M

    1994-01-01

    Seventy-seven volunteer participants enrolled in eight substance abuse treatment facilities were surveyed using the Substance Abuse and Incest Survey. Of the sample, 36 (48%) reported histories of incest. For participants reporting incest, data on substance abuse history, perceptions of the relationship between incest and substance abuse, and opinions regarding incest-related counseling in the context of substance abuse treatment are presented. Recommendations for substance abuse professionals and facilities are made, including intake screening, barriers to treatment, counselor education, and future research.

  16. Playing Video Games While Using or Feeling the Effects of Substances: Associations with Substance Use Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Geoffrey L. Ream; Elliott, Luther C.; Eloise Dunlap

    2011-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that playing video games while using or feeling the effects of a substance—referred to herein as “concurrent use”—is related to substance use problems after controlling for substance use frequency, video gaming as an enthusiastic hobby, and demographic factors. Data were drawn from a nationally representative online survey of adult video gamers conducted by Knowledge Networks, valid n = 2,885. Problem video game playing behavior was operationalized using Tejei...

  17. Reward processing in obesity, substance addiction and non-substance addiction

    OpenAIRE

    García-García, Isabel; Horstmann, Annette; Jurado, María Angeles; Garolera, Maite; Chaudhry, Shereen J.; Margulies, Daniel S.; Villringer, Arno; Neumann, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Similarities and differences between obesity and addiction are a prominent topic of ongoing research. We conducted an activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis on 87 studies in order to map the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) response to reward in participants with obesity, substance addiction and non-substance (or behavioural) addiction, and to identify commonalities and differences between them. Our study confirms the existence of alterations during reward processing in ob...

  18. Addressing substance abuse and violence in substance use disorder treatment and batterer intervention programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timko Christine

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Substance use disorders and perpetration of intimate partner violence (IPV are interrelated, major public health problems. Methods We surveyed directors of a sample of substance use disorder treatment programs (SUDPs; N=241 and batterer intervention programs (BIPs; N=235 in California (70% response rate to examine the extent to which SUDPs address IPV, and BIPs address substance abuse. Results Generally, SUDPs were not addressing co-occurring IPV perpetration in a formal and comprehensive way. Few had a policy requiring assessment of potential clients, or monitoring of admitted clients, for violence perpetration; almost one-quarter did not admit potential clients who had perpetrated IPV, and only 20% had a component or track to address violence. About one-third suspended or terminated clients engaging in violence. The most common barriers to SUDPs providing IPV services were that violence prevention was not part of the program’s mission, staff lacked training in violence, and the lack of reimbursement mechanisms for such services. In contrast, BIPs tended to address substance abuse in a more formal and comprehensive way; e.g., one-half had a policy requiring potential clients to be assessed, two-thirds required monitoring of substance abuse among admitted clients, and almost one-half had a component or track to address substance abuse. SUDPs had clients with fewer resources (marriage, employment, income, housing, and more severe problems (both alcohol and drug use disorders, dual substance use and other mental health disorders, HIV + status. We found little evidence that services are centralized for individuals with both substance abuse and violence problems, even though most SUDP and BIP directors agreed that help for both problems should be obtained simultaneously in separate programs. Conclusions SUDPs may have difficulty addressing violence because they have a clientele with relatively few resources and more complex

  19. Substance abuse and rehabilitation: responding to the global burden of diseases attributable to substance abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Li-Tzy Wu

    2010-01-01

    Li-Tzy Wu*Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University School of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA *Li-Tzy Wu is the Editor-in-Chief of Substance Abuse and RehabilitationAbstract: Alcohol, tobacco, and illegal drug use are pervasive throughout the world. Substance use problems are among the major contributors to the global disease burden, which includes disability and mortality. The benefits of treatment far outweigh the economic costs. Despite the...

  20. Correlates of early substance use and crime among adolescents entering outpatient substance abuse treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michael S; Kinlock, Timothy W; Battjes, Robert J

    2004-01-01

    Although many studies have examined the relationship between early deviant behavior and subsequent life problems among adolescents drawn from the general population, such relationships have not been examined for youth attending substance abuse treatment. Based on in-depth psychosocial assessments conducted with adolescents entering an outpatient substance abuse treatment program (N = 193), the current study examines individual characteristics, life circumstances, and other behavioral and psychological characteristics that are correlated with the age at which these youth initiated substance use and criminal activity. Early onset of substance use was associated with greater levels of family deviance and a variety of problems including school adjustment, drug use, criminal involvement, bullying and cruelty to people and animals, and involvement in risky sexual activities. In contrast, early onset of crime was related only to male gender, early onset of substance use, and cruelty to people. Findings suggest that treatment providers may need to consider the ages at which their adolescent clients initiated substance use given its association with illegal activity, other deviant behavior, and precocious and high-risk sexual behaviors. PMID:15083553

  1. Psychopathology in Substance Use Disorder Patients with and without Substance-Induced Psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Zhornitsky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Substance-induced psychotic disorder (SIPD is a diagnosis constructed to distinguish substance-induced psychotic states from primary psychotic disorders. A number of studies have compared SIPD persons with primary psychotic patients, but there is little data on what differentiates substance use disorder (SUD individuals with and without SIPD. Here, we compared psychopathology, sociodemographic variables, and substance use characteristics between SUD patients with and without SIPD. Methods. A retrospective chart review was conducted on newly admitted patients at a rehabilitation centre between 2007 and 2012. Results. Of the 379 patients included in the study, 5% were diagnosed with SIPD n=19 and 95% were diagnosed with SUDs without SIPD n=360. More SIPD patients reported using cannabis and psychostimulants, and fewer SIPD patients reported using alcohol than SUDs patients without SIPD. SIPD patients scored higher on the “schizophrenia nuclear symptoms” dimension of the SCL-90R psychoticism scale and exhibited more ClusterB personality traits than SUD patients without SIPD. Discussion. These data are consistent with previous studies suggesting that psychopathology, substance type, and sociodemographic variables play important role in the development of SIPD. More importantly, the results highlight the need for paying greater attention to the types of self-reported psychotic symptoms during the assessment of psychotomimetic effects associated with psychoactive substances.

  2. Substance Abuse and Prison Recidivism: Themes from Qualitative Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Lindsay A.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative analysis explores the role of substance abuse in reentry from prison to society. Participants who recidivated (N = 20) in an urban prison system identified substance abuse as their primary reason for recidivism. Treatment implications are discussed.

  3. Use of Performance-Enhancing Substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBotz, Michele; Griesemer, Bernard A

    2016-07-01

    Performance-enhancing substances (PESs) are used commonly by children and adolescents in attempts to improve athletic performance. More recent data reveal that these same substances often are used for appearance-related reasons as well. PESs include both legal over-the-counter dietary supplements and illicit pharmacologic agents. This report reviews the current epidemiology of PES use in the pediatric population, as well as information on those PESs in most common use. Concerns regarding use of legal PESs include high rates of product contamination, correlation with future use of anabolic androgenic steroids, and adverse effects on the focus and experience of youth sports participation. The physical maturation and endogenous hormone production that occur in adolescence are associated with large improvements in strength and athletic performance. For most young athletes, PES use does not produce significant gains over those seen with the onset of puberty and adherence to an appropriate nutrition and training program. PMID:27354458

  4. [The substance experience, a history of LSD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, François; Bonnet, Nicolas

    2013-04-01

    This article reviews the recent knowledge on LSD stemming from various disciplines among which pharmacology, sociology and epidemiology. The d-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is a particularly powerful hallucinogenic substance. It produces distortions and hearing, visual and tactile hallucinations. Rarely used (only 1.7% of people aged 15-64 years old have tried it in their lifetime), this very powerful drug generates a strong apprehension within the general population, but the ethnographical studies show that its image seems rather good among illicit drug users. This representation relies both on the proper effects of this substance and also on the history of LSD very closely linked to the counterculture characteristic of the years 1960-1970.

  5. Substance dependency among homeless American Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Susan; Vaughan, Margaret Mortensen

    2003-01-01

    Extensive qualitative research in the San Francisco Bay Area in California and in Tucson, Arizona, indicates strong associations between substance abuse and homelessness among American Indians. This article takes a comparative approach to describe and analyze precipitating factors and survival patterns of those who are both homeless and who suffer from substance dependency. Possible precipitating factors presented through case studies consider the complex interaction of childhood fostering or adoption into non-Native families, different types of involuntary institutionalization during youth, and the personal impact of accident, trauma and loss. Coping strategies and keys to survival are examined, including the role of the extended family and close friendships, American Indian and mainstream organizations that offer formal and informal services, the existence of anchor or key households, the helping relationships and sobriety groups among homeless individuals, spirituality, and cultural resiliency.

  6. Addiction: Alcohol and Substance Abuse in Judaism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Miriam Loewenthal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This article outlines a history of rulings and beliefs about addiction in Judaism, covering alcohol and substance use and addiction, in the context of a brief account of the development of the status of addiction. It examines the prevalence of alcohol and substance use and abuse among Jews, including a discussion of some of the difficulties in estimating prevalence and of factors involved in changing patterns of use and abuse. Community beliefs and attitudes are examined, using published material and interviews with community leaders and members. Some conclusions are suggested about the impact of religious rulings and of other factors on addiction among Jews. Attention is given to the phenomenon of denial. Therapeutic practices and organisations are described. The scope for further research is identified.

  7. Multiply charged ion beams from solid substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mVINIS Ion Source has enabled us to obtain multiply charged ion beams from gases as well as from solid materials. The solid substance ion beams were produced by using two techniques: a) the evaporation of metals by using the inlet system based on mini-oven and b) the metal-ions-from volatile-compounds method (MIVOC) by using the modified gas inlet system. In the production of high current stable ion beams of solids with relatively high melting points (over 1000 deg) were made great efforts. The B3+ ion beam current of over 300 μA is one of the most intensive beams extracted until now. The obtained multiply charged ion beam spectra of solid substances (B, Fe and Zn) are presented as well as some of the corresponding experimental results achieved during the modification of polymers, carbon materials and fullerenes. (author)

  8. DSM-V Research Agenda: Substance Abuse/Psychosis Comorbidity

    OpenAIRE

    Rounsaville, Bruce J.

    2007-01-01

    For diagnosis of patients with comorbid psychotic symptoms and substance use disorders (SUDs), Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, makes clear distinctions between independent psychotic disorders (eg, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia) and substance-induced syndromes (eg, delirium, dementias). Most substance-induced psychotic symptoms are considered to be short lived and to resolve with sustained abstinence along with other symptoms of substance intoxication a...

  9. Stimulant ADHD medication and risk for substance abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Z.(Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, 77843, USA); Lichtenstein, P.; Halldner, L; D'Onofrio, B; Serlachius, E.; Fazel, S.; Långström, N.; Larsson, H

    2013-01-01

    Background: There are persistent concerns of long-term effects of stimulant ADHD medication on the development of substance abuse. Methods: Using Swedish national registers, we studied all individuals born between 1960 and 1998 and diagnosed with ADHD (26,249 men and 12,504 women). We investigated the association between stimulant ADHD medication in 2006 and substance abuse during 2009. Substance abuse was indexed by substance-related death, crime, or hospital visits. Results: ADHD medication...

  10. Substance Use Correlates of Depression among African American Male Inmates

    OpenAIRE

    Holliday, Rhonda Conerly; Braithwaite, Ronald L.; Yancey, Elleen; Akintobi, Tabia; Stevens-Watkins, Danielle; Smith, Selina; Powell, C. Lamonte

    2016-01-01

    Substance use correlates of depressive symptoms among incarcerated adult male African American substance users were examined in the current study. Frequency of drug use was assessed with 12 items specific to an individual’s substance use. The Patient Depression Questionnaire (PHQ-9) was used to assess symptoms of depression. Approximately 90% of the sample displayed symptoms of depression ranging from minimal to severe. Regression models revealed that three substance use variables demonstrate...

  11. Sampling Odor Substances by Mist-Cyclone System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Osamu; Jiang, Zhiheng; Toyama, Shigeki

    2009-05-01

    Many techniques have been developed to measure odor substances. However most of those methods are based on using aquatic solutions(1),(2). Many odor substances specifically at low density situation, are difficult to dissolve into water. To absorb odor substances and obtain highest concentration solutions are key problems for olfactory systems. By blowing odor substances contained air mixture through mist of water and then separating the liquid from two-phases fluid with a cyclone unit a high concentration solution was obtained.

  12. Developmental Trajectories of Adolescent Substance Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Samantha; Pepler, Debra; Jiang, Depeng; Cappadocia, M. Catherine; Craig, Wendy; Connolly, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Longitudinal data from 746 adolescents in Toronto, Canada (54% females), was gathered in eight waves over seven years (1995 through 2001), beginning when the youths were 10 to 12 years old (mean age = 11.8, SD = 1.2 years). Five trajectories of substance use were identified: chronic-high, childhood onset-rapid high, childhood onset-moderate,…

  13. Acupuncture Treatment of Substance Use Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Dan; Freeman, Sonya; Kong, Jian

    2013-01-01

    The use of acupuncture as a medical treatment over the course of thousands of years has led to the development of a variety of acupuncture administration techniques. Clinical trials testing the efficacy of acupuncture as a treatment for substance use disorder have produced contradictory results. This ambiguity may be, at least in part, the result of the numerous administration methods performed in the many acupuncture schools and protocols that exist today. Animal s...

  14. Genetic and perinatal effects of abused substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brande, M.C.; Zimmerman, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the effects of several abused drugs, including opiates, cannabinoids, alcohol, nicotine, and cocaine, with special emphasis on the actions of these substances at the molecular and cellular levels. The first half deals with genetic effects, including molecular genetics, biochemical genetics, pharmacogenetics, cytogenetics, and genetic toxicity. The second half focuses on perinatal effects and covers: drug abuse during pregnancy; biochemical aspects of marihuana on male reproduction; and long-term behavioral and neuroendocrine effects of perinatal alcohol exposure.

  15. NEIGHBORHOOD NORMS AND SUBSTANCE USE AMONG TEENS

    OpenAIRE

    Musick, Kelly; Seltzer, Judith A.; Schwartz, Christine R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper uses new data from the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey (L.A. FANS) to examine how neighborhood norms shape teenagers’ substance use. Specifically, it takes advantage of clustered data at the neighborhood level to relate adult neighbors’ attitudes and behavior with respect to smoking, drinking, and drugs, which we treat as norms, to teenagers’ own smoking, drinking, and drug use. We use hierarchical linear models to account for parents’ attitudes and behavior and other ch...

  16. Developmental models of substance abuse relapse

    OpenAIRE

    Ramo, Danielle Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Most models of addiction treatment outcome and relapse have been formulated on adult populations, with only modest consideration of developmental factors which are salient issues for substance use disordered (SUD) youth. The dominant cognitive behavioral model of addiction relapse (Marlatt & Gordon, 1985) has been compelling in its description of how situational context (e.g., high risk situations) interacts with cognitive factors (e.g., self-efficacy, coping resources) to elevate risk for re...

  17. Biologically active substance usable in organic agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Šircová, Alena

    2012-01-01

    Organic farming system is a model of continuous agricultural activities, in that no synthetic pesticides, herbicides, growth regulators or GMOs may be used for plant protection. Such biological plant protection is allowed, where different antagonistic relationships between individual micro- and macro-organisms and pests occur. Certain biologically active substances contained in plants have a positive effect in protecting plants from pests and diseases as well as extracts from them functio...

  18. Substance abuse and cognitive functioning in schizophrenia.

    OpenAIRE

    Addington, J.; Addington, D

    1997-01-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia have an increased vulnerability to abuse drugs or alcohol. This vulnerability can interfere with the course and treatment of the disorder and may also have a detrimental effect on already compromised cognitive functioning. This study has a matched, cross-sectional design and compares the social and cognitive functioning and the symptoms of 33 schizophrenia subjects who abuse substances with 33 nonabusing schizophrenia subjects. Subjects were matched on sex, age,...

  19. 16 CFR 1500.40 - Method of testing toxic substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Method of testing toxic substances. 1500.40... testing toxic substances. The method of testing the toxic substances referred to in § 1500.3(c) (1)(ii)(C... with additional strips and should fit snugly around the trunk of the animal. The ends of the sleeve...

  20. 76 FR 51399 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-18

    ..., 40 FR 43745, all applicants for registration to import a basic class of any controlled substance in... Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application Pursuant to 21 U.S.C. 958... be registered as an importer of Noroxymorphone (9668), a basic class of controlled substance...

  1. Attitudes towards Substance Addiction: A Study of Turkish University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sungu, Hilmi

    2015-01-01

    Substance addiction has become one of the important issues in the world. The studies concerning substance use reveal the extent of the problem. According to the results of such studies, the number of the people using illicit drugs has increased profoundly in recent years. In this study, it was tried to find out how common substance use among…

  2. Substance Abuse by Youth and Young Adults in Rural America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, David; Gale, John A.; Hartley, David

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Addressing substance abuse in rural America requires extending our understanding beyond urban-rural comparisons to how substance abuse varies across rural communities of different sizes. We address this gap by examining substance abuse prevalence across 4 geographic levels, focusing on youth (age 12-17 years) and young adults (age 18-25…

  3. Adolescent Sexual Behaviors at Varying Levels of Substance Use Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Leah J.; Latimer, William

    2010-01-01

    Combining substance use and sex compounds the risk of contracting sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV. However, the association between substance use and sexual behaviors may vary by substance and sexual behavior. The current study sought to examine the relationship between alcohol and marijuana use frequency and specific sexual…

  4. Violence against Native Women in Substance Abuse Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylors, Karen; Daliparthy, Nalini

    2006-01-01

    Many mental health problems among substance abusing populations are directly linked to high rates of abuse and trauma. There is increasing evidence of associations between childhood physical and sexual abuse to adult substance use and HIV-risk behavior. The relationship of abuse, mental health problems, substance abuse, and high-risk sexual…

  5. 76 FR 61625 - Cheri Swensson; Certification of Substance Abuse Experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-05

    ... COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 26 Cheri Swensson; Certification of Substance Abuse Experts AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... one of the organizations authorized to certify a substance abuse expert. DATES: Submit comments by..., ``Substance abuse expert,'' by including the Academy at Section 26.187(b)(5). The petitioner is the...

  6. School-Based Interventions for Students with Substance Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrow-Sanchez, Jason J.; Jenson, William R.; Clark, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    Experimentation with substances is typical for many young people, but unfortunately some will go on to develop substance abuse problems that substantially affect their lives. Successfully intervening with students who use or abuse substances is a challenge for school mental health professionals across the nation. There is a need for evidence-based…

  7. 77 FR 33619 - Certification of Substance Abuse Experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-07

    ... COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 26 Certification of Substance Abuse Experts AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... substance abuse expert. The NRC determined that the issues raised in the PRM are appropriate for... substance abuse expert. The NRC received one comment during the public comment period (ADAMS Accession...

  8. 76 FR 62293 - National Substance Abuse Prevention Month, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8728 of October 3, 2011 National Substance Abuse Prevention Month, 2011 By... increase their chances of living long, healthy, and productive lives. During National Substance Abuse... diagnosable substance abuse or dependence problems--countless families and communities also live with the...

  9. Core Competencies and the Prevention of Adolescent Substance Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haegerich, Tamara M.; Tolan, Patrick H.

    2008-01-01

    Adolescence is a developmental period during which youth are at increased risk for using substances. An empirical focus on core competencies illustrates that youth are less likely to use substances when they have a positive future orientation, a belief in the ability to resist substances, emotional and behavioral control, sound decision-making…

  10. From substance use to homelessness or vice versa?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McVicar, Duncan; Moschion, Julie; van Ours, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Homelessness is associated with substance use, but whether substance use precedes or follows homelessness is unclear. We investigate the nature of the relationship between homelessness and substance use using data from the unique Australian panel dataset Journeys Home collected in 4 surveys over the

  11. Medical marijuana users in substance abuse treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swartz Ronald

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rise of authorized marijuana use in the U.S. means that many individuals are using cannabis as they concurrently engage in other forms of treatment, such as substance abuse counseling and psychotherapy. Clinical and legal decisions may be influenced by findings that suggest marijuana use during treatment serves as an obstacle to treatment success, compromises treatment integrity, or increases the prevalence or severity of relapse. In this paper, the author reviews the relationship between authorized marijuana use and substance abuse treatment utilizing data from a preliminary pilot study that, for the first time, uses a systematic methodology to collect data examining possible effects on treatment. Methods Data from the California Outcomes Measurement System (CalOMS were compared for medical (authorized marijuana users and non-marijuana users who were admitted to a public substance abuse treatment program in California. Behavioral and social treatment outcomes recorded by clinical staff at discharge and reported to the California Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs were assessed for both groups, which included a sample of 18 reported medical marijuana users. Results While the findings described here are preliminary and very limited due to the small sample size, the study demonstrates that questions about the relationship between medical marijuana use and involvement in drug treatment can be systematically evaluated. In this small sample, cannabis use did not seem to compromise substance abuse treatment amongst the medical marijuana using group, who (based on these preliminary data fared equal to or better than non-medical marijuana users in several important outcome categories (e.g., treatment completion, criminal justice involvement, medical concerns. Conclusions This exploratory study suggests that medical marijuana is consistent with participation in other forms of drug treatment and may not adversely affect

  12. The Effects of Mexican origin family structure on parental monitoring and pre-adolescent substance use expectancies and substance use

    OpenAIRE

    Warren, Jennifer R.; Wagstaff, David A.; Hecht, Michael L.; Elek, Elvira

    2008-01-01

    Substance use among Mexican origin, low-income youths is a serious, but under-studied problem. This study examines the relationship between the structure of Mexican origin families (i.e. nuclear, single-parent, blended or extended), and the parental monitoring, substance use expectancies, and substance use reported by pre-adolescents. Family structure did not differentiate the substance use prevalence, expectancies or parental monitoring among the 1224 low-income, Mexican-origin fifth grade p...

  13. Is It the Music? Peer Substance Use as a Mediator of the Link between Music Preferences and Adolescent Substance Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Juul; Ter Bogt, Tom F. M.; Raaijmakers, Quinten A. W.; Gabhainn, Saoirse Nic; Monshouwer, Karin; Vollebergh, Wilma A. M.

    2010-01-01

    Both music preferences and the substance use behavior of peers are important elements in explaining adolescent substance use. The extent to which music preference and peer use overlap in explaining adolescent substance use remains to be determined. A nationally representative sample of 7324 Dutch school-going adolescents (aged 12-16) provided data…

  14. Relationships between personality and preferred substance and motivations for use among adolescent substance abusers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Justin B; Heath, Alisa J; Young, Susan E; Hewitt, John K; Corley, Robin P; Stallings, Michael C

    2003-08-01

    This study examined the utility of Cloninger's tridimensional personality theory (1986, 1987a) in predicting preferred substance of abuse and self-reported motivations for use among a sample of 200 adolescent substance abusers and 200 matched community control adolescents. Two primary hypotheses were tested: (1) Cloninger's type II profile is more strongly associated with stimulant use, and his type I profile is more strongly associated with substances having sedative-hypnotic effects; and 2) type II individuals will report motivations for use that focus primarily on obtaining positive rewards, whereas type I individuals will report motivations primarily concerning negative reinforcement or the avoidance of problems and negative life experiences. Our results did not show strong associations between Cloninger's Harm Avoidance and Reward Dependence dimensions and preferred substance or motivations for use. However, in partial support of the hypotheses examined here, we did find that individuals low in novelty seeking (NS) tended to prefer alcohol and marijuana, whereas those high in NS endorsed a wider range of preferred substances. High NS was associated with significantly greater stimulant use and motivations focused on obtaining positive rewards, whereas low NS was associated with greater sedative use and motivations related to avoiding negative emotions or negative life experiences.

  15. Substance Use among Muslim Students in Aceh, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inda Mariana Harahap

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Illicit substance use is a serious social problem faced by adolescents worldwide, including adolescents in Aceh and has many negative consequences. In addition, illicit substance use does not fit with the values of Islamic teaching, and is strictly prohibited in Islam. Purpose: The aims of this paper are to determine the prevalence of illicit substance use, the stages of substance use, and types of substance used among Muslim students in senior high schools in Aceh, Indonesia. Method: Four hundred and twenty six students who met the inclusion criteria were recruited from four senior high schools in Banda Aceh by using simple random sampling, and of these, 290 returned a completed questionnaire. A self reported questionnaire was used to collect data. Result: The mean age of the subjects was 15.9 years old and the majority of them were female (68.6%. The study found that the prevalence of substance use was 2.4%with a higher number of females than males who had used illicit substances. The common substances that were used by the students were marijuana and dextromethorphon, as well as intentionally inhaled substances. Lastly, out of the students who had used illegal substances the majority was in the regular use stage (1.4%. Conclusion: This study found that substance use among Muslim students in Aceh exists, although prevalence was low. Thus, several preventive programs may be needed in Aceh not only for Muslims students who have used substances but also for students who have not use illegal substances. Keywords: Adolescents, Substance use, Muslim students, Indonesia.

  16. 78 FR 38355 - Center for Substance Abuse Prevention; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-26

    ... and Mental Health Services Administration's (SAMHSA) Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP) Drug... Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's Center for Substance Abuse Prevention Drug Testing... HUMAN SERVICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Center for Substance...

  17. 76 FR 20994 - Center for Substance Abuse Prevention; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-14

    ... Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's Center for Substance Abuse Prevention Drug Testing... HUMAN SERVICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Center for Substance Abuse... meeting of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's (SAMHSA) Center for...

  18. 78 FR 69702 - Center for Substance Abuse Prevention; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-20

    ... and Mental Health Services Administration's (SAMHSA) Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP) Drug... Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's Center for Substance Abuse Prevention Drug Testing... HUMAN SERVICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Center for Substance...

  19. Dental care of patients with substance abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, K

    1999-07-01

    Patients who abuse alcohol, crack, heroin or prescription drugs, are likely to interact with the dental professional. The dentist should therefore be able to identify problems of abuse and provide informed care and referral. Substance abuse should be a consideration in all patients who present with dental trauma and those who present with frequent vague complaints, multiple pain medication allergies, and regimens with multiple narcotic medications. Polydrug use, either prescription or illicit, is also a possibility, and effective treatment requires prompt recognition. Dentists should be alert to drug-seeking behavior within the context of pain management, and because pain severity is an objective experience, each patient must be treated carefully and sensitively. Unrelieved or unremitting pain can be a relapse trigger and therefore adequate pain control is a necessity in the recovering chemically dependent patient. New modalities, such as coanalgesia with low-dose ketamine in the opioid addicted have been shown to work effectively. In the post-dental surgical patient with chemical dependency, agents with less psychoactive activity than their drugs of abuse, such as extended-release morphine (MS Contin) have been tried with variable success. An informed treatment plan includes recognition of substance abuse, appropriate intervention, and referral. This plan may include universal screening, followed by brief interventional therapy for positive patients and in some cases, pharmacological pain control. On discharge from the office, instructions concerning referral to a substance abuse program or, in the case of the patient who may require more immediate treatment, to the emergency department are important. PMID:10516924

  20. Hazardous substances in the drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Federal Republic of Germany, a drinking water regulation has been existing since 1976 which guarantees permanent control. In this speech, the ecological viewpoints are discussed, i.e. the whole transport of hazardous substances with the water circulation up to man is dealt with in order to grasp the problem in its very beginning 1) limit values for chemicals exceeding the regulations terms; 2) Pollutions taking place during the preparation of drinking water; e.g. chlorification; 3) Pollution during transport in the tubes; Furthermore, first results of measurements of Ra-226 and Rn-222 in drinking water are presented. (HP)

  1. Substances et méthodes interdites

    OpenAIRE

    Saugy, Martial; Veuthey, Jean-Luc

    2011-01-01

    La Liste des substances et méthodes interdites a été publiée pour la première fois en 1963 sous l'égide du Comité international olympique. Depuis 2004, tel que c'est stipulé dans le Code mondial antidopage, l'Agence Mondiale Anti-dopage (AMA) est responsable de la préparation et de la publication de cette liste. L'AMA est l'organisation internationale responsable de superviser la lutte contre le dopage dans le sport. Le Code mondial antidopage est le document harmonisant les règles antidopage...

  2. Substance P Modulates Colitis-Asscociated Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Koon, Hon Wai; Shih, David; Karagiannides, Iordanes; Zhao, Dezheng; Fazelbhoy, Zafeer; Hing, Tressia; Xu, Hua; Lu, Bao; Gerard, Norma; Pothoulakis, Charalabos

    2010-01-01

    Substance P (SP) and the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R) are involved in the development of colitis and mucosal healing after colonic inflammation. We studied whether SP modulates colonic fibrosis by using a chronic model of trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in wild-type (WT) and NK-1R-deficient (NK-1R KD) mice. We found increased mRNA expression levels of collagen, vimentin, and the fibrogenic factors transforming growth factor β1 and insulin-like growth factor 1 in the chron...

  3. Formation of 11-trans slow reacting substances.

    OpenAIRE

    Atrache, V; Sok, D E; Pai, J K; Sih, C J

    1981-01-01

    Under strongly basic conditions [excess LiOH, dimethoxyethane/water (4:1, vol/vol)], purified slow reacting substances (SRSs) SRS-GSH and SRS-Cys were not isomerized to their corresponding 11-trans isomers. However, addition of thiols such as glutathione (GSH) or L-cysteine to this basic medium produced various amounts of 11-trans-SRS, depending on the thiol concentration. This chemical isomerization was inhibited by the radical scavenger 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinooxy free radica...

  4. Randomization in substance abuse clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woolson Robert F

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A well designed randomized clinical trial rates as the highest level of evidence for a particular intervention's efficacy. Randomization, a fundamental feature of clinical trials design, is a process invoking the use of probability to assign treatment interventions to patients. In general, randomization techniques pursue the goal of providing objectivity to the assignment of treatments, while at the same time balancing for treatment assignment totals and covariate distributions. Numerous randomization techniques, each with varying properties of randomness and balance, are suggested in the statistical literature. This paper reviews common randomization techniques often used in substance abuse research and an application from a National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA-funded clinical trial in substance abuse is used to illustrate several choices an investigator faces when designing a clinical trial. Results Comparisons and contrasts of randomization schemes are provided with respect to deterministic and balancing properties. Specifically, Monte Carlo simulation is used to explore the balancing nature of randomization techniques for moderately sized clinical trials. Results demonstrate large treatment imbalance for complete randomization with less imbalance for the urn or adaptive scheme. The urn and adaptive randomization methods display smaller treatment imbalance as demonstrated by the low variability of treatment allocation imbalance. For all randomization schemes, covariate imbalance between treatment arms was small with little variation between adaptive schemes, stratified schemes and unstratified schemes given that sample sizes were moderate to large. Conclusion We develop this paper with the goal of reminding substance abuse researchers of the broad array of randomization options available for clinical trial designs. There may be too quick a tendency for substance abuse researchers to implement the fashionable urn

  5. Protective factors of substance use in youth subcultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobakova, Daniela; Geckova, Andrea Madarasova; Klein, Daniel; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; van Dijk, Jitse P

    2012-09-01

    Youth subcultures, characterized by a distinctive lifestyle, music preference, shared values and behaviors, are associated with substance use. The aim of this study was to explore whether protective factors such as parental monitoring, parental bonding and parental substance abstinence affect the association between subculture affiliation and adolescents' substance use. We used data from 15-year-old elementary school pupils (N=1380; mean age=15.47; response 79.5%) who participated in the Health Behaviour in School Aged Children 2009/2010 study. The association between subculture affiliation and substance use (smoking, drinking alcohol, drunkenness, and cannabis use) was adjusted for parental monitoring, parental bonding and parental substance abstinence for boys and girls separately using logistic regression. Adolescents affiliated to one of the selected youth subcultures were significantly more likely to use substances than other 15-years-olds, except for cannabis use in girls. Adjustment for parental monitoring reduced the association between subculture affiliation and substance use by 31-64% in girls and by 10-23% in boys. Adjustment for parental bonding and parental substance abstinence led to no changes or minor changes. After adjustments for protective factors, subculture affiliation remained significantly associated with substance use. The role of protective factors in adolescents with a subculture affiliation regarding substance use is rather limited. Our findings imply that preventive strategies targeting youth subcultures should take protective factors into account and be gender-specific.

  6. Periodontal Status amongst Substance Abusers in Indian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Shantipriya; Kaul, Sanjay; Agrawal, Chaitali; Prasad, M G S; Agnihotri, Jaya; Bhowmik, Nirjhar; Amudha, D; Kambali, Soumya

    2012-01-01

    Background. In India there have been limited number of studies on periodontal status among drug addicts, and thus this study aims to assess the Oral hygiene and periodontal status in substance abusers and compare it with non-substance abusers. Methods. A comparative study was conducted to assess the periodontal status in substance abusers. Non-substance abusers were procured from the general population of Bangalore. From the control group 250 non-substance abusers were age and sex matched with the study population of substance abusers. The oral hygiene and periodontal condition of all subjects was assessed using Oral hygiene index- simplified (OHI-S), Russell's periodontal indices and Gingival bleeding index. Results. The mean of OHI-S and Periodontal Index (Russell's Index) scores were higher (2.70 and 3.68, resp.) in substance abusers than the control group (2.45 and 2.59, resp.). The mean Gingival bleeding score was lower (9.69) in substance abusers than the control group (22.7) and found to be statistically significant. A positive correlation found between OHI-S and Russell's periodontal index whereas negative correlation was found between OHI-S and Gingival bleeding in substance abusers. Conclusions. Though the oral hygiene was fair, more periodontal destruction and less of gingival bleeding were observed in substance abusers as compared to control group.

  7. Evidence based psychosocial interventions in substance use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonali Jhanjee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been significant progress and expansion in the development of evidence-based psychosocial treatments for substance abuse and dependence. A literature review was undertaken using the several electronic databases (PubMed, Cochrane Database of systemic reviews and specific journals, which pertain to psychosocial issues in addictive disorders and guidelines on this topic. Overall psychosocial interventions have been found to be effective. Some interventions, such as cognitive behavior therapy, motivational interviewing and relapse prevention, appear to be effective across many drugs of abuse. Psychological treatment is more effective when prescribed with substitute prescribing than when medication or psychological treatment is used alone, particularly for opiate users. The evidence base for psychological treatment needs to be expanded and should also include research on optimal combinations of psychological therapies and any particular matching effects, if any. Psychological interventions are an essential part of the treatment regimen and efforts should be made to integrate evidence-based interventions in all substance use disorder treatment programs.

  8. Sludge management paradigms: impact of priority substances and priority hazardous substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Eva; Lundy, L.; Donner, E.;

    2011-01-01

    metals in sludge applied to agricultural land, the potential impact of many EU Water Framework Directive priority and priority hazardous substances (PS/PHS) on human or environmental health has yet to be fully addressed. Research presented here shows that treated sludge from five urban WWTPs experiencing...

  9. Substance use, need, and demand for substance user treatment services in patients treated for sexually transmitted diseases in michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktan, G B; Calkins, R F; Johnson, D R

    2001-10-01

    The association between substance use and communicable diseases, and the need for substance user treatment services for patients treated for communicable diseases, is well documented. This study builds upon this knowledge in that it quantifies the need and demand for substance user treatment services in a large population of patients treated for communicable diseases, specifically, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), an area in which there is insufficient research published in the literature, but which is essential for policy development. More than 1700 patients treated for STDs in publicly funded clinics in Michigan between 1994-1995 were interviewed about their substance use, consequences of use and demand for substance user treatment services. Results indicated that the rates of substance use and demand for substance user treatment services were significantly higher among persons encountered in the STD clinics compared to the Michigan general adult population; however, a large proportion of STD patients determined to need substance user treatment services according to DSM-III-R criteria for "substance dependence" and "abuse" did not report ever receiving it. These results are followed by a discussion of possible policy implications for planning for substance user treatment services for patients treated for STDs in publicly funded clinics and suggestions for further research.

  10. Rural Drug Users: Factors Associated with Substance Abuse Treatment Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oser, Carrie B.; Leukefeld, Carl G.; Tindall, Michele Staton; Garrity, Thomas F.; Carlson, Robert G.; Falck, Russel; Wang, Jichuan; Booth, Brenda M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to use a modified version of Andersen’s (1968, 1995) Behavioral Model of Health Services Use to identify the correlates of the number of substance abuse treatment episodes received by rural drug users. Data were collected from face-to-face interviews with 711 drug users in rural areas of Ohio, Arkansas, and Kentucky. Descriptive analyses examine rural drug users’ substance use histories and retrospective substance abuse treatment service utilization patterns. A negative binomial regression model indicated that selected predisposing, historical health, and enabling factors were significantly associated with the utilization of substance abuse treatment among rural drug users. Despite high levels of recent and lifetime self-reported substance use among these rural drug users, treatment services were underutilized. Future studies are needed to examine the impact of the health care system and characteristics of the external environment associated with rural substance abuse treatment in order to increase utilization among drug users. PMID:20463206

  11. Novelty seeking as a phenotypic marker of adolescent substance use

    OpenAIRE

    Cinnamon Bidwell, L; Knopik, Valerie S.; Janet Audrain-McGovern; Glynn, Tiffany R; Spillane, Nichea S.; Ray, Lara A.; Riggs, Nathaniel R.; Guillot, Casey R.; Pang, Raina D.; Leventhal, Adam M.

    2015-01-01

    © the authors, publisher and licensee Libertas Academica Limited. Trait novelty seeking has been consistently implicated in substance use, yet the origins and mechanisms of novelty seeking in substance use proneness are unclear. We aimed to characterize novelty seeking as a phenotypic marker of substance use proneness in adolescence, a critical period for drug use experimentation. To this end, we parsed novelty seeking’s two constituent subdimensions – exploratory excitability (drive for nove...

  12. Subculture Affiliation Is Associated with Substance Use of Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Bobakova, Daniela; Geckova, Andrea Madarasova; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.; van Dijk, Jitse P.

    2012-01-01

    Youth subcultures (hip-hop, punk, skinhead, techno scene, metal) are known for specific lifestyles, music preferences, shared values and behaviours of their members. The aim of this study was to assess the association between subculture affiliation and substance use (tobacco, alcohol and cannabis), and whether gender, family affluence and substance use by peers explain this association. Subculture affiliation was significantly associated with substance use (OR/95% CI: smoking 3.13/2.30-4.24; ...

  13. Interpersonal Guilt and Substance Use in College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Locke, Geoffrey W.; Shilkret, Robert; Everett, Joyce E.; Nancy M. Petry

    2015-01-01

    The college years are a time for developing independence and separating from one’s family, and it is also a time in which substance use often escalates. This study examined the relationships between use of substances and interpersonal guilt, an emotion that can arise from feelings about separation, among 1,979 college students. Regular users of alcohol, cigarettes, cannabis, and other illicit drugs were compared with non-regular users of each substance. Sequential linear regression, controlli...

  14. Comparison of psychosexual problems between substance dependence patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hamid Kazami; Maryam Chorbani; Majid Bahreini-Borujeni; Kobra Sepehri-Borujeni

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: Sexual dissatisfaction is one of the common problems in patients of Substance dependency. The aim of this study was to investigate psychosexual problems in marital relationships in substance dependence patients: Crack, Cristal and Opium and compare with control group. Methods: In this descriptive-analytic study, 56 substance dependences referred to addiction treatment center were selected by convenience sampling and assigned to four groups: 20 Opium consumers, 18 on Crack...

  15. The relationship between individual and family religiosity with substance abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Sepideh Makarem; Zahra Zanjani

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this research was to investigate the relationship between individual and family religiosity with substance abuse. In other side because of the importance of prevention and the role of people beliefs about the causes of substance use/ non-use in this area, the relationship between (university) students’ beliefs about drug and their consequences with amount of the substance use was explored. Method: Study sample included 270 students (128 females and 142 males) from t...

  16. The Harmful Effects of Parental Substance Abuse on Children

    OpenAIRE

    Virtala, Maria; Suikkanen, Aino-Kaisa

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this final project was to describe the harmful effects of parental substance abuse from child perspective as having to grow up in a substance abusing family is considered as child maltreatment. In addition, the trends in parental substance abuse and the children's visibility in the treatment cycle were stressed as the data was gathered from Järvenpää Addiction Hospital's children's treatment documents. This study is of qualitative nature including 80 treatment documents fro...

  17. Offending, Substance Use, and Cohabitation in Young Adulthood*

    OpenAIRE

    Lonardo, Robert A.; Manning, Wendy D.; Giordano, Peggy C.; Longmore, Monica A.

    2010-01-01

    Over half of young adults have cohabited, but relatively little is known about the role delinquency and substance use play in youths’ odds of cohabiting as well as the implications of cohabitation for early adult offending and substance use. This study focuses on the reciprocal relationship between cohabitation during late adolescence and young adulthood and self-reported offending and substance use. Using longitudinal data, we find that net of traditional predictors delinquency involvement i...

  18. The Use of Therapeutic Rituals in Substance Abuse Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Becky L.

    2001-01-01

    This study explored the use of rituals in substance abuse counseling. Data were obtained from a total of 25 mental health workers in the substance abuse field from the northern region of Utah. Four research questions were asked about rituals and their use in substance abuse counseling: (I) Are addictions therapists using rituals? (2) How did therapists determine when to use rituals? (3) What types of rituals do they use? and (4) How do therapists assess ritual effectiveness? Results indicated...

  19. Nerve and Behavioral Responses of Mice to Various Umami Substances

    OpenAIRE

    Narukawa, Masataka; MORITA, Kanako; UEMURA, Masahide; Kitada, Ryo; OH, Seong-Hee; HAYASHI, Yukako

    2011-01-01

    Food contains various taste substances. Among them, umami substances play an important role with regard to the perception of the taste of food, but, few studies have examined the taste characteristics of representative umami substances other than monosodium L-glutamate (MSG). By conducting mouse behavioral studies (the 48-h 2-bottle preference test and the conditioned taste aversion test) and assessing gustatory nerve responses, we investigated the taste characteristics of unique umami substa...

  20. Epidemiology of Substance Use among University Students in Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarig Osman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Youth populations are vulnerable to substance use particularly in developing countries where circumstances may be favorable for it. There is no published data on substance use among the youth in Sudan other than on tobacco use. Objectives. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence, circumstances, and factors associated with substance use. Methods. An institution-based survey was conducted on a sample of 500 students. Data was collected using a questionnaire designed by the WHO for student drug surveys and analyzed using IBM SPSS version 20. Results. The overall prevalence of substance use is 31%. The current prevalence of tobacco, cannabis, alcohol, amphetamines, tranquilizers, inhalants, opiates, cocaine, and heroin use was 13.7%, 4.9%, 2.7%, 2.4%, 3.2%, 1%, 1.2%, 0.7%, and 0.5%, respectively. Curiosity (33.1% was the main reason for initiation of substance use. The main adverse effects reported were health problems (19.7% and theft (19.7%. Peers (40.9% were the prime source of substance use. On multivariate analysis, male sex was the principle predictor for substance use (AOR: 5.55; 95% CI: 3.38, 9.17. Conclusion. Strategies to control substance use should encompass the role of the university and parents in observing and providing education to improve awareness of substances and their consequences.

  1. 76 FR 5829 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-02

    ... controlled substances: Drug Schedule Marihuana (7360) I Tetrahydrocannabinols (7370) I Amphetamine (1100) II... distribution to its customers. In reference to drug code 7360 (Marihuana), the company plans to...

  2. 76 FR 51401 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-18

    ... classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Marihuana (7360) I Tetrahydrocannabinols (7370) I The... customers. In reference to drug code 7360 (Marihuana), the company plans to bulk manufacture cannabidiol...

  3. Epidemiology of Substance Use among University Students in Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Tarig; Victor, Cathrine; Abdulmoneim, Alaa; Mohammed, Hala; Abdalla, Fatima; Ahmed, Asma; Ali, Eiman; Mohammed, Wael

    2016-01-01

    Background. Youth populations are vulnerable to substance use particularly in developing countries where circumstances may be favorable for it. There is no published data on substance use among the youth in Sudan other than on tobacco use. Objectives. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence, circumstances, and factors associated with substance use. Methods. An institution-based survey was conducted on a sample of 500 students. Data was collected using a questionnaire designed by the WHO for student drug surveys and analyzed using IBM SPSS version 20. Results. The overall prevalence of substance use is 31%. The current prevalence of tobacco, cannabis, alcohol, amphetamines, tranquilizers, inhalants, opiates, cocaine, and heroin use was 13.7%, 4.9%, 2.7%, 2.4%, 3.2%, 1%, 1.2%, 0.7%, and 0.5%, respectively. Curiosity (33.1%) was the main reason for initiation of substance use. The main adverse effects reported were health problems (19.7%) and theft (19.7%). Peers (40.9%) were the prime source of substance use. On multivariate analysis, male sex was the principle predictor for substance use (AOR: 5.55; 95% CI: 3.38, 9.17). Conclusion. Strategies to control substance use should encompass the role of the university and parents in observing and providing education to improve awareness of substances and their consequences. PMID:27006856

  4. A bibliographic essay: the relationship between stress and substance use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerbone, F G; Larison, C L

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this review is to outline and critique studies that have examined the link between stress and substance use. Studies are categorized according to the age of the sample and the type of substance use measure considered. The research is mostly limited to studies that operationalize stress as stressful life events, daily hassles, or subjective stress. This paper concludes that there is a robust relationship between stress and substance use. However, there is a clear need for general population studies to address age, gender, and cultural differences to better assess the specificity and complexity of the stress/substance use relationship. PMID:10807155

  5. Getting boozy in books: substance use in adolescent literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Sarah M; Callister, Mark; Phillips, James C

    2011-09-01

    Media effects research provides evidence for a link between adolescent exposure to media portrayals of substance use and usage. Exposure to media content that glamorizes and normalizes substance use carries potential public health risks. Though substance use has been examined in other media, such as film, television, and magazines, no research to date examines usage portrayals in adolescent novels. Given that adolescents do read, and given the potential impact of content on adolescent attitudes and behavior, this study provides a detailed analysis of the frequency and nature of substance use in the understudied area of novels. Substance use was examined in 40 best-selling adolescent novels on the New York Times Best Sellers list (time span June-July 2008). Substance use varied widely. Of the various types of substances, alcohol portrayals were most common. Almost all substance use was portrayed as having no consequences. Alcohol use was portrayed in similar frequencies in books aimed at younger, middle, and older adolescents, though illegal drug use was more likely to be found in books aimed at older ages. Our results suggest that the manner in which substance use is generally portrayed may encourage use among adolescents. Researchers, parents, and adolescents are encouraged to examine books as one potentially overlooked area of influence. PMID:21469003

  6. Perceived harmfulness of substance use: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth Sarkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Harm ratings of substances help in understanding the perception toward substance use and formulating policies. Evidence of such harm ratings by substance users and their caregivers provides a clearer perspective of those who experience and observe such harm closely. Materials and Methods: Substance users and their caregivers were recruited from the Drug De-addiction and Treatment Centre of PGIMER, Chandigarh. Sociodemographic details of the subjects were noted. The subjects were then asked to rate a list of psychoactive preparations according to the harms they thought the preparation caused. The list of substances was developed taking into consideration substance commonly encountered in the geographical area. The harm ratings were transformed on a scale of 0-100. Results: All subjects were males and majority of them were educated above 10 th standard, were not employed and belonged to urban background. Most of them had taken psychoactive substances in their lifetimes but were currently abstinent. Most of the subjects endorsed intravenous drugs as the most harmful, followed by heroin. Beer and chewable tobacco considered the least harmful substances. Greater degree of education was associated with lower harm rankings for heroin, cannabis, dextropropoxyphene, and raw opium; while urban residence was associated with greater harm ratings for cannabis and raw opium. Differences in the harms were perceived for different preparations of the same active compound for alcohol and nicotine. Conclusion: Harm ratings of substances can be a useful guide while formulating policies and allocating resources. Need for further research extending this pilot study is emphasized.

  7. Photoprotective substance occurs primarily in outer layers of fish skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabacher, D.L.; Little, E.E.

    1998-01-01

    Methanol extracts of dorsal skin layers, eyes, gills, and livers from ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation-sensitive and UVB-tolerant species of freshwater fish were examined for a substance that appears to be photoprotective. Significantly larger amounts of this substance were found in extracts of outer dorsal skin layers from both UVB-sensitive and UVB-tolerant fish when compared with extracts of inner dorsal skin layers. This substance occurred in minor amounts or was not detected in eye, gill, and liver extracts. The apparent primary function of this substance in fish is to protect the cells in outer dorsal skin layers from harmful levels of UVB radiation.

  8. Isolation of a substance activating foot formation in hydra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C J; Schaller, H C

    1977-01-01

    We have developed an assay for a substance from hydra that accelerates foot regeneration in the animal. This substance is specific for the foot as evidenced by the following findings: (1) It is present in the animal as a steep gradient descending from foot to head, paralleling the foot-forming po......We have developed an assay for a substance from hydra that accelerates foot regeneration in the animal. This substance is specific for the foot as evidenced by the following findings: (1) It is present in the animal as a steep gradient descending from foot to head, paralleling the foot...

  9. Reaction between drug substances and pharmaceutical excipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jesper; Cornett, Claus; Jaroszewski, Jerzy Witold;

    2009-01-01

    The reactivity of citric acid towards drug substances in the solid state was examined using the beta-blocker carvedilol as a model compound. The reaction mixtures were analysed by LC-MS, the reaction products were isolated by preparative HPLC, and the structures were elucidated by microprobe NMR...... spectroscopy. Heating a mixture of solid carvedilol and solid citric acid monohydrate for 96h at 50 degrees C resulted in the formation of about 3% of a symmetrical ester as well as of a number of other reaction products in smaller amounts. Formation of the symmetrical ester was also observed at room...... temperature. At 70 degrees C, the amounts of three isomeric esters formed reached 6-8%. The minor reaction products were citric acid amides, O-acetylcarvedilol, and esters of itaconic acid....

  10. Control substances and alcohol use and testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Przybylski, J.L.

    1994-07-01

    The Omnibus Transportation Employee Testing Act was signed into law in October of 1991. The Omnibus Transportation Employee Testing Act of 1991 required the United States Department of Transportation (DOT) to enact regulations requiring the testing of employees that perform ``safety sensitive functions`` for illegal controlled substance use and alcohol misuse. The Transportation Management Division, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (TMD/EM-261), United States Department of Energy (DOE), Training Program Manager is committed to promoting the availability of the necessary information to those affected members of the Department of Energy (DOE) community in an effort to attain the highest possible level of regulatory compliance and to enhance the safety of each individual in the workplace.

  11. Hazardous substances shipping at inland water harbors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety measures and regulations system covering the aspects of fire protection, professional and ecological safety are aimed to create a safe working environment, by detection and remedy of conditions that are potentially hazardous for the well-being of the employees or are leading to certain undesired events. Such unwanted incidents may result in different consequences: operating person's injury, environment pollution or material damage. This study attempts to illustrate the organization of work during hazardous matter loading and unloading at inland water harbors, based on legal provisions and decrees involving safety precautions, and in order to achieve constant enhancement of operating procedure, decreasing thereby the number of work-related injuries and various accidental situations. Fundamental precondition required to prevent possible accidents and to optimize general safety policy is to recognize and control any danger or potential hazard, as well as to be familiar with the legal provisions covering the inland waterway transport of harmful substances.(author)

  12. Biological monitoring of polyfluoroalkyl substances: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houde, Magali; Martin, Jonathan W; Letcher, Robert J; Solomon, Keith R; Muir, Derek C G

    2006-06-01

    Polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFSs) are used in industrial and commercial products and can degrade to persistent perfluorocarboxylates (PFCAs) and perfluoroalkyl sulfonates (PFSAs). Temporal trend studies using human, fish, bird, and marine mammal samples indicate that exposure to PFSs has increased significantly over the past 15-25 years. This review summarizes the biological monitoring of PFCAs, PFSAs, and related PFSs in wildlife and humans, compares concentrations and contamination profiles among species and locations, evaluatesthe bioaccumulation/biomagnification in the environment, discusses possible sources, and identifies knowledge gaps. PFSs can reach elevated concentrations in humans and wildlife inhabiting industrialized areas of North America, Europe, and Asia (2-30,000 ng/ mL or ng/g of wet weight (ww)). PFSs have also been detected in organisms from the Arctic and mid-ocean islands (sentinel species and standardization of analytical methods are recommended. PMID:16786681

  13. Measurement and analysis of radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here are gathered the abstracts presented to the 3. summer university of the year 2001 whose main themes were the destructive (5 conferences) and nondestructive (8 conferences) analyses applied to nuclear industry. The points of view of different organisms (as DSIN: Directorate for the Safety of Nuclear Installations, IPSN: Institute of Nuclear Protection and Safety, OPRI: Office of Protection against Ionizing Radiations, TUI: Institute for Transuranium Elements, COGEMA, EDF: Electric Utilities, ANDRA: French National Agency for Radioactive Waste Management, CRLC Val d'Aurelle, France) concerning the needs involved in nuclear facilities control, the methods of radionuclide speciation in use internationally, the measurements and analyses of radioactive substances are given too as well as some general concepts concerning 1)the laser-matter interaction 2)the ions production 3)the quality applied to the measurements and analyses 4)the standard in activity metrology. (O.M.)

  14. Can you vaccinate against substance abuse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosten, Thomas R; Domingo, Coreen B

    2013-08-01

    Vaccines are being developed against substance abuse and most progress has been made with anti-cocaine, nicotine and opiate vaccines, but new ones are being developed for methamphetamine and may be in humans within 18 - 24 months. These haptenated vaccines share a common problem in that only about one-third of those vaccinated get a sufficiently robust antibody titer to enable them to effectively block drug use. This problem is being addressed with better carrier proteins and new adjuvants beyond alum. This review provides details about these developing vaccines that act through pharmacokinetic rather than pharmacodynamics blockade. Due to this pharmacokinetic mechanism of keeping abused drugs in the bloodstream and not allowing them entry into the brain or other organs, these vaccines have very few side effects compared to other blockers used in addictions treatment.

  15. Schedules of Controlled Substances: Removal of [123I]Ioflupane From Schedule II of the Controlled Substances Act. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-11

    With the issuance of this final rule, the Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration removes [123I]ioflupane from the schedules of the Controlled Substances Act. This action is pursuant to the Controlled Substances Act which requires that such actions be made on the record after an opportunity for a hearing through formal rulemaking. Prior to the effective date of this rule, [123I]ioflupane was, by definition, a schedule II controlled substance because it is derived from cocaine via ecgonine, both of which are schedule II controlled substances. This action removes the regulatory controls and administrative, civil, and criminal sanctions applicable to controlled substances, including those specific to schedule II controlled substances, on persons who handle (manufacture, distribute, reverse distribute, dispense, conduct research, import, export, or conduct chemical analysis) or propose to handle [123I]ioflupane. PMID:26364325

  16. Environmental risk limits for antifouling substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wezel, Annemarie P. van; Vlaardingen, P. van

    2004-03-10

    In 1989, the EU restricted the use of tributyl-tin (TBT) and the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) decided for a world-wide ban on TBT in 2003. As a replacement for TBT, new antifouling agents are entering the market. Environmental risk limits (ERLs) are derived for substances that are used as TBT-substitutes, i.e. the compounds Irgarol 1051, dichlofluanid, ziram, chlorothalonil and TCMTB. ERLs represent the potential risk of the substances to the ecosystem and are derived using data on (eco)toxicology and environmental chemistry. Only toxicity studies with endpoints related to population dynamics are taken into account. For Irgarol 1051 especially plants appear to be sensitive; the mode of action is inhibition of photosynthetic electron transport. Despite the higher sensitivity of the plants, the calculated ERL for water based on plants only is higher than the ERL based on all data due to the lower variability in the plant only dataset. Because there is a mechanistic basis to state that plants are the most sensitive species, we propose to base the ERL for water on the plants only dataset. As dichlofluanid is highly unstable in the water phase, it is recommended to base the ERL on the metabolites formed and not on the parent compound. No toxicity data of the studied compounds for organisms living in sediments were found, the ERLs for sediment are derived with help of the equilibrium partitioning method. For dichlofluanid and chlorothalonil the ERL for soil is directly based on terrestrial data, for Irgarol 1051 and ziram the ERL for soil is derived using equilibrium partitioning. Except for Irgarol 1051, no information was encountered in the open literature on the environmental occurrence in The Netherlands of the chemicals studied. The measured concentrations for Irgarol 1051 are close to the derived ERL. For this compound it is concluded that the species composition and thereby ecosystem functioning cannot be considered as protected.

  17. Environmental risk limits for antifouling substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wezel, Annemarie P; van Vlaardingen, P

    2004-03-10

    In 1989, the EU restricted the use of tributyl-tin (TBT) and the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) decided for a world-wide ban on TBT in 2003. As a replacement for TBT, new antifouling agents are entering the market. Environmental risk limits (ERLs) are derived for substances that are used as TBT-substitutes, i.e. the compounds Irgarol 1051, dichlofluanid, ziram, chlorothalonil and TCMTB. ERLs represent the potential risk of the substances to the ecosystem and are derived using data on (eco)toxicology and environmental chemistry. Only toxicity studies with endpoints related to population dynamics are taken into account. For Irgarol 1051 especially plants appear to be sensitive; the mode of action is inhibition of photosynthetic electron transport. Despite the higher sensitivity of the plants, the calculated ERL for water based on plants only is higher than the ERL based on all data due to the lower variability in the plant only dataset. Because there is a mechanistic basis to state that plants are the most sensitive species, we propose to base the ERL for water on the plants only dataset. As dichlofluanid is highly unstable in the water phase, it is recommended to base the ERL on the metabolites formed and not on the parent compound. No toxicity data of the studied compounds for organisms living in sediments were found, the ERLs for sediment are derived with help of the equilibrium partitioning method. For dichlofluanid and chlorothalonil the ERL for soil is directly based on terrestrial data, for Irgarol 1051 and ziram the ERL for soil is derived using equilibrium partitioning. Except for Irgarol 1051, no information was encountered in the open literature on the environmental occurrence in The Netherlands of the chemicals studied. The measured concentrations for Irgarol 1051 are close to the derived ERL. For this compound it is concluded that the species composition and thereby ecosystem functioning cannot be considered as protected. PMID:15168950

  18. Just Say Know: An Examination of Substance Use Disorders among Older Adults in Gerontological and Substance Abuse Journals

    OpenAIRE

    Rosen, Daniel; Engel, Rafael J.; Hunsaker, Amanda E.; Engel, Yael; Detlefsen, Ellen Gay; REYNOLDS, CHARLES F.

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the extent to which studies of alcohol abuse, illicit drug use, and prescription drug abuse among older adults appear in the leading gerontological and substance abuse journals. The authors reviewed articles published in the 10 social science gerontological journals and the 10 social science substance abuse journals with the highest 5-year impact factors in PubMed from 2000 to 2010. Articles were selected that presented original research on alcohol, substance, or prescri...

  19. Order of age at onset for substance use, substance use disorder, conduct disorder and psychiatric illness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldager, Steen; Linneberg, Inger Holm; Hesse, Morten

    2012-01-01

    of Personality – Abbreviated Scale (SAPAS), completed the MCMI-III, the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and were rated with the Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale. Age at onset was lowest for conduct disorder/antisocial behaviour, followed by tasting alcohol, trying drugs, post-traumatic stress disorder......This study aimed to assess the number of patients who reported earlier age at onset for psychiatric illness versus those with an earlier age at onset for substance use. Subjects were 194 patients from substance use disorder (SUD) treatment services in the Municipality of Fredericia who accepted...... an offer of psychological assessment. Patients were administered the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI), and when diagnoses were indicated, queried about the age at onset for each disorder. Additionally, subjects were administered the WAIS-III vocabulary scale, the Structured Assessment...

  20. [Negative symptoms in schizophrenia and substance-related disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, N; Belzeaux, R; Adida, M; Azorin, J-M

    2015-12-01

    Dual diagnosis of schizophrenia and substance-related disorders is common in psychiatric practice. Epidemiologic studies and report have established that the risk of a substance-related disorder was 4 to 5 times higher in a population of psychiatric patients than in the general population. However, little is known on the reason of this relationship and the treatments required. It's well known that a family history of psychosis is a risk factor of schizophrenia. Similarly a family history of substance use disorders increases the risk of using substances. Because the two disorders often occurred together, it could be hypothesized that a genetic risk factor is common. However, recent studies did not confirm this hypothesis and it seems that their genetic risks factor would be unrelated. Evidence now exists describing the different profiles of patients whether they used substance or not. Concerning negative symptoms clinical studies and meta-analyses have described fewer symptoms in schizophrenia patients with a substance use disorder. Among the different explanations that have been addressed, it seems that a lower capability of obtaining the substance could partly explain this relationship. Perhaps because patients with social withdrawal have more difficulties to find and spend the time required to obtain abused substances. At the opposite some products such as cocaine may relieve some symptoms especially anhedonia and alogia. However the link between substance-related disorders and negative symptoms is weak and decreases in more recent studies, probably because negative symptoms as well as addiction disorders are better characterized. Considering that treating psychiatric symptoms may not always lead to a decrease in the substance-related disorders but that patients who give up substances improve their psychotic symptoms, a therapeutic strategy should be planned for these dual disorders patients combining psychiatry and addiction interventions. PMID:26776388

  1. Neural Circuitry of Impaired Emotion Regulation in Substance Use Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Claire E.; Pommy, Jessica M.; Adinoff, Bryon

    2016-01-01

    Impaired emotion regulation contributes to the development and severity of substance use disorders (substance disorders). This review summarizes the literature on alterations in emotion regulation neural circuitry in substance disorders, particularly in relation to disorders of negative affect (without substance disorder), and it presents promising areas of future research. Emotion regulation paradigms during functional magnetic resonance imaging are conceptualized into four dimensions: affect intensity and reactivity, affective modulation, cognitive modulation, and behavioral control. The neural circuitry associated with impaired emotion regulation is compared in individuals with and without substance disorders, with a focus on amygdala, insula, and prefrontal cortex activation and their functional and structural connectivity. Hypoactivation of the rostral anterior cingulate cortex/ventromedial prefrontal cortex (rACC/vmPFC) is the most consistent finding across studies, dimensions, and clinical populations (individuals with and without substance disorders). The same pattern is evident for regions in the cognitive control network (anterior cingulate and dorsal and ventrolateral prefrontal cortices) during cognitive modulation and behavioral control. These congruent findings are possibly related to attenuated functional and/or structural connectivity between the amygdala and insula and between the rACC/vmPFC and cognitive control network. Although increased amygdala and insula activation is associated with impaired emotion regulation in individuals without substance disorders, it is not consistently observed in substance disorders. Emotion regulation disturbances in substance disorders may therefore stem from impairments in prefrontal functioning, rather than excessive reactivity to emotional stimuli. Treatments for emotion regulation in individuals without substance disorders that normalize prefrontal functioning may offer greater efficacy for substance disorders

  2. Substance abuse in emergency department patients with unexplained syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Zev; Chiu, David Te-Wei; Shapiro, Nathan Ivan; Grossman, Shamai Aron

    2014-04-01

    Current data suggest that up to 60 % of patients presenting to the ED with syncope leave the hospital without a defined etiology. Although a relationship between syncope and substance abuse has been described, no study to date has looked at the relationship between syncope of unknown etiology and substance abuse in patients presenting to the ED. The objective of the study was to determine whether a history of or current substance abuse is associated with an increased incidence of syncope of unknown etiology in ED patients. A prospective, observational, cohort study of consecutive ED patients aged ≥18 who presented with syncope was conducted between 6/03 and 7/06. Patients were queried in the ED and charts reviewed about a history of or current substance abuse. Substance abuse was defined as consumption of >2 alcoholic beverages nightly, repetitive use of any illicit substances, or documentation by the patient's physician of concern regarding suspected substance abuse. Data were analyzed using SAS with Chi-squared and Fisher's exact tests. We enrolled 518 patients who presented to the ED after syncope, 161 of whom did not have an identifiable etiology for their syncopal event. 62 patients had a history of, or current substance abuse. Among patients with a history of, or current substance abuse, 45 % had unexplained syncope, as opposed to 29 % of patients without such a history (p = 0.01). Our results suggest that prior and current substance abuse is associated with increased incidence of syncope of unknown etiology. Patients evaluated in the ED or even hospitalized with syncope of unknown etiology may benefit from substance abuse screening and possibly detoxification referral.

  3. 76 FR 75794 - Significant New Use Rules on Certain Chemical Substances; Withdrawal of Two Chemical Substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ... July 27, 1989 (54 FR 31314). The docket for the direct final SNURs for these two chemical substances... entities is provided in the Federal Register issue of October 5, 2011 (76 FR 61566) (FRL-8880-2). If you..., 1345 (d) and (e), 1361; E.O. 11735, 38 FR 21243, 3 CFR, 1971-1975 Comp. p. 973; 42 U.S.C. 241,...

  4. 76 FR 51400 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-18

    ... listed controlled substances in order to bulk manufacture controlled substances in Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API) form. The company distributes the manufactured API's in bulk form only to its customers. As... 28, 2011, and published in the Federal Register on May 4, 2011 76 FR 25374, Rhodes Technologies,...

  5. Newly detected ozone-depleting substances in the atmosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laube, Johannes C.; Newland, Mike J.; Hogan, Christopher; Brenninkmeijer, Carl A M; Fraser, Paul J.; Martinerie, Patricia; Oram, David E.; Reeves, Claire E.; Röckmann, Thomas; Schwander, Jakob; Witrant, Emmanuel; Sturges, William T.

    2014-01-01

    Ozone-depleting substances emitted through human activities cause large-scale damage to the stratospheric ozone layer, and influence global climate. Consequently, the production of many of these substances has been phased out; prominent examples are the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), and their intermed

  6. The Marihuana Perception Inventory: The Effects of Substance Abuse Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabany, Steve G.; Plummer, Portia

    1990-01-01

    Studied 617 high school and college students prior to and after substance abuse instruction to determine relationship between perceptions and demographic characteristics, and to learn whether substance abuse instruction was related to changes in student's perception of relationships. Findings from Marihuana Perception Inventory showed five factors…

  7. New psychoactive substances legislation in Ireland - Perspectives from academia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, Pierce V; Power, John D

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of 'legal highs' or 'new psychoactive substances' (NPS) on the Irish market is reflective of their appearance in many countries, with some notable exceptions. The official response to the situation is examined here by looking at Irish controlled drugs legislation and drug enforcement policies as enacted in recent years and their effects on academic research on NPS. The philosophy and practice of outright bans of scheduled substances has not been effective in delivering the stated aims of illicit drug control, namely harm reduction. With these legislative changes, we have witnessed the removal of the 'legitimate' sale and open marketing of a number of NPS to the general public in commercial retail premises. However, as legislation was enacted, suppliers and vendors rapidly changed the contents of their legal high products from now controlled to non-controlled substances. We have found that it is administratively challenging to perform scientific research on controlled substances at academic institutions. It is desirable to gather analytical, pharmacological, and toxicological data on these substances as they emerge on the market but due to the restrictive nature of licensing requirements, once a substance or generic class of substances is controlled, this becomes more difficult. The facts that any quantity of substance, no matter how small, is controlled, the nomenclature used to describe compounds is not consistent within the enacted legislation and the use of catch-all classes of compounds with the intention of controlling many similar molecular structures, all create problematic issues for academic researchers.

  8. 49 CFR 655.52 - Substance abuse professional (SAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... OPERATIONS Drug and Alcohol Testing Procedures § 655.52 Substance abuse professional (SAP). The SAP must perform the functions in 49 CFR Part 40. ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Substance abuse professional (SAP). 655.52...

  9. 21 CFR 509.6 - Added poisonous or deleterious substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS UNAVOIDABLE CONTAMINANTS IN ANIMAL FOOD AND FOOD... poisonous or deleterious substance, other than a pesticide chemical, that is also a food additive will be... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Added poisonous or deleterious substances....

  10. 78 FR 37991 - Alcohol and Controlled Substances Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-25

    ... approaches that maximize net benefits (including potential economic, environmental, public health and safety... Federal Transit Administration 49 CFR Part 655 RIN 2132-AB09 Alcohol and Controlled Substances Testing... to revise sections of the Alcohol and Controlled Substances (D&A) Testing regulation to...

  11. Examining the Interface Between Substance Misuse and Intimate Partner Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M. Monti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available There is considerable theoretical and empirical support for a link between substance misuse and perpetration and victimization of intimate partner violence. This review briefly summarizes this literature and highlights current research that addresses the interface between treatment for substance abuse and intimate partner violence. Suggestions for future research and clinical implications are provided.

  12. Adolescent Substance Abuse: A Comprehensive Approach to Prevention Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodarski, John S.; Smyth, Nancy J.

    1994-01-01

    Presents data on the extent, nature, and consequences of adolescent substance abuse. Definition of substance abuse is considered. Discusses primary and secondary prevention programs, including programs targeting high-risk youth, school and peer group, families, and communities. Outlines tertiary prevention efforts and emphasizes the need for…

  13. Why young people's substance use matters for global health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Wayne D; Patton, George; Stockings, Emily; Weier, Megan; Lynskey, Michael; Morley, Katherine I; Degenhardt, Louisa

    2016-03-01

    During puberty, when young people are completing their education, transitioning into employment, and forming longer-term intimate relationships, a shift in emotional regulation and an increase in risky behaviour, including substance use, is seen. This Series paper considers the potential effects of alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drug use during this period on: social, psychological, and health outcomes in adolescence and young adulthood; role transitions, and later health and social outcomes of regular substance use initiated in adolescence; and the offspring of young people who use substances. We sourced consistent support for causal relations between substance use and outcomes and evidence of biological plausibility from different but complementary research designs. Many adverse health and social outcomes have been associated with different types of substance use. The major challenge lies in deciding which are causal. Furthermore, qualitatively different harms are associated with different substances, differences in life stage when these harms occur, and the quality of evidence for different substances and health outcomes varies substantially. The preponderance of evidence comes from a few high-income countries, thus whether the same social and health outcomes would occur in other countries and cultures is unclear. Nonetheless, the number of harms that are causally related to substance use in young people warrant high-quality research design interventions to prevent or ameliorate these harms. PMID:26905482

  14. 76 FR 42731 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    ... notice published in the Federal Register on September 23, 1975, (40 FR 43745-46), all applicants for... Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application Pursuant to 21 U.S.C. 958... importer of the following basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Methaqualone (2565)...

  15. 75 FR 160 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-04

    ... Federal Register on September 23, 1975, (40 FR 43745-46), all applicants for registration to import a... Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application Pursuant to 21 U.S.C. 958... be registered as an importer of the basic classes of controlled substances listed in schedule...

  16. 75 FR 76755 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-09

    ... published in the Federal Register on September 23, 1975, (40 FR 43745-46), all applicants for registration... Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application Pursuant to 21 U.S.C. 958... Administration (DEA) to be registered as an importer of the basic classes of controlled substances listed...

  17. 75 FR 36684 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ... notice published in the Federal Register on September 23, 1975, (40 FR 43745-46), all applicants for... Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application Pursuant to 21 U.S.C. 958... (DEA) to be registered as an importer of the basic classes of controlled substances listed in...

  18. 76 FR 30969 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-27

    ... Register on September 23, 1975, (40 FR 43745), all applicants for registration to import a basic class of... Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application Pursuant to 21 U.S.C. 958... importer of Remifentanil (9739), a basic class of controlled substance listed in schedule II. The...

  19. 77 FR 16262 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ... notice published in the Federal Register on September 23, 1975, 40 FR 43745-46, all applicants for... Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application Pursuant to 21 U.S.C. 958...) to be registered as an importer of Fentanyl (9801), a basic class of controlled substance listed...

  20. 75 FR 65660 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-26

    ... the Federal Register on September 23, 1975, (40 FR 43745-46), all applicants for registration to... Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application Pursuant to 21 U.S.C. 958... as an importer of the basic classes of controlled substances listed in schedule II: Drug...

  1. 76 FR 57080 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-15

    ... Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration By Notice dated June 7, 2011, and published in the Federal Register on June 16, 2011, 76 FR 35239, Noramco Inc., 1440 Olympic... be registered as an importer of Phenylacetone (8501), a basic class of controlled substance listed...

  2. 77 FR 21998 - Importer of Controlled Substances: Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-12

    ... notice published in the Federal Register on September 23, 1975, 40 FR 43745-46, all applicants for... Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances: Notice of Application Pursuant to 21 U.S.C. 958...) to be registered as an importer of Nabilone (7379), a basic class of controlled substance listed...

  3. 75 FR 44285 - Importer of Controlled Substances: Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    ... Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances: Notice of Registration By Notice dated April 26, 2010 and published in the Federal Register on April 30, 2010, (75 FR 22844), Penick Corporation, 33... Administration (DEA) to be registered as an importer of the basic classes of controlled substances listed...

  4. 76 FR 77253 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-12

    ... noted in a previous notice published in the Federal Register on September 23, 1975, 40 FR 43745, all... Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application Pursuant to 21 U.S.C. 958...) to be registered as an importer of Remifentanil (9739), a basic class of controlled substance...

  5. Representing Energy. I. Representing a Substance Ontology for Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Rachel E.; Close, Hunter G.; McKagan, Sarah B.; Vokos, Stamatis

    2012-01-01

    The nature of energy is not typically an explicit topic of physics instruction. Nonetheless, verbal and graphical representations of energy articulate models in which energy is conceptualized as a quasimaterial substance, a stimulus, or a vertical location. We argue that a substance ontology for energy is particularly productive in developing…

  6. 21 CFR 109.6 - Added poisonous or deleterious substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION UNAVOIDABLE CONTAMINANTS IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION AND FOOD... poisonous or deleterious substance, other than a pesticide chemical, that is also a food additive, will be... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Added poisonous or deleterious substances....

  7. Substance Use and Its Prevention: A Survey of Classroom Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genaux, Melisa; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A nationwide survey of 109 teachers of students with behavioral disorders found little programming concerning prevention of substance abuse. Teachers differed in their priority assignment of substance abuse prevention and reported the absence of parental involvement in such efforts. Lack of time, curriculum materials, and adequate funding were…

  8. Substance Abuse in Rural African-American Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawkins, Marvin P.; Williams, Mary M.

    More research into illicit substance abuse in rural African-American communities is needed. The existing literature indicates that patterns of use for licit substances (alcohol and cigarettes) are either similar for rural Blacks and Whites or lower for Blacks. However, the negative health and social consequences of smoking and abusive drinking are…

  9. Substance Use and the Treatment of Resistant Depression in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Benjamin I.; Shamseddeen, Wael; Spirito, Anthony; Emslie, Graham; Clarke, Greg; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Vitiello, Benedetto; Ryan, Neal; Birmaher, Boris; Mayes, Taryn; Onorato, Matthew; Zelazny, Jamie; Brent, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Despite the known association between substance use disorders and major depressive disorder (MDD) among adolescents, little is known regarding substance use among adolescents with MDD. Method: Youths with MDD who had not improved after an adequate selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor trial (N = 334) were enrolled in the Treatment of…

  10. Adolescent Romantic Couples Influence on Substance Use in Young Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudonis-Miller, Lauren C.; Lewis, Lisa; Tong, Yan; Tu, Wanzhu; Aalsma, Matthew C.

    2012-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that adolescent peer group affiliations are consistent predictors of substance use initiation and maintenance; it is less clear how adolescent "romantic" relationships influence substance use behavior. Data were drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Participants in the final dataset for the…

  11. A Graphical Representation for the Fugacity of a Pure Substance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Book, Neil L.; Sitton, Oliver C.

    2010-01-01

    The thermodynamic equations used to define and compute the fugacity of a pure substance are depicted as processes on a semi-logarithmic plot of pressure vs. molar Gibbs energy (PG diagram) with isotherms for the substance behaving as an ideal gas superimposed. The PG diagram clearly demonstrates the physical basis for the definitions and the…

  12. General Strain Theory and Substance Use among American Indian Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitle, Tamela McNulty; Eitle, David; Johnson-Jennings, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Despite the well-established finding that American Indian adolescents are at a greater risk of illicit substance use and abuse than the general population, few generalist explanations of deviance have been extended to American Indian substance use. Using a popular generalist explanation of deviance, General Strain Theory, we explore the predictive utility of this model with a subsample of American Indian adolescents from waves one and two of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add-Health). Overall, we find mixed support for the utility of General Strain Theory to account for American Indian adolescent substance use. While exposure to recent life events, a common measure of stress exposure, was found to be a robust indicator of substance use, we found mixed support for the thesis that negative affect plays a key role in mediating the link between strain and substance use. However, we did find evidence that personal and social resources serve to condition the link between stress exposure and substance use, with parental control, self-restraint, religiosity, and exposure to substance using peers each serving to moderate the association between strain and substance use, albeit in more complex ways than expected. PMID:23826511

  13. Solution-Focused Group Therapy for Level 1 Substance Abusers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smock, Sara A.; Trepper, Terry S.; Wetchler, Joseph L.; McCollum, Eric E.; Ray, Rose; Pierce, Kent

    2008-01-01

    The present study compared solution-focused group therapy (SFGT) with a traditional problem-focused treatment for level 1 substance abusers. Outcome research on the effectiveness of solution-focused group therapy is minimal, especially in treating substance abusers. In the present study, clients were measured before and after treatment to…

  14. Per and polyfluorinated substances in the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posner, Stefan; Roos, Sandra; Brunn Poulsen, Pia;

    This Tema Nord report presents a study based on open information and custom market research to review the most common perfluorinated substances (PFC) with less focus on PFOS and PFOA. The study includes three major parts: 1) Identification of relevant per-and polyfluorinated substances...

  15. Protective factors of substance use in youth subcultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobakova, D.; Geckova, A.M.; Klein, D.; Reijneveld, S.A.; van Dijk, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Youth subcultures, characterized by a distinctive lifestyle, music preference, shared values and behaviors, are associated with substance use. The aim of this study was to explore whether protective factors such as parental monitoring, parental bonding and parental substance abstinence affect the as

  16. Prevalence and Pedagogy: Understanding Substance Abuse in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salm, Twyla; Sevigny, Phil; Mulholland, Val; Greenberg, Hirsch

    2011-01-01

    This case study examines not only the prevalence of substance abuse in one rural, Canadian high school, but also how teachers understand teaching and learning in relation to substance abuse. Over one third of students reported that they had used marijuana (37%) and alcohol (38%) in the last seven days, a rate considerably higher than typical…

  17. Food contact materials, flavouring substances and smoke flavourings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engel K-H

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available

    The EFSA Panel on Food Additives, Flavourings, Processing Aids and Materials in Contact with Food (AFC Panel and the subsequent Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF Panel have undertaken evaluations of the safety of flavourings (both chemically defined substances and mixtures such as smoke flavourings and food contact materials (FCM, as well as assessments on other substances used in food. The major progress in methodologies for the evaluation of the safety of these substances is highlighted in this article. By December 2011, scientific opinions had been adopted for 247 substances for food contact materials, mainly plastics. Adoption of a series of opinions on active and/or intelligent packaging substances and on recycling processes of plastics is planned between July 2012 and December 2013. Panel opinions, EFSA statements/reports and guidance documents were published on specific issues and on substances for which there was an urgent request for safety evaluation (for example isopropylthioxanthone (ITX, bisphenol A (BPA, phthalates, epoxidised soybean oil (ESBO, benzophenone and 4-methylbenzophenone. By 2009, the AFC and CEF Panels had completed the safety review of 2 067 flavourings substances used in the EU. Additional data, which were requested for 404 substances, are currently under evaluation or have been generated. Eleven smoke flavourings have been evaluated, and the CEF Panel has prepared a guidance document on the future data required for the evaluation of flavourings.

  18. Pathways to Adolescent Substance Use among Sexually Abused Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Jennifer A.; McCloskey, Laura Ann

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the link between childhood sexual abuse and adolescent substance use among girls, and evaluated depressive self-concept and behavioral under-control (BUC) as pathways to substance use for sexually abused girls. Participants (n = 150) were drawn from a longitudinal study of the impact of domestic violence on the lives of women…

  19. Gender Differences Regarding Peer Influence and Attitude toward Substance Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rienzi, Beth M.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    To investigate gender differences in acceptance of substance abuse behavior among adolescents, 968 students were administered a questionnaire to assess their perceptions. Results show that both genders felt that boys would be more approving of teenage substance abuse. Most students were disapproving of a teenager driving after drinking. Other…

  20. The Evolution of an Online Substance Abuse Counseling Certificate Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozier, Mary K.

    2012-01-01

    In the field of rehabilitation services, substance abuse counseling requires unique skills. Post-baccalaureate academic certificate programs offer professionals an opportunity to retool or expand their skills and meet licensure needs in this evolving field. East Carolina University's online Substance Abuse Counseling Certificate Program was…

  1. The Root-inhibiting Substance of Allium Cepa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, Anth.

    1953-01-01

    Whereas scientific research on inhibiting substances has mainly occupied itself with the effect of these substances on the germination process, I was able to demonstrate the presence of a root-inhibiting agent during my studies on root formation in Fuchsia hybrida and Pelargonium zonale (Stolk, 1952

  2. 25 CFR 11.452 - Possession of a controlled substance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... unlawful for a person to knowingly or intentionally possess any controlled substance listed in 21 CFR Part... by 21 CFR 1308.21 through 1308.35, as amended; or (3) The provisions of 42 U.S.C. 1996a (regarding... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Possession of a controlled substance. 11.452 Section...

  3. Young People's Involvement in a Substance Misuse Communications Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Mathew; Salmon, Debra; Orme, Judy

    2004-01-01

    There is growing emphasis in public policy on involving young people in the development of health promotion campaigns and information resources on substance misuse. To date there has been little literature that explores the level and nature young people's involvement in such initiatives. This paper reports on an evaluation of a substance misuse…

  4. Substance Abuse: Implications for Counseling African American Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Jay C.

    1994-01-01

    Examines factors--such as unemployment, economic deprivation, racism, issues pertaining to gender roles--and their contribution to substance abuse in African American men. Specifically reviews the use of alcohol, opiates, crack, and cocaine. Argues that a biopsychosocial model offers the best framework in conceptualizing substance abuse and…

  5. SUBSTANCE ABUSE AND MENTAL HEALTH DATA ARCHIVE (SAMHDA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Data Archive (SAMHDA) is an initiative of the Office of Applied Studies, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) of the United States Department of Health and Human Services. The goal of the archive is to provide re...

  6. Special Considerations for Substance Abuse Intervention with Latino Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldbach, Jeremy T.; Thompson, Sanna J.; Holleran Steiker, Lori K.

    2011-01-01

    Nearly 10% of Latino youth who are twelve and older are in need of substance abuse treatment for alcohol or illicit drug use. Ethnic differences exist with regard to susceptibility to drug use, attitudes regarding drugs, and drug resistance strategies. The failure of some substance abuse prevention programs can be traced in part to their lack of…

  7. 36 CFR 34.7 - Cultivation of controlled substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cultivation of controlled substances. 34.7 Section 34.7 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EL PORTAL ADMINISTRATIVE SITE REGULATIONS § 34.7 Cultivation of controlled substances. In...

  8. Transport of radioactive substances; Der Transport radioaktiver Stoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-12-15

    The report on the transport of radioactive substances covers the following topics: facts on radioactive materials transport, safety of the transport of radioactive substances, legal regulations and guidelines: a multiform but consistent system, transport of nuclear fuels, safety during the transport of nuclear fuel, future transport of spent fuel elements and high-level radioactive wastes in Germany.

  9. Substance-Abusing Women: False Stereotypes and Real Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Margaret E.

    1995-01-01

    Reviews and interprets some recent literature on substance abuse problems and treatments among women. Major risk factors include childhood sexual or physical abuse, domestic violence, and a spouse or partner who abuses substances. Discusses the enormous problems of access to treatment for women with minor children. (JPS)

  10. Substance Flow Analysis of Mercury in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, L. M.; Wang, S.; Zhang, L.; Wang, F. Y.; Wu, Q. R.

    2015-12-01

    In previous studies, the emission of anthropogenic atmospheric Hg in China as well as single sector have been examined a lot. However, there might have been more Hg released as solid wastes rather than air. Hg stored in solid wastes may be released to air again when the solid wastes experience high temperature process or cause local pollution if the solid wastes are stacked casually for a long time. To trace the fate of Hg in China, this study developed the substance flow of Hg in 2010 covering all the sectors summarized in table 1. Below showed in Figure 1, the total Hg input is 2825t. The unintentional input of Hg, mined Hg, and recycled Hg account for 57%, 32% and 11% respectively. Figure 2 provides the detail information of substance flow of Hg. Byproducts from one sector may be used as raw materials of another, causing cross Hg flow between sectors. The Hg input of cement production is 303 t, of which 34% comes from coal and limestone, 33% comes from non-ferrous smelting, 23% comes from coal combustion, 7% comes from iron and steel production and 3% comes from mercury mining. Hg flowing to recycledHg production is 639 t, mainly from Hg contained in waste active carbon and mercuric chloride catalyst from VCM production and acid sludge from non-ferrous smelting. There are 20 t mercury flowing from spent mercury adding products to incineration. Figure1 and Figure 2 also show that 46% of the output Hg belongs to "Lagged release", which means this part of mercury might be released later. The "Lagged release" Hg includes 809 t Hg contained in stacked byproducts form coal combustion, non-ferrous smelting, iron and steel production, Al production, cement production and mercury mining, 161t Hg stored in the pipeline of VCM producing, 10 t Hg in fluorescent lamps that are in use and 314 t mercury stored in materials waiting to be handled with in recycled mercury plants. There is 112 t Hg stored in landfill and 129 t Hg exported abroad with the export of mercury adding

  11. Mechanisms of humic substances degradation by fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Hadar, Y.; Grinhut, T.

    2012-04-01

    Humic substances (HS) are formed by secondary synthesis reactions (humification) during the decay process and transformation of biomolecules originating from plants and other dead organisms. In nature, HS are extremely resistant to biological degradation. Thus, these substances are major components in the C cycle and in the biosphere and therefore, the understanding of the process leading to their formation and transformation and degradation is vital. Fungi active in the decomposition process of HS include mainly ascomycetes and basidiomycetes that are common in the upper layer of forest and grassland soils. Many basidiomycetes belong to the white-rot fungi (WRF) and litter-decomposing fungi (LDF). These fungi are considered to be the most efficient lignin degraders due to their nonspecific oxidizing enzymes: manganese peroxidase (MnP), lignin peroxidase (LiP) and laccase. Although bacteria dominate compost and participate in the turnover of HS, their ability to degrade stable macromolecules such as lignin and HS is limited. The overall objectives of this research were to corroborate biodegradation processes of HS by WRF. The specific objectives were: (i) To isolate, identify and characterize HS degrading WRF from biosolids (BS) compost; (ii) To study the biodegradation process of three types of HS, which differ in their structure, by WRF isolated from BS compost; and (iii) To investigate the mechanisms of HA degradation by WRF using two main approaches: (a) Study the physical and chemical analyses of the organic compounds obtained from direct fungal degradation of HA as well as elucidation of the relevant enzymatic reactions; and (b) Study the enzymatic and biochemical mechanisms involved during HA degradation. In order to study the capability of fungi to degrade HS, seventy fungal strains were isolated from biosolids (BS) compost. Two of the most active fungal species were identified based on rDNA sequences and designated Trametes sp. M23 and Phanerochaetesp., Y6

  12. The Notion of Substance in Physical Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanzandt, Joseph David

    The thesis explores the philosophical consequences of adopting the view that the principle of non-contradiction, the principle of sufficient reason, and the monistic notion of substance are more closely linked than most modern and contemporary philosophers have supposed. This thesis is then applied to show the connections between the metaphysical views of Spinoza and the view of nature of Albert Einstein. The first chapter is an historical overview of the principles of sufficient reason and non-contradiction, and the notion of substance, followed by a presentation of the reasons that led the author to conclude that the usual treatment of these concepts requires revision. These reasons are based upon substantial cause theory, developed in the 1970s by Richard Cole. The second and third chapters are an interpretation of Book 1 of Spinoza's Ethics from the viewpoint presented in the first chapter. The implicit role of the principles of non-contradiction and sufficient reason in Spinoza's argument is drawn out through an examination of his definitions, axioms and propositions. The third and fourth chapters are an interpretation and criticism of Immanuel Kant. It is first shown that the common dismissal of Kant's philosophy based upon the discovery of non-Euclidean geometries and the denial of strict causality among some physical events is not well founded; ways in which Kant's framework can accommodate these problems are proposed. It is then argued that Kant's criticism of traditional metaphysics is not conclusive. In particular, Kant's arguments against the possibility of an ontological argument are examined and criticisms of his arguments are presented. The sixth and seventh chapters contain an historical account of the development of physics in the 20th century to illustrate the strong tendency toward unification found in science. It is suggested that this natural tendency to seek ever higher levels of unification is evidence that the principle of sufficient reason

  13. Prenatal Substance Use: Exploring Assumptions of Maternal Unfitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terplan, Mishka; Kennedy-Hendricks, Alene; Chisolm, Margaret S

    2015-01-01

    In spite of the growing knowledge and understanding of addiction as a chronic relapsing medical condition, individuals with substance use disorders (SUD) continue to experience stigmatization. Pregnant women who use substances suffer additional stigma as their use has the potential to cause fetal harm, calling into question their maternal fitness and often leading to punitive responses. Punishing pregnant women denies the integral interconnectedness of the maternal-fetal dyad. Linking substance use with maternal unfitness is not supported by the balance of the scientific evidence regarding the actual harms associated with substance use during pregnancy. Such linkage adversely impacts maternal, child, and family health by deterring pregnant women from seeking both obstetrical care and SUD treatment. Pregnant women who use substances deserve compassion and care, not pariah-status and punishment. PMID:26448685

  14. Subculture affiliation is associated with substance use of adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobakova, Daniela; Madarasova Geckova, Andrea; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; van Dijk, Jitse P

    2012-01-01

    Youth subcultures (hip-hop, punk, skinhead, techno scene, metal) are known for specific lifestyles, music preferences, shared values and behaviours of their members. The aim of this study was to assess the association between subculture affiliation and substance use (tobacco, alcohol and cannabis), and whether gender, family affluence and substance use by peers explain this association. Subculture affiliation was significantly associated with substance use (OR/95% CI: smoking 3.13/2.30-4.24; drinking 2.58/1.95-3.41; drunkenness 2.02/1.54-2.66; cannabis use 2.42/1.46-4.00). Only a part of this risk runs via gender, family affluence and peer substance use. Health promotion should be targeted in particular at adolescents with a subculture affiliation as they are at higher risk of substance use.

  15. Mood disorders and substance use disorder: a complex comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quello, Susan B; Brady, Kathleen T; Sonne, Susan C

    2005-12-01

    Mood disorders, including depression and bipolar disorders, are the most common psychiatric comorbidities among patients with substance use disorders. Treating patients' co-occurring mood disorders may reduce their substance craving and taking and enhance their overall outcomes. A methodical, staged screening and assessment can ease the diagnostic challenge of distinguishing symptoms of affective disorders from manifestations of substance intoxication and withdrawal. Treatment should maximize the use of psychotherapeutic interventions and give first consideration to medications proven effective in the context of co-occurring substance abuse. Expanded communication and collaboration between substance abuse and mental health providers is crucial to improving outcomes for patients with these complex, difficult co-occurring disorders. PMID:18552741

  16. Methodological issues in the assessment of substance use phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Michael C; Aggen, Steven H; Maes, Hermine H; Kubarych, Thomas S; Schmitt, J Eric

    2006-06-01

    The measurement of behavior is inherently problematic, and this is especially true of substance use and abuse phenotypes. The contingent nature of many assessments, such that symptoms of abuse and dependence cannot be obtained from those who have not initiated substance use, presents special difficulties. Furthermore, it is not clear whether individual differences in liability to use, abuse and dependence are best characterized as dimensions or classes or a combination of both. This article outlines research designs and methods suitable for quantifying liability to substance use. The value of data collected from relatives is emphasized in this context, as they permit identification of models normally compromised because data on, e.g., substance dependence symptoms, are systematically missing in those who have not initiated use of the substance in question. PMID:16723188

  17. Substance Use Correlates of Depression among African American Male Inmates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Rhonda Conerly; Braithwaite, Ronald L; Yancey, Elleen; Akintobi, Tabia; Stevens-Watkins, Danielle; Smith, Selina; Powell, C Lamonte

    2016-01-01

    Substance use correlates of depressive symptoms among incarcerated adult male African American substance users were examined in the current study. Frequency of drug use was assessed with 12 items specific to an individual's substance use. The Patient Depression Questionnaire (PHQ-9) was used to assess symptoms of depression. Approximately 90% of the sample displayed symptoms of depression ranging from minimal to severe. Regression models revealed that three substance use variables demonstrated a significant predictor of depression, including alcohol (β = .16, p= .03), hallucinogens (β =-.17, p =.021), and ecstasy (β =-.14, p= .05). The study findings indicate a need to consider the role of specific substances with regard to symptoms of depression. The results are discussed in the context of transition planning for jail inmates. PMID:27133518

  18. Use of psychoactive substances in students at a public university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meire Luci da Silva

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The use of psychoactive substances by the student population has been the object of various studies in Brazil. Objective: To determine the prevalence of substance use among students. Methods: Quantitative study with a closed questionnaire based on standardized assessment instruments was developed. It consists of questions related to types of psychoactive substance use, abuse, frequency and duration of use, self-criticism regarding the use, consequences of use in relation to health, and misdemeanors committed under the influence of psychoactive substances. The sample included the participation of 268 students. A total of 183 (68.3% questionnaires were analyzed, and only those with positive result for substance abuse at some point in life, the remainder, 85 (31% questionnaires, had negative responses to psychoactive substances. Results: Students’ responses to the two years surveyed indicated that the first psychoactive substance used was alcohol (77.9%, followed by tobacco use (10.9%, and marijuana (7.6%. Of the students surveyed, 145 (79.2% answered that still make use of psychoactive substances, and the current frequency of use varies from one or more times per week. When asked about the possibility of being or becoming drug addicts, 169 (92.3% responded that they are not or will not become dependent. Conclusion: The results indicate the high rate of substance use among college students surveyed, and point to their contradiction to consider such psychoactive substances harmful to their health.

  19. Substance-Abusing Parents in the Criminal Justice System: Does Substance Abuse Treatment Improve Their Children's Outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Susan D.; Gleeson, James P.; Waites-Garrett, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    The expansion of the criminal justice system over the last several decades helped to focus attention on children of incarcerated parents, many of whom have parents with substance abuse problems. Since the 1990's, a national grassroots campaign has been underway to make substance abuse treatment an alternative to incarceration for parents who…

  20. Antisocial Behavior and Psychoactive Substance Involvement among Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Caucasian Adolescents in Substance Abuse Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David G.; Brown, Sandra A.; Myers, Mark G.

    1997-01-01

    Compared conduct disorder behaviors and substance involvement of Hispanic (n=34) and non-Hispanic Caucasian (n=34) adolescents so as to determine pre-treatment problem behavior. Results indicate that non-Hispanic Caucasian youth were three times as likely to be diagnosed with conduct disorder prior to substance involvement than were their Hispanic…

  1. 75 FR 82408 - Center for Substance Abuse Prevention; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-30

    ... Administration, Center for Substance Abuse Prevention Drug Testing Advisory Board. Date/Time/Type: January 26... HUMAN SERVICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Center for Substance Abuse... Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Center for Substance Abuse......

  2. 77 FR 43344 - Center for Substance Abuse Prevention; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Center for Substance Abuse... Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's (SAMHSA) Center for Substance Abuse Prevention..., http://nac.samhsa.gov/ , or by contacting Matthew J. Aumen. Committee Name: Substance Abuse and...

  3. 78 FR 37560 - Center for Substance Abuse Prevention; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Center for Substance Abuse... Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's (SAMHSA) Center for Substance Abuse Prevention..., http://nac.samhsa.gov/ , or by contacting Matthew J. Aumen. Committee Name: Substance Abuse and...

  4. 78 FR 45545 - Center for Substance Abuse Prevention; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Center for Substance Abuse... Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's (SAMHSA) Center for Substance Abuse Prevention... meeting will also be available on the SAMHSA Web site after the meeting. Committee Name: Substance...

  5. Immigration and use of psychoactive substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Missouridou E.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the context of deep economic and socio-cultural crisis and the massive influx of immigrants in our country, health professionals are called to meet the needs of immigrants who use psychoactive substances. Purpose: This study aims at investigating the problematic use of alcohol and drugs by immigrants and addressing effectively their needs. Method: Study of Greek and international literature from online databases and journals. Conclusions: Acculturation stress, high degree of acculturation and acculturation gap between different generations of immigrants are associated with high rates of addiction. In the case of new immigrants, who are experiencing the acculturation gap to the previous generation as well as the difficulty to establish an identity that synthesizes elements from both cultures , the subculture of use is often a way of seeking support which they are unable to find in their family or other cultural groups. The efforts to provide culturally competent care require self-knowledge and awareness related to beliefs, attitudes, and stereotypes about the culturally different at a both personal and collective level (organizations, cultural groups, society.

  6. Naturally occurring toxic substances in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, R L; Newberne, P M

    1977-11-01

    Numerous chemical toxins, including normal components of natural foods, e.g., mycotoxins, and toxic chemicals as contaminants such as pesticides, fertilizers, food additives, and preservatives, which are potentially toxic to humans, are discussed. Potential toxicity, the hazard to man represented by most of these chemicals, may be low because the concentration in food may be low. The gap in our knowledge of long-term effects makes rational decisions as to allowable levels of these substances a major problem. On the other hand, nitrosamines and aflatoxins are toxins for which there exists a voluminous literature documentaing extreme biologic activity in experimental animals and indirect evidence for activity in man. Epidemiologic evidence has linked them to human cancers, and because of increasing evidence of long-term human exposure to these toxins either as inadvertent contaminants during food preparation or as the metabolites of mycotic infestation this possible hazard demands intensive investigation. An exhaustive review of data from epidemiologic surveys in various parts of the world, as well as from long-term laboratory studies, represents an impressive start in this direction.

  7. Adolescent substance use disorders and comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simkin, Deborah R

    2002-04-01

    It is imperative to know what risk factors are more likely to appear during specific developmental stages so that identification and interventions can be used to decrease the risk for future SUD. Continued surveying of risk factors that can occur at any stage in childhood are important to ensure that other risk factors are anticipated and intervened upon as well. Multiple risk factors increase the magnitude of the risk for SUD, and therefore all risk factors should be detected to convert these to protective factors. Screening instruments that can assess risk factors found to increase the risk for substance abuse can be found in examples, such as the Drug Usage Screening Instrument [81] and the Problem-Oriented Screening Instrument for Teenagers. The detection of risk factors by primary care providers is becoming increasingly important. However, other professionals are beginning to recognize that early recognition and treatment can enable a youth to go on to a productive life in other arenas as well. Drug courts and diversion programs are beginning to treat first-time offenders and their families rather than taking the punitive approach. These have proven to be very successful. Primary care physicians also should become familiar with motivational enhancement therapy when confronting a youth with a suspected substance abuse problem [57]. This method has proven to be more effective in getting youth into treatment than the direct, confrontational style, which often puts the youth in a defensive mode. Motivational enhancement therapy includes interventions that are delivered in a neutral and empathetic way. The six components of motivational enhancement therapy (also called FRAMES) include: Feedback on personal impairment Emphasis on personal responsibility Clear advice to change Menu of alternative options Empathy as a counseling style Self-efficacy In this way, a clinician can elicit pros and cons, give advice, provide choices, practice empathy, clarify goals, and

  8. Formation of 11-trans slow reacting substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atrache, V; Sok, D E; Pai, J K; Sih, C J

    1981-01-01

    Under strongly basic conditions [excess LiOH, dimethoxyethane/water (4:1, vol/vol)], purified slow reacting substances (SRSs) SRS-GSH and SRS-Cys were not isomerized to their corresponding 11-trans isomers. However, addition of thiols such as glutathione (GSH) or L-cysteine to this basic medium produced various amounts of 11-trans-SRS, depending on the thiol concentration. This chemical isomerization was inhibited by the radical scavenger 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinooxy free radical (HTMP); the inhibition suggests that the thiyl radical (RS) is added reversibly to the triene system at C-12, resulting in the overall cis leads to trans isomerization of the 11,12 double bond. Because the amount of 11-trans-SRS-Cys produced by intact rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-1) cells was consistently higher than the amount produced in boiled cells, we believe that intact RBL-1 cells contain enzyme systems that form peroxides, which are known to enhance the formation of thiyl radicals, required for cis leads to trans isomerization. Likewise, HTMP inhibited the formation of 11-trans-SRS-Cys in this cell system. PMID:6112746

  9. Positron Annihilation in Medical Substances of Insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzak, R.; Szatanik, R.

    2005-05-01

    Positrons lifetimes were measured in medical substances of insulin (human and animal), differing as far as the degree of purity and time of their activity in the organism are concerned. In all of the cases the spectrum of positron lifetime was distributed into three components, with the long-life component ranging from 1.8 to 2.08 ns and the intensity taking on values from 18 to 24%. Making use of Tao-Eldrup model, the average radius of the free volume, in which o-Ps annihilated, and the degree of filling in the volume were determined. It was found that the value of the long-life component for human insulin is higher than that of animal insulin. Moreover, the value of this component clearly depends on the manner of purification of the insulin. It was also noticed that there occurs a correlation between the value of this component and the time after which it begins to be active in the organism, as well as the total time of its activity.

  10. Tumour imaging with non specific substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short introduction concerning tumour imaging in nuclear medicine is given as well as the formulation of the problem treated in this thesis. In a literature review the most important tumour imaging radiopharmaceuticals used until now are described together with their clinical significance in the diagnosis of malignancy. The mechanism of uptake and subcellular distribution of most of the radiopharmaceuticals reviewed are discussed in chapter three with special reference to gallium-citrate. An ionic model to explain the distribution patterns of a number of these tumour imaging radiopharmaceuticals in normal and pathological tissues has been proposed. Evidence for the validity of this model is presented with specific reference to the ionic state of the reagents concerned. EXperimental evidence to support the proposed model is presented, with reference to the biologic behaviour of the radiopharmaceuticals in normal and pathological tissues. A limited number of selected case reports demonstrate how the results of the earlier described investigations can be applied to explain phenomena observed in clinical studies with ionic substances. The results obtained are discussed and the validity of the data with respect to the proposed model has been investigated. (Auth.)

  11. Adolescent substance use disorders and comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simkin, Deborah R

    2002-04-01

    It is imperative to know what risk factors are more likely to appear during specific developmental stages so that identification and interventions can be used to decrease the risk for future SUD. Continued surveying of risk factors that can occur at any stage in childhood are important to ensure that other risk factors are anticipated and intervened upon as well. Multiple risk factors increase the magnitude of the risk for SUD, and therefore all risk factors should be detected to convert these to protective factors. Screening instruments that can assess risk factors found to increase the risk for substance abuse can be found in examples, such as the Drug Usage Screening Instrument [81] and the Problem-Oriented Screening Instrument for Teenagers. The detection of risk factors by primary care providers is becoming increasingly important. However, other professionals are beginning to recognize that early recognition and treatment can enable a youth to go on to a productive life in other arenas as well. Drug courts and diversion programs are beginning to treat first-time offenders and their families rather than taking the punitive approach. These have proven to be very successful. Primary care physicians also should become familiar with motivational enhancement therapy when confronting a youth with a suspected substance abuse problem [57]. This method has proven to be more effective in getting youth into treatment than the direct, confrontational style, which often puts the youth in a defensive mode. Motivational enhancement therapy includes interventions that are delivered in a neutral and empathetic way. The six components of motivational enhancement therapy (also called FRAMES) include: Feedback on personal impairment Emphasis on personal responsibility Clear advice to change Menu of alternative options Empathy as a counseling style Self-efficacy In this way, a clinician can elicit pros and cons, give advice, provide choices, practice empathy, clarify goals, and

  12. Positron annihilation in medical substances of insulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positrons lifetimes were measured in medical substances of insulin (human and animal), differing as far as the degree of purity and time of their activity in the organism are concerned. In all of the cases the spectrum of positron lifetime was distributed into three components, with the long-life component ranging from 1.8 to 2.08 ns and the intensity taking on values from 18% to 24%. Making use of Tao-Eldrup model, the average radius of the free volume, in which o-Ps annihilated, and the degree of filling in the volume were determined. It was found that the value of the long-life component for human insulin is higher than that of animal insulin. Moreover, the value of this component clearly depends on the manner of purification of the insulin. It was also noticed that there occurs a correlation between the value of this component and the time after which it begins to be active in the organism, as well as the total time of its activity. (author)

  13. Substance abuse and developments in harm reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Y W

    2000-06-13

    A drug is a substance that produces a psychoactive, chemical or medicinal effect on the user. The psychoactive effect of mood-altering drugs is modulated by the user's perception of the risks of drug use, his or her ability to control drug use and the demographic, socioeconomic and cultural context. The ability to control drug use may vary along a continuum from compulsive use at one end to controlled use at the other. The "drug problem" has been socially constructed, and the presence of a moral panic has led to public support for the prohibitionist approach. The legalization approach has severely attacked the dominant prohibitionist approach but has failed to gain much support in society because of its extreme libertarian views. The harm reduction approach, which is based on public health principles, avoids the extremes of value-loaded judgements on drug use and focuses on the reduction of drug-related harm through pragmatic and low-threshold programs. This approach is likely to be important in tackling the drug problem in the 21st century.

  14. Integrated psychological treatment for substance use and co-morbid anxiety or depression vs. treatment for substance use alone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesse, Morten

    2009-01-01

    -analysis could be carried out for integrated treatment for anxiety and substance use disorders, due to multivariate reporting of outcomes in original articles. Integrated treatment for depression and substance abuse produced significant effects on percent days abstinent at follow-up. Differences in retention......Background There is a growing consensus in favour of integrated treatment of substance use disorders and co-morbid conditions, such as depression or anxiety. However, up till now no systematic reviews have been published. Methods Based on a systematic search of MedLine and PsychInfo, 10 trials...... of integrated treatment for depression or anxiety plus substance use disorder were identified. Where possible, meta-analyses were carried out, using random effects models. Results Meta-analyses were carried out for integrated treatment for depression and substance use disorders on a number of outcomes. No meta...

  15. Effects of humic substances on the migration of radionuclides: Complexation of actinides with humic substances. 1. progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present research programme is to study the complexation behaviour of actinide ions with humic substances in natural aquifer systems and hence to quantify the effect of humic substances on the actinide migration. Aquatic humic substances commonly found in all groundwaters in different concentrations have a strong tendency towards complexation with actinide ions. This is one of the major geochemical reactions but hitherto least quantified. Therefore, the effect of humic substances on the actinide migration is poorly understood. In the present research programme the complexation of actinide ions with humic substances will be described thermodynamically. This description will be based on a model being as simple as possible to allow an easy introduction of the resulting constants into geochemical modelling of the actinide migration. This programme is a continuation of the activities of the COCO group in the second phase of the CEC-MIRAGE project. (orig.)

  16. Substance Abuse among High-Risk Sexual Offenders: Do Measures of Lifetime History of Substance Abuse Add to the Prediction of Recidivism over Actuarial Risk Assessment Instruments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looman, Jan; Abracen, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    There has been relatively little research on the degree to which measures of lifetime history of substance abuse add to the prediction of risk based on actuarial measures alone among sexual offenders. This issue is of relevance in that a history of substance abuse is related to relapse to substance using behavior. Furthermore, substance use has…

  17. Just say know: an examination of substance use disorders among older adults in gerontological and substance abuse journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Daniel; Engel, Rafael J; Hunsaker, Amanda E; Engel, Yael; Detlefsen, Ellen Gay; Reynolds, Charles F

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the extent to which studies of alcohol abuse, illicit drug use, and prescription drug abuse among older adults appear in the leading gerontological and substance abuse journals. The authors reviewed articles published in the 10 social science gerontological journals and the 10 social science substance abuse journals with the highest 5-year impact factors in PubMed from 2000 to 2010. Articles were selected that presented original research on alcohol, substance, or prescription abuse with older adults aged 50 and older; and were identified through aging and substance abuse-related Medical Subject Headings and word searches of titles and abstracts (N = 634). Full text of each article was reviewed by the authors, and consensus determined inclusion in the final sample. Of the 19,953 articles published respectively in the top 10 gerontological and substance abuse journals, 181 articles met the inclusion criteria of reporting findings related to substance use disorders among older adults. Specifically, 0.9% (102 of 11,700) of articles from the top 10 gerontology journals and 1.0% (79 of 8,253) of articles from the top 10 substance abuse journals met the criteria. Most published articles addressed alcohol misuse/abuse or polysubstance abuse with few articles addressing illicit drug use or the misuse of prescription medications. Less than 1% of articles published in the 10 gerontology journals and the 10 substance abuse journals with the highest 5-year impact scores addressed substance abuse in older adults. Practitioners treating health and/or mental health problems are at a disadvantage in accurately identifying and treating these conditions in older adult populations without a proper understanding of the role of comorbid substance use disorders.

  18. Understanding the diverse needs of children whose parents abuse substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, Jessica M; Shadur, Julia M; Burns, Alison R; Hussong, Andrea M

    2012-06-01

    In this review, we consider the potential service needs of children of substance abusing parents based on what we know about the risk outcomes faced by these children and the parenting deficits often present in these families. Importantly, our review does not address the etiological role of parental substance abuse in children's negative outcomes but instead we discuss the complex inter-related risk factors that often co-occur with and exacerbate risk associated with parental alcohol and drug use. We first review studies showing the elevated risk that children of substance abusing parents face in general for poorer academic functioning; emotional, behavioral, and social problems; and an earlier onset of substance use, faster acceleration in substance use patterns, and higher rates of alcohol and drug use disorders. We then review studies showing contextual risk factors for children of substance abusing parents, including parenting deficits (less warmth, responsiveness, and physical and verbal engagement as well as harsher and more over-involved interaction styles), greater risk for child maltreatment, and less secure attachment patterns. We conclude with a discussion of future directions for research and guidelines for professionals working with children and their families where parental substance abuse is present. PMID:22455509

  19. The relationship between individual and family religiosity with substance abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepideh Makarem

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this research was to investigate the relationship between individual and family religiosity with substance abuse. In other side because of the importance of prevention and the role of people beliefs about the causes of substance use/ non-use in this area, the relationship between (university students’ beliefs about drug and their consequences with amount of the substance use was explored. Method: Study sample included 270 students (128 females and 142 males from the University of Shiraz that were selected by multistage cluster sampling. They completed religious orientation questionnaire, family religiosity questionnaire and drug questionnaire. Findings: Results indicated significant negative relationship between individual religiosity in general and amount of substance use .however, the relationship between drug use and family religiosity was not found. Also, there was significant negative correlation between believing the consequences (mostly physical and mental and rate of substance use. Results: According to this results, religious beliefs and considering the consequences of substance use play important role in reducing substance use.

  20. Conventional wisdom about familial contributions to substance abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blechman, E A

    1982-01-01

    Conventional social-science wisdom about the family background of substance abusers breaks down into three hypotheses. The broken home causes substance abuse; overprotective mothers with or without neglectful fathers cause substance abuse; substance abuse is reinforced by the changes it brings about in family interaction. The broke-home hypothesis attributes substance abuse to sheer absence of a parent, usually the father. The overprotective-mother hypothesis emphasizes the effect of indulgent, dominant mother behavior sometimes combined with ineffectual father behavior. The increased-control hypothesis emphasizes the effects of substance abuser, parents, and siblings on one another. Because investigations of these hypotheses are necessarily correlational, existing research on the family backgrounds of substance abusers suffers from methodological flaws characteristic of weak correlational designs. These hypotheses are logical extensions of Freudian theory, early social-learning theory, and revised social-learning theory respectively. Assumptions that pertinent aspects of the more general theories have been upheld by empirical investigation are not justified. PMID:7171072

  1. The existing state of sewage sludge containing radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive substances were discharged over a wide range from the accident of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Station of Tokyo Electric Power Company. As a result, in sewer system, especially in the combined sewer system that jointly collects rainwater and sewage, radioactive substances accumulated on the surface of urban areas were transferred together with rainwater to sewage plants and accumulated there. In the process of further treatment, radioactive substances were transferred to and concentrated in sewage sludge, and a high concentration of radioactive substances were detected in incineration ash. For this reason, some sewage plants still continuously store dewatered sludge, incinerator ash, etc. This paper introduces the current state of waste treatment from the published data from each local government in Tohoku and Kanto districts. As for the sewer, which is essential as a lifeline, the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism, together with the Japan Sewage Works Association, established 'Investigative Commission on Radioactive Substance Countermeasures in Sewerage System.' This group grasped the damage situation due to radioactive substances, and summarized the measures to be taken by sewage managers, such as the storage method for sewage sludge containing radioactive substances as well as the method for the volume reduction of sewage sludge. (O.A.)

  2. Understanding the diverse needs of children whose parents abuse substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, Jessica M; Shadur, Julia M; Burns, Alison R; Hussong, Andrea M

    2012-06-01

    In this review, we consider the potential service needs of children of substance abusing parents based on what we know about the risk outcomes faced by these children and the parenting deficits often present in these families. Importantly, our review does not address the etiological role of parental substance abuse in children's negative outcomes but instead we discuss the complex inter-related risk factors that often co-occur with and exacerbate risk associated with parental alcohol and drug use. We first review studies showing the elevated risk that children of substance abusing parents face in general for poorer academic functioning; emotional, behavioral, and social problems; and an earlier onset of substance use, faster acceleration in substance use patterns, and higher rates of alcohol and drug use disorders. We then review studies showing contextual risk factors for children of substance abusing parents, including parenting deficits (less warmth, responsiveness, and physical and verbal engagement as well as harsher and more over-involved interaction styles), greater risk for child maltreatment, and less secure attachment patterns. We conclude with a discussion of future directions for research and guidelines for professionals working with children and their families where parental substance abuse is present.

  3. Security and health protection during the transport of hazardous substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The introduction of this work describes the legal regulations which regulate the conditions and method of the transport of hazardous substances, necessary documentation for storage, forwarding and transport. Hazardous substances are defined and classified according to the ADR. The necessary security measures which are taken for the transport of particular types of hazardous substances are mentioned. Marking and labeling of vehicles for the transport of hazardous substances (plates and lists of hazards), packing and marking of packaging is important. The safety measures which are taken at the filling stations of combustible liquids as well as places specially organized for filling, prohibitions and limitations and necessary transport documentation are mentioned. It is visible from the above mentioned that the activity of the whole security chain is necessary and depends on the good knowledge of basic characteristics and features of substances. All the participants in the security chain have to be familiar with and consistently obey the legal regulations. The manufacturer must know the features of the hazardous substance, supervisory services must be acquainted with the threat and potential danger. The hauler and intervention forces must, in case of accidents and damage, be familiar with the emergency procedures in case of accidents and act properly regarding the threatening dangerous substance.(author)

  4. Persistent toxic substances in Mediterranean aquatic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miniero, Roberto; Abate, Vittorio; Brambilla, Gianfranco; Davoli, Enrico; De Felip, Elena; De Filippis, Stefania P; Dellatte, Elena; De Luca, Silvia; Fanelli, Roberto; Fattore, Elena; Ferri, Fabiola; Fochi, Igor; Rita Fulgenzi, Anna; Iacovella, Nicola; Iamiceli, Anna Laura; Lucchetti, Dario; Melotti, Paolo; Moret, Ivo; Piazza, Rossano; Roncarati, Alessandra; Ubaldi, Alessandro; Zambon, Stefano; di Domenico, Alessandro

    2014-10-01

    Fish and fishery products may represent one of the main sources of dietary exposure to persistent toxic substances (PTSs) such as polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, dibenzofurans, and biphenyls; polybromodiphenyl ethers; organochlorine pesticides; perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluorooctane sulfonate; and inorganic mercury and methyl mercury. In this study, PTS contamination of Mediterranean fish and crustaceans caught in Italian coastal waters was investigated in order to increase the representativeness of the occurrence database for wild species. The objectives were to verify the suitability of regulatory limits for PTSs, identify background concentrations values, if any, and examine the possible sources of variability when assessing the chemical body burdens of aquatic species. Twelve wild species of commercial interest and two farmed fish species were chosen. Excluding methyl mercury, chemical concentrations found in wild species fell generally towards the low ends of the concentration ranges found in Europe according to EFSA database and were quite lower than the tolerable maximum levels established in the European Union; farmed fish always showed contamination levels quite lower than those detected in wild species. The data obtained for wild species seemed to confirm the absence of local sources of contamination in the chosen sampling areas; however, species contamination could exceed regulatory levels even in the absence of specific local sources of contamination as a result of the position in the food web and natural variability in species' lifestyle. A species-specific approach to the management of contamination in aquatic organisms is therefore suggested as an alternative to a general approach based only on contaminant body burden. A chemical-specific analysis performed according to organism position in the food chain strengthened the need to develop this approach. PMID:25020099

  5. Substance P modulates colitis-associated fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koon, Hon Wai; Shih, David; Karagiannides, Iordanes; Zhao, Dezheng; Fazelbhoy, Zafeer; Hing, Tressia; Xu, Hua; Lu, Bao; Gerard, Norma; Pothoulakis, Charalabos

    2010-11-01

    Substance P (SP) and the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R) are involved in the development of colitis and mucosal healing after colonic inflammation. We studied whether SP modulates colonic fibrosis by using a chronic model of trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in wild-type (WT) and NK-1R-deficient (NK-1R KD) mice. We found increased mRNA expression levels of collagen, vimentin, and the fibrogenic factors transforming growth factor β1 and insulin-like growth factor 1 in the chronically inflamed colons of WT mice treated with repeated intracolonic TNBS administrations. Fibrosis in TNBS-treated mice was also evident immunohistochemically by collagen deposition in the colon. Treatment of TNBS-exposed WT mice with the NK-1R antagonist CJ-12255 reduced colonic inflammation, colonic fibrosis, fibroblast accumulation, and expression levels of the fibrogenic factors. NK-1R knockout mice chronically exposed to TNBS had similar colonic inflammation compared with WT, but reduced colonic fibrosis, fibroblast accumulation, and expression levels of fibrogenic factors. Immunohistochemical staining also showed co-localization of NK-1R with fibroblasts in inflamed colons of mice and in colonic mucosa of patients with Crohn's disease. Exposure of human colonic CCD-18Co fibroblasts to SP (10 nmol/L) increased cell migration. SP stimulated collagen synthesis in CCD-18Co fibroblasts in the presence of transforming growth factor β1 and insulin-like growth factor 1, and this effect was reduced by Akt inhibition. Thus, SP, via NK-1R, promotes intestinal fibrogenesis after chronic colitis by stimulating fibrotic responses in fibroblasts. PMID:20889569

  6. Persistent toxic substances in Mediterranean aquatic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miniero, Roberto; Abate, Vittorio; Brambilla, Gianfranco; Davoli, Enrico; De Felip, Elena; De Filippis, Stefania P; Dellatte, Elena; De Luca, Silvia; Fanelli, Roberto; Fattore, Elena; Ferri, Fabiola; Fochi, Igor; Rita Fulgenzi, Anna; Iacovella, Nicola; Iamiceli, Anna Laura; Lucchetti, Dario; Melotti, Paolo; Moret, Ivo; Piazza, Rossano; Roncarati, Alessandra; Ubaldi, Alessandro; Zambon, Stefano; di Domenico, Alessandro

    2014-10-01

    Fish and fishery products may represent one of the main sources of dietary exposure to persistent toxic substances (PTSs) such as polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, dibenzofurans, and biphenyls; polybromodiphenyl ethers; organochlorine pesticides; perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluorooctane sulfonate; and inorganic mercury and methyl mercury. In this study, PTS contamination of Mediterranean fish and crustaceans caught in Italian coastal waters was investigated in order to increase the representativeness of the occurrence database for wild species. The objectives were to verify the suitability of regulatory limits for PTSs, identify background concentrations values, if any, and examine the possible sources of variability when assessing the chemical body burdens of aquatic species. Twelve wild species of commercial interest and two farmed fish species were chosen. Excluding methyl mercury, chemical concentrations found in wild species fell generally towards the low ends of the concentration ranges found in Europe according to EFSA database and were quite lower than the tolerable maximum levels established in the European Union; farmed fish always showed contamination levels quite lower than those detected in wild species. The data obtained for wild species seemed to confirm the absence of local sources of contamination in the chosen sampling areas; however, species contamination could exceed regulatory levels even in the absence of specific local sources of contamination as a result of the position in the food web and natural variability in species' lifestyle. A species-specific approach to the management of contamination in aquatic organisms is therefore suggested as an alternative to a general approach based only on contaminant body burden. A chemical-specific analysis performed according to organism position in the food chain strengthened the need to develop this approach.

  7. Research on substances with activity against orthopoxviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Kołodziej

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Although smallpox was eradicated over 30 years ago, the disease remains a major threat. High mortality, high infectivity and low resistance of the contemporary population make the smallpox virus very attractive to terrorists. The possible presence of illegal stocks of the virus or risk of deliberate genetic modifications cause serious concerns among experts. Hence, it is reasonable to seek effective drugs that could be used in case of smallpox outbreak. This paper reviews studies on compounds with proven in vitro or in vivo antipoxviruses potential, which show various mechanisms of action. Nucleoside analogues, such as cidofovir, can inhibit virus replication. Cidofovir derivatives are developed to improve the bioavailability of the drug. Among the nucleoside analogues under current investigation are: ANO (adenozine N[sub]1[/sub]-oxide and its derivatives, N-methanocarbothymidine [(N-MCT], or derivatitives of aciklovir, peninclovir and brivudin. Recently, ST-246 – which effectively inhibits infection by limiting release of progeny virions – has become an object of attention. It has been also been demonstrated that compounds such as: nigericin, aptamers and peptides may have antiviral potential. An interesting strategy to fight infections was presented in experiments aimed at defining the role of individual genes (E3L, K3L or C6L in the pathogenesis, and looking for their potential blockers. Additionally, among substances considered to be effective in the treatment of smallpox cases, there are factors that can block viral inhibitors of the human complement system, epidermal growth factor inhibitors or immunomodulators. Further studies on compounds with activity against poxviruses are necessary in order to broaden the pool of available means that could be used in the case of a new outbreak of smallpox.

  8. Motivation and Contingency Management Treatments for Substance Use Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Kimberly N; Petry, Nancy M

    2016-01-01

    Contingency management (CM) is a highly efficacious psychosocial treatment for substance use disorders based on the principles of behavioral analysis. CM involves delivering a tangible positive reinforcer following objective evidence of submission of a drug-negative urine sample. Although CM interventions primarily involve applying extrinsic rewards, a patient's intrinsic motivation to change substance use behavior may also be impacted by CM. This chapter provides an introduction to CM interventions for substance use disorders and examines the impact of CM on intrinsic motivation . It also addresses applications of this intervention to other conditions and patient populations. PMID:25762429

  9. Interaction of humic substances and hematite: FTIR study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Hong-bo; QUAN Xie; CHEN Shuo; ZHAO Hui-min; ZHAO Ya-zhi

    2005-01-01

    The present work extended the knowledge on the binding and complexation of humic substances( humic acid or fulvic acid) and hematite by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy( FTIR). The FTIR data gained gave the consist evidences by two different sampling preparation methods that the interaction mechanism between humic substances and hematite was mainly conform to the ligand-exchange involving carboxylic functional groups of humic substances and the surfaces sites of hematite. The present method, although associated with some uncertainties, provided an opportunity to increase the knowledge in this field.

  10. 78 FR 45167 - National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan; National Priorities List...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 300 National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan; National... appendix of the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP). The EPA and the... protection, Air pollution control, Chemicals, Hazardous waste, Hazardous substances,...

  11. 76 FR 30081 - National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan; National Priorities List...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 300 National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan; National... (CERCLA) of 1980, as amended, is an appendix of the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution... protection, Air pollution control, Chemicals, Hazardous waste, Hazardous substances,...

  12. 78 FR 60721 - National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan; National Priorities List...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 300 National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan; National... B of 40 CFR Part 300, which is the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan... substances, Intergovernmental relations, Natural resources, Oil pollution, Penalties, Reporting...

  13. 78 FR 49993 - National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan; National Priorities List...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 300 National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan; National..., as amended, is an appendix of the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan... pollution control, Chemicals, Hazardous waste, Hazardous substances, Intergovernmental relations,...

  14. Substance P and substance K receptor binding sites in the human gastrointestinal tract: localization by autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, T.S.; Zimmerman, R.P.; Mantyh, C.R.; Vigna, S.R.; Maggio, J.E.; Welton, M.L.; Passaro, E.P. Jr.; Mantyh, P.W.

    1988-11-01

    Quantitative receptor autoradiography was used to localize and quantify the distribution of binding sites for /sup 125/I-radiolabeled substance P (SP), substance K (SK) and neuromedin K (NK) in the human GI tract using histologically normal tissue obtained from uninvolved margins of resections for carcinoma. The distribution of SP and SK binding sites is different for each gastrointestinal (GI) segment examined. Specific SP binding sites are expressed by arterioles and venules, myenteric plexus, external circular muscle, external longitudinal muscle, muscularis mucosa, epithelial cells of the mucosa, and the germinal centers of lymph nodules. SK binding sites are distributed in a pattern distinct from SP binding sites and are localized to the external circular muscle, external longitudinal muscle, and the muscularis mucosa. Binding sites for NK were not detected in any part of the human GI tract. These results demonstrate that: (1) surgical specimens from the human GI tract can be effectively processed for quantitative receptor autoradiography; (2) of the three mammalian tachykinins tested, SP and SK, but not NK binding sites are expressed in detectable levels in the human GI tract; (3) whereas SK receptor binding sites are expressed almost exclusively by smooth muscle, SP binding sites are expressed by smooth muscle cells, arterioles, venules, epithelial cells of the mucosa and cells associated with lymph nodules; and (4) both SP and SK binding sites expressed by smooth muscle are more stable than SP binding sites expressed by blood vessels, lymph nodules, and mucosal cells.

  15. 75 FR 44929 - Request for Information Regarding Workplace Substance Abuse Programs for Department of Energy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-30

    ... substance abuse programs (57 FR 32652). The rule established minimum requirements for DOE contractors and... workplace substance abuse programs for its contactor. The Department urges those individuals interested...

  16. 76 FR 21915 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-19

    ... listed controlled substance in bulk ] active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) form. There are no domestic... Federal Register on September 23, 1975, 40 FR 43745-46, all applicants for registration to import a...

  17. 75 FR 53720 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ... classes of controlled substances listed in schedules I and II: Drug Schedule Marihuana (7360) I... distribution to its customers. In reference to drug code 7360 (Marihuana), the company plans to...

  18. Peripheral Mechanisms of Dental Pain: The Role of Substance P

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Sacerdote

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Current evidence supports the central role of neuropeptides in the molecular mechanisms underlying dental pain. In particular, substance P, a neuropeptide produced in neuron cell bodies localised in dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia, contributes to the transmission and maintenance of noxious stimuli and inflammatory processes. The major role of substance P in the onset of dental pain and inflammation is increasingly being recognised. Well-grounded experimental and clinical observations have documented an increase in substance P concentration in patients affected by caries, pulpitis, or granulomas and in those undergoing standard orthodontic or orthodontic/dental care procedures. This paper focuses on the role of substance P in the induction and maintenance of inflammation and dental pain, in order to define future lines of research for the evaluation of therapeutic strategies aimed at modulating the complex effects of this mediator in oral tissues.

  19. Peripheral mechanisms of dental pain: the role of substance P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacerdote, Paola; Levrini, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Current evidence supports the central role of neuropeptides in the molecular mechanisms underlying dental pain. In particular, substance P, a neuropeptide produced in neuron cell bodies localised in dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia, contributes to the transmission and maintenance of noxious stimuli and inflammatory processes. The major role of substance P in the onset of dental pain and inflammation is increasingly being recognised. Well-grounded experimental and clinical observations have documented an increase in substance P concentration in patients affected by caries, pulpitis, or granulomas and in those undergoing standard orthodontic or orthodontic/dental care procedures. This paper focuses on the role of substance P in the induction and maintenance of inflammation and dental pain, in order to define future lines of research for the evaluation of therapeutic strategies aimed at modulating the complex effects of this mediator in oral tissues.

  20. Substance use during pregnancy [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariadna Forray

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Prenatal substance use is a critical public health concern that is linked with several harmful maternal and fetal consequences. The most frequently used substance in pregnancy is tobacco, followed by alcohol, cannabis and other illicit substances. Unfortunately, polysubstance use in pregnancy is common, as well as psychiatric comorbidity, environmental stressors, and limited and disrupted parental care, all of which can compound deleterious maternal and fetal outcomes. There are few existing treatments for prenatal substance use and these mainly comprise behavioral and psychosocial interventions. Contingency management has been shown to be the most efficacious of these. The purpose of this review is to examine the recent literature on the prenatal use of tobacco, alcohol, cannabis, stimulants, and opioids, including the effects of these on maternal and fetal health and the current therapeutic options.