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Sample records for anti-malarial treatment evidence

  1. A retrospective analysis of the change in anti-malarial treatment policy: Peru

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    Vincent-Mark Arlene

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background National malaria control programmes must deal with the complex process of changing national malaria treatment guidelines, often without guidance on the process of change. Selecting a replacement drug is only one issue in this process. There is a paucity of literature describing successful malaria treatment policy changes to help guide control programs through this process. Objectives To understand the wider context in which national malaria treatment guidelines were formulated in a specific country (Peru. Methods Using qualitative methods (individual and focus group interviews, stakeholder analysis and a review of documents, a retrospective analysis of the process of change in Peru's anti-malarial treatment policy from the early 1990's to 2003 was completed. Results The decision to change Peru's policies resulted from increasing levels of anti-malarial drug resistance, as well as complaints from providers that the drugs were no longer working. The context of the change occurred in a time in which Peru was changing national governments, which created extreme challenges in moving the change process forward. Peru utilized a number of key strategies successfully to ensure that policy change would occur. This included a having the process directed by a group who shared a common interest in malaria and who had long-established social and professional networks among themselves, b engaging in collaborative teamwork among nationals and between nationals and international collaborators, c respect for and inclusion of district-level staff in all phases of the process, d reliance on high levels of technical and scientific knowledge, e use of standardized protocols to collect data, and f transparency. Conclusion Although not perfectly or fully implemented by 2003, the change in malaria treatment policy in Peru occurred very quickly, as compared to other countries. They identified a problem, collected the data necessary to justify the

  2. Co-treatment with the anti-malarial drugs mefloquine and primaquine highly sensitizes drug-resistant cancer cells by increasing P-gp inhibition.

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    Kim, Ju-Hwa; Choi, Ae-Ran; Kim, Yong Kee; Yoon, Sungpil

    2013-11-22

    The purpose of this study was to identify conditions that will increase the sensitivity of resistant cancer cells to anti-mitotic drugs. Currently, atovaquine (ATO), chloroquine (CHL), primaquine (PRI), mefloquine (MEF), artesunate (ART), and doxycycline (DOY) are the most commonly used anti-malarial drugs. Herein, we tested whether anti-malarial drugs can sensitize drug-resistant KBV20C cancer cells. None of the six tested anti-malarial drugs was found to better sensitize the drug-resistant cells compared to the sensitive KB cells. With an exception of DOY, all other anti-malarial drugs tested could sensitize both KB and KBV20C cells to a similar extent, suggesting that anti-malarial drugs could be used for sensitive as well as resistant cancer cells. Furthermore, we examined the effects of anti-malarial drugs in combination with an antimitotic drug, vinblastine (VIN) on the sensitisation of resistant KBV20C cells. Using viability assay, microscopic observation, assessment of cleaved PARP, and Hoechst staining, we identified that two anti-malarial drugs, PRI and MEF, highly sensitized KBV20C-resistant cells to VIN treatment. Moreover, PRI- or MEF-induced sensitisation was not observed in VIN-treated sensitive KB parent cells, suggesting that the observed effect is specific to resistant cancer cells. We demonstrated that the PRI and MEF sensitisation mechanism mainly depends on the inhibition of p-glycoprotein (P-gp). Our findings may contribute to the development of anti-malarial drug-based combination therapies for patients resistant to anti-mitotic drugs.

  3. Multiple treatment comparisons in a series of anti-malarial trials with an ordinal primary outcome and repeated treatment evaluations

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    Youdom Solange

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACT are widely used in African countries, including Cameroon. Between 2005 and 2007, five randomized studies comparing different treatment arms among artesunate-amodiaquine and other ACT were conducted in Cameroonian children aged two to 60 months who had uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. In these studies, the categorical criterion proposed by the World Health Organization (WHO to assess the relative effectiveness of anti-malarial drugs was repeatedly evaluated on Days 14, 21 and 28 after treatment initiation. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of different treatments on this repeated ordinal outcome, hence using the fully available information. Methods The quantitative synthesis was based on individual patient data. Due to the incomplete block design concerning treatment arms between different trials, a mixed treatment comparison (MTC meta-analysis approach was adopted. The repeated ordinal outcome was modelled through a latent variable, as a proportional odds mixed model with trial, period and treatment arms as covariates. The model was further complexified to account for the variance heterogeneity, and the individual log-residual variance was modelled as a linear mixed model, as well. The effects of individual covariates at inclusion, such as parasitaemia, fever, gender and weight, were also tested. Model parameters were estimated using a Bayesian approach via the WinBUGS software. After selecting the best model using Deviance Information Criterion (DIC, mixed treatment comparisons were based on the estimated treatment effects. Results Modeling the residual variance improved the model ability to adjust the data. The results showed that, compared to artesunate-amodiaquine (ASAQ, dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHPP was significantly more efficacious. Artesunate-chlorproguanil-dapsone (ASCD was less efficacious than artesunate

  4. Case management of malaria fever in Cambodia: results from national anti-malarial outlet and household surveys

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    Littrell Megan

    2011-10-01

    market shows favourable progress towards replacing artemisinin monotherapies with ACT, the widespread use of drug cocktails to treat malaria is a barrier to effective case management. Significant achievements have been made in availability of diagnostic testing and effective treatment in the public and private sectors. However, interventions to improve case management are urgently required, particularly in the private sector. Evidence-based interventions that target provider and consumer behaviour are needed to support uptake of diagnostic testing and treatment with full-course first-line anti-malarials.

  5. Review of pyronaridine anti-malarial properties and product characteristics

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    Croft Simon L

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pyronaridine was synthesized in 1970 at the Institute of Chinese Parasitic Disease and has been used in China for over 30 years for the treatment of malaria. Pyronaridine has high potency against Plasmodium falciparum, including chloroquine-resistant strains. Studies in various animal models have shown pyronaridine to be effective against strains resistant to other anti-malarials, including chloroquine. Resistance to pyronaridine appears to emerge slowly and is further retarded when pyronaridine is used in combination with other anti-malarials, in particular, artesunate. Pyronaridine toxicity is generally less than that of chloroquine, though evidence of embryotoxicity in rodents suggests use with caution in pregnancy. Clinical pharmacokinetic data for pyronaridine indicates an elimination T1/2 of 13.2 and 9.6 days, respectively, in adults and children with acute uncomplicated falciparum and vivax malaria in artemisinin-combination therapy. Clinical data for mono or combined pyronaridine therapy show excellent anti-malarial effects against P. falciparum and studies of combination therapy also show promise against Plasmodium vivax. Pyronaridine has been developed as a fixed dose combination therapy, in a 3:1 ratio, with artesunate for the treatment of acute uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria and blood stage P. vivax malaria with the name of Pyramax® and has received Positive Opinion by European Medicines Agency under the Article 58 procedure.

  6. The ACTwatch project: methods to describe anti-malarial markets in seven countries

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    Chapman Steven

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Policy makers, governments and donors are faced with an information gap when considering ways to improve access to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT and malaria diagnostics including rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs. To help address some of these gaps, a five-year multi-country research project called ACTwatch was launched. The project is designed to provide a comprehensive picture of the anti-malarial market to inform national and international anti-malarial drug policy decision-making. Methods The project is being conducted in seven malaria-endemic countries: Benin, Cambodia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Madagascar, Nigeria, Uganda and Zambia from 2008 to 2012. ACTwatch measures which anti-malarials are available, where they are available and at what price and who they are used by. These indicators are measured over time and across countries through three study components: outlet surveys, supply chain studies and household surveys. Nationally representative outlet surveys examine the market share of different anti-malarials passing through public facilities and private retail outlets. Supply chain research provides a picture of the supply chain serving drug outlets, and measures mark-ups at each supply chain level. On the demand side, nationally representative household surveys capture treatment seeking patterns and use of anti-malarial drugs, as well as respondent knowledge of anti-malarials. Discussion The research project provides findings on both the demand and supply side determinants of anti-malarial access. There are four key features of ACTwatch. First is the overlap of the three study components where nationally representative data are collected over similar periods, using a common sampling approach. A second feature is the number and diversity of countries that are studied which allows for cross-country comparisons. Another distinguishing feature is its ability to measure trends over time. Finally, the

  7. Anti-malarial Drug Design by Targeting Apicoplasts: New Perspectives

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    Avinaba Mukherjee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Malaria has been a major global health problem in recent times with increasing mortality. Current treatment methods include parasiticidal drugs and vaccinations. However, resistance among malarial parasites to the existing drugs has emerged as a significant area of concern in anti-malarial drug design. Researchers are now desperately looking for new targets to develop anti-malarials drug which is more target specific. Malarial parasites harbor a plastid-like organelle known as the ‘apicoplast’, which is thought to provide an exciting new outlook for the development of drugs to be used against the parasite. This review elaborates on the current state of development of novel compounds targeted againstemerging malaria parasites. Methods: The apicoplast, originates by an endosymbiotic process, contains a range of metabolic pathways and housekeeping processes that differ from the host body and thereby presents ideal strategies for anti-malarial drug therapy. Drugs are designed by targeting the unique mechanism of the apicoplasts genetic machinery. Several anabolic and catabolic processes, like fatty acid, isopenetyl diphosphate and heme synthess in this organelle, have also been targeted by drugs. Results: Apicoplasts offer exciting opportunities for the development of malarial treatment specific drugs have been found to act by disrupting this organelle’s function, which wouldimpede the survival of the parasite. Conclusion: Recent advanced drugs, their modes of action, and their advantages in the treatment of malaria by using apicoplasts as a target are discussed in this review which thought to be very useful in desigining anti-malarial drugs. Targetting the genetic machinery of apicoplast shows a great advantange regarding anti-malarial drug design. Critical knowledge of these new drugs would give a healthier understanding for deciphering the mechanism of action of anti-malarial drugs when targeting apicoplasts to overcome drug

  8. High prevalence of pfdhfr-pfdhps triple mutations associated with anti-malarial drugs resistance in Plasmodium falciparum isolates seven years after the adoption of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine in combination with artesunate as first-line treatment in Iran.

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    Rouhani, Maryam; Zakeri, Sedigheh; Pirahmadi, Sakineh; Raeisi, Ahmad; Djadid, Navid Dinparast

    2015-04-01

    The spread of anti-malarial drug resistance will challenge any malaria control and elimination strategies, and routine monitoring of resistance-associated molecular markers of commonly used anti-malarial drugs is very important. Therefore, in the present investigation, the extent of mutations/haplotypes in dhfr and dhps genes of Plasmodium falciparum isolates (n=72) was analyzed seven years after the introduction of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) plus artesunate (AS) as first-line anti-malarial treatment in Iran using PCR-RFLP methods. The results showed that the majority of the patients (97.2%) carried both 59R and 108N mutations in pure form with wild-type genotype at positions N51 and I164. Additionally, a significant increase (Pdrug for treatment of falciparum patients in these malaria-endemic areas of Iran. However, no quintuple mutations associated with treatment failure were detected. In conclusion, the present results along with in vivo assays suggest that seven years after the adoption of SP-AS as the first-line treatment in Iran, this drug remains efficacious for treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria, as a partner drug with AS in these malaria-endemic areas.

  9. Atovaquone and quinine anti-malarials inhibit ATP binding cassette transporter activity

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    Rijpma, S.R.; Heuvel, J.J.; Velden, M. van der; Sauerwein, R.W.; Russel, F.G.; Koenderink, J.B.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Therapeutic blood plasma concentrations of anti-malarial drugs are essential for successful treatment. Pharmacokinetics of pharmaceutical compounds are dependent of adsorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion. ATP binding cassette (ABC) transport proteins are particularly involve

  10. Therapeutic and prophylactic effect of intermittent preventive anti-malarial treatment in infants (IPTi from Ghana and Gabon

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    Kreuels Benno

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intermittent preventive treatment in infants (IPTi with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP reduces the incidence of malaria episodes in young children. The exact mechanism by which the protective effect is mediated needs to be defined. This study aimed to investigate therapeutic, prophylactic, and possible exceeding effects of SP-based IPTi in two clinical trials. Methods Protective efficacies from two IPTi trials performed in Kumasi, Ghana, and Lambaréné, Gabon, were assessed for overlapping time series of 61 days. For six-months periods after each of three IPTi doses a multivariate Poisson regression model with the respective cohort as co-variate was generated and effect modification of protective efficacy with time strata was evaluated by log-likelihood tests. Results Protective efficacies were not significantly different between the two study cohorts. Study-cohort corrected protective efficacy was highest for the first 61 days after each IPTi application and decreased continuously. For the first 61 days after IPTi-1, IPTi-2, and IPTi-3 the protective efficacy was 71%, 44%, and 43%, respectively. A reduction of the malaria incidence rate was detectable for the first 60, 30 and 40 days after IPTi-1, IPTi-2 and IPTi-3 drug application, respectively. After IPTi-3 a higher risk for malaria could be seen after day 60. This effect was mainly based on the overwhelming influence of the Kumasi cohort. Conclusion The results suggest that SP-based IPTi mainly works through a therapeutic and prophylactic effect over 30 to 60 days after drug application and that a sustained effect beyond post-treatment prophylaxis might be very low. Trial registration Data analysis from clinical trials NCT ID # 00206739 (Kumasi Trial and NCT ID # 00167843 (Lambaréné Trial, http://www.clinicaltrials.gov.

  11. Got ACTs? Availability, price, market share and provider knowledge of anti-malarial medicines in public and private sector outlets in six malaria-endemic countries

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    O'Connell Kathryn A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT is the first-line malaria treatment throughout most of the malaria-endemic world. Data on ACT availability, price and market share are needed to provide a firm evidence base from which to assess the current situation concerning quality-assured ACT supply. This paper presents supply side data from ACTwatch outlet surveys in Benin, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC, Madagascar, Nigeria, Uganda and Zambia. Methods Between March 2009 and June 2010, nationally representative surveys of outlets providing anti-malarials to consumers were conducted. A census of all outlets with the potential to provide anti-malarials was conducted in clusters sampled randomly. Results 28,263 outlets were censused, 51,158 anti-malarials were audited, and 9,118 providers interviewed. The proportion of public health facilities with at least one first-line quality-assured ACT in stock ranged between 43% and 85%. Among private sector outlets stocking at least one anti-malarial, non-artemisinin therapies, such as chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, were widely available (> 95% of outlets as compared to first-line quality-assured ACT ( Conclusions These standardized, nationally representative results demonstrate the typically low availability, low market share and high prices of ACT, in the private sector where most anti-malarials are accessed, with some exceptions. The results confirm that there is substantial room to improve availability and affordability of ACT treatment in the surveyed countries. The data will also be useful for monitoring the impact of interventions such as the Affordable Medicines Facility for malaria.

  12. Does anti-malarial drug knowledge predict anti-malarial dispensing practice in drug outlets? A survey of medicine retailers in western Kenya

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    Rusk Andria

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Kenya, where it is the fifth leading cause of death in both children and adults. Effectively managing malaria is dependent upon appropriate treatment. In Kenya, between 17 to 83 percent of febrile individuals first seek treatment for febrile illness over the counter from medicine retailers. Understanding medicine retailer knowledge and behaviour in treating suspected malaria and dispensing anti-malarials is crucial. Methods To investigate medicine retailer knowledge about anti-malarials and their dispensing practices, a survey was conducted of all retail drug outlets that sell anti-malarial medications and serve residents of the Webuye Health and Demographic Surveillance Site in the Bungoma East District of western Kenya. Results Most of the medicine retailers surveyed (65% were able to identify artemether-lumefantrine (AL as the Kenyan Ministry of Health recommended first-line anti-malarial therapy for uncomplicated malaria. Retailers who correctly identified this treatment were also more likely to recommend AL to adult and paediatric customers. However, the proportion of medicine retailers who recommend the correct treatment is disappointingly low. Only 48% would recommend AL to adults, and 37% would recommend it to children. It was discovered that customer demand has an influence on retailer behaviour. Retailer training and education were found to be correlated with anti-malarial drug knowledge, which in turn is correlated with dispensing practices. Medicine retailer behaviour, including patient referral practice and dispensing practices, are also correlated with knowledge of the first-line anti-malarial medication. The Kenya Ministry of Health guidelines were found to influence retailer drug stocking and dispensing behaviours. Conclusion Most medicine retailers could identify the recommended first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria, but the percentage that could

  13. Substandard anti-malarial drugs in Burkina Faso

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    Sie Ali

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is concern about an increasing infiltration of markets by substandard and fake medications against life-threatening diseases in developing countries. This is particularly worrying with regard to the increasing resistance development of Plasmodium falciparum against affordable anti-malarial medications, which has led to a change to more expensive drugs in most endemic countries. Methods A representative sample of modern anti-malarial medications from licensed (public and private pharmacies, community health workers and illicit (market and street vendors, shops sources has been collected in the Nouna Health District in north-western Burkina Faso in 2006. All drugs were tested for their quality with the standard procedures of the German Pharma Health Fund-Minilab. Detected low standard drugs were re-tested with European Pharmacopoeia 2.9.1 standards for disintegration and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy at the laboratory of the Heidelberg University for confirmation. Results Overall, 86 anti-malarial drug samples were collected, of which 77 samples have been included in the final analysis. The sample consisted of 39/77 (50% chloroquine, 10/77 (13% pyrimethamine-sulphadoxine, 9/77 (12% quinine, 6/77 (8% amodiaquine, 9/77 (12% artesunate, and 4/77 (5% artemether-lumefantrine. 32/77 (42% drug samples were found to be of poor quality, of which 28 samples failed the visual inspection, nine samples had substandard concentrations of the active ingredient, four samples showed poor disintegration, and one sample contained non of the stated active ingredient. The licensed and the illicit market contributed 5/47 (10.6% and 27/30 (90.0% samples of substandard drugs respectively. Conclusion These findings provide further evidence for the wide-spread existence of substandard anti-malarial medications in Africa and call for strengthening of the regulatory and quality control capacity of affected countries, particularly in view of the

  14. Access to artesunate-amodiaquine, quinine and other anti-malarials: policy and markets in Burundi

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    Dismas Baza

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in post-conflict Burundi. To counter the increasing challenge of anti-malarial drug resistance and improve highly effective treatment Burundi adopted artesunate-amodiaquine (AS-AQ as first-line treatment for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria and oral quinine as second-line treatment in its national treatment policy in 2003. Uptake of this policy in the public, private and non-governmental (NGO retail market sectors of Burundi is relatively unknown. This study was conducted to evaluate access to national policy recommended anti-malarials. Methods Adapting a standardized methodology developed by Health Action International/World Health Organization (HAI/WHO, a cross-sectional survey of 70 (24 public, 36 private, and 10 NGO medicine outlets was conducted in three regions of Burundi, representing different levels of transmission of malaria. The availability on day of the survey, the median prices, and affordability (in terms of number of days' wages to purchase treatment of AS-AQ, quinine and other anti-malarials were calculated. Results Anti-malarials were stocked in all outlets surveyed. AS-AQ was available in 87.5%, 33.3%, and 90% of public, private, and NGO retail outlets, respectively. Quinine was the most common anti-malarial found in all outlet types. Non-policy recommended anti-malarials were mainly found in the private outlets (38.9% compared to public (4.2% and NGO (0% outlets. The median price of a course of AS-AQ was US$0.16 (200 Burundi Francs, FBu for the public and NGO markets, and 3.5-fold higher in the private sector (US$0.56 or 700 FBu. Quinine tablets were similarly priced in the public (US$1.53 or 1,892.50 FBu, private and NGO sectors (both US$1.61 or 2,000 FBu. Non-policy anti-malarials were priced 50-fold higher than the price of AS-AQ in the public sector. A course of AS-AQ was affordable at 0.4 of a day's wage in the public and NGO sectors

  15. In vitro and in vivo assessment of the anti-malarial activity of Caesalpinia pluviosa

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    Eberlin Marcos N

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To overcome the problem of increasing drug resistance, traditional medicines are an important source for potential new anti-malarials. Caesalpinia pluviosa, commonly named "sibipiruna", originates from Brazil and possess multiple therapeutic properties, including anti-malarial activity. Methods Crude extract (CE was obtained from stem bark by purification using different solvents, resulting in seven fractions. An MTT assay was performed to evaluate cytotoxicity in MCF-7 cells. The CE and its fractions were tested in vitro against chloroquine-sensitive (3D7 and -resistant (S20 strains of Plasmodium falciparum and in vivo in Plasmodium chabaudi-infected mice. In vitro interaction with artesunate and the active C. pluviosa fractions was assessed, and mass spectrometry analyses were conducted. Results At non-toxic concentrations, the 100% ethanolic (F4 and 50% methanolic (F5 fractions possessed significant anti-malarial activity against both 3D7 and S20 strains. Drug interaction assays with artesunate showed a synergistic interaction with the F4. Four days of treatment with this fraction significantly inhibited parasitaemia in mice in a dose-dependent manner. Mass spectrometry analyses revealed the presence of an ion corresponding to m/z 303.0450, suggesting the presence of quercetin. However, a second set of analyses, with a quercetin standard, showed distinct ions of m/z 137 and 153. Conclusions The findings show that the F4 fraction of C. pluviosa exhibits anti-malarial activity in vitro at non-toxic concentrations, which was potentiated in the presence of artesunate. Moreover, this anti-malarial activity was also sustained in vivo after treatment of infected mice. Finally, mass spectrometry analyses suggest that a new compound, most likely an isomer of quercetin, is responsible for the anti-malarial activity of the F4.

  16. Recent progress in the development of anti-malarial quinolones.

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    Beteck, Richard M; Smit, Frans J; Haynes, Richard K; N'Da, David D

    2014-08-30

    Available anti-malarial tools have over the ten-year period prior to 2012 dramatically reduced the number of fatalities due to malaria from one million to less than six-hundred and thirty thousand. Although fewer people now die from malaria, emerging resistance to the first-line anti-malarial drugs, namely artemisinins in combination with quinolines and arylmethanols, necessitates the urgent development of new anti-malarial drugs to curb the disease. The quinolones are a promising class of compounds, with some demonstrating potent in vitro activity against the malaria parasite. This review summarizes the progress made in the development of potential anti-malarial quinolones since 2008. The efficacy of these compounds against both asexual blood stages and other stages of the malaria parasite, the nature of putative targets, and a comparison of these properties with anti-malarial drugs currently in clinical use, are discussed.

  17. Hyperparasitaemia and low dosing are an important source of anti-malarial drug resistance

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    Lee Sue J

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preventing the emergence of anti-malarial drug resistance is critical for the success of current malaria elimination efforts. Prevention strategies have focused predominantly on qualitative factors, such as choice of drugs, use of combinations and deployment of multiple first-line treatments. The importance of anti-malarial treatment dosing has been underappreciated. Treatment recommendations are often for the lowest doses that produce "satisfactory" results. Methods The probability of de-novo resistant malaria parasites surviving and transmitting depends on the relationship between their degree of resistance and the blood concentration profiles of the anti-malarial drug to which they are exposed. The conditions required for the in-vivo selection of de-novo emergent resistant malaria parasites were examined and relative probabilities assessed. Results Recrudescence is essential for the transmission of de-novo resistance. For rapidly eliminated anti-malarials high-grade resistance can arise from a single drug exposure, but low-grade resistance can arise only from repeated inadequate treatments. Resistance to artemisinins is, therefore, unlikely to emerge with single drug exposures. Hyperparasitaemic patients are an important source of de-novo anti-malarial drug resistance. Their parasite populations are larger, their control of the infection insufficient, and their rates of recrudescence following anti-malarial treatment are high. As use of substandard drugs, poor adherence, unusual pharmacokinetics, and inadequate immune responses are host characteristics, likely to pertain to each recurrence of infection, a small subgroup of patients provides the particular circumstances conducive to de-novo resistance selection and transmission. Conclusion Current dosing recommendations provide a resistance selection opportunity in those patients with low drug levels and high parasite burdens (often children or pregnant women. Patients with

  18. Epidemiological models for the spread of anti-malarial resistance

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    Antia R

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The spread of drug resistance is making malaria control increasingly difficult. Mathematical models for the transmission dynamics of drug sensitive and resistant strains can be a useful tool to help to understand the factors that influence the spread of drug resistance, and they can therefore help in the design of rational strategies for the control of drug resistance. Methods We present an epidemiological framework to investigate the spread of anti-malarial resistance. Several mathematical models, based on the familiar Macdonald-Ross model of malaria transmission, enable us to examine the processes and parameters that are critical in determining the spread of resistance. Results In our simplest model, resistance does not spread if the fraction of infected individuals treated is less than a threshold value; if drug treatment exceeds this threshold, resistance will eventually become fixed in the population. The threshold value is determined only by the rates of infection and the infectious periods of resistant and sensitive parasites in untreated and treated hosts, whereas the intensity of transmission has no influence on the threshold value. In more complex models, where hosts can be infected by multiple parasite strains or where treatment varies spatially, resistance is generally not fixed, but rather some level of sensitivity is often maintained in the population. Conclusions The models developed in this paper are a first step in understanding the epidemiology of anti-malarial resistance and evaluating strategies to reduce the spread of resistance. However, specific recommendations for the management of resistance need to wait until we have more data on the critical parameters underlying the spread of resistance: drug use, spatial variability of treatment and parasite migration among areas, and perhaps most importantly, cost of resistance.

  19. Got ACTs? Availability, price, market share and provider knowledge of anti-malarial medicines in public and private sector outlets in six malaria-endemic countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is the first-line malaria treatment throughout most of the malaria-endemic world. Data on ACT availability, price and market share are needed to provide a firm evidence base from which to assess the current situation concerning quality-assured ACT supply. This paper presents supply side data from ACTwatch outlet surveys in Benin, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Madagascar, Nigeria, Uganda and Zambia. Methods Between March 2009 and June 2010, nationally representative surveys of outlets providing anti-malarials to consumers were conducted. A census of all outlets with the potential to provide anti-malarials was conducted in clusters sampled randomly. Results 28,263 outlets were censused, 51,158 anti-malarials were audited, and 9,118 providers interviewed. The proportion of public health facilities with at least one first-line quality-assured ACT in stock ranged between 43% and 85%. Among private sector outlets stocking at least one anti-malarial, non-artemisinin therapies, such as chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, were widely available (> 95% of outlets) as compared to first-line quality-assured ACT (< 25%). In the public/not-for-profit sector, first-line quality-assured ACT was available for free in all countries except Benin and the DRC (US$1.29 [Inter Quartile Range (IQR): $1.29-$1.29] and $0.52[IQR: $0.00-$1.29] per adult equivalent dose respectively). In the private sector, first-line quality-assured ACT was 5-24 times more expensive than non-artemisinin therapies. The exception was Madagascar where, due to national social marketing of subsidized ACT, the price of first-line quality-assured ACT ($0.14 [IQR: $0.10, $0.57]) was significantly lower than the most popular treatment (chloroquine, $0.36 [IQR: $0.36, $0.36]). Quality-assured ACT accounted for less than 25% of total anti-malarial volumes; private-sector quality-assured ACT volumes represented less than 6% of the total market share

  20. Compliance with a three-day course of artesunate-mefloquine combination and baseline anti-malarial treatment in an area of Thailand with highly multidrug resistant falciparum malaria

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    Na-Bangchang Kesara

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT is presently recommended by the World Health Organization as first-line treatment for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in several countries, as a mean of prolonging the effectiveness of first-line malaria treatment regimens. A three-day course of artesunate-mefloquine (4 mg/kg body weight once daily for three consecutive days, plus 15 and 10 mg/kg body weight mefloquine on the first and second days has been adopted by Malaria Control Programme of Thailand as first-line treatment for uncomplicated falciparum malaria all over the country since 2008. The gametocytocydal anti-malarial drug primaquine is administered at the dose of 30 mg (0.6 mg/kg on the last day. The aim of the present study was to assess patient compliance of this combination regimen when applied to field condition. Methods A total of 240 patients (196 males and 44 females who were attending the malaria clinics in Mae-Sot, Tak Province and presenting with symptomatic acute uncomplicated falciparum malaria, with no reappearance of Plasmodium vivax parasitaemia during follow-up were included into the study. The first dose of the treatment was given to the patients under direct supervision. All patients were given the medication for self-treatment at home and were requested to come back for follow-up on day 3 of the initial treatment. Baseline (day 0 and day 3 whole blood mefloquine and plasma primaquine concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Results Two patients had recrudescence on days 28 and 35. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of the 42-day efficacy rate of this combination regimen was 99.2% (238/240. Based on whole blood mefloquine and plasma primaquine concentrations on day 3 of the initial treatment, compliance with mefloquine and primaquine in this three-day artesunate-mefloquine combination regimen were 96.3% (207/215, and 98.5% (197/200, respectively. Baseline mefloquine

  1. Active case detection, treatment of falciparum malaria with combined chloroquine and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine and vivax malaria with chloroquine and molecular markers of anti-malarial resistance in the Republic of Vanuatu

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    Rogers William O

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum was first described in the Republic of Vanuatu in the early 1980s. In 1991, the Vanuatu Ministry of Health instituted new treatment guidelines for uncomplicated P. falciparum infection consisting of chloroquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine combination therapy. Chloroquine remains the recommended treatment for Plasmodium vivax. Methods In 2005, cross-sectional blood surveys at 45 sites on Malo Island were conducted and 4,060 adults and children screened for malaria. Of those screened, 203 volunteer study subjects without malaria at the time of screening were followed for 13 weeks to observe peak seasonal incidence of infection. Another 54 subjects with malaria were followed over a 28-day period to determine efficacy of anti-malarial therapy; chloroquine alone for P. vivax and chloroquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine for P. falciparum infections. Results The overall prevalence of parasitaemia by mass blood screening was 6%, equally divided between P. falciparum and P. vivax. Twenty percent and 23% of participants with patent P. vivax and P. falciparum parasitaemia, respectively, were febrile at the time of screening. In the incidence study cohort, after 2,303 person-weeks of follow-up, the incidence density of malaria was 1.3 cases per person-year with P. vivax predominating. Among individuals participating in the clinical trial, the 28-day chloroquine P. vivax cure rate was 100%. The 28-day chloroquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine P. falciparum cure rate was 97%. The single treatment failure, confirmed by merozoite surface protein-2 genotyping, was classified as a day 28 late parasitological treatment failure. All P. falciparum isolates carried the Thr-76 pfcrt mutant allele and the double Asn-108 + Arg-59 dhfr mutant alleles. Dhps mutant alleles were not detected in the study sample. Conclusion Peak seasonal malaria prevalence on Malo Island reached hypoendemic levels during the study

  2. Access to Artemisinin-Combination Therapy (ACT) and other Anti-Malarials: National Policy and Markets in Sierra Leone

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    Amuasi, John H.; Diap, Graciela; Nguah, Samuel Blay; Karikari, Patrick; Boakye, Isaac; Jambai, Amara; Lahai, Wani Kumba; Louie, Karly S.; Kiechel, Jean-Rene

    2012-01-01

    Malaria remains the leading burden of disease in post-conflict Sierra Leone. To overcome the challenge of anti-malarial drug resistance and improve effective treatment, Sierra Leone adopted artemisinin-combination therapy artesunate-amodiaquine (AS+AQ) as first-line treatment for uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria. Other national policy anti-malarials include artemether-lumefantrine (AL) as an alternative to AS+AQ, quinine and artemether for treatment of complicated malaria; and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) for intermittent preventive treatment (IPTp). This study was conducted to evaluate access to national policy recommended anti-malarials. A cross-sectional survey of 127 medicine outlets (public, private and NGO) was conducted in urban and rural areas. The availability on the day of the survey, median prices, and affordability policy and available non-policy anti-malarials were calculated. Anti-malarials were stocked in 79% of all outlets surveyed. AS+AQ was widely available in public medicine outlets; AL was only available in the private and NGO sectors. Quinine was available in nearly two-thirds of public and NGO outlets and over one-third of private outlets. SP was widely available in all outlets. Non-policy anti-malarials were predominantly available in the private outlets. AS+AQ in the public sector was widely offered for free. Among the anti-malarials sold at a cost, the same median price of a course of AS+AQ (US$1.56), quinine tablets (US$0.63), were found in both the public and private sectors. Quinine injection had a median cost of US$0.31 in the public sector and US$0.47 in the private sector, while SP had a median cost of US$0.31 in the public sector compared to US$ 0.63 in the private sector. Non-policy anti-malarials were more affordable than first-line AS+AQ in all sectors. A course of AS+AQ was affordable at nearly two days’ worth of wages in both the public and private sectors. PMID:23133522

  3. Therapeutic efficacy of artesunate in the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria and anti-malarial, drug-resistance marker polymorphisms in populations near the China-Myanmar border

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    Huang Fang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome after seven-day artesunate monotherapy for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Yingjiang County along the China-Myanmar border and investigate genetic polymorphisms in the P. falciparum chloroquine-resistance transporter (pfcrt, multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1, dihydrofolate reductase (pfdhfr, dihydropteroate synthase (pfdhps and ATPase (pfatp6 genes. Methods Patients ≥ one year of age with fever (axillary temperature ≥37.5°C or history of fever and P. falciparum mono-infection were included. Patients received anti-malarial treatment with artesunate (total dose of 16 mg/kg over seven days by directly observed therapy. After a 28-day follow-up, treatment efficacy and effectiveness were assessed based on clinical and parasitological outcomes. Treatment failure was defined as recrudescence of the original parasite and distinguished with new infection confirmed by PCR. Analysis of gene mutation and amplification were performed by nested polymerase chain reaction. Results Sixty-five patients were enrolled; 10 withdrew from the study, and six were lost to follow-up. All but two patients demonstrated adequate clinical and parasitological response; 12 had detectable parasitaemia on day 3. These two patients were confirmed to be new infection by PCR. The efficacy of artesunate was 95.9%. The pfcrt mutation in codon 76 was found in all isolates (100%, and mutations in codons 71 and 72 were found in 4.8% of parasite isolates. No mutation of pfmdr1 (codons 86 or 1246 was found. Among all samples, 5.1% were wild type for pfdhfr, whereas the other samples had mutations in four codons (51, 59, 108 and 164, and mutations in pfdhps (codons 436, 437, 540 and 581 were found in all isolates. No samples had mutations in pfatp6 codons 623 or 769, but two new mutations (N683K and R756K were found in 4.6% and 9.2% of parasite isolates, respectively. Conclusion Plasmodium

  4. Anti-malarial activities of Andrographis paniculata and Hedyotis corymbosa extracts and their combination with curcumin

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    Swain Bijay K

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herbal extracts of Andrographis paniculata (AP and Hedyotis corymbosa (HC are known as hepato-protective and fever-reducing drugs since ancient time and they have been used regularly by the people in the south Asian sub-continent. Methanolic extracts of these two plants were tested in vitro on choloroquine sensitive (MRC-pf-20 and resistant (MRC-pf-303 strains of Plasmodium falciparum for their anti-malarial activity. Methods Growth inhibition was determined using different concentrations of these plant extracts on synchronized P. falciparum cultures at the ring stage. The interactions between these two plant extracts and individually with curcumin were studied in vitro. The performance of these two herbal extracts in isolation and combination were further evaluated in vivo on Balb/c mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA and their efficacy was compared with that of curcumin. The in vivo toxicity of the plant derived compounds as well as their parasite stage-specificity was studied. Results The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50 of AP (7.2 μg/ml was found better than HC (10.8 μg/ml. Combination of these two herbal drugs showed substantial enhancement in their anti-malarial activity. Combinatorial effect of each of these with curcumin also revealed anti-malarial effect. Additive interaction between the plant extracts (AP + HC and their individual synergism with curcumin (AP+CUR, HC+CUR were evident from this study. Increased in vivo potency was also observed with the combination of plant extracts over the individual extracts and curcumin. Both the plant extracts were found to inhibit the ring stage of the parasite and did not show any in vivo toxicity, whether used in isolation or in combination. Conclusion Both these two plant extracts in combination with curcumin could be an effective, alternative source of herbal anti-malarial drugs.

  5. The biological and clinical activity of anti-malarial drugs in autoimmune disorders.

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    Taherian, Elham; Rao, Anshul; Malemud, Charles J; Askari, Ali D

    2013-01-01

    Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine are 4-aminoquinoline compounds commonly employed as anti-malarial drugs. Chloroquine and its synthetic analogue, hydroxychloroquine also belong to the disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug class because these drugs are immunosuppressive. The immunosuppressive activity of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine is likely to account for their capacity to reduce T-cell and B-cell hyperactivity as well as pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression. This review evaluated experimental and clinical trials results as well as clinical response data relative to the use of chloroquine and/or hydroxychloroquine as first-line medical therapies in systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, primary Sjogren's syndrome, the anti-phospholipid syndrome and in the treatment of sarcoidosis. A primary outcomes measure in these clinical trials was the extent to which chloroquine and/or hydroxychloroquine reduced disease progression or exacerbations and/or the use and dosage of corticosteroids. The relative efficacy of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine in modifying the clinical course of these autoimmune disorders is balanced against evidence that these drugs induce adverse effects which may reduce their use and effectiveness in the therapy of autoimmune disorders.

  6. Fake anti-malarials: start with the facts.

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    Kaur, Harparkash; Clarke, Siȃn; Lalani, Mirza; Phanouvong, Souly; Guérin, Philippe; McLoughlin, Andrew; Wilson, Benjamin K; Deats, Michael; Plançon, Aline; Hopkins, Heidi; Miranda, Debora; Schellenberg, David

    2016-02-13

    This meeting report presents the key findings and discussion points of a 1-day meeting entitled 'Fake anti-malarials: start with the facts' held on 28th May 2015, in Geneva, Switzerland, to disseminate the findings of the artemisinin combination therapy consortium's drug quality programme. The teams purchased over 10,000 samples, using representative sampling approaches, from six malaria endemic countries: Equatorial Guinea (Bioko Island), Cambodia, Ghana, Nigeria, Rwanda and Tanzania. Laboratory analyses of these samples showed that falsified anti-malarials (fact that the WHO has urged regulatory authorities in malaria-endemic countries to take measures to halt the production and marketing of these oral monotherapies since 2007. This report summarizes the presentations that reviewed the public health impact of falsified and substandard drugs, sampling strategies, techniques for drug quality analysis, approaches to strengthen health systems capacity for the surveillance of drug quality, and the ensuing discussion points from the dissemination meeting.

  7. Molecular Farming in Artemisia annua, a sustainable approach to improve anti-malarial drug production

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    Giuseppe ePulice

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a parasite infection affecting millions of people worldwide. Even though progresses in prevention and treatment have been developed, 198 million cases of malaria occurred in 2013, resulting in 584000 estimated deaths. 90% of all malaria deaths occurred in Africa, mostly among children under the age of five. This article aims to review malaria’s history, epidemiology and current treatments, with a particular focus on the potential of molecular farming that use metabolic engineering in plants as effective anti-malarial solution. Malaria indeed represents an example of how a health problem on one hand, may eventually influence the proper development of a country due to the burden of the disease, and on the other hand, constitutes an opportunity for lucrative business of diverse stakeholders. In contrast, plant biofarming is here proposed as a sustainable alternative for the production not only of natural herbal repellents used for malaria prevention but also for the production of sustainable anti-malarial drugs like artemisinin used for primary parasite infection treatments.Artemisinin, a sesquiterpene lactone, is a natural anti-malarial compound that can be found in Artemisia annua plant. However, the low concentration of artemisinin in plant makes this molecule relatively expensive and difficult to meet the worldwide demand of Artemisinin Combination Therapies, especially for economically disadvantaged people in developing countries. The biosynthetic pathway of artemisinin, a process that only takes place in glandular secretory trichomes of A. annua, is relatively well elucidated, and significant efforts using plant genetic engineering have been made to increase the production of this compound. These include studies on diverse transcription factors, which all have been shown to regulate artemisinin genetic pathway and other biological processes. Therefore, genetic manipulation of these genes may be used as a cost-effective potential

  8. Quality of anti-malarials collected in the private and informal sectors in Guyana and Suriname

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    Evans Lawrence

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite a significant reduction in the number of malaria cases in Guyana and Suriname, this disease remains a major problem in the interior of both countries, especially in areas with gold mining and logging operations, where malaria is endemic. National malaria control programmes in these countries provide treatment to patients with medicines that are procured and distributed through regulated processes in the public sector. However, availability to medicines in licensed facilities (private sector and unlicensed facilities (informal sector is common, posing the risk of access to and use of non-recommended treatments and/or poor quality products. Methods To assess the quality of circulating anti-malarial medicines, samples were purchased in the private and informal sectors of Guyana and Suriname in 2009. The sampling sites were selected based on epidemiological data and/or distance from health facilities. Samples were analysed for identity, content, dissolution or disintegration, impurities, and uniformity of dosage units or weight variation according to manufacturer, pharmacopeial, or other validated method. Results Quality issues were observed in 45 of 77 (58% anti-malarial medicines sampled in Guyana of which 30 failed visual & physical inspection and 18 failed quality control tests. The proportion of monotherapy and ACT medicines failing quality control tests was 43% (13/30 and 11% (5/47 respectively. A higher proportion of medicines sampled from the private sector 34% (11/32 failed quality control tests versus 16% (7/45 in the informal sector. In Suriname, 58 medicines were sampled, of which 50 (86% were Artecom®, the fixed-dose combination of piperaquine-dihydroartemisinin-trimethoprim co-blistered with a primaquine phosphate tablet. All Artecom samples were found to lack a label claim for primaquine, thus failing visual and physical inspection. Conclusions The findings of the studies in both countries point to

  9. Reduction of anti-malarial consumption after rapid diagnostic tests implementation in Dar es Salaam: a before-after and cluster randomized controlled study

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    Swai Ndeniria

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Presumptive treatment of all febrile patients with anti-malarials leads to massive over-treatment. The aim was to assess the effect of implementing malaria rapid diagnostic tests (mRDTs on prescription of anti-malarials in urban Tanzania. Methods The design was a prospective collection of routine statistics from ledger books and cross-sectional surveys before and after intervention in randomly selected health facilities (HF in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. The participants were all clinicians and their patients in the above health facilities. The intervention consisted of training and introduction of mRDTs in all three hospitals and in six HF. Three HF without mRDTs were selected as matched controls. The use of routine mRDT and treatment upon result was advised for all patients complaining of fever, including children under five years of age. The main outcome measures were: (1 anti-malarial consumption recorded from routine statistics in ledger books of all HF before and after intervention; (2 anti-malarial prescription recorded during observed consultations in cross-sectional surveys conducted in all HF before and 18 months after mRDT implementation. Results Based on routine statistics, the amount of artemether-lumefantrine blisters used post-intervention was reduced by 68% (95%CI 57-80 in intervention and 32% (9-54 in control HF. For quinine vials, the reduction was 63% (54-72 in intervention and an increase of 2.49 times (1.62-3.35 in control HF. Before-and-after cross-sectional surveys showed a similar decrease from 75% to 20% in the proportion of patients receiving anti-malarial treatment (Risk ratio 0.23, 95%CI 0.20-0.26. The cluster randomized analysis showed a considerable difference of anti-malarial prescription between intervention HF (22% and control HF (60% (Risk ratio 0.30, 95%CI 0.14-0.70. Adherence to test result was excellent since only 7% of negative patients received an anti-malarial. However, antibiotic

  10. Closing the access barrier for effective anti-malarials in the private sector in rural Uganda: consortium for ACT private sector subsidy (CAPSS) pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT), the treatment of choice for uncomplicated falciparum malaria, is unaffordable and generally inaccessible in the private sector, the first port of call for most malaria treatment across rural Africa. Between August 2007 and May 2010, the Uganda Ministry of Health and the Medicines for Malaria Venture conducted the Consortium for ACT Private Sector Subsidy (CAPSS) pilot study to test whether access to ACT in the private sector could be improved through the provision of a high level supply chain subsidy. Methods Four intervention districts were purposefully selected to receive branded subsidized medicines - “ACT with a leaf”, while the fifth district acted as the control. Baseline and evaluation outlet exit surveys and retail audits were conducted at licensed and unlicensed drug outlets in the intervention and control districts. A survey-adjusted, multivariate logistic regression model was used to analyse the intervention’s impact on: ACT uptake and price; purchase of ACT within 24 hours of symptom onset; ACT availability and displacement of sub-optimal anti-malarial. Results At baseline, ACT accounted for less than 1% of anti-malarials purchased from licensed drug shops for children less than five years old. However, at evaluation, “ACT with a leaf” accounted for 69% of anti-malarial purchased in the interventions districts. Purchase of ACT within 24 hours of symptom onset for children under five years rose from 0.8% at baseline to 26.2% (95% CI: 23.2-29.2%) at evaluation in the intervention districts. In the control district, it rose modestly from 1.8% to 5.6% (95% CI: 4.0-7.3%). The odds of purchasing ACT within 24 hours in the intervention districts compared to the control was 0.46 (95% CI: 0.08-2.68, p=0.4) at baseline and significant increased to 6.11 (95% CI: 4.32-8.62, p<0.0001) at evaluation. Children less than five years of age had “ACT with a leaf” purchased for them more often than those

  11. Anti-malarial activity of leaf-extract of hydrangea macrophylla, a common Japanese plant.

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    Kamei K

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available To find a new anti-malarial medicine derived from natural resources, we examined the leaves of 13 common Japanese plants in vitro. Among them, a leaf-extract of Hydrangea macrophylla, a common Japanese flower, inhibited the parasitic growth of Plasmodium falciparum. The IC50 of Hydrangea macrophylla leaf extract to Plasmodium falciparum was 0.18 microg/ml. The IC50 to NIH 3T3-3 cells, from a normal mouse cell line, was 7.2 microg/ml. Thus, selective toxicity was 40. For the in vivo test, we inoculated Plasmodium berghei, a rodent malaria parasite, to ddY mice and administered the leaf-extract of Hydrangea macrophylla (3.6 mg/0.2 ml orally 3 times a day for 3 days. Malaria parasites did not appear in the blood of in the treated mice, but they did appear in the control group on day 3 or 4 after inoculation with the parasites. When leaf extract was administered to 5 mice 2 times a day for 3 days, malaria parasites did not appear in 4 of the mice but did appear in 1 mouse. In addition, the leaf-extract was administered orally 3 times a day for 3 days to Plasmodium berghei infected mice with a parasitemia of 2.7%. In the latter group, malaria parasites disappeared on day 3 after initiating the treatment, but they appeared again after day 5 or 6. Although we could not cure the mice entirely, we confirmed that the Hydrangea macrophylla leaf extract did contain an anti-malarial substance that can be administered orally.

  12. Anti-Malarial Plants of Jonai, India: an Ethnobotanical Approach

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    Tonlong WANGPAN

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available North-East India represents a unique ecosystem with treasured medicinal plant wealth closely related with Folk medicines. A large number of plants having medicinal properties and their folk uses have remained confined to the natives of this region. The tribal community of Jonai, Assam was explored to expose the indigenous herbal remedy for malaria. Sixteen antimalarial plants belonging to 13 families were reported. The analysis revealed highest fidelity level (FL value for Ajuga integrifolia (100% followed by Ricinus communis (94%, Alstonia scholaris (88%, Oroxylum indicum (86% and Achyranthes aspera (82%. The percentage of respondent’s knowledge (PRK about anti-malarial plants showed Alstonia scholaris as the most commonly known antimalarial species (53% within this region. Preference ranking (PR unveiled eight species to be very effective against malarial parasite, which includes Allium sativum, Artemisia indica, Azadirachta indica, Carica papaya, Clerodendrum glandulosum, Ocimum tenuiflorum, Oroxylum indicum, Piper longum and Piper nigrum. All medicine preparations are made using water as the medium and are orally administered in the form of crude extract, powder, juice and decoction. Overall analysis suggested Ajuga integrifolia, Achyranthes aspera, Alstonia scholaris, Artemisia indica, Oroxylum indicum and Ricinus communis to be used for the development of novel, economical, effective and ecofriendly herbal formulations for healthcare management.

  13. Saleability of anti-malarials in private drug shops in Muheza, Tanzania: a baseline study in an era of assumed artemisinin combination therapy (ACT

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    Ringsted Frank M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemether-lumefantrine (ALu replaced sulphadoxine-pymimethamine (SP as the official first-line anti-malarial in Tanzania in November 2006. So far, artemisinin combination therapy (ACT is contra-indicated during pregnancy by the national malaria treatment guidelines, and pregnant women depend on SP for Intermittent Preventive Treatment (IPTp during pregnancy. SP is still being dispensed by private drug stores, but it is unknown to which extent. If significant, it may undermine its official use for IPTp through induction of resistance. The main study objective was to perform a baseline study of the private market for anti-malarials in Muheza town, an area with widespread anti-malarial drug resistance, prior to the implementation of a provider training and accreditation programme that will allow accredited drug shops to sell subsidized ALu. Methods All drug shops selling prescription-only anti-malarials, in Muheza town, Tanga Region voluntarily participated from July to December 2009. Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with owners or shopkeepers on saleability of anti-malarials, and structured questionnaires provided quantitative data on drugs sales volume. Results All surveyed drug shops illicitly sold SP and quinine (QN, and legally amodiaquine (AQ. Calculated monthly sale was 4,041 doses, in a town with a population of 15,000 people. Local brands of SP accounted for 74% of sales volume, compared to AQ (13%, QN (11% and ACT (2%. Conclusions In community practice, the saleability of ACT was negligible. SP was best-selling, and use was not reserved for IPTp, as stipulated in the national anti-malarial policy. It is a major reason for concern that such drug-pressure in the community equals de facto intermittent presumptive treatment. In an area where SP drug resistance remains high, unregulated SP dispensing to people other than pregnant women runs the risk of eventually jeopardizing the effectiveness of the IPTp

  14. Assessing the utility of an anti-malarial pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model for aiding drug clinical development

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    Zaloumis Sophie

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanistic within-host models relating blood anti-malarial drug concentrations with the parasite-time profile help in assessing dosing schedules and partner drugs for new anti-malarial treatments. A comprehensive simulation study to assess the utility of a stage-specific pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD model for predicting within-host parasite response was performed. Methods Three anti-malarial combination therapies were selected: artesunate-mefloquine, dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine, and artemether-lumefantrine. The PK-PD model included parameters to represent the concentration-time profiles of both drugs, the initial parasite burden and distribution across the parasite life cycle, and the parasite multiplication factor due to asexual reproduction. The model also included the maximal killing rate of each drug, and the blood drug concentration associated with half of that killing effect (in vivo EC50, derived from the in vitro IC50, the extent of binding to 0.5% Albumax present in the in vitro testing media, and the drugs plasma protein binding and whole blood to plasma partitioning ratio. All stochastic simulations were performed using a Latin-Hypercube-Sampling approach. Results The simulations demonstrated that the proportion of patients cured was highly sensitive to the in vivo EC50 and the maximal killing rate of the partner drug co-administered with the artemisinin derivative. The in vivo EC50 values that corresponded to on average 95% of patients cured were much higher than the adjusted values derived from the in vitro IC50. The proportion clinically cured was not strongly influenced by changes in the parameters defining the age distribution of the initial parasite burden (mean age of 4 to 16 hours and the parasite multiplication factor every life cycle (ranging from 8 to 12 fold/cycle. The median parasite clearance times, however, lengthened as the standard deviation of the initial parasite burden increased (i

  15. Molecular markers of anti-malarial drug resistance in Lahj Governorate, Yemen: baseline data and implications

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    Chance Michael L

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This is an investigation of anti-malarial molecular markers coupled with a therapeutic efficacy test of chloroquine (CQ against falciparum malaria in an area of unstable malaria in Lahj Governorate, Yemen. The study was aimed at assessment of therapeutic response to CQ and elucidation of baseline information on molecular markers for Plasmodium falciparum resistance against CQ and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP. Methods Between 2002 and 2003 the field test was conducted according to the standard WHO protocol to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of CQ in 124 patients with falciparum malaria in an endemic area in Lahj Governorate in Yemen. Blood samples collected during this study were analysed for P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter gene (pfcrt-76 polymorphisms, mutation pfcrt-S163R and the antifolate resistance-associated mutations dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr-C59R and dihydropteroate synthase (dhps-K540E. Direct DNA sequencing of the pfcrt gene from three representative field samples was carried out after DNA amplification of the 13 exons of the pfcrt gene. Results Treatment failure was detected in 61% of the 122 cases that completed the 14-day follow-up. The prevalence of mutant pfcrt T76 was 98% in 112 amplified pre-treatment samples. The presence of pfcrt T76 was poorly predictive of in vivo CQ resistance (PPV = 61.8%, 95% CI = 52.7-70.9. The prevalence of dhfr Arg-59 mutation in 99 amplified samples was 5%, while the dhps Glu-540 was not detected in any of 119 amplified samples. Sequencing the pfcrt gene confirmed that Yemeni CQ resistant P. falciparum carry the old world (Asian and African CQ resistant haplotype CVIETSESI at positions 72,73,74,75,76,220,271, 326 and 371. Conclusion This is the first study to report baseline information on the characteristics and implications of anti-malarial drug resistance markers in Yemen. It is also the first report of the haplotype associated with CQR P. falciparum

  16. In silico and in vivo anti-malarial studies of 18β glycyrrhetinic acid from Glycyrrhiza glabra.

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    Kalani, Komal; Agarwal, Jyoti; Alam, Sarfaraz; Khan, Feroz; Pal, Anirban; Srivastava, Santosh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most prevailing fatal diseases causing between 1.2 and 2.7 million deaths all over the world each year. Further, development of resistance against the frontline anti-malarial drugs has created an alarming situation, which requires intensive drug discovery to develop new, more effective, affordable and accessible anti-malarial agents possessing novel modes of action. Over the past few years triterpenoids from higher plants have shown a wide range of anti-malarial activities. As a part of our drug discovery program for anti-malarial agents from Indian medicinal plants, roots of Glycyrrhizaglabra were chemically investigated, which resulted in the isolation and characterization of 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) as a major constituent. The in vitro studies against P. falciparum showed significant (IC50 1.69 µg/ml) anti-malarial potential for GA. Similarly, the molecular docking studies showed adequate docking (LibDock) score of 71.18 for GA and 131.15 for standard anti-malarial drug chloroquine. Further, in silico pharmacokinetic and drug-likeness studies showed that GA possesses drug-like properties. Finally, in vivo evaluation showed a dose dependent anti-malarial activity ranging from 68-100% at doses of 62.5-250 mg/kg on day 8. To the best of our knowledge this is the first ever report on the anti-malarial potential of GA. Further work on optimization of the anti-malarial lead is under progress.

  17. Novel Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase with Anti-malarial Activity in the Mouse Model

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    Booker, Michael L.; Bastos, Cecilia M.; Kramer, Martin L.; Barker, Jr., Robert H.; Skerlj, Renato; Sidhu, Amar Bir; Deng, Xiaoyi; Celatka, Cassandra; Cortese, Joseph F.; Guerrero Bravo, Jose E.; Crespo Llado, Keila N.; Serrano, Adelfa E.; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Viera, Sara; Garuti, Helen; Wittlin, Sergio; Papastogiannidis, Petros; Lin, Jing-wen; Janse, Chris J.; Khan, Shahid M.; Duraisingh, Manoj; Coleman, Bradley; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J.; Phillips, Margaret A.; Munoz, Benito; Wirth, Dyann F.; Klinger, Jeffrey D.; Wiegand, Roger; Sybertz, Edmund (Leiden-MC); (Puerto Rico); (STPHI); (Harvard); (GSK); (Genzyme); (UTSMC)

    2010-11-22

    Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the most deadly form of human malaria, is unable to salvage pyrimidines and must rely on de novo biosynthesis for survival. Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway and represents a potential target for anti-malarial therapy. A high throughput screen and subsequent medicinal chemistry program identified a series of N-alkyl-5-(1H-benzimidazol-1-yl)thiophene-2-carboxamides with low nanomolar in vitro potency against DHODH from P. falciparum, P. vivax, and P. berghei. The compounds were selective for the parasite enzymes over human DHODH, and x-ray structural data on the analog Genz-667348, demonstrated that species selectivity could be attributed to amino acid differences in the inhibitor-binding site. Compounds from this series demonstrated in vitro potency against the 3D7 and Dd2 strains of P. falciparum, good tolerability and oral exposure in the mouse, and ED{sub 50} values in the 4-day murine P. berghei efficacy model of 13-21 mg/kg/day with oral twice-daily dosing. In particular, treatment with Genz-667348 at 100 mg/kg/day resulted in sterile cure. Two recent analogs of Genz-667348 are currently undergoing pilot toxicity testing to determine suitability as clinical development candidates.

  18. Adherence to and acceptability of artemether-lumefantrine as first-line anti-malarial treatment: evidence from a rural community in Tanzania

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    Schlienger Raymond

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Controlled clinical trials have shown that a six-dose regimen of artemether-lumefantrine (AL therapy for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria results in cure rates >95% with good tolerability. Materials and methods A prospective study was carried out to document the adherence to and acceptability of AL administration. This was undertaken in the context of the ALIVE study, a prospective, community-based, observational study in a rural, malaria-endemic area of Tanzania. Following microscopic confirmation of P. falciparum infection, the first AL dose was taken under supervision, with the subsequent five doses taken unsupervised at home. Patients were randomized to receive a home-based assessment close to the scheduled time for one of the unsupervised doses, but were blinded to which follow-up visit they had been allocated. A structured questionnaire was administered by trained staff and AL consumption was confirmed by inspection of blister packs. Results A total of 552 patients were recruited of whom 352 (63.8% were Discussion Factors contributing to adherence were likely to be helpful packaging, pictorial dosing instructions and patients' conviction that AL is effective. Conclusion Adherence to the dosing regimen and timing of AL administration was very good.

  19. Accessibility, availability and affordability of anti-malarials in a rural district in Kenya after implementation of a national subsidy scheme

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    Simiyu Chrispinus

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poor access to prompt and effective treatment for malaria contributes to high mortality and severe morbidity. In Kenya, it is estimated that only 12% of children receive anti-malarials for their fever within 24 hours. The first point of care for many fevers is a local medicine retailer, such as a pharmacy or chemist. The role of the medicine retailer as an important distribution point for malaria medicines has been recognized and several different strategies have been used to improve the services that these retailers provide. Despite these efforts, many mothers still purchase ineffective drugs because they are less expensive than effective artemisinin combination therapy (ACT. One strategy that is being piloted in several countries is an international subsidy targeted at anti-malarials supplied through the retail sector. The goal of this strategy is to make ACT as affordable as ineffective alternatives. The programme, called the Affordable Medicines Facility - malaria was rolled out in Kenya in August 2010. Methods In December 2010, the affordability and accessibility of malaria medicines in a rural district in Kenya were evaluated using a complete census of all public and private facilities, chemists, pharmacists, and other malaria medicine retailers within the Webuye Demographic Surveillance Area. Availability, types, and prices of anti-malarials were assessed. There are 13 public or mission facilities and 97 medicine retailers (registered and unregistered. Results The average distance from a home to the nearest public health facility is 2 km, but the average distance to the nearest medicine retailer is half that. Quinine is the most frequently stocked anti-malarial (61% of retailers. More medicine retailers stocked sulphadoxine-pyramethamine (SP; 57% than ACT (44%. Eleven percent of retailers stocked AMFm subsidized artemether-lumefantrine (AL. No retailers had chloroquine in stock and only five were selling artemisinin

  20. Quality of anti-malarial drugs provided by public and private healthcare providers in south-east Nigeria

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    Uzochukwu Benjamin

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is little existing knowledge about actual quality of drugs provided by different providers in Nigeria and in many sub-Saharan African countries. Such information is important for improving malaria treatment that will help in the development and implementation of actions designed to improve the quality of treatment. The objective of the study was to determine the quality of drugs used for the treatment of malaria in a broad spectrum of public and private healthcare providers. Methods The study was undertaken in six towns (three urban and three rural in Anambra state, south-east Nigeria. Anti-malarials (225 samples, which included artesunate, dihydroartemisinin, sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP, quinine, and chloroquine, were either purchased or collected from randomly selected providers. The quality of these drugs was assessed by laboratory analysis of the dissolution profile using published pharmacopoeial monograms and measuring the amount of active ingredient using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Findings It was found that 60 (37% of the anti-malarials tested did not meet the United States Pharmacopoeia (USP specifications for the amount of active ingredients, with the suspect drugs either lacking the active ingredients or containing suboptimal quantities of the active ingredients. Quinine (46% and SP formulations (39% were among drugs that did not satisfy the tolerance limits published in USP monograms. A total of 78% of the suspect drugs were from private facilities, mostly low-level providers, such as patent medicine dealers (vendors. Conclusion This study found that there was a high prevalence of poor quality drugs. The findings provide areas for public intervention to improve the quality of malaria treatment services. There should be enforced checks and regulation of drug supply management as well as stiffer penalties for people stocking substandard and counterfeit drugs.

  1. Poor quality vital anti-malarials in Africa - an urgent neglected public health priority

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    Newton Paul N

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum malaria remains a major public health problem. A vital component of malaria control rests on the availability of good quality artemisinin-derivative based combination therapy (ACT at the correct dose. However, there are increasing reports of poor quality anti-malarials in Africa. Methods Seven collections of artemisinin derivative monotherapies, ACT and halofantrine anti-malarials of suspicious quality were collected in 2002/10 in eleven African countries and in Asia en route to Africa. Packaging, chemical composition (high performance liquid chromatography, direct ionization mass spectrometry, X-ray diffractometry, stable isotope analysis and botanical investigations were performed. Results Counterfeit artesunate containing chloroquine, counterfeit dihydroartemisinin (DHA containing paracetamol (acetaminophen, counterfeit DHA-piperaquine containing sildenafil, counterfeit artemether-lumefantrine containing pyrimethamine, counterfeit halofantrine containing artemisinin, and substandard/counterfeit or degraded artesunate and artesunate+amodiaquine in eight countries are described. Pollen analysis was consistent with manufacture of counterfeits in eastern Asia. These data do not allow estimation of the frequency of poor quality anti-malarials in Africa. Conclusions Criminals are producing diverse harmful anti-malarial counterfeits with important public health consequences. The presence of artesunate monotherapy, substandard and/or degraded and counterfeit medicines containing sub-therapeutic amounts of unexpected anti-malarials will engender drug resistance. With the threatening spread of artemisinin resistance to Africa, much greater investment is required to ensure the quality of ACTs and removal of artemisinin monotherapies. The International Health Regulations may need to be invoked to counter these serious public health problems.

  2. In silico and in vivo anti-malarial studies of 18β glycyrrhetinic acid from Glycyrrhiza glabra.

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    Komal Kalani

    Full Text Available Malaria is one of the most prevailing fatal diseases causing between 1.2 and 2.7 million deaths all over the world each year. Further, development of resistance against the frontline anti-malarial drugs has created an alarming situation, which requires intensive drug discovery to develop new, more effective, affordable and accessible anti-malarial agents possessing novel modes of action. Over the past few years triterpenoids from higher plants have shown a wide range of anti-malarial activities. As a part of our drug discovery program for anti-malarial agents from Indian medicinal plants, roots of Glycyrrhizaglabra were chemically investigated, which resulted in the isolation and characterization of 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid (GA as a major constituent. The in vitro studies against P. falciparum showed significant (IC50 1.69 µg/ml anti-malarial potential for GA. Similarly, the molecular docking studies showed adequate docking (LibDock score of 71.18 for GA and 131.15 for standard anti-malarial drug chloroquine. Further, in silico pharmacokinetic and drug-likeness studies showed that GA possesses drug-like properties. Finally, in vivo evaluation showed a dose dependent anti-malarial activity ranging from 68-100% at doses of 62.5-250 mg/kg on day 8. To the best of our knowledge this is the first ever report on the anti-malarial potential of GA. Further work on optimization of the anti-malarial lead is under progress.

  3. Treatment of imported severe malaria with artesunate instead of quinine - more evidence needed?

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    Grobusch Martin P

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rapid and fast acting anti-malarials are essential to treat severe malaria. Quinine has been the only option for parenteral therapy until recently. While current evidence shows that intravenous artesunate is more effective than quinine in treating severe malaria in endemic countries, some questions remain regarding safety profiles and drug resistance. For imported severe malaria, additional unanswered questions are related to generalizability of the findings from endemic countries and to legal aspects, as there is no Good Manufacturing Practice-conform drug available yet. Here, the implications of existing evidence for the treatment of imported severe malaria are discussed.

  4. Prescription pattern of anti-malarial drugs in a tertiary care hospital

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Santoshkumar R Jeevangi; Manjunath S; Sharanabasappa M Awanti

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the prescribing pattern of anti malarial drugs in a tertiary care hospital. Methods:A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted for 6 months of patients visiting in Basaveshwar Teaching and General Hospital, Gulbarga. Data were analyzed for various drug use indicators. Results: A total of 212 prescriptions were collected, with 136 (64.15%) male and 76 (35.85%) female. There were 128 (60.37%) Plasmodium vivax cases and 84 (39.63%) Plasmodium falciparum cases. All Plasmodium vivax cases were treated with chloroquine alone and among these 16 (12.5%) recieved radical treatment with primaquine along with chloroquine. Among 84 patients with Pasmodium falciparum, 40 patients received single drug such as quinine/mefloquinine/artesunate/arteether. Another 44 patients received multidrug regime like, quinine+artesunate (54.54%), quinine+mefloquine (27.27%) and quinine+arteether (18.18%). Chloroquine was not administered to any of the patients with Plasmodium falciparum malaria. The most common adverse effects with chloroquine were anorexia, nausea, vomiting and tinnitus in 9.37%of the cases. With quinine it was nausea and vomiting in 17.64%, tinnitus in 11.76%and hypoglycemia in 2.1%of cases. Conclusions: Our study found the perennial favorites like chloroquine for Plasmodium vivax and quinine for Plasmodium falciparum were the most effective drug. In the severe Plasmodium falciparum cases the artesunate derivatives and combination of artesunate with quinine/mefloquine were most effective with fewer incidences of side effects.

  5. Prospective strategies to delay the evolution of anti-malarial drug resistance: weighing the uncertainty

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    McKenzie F Ellis

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evolution of drug resistance in malaria parasites highlights a need to identify and evaluate strategies that could extend the useful therapeutic life of anti-malarial drugs. Such strategies are deployed to best effect before resistance has emerged, under conditions of great uncertainty. Methods Here, the emergence and spread of resistance was modelled using a hybrid framework to evaluate prospective strategies, estimate the time to drug failure, and weigh uncertainty. The waiting time to appearance was estimated as the product of low mutation rates, drug pressure, and parasite population sizes during treatment. Stochastic persistence and the waiting time to establishment were simulated as an evolving branching process. The subsequent spread of resistance was simulated in simple epidemiological models. Results Using this framework, the waiting time to the failure of artemisinin combination therapy (ACT for malaria was estimated, and a policy of multiple first-line therapies (MFTs was evaluated. The models quantify the effects of reducing drug pressure in delaying appearance, reducing the chances of establishment, and slowing spread. By using two first-line therapies in a population, it is possible to reduce drug pressure while still treating the full complement of cases. Conclusions At a global scale, because of uncertainty about the time to the emergence of ACT resistance, there was a strong case for MFTs to guard against early failure. Our study recommends developing operationally feasible strategies for implementing MFTs, such as distributing different ACTs at the clinic and for home-based care, or formulating different ACTs for children and adults.

  6. Saleability of anti-malarials in private drug shops in Muheza, Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringsted, Frank M; Massawe, Isolide S; Lemnge, Martha M;

    2011-01-01

    prescription-only anti-malarials, in Muheza town, Tanga Region voluntarily participated from July to December 2009. Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with owners or shopkeepers on saleability of anti-malarials, and structured questionnaires provided quantitative data on drugs sales volume. Results......: All surveyed drug shops illicitly sold SP and quinine (QN), and legally amodiaquine (AQ). Calculated monthly sale was 4,041 doses, in a town with a population of 15,000 people. Local brands of SP accounted for 74% of sales volume, compared to AQ (13%), QN (11%) and ACT (2%). Conclusions: In community...... resistance remains high, unregulated SP dispensing to people other than pregnant women runs the risk of eventually jeopardizing the effectiveness of the IPTp strategy. Further studies are recommended to find out barriers for ACT utilization and preference for self-medication and to train private drug...

  7. New developments in anti-malarial target candidate and product profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Jeremy N; Duparc, Stephan; Gutteridge, Winston E; Hooft van Huijsduijnen, Rob; Kaszubska, Wiweka; Macintyre, Fiona; Mazzuri, Sébastien; Möhrle, Jörg J; Wells, Timothy N C

    2017-01-13

    A decade of discovery and development of new anti-malarial medicines has led to a renewed focus on malaria elimination and eradication. Changes in the way new anti-malarial drugs are discovered and developed have led to a dramatic increase in the number and diversity of new molecules presently in pre-clinical and early clinical development. The twin challenges faced can be summarized by multi-drug resistant malaria from the Greater Mekong Sub-region, and the need to provide simplified medicines. This review lists changes in anti-malarial target candidate and target product profiles over the last 4 years. As well as new medicines to treat disease and prevent transmission, there has been increased focus on the longer term goal of finding new medicines for chemoprotection, potentially with long-acting molecules, or parenteral formulations. Other gaps in the malaria armamentarium, such as drugs to treat severe malaria and endectocides (that kill mosquitoes which feed on people who have taken the drug), are defined here. Ultimately the elimination of malaria requires medicines that are safe and well-tolerated to be used in vulnerable populations: in pregnancy, especially the first trimester, and in those suffering from malnutrition or co-infection with other pathogens. These updates reflect the maturing of an understanding of the key challenges in producing the next generation of medicines to control, eliminate and ultimately eradicate malaria.

  8. Anti-malarial drug quality in Lagos and Accra - a comparison of various quality assessments

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    Bate Roger

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two major cities in West Africa, Accra, the capital of Ghana, and Lagos, the largest city of Nigeria, have significant problems with substandard pharmaceuticals. Both have actively combated the problem in recent years, particularly by screening products on the market using the Global Pharma Health Fund e.V. Minilab® protocol. Random sampling of medicines from the two cities at least twice over the past 30 months allows a tentative assessment of whether improvements in drug quality have occurred. Since intelligence provided by investigators indicates that some counterfeit producers may be adapting products to pass Minilab tests, the results are compared with those from a Raman spectrometer and discrepancies are discussed. Methods Between mid-2007 and early-2010, samples of anti-malarial drugs were bought covertly from pharmacies in Lagos on three different occasions (October 2007, December 2008, February 2010, and from pharmacies in Accra on two different occasions (October 2007, February 2010. All samples were tested using the Minilab® protocol, which includes disintegration and active ingredient assays as well as visual inspection, and most samples were also tested by Raman spectrometry. Results In Lagos, the failure rate in the 2010 sampling fell to 29% of the 2007 finding using the Minilab® protocol, 53% using Raman spectrometry, and 46% using visual inspection. In Accra, the failure rate in the 2010 sampling fell to 54% of the 2007 finding using the Minilab® protocol, 72% using Raman spectrometry, and 90% using visual inspection. Conclusions The evidence presented shows that drug quality is probably improving in both cities, especially Lagos, since major reductions of failure rates over time occur with all means of assessment. Many more samples failed when examined by Raman spectrometry than by Minilab® protocol. The discrepancy is most likely caused by the two techniques measuring different aspects of the medication

  9. CoMFA, CoMSIA, and docking studies on thiolactone-class of potent anti-malarials: identification of essential structural features modulating anti-malarial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Kuldeep K; Bhunia, Shome S; Saxena, Anil K

    2011-09-01

    The integrated ligand- and structure-based drug design techniques have been applied on a homogeneous dataset of thiolactone-class of potent anti-malarials, to explore the essential structural features for the inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum. Developed CoMFA (q(2) = 0.716) and CoMSIA (q(2) = 0.632) models well explained structure-activity variation in both the training (CoMFA R(2) = 0.948 & CoMSIA R(2) = 0.849) and test set (CoMFA R(2) (pred) = 0.789 & CoMSIA R(2) (pred) = 0.733) compounds. The docking and scoring of the most active compound 10 into the active site of high-resolution (2.35 Å) structure of FabB-TLM binary complex (PDB-ID: 1FJ4) indicated that thiolactone core of this compound forms bifurcated H-bonding with two catalytic residues His298 and His333, and its saturated decyl side group is stabilized by hydrophobic interactions with the residues of a small hydrophobic groove, illustrating that the active site architecture, including two catalytic histidines and a small hydrophobic groove, is vital for protein-ligand interaction. In particular, the length and flexibility of the side group attached to the position 5 of thiolactone have been observed to play a significant role in the interaction with FabB enzyme. These results present scope for rational design of thiolactone-class of compounds that could furnish improved anti-malarial activity.

  10. Anti-malarial effect of 1-(N-acetyl-6-aminohexyl)-3-hydroxy-2-methylpyridin-4-one and green tea extract on erythrocyte-stage Plasmodium berghei in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Phitsinee; Thipubon; Wachiraporn; Tipsuwan; Chairat; Uthaipibull; Sineenart; Santitherakul; Somdet; Srichiratanakool

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine the efficacy of 1-(N-acetyl-6-aminohexyl)-3-hydroxy-2-methylpyridin-4-one(CM1) iron chelator and green tea extract(GTE) as anti-malarial activity in Plasmodium berghei(P. berghei) infected mice.Methods: The CM1(0–100 mg/kg/day) and GTE(0–100 mg(-)-epigallocatechin 3-gallate equivalent/kg/day) were orally administered to P. berghei infected mice for consecutive 4 days. Parasitized red blood cells(PRBC) were enumerated by using Giemsa staining microscopic method.Results: CM1 lowered percentage of PRBC in dose-dependent manner with an ED50 value of 56.91 mg/kg, when compared with pyrimethamine(PYR)(ED50= 0.76 mg/kg).GTE treatment did not show any inhibition of the malaria parasite growth. In combined treatment, CM1 along with 0.6 mg/kg PYR significantly inhibited the growth of P. berghei in mice while GTE did not enhance the PYR anti-malarial activity.Conclusions: CM1 would be effective per se and synergize with PYR in inhibiting growth of murine malaria parasites, possibly by limiting iron supply from plasma transferrin and host PRBC cytoplasm, and chelating catalytic iron cstitutive in parasites’ mitochondrial cytochromes and cytoplasmic ribonucleotide reductase. CM1 would be a promising adjuvant to enhance PYR anti-malarial activity and minimize the drug resistance.

  11. Anti-malarial effect of 1-(N-acetyl-6-aminohexyl)-3-hydroxy-2-methylpyridin-4-one and green tea extract on erythrocyte-stage Plasmodium berghei in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Phitsinee Thipubon; Wachiraporn Tipsuwan; Chairat Uthaipibull; Sineenart Santitherakul; Somdet Srichiratanakool

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To examine the efficacy of 1-(N-acetyl-6-aminohexyl)-3-hydroxy-2-methylpyridin-4-one (CM1) iron chelator and green tea extract (GTE) as anti-malarial activity in Plasmodium berghei (P. berghei ) infected mice. Methods:The CM1 (0–100 mg/kg/day) and GTE (0–100 mg (-)-epigallocatechin 3-gallate equivalent/kg/day) were orally administered to P. berghei infected mice for consecutive 4 days. Parasitized red blood cells (PRBC) were enumerated by using Giemsa staining microscopic method. Results: CM1 lowered percentage of PRBC in dose-dependent manner with an ED50 value of 56.91 mg/kg, when compared with pyrimethamine (PYR) (ED50=0.76 mg/kg). GTE treatment did not show any inhibition of the malaria parasite growth. In combined treatment, CM1 along with 0.6 mg/kg PYR significantly inhibited the growth of P. berghei in mice while GTE did not enhance the PYR anti-malarial activity. Conclusions: CM1 would be effective per se and synergize with PYR in inhibiting growth of murine malaria parasites, possibly by limiting iron supply from plasma transferrin and host PRBC cytoplasm, and chelating catalytic iron constitutive in parasites’ mitochondrial cytochromes and cytoplasmic ribonucleotide reductase. CM1 would be a promising adjuvant to enhance PYR anti-malarial activity and minimize the drug resistance.

  12. In silico analysis reveals the anti-malarial potential of quinolinyl chalcone derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thillainayagam, Mahalakshmi; Pandian, Lavanya; Murugan, Kumar Kalavathy; Vijayaparthasarathi, Vijayakumar; Sundaramoorthy, Sarveswari; Anbarasu, Anand; Ramaiah, Sudha

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the correlation between chemical structures and various parameters such as steric effects and electrostatic interactions to the inhibitory activities of quinolinyl chalcone derivatives is derived to identify the key structural elements required in the rational design of potent and novel anti-malarial compounds. The molecular docking simulations and Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) are carried out on 38 chalcones derivatives using Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase (PfLDH) as potential target. Surflex-dock is used to determine the probable binding conformations of all the compounds at the active site of pfLDH and to identify the hydrogen bonding interactions which could be used to alter the inhibitory activities. The CoMFA model has provided statistically significant results with the cross-validated correlation coefficient (q(2)) of .850 and the non-cross-validated correlation coefficient (r(2)) of .912. Standard error of estimation (SEE) is .280 and the optimum number of component is five. The predictive ability of the resultant model is evaluated using a test set comprising of 13 molecules and the predicted r(2) value is .885. The results provide valuable insight for optimization of quinolinyl chalcone derivatives for better anti-malarial therapy.

  13. A framework for assessing the risk of resistance for anti-malarials in development

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    Ding Xavier C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Resistance is a constant challenge for anti-infective drug development. Since they kill sensitive organisms, anti-infective agents are bound to exert an evolutionary pressure toward the emergence and spread of resistance mechanisms, if such resistance can arise by stochastic mutation events. New classes of medicines under development must be designed or selected to stay ahead in this vicious circle of resistance control. This involves both circumventing existing resistance mechanisms and selecting molecules which are resilient against the development and spread of resistance. Cell-based screening methods have led to a renaissance of new classes of anti-malarial medicines, offering us the potential to select and modify molecules based on their resistance potential. To that end, a standardized in vitro methodology to assess quantitatively these characteristics in Plasmodium falciparum during the early phases of the drug development process has been developed and is presented here. It allows the identification of anti-malarial compounds with overt resistance risks and the prioritization of the most robust ones. The integration of this strategy in later stages of development, registration, and deployment is also discussed.

  14. In vitro and in vivo anti-malarial activity of Boerhavia elegans and Solanum surattense

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    Khodakarim Nastaran

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an urgent need to identify new anti-malarial drug targets for both prophylaxis and chemotherapy, due to the increasing problem of drug resistance to malaria parasites. In the present study, the aim was to discover novel, effective plant-based extracts for the activity against malaria. Methods Ten plants found in Iran were selected by ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants. The crude ethanolic extracts were tested for in vitro anti-plasmodial activity against two strains of Plasmodium falciparum: K1 (chloroquine-resistant strain and CY27 (chloroquine-sensitive strain, using the parasite lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH assay. The anti-plasmodial activity of the extracts was also assessed in the 4-day suppressive anti-malarial assay in mice inoculated with Plasmodium berghei (ANKA strain. Crude ethanolic extracts showed good anti-plasmodial activity were further fractionated by partitioning in water and dichloromethane. Results Of 10 plant species assayed, three species: Boerhavia elegans (Choisy, Solanum surattense (Burm.f. and Prosopis juliflora (Sw. showed promising anti-plasmodial activity in vitro (IC50 ≤ 50 μg/ml and in vivo with no toxicity. The dichloromethane fraction of three extracts revealed stronger anti-plasmodial activity than the total extracts. Conclusion Anti-plasmodial activities of extracts of B. elegans and S. surattense are reported for the first time.

  15. The anti-malarial chloroquine overcomes Primary resistance and restores sensitivity to Trastuzumab in HER2-positive breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cufí, Sílvia; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Cuyàs, Elisabet; López-Bonet, Eugeni; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Joven, Jorge; Menendez, Javier A.

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy may control the de novo refractoriness of HER2 gene-amplified breast carcinomas to the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab (Herceptin). Tumor cells originally obtained from a patient who rapidly progressed on trastuzumab ab initio display increased cellular levels of the LC3-II protein—a finding that correlates with increased numbers of autophagosomes—and decreased levels of the autophagy receptor p62/SQSTM1, a protein selectively degraded by autophagy. Trastuzumab-refractory cells are in a state of “autophagy addiction” because genetic ablation of autophagy-specific genes (ATG8, ATG5, ATG12) notably reduces intrinsic refractoriness to trastuzumab. When the anti-malarial lysosomotropic drug chloroquine impedes autophagic resolution of the accumulation of autophagolysosomes formed in the presence of trastuzumab, cells commit to die by apoptosis. Accordingly, combination treatment with trastuzumab and chloroquine radically suppresses tumor growth by > 90% in a tumor xenograft completely refractory to trastuzumab. Adding chloroquine to trastuzumab-based regimens may therefore improve outcomes among women with autophagy-addicted HER2-positive breast cancer. PMID:23965851

  16. Natural products as starting points for future anti-malarial therapies: going back to our roots?

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    Wells Timothy NC

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery and development of new anti-malarials are at a crossroads. Fixed dose artemisinin combination therapy is now being used to treat a hundred million children each year, with a cost as low as 30 cents per child, with cure rates of over 95%. However, as with all anti-infective strategies, this triumph brings with it the seeds of its own downfall, the emergence of resistance. It takes ten years to develop a new medicine. New classes of medicines to combat malaria, as a result of infection by Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax are urgently needed. Results Natural product scaffolds have been the basis of the majority of current anti-malarial medicines. Molecules such as quinine, lapachol and artemisinin were originally isolated from herbal medicinal products. After improvement with medicinal chemistry and formulation technologies, and combination with other active ingredients, they now make up the current armamentarium of medicines. In recent years advances in screening technologies have allowed testing of millions of compounds from pharmaceutical diversity for anti-malarial activity in cellular assays. These initiatives have resulted in thousands of new sub-micromolar active compounds – starting points for new drug discovery programmes. Against this backdrop, the paucity of potent natural products identified has been disappointing. Now is a good time to reflect on the current approach to screening herbal medicinal products and suggest revisions. Nearly sixty years ago, the Chinese doctor Chen Guofu, suggested natural products should be approached by dao-xing-ni-shi or ‘acting in the reversed order’, starting with observational clinical studies. Natural products based on herbal remedies are in use in the community, and have the potential unique advantage that clinical observational data exist, or can be generated. The first step should be the confirmation and definition of the clinical activity of herbal

  17. Closing the access barrier for effective anti-malarials in the private sector in rural Uganda: consortium for ACT private sector subsidy (CAPSS pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talisuna Ambrose O

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT, the treatment of choice for uncomplicated falciparum malaria, is unaffordable and generally inaccessible in the private sector, the first port of call for most malaria treatment across rural Africa. Between August 2007 and May 2010, the Uganda Ministry of Health and the Medicines for Malaria Venture conducted the Consortium for ACT Private Sector Subsidy (CAPSS pilot study to test whether access to ACT in the private sector could be improved through the provision of a high level supply chain subsidy. Methods Four intervention districts were purposefully selected to receive branded subsidized medicines - “ACT with a leaf”, while the fifth district acted as the control. Baseline and evaluation outlet exit surveys and retail audits were conducted at licensed and unlicensed drug outlets in the intervention and control districts. A survey-adjusted, multivariate logistic regression model was used to analyse the intervention’s impact on: ACT uptake and price; purchase of ACT within 24 hours of symptom onset; ACT availability and displacement of sub-optimal anti-malarial. Results At baseline, ACT accounted for less than 1% of anti-malarials purchased from licensed drug shops for children less than five years old. However, at evaluation, “ACT with a leaf” accounted for 69% of anti-malarial purchased in the interventions districts. Purchase of ACT within 24 hours of symptom onset for children under five years rose from 0.8% at baseline to 26.2% (95% CI: 23.2-29.2% at evaluation in the intervention districts. In the control district, it rose modestly from 1.8% to 5.6% (95% CI: 4.0-7.3%. The odds of purchasing ACT within 24 hours in the intervention districts compared to the control was 0.46 (95% CI: 0.08-2.68, p=0.4 at baseline and significant increased to 6.11 (95% CI: 4.32-8.62, p Conclusions These data demonstrate that a supply-side subsidy and an intensive communications campaign

  18. In Silico and In Vivo Anti-Malarial Studies of 18β Glycyrrhetinic Acid from Glycyrrhiza glabra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalani, Komal; Agarwal, Jyoti; Alam, Sarfaraz; Khan, Feroz; Pal, Anirban; Srivastava, Santosh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most prevailing fatal diseases causing between 1.2 and 2.7 million deaths all over the world each year. Further, development of resistance against the frontline anti-malarial drugs has created an alarming situation, which requires intensive drug discovery to develop new, more effective, affordable and accessible anti-malarial agents possessing novel modes of action. Over the past few years triterpenoids from higher plants have shown a wide range of anti-malarial activities. As a part of our drug discovery program for anti-malarial agents from Indian medicinal plants, roots of Glycyrrhizaglabra were chemically investigated, which resulted in the isolation and characterization of 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) as a major constituent. The in vitro studies against P. falciparum showed significant (IC50 1.69µg/ml) anti-malarial potential for GA. Similarly, the molecular docking studies showed adequate docking (LibDock) score of 71.18 for GA and 131.15 for standard anti-malarial drug chloroquine. Further, in silico pharmacokinetic and drug-likeness studies showed that GA possesses drug-like properties. Finally, in vivo evaluation showed a dose dependent anti-malarial activity ranging from 68–100% at doses of 62.5–250mg/kg on day 8. To the best of our knowledge this is the first ever report on the anti-malarial potential of GA. Further work on optimization of the anti-malarial lead is under progress. PMID:24086367

  19. A study of toxicity and differential gene expression in murine liver following exposure to anti-malarial drugs: amodiaquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine

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    Rath Srikanta

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amodiaquine (AQ along with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP offers effective and cheaper treatment against chloroquine-resistant falciparum malaria in many parts of sub-Saharan Africa. Considering the previous history of hepatitis, agranulocytosis and neutrocytopenia associated with AQ monotherapy, it becomes imperative to study the toxicity of co-administration of AQ and SP. In this study, toxicity and resulting global differential gene expression was analyzed following exposure to these drugs in experimental Swiss mice. Methods The conventional markers of toxicity in serum, oxidative stress parameters in tissue homogenates, histology of liver and alterations in global transcriptomic expression were evaluated to study the toxic effects of AQ and SP in isolation and in combination. Results The combination therapy of AQ and SP results in more pronounced hepatotoxicity as revealed by elevated level of serum ALT, AST with respect to their individual drug exposure regimen. Furthermore, alterations in the activity of major antioxidant enzymes (glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, indicating the development of oxidative stress, was more significant in AQ+SP combination therapy. cDNA microarray results too showed considerably more perturbed gene expression following combination therapy of AQ and SP as compared to their individual drug treatment. Moreover, a set of genes were identified whose expression pattern can be further investigated for identifying a good biomarker for potential anti-malarial hepatotoxicity. Conclusion These observations clearly indicate AQ+SP combination therapy is hepatotoxic in experimental Swiss mice. Microarray results provide a considerable number of potential biomarkers of anti-malarial drug toxicity. These findings hence will be useful for future drug toxicity studies, albeit implications of this study in clinical conditions need to be monitored with cautions.

  20. Antibodies to malaria vaccine candidates are associated with chloroquine or sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine treatment efficacy in children in an endemic area of Burkina Faso

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    Diarra Amidou

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient immune status is thought to affect the efficacy of anti-malarial chemotherapy. This is a subject of some importance, since evidence of immunity-related interactions may influence our use of chemotherapy in populations with drug resistance, as well as assessment of the value of suboptimal vaccines. The study aim was to investigate relationship between antibodies and anti-malarial drug treatment outcomes. Methods Some 248 children aged 0.5 and 15 years were recruited prior to the high malaria transmission season. Venous blood (5 ml was obtained from each child to measure antibody levels to selected malaria antigens, using ELISA. Blood smears were also performed to assess drug efficacy and malaria infection prevalence. Children were actively followed up to record clinical malaria cases. Results IgG levels to MSP3 were always higher in the successfully treated group than in the group with treatment failure. The same observation was made for GLURP but the reverse observation was noticed for MSP1-19. Cytophilic and non-cytophilic antibodies were significantly associated with protection against all three antigens, except for IgG4 to MSP1-19 and GLURP. Conclusion Acquired anti-malarial antibodies may play an important role in the efficacy of anti-malarial drugs in younger children more susceptible to the disease.

  1. Anti-malarial drug artesunate attenuates experimental allergic asthma via inhibition of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt pathway.

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    Chang Cheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt pathway is linked to the development of asthma. Anti-malarial drug artesunate is a semi-synthetic derivative of artemisinin, the principal active component of a medicinal plant Artemisia annua, and has been shown to inhibit PI3K/Akt activity. We hypothesized that artesunate may attenuate allergic asthma via inhibition of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Female BALB/c mice sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA developed airway inflammation. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was assessed for total and differential cell counts, and cytokine and chemokine levels. Lung tissues were examined for cell infiltration and mucus hypersecretion, and the expression of inflammatory biomarkers. Airway hyperresponsiveness was monitored by direct airway resistance analysis. Artesunate dose-dependently inhibited OVA-induced increases in total and eosinophil counts, IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 and eotaxin levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. It attenuated OVA-induced lung tissue eosinophilia and airway mucus production, mRNA expression of E-selectin, IL-17, IL-33 and Muc5ac in lung tissues, and airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. In normal human bronchial epithelial cells, artesunate blocked epidermal growth factor-induced phosphorylation of Akt and its downstream substrates tuberin, p70S6 kinase and 4E-binding protein 1, and transactivation of NF-κB. Similarly, artesunate blocked the phosphorylation of Akt and its downstream substrates in lung tissues from OVA-challenged mice. Anti-inflammatory effect of artesunate was further confirmed in a house dust mite mouse asthma model. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Artesunate ameliorates experimental allergic airway inflammation probably via negative regulation of PI3K/Akt pathway and the downstream NF-κB activity. These findings provide a novel therapeutic value for artesunate in the treatment of allergic asthma.

  2. Communicating the AMFm message: exploring the effect of communication and training interventions on private for-profit provider awareness and knowledge related to a multi-country anti-malarial subsidy intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The Affordable Medicines Facility - malaria (AMFm), implemented at national scale in eight African countries or territories, subsidized quality-assured artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) and included communication campaigns to support implementation and promote appropriate anti-malarial use. This paper reports private for-profit provider awareness of key features of the AMFm programme, and changes in provider knowledge of appropriate malaria treatment. Methods This study had a non-experimental design based on nationally representative surveys of outlets stocking anti-malarials before (2009/10) and after (2011) the AMFm roll-out. Results Based on data from over 19,500 outlets, results show that in four of eight settings, where communication campaigns were implemented for 5–9 months, 76%-94% awareness of the AMFm ‘green leaf’ logo, 57%-74% awareness of the ACT subsidy programme, and 52%-80% awareness of the correct recommended retail price (RRP) of subsidized ACT were recorded. However, in the remaining four settings where communication campaigns were implemented for three months or less, levels were substantially lower. In six of eight settings, increases of at least 10 percentage points in private for-profit providers’ knowledge of the correct first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria were seen; and in three of these the levels of knowledge achieved at endline were over 80%. Conclusions The results support the interpretation that, in addition to the availability of subsidized ACT, the intensity of communication campaigns may have contributed to the reported levels of AMFm-related awareness and knowledge among private for-profit providers. Future subsidy programmes for anti-malarials or other treatments should similarly include communication activities. PMID:24495691

  3. Development of a TaqMan Allelic Discrimination Assay for detection of Single Nucleotides Polymorphisms associated with anti-malarial drug resistance

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    Kamau Edwin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anti-malarial drug resistance poses a threat to current global efforts towards control and elimination of malaria. Several methods are used in monitoring anti-malarial drug resistance. Molecular markers such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP for example are increasingly being used to identify genetic mutations related to anti-malarial drug resistance. Several methods are currently being used in analysis of SNP associated with anti-malarial drug resistance and although each one of these methods has unique strengths and shortcoming, there is still need to improve and/or develop new methods that will close the gap found in the current methods. Methods TaqMan Allelic Discrimination assays for detection of SNPs associated with anti-malarial drug resistance were designed for analysis on Applied Biosystems PCR platform. These assays were designed by submitting SNP sequences associated with anti-malarial drug resistance to Applied Biosystems website. Eleven SNPs associated with resistance to anti-malarial drugs were selected and tested. The performance of each SNP assay was tested by creating plasmid DNAs carrying codons of interests and analysing them for analysis. To test the sensitivity and specificity of each SNP assay, 12 clinical samples were sequenced at codons of interest and used in the analysis. Plasmid DNAs were used to establish the Limit of Detection (LoD for each assay. Results Data from genetic profiles of the Plasmodium falciparum laboratory strains and sequence data from 12 clinical samples was used as the reference method with which the performance of the SNP assays were compared to. The sensitivity and specificity of each SNP assay was establish at 100%. LoD for each assay was established at 2 GE, equivalent to less than 1 parasite/μL. SNP assays performed well in detecting mixed infection and analysis of clinical samples. Conclusion TaqMan Allelic Discrimination assay provides a good alternative tool in

  4. Recent progress in the identification and development of anti-malarial agents using virtual screening based approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Priyanka; Tiwari, Sunita; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran

    2015-01-01

    Malaria has continued to be one of the most perplexing diseases for biological science community around the world due to its prevalent devastating nature and quick developing resistance against the frontline drugs. Artimisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) has been so far found to be among the best therapies against Plasmodium pathogens but alarming emergence of resistance in parasites against every known chemotherapy has prompted the scientific community to step up all the efforts towards development of new and affordable anti-malarial drugs. Computer-aided approaches have received enormous attention in recent years in the field of identification and design of novel drugs. In this review, we summarize recently published research concerning the identification and development of anti-malarial compounds using virtual screening approaches. It would be admirable to discern the successful application of in silico studies for anti-malarial drug discovery hitherto and would certainly help in generating new avenues for pursuing integrated studies between the experimentalists and computational chemists in a systematic manner as a time and cost efficient alternative for future antimalarial drug discovery projects.

  5. Combinatorial pathway engineering for optimized production of the anti-malarial FR900098.

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    Freestone, Todd S; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-02-01

    As resistance to current anti-malarial therapeutics spreads, new compounds to treat malaria are increasingly needed. One promising compound is FR900098, a naturally occurring phosphonate. Due to limitations in both chemical synthesis and biosynthetic methods for FR900098 production, this potential therapeutic has yet to see widespread implementation. Here we applied a combinatorial pathway engineering strategy to improve the production of FR900098 in Escherichia coli by modulating each of the pathway's nine genes with four promoters of different strengths. Due to the large size of the library and the low screening throughput, it was necessary to develop a novel screening strategy that significantly reduced the sample size needed to find an optimal strain. This was done by using biased libraries that localize searching around top hits and home in on high-producing strains. By incorporating this strategy, a significantly improved strain was found after screening less than 3% of the entire library. When coupled with culturing optimization, a strain was found to produce 96 mg/L, a 16-fold improvement over the original strain. We believe the enriched library method developed here can be used on other large pathways that may be difficult to engineer by combinatorial methods due to low screening throughput.

  6. Treatment of imported severe malaria with artesunate instead of quinine--more evidence needed?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cramer, J.P.; López-Vélez, R.; Burchard, G.D.; Grobusch, M.P.; de Vries, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    Rapid and fast acting anti-malarials are essential to treat severe malaria. Quinine has been the only option for parenteral therapy until recently. While current evidence shows that intravenous artesunate is more effective than quinine in treating severe malaria in endemic countries, some questions

  7. Anti-malarial efficacy of pyronaridine and artesunate in combination in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivas, Livia; Rattray, Lauren; Stewart, Lindsay; Bongard, Emily; Robinson, Brian L; Peters, Wallace; Croft, Simon L

    2008-03-01

    Pyronaridine is a Mannich base anti-malarial with demonstrated efficacy against drug resistant Plasmodium falciparum, P. vivax, P. ovale and P. malariae. However, resistance to pyronaridine can develop quickly when it is used alone but can be considerably delayed when it is administered with artesunate in rodent malaria models. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of pyronaridine in combination with artesunate against P. falciparum in vitro and in rodent malaria models in vivo to support its clinical application. Pyronaridine showed consistently high levels of in vitro activity against a panel of six P. falciparum drug-sensitive and resistant strains (Geometric Mean IC50=2.24 nM, 95% CI=1.20-3.27). In vitro interactions between pyronaridine and artesunate showed a slight antagonistic trend, but in vivo compared to pyronaridine and artesunate administered alone, the 3:1 ratio of the combination, reduced the ED90 of artesunate by approximately 15.6-fold in a pyronaridine-resistant P. berghei line and by approximately 200-fold in an artesunate-resistant line of P. berghei. Complete cure rates were achieved with doses of the combination above or equal to 8 mg/kg per day against P. chabaudi AS. These results indicate that the combination had an enhanced effect over monotherapy and lower daily doses of artesunate could be used to obtain a curative effect. The data suggest that the combination of pyronaridine and artesunate should have potential in areas of multi-drug resistant malaria.

  8. Innovative public-private partnerships to maximize the delivery of anti-malarial medicines: lessons learned from the ASAQ Winthrop experience

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    Sebbag Robert

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This case study describes how a public-private partnership initiated to develop a new anti-malarial combination, ASAQ Winthrop, has evolved over time to address issues posed by its effective deployment in the field. Case description In 2002, DNDi created the FACT project to develop two fixed-dose combinations, artesunate-amodiaquine and artesunate-mefloquine, to meet the WHO anti-malarial treatment recommendations and international regulatory agencies approval standards. In 2002, Sanofi-aventis had started a development programme for a fixed-dose combination of artesunate and amodiaquine, to replace its co-blister combination. DNDi and sanofi-aventis joined forces in 2004, with the objective of developing within the shortest possible time frame a non-patented, affordable and easy to use fixed-dose combination of artesunate and amodiaquine adapted to the needs of patients, in particular, those of children. The partners developed Coarsucam®/Artesunate Amodiaquine Winthrop® ("ASAQ Winthrop" which was prequalified by the WHO in 2008. Additional partnerships have since been established by DNDi and sanofi-aventis to ensure: 1 the adoption of this new medicine by malaria-endemic countries, 2 its appropriate usage through a broad range of information tools, and 3 the monitoring of its safety and efficacy in the field through an innovative Risk Management Plan. Discussion and evaluation The partnership between DNDi and sanofi-aventis has enabled the development and pre-qualification of ASAQ Winthrop in a short timeframe. As a result of the multiple collaborations established by the two partners, as of late 2010, ASAQ Winthrop was registered in 30 sub-Saharan African countries and in India, with over 80 million treatments distributed in 21 countries. To date, 10 clinical studies, involving 3432 patients with ASAQ Winthrop were completed to document efficacy and safety issues identified in the Risk Management Plan. Conclusions The

  9. Evaluation of anti-malarial activity of Artemisia turcomanica and A. kopetdaghensis by cell-free β-hematin formation assay

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    M. Mojarrab

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives:The plants of genus Artemisia (Asteraceae have been conventionally used for prevention and medication of a number of ailments. In the present research, ten extracts with different polarities from aerial parts of two Artemisia species, A. kopetdaghensis and A. turcomanica were evaluated for their potential anti-malarial properties. Methods: The plant materials were extracted successively with petroleum ether (PE, dichloromethane (DCM, ethyl acetate (EtOAC, ethanol, and ethanol-water (1:1 v/v  by cold maceration method. Cell free β-hematin formation assay were used for assessing anti-malarial activity of obtained extracts. Results: DCM extract of A. kopetdaghensis and PE extract of A. turcomanica showed remarkable anti-malarial activity with IC50 values of 1.04±0.02 mg/mL and 0.90±0.27 mg/mL, respectively, compared to positive control (chloroquine, IC50 0.04±0.01 mg/mL. Conclusion:  It seems that the anti-malarial activity of these extracts might be bound up with the presence of compounds with low or medium polarity; hence, this preliminary test indicated that these potent extracts could be considered for further investigations to find new sources of anti-malarial phytochemicals.

  10. Anti-malarial drug safety information obtained through routine monitoring in a rural district of South-Western Senegal

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    Brasseur Philippe

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowing the safety profile of anti-malarial treatments in routine use is essential; millions of patients receive now artemisinin combination therapy (ACT annually, but the return on information through current systems is as yet inadequate. Cohort event monitoring (CEM is a WHO (World Health Organization-recommended practice; testing its performance and feasibility in routine practice in malaria-endemic is important. Methods A nine-year CEM-based study of the safety of artesunate-amodiaquine (ASAQ at five peripheral health facilities in a rural district of South-western Senegal. Staff (nurses, health workers were trained to collect actively and systematically information on the patient, treatment and events on a purposely designed questionnaire. The occurrence and severity of events was collected before, during and after treatment up to 28 days in order to generate information on all adverse events (AEs as well as treatment-emerging signs/symptoms (TESS. Laboratory tests (haematology, liver and renal was planned for at least 10% of cases. Results During 2001–2009, 3,708 parasitologically-confirmed malaria cases (mean age = 16.0 ± 12.7 years were enrolled (26% and 52% of all and parasitologically-confirmed ASAQ treatments, respectively. Treatment was supervised in 96% of cases. Products changed over time: 49% were a loose combination of individually-packaged products (available 2001–03, 42% co-blistered products (2004–09 and 9% a fixed-dose co-formulation (2006–09; dosing was age-based for 42%, weight-based for 58%. AS and AQ were correctly dosed in 97% and 82% of cases with the loose and 93% and 86% with the fixed combination, but only 50% and 42% with the co-blistered product. Thirty-three per cent (33% of patients had at least one sign/symptom pre-treatment, 12% had at least one AE and 9% a TESS (total events 3,914, 1,144 and 693, respectively. AEs overestimated TESS by 1.2-2 fold (average 1.7. Changes in

  11. Synthesis, characterization of chitosan-tripolyphosphate conjugated chloroquine nanoparticle and its in vivo anti-malarial efficacy against rodent parasite: a dose and duration dependent approach.

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    Tripathy, Satyajit; Das, Sabyasachi; Chakraborty, Subhankari Prasad; Sahu, Sumanta Kumar; Pramanik, Panchanan; Roy, Somenath

    2012-09-15

    Various strategies to deliver antimalarials using nanocarriers have been evaluated. However, taking into account the peculiarities of malaria parasites, the focus is placed mainly polymer-based chitosan nanocarriers. Our purpose of the study is to develop chitosan-tripolyphosphate (CS-TPP) nanoparticles (NPs) conjugated chloroquine in application for attenuation of Plasmodium berghei infection in Swiss mice. NPs were prepared by ionotropic gelation between CS and sodium TPP. In the study, the interaction of CS and TPP and the presence of chloroquine at the surface of chitosan-TPP NPs have been investigated by means of different methods like FTIR, DLS, and zeta potential. After drug preparation, effective dose of the nanoconjugated chloroquine (Nch) among 100, 250, and 500 mg/kg bw/day, was studied against P. berghei infection in Swiss mice by blood smear staining and biochemical assay of different inflammatory markers, and antioxidant enzyme levels also performed. After evaluating the effective dose, dose-dependent duration study was performed for 5, 10, 15 days. From the present study the maximum effect of Nch was found at 250 mg/kg bw concentration for 15 days treatment. So, this Nch might have potential of application as therapeutic anti-malarial and antioxidant agent.

  12. Ex vivo susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Dakar, Senegal, to seven standard anti-malarial drugs

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    Pradines Bruno

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a result of widespread chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine resistance, artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT (which includes artemether-lumefantrine and artesunate-amodiaquine has been recommended as a first-line anti-malarial regimen in Senegal since 2006. Since then, there have been very few reports on the ex vivo susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum to anti-malarial drugs. To examine whether parasite susceptibility has been affected by the widespread use of ACT, the ex vivo susceptibility of local isolates was assessed at the military hospital of Dakar. Methods The ex vivo susceptibility of 93 P. falciparum isolates from Dakar was successfully determined using the Plasmodium lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH ELISA for the following drugs: chloroquine (CQ, quinine (QN, mefloquine (MQ, monodesethylamodiaquine (MDAQ, lumefantrine (LMF, dihydroartemisinin (DHA and doxycycline (DOX. Results After transformation of the isolate IC50 in ratio of IC50 according to the susceptibility of the 3D7 reference strain (isolate IC50/3D7 IC50, the prevalence of the in vitro resistant isolates with reduced susceptibility was 50% for MQ, 22% for CQ, 12% for DOX, 6% for both QN and MDAQ and 1% for the drugs LMF and DHA. The highest significant positive correlations were shown between responses to CQ and MDAQ (r = 0.569; P r = 0.511; P r = 0.428; P = 0.0001, LMF and MQ (r = 0.413; P = 0.0002, QN and DHA (r = 0.402; P = 0.0003 and QN and MQ (r = 0.421; P = 0.0001. Conclusions The introduction of ACT in 2002 has not induced a decrease in P. falciparum susceptibility to the drugs DHA, MDAQ and LMF, which are common ACT components. However, the prevalence of P. falciparum isolates with reduced susceptibility has increased for both MQ and DOX. Taken together, these data suggest that intensive surveillance of the P. falciparum in vitro susceptibility to anti-malarial drugs in Senegal is required.

  13. A population genetic model for the initial spread of partially resistant malaria parasites under anti-malarial combination therapy and weak intrahost competition.

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    Yuseob Kim

    Full Text Available To develop public-health policies that extend the lifespan of affordable anti-malarial drugs as effective treatment options, it is necessary to understand the evolutionary processes leading to the origin and spread of mutations conferring drug resistance in malarial parasites. We built a population-genetic model for the emergence of resistance under combination drug therapy. Reproductive cycles of parasites are specified by their absolute fitness determined by clinical parameters, thus coupling the evolutionary-genetic with population-dynamic processes. Initial mutations confer only partial drug-resistance. Therefore, mutant parasites rarely survive combination therapy and within-host competition is very weak among parasites. The model focuses on the early phase of such unsuccessful recurrent mutations. This ends in the rare event of mutants enriching in an infected individual from which the successful spread of resistance over the entire population is initiated. By computer simulations, the waiting time until the establishment of resistant parasites is analysed. Resistance spreads quickly following the first appearance of a host infected predominantly by mutant parasites. This occurs either through a rare transmission of a resistant parasite to an uninfected host or through a rare failure of drugs in removing "transient" mutant alleles. The emergence of resistance is delayed with lower mutation rate, earlier treatment, higher metabolic cost of resistance, longer duration of high drug dose, and higher drug efficacy causing a stronger reduction in the sensitive and resistant parasites' fitnesses. Overall, contrary to other studies' proposition, the current model based on absolute fitness suggests that aggressive drug treatment delays the emergence of drug resistance.

  14. Anti-malarials exert a protective effect while Mestizo patients are at increased risk of developing SLE renal disease: data from a Latin-American cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons-Estel, Guillermo J.; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Hachuel, Leticia; Boggio, Gabriela; Wojdyla, Daniel; Pascual-Ramos, Virginia; Soriano, Enrique R.; Saurit, Verónica; Cavalcanti, Fernando S.; Guzman, Renato A.; Guibert-Toledano, Marlene; Sauza del Pozo, Maria J.; Amigo, Mary-Carmen; Alva, Magaly; Esteva-Spinetti, Maria H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To examine the role of ethnicity and the use of anti-malarials (protective) on lupus renal disease. Methods. A nested case–control study (1:2 proportion, n = 265 and 530) within GLADEL's (Grupo Latino Americano De Estudio de Lupus) longitudinal inception cohort was carried out. The end-point was ACR renal criterion development after diagnosis. Cases and controls were matched for follow-up time (end-point or a comparable time, respectively). Renal disease predictors were examined by univariable and multivariable analyses. Additional analyses were done to determine if the protective effect of anti-malarials persisted after adjusting for intake-associated confounders. Results. Of the cases, 233 (87.9%) were women; their mean (s.d.) age at diagnosis was 28.0 (11.9) years and their median (Q3–Q1 interquartile range) follow-up time for cases and controls was 8.3 months (Q3–Q1: 23.5); 56.6% of the cases and 74.3% of the controls were anti-malarial users. Mestizo ethnicity [odds ratio (OR) 1.72, 95% CI 1.19, 2.48] and hypertension (OR 2.26, 95% CI 1.38, 3.70) were independently associated with a higher risk of renal disease, whereas anti-malarial use (OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.26, 0.58), older age at disease onset (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.96, 0.99) and female gender (OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.32, 0.99) were negatively associated with such occurrence. After adjusting for variables associated with their intake, the protective effect of anti-malarials on renal disease occurrence persisted (OR 0.38, 95% CI 0.25, 0.58). Conclusion. Mestizo patients are at increased risk of developing renal disease, whereas anti-malarial use protects patients from such an occurrence. PMID:22389125

  15. Discovery of potent, novel, non-toxic anti-malarial compounds via quantum modelling, virtual screening and in vitro experimental validation

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    Kaludov Nikola

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Developing resistance towards existing anti-malarial therapies emphasize the urgent need for new therapeutic options. Additionally, many malaria drugs in use today have high toxicity and low therapeutic indices. Gradient Biomodeling, LLC has developed a quantum-model search technology that uses quantum similarity and does not depend explicitly on chemical structure, as molecules are rigorously described in fundamental quantum attributes related to individual pharmacological properties. Therapeutic activity, as well as toxicity and other essential properties can be analysed and optimized simultaneously, independently of one another. Such methodology is suitable for a search of novel, non-toxic, active anti-malarial compounds. Methods A set of innovative algorithms is used for the fast calculation and interpretation of electron-density attributes of molecular structures at the quantum level for rapid discovery of prospective pharmaceuticals. Potency and efficacy, as well as additional physicochemical, metabolic, pharmacokinetic, safety, permeability and other properties were characterized by the procedure. Once quantum models are developed and experimentally validated, the methodology provides a straightforward implementation for lead discovery, compound optimizzation and de novo molecular design. Results Starting with a diverse training set of 26 well-known anti-malarial agents combined with 1730 moderately active and inactive molecules, novel compounds that have strong anti-malarial activity, low cytotoxicity and structural dissimilarity from the training set were discovered and experimentally validated. Twelve compounds were identified in silico and tested in vitro; eight of them showed anti-malarial activity (IC50 ≤ 10 μM, with six being very effective (IC50 ≤ 1 μM, and four exhibiting low nanomolar potency. The most active compounds were also tested for mammalian cytotoxicity and found to be non-toxic, with a

  16. Characterization and optimization of the haemozoin-like crystal (HLC) assay to determine Hz inhibiting effects of anti-malarial compounds

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background The haem-haemozoin biocrystallization pathway is an attractive target where several efficacious and safe anti-malarial drugs act. Consequently, in vitro haemozoin (Hz) inhibition assays have been developed to identify novel compounds. However, results may differ between assays and often require complex methods or sophisticated infrastructure. The recently reported growth of haemozoin-like crystals (HLC) appears to be a simple alternative although the endproduct is structurally diff...

  17. The potential of anti-malarial compounds derived from African medicinal plants, part I: a pharmacological evaluation of alkaloids and terpenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoa Onguéné, Pascal; Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Lifongo, Lydia Likowo; Ndom, Jean Claude; Sippl, Wolfgang; Mbaze, Luc Meva'a

    2013-12-13

    Traditional medicine caters for about 80% of the health care needs of many rural populations around the world, especially in developing countries. In addition, plant-derived compounds have played key roles in drug discovery. Malaria is currently a public health concern in many countries in the world due to factors such as chemotherapy faced by resistance, poor hygienic conditions, poorly managed vector control programmes and no approved vaccines. In this review, an attempt has been made to assess the value of African medicinal plants for drug discovery by discussing the anti-malarial virtue of the derived phytochemicals that have been tested by in vitro and in vivo assays. This survey was focused on pure compounds derived from African flora which have exhibited anti-malarial properties with activities ranging from "very active" to "weakly active". However, only the compounds which showed anti-malarial activities from "very active" to "moderately active" are discussed in this review. The activity of 278 compounds, mainly alkaloids, terpenoids, flavonoids, coumarines, phenolics, polyacetylenes, xanthones, quinones, steroids, and lignans have been discussed. The first part of this review series covers the activity of 171 compounds belonging to the alkaloid and terpenoid classes. Data available in the literature indicated that African flora hold an enormous potential for the development of phytomedicines for malaria.

  18. Several Human Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors, Structurally Related to Roscovitine, As New Anti-Malarial Agents

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    Sandrine Houzé

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In Africa, malaria kills one child each minute. It is also responsible for about one million deaths worldwide each year. Plasmodium falciparum, is the protozoan responsible for the most lethal form of the disease, with resistance developing against the available anti-malarial drugs. Among newly proposed anti-malaria targets, are the P. falciparum cyclin-dependent kinases (PfCDKs. There are involved in different stages of the protozoan growth and development but share high sequence homology with human cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs. We previously reported the synthesis of CDKs inhibitors that are structurally-related to (R-roscovitine, a 2,6,9-trisubstituted purine, and they showed activity against neuronal diseases and cancers. In this report, we describe the synthesis and the characterization of new CDK inhibitors, active in reducing the in vitro growth of P. falciparum (3D7 and 7G8 strains. Six compounds are more potent inhibitors than roscovitine, and three exhibited IC50 values close to 1 µM for both 3D7 and 7G8 strains. Although, such molecules do inhibit P. falciparum growth, they require further studies to improve their selectivity for PfCDKs.

  19. Assessment of global reporting of adverse drug reactions for anti-malarials, including artemisinin-based combination therapy, to the WHO Programme for International Drug Monitoring

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    Van Erps Jan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In spite of enhanced control efforts, malaria remains a major public health problem causing close to a million deaths annually. With support from several donors, large amounts of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT are being deployed in endemic countries raising safety concerns as little is known about the use of ACT in several of the settings where they are deployed. This project was undertaken to profile the provenance of the pharmacovigilance reporting of all anti-malarials, including ACT to the WHO adverse drug reaction (ADR database (Vigibase™ over the past 40 years. Methods The WHO Programme for International Drug Monitoring, the Uppsala Monitoring Centre (UMC provided anonymized extracts of Vigibase™ covering the period 1968-2008. All countries in the programme were clustered according to their malaria control phase and income status. The number of individual case safety reports (ICSRs of anti-malarials was analyzed according to those clusters. Results From 1968 to 2008, 21,312 ICSRs suspecting anti-malarials were received from 64 countries. Low-income countries, that are also malaria-endemic (categorized as priority 1 countries submitted only 1.2% of the ICSRs. Only 60 out of 21,312 ICSRs were related to ACT, 51 of which were coming from four sub-Saharan African countries. Although very few ICSRs involved artemisinin-based compounds, many of the adverse events reported were potentially serious. Conclusions This paper illustrates the low reporting of ADRs to anti-malarials in general and ACT in particular. Most reports were submitted by non-endemic and/or high-income countries. Given the current mix of large donor funding, the insufficient information on safety of these drugs, increasing availability of ACT and artemisinin-based monotherapies in public and private sector channels, associated potential for inappropriate use and finally a pipeline of more than 10 new novel anti-malarials in various stages of

  20. Genotyping of Plasmodium falciparum using antigenic polymorphic markers and to study anti-malarial drug resistance markers in malaria endemic areas of Bangladesh

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    Akter Jasmin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past many regions of Bangladesh were hyperendemic for malaria. Malaria control in the 1960s to 1970s eliminated malaria from the plains but in the Chittagong Hill Tracts remained a difficult to control reservoir. The Chittagong Hill Tracts have areas with between 1 and 10% annual malaria rates, predominately 90-95% Plasmodium falciparum. In Southeast Asia, multiplicity of infection for hypo-endemic regions has been approximately 1.5. Few studies on the genetic diversity of P. falciparum have been performed in Bangladesh. Anderson et al. performed a study in Khagrachari, northern Chittagong Hill Tracts in 2002 on 203 patients and found that parasites had a multiplicity of infection of 1.3 by MSP-1, MSP-2 and GLURP genotyping. A total of 94% of the isolates had the K76T Pfcrt chloroquine resistant genotype, and 70% showed the N86Y Pfmdr1 genotype. Antifolate drug resistant genotypes were high with 99% and 73% of parasites having two or more mutations at the dhfr or dhps loci. Methods Nested and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR methods were used to genotype P. falciparum using antigenic polymorphic markers and to study anti-malarial drug resistance markers in malaria endemic areas of Bangladesh. Results The analysis of polymorphic and drug resistant genotype on 33 paired recrudescent infections after drug treatment in the period 2004 to 2008 in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, which is just prior to countrywide provision of artemisinin combination therapy. Overall the multiplicity of infection for MSP-1 was 2.7 with a slightly smaller parasite diversity post-treatment. The 13 monoclonal infections by both GLURP and MSP-1 were evenly divided between pre- and post-treatment. The MSP-1 MAD block was most frequent in 66 of the samples. The prevalence of the K76T PfCRT chloroquine resistant allele was approximately 82% of the samples, while the resistant Pfmdr1 N86Y was present in 33% of the samples. Interestingly, the post-treatment

  1. Factors related to compliance to anti-malarial drug combination: example of amodiaquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine among children in rural Senegal

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    Sow Diarietou

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The introduction of new anti-malarial treatment that is effective, but more expensive, raises questions about whether the high level of effectiveness observed in clinical trials can be found in a context of family use. The objective of this study was to determine the factors related to adherence, when using the amodiaquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (AQ/SP association, a transitory strategy before ACT implementation in Senegal. Methods The study was conducted in five rural dispensaries. Children, between two and 10 years of age, who presented mild malaria were recruited at the time of the consultation and were prescribed AQ/SP. The child's primary caretaker was questioned at home on D3 about treatment compliance and factors that could have influenced his or her adherence to treatment. A logistic regression model was used for the analyses. Results The study sample included 289 children. The adherence rate was 64.7%. Two risks factors for non-adherence were identified: the children's age (8–10 years (ORa = 3.07 [1.49–6.29]; p = 0.004; and the profession of the head of household (retailer/employee versus farmer (ORa = 2.71 [1.34–5.48]; p = 0.006. Previously seeking care (ORa = 0.28 [0.105–0.736], p=0.001] satisfaction with received information (ORa = 0.45 [0.24–0.84]; p = 0.013, and the quality of history taking (ORa = 0.38 [0.21–0.69]; p = 0.001 were significantly associated with good compliance. Conclusion The results of the study show the importance of information and communication between caregivers and health center staff. The experience gained from this therapeutic transition emphasizes the importance of information given to the patients at the time of the consultation and drug delivery in order to improve drug use and thus prevent the emergence of rapid drug resistance.

  2. Longitudinal in vitro surveillance of Plasmodium falciparum sensitivity to common anti-malarials in Thailand between 1994 and 2010

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    Parker Daniel

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug and multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria has existed in Thailand for several decades. Furthermore, Thailand serves as a sentinel for drug-resistant malaria within the Greater Mekong sub-region. However, the drug resistance situation is highly dynamic, changing quickly over time. Here parasite in vitro drug sensitivity is reported for artemisinin derivatives, mefloquine, chloroquine and quinine, across Thailand. Methods Blood was drawn from patients infected with P. falciparum in seven sentinel provinces along Thai international borders with Cambodia, Myanmar, Laos, and Malaysia. In vitro parasite sensitivity was tested using the World Health Organization’s microtest (mark III (between 1994 and 2002 and the histidine-rich protein-2 (HRP2-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (in 2010. Following World Health Organization protocol, at least 30 isolates were collected for each province and year represented in this study. Where possible, t-tests were used to test for significant differences. Results There appears to be little variation across study sites with regard to parasite sensitivity to chloroquine. Quinine resistance appears to have been rising prior to 1997, but has subsequently decreased. Mefloquine sensitivity appears high across the provinces, especially along the north-western border with Myanmar and the eastern border with Cambodia. Finally, the data suggest that parasite sensitivity to artemisinin and its derivatives is significantly higher in provinces along the north-western border with Myanmar. Conclusions Parasite sensitivity to anti-malarials in Thailand is highly variable over time and largely mirrors official drug use policy. The findings with regard to reduced sensitivity to artemisinin derivatives are supported by recent reports of reduced parasite clearance associated with artemisinin. This trend is alarming since artemisinin is considered the last defence against malaria. Continued

  3. Determination of metabolic profile of anti-malarial trioxane CDRI 99/411 in rat liver microsomes using HPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Smriti; Manickavasagam, Lakshmi; Jain, Girish Kumar

    2012-01-01

    CDRI 99/411 is a potent 1,2,4-trioxane anti-malarial candidate compound of the Central Drug Research Institute, India. This study aimed to conduct comprehensive in vitro metabolic investigations of CDRI 99/411 to corroborate its preclinical investigations. Preliminary in vitro metabolic investigations were performed to assess the metabolic stability [in vitro half-life (t(1/2) ) and in vitro hepatic intrinsic clearance (Cl(int) )] of CDRI 99/411 in male Sprague-Dawley rat and human liver microsomes using validated high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detector. The observed in vitro t(1/2) of the compound in rat and human liver microsomes was 13 min with in vitro Cl(int) 130.7±25.0 μL/min/mg and 19 min with in vitro Cl(int) 89.3 ± 17.40 μL/min/mg. These observations suggested moderate metabolic degradation and in vitro Cl(int) with insignificant difference (p>0.05) in the metabolic stability profile in rat and human. Hence, in vitro metabolic investigations were performed with rat liver microsomes. It was observed that CDRI 99/411 exhibited sigmoidal kinetics. At nonlinear regression (r ≥ 0.99) EC(50) and Hill slope values were 17 µm and 1.50, respectively. The metabolism of CDRI 99/411 was primarily mediated by CYP3A2 and was inferred by CYP reaction phenotyping with known potent inhibitors. Two metabolites of CDRI 99/411 were detected which were undetectable on incubation with 1-aminobenzotriazole and ketoconazole.

  4. CYP450 phenotyping and accurate mass identification of metabolites of the 8-aminoquinoline, anti-malarial drug primaquine

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    Pybus Brandon S

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 8-aminoquinoline (8AQ drug primaquine (PQ is currently the only approved drug effective against the persistent liver stage of the hypnozoite forming strains Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium ovale as well as Stage V gametocytes of Plasmodium falciparum. To date, several groups have investigated the toxicity observed in the 8AQ class, however, exact mechanisms and/or metabolic species responsible for PQ’s haemotoxic and anti-malarial properties are not fully understood. Methods In the present study, the metabolism of PQ was evaluated using in vitro recombinant metabolic enzymes from the cytochrome P450 (CYP and mono-amine oxidase (MAO families. Based on this information, metabolite identification experiments were performed using nominal and accurate mass measurements. Results Relative activity factor (RAF-weighted intrinsic clearance values show the relative role of each enzyme to be MAO-A, 2C19, 3A4, and 2D6, with 76.1, 17.0, 5.2, and 1.7% contributions to PQ metabolism, respectively. CYP 2D6 was shown to produce at least six different oxidative metabolites along with demethylations, while MAO-A products derived from the PQ aldehyde, a pre-cursor to carboxy PQ. CYPs 2C19 and 3A4 produced only trace levels of hydroxylated species. Conclusions As a result of this work, CYP 2D6 and MAO-A have been implicated as the key enzymes associated with PQ metabolism, and metabolites previously identified as potentially playing a role in efficacy and haemolytic toxicity have been attributed to production via CYP 2D6 mediated pathways.

  5. Phase I randomized dose-ascending placebo-controlled trials of ferroquine - a candidate anti-malarial drug - in adults with asymptomatic Plasmodium falciparum infection

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    Ospina Salazar Carmen L

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development and spread of drug resistant Plasmodium falciparum strains is a major concern and novel anti-malarial drugs are, therefore, needed. Ferroquine is a ferrocenic derivative of chloroquine with proven anti-malarial activity against chloroquine-resistant and -sensitive P. falciparum laboratory strains. Methods Adult young male aged 18 to 45 years, asymptomatic carriers of P. falciparum, were included in two-dose escalation, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled Phase I trials, a single dose study and a multiple dose study aiming to evaluate oral doses of ferroquine from 400 to 1,600 mg. Results Overall, 54/66 patients (40 and 26 treated in the single and multiple dose studies, respectively experienced at least one adverse event, 15 were under placebo. Adverse events were mainly gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain (16, diarrhoea (5, nausea (13, and vomiting (9, but also headache (11, and dizziness (5. A few patients had slightly elevated liver parameters (10/66 including two patients under placebo. Moderate changes in QTc and morphological changes in T waves were observed in the course of the study. However, no adverse cardiac effects with clinical relevance were observed. Conclusions These phase I trials showed that clinically, ferroquine was generally well-tolerated up to 1,600 mg as single dose and up to 800 mg as repeated dose in asymptomatic young male with P. falciparum infection. Further clinical development of ferroquine, either alone or in combination with another anti-malarial, is highly warranted and currently underway.

  6. Reverse pharmacology for developing an anti-malarial phytomedicine. The example of Argemone mexicana

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    Claudia Simoes-Pires

    2014-12-01

    Reverse pharmacology, also called bedside-to-bench, is a research approach based on the traditional knowledge and relates to reversing the classical laboratory to clinic pathway to a clinic to laboratory practice. It is a trans-disciplinary approach focused on traditional knowledge, experimental observations and clinical experiences. This paper is an overview of the reverse pharmacology approach applied to the decoction of Argemone mexicana, used as an antimalarial traditional medicine in Mali. A. mexicana appeared as the most effective traditional medicine for the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria in Mali, and the clinical efficacy of the decoction was comparable to artesunate–amodiaquine as previously published. Four stages of the reverse pharmacology process will be described here with a special emphasis on the results for stage 4. Briefly, allocryptopine, protopine and berberine were isolated through bioguided fractionation, and had their identity confirmed by spectroscopic analysis. The three alkaloids showed antiparasitic activity in vitro, of which allocryptopine and protopine were selective towards Plasmodium falciparum. Furthermore, the amount of the three active alkaloids in the decoction was determined by quantitative NMR, and preliminary in vivo assays were conducted. On the basis of these results, the reverse pharmacology approach is discussed and further pharmacokinetic studies appear to be necessary in order to determine whether these alkaloids can be considered as phytochemical markers for quality control and standardization of an improved traditional medicine made with this plant.

  7. Synthesis and pharmacokinetics of radioisotope labeled anti-malarial agent in Sprague-Dawley rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannanpalli, Pradeep; Park, Sang Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    Pyro naridine tetraphosphate is a new synthetic drug which is currently being investigated for use in the treatment of malaria. The main objective of this investigation was to synthesize [{sup 14}C]pyro naridine tetraphosphate and to determine its absorption, distribution, excretion and pharmacokinetics in to male and female Sprague-Dawley rats following a single oral administration (10 mg/kg). To overcome the disadvantages posed by the classical method, a novel and efficient method using microwave irradiation was employed for the synthesis of pyro naridine tetraphosphate. Use of microwave irradiation decreased the reaction time considerably, used less of the starting material and also increased the yield when compared with the classical method. [{sup 14}C]Pyro naridine tetraphosphate thus synthesized had a high degree of purity and showed satisfactory {sup 1}H NMR, {sup 13}C NMR, mass spectra (MS), infrared (IR) and elemental analysis data. The distribution of [{sup 14}C]pyro naridine tetraphosphate in various tissues like the blood, plasma, liver, lung, heart, spleen, kidney, brain, stomach, small intestine and large intestine were determined at 1, 4, 8, 24, 48, 96, 144, 192 and 240 h post administration of the drug to rats. Mass balance excretion of [{sup 14}C]pyro naridine tetraphosphate in urine, faeces and in breath as {sup 14}CO{sub 2} were also determined at different time intervals post administration of the drug. We observed that [{sup 14}C]pyro naridine tetraphosphate was readily absorbed and widely distributed within 1 h following oral administration as it was determined by the presence of radioactivity in various tissues investigated. The absorption, distribution and excretion of the drug was found to be gender independent as both male and female rats showed a similar pattern of radioactivity. [{sup 14}C]Pyro naridine tetraphosphate was absorbed mainly from the small intestine upon oral administration. The major route of excretion for [{sup 14}C

  8. Plasmodium serine hydroxymethyltransferase as a potential anti-malarial target: inhibition studies using improved methods for enzyme production and assay

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    Sopitthummakhun Kittipat

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an urgent need for the discovery of new anti-malarial drugs. Thus, it is essential to explore different potential new targets that are unique to the parasite or that are required for its viability in order to develop new interventions for treating the disease. Plasmodium serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT, an enzyme in the dTMP synthesis cycle, is a potential target for such new drugs, but convenient methods for producing and assaying the enzyme are still lacking, hampering the ability to screen inhibitors. Methods Production of recombinant Plasmodium falciparum SHMT (PfSHMT and Plasmodium vivax SHMT (PvSHMT, using auto-induction media, were compared to those using the conventional Luria Bertani medium with isopropyl thio-β-D-galactoside (LB-IPTG induction media. Plasmodium SHMT activity, kinetic parameters, and response to inhibitors were measured spectrophotometrically by coupling the reaction to that of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (MTHFD. The identity of the intermediate formed upon inactivation of Plasmodium SHMTs by thiosemicarbazide was investigated by spectrophotometry, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS. The active site environment of Plasmodium SHMT was probed based on changes in the fluorescence emission spectrum upon addition of amino acids and folate. Results Auto-induction media resulted in a two to three-fold higher yield of Pf- and PvSHMT (7.38 and 29.29 mg/L compared to that produced in cells induced in LB-IPTG media. A convenient spectrophotometric activity assay coupling Plasmodium SHMT and MTHFD gave similar kinetic parameters to those previously obtained from the anaerobic assay coupling SHMT and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR; thus demonstrating the validity of the new assay procedure. The improved method was adopted to screen for Plasmodium SHMT inhibitors, of which some were originally designed

  9. FlexiChip package: an universal microarray with a dedicated analysis software for high-thoughput SNPs detection linked to anti-malarial drug resistance

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    Dondorp Arjen M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of molecular tools have been developed to monitor the emergence and spread of anti-malarial drug resistance to Plasmodium falciparum. One of the major obstacles to the wider implementation of these tools is the absence of practical methods enabling high throughput analysis. Here a new Zip-code array is described, called FlexiChip, linked to a dedicated software program, which largely overcomes this problem. Methods Previously published microarray probes detecting single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP associated with parasite resistance to anti-malarial drugs (ResMalChip were adapted for a universal microarray FlexiChip format. To evaluate the overall sensitivity of the FlexiChip package (microarray + software, the results of FlexiChip were compared to ResMalChip microarray, using the same extension probes and with the same PCR products. In both cases, sequence results were used as gold standard to calculate sensitivity and specificity. FlexiChip results obtained with a set of field isolates were then compared to those assessed in an independent reference laboratory. Results The FlexiChip package gave results identical to the ResMalChip results in 92.7% of samples (kappa coefficient 0.8491, with a standard error 0.021 and had a sensitivity of 95.88% and a specificity of 97.68% compared to the sequencing as the reference method. Moreover the method performed well compared to the results obtained in the reference laboratories, with 99.7% of identical results (kappa coefficient 0.9923, S.E. 0.0523. Conclusion Microarrays could be employed to monitor P. falciparum drug resistance markers with greater cost effectiveness and the possibility for high throughput analysis. The FlexiChip package is a promising tool for use in poor resource settings of malaria endemic countries.

  10. Estimating the Impact of Means-tested Subsidies under Treatment Externalities with Application to Anti-Malarial Bednets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhattacharya, Debopam; Dupas, Pascaline; Kanaya, Shin

    purchase price, causing free-riding and sub-optimal private procurement, such products may be subsidized in developing countries through means-testing. Owing to associated spillover effects, cost-benefit analysis of such subsidies requires modelling behavioral responses of both the subsidized household......Regular use of effective health-products such as insecticide-treated mosquito nets (ITN) by a household benefits its neighbors by (a) reducing chances of infection and (b) raising awareness about product-effectiveness, thereby increasing product-use. Due to their potential social benefits and high......-dimensional estimated regressors corresponding to continuously distributed location coordinates and makes the inference problem novel. We show that even if individual ITN use unambiguously increases with increasing incidence of subsidy in the neighborhood, ignoring spillovers may over- or under-predict overall ITN use...

  11. Finding parasites and finding challenges: improved diagnostic access and trends in reported malaria and anti-malarial drug use in Livingstone district, Zambia

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    Masaninga Freddie

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the impact of malaria rapid diagnostic test (RDT use on management of acute febrile disease at a community level, and on the consumption of anti-malarial medicines, is critical to the planning and success of scale-up to universal parasite-based diagnosis by health systems in malaria-endemic countries. Methods A retrospective study of district-wide community-level RDT introduction was conducted in Livingstone District, Zambia, to assess the impact of this programmed on malaria reporting, incidence of mortality and on district anti-malarial consumption. Results Reported malaria declined from 12,186 cases in the quarter prior to RDT introduction in 2007 to an average of 12.25 confirmed and 294 unconfirmed malaria cases per quarter over the year to September 2009. Reported malaria-like fever also declined, with only 4,381 RDTs being consumed per quarter over the same year. Reported malaria mortality declined to zero in the year to September 2009, and all-cause mortality declined. Consumption of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT dropped dramatically, but remained above reported malaria, declining from 12,550 courses dispensed by the district office in the quarter prior to RDT implementation to an average of 822 per quarter over the last year. Quinine consumption in health centres also declined, with the district office ceasing to supply due to low usage, but requests for sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP rose to well above previous levels, suggesting substitution of ACT with this drug in RDT-negative cases. Conclusions RDT introduction led to a large decline in reported malaria cases and in ACT consumption in Livingstone district. Reported malaria mortality declined to zero, indicating safety of the new diagnostic regime, although adherence and/or use of RDTs was still incomplete. However, a deficiency is apparent in management of non-malarial fever, with inappropriate use of a low-cost single dose drug, SP

  12. The anti-malarial drug Mefloquine disrupts central autonomic and respiratory control in the working heart brainstem preparation of the rat

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    Lall Varinder K

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mefloquine is an anti-malarial drug that can have neurological side effects. This study examines how mefloquine (MF influences central nervous control of autonomic and respiratory systems using the arterially perfused working heart brainstem preparation (WHBP of the rat. Recordings of nerve activity were made from the thoracic sympathetic chain and phrenic nerve, while heart rate (HR and perfusion pressure were also monitored in the arterially perfused, decerebrate, rat WHBP. MF was added to the perfusate at 1 μM to examine its effects on baseline parameters as well as baroreceptor and chemoreceptor reflexes. Results MF caused a significant, atropine resistant, bradycardia and increased phrenic nerve discharge frequency. Chemoreceptor mediated sympathoexcitation (elicited by addition of 0.1 ml of 0.03% sodium cyanide to the aortic cannula was significantly attenuated by the application of MF to the perfusate. Furthermore MF significantly decreased rate of return to resting HR following chemoreceptor induced bradycardia. An increase in respiratory frequency and attenuated respiratory-related sympathetic nerve discharge during chemoreceptor stimulation was also elicited with MF compared to control. However, MF did not significantly alter baroreceptor reflex sensitivity. Conclusions These studies indicate that in the WHBP, MF causes profound alterations in autonomic and respiratory control. The possibility that these effects may be mediated through actions on connexin 36 containing gap junctions in central neurones controlling sympathetic nervous outflow is discussed.

  13. A phase I trial to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics of low-dose methotrexate as an anti-malarial drug in Kenyan adult healthy volunteers

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    Oyoo George O

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous investigations indicate that methotrexate, an old anticancer drug, could be used at low doses to treat malaria. A phase I evaluation was conducted to assess the safety and pharmacokinetic profile of this drug in healthy adult male Kenyan volunteers. Methods Twenty five healthy adult volunteers were recruited and admitted to receive a 5 mg dose of methotrexate/day/5 days. Pharmacokinetics blood sampling was carried out at 2, 4, 6, 12 and 24 hours following each dose. Nausea, vomiting, oral ulcers and other adverse events were solicited during follow up of 42 days. Results The mean age of participants was 23.9 ± 3.3 years. Adherence to protocol was 100%. No grade 3 solicited adverse events were observed. However, one case of transiently elevated liver enzymes, and one serious adverse event (not related to the product were reported. The maximum concentration (Cmax was 160-200 nM and after 6 hours, the effective concentration (Ceff was Conclusion Low-dose methotraxate had an acceptable safety profile. However, methotrexate blood levels did not reach the desirable Ceff of 250-400-nM required to clear malaria infection in vivo. Further dose finding and safety studies are necessary to confirm suitability of this drug as an anti-malarial agent.

  14. 3D structure and immunogenicity of Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite induced associated protein peptides as components of fully-protective anti-malarial vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, Martha P; Almonacid, Hannia; Calderón, Dayana; Chacón, Edgar A; Poloche, Luis A; Patarroyo, Manuel A; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2011-12-16

    SIAP-1 and SIAP-2 are proteins which are implicated in early events involving Plasmodium falciparum infection of the Anopheles mosquito vector and the human host. High affinity HeLa and HepG2 cell binding conserved peptides have been previously identified in these proteins, i.e. SIAP-1 34893 ((421)KVQGLSYLLRRKNGTKHPVY(440)) and SIAP-1 34899 ((541)YVLNSKLLNSRSFDKFKWIQ(560)) and SIAP-2 36879 ((181)LLLYSTNSEDNLDISFGELQ(200)). When amino acid sequences have been properly modified (replacements shown in bold) they have induced high antibody titres against sporozoites in Aotus monkeys (assessed by IFA) and in the corresponding recombinant proteins (determined by ELISA and Western blot). (1)H NMR studies of these conserved native and modified high activity binding peptides (HABPs) revealed that all had α-helical structures in different locations and lengths. Conserved and corresponding modified HABPs displayed different lengths between the residues fitting into MHCII molecule pockets 1-9 and different amino acid orientation based on their different HLA-DRβ1(∗) binding motifs and binding registers, suggesting that such modifications were associated with making them immunogenic. The results suggested that these modified HAPBs could be potential targets for inclusion as components of a fully-effective, minimal sub-unit based, multi-epitope, and multistage anti-malarial vaccine.

  15. Exposure to anti-malarial drugs and monitoring of adverse drug reactions using toll-free mobile phone calls in private retail sector in Sagamu, Nigeria: implications for pharmacovigilance

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    Ogunwande Isiaka A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adverse drug reactions (ADRs contribute to ill-health or life-threatening outcomes of therapy during management of infectious diseases. The exposure to anti-malarial and use of mobile phone technology to report ADRs following drug exposures were investigated in Sagamu - a peri-urban community in Southwest Nigeria. Methods Purchase of medicines was actively monitored for 28 days in three Community Pharmacies (CP and four Patent and Proprietary Medicine Stores (PPMS in the community. Information on experience of ADRs was obtained by telephone from 100 volunteers who purchased anti-malarials during the 28-day period. Results and Discussion A total of 12,093 purchases were recorded during the period. Antibiotics, analgesics, vitamins and anti-malarials were the most frequently purchased medicines. A total of 1,500 complete courses of anti-malarials were purchased (12.4% of total purchases; of this number, purchases of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP and chloroquine (CQ were highest (39.3 and 25.2% respectiuvely. Other anti-malarials purchased were artesunate monotherapy (AS - 16.1%, artemether-lumefantrine (AL 10.0%, amodiaquine (AQ - 6.6%, quinine (QNN - 1.9%, halofantrine (HF - 0.2% and proguanil (PR - 0.2%. CQ was the cheapest (USD 0.3 and halofantrine the most expensive (USD 7.7. AL was 15.6 times ($4.68 more expensive than CQ. The response to mobile phone monitoring of ADRs was 57% in the first 24 hours (day 1 after purchase and decreased to 33% by day 4. Participants in this monitoring exercise were mostly with low level of education (54%. Conclusion The findings from this study indicate that ineffective anti-malaria medicines including monotherapies remain widely available and are frequently purchased in the study area. Cost may be a factor in the continued use of ineffective monotherapies. Availability of a toll-free telephone line may facilitate pharmacovigilance and follow up of response to medicines in a resource

  16. Development of ELISA-based methods to measure the anti-malarial drug chloroquine in plasma and in pharmaceutical formulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalil, Insaf F; Alifrangis, Michael; Recke, Camilla

    2011-01-01

    In Central and South America and Eastern and Southern Africa, Plasmodium vivax infections accounts for 71-81% and 5% of malaria cases, respectively. In these areas, chloroquine (CQ) remains the treatment of choice for P. vivax malaria. In addition, CQ has recently proven to be an effective HIV-1 ...... resistance. The aim of this study was to develop an inexpensive, simple antibody-based ELISA to measure CQ concentrations in tablets and in plasma.......In Central and South America and Eastern and Southern Africa, Plasmodium vivax infections accounts for 71-81% and 5% of malaria cases, respectively. In these areas, chloroquine (CQ) remains the treatment of choice for P. vivax malaria. In addition, CQ has recently proven to be an effective HIV-1...

  17. Development of ELISA-based methods to measure the anti-malarial drug chloroquine in plasma and in pharmaceutical formulations

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    Ronn Anita

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Central and South America and Eastern and Southern Africa, Plasmodium vivax infections accounts for 71-81% and 5% of malaria cases, respectively. In these areas, chloroquine (CQ remains the treatment of choice for P. vivax malaria. In addition, CQ has recently proven to be an effective HIV-1 therapeutic agent. There is a dire need to continue monitoring quality of CQ as there is a major influx of substandard and fake formulations into malaria-endemic countries. The use of fake/substandard drugs will result in sub-therapeutic levels endangering the patient and possibly select for parasite resistance. The aim of this study was to develop an inexpensive, simple antibody-based ELISA to measure CQ concentrations in tablets and in plasma. Methods A monoclonal antibody (MAb that reacts with the N-side chain of the CQ molecule was prepared by use of a CQ analogue. A specific and reliable ELISA for detection of CQ was developed. The developed assay was validated by measuring CQ in tablets sold in Denmark, India and Sudan. Furthermore, kinetics of CQ concentrations in plasma of four volunteers, who ingested two tablets of Malarex® containing, 250 mg CQ base, were measured before drug intake, three hours later and thereafter at days 1, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28. The same plasma samples were simultaneously measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Results The ELISA proved an easy-to-handle and very sensitive tool for the detection of CQ with a lower limit of detection at 3.9 ng/ml. ELISA levels of CQ in plasma showed high agreement with the levels obtained by HPLC (r = 0.98. The specificity in the negative control group was 100%. Conclusion The developed ELISA can be used for quality screening of CQ in pharmaceutical formulations and for drug monitoring in malaria and in other infectious diseases, such as HIV, where CQ proved to be an effective therapeutic agent. The methodology has been exploited to develop monoclonal

  18. Malaria Treatment Policy Change and Implementation: The Case of Uganda

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    Miriam Nanyunja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria due to P. falciparum is the number one cause of morbidity and mortality in Uganda where it is highly endemic in 95% of the country. The use of efficacious and effective antimalarial medicines is one of the key strategies for malaria control. Until 2000, Chloroquine (CQ was the first-line drug for treatment of uncomplicated malaria in Uganda. Due to progressive resistance to CQ and to a combination of CQ with Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine, Uganda in 2004 adopted the use of ACTs as first-line drug for treating uncomplicated malaria. A review of the drug policy change process and postimplementation reports highlight the importance of managing the policy change process, generating evidence for policy decisions and availability of adequate and predictable funding for effective policy roll-out. These and other lessons learnt can be used to guide countries that are considering anti-malarial drug change in future.

  19. Malaria treatment policy change and implementation: the case of Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanyunja, Miriam; Nabyonga Orem, Juliet; Kato, Frederick; Kaggwa, Mugagga; Katureebe, Charles; Saweka, Joaquim

    2011-01-01

    Malaria due to P. falciparum is the number one cause of morbidity and mortality in Uganda where it is highly endemic in 95% of the country. The use of efficacious and effective antimalarial medicines is one of the key strategies for malaria control. Until 2000, Chloroquine (CQ) was the first-line drug for treatment of uncomplicated malaria in Uganda. Due to progressive resistance to CQ and to a combination of CQ with Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine, Uganda in 2004 adopted the use of ACTs as first-line drug for treating uncomplicated malaria. A review of the drug policy change process and postimplementation reports highlight the importance of managing the policy change process, generating evidence for policy decisions and availability of adequate and predictable funding for effective policy roll-out. These and other lessons learnt can be used to guide countries that are considering anti-malarial drug change in future.

  20. Antibodies to malaria vaccine candidates are associated with chloroquine or sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine treatment efficacy in children in an endemic area of Burkina Faso

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diarra, Amidou; Nebie, Issa; Tiono, Alfred

    2012-01-01

    of the value of suboptimal vaccines. The study aim was to investigate relationship between antibodies and anti-malarial drug treatment outcomes. METHODS: Some 248 children aged 0.5 and 15 years were recruited prior to the high malaria transmission season. Venous blood (5 ml) was obtained from each child...... to measure antibody levels to selected malaria antigens, using ELISA. Blood smears were also performed to assess drug efficacy and malaria infection prevalence. Children were actively followed up to record clinical malaria cases. RESULTS: IgG levels to MSP3 were always higher in the successfully treated......: Acquired anti-malarial antibodies may play an important role in the efficacy of anti-malarial drugs in younger children more susceptible to the disease....

  1. Treatment guided by rapid diagnostic tests for malaria in Tanzanian children: safety and alternative bacterial diagnoses

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    Sykes Alma

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background WHO guidelines for the treatment of young children with suspected malaria have recently changed from presumptive treatment to anti-malarial treatment guided by a blood slide or malaria rapid diagnostic test (RDT. However, there is limited evidence of the safety of this policy in routine outpatient settings in Africa. Methods Children 3-59 months of age with a non-severe febrile illness and no obvious cause were enrolled over a period of one year in a malaria endemic area of Tanzania. Treatment was determined by the results of a clinical examination and RDT result, and blood culture and serum lactate were also collected. RDT-negative children were followed up over 14 days. Results Over the course of one year, 965 children were enrolled; 158 (16.4% were RDT-positive and treated with artemether-lumefantrine and 807 (83.4% were RDT-negative and treated with non-anti-malarial medicines. Compared with RDT-positives, RDT-negative children were on average younger with a lower axillary temperature and more likely to have a history of cough or difficulty in breathing. Six (0.6% children became RDT-positive after enrolment, all of whom were PCR-negative for Plasmodium falciparum DNA at enrolment. In addition, 12 (1.2% children were admitted to hospital, one with possible malaria, none of whom died. A bacterial pathogen was identified in 9/965 (0.9% children, eight of whom were RDT-negative and one was RDT-positive, but slide-negative. Excluding three children with Salmonella typhi, all of the children with bacteraemia were ≤12 months of age. Compared to double-read research slide results RDTs had a sensitivity of 97.8% (95%CI 96.9-98.7 and specificity of 96.3% (95%CI 96.3-98.4. Conclusions Use of RDTs to direct the use of anti-malarial drugs in young children did not result in any missed diagnoses of malaria although new infections soon after a consultation with a negative RDT result may undermine confidence in results. Invasive

  2. The acceptability of intermittent screening and treatment versus intermittent preventive treatment during pregnancy: results from a qualitative study in Northern Ghana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pell, C.; Meñaca, A.; Chatio, S.; Hodgson, A.; Tagbor, H.; Pool, R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Affecting mother and child, malaria during pregnancy (MiP) provokes a double morbidity and mortality burden. Within a package of interventions to prevent MiP in endemic areas, the WHO currently recommends intermittent preventive treatment (IPTp). Concerns about anti-malarial resistance h

  3. [Current view on chloroquine derivative treatment from rheumatologist perspective and possible ocular side effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak-Buś, Katarzyna; Gaca-Wysocka, Magdalena; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Leszczyński, Piotr

    2016-03-01

    Anti-malarial drugs specifically hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) or chloroquine (CQ) are very effective in treating and preventing the symptoms of systemic lupus erythematosus and other connective tissue diseases. These medications have shown to improve joint and muscle pain and arthritis, skin rashes, fatique, fever and also to control systemic signs of lupus as pericarditis or pleuritis. Shortterm and long-term treatment reduce cholesterol and have anti-platelet effect with decreasing risk of cardiovascular disease. The lupus patients on anti-malarials have also lower risk of cumulative organ damage due to reduce the amount of steroids. They may help to decrease lupus flares, mortality and are the key to controlling lupus long term outcome. Some lupus patients should be on anti-malarials for the rest of their life. For this reason, the key question is weather these drugs are absolutely safe and can be long term used in all lupus patients as a background therapy? Potential non-specific side effects occur very rare and are usually minor and last for short period. The major concerns are retinal deposits damage which could be potential reversible especially during hydroxychloroquine treatment. Nevertheless, ophthalmologist examination is still needed before starting to take HCQ or CQ and at to follow-up visits every 6-12 months. In conclusion it seems that anti-malarials are safe and have more clinical benefits than risks and from rheumatologist point of view should be more widely use in all lupus patients.

  4. Mapping the genome of Plasmodium falciparum on the drug-like chemical space reveals novel anti-malarial targets and potential drug leads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kasper; Plichta, Damian Rafal; Panagiotou, Gianni;

    2012-01-01

    The parasite Plasmodium falciparum is the main agent responsible for malaria. In this study, we exploited a recently published chemical library from GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) that had previously been confirmed to inhibit parasite growth of the wild type (3D7) and the multi-drug resistance (D2d) strains......, in order to uncover the weak links in the proteome of the parasite. We predicted 293 proteins of P. falciparum, including the six out of the seven verified targets for P. falciparum malaria treatment, as targets of 4645 GSK active compounds. Furthermore, we prioritized druggable targets, based on a number...... on integration of available chemical-protein and protein-protein interaction data. Our work suggests that a large number of the P. falciparum proteome is potentially druggable and could therefore serve as novel drug targets in the fight against malaria. At the same time, prioritized compounds from the GSK...

  5. Current evidence for osteoarthritis treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandacoomarasamy, Ananthila; March, Lyn

    2010-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis and the leading cause of chronic disability among older people. The burden of the disease is expected to rise with an aging population and the increasing prevalence of obesity. Despite this, there is as yet no cure for OA. However, in recent years, a number of potential therapeutic advances have been made, in part due to improved understanding of the underlying pathophysiology. This review provides the current evidence for symptomatic management of OA including nonpharmacological, pharmacological and surgical approaches. The current state of evidence for disease-modifying therapy in OA is also reviewed.

  6. Reviewing the literature on access to prompt and effective malaria treatment in Kenya: implications for meeting the Abuja targets

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    Tetteh Gladys

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effective case management is central to reducing malaria mortality and morbidity worldwide, but only a minority of those affected by malaria, have access to prompt effective treatment. In Kenya, the Division of Malaria Control is committed to ensuring that 80 percent of childhood fevers are treated with effective anti-malarial medicines within 24 hours of fever onset, but this target is largely unmet. This review aimed to document evidence on access to effective malaria treatment in Kenya, identify factors that influence access, and make recommendations on how to improve prompt access to effective malaria treatment. Since treatment-seeking patterns for malaria are similar in many settings in sub-Saharan Africa, the findings presented in this review have important lessons for other malaria endemic countries. Methods Internet searches were conducted in PUBMED (MEDLINE and HINARI databases using specific search terms and strategies. Grey literature was obtained by soliciting reports from individual researchers working in the treatment-seeking field, from websites of major organizations involved in malaria control and from international reports. Results The review indicated that malaria treatment-seeking occurs mostly in the informal sector; that most fevers are treated, but treatment is often ineffective. Irrational drug use was identified as a problem in most studies, but determinants of this behaviour were not documented. Availability of non-recommended medicines over-the-counter and the presence of substandard anti-malarials in the market are well documented. Demand side determinants of access include perception of illness causes, severity and timing of treatment, perceptions of treatment efficacy, simplicity of regimens and ability to pay. Supply side determinants include distance to health facilities, availability of medicines, prescribing and dispensing practices and quality of medicines. Policy level factors are around

  7. Retail sector distribution chains for malaria treatment in the developing world: a review of the literature

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    Hanson Kara G

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many low-income countries, the retail sector plays an important role in the treatment of malaria and is increasingly being considered as a channel for improving medicine availability. Retailers are the last link in a distribution chain and their supply sources are likely to have an important influence on the availability, quality and price of malaria treatment. This article presents the findings of a systematic literature review on the retail sector distribution chain for malaria treatment in low and middle-income countries. Methods Publication databases were searched using key terms relevant to the distribution chain serving all types of anti-malarial retailers. Organizations involved in malaria treatment and distribution chain related activities were contacted to identify unpublished studies. Results A total of 32 references distributed across 12 developing countries were identified. The distribution chain had a pyramid shape with numerous suppliers at the bottom and fewer at the top. The chain supplying rural and less-formal outlets was made of more levels than that serving urban and more formal outlets. Wholesale markets tended to be relatively concentrated, especially at the top of the chain where few importers accounted for most of the anti-malarial volumes sold. Wholesale price mark-ups varied across chain levels, ranging from 27% to 99% at the top of the chain, 8% at intermediate level (one study only and 2% to 67% at the level supplying retailers directly. Retail mark-ups tended to be higher, and varied across outlet types, ranging from 3% to 566% in pharmacies, 29% to 669% in drug shops and 100% to 233% in general shops. Information on pricing determinants was very limited. Conclusions Evidence on the distribution chain for retail sector malaria treatment was mainly descriptive and lacked representative data on a national scale. These are important limitations in the advent of the Affordable Medicine Facility for

  8. Evidence Regarding the Treatment of Denture Stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarborough, Alexandra; Cooper, Lyndon; Duqum, Ibrahim; Mendonça, Gustavo; McGraw, Kathleen; Stoner, Lisa

    2016-06-01

    Denture stomatitis is a common inflammatory condition affecting the mucosa underlying complete dentures. It is associated with denture microbial biofilm, poor denture hygiene, poor denture quality, and nocturnal denture use. Numerous treatment methodologies have been used to treat stomatitis; however, a gold standard treatment has not been identified. The aim of this systematic review is to report on the current knowledge available in studies representing a range of evidence on the treatment of denture stomatitis.

  9. Treatment of malaria from monotherapy to artemisinin-based combination therapy by health professionals in urban health facilities in Yaoundé, central province, Cameroon

    OpenAIRE

    Bley Daniel; Malvy Denis; Vernazza-Licht Nicole; Gausseres Mathieu; Sayang Collins; Millet Pascal

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background After adoption of artesunate-amodiaquine (AS/AQ) as first-line therapy for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria by the malaria control programme, this study was designed to assess the availability of anti-malarial drugs, treatment practices and acceptability of the new protocol by health professionals, in the urban health facilities and drugstores of Yaoundé city, Cameroon. Methods Between April and August 2005, retrospective and current information was collected by cons...

  10. Evidence-Based Treatment of Maisonneuve Fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.A. Stufkens; M.P.J. van den Bekerom; J.N. Doornberg; C.N. van Dijk; P. Kloen

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to review the published clinical evidence available for the treatment of Maisonneuve fractures. Medline via PubMed, Orthopaedic Trauma Association (OTA) annual meetings' abstracts archives Web site, Embase, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and the C

  11. Comparing changes in haematologic parameters occurring in patients included in randomized controlled trials of artesunate-amodiaquine vs single and combination treatments of uncomplicated falciparum in sub-Saharan Africa

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    Zwang Julien

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artesunate-amodiaquine (AS&AQ is a widely used artemisinin combination therapy (ACT for falciparum malaria. A comprehensive appreciation of its effects on haematology vs other anti-malarials is needed in view of potential safety liabilities. Methods Individual-patient data analysis conducted on a database from seven randomized controlled trials conducted in sub-Saharan African comparing AS&AQ to reference treatments in uncomplicated falciparum malaria patients of all ages. Haematologic values (white cells total and neutrophil counts, haemoglobin/haematocrit, platelets were analysed as both continuous and categorical variables for their occurrence, (severity grade 1-4 and changes during follow-up. Risks and trends were calculated using multivariate logistic random effect models. Results 4,502 patients (72% p = 0.001. Multivariate analysis showed that the risk of anaemia, thrombocytopaenia, and leucopaenia decreased with follow-up time, while neutropaenia increased; the risk of anaemia and thrombocytopaenia increased with higher baseline parasitaemia and parasitological reappearance. White cells total count was not a good surrogate for neutropaenia. No systematic significant difference between treatments was detected. Older patients were at lower risks. Conclusion The effects of AS&AQ on haematologic parameters were not different from those of other anti-malarial treatments used in sub-Saharan Africa. This analysis provides the basis for a broader evaluation of haematology following anti-malarial treatment. Continuing monitoring of haematologic safety on larger databases is required.

  12. Improvements in access to malaria treatment in Tanzania after switch to artemisinin combination therapy and the introduction of accredited drug dispensing outlets - a provider perspective

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    Dillip Angel

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To improve access to treatment in the private retail sector a new class of outlets known as accredited drug dispensing outlets (ADDO was created in Tanzania. Tanzania changed its first-line treatment for malaria from sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP to artemether-lumefantrine (ALu in 2007. Subsidized ALu was made available in both health facilities and ADDOs. The effect of these interventions on access to malaria treatment was studied in rural Tanzania. Methods The study was carried out in the villages of Kilombero and Ulanga Demographic Surveillance System (DSS and in Ifakara town. Data collection consisted of: 1 yearly censuses of shops selling drugs; 2 collection of monthly data on availability of anti-malarials in public health facilities; and 3 retail audits to measure anti-malarial sales volumes in all public, mission and private outlets. The data were complemented with DSS population data. Results Between 2004 and 2008 access to malaria treatment greatly improved and the number of anti-malarial treatment doses dispensed increased by 78%. Particular improvements were observed in the availability (from 0.24 shops per 1,000 people in 2004 to 0.39 in 2008 and accessibility (from 71% of households within 5 km of a shop in 2004 to 87% in 2008 of drug shops. Despite no improvements in affordability this resulted in an increase of the market share from 49% of anti-malarial sales 2005 to 59% in 2008. The change of treatment policy from SP to ALu led to severe stock-outs of SP in health facilities in the months leading up to the introduction of ALu (only 40% months in stock, but these were compensated by the wide availability of SP in shops. After the introduction of ALu stock levels of the drug were relatively high in public health facilities (over 80% months in stock, but the drug could only be found in 30% of drug shops and in no general shops. This resulted in a low overall utilization of the drug (19% of all anti-malarial

  13. Evidence-based treatment of metabolic myopathy

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    Yan LIN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the current treatments and possible adverse reactions of metabolic myopathy, and to develop the best solution for evidence-based treatment.  Methods Taking metabolic myopathy, mitochondrial myopathy, lipid storage myopathy, glycogen storage diseases, endocrine myopathy, drug toxicity myopathy and treatment as search terms, retrieve in databases such as PubMed, Cochrane Library, ClinicalKey database, National Science and Technology Library (NSTL, in order to collect the relevant literature database including clinical guidelines, systematic reviews (SR, randomized controlled trials (RCT, controlled clinical trials, retrospective case analysis and case study. Jadad Scale was used to evaluate the quality of literature.  Results Twenty-eight related articles were selected, including 6 clinical guidelines, 5 systematic reviews, 10 randomized controlled trials and 7 clinical controlled trials. According to Jadad Scale, 23 articles were evaluated as high-quality literature (≥ 4, and the remaining 5 were evaluated as low-quality literature (< 4. Treatment principles of these clinical trials, efficacy of different therapies and drug safety evaluation suggest that: 1 Acid α-glycosidase (GAA enzyme replacement therapy (ERT is the main treatment for glycogen storage diseases, with taking a high-protein diet, exercising before taking a small amount of fructose orally and reducing the patient's physical activity gradually. 2 Carnitine supplementation is used in the treatment of lipid storage myopathy, with carbohydrate and low fat diet provided before exercise or sports. 3 Patients with mitochondrial myopathy can take coenzyme Q10, vitamin B, vitamin K, vitamin C, etc. Proper aerobic exercise combined with strength training is safe, and it can also enhance the exercise tolerance of patients effectively. 4 The first choice to treat the endocrine myopathy is treating primary affection. 5 Myopathies due to drugs and toxins should

  14. Anti-bacterial activity of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy: comparative in vitro study of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, mefloquine, and azithromycin

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    Mombo-Ngoma Ghyslain

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP is recommended for the prevention of malaria in pregnancy in sub-Saharan Africa. Increasing drug resistance necessitates the urgent evaluation of alternative drugs. Currently, the most promising candidates in clinical development are mefloquine and azithromycin. Besides the anti-malarial activity, SP is also a potent antibiotic and incurs significant anti-microbial activity when given as IPTp - though systematic clinical evaluation of this action is still lacking. Methods In this study, the intrinsic anti-bacterial activity of mefloquine and azithromycin was assessed in comparison to sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine against bacterial pathogens with clinical importance in pregnancy in a standard microdilution assay. Results SP was highly active against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. All tested Gram-positive bacteria, except Enterococcus faecalis, were sensitive to azithromycin. Additionally, azithromycin was active against Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Mefloquine showed good activity against pneumococci but lower in vitro action against all other tested pathogens. Conclusion These data indicate important differences in the spectrum of anti-bacterial activity for the evaluated anti-malarial drugs. Given the large scale use of IPTp in Africa, the need for prospective clinical trials evaluating the impact of antibiotic activity of anti-malarials on maternal and foetal health and on the risk of promoting specific drug resistance of bacterial pathogens is discussed.

  15. Evidence on conservative clinical treatments for haemorrhoids

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    Fernanda da Silva Barbosa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this health technology assessment was to analyse the evidence on conservative clinical treatments for haemorrhoids usable in Primary Health Care. Methods: We searched in Embase, LILACS and MEDLINE through Pubmed for meta-analyses, systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials published until December 2012, without limits of language. Studies should evaluate the effects of conservative medical treatments (fibres or laxatives, flavonoids, analgesics, corticosteroids, sitz baths or nitro-glycerine ointments compared to placebo or each other. The outcomes considered were overall symptom improvement, bleeding, itching, pain, prolapse and adverse effects. Results: One meta-analysis showed that fibres promote overall improvement of symptoms and bleeding; and decrease recurrence after outpatient procedures. Three meta-analyses showed efficacy of flavonoids for acute and postoperative bleeding, overall symptom improvement, perianal discharge and recurrence after acute episode. There was no statistical difference for itching, pain, prolapse, or adverse effects in both cases. Rutosides, a type of flavonoid, reduced symptoms in pregnant women, despite the insufficiency of data to prove its safety. No studies were found on other types of treatment that met the selection criteria. Conclusions: In Primary Health Care, oral fibres or flavonoids can be used to improve overall symptoms and bleeding in haemorrhoid patients at grades I and II; to patient grade III who does not wish to undergo outpatient procedure; and postoperatively. Randomized controlled trials with adequate methodological quality are needed to confirm these results.

  16. Treatment of intracerebral hemorrhage: the clinical evidences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterzi, R; Vidale, S

    2004-03-01

    Of all strokes 10% to 15% are intracerebral hemorrhage, primary ICH accounting for more than 75% of cases. A correct evaluation and management must start in the emergency room, in particular for patients who rapidly deteriorate. The diffusion of organized care for stroke patients and the availability of the stroke units in Italian hospitals, may represent a further opportunity to improve the outcome of patients with ICH. Despite the bulk of evidences coming from the randomized clinical therapeutic trials for acute ischemic stroke, the available data for randomized surgical trials are scanty. In these small randomized studies, neither surgical nor medical treatment has conclusively been shown to benefit patients with ICH. Surgical techniques are improving but it is important to find out the time window during which surgical evacuation is most effective with respect to the long-term outcome. The use of thrombolytic therapy to promote the resolution of ventricular blood clots appears to be promising.

  17. Treatment of malaria from monotherapy to artemisinin-based combination therapy by health professionals in urban health facilities in Yaoundé, central province, Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bley Daniel

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After adoption of artesunate-amodiaquine (AS/AQ as first-line therapy for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria by the malaria control programme, this study was designed to assess the availability of anti-malarial drugs, treatment practices and acceptability of the new protocol by health professionals, in the urban health facilities and drugstores of Yaoundé city, Cameroon. Methods Between April and August 2005, retrospective and current information was collected by consulting registers and interviewing health practitioners in urban health facilities using a structured questionnaire. Results In 2005, twenty-seven trade-named drugs have been identified in drugstores; quinine tablets (300 mg were the most affordable anti-malarial drugs. Chloroquine was restricted to food market places and no generic artemisinin derivative was available in public health centres. In public health facilities, 13.6% of health professionals were informed about the new guidelines; 73.5% supported the use of AS-AQ as first-line therapy. However, 38.6% apprehended its use due to adverse events attributed to amodiaquine. Malaria treatment was mainly based on the diagnosis of fever. Quinine (300 mg tablets was the most commonly prescribed first-line anti-malarial drug in adults (44.5% and pregnant women (52.5%. Artequin® was the most cited artemsinin-based combination therapy (ACT (9.9%. Medical sales representatives were the main sources of information on anti-malarials. Conclusion The use of AS/AQ was not implemented in 2005 in Yaoundé, despite the wide range of anti-malarials and trade-named artemisinin derivatives available. Nevertheless, medical practitioners will support the use of this combination, when it is available in a paediatric formulation, at an affordable price. Training, information and participation of health professionals in decision-making is one of the key elements to improve adherence to new protocol guidelines. This baseline

  18. Evidence-based treatments for cluster headache

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    Gooriah R

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Rubesh Gooriah, Alina Buture, Fayyaz Ahmed Department of Neurology, Hull Royal Infirmary, Kingston upon Hull, UK Abstract: Cluster headache (CH, one of the most painful syndromes known to man, is managed with acute and preventive medications. The brief duration and severity of the attacks command the use of rapid-acting pain relievers. Inhalation of oxygen and subcutaneous sumatriptan are the two most effective acute therapeutic options for sufferers of CH. Several preventive medications are available, the most effective of which is verapamil. However, most of these agents are not backed by strong clinical evidence. In some patients, these options can be ineffective, especially in those who develop chronic CH. Surgical procedures for the chronic refractory form of the disorder should then be contemplated, the most promising of which is hypothalamic deep brain stimulation. We hereby review the pathogenesis of CH and the evidence behind the treatment options for this debilitating condition. Keywords: cluster headache, pathogenesis, vasoactive intestinal peptide, suprachiasmatic nucleus

  19. Evidence-Based Treatment and Stuttering--Historical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, David; Ingham, Roger J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To illustrate the way in which both fluency shaping (FS) and stuttering management (SM) treatments for developmental stuttering in adults are evidence based. Method: A brief review of the history and development of FS and SM is provided. It illustrates that both can be justified as evidence-based treatments, each treatment seeking…

  20. Using qualitative evidence to optimize child PTSD treatment guidelines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesel, F. van; Alisic, E.; Boeije, H.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of patients’ perspectives in the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is increasingly emphasized in recent years. However, qualitative evidence regarding these perspectives, is not systematically included in treatment guidelines. The possibilities of adding systematically

  1. Treatment of fevers prior to introducing rapid diagnostic tests for malaria in registered drug shops in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbonye, Anthony K.; Lal, Sham; Cundill, Bonnie;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since drug shops play an important role in treatment of fever, introducing rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for malaria at drug shops may have the potential of targeting anti-malarial drugs to those with malaria parasites and improve rational drug use. As part of a cluster randomized trial...... shops on presenting symptoms, the consultation process, treatment received, and malaria diagnoses. Malaria diagnosis made by drug shop vendors were confirmed by the study team through microscopy examination of a blood slide to ascertain whether appropriate treatment was received. RESULTS: Among febrile...

  2. Behavioral Activation Is an Evidence-Based Treatment for Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturmey, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Recent reviews of evidence-based treatment for depression did not identify behavioral activation as an evidence-based practice. Therefore, this article conducted a systematic review of behavioral activation treatment of depression, which identified three meta-analyses, one recent randomized controlled trial and one recent follow-up of an earlier…

  3. Pattern of drug utilization for treatment of uncomplicated malaria in urban Ghana following national treatment policy change to artemisinin-combination therapy

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    Tenkorang Ofori

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Change of first-line treatment of uncomplicated malaria to artemisinin-combination therapy (ACT is widespread in Africa. To expand knowledge of safety profiles of ACT, pharmacovigilance activities are included in the implementation process of therapy changes. Ghana implemented first-line therapy of artesunate-amodiaquine in 2005. Drug utilization data is an important component of determining drug safety, and this paper describes how anti-malarials were prescribed within a prospective pharmacovigilance study in Ghana following anti-malarial treatment policy change. Methods Patients with diagnosis of uncomplicated malaria were recruited from pharmacies of health facilities throughout Accra in a cohort-event monitoring study. The main drug utilization outcomes were the relation of patient age, gender, type of facility attended, mode of diagnosis and concomitant treatments to the anti-malarial regimen prescribed. Logistic regression was used to predict prescription of nationally recommended first-line therapy and concomitant prescription of antibiotics. Results The cohort comprised 2,831 patients. Curative regimens containing an artemisinin derivative were given to 90.8% (n = 2,574 of patients, although 33% (n = 936 of patients received an artemisinin-based monotherapy. Predictors of first-line therapy were laboratory-confirmed diagnosis, age >5 years, and attending a government facility. Analgesics and antibiotics were the most commonly prescribed concomitant medications, with a median of two co-prescriptions per patient (range 1–9. Patients above 12 years were significantly less likely to have antibiotics co-prescribed than patients under five years; those prescribed non-artemisinin monotherapies were more likely to receive antibiotics. A dihydroartemisinin-amodiaquine combination was the most used therapy for children under five years of age (29.0%, n = 177. Conclusion This study shows that though first-line therapy

  4. ADVANCES IN THE TREATMENT OF MALARIA

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    Francesco Castelli

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Malaria still claims a heavy toll of deaths and disabilities even at the beginning of the third millennium. The inappropriate sequential use of drug monotherapy in the past has facilitated the spread of drug-resistant P. falciparum, and to a lesser extend P. vivax, strains in most of the malaria endemic areas, rendering most anti-malarial ineffective. In the last decade, a new combination strategy based on artemisinin derivatives (ACT has become the standard of treatment for most P. falciparum malaria infections. This strategy could prevent the selection of resistant strains by rapidly decreasing the parasitic burden (by the artemisinin derivative, mostly artesunate and exposing the residual parasite to effective concentrations of the partner drug. The widespread use of this strategy is somehow constrained by cost and by the inappropriate use of artemisinin, with possible impact on resistance, as already sporadically observed in South East Asia. Parenteral artesunate has now become the standard of care for severe malaria, even if quinine still retains its value in case artesunate is not immediately available. The appropriateness of pre-referral use of suppository artesunate is under close monitoring, while waiting for an effective anti-malarial vaccine to be made available.

  5. ADVANCES IN THE TREATMENT OF MALARIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Castelli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Malaria still claims a heavy toll of deaths and disabilities even at the beginning of the third millennium. The inappropriate sequential use of drug monotherapy in the past has facilitated the spread of drug-resistant P. falciparum, and to a lesser extend P. vivax, strains in most of the malaria endemic areas, rendering most anti-malarial ineffective. In the last decade, a new combination strategy based on artemisinin derivatives (ACT has become the standard of treatment for most P. falciparum malaria infections. This strategy could prevent the selection of resistant strains by rapidly decreasing the parasitic burden (by the artemisinin derivative, mostly artesunate and exposing the residual parasite to effective concentrations of the partner drug. The widespread use of this strategy is somehow constrained by cost and by the inappropriate use of artemisinin, with possible impact on resistance, as already sporadically observed in South East Asia. Parenteral artesunate has now become the standard of care for severe malaria, even if quinine still retains its value in case artesunate is not immediately available. The appropriateness of pre-referral use of suppository artesunate is under close monitoring, while waiting for an effective anti-malarial vaccine to be made available.

  6. Evidence-Based Psychosocial Treatments for Ethnic Minority Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huey, Stanley J., Jr.; Polo, Antonio J.

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews research on evidence-based treatments (EBTs) for ethnic minority youth using criteria from Chambless et al. (1998), Chambless et al. (1996), and Chambless and Hollon (1998). Although no "well-established" treatments were identified, "probably efficacious" or "possibly efficacious" treatments were found for ethnic minority…

  7. Medical tourism: A snapshot of evidence on treatment abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunt, Neil; Horsfall, Daniel; Hanefeld, Johanna

    2016-06-01

    The scoping review focuses on medical tourism, whereby consumers elect to travel across borders or to overseas destinations to receive their treatment. Such treatments include: cosmetic and dental surgery; cardio, orthopaedic and bariatric surgery; IVF; and organ and tissue transplantation. The review assesses the emerging focus of research evidence post-2010. The narrative review traverses discussion on medical tourism definitions and flows, consumer choice, clinical quality and outcomes, and health systems implications. Attention is drawn to gaps in the research evidence.

  8. Treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism: evidence-based and emerging modalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2009-01-01

    Currently there are three well-established treatment options for hyperthyroid Graves' disease (GD): antithyroid drug therapy with thionamides (ATD), radioactive iodine treatment with (131)I, and thyroid surgery. This article reviews the current evidence so the reader can evaluate advantages...

  9. Evidence-Based Practices in Outpatient Treatment for Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffner, Angela D.; Buchanan, Linda Paulk

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the current issues relevant to implementing evidence-based practices in the context of outpatient treatment for eating disorders. The study also examined the effectiveness of an outpatient treatment program for eating disorders among a group of 196 patients presenting with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or eating disorder…

  10. Evidence-Based Medicine in the Treatment of Infantile Hemangiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Robert G; Patel, Krishna G

    2015-08-01

    Over the past decade, the treatment of infantile hemangiomas has undergone dramatic breakthroughs. This review critically evaluates the latest literature that supports the myriad treatment options for infantile hemangiomas. It chronicles the fading role of steroid therapy and evolution of propranolol use as the major treatment modality. Although propranolol is helping this disease become more of a medical disease and less of a surgical dilemma, the report also reveals a continued search to find nonsystemic treatment options. In summary, this is an evidence-based medicine review for the treatment of infantile hemangiomas.

  11. Diversity oriented synthesis for novel anti-malarials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathula, Chandramohan; Singh, Shailja; Sen, Subhabrata

    2015-12-01

    Malaria a global pandemic has engulfed nearly 0.63 million people globally. It is high time that a cure for malaria is required to stop its ever increasing menace. Our commentary discusses the advent and contribution of diversity oriented synthesis (DOS) in the drug discovery efforts towards developing cure for malaria. DOS based on chemical genetics focusses on design and synthesis of molecular libraries which covers large tracts of biologically relevant chemical space. Herein we will discuss the applications, advantages, disadvantages and future directions of DOS with respect to malaria.

  12. Malaria prevention and treatment in pregnancy: survey of current practice among private medical practitioners in Lagos, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiu, Kabiru Afolarin; Davies, Nosimot Omolola; Nzeribe-Abangwu, Ugochi O; Adewunmi, Adeniyi Abiodun; Akinlusi, Fatimat Motunrayo; Akinola, Oluwarotimi Ireti; Ogundele, Sunday O

    2015-01-01

    We studied the practice of malaria prevention and treatment in pregnancy of 394 private medical practitioners in Lagos State, Nigeria using a self-administered pre-tested structured questionnaire. Only 39 (9.9%) respondents had correct knowledge of the World Health Organization (WHO) strategies. Malaria prophylaxis in pregnancy was offered by 336 (85.3%), but only 98 (24.9%) had correct knowledge of recommended chemoprophylaxis. Of these, 68 (17.3%) had correct knowledge of first trimester treatment, while only 41 (10.4%) had knowledge of second and third trimester treatment. Only 64 (16.2%) of respondents routinely recommended use of insecticide-treated bed nets. The most common anti-malarial drug prescribed for chemoprophylaxis was pyrimethamine (43.7%); chloroquine was the most common anti-malarial prescribed for both first trimester treatment (81.5%) and second and third trimester treatment (55.3%). The study showed that private medical practitioners have poor knowledge of malaria prophylaxis and treatment in pregnancy, and the practice of most do not conform to recommended guidelines.

  13. Current Treatment of Toxoplasma Retinochoroiditis: An Evidence-Based Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith Harrell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To perform an evidence-based review of treatments for Toxoplasma retinochoroiditis (TRC. Methods. A systematic literature search was performed using the PubMed database and the key phrase “ocular toxoplasmosis treatment” and the filter for “controlled clinical trial” and “randomized clinical trial” as well as OVID medline (1946 to May week 2 2014 using the keyword ‘‘ocular toxoplasmosis’’. The included studies were used to evaluate the various treatment modalities of TRC. Results. The electronic search yielded a total of 974 publications of which 44 reported on the treatment of ocular toxoplasmosis. There were 9 randomized controlled studies and an additional 3 comparative studies on the treatment of acute TRC with systemic or intravitreous antibiotics or on reducing the recurrences of TRC. Endpoints of studies included visual acuity improvement, inflammatory response, lesion size changes, recurrences of lesions, and adverse effects of medications. Conclusions. There was conflicting evidence as to the effectiveness of systemic antibiotics for TRC. There is no evidence to support that one antibiotic regimen is superior to another so choice needs to be informed by the safety profile. Intravitreous clindamycin with dexamethasone seems to be as effective as systemic treatments. There is currently level I evidence that intermittent trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole prevents recurrence of the disease.

  14. Varying efficacy of artesunate+amodiaquine and artesunate+sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine for the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria in the Democratic Republic of Congo: a report of two in-vivo studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Overmeir Chantal

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Very few data on anti-malarial efficacy are available from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC. DRC changed its anti-malarial treatment policy to amodiaquine (AQ and artesunate (AS in 2005. Methods The results of two in vivo efficacy studies, which tested AQ and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP monotherapies and AS+SP and AS+AQ combinations in Boende (Equatorial province, and AS+SP, AS+AQ and SP in Kabalo (Katanga province, between 2003 and 2004 are presented. The methodology followed the WHO 2003 protocol for assessing the efficacy of anti-malarials in areas of high transmission. Results Out of 394 included patients in Boende, the failure rates on day 28 after PCR-genotyping adjustment of AS+SP and AS+AQ were estimated as 24.6% [95% CI: 16.6–35.5] and 15.1% [95% CI: 8.6–25.7], respectively. For the monotherapies, failure rates were 35.9% [95% CI: 27.0–46.7] for SP and 18.3% [95% CI: 11.6–28.1] for AQ. Out of 207 patients enrolled in Kabalo, the failure rate on day 28 after PCR-genotyping adjustment was 0 [1-sided 95% CI: 5.8] for AS+SP and AS+AQ [1-sided 95% CI: 6.2]. It was 19.6% [95% CI: 11.4–32.7] for SP monotherapy. Conclusion The finding of varying efficacy of the same combinations at two sites in one country highlights one difficulty of implementing a uniform national treatment policy in a large country. The poor efficacy of AS+AQ in Boende should alert the national programme to foci of resistance and emphasizes the need for systems for the prospective monitoring of treatment efficacy at sentinel sites in the country.

  15. [Evidence-based treatment of mentally ill homeless persons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Maja; Nordentoft, Merete

    2010-05-31

    A systematic review of the literature shows that it is possible to reduce homelessness among mentally ill homeless persons, partly by offering access to housing and partly by providing intensive care through Assertive Community Treatment. Assertive Community Treatment can, to some extent, decrease psychiatric symptoms and increase quality of life. It is evident that by offering housing, homelessness may be reduced, but the comparison of independent housing and group living did not reveal big differences.

  16. Evidence-Based Treatment of Diabetic Macular Edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barham, Rasha; El Rami, Hala; Sun, Jennifer K; Silva, Paolo S

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that affects 415 million people worldwide. Despite treatment advances, diabetic eye disease remains a leading cause of vision loss worldwide. Diabetic macular edema (DME) is a common cause of vision loss in diabetic patients. The pathophysiology is complex and involves multiple pathways that ultimately lead to central retinal thickening and, if untreated, visual loss. First-line treatment of DME has evolved from focal/grid laser established by the Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) to intravitreous pharmacologic therapy. Landmark prospective clinical trials examining the effect of intravitreous injections of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors in the treatment of DME have demonstrated improved visual outcomes over focal grid laser. This review focuses on the scientific evidence treatment of DME, disease pathophysiology, clinical disease course, current treatment standards, and emerging novel therapeutic approaches.

  17. Cluster-randomized study of intermittent preventive treatment for malaria in infants (IPTi in southern Tanzania: evaluation of impact on survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schellenberg Joanna

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intermittent Preventive Treatment for malaria control in infants (IPTi consists of the administration of a treatment dose of an anti-malarial drug, usually sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, at scheduled intervals, regardless of the presence of Plasmodium falciparum infection. A pooled analysis of individually randomized trials reported that IPTi reduced clinical episodes by 30%. This study evaluated the effect of IPTi on child survival in the context of a five-district implementation project in southern Tanzania. [Trial registration: clinical trials.gov NCT00152204]. Methods After baseline household and health facility surveys in 2004, five districts comprising 24 divisions were randomly assigned either to receive IPTi (n = 12 or not (n = 12. Implementation started in March 2005, led by routine health services with support from the research team. In 2007, a large household survey was undertaken to assess the impact of IPTi on survival in infants aged two-11 months through birth history interviews with all women aged 13-49 years. The analysis is based on an "intention-to-treat" ecological design, with survival outcomes analysed according to the cluster in which the mothers lived. Results Survival in infants aged two-11 months was comparable in IPTi and comparison areas at baseline. In intervention areas in 2007, 48% of children aged 12-23 months had documented evidence of receiving three doses of IPTi, compared to 2% in comparison areas (P P = 0.31. Conclusion The lack of evidence of an effect of IPTi on survival could be a false negative result due to a lack of power or imbalance of unmeasured confounders. Alternatively, there could be no mortality impact of IPTi due to low coverage, late administration, drug resistance, decreased malaria transmission or improvements in vector control and case management. This study raises important questions for programme evaluation design.

  18. Functional Mitral Regurgitation: Appraising the Evidence Behind Recommended Treatment Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samad, Zainab; Velazquez, Eric J

    2016-12-01

    Functional mitral regurgitation (MR) is the most common type of MR encountered in clinical practice. Because the disease arises from the ventricular aspect of the mitral valve apparatus, treatment therapies are less defined and outcomes are poor. In this review, the state of evidence for medical and surgical therapy in functional MR is appraised. Future directions for research in this area are also defined.

  19. Behavioural Treatments for Tourette Syndrome: An Evidence-Based Review

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    Madeleine Frank

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tourette syndrome (TS is a disorder characterised by multiple motor and vocal tics and is frequently associated with behavioural problems. Tics are known to be affected by internal factors such as inner tension and external factors such as the surrounding environment. A number of behavioural treatments have been suggested to treat the symptoms of TS, in addition to pharmacotherapy and surgery for the most severe cases. This review compiled all the studies investigating behavioural therapies for TS, briefly describing each technique and assessing the evidence in order to determine which of these appear to be effective. Different behavioural therapies that were used included habit reversal training (HRT, massed negative practice, supportive psychotherapy, exposure with response prevention, self-monitoring, cognitive-behavioural therapy, relaxation therapy, assertiveness training, contingency management, a tension-reduction technique and biofeedback training. Overall, HRT is the best-studied and most widely-used technique and there is sufficient experimental evidence to suggest that it is an effective treatment. Most of the other treatments, however, require further investigation to evaluate their efficacy. Specifically, evidence suggests that exposure with response prevention and self-monitoring are effective, and more research is needed to determine the therapeutic value of the other treatments. As most of the studies investigating behavioural treatments for TS are small-sample or single-case studies, larger randomised controlled trials are advocated.

  20. Evidence-Based Treatments for Adults with Migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubesh Gooriah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Migraine, a significantly disabling condition, is treated with acute and preventive medications. However, some individuals are refractory to standard treatments. Although there is a host of alternative management options available, these are not always backed by strong evidence. In fact, most of the drugs used in migraine were initially designed for other purposes. Whilst effective, the benefits from these medications are modest, reflecting the need for newer and migraine-specific therapeutic agents. In recent years, we have witnessed the emergence of novel treatments, of which noninvasive neuromodulation appears to be the most attractive given its ease of use and excellent tolerability profile. This paper reviews the evidence behind the available treatments for migraine.

  1. Pediatric Depression: Is There Evidence to Improve Evidence-Based Treatments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brent, David A.; Maalouf, Fadi T.

    2009-01-01

    Although there have been advances in our ability to treat child and adolescent depression, use of evidence-based treatments still results in many patients with residual symptoms. Advances in our understanding of cognitive, emotional, and ecological aspects of early-onset depression have the potential to lead to improvements in the assessment and…

  2. Evidences in the treatment of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Fernandes de Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary Introduction: idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (INPH is characterized by gait apraxia, cognitive dysfunction and urinary incontinence. There are two main treatment options: ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VPS and endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV. However, there are doubts about which modality is superior and what type of valve should be applied. We are summarizing the current evidence in INPH treatment. Methods: an electronic search of the literature was conducted on the Medline, Embase, Scielo and Lilacs databases from 1966 to the present to obtain data published about INPH treatment. Results: the treatment is based on three pillars: conservative, ETV and VPS. The conservative option has fallen into disuse after various studies showing good results after surgical intervention. ETV is an acceptable mode of treatment, but the superiority of VPS has made the latter the gold standard. Conclusion: well-designed studies with a high level of appropriate evidence are still scarce, but the current gold standard for treatment of INPH is conducted using VPS.

  3. Optimal price subsidies for appropriate malaria testing and treatment behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, K. S.; Lesner, T. H.; Østerdal, L. P.

    2016-01-01

    of presumptive diagnosis. A global subsidy on artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) has recently been suggested to increase access to the most effective malaria treatment. Methods: Following the recommendation by World Health Organization that parasitological testing should be performed before treatment......, ACT medicines, and cheap, less effective anti-malarials are sold. Assuming that the individual has certain beliefs of the accuracy of the RDT and the probability that the fever is malaria, the model predicts the diagnosis-treatment behaviour of the individual. Subsidies on RDTs and ACT are introduced...... to incentivize appropriate behaviour: choose an RDT before treatment and purchase ACT only if the test is positive. Results: Solving the model numerically suggests that a combined subsidy on both RDT and ACT is cost minimizing and improves diagnosis-treatment behaviour of individuals. For certain beliefs...

  4. Evidence-based evaluation of treatment strategy for multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Meng-qiu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To formulate the best treatment plan for multiple sclerosis (MS patients by evaluating the therapeutic efficacy and side effect of various evidence-based programs. Methods Key words were defined as multiple sclerosis, immunomodulatory therapy and therapy, etc. We searched MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Wanfang data bases for Scientific Journals in China and National Knowledge Infrastructure for Chinese Scientific Journals Database. Additionally, we applied manual searching and screened out conference paper and academic dissertation, etc, from various references. After that we obtained and evaluated by Jadad scales on systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials and observational study cases about glucocorticoids, plasmapheresis, intravenous immunoglobulin, IFN-β, glatiramer acetate, mitoxantrone, natalizumab, fingolimod. Results After screening, all seventeen selected resources included systematic reviews 6 articles, randomized controlled trials 7 articles, controlled clinical trials 2 articles, observational study cases 2 articles, among which fifteen articles were proved to be high quality (according to Jadad scoring system, five score 4, six score 5, four score 7, two chapters were judged to be low quality scoring 3. Finally, we summerize that: 1 The first choice of treatment for acute relapses is glucocorticoids and we suggest that plasmapheresis or intravenous immunoglobulin may be tried as an alternative therapy in acute MS relapse, especially in case of contraindications to intravenous methylprednisolone. 2 Immunomodulatory or immunosuppressive treatment (IFN-β, glatiramer acetate, mitoxantrone, natalizumab can be an option to prevent new relapses and progression of disability. 3 Fingolimod is an oral treatment for multiple sclerosis to improve treatment adherence. Conclusion Using evidence-based medicine methods can provide us best clinical evidence on MS treatment.

  5. Surveillance of the efficacy of artemether-lumefantrine and artesunate-amodiaquine for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum among children under five in Togo, 2005-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorkenoo Monique A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria remains a major public health problem in Togo. The national malaria control programme in Togo changed the anti-malarial treatment policy from monotherapy to artemisinin combination therapy in 2004. This study reports the results of therapeutic efficacy studies conducted on artemether-lumefantrine and artesunate-amodiaquine for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Togo, between 2005 and 2009. Methods Children between 6 and 59 months of age, who were symptomatically infected with P. falciparum, were treated with either artemether-lumefantrine or artesunate-amodiaquine. The primary end-point was the 28-day cure rate, PCR-corrected for reinfection and recrudescence. Studies were conducted according to the standardized WHO protocol for the assessment of the efficacy of anti-malarial treatment. Differences between categorical data were compared using the chi-square test or the Fisher’s exact test where cell counts were ≤ 5. Differences in continuous data were compared using a t-test. Results A total of 16 studies were conducted in five sentinel sites, with 459, 505 and 332 children included in 2005, 2007 and 2009, respectively. The PCR-corrected 28-day cure rates using the per-protocol analysis were between 96%-100% for artemether-lumefantrine and 94%-100% for artesunate-amodiaquine. Conclusions Both formulations of artemisinin-based combination therapy were effective over time and no severe adverse events related to the treatment were reported during the studies.

  6. The evidence for pharmacological treatment of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Sindrup, Søren Hein; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2010-09-01

    Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials on neuropathic pain treatment are accumulating, so an updated review of the available evidence is needed. Studies were identified using MEDLINE and EMBASE searches. Numbers needed to treat (NNT) and numbers needed to harm (NNH) values were used to compare the efficacy and safety of different treatments for a number of neuropathic pain conditions. One hundred and seventy-four studies were included, representing a 66% increase in published randomized, placebo-controlled trials in the last 5 years. Painful poly-neuropathy (most often due to diabetes) was examined in 69 studies, postherpetic neuralgia in 23, while peripheral nerve injury, central pain, HIV neuropathy, and trigeminal neuralgia were less often studied. Tricyclic antidepressants, serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors, the anticonvulsants gabapentin and pregabalin, and opioids are the drug classes for which there is the best evidence for a clinical relevant effect. Despite a 66% increase in published trials only a limited improvement of neuropathic pain treatment has been obtained. A large proportion of neuropathic pain patients are left with insufficient pain relief. This fact calls for other treatment options to target chronic neuropathic pain. Large-scale drug trials that aim to identify possible subgroups of patients who are likely to respond to specific drugs are needed to test the hypothesis that a mechanism-based classification may help improve treatment of the individual patients.

  7. Evidence-based rationale for offloading treatment modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Desmond

    2008-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) are a common co-morbidity affecting patients with diabetes. A variety of factors, including diabetic peripheral neuropathy, altered gait, and increased pressure on certain regions of the foot, can over time result in a diabetic foot wound. Reducing pressure at the site of the ulcer can promote healing and prevent further ulceration. Offloading is an evidence-based treatment modality for patients with DFUs and is part of the standard protocol for treatment. We discuss here the most common offloading modalities, placing them in the context of relevant medical and compliance issues that affect their use and success.

  8. Optimal price subsidies for appropriate malaria testing and treatment behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristian Schultz; Lesner, Tine Hjernø; Østerdal, Lars Peter

    2016-01-01

    , ACT medicines, and cheap, less effective anti-malarials are sold. Assuming that the individual has certain beliefs of the accuracy of the RDT and the probability that the fever is malaria, the model predicts the diagnosis-treatment behaviour of the individual. Subsidies on RDTs and ACT are introduced...... to incentivize appropriate behaviour: choose an RDT before treatment and purchase ACT only if the test is positive. RESULTS: Solving the model numerically suggests that a combined subsidy on both RDT and ACT is cost minimizing and improves diagnosis-treatment behaviour of individuals. For certain beliefs......BACKGROUND: Malaria continues to be a serious public health problem particularly in Africa. Many people infected with malaria do not access effective treatment due to high price. At the same time many individuals receiving malaria drugs do not suffer from malaria because of the common practice...

  9. Medical tourism: assessing the evidence on treatment abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunt, Neil; Carrera, Percivil

    2010-05-01

    The review focuses on one growing dimension of health care globalisation - medical tourism, whereby consumers elect to travel across borders or to overseas destinations to receive their treatment. Such treatments include cosmetic and dental surgery; cardio, orthopaedic and bariatric surgery; IVF treatment; and organ and tissue transplantation. The review sought to identify the medical tourist literature for out-of-pocket payments, focusing wherever possible on evidence and experience pertaining to patients in mid-life and beyond. Despite increasing media interest and coverage hard empirical findings pertaining to out-of-pocket medical tourism are rare. Despite a number of countries offering relatively low cost treatments we know very little about many of the numbers and key indicators on medical tourism. The narrative review traverses discussion on medical tourist markets, consumer choice, clinical outcomes, quality and safety, and ethical and legal dimensions. The narrative review draws attention to gaps in research evidence and strengthens the call for more empirical research on the role, process and outcomes of medical tourism. In concluding it makes suggestion for the content of such a strategy.

  10. Tendinopathy: a review of the pathophysiology and evidence for treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldin, Michael; Malanga, Gerard A

    2013-09-01

    The understanding of tendinopathy has evolved over the past several decades. Initially thought to be a primarily inflammatory process, histologic evaluation has revealed that there is an absence of inflammatory cells, and rather, tendinopathy is more of a degenerative process. Various types of medications, rehabilitation, modalities, injections, and minimally invasive procedures have been described as treatment for this condition. The purpose of our article is to describe the pathophysiology of tendinopathy as currently understood and the evidence for the various available treatments. We performed a literature search to determine the types of reviews that have been performed previously regarding treatment for tendinopathy, and summarized these reviews. We then performed a systematic review of randomized controlled trials for treating patients with tendinopathy. It is our hope that our review of trial data will help providers to determine optimal management for their patients with tendinopathy.

  11. Treatment-resistant schizophrenia: Evidence-based strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Englisch

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment-resistant symptoms complicate the clinical course of schizophrenia, and a large proportion of patients do not reach functional recovery. In consequence, polypharmacy is frequently used in treatment-refractory cases, addressing psychotic positive, negative and cognitive symptoms, treatment-emergent side effects caused by antipsychotics and comorbid depressive or obsessive-compulsive symptoms. To a large extent, such strategies are not covered by pharmacological guidelines which strongly suggest antipsychotic monotherapy. Add-on strategies comprise combinations of several antipsychotic agents and augmentations with mood stabilizers; moreover, antidepressants and experimental substances are applied. Based on the accumulated evidence of clinical trials and meta-analyses, combinations of clozapine with certain second-generation antipsychotic agents and the augmentation of antipsychotics with antidepressants seem recommendable, while the augmentation with mood stabilizers cannot be considered superior to placebo. Forthcoming investigations will have to focus on innovative pharmacological agents, the clinical spectrum of cognitive deficits and the implementation of cognitive behavioral therapy.

  12. Evaluation of medication treatment for Alzheimer's disease on clinical evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-qiu LI

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To formulate the best treatment plan for Alzheimer's disease patients by evaluating the therapeutic efficacy and side effect of various evidence-based programs. Methods Alzheimer's disease, donepezil, rivastigmine, galantamine, memantine, rosiglitazone, etc. were defined as retrieval words. PubMed, Cochrane Library, Wanfang Data and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI databases were used with applying of manual searching. Systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials (RCT, controlled clinical trials and case-observation studies were collected and evaluated by Jadad Scale. Results After screening, 33 selected resources included 14 systematic reviews, 14 randomized controlled trials, 4 controlled clinical trials and 1 case-observation study. According to Jadad Scale, total 28 articles were evaluated to be high quality (12 with score 4, 10 score 5, 6 score 7, and 5 were low quality with score 3. It was summarized as follows: 1 Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease for which no cure exists. To date, only symptomatic treatments with cholinesterase inhibitors (donepezil, rivastigmine, galantamine and an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor noncompetitive antagonist (memantine, are effective and well tolerated to counterbalance the neurotransmitter disturbance, but cannot limit or impact on disease progression. 2 Disease modifying drug is an potential agent, with persistent effect on slowing the progression of structural damage, and can be detected even after withdrawing the treatment. Many types of disease modifying drugs are undergoing clinical trials. Conclusions Using evidence-based medicine methods can provide best clinical evidence on Alzheimer's disease treatment. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.03.009

  13. Evidence for Resistance Training as a Treatment Therapy in Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Strasser

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, investigators have paid increasing attention to the effects of resistance training (RT on several metabolic syndrome variables. Evidence suggests that skeletal muscle is responsible for up to 40% of individuals' total body weight and may be influential in modifying metabolic risk factors via muscle mass development. Due to the metabolic consequences of reduced muscle mass, it is understood that normal aging and/or decreased physical activity may lead to a higher prevalence of metabolic disorders. The purpose of this review is to (1 evaluate the potential clinical effectiveness and biological mechanisms of RT in the treatment of obesity and (2 provide up-to-date evidence relating to the impact of RT in reducing major cardiovascular disease risk factors (including dyslipidaemia and type 2 diabetes. A further aim of this paper is to provide clinicians with recommendations for facilitating the use of RT as therapy in obesity and obesity-related metabolic disorders.

  14. [Evidence for emergency treatment of chemical eye burns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Jonas Vejvad Nørskov; Hjortdal, Jesper Østergaard

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the existing evidence on emergency treatment of chemical eye burns. Clinical studies show that patients receiving prompt eye irrigation after chemical burns had a significantly better clinical outcome. This is further collaborated in animal studies where prompt irrigation with diphoterine or borate buffer significantly lowered pH in the eye after alkali burns. Two of three studies showed that tap water significantly lowered pH as well, but only if it was administered within 60 seconds after exposure. Saline, however, did not cause any significant decrease in pH at all.

  15. Evidence-based investigations and treatments of recurrent pregnancy loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Ole B; Nybo Andersen, Anne-Marie; Bosch, Ernesto

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To give an overview of currently used investigations and treatments offered to women with recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) and, from an evidence-based point of view, to evaluate the usefulness of these interventions. DESIGN: Ten experts on epidemiologic, genetic, anatomic, endocrinologic......, and an extensive investigation for all major factors should always be undertaken. There is an urgent need for agreement concerning the thresholds for detecting what is normal and abnormal, irrespective of whether laboratory tests or uterine abnormalities are concerned. A series of lifestyle factors should...

  16. The Alcohol Mandatory Treatment Act: evidence, ethics and the law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lander, Fiona; Gray, Dennis; Wilkes, Edward

    2015-07-01

    The Northern Territory Alcohol Mandatory Treatment Act 2013 (AMT Act) permits mandatory residential alcohol rehabilitation for up to 3 months. International guidelines and human rights law confirm that mandatory rehabilitation should only be used for short periods. Evidence concerning the efficacy of long-term mandatory alcohol rehabilitation is lacking, and minimal data concerning the efficacy of the scheme have been released. Specific legal issues also arise concerning the AMT Act, including its potentially discriminatory application to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. The program only permits referral by police, despite the fact that it is ostensibly a medical intervention. Use of a treatment as a method of effectively solving a public intoxication problem is highly dubious, and should be of concern to the medical community. Given that more cost-effective and proven measures exist to combat alcohol dependence, the utility of the AMT Act is questionable.

  17. Barriers to prompt and effective malaria treatment among the poorest population in Kenya

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    Okungu Vincent

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prompt access to effective malaria treatment is central to the success of malaria control worldwide, but few fevers are treated with effective anti-malarials within 24 hours of symptoms onset. The last two decades saw an upsurge of initiatives to improve access to effective malaria treatment in many parts of sub-Saharan Africa. Evidence suggests that the poorest populations remain least likely to seek prompt and effective treatment, but the factors that prevent them from accessing interventions are not well understood. With plans under way to subsidize ACT heavily in Kenya and other parts of Africa, there is urgent need to identify policy actions to promote access among the poor. This paper explores access barriers to effective malaria treatment among the poorest population in four malaria endemic districts in Kenya. Methods The study was conducted in the poorest areas of four malaria endemic districts in Kenya. Multiple data collection methods were applied including: a cross-sectional survey (n = 708 households; 24 focus group discussions; semi-structured interviews with health workers (n = 34; and patient exit interviews (n = 359. Results Multiple factors related to affordability, acceptability and availability interact to influence access to prompt and effective treatment. Regarding affordability, about 40 percent of individuals who self-treated using shop-bought drugs and 42 percent who visited a formal health facility reported not having enough money to pay for treatment, and having to adopt coping strategies including borrowing money and getting treatment on credit in order to access care. Other factors influencing affordability were seasonality of illness and income sources, transport costs, and unofficial payments. Regarding acceptability, the major interrelated factors identified were provider patient relationship, patient expectations, beliefs on illness causation, perceived effectiveness of treatment, distrust in

  18. Surgical treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma:Evidence-based outcomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shintaro Yamazaki; Tadatoshi Takayama

    2008-01-01

    Surgeons may be severely criticized from the perspective of evidence-based medicine because the majority of surgical publications appear not to be convincing.In the top nine surgical journals in 1996,half of the 175publications refer to pilot studies lacking a control group,18% to animal experiments,and only 5% to randomized controlled trials (RCT).There are five levels of clinical evidence:level 1 (randomized controlled trial),level 2 (prospective concurrent cohort study),level 3 (retrospective historical cohort study),level 4(pre-post study),and level 5 (case report).Recently,a Japanese evidence-based guideline for the surgical treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was made by a committee (Chairman,Professor Makuuchi and five members).We searched the literature using the Medline Dialog System with four keywords:HCC,surgery,English papers,in the last 20 years.A total of 915 publications were identified systematically reviewed.At the first selection (in which surgery-dominant papers were Selected),478 papers survived.In the second selection (clearly concluded papers),181 papers survived.In the final selection (clinically significant papers),100 papers survived.The evidence level of the 100 surviving papers is shown here:level-1 papers (13%),level-2 papers (11%),level-3 papers (52%),and level-4 papers (24%);therefore,there were 24% prospective papers and 76%retrospective papers.Here,we present a part of the guideline on the five main surgical issues:indication to operation,operative procedure,peri-operative care,prognostic factor,and post-operative adjuvant therapy.

  19. Evidence-based insulin treatment in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Iben Brock; Henriksen, J E; Hother-Nielsen, O

    2009-01-01

    AIM: Evaluation of the evidence base for recommending different insulin treatment regimens in type 1 diabetes. METHODS: A computerised literature survey was conducted using The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register and the Pub Med database for the period of 1982-2007. RESULTS: A meta-analysis on only...... 49 out of 1295 references showed that CSII compared with conventional or multiple insulin injections therapy demonstrated a significant reduction in mean HbA1c (primary outcome) of 1.2% CI [0.73; 1.59] (P... daily insulin injections was based on only one publication demonstrating an improved quality of life but no significant reduction in HbA1c or hypoglycaemia. A comparison of rapid-acting insulin analogues and human soluble insulin demonstrated a statistically significant reduction in HbA1c of 0.1% CI: [0...

  20. Evidence of Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Autism and Implications for Treatment

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    Daniel A. Rossignol

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Classical mitochondrial diseases occur in a subset of individuals with autism and are usually caused by genetic anomalies or mitochondrial respiratory pathway deficits. However, in many cases of autism, there is evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction (MtD without the classic features associated with mitochondrial disease. MtD appears to be more common in autism and presents with less severe signs and symptoms. It is not associated with discernable mitochondrial pathology in muscle biopsy specimens despite objective evidence of lowered mitochondrial functioning. Exposure to environ-mental toxins is the likely etiology for MtD in autism. This dysfunction then contributes to a number of diagnostic symptoms and comorbidities observed in autism including: cognitive impairment, language deficits, abnormal energy metabolism, chronic gastrointestinal problems, abnormalities in fatty acid oxidation, and increased oxidative stress. MtD and oxidative stress may also explain the high male to female ratio found in autism due to increased male vulnerability to these dysfunctions. Biomarkers for mitochondrial dysfunction have been identified, but seem widely under-utilized despite available therapeutic interventions. Nutritional supplementation to decrease oxidative stress along with factors to improve reduced glutathione, as well as hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT represent supported and rationale approaches. The underlying pathophysiology and autistic symptoms of affected individuals would be expected to either improve or cease worsening once effective treatment for MtD is implemented.

  1. Treatment of neuromyelitis optica: an evidence based review

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    Douglas Sato

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica (NMO is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system characterized by severe optic neuritis and transverse myelitis, usually with a relapsing course. Aquaporin-4 antibody is positive in a high percentage of NMO patients and it is directed against this water channel richly expressed on foot processes of astrocytes. Due to the severity of NMO attacks and the high risk for disability, treatment should be instituted as soon as the diagnosis is confirmed. There is increasing evidence that NMO patients respond differently from patients with multiple sclerosis (MS, and, therefore, treatments for MS may not be suitable for NMO. Acute NMO attacks usually are treated with high dose intravenous corticosteroid pulse and plasmapheresis. Maintenance therapy is also required to avoid further attacks and it is based on low-dose oral corticosteroids and non-specific immunosuppressant drugs, like azathioprine and mycophenolate mofetil. New therapy strategies using monoclonal antibodies like rituximab have been tested in NMO, with positive results in open label studies. However, there is no controlled randomized trial to confirm the safety and efficacy for the drugs currently used in NMO.

  2. Provider knowledge of treatment policy and dosing regimen with artemether-lumefantrine and quinine in malaria-endemic areas of western Kenya

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    Watsierah Carren A

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to widespread anti-malarial drug resistance in many countries, Kenya included, artemisinin-based Combination Therapy (ACT has been adopted as the most effective treatment option against malaria. Artemether-lumefantrine (AL is the first-line ACT for treatment of uncomplicated malaria in Kenya, while quinine is preferred for complicated and severe malaria. Information on the providers’ knowledge and practices prior to or during AL and quinine implementation is scanty. The current study evaluated providers’ knowledge and practices of treatment policy and dosing regimens with AL and quinine in the public, private and not-for-profit drug outlets. Methods A cross-sectional survey using three-stage sampling of 288 (126 public, 96 private and 66 not-for-profits providers in drug outlets was conducted in western Kenya in two Plasmodium falciparum-endemic regions with varying malarial risk. Information on provider in-service training, knowledge (qualification, treatment policy, dosing regimen, recently banned anti-malarials and on practices (request for written prescription, prescription of AL, selling partial packs and advice given to patients after prescription, was collected. Results Only 15.6% of providers in private outlets had received any in-service training on AL use. All (100% in public and majority (98.4% in not-for-profit outlets mentioned AL as first line-treatment drug. Quinine was mentioned as second-line drug by 47.9% in private outlets. A total of 92.0% in public, 57.3% in private and 78.8% in not-for-profit outlets stated correct AL dose for adults. A total of 85.7% of providers in public, 30.2% in private and 41.0% in not-for-profit outlets were aware that SP recommendations changed from treatment for mild malaria to IPTp in high risk areas. In-service training influenced treatment regimen for uncomplicated malaria (P = 0.039 and P = 0.039 and severe malaria (P P = 0.002 in children and adults

  3. Improving childhood malaria treatment and referral practices by training patent medicine vendors in rural south-east Nigeria

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    Uzochukwu Benjamin SC

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality among children under five years of age in Nigeria. Most of the early treatments for fever and malaria occur through self-medication with anti-malarials bought over-the-counter (OTC from untrained drug vendors. Self-medication through drug vendors can be ineffective, with increased risks of drug toxicity and development of drug resistance. Global malaria control initiatives highlights the potential role of drug vendors to improve access to early effective malaria treatment, which underscores the need for interventions to improve treatment obtained from these outlets. This study aimed to determine the feasibility and impact of training rural drug vendors on community-based malaria treatment and advice with referral of severe cases to a health facility. Methods A drug vendor-training programme was carried out between 2003 and 2005 in Ugwuogo-Nike, a rural community in south-east Nigeria. A total of 16 drug vendors were trained and monitored for eight months. The programme was evaluated to measure changes in drug vendor practice and knowledge using exit interviews. In addition, home visits were conducted to measure compliance with referral. Results The intervention achieved major improvements in drug selling and referral practices and knowledge. Exit interviews confirmed significant increases in appropriate anti-malarial drug dispensing, correct history questions asked and advice given. Improvements in malaria knowledge was established and 80% compliance with referred cases was observed during the study period, Conclusion The remarkable change in knowledge and practices observed indicates that training of drug vendors, as a means of communication in the community, is feasible and strongly supports their inclusion in control strategies aimed at improving prompt effective treatment of malaria with referral of severe cases.

  4. Evidence-based treatment for mental disorders in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiano, Gregory A; Pelham, William E

    2002-04-01

    In the past decade, increased emphasis has been placed on identifying treatments for childhood disorders that are supported by empirical evidence of their effectiveness. This process was spearheaded by an American Psychological Association division 12 task force that identified evidence-based treatments--mostly for disorders of adulthood. Because of the publication of the task force results, other studies have been published that contribute to the knowledge base of evidence-based treatment, and these studies are briefly reviewed. Across evidence-based treatments, common features of effective treatments, such as parent involvement, use of a treatment manual, and the emphasis on generalization of treatment effects to natural settings, are also identified and reviewed.Introduction

  5. Clinical tolerability of artesunate-amodiaquine versus comparator treatments for uncomplicated falciparum malaria: an individual-patient analysis of eight randomized controlled trials in sub-Saharan Africa

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    Zwang Julien

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The widespread use of artesunate-amodiaquine (ASAQ for treating uncomplicated malaria makes it important to gather and analyse information on its tolerability. Methods An individual-patient tolerability analysis was conducted using data from eight randomized controlled clinical trials conducted at 17 sites in nine sub-Saharan countries comparing ASAQ to other anti-malarial treatments. All patients who received at least one dose of the study drug were included in the analysis. Differences in adverse event (AE and treatment emergent adverse event (TEAE were analysed by Day 28. Results Of the 6,179 patients enrolled (74% Conclusion ASAQ was comparatively well-tolerated. Safety information is important, and must be collected and analysed in a standardized way. TEAEs are a more objective measure of treatment-induced toxicity.

  6. Treatment of malaria from monotherapy to artemisinin-based combination therapy by health professionals in rural health facilities in southern Cameroon

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    Bley Daniel

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One year after the adoption of artesunate-amodiaquine (AS/AQ as first-line therapy for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria, this study was designed to assess the treatment practices regarding anti-malarial drugs at health facilities in four rural areas in southern Cameroon. Methods Between April and August 2005, information was collected by interviewing fifty-two health professionals from twelve rural health facilities, using a structured questionnaire. Results In 2005, only three anti-malarial drugs were used in rural health facilities, including: amodiaquine, quinine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine. Only 2.0% of the health professionals prescribed the recommended AS/AQ combination. After reading the treatment guidelines, 75.0% were in favour of the treatment protocol with the following limitations: lack of paediatric formulations, high cost and large number of tablets per day. Up to 21.0% of professionals did not prescribe AS/AQ because of the level of adverse events attributed to the use of amodiaquine as monotherapy. Conclusion The present study indicates that AS/AQ was not available in the public health facilities at the time of the study, and health practitioners were not informed about the new treatment guidelines. Results of qualitative analysis suggest that prescribers should be involved as soon as possible in projects related to the optimization of treatment guidelines and comply with new drugs. Adapted formulations should be made available at the international level and implemented locally before new drugs and treatments are proposed through a national control programme. This baseline information will be useful to monitor progresses in the implementation of artemisinin-based combination therapy in Cameroon.

  7. [Pharmacotherapy of psoriatic arthritis. Treatment recommendations against the background of limited evidence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhm, M; Behrens, F

    2015-06-01

    International treatment recommendations for assisting the choice of pharmaceutical treatment of psoriatic arthritis are currently available in two different versions. While the group for research and assessment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (GRAPPA) recommendations mainly focus on both the description of treatment options for the different phenotypes of psoriatic arthritis and the listing of evidence grades, the European League against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations try to implement the knowledge about drugs into an algorithm for the different treatment steps. However, the presentation of a treatment algorithm suggests comparable evidence levels for the individual treatment steps, which is at present not the case for psoriatic arthritis. This should be borne in mind for each individual treatment option and treatment step when using a predetermined therapy algorithm and in view of the heterogeneous study results (or no study results available). Both recommendations are currently being revised and will allow the latest evidence trends to be included in the updated version.

  8. Evidence Base Update: 50 Years of Research on Treatment for Child and Adolescent Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higa-McMillan, Charmaine K; Francis, Sarah E; Rith-Najarian, Leslie; Chorpita, Bruce F

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health disorder among children and adolescents. We examined 111 treatment outcome studies testing 204 treatment conditions for child and adolescent anxiety published between 1967 and mid-2013. Studies were selected for inclusion in this review using the PracticeWise Evidence-Based Services database. Using guidelines identified by this journal (Southam-Gerow & Prinstein, 2014), studies were included if they were conducted with children and/or adolescents (ages 1-19) with anxiety and/or avoidance problems. In addition to reviewing the strength of the evidence, the review also examined indicators of effectiveness, common practices across treatment families, and mediators and moderators of treatment outcome. Six treatments reached well-established status for child and adolescent anxiety, 8 were identified as probably efficacious, 2 were identified as possibly efficacious, 6 treatments were deemed experimental, and 8 treatments of questionable efficacy emerged. Findings from this review suggest substantial support for cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) as an effective and appropriate first-line treatment for youth with anxiety disorders. Several other treatment approaches emerged as probably efficacious that are not primarily CBT based, suggesting that there are alternative evidence-based treatments that practitioners can turn to for children and adolescents who do not respond well to CBT. The review concludes with a discussion of treatments that improve functioning in addition to reducing symptoms, common practices derived from evidence-based treatments, mediators and moderators of treatment outcomes, recommendations for best practice, and suggestions for future research.

  9. Evidence for Resistance Training as a Treatment Therapy in Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Barbara Strasser; Wolfgang Schobersberger

    2010-01-01

    Over the last decade, investigators have paid increasing attention to the effects of resistance training (RT) on several metabolic syndrome variables. Evidence suggests that skeletal muscle is responsible for up to 40% of individuals' total body weight and may be influential in modifying metabolic risk factors via muscle mass development. Due to the metabolic consequences of reduced muscle mass, it is understood that normal aging and/or decreased physical activity may lead to a higher prevale...

  10. From Science to Practice: The Flexible Use of Evidence-Based Treatments in Clinical Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nock, Matthew K.; Goldman, Jennifer L.; Wang, Yanping; Albano, Anne Marie

    2004-01-01

    Psychosocial treatment options are nearly as broad as the behavioral problems that they address. With literally hundreds of treatment approaches available, how should clinicians select the most appropriate and effective intervention? One way is to consider using only those treatments with evidence of therapeutic efficacy. Indeed, funding agencies…

  11. Treatment of insufficient lactation is often not evidence-based

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsson, Paul Bryde; Bjerrum, Flemming; Løkkegaard, Ellen Christine Leth

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Breast milk has many advantages over formula for infants in developed and developing countries alike. Despite intentions of breastfeeding, some women develop insufficient lactation. Treatment options traditionally include breastfeeding education and pharmacotherapy. MATERIAL...... AND METHODS: An electronic questionnaire regarding treatment of insufficient lactation was sent to all obstetric departments (n = 21) and neonatal wards (n = 17) in Denmark. Three main questions were included which focused on: breastfeeding education for women, use of pharmacotherapy and availability of local...... guidelines. RESULTS: In all, 30 out of a total of 38 departments participated; and among those, 93% offered some form of breastfeeding education. 50% used either metoclopramide or syntocinon to promote lactation. None used domperidone. 73% had a local clinical guideline. 77% offered sessions with a lactation...

  12. [Cancer treatment in elderly patients: evidence and clinical research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repetto, Lazzaro; Luciani, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In 2020 the percentage of patients with a diagnosis of cancer in people with more than 65 years will exceed 70% and 28% in ethnic minorities. The treatment of cancer in these populations is challenging for the oncologists due to socio-economic issues such as poverty, reduced access to the hospital care, level of education. The clinical pathway "diagnosis-treatment-cure", typical of the care of young patients has to be integrated in elderly patients with a more individualized treatment by means of comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA). IADL (Instrumental Activities of Daily Living) have the best predictive role in oncological setting and their impairment significantly correlate with overall survival, chemotherapy toxicities and thirty days postoperative morbidities. The CGA is universally accepted as the most appropriate instrument to analitically evaluate the age related problems of elderly patients. The role of CGA is crucial to identify geriatric issues not easily diagnosed, to predict treatment toxicities, functional or cognitive decline, post operative complications and to estimate life expectancy. The CGA items are predictive of severe toxicity, however it is not clearly established which are the best performers and the best cut-offs points. Today CGA is integrated with physical performance tests (the most widely used is the "time up and go" test) and laboratory assay of Interleukin 6 and D-Dimer that correlate with mortality and physical decline. There are few prospective studies that evaluated the role of CGA in treatment choice. The first is a phase II study in solid tumors, the second is a haematological trial on non Hodgkin lymphoma. The largest trial is a 571 patients observational series that confirmed the role of CGA in decision making. The administration of CGA is time consuming and consequently some screening tools were developed. VES-13 is a 13 items tool that explores prevalently the functional status and the self reported health status. VES-13

  13. Putting evidence into practice: an update of evidence-based interventions for cancer-related fatigue during and following treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sandra A; Hoffman, Amy J; Clark, Jane C; DeGennaro, Regina M; Poirier, Patricia; Robinson, Carolene B; Weisbrod, Breanna L

    2014-01-01

    Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) has deleterious effects on physical, social, cognitive, and vocational functioning, and causes emotional and spiritual distress for patients and their families; however, it remains under-recognized and undertreated. This article critically reviews and integrates the available empirical evidence supporting the efficacy of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment approaches to CRF, highlighting new evidence since 2007 and 2009 Putting Evidence Into Practice publications. Interventions that are recommended for practice or likely to be effective in improving fatigue outcomes include exercise; screening for treatable risk factors; management of concurrent symptoms; yoga; structured rehabilitation; Wisconsin ginseng; cognitive-behavioral therapies for insomnia, pain, and depression; mindfulness-based stress reduction; and psychoeducational interventions such as anticipatory guidance, psychosocial support, and energy conservation and activity management. This information can be applied to improve the management of CRF, inform health policy and program development, shape the design of clinical trials of new therapies for CRF, and drive basic and translational research.

  14. Supplier-induced demand for newborn treatment: evidence from Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigeoka, Hitoshi; Fushimi, Kiyohide

    2014-05-01

    We estimate the degree of supplier-induced demand for newborn treatment by exploiting changes in reimbursement arising from the introduction of the partial prospective payment system (PPS) in Japan. Under the partial PPS, neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) utilization became relatively more profitable than other procedures, since it was excluded from prospective payments. We find that hospitals have responded to PPS adoption by increasing NICU utilization and by more frequently manipulating infants' reported birth weights which in large part determine their maximum allowable stay in the NICU. This induced demand substantially increases the reimbursements received by hospitals.

  15. Empirically supported treatments in psychotherapy: towards an evidence-based or evidence-biased psychology in clinical settings?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Castelnuovo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The field of research and practice in psychotherapy has been deeply influenced by two different approaches: the empirically supported treatments (ESTs movement, linked with the evidence-based medicine (EBM perspective and the “Common Factors” approach, typically connected with the “Dodo Bird Verdict”. About the first perspective, since 1998 a list of ESTs has been established in mental health field. Criterions for “well-established” and “probably efficacious” treatments have arisen. The development of these kinds of paradigms was motivated by the emergence of a “managerial” approach and related systems for remuneration also for mental health providers and for insurance companies. In this article ESTs will be presented underlining also some possible criticisms. Finally complementary approaches, that could add different evidence in the psychotherapy research in comparison with traditional EBM approach, are presented.

  16. Towards an evidence-based taxonomy of nonpharmacologic treatments for ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraone, Stephen V; Antshel, Kevin M

    2014-10-01

    We have created an evidence-based guide for clinicians to the relative utility of nonpharmacologic treatments for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This article uses the term evidence-based in the sense applied by the Oxford Center for Evidenced-Based Medicine to help readers understand the degree to which nonpharmacologic treatments are supported by the scientific literature. This article also reviews the magnitude of the treatment effect expressed as the standardized mean difference effect size (also known as Cohen D). It then describes a meta-algorithm to describe how to integrate pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatments for ADHD.

  17. Treatment of Scoliosis-Evidence and Management (Review of the Literature

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    Weiss

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Context Scoliosis is a three-dimensional deformity of the spine and trunk which includes lateral deviation, rotation, and a disturbance of the sagittal profile. Treatment is indicated for scoliosis because it may lead to negative consequences with regard to the quality of life and other health issues for some patients. The purpose of this review was to gather current, up-to-date information, and to search the recent articles on scoliosis for evidence of the different modes of treatment. Evidence Acquisition A PubMed search for review articles, prospective controlled trials (PCT, and randomized controlled trials (RCT was performed. The search terms were: 1 scoliosis, treatment (12,045 items found; 2 scoliosis, physiotherapy (776 items found; 3 scoliosis, brace treatment (1,447 items found; and 4 scoliosis, surgery (10,485 items found. Results When looking at the current literature, high quality evidence (level I was found to support physical rehabilitation and brace treatments, while no evidence was found to support spinal fusion surgery. The numerous long-term complications that patients may face post-operation, and the lack of evidence for spinal fusion surgery indicate that there is no clear medical indication for this kind of treatment. Conclusions There is a high level of evidence for the conservative treatment of scoliosis, but there are varying levels of success in the different approaches. The better the correction of the curve, the better the end result and outcome for the patient. This is supported by the current evidence reviewed in this paper. Physiotherapy and bracing should be used and, specifically, those approaches using high corrective methods. Spinal fusion surgery is not supported by the current evidence. According to the literature, the long-term complications of surgery for scoliosis far outweigh the consequences of untreated scoliosis.

  18. Treatment of Primary Pulmonary Aspergillosis: An Assessment of the Evidence

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    Ethan R. Stewart

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus spp. are a group of filamentous molds that were first described due to a perceived similarity to an aspergillum, or liturgical device used to sprinkle holy water, when viewed under a microscope. Although commonly inhaled due to their ubiquitous nature within the environment, an invasive fungal infection (IFI is a rare outcome that is often reserved for those patients who are immunocompromised. Given the potential for significant morbidity and mortality within this patient population from IFI due to Aspergillus spp., along with the rise in the use of therapies that confer immunosuppression, there is an increasing need for appropriate initial clinical suspicion leading to accurate diagnosis and effective treatment. Voriconazole remains the first line agent for therapy; however, the use of polyenes, novel triazole agents, or voriconazole in combination with an echinocandin may also be utilized. Consideration as to which particular agent and for what duration should be made in the individual context for each patient based upon underlying immunosuppression, comorbidities, and overall tolerance of therapy.

  19. Current knowledge on evidence-based shockwave treatments for shoulder pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya, Daniel; Ramón, Silvia; Guiloff, Leonardo; Gerdesmeyer, Ludger

    2015-12-01

    Shoulder pain is one of the most common musculoskeletal pathologies. Treatment by ESWT (extracorporeal shockwave therapy) has emerged as an alternative when conservative treatment fails in rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy, prior to invasive procedures. The clinical efficacy of ESWT in non-calcific tendinopathy remains controversial. The good results in the treatment of rotator cuff calcifications, have led to indications of ESWT being expanded to other shoulder pathologies. We review the current state of indications and evidence based practice.

  20. Therapeutic efficacy of artemether-lumefantrine combination in the treatment of uncomplicated malaria among children under five years of age in three ecological zones in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abuaku Benjamin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2008, artemether - lumefantrine (AL and dihydroartemisinin - piperaquine (DHAP were added to artesunate - amodiaquine (AS-AQ as first-line drugs for uncomplicated malaria in Ghana. The introduction of new drugs calls for continuous monitoring of these drugs to provide timely information on trends of their efficacy and safety to enhance timely evidence-based decision making by the National Malaria Control Programme. In this regard, the therapeutic efficacy of AL was monitored from September 2010 to April 2011 in four sentinel sites representing the three main ecological zones of the country. Methods The study was a one-arm prospective evaluation of clinical and parasitological responses to directly observed treatment for uncomplicated malaria among children aged 6 months to 59 months using the 2009 WHO protocol for surveillance of anti-malarial drug efficacy. Children recruited into the study received weight-based 20/120 mg AL at 0, 8, 24, 36, 48, and 60 hrs. Parasitaemia levels were assessed on days 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, and at any time a study child was brought to the clinic with fever. Results A total of 175 children were enrolled into the study: 56 in the savanna zone, 78 in the forest zone and 41 in the coastal zone. Per-protocol analysis showed that the overall PCR-corrected cure rates on day 14 and day 28 were 96.5% (95% CI: 92.1, 98.6 and 95.4% (95% CI: 90.3, 98.0, respectively, with statistically significant differences between the ecological zones. The 90.4% day-28 cure rate observed in the savannah zone (95% CI: 78.2, 96.4 was significantly the lowest compared with 100% (95% CI: 93.2, 99.9 in the forest zone and 93.8% (95% CI: 77.8, 98.9 in the coastal zone (P = 0.017. Fever and parasite clearance were slower among children enrolled in the savannah zone. Gametocytaemia after day-3 post-treatment was rare in all the zones. Conclusions The study has shown that AL remains efficacious in Ghana with

  1. Treatment of American tegumentary leishmaniasis in special populations: a summary of evidence

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    Juliana Saboia Fontenele e Silva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to assess and synthesize the information available in the literature regarding the treatment of American tegumentary leishmaniasis in special populations. We searched MEDLINE (via PubMed, EMBASE, LILACS, SciELO, Scopus, Cochrane Library and mRCT databases to identify clinical trials and observational studies that assessed the pharmacological treatment of the following groups of patients: pregnant women, nursing mothers, children, the elderly, individuals with chronic diseases and individuals with suppressed immune systems. The quality of evidence was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluations (GRADE approach. The available evidence suggests that the treatments of choice for each population or disease entity are as follows: nursing mothers and children (meglumine antimoniate or pentamidine, patients with renal disease (amphotericin B or miltefosine, patients with heart disease (amphotericin B, miltefosine or pentamidine, immunosuppressed patients (liposomal amphotericin, the elderly (meglumine antimoniate, pregnant women (amphotericin B and patients with liver disease (no evidence available. The quality of evidence is low or very low for all groups. Accurate controlled studies are required to fill in the gaps in evidence for treatment in special populations. Post-marketing surveillance programs could also collect relevant information to guide treatment decision-making.

  2. Treatment of chronic depression with sulpiride: evidence of efficacy in placebo-controlled single case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, W; Benkert, O

    1994-08-01

    Systematic variation of treatment (alternating active drug and placebo in four treatment periods) in individual patients is proposed to collect preliminary evidence for a therapeutic effect of sulpiride in chronic depression; the ARIMA model is applied to evaluate the intervention effects of the tentatively effective treatment in single subjects. Ten single cases of chronic depression with a diagnosis of major depression or dysthymia were selected and seven of these provided evidence for beneficial effects of sulpiride with regard to treating the symptoms of depression and anxiety. However, the drug effects were intraindividually not always replicable. The results obtained with these single cases positively support the recommendation to perform regular randomized placebo-controlled trials with sulpiride in chronic depression. Simultaneously, these single case investigations reveal a lack of temporal stability of treatment response and inconsistencies of response with regard to different treatment targets in individual patients.

  3. PfHRP2 and PfLDH antigen detection for monitoring the efficacy of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT in the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deloron Philippe

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An assessment of the accuracy of two malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDT for the detection of Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein 2 (PfHRP2 or Pf lactate dehydrogenase (PfLDH was undertaken in children aged between six and 59 months included in an anti-malarial efficacy study in Benin. Methods In Allada (Benin, 205 children aged 6-59 months with falciparum malaria received either artesunate-amodiaquine (ASAQ, artemether-lumefantrine (AL, or sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP. Children included in the study were simultaneously followed by both RDT and high-quality microscopy for up to 42 days. Results At the time of inclusion, PfHRP2-based tests were positive in 203 children (99% and PfLDH-based tests were positive in 204 (99.5%. During follow-up, independent of the treatment received, only 17.3% (28/162 of children effectively cured were negative with the PfHRP2 RDT at day 3, with a gradual increase in specificity until day 42. The specificity of antigen detection with the PfLDH test was 87% (141/162 on day 3, and between 92% and 100% on days 7 to 42. A statistical difference was observed between the persistence of PfHRP2 and PfLDH antigenaemia during follow-up in children treated with artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT but not with SP. Conclusion Although both RDTs are as sensitive as microscopy in detecting true malaria cases, the PfHRP2 RDT had very low specificity during follow-up until day 28. On the other hand, the PfLDH test could be used to detect failures and, therefore, to assess anti-malarial efficacy.

  4. Evidence update on the treatment of overweight and obesity in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Myra; Wilfley, Denise E

    2015-01-01

    Childhood obesity is associated with increased medical and psychosocial consequences and mortality and effective interventions are urgently needed. Effective interventions are urgently needed. This article reviews the evidence for psychological treatments of overweight and obesity in child and adolescent populations. Studies were identified through searches of online databases and reference sections of relevant review articles and meta-analyses. Treatment efficacy was assessed using established criteria, and treatments were categorized as well-established, probably efficacious, possibly efficacious, experimental, or of questionable efficacy. Well-established treatments included family-based behavioral treatment (FBT) and Parent-Only Behavioral Treatment for children. Possibly efficacious treatments include Parent-Only Behavioral Treatment for adolescents, FBT-Guided Self-Help for children, and Behavioral Weight Loss treatment with family involvement for toddlers, children, and adolescents. Appetite awareness training and regulation of cues treatments are considered experimental. No treatments are considered probably efficacious, or of questionable efficacy. All treatments considered efficacious are multicomponent interventions that include dietary and physical activity modifications and utilize behavioral strategies. Treatment is optimized if family members are specifically targeted in treatment. Research supports the use of multicomponent lifestyle interventions, with FBT and Parent-Only Behavioral Treatment being the most widely supported treatment types. Additional research is needed to test a stepped care model for treatment and to establish the ideal dosage (i.e., number and length of sessions), duration, and intensity of treatments for long-term sustainability of healthy weight management. To improve access to care, the optimal methods to enhance the scalability and implementability of treatments into community and clinical settings need to be established.

  5. Consistency with evidence-based treatments and perceived effectiveness of children's community-based care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haine-Schlagel, Rachel; Fettes, Danielle L; Garcia, Antonio R; Brookman-Frazee, Lauren; Garland, Ann F

    2014-02-01

    This study examined whether delivery of psychotherapeutic strategies consistent with common elements of evidence-based (EB) treatments for child disruptive behavior problems was associated with parents' report of treatment effectiveness. The intensity of delivery of practice elements consistent with EB treatments was coded from a random sample of 538 videotaped psychotherapy sessions with 157 children/families and 75 therapists from six community-based clinics. Multilevel regression analyses tested whether intensity of EB practice elements was associated with parents' report of treatment effectiveness after 4 months, controlling for intensity of other practice elements. Results indicate parents reported greater perceived treatment effectiveness when community-based treatment included more intensive delivery of practice elements consistent with EB treatments to children. These findings may reassure providers about the acceptability of EB practice elements and may motivate efforts to integrate EB practice elements more intensively into community-based care.

  6. Evidence Base Update for Psychosocial Treatments for Children and Adolescents Exposed to Traumatic Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, Shannon; McLaughlin, Katie A; Kerns, Suzanne E U; Harrison, Julie P; Lambert, Hilary K; Briggs, Ernestine C; Cox, Julia Revillion; Amaya-Jackson, Lisa

    2016-10-19

    Child and adolescent trauma exposure is prevalent, with trauma exposure-related symptoms, including posttraumatic stress, depressive, and anxiety symptoms often causing substantial impairment. This article updates the evidence base on psychosocial treatments for child and adolescent trauma exposure completed for this journal by Silverman et al. (2008). For this review, we focus on 37 studies conducted during the seven years since the last review. Treatments are grouped by overall treatment family (e.g., cognitive behavioral therapy), treatment modality (e.g., individual vs. group), and treatment participants (e.g., child only vs. child and parent). All studies were evaluated for methodological rigor according to Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology evidence-based treatment evaluation criteria (Southam-Gerow & Prinstein, 2014), with cumulative designations for level of support for each treatment family. Individual CBT with parent involvement, individual CBT, and group CBT were deemed well-established; group CBT with parent involvement and eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) were deemed probably efficacious; individual integrated therapy for complex trauma and group mind-body skills were deemed possibly efficacious; individual client-centered play therapy, individual mind-body skills, and individual psychoanalysis were deemed experimental; and group creative expressive + CBT was deemed questionable efficacy. Advances in the evidence base, with comparisons to the state of the science at the time of the Silverman et al. (2008) review, are discussed. Finally, we present dissemination and implementation challenges and areas for future research.

  7. National attitudes towards mental health treatment: the importance of research evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Alex; Broman-Fulks, Joshua; Bergquist, John

    2016-11-01

    Most conceptualizations of evidence-based practice view it as a "three legged stool" consisting of: the use of best available research evidence, clinical expertise, and client preferences. Although empirical evidence and clinical expertise have received greater empirical attention, relatively little research has systematically explored client preferences. The present study analyzed self-reported treatment preferences for various clinical and non-clinical presentations. Adult participants (n = 1262) residing in the United States were presented with diagnostic vignettes and rated their relative preferences among 5 treatment variables, including: use of an empirically supported treatment (EST), quality of the client-therapist relationship, therapist empathy, therapist experience, and client speaking for the majority of therapy sessions. Results indicated that participants endorsed significant preference for receiving an EST over other treatment variables for all clinical disorders, with effect sizes ranging from small to large depending on the diagnosis. There was slightly greater variability in treatment preferences for non-clinical issues, though participants generally reported greater preference for receiving an EST. Follow-up questions provided further evidence for EST preferences. The implications of these results are discussed.

  8. Evidence and recommendation. Is intratympanic corticosteroid treatment of sudden hearing loss effective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis PARDAL-REFOYO

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: It is considered that treatment with systemic corticosteroid (SC orally is preferred in sudden deafness and intratympanic injection of corticosteroid (ITC can be used as an alternative. PICO question: In an adult with no improvement sudden deafness or partial hearing improvement [patient], does treatment with intratympanic corticoid [intervention] compared with conventional treatment [compared] improve hearing? [result]. Material and Methods: Literature search in PubMed, Scopus and Cochrane meta-analysis of published data including descriptors: deafness, hearing loss, steroids, corticoids, intratympanic. Selected studies in adult humans, in Spanish or English that included meta-analysis. Results: Level of evidence: Evidence is high for the use of ITC as rescue therapy in patients undergoing SC without response or partial response. The evidence is moderate for the use of ITC as initial therapy given the poor quality of published studies. What is more, the evidence is high against the use of ITC as initial therapy. Conclusions: Recommendation: The recommendation is strongly in favor of ITC as rescue therapy in patients with little or no response to SC treatment. The recommendation is weak against ITC perform as first-line treatment.

  9. Central retinal vein occlusion: A review of current Evidence-based treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Patel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO can induce an ischemic and hypoxic state with resulting sequelae of macular edema and neovascularization. Many treatment options have been studied. Our review aims to investigate the safety and efficacy of the multiple treatment options of CRVO. A PubMed and Cochrane literature search was performed. Well-controlled randomized clinical trials that demonstrated strong level 1 evidence-based on the rating scale developed by the British Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine were included. Seven clinical trials met inclusion criteria to be included in this review. These included studies that investigated the safety and efficacy of retinal photocoagulation (1 study, intravitreal steroid treatment (2 studies, and antivascular endothelial growth factor treatment (4 studies for the treatment of CRVO. In addition, studies evaluating surgical treatment options for CRVO were also included. Many treatment modalities have been demonstrated to be safe and efficacious in the treatment of CRVO. These treatment options offer therapeutic benefits for patients and clinically superior visual acuity and perhaps the quality of life after suffering from a CRVO.

  10. An evidence-based algorithm for the treatment of neuropathic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Otto, Marit; Jensen, Troels Staehelin;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this article is to discuss an evidence-based algorithm that can be implemented by the primary care physician in his/her daily clinical practice for the treatment of patients with neuropathic pain conditions. METHOD: A treatment algorithm for neuropathic pain was formulated...... on the basis of a review of 105 high-quality, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials. The number needed to treat (NNT) and number needed to harm (NNH) were used to compare the safety and effectiveness of current treatments for neuropathic pain syndromes. Most of the clinical trials reviewed...... with different experimental designs and outcomes. CONCLUSION: Patients presenting with neuropathic pain are becoming a more frequent occurrence for the primary care physician as the population ages. Evidence-based treatment options allow for the most efficient and effective pharmacotherapy regimen...

  11. Medicinal Plants for the Treatment of Acne Vulgaris: A Review of Recent Evidences

    OpenAIRE

    Nasri, Hamid; Bahmani, Mahmoud; Shahinfard, Najmeh; Moradi Nafchi, Atefeh; Saberianpour, Shirin; Rafieian Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Context: Acne vulgaris affects about 85% of teenagers and may continue to adulthood. There are about two million visits to physicians per year for teenagers and the direct cost of acne treatment in the US exceeds $1 billion per year. Evidence Acquisition: A wide variety of treatment regimens exist for acne vulgaris including benzoil peroxide, retinoids, isotretinoids, keratolytic soaps, alpha hydroxy acids, azelaic acid, salicilic acid as well as hormonal, anti-androgen or antiseborrheic trea...

  12. Improvements in access to malaria treatment in Tanzania following community, retail sector and health facility interventions -- a user perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obrist Brigit

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ACCESS programme aims at understanding and improving access to prompt and effective malaria treatment. Between 2004 and 2008 the programme implemented a social marketing campaign for improved treatment-seeking. To improve access to treatment in the private retail sector a new class of outlets known as accredited drug dispensing outlets (ADDO was created in Tanzania in 2006. Tanzania changed its first-line treatment for malaria from sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP to artemether-lumefantrine (ALu in 2007 and subsidized ALu was made available in both health facilities and ADDOs. The effect of these interventions on understanding and treatment of malaria was studied in rural Tanzania. The data also enabled an investigation of the determinants of access to treatment. Methods Three treatment-seeking surveys were conducted in 2004, 2006 and 2008 in the rural areas of the Ifakara demographic surveillance system (DSS and in Ifakara town. Each survey included approximately 150 people who had suffered a fever case in the previous 14 days. Results Treatment-seeking and awareness of malaria was already high at baseline, but various improvements were seen between 2004 and 2008, namely: better understanding causes of malaria (from 62% to 84%; an increase in health facility attendance as first treatment option for patients older than five years (27% to 52%; higher treatment coverage with anti-malarials (86% to 96% and more timely use of anti-malarials (80% to 93-97% treatments taken within 24 hrs. Unfortunately, the change of treatment policy led to a low availability of ALu in the private sector and, therefore, to a drop in the proportion of patients taking a recommended malaria treatment (85% to 53%. The availability of outlets (health facilities or drug shops is the most important determinant of whether patients receive prompt and effective treatment, whereas affordability and accessibility contribute to a lesser extent. Conclusions An

  13. Evidence Map of Prevention and Treatment Interventions for Depression in Young People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Callahan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Depression in adolescents and young people is associated with reduced social, occupational, and interpersonal functioning, increases in suicide and self-harm behaviours, and problematic substance use. Age-appropriate, evidence-based treatments are required to provide optimal care. Methods. “Evidence mapping” methodology was used to quantify the nature and distribution of the extant high-quality research into the prevention and treatment of depression in young people across psychological, medical, and other treatment domains. Results. Prevention research is dominated by cognitive-behavioral- (CBT- based interventions. Treatment studies predominantly consist of CBT and SSRI medication trials, with few trials of other psychological interventions or complementary/alternative treatments. Quality studies on relapse prevention and treatment for persistent depression are distinctly lacking. Conclusions. This map demonstrates opportunities for future research to address the numerous evidence gaps for interventions to prevent or treat depression in young people, which are of interest to clinical researchers, policy makers, and funding bodies.

  14. Evidence - based pharmacological treatment of atopic dermatitis: An expert opinion and new expectations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold P Oranje

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is one of the most common skin diseases with a complex multifactorial background. The clinical presentation, the aggravating factors and the complications vary according to the age of the patients. Most cases, approximately 60-80%, present for the 1 st time before the age of 12 months. Adult-onset AD has been observed as a special variant. Pruritus is the worst sign of AD, which also often indicates an exacerbation and is considered to be the most annoying symptom of AD. Treatment is preferably started based on the severity of AD. In only 10% of the cases, AD is so severe that systemic treatment is necessary. Systemic treatment including topical wet-wrap treatment is indicated in the worst and recalcitrant cases of AD. Systemic treatment of AD is discussed with regards to the evidence-based efficacy and safety aspects. I prefer wet-wraps as a crisis intervention in severe childhood cases, whereas UV and systemic treatments are the choices in patients older than 10 years. Probiotics are not useful in the treatment. If they have any effect at all it may only be in food-allergic children with AD. Finally, anti-histamines are not effective against pruritus in AD. They are only effective against urticarial flares and in cases with food-allergy. This article consists of an expert opinion on evidence-based pharmacological treatment of AD, but it is not a systemic review.

  15. Evidence-Based and Best Practice Addiction Treatment Resources: A Primer for Librarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix, Sheila I.

    2002-01-01

    Introduces concepts, such as evidence-based medicine and best practices, explores these concepts in terms of addiction treatment, discusses practice guidelines, offers suggestions to find and select science-based resources, and explores the librarian's or information specialist's role in the dissemination of this information. (LRW)

  16. Implementing and Evaluating Evidence-Based Treatments of Conduct Problems in Children and Youth in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Terje; Hagen, Kristine Amlund; Askeland, Elisabeth; Christensen, Bernadette

    2009-01-01

    This article sums up 8 years of experience with evidence-based programs in the treatment of conduct problems in children and youth. A conceptual model describing the implementation components relevant to the Norwegian project is presented and discussed. Next, we describe a case study of the implementation strategy accompanied by outcomes from the…

  17. Type 2 Endoleaks Post-EVAR: Current Evidence for Rupture Risk, Intervention and Outcomes of Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Raymond, E-mail: rchung@doctors.org.uk; Morgan, Robert A., E-mail: Robert.Morgan@stgeorges.nhs.uk [St. George’s Healthcare NHS Trust, Radiology, Ground Floor, St. James Wing (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    Type 2 endoleaks (EL2) are the most commonly encountered endoleaks following EVAR. Despite two decades of experience, there remains considerable variation in the management of EL2 with controversies ranging from if to treat, when to treat and how to treat. Here, we summarise the available evidence, describe the treatment techniques available and offer guidelines for management.

  18. Procedures for identifying evidence-based psychological treatments for older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yon, Adriana; Scogin, Forrest

    2007-03-01

    The authors describe the methods used to identify evidence-based psychological treatments for older adults in this contribution to the special section. Coding teams were assembled to review the literature on several problems relevant to mental health and aging. These teams used the manual developed by the Committee on Science and Practice of the Society for Clinical Psychology (Division 12) of the American Psychological Association that provided definitions of key constructs used in coding. The authors provide an overview of the process followed by the review teams and of some of the issues that emerged to illustrate the steps involved in the coding procedure. Identifying evidence-based treatments is a fundamental aspect of promoting evidence-based practice with older adults; such practice is advocated by most health care disciplines, including psychology.

  19. Roflumilast: the evidence for its clinical potential in the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Timm Wagner

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Linda Timm Wagner, Charlotte A. KenreighMLC Solutions Ltd, Galena, Ohio, USAIntroduction: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, characterized by a progressive deterioration of lung function caused primarily by the inhalation of toxic substances, is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Current treatment options for the management of its symptoms include the use of bronchodilators and glucocorticoid agents that are not universally beneficial and which are associated with limitations. Phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4 inhibitors are a novel class of antiinflammatory agents being developed for COPD treatment.Aims: The purpose of this article is to review the clinical potential of roflumilast, a PDE4 inhibitor currently in phase III clinical trials, in the management of patients with COPD.Evidence review: Phase II studies indicate that roflumilast can be given orally once daily. Preliminary evidence from two phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies suggest that roflumilast improves or stabilizes lung function, as measured by forcedexpiratory volume in 1 s and 6 s (FEV1 and FEV6, forced vital capacity (FVC, and peak expiratory flow (PEF in patients with COPD. Improvements in COPD exacerbation rate were also reported in these trials. Quality of life, as measured by the St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire, also improved with roflumilast treatment. Clinical studies to date suggest that roflumilast is well tolerated.Clinical potential: Current evidence supports the use of roflumilast in the management of COPD as shown by improvements in patients’ symptoms and quality of life, and good tolerability profile. Its once-daily oral dosing regimen is unique among current therapies for COPD. This potential and the place of roflumilast in the stepwise management of the disease need to be confirmed as further evidence is published. Additional evidence will also be welcome to determine if its mechanism of action

  20. Integrating evidence into practice: use of McKenzie-based treatment for mechanical low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarke S

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Angela Dunsford1, Saravana Kumar1,2, Sarah Clarke1 1International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, 2School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia Abstract: Low back pain (LBP is a major health issue with significant socioeconomic implications in most Western countries. Many forms of treatment have been proposed and investigated in the past, with exercise being a commonly prescribed intervention. Within allied health, in particular physiotherapy, there has been a growing movement that recognizes the role of the McKenzie method in treating LBP. Within the McKenzie framework, directional preference (DP exercises are one such intervention, with preliminary data demonstrating its effectiveness in the management of LBP. In this paper, we aim to integrate the evidence from current research, identified using a systematic review, and utilize a practical real-life case scenario to outline how evidence from the literature can be implemented in clinical practice. The findings from the systematic review indicate that DP exercises may have positive effects in the management of LBP. While the body of evidence to support this is limited (only four studies and therefore modest at best, it does provide some emerging evidence to support the use of DP exercises in clinical practice. Despite this, gaps also persist in the literature on DP exercises, and this relates to the exercise parameters and the compliance rates. Recognizing this dichotomy (modest evidence in some areas and evidence gaps in other areas, which is likely to confront health practitioners, using a practical approach with a real-life clinical scenario, we outline how the evidence from the systematic review can be implemented in clinical practice. This approach builds on the philosophy of evidence-based practice of integrating research evidence with clinical expertise and patient values. Keywords: low back pain, McKenzie method, directional

  1. Psychological treatments for mental disorders in adults: A review of the evidence of leading international organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriana, Juan Antonio; Gálvez-Lara, Mario; Corpas, Jorge

    2017-03-29

    Most mental health services throughout the world currently regard evidence-based psychological treatments as best practice for the treatment of mental disorders. The aim of this study was to analyze evidence-based treatments drawn from RCTs, reviews, meta-analyses, guides, and lists provided by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), Division 12 (Clinical Psychology) of the American Psychological Association (APA), Cochrane and the Australian Psychological Society (APS) in relation to mental disorders in adults. A total of 135 treatments were analyzed for 23 mental disorders and compared to determine the level of agreement among the organizations. The results indicate that, in most cases, there is little agreement among organizations and that there are several discrepancies within certain disorders. These results require reflection on the meaning attributed to evidence-based practice with regard to psychological treatments. The possible reasons for these differences are discussed. Based on these findings, proposals to unify the criteria that reconcile the realities of clinical practice with a scientific perspective were analyzed.

  2. Does Evidence-Based PTS Treatment Reduce PTS Symptoms and Suicide in Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans Seeking VA Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0038 TITLE: Does Evidence-Based PTS Treatment Reduce PTS Symptoms and Suicide in Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans...2016 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 15 Apr 2015-14 Apr 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Does Evidence-Based PTS Treatment Reduce PTS Symptoms and...health problems among Service Members and Veterans returning from recent deployments, and despite the availability of evidence-based treatments (EBT

  3. Integrating evidence into practice: use of McKenzie-based treatment for mechanical low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunsford, Angela; Kumar, Saravana; Clarke, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a major health issue with significant socioeconomic implications in most Western countries. Many forms of treatment have been proposed and investigated in the past, with exercise being a commonly prescribed intervention. Within allied health, in particular physiotherapy, there has been a growing movement that recognizes the role of the McKenzie method in treating LBP. Within the McKenzie framework, directional preference (DP) exercises are one such intervention, with preliminary data demonstrating its effectiveness in the management of LBP. In this paper, we aim to integrate the evidence from current research, identified using a systematic review, and utilize a practical real-life case scenario to outline how evidence from the literature can be implemented in clinical practice. The findings from the systematic review indicate that DP exercises may have positive effects in the management of LBP. While the body of evidence to support this is limited (only four studies) and therefore modest at best, it does provide some emerging evidence to support the use of DP exercises in clinical practice. Despite this, gaps also persist in the literature on DP exercises, and this relates to the exercise parameters and the compliance rates. Recognizing this dichotomy (modest evidence in some areas and evidence gaps in other areas), which is likely to confront health practitioners, using a practical approach with a real-life clinical scenario, we outline how the evidence from the systematic review can be implemented in clinical practice. This approach builds on the philosophy of evidence-based practice of integrating research evidence with clinical expertise and patient values.

  4. Levels of evidence in the treatment of slipped capital femoral epiphysis: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Moriarity

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The primary aim of this study was to analyze the current level of evidence available on the surgical management of Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis (SCFE. Secondary aims were to correlate the level of evidence with the impact factor of the journal to evaluate the level of evidence over time, and to evaluate the geographic distribution of the studies. Therapeutic studies published in English between January 1991 and August 2014 that reported on SCFE were identified via electronic search was performed using the databases PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library. The search terms used included: Slipped capital femoral epiphyses OR SCFE OR Slipped upper femoral epiphyses OR SUFE AND Management OR Treatment. Correlation between the level of evidence and the impact factor of the journal were analyzed together with linear regression models to reveal any significant trends over time. A total of 1516 studies were found, of which 321 were included in the final analysis. The most frequent study type was the case series (51.1% followed by case reports (22.4% and expert opinion (14.0%. Randomized control trial accounted for only 0.6%. The Journal of Pediatric Orthopedics (American had the most studies (22.6% and the highest number of level 2 (n=1 and level 3 (n=15 type evidence. There was no progression of level of evidence over time. There was no correlation between level of evidence and impact factor of journal. The majority of therapeutic studies on SCFE are of low level of evidence. High-level RCTs are difficult to perform in pediatric orthopedic surgery, however the management of SCFE would benefit from well-designed, multicenter, clinical RCTs to advance evidence-based practice.

  5. Adherence to Plasmodium vivax malaria treatment in the Brazilian Amazon Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Elza A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients' adherence to malaria treatment is an important factor in determining the therapeutic response to anti-malarial drugs. It contributes to the patient's complete recovery and prevents the emergence of parasite resistance to anti-malarial drugs. In Brazil, the low compliance with malaria treatment probably explains the large number of Plasmodium vivax malaria relapses observed in the past years. The goal of this study was to estimate the proportion of patients adhering to the P. vivax malaria treatment with chloroquine + primaquine in the dosages recommended by the Brazilian Ministry of Health. Methods Patients who were being treated for P. vivax malaria with chloroquine plus primaquine were eligible for the study. On the seventh day of taking primaquine, they were visited at their home and were interviewed. The patients were classified as probably adherent, if they reported having taken all the medication as prescribed, in the correct period of time and dosage, and had no medication tablets remaining; probably non-adherent, if they reported not having taken the medication, in the correct period of time and dosage, and did not show any remaining tablets; and certainly non-adherent, if they showed any remaining medication tablets. Results 242 of the 280 patients reported having correctly followed the prescribed instructions and represented a treatment adherence frequency (CI95% of 86.4% (81.7%-90.1%. Of the 38 patients who did not follow the recommendations, 27 (9.6% were still taking the medication on the day of the interview and, therefore, still had primaquine tablets left in the blister pack. These patients were then classified as certainly non-adherent to treatment. Although 11 patients did not show any tablets left, they reported incorrect use of the prescribed therapy regimen and were considered as probably non-adherent to treatment. Conclusions Compliance with the P. vivax malaria treatment is a characteristic of

  6. Taking stock: provider prescribing practices in the presence and absence of ACT stock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Caroline

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Globally, the monitoring of prompt and effective treatment for malaria with artemisinin combination therapy (ACT is conducted largely through household surveys. This measure; however, provides no information on case management processes at the health facility level. The aim of this review was to assess evidence from health facility surveys on malaria prescribing practices using ACT, in the presence and absence of ACT stock, at time and place where treatment was sought. Methods A systematic search of published literature was conducted. Findings were collated and data extracted on proportion of patients prescribed ACT and alternative anti-malarials in the presence and absence of ACT stock. Results Of the 14 studies identified in which ACT prescription for uncomplicated malaria in the public sector was evaluated, just six, from three countries (Kenya, Uganda and Zambia, reported this in the context of ACT stock. Comparing facilities with ACT stock to facilities without stock (i ACT prescribing was significantly higher in all six studies, increasing by a range of 21.3% in children Conclusions Prescriber practices vary based on ACT availability. Although ACT prescriptions increased and alternative anti-malarials prescriptions decreased in the presence of ACT stock, ACT was prescribed in the absence, and alternative anti-malarials were prescribed in the presence of, ACT. Presence of stock alone does not ensure that treatment guidelines are followed. More health facility surveys, together with qualitative research, are needed to understand the role of ACT stock-outs on provider prescribing behaviours and preferences.

  7. Outcome analysis of breast cancer patients who declined evidence-based treatment

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    Joseph Kurian

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To analyze the characteristics and outcomes of women with breast cancer in the Northern Alberta Health Region (NAHR who declined recommended primary standard treatments. Methods A chart review was performed of breast cancer patients who refused recommended treatments during the period 1980 to 2006. A matched pair analysis was performed to compare the survival data between those who refused or received standard treatments. Results A total of 185 (1.2% patients refused standard treatment. Eighty-seven (47% were below the age of 75 at diagnosis. The majority of those who refused standard treatments were married (50.6%, 50 years or older (60.9%, and from the urban area (65.5%. The 5-year overall survival rates were 43.2% (95% CI: 32.0 to 54.4% for those who refused standard treatments and 81.9% (95% CI: 76.9 to 86.9% for those who received them. The corresponding values for the disease-specific survival were 46.2% (95% CI: 34.9 to 57.6% vs. 84.7% (95% CI: 80.0 to 89.4%. Conclusions Women who declined primary standard treatment had significantly worse survival than those who received standard treatments. There is no evidence to support using Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM as primary cancer treatment.

  8. BRIEF ANALYSIS ON THEORETIC EVIDENCE OF FOUR-GATE POINTS IN TREATMENT OF DISEASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In the present paper, the authors expound the approaches of four-gate points on treatment of diseases and the relevant theoretic evidence. The analysis and discussion were carried on in the aspects of the origins of four-gate points and the relationships of four-gate points with primary qi, running course of meridian, qi and blood and biaoben qijie of meridian and collateral. Being the major points in clinic, fourgate points provide extensive indications and good therapeutic effects, which are supported thoroughly by the theoretic evidence.

  9. Initial treatment of complete rotator cuff tear and transition to surgical treatment: systematic review of the evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Wahab, Taiceer A.; Betancourt, Jean P.; Hassan, Fadi; Thani, Saeed Al.; Choueiri, Hened; Jain, Nitin B.; Malanga, Gerard A.; Murrell, William D.; Prasad, Anil; Verborgt, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background rotator cuff tear affects many people. Natural history, and evidence for non-operative treatment remains limited. Our objective is to assess evidence available for the efficacy and morbidity of commonly used systemic medications, physiotherapy, and injections alongside evaluating any negative long-term effects. Methods a systematic search was performed of PubMed, Cochrane, EMBASE and CINAHL dates (1 January 1960 – 1 December 2014), search terms: ‘rotator cuff tear’, ‘natural history’, ‘atraumatic’, ‘injection’, ‘physiotherapy’ or ‘physical therapy’, ‘injection’, ‘corticosteroid’, ‘PRP‘, ‘MSC’, risk of conservative treatment’, and ‘surgical indication’. Results eleven studies were included. The mean Coleman Methodology Score modified for conservative therapy is 69.21 (range 88–44) (SD 12.31). This included 2 RCTs, 7 prospective, and 2 retrospective studies. Evidence suggests it is safe to monitor symptomatic rotator cuff tears, as tear size and symptoms are not correlated with pain, function, and/or ultimate outcome. Conclusions complete rotator cuff tears may be effectively treated with injections, exercise in the short and intermediate terms respectively. Negative effect of corticosteroids on rotator cuff tissue has not been demonstrated. Timing to end conservative treatment is unknown, but likely indicated when a patient demonstrates increased weakness and loss of function not recoverable by physiotherapy. PMID:27331030

  10. Do orthodontists recommend Class II treatment according to evidence-based knowledge?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraia Azevedo Almeida

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroductionThe adequate indications for the timing of treatment for Class II malocclusion are mandatory for the ethical and efficient practice of orthodontics, but clinicians are reluctant to accept new information that contradicts their preferred method of treatment.ObjectiveThe aim of this investigation was to assess the agreement regarding the indications for Class II malocclusion interceptive therapy between a group of international opinion-makers on early treatment and a group of orthodontists and to compare their treatment indications with the current evidence-based knowledge.Material and methodAn electronic survey containing photographs of mild, moderate and severe Class II malocclusions in children was sent to two panels of experts. Panel 1 (n=28 was composed of international orthodontists who had authored world-class publications on early orthodontic treatment, and Panel 2 (n=261 was composed of clinical orthodontists. Based on a 5-point Likert-type scale, the orthodontists selected their therapy option for each of the 9 Class II malocclusion cases.ResultThe Class II malocclusion treatment recommendations of Panel 2 were significantly different from those offered by Panel 1 with a skew of at least 1 scale point toward earlier treatment. The Class II malocclusion treatment recommendations of the members of Panel 1 members were in accordance with contemporary evidence-based knowledge.ConclusionClass II malocclusion overtreatment appears to be the tendency among clinical orthodontists but not among orthodontists who are academically involved with early treatment. There is a gap between the scientific knowledge and the practices of orthodontists.

  11. Anti-malarial drug quality in Lagos and Accra - a comparison of various quality assessments

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Two major cities in West Africa, Accra, the capital of Ghana, and Lagos, the largest city of Nigeria, have significant problems with substandard pharmaceuticals. Both have actively combated the problem in recent years, particularly by screening products on the market using the Global Pharma Health Fund e.V. Minilab® protocol. Random sampling of medicines from the two cities at least twice over the past 30 months allows a tentative assessment of whether improvements in drug...

  12. Anti-malarial activity of a non-piperidine library of next-generation quinoline methanols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melendez Victor

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The clinical utility for mefloquine has been eroded due to its association with adverse neurological effects. Better-tolerated alternatives are required. The objective of the present study was the identification of lead compounds that are as effective as mefloquine, but exhibit physiochemical properties likely to render them less susceptible to passage across the blood-brain barrier. Methods A library of drug-like non-piperidine analogs of mefloquine was synthesized. These compounds are diverse in structure and physiochemical properties. They were screened in appropriate in vitro assays and evaluated in terms of their potential as lead compounds. The correlation of specific structural attributes and physiochemical properties with activity was assessed. Results The most potent analogs were low molecular weight unconjugated secondary amines with no heteroatoms in their side-chains. However, these compounds were more metabolically labile and permeable than mefloquine. In terms of physiochemical properties, lower polar surface area, lower molecular weight, more freely rotatable bonds and fewer H-bond acceptors were associated with greater potency. There was no such relationship between activity and LogP, LogD or the number of hydrogen bond donors (HBDs. The addition of an H-bond donor to the side-chain yielded a series of active diamines, which were as metabolically stable as mefloquine but showed reduced permeability. Conclusions A drug-like library of non-piperidine analogs of mefloquine was synthesized. From amongst this library an active lead series of less permeable, but metabolically stable, diamines was identified.

  13. The molecular evolution of four anti-malarial immune genes in the Anopheles gambiae species complex

    OpenAIRE

    Simard Frederic; Antonio-Nkondjio Christophe; Awono-Ambene Parfait H; Marshall Jonathon C; Slotman Michel A; Parmakelis Aristeidis; Caccone Adalgisa; Powell Jeffrey R

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background If the insect innate immune system is to be used as a potential blocking step in transmission of malaria, then it will require targeting one or a few genes with highest relevance and ease of manipulation. The problem is to identify and manipulate those of most importance to malaria infection without the risk of decreasing the mosquito's ability to stave off infections by microbes in general. Molecular evolution methodologies and concepts can help identify such genes. Withi...

  14. Seasonal distribution of anti-malarial drug resistance alleles on the island of Sumba, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asih, P.B.; Rogers, W.O.; Susanti, A.I.; Rahmat, A.; Rozi, I.E.; Kusumaningtyas, M.A.; Dewi, R.M.; Coutrier, F.N.; Sutamihardja, A.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Sauerwein, R.W.; Syafruddin, D.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Drug resistant malaria poses an increasing public health problem in Indonesia, especially eastern Indonesia, where malaria is highly endemic. Widespread chloroquine (CQ) resistance and increasing sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) resistance prompted Indonesia to adopt artemisinin-based com

  15. Genetic Effects on Sensorineural Hearing Loss and Evidence-based Treatment for Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-qiang Yu; Huai-an Yang; Ming Xiao; Jing-wei Wang; Dong-yan Huang; Yagesh Bhambhani; Lyn Sonnenberg

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the mechanism of inheritance behind inherited hearing loss and genetic susceptibility in noise-induced hearing loss are reviewed. Conventional treatments for sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), i.e. hearing aid and cochlear implant, are effective for some cases, but not without limitations. For example, they provide little benefit for patients of profound SNHL or neural hearing loss, especially when the hearing loss is in poor dynamic range and with low frequency resolution. We emphasize the most recent evidence-based treatment in this field, which includes gene therapy and allotransplantation of stem cells. Their promising results have shown that they might be options of treatment for profound SNHL and neural hearing loss. Although some treatments are still at the experimental stage, it is helpful to be aware of the novel therapies and endeavour to explore the feasibility of their clinical application.

  16. Evidence based postoperative treatment of distal radius fractures following internal locking plate fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, S M; Prantl, L; Koller, M; Vykoukal, J; Dolderer, J H; Graf, S; Nerlich, M; Loibl, M; Geis, S

    2015-01-01

    Originally, the treatment method of choice for distal radial fractures (DRF) has been a non-operative approach with six to eight weeks of plaster casting. The introduction of volar locking plate systems at the beginning of the 21 st century has pushed trends towards open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). While the introduction of fixed angle locking plates together with the increasing knowledge on wrist function and related variable outcomes has led to consensus that operative fixation in instable DRF is the treatment method of choice, there is no agreement on a postoperative care of these injuries. The authors will discuss the available evidence for current concepts of postoperative treatment of DRFs following fixed angle fixation under socioeconomical, biomechanical and burden of disease aspects. Further, relevant randomized controlled trials are evaluated with regard to applied postoperative treatment regimes and related risks for complications.

  17. Medicinal Plants for the Treatment of Acne Vulgaris: A Review of Recent Evidences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasri, Hamid; Bahmani, Mahmoud; Shahinfard, Najmeh; Moradi Nafchi, Atefeh; Saberianpour, Shirin; Rafieian Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Context: Acne vulgaris affects about 85% of teenagers and may continue to adulthood. There are about two million visits to physicians per year for teenagers and the direct cost of acne treatment in the US exceeds $1 billion per year. Evidence Acquisition: A wide variety of treatment regimens exist for acne vulgaris including benzoil peroxide, retinoids, isotretinoids, keratolytic soaps, alpha hydroxy acids, azelaic acid, salicilic acid as well as hormonal, anti-androgen or antiseborrheic treatments. However, none of these methods is free of side effects and their exact role in therapy is not clear. In this paper apart from presenting the possible causes of acne vulgaris and its available drugs, recently published papers about medicinal plants used in the treatment of acne vulgaris were reviewed. Results: Consumption of alternative and complementary medicine, including medicinal plants, is increasing and is common amongst patients affected by acne and infectious skin diseases. Medicinal plants have a long history of use and have been shown to possess low side effects. These plants are a reliable source for preparation of new drugs. Conclusions: Many plants seem to have inhibitory effects on the growth of bacteria, fungi and viruses in vitro. However, there are a few clinical evidences about the effectiveness and safety of these plants in the treatment of acne and other skin infections. PMID:26862380

  18. What is the evidence basis for existing treatments of eating disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergh, Cecilia; Ejderhamn, Jan; Södersten, Per

    2003-06-01

    Most existing treatments of eating disorders (ED) produce a period of remission that is short lived and expressed in fewer than 50% of the patients. Antidepressants (eg, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors [SSRI]) have a small effect in bulimia nervosa and they are not recommended in anorexia nervosa (AN) because serotonin inhibits food intake. In a randomized, controlled trial, training of eating behavior and satiety, supply of warmth, reduction of physical hyperactivity, and restoration of social activities brought 75% of patients with ED into remission, and 93% remained in remission during follow-up. Further randomized, controlled trials comparing presently used interventions will provide the evidence needed to improve the treatment of ED.

  19. Evidence That Anorectal Transplantation Is the Logical Treatment for Serious Anorectal Dysfunction and Permanent Colostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira Galvao, F H; Araki, J; Seid, V E; Waisberg, D R; Traldi, M C; Naito, M; Araujo, B C; Lanchotte, C; Chaib, E; D'Albuquerque, L A C

    2016-03-01

    Anorectal dysfunction resulting in fecal incontinence or permanent colostomy is a current public health concern that strongly impairs patient quality of life. Present treatment options for this complex disease are expensive and usually ineffective. Anorectal transplantation is the logical treatment for fecal incontinence and permanent colostomy. This procedure has been clinically effective in a few cases reported in the medical literature. Furthermore, experiments in rats, pigs, and dogs have shown promising results, with functional recovery of the graft. In this article we describe the scientific evidence that anorectal transplantation may be an important option for treating anorectal dysfunction.

  20. Tocilizumab: The evidence for its place in the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlin, Troels

    2010-01-01

    clinical trial of tocilizumab demonstrating the clinical efficacy and safety in systemic onset JIA have been published. Within those studies, sustained and high response rates of clinical improvement have been achieved with American College of Rheumatology Pediatric criteria (ACRPed) 30, 50, and 70...... antibody, could therefore be an effective treatment of systemic JIA. AIMS: The purpose of this article was to review the clinical trials of tocilizumab and to discuss its place in the treatment of JIA with the focus on the systemic onset of disease. EVIDENCE REVIEW: Two phase II studies and one phase III...

  1. Omalizumab: the evidence for its place in the treatment of allergic asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diarmuid M. McNicholl

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Diarmuid M. McNicholl, Liam G. HeaneyRegional Respiratory Centre, Belfast City Hospital, Belfast, UKIntroduction: Asthma is a chronic inflammatory airways disease associated with reversible airflow obstruction and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. Asthma is prevalent worldwide and results in significant morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs, the majority of which arise from those with severe disease. Omalizumab is a monoclonal antibody to immunoglobulin E (IgE that has been developed for the treatment of severe persistent allergic (IgE mediated asthma.Aims: The aim of this review is to evaluate the available clinical evidence on omalizumab to determine the role it has to play in the treatment of persistent allergic asthma.Evidence review: There is clear evidence to show that omalizumab is effective in reducing the rate of asthma exacerbations, inhaled corticosteroid dose, and the need for rescue medication in patients with allergic asthma. Clinical data indicate beneficial effects on patient-reported symptoms and perceived quality of life, as well as a reduction in unscheduled healthcare visits. There is little evidence to suggest omalizumab may enhance lung function or reduce the requirement for oral corticosteroids. Omalizumab has a favorable safety profile, although anaphylaxis has occurred. A study in children showed similar results to those achieved in adults and adolescents, with fewer asthma exacerbations and school days missed. Omalizumab may be cost effective in patients when used as add-on therapy to inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting beta2 agonists (LABA.Place in therapy: Omalizumab is an effective add-on therapy to inhaled corticosteroids and LABAs in adults and adolescents with severe persistent allergic asthma. Currently there is insufficient evidence to support the use of omalizumab in children.  Key words: allergic asthma, omalizumab, immunoglobulin E, evidence

  2. Treatment of Scoliosis-Evidence and Management (Review of the Literature)

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss,, C.; Turnbull,; Tournavitis; Borysov

    2016-01-01

    Context Scoliosis is a three-dimensional deformity of the spine and trunk which includes lateral deviation, rotation, and a disturbance of the sagittal profile. Treatment is indicated for scoliosis because it may lead to negative consequences with regard to the quality of life and other health issues for some patients. The purpose of this review was to gather current, up-to-date information, and to search the recent articles on scoliosis for evidence of the different modes of tre...

  3. Pain treatment after craniotomy: where is the (procedure-specific) evidence? A qualitative systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.S; Brennum, Jannick; Moltke, Finn B;

    2011-01-01

    Pain following craniotomy has been demonstrated to be frequent and moderate-to-severe in nature. In recent years, the focus on the challenges in treatment of postoperative pain following craniotomy has increased. Fear of using opioids because of their wide array of side-effects has led to the sea...... to the search for alternative analgesic options. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate current evidence about analgesic therapy following craniotomy....

  4. A review on prevention and treatment of post-orthodontic white spot lesions - evidence-based methods and emerging technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrand, Fredrik; Twetman, Svante

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to update the evidence for primary and secondary prevention (treatment) of white spot lesions (WSL) adjacent to fixed orthodontic appliances.......The aim of this paper was to update the evidence for primary and secondary prevention (treatment) of white spot lesions (WSL) adjacent to fixed orthodontic appliances....

  5. Statewide CBT Training for Clinicians and Supervisors Treating Youth: The New York State Evidence Based Treatment Dissemination Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleacher, Alissa A.; Nadeem, Erum; Moy, Amanda J.; Whited, Andria L.; Albano, Anne Marie; Radigan, Marleen; Wang, Rui; Chassman, Janet; Myrhol-Clarke, Britt; Hoagwood, Kimberly Eaton

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, several states have undertaken efforts to disseminate evidence-based treatments to agencies and clinicians in their children's service system. In New York, the Evidence Based Treatment Dissemination Center adopted a unique translation-based training and consultation model in which an initial 3-day training was combined with a year…

  6. Clinical Practice: Evidence-Based Recommendations for the Treatment of Cervical Dystonia with Botulinum Toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contarino, Maria Fiorella; Van Den Dool, Joost; Balash, Yacov; Bhatia, Kailash; Giladi, Nir; Koelman, Johannes H.; Lokkegaard, Annemette; Marti, Maria J.; Postma, Miranda; Relja, Maja; Skorvanek, Matej; Speelman, Johannes D.; Zoons, Evelien; Ferreira, Joaquim J.; Vidailhet, Marie; Albanese, Alberto; Tijssen, Marina A. J.

    2017-01-01

    Cervical dystonia (CD) is the most frequent form of focal dystonia. Symptoms often result in pain and functional disability. Local injections of botulinum neurotoxin are currently the treatment of choice for CD. Although this treatment has proven effective and is widely applied worldwide, many issues still remain open in the clinical practice. We performed a systematic review of the literature on botulinum toxin treatment for CD based on a question-oriented approach, with the aim to provide practical recommendations for the treating clinicians. Key questions from the clinical practice were explored. Results suggest that while the beneficial effect of botulinum toxin treatment on different aspects of CD is well established, robust evidence is still missing concerning some practical aspects, such as dose equivalence between different formulations, optimal treatment intervals, treatment approaches, and the use of supportive techniques including electromyography or ultrasounds. Established strategies to prevent or manage common side effects (including excessive muscle weakness, pain at injection site, dysphagia) and potential contraindications to this treatment (pregnancy and lactation, use of anticoagulants, neurological comorbidities) should also be further explored. PMID:28286494

  7. Rimonabant: the evidence for its use in the treatment of obesity and the metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Waterlow

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Mark Waterlow, Paul ChrispCore Medical Publishing, Knutsford, UKIntroduction: Obesity and overweight affect over 1 billion people worldwide and are leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Clinical features of obesity converge with those of the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, greatly increasing the risk of long-term adverse outcomes.Aims: To review the evidence on rimonabant, a novel CB1 receptor antagonist, for the treatment of obese and overweight patients.Evidence review: There is clear evidence that rimonabant 20 mg/day in conjunction with a hypocaloric diet causes a mean weight loss of 4.6 kg in obese and overweight patients after 1 year’s treatment, with approximately 50% of patients achieving a weight loss of ≥5%. One study demonstrated that weight loss is maintained for up to 2 years. The drug also improves lipid and glycemic cardiovascular risk factors, including high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and insulin resistance, and reduces waist circumference, thus reducing the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Treatment of obese and overweight diabetic patients with rimonabant decreases glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, including patients previously untreated for diabetes. The effect of rimonabant appears to be partly independent of weight loss. Rimonabant 20 mg/day is generally well tolerated, with mild to moderate transient adverse effects including nausea, diarrhea, dizziness, and anxiety. Approximately 14% of patients receiving rimonabant 20 mg/day discontinued due to adverse effects, primarily depressed mood, although overall rates of depression did not differ significantly compared with placebo.Place in therapy: The evidence supports the use of rimonabant 20 mg/day along with dietary modification to reduce cardiovascular risk factors in obese and overweight patients, including those with diabetes. The drug is contraindicated in patients receiving antidepressants. Long-term data on cardiovascular outcomes, morbidity, and

  8. Evidence-based treatment of jellyfish stings in North America and Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Nicholas T; Darracq, Michael A; Tomaszewski, Christian; Clark, Richard F

    2012-10-01

    We performed a systematic review of the evidence supporting various treatments for envenomation by jellyfish (cnidarian) and related organisms in North America and Hawaii. Our review produced 19 pertinent primary articles. Current research demonstrates variable response to treatment, often with conflicting results according to species studied, which contributes to considerable confusion about what treatment is warranted and efficacious. Our review suggests that vinegar causes pain exacerbation or nematocyst discharge in the majority of species. Hot water and topical lidocaine appear more widely beneficial in improving pain symptoms and are preferentially recommended. Unfortunately, they may be difficult to obtain at the site of envenomation, such as the beach or diving sites. In these instances, removing the nematocysts and washing the area with saltwater may be considered. If the envenomation is thought to be due to the bluebottle (Physalia), vinegar may be beneficial.

  9. An evidence-based algorithm for the treatment of neuropathic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnerup, Nanna B; Otto, Marit; Jensen, Troels S;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this article is to discuss an evidence-based algorithm that can be implemented by the primary care physician in his/her daily clinical practice for the treatment of patients with neuropathic pain conditions. METHOD: A treatment algorithm for neuropathic pain was formulated...... on the basis of a review of 105 high-quality, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials. The number needed to treat (NNT) and number needed to harm (NNH) were used to compare the safety and effectiveness of current treatments for neuropathic pain syndromes. Most of the clinical trials reviewed...... in the analysis assessed tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) and antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). RESULTS: TCAs had the lowest NNT followed by opioids and AEDs, such as gabapentin and pregabalin. The nature of the retrospective calculation of the NNT and NNH involves obvious limitations because of the pooling of studies...

  10. Assessment of Evidence Base from Medical Debriefs Data on Space Motion Sickness Incidence and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younker, D.R.; Daniels, V.R.; Boyd, J.L.; Putcha, L.

    2008-01-01

    An objective of this data compilation and analysis project is to examine incidence and treatment efficacy of common patho-physiological disturbances during spaceflight. Analysis of medical debriefs data indicated that astronauts used medications to alleviate symptoms of four major ailments for which astronauts received treatment for sleep disturbances, space motion sickness (SMS), pain (headache, back pain) and sinus congestion. In the present data compilation and analysis project on SMS treatment during space missions, subject demographics (gender, age, first-time or repeat flyer), incidence and severity of SMS symptoms and subjective treatment efficacy from 317 crewmember debrief records were examined from STS-1 through STS-89. Preliminary analysis of data revealed that 50% of crew members reported SMS symptoms on at least one flight and 22% never experienced it. In addition, there were 387 medication dosing episodes reported, and promethazine was the most commonly used medication. Results of analysis of symptom check lists, medication use/efficacy and gender and flight record differences in incidence and treatment efficacy will be presented. Evidence gaps for treatment efficacy along with medication use trend analysis will be identified.

  11. Axitinib: The evidence of its potential in the treatment of advanced thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari A Deshpande, Scott Gettinger

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Hari A Deshpande1, Scott Gettinger1, Julie Ann Sosa21Yale Cancer Center, Department of Medical Oncology, 2Division of Endocrine Surgery, Department of Surgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USAIntroduction: Thyroid cancer is a rare disease with an incidence of around 37,000 cases per year. However, its incidence is rising faster than many other cancers and for men this disease ranks highest overall in the rate of increase (2.4% annual increase in cancer deaths. As the number of radioactive iodine-resistant thyroid cancers increases, the need for newer treatments has become more important. Axitinib is one of many new small molecule inhibitors of growth factor receptors that have shown promise in the treatment of many cancers. It targets the vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1, 2 and 3.Aims: The goal of this article is to review the published evidence for the use of axitinib in the treatment of thyroid cancer and define its therapeutic potential. Evidence review: The major evidence of axitinib activity has appeared in meeting report abstracts. One phase II study has been published. This included patients with any histological type of thyroid cancer that was not amenable to treatment with radioactive iodine. Clinical potential: To date, in phase II clinical studies axitinib has demonstrated antitumor activity in advanced refractory thyroid cancer. As a monotherapy it resulted in a 30% response rate with another 38% of patients having stable disease. Axitinib appears to have a good tolerability profile, with hypertension being the most common grade 3 or greater side effect. Keywords: axitinib, thyroid cancer, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in patients with cystic fibrosis: scientific evidence regarding clinical impact, diagnosis, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Vicente Ribeiro Ferreira da Silva Filho

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Evidence-based techniques have been increasingly used in the creation of clinical guidelines and the development of recommendations for medical practice. The use of levels of evidence allows the reader to identify the quality of scientific information that supports the recommendations made by experts. The objective of this review was to address current concepts related to the clinical impact, diagnosis, and treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. For the preparation of this review, the authors defined a group of questions that would be answered in accordance with the principles of PICO–an acronym based on questions regarding the Patients of interest, Intervention being studied, Comparison of the intervention, and Outcome of interest. For each question, a structured review of the literature was performed using the Medline database in order to identify the studies with the methodological design most appropriate to answering the question. The questions were designed so that each of the authors could write a response. A first draft was prepared and discussed by the group. Recommendations were then made on the basis of the level of scientific evidence, in accordance with the classification system devised by the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, as well as the level of agreement among the members of the group.

  13. Evidence-based review of lasers, light sources and photodynamic therapy in the treatment of acne vulgaris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hædersdal, Merete; Togsverd-Bo, Katrine; Wulf, Hans Chr.

    2008-01-01

    Background There is a considerable need for effective and safe treatment for acne vulgaris. Objective In a systematic review with an evidence-based approach to assess the effects of optical treatments for acne vulgaris. Methods Original publications of controlled clinical trials were identified...... treatments included pain, erythema, oedema, crusting, hyperpigmentation, pustular eruptions and were more intense for treatments combined with ALA or MAL. Conclusion Evidence from controlled clinical trials indicates a short-term efficacy from optical treatments for acne vulgaris with the most consistent...... of 19), which applied blinded response evaluations (12 of 19) and assessed a short-term efficacy up to 12 weeks after treatment (17 of 19). Based on the present best available evidence, we conclude that optical treatments possess the potential to improve inflammatory acne on a short-term basis...

  14. Evidence for Conservative Treatment of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis - Update 2015 (Mini-Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sy, Ng; Bettany-Saltikov, Josette; Moramarco, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic scoliosis predominantly afflicts adolescents. Adolescents with mild curvatures do not generally have any symptoms. However spinal fusion is indicated when the deformity exceeds 45°. Treatment is thus necessary to prevent and/or reduce the progression of curvatures to that below which surgery is indicated. Conservative treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis includes observation, scoliosis-specific exercises (SSE) and bracing. There is increasing evidence suggesting that SSE and brace treatment can significantly limit the progression of spinal curvatures. In growing adolescents with curvatures more than 20°, bracing is indicated and should be used in conjunction with SSE. The effectiveness of bracing varies according to the type of brace applied to the patient. In general rigid braces are preferable to soft flexible braces, as the latter falls short of halting curvatures progression. Also, preliminary evidence suggests that asymmetric braces which enable over-correction provide more correction when compared with symmetrical braces. Recently it has also been reported that high quality bracing can also reduce curvatures exceeding 45° in over 70% of growing adolescents. This new knowledge might possibly increase the threshold of surgical indications to beyond 50° or above in the near future.

  15. Tocilizumab: The evidence for its place in the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troels Herlin

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Troels HerlinDepartment of Pediatrics, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Aarhus, DenmarkIntroduction: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is one of the most common chronic diseases with childhood onset. It comprises different subtypes of which the systemic onset subtype is often resistant to treatment. With the advent of biological treatment with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα-inhibitors, the clinical outcome of JIA has improved considerably, but only for subtypes other than systemic JIA. Substantial evidence shows that the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6 plays a pivotal role in systemic JIA. The blockage of IL-6 action by tocilizumab, a humanized anti-IL-6-receptor monoclonal antibody, could therefore be an effective treatment of systemic JIA.Aims: The purpose of this article was to review the clinical trials of tocilizumab and to discuss its place in the treatment of JIA with the focus on the systemic onset of disease. Evidence review: Two phase II studies and one phase III clinical trial of tocilizumab demonstrating the clinical efficacy and safety in systemic onset JIA have been published. Within those studies, sustained and high response rates of clinical improvement have been achieved with American College of Rheumatology Pediatric criteria (ACRPed 30, 50, and 70 observed in 98%, 94%, and 90% of patients, respectively, after 48 weeks. One study regarding the clinical efficacy of tocilizumab for the treatment of oligo- and polyarticular JIA has been presented only as a conference abstract.Place in therapy: The very promising results seen so far in patients with severe systemic JIA and acceptable tolerability gives tocilizumab a central role in the future therapy in controlling this disease. No other biological therapy has achieved similar high response rates when treating with tocilizumab 8 mg/kg every two weeks to patients with systemic onset JIA, but direct comparison of the efficacy of different biological agents are not

  16. Angina treatments and prevention of cardiac events: an appraisal of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchester, David E; Pepine, Carl J

    2015-12-01

    Angina pectoris is the symptomatic manifestation of transient myocardial ischaemia. At the most fundamental level, angina arises when myocardial oxygen demand exceeds the ability of the coronary circulation to provide adequate oxygen delivery to maintain normal myocardial metabolic function. In vivo, the balance of oxygen demand and delivery is a complex physiological process that can be altered by a variety of interventions. Lifestyle modification is a cornerstone of cardiovascular disease management, with or without angina. Additional pharmaceutical and physical interventions are usually applied to patients with angina. Mechanisms of action for these interventions include heart rate modulation, vascular smooth muscle relaxation, metabolic manipulation, revascularization, and others. A number of these interventions have overlapping mechanisms that target angina. Additionally, some interventions may directly or indirectly prevent or delay adverse outcomes such as myocardial infarction or death. This review summarizes current evidence for many applied ischaemia treatments documented to modify angina and comments on available evidence relating to improvement in cardiovascular outcomes.

  17. Oxytocin and Major Depressive Disorder: Experimental and Clinical Evidence for Links to Aetiology and Possible Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga D. Neumann

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Affective disorders represent the most common psychiatric diseases, with substantial co-morbidity existing between major depressive disorders (MDD and anxiety disorders. The lack of truly novel acting compounds has led to non-monoaminergic based research and hypotheses in recent years. The large number of brain neuropeptides, characterized by discrete synthesis sites and multiple receptors, represent likely research candidates for novel therapeutic targets. The present review summarises the available preclinical and human evidence regarding the neuropeptide, oxytocin, and its implications in the aetiology and treatment of MDD. While the evidence is not conclusive at present additional studies are warranted to determine whether OXT may be of therapeutic benefit in subsets of MDD patients such as those with comorbid anxiety symptoms and low levels of social attachment.

  18. New Evidence-Based Treatment Approach in Behçet's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Alpsoy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Behçet's disease (BD is a chronic, relapsing, and debilitating systemic vasculitis of unknown aetiology with the clinical features of mucocutaneous lesions, ocular, vascular, articular, neurologic, gastrointestinal, urogenital, and pulmonary involvement. The disease is much more frequent along the ancient “Silk Route” extending from Eastern Asia to the Mediterranean basin, compared with Western countries. The disease usually starts around the third or fourth decade of life. Male sex and a younger age of onset are associated with more severe disease. Although the treatment has become much more effective in recent years, BD is still associated with severe morbidity and considerable mortality. The main aim of the treatment should be the prevention of irreversible organ damage. Therefore, close monitoring, early, and appropriate treatment is mandatory to reduce morbidity and mortality. The treatment is mainly based on the suppression of inflammatory attacks of the disease using immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive agents. In this paper, current state of knowledge regarding the therapeutic approaches is outlined. To provide a rational framework for selecting the appropriate therapy along the various treatment choices, a stepwise, symptom-based, evidence-based algorithmic approach was developed.

  19. Dental Trauma Guide: a source of evidence-based treatment guidelines for dental trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Ahrensburg, Søren Steno

    2012-10-01

    Diagnosis and treatment for traumatic dental injuries are very complex owing to the multiple trauma entities represented by six luxation types and nine fracture types affecting both the primary and the permanent dentition. When it is further considered that fracture and luxation injuries are often combined, the result is that more than 100 trauma scenarios exist, when the two dentitions are combined. Each of these trauma scenarios has a specific treatment demand and prospect for healing. With such a complexity in diagnosis and treatment, it is obvious that even experienced practitioners may have problems in selecting proper treatment for some of these trauma types. To remedy this situation, an Internet-based knowledge base consisting of 4000 dental trauma cases with long-term follow up is now available to the public and the professions on the Internet using the address http://www.DentalTraumaGuide.org. It is the aspiration that the use of this Guide may lead the practitioner to offer an evidence-based diagnosis and treatment.

  20. Clinical utility of tadalafil in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension: an evidence-based review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrie AM

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Adam M Henrie, James J Nawarskas, Joe R Anderson College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USA Abstract: Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a chronic and disabling condition characterized by an elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and an elevated mean pulmonary arterial pressure. Despite recent improvements in treatment availability, PAH remains challenging to treat, burdensome for patients, and ultimately incurable. Tadalafil is a phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor that is administered once daily by mouth for the treatment of PAH. Current treatment guidelines recommend tadalafil as an option for patients with World Health Organization functional class II or III PAH. In a placebo-controlled clinical trial, patients taking tadalafil demonstrated significantly improved exercise capacity as measured by the 6-minute walk distance. Patients also experienced decreased incidence of clinical worsening, increased quality of life, and improved cardiopulmonary hemodynamics. Uncontrolled studies and smaller trials have indicated a possible role for tadalafil as a suitable alternative to sildenafil and as a beneficial add-on option when used in combination with other treatments for PAH. Tadalafil is generally safe and well tolerated. Adverse events are typically mild-to-moderate in intensity, and discontinuation rates are usually low. The purpose of this review is to provide an evidence-based evaluation of the clinical utility of tadalafil in the treatment of PAH. Keywords: tadalafil, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor, pulmonary arterial hypertension

  1. New Evidence-Based Treatment Approach in Behçet's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpsoy, Erkan

    2012-01-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a chronic, relapsing, and debilitating systemic vasculitis of unknown aetiology with the clinical features of mucocutaneous lesions, ocular, vascular, articular, neurologic, gastrointestinal, urogenital, and pulmonary involvement. The disease is much more frequent along the ancient "Silk Route" extending from Eastern Asia to the Mediterranean basin, compared with Western countries. The disease usually starts around the third or fourth decade of life. Male sex and a younger age of onset are associated with more severe disease. Although the treatment has become much more effective in recent years, BD is still associated with severe morbidity and considerable mortality. The main aim of the treatment should be the prevention of irreversible organ damage. Therefore, close monitoring, early, and appropriate treatment is mandatory to reduce morbidity and mortality. The treatment is mainly based on the suppression of inflammatory attacks of the disease using immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive agents. In this paper, current state of knowledge regarding the therapeutic approaches is outlined. To provide a rational framework for selecting the appropriate therapy along the various treatment choices, a stepwise, symptom-based, evidence-based algorithmic approach was developed.

  2. Treatment of African children with severe malaria - towards evidence-informed clinical practice using GRADE

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    English Mike

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe malaria is a major contributor of deaths in African children up to five years of age. One valuable tool to support health workers in the management of diseases is clinical practice guidelines (CPGs developed using robust methods. A critical assessment of the World Health Organization (WHO and Kenyan paediatric malaria treatment guidelines with quinine was undertaken, with a focus on the quality of the evidence and transparency of the shift from evidence to recommendations. Methods Systematic reviews of the literature were conducted using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE tool to appraise included studies. The findings were used to evaluate the WHO and Kenyan recommendations for the management of severe childhood malaria. Results The WHO 2010 malaria guidance on severe malaria in children, which informed the Kenyan guidelines, only evaluated the evidence on one topic on paediatric care using the GRADE tool. Using the GRADE tool, this work explicitly demonstrated that despite the established use of quinine in the management of paediatric cases of severe malaria for decades, low or very low quality evidence of important outcomes, but not critical outcomes such as mortality, have informed national and international guidance on the paediatric quinine dosing, route of administration and adverse effects. Conclusions Despite the foreseeable shift to artesunate as the primary drug for treatment of severe childhood malaria, the findings reported here reflect that the particulars of quinine therapeutics for the management of severe malaria in African children have historically been a neglected research priority. This work supports the application of the GRADE tool to make transparent recommendations and to inform advocacy efforts for a greater research focus in priority areas in paediatric care in Africa and other low-income settings.

  3. Factors associated with the use of evidence-based practices to treat psychological trauma by psychotherapists with trauma treatment expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Carlton D; Sprang, Ginny

    2010-10-01

    This paper investigates 10 socio-demographic and case characteristic variables as predictors of use of evidence-based practice and non-evidence-based practice in the treatment of psychological trauma. A national random sample of 2,400 trauma treatment specialists in all 50 states and the District of Columbia were sent surveys with a response rate of 29.6% (N = 711) usable surveys returned. Stepwise regressions conducted on evidence-based practice use indicated that special trauma training, older age, and higher percentage of PTSD on the case load were the only significant predictors of evidence-based practice use. Implications for trauma practices are indicated.

  4. Dapoxetine: an evidence-based review of its effectiveness in treatment of premature ejaculation

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    McCarty EJ

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available McCarty EJ, Dinsmore WWDepartment of Genitourinary Medicine, Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast, IrelandAbstract: Premature ejaculation (PE is a major issue in male sexual health. The global prevalence of PE is estimated to be between 20% and 40%, making it the most common sexual dysfunction in men. PE causes distress and reduced quality of life for patients and has a negative impact on interpersonal relationships. Historically, it has been treated with cognitive therapy, behavioral methods, and off-label use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors usually used to treat depression and other psychological disorders. Dapoxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor specifically designed to treat PE. This paper reviews the current evidence for use of dapoxetine in the treatment of PE in adult men. There is substantial evidence that dapoxetine 30 mg or 60 mg taken “on-demand” results in a significant increase in intravaginal ejaculatory latency time when compared with placebo. Patient-reported outcomes are clearly improved relative to placebo following dapoxetine therapy, indicating greater control over ejaculation, more satisfaction with intercourse, less ejaculation-related distress, and, importantly, significantly reduced interpersonal difficulty. These data were supported by consistent reports of improvement in Clinical Global Impression of change in PE following treatment with dapoxetine. Further studies are needed to evaluate long-term efficacy and health economics. The unique pharmacology of dapoxetine makes it ideal for on-demand dosing, and the clinical evidence shows dapoxetine to be an efficacious and tolerable treatment for lifelong and acquired PE.Keywords: dapoxetine, intravaginal ejaculatory latency time, patient-reported outcomes, premature ejaculation

  5. Febuxostat: the evidence for its use in the treatment of hyperuricemia and gout

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    Angelo L Gaffo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Angelo L Gaffo1, Kenneth G Saag21Birmingham VA Medical Center, 2Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, University of Alabama at BirminghamIntroduction: Gout is a common and disabling cause of arthritis in middle-aged and elderly populations, with its main predisposing factor being hyperuricemia (serum urate > 6.8 mg/dL. Options for treatment of chronic gout until 2008 were allopurinol, a xanthine oxidase inhibitor, and the group of drugs known as uricosurics that stimulate the renal excretion of uric acid. A proportion of patients, including some with chronic kidney disease and solid organ transplantations, could not be treated with the those therapies because of intolerance, drug interactions, or adverse events. Febuxostat is a nonpurine xanthine oxidase inhibitor, recently approved in Europe and the United States for the treatment of chronic gout.Aim: To review the clinical evidence (phase II and III studies of the effectiveness and safety of febuxostat for treatment of hyperuricemia and gout.Evidence review: Febuxostat, at doses ranging from 40 to 240 mg/day, is efficacious in reducing serum urate in patients with hyperuricemia and gout, comparing favorably with fixed doses of allopurinol in that respect. Early safety signals with respect to liver test abnormalities and cardiovascular outcomes have not been confirmed in recent large prospective trials but need to be further monitored.Clinical potential: Given its low cost and extensive clinical experience, allopurinol will likely remain the first-line drug for management of hyperuricemia and gout. Febuxostat may provide an important option in patients unable to use allopurinol, those with very high serum urate levels, or in the presence of refractory tophi.Keywords: febuxostat, gout, hyperuricemia, evidence

  6. Narrative exposure therapy: an evidence-based treatment for multiple and complex trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongedijk, Ruud A

    2014-01-01

    Narrative exposure therapy (NET) is a recently developed, short-term treatment for patients with a posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as a result of multiple trauma. NET can be applied very successfully in patients with complex trauma complaints (Jongedijk, 2014; Schauer, Neuner, & Elbert, 2011). An important feature of NET is that trauma processing is never an isolated event but is always embedded in the context of a traumatic event and in the life history as a whole. At the start, the lifeline is laid. The lifeline is made up of a rope, with flowers (happy events), stones (traumatic events), sometimes candles (grief), or recently also sticks for aggressive acts (NET for offenders; see Stenmark, Cuneyt Guzey, Elbert, & Holen, 2014). These symbols are laid down along the rope, in chronological order. Subsequently, in the subsequent therapy sessions the lifeline is processed in chronological order, giving attention to all the important events a person has experienced in his or her life, both the adverse as well as the pleasurable ones. The narration ends with a written testimony. To date, there is good evidence NET is effective in the treatment of PTSD patients, with support from 18 RCTs (N=950). For culturally diverse populations, NET is recommended as the most evidence-based trauma treatment, besides culturally adapted CBT. NET has been investigated in different populations in Africa, Europe, and Asia. In Asia, research has been carried out in Sri Lanka as well as in China. In China, NET was conducted and investigated with survivors of the Sichuan earthquake (Zang, Hunt, & Cox, 2013, 2014). NET is understandable, even appealing and also supportive for patients with multiple trauma. In this presentation, the treatment principles and the practice of NET will be explained.

  7. Narrative exposure therapy: an evidence-based treatment for multiple and complex trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruud A. Jongedijk

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Narrative exposure therapy (NET is a recently developed, short-term treatment for patients with a posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD as a result of multiple trauma. NET can be applied very successfully in patients with complex trauma complaints (Jongedijk, 2014; Schauer, Neuner, & Elbert, 2011.An important feature of NET is that trauma processing is never an isolated event but is always embedded in the context of a traumatic event and in the life history as a whole. At the start, the lifeline is laid. The lifeline is made up of a rope, with flowers (happy events, stones (traumatic events, sometimes candles (grief, or recently also sticks for aggressive acts (NET for offenders; see Stenmark, Cuneyt Guzey, Elbert, & Holen, 2014. These symbols are laid down along the rope, in chronological order. Subsequently, in the subsequent therapy sessions the lifeline is processed in chronological order, giving attention to all the important events a person has experienced in his or her life, both the adverse as well as the pleasurable ones. The narration ends with a written testimony.To date, there is good evidence NET is effective in the treatment of PTSD patients, with support from 18 RCTs (N=950. For culturally diverse populations, NET is recommended as the most evidence-based trauma treatment, besides culturally adapted CBT. NET has been investigated in different populations in Africa, Europe, and Asia. In Asia, research has been carried out in Sri Lanka as well as in China. In China, NET was conducted and investigated with survivors of the Sichuan earthquake (Zang, Hunt, & Cox, 2013, 2014. NET is understandable, even appealing and also supportive for patients with multiple trauma. In this presentation, the treatment principles and the practice of NET will be explained.

  8. Skin tears: a review of the evidence to support prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratliff, Catherine R; Fletcher, Kathleen R

    2007-03-01

    Physiological changes that occur as part of the aging process put the elderly at risk for developing skin tears. Lack of consistent care in the management of skin tears in the authors' community sparked a literature search to determine best evidence for the management of skin tears. Medline and Cochrane Library databases were searched for studies and systematic reviews on skin tear prevention and treatment. The literature suggested that the greatest number of skin tears occurs among the elderly (65 years and older). Factors reported to be associated with the occurrence of skin tears in addition to age include immobility and a history of skin tears. In the absence of systematic risk factor research, clinicians continue to report that all variables that may be associated with these wounds must be considered when assessing the elderly. Several small studies suggest that most skin tears occur on the extremities and seasonal incidence variations also have been reported. Despite consistent sample-size limitations, the results of controlled clinical studies and case series consistently suggest that education and implementation of prevention protocols reduce the incidence of skin tears in extended care facilities by almost 50%. Studies to evaluate and compare the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of skin tear treatments are limited but when appropriate care is provided most skin tears can be expected to heal after 7 to 21 days depending on the severity of the wound. A combination of skin protection, preventive measures, and treatments that facilitate moist wound healing appear to be most effective. Risk factor and epidemiological studies as well as research to validate the existing skin tear classification system and improve clinician ability to provide evidence-based risk assessments, preventive care, and treatment are needed.

  9. Hypnosis Treatment of Gastrointestinal Disorders: A Comprehensive Review of the Empirical Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palsson, Olafur S

    2015-10-01

    Hypnotherapy has been investigated for 30 years as a treatment for gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. There are presently 35 studies in the published empirical literature, including 17 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that have assessed clinical outcomes of such treatment. This body of research is reviewed comprehensively in this article. Twenty-four of the studies have tested hypnotherapy for adult irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and 5 have focused on IBS or abdominal pain in children. All IBS hypnotherapy studies have reported significant improvement in gastrointestinal symptoms, and 7 out of 10 RCTs in adults and all 3 RCTs in pediatric patient samples found superior outcomes for hypnosis compared to control groups. Collectively this body of research shows unequivocally that for both adults and children with IBS, hypnosis treatment is highly efficacious in reducing bowel symptoms and can offer lasting and substantial symptom relief for a large proportion of patients who do not respond adequately to usual medical treatment approaches. For other GI disorders the evidence is more limited, but preliminary indications of therapeutic potential can be seen in the single randomized controlled trials published to date on hypnotherapy for functional dyspepsia, functional chest pain, and ulcerative colitis. Further controlled hypnotherapy trials in those three disorders should be a high priority. The mechanisms underlying the impact of hypnosis on GI problems are still unclear, but findings from a number of studies suggest that they involve both modulation of gut functioning and changes in the brain's handling of sensory signals from the GI tract.

  10. [Evidence-based evaluation of present guidelines for the treatment of tennis elbow -- a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theis, C; Herber, S; Meurer, A; Lehr, H-A; Rompe, J-D

    2004-08-01

    The guidelines of the German Orthopaedic Societies regarding the treatment of lateral elbow epicondylitis were analysed on the ground of recently published reviews or randomised placebo-controlled trials (RCT). For the acute phase, reviews or RCTs failed to show a clinical effect beyond placebo if follow-up was extended over 6 weeks. For the chronic phase a current Cochrane review failed to identify any controlled trial regarding surgical procedures during the last decades. Without an adequate control group, it is not possible to draw any meaningful conclusions about the value of this modality of treatment. Therefore surgery is not indicated before repetitive low-energy extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) has been applied. This novel treatment, under strictly standardized conditions, showed effects beyond placebo in independent randomised placebo-controlled trials for follow-up periods of 3 and 6 months. To date there exists no evidence-based therapeutic algorithm for the treatment of acute and chronic tennis elbow. Even medium-term effects should be regarded as either a placebo effect or natural regression to the mean.

  11. Clinical utility of trabectedin for the treatment of ovarian cancer: current evidence

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    Mascilini F

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Floriana Mascilini,* Giulia Amadio,* Maria Grazia Di Stefano, Manuela Ludovisi, Alessia Di Legge, Carmine Conte, Rosa De Vincenzo, Caterina Ricci, Valeria Masciullo, Vanda Salutari, Giovanni Scambia, Gabriella FerrandinaGynecologic Oncology Unit, Department of Oncology, Catholic University of Rome, Italy  *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Among the pharmaceutical options available for treatment of ovarian cancer, attention has been increasingly focused on trabectedin (ET-743, a drug which displays a unique mechanism of action and has been shown to be active in several human malignancies. Currently, single agent trabectedin is approved for treatment of patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma after failure of anthracyclines and ifosfamide, and in association with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin for treatment of patients with relapsed partially platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer. This review aims at summarizing the available evidence about the clinical role of trabectedin in the management of patients with epithelial ovarian cancer. Novel perspectives coming from a better understanding of trabectedin mechanisms of action and definition of patients subgroups likely susceptible to benefit of trabectedin treatment are also presented. Keywords: ET-743, ovarian cancer, clinical trials

  12. Definition, assessment and treatment of wheezing disorders in preschool children: an evidence-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, P L P; Baraldi, E; Bisgaard, H; Boner, A L; Castro-Rodriguez, J A; Custovic, A; de Blic, J; de Jongste, J C; Eber, E; Everard, M L; Frey, U; Gappa, M; Garcia-Marcos, L; Grigg, J; Lenney, W; Le Souëf, P; McKenzie, S; Merkus, P J F M; Midulla, F; Paton, J Y; Piacentini, G; Pohunek, P; Rossi, G A; Seddon, P; Silverman, M; Sly, P D; Stick, S; Valiulis, A; van Aalderen, W M C; Wildhaber, J H; Wennergren, G; Wilson, N; Zivkovic, Z; Bush, A

    2008-10-01

    There is poor agreement on definitions of different phenotypes of preschool wheezing disorders. The present Task Force proposes to use the terms episodic (viral) wheeze to describe children who wheeze intermittently and are well between episodes, and multiple-trigger wheeze for children who wheeze both during and outside discrete episodes. Investigations are only needed when in doubt about the diagnosis. Based on the limited evidence available, inhaled short-acting beta(2)-agonists by metered-dose inhaler/spacer combination are recommended for symptomatic relief. Educating parents regarding causative factors and treatment is useful. Exposure to tobacco smoke should be avoided; allergen avoidance may be considered when sensitisation has been established. Maintenance treatment with inhaled corticosteroids is recommended for multiple-trigger wheeze; benefits are often small. Montelukast is recommended for the treatment of episodic (viral) wheeze and can be started when symptoms of a viral cold develop. Given the large overlap in phenotypes, and the fact that patients can move from one phenotype to another, inhaled corticosteroids and montelukast may be considered on a trial basis in almost any preschool child with recurrent wheeze, but should be discontinued if there is no clear clinical benefit. Large well-designed randomised controlled trials with clear descriptions of patients are needed to improve the present recommendations on the treatment of these common syndromes.

  13. The internet racing ahead of the scientific evidence: the case of "liberation treatment" for multiple sclerosis

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    Yára Dadalti Fragoso

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic neurological disease that typically affects young adults. A recent publication suggested that MS might originate from insufficient blood drainage in certain areas of the central nervous system. The condition was named chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI. Other papers have not confirmed these findings and, therefore, the matter remains controversial. Nineteen months after the original publication on CCSVI and MS, another 22 papers have been published addressing the matter. No clinical trials have been carried out on the subject and there is no evidence-based indication to perform surgical vascular procedures in MS patients. However, over the same nineteen-month period, the internet discussion on the subject of CCSVI and MS has led to countless websites advertising treatment using vascular surgery for patients with MS all over the world. The treatment based on the CCSVI theory has appealingly been called "liberation treatment", thus making it difficult to explain to patients why a treatment that has been highly praised (on the internet cannot be recommended based on partial medical results that await confirmation.

  14. Ozone treatment for radiotherapy skin reactions: is there an evidence base for practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Liz; Beaver, Kinta; Foy, Sharon

    2002-12-01

    Clinical staff and researchers working together can do much to bridge the gap between research and practice. This paper reports on the practice of treating severe radiotherapy skin reactions with ozone therapy; a practice that has been in place for a number of years at a specialist oncology hospital in England and perceived to be beneficial in terms of wound healing and pain relief. A multidisciplinary team of clinical staff and researchers questioned the evidence base for this practice and a literature search revealed little support for the effectiveness of this treatment in this particular context. The views of patients receiving ozone therapy were sought and assessment forms were completed to gain objective information on the progress (or otherwise) of wound healing. While patients perceived the ozone treatment to be beneficial in terms of pain relief, it was impossible to isolate the impact of ozone alone as other preparations and treatments were also being given. Patient reports and nursing assessments did not support that ozone was effective at wound healing. A more formal evaluation of this treatment is being planned, supported by the shared governance initiative at the study site and a continued collaboration between clinical staff and researchers.

  15. K-111: the emerging evidence for its potential in the treatment of the metabolic syndrome

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    Margaret Duggan-Keen

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Margaret Duggan-KeenCore Medical Publishing, Knutsford, UKIntroduction: Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome has increased dramatically in recent years. Optimal patient care demands a multifaceted approach, with many individuals requiring several therapies to minimize the significant associated cardiovascular burden. The need for novel agents in the management of the metabolic syndrome is emphasized by the current lack of drugs to treat insulin resistance, one of the major components of the metabolic syndrome that has several deleterious consequences. Aims: The objective of this review is to assess the emerging evidence for the potential use of K-111 in treatment of the metabolic syndrome.Emerging evidence: K-111 is a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-alfa agonist that, in preclinical studies, has shown efficacy in improving insulin resistance, reducing bodyweight, and ameliorating atherogenic dyslipidemia. Preliminary evidence suggests that toxicity and adverse events are low.Profile: The improvements in obesity and insulin resistance, together with other beneficial effects following activation of PPAR alfa by K-111 in preclinical models, are encouraging and offer several potential advantages over currently available therapies for patients with the metabolic syndrome. However, K-111 is at an early stage of development and establishment of its role will require full analysis of clinical trials carefully designed to determine its overall benefits in this increasingly important disease area.Key words: BM 17.0744, cardiovascular diseases, insulin resistance, K-111, metabolic syndrome X, PPAR alfa

  16. Evidence-based guidelines for the pharmacological treatment of schizophrenia: recommendations from the British Association for Psychopharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Thomas R E

    2011-05-01

    These guidelines from the British Association for Psychopharmacology address the scope and targets of pharmacological treatment for schizophrenia. A consensus meeting, involving experts in schizophrenia and its treatment, reviewed key areas and considered the strength of evidence and clinical implications. The guidelines were drawn up after extensive feedback from the participants and interested parties, and cover the pharmacological management and treatment of schizophrenia across the various stages of the illness, including first-episode, relapse prevention, and illness that has proved refractory to standard treatment. The practice recommendations presented are based on the available evidence to date, and seek to clarify which interventions are of proven benefit. It is hoped that the recommendations will help to inform clinical decision making for practitioners, and perhaps also serve as a source of information for patients and carers. They are accompanied by a more detailed qualitative review of the available evidence. The strength of supporting evidence for each recommendation is rated.

  17. The 'antisocial' person: an insight in to biology, classification and current evidence on treatment

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    Rajapakse Senaka

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This review analyses and summarises the recent advances in understanding the neurobiology of violence and empathy, taxonomical issues on defining personality disorders characterised by disregard for social norms, evidence for efficacy of different treatment modalities and ethical implications in defining 'at-risk' individuals for preventive interventions. Methods PubMed was searched with the keywords 'antisocial personality disorder', 'dissocial personality disorder' and 'psychopathy'. The search was limited to articles published in English over the last 10 years (1999 to 2009 Results Both diagnostic manuals used in modern psychiatry, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual published by the American Psychiatric Association and the International Classification of Diseases published by the World Health Organization, identify a personality disorder sharing similar traits. It is termed antisocial personality disorder in the diagnostic and statistical manual and dissocial personality disorder in the International Classification of Diseases. However, some authors query the ability of the existing manuals to identify a special category termed 'psychopathy', which in their opinion deserves special attention. On treatment-related issues, many psychological and behavioural therapies have shown success rates ranging from 25% to 62% in different cohorts. Multisystemic therapy and cognitive behaviour therapy have been proven efficacious in many trials. There is no substantial evidence for the efficacy of pharmacological therapy. Currently, the emphasis is on early identification and prevention of antisocial behaviour despite the ethical implications of defining at-risk children. Conclusions Further research is needed in the areas of neuroendocrinological associations of violent behaviour, taxonomic existence of psychopathy and efficacy of treatment modalities.

  18. Evidence of effectiveness of herbal medicinal products in the treatment of arthritis. Part I: Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Melainie; Gagnier, Joel J; Little, Christine V; Parsons, Tessa J; Blümle, Anette; Chrubasik, Sigrun

    2009-11-01

    Herbal medicinal products (HMPs) are used in a variety of oral and topical forms for the treatment of osteoarthritis. The aim of this study was to update a previous systematic review published in 2000. We searched electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CISCOM, AMED, CINAHL, Cochrane registers) to June 2007, unrestricted by date or language, and included randomized controlled trials that compared HMPs with inert (placebo) or active controls in patients with osteoarthritis. Five reviewers contributed to data extraction. Disagreements were discussed and resolved by consensus with reference to Cochrane guidelines and advice from the Cochrane Collaboration.Thirty-five studies (30 studies identified for this review update, and 5 studies included in the original review) evaluating the effectiveness of 22 HMPs were included. However, due to differing HMPs, interventions, comparators, and outcome measures, meta-analysis was restricted to data from studies of three HMPs: topical capsaicin, avocado-soybean unsaponifiables, and the Chinese herbal mixture SKI306X showed benefit in the alleviation of osteoarthritic pain.Several studies investigating products from devil's claw, and a powder from rose hip and seed, reported favorable effects on osteoarthritic pain, whereas two studies of a willow bark extract returned disparate results. Three studies of Phytodolor N(R) were of limited use because doses and measures were inconsistent among trials. The remaining single studies for each HMP provided moderate evidence of effectiveness. No serious side effects were reported with any herbal intervention.Despite some evidence, the effectiveness of none of the HMPs is proven beyond doubt. The obvious potential benefits of HMPs in the treatment of osteoarthritis are reduced reliance on synthetic medications with the associated risks of harmful adverse events, but further clinical trials are necessary before HMPs can be adopted in osteoarthritis treatment guidelines.

  19. An evidence-based review on urate-lowering treatments: implications for optimal treatment of chronic hyperuricemia

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    Bove M

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Marilisa Bove, Arrigo Francesco Giuseppe Cicero, Maddalena Veronesi, Claudio Borghi Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy Abstract: Several studies suggest that chronic hyperuricemia, the main precursor of gout, is involved in the pathogenesis of different systemic disorders that affect cardiovascular and renal systems, such as hypertension, obesity, hypercholesterolemia, atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome, chronic heart failure, and chronic kidney disease. Recent epidemiological evidence has shown an increasing trend in the prevalence of hyperuricemia and gout in the Western world: a number of population-based studies estimate a prevalence of up to 21% for hyperuricemia and 1%–4% for gout. As such, early detection and careful management of this pathological condition is required, starting from lifestyle changes (mainly based on a diet low in red meat, sugars, and alcoholic beverages, with increased intake of vegetables, water, and vitamin C sources, adding specific drugs to lead serum uric acid (SUA levels under the target value of 7 mg/dL. In particular, nonselective and selective XO inhibitors (allopurinol, oxypurinol, febuxostat reduce SUA levels and the overproduction of reactive oxygen species, mainly related to XO overactivity that often causes inflammatory damage to the vascular endothelium. The effect of lowering SUA levels via XO inhibition includes an attenuation of oxidative stress and related endothelial dysfunction that largely contribute to the pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, the inhibition of XO overactivation seems to be an excellent therapeutic option to limit the harmful effects of excess UA and reactive oxygen species. In conclusion, rapid diagnosis and correct therapy for hyperuricemia may also improve the prevention and/or treatment of serious and multifactorial diseases. The available evidence supports the importance of

  20. Yoga for the Treatment of Insomnia among Cancer Patients: Evidence, Mechanisms of Action, and Clinical Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustian, Karen M; Janelsins, Michelle; Peppone, Luke J; Kamen, Charles

    Up to 90% of cancer patients report symptoms of insomnia during and after treatment. Symptoms of insomnia include excessive daytime sleepiness, difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, and waking up too early. Insomnia symptoms are among the most prevalent, distressing and persistent cancer- and cancer treatment-related toxicities reported by patients, and can be severe enough to increase cancer morbidity and mortality. Despite the ubiquity of insomnia symptoms, they are under-screened, under-diagnosed, and under-treated in cancer patients. When insomnia symptoms are identified, providers are hesitant to prescribe, and patients are hesitant to take pharmaceuticals due to polypharmacy concerns. In addition, sleep medications do not cure insomnia. Yoga is a well-tolerated mode of exercise with promising evidence for its efficacy in improving insomnia symptoms among cancer patients. This article reviews existing clinical research on the effectiveness of yoga for treating insomnia among cancer patients. The article also provides clinical recommendations for prescribing yoga for the treatment of insomnia in this population.

  1. Community-Based Addiction Treatment Staff Attitudes about the Usefulness of Evidence-Based Addiction Treatment and CBO Organizational Linkages to Research Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Lena; Krull, Ivy; Zerden, Lisa de Saxe; McCarty, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    This national study of community-based addiction-treatment organizations' (CBOs) implementation of evidence-based practices explored CBO Program Directors' (n = 296) and clinical staff (n = 518) attitudes about the usefulness of science-based addiction treatment. Through multivariable regression modeling, the study identified that identical…

  2. Modelling malaria treatment practices in Bangladesh using spatial statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haque Ubydul

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria treatment-seeking practices vary worldwide and Bangladesh is no exception. Individuals from 88 villages in Rajasthali were asked about their treatment-seeking practices. A portion of these households preferred malaria treatment from the National Control Programme, but still a large number of households continued to use drug vendors and approximately one fourth of the individuals surveyed relied exclusively on non-control programme treatments. The risks of low-control programme usage include incomplete malaria treatment, possible misuse of anti-malarial drugs, and an increased potential for drug resistance. Methods The spatial patterns of treatment-seeking practices were first examined using hot-spot analysis (Local Getis-Ord Gi statistic and then modelled using regression. Ordinary least squares (OLS regression identified key factors explaining more than 80% of the variation in control programme and vendor treatment preferences. Geographically weighted regression (GWR was then used to assess where each factor was a strong predictor of treatment-seeking preferences. Results Several factors including tribal affiliation, housing materials, household densities, education levels, and proximity to the regional urban centre, were found to be effective predictors of malaria treatment-seeking preferences. The predictive strength of each of these factors, however, varied across the study area. While education, for example, was a strong predictor in some villages, it was less important for predicting treatment-seeking outcomes in other villages. Conclusion Understanding where each factor is a strong predictor of treatment-seeking outcomes may help in planning targeted interventions aimed at increasing control programme usage. Suggested strategies include providing additional training for the Building Resources across Communities (BRAC health workers, implementing educational programmes, and addressing economic factors.

  3. Artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs): best hope for malaria treatment but inaccessible to the needy!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutabingwa, T K

    2005-09-01

    within funding agencies might improve the situation. Increased interest in drug development together with the public and private sector partnership have led to new anti-malarials, some less expensive and therefore affordable by poor malaria endemic countries. Dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (Artekin) has a cost advantage over other ACTs (USD 1 for an adult treatment) making it a potential best candidate for deployment in Africa. Part of available funds should be invested into capacity building and strengthening (personnel, resources and infrastructure) of institutions in malaria endemic countries. This will create enabling environment and a critical mass of scientists and public health experts to spearhead ACT policy implementation. Active involvement of scientists from malaria endemic countries in recent International Scientific Forums like the Malaria in Pregnancy Working Group and the Consortium on ACT Implementation is the best way forward to emulate.

  4. Community-based addiction treatment staff attitudes about the usefulness of evidence-based addiction treatment and CBO organizational linkages to research institutions

    OpenAIRE

    Lundgren, Lena; Krull, Ivy; Zerden, Lisa de Saxe; McCarty, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    This national study of community-based addiction-treatment organizations’ (CBOs) implementation of evidence-based practices explored CBO Program Directors’ (n = 296) and clinical staff (n = 518) attitudes about the usefulness of science-based addiction treatment. Through multivariable regression modeling, the study identified that identical factors were associated with directors, and staff attitudes about the usefulness of science-based addiction treatment. For both directors and staff workin...

  5. Treatments for compulsive buying: A systematic review of the quality, effectiveness and progression of the outcome evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hague, Ben; Hall, Jo; Kellett, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    Background and aims This review appraises the progression and status of the evidence base for the treatment of compulsive buying disorder (CBD), in order to highlight what currently works and to prompt useful future research. Methods Online databases ISI Web of Knowledge, PsycINFO, and PubMed via Ovid were searched at two time points. Two quality checklists and an established model of therapy evaluation (hourglass model) evaluated the quality and progression of both psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy treatments for CBD. Uncontrolled effect sizes were calculated and meta-regression analyses were performed regarding treatment duration. Results A total of 29 articles met the inclusion criteria, which were divided into psychotherapy (n = 17) and pharmacotherapy treatments (n = 12). Of the 29 studies, only 5 studies have been tested under conditions of high methodological quality. Both forms of treatment had been evaluated in a haphazard manner across the stages of the hourglass model. Although large effects were demonstrated for group psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy, such evidence of effectiveness was undermined by poor study quality and risk of publication bias. Long-term CBD treatment was associated with improved outcome with pharmacotherapy, but not when delivering psychotherapy. Discussion Group psychotherapy currently appears the most promising treatment option for CBD. Poor methodological control and sporadic evaluation of specific treatments have slowed the generation of a convincing evidence base for CBD treatment. Defining the active ingredients of effective CBD treatment is a key research goal.

  6. Disability among Attendees with Schizophrenia in a Nigerian Hospital: Further Evidence for Integrated Rehabilitative Treatment Designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olagunju, Andrew Toyin; Adegbaju, Dapo Adebowale; Uwakwe, Richard

    2016-11-23

    Evidence-based rehabilitative treatment is constrained due to limited knowledge about disability and its related factors among individuals with schizophrenia across West Africa. This study aims to investigate the pattern of disability, and the associated factors among individuals with schizophrenia. One hundred consecutively recruited consenting participants were subjected to designed questionnaire to inquire about their demographic and illness-related variables. This was followed by the administration of Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Axis I Disorders and Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale to confirm the diagnosis of schizophrenia and rate severity of symptoms respectively in them. In addition, the World Health Organisation Disability Assessment Scale II (WHODAS-II) was used to assess for disability in all participants. Different degrees of disability based on WHODAS-II mean score of 27.02±3.49 were noted among individuals with schizophrenia, and affectation of domains of disability like self care, getting along with others, life activities and participation in the society among others were observed. In addition, high level of disability was significantly associated with younger adults in the age group 18-44 years (P=0.007), unemployment status (P=0.003), remittance source of income (P=0.034) and ethnicity (P=0.017); conversely, less number of children (P=0.033), less amount spent on treatment (Pdisability. In spite of clinical stability following treatment, individuals with schizophrenia were disabled to varied degrees, and socioeconomic as well as illness-related factors constituted important correlates. Integration of rehabilitation along with social intervention into treatment design to reduce disability is implied, and further research is also warranted.

  7. The evidence for antiresorptive osteoporosis treatment in the elderly and old

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, M; McMurdo, MET; Vestergaard, P;

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. – The mean age at diagnosis of osteoporosis is in the late 1960s, and fracture risk and need for fracture prevention rises sharply with increasing age. However, what is the evidence that supports the use of antiresorptive osteoporosis treatments in elderly people? Methods. – This study...... was a meta-analysis and meta-regression of the published literature on the clinical efficacy of antiresorptive therapy in the reduction of fracture risk in elderly (age > 70 years) and old (age > 80 years). A systematic literature search was performed. Studies included were randomised placebo controlled...... trials of post-menopausal women or men where the primary endpoint was vertebral, non-vertebral or hip fracture risk reduction. No papers on fractures in males were published, so BMD as primary endpoint was accepted. Results. – Thirteen studies in women were included. We found increasing vertebral...

  8. Treatment of chronic pain in older people: evidence-based choice of strong-acting opioids.

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    van Ojik, Annette L; Jansen, Paul A F; Brouwers, Jacobus R B J; van Roon, Eric N

    2012-08-01

    In the treatment of chronic malignant and non-malignant pain, opioids are used as strong analgesics. Frail elderly patients often have multiple co-morbidities and use multiple medicines, leading to an increased risk of clinically relevant drug-drug and drug-disease interactions. Age-related changes and increased frailty may lead to a less predictable drug response, increased drug sensitivity, and potential harmful drug effects. As a result, physicians face a complex task in prescribing medication to elderly patients. In this review, the appropriateness of the strong-acting opioids buprenorphine, fentanyl, hydromorphone, methadone, morphine, oxycodone and tapentadol is determined for use in elderly patients. Evidence-based recommendations for prescribing strong opioids to the frail elderly are presented. A literature search was performed for all individual drugs, using a validated and published set of 23 criteria concerning effectiveness, safety, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, experience, and convenience in elderly patients. First, information on the criteria was obtained from pharmaceutical reference books and a MEDLINE search. The information obtained on the individual drugs in the class of opioids was compared with the reference drug morphine. Evidence-based recommendations were formulated on the basis of the pros and cons for the frail elderly. Using the set of 23 criteria, no differentiation can be made between the appropriateness of buprenorphine, fentanyl, hydromorphone, morphine and oxycodone for use in elderly patients. Methadone has strong negative considerations in the treatment of chronic pain in the frail elderly. Methadone has a high drug-drug interaction potential and is associated with prolongation of the QT interval and a potential risk of accumulation due to a long elimination half-life. In addition, methadone is difficult to titrate because of its large inter-individual variability in pharmacokinetics, particularly in the frail elderly

  9. Diagnosis and treatment based on quantitative PCR after controlled human malaria infection

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    Jona Walk

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Controlled human malaria infection (CHMI has become well-established in the evaluation of drugs and vaccines. Anti-malarial treatment is usually initiated when thick blood smears are positive by microscopy. This study explores the effects of using the more sensitive qPCR as the primary diagnostic test. Methods 1691 diagnostic blood samples were analysed by microscopy and qPCR from 115 volunteers (55 malaria naïve and 60 having received chemoprophylaxis and sporozoite immunization who were challenged by five mosquitoes infected with Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites of the NF54 strain. Results Retrospective analysis of different qPCR criteria for diagnosis and treatment, showed that once daily qPCR (threshold 100 parasites/ml had 99 % sensitivity and 100 % specificity, and shortened the median prepatent period from 10.5 to 7.0 days after CHMI when compared to twice daily measurement of thick blood smears (threshold 4000 parasites/ml. This is expected to result in a 78 % decrease of adverse events before initiation of treatment in future studies. Trial outcome related to infection and protective efficacy remained unchanged. Conclusion The use of qPCR as the primary diagnostic test in CHMI decreases symptoms as well as parasitaemia while obviating the need for twice daily follow-up. The implementation improves safety while reducing the clinical burden and costs without compromising the evaluation of protective efficacy.

  10. Tratamento farmacológico da gagueira: evidências e controvérsias Pharmacologic treatment of stuttering: evidences and controversies

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    Camila Vila-Nova

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Este artigo tem por objetivo analisar a situação do tratamento farmacológico da gagueira, mostrando a eficácia de diferentes abordagens baseadas em drogas psiquiátricas, além de evidenciar a utilização de outros fármacos no tratamento dessa enfermidade. MÉTODOS: Revisão de literatura em base de dados Medline, utilizando os termos stuttering treatment, disfluency, disfluency treatments, botulinum toxin and stuttering treatment, botulinum toxin and disfluency treatment. RESULTADOS: Foram encontrados estudos envolvendo as seguintes drogas: citalopram + clomipramina, paroxetina, olanzapina, citalopram + alprazolam, pimozida, risperidona, tiaprida, clomipramina e desipramina, levetiracetam, divalproato de sódio, clonidina e betanecol, além de ensaios clínicos com a utilização de toxina botulínica tipo A e anestésicos. Os estudos envolvendo citalopram + clomipramina, paroxetina, olanzapina, citalopram + alprazolam, risperidona, clomipramina e desipramina, levetiracetam, divalproato de sódio, lidocaína e toxina botulínica tipo A demonstraram resultados positivos. A maioria das pesquisas relativas ao tratamento farmacológico da gagueira se restringe a estudos de caso e ensaios clínicos com pequenas amostras. CONCLUSÃO: Não existem evidências suficientes que justifiquem a utilização de um tratamento específico para a gagueira. Os estudos apresentados indicam a necessidade da realização de mais ensaios clínicos duplo-cegos e controlados com placebo envolvendo amostras maiores.OBJECTIVE: This article analyzes the pharmacologic treatment of stuttering, assessing the effectiveness of different treatments using psychiatric drugs and further evidences of other drugs in the treatment of this disorder. METHODS: Search in Medline database, using the terms stuttering treatment, disfluency, disfluency treatments, botulinum toxin and stuttering treatment, botulinum toxin and disfluency treatment. RESULTS: Studies involving

  11. Vitamin E in Sarcopenia: Current Evidences on Its Role in Prevention and Treatment

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    Shy Cian Khor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia is a geriatric syndrome that is characterized by gradual loss of muscle mass and strength with increasing age. Although the underlying mechanism is still unknown, the contribution of increased oxidative stress in advanced age has been recognized as one of the risk factors of sarcopenia. Thus, eliminating reactive oxygen species (ROS can be a strategy to combat sarcopenia. In this review, we discuss the potential role of vitamin E in the prevention and treatment of sarcopenia. Vitamin E is a lipid soluble vitamin, with potent antioxidant properties and current evidence suggesting a role in the modulation of signaling pathways. Previous studies have shown its possible beneficial effects on aging and age-related diseases. Although there are evidences suggesting an association between vitamin E and muscle health, they are still inconclusive compared to other more extensively studied chronic diseases such as neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, we reviewed the role of vitamin E and its potential protective mechanisms on muscle health based on previous and current in vitro and in vivo studies.

  12. Commentary: Hyperbaric oxygen treatment for wounds - evidence and the Sword of Damocles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laden, Gerard

    2015-12-01

    Increased access to any treatment sensibly follows the clinical and cost benefit being established. For many treatments this requires multiple, high-quality clinical trials and supporting cost analysis. Cost analysis may be applied to a single treatment or used to compare two or more treatments. Clinical efficacy and cost benefit are best scrutinised and validated by publication in the peer-reviewed literature. True peer review is most effectively achieved 'after publication' by the wider scientific community, i.e., the journal readers. However, initially an editor, usually advised by referees, is asked to make a judgment on a paper's suitability for publication. It follows that medical journals are in a position of power and responsibility. Researchers and editors know publications are currency; effectively they are the equivalent of academic bitcoins. Regarding the paper in this issue by Santema et al., the same authors, in designing a prospective randomised controlled trial (RCT) of the role of hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT) in diabetic wounds, included the name "Damocles" in that trial's title. Readers will perhaps appreciate from my comments below as a referee for the Santema et al. paper, that behind the scenes "the Sword of Damocles" (an allusion to the imminent and ever-present peril faced by those in positions of power) hangs over researchers, treating physician, journal editors and referees alike. Whilst positive about its content, upon reflection, my concern was the anticipated reception of this paper by the journal readership. This is, of course, a matter for the Editor; however, herewith is my reasoning. Further to the body of published work by Bennett et al., and others that has focused attention on the lack of good quality evidence for the use of HBOT for most indications, I think this regrettable state of affairs is now both known and accepted by mainstream healthcare purchasers and providers. I speculate that all these bodies already

  13. Evidence-based treatments for pemphigus vulgaris, pemphigus foliaceus, and bullous pemphigoid: A systematic review

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    Sanjay Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pemphigus, bullous pemphigoid, and epidermolysis bullosa acquisita are autoimmune diseases of skin associated with considerable morbidity and sometimes mortality. There is no cure for these diseases. Aims: To summarize evidence-based treatments for these diseases by performing a systematic review. Methods: The research protocol included the following steps: identification of databases to be searched, defining search strategy, searching the databases for references, first-stage screening of the abstracts, second-stage screening of full texts of articles identified after the first-stage screening, data extraction from the identified articles after second-stage screening, quality appraisal of the studies using the Delphi list, and summarizing the findings. Results: No randomized controlled trials of interventions in pemphigus vegetans, pemphigus erythematosus, and epidermolysis bullosa acquisita could be found. After the second-stage screening, 12 randomized controlled trials were analyzed, which included patients with pemphigus vulgaris or pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus, and 7 which included patients with bullous pemphigoid. Conclusions: Number of high-quality randomized controlled trials conducted on pemphigus and bullous pemphigoid is small. Oral corticosteroid along with a steroid-sparing agent appears to be the most effective treatment for pemphigus. Azathioprine may be most effective as a steroid-sparing agent. Topical corticosteroid therapy (as studied is effective for bullous pemphigoid and appears to be superior to oral corticosteroid for extensive disease. Some suggestions about future research are made.

  14. Cellulite treatment: evidence and ethics, brief history, and emphasis on current practices including liposuction

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Riese, Cornelia

    2005-04-01

    According to Taber's Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary "cellulite" is defined as: "a non-technical term for subcutaneous deposits of fat, especially in the buttocks, legs, and thighs." These deposits result in puckered, dimply skin and they are a cause for major aesthetic concerns in affected patients. The etiology of this condition is still unclear. Female predilection is witnessed in clinical practice as it is reported in the literature. It remains a subject for further studies whether it is a structural problem of connective tissue or as suggested probably related to hormonal causes. Magnetic resonance imaging may provide some answers to these questions. Not knowing what is causing this nuisance makes it almost impossible to treat. No wonder that there is little scientific validation to support any of the many treatments that are advertised on the Internet or in women's magazines. This review focuses on mechanical and microinvasive interventions that claim to alleviate "cellulite": lipoplasty, liposcultpure, liposuction, subcision, and laser. Among the parameters analyzed are the proposed modes of action of these techniques as well as adverse events and complications that may occur. Of special interest will be the evidence that backs these procedures. Extracting reliable data is hampered by methodical problems with the design of most of the published trials. In essence, at this time there is no "cure" for cellulite. Safe treatment recommendations are related to healthy life style choices that include toning exercises, dietary changes, and weight loss.

  15. A systematic review on burn scar contracture treatment: searching for evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stekelenburg, Carlijn M; Marck, Roos E; Tuinebreijer, Wim E; de Vet, Henrica C W; Ogawa, Rei; van Zuijlen, Paul P M

    2015-01-01

    Treating burn scar contracture remains a challenging problem for reconstructive surgeons. At present, no consensus exists on when to use what kind of technique. Therefore, a systematic review was performed on the effectiveness of the different surgical techniques after burn scar contracture release. Electronic databases were searched using a predefined search strategy. Studies evaluating the outcome of surgical techniques for the treatment of burn scar contractures were included. The methodological quality was tested and the data were summarized. One thousand six hundred fourty-nine papers were identified of which 17 met the inclusion criteria. Three papers reported on a controlled trial, 14 were cohort studies, including 10 of a pre-post operative design and 4 of a comparative design. The papers described outcomes of grafts, flaps with random or defined vascularization, and dermal substitutes. All studies had methodological shortcomings and most used inappropriate statistical methods. The current evidence on the effectiveness of reconstruction techniques for burn scar contractures was summarized. Due to the scarcity and low quality of the included studies, no definitive conclusions could be reached about the effectiveness of different techniques. Therefore, no direct implications for daily practice could be made. However, recommendations could be given for improvement of the quality of further primary research on the effectiveness of surgical treatment strategies for burn scar contracture release.

  16. Significance of Kampo, Japanese Traditional Medicine, in the Treatment of Obesity: Basic and Clinical Evidence

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    Jun-ichi Yamakawa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The cause of obesity includes genetic and environmental factors, including cytokines derived from adipocytes (adipo-cytokines. Although drug therapy is available for obesity, it is highly risky. Our main focus in this review is on the traditional form of Japanese medicine, Kampo, in the treated of obesity. Two Kampo formulas, that is, bofutsushosan (防風通聖散 and boiogito (防己黄耆湯, are covered by the national health insurance in Japan for the treatment of obesity. Various issues related to their action mechanisms remain unsolved. Considering these, we described the results of basic experiments and presented clinical evidence and case reports on osteoarthritis as examples of clinical application of their two Kampo medicine. Traditional medicine is used not only for treatment but also for prevention. In clinical practice, it is of great importance to prove the efficacy of combinations of traditional medicine and Western medicine and the utility of traditional medicine in the attenuation of adverse effects of Western medicine.

  17. Pharmacological treatment of opioid-induced hyperalgesia: a review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasubbu, Chitra; Gupta, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Opioids are commonly used to treat moderate to severe pain. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia is a paradoxical response to opioid agonists resulting in an increased perception of pain rather than an antinociceptive effect. Even though there is a debate regarding its clinical relevance, it is becoming a challenge in both acute and chronic pain settings. The study of opioid-induced hyperalgesia is an emerging field with multiple challenges faced by investigators with regard to defining the diagnosis and characterizing the findings. The objective of this study was to review the preliminary evidence related to the treatment and management of opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Lack of data, small patient numbers, short-term follow-up, and variations in study design limited the review. With the literature on this subject being sparse, this study attempts to provide a preliminary look at the available data and to set the stage for an eventual meta-analysis. Case reports in the literature have shown success with various pharmacological interventions. Possible treatment regimens include ketamine, dextromethorphan, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), opioid switching, amantadine, buprenorphine, α(2) agonists, and methadone. These agents are briefly discussed in this paper. Further well-designed, placebo-controlled trials are needed to assess the effectiveness of the interventions investigated in this review.

  18. Dulaglutide: an evidence-based review of its potential in the treatment of type 2 diabetes

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    Edwards KL

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Krystal L Edwards,1 Molly G Minze2 1Ambulatory Care Division, Department of Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Dallas, TX, USA; 2Ambulatory Care Division, Department of Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Abilene, TX, USA Introduction: As the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is anticipated to continue to rise worldwide, so too are the treatment options also continuing to expand. Current guidelines recommend individualized treatment plans which allow for provider choice and diversity of pharmacotherapeutic regimens. The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist (GLP-1 RA class is rapidly expanding, with dulaglutide (Trulicity™ as a once-weekly agent recently approved. Aims: This article examines the evidence currently available on the efficacy and safety of dulaglutide for use in T2DM. Evidence review: Dulaglutide has been shown to have similar efficacy and safety to other newer GLP-1 RAs, and better glycemic control than placebo. It lowers glycated hemoglobin (A1c, fasting and postprandial glucose levels, and promotes weight loss when used as first-, second-, or third-line therapy. It has also been shown to improve β-cell function and provide cardiovascular benefits, such as lower blood pressure and improved lipid levels. Dulaglutide also has a low risk for hypoglycemia and a similar adverse effect profile to other GLP-1 RAs in the class, with transient gastrointestinal problems and potential risk for pancreatitis. Place in therapy: While long-term data on safety and efficacy are forthcoming, dulaglutide is positioned to be placed at the same level as other GLP-1 RAs in the class: as second-line therapy in addition to diet and exercise in those patients who cannot achieve glycemic control on monotherapy metformin. It may also be useful as first-line therapy instead of metformin. Conclusion: Dulaglutide is a once-weekly GLP-1 RA

  19. Spotlight on sirukumab for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: the evidence to date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzerini, Pietro Enea; Capecchi, Pier Leopoldo; Guidelli, Giacomo Maria; Selvi, Enrico; Acampa, Maurizio; Laghi-Pasini, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease primarily affecting synovial joints and is characterized by persistent high-grade systemic inflammation. Proinflammatory cytokines, particularly interleukin-6 (IL-6), are of crucial importance in the pathogenesis of the disease, driving both joint inflammation and extra-articular comorbidities. Tocilizumab, a humanized IL-6 receptor-inhibiting monoclonal antibody, has been the first, and, to date, the only, IL-6 inhibitor approved for the treatment of RA. Many studies have demonstrated the potency and effectiveness of tocilizumab in controlling disease activity and radiological progression of RA. These successful results have encouraged the development of novel IL-6 inhibitors, among which a promising agent is sirukumab (SRK), a human anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibody currently under evaluation in Phase II/III studies in patients with RA, systemic lupus erythematosus, giant-cell arteritis, and major depressive disorder. The evidence to date indicates SRK as an effective and well-tolerated new therapeutic tool for patients with active RA, with some preliminary data suggesting a specific beneficial impact on relevant systemic complications associated with the disease, such as depression and cardiovascular disease. Conversely, although pathophysiological considerations make plausible the hypothesis that IL-6 blockade with SRK may also be beneficial in the treatment of many diseases other than RA (either autoimmune or not), available clinical data in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus do not seem to support this view, also giving rise to potentially relevant concerns about drug safety. If large Phase III clinical trials currently in progress in patients with RA confirm the efficacy and tolerability of SRK, then in the long term, this drug could, in the near future, occupy a place in the treatment of the disease, potentially also opening the doors to a more extended use of SRK in a wide range of

  20. Choice of antipsychotic treatment by European psychiatry trainees: are decisions based on evidence?

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    Jauhar Sameer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the factors influencing treatment choice in psychosis, the majority of this work being conducted with specialists (consultant in psychiatry. We sought to examine trainees' choices of treatment for psychosis if they had to prescribe it for themselves, their patients, and factors influencing decision-making. Methods Cross-sectional, semi-structured questionnaire-based study. Results Of the 726 respondents (response rate = 66%, the majority chose second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs if they had to prescribe it for themselves (n = 530, 93% or for their patients (n = 546, 94%. The main factor influencing choice was perceived efficacy, 84.8% (n = 475 of trainees stating this was the most important factor for the patient, and 77.8% (n = 404 stating this was the most important factor for their own treatment. Trainees with knowledge of trials questioning use of SGAs (CATIE, CUtLASS, TEOSS were more likely to choose second-generation antipsychotics than those without knowledge of these trials (χ2 = 3.943; p = 0.047; O.R. = 2.11; 95% C.I. = 1.0-4.48. Regarding psychotherapy, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT was the most popular choice for self (33.1%; n = 240 and patient (30.9%; n = 224. Trainees were significantly more likely to prefer some form of psychotherapy for themselves rather than patients (χ2 = 9.98; p Conclusions Trainees are more likely to choose second-generation antipsychotic medication for patients and themselves. Despite being aware of evidence that suggests otherwise, they predominantly base these choices on perceived efficacy.

  1. Panitumumab: the evidence for its use in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossana Berardi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Rossana Berardi1, Azzurra Onofri2, Mirco Pistelli2, Elena Maccaroni2, Mario Scartozzi1, Chiara Pierantoni1, Stefano Cascinu11Clinica di Oncologia Medica, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ospedali Riuniti Umberto I-GM Lancisi-G Salesi di Ancona, Italy; 2Scuola di Specializzazione in Oncologia Medica, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, ItalyAbstract: Panitumumab is the first fully human monoclonal antibody to Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR to enter clinical trials for the treatment of solid tumors. The anti-tumor activity of panitumumab has been tested in vitro and in vivo, and inhibition of tumor growth has been observed in numerous cancer models, particularly lung, kidney and colorectal (CRC. Preclinical and clinical studies have established a role for panitumumab in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC refractory to multiple chemotherapeutic regimens. Based on these encouraging findings, panitumumab was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of patients with epidermal growth factor receptor-expressing mCRC refractory to fluoropyrimidine-, oxaliplatin-, and/or irinotecan-containing chemotherapeutic regimens. The improvement in progression free survival (PFS and response rate (RR produced by panitumumab monotherapy was significantly greater in patients with non mutated (wild-type K-RAS than in those with mutant K-RAS. Therefore implementing routine K-RAS screening and limiting the use of EGFR inhibitors to patients with wild-type K-RAS appears the better strategy for select only the patients who could benefit from the therapy with panitumumab and also may have the potential for cost savings. The purpose of this review was to evaluate the patient-related, disease-related and economic-related evidence for the use of panitumumab in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer in clinical practice.Keywords: colorectal cancer, EGFR; K-RAS, panitumumab 

  2. Dutasteride: an evidence-based review of its clinical impact in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia

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    Andrew Thomson

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Andrew ThomsonCore Medical Publishing, Knutsford, UKIntroduction: Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH is a common condition affecting older men. Bothersome symptoms can progress to serious complications such as acute urinary retention (AUR requiring surgical intervention. Dutasteride, a dual 5-alfa-reductase (5AR inhibitor (5ARI, is a recently introduced therapy for the treatment of BPH. Aims: The objective of this article is to review the evidence for the treatment of BPH with dutasteride. Evidence review: Evidence from large clinical studies shows that men with an enlarged prostate achieve a measurable decrease in prostate volume by up to 26% after 4 years of treatment with dutasteride and urinary symptoms improve after 6 months of treatment. This is achieved by rapid suppression (through inhibition of 5AR of the principal androgen (dihydrotestosterone or DHT responsible for stimulating prostatic growth. Evidence suggests that dutasteride treatment results in a reduction in risk (rather than delay of the most serious complications including episodes of AUR and the need for BPH-related surgery. Early symptom relief has been achieved with the combination of an alfa blocker and dutasteride. There is good evidence that dutasteride is well tolerated; side effects limited to sexual dysfunction (reduced libido, impotence, and gynecomastia are more common compared with placebo but occur with a similar incidence to finasteride, another 5ARI. No pharmacoeconomic evidence from studies with dutasteride has so far been published.Clinical value: In conclusion, dutasteride is a valuable treatment option in men with moderate to severe BPH. Reductions in prostate volume lead to symptom relief and serious complications appear to be reduced.Key words: dutasteride, evidence-based review, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH, 5-alfa-reductase inhibitor

  3. Perceptions and Attitudes of Resident Doctors about Malaria Treatment as Per National Drug Policy on Malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanshyam Ahir, D V Bala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The involvement of public and private health care providers in malaria treatment, particularly understanding their knowledge and practices will aid in devising strategies to increase the rational use of antimalarial drugs. They should be aware about rationale and implement national drug policy on malaria to prevent morbidity and mortality of malaria as well as development of antimalarial drug resistance. Therefore, a study was planned on the same issue among resident doctors of a tertiary care teaching hospital. Objective: To study the perceptions and attitudes of resident doctors regarding use of anti malarial drugs for treatment of all types of malaria cases in accordance with national drug policy on malaria-2010. Methodology: This cross-sectional study was conducted at tertiary care teaching hospital with sixty four (64 resident doctors of medicine (24, pediatrics (24 and obstetrics (16 departments with the help of pre tested; semi-structured questionnaire based on national drug policy on malaria-2010 from 15th July to 30th August 2010. Results: Only 12 (18.8% residents were aware about drug policy. Dose and duration and indication of primaquine was known to 21 (32.8% of resident doctors. Artesunate (49.2% and Arteether (16.9% were commonly prescribed in case of uncomplicated P.falciparum and P.vivax malaria. Conclusion: It was noticeable that knowledge and awareness regarding drug policy among resident doctors was unsatisfactory. Regular sensitization programme on malaria drug policy should be conducted.

  4. Enzalutamide: an evidence-based review of its use in the treatment of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golshayan AR

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Ali R Golshayan,1 Emmanuel S Antonarakis21Division of Hematology/Oncology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA; 2Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD, USAIntroduction: Enzalutamide is an oral androgen receptor (AR signaling inhibitor that was specifically engineered to overcome castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC harboring AR amplification or overexpression. Enzalutamide has demonstrated significant activity in men with metastatic CRPC.Aims: To update the evidence and provide an overview of the available data on enzalutamide.Evidence review: Peer reviewed articles published and listed in Medline Search were reviewed. In addition, relevant ASCO and ESMO abstracts were searched. The activity of enzalutamide is mediated by potently antagonizing the full-length AR, impairing translocation of the AR from the cytoplasm into the nucleus, and inhibiting the transcriptional activity of the AR by modulating the interaction of the AR with androgen-response elements in gene promoter regions. Enzalutamide has a favorable safety profile and the most common adverse events include fatigue, hot flashes and headache; 1% of patients experienced seizure. Place in Therapy: The AFFIRM phase III study evaluated the clinical utility of treatment with enzalutamide in men with docetaxel-refractory metastatic CRPC. Enzalutamide improved overall survival compared to placebo, with a median overall survival of 18.4 months versus 13.6 months respectively.Conclusion: Enzalutamide has demonstrated impressive efficacy in men with metastatic CRPC, moving swiftly from a phase I/II study to two pivotal phase III trials testing this agent in both chemotherapy-pretreated as well as chemotherapy-naïve CRPC patients. Ongoing studies are aiming to explore the utility of enzalutamide in earlier stages of the disease, and to investigate the optimal sequencing and combination of enzalutamide with other standard and novel

  5. [Prevention and treatment of the complications of polycystic ovarian syndrome--the significance of evidence-based, interdisciplinary management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gődény, Sándor; Csenteri, Orsolya Karola

    2015-12-13

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is the most common hormonal and metabolic disorder likely to affect women. The syndrome is often associated with obesity, hyperinsulinemia and adversely affects endocrine, metabolic, and cardiovascular health. The complex feature of the syndrome requires an interdisciplinary approach to treatment, where cooperation of paediatrician, internist, gynaecologist, endocrinologist, dermatologist, psychologist and oncologist is essential. The prevention and the treatment should be based on the best available evidence. This should include physical examination, laboratory tests for hormones, serum insulin, glucose, lipids, in addition patient's preferences should be considered, too. To maximise health gain of polycystic ovarian syndrome, adequate, effective, efficient and safe treatment is necessary. This article summarises the highest available evidence provided by meta-analyses and systematic reviews of the prevention of metabolic and cardiovascular complications of the syndrome, and discusses the relevant evidence published in the literature.

  6. Managing symptoms during cancer treatments: evaluating the implementation of evidence-informed remote support protocols

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    Stacey Dawn

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Management of cancer treatment-related symptoms is an important safety issue given that symptoms can become life-threatening and often occur when patients are at home. With funding from the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer, a pan-Canadian steering committee was established with representation from eight provinces to develop symptom protocols using a rigorous methodology (CAN-IMPLEMENT©. Each protocol is based on a systematic review of the literature to identify relevant clinical practice guidelines. Protocols were validated by cancer nurses from across Canada. The aim of this study is to build an effective and sustainable approach for implementing evidence-informed protocols for nurses to use when providing remote symptom assessment, triage, and guidance in self-management for patients experiencing symptoms while undergoing cancer treatments. Methods A prospective mixed-methods study design will be used. Guided by the Knowledge to Action Framework, the study will involve (a establishing an advisory knowledge user team in each of three targeted settings; (b assessing factors influencing nurses’ use of protocols using interviews/focus groups and a standardized survey instrument; (c adapting protocols for local use, ensuring fidelity of the content; (d selecting intervention strategies to overcome known barriers and implementing the protocols; (e conducting think-aloud usability testing; (f evaluating protocol use and outcomes by conducting an audit of 100 randomly selected charts at each of the three settings; and (g assessing satisfaction with remote support using symptom protocols and change in nurses’ barriers to use using survey instruments. The primary outcome is sustained use of the protocols, defined as use in 75% of the calls. Descriptive analysis will be conducted for the barriers, use of protocols, and chart audit outcomes. Content analysis will be conducted on interviews/focus groups and usability testing

  7. Consistency with evidence-based treatments and perceived effectiveness of children’s community-based care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fettes, Danielle L.; Garcia, Antonio R.; Brookman-Frazee, Lauren; Garland, Ann F.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined whether delivery of psychotherapeutic strategies consistent with common elements of evidence-based (EB) treatments for child disruptive behavior problems was associated with parents' report of treatment effectiveness. The intensity of delivery of practice elements consistent with EB treatments was coded from a random sample of 538 videotaped psychotherapy sessions with 157 children/families and 75 therapists from six community-based clinics. Multilevel regression analyses tested whether intensity of EB practice elements was associated with parents' report of treatment effectiveness after four months, controlling for intensity of other practice elements. Results indicate parents reported greater perceived treatment effectiveness when community-based treatment included more intensive delivery of practice elements consistent with EB treatments to children. These findings may reassure providers about the acceptability of EB practice elements and may motivate efforts to integrate EB practice elements more intensively into community-based care. PMID:23296551

  8. Profile of pridopidine and its potential in the treatment of Huntington disease: the evidence to date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squitieri, Ferdinando; de Yebenes, Justo Garcia

    2015-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a chronic, genetic, neurodegenerative disease for which there is no cure. The main symptoms of HD are abnormal involuntary movements (chorea and dystonia), impaired voluntary movements (ie, incoordination and gait balance), progressive cognitive decline, and psychiatric disturbances. HD is caused by a CAG-repeat expanded mutation in the HTT gene, which encodes the huntingtin protein. The inherited mutation results in the production of an elongated polyQ mutant huntingtin protein (mHtt). The cellular functions of the Htt protein are not yet fully understood, but the functions of its mutant variant are thought to include alteration of gene transcription and energy production, and dysregulation of neurotransmitter metabolism, receptors, and growth factors. The phenylpiperidines pridopidine (4-[3-methanesulfonyl-phenyl]-1-propyl-piperidine; formerly known as ACR16) and OSU6162 ([S]-[-]-3-[3-methane [sulfonyl-phenyl]-1-propyl-piperidine) are members of a new class of pharmacologic agents known as "dopamine stabilizers". Recent clinical trials have highlighted the potential of pridopidine for symptomatic treatment of patients with HD. More recently, the analysis of HD models (ie, in vitro and in mice) highlighted previously unknown effects of pridopidine (increase in brain-derived neurotrophic factor, reduction in mHtt levels, and σ-1 receptor binding and modulation). These additional functions of pridopidine suggest it might be a neuroprotective and disease-modifying drug. Data from ongoing clinical trials of pridopidine will help define its place in the treatment of HD. This commentary examines the available preclinical and clinical evidence regarding the use of pridopidine in HD.

  9. [Orthobiologic treatment with platelet-rich plasma: is there sufficient evidence for its recommendation?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizcaíno, Gilberto

    2016-03-01

    In recent years there has been a boom in the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) as an orthobiology (therapy based on cell biological agents) material agent. The presence of growth factors and other bioactive agents stored in alpha platelet granules and whose properties are well determined in cell proliferation, angiogenesis and extracellular matrix formation have involved the PRP containing supraphysiological concentrations of autologous platelets in tissue regeneration processes. The relative ease of preparation of PRP, its generally ambulatory application, the almost complete absence of side effects and the possibility to observe satisfactory results of clinical improvement makes the PRP a promising treatment in regenerative processes. However, there is still a lack of knowledge of the mechanism of action of the PRP, creating skepticism regarding their use and potential efficacy. Caution should be taken until the clinical evidence is stablished. On this subject some questions that should be answered in future research are listed below: What is the optimal preparation of PRP? What is the most effective method for the activation of PRP? Which is better, the use of total PRP or only the platelet growth factors? And finally, what pathological conditions should be chosen for the routine application of PRP? The answers to these questions through well-designed studies and systematic reviews by experts, would lead to the routine use of PRP as the recommended treatment. As final conclusion, the AAOS (The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons) made a consideration that today is still valid: in a Forum in 2011 concluded that "the PRP is an option that has not yet been proven."

  10. Evidence for Distinguishable Treatment Costs among Paranoid Schizophrenia and Schizoaffective Disorder.

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    Dusan Hirjak

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia spectrum disorders result in enormous individual suffering and financial burden on patients and on society. In Germany, there are about 1,000,000 individuals suffering from schizophrenia (SZ or schizoaffective disorder (SAD, a combination of psychotic and affective symptoms. Given the heterogeneous nature of these syndromes, one may assume that there is a difference in treatment costs among patients with paranoid SZ and SAD. However, the current the national system of cost accounting in psychiatry and psychosomatics in Germany assesses all schizophrenia spectrum disorders within one category.The study comprised a retrospective audit of data from 118 patients diagnosed with paranoid SZ (F20.0 and 71 patients with SAD (F25. We used the mean total costs as well as partial cost, i.e., mean costs for medication products, mean personal costs and mean infrastructure costs from each patient for the statistical analysis. We tested for differences in the four variables between SZ and SAD patients using ANCOVA and confirmed the results with bootstrapping.SAD patients had a longer duration of stay than patients with SZ (p = .02. Mean total costs were significantly higher for SAD patients (p = .023. Further, we found a significant difference in mean personnel costs (p = .02 between patients with SZ and SAD. However, we found no significant differences in mean pharmaceutical costs (p = .12 but a marginal difference of mean infrastructure costs (p = .05 between SZ and SAD. We found neither a common decrease of costs over time nor a differential decrease in SZ and SAD.We found evidence for a difference of case related costs of inpatient treatments for paranoid SZ and SAD. The differences in mean total costs seem to be primarily related to the mean personnel costs in patients with paranoid SZ and SAD rather than mean pharmaceutical costs, possibly due to higher personnel effort and infrastructure.

  11. Irritable bowel syndrome: pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, and evidence-based medicine.

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    Saha, Lekha

    2014-06-14

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic and debilitating functional gastrointestinal disorder that affects 9%-23% of the population across the world. The percentage of patients seeking health care related to IBS approaches 12% in primary care practices and is by far the largest subgroup seen in gastroenterology clinics. It has been well documented that these patients exhibit a poorer quality of life and utilize the health care system to a greater degree than patients without this diagnosis. The pathophysiology of IBS is not clear. Many theories have been put forward, but the exact cause of IBS is still uncertain. According to the updated ROME III criteria, IBS is a clinical diagnosis and presents as one of the three predominant subtypes: (1) IBS with constipation (IBS-C); (2) IBS with diarrhea (IBS-D); and (3) mixed IBS (IBS-M); former ROME definitions refer to IBS-M as alternating IBS (IBS-A). Across the IBS subtypes, the presentation of symptoms may vary among patients and change over time. Patients report the most distressing symptoms to be abdominal pain, straining, myalgias, urgency, bloating and feelings of serious illness. The complexity and diversity of IBS presentation makes treatment difficult. Although there are reviews and guidelines for treating IBS, they focus on the efficacy of medications for IBS symptoms using high-priority endpoints, leaving those of lower priority largely unreported. Therefore, the aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive evidence-based review of the diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment to guide clinicians diagnosing and treating their patients.

  12. Refractory Hypertension: Evidence of Heightened Sympathetic Activity as a Cause of Antihypertensive Treatment Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudenbostel, Tanja; Acelajado, Maria C; Pisoni, Roberto; Li, Peng; Oparil, Suzanne; Calhoun, David A

    2015-07-01

    Refractory hypertension is an extreme phenotype of treatment failure defined as uncontrolled blood pressure in spite of ≥5 classes of antihypertensive agents, including chlorthalidone and a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist. A prospective evaluation of possible mechanisms of refractory hypertension has not been done. The goal of this study was to test for evidence of heightened sympathetic tone as indicated by 24-hour urinary normetanephrine levels, clinic and ambulatory heart rate (HR), HR variability, arterial stiffness as indexed by pulse wave velocity, and systemic vascular resistance compared with patients with controlled resistant hypertension. Forty-four consecutive patients, 15 with refractory and 29 with controlled resistant hypertension, were evaluated prospectively. Refractory hypertensive patients were younger (48±13.3 versus 56.5±14.1 years; P=0.038) and more likely women (80.0 versus 51.9%; P=0.047) compared with patients with controlled resistant hypertension. They also had higher urinary normetanephrine levels (464.4±250.2 versus 309.8±147.6 µg per 24 hours; P=0.03), higher clinic HR (77.8±7.7 versus 68.8±7.6 bpm; P=0.001) and 24-hour ambulatory HR (77.8±7.7 versus 68.8±7.6; P=0.0018), higher pulse wave velocity (11.8±2.2 versus 9.4±1.5 m/s; P=0.009), reduced HR variability (4.48 versus 6.11; P=0.03), and higher systemic vascular resistance (3795±1753 versus 2382±349 dyne·s·cm(5)·m(2); P=0.008). These findings are consistent with heightened sympathetic tone being a major contributor to antihypertensive treatment failure and highlight the need for effective sympatholytic therapies in patients with refractory hypertension.

  13. Saxagliptin: the evidence for its place in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Kulasa

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Kristen Kulasa1, Steven Edelman21Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, VA San Diego Healthcare System, University of California, USA; 2Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism Veterans Affairs Medical Center, University of California, San Diego, California, USAIntroduction: The worldwide prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is high, and the chronically poor metabolic control that can result from T2DM is associated with a high risk for microvascular and macrovascular complications. Because of the progressive pathophysiology of T2DM, oral antidiabetic agents often fail to provide sustained glycemic control, indicating the need for new therapies. Saxagliptin (Onglyza™; Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Princeton, NJ, USA; AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Wilmington, DE, USA is an oral dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, recently approved for the treatment of T2DM.Evidence review: Saxagliptin significantly improves glycemic control vs placebo, as demonstrated by decreasing glycated hemoglobin, fasting plasma glucose, and postprandial plasma glucose levels when used as monotherapy; in initial combination with metformin; and as add-on therapy with metformin, sulfonylurea (SU, or thiazolidinedione (TZD. Saxagliptin also significantly improves β-cell function, is weight neutral, has a low risk for hypoglycemia, and has been shown to have cardiovascular safety.Place in therapy: The clinical profile for saxagliptin indicates that it is useful as an adjunct to diet and exercise as first-line monotherapy and in combination with metformin; or as add-on treatment for patients who cannot achieve glycemic control with a combination of diet and lifestyle changes and metformin, SU, or TZD.Keywords: dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitor, GLP-1, HbA1c, incretin, saxagliptin

  14. Treatment of Fibromyalgia Syndrome: Recommendations of Recent Evidence-Based Interdisciplinary Guidelines with Special Emphasis on Complementary and Alternative Therapies

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    Jacob Ablin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Current evidence indicates that there is no single ideal treatment for fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS. First choice treatment options remain debatable, especially concerning the importance of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM treatments. Methods. Three evidence-based interdisciplinary guidelines on FMS in Canada, Germany, and Israel were compared for their first choice and CAM-recommendations. Results. All three guidelines emphasized a patient-tailored approach according to the key symptoms. Aerobic exercise, cognitive behavioral therapy, and multicomponent therapy were first choice treatments. The guidelines differed in the grade of recommendation for drug treatment. Anticonvulsants (gabapentin, pregabalin and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (duloxetine, milnacipran were strongly recommended by the Canadian and the Israeli guidelines. These drugs received only a weak recommendation by the German guideline. In consideration of CAM-treatments, acupuncture, hypnosis/guided imagery, and Tai Chi were recommended by the German and Israeli guidelines. The Canadian guidelines did not recommend any CAM therapy. Discussion. Recent evidence-based interdisciplinary guidelines concur on the importance of treatment tailored to the individual patient and further emphasize the need of self-management strategies (exercise, and psychological techniques.

  15. Evidence-based diagnosis and treatment of chronic urticaria/angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, David M

    2014-01-01

    Chronic urticaria/angioedema (CUA) continues to be a vexing condition for both patients and health care providers. Despite progress made in recent years to improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of CUA and its treatment, many patients continue to experience ongoing symptoms and impaired quality of life. In the overwhelming majority of cases, a definite etiology is not identified. Laboratory testing may be justified based on its "reassurance value"; however, extensive routine testing is not favorable from a cost-benefit standpoint and does not lead to improved patient care outcomes. The target for effective management is to control CUA with a combination of avoidance measures, lifestyle changes, and regular administration of medication. A step-care approach to pharmacologic management that is favorable from the standpoint of balancing the potential for benefit with the potential for harm can lead to substantial improvement in quality of life. This article will focus on achieving improved outcomes for patients with CUA based on evidence-directed recommendations for diagnosis and management.

  16. Neglected evidence in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and the importance of early diagnosis and treatment

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    Vincent Cottin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, some facts or concepts based on substantial evidence, whilst implicit for learned subspecialists, have previously been neglected and/or not explicitly formulated or made accessible to a wider audience. IPF is strongly associated with cigarette smoking and is predominantly a disease of ageing. However, its cause(s remain elusive and, thus, it is one of the most challenging diseases for the development of novel effective and safe therapies. With the approval of pirfenidone for patients with mild-to-moderate IPF, an earlier diagnosis of IPF is a prerequisite for earlier treatment and, potentially, improvement of the long-term clinical outcome of this progressive and ultimately fatal disease. An earlier diagnosis may be achieved in IPF by promoting thin-slice chest high-resolution computed tomography screening of interstitial lung disease as a “by-product” of large-scale lung cancer screening strategies in smokers, but other techniques, which have been neglected in the past, are now available. Lung auscultation and early identification of “velcro” crackles has been proposed as a key component of early diagnosis of IPF. An ongoing study is exploring correlations between lung sounds on auscultation obtained using electronic stethoscopes and high-resolution computed tomography patterns.

  17. Dietary treatment of colic caused by excess gas in infants: Biochemical evidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dámaso Infante; Oscar Segarra; Bernard Le Luyer

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the impact of feeding colicky infants with an adapted formula on the hydrogen breath test and clinical symptoms. METHODS: Hydrogen expiration was measured by SC MicroLyzer gas chromatography at inclusion and 15 d after treatment with an adapted low-lactose formula in 20 colicky infants. RESULTS: All babies were symptomatic: 85% with excess gas, 75% with abnormal feeding pattern, and 85% with excessive crying. The hydrogen breath test at inclusion was abnormal: 35 ± 3.1 ppm. After 15 d feeding with an adapted low-lactose formula, crying and flatulence decreased in 85% of patients (P < 0.001). For infants in whom no decrease of gas was reported, crying was still reduced (P < 0.01). Moreover, the feeding pattern was improved in 50% of infants when it was initially considered as abnormal. Finally, the hydrogen breath test decreased significantly (10 ± 2.5 ppm, P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: This study showed an association between clinical improvement and evidence of decreased levels of hydrogen when the infants were fed with a specially designed, low-lactose formula.

  18. Suicidality in schizophrenia: a review of the evidence for risk factors and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Herbert Y

    2002-08-01

    Suicide is a major contributor to the morbidity and mortality of schizophrenia, accounting for approximately 10% of deaths in these patients. The known risk factors for suicide in schizophrenia include prior suicide attempts, substance abuse, male sex, onset during first decade of illness, social isolation, depression, and feelings of hopelessness. There is significant evidence suggesting that clozapine reduces the suicide rate in patients with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. Possible factors that lead to a decrease in suicidality with clozapine include the following: a direct antidepressant action, improved cognitive function and insight, diminished negative symptoms, reduced substance abuse, and improved compliance. These effects may converge or lessen feelings of hopelessness and more of its converse optimism. The International Suicide Prevention Trial (InterSePT) is a large prospective, 2-year randomized trial of the comparative effects of clozapine and olanzapine involving 980 patients at high risk for suicide in 11 countries in 56 sites. The study included complete freedom to augment these treatments if needed, blinded ratings, a blinded Suicide Monitoring Board, and equivalent clinical contact. The results support the superiority of clozapine over olanzapine to reduce the risk of suicidality and suggest its use should be considered for all patients with schizophrenia with high risk for suicide.

  19. Renal sympathetic denervation for treatment of patients with heart failure: summary of the available evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nammas, Wail; Koistinen, Juhani; Paana, Tuomas; Karjalainen, Pasi P

    2017-02-10

    Heart failure syndrome results from compensatory mechanisms that operate to restore - back to normal - the systemic perfusion pressure. Sympathetic overactivity plays a pivotal role in heart failure; norepinephrine contributes to maintenance of the systemic blood pressure and increasing preload. Cardiac norepinephrine spillover increases in patients with heart failure; norepinephrine exerts direct toxicity on cardiac myocytes resulting in a decrease of synthetic activity and/or viability. Importantly, cardiac norepinephrine spillover is a powerful predictor of mortality in patients with moderate to severe HF. This provided the rationale for trials that demonstrated survival benefit associated with the use of beta adrenergic blockers in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. Nevertheless, the MOXCON trial demonstrated that rapid uptitration of moxonidine (inhibitor of central sympathetic outflow) in patients with heart failure was associated with excess mortality and morbidity, despite reduction of plasma norepinephrine. Interestingly, renal norepinephrine spillover was the only independent predictor of adverse outcome in patients with heart failure, in multivariable analysis. Recently, renal sympathetic denervation has emerged as a novel approach for control of blood pressure in patients with treatment-resistant hypertension. This article summarizes the available evidence for the effect of renal sympathetic denervation in the setting of heart failure. Key messages Experimental studies supported a beneficial effect of renal sympathetic denervation in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. Clinical studies demonstrated improvement of symptoms, and left ventricular function. In heart failure and preserved ejection fraction, renal sympathetic denervation is associated with improvement of surrogate endpoints.

  20. Comparing Client Outcomes for Two Evidence-Based Treatment Consultation Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funderburk, Beverly; Chaffin, Mark; Bard, Elizabeth; Shanley, Jenelle; Bard, David; Berliner, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Posttraining expert case consultation is a key component of transporting and scaling up evidence-based treatments, and hopefully retaining their efficacy. Live practice observation and in vivo coaching is a strategy used in academic training environments, but is rarely feasible in field settings. Post hoc telephone consultation is a substitute strategy but does not approximate many aspects of live coaching. Live video technology offers a closer approximation but has not yet been sufficiently tested. Using a roll-out experimental design, this study compared client outcomes across doses of two posttraining expert consultation strategies-standard telephone consultation and live video coaching. The study was conducted during a two-state, 30-agency implementation involving 80 therapists and 330 cases receiving Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT). Child behavior problems fell from well above to below clinical cutoff values, with about a 1 standard deviation improvement in 14 sessions, which is within the range reported in laboratory efficacy trials. Symptom improvement was augmented by increased therapist dose of live video consultations. Phone consultation dose had no association with client level outcomes. PCIT benefits appear to be retained when the model is transported at scale into the field, and live video consultation appeared to offer small but significant advantages over telephone consultation as one element of an overall transport strategy.

  1. Herbal Medicine for the Treatment of Vascular Dementia: An Overview of Scientific Evidence

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    Dennis Chang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dementia is a leading cause of mental and physical disability. Vascular dementia (VaD is the second most common cause of dementia after Alzheimer’s disease (AD constituting 10–15% of the dementia population. Currently there are no approved pharmaceutical options for VaD and the conventional anti-AD therapies provide only modest, short-term relief of symptoms associated with VaD. Herbal medicines have been used for the management of dementia-like symptoms for centuries and may provide viable therapies for VaD due to their multicomponent and multitarget approach. This review is designed to provide an updated overview on the current status of herbal medicine research, with an emphasis on Chinese herbal medicine, for the treatment of VaD or dementia. A case study is also provided to demonstrate the development process of a novel standardized complex herbal formulation for VaD. The article reveals some preliminary evidence to support the use of single and complex herbal preparations for VaD and dementia. Multiple issues in relation to clinical and preclinical research have been identified and future research directions are discussed.

  2. Preclinical evidences toward the use of triterpenoid CDDO-Me for solid cancer prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Yang; Zhe, Hong; Zhao, Ren

    2014-02-20

    Solid cancer remains a major cause of death in the world. As limited treatment options are currently available to patients with solid cancer, novel preventive control and effective therapeutic approaches are considered to be reasonable and decisive measures to combat this disease. The plant-derived triterpenoids, commonly used for medicinal purposes in many Asian countries, poses various pharmacological properties. A large number of triterpenoids exhibit cytotoxicity against a variety of cancer cells, and cancer preventive, as well as anticancer efficacy in preclinical animal models. To improve antitumor activity, some synthetic triterpenoid derivatives have been synthesized, including cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)- dien-28-oic (CDDO), its methyl ester (CDDO-Me), and imidazolide (CDDO-Im) derivatives. In this review, we will critically examine the current preclinical evidences of cancer preventive and therapeutic activity about one of the synthetic triterpenoids, CDDO-Me. Both in vitro and in vivo effects of this agent and related molecular mechanisms are presented.

  3. Stroke treatment in Stroke Unit: from scientific evidences to clinical practice

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    Michele Stornello

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: In themanagement of stroke disease, evidences fromthe literature demonstrate that the introduction of stroke units, hospital wards with dedicated beds providing intensive care within 48 hours of symptoms’ onset, produced a real improvement in the outcome, reducing in-hospital fatality cases and increasing the proportion of patients independently living in long term follow-up. Discussion: The article focuses on stroke disease-management, suggesting a stroke integrated approach for the admission of patients on dedicated beds, in order to extend the ‘‘stroke care’’ approach outcomes to as many hospitals as possible in Italy. This approach implies the set up of a stroke network for an effective patients’ stratification according to the severity of the illness at debut; the set up of an integrated team of specialists in hospital management of the acute phase (first 48 hours and a timely rehabilitation treatment. Ultimately the hospital should be organized according to department’s semi-intensive areas in order to assure to the patients, in the early stage of the disease, a timely high intensity care aimed to improve the long term outcome.

  4. Herbal Medicine for the Treatment of Vascular Dementia: An Overview of Scientific Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianxun; Bilinski, Kellie; Xu, Li; Seto, Sai W.

    2016-01-01

    Dementia is a leading cause of mental and physical disability. Vascular dementia (VaD) is the second most common cause of dementia after Alzheimer's disease (AD) constituting 10–15% of the dementia population. Currently there are no approved pharmaceutical options for VaD and the conventional anti-AD therapies provide only modest, short-term relief of symptoms associated with VaD. Herbal medicines have been used for the management of dementia-like symptoms for centuries and may provide viable therapies for VaD due to their multicomponent and multitarget approach. This review is designed to provide an updated overview on the current status of herbal medicine research, with an emphasis on Chinese herbal medicine, for the treatment of VaD or dementia. A case study is also provided to demonstrate the development process of a novel standardized complex herbal formulation for VaD. The article reveals some preliminary evidence to support the use of single and complex herbal preparations for VaD and dementia. Multiple issues in relation to clinical and preclinical research have been identified and future research directions are discussed. PMID:28115971

  5. Spotlight on sirukumab for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: the evidence to date

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    Lazzerini PE

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Pietro Enea Lazzerini,1 Pier Leopoldo Capecchi,1 Giacomo Maria Guidelli,1 Enrico Selvi,1 Maurizio Acampa,2 Franco Laghi-Pasini1 1Department of Medical Sciences, Surgery and Neurosciences, University of Siena, 2Stroke Unit, University Hospital of Siena, Siena, Italy Abstract: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease primarily affecting synovial joints and is characterized by persistent high-grade systemic inflammation. Proinflammatory cytokines, particularly interleukin-6 (IL-6, are of crucial importance in the pathogenesis of the disease, driving both joint inflammation and extra-articular comorbidities. Tocilizumab, a humanized IL-6 receptor-inhibiting monoclonal antibody, has been the first, and, to date, the only, IL-6 inhibitor approved for the treatment of RA. Many studies have demonstrated the potency and effectiveness of tocilizumab in controlling disease activity and radiological progression of RA. These successful results have encouraged the development of novel IL-6 inhibitors, among which a promising agent is sirukumab (SRK, a human anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibody currently under evaluation in Phase II/III studies in patients with RA, systemic lupus erythematosus, giant-cell arteritis, and major depressive disorder. The evidence to date indicates SRK as an effective and well-tolerated new therapeutic tool for patients with active RA, with some preliminary data suggesting a specific beneficial impact on relevant systemic complications associated with the disease, such as depression and cardiovascular disease. Conversely, although pathophysiological considerations make plausible the hypothesis that IL-6 blockade with SRK may also be beneficial in the treatment of many diseases other than RA (either autoimmune or not, available clinical data in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus do not seem to support this view, also giving rise to potentially relevant concerns about drug safety. If large Phase III

  6. Further evidence supporting a role for gs signal transduction in severe malaria pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Auburn

    Full Text Available With the functional demonstration of a role in erythrocyte invasion by Plasmodium falciparum parasites, implications in the aetiology of common conditions that prevail in individuals of African origin, and a wealth of pharmacological knowledge, the stimulatory G protein (Gs signal transduction pathway presents an exciting target for anti-malarial drug intervention. Having previously demonstrated a role for the G-alpha-s gene, GNAS, in severe malaria disease, we sought to identify other important components of the Gs pathway. Using meta-analysis across case-control and family trio (affected child and parental controls studies of severe malaria from The Gambia and Malawi, we sought evidence of association in six Gs pathway candidate genes: adenosine receptor 2A (ADORA2A and 2B (ADORA2B, beta-adrenergic receptor kinase 1 (ADRBK1, adenylyl cyclase 9 (ADCY9, G protein beta subunit 3 (GNB3, and regulator of G protein signalling 2 (RGS2. Our study amassed a total of 2278 cases and 2364 controls. Allele-based models of association were investigated in all genes, and genotype and haplotype-based models were investigated where significant allelic associations were identified. Although no significant associations were observed in the other genes, several were identified in ADORA2A. The most significant association was observed at the rs9624472 locus, where the G allele (approximately 20% frequency appeared to confer enhanced risk to severe malaria [OR = 1.22 (1.09-1.37; P = 0.001]. Further investigation of the ADORA2A gene region is required to validate the associations identified here, and to identify and functionally characterize the responsible causal variant(s. Our results provide further evidence supporting a role of the Gs signal transduction pathway in the regulation of severe malaria, and request further exploration of this pathway in future studies.

  7. The evidence for efficacy of osteoporosis treatment in men with primary osteoporosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis of antiresorptive and anabolic treatment in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarz, Peter; Jorgensen, Niklas Rye; Mosekilde, Leif;

    2011-01-01

    fractures a non-significant trend towards a reduction was seen. Conclusion. The evidence of medical osteoporosis treatment in men is scant and inconclusive due to the lack of prospective RCT studies with fracture prevention as primary end point. So far, all evidence is based on BMD increases in small RCT...... treatment in men. Methods. This study was a systematic review of the published literature on the clinical efficacy of medical osteoporosis therapy in the reduction of fracture risk in men (age > 50 years). Studies included were randomised, placebo-controlled trials of men. Results. Five BMD studies......Purpose. Fragility fractures in men constitute a major worldwide public health problem with a life-time risk of 13%. It cannot be directly inferred that antiosteoporotic drugs effective in women have the same effect in men. Our aim was to appraise the existing evidence for efficacy of osteoporosis...

  8. The detection and treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria: Time for change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nosten F

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In most countries where malaria is endemic, P. falciparum malaria is on the rise. This is primarily due to the spread of drug-resistant strains. Drug resistance is mediated by spontaneous changes in the parasite genome that allow resistant parasites to escape the action of the drugs. The spread of drug resistance increases the transmission of malaria parasites. The consequences for the populations at risk are profound both in terms of consequences for health and economy. In order to halt the progression of drug resistance, we need to change the way antimalarials are used. As in tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS, we must use a combination of drugs for the treatment of malaria. Taking into account the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of the various anti-malarial agents, artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT seems to be the best option. This strategy should be used in conjunction with early diagnosis and appropriate vector control measures to achieve reduction in the emergence and spread of drug resistance.

  9. Evidence-based guidelines for the pharmacological treatment of anxiety disorders : recommendations from the British Association for Psychopharmacology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baldwin, DS; Anderson, IM; Nutt, DJ; Bandelow, B; Bond, A; Davidson, JRT; den Boer, JA; Fineberg, NA; Knapp, M; Scott, J; Wittchen, HU

    2005-01-01

    These British Association for Psychopharmacology guidelines cover the range and aims of treatment for anxiety disorders. They are based explicitly on the available evidence and are presented as recommendations to aid clinical decision making in primary and secondary medical care. They may also serve

  10. Evidence of effectiveness of herbal antiinflammatory drugs in the treatment of painful osteoarthritis and chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrubasik, J E; Roufogalis, B D; Chrubasik, S

    2007-07-01

    Treatment with herbal medicines is very popular in Europe. In order to get information on the evidence of effectiveness of oral herbal medicines in the treatment of pain in the joints or lower back, OVID(MEDLINE), PUBMED and COCHRANE COLLABORATION LIBRARY were searched back to 1985 for systematic reviews. The level of evidence of effectiveness was defined as strong - at least two confirmatory studies demonstrating a clinical relevant effect, moderate - one confirmatory study with a clinical relevant effect and/or multiple exploratory studies of good quality; otherwise the evidence was insufficient or conflicting in the case of inconsistent findings. Fifteen systematic reviews were identified. The evidence of effectiveness was strong for a proprietary unsaponifiable avocado soybean fraction and Harpagophytum preparations containing > 50 mg harpagoside in the daily dosage, moderate for ginger and a proprietary rose hip and seed powder, insufficient for Boswellia serrata gum resin and other herbal preparations and inconsistent for a proprietary willow bark extract. Further rigorous studies are required to confirm the usefulness of herbal medicines in the treatment of osteoarthritic complaints and chronic low back pain in order to enable acceptance of the herbal medicines into the treatment guidelines.

  11. The impact of intermittent preventive treatment with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine on the prevalence of malaria parasitaemia in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeh, Uchenna Anthony; Obi, Samuel N; Onah, Hyacinth E; Ugwu, Emmanuel Onyebuchi V; Ajah, Leonard Ogbonna; Umeh, Chioma Roseline; Okafor, Innocent Igwebuike

    2012-07-01

    The Roll Back Malaria initiatives were introduced to ensure that 60% of pregnant women receive intermittent preventive anti-malarial treatment by the end of 2005 in an attempt to halve the mortality from malaria by 2010. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic malaria parasitaemia in pregnant women on intermittent preventive treatment (IPT) with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) compared with a control group. This comparative study involved testing the peripheral blood of pregnant women on IPT with SP and a control group that did not receive SP for the malaria parasite upon registration and at 34 weeks gestational age. The levels of parasitaemia in the intervention group upon registration (4.9%) and at 34 weeks (63.9%) were not significantly different (P > 0.05) from that of the control group (10%) and at 34 weeks gestation (68.3%). IPT with SP during pregnancy did not significantly reduce the prevalence of the malaria parasitaemia among the pregnant women in our environment.

  12. Psychiatric stigma in treatment seeking adults with personality problems: evidence from a sample of 214 patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten eCatthoor

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Stigmatization is a major hindrance in adult psychiatric patients with Axis-I diagnoses, as shown consistently in most studies. Significantly fewer studies on the emergence of psychiatric stigma in adult patients with personality disorders exist, although the resulting evidence is conclusive. Some authors consider patients with personality disorders at risk for severe stigmatization because of intense difficulties during interpersonal contact, even in a psychotherapeutic relationship. The aim of this study was primarily the assessment of pre-existing stigma in patients referred for intensive treatment for personality disorders. The study enrolled 214 patients admitted to the adult department of a highly specialized mental health care institute offering psychotherapy for patients with severe and complex personality pathology. All patients underwent a standard assessment with self-report questionnaires and a semi-structured interview to measure Axis II personality disorders. The Stigma Consciousness Questionnaire (SCQ and the Perceived Devaluation-Discrimination Questionnaire (DDQ, both validated instruments, were used to measure perceived and actual experiences of stigma. Independent sample t-tests were used to investigate differences in the mean total stigma scores for patients both with and without a personality disorder. One-way ANOVA’s were performed to assess the differences between having a borderline personality disorder, another personality disorder, or no personality disorder diagnosis.Multiple regression main effect analyses were conducted in order to explore the impact of the different personality disorder diagnosis on the level of stigma. The mean scores across all patient groups were consistent with rather low stigma. No differences were found for patients with or without a personality disorder diagnosis. Level of stigma in general was not associated with an accumulating number of personality disorders.

  13. Utilization of evidence-based treatment in elderly patients with chronic heart failure: using Korean Health Insurance claims database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Ju-Young

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic heart failure accounts for a great deal of the morbidity and mortality in the aging population. Evidence-based treatments include angiotensin-2 receptor blockers (ARBs, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I, beta-blockers, and aldosterone antagonists. Underutilization of these treatments in heart failure patients were frequently reported, which could lead to increase morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utilization of evidence-based treatments and their related factors for elderly patients with chronic heart failure. Methods This is retrospective observational study using the Korean National Health Insurance claims database. We identified prescription of evidence based treatment to elderly patients who had been hospitalized for chronic heart failure between January 1, 2005, and June 30, 2006. Results Among the 28,922 elderly patients with chronic heart failure, beta-blockers were prescribed to 31.5%, and ACE-I or ARBs were prescribed to 54.7% of the total population. Multivariable logistic regression analyses revealed that the prescription from outpatient clinic (prevalent ratio, 4.02, 95% CI 3.31–4.72, specialty of the healthcare providers (prevalent ratio, 1.26, 95% CI, 1.12–1.54, residence in urban (prevalent ratio, 1.37, 95% CI, 1.23–1.52 and admission to tertiary hospital (prevalent ratio, 2.07, 95% CI, 1.85–2.31 were important factors associated with treatment underutilization. Patients not given evidence-based treatment were more likely to experience dementia, reside in rural areas, and have less-specialized healthcare providers and were less likely to have coexisting cardiovascular diseases or concomitant medications than patients in the evidence-based treatment group. Conclusions Healthcare system factors, such as hospital type, healthcare provider factors, such as specialty, and patient factors, such as comorbid cardiovascular disease, systemic disease with

  14. Parent-Reported Homework Problems in the MTA Study: Evidence for Sustained Improvement with Behavioral Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langberg, Joshua M.; Arnold, L. Eugene; Flowers, Amanda M.; Epstein, Jeffery N.; Altaye, Mekibib; Hinshaw, Stephen P.; Swanson, James M.; Kotkin, Ronald; Simpson, Stephen; Molina, Brooke S. G.; Jensen, Peter S.; Abikoff, Howard; Pelham, William E., Jr.; Vitiello, Benedetto; Wells, Karen C.; Hechtman, Lily

    2010-01-01

    Parent-report of child homework problems was examined as a treatment outcome variable in the MTA-Multimodal Treatment Study of Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Five hundred seventy-nine children ages 7.0 to 9.9 were randomly assigned to either medication management, behavioral treatment, combination treatment, or…

  15. Antidotes and treatments for chemical warfare/terrorism agents: an evidence-based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, G C; Condurache, C T

    2010-09-01

    This article reviews the evidence supporting the efficacy of antidotes used or recommended for the potential chemical warfare agents of most concern. Chemical warfare agents considered include cyanide, vesicants, pulmonary irritants such as chlorine and phosgene, and nerve agents. The strength of evidence for most antidotes is weak, highlighting the need for additional research in this area.

  16. Evidence-based recommendations for treatment with methotrexate in rheumatic disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Rintek; Faurschou, Mikkel; Loft, Anne Gitte;

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop 3E (Evidence, Expertise, Exchange) recommendations (RCs) on the use of methotrexate in rheumatic disorders and to assess the agreement among Danish rheumatologists.......The aim of this study was to develop 3E (Evidence, Expertise, Exchange) recommendations (RCs) on the use of methotrexate in rheumatic disorders and to assess the agreement among Danish rheumatologists....

  17. Constructing evidence-based treatment strategies using methods from computer science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineau, Joelle; Bellemare, Marc G; Rush, A John; Ghizaru, Adrian; Murphy, Susan A

    2007-05-01

    This paper details a new methodology, instance-based reinforcement learning, for constructing adaptive treatment strategies from randomized trials. Adaptive treatment strategies are operationalized clinical guidelines which recommend the next best treatment for an individual based on his/her personal characteristics and response to earlier treatments. The instance-based reinforcement learning methodology comes from the computer science literature, where it was developed to optimize sequences of actions in an evolving, time varying system. When applied in the context of treatment design, this method provides the means to evaluate both the therapeutic and diagnostic effects of treatments in constructing an adaptive treatment strategy. The methodology is illustrated with data from the STAR*D trial, a multi-step randomized study of treatment alternatives for individuals with treatment-resistant major depressive disorder.

  18. Evidence-based primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections in Europe: a comparative analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijnen, E.M. van; Paget, J.; Heijer, C.D. den; Stobberingh, E.E.; Bruggeman, C.A.; Schellevis, F.G.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Europe, most antibiotics for human use are prescribed in primary care. Incorporating resistance data into treatment guidelines could improve appropriate prescribing, increase treatment effectiveness and control the development of resistance. OBJECTIVES: This study reviews primary care

  19. Evidence-based primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections in Europe: a comparative analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijnen, E.M.E. van; Paget, J.; Heijer, C.D.J. den; Stobberingh, E.E.; Bruggeman, C.A.; Schellevis, F.G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In Europe, most antibiotics for human use are prescribed in primary care. Incorporating resistance data into treatment guidelines could improve appropriate prescribing, increase treatment effectiveness and control the development of resistance. Objectives: This study reviews primary care

  20. Anti-TNFα-therapy as an evidence-based treatment option for different clinical manifestations of psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhm, Michaela; Burkhardt, Harald; Behrens, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The development programmes of different TNF-blocking agents in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) not only provided substantial evidence for the therapeutic benefits of the specific treatment options, but also enabled new insights into the differential treatment effects on distinct disease manifestations. For the first time, specific robust evidence for distinctive effects on different manifestations of PsA, as a distinct entity separate from rheumatoid arthritis (RA), has been generated in a standardized way. The clearest evidence was shown for an effect on peripheral arthritis (polyarticular) with ACR20 response rates from 45 up to 58% (vs. 9-24% for placebo), and an inhibition of radiographic progression demonstrated for the first time for a treatment principle in PsA. However, as PsA does not remain confined to the peripheral joints, it was necessary to address diverse patterns of PsA-subtypes in the outcome measurements of the anti-TNF trials. Accordingly, the results of the clinical studies on anti-TNF treatment also have demonstrated efficacy on enthesitis, dactylitis and skin psoriasis, either in sub analysis of results from phase III RCTs, or in additional prospective studies.

  1. Postabortion Care: 20 Years of Strong Evidence on Emergency Treatment, Family Planning, and Other Programming Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Douglas; Curtis, Carolyn; Irani, Laili; Pappa, Sara; Arrington, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Worldwide 75 million women need postabortion care (PAC) services each year following safe or unsafe induced abortions and miscarriages. We reviewed more than 550 studies on PAC published between 1994 and 2013 in the peer-reviewed and gray literature, covering emergency treatment, postabortion family planning, organization of services, and related topics that impact practices and health outcomes, particularly in the Global South. In this article, we present findings from studies with strong evidence that have major implications for programs and practice. For example, vacuum aspiration reduced morbidity, costs, and time in comparison to sharp curettage. Misoprostol 400 mcg sublingually or 600 mcg orally achieved 89% to 99% complete evacuation rates within 2 weeks in multiple studies and was comparable in effectiveness, safety, and acceptability to manual vacuum aspiration. Misoprostol was safely introduced in several PAC programs through mid-level providers, extending services to secondary hospitals and primary health centers. In multiple studies, postabortion family planning uptake before discharge increased by 30–70 percentage points within 1–3 years of strengthening postabortion family planning services; in some cases, increases up to 60 percentage points in 4 months were achieved. Immediate postabortion contraceptive acceptance increased on average from 32% before the interventions to 69% post-intervention. Several studies found that women receiving immediate postabortion intrauterine devices and implants had fewer unintended pregnancies and repeat abortions than those who were offered delayed insertions. Postabortion family planning is endorsed by the professional organizations of obstetricians/gynecologists, midwives, and nurses as a standard of practice; major donors agree, and governments should be encouraged to provide universal access to postabortion family planning. Important program recommendations include offering all postabortion women

  2. Postabortion Care: 20 Years of Strong Evidence on Emergency Treatment, Family Planning, and Other Programming Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Douglas; Curtis, Carolyn; Irani, Laili; Pappa, Sara; Arrington, Lauren

    2016-09-28

    Worldwide 75 million women need postabortion care (PAC) services each year following safe or unsafe induced abortions and miscarriages. We reviewed more than 550 studies on PAC published between 1994 and 2013 in the peer-reviewed and gray literature, covering emergency treatment, postabortion family planning, organization of services, and related topics that impact practices and health outcomes, particularly in the Global South. In this article, we present findings from studies with strong evidence that have major implications for programs and practice. For example, vacuum aspiration reduced morbidity, costs, and time in comparison to sharp curettage. Misoprostol 400 mcg sublingually or 600 mcg orally achieved 89% to 99% complete evacuation rates within 2 weeks in multiple studies and was comparable in effectiveness, safety, and acceptability to manual vacuum aspiration. Misoprostol was safely introduced in several PAC programs through mid-level providers, extending services to secondary hospitals and primary health centers. In multiple studies, postabortion family planning uptake before discharge increased by 30-70 percentage points within 1-3 years of strengthening postabortion family planning services; in some cases, increases up to 60 percentage points in 4 months were achieved. Immediate postabortion contraceptive acceptance increased on average from 32% before the interventions to 69% post-intervention. Several studies found that women receiving immediate postabortion intrauterine devices and implants had fewer unintended pregnancies and repeat abortions than those who were offered delayed insertions. Postabortion family planning is endorsed by the professional organizations of obstetricians/gynecologists, midwives, and nurses as a standard of practice; major donors agree, and governments should be encouraged to provide universal access to postabortion family planning. Important program recommendations include offering all postabortion women family planning

  3. An Update on Evidence-Based Psychosocial Treatments for Eating Disorders in Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, James

    2015-01-01

    Eating disorders are relatively common and serious disorders in adolescents. However, there are few controlled psychosocial intervention studies with this younger population. This review updates a previous Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology review published in 2008. The recommendations in this review were developed after searching the literature including PubMed/Medline and employing the relevant medical subject headings. In addition, the bibliographies of book chapters and treatment guideline articles were reviewed; last, colleagues were asked for suggested additional source materials. Psychosocial treatments examined include family therapy, individual therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy, cognitive training, and dialectical behavior therapy. Using the most recent Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology methodological review criteria, family treatment-behavior (FT-B) is the only well-established treatment for adolescents with anorexia nervosa. Family treatment-systemic and insight oriented individual psychotherapy are probably efficacious treatments for adolescents with anorexia nervosa. There are no well-established treatments for adolescents with bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, or avoidant restrictive food intake disorder. Possibly efficacious psychosocial treatments for adolescent bulimia nervosa include FT-B and supportive individual therapy. Internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy is a possibly efficacious treatment for binge eating disorder. Experimental treatments for adolescent eating disorders include enhanced cognitive behavioral therapy, dialectical behavioral therapy, cognitive training, and interpersonal psychotherapy. FT-B is the only well-established treatment for adolescent eating disorders. Additional research examining treatment for eating disorders in youth is warranted.

  4. Challenges in treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder in refugees: towards integration of evidence-based treatments with contextual and culture-sensitive perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Drožđek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Research shows that trauma-focused therapy and multimodal interventions are the two most often used strategies in treatment of refugees suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. While preliminary evidence suggests that trauma-focused approaches may have some efficacy, this could not be established for multimodal interventions. However, it may be that multimodal interventions have been studied in more treatment-resistant refugees with very high levels of psychopathology, disability, and chronicity. In the past decades, various models for understanding of the complex relationship between mental health problems and well-being have emerged. They aim at framing mental health problems in individualized, contextual, epigenetic, and culturally sensitive ways, and may be useful in tailoring content and timing of multimodal interventions. Objective: To draw clinicians’ attention to the possibility of using the Integrative Contextual Model for understanding and assessment of posttrauma mental health sequelae while tailoring multimodal interventions; to present a possible way of combining multimodal with evidence-based trauma-focused approaches; and to improve the understanding and treatment of PTSD and other mental health problems in refugee survivors of prolonged and repeated trauma. Method: Based on literature, clinical experience, and presentation of a fictional case, the use of the Integrative Contextual Model in tailoring the treatment of severe PTSD in a refugee patient is presented and discussed. Results: The Integrative Contextual Model for understanding and assessing factors, which may play a role in causing and maintaining of PTSD and comorbidity in refugees, may help tailoring of multimodal interventions. These interventions can be combined with evidence-based trauma-focused treatments. Conclusion: The field of refugee mental health intervention and clinical practice with traumatized refugees may be enriched with the use

  5. Evidence-based recommendations for treatment with methotrexate in rheumatic disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Rintek; Faurschou, Mikkel; Loft, Anne Gitte;

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop 3E (Evidence, Expertise, Exchange) recommendations (RCs) on the use of methotrexate in rheumatic disorders and to assess the agreement among Danish rheumatologists....

  6. The treatment of metastatic non-small cell lung cancer in the elderly: an evidence-based approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E Dawe

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An increasing proportion of patients with advanced NSCLC are over 70 years old, raising unique challenges for treatment decision-making. While these patients are underrepresented in clinical trials, there is an emerging body of evidence associated with this group. The lesson of comprehensive geriatric assessment is that chronological age does not always correlate with physiological age and a variety of important comorbidities and geriatric syndromes can go undetected in a typical history and physical. These comorbidities and expected physiologic changes due to aging complicate decision-making around appropriate treatment. This review discusses geriatric assessment in elderly cancer patients and evaluates the current evidence for chemotherapy and targeted therapy for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer aged ≥70 years.

  7. Evidence for Action on HIV Treatment and Care Systems in low and middle-income countries: background and introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, David A; South, Annabelle; Weller, Ian; Hakim, James

    2012-12-01

    Despite the unprecedented scale-up of treatment for HIV in low and middle-income countries over the past decade, 49% of adults and 77% of children in need of HIV treatment still do not have access to it. ART programmes that were initially set up as an emergency response now need to be adapted to ensure that they include all the essential components and are well integrated with other health services; meet the needs of special groups, including children, adolescents, pregnant women and older people; address the mental health needs of HIV-positive people; and monitor as well as report their impact in valid and comparable ways.This supplement is an output from the Evidence for Action on HIV Treatment and Care Systems research programme consortium. Evidence for Action was a 5-year, multidisciplinary research programme, which ran from 2006 to 2011, with partners in India, Malawi, Uganda, Zambia and the United Kingdom.The primary aim of this supplement is to stimulate reflection and provide guidance on what should be in the package of HIV treatment and care systems, as national programmes look to maintain the major advances of the past decade and scale-up treatment to the other 50% of people in need of it.

  8. 反流性咽喉炎的循证治疗%Evidence based treatment of relfux disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈月湘; 沈阳

    2016-01-01

    目的:探索分析反流性咽喉炎的循证治疗方案。方法选择就诊于我院的1例反流性咽喉炎患者为研究对象,回顾分析患者的临床资料,采用循证医学理论进行询证治疗,观察分析患者的治疗效果。结果经治疗,患者的临床症状显著改善,胃镜可见食管中段、下端糜烂和充血现象明显好转,喉镜检查未见异常,经为期6个月的随访患者对治疗效果较满意。结论依据询证治疗原理,制定合理的治疗计划,能够有效的缓解反流性咽喉炎的临床症状,改善患者的生活质量。%[Abstrac]ObjectiveTo explore the analysis of evidence-based treatment of reflux pharyngolaryngitis. MethodsIn our hospital for treatment of 1 cases of relfux laryngitis patients as the research object, a retrospective analysis of clinical data of patients, using the theory of evidence-based medicine to evidence-based treatment, observation and analysis of the treatment effect of the patients.ResultsAfter treatment, the clinical symptoms of the patients were improved signiifcantly, signiifcant improvement in the gastroscope visible esophageal and lower erosion and congestion phenomenon, laryngoscopy revealed no abnormalities, the period of follow-up of 6 months of treatment effect was satisfactory.ConclusionOn the basis of evidence-based treatment principle, develop a reasonable treatment plan, can effectively alleviate the clinical symptoms of relfux pharyngolaryngitis, improve the quality of life of patients.

  9. Scientific Evidence in the Study and Treatment of Addictive Behaviours in Psychosocial Intervention. Journal on Equality and Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itziar Iruarrizaga Díez

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In Spain, the importance and relevance of substance dependence and other addictive behaviours has generated great interest among the scientific community. Since its creation in 1992, Psychosocial Intervention. Journal on Equality and Quality of Life has transmitted the needs and training demands of psychologists, paying special attention to those aspects related to prevention, health outcomes and psychosocial factors involved in the onset and maintenance of drug addiction, psychosocial intervention and the treatment of addictive behaviours. As an introduction to this report on the Scientific evidence in the study and treatment of addictive behaviours, all topics covered by this journal throughout the years will be addressed.

  10. How does reviewing the evidence change veterinary surgeons' beliefs regarding the treatment of ovine footrot? A quantitative and qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Helen M; Green, Laura E; Green, Martin J; Kaler, Jasmeet

    2013-01-01

    Footrot is a widespread, infectious cause of lameness in sheep, with major economic and welfare costs. The aims of this research were: (i) to quantify how veterinary surgeons' beliefs regarding the efficacy of two treatments for footrot changed following a review of the evidence (ii) to obtain a consensus opinion following group discussions (iii) to capture complementary qualitative data to place their beliefs within a broader clinical context. Grounded in a Bayesian statistical framework, probabilistic elicitation (roulette method) was used to quantify the beliefs of eleven veterinary surgeons during two one-day workshops. There was considerable heterogeneity in veterinary surgeons' beliefs before they listened to a review of the evidence. After hearing the evidence, seven participants quantifiably changed their beliefs. In particular, two participants who initially believed that foot trimming with topical oxytetracycline was the better treatment, changed to entirely favour systemic and topical oxytetracycline instead. The results suggest that a substantial amount of the variation in beliefs related to differences in veterinary surgeons' knowledge of the evidence. Although considerable differences in opinion still remained after the evidence review, with several participants having non-overlapping 95% credible intervals, both groups did achieve a consensus opinion. Two key findings from the qualitative data were: (i) veterinary surgeons believed that farmers are unlikely to actively seek advice on lameness, suggesting a proactive veterinary approach is required (ii) more attention could be given to improving the way in which veterinary advice is delivered to farmers. In summary this study has: (i) demonstrated a practical method for probabilistically quantifying how veterinary surgeons' beliefs change (ii) revealed that the evidence that currently exists is capable of changing veterinary opinion (iii) suggested that improved transfer of research knowledge into

  11. How does reviewing the evidence change veterinary surgeons' beliefs regarding the treatment of ovine footrot? A quantitative and qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen M Higgins

    Full Text Available Footrot is a widespread, infectious cause of lameness in sheep, with major economic and welfare costs. The aims of this research were: (i to quantify how veterinary surgeons' beliefs regarding the efficacy of two treatments for footrot changed following a review of the evidence (ii to obtain a consensus opinion following group discussions (iii to capture complementary qualitative data to place their beliefs within a broader clinical context. Grounded in a Bayesian statistical framework, probabilistic elicitation (roulette method was used to quantify the beliefs of eleven veterinary surgeons during two one-day workshops. There was considerable heterogeneity in veterinary surgeons' beliefs before they listened to a review of the evidence. After hearing the evidence, seven participants quantifiably changed their beliefs. In particular, two participants who initially believed that foot trimming with topical oxytetracycline was the better treatment, changed to entirely favour systemic and topical oxytetracycline instead. The results suggest that a substantial amount of the variation in beliefs related to differences in veterinary surgeons' knowledge of the evidence. Although considerable differences in opinion still remained after the evidence review, with several participants having non-overlapping 95% credible intervals, both groups did achieve a consensus opinion. Two key findings from the qualitative data were: (i veterinary surgeons believed that farmers are unlikely to actively seek advice on lameness, suggesting a proactive veterinary approach is required (ii more attention could be given to improving the way in which veterinary advice is delivered to farmers. In summary this study has: (i demonstrated a practical method for probabilistically quantifying how veterinary surgeons' beliefs change (ii revealed that the evidence that currently exists is capable of changing veterinary opinion (iii suggested that improved transfer of research

  12. The evidence base for chiropractic treatment of musculoskeletal conditions in children and adolescents: The emperor's new suit?

    OpenAIRE

    Stochkendahl Mette; Hestbaek Lise

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Five to ten percent of chiropractic patients are children and adolescents. Most of these consult because of spinal pain, or other musculoskeletal complaints. These musculoskeletal disorders in early life not only affect the quality of children's lives, but also seem to have an impact on adult musculoskeletal health. Thus, this is an important part of the chiropractors' scope of practice, and the objective of this review is to assess the evidence base for manual treatment of musculosk...

  13. Diagnosis and treatment of malaria in peripheral health facilities in Uganda: findings from an area of low transmission in south-western Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarke Siân

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early recognition of symptoms and signs perceived as malaria are important for effective case management, as few laboratories are available at peripheral health facilities. The validity and reliability of clinical signs and symptoms used by health workers to diagnose malaria were assessed in an area of low transmission in south-western Uganda. Methods The study had two components: 1 passive case detection where all patients attending the out patient clininc with a febrile illness were included and 2 a longitudinal active malaria case detection survey was conducted in selected villages. A malaria case was defined as any slide-confirmed parasitaemia in a person with an axillary temperature ≥ 37.5°C or a history of fever within the last 24 hrs and no signs suggestive of other diseases. Results Cases of malaria were significantly more likely to report joint pains, headache, vomiting and abdominal pains. However, due to the low prevalence of malaria, the predictive values of these individual signs alone, or in combination, were poor. Only 24.8% of 1627 patients had malaria according to case definition and > 75% of patients were unnecessarily treated for malaria and few slide negative cases received alternative treatment. Conclusion In low-transmission areas, more attention needs to be paid to differential diagnosis of febrile illnesses In view of suggested changes in anti-malarial drug policy, introducing costly artemisinin combination therapy accurate, rapid diagnostic tools are necessary to target treatment to people in need.

  14. Gingival recession and adult orthodontics: a clinical evidence-based treatment proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dersot, Jean-Marc

    2012-03-01

    The presence of a gingival recession prior to orthodontic treatment is a real problem. Patients are concerned about losing their teeth but may also complain of their unpleasant appearance or root sensitivity in the exposed area. The orthodontist is not sure whether orthodontic treatment can be performed or whether the tooth movement will not aggravate the recession and whether periodontal surgery needs to be done before or after orthodontic treatment. The aim of this paper is to present recent data from the literature and several clinical situations in adults in order to submit a treatment sequence and clarify the role of different periodontal plastic surgery root coverage procedures.

  15. Perceptions of Radiation Oncologists and Urologists on Sources and Type of Evidence to Inform Prostate Cancer Treatment Decisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Leona C. [Division of Health Care Policy and Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Delpe, Sophia [Department of Urology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Shah, Nilay D. [Division of Health Care Policy and Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Ziegenfuss, Jeanette Y. [HealthPartners, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Tilburt, Jon C. [Knowledge and Evaluation Research Unit, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Biomedical Ethics Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Division of General Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Karnes, R. Jeffrey [Department of Urology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Nguyen, Paul L. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Gross, Cary P. [Cancer Outcomes and Public Policy Effectiveness Research Center, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Yu, James B. [Cancer Outcomes and Public Policy Effectiveness Research Center, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Trinh, Quoc-Dien [Division of Urology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sun, Maxine [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, QC (Canada); Ranasinghe, Weranja K.B. [Division of Urology, Alfred Hospital, Prahran, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Kim, Simon P., E-mail: simkim@me.com [Department of Urology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Cancer Outcomes and Public Policy Effectiveness Research Center, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To perform a national survey of radiation oncologists and urologists about the type of resources used and the level of evidence needed to change clinical practice in localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From a random sample, 1422 physicians were mailed a survey assessing the types of information used and what level of evidence could alter their clinical practice in prostate cancer. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to identify differences in physician characteristics for each outcome. Results: Survey response rates were similar for radiation oncologists and urologists (44% vs 46%; P=.46). Specialty-specific journals represented the most commonly used resource for informing the clinical practice for radiation oncologists (65%) and urologists (70%). Relative to radiation oncologists, urologists were less likely to report utilizing top-tier medical journals (25% vs 39%; adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.50; P=.01) or cancer journals (22% vs 51%; adjusted OR 0.50; P<.001) but more likely to rely on clinical guidelines (46% vs 38%; adjusted OR 1.6; P=.006). Both radiation oncologists and urologists most commonly reported large randomized, clinical trials as the level of evidence to change treatment recommendations for localized prostate cancer (85% vs 77%; P=.009). Conclusions: Both specialties rely on their own specialty-specific journals and view randomized, clinical trials as the level of evidence needed to change clinical practice. Our study provides a context on meaningful ways of disseminating evidence for localized prostate cancer.

  16. Evidence-Based Psychosocial Treatments for Phobic and Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Wendy K.; Pina, Armando A.; Viswesvaran, Chockalingam

    2008-01-01

    The article reviews psychosocial treatments for phobic and anxiety disorders in youth. Using criteria from Nathan and Gorman (2002), 32 studies are evaluated along a continuum of methodological rigor. In addition, the treatments evaluated in each of the 32 studies are classified according to Chambless et al.'s (1996) and Chambless and Hollon's…

  17. Medicaid-Covered Alcohol and Drug Treatment Use among People with Intellectual Disabilities: Evidence of Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slayter, Elspeth

    2010-01-01

    For some, community inclusion facilitates access to alcohol and drugs and, therefore, the potential for developing substance abuse disorders. However, little is known about substance abuse treatment use among people with intellectual disabilities. Using standardized performance measures, substance abuse treatment utilization was examined for…

  18. Recovery of Sentence Production Processes Following Language Treatment in Aphasia: Evidence from Eyetracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Jennifer E.; Nerantzini, Michaela; Thompson, Cynthia K.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Sentence production impairments in aphasia often improve with treatment. However, little is known about how cognitive processes supporting sentence production, such as sentence planning, are impacted by treatment. Methods: The present study used eyetracking to examine changes in sentence production resulting from a 12-week language treatment program focused on passive sentences (Treatment of Underlying Forms (TUF); Thompson and Shapiro, 2005). In two pre-treatment and two post-treatment sessions, nine participants with mild-to-moderate agrammatic aphasia performed a structural priming task, which involved repeating primed sentences (actives or passives) and then, using the same verb, producing sentences describing pictured events. Two individuals with aphasia performed the eyetracking task on the same schedule without intervening language treatment. Ten unimpaired older adults also performed the task to identify normal performance patterns. Sentence production accuracy and speech onset latencies were examined, and eye movements to the pictured Agent and Theme characters were analyzed in the first 400 ms after picture onset, reflecting early sentence planning, and in the regions preceding the production of the sentence subject and post-verbal noun, reflecting lexical encoding. Results: Unimpaired controls performed with high accuracy. Their early eye movements (first 400 ms) indicated equal fixations to the Agent and Theme, consistent with structural sentence planning (i.e., initial construction of an abstract structural frame). Subsequent eye movements occurring prior to speech onset were consistent with encoding of the correct sentence subject (i.e., the Agent in actives, Theme in passives), with encoding of the post-verbal noun beginning at speech onset. In participants with aphasia, accuracy improved significantly with treatment, and post-treatment (but not pre-treatment) eye movements were qualitatively similar to those of unimpaired controls

  19. Relationship between treatment-seeking behaviour and artemisinin drug quality in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein Eili Y

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT is currently the recommended first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria infections. However, a significant proportion of ACT is assumed to be of poor quality, particularly in Africa. In addition, little is known about how treatment-seeking behaviour of individuals or drug price is associated with drug quality. Methods Caregivers of children less than 5 years of age were interviewed on their knowledge of malaria and their choices for treatment. Artemisinin drugs were then purchased from sellers that caregivers preferred or had previously patronized. The active ingredients were quantified by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Results A negative relationship was anticipated between the education level of caregivers and the quality of anti-malarial drugs purchased. However, of the 33 drugs collected from 16 different shops, only one contained less than 80% of its purported active ingredient, and most drugs were within 90% of their listed amounts. No link was found between drug quality and price. Nonetheless, while ACT is the recommended first-line treatment in Ghana, 21% of the drugs collected were artemisinin monotherapy, and 27% of the ACT was not co-formulated. Among caregivers, higher education was found to be associated with both an increased likelihood of seeking treatment in a clinic first, as opposed to visiting drug shops or using herbal remedies, and with purchasing drugs from licensed sellers. Conclusion Surprisingly, drug quality was found to be uniformly high and thus no significant relationship between price, treatment-seeking behaviour and the content of the active ingredients was observed. However, artemisinin monotherapy, which the WHO considers inappropriate therapy, was still widely available in Ghana in 2010. Monotherapy was more likely to be available in unlicensed vendors where less-educated caregivers generally shopped. This linkage between education

  20. Family processes in the development of youth depression: translating the evidence to treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Restifo, K.; Bögels, S.

    2009-01-01

    There is strong evidence that family factors play a role in the development, maintenance and course of youth depression. However, to date few clinical trials of psychotherapy for youth depression employ family therapy interventions or target the known family risk factors. This is surprising given re

  1. EVIDENCE-BASED REVIEW OF TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR PATIENTS WITH GLOTTIC CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartl, Dana M.; Ferlito, Alfio; Brasnu, Daniel F.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Silver, Carl E.; Wolf, Gregory T.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine integrates the best available data in decision making, with the goal of minimizing physicians' and patients' subjectivity. In 2006, the American Society of Clinical Oncology edited clinical practice guidelines for the use of larynx preservation strategies. The objective of th

  2. Evidence-based treatment and quality of life in heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobre, Daniela; van Jaarsveld, Cornelia H. M.; Ranchor, Adelita V.; Arnold, Rosemarie; de Jongste, Mike J. L.; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.

    2006-01-01

    To explore whether prescription of evidence-based drug therapy is associated with better quality of life (QoL) in patients with heart failure (HF). Patients (n = 62) were recruited in the outpatient clinic of Groningen University Hospital. Inclusion criteria were previous diagnosis of HF, age 40-80

  3. Current Evidence on Treatment of Patients With Chronic Systolic Heart Failure and Renal Insufficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, Kevin; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Felker, G. Michael; Lassus, Johan; Zannad, Faiez; Krum, Henry; McMurray, John J. V.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasingly prevalent in patients with chronic systolic heart failure. Therefore, evidence-based therapies are more and more being used in patients with some degree of renal dysfunction. However, most pivotal randomized clinical trials specifically excluded patients

  4. Treatment of Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture in Scandinavia Does Not Adhere to Evidence-based Guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Kristoffer W; Nielsen, Fredrik; Helander, Katarina N;

    2013-01-01

    and that adherence to evidence-based recommendations would not be as good as desired. The purpose of the present study was to investigate how acute Achilles tendon rupture is treated in Scandinavia. A questionnaire was distributed to all orthopedic departments treating acute Achilles tendon ruptures in Denmark...

  5. NICE CG178 Psychosis and Schizophrenia in Adults: Treatment and Management - an evidence-based guideline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Mark; Perera, Udayanga

    2015-05-01

    National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) clinical guideline (CG)178 was published in 2014. NICE guidelines occupy an important international position. We argue that CG178 overemphasises the use of cognitive-behavioural therapy for schizophrenia and those 'at risk' of psychosis, with recommendations that do not always reflect the evidence base. The CG178 recommendations on medications are limited.

  6. Purine and pyrimidine metabolism: Convergent evidence on chronic antidepressant treatment response in mice and humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dong Ik; Dournes, Carine; Sillaber, Inge; Uhr, Manfred; Asara, John M.; Gassen, Nils C.; Rein, Theo; Ising, Marcus; Webhofer, Christian; Filiou, Michaela D.; Müller, Marianne B.; Turck, Christoph W.

    2016-01-01

    Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly used drugs for the treatment of psychiatric diseases including major depressive disorder (MDD). For unknown reasons a substantial number of patients do not show any improvement during or after SSRI treatment. We treated DBA/2J mice for 28 days with paroxetine and assessed their behavioral response with the forced swim test (FST). Paroxetine-treated long-time floating (PLF) and paroxetine-treated short-time floating (PSF) groups were stratified as proxies for drug non-responder and responder mice, respectively. Proteomics and metabolomics profiles of PLF and PSF groups were acquired for the hippocampus and plasma to identify molecular pathways and biosignatures that stratify paroxetine-treated mouse sub-groups. The critical role of purine and pyrimidine metabolisms for chronic paroxetine treatment response in the mouse was further corroborated by pathway protein expression differences in both mice and patients that underwent chronic antidepressant treatment. The integrated -omics data indicate purine and pyrimidine metabolism pathway activity differences between PLF and PSF mice. Furthermore, the pathway protein levels in peripheral specimens strongly correlated with the antidepressant treatment response in patients. Our results suggest that chronic SSRI treatment differentially affects purine and pyrimidine metabolisms, which may explain the heterogeneous antidepressant treatment response and represents a potential biosignature. PMID:27731396

  7. Biologic therapy with or without topical treatment in psoriasis: what does the current evidence say?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, J Daniel; Delcambre, Macey Renault; Nguyen, Gloria; Sami, Naveed

    2014-10-01

    Biologic therapy represents a relatively new class of drugs which have revolutionized the treatment of psoriasis and are used with increasing frequency in order to control this chronic, systemic inflammatory disease. However, it is unclear what role there is for combination therapy of biologics with traditional topical agents. The purpose of this article is to assess the literature on the role of topical agents as adjuvants to biological treatments in the treatment of psoriasis and identify areas for further research. A MEDLINE search was performed in order to identify English-language publications from 1996 to 2014 examining combination biologic therapy with topical medications in the treatment of psoriasis. Data from these clinical studies are summarized and the outcomes are discussed. In general, the addition of adjuvant topical therapy to systemic biologic therapy allowed for a reduction in dosage and side effects of both agents, maintenance of initial response to biologics, treatment of recalcitrant lesions in partial responders, and potential acceleration of response to biologic therapies. The current data, though limited, suggest that using topical therapies as adjunct treatment to biologics is a well tolerated and effective means of controlling psoriasis and improving quality of life for patients. However, the treating physician should remain attentive to signs of adverse events and seek opportunities to reduce the dose or treatment frequency during chronic use.

  8. Virtual reality in the psychological treatment for mental health problems: An systematic review of recent evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valmaggia, Lucia R; Latif, Leila; Kempton, Matthew J; Rus-Calafell, Maria

    2016-02-28

    The aim of this paper is to provide a review of controlled studies of the use of Virtual Reality in psychological treatment (VRT). Medline, PsychInfo, Embase and Web of Science were searched. Only studies comparing immersive virtual reality to a control condition were included. The search resulted in 1180 articles published between 2012 and 2015, of these, 24 were controlled studies. The reviewed studies confirm the effectiveness of VRT compared to treatment as usual, and show similar effectiveness when VRT is compared to conventional treatments. Current developments and future research are discussed.

  9. Spinal cord stimulation for long-term treatment of severe angina pectoris: what does the evidence say?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börjesson, Mats; Andréll, Paulin; Mannheimer, Clas

    2011-11-01

    Patients who continue to suffer from severe and disabling angina pectoris, despite optimum treatment in terms of conventional pharmacological therapy and/or revascularization procedures, have been termed as having refractory angina pectoris. The future group of patients with refractory angina pectoris will be different from today's patients and represent a 'moving target' as risk factors, efficacy of treatment and indications continue to change. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is today considered as first-line treatment of refractory angina pectoris, by the European Society of Cardiology, with an anti-ischemic effect. There is strong evidence for SCS giving symptomatic benefits (decrease in anginal attacks), improved quality of life and improvement of functional status. In addition, SCS seems to be cost effective with a 'break-even' after approximately 15-16 months.

  10. Gap between evidence and physicians' knowledge and practice regarding hypertension and its drug treatment: a survey in a Chinese city

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei-zhong; TANG Jin-ling; HU Yong-hua; AN Jian-gang; WANG Yan-ling; REN Zhong-he; ZHANG Hong; Sian Griffiths

    2011-01-01

    Background Evidence-based medicine has come into its second decade. How prepared clinicians are in practicing it in particular in developing countries remains unclear. Thus we conducted this survey of physicians in urban hospitals in China to determine the size of the gap between research evidence and physicians' knowledge and practice regarding antihypertensive drugs for primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases in China.Methods A cross sectional survey by a face-to-face interview was conducted in 20 tertiary general hospitals in China in 2005. A total of 444 physicians (mostly cardiologists) in internal medicine who had treated at least one hypertensive patient in the past 12 months were invited for the interview on their perception of the cardiovascular risk of hypertension,the magnitude of the benefit of antihypertensive drugs, knowledge on the overall risk approach, first-line drugs used, the risk above which drug treatment is recommended, and knowledge on evidence-based medicine.Results A total of 444 of the 468 eligible physicians were successfully interviewed with a response rate of 94.9%. They estimated that a hypertensive man with an actual 5-year cardiovascular risk of 8.4% would have a 5-year cardiovascular risk of 40% (95% CI: 38% to 42%) if not treated, and have an absolute risk reduction and relative risk reduction from drug treatment by 20% (95% CI. 18% to 22%) and 39% (95% CI: 37% to 42%) respectively, as compared to 3.3% and 33%respectively shown in research evidence. On average, the physicians would recommend drug treatment at a number needed to treat (NNT) of 368 or smaller, as compared to the actual NNT of 50 for drug treatment in an average hypertensive Chinese. Fifty-five percent (95% CI: 50% to 59%) of them had never intently used the national hypertension guidelines. The majority still prescribed drugs primarily based on blood pressure alone by ignoring other risk factors or the overall risk and 78% (95 % C/. 76% to 83%) used new

  11. Is disorganized schizophrenia a predictor of treatment resistance? Evidence from an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Bertolucci Ortiz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate whether inpatients with disorganized schizophrenia are more resistant to treatment. Method: Eighty-five inpatients were assessed at admission and at discharge for schizophrenia subtype, symptom severity, and treatment resistance criteria. Results: Disorganized patients were significantly more treatment-resistant than paranoid patients (60%, p = 0.001, and presented worse scores on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS, the Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGI-S, and the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale (GAF (p < 0.001. Although the difference was not significant, 80% of treatment-resistant patients with disorganized schizophrenia responded to clozapine. Conclusion: Patients with the disorganized subtype of schizophrenia should benefit from clozapine as a second-line agent.

  12. The impact of prison-based treatment on sex offender recidivism: evidence from Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duwe, Grant; Goldman, Robin A

    2009-09-01

    Using a retrospective quasi-experimental design, this study evaluates the effectiveness of prison-based treatment by examining recidivism outcomes among 2,040 sex offenders released from Minnesota prisons between 1990 and 2003 (average follow-up period of 9.3 years). To reduce observed selection bias, the authors used propensity score matching to create a comparison group of 1,020 untreated sex offenders who were not significantly different from the 1,020 treated offenders. In addition, intent-to-treat analyses and the Rosenbaum bounds method were used to test the sensitivity of the findings to treatment refuser and unobserved selection bias. Results from the Cox regression analyses revealed that participating in treatment significantly reduced the hazard ratio for rearrest by 27% for sexual recidivism, 18% for violent recidivism, and 12% for general recidivism. These findings are consistent with the growing body of research supporting the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral treatment for sex offenders.

  13. A business case for quality improvement in addiction treatment: evidence from the NIATx collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quanbeck, Andrew R; Madden, Lynn; Edmundson, Eldon; Ford, James H; McConnell, K John; McCarty, Dennis; Gustafson, David H

    2012-01-01

    The Network for the Improvement of Addiction Treatment (NIATx) promotes treatment access and retention through a customer-focused quality improvement model. This paper explores the issue of the "business case" for quality improvement in addiction treatment from the provider's perspective. The business case model developed in this paper is based on case examples of early NIATx participants coupled with a review of the literature. Process inefficiencies indicated by long waiting times, high no-show rates, and low continuation rates cause underutilization of capacity and prevent optimal financial performance. By adopting customer-focused practices aimed at removing barriers to treatment access and retention, providers may be able to improve financial performance, increase staff retention, and gain long-term strategic advantage.

  14. Yoga for the Treatment of Insomnia among Cancer Patients: Evidence, Mechanisms of Action, and Clinical Recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Karen M. Mustian; Janelsins, Michelle; Peppone, Luke J.; Kamen, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Up to 90% of cancer patients report symptoms of insomnia during and after treatment. Symptoms of insomnia include excessive daytime sleepiness, difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, and waking up too early. Insomnia symptoms are among the most prevalent, distressing and persistent cancer- and cancer treatment-related toxicities reported by patients, and can be severe enough to increase cancer morbidity and mortality. Despite the ubiquity of insomnia symptoms, they are under-sc...

  15. EMDR therapy for PTSD after motor vehicle accidents: meta-analytic evidence for specific treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Maddalena eBoccia; Laura ePiccardi; Pierluigi eCordellieri; Cecilia eGuariglia; Anna Maria eGiannini

    2015-01-01

    Motor vehicle accident (MVA) victims may suffer both acute and post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD). With PTSD affecting social, interpersonal and occupational functioning, clinicians as well as the National Institute of Health are very interested in identifying the most effective psychological treatment to reduce PTSD. From research findings, eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) therapy is considered as one of the effective treatment of PTSD. In this paper, we present the r...

  16. Evidence-based treatment for adult women with child abuse-related Complex PTSD: a quantitative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethy Dorrepaal

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Effective first-line treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD are well established, but their generalizability to child abuse (CA-related Complex PTSD is largely unknown. Method: A quantitative review of the literature was performed, identifying seven studies, with treatments specifically targeting CA-related PTSD or Complex PTSD, which were meta-analyzed, including variables such as effect size, drop-out, recovery, and improvement rates. Results: Only six studies with one or more cognitive behavior therapy (CBT treatment conditions and one with a present centered therapy condition could be meta-analyzed. Results indicate that CA-related PTSD patients profit with large effect sizes and modest recovery and improvement rates. Treatments which include exposure showed greater effect sizes especially in completers’ analyses, although no differential results were found in recovery and improvement rates. However, results in the subgroup of CA-related Complex PTSD studies were least favorable. Within the Complex PTSD subgroup, no superior effect size was found for exposure, and affect management resulted in more favorable recovery and improvement rates and less drop-out, as compared to exposure, especially in intention-to-treat analyses. Conclusion: Limited evidence suggests that predominantly CBT treatments are effective, but do not suffice to achieve satisfactory end states, especially in Complex PTSD populations. Moreover, we propose that future research should focus on direct comparisons between types of treatment for Complex PTSD patients, thereby increasing generalizability of results.

  17. Has increased provision of treatment reduced the prevalence of common mental disorders? Review of the evidence from four countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorm, Anthony F; Patten, Scott B; Brugha, Traolach S; Mojtabai, Ramin

    2017-02-01

    Many people identified as having common mental disorders in community surveys do not receive treatment. Modelling has suggested that closing this "treatment gap" should reduce the population prevalence of those disorders. To evaluate the effects of reducing the treatment gap in industrialized countries, data from 1990 to 2015 were reviewed from four English-speaking countries: Australia, Canada, England and the US. These data show that the prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders and symptoms has not decreased, despite substantial increases in the provision of treatment, particularly antidepressants. Several hypotheses for this lack of improvement were considered. There was no support for the hypothesis that reductions in prevalence due to treatment have been masked by increases in risk factors. However, there was little evidence relevant to the hypothesis that improvements have been masked by increased reporting of symptoms because of greater public awareness of common mental disorders or willingness to disclose. A more strongly supported hypothesis for the lack of improvement is that much of the treatment provided does not meet the minimal standards of clinical practice guidelines and is not targeted optimally to those in greatest need. Lack of attention to prevention of common mental disorders may also be a factor. Reducing the prevalence of common mental disorders remains an unsolved challenge for health systems globally, which may require greater attention to the "quality gap" and "prevention gap". There is also a need for nations to monitor outcomes by using standardized measures of service provision and mental disorders over time.

  18. Evidence-based (S3) guideline for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia in women and in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumeyer, Anja; Tosti, Antonella; Messenger, Andrew; Reygagne, Pascal; Del Marmol, Veronique; Spuls, Phyllis I; Trakatelli, Myrto; Finner, Andreas; Kiesewetter, Franklin; Trüeb, Ralph; Rzany, Berthold; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike

    2011-10-01

    Androgenetic alopecia is the most common hair loss disorder, affecting both men and women. Initial signs of androgenetic alopecia usually develop during teenage years leading to progressive hair loss with a pattern distribution. Moreover, its frequency increases with age and affects up to 80 % Caucasian men and 42 % of women. Patients diagnosed with androgenetic alopecia may undergo significant impairment of quality of life. Despite the high prevalence and the variety of therapeutic options available, there have been no national or international evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia in men and women so far. Therefore, the European Dermatology Forum (EDF) initiated a project to develop an evidence-based S3 guideline for the treatment of andro-genetic alopecia. Based on a systematic literature research the efficacy of the currently available therapeutic options was assessed and therapeutic recommendations were passed in a consensus conference. The purpose of the guideline is to provide dermatologists as well as general practitioners with an evidence-based tool for choosing an efficacious and safe therapy for patients with androgenetic alopecia.

  19. Vildagliptin: the evidence for its place in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Profit

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Louise Profit, Paul Chrisp, Carole NadinCore Medical Publishing, Knutsford, UKIntroduction: Type 2 diabetes is increasing in prevalence worldwide and is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, mainly due to the development of complications. Vildagliptin is an inhibitor of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4, a new class of oral antidiabetic agents.Aims: To evaluate the role of vildagliptin in the management of type 2 diabetes.Evidence review: Clear evidence shows that vildagliptin improves glycemic control (measured by glycosylated hemoglobin and blood glucose levels more than placebo in adults with type 2 diabetes, either as monotherapy or in combination with metformin. Vildagliptin is as effective as pioglitazone and rosiglitazone, and slightly less effective than metformin, although better tolerated. Further glycemic control is achieved when adding vildagliptin to metformin, pioglitazone, or glimepride. There is evidence that vildagliptin improves beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity. Vildagliptin does not appear to be associated with weight gain or with a higher risk of hypoglycemia than placebo or other commonly used oral antidiabetic agents. Economic evidence is currently lacking.Place in therapy: Vildagliptin improves glycemic control with little if any weight gain or hypoglycemia in adult patients with type 2 diabetes when given alone or in combination with metformin, thiazolidinediones, or sulfonylureas. Since many diabetic patients require combination therapy, the complementary mechanism of action of vildagliptin and other commonly prescribed antidiabetic drugs represents an important new therapeutic option in diabetes management.Key words: dipeptidyl peptidase IV (dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibition, glycemic control, LAF 237, type 2 diabetes, vildagliptin

  20. The molecular evolution of four anti-malarial immune genes in the Anopheles gambiae species complex - art. no. 79

    OpenAIRE

    Parmakelis, A.; Slotman, M. A.; Marshall, J. C.; Awono Ambene, P. H.; Antonio Nkondjio, C.; Simard, Frédéric; Caccone, A; Powell, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    Background: If the insect innate immune system is to be used as a potential blocking step in transmission of malaria, then it will require targeting one or a few genes with highest relevance and ease of manipulation. The problem is to identify and manipulate those of most importance to malaria infection without the risk of decreasing the mosquito's ability to stave off infections by microbes in general. Molecular evolution methodologies and concepts can help identify such genes. Within the se...

  1. Nature's Chiral Catalyst and Anti-Malarial Agent: Isolation and Structure Elucidation of Cinchonine and Quinine from "Cinchona calisaya"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Anne-Marie; Kavanagh, David J.; McGovern, Fiona P.; Reilly, Joe W.; Walsh, John J.

    2012-01-01

    Nature is a well-recognized source of compounds of interest, but access is often an issue. One pertinent example is the cinchona alkaloids from the bark of "Cinchona calisaya." In this experiment, students at the third-year undergraduate level undertake the selective isolation and characterization of two of the four main alkaloids present in the…

  2. Crystal structures of multidrug-resistant HIV-1 protease in complex with two potent anti-malarial compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yong; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Woster, Patrick M.; Kovari, Ladislau C.; Gupta, Deepak (LECOM); (WSI); (NWU); (MUSC); (WSU)

    2012-06-19

    Two potent inhibitors (compounds 1 and 2) of malarial aspartyl protease, plasmepsin-II, were evaluated against wild type (NL4-3) and multidrug-resistant clinical isolate 769 (MDR) variants of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) aspartyl protease. Enzyme inhibition assays showed that both 1 and 2 have better potency against NL4-3 than against MDR protease. Crystal structures of MDR protease in complex with 1 and 2 were solved and analyzed. Crystallographic analysis revealed that the MDR protease exhibits a typical wide-open conformation of the flaps (Gly48 to Gly52) causing an overall expansion in the active site cavity, which, in turn caused unstable binding of the inhibitors. Due to the expansion of the active site cavity, both compounds showed loss of direct contacts with the MDR protease compared to the docking models of NL4-3. Multiple water molecules showed a rich network of hydrogen bonds contributing to the stability of the ligand binding in the distorted binding pockets of the MDR protease in both crystal structures. Docking analysis of 1 and 2 showed a decrease in the binding affinity for both compounds against MDR supporting our structure-function studies. Thus, compounds 1 and 2 show promising inhibitory activity against HIV-1 protease variants and hence are good candidates for further development to enhance their potency against NL4-3 as well as MDR HIV-1 protease variants.

  3. Hepatocellular carcinoma: From clinical practice to evidence-based treatment protocols

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Danijel; Galun; Dragan; Basaric; Marinko; Zuvela; Predrag; Bulajic; Aleksandar; Bogdanovic; Nemanja; Bidzic; Miroslav; Milicevic

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) is one of the major malignant diseases in many healthcare systems. The growing number of new cases diagnosed each year is nearly equal to the number of deaths from this cancer. Worldwide, HCC is a leading cause of cancerrelated deaths, as it is the fifth most common cancer and the third most important cause of cancer related death in men. Among various risk factors the two are prevailing: viral hepatitis, namely chronic hepatitis C virus is a well-established risk factor contributing to the rising incidence of HCC. The epidemic of obesity and the metabolic syndrome, not only in the United States but also in Asia, tend to become the leading cause of the long-term rise in the HCC incidence. Today, the diagnosis of HCC is established within the national surveillance programs in developed countries while the diagnosis of symptomatic, advanced stage disease still remains the characteristic of underdeveloped countries. Although many different staging systems have been developed and evaluated the BarcelonaClinic Liver Cancer staging system has emerged as the most useful to guide HCC treatment. Treatment allocation should be decided by a multidisciplinary board involving hepatologists, pathologists, radiologists, liver surgeons and oncologists guided by personalized-based medicine. This approach is important not only to balance between different oncologic treatments strategies but also due to the complexity of the disease(chronic liver disease and the cancer) and due to the large number of potentially efficient therapies. Careful patient selection and a tailored treatment modality for every patient, either potentially curative(surgical treatment and tumor ablation) or palliative(transarterial therapy, radioembolization and medical treatment, i.e., sorafenib) is mandatory to achieve the best treatment outcome.

  4. Tratamento da pré-eclâmpsia baseado em evidências Pre-eclampsia treatment according to scientific evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Noronha Neto

    2010-09-01

    . Currently, the best treatment for forms of pre-eclampsia is being discussed at different times in pregnancy and puerperium, with the objective to reduce the high rates of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Considering the pathophysiology of the event, anticipation of delivery is the best treatment for pre-eclampsia. The use of magnesium sulfate is recommended in all cases of severe pre-eclampsia and eclampsia for prevention and treatment of seizures. Likewise, treatment of hypertensive crises is recommended. Hydralazine, nifedipine and labetalol have been the most commonly used drugs for this purpose, but their use depends on the familiarity of the treating physician. Antenatal corticoid therapy is indicated whenever there is an imminent risk of preterm delivery between 24 and 34 weeks. In contrast, there is insufficient evidence to recommend bed rest and routine plasma volume expansion, and there is an urgent need for randomized clinical trials to determine whether maintenance antihypertensive treatment in pregnant women has benefits or risks for mothers and fetuses in all clinical forms of disease, particularly in cases of pure pre-eclampsia.

  5. Using biomarkers to predict treatment response in major depressive disorder: evidence from past and present studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thase, Michael E

    2014-12-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a heterogeneous condition with a variable response to a wide range of treatments. Despite intensive efforts, no biomarker has been identified to date that can reliably predict response or non-response to any form of treatment, nor has one been identified that can be used to identify those at high risk of developing treatment-resistant depression (ie, non-response to a sequence of treatments delivered for adequate duration and intensity). This manuscript reviews some past areas of research that have proved informative, such as studies using indexes of hypercortisolism or sleep disturbance, and more recent research findings using measures of inflammation and different indicators of regional cortical activation to predict treatment response. It is concluded that, although no method has yet been demonstrated to be sufficiently accurate to be applied in clinical practice, progress has been made. It thus seems likely that--at some point in the not-too-distant future--it will be possible to prospectively identify, at least for some MDD patients, the likelihood of response or non-response to cognitive therapy or various antidepressant medications.

  6. Can Vitex Agnus castus Be Used for the Treatment of Mastalgia? What Is the Current Evidence?

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    A. R. Carmichael

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been many treatments suggested for the management of mastalgia; one of these is the fruit extract of Vitex Agnus castus L. commonly known as Agnus castus, an extract of a deciduous shrub native to Mediterranean Europe and Central Asia. It is postulated that A. castus suppresses the stress-induced latent hyperprolactinemia which is a release of supra-physiological levels of prolactin in some patients in response to stressful stimuli. It is postulated that A. castus could be effective in the treatment of cyclical mastalgia by inhibiting the release of excess prolactin by blocking Dopamine-2 receptor type on pituitary. The adverse events following A. castus treatment are mild and reversible. The aim of this review is assess the efficacy of A. castus in the treatment of mastalgia. Data from randomized and non-randomized studies regarding the efficacy and safety of A. castus is reviewed in a systematic fashion. It is concluded that A. castus can be considered as an efficient alternative phytotherapeutic agent in the treatment of mastalgia.

  7. American Indian culture as substance abuse treatment: pursuing evidence for a local intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gone, Joseph P; Looking, Patrick E Calf

    2011-01-01

    Contemporary tribal commitments to traditional cultural reclamation and revitalization find continued expression by recent generational cohorts of American Indians who, when it comes to matters of recovery, healing, and wellness in the context of substance abuse, routinely assert that "our culture is our treatment." And yet, empirical investigations of this culture-as-treatment hypothesis--namely, that a (post)colonial return to indigenous cultural orientations and practices is sufficient for effecting abstinence and recovery from substance use disorders for many American Indians--have yet to appear in the scientific literature. Preliminary activities of a research partnership dedicated to the empirical exploration of this hypothesis for reducing Native American substance use disorders are summarized. Specifically, collaboration between a university-based research psychologist and a reservation-based substance abuse treatment program staff has thus far resulted in a detailed blueprint for a radically alternative, culturally-grounded intervention developed for reservation residents. This proposed alternative intervention--a seasonal cultural immersion camp designed to approximate the day-to-day experiences of prereservation ancestors--was designed for eventual implementation and evaluation with adult clients referred for residential treatment on the Blackfeet Indian reservation. It is anticipated that the proposed intervention will eventually afford empirical evaluation of the culture-as-treatment hypothesis.

  8. The impact of text message reminders on adherence to antimalarial treatment in northern Ghana: a randomized trial.

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    Julia R G Raifman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Low rates of adherence to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT regimens increase the risk of treatment failure and may lead to drug resistance, threatening the sustainability of current anti-malarial efforts. We assessed the impact of text message reminders on adherence to ACT regimens. METHODS: Health workers at hospitals, clinics, pharmacies, and other stationary ACT distributors in Tamale, Ghana provided flyers advertising free mobile health information to individuals receiving malaria treatment. The messaging system automatically randomized self-enrolled individuals to the control group or the treatment group with equal probability; those in the treatment group were further randomly assigned to receive a simple text message reminder or the simple reminder plus an additional statement about adherence in 12-hour intervals. The main outcome was self-reported adherence based on follow-up interviews occurring three days after treatment initiation. We estimated the impact of the messages on treatment completion using logistic regression. RESULTS: 1140 individuals enrolled in both the study and the text reminder system. Among individuals in the control group, 61.5% took the full course of treatment. The simple text message reminders increased the odds of adherence (adjusted OR 1.45, 95% CI [1.03 to 2.04], p-value 0.028. Receiving an additional message did not result in a significant change in adherence (adjusted OR 0.77, 95% CI [0.50 to 1.20], p-value 0.252. CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest that a simple text message reminder can increase adherence to antimalarial treatment and that additional information included in messages does not have a significant impact on completion of ACT treatment. Further research is needed to develop the most effective text message content and frequency. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01722734.

  9. Current concepts on posterior meniscal root lesion: A treatment algorithm based on the currently available evidence

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    Guan-Yang Song

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Meniscal root lesion is defined as an avulsion of the tibial insertion of the meniscus or a radial tear close to the meniscal insertion, which is commonly observed at the posterior region in the clinical practice. Although a number of biomechanical and clinical studies have shown the importance of the integrity of the posterior meniscal roots, the appropriate treatment is still controversial. The purposes of this review are to develop a current understanding of how the posterior meniscal root functions and to review the available treatment options for posterior meniscal root lesion.

  10. Lurasidone for the treatment of bipolar depression: an evidence-based review

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    Franklin R

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Rachel Franklin,1 Sam Zorowitz,1 Andrew K Corse,1 Alik S Widge,2 Thilo Deckersbach1 1Division of Neurotherapeutics, Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, 2Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA Abstract: Bipolar disorder (BD is a debilitating and difficult-to-treat psychiatric disease that presents a serious burden to patients’ lives as well as health care systems around the world. The essential diagnostic criterion for BD is episodes of mania or hypomania; however, the patients report that the majority of their time is spent in a depressive phase. Current treatment options for this component of BD have yet to achieve satisfactory remission rates. Lurasidone is a drug in the benzisothiazole class approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in June 2013 for the acute treatment of bipolar depression. Its pharmacological profile features high-affinity antagonism at D2, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT7 receptors; moderate-affinity antagonism at α2C-adrenergic receptors; low- to very low-affinity antagonism at α1A-adrenergic, α2A-adrenergic, H1, M1, and 5-HT2C receptors; and high-affinity partial agonism at 5-HT1A. Preliminary findings from two recent double-blinded clinical trials suggest that lurasidone is efficacious in treating bipolar I depression, with clinical effects manifesting as early as the first 2–3 weeks of treatment (as measured by the Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale and Clinical Global Impressions Scale for use in bipolar illness. Its therapeutic benefit appears to be comparable to the current US Food and Drug Administration-indicated treatments: quetiapine and olanzapine–fluoxetine, according to a measure of effect size known as number needed to treat. These studies reported relatively limited extrapyramidal and metabolic side effects as a result of treatment with lurasidone, with the most common side

  11. Does Scientific Evidence for the Use of Natural Products in the Treatment of Oral Candidiasis Exist? A Systematic Review

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    Gabriela Lacet Silva Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In view of the limitations of antifungal agents used in the treatment of oral candidiasis and the wide variety of natural products that have been studied as treatment of this disease, this systematic literature review proposed to evaluate whether scientific evidence attesting to the efficacy of natural products in the treatment of this disease exists. A systematic search in PubMed, MEDLINE, SciELO, Lilacs, and Cochrane Library databases was accomplished using the associations among the keywords Candida albicans, phytotherapy, biological products, denture stomatitis, and oral candidiasis in both English and Portuguese. Four independent observers evaluated the methodological quality of the resulting articles. Three studies were included for detailed analysis and evaluated according to the analysis protocol based on the CONSORT (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials 2010 statement. The tested products were different in all studies. Two studies mentioned random samples, but no study described the sample allocation. No study mentioned sample calculations, a prior pilot study, or examiner calibration, and only one trial reported sample losses. Differences between the tested products and the methodological designs among these studies did not allow the existence of scientific evidence related to the effectiveness of these products for the proposed subjects to be confirmed.

  12. Use of opioid analgesics in the treatment of cancer pain: evidence-based recommendations from the EAPC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraceni, Augusto; Hanks, Geoffrey; Kaasa, Stein; Bennett, Michael I; Brunelli, Cinzia; Cherny, Nathan; Dale, Ola; De Conno, Franco; Fallon, Marie; Hanna, Magdi; Haugen, Dagny Faksvåg; Juhl, Gitte; King, Samuel; Klepstad, Pål; Laugsand, Eivor A; Maltoni, Marco; Mercadante, Sebastiano; Nabal, Maria; Pigni, Alessandra; Radbruch, Lukas; Reid, Colette; Sjogren, Per; Stone, Patrick C; Tassinari, Davide; Zeppetella, Giovambattista

    2012-02-01

    Here we provide the updated version of the guidelines of the European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC) on the use of opioids for the treatment of cancer pain. The update was undertaken by the European Palliative Care Research Collaborative. Previous EAPC guidelines were reviewed and compared with other currently available guidelines, and consensus recommendations were created by formal international expert panel. The content of the guidelines was defined according to several topics, each of which was assigned to collaborators who developed systematic literature reviews with a common methodology. The recommendations were developed by a writing committee that combined the evidence derived from the systematic reviews with the panellists' evaluations in a co-authored process, and were endorsed by the EAPC Board of Directors. The guidelines are presented as a list of 16 evidence-based recommendations developed according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system.

  13. Growth factors as treatment for inflammatory bowel disease: A concise review of the evidence toward their potential clinical utility

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    Barahona-Garrido Josue

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the process of inflammation and repair of the intestinal mucosa in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, there occurs a complex and an unknown interplay of innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. This interaction of factors may explain why IBD is characterized by a relapsing and remitting clinical course. Different components of innate immunity, hormones and interleukins in IBD have been suggested to be impaired. The growth hormone, epidermal growth factor, keratinocyte growth factor and colony-stimulating factors have emerged as potential tools for the modulation of intestinal inflammation and repair. Despite promising results of initial studies, the evidence that justify treatment of patients in clinical practice is not enough as some of the trials are nonrandomized or included a small number of patients. In this concise review, we provide a summary of the most recent and relevant evidence regarding the potential therapeutic effects of growth factors in IBD.

  14. Cost comparison of microscopy vs. empiric treatment for malaria in southwestern nigeria: a prospective study

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    Davidson Mario

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Presumptive treatment for malaria is common in resource-limited settings, yet controversial given the imprecision of clinical diagnosis. The researchers compared costs of diagnosis and drugs for two strategies: (1 empirical treatment of malaria via clinical diagnosis; and (2 empirical diagnosis followed by treatment only with Giemsa smear confirmation. Methods Patients with a diagnosis of clinical malaria were recruited from a mission/university teaching hospital in southwestern Nigeria. The patients underwent free Giemsa thick (diagnosis and thin (differentiation smears, but paid for all anti-malarial drugs. Clinical diagnosis was made on clinicians' judgments based on symptoms, including fever, diarrhoea, headache, and body aches. The paediatric regimen was artesunate (6-9 tablets of 3 mg/kg on day one and 1.5 mg/kg for the next four days plus amodiaquine (10 mg/kg day 1-2 and 5 mg/kg on day three in suspension. Adults were given two treatment options: option one (four and one-half 50 mg artesunate tablets on day one and nine tablets for the next four days, plus three 500 mg sulphadoxine/25 mg pyrimethamine tablets and option two (same artesunate regimen plus nine 200 mg tablets of amodiaquine at 10 mg/kg day 1-2 and 5 mg/kg on day three. The researchers calculated the costs of smears/drugs from standard hospital charges. Results Doctors diagnosed 304 patients (170 adults ages >16 years and 134 pediatric with clinical malaria, prescribing antimalarial drugs to all. Giemsa thick smears were positive in 115/304 (38%. The typical patient cost for a Giemsa smear was 550 Naira (US$3.74 in 2009. For children, the cost of testing all, but treating only Giemsa positives was N888 ($6.04/child; the cost of empiric treatment of all who were clinically diagnosed was lower, N660 ($4.49/child. For adults, the cost of testing all, but treating only Giemsa positives was N711 ($4.84/adult for treatment option one (artesunate and

  15. Evaluation of an Evidence-Based Tobacco Treatment Curriculum for Psychiatry Residency Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, Judith J.; Fromont, Sebastien C.; Leek, Desiree; Hudmon, Karen Suchanek; Louie, Alan K.; Jacobs, Marc H.; Hall, Sharon M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Smokers with mental illness and addictive disorders account for nearly one in two cigarettes sold in the United States and are at high risk for smoking-related deaths and disability. Psychiatry residency programs provide a unique arena for disseminating tobacco treatment guidelines, influencing professional norms, and increasing access…

  16. [Evidence on afatinib in patients progressing on a first-line treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artal Cortés, Ángel; Gimeno Pelegrín, Joaquín; Alejandro, María Álvarez

    2016-04-01

    After description of the importance of EGFR mutations in non-small cell lung cancer and confirmation that tyrosine-kinase inhibitors are more beneficial than chemotherapy in patients with EGFR+ tumours, treatment with one of these drugs has become the standard recommendation. Despite this advance, patients continue to progress and consequently there is a need to search for alternative treatments. Some studies have analysed afatinib activity after first-generation TKI therapy, as well as its administration in combination with conventional chemotherapy. Afatinib produces significant response rates and progression-free survival times after the development of clinical resistance, which are independent of the presence of the T790M resistance mutation and can be attributed to continued pan-HER inhibition. In addition to the initial clinical trial, LUX-LUNG-1, data are available from the use of afatinib in routine clinical practice, within extended use programs. Overall, response rates of between 7 and 15% can be expected with a duration of approximately 24 months and a median progression-free time of about 4 months. A study combining afatinib with cetuximab has obtained a high response rate. Afatinib toxicity in second-line treatment is similar to that appears when the drug is used as first-line therapy (mainly mucocutaneous and diarrhoea) and can be managed with routine measures. In conclusion, afatinib should be considered as a treatment option in patients with EGFR mutations who show disease progression after a first tyrosine-kinase inhibitor.

  17. Clinical utility of apixaban in the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism: current evidence

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    Zalpour A

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ali Zalpour,1 Thein Hlaing Oo21Division of Pharmacy – Clinical Programs, 2Section of Thrombosis and Benign Hematology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Anticoagulation with heparin and vitamin K antagonist has been the mainstay of prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE for many years. In recent years, novel oral anticoagulants such as dabigatran etexilate (a direct thrombin inhibitor and rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban (a direct factor Xa inhibitor have emerged for the prevention and treatment of VTE. Novel oral anticoagulants have been shown to be noninferior to vitamin K antagonist or heparin in the prevention and treatment of VTE. This review specifically examines the role of apixaban in the prevention and treatment of VTE based on the available literature. The management of apixaban in the perioperative setting is also explored because some patients on apixaban may require surgical intervention. Finally, we discuss the management of apixaban-induced major bleeding complications, the relevance of drug–drug interactions, and patient education.Keywords: new oral anticoagulants, apixaban, venous thromboembolism, thromboprophylaxis

  18. The treatment of patients with otosclerosis. From expert opinion to evidence-based practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bittermann, A.J.N.

    2014-01-01

    Finishing this thesis we summarize the findings from the thesis chapters and conclude that we were able to add usable new information to the otosclerosis field. We took the initiative to aim for a more standardized treatment approach with a step-by-step guideline instruction manual (chapter 2 ). Thi

  19. Spotlight on elotuzumab in the treatment of multiple myeloma: the evidence to date

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    Weisel K

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Katja Weisel Department of Hematology/Oncology, University Hospital Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany Abstract: Despite advances in the treatment of multiple myeloma, it remains an incurable disease, with relapses and resistances frequently observed. Recently, immunotherapies, in particular, monoclonal antibodies, have become important treatment options in anticancer therapies. Elotuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody to signaling lymphocytic activation molecule F7, which is highly expressed on myeloma cells and, to a lower extent, on selected leukocyte subsets such as natural killer cells. By directly activating natural killer cells and by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, elotuzumab exhibits a dual mechanism of action leading to myeloma cell death with minimal effects on normal tissue. In several nonclinical models of multiple myeloma, elotuzumab was effective as a single agent and in combination with standard myeloma treatments, supporting the use of elotuzumab in patients. In combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone, elotuzumab showed a significant increase in tumor response rates and progression-free survival in patients with relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma. This review summarizes the nonclinical and clinical development of elotuzumab as a single agent and in combination with established therapies for the treatment of multiple myeloma. Keywords: multiple myeloma, elotuzumab, SLAMF7, CS1, antibody-based immunotherapy

  20. Improving the Targeting of Treatment: Evidence from College Remediation. NBER Working Paper No. 18457

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Clayton, Judith; Crosta, Peter M.; Belfield, Clive R.

    2012-01-01

    At an annual cost of roughly $7 billion nationally, remedial coursework is one of the single largest interventions intended to improve outcomes for underprepared college students. But like a costly medical treatment with non-trivial side effects, the value of remediation overall depends upon whether those most likely to benefit can be identified…

  1. Evidence-Based Behavioral Treatment of Dog Phobia with Young Children: Two Case Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Anna C.; Rudy, Brittany M.; Davis, Thompson E., III; Matson, Johnny L.

    2013-01-01

    Specific phobias are among the most common anxiety disorders, especially in children. Unfortunately, a paucity of literature exists regarding the treatment of specific phobia in young children, despite the knowledge that traditional techniques (i.e., cognitive-behavioral therapy [CBT]) may not be practical. Therefore, the purpose of this article…

  2. Diagnosis, treatment and prevention of ankle sprains: an evidence-based clinical guideline.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoffs, G.M.; Bekerom, M. van den; Elders, L.A.; Beek, P.A. van; Hullegie, W.A.; Bloemers, G.M.; Heus, E.M. de; Loogman, M.C.; Rosenbrand, K.C.; Kuipers, T.; Hoogstraten, J.W.; Dekker, R.; Duis, H.J. Ten; Dijk, C.N. van; Tulder, M.W. van; Wees, P.J. van der; Bie, R.A. de

    2012-01-01

    Ankle injuries are a huge medical and socioeconomic problem. Many people have a traumatic injury of the ankle, most of which are a result of sports. Total costs of treatment and work absenteeism due to ankle injuries are high. The prevention of recurrences can result in large savings on medical cost

  3. Treatment of Chronic Pain in Older People Evidence-Based Choice of Strong-Acting Opioids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ojik, Annette L.; Jansen, Paul A. F.; Brouwers, Jacobus R. B. J.; van Roon, Eric N.

    2012-01-01

    In the treatment of chronic malignant and non-malignant pain, opioids are used as strong analgesics. Frail elderly patients often have multiple comorbidities and use multiple medicines, leading to an increased risk of clinically relevant drug-drug and drug-disease interactions. Age-related changes a

  4. Diagnosis, treatment and prevention of ankle sprains : an evidence-based clinical guideline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoffs, Gino M.; van den Bekerom, Michel; Elders, Leon A. M.; van Beek, Peter A.; Hullegie, Wim A. M.; Bloemers, Guus M. F. M.; de Heus, Elly M.; Loogman, Masja C. M.; Rosenbrand, Kitty C. J. G. M.; Kuipers, Ton; Hoogstraten, J. W. A. P.; Dekker, Rienk; ten Duis, Henk-Jan; van Dijk, C. Niek; van Tulder, Maurits W.; van der Wees, Philip J.; de Bie, Rob A.

    2012-01-01

    Ankle injuries are a huge medical and socioeconomic problem. Many people have a traumatic injury of the ankle, most of which are a result of sports. Total costs of treatment and work absenteeism due to ankle injuries are high. The prevention of recurrences can result in large savings on medical cost

  5. Experimental evidence for growth factor treatment and function in certain neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, J E

    1993-11-01

    This issue focuses on the potential utilization or involvement of growth factors in Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and epilepsy. Certainly, the role of growth factors in other neurological disorders associated with stroke, trauma, and neurodegeneration needs to be considered. While there is no direct evidence to indicate that a neurological disorder is associated with the compromised function of a specific growth factor, the use of these molecules as therapeutic agents is justifiable. Undoubtedly, the outcome of current clinical trials will certainly influence future decisions on the use of growth factor therapies.

  6. Phytic acid as a potential treatment for alzheimer's pathology: evidence from animal and in vitro models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anekonda, Thimmappa S; Wadsworth, Teri L; Sabin, Robert; Frahler, Kate; Harris, Christopher; Petriko, Babett; Ralle, Martina; Woltjer, Randy; Quinn, Joseph F

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) causes progressive, age-dependent cortical and hippocampal dysfunction leading to abnormal intellectual capacity and memory. We propose a novel protective treatment for AD pathology with phytic acid (inositol hexakisphosphate), a phytochemical found in food grains and a key signaling molecule in mammalian cells. We evaluated the protective and beneficial effects of phytic acid against amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology in MC65 cells and the Tg2576 mouse model. In MC65 cells, 48-72-hour treatment with phytic acid provided complete protection against amyloid precursor protein-C-terminal fragment-induced cytotoxicity by attenuating levels of increased intracellular calcium, hydrogen peroxide, superoxide, Aβ oligomers, and moderately upregulated the expression of autophagy (beclin-1) protein. In a tolerance paradigm, wild type mice were treated with 2% phytic acid in drinking water for 70 days. Phytic acid was well tolerated. Ceruloplasmin activity, brain copper and iron levels, and brain superoxide dismutase and ATP levels were unaffected by the treatment. There was a significant increase in brain levels of cytochrome oxidase and a decrease in lipid peroxidation with phytic acid administration. In a treatment paradigm, 12-month old Tg2576 and wild type mice were treated with 2% phytic acid or vehicle for 6 months. Brain levels of copper, iron, and zinc were unaffected. The effects of phytic acid were modest on the expression of AβPP trafficking-associated protein AP180, autophagy-associated proteins (beclin-1, LC3B), sirtuin 1, the ratio of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (PAMPK) to AMPK, soluble Aβ1-40, and insoluble Aβ1-42. These results suggest that phytic acid may provide a viable treatment option for AD.

  7. Alprostadil cream in the treatment of erectile dysfunction: clinical evidence and experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzin, Béatrice

    2016-08-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a very common disorder with a deep impact on quality of life on both patients and partners. Several options are available for treating ED: oral pharmacotherapy with phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors currently represents the first-line option for many patients with ED. Alprostadil, a prostaglandin, has been marketed for many years as a urethral stick and an intracavernous injection for the treatment of ED. It is now available in the form of a cream (Vitaros/Virirec), a noninvasive treatment which combines an active drug (alprostadil, a synthetic prostaglandin E1) with a skin enhancer improving its local absorption directly at the site of action. Alprostadil has a favourable pharmacodynamic profile and is poorly absorbed in systemic circulation, which makes it suitable in a lot of circumstances and results in a reduced risk of adverse effects (AEs). Systemic AEs are reported in only 3% of the treated population. Clinical efficacy has been demonstrated in both phase II and III trials, showing a global efficacy up to 83% with the 300 μg dose in patients with severe ED, significantly better than placebo. Its fast onset of action and lack of interactions with other drugs makes alprostadil cream a possible first-line therapeutic option for some patients with ED: individuals who are reluctant to take systemic treatments or have AEs, patients who do not respond, cannot tolerate, or do not accept PDE5 inhibitor therapy, and patients treated with nitrates. Therefore, this new treatment for ED can be offered to patients and could help address the needs unmet by other treatments.

  8. Carbidopa/levodopa/entacapone: the evidence for its place in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markos Poulopoulos

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Markos Poulopoulos, Cheryl WatersDepartment of Neurology, Division of Movement Disorders, Columbia University Medical Center, Neurological Institute of New York, Center of Parkinson’s Disease and Other Movement Disorders, New York, NY, USAIntroduction: Parkinson’s disease (PD is a common neurodegenerative disease. In the 1960s, it was shown that the degeneration of dopamine producing neurons in the substantia nigra (SN caused the motor features of PD. Dopamine replacement with levodopa, a dopamine precursor, resulted in remarkable benefit. Yet, the intermittent administration of levodopa is a major cause of motor complications, such as “wearing-off ” of levodopa’s benefit and involuntary movements, known as dyskinesia. Therefore, agents that prolong levodopa’s half-life were employed, such as carbidopa, an aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AADC inhibitor, and entacapone, a catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT inhibitor. The combination product carbidopa/levodopa/entacapone (CLE was approved in 2003 for the treatment of PD patients.Aims: To assess the evidence for the place of CLE in the treatment of PD.Evidence review: CLE has a good efficacy, safety and tolerability profile, similar to that of entacapone taken separately with carbidopa/levodopa (CL. Compared to CL alone, it prolongs levodopa’s benefit, and improves the quality of life but not the motor performance in PD patients with nondebilitating “wearing-off ” or dyskinesia. However, it increases the dyskinesia rate in early PD patients, and has adverse events in advanced patients with significant motor complications. There is insufficient evidence regarding cost-effectiveness.Place in therapy: CLE is an attractive alternative for patients with nondisabling “wearing-off ” or dyskinesia taking CL with or without entacapone. It cannot be recommended for early PD patients, as it can induce more dyskinesia than CL alone, or in any patients who seem to have more adverse

  9. Therapeutic efficacy of chloroquine for treatment of Plasmodium vivax malaria cases in Halaba district, South Ethiopia

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    Bacha Ketema

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chloroquine is an anti-malarial drug being used to treat Plasmodium vivax malaria cases in Ethiopia. However, emergence of chloroquine resistant strains of the parasite has challenged the current efficacy of the drug. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of chloroquine against P. vivax strains in one of the malaria endemic areas of Ethiopia, namely Halaba district, located in South Nations and Nationalities Peoples Region (SNNPR of South Ethiopia Results Among 87 malaria patients enrolled in the study, only 80 of them completed the 28-days follow-up. Seven of them dropped from the study for different reasons. Among those study participants that completed their follow-up, 69 were classified under the category of adequate clinical and parasitological response (ACPR. However, the remaining 11 cases were considered as under treatment failure mainly due to recurrence of parasitemia on day 7 (four patients, day 14 (six patients, and day 21 (one patient. The age of all cases of treatment failures was found to be less than 20 years. The load of parasitemia of patients with treatment failure on day of admission (4709.4/μl was higher than day of recurrence (372.37/μl. Parasite reduction ratio (PRR of treatment failure cases was 12.6/μl. Conclusion This report revealed the rise in treatment failure (13% [95% CI = 0.074 - 0.217] as compared to earlier reports from Ethiopia. It signals the spreading of chloroquine resistant P. vivax (CRPv strains to malaria endemic areas of Ethiopia. It is recommended that all concerned bodies should act aggressively before further expansion of the current drug resistant malaria.

  10. Canagliflozin in the treatment of type 2 diabetes: an evidence-based review of its place in therapy

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    Karagiannis T

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Karagiannis,1 Eleni Bekiari,1 Apostolos Tsapas1,2 1Clinical Research and Evidence‑Based Medicine Unit, Second Medical Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece; 2Harris Manchester College, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom Introduction: Deciding on an optimal medication choice for type 2 diabetes is often challenging, due to the increasing number of treatment options. Canagliflozin is a novel glucose-lowering agent belonging to sodium–glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2 inhibitors. Aim: The aim of this study was to examine and summarize the evidence based on the efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness of canagliflozin for type 2 diabetes. Evidence review: Compared to placebo, canagliflozin 100 and 300 mg lower glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c by ~0.6%–0.8%, respectively. Canagliflozin appears to be slightly more effective than dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitors in reducing HbA1c. It also has a favorable effect on body weight and blood pressure, both versus placebo and most active comparators. However, treatment with canagliflozin is associated with increased incidence of genital tract infections and osmotic diuresis-related adverse events. Based on short-term data, canagliflozin is not associated with increased risk for all-cause mortality and cardiovascular outcomes. Economic evaluation studies from various countries indicate that canagliflozin is a cost-effective option in dual- or triple-agent regimens. Place in therapy: As monotherapy, canagliflozin could be used in patients for whom metformin is contraindicated or not tolerated. For patients on background treatment with metformin, canagliflozin appears to be superior to sulfonylureas with respect to body weight, blood pressure and risk for hypoglycemia, and to DPP-4 inhibitors in terms of lowering HbA1c, body weight, and blood pressure. Canagliflozin also seems to be cost-effective compared with sulfonylureas and DPP-4 inhibitors as add

  11. [Diagnosis and pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment of fibromyalgia. Compendium of the best evidence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, P; Gentile, M J; Helfenstein, M; Jannaut, M J; Liendo, V; Ríos, C; Vidal Neira, L; Messina, O D

    2011-04-01

    Chronic generalized musculoskeletal pain is one of the most common reasons for consultation in daily medical practice, and it poses a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Fibromyalgia is one of the so-called central sensitization syndromes, mainly characterized by generalized pain in the musculoskeletal system. Fibromyalgia diagnosis is basically clinical, and it should be considered whenever patients complain of generalized pain. Patients with chronic inflammatory diseases may also suffer from fibromyalgia, and this condition may be the reason for the pain they complain of in medical consultations. The aim of this review paper has been to provide our readers with a summary of the best available evidence about this disease based upon an updated review of scientific literature on fibromyalgia aspects, such as its diagnostic criteria, pathophysiology, clinical profile and differential diagnosis, followed by an ample systematic review of its pharmacological and non-pharmacological aspects. This systematic review analyses the multidisciplinary aspects in which sufficient evidence was found in the two strongest types of clinical research design, 1) controlled clinical trials and 2) systematic reviews or meta-analysis. This review was developed by a group of Latin American specialists from several countries, recognized as a group of experts in fibromyalgia study.

  12. Adapting an evidence-based HIV prevention intervention for pregnant African-American women in substance abuse treatment

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    Winona Poulton

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Wendee M Wechsberg1, Felicia A Browne1, Winona Poulton1, Rachel Middlesteadt Ellerson1, Ashley Simons-Rudolph1, Deborah Haller2,  1RTI International,* Research Triangle Park, NC, USA; 2Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY, USA,  *RTI International is a trade name of Research Triangle InstituteAbstract: An adaptation of an evidence-based, woman-focused intervention designed to reduce HIV risk behaviors was conducted for pregnant, African-American women in substance abuse treatment in North Carolina. The intervention adaptation process included focus groups, expert panels, and the filming of women who spoke about their experiences with pregnancy, drug use, sex risk behaviors, HIV testing and treatment, need for substance abuse treatment, violence, and victimization. The assessment instrument was adapted for pregnant women and the intervention was organized into a 4-session PowerPoint presentation, with an additional session if a woman tested positive for HIV. All sessions and assessment instrument were installed on laptop computers for portability in treatment programs. We pilot tested our adaptation with 59 pregnant African-American women who had used an illicit drug within the past year and were enrolled in substance abuse treatment. At baseline, 41% were currently homeless, 76% were unemployed, 90% had not planned their current pregnancy, and approximately 70% reported drug use since finding out about the pregnancy. This sample of participants rated the intervention sessions and were highly satisfied with their experience, resulting in a mean satisfaction score of 6.5 out of 7. Pregnant African-American women who use drugs need substance abuse treatment that they do not currently access. Woman-focused HIV interventions help to address intersecting risk behaviors and need for treatment prevalent among this vulnerable group.Keywords: African-American woman, HIV prevention pregnancy, drug use, violence, sexual

  13. Sofosbuvir for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C: between current evidence and future perspectives

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    Degasperi E

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Elisabetta Degasperi, Alessio AghemoDivision of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, AM and M Migliavacca Center, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Maggiore Hospital, University of Milan, Milan, ItalyAbstract: In recent years, clinical research in the field of new treatments for chronic hepatitis C (HCV has been devoted to developing regimens based on direct-acting antivirals (DAAs, with the goal of increasing treatment efficacy and improving tolerability and safety. This can be achieved by Peginterferon (PegIFN-free anti-HCV regimens, as PegIFN is responsible for many side effects and limits treatment access due to contraindications in some patient categories. Sofosbuvir (SOF is the first compound to enter the market with IFN-free combination regimens; it belongs to the nucleotide inhibitors of viral polymerase NS5B and acts as a chain terminator during the HCV replication process, exhibiting pan-genotypic antiviral activity with a high barrier to resistance. Clinical trials in HCV genotype 2/3 patients have demonstrated optimal efficacy in HCV-2, where the combination SOF/ribavirin (Rbv for 12 weeks resulted in >90% sustained virological response (SVR rates, while HCV-3 patients with advanced liver fibrosis and previous failure to PegIFN plus Rbv therapy still require individualized and optimized treatment strategies. Historically difficult-to-treat genotypes HCV-1, -4–6 can benefit from reduced duration of PegIFN plus SOF and Rbv, while IFN-free regimens in these patients will be based on SOF in combination with other DAA classes. Due to an optimal tolerability and safety profile with no significant drug-to-drug interactions, SOF is currently undergoing clinical trials in the setting of pre- and post-liver transplantation and HIV-coinfected patients, with the objective to address the until now unmet need for safe and efficient treatment in these populations. This article provides an overview of SOF features and the main clinical trials, discussing

  14. Evidence for use of mood stabilizers and anticonvulsants in the treatment of nonaffective disorders in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaladoss, Alfred; Roberts, Nasreen; Amaladoss, Franklin

    2010-01-01

    Mood stabilizers and anticonvulsants have been frequently used to control behaviors in children and adolescent with nonaffective disorders. The purpose of this study was to review the literature to evaluate the evidence of these agents as treatment options in this subset of patients. We reviewed all the literature between 1949 and 2009 on the use of anticonvulsants and mood stabilizers in controlling severe behavior dysregulation and aggression in child and adolescent who do not meet the criteria for any mood disorder. The review revealed a total of 19 studies. Of the different mood stabilizers/anticonvulsants, both lithium and divalproex showed some promise in treating children and adolescents with nonmood disorders. Larger studies are nevertheless needed to support the ongoing use of these current anticonvulsants and mood stabilizers in children and adolescents with nonmood disorders. Also, further investigation to the potential use in the long term would need to be established, bearing in mind the balance of side effects and treatment benefit.

  15. Sustained adoption of an evidence-based treatment: a survey of clinicians certified in problem-solving therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabb, Rebecca M; Areán, Patricia A; Hegel, Mark T

    2012-01-01

    Training models that incorporate case supervision in addition to didactic instruction appear to be effective in maximizing clinicians' proficiency in evidence-based treatments (EBTs). However, it is unknown the extent to which these models promote sustained adoption of EBTs. We describe the results of an online survey on post-training utilization of an EBT, problem-solving therapy (PST), among 40 clinicians highly trained in PST. Seventy-five percent of the survey's 40 respondents reported that they continued to use PST in their clinical practices. Many PST-trained clinicians reported that they had modified the PST protocol in their clinical practices according to patient characteristics or preferences. Considering these results, we recommend emphasizing patient variability and treatment tailoring throughout the training process as a means for promoting clinicians' sustained adoption of EBTs.

  16. Evidence for Distinguishable Treatment Costs among Paranoid Schizophrenia and Schizoaffective Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Dusan Hirjak; Achim Hochlehnert; Philipp Arthur Thomann; Katharina Maria Kubera; Knut Schnell

    2016-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia spectrum disorders result in enormous individual suffering and financial burden on patients and on society. In Germany, there are about 1,000,000 individuals suffering from schizophrenia (SZ) or schizoaffective disorder (SAD), a combination of psychotic and affective symptoms. Given the heterogeneous nature of these syndromes, one may assume that there is a difference in treatment costs among patients with paranoid SZ and SAD. However, the current the national system ...

  17. Integrating neurobiology and psychopathology into evidence-based treatment of social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebowitz, Michael R; Ninan, Philip T; Schneier, Franklin R; Blanco, Carlos

    2005-10-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is a common, chronic psychiatric disorder characterized by a persistent fear of social or performance situations in which embarrassment can occur. This disorder typically appears during the mid-adolescent years and is unremitting throughout life if not properly treated. SAD presents as two subtypes: the more common and debilitating generalized form, and the nongeneralized form, which consists predominantly of performance anxiety. The majority of patients with SAD have comorbid mental disorders, including mood, anxiety, and substance abuse. No single development theory has been proposed to account for the origins of SAD, although current understanding of the etiology of SAD posits an interaction between psychological and biological factors. Risk factors include environmental and parenting influences and dysfunctional cognitive and conditioning events in early childhood. The neurobiology of SAD appears to involve neurochemical dysfunction, as evidenced by studies of neuroreceptor imaging, neuroendocrine function, and profiles of response to specific medications. Clinical trials have demonstrated that benzodiazepines and antidepressants are effective in the treatment of SAD. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are emerging as the first-line treatment for SAD, based on their proven safety, tolerability, and efficacy. Goals for ongoing future research include development of approaches to achieve remission, to convert nonresponders and partial responders to full responders, and to prevent relapse and maintain long-term efficacy. This monograph explores the epidemiology, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis of SAD, with a focus on neural circuitry of social relationships and neurochemical dysfunction. The prevalence, rates of recognition and treatment, patterns of comorbidity, quality-of-life issues, and natural history of SAD are discussed as well as pharmacologic and psychosocial treatment strategies for SAD.

  18. Narrative exposure therapy: an evidence-based treatment for multiple and complex trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Ruud A. Jongedijk

    2014-01-01

    Narrative exposure therapy (NET) is a recently developed, short-term treatment for patients with a posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as a result of multiple trauma. NET can be applied very successfully in patients with complex trauma complaints (Jongedijk, 2014; Schauer, Neuner, & Elbert, 2011).An important feature of NET is that trauma processing is never an isolated event but is always embedded in the context of a traumatic event and in the life history as a whole. At the start, the ...

  19. Molecular Targeted Therapies for the Treatment of Leptomeningeal Carcinomatosis: Current Evidence and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dae-Won; Lee, Kyung-Hun; Kim, Jin Wook; Keam, Bhumsuk

    2016-07-05

    Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis (LMC) is the multifocal seeding of cerebrospinal fluid and leptomeninges by malignant cells. The incidence of LMC is approximately 5% in patients with malignant tumors overall and the rate is increasing due to increasing survival time of cancer patients. Eradication of the disease is not yet possible, so the treatment goals of LMC are to improve neurologic symptoms and to prolong survival. A standard treatment for LMC has not been established due to low incidences of LMC, the rapidly progressing nature of the disease, heterogeneous populations with LMC, and a lack of randomized clinical trial results. Treatment options for LMC include intrathecal chemotherapy, systemic chemotherapy, and radiation therapy, but the prognoses remain poor with a median survival of <3 months. Recently, molecular targeted agents have been applied in the clinic and have shown groundbreaking results in specific patient groups epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted therapy or an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor in lung cancer, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-directed therapy in breast cancer, and CD20-targeted therapy in B cell lymphoma). Moreover, there are results indicating that the use of these agents under proper dose and administration routes can be effective for managing LMC. In this article, we review molecular targeted agents for managing LMC.

  20. Molecular Targeted Therapies for the Treatment of Leptomeningeal Carcinomatosis: Current Evidence and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Won Lee

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis (LMC is the multifocal seeding of cerebrospinal fluid and leptomeninges by malignant cells. The incidence of LMC is approximately 5% in patients with malignant tumors overall and the rate is increasing due to increasing survival time of cancer patients. Eradication of the disease is not yet possible, so the treatment goals of LMC are to improve neurologic symptoms and to prolong survival. A standard treatment for LMC has not been established due to low incidences of LMC, the rapidly progressing nature of the disease, heterogeneous populations with LMC, and a lack of randomized clinical trial results. Treatment options for LMC include intrathecal chemotherapy, systemic chemotherapy, and radiation therapy, but the prognoses remain poor with a median survival of <3 months. Recently, molecular targeted agents have been applied in the clinic and have shown groundbreaking results in specific patient groups epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-targeted therapy or an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK inhibitor in lung cancer, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2-directed therapy in breast cancer, and CD20-targeted therapy in B cell lymphoma. Moreover, there are results indicating that the use of these agents under proper dose and administration routes can be effective for managing LMC. In this article, we review molecular targeted agents for managing LMC.

  1. Does contraceptive treatment in wildlife result in side effects? A review of quantitative and anecdotal evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Meeghan E; Cameron, Elissa Z

    2010-01-01

    The efficacy of contraceptive treatments has been extensively tested, and several formulations are effective at reducing fertility in a range of species. However, these formulations should minimally impact the behavior of individuals and populations before a contraceptive is used for population manipulation, but these effects have received less attention. Potential side effects have been identified theoretically and we reviewed published studies that have investigated side effects on behavior and physiology of individuals or population-level effects, which provided mixed results. Physiological side effects were most prevalent. Most studies reported a lack of secondary effects, but were usually based on qualitative data or anecdotes. A meta-analysis on quantitative studies of side effects showed that secondary effects consistently occur across all categories and all contraceptive types. This contrasts with the qualitative studies, suggesting that anecdotal reports are insufficient to investigate secondary impacts of contraceptive treatment. We conclude that more research is needed to address fundamental questions about secondary effects of contraceptive treatment and experiments are fundamental to conclusions. In addition, researchers are missing a vital opportunity to use contraceptives as an experimental tool to test the influence of reproduction, sex and fertility on the behavior of wildlife species.

  2. Stem-cell treatment in disc degeneration: What is the evidence?

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    Manuela Peletti-Figueiró

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To review the potential role of stem cells in treating degenerative disc disease of the intervertebral disc (IVD. A review was performed of articles from the Medline database concerning stem cells and degenerative disc disease (DDD. To discuss the data, the papers were classified as: review, in vitro, experimental, and clinical. The currently available treatments were basically for symptom reduction, not to revert the IVD degenerative process. The use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC is being proposed as an option of treatment for DDD. In vitro studies have shown that the MSC are able to differentiate into NP cells and that the MSC also reduce the inflammatory levels of the degenerated IVD. Besides, experimental studies demonstrated that the MSC remained viable when injected into the IVD, and that they were able to regenerate partially from the degenerated IVD and its structure. The few clinical studies found in the literature presented diverging results. The use of MSC is being widely studied and shows promising results for the treatment of DDD. Although many advances are being achieved in studies in vitro and experimental, there is a lack of clinical studies to prove the role of MSC in DDD management.

  3. Evidence based approach to the treatment of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

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    William J Peppard

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available William J Peppard1, Anne Daniels1, Lynne Fehrenbacher2, Jamie Winner31Froedtert Hospital Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA; 2Aurora St Luke’s Medical Center Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA; 3Clement J Zablocki VA Medical Center, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USAAbstract: Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA infections have increased dramatically over the last two decades. The types of infections can range from complicated skin and skin structure infections (cSSSI to pneumonia and endocarditis. Oral antimicrobial therapy, such as trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, clindamycin, long-acting tetracyclines, or linezolid may provide enhanced benefit to those with uncomplicated cutaneous lesions when used in conjunction with incision and drainage in an outpatient setting. However, resistance, susceptibilities, patient-specific circumstances, and adverse effects can impact a healthcare professional’s choice of antibiotics. In patients with complicated infections requiring hospitalization or parenteral treatment, vancomycin remains the drug of choice, even though increased resistance and decreased efficacy have crept into clinical practice. Linezolid, quinupristin/dalfopristin, daptomycin, and tigecycline are alternative intravenous agents for the treatment of CA-MRSA. Investigational agents such as dalbavancin, telavancin, oritivancin, iclaprim, ceftobiprole, ceftaroline, and others may expand our therapeutic armamentarium for the treatment of infections caused by CA-MRSA in the future.Keywords: community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, CA-MRSA, complicated skin and skin structure infections, cSSSI, Panton-Valentine leukocidin, PVL, in vitro activity

  4. Anti-angiogenesis in hepatocellular carcinoma treatment: Current evidence and future perspectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Martin-Walter Welker; Joerg Trojan

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is among the most common cancer diseases worldwide. Arterial hypervascularisation is an essential step for HCC tumorigenesis and can be targeted by transarterial chemoembolization (TACE). This interventional method is the standard treatment for patients with intermediate stage HCC, but is also applied as "bridging" therapy for patients awaiting liver transplantation in many centers worldwide. Usually the devascularization effect induced by TACE is transient, consequently resulting in repeated cycles of TACE every 4-8 wk. Despite documented survival benefits, TACE can also induce the up-regulation of proangiogenic and growth factors, which might contribute to accelerated progression in patients with incomplete response. In 2007, sorafenib, a multi-tyrosine kinase and angiogenesis inhibitor, was approved as the first systemic treatment for advanced stage HCC. Other active targeted compounds, either inhibitors of angiogenesis and/or growth factors, are currently being investigated in numerous clinical trials. To overcome revascularisation or tumor progression under TACE treatment it seems therefore attractive to combine TACE with systemic targeted agents, which might theoretically block the effects of proangiogenic and growth factors. Over the last 12 mo, several retrospective or prospective cohort studies combining TACE and sorafenib have been published. Nevertheless, robust results of the efficacy and tolerability of such combination strategies as proven by randomized, controlled trials are awaited in the next two years.

  5. Anticoagulant treatment and survival in cancer patients. The evidence from clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecumberri, Ramón; Páramo, José A; Rocha, Eduardo

    2005-09-01

    The association between cancer and an increased incidence of venous thromboembolism (Trousseau syndrome) is well characterized and recent studies have shown that the hemostatic system plays a key role at different stages in the process of tumorigenesis. Anticoagulant drugs therefore appear to be an attractive strategy in cancer therapy, with an effect that would surpass the benefit of preventing thrombosis. This hypothesis was initially supported by the post-hoc analysis of clinical trials not primarily designed to evaluate the effect of anticoagulants, mainly low molecular weight heparins (LMWH), on cancer survival. Other studies regarding the addition of unfractionated heparin or oral anticoagulants to standard cancer treatment offered controversial results. However, recent investigations among cancer patients without deep venous thrombosis, with cancer-related mortality as the primary end point, suggest that at least in some patients LMWH may exert an antineoplastic effect in vivo and alter the natural history of malignant disease by increasing the response rates and, therefore, improving survival. Additional research on this field is needed to clarify the biological mechanisms involved and to answer yet unsolved questions such as the types of tumor and stages of disease most suitable for this treatment as well as how to optimize treatment regimens.

  6. The Expanding Evidence Base for rTMS Treatment of Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Mark S.; Taylor, Joseph J.; Short, E. Baron

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Daily left prefrontal transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) for several weeks was first proposed as an acute treatment for depression in the early 1990’s, and was FDA approved in 2008. In the past year several important studies have been published that extend our understanding of this novel treatment approach. Recent findings The first round of multisite clinical trials with TMS addressed whether prefrontal rTMS has efficacy and were conducted in carefully selected depressed patients who were antidepressant medication free. Several more recent studies assess the clinical effectiveness of TMS and report that about 35–40% of real world patients who are commonly taking adjunctive antidepressants reach remission with a modest side effect profile. There are also new studies examining the durability of the TMS induced antidepressant effect. 58% of TMS remitters remain remitted at 3-month follow-up. Summary These recent studies suggest that daily left prefrontal TMS over several weeks as a treatment for depression appears to not only have efficacy in rigorous randomized controlled trials, but is effective in real world settings, with remission in 30–40% of patients. The TMS antidepressant effect, once achieved, appears to be as durable as with other antidepressant medications or interventions. Much more research is needed, particular with issues such as the TMS coil location, stimulation intensity and frequency, and dosing strategy. PMID:23154644

  7. The SCIDOTS Project: Evidence of benefits of an integrated tobacco cessation intervention in tuberculosis care on treatment outcomes

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    Syed Sulaiman Syed Azhar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is substantial evidence to support the association between tuberculosis (TB and tobacco smoking and that the smoking-related immunological abnormalities in TB are reversible within six weeks of cessation. Therefore, connecting TB and tobacco cessation interventions may produce significant benefits and positively impact TB treatment outcomes. However, no study has extensively documented the evidence of benefits of such integration. SCIDOTS Project is a study from the context of a developing nation aimed to determine this. Methods An integrated TB-tobacco intervention was provided by trained TB directly observed therapy short-course (DOTS providers at five chest clinics in Malaysia. The study was a prospective non-randomized controlled intervention using quasi-experimental design. Using Transtheoretical Model approach, 120 eligible participants who were current smokers at the time of TB diagnosis were assigned to either of two treatment groups: conventional TB DOTS plus smoking cessation intervention (integrated intervention or SCIDOTS group or conventional TB DOTS alone (comparison or DOTS group. At baseline, newly diagnosed TB patients considering quitting smoking within the next 30 days were placed in the integrated intervention group, while those who were contemplating quitting were assigned to the comparison group. Eleven sessions of individualized cognitive behavioral therapy with or without nicotine replacement therapy were provided to each participant in the integrated intervention group. The impacts of the novel approach on biochemically validated smoking cessation and TB treatment outcomes were measured periodically as appropriate. Results A linear effect on both 7-day point prevalence abstinence and continuous abstinence was observed over time in the intervention group. At the end of 6 months, patients who received the integrated intervention had significantly higher rate of success in quitting smoking when

  8. Treatment Efficacy of Integrative Family and Systems Treatment (I-FAST) With and Without Consultation: The Role of Model Training in the Sustainability of Evidence-Based Family Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mo Yee; Hsu, Kai-Shyang; Liu, Chang; Greene, Gilbert J; Fraser, J Scott; Grove, David; Solovey, Andy; Edwards, Shivani G; Scott, Pam

    2016-07-01

    This study examined the efficacy of the Integrative Family and Systems Treatment (I-FAST) training model that seeks to support development of model expertise within the agency in the context of facilitating the sustainability of evidence-based family treatment within community mental health settings. A quasi-experimental design was used to examine treatment outcomes of I-FAST among agencies that received ongoing Consultation and agencies that received No Consultation upon completion of I-FAST training. χ (2) analyses and independent samples t test analyses showed that there were no significant differences between the two groups on clients who had achieved reliable change on Problem Severity and Functioning based on parents' assessments. Significance of this study is discussed in the context of the role of evidence-based family therapy (EBFT) training in facilitating its sustainability in community mental health settings.

  9. The Molecular Immunology of Mucositis: Implications for Evidence-Based Research in Alternative and Complementary Palliative Treatments

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    Francesco Chiappelli

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The terms ‘mucositis’ and ‘stomatitis’ are often used interchangeably. Mucositis, however, pertains to pharyngeal-esophago-gastrointestinal inflammation that manifests as red, burn-like sores or ulcerations throughout the mouth. Stomatitis is an inflammation of the oral tissues proper, which can present with or without sores, and is made worse by poor dental hygiene. Mucositis is observed in a variety of immunosuppressed patients, but is most often consequential to cancer therapy. It appears as early as the third day of intervention, and is usually established by Day 7 of treatment. Mucositis increases mortality and morbidity and contributes to rising health care costs. The precise immune components involved in the etiology of mucositis are unclear, but evidence-based research (EBR data has shown that applications of granulocyte–macrophage-colony stimulating factor prevent the onset or the exacerbation of oropharyngeal mucositis. The molecular implications of this observation are discussed from the perspective of future developments of complementary and alternative treatments for this condition. It must be emphasized that this article is meant to be neither a review on mucositis and the various treatments for it, nor a discussion paper on its underlying molecular immunology. It is a statement of the implications of EBR for CAM-based interventions for mucositis. It explores and discusses the specific domain of molecular immunology in the context of mucositis and its direct implications for EBR research in CAM-based treatments for mucositis.

  10. Anti EGFR therapy in the treatment of non-metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: The current evidence

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    Rony Benson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC accounts for a large oncologic burden in the developing countries. In patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer multimodality treatment is warranted. Radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy has long been considered the standard for patients with disease involving the oropharynx, larynx and hypopharynx. However, addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy increases treatment related toxicity by many folds and compliance rates decrease. In this context a systemic therapy, which when used concurrent with radiation with favorable toxicity profile is of great importance for improving disease control in locally advanced HNSCC. Anti-epithelial growth factor receptor targeted therapy emerged as a potential treatment option. In recent years many trials were conducted to find the optimum treatment option with the combination of these targeted agents. The initial trials showed excellent results with minimal morbidity and led to great enthusiasm across the globe to incorporate these regimens as a standard of care. However, subsequently many trials failed to maintain such results and now there is little agreement to the initial results achieved with these drugs. Based on the current evidence we cannot recommend the replacement of cisplatin with targeted therapy in concurrent setting. It may be considered in patients with altered renal parameters, hypersensitivity or intolerance to cisplatin. The addition of targeted therapy in addition to chemotherapy in the concurrent setting can’t also be recommended as the benefit is doubtful and is associated with a significant increase in toxicity.

  11. Between hope and evidence: how community advisors demarcate the boundary between legitimate and illegitimate stem cell treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Alan; Tanner, Claire; Munsie, Megan

    2015-03-01

    Stem cell science provides an exemplary study of the 'management of hope'. On the one hand, raising 'hopes' and expectations is a seen as a necessary aspect of securing investment in promising innovative research. On the other, such hyperbole risks raising hopes to a level that may lead people to undertake undue risks, which may ultimately undermine confidence in medical research. In this context, the 'management of hope' thus involves the negotiation of competing claims of truth about the value and safety of particular treatments and about the trustworthiness of providers. Using Gieryn's concept of boundary-work, this article examines the means by which this work of 'managing hope' is undertaken. Drawing on data collected as part of our study that investigated the perspectives of those who are consulted by patients and their carers about stem cell treatments, we explore how these community advisors – both scientists and clinicians with a stake in stem cell research and representatives from patient advocacy groups – demarcate the boundary between legitimate and illegitimate treatments. In particular, we examine how these actors rhetorically use 'evidence' to achieve this demarcation. We argue that analysing accounts of how advisors respond to patient enquiries about stem cell treatments offers a window for examining the workings of the politics of hope within contemporary bioscience and biomedicine. In conclusion, we emphasize the need to re-conceptualize the boundary between science and non-science so as to allow a better appreciation of the realities of health care in the age of medical travel.

  12. Profile of nintedanib in the treatment of solid tumors: the evidence to date

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awasthi N

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Niranjan Awasthi,1 Roderich E Schwarz1,2 1Department of Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, South Bend, IN, USA; 2Indiana University Health Goshen Center for Cancer Care, Goshen, IN, USA Abstract: Angiogenesis is an essential process for tumor growth and metastasis, and remains a promising therapeutic target process in cancer treatment for several cancer types. Bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody that targets vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, was the first antiangiogenic agent approved for cancer therapy. Novel antiangiogenic agents, such as sunitinib, sorafenib, pazopanib, or vandetanib that target additional proangiogenic signaling pathways beyond VEGF, have also been approved for the treatment of various malignant diseases. While most of these agents are approved in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy for indications including metastatic colorectal cancer, non-small-cell lung cancer, breast cancer, renal cell carcinoma (RCC, and gastric cancer, some are used as approved monotherapy for advanced RCC, hepatocellular carcinoma and medullary thyroid cancer. Major challenges to the success of antiangiogenic therapy include associated toxicity risks, limitation of efficacy through the possible development of resistance and induction or promotion of metastatic progression. Nintedanib (formally known as BIBF 1120 is a triple angiokinase inhibitor of VEGF, fibroblast growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor signaling with lesser activity against RET, Flt-3, and Src. Through this unique targeting profile nintedanib has demonstrated significant antitumor activity in several tumor types in preclinical studies. Nintedanib has also shown promising clinical efficacy in combination with docetaxel and has been approved for treating patients with locally advanced and metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer in Europe. Nintedanib has also been found to be clinically promising in terms of efficacy and safety in several other solid tumors

  13. Evidence-based treatments for children with trauma-related psychopathology as a result of childhood maltreatment: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenarts, Laura E W; Diehle, Julia; Doreleijers, Theo A H; Jansma, Elise P; Lindauer, Ramón J L

    2013-05-01

    This is a systematic review of evidence-based treatments for children exposed to childhood maltreatment. Because exposure to childhood maltreatment has been associated with a broad range of trauma-related psychopathology (e.g., PTSD, anxiety, suicidal ideation, substance abuse) and with aggressive and violent behavior, this review describes psychotherapeutic treatments which focus on former broad range of psychopathological outcomes. A total of 26 randomized controlled clinical trials and seven non-randomized controlled clinical trials published between 2000 and 2012 satisfied the inclusionary criteria and were included. These studies dealt with various kinds of samples, from sexually abused and maltreated children in child psychiatric outpatient clinics or in foster care to traumatized incarcerated boys. A total of 27 studies evaluated psychotherapeutic treatments which used trauma-focused cognitive, behavioral or cognitive-behavioral techniques; only two studies evaluated trauma-specific treatments for children and adolescents with comorbid aggressive or violent behavior; and four studies evaluated psychotherapeutic treatments that predominantly focused on other mental health problems than PTSD and used non-trauma focused cognitive, behavioral or cognitive-behavioral techniques. The results of this review suggest that trauma-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy (TF-CBT) is the best-supported treatment for children following childhood maltreatment. However, in line with increased interest in the diagnosis of complex PTSD and given the likely relationship between childhood maltreatment and aggressive and violent behavior, the authors suggest that clinical practice should address a phase-oriented approach. This review concludes with a discussion of future research directions and limitations.

  14. Audiological evidence of therapeutic effect of steroid treatment in neuromyelitis optica with hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takanashi, Yoshitaka; Misu, Tatsuro; Oda, Kazuha; Miyazaki, Hiromitsu; Yahata, Izumi; Hidaka, Hiroshi; Fujihara, Kazuo; Kawase, Tetsuaki; Kobayashi, Toshimitsu; Katori, Yukio

    2014-12-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an autoimmune astrocytopathy caused by anti-aquaporin 4 antibody. Only two patients with NMO have been reported presenting with hearing disorders to our knowledge. We recently treated a 40-year-old woman with NMO complaining of right hearing loss. Audiometry showed minimal asymmetry, but the auditory brainstem responses (ABR) were severely attenuated on the right. The attenuated ABR and her aural symptoms (hearing loss and fullness) improved after steroid treatment. The present case shows that the retrocochlear-type hearing loss may be associated with NMO.

  15. Predictive factors of response to treatment in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma: new evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonini, Giuseppe; Fratto, Maria Elisabetta; Imperatori, Marco; Pantano, Francesco; Vincenzi, Bruno; Santini, Daniele

    2011-06-01

    Renal cell carcinoma represents approximately 3% of adult malignancies and 90-95% of neoplasms arising from the kidney. Many agents that target angiogenesis (e.g., sunitinib, sorafenib, bevacizumab and pazopanib) and mTOR-targeted therapy (e.g., temsirolimus and everolimus) have been approved as first-line agents. The choice of the most suitable treatment for advanced renal cell carcinoma depends on the definition of risk. In this article, we reviewed the scientific literature identifying predictive factors on the activity/efficacy of a specific therapy.

  16. Definition, assessment and treatment of wheezing disorders in preschool children: an evidence-based approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brand, P.L.; Baraldi, E.; Bisgaard, H.;

    2008-01-01

    There is poor agreement on definitions of different phenotypes of preschool wheezing disorders. The present Task Force proposes to use the terms episodic (viral) wheeze to describe children who wheeze intermittently and are well between episodes, and multiple-trigger wheeze for children who wheeze...... preschool child with recurrent wheeze, but should be discontinued if there is no clear clinical benefit. Large well-designed randomised controlled trials with clear descriptions of patients are needed to improve the present recommendations on the treatment of these common syndromes Udgivelsesdato: 2008/10...

  17. THE "NEW" DRUG CLASSES IN THE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC HEART FAILURE AND THEIR EVIDENCE BASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Tereshchenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparison of ivabradine and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, drugs with principally different mechanisms of action, is presented in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF on the base of GISSI-HF and SHIFT trails results. It is essential to compaire an effect of these drugs on the morbidity and mortality in combined therapy of patients with CHF , because each additional drug may change in compliance to treatment, induces additional costs or may be a reason of new side effects. Additional (to standard therapy effects of ivabradine and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are discussed.

  18. THE "NEW" DRUG CLASSES IN THE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC HEART FAILURE AND THEIR EVIDENCE BASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Tereshchenko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A comparison of ivabradine and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, drugs with principally different mechanisms of action, is presented in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF on the base of GISSI-HF and SHIFT trails results. It is essential to compaire an effect of these drugs on the morbidity and mortality in combined therapy of patients with CHF , because each additional drug may change in compliance to treatment, induces additional costs or may be a reason of new side effects. Additional (to standard therapy effects of ivabradine and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are discussed.

  19. Current evidence on treatment of patients with chronic systolic heart failure and renal insufficiency: practical considerations from published data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damman, Kevin; Tang, W H Wilson; Felker, G Michael; Lassus, Johan; Zannad, Faiez; Krum, Henry; McMurray, John J V

    2014-03-11

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasingly prevalent in patients with chronic systolic heart failure. Therefore, evidence-based therapies are more and more being used in patients with some degree of renal dysfunction. However, most pivotal randomized clinical trials specifically excluded patients with (severe) renal dysfunction. The benefit of these evidence-based therapies in this high-risk patient group is largely unknown. This paper reviews data from randomized clinical trials in systolic heart failure and the interactions between baseline renal dysfunction and the effect of randomized treatment. It highlights that most evidence-based therapies show consistent outcome benefit in patients with moderate renal insufficiency (stage 3 CKD), whereas there are very scarce data on patients with severe (stage 4 to 5 CKD) renal insufficiency. If any, the outcome benefit might be even greater in stage 3 CKD compared with those with relatively preserved renal function. However, prescription of therapies should be individualized with consideration of possible harm and benefit, especially in those with stage 4 to 5 CKD where limited data are available.

  20. Thrombolytic treatment in the oldest-old patient with acute ischemic stroke: an update on current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola Maioli

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of ischemic stroke rises exponentially with age, with a steep increase in the age interval between 75 and 85 years. Thrombolytic therapy restores cerebral blood flow in patients with acute ischemic stroke of any etiology by using drugs that dissolve blood clots. Infusion for 1 h of alteplase at the dose of 0.9 mg/kg within 3 h of the start of the symptoms is associated to a 30% increase in the likelihood of gaining a favorable outcome with respect to placebo. There is strong evidence that selected patients with ischemic stroke may benefit from intravenous thrombolysis when treated within 3 h. The aim of the study was to evaluate available evidence for the efficacy and safety of thrombolytic therapy in patients with ischemic stroke aged 80 years and over. Compared to younger stroke patients treated with thrombolytic therapy, those aged 80 years and over have higher acute mortality due to symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage. However, functional outcome at six months is significantly better for over-80-year-olds than younger patients. There is a need for screening tools that take into account pre-stroke functional and cognitive status that are able to identify those over-80-year-old patients with ischemic stroke who can most benefit from thrombolytic treatment. Available evidence supports further recruitment of oldest-old patients into ongoing trials of thrombolysis.

  1. Physical Exercise for the Treatment of Neuropsychiatric Disturbances in Alzheimer's Dementia: Possible Mechanisms, Current Evidence and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matura, Silke; Carvalho, André F; Alves, Gilberto S; Pantel, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), also known as neuropsychiatric or non-cognitive symptoms are common and often distressing features of Alzheimer's Dementia. BPSD significantly increase patient suffering, early institutionalization and caregiver's burden. The clinical management of BPSD is dominated by a pharmacological approach, although these medications often come with serious adverse side-effects. There are only few nonpharmacological treatment strategies for BPSD. A substantial amount of intervention studies that have investigated non-pharmacological treatment options for BPSD have focused on physical exercise. Although these studies are very heterogeneous in terms of type and severity of dementia, as well as type and duration of the exercise intervention, the overall picture shows a positive effect of physical exercise in alleviating BPSD. There is evidence that numerous mechanisms contribute to the positive effect of physical exercise on BPSD. No attempt has been undertaken so far to give an overview of the existing knowledge regarding these mechanisms. Therefore, the current review aims to integrate the existing evidence on psychological and neurobiological mechanisms that contribute to the beneficial effects of physical exercise in ameliorating BPSD in Alzheimer's dementia. A discussion of psychological mechanisms such as improved sleep and stress reduction will be followed by a discussion of neurobiological mechanisms including the exercise induced change in neurotransmitter concentrations, increased synthesis of neurotrophins and immune activation. The review closes with recommendations for future research to overcome the shortcomings of existing studies and broaden the current knowledge on the positive effects of physical exercise on BPSD.

  2. African herbal medicines in the treatment of HIV: Hypoxis and Sutherlandia. An overview of evidence and pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seely Dugald

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In Africa, herbal medicines are often used as primary treatment for HIV/AIDS and for HIV-related problems. In general, traditional medicines are not well researched, and are poorly regulated. We review the evidence and safety concerns related to the use of two specific African herbals, which are currently recommended by the Ministry of Health in South Africa and member states for use in HIV: African Potato and Sutherlandia. We review the pharmacology, toxicology and pharmacokinetics of these herbal medicines. Despite the popularity of their use and the support of Ministries of Health and NGOs in some African countries, no clinical trials of efficacy exist, and low-level evidence of harm identifies the potential for drug interactions with antiretroviral drugs. Efforts should be made by mainstream health professionals to provide validated information to traditional healers and patients on the judicious use of herbal remedies. This may reduce harm through failed expectations, pharmacologic adverse events including possible drug/herb interactions and unnecessary added therapeutic costs. Efforts should also be directed at evaluating the possible benefits of natural products in HIV/AIDS treatment.

  3. CROSSLINGUISTIC GENERALIZATION OF SEMANTIC TREATMENT IN APHASIA: EVIDENCE FROM THE INDIAN CONTEXT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopeekrishnan Gopeekrishnan

    2014-04-01

    We employed the methods of Edmonds and Kiran (2006 for preparing treatment probes as well as administering treatment in our participants. From an initial set of 300 pictures that were administered on each participant, 50 unsuccessfully named pictures were selected for the training purpose. The names of these pictures were neither cognates nor had 50% or more phonetic similarity in both languages. The selected items for each participant varied from that of other participants as the final items (n = 50 were selected based on the individual naming failures. All items belonged to various semantic categories like animals, fruits, household articles etc. For each participant, six sets of stimuli were developed with 10 items in each set, except in control set, which had only 5 stimuli. The stimuli were categorized into: a English Set 1 (e.g., cat: N = 10; b Kannada set 1 (translation equivalent of English set 1: e.g., /bekku/: N = 10; c English set 2 (semantically related to items in set 1: e.g., dog: N = 10; d Kannada set 2 (translation equivalent of English set 2: e.g., /na:ji/: N = 10; e English set 3 (control: semantically unrelated: e.g., stone: N = 5; f K

  4. Clinical evidence of the efficacy of everolimus and its potential in the treatment of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saksena R

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Rujuta Saksena, Serena T WongThe Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ, USAAbstract: The PI3K/Akt/mTOR (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway regulates several key cellular functions and its dysregulation creates an environment that promotes tumorigenesis as well as resistance to therapy. The mTOR inhibitor everolimus has emerged as a promising agent in the treatment of breast cancer and was recently approved in combination with exemestane for advanced hormone receptor–positive disease after progression on a nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor. Everolimus may also be effective in combination with cytotoxic and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-directed therapies for the treatment of other subtypes of breast cancer. This paper highlights preclinical and clinical data that have emerged on the role of mTOR inhibition in breast cancer. Although generally well tolerated, everolimus carries a unique side effect profile of which both patients and providers should be made aware. Recommendations related to the administration of everolimus in the clinical setting are also discussed.Keywords: everolimus, breast cancer, mTOR inhibition

  5. Evidence to practice: treatment of anxiety in individuals with autism spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Lang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Russell Lang, Richard Mahoney, Farah El Zein, Elizabeth Delaune, Megan AmidonTexas State University-San Marcos, TX, USADate of preparation: 23rd December 2010 Conflict of interest: None declaredClinical question: What treatment improves social interactions and reduces reports of anxiety symptoms in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD and a co-occurring anxiety disorder? Results: Systematic reviews and randomized clinical trials suggest that cognitive behavior therapy in tandem with direct instruction of social skills using applied behavior analysis intervention components may be effective for treating anxiety in individuals with high functioning ASD. For individuals with ASD, an anxiety disorder, and an intellectual disability, systematic desensitization may be effective.Implementation: Intervention should emphasize teaching social skills. Reinforcers (ie, rewards based upon the client's interests should be used to encourage participation in therapy. Treatment should incorporate visual aides and family involvement. Intervention components involving abstract concepts, visualization, and discussions of emotions are less useful given difficulties in abstract reasoning and communication inherent to ASD.Keywords: autism, ASD, Asperger's, anxiety, cognitive behavior therapy, applied behavior analysis

  6. Who seeks treatment where? Suicidal behaviors and health care: evidence from a community survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Allison; De Leo, Diego

    2010-06-01

    The reason why some persons seek help following a suicide attempt while others do not is still insufficiently clarified. Using data from the World Health Organization/SUicide PREvention-Multisite Intervention Study on Suicidal Behavior community survey, this study tried to shed more light on this problem by investigating the type and number of treatments sought by suicide attempters in 2 major cities of Queensland, Australia. Compared with those who did not attend services (n = 142), help-seekers (n = 257) had significantly greater odds of overdosing with medications and communicating suicidal thoughts. They also had greater odds of reporting a history of psychological problems, previous attempts, and help-seeking behavior. Those who sought multiple services were more likely to be female and suffer also from physical illness. Non help-seekers were more frequently males, with no history of having previously sought help or communicated intent. They also appeared at greater risk of using more lethal methods (hanging) and less likely to express mental health concerns at the time of the attempt. These findings underline the need to further understand the relationship between lethality, suicide intent, and help-seeking behavior. Improving motivation to seek treatment after a suicide attempt could substantially impact on suicide prevention success efforts.

  7. Improved sequence learning with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation: evidence for treatment-specific network modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mure, Hideo; Tang, Chris C; Argyelan, Miklos; Ghilardi, Maria-Felice; Kaplitt, Michael G; Dhawan, Vijay; Eidelberg, David

    2012-02-22

    We used a network approach to study the effects of anti-parkinsonian treatment on motor sequence learning in humans. Eight Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation underwent H(2)(15)O positron emission tomography (PET) imaging to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) while they performed kinematically matched sequence learning and movement tasks at baseline and during stimulation. Network analysis revealed a significant learning-related spatial covariance pattern characterized by consistent increases in subject expression during stimulation (p = 0.008, permutation test). The network was associated with increased activity in the lateral cerebellum, dorsal premotor cortex, and parahippocampal gyrus, with covarying reductions in the supplementary motor area (SMA) and orbitofrontal cortex. Stimulation-mediated increases in network activity correlated with concurrent improvement in learning performance (p learning performance or network activity. Analysis of learning-related rCBF in network regions revealed improvement in baseline abnormalities with STN stimulation but not levodopa. These effects were most pronounced in the SMA. In this region, a consistent rCBF response to stimulation was observed across subjects and trials (p = 0.01), although the levodopa response was not significant. These findings link the cognitive treatment response in PD to changes in the activity of a specific cerebello-premotor cortical network. Selective modulation of overactive SMA-STN projection pathways may underlie the improvement in learning found with stimulation.

  8. Review of Select Practice Parameters, Evidence-Based Treatment Algorithms, and International Guidelines for Hereditary Angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Jaison; Zacharias, Jamie; Craig, Timothy

    2016-10-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare bradykinin-mediated disease that is characterized by recurrent attacks of subcutaneous or submucosal edema, which can be life threatening. HAE affects all ethnic groups equally and does not differentiate between age, sex, or race. However, the availability of therapies varies amongst countries resulting in a lack of uniformity of care. Not only is there a disparity of medication availability, but since HAE is a rare disease, it is frequently overlooked and the diagnosis is missed. Even with diagnosis, treatment and management is often less than optimal. For these reasons, it is essential to have practice parameters and guidelines. In this chapter, we focus on recent guidelines. These guidelines deal with recognition, diagnosis, medical care, patient management, and assessment, all which are essential to provide optimal care to people with a rare and orphan disease. The intent of the guidelines, and thus this chapter, is to reduce morbidity and mortality, and restore a normal quality of life for the patient with HAE. We will review the guidelines from various regions of the world as well as international group recommendations. In addition, specific patient populations such as the pregnant, elderly, and juvenile require modified treatment regimens, and for this reason, we have included these data as well. The intent of this chapter is to aid the practitioner in holistic care of the patient with HAE in order to ultimately provide the best standard of care possible.

  9. EMDR therapy for PTSD after motor vehicle accidents: meta-analytic evidence for specific treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maddalena eBoccia

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Motor vehicle accident (MVA victims may suffer both acute and post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD. With PTSD affecting social, interpersonal and occupational functioning, clinicians as well as the National Institute of Health are very interested in identifying the most effective psychological treatment to reduce PTSD. From research findings, eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR therapy is considered as one of the effective treatment of PTSD. In this paper, we present the results of a meta-analysis of fMRI studies on PTSD after MVA through activation likelihood estimation. We found that PTSD following MVA is characterized by neural modifications in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, a cerebral structure involved in fear-conditioning mechanisms. Basing on previous findings in both humans and animals, which demonstrate that desensitization techniques and extinction protocols act on the limbic system, the effectiveness of EMDR and of cognitive behavioral therapies (CBT may be related to the fact that during these therapies the ACC is stimulated by desensitization.

  10. EMDR therapy for PTSD after motor vehicle accidents: meta-analytic evidence for specific treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccia, Maddalena; Piccardi, Laura; Cordellieri, Pierluigi; Guariglia, Cecilia; Giannini, Anna Maria

    2015-01-01

    Motor vehicle accident (MVA) victims may suffer both acute and post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD). With PTSD affecting social, interpersonal and occupational functioning, clinicians as well as the National Institute of Health are very interested in identifying the most effective psychological treatment to reduce PTSD. From research findings, eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) therapy is considered as one of the effective treatment of PTSD. In this paper, we present the results of a meta-analysis of fMRI studies on PTSD after MVA through activation likelihood estimation. We found that PTSD following MVA is characterized by neural modifications in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), a cerebral structure involved in fear-conditioning mechanisms. Basing on previous findings in both humans and animals, which demonstrate that desensitization techniques and extinction protocols act on the limbic system, the effectiveness of EMDR and of cognitive behavioral therapies (CBT) may be related to the fact that during these therapies the ACC is stimulated by desensitization.

  11. Evidence of improved small airways function after azithromycin treatment in diffuse panbronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanon, Shane; Verbanck, Sylvia; Schuermans, Daniel; Vanden Berghe, Bram; Vanderhelst, Eef; Vincken, Walter

    2012-01-01

    A 67-year-old never-smoker was diagnosed with diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB) and was started on 250 mg azithromycin twice weekly. Over a 16-month observation period, lung function was assessed monthly, including a dedicated small airways test, the multiple breath nitrogen washout (MBW) with indices S(cond) and S(acin) of ventilation heterogeneity at the level of the conductive and acinar air spaces, respectively. Baseline measurements indicated moderate airway obstruction, air trapping and considerable dysfunction of the small airways around the acinar entrance. Treatment resulted in excellent symptomatic improvement paralleled by marked improvements in FEV(1), FVC, RV/TLC, S(cond) and S(acin); by contrast, there were no consistent changes in FEF(75) or TL(CO). While improvements were such that S(cond) fell within normal limits after 5 months, S(acin) remained abnormal even after 16 months of treatment. This suggests a distinct acinar structural abnormality in DPB that cannot be reversed by azithromycin.

  12. Disparities between malaria infection and treatment rates: Evidence from a cross-sectional analysis of households in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saran, Indrani; Cohen, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    Background In Sub-Saharan Africa, both under-treatment and over-treatment of malaria are common since illnesses are often diagnosed and treated on the basis of symptoms. We investigate whether malaria treatment rates among febrile individuals correspond to observed patterns of malaria infection by age and by local prevalence. Methods and findings We use data on treatment of febrile illnesses from a household survey that was conducted between March and May 2012 in 92 villages in six districts in Eastern Uganda. All household members were also tested for malaria using a rapid diagnostic test. We show that both the age of the febrile individual and the village prevalence rate are strongly associated with the odds that a febrile patient was infected with malaria, but not with the odds of ACT treatment. Compared to individuals who were aged 15 or above, febrile individuals aged 5–14 had 3.21 times the odds of testing positive for malaria (95% CI: [2.36 4.37], P<0·001), and febrile individuals who were under age 5 had 2.66 times the odds of testing positive for malaria (95% CI: [1.99 3.56], P<0·001). However, ACT treatment rates for febrile illnesses were not significantly higher for either children ages 5–14 (Unadjusted OR: 1.19, 95% CI: [0.88 1.62], P = 0.255) or children under the age of 5 (Unadjusted OR: 1.24, 95% CI: [0.92 1.68], P = 0·154). A one standard deviation increase in the village malaria prevalence rate was associated with a 2.03 times higher odds that a febrile individual under the age of five tested positive for malaria (95% CI: [1.63 2.54], p<0·001), but was not significantly associated with the odds of ACT treatment (Un-adjusted OR: 0.83, 95% CI: [0.66 1.05], P = 0·113). We present some evidence that this discrepancy may be because caregivers do not suspect a higher likelihood of malaria infection, conditional on fever, in young children or in high-prevalence villages. Conclusion Our findings suggest that households have significant mis

  13. Canagliflozin in the treatment of type 2 diabetes: an evidence-based review of its place in therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagiannis, Thomas; Bekiari, Eleni; Tsapas, Apostolos

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Deciding on an optimal medication choice for type 2 diabetes is often challenging, due to the increasing number of treatment options. Canagliflozin is a novel glucose-lowering agent belonging to sodium–glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. Aim The aim of this study was to examine and summarize the evidence based on the efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness of canagliflozin for type 2 diabetes. Evidence review Compared to placebo, canagliflozin 100 and 300 mg lower glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) by ~0.6%–0.8%, respectively. Canagliflozin appears to be slightly more effective than dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors in reducing HbA1c. It also has a favorable effect on body weight and blood pressure, both versus placebo and most active comparators. However, treatment with canagliflozin is associated with increased incidence of genital tract infections and osmotic diuresis-related adverse events. Based on short-term data, canagliflozin is not associated with increased risk for all-cause mortality and cardiovascular outcomes. Economic evaluation studies from various countries indicate that canagliflozin is a cost-effective option in dual- or triple-agent regimens. Place in therapy As monotherapy, canagliflozin could be used in patients for whom metformin is contraindicated or not tolerated. For patients on background treatment with metformin, canagliflozin appears to be superior to sulfonylureas with respect to body weight, blood pressure and risk for hypoglycemia, and to DPP-4 inhibitors in terms of lowering HbA1c, body weight, and blood pressure. Canagliflozin also seems to be cost-effective compared with sulfonylureas and DPP-4 inhibitors as add-on to metformin monotherapy, and compared with DPP-4 inhibitors as add-on to metformin and sulfonylurea. Conclusion Current evidence on intermediate efficacy outcomes, short-term safety and cost-effectiveness support the use of canagliflozin in patients on background treatment with metformin

  14. Treatment of gastric outlet obstruction that results fromunresectable gastric cancer: Current evidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) is a commoncondition that results from locally advanced malignanciesin the upper gastrointestinal tract, such aspancreatic, gastric, and other carcinomas. Two typesof procedures for malignant GOO, namely, gastrojejunostomy(GJ) with laparotomy or a laparoscopicapproach and endoscopic stenting (ES), are currentlyavailable. Although numerous previous reports haveclarified the benefits and drawbacks of each procedure,whether GJ or ES should be used in patients with GOOthat results from gastric cancer who may have a longerlife expectancy than patients with other malignancieshas not been determined. In this review, which focuseson gastric cancer-induced GOO, we analyzed the twosystematic reviews and a meta-analysis that comparedGJ and ES and outlined the current status of GOOtreatment. We also provide an updated review thatincludes laparoscopic GJ. Various data from 13 studiesin one review and 6 studies in another review wereanalyzed. Although the main results of the presentreview indicated that both GJ and ES were efficacioustreatments in patients with GOO that resulted fromgastric cancer, current evidence suggests that GJ maybe the preferable procedure given its good performancestatus and improved prognosis in gastric cancer patients.

  15. Clinical potential of methylphenidate in the treatment of cocaine addiction: a review of the current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dürsteler KM

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Kenneth M Dürsteler,1,2 Eva-Maria Berger,1 Johannes Strasser,1 Carlo Caflisch,2 Jochen Mutschler,2 Marcus Herdener,2 Marc Vogel1 1Center for Addictive Disorders, Psychiatric University Clinics Basel, Basel, Switzerland; 2Center for Addictive Disorders, Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Psychiatric Hospital, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland Background: Cocaine use continues to be a public health problem, yet there is no proven effective pharmacotherapy for cocaine dependence. A promising approach to treating cocaine dependence may be agonist-replacement therapy, which is already used effectively in the treatment of opioid and tobacco dependence. The replacement approach for cocaine dependence posits that administration of a long-acting stimulant medication should normalize the neurochemical and behavioral perturbations resulting from chronic cocaine use. One potential medication to be substituted for cocaine is methylphenidate (MPH, as this stimulant possesses pharmacobehavioral properties similar to those of cocaine. Aim: To provide a qualitative review addressing the rationale for the use of MPH as a cocaine substitute and its clinical potential in the treatment of cocaine dependence. Methods: We searched MEDLINE for clinical studies using MPH in patients with cocaine abuse/dependence and screened the bibliographies of the articles found for pertinent literature. Results: MPH, like cocaine, increases synaptic dopamine by inhibiting dopamine reuptake. The discriminative properties, reinforcing potential, and subjective effects of MPH and cocaine are almost identical and, importantly, MPH has been found to substitute for cocaine in animals and human volunteers under laboratory conditions. When taken orally in therapeutic doses, its abuse liability, however, appears low, which is especially true for extended-release MPH preparations. Though there are promising data in the literature, mainly from case reports and

  16. Buprenorphine vs methadone treatment: A review of evidence in both developed and developing worlds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J Whelan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heroin dependence is a major health and social problem associated with increased morbidity and mortality that adversely affects social circumstances, productivity, and healthcare and law enforcement costs. In the UK and many other Western countries, both methadone and buprenorphine are recommended by the relevant agencies for detoxification from heroin and for opioid maintenance therapy. However, despite obvious benefits due to its unique pharmacotherapy (eg, greatly reduced risk of overdose, buprenorphine has largely failed to overtake methadone in managing opioid addiction. The experience from the developing world (based on data from India is similar. In this article we compare the advantages and disadvantages of the use methadone and buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid addiction from both a developed and developing world perspective; and explore some of the reasons why buprenorphine has not fulfilled the expectations predicted by many in the addictions field.

  17. Evidence that p53-mediated cell-cycle-arrest inhibits chemotherapeutic treatment of ovarian carcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos S Moreno

    Full Text Available Gene expression profiles of malignant tumors surgically removed from ovarian cancer patients pre-treated with chemotherapy (neo-adjuvant prior to surgery group into two distinct clusters. One group clusters with carcinomas from patients not pre-treated with chemotherapy prior to surgery (C-L, while the other clusters with non-malignant adenomas (A-L. We show here that although the C-L cluster is preferentially associated with p53 loss-of-function (LOF mutations, the C-L cluster cancer patients display a more favorable clinical response to chemotherapy as evidenced by enhanced long-term survivorships. Our results support a model whereby p53 mediated cell-cycle-arrest/DNA repair serves as a barrier to optimal chemotherapeutic treatment of ovarian and perhaps other carcinomas and suggest that inhibition of p53 during chemotherapy may enhance clinical outcome.

  18. Evidence for the use of pimavanserin in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarva, Harini; Henchcliffe, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder with both motor and nonmotor symptoms (NMS), leading to significant morbidity and caregiver burden. Psychosis is common but is under recognized by physicians. When present, it increases the patient’s risk of hospitalization and nursing home placement and caregiver burden. Although the atypical antipsychotic agent, clozapine, has been considered the gold standard treatment, severe agranulocytosis in 0.38% of patients and more commonly milder leukopenia, resulting in frequent blood testing, limit its use. Pimavanserin, a 5HT2A receptor inverse agonist, has been shown to reduce psychosis in PD without worsening motor symptoms. It is therefore a welcome therapeutic option for this devastating NMS. PMID:27800022

  19. Dyslipidemia: evidence of efficacy of the pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment in the elderly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Claudia F Gravina; Marcelo Bertolami; Giselle HP Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    The clinical decision to control risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the elderly takes the followings into consideration: (1) the elderly life expectancy; (2) the elderly biological age and functional capacity; (3) the role of cardiovascular disease in the elderly group; (4) the prevalence of risk factors in the elderly; and (5) The effectiveness of treatment of risk factors in the elderly. A large number of studies showed the efficacy of secondary and primary prevention of dyslipidemia in the elderly. However, the only trial that included patients over 80 years was the Heart Protection Study (HPS). Statins are considered the first line therapy for lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Because lifestyle changes are very difficult to achieve, doctors in general tend to prescribe many drugs to control cardiovascular risk factors. However, healthy food consumption remains a cornerstone in primary and secondary cardiovascular prevention and should be implemented by everyone.

  20. Luliconazole for the treatment of fungal infections: an evidence-based review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanna D

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Deepshikha Khanna, Subhash Bharti Department of Dermatology, Chacha Nehru Bal Chikitsalaya (Childrens Hospital, Delhi, India Abstract: Luliconazole is an imidazole antifungal agent with a unique structure, as the imidazole moiety is incorporated into the ketene dithioacetate structure. Luliconazole is the R-enantiomer, and has more potent antifungal activity than lanoconazole, which is a racemic mixture. In this review, we summarize the in vitro data, animal studies, and clinical trial data relating to the use of topical luliconazole. Preclinical studies have demonstrated excellent activity against dermatophytes. Further, in vitro/in vivo studies have also shown favorable activity against Candida albicans, Malassezia spp., and Aspergillus fumigatus. Luliconazole, although belonging to the azole group, has strong fungicidal activity against Trichophyton spp., similar to that of terbinafine. The strong clinical antifungal activity of luliconazole is possibly attributable to a combination of strong in vitro antifungal activity and favorable pharmacokinetic properties in the skin. Clinical trials have demonstrated its superiority over placebo in dermatophytosis, and its antifungal activity to be at par or even better than that of terbinafine. Application of luliconazole 1% cream once daily is effective even in short-term use (one week for tinea corporis/cruris and 2 weeks for tinea pedis. A Phase I/IIa study has shown excellent local tolerability and a lack of systemic side effects with use of topical luliconazole solution for onychomycosis. Further studies to evaluate its efficacy in onychomycosis are underway. Luliconazole 1% cream was approved in Japan in 2005 for the treatment of tinea infections. It has recently been approved by US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of interdigital tinea pedis, tinea cruris, and tinea corporis. Topical luliconazole has a favorable safety profile, with only mild application site reactions reported

  1. Osteoporosis: review of the evidence for prevention, diagnosis and treatment and cost-effectiveness analysis. Executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This report describes evidence for the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of osteoporosis in postmenopausal healthy white women. Osteoporosis is becoming an increasingly important public health problem as our population ages. Although it is partially preventable, fractures related to osteoporosis are still common. Because of the economic and social burdens, comprehensive prevention programs are needed. Insufficient data prevent development of comparable analyses for men or nonwhite women. Discussed are the effectiveness, risks, and costs of diagnostic tests and treatments, the probabilities that women will have osteoporosis-related fractures, and the effects of various factors on these probabilities. Hormone replacement therapy is considered most cost-effective; women who refuse hormone replacement can consider bisphosphonates (alendronate) and calcitonin. Nomograms are presented for guiding treatment and testing decisions for individual patients. The following public health measures are recommended: Ensure that adults receive the optimal daily intake of calcium--between 1000 mg and 1500 mg; ensure that people at risk for vitamin D deficiency receive 400 IU to 800 IU of vitamin D daily; inform people that exercise, in addition to its other benefits, should help prevent osteoporosis; and discourage people from smoking.

  2. Evidence for the Treatment of Osteoporosis with Vitamin D in Residential Care and in the Community Dwelling Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. A. Geddes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Vitamin D is common treatment for osteoporosis. Both age >70 years and living in residential care are associated with increased fracture risk. Community dwelling elderly are a heterogeneous group who may have more similatiry with residential care groups than younger community dwelling counterparts. Aims. To review the evidence for cholecalciferol or ergocalciferol tretment of osteoporosis in either community dwelling patients aged ≥70 years of age, or redidential care patients. Secondly endpoints were changes in bone mineral denisty, and in bone turnover markers. Methods. We performed a literature search using search terms for osteoporosis and vitamin D. Treatment for at least one year was required. Results. Only one residential care study using cholecalciferol, showed non-vertebral and hip fracture reduction in vitamin D deficient subjects. In the community setting one quasi randomised study using ergocalciferol showed reduction in total but not hip or non-vertebral fracture, and a second randomised study showed increased hip fracture risk. Three studies reported increases in hip bone mineral denisty. Discussion. A minority of studies demonstrated a fracture benefit form vitamin D and one suggested possible harm in a community setting. Current practice should be to only offer this treatment to subjects identified as deficient.

  3. Evidence for the endothelin system as an emerging therapeutic target for the treatment of chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith TP

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Terika P Smith,1 Tami Haymond,1 Sherika N Smith,1 Sarah M Sweitzer1,2 1Department of Pharmacology, Physiology and Neuroscience, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA; 2Department of Pharmaceutical and Administrative Sciences, Presbyterian College School of Pharmacy, Clinton, SC, USA Abstract: Many people worldwide suffer from pain and a portion of these sufferers are diagnosed with a chronic pain condition. The management of chronic pain continues to be a challenge, and despite taking prescribed medication for pain, patients continue to have pain of moderate severity. Current pain therapies are often inadequate, with side effects that limit medication adherence. There is a need to identify novel therapeutic targets for the management of chronic pain. One potential candidate for the treatment of chronic pain is therapies aimed at modulating the vasoactive peptide endothelin-1. In addition to vasoactive properties, endothelin-1 has been implicated in pain transmission in both humans and animal models of nociception. Endothelin-1 directly activates nociceptors and potentiates the effect of other algogens, including capsaicin, formalin, and arachidonic acid. In addition, endothelin-1 has been shown to be involved in inflammatory pain, cancer pain, neuropathic pain, diabetic neuropathy, and pain associated with sickle cell disease. Therefore, endothelin-1 may prove a novel therapeutic target for the relief of many types of chronic pain. Keywords: endothelin-1, acute pain, chronic pain, endothelin receptor antagonists

  4. Iliotibial band syndrome: an examination of the evidence behind a number of treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falvey, E C; Clark, R A; Franklyn-Miller, A; Bryant, A L; Briggs, C; McCrory, P R

    2010-08-01

    Iliotibial band (ITB) syndrome (ITBS) is a common cause of distal lateral thigh pain in athletes. Treatment often focuses on stretching the ITB and treating local inflammation at the lateral femoral condyle (LFC). We examine the area's anatomical and biomechanical properties. Anatomical studies of the ITB of 20 embalmed cadavers. The strain generated in the ITB by three typical stretching maneuvers (Ober test; Hip flexion, adduction and external rotation, with added knee flexion and straight leg raise to 30 degrees ) was measured in five unembalmed cadavers using strain gauges. Displacement of the Tensae Fasciae Latae (TFL)/ITB junction was measured on 20 subjects during isometric hip abduction. The ITB was uniformly a lateral thickening of the circumferential fascia lata, firmly attached along the linea aspera (femur) from greater trochanter up to and including the LFC. The microstrain values [median (IQR)] for the OBER [15.4(5.1-23.3)me], HIP [21.1(15.6-44.6)me] and SLR [9.4(5.1-10.7)me] showed marked disparity in the optimal inter-limb stretching protocol. HIP stretch invoked significantly (Z=2.10, P=0.036) greater strain than the SLR. TFL/ITB junction displacement was 2.0+/-1.6 mm and mean ITB lengthening was <0.5% (effect size=0.04). Our results challenge the reasoning behind a number of accepted means of treating ITBS. Future research must focus on stretching and lengthening the muscular component of the ITB/TFL complex.

  5. Spotlight on blisibimod and its potential in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus: evidence to date

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenert, Aleksander; Niewold, Timothy B; Lenert, Petar

    2017-01-01

    B cells in general and BAFF (B cell activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor [TNF] family) in particular have been primary targets of recent clinical trials in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In 2011, belimumab, a monoclonal antibody against BAFF, became the first biologic agent approved for the treatment of SLE. Follow-up studies have shown excellent long-term safety and tolerability of belimumab. In this review, we critically analyze blisibimod, a novel BAFF-neutralizing agent. In contrast to belimumab that only blocks soluble BAFF trimer but not soluble 60-mer or membrane BAFF, blisibimod blocks with high affinity all three forms of BAFF. Furthermore, blisibimod has a unique structure built on four high-affinity BAFF-binding peptides fused to the IgG1-Fc carrier. It was tested in phase I and II trials in SLE where it showed safety and tolerability. While it failed to reach the primary endpoint in a recent phase II trial, post hoc analysis demonstrated its efficacy in SLE patients with higher disease activity. Based on these results, blisibimod is currently undergoing phase III trials targeting this responder subpopulation of SLE patients. The advantage of blisibimod, compared to its competitors, lies in its higher avidity for BAFF, but a possible drawback may come from its immunogenic potential and the anticipated loss of efficacy over time. PMID:28331294

  6. New research on anxiety disorders in the elderly and an update on evidence-based treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreescu, Carmen; Varon, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Anxiety disorders are frequently encountered in the elderly, but they are largely undetected and untreated. Epidemiological studies indicate a prevalence ranging from 1.2 to 15 %. With the exception of generalized anxiety disorder and agoraphobia, which can often start in late life, most anxiety disorders in older patients are chronic and have their onset earlier in life. Anxiety disorders are an often unrecognized cause of distress, disability, and mortality risk in older adults, and they have been associated with cardiovascular disease, stroke, and cognitive decline. The mechanisms of anxiety in older adults differ from that in younger adults due to age-related neuropathology, as well as the loss and isolation so prominent in late life. Our review intends to provide a comprehensive summary of the most recent research done in the field of anxiety disorders in the elderly. Recent findings in clinical research, neuroimaging, neuroendocrinology, and neuropsychology are covered. An update on treatment options is discussed, including pharmacological and non-pharmacological alternatives.

  7. GABAB receptor ligands for the treatment of alcohol use disorder: preclinical and clinical evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta eAgabio

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper summarizes the preclinical and clinical studies conducted to define the anti-alcohol pharmacological profile of the prototypic GABAB receptor agonist, baclofen, and its therapeutic potential for treatment of alcohol use disorder (AUD. Numerous studies have reported baclofen-induced suppression of alcohol drinking (including relapse- and binge-like drinking and alcohol reinforcing, motivational, stimulating, and rewarding properties in rodents and monkeys. The majority of clinical surveys conducted to date – including case reports, retrospective chart reviews, and randomized placebo-controlled studies – suggest the ability of baclofen to suppress alcohol consumption, craving for alcohol, and alcohol withdrawal symptomatology in alcohol-dependent patients. The recent identification of a positive allosteric modulatory binding site, together with the synthesis of in vivo effective ligands, represents a novel, and likely more favorable, option for pharmacological manipulations of the GABAB receptor. Accordingly, data collected to date suggest that positive allosteric modulators of the GABAB receptor reproduce several anti-alcohol effects of baclofen and display a higher therapeutic index (with larger separation – in terms of doses – between anti-alcohol effects and sedation.

  8. Isavuconazole for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis: current evidence, safety, efficacy, and clinical recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natesan, Suganthini Krishnan; Chandrasekar, Pranatharthi H

    2016-01-01

    The majority of invasive mold infections diagnosed in immunocompromised cancer patients include invasive aspergillosis (IA) and mucormycosis. Despite timely and effective therapy, mortality remains considerable. Antifungal agents currently available for the management of these serious infections include triazoles, polyenes, and echinocandins. Until recently, posaconazole has been the only triazole with a broad spectrum of anti-mold activity against both Aspergillus sp. and mucorales. Other clinically available triazoles voriconazole and itraconazole, with poor activity against mucorales, have significant drug interactions in addition to a side effect profile inherent for all triazoles. Polyenes including lipid formulations pose a problem with infusion-related side effects, electrolyte imbalance, and nephrotoxicity. Echinocandins are ineffective against mucorales and are approved as salvage therapy for refractory IA. Given that all available antifungal agents have limitations, there has been an unmet need for a broad-spectrum anti-mold agent with a favorable profile. Following phase III clinical trials that started in 2006, isavuconazole (ISZ) seems to fit this profile. It is the first novel triazole agent recently approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of both IA and mucormycosis. This review provides a brief overview of the salient features of ISZ, its favorable profile with regard to spectrum of antifungal activity, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters, drug interactions and tolerability, clinical efficacy, and side effects. PMID:27994475

  9. No Evidence of Effect on Male Mice Germ Cells After Acute Treatment With Thiram

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    Thiram is a dithiocarbamate compound widely used for industrial processes and agriculture.Animal studies reveal that this compound may affect the male reproductive system.Aim of this study was to test,using sensitive testicular parameters,whether thiram directly affects germinal cells.For this purpose,B6C3F1 mice were intraperitoneally injected with thiram in oil(single dose:75mg/kg;repeated five daily doses:25mg/k).Although both reatments were toxic ,none of the parameters examined.i.e.,testis weight,spermatid head number,specific enzyme levels at different times after treatment(14,28,35,56days)showed significant variations form the controls.On the contrary,in the positive controls(treated with chlorambuci),a marked reduction of sperm head number as well as a decrease of lactate dehydrogenasex and sorbitol dehydrogenase activity levels were evidenced at day 28,with a tendency to recover at day 35.Under these conditions thiram did not cause cytotoxicity on diferentiating spermatogonia and on late spermatocyte stages of mice gonads.

  10. Intravenous immunoglobulin for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease: current evidence and considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schindowski C

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Christina Schindowski,1,* Jürgen Zimmermann,2,* Katharina Schindowski3  1Vivantes Klinikum am Urban Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatic Medicine, Berlin, Germany; 2Thermofisher Scientific, Langenselbold, Germany; 3Institute of Applied Biotechnology, Faculty for Biotechnology, Biberach University of Applied Sciences, Biberach/Riss, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD is a devastating neurodegenerative form of dementia with increasing incidence rates in most countries. AD is characterized by amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of AD individuals accompanied by global neuronal loss. The peptide amyloid-β (Aβ aggregates to amyloid plaques in AD brains. As a result, many therapeutic approaches target Aβ. Human plasma and the plasma product intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG contain naturally-occurring anti-Aβ antibodies (Nabs-Aβ that appear to reduce risks of developing AD. IVIG sequesters Aβ and thus interferes with AD progression. This study reviews the role of different Aβ species, Nabs-Aβ, preclinical data, and clinical studies of IVIG as potential AD treatments. The focus of this study is the outcomes of a recent Gammaglobulin Alzheimer's Partnership Phase III trial that did not reach primary endpoints, as well as efforts to compare IVIG with current anti-Aβ monoclonals such as bapineuzumab, solanezumab, and BIIB037. Moreover, this study critically examines current market and ethical consequences of potential off-label uses of IVIG, limits in IVIG supply, and subsequent challenges. Keywords: IVIG, amyloid-beta, Nabs-Aβ, Gammagard®, efficacy, target, market

  11. Isavuconazole for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis: current evidence, safety, efficacy, and clinical recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natesan SK

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Suganthini Krishnan Natesan,1,2 Pranatharthi H Chandrasekar1 1Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Wayne State University, 2John D Dingell VA Medical Center, Detroit, MI, USA Abstract: The majority of invasive mold infections diagnosed in immunocompromised cancer patients include invasive aspergillosis (IA and mucormycosis. Despite timely and effective therapy, mortality remains considerable. Antifungal agents currently available for the management of these serious infections include triazoles, polyenes, and echinocandins. Until recently, posaconazole has been the only triazole with a broad spectrum of anti-mold activity against both Aspergillus sp. and mucorales. Other clinically available triazoles voriconazole and itraconazole, with poor activity against mucorales, have significant drug interactions in addition to a side effect profile inherent for all triazoles. Polyenes including lipid formulations pose a problem with infusion-related side effects, electrolyte imbalance, and nephrotoxicity. Echinocandins are ineffective against mucorales and are approved as salvage therapy for refractory IA. Given that all available antifungal agents have limitations, there has been an unmet need for a broad-spectrum anti-mold agent with a favorable profile. Following phase III clinical trials that started in 2006, isavuconazole (ISZ seems to fit this profile. It is the first novel triazole agent recently approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA for the treatment of both IA and mucormycosis. This review provides a brief overview of the salient features of ISZ, its favorable profile with regard to spectrum of antifungal activity, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters, drug interactions and tolerability, clinical efficacy, and side effects. Keywords: isavuconazole, aspergillosis, mucormycosis, efficacy, antifungal therapy, novel azole, tolerability, drug interactions

  12. Iliotibial band syndrome: an examination of the evidence behind a number of treatment options.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Falvey, E C

    2010-08-01

    Iliotibial band (ITB) syndrome (ITBS) is a common cause of distal lateral thigh pain in athletes. Treatment often focuses on stretching the ITB and treating local inflammation at the lateral femoral condyle (LFC). We examine the area\\'s anatomical and biomechanical properties. Anatomical studies of the ITB of 20 embalmed cadavers. The strain generated in the ITB by three typical stretching maneuvers (Ober test; Hip flexion, adduction and external rotation, with added knee flexion and straight leg raise to 30 degrees ) was measured in five unembalmed cadavers using strain gauges. Displacement of the Tensae Fasciae Latae (TFL)\\/ITB junction was measured on 20 subjects during isometric hip abduction. The ITB was uniformly a lateral thickening of the circumferential fascia lata, firmly attached along the linea aspera (femur) from greater trochanter up to and including the LFC. The microstrain values [median (IQR)] for the OBER [15.4(5.1-23.3)me], HIP [21.1(15.6-44.6)me] and SLR [9.4(5.1-10.7)me] showed marked disparity in the optimal inter-limb stretching protocol. HIP stretch invoked significantly (Z=2.10, P=0.036) greater strain than the SLR. TFL\\/ITB junction displacement was 2.0+\\/-1.6 mm and mean ITB lengthening was <0.5% (effect size=0.04). Our results challenge the reasoning behind a number of accepted means of treating ITBS. Future research must focus on stretching and lengthening the muscular component of the ITB\\/TFL complex.

  13. Spotlight on mavrilimumab for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: evidence to date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crotti, Chiara; Raimondo, Maria Gabriella; Becciolini, Andrea; Biggioggero, Martina; Favalli, Ennio Giulio

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of biological therapies into clinical practice has dramatically modified the natural history of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA is a systemic autoimmune disease that causes articular damage and has a great negative impact on patients' quality of life. Despite the wide spectrum of available biological treatments, ~30% of RA patients are still unresponsive, resulting in high disability and increased morbidity and mortality. In the last few decades, the scientific knowledge on RA pathogenesis vastly improved, leading to the identification of new proinflammatory molecules as potential therapeutic targets. Several in vitro and in vivo studies showed that granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), known to be a hematopoietic factor, is also one of the proinflammatory cytokines involved in macrophage activation, crucial for the pathogenic network of RA. Mavrilimumab, a human monoclonal antibody targeting the subunit α of GM-CSF receptor, was recently developed as a competitive antagonist of GM-CSF pathway and successfully adopted in human trials for mild to moderate RA. Mavrilimumab phase I and phase II studies reported an overall good efficacy and safety profile of the drug, and these encouraging results promoted the initiation of worldwide phase III studies. In particular, 158-week results of phase II trials did not show long-term lung toxicity, addressing the major concern about this target of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis development. However, further clinical studies conducted in larger RA populations are needed to confirm these promising results. This review summarizes the biological role of GM-CSF in RA and the preclinical and clinical data on mavrilimumab and other monoclonal antibodies targeted on this pathway as an alternative therapeutic option in RA patients who are unresponsive to conventional biological drugs.

  14. Lixisenatide: evidence for its potential use in the treatment of type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnett AH

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Anthony H BarnettUniversity of Birmingham and BioMedical Research Centre, Heart of England National Health Service Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UKAbstract: Lixisenatide is a once-daily glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 receptor agonist mimicking several favorable actions of endogenous GLP-1 that result in improved glycemic control with little or no hypoglycemia and weight loss. Phase II trials have shown that lixisenatide 20 µg once daily restores first-phase insulin release in patients with type 2 diabetes and improves the second-phase insulin response. Administered once or twice daily for 4 weeks, it significantly reduced postprandial and fasting blood glucose levels, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c. The efficacy and safety of lixisenatide once daily is being assessed in the GETGOAL Phase III clinical trial program. Results have shown beneficial effects on HbA1c compared with placebo in combination with commonly used antidiabetes agents, with no increased risk of hypoglycemia and with beneficial weight reduction. Adverse effects were similar to those observed for available GLP-1 receptor agonists, the most frequent being gastrointestinal. Both GLP-1 receptor agonists and long-acting insulin analogs have demonstrated protective effects on beta cells in preclinical studies. This, along with the pronounced effect of lixisenatide on postprandial plasma glucose, provides a rationale for combining it with long-acting basal insulin analogs, in the hope that the additive effects on glycemic control combined with a potential benefit on islet cells may lead to a new treatment approach to control blood glucose better and prevent long-term complications in patients with type 2 diabetes.Keywords: GLP-1 receptor agonist, combination therapy, GETGOAL program, insulin, lixisenatide, postprandial plasma glucose, type 2 diabetes

  15. Clinical utility of treprostinil in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension: an evidence-based review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buckley MS

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Mitchell S Buckley,1 Andrew J Berry,1 Nadine H Kazem,2 Shardool A Patel,3 Paul A Librodo41Department of Pharmacy, Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ, USA; 2Department of Pharmacy, St Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ, USA; 3Department of Pharmacy, Banner Estrella Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ, USA; 4Department of Pharmacy, San Francisco VA Medical Center, San Francisco, CA, USAAbstract: Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH remains a progressive disease without a cure, despite the development of several treatment options over the past several decades. Its management strategy consists of the endothelin receptor antagonists (ambrisentan, bosentan, macitentan, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (sildenafil, tadalafil, vardenafil, and prostacyclin analogs (epoprostenol, treprostinil, iloprost. Treprostinil, a stable prostacyclin analog, displays vasodilatory effects in the pulmonary vasculature, as well as antiplatelet aggregation properties. Clinical practice guidelines recommend oral endothelin receptor antagonist or phosphodiesterase inhibitor therapy in mild to moderate PAH. Epoprostenol is specifically suggested as first-line therapy in moderate to severe PAH patients (ie, World Health Organization/New York Heart Association functional class III–IV. However, treprostinil may be an alternative option in these severe PAH patients. The longer half-life and stability at room temperature with treprostinil may be associated with lower risk of pulmonary hemodynamic worsening as a result of abrupt infusion discontinuation and less frequent drug preparation. These characteristics make treprostinil an attractive alternative to continuous infusion of epoprostenol, due to convenience and patient safety. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of continuous infusion of treprostinil as well as the inhaled and oral routes of administration in PAH.Keywords: treprostinil, prostacyclin, pulmonary arterial

  16. Spotlight on mavrilimumab for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: evidence to date

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crotti, Chiara; Raimondo, Maria Gabriella; Becciolini, Andrea; Biggioggero, Martina; Favalli, Ennio Giulio

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of biological therapies into clinical practice has dramatically modified the natural history of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA is a systemic autoimmune disease that causes articular damage and has a great negative impact on patients’ quality of life. Despite the wide spectrum of available biological treatments, ~30% of RA patients are still unresponsive, resulting in high disability and increased morbidity and mortality. In the last few decades, the scientific knowledge on RA pathogenesis vastly improved, leading to the identification of new proinflammatory molecules as potential therapeutic targets. Several in vitro and in vivo studies showed that granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), known to be a hematopoietic factor, is also one of the proinflammatory cytokines involved in macrophage activation, crucial for the pathogenic network of RA. Mavrilimumab, a human monoclonal antibody targeting the subunit α of GM-CSF receptor, was recently developed as a competitive antagonist of GM-CSF pathway and successfully adopted in human trials for mild to moderate RA. Mavrilimumab phase I and phase II studies reported an overall good efficacy and safety profile of the drug, and these encouraging results promoted the initiation of worldwide phase III studies. In particular, 158-week results of phase II trials did not show long-term lung toxicity, addressing the major concern about this target of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis development. However, further clinical studies conducted in larger RA populations are needed to confirm these promising results. This review summarizes the biological role of GM-CSF in RA and the preclinical and clinical data on mavrilimumab and other monoclonal antibodies targeted on this pathway as an alternative therapeutic option in RA patients who are unresponsive to conventional biological drugs. PMID:28144129

  17. Feasibility of onchocerciasis elimination with ivermectin treatment in endemic foci in Africa: first evidence from studies in Mali and Senegal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamine Diawara

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mass treatment with ivermectin is a proven strategy for controlling onchocerciasis as a public health problem, but it is not known if it can also interrupt transmission and eliminate the parasite in endemic foci in Africa where vectors are highly efficient. A longitudinal study was undertaken in three hyperendemic foci in Mali and Senegal with 15 to 17 years of annual or six-monthly ivermectin treatment in order to assess residual levels of infection and transmission and test whether ivermectin treatment could be safely stopped in the study areas. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Skin snip surveys were undertaken in 126 villages, and 17,801 people were examined. The prevalence of microfilaridermia was <1% in all three foci. A total of 157,500 blackflies were collected and analyzed for the presence of Onchocerca volvulus larvae using a specific DNA probe, and vector infectivity rates were all below 0.5 infective flies per 1,000 flies. Except for a subsection of one focus, all infection and transmission indicators were below postulated thresholds for elimination. Treatment was therefore stopped in test areas of 5 to 8 villages in each focus. Evaluations 16 to 22 months after the last treatment in the test areas involved examination of 2,283 people using the skin snip method and a DEC patch test, and analysis of 123,000 black flies. No infected persons and no infected blackflies were detected in the test areas, and vector infectivity rates in other catching points were <0.2 infective flies per 1,000. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study has provided the first empirical evidence that elimination of onchocerciasis with ivermectin treatment is feasible in some endemic foci in Africa. Although further studies are needed to determine to what extent these findings can be extrapolated to other endemic areas in Africa, the principle of elimination has been established. The African Programme for Onchocerciasis Control has adopted an additional

  18. Determinants of delay in malaria treatment-seeking behaviour for under-five children in south-west Ethiopia: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deribew Amare

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prompt diagnosis and timely treatment of malaria within 24 hours after onset of first symptoms can reduce illness progression to severe stages and therefore, decrease mortality. The reason why mothers/caretakers delay in malaria diagnosis and treatment for under-five children is not well studied in Ethiopia. The objective of this study was to assess determinants of malaria treatment delay in under-five children in three districts of south-west Ethiopia. Methods A case control study was conducted from March 15 to April 20, 2010. Cases were under-five children who had clinical malaria and sought treatment after 24 hours of developing sign and symptom, and controls were under-five children who had clinical malaria and sought treatment within 24 hours of developing sign and symptom of malaria. Data were collected by trained enumerators using structured questionnaire. Data were entered in to Epi Info version 6.04 and analyzed using SPSS version 16.0. To identify determinants, multiple logistic regression was done. Results A total of 155 mothers of cases and 155 mothers of controls were interviewed. Mothers of children who were in a monogamous marriage (OR = 3.41, 95% CI: 1.39, 8.34, who complained about the side effects of anti-malarial drugs (OR = 4.96, 95% CI: 1.21, 20.36, who had no history of child death (OR = 3.50, 95% CI: 1.82, 6.42 and who complained about the higher cost of transportation to reach the health institutions (OR = 2.01, 95% CI: 1.17, 3.45 were more likely to be late for the treatment of malaria in under-five children. Conclusion Effective malaria control programmes should address reducing delayed presentation of children for treatment. Efforts to reduce delay should address transport cost, decentralization of services and increasing awareness of the community on early diagnosis and treatment.

  19. Evidence-based recommendations for negative pressure wound therapy: treatment variables (pressure levels, wound filler and contact layer)--steps towards an international consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birke-Sorensen, H; Malmsjo, M; Rome, P; Hudson, D; Krug, E; Berg, L; Bruhin, A; Caravaggi, C; Chariker, M; Depoorter, M; Dowsett, C; Dunn, R; Duteille, F; Ferreira, F; Francos Martínez, J M; Grudzien, G; Ichioka, S; Ingemansson, R; Jeffery, S; Lee, C; Vig, S; Runkel, N; Martin, R; Smith, J

    2011-09-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is becoming a commonplace treatment in many clinical settings. New devices and dressings are being introduced. Despite widespread adoption, there remains uncertainty regarding several aspects of NPWT use. To respond to these gaps, a global expert panel was convened to develop evidence-based recommendations describing the use of NPWT. In a previous communication, we have reviewed the evidence base for the use of NPWT within trauma and reconstructive surgery. In this communication, we present results of the assessment of evidence relating to the different NPWT treatment variables: different wound fillers (principally foam and gauze); when to use a wound contact layer; different pressure settings; and the impact of NPWT on bacterial bioburden. Evidence-based recommendations were obtained by a systematic review of the literature, grading of evidence and drafting of the recommendations by a global expert panel. Evidence and recommendations were graded according to the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) classification system. In general, there is relatively weak evidence on which to base recommendations for any one NPWT treatment variable over another. Overall, 14 recommendations were developed: five for the choice of wound filler and wound contact layer, four for choice of pressure setting and five for use of NPWT in infected wounds. With respect to bioburden, evidence suggests that reduction of bacteria in wounds is not a major mode of action of NPWT.

  20. Clinical Decision-Making in Community Children's Mental Health: Using Innovative Methods to Compare Clinicians with and without Training in Evidence-Based Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker-Ericzén, Mary J.; Jenkins, Melissa M.; Park, Soojin; Garland, Ann F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mental health professionals' decision-making practice is an area of increasing interest and importance, especially in the pediatric research and clinical communities. Objective: The present study explored the role of prior training in evidence-based treatments (EBTs) on clinicians' assessment and treatment formulations using…

  1. Saroglitazar for the treatment of hypertriglyceridemia in patients with type 2 diabetes: current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sosale A

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aravind Sosale,1 Banshi Saboo,2 Bhavana Sosale11Diacon Hospital, Bangalore, 2Dia Care (Diabetes Care and Hormone Clinic, Ahmedabad, IndiaAbstract: Diabetes mellitus (DM is one of the most dreaded metabolic disorders in the world today. It is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality, and plays a cardinal role in quality of life and health economics. DM is associated with a high prevalence of microvascular and macrovascular complications. DM is a very important cardiovascular (CV risk factor. Cardiovascular disease (CVD has been implicated as the prime cause of mortality and morbidity in patients with DM. Hence, treatment of DM goes beyond glycemic control, and demands a multidisciplinary approach that comprehensively targets risk factors inherent in CV events. Lipid abnormalities are undoubtedly common in patients with DM, and they contribute to an increased risk of CVD. A high-risk lipid profile, termed atherogenic dyslipidemia of diabetes (ADD, is known to occur in patients with DM. The use of lipid-lowering agents, a quintessential part of the multifactorial risk factor approach, is a crucial intervention to minimize diabetes-related complications. In this article, we discuss the role of peroxisome proliferator activator receptor (PPAR alpha/gamma (α/γ agonist, saroglitazar, in the management of ADD. While statins are irrefutably the first line of drugs for dyslipidemia management in patients with residual CV risk while on a statin, PPAR α/γ agonists have been found to be of substantial benefit. Data from the PRESS I–VI clinical trials testify to the fact that saroglitazar and fibrates have similar efficacy in reducing triglycerides and improving high-density lipoprotein. The ancillary benefit of improved glycemic control, without the weight gain of PPAR γ agonists, is an added advantage. Reduction in ADD, improved glycemic control, efficacy at par with fibrates, and an acceptable safety profile form the grounds on which this

  2. Current data of targeted therapies for the treatment of triple-negative advanced breast cancer: empiricism or evidence-based?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrelli, Fausto; Cabiddu, Mary; Ghilardi, Mara; Barni, Sandro

    2009-10-01

    Approximately 10 - 15% of breast carcinomas (BCs) are known to be 'triple-negative (TN) receptor' (i.e., not expressing ER or PR and not exhibiting overexpression and/or gene amplification of HER2-neu). Triple-negative BCs comprise approximately 85% of all basal-type tumours. Classically, basal-like BCs have been characteris